M|G Magazine Fall '22, Issue 3

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IN FLORAL COLOR WITH HAZELTON HOUSE

DESIGN INSPIRATION QUARTERLY

FALL FLORALS IN CONVERSATION WITH Keith Fritz, Keith Fritz Fine Furniture

Michael S. Smith, Jasper Fine Furniture and Fabrics

Fall '22, Issue 3 1


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As published in Atlanta Homes & Lifestyle Magazine, September 2017.

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Int er i o r s by AN N A BRAUN D


Detail | Tree of Life - Sage Jasper Fabrics

JASPER

MI C H A E L S . S M I T H FINE FURNITURE AND FABRICS

michaelsmithinc.com

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MESSAGE FROM THE CREATIVE DIRECTOR DESIGNER'S NOTE DESIGNER'S PICKS: TOP 7 GIFTS

COLOUR STORIES

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TOASTY BROWNS

Pure

A rt i st ry Hand Made in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina

ROYAL JEWELS GOLDEN HUES

PROFILES

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HAZELTON HOUSE: In Floral Bloom

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Charleston Forge www.CharlestonForge.com

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PONTORMO MIRROR

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MICHAEL S. SMITH: Jasper Fine Furniture & Fabrics IN CONVERSATION: Keith Fritz, Keith Fritz Fine Furniture

LIFESTYLES

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CATHY B. GRAHAM: "Full Bloom" TRAIL BLAZERS: Emerging Artist Series, Erik Carter TRIP TO KEITH FRITZ FINE FURNITURE WAREHOUSE DESIGNING THE PERFECT EVENING

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CONTENTS 45

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NUTS AND BOLTS

80 88 92

93 94 95 97

TRACKING & COMMUNICATION: Erinn Valencich, StyleRow

KNOWS FROM THE PROS: SketchUp for iPad ushers in a new way to Create in 3D OUR BOOKSHELF: Five books past and present to inspire your seasonal reading list

IN PRACTICE: Business Refresh M|G EVENTS ARCHIVEs: Wonderful Windows OUR PARTNERS

ON THE COVER Keith Fritz | Ball & Faceted Spike Mirror Keith Fritz | Gramercy Cocktail Table Minton-Spidell | Brittany Side Table Jasper | Kelly Chair upholstered Jasper fabric Jasper | Grace - Willow Wallcovering Artifacts International | Glencrest Fireplace 8 Grag Studios | Brass Repousse Sconces

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Sofa upholstered in Cascade Honeydew. Cushions in Cascade Feather and Bay. Inset photo Sofa upholstered in Cascade Honeydew. Cushions in Luna Sateen Midnight Green. Johnstons of Elgin House Check Lambswool Throw in Navy.


Message from the CREATIVE DIRECTOR

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runchy leaves, cozy blankets, comfort foods and moments of seasonal change are ahead.

As we launch our third issue of the magazine, I am reminded how quickly things transition and how we frequently find ourselves rushing from place to place. We never stop to see the talented makers and beautiful creators that make our industry truly one of a kind. In New England, we take the distinct seasonal shifts for granted and we get to witness the magic of fresh green leaves evolving to reds, oranges, and yellows of all hues, finally resulting in the white of winter. Most places only dream of such seasonal progression.

SCORPIO SCONCE https://boydlighting.com

Growing up in Louisiana, I have come to learn that these seasonal changes are more than just cutout construction paper handprints. That Thanksgiving is more than just a brown paper bag cut into a vest for a meal at one large table and that when snowflakes fall, they really are tiny frozen cites that melt in only a matter of seconds. All are moments we should stop and treasure here in New England. In this issue we hope you’ll take time to stop and smell the flowers, meet some of our makers in the stories and be inspired by the photography for your tabletop celebrations in the seasons ahead. And this season of giving, I thought I’d change up my plans, change my own way of doing things. Instead of giving ideas of what to get others, I thought it might be more fun to be a child again for a moment and make a list of what you all can get for me. So here we go, - “Holiday,” by Ralph Lauren - A new pair of Stubbs & Wooten’s - Baccarat martini glasses - A vintage green Defender - Anything from the Formulary 55 store And if none of those mentioned above arrive at my front door, then I’ll ask for one last gift… May each of you in these seasons of change find joy, be filled with prosperity, and discover rest. On behalf of the entire team here, we thank you for your friendship, support, and partnerships. We could not do it without you. Cheers!

ERIC HAYDEL Creative Director eric@m-geough.com

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Volterra Illuminat e d Mi r ro r Hand-carved alabas t e r fr am e s this unique des ign that turns a d e c o r ativ e mirror into an illuminated w o r k of ar t. ww w.boydlightin g . c o m 11


Designer's

OCTOBER '22

note

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appy holidays from M-Geough and welcome to the M|G Magazine fall issue, “Fall Florals.” Consider this an insider’s look at all things M-Geough!

Royal jewels, golden hues and toasty browns are all making a big comeback this season. See how you can use them to produce a cozy and inviting feel in Warm and Wonderful. And take a peek at the uniquely whimsical style and artful touch of Cathy B. Graham, who creates a variety of colorful designs for home entertaining. Our feature stories include Michael S. Smith of Jasper Fine Furniture & Fabrics and his journeys designing both “The Rooms as Portraits” at Christie’s as well as the residential areas of the White House, and Keith Fritz of Keith Fritz Fine Furniture, who explains his back story about his first studio in Washington D.C. and his use of traditional and modern woodworking techniques. Also highlighted is the history behind Hazelton House and their block printing methods. We are pleased to announce our Emerging Artist Series currently showing the work of Erik Carter’s “Isolation | Shadow, Light, and Form.” Yes, the holiday season is creeping up on us… and we’ve helped you get ahead of the game with our fabulous Top 7 Holiday Gift Guide from SoWa Open Market on the adjacent page. Think differently, be inspired, & create!

ANDREW LEVINE

Brand Marketing Manager andrew@m-geough.com

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DESIGNER'S PICKS

TOP 7

That vintage feeling

Nature-inspired thick sterling silver band with a beautiful large opaque stone at its center, this ring is perfect for making a statement. The gemstones are freshwater pearls & agate, available in ruby agate, sapphire agate & emerald agate. Vintage Original Rings: GarciaCristina

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE S O WA O P E N M A R K E T

MARKETS, ART, FOOD TRUCKS, & MORE SoWa Open Market Sundays, May-October 11am-4pm

100+ weekly tent vendors (outdoors) 100+ artist studios, galleries, and retail shops (indoors) Food Trucks Outdoor Oasis Café & Bar Rotating DJ’s Carefully curated local artisans selling an array of hand-made goods. Products include jewelry, clothing, home goods, photography, ceramics, and more.

Stick it

Glass charm

Based on a handmade collage of various iconic and colorful Japanese paper tapes, these decals are made of woven materials with an adhesive backing, making them removable and able to easily peel & stick. The Majestic Peacock & The Lion: Art that Sticks

Natural choice

Made with Dead Sea salt + anise + olive oil, a therapeutic salt scrub that will leave you with smooth, hydrated skin and feeling relaxed. Dead Sea salt scrub: Element Oasis

If you’re looking for the perfect tropical botanical, look no further than our pineapple planter with a live Tillandsia air plant. Known for its ease in care, air plants make the perfect plant because they require minimal watering and can thrive in almost any light. Glass pineapple planter + air plant crown, & hand-blown solid glass pineapple paperweight in bright yellow: Charged Glass Our blown glass brush cleaner has quickly become a staple in our beauty routine. After using a brush to apply your makeup or a face mask, it's important to cleanse and sanitize it to remove the buildup of product and bacteria that can be harmful to your skin. Glass makeup brush cleaner, handblown clear glass makeup & skincare tool gift set: Charged Glass

Just dance This comfortable, stylish, and swingy jumpsuit is a playful and relaxed look in deep red for summer. Red Dalina jumpsuit: Rachel Walters Collection

After the SoWa Market closes, you can still purchase gifts by clicking the products for each vendor's website!

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Eros LED Single Sconce

M|G CREATIVE DIRECTOR ERIC HAYDEL BRAND MARKETING MANAGER ANDREW LEVINE WRITERS RACHEL GRAY EDITORIAL/PUBLIC RELATIONS CONSULT JDCOMMUNICATIONS, INC CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JJ MEDIA ERINN VALENCICH COPY EDITOR RACHEL GRAY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS QUENTIN BACON KATE CARR CHRISTIE'S SALVATORE DRAGONE KEITH FRITZ MICHAEL MUNDY KRIS TAMBURELLO

PHOENIX DAY WWW.PHOENIXDAY.COM

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Introducing the

Hambleden Collection

infinite

POSSIBILITIES.

robertjamescollection.com

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www.oharastudio.com

M | G TEAM CREATIVE DIRECTOR ERIC HAYDEL ERIC@M-GEOUGH.COM

VICE PRESIDENT SUSAN M-GEOUGH SUSAN@M-GEOUGH.COM

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS GARY GONSALVES GARY@M-GEOUGH.COM

SENIOR SALESPERSON MICHAEL REBOLO MICHAEL@M-GEOUGH.COM

SENIOR A&D SALES REPRESENTATIVE REGINA MOYER REGINA@M-GEOUGH.COM

TEXTILES MANAGER RACHEL GRAY RACHEL@M-GEOUGH.COM

BRAND MARKETING MANAGER ANDREW LEVINE ANDREW@M-GEOUGH.COM

SALES ASSOCIATE MOLLY ZUCKER MOLLY@M-GEOUGH.COM

PRESIDENT EMERITUS JIM M-GEOUGH JIM@M-GEOUGH.COM

SUBSCRIPTION CUSTOMER SERVICE

INFO@M-GEOUGH.COM

ADVERTISING SALES

INFO@M-GEOUGH.COM

. O Hara Studio 16

CONTACT THE EDITOR If you have comments or suggestions of products you would like to see, please contact: INFO@M-GEOUGH.COM


Levante Digital Prints | Quercia™ Loloey for Maya Romanoff

THE ULTIMATE DIGITALLY-PRINTED WALLCOVERING COLLECTION

Quercia in Light Gray | © Maya Romanoff

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Fresh Cut Olive Branches One of the oldest symbols of peace, fresh cut olive branches craft idyllic and chic serenity. Imagine: woody stems adorned with dusty silver-green leaves create a fabulous backdrop for focal flowers; olive berries hang from the branches, adding a textural accent for your arrangements.

Alexandrian Laurel or Poet’s Laurel A rare evergreen shrub that is prized for its elegant and gracefully arching habit. Rich green foliage throughout the year. Inconspicuous flowers followed by showy orange - red fruits in fall and winter. Excellent as a cut green.

HOLIDAY GREENS

REMIX

GUNNI eucalyptus stem Perfect for creating full arrangements with its many shoots from one stem. You can break the stem down and use the shoots to elongate its usage. Another workhorse greenery with a great bang for your buck.

Italian Ruscus Greenery A classic foliage, this emerald greenery adds a dainty, soft touch to sweet and serene flower arrangements. This versatile greenery is an affordable way to make your designs go far. The individual branch sections can be used to create 18 or corsages. These humble leaves are an ideal accent for bouquets boutonnieres and arrangements focused more on the flowers than abundant greenery.


LINKDINING TABLE

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MATTHEW STUDIOS HARDWARE COLLECTION


COLOUR STORIES 21


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TOASTY BROWNS TOASTY BROWNS

1) Hazelton House: Oriental Pheasants - Olive 2) Waterhouse: Opera Mohair - Bronze 3) Christopher Spitzmiller: Brown and White Dinner Plate, Soup Bowl, Salad Plate 4) Christopher Spitzmiller: Round Naturalistic Gourd, Lg. , Sm. 5) Marvic: La Balancoire - Red/Beige 6) Marvic: Titian - Poppy 7) Marvic: Gallone - Wine 8) Borderline: Windfall - Red 9) Templeton: Cordoba - Coral 10) Templeton: Darby Rose - Indigo 11) Calvin Fabrics: Abbey Linen - Tartan Red 12) Johnston's of Elgin: Glen Isla - Denim 13) Dakota Jackson: Chest Round Table 14) Dakota Jackson: Ooma Arm Chair 15) Keith Fritz: Cube Side/ Drink Table 16) Boyd Lighting: Spire Pendant

ROYAL JEWELS

1) Jasper: Star Atlantico, Aubergine 2) Christopher Spitzmiller: Glazes 3) Jasper: Isle Flower - Aubergine 4) Marvic Textiles: Iona - Purple/Olive 5) Matthew Studios: Thea XL Knob 6) Matthew Studios: Freya Metal & Crystal Pull 7) Matthew Studios: Thea XL Knob 8) Matthew Studios: Thea XL Knob 9) Maya Romanoff: Precious Metals - Ebony Gold 10) Maya Romanoff: Precious Metals - Vermilion Gold 12) Johnston's of Elgin: Cashmere Velour - Wine 13) Christopher Spitzmiller: Marble Dinner Plates

& GOLDEN HUES

1) A Rudin: 507 Dining Chair 2) Johnston's of Elgin: Golspie - Lovat (accent fabric) 3) A. Rudin: 807 Cane Side Chair 4) Johnson’s of Elgin: Sonnet Sateen Jacquard - Talc 5) Matthew Studios: Harper Large Pull, Pepite Knob 6) Keith Fritz: Triumph Dining Table w/Gold Banding 7) Hazelton House: Magnolia - White 8) Christopher Spitzmiller: Hurricane Lanterns, Medium and Large 9) Marvic: Rye - Sienna, Titian - Guava, Perseus - Saffron 10) Twigs: Ferns - Gold and Gray 11) Jasper: Antique Velvet - Saffron 12) Templeton: Douro - Beige

CLICK CLICKHERE HERE

FOR FOROUR OURZERO ZERO IMPACT IMPACTVIDEO VIDEO

Zero Impact for furniture, leather goods and fashion is the result of over 10 years of research and development aimed at reducing the environmental impact of leather-making, throughout its whole cycle.

FURNISHING and CONTRACT 25


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PROFILES 27


C L A R O L F N I

HAZELTON HOUSE

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R O L CO

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As custodians of traditional hand block printing, Hazelton H impressive collection of original hand blocks, ranging from t use selected original blocks carved in the 1930s.

Ever since its conception on Hazelton Avenue, Toronto, Ha exclusive collection of botanical designs. Canadian designer of his passion to restoring the beautiful, archived designs. Su been revived to suit today’s taste, fusing tradition and style i

Hazelton House is represented in major cities throughout N rest of the world. Please browse the stockists for your closes

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T H E H I S TO RY O F

HAZELTON HOUSE

House has assembled an the 1830-1920s, and continue to

azelton House has boasted an Budd Sugarman dedicated a lot ugarman’s original prints have in our botanical themed range.

North America, Europe and the st vendor.

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A SKILLED CRAFT Block prints simply cannot be replicated by machinery - it would be the equivalent of comparing an original oil painting with a reproduction. The delicate, intricate designs conceal the arduous process behind them. Cloths are laid across 17-meter tables and large, dye-coated wooden blocks are stamped onto the surface. Each block can weigh 10 pounds, and is repeatedly dropped onto the fabric layer upon layer, day after day. Yet, the beauty of block prints lies in its imperfections. Hand block printing is unique due to the individuality of each repeat. The untrained eye may gloss over these subtleties, but if you look closely the human craftsmanship becomes evident. It is where the head, heart and the hand come together in unison. The blocks allow dyes to be layered, creating a depth of color, and as each individual block is placed by hand, no two sections are the same. This original and tailor-made approach renders hand block prints the finest art form in our industry, timeless luxury.

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TRADITIONAL HAND

& COLONIAL

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D BLOCK PRINTING

PATCHWORK

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GRAG STUDIOS

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borderlinefabrics.com

korlahome.com

hazeltonhouse.com


DESIGN FOR

CLIMATE | HEALTH | EQUITY

Interior design professionals create the spaces where people live, work, heal, learn, socialize, and play. Designers’ decisions also impact the interior design industry comprised of designers, manufacturers, dealers, contractors, consultants, tradespeople, artisans, and workers around the world.

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MICHAEL S. SMITH, INC. TA S T E M A K E R , D E C O R AT O R - I N - C H I E F, & CHAMELEONESQUE BY DESIGN

JASPER

MIC H AE L S. SM ITH

M

FINE FURNITURE AND FABRICS

ichael S. Smith is a chameleon, albeit of a distinctive sort. To say he "blends in" with his surroundings would be wrong – he's a man who stands out. As do his designs; one glance at his Jasper Furniture & Fabrics multiline is proof of that. But he is comfortable in any room and situation and inevitably makes them his own. For example, during an interview with the New York Times, he appeared thoroughly modern in Camelot-era Kennedy attire: barefoot in a navy sweater and sail-white trousers while talking about how he channeled Jackie during his eightyear makeover of the White House. Yes, Michael has an inscrutable way of affecting the world around him. You'll note that instead of assuming the colors of his environment, it's the other way around: he changes the environment to his colors. So perhaps it would be more accurate to call him a reverse chameleon, fashioning his surroundings to suit his aesthetics and

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his place in it. It's essential to underline that collaboration (and not a single-minded vision) is the cornerstone of his work when it comes to design and decorating. More specifically, it's about listening to his clients' wishes, interpreting them, and helping bring them to life. That takes dedication, but it also takes supreme confidence in your abilities – something Michael has never lacked since he set out on his own at 25. "If you believe in your own aesthetic and vision, it's easier to adapt (to the client's vision)," he said once. "Part of what makes it easy for me to adapt is having a really clear understanding of what is personal to me and what is the defining thing." Of course, that "thing" – that Michael S. Smith essence – is the elusive, ineffable quality that Michael so effortlessly conjures in his interior and product design. It's a rare and precious skill that in 2018, Christie's auction house commissioned Michael to design three distinct rooms using sale items. ("The Tastemaker," they called him.) The Rooms as Portraits auction made a big splash in Los


Angeles, New York, and London, closing $3.273 million in auction sales. Michael was also called the "Decorator in Chief" when the Obamas hired him to redesign the residential areas of the White House. By all accounts, Michael helped revitalize many of the rooms during his eight-year tenure there. Add author to his list of achievements, too – he wrote a book about his experience working with the First Family called Designing History: The Extraordinary Art & Style of the Obama White House, complete with pictures. That title touches upon another one of Michael's core inspirations: history itself. "When you love history, what better history than that building?" This is probably why Michael is also a chameleon of time, shaping the past to meet the needs of the present. His fixtures for Kallista are proof of that – taps and faucets and hand-held shower heads that look torn from the pages of The Great Gatsby, crafted in gorgeous, gleaming art deco. Yet, as you would expect from Michael, they still have a modern feel and appeal, seamlessly spanning the ages. "It was a kind of plumbing that I thought

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hen you love history, what better history than that building? This is probably why Michael is also a chameleon of time, shaping the past to meet the needs of the present.

existed... that art deco-y type of aesthetic," Michael said. "So, for me, it was about going back to those ideas and remaking them." Jasper Fabrics & Furniture Michael S. Smith's Jasper Fabrics & Furniture Collection could be a whole seminar course on Michael's mastery of blending styles and eras. The extensive, renowned multiline features furniture, fabrics, wallcoverings (including Grace, which graces the cover of this issue), lighting, and accessories. Mid-20th-century American,

Left to right: The Family Dining Room, where the Obamas ate dinner most nights; the Yellow Oval Room, Smith’s personal favorite. Photo: MICHAEL MUNDY

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Chippendale, 18th-century English, and early 20th-century Syrian – all these and more sit side by side on the catalog page. Browsing through the large selection, you realize it's little wonder Christie's chose Michael to bring together their eclectic auction items for Rooms as Portraits. Each item in Jasper stands on its own, of course. But when the interior designer starts playing with the different styles, a kind of magic happens when designs blend. The Jasper Collection is a vision board of inspiration.

These widely varying pieces are part of why Michael's style has been described as "a seamless blend of classic English country house, European classicism, and American modernism." Although many designers have worked to bring the massive collection together, Michael has the final say and sign-off on every single piece. His stamp is his own Royal Seal of Approval you can bank on. "Collections aren't made for the sake of making collections. It was about finding a product I can't find," he said during another interview. "That's much different deciding whether I'm going to do the Michael Smith Shanghai Collection or the Michael Smith New Orleans Collection. For me, it's really purposeful. I assume that if I need them, then other people probably do, too." It's another way he's a collaborator. His unique approach to product design is to create pieces that allow designers to bring their unique visions to the project. That takes singular talent, creating product designs that don't dictate use but underpin any number of uses that designers imagine. Yet no matter where his designs go,

A residence on London's Eaton Square, from which the Christie's London sale draws. Photo by Christie's

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from Christie's to the White House to designers' one-of-akind projects across America and around the world, you'll see that distinctive Michael S. Smith fingerprint in a whorl of styles, eras, and places. Ever the chameleon of a very special sort. www.michaelsmithinc.com

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These collections were offered at two auctions in London & New York in September 2018. Photo: Kate Carr

is unique approach to product design is to create pieces that allow designers to bring their unique visions to the project. That takes singular talent, creating product designs that don't dictate use but underpin any number of uses that designers imagine.

Sirocco Bench 41 WWW.HENRYROYER.COM


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M|G D E S I G N E R ' S I N S P I R AT I O N Q U A R T E R LY

DIGITAL MAGAZINE m-geough.com/press

M|G

M|G Next Issue M|G Spring 2023 Coming in April

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douglas chair and stool

m i n to n - s p i d e l l . co m

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IN CONVERSATION KEITH FRITZ

I

KEITH FRITZ FINE FURNITURE

t is said that self-awareness is a powerful quality that helps to shape one’s future. It is rare when one possesses this insight at a young age. Enter Keith Fritz, bespoke furniture maker extraordinaire. For over 20 years, Keith and his team of artisans have amassed an elite following, creating masterpieces that grace some of our country’s finest homes. Keith knew early on that craftsmanship was his future. Raised on a farm in the small rural community of Siberia, Indiana, Keith grew up in a family of makers. We had the privilege of speaking with Keith and asked that he share his journey from his humble beginnings to becoming one of our country’s most renowned fine furniture makers. Your back story is so interesting. Can you tell us a bit more about your early years?

Our family has lived on the same farm since the 1860s. My family growing up was self-sufficient—if we wanted something we made it. My father was a carpenter who

not only built our home, but let me work with him to build the furniture for our home. My mother taught me to sew and together we made the curtains and other items for the home. My interest in high end interiors came about when my dad mistakenly got a subscription to Architectural Digest. He thought the magazine was going to be about building codes and architectural plans. While he was disappointed, I fell in love with it. Reading about New England and people who had this 18th century furniture passed down from generation to generation was amazing. While we had the pie cupboard, they had these intricate Chippendale pieces. This opened my eyes to what it is that I wanted—so I made it. This influenced my decision in high school to build my own Bombay Secretary desk. I created the world I wanted for myself. 45


From your first studio in D.C to his factory in Indiana - tell us more about the growth of the company?

I went to DC because I was in seminary. While in seminary I made liturgical furniture in the basement of the seminary. The seminary’s insurance company didn’t like having a wood shop in the basement, so I had to get my own shop. When I decided to leave the seminary, I started calling interior designers. I think I called 30 designers in the DC area. Three out of the 30 gave me an appointment. Todd Davis of Brown and Davis Architecture & Interiors was one of them. I

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remember Todd saying, “If you can make that desk, you can make anything.” In the beginning I would copy antiques and make the furniture designers in DC requested. After a while I realized that you can’t make furniture in Washington DC. Space is at a premium and the talent pool wasn’t located there. In 2005 I moved back to Indiana where the art of fine furniture making has been passed down for generations. Here in Indiana, I have been able to grow my business and hire talented artisans who hand make each piece of furniture we sell to the

Continued on page 52


Textiles & Wallpaper

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client’s exact specifications. I also owe a lot to Jim & Susan M-Geough. They took me under their wings and mentored me. They helped me learn the business. I am forever grateful for their guidance and wisdom. How many artists/craftspeople currently work with you? How do you discover new talent?

Today we have a team of 34 people. We have been very fortunate to hire and retain talented craftspeople during these challenging years. Our skilled and dedicated artisans have allowed us to keep our lead time short: 8-10 weeks. We haven’t really had to do any recruiting yet. Our people have come to us because there are very few companies that make the level of furniture that we do in the area. It is not uncommon for one employee to work on one piece of furniture for 3-4 weeks at a time. This is not an assembly

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hen someone thinks of veneering, they think of the old antiques and the peeling veneer. That is not the case anymore. Veneering with modern technology will last forever.

line. Our artisans want to make art and we give them the opportunity to showcase their talent. Everything here is done by hand and we take pride in the quality of the products we produce. From the rare woods we select, to the intricate grain 48

arrangement, to the exquisite finishes, we create pieces that are truly works of art. Bring us through your creative process.

Dining tables are our specialty. Before we begin to make a table, we want to know from the designer what the size and shape of the room they are creating, how many people they are trying to seat and what kind of chairs they will be using. A dining table needs to be perfectly tailored ensuring the end client gets exactly what they want and need. The next step is selecting the right wood and finish. This is an equally important step because the right wood and finish can make a table become a work of art. Do you incorporate any new technologies when crafting pieces?

We use traditional woodworking techniques when hand crafting our products. However, thanks to the advancements in technology, we do a lot of things that couldn’t be done in the 18th century. We are able to include lots of curves into our designs because of vacuuming veneering. At Keith Fritz we veneer all of our pieces with two-ply veneer. When someone thinks of veneering, they think of the old


antiques and the peeling veneer. That is not the case anymore. Veneering with modern technology will last forever. Two-ply veneering- All of our veneers are twoplyed. The wood is pressed at 310 degrees with an extreme amount of pressure and just the right amount of moisture. This creates a marine grade bond that doesn’t allow water to penetrate. Solid wood can crack over time but cross layering and cross linking the veneer gives us dimensional

stability. We then laminate that two-ply veneer on the ply core in a vacuum; there is no movement in the wood and in turn no cracking. This process also allows for intricate arrangements of the grains. Have you seen a shift over the past couple of years in what designers are requesting?

Yes. Designers are not buying simple, easy products. Their clients don’t just want a dining table. They are wanting to do everything! People are tired of mass produced furniture that is 49 51 Continued on page


Detail | Orleans in Slate Eric Haydel in collaboration with Waterhouse Wallhangings

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made overseas…they are requesting more intricate time-consuming things. Credenzas, bedside tables—more. We are seeing a greater appreciation of handcrafted furnishing. Clients are understanding what we offer—quality craftsmanship and artisanal veneer arrangements and they are willing to spend the money to get exactly what they want.

High Performance & Commercial Grade

Do you see a difference in requests from east coast designers vs. west coast designers?

This is an interesting question. We are finding that location doesn’t really matter. People live and travel everywhere and they take their tastes with them. We sell as much traditional furniture on the west coast and we do contemporary pieces on the east coast. Is there one piece you consider your favorite?

I like dining tables with legs that curve in. Our Nantucket table is the easiest table to sit at because it allows for leg clearance. I like comfort. I love multiple colorways in wood. I love rosewood, figure movement, stumps and crotches. A stump is when the trunk gets twisted into the roots. It produces something with beautiful movement. Anything where the grain gets twisted is always a favorite.

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f you can make that desk, you can make anything.”

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SKETCH BOOK

FORMAL TABLE SETTINGS

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Photo: Salvatore Dragone

Creativity

Transcend

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FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: (1 KEITH FRITZ FINE FURNITURE - Quattro Co - Aalto Dining Table (3 3 KEITH FRITZ FINE FURNITURE - Cello 1 Dining (4 KNOWLTO KNOWLTON BROTHERS - K-3 66” Square Dining Table (6 6 KNOWLTON BROTHERS - L Charleston Forge Monarch (8 CHARLESTON FORGE - Watson Square Cocktail Table (9 9


nds Form

ocktail Table (2 KEITH FRITZ FINE FURNITURE ON BROTHERS - Link Round Coffee Table (5 5 Link Dining Table (7 CHARLESTON FORGE DAKOTA JACKSON - GUI Dining Table

a f t's

n o i sh 55


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Exquisite Furnishings Made To Order


LIFESTYLE 57


CATHY B. GRAHAM

FULL BLOOM CATHY B. GRAHAM with CLINTON SMITH Forward by CHRISTOPHER SPITZMILLER PRINCIPLE PHOTOGRAPHER

QUENTIN BACON

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elcome to Cathy Graham’s floral world. In her second book, the acclaimed artist, host, and gardener presents a new series of floral creations. With her uniquely whimsical style and artful touch, Graham creates a variety of colorful designs for the table, home, and party. Brilliant bouquets are paired with Graham’s own watercolor artwork, and easy-to-follow stepby-step guides to creating delightful table settings and floral designs will inspire readers in designing their own creations. Graham creates a wide range of table settings, for occasions ranging from a simple lunch to a festive dinner party—each with myriad floral decorations. These colorful creations are accompanied by useful 58


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sidebars outlining her methods for arranging and selecting blooms— but also for making her singularly unique decor, including hand-painted pots and faux fruit trees. Drawing from her art background, Graham also presents a variety of collages, which range from fanciful, layered companion pages to labeled graphic floral photos with informative take- aways on flower style, species, and arrangement. Taken together, these pages provide both a bevy of inspiration and accessible takeaways. Beginner floral arrangers and seasoned hosts alike will delight in her unconventional arrangements, expert tips, an informative guides, all sure to make any home more colorful.

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ABOUT THE AUTHORS

former Editor in Chief of Veranda, he has authored four books and currently serves as Cathy B. Graham received a BFA in Editor at Large for New England Home and painting from the Rhode Island School of Style Editor for Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles. Design and studied fashion illustration at He lives in New York City. Parsons. A frequent host and passionate gardener, she delights audiences with Christopher Spitzmiller is an Second Bloom, her first book on floral internationally celebrated ceramicist and design and entertaining. She regularly tastemaker. He is author of the successful charms fans across the country with book A Year at Clove Brook Farm, chronicling discussions and demonstrations of her life and entertaining at his property in unique creations. She lives in New York Millbrook, New York. City and has a home on Nantucket. FULL BLOOM will be released on For two decades, Clinton Smith has November 8th. Click to preorder. been regarded as one of the design industry’s authorities on matters of taste and style. A

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ERINNV.COM HANDCRAFTED IN CALIFORNIA SINCE 2005 CUSTOM SIZING + FINISHES AVAILABLE

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TRAIL BLAZERS

Isolation

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Shadow, Light, and and Form

EMERGING ARTIST SERIES by Rachel Gray 65


|

Isolation

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Shadow, Light, and and Form

he human body has been Erik P. Carter’s interest for some time.

Growing up in Sterling, Massachusetts, an agricultural enclave near Worcester whose population peaked shy of 8,000 in 2020 and most notable resident was Ebenezer Butterick—the inventor of paper dress patterns—Carter was raised by a physical therapy assistant mother and software engineer father. His earliest memory of an artistic inkling was in the second grade, when he was given accolades for his rendering of a giraffe by a teacher who went on to compliment his efforts by saying that he could be the next Eric Carle, another Western Massachusetts resident.

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arter’s goal is to elicit an emotional response through his art and hopes that it in some fashion normalizes the human form. He's on his way.

However, Carter’s work didn’t evolve into the colorful papier mache-like collages of Carle’s fame but instead is a nod to the Italian Baroque works of Caravaggio and Gentileschi. In His Arms. Oil on canvas, 48” x 48”.

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Doheny House – Blue Room . Sofa Upholstered in our Stonewashed Belgian Linen pattern Ravin col Optic White. And the two chairs are upholstered in our Soft Wash Belgian Linen pattern Oviedo col Optic White, and we have used pattern Oviedo col Dark Navy for the trim. J Samuel Belgian Linens – Italian Blens. This is a simple picture illustrating our range of products from Belgian Linen, to Italian blends, and Solution Dyed Acrylic from Spain. We have range of products to meet requirements across any project. From Left to Right; Stonewashed Belgian Linen pattern Portico col Charcoal, Solutioned Dyed Acrylic pattern Tiburon col Holland Grey, and Solution Dyed Acrylic pattern Cambria col Grafito

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Carter is an amateur artist as he has no formal training. Self-taught thanks to watching YouTube and through his exploration of the aforementioned artists as well as more contemporary names such as British painters Francis Bacon and Jenny Saville, he studies the body using the technique of chiaroscuro.

Carter is a scientist at a Boston-based biotech company whose current research includes the development of RNA-based vaccines to be used prophylactically against infectious diseases. He doesn’t feel that his scientific bent influences his art but the reverse.

Unlike Bacon and Saville, whose incorporation of color can often be ironic depending upon the subject matter, Carter’s paintings are monochromatic. He attributes that to initially “not wanting to spend money on many tubes of paint in case I ended up not liking oil paints.”

“My artistic side influences how I approach science. When facing a scientific question, thinking outside the box to develop hypotheses can often land you at a solution more quickly than a less imaginative approach drawing exclusively from prior experiences.” said Carter.

Limiting his selections to five hues, he feels that they are “sufficient to make just about any naturally occurring color in existence if mixed in the right ratios.”

Carter looks at painting as a meditative exercise and an opportunity to balance his somewhat analytical career. But it also allows the viewer to witness his admission of being drawn to intriguing figures that are startlingly isolating and, in some cases, provocative.

Which leads one to understand his more pragmatic approach to learning to paint.

Symphony of Form I, Symphony of Form II & Symphony of Form III. Oil on canvas, 20” x 36”.

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Gentle Fortitude. Oil on canvas, 24” x 36”.

His favorite composition, entitled “A Gentle Fortitude” shows a man who’s been the victim of a homophobic hate crime, almost proudly wearing a slur across his chest that harkens back to the #wordscanhurt trend on social media in recent years. “The Embrace” pushes the envelope further with Jesus embracing a young man, based on a photo seen on an Instagram feed. Carter said “I modified the image slightly for the painting, but what I loved about the original photo was the juxtaposition of religious imagery with a touch of homoeroticism.” As the world of preventative science continues to progress in its goal of hindering diseases, Carter’s goal is to elicit an emotional response through his art and hopes that it in some fashion normalizes the human form. He’s on his way.

Walden

Drink Table - 13" Diameter x 23" High

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OUR TRIP TO KENTUCK CLIENTS AT THE KEIT


KY & Indiana TOURING TH FRITZ WAREHOUSE

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Anemone 15” Dia Table

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FOR YOUR FAVORITE PAINT COLOR OF THE YEAR!

Raspberry Mist Benjamin Moore

Gentle Violet Valspar

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Redend Point

Blank Canvas

Ivy

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Sherwin-Williams

Glidden

Behr

DunnEdwards


DESIGN FOR

CLIMATE | HEALTH | EQUITY

Through this wide reach, interior designers play a significant role in reducing global carbon emissions and regenerating ecosystems to help avert the climate crisis. Interior design professionals are also in a unique position to improve people’s lives and support wellness and prosperity in our communities.

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Designing the Perfect Evening Now that the leaves are cascading and the air is crisp, gatherings are turning to the great indoors. Here are some great entertaining tips from a few of our friends to help inspire your next fete!

Pouring Perfection

Tina Marguerite | Founder, Marguerite Interiors TIP: I love to greet guests with a 'welcome drink' something small and festive. (both alcoholic and nonalcoholic options) It's almost like a party favor at the beginning of the event! Then everyone feels included and their presence appreciated from the start.

RECIPE: Spiced Cranberry Gin Fizz Shake with ice: - 2oz gin - 1/2 oz 100% unsweetened cranberry juice - 1/2 oz spiced cranberry syrup (or simple syrup) - 1/2 oz orange juice, freshly squeezed - 1/2 oz lime juice Top with: - club soda - Sugared Cranberries & Rosemary optional, for garnish Serve as martini or over ice ice

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Sensational Snacks

Kristen Rivoli | Kristen Rivoli Design I do love to cook, but my favorite part is the "before time" where we have a cocktail and appetizers. Everyone starts to relax, the conversation starts to get lively and 'm usually finishing up dinner or just joining in until everything is ready. I love pulling charcuterie boards together and miscellaneous bites based on what we're having for dinner. I can get really creative with the arrangement which feeds into my artistic side. Keep it simple with the apps. My go-to’s are shrimp cocktail or Manchego cheese with membrillo and some delicious bread sticks.

Serving It Simply

Susan M-Geough | The M-Geough Company We do most of our entertaining at home in VT with close friends. As tastes have changed, we have become much more informal about how we serve drinks and dinner. For parties of ten or fewer, we usually take care of preparations ourselves. Over that number we like to get some help or a caterer. For before-dinner drinks we serve each guest their first drink and then ask them to help themselves to subsequent ones. We generally lay out platters of hors d’oeuvres around the great room for guests to help themselves rather than passing them. Dinner is always served buffet-style with most dishes prepared ahead for time to avoid last-minute craziness in the kitchen. After the dinner dishes are cleared, we always sit around the table with our guests for dessert and a glass of wine, rather than leaving them for kitchen clean-up. We find that these laidback plans make for a lovely evening, happy guests, and hosts who are relaxed. Not to everyone’s tastes, but it fits our lifestyle perfectly!

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Waterhouse Wallhangings & Thomas Strahan 76

waterhousewallhangings.com


Setting the Mood

Alexandra G Aquadro | AGA Interior Design My husband and I created a Spotify playlist for our wedding called “September” and it includes Hall & Oats, Nat King Cole, the Beatles, and Elton John, to name a few. It has a little bit of everything and is perfect for hosting all age groups. “(The ultimate) atmosphere creator: candlelit glass hurricanes, my favorites are the Revere Hurricanes by Simon Pearce.”

Flawless Florals

Sean William Donovan | Designer & Stylist There is nothing quite like welcoming guests into your home for the purpose of celebration or simply catching up! The best way to make it appear as if you have 'done the most' which absolutely 'doing the least,' aside from dimming the lights and adding a few candles, is by throwing together a few dramatic floral arrangements. While they are surely having a moment right now, I always have some 'hot girl branches' either in the center of my dining table or placed in a hefty vessel in the corner of my apartment to emphasize the height of my ceilings. These tall, branchy specimens can be anything, from quince to cherry blossoms or even trimmed from whatever tree might be outside of your home. I would be lying if I said my neighbors haven't caught me trimming their bushes under the cover of darkness! Another 'must have' is anything I tend to refer to as 'ditzy,' such as an anemone or ranunculus. Their twisty stems make for a great spread and add a pop of color when mixed with some filler greens. Lastly, I really enjoy using whatever is the most colorful flower of the season, such as dahlias or peonies to really liven up spaces like the entry way or powder room. While impressive in large quantities, you need but only a few stems to add a little flair to even the sleepiest of spaces.

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NUTS & BOLTS 79


TRACKING & COMMUNICATION IT’S 80% OF THE JOB. ARE YOU DOING IT WELL?

ERINN VALENCICH

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Founder & CEO of StyleRow. Founder of ERINN V. Furniture & ERINN V. Design Group

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ommunication is crucial. We all know that. In life, in relationships, in business, sure. Makes sense. It makes the world go round one could say.

I always like to think I’m a good communicator, but in design, we have so many things to talk about. And then more importantly we must communicate those decisions to others on time and in a way so that they too can share the ideas, designs, drawings, order details, deadlines, installation dates, etc. and get their work achieved well. Designers are the puppet masters pulling all the strings. There are hundreds if not thousands of decisions made in a single design project. So many items to look for, to present, to bill for, to purchase, to move around the country, to install,

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have learned the better you are at being nice while delivering the reason you need the thing done nowmakes people far more willing to help you solve the issue at hand. 80

to measure, to change, and to bill for again. And the communication around these items with your team can be overwhelming. (So can the timebilling!) It’s not just about the paperwork, but about communicating with your team members, clients and vendors – in whichever form that takes (be it email, a phone call, a text message, a spreadsheet, a mood board or an invoice—these are all moments of communication)— and the better and faster you can communicate, the better your projects turn out and the happier your clients and team are in the end. And sometimes you just don’t want to chat! You’re overwhelmed and you just want to note it down and have that other person see the note and do the next step-right!? Right! That’s why I built StyleRow’s Projects software. No one likes fixing messes all the time because someone left some detail out or forgot to send an email or left off the last digit of an item code or didn’t send the wrap up report or share the latest drawing because it was stuck in their thousands of emails or buried in a text thread they didn’t see. Project management can be like a messy game of blindfolded telephone! Yet our goal is to build a beautiful projects, to make a good living and be able to learn and


Project view, filtering by items with comments

Item showing our images, team chat, status, etc.

grow our businesses, right? I doubt anyone gets into design hoping to be mired down in administrative drama, which leads to unhappy people due to bad communication and poor tracking which makes missing placing orders on time too easy to do. That leads to missing installation dates and as a result finishing projects becomes nearly impossible. No, pretty sure that’s not the goal. But it happens all the time. Finding the right team members that communicate well, stay organized on top of all the juggling and running over hot coals that designers must do to get things done- is a skill. But we’ll talk about hiring another time. Let’s focus on communication. And making more money for the great work we do. Let’s focus on making the job easier so we can make more things pretty. That’s what I love to do: solve problems

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and make things pretty so that people enjoy their daily moments more because they are surrounded by beauty. I also love just the right amount of communicationnot too much- not too little- just what is needed to get the job done FAST. Speed for me is key. If it needs to be handled- do it now. If it can wait, let it wait. Priorities matter. We are all running fast but chasing the wrong ball down the field doesn’t make you rich. Nor does it enrich your day or give you a feeling of accomplishment. I am all too guilty of doing too many things at once and missing a lot of deadlines. But in the end, I do get a lot more done than most people because I am willing to juggle so much at once. I learn along the way and work to course correct as needed. I am always trying to better myself, to learn from a situation and to communicate with intention and affinity so the other person leaves feeling good too. And hopefully doing exactly what I wanted them to do. (wink, wink) I can be forceful and demanding if needed, but I have learned the better you are at being nice while delivering the reason you need the thing done now- makes people far more willing to help you solve the issue at hand, than if you just bull-doze them over or don’t communicate “the why” at all and hope

Emails with team

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they figure it out on their own. Communication is a two-way street. But in design it’s kind of a four-way street (vendor- showroom- designer- client) And we have so many things to talk about to get a job done! Far too many. It’s literally insane how many things we all juggle in a day just to make one ornate pillow! So how do you track your team communication around the hundreds of items you’re buying? How do you know—at a glance—the status of those items? Well, that’s why I built software around this part of our work-needs. Project management is not just about “accounting” as most care to think. It’s really “communication.” All the things we do are a form of communication, and the thoughts and decisions we make turn into real life environments. Therefore, we have to turn thought into action and share with a team (sub-contractors, builder, architects, painters, artists, showroom sales teams, manufacturers and then yes… clients!) Have you moved your work into a platform that helps you scale? Have you found solutions to work which make your projects easier and faster to manage?

Email notification when my team is communicating with our client

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Less redundant? Speed of particle flow alone equals power. Really successful people are quick. That equals long term success and profit. The more of a mess your tracking and communication are- and the more places you must look for answers or copy and paste from- the longer you and your team spend on it, and the more money you lose. So, communication is the key to good business, regardless of which word you choose to label it. At StyleRow, our Projects software allows you to have transparency into what your teams are doing- and saying. The email notifications around every item “comment” or “status change” make it deliciously easy to stay on top of things, item by item. This is not an immediate benefit the moment you log in- you’ve got to start doing your work in the software, and you uncover more and more ways that it helps keep you up to date and creates fewer redundancies in your daily business. I can see when my team is communicating with clients, I can see what they said, when they said it and I can do so in a beautiful way without being copied on the email, per se. I can hop into a project months later and all the communication with the team, the client (and soon the vendors!) are right there at my fingertips along with the drawing, the size, the color, the images, and more importantly the CLIENT STATUS and TEAM STATUS which shows me if they paid us and what we need to do next. It’s pretty great. But it requires you to invest a bit of time in the beginning and start using it for one of your projects and use it to communicate to get these benefits. The communication tools are my favorite. And we as a team will keep improving the platform- I promise you that. Every two weeks we release new features. The above was mostly focused on you and your

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nd we as a team will keep improving the platform- I promise you that. Every two weeks we release new features.

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team…but put yourself in your clients’ shoes for a minute. They must do a lot of the above too. So how do they track your feedback? How does your client track the 300 items they are paying you for? And their thoughts on all of them? How do they know when things are arriving? Which chair they approved five months ago and what the next steps are? Well, StyleRow has a solution to that too- it’s the Client Dashboard. It streamlines client feedback

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ll the things we do are a form of communication, and the thoughts and decisions we make turn into real life environments.

item by item into one place so your whole team can see it and so can your client. Best is you, the designer, control it all and can take it away or hide things anytime you wish. Be as transparent as you wish to be based on your clients’ preferences and communication style. But please realize- it’s also a communication tool. Your client gets emails if you use the dashboard that helps them stay on track. They know where to comment so that work can be moved on when you need it. You don’t have to hunt down their thoughts in a text thread nor read through 50 emails wondering where they said, “let’s get the blue one!” And they have the images, the size, the price the details at hand that you shared with them so they can make a quick decision or take as long as they would like to mull it all over- and be thoughtful with their reply. Our work is communication- and that is hard to quantify- but in the end there is a reason lawyers bill for every 15 mins. Because you can’t take ideas back. You can’t get a refund on the knowledge you share. You can’t return a great design concept once you have given it to someone. It’s theirs. So, get paid well


Filtering your project view by “deposit received”

for your time and don’t let anyone tell you that ideas don’t have value. In the end, all we do in design is sell our ideas. I had to tell a client that this week who was questioning why I keep money on retainer and apply it at their final accounting/end of the project. He said, “I only know of lawyers that bill like this!” and my answer was exactly what I said above. “I can’t take back what I give to you. I can’t return my time, I can’t return the ideas or product selections I share with you- so if you don’t pay me for my time, I am left with nothing, and you have everything.” Be bold. Communicate well and you will succeed. Spend your time wisely and do more of what you love- and what you’re good at. And if you’re not a good communicator- take some classes- and then hire people that are and surround yourself with them. But more importantly- use tools that help you with your weak spots. If the tools you use in your daily business are not serving you- and making your work-life easier

and better- then why are you continuing to use them? Environments are communication. Great art speaks to us. It’s all communication in different forms. And yet we designers must straddle the creative genius and the practical-spreadsheet-world to do our art. Help yourself and your team and use better communication tools- I promise you won’t regret it!

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e bold. Communicate well and you will succeed.

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I N S TA L L AT I O N S AV E R S Last Minute Details? No Worries. No Problem. Many of the items available on the showroom floor are yours for the taking. Add one or all of these elements to your list to complete your installation day shopping bag.

The Perfect Drink Table

One-of-a-Kind Handmade Lamps

Useful Floor Lamps 86


Last Minute Coffee Table Change?

Or Try an Ottoman instead?

San Ysidro Side Table 87


Knows from the Pros

SKETCHUP FOR IPAD USHERS IN A NEW SKETCHUP WAY TO CREATE IN 3D, ANYWHERE Intuitive, powerful 3D modeler provides architects and designers with on-the-go workflow.

Given that work now happens any time, anywhere, Trimble recently announced the launch of its SketchUp for iPad , a new app that combines the power of 3D with the ease of sketching by hand. SketchUp for iPad enables interior designers, architects, engineers and construction professionals to more effectively create, edit and collaborate on projects while on-site, on the go and in the office. With SketchUp for iPad’s smart drawing tools and support for Apple Pencil, Pencil, users can intuitively sketch in 3D. The app offers innovative capabilities and workflow enhancements that allow architects and designers to spend less time performing repetitive modeling tasks and more time exploring ideas. Autoshape, a new machine-learning feature instantly transforms doodles into 3D shapes and 88


configurable components. With Markup mode, users can capture client feedback in real-time by digitally overlaying annotations and illustrations atop 3D models using Apple Pencil. Connecting the physical and digital worlds, SketchUp for iPad also enables users to import satellite imagery and terrain data of existing site locations, apply photo textures using an iPad camera, and visualize 3D creations in the real world using augmented reality. The launch of SketchUp for iPad comes after a successful beta program. “It’s been liberating,” said Omar Calderon Santiago, design principal at Perkins Eastman, a global design firm. “I enjoy the mobile aspect of SketchUp for iPad because I can take my design work anywhere. The last couple of years have brought a new perspective to the way we work and has fast-tracked our ability to work outside of the office. Today, our work needs to be easily transportable and with SketchUp for iPad, it is.” The new mobile tool offers a robust, native integration with the Trimble Connect collaboration platform. SketchUp models that are stored in Trimble Connect automatically sync across devices so project stakeholders can move seamlessly between SketchUp for iPad, SketchUp for Web and SketchUp Desktop applications. “The way we work has changed and SketchUp for iPad was designed to go wherever work takes our users with a uniquely intuitive 3D experience to help capture and bring creative inspiration to life—whether on the job site, in a coffee shop or meeting with clients in an office,” said Christopher Cronin, vice president and general manager of Trimble SketchUp. “We’re excited to make 3D even more accessible to designers who’ve always dreamed of working in 3D. We want to help dissolve barriers between the physical and digital worlds by offering immersive and collaborative 3D experiences that can be shared by all stakeholders, from concept through construction.” SketchUp for iPad is included in all paid SketchUp subscriptions. To learn more, visit SketchUp for iPad or purchase from the Apple App Store. I+S published this article online; April 18, 2022. 89


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Interior design professionals create the spaces where people live, work, heal, learn, socialize, and play. Designers’ decisions also impact the interior design industry comprised of designers, manufacturers, dealers, contractors, consultants, tradespeople, artisans, and workers around the world. Through this wide reach, interior designers play a significant role in reducing global carbon emissions and regenerating ecosystems to help avert the climate crisis. Interior design professionals are also in a unique position to improve people’s lives and support wellness and prosperity in our communities. We have a professional obligation to our peers, the public, and future generations to strive for a just, healthy, and sustainable society. The Interior Design Pledge for Positive Impact calls upon designers to understand, assess, and maximize the positive impact of our work by making three interconnected commitments: DESIGN FOR CLIMATE: The climate crisis is the greatest single threat to health and economic prosperity on the planet, and disproportionately affects vulnerable communities. Interior design professionals reduce the negative impacts of climate change by committing to: – Reduce emissions, including operational and embodied carbon, to the maximum extent on all projects. – Optimize design processes to reduce waste and the depletion of natural resources. – Design for adaptability and resilience. – Design for responsible end-of-life, deconstruction, and decommissioning processes. DESIGN FOR HEALTH: Both human and ecological health are essential components of a thriving society, and essential for the future of humanity on the planet. Interior design professionals support holistic health and safety by committing to: – Improve physical health by eliminating toxic and hazardous substances and creating healthy and regenerative environmental conditions. – Nurture the mental wellness and wellbeing of people who use our spaces. – Building social health by fostering better connections between people and strengthening community. – Promote ecological health by preferring processes that restore and regenerate air, water, and other natural systems. DESIGN FOR EQUITY: Social equity and climate justice are central to cohesive, safe, and resilient communities. Interior design professionals promote diversity, inclusion, and equity by committing to: – Design to benefit people with different backgrounds and needs, equally and fairly. – Include and reflect the perspectives of underrepresented communities in our work process. – Make design choices that directly support the health and prosperity of vulnerable communities in our work product. – Prioritize access and a positive experience for all people, regardless of visible and invisible differences.

Sign the Interior Pledge for Positive Impact CLICK HERE

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Our Bookshelf Five Books Past and Present to Inspire Your Seasonal Reading List

Salvador Dalí: The Impossible Collection

by Paul Moorhouse

Dior In Bloom

by Jérôme Hanover (Author), Justine Picardie (Author), Naomi A. Sachs (Author), Alain Stella (Author), Nick Knight (Photographer) Celebrating Dior's floral inspirations in fashion and perfume, this unique volume features a portfolio of rose portraits by acclaimed fashion photographer Nick Knight.

Salvador Dalí: The Impossible Collection (Assouline) spotlights 100 works by Salvador Dalí—notably the most recognizable painter who managed to portray the angst and turbulence of the 20th century—selected by art historian and curator Paul Moorhouse. The book further delves into Dalí’s wide array of influences, ranging from old masters to realism, impressionism, fauvism and cubism.

Versailles: From Louis XIV to Jeff Koons by Catherine Pégard

Richard Mishaan Design, Vendome, (November 2022) by Richard Mishaan with Jacqueline Terrebonne

Richard Mishaan is renowned for his masterly integration of textiles, palettes rich in complementary shades, natural materials forged by artisans, surfaces bedecked with talismanic curios, a strategic sense of when and where to place a mirror, and a deep knowledge of both the fine and decorative arts. His many influences, including his upbringing in Colombia, coupled with his idiosyncratic perspective, explain why his sophisticated clientele return repeatedly as their lives evolve. In Richard Mishaan Design, his working methods are revealed in projects as varied as the conversion of a 400-year-old barn in the Hamptons into a warm, inviting family home and the transformation of an ultra-modern, glass-walled New York City apartment into a comfortable yet sophisticated aerie.

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Narrating the captivating social and cultural milestones of the Palace of Versailles, Versailles: From Louis XIV to Jeff Koons (Assouline) explores the historical property— from its hall of mirrors and gardens to the Grand Trianon and the Queen’s Hamlet. Illustrated with archival images, Catherine Pégard’s texts unveil the lavish stories that have unfolded within the hallowed halls.

The Elegant Life: Rooms That Welcome and Inspire by Alex Papachristidis (Author), Harry Slatkin (Foreword), Mitchell Owens (Contributor)

Features recent interiors that are classic with an unexpected twist, inspiring for those who enjoy entertaining at home.


IN PRACTICE

TOP 5: Perhaps your business could use a little refresh, or you need a moment to gather your thoughts. As the year ends, take a moment to journal, reflect, and pull together a plan for the New Year.

1

What are the top three goals you have for your business? Why?

Hint: These can be long term and short term, but the Why is the key to you finding answers.

2

What do you think your brand represents?

Hint: Dig deep, think about what others have said to you about your brand. It might hurt, but the truth will set you free, as they say.

3

What are 3 brands or competitors you admire, and why? Hint: Get out of design for now, think about other brands you interact with, buy all the time, or must have. The key is to emulate their success.

4

What are your top three business frustrations?

Hint: Now here is the hard part, think long and hard. Come back to this question again and again. It is okay to struggle here but get it out on the paper! You’ll feel better.

5

What do you love about your business?

Hint: We want to end on high note, chances are what you love about your business will be the driving factor in determining successful answer to the question above. When we think about joy, we find joy! You started your business because it brought a smile to your face, we just hope you can find it again!! -Cheers

CLICK HERE TO EMAIL US!

S HA R E YO U R THOUG HTS WITH US ! 93


M|G EVENTS FALL MARKET OCTOBER 18 - OCTOBER 19, 2022 BDC, ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE BOSTON, MA 02210 BOSTON STATE OF THE MARKET | BISNOW OCTOBER 20, 2022, 8:00-12:30PM LOCATION: TBD FASHION SHOW | IIDA THURSDAY, NOV. 5, 2022, 6:00-11:00PM BIG NIGHT LIVE 110 CAUSEWAY ST, BOSTON, MA 02114 BOUTIQUE DESIGN NEW YORK | BDNY NOVEMBER 13-14, 2022 JAVITS CONVENTION CENTER 655 WEST 34TH STREET MANHATTAN, NEW YORK CITY 10014

BOSTON DESIGN MARKET A LOOK INSIDE THE ART OF DESIGN

OCTOBER 18-19, 2022 BOSTONDESIGN.COM #BOSDESIGNMARKET

BOSTON DESIGN CENTER

HOLIDAY STROLL DECEMBER 8, 2022 BDC, ONE DESIGN CENTER PLACE BOSTON, MA 02210 MAISON&OBJECT IN THE CITY JANUARY 19-23, 2023 SAFI - MAISON&OBJET 8 RUE CHAPTAL CS 50028 75442 PARIS CEDEX 09 FRANCE PARIS DECO OFF JANUARY 19-23, 2023 SHOWROOMS OPEN | 9:30AM-7:30PM LATE-NIGHT SATURDAY JANUARY 21, 6:30PM LOCATION: PARIS, FRANCE (TBD) 94

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showroom

ARCHIVEs We are keeping it simple… …Florals of Showroom Past From Newbury Street, to the Beau Arts Building on Boylston… To the Boston Design Center: Floors 2, 5, 4 and now 3… You could say we are experts in building, creating and welcoming you into our showrooms!

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