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International  Lighting  Magazine 2010/5 June

LIGHT, HEALTH AND WELL BEING MARK MAJOR A major impact on light

LIGHT AND SMELL


EDITORIAL

The subject of this issue of Luminous, Light and Well being, explores examples of how we fulfill our brand promise of Sense and Simplicity through simply enhancing people’s lives with light. We have moved beyond the stage where lighting provides only the functional illumination that is needed for certain tasks, to one where light can and does make a positive difference to how people feel, wherever they are. Where they live, work or shop. When they are travelling, learning or entertaining. Fundamentally our business is about the well being of people and ensuring that what we do every day addresses their real needs and aspirations in life. Through developments in LEDs we can now create more adaptable environments that deliver real human benefits. Working together with municipalities, for example, we can make cities more liveable, where bright white LEDs make streets more welcoming and safe. Working together with designers, we can empower people at home to transform their environments with colour and light to suit their moods. With architects and installers, we can create environmentally sustainable offices, where lighting can energize bodies and rejuvenate minds. And Green offices aren’t just healthier for humans and our planet. They make for better business, too. So, moving forward, we will continue to partner with experts to better understand light’s relationship to our physical and emotional health. And with these insights, we will create lighting solutions that potentially have the power to truly improve people’s lives with meaningful, innovative solutions that are advanced, easy to experience and designed around people. Rudy Provoost CEO Philips Lighting

colophon published by | Philips Lighting BV – Mathildelaan 1, Eindhoven 5611 BD, The Netherlands – www.lighting.philips.com editor in chief | Vincent Laganier editorial department/marketing communications | Marijn Damen, Augustina del Bao steering committee | Peter Halmans, Fernand Pereira copywriting & editing | Ruth Slavid translations | Lion Bridge graphic design concept | Philips Design, Bureau Kellerman dtp | Relate4u printing | Print Competence Center more info | luminous@philips.com T: +31 (0)40 - 2756591 ISSN nr | 1876-2972 12 NC | 0000 000 00000 Cover | Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo, Japan Lighting design | Tino Kwan Printed on environmentally friendly, recycled paper.


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DOSSIER

FEEDBACK

Challenges in Lighting Design

Light, Health and Well being

Development and Trends in Lighting

INTRODUCTION Health and Well being

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BLUE SKY THINKING Light and fragrance

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PROJECT REPORT Notary Unit head office Sogutozu, Ankara, Turkey

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CONCEPT CORNER Grazing lighting

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GALLERY Chilean lighting design

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PROJECT REPORT Rosario City Centre Casino, Buenos Aires, Argentina

PROJECT REPORT Rafayel Hotel, London, United Kingdom

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SNAPSHOT Expo Bilbao, China Marcel Saupin Stadium, France Golfclub, The Netherlands La Maddalena, Italy Park Podeby, Russia CarrĂŠ de la soie, France

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PROJECT REPORT In der alten Frost school, Hamburg, Germany

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SPOTLIGHT Books Where to go

PERCEPTIONS Light for the elderly

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LIGHT SOURCE Tino Kwan, Hong Kong, China

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PLATFORM Mark Major, London, United Kingdom

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© Peninsula Tokyo lobby

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DIALOGUE © Hyatt Regency ShaTin

© Peninsula Tokyo ceiling feature


TINO KWAN, HONG KONG, CHINA

“LAYERS OF LIGHT” Interview by Vincent Laganier

Hong Kong-based, internationally acclaimed lighting designer Tino Kwan is widely recognised as one of the world’s most celebrated masters of his trade. His dazzling work can be found across the globe – from palaces in Iran to the most luxurious hotels in Tokyo. Tino Kwan

Could you explain your philosophy of “Layers of light”? When I say “Layers of Light”, you probably do not immediately understand what I mean. But when I ask you to consider the depth of field of a masterpiece of painting or an award-winning photograph, you will begin to understand better. They have one thing in common: layers… layers of details, layers of shades and layers of light. All my lighting designs are composed of different layers of light. The different layers of light not only give depth to a space but also help to direct focus on an important object, give directions in a public space and even improve retail sales. The different layers are actually made up of different intensity and different beam angles of light sources. The trick is to create an optimal balance of light in a space by providing higher intensity where more light is needed and lower intensity where less light is required. How do you respond to materials and colours? Any given space is made up of different materials and colours and when we light up a space, we are actually lighting all the materials and their colours. Therefore, it is very important to know the characteristics of all the different materials in the spaces you are lighting. Materials come in different shades of colours, textures and reflectances and because of their nature, very often they actually become part of our lighting tools, because they help to reflect or absorb light.

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How do you choose the light sources for your projects? Different light sources have different characters in terms of colour temperatures and performances. In addition, some light sources give a linear form of light such as fluorescent lamps, cold cathode and linear LED; whereas others are point light sources such as halogen lamps, compact fluorescent lamps and discharge lamps, etc. We generally prefer to use warmer light sources such as halogen and 2400K cold cathode for our hotel projects and whiter light sources such as compact fluorescent lamps and metal halide lamps for our commercial projects. How do you choose between simple light points and diffuse light? We use more direct downlight or accent light to create highlights and drama, whereas diffuse light will be used mainly for general areas. What is the significance of cove lighting for you? Cove lighting is an architectural form of light which defines a ceiling design, creates an illusion of extra height and provides an ambient light to a space. If you look at the ceiling of the swimming pool of the Peninsula hotel in Tokyo, it is evident how the cove lighting enhances and defines the perception of the ceiling design, contributing to the general lighting with a soft, diffuse light. However, when cove lighting is used as a linear cove along a wall, it will become a wall washer light highlighting the wall and its texture, at the same time creating the illusion of a bigger space. Which colour temperature do you prefer in Asia? And in your projects in particular? It depends on the type of project. We are doing a lot of deluxe hotels in Asia,where we tend to use a warmer colour temperature, ranging from 2400K to 2800K, similar to incandescent light, to provide the warmth and feeling of luxury that guests will expect. In other projects such as shopping malls and commercial buildings, we use colour temperatures ranging from 3000K to 6500K. How do you envisage lighting developing in the future? My vision is to create awareness in people that allows them to recognise the importance of good lighting design and how it can help to improve our life styles, living standards and the world we are living in.

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Peninsula Hotel, Tokyo, Japan

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Trident Hotel, Mumbai, India

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Peninsula Salon de Ning, Tokyo, Japan

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Ushna Dining area, Abu Dhabi, UAE Website www.tinokwan.com

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© Ushna Abu Dhabi

© Peninsula Tokyo Staircase

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© Trident Hotel Mumbai


MARK MAJOR Lighting designer, Speirs and Major Associates, London, United Kingdom Interview by Paul Haddlesey

Luminous spoke to Mark Major of Speirs and Major Associates about his background, why he became a lighting designer and his predictions for the future of lighting design What is your first memory of light? I have two distinct early memories. One was sitting in a car with my grandfather when I was a child and him reciting the old saying “red sky at night, shepherd’s delight”. I was amazed that people could tell things from the colour of the sky. Also, I spent a large part of my childhood in the Arabian Gulf and I remember the contrast between the dim northern light of a British winter and the harsh, unrelenting sunlight of the Gulf. I think that contrast has had a deep effect on my approach to lighting. Ironically I’m still one of those people who can find a grey rainy day standing outside White Hart Lane (the home of Tottenham Hotspur Football Club) sadly romantic. Though I confess to an increasing love of sunlight as I get older!

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How did you get involved with light and why did you become a lighting designer? I was training as an architect in Edinburgh in the mid-1980s when I met my now business partner Jonathan Speirs, who was working in architectural lighting with Lighting Design Partnership. Having started out as a painter before falling into architecture because it was deemed a “proper profession,” I was fascinated by the potential to combine my passions for light, colour and the built form - and to have some fun at the same time. Even in those early days I could see there was huge potential for lighting design in the UK. I can honestly say I’ve never regretted ignoring the advice of my final year tutor to “abandon the frivolous and fashionable pursuit of lighting design because it won’t last”.


What is your best personal experience of architectural lighting? Embarrassingly, my best personal experiences of light are generally related to daylight. Which isn’t to say there is anything intrinsically wrong with artificial lighting, and clearly there have been some excellent schemes – some of which have hopefully been designed by us.

How do you view the work of the Professional Lighting Designers’ Association in education? I think the PLDA provides remarkable value in respect of education. They have always encouraged students and young lighting designers to engage with light in a hands-on manner, putting them in touch with many skilled practitioners and experienced manufacturers. These people are able to provide the young people with an excellent grounding in both the potential and the basic techniques of lighting design through their well-organised workshop programmes.

© Speirs and Major Associates, James Newton

However, I can genuinely say that the natural effects of light, both outside and within great buildings, have by far and away surpassed anything I have ever seen that was man-made. I am not a religious man but if there were a god I am sure he would manage to produce something better within a building after dark than anything we have achieved.

I therefore turn, in architecture, towards the divine light of great Gothic cathedrals, the quiet, private light of domestic architecture and the incredible effect of natural light in modern buildings by masters such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Kahn, Norman Foster, Jean Nouvel – the list goes on.

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© Ramon Prat

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A major impact on light How do you see the lighting-design profession developing over the next ten years? At the end of the last recession, when I was asked whether the growth of lighting design in the late 1980s would be killed off by a lack of work, I predicted that it would arise from the ashes of that downturn even greater and stronger than it was before. And I was proved right. However, even I could not have envisaged the remarkable growth we have experienced in the last ten years.

There is much work to be done if we are to compare what is still little more than a trade organisation with the traditional idea of professions such as architecture, medicine and law. I do not mean that rudely, because not being an established profession does not make you any less professional in your approach. But ultimately, society will demand a clear and consistent idea of what it is that a lighting designer does, what should be expected of them, what their ethical professional behaviour should be. They should be insured on a mandatory basis and they should have in place a proper and certified system of both creative and professional education that will promise to deliver a minimum standard from the professional lighting designer, working alongside the other members of the design and construction team.

During these leaner times it is the perfect moment for lighting professionals to consolidate and prepare themselves for what will no doubt be busier times ahead.

We are still a little way off meeting that challenge but I firmly believe that within ten years we ought to have made it. 1

Usher Hall Chandelier, Edinburgh, UK

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Armani Fifth Avenue, New York, USA

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Devonshire Square, London, UK Website www.samassociates.com

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© Daniela MC Adden


ROSARIO CITY CENTRE CASINO, BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

BEHIND THE GAME Interview by Lorena Obiol

Provedo-Quintiero Architects worked with Baudizzone-Lestard Architecture on Rosario City Centre, a project linking a five-star hotel with the largest casino in South America. Luminous interviewed the architect Aladina Quintiero about her design choices for this project.

Which is are the particular features of your architecture? I have specialized in casinos for almost twenty years. In my projects, I aim to create special effects and big-impact situations. More than situations, I would say sensations. This is possible thanks to the colours I use, which are very strong ones. I am not afraid of colour. LED technology and lighting help a lot, because they enable people to be transported to a different place and allow me to be a more dynamic architect. How is the building arranged? From the main entrance you move to a tourism centre with a convention room, shops and restaurants. This distribution hallway then leads to either the hotel or the casino; the latter covering more than 40,000 m2, with more than 2,500 slot machines and eithy gaming rooms. Because of the security requirements, there are also 8,000 m2 of back offices which include offices, closed circuit TV and a lot of security. In addition, 1,200 employees work there, all of whom need to eat, dress for work and rest. There are also service areas for the restaurant and the theme bars. What role does lighting play in the casino? The idea is that people going to the casino in Rosario feel like Alice in Wonderland. They must think: “What colour is this? Is this red?” And, suddenly, the place changes to blue and, then, with the blink of an eye, it becomes green. As I said before, lighting helps my architecture not to be static, to generate sensations and to transport individuals to a magical world. it is not just a world of gaming, but also a world with other possibilities: where people can drink coffee at the coffee shops or watch a show. On this project I used RGB in the exterior walls as well as in the illuminated ceilings. Where we needed calmer lighting, we used strings, which generate the precise level of light for the slot machines. The light in a casino must be neither too strong nor too glaring, and for that purpose I used LEDs so as to generate the precise level of light.

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How have you placed the lights in the double-skin facade? For the sake of safety, the entire building has been built in concrete. The skin is in prefabricated panels measuring 1.22 x 2.20 meters, with a texture of small stones. Our idea was that the building should resemble a big rock on the edge of the city. But without lighting, it was so big it began to be a bit boring. For that reason we came up with the idea of having plaques with hollows covered by frosted glass. Between the real skin - the concrete - and this second skin, we placed RGB colour-changing lights. The idea is that they will give a constantly changing effect. And, what are the Chinese wall lights like? All the interior walls were coloured in a Chinese red and, besides, I added red LEDline, which intensified the colour. The whole casino seems to be red. How were the ceiling effects in the central area achieved? I work a lot with a material called Barrisol, which is a French ceiling. It is like a tightened plastic fabric with a backlight, and the LED is behind that fabric. Thus, it seems to be a big screen. Every ceiling changes colour. Why have you added LED screens in the casino walls? I put in the screens to provide an element of amusement and entertainment. But they also have a marketing and publicity function. For example, the company uses them to display information about upcoming shows or promotions. How are these light effects controlled? Everything is programmed from a central computer system which operates both the interior and the exterior lighting. The system is called Light System Manager. It is very expensive, but allows you to manage everything at a distance with a single computer. It is a very complex system assembled by Philips. Why have you chosen to do all the main lighting throughout the project with LEDs? With LEDs I can create the atmosphere I want: to transport people. Having a single colour is not the same as having several changing colours. I found LED lighting a huge help, because it gives added value to the design, by providing dynamism to the project. It is like living in another dimension. For that reason, LED lighting became the primary light source, and traditional lighting, the secondary one.

Client Casino Club Architect Provedo-Quintiero, Buenos Aires, Argentina Baudizzone-Lestard Architecture, Buenos Aires, Argentina Construction Company RIVA SA Lighting solutions German Santiso, Gladys Gatti, Romina Forciniti, Guillermo Pasina, Philips Argentina Light sources Philips LUXEON ® LED Luminaires Philips ColorGraze Powercore, iColor Cove QLX, iColor Flex SL, ColorBlast, LEDline2 NB red, TMS, LED string, C-Splash, Underwater LED RGB Lighting controls Philips Video System Manager, Light System Manager Websites www.casino-club.com.ar www.provedoquintiero.com.ar www.blklm-architects.com

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Client Bilbao City Council, Fundación Metrópoli Architect Artemio Fochs, Carlos Lahoz, Inés Primo de Rivera, Design L.A.A.B., Madrid, Spain

BILBAO’S CITY PAVILION, SHANGHAI, CHINA

Model designer Esther Pizarro, Madrid, Spain

At the World Expo 2010 in Shanghai, one of the Spanish entries is a pavilion telling the story of the city of Bilbao. Using two video displays, and a massive scale sculpture of the city of Bilbao measuring 13 x 8 meters, the display explains the changes and revolutionsthat the city has gone through. Using individually controlled LED Lighting inside all the modelled buildings, it creates an amazing atmosphere to tell an extraordinary story.

© Markus Schroll

© Esther Marí xxxxxxxxxx

1900 nodes of Philips iColorFlex SL were installed to light the sculpture from inside. Flexitube blue is used to create the Bilbao River on the sculpture. Lighting of the complete installation is controlled by a Pharos system.

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Lighting solutions Bas Hoksbergen, Santiago Erice, Jorge Jusdado, Philips Lighting Electrical installer Vitelsa Luminaires Philips iColorFlex SL, Flexitube blue Lighting controls Pharos LPC20 Website www.fundacion-metropoli.org

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© Patrick Miara Beeld checken na keuze op formaat bestand, CMYK en resolutie

MARCEL SAUPIN STAND, NANTES, FRANCE Originally built in 1937, the Marcel Saupin football stadium was extensively remodelled in 2009, with only the original North stand remaining. The architect wanted to introduce transparency into the concrete structure, putting glass doors on the ground floor, and stainless steel panels below the stands, to reduce the feeling of claustrophobia. “It is important that the building frame has a strong signature at night so that it can act as an entrance to the city” says Bernard Tournier-Lasserve from Quadra Architectes LED lighting gives a different emphasise to four elements of the architecture. First, the lower flights of steps are highlighted in white cold light. Second, orange flares emphasise the verticality of the portico. Third, the punched stainless steel above the doors is accented in cold white. Fourth, graphic orange dots outline the skyline and show the size of the stands. Thanks to trials carried out by Philips LED lighting trial and to an adequate budget, this project has seen the realization of innovative ideas.

Beeld checken na keuze op formaat bestand, CMYK en resolutie

Client Ville de Nantes Architect Bernard Tournier-Lasserve, Quadra Architectes, Orvault, France Lighting design Bernard Tournier-Lasserve, Quadra Architectes, Orvault, France Frédérick Potereau, GEFI Ingenierie, Nantes, France Lighting solutions Patrice Fontaine, Philips France Light sources Philips LUXEON ® LED, 1W, White, Amber Luminaires Philips LEDline2, Narrow Beam, 0.60 and 1.2m Websites www.quadra-architectes.com www.gefi-ingenierie.fr

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Dirkshorn Golf Course Clubhouse, Dirkshorn, The Netherlands Architect Jan Kramer really had something special in mind for Dirkshorn Golf Club’s new clubhouse. The characteristic Dutch “bell-jar” farmhouse makes use of the latest materials and technical tours de force and excels in terms of sustainability. Kramer wanted it to be as “green” a design as possible. “The building is partly embedded in an artificial mound, providing good insulation. In addition, all lighting, energy and water facilities are controlled entirely via touchscreens and sensors.” he said. The architect is enthusiastic about the lighting plan developed by Philips, with dimmable LED lighting everywhere. The new lighting plan also provides a high level of userfriendliness. For instance, the lighting is automatically turned off by the Occuswitch when the last person leaves the room.

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Client Golfbaan Dirkshorn Architect Jan Kramer BV BNA, Petten, The Netherlands Lighting solutions Fred Dorgelo and Wibeke Pollé, Philips Netherlands Electrical installer Beemster Elektrotechniek Luminaires Philips SpotLED 1, SpotLED 3, LuxSpace, eW Cove Powercore, Fugato, LEDline2, Rotaris, SmartForm, Pacific TCW216, Europa 2, Occuswitch Website www.golfclubdirkshorn.nl


Š Iwan Baan, Photography

LA MADDALENA, OLBIA, ITALY The former arsenal of the Italian Navy on the island of La Maddalena, Sardinia, was originally chosen as the venue to host the G8 summit that was subsequently moved to Aquila. A conference complex comprising state-of-theart buildings that blend seamlessly with the existing, restored buildings was built in just 18 months. The lighting engineering part of the project covered all the outdoor areas (the port, streets, arches, facades, etc.) and a wide array of indoor spaces, including the main conference building. Extensive use was made of LED technology to provide warm and cool white lighting and coloured static and dynamic lighting. The application of equipment using LED technology and control systems ensured the protection of the natural environment and also offered a significant energy saving, as well as a reduction in the costs of maintenance due to the longer lifetime of the light sources.

Client Italian Ministry of the Interior Department for Civil Protection and Region of Sardinia Architect Stefano Boeri Light sources LED, MASTERColour Luminaires Philips UrbanScene, CosmoPolis, UrbanLine, LEDline RGB, LEDflood AWB/RGB, DecoScene, Pentura, Decoflood, Savio, Rotaris, Fugato, LEDline2 Balcony/ RGB, Smart Bollard LED, Scrabble, Bolar, Celino, SpotLED 1, SpotLED 2, TMX204, UnicOne LED, eW Cove Powercore, eW Down Light, Underwater, Quadratus, Shappire. Website www.stefanoboeri.net

The illumination of the La Maddalena area offers a perfect example of lighting solutions combining to deliver a high level of performance, maximum energy efficiency and respect for the environment.

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PARK POBEBY VOLGOGRAD, RUSSIA As part of the development programme of the city of Volgograd, the first stage of upgrading the lighting system in Victory Park was completed on the riverbank’s upper terrace. The aim was to treat this typical urban space in an original way. The Park, named after the achievements of the 62nd Army, itself became the canvas for creation, with the new coloured lighting providing the palette. The control system has three different modes. There is the evening mode, with high-level luminaires providing general lighting for the park, and projectors illuminating the trees;there is a night mode, when the general lighting is turned off and only the trees are illuminated; and there is a festive mode, when projectors cover the park with a single pattern of light. With its new lighting, Victory Park is not only a reminder of the heroism of those who fought for their country, but also part of the cultural heritage of Volgograd to be enjoyed and appreciated by visitors and residents alike. To implement the concept, Philips Decoflood projectors and gobo projectors from the UrbanScene range were used, along with various accessories.

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Client Administration of Volgograd City Lighting design Yulia Cherkasova, Dmitry Burov, &light, Moscow, Russia Electrical installer Igor Borodov, Svetosila, Volgograd, Russia Lighting solutions Jan Chernoushevich, Philips Russia Light sources Philips CDM-SA/T 150W /840 Philips CDM-T 35, 70W / 840 BLV MH blue, green, magenta, 70W Sylvania, MH, HIS-TD 35-70W Luminaires Philips Decoflood 606 NB Philips UrbanScene gobo projector Saros Smileflood Websites www.andlight.ru www.svetosila.net


© Joseph Frey

CARRE DE LA SOIE SHOPPING MALL, VAULX EN VELIN, FRANCE Spreading across 180,000 square meters, the lighting environment of the Carré de Soie Shopping Mall drew its inspiration from the powerful architectural forms. The undulating metal profiles provide a rhythm and identity that the lighting can accentuate. LEA proposes to bring it to life at night, during the opening hours of the cinema. The proposal incudes lighting the buildings, the walkways, the elevators and the car parks. “During a part of the night, Carré de la Soie, a mall devoted to leisure and shopping, is the floodlit and luminescent heart of the new hippodrome neighbourhood” says Laurent Fachard. As a result, at night, the architectural concept is enhanced by 16,000 RGB pixels made of Philips iColor Flex. Its flexibility allows it to be integrated easily in the structures. Pixels are addressed point by point separately to allow chromatic programmes that can change according. to the seasons or other variables. This satisfies the management’s commercial needs for environmentally friendly illumination.

Client ALTAREA Architects John Holt, Faulkner&Browns, Newcastle, United Kingdom Jean-Marie Charpentier, Arte Charpentier, Lyon, France Lighting design Laurent Fachard, Joseph Frey, Les Eclairagistes Associés, Lyon, France Lighting solutions Jean-Philippe Josserand, Axente, Longjumeau, France Luminaires Philips iColor Flex SLX, RGB Lighting controls Philips Light System Manager Electrical installer SNEF Websites www.faulknerbrowns.co.uk www.arte-charpentier.com www.ace-fr.org/art_membres.php?id_article=250 www.axente.fr

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Designing for health and well being is an increasingly important topic. It goes well beyond the narrow confines of healthcare buildings, to cover the design of all buildings so that people can work, relax and enjoy themselves in as effective a manner as possible, in buildings that make them feel well and energized, and which certainly don’t threaten their health or happiness. Lighting play a key role in this process, addressing both the emotional response to light, and the requirement for visual comfort. Doctor Catherine Sémidor at the GRECAU laboratory of the Bordeaux architecture and landscape school has come up with a definition of visual comfort. She says, “Visual comfort links luminance balance, luminance contrast and glare. It acts as a bridge between utility and pleasure. It is to do with the ways in which natural light and artificial light can complement each other.” Design for health and well being has to take account not only of the different activities that will take place in a building, but also the differences in the people who will use the building.

Age, sex and cultural background can all affect the ways in which we perceive visual comfort. An exciting environment for a person in their 20s may be confusing or even distressing for an older person. The projects described here show some of the latest thinking about incorporating well being into lighting design. In a Turkish office, daylight and traditional light sources are combined to create an enjoyable working environment. In a British hotel, LEDs are used throughout to provide a pleasant and energy-efficient place to relax. Research at a German school shows how dynamic lighting can help enhance learning. A study on the elderly examines the best way to use lighting for people in this age group. These diverse projects share a common thread. They are all about the people who use the buildings, about lighting which is tailored not just to the architecture but to the users of that architecture. By asking who the users are, what they are doing and how they will use the buildings, lighting designers can help to give them a happier and even a healthier experience. Vincent Laganier

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© Gürkan Akay


NOTARY UNIT HEAD OFFICE, SOGUTOZU, ANKARA, TURKEY

COMFORT OFFICE By Tuba Bostancı Baskan

The building of the Turkish Association of Notaries has an architectural design that allows seamless communication between the spaces that make it up. Designed around an exterior courtyard space, which forms an internal garden, the foyer space of the building includes a meeting area, an exhibition space, a cafe-restaurant and a gallery. It provides a contemporary working atmosphere with clear differentiation between the working spaces and the socio-cultural spaces. These differentiations are made in both visual and operational terms.

© MuuM, ground floor plan

The indoor and outdoor lighting designs support the differentiation of the building. In the working areas, light bands have been formed with the linear luminaires selected in rhythm with the ceiling structure, in a way that supports communication between different locations. The reflector type and the optical features of the luminaires are appropriate for working environments where computers are used, producing a minimal amount of glare. The circulation areas have a different treatment, using decorative recessed downlights with glass accessories. In the meeting rooms, end-to-end linear luminaires form bands of light., They are used in association with mini fixed and adjustable downlights employing halogen lamps, which allow different scenarios to be created.

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© MuuM, section

In the cultural and meeting areas on the ground floor of the building, the lighting has been chosen to be appropriate to the architecture and to fit well within the ceiling structure.. In the exhibition area, general lighting is provided by fixed recessed downlights with decorative glass covers, and the vertical lighting of the exhibition panels is supplied by adjustable recessed downlights. Decorative pendant luminaires with compact fluorescent lamps were used in the restaurant and cafeteria besides linear recessed luminaires with fluorescent lamps. The gallery, which visually interconnects the floors vertically, has a transparent structure. It has been illuminated with asymmetric, decorative luminaires, which were installed in the metal construction. The luminaires use long-life CDM lamps. Overall, the lighting of the Turkish Association of Notaries was designed to enhance the architecture and to help the building operate in an optimal manner. Wherever possible, lighting systems with long-life and low energy consumption are being used, to save energy.

Client Turkish Association of Notaries Architect Selim Velioğlu, Umut İyigün, Orkun Özüer, Murat Aksu Electrical installer Ketenciler Electricity Lighting solutions Engin Kayaoglu, Tuba Baskan, Philips Turkey Light sources Philips TL-5 28 and 54W /840 Philips PL-C 26W /830 Luminaires Philips TBS 631 2x28W Philips FBH 147 2x26W Philips TBS 680 1x54W Lighting controls ABB EIB lighting automation system Website www.tnb.org.tr www.MuuM.com.tr www.gurkanakay.com

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27 © Gürkan Akay

© Gürkan Akay


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© Francesco Foroni

© Peter Smith


RAFAYEL HOTEL, LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

INTIMATE FEELING By Ruth Slavid

There can be few projects in which lighting plays so integral a part as the new Rafayel Hotel in London, and also few where the design team has had such a close relationship with the lighting supplier. Designer Latis worked hand in hand with Phillips which kept it abreast not only of the products that were currently available, but also of those that were in the pipeline. “It was the first time that we have taken this approach with a design practice,” explained creative director Rowena Preiss, “but it was also the first time that we had the opportunity to look at every aspect of hotel design.”

The hotel is in an existing building, saving the embodied energy of a new build, an approach that Pattni calls “urban recycling”. It occupies the first four floors of a 17-storey building with a deep, kidney-shaped plan. Within this space, Latis has inserted 65 generously sized bedrooms as well as flexible meeting rooms and a spa on the third floor. A restaurant occupies a separate, single-storey building. The reception area has been designed to help link the street to riverfront, with entrances on both sides and locals encouraged to use it as a shortcut.

© LATIS, Helicopter bar

The Rafayel is unusual, a five star hotel in Battersea, south London, a part of the city that does not normally house such facilities. Although not the smartest area, it is near to the centre and is on the river with magnificent views, which include take-offs and landings at the adjacent heliport. This was client Iqbal Latif’s first hotel, and he wanted and needed a point of differentiation.

Krishan Pattni, design director of Latis, explained, “The idea was to focus on lowering energy consumption. How do you introduce sustainability into a commercial project?” The intention was not just to make the hotel as sustainable as possible, but also to make it clear to the guests just how sustainable it is, so that this could become one of its unique selling points.

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A large part of the energy-saving approach came through a determination to use the latest technology. This includes a heat-recovery system, and the use of rainwater harvesting, but lighting plays the major role. By using LEDs almost exclusively, Pattni calculates that he has reduced the total energy consumption of the building by 60% - a saving that comes not only from the reduced energy use of the LEDs, but also in the reduction in cooling needed to the building, because the heat output is so low. At the same time, it was essential to give a feeling of luxury and comfort to the building, and the lighting had a key part to play – not least because little natural light reaches the central spaces. “Part of the reason for using LEDs is that they are fully controllable,” said Pattni. “You can make them do what you want.” What he wanted included an impression of daylight in some of the deepest spaces, with colours changing from a pale blue in the mornings to a deeper blue in the middle of the day and then a rosy glow at dusk. This happens, for instance, in the lighting installed around bulkheads. Even more special effects take place in seven bedrooms designated as “jet lag rooms”. These use advances by Philips Healthcare division in helping to control melatonin production. Panels above the beds can be programmed to help reduce the effects of jetlag, to wake users up gently or to supply a “rejuvenating” programme of lighting between a packed schedule of meetings and a dinner.

An indication of the way that the technology advanced during the design and commissioning period comes from the corridor lighting. “When we started off, there wasn’t an LED light that could provide an even light,” Pattni said, “so we had to have a cove. But then what came in was a fitting that could sit at an angle and the light could cover the width of the corridor without any scalloping. Previously we would have had to pepper the ceiling with fittings.” The number of services running through the ceiling provided another constraint. “We had to work with a luminaire with a very shallow depth,” explained Preiss. The bedrooms and bathrooms use a combination of ceiling mounted LEDs with more domestic-style lighting from Philips’ consumer range. And even the televisions come from Philips and themselves use coloured light to change the experience. This is a synergy that could not have been achieved without a single point of contact. “Rowena was able to take our concept design specification and turn it into fittings,” said Pattni. “It’s nice that giants like Philips will work with a small design practice like ours.”

Client Iqbal Latif, Rafayel Hotel Designer, lighting design Krishan Pattni, LATIS, London, United Kingdom Lighting solutions Rowena Preiss, Philips United Kingdom Electrical contractor East Anglia Developments

© LATIS, second floor

Light sources Philips MASTER LED 7W Luminaires Philips LED downlights, Luxspace compact, iColor Cove; iColor Powercore, LivingColor Website www.hotelrafayel.com www.latisgroup.com

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© Peter Smith

© Peter Smith

© Francesco Foroni


IN DER ALTEN FROST SCHOOL, HAMBURG, GERMANY

A LESSON IN LEARNING By Natasja Gielen

The primary school “Grundschule In der Alten Forst” is an innovative primary school in Hamburg, Germany with 12 classes and 368 children. The aim of School Director Andreas Wiedemann is for offering children the best possible environment in which to learn.

We’ve known for a long time that light can affect our moods, making us feel less energetic on dull mornings than we do on bright, sunny days. Research into the highly complex relationship between light and well being has led to some fascinating discoveries. Not only does exposure to higher levels of blue light in the daylight spectrum make us feel better; the receptors in the eye’s retina also help to produce the neurotransmitters that control our mood and activity, So what effect could light have on learning behaviour? To discover more a new study was conducted by Prof. Dr. Michael Schulte-Markwort, Director of the Clinic for Psychosomatics in Children and Juveniles at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf on behalf of Philips. The intention was to see whether light could be used to influence the learning behaviour of school children. A total of 166 schoolchildren aged between 8 and 16 took part in the year-long experiment, along with 18 teachers. The study covered a range of classes in different types of schools and naturally the Director of the “Grundschule In der Alten Forst” was keen to take part. Prior to the study, the existing classroom lighting was replaced with the Philips SchoolVision system with Dynamic Lighting to see what impact it had on the behaviour and performance of pupils. SchoolVision is a classroom lighting solution that helps to improve learning conditions by bringing the dynamics of daylight into the classroom. The teacher can control the classroom atmosphere to create exactly the right atmosphere, tailoring the light to suit the learning task or the time of day. By making the learning environment as comfortable as possible for each activity, it keeps young minds alert and eager to take part, optimising results for teachers and pupils. Four dedicated lighting scenes are available for the teacher to select via a touchpad. The scenes are produced by varying the balance between light intensity and colour tone/temperature to create a particular ambience that is suitable for a certain tasks or the time of day. Normal is for regular classroom activities. Energy helps to invigorate pupils when they need to be more active, supporting a fresh start to the day (morning) or afternoon (after lunch break). Focus aids concentration during challenging tasks and Calm brings a relaxing ambience to individual work or quiet time.

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“ We saw for ourselves and the results confirmed that the specific application of light really can have a positive effect on learning and the learning environment.” Andreas Wiedemann, School Director, In der Alten Forst

Reading speed increased by almost 35% in the SchoolVision experiment and the concentration also improved dramatically with the frequency of errors dropping by almost 45%. Hyperactivity and aggression were also examined. Although the perceived reduction in aggression was not found to be significant, video evidence showed a distinct change in levels of hyperactivity. Observed hyperactivity was reduced by up to 76% when pupils were given a mathematical problem to solve under the Calm lighting scene, a figure that the baseline measurement and control group did not even come close to. Scientifically proven standard tests were used to measure levels of attention and concentration. These were D2 attention load tests and/ or reading comprehension test, depending on the child’s age. The results with SchoolVision were compared with those of the baseline measurement. A control group working under standard light was also used as a comparison. The study shows that attention span, concentration and behavior is significantly improved through the use of dedicated light settings. SchoolVision provides teachers and schools with a new tool to improve performance and support the well being of children at school. The conclusion can only be that children’s activity can be positively and significantly supported with the targeted use of the right kind of light. Most schools have standard lighting systems with a fixed colour temperature. Dynamic Lighting adjusts these values with seamless changes in lighting patterns that simulate natural daylight. The Philips luminaires used in the study featured two unique ActiViva Active TL5 and a fluorescent TL5 lamp with a similar warm-white colour temperature to conventional bulbs. By mixing the light to vary the brightness and colour mood, Dynamic Lighting provided stimulation or relaxation, achieving the right psychological effect to benefit the task. By bringing the dynamics of daylight indoors, SchoolVision has created an outstanding learning environment that gives pupils at In der Alten Forst the very best start in school. Daylight sensors also dim the lights when there is enough natural daylight and presence detectors turn the lights off when the classroom is empty, saving the school even more in energy costs. Client Grundschule In der Alten Forst School Director Andreas Wiedemann University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf Prof. Dr. M. Schulte-Markwort, Dipl.-Psych. N. Wessolowski Lighting solutions Günter Hohensee, Gerd Wiesemann, Philips Germany Luminaires Philips SchoolVision system with Dynamic Lighting

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LIGHT FOR THE ELDERY By Martine Knoop

Growing older is linked to a large number of physiological and behavioral changes. Due to a decline in mobility and dim lighting conditions in (nursing) homes, the daily light exposure is relatively low. The limited light exposure, in combination with the aging eye, results in a weak signal to both the visual system and the circadian system. Visual performance is compromised for a large proportion of the aging society. As the circadian system itself also ages, the elderly can suffer from a number of related ailments, such as reduced sleep quality, depression and decline in cognitive performance.

A strong light input signal to both the visual system and the circadian system is beneficial. Provision of more light can compensate for the reduced captured intensity of light. With higher light levels a reasonable level of visual acuity can be achieved. Furthermore, bright light can be used to strengthen the circadian system, as light is a strong cue for stabilizing the sleep-wake pattern.

LIGHT FOR SIGHT

The deterioration of the visual system with age has implications for the performance of many tasks. The elderly typically have difficulty with visual tasks such as reading, recognizing objects, picking out a face in a crowd, seeing in dimly-lit environments and seeing moving objects. The provision of more light can compensate for the reduced captured intensity of light as a consequence of pupil size, transmission of the lens and visual resolution. Therefore the light levels recommended in guidelines are typically twice to three times as high as those required for young and middle-aged people. Besides this, good colour rendering is required, at a level that is also used in professional lighting solutions. At the same time, the visual system is more sensitive to high lighting contrasts. Shades become confusing, large contrasts and glare becomes more disturbing. Rooms need to be uniformly lit, and glare needs to be prevented. A reasonable visual performance can still be achieved with appropriate lighting: with “Light for Sight�, allowing residents to be active and socially connected for longer.

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LIGHT FOR MEMORY

An age-related weakened circadian system is associated with both sleep-wake and functional disturbances, such as a reduction in sleep quality and cognitive performance, disturbances in physical, emotional and social functioning as well as depression, and a decreased and more fragmented rest-activity rhythm. A stronger signal is required to maintain the proper strength and synchronization of the internal body clock. This stronger signal still has an effect on the weakened circadian rhythm, as even in older people and those with Alzheimer’s disease high responsiveness to stimuli and plasticity of the circadian system are available. A strengthened circadian system is beneficial for the elderly, especially for Alzheimer patients, as it reduces restless behavior and improves the activity level of Alzheimer patients. A higher activity level plays a positive role in cognitive performance and subjective sleep quality in the elderly, and may provide protection from certain chronic diseases.


Riemersma and her colleagues conducted a long-term study over two years in homes for the elderly, evaluating the effect of whole-day bright light of 1000 lux and 4000 K at the eye. The results indicate that long-term use of a light as a stimulus for the body clock may have improved its abilities to synchronize rhythms, which contributes considerably to the general functioning of the elderly. The study shows that Alzheimer’s disease can be slowed down by light therapy. Cognitive decline was reduced by 5%, though with an unchanged rate of progression. In addition, the results show an increase in sleep duration, a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in activities of daily living functioning. Therefore, higher light levels, typically four times higher than those required for recreation rooms, are proven to be successful in addressing a number of age-related issues, such as sleep disturbances, cognitive decline, reduced mood and depressive symptoms. As the required levels are even higher than those needed to address the age-related decline in visual performance, glare protection and uniformity are also important in the “Light for Memory” lighting solutions.

In conclusion, light is a powerful biological and visual stimulus to the human body and can be deployed to support the well being and visual performance of people in nursing homes. The majority of elderly people will be helped by light that allows them to perform daily tasks, recognize faces and feel more confident in their vision. Elderly people who lack exposure to sufficient daylight to maintain healthy circadian rhythms, in particular the demented elderly, will be helped by higher light levels, which result in a reduction in cognitive degeneration and a strengthened rest-activity rhythm. Therefore, at Philips we focus on Light for Sight for the relatively healthy elderly and on Light for Memory for Alzheimer patients. REFERENCE

Riemersma-van der Lek RF, Swaab DF, Twisk J, Hol EM, Hoogendijk WJG, Van Someren EJW (2008) Effect of bright light and melatonin on cognitive and noncognitive function in elderly residents of group care facility. A randomised controlled trial JAMA 299(22):2642-2655

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FRAGRANCE LENDS LIGHT EXTRA COLOUR By Monique van Empel

Fragrance designer Dimitri Weber and lighting designer Koert Vermeulen shine their light on our fifth sense: smell. That Philips Lighting needs to play a pioneering role as a trendsetter in this field is self-evident to both men. An interview about smells and colours, Ambilight and Ambipur, car perfumes and toilet fresheners. Fragrance consultant and creator Dimitri Weber lives and works in a beautifully restored pre-war mansion on the outskirts of Antwerp. The colours are warm: ochre, terracotta and red tints, with accents in Prussian blue and lots of dark wood. A man whose motto is “a fragrance state of mind” has a pleasant fragrance in his house, of course. Subtle and without it being possible to define the smell, the effect is absolutely noticeable: you feel welcome and relaxed. “Everyone knows that smells affect your mood”, says Dimitri Weber. “Some smells make you happy, while others make for negative associations. Smells occupy our memories like a kind of picture book. And in this way fragrances unconsciously, though very directly, evoke memories of experiences from the past. Scientific research has been going on in America for some 15 years into the precise whys and wherefores of this. So all the facts and figures are known. And yet here in Europe there is still a certain reticence where the application of smells in projects and products is concerned. But: it is going to happen. Of that I’m certain!” AMBILIGHT WITH SMELLS

According to Dimitri Weber, Philips Lighting is the obvious party to introduce smells into interiors. “With the Ambilight they’ve already made the effect of colours known to the public at large. The next step is the combination of light, colour and smell. Consumers now understand that story more quickly. And what do you think: if the consumer can choose between Ambilight with and without smells, I think the decision is clear, don’t you?” Weber can envision it entirely and is getting more and more enthusiastic. “Besides high tech and technology, smell is a new tool for opening the door to lifestyle and beauty. For instance you can create an individual signature, an individual smell, for every company. Like a kind of invisible second logo that’s engraved on people’s memories, making it easier to remember than a visual logo. I can see so many business options. The big question is just who has the guts to pick it up.”

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CUSTOMISED SMELLS

But is it that simple: a question of adding a smell to a colour? “Yes and no”, answers Weber. “Yes, because every smell, like colour, has a certain effect on people’s peace of mind. Actually every colour has its smell and every smell its colour. Take lemon yellow: that’s summery, fresh and invigorating. Bergamot and Sicilian lemon also have these properties. Look at it as two sides of a coin that reinforce and support one another in terms of atmosphere. Basically it’s straightforward: mint is effective against headaches, vervain makes you alert, grapefruit helps get rid of melancholy and mandarin is good for creativity. Good research is essential when developing smells, however. And that takes time. My car perfume for Smart took me at least a year. There are currently many companies that are making money really fast with easy smells. Those chemical right in your face types of smell. I’d like to make a more noble alternative for the “Ambipurs” of this world. Customised smells: natural and subtle. And then preferably in collaboration with a party such as Philips, since it fits in with the image that consumers, and certainly lighting designers and architects, have of them as trendsetters.”


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Š Dimitri Weber


REFRESHING SOURCE OF INSPIRATION

The world-famous Belgian lighting designer Koert Vermeulen is also enthusiastic about the medium of smell. “I’m certain that smell can be a very fundamental, literally refreshing source of inspiration for designers who are currently primarily focused on our eyes and ears. Whereas it is smells in particular that have a tremendous impact. Research has shown that, of the three senses of sight, hearing and smell, smell has the greatest effect on our long-term memory. Of the 3 gigabytes or so of image data that we receive every day on our retinas, 95% are forgotten immediately. MEMORIES

And of the remaining 5% only some kilobytes are retained in the long term. So sight is a very fleeting medium. On the other hand, ask a 90-year-old grandad what his wife smelt like the first time they met and he’ll be able to tell you precisely. So smell is something that stays with you for a very long time. It’s also a fast catalyst that evokes associations almost at once. Looking at it this way, smell is a perfect medium for visual images. In fact smell evokes even more detailed images than purely visual inspiration. And so a visual image when linked to a smell is experienced more intensely and is remembered better.”

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NEUTRALISING

Koert Vermeulen has experimented in the past with both light and smell, for instance in museum arrangements. He does see one problem, however: neutralising smells again. “Even if after a while you can no longer smell them yourself, smells stay around for a long time and don’t disappear right away. So something like Ambilight with smells is a nice idea, but in practice smell A would first have to be neutralised before smell B could be introduced. You switch an image on and then off again and it’s gone. But smell has a different refreshment rate. Typical fodder for a doctoral student to find out the precise details of this. And perhaps an Ambilight with smells can then be developed that you can set for a day or a week. Because I agree with Dimitri that something is going to happen.” SYNERGY

Like Dimitri Weber, Koert Vermeulen also sees opportunities here for Philips. “On the one hand you’ve got the more technical companies, involved with for instance audio, video and lighting. On the other hand there are the Proctor & Gambles of this world that offer the consumer fragrances for the home, in the toilet and in their cars. I think that for a company like Philips there’s a movement towards integrating smell in their marketing strategy and making technically sound products that stimulate not only the eyes and ears, but also the nose. Then a fragrance designer becomes part of the design process, just like a lighting designer. And that synergy can produce tremendous things.” Just daydreaming out loud. “At the moment I’m working on a lighting design for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Youth Olympic Games in Singapore in August. I’m going to work with light and sound on a stretch of water the size of a football pitch. Some 42,000 people are expected, plus millions of TV viewers. If Philips can get that TV with smell ready on time, I’ll provide an unforgettable light spectacle, with smell!”


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Š Koert Vermeulen


GRAZING LIGHT By Natacha Lameyre, Vincent Laganier

Grazing lighting is the “low angle of incidence” type of lighting application. Luminaires are usually positioned close to the surface to illuminate it. How will the beam, the distance from the wall and the spacing between linear LED luminaires influence our perception? The close offset of LED lighting makes it suitable for revealing details, and creating rhythm and contrast. Sometimes used to provide a homogenous wash, and sometimes to highlight one or more elements, the low angle can also be used to dramatic or theatrical effect. The impact comes mainly from the fact that this effect is not usually found in nature. It will also depend on how bright the element is relative to its surroundings. The Philips Graze Powercore is a linear LED product available in four lengths and five light distributions. These options allow it to cover a wide range of applications in architectural lighting from the creation of accents of light, to a wash of light on facades or to specific lighting effects on structures. Depending on the size of the element to be lit, different light distributions can be used. The narrow 9°x9° beam can outline a pillar or a column perfectly, while the 10°x60° and 30°x60° beams are more appropriate for broader elements such as windows, arches or sculptures. By placing the luminaires next to each other, it is possible to create a homogeneous upward or downward wash of light on the wall. Depending on the beam, the light can reach different heights of up to 12 meters. The wider the opening angle is in the horizontal plane, the bigger the spacing can be. Depending on the desired lighting effect, one may also choose to increase the spacing between luminaires and give a rhythm to the facade.

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concept corner DISTANCE FROM THE WALL

The pictures show effects using an eW Graze Powercore 600 mm in neutral white. The products is positioned at a number of different distances (d) from the wall, and is aimed at the top of the wall..

Narrow beam 9 x 9°

The narrow beam should preferably be used close to the element (d = 10 to 20 cm). A strong gradient of light is created. When the luminaire is set back, the effect becomes wider and loses its intensity.

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Medium beam 15 x 30°

Placed at a distance of 20 to 30 cm from the element, (d) the medium beam creates a pleasing grazing effect. It illuminates a greater width compared to the narrow beam but the height of illumination is reduced to a maximum of 6 meters.

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DISTANCE FROM THE WALL Narrow beam 10 x 60°

With a distance from the wall of 20 to 50 cm (d), the lighting effect is soft and homogeneous. The narrow 10° beam has a wide light distribution in the horizontal plane, which it is more appropriate for broader elements such as windows, arches or sculptures.

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Wide beam 30 x 60°

If the wide beam is positioned too close to the wall (10 cm), the lighting effect creates a hot spot at the bottom of the surface. Placed a bit further away, the effect is softer. This beam creates almost the same lighting effect on the wall as the narrow 10° beam but is more suitable for lower elements, up to 4 meters high.

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d = 20cm

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concept corner SPACING BETWEEN FIXTURES

The pictures below show the maximum spacing between two products (s) to prevent scalloping effect on the wall. A continuous line of eW Graze Powercore 600 mm in neutral white is used. The distance between the products and the wall has been fixed at 20 cm.

Medium beam 15 x 30°

Maximum spacing between products: 20 cm. The medium beam allows larger spacing than the narrow 9 x 9° beam.

s = 0cm

s = 10cm

s = 15cm

s = 20cm

Narrow beam 10 x 60°

Maximum spacing between products: 50 to 60 cm. The 30 x 60° beam gives comparable results. The narrow 10° beam’ and wide 30° beam enable large spacing between products without scalloping effect. These beams have a wide light distribution in the horizontal plane and are well adapted to create a continuous line of light on a wall.

s = 0cm

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LIGHTING CULTURE IN CHILE By Antonia Reyes S.

Lighting and how we work with light is a subject about which there is still little information or history. In Chile this is particularly true, but its designers have, over the past few decades, discovered the infinite possibilities of lighting design, and the importance of professionalising their speciality. The story can be traced through the work of a few individuals who have shown us the effect that lighting can have on us; who have explored the ways in which it can be integrated into architecture. It is possible to outline this history through the work of five talented illuminators. The tale starts In the 1960s. Douglas Leonard was a student of electrical engineering when Professor Helmuth Stuven joined him in creating the first South American Lighting Laboratory. “Our enthusiasm was such that even our families became involved,” Leonard said. He then worked for the Chilean subsidiary of Philips for over twenty years. In addition to having worked on major lighting projects in the country, he played a key role in the development of lighting design in Chile. In the 1990s he set up on his own, and says, “Since then I’ve been making proposals for attractive lighting with responsible energy management”. At the start of this century he set up Douglas Leonard Lighting with his son, a business which he describes as: “a design and engineering firm in professional lighting, staffed by a team of professionals and technicians with complementary skills and knowledge, to offer a service which integrates design, lighting efficiency and comfort”. Oriana Ponzini has always been interested in the union between the creative and the technological. When she was studying for a Master’s degree in architecture in London, she started working on lighting projects. At that time,she says, in the late ’80s, “no one talked about the quality of lighting”. Now, she says, it is considered essential to insist that “we should know more about natural lighting and harness it, incorporating common sense in the way we handle light, and not just seek a technological solution. We should learn from the vernacular, and from the experience of architecture in other countries.”.

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Centro Comunitario Circulo Israelita de Santiago La Dehesa, Chile Lighting design Sandra Bordoni, Carolina Palacios ARQLUZ, Santiago, Chile

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Centro de atención de emergencias Autopista Central Lighting design Douglas Leonard Covarrubias, Douglas Leonard Lighting, Santiago, Chile

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Salon Fundadores, Bibliotheca National Santiago, Chile Lighting design Ximena Muñoz, Paulina Villalobos, DIAV, Santiago, Chile

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© Eduardo Cifuente

© Giuseppe Brucculeri

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The path to enlightenment for Sandra Bordoni also comes from architecture. When she started work she became aware of the absence of ideas about artificial lighting concepts. I always found it a fascinating subject, allowing the creative process to work from another perspective. “For over ten years ARQLUZ, Bordoni, together with her partner, the designer Carolina Palacios, have developed a lot of lighting projects. For Bordoni this work is a continuous challenge. “We must be at the forefront of technological innovations, such as the effects of light on health,” she says. “The rate of progress requires permanent study. Paulina Villalobos was working as an architect designing a cultural centre when she started to think about the nature of the lighting and “at the same time I discovered my ignorance. I wanted to learn more and the only option I found on the Internet was a Masters degree in Germany. I applied and I went. “That was in 2002. After the Masters, Villalobos went to Sweden and Finland to carry out further study. Her deepest interest is in natural lighting, specializing in light and latitude which involves many variables of lighting concepts such as cultural aspects and energy efficiency, that is my academic interest. In terms of professional development I hope to keep moving towards excellence in lighting design”. Many Chileans working in the field of lighting have felt the need to learn more and to have professional training. This need led to the formation of DIA (the Chilean association of lighting designers) which outlines as a principle that, lighting design is the art and science of illuminating the environment in which humans live their lives, it plays a key role in ensuring the responsible and ethical nature of a profession, in which interest is growing daily. As Leonard says: Twenty years ago there were no more than three independent offices working on lighting projects. Today the trade association has twelve professional members and twenty associates, working in a range of different areas of lighting. Pascal Chautard was a teenager living in France when he discovered that light could give a different aspect to his room. When he became older he realized that this could be a job for him when he saw how the lighting was programmed in a play. He started working in stage lighting, but later joined an architectural lighting office. In the 1990s he moved to Chile and set up his own office, called LLD - Limarí Lighting Design. At first he concentrated on architecture and urban projects. One of the most important was the Bicentennial Park, designed by the architect Teodoro Fernández. But he has also specialized in museum design. One of his favourite projects is Limarí architectural museum in Ovalle, because it offers a high quality of lighting in a place that is open to all and far from the technology of big cities. Chautard is committed to his profession. As president of DIA, he is eager to continue the process of professionalising and legitimising a profession that has the noble aim of showing us the world differently.

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Cathedral de Concepción Concepción, Chile Lighting design Oriana Ponzini, Santiago, Chile

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Cave Clos d’Apalta Casa Lapostolle Santa Cruz, Chile Lighting design Pascal Chautard, Gonzalo Saez, LLD, Limarí Lighting Design Ltda, Santiago, Chile DIA website www.diaorg.cl

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4 © Sebastian Sepulveda

© Marcelo Pinzón

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BOOKS Effetto Maddalena Una vicenda di architecttura The Maddalena Effect An Architectural Affair Authors: Michelle Brunello, Francisca Insulza, Stefano Boeri, Iwan Baan, Stefano Graziani, Armin Linke, Antonio Ottomanelli, Giovanna Silva, Paolo Rosselli, Guido Bertolaso, Rem Koolhaas, Renato Soru. Publishers: Abitare, Rizzoli (Italy), December 2009 ISBN-13 (Italian, English): 978-8-8170-4107-2 ISBN-13 (English): 978-0-8478-3516-4 224 pages, colour illustrations, hardcover www.abitare.it www.rizzoliusa.com International Lighting Design Index 2010 Authors: Helmut Bien, Markus Helle Publisher: Avedition (Germany), décembre 2009 ISBN-13: 978-3-89986-108-2 256 pages, 236 colour illustrations, hardcover Languages: English, German www.avedition.de Architects, designers and artists become the directors of light: they see buildings and spaces as three-dimensional media which tell stories. The dream of an immaterial, ethereal architecture is receiving fresh sustenance. The book presents the players who are marking out current international trends with their light concepts: for office buildings, in urban planning as well as for cultural buildings and urban night life.

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James Turrell The Wolfsburg Project Authors: Esther Barbara Kirschner, Markus Brüderlin, Richard Andrews, Annelie Lütgens, Peter Weber Publisher: Hatje Cantz (Germany), Mars 2010 ISBN-13: 978-3-7757-2455-5 184 pages, 125 colour illustrations, hardcover Languages: German, English www.hatjecantz.de Moving beyond the scientific investigation of optical phenomena, James Turrell’s works open up the dimensions of the experience of light. He recently realized in Germany his largest installation to date in the eighteenby-thirty-meter hall at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg. This Ganzfeld Piece resembles the Roden crater, everted and rotated ninety degrees. This richly illustrated publication also documents the genesis of his artwork. By night Lumière et architecture Authors: Montse Borràs, Roger Narboni Publisher: Loft Publications (Spain), April 2009 ISBN-13: 978-84-924632-1-3 216 pages, colour illustrations, hardcover Languages: French www.loftpublications.com Artificial light is the element that underlines or transforms a building. From urban furniture to major office towers, museums to stadiums, this book presents examples of spectacular lighting design, to displaying a different urban landscape and revealing the poetry side of architecture.


WHERE TO GO Until 5 September

Exhibition Sustainable Futures Can design make a difference? www.designmuseum.org Design Museum, London, UK

Until 3 October

Art exhibition, central piece James Turrell, Bridget’s Bardo www.kunstmuseum-wolfsburg.de Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Wolfsburg, Germany

Until 9 September

Exhibition Rising Currents Projects for New York’s Waterfront www.moma.org MoMA, New York, USA

7 - 9 October

IALD Conference Enlighten Americas 2010 www.iald.org The Westin Westminster Denver, Colorado, USA

15 - 19 September

Association meeting LUCI Annual forum www.luciassociation.org City centre Chartres, France

17 - 23 October

DIA Conference ELLD 2010 www.elld2010.com Muelle Barón Valparaiso, Chile

20 - 25 September

PLDA workshop Shaping the Night www.pld-a.org Five locations Alingsås, Sweden

Until 31 October

World Exposition Better City, Better Life www.en.expo2010.cn Shanghai World Expo Shanghai, China

27 - 28 September

AFE congress Lumières durables et nouvelles technologies www.afe-eclairage.com.fr Tours, France

14 - 19 March

PLDA workshop Activating Public Spaces www.pld-a.org Five locations Goa, India

Until 31 December

Art exhibition Collection Peggy Guggenheim www.guggenheim-venice.it Palazzo Venier dei Leoni Venice, Italy

Winner! Mr. Ralph Kensmann of Start.Design GmbH in Essen, Germany, has won a Philips Ambilight TV. Mr. Kensmann was rewarded with this prize after being selected out of the respondents to an online survey about Luminous magazine.

Copyright

Mr. Kensmann “I regularly receive Luminous magazine and therewith stay well informed on new projects by Philips Lighting. I see Philips as a very dynamic company, adapting to new market needs and opportunities. I would like to read more about their view on market trends and the future as such”.

© 2009 Koninklijke Philips Electronics B.V. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the prior written consent of the copyright owner. The information presented in this document does not form part of any quotation or contract, is believed to be accurate and reliable and may be changed without notice. No liability will be accepted by the publisher for any consequences of its use. Publication thereof does not convey nor imply any license under patent - or other industrial or intellectual property rights.

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Architectural Lighting Design Competition Flynn Talbot, an Australian lighting designer, is the winner of the Architectural Lighting Design Competition hosted by Philips and the Professional Lighting Designers’ Association (PLDA). Flynn was asked to produce and execute a lighting design for the exterior of Sankt Peter Church in the city of Frankfurt to take part in the Luminale exhibition. Talbot, who is 29, has worked as a lighting designer in London, England and in Perth, Australia. We caught up with him in Frankfurt. How do you see the profession of lighting design in ten years from now? It will become more and more interactive, and more and more user friendly. Lighting has always been something where, unless you have a technical lighting system, you can’t do much more than dim the lights. Now people are becoming more aware and wanting more control. I hope there will be less expensive ways to control lights, which will also be more energy efficient.

What is the difference for you between a temporary and a permanent lighting scheme? It could be to do with how things are fixed in place, but in fact on our church in Frankfurt, the lights are all fixed as if they are permanent. You may be able to get away with having fewer fittings on a permanent scheme. What do you want to be doing in five years’ time? I want to be running my own design studio, and doing bigger and more impressive lighting schemes, both temporary and permanent. I also want to work with manufacturers on my ideas for luminaires. Working with light is my main passion. Extract from e-luminous 1, April 2010. Full interview online Website www.flynntalbot.co


Luminous 5 | Light, Health and Well Being