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Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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Contributors

Mellerio & the Second Empire

Gaelle Khouri

Discover our amazing team that create each issue of the Jewellery Historian

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier visits an amazing exhibition in Paris

Olivier Dupon introduces us to Gaelle Khouri

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Editor’s Letter

Breathtaking beauty of gems

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier invites you to discover this new issue

Eva Kountouraki introduces us

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Our news

Cécile Arnaud

From auctions to new collections, all you need to know is in our news

Olivier Dupon introduces us to the amazing universe of Cécile Arnaud

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Book review

Hartmann

Our editor-in-chief reviews the exceptional “Tanzanite: Born from lighting”

Olivier Dupon talks about pink diamonds

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Jewellery Historian Editor-in-Chief Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Creative director-at-large Panayiotis Simopoulos Gemology Department Editor Eva Kountouraki Haute Joaillerie Department Editor Olivier Dupon --Founder Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier --Columnists Eva Kountouraki ( Breathtaking beauty of Gems) Olivier Dupon ( The art of creativity / Haute Joaillerie) --Contributors Martin Huynh , Christina Rodopoulou, Catherine Varoucha --Creative Jewellery Historian Production Jewellery Historian Made in the European Union --Photo agencies Shutterstock, Pixabay, Freepik, The stocks Cover Halay Alex / Shutterstock. com --Advertising info@jewelleryhistorian.com Website www.jewelleryhistorian.com E-mail info@jewelleryhistorian.com --FREE DIGITAL COPY / NOT FOR SALE JEWELLERY HISTORIAN © 2016

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All material published in this e-magazine and at www.jewelleryhistorian.com is published with permission of the brands and designers. Unless otherwise authorized in writing by the Jewellery Historian, it is strictly prohibited to reproduce, in whole or in part, and by any way, the content of this e-magazine. While precautions have been take to ensure the accuracy of the contents of our magazine and digital brands, neither the editors, publishers or its agents can accept responsibility for damages or injury which may arise there from. The information on this e-magazine is for information purposes only. Jewellery Historian assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information. The information contained has been provided by individual brands, event organizers, brands, press offices or organizations without verification by us. The opinions expressed in articles and/or advertorials, are the author's and/or brand’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Jewellery Historian, the owner, the publisher, the editor-in-chief and team of the magazine, or of any part related to the magazine. The name “Jewellery Historian” and/or logo, may not be reproduced without prior written consent of the founder of magazine.

are the property of their owners and are protected by law. The same is valid also for all Links (links) .The presence of third-part links (links) in the Jewellery Historian Web pages & e-magazine is for informational purposes only.

Partial or entire reproduction of the material of this magazine is strictly prohibited.The content, entire edition, graphics, design, lay-out and other matters related to this issue are protected under applicable copyrights and other proprietary laws, including but not limited to intellectual property laws. The copying, reproduction, use, modification or publication by you of any such matters or any part of the material is strictly prohibited, without our express prior written permission.All trade names, trademarks or distinctive signs of any kind contained in the Web pages of the company

Our articles may contain photos/texts/graphics/designs that belong to third parties. They are published for information purposes only and with permission of the brands. Image(s) or Footage (as applicable), used under license from photo agencies. The Jewellery Historian is publishing articles about jewellery, auctions, jewellery designers, gemology, gemstones, etc. All trademarks mentioned in the Jewellery Historian’s website and/or magazine belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation & information and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law. Photos used in articles belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law.


Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

130 Collection Privée Olivier Dupon introduces us the “Private Collection” of Mellerio dits Meller

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230 Collector Timepiece Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier presents us the Hourstriker pin-up limited edition

Esthète A person who has or professes to have refined sensitivity toward the beauties of art or nature.

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Alessio Boschi

Fashion

Olivier Dupon meets the famous designer for an exclusive interview

Two fashion editorial to welcome the new season

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KOVA Jewels

Jewels we love

Olivier Dupon introduces us to a new vision

Special trends

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Gaelle Khouri & Hussein Bazaza

Christmas baking with Lucas

When haute couture meets joaillerie

We finally persuaded him to share with us his Finnish Christmas recipes exclusively for you all

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JH Travel THE LUXURY TRAVEL SUPPLEMENT OF THE JEWELLERY HISTORIAN

now available with this issue

www.jewelleryhistorian.com/jhtravel


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

CONTRIBUTORS

As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of exciting names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid precious designs. His previous books include The New Artisans (2011), The New Jewelers (2012), The New Pâtissiers (2013), Floral Contemporary (2014), Encore! The New Artisans (2015), Shoe: Contemporary Footwear by Inspiring Designers (2015) and Fine Jewelry Couture (2016) reviewed in issue #21, all published by Thames & Hudson. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity column, Olivier Dupon exposes inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centered around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry.

Eva Kountouraki was born and raised in a family of goldsmiths and jewelers. From a very young age she expressed her keen interest in gems, jewelry and design, a passion that led her to devote her studies and her career in this field. She started her first collection of polished and rough gemstones at a very early age and realized that this would be her profession in the future. After studying gemology books in various languages, she attended gemological seminars in Greece and Europe and developed practical skills to analyze gems, Eva decided to accredit those skills choosing the best gemological institute in the world, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), for her studies. Succeeding unprecedented results in the practice and theory of gemology, analyzing and identifying thousands of gemstones and diamonds, she graduated and acquired the prestigious certificate GIA Graduate Gemologist Diploma, which includes specific studies in diamond grading (GIA Graduate Diamonds Diploma) and colored gemstones (GIA Graduate Colored Stones Diploma). Her studies in the jewelry field continued and Eva got her Jewelry Business Management Diploma, gaining specialized knowledge about all the aspects of the jewelry industry. Her training continued with jewelry design and computer aided design. Eva’s brilliant path in the field of gemology was crowned by her collaboration with the Italian branch of GIA. Eva received special training from professional and experienced gemologists of GIA Italy, New York and California, US, and for more than a decade she teaches gemology and jewelry design in GIA, transferring her experience, knowledge and passion for diamonds, gems and jewelry to her students-famous professionals from around world. Eve is proud to be the only Greek woman who has ever accomplished such a distinction in the field of diamonds and precious stones. Alongside her work as a gemology instructor, Eva is a jewelry and gemstone buyer and consultant for privates and companies, advising and helping her clients to make successful buys and investments in gemstones. She also organizes and teaches seminars for the training of gemstone and jewelry merchants, salespeople and gem-passionates. For the Jewellery Historian, in her The breathtaking beauty of gems column, she introduces you to a breathtaking gemstone in every issue.

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

CONTRIBUTORS

Panayiotis Simopoulos is the creative director-atlarge of the Jewellery Historian. In his role, he contributes to special projects and serves as roving ambassador with links to all creative areas of the magazine. With a successful world career as a fashion top model and as a  talented fashion photographer, he is the rarest kind of creative artist, one who creates extraordinary images. With a unique creative vision, whilst maintaining a clear vision of delivering a message that speaks directly to the reader, he ultimately creates an exciting and balanced visual experience.

For Catherine Varoucha art has always been her true passion, and every forms of art has captivated her since early childhood. With a desire to explore how science and technology can be used to change skylines that form our cities and to improve the performance of buildings both socially and environmentally, she studied architecture which allowed her to engage both creatively and scientifically with the aesthetic and functional aspects of design.

For the Jewellery Historian, Panayiotis creates the exceptional visual of each issue. Together with many of the most talented young photographers, he definitely delivers, the most memorable, exciting and unique images and fashion editorials that the magazine has ever published.

Christopher Wren once said, 'Architecture aims at eternity' and Catherine can think of no better way to achieve eternity than to help create buildings of tomorrow that preserve the ideas of today. Ultimately, we are judged by what we leave behind.

In close collaboration with the founder & editor-in-chief of the magazine and with the creative team, he is responsible for the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to  a minimal and clean design offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.

Inspired by minimal architecture of the Cyclades in Greece and in particular of Naxos, Catherine works in close collaboration with the editor-in-chief and with the creative director-at-large, to create the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to a minimal and clean design offers to our precious readers from around the globe a unique reading experience. Periodically she will also introduce us exceptional interiors around the globe. In each issue of the Jewellery Historian, with the editor-in-chief, she will share their “inspirations” with us all.

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Photo courtesy of LUCAS SAMALTANOS-FERRIER © LUCAS SAMALTANOS-FERRIER

Jewellery Historian

| EDITOR’S LETTER

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EDITOR’S LETTER There is one quality that is unique to every piece of jewellery you own. Sentimental value. As jewellery is handed down from generation to generation it becomes more and more valuable. Not necessarily in a monetary sense; but in what it means to the owner.

and core values. We believe that no one should be discriminated against because of their differences, such as age, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, religion or sexual orientation. We believe an inclusive culture is good for business, fostering the creativity and innovation. It is fundamental that all people that work with us, can feel comfortable, be themselves and, as a result, be productive. We believe that our readers can feel this passion for equality and diversity.

This emotional value is one of the most important to us all, jewellery lovers, but it is not the only one. At the Jewellery Historian is that we are constantly searching for designers and brands of whom work is exceptional and of the highest quality in all aspects, For this reason we expect all designers and brands whose work we feature to be generous with their knowledge.

At the Jewellery Historian we believe that everyone in the world should have access to high-quality educational experiences and resources .  Education is the key to building better lives for hundreds of millions worldwide. For us education is a fundamental right that requires free delivery and free access to material of high quality. One of our main goals is to provide highest-quality content for free on the internet, while keeping access to our e-magazine free to all users worldwide.

When I first started the Jewellery Historian in spring 2014, I was alone and the first issues were born thanks to the precious supports of brands and designers that saw on my vision something different. Since then, the magazine grows every day and at the moment I am writing this editorial we have already reached 670.000 people in more than 70 countries around the globe.

You may wonder why I choose to write all this, instead of my “classic” editorial. The reason is that with the end of this year, I felt it was necessary to express my gratitude to all people that contribute to the success of the Jewellery Historian.

Based between Helsinki, Paris and Athens, the Jewellery Historian has an international core team that hails from Italy, the United Kingdom, France, Greece,  Finland, Panama, and is today considered by many decision makers & connoisseurs as the "Best kept secret in the world of luxury". 

I would to publicly thanks all the Jewellery Historian team, and in particular, Catherine, Christina, Eva, Olivier, Panayiotis, for their amazing work. I would like to thank you, our precious readers for your continuous precious support. Finally, I would like to thanks all designers, brands, press offices, PR executives and maisons for their trust to our work and for choosing us to feature in each issue of our magazine their exceptional and unique work.

Our readers are high-end professionals, a connected community of decision makers, connoisseurs with enhanced refinement.  Our readership, has until now been accumulated only by word-of-mouth and in short time reached an international audience due to the professional knowledge, the high quality content and exceptional aesthetics of our amazing team.  At the Jewellery Historian we focus on aesthetics and to the creativity of the designers, we choose to showcase, by letting their creations to speak for themselves, rather that surrounding them with distractions and other imagery.    The Jewellery Historian offers one of the highest-quality content for free on the internet, while keeping access to our emagazine & website free to all users worldwide.  We are passionate about what we do and we are doing our best to promote young designers and brands. We love to work together, support each other and make the jewellery industry a true global community. 

The Jewellery Historian is the result of a passion and love we all share in common, for jewellery and design, as well as our mutual commitment of raising the awareness of design as a form of creative expression. Christmas and New Year are knocking the door... It's the time of the year to be joyful and merry. Enjoy the spirit of the season and wish your friends, family, acquaintances and loved ones. I wish you all a happy time, a Merry Christmas and a Happy new year.

At the Jewellery Historian, we have an underlying belief in inclusion and diversity, which are fundamental to our culture Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Founder & Editor-in-Chief

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Jewellery Historian

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Jewellery Historian

NEWS


U LYS S E N A R D I N Ulysse Nardin highlights the exquisite art of enameling with a translucid blue Classico Manufacture "Grand Feu".

At this year's prestigious Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie in Geneva, Switzerland, Ulysse Nardin is highlighting its unique savoir-faire in the fine craft of enameling. As part of a closer look at this lost decorative art, Ulysse Nardin will launch a new edition Classico Manufacture with a blue "Grand Feu" enamel dial. The timepiece upholds the three fundamentals upon which Ulysse Nardin has built its reputation as a mechanical watchmaker: independent manufacturing, rare craftsmanship and an unceasing quest for innovation. This Classico Manufacture is powered by the self-winding UN-320 caliber, a movement entirely designed and produced in-house by the Swiss manufacture. It incorporates the celebrated silicium hairspring and anchor escapement, also designed and manufactured in-house. In fact, Ulysse Nardin pioneered the use of silicium parts in mechanical watchmaking, being the first to identify the advanced material's potential for improved precision and durability before others followed suit. The second pillar of Ulysse Nardin's unique savoir-faire is evident in the artistry of the "Grand Feu" enamel dial. Created by the Ulysse Nardin company, DonzĂŠ Cadrans, specialists in the fine art of enameling, this "Grand Feu" enamel dial is a stunning blue. Only a handful of craftsmen have the necessary skill to master this 17th-century technique, and the blue dial of the Classico Manufacture "Grand Feu", with its delicately translucid quality, is a fine example of this challenging art. The UN-320 movement and "Grand Feu" enamel dial are set in a chic 40 mm stainless-steel case with a leather strap. The overall effect is one of streamlined simplicity: the hour and minute hands point to classic roman numer- al indexes, completed with a small seconds counter at 6 o'clock. Within lies a round date window: the wearer can easily set the date forwards or backwards, an incredible achievement for a mechanical watch. With a competitive price point, the latest edition Classico Manufacture "Grand Feu" is a more accessible expression of Ulysse Nardin's DNA: craftsmanship rooted in tradition, and savoir-faire anchored in innovation. www.ulysse-nardin.com

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Photo courtesy of ULYSSE NARDIN © ULYSSE NARDIN

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B OA R I N I M I L A N E S I 
 Maison Boarini Milanesi unveils an array of unique creations and writes a new chapter in the history of exclusive handbags

Creative at heart and passionate purveyors of elegance, Carolina Boarini and Matteo Rodolfo Milanesi open the doors of their Maison, revealing unique and charming handbags and inviting us to be a m o n g t h e fir s t t o w i t n e s s t h e e x q u i s i t e craftsmanship of their elegant creations.

With their splendid attention to detail, Carolina Boarini and Matteo Rodolfo Milanesi masterly breathe new life into the most precious pigments of ancient times, such as that very delicate shade of pink known as “Rosa Tiepolo” from the name of the Venetian painter who widely used it in his extraordinary frescoes.

The Maison, located in Bologna, Italy is the only place where their refined bags and briefcases can be found. They are not on display in stores that look much the same everywhere, nor can they be bought online.

Each bag features a precious gem of detail that is uniquely chosen for the Client, and carries regal indulgence into the everyday. These beautiful gems, such as the iridescent Mother of Pearl, epitome of pureness, and the enchanting amethyst, favoured by queens and kings, make every bag highly personal and unique. No two gems are indeed the same and they are given their flat or gently faceted shape by Italian craftsmen, one by one.

For the ethos of Boarini Milanesi is to create irreplaceable masterpieces, and the process of this creation begins with a very personal connection between the client, his or her desires, and the artist who will fulfill them.

Maison Boarini Milanesi perfectly embodies that unique combination of refinement and authenticity which is deeply rooted in the noble and rich Italian culture. The family writes a new chapter in the history of exclusive leather handbags, a long-standing tradition in Italy where elegance, simplicity, and sophistication reign. Carolina and Matteo Rodolfo evidence a passion for natural beauty and a dedication to stay true to their roots; the Maison seeks perfect forms and a style that is genuinely Italian.

This deep connection results in much more than just a product: it generates a lasting experience, a contemporary revival of the relationships that were established during the Renaissance between Masters of Italian art and their patrons. Each one-of-a-kind bag is handmade by premier artisans in a small atelier set in the rolling hills of the Tuscan countryside, and is composed of the world’s most exclusive materials. Carolina Boarini and Matteo Rodolfo Milanesi personally handpick all of the skins, ranging from the most sought-after ones, those of crocodile and alligator, to the brilliant and less know galuchat. Though sourcing only the best skins is quite a lengthy and hard process in itself, it is in fact not the only one: <<Finding the perfect skin is just the beginning - explains Carolina - What comes next is the pursuit of beauty and harmony. We strongly believe that only a very harmonious dialogue between the elements of the bag leads to a beautiful and timeless creation>>.

In this dimension, which lies somewhere between cultural heritage and contemporary art, the Maison gives life to a very personal and timeless creation, filled with values and emotions. A masterpiece capable of shining the light of Italian High Elegance on those who choose to make it their own. www.boarini-milanesi.com

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Photo courtesy of Boarini Milanesi Š Boarini Milanesi

Jewellery Historian

Maison Boarini Milanesi interprets the Client's emotions, desires and values and infuses them into the Unus atque Solus creation that will be cherished for life.

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Photo courtesy of Boarini Milanesi Š Boarini Milanesi Photo courtesy of Boarini Milanesi Š Boarini Milanesi

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Photo courtesy of Boarini Milanesi Š Boarini Milanesi

The magnificence of nature concentrated in such a small object makes every creation precious and unique. 20


S OT H E BY ’ S SOTHEBY’S Geneva jewellery sale realizes CHF 136.7M / US$ 136.4M Deep bidding at Sotheby’s sale on November 16, 2016, of Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels propelled the sale total to CHF 136,734,500 / US$ 136,428,215. This brings Sotheby’s 2016 sales of jewels in Geneva to a record high of CHF 307,753,125 / US$ 311,525,634 eclipsing last year’s record of CHF 289.4m / US$ 300m.

for CHF 7,550,000 / US$ 7,533,088 (US$ 186,925 per carat) (Lot 331, Est. CHF 5.9–9.83m / US$ 6-10m). BLUE DIAMONDS The exceptionally rare “Sky Blue Diamond”, a mesmerising Fancy Vivid Blue diamond weighing 8.01 carats, sold for CHF 17,112,500 / US$ 17,074,168 (US$ 2,131,607 per carat) (Lot 337, Est. CHF 14.76–24.59m/ US$ 15- 25m ).

David Bennett, Worldwide Chairman of Sotheby’s International Jewellery Division, said: “Tonight’s result is a great finalé to what has been yet another phenomenal year for jewellery in Geneva. Earlier this year, in May, we set a world record for any jewellery sale, and tonight the momentum continued, making 2016 the second record year in a row for Geneva. The very best coloured diamonds of all hues remain highly desirable, but tonight pink and blue were undoubtedly the hottest colours accounting for many of the top prices this evening, with new records set for deep blue, fancy light blue and light pink diamonds, and with the fabulous Sky Blue diamond selling for US$ 17.1m - an increase of over 30% on the US$ 12.8m it realised at Sotheby’s in 2012.

The enduring allure of blue diamonds was echoed in another strong price, that for the magnificent Fancy Deep Blue diamond ring. No fewer than nine bidders drove the price to CHF 13,737,500 / US$ 13,706,728 – a new record for a deep blue diamond of any kind (US$ 1,770,895 per carat). (Lot 298A, Est. CHF 8.85-13.78m/ US$ 9-14m). A second record for a blue stone was broken tonight, this time for a Fancy Light Blue diamond, that sold for CHF 2,172,500 / US$ 2,167,634 (US$ 134,803 per carat) (Lot 311, Est. CHF 1.48-2.46m / US$ 1.5-2.5m).

PINK DIAMONDS Leading the sale was the 17.07-carat emerald-cut Fancy Intense Pink diamond that soared over estimate to sell for CHF 20,825,000 / US$ 20,778,352 (US$ 1,217,244 per carat) (Lot 336, Est. CHF 11.81-14.76m / US$ 12-15m).

Within the past two years alone, Sotheby’s has twice set a new world record auction price for any blue diamond, most recently with the only diamond or gemstone in auction history to have exceeded US$ 4 million per carat, the Blue Moon of Josephine (sold for US$ 48.5m / US$ 4,028,941 per carat in November 2015).

A breath-taking Internally Flawless Fancy Intense Pink diamond of 13.20 carats also captivated bidders to reach CHF 16,268,750 / US$ 16,232,308 (US$ 1,229,720 per carat) (Lot 329, Est. CHF 8.85-13.78m / US$ 9- 14m).

That eclipsed the previous world auction set by Sotheby’s in November 2014 with the sale of the Zoe Diamond: a Fancy Vivid Blue Diamond weighing 9.75 carats that was offered from the collection of Mrs. Paul Mellon. It sold for a final price of US$ 32,645,000 (US$ 3,348,205 per carat).

Both diamonds above (lots 336 and 329) were acquired by Graff Diamonds Limited today. A new auction record was set this evening for any Fancy Light Pink Diamond when an impressive pearshaped stone weighing 40.30 carats was purchased

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

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GUCCI GUCCI TIMEPIECES & JEWELRY presents Diamond Timepieces

Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry is pleased to present select models from the Diamantissima, Horsebit, G-Timeless, Gucci Dive and GG2570 ranges embellished with white diamonds. All of these precious timepieces see their bezel etched with diamonds showing a different style around the same concept. Dainty and feminine, the two Diamantissima variants evoke a truly classical tone with elegant black lizard-skin straps, a generous diamond bezel and pretty pyramidal studs on the white mother of pearl dial. For a bolder look, the larger Horsebit models, in 34 or 30mm sizes, see a rendering of the iconic Horsebit clasp motif encircle a diamond bezel which offsets a shimmering mother of pearl dial and crocodile strap with unusual rounded scale detailing. GucciÊs most enduring timepiece, the G-Timeless, sees two of its sizes elevated by a slim circle of 42 or 43 diamonds around a textured white or black mother of pearl dial. Even the sporty lines of the Gucci Dive timepieces feature diamonds, as 45 gems around the bezel bring a beautifully feminine touch to this highly wearable watch. Finally the GG2570 variant sees the precious gems extended to the lugs, creating a full pavé effect further enhanced by a crocodile strap and diamond indexes. When rendered with a stainless steel bracelet, the GG2570 shows off crisp, clean lines: the bracelet is set off by a white sun- brushed dial, diamond indexes and refined diamond bezel. About Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry Gucci Timepieces, one of the most reliable and consistent fashion watch brands, with a clear design approach and positioning, has been designing, developing and manufacturing iconic Gucci watches since the early 1970s. 
 Rigorously made in Switzerland, Gucci watches are recognized for their innovative and contemporary design, quality and craftsmanship and are distributed worldwide through the exclusive network of directly operated Gucci boutiques and selected watch distributors. Since January 2010, Gucci Timepieces has also been distributing the Gucci Jewelry collections, capitalizing on the expertise gained in the watch sector and leveraging the synergies between the watch and jewelry industries. For more information about Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry, please visit www.gucciwatches.com. Gucci is part of the Kering Group, a world leader in apparel and accessories, which develops an ensemble of powerful Luxury and Sport and Lifestyle brands.

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J H T R AV E L The Jewellery Historian releases new issue of its’ luxury travel supplement The new JH Travel, the luxury travel supplement of the Jewellery Historian is released as a supplement to issue 22 of the Jewellery Historian.

culinary and gastronomical musts and exceptional services that offer you pleasure, refinement and serenity. “At the Jewellery Historian, we know how important is not only to travel but also to experience refinement and world-class personal services” said the newly appointed editor of JH Travel, Christina Rodopoulou. “Entirely redesigned, the new JH Travel is definitely more than just a luxury travel supplement, it is a way of living” she added.

Luxury travel has evolved to encompass one-ofa-kind experiences and memorable escapes. At the JH Travel, we share with you our passion for luxury travel, advise you on the best places to stay in the world, inspire you to travel your dreams in style, and give you tips for luxury travel. At the Jewellery Historian we know how important is to travel, discover new cultures and our world. After all travel is a requirement for a meaningful life.

“Luxury travel is increasingly becoming harder to define, as it continues to adapt to changes in our society. For us all at the Jewellery Historian, luxury travel is definitely a unique experience, rather than just an appearance. Enrichment, authenticity and exclusivity are essential and this is where we focus with JH Travel”, said Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier, founder and editorin-chief of the Jewellery Historian and of JH Travel. “As we grow, we want our readers with JH Travel, to enjoy one-of-a-kind experiences that answer to their need for refinement and understated elegance in every stage of their journey” he added.

Our readers are high-end professionals, a connected community of decision m a k e r s , c o n n o i s s e u r s w i t h e n h a n c e d refinement. Our travel supplement answers to their need to experience dedicated services, exceptional comfort and understated elegance in every stage of their journey. World's finest luxury hotels and travel experiences – exclusive destinations, unique resorts, fine dinning and luxury spas for vacation or romantic getaways – our readers find everything they need in our travel supplement.

Entirely redesigned, the new JH Travel has a uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, combined to a minimal and clean design, and offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience. 

For each issue, we carefully select designdriven, service-focused luxury & hotels and resorts around the globe. We invite our readers to experience refinement and world-class personal services with the best airlines of the world, and we introduce them to exclusive luxury destinations worldwide.

The new issue of our luxury travel supplement, is now exclusively available online, for free as all publications of the Jewellery Historian, at www.jewelleryhistorian.com/jhtravel. Travel your dreams in style & be inspired by JH Travel.

With every issue of JH Travel discover white sanded islets, transparent waters teeming with reef life and luxurious villas, cultural events,

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Cover courtesy of JH Travel. Cover credits inside the JH Travel issue.


Jewellery Historian

| BOOK REVIEW

EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

BOOK REVIEW by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

This first monograph ever to present this rare precious stone discovered only fifty years ago, and one thousand times rarer than diamonds is definitely a must-have for all who are interested in Tanzanite, one of the best-selling colored gemstones and the quintessential gemstone of the 20th century. 33


| BOOK REVIEW

Photo courtesy of Watchprint.Com Sarl © Watchprint.Com Sarl Photo courtesy of WALLACE CHAN © WALLACE CHAN

Jewellery Historian

Exceptional jewellery by designers such as Wallace Chan (above) illustrate this first monograph

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Tanzanite-Born From Lightning tells stories of the gems’ discovery in the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, and how it made it’s way into the hands of the jewelry wearing elite.

Since it’s discovery in 1967, Tanzanite has become one of the most intriguing and desirable gemstones of our time, managing to capture the imagination of jewelry designers and collectors who have fallen in love with it’s mesmerizing color, romantic origin and captivating brilliance. This book, Tanzanite – Born From Lightning is a compilation of some of the world’s most prestigious brands, designers and jewelry makers, all coming together to showcase their most stunning creations – incredible, one-of-a kind tanzanite jewels, inspired by their most vivid imaginations and created in their own unique way. It took Didier Brodbeck and Hayley Henning over two years to bring the concept of this book together. Literally hundreds of e-mails and many hours have resulted in almost 200 pages of incredible loose gems and jewels - the first Tanzanite compilation of its’ kind and exceptional in that many of the participating designers and brands are seldom seen page-on-page, alongside one another. As the founder and editor-in-chief of the Jewellery Historian, with extensive knowledge in jewellery and gemstones, backed up by studies in gemology at the internationally known Gemological Institute of America (GIA), I could say that I loved this new book written by experts Didier Brodbeck and Hayley A. Henning. Under the unique art direction of the talented Icaro Carlos, this exceptional book is definitely a must-have and I am extremely honored and proud to be among the first to review it. The first monograph ever to present this rare precious stone discovered only fifty years ago, and one thousand times rarer than diamonds - as a sole source gemstone, Tanzanite is much defined by its genuine rarity as its beauty - is the perfect resource for both aficionados and professionals who are interested in Tanzanite, one of the best-selling colored gemstones and the quintessential “haute fashion” gem of the 20th century. From Tiffany and Cartier to Boucheron, Piaget, Van Cleef and Arpels, Bulgari and Boucheron, Tanzanite has captured everybody’s attention and inspired designers the world over. The pages of this book showcase many of these, and also include designers such as Lorenz Bäumer, Stephen Webster, Brigitte Ermel, Wallace Chang and Erica Courtney. Tanzanite - Born from Lightning showcases hundreds of beautiful pieces of Tanzanite jewelry – each page delights with another jewel! Tanzanite-Born From Lightning tells stories of the gems’ discovery in the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, and how it made it’s way into the hands of the jewelry wearing elite. The book shares stories of personal accounts and experiences of the early prospectors who moulded the journey of the gem from mine to market, beginning with how Tanzanite got it’s name, and how eventually the American Gem Trade Association (AGTA) came to include Tanzanite into their list of official birthstones, unchanged since 1907. Tanzanite's transformations have ultimately placed it alongside the rarest of gems. In short, tanzanite's age of glory has finally dawned. TANZANITE – BORN FROM LIGHTNING H a r d c o v e r : 1 9 6 p a g e s
 Publisher: Watchprint.Com Sarl Language: English ISBN-13: 978-2940506118

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| BOOK REVIEW

Photo courtesy of Watchprint.Com Sarl © Watchprint.Com Sarl

Photo courtesy of CARNET © CARNET

Jewellery Historian

Hardcover: 196 pages, Publisher: Watchprint.Com Sarl (October 28, 2016), Language: English , ISBN-13: 978-2940506118

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Jewellery Historian

| BOOK REVIEW

Photo courtesy of Watchprint.Com Sarl © Watchprint.Com Sarl

Didier Brodbeck (Author) is a long-time journalist and writer; he is the author of a dozen books on watches, pearls, diamonds, and counterfeit goods. As publisher he created Heure magazine (men's watches), Tendances (an "art de vivre" magazine) and Dreams, the first French magazine dedicated to watches and jewelry for women. Didier Brodbeck also serves as consultant for the luxury goods industry.

Photo courtesy of Watchprint.Com Sarl © Watchprint.Com Sarl

Hayley A. Henning (author) was the driving force behind The Tanzanite Foundation as Executive Director. Her main achievement was to give Tanzanite a sustainable position in the colored gemstone industry with significant sales and brand recognition. During that time, Hayley was also making a difference in the lives of the local communities outside the tanzanite mining areas, which lead her to spearhead several corporate social responsibility programs in the region. This resulted in the construction of schools and orphanages, as well as setting up The Maasai Ladies Project teaching a group of Maasai women jewelry making techniques and business practices. This project was recognized by the United Nations as being a relevant part of the Millennium Development Goals as Women's Empowerment Initiatives.

Photo courtesy of Watchprint.Com Sarl © Watchprint.Com Sarl

Icaro Carlos (Art Director) is Brazilian, young, speaks Portuguese, English, French and Italian. Was born in São Paulo and he is only 27 year old. Incredibly talented and gifted, he learned his skills at the Instituto Europeo di Design in Brazil. Then, he was accepted by the Creative Academy at the Richemond Group in Milan. Internship in Cartier in Geneva; came to Paris to master the technique in gouache at the UFBJOP School. He then created his own brand working for private clients and luxury fashion brands in Brazil. In 2015, he founded The Luxury Studio and was granted a scholarship to attend the GIA in London.

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Photo courtesy of FRÉDÉRIC MANÉ © FRÉDÉRIC MANÉ

Jewellery Historian

Exceptional designs as this one by Frédéric Mané (above) illustrate this first monograph about tanzanite

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| BOOK REVIEW

Photo courtesy of Watchprint.Com Sarl © Watchprint.Com Sarl Photo courtesy of LORENZ BÄUMER © LORENZ BÄUMER

Jewellery Historian

Exceptional jewellery by designers such as Lorenz Bäumer (above) illustrate this first monograph

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| BOOK REVIEW

Photo courtesy of Watchprint.Com Sarl © Watchprint.Com Sarl Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & APRELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

Exceptional jewellery by prestigious maisons such as Van Cleef & Arpels (above) illustrate this first monograph

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Jewellery Historian

| EXHIBITION

EDITOR’S CHOICE

EXHIBITION by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

MELLERIO DITS MELLER JEWELLER OF THE SECOND EMPIRE The Musée d’Orsay in Paris celebrates 30th anniversary and organizes an exhibtion on the Second Empire from 27th September 2016 the 15th January 2017. Mellerio displays at the Musée d’Orsay 35 jewellery pieces in order illustrating the pomp of this « Spectaculaire Second Empire ». 41


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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Peacock brooch ordered by the Empress Eugenie, diamonds, emeralds, sapphires, rubies, silver on gold, 1868.

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Jewellery Historian

To celebrate its 30 years the Musée d’Orsay organizes an exhibition on the Second Empire from 27th September 2016 the 15th January 2017. This exhibition, staged by Hubert Le Gall, will feature paintings, sculptures, photographs, architectural drawings, art objects, costumes and jewellery. For this last part, the Museum chose Mellerio to represent the know-how and exceptional design for this period. Since their arrival in Paris in 1515 the Mellerios, and in particular after the privilege granted by Marie de Medici, the Mellerios, from father to son jewellers, have observed a lightning and unique ascent. At the end of the XVIIIth century, Marie-Antoinette and her entourage were loyal clients. In 1815, they were the first jewellers to open their shop and workshop on the rue de la Paix. During the Second Empire, they continue to reinvent themselves with audacious creations, outstanding quality and expertise. Their jewellery is inspired by nature, oriental influences, and creative inventions such as flexible and transformable pieces, adorned with exquisite stones. The Universal Exhibitions of 1855, 1862, 1867 will become their universal window enabling them to establish their worldwide supremacy. The Mellerio clientele at this time was also exceptional: the Emperor Napoleon the third and his wife, the Empress Eugénie, Princess Mathilda of Spain, many aristocratic families, the Royal Courts of France and Europe, but also writers, composers, actresses and socialites ... Demonstrated by the numerous and frequent orders still preciously conserved by the Mellerio family. It is really during the Second Empire that they reached a certain soaring point.The 1855, 1862 and 1867 World Exhibitions were a success: Mellerio showed daring creations, won many awards and thus established its solid reputation. From this period the Maison has kept drawings, jewellery pieces and purchase orders signed by famous personalities and the most discerning clientele, such as Impress Eugénie and Princess Mathilde. It is for all those reasons that Mellerio displays at the Musée d’Orsay 35 jewellery pieces in order illustrating the pomp of this « Spectaculaire Second Empire ». Among the selected pieces, visitors can view jewellery inspired by nature, such as wild roses, Mellerio’s emblematic flower, transformable jewellery, “archaeological jewellery”, “esoteric jewellery” such as the “Peacock brooch”, creations with Gothic and Renaissance inspirations, jewel-

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lery inspired by XVIII century and in particular the XVIII century lace, enameled jewellery that celebrates the triumph of color, as well as major technical innovations, such as articulated bracelets and flexible stem for the mounting of stones. Naturalism describes a true-to-life style which involves the representation of nature with a sense of reality and objectivity. In jewellery the trend was an imitation of nature as opposed to a more stylised, idealistic or symbolic look. Nature is a constant source of inspiration in the Mellerio collections. One can see in their archives abundant floral designs such as wild roses, fuchsias, violets, ferns, vines, oak, olive and chestnut leaves .... The Mellerio designers put together herbariums as sources for their creations. They also capture images of live nature by using a system of portative obscurant camera. Mellerio often uses flowers and wild plants for their creations. The wild rose (or eglantine) is their predominant flower. This very pure and elegant flower, composed of five regular petals, appears in the 1830’s and has become since then one of their emblems. Symbol of love and beauty in the Ancient Greece, the wild rose, mother of all roses, is sought after for its delicate and ephemeral aspect: these flowers only bloom once a year. Mellerio sought to capture this moment of rarity and beauty. The notion of “cascade” jewellery appears in the Mellerio archives around 1830. There are regular orders in their books which have the following annotations: “large vegetal suite with a cascade of diamonds, devant de corsage with large bow of cascade of pearls, hair pieces of flowers and foliage, cascade ...”. These descriptions were the result of a specific Mellerio vocabulary used to describe a tassel of pearls and diamonds. In their pursuit of imitating the natural movements of nature, they created jewels with cascades of flowers, foliage and raindrops. Tiaras were undoubtedly the centrepieces of jewellery sets during the Second Empire. They were only worn for important occasions. Mellerio developed sophisticated systems, to create transformable jewellery, that allowed to every women to adapt their jewellery according to the social event they were invited to. These systems including screws, screwdrivers and structures were referred to as “carcasse”. The various items composing the transformable system were usually hidden in the bottom part of the jewellery case.


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Photo courtesy of CARNET © CARNET

Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

“Grand Bouquet de boutons de Rose”. This bodice ornament commissioned by Princess Mathilda was entirely set with diamonds.

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As its name implies, transformable jewellery can be modified due to ingenious systems turning one jewel into several other pieces. Brooches can be turned into pendants due to special loops; the centre piece of a bracelet can be transformed into a brooch with a specially adapted pin; tiaras can be turned into hair clips, brooches and even “devants de corsage”. Mellerio has been using this system since 1830.

the early Christian and Byzantine influence. One can also see in the painting of “La Princesse de Broglie” by Ingres in 1853, that the princess is wearing a Byzantine bulla pendant bought at Mellerio’s in 1851. The House and the jewellers Castellani have also collaborated for over ten years creating many archaeological inspiration jewels such as the extraordinary necklace of the Io heads, Priestess of the Temple of Hera in Argos.

The name “archaeological jewellery” is given to all creations evoking the antiquity era manufactured during the second half of the eighteenth century. The designs are inspired or directly imitated from pieces discovered by famous archaeologists during their excavations, of important archaeological discoveries such as the discovery of Herculaneum in Italy(1709), the discovery of Pompeii in Italy (1748), the 1812 discovery of Petra in Jordan, the translation of hieroglyphs by Champollion in 1822, the discovery by Heinrich Schliemann on May 27, 1873 of what he called “Priam’s Treasure”. In 1871–73 and 1878–79, he excavated the hill and discovered the ruins of a series of ancient cities dating from the Bronze Age to the Roman period. Schliemann declared one of these cities — at first Troy I, later Troy II — to be the city of Troy, and this identification was widely accepted at that time. Following his passion for Homeric stories, Heinrich Schliemann, excavated, first without permission in 1874 and since August 1876 with the permission of the Archaeological Society of Athens and under the supervision of one of its members, Panayiotis Stamatakis, on Mycenae in Greece, where in 1841 Greek archaeologist Kyriakos Pittakis found and restored the famous Lion Gate. Mellerio’s jewellery was inspired also from the excavations and the discovery by Arthur Evans non only of the city of Cnossos, but the discovery of the Minoan civilisation on the island of Crete in Greece.

Gothic and Renaissance inspired jewellery was at its peak under the Restoration and has carried on throughout the XIX century. As early as in 1808, one can see the Middle Age and Renaissance influences in Mellerio’s creations such as the “gothic rings” ordered by the Empress Josephine.

Mellerio referred themselves to archaeological catalogues for their Egyptian, Roman, Byzantine, Etruscan inspirations... A gold and amethyst “devant de corsage” was enamelled with an ancient Greece palm frieze as well as a gold and emerald set ordered in 1863 by Napoléon the third for the wedding of Marechal François Certain de Canrobert. Very influenced by their Italian origins, the Mellerio members often went to Rome to seek out the highest expertise of their time. They had large quantities of cameos made in specialized workshops, as seen on the cameo and pearl set. Mellerio placed orders with the Vatican workshops to produce micro-mosaics composed of minuscule glass fragments. The beetle bulla pendant and its chain illustrates

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Their sources of inspiration came from the Romanticism, the rediscovery of the Middle Ages and the great interest of the architectural repertoire under François 1st. This influence can also be found in the literature : in Walter Scott’s novels, stories were set in the imaginary Middle-Age times, and Victor Hugo’s Hunchback of Notre Dame written in 1831 reinforced this growing appeal. The beauties of architecture are copied and reinterpreted by the jewellers to create unique pieces. As a result, Gothic revival jewellery frequently incorporated ogives (pointed arches), trefoil, quatrefoil motifs, canopied niches, or even shields. Silversmith techniques such as enamelling and engraving become essential components to the jewellery making. Around 1830, Mellerio perfected a precise technique of articulated bracelets. Made up of springs and articulated hinges, this system enables the bracelets to adapt to any size of arm and can be worn on the wrist but also on the upper arm like in the Antiquity. This procedure developed under the Second Empire was essentially used for snake bracelets and others set with precious stones. The symbol of the snake represents the idea of life and death. The snake moult represents rebirth and eternal life. In the Egyptian times, l’Uraeus (the female cobra) protected the Pharaoh from his enemies. For the Amerindians, the snake is the symbol of the cycle of life : death and revival. In Ancient Greece, the God Asclepius was represented by Esculape coiled around a long stick. Mellerio, influenced by the archaeological discoveries and the revival of the Antiquity, used the image of the snake as a symbol of strength and beauty. As seen on a pair of Egyptian snake bracelets in gold, rubies, emeralds, diamonds and black and white enamel (around 1860), they represent the alliance of feminine and masculine strength


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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Bracelets in gold with enamel, set with diamonds and brightly coloured gems.

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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO Š MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Extract of the Paris Universal Exhibition register, with the orders of the Emperor Napoleon the third, the King of Italy, the Emperor of Russia, the King of Prussia, the vice-King of Egypt and the futur King of Italy, Umberto the first, 1867

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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO Š MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Mellerio introduces its famous brooch representing a freshly cut purple lilac branch at the 1862 Universal Exhibition of London. This life size gold, diamond and enamel piece of jewellery is a perfect representation of nature : with its intricate details it offers a startling optical illusion. The buds and the flowers are in different shades of enamel, and each heart of the flower is represented with a diamond. To perfectly imitate nature the leaves are very slightly of a burnt colour using the guilloche technique to give an illusion of wilting, and one can also see in transparency the nerves of the leaves. In contrast the third leaf set with diamonds evokes the morning dew. To accentuate the beauty and grace of this brooch the leaves at the back of the brooch complete the harmony of the structure. This lilac brooch will become a notable reference in the history of jewellery.

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Jewellery Historian

and purity. These two bracelets are completely articulated thanks to hinges and springs. The bracelets are set with diamonds and brightly coloured gems. Princess Mathilde, cousin of Napoleon III, was extremely partial to these type of bracelets. As early as under the First Empire, enamel was widely used in Mellerio’s creations and it became one of their essential decorative component. The magazine “La Mode” described Mellerio’s enamels as “a mirror of reality. Excellently painted they manage to create an optical illusion (...).” The use of enamel became more and more elaborate, colourful and advanced in cutting techniques increasing the brightness of the stones. Thus vibrant greens, delicate purples, flamboyant reds, royal blues, brilliant whites, deep blacks are combined with dazzling success. Under the Second Empire, Mellerio collaborated closely with the renowned enamel expert Armand-Désir Riffault. Different types of enamelling (cloisonné, plique-à- jour, painted) with various types of enamels (transparent, opaque, painted) and varied techniques (guilloché, paillonné) were used making every creation a unique and original work of art. In 1833, the King of France, Louis-Philippe the 1st, decided to save Versailles from ruin by creating the Museum of France’s History. During the Second Empire, the Empress Eugenie, fascinated by Marie Antoinette with whom she seemed to share a tragic relationship with the French people, provoked a very strong sense of identification. She surrounded herself with furniture belonging to the Queen, restored the Petit Trianon gardens, had a portrait painted by Franz Xaver Winterhalter where she iswearing a XVIIIth century costume. The universal exhibitions originated during the industrial revolution and were platforms and showcases where the state-of-the-art for different artistic and industrial technologies were brought together. Receiving awards at these exhibitions was a prestigious guarantee for commercial success. Approximately a million visitors came from all over the world to visit the first universal exhibition organized in London in 1851 at the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park. Following the success of this event, the Emperor Napoleon the third decided to hold a universal exhibition in Paris to compete with the one held in London. Mellerio understood very quickly the importance of this international market and made their first presentation to the public in the jewellery section of the 1855 Universal Exhibi-

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tion in Paris. During the two previous years, they pursued their innovative and artistic ascension. They particularly refined their technique of the flexible stem manufactured in order to introduce it at the universal exhibition. Mellerio was awarded the “Grande Médaille d’Honneur” for the flexible stem technique, duly sold all the creations presented at the show and doubled their clientele. In 1862, the Universal Exhibition held in London enabled Mellerio to strengthen its international reputation an confirm its artistic creativity and technical expertise. The archaeological influence was very strong. Mellerio also embraced the naturalistic style and their creations dominated the market and reflected their expertise workmanship with their graceful and pure lines. The collections gained in lightness and refinement. The 1862 exhibition was a commercial and artistic success; the Empress Eugenie bought the dragonfly brooch named “Demoiselle” and the yellow gold ancient Greek frieze necklace. Once again, Mellerio was distinguished with the “Prix d’Excellence” design award and the “Prize Medal” for the excellence of technique and execution of the designs. The Paris Universal Exhibition was inaugurated on the 1st April 1867. All the famous jewellers were present at the event. Faced with a very strong competition, Mellerio wanted to stand out with a spectacular display. In early 1865, they purchased precious gems from the East India Company in London and worked on many new designs to prepare for the exhibition. Little by little, they created the most breath-taking jewellery stand to display their incredible extravaganza and expertise. Mellerio was once again rewarded with the “Medaille d’Or” and universally praised by the critiques. Mellerio also sought inspiration from the XVIIIth century designs such as for the “Rocaille tiara” presented at the Universal Exhibition of 1867 in Paris. Created with several shells, characteristic of the time of Louis XV, this tiara, entirely set with diamonds, is in platinum, silver and gold. Seven pearl drops and pear diamonds drops were mounted as pendants. The technical accomplishment of this creation was recognized and admired by all. The Queen of Spain, Isabel II, purchased it for her daughter’s wedding. This tiara is still worn today by Queen Letizia of Spain. For the 1867 Universal Exhibition in Paris, Mellerio presented to the public for the very first time a unique brooch in the shape of a peacock feather. Created by Henri Foullé, head of the Mellerio workshop, it rapidly became the emblem of the House, reuniting all of their expertise


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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Diamond and turquoise floral tiara, in silver on gold. This piece is characteristic of transformable jewellery. It is composed of eight brooches, screwed onto a structure, enabling multiple combinations such as a “devant de corsage”, for example, ca 1860 


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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Extract of the Mellerio register, with the order of the Empress , 1868

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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Antique inspired snake bracelet, yellow gold, rubies, pearls, ca 1860

Devant de corsage nœud , inspired by Louis XVI, diamonds, silver on gold, ca 1870

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Jewellery Historian

and knowhow. This emblematic piece was designed with a flexible stem to enable the oscillation of the barbs of the feather. The diamonds, emeralds, sapphires and rubies are set around a central sapphire. The central part of the eye can be detached, creating a pendant. This esoteric jewel was to protect whoever was wearing it. The success was immediate: The Dutchess of Medina Coeli bought the feather a few days after the opening of the Exhibition.

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tion is particularly devoted to spectacles and imperial festivities. Those moments were times of experimentation during which new ideas were rising, setting the first fruits of today’s modernity.

This virtuously handcraft peacock brooch is one of Mellerio’s major pieces but also representative of the history of French Jewellery : the drawing was reproduced in the book of “French Jewellery of XIXth century” by Henri Vever and in the “Les Merveilles de l’Exposition Universelle de 1867” by Jules Mesnard. The peacock theme became one of the emblems of the House. The Empress Eugenie noticed this brooch during her visit to the Exhibition and ordered a second version in 1867. It was reproduced on a slightly smaller scale and modified with an emerald for the centre stone, which was her favourite gem. There was such an fascination for this piece that Xavier Korezak Branicki, exiled Polish politician, ordered a third version with an emerald centre. As early as the XIX century, Mellerio became a renowned jeweller for its fine pearls. Their reputation was built on their selection of the finest pearls from the Persian Gulf. In an extract of the “Almanach des Modes” in 1814, one can read : “the most fashionable, the Mellerios [...] jewellers and silversmiths not only know how to adapt but also to anticipate the fashion trends. Their passion for pearls, of which they own the most unrivalled collection has made them the leaders of the worldwide attraction for jewellery.” During the Second Empire, Mellerio was recognized as the world’s specialists in pearl trading as one can see if the archives. The amounts of the transactions could reach tens of thousands for just one string of pearls. A specific vocabulary appeared in the archives to differentiate the quality and size of the pearls. Definitions such as “extra string” or “extra pearl” are frequently used along with colour codes such as “beautiful colour, perfectly round, beautiful orient, no marks”. Pearls could be referred to as “mastodons” for very large ones or “lilliputian” for small ones which were difficult to work with. The House still has many illustrations regarding creations with different shapes, sizes and colours of pearls. The Second Empire was one of the most ostentatious moment of French History during which the decorative arts were evolving following the pace of the Industrial Revolution. Entitled « Spectaculaire Second Empire » this exhibi-

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The ostentation of the “Fête impériale” and France’s humiliating defeat in 1870 by Prussia, have long tarnished the reputation of the Second Empire, suspected of having been a time purely of amusements, scandals and vices, as described by Zola in his novels written during the Third Republic. It was, however, a period of unrivalled prosperity in the 19th century and one of unprecedented social upheavals. A time of abundance, euphoria and numerous celebrations, political, economic, religious and artistic, today we see the 1850s as the pivotal moment in the birth of “modern France” (Gambetta). To celebrate its 30th anniversary in autumn 2016, the musée d’Orsay is, for the first time, looking at this first society of spectacle and consumerism, a society that we have inherited. The exhibition brings together paintings, sculptures, photography, architectural drawings, objets d’art and jewellery in a lavish thematic exhibition based around the great aesthetic and social questions that are just as relevant today: art used in the staging of power, the individual and his/her image, the taste for objects and decoration, society’s latest entertainments and the great artistic events of the Salons and the Universal Exhibitions. Napoleon III's authority was staged during the Second Empire in an attempt to create an image of himself as the worthy heir to his uncle, while the Empress Eugenie fostered an image of herself as the perfect “first lady”, devoted to charitable causes. Set in locations inherited from the monarchy (Tuileries, Château de Saint-Cloud) or on new stages (the new Louvre, Château de Pierrefonds), the Emperor used the many dynastic and political events that marked his reign to bind the population to a fragile regime. The baptism of the Imperial Prince in 1856 – represented in this exhibition by the magnificent cradle given to Napoleon III by the City of Paris (musée Carnavalet) – was the high point of the reign, following the success of the 1855 Universal Exhibition and the victories in Crimea. Enriched and triumphant, seduced by its own image, the wealthy middle class reflected itself endlessly in painted, sculpted or photographed portraits. Faced with such high demand, artists carried on with the neo-classical traditions (Ingres, Flandrin), or broke new ground, turning to new sources of inspiration: the verve of English painting for Winterhalter or the spirit of French Baroque for Carpeaux. In response to narcissistic exhibitions and tricks of photographic distortion, like those of the Comtesse de Casti-


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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

“Devant de corsage” representing a bouquet of snowdrops surrounded by diamond set leaves, silver on gold, 1855.

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glione and the Empress Eugenie, painters such as Courbet, Manet, Monet and Degas produced realist portrayals of the individual “in his or her environment”. The decoration and arrangement of the interiors, the backdrop to this new society, were the subject of particular care where collection pieces or flamboyant new pieces of furniture were displayed. Certain residences embodied these concerns Prince Napoleon’s Pompeian Villa, the Château d’Abbadia near Hendaye, a neo-Gothic folly, and the Château de Ferrières, a luxurious neo-Renaissance gem built by the Rothschild family - and are evoked in the exhibition with an eclectic display of objects and interior views.

the Empire still shone brightly. Here the excellence of the French art industry and the unbridled eclecticism of the sources of inspiration to which the creators turned were affirmed. Through its spectacular scenography, the exhibition presents those joyous accumulations of the most beautiful objects produced by the Imperial Manufacture of Sèvres, cabinetmakers Fourdinois and Diehl, goldsmiths. Christofle and Froment-Meurice and the bronze founder Barbedienne. This exceptional exhibition has been organised with the special assistance of the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the Musée national du palais de Compiègne, the Musée Carnavalet-Histoire de Paris, the Mobilier national and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

During the Second Empire, Parisian life pulsated to the rhythm of a multitude of society balls, soirées and salons organized by the most dazzling court of the 19th century, the memory of which is kept alive in several large watercolors by Eugène Lami and Henri Baron. Paris became the court of this “fête impériale”, which was more political than it seemed, and which supported the luxury goods industry. This society cultivated a taste for tableaux vivants, dressing up and fancy dress balls, where identities were concealed, where the beau monde and the demi-monde mixed and intrigued.

The Spectacular Second Empire 1852 – 1870 27 September 2016 – 15 January 2017 Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France


 Taking advantage of the vivacity of the Parisian world of opera and theatre, the Emperor brought in modern regulations for theatres, demolished old theatres and launched a building program for new venues such as the theatres in the Place du Châtelet, and Charles Garnier’s new Opera, the monument to entertainment par excellence. The city of Paris, a constant building site, transformed by Haussmann’s scenography, became an open- air set and an element of artificiality invaded the urban space. With the arrival of leisure activities and holiday resorts, from Biarritz to Deauville, came a New Painting, evoked in the exhibition by the paintings of Boudin, Degas, Renoir and Monet. A place of official recognition and of scandal, the Painting and Sculpture Salon was both an aesthetic battleground and a huge market for the new middle class who flocked there in great numbers. In 1863 Napoleon III, confronted by the protests of artists rejected by the jury, created a “Salon des Refusés” alongside the official Salon, an act of significant liberalisation. With paintings hung at several different levels, as was customary in the 19th century, the exhibition here demonstrates the startling difference between the two Salons with Cabanel’s Birth of Venus and Manet’s Luncheon on the Grass. Napoleon III’s Empire was also staged in Europe during the 1855 and 1867 Universal Exhibitions in Paris, when

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Opening hours: every day except Monday, 9.30am to 6pm, Thursdays until 9.45pm. 
 For further information and tickets, visit the official website of the museum at www.musee-orsay.fr


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Photo courtesy of MELLERIO © MELLERIO

Jewellery Historian

Inspired oriental and naturalistic emerald and diamond “devant de corsage”, silver on gold, ca 1860

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

GAELLE KHOURI On the eve of Gaelle Khouriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s launch of her second fine jewellery collection, Soft Deconstruction, Olivier Dupon was able to interview her exclusively for the Jewellery Historian.

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

| THE ART OF CREATIVITY


Jewellery Historian

| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

On the eve of Gaelle Khouri’s launch of her second fine jewellery collection, Soft Deconstruction, I was able to interview her. Khouri’s lengthy answers give an interesting insight into what drives one of the most talented young jewellery designers to create jewellery pieces that some people may find dark. That the mind of such a gentle, petite persona can deliver bold jewellery pieces with a strong philosophical backstory is in itself amazing. Born into a family of academics, Gaelle Khouri left Lebanon for New York City at 21 to study and pursue a career in economics, but soon found herself battling her moral obligation with a more intrinsic desire to work in the design industry. Taking a position with Oscar de la Renta, Khouri worked on market analysis and international expansion for the brand and whilst her work was business focused, she revelled in this new parallel world. Inspired and enlightened by her experience, Khouri returned to her roots in Beirut to intern for international designer Elie Saab. “With a newfound confidence in herself and her vision for the future, Khouri bravely returned to her studies, learning a new trade in fine jewellery design, rebuilding herself and carving out her future”, her official bio reads. Khouri’s jewellery – and specifically Soft Deconstruction, which is divided into two sub-collections – is resonant with metaphysical references and spiritual archetypes, which are fundamental to Khouri’s creative approach. It is almost as if each creation is a soulful attempt to recapture a transient experience or thought. Her aesthetic flair is indeed both decadent (beauty as transcendental) and elemental (beauty as bound to the earth), for which she uses precious stones and diamonds set in 18K gold with blackened sterling silver or with bronze in its matte form. “I find the mix of metals aligns very well with the general aesthetic of my designs – artistic, intricate and elegant”, she shares.

The Conceptual collection, abstract via the use of ellipses, “depicts the richness and great diversity that exists in the inner world – the world perceived in thoughts and imagination”, she says. What seems entangled is actually a free flowing linear composition. For those who prefer to wear head-turning jewellery on their hands, the collection offers a selection of six rings, each evoking hand adornments – sculptural yet wearable works of art in yellow gold, rose gold and silver, set with lines of black and white diamonds, blue sapphires and brown diamonds. These ultimate pieces of jewellery crown as well as shield your grip while they illuminate your whole persona. Not only does the myriad of precious gems magnify the ensemble, the calligraphic design, steeped in circles and ovals, evolves on one’s hand with ease and comfort. Case in point is the ‘Trinity’ ring which spreads across the hand from the middle finger to the pinky, while the ‘Contortion’ ring is elegantly designed to slip onto the pinky and embellish the outer side of the hand. Think about how much your hands are exposed for all to see, and beyond their functional role, how much they represent to the world who you are every bit as much as your other perhaps more seductive attributes, gaze and hair! Olivier Dupon - What makes you passionate about jewellery design? GK - The creativity behind it. For me, inspiration comes from within. In each piece, I create a tangible form of my emotions and thought process, and I think the ability to create something physical out of abstract and conceptual things like feelings is what drives my passion. I also enjoy translating the complexities of the human emotional range into a complex movement of the piece while at the same time keeping it wearable and elegant to fulfil its purpose. OD – How would you describe Gaelle Khouri’s spirit?

I suspect Khouri wishes to question concepts of life and death (most prominently in the Couture section of the collection, which “seek to expose the unity that exists within the outer world; all that we perceive in tangible forms including the human body, plants, animals, and stones. The central notion is that all life forms have the same structure”, Khouri explains), and demonstrate that every stage of a life span should be appreciated, hence the use of naturalistic images, skeleton and insect designs set in precious renditions. The ‘Self-Portrait’ fish earrings each share a silver and gold half-skeleton, half-live body, set with diamonds; while the ‘Framboise’ earrings depict flies swarming on a ruby-set raspberry which hangs from the ear, while the accompanying ‘Sepal’ stud is a silver leaf set with rubies and brown diamonds.

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GK - I think we are all constantly influenced by everything that surrounds us such as music, stories, random shapes and forms. The amount of information we have access to is growing even more due to various social media platforms. With such information and material now made so easily accessible, we are subconsciously storing the things that we are exposed to in our memory and, for designers such as myself, everything we are exposed to influences our work whether we actively seek it or not. Out of everything that inspires me and is stored in my mind and thought process I am particularly interested in strong movements and shapes. I find beauty in intricate and complex forms that are left unfinished and impure; I


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Photo courtesy of GAELLE GAELLE KHOURI Photo courtesy of KHOURI CARNET © © CARNET

Jewellery Historian

LA CUCARACHA Ring in 18 ct Yellow Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Brown Diamonds, Pink Sapphires, and Enamel

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

PERPETUITY Ring in 18 ct Yellow Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Blue Sapphires

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

IMBROGLIO Ring in 18 ct Rose Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Ice White Diamonds, Brown Diamonds, and Tsavorites

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

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feel that such pieces with a contrasting fusion of appeal and unattractiveness create a particular and exotic beauty. The Italian architect, Renzo Piano for example, has such complexities in his work – there are so many different perspectives in one piece when you look at it from a number of angles. Similarly, Jean Tinguely’s sculptures are very relatable to my own designs and what inspires me to create, as his work focuses on movement and technical challenges – something that triggers my own personal interests when designing. Visual influence aside, my reflective thinking is very much influenced by philosophical thoughts which have an impact on my creative process. I have always been greatly inspired by the writings of Michel de Montaigne, Hegel, and Nietzsche, each of them providing me with the strength to pursue my love for jewellery design and endowing me with the emotional depth that I work to translate in my designs. OD - If you weren’t head of a fine jewellery house today, what would have been your Plan B? GK - I have an academic and professional background in economics and finance, so I think I would have pursed a career in that field. Though it is not an inner passion for me, I truly enjoyed it before my career change. I think one of the beauties of life is that we develop a passion for every subject we become knowledgeable about.

tive and artistic disciplines but I had not been able to openly express it before due to circumstance at the time. I grew up in Tripoli, a city in the North of Lebanon where the perception of success is largely dictated by a handful of academic fields such as medicine, engineering, law and economics. This perception partly influenced my academic choice and led me to major in the scientific field. It was during my time in New York as a graduate student and professional economist that I began to realise I wanted to do something different. A better understanding of my aspirations, passion and identity then started to form and the notion of design was very central to it. I took the first step when I interned at Oscar de la Renta in New York and then at Elie Saab in Beirut. My role at both institutions focused on strategic expansion and business development but contributed significantly to my understanding of the design aspect of the business. I was fortunate to be offered full-time positions at both houses, but I decided against accepting as I was already siezed by an entrepreneurial drive to start my own venture. When I moved back to Beirut I immediately sought and undertook extensive private jewellery lessons with renowned Lebanese painter, Bernard Renno and worked extensively on developing my first portfolio within a few months. Jewellery design – as opposed to fashion - was a more natural choice for me as it offered some flexibility whilst continuing to work full-time at Blominvest. Moreover, I found that designing jewellery satisfied my thirst for exploring and expressing the creative side of my personality that had long been supressed. Afterwards, I was faced with the challenging but fascinating world of production.

OD - When did you know that this is what you wanted to do? GK - I started my jewellery design journey five years ago. At the time, I was working as a senior economist at one of the top financial institutions in the MENA region. As much as the transition from the science to the design world seems unusual, it was the most natural step forward in my case and led me to launch my eponymous jewellery brand ‘Gaelle Khouri’ in July 2015. My professional development started shortly after obtaining a BA in Economics and a minor in Mathematics from the American University of Beirut (AUB) and completing a Master’s degree in Economics at New York University (NYU). Following my graduation, I worked for Toyota Motors as an economic consultant in NYC, and as a senior economist with Blominvest, a regional investment bank in Beirut. The transition from economics and finance to design did not happen overnight. I always had an interest in the crea-

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The jewellery industry in Lebanon is notoriously secretive and closed – it is privately controlled by a small number of families, making it very hard for an outsider to penetrate. This proved to be a difficult obstacle, but over the past five years I developed a solid network of highly competent artisans and trustworthy stone suppliers that continue to assist in the creation of my intricate designs. I would go to the workshop every day after work to sit with artisans, absorb their knowledge and skills, and learn about the various metals and precious stones to develop a holistic understanding of the industry. I then started work on producing my first collection, The Garden of Earthly Delights, and building the brand identity which included shooting the product and building my website. As I am selffunded, it took just over three years to fully launch the


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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

SELF-PORTRAIT Earrings in 18 ct Rose Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Ice White Diamonds and Brown Diamonds

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

TEARS LOST Ring in 18 ct Yellow Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Blue Sapphires

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

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brand, which I am now in a position to look forward to expanding internationally.

OD - What would be the one most important piece of advice you could now tell your younger self?

OD - What is the best memory you associate with jewellery in your own life?

GK - It honestly depends on the assets and facilities people have access to at the start of their journey. If someone has the technical knowledge coupled with the financial ability to venture into the industry then the journey would be significantly easier. Otherwise, it requires a true passion for the field – I firmly believe that only when you are passionate about your work can you find the patience, the self-control and composure that will drive your motivation and keep you constantly moving forward.

GK - When I think about jewellery, there isn’t necessarily a memory that I associate with a particular piece but a feeling or emotion – it brings a sense of self-fulfilment that I didn’t experience in my previous career path. I know now that no matter how far up the corporate ladder I may have climbed, I would never feel the satisfaction and pride that comes from creating and having ownership of the Gaelle Khouri brand. OD - What personality traits do you have that have led you to where you are today? GK - As I mentioned, the transition was not an immediate or impulsive one; it was the result of a journey in both selfdiscovery and exploration and was accelerated by a number of factors. In particular, my time in New York helped me widen my perspective and taught me how to think freely. It enabled me to find the strength to deviate from the well-trodden path and to express my individuality through my creativity, which I had disregarded for a long time. My academic and professional background contributed significantly to developing the entrepreneurial skills that I believe are crucial for any start-up. It gifted me with a broad skill set, spanning analytical and creative dimensions, as well as the ability to structure, organise and prioritise various actions and tasks. I was able to learn about vital financial structures and planning that I now use on a daily basis to keep track of cash flows, which as a luxury jewellery designer is so important to my business. For instance, every piece produced involves different stones of different sizes and henceforth varying costs. The same would apply for precious metals where price can fluctuate significantly. As a consequence, such factors can add up to different labour costs. I think getting out of my comfort zone, challenging myself and seeking a career change at a time when I was succeeding in my current profession is a testimony to my strong determination. I had to compromise and faced financial difficulties so this journey was not without its struggles. That said, I have never doubted my decision to follow a different career path and have always had the resilience and perseverance in me to keep going. Such conviction can only come from true passion.

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The path won’t always be smooth and there will be days where you might find yourself on a tough rollercoaster of emotions, and it won’t be without its obstacles. It’s important to keep a positive mind-set and plan in the short term. Have a long-term vision for the brand, but work it step by step and most importantly enjoy small victories. I genuinely believe that if someone is really passionate about their work, their passion will guide them through the journey. OD - Can you describe the process of how a piece is made from idea to finished product? GK - It is actually quite difficult for me to describe the design process as ideas and figures of potential pieces will come to me quite often randomly in my head – mostly when I go to sleep and my mind starts to wander. I have a very active imagination and so always keep a pen and paper on the bedside table so I can quickly sketch out an idea when I see something. If I didn’t do this, I would forget what I saw in the morning! As I noted earlier, creativity for me flows from the inside, not outside. Inspiration does not relate to what I see, but to what I experience emotionally. The pieces I create are sort of my inner voice; they are a tangible form of my emotions. What is outside, like nature for instance, is simply ‘raw products’ to help translate the emotions and put them into the ‘final product’ which is the actual piece. Once I have the design in my head and sketched out on paper the production work can start. The first phase is carving: I carve the design on wax so all the intricacies and movement of the design are expressed in the most artistic and realistic way. Once the design is carved – this is the most challenging and time consuming part – it is then moulded in metal, which is also not without its challenges. My designs are crafted from a mix of metals and it is important for the finish to be neat and the combination of metals clean. The next step in my craft is stone setting: I pick the


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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

VESSELS Necklace in 18 ct Yellow Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Rubies

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

SPINE Cuff in Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Ice White Diamonds

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

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stones with the colour, size and quality being pre-eminent. I then decide on the most aesthetically pleasing way to set them to complement the metal.

OD - How would you yourself best describe Gaelle Khouri’s creative philosophy? GK - I am still trying to understand it and explore where it comes from! My creativity stems deeply from the inside. Designing became a means to express my emotions which are communicated through the final piece itself. It has helped me understand and discover my emotional state through the silent interpretation of each final piece. The ongoing dialogue between ‘me, myself and I’ is the core inspiration of my designs that are borne from the pure and sincere baring of the soul.

OD - Is it possible to totally free-flow / experiment or does one always need to follow rules? GK - Yes and no. If you let your creativity guide you freely and without constraints, then yes, I think more daring and beautiful pieces can be created. However, the difficult part is ensuring that the concept and final design translates into a wearable piece. It is here that you need to make sure that the technical part of design and production is done with the utmost level of expertise.

OD - What is the piece of jewellery that represents most the Gaelle Khouri style?

OD - Is there anything in your designs that make them quintessentially Lebanese? GK - In the city where I grew up, the Gold Souk is the oldest in the region. I was exposed to that when I was young and this has definitely steered my artistic direction. I believe my genuine interest in intricate craft and design and the detail and time that I invest in my pieces stems from my Middle Eastern heritage, which is renowned for its elaborate jewellery. In addition to this, many of my pieces follow movement with the fingers and hands which also relates to my Middle Eastern roots as women used to cover themselves and their hands with statement jewellery. OD - How has your work changed/evolved since beginning in 2010?

GK - That is a difficult question, as I really feel attached to each and every piece I create. Each piece represents a different side of me or thought process, and so much thought and work from design to production has gone into each and every one. If I had to pick, I think I would choose the Anchor earrings, which are one of the first pieces I created from the Garden of Earthly Delights collection. They are crafted from 18ct yellow gold and set with intricate brown diamonds and large baroque pearls. Pearls are often worn by older woman and evoke romance and femininity; however, with the Anchor earrings, the bold and striking design also creates a sense of fearlessness. The sharp dichotomy resonates well with my divergent personality traits. OD - How are you positioning yourself next to other joailliers?

GK - This is an on-going voyage of discovery. I think the evolution of my designs will be affected by two main factors. Firstly, the continued development of my personality – my thoughts and emotions are the catalyst to my creativity. Secondly, the constant ‘noise’ from my surroundings and what I see whilst also considering what I think the market wants. I try as much as possible not to be affected by the latter, but I think it is unavoidable. Looking back to the first pieces I created and comparing those designs to my new collection, Soft Deconstruction, I think the DNA of the Gaelle Khouri brand has been strongly preserved: my designs have an artistic and avantgarde feel but are still very wearable pieces that possess a lot of movement and technical intricacies, all the while creating depth to each piece. In terms of what has changed since my first collection, I think my pieces have evolved into more playful designs.

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GK - When I started designing I was an economist and wasn’t necessarily fully aware of other designers in the market. I think this initial lack of knowledge gave my creativity the freedom to flow in whatever path that felt right, undoubtedly working in my favour. Today, I try as much as possible to keep a visual distance from other people’s work in order to remain in my own creative ‘bubble’, so to speak. With this in mind, coupled with the fact that I come from a different background to most contemporary designers, I don’t find myself comparing my work or positioning against other players. I am in constant competition with myself, but not with others. In terms of product, I think I offer designs that relate to a few other brands, with the difference being that I offer my jewellery at a competitive price.


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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

FRAMBOISE Earrings in 18 ct Yellow Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Brown Diamonds and Rubies

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OD - What is your vision of the field you are in, at the moment? GK - The jewellery industry is highly competitive, and having a strong product is no longer enough to ensure a brand is successful. Today, a clear vision and a strong marketing strategy are key to securing a sustainable place in the market – this requires a significant amount of financial investment, strategic thinking and networking. It is also an exciting time, however, as social media is continuing to push boundaries,opening the world up. Exposure that used to take years to achieve is now accessible within seconds. It is a very dynamic time that I think should be handled with a lot of care: we should move fast enough to catch the flow, but cautiously enough to take the time to think, plan, and create. OD - What is the best compliment your work has ever received? GK - “I have never seen anything like it before” – I frequently hear this when meeting people in the field when showcasing my designs. Given the big competition and saturation of the market, to hear such positive comments and so frequently fills me with pride. I recall a time when Lesley Schill, Founder and Curator of Talisman Gallery Fine Jewellery Boutique at Harvey Nichols, London called me after I shared the look book with her a few months ago and commented, “Your work is amazing, it is like nothing I have seen before, it is a work of art that belongs in a gallery, but you did it in a smart way to make it wearable. Your pieces stand out of the crowd”. I can’t describe how amazing it was to hear such complimentary feedback about “Soft Deconstruction”. www.gaellekhouri.com

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

CONTORTION Ring in 18 ct Rose Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Black Diamonds

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

Jewellery Historian

ENCIRCLE Ring in 18 ct Yellow Gold and Blackened Sterling Silver; Set with Brown Diamonds

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Photo courtesy of GAELLE KHOURI © GAELLE KHOURI

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B R E AT H TA K I N G B E AU T Y O F G E M S

RED & PINK DIAMONDS by Eva Kountouraki

In everything in life there is what is considered to be “normal” and what is “extraordinary”. Often, normal translates as common, ordinary, while the things that stand out from the crowd are described as exceptional, rare, and sometimes even impossible. This is true for people, for sense and knowledge, for emotions, for minerals, and in certain terms, for their majesty, the diamonds.

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Photo courtesy of RIO TINTO © RIO TINTO

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Among the rarest and the most soughtafter of all are the warm-hued pink and red diamonds.

| BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF GEMS In everything in life there is what is considered to be “normal” and what is “extraordinary”. Often, normal translates as common, ordinary, while the things that stand out from the crowd are described as exceptional, rare, and sometimes even impossible. This is true for people, for sense and knowledge, for emotions, for minerals, and in certain terms, for their majesty, the diamonds. Diamonds are a true miracle of nature so it is unfair to refer to any of them as common or normal. However we adopt this term in order to describe a group of diamonds that represent the majority of the material extracted from the world’s diamond mines. These are the diamonds that fall within the ‘normal colour range’ or else, the diamonds whose colours range from colorless to light yellow. But there are also the other ones, the extraordinary diamonds that exhibit other hues, which are described altogether as fancycolour diamonds, and although they are exceptionally rare, all hues can be found in nature, from intense yellow to orange and brown, pink and red, green, blue, violet and purple and also black, white and gray. Among the rarest and the most sought-after of all are the warm-hued pink and red diamonds. Truly red means that the gems exhibit red bodycolour with no brownish secondary colour, so these gems achieve high saturation and pure hue. As of today, there are only about 20 or 30 such diamonds found in nature. And they are magnificent from all points of view. What causes red and pink hues in diamonds are irregularities in their crystal structure, which affect the way the crystals absorb and transmit the light. Because of sudden changes in the environment of formation, deep inside the earth, the growing diamond crystals undergo severe stress which gets imprinted in their bodies as structural defects that may have a variety of results visible to our human eyes. One of those is the perception of pink and red hues, colours that are breathtaking when we are lucky enough to see them in such potent gems like the diamonds. Pink and red diamonds come mostly from African and Australian mines, although some have been found in Brazilian, Russian and Indian sources as well. Today, the most famous mine and probably the most commercially important concerning the pinks and reds, is the Argyle in west Australia. This mine is very significant for the large quantity of mostly commercial quality diamonds it produces, as well as for the gorgeous pinks and reds that are found there; and although these represent a small percentage of the production in terms of quantity they account for a great one in terms of value. These rare gems are sold in exclusive invitationonly events to few lucky buyers. What is already described by some as “the rarest and finest in its history”, or else, the latest “Argyle tender” was completed recently, and revealed some extraordinary treasures to the world, including what is as of today the rarest

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Photo courtesy of RIO TINTO © RIO TINTO

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Jewellery Historian

Although the value of the “normal” diamonds is based on the combination of four factors, when it comes to fancy hues, the colour becomes the dominant consideration.

| BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF GEMS Violet diamond ever found, along with some wondrous fancy vivid purplish pinks and one gorgeous fancy red. Although the value of the “normal” diamonds is based on the combination of four factors, when it comes to fancy hues, the colour becomes the dominant consideration. This is especially true for one of the most famous red diamonds in the history, the “Hancock Red”. This magnificent gem weighs less than a carat, and grades low in the clarity scale, but it proudly exhibits a remarkable fancy purplish Red colour. It is largely improbable that we will encounter another such gem soon, so it is safe to say that the one of Mr. Warren Hancock was probably the most important diamond investment of the century, with a reported purchase price of $13.500 in 1956 and a selling price of $926.000 per carat in 1987! Another famous red diamond is the 5.11ct “Moussaieff Red”, formerly known as the “Red Shield”. This marvelous gem was graded Fancy Red and as the Gemological Institute of America states, "It is the largest Fancy Red, natural color diamond that we have graded as of the date the report was issued."

Photo courtesy of RIO TINTO © RIO TINTO

Plastic deformation on their ancient body, extremely stressful conditions and mighty endurance. These diamonds have survived some of this extraordinary planet’s most harsh treatments. And they show it. They shout it out loud and they shine bright through it. Proud, unconquerable, insolent, beyond rare, Red.

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Photo courtesy of RIO TINTO © RIO TINTO Photo in PUBLIC DOMAIN

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Hj Haute joaillerie

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CÃ&#x2030;CILE ARNAUD

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H AU T E J OA I L L E R I E by Olivier Dupon

CĂ&#x2030;CILE ARNAUD Thanks to decades of experience working for various eponymous high-end joailliers, and in tandem with their in-house ateliers, CĂŠcile Arnaud has accumulated in-depth knowledge of how pieces of jewellery are crafted. It is such a rare and powerful skill since she can then freely imagine the most captivating designs, infusing them with layers of subtext, all the while making sure they can actually become 3D marvels. 89


Photo courtesy of CECILE ARNAUD © CECILE ARNAUD

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In many designers’ showrooms, jewellery drawings rightfully adorn the walls as the works of art they indeed are. Each time I spend time gazing at one, I feel its power to draw me into its pictorial realm. There is something almost mystical in the way jewellery sketches attract and then hypnotise; they are a promise in the making. However in this instance, the ‘before’ is as riveting and beautiful as the ‘after’, which is rather uncommon (c.f. the caterpillar / butterfly story).

ling jewellery pieces in different ateliers which supplied the place Vendôme high jewellery houses such as Bulgari and Chopard, to name but two. Then I became the artistic director for Van Cleef & Arpels.

The transfer onto paper of an imaginative scheme is more often than not as beautiful as the final precious rendition. It is also one of a kind and therefore collectable.

After 2 years, my work had become a passion and I wanted to broaden my creative skills and experience to other products and styles. The only way to do that was to create my own company.

Drawings may also have a sort of precedence over the 3D jewels since they lay down what the outcome should be. They set the framework in terms of tangible parameters (dimension, component and mechanism), as well as in terms of effect (emotion and evocation). It is then down to the atelier to use everything in their repertoire to realise the drawing’s intentions.

While in these positions, I was able to strengthen my experience: managing my own designer team, dealing with the marketing and production departments, the suppliers and exclusive clients.

OD - Do you remember what your first ever drawing was about? CA - I don’t remember very well the first one, but in my childhood I used to draw landscapes all the time. I grew up in the middle of fields, flowers, trees and animals.

Some independent jewellery makers do sketch their own designs, whereas some of the main high jewellers enlist freelance talents, who provide drawings. There are only a few of these experts in high jewellery drawing on the market, and none is more experienced than Cécile Arnaud. The French artist will not only engineer sublime pictures, she will make sure these are feasible for production. Thanks to decades of experience working for various eponymous high-end joailliers, and in tandem with their inhouse ateliers, she has accumulated in-depth knowledge of how pieces of jewellery are crafted. It is such a rare and powerful skill since she can then freely imagine the most captivating designs, infusing them with layers of subtext, all the while making sure they can actually become 3D marvels.

OD - What attracted you to drawing in the first place? CA - I discovered it while I started to train at the BJO. I was 17 years old and at the time I favoured learning all about the craftsmanship aspect of high jewellery in preference to the design side; however I soon realized that my favourite subject was actually drawing and designing. OD - What attracted you specifically to drawing high jewellery?

I have asked Cécile Arnaud a few questions.

CA - Again, circumstances! My first position as a designer was in an atelier which manufactured high jewellery. This is where I discovered the world of prestigious and unique pieces with marvellous unique gems. It was a revelation to me and prompted my decision to garner further knowledge about this beautiful subject.

Olivier Dupon - First could you please tell us more about your career path?

OD - Do you have mentors or inspiring models in the world of high jewellery drawing?

Cécile Arnaud - After two years of jewellery studies at the BJO (Bijouterie Joaillerie Orfèvrerie) school where I learned drawing, wax modelling, gouache painting, and jewellery making, I came out top of my class and with the help of the director’s recommendation I got my first job as a designer in an atelier at the age of 19 years old in 1986.

CA - There are a few, but my ultimate mentor is Lalique. His design is at the highest level and he is a true reference point for me! Not only did he create perfect designs, but all his designs are alive; I try to capture the same emotions in my approach. His creativity in both jewellery and glass production and the way he has used the beauty of nature is simply extraordinary. It would be a dream come true if I could only be in his presence and discuss his works with him.

For the next following 15 years, as a jewellery designer, I gained a precise knowledge of both drawing and model-

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Photo courtesy of CECILE ARNAUD © CECILE ARNAUD

Jewellery Historian

‘Je ceuille une fleur ou deux pour séduire mon voyageur…’ Breguet’s necklace by Cecile Arnaud in gray gold set with pink, green and blue sapphires and diamonds.

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OD - How do you make sure that what you draw is technically feasible? CA - First of all, at the BJO professional class I was surrounded by jewellers who had 20 or 30 years experience and the course was actually catering for professionals. Only a few young students like me attended this course. It is there that I learned all the techniques of jewellery making over two years. When I first started my career and for a further 15 years, I worked in the ateliers next to the jewellery makers. Most of the time I was not isolated in an office but working among all the technicians. Besides being my best friends there were the jewellers who taught me all the ins and outs of the highly complex techniques at play.

CA - When a potential client calls me, most of the time, they want to start with a project to see what I am able to create for them. For example, if the client needs one collection about a “butterfly” theme, it often results in me creating five, six pieces of jewellery (ring, earrings, bracelet, necklace, pendant…). They could also have a special order - to create a tiara for a princess for instance - or they may want to create a set based on specific stones they have recently bought. After the first test, and if they succeed in selling these creations, we then negotiate a collaboration on a long-term basis. 90% of the time it makes more sense financially for both the client and I to have a long term contract as it is more flexible and simpler.

I am still in touch with them if I need specific technical advice for closing a clasp on a complicated item or to create a movement on an unusual piece. Their technical expertise guides me to make sure I only design pieces that can be manufactured. A good designer is one who has creative ideas which function. I can easily spot jewels that have been created by people who haven’t actually got the technical knowledge of craftsmanship. Often the jewellery item either does not present well, its proportions are wrong or the body of the jewel is too heavy and prevents movements…among other mistakes.

OD - Are you involved in the making of the pieces you have drawn? CA - Not always but very quickly clients realise that I know the technical side of the trade. I can tell them what will be feasible or not; how they can proceed to make sure the craftsmanship is successful. I have over 35 years of experience in this industry. It is crucial to know the technical side of high jewellery since you are dealing with highly expensive gems, of different sizes, with different properties, for different purposes. Once a good relationship is established with a brand, they entrust me with supervising the pieces.

OD - What tools do you use? CA - I start my drawings on simple paper with a pencil and I paint my designs with water gouache combined with coloured marker on transparent paper or grey paper. Sometimes I scan my designs to create specific presentations with the help of Photoshop. OD - Do you need a specific environment to draw? CA - Light of course is essential but the most important aspect for me is to feel comfortable. Indeed, to be in a cosy environment, the same as my home is crucial I need my books, flowers and above all music, a lot of music. It accompanies me all the time as it helps me create.

Ensuring successful craftsmanship, which reflects exactly what is shown on the drawings, is most definitely part of a designer’s competence. It is my ethics and, as much as possible, I ensure that I can discuss with the jewellers how the jewellery is going to be manufactured and ensure we have the same understanding when it comes to delicate and technical points. When my client chooses a design, the final product needs to be identical. In order to save time, I often suggest sculpting a model, which will be useful for the jeweller to get a good understanding of the volume and proportions of the product. OD - Are you given the opportunity to look at the gemstones before starting the sketch? CA - Yes, and when it’s possible, it’s better for me. When I hold them in my hand, I can see what kind of jewels I am going to develop to highlight their value. Stones are magical; my role is to respect them and to conceive an at-

OD - Could you tell us more about the process involved when one brand comes to you for drawings?

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Jewellery Historian

‘A l’ombre d’un grand pin, les manches pleines de vent, mon regard s’éternise sur la grande bleue…’ Sea view with hilltops and stone pines pendant in gold with tsavorites, emeralds, blue, pink, yellow and orange sapphires, tourmaline cabochons, princess- and brilliant-cut diamonds (courtesy of Mrs G from Moscow).

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mosphere which enhances and reveals their extraordinary beauty at the maximum possible level. If my client is based far away, he sends me pictures and the certificate of value along with the precise dimensions of the gems. OD - Are you personally drawn to certain gemstones more than others? CA - I have the chance to work with some exceptional diamonds of rare beauty in terms of colour, size and quality. I consider them my best friends because they are the perfect accompaniment for others stones. I mainly design jewellery with precious gems but it really depends on the trend or the client’s brief. Some stones like paraiba tourmaline, opals, melo and conch pearls are very fashionable right now.

their existence. This ability to extract existing but untouched aspects of a brand and create innovative jewellery collections or unique objects, which reflect perfectly the identity of a brand, is very important in my work. My designs always respect the core values of a client or his brand. I truly embrace their culture in order to produce drawings, which tell the story of my clients. My drawings are filled with emotions and clients are generally receptive to my sensitivity. That’s a part of Cécile Arnaud’s style! “Designers” without sensitivity and personality can’t have a style, and that is usually why they end up copying…. OD - Is it difficult to part with your drawings once they have been acquired by a jewellery brand?

OD - In this day and age of CAD (computer aided-design) and 3D printing, how does hand sketching fit in? CA - Our job has changed a great deal since the nineties. It all began in the workshops with the arrival of new technology. The laser machine for welding has been a revolution; new computer software has changed the way we conceive jewellery designs. This process of evolution is normal and we need to adapt and use its benefits in our profession. Personally, I don’t use CAD simply because I am quicker sketching by hand. Is a computer able to come up with twenty ideas in ten minutes? No, the machine won’t be able to replace the job of the designer. The creator has this inexplicable alchemy between the heart and the brain, conscious and subconscious. I also believe that the life of a design or a drawing evolves and is ever changing.

CA - I prefer to give copies rather than my originals. It is the most difficult thing for me and I think for most artists. The higher your sensitivity is, the harder it is to give a part of your mind to someone else. That is why I can’t work with everybody. I am fortunately free to choose my clients. I give my designs with great pleasure to those who understand, like, and respect the ideas I develop for them. OD - When drawing, can you completely free flow or do you have to follow certain rules? CA - Yes, I have to follow certain rules therefore it is not completely a free flow process. I pay particular attention to the spirit of the brand of course and their actual brief: what kind of pieces needs to be developed, their clients’ profile and taste, or to which clients they would like to appeal. I also need to take into consideration the type of materials and stones they want to use (quality, size, fragility), the style of a collection (simple, soft, or with emphasis on volume). Creating unique pieces for a client or for a specific occasion is obviously completely different from creating a more accessible collection. Price is always a prime consideration.

OD - Do you ever instil a ‘touch’ of Cécile Arnaud into the drawings commissioned by the brands? CA - Yes of course! When a client comes to see me, it is because he very much likes my universe; and because of our shared feelings and understanding of beauty, we are able to work together. In order to last in this difficult profession, you need to have an equally strong personality and sensitivity. Both are important in defining a personal and unique style, and creating original new ideas. When I work for a company, I subtly insert my own ideas, which will fit my client’s brand. One of the best moments in my job is to discover and identify the philosophy, the heritage of a company, and provide a natural development of

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OD - Having worked for so many diverse jewellery names, is there a ‘Cécile Arnaud style’? How would you describe it? CA - I think the “Cécile Arnaud” style exists, because many people recognise my pieces. That said, and as mentioned earlier, my own signature is not prevalent because I always adapt to the style of my clients. I am like a chameleon but one who imbues each creation with his own perspective.


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Photo courtesy of CECILE ARNAUD © CECILE ARNAUD

Jewellery Historian

‘Le vent souffle dans les camellias, une pluie de perle ruisselle…’ Studies for Chanel by Cecile Arnaud (copyright Cecile Arnaud) is a work around camellias and corsets: ‘the corset breaks open to release the camellia flowers’; in gray gold set with fine pearls, pink sapphires and diamonds.

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‘Vers l’est, disparait dans les grandes vagues, les fleurs et les herbes de l’antique palais…’ David Morris’ ‘Dentelle Noire’ necklace by Cecile Arnaud in gray gold set with diamonds.

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Photo courtesy of CECILE ARNAUD © CECILE ARNAUD

Jewellery Historian

‘L’amour oublié se réveille. Tant de baisers donnés ou pardonnés…’ David Morris’ Ring by Cécile Arnaud in gray gold set with rubies and diamonds.

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A friend of mine, a famous painter, described perfectly my style so I will just repeat what she said: “Cécile’s jewellery creations are like poetry and skin is the canvas on which they tell their story; each time it is like an odyssey brimming with sensitivity, fragility and delicacy. Nothing is static or restricted; it all flows like an enchanting dream that exudes emotions and lays down a tale that each wearer can make his own. Opposites are reconciled: perfection and imperfection; grace and tragedy; disruption and peace; containment and free flow; violence and caresses. The organic, mineral and vegetal conjoin in unison, while essential elements - wind, light and water – nourish her creative spirit.” OD - Has your drawing style evolved and changed over time? CA - Yes of course, it needs to constantly evolve! It is like a good wine. Over the years, my designs continue to evolve as I constantly explore. My pencil strokes have become more efficient but most importantly my creativity spectrum has expanded. My style and designs have evolved because of the sheer variety of briefs; I am very lucky to have such a diverse clientele (different traditions, cultures and countries). It is not the same mindset when working with a sultan who wants a gift for his guests, or when creating a tiara for an Arabic princess, or a ruby bangle sang de pigeon (pigeon blood) for a Chinese girl, or fashioning some clips with fantastic unique gems for an exclusive auction. OD - Do you have to follow trends (fashion, lifestyle, etc.) in your line of work? CA – I do indeed need to follow the ever-changing trends of our society, from consumer goods to architecture and fashion. Personally I like fashion and outstanding elegance. I like to study all the details, the pleats of a fabric, the curves, the embroideries, the feathers, hats, bags and shoes. Women need to have jewellery which matches their clothes. You don’t wear the same jewel when you wear silk, muslin or a tweed dress. In a way, high fashion and high jewellery belong to the luxury industry, but most of the time they work separately, which is a shame! I would love to create some high jewellery pieces combined with fashion materials such as fabrics, leather, feather, and wood… It would be fantastic to explore another aspect of my creativity. OD - What are your sources of inspiration? CA - Like most people, art books, exhibitions, fashion, travel are essential to nourish my inspiration. But my first inspiration, the one, which helped me to be what I am today, comes from my childhood. This inspiration is the “source” of my imagination and all the arts are like the rain that nourishes the source. I lived in a farm in the Gers region in south west of France. I spent most of my time observing nature. Season after season, always perched on the most imposing oak tree, I could see the leaves swinging gently in the wind, I could hear the storm, look at the rain falling down, feel the smell of the wet soil, look at a spider weaving her web, observe the landscape transforming itself. I was constantly dreaming, my head in the clouds as they say, or in French “dans la lune”. In this fabulous countryside environment, I developed my sense of observation, my ability to easily create stories. My ebullient mind is akin to the ever-changing seasons year after year, indefinitely. Nature is my true source of inspiration; it definitively contributed to finding my style. OD - Has it ever happened that a drawing has surpassed the finished jewel in terms of beauty?

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Photo courtesy of CECILE ARNAUD © CECILE ARNAUD

Jewellery Historian

‘Au milieu des herbes sauvages, une passerelle parfumée nous ennivre…’ David Morris’ ‘Art Deco’ bracelet by Cecile Arnaud in gray gold set with conch pearls, emeralds and diamonds.

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Good ideas, great gouache skills and drawing techniques combined with strong emotions create beautiful and original designs, which are wearable.

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CA - I do think that both the designs and the final piece of jewellery cannot express exactly the same emotions because in the high jewellery industry different people work on the same piece of jewellery from conception to realisation.

Good ideas, great gouache skills and drawing techniques combined with strong emotions create beautiful and original designs, which are wearable. Looking at beautiful drawings that ignite the senses is a great place to be when one is in search of inner peace and comfort; then comes the desire to create the real tangible object. So maybe after all the power of drawings surpass the beauty of the finished jewel. Because the making of a jewellery piece involves space (it is about 3D where form, volume, beauty of the gems and metal used will definitely reveal another expression of beauty), the most difficult part is to have both the drawing and the manufactured jewellery reveal the same emotions. For these reasons I strongly believe that designers and jewellers should work hand in hand or at a minimum meet up before the start of the craftsmanship process. That way the jeweller can understand the emotions to be encapsulated in the jewels, as well as the technical aspects (proportions, volume, movements), which will ensure the successful reproduction of a drawing. OD - What type of jewellery person are you? CA - I love jewels and I am a chameleon when it comes to jewellery so I have all sorts of jewels. Some come from my family, others I have created based on Indian, vegetal or Art Deco inspirations. I am a great fan of less is more; so I wear one jewel and not too many at one time. I also very much like fantasy jewels. Consequently, I have created some with a mix of all sorts of materials. For a party, it is great to let your imagination to go wild and explosiveâ&#x20AC;Ś www.cecilearnaud.comâ&#x20AC;¨

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Photo courtesy of CECILE ARNAUD © CECILE ARNAUD

Jewellery Historian

‘Dans les champs bleux du ciel, splendour orientale, allure d’éternité…’ David Morris’ ‘Belle Bleue’ bracelet by Cecile Arnaud in gray gold set with sapphires and diamonds.

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

HARTMANN The perfect combination of quintessential Scandinavian minimalism and of the exceptional Argyle pink diamonds.

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There are some jewellers who are almost like family doctors. They forge strong relationships with their clients over generations, marking their most intimate and important life milestones with heirloom jewels. Such is Hartmann’s, the jewellery company founded in 1995 by Ulrik Hartmann, and whose flagship store was opened in 1997 on Bredgade in Copenhagen. In addition to being a much beloved purveyor of refined timeless fine jewellery, Hartmann’s became an Argyle Pink Diamonds Select Atelier in 2008. To put this in perspective, it is important to mention that the European market, and especially Denmark, did not at the time know much about coloured diamonds, least of all pink diamonds; so in essence Hartmann’s took quite a risk in becoming the first and only one to bring pink diamonds onto the Danish market. They knew it would be a long process of investing time and resources to educate the public. “It was not easy. Already from 2001 we were doing talks, events and advertising around pink diamonds. It took more than five years of hard work to get the message ou”, Ulrik says. “However, we saw (and still see) women that want to be different, and pink diamonds really differentiates you in the jewellery world. Our success was due to the fact that we make affordable pink diamond jewellery and not just one-of-a-kind pieces that cost a fortune.” Rio Tinto, the Anglo-Australian corporation, who have ethically managed the Argyle diamond mine since 1983, owns the Argyle Pink Diamond brand trademark that licenses select ateliers and some fifteen authorized partners. “Luxury jewellers must qualify to buy directly from the Argyle mine. The hurdle bar is very high and based on criteria such as design capability, financial backing, ability to develop the market, global reach and commitment to an ethical supply chain” Josephine Johnson, manager of Argyle Pink Diamonds, explains. In turn being an ‘Argyle Pink Diamonds Select Atelier’ means that you can access rare and beautiful diamonds directly from the Argyle mine and work with their limited edition pieces. “We also bid directly at the Argyle Pink Diamond Tender every year where the best 50-60 diamonds are offered for sale”, Ulrik adds. “I have seen many beautiful gems in my life. However, every year it feels like Christmas Eve before the annual Argyle Pink Diamond Tender in September. The rich and intense Argyle pink colours make my heart skip a beat. Especially the Vivid Purplish Pink colours that are my favourites.” This is just the kind of jewellers you want in your life; ones that think long-term, are passionate, can be trusted and are committed to accompany you on your precious journey. “In today’s world I find it exciting to create

beautiful ‘long-life luxury items’ that are treasured and often passed on to the next generation”, Ulrik says, “a lot of designs are cast aside after just a few years if the jewellery does not speak to your heart. If you create classic and timeless jewellery with soul and high quality, it will have a long lifespan and generations will enjoy it after you.” Ulrik’s childhood dream was to become a silversmith. However, he soon realised that he was not a very good craftsman, being much more proficient at sourcing and finding ‘ingredients’. It all started when his mother met her second husband who was in the second-hand silver and jewellery business; Ulrik was about ten at the time. “Every evening he would come home with silver and jewellery and I was to guess what he had paid for it at auction or from private sales. I found it very exciting and became good at guessing the value”, Ulrik shares. “After a while, he started asking questions about the objects themselves and I was forced to study them – it was fantastic schooling! When I reached sixteen, I had amassed a lot of knowledge, which helped me start working in an auction house in the gold and silver department.” From nineteen to twenty-six, Ulrik managed a jewellery shop, running the business with twelve people under his wing. Setting up his own company was therefore an obvious and logical next step in his career, having accumulated a lot of experience (identifying, valuing, selling) and having stamina, drive and ambition. The Scandinavian design tradition is ingrained in Hartmann’s. Ulrik credits a lot of beautiful silver from silversmith Georg Jensen for inspiring him. “Especially the designs from the 1930-1950s that have this minimalistic look that we try to bring into our jewellery. “Less is more is my mantra”, he says. “Scandinavian or European women in today’s modern world want functional and timeless jewellery that they can wear throughout the whole day. They want to be able to wear their jewellery when they take their kids to school, when they work, shop or during a romantic dinner with their partner.” It is true that Hartmann’s creations are sublimely understated yet unmistakably feminine. Ulrik favours formal compositions with stones that are cut with careful consideration. Every piece seems to capture the elusive essence of timeless composure, with pink diamonds either as elegant highlights or as stars of the jewel. A jewellery piece can have many qualities – sentimental, ornamental, and celebratory – but only rarely does it convey a special mood: bliss.

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Photo courtesy of HARTMANN © HARTMANN

Jewellery Historian

Pure Love Ring in cocolong stone/ fine Russian agate and rose gold set with heart shaped 1.25 ct. Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink Tender stone.

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Ring in platinum set with a 0.50 ct. radiant-cut Natural Fancy Intense Pink/P1 diamond, surrounded by 46 diamonds, total 0.30 ct., 8 oval cut diamonds, total 0.87 ct. and 4 trapeze-cut diamonds, total 0.32 ct. All Top Wesselton/VVS-SI

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Photo courtesy of HARTMANN © HARTMANN

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Pearl pendant in 18 ct. two-coloured gold set with 16 x 22 mm drop Tahiti pearl, 0.86 ct. Top Wesselton(F)/VS1 cushion-cut diamond, 0.30 ct. trapeze-cut natural Pink diamond and total 1.80 ct. Fancy Pink and white diamonds. GIA certificate.

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A pair of unique diamond chandelier earrings in 18 ct. two-coloured gold set with 22 criss-cut diamonds, total 8.68 ct. Top Wesselton/VVS-VS diamonds and 20 natural Fancy Intense Pink diamonds, total 1.89 ct.

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Ancient Rose Pink diamond cocktail ring in 18 ct. white gold set with 0.77 ct. cushion-cut Fancy Intense Purplish Pink/SI2 2011 Argyle Pink Tender stone, 6 white cushion-cut diamonds, 2 pear-shaped white diamonds and 106 small white diamonds, total 2.42 ct.

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There is indeed no fuss or frills; each Hartmann’s piece brims with subtlety and intelligence, presenting pink diamonds to reveal the best of their potential. “Whenever you look into the dazzling facets of a pink diamond, you become spellbound. It is hard to look away. The rich warm colour and depth tells a unique story of profound transformation, of enormous energy and of endless time. A pink diamond contains a never-ending stream of light from the past but also a glimpse into the future”, Ulrik observes. With such power comes a great legacy so that in each pink diamond jewel, Hartmann’s hides a small Argyle pink diamond inside the piece; while on Hartmann´s signature pieces there is a classic H inscribed as trademark. In 2012, they were invited by Rio Tinto to exhibit unique Argyle pink diamond jewellery in the exhibition ‘Out of the Vault: Pink Diamonds and Royalty’ at Kensington Palace, London, as part of Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee. This event was Hartmann’s undeniable international breakthrough, as the Danish jewellers were exhibiting alongside houses like Graff and Moussaieff. “We really had to think outside the box to get some attention. As a result, we decided to make a classic pink cocktail ring (old English style) in a simple Scandinavian design. The ‘Ancient Rose’ ring symbolizes the beautiful pink roses seen in the flower gardens and shows of England. The softly delicate pink colour surrounded by soft cushion cut diamonds give the impression that one can almost smell the rose,” Ulrik comments. A further spellbinding piece unveiled at the exhibition was another ring, ‘Pure Love’; a unique design featuring an exceptional 1.25-carats Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink heart shaped diamond, seamlessly inlaid into a cacholong stone (a fine Russian white agate). “The smooth white contrast of the cacholong with the vibrant pink heart symbolizes deep passion and pure sentiment. The ring was commissioned as a gift and given as a precious declaration of love”, Ulrik notes.

will treasure the excitement I witnessed from my customers for many years to come”, Ulrik sighs. So what will they do when the Argyle Pink Diamond mines expire? “We will cry! There will still be Argyle Pink diamonds on the market from more than thirty years of trading, but it will certainly be harder and more expensive to source the right stones,” Ulrik explains. In addition and in testament to their serious reputation and leadership position in the market, Hartmann’s has also become the sole and exclusive partner of Boucheron in Scandinavia. “We have good friends in Zurich that recommended me to the Boucheron brand. We had discussions for some time to make sure this was the right match for both us. Besides, Boucheron are in no hurry to open a lot of retail points”, Ulrik says. “They are rather looking for long-term partnerships based on mutual passion and commitment; and as we share the same vision about storytelling and educating our customers, it works very well.” As for educating, Ulrik’s motto is ‘knowledge is power’. He has spent time and energy educating his customers, organizing seminars and workshops, creating catalogues. “Diamonds are magical! But diamonds are also very different. Some years ago we also made http://hartmanns.com/hartmanns-diamond-guide – a website focusing on the basic knowledge about the 4 C’s explained in an engaging way. Customers are still eager to understand this side of their purchase”, Ulrik notes. After knowing customers and their families for more than twenty years, Ulrik’s greatest pleasure is to meet his ‘babies’ (jewellery creations) and see how they have become important keepsakes and treasures for their owners. Moreover customers often pull him aside in the shop and ask “do you remember when we designed this piece on such and such special occasion?” and they press on by confiding that “it has never left my hand since!”

More recently the ‘Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender 2016’ world premiere in Copenhagen was another milestone for Ulrik after many years of hard work. Organised in the Moltkes Palace, the event took place in the grand salon, where Hartmann’s jewellery was also on show, displayed in glass cabinets aligned on each side of the room. The Tender 2016 itself was exhibited at the far end of the same room. “The event went exceptional well and when I look back, I feel so proud and honoured to have had this opportunity just five years before the Argyle mine is due for closure. It was an amazing moment to show these rare gems for the first time to about a thousand clients, and I

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Jewellery Historian

Pink diamond ear rings in 18 ct. two-coloured gold set with 3.01 ct. step-cut Top Wesselton (G)/VS1-SI1 diamonds, 1.92 ct. pink fancy cut diamonds surrounded by 210 pink and white brilliants.

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Pink brilliant-cut diamond ring in 18 ct. rose gold set with 5 Fancy Intense Pink diamonds, total 1.52 ct. flanked by 44 natural Fancy Intense Pink diamonds, total 0.44 ct.

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"Pink Sky" Ring in platinum set with 0.36 ct. Natural Fancy Intense Pink/SI2 Tender diamond from 2015 flanked by 16 baguette-cut diamonds, total 0.36 ct. 1.63 Top Wesselton/VVS surrounded by 34 small diamonds, total1.70 ct. Top Wesselton/VVS.

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Bracelet in 18 kt. two-coloured gold set with 12 brilliant-cut diamonds, total 4.01 ct. River (D-E)/VVS1-VVS2 surrounded by 192 diamonds, total 0.92 ct. Top Wesselton/VVS-SI and 52 Fancy Intense pink/VVS-SI diamonds, total 0.89 ct.

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Earrings in 18 kt. two coloured gold set with 2 old mine brilliants, total 4.02 F-G/VVS2-VS2 diamonds surrounded by 54 brilliants, total 0.44 ct. Top Wesselton/VS and 40 Natural Fancy Intense pink/SI diamonds, total 0.40 ct.

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”The Otto” A superb Argyle trilogy ring in 18 ct. two-coloured gold set with 2.55 ct. radiant-cut E colour diamond and two matching Argyle Fancy Vivid Pink radiant-cut diamonds 1,05 carat and 1,09 carat.

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Bracelet in 18 kt. white gold set with 3 Fancy Cut diamonds, total 2.69 Top Wesselton/VVS-VS and 6 diamonds, total 0.37 ct. Top Wesselton/VVS-VS.

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Hj Haute joaillerie

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MELLERIO DITS MELLER

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H AU T E J OA I L L E R I E by Olivier Dupon

Collection Privée The private collection of Mellerio dits Meller For its “Private Collection”, Mellerio has created a range of dazzling colours and bold forms. Eager to return the long-standing expertise of its workshops at the heart of the creative process, it has decided to celebrate its History by digging into its archives and paying homage to the stunning pieces of the previous generation of designers and by dipping into its exceptional reserve of precious stones. 129


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Collection Privée is a first step towards modernising the name and it is going to be followed by a refurbishing of the historical boutique at 9 rue de la Paix, a complete revamp of the graphic charter, and further high jewellery collections early in 2017.

It is never too late. So let’s talk about the latest high jewellery collection from Mellerio dits Meller, which was unveiled last July in Paris, Collection Privée. It is a milestone collection on several counts. Traditionally the house has been passed from father to son, but now a woman, Laure-Isabelle Mellerio, is at the helm of art direction. Her series of eleven high jewellery pieces (eight rings, two pairs of earrings and one pendant) exude femininity, grace and sensuality. For this collection, Laure-Isabelle has delved into the mesmerising archives of tens of thousands of drawings and records, spanning from 1825 to the end of the 20th century. She was particularly struck by the ebullient creativity that occurred during the Second Empire (1852-1870). Her husband, Laurent Mellerio, was appointed CEO of the house in 2015, and as result the oldest high jewellery house in the world is piloted by a couple for the first time, a couple whose fresh vision and ambition will propel Mellerio dits Meller into the future. Collection Privée is a first step towards modernising the name and it is going to be followed by a refurbishing of the historical boutique at 9 rue de la Paix, a complete revamp of the graphic charter, and further high jewellery collections early in 2017. It is evident that Laurent and Laure-Isabelle plan to put Mellerio dits Meller back on the map and to present it to a wider audience. Since September 27, the public has been able to admire thirty-five exceptional Mellerio antique pieces that are included in the ‘Spectaculaire Second Empire’ exhibition at the Musée d’Orsay. It took two years for the Mellerio team to identify and source these splendid examples, each and every one testament to the house’s tremendous legacy and modernity before its time. Collection Privée is an artful exercise in colour, volume and contrast, but also a statement that size does not matter. The pieces are indeed ‘cocktail’ in aesthetics but reasonable in dimension. These are not pieces that will drop to one or the other side of your finger due to their weight, nor have they a ‘look at me’ appeal: they are very well proportioned, the antithesis of ostentatious jewellery, the synonym of keepsakes. Laure-Isabelle was indeed inspired by 50s designs from the house, as well as rare gemstones that she has found in the coffers. These unused stones were the starting point for each creation of Collection Privée, and further gems were acquired to complement the colour schemes. Worth noting are a rare emerald-cut rubelite with hues of intense pink and red, a padparadscha sapphire with a unique peach tinge, a deep fancy yellow 1.05-carat diamond and a Burmese cabochon ruby. The first gem shines in the ‘Paratii Ring’, where the carnation tint has been accentuated with multi-coloured rose-cut sapphires. Similarly the padparadscha sapphire presides over the ravishing ‘Porto Ercole’ ring with its supporting angel skin coral beads and tsavorite cabochons. In complete contrast the yellow diamond is dramatically ignited by black onyx in the ‘Cape Cod Ring’, while the Burmese ruby is enhanced by the softness of delicate fine pearls in the ‘Livadia Ring’. If anything these renditions attest to LaureIsabelle’s instinct for colour and her talent in knowing just how to orches-

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MINORCA ring Emerald cut aquamarine (16,92 ct), 16 cabochon sapphires (4,2 ct), 8 cabochon moonstones (1,99 ct), Diamonds (F-G/VS+) 0,44 ct

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PARATII ring Step cut rubellite (8,85 ct), 8 rose cut orange sapphires (8,41 ct), 2 rose cut pink sapphires (1,62 ct), 4 rose cut yellow sapphires (3,24 ct), Diamonds (0,23ct)

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CAPE COD ring Fancy deep yellow diamond (1,05 ct), 13 yellow diamonds (0,93 ct), Onyx

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LIVADIA ring Myanmar cabochon ruby (3,25 ct), 14 natural pearls (2,29 ct), 85 paving diamonds (1,47 ct), 20 rubbies (0,55 ct)

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GOA ring Central emerald (1,96 ct), 110 diamonds (2,11 ct), 22 Paraiba tourmalines (0,70ct), 39 sapphires (1,27 ct), 60 emeralds (1,04 ct)

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This is a joyful and eclectic collection, a celebration of Mellerio’s tradition as well as a departure from what competitors do.

trate them. This is a joyful and eclectic collection, a celebration of Mellerio’s tradition as well as a departure from what competitors do (e.g. collections based on ‘theme’ ensembles, in other words necklace with matching ring and earrings). Shall I add that the price point is highly competitive when you take into consideration the signature, the quality of the components and most importantly the input of the acclaimed in-house atelier? In part this novel approach could be due to Laure-Isabel’s education, which sets her apart from other high jewellery art directors: she is in fact an interior architect, an Art historian as well as a gemmologist. No wonder then that her approach is ‘quirky’ and that it offers redefinition of what haute joaillerie’s parameters are. A forward thinking, out of the box perspective is indeed more than welcome. Long live Mellerio dits Mellers! www.mellerio.fr

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PORTO ERCOLE ring Padparadscha oval sapphire (4,03 carats), tsavorite cabochon (2,12 carats), coral, diamonds (0,40 carat), pink gold

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LIKOMA ring Pear-shaped pink tourmaline (4,18 ct), 10 pink, grey, white and golden natural pearls, Diamonds (3,50 ct)

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NOSY BE ring Cushion cut violet sapphire (1,73 ct), 2 Cushion cut pink sapphires (1,84 ct & 1,65 ct), 2 Oval cut pink sapphires (0,92 ct & 0,88 ct), 4 triangle cut amethysts (1,28 ct), Diamonds (0,58 ct)

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

ALESSIO BOSCHI The best way to get to know Alessio Boschi is simply to sit down and listen. As soon as you ask him a few questions, just beware, as this will open a floodgate of fascinating information, comments and confidences. The proof is in the following multi-pages exclusive interview, the biggest we ever published, which will take you some time to go through. Discover the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poet of grace and beautyâ&#x20AC;?. 141


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The best way to get to know Alessio Boschi is simply to sit down and listen. As soon as you ask him a few questions, just beware, as this will open a floodgate of fascinating information, comments and confidences. The proof is in the following multi-pages of Q&A (mostly answers!), which will take you some time to go through. But trust me when I say that Alessio’s answers are like a good book: at the end, you will feel as if you personally know the Italian jewellery designer. Besides looking at his work, it makes sense that there is no straightforward, simple way of describing what goes on in Alessio’s mind. Each piece is a feat of layer upon layer of storytelling and detail. Baroque, intricate, plentiful, lavish… Many adjectives and none that do it justice. So let’s not waste anymore time and just enter Alessio Boschi’s world. Olivier Dupon - What makes you passionate about jewellery design? Alessio Boschi - We could talk for hours about this, but the simple answer, really, is the jewellery itself, and the process of creation, from original idea to final jewel; it is the constant challenge to improve and to surprise, while trying to be neither repetitive nor banal. The gemstones, the designs, the production stages, the people and artisans you encounter, the customers – all those factors contribute to the challenge. You have to be able, not only to see what is going on in the market and to bring new, creative and interesting ideas into play, but to be a salesman and defend your ideas. You must combine all that with a few psychological skills if you want to understand the people you are working with and your customers; I am a Roman and therefore not really the most diplomatic person all the time! OD - Artist/Designer/Artisan/Architect/Composer/Poet - Is there one or more (or none) denomination that best describes you? AB - All I want is to create and to touch people – to bring a note of amazement and whimsicality to their lives; that is good enough for me. But let me look at some of those words … The Artist: well, I still believe in the romantic old idea that a real artist should be free from any commercial interference, but jewellery is connected with value and commerce and today, more and more, jewellery is considered a form of investment; only rarely is the purchase motivated by a passionate instinct to please yourself or another. So, I would rather people call me a ‘creative’. Hav-

ing said that, I did have an interesting conversation with my partner a few weeks ago about this very matter. I was told I should accept the modern world, in which all the art forms are connected with the market and related industries (PR, marketing, sales, etc.) and start looking at my creations ‘with Respect’! I am definitely a designer. I have had some, limited, experience of designing other accessories and, while I feel that the world of watches is too geometrical, too technical and mechanical for me, I would love to experiment with other, related items: bags and shoes, bottles, table accessories, glass and other objects, ceramics. I like sculpture and painting but I am not a painter or a sculptor. I don’t think I am an artisan. It is important to say that I am not a goldsmith myself. Of course, I can say with confidence that I have an extensive knowledge of jewellery, after twenty-six years in this field, but I never stop learning from others’ work, through curiosity and observation. I like to see myself rather as a conductor: someone who puts together amazing artisans to create a beautiful symphony. I continue to have the honour and pleasure of being near real maestros: incredible engravers, unique goldsmiths, exceptional micro-mosaicists, talented painters and wonderful stonecutters and carvers. (I have also met excellent, skilled sales-and-marketing people, photographers and graphic designers; I am personally involved in all of that). I love to be the first one, who presents and writes the stories behind each of my creations, but I also orchestrate a great team, which works with the unified purpose of achieving a beautiful new jewellery creation, filled with passion and details. Relatedly, I like the definition of an architect, for example, as a person who is responsible for inventing or realising a particular idea or project – someone who plans, devises or organises something. Sometimes, in the past, I have had disputes with marketing people, in some of the geographical areas in which I was working, due to the poverty of their language and their artistic, historical and geographical ignorance. Despite the fact that my English grammar is not so good and that I tend to ‘Italianise’ my language – using long and perhaps too descriptive sentences – the richness of my mother tongue, and my knowledge of Latin and Greek, have helped me a lot in describing my creations with a poetic and passionate flair. This is where poetry comes in. Translations lose that peculiar character that I want people to perceive from my jewellery and also from my descriptions. Today, in my company, I am the one who writes the descriptions and the narratives that I consider the real soul of each creation. Only when I am sufficiently satisfied with what I wrote, after hours of research, do I send the writing

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Photo courtesy of ALESSIO BOSCHI © ALESSIO BOSCHI

Jewellery Historian

HOMAGE TO THE PIAZZA NAVONA Palladium and Gold 18KT 269.32 gms - White Diamond 4.411 cts - White Diamond Baquette 0.12 cts - Pearls 1.20 cts - Emerald 5.407 cts (131 pcs) - Paraiba 260.268 cts (282 pcs) - Blue Sapphire 1.275 cts - Blue Baby Akoya 11 (2-3.5mm)

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to my English-speaking friends, especially to my journalist friend in the U.S. So, I am closest, perhaps, to a poet, not only because I attentively choose the different elements to create a piece jewellery, as a poet does by carefully choosing each word, but because I don’t want to keep secret those hours and months of work. I want to share them and to describe jewellery to people, in order to touch the heart and soul. Those descriptions and inspirations, supported by reference pictures and sketches, are very strong marketing tools for my sales team. My trunk shows also work better when I have a one-to-one meeting with a customer and have enough time to properly take them by hand and show them the differences between, and stories behind, my three collections. Then those people know my style and are ready, perhaps, for the creation of something uniquely and designed exclusively for them – a jewel that perhaps holds, hidden somewhere, a bit of their own life journey. This is, for me, real ‘luxury’, as it is soulful. OD - If you weren’t head of a fine jewellery house today, what would have been your ‘Plan B’? AB - The first answer that crossed my mind is too indecent to write about! The sexual aspect of life has always intrigued me – it is so fascinating, but sometimes so dangerous. Apart from the above, questionable, answer, I have two others. I would probably be a design director and product developer at another company, as I have been in the past. Those two roles must be handled by the same mind, in my opinion, so that the final creation really is made as the creative mind initially conceived it. In most companies today, the design and product development areas are separated, and this discrepancy is reflected in the final product. Of course, I had to start my career as a simple designer, not much involved in production, but I was always curious and I always wanted to talk to the goldsmiths and model makers, so that I was able to explain my concepts and, at the same time, learn more about jewellery from them. Jewellery is my world and I was lucky enough to discover it at an early stage of my life, so I find it difficult to think of something else that would please me as much as jewellery does. It is highly addictive to work with gems and their sparkling colours and cuts, and each stone is a new universe to discover. However, a few people have told me that I would be a great actor or entertainer! I would love to handle my own show – to invite people to share their experiences, perhaps in the format of a journalistic debate or a

family reunion show, or even a talent show. I would have fun, with a touch of scandal and provocation for the audience, in order to disturb average public opinion and more conservative ideas. I like challenges and I like debates and confrontations, as long as they do not escalate into violence. OD - When did you know that this is what you wanted to do? Have you had a defining moment or an epiphany that prompted your career? AB - The first time that I came across the jewellery world was apparently at the age of seven: my mother took me to Athens to see the Treasure of Philip II, father of Alexander the Great – newly discovered in Vergina (part of the Greek Macedonian Empire) and exhibited at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. I totally forgot about this until I was about twenty-two years old: I was living and working in Greece and my mother recalled this story to me one Christmas when I went home. She added that I was so enthralled by the crowns and those Hellenistic jewels that it was impossible to drag me away from the cases. The first time that I knew for myself what I wanted was when I ended my high-school education and enrolled at the Accademia Costume & Moda in Rome; I couldn’t wait and signed up for the fashion course in July, waiting for the course to actually start at the beginning of September. That same summer my friends made me realise that I was actually stopping at every jewellery-shop window in the centre of Rome to admire the details and gemstones. Italy has some big brand names for jewellery, together with incredible independent shops. After that, I started to purchase jewellery magazines and books and my eagerness to gain more knowledge became so intense that it is still alive and kicking to this day. Lessons in my first two years were taught inside a sixteenth-century building with five-metre-high ceilings, full of frescoes. Students of fashion, students of costume, students of jewellery and graphic design – we were all in a symbiotic and friendly environment. I was no longer the ‘strange and unusual’ creative guy of my high school, wearing colourful clothes, listening to classical music and ‘wasting’ my time in museums. I was in my field, with similar, ‘strange’ people. There were many more glorious moments: when I won a design contest in Lyon (France) with a shell brooch, or when I won the amazing Japan International Pearl Contest, Kobe in 1994 (I was the only Western designer to be so awarded). My second year at Baselworld [international

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watch and jewellery show] was also incredible: thanks to the collection I designed for an Australian pearl company, we had over 60 journalists from around the world visit and reached the sales target on the third day of the trade fair. The production manager of Van Cleef & Arpels left me speechless and a bit emotional after he entered our booth in Basel and congratulated me for my creativity. It happened again this year, but this time it was my brand and my booth at Baselworld 2016. OD - When did you launch your jewellery brand? AB - In September 2010, after five years, I left the pearl company I had been working for in Sydney and founded the Lux2Lux Company with my best friend, Martino Eduardo Convertino. We registered the brand name ALESSIO BOSCHI, not out of narcissism, but because I wanted to ride the wave of success from the awards I had won. I consider the relationship with the media the real ‘business card’ that opens the gates of brand recognition and success. To build up great contacts takes time and money, while to be forgotten or to make mistakes is very easy in such a fast-growing world. My name was still very ‘hot’ at that time and, as I had the ridiculous sum of just a few thousand dollars and no family name in jewellery behind me, the only way to establish a commercial business was to use my reputation and my success to build up relationships and get credit. I worked for about three years from Australia before deciding to move to Asia. Living in Australia, far away from the production site, made things very difficult for someone like me, who had decided to focus on one-of-a-kind and highly detailed creations, so I moved to Thailand. I believe that, right now, the best place in the world for jewellery production and gemstones is Bangkok, where reputable international companies are producing high-standard jewellery for some of the biggest brands and jewellery houses worldwide. This was the beginning of my new journey – moving production and office operations to Bangkok in 2013 was the start of a more efficient business model for my company. At Baselworld in 2015, the brand was made visible to the European market and I used this prestigious location to present my new collections, without being ashamed to disclose the Asian base of my operations. I wanted to show the world that it doesn’t matter where you produce but who is behind the scenes. At the show, I had amazing conversations with the production teams of some incredible European jewellery brands, and with established Russian, Arab and Chinese jewellers: those people could not believe the quality I achieved and that the creations were not made in Italy, France or Switzerland (some parts of them were, ac-

tually! I refer to the ‘micro-mosaic’ or ‘ramage’ and handengraved details, made in Rome). OD - What is the best memory you associate with your jewellery? AB - The first really memorable moment arrived when, in front of a few hundred people, I was called on stage in Kobe to collect my award from the Japan International Pearl Contest. At that time, I didn’t speak much English and I just raised the champagne glass in the traditional Italian manner, screaming ‘CIN CIN!’ meaning ‘Cheers!!!’ The crowd stopped talking and everyone stared at me – I was about to pronounce the same word again when my friend Aiko quickly ran up behind me and whispered, ‘Alessio, sorry, but Japanese do not like to talk about sex in public!’ – in Japan, the word ‘Cin’ refers to a male sexual attribute … Someone quickly made sure that the next category winner would also be called on stage, and they kindly escorted me back to my seat! The UK Jewellery Awards in London in 2009 and, in New York, the VERANDA Art of Design Awards of 2010, were held in amazing venues and I met very important people. The Centurion Design Awards and the ceremony at the Wynn of Las Vegas for the Couture Design Awards were really enthralling too. I should say, though, that the pleasure and excitement of those unique memories are renewed every time that I show one of my creations to a new customer and see her surprise or a smile on her face. OD - What are the personality traits that have led you to where you are today? AB - I am ambitious. People tend to attach to this word a negative meaning, associating it with being unscrupulous and careerist. For me, to be ambitious has a positive impact; a person who possesses this quality wants to improve and to reach a high goal in his or her life, though they should do it with respect for social and ethical values and for other cultures too. I think that curiosity, also, is the basis of self-improvement and of knowledge, enabling one to demolish social or self-inflicted boundaries. It helps one, not only to acquire knowledge, but to be a very understanding, flexible and kind person as regards other customs and cultures. Despite what my sister and mother may say, I think I am also quite a humble person. It is not always easy to cultivate this quality – I had to go through certain difficult stages, and admit and face my mistakes, so that I could treasure feedback and the lessons learnt.

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FONTANA earrings 18KT WG 12.97 gms - White Diamond 0.23 cts - Tsavorite 0.05 cts - Opal 2/10.25 cts

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Unfortunately, I become more and more a businessman every day and have to deal with unpleasant matters, far from my real nature and interests. This relatively new approach has made me very stressed and my tolerance is quite thin, especially in regard to hypocrisy, lies and unnecessary abuse. Dealing with new markets can put experience and tolerance to the test; I explain to the sales team at my company the characteristics of designs and the unique details of their making, but I am sometimes astonished by the narrowed-mindedness and demands of some customers. However, part of my mission is to enlarge, and even try to change for the better, customers’ initial thoughts or visions; at the same time, I learn a lot from them in terms of different customs and taste.

think of and design something for them on the spot. Some of our clients show me exceptional or interesting gemstones and, in a matter of minutes – after asking them a few questions about their life stories, their desires, ambitions or memories – I start to sketch something ‘custom’, only for them. This is really one of the biggest advantages I have and has made my operation even more unique.

When I sketch a new idea and I talk with the manufacturer, I am not taking ‘NO’ for an answer – determination in achieving results is another personality trait! Almost everything can be achieved in jewellery – it is only a matter of two factors: time and money. I like to clarify that, in terms of quality and beauty, the word ‘compromise’ is not part of my vocabulary. If a customer is not 100-per-cent convinced of what I am definitely sure about, then I do everything in my power to convince him or her, though I am not one of those rigid people who will never listen his client’s suggestions. When I read interviews with some of my colleagues, I get so annoyed: ‘a customer MUST accept my design at my time and price conditions without any exception and without any comment because I know better and I am the designer.’ There should be a soft compromise between our creative ideas and knowledge and the client’s requests and favourite style. Good communication is essential here – though I admit that, early on, ‘hand language’ (which every Italian practices from birth) helped me on more than one occasion!

Learn from others’ experiences – be flexible and selfaware, especially about mistakes you may have made. Process and treasure these and try to make a new mistake every time, instead of repeating the same one.

Every successful person who wants to achieve positive results by selling his or her professionalism, or through any creative or business strategy, should also have some psychological skill. Such a person should be able to understand the strong and weak points of the people he has before him and, consequently, be able to relate to them in a more effective way. I think I possess enough communication and psychological skills and awareness, not only to survive in a hard and sometimes even ruthless commercial world, but also to remain amiable and affable. Finally, I am have been given a strong creativity, which I am able to express graphically, in a clear and expressive way, and in a very short period of time. After our exclusive customers have been introduced to new collections and purchased one or more creations, they often ask me to

OD - What would be the most important advice you would now tell your younger self? AB - Be humble as far as you can, trying to learn from people around you! Travel the world, open your mind and ask questions.

However, do not accept, indiscriminately, any compromise, without first processing and considering whether it harms your integrity! Be like the bamboo in the Chinese proverb: tall and strong but not too hard – when the strong wind comes, bamboo bends but does not break. Try to build the main characteristics of your style, the ones that will make you different and unique – recognisable and therefore valuable. Coco Chanel said ‘In order to be irreplaceable, one must always be different.’ I have this sentence painted on the violet wall of my office. Try to pursue ethically correct behaviour as regards other people and our planet. If a rich customer asks you to make an ivory or a coral jewel, or to use an endangered species’ skin, fur or feathers, you should politely decline. By doing that, you are helping to change the perception that a luxury product should involve the death or the harming of some sea creature or animal. You are actually contributing, if not necessarily as an activist, to the preservation of our planet, and showing your strength and values even as a young designer. People will learn, with time, how to respect you as a person and as an artist. OD - How long does it take to perfect a design? AB - Sometime the sketch can take a few minutes, sometimes longer, and, sometimes, after I purchase a gemstone, the idea is not ready until much later. In any case, after the first idea is put on paper, I need much more time to design all the details and prepare the different instructions for the manufacturer; those details can take one or

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Photo courtesy of ALESSIO BOSCHI © ALESSIO BOSCHI

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THE STAR OF TAJ ring 18KT WG/RG 17.51 gms - Blue Sapphire Pear Shape 5.42 cts - White Diamond 0.96 cts - Yellow Diamond 1.21 cts Black Diamond 0.03 cts - Emerald Round 11.42 cts

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THE STAR OF TAJ ring 18KT WG/RG 17.51 gms - Blue Sapphire Pear Shape 5.42 cts - White Diamond 0.96 cts - Yellow Diamond 1.21 cts Black Diamond 0.03 cts - Emerald Round 11.42 cts

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Photo courtesy of ALESSIO BOSCHI © ALESSIO BOSCHI

Jewellery Historian

THE STAR OF TAJ ring 18KT WG/RG 17.51 gms - Blue Sapphire Pear Shape 5.42 cts - White Diamond 0.96 cts - Yellow Diamond 1.21 cts Black Diamond 0.03 cts - Emerald Round 11.42 cts

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Photo courtesy of ALESSIO BOSCHI © ALESSIO BOSCHI

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THE STAR OF TAJ ring 18KT WG/RG 17.51 gms - Blue Sapphire Pear Shape 5.42 cts - White Diamond 0.96 cts - Yellow Diamond 1.21 cts Black Diamond 0.03 cts - Emerald Round 11.42 cts

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two days but, in some cases, the design is only finalised after weeks. And this is just for the pure, hand-sketched design; then, I supervise, and usually correct, a model in wax, and oversee the casting and the finishing, going through settings and sourcing other decorative stones (assuming that the main gem is usually provided by me). While the manufacturer is making a piece – which can take up to three months, or more in the case of complicated necklaces (some, due to their complicated design, require over six months) – we are collecting all the pictures and the materials to help me write the background story. It is important to say that, during production, many changes can occur, even up to the very final touch or the very final ideal, added at the last minute, which is often what makes our jewellery unique and whimsical. OD - Could you describe in detail how you are able to achieve the superb intricacies within your pieces. AB - For some collections, everything might start with the observation of an architectural detail, or with a story that fascinated me or a symbol or an artefact I saw somewhere. At other times, especially when I am in Asia, I can spend hours with a gemstone and am as happy as a kid in a candy store – I love touching the gems and moving them between my fingers, to see the potential hidden within their facets. As soon as I chose a gem, it is as if it wants to talk to me, trying to reveal its secrets, and something begins. Soon, all the pieces come together and a form begins to be assembled in my mind: this three-dimensional image, which turns in my brain like a hologram, is transposed onto a sheet of white paper. The really painful part of this wonderful job, for all creative people, is the business part! Sometimes, I would love to remain inside my creative bubble instead of dealing with finance, with buyer negotiations and with temporary business partners. It is our belief at ALESSIO BOSCHI that each piece of jewellery should come with a story, which is the real soul of the jewel itself and distinguishes it from other products. We consider the passion we put into the creation of every single piece a really Italian approach. Of course, I might be quite pleased with the result but, as soon as I finish a creation, I like to think about the next one – the next step and new collection. I believe (and this is Michelangelo’s concept, explained 500 years ago) that in every material, in every stone, exists the seed of a future idea. Somehow, each stone carries, hidden inside, the potential to be expressed as and sublimated in something exceptionally beautiful. To be able to catch at least a sparkle of this potential is the secret formula in the process of jewellery creation. When I start a new piece, the most fascinating part is

this special relationship I have with the stones. I know this seems a bit crazy and believe me, I would probably think the same if I did not experience myself the exact sensation! After a stone has ‘talked’ to me, there is a new, inner sense of dissatisfaction sparked, difficult to explain with words, which requires me to go deeper in researching many architectonic, artistic or natural details that are related to the story I want to unveil. I will search through books and the internet and talk to people – I expand my knowledge by pursuing those stories and executing new details in parts of my jewel, even where they are eventually hidden behind secret doors or inside the ring’s band. Sometimes motifs are simplified and used around the ring shanks, or behind the earrings’ settings – they can even appear on earring clips. Sometimes there are designs around the length of a necklace, the volume of a bangle and the shapes of brooches, which have larger surfaces to play with: larger volumes allow more details to be studied, designed and created. Those bigger jewels become like a large canvas, where the painter can express himself easily and with fewer limitations. The small surface of rings makes this operation more delicate but, because designing rings has become an area of expertise, I love to surprise both the media and customers with detailed microsculptures hidden somewhere in the gallery or around the ring’s shanks. We always dedicate the result of the company’s works and the awards we get to the production people and hardworking artisans behind the scenes. Because of their important contributions, our creations find their way to our beloved followers, to proud owners and wearers, and even to the red carpet. OD - Is it possible to totally free-flow creatively and experiment, or does one always need to follow rules? AB - ‘Rules’ are not things I like to proscribe for the making of my jewellery and are definitely not followed in a simple sense. Of course, the manufacturer must consider wearability, the overall aesthetic sense and functionality. Volumes and details related to setting are also important, because, even in the most delicate encrusting of those gems, we should be sure that the stone will be safe and will not ‘jump out’. I once found this statement, which I believe is the quintessential answer to your question. It is from an artist called Rebekah Joy Plett and it runs as follows: “When you buy from an independent artist you are buying more than just a

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Neptune Brooch 18KT WG/RG 15.6 gms - Hauynite 0.48 cts - Black Bolder Opal 19.23 cts - Baby Akoya Silver Blue Pearls 6 pcs

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painting or a novel or a song. You are buying hundreds of hours of experimentation and thousands of failures. You are buying days, weeks, months, years of frustration and moments of pure joy. You are buying nights of worry about paying the rent, having enough money to eat, having enough money to feed the children, the birds, the dog. You aren’t just buying a thing. You are buying a piece of heart, part of a soul, a private moment in someone’s life. Most importantly, you are buying that artist more time to do something they are truly passionate about; something that makes all of the above worth the fear and the doubt; something that puts the life into the living.” OD - Apart from their inspiration, is there anything in your designs that make them quintessentially Italian? AB - Everything is Italian in the deepest meaning of this statement. Every creation comes from my heart and soul and you can even feel a drop of myself in there, in each of them! The process of creating a jewel itself is an on-going education – a methodology whereby to process each idea until the finish jewel is accomplished. Everything we make has to have a meaning and a story behind it and it is in this unceasing research into new inspirations, new motifs, forms and colour combinations that the very essence of my culture is mirrored. OD - What are the synergies between your jewellery and your passion for Italian history and architecture? AB - Architecture was considered one of the major arts of the Renaissance, a period which I adore and which, based on the Ancient Greek rule, stated the correct relationship for the human being to the space around him or her (the Golden Ratio). My country, also, has been an incredible source of inspiration, especially the architecture: in any little village, from the north near the Alps through to the south near Greece, I find sources of designs and symbols to study. Travelling through Italy has always been an amazing journey of discovery and enthralling emotion. The ‘Historica’ collection features intriguing stories and personalities from a luxurious past – either from our rich European history or from fascinating Oriental tales and other empires. Many jewels are decorated with details taken from fine architectural motifs and decorative structures from various historical and artistic periods or cultures worldwide. OD - Your thoughts on the following quote by Giuseppe Verdi: ‘Avrai tu l'universo, resti l'Italia a me’ (You may have the universe, but let Italy remain mine).

AB - I love travel, I love to see other cultures and to experience other customs, but I am definitely Italian. I deeply love my country – the arts, the food, the people, the traditions, the way I was taught at an early stage that we should always look to our heritage. I was taught that we should take lessons from this heritage and preserve it. You cannot separate Italy from Alessio Boschi, neither the brand nor the person: the way I talk with my hands; the knowledge I acquired by studying and observing the Italian arts in person – by visiting places, sites, museums, by talking with artists or maestros of different crafts – these all inform the work we do. The element of surprise that permeates the Roman Baroque is also an essential part of my style. Due to its favourable geographical position, Italy has been conquered by so many different ethnic groups, so many empires and cultures, one after another and sometimes at the same time in different areas. Such an interesting mix of cultures and customs, in a relatively small territory, allowed the bloodstream of Italians to become extremely creative and versatile. I believe that every Italian possesses a drop of blood from each of those cultures, and this is why, when we design, create or produce something, our taste and sense of beauty seem to be internationally acclaimed. If you take away my Italian-ness, you take away the real source of my creativity. OD - Your jewellery pays constant homage to Rome. Could you ever consider creating jewellery inspired by other cultures or cities? AB - I am Roman in many ways: the very spirit of my city is its Baroque heritage, from which spring the surprising and ludic elements of both the character of its indigenous inhabitants and the urban and artistic structure of the capital. At any corner, you can find a statue, a Madonna, an angel or a fountain to discover. Your eyes and your imagination are constantly challenged, and the senses overwhelmed by colours, perfumes and art, which are everywhere. It is easy to see the connections between my ‘Historica’ collection, for example, and the city where I was born. It is sufficient to spend one afternoon wandering between the little alleys of Trastevere and Centro Storico to understand where my detailed jewels are coming from. However, to think that my creations take only Rome as an inspiration would be wrong. I love to merge cultures and customs – not only from Italian culture, but also from other countries. For example, this year at Baselworld, in the ‘Historica’ collections alone, I presented to the media and clients a line of earrings and rings inspired by the Château

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THE MOGHUL PRIDE 18KT WG/YG 15.52 gms -White Diamond 0.96 cts - White Diamond Rose Cut Round 0.16 cts - White Diamond Rose Cut Pear Shape 1.47 cts - Yellow Diamond 0.04 cts - Violet Sapphire 1.35 cts - VSP 2/3.17 cts - Emerald Baquette 6.04 cts - Emerald Cushion Cabochon 10.22 cts

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THE MOGHUL PRIDE 18KT WG/YG 15.52 gms -White Diamond 0.96 cts - White Diamond Rose Cut Round 0.16 cts - White Diamond Rose Cut Pear Shape 1.47 cts - Yellow Diamond 0.04 cts - Violet Sapphire 1.35 cts - VSP 2/3.17 cts - Emerald Baquette 6.04 cts - Emerald Cushion Cabochon 10.22 cts

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THE MOGHUL PRIDE 18KT WG/YG 15.52 gms -White Diamond 0.96 cts - White Diamond Rose Cut Round 0.16 cts - White Diamond Rose Cut Pear Shape 1.47 cts - Yellow Diamond 0.04 cts - Violet Sapphire 1.35 cts - VSP 2/3.17 cts - Emerald Baquette 6.04 cts - Emerald Cushion Cabochon 10.22 cts

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de Versailles and the boudoir of Marie Antoinette; the Fountains of Rome collection; a golden lariat with matching earrings and ring, inspired by the Catherine Palace and its Amber Room, located just outside St Petersburg; and the Breakfast in Jaipur collection, consisting of coloured-gemstone rings, which are enriched by multicoloured, South Sea Keshi pearls, and earrings inspired by Moghul motifs and patterns. And more: the illuminating Qajar Pride ring and cufflinks, inspired by a mosque in Isfahan, Iran; the Venetian scenes in the Casanova and Palazzo rings; the Cathedral ring, inspired by the gothic façade and the most beautiful rose window in Italy, at the cathedral of Orvieto, in Umbria; the Fer Forgé Etoiles rings and matching earrings inspired by eighteenth-century, French, gilded ironwork. And that is not even to mention the jade jewellery I create for Beijing, inspired by Chinese culture, or the ‘Thalassa’ and the ‘Naturalia’ collections. Those last two feature sea creatures, plants and animals, and natural or physical phenomena (such as explosions of stars, raging volcanoes and beautiful glaciers) designed from observation of our beloved planet.

very carefully selected slices of pietersite – a fibrous, crystallised, black conglomeration of quartz with veins of other minerals, which, when moved under a source of light, can reveal metallic blue hues. The first impression I had was that of caressing the shining coat of a black panther. I have a few ideas for how to carve and insert this enchanting stone into some of our one-of-a-kind pieces.

OD - Please explain your fascination with coloured gemstones

One of the most exciting highlights of our journey has been to design a line featuring jade, for the Chinese luxury market. We started working without really having much knowledge of the characteristics of this precious gemstone. Now, after five amazing years, we have created twenty-two collections in jade: we were able to experiment with colour combinations, unifying different cultures and styles through the use of this marvellous gem and its strong symbolism. Its nuanced, semi-transparent appearance can range in colour from white to pale grey, light to intense purple, yellow to brown and then many hues of green. This stone has enchanted my imagination since, in my youth, I saw Bernardo Bertolucci’s [1987 film] The Last Emperor. ’Black’ jade, which, in its best quality, is actually in a very dark variety of green, is fascinating, not only because it allows neutral combinations with every other colour, but also because, due to the possibility of having slightly bigger pieces, it helps us to experiment with larger jewellery using Italian inlay work, called ‘ramage’. Lavender jadeite offered us the opportunity to create very highquality jewels, especially when combined with purple sapphires and natural yellow or pink diamonds. In December 2015, the Transformer Ara Pacis set, featuring two large cabochons of matching quality of emerald-green and lavender, transparent jade, was sold at a Hong Kong auction for 3.3 million dollars.

AB - As a designer it is natural for me to plunge myself into the wonderful world of gemstones. I’m not limited by the fire and sparkles of diamonds. I’m much more fascinated by particular colours or inclusions: how amazing is it to think that a Columbian emerald from Muzo contains the three stages of life, visible only using a microscope. How incredible would it be to be able to swim between molecules of water and crystal or aragonite, which give the lustre to each pearl? And what about the multicolour effects of opals? The ‘cat’s-eye’ effect of chrysoberyl and moonstones, which is related to their micro-inclusions? Elongated copper-like crystals of rutile inside quartz – the ancients believed these were the imprisoned hairs of Aphrodite! I am just amazed by the crystal world. I’m not looking just for the precious – this is a modern marketing factor, which doesn't impress me as a designer! Of course I am thrilled when I see a natural Burmese ‘pigeon-blood’ ruby or a fancy-colour diamond, but I'm always looking for new materials, new crystals, and unusual combinations of textures, inclusions or colours, to suggest an emotion that I wish to share through my jewellery. I came across some meteorite not long ago and the energy that I felt touching the pieces was amazing; moreover, the optical effects of their metallic surfaces (that have travelled through space) would be perfect for some trendy male jewellery. A few years ago, in Tucson, I bought a parcel of

One of the most amazing things in the jewellery world is that Mother Nature continues to teach and amaze us with her infinite resources. Crystals and minerals carry spiritual powers, which were harnessed in the ancient world to cure illness and perform rituals. Today, those gemstones, once cut and polished, are carefully placed within refined pieces of jewellery – they become precious talismans for our time, continuing to enchant us with their colour and intrinsic power. Asia offers us the facilities to work quickly and efficiently with a huge palette of coloured stones, including shades that would be very costly and difficult to obtain in such variety in Europe (though, of course, we still work with some great artisans in Italy).

Opals have always been fascinating stones for us and not only due to their multiple shades and sparks of light, which symbolise for us the constant change in one life’s journey.

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AMETHYST CORAL REEF 18KT White Gold 21.90 gms - White DIA 0.09 cts - Black DIA 0.45 cts - Brown DIA 1.17 cts - Tsavorite 0.33 - Purple Sapphires 0.44 cts - Keshi Pearls 9/0.75 gms - Amethyst 1/20.68 cts

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AMETHYST CORAL REEF 18KT White Gold 28.15 gms - White DIA 1.21 cts - Black DIA 1.17 cts - Brown DIA 2.22 cts - Tsavorite 2.89 - Purple Sapphire 3.70 cts - Amethyst 2/9.37 cts 2/Baroque White SSP (15.30mm-16.01mm)

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A few years ago, we experimented with beautiful, freeshape Mexican fire opals (with their orange through to bright yellow tones) while designing the ‘Lava’ collection. I love working with the relatively new, Ethiopian, multicoloured opals, with their intriguing rainbow colours and unique semi-transparency, though we must be careful to stabilise these or we risk the unfortunate ‘spider-net breakage effect’. Black Australian opals, the king of this gemstone family, are our most beloved and challenging stones. In 2013, we received awards in Hong Kong and at the Centurion Design Awards in Arizona, for the elegant Ivy set, which features an incredible, leaf-shaped, carved black opal.

OD - Is there a colour, texture or technique that you always include e.g. a signature?

Our expertise with what is considered the most sensual and feminine of the gemstones, the only lively and organic one of them – the pearl – has brought us on an enchanting journey, from fancy, natural colour, freshwater pearls, to Japan’s best-quality stones and Vietnam’s rarest, babyblue, natural Akoya, through the wonderful world of South Sea pearls. We love to work with this perfection of nature and match coloured gemstones with the multiple hues of those pearls: the Australian white and grey; the Philippino and Indonesian cream, yellow and gold; and the Tahitian rainbow of colours. In the past, I have also had the chance to work with natural abalone pearls – both in rare and unique shapes and in the blue Mabe variety farmed in New Zealand. I have been lucky enough to work with some of the rarest pearls in the world, focusing on natural white pearls from the Persian Gulf; the incredible Conch pearls with their flaming pinkish surface or pale, porcelain, angel-like skin; and some purplish Quahog, with their conic shape.

In the long journey between the primordial idea and the final piece, my jewellery maintains the original pathos – its distinctive soul. I prefer curved lines to sharp corners and I love to use minute details – unusual stones with amazing inclusions, often tailor-cut to achieve a certain impression. I am fascinated by colour, in multiple shades and contrasting tones, because it reminds me of the changeability of life. I fervently long for my jewels to suggest emotions, with the help of their three-dimensional volume, as a result of which the reflection of the light accentuates the curves and the glamour of the sparkling gemstones.

My ‘beauty award’, in terms of colour, undoubtedly goes to the Paraiba tourmaline. The intense hue of the neon blue variety form Brazil is incomparable, though some pastel nuances of turquoise blue and greenish-blue remind me of the tropical waters of the Pacific Ocean. Last year I snorkelled off Kho Lipe island in Thailand and took many pictures of the Andaman Sea. When I look at those beaches and the colour of the water, there is only one gemstone that crosses my mind: Paraiba, forever!

OD - How many collection or styles do you design on average, per year?

The six months required to create the Cedar necklace and matching earrings allowed me to work with a rare and very bright beryl variety found in the mines between Afghanistan and Pakistan: Panjshir emerald beryls. The mineral is very hard and comes in long strips of prismatic crystal formation, the risk of breakage is much higher than for their ‘brothers’ in Colombia, but their intense colour is breathtaking.

AB - I love to play with the different textures of gold: I often mix plain, polished gold with areas full of encrusted gemstones, engraved details or sandblasted carvings, and with the silky effect created on brushed surfaces. My love of interesting colour combinations is also reflected in the contrast of precious metals: I often use a gallery spring system, which has become a signature element of my style – a lining design related to the story or motives I want to represent, inserted in the ring shanks and made from a different colour of gold to the one used in the ring shanks.

My most eclectic creations incorporate the use of colour; subtle, hidden articulation; multifunctionality, which allows the jewel to be worn in different ways and for different occasions; and finally, hidden details, which lead to an imaginary journey. I want my creations to guide you on a whimsical journey full of discoveries, where nothing is ordinary. Please be my guest.

AB - I design hundreds of pieces every year, divided between different collections, customer requests and private orders, projects for independent shops and collaborations with other brands and people. The ALESSIO BOSCHI collection easily reaches 200 new models produced per year. We also design a large collection featuring Burmese jadeite of very high quality, for a Chinese customer; the yearly collection for her could vary between 60 and 200 designs produced, and the pieces are exhibited in her luxurious shop in Beijing and also auctioned at Tiancheng International Auctioneer Ltd in Hong Kong. I have also being appointed Creative Director for another Chinese firm and, since the beginning of that collection, created in 2011, we have developed a brand inspired by the city of Florence. For them, we design about 200 to 250 designs per year,

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CHRYSANTHEMUM BROOCH/PENDANT 18KT White and Rose Gold 110.39 gms - White DIA 2.52 cts - White DIA Rose Cut 0.61 cts - Paraiba 3.17 cts -
 Emerald 7.16 cts - Keshi Pearls 67/178.73 cts (35.746 gms)

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CHRYSANTHEMUM BROOCH/PENDANT 18KT White and Rose Gold 110.39 gms - White DIA 2.52 cts - White DIA Rose Cut 0.61 cts - Paraiba 3.17 cts -
 Emerald 7.16 cts - Keshi Pearls 67/178.73 cts (35.746 gms)

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exclusively featuring jewellery that uses pearls of excellent quality. Most of our designs at ALESSIO BOSCHI are connected to our three main collections: ‘Historica’, ‘Naturalia’ and ‘Thalassa’, which also represent the base for our marketing structure, in which our love for the natural world, as well as our passion for history, architecture, archaeology and ancient civilisations is instantly recognisable. However, the ludic aspect of our style allows us to experiment with mechanisms, technical innovations and systems that bring a certain joie de vivre to our little, precious wonders. One of our main characteristics, as I mention above, has always been multifunctionality. I admire jewellery of past eras – for example, the art deco period of the 1930s – in which transformers were used and a pair of earrings transformed into a brooch or a pair of dress clips. I believe that jewellery should cheer you up, reminding you not to take everything too seriously. We have an amazing team of workers who develop, exclusively for us, new details, on a micro-engineering level: hidden secrets, pop-out motifs, en tremblant feminine details, and enhancers and invisible clasps, hidden behind our intricate galleries. Those mechanisms allow a pendant to become the centrepiece of a necklace, rings to detach from their bands and come to life again as medallions. From time to time, our jewellery needs attention so that its mechanical systems continue to be fully operative. Doesn’t a car need an MOT? Doesn’t any house need a repainting from time to time? Our creations can change function and be assembled, however, without the use of specialist tools. It’s true that repairs are not easy in all geographic regions, but this is no reason for us to stop experimenting. After all, if we were to start cutting out our brand’s distinctive points of difference, we would end up creating just classical wedding bands. OD - How has your work’s aesthetics evolved since the beginning? AB - I can say that, at the very beginning of my career as a designer, I was very, and perhaps unnecessarily, baroque, and then became more minimalistic and simple; then, after a few years, I developed a more detailed and intricate style again, but in a different way. Initially I did not have the same sense of proportion and the same linearity as I do today. I also did not have the same ability to match or contrast colours. As a young designer I was also so influenced by other people, and easily impressed by the brand names in jewellery,

some of which are really disappointing today from a creative point of view, with average products visible everywhere in the market. Some of those names have lost their identity and become more and more commercial – their quality has decreased and their style has become obsolete. For a few years now, I have concentrated more on my own style. Of course, I still look to other designers and trends, but I have developed more confidence in my design identity and myself. Also, there is huge difference between the beginning, when there was no story attached to my designs, and now. Of course the creative process was no different, but the designs were not explained – this process is compulsory for me today. The experience I have acquired in the different countries and companies in which I have worked – Greece, then northern Italy, Hong Kong, Thailand and Taiwan – has contributed to the formation of a more mature personality and to a better understanding of cultures and costumes, styles and markets, in other areas of the world. In Thailand, I acquired a better knowledge of the Asian and the Arab markets, as well as gaining experience in the world centre for sourcing, cutting and trading gemstones. My experience with a Thai-Taiwanese company allowed me to understand low-end and mass-produced jewellery, despite the fact that the designs and the gemstones were not so exciting. I developed an eye for small details that I later utilised in my more important creations. The real change, however, happened during my five years at AUTORE. There, where everyone looked at us as trendsetters in the pearl business; I was involved in several operations and not just in the design department. As a product development director, I was involved in all of the production stages, and sometimes even had the power to purchase stones for the making of new collections. I worked very closely with marketing people, including external consultants, learning a more sophisticated and technical terminology with which to express the feelings connected to our jewellery and to describe my creations. At that time, I didn’t think I would have my own company – I was just so passionate and had such a thirst for knowledge, I was giving all of my enthusiasm to this amazing company. I learned the factors that contribute to the birth and growth of a new brand identity. I learned how to say the same thing in different and more effective ways and how to hide certain unpleasant details, as are connected, for example, with the pearl cultivation story, which has had its Dark Ages. Finally I learned how to talk to the media. I contributed to the beautiful image of the company, not only in matters relating directly to creativity, but also as regards the commercial and promotional aspect of the brand. Australia and Rosario Autore have undoubtedly con-

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THE MAHARAJAH'S DOMES 18KT WG/YG/RG 8.22 gms - White Diamond 1.04 cts - White diamond Rose Cut Round 0.83 cts - Yellow Diamond 0.32 cts - BSRBlue Sapphire Round 0.08 cts - Blue Sapphire Baquette 5.05 cts - Emerald 2/6.83 cts - Blue Sapphire Sugar Loft 1/17.05

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THE MAHARAJAH'S DOMES 18KT WG/YG/RG 8.22 gms - White Diamond 1.04 cts - White diamond Rose Cut Round 0.83 cts - Yellow Diamond 0.32 cts - BSRBlue Sapphire Round 0.08 cts - Blue Sapphire Baquette 5.05 cts - Emerald 2/6.83 cts - Blue Sapphire Sugar Loft 1/17.05

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THE MAHARAJAH'S DOMES 18KT WG/YG/RG 8.22 gms - White Diamond 1.04 cts - White diamond Rose Cut Round 0.83 cts - Yellow Diamond 0.32 cts - BSRBlue Sapphire Round 0.08 cts - Blue Sapphire Baquette 5.05 cts - Emerald 2/6.83 cts - Blue Sapphire Sugar Loft 1/17.05

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tributed a great deal to the creation of my personality, knowledge and confidence in this industry. OD - How are you positioning yourself next to other independent high jewellers? AB - I think we are in a peculiar and unique position among trend-making designers and high-end brands. We are a very small, therefore flexible, operation and we have a great opportunity to grow more and to shape our business accordingly. I believe that today, amid all the turbulence in the world, it is vital to try to hold on to your values and style. We believe in the uniqueness of our creations and we try to shape our operations with respect to our values, but also with all the necessary marketing tools. We are trying to stick with the creation of a style where we prioritise the beauty and quality of our jewellery. We are a bit baroque sometimes, but we do not want to be too extreme, because our aim is to caress a female body with timeless and pleasant jewellery. When we challenge, we are doing it gently and not aggressively, and we favour organic and feminine shapes. We want to amuse and we want to enchant people. We want to be remembered, not only for our jewellery, but also for the way we are and for the stories and inspirations that we give people when we unveil’ our ‘creatures’. We aim to give people the total ‘Precious Journey’ experience, especially when time and situation allow us to properly do so. Our design strength has always been our main characteristic: we develop a concept, we explore its potential and, once the collection is fully expressed, we move on to the next idea. We are constantly challenging ourselves. Because of the flexibility of our small operation, we are also able to offer very reasonable prices for the type of jewellery we offer. We love to collaborate with various artisans around the world, using the best shading or contrasting coloured gemstones available in the market; the best micro-setting, by Thai and Italian model makers; the French designer specialising in one very sophisticated computer program; the rare Italian micro-mosaic technique consisting in applying thousand of micro-tesserae, each a fraction of millimetre wide, to stucco paste; a man specialising in the Japanese medieval technique of making samurai swords, mokumegane. Our contacts worldwide have facilitated the opening of an incredible line of creativity, with the influence of Asian culture.

their collections. Despite the apparent similarity between other companies’ subjects and some of the themes we have decided to develop, however – historical masterpieces such as the Venetian Doge’s Palace, for example – the architectural details we used and the way we represented them, the manufacturing skills and the settings we used, the designs we carved in the galleries, the original background and the story behind all of this, reveal huge differences to the more attentive and prepared eye. Since the beginning of my journey, I have always admired creators and designers entering the market with new ideas so, today, it is a great opportunity for us to be among the trendsetters of the jewellery business. Not only it is an honour to be recognised by the media and clients as having been the first to have created something new but it is an honour to be able to share our ideas with others, and even, sometimes, with due restriction, to see them copied. To accompany each purchase, and underline the highquality, detail-oriented and artistic nature of our company, we like to provide a nicely printed file on our style. This little file is wrapped in a wool-felt envelope of purple colour, our corporate colour. The authenticity certificate envelope includes copies of my original sketches, jewellery pictures and material descriptions, and the collection’s stories and inspirations. This sheet accompanies each unique creation and is attentively put together with the help of a professional graphic designer and our jewellery photographer. It serves as a guarantee certificate and can be delivered to the customer, who, in some cases, has honoured us by framing the artwork as a collectable item. At ALESSIO BOSCHI we strive to operate in respect of Mother Nature and in a socially and environmentally conscious way. Therefore, we do our utmost to refrain from using materials and production methods that may spoil the ocean, harm wildlife or otherwise negatively impact the planet. Furthermore, we provide good working conditions and fair salaries to all our workers and operate so as to treat our employees and collaborators in an appreciative and respectful manner. The diamonds and gemstones we use have been purchased from legitimate sources, in compliance with United Nations resolutions. We certify that these gems and metals are conflict-free, based on our personal knowledge and written notice provided by our worldwide suppliers. We favour untreated stones and not enhanced-colour pearls. OD - Which one of your projects has given you the most satisfaction?

Moreover, some of our pieces have been taken on board by other companies and have become an inspiration for

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BLACK DIAMONDS CORAL REEF 18KT White Gold 16.50 gms - White Gold 0.13 cts - Brown DIA 1.03 cts - Black DIA 1.474 cts - Purple Sapphire 0.54 cts - Tsavorite 0.39 cts - Baroque Pearl 1/16 mm (32.21 gms)

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BLACK DIAMONDS CORAL REEF 18KT White Gold 16.50 gms - White Gold 0.13 cts - Brown DIA 1.03 cts - Black DIA 1.474 cts - Purple Sapphire 0.54 cts - Tsavorite 0.39 cts - Baroque Pearl 1/16 mm (32.21 gms)

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AB - I am never really fully satisfied! I believe that this is the very force that allows really creative people to work without rest when they have new ideas. I must say, however, that last year’s Homage to Renaissance necklace and this year’s Cedar sets mark two milestones in my career. The first, inspired by Renaissance motifs, features magnificent micro-mosaics, and custom made according to my drawings. The highly crafted necklace, with baby-pink Akoya pearls, pink shaded sapphires and diamonds, features a mosaic of the queen Catherine de Medici with the cathedral of Florence in the background, hidden beside two doors, hand-carved from rubellite slices. The earrings feature, on one side, Michelangelo’s David and, on the other, the lily of Florence. The engravings and micromosaics were made in Rome and then sent overseas, where they were fixed by laser on a pre-existing, gemencrusted structure. Those elements were set by microscope and decorated with pearls and several precious details taken from the historical site, and set with coloured stones and diamonds. The work took over five months and was sold in China immediately after the show in Basel. The Cedar necklace is a masterpiece of gold crafts, gem cutting and engineering and required over six months of hard work, involving over twenty people, to be made to perfection. It represents a branch of a coniferous tree, with gem-encrusted bark and leaves rendered in trembling Panjshir emeralds. The gemstones are just slightly recut from their natural, polyhedral crystal structure. Three cedar cones appear on the surface of the necklace: one, open like a flower, is composed of trembling sections set with yellow and champagne-coloured rose-cut diamonds; the other two, closed, are made in a mosaic of Fanta-orange spessartite garnet. Those two orange cones feature a hidden lighting system using LEDs and changeable microbatteries. The branch itself is composed using a mokumegane structure, composed of nineteen layers of precious metals, and is today probably the largest piece of its kind in the world. This incredible set of necklace and matching earrings (of different sizes) has been featured in the media, and met with hundreds of followers. OD - What is your vision of the fine jewellery field, at the moment? AB - To my mind, there is a tendency for the luxury brands, including those who make jewellery, to become part of just a few important groups. From the marketing and distribution point of view this may represent a hugely success business strategy; however, it takes out of the

equation that individuality proper to each style and firm. Those groups tend more and more to feature jewellery with the same standards of manufacturing, setting and gemstones and, in a few cases, also with similar concepts and designs. This style equates, in my opinion, to the absolute opposite of the very profound concept and meaning of luxury. I see that, with the current market crisis, and especially as relates to the medium-end jewellery sector, most companies are facing huge economical restrictions and, in some cases, bankruptcy; therefore, the specialisation in highend jewellery, which I embraced many years ago, seems to be a great solution for those lucky enough to pursue this career. The geographical location of a company – closer or further away from certain ‘hot’ areas, and with the taxation factors imposed by different countries – may facilitate or impeach the growth of that company. I found it a great advantage to be located in Thailand, where I am placed near some of the greatest manufacturers and am closer to important commercial areas such are Hong Kong, Singapore and China. If the stability of the kingdom of Thailand can be guaranteed, I can see only growth in this area of the world for the next ten years. OD - What is your pet-peeve list when it comes to the fine jewellery industry? AB - If I had to make a list, it would run as follows: 1. Attitude. Certain managers, CEOs and owners of jewellery brands assume they have reached such a level of importance and economic status that they should therefore perform a certain arrogance and superior attitude with others, in the way they communicate or conduct business operations. 2. Hypocrisy. We all know that many stones declared conflict-free are getting to destinations by certain deviations that will clean up their origin. The final consumer is convinced of a different origin and everyone is happy to close an eye and believe another fairy tale. A stone may suffer an increase or a loss of value on the market according to political or economical turbulences in its country of origin – for example, Burma, Africa, Colombia, Afghanistan – and others will take advantage. It is unfortunate that the countries behind such conflicts, that were partially responsible for the escalations of wars or riots in those areas for their economic or political gain, will then apply a sort of embargo on any goods coming from those affected areas. Very often the repercussions of those actions are dramatic, having a very negative impact on the people who are trying to live in those areas,

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BLACK DIAMONDS CORAL REEF 18KT White Gold 20.47 gms - White DIA 0.81 cts - Brown DIA 1.66 cts - Black DIA 0.22 cts - Purple Sapphires 0.63 cts Tsavorite 0.97 cts - Baroque Pearl 2/ 15-16 mm

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using and selling natural resources, such as gems, in order to survive. 3. The lie about the real place of manufacture for so-called Western and European-branded products and creations. I declare the place of manufacture for my jewels and I do not have to hide that because, as I said already, it is more important how the creation is accomplished, and who is behind the production, than where the jewellery is manufactured. Many brands and jewellers, especially, attach a sort of negative value to Asian countries. I can very confidently say that, today, Thailand, Hong Kong and a few factories in China maintain a similar, if not superior in some cases, standard of manufacturing to most European facilities. 4. The monopoly that certain brands or structures have over the market. There should be a segment of the market in each area of the industry that allows the survival of smaller companies and allows them to show novelties and interesting ideas, which would otherwise be difficult to achieve. 5. The careless attitude of certain brands or customers as regards our planet and its preservation or exploitation in the name of some rare luxurious product. OD - Is it possible to describe the woman who buys/wears Alessio Boschi’s creations? AB - She is a woman who wants to feel passion in her life, a creature that needs something more, something deeper than a simple jewel – something that connects with her feelings. But she is someone who, first of all, allows the time to listen to the stories behind some of my creations. A beautiful soul – gentle and feminine or passionate and determined, but, in any case, ready for the precious journey. Such a woman is ready to declare to the world that she is a confident human being and a determined female and not afraid to wear with pride one of my unique creations. The jewellery enhances her. Let me also tell you about the kind of woman who will not and should not buy any of my pieces. Last year I coparticipated at Hong Kong Jewellery and Gem Fair with an established partner firm, and I had the pleasure of meeting my first Iranian customer. However, I realised that it would be better for me not to participate in those Asian jewellery fairs, which will become more and more commercial. One woman – a Chinese lady, originally from Hong Kong – stopped at my booth, attracted by the colours of my jewellery. I was busy with something important but left what I was doing and approached her politely, taking out of the window a couple of pieces she asked for. While I was trying to explain the jewellery’s background to her, she rudely

cut me off several times to ask other questions; she wouldn’t keep her attention on any single word I was saying, playing with her phone and looking at other things. I left her alone. She was finally speechless and asked me the price – again I didn’t answer and I just smiled at her. Finally she left. If a person comes across our booth or wants to ask some questions relating to our jewels, she should and MUST have the necessary time to know me for a few moments. If someone doesn’t have at least twenty minutes to sit down, probably taking an espresso or a tea with us, and talk at least about three of my creations – one from each of the three main collections – then it is a waste of time for both of us and this person is unlikely to become our customer. OD - Has anyone who has bought your jewellery said anything that touched you? AB - Many clients share very nice words to describe the jewellery I design and the effect it has on them. Gary Douglas, the man who might have inspired the [1998] movie The Horse Whisperer, called me ‘the new Tiffany but even more interesting’. He ordered the only ring without pearls from the brand I was working with formerly, in Australia – a brand that specialised in pearl jewellery. Gary told me that he wanted a ring designed by me, which should fit his personality and his love for horses, but he insisted with the company that I should sign my name inside. So I did make a Pegasus ring and inscribed my name with a laser, together with the brand of the company – he told me he believed that one day I would be well known in the jewellery field. One year later I resigned and started my own business and today, thanks to you, I can tell this story and someone will read it. You are writing about me, so maybe I have made some impact in the jewellery world, as Gary foresaw. Not long after that, I met a lady who told me that she joined a self-confidence and self-improvement group, because her life experiences had made her a very indecisive and insecure person. When I met her, she was in the process of totally changing her character and behaviour. She purchased one of my chandelier earrings and, a few months after, she wrote me a very touching email. She told me that every time she wears my jewellery she feels like a really confident queen. She said that my earrings transformed even her body, magically changing her posture. She said ‘I walk more straight … more proud, my head raises like a swan and people look at me like I am a kind of princess’. She ended by writing ‘this is what your jewellery does to people who connected with them.’

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FONTANA DEL TRITONE with DELFINI 18KT WG/RG 33.65 gms - White Diamond 1.845 cts - Tsavorite 1.427 cts - Blue Sapphire 1.90 cts - Paraiba 0.789 cts - Aquamarine 1/56.04 cts

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FONTANA DEL TRITONE with DELFINI 18KT WG/RG 33.65 gms - White Diamond 1.845 cts - Tsavorite 1.427 cts - Blue Sapphire 1.90 cts - Paraiba 0.789 cts - Aquamarine 1/56.04 cts

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FONTANA DEL TRITONE with DELFINI 18KT WG/RG 33.65 gms - White Diamond 1.845 cts - Tsavorite 1.427 cts - Blue Sapphire 1.90 cts - Paraiba 0.789 cts - Aquamarine 1/56.04 cts

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There have been a few comments from honourable people in our industry that have made us very proud. Even though they did not purchase any jewellery from us, I think it worthwhile to write about them. At Baselworld 2016, the Production Director of unique pieces at one of the biggest brands in Paris said (and we spoke French, so I must translate into English): ‘I wondered who was the creator of such a beautiful and unique collection. I didn’t know until I stepped in your booth but I was attracted by your window’s pieces. You are one of the most interesting designers of this year … I didn’t see much novelties in this edition of Basel but your pieces are stunning, Bravo.’ Then he entered and we hugged each other and he called his whole team to join him. We met in 2009 and he made me very emotional when, at that time, he called me ‘an Artist’, but then we lost contact and he didn’t know where I was until this year when he stepped inside my booth. Just to share with you the feeling: you should imagine an opera singer meeting the diva Maria Callas after his performance and she congratulates him and hugs him with true admiration! A Russian journalist and writer, who is an expert in the jewellery and history of Fabergé and who complimented to me at Baselworld 2015, with the help of an English translator, made a daring (to my mind) comparison between the great maestro Karl Fabergé’s creations and those of my business. Our Venezia, Palazzo, Lucrezia, Medici and Alhambra (and other) rings, with their open doors and hidden details, reminded him of the famous eggs and the surprises inside. He told me that the Russian jeweller and I both share a similar idea of the jeweller, with the playful, surprise element attached to a very complicated masterpiece. Such a compliment was a great honour for me, especially because he was someone so expert in Fabergé. The following was written by my dear friend and supporter Caroline Childers after my unfortunate experience of sharing a part of my business journey with a shop located in northern Italy, in the rich province of Cuneo: ‘Dear Mr … we regret to inform you that we are not going to work with you because we are very close to the work of our friend and admired Alessio.’ I like to mention Caroline because she represents a real case of friendly and disinterested support, motivated only by integrity and a sense of justice and respect. Caroline was approached by those people for advertising purposes but refused to promote them because she believed (very rightly) that they were trying to copy my style and models, claiming the paternity of my ideas and designs. One year after Caroline’s letter, the company went bankrupt and disappeared from the exhibi-

tion circuit and media. I received news from people in our industry who sued them and finally won the case. It is an example of strong support between designers and the media. Caroline continues to promote my creations with such a good heart and passion, and inserted me in her latest Jewellery International book. The ‘Russian Bible’, as I like to call Elena Veselaya, also always has nice words for us in any article and piece she writes. She also, at a more personal level, does not spare comments and suggestions to help me in business and to direct me to the right people and sometimes, also, to new clients. This year, the cover page of the Russian book titled JEWELLERY 2016 featured our Homage to Renaissance necklace. That is without mentioning the help of Andre and Wilhelmina Vermeer, Katerina Perez and Tatyana Pfaifer and the many videos posted by The Jewellery Editor on social media. A new and beautiful friendship developed at BaselWorld this year after the very pleasant visit to my booth of Caroline Bigeard, a journalist and member of the gemmological association of France, who called me ‘The revelation of Basel’ after seeing my Fountains of Rome collection: ‘extraordinary stories are framing his creations … his vivid imagination and his sculptural compositions in ready to wear revolutionised the precious jewellery …One very personal style: baroque, sophisticated, with a fantasy touch that becomes his signature, this jewellery alchemy dazzles and take its power at BaselWorld.’ Amazing words, which could boost anyone’s self-confidence! OD - What is your next main ambition? AB - I aim to become better known worldwide, with the penetration of the Arab and the American markets. In both cases I need a program and the right agents. For the Arab market, while I have an important Middle-Eastern brand established since 1870, which recently bought a few exclusive rings and earrings to distribute them in London, I do not feel I have the right channel to approach that market properly. In the U.S., I am negotiating something very exclusive with a powerful person, well known in the jewellery industry … let’s see what develops there. I am impatiently waiting the economic recovery of Russia, as my well established and very sophisticated St Petersburg clientele, and many new potential customers, have suffered a lot with the country’s recession over the past year and a half, despite their love for my jewellery. I would also love to find the right opportunity to collaborate with Iranian exclusive jewellery stores, because I feel that Per-

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Jewellery Historian

FONTANA DEL MORO 18KT WG/RG 14.20 gms - White Diamond Full Cut 0.50 ts - White Diamond Princess 0.36 cts White Diamond Tapered 2.00 cts - WD VS-E Half Moon 2/1.14 cts - Emerald Round 4.35 cts - Paraiba 0.43 cts - Tsavorite Oval 1/8.10 cts

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FONTANA DEL MORO 18KT WG/RG 14.20 gms - White Diamond Full Cut 0.50 ts - White Diamond Princess 0.36 cts White Diamond Tapered 2.00 cts - WD VS-E Half Moon 2/1.14 cts - Emerald Round 4.35 cts - Paraiba 0.43 cts - Tsavorite Oval 1/8.10 cts

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Jewellery Historian

FONTANA DEL MORO 18KT WG/RG 14.20 gms - White Diamond Full Cut 0.50 ts - White Diamond Princess 0.36 cts White Diamond Tapered 2.00 cts - WD VS-E Half Moon 2/1.14 cts - Emerald Round 4.35 cts - Paraiba 0.43 cts - Tsavorite Oval 1/8.10 cts

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I want to continue to surprise and amaze with my creations. I am always grateful to the universe for the creativity I was blessed with and I hope this gift will never leave me.

sian art, crafts and culture are a very large part of and source of my inspirations. I don’t know why, but I feel this culture is very familiar to me; I would love to organise a trip to this country, to see the many wonders and beauties it possesses. Despite certain economical and political issues related to Iran, we should not forget that the Persian Empire was the cradle of many arts and costume styles, adopted or partially modified by several other countries. The motifs and patterns of the Persians fascinated the Ancient Greeks, the Romans, the Arabs and even the Chinese, and their artefacts were highly appreciated as commodities in worldwide trade. My latest collection, Breakfast in Jaipur – featuring precious gemstones, coloured diamonds and Keshi South Sea pearls – is inspired by the Mughal Empire. When the Persians conquered the northern territories of India in the middle of the sixteenth century, their cultural heritage merged with the local Asian customs, creating a very unique Empire that lasted for centuries and still fascinates millions of tourists each year. I want to continue to surprise and amaze with my creations. I am always grateful to the universe for the creativity I was blessed with and I hope this gift will never leave me. www.alessio-boschi.com

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Jewellery Historian

FONTANA DEL TRITONI 18KT WG/RG 43.50 gms - White Diamond 1.35 cts - Tsavorite 0.70 cts - Hauyin 0.25 cts - Paraiba 0.50 cts - Tanzanite Emerald 26.11 cts

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FONTANA DEL TRITONI 18KT WG/RG 43.50 gms - White Diamond 1.35 cts - Tsavorite 0.70 cts - Hauyin 0.25 cts - Paraiba 0.50 cts - Tanzanite Emerald 26.11 cts

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FONTANA DEL TRITONI 18KT WG/RG 43.50 gms - White Diamond 1.35 cts - Tsavorite 0.70 cts - Hauyin 0.25 cts - Paraiba 0.50 cts - Tanzanite Emerald 26.11 cts

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18KT RG/WG 8.27 gms - White Diamond 0.11 cts - White Diamond Rose Cut 2/0.13 cts - Blak Diamond 0.06 cts White Diamond Briollettes 1.37 cts - 2/Baby Akoya 3.5mm

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18KT White Gold 14.92 cts - White DIA 0.48 cts - Black DIA 0.02 cts - Blue Sapphire Round 1.18 cts Blue Sapphire Cabochon 2/10.14 cts

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

KOVA Jewels Haute Couture Collection I presents six cocktail rings; an exploration of one style and its plural possibilities. Each ring is a unique narrative of hues and shapes, with Russian Suprematism and its legacy on modern graphics at the core.

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Haute Couture Collection I by KOVA Jewels is conceptual as if the focus was entirely on sculpture for the body. ‘Rather cerebral’ the brainchild and founder Russian-born Katie Kova would add. KOVA Jewels is indeed a jewellery brand that has a firm ambition to establish itself for the long run by the way of forging intelligent designs. Since 2015 it has been a fine jewellery brand only, until they decided to enter the Haute Joaillerie arena in June this year during the Paris Couture week; a bold move and a clever one which intrigued editors and cemented credentials.

brand. Fine jewellery is to me an extension of my previous career: the conceptual approach to construction and the endurance of materials are common to both trades”, she shares.

Katie Kova’s talent is all about forging sculptural and unconventional designs; a philosophy that has been pushed further with this first high jewellery series of six rings, which was mostly inspired by Russian Suprematism. “By ‘Suprematism’ I mean the supremacy of pure feeling in creative art. To the Suprematist the visual phenomena of the objective world are, in themselves, meaningless; the significant thing is feeling”, Russian artist Kazimir Malevich said about the artistic movement he created around 1913, that constitutes one of the earliest and most radical developments in abstract art.

Come March 2017, the first part of Collection II will be presented. “Our gradual build-up raises questions on the speed of communications and expectations in the luxury goods industry. Hopefully our approach will show that you can still take your time to develop collections while keeping an element of newness”, Katie explains. “Our first Haute Couture collection, which we presented in July this year, took 18 months to develop. Some of the stones even took three months to source.” And in keeping with the saying ‘good things take time’ the second haute joaillerie opus will only be unveiled in July 2018.

The rings are each a montage of simple shapes assembled as the law of gravity intended. Finding the perfect match of stone and metal that will bring the design to life and formulating glorious colour mixes are prevalent. Proportions are voluminous yet perfectly balanced; lines are clean but architecturally sophisticated; surfaces are coolly polished though emotionally charged. “We wanted to tell a story based on one statement piece presented in six different interpretations. From the very beginning we´ve felt strongly about rings as a category, so our Haute Couture collection is an exploration of the cocktail ring as a veritable statement piece and its multiple possibilities”, the designer says.

In the meantime, and while waiting with anticipation for that new haute joaillerie chapter, let’s find out more about KOVA Jewels.

In order to present the rings to the world and highlight further their artistic message, Katie Kova teamed with artist Naomi Filmer to create displays in perfect symbiosis with the collection. “They feel so effortless even if they took 10 months to develop and produce. We identified the direction straight away and spent significant time on every little detail, which is what I enjoyed the most in this process. It is something that you keep on exploring over time. This, in my opinion, is what makes it a piece of art in itself”, Katie explained. Interestingly, Katie’s family comes from the construction field; indeed she had a career lined up in that direction. “But I made a very important decision to lean towards my passion and explore the creative project that is now my

So far, the expansion of the brand has been planned with military precision. It took two years to develop Collection I, the first ready-to-wear collection, which is split into three sub-collections – I, I.B and I.C – that have been rolled out every six months since July last year.

Olivier Dupon - What makes you passionate about jewellery design? Katie Kova - It´s the very essence of fine jewellery that I´m so passionate about. For me a piece of fine jewellery of unique design and quality is as substantial as a piece of fine art. Both can be timeless and both can be passed on to coming generations. OD - When did you know that this is what you wanted to do? KK - Fine jewellery always felt right to me, but about two or three years ago I realised that there was a void in the fine jewellery market that needed to be filled. I felt that with my vision of fine jewellery I had something new to offer. And this is the essence of what we try to achieve at KOVA: newness, freshness and wearability. OD - Could you describe in detail how you got interested in sculptural / modernist shapes in the first place? KK - I love things that are not straightforward. There is a silent dynamic in modernist shapes that has always caught my attention. If you look at the works of Kasimir

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COCKTAIL RING IN 18K WHITE GOLD SET WITH CLEAR QUARTZ (35 CT) AND WHITE DIAMONDS (0.98 CT) 


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COCKTAIL RING IN 18K BLACK GOLD SET WITH CULTURED PINK PEARL (11MM) AND BLACK DIAMONDS (1.09 CT)


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COCKTAIL RING IN 18K WHITE GOLD SET WITH NEPHRITE (90 CT), CULTURED IVORY PEARL (11MM) AND WHITE DIAMONDS (1.22 CT) 


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Our creative philosophy is the same for Haute Couture as it has been for readyto-wear. It´s about renewing formulas, presenting intelligent design and making understated statements.

Malevich, Nikolai Suetin and other representatives of Suprematism you wonder how something that is apparently so simple and understated can be so powerful. The very subjectivity of their work is what makes you want to stop and explore. I also can’t stress enough how much we value the metal framework in the pieces we design. For us, it is the core, which we then build on using custom-cut stones and diamond pavé setting to create a wearable sculpture. OD - What kind of jewellery person are you? KK - I would like to think that I´m the kind of person who wears my kind of jewellery: intelligent, young and dynamic. OD - How and why have you chosen the particular gemstones? KK - We selected the stones specifically to complement the existing metal framework. It was essential for us that the stones enhanced the design whilst making a graphic and colour statement. We´ve also had to ensure that the rings can be reproduced in future, as some are rather rare. OD - How would you yourself best describe KOVA Haute Joaillerie’s creative philosophy? KK - Our creative philosophy is the same for Haute Couture as it has been for readyto-wear. It´s about renewing formulas, presenting intelligent design and making understated statements. Our Haute Couture collection does not echo what people expect from a major jewellery house, yet it has received considerable praise and many accolades. I like to think that this suggests people are ready for renewed perspectives in couture fine jewellery. OD - How are you positioning yourself next to other independent fine jewellers? KK - We don´t think in terms of positioning ourselves next to anyone. We are so focused on building a brand that is both modern and timeless, a considerable challenge in itself, that we don´t really bring other brands into consideration. OD - What is your vision of the high jewellery field at the moment? KK - Now is the perfect time for young independent brands like KOVA to be understood and their collections to be appreciated in full. I think the industry is being stimulated and excited by brands like us providing an element of a pleasant surprise. www.kovajewels.com

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COCKTAIL RING IN 18K BLACK GOLD SET WITH SPINEL (55 CT), CULTURED IVORYonyx, PEARL (9,5 set MM) ANDyellow BLACK DIAMONDS (2.18 CT) Esmeralda, with diamond, brownBLUE diamond, sapphire, pink sapphire, crystal, wood, in 18K gold. 


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The exceptional KOVA jewellery displays 


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COCKTAIL RING IN 18K ROSE GOLD SET WITH AQUAMARINE (60 CT) AND CHAMPAGNE DIAMONDS (0.86 CT)


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COCKTAIL RING IN 18K ROSE GOLD SET WITH TAUPE MOONSTONE (9 CT) AND CHAMPAGNE DIAMONDS (1.52 CT)


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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

Khouri & Bazaza Sophia is the Goddess of those who are wise, and she may well have cast an auspicious spell over a collaboration in her honour that has recently united two fresh Lebanese talents : Gaelle Khouri & Hussein Bazaza.

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For his Fall-Winter 2017 Haute Couture collection, entitled Sophia the Goddess, and which was premiered early in July in Rome, Bazaza astutely joined forces with jewellery designer, Gaelle Khouri.

Sophia is the Goddess of those who are wise, and she may well have cast an auspicious spell over a collaboration in her honour that has recently united two fresh Lebanese talents. Enter Hussein Bazaza, the Beirut-born fashion prodigy who in his short career has already garnered coveted awards (the prestigious Elle Style Award ‘Best Upcoming Middle East Designer’ in December 2013 and the Style.com/Arabia – DDFC Fashion Prize in 2016). For his Fall-Winter 2017 Haute Couture collection, entitled Sophia the Goddess, and which was premiered early in July in Rome, Bazaza astutely joined forces with jewellery designer, Gaelle Khouri. ‘Astutely’ because of Khouri’s own fascination with esoteric and philosophical subjects, for her designs are never just what they seem to be. Beneath the obvious beauty are layer upon layer of meaningful commentaries. In the Sophia the Goddess collection, Bazaza has explored medieval themes, while continuing “the story of Sophia the Alchemist on the journey to discover the elixir of life and eternity. Drawing inspiration from traditional alchemists looking for a universal cure for disease, Bazaza’s story begins in medieval times, with Sophia discovering the desirable formula for the elixir of life and keeping it as her secret to this day”, Bazaza’s team says. “Following her journey in her transition to Goddess, the range covers an array of handmade fabrics, silhouettes and intricate details. Key motifs in the collection derive from alchemists’ archives of studies, geometric symbols, drawings and equations.” Bazaza’s signature techniques of lace collage are complemented by a mix of embroideries, embellishments and storytelling prints to create a painting effect on the designs: embroidered symbols, stars, butterflies, unicorns and natural elements. Colours throughout the collection include black, grey, white, gold and red, while Bazaza employs raffia and delicate lace to flared dresses, long skirts, high necks and draping. Naturally such intricate compositions required jewels that could not only complement the silhouettes, but also finish them by adding a regal touch. The four bespoke jewellery pieces created by Khouri went beyond that. Due to their sheer grandiosity and visual impact, they became additional garments, wearable art jewels. And in keeping with the mystical theme, Khouri did not shy from making a statement. Take the elaborate Flowers choker that runs from neck to navel. Crafted in five separate pieces, the neckpiece can be worn in two different ways on dresses. Set with over 3,000 coloured stones – ruby, champagne yellow and blue zircons – a myriad of 10 different types of intricately

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The Unicorn headpiece, the pinnacle of how to redefine the boundaries between jewellery and apparel, a decorative structure that runs like a majestic waterfall from the forehead of the model down the neck and onto the spine, enhancing the wearerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stance.

crafted tiny flowers decorate the neckpiece to cover the whole of the neck and clavicle. Or the Unicorn headpiece, the pinnacle of how to redefine the boundaries between jewellery and apparel, a decorative structure that runs like a majestic waterfall from the forehead of the model down the neck and onto the spine, enhancing the wearerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stance. The piece, weighing 2kg, employs silver and black zircons throughout, with rose gold vermeil for colour. Polished on the back, it also features imperfections and blackened areas to emphasise the assertive side of Sophia on her transformative journey. The headpiece is indeed feminine armour that will undeniably reveal your hidden fierceness once you try it. The other two pieces (a black zircon earring that is an integral part of the hairstyling and frames the face, and a Unicorn choker, in silver, rose gold vermeil and black zircon, which sits on the fabric of the dress) also emphasise the statuesque posture of each silhouette. If there was ever one project that demonstrates how wonderful the meeting of two great creative minds could be, it is the Sophia the Goddess collection.

www.gaellekhouri.com www.husseinbazaza.com

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C O L L E C TO R T I M E P I E C E

HOURSTRIKER PIN-UP by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

Celebrated Manufacture Ulysse Nardin Seduces Collectors with a Limited Edition Hourstriker Pin-Up

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The delightful daring of the burlesque dancer is brought alluringly to life by the craft of Swiss watchmaker Ulysse Nardin. In a limited edition of 28 rose gold and platinum timepieces, each edition features miniature painting on the dial and Jaquemarts to highlight the hourstriker function. This charming and delicate figure gazes seductively out at the viewer, posing in her high heel sandals with a flower in her hair and her modesty barely hidden by the colorful explosion of peacock feathers. They are the result of the unique skill of the in-house miniature painters at Ulysse Nardin. Acrylic colors are applied and mixed direct- ly on the dial, as the tiniest details erupt to life through the use of extremely delicate brushes. Depending on their complexity, their meticulously detailed creations can take between 50 and 90 hours to complete. The finished dials are sublime works of art, highly prized by collectors and artlovers alike. Enveloped by the extravagance of the peacock’s tail and wing, the sensual curves of our mysterious dancer are revealed by the hourstriker function, when they sweep back to expose her beauty. This complication – one of the most intricate in mechanical timekeeping – comes alive on the hour, the half-hour and whenever the push-button is activated by the wearer. One of the first manufacturers to lead the revival of the hourstriker mechanism, Ulysse Nardin is also one of its undisputed creative masters, and one of the few to employ Jaquemarts to set them off. Set in a round case, the watch is as functional as it is artistic. Self-winding, it has a power reserve of approximately 42 hours and is water resistant to 30 meters. Its face cover is anti-reflective sapphire crystal, ensuring it is highly durable and scratch resistant. Its case-back, also sapphire crystal, protects its complex inner workings while allowing them to be seen and admired. At the Jewellery Historian we are honored to introduce you this limited edition of the celbrated manufacture Ulysse Nardin. For more than 170 years, Ulysse Nardin has forged ahead, anchored in seafaring history with sights set firmly on the horizon. For the next 170, the company aims to continue its course of independence and innovation, remaining steadfast in the pioneering precision that combines daring ingenuity with undeniable style.

| Collector Timepiece and Ulysse Nardin navigational timepieces would come to set the standard for precision in both civil and military realms, and establish his company for generations to come.By the 1870s, over 50 navies and international shipping companies were equipped with Ulysse Nardin marine deck chronometers, providing sailors instruments for accuracy and efficiency across trades and continents. When he died in 1876, his son, Paul-David Nardin, took control, ensuring Ulysse Nardin's continued quest for technical innovation. By 1975, the company had 4,300 watchmaking awards to its illustrious name, including 18 international gold medals, as well as a great number of technological patents. Despite these impressive achievements, in the 1980s, the fortunes of Ulysse Nardin were threatened by the unexpectedly swift rise of quartz watches, known in Swiss watchmaking as the Quartz Crisis. But when Rolf W. Schnyder purchased the company in 1983, this setback transformed into a remarkable success: Ulysse Nardin would come to engineer its own renaissance, becoming revered once again for its revolutionary developments in Haute Horlogerie. Schnyder was convinced the imaginative firm could become a market leader. But it was Schnyder's fortuitous encounter with watchmaking genius Dr. Ludwig Oechslin that sparked the turning point for Ulysse Nardin, setting in motion a fresh wave of watchmaking innovation, which combined creative inspiration with the proactive use of new materials, like silicium. Since then, Ulysse Nardin has continued to introduce iconic timepieces full of wonderful ingenuity and extraordinary technical achievement. Part of this achievement comes from the company's determination to master every aspect of the craft in-house. This spirit of independence is behind the acquisition of master enamellers Donzé Cadrans, and control over production of high-tech materials like DIAMonSIL,as well as the many movements fully created and produced in-house. In 2014, Ulysse Nardin found a new ally when it joined Kering's Luxury Watches and Jewellery division. Kering wholly supports Ulysse Nardin's course of bold innovation and independence. www.ulysse-nardin.com

In 1846, in Le Locle, Switzerland, young watchmaker Ulysse Nardin had a vision of the future. Despite living miles from the sea, he was convinced of two things: a rising demand for marine and pocket chronometers, and his ability to meet that demand.He was right on both counts,

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EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

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esthète by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

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EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

esthète by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

a person who has or professes to have refined sensitivity toward the beauties of art or nature

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An exceptional ring byAlessio Boschi

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In every issue, discover the very best of contemporary francophone literature...in french.

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Jewels we

Love CONRADO / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

In every issue we handpick the finest jewellery for you to choose, enabling you to add a sophisticated, elegant touch to the most important times of your life. Previously known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Favesâ&#x20AC;?, this new column introduces you to our favorite jewellery, designed by the most talented jewellery designers.

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LYDIA COURTEILLE

BORGIONI

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GILAN

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YOKO LONDON

GILAN

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LE VIAN

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LE VIAN

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ETHO MARIA

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YOKO LONDON

ADLER

HARRY KOTLAR

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U E EF

S E L L I

ucas L y b n electio

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Le dernier des nôtres,de Adélaïde Clermont-Tonnerre Grand prix du roman de l'Académie française 2016 « La première chose que je vis d’elle fut sa cheville, délicate, nerveuse, qu’enserrait la bride d’une sandale bleue… » Manhattan, 1969 : un homme rencontre une femme. Dresde, 1945 : sous un déluge de bombes, une mère agonise en accouchant d'un petit garçon.

Avec puissance et émotion, Adélaïde de Clermont Tonnerre nous fait traverser ces continents et ces époques que tout oppose : des montagnes autrichiennes au désert de Los Alamos, des plaines glacées de Pologne aux fêtes new-yorkaises, de la tragédie d’un monde finissant à l’énergie d’un monde naissant... Vous ne dormirez plus avant de découvrir qui est vraiment « le dernier des nôtres ». 496 pages, Grasset

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Chanson douce, de Leïla Slimani Prix Goncourt 2016 Lorsque Myriam, mère de deux jeunes enfants, décide malgré les réticences de son mari de reprendre son activité au sein d'un cabinet d'avocats, le couple se met à la recherche d'une nounou. Après un casting sévère, ils engagent Louise, qui conquiert très vite l'affection des enfants et occupe progressivement une place centrale dans le foyer. Peu à peu le piège de la dépendance mutuelle va se refermer, jusqu'au drame. À travers la description précise du jeune couple et celle du personnage fascinant et mystérieux de la nounou, c'est notre époque qui se révèle, avec sa conception de l'amour et de l'éducation, des rapports de domination et d'argent, des préjugés de classe ou de culture. Le style sec et tranchant de Leïla Slimani, où percent des éclats de poésie ténébreuse, instaure dès les premières pages un suspense envoûtant. 240 pages, Gallimard

Au commencement du septième jour, de Luc Lang 4 h du matin, dans une belle maison à l’orée du bois de Vincennes, le téléphone sonne. Thomas, 37 ans, informaticien,  père de deux jeunes enfants, apprend par un appel  de la gendarmerie que sa femme vient d’avoir un très grave  accident, sur une route où elle n’aurait pas dû se trouver. Commence une enquête sans répit alors que Camille lutte  entre la vie et la mort. Puis une quête durant laquelle chacun des rôles qu’il incarne : époux, père, fils et frère devient un  combat. Jour après jour, il découvre des secrets de famille qui sont autant d’abîmes sous ses pas. De Paris au Havre, des Pyrénées à l’Afrique noire, Thomas se trouve emporté par une course dans les tempêtes, une  traversée des territoires intimes et des géographies lointaines. Un roman d’une ambition rare. 544 pages, Stock

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INSPIRATIONS | INTERIOR DESIGN | ARCHITECTURE | DESIGN

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EXCLUSIVE

Christmas baking with Lucas

Natalia Klenova / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

The holiday season is definitely one of our favorites. Our editor-in-chief is a passionate amateur cook and baker and every year we taste his delicious cookies and tarts during this season. For this reason, exclusively for the Jewellery Historian, he shares with us all, some of his secret and delicious Finnish winter recipes, so we can all bake too for our beloved ones.

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Joulutorttu : Finnish Christmas prune tarts Preparation time 15-20 minutes Cooking time 8-10 minutes

Joulutorttu are pastry windmill-shaped tarts with a prune jam filling. I discovered those delicious tarts when I first moved to Finland. Since then, I cannot imagine a holiday season without them. All my friends love them and their children ask for them constantly. You can also freeze them for a later date if you like.

INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

For the pastry

• 1.Put all the pastry ingredients into a bowl and mix quickly by hand into a dough. Don’t knead too much. • • 2. Put the dough to a cold place to harden. • • 3. Roll out on a floured board, folding a few times to make a puff pastry, and finally make a 1/2 cm thick sheet. • • 4. Cut the sheet into 7 x 7 cm squares. Split the corners of each square with a knife ( see drawing ). • • 5. Place a bit of prune puree or plum jam in the middle of each square. Fold over every other split end onto the center, to form a windmill-like pastry. • • 6. Brush with beaten egg and bake at 200° C (400° F) until light brown. (approximately 8-10 minutes in fan mode) • •

-200g soft butter or margarine -1 cup (2 1/2 dl) flour -1/3 cup (1 dl) cold water -1 teaspoon vinegar For the filling Sweetened prune purée or plum jam

TIPS • If you want to make them faster, buy a puff pastry from the store and the sweetened prune purée or plum jam.

Recipe courtesy of Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier © Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

To make give them their traditional shape of a windmill, use the following design.

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Piparkakut : Finnish gingerbread cookies Preparation time 30 minutes (plus waiting time) Cooking time 6-8 minutes

Christmas is definitely time for gingerbread cookies. During the holidays you will find those delicious and spicy cookies in every Finnish home. They are crispy and spicy, perfect to remind you the beauty of the holiday season. We enjoy them during all day long, but they are definitely a must for cold days when you drink glögi, the Finnish mulled wine, a delicious hot red wine fortified with spices. This family recipe was given to me by a person which is very dear to me. It has passed down from generation to generation and I am honored to have it. It is the authentic and traditional Finnish recipe. With this recipe, the gingerbread cookies are definitely always delicious.

INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

-250g butter -2 ¼ sugar -1 egg -¾ cup of dark syrup -1 ½ tablespoons Ceylon cinnamon -1 ½ tablespoons ginger -1 ½ tablespoons cloves -1 ½ teaspoons of bitter orange peel -2 teaspoons soda -720g wheat flour

• 1.They day before making your cookies you must make the dough. • • 2. Bring dark syrup, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, bitter orange to a boil and let cooled. • • 3. When syrup is cooled, mix flour, with sugar, soda and egg in a bowl and add the syrup. • • 4. Mix quickly by hand into a dough. Don’t knead too much. • • 5. Cover the bowl with transparent film and refrigerate the dough overnight. • • 6. The next day, preheat oven to 200° C (400° F) in fan mode. • • 7. Roll out dough as thin as possible. • • 8. Cut desired shapes using cookie cutters & place biscuits onto oven trays. • • 9. Brush cookies with iced water. • • 10. Bake in preheated oven for 6-8 minutes until brown and slightly puffy. • • 11. When they are cold, you can decorate them with sugar paste. • 


TIPS

Recipe courtesy of Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier © Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

If you want you can prepare larger quantities of dough and refrigerate it. This will allow you to make your cookies during the season’s holidays faster and easier.

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Korvapuustit : Finnish Cinnamon Rolls Preparation time 15-20 minutes Cooking time 8-10 minutes

If you have even been to Finland, then you can’t imagine a week without Korvapuustit, especially in winter. Those delicious cinnamon rolls are available almost in every bakery and café in Helsinki. You must definitely try them. Just be cautious, once you try them, you will never be able to resist to them.

INGREDIENTS

PREPARATION

-25g yeast -75 g butter -300 ml milk -1⁄2 teaspoon salt -50 ml sugar -3⁄4 teaspoon ground cardamom -750 ml all-purpose flour

• • • • • • •

Filling -100 g butter, room temperature -100 ml sugar -3 teaspoons Ceylon cinnamon

Recipe courtesy of Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier © Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

-1 egg, beaten for brushing

1.Crumble yeast into a bowl. 2.Melt butter, add milk and gently heat the mixture to 37°C. 3.Pour over yeast and mix until yeast has dissolved. 4.Add salt, sugar, cardamom and stir; add about 200 ml of the flour and stir.

• • 5.Add the rest of the flour and knead dough by hand until smooth and elastic, and it no longer sticks to the bowl (this shouldn't take long) nor to your hand (which takes a bit longer). • • 6.Sprinkle some flour on top and cover: let rise for 30 minutes. • • 7.Mix the filling ingredients together. • • 8.Lightly flour the baking board and turn the dough on it. • • 9.Roll dough out to a 40 x 60 cm square. & • & • 10.Spread the filling on the dough and roll it up tightly, starting from the longer side of the square. • • 11.Cut the roll in 3-4 cm pieces. • • 12."Open" the pieces by pressing the centre of each piece with a handle of a knife so that the centre is pressed down and the sides spread. • • 13. Place rolls on a parchment baking sheet, cover and let rise for 30 minutes. • • 14. Brush the rolls with beaten egg. • • 15. Bake at 225 C for about 10 minutes. • 292 16. Cover the rolls while cooling. • •


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ADLER

HARTMANN

www.adler.ch

www.hartmanns.com

ALESSIO BOSCHI

KOVA

www.alessio-boschi.com

www.kovajewels.com

BORGIONI

LE VIAN

www.borgionis.com

www.levian.com

BUTANI

LYDIA COURTEILLE

www.butani.com

www.lydiacourteille.com

CARRERA Y CARRERA

MELLERIO

www.carreraycarrera.com

www.mellerio.fr

CECILE ARNAUD

PASQUALE BRUNI

www.cecilearnaud.com

www.pasqualebruni.com

ETHO MARIA

SOTHEBYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

www.ethomaria.com

www.sothebys.com

GAELLE KHOURI

ULYSSE NARDIN

www.gaellekhouri.com

www.ulysse-nardin.com

GILAN

YOKO LONDON

www.gilan.com

www.yokolondon.com

GUCCI Jewelry & Timespieces

YVEL

www.guccitimeless.com

www.yvel.com

HARRY KOTLAR www.harrykotlar.com

294


RUTH BLACK / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

www.jewelleryhistorian.com

295

Jewellery Historian #22  

Discover the issue #22 of the Jewellery Historian, the "Best kept secret in the world of luxury". www.jewelleryhistorian.com

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