Page 1

Jewellery Historian HO RS - SÉR IE VOL U ME 2

SPECIAL ISSUE

HAU T E JOA IL L E R IE


Jewellery Historian SPECIAL ISSUE

H AUT E J OA IL LER IE VOLUME 2

1


Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE 13 ÉMERAUDE EN MAJESTÉ by VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

71 MAGNIFICENT INSPIRATIONS by BULGARI

129 CARTIER MAGICIEN

171 UNICA by BUCCELLATI

195 ALEXANDRE REZA

2


Jewellery Historian Editor-in-Chief Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Creative director-at-large Panayiotis Simopoulos Gemology Department Editor Eva Kountouraki Haute Joaillerie Department Editor Olivier Dupon --Founder Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier --Columnists Eva Kountouraki ( Breathtaking beauty of Gems) Olivier Dupon ( The art of creativity / Haute Joaillerie) --Contributors Martin Huynh , Christina Rodopoulou, Catherine Varoucha --Creative Jewellery Historian Production Jewellery Historian --Photo agencies Shutterstock, Pixabay, Freepik, The stocks --Cover © Cartier 2016 - Photo: Ben Hassett - Model: Toni Garrn. --Advertising info@jewelleryhistorian.com Website www.jewelleryhistorian.com E-mail info@jewelleryhistorian.com --FREE DIGITAL COPY / NOT FOR SALE JEWELLERY HISTORIAN © 2016

All material published in this e-magazine and at www.jewelleryhistorian.com is published with permission of the brands and designers. Unless otherwise authorized in writing by the Jewellery Historian, it is strictly prohibited to reproduce, in whole or in part, and by any way, the content of this e-magazine. While precautions have been take to ensure the accuracy of the contents of our magazine and digital brands, neither the editors, publishers or its agents can accept responsibility for damages or injury which may arise there from. The information on this e-magazine is for information purposes only. Jewellery Historian assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information. The information contained has been provided by individual brands, event organizers, brands, press offices or organizations without verification by us. The opinions expressed in articles and/or advertorials, are the author's and/or brand’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Jewellery Historian, the owner, the publisher, the editor-in-chief and team of the magazine, or of any part related to the magazine. The name “Jewellery Historian” and/or logo, may not be reproduced without prior written consent of the founder of magazine. Partial or entire reproduction of the material of this magazine is strictly prohibited.The content, entire edition, graphics, design, lay-out and other matters related to this issue are protected under applicable copyrights and other proprietary laws, including but not limited to intellectual property laws. The copying, reproduction, use, modification or publication by you of any such matters or any part of the material is strictly prohibited, without our express prior written permission.All trade names, trademarks or distinctive signs of any kind contained in the Web pages of the company

are the property of their owners and are protected by law. The same is valid also for all Links (links) .The presence of third-part links (links) in the Jewellery Historian Web pages & e-magazine is for informational purposes only. Our articles may contain photos/texts/graphics/designs that belong to third parties. They are published for information purposes only and with permission of the brands. Image(s) or Footage (as applicable), used under license from photo agencies. The Jewellery Historian is publishing articles about jewellery, auctions, jewellery designers, gemology, gemstones, etc. All trademarks mentioned in the Jewellery Historian’s website and/or magazine belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation & information and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law. Photos used in articles belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law.


Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

215 MESSIKA

233 DE GRISOGONO

251 SUZANNE SYZ

271 GIAMPIERO BODINO

281 SYLVIE CORBELIN

4


I N S I D E T H E J E W E L L E RY H I S TO R I A N

CONTRIBUTORS

As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of exciting names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid precious designs. His previous books include The New Artisans (2011), The New Jewelers (2012), The New Pâtissiers (2013), Floral Contemporary (2014), Encore! The New Artisans (2015), and Shoe: Contemporary Footwear by Inspiring Designers (2015) all published by Thames & Hudson. His new book on luxury jewellery will be published in Autumn 2016. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity column, Olivier Dupon exposes inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centered around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry.

Eva Kountouraki was born and raised in a family of goldsmiths and jewelers. From a very young age she expressed her keen interest in gems, jewelry and design, a passion that led her to devote her studies and her career in this field. She started her first collection of polished and rough gemstones at a very early age and realized that this would be her profession in the future. After studying gemology books in various languages, she attended gemological seminars in Greece and Europe and developed practical skills to analyze gems, Eva decided to accredit those skills choosing the best gemological institute in the world, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), for her studies. Succeeding unprecedented results in the practice and theory of gemology, analyzing and identifying thousands of gemstones and diamonds, she graduated and acquired the prestigious certificate GIA Graduate Gemologist Diploma, which includes specific studies in diamond grading (GIA Graduate Diamonds Diploma) and colored gemstones (GIA Graduate Colored Stones Diploma). Her studies in the jewelry field continued and Eva got her Jewelry Business Management Diploma, gaining specialized knowledge about all the aspects of the jewelry industry. Her training continued with jewelry design and computer aided design. Eva’s brilliant path in the field of gemology was crowned by her collaboration with the Italian branch of GIA. Eva received special training from professional and experienced gemologists of GIA Italy, New York and California, US, and for more than a decade she teaches gemology and jewelry design in GIA, transferring her experience, knowledge and passion for diamonds, gems and jewelry to her students-famous professionals from around world. Eve is proud to be the only Greek woman who has ever accomplished such a distinction in the field of diamonds and precious stones. Alongside her work as a gemology instructor, Eva is a jewelry and gemstone buyer and consultant for privates and companies, advising and helping her clients to make successful buys and investments in gemstones. She also organizes and teaches seminars for the training of gemstone and jewelry merchants, salespeople and gem-passionates. For the Jewellery Historian, in her The breathtaking beauty of gems column, she introduces you to a breathtaking gemstone in every issue.

5


I N S I D E T H E J E W E L L E RY H I S TO R I A N

CONTRIBUTORS

Panayiotis Simopoulos  is the creative director-atlarge of the Jewellery Historian. In his role, he contributes to special projects and serves as roving ambassador with links to all creative areas of the magazine. With a successful world career as a fashion top model and as a  talented fashion photographer, he is the rarest kind of creative artist, one who creates extraordinary images. With a unique creative vision, whilst maintaining a clear vision of delivering a message that speaks directly to the reader, he ultimately creates an exciting and balanced visual experience. For the Jewellery Historian, Panayiotis creates the exceptional visual of each issue. Together with many of the most talented young photographers, he  definitely delivers, the most memorable, exciting and unique images and fashion editorials that the magazine has ever published. In close collaboration with the founder & editor-in-chief of the magazine and with the creative team, he is responsible for the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to  a minimal and clean design offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.

Catherine Varoucha joined recently the Jewellery Historian. Art has always been her true passion, and every forms of art has captivated her since early childhood. With a desire to explore how science and technology can be used to change skylines that form our cities and to improve the performance of buildings both socially and environmentally, she studied architecture which allowed her to engage both creatively and scientifically with the aesthetic and functional aspects of design. Christopher Wren once said, 'Architecture aims at eternity' and Catherine can think of no better way to achieve eternity than to help create buildings of tomorrow that preserve the ideas of today. Ultimately, we are judged by what we leave behind. Inspired by minimal architecture of the Cyclades in Greece and in particular of Naxos, Catherine works in close collaboration with the editor-in-chief and with the creative director-at-large, to create the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to  a minimal and clean design offers to our precious readers from around the globe a unique reading experience. Periodically she will also introduce us exceptional interiors around the globe.

6


Pugovica88 / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

Jewellery Historian

| EDITOR’S LETTER


EDITOR’S LETTER Founded in 2014, the Jewellery Historian is today considered by many decision makers & connoisseurs as the  "Best kept secret  in the world of luxury", the Jewellery Historian has definitely a uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to a minimal and clean design offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.   Our readers are high-end professionals, a connected community of decision makers, connoisseurs with enhanced refinement.   Our readership, has until now been accumulated only by word-of-mouth and in short time reached an international audience due to the professional knowledge, the high quality content and exceptional aesthetics of our team. To satisfy our unique and important audience around the globe that loves creativity, innovation and exceptional jewellery and timepieces, we focus on aesthetics and to the creativity of the designers, we choose to showcase, by letting their creations to speak for themselves, rather that surrounding them with distractions and other imagery.  Today the jewellery industry is as dynamic as it is fast growing. Consequential changes are under way, both in consumer behavior as well as in the industry itself. Jewellery players can’t simply do business as usual and expect to thrive; they must be alert and responsive to important trends and developments or else risk being left behind by more agile competitors. In this competitive industry, every jewellery brand needs to strengthen and differentiate its brands through unique, distinctive designs. This is hard especially for young designers and brands that don't have the marketing muscle of others. At the Jewellery Historian we work with all brands, from the small artisan to the large jewellery group, because we believe that if we work united, we can raise awareness of jewellery design as a form of creative expression.  The Jewellery Historian offers one of the highest-quality content for free on the internet, while keeping access to our e-magazine & website free to all users worldwide.   We are passionate about what we do and we are doing our best to promote young designers and brands.  We love to work together, support each other and make the jewellery industry a true global community.  Our main mission is to educate, inspire and to promote jewellery & timepieces designers ( and designers in general),  the expertise and vision of famous international maisons and talented young designers with the goal of raising the awareness of design as a form of creative expression. In this first “Special Edition”, we invite you to discover the very best of Haute Joaillerie, to discover the work of artists and brands that share the fundamental values of creativity, excellence and expertise. I would like to publicly thanks Olivier Dupon for his amazing report and all the JH team for their exceptional work.   After all, luxury is not only an industry, but also a language of passion.

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Founder & Editor-in-Chief

8


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

H AU T E J OA I L L E R I E

PARIS JULY 2016 by Olivier Dupon

Each year in July, coinciding with Haute Couture week, high-end jewellery houses unveil their haute joaillerie collections in Paris. It goes without saying that this is an important week in the calendar of the super rich, where collectors can renew their wardrobes and invest in the exclusive jewels that go with it. It is also generally a time when one can hear a lot of “wows!” and “ohs!” as the collections tantalise while their mise-en-scène mesmerises. This year does not disappoint offering an exciting array of creative approaches. Some collections celebrate naturalistic designs, notably in the recurrence of one symbol in particular, the wheat motif, in the collections of three Houses. There was as ever the focus on rare and exceptional gemstones (Louis Vuitton had a few surprises in store) and of course superlative craftsmanship with some eye-catching results. That said, each brand provided very distinct visions: Chanel, De Beers and Van Cleef & Arpels have all managed to successfully create excitement with a mono-theme (respectively, all about wheat, London landmarks viewed through white diamonds, and a symphony of emeralds) while other brands opted for a traditional umbrella concept which they then interpreted with varied sub-collections. It is interesting to note that the likes of Bulgari and Boucheron delved into their own histories – a form of re-assurance in times of uncertainty – to revive some of their iconic symbols. Others, like Piaget and Alexandre Reza, experimented with a more modern vision of Haute Joaillerie, while Dior perfectly combined past, present and future in their homage to Versailles. Overall the 2016 edition was as always spectacular and it is my pleasure to describe the exceptional offering of the following seventeen haute or high jewellers in more detail and not in alphabetical order: De Beers, Chaumet, Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Dior, Piaget, Van Cleef & Arpels, Boucheron, Bulgari, Cartier, Buccellati, Alexandre Reza, Messika, de Grisogono, Sylvie Corbelin, Giampiero Bodino and Suzanne Syz.

9


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

10

Photo courtesy of CARNET © CARNET

Jewellery Historian


11


VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

12


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Émeraude en MajestÊ by Van Cleef & Arpels by Olivier Dupon

Unlike any other gem, the emerald is the only one that has travelled through so many continents and cultures throughout history. From their mines to royal courts via new owners, it is possible to trace back the exceptional journey of significant emeralds, tales.

13


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

One emerald-cut emerald of 17.82 carates (Colombia), on the gouaché of the Émeraude Entralacée necklace

14


Prominent clients commissioned some extraordinary emerald creations : H.I.H Farah Pahlavi, first Empress of Iran in 1967, King Edward VIII for the Duchess of Windsor, Princess Faiza of Egypt, H.H. the Maharani of Baroda Her Highness Begum Salimah Aga Khan.

Unlike any other gem, the emerald is the only one that has travelled through so many continents and cultures throughout history. From their mines to royal courts via new owners, it is possible to trace back the exceptional journey of significant emeralds, tales, which read like Around the World in 400 years, not the customary 80 days. In this context, only a handful of French jewellery houses have dealt with some of the most historically iconic emerald jewellery there is, and Van Cleef & Arpels is one of these. The list of prominent clients of the French House is an immersion into the most fascinating and powerful dynasties, which each commissioned some extraordinary emerald creations at one moment or the other: the tiara made for H.I.H Farah Pahlavi, first Empress of Iran in 1967, the high jewellery pieces commissioned by King Edward VIII for the Duchess of Windsor, the emerald collaret once ordered by Princess Faiza of Egypt and now back into Van clef & Arpels own collection, the carved emerald brooch for H.H. the Maharani of Baroda or the transformable necklace with ribbed emeralds for Her Highness Begum Salimah Aga Khan, now also part of Van Cleef & Arpels heritage collection. With this in mind, it was only a matter of time for Van Cleef & Arpels to celebrate their special attachment to emeralds with a defining collection: Émeraude en Majesté. A decade in the making, the gathering of the almost 1,400 carats of emerald present in the collection was an undertaking of epic proportions. Whether originating from historic deposits in Colombia, the more recent mines of Zambia or antique jewels, the emeralds have been precisely selected and processed according to four criteria: the colour (Van Cleef & Arpels has always favoured deep hues), purity (ensuring the jardins or inclusions are subtle and balanced), consistency (the quality of crystallisation that ensures good brilliancy) and the cut (the best possible intervention to enhance a rough or already cut gem), so they can all be named Pierres de Caractère™.

3 carved emeralds for a total of 127.88 carats (Colombia), emeralds on the gouaché of the Grand Opus necklace

Émeraude en Majesté is a superb homage that aims to present emeralds in all their varied beauty: emerald-, round-, cushion- or pear-cut, engraved or cabochon, the beryls are the resplendent star of each set. In order to ensure the upmost respect for the gems, the designs are mostly classical in the revered House’s style. It is undoubtedly one of the most timeless Haute Joaillerie collections to be presented this year, a byword for excellence and elegance. I will not review all the pieces but I must mention a few that caught my eye. The ‘Grand Opus Set’ features three engraved Colombian ‘old mine’ emeralds, weighting a total of 127.88 carats, two of which are majestically hanging from an elegant diamond-set double row, while the third is sensually bejewelling the nape. The way the necklace is tied like a loose ribbon is utterly graceful. The ‘Émeraude Entrelacée Necklace’ is another derived from linearity, yet this time in a more contemporary way. Two strands, one of round- and the other of baguette-cut diamonds, entwine in gentle loops until an horizontally-mounted Colombian emerald-cut emerald of 17.82 carats holds them together in the manner of a tie. The strands are knotted together at the back, their ends curling, as would a delicate garland.

15


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CANOPÉE RING White gold, platinum, round and baguette-cut diamonds, one emerald-cut emerald of 13.52 carats (Colombia).

16


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

17


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

19


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

20


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

21


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CANOPÉE RING White gold, platinum, round and baguette-cut diamonds, one emerald-cut emerald of 13.52 carats (Colombia).

22


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

23


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

24


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

25


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

TWIST ÉMERAUDE BRACELET White gold, round diamonds, round mauve sapphires, 2 cabochon-cut emeralds of 19.80 and 21.48 carats (Colombia).

26


In each and every one of the presented jewels, you can identify Van Cleef & Arpels DNA.

A third necklace caught my attention, the ‘Drapé Majestueux Necklace’, which is a sublime collar piece composed of 150 Zambian emeralds (total of 244.24 carats). It has literally no front or back as it can be worn either way, with rows of cabochon-cut beads embracing the décolleté, the shoulders or the back with the same lace-like effect. In terms of rings, there are two contenders: the ‘Canopée Ring’ and the ‘Lune d’Eau Between the Finger Ring’; the former is a tropical reverie with a Zambian pear-shaped 3 carat emerald and the latter a splendid toi et moi with a D IF 3.03 carat diamond facing a Zambian 3 carat emerald. The ‘Twist Émeraude Bracelet’ is a thing of ‘One Thousand and One Nights’. The torque bracelet plays with colours and movement: round diamonds and mauve sapphires spin towards two Colombian cabochon-cut emeralds on each end. The line-up would not be complete without a Van Cleef & Arpels brooch, and what a brooch! The ‘Bouquet d’Émeraudes Clip’ is a verdant floral delight with 11 carved-as-flowers Zambian emeralds (total of 32.53 carats) and hints of bright small foliage brought in by cabochon-cut chrysoprases. The flowers rest on a carpet of diamond-paved leaves. In each and every one of the presented jewels, you can identify Van Cleef & Arpels DNA. Inherent in the instant-classic power that their jewellery has, and exemplified in this most fascinating Émeraude en Majesté collection, is the realisation that throughout history and to this day, emeralds found Van Cleef & Arpels, as much as Van Cleef & Arpels found emeralds. www.vancleefarpels.com

27


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

TWIST ÉMERAUDE BRACELET White gold, round diamonds, round mauve sapphires, 2 cabochon-cut emeralds of 19.80 and 21.48 carats (Colombia).

28


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

29


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

LUNE D’EAU BETWEEN THE FINGER RING White gold, platinum, round diamonds, baguette-cut emeralds, one pear-shaped D IF diamond of 3.03 carats, one pear-shaped emerald of 3 carats (Zambia).

30


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

31


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

BOUQUET D’ÉMERAUDES CLIP White gold, yellow gold, round diamonds, cabochon-cut chrysoprases, 11 carved emeralds for a total of 32.53 carats (Zambia).

32


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

33


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

34


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

35


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

36


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

37


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CLAUDINE NECKLACE White gold, yellow gold, round, tapered-cut, triangle-cut, baguette-cut and pear-shaped diamonds, bu -topped round emeralds, 9 emerald-cut emeralds for a total of 42.07 carats (Colombia). Detachable clip.

38


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

39

Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CLAUDINE NECKLACE White gold, yellow gold, round, tapered-cut, triangle-cut, baguette-cut and pear-shaped diamonds, bu -topped round emeralds, 9 emerald-cut emeralds for a total of 42.07 carats (Colombia). Detachable clip.

40


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

41


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CLAUDINE NECKLACE White gold, yellow gold, round, tapered-cut, triangle-cut, baguette-cut and pear-shaped diamonds, bu -topped round emeralds, 9 emerald-cut emeralds for a total of 42.07 carats (Colombia). Detachable clip.

42


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

43


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

44


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

45


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

DRAPÉ MAJESTUEUX NECKLACE White gold, round, square-cut, asscher-cut, baguette-cut and obus-cut diamonds, 150 emerald beads for a total of 244.24 carats (Zambia). Reversible necklace.

46


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

47


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

DRAPÉ MAJESTUEUX NECKLACE White gold, round, square-cut, asscher-cut, baguette-cut and obus-cut diamonds, 150 emerald beads for a total of 244.24 carats (Zambia). Reversible necklace.

48


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

49


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

DRAPÉ MAJESTUEUX NECKLACE White gold, round, square-cut, asscher-cut, baguette-cut and obus-cut diamonds, 150 emerald beads for a total of 244.24 carats (Zambia). Reversible necklace.

50


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

51


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

52


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

53


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

ÉMERAUDE ENTRELACÉE NECKLACE White gold, platinum, round and baguette-cut diamonds, one emerald-cut emerald of 17.82 carats (Colombia).

54


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

55


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

56


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

3 carved emeralds for a total of 127.88 carats (Colombia), emeralds on the gouaché of the Grand Opus necklace

57


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GRAND OPUS SET

White gold, round, baguette-cut and princess-cut diamonds, bu -topped square-cut emeralds, white cultured pearls, 3 carved emeralds for 127.88 carats (Colombia). Transformable necklace, earrings and clip with detachable pendants.

58


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

59


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GRAND OPUS SET

White gold, round, baguette-cut and princess-cut diamonds, bu -topped square-cut emeralds, white cultured pearls, 3 carved emeralds for 127.88 carats (Colombia). Transformable necklace, earrings and clip with detachable pendants.

60


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

61


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GRAND OPUS SET

White gold, round, baguette-cut and princess-cut diamonds, bu -topped square-cut emeralds, white cultured pearls, 3 carved emeralds for 127.88 carats (Colombia). Transformable necklace, earrings and clip with detachable pendants.

62


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

63


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GRAND OPUS SET

White gold, round, baguette-cut and princess-cut diamonds, bu -topped square-cut emeralds, white cultured pearls, 3 carved emeralds for 127.88 carats (Colombia). Transformable necklace, earrings and clip with detachable pendants.

64


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GRAND OPUS SET

White gold, round, baguette-cut and princess-cut diamonds, bu -topped square-cut emeralds, white cultured pearls, 3 carved emeralds for 127.88 carats (Colombia). Transformable necklace, earrings and clip with detachable pendants.

65


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GRAND OPUS SET

White gold, round, baguette-cut and princess-cut diamonds, bu -topped square-cut emeralds, white cultured pearls, 3 carved emeralds for 127.88 carats (Colombia). Transformable necklace, earrings and clip with detachable pendants.

66


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

67


Photo courtesy of VAN CLEEF & ARPELS © VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GRAND OPUS SET

White gold, round, baguette-cut and princess-cut diamonds, bu -topped square-cut emeralds, white cultured pearls, 3 carved emeralds for 127.88 carats (Colombia). Transformable necklace, earrings and clip with detachable pendants.

68


69


BVLGARI

70


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Magnificent Inspirations by Bulgari by Olivier Dupon

In their new high jewellery collection, Magnificent Inspirations, Bulgari not only pay tribute to their country and city of residence, they are also upholders of Italy’s aura in the world through these sumptuous, new and quintessentially Latin creations.

71


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

Serpenti Seduttori High Jewellery necklace in white gold set with 1 oval-shaped, brilliant-cut sapphire (13.55 ct), 10 round and pear shaped rubies (8.96 ct), 8 round shaped sapphires (14.97 ct), and baguette and pavé diamonds (24.59 ct).

72


Divided into three eloquent chapters, the daring Italian Extravaganza, the romantic Mediterranean Eden and the mythical Roman Heritage, the collection “savours its very Italian personality – the blues of the Mediterranean, the pinks of Roman sunset, the golds of an ancient age – as it captures the colours, light, and expressivity of its homeland into these facets of inspiration”, the Bulgari house shares.

“'Avrai tu l'universo, resti l'Italia a me' the famous quote from Giuseppe Verdi’s opera, Attila, translates as ‘you may have the universe if I can have Italy’, a bold statement cementing overwhelming love for one country, a love so strong that one is willing to forego the pinnacle of power. Such is the pull of Italy, a land universally fantasised as a destination for romance, good food, beautiful countryside and cities. In their new high jewellery collection, Magnificent Inspirations, Bulgari not only pay tribute to their country and city of residence, they are also upholders of Italy’s aura in the world through these sumptuous, new and quintessentially Latin creations. Magnificent Inspirations is a divine invitation to a Roman holiday; in a way it is to Rome in a jewellery form, what La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty) the movie by director Paolo Sorrentino is to the Eternal city in a cinematic format: a compelling homage. Divided into three eloquent chapters, the daring Italian Extravaganza, the romantic Mediterranean Eden and the mythical Roman Heritage, the collection “savours its very Italian personality – the blues of the Mediterranean, the pinks of Roman sunset, the golds of an ancient age – as it captures the colours, light, and expressivity of its homeland into these facets of inspiration”, the Bulgari house shares. The first part of the collection, Italian Extravaganza, conjures up exuberance and glamour through highly sophisticated colour and gemstone combinations. The names alone evoke grandeur (‘Diva’s Dream Eleganza’, ‘Diva’s Dream Gioco E Vanita’ or ‘Ispirazioni Italiane’ necklaces), and their aesthetics deliver. The first pendant necklace embodies the elegance of a diva as it heralds the perfection of its precious, prominent sapphire. The second echoes the patterned Roman mosaics of an ancient palace. Dazzling with brilliant colours like the fanned tail of a peacock, the precious necklace combines blue sapphires, emeralds and diamonds. The suppleness of its body recalls the flow of the bird’s feathers, while the abstract head discreetly sits on one side of the neck, as if the bird was gently resting around the woman’s neck. The third necklace, ‘Ispirazioni Italiane’, is a saturnalia of sensual autumnal hues, in the manner of the house’s ‘tutti frutti’ aesthetics. Featuring the chestnut cut that is a hallmark of the Roman jeweller, amethysts, tourmaline, emeralds, spinels and diamonds exalt roundness and volume as they produce a joyful melody in their movement. In Mediterranean Eden, gardens are sculpted and geometrical (as seen in the ‘Giardini Italiani’ necklace whose medallion is a garden maze of emeralds and diamonds), flower petals are charming and the seductive snake is lithe. Beguilement is never far from danger, which makes this naturalistic wonderland all the more tempting. The deceptively naïve ‘Fiore Ingenuo’ question-mark necklace is rich with nostalgic, floral inspiration. Meticulously set blue gemstone pavé creates the flower petal’s curves, turquoise inserts bring vivid accents and moonstones, tanzanites, sapphires and diamonds compose a cerulean delight, while ‘The Fiore Allegro’ round neckpiece is a brighter affair in the

73


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

Fiore ingenuo High Jewellery necklace in white gold, set with turquoise inserts, with 1 tanzanite (9,39 ct) 1 certi ed diamond (0.90 ct) 20 round double rose cut moonstones (10.56 ct), sapphires (19.45 ct) and brilliant cut diamonds and pavé-set diamond (20.42 ct).

74


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

75


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

Ispirazioni Italiane High Jewellery necklace in pink gold with 6 cabochon cut pink tourmalines (142.32 ct), 5 cabochon cut amethysts (101.37 ct), 5 emerald beads (24.39 ct), 1 round bead cut tourmaline (5.50 ct), 10 cabochon cut red spinels (16.48 ct) and round and pavé-set diamonds (22.77 ct).

76


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

77


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

78


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

High jewellery earrings in pink gold with 14 Spinels (24.87 ct ), 8 Emeralds (5.65 ct), 8 round, brilliant cut (2.85 ct) and round, brilliant cut Diamonds and pave set Diamonds (0.66 ct)


79


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

High Jewellery necklace with 5 aquamarines (37,65 ct), 10 pink tourmalines (30,70 ct), 21 emerald beads (18,60 ct) and round pavè set diamonds .

80


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

81


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

82


It is possible to compare Haute Joaillerie and Haute Couture. For a start, they share the same clientele. They also offer unique pieces with superlative craftsmanship

manner of wild flowers. Two flowers, one with aquamarine and the other with rubellite petals preside over a delicate chain set with diamond pavé garlands, while berries of red spinels pepper the scene. Among all this enchantment, ‘Serpenti Seduttori’ may surreptitiously lurk. Both a talisman and a peril (you may fall head over heels for it), the magnetic power of the ruby eyes is hypnotising in white gold with brilliant sapphires, rubies and diamond baguettes. The patterning of the snake’s gemstone head is the hexagonal modular motif unique to Bulgari, and recalling the tactile scales of a serpent. A prominent sapphire crowns the reptile’s head. Lastly, no where better than in the Roman Heritage chapter, is the tribute to the Eternal City and its architecture more powerful. With designs inspired by Rome’s beauty, the cabochon gems evoke ancient domes that stud the city’s skyline, and the interlocked links of the ‘Parentesi’ choker emulates the golden patterns of travertine streets. ‘With Rome at its soul, Bulgari’s spirit lives eternal’ is one of their mottos, while the use of ancient Roman coins may attest to the credo by literally merging past and present in one piece of jewellery. While a crowd of stylish women were gazing at the display of Magnificent Inspirations in the main space of the Paris flagship store, I chose a quieter part of the premises to interview Jean-Christophe Babin, Bulgari CEO. OD - Is Haute Joaillerie to fine jewellery what Haute Couture is to ready-to-wear? CB - It is possible to compare Haute Joaillerie and Haute Couture. For a start, they share the same clientele. They also offer unique pieces with superlative craftsmanship. However the comparison stops there: Haute Couture does follow trends and seasons, and even though the calendar for haute joailleire’s presentations is based on that of haute couture, haute joaillerie stops short of following any seasonality. In Magnificent Inspirations, the themes (Rome, Italian extravagance, the Mediterranean world, etc.) are prerequisites for each and every one of Bulgari’s collections year after year. They are the basis of our vision. Of course the expression of each new collection is different from one collection to another, yet they all share these same fundamentals. Consequently it is not accurate to compare fine jewellery with ready-to-wear since the former also deals with timeless creations. The concept is quite different for ready-to-wear, which has to reassess its vision each season. The epitome of excellence, Haute joaillerie personifies expert knowhow and timelessness and this definitely spills over into the more affordable fine jewellery lines that share the same quality of material and craftsmanship. Moreover some of these lines themselves achieve permanence (e.g. Diva, Serpenti) and stand the test of time.

83


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

84


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

85


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

Divas’ Dream Gioco e Vanità High Jewellery necklace in white gold with 13 round emerald beads (20.20 ct), 16 round sapphire beads (43.40 ct), 9 buff top cut emeralds (0.69 ct), 105 buff top cut sapphires (9.04 ct), 14 round brilliant cut diamonds and pavé diamonds.

86


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

87


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

88


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Gemme Straordinarie High Jewellery ring with a Mozambique ruby (11 ct) and diamonds.

89


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery ring in platinum and yellow gold with Emerald (7,96 ct), Diamonds


90


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

91


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Fiore ingenuo High Jewellery necklace in white gold, set with turquoise inserts, with 1 tanzanite (9,39 ct) 1 certi ed diamond (0.90 ct) 20 round double rose cut moonstones (10.56 ct), sapphires (19.45 ct) and brilliant cut diamonds and pavé-set diamond (20.42 ct).

92


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

93


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

94


Bulgari’s positioning is indistinguishable from its history: a silversmith from Greece, who moved to Rome and started working with more precious metals.

Olivier Dupon - How do you see Bulgari’s positioning compared to that of other high jewellers? Jean-Christophe Babin – It is not possible to compare positioning since the house was founded in very specific circumstances and at a time when there was no other house for comparison. Bulgari’s positioning is indistinguishable from its history: a silversmith from Greece, who moved to Rome and started working with more precious metals. The city, its powerful architecture, its volume and colours shaped his vision of beauty, and that of the brand. It is incomparably Roman. In the same way other high jewellery houses may be born in the contexts of Paris or New York, nothing can compare with the uniqueness of Italian colours and spirit. OD- When you first joined Bulgari a few years ago, what surprised or impressed you regarding Bulgari’s Haute Joaillerie? JCB – The passion for gemstones, which comes from Lucia Silvestri and Paolo Bulgari. I remember the first time they invited me to Bulgari’s ‘Gemsroom’ and opened several small boxes each with dozens of sapphires, rubies, emeralds, etc. At first I could hardly tell the gems apart, but I rapidly found out that touch is one of the most important senses when it comes to assessing these stones. This revelation truly touched me.

OD – In Haute Joaillerie, does creativity precede technique or the other way round? JCB – Technique is at the service of creativity in our jewellery. One example is the bracelet of Tubogas, with its hidden springs. The idea that the bracelet should flawlessly extend was paramount, so it fell to the workshop to find a solution. OD – What is the advantage of being able to draw from a repertoire of iconic pieces? JCB – Bulgari has historically used identifiable symbols (e.g. the serpent or even the brand’s logo in the form of an ancient Roman coin). Therefore when one is presented with a Bulgari piece, one will recognise the symbol first and then associate it with our brand. There are not a lot of symbols: they are complementary and refer to the genesis of the brand and to our heritage. Moreover they are vibrant and lively expressions of that heritage, the Roman patrimony, so much so that they contribute to the cultural dimension of the name, as well as reinforce people’s admiration for it. www.bulgari.com

95


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

96

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

97


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

98


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery bracelet in white gold with 11 round Emerald beads (15.40 ct), 11 Sapphire beads (31.00 ct), 90 buff top cut Sapphires (9.35 ct), 8 round brilliant cut diamonds and pavé Diamonds (11.44 ct).


99


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery bracelet in white gold with 11 round Emerald beads (15.40 ct), 11 Sapphire beads (31.00 ct), 90 buff top cut Sapphires (9.35 ct), 8 round brilliant cut diamonds and pavé Diamonds (11.44 ct).


100


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

101


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery necklace with 1 Sri Lanka cushion cut Sapphire (45.15 ct), 1 round, brilliant cut Diamond (0,90 ct), 12 Emeralds beads (39.90 ct), 15 round, brilliant cut Diamonds (4.48 ct), 64 fancy shape, buff top cut Blue Sapphires (6.04 ct), tapered cut Diamonds (2.32 ct ) and pave set Diamonds (11.50 ct)

102


Photo courtesy of BULGARI Š BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Serpenti Seduttori High Jewellery watch, 40mm 18-kt white gold curved case set with 248 brilliant-cut diamonds (1.9 ct), 27 marquise-cut diamonds (2 ct), 12 marquise-cut emeralds (0.9 ct) and 2 pear-shaped emeralds (0.3 ct); 18-kt white gold dial set with 32 brilliant-cut diamonds (0.2 ct) and green-plated hands; two-row 18-kt white gold bracelet set with 112 brilliant-cut diamonds (1.4 ct), 12 marquise-cut diamonds (1.6 ct), 15 marquise-cut emeralds (2 ct) and
 93 brilliant-cut emeralds (1.9 ct). Quartz movement, Bulgari customised and adorned with Bulgari logo

103


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

104


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

105

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Gemme Principesche High Jewellery necklace in platinum with 7 emeralds (56.4 ct) and pavé diamonds (19.23 ct ).

106


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

107


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Extravaganza High Jewellery necklace in pink gold with 7 South Sea cultured pearls, 12 sassi cut amethyst (344.25 ct), 19 round shaped emerald beads (35.78 ct), 10 round shaped amethyst beads (8.07 ct), 8 round shaped cabochon cut spinels (12.42 ct) and 69 round brilliant cut diamonds (8.41 ct).

108


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

109


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery Serpenti bracelet in pink gold set with fancy-cut malachites and pavé diamonds (8.23 ct).


110


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

111


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery Serpenti necklace in platinum with 12 marquise brilliant cut diamonds 9.54 ct and 28 round, pear and marquise shaped emeralds (35.42 ct) and round and pavé diamonds (11.03 ct)


112


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

113

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Parentesi High Jewellery necklace in pink gold with pavé diamonds (42.17 ct).

114


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

115


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Serpenti Seduttori High Jewellery necklace in white gold set with 1 oval-shaped, brilliant-cut sapphire (13.55 ct), 10 round and pear shaped rubies (8.96 ct), 8 round shaped sapphires (14.97 ct), and baguette and pavé diamonds (24.59 ct).

116


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

117

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery bracelet in white gold with 11 round Emerald beads (15.40 ct), 11 round Sapphire beads (31.00 ct), 90 buff-top cut Sapphires (9.35 ct), 8 round brilliant cut diamonds and pavé Diamonds (11.44 ct).


118


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

119


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

High Jewellery necklaces in platinum with 1 round Colombia emerald (17,34 ct approx.), emeralds (7,68 ct) and diamonds (39,73 ct)


120


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

121


Photo courtesy of BULGARI Š BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Serpenti Seduttori High Jewellery bangle watch, 36mm 18kt pink gold curved case set with 39 brilliant-cut diamonds (2.2 ct), 1 cabochon- cut tourmaline (17.4 ct) and 2 pear-shaped emeralds (0.6 ct); 18kt pink gold dial set with 85 brilliant-cut diamonds (~0.5 ct) and pink coated brass hands; 18kt pink gold bracelet set with 116 brilliant-cut diamonds (7.75 ct) and 35 baguette-cut tourmalines (2.4 ct). Quartz movement, Bulgari customised and adorned with Bulgari logo

122


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

123


Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Divas’ Dream Bellezza High Jewellery necklace in white gold with 6 fancy cut aquamarines (13.90 ct), 6 fancy cut amethyst (5.54 ct), 51 buff top cut blue sapphires (3.53 ct), 9 round brilliant cut diamonds and pavé-set diamonds (10.82 ct).

124


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

125


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

126

Photo courtesy of BULGARI © BULGARI

Jewellery Historian


127


CARTIER

128


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Cartier Magicien by Olivier Dupon

Prepare to be spellbound by dazzling pieces that in turn mesmerise, intrigue and astound. The tour de force of the twelve first pieces of Cartier Magicien high jewellery collection resides in their mathematical precision, futuristic ingenuity and mystical reach

129


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

130


With this high jewellery, the wearer becomes the nucleus of an enigmatic universe, around which symbolical precious suns and stars orbit, exposing or concealing their radiant inner worlds.

Abracadabra! Prepare to be spellbound by dazzling pieces that in turn mesmerise, intrigue and astound. The tour de force of the twelve first pieces of Cartier Magicien high jewellery collection (part of chapter 1, which will have a total of 43 pieces, while chapter 2, will feature 50) resides in their mathematical precision, futuristic ingenuity and mystical reach: a feat of complex construction with hidden mechanisms and layers of detail, where the wearer can decide how much of the secret core she wishes to show the world, thereby creating the ultimate intimate bond between custodian and piece. More than magical, these renditions verge on the alchemical since they are not just about tricks but meticulous formulas. With this high jewellery, the wearer becomes the nucleus of an enigmatic universe, around which symbolical precious suns and stars orbit, exposing or concealing their radiant inner worlds. This mode of interacting with one’s jewellery is reminiscent of the Renaissance obsession with utilitarian ways of holding one’s secrets close to one’s chest. Alchemical revelations would go under the cloak; the more inconspicuous the vessel, the more plentiful the content. Case in point with the ‘Incantation’ necklace whose collar made of two types of tiny geometric diamond-paved modules recalls a sort of fierce and futuristic skeleton. The modules are interspaced one after the other in a symmetrical dance that is punctuated by just one cushion-cut 22.84-carat sapphire pendant. Known only to the wearer, the necklace can be transformed, its curve being inverted with a single touch, in a stunning feat of technical prowess never before seen in high jewellery workshops. The length and dimensions of the piece can be adjusted so it becomes more intimate, fitting closer to the neck, or it can be opened out. Further, the sapphire can be detached and mounted onto a ring. The ‘Oracle’ necklace projects a similar geometric grid pattern that seems to expand from the centre vertical row of three modified rectangular round-cornered step-cut Colombian emeralds. The illusion of movement, a rippling effect as if the emerald had just been dropped onto a glistening flowing surface, is enhanced by black onyx underneath some of the structure’s rows. It is all about concentric waves, streams of light, gleaming prisms, a type of shamanistic beauty pulling us like some magnetic force. What about the ‘Paillettes’ necklace that evokes amulets? Inspired by the lightness and perfectly rounded shape of a dandelion clock, Cartier has created two globes faceted with rose-cut diamonds, and encapsulating blazing yellow diamonds. The sheer diversity of cuts (rose-cut diamonds, yellow triangular-shaped briolette-cut diamonds, briolette-cut diamond beads, diamond slices, yellow, orange and white brilliant-cut diamonds) is in itself enthralling. The necklace can also be worn long or short, with the removable piece of chain becoming a bracelet. It must be said that Cartier Magicien is naturally not a menacing affair; it rather deals with positive magic, that provides benevolence and protective powers. This is also why there is a suite named ‘Magie Blanche’. Unlike black magic, white magic is for good and selfless purposes. That said, in this instance the latter may fail since both the chandelier necklace

131


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

QUETZAL necklace 
 White gold, one 68.82-carat cushion-shaped cabochon- cut rubellite, black lacquer, brilliant-cut diamonds. carat weight: 10.18cts

132

Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

QUETZAL bracelet White gold, two sugarloaf cabochon-cut rubellites totalling

133

41.09 carats, black lacquer, brilliant-cut diamonds.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

QUETZAL ear cuffs White gold, black lacquer, brilliant-cut diamonds. These versatile ear cuffs can be worn in two different ways.

134


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

QUETZAL necklace 
 White gold, one 68.82-carat cushion-shaped cabochon- cut rubellite, black lacquer, brilliant-cut diamonds. carat weight: 10.18cts

135


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

136


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

QUETZAL ear cuffs White gold, black lacquer, brilliant-cut diamonds. These versatile ear cuffs can be worn in two different ways.

137


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

QUETZAL bracelet White gold, two sugarloaf cabochon-cut rubellites totalling 41.09 carats, black lacquer, brilliant-cut diamonds.

138


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

139


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

INCANTATION ring

Platinum, one 22.84-carat cushion-shaped sapphire from Ceylon, brilliant-cut diamonds. The sapphire can be worn on the necklace.

INCANTATION drop earrings

Platinum, two cushion- shaped sapphires from Ceylon totalling 9.55 carats, brilliant-cut diamonds.

140


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

INCANTATION drop earrings Platinum, two cushion- shaped sapphires from Ceylon totalling 9.55 carats, brilliant-cut diamonds.

141


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

INCANTATION ring Platinum, one 22.84-carat cushion-shaped sapphire from Ceylon, brilliant-cut diamonds. The sapphire can be worn on the necklace.

142


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

INCANTATION necklace Platinum, one 22.84-carat cushion-shaped sapphire from Ceylon, one 1.06-carat modified step-cut pentagon G VVS2 diamond, baguette- cut diamonds, princess-cut diamonds and brilliant-cut diamonds. The necklace’s radius of curvature can be inverted and the sapphire may be worn as a ring.

143


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

INCANTATION necklace Platinum, one 22.84-carat cushion-shaped sapphire from Ceylon, one 1.06-carat modified step-cut pentagon G VVS2 diamond, baguette- cut diamonds, princess-cut diamonds and brilliant-cut diamonds. The necklace’s radius of curvature can be inverted and the sapphire may be worn as a ring.

144


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER Š CARTIER

PAILLETTES SOLAIRES necklace 
 Platinum, yellow gold, rose-cut diamonds, yellow triangular-shaped briolette- cut diamonds, briolette-cut diamond beads, diamond slices, yellow, orange and white brilliant-cut diamonds. The necklace can be worn long or short. The removable piece of chain can be worn as a bracelet.

145


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

146


Alchemists and magicians often call for the appearance of otherworldly forces as they revere a number of mythical creatures with extraordinary powers. In the ‘Quetzal’ set , Jacqueline Karachi, The Director of High Jewellery, has drawn inspiration from a mythical Aztec being: the sacred feathered serpent, bridging earth and sky.

and bracelet are so covetable one must struggle to contain the desire for possession. Rows of pearls, in subtle shades of white, grey and gold, and briolette- and brilliant-cut diamonds seem to flit around; the ensemble recalls the delicacy of antique lace. The central vertical line that covers the décolleté is a hymn to old-cut diamonds: from bottom to top, a detachable 20.09-carat very light brown VS1 type IIa modified pear-shaped diamond, one 6.44-carat diamond faceted bead, one 5.25-carat light brown VVS2 pear-shaped rose-cut diamond, one 2.82-carat diamond faceted bead, and one 1.29-carat light brown rose-cut diamond. The matching bracelet is simply fit for a queen and its 10.90-carat fancy brown-yellow pear-shaped rosecut diamond is a central celestial body that captivates. Alchemists and magicians often call for the appearance of otherworldly forces as they revere a number of mythical creatures with extraordinary powers. In the ‘Quetzal’ set (a necklace, torque bracelet and ear climbers), Jacqueline Karachi, The Director of High Jewellery, has drawn inspiration from a mythical Aztec being: the sacred feathered serpent, bridging earth and sky. The abstract rendition has almost paired the creature to its core essence, and in the end the jewellery seems to literally embrace the wearer’s body: the fluidity of lines, the suppleness of tiny links paved with diamonds that evoke delicate feather-scales, the raised shadows of black lacquer enhancing the animal’s serpentine sinuosity, the animalistic flow and the glow of sugarloaf rubellites. In the necklace, the never-ending curve with its preternatural pink eye is beyond any doubt the most arresting talisman you will ever see. www.cartier.com

147


Photo courtesy of CARTIER Š CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

MAGIE BLANCHE bracelet Platinum, one 10.90-carat fancy brown-yellow pear-shaped rose-cut diamond, one 2.15-carat briolette-cut diamond, briolette-cut diamonds, white and coloured natural pearls, brilliant-cut diamonds.

148


Photo courtesy of CARTIER Š CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

MAGIE BLANCHE bracelet Platinum, one 10.90-carat fancy brown-yellow pear-shaped rose-cut diamond, one 2.15-carat briolette-cut diamond, briolette-cut diamonds, white and coloured natural pearls, brilliant-cut diamonds.

149


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER Š CARTIER

MAGIE BLANCHE necklace Platinum, one 20.09-carat very light brown VS1 type IIa modified pear-shaped diamond, one 6.44-carat diamond faceted bead, one 5.25-carat light brown VVS2 pear-shaped rose-cut diamond, one 2.82-carat diamond faceted bead, one 1.29-carat light brown rose-cut diamond, briolette-cut diamonds, y-two button-shaped and round-shaped natural pearls totalling 98.08 grains, brilliant-cut diamonds. The first row is removable and can be worn alone. The diamond weighing 20.09 carats is also removable.

150


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

151


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

MAGIE BLANCHE necklace Platinum, one 20.09-carat very light brown VS1 type IIa modified pear-shaped diamond, one 6.44-carat diamond faceted bead, one 5.25-carat light brown VVS2 pear-shaped rose-cut diamond, one 2.82-carat diamond faceted bead, one 1.29-carat light brown rose-cut diamond, briolette-cut diamonds, y-two button-shaped and round-shaped natural pearls totalling 98.08 grains, brilliant-cut diamonds. The first row is removable and can be worn alone. The diamond weighing 20.09 carats is also removable.

152


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

153


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

ORACLE ring 
 Platinum, one 6.53-carat modi ed octagonal step-cut emerald from Colombia, baguette-cut diamonds, onyx, brilliant-cut diamonds.

154


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

ORACLE necklace 
 Platinum, three modi ed rectangular round-cornered step-cut emeralds from Colombia totalling 18.30 carats, one 0.79-carat rectangular step-cut F VVS2 diamond, one 0.70-carat rectangular stepcut D VS1 diamond, one 0.70-carat rectangular step-cut F VVS2 diamond, six modi ed step-cut kite-shaped diamonds totalling 3.84 carats, kite-shaped diamonds, onyx, brilliant-cut diamonds.

155


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

156


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

157


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

158


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

159


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

ILLUMINATION bracelet/ring 
 White gold, one 31.16-carat, D IF emerald-cut diamond, one 0.80-carat D VS2 and one 0.77-carat D VVS1 trapezoid-shaped step-cut diamonds, carved rock crystal, calibré-cut diamonds, brilliantcut diamonds. The diamond can be worn on a ring or replaced by a paved motif. (see next page)

160


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

161


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

ILLUMINATION bracelet/ring 
 White gold, one 31.16-carat, D IF emerald-cut diamond, one 0.80-carat D VS2 and one 0.77-carat D VVS1 trapezoid-shaped step-cut diamonds, carved rock crystal, calibrÊ-cut diamonds, brilliantcut diamonds. The diamond can be worn on a ring or replaced by a paved motif. (see previous page)

162


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

MANDRAGORE necklace White gold, two pear-shaped green beryls totalling 79.38 carats, one 4.61-carat cushion-shaped blue-green sapphire, briolette-cut chrysoberyl beads, tsavorite garnets, brilliant-cut diamonds.

163


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

164


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

MANDRAGORE drop earrings White gold, tsavorite garnets, brilliant-cut diamonds.

165


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

166


Photo courtesy of CARTIER © CARTIER

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

MANDRAGORE drop earrings White gold, tsavorite garnets, brilliant-cut diamonds.

167


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

168


169


BUCCELLATI

170


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

UNICA by BUCCELLATI by Olivier Dupon

During the Paris Couture week and to celebrate the launch of new creations that will enrich the Unica collection (Unica is Buccellati’s permanent collection of one-of-a-kind haute joaillerie jewels), Buccellati organised two memorable events.

171


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Cuff bracelet in yellow gold, “rigato” engraved. On openwork surface, in the center, a rosette com- posed of six logo elements in white gold and diamonds, with central oval leaf-modeled bezel set with a sapphire. Shiny beads in yellow gold. Centering a grand leaf-modeled white gold bezel set with a sapphire. Along the band, logo elements in white gold and diamonds, 16 oval faceted sapphires cts. 2,69, 2 round faceted sapphires cts. 0,11
 1 faceted sapphire cts. 4,90, 264 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 2,37

172


There we learned that around the 16th century engraving truly acquired an aesthetic function to embellish and enhance objects. To this day, the processes and know-how have not changed, with the workshop team using the same tools and facing the same challenges

The new premises for Buccellati’s Paris flagship boutique are on rue de la Paix in Paris. A prestigious address made even more special with the attribution of number 1. In a way this is befitting for a jewellery house whose founder was once nicknamed ‘The Prince of Goldsmiths’ by Gabriele d’Annunzio. It is also relevant for a house that has been steadily championing antique traditional goldsmith techniques, preserving them into the future while creating highly desirable timeless jewels. During the Paris Couture week and to celebrate the launch of new creations that will enrich the Unica collection (Unica is Buccellati’s permanent collection of one-of-a-kind haute joaillerie jewels), Buccellati organised two memorable events. First they joined forces with another Italian luxury powerhouse, Giambattista Valli, to preview the latest Buccellati high jewellery creations during the Giambattista Valli fashion show at the Grand Palais. After all, clients of haute couture are also collectors of haute joaillerie so it is only logical that the two be presented together (not just during the same launch week, but literally together on the catwalks). ‘Perfectly matching the elegant cocktail and evening dresses presented by Giambattista Valli, recalling the volumes of the Renaissance gowns, Buccellati jewels stood out for their opulence and appeal. Amidst impressive ruffles and rhinestone flowers, the precious gemstones and diamonds glistened like stars. In a blaze of silk, impalpable voile and embroideries, Buccellati cuff bracelets, necklaces and earrings showed their affinities with precious fabrics’, the post-show report says. Secondly, Buccellati invited two of their in-house craftspeople to demonstrate some of their ancestral techniques at 1 rue de la Paix, where the new collection was subsequently presented. Facing each other on adjoined benches, a young woman applyed rigato engraving on a cuff while her male counterpart delicately honeycomb filed the inside of a piece of gold. By putting front and centre what the house is all about – ‘a savoir-faire dating back to the Renaissance goldsmith’s techniques that Buccellati continues to embody in its jewels’ - this fascinating live show re-affirmed how expertly artisanal the Buccellati’s pieces are. There we learned that around the 16th century engraving truly acquired an aesthetic function to embellish and enhance objects. To this day, the processes and know-how have not changed, with the workshop team using the same tools (the burin in many sizes being the most useful) and facing the same challenges: “to maintain the cutting angle of the burin to allow the removal of just the right quantity of metal, a technique which would be compromised by changing the angle by just one degree”, the Buccellati team explains. You will not find glossy surfaces in their collection as gold is systematically engraved. That is not to say the outcome is repetitive since there are five different engraving techniques, each bestowing a different texture and

173


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Bib-necklace in openwork white gold and diamonds. Oval and round bezels on openwork surface in leaf-modeled white gold set with diamonds. Garland-shaped elements in white gold and diamonds, laterally “rigato” engraved. Shiny beads in white gold., 28 diamonds cts. 12,81, 701 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 27,48

174


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

175


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

176


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Cocktail ring in white gold and diamonds alternating with drop-shaped bezels and diamonds. Gar- landshaped borders in white gold and diamonds, laterally “rigato” engraved. Centering a griffe in modeled yellow gold set with a cabochon ruby. Shiny beads in yellow gold. Scalar bombé leaf-mo- deled stem in white gold ,with yellow gold sections modeled with leaves running after each other. 1 ruby cts. 15,10, 13 dropshaped brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 1,81 60 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 0,73

177


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Bangle bracelet in white gold, “rigato” engraved, with yellow gold rosettes with yellow diamonds, centering oval yellow gold bezels set with tourmalines. The rosettes alternate with rhomboidal shapes in white gold and diamonds. Borders composed of rhomboidal elements in white gold and diamonds. Band width cm. 4,0., 348 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 2,56, 24 oval faceted tourmalines cts. 10,45, 190 diamonds cts. 0,99

178


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

179


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI Š BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Band ring in white gold with openwork upper part with rhomboidal shapes set with diamonds, alternating with yellow gold bezels set with yellow diamonds. On the back, openwork band with rouches-modeled white gold shapes. Centering an oval yellow gold bezel set with an emerald. Scal- loped rouches-modeled borders in yellow gold. 12 yellow diamonds cts. 0,46, 1 faceted emerald cts. 1,42, 12 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 0,36

180


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

181

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI Š BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Watch composed of a exible honeycomb bracelet in yellow gold, with ower-shaped rosettes in white gold set with diamonds, centering white gold bezels set with diamonds. Case in yellow gold, contoured by a garland-like rosette in white gold set with diamonds. Linear border in white gold set with diamonds. Band width cms. 4,40.
 666 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 7,98, 1 navette-cut diamond cts. 0,19

182


This anthology of engraving methods, and all the other techniques such as honeycomb filing, highlights one fact: each and every one of Buccellati’s renditions is uniquely brought to life by human touch.

finish. The following summary of these engraving techniques has been provided by Buccellati: Rigato – this engraving style is based on fine parallel cuts into the surface of the metal with a burin to obtain a bright and silky sheen effect. Telato – a textural effect obtained by applying a linen-like pattern of fine crosshatched lines which results in a soft luminescence. Segrinato – this third technique produces the softest effect of all and is obtained by engraving in all directions with tiny overlapping lines. Ornato – this complicated technique is used for scroll-work decoration often inspired by nature (animal, leaves, flowers). Modellato – this is the most delicate engraving technique of all and consists of reproducing three dimensional designs chiselled on a minuscule scale. It is mainly used for decorative borders and appears very like micro sculpture. This anthology of engraving methods, and all the other techniques such as honeycomb filing, highlights one fact: each and every one of Buccellati’s renditions is uniquely brought to life by human touch. One could also add that so much effort put into the body of a ring or bracelet is the perfect approach to support sublimely coloured gemstones. This formula is inherent in every one of the latest Unica high jewels: in the ravishing cuff bracelets in yellow or white gold, rigato and/or ornato engraved; or in the ring band in white gold with an openwork upper part with rhomboidal shapes set with diamonds alternating with yellow gold bezels set with yellow diamonds; or in the regal bib-necklace in openwork white gold and diamonds, with oval and round bezels on an openwork surface in leaf-modelled white gold set with diamonds, and garland-shaped elements in white gold and diamonds. The skilled meeting of intricacy and delicacy has also produced gold work which thrills with a lace-like effect. This is manifested perfectly in the gossamer-like bangle bracelet with gold elements in the form of radial tulle. One has to hold the cuff to feel its lightness and admire the ultra-fine rays of yellow gold to see that it is deceptively fragile. www.buccellati.com

183


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Necklace in white gold set with rose-cut diamonds, laterally “rigato” engraved, with shapes and bezels in white gold set with yellow diamonds. Centering oval yellow gold bezels set with pink and blue sapphires. 558 rose-cut diamonds cts. 10,92, 9 pink sapphires cts. 16,36, 60 yellow diamonds cts. 5,07, 11 faceted sapphires cts. 23,08.

Pendant earrings in white gold set with rose-cut diamonds and laterally “rigato” engraved, with yel- low gold shapes set with yellow diamonds. Centering oval yellow gold bezels set with pink and blue sapphires. A white gold bezel set with a diamond renders the pendant part detachable,, 90 rose-cut diamonds cts. 2,07, 2 pink sapphires cts. 2,89, 18 yellow diamonds cts. 0,89

184


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Cuff bracelet in white gold, “rigato” engraved and “ornato” engraved” alla round the rosettes set with diamonds on openwork surface. Leaf-modeled yellow gold decorations. Centering a leaf-mo- deled white gold bezel set with a diamond, contoured by a rivière in yellow gold and diamonds. The three rosettes alternate with round rivières in yellow gold and diamonds. Shiny beads in yellow gold. , 309 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 2,53

185


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI Š BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Pendant earrings with yellow gold elements set wtih rose-cut diamonds. Centering each element, a small white gold cloud set with diamonds. Borders with elements in white gold and frames in mode- led white gold. A white gold bezel set with a diamond renders the pendant part detachable. 661 rose-cut diamonds cts. 3,99, 218 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 3,83

186


Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

187


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Crown-shaped ring in openwork garland-like white gold, laterally “rigato” engraved. Shapes set with diamonds and central drop-shaped yellow gold bezel set with a tourmaline, anked by two round white gold bezels set with diamonds. A yellow gold section with leaves running after each other di- vides the white gold border with diamonds from the central part. Shiny beads in yellow gold. Scalar white gold stem with yellow gold section with leaves running after each other., 1 faceted tourmaline cts. 1,00, 36 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 1,27

188


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI Š BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Pendant earrings in honeycomb yellow gold, centering a white gold rosette with diamonds and a yellow gold bezel set with a ruby. Garland-shaped elements in white gold and diamonds and shiny beads in yellow gold. A white gold bezel set with a diamonds renders the pendant part detachable. 2 oval faceted rubies cts. 2,04 , 2 round faceted rubies cts. 0,57, 226 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 7,30

189


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Cuff bracelet in white gold, “rigato” engraved, with daisies of different colors and dimensions on openwork surface. Yellow gold petals with emeralds, blue sapphires or Paraiba tourmalines, cen- tering leaf-modeled white gold bezels set with diamonds. Petals in pink gold with pink sapphires or rubies, centering white gold leafmodeled bezels with diamonds. Shiny beads in yellow gold. Band width cms. 4,50., 121 round faceted emeralds cts. 0,47, 97 faceted tourmalines cts. 0,54, 99 round faceted sapphires cts. 0,75, 122 round faceted rubies cts. 0,85, 48 pink sapphires cts. 0,35, 25 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 1,71

190


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

191


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BUCCELLATI © BUCCELLATI

Jewellery Historian

Drop-shaped lacework pendant earrings with white gold shapes set with diamonds and yellow gold shapes set with yellow diamonds. Centering the pendant part, a yellow gold bezel set with a kunzite. The upper part has a leaf-modeled yellow gold bezel set with a diamond. Shiny beads in yellow gold. The pendant part is detachable thanks to a bezel set with a diamond. “Chiodino” chain in white gold with a bilière in white gold and diamonds, 2 faceted kunzites cts. 21,56, 178 yellow diamonds cts. 1,21, 338 round brilliant-cut diamonds cts. 4,54

192


193


ALEXANDRE REZA

194


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Alexandre Reza by Olivier Dupon

At the heart of the Alexandre Reza legacy is the pinnacle of gem connoisseurship. The father, Alexandre, was indeed first and foremost a gem expert, who amassed a very important collection of his own. This in turn propelled him into the role of go-to precious gems supplier for some of the most prestigious jewellers then on Place VendĂ´me. 195


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

196


Today his son Olivier is carrying the torch from two exclusive salons, the famous one at 21 Place Vendôme, and a remodelled boutique at the iconic Ritz Palace, where I was invited to view some of the latest high jewellery creations.

At the heart of the Alexandre Reza legacy is the pinnacle of gem connoisseurship. The father, Alexandre, was indeed first and foremost a gem expert, who amassed a very important collection of his own. This in turn propelled him into the role of go-to precious gems supplier for some of the most prestigious jewellers then on Place Vendôme. Possessing amazing gems, it was just a matter of time for Alexandre to start creating high jewellery pieces under his own name for private clients, or for jewellery houses. Today his son Olivier is carrying the torch from two exclusive salons, the famous one at 21 Place Vendôme, and a remodelled boutique at the iconic Ritz Palace, where I was invited to view some of the latest high jewellery creations. However first let’s hear from Olivier Reza to understand a bit more about the new offerings. Olivier Dupon - You are in a unique position as custodian of a crucial name in the highly competitive world of fine jewellery. How does one create one’s own legacy whilst nurturing one's father's legacy? Olivier Reza - I'm trying to write a new chapter that will significantly differentiate our name. It is harder than I expected but the challenge is worth it. It requires discipline, patience and an uncompromising focus. OD - Could you please tell us more about the Dune cuff and its inception? OR - I wanted and I needed to do a cuff. It had to be original in every way: the shape, the design, the feel and the set. All this had to happen with a very desirable overall composition. It was the longest process I've experienced since I took over from my father. Creating an original cuff is not an easy task but I'm very proud of the result. Moreover, we are creating a lot of new pieces inspired by this cuff. OD - Have you always thought you would eventually follow in the footsteps of your father? OR - Yes and no, depending on where I was in my life. It made sense when I was younger but it was complicated with my father. OD - Is there a need to distance yourself from the aura of your father to bring the brand into the future? OR - Yes. People want to be constantly surprised and impressed. You can't do that if you are stuck in the past. OD - Can you tell us more about high jewellery for men? OR - I want to create a demand for something which is not so obvious to many but a no-brainer to me. I believe it is obvious that if some women want to wear jewellery then some men would want to do so as well as was the case in the past. We just have to make pieces that are so desirable and wearable that we will break down taboos and the demand will follow. Of course we need patience and time. OD - How has Reza’s signature changed/evolved, and how will it change in the future under your leadership?

197


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

FACETTE EBENNE Ring

Ebony faceted ring featuring an oval cabochon Colombian Emerald weighing 8,49 carats. Set on yellow gold.

198


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

199


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CROISSANTS earrings

200


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

201


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

202


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

203


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

FARANDOLES

Earrings featuring 18 turquoises ribbed balls weighing 34.29 carats and 70 brilliant-cut diamonds weighing 6.22 carats. Set on grey gold.

204


OR - It changes everyday. I often scratch my head wondering where I need to go next, whether I am too dispersed and if I need to make our pieces more identifiable. I've made the decision to produce less and only pieces I'm very proud of. Is that enough and will collectors understand? Should I impose on our creative team more boundaries? Should Reza pieces look more similar, follow more common lines? Will absolute freedom in creativity be enough as long as the final pieces work? I am still asking myself those questions… The refurbished boutique is compact, yet it feels somehow expansive. Right across the long corridor that services each boutique, and facing the Alexandre Reza premises, French double doors open onto the gorgeous landscaped courtyard of the Ritz. This proximity to a verdant and peaceful open space contributes to the airy feel of the room. Framed by mouldings, an elongated mirror whose right end is curved does not cover the entire back wall. The cropped effect creates a flow, while the main station desk juts out of the mirrored wall as if suspended in thin air. An accompanying stool is encased below in the mirror so one can slide it out when needed. It is discreetly ingenious, like all of Alexandre Reza’s creations, and even more so under Olivier’s guiding hand. The best example is undoubtedly the ‘Dune’ cuff mentioned in the interview. Featuring two pear-shaped diamonds and 152 brilliant-cut diamonds weighing 31.48 carats, the cuff is set on sand blasted and polished pink gold in the manner

“Should Reza pieces look more similar, follow more common lines? Will absolute freedom in creativity be enough as long as the final pieces work? I am still asking myself those questions…” of a futuristic claw. Although the diamonds are affixed, they seem to be randomly floating within each cutout ridge. The same sculptural dynamism applies to the ‘Croissants’ earrings, a pair of twisted ribbons, which are paved with diamonds on the outside and blue sapphires on the inside. The calligraphic quality of the earrings conjures up a playful elegance. How to make architectural attributes look dainty is the ‘Dhelia’ necklace’s forte. The chain is a delicate geometrical affair, which could well pass for the update of an antique long filigree gold chain, Art Nouveau era, except the gold is blackened and the filigrees are compositions of princess- and brilliant-cut diamonds. A troïda pink 3.40-carat sapphire from Madagascar almost crowns a Colombian 27.90-carat carved emerald pendant, whose hue is echoed by twelve cabochon emeralds all along the chain. Inserting a matching-chain bracelet can extend the necklace, and interestingly this separate bracelet is unisex. This refers back to Olivier’s comment in the interview about carving a niche for high jewellery for men. He says the challenge is to design pieces that will be so desirable that men will crave them. We may have the exact answer with the ‘Facette Ebene’ ring, a magnificent and sculptural jewel that recalls chevalière rings. The Colombian oval cabochon 8.49-carat emerald is nested in a decagon of yellow gold, which reverberates the brilliance of the beryl. The body of the ring looks like a parquetry of ebony wood, but this effect is in fact faceted. Further, the piece is super light, which contrasts beautifully with the statement volume of the ringpiece. We know that women have been anticipating Alexandre Reza’s offerings for years, however from now on, men will also rejoice. www.alexandrereza.com

205


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

DHELIA Necklace featuring 1 engraved Colombian Emerald weighing 27.90 carats, 1 troïda pink sapphire from Madagascar weighing 3.40 carats, 12 cabochon emeralds, 98 princess-cut diamonds and 26 brilliant-cut diamonds. Set on blackened grey gold.

206


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

207


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

DUNE

Cuff bracelet featuring two pear- shaped diamonds and 152 brilliant cut diamonds weighing 31.48 carats. Set on sand blasted and polished pink gold.

208


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

209


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CROISSANTS

Earrings featuring round-cut sapphires weighing 4.41 carats and brilliants weighing 6.86 carats. Set on white gold.

210


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

DUNE ring

211


Photo courtesy of ALEXANDRE REZA © ALEXANDRE REZA

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Toi & Moi Spinel ring

212


213


MESSIKA

214


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Messika by Olivier Dupon

Gradually, a few pieces at a time, Messika is securely establishing its haute joaillerie credentials. A year ago, their high jewellery atelier was established in the heart of Paris, and last March their first ever and hotly anticipated collection of 35 exceptional pieces was unveiled at Basel World in 2015, the ‘10th Anniversary High Jewellery’ Collection.

215


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

Messika Joaillerie- 16ct pear shape diamond- Private collection

216


To coincide with the Paris Couture week this July, Messika revealed four new jewels that complement her existing themes a necklace, two ear cuffs and a double ring – that were inspired by the world of ancient and mythical deities.

Gradually, a few pieces at a time, Messika is securely establishing its haute joaillerie credentials. A year ago, their high jewellery atelier was established in the heart of Paris, and last March their first ever and hotly anticipated collection of 35 exceptional pieces was unveiled at Basel World in 2015, the ‘10th Anniversary High Jewellery’ Collection. Followed by the Celestial Diamonds collection also presented at Basel World a year later in 2016. On both occasions, the immediate success had as much to do with the exceptional quality of the diamonds (Messika’s core raison d’être) as with the upto-date approach Valerie Messika is bringing to her art. Already successfully designing fine jewellery that addresses the wishes of modern women, she has modelled her haute joaillerie on the same prerequisite: functional, playful, stylish and versatile. The days of old-world and stately joaillerie are long gone when one tries on a piece of Messika high jewellery. To coincide with the Paris Couture week this July, Messika revealed four new jewels that complement her existing themes - a necklace, two ear cuffs and a double ring – that were inspired by the world of ancient and mythical deities. Following in the wake of the ingenious ‘Aurora’ necklace (launched in March, this more than a metre long piece, with 21.21 carat of EF / VVSVS brilliant-cut diamonds, can be transformed into multiple lengths), the new ‘Hera’ necklace is not an update, but rather a sibling to its predecessor. It has the same versatility (its three rows are detachable) plus an even more impressive weight of near flawless diamonds (100.25 carat of DEF / VVSVS diamonds), but adds to this tally by playing with different cuts alternating cushion- and emerald-cut diamonds in a refined symmetry. When it comes to the new ear cuffs, one is more a re-interpretation while the other is an innovation. The ‘Calypso’ ear cuff is indeed a revisited design from its March predecessor of the same name: a single line of pearcut diamonds starts high on the ear and gradually extends to three rows as it embraces the ear curves. In this refreshed version, the flow is subtler and possibly emblematic of the type of sensual love the Calypso of Greek mythology would have known well. The ‘Solena Maya’ theme is a tribute to Mayan worship of the Sun, and this pervades the new version of the ear cuff, which is resolutely radiant. The cascading rows of emerald- and pear-cut diamonds (total of 11.71 carat) create an almost shield-like effect: the design is empowering more than overpowering. Last of Messika’s new jewels, the double ring, is a welcome addition to the ‘Cassiopée’ cuff of the same name unveiled at Basel World. Actually composed of two rings linked by a detachable chain, it is worn on several knuckles with the possibility of many permutations. Once more, thanks to Messika, high jewellery has never been so effortless in its wearability. www.messika.com

217


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

HERA necklace 100.25 ct. diamonds, D/E/F color & VVS -VS clarity

218


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

219


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

220


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

221


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

222


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

223


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

224


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

CALYPSO earcuff 8.89 ct of pear cut diamonds of E/F color and VVS-VS clarity

225


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

CALYPSO earcuff 8.89 ct of pear cut diamonds of E/F color and VVS-VS clarity

226


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

SOLENA MAYA Earcuff 11,71 ct of pear cut diamonds of D/E/F color and VVS-VS clarity

227


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

CASSIOPÉE ring 8.45 ct of diamonds of E/F color and VVS-VS clarity

228


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of MESSIKA © MESSIKA

Jewellery Historian

229


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

230


231


DE GRISOGONO

232


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

DE GRISOGONO by Olivier Dupon

True to the daring combinations of colours, shapes and materials that have been the hallmark of the brand for 23 years, this new set of one-of-a-kind jewels is once again radiant with character and sex appeal.

233


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

234


The compositions are curvaceous as seen in the earrings of pear-cut emeralds and cabochon-cut rubies, whose back is an intricate embroidery-like design of emeralds. Not a single surface (clips included) is left unpaved or set with a precious gem. Some women turn heads, the ones wearing these ‘baubles’ will be asked to turn their own.

It’s May 12th 2016, the opening ceremony of the Cannes film festival: Bella Hadid, the statuesque supermodel who is also the new face of Dior beauty, is wearing a deceptively revealing and shimmering gown by Roberto Cavalli. Part geometrical part naturalistic, the pattern delineates the structure of the dress in such a way that it enhances Hadid’s forms. Her hair is elegantly pulled back so as to not distract, while her immaculate face is highlighted from below by a sumptuous de Grisogono band necklace. The jewel contributes to Bella’s Grecian fierceness as it embraces her delicate neckline. Composed of a myriad diamonds and sapphires and crowned by six pear-cut diamonds and one pear-cut sapphire, this white gold wonder is part of a new collection of twenty pieces de Grisogono has recently unveiled in Paris. True to the daring combinations of colours, shapes and materials that have been the hallmark of the brand for 23 years, this new set of one-of-a-kind jewels is once again radiant with character and sex appeal. The compositions are curvaceous as seen in the earrings of pear-cut emeralds and cabochon-cut rubies, whose back is an intricate embroidery-like design of emeralds. Not a single surface (clips included) is left unpaved or set with a precious gem. Some women turn heads, the ones wearing these ‘baubles’ will be asked to turn their own. For those who prefer to wear head-turning jewellery on their wrist, there is an articulated bulbous bracelet composed of pink opal quilting, whose buttons are made of rice grain-shaped yellow gold set with tsavorites. Either side of the two rows of opals is lined with pink sapphire-paved edges, in the manner of contrasting piping. It is true that in most of de Grisogono’s creations similarities with couture and rich textiles (brocades, jacquards) are rife. Each new collection is also laudable for drawing from the entire colour spectrum. After the riot of pinks, reds and greens above, the same artistry operates with the blue hues. In a pair of pendant earrings, the circling succession of aquamarines, blue sapphires, and white diamonds creates a flow so that the sum of each hoop evokes an oceanic vortex, while the matching ring mirrors a swirling wave. And to conclude, I can tell you that we are in for a treat. I am able to exclusively preview two further rings, which are not part of this collection but which will be officially unveiled at the Paris Biennale this September. These two pieces are from the Folies collection, which focuses on larger, top-quality precious diamonds of significant importance. The highlight will be the 404-carat ‘rock’s spirit’, one of their latest acquisition, that is currently being faceted and cut in New York). First a five-band solitaire with a 10-carat emerald-cut diamond surrounded by a cluster of emerald, whose size, weight and proportions make quite a masculine statement; then a second solitaire in the form of a 14-carat round-cut diamond nestled amid a blossoming 44.20-carat canopy of briolette-cut rubies, exude bountiful femininity. Either way, they both revolve around delectability. Once again, what impresses most is de Grisogono’s unapologetic embrace of wickedly indulgent forms coupled with high-octane glamour. www.degrisogono.com

235


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

High jewellery ring in 18k pink gold set with 1 round-cut white diamonds G / VS1 (14.18 carats), 47 briolette-cut rubies (approx. 44.20 cts), 94 white diamonds (approx. 0.11 ct) and 365 rubies (approx. 3.24 cts)

236


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

237


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

238


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

Earrings in pink gold set with 1 pear-cut emerald (4.43 ct) 1 pear-cut emerald (4.93 ct), 1 pear-cut emerald (5.94 ct), 1 pear-cut emerald (6.48 ct) , 70 cabochon rubies, 92 diamonds and 614 emerlads

239


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

240


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

241


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

High jewellery ring set in 18k white gold with1 emerald-cut white diamonds H VVS1 (10.33 carats), 200 emeralds (approx. 1.31 cts), 472 white diamonds (approx. 3.75 cts)

242


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

243


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Necklace in white gold, set with 1 pear-cut blue sapphire, 6 pear-cut diamonds, 170 sapphires, 477 icy diamond and 1012 white diamonds

244


Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

245


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

Bracelet in pink gold set with 26 pink opals, 99 tsavorites and 738 pink sapphires

246


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

Earrings in white gold, set with 212 diamonds, 46 aquamarines and 38 blue sapphires

247


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

Ring in white gold, set with 107 diamonds, 8 aquamarines and 5 blue sapphires

248


249


SUZANNE SYZ

250


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

SUZANNE SYZ by Olivier Dupon

It is hard to pinpoint an overall theme since all of Syz’s creations are one-of-a-kind and each is therefore an invitation into its own artful world made of naturalistic elements and state-of-the-art materials.

251


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“Belle Epoque” earrings Red gold set with 16 pink sapphire briolettes, 14 diamond pears, 982 diamonds & 2 diamond briolettes.

252


It is hard to pinpoint an overall theme since all of Syz’s creations are one-of-akind and each is therefore an invitation into its own artful world made of naturalistic elements and state-of-the-art materials.

There could be no better setting than one of the ground floor private salons at the palatial Ritz Hotel to preview Suzanne Syz’s creations. The whimsy, playfulness and grace that Suzanne Syz jewels are famous for, were so much at play that wandering between each dome-shaped glass cabinet (created in the ‘cabinet of curiosities’ style) felt like the kaleidoscope of a carnival merry-go-round. It is hard to pinpoint an overall theme since all of Syz’s creations are oneof-a-kind and each is therefore an invitation into its own artful world made of naturalistic elements and state-of-the-art materials. From the truly technical – the ‘Magellanic Cloud’ titanium and white gold cuff in a criss-cross pattern with a huge 76.17 carat diamond cabochon – via the enchanting and clin d’oeil as seen in the ‘Belle Époque’ chandelier earrings wittily in the form of miniature chandeliers that your inner princess would adore, to the magical as exemplified in the ‘Nature Framed’ brooch in yellow gold with a dendritique quartz. In the latter the natural intricacies of the quartz depict an abstract floral landscape that is sublime and intriguing enough in itself that it had to be framed with gold and pearls: in the manner of a witch’s mirror it suggests the opening of a portal into an otherworldly dimension. Such is the theatricality of Syz’s jewels that they will have your mind imagining fantastic stories. The fairy tale continues with the ‘Prince Charming’ bracelet that features frogs made of carved chrysoprase. The amphibians in all their lifelike ruggedness (the carving has produced the bumpy texture of their skin) are perched on top of water lilies, the links of the bracelet. The frogs’ natural aspect being the only concession to reality you will find here since their backs are bedecked with round diamonds and their eyes made of ruby cabochons. There is a matching brooch and necklace, each bearing a name that reflects humour. Respectively titled ‘Kermit on a Lilypad’ and ‘Frog’s Heaven’, they celebrate playfulness as much as they represent talismanic charms for some people. Others will believe in the protective aura of the ‘Hippopotame’ brooch, whereas some will just fall for its adorableness. Made of white gold and zirconium, it is set with demantoids for the eyes and 158 diamonds mostly for the foot. The animal’s expressive gaze and open mouth exude friendliness and companionship. Of course it is not just about benevolent creatures, but rather the entire spectrum of what nature can offer. Some creations can also address one’s fear as seen in the ‘Toile d’Araignée’ earrings, an asymmetrical pair where two most certainly poisonous spiders (just look at their back stripes in yellow diamonds and tsavorites, a colour combo which in nature may be a sign of danger for potential predators) weave their respective diamond-paved web. The graceful pose of the arachnids is menacing, yet beguiling. High jewellery does not have to be too serious, and this is precisely what Syz’s customers are looking for when they collect her pieces: jewellery that makes you smile and laugh. After all isn’t that precisely what triggers love at first sight? www.suzannesyz.ch

253


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“Prince Charming” cuff White gold set with chrysoprase, tsavorites (48.88 cts), Garnets (46.08 cts), Diamonds (0.33 cts), Cabochon rubies ( 0.56cts)

254


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

255

Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“The Magellanic clod” cuff Titanium set with one cabochon diamond (76.17cts) & 155 diamonds (1.50cts)

256


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

257


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“Hippopotamus” brooch White gold set with 2 demantoid garnets (0.33 cts) and 158 diamonds

258


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

259


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“Frog’s Heaven” necklace White gold set with chrysoprase, green agates (1108.80 cts), 72 diamonds (1.06 cts ), 1 rubelite (53.47 cts), 6 rubelite briolettes ( 9.75 cts ), 6 amethyst briolettes ( 13.14 cts), aquamarine briolettes

260


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

261


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“Toile d’araignée” earrings White gold set with diamonds, rose-cut diamonds, tsavorites, yellow diamonds.

262


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

263


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“The Sleeping beauty” brooch White gold set with rose-cut diamonds, brown diamonds, diamonds & pearls

264


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“We are the World” earrings Titanium (11.00 grs) set with 68 Diamonds 0.34 Cts

265


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“Kermit on a lilypad” brooch White gold (83 grs) set with chrysoprase, 590 spessartite garnets (22.51 cts), tsavorite garnets ( 22.51 cts / 29,46 cts), 6 cabochon rubies (0.66 cts), 10 diamonds (0.29cts)

266


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

267


Photo courtesy of SUZANNE SYZ © SUZANNE SYZ

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

“Nature framed” brooch Yellow gold set with dendritic agate, diamonds, pearls.

268


269


GIAMPIERO BODINO

270


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GIAMPIERO BODINO by Olivier Dupon

The man who apprenticed alongside Gianni Bulgari and was later appointed Art Director for the Richemont Group in 2002, is possibly the finest high jeweller of our generation. The Richemont headquarters were prompt to identify that Bodino’s expertise and flair should be allocated to a unique independent high jewellery house.

271


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of GIAMPIERO BODINO © GIAMPIERO BODINO

Jewellery Historian

Tesori del Mare Transformable jewel: necklace and earrings Blue sapphires, diamonds, white gold.

272


Is there any adjective eloquent enough to describe Giampiero Bodino’s talent? The man who apprenticed alongside Gianni Bulgari and was later appointed Art Director for the Richemont Group in 2002, is possibly the finest high jeweller of our generation. The Richemont headquarters were prompt to identify that Bodino’s expertise and flair should be allocated to a unique independent high jewellery house. At the helm of his own jewellery destiny since 2013, Giampiero Bodino has since created a catalogue of pieces that are both flamboyant and hedonistic to baroque perfection. The man is an accomplished artist, whose exquisite drawings are true artworks, and finished compositions second to none. The Capi d’Opera “are unique pieces of high jewellery that evoke an exclusive form of ancient art. For in bygone times, the capo d’opera was the culmination of the apprentice craftsman’s talent, vision, expertise, and this masterpiece was the symbol of his passage to becoming a maestro,” Bodino explains in his book. It is an ever-growing project, which draws its inspiration from the inexhaustible source that is Italian art and culture. The latest additions to the Capi d’Opera were presented in a ground floor Ritz salon, which opened onto the hotel’s landscaped courtyard. Of the many intoxicating creations on display (the chain necklace with multiple bejewelled cross charms and the sautoir with an imposing medallion in the manner of papal jewellery deserve thundering applause) I present four pieces to you. First is ‘Tesori del Mare’, a transformable open necklace with earrings. Dangling from each side of the necklace are two white gold earrings with brilliant and pear-cut diamonds and encrusted with sapphires – with a gradation of shades – that can be easily attached or detached. The piece captures the force of currents or swirls of frothing water.

since 2013, Giampiero Bodino has since created a catalogue of pieces that are both flamboyant and hedonistic to baroque perfection

It is a triumph of light that is emphasised by the openwork technique: each setting has been perforated and polished so that every stone retainscaptures as much light as possible. The most delectable ‘Passamaneria’ ring is an intricate feat of embroidery-like open work of white gold and diamonds that encompasses a 23.58 carat pink tourmaline sugar loaf in decadent perfection. “The voluptuous decoration that focuses on the fleur-de-lis motif – a heraldic symbol of royalty – is also used in the design of the four prongs holding the extraordinary central stone”, Bodino notes. When one thought nothing could be more ravishing, along comes the ‘Rosa dei Venti’ pendant earrings inspired by the number eight, which symbolises the Rosa dei Venti – the Wind Rose – a harmonious geometric figure. In his interpretation, Bodino blurs perception by concocting two-fold asymmetries: one in the design of the flowers (similar in proportion, they are different in structure), the other in the diagonal mirroring of violet and blue sapphires (a blue sapphire on top and a 2.37-carat violet sapphire from Madagascar at the bottom on one side, and violet sapphire on top with a 3.61-carat blue sapphire from Sri Lanka at the bottom on the other side). The optical illusion is dramatic and theatrical. Last but not least, ‘Mosaico’ is singlehandedly reinvigorating the appeal for cuffs. As its name suggests, it evokes a mosaic design. The surface is formed from a motif of concentric circles, seemingly without a beginning or an end, which are repeated as an all-over pattern. The effect is that of rippling water, but captured in yellow gold and diamonds. It is true, the rich vein of Capi d’Opera is an incomparable fantasy trove. www.giampierobodino.com

273


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of GIAMPIERO BODINO © GIAMPIERO BODINO

Jewellery Historian

Passamaneria Ring
 Pink tourmaline – 23.58 cts. Diamonds, white gold.

274


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of GIAMPIERO BODINO © GIAMPIERO BODINO

Jewellery Historian

275


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of GIAMPIERO BODINO © GIAMPIERO BODINO

Jewellery Historian

Mosaico Bracelet
 Diamonds, pink gold.

276


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Rosa dei Venti

Inspired by the number eight, symbolizing the constructive balance of forms and energies, the Rosa dei Venti – the Wind Rose – is a harmonious geometric figure which, when transformed into a jewel, conveys the greatest freedom of style. The reinterpreted diagram at the center of these earrings becomes the ideal setting for amazing color compositions: similar in structure, they are different in their design and in the combination of stones and colors. 
 The shades of one, echoed in the other, testify to a special study of reciprocal complementarity and balance. White gold and diamonds form
 the base for the vibrant hues of precious gems and fine multicolored stones. The center of one is dominated by a 2.37 carat violet sapphire from Madagascar, while the center of the other boasts a 3.61 carat blue sapphire from Sri Lanka. The articulated chain features fleur-de-lis motifs, a heraldic symbol for royalty. Earrings
 Violet sapphire (Madagascar) – 2.37 cts. Blue sapphire (Sri Lanka) – 3.61 cts.
 Precious gems and ne multicolored stones, diamonds, white gold.

277


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of GIAMPIERO BODINO © GIAMPIERO BODINO

Jewellery Historian

278


279


SYLVIE CORBELIN

280


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Sylvie Corbelin by Olivier Dupon

Being offered a neatly wrapped box of homemade cookies after viewing high jewellery is possibly one of the sweetest highlights of my Paris Couture week. It also says a lot about the woman who treats her colleagues and friends with such thoughtful generosity.

281


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

282


With her long golden hair strewn with diamonds, the ‘Belle Impossible’ pendant has a seductive stance: her hands hold an amethyst, her chest is engraved (‘tattooed’) with a seahorse, and the lower half of her body is made of iridescent scales (beetle wings).

Being offered a neatly wrapped box of homemade cookies after viewing high jewellery is possibly one of the sweetest highlights of my Paris Couture week. It also says a lot about the woman who treats her colleagues and friends with such thoughtful generosity. I first wrote about Sylvie Corbelin in 2012 in my book The New Jewelers, and at the time I described her work as ‘a mysterious and sensual world, in which mythical characters coexist with naturalistic treasures; a poetic and baroque rhapsody combining precious gems, irregular stones and fine metals with expert craftsmanship and a Baudelairean aura.’ A few years and many more beguiling creations later, Sylvie Corbelin’s latest renditions still abide by the same mantra. On July 5th, in between other meetings, the Sylvie Corbelin presentation truly felt like a respite: an opportunity to daydream in good company. It started with the aptly named ‘Eau Rêvante’ series, an invitation to a mysterious fairytale, where mermaids lead the way. With her long golden hair strewn with diamonds, the ‘Belle Impossible’ pendant has a seductive stance: her hands hold an amethyst, her chest is engraved (‘tattooed’) with a seahorse, and the lower half of her body is made of iridescent scales (beetle wings). A moonstone punctuates her fishtail. As a ring, her counterpart mermaid is more contemplative; her fishtail is a delightful cluster of multicoloured spinels and sapphires, while her flowing golden locks morph into her body. Why does she cross her hands on her chest is anyone’s guess. This phantasmagorical odyssey culminates with two statement pieces: on one hand, the ‘Joyeuse’ mobile earrings (a signature style of Corbelin) where mermaids glide among bejeweled golden waves; on the other, the one-of-akind rigid torque necklace, a 24-carat yellow gold plated silver rendition. The large bib is a canvas for a mesmerising abstract landscape made of abalone, moonstone, a large garnet, and myriad tsavorites, sapphires and spessartites. It evokes a Japanese etching with puffs of cloud, celestial suns and moons. Or is this an underwater world, and the opalescent pods are reefs? Shamanism and fortune telling are summoned forth especially in the ‘Présage’ series where a totemic owl prevails. Her wide eyes and bulbous body is, presumably, styled in the manner of a Hellenic owl (the symbol of Athena). The combination of yellow gold and silver (a Corbelin signature) enhances the beast’s liveliness. In both the short necklace, chandelier earrings, ‘Lune’ earrings and the pendant, moon-face charms are made of carved-moonstones, and they exude auspiciousness. Flora and fauna, garden-style, is again magnified, this time with the ‘Splendeur Rousse’ carved amber resin ring, the divine asymmetrical ‘Lucky Frog’ earrings, and the ravishing ‘Escargot Mingot’ ring with its natural baroque pearl. All these seem to take us back to the terrestrial world, or do they? The last two creations I would like to present are superbly emblematic of Corbelin’s style and are the perfect candidates to leave a lasting impression. The one-of-a-kind ‘Bleu Regard’ ring set in 18-carat gold with Persian turquoise and an antique agate is magnetic in its dramatic power and the ultimate protector to ward off any evils.

283


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

BAGUE PRÉCIEUSE PROTECTION Repeat Ring
 18 K : 18 grs, Silver : 10,0 grs , Diamond : 1,35 cts Ruby : 0,10 cts GW : 29,3 grs

284


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

EAU RÊVANTE COLLECTION "BELLE IMPOSSIBLE" PENDANT 
 Length : 10 cm Width : , 18K : 5 grs Silver : 100 grs Diamond : 2,2 cts Brown Diamond : 1,8 cts, Ruby : 0,85 cts Moon stone : 3,6 cts Beetle wings : 1,7 cts Amethyst : 0,25 cts , GW : 115,5 grs

285

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

EAU RÊVANTE COLLECTION RING 
 18K : 14,45 grs Silver : 10,78 grs Spinel : 0,15 cts Sapphire : 2,3 cts GW : 25,7 grs

286


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

EAU RÊVANTE COLLECTION LARGE RING 
 18K gold : 5,91 grs Silver : 23,83 grs Rubis : 0,4 cts Abalone : 24,25 cts Diamond : 1,6 cts Emerald sapphire : 1,7 cts GW : 35,5 grs

287


Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

288


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

SPLENDEUR ROUSSE Collection Jardin
 One of a kind
 18K : 7,5 grs Silver: 23,24 grs Ambre resin : 111,3 cts Diamond : 2,54 cts GW : 53,12 grs

289


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

ESCARGOT MINGOT
 Ring Unique
 Yellow 18K : 10,58 gr Silver : 5 gr Natural baroque pearl : 23,15 ct Turquoise : 1,3 ct Diamond : 3,30 ct gw : 16,3 gr

290


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

BLEU REGARD RING - ONE OF A KIND
 18K Yellow gold : 9 gr Silver : 31,52 gr
 Persian turquoise : 84ct, Antique agate : 25,1 ct
 Spessartite : 2,5 ct Tsavorite : 1,1 ct Diamond : 2,15 ct GW : 62,2 gr

291


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

"JOYEUSE" MOBILE EARRINGS.
 EAU RÊVANTE COLLECTION
 18K : 6 grs Silver : 39 grs Diamond : 3,30 cts Spinel : 0,22 cts Sapphire: 1,4 cts Tsavorite, garnet tourmaline : 1,7 cts
 GW : 52,1 grs

292


As much a piece of jewellery as miniature sculptures, these clip earrings and her repertoire as a whole, are testament to Sylvie Corbelin’s unwavering allegiance to oneirism.

Then under Corbelin’s spell, agate can also take on a portraiture aspect. In the ‘Le Pavillon aux Pivoines’ earrings, the stones represent the gown and ornate matching coifs of twin Chinese princesses. The headdresses are elaborate with precious combs and pins in keeping with the cultural reference, while the bodies are plump. As much a piece of jewellery as miniature sculptures, these clip earrings and her repertoire as a whole, are testament to Sylvie Corbelin’s unwavering allegiance to oneirism. www.sylvie-corbelin.com

293


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

EAU RÊVANTE COLLECTION RIGID NECKLACE UNIQUE
 24 K GOLD PLATED ON SILVER 10 MIC
 Silver : 252,63 grs Abalone : 13,25 cts Moonstone : 22,85 cts Diamond : 8,63 cts Garnet : 20,1 cts Tsavorite sapphire & spessartite : 5,52 cts GW : 278 grs

294


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

EAU RÊVANTE COLLECTION RING "PRÉSAGE"
 18K: 18,64 grs Silver : 14,55 grs , Diamonds : 0,3 cts Moonstone : 6,3 cts Rubies : 0,19 cts

295


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

PRÉSAGE PENDANT
 18K : 3,10 grs Silver : 33,55 grs Moonstone : 15,17 cts Diamond : 2,38 cts gw : 20,4 grs

296


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian

LE PAVILLON AUX PIVOINES One of a kind 
 18 K : 3,2 grs Silver 23,74 grs Corozo : 36,6 cts Agate : 95,05 cts
 Diamond : 1,82 cts Mixt of precious stones ( sapphire- spessartite-tsavorite) : 4,76 cts Coral : 6,6 cts GW : 70,1 grs

297


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

298

Photo courtesy of SYLVIE CORBELIN © SYLVIE CORBELIN

Jewellery Historian


299


www.jewelleryhistorian.com

300


301


JEWELLERY HISTORIAN, HJ vol.2  

The "HAUTE JOAILLERIE" supplement (vol.2) of the JEWELLERY HISTORIAN. www.jewelleryhistorian.com

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you