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THE MAGAZINE FOR LOUISBURG COLLEGE ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

SPRING 2014

RESTORATION REJUVENATION Breathing New Life Into Our Historic Campus PAGE 19

E INSID THIS ISSUE

14 THEATRE PROGRAM RETURNS TO THE COLLEGE 24 GREAT FUTURES CAMPAIGN UPDATE 30 CLASS NOTES


PRESIDENT’S CABINET

2014 CASE Special Merit Award Winner for Print & Digital Publications

Features 6 The Honors Advantage 8

Profiles in Teaching

12

$2.2 Million Grant Awarded

14

Act II: Theatre Returns to Louisburg

COVER STORY Restoration & Rejuvenation

19

Sections

3

A Word from the President

4

Academic Report: Are We There Yet?

16

College News

24

State of the College

28

Alumni & Class Notes

34

In Memoriam

36

Chaplain’s Message

38

Honor Roll

52

Athletics

Dr. Mark La Branche President Kurt Carlson Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. James Eck Dean of the Faculty and Executive Vice President for Academic Life Belinda Faulkner Vice President for Finance Michael Holloman ’83 Athletics Director Jason Modlin Vice President for Student Life Stephanie Buchanan Tolbert ’97 Vice President for Enrollment

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Alex Cheek ’94 President of the Alumni Association William Hurley ’53 President of the Golden Anniversary Council

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Michael W. Boddie ’77 Chairman Ely J. Perry III ’84 Vice Chairman Lucy T. Allen Secretary John Allen ’85 Anne D. Bowen Dr. W. John Cameron Marla Gupton Coleman ’62 William R. Cross ’71

David “Tad” DeBerry ’85 Clyde P. Harris, Jr. H. John Hatcher, Jr. Emily Hodges Seymour Holt ’49 Lynda W. Hudson ’68 Lynda C. Lumpkin Beth M. Norris Russell Odom ’68 Donald Parrott ’63 Dr. Bobbie Richardson Fred Roberson ’62 Sue C. Robertson William C. Shelton ’69 Kimberly D. Spivey John F. Strotmeyer ’68 C. Boyd Sturges Roger G. Taylor ’68 Dr. James P. West Brian Wilder ’94

EX-OFFICIO TRUSTEES Ashley-Champale Harris ’14 President of the Student Government Association Alex Cheek ’94 President of the Alumni Association Rev. Jon Strother Capital District Superintendent of the NC Conference of the United Methodist Conference Bishop Hope Morgan Ward Bishop of the NC Conference of the United Methodist Church

Columns Staff EDITOR Melinda McKee

Director of Communications and Marketing

DESIGNER & ASSISTANT EDITOR Amy Scoggin Wolfe Director of Publications

ASSISTANT EDITOR Emily Zank

Assistant Dean for Academic Support

CONTRIBUTORS Barry Burger

Communications Volunteer

Wendi Eck

Communications Assistant

Brittany Hunt ’10

Campus Guest Coordinator

Corey Nolen Photographer

Our Mission

Related by faith to The United Methodist Church, Louisburg College is committed to offering a supportive community which nurtures young men and women intellectually, culturally, socially, physically, and spiritually. As a two-year residential institution, we provide a bridge for students to make a successful transition from high school to senior colleges and universities.

Questions about this issue?

HE T N O ER V O C page 19 We’ve been busy! Read on to learn about recent campus improvements (like the restoration of the E. Carroll Joyner Student Residence, at right), as well as future building projects.

Please contact Melinda McKee, director of communications and marketing, at (919) 497-3330 or mmckee@louisburg.edu. Columns magazine is published for alumni and friends of Louisburg College annually in the spring by the Office of Communications and Marketing.

Louisburg College 501 N. Main Street Louisburg, NC 27549 www.louisburg.edu 1 (800) 775-0208 l (919) 496-2521


We perform better when we are challenged by those who outpace us and have developed the ability to run greater distances; we perform better when we experience joy in each other’s accomplishments.

The Louisburg Advantage:

As North Carolina’s independent two-year college, we give our students an edge as they pursue their dreams. 92% of our graduates continue their education at four-year schools.

- President La Branche (pictured with the LC Running Club)

A Word from the President Dear Friends, It is an honor and privilege to come alongside our students as they journey through their college years. Those we travel with while in college often become lifelong friends. The opportunities for growth and change are so tremendous that the coaching, teaching, and mentoring we receive in college can truly shape our destiny. Many of our alumni share with me how formative their years at Louisburg College were, and they often mention a coach, faculty, or staff member who made a profound difference in their lives. The Apostle Paul talks about our journey through life as a race. Paul exhorts us to “run with patience the race that is set before us” (Hebrews 12:1-3), and running truly is a great metaphor for life. Running a long distance successfully requires preparation, perseverance, and patience. We must set a course and be prepared to adjust in response to changing conditions. Setbacks are not an unusual occurrence; the important thing is to keep moving ahead. Just as runners perform better when there are people cheering them on and holding them accountable, we perform better in our life journey when we run alongside others. We perform better when we are challenged by those who outpace us and have developed the ability to run greater distances; we perform better when we experience joy in each other’s accomplishments. All of this also describes the power of being part of Louisburg College’s learning community. Our students are surrounded by supporters who challenge and cheer them along their amazing life journey.

Learn more about the Louisburg advantage at www.louisburg.edu .

1 (800) 775-0208

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(919) 496-2521

As the Louisburg College family, we are all part of a collective journey that began with our charter in 1787. Prosperity and adversity have commingled to tell a glorious story, and the past several years have been a special period of revival cheered on by thousands of our alumni and friends. In the pages of this magazine, you will read stories of significant accomplishments and exciting plans for the future. Together, we are making it possible for a new generation of students to discover their calling in life for the benefit of the communities they will serve. Thank you for your loyalty and support. For the College,

Mark La Branche SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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academics

Are We There Yet ?

AT ONE WITH NATURE

By Dr. James C. Eck, Dean of the Faculty & Executive Vice President for Academic Life

For many of us, long trips often include a chorus from the backseat desperately asking, “Are we there yet?” The enthusiasm behind this refrain is much like my own when I consider where Louisburg College is headed. Horizon 2020: The Plan for Louisburg College is a map of innovation that will guide us through Spring 2018. We have at least 86 tasks to complete within this first year, and we are well on our way to reaching all of them, from developing new courses in important disciplines such as education and biology to experimenting with best practices in living/learning communities. Our students are taking advantage of a plethora of learning resources that are available to them, so when they represent us at regional and national conferences, we are not surprised by their success. This summer, the Louisburg chapter of Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) once again experienced national recognition, as we had two teams place at the National PBL Competition in Anaheim, California. The team of Kyle May ’13 and Abdul Caesar ’13 placed 5th in the Integrated Marketing Campaign category, and John ’13 and Joe ’13 McGillicuddy teamed up to bring home 9th place in the Emerging Business Issues category. Louisburg College also participated in the 2014 North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities Ethics Bowl, the theme of which was “Ethics in Health Care.” During the preparation process, students

strengthened their skills in analytical thinking, decision making, and consensus building. Higher education research often points out that the most transformative college experiences occur outside of the classroom, and our Faculty Fellows program encourages faculty, student life staff, and students to actively participate with one another. As partners, faculty members and student life community directors collaborate on meaningful activities both in and outside of the classroom. (See photos on opposite page.) Taking measures such as increasing the number of full-time faculty is leading to improved student outcomes, as well: • • • •

160 students were rewarded with recognition on the Dean’s and Honors Lists in Spring 2013; 176 students were recognized in Fall 2013. 113 students were honored at our 2014 Hurricane Scholar-Athlete Award Ceremony, up from 99 in 2013. Our new Honors Program attracted 17 excellent students in 2013-14, many of whom are contributing to the College as athletes and leaders. (Read more on Page 6.) 24 students were inducted into the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society in Fall 2013, nearly an 85% increase from the previous year.

The College will seek its reaffirmation of accreditation during the next academic year, and we are committed to ensuring a successful outcome. We will continue to make progress with our strategic plan, and you will notice many campus-wide improvements resulting from the $2.2 million U.S. Department of Education Title III grant we were awarded in Fall 2013. (Read more on Page 12.) “Our students are taking advantage of a plethora of learning resources that are available to them, so when they represent us at regional and national conferences, we are not surprised by their success.” Our Title III grant is a resounding vote of confidence that our strategic planning processes are robust, and that we should eagerly anticipate Louisburg College’s future. No, we are not there yet, but we are absolutely heading in the right direction— toward academic excellence and distinction. As Daniel Webster once said about his beloved Dartmouth in 1818, “It is a small college, and yet there are those who love it.” And so it is true for Louisburg College.

PBL SEES TOP-TEN FINALISTS AT NATIONALS From L-R: 2013 grads Kyle May, Joe McGillicudy, Abdul Caesar, and John McGillicudy at the 2013 National Phi Beta Lambda Competition in Anaheim, CA.

EXPLORING ETHICS LC’s team at the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities Ethics Bowl, from L-R: Mr. Wally Hurst, Jeffery General ’14, Daniel Jones ’15, Jennifer Short ’15, Dr. Kelvin Spragley, Derrick Vause ’15, and President Mark La Branche.

AN ARTISTIC EXPRESSION

FOOTBALL GIVES BACK As part of the Faculty Fellows program, residents of Patten Hall (where many football players live) spent an afternoon with the Boys & Girls Club in Louisburg. Pictured below: Chris Brown ’14.

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On a beautifully brisk fall day in October, eight students hiked with faculty and staff during a Faculty Fellows program at Louisburg College’s De Hart Botanical Gardens. (Read more about the Gardens on Page 16.)

In a Faculty Fellows partnership between Professor of Visual Art Will Hinton and Kenan Hall Community Director Ashley Holland, a site-specific public art piece was constructed earlier this year. The front of our Campus Expression Wall features the message “Before I die, I want to _________,” part of an ongoing global art project that speaks to our individual life goals and aspirations.

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FEATURE

A

fter a year of proposals to create a program for our best and brightest students, Louisburg College’s much-awaited Honors Program officially took off in the fall of 2013. At the helm is Director of Library Services, Assistant Professor of English, and now Honors Program Director Candace Jones ’99 (pictured at left).

Jones recalls the proposal period during which faculty members championed the project. “The faculty wanted to offer a program that supported the needs of Louisburg’s academically gifted students by providing challenging coursework and other learning opportunities,” she explains. With 100 students eligible to apply for the Honors Program and 17 ultimately accepted, an excellent inaugural class was established. Two courses were offered last fall and one this spring, all designated as “honors-only” based on the students’ curricular needs and the group’s interests. To create an honors version of a regular course, a student can simply speak with the professor of the desired class. Additional coursework and a collaborative effort between the student, the professor, and Jones can add an academic edge to a subject the student wishes to explore in depth.

Skerpon’s baseball teammate, sophomore Luke Emmett from Raleigh, will be the first student to graduate from Louisburg College’s Honors Program. “It’s more than just a notation on your diploma,” he comments. “The Honors Program delivers fantastic real-world experiences and helps build relationships. The program invests in the students’ success.” Emmett plans to transfer to Davidson College or North Carolina State University in the fall of 2014. The 2014-15 school year promises to offer even more to the program. Two new honors classes will be offered in the fall: Biology with Dr. Diane Cook, associate professor of biology, and World Religions with Joshua Parrot, assistant professor of religion. With a new freshman class coming in, the program will double in size and offer new advantages to the students, strengthening the promise of the program and ensuring our most ambitious scholars continue to grow and thrive.

“Being in the Honors Program has taught me to be a more disciplined student ...it’s helped me to grow as an individual, and to meet expectations I never thought were possible.” - Sophomore Nicholas Skerpon

Inaugural Class of the Louisburg College Honors Program

Thus far, honors courses at Louisburg have included English 111 with Crystal Brantley, assistant professor of English; Honors Freshman Seminar (part of the first-year Crossroads program) with Candace Jones; and Psychology with Dr. Jim Eck, vice president for academic life.

The Honors Advantage By Brittany Hunt ’10

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The program does not exist solely in the classroom, however. For example, during fall break in October 2013, the honors students took a trip to Savannah, Georgia and St. Augustine, Florida in order to explore the history of the South while connecting with each other outside of the classroom. Plus, sophomores focus on internships and job shadowing opportunities, regularly meeting with Great Futures Coach and Transfer Counselor Marla Peoples. “Our honors students have successfully balanced their advanced studies with other activities, such as athletics, clubs and organizations,” says Jones. “And they’ve bonded; they genuinely enjoy spending time together.” In no place is this sentiment clearer than in the words of the students themselves. “The program has helped me in so many ways,” says Ellen Tootoo, a freshman from Wilmington and a member of the volleyball team. “It has allowed me to make a new group of close friends that have the same goals as I do, and it’s given me the opportunity to show my creative side through different projects.” Many students, such as freshman Daniel Jones, find opportunities outside the classroom. “It’s given me social experience for business interaction in the real world,” says the Louisburg native. “The program has helped me get more out of my academic experience by extending my chances to learn.” Nicholas Skerpon, a sophomore baseball player all the way from Sayre, Pennsylvania, agrees. “Being in the Honors Program has taught me to be a more disciplined student…it’s helped me to grow as an individual, and to meet expectations I never thought were possible.”

• Merit Scholarship with a 3.3 minimum GPA • All-expense-paid travel opportunities • Priority registration for classes • Honors distinction on transcript and diploma, and honors cord for commencement • Dedicated faculty advisor and freshman seminar facilitator • Enrollment in honors courses and additional faculty-sponsored learning opportunities • Off-campus leadership and volunteer activities • Participation in special events and cultural activities • Special training sessions and trips with our career and transfer coach


FEATURE

FEATURE

Dr. Genya Afanasyeva

Mr. Michael Childs

Mr. Kris Hoffler

Who inspired you to teach? My grandmother worked with adults in Russian rural communities as part of efforts to fight illiteracy, taught in an elementary school, and later became a principal. My mother taught in a technical college in Russia.

What has been your greatest joy in your teaching career? Watching students find success in areas where they haven’t succeeded before—watching them work hard and overcome the obstacles that have held them back before.

What and where have you studied? I earned a Master and Doctorate in Mining Engineering/Surveying from Sckohinskiy Mining Institute in Russia, and I earned a Master of Science in Applied Mathematics from NC State.

What activities are you involved with outside of the classroom? I lead a Bible study that meets in the Chapel one evening during the week. Since starting the Bible study a few years ago, we have studied Genesis, John, 1 John, and Ephesians.

Who inspired you to teach? My high school English teacher. He exposed me to works like Shakespeare’s Macbeth and many other literary heavyweights. The expertise and conviction with which he taught literature was unlike any other teacher I had had up to that point. He lit the fuse that sparked my interest.

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

profiles in teaching Fourteen faculty members reveal everything from personal joys of teaching to secret superhero ambitions.

By Melinda McKee

A

s a first-generation college student, I can relate to the fact that college is a huge transition for our students,” notes Associate Professor of Library Services and Librarian Pat Hinton.

Her husband, Professor of Art Will Hinton, had been a faculty member for 15 years when she officially joined the Louisburg family in 1998. “I knew I’d be working with a dedicated community of educators who cared deeply about their mission of helping and developing students.”

His perspective as a long-time faculty member has allowed him to witness the College’s adaptive nature in response to an ever-changing world, and he expresses his excitement “about the College’s future because of our thorough planning efforts and best practices approach to management.”

Also an artist herself, Hinton maintains a studio where she paints and creates other works. Her painting “Meadow at Penland School” hangs in the College’s Elizabeth Tiel Faulkner Gallery.

Brown’s Louisburg years have even had their share of romance: his “greatest reward” is that he met his wife, George-Anne Willard, while she was teaching history at the College.

True to her creative spirit, she likens the role of a librarian to that of a dancer: “Roles change frequently. We catalog books, plan instruction, teach classes, develop library guides, work on archival materials…there is a balance and a rhythm to it.”

Professor of Education and Religion Charles Sloan has served the College in numerous roles since 1986.

Recalling with pride her successful efforts to have a computer lab constructed in the library, Hinton is excited to be part of the new growth that will come from the Title III grant the College was awarded in 2013 (see Page 12). The son of beloved Professor of Mathematics Captain Brown, and a Louisburg College graduate himself, Matt Brown ’68 took up the family mantle when he joined the faculty in 1983 to teach computer courses. “As an actual product of the College,” he explains, “I had come to embrace its purpose and to completely believe that the school’s mission is worthy of a life’s work.” Now Professor of Business and Engineering Graphics, Brown also serves as chair of the Business and Social Sciences Division. With a Master of Science in Civil Engineering from NC State and an

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MBA from Georgia State, he enjoys helping shape the educational futures of his students as an engaged academic advisor. “Our campus is just too small for anyone to hide from me for very long!”

COLUMNS / SPRING 2014

In addition to his teaching, he has filled the position of institutional research director (1994-2012) and registrar (1997-2000). He also began coaching the men’s golf team in 2003. A man of many interests, the former Navy serviceman holds a BSEd in Mathematics and an MEd in Administration and Supervision from Georgia Southern University, and a Master of Divinity and Religious Education from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. His enthusiasm for teaching was first sparked while working with youth in his church. “My greatest joy each year has been watching students walk across the stage at graduation, knowing that they have been successful as they move on to senior institutions.” A Kenyan resident at one point in his life, Sloan enjoys retelling his tales of climbing Mount Kilimanjaro and Mount Kenya, and of chauffeuring for the country western and gospel singer Skeeter Davis for four weeks while she sang in an evangelistic crusade in East Africa.

What has been the biggest surprise of your teaching career? The biggest surprise is how much I learn from my students. I learn more from them than from any textbook; they are my best teachers.

Mr. Michael Brantley Instructor of English

Instructor of Mathematics

Where is your favorite place you’ve traveled? Europe. Some of my favorite countries are Holland, Poland, and Switzerland.

Dr. Brent Dozier Assistant Professor of Mathematics

What did you do prior to coming to Louisburg College? I was a photographer and freelance writer for almost 18 years. I had a studio and wrote for regional and national magazines on sports, farming, business, and music. I also taught as an adjunct at Barton, Wesleyan, and Campbell before coming to Louisburg. What do you hope to impart to your students? Life is what you choose to make it. Have a high standard at all times, and remember that showing up is half the battle. What’s your favorite book? It changes constantly, but recently I’ve enjoyed Home Stand by James McKean, The Gay Talese Reader by Gay Talese, and Burning Bright by Ron Rash.

What do you hope to impart to your students? Academically, I want them to increase their mathematical and problem-solving skills, which will hopefully result in more logical thinking and sound judgment. In their hearts, I want them to know someone cared about them. What are some of your interests outside of teaching? I love fishing, small game hunting, basketball, and golf. I also love reading, and read fifty books last year (mainly Christian/theology books, but also some biographies and fiction titles). If you weren’t an educator, what would you be? A silent guardian; a watchful protector; a dark knight. Yes, I’d be Batman. But, aside from that, I suppose I’d settle for research mathematician.

Assistant Professor of English

What inspired you to start a study abroad initiative at Louisburg? I went to England for the first time in 1999, and those nine days changed my life. Then I got a grant from the state to study at Oxford University in 2005 for a semester, and it ingrained in me the perspective-changing potential of travel. If the overall goal of education is to broaden perspectives, a study abroad program does that exponentially. Editor’s Note: Read more about Louisburg College’s study abroad trips on Page 18.

Ms. Amy Johnson

Assistant Professor of English; Director of Developmental English

What did you do prior to coming to Louisburg College? I taught high school in Gates County, North Carolina, and in Elizabeth City before that. What do you love most about teaching at Louisburg? I have been teaching English in the Humanities Division for eight years, and the closeness between faculty and students is the best thing about teaching here. Fun Facts: I love to read and garden; I raise heritage breed turkeys; I have two grandsons with whom I try to spend as much time as I can; and I taught both of my sons and my daughter-in-law when they were in high school.

“Life is what you choose to make it. Have a high standard at all times, and remember that showing up is half the battle.” - Michael Brantley, On His Advice to Louisburg Students

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academics

Assistant Professor of Business & Science

What and where have you studied? After receiving a BS in Engineering from Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea, I earned a Master of Science in Engineering from Wayne State University, an MSA in Business Administration from Central Michigan University, and a PhD in International Business from Columbus University. I am also certified as a Six Sigma green belt by automotive corporations Daimler and Chrysler, and currently hold an 8th degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do. What inspired you to teach? I always aspired to be an educator, to devote my time and talents to promote others’ success in the business world. It was one of my dreams to be part of the connection between academia and the real world. Where is your favorite place you’ve traveled? Hangzhou, China and Rome, Italy.

Mr. David Minard Assistant Professor of Physics & Astronomy

What do you love most about teaching at Louisburg? The small class sizes. We get to see our students several times a week in small groups, so we can sit and talk with students who want to major in our field, and we can give targeted help to those who are struggling, which would be impossible at a larger school. What activities are you involved with outside of the classroom? I set up my telescope viewings when possible, and I make Lunch & Learn presentations for students and faculty about significant current events and other science-based topics. Over the last couple of years, I’ve tackled the 2012 “End of the World” misconceptions, the Japanese tsunami, and the nature of infinity.

“Our students are resilient. They can pick themselves up academically, socially, or in numerous other ways, dusting themselves off and continuing their journey a little wiser.” - Dr. Louise Mitchum, On What She Appreciates most about Louisburg Students

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Dr. Louise Mitchum Assistant Professor; Director of Crossroads, First Year Programs

What do you appreciate most about Louisburg College students? Our students are resilient. They can pick themselves up academically, socially, or in numerous other ways, dusting themselves off and continuing their journey a little wiser. It is inspiring to watch our students soar when given opportunities. What activities are you involved with outside of the classroom? I serve as the faculty advisor for the Phi Theta Kappa honor society, the international honor society for two-year colleges. When I took on this role in 2007, there was only a small nucleus of students in the society, and now there are more than 70 members. I am most proud of the peer tutoring program, suggested by the students themselves, through which they hope to bring grades up and impart understanding of the material that can only be offered by someone who has been there.

Mr. Brian Sanders Assistant Professor of Business

What inspired you to become a business professor, rather than pursue a career in the corporate world? While the monetary rewards of a job in the corporate sector were certainly enticing, I really wanted to have a job where I felt like my work was making a difference in the world. I wanted my legacy to be made up of people I had helped and taught. What do you love most about teaching at Louisburg? The sense of community that exists here. It always makes my day when I hear a student yell “Mr. Sanders!!” as I’m walking through Target or the grocery store. I love that I get the chance to know my students personally, and that they aren’t simply faces in the crowd of a massive auditorium.

By Maury York ’73

Photo courtesy of The Franklin Times

Dr. SangSoon Koh

ince opening in the summer of 2013, the Tar River Center for History and Culture has undertaken several initiatives to bolster our local heritage, including the following:

• “Tar River Roots,” a bi-weekly column in The Franklin Times, was launched to explore various aspects of the history of Franklin County and the Upper Tar River region, from historic landmarks to landmark events.

• A lecture series focusing on the Civil War and its aftermath in North Carolina and Franklin County has The historical and cultural heritage of the Upper Tar River region is a rich one, and President Mark La Branche recognized the importance of preserving and lifting up this heritage. In 2013, Louisburg College established the Tar River Center for History and Culture (TRCHC) to develop a sense of shared history among citizens of the Upper Tar River region, to promote economic development through heritage tourism, and to provide resources for use by public schools. Public historian and librarian Maury York ’73 was brought on board to helm the efforts.

brought noted historians to the College.

• In December 2013, the national Civil War Trails program erected on campus a handsome and

informative marker commemorating the May 1 - July 27, 1865 encampment of Union troops in the groves of Louisburg Female College and Louisburg Male Academy.

We’ve also begun planning the future of the TRCHC. In September, we facilitated a public meeting attended by some sixty area residents. They expressed keen interest in a survey of historic buildings in Franklin County, the development of a research facility for genealogists and local historians, and other ventures. An advisory group is helping us develop these ideas into a strategic plan for the TRCHC, and we look forward to sharing this with our community. If you’re interested in supporting the preservation of our local history by contributing to the Tar River Center for History and Culture Foundation, you may send your contribution to: Maury York Louisburg College 501 North Main Street Louisburg, NC 27549 To stay in the loop with the latest TRCHC news (and to read our “Tar River Roots” columns), please visit us on the web at www.louisburg.edu/tarrivercenter.

Favorite movie? A tough call, but I’ll go with The Shawshank Redemption.

Mr. James “Buster” White ’76 Assistant Professor of Psychology

What do you love most about teaching at Louisburg? I work with a great group of people including the administration, faculty, and staff. We support and encourage each other in our efforts to serve and promote the success of our students. How did your experience as a Louisburg College student impact your future? Those two years of education had a profound and lasting effect on my life. I attained the educational foundation to pursue a bachelor’s and a master’s degree, and it eventually led to my employment as LC’s Director of Counseling Services and my current position as a full-time faculty member. My son Matt also graduated from Louisburg and went on to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Barton; my wife Norma works part time in the Louisburg College library.

“Priming, Tyeing, and Batting Tobacco” Louisburg, 1951

Photo by Hemmer; Courtesy of the NC Dept. of Conservation and Development.

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FEATURE

FEATURE

Louisburg College Proposal Wins $2.2 Million Grant By Emily Zank, Assistant Dean for Academic Support, Instructor of English, and Title III Coordinator

A

t the end of Spring 2013, a committee of faculty and administration faced the enormous task of developing a U.S. Department of Education Title III-A federal grant proposal in just over one month’s time. Having finalized our Horizon 2020 five-year strategic plan just weeks earlier, the timing to seek this funding was perfect. After several arduous weeks of discussing, researching, writing, and revising, the team submitted the proposal. The wait from June until late September seemed long, but the College community was cautiously optimistic as we anticipated the phone call from Washington.

environment, and train our faculty and staff for higher levels of effectiveness. All of this will be done for the sake of greater levels of student success.”

President La Branche officially announced Louisburg College’s successful “Strengthen Foundations for Great Student Futures” grant, awarded in the amount of $2.2 million over five years, on September 26, 2013: “We celebrate the significant impact this award will have on the College. The resources provided will allow us to upgrade technology, transform our library into a state-of-the-art collaborative learning

The Title III grant objectives, taken from the strategic plan, focus on improving academic curriculum; increasing student retention, persistence and graduation rates; documenting and improving institutional effectiveness; supporting institutional data management; and strengthening institutional effectiveness through professional development. Significant progress toward meeting year one objectives is well underway as the College submits its six-month interim report to the U.S. Department of Education.

North Carolina District 1 Congressman G. K. Butterfield also voiced his support, applauding the U.S. Department of Education for investing in Louisburg College and its students. “I have no doubt that these funds will help increase student success and enhance institutional productivity and sustainability,” he commented in a press release from Washington, DC. The only private institution in North Carolina to be awarded a Title III grant in this cycle, Louisburg College is proud to have earned a perfect score from grant reviewers.

TOTAL AWARDED:

$2,225,757

FUNDING OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS: 2013-14: $446,185 2014-15: $449,354 2015-16: $441,012 2016-17: $444,225 2017-18: $444,981 12

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The most visible changes will be appreciated in the Cecil W. Robbins Library, which will be transformed from a traditional library model to a collaborative learning space packed with technology and support. Over the next several summers, the College will invest more than $1,000,000, addressing deferred maintenance issues and preparing the space for Title III-funded technology upgrades and learning environments. During renovations, Title III will provide $108,000 for

only

The private institution in North Carolina to be awarded a Title III grant in this cycle, Louisburg College is proud to have earned

a perfect score from grant reviewers.

facilities modification and technology installation and wiring, creating the Academic Success Center, Peer Tutoring/ Collaborative Labs, and Professional Development Commons. “When students return this fall, they will be pleasantly surprised at how much the library has already transformed,” notes Library Director Candace Jones. “We have a lot of work ahead of us, but I can’t wait for our students to reap the rewards.” Technology across campus will be enhanced each year through Title III funds. “We will invest an average of $260,000 annually on expanding wireless access, purchasing technology, and upgrading software, all of which add up to increased efficiency, informed decision making, and improved learning,” explains Chief Technology Officer Mark Joyner. Visit www.louisburg.edu/about/grant to keep track of our progress.

NEW LIBRARY SPACES WILL INCLUDE: n Academic Success Center

n Professional Development Center

n Peer tutoring/collaborative

n Collaborative Commons

meeting rooms

n Quiet study space*

n Café*

*College-funded

The resources provided will allow us to upgrade technology, transform our library into a state-of-the-art collaborative learning environment, and train our faculty and staff for higher levels of effectiveness.

NEW POSITIONS FUNDED BY TITLE III:

HOW THE FUNDS WILL BE USED: n Personnel - 22.82%

n Professional Development Director

n Supplies - 18.54%

n Instructional & Emerging

n Equipment - 17.34%

Technologies Librarian

n Institutional Effectiveness Director

n Professional Consultants - 7.98% n Travel - 5.64%

n Faculty, Professional & Student Tutors

n Facilities Modification - 4.09%

n Faculty Champions

n Other - 23.59% SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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FEATURE

FEATURE But all performances must end. When Smith retired in 2011, the stage fell silent. The Norris Theatre was used sparingly, except for the rare class that met in its “black box.” Even worse, it became a storage space.

For details on upcoming shows and ticketing information, visit

“The theatre was dormant,” says current Director of The Norris Theatre Walter “Wally” Hurst. “It was just highly underutilized…there were talks of turning it into a lab or a permanent storage center.”

www.JPACarts.com/norristheatre

A theatre expert who has performed in, directed, and managed over four hundred performances, Hurst was joined in 2013 by William “Byrd” Wilkins ’85 (a previous student of Smith’s and an established actor in his own right) in a mission to revitalize the theatre program.

or call the Louisburg College Box Office at (919) 497-3300 or

But what about the students?

1 (866) 773-6354.

“We had over forty-eight signatures from interested students that first day,” Hurst recalls of a 2012 student activities engagement fair. Yet the issue of The Norris Theatre’s disrepair and dim recognition on campus remained. Renovations began in 2012 when new lighting was installed to make the room usable for plays once more, and the peeling, flaking ceilings and walls were restored with fresh paint. Future enhancements to the space will include an updated sound system and backstage communication tools, allowing for more professional productions as well as new learning experiences for students.

THEATRE Returns to Louisburg By Brittany Hunt ’10

ucked away in the southern wing of the grand Seby B. Jones Performing Arts Center, Louisburg College’s Norris Theatre bears a subtler image than the building’s illustrious auditorium, whose walls contain the festive tones of concerts and steps of graduating students. With its demure columns and slowly widening stairway, the entrance to The Norris Theatre hints at a quiet, noble sound that has been steadily growing this past year. Settled far away from Hollywood’s Sunset Strip and New York’s Broadway, the town of Louisburg does not jump out as a hub for actors and actresses. The theatre program may have never taken off at all if not for the support of those determined to see the dramatic arts flourish at Louisburg College. Professor Emeritus Charley-John Smith first sparked the College’s modern-day theatre program with his renowned experience in drama. Joining the College in 1979, Smith propelled interest in the theater program. Although drama courses had been offered since 1963, the College began to offer classes specifically geared toward acting and theater, all guided by Smith’s expertise and his students’ passions. As an actor who had both produced and directed films as well as taught in the classroom, Smith awoke an insatiable love of theatre in the hearts of his students.

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With improvements underway, the newly revived theatre program quickly began a campaign to put a face to its venue. The group organized its inaugural and highly popular Halloween haunted house in 2012, sponsored student trips to Raleigh for professional productions such as Monty Python’s Spamalot and Spring Awakening, and screened classic comedy films in the theatre in 2013. With The Norris Theatre established once more, next came the acting. Byrd Wilkins embraced his role as instructor of drama. “Students who have never acted before learn more about themselves, their creativity, and their beautiful uniqueness. They rise to the challenges presented and exhibit heartfelt, honest, truthful acting.” The students first found themselves on stage in April 2013, performing five ten-minute plays. Since then, the support poured in, as did the idea of pulling the local community into the act. After a successful run of the two-man memoir Tuesdays with Morrie in fall 2013, Wally Hurst set his sights on Louisburg College’s return to community theatre. Barbara Robinson’s The Best Christmas Pageant Ever was successfully staged in December, featuring children and adults not just from the College and the town of Louisburg, but also from Franklinton, Bunn, Warrenton, and Wake Forest. The show even garnered funding support from the North Carolina Arts Council and the Franklin County Arts Council. 2014 brought in even more talent to the theatre, with spring productions of Love Letters (A.R. Gurney’s play about a couple’s letters spanning five decades, performed by Hurst and his wife Maria) and Godspell (a combination of student and community actors in one of the most popular off-Broadway musicals). In early April of this year, students had the opportunity to attend a fight choreography workshop with professional actor Michael Johnson, and plans are in the works for a young people’s theatre workshop which will be open to the community. Louisburg theatre alumni will also have their own chance to get back in the action during a Fall 2014 reunion. (For more information, contact Jamie Patrick at jpatrick@louisburg.edu.) With hopes of expanding the program as far as the students’ dreams will allow, Hurst and Wilkins are busy, yet thrilled. “Acting is all in being fearless,” says Hurst. After all, you never know what big things may come from even the quietest of sounds.

Walter “Wally” Hurst, Director of The Norris Theater, lives not too far from the College in Warrenton, NC. With a BA from Duke University; a Juris Doctor from the University of the Pacific in California; and an MA in Shakespeare Authorship Studies from Brunel University in London, England, Hurst also has extensive theater experience seasoned with a large and laughing personality. He teaches a variety of subjects including Public Speaking and Political Science. Drama instructor William “Byrd” Wilkins is a born-and-raised Louisburg native. He recalls being introduced to Louisburg College as a child (his father worked here for twenty-eight years as a custodian); he later graduated with the class of 1985. Wilkins holds a BA in Drama from UNC-Greensboro and an MFA in Acting from The Actors Studio Drama School. He teaches both Acting I and II, as well as Introduction to Drama and Rehearsal and Performance.

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college news

College Dedicates W. Seymour & Rheta W. Holt Lobby Just before The Embers opened their holiday show in front of a sold-out JPAC crowd this past December, Louisburg College Trustee Seymour Holt ’49 and his wife, Rheta, presided over the annual Christmas Tree Lighting in the lobby newly named in honor of their generosity. Pictured, L-R: Seymour Holt ’49, Rheta Holt, President Mark La Branche, and Board of Trustees Chairman Mike Boddie ’77.

college news

Ponder’s Portrait Unveiled

Board of Trustees Welcomes New Members Louisburg College appointed four new members to the Board of Trustees in 2013 (pictured above, from L-R): business owner and general contractor John Allen ’85 of Durham, NC; Wells Fargo human resources advisor Lynda Hudson ’68 of Midlothian, VA; artist and retired educator Marla Gupton Coleman ’62 of Mechanicsville, VA; and certified public accountant Robert Parrott ’63 of Greenville, NC. We thank these new members for their willingness to serve their alma mater!

Northern Troops Leaving Southern Trails This past December, the national Civil War Trails program installed on the Louisburg College campus a marker commemorating the encampment of Union troops following the Civil War. Learn more at www.louisburg.edu/tarrivercenter/marker.

At a faculty/staff gathering in September 2013, Dr. Mark La Branche (left) unveiled the completed portrait of Dr. Reginald Ponder, who served as president of Louisburg College from 2002-2007. The painting will be hung in the Main administration building with those of preceding presidents.

De Hart Gardens Blooming With New Use Starting in 2013, several science courses began incorporating visits to Louisburg College’s De Hart Botanical Gardens, donated by Professor Emeritus and College supporter Allen de Hart in 2012. Improvements are being made to the property, including upgrades to the parking lot that now allow the Gardens to accommodate buses and more visitors than ever before. A student work study position has also been created to help with projects such as a calendar showcasing the blooming patterns of native flowers. The Gardens are open to the public from sunrise to sunset, and patrons are encouraged to enjoying activities such as hiking, photographing, picnicking, and birding. For more visitor information, contact Allen de Hart at (919) 496-4771 or adh4771@aol.com.

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College Breaks Ground for Ray Hodges Fine Arts Complex A groundbreaking ceremony was held on February 27, 2014 for an exciting building project: the expansion of the newly named Ray Hodges Fine Arts Complex. A new studio addition, renovated teaching spaces, improved technology, and the return of a combined facility for art and music will represent a significant step forward for the fine arts at Louisburg College. Read more about the project on Page 19, and online at www.louisburg.edu/news/artscomplex.

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college news

FEATURE

Final NASA Internship Brings Five Students to Maryland This past summer, “Team Louisburg” (as they were called by personnel at the Goddard Space Flight Center) completed their third and final phase of an internship project begun in the summer of 2011 through a NASA grant. Louisburg College Instructor of Biology Jennith Thomas was again joined by second-phase participant Roselani Robinson ’13, as well as new teammates Nichole Casto ’13, Sara Christmas ’13, and Dominique Wilson ’14.

An English Adventure In May 2013, Assistant Professor of English Kris Hoffler’s study abroad program took to life and took off to the Old World. For its first trip, six students from the College (including Carsyn Yow ’14, pictured above) travelled across the pond to spend eleven days touring the United Kingdom. “During our three days in Scotland, we visited the thousandyear-old Edinburg Castle and numerous cathedrals, explored the palace of James I, walked and shopped on the Royal Mile, climbed the many stone steps to the top of the Sir Walter Scott Memorial, and took a late night ghost walk,” says Hoffler. Next came the trip to London, which Hoffler notes as a highlight for the students. “We had the special opportunity to witness the dress inspection of the hundreds of red-coated Royal Guards at Buckingham Palace.” Future plans for the study abroad program include a 2015 joint trip to Italy and Greece with Assistant Professor of Religion Joshua Parrott. “Our idea,” explains Hoffler, “is to have the trip cover not just literature, but also religion and art.”

Working with a group from Yale University, Robinson, Casto, Thomas, and Dr. Miguel Roman of the Goddard Space Flight Center used the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), testing its data’s accuracy to “discern patterns in energy use or migrations.” Meanwhile, Wilson inspected labs for safety compliance, while Christmas’ primary task was to “create a 25-year timeline correlating NASA missions, policy development, and technology achievements,” Thomas explains. Of the students from this final phase, then-freshman Wilson returned for his sophomore year at Louisburg. Costas and Christmas both transferred to North Carolina State University for their junior year, while Robinson moved on to East Carolina University. From L-R: Elmer Rayo ’12, Gerardo Jaramillo ’12, and Roselani Robinson ’13 with biology instructor Jennith Thomas at NASA. (Credit: NASA/Victoria Weeks.) You can learn more about the interns’ experience through a video here: www.louisburg.edu/nasavideo.

Devoted Friends We Will Miss The College and local community mourn the loss of Franklin County native Arlene Mashburn Hodges, who passed away on October 12, 2013 at the age of 58. Born February 23, 1955 to Arland and Ella Mashburn, Arlene attended Louisburg High School and was a 1977 graduate of East Carolina University. Preceded in death by her husband, Louisburg College Trustee Ray Hodges, Arlene enjoyed golfing, traveling, completing crossword puzzles, and supporting her favorite team, the ECU Pirates. She is remembered as a kind, fun woman, and one who was adored by her family and friends. Arlene is survived by daughters Emily Hodges and Allison Westmoreland, as well as Allison’s husband, Bucky Westmoreland (all of Raleigh); sisters and brothers-in-law Margaret and Jimmy Hill of Manakin Sabot, VA and Debbie and Kevin Spain of Hillsborough, NC; and several nieces and nephews. The Hodges’ legacy at the College and within the community will continue through the

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Ray Hodges Fine Arts Complex, a major renovation project made possible through the generosity of the Hodges family. Ray and Arlene’s daughter, Emily Hodges, also serves in her father’s stead as a trustee of the College. Mrs. Frances Boyette Dickson ’35, a long-time resident of Burlington, North Carolina and the widow of Dr. Malcolm Shields Dickson, passed away on February 14, 2014 at the age of 97. She is survived by a sister and three daughters, as well as numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A 1935 alumna of Louisburg College, Mrs. Dickson gave freely of her time, talents, and resources in support of her beloved alma mater. She served on the Board of Trustees from 2002-2006 and also served for a time on the Golden Anniversary Council; she held the status of trustee emeritus for the rest of her life. Louisburg College’s most generous benefactress in its history, Mrs. Dickson was the 2002 recipient of the Cecil W. Robbins Public Service Award; her years of support

were hallmarked with gifts such as the endowed Lillian Cherry Boyette Scholarship, named in honor of her mother. In 2009, the Frances Boyette Dickson Auditorium was named to commemorate her generosity toward the College. In his eulogy for Mrs. Dickson’s memorial service, Louisburg College past president Dr. Reginald Ponder remembered his friend with a fondness and gratitude that is echoed by our entire community: “When she talked about her days at Louisburg College, her eyes would twinkle and her whole being would glow. Those days, now almost 80 years in the past, were some of her happiest memories…[and in the College’s] hour of greatest need, when experts were recommending that it close its doors, Frances Dickson rose to its defense…to help save the College for its important mission now and into the future.” Her daughter, Ann Bowen of Charlottesville, Virginia, currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. Mrs. Dickson’s greatgrandson, Mack Roberts, is also a graduate of the College.

estoration ejuvenation Breathing New Life Into Our Historic Campus By Melinda McKee SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

19


FEATURE

uilt in 1915, the Arthur Person House (as it was originally known) has belonged to Louisburg College since 1970, when a Person family descendant sold the property to the institution. After serving as a homestead for various members of the College family, the house eventually found itself vacant. Unused, time took its inevitable toll, and the once-grand dwelling slid into severe deterioration. It still had good bones, however—an asset recognized by the College’s Board of Trustees in 2011, when they voted to restore the building and reconfigure it as a student residence. Today, the house is now home to 15 of Louisburg College’s most promising female students, thanks to the generosity of the College’s longtime friend and supporter Carroll Joyner, the Boddie-Noell Foundation, and the College’s Golden Anniversary Club. Renamed the E. Carroll Joyner Student Residence and known as the “Joyner House,” the building underwent a major structural and cosmetic renovation lasting not quite a year, opening in time for the Fall 2013 semester. Located within the Town of Louisburg’s Historic District, the building’s redesign pays careful homage to its architectural heritage while offering modern amenities and a contemporary style. Its new tenants (selected from a pool of applicants that met a minimum 3.0 GPA) were welcomed last fall by a home-like

atmosphere, complete with a beautifully decorated common room, laundry room, and luxuriously large wrap-around porch. “I worked so hard to maintain good grades throughout the year that it was sort of like a reward for myself,” explains current resident Ashley-Champale Harris ’14, regarding her motivation to apply for the new specialty housing. With a schedule packed with responsibilities as a Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) honor society member, cheerleader, SGA president, and Joyner resident assistant, the future nurse anesthetist is grateful to have a serene retreat to call her own. “I enjoy the quiet environment and the sense of coming home to my Joyner House ‘family,’” Ashley-Champale reflects. “We’ve all grown very close to each other, and it has made the experience that much better.” Sophomore volleyball player and fellow PTK member Kaitlyn Sitterson ’14 echoes her housemate’s sentiments almost exactly. “I enjoy that it’s secluded and not as busy as other parts of campus,” she says, also speaking fondly about the family she has formed with the other young women. This is not, in fact, the first time the house has hosted Louisburg students. Jamie Patrick ’84, director of annual giving and alumni relations, lived there as a young teenager with her father, former Dean of Students and Professor of English Craig Eller. “I could hear the male students who lived on the second floor, but I never actually saw them,” Jamie recalls. “Life was all about making good grades, friends, and dating, and I spent a lot of time on that huge wrap-around porch. I imagine it’s much the same for the girls living there today...only the house is so much lovelier and they’re allowed to go upstairs!”

The E. Carroll Joyner Student Residence, before and after renovations.

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21


FEATURE

A Flourishing Campus Thanks to healthy operational practices, the awarding of specialized grants, and the support of numerous donors, the E. Carroll Joyner Student Residence is only one of the many construction, renovation, and beautification projects the College has undertaken recently: •

As part of a “Preserve the Oaks” initiative, the grounds unfolding in front of Main Building have been beautifully reshaped with new flower beds, lamp posts, benches, and garden art, while the brick walkways central to campus have been re-laid in a manner that will allow our cherished oaks to continue to grow.

Three of the College’s seven residence halls have enjoyed major improvements in the past two years, ranging from new flooring and paint to refinished restrooms and upgraded air conditioning; additional enhancements to our student residences will continue over the next few years.

• Taft Academic Building has been re-carpeted; both Taft and The Norris Theatre have benefitted from new paint and various lighting upgrades. • Our athletes and coaches who call the Roger G. Taylor Athletic Center home were thrilled about the installation of an industrial HVAC system to Historic Holton Gymnasium this past summer. (Additionally, the Ruth Cooke Gardens that lead to the gym entrance will soon see new flowers as well as a new fountain and benches, and funds are currently being raised to replace 78 gym windows original to the circa-1950 building.) These changes come on the heels of major improvements made to the Taylor Center from 2011-2013, including a new roof, refinished floors, new bleachers, new paint, and new football coaches’ offices; the building was renamed in 2012 in honor of College Trustee and donor Roger Taylor ’68. Significant upgrades were also made to the Seby B. Jones Performing Arts Center from 2011-2013, including new roofing, new signage, and improvements to the Edith C. Lumpkin Community Gallery. The College is currently raising funds to replace the JPAC’s carpeting. All told, gifts, grants, and budgeted funds have enabled the College to invest $4,436,403 in capital improvements over the past four years.

Looking Ahead Plans for a new addition to Louisburg College’s athletic facilities have been drawn up, taking advantage of the campus’s “Old Coal Plant.”

Also built in the 1950s, the coal plant once served as the central source of heat generation for the College community. Now, the two-storied building will be repurposed as a much-needed student fitness center, with its architectural integrity and iconic smokestack silhouette preserved. A second phase to the project will entail a building expansion, providing space for a football locker room, football equipment storage, and an athletic laundry facility. Renovations to the Ray Hodges Fine Arts Complex—so named in 2013 to honor the support and artistic vision of the late College trustee—began in the summer of 2012, including new interior and exterior paint, and new ceilings and floors. The second phase will commence this summer when a 2,100-square-foot studio addition will be constructed to house ceramics and painting courses. The new space, which will open to students this coming fall, will echo the aesthetics of the original building with a cathedral ceiling and clerestory windows. Future plans to breathe new life into the complex include the renovation of the music wing, once again bringing both visual art and music under one roof, and the creation of a digital art and music lab. In an age when digital literacy comes second-nature to teenagers, “investment in this new lab will immediately benefit our admissions office,” notes Professor of Visual Art Will Hinton. “It will help interested students identify Louisburg College as a creative port from which they can start a college career.” Students can also be excited about numerous renovations to the Jordan Student Center slated for this summer. The Hurricane Zone (an à la carte grill) and The Eye (an enclosed area for enjoying meals and games) will be reinvented as part of the main dining area via a large, circular counter and seating space. The dining hall’s kitchen and serving area will also be restructured to function more like a food court with multiple stations. “I think this is a great opportunity for Louisburg,” comments freshman Stephon Jordan. “The grill and The Eye really need this remodeling, so I look forward to seeing the development and transformation.” The Multipurpose Room (or MPR, as it’s known around campus) will also be transformed when it’s converted to a campus living room of sorts where students can hang out, eat, watch movies, and more. “I’m pretty excited!” says Alex Johnson, also a freshman. “The MPR will be more lively than usual when the remodeling is done.” Duke Dining Center renovations will also extend to a newly designed Alumni Room, which will double as a quieter dining space for students when not in use for special events. These dining center upgrades, including all-new kitchen equipment, will be funded largely

The “Old Coal Plant” will be converted into a state-of-the-art fitness center.

“The great quality of our educational enterprise is being matched by the increasing greatness of our facilities, and we’re thankful to our alumni and friends for the growing investment that is making this possible.”

- President Mark La Branche

by investments from Chartwells, the College’s contracted food services company. Rounding out the College’s upcoming projects are extensive improvements to the Cecil W. Robbins Library. New and returning students can look forward to the construction of a “Corner Coffee Café” as early as this coming fall, featuring indoor seating as well as umbrella-adorned tables outside. Additionally, the Title III-funded Academic Success Center will be added onto the existing computer lab, furnished with advanced hardware and software that will facilitate both collaborative and individual research.

Library café concept

Growing Our Campus to Advance Our Mission With such an abundance of rejuvenating improvements, the Louisburg College campus has truly never looked—or functioned—better. “The preservation, restoration, and expansion of our historic campus is at the foundation of our mission as a two-year residential college,” notes College President Dr. Mark La Branche.

Further upgrades to Robbins Library will include a glassed-in study room on the second floor and new carpeting, as well as improvements to the distribution desk, elevators, restrooms, offices, and external building façade.

“The great quality of our educational enterprise is being matched by the increasing greatness of our facilities, and we’re thankful to our alumni and friends for the growing investment that is making this possible.”

These four projects to revitalize the Old Coal Plant/fitness center, Hodges Fine Arts Complex, student center, and library will cost the College an approximate total of $6,112,000 to complete. The investment will again come from a mix of budgeted funds, grants, and gifts.

To stay in the loop with the College’s future building projects, you can subscribe to our monthly “Hurricane Headlines” e-newsletter at www.louisburg.edu/emailsignup, and follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LouisburgCollege.

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$1,000,000 or more

STATE of the COLLEGE

Great Futures Campaign Goal Increased to $18 Million By Kurt Carlson, Vice President for Institutional Advancement

As a result

of robust fundraising efforts, Louisburg College’s Great Futures Campaign goal of $15 million has been reached two years before our target date.

This ambitious, comprehensive fundraising campaign was announced at our 225th anniversary celebration gala in September 2012, and it has since supported many construction projects, including the preservation of historic campus buildings and grounds. In addition, new scholarship endowments created through the Campaign are helping Louisburg College attract talented athletes, musicians, and honors students. Finally, estate and planned gifts account for almost half of all gifts and pledges to the Campaign, building a pipeline of future funding for the institution. Our fundraising has doubled in the past five years, thanks to the extraordinary generosity of Louisburg College alumni and friends. Cash and future commitments to the Campaign now exceed $16.1 million. To continue our momentum and the growth in charitable giving, the Louisburg College Board of Trustees has set a new campaign fundraising goal of $18 million; the ending timeframe for the Campaign remains December 2015.

With Your Help, Our Students Succeed Donors tell us they have contributed to the Great Futures Campaign because they care about today’s students and wish to provide them with committed faculty, excellent facilities, a nurturing community, and the foundation for successful lives. We invite you to participate in this important effort to support our College and community. Louisburg College gratefully acknowledges the major support of the alumni and friends who helped us exceed our original Great Futures Campaign goal of $15 million.

To discuss giving opportunities and ways your contribution or pledge may be recognized, please contact Kurt Carlson at (919) 497-3325 or kcarlson@louisburg.edu.

New Campaign Initiatives

The additional $3 million in campaign funding will help the College support three new construction and renovation projects:

Student Fitness Center and Football Locker Room

We seek gifts to support the conversion of the “Old Coal Plant” building to a state-of-the-art fitness center for students, which will also provide strength and conditioning facilities for Louisburg College athletes. An addition to the historic building will accommodate a locker room for the football team.

Other Campaign Funding Priorities Scholarship Endowments

New scholarship endowments are among our highest priorities, as these funds provide income in perpetuity to help deserving students. Need-based scholarships provide us the greatest flexibility in selecting recipients, while merit- or talent-based scholarships help us attract students with exceptional abilities, such as outstanding musicians and athletes. Many donors choose to honor a family member or favorite professor with a gift to establish an endowed scholarship fund.

Ray Hodges Fine Arts Complex, Music Wing Renovation

Renovations to the student center will begin this summer with a complete makeover and expansion of the cafeteria into a modern food court. Additional gifts are sought to reconfigure the layout to better accommodate clubs and organizations, and to create common spaces for informal learning. Redesigned entryways and enhancements to the facade will improve the building’s functionality and appearance.

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$500,000 to $999,999 Estate of Larry Brown Mr. Allen de Hart Mrs. Frances B. Dickson ’35* Seby B. Jones Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Taylor ’68 United Methodist Foundation Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation

$250,000 to $499,999 Nicholas B. Boddie and Lucy Mayo Boddie Foundation Mr. E. Carroll Joyner Estate of Roberta B. Morris North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church Estate of Dr. C. Ray Pruette

$100,000 to $249,999 Estate of Richard P. Butler Mrs. Beulah B. Cameron Chartwells Corporation Mrs. Anne Fleming Coghill Estate of Bobby Davis ’48 Mr. William M. Davis ’61 Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S. DeBerry Mr. and Mrs. David T. DeBerry ’85 Mr. William P. Franklin ’52 Golden Anniversary Club Mrs. Arlene Hodges* Ms. Emily Hodges Hodges Insurance Agency, Inc. Robert P. Holding Foundation Independent College Fund of North Carolina Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Lumpkin II Mr. Willie Lee Lumpkin III Estate of Frances Brower Paschal ’39 Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Reginald W. Ponder Mrs. Allison Hodges Westmoreland

$50,000 to $99,999

Anonymous James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation Estate of Pearl Gomo ’38 Dr. and Mrs. Mark D. La Branche Mr. Benjamin Hicks Whitaker ’86

With support from the Great Futures Campaign, the art building will experience continued renovations this summer; by the fall, our students will enjoy a 2,100-square-foot studio addition constructed to accommodate ceramics and painting. Additional gifts will make possible renovations to the music wing of the building, which once again will serve as the hub for musical activity at the College with practice rooms, offices, and a digital art and music lab.

Jordan Student Center Renovation

Estate of R. Nelson Leonard

$25,000 to $49,999 Honors Program Endowment

We seek gifts to endow and name our newly created Honors Program. The Honors Program attracts many of our most academically accomplished students who participate in specially designed courses; they also have opportunities for internships, preferred housing, travel, and other benefits. Income from the endowment will support academic scholarships, development of new honors courses, and extracurricular activities.

This page: Endowed music scholarship recipients Kristen Huffstetler ’15 and Kriss Wade ’14. Opposite page: Honors Program participants Nick Moore ’15 and Brandy Johnson ’15.

Dr. and Mrs. W. John Cameron Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Coca-Cola Foundation Ms. Ruth M. Cooke Estate of Frances Gwin ’41 Mr. Clyde Harris Mrs. Beth M. Norris Estate of Celia Purdie ’37 Mrs. Julia M. Rodenbeck Mrs. Paula Drake Smith ’74 Mr. Howard Hoy Wah Tang ’70 Triad Foundation Mr. Brian Scott Wilder ’94 *Deceased


STATE of the COLLEGE

NET ASSETS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

A Thriving Institution An Overview of College Finances

$16,000,000

Operating Revenue

$14,000,000 $12,000,000 $10,000,000

Operating Expenses

$8,000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000

Net Asset Increase

$2,000,000 $0

2010

2011

2012

2013

TOTAL ASSETS $50,000,000 $45,000,000

By Belinda Faulkner, Vice President for Finance

O

ver the past four years, Louisburg College has established a strong financial position upon which we continue to build. During our most recently completed fiscal year in 2013, the College showed operating budget revenues of $14, 840,326 and operating budget expenses of $13,704,063, resulting in an increase of over $1.1 million in net assets from operating activities. This is the fifth year that the College has shown an increase from operations. Also in the last four years, total assets have increased by 86%, from $25.1 million to $46.8 million. The largest increase occurred in 2013 with the reacquisition of three residence halls previously owned by Athena Housing Partners. The College’s investments have increased by 25%, from $10.8 million in 2010 to $13.5 in 2013. During that time, private gifts and grants (restricted and unrestricted) nearly doubled from $1.4 million to almost $2.7 million. We continue to derive our main source of revenue from tuition and fees, and gross tuition and fees have continued to increase each year. This is due, in part, to an increase in enrollment and an increase in the cost of attendance. However, there has also been an increase in net tuition and fees (tuition and fees less institutional scholarships), demonstrating the institution’s commitment to controlling financial aid expenses. Louisburg College continues to grow financially stronger, making it possible to grow stronger overall. By investing our resources in the provision of quality educational programs, opportunities for student experiences outside the classroom, and the improvement of physical facilities, we are firmly pursuing our institutional mission of “Building Strong Foundations for Great Futures.”

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$40,000,000 $35,000,000

Net Property & Equipment

$30,000,000 $25,000,000

Total Assets

$20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 $5,000,000 $0

2010

2011

2012

2013

GIFTS & GRANTS $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000

Gifts & Grants

$1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0

2010

2011

2012

GROSS TUITION/NET TUITION $12,000,000 $10,000,000

Gross Tuition

$6,000,000

Net Tuition

$4,000,000 $2,000,000 $0

2010

2011

2012

2013

over the course of authoring eleven different trail guidebooks, founded the Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail, and taught at Louisburg College for 52 years…

…but his greatest legacy for Louisburg College may well be the 91-acre De Hart Botanical Gardens he gave to the College in 2012, along with an endowment fund he established to help provide for the Gardens’ future care. Please consider helping Louisburg through a bequest or through a gift that pays you income during your lifetime. For more information, contact Vice President for Institutional Advancement Kurt Carlson at (919) 497-3325 or kcarlson@louisburg.edu.

2013

$8,000,000

Allen de Hart measured more than 57,000 miles


ALUMNI

HOMECOMING 2013

Giving Our Hearts and Hands By Jamie Patrick ’84, Director of Annual Giving and Alumni Relations

Homecoming 2013 was a jam-packed weekend event! After a spirited pep rally Friday evening, alumni and friends met for a 1960s-flavored reunion, and then they were treated to a sparkling performance in the JPAC with Mary Wilson of The Supremes. On Saturday, alumni gathered to celebrate at our annual awards breakfast, cheer on the Canes at their 24-22 win over Lackawanna College, and reminisce at the Person Place reception afterwards. Other events included an introduction to our new Tar River Center for History & Culture and a lecture about the Shakespearean authorship controversy. To see more photos online, visit www.louisburg.edu/homecoming2013/photos.

I experienced Louisburg College as a newcomer three times: once as a young child when my parents joined the faculty, later as a student, and most recently when I became director of annual giving and alumni relations. Over the course of so many arrivals, some faces and facilities changed—but with each encounter, a spirit of community distinct to Louisburg let me know that I was home. Our Methodist heritage calls us to extend this sense of campus community into our greater community. Many in our College family volunteer on boards for organizations like the Lions Club, the Boys & Girls Club, our local hospital, and the United Way. Others share their talents in area churches, providing everything from stewardship to music and art.

Jamie as a child

Shared below are some of the kind words our fellow community members have written about the College and its impact throughout Franklin County. I’d also like to call to mind the words of John F. Kennedy: “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.” If you benefitted because of your Louisburg College experience, you can bolster your alumni community just by reconnecting. Contact me at (919) 497-3245 or jpatrick@louisburg.edu, and find your Louisburg College Facebook friends at www.facebook.com/groups/louisburgalumni.

- KA TH Y HA RR ELS ON

Exec utive Dire ctor , The Unite d Way of Fran klin Cou nty; Kath y nom inat ed Dr. La Bran che Citiz en of the Yea r, an hon as Fran klin Cou nty or awa rded to him by the Grea ter Fran klin Cou nty Cha mbe Janu ary 2014 (pic ture d at right r of Com mer ce in with past Cha mbe r Cha ir Can dac e Lend erm an)

involvement of e th d an th rs fi en se ve “I ha as the Tar ch su ts en ev in e eg oll C Louisburg parades, and as tm is hr C , al iv st Fe er Riv ents. They have Business Before Hours ev rve with our se also offered volunteers to ip Franklin, and sh board of directors, Leader e College is a big . Th our ambassador program the Chamber d part of our community, an it not for their re could not do what we do we involvement.” R LY - C H A R LE S EA nklin County Chamber of Commerce

te r Fra Ch air ma n, Gr ea

“Lo uisb urg Col leg e pro vid es sup por t in eve ry asp ect of our mis sion , fro m me etin g spa ce and em ploy ees to ser ve on our boa rds , to an imp rom ptu req ues t of the Col leg e pre sid ent to introdu ce the gue st spe ake r at our ann ual din ner . No tas k has bee n too big or too sm all. Thi s has bee n ins tru me nta l in our abi lity to pro vid e opp ort uni ties for the you th of Fra nkl in Cou nty to live up to the ir ful l pot ential. ” - AP RIL SC OT T

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CPO , The Boys & Girls Club s of Nort h Cen tral Nort h Caro lina

! e t a D e h t e Sav 2014 ING 7. M O C HOME SEPT. 26-2 ll be wi

2013 GAC REUNION


ALUMNI

ALUMNI

William “Bill” Bowers ’39 recently published his novel Memoirs of a World War II Destroyer Escort Sailor, covering his time in the Navy from 1944 to 1946. “It includes our escort duties in the Atlantic and Pacific, and the occupation of Japan,” says William. On writing the memoir, he offers further encouragement to others in following their passions. “Don’t tell me that you can’t do something new in your 93rd year!” Wilson “Glenn” Beasley ’40 (pictured left), born and raised in Louisburg, now lives in Charlotte and is enjoying retirement with his wife Betty Marsh at the Aldersgate United Methodist Retirement Center. The former salesman, Broadway dancer, and U.S. Army corporal has two sons and two granddaughters. Now 91, Glenn enjoys socializing and landscape painting.

Graham Kennedy ’52 (pictured left) is retired and now enjoys his time with wife Alice Dennis Kennedy ’54, his college sweetheart. Their children and six grandchildren are stretched across the nation in Philadelphia, Miami, Wyoming, and Atlanta.

Ann Schwarzmann ’54 (pictured left) now serves on several boards at East Carolina University, where she transferred after Louisburg to earn her BS and MA degrees. She enjoys attending concerts, reading, traveling, and spending time with her Siamese cats Sally and Sammy. Dr. Nancy Floyd ’58 recently retired from her position as Business Division Chair at North Carolina Wesleyan College. Now living in Stuarts Draft, VA, she has had the chance to explore her creative spirit through writing and photography. Already published in the “ND Quarterly” in the form of a short story, she plans to lead photography workshops in photo organizing and editing in her local area.

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Peggy Wilder ’60 and husband Barna Wilder recently celebrated their 52nd wedding anniversary and the birth of their grandchildren. Twins Josephine “Josie” and Bryson “Revel” were welcomed to the world by the Wilders’ son Dr. Osbone Wilder and his wife, Jennifer, of Goldsboro on April 15, 2013. Jim Hogsett ’64 (pictured right) works in ministry, aiming to reach the workplace. The author of the book A Worker Need Not Be Ashamed and of a monthly newsletter with over 12,000 subscribers, he reaches out to Christians through education conferences nationwide. He enjoys interacting with people and annually spends time living with the homeless on the streets of New York City, Miami, and Washington, DC. Further information on Jim’s ministry may be found at www.workerministries.com. Christen “Chris” Blackley ’65 (pictured right) and husband Jim recently retired, having handed their family business in real estate to their son Chad. Chris is enjoying retirement and the chance to travel more often. Also a “very serious amateur photographer,” she brings focus to the outdoor world through photos of waterfalls, bridges, old railroad stations, and more, and she has taught photography classes at Central Piedmont Community College in North Carolina.

Barbara Nelson ’68 (pictured left) is fulfilling her lifelong dream, working as a fiber artist in her very own Woven Dreams Studio. Having weaved for over 40 years, she creates baskets and other woven projects such as scarves and rugs. Her work and additional details on her art may be found at her website, www.wovendreamstudio.com.

Norwood Jackson ’70 (pictured left) moved to the Crystal Coast of North Carolina after retiring from the retail automotive industry to pursue his dream career in real estate. Having reached his fourth year in the Beaufort office as broker-in-charge, Norwood was recently named president of the Carteret County Association of Realtors.

Michael “Mike” Chappell ’78 returned to his alma mater Franklinton High School recently to serve as the school’s principal. Mike also serves on the Louisburg College Alumni Board. Susan Lorick ’78 (pictured below) looks forward to retiring with her husband in Oak Island, NC. Their daughters, Allyson and Katelyn, meanwhile celebrate their achievements in education. Having graduated from UNC-Wilmington, Allyson is the producer of the morning show at WWAY in Wilmington, NC. Younger daughter Katelyn aims to be a teacher with a focus in middle school language arts and social studies after graduating from NCSU.

Deborah Moore ’70 now lives in Florida where she owns a scooter, bike, and electric car business out of Key West. A former president and current member of an artist co-op, she sells watercolors, acrylics, and oil paintings locally as well as internationally. Lewis Hauser ’71 had a 35-year career in sales and marketing for the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies, which concluded with his retirement in 2010. Taking the chance to travel and live in several locations around the globe, he and his wife settled into the coast of South Carolina. Lewis still remains active, however; he runs his own management consulting company and presents at business schools as a guest speaker on leadership. Herbert Chan ’72 (pictured left) recently retired from his career as a registered respiratory therapist. He remains in New Jersey where he has lived for 40 years. Ben Alexander ’75 now works for the Town of Kitty Hawk Planning and Inspections Department as fire inspector and code enforcement officer. Charles Simmons ’75 has been honored by the North Carolina High School Athletic Association as the Dave Harris Athletic Director of the Year after having received an NCHSAA Award of Merit in 1995. As Hertford County High School’s Men’s Head Basketball Coach, Charles has earned over 500 victories and has been named Conference Coach of the Year 14 times; he has also served as the president for both the North Carolina Athletic Directors Association and the North Carolina Coaches Association.

Robert “Rob” Littrell ’79 recently completed his recovery from several foot surgeries and is looking forward to volunteering at this spring’s wilderness aid course for the Occoneechee Council of Boy Scouts of America. Recently named class agent for the Class of 1979, Rob hopes to see friends at homecoming and at the theatre reunion this fall. He encourages his fellow alums to “give to the College, even if only one dollar...stand up and be counted.”

Dennis “D.A.” Winstead ’81 has published his third novel Wiggle Rooms: A Tale of a Fallen Anchorite, which was released in April 2013, following his second novel Southern Crosses. Both pieces are suspense and mystery historical fiction. Wiggle Rooms is “set in Latvia during early Soviet occupation…a mixed bag of old Baltic lore, superstitions, religious fervor, and diplomatic intrigue.”

William “Tank” Hardin ’85 was recently inducted into the Elon University Sports Hall of Fame, after having been honored as a member of the Louisburg College Athletic Hall of Fame in 2010 for his contributions as a baseball player. Now in his 20th year of teaching, Tank currently teaches and coaches at Page High School in Greensboro, NC. He and wife Natalee Hardin ’88 have four children.

SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

31


ALUMNI

Christina Ashby ’91 (pictured below) and husband Rob live on a farm with their three daughters and son. While her husband raises Black Angus cattle in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Christina works as an administrative assistant and billing specialist for a small local town. “I guess home is always calling,” she shares, having returned to her native Virginia after living in New York for five years.

Dega Lancaster ’97 (pictured right) celebrated the birth of her and husband Robert’s first child, son Mason Curtis, on July 23, 2013. The family has grown further and now includes their labradoodle, Ruffin. Dega recently went on her first mission trip to Costa Rica and now plans to write a “year-long devotion about living a life of mission.” She teaches and cites Romans 12:8 as a source of her strength: “I am called to teach and, therefore, teach well.”

Gibran Castillo ’99 (pictured left), a software engineer, has enjoyed a career at a number of companies after earning a BS in Computer Science from NC State in 2004. Enjoying the company of those in his field, Gibran wishes to connect with other software and enterprise developers, architects, investors, system administrators, and accountants. He, his wife, and their three children now live in Virginia.

Fredric “Clayton” Hall, Jr. ’05 (pictured right) is the Director of Athletics at Harrells Christian Academy in Harrells, NC. Also teaching Advanced Placement U.S. History, Clayton enjoys his additional role as head coach of the men’s varsity basketball team.

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Nikkol Whittington ’08 (pictured left) transferred to North Carolina Wesleyan College after Louisburg and graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Soon thereafter, she found a job in a transportation company operating out of Durham, NC. Recently promoted and now a manager at the company, Nikkol could not be happier. “I coordinate transportation for large local events,” she explains. Her events have included venues in the Research Triangle Park as well as local universities. Recently engaged, Nikkol lives in Wake Forest with her four dogs and plans to continue her education with a master’s degree from the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Marcus Huie ’09 (pictured right) is pursuing a Master of Science in Sports Management and Recreation at the University of Tennessee, which he is scheduled to earn in May of 2014. Currently working at Home Depot, he also referees basketball and football, and he serves as a motivational speaker for youth camps and high school athletes.

Lauren Wilkerson ’10 graduated from East Carolina University with a BS in Family and Community Service with a focus in early childhood intervention, and a minor in elementary education. Her passion for working with children has been realized as she is now an infant teacher at the Nancy W. Darden Child Development Center on East Carolina University’s campus.

To ensure your class notes are included in the next issue of Columns, please submit a professional and/or personal update via the online form at www.louisburg.edu/alumni, or by sending an email to cjohnston@louisburg.edu.


ALUMNI

ALUMNI

In Memoriam 1933 Marguerite Harris Keeling, October 5, 2012 Roy Ellsworth Wilder, Jr., March 25, 2012

1934 Dorothy Dennis Arrington, December 29, 2013 Virginia Deibel Lundell, August 11, 2013 Caroline Singletary, August 2, 2010

1935 Frances Boyette Dickson, February 14, 2014 Iola Pritchard, October 17, 2012

1936 Elizabeth Campbell Allen, June 16, 2013 Sally Anderson Windley, June 7, 2006

1938 Adrian E. Brown, June 30, 2013 Veta Epps Gorman, August 24, 2013 Margaret Becton Greene, July 12, 2004 Avis Shearon McKeithan, August 29, 2013 William Tracey Medlin, Jr., December 12, 2013 Helen Polston Tucker Smith, March 27, 2011 Emanuel James Walker, October 3, 2013

1939 Vincent Earl Barnes, December 18, 2013 Katherine Davis, March 16, 2013 Edith Woodlief Finnegan, March 2, 2006 Horace Augusta Gurganus, November 2, 2009 Vera Hill Hubbard, May 27, 2012 Frances Smith Ketchum, January 30, 2014 Hazel Winstead Lee, January 25, 2014 Frances McDonald Mendenhall, December 16, 2002 Allen Lindsay Midyette, August 8, 2013 Gladys Walters Nicholson, February 13, 2003 Catherine McIntosh Pasko, February 27, 2008 Oal Sherian Postorino, November 18, 2013 Alvin Needham Staples, April 23, 2011 Annie Britt Stone, January 29, 2006 Ella Davenport West, July 22, 2013

1940 Anniebelle Barrett Allmon, January 5, 2013 Lois Britton Carpenter, April 20, 2007 Dorothy Williams Clifton, September 12, 2007 Paul Eugene Freeman, November 20, 2013 Lula Gupton Joyner, June 22, 2000 Margaret Murphy Joyner, February 3, 2013 Lora Caddell Matthews, April 1, 2011 Savonne Matthews Medlin, December 29, 2002 Cliff C. Morris, Jr., November 30, 2013 Doris Lane Myers, February 7, 2008 Minnie Lee Parker, September 13, 2000

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Mary Phillips Paschal, January 3, 2009 Roy Wesley Pitts, February 7, 2008 Dorothy Wilder Simmons, August 22, 2004 Clyde Morton Stallings, September 2, 2007 Vivian Lupton Venters, March 7, 2009 Kipling Wycliffe Wise, January 9, 2000

1948

1941

1949

Sarah Russell Allman, May 31, 2001 Dorothy Edge Bishop, March 10, 2013 Neva Budd Carpenter, September 1, 2001 Louise Braswell Cates, December 30, 2013 Genevieve Hodgin Gay, August 29, 2013 Joseph E. M. Hicks, September 4, 2013 Eleanor Martin Howard, December 7, 2012 Jesse L. Johnson, Jr., July 31, 2013 Mary Richardson Penning, September 24, 2004 Edna Gillis Shelley, January 31, 2001 Betty Turlington Tew, February 24, 2011 Martha Bass Williamson, April 23, 2011

Vivian Pergerson Dickerson, July 29, 2013 Wiley Dwight Hooper, August 26, 2011

1942

1954

Bobby Coy Davis, January 26, 2014 Charles T. Skinner, Jr., July 4, 2013 James Earl Sneeden, March 12, 2013 Russell A. Wilcock, February 28, 2012 Leelan Alvin Wooflief , March 1, 2014

1950 Robert Houston Broome III, January 22, 2008 Gay Cameron Moore, August 31, 2005

1953 Marvin Lawrence Jordan, June 29, 2013 John Franklin Joyner, March 13, 2011 Lon Hugh West, October 5, 2012 Peggy Gupton Williams, November 29, 2003

1960

1969

David Carlyle Adams, Jr., July 17, 2013 Robert Randolph Huddleston, January 22, 2013 Matthew Haywood Mills, November 6, 2012 Albert Eugene Pittman, May 3, 2013 Elmo Bobbitt Shearin, September 4, 2011 George Alden Buck Thornton III, January 3, 2014

Deborah Pauli Maxey, September 2, 2012

Angela Quinn Estes, October 10, 2011 William J. B. McGugan, December 2, 2010

1970

1983

Rebecca Burch Ezzell, June 25, 2013 Phyllis Sherron Heeres, January 9, 2013 Thomas Brantley Leonard, September 7, 2008 Becky Pullen Ryals, July 20, 2010

Gordon Andrews Greene, November 16, 2011

1984

1971

1985

1961 Jack Powell Butcher, November 20, 2005 Claudette Cranford Edwards, July 16, 2010 James Hunter Hamlett, October 5, 2011 Sam Alexander Maddry, January 11, 2014 Joseph C. Parker, January 14, 2013 Kenneth Greene Ray, November 4, 2013

1962

Ellis J. Bedsworth, July 24, 2013 Mildred Lewis Curley, May 8, 2013 Marquerite R. Greene, December 24, 2001 Beatrice Lewis Johnson, February 7, 2014 Annie Barrett Kostecki, March 21, 2013 Kate Davis Puryear, October 13, 2000 Kathryn Jones White, September 24, 2012 Grace Carmen Whitehurst, December 31, 2013

Frances Baker Joyner, July 27, 2013

Ann Ayscue Lancaster, December 17, 2012 Bobby Lawrence Langston, August 4, 2013 Robert Henderson Shannonhouse, November 1, 2012 Carolyn Harper Smith, January 5, 2014

1955

1963

Margaret Amanda Goodwin, February 18, 2013 Douglas B. Hunter, June 29, 2011 Flora Bundy Lamm, April 30, 2012 James B. Slaughter, August 1, 2003

1964

1943

Joshua Branch Bobbitt, September 25, 2012 Sara Crews Coghill, June 17, 2009 Dewey Winston Kerr, July 9, 2008 Laura Winstead Webster, October 2, 2012 John Kelly White, April 19, 2013 William Lee Winslow, August 18, 2013

Mildred Newton Brisson, June 13, 2013 Hazel Cottrell Mahoney, February 21, 2014

1944 Lena Conyers Lewis, January 20, 2013 Josephine Lassiter Sturdivant, May 13, 2013 Janet Griffin Turner, November 4, 2013

1945 Betty King Dean, May 16, 2013 Lonnie Cecil Stroud, January 22, 2013 Dorothy Holder Toothman, September 16, 2013 Harvey Langill Watson, April 12, 2013 Hazel Case Yelverton, September 26, 2013

1956

1957 Reuben Fox Cannady, December 20, 2013 Ernestine C. Cannady, July 31, 2009 Larry Windsor Castleberry, August 26, 2011 Hannah Garrett Clayton, November 2, 2003 Johnny Brantley Saunders, March 26, 2012

1958

Doris Shore Lobb, August 5, 2013

Charlie Clifton Finch, Jr., October 29, 2012 Catherine Story Fravel, August 8, 2013 Randy Allen Marshall, March 21, 2007

1965 Jonathan Franklin Havens, February 20, 2011 Diana Midgett Underwood, August 7, 2010 Glenwood Lee Weatherly, February 27, 2011 Mark Handler, March 12, 2004

1966 James Thomas Hight, Jr., March 1, 2013 Faye Rudd Mauney, July 9, 2006 William Michael Swain, June 25, 2013

1967

Winford Gray Babson, November 25, 2010 James Ashley Edmonds, June 19, 2012 Elizabeth Rhodes Hiser, October 13, 2012

1972 Murlon Fredrick Rigsbee, Jr., April 29, 1999 Elizabeth Bull Thompson, March 18, 2009

1973 William Ronald Ennis, December 17, 2007 Dennis Neal Spady, August 31, 2012

1974 Vickie Myrick Camp, July 27, 2010 John Blakey Geddes, July 18, 2001 William Russell Gilbeert, July 3, 2007

1975

Benedict Joseph “BJ� Kavanaugh, Jr., November 18, 2013 Angela Sutter Phillips, May 30, 2011

1990 Latifa Whitfield-McNeil, January 11, 2014

1991 Alfred Scott Davis, August 25, 2004 Samuel Joseph Parham, December 4, 2008

1996 Lynwood D. Buffaloe, December 4, 2013 Edwin Winn Earnhardt III, September 13, 2013 Winn Flythe, September 13, 2013

1976

Thomas Michael Moore, September 19, 2013 Thomas M. Moore, September 19, 2013

Larry Darnell Burgess, January 31, 2013 Henry Franklin Holt, April 11, 2013

Brandon Eugene Granger, December 26, 2010

2003

2007

1977

Brook Patrice Lewis, December 19, 2013

James Watson Holyfield, April 24, 2011 William Roger Wynne, July 15, 2010

2008

1978 Allan Todd Dixon, March 22, 2010

1979

Janice Trebuchon Barnette, March 30, 2013 Dorothy Casey, July 16, 2013 Mary Frances Morton Green, March 15, 2013

1947

1959

1968

1982

Gregory Ralph Etheridge, October 17, 2000

Curtis Lee Corbin, March 11, 2011

Benjamin Thomas Adcock, June 29, 2013 David Paschal Rakestraw, November 28, 2004

1989

1998

John Wilkinson Blackwell, June 30, 2012 Patrick Duane Conner, May 1, 2010 Ernest Lewis Garner, April 3, 2013 Vernon Glenn May, February 4, 2011 Bobby Powell Tyson, November 22, 2009

Joan Simmons Manning, February 4, 2014 Jack Maurice Rascoe, September 11, 2013

Jacquelina Wilkins, August 12, 2013

Star Cardwell Abbott, October 10, 2013 Clarence Anthony Dillard, May 24, 2013 Wanda Willett Perry, January 16, 2008

Duncan Gilbert Collins, April 29, 2010 Gwynda Ramey Downing, January 13, 2014 Vaneda Dobbins Hess, February 21, 2011 John Russell Hoyle, Jr., October 2, 2009 George Thomas Overton, April 6, 2008 Suzanne Evans Ruffin, February 9, 2013

1946

Matthew McHugh Webb, April 15, 2013

Timothy Lee Baldridge, January 16, 2011 Michael Douglas Bullock, December 20, 2011

1980 Susan Rene Fowler, June 29, 2009 Tony Clifton Wynne, March 17, 2010

Derico C. Lynch, July 6, 2013

2009 Darius Purcel Shackelford, May 9, 2012

2011 James Douglas Boxikis, August 4, 2012

2015 Michael John Lyles, December 17, 2013

Friends of the College Arlene Hodges, October 12, 2013

SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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The Sanctified Role of Knowledge By Rev. Shane Benjamin, Chaplain & Instructor of Religion

In

1947, while a student at Morehouse College, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote an essay for the school newspaper titled “The Purpose of Education.” King insisted that an education divorced from moral development and character training is not enough: Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction…But education which stops with efficiency may prove the greatest menace to society. The most dangerous criminal may be the man gifted with reason, but with no morals. Two centuries before King penned those words, Charles Wesley made a similar-sounding statement in a hymn he wrote for the opening of Kingswood School in England. The hymn, “Sanctified Knowledge,” contains this lyric: “Unite the two so long disjoined, knowledge and vital piety.” Wesley’s desire to see knowledge united with “vital piety” (holiness) was driven by his love for God and neighbor. Indeed,

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the primates pal By Barry Burger

knowledge that was not put in service to see justice done and mercy given—especially to the poor—was to be considered vanity. Since their earliest days, this desire of Mr. Wesley was encoded into the DNA of the people called Methodists. Today it thrives here at Louisburg College, an institution related by faith to the United Methodist Church, where we continue to serve many students from underprivileged backgrounds. Equally important, our students are always reaching out to serve others in the wider community of Louisburg. The student-led Christian Life Council, for example, helps lead Tuesday chapel services. It also meets weekly to plan service projects, followed by Bible study. Some of these service projects include serving at a local soup kitchen, preparing a special meal for our housekeeping and dining hall staff, providing groceries for a single-parent family or care packages for students in need, gleaning at one of the nearby family farms, and helping UNC-TV (North Carolina’s PBS network) with phone-a-thons. As the founders of Methodism, no doubt John and Charles Wesley would be proud of our students and of Louisburg College. We continue in the spirit of Methodism which seeks to make people more sensitive to God’s presence, to the needs of neighbors, and to the importance of leading a holy life.

vercoming the challenges of building a career may prove daunting for most, and this can be especially true for someone born with a physical handicap. Armed with a college degree and the determination to succeed, however, Louisburg alum Palmer Midgett ’61 made his way into a fascinating world few people are privileged to experience. At the urging of his aunt, Palmer—who was born with a disability that affects his speech— arrived on the Louisburg College campus in 1959. Here he discovered supportive, compassionate professors like Allen de Hart, Felton Nease, and William Gretter who helped him recognize his own potential, and who were more than willing to help him reach the next level. Graduating from Louisburg in 1961, Palmer then went on to earn a Bachelor of Arts in History from UNC Pembroke. After college, his speech impediment led to struggles in his

job search. However, his positive attitude paid off when he gained employment at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, Georgia. The six-month assignment in Atlanta led to a position with Emil Menzel at the Delta Regional Primate Research Center, where Palmer worked as a biomedical research assistant and primate co-investigator over the next seven years. It was also where he met the woman who is now perhaps the most wellknown figure in the world of primate research: none other than Dr. Jane Goodall herself. Eventually, Palmer (known by friends and colleagues as “Pal”) followed Jane to the Stanford School of Medicine to work with her on the development of the Stanford Outdoor Primate Facility, which would house some of the primates from the Delta Center. He and Jane developed a close friendship and he referred to her as “Big Sis;” her colleague David Hamburg became known as “Uncle Dave.” In 1973, David selected Palmer to travel with him to the Gombe Stream Chimpanzee

Reserve in western Tanzania, assisting David and Jane in their studies of the chimpanzees. Palmer recalls those six weeks spent in Africa as one of the unforgettable highlights of his career. His association with Stanford University continued over the next eight and a half years as he provided invaluable assistance to the two primatologists. Eventually, Palmer returned to the Delta Center (now known as the Tulane National Primate Research Center) as supervisor of the chimp building; he later retraced his steps even further to work at the Yerkes Center on a language project with Georgia State University. Palmer rounded out his storied career in Texas, working at the MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Department of Veterinary Medicine caring for various animals—including, of course, plenty of chimpanzees. Now retired, Pal and his friend Jane keep in close contact, and she keeps him apprised of her continued efforts to protect animal species throughout the world. SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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HONOR ROLL

HONOR ROLL

ouisburg alumni and friends generously contributed $2,334,664 to the College between June 1, 2012 and May 31, 2013. Nearly 1,000 donors supported the Louisburg Fund, student scholarships, endowments, academic and athletic programs, and improvements to buildings and grounds. Included in this donor list are 142 members of the Louisburg Society, which recognizes annual gifts of $1,000 or more. The College is also grateful to our new members of the Old Main Society, who have included Louisburg in their estate plans.

SOCIETY OF 1787

Members of the Society of 1787 have generously contributed $50,000 or more to the College in their lifetime. Anonymous Aramark Management Services Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Barringer II Mr. and Mrs. Victor C. Barringer BASF Corporation Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Baugh ’53 The Nicholas B. Boddie and Lucy Mayo Boddie Foundation Mr. and Mrs. B. Mayo Boddie, Jr. ’73 Mr. and Mrs. B. Mayo Boddie, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Boddie ’77 Mr. and Mrs. William L. Boddie ’74 Branch Banking & Trust Co. Mr. Larry Brown* James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation Mr. William H. Bryan Burroughs Wellcome Company Mrs. John L. Cameron The Cannon Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Chandler Chartwells Corporation Coastal Lumber Company Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Coca-Cola Foundation Ms. Ruth M. Cooke Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Davis De Hart Botanical Gardens, Inc. Mr. Allen S. de Hart Mrs. Frances Boyette Dickson ’35* Mrs. John Lee Edwards ’38 Eli Lilly & Co. Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Lynn W. Eury First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. Flagler Systems, Inc. A.J. Fletcher Foundation Franklin Veneers Franklinton United Methodist Church GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Golden LEAF Foundation Mr. Kelmon P. Gomo Mrs. Ann J. Goodwin Felix Harvey Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Donald L. Henson Hodges Insurance Agency, Inc. Mr.* and Mrs.* Ray Hodges Ms. Emily Hodges Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Holding Robert P. Holding Foundation Mr. and Mrs. W. Seymour Holt ’49 Mr. and Mrs. Hugh T. Jones Mr. Robert L. Jones Seby B. Jones Family Foundation

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COLUMNS / SPRING 2014

Mr. Ben E. Jordan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. E. Carroll Joyner Mr. Robert L. Luddy Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Lumpkin II Mr. Willie Lee Lumpkin III The Marshall Group NC Community Foundation North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities The North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church Novo Nordisk BioChem, Inc. Ely J. Perry Foundation Mr. Ely J. Perry III ’84 Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Reginald W. Ponder Mr. and Mrs. Bland B. Pruitt, Jr. ’62 Pruitt Lumber Company Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roberson ’62 Ms. Sue C. Robertson Mr. and Mrs. John A. Rogers Sprint Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Taylor ’68 Tri Properties The United Methodist Church United Methodist Foundation James and Vedna Welch Foundation Mrs. Allison Hodges Westmoreland Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation

Old Main Society

The Old Main Society recognizes alumni and friends who will support Louisburg College through an estate gift. Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Barringer II Mrs. Mary M. Beauchamp Mrs. Dorothy Midgett Brannan ’48 Mr. Randy L. Brantley ’83 Mr. Richard L. Cannon, Jr. ’52 Mrs. Frances Terrell Cherney ’42 Mr. E. Wilson Clary, Jr. ’74 Mrs. Anne H. Coghill Mrs. Carolyn V. Cotton ’57 Mr. Osborne Gray Davis ’41 Mr. William M. Davis ’61 Mr. J. Jackson Dean Mr. and Mrs. Arthur DeBerry Mr. and Mrs. D. Tad DeBerry ’85 Mr. Allen de Hart Mrs. Frances Boyette Dickson ’35 Mr. William P. Franklin ’52 Mr. Kelmon Gomo Mrs. Ann J. Goodwin Mrs. Carol Bessent Hayman ’45 Mr. and Mrs. W. Seymour Holt ’49

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh T. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Ben E. Jordan, Jr. Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Wallace H. Kirby Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Lumpkin II Mr. Willie Lee Lumpkin III Mrs. Beth M. Norris Mr. Thomas Wesley Parson IV ’73 Mrs. Frances Brower Paschal ’39* Mrs. Julia Carroll Paul ’48 Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Reginald W. Ponder Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Pulliam, Jr. ’63 ’63 Mr. Peter B. Saunders ’80 Mr. and Mrs. Job K. Savage ’36 ’36 Mr. and Mrs. William C. Shelton ’69 Mr. and Mrs. John Clark Shotton ’69 ’69 Dr. Raymond A. Stone ’47 Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Taylor ’68 Mr. Benjamin Hicks Whitaker ’86 Mrs. Peggy Lee Wilder ’60

Louisburg Society Charter Members

Contributed $1,000 or more annually between June 1, 2009 – May 31, 2011. AXA Foundation Mrs. Janet Gardner Adair Ms. Judith D. Adams The Hon. Lucy Allen Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Anderson, Jr. Mrs. Carolyn Riddle Armstrong ’66 Mr. and Mrs. S. Thomas Arrington, Jr. ’69 ’71 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Barringer II Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Baugh ’53 Mr. Robert E. Beck ’53 Nicholas Bunn Boddie & Lucy Mayo Boddie, Sr. Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Michael Boddie ’77 Dr. and Mrs. Edgar J. Boone Mrs. Anne Bowen Mr. Carl Wood Brown James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation Mr. William H. Bryan Dr. and Mrs. C. Douglas Bryant, Sr. ’47 Bunn Heating & Air Conditioning Mr. Bob Butler Mr. H. Dwight Byrd ’57 Mrs. Beulah Cameron Dr. and Mrs. W. John Cameron Mr. G. Maurice Capps ’57 Mr. Kurt Carlson Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Champion Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Chandler Chartwells Corporation Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Estate of Nathan Cole, Jr.

*Deceased

Mr. Bryan W. Compton ’95 Compton Family Foundation Ms. Sheilah R. Cotten Ms. Carolyn V. Cotton ’57 Mr. and Mrs. James B. Cottrell ’61 ’62 County of Franklin Mrs. Susan Gardner Creed Mr. and Mrs. William R. Cross ’71 Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Davis Mr. William M. Davis ’61 Ms. Tamaya I. Davis Mr. and Mrs. D. Tad DeBerry ’85 Mrs. Frances Boyette Dickson ’35* Mr. and Mrs. William H. Dove Mr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Driver ’53 ’52 Dr. and Mrs. James C. Eck Mr.* and Mrs. M. Douglas Edwards ’53 Mr. and Mrs. Tim Ehrsam Mr. and Mrs. J. Craig Eller Mr. Douglas M. Epling Mr. and Mrs. Lynn W. Eury Ms. Belinda Faulkner Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. Fish ’60 ’59 First United Methodist Church of Cary First United Methodist Men of Cary Mr. Robert Fuller Fleming ’64 Ms. Sarah Foster Franklin Regional Medical Center The Franklin Times Franklinton United Methodist Church Ms. Betty W. Frazier Mrs. Elaine Weldon Fuller ’39 Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Gardner ’44 ’45 Mr. and Mrs. David Gardner H. Gillis & Associates Mr. Michael J. Gleason Estate of Pearl Gomo ’38 Mr. Peter Goodrich Griffin ’67 Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Griffin ’64 Mr. Graham P. Grissom ’36 Rev. and Mrs. Rodney Hamm Mr. Gene Hammond Mr. Clyde P. Harris, Jr. Mr. William L. Harris, Jr. ’66 Mr. and Mrs. John Hatcher, Jr. Judge and Mrs. Robert H. Hobgood Hodges Insurance Agency, Inc. Mr.* and Mrs.* Ray Hodges Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Holding Robert P. Holding Foundation Mr. Alan G. Hollowell Mr. and Mrs. W. Seymour Holt ’49 Hoof Hughes Law, PLLC Mr. Richard E. Hunter, Jr. ’68 Mr. John William Hurley ’53 IBM Matching Grants Arch C. Ingram Revocable Trust Estate of Henry Clayton Jackson Mr. Robert L. Jones Seby B. Jones Family Foundation Mr. Gary R. Jones ’65 Mr. and Mrs. Ben E. Jordan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. E. Carroll Joyner The Kayne Foundation Mrs. Suzanne Kayne ’66 Kelly Electric Mr. Charles R. Knight ’87 Dr. and Mrs. Mark D. La Branche *Deceased

NICHOLAS COSTAS ’13

D

riven by a passion for baseball, Nicholas Costas of Lynchburg, Virginia came to Louisburg College in the fall of 2011. Joining under Mike McGuire and continuing his baseball career with current coach Keith Shumate, Nick played the position of pitcher.

“Both years were a lot of fun. We had a lot of talent and a really good group of guys,” says Nick. “At one point in my freshman year, we were ranked number one in the country”—an NCJAA polling first for Louisburg’s baseball program. As the son of an investment banker and coming from a family of businessmen, he sought to follow in their footsteps and graduated from Louisburg with an Associate of Science in Business last spring. While here, Nick was encouraged by Brian Sanders, assistant professor of business studies, who taught him in several courses. “He has a lot of energy and really cares about his students,” Nick recalls. Nick also credits Louisburg College Chaplain Shane Benjamin and Director of Counseling Services Fonda Porter with making his time at Louisburg extraordinary. When it came time to transfer, the support continued. “[Registrar] Cat Ziencik helped me so much…I was very thankful for her making the process easier,” he says. After Louisburg, Nick took some time away from traditional schooling to spend this past fall semester in the Patagonia region of Chile, through a program with the National Outdoor Leadership School (see photo). “It was all outdoors. We lived in the mountains half the time, and we sea kayaked and lived by the ocean the other half,” he shares. “It was an incredible experience living on our own for that long, just roughing it. Everything we had for three months was either on our backs or in the kayak.” Virginia Commonwealth University, where Nick transferred this spring, has proven both a comfort and a challenge: it’s closer to home, yet significantly larger than the cozy campus of Louisburg College. Within the comforts and the challenges, he has found his calling. No longer playing baseball, Nick now focuses fully on academics and will finish with a Bachelor of Science in Social Work in two years’ time. “I looked into social work because I wanted to do a job that matters and directly makes someone’s life better,” he explains. That pull to take care of others has led Nick to his new mission in life. After graduation, he plans to enter the military, and though his branch of choice is yet to be determined, his future is clear and bright. “I want to challenge myself,” he explains, “and do something great for my country.” - Brittany Hunt ’10

SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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HONOR ROLL

HONOR ROLL

SAM PENDERGRAFT ’10

I

n the College’s long history, there has been no shortage of Louisburg alumnae creating a family legacy. Samantha “Sam” Pendergraft ’10, of Raleigh, North Carolina is proud to have followed in the footsteps of her grandmother, Anne Jones Weathersbee ’49 (also of Raleigh).

“With joy in her eyes, Granny told stories about Louisburg, and I knew it would be a great place for me to start,” shares Sam. “She spoke highly of her professors, especially Ms. Merritt. I wanted to have professors who cared like that.” Sam found such professors at Louisburg quickly, feeling drawn to the bright personalities of business faculty members. “They helped me grow in my academics and as a person. They were always there if I had any questions at any time.” With their guidance, Samantha soon found herself on track to graduate with an Associate of Science in Business, and a deep connection to the Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) business fraternity. Not only active in PBL, she was also a member of the Christian Life Council, Student Ambassadors, and served as president for both the Phi Theta Kappa honor society and the Commuter’s Club. She spearheaded several blood drives and participated in a summer internship with the Red Cross. While doing all of this, she maintained a strong GPA and even stronger friendships.

“The memories that I have of Louisburg are priceless,” says Sam, “like being on the homecoming court, earning a first-place win at the state PBL leadership conference, and graduating with my best friends.” After a smooth transfer to William Peace University, Sam wasted no time in settling into her new small college home by starting a PBL chapter and becoming class president. Graduating from Peace in 2012 with a double major in communications and business, Sam now works in the registrar’s office at Wake Technical Community College. She looks forward to one day entering the higher education field as an administrator, and she plans to pursue a master’s degree in higher education starting this fall. With a fearlessly generous spirit, Sam recently shaved her hair for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation in honor of her boyfriend’s sixteen-year-old cousin, who passed away after a battle with the rare cancer rhabdomyosarcoma. “She was a very strong young woman and so young. I felt like I had to do something,” explains Sam. “Not only did we raise over a thousand dollars for childhood cancer research, we raised awareness.” “It’s hard to express how I felt when my hair fell to the ground, but I can honestly say that it was the best feeling in the world. I felt proud knowing that not everyone would have done what I did!” - Brittany Hunt ’10

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Ms. Elizabeth Landis Mrs. Jane Austin Lee ’71 Mr. John C.R. Lentz ’87 Eli Lilly & Co. Foundation Mr. W. J. Little, Jr. ’49 Rev. and Mrs. Thomas E. Loftis Mr. Robert L. Luddy Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Lumpkin II Mr. Willie Lee Lumpkin III Mr. Billy R. Merritt ’53 Mr. Nathan Miller Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Mixon, Jr. Mixon Construction Company, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Jason Modlin Mr. William David Moon ’45 Estate of Roberta B. Morris Mr. and Mrs.* Roger Moulton ’43 Estate of Willie B. Mullen Mrs. Jane Earley Newsome ’64 Mrs. Beth M. Norris North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities The North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church Mr. and Mrs. T. Russell Odom ’68 PJM Interconnection Matching Grants Mrs. Jean Austin Patterson ’71 Ely J. Perry Foundation Mr. Ely J. Perry III ’84 Pizza Hut of Clinton, Inc. Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Reginald W. Ponder Mr. and Mrs. Bland B. Pruitt, Jr. ’62 Estate of Celia Grantham Purdie ’37 Mr. and Mrs. G. Samuel Register ‘76 Mrs. Donna Rhoden Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roberson ’62 Ms. Lisa Minton Robert ’90 Ms. Sue C. Robertson Mr. and Mrs. William E. Rodenbeck Mr. and Mrs. John A. Rogers Mr. Jean Paul W. Roy Mrs. Ann Rhem Schwarzmann ’54 Mr. Ronald V. Shearin Mr. Joseph W. Shearon ’51 Mr. and Mrs. William C. Shelton ’69 Mr. Charles Sloan Mrs. Paula Drake Smith ’74 Mr. Emmett Chapman Snead III ’71 Mr. and Mrs. Grady K. Snyder ’50 ’50 Mr. Carl Stafford Mr. and Mrs. Glendel U. Stephenson ’52 Mr. and Mrs. John F. Strotmeyer, Jr. ’69 Stupp Brothers Bridge & Iron Co. Foundation Mr. and Mrs. C. Boyd Sturges Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Taylor ’68 Mrs. Barbara Johnson Thompson ’62 Mrs. Ruby Chewning Thompson ’59 Mrs. Edith Boone Toussaint ’49 Travelers Motor Club Sales, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Traylor, Jr. United Methodist Foundation Wachovia Matching Gifts Mr. Carl D. Wagner ’50 Wake Electric Care Tommy Wallace Electrical, Inc. Mr. Theron P. Watson James & Vedna Welch Foundation Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Mrs. Peggy Lee Wilder ’60

*Deceased

Estate of Joyce Hughes Witt ’39 Ms. Cherry Dickson Woodbury Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Woodhouse, Sr. ’56 Mr. and Mrs. James T. Wooters ’42 Mr. and Mrs. Maurice C. York ’73 Otto H. York Foundation

Louisburg Society

The College’s premiere annual giving program, the Louisburg Society recognizes annual gifts of $1,000 or more in 2012-2013. Ms. Judith D. Adams The Hon. Lucy Allen Judy W. Anderson Charitable Trust Mrs. Carolyn Riddle Armstrong ’66 Mr. and Mrs. S. Thomas Arrington, Jr. ’69 ’71 Dr. and Mrs. Leonard W. Aurand Mr. Larry Williams Barefoot ’64 Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Baugh ’53 Mr. Robert E. Beck ’53 The Nicholas B. Boddie & Lucy Mayo Boddie Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Boddie ’77 Dr. and Mrs. Edgar J. Boone Mrs. Anne Dickson Bowen Mr. Carl Wood Brown Estate of Larry Brown Dr. and Mrs. C. Douglas Bryant, Sr. ’47 Ms. Katherine S. Burden Mr. Bob Butler Mrs. Beulah Cameron Dr. and Mrs. W. John Cameron The John and Mary Camp Foundation Mr. and Mrs. G. Maurice Capps ’57 Mr. Kurt Carlson Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Champion Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Chandler Mr. Steven R. Charbonneau ’82 Mrs. Anne H. Coghill Chartwells Corporation Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Coca-Cola Foundation Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Compton Mrs. Carolyn V. Cotton ’57 Mr. and Mrs. James B. Cottrell ’61 ’62 County of Franklin Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Davis Mr. William Moore Davis ’61 Mr. J. Jackson Dean Mr. and Mrs. D. Tad DeBerry ’85 Mr. Allen de Hart Mrs. Frances Boyette Dickson ’35* Mr. and Mrs. William H. Dove Mr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Driver ’53 ’52 Dr. and Mrs. James C. Eck Mrs. Shirley Edwards Mr. and Mrs. Charles Benton Efird ’70 ’70 Element One, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. J. Craig Eller ’65 Mr. and Mrs. Lynn W. Eury Ms. Belinda Faulkner First United Methodist Men of Cary Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. Fish ’60 ’59 Mr. Robert Fuller Fleming ’64 Ms. Sarah Foster Ms. Betty W. Frazier Mrs. Elaine Weldon Fuller ’39 Mr. Michael J. Gleason

*Deceased

Mr. Kelman Gomo Mr. James Goodnight Mr. and Mrs. Samuel V. Greco, Jr. Sam Greco Construction, Inc. Mr. Peter H. Green ’91 Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Griffin ’67 Estate of Frances Gwin ’41 The Sarah Starnes Harris Revocable Trust Mr. William L. Harris, Jr. ’66 Mr. and Mrs. H. John Hatcher, Jr. High Point Community Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James Hill Hodges Insurance Agency, Inc. Mrs. Arlene M. Hodges* Ms. Emily Hodges Robert P. Holding Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Holding Mrs. Hazel Holloman Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Holloman ’83 ’90 Mr. and Mrs. W. Seymour Holt ’49 Mr. and Mrs. David Gardner IBM Matching Grants Mr. Gary R. Jones ’65 Mr. John Richard Jones Mr. Robert L. Jones Seby B. Jones Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Walter Baskerville Jones, Jr. ’65 Mr. and Mrs. Ben E. Jordan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. E. Carroll Joyner The Kayne Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Mark D. La Branche Mrs. Jane Austin Lee ’71 Estate of Nelson Leonard Mr. John C.R. Lentz ’87 Mrs. Jane Moon Linsky ’43 Rev. and Mrs. Thomas E. Loftis Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Lumpkin II Mr. Willie Lee Lumpkin III Mr. D. Michael May ’63 Mr. Billy R. Merritt ’53 Modern Exterminating Company, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Jason Modlin Mr. Roger Moulton NC Community Foundation Mrs. Jane Earley Newsome ’64 Mrs. Beth M. Norris The North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities Mr. and Mrs. T. Russell Odom ’68 Mrs. Jean Austin Patterson ’71 Pizza Hut of Clinton, Inc. Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Reginald W. Ponder Mr. and Mrs. Jason J. Proctor Mr. and Mrs. Bland B. Pruitt, Jr. ’62 Renaissance Charitable Foundation, Inc. Mr. Charles Riddick Revelle II ’80 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Riggan, Sr. ’59 Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roberson ’62 Ms. Sue C. Robertson Mr. and Mrs. William Rodenbeck Mr. Charles Morehead Rucker ’72 Mrs. Ann Rhem Schwarzmann ’54 Seller’s, Inc. Mr. Joseph W. Shearon ’51 Mr. and Mrs. William C. Shelton ’69 Mr. Charles Sloan Mrs. Paula Drake Smith ’74

Mr. Emmett Chapman Snead III ’71 Mr. and Mrs. Grady K. Snyder ’50 ’50 Ms. Kimberly D. Spivey Mr. Samuel Henry Stallings ’68 Mr. and Mrs. Glendel U. Stephenson ’52 Mr. and Mrs. John F. Strotmeyer, Jr. ’68 Stupp Brothers Bridge & Iron Co. Foundation Mr. and Mrs. C. Boyd Sturges III Mr. Howard Hoy Wah Tang ’70 Roger G. Taylor and Associates Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Taylor ’68 Estate of Cleo Fox Titus ’36 Mrs. Edith Boone Toussaint ’49 Triad Foundation United Methodist Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation James and Vedna Welch Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Barry W. Whitaker Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Mr. Brian Scott Wilder ’94 Mrs. Peggy Lee Wilder ’60 Mr. Wilton H. Williams ’49 Mr. Paul L. Wilson ’61 Mr. and Mrs. Ray H. Womble, Sr. ’48 Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W. Woodhouse, Sr. ’56 Mr. and Mrs. James T. Wooters ’42 Mr. and Mrs. William H. Yarborough Mr. and Mrs. Maurice C. York ’73

$500-$999 Mrs. Rebecca Drake Allen ’83 Dr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Aurand ’70 Ms. Mary Thompson Austell Mr. Major H. Bowes ’58 Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Brown ’62 Mr. H. Dwight Byrd ’57 Mr. James E. Compton ’65 Mr. Marion Frank Erwin ’58 Evansdale United Methodist Church Mr. Frances F. Falls ’62 Mr. Jimmy W. Goldston Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Griffin ’64 Mr. Harry J. Harles ’70 Mr. Clyde P. Harris, Jr. Mr. James Linley Hill ’88 Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Holloman ’83 ’90 Ms. Elizabeth Tempie Ijames ’89 Dr. Alice Peedin Jacobs ’64 Mrs. Phyllis Pleasants Jones ’84 Mr. and Mrs. Larry M. Jordan ’65 Mrs. Myrtle C. King Mrs. Margaret Webb King ’69 Mr. Charles R. Knight ’87 KP’s Lawncare Louisburg Baptist Church Mrs. Jacquelyn Smith McNamara ’73 Estate of Roberta B. Morris Mr. Richard D. Niedermayer ’65 Northwestern Mutual Foundation Mrs. Darlene Thompson Oakes Orthopaedic Specialists of NC Mrs. Susan Mixon Parris ’64 Mr. Kyle Perkins ’07 Mrs. Donna Rhoden Richards Oil Company, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Smith Rev. and Mrs. Sidney Stafford Mr. Robert F. Stevens ’66 SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

41


HONOR ROLL Mr. and Mrs. Neal D. Stewart ’75 ’82 Mr. Benjamin N. Thompson Mrs. Stephanie Buchanan Tolbert ’97 Mr. Timothy Kamptner Wilcox ’78 Mr. Floyd Johnson Wingfield ’67

$100 - $499 Able Roofing, Inc. Mr. L. C. Adcock Mr. David B. Allen ’70 Mrs. Haven Cooper Allen ’84 Ms. Patricia G. Alston Judge and Mrs. James F. Ammons, Jr. ’75 Ms. Virginia S. Andrew Mr. Glenn Archer Maj. and Mrs. William H. Arrington, Jr. ’64 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Wayne Axselle ’65 Mr. John A. Bacik ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Billy A. Baker, Sr. ’55 Mr. Carl Edward Baker ’79 Mr. and Mrs. William H. Baker, Jr. ’52 Mr. Felix G. Banks ’43 Mr. Robert Teele Barnhill ’63 Mr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Beasley ’70 Mrs. Mary M. Beauchamp Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Bender Mr. and Mrs. Wayne D. Benton Mrs. Lillian A. Benton Ms. Mary Lynne Benton ’76 Mr. Billie Coleman Biggs, Jr. ’70 Blue Ridge Family Physicians Ms. Teresa Blumenauer Ms. Delano R. Borys Mr. and Mrs. Raymond G. Boutwell Mrs. Dorothy Midgett Brannan ’48 Mr. Randy L. Brantley ’83 Mr. Glenn D. Brewer ’65 Ms. Susan A. Bridgeman Mr. H. Vinson Bridgers, Jr. ’70 Mrs. Velma Ferrell Brown ’60 Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson C. Bulluck ’66 ’66 Mr. and Mrs. George P. Bunn ’54 Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Burns ’55 Mr. Christopher D. Burns ’74 Mr. Robert C. Byrd ’62 Mr. Richard L. Cannon, Jr. ’52 Mrs. Mary S. Cardozo Dr. Patrick W. Carlton ’57 Catenacci Dance Mr. Obie Maynard Chambers Mr. and Mrs. James T. Chandler, IV ’67 Mr. Michael W. Chappell Mr. E. Wilson Clary, Jr. ’74 The Community Foundation of Western NC HM Conner General Contractor Mrs. Virginia Brittain Copping ’50 Mr. Nick G. Costas Ms. Sheilah Cotten Mrs. Louise Mason Cowart ’42 Mr. Douglas R. Craig Mr. W. Dempsey Craig ’62 Mr. William Alexander Crane ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Ernest G. Crews Mr. and Mrs. William R. Cross ’71 Mr. and Mrs. Wayne B. Currin ’71 ’71 Mr. James C. Cutchins III ’96 Mr. and Mrs. James B. Daley Mr. Tucker D. Daniel ’60

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HONOR ROLL Mr. David A. Davis Mrs. Jamie Burnette Davis ’85 Mr. R. Grady Dawson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur DeBerry Mr. David Michael Dement ’74 Mr. and Mrs. William T. Dement, Jr. ’68 Mr. Aaron V. Denton Mr. E. Wayland Denton ’75 Mr. and Mrs. J. Mark Dickens ’80 ’83 Mrs. Ann Dunham Donnell ’45 Mr. and Mrs. Jerry R. Dudley Duke Energy Foundation Mr. Thomas Hunter Dula ’61 Ms. Kimberly A. Dumond-Crawford Mr. Sidney Eugene Edwards ’63 Ms. Mary Jane Ekdahl Mr. Sam H. Elliott ’52 Mrs. Meg Ellis Mr. L. Randolph Everett Mr. and Mrs. L. Nelson Falkner ’65 Mr. James M. Featherston, Jr. ’42 Mr. Charles Ray Felmlee ’64 Mr. and Mrs. John Felton Dr. Diane Price Fleming Ms. Vickie Fleming Mr. and Mrs. David L. Foster ’71 Dr. and Mrs. Jimmy W. Foster ’60 ’59 Mr. Morgan Scott Foster Mr. Harry L. Foy, Jr. Mr. William P. Franklin ’52 Franklin Co. Emancipation Mr. Harold William Fromholz Future Financial Services, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Cam Leonard Garner ’69 ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Ernest P. Gaster, Jr. ’50 ’50 Dr. and Mrs. Milton H. Gilbert Mr. Willis A. Goodrum ’52 The Gorman Group, LLC Mr. E. Shelton Griffin ’67 Mr. Graham P. Grissom ’36 Mrs. Susan M. Guerrant Mr. Willis F. Gupton ’42 Dr. Thomas J. Hagan Mrs. Clara C. Hall Mr. Scott Campbell Hall ’73 Mr. and Mrs. Swayn G. Hamlet ’57 ’56 Rev. Madison Newton Hankal Mrs. Deborah L. Hardin Mrs. Ashley Hardy Ms. Cora R. Hardy Mr. L. Reid Harris ’45 Mr. R. Ray Harris ’57 Mr. William D. Harrison ’47 Mr. John Leroy Hatchell, Jr. ’65 Ms. Brenda G. Hawks Mrs. Rubie Riggan Hecht ’52 Ms. E. L. Heffernan Mr. and Mrs. Roger E. Heflin ’65 Mr. Richard L. Hibbits Mr. James O. Hillsman ’67 Mrs. Deborah Stevens Hinkle ’98 Mrs. Ruby Massenburg Hinson ’42 Mrs. Patricia Hinton Mr. William J. Hinton, Jr. Judge and Mrs. Robert H. Hobgood Dr. Thomas N. Hobgood, Jr. Rev. and Mrs. Hubert H. Hodgin ’54 ’54 Mrs. Edeth Hill Hodnett ’68 Mrs Celeste Hughes Hoffman ’84

Mrs. Donna Tuttle Holder ’76 Mr. Yuille Holt III ’63 Mr. and Mrs. Lennon Hooper ’50 Mr. Kevin S. House ’97 Mrs. Lynda Wooten Hudson ’68 Mrs. Mary Wheless Hughes ’52 Mr. Frank Hunter Mr. J. William Hurley ’53 Ms. Barbara Iblitson Mr. Donald Clarence Jaekel ’52 James A. Johnson Masonic Lodge #413 Mr. Tommy Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. Horace Jernigan ’47 Mr. Eric Ralph Joerg ’69 The Rev. Dr. George W. Johnson Rev. Jesse L. Johnson, Jr. ’41 Mr. Robert W. Johnson ’65 Mr. and Mrs. Tapley O. Johnson, Jr. ’60 Ms. Carmen S. Johnston ’01 Mrs. Candace Lester Jones ’99 Mr. Robert L. Jones ’66 Dr. Raymond E. Joyner ’62 Ms. Kendra A. Keels Mrs. Olivia Burton Kemp ’70 Dr. Christine Knights Mr. Timothy L. Kunkle ’73 Lamm & Lamm Farms Mr. and Mrs. Stephen E. Lamm, Jr. ’65 ’64 Mr. T. Michael Lampros ’71 Mr. Roderick E. Lane ’84 Mrs. Gail Fathera Laney ’66 Mr. and Mrs. J. Harry Lange, Jr. ’61 Mrs. Katheryn Coor Lewis Ms. Jan L. Linsky Mr. W. J. Little, Jr. ’49 Mr. Robert Leggett Littrell ’79 Louisburg Lions Club Louisburg Tractor & Truck Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Loyd ’80 ’81 Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Marks ’56 Mrs. Veronika Haun Marquoit ’67 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Marshall ’56 Mr. Daniel L. Massey ’62 Mrs. Mildred Boney Matthis ’46 Mr. Wilton L. Matthis ’56 Mr. Brian H. McCants ’91 Mr. Howard G. McCullough ’74 Mr. Duane N. McDonald ’65 Mrs. Melba Harrington McLean ’66 Rev. Dr. Charles Henry Mercer, Sr. ’38 Mr. Reuben Earl Mercer Dr. Linda L. Miles ’73 Dr. D. Edmond Miller Mr. Kelly Edman Miller ’76 Mr. David Minard Mission Foods Dr. Louise B. Mitchum Ms. Rachael A. Modlin ’50 Mrs. Linda L. Moore Mr. P. Wayne Moore ’68 Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Farland Morris ’74 Mrs. Gwynn Torrence Morris ’58 Mrs. Anne Tucker Mulchi ’53 Ms. Patrice Nealon Mr. Marvin Newsom III Ms. Cindy Nicholson Mr. Joseph Lester Niquette ’51 Mrs. Pearl Grant Nunnamaker ’52 Mr. Larry Wesley Oakley ’69

*Deceased

Oakley Combine Sales & Salvage, LLC James S. Ogburn, CPA, PC Mr. Jeffrey V. Olbrys Mr. Marion D. Outlaw ’68 Ms. Jamie Eller Patrick ’84 Mr. and Mrs. John G. Patronis ’60 Dr. and Mrs. Paul W. Stewart, Jr. Mr. Clarence W. Pearce, Jr. ’54 Peninsula Stars Ms. Susie T. Perdue Mrs. Mary Anne Peele Petteway ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Elbert H. Phelps ’52 Rev. and Mrs. G. Paul Phillips Dr. Jonathan D. Phillips ’76 Ms. Terri Pilkington Pilot Lions Club Mr. Frederick W. Pittard ’77 Mr. John R. Poe, Jr. ’63 Mr. Chester S. Ragland ’73 Mr. Frank M. Rapoport Ms. Ann Brooke Raynal Dr. Bobbie Richardson Mrs. Strowd Ward Riggsbee ’45 Mrs. Nancy Garner Robertson ’59 Mr. and Mrs. Willie Robertson ’48 Mrs. Margaret Adcock Robinson ’58 Mrs. Dori Liles Rockefeller ’61 Mr. Robin Rhea Rose ’75 Rose Mini Storage Dr. and Mrs. Robert N. Rosenstein ’68 ’68 Ms. H. Ann Ross ’71 Mr. Paul L. Sanderford, Jr. ’70 Mr. Randy Addison Sandlin ’81 Ms. Janice A. Sapp ’71 Ms. Elizabeth Denise Sapp ’71 Mr. Edward Rhone Sasser Mr. Alan G. Saunders ’73 Mr. Aldo G. Scala Mr. Gary Josh Scull ’54 Mr. Russell L. Sears ’66 Mrs. Martha Cly Shaffner ’65 Mrs. Joy P. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Julian J. Smith Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Smith Mr. and Mrs. William R. Spade ’67 ’67 Mr. Richard Thomas Spain, III ’72 Mr. Steve Sparks Mrs. Mary Spector Mrs. Anna Stallings Mr. Dudley B. Stallings ’46 Mr. and Mrs. E. Howard Stallings Mr. J. Gilbert Stallings Mrs. Marcelle K. Stanley Mr. Wallace C. Stepp ’64 Mr. and Mrs. M. Graham Stewart, Sr. ’49 Mr. Angelo J. Stillittano Mr. Andrew Stokes Dr. Raymond A. Stone ’47 Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Stringfellow ’71 Mr. Milton Keith Stutts ’75 Mr. Andrew M. Sugg ’89 Mr. Garland Franklin Swartz ’63 Mr. and Mrs. James G. Tarrant, Jr. ’61 ’62 Mr. and Mrs. Larry E. Tetterton ’56 ’56 Ms. Jennith Thomas Ms. Madge G. Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Timberlake ’64 ’59 Mrs. Charlotte P. Tippett Mr. and Mrs. G. Neal Titus, Jr. ’65 Mrs. Linda Crocker Todd ’64 *Deceased

BILL LORD ’75

E

nvironmentalist, hydrologist, horticulturist, bee keeper, and world traveler are a few of the monikers that could be ascribed to Bill Lord. A native of Henderson, North Carolina, he moved to Louisburg with his family as a high school student and was drawn to Louisburg College as a means to help decide his life’s future course. From Louisburg, Bill went on to NC State, where he earned an undergraduate degree in horticulture. Then, while pursuing his Master of Science in Entomology, he worked as an extension associate, which gave him the opportunity to travel to the Sudan on behalf of the Near East Foundation. After later serving as Franklin County’s extension agent for ten years, he moved on to his current role as an NCSU Specialized Agent in Water Resources. Bill’s work takes him all over the state as he seeks to protect its natural water resources, and he speaks passionately about his role to ensure that checks and balances are in place to protect the quality of our waters. While progress has been made as evidenced by the clean-up of the Neuse River, “unchecked growth is still a major concern and challenge,” he notes. His knowledge and expertise are not limited to North Carolina, either; he’s traveled to Denmark and Scotland to educate and train engineers on ways to protect their water resources from stormwater runoff and pollution. A man of many interests, Bill is also a beekeeping consultant and a contractor for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). He has visited countries such as Ethiopia, Malawi, Kazakhstan, Bulgaria, Romania, Armenia, Turkmenistan, and the Republic of Georgia, working on honey bee projects related to food production and income generation. As many of these areas are isolated and inhabitants are leery of foreigners, Bill knows he can’t simply barge in. “One has to go slow, make incremental changes, and show respect for the culture.”

Top-Bottom: Bill Lord in Turkmenistan, Malawi, Ethiopia, and Nepal. - Barry Burger SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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HONOR ROLL

HONOR ROLL Mrs. Sara Hux Townsend ’43 Mr. Todd Trickey Trinity United Methodist Church Trips-n-Tours Mrs. Delores Cole Tune ’62 Mr. William Troy Turlington ’59 Mr. Joseph Barton Umphlette, Jr. ’64 Mrs. Sandra Garman Vickers ’68 Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm Volk Mr. and Mrs. C. Norman Wagoner Mrs. Jan Walden Mr. and Mrs. William Wall ’47 Bishop Hope Morgan Ward Mrs. Jane Rosser Warfel ’41 Mr. Douglas Randolph Warrick, Jr. ’75 Mr. Andrew Carol Wells ’71 Mr. Randall Scott Wells ’64 Mr. Robert L. Wells ’60 Dr. James P. West Ms. Mary Ellen West ’41 Mr. Robert L. West ’60 Mr. John W. Wheelous III ’69 Mrs. Joyce Smith Whitaker ’48 Ms. Georgea L. White Mr. James Melton White, Jr. ’76 Mrs. Norma G. White Ms. Tracey Walker Whitehouse ’86 Mrs. Louis R. Wilkerson Mr. James A. Williams Mrs. Nellie Stallings Williams ’47 Mr. B. N. Williamson III Mr. Carlton F. Williamson ’74 Mr. Arnold W. Wilson ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Hubert L. Wilson ’43 Mr. Stephen N. Wilson ’71 Mr. and Mrs. M. Lee Winder, Sr. Mrs. Frances Neathery Winslow ’67 Winston-Salem Foundation Mrs. Jean Cook Woodruff ’58 Mr. Marvin Graham Wooten Ms. Janice M Worthington Ms. Kaye Yadusky Mr. Aaron Donald Yarbrough ’56 Rev. and Mrs. Thomas S. Yow III

Contributors

Louisburg College experienced 94% participation during our 2012-13 Faculty-Staff “Growing Green” Campaign, our highest rate of participation ever! Gifts from current faculty, staff, and faculty emeriti totaled nearly $44,000.

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COLUMNS / SPRING 2014

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin T. Adcock, Jr. ’59 Mrs. Candace Spain Adcock ’86 Ms. Angela Adkins Mr. Damon Adkins Ms. Genya V. Afanasyeva Mrs. Mavis McGowan Alder ’40 Ms. Cherri W. Allen Mr. John A. Allen ’85 Mrs. Lisa Allen Mr. Gary Edmund Allred ’87 Mrs. Missy Alls American Legion Springhill Post No. 237 Mrs. Jessica Anest Angelic Image Photography Mr. Theodore Keola Awana ’08 Mr. Fred S. Ayscue ’62 Mrs. Jackie Ayscue Mr. Roderick Bailey Mr. Rossie V. Baker, Sr. ’57 Ms. Patricia Turner Barbour ’66 Mr. and Mrs. Wayne M. Barker ’64 Mr. and Mrs. Rufus A. Bartholomew, Jr. ’71

*Deceased

Mr. Daniel Bartholomew Mr. John Basaldu Mr. Paul G. Bass ’50 Mrs. Judy B. Bateman Mrs. Grace S. Beasley Ms. Maribel C. Beckwith Rev. Shane Benjamin Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bennett ’69 Mrs. Bobbie Kennedy Berry ’58 Mr. Nathan Biegenzahn Mr. Harold Dean Blackburn, Jr. ’87 Mr. and Mrs. David C. Blake ’50 Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wilson Bohannan ’60 ’62 Mr. Randall H. Bowman ’90 Dr. Martha Bragg Ms. Patricia I. Bragg Ms. Crystal Brantley Mr. and Mrs. Larry H. Britt Mrs. Jill T. Brown Mrs. Louise M. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Matthew A. Brown ’68 Mr. Vincent Brown Ms. Nancy L. Brozewicz Mr. Temple Robins Buck ’69 Ms. Maura Budusky Mrs. Georgette Burnette Mr. Anthony A. Butler ’92 Mr. John Byrwa Ms. Colleen Camaione-Edmonston Mr. Robert E. Carroll ’02 Mr. Larry W. Carter Mr. Steve Cataneo Mrs. Louise Braswell Cates ’41 Mr. Alexander Cheek ’94 Mr. Michael Childs Mrs. Deborah C. Christie Ms. Sara Elizabeth Christmas ’13 Mr. Willie R. Clanton Mr. Herman Christopher Clark ’84 Ms. Deneen Clemons Ms. Diana M. Clemons Ms. Nannette Levay Coates ’82 Mr. and Mrs. Gerry F. Cohen Mrs. Virginia Spivey Coleman ’42 Mrs. Hazel Lassiter Collier ’45 Mrs. Emma Snell Coney ’42 Dr. Diane Cook Mr. Jawara D. Cooley ’94 Ms. Leej Copperfield Mrs. Lynda J. Costello Ms. Lynda Couey Mrs. Mae Bell Cox ’47 Mr. John M. Daniels ’79 Ms. Brandi Smith Davis Ms. Katherine Davis ’39 Mr. Reid Sexton Davis ’60 Mr. Steven B. Davis ’72 Mr. and Mrs. Larry Stewart Dean ’67 Mrs. Pamela Alford Denning ’62 Ms. Brenda C. Dillard Mr. David J. Diraimondo Mrs. Patricia Wilson Dixon ’58 Mrs. Judith Ammons Dorman ’59 Mrs. Judy W. Dulaney Ms. Terrie Dunn Ms. Mary Eason Mr. Michael D. Eaves ’76 Mr. and Mrs. Talmadge H. Edwards, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Dan R. Ellis ’70

*Deceased

Mrs. Beth Erbe Mrs. Erlene Jordan Evans ’49 Ms. Claudia Farris Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth P. Faulkner Mr. Mercer McArthur Faulkner ’66 Rev. and Mrs. Horace T. Ferguson ’60 ’60 Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Ferreira ’67 Mrs. Betty Luper Ferrell ’60 Ms. Terri L. Ferris First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. Mr. Travis Flewelling Ms. Rosa Fontana Mr. Donald M. Fox ’79 Mr. and Mrs. Russel Frazier ’54 ’55 Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph A. Frazier Mr. and Mrs. Theo Freeman Mr. Thomas W. Freuler Mr. William D. Freuler Mr. Anthony P. Frigon Mrs. Kendall Fuller Mr. Justin Furr Mrs. Pattie Joyner Gambardella ’46 Mr. and Mrs. J. David Garrabrant Mrs. Marietta Joliff Garrett ’51 Mr. and Mrs. Pierre L. Giani Rev. Alan C. Gibson ’73 GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Mrs. Betty Ellis Goodbar ’50 Mr. W. Larry Goswick Mr. and Mrs. Steven L. Graham Mrs. Joyce Parris Grant ’57 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey G. Gravitte Mr. and Mrs. James Green Ms. Ann B Greene Mr. Jeffrey A. Greentree ’73 Mr. James K. Gregory, Jr. ’62 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Grinnan, Jr. ’64 Ms. Crystal Gubbins Mrs. Brandy L. Gupton Ms. Lisa W. Hale Mr. Arthur B. Hall Mr. Brett Hall Mr. John B. Hall Mr. John L. Hancock ’63 Ms. Ella G. Hardy Ms. Betty Jean Harper ’86 Mr. Harvey Douglas Harris ’61 Mr. W. Tate Hayman ’89 Hebron Lions Club Mrs. Martha E. Hedgepeth ’93 Mrs. Elizabeth Troutman Hennings ’56 Ms. Patricia M. Hester Mr. Adam Hight Mrs. Barbara Dunn Hilliard ’59 Ms. Sheri Hincks Mr. Joe B. Hobbs ’61 Mr. Ronald P. Hodul ’78 Mr. Kris Hoffler Hoffman & Arthur, DDS, PA Mr. John C. Hogan Mrs. Jane Trump Hohn ’61 Mr. and Mrs. J. Peter Holland IV ’68 Ms. Lou Verta Holman Mrs. Elmar Newton Holmes ’58 Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Holmes Mr. Todd Landon Holt ’99 Mr. James Lawrence Howard ’61 Mr. William Howell Ms. Rebecca Howerton

Ms. Brittany Leigh Hunt ’10 Mr. and Mrs. Carroll T. Hunt Mrs. Carol J. Hunter Mr. Wally Hurst Mr. J. Ralph Ihrie ’67 Ms. Phyllis M. Ihrie Ms. Nicole M. Interdonato Mr. James A. Irion Dr. and Mrs. David J. Irvine Mr. and Mrs. J. Deane Irving ’66 Rev. Wilbur Ivan Jackson Mr. W. Patrick Jackson, Jr. ’78 Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Jamerson Ms. Erica Janak JJR Restaurant, LLC Mrs. Amy Cobb Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Phillip R. Johnson Mrs. Janie Johnson Ms. Marcia H. Johnson Mrs. Martha Sue Johnson ’61 Mr. and Mrs. James L. Johnston ’78 Mr. and Mrs. Ira Jones Ms. Kim Joyner Mr. Mark L. Joyner Mrs. Patricia Moss Kelly ’68 Mr. and Mrs. Graham C. Kennedy ’52 ’54 Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Kennedy ’53 Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Kennett Ms. Amanda Ryan Kiger Mr. and Mrs. W. McDonald King, Jr. ’77 ’77 Ms. Laura L. Kinzinger Mr. W. Gary Kirkman ’76 Ms. Diana Koenig Mr. Sangsoon Koh Mrs. Sara Davis Koontz Mr. Chester E. Kroll Mrs. Sharon Turner Landreth ’67 Mrs. Sonya I. Lane Mrs. Mary K. Lassiter Mrs. Patsy Conwell Lawrence ’59 Mr. Randall L. Ledford Mr. Willard T. Leonard Mrs. Tony Gupton LeTrent Jones ’70 Mrs. Georgia T. Lewis Mr. Robert Wilkins Lindsay ’51 Mr. Jeffrey Linney Mr. and Mrs. Glenn S. Linsky Mr. C.D. Loflin Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Long, Sr. Mrs. Sandra Featherstone Lunsford ’61 Main Beverage Co. Ms. Colby Mangum Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Mangum ’51 Manie P. Currin & Associates, LLC Ms. Emily Williams Manley ’72 Mr. Brantley Martin Ms. Karen Martin ’99 Mrs. Rosa Martinez Mr. John M. May ’69 Mr. W. Charles May ’75 Mr. John Estes McAllister III ’73 Mr. and Mrs. James L. McFarland ’61 Ms. Melinda McKee Mr. Michael Lawton McQueen ’85 Mr. and Mrs. W. Fred Mercer Mr. and Mrs. David Arthur Michael, Jr. ’69 Mrs. Martha L. Mobley Mr. James H. Moncure ’90 Mr. and Mrs. S. Howard Montague ’72

SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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HONOR ROLL Mrs. Regina Creech Morgan ’81 Mrs. Martha Butler Murray ’85 Mrs. Cindy B. Musa Mr. Cristian Neagu Mr. Paul L. Nevitt ’77 O. Henry Book Club Mr. Paul Opanasenko Mrs. Jeannene Pacheco Dr. Earl W. Parker Ms. Leigh Ann Parrish Mr. Josh Parrott Patco East, Inc. Ms. Jennifer Patsy Mrs. Kathryn Ward Paul ’51 Mr. and Mrs. Irvin A. Pearce Ms. Samantha Celeste Pendergraft ’10 Mrs. Marla R. Peoples Mrs. Kathleen Perdick Mr. Clay Perdue ’68 Mr. Mark M. Person Mr. Thomas W. Peterkin, Jr. ’66 Mr. W. Horace Petty ’46 Mrs. Patricia Parrish Pollock ’73 Mr. Robert Poole Mrs. Fonda Porter Mr. and Mrs. Marcus H. Potter ’68 Mrs. Tracy N. Potter ’13 Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Pulliam, Jr. ’63 ’63 Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Reeve ’85 ’85 Ms. Vicki Reid Mrs. Earline Whitehurst Revelle ’45 Mr. Bernard Rice Mr. and Mrs. Norman Ridout ’65 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Riley Mrs. Jessica Roberson Mrs. Betsy Brodie Roberts ’75 Mrs. Tena Williams Roberts ’93 Mr. Gary Rosenberg Mr. Brandon Rosser Mr. Lawrence F. Ruggiero Mr. Eric Rutledge Mr. and Mrs. James Rutledge Mr. John Sala Ms. Tracey Sala Mr. Brian W. Sanders Mrs. Pamela Young Schley ’76 Mr. Richard B. Schneider ’73 Ms. Diane L. Schultz ’69 Ms. Anne V. Scoggin Mr. Chad Scott Mrs. Mae Asbell Shaw ’40 Mr. Keith Shumate Mr. Alan Skinner Mr. Chase Slinkard Mr. and Mrs. Ted N. Sloan ’60 ’60 Ms. Allison H. Smith ’02 Ms. Elizabeth Bailey Smith ’69 Mrs. Susan Ray Smith ’73 Mr. and Mrs. Marvin W. Smith, Jr. ’59 Ms. Mary Charles Smith ’98 Mr. Ralph M. Smith Mrs. Stella L. Smith Mrs. Virginia Carter Smith ’51 Mr. Warren Woodlief Smith ’75 Ms. Ann M. K. Spencer Mr. and Mrs. Emerson L. Spivey ’52 Mr. Kelvin Spragley Ms. Nicolette Stanfill

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HONOR ROLL State Farm Companies Foundation Ms. Susan L. Steele ’70 Mr. Donald Stopa Mrs. Nicole Stovall Dr. and Mrs. Phillip E. Stover Mr. Robert Perry Strickland ’82 Mrs. Katheryn C. Styles Mrs. Janie Williams Sutton ’58 Mr. Andrew Swartzel Ms. Melissa Sykes Mr. and Mrs. Clarence L. Tart Mr. Gene Tharrington Mr. Allen Thomas Thomas Brothers Body Shop Mr. and Mrs. Adron Thompson Mrs. Ruby Chewning Thompson ’59 Ms. Sarah Thompson Toney Lumber Company Ms. Sally M. Torres Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Traylor Mr. Johnny Turnage Mr. Brett Vana Mr. Mark Vanderslice Mr. David A. Vaughan ’76 Mrs. Gail M. Vella Ms. Carolyn Vickery Ms. Myrna A. Vickrey Mr. Adam Wade Mr. Rickie Logan Wagstaff ’77 Rev. Lynn T. Wall Mrs. Claire Broome Waller ’50 Dr. Robert S. Walton ’64 Mr. Thomas E. Wardrick ’90 Mrs. Carol Dement Weeks ’65 Mr. Lawrence M. Werger ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Wheless ’59 ’66 Mrs. Phyllis Bailey Whitaker ’53 Mrs. Susan Wolfe Whitfield ’65 Mrs. Ann C. Whitley ’92 Mrs. Connie Womack Wicker ’70 Mr. and Mrs. Bill Wiggins Mr. Jimmy Lee Wilborn Mr. William Byrd Wilkins ’85 Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Wilkinson ’66 Ms. Carolyn Williams Mrs. Dulcie Gupton Williams ’52 Mr. Gary Williams Mr. Gregory A. Williams ’69 Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Larry Williams Mr. and Mrs. Hilbert J. Williams Mrs. Ann Cobb Williamson Mrs. Helen Mansfield Willie ’46 Dr. G. Curtis Wilson ’47* Ms. Tina Mascia Winesette ’80 Mr. Dennis Alan Winstead ’81 Mr. Leo L. Wojtkowicz Ms. Meagan Wojtkowicz Ms. Amy Scoggin Wolfe Ms. Ann Womble Mrs. Delores West Woodard ’64 Mr. Edwin Wilbur Woodhouse, Jr. ’79 Mr. Steven B. Wright ’77 Mrs. Terry Ball Wright ’87 Mrs. Yvonne Winstead Yantsios ’56 Mr. Lewis G. Young ’69 Youngsville Woman’s Club Ms. Emily Zank Ms. Catherine Ziencik

AWA JAGNE ’11

Estates Estate of Larry Brown Estate of Frances Gwin ’41 Estate of Nelson Leonard Estate of Roberta Morris Estate of Cleo Fox Titus ’36

F

Corporations, Foundations, and Matching Gifts The Nicholas B. Boddie & Lucy Mayo Boddie Foundation James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation The John and Mary Camp Foundation Chartwells Corporation Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated Coca-Cola Foundation The Community Foundation of Western NC Cooper Insurance DBA Jackson Dean Enterprises Duke Energy Foundation Element One, Inc. First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. GlaxoSmithKline Foundation The Gorman Group, LLC Sam Greco Construction, Inc. High Point Community Foundation Hodges Insurance Agency, Inc. Robert P. Holding Foundation IBM Matching Grants JJR Restaurant, LLC The Kayne Foundation KP’s Lawncare Lamm & Lamm Farms Louisburg Tractor & Truck Main Beverage Co. Mission Foods Modern Exterminating Co., Inc. NC Community Foundation North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities Northwestern Mutual Oakley Combine Sales & Salvage, LLC James S. Ogburn, CPA, PC Patco East, Inc. Pizza Hut of Clinton, Inc. Renaissance Charitable Foundation, Inc. Richards Oil Company, Inc. Rose Mini Storage Lawrence Ruggiero, Esq. Seby B. Jones Family Foundation Seller’s, Inc. State Farm Companies Foundation Stewart’s Jewelers Paul W. Stewart, Jr., DDS, PA Stupp Brothers Bridge & Iron Co. Foundation Thomas Brothers Body Shop Toney Lumber Company Triad Foundation Trips-n-Tours United Methodist Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation James & Vedna Welch Foundation Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation Winston-Salem Foundation

*Deceased

or 2011 graduate Awa Loum Jagne, the journey to Louisburg College spanned two continents. A native of Gambia and the youngest of three children, Awa spent her childhood surrounded by “the warm smiles of my people, beautiful sunsets, and delectable food.” Her homeland, she says, can be described in one word: “Bliss.” She credits her parents (Dad is currently working on a malaria project for the United Nations Development Program, and Mom is a bank clerk) for instilling a sense of adventure in her and her older brothers. “I learned at an early age to not limit myself,” she explains. “That is why I love traveling.” “Change is a vital part of life and I’m acquainted with it because I’ve been migrating since the mere age of eleven,” says Awa. “This endurance has resulted in my quick nature to adapt to new environments. I attended three different high schools in three different countries, absorbing the distinctive cultures and acknowledging the significant languages and customs each presented,” she says of her diverse educational experiences. After living in Malawi for three years, Awa returned to Gambia where she graduated from high school at the age of 15. Feeling too young for college, she accepted an invitation from her Aunt Sukai to attend high school in the United States. Awa completed a year at Enloe in Raleigh, a magnet high school for the arts. While researching college options, Awa was drawn to Louisburg because of its size. “I wanted be the big fish in the small pond before proceeding to a four-year institution,” she recalls. As a freshman in the fall of 2009, she was a bit overwhelmed at first, but quickly became accustomed to campus life. “Louisburg College is indeed a small, private institution,” she says, “and it has a collective way of nurturing students academically, spiritually, and socially.” Awa’s two years at Louisburg would prove to be packed with a variety of rewarding experiences. She served as a senator for the Student Government Association, president of Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) honor society, historian and vice president of Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) business fraternity, a member of Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD), an orientation leader, a freshman marshal for commencement, and a PTK after-hours tutor. “These activities helped me improve my deftness and reach my personal goals,

*Deceased

particularly in organization, well-established leadership, and time management.” As a Muslim on a Christian-affiliated campus, Awa faced minor challenges from those who did not understand her religion, but she was warmly accepted by her classmates. “Throughout the years, the media have portrayed Islam as one of the worst religions in the world, mainly due to poignant situations such as 9/11. Ultimately, in the Islamic Holy Scripture, God states that we must all love one another, and I live for this statement,” she explains. “I grew up in an environment filled with a handful of friends from various religions and I personally did not care what faith they believed in because, at the end of the day, they were humans just like me.” Although she wasn’t a fan of the campus curfew, Awa is quick to share the aspects of life she enjoyed most while at Louisburg. “Sometimes I get nostalgic and think about my days at LC,” she says. “I mostly reminisce about the swings that were outside of Merritt Hall, the friends that I built bonds with, how close classes were to the dorms, the one-on-one interactions with teachers, the organizations I was affiliated with, and the soccer matches.” At the 2011 PBL State Competition, she earned 5th place in the Marketing Concepts category, and she also placed in the Business Presentation, International Business, and Business Communication categories. With a spot on the Dean’s List each of her four semesters, Awa earned her Associate of Science in Business from Louisburg, graduating with honors. She cites a long list of faculty and staff who helped shape her along her journey— both as a student and a future leader. “My professors taught me the vitality of leadership and courage, and to network for the future. Staff members inspired me through their altruistic ways to be kind to all,” Awa reflects. Assistant Professor of Business Brain Sanders “has a very amusing sense of humor” explains Awa, “and inspired me to always work hard, but to also take a step back and enjoy life.” Through art courses, Professor of Art Will Hinton inspired Awa “to think outside of the box.” In 2011, she was accepted to the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she earned a Bachelor of Science in Global Studies with a concentration in African development, international politics, and social movements, as well as a minor in African studies. “I will forever

be honored to be a Tar Heel!” she says. Awa is now serving as an intern with Femmes Africa Solidarité (FAS) in Senegal, an NGO created by African women leaders to publicize and promote the role of African women as instrumental to successful repatriation and resettlement, rehabilitation, reintegration, and postconflict reconstruction. “In the FAS vision, each and every African woman can play a role in conflict prevention and resolution, contributing to peace in Africa while improving her own life at the same time,” she explains of the organization’s mission. “There is a deep barrier between the views of what a traditional woman should be and what a modern African woman should be. Personally, I believe that my greatest challenge as an African woman living here is that sometimes I’m perceived as inferior. But I do not let my womanhood define me, and I am determined to elevate women’s roles in the world to prove that men and women should be equal.” With clearly defined goals for her internship and beyond, Awa wants to amplify equality. “This is what I believe in. Without it, all is lost. I am not trying to ‘save’ Africa because that is merely a delusion,” she continues, “especially since Africa is not broken. I am just aspiring to augment women’s participation and roles in the peace and security process in African countries.” She also hopes to play a role in eradicating detrimental diseases that affect African women, including fistula, HIV, and malaria, and Awa plans to help women who have been caught in conflict zones. “I want to use the knowledge I’ve gained from my current internship to help women that are affected by sexual violence, especially in places where it’s used as a tool of war. Women are the core of society; without us, humanity would cease to exist.” In the next few years, she plans to add a master’s degree to her list of credentials, either in African development or equality and human rights. “I eventually want to establish an NGO that improves education for kids in the Senegal/Gambia region.” She also hopes to travel throughout Africa, South America, and Europe to “explore this beautiful world.” - Amy Scoggin Wolfe SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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HONOR ROLL

HONOR ROLL Donors to Endowed Funds

Mercer Scholarship Rev. Charles Henry Mercer, Sr. ’38

Alumni Appreciation Scholarship Estate of Roberta B. Morris

DEBRA PEGRAM ’87

A

t an early age, Debra Pegram knew exactly where she wanted life to take her: she had set her sights on becoming a coach.

Debra grew up in the tiny Eastern North Carolina town of Fountain and attended high school in Farmville, NC. A softball and basketball player, she attended a basketball camp at Louisburg College and knew that it would be a great fit for her. After high school, she went on to play both sports at Louisburg and was presented with a coach’s award her sophomore year. She remembers how Enid Drake (Louisburg’s Head Men’s Basketball Coach from 1965-2006) ran his practices, and how he was a stickler for the fundamentals of the game. Both Sheilah Cotten (then Louisburg’s Head Women’s Basketball Coach) and Sam White (director of intramural sports) had a profound influence on Debra. Playing basketball under Sheilah and watching Sam in intramurals were eye-opening experiences for her, and she feels blessed to have had them as role models. As a coach, Debra now realizes “how much thought and time Cotten put into her players to make them successful.” After graduating from Louisburg College in 1987, Debra attended North Carolina Wesleyan College in Rocky Mount, earning a degree in physical education. She immediately began to apply for teaching and coaching positions. She received an offer shortly thereafter, and Debra has become a fixture at Beddingfield High School in Wilson, NC, having taught and coached there for the last 23 years—first coaching volleyball and then women’s basketball. When asked what advice she would give to those who wish to coach, Debra evokes wisdom that those in any field would do well to heed: “Try to find yourself a mentor you can trust, surround yourself with good people, and don’t be afraid to ask questions.” Debra’s career has been a rewarding journey, as evidenced by her successes. In 1996, the Beddingfield volleyball team placed as runner-up in the state finals. In 2006, the women’s basketball team took home the state championship; that same year Debra was honored by the Associated Press as the High School Women’s Basketball Coach of the Year for North Carolina. In 2011, she was tapped for the North Carolina Coaches Association East-West All-Star Game in women’s basketball, and she led her team to victory. Reflecting on her career choice, Debra expresses the sentiment shared by many teachers and coaches the world over: “It is so rewarding and exciting to watch kids grow and have the fruits of your labor pay off.” - Barry Burger

Herbert and Elsie Miller Scholarship Dr. D. Edmond Miller

Dr. Thomas Aurand Scholarship Dr. and Mrs. Leonard W. Aurand

William Moon and Jane Moon Linsky Scholarship Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Linsky Ms. Jan L. Linsky Mrs. Jane Moon Linsky ’43 Mr. William David Moon ’45 State Farm Companies Foundation

Marvin and Mary Jo Baugh Scholarship Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Baugh ’53 James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation Endowment NC Community Foundation John L. Cameron Athletic Scholarship Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Pearce Mrs. Beulah Cameron

Gary Ward Paul Scholarship Mrs. Kathryn Ward Paul ’51 Stallings and Thomas Endowment Renaissance Charitable Foundation, Inc.

Peter A. Carlton Memorial Scholarship Dr. Patrick W. Carlton ’57

Blair Tucker Scholarship Mr. and Mrs. H. John Hatcher, Jr.

Coltrane-Robertson-Coleman Scholarship Ms. Sue C. Robertson

John B. York Athletic Scholarship Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Clifton York ’73

Coor Family Scholarship Mrs. Katheryn Coor Lewis Allen de Hart Endowment Mr. Emmett Chapman Snead III ’71

Hurricane Club Coca-Cola Foundation Dr. and Mrs. James C. Eck Evansdale United Methodist Church Mr. Morgan Scott Foster Hodges Insurance Agency, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Holloman ’83 ’90 Mr. Charles R. Knight ’87 Dr. and Mrs. Mark D. La Branche Mr. and Mrs. John H. Lewis ’69 ’69 Orthopaedic Specialists of NC Richards Oil Co., Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roberson ’62 Mr. and Mrs. William E. Rodenbeck Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Taylor ’68 Mr. and Mrs. William C. Shelton ’69 Mr. and Mrs. Neal D. Stewart ’75 ’82 Ms. Janice M. Worthington

Coach J. Enid Drake Basketball Scholarship Mrs. Rebecca Drake Allen ’83 Mrs. Paula Drake Smith ’74 Sarah Foster Music Endowment Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Baugh ’53 Mr. Robert E. Beck ’53 Mrs. Bobbie Kennedy Berry ’58 Mr. Richard Luby Cannon, Jr. ’52 Mr. Francis Fayette Falls ’62 Mrs. Betty Luper Ferrell ’60 Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wayne Fish ’60 ’59 Dr. and Mrs. Jimmy W. Foster ’60 ’59 Mrs. Rubie Riggan Hecht ’52 Mr. James Lawrence Howard ’61 Mr. John William Hurley ’53 Mr. Horace Jernigan ’47 Mrs. Sandra Featherston Lunsford ’61 Mrs. Faye Clayton McFarland ’61 Mr. William David Moon ’45 Mr. and Mrs. Walt M. Pulliam, Jr. ’63 ’63 Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roberson ’62 Mr. and Mrs. Roger G. Taylor ’68 Mr. Garland Franklin Swartz ’63 Mrs. Claire Broome Waller ’50 Mrs. Phyllis Bailey Whitaker ’53 Mrs. Peggy Lee Wilder ’60 Mr. Paul Lewis Wilson ’61

Churches Evansdale United Methodist Church First United Methodist Church of Cary Louisburg Baptist Church Louisburg United Methodist Church The North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church Trinity United Methodist Church

Friends of the Arts

Pearl Harris Gomo Scholarship Mr. Kelman Gomo

Mr. L. C. Adcock Mr. and Mrs. Wayne D. Benton Mrs. Lillian A. Benton Ms. Delano R. Borys Mr. Bob Butler Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Champion Mr. J. Jackson Dean Mr. Allen de Hart Mr. David J. Diraimondo Mr. and Mrs. William Dove Dr. and Mrs. James C. Eck

Frances Gwin Scholarship Estate of Frances Gwin ’41 R. Edward and Louise Hunter Scholarship Mr. Frank Hunter Mr. Richard E. Hunter, Jr. ’68 Blanche Hooper and Earl R. Meekins Scholarship Mrs. Mary M. Beauchamp

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COLUMNS / SPRING 2014

*Deceased

*Deceased

Mr. and Mrs. Talmadge H. Edwards, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J. Craig Eller ’65 Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth P. Faulkner First Citizens Bank & Trust Co. Dr. Diane Price Fleming Future Financial Services, LLC Mr. and Mrs. David Gardner Ms. Ann B Greene Mr. Arthur B. Hall IBM Matching Grants Dr. and Mrs. Mark D. La Branche Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Long, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Lumpkin, II Dr. and Mrs. Paul W. Stewart, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Marcus H. Potter ’68 Mr. and Mrs. John A. Rogers Mrs. Martha Cly Shaffner ’65 Mr. Joseph W. Shearon ’51 Mr. Alan Skinner Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Julian J. Smith Mr. Warren Woodlief Smith ’75 Mrs. Anna Stallings Mr. and Mrs. E. Howard Stallings Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Stone Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Larry Williams Youngsville Woman’s Club

Golden Anniversary Club Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin T. Adcock, Jr. ’59 Mrs. Mavis McGowan Alder ’40 Mr. Robert W. Alston, Jr. ’60 Mr. Fred S. Ayscue ’62 Mr. and Mrs. Billy A. Baker, Sr. ’55 Mr. and Mrs. William H. Baker, Jr. ’52 Mr. Rossie V. Baker, Sr. ’57 Mr. Felix G. Banks ’43 Mr. Paul G. Bass ’50 Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Baugh ’53 Mr. Robert E. Beck ’53 Mrs. Bobbie Kennedy Berry ’58 Mr. and Mrs. David C. Blake ’50 Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wilson Bohannan ’60 ’62 Mr. Major H. Bowes ’58 Mrs. Dorothy Midgett Brannan ’48 Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Brown ’62 Mrs. Velma Ferrell Brown ’60 Dr. and Mrs. C. Douglas Bryant, Sr. ’47 Mr. and Mrs. George P. Bunn ’54 Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Burns ’55 Mr. H. Dwight Byrd ’57 Mr. Robert C. Byrd ’62 Mr. Richard L. Cannon, Jr. ’52 Mr. and Mrs. G. Maurice Capps ’57 Dr. Patrick W. Carlton ’57 Mrs. Louise Braswell Cates ’41 Mrs. Virginia Spivey Coleman ’42 Mrs. Hazel Lassiter Collier ’45 Mrs. Emma Snell Coney ’42 Mrs. Virginia Brittain Copping ’50 Mrs. Carolyn V. Cotton ’57 Mr. and Mrs. James B. Cottrell ’61 ’62 Mrs. Louise Mason Cowart ’42 Mrs. Mae Bell Cox ’47 Mr. W. Dempsey Craig ’62 Mr. Tucker D. Daniel ’60 Ms. Katherine Davis ’39 Mr. Reid Sexton Davis ’60 Mrs. Pamela Alford Denning ’62

Mrs. Frances Boyette Dickson ’35* Mrs. Patricia Wilson Dixon ’58 Mrs. Ann Dunham Donnell ’45 Mrs. Judith Ammons Dorman ’59 Mr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Driver ’53 ’52 Mr. Thomas Hunter Dula ’61 Mr. Sam H. Elliott ’52 Mr. Marion Frank Erwin ’58 Mrs. Erlene Jordan Evans ’49 Mr. Frances F. Falls ’62 Mr. James M. Featherston, Jr. ’42 Rev. and Mrs. Horace T. Ferguson ’60 ’60 Mrs. Betty Luper Ferrell ’60 Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. Fish ’60 ’59 Dr. and Mrs. Jimmy W. Foster ’60 ’59 Mr. William P. Franklin ’52 Mr. and Mrs. Russel Frazier ’54 ’55 Mrs. Elaine Weldon Fuller ’39 Mrs. Pattie Joyner Gambardella ’46 Mrs. Marietta Joliff Garrett ’51 Mr. and Mrs. Ernest P. Gaster, Jr. ’50 ’50 Mrs. Betty Ellis Goodbar ’50 Mr. Willis A. Goodrum ’52 Mrs. Joyce Parris Grant ’57 Mr. James K. Gregory, Jr. ’62 Mr. Graham Paraham Grissom ’36 Mr. Willis F. Gupton ’42 Mr. and Mrs. Swayn G. Hamlet ’57 ’56 Mr. Harvey Douglas Harris ’61 Mr. L. Reid Harris ’45 Mr. R. Ray Harris ’57 Mr. William D. Harrison ’47 Mrs. Rubie Riggan Hecht ’52 Mrs. Elizabeth Troutman Hennings ’56 Mrs. Barbara Dunn Hilliard ’59 Mrs. Ruby Massenburg Hinson ’42 Mr. Joe B. Hobbs ’61 Rev. and Mrs. Hubert H. Hodgin ’54 ’54 Mrs. Jane Trump Hohn ’61 Mrs. Elmar Newton Holmes ’58 Mr. and Mrs. W. Seymour Holt ’49 Mr. and Mrs. Lennon Hooper ’50 Mr. James Lawrence Howard ’61 Mrs. Mary Wheless Hughes ’52 Mr. J. William Hurley ’53 Mr. Donald Clarence Jaekel ’52 Mr. and Mrs. Horace Jernigan ’47 Mr. and Mrs. Phillip R. Johnson ’52 Rev. Jesse L. Johnson, Jr. ’41 Ms. Martha Sue Johnson ’61 Mr. and Mrs. Tapley O. Johnson, Jr. ’60 Dr. Raymond E. Joyner ’62 Mr. and Mrs. Graham C. Kennedy ’52 ’54 Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Kennedy ’53 Mr. and Mrs. J. Harry Lange, Jr. ’61 Mrs. Patsy Conwell Lawrence ’59 Mr. Robert Wilkins Lindsay ’51 Mrs. Jane Moon Linsky ’43 Mr. W. J. Little, Jr. ’49 Mrs. Sandra Featherstone Lunsford ’61 Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Mangum ’51 Mrs. Manie Parham Currin ’57 Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Marks ’56 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Marshall ’56 Mr. Daniel L. Massey ’62 Mrs. Mildred Boney Matthis ’46 Mr. Wilton L. Matthis ’56 Mr. and Mrs. James L. McFarland ’61 Rev. Dr. Charles Henry Mercer, Sr. ’38 Mr. Billy R. Merritt ’53 Ms. Rachael A. Modlin ’50 SPRING 2014 / COLUMNS

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HONOR ROLL Mr. and Mrs. William D. Moon ’45 Mrs. Gwynn Torrence Morris ’58 Mrs. Anne Tucker Mulchi ’53 Mr. Joseph Lester Niquette ’51 Mrs. Pearl Grant Nunnamaker ’52 Mrs. Kathryn Ward Paul ’51 Mr. Clarence W. Pearce, Jr. ’54 Mr. W. Horace Petty ’46 Mr. and Mrs. Elbert H. Phelps ’52 Mrs. Earline Whitehurst Revelle ’45 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Riggan, Sr. ’59 Mrs. Strowd Ward Riggsbee ’45 Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roberson ’62 Mrs. Nancy Garner Robertson ’59 Mr. and Mrs. Willie B. Robertson ’48 Mrs. Margaret Adcock Robinson ’58 Mrs. Dori Liles Rockefeller ’61 Mr. Edward Rhone Sasser ’57 Mrs. Ann Rhem Schwarzmann ’54 Mr. Gary Josh Scull ’54 Mrs. Mae Asbell Shaw ’40 Mr. Joseph W. Shearon ’51 Mr. and Mrs. Ted N. Sloan ’60 ’60 Mr. and Mrs. Marvin W. Smith, Jr. ’59 Mrs. Virginia Carter Smith ’51 Mr. and Mrs. Grady K. Snyder ’50 ’50 Mr. and Mrs. Emerson L. Spivey ’52 Mr. Richard N. Stabell ’59 Mr. Dudley B. Stallings ’46 Mrs. Marcelle K. Stanley ’45 Mr. and Mrs. Glendel U. Stephenson ’52 Mr. and Mrs. M. Graham Stewart, Sr. ’49 Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Stone ’47 Dr. Raymond A. Stone ’47 Mrs. Janie Williams Sutton ’58 Mr. and Mrs. James G. Tarrant, Jr. ’61 ’62 Mr. and Mrs. Larry E. Tetterton ’56 ’56 Mrs. Ruby Chewning Thompson ’59 Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Timberlake ’64 ’59 Mrs. Edith Boone Toussaint ’49 Mrs. Sara Hux Townsend ’43 Mrs. Delores Cole Tune ’62 Mr. William Troy Turlington ’59 Mr. and Mrs. William Wall ’47 Mrs. Claire Broome Waller ’50 Mrs. Jane Rosser Warfel ’41 Mr. Robert L. Wells ’60 Ms. Mary Ellen West ’41 Mr. Robert L. West ’60 Mrs. Phyllis Bailey Whitaker ’53 Mrs. Joyce Smith Whitaker ’48 Mrs. Peggy Lee Wilder ’60 Mrs. Dulcie Gupton Williams ’52 Mrs. Nellie Stallings Williams ’47 Mr. Wilton H. Williams ’49 Mrs. Helen Mansfield Willie ’46 Dr. G. Curtis Wilson ’47 Mr. and Mrs. Hubert L. Wilson ’43 Mr. Paul L. Wilson ’61 Mr. and Mrs. James Floyd Womble ’55 Mr. and Mrs. Ray H. Womble, Sr. ’48 Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W. Woodhouse, Sr. ’56 Mrs. Jean Cook Woodruff ’58 Mr. and Mrs. James T. Wooters ’42 Mrs. Yvonne Winstead Yantsios ’56 Mr. Aaron Donald Yarbrough ’56

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Myrtle King

Memorial Gifts Were Made in Honor of the Following Alumni and Friends

A Lifetime of Campus Connections By Barry Burger

Mrs. Jamima Williams Barefoot ’27 Mr. B. C. Bean Mrs. Christine Fletcher Bowker Mrs. Nellie Loftis Bryan Mr. William P. Burke Mr. Robert E. Carter Mrs. Mary Lib Loftis Cobb Mr. David Cothran ’64 Mrs. Virginia L. Dement ’43 Mr. Melvin Douglas Edwards ’53 Mr. Appleton Fryer Mrs. Emily T. Gardner ’46 Mrs. Fannie Gaffres Gergoudis Mr. Lewis Gergoudis Mr. M. Meade Gregory Mr. Gordon E. Hawthorne ’64 Mr. Ray Hodges Mrs. Barbara Lane Jowaisas Mrs. Ola Kenan Mr. Charles B. Loftis Mr. T. M. Marsh, Jr. Mrs. Julia Gray Saunders Michaux Mr. Douglas Morris ’58 Mrs. Bessie Norwood Mr. Duffy Paul Mr. Gary Ward Paul Mrs. Madaline K. Person Mrs. Linda Morgan Phillips ’38 Mrs. Katherine Rueger Poynter Mrs. Gwendolyn DeBerry Railey Mrs. Muriel Whitehurst Spain ’43 Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Midyette Thompson ’44 Mr. Harvey Tippett ’53 Rev. Ivey J. Wall, Jr. Mr. Ralph Wall ’85 Mr. J. C. Whitehurst Mr. Stokes Williams

A

child of the Great Depression, Myrtle King eventually moved from her childhood home of Selma, North Carolina, to live with her older sister, Ms. Breattie O’Neal, in Louisburg. After graduating from Mills High School and attending business school in Washington, DC, the now 94-year-old Myrtle continued her journey in Atlanta, Georgia, where she served with the South Atlantic Division of the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers during World War II. She is especially proud of her efforts to help launch a liberty ship that sailed out of Panama City, Florida. Upon returning home in 1948, Myrtle married Louisburg native John King; she still lives in the same house where her husband was born and lived his entire life. Myrtle may not have guessed she was beginning a long career at Louisburg College when her service as a fundraising volunteer led to a

“three-month temporary job” in 1962. She became a fixture on campus, however, working for the College for the next 25 years in numerous roles: post office manager, student center coordinator, book store manager, and director of housing for female students. Recollections of this last job brought about a chuckle as she recalled the story of a cat fight breaking out between two roommates she had placed together. “As fate would have it, when they unpacked their personal belongings and set out the pictures of their boyfriends…they realized they had the same boyfriend!” She remembers thoroughly enjoying her many opportunities to work with students, and Myrtle is proud of the fact that she was a good listener for them. When asked about advice for today’s students, Myrtle’s response is timeless: “If you really want a place in society and to feel good about yourself, you need to complete your education.”

King at her desk in 1968.

Since retiring in 1987, she has remained connected to Louisburg College while staying active maintaining her home, spending time with family and friends, and participating in activities with United Daughters of the Confederacy. At the age of 80, she published a book, Anna Long Thomas Fuller’s Journal: A Civil War Diary. God is a very important part of Myrtle’s life, as is her family, she notes. She is proud of her three children, seven grandchildren, and ten great-grandchildren; all three of her children are graduates of Louisburg College.

This portrait of Dr. John King hangs in the foyer of King’s home. The Methodist minister was a founding trustee of the Franklin Male Academy, which later became known as Louisburg College.

Honorary Gifts Were Made in Recognition of the Following Individuals Mr. Earl Beshears Mr. Clyde Brooks Mr. Bob Butler Mr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Cooper Mr. William R. Crews ’12 Mrs. Alicia Eller ’65 Mr. J. Craig Eller Ms. Sarah Foster Mr. Troy Matthew Hagan ’06 Mr. Michael L. Holloman ’83 Rev. Wilbur Jackson Mr. Don L. Jenkins Ms. Carmen Johnston ’01 Rev. Wallace Kirby Mr. Jamey Winn Koenig ’09 Mrs. Jane Moon Linsky ’43 Mr. C. S. Loftis, Jr. Rev. Thomas E. Loftis Mr. and Mrs. David Marlette Mr. and Mrs. William Moon ’45 Mr. Charles M. Rucker ’72 Mrs. Ann Whitehurst

King in front of her home on Main Street, with her granddaughter Rosalyn Powell, Powell’s husband Jason, and King’s great-grandson Dillon Powell ’13.

*Deceased

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ATHLETICS

was another strong year on the fields and courts for Louisburg College athletics, with six of our nine varsity teams showing up in the national rankings over the course of their seasons. Some highlights of these rankings include our women’s basketball team being ranked #1 the first week of the national polls and our men’s basketball team placing as high as 2nd in the country.

2013

Our baseball team experienced another fine season, finishing regular-season play tied for first place in Region X. The women’s soccer team followed up their 2012 national tournament run by advancing to the Region X tournament finals, and our men’s soccer team also had a successful year, winning the Region X Championship. The women’s basketball team lived up to their pre-season status with another Region X championship; they went on to finish in the final 16 at the NJCAA National Championship.

ATHLETICS

LC Welcomes New Cross Country Coach for Program Reboot

Eight of our nine teams finished the season with winning records, and every team saw players matriculate to four-year colleges to continue their academic and athletic careers. In fact, we had 110 student athletes transfer to four-year college programs during the past year.

During the Fall 2013 semester, Louisburg College Athletic Director Mike Holloman made the announcement that the College would add Men’s and Women’s Cross Country to the mix, upping the school’s athletic programs to 11 teams. Shortly after the announcement, Jay Koloseus was hired as head coach.

Our student athletes continue to excel academically. 60 out of the College’s 113 graduates in 2013 were student athletes, and 20 of them graduated with honors. During the spring and fall of 2013, 18 Hurricane athletes earned perfect 4.0 GPAs, 40 were on the Dean’s List, and 56 made the College’s Honors List. Athletics continue to be a vital part of the Louisburg College campus, and our teams continue to make us proud both athletically and academically.

As an NCAA Division I competitor (Syracuse University) and coach (Auburn University), Koloseus brings a wealth of experience to a program that is being renewed from its early 2000s roots. Recruiting began immediately upon Koloseus’ arrival, and both teams will commence competition in the fall of 2014.

- Mike Holloman ’83, Athletics Director

Season Summaries by Don Stopa, Softball Coach & Sports Information Director

Baseball Thrives With New Coach The Hurricanes baseball team had a change in the guard last season, as NCAA veteran coach Keith Shumate took over the reins of one of the College’s oldest programs. Shumate stepped up to the job, leading his team to a 2013 final record of 34-15, 17-9 in Region X play. Sophomore outfielder Bradley Morton (Winston-Salem, NC) led the offensive effort for the Canes as he hit a whopping .420, smacked seven homeruns, and drove in 39 RBIs; all of Morton’s numbers were team-leading marks. John Allen (Creedmoor, NC) was the leader on the hill as he finished with a record of 8-1, and he led the team in innings pitched at 53.1. Shumate also had a pair of twins on the bump as Joe and John McGillicuddy (Fairfax, VA) combined for a record of 8-4, with each throwing a pair of complete games.

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Softball Streak Leads to Regionals Don Stopa entered his second season at the helm of the Lady Canes softball team, with his squad finishing out the Spring 2013 season with a record of 23-20. The Canes finished the season on a nine-game winning streak, but they couldn’t maintain their momentum going into the Region X tournament , during which they lost two games straight. Morgan Tharrington (Youngsville, NC) was the offensive leader for Louisburg as she belted 17 homeruns, a top-10 ranking in the NJCAA. The sophomore infielder also picked up a National Fastpitch Coaches Association (NFCA) All-America nod for her efforts. Trina Bartlett (Greensboro, NC) didn’t quite put up the power numbers of Tharrington, but did lead the team with a .424 batting average and 16 stolen bases.

Golfer Finishes in Top 20 at Nationals Charles Sloan and his men’s golf team played their usual competitive schedule, taking on two- and four-year programs in tournaments throughout Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Zach Robins (Southern Shores, NC) was the standout for the Hurricanes as the team leader in most of the spring events, and he was rewarded by qualifying for the NJCAA National Championship in Chautauqua, New York. Robins finished 18th overall, bettering his scores in each of the tournament’s three rounds of play.

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ATHLETICS

ATHLETICS

Coach Mangum Continues to Build Up Volleyball Program

Football Standouts Lead the Way The Hurricanes football team got off to a great start as they opened up the 2013 season with a five-game win streak, highlighted by wins over Lackawanna College and Dean College. The team stumbled through the remainder of the season, finishing with a final record of 5-4.

Second-year Head Volleyball Coach Colby Mangum assembled a very talented squad for 2013 as she started rebuilding a program that she could call her own. Mangum had a pair of returning sophomores that played a great deal in 2012 with Ashley Britton (Henrico, NC) and Kaitlyn Sitterson (Williamston, NC), and they led the way on the floor in the 9-9 regular season (10-11 overall).

Head Coach John Sala’s crew was led by sophomore running back Chris Brown (LaGrange, NC), who averaged over 60 yards of rushing per game, and sophomore wide receiver John Wheatley (New Bern, NC), who made 26 receptions, six of which went for touchdowns.

Freshman setter Ellen Tootoo (Wilmington, NC) was a big part of the Lady Canes’ success as she earned an All-Conference nod for her efforts; she is expected to lead a 2014 team that will have a good sophomore/freshmen mix.

The LC defensive unit was an exciting group, making big play after big play. Linebacker Stephen Williams (Reidsville, NC) was a tackling machine, getting in on 75 total tackles, 13 for loss; he also picked off one pass that he returned 65 yards for a score. Kenny Watt (Seneca, SC) and Darshaun Ford (Clermont, FL) were standout defensive backs, as they each picked off four passes through their nine games played.

Men’s Soccer Reaches NJCAA District Championship Men’s soccer had a very successful 2012 under first-year Head Coach Cristian Neagu, and the team was poised to make another run at their first national title in 2013. They finished the regular season with a misleading record of 9-6-1, with six earned wins being forfeited as losses due to an ineligible player rule. The Hurricanes battled back to a near-flawless effort, including three straight wins in the Region X Tournament, during which they outscored their opponents, 23-1. After earning their second-straight Region X tournament title, the Canes traveled to Melbourne, Florida, where they dropped the District Championship, 1-0. It was the only game of the year in which sophomore goalkeeper Brian Howard (Roanoke Rapids, NC) earned a loss. Still, the team’s offense was one of the nation’s best as they finished with 99 total goals, 2nd among all NJCAA teams. Adrian Gonzales (Fuquay-Varina, NC) led the scoring effort as he knocked home 21 total goals.

Women’s Soccer Players Are Cream of the NJCAA Crop Head Women’s Soccer Coach Andy Stokes knew he would have some offensive punch in 2013 as he had the top goal-scorer in the country, Jessica Scales (Roanoke Rapids, NC), returning for her sophomore campaign. Little did the fifth-year head coach know that he would gain even more of an offensive advantage with freshman forward Sam Rowland (London, England) leading the NJCAA in goals and points for most of the year. At the end of the 2013 campaign, Rowland finished 2nd in goals and points, while Scales finished 4th in goals, 8th in overall points. The Lady Canes finished the year with an overall record of 15-4-1, and a co-regular season title with a Region X mark of 11-1. Stokes’ squad made it to the Region X Tournament championship game where they were knocked off 2-0, thwarting their bid for a return to the NJCAA Championship Tournament.

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Men’s Basketball Wraps Season Full of Wins The Hurricanes men’s basketball team had another great year, wrapping up their 2013-14 season with a record of 28-5, 16-2 in Region X play. The team also earned a Region X regular season title, but fell by one point during overtime in the postseason regional championship game. Big man in the middle Marcus Freeman (Williamston, NC) was a force in the paint all year, as the sophomore center averaged a double-double with over 12 points per game and hauled in ten boards per game. Trey Brown (Newport News, VA) also hit for double-digits with just over 11, while Miles Bowman (WinstonSalem, NC) was going for over 20 per game before an injury ended his season after 12 games played.

Lady Canes Basketball Returns to Nationals The Lady Canes basketball team returned to the NJCAA Championship Tournament this spring after winning it all in 2013. However, the sixth-seeded Canes fell in the opening round to New York’s Monroe College, finishing in the final 16. With a final season record of 24-7, first-year Head Coach Shay Hayes (who was voted “Coach of the Year” by her Region X peers) had to be pleased with her team’s effort. Guards Courtney Raiford (Greenwood, SC) and Kiara Rawls (Killeen, TX) were the leaders on the stat sheet; Raiford averaged 14 points per game, six rebounds, and five assists, while Rawls averaged just over 14 points per game and four boards.

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Photo Credits, Back Cover

Join the Conversation!

East Carolina University Cliff Hollis Elon University Melinda McKee (Louisburg College) High Point University Chad Christian North Carolina State University Becky Kirkland Old Dominion University Chuck Thomas

Below: Freshmen Alex Ennis (left) and Dominique Sewell (right)

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This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. For more information, please visit www.louisburg.edu/about/equal.html.

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Office of Institutional Advancement 501 N. Main Street Louisburg, NC 27549 Toll Free: 1 (800) 488-5071 Local: (919) 496-2521 www.louisburg.edu Change Service Requested

WHERE ARE OUR GRADS GOING?

92% of Louisburg College graduates continue their education at four-year schools. Ashley Walls ’13 East Carolina University Major: Nursing Career Goal: Pediatric Nurse

John McGillicuddy ’13 High Point University Major: Business Administration (Global Commerce Minor) Career Goal: Congressman or Government Consultant

LaQuel Bailey ’12 Old Dominion University Major: Art Education Career Goal: Teacher

Nichole Casto ’13 (L) North Carolina State University Major: Animal Science Career Goal: Veterinarian Emily Nicholson ’13 (R) North Carolina State University Major: Communications Public Relations Career Goal: Public Relations Practitioner

Caroline Knight ’14 Elon University Intended Major: Human Service Studies Career Goal: Social Worker Eduardo Alvarez ’14 Elon University Intended Major: International Business Career Goal: Professional Soccer Player or Global Business Owner


Columns - Spring 2014