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LONG TRAIL SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDIES 2017-2018


Dear LTS Community, Long Trail School proudly attracts students from all over southwestern Vermont and eastern New York to participate in our unique programs. As the first International Baccalaureate (IB) school in Vermont, Long Trail allows students to develop a solid sense of self, while also developing critical thinking and communication skills. We encourage students to explore who they are personally as well as how they fit into the community and the world. Long Trail students have a long, proud history of educational accomplishments academically, artistically and athletically. Our students’ success in college placement is a result of their great academic preparation and hard work, combined with a highly personalized and supportive college counseling program. This document, our 2017-2018 Course of Studies, demonstrates our commitment to providing students with a wide range of choice in which to develop their skills and talents. With over ninety courses, three languages offered at ten different levels, and a strong athletic and extracurricular program, Long Trail is pleased to serve our students. I encourage you to read through our Course of Studies to outline your academic experiences here at Long Trail School. We are happy to sit down with you to design a personalized plan to meet your needs which will help in preparing you for future success! Sincerely,

Steven Dear Head of School

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Core Values

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Honor Code

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How to Use The Course of Studies 4 LTS Programs

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College Guidance

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LTS Grading System

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Graduation Requirements

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Arts Courses

9-15

English Courses

16-19

ESOL Courses

20

Mathematics Courses

21-24

Science Courses

25-28

Social Studies/History Courses

29-31

World Language Courses

32-33

Technology/Media Courses

34

International Baccalaureate

35-36

Support Services

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CORE VALUES We believe: • Learning how to think is more important than being told what to think. • Curiosity and conversation motivate. • Children deserve a safe, welcoming and supportive school where everybody is known and valued. •

Diversity improves the educational experience.

A dynamic classroom responds to the individuality of each child.

A balance of challenge and support moves learners to greater understanding and skill.

“We are honor bound to display the utmost respect for ourselves, each other, and our resources in a manner that fosters in us a desire and capacity for exceptional growth and learning. We will not lie, cheat, or steal in any form nor will we endure the faltering of those who do. We will strive to improve the Long Trail School environment by continually building upon our personal integrity and encouraging it in others, thus promoting a more distinguished and harmonious community.”

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Teaching and learning work best in small groups.

Education is a shared responsibility. . .

. . .and it works.

THE HONOR CODE The Honor Code is central to the student experience at Long Trail School. Students sign the code each year. Lying, cheating, and plagiarism are all violations of the Honor Code and will result in an Honor Board hearing and disciplinary measures with academic consequences.


HOW TO USE THE COURSE OF STUDIES Review the graduation requirements that are printed in this booklet. There are certain required courses, as well as a required overall credit total that must be earned. A specified number of credits are required from the course clusters. It will be necessary to plan ahead so that you will have satisfied all graduation requirements by the end of your senior year. Note that in certain departments, courses are organized into levels. Where levels exist, class enrollment tends to be more homogeneous. In all other courses, the enrollment tends to be heterogeneous. The description of a course in this Course of Studies indicates the ability of the Long Trail School staff to provide the experience. However, if an inadequate number of students select a specific course, it will not be possible to offer the course that semester. In cases where courses are oversubscribed, priority for enrollment will be given first to seniors, then juniors, then sophomores, and finally freshmen, provided they satisfy course prerequisites. Students who are unable to be enrolled in a course for their first choice will be offered an alternate course to ensure a six course minimum program. The level designations for courses mean the following: ADVANCED courses are recommended for students who have demonstrated exceptional academic achievement through a combination of ability and motivation. These courses contain considerable enrichment and acceleration. Instruction will assume that students are able to grasp concepts on initial presentation and will, therefore, emphasize observation, analysis, synthesis, and problem solving. There will be little practice or repetition within the classroom. Students are expected to be able to organize their time, to plan long- term assignments, and to seek help when necessary, all on their own initiative. Placement in advanced courses is by teacher recommendation only. IB STANDARD LEVEL (SL): It is essential for any pre-university education to equip students with the depth of discipline-specific knowledge and skills that they will need for their chosen academic and career paths. However, this must be balanced with the breadth needed to develop well-rounded students who can draw connections between the different disciplines. As such, the philosophy of the IB Diploma Programme (DP) is that students should engage with a range of subjects while being able to explore specific areas of personal interest in greater depth. SL courses ensure students are exposed to a range of disciplines that they might otherwise opt out of. IB HIGH LEVEL (HL): Higher level courses allow students to spend more time with subjects they are more interested in by exploring options in addition to the SL core curriculum. HL courses typically also include a range of additional elements designed to allow students to explore areas of interest within the subject in more depth. Schedule your program with the future in mind. Make your decisions carefully and take advantage of all of the advice available from your parents, teachers, advisors, college counselor, and the Dean of Academics. If you have a question about the types of courses you should take, consult with the Dean of Academics.

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LTS PROGRAMS Middle School Program (Grades 6 & 7) The Middle School program is designed to build the foundation for academic success throughout the student’s years at Long Trail School. The curriculum is designed to feed off students’ innate creativity and curiosity to encourage them to be academic risktakers, communicators, and listeners. Using problem solving, research, and writing skills, students will learn to express themselves, through both oral and written modalities, to become confident and reflective in their studies at Long Trail School. Pre-IB Program (Grades 8, 9, & 10) The Pre-IB Program builds on the foundation for academic success developed in the Middle School Program, to refine and increase the complexity of students communication, writing, and research skills. The Pre-IB Program focuses on critical thinking, analysis, and synthesis of information. Students learn how developments in literature, history, science, arts, and mathematics have an impact on the world today. The program works to widen the students’ understanding of the world around them and how individual and groups can impact society today. Towards the end of the Pre-IB Program, students will begin to plan their course of studies in the International Baccalaureate Program, develop a CAS plan, and generate ideas and plans for their extended essay. College Preparatory In addition to the IB Diploma and Certificate programs, Long Trail School offers a college preparatory curriculum designed to prepare all students for success and achievement at college and university level study. For those students seeking additional challenge, Long Trail offers a small selection of classes at the Advanced Placement level in conjunction with or to supplement our IB offerings. Advanced Placement (AP) courses can lead to college credit and are an advanced level option in the Upper School for some 11th and 12th grade courses. Those students taking individual AP courses are required to take the corresponding external exam at the end of the course at their own cost.

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM (Grades 11 & 12) The International Baccalaureate program is designed to develop global thinkers that can understand a variety of perspectives in order to become global citizens. Through inquiry-based activities, students grow to be knowledgeable, caring, open-minded young adults who leave Long Trail School as confident learners. During the two year program, diploma students are supported not only in the content but also in completing their Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) project and extended essay. Whether students participate in the traditional college preparatory, certificate, or full-diploma option, they develop into confident, lifelong learners. The IB Diploma curriculum emphasizes how to learn, how to think, and how to reach considered conclusions on the many issues that will face students in the future. The twoyear course of study is designed to establish a standard for international education and focuses on the education of the “whole person.” Mirroring Long Trail School’s own Core Values, the IB Programme is based on the premise that academic training must also provide students with the values and skills they need to succeed. Diploma candidates must complete coursework in six subject areas and pass exams in each. They must also take the Theory of Knowledge course, write an Extended Essay based on the study and research of an original thesis, and complete an extracurricular requirement in three areas: creativity, action, and service (CAS). In many cases, upon entering college, LTS students are granted college credit for some or all of their IB courses.

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COLLEGE GUIDANCE Nearly 95% of Long Trail students enter a four year college the fall after graduation. They attend an amazing variety of institutions of higher learning: highly selective liberal arts colleges, top ranked research universities, colleges of music, women’s colleges, institutes focusing on science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM), as well as, universities in other countries. The great success of Long Trail students in college placement is the result of their strong academic preparation and hard work combined with a highly personalized and supportive college counseling program. Since LTS has an average graduating class size of 25 students, the director of college counseling has the ability to truly get to know the strengths, interests, and aspirations of each student very well. The college search and application process at Long Trail School is then individually tailored to meet the needs of each student and family. Just as no two Long Trail students are alike, no two college searches or lists will be the same. It is this personal approach and connection that give Long Trail students such an advantage in the college admissions process. Long Trail realizes and appreciates that the college search and application process is not only a time for self discovery and reflection, but often a time of increased parental and student anxiety. Long Trail’s personal approach helps to alleviate these stresses by ensuring parents and students have the information and preparation they need for a successful application process. From the start, our students are exposed to ideas and expectations that begin to prepare them for their time after high school. Information about each student’s strengths, interests, and goals is gathered by our Director of College Counseling through standardized testing (PSAT, SAT, ACT), group meetings and discussions, and especially, formal, individual college meetings with students and parents. These meetings help students find their own voices and identify their personal academic and career interests. Together this information is used to identify for each student, several colleges, universities, and postsecondary options, which would be a great fit. Every year, Long Trail provides SAT and ACT test preparation, several college nights, workshops, and trips to national and regional college fairs to move students from the college search to application stage. Finally, we help students navigate through the application, financial aid, and scholarship processes in their 12th grade year. Long Trail strives to ensure that the college search and application process is an enriching and empowering experience for its students and families.

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LTS GRADING SYSTEM Grades 90-100%: Superior work marked by: • Consistent and thorough preparation • Exceptional grasp both of material and mechanics of subject and outstanding recall • Demonstrated ability to independently connect themes, ideas, and concepts • In independent work, demonstration of capacity for individual interpretation and analysis of materials derived from inquiry in depth, for discriminating selection of materials, and for clear and interesting presentation Grade 80-89%: Strong work marked by: • Regular and thorough preparation • Thorough grasp, both of material and mechanics of subject • Capacity to recall material and make relationships to new material • In independent work, a demonstration of depth of thought, of careful attention to sources and selection of material, and of capacity for clear presentation Grade 70-79%: Satisfactory work that may be marked by one or a combination of these: • Somewhat irregular preparation • Adequate grasp of material and mechanics of subject • Tendency to rely on memory rather than to identify relationships • Basic focus on the material or topic • In independent work, a survey approach rather than inquiry and analysis in depth; presentation may contain mechanical errors Grade 60-69%: Less than satisfactory work that may suggest inability to continue more advanced work in the subject with success. Often marked by: • Hasty, irregular, inadequate preparation • Undeveloped study skills and/or reading ability, limited motivation • Carelessness in mechanics, presentation and/or completion of work Grade Below 60% • A grade of 59 or below is a failure (F). A student receiving an F as a final year grade will be instructed as to whether s/he may retake the course at LTS, or at an approved summer school, to earn the credit. In some cases, a student with a semester or final grade of an F will be notified that her/his continued enrollment may be at risk.

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ACADEMIC HONORS Honors are awarded for students at the end of the first and second semesters and for year-long performances. • Upper School High Honors – for students with semester grades of 93 or above in all courses (91 for IB courses) • Upper School Honors – for students with semester grades of 90 or above in all courses (88 for IB courses) • Middle School Honors - for students with semester grades of 90 or above in all courses are bestowed Honors. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Students at Long Trail School typically earn six credits per year and twenty-four credits in four years. English Mathematics Science Social Studies World Language* The Arts Additional

4 credits (4 recommended) 3 credits (4 recommended) 3 credits (4 Recommended) 3 credits (4 Recommended) 3 credits (same language) 2 credits 6 credits

TOTAL

24 credits

*The three year World Language requirement may be waived by the Dean of Academics based on student need.

Although not required, Long Trail strongly encourages students to take four years of mathematics, science, and social studies. The Dean of Academics and the Registrar must approve exceptions to the required course of study. In order to qualify for a diploma, students in grades nine through twelve, must be currently enrolled and in good standing in the School. They must satisfy the various departmental requirements regarding level of study and proficiency and must successfully complete all requirements. Successful completion (passing grade) of a full-year course earns one (1) credit. Successful completion (passing grade) of a semester course earns one-half (½) credit. A student must earn a minimum of 6 credits each year. Students are highly


encouraged to take courses in all disciplines each year. International students must successfully complete at least one year of a regular English class in order to earn a LTS Diploma. Students may also complete summer work in order to accelerate into a higher-level course for the following year with prior approval; however, this summer work will not fulfill graduation requirements. Long Trail students who complete the International Baccalaureate (IB) Programme, fully meeting all of their requirements, may also receive an International Baccalaureate Diploma. CREDIT TRANSFER LTS will honor all courses granted credit by the sending school provided the school is an accredited secondary school. LTS will not apply middle school credits to its upper school requirements, nor does it accept independent study credit from other secondary schools. Transfer students must earn a minimum of twelve credits at LTS in order to meet graduation requirements. Exceptions to this should be presented to the Dean of Academics for approval. Transfer students will be placed in the grade deemed appropriate based on their transcript, previous high school experience, and LTS entrance testing. COURSE WITHDRAWALS Permission to withdraw from a course is granted by the Dean of Academics on a case by case basis. A student may not be permitted to withdraw from a course if it means that s/he will drop below the minimum course load. Students wishing to drop/ add a course must complete a Course Change form (available in the Registrar’s Office) prior to the deadline. ADD/DROP During the first three weeks of the first semester (for first semester and full year courses) and at the beginning of the second semester (for second semester courses only), an Upper School student may follow the add/drop procedure to change courses. Students seeking to add/drop a course should see the Registrar first. Students are not permitted to drop or add a new course to their schedules after the add/ drop period has ended. Students wishing to drop/add a course must complete a Course Change form.

INDEPENDENT STUDY Independent studies are courses in specialized topics not offered within the regular curriculum. These classes are generally reserved for seniors, and are treated as an exception, not a rule, for students. An interested student may plan an independent study with a faculty member and submit a proposal for approval to the Dean of Academics. Students are limited to one independent course per semester and with permission, the independent study can replace a course requirement. All proposals for first semester or full year independent studies must be submitted no later than the drop/add deadline in order to be considered. Proposals for second semester independent courses must be submitted to the Dean of Academics no later than the first week of January. Students, advisors, and faculty supervisors will be notified whether a student’s independent study proposal has been approved. An Independent Study Request form is available from the Registrar. SENIOR INTERNSHIPS Seniors in good academic standing (overall average of 75) may arrange for either a first or second semester internship in substitution of up to two courses (excluding diploma requirements). The student must demonstrate in writing how the internship will meet the student’s learning objectives, how the student will be evaluated, and how the opportunity expands the student’s experience at LTS. The student must present the internship proposal to a committee of faculty who will determine whether the internship is acceptable.

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ARTS When we teach a child to sing or play the flute, we teach her how to listen. When we teach her to draw, we teach her to see. When we teach a child to dance, we teach him about his body and about space, and when he acts on stage, he learns about character and motivation. When we teach a child design, we reveal the geometry of the world. When we teach children about the folk and traditional arts and the great masterpieces of the world, we teach them to celebrate their roots and find their own place in history. ~Jane Alexander The Long Trail School Arts faculty has a deep commitment to helping students discover and express their creative selves. From our award winning drama program, to the professional experience of our music faculty, to our dynamic and creative visual arts program, The Arts department’s classes empower students to become inquisitive thinkers and reflective creators. VISUAL ARTS Middle School Art Exploration Full year Two days per week Grades 6, 7, and 8 The foundation of the middle school visual arts curriculum is based on the exploration of the elements of art and principles of design. Students are given a variety of dynamic studio projects, inspired by famous artists, to become knowledgeable, creative thinkers and creators. By observing and reflecting upon the works of artists who came before them, students develop a stronger understanding of art’s role in history. Students will be challenged to problem solve, think creatively, and express themselves through innovative studio projects as they find their voice in art.

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Art Foundations Full year - 1 Credit Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Art Exploration or permission from Art Faculty; Strongly recommended for grades 9 and 10 as a prerequisite for the IB Visual Arts program. This course is designed to introduce students to periods in art from the Renaissance to the present. Students learn about each era in art through a variety of sources including books, videos, kinesthetic learning, and hands-on studio projects. Students are required to keep an investigative workbook where they learn to analyze, appreciate, and reflect upon art from a variety of time periods and cultures. As art reflects the social, economic, political, and environmental concerns of the time period and society from which it is created, students will be fascinated by the influences and styles that have documented our world through art. Students will come away with the ability to interpret and appreciate art and will have a rich understanding of art’s purpose.


Ceramics I and II Full year - 1 Credit Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Art Exploration or permission from Art Faculty Ceramics is a comprehensive course designed to provide students with a strong foundation in the use of clay as an art medium. Many different techniques of clay modeling and decoration will be introduced through a series of challenging projects. In Ceramics II, after students become familiar with the possibilities and properties of clay, they will use their knowledge to arrive at individual and creative solutions to various prompts. Class critiques, as well as the study of past and contemporary ceramics artists and trends are important elements of this course.

the likenesses of their subjects. Students will use graphite, charcoal, colored pencil, pastel, and pen/ink. Through a variety of exercises and projects, students will demonstrate the ability to draw fine detail, as well as create loose gestural drawings. Students will explore the work of artists from a variety of time periods and cultures. Studio II further develops students’ abilities to express themselves by taking their drawing skills to new heights as they explore other media. Painting material will include watercolor, acrylic, gouache, and oil paint. Students will deepen their understanding of creating depth and contrast in portraiture, landscapes, still life, architectural drawings, and imaginative design.

Design I and II Full year - 1 Credit Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Art Exploration or permission from Art Faculty Design I presents students with an in depth look into numerous media and their history. Media exploration may include painting, linoleum cutting, drawing, collage art, screen-printing, and papermaking. Students create artwork that incorporates the principles and elements of design and learn to reflect on their own, classmates’, and known artists’ work and share constructive criticism. Design II extends the student’s knowledge of the elements of art and the principles of design through the use of various 3-D media. A focus on industrial art is central to this course and students learn to apply their sense of design to functional utilitarian objects. Studio Art I and II Full year - 1 Credit Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Art Exploration or permission from Art Faculty In Studio I students will learn the fundamentals of drawing as they develop their ability to illustrate what they actually see, and discover strategies to capture

Studio Art III and IV Full year - 1 credit Semester - 0.5 credits Grades 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Studio I and II or permission from Art Faculty Students will hone their skills as they develop a more advanced portfolio of 2 and 3-dimensional works of art. Students will express themselves through painting, collage, sculpture, encaustic, ceramics, and more. They will be exposed to artists, both past and present, who work in a variety of media. In Studio IV students will be more self-directed as they have had experience in art making and will be creating a body of work. Students will come away with an increased awareness of self-expression as they discover exciting new ways to incorporate alternative elements and materials into their studio pieces.

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Photography/Yearbook Full year - 1 Credit Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Art Exploration or permission from Art Faculty This course introduces students to the art of photography by studying composition, intent, light, and mood in their own and others photographs. Students develop skills in the use of software such as Photoshop and other editing programs. They will study the work of photographers from the past and present to gain an understanding of what has been done and what the possibilities are. An emphasis will be placed on the significance and importance of photography as a documentary of life from a variety of cultures and time periods. Photography students will be an integral part of the building of the Yearbook and will serve as the school’s photographers.

and a Comparative Study. Students will explore art from a variety of cultures and time periods. As they progress in the course, students develop an overarching theme for their portfolios, as they explore 2- and 3-dimensional media. With each studio piece, students investigate, plan, experiment, and reflect on their work in a visual art journal. They document their process and planning for each piece and research art and artists who have inspired them. This leads to an in-depth Comparative Study of two to three works of art by artists of the student’s choosing. The culmination of this course is a Senior show at a public gallery where students discuss and present work which they created over a two year period. IB Visual Art requires students to be self-directed, interested, and highly motivated to take their artwork to a higher level as they create a strong portfolio. MUSIC Middle School Chorus Full Year Two days per week Grades 6, 7, and 8 Middle School Chorus is a vocal ensemble open to students in grades six through eight. No prior vocal experience is required. The ensemble explores repertoire from a wide range of cultures and musical styles. Emphasis is placed on individual and group singing, harmony, tone, blend, and stylistic interpretation. Participation in the winter and spring concerts is required. Students are invited to audition for the region-wide Green Mountain Music District Festival where they can be selected to sing in the festival chorus.

HL/SL IB Visual Arts Full year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Two years of Visual Art classes (Art Foundations strongly suggested) and Approval from Art Faculty This course is designed for students who have had a solid foundation in studio and art history classes and are willing to challenge themselves to create highly refined art with a global perspective. The components to the course are: Studio artwork and senior exhibition, Process/Planning/Experimentation,

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Middle School Guitar Full year or semester Two days per week Grades 6, 7, and 8 Guitar class is designed to introduce students to basic guitar techniques. Students develop skills such as musical literacy, fretting and picking techniques, chord shapes, scale patterns, and the guitar’s role in jazz, classical, and popular music. Students learn songs across a wide range of musical styles, and have the option to perform in LTSounds concerts. Owning a guitar is not required, but it is encouraged.


Middle School Band Full year Two or four days per week Grades 6, 7, and 8 Students will study a variety of concert band and wind ensemble arrangements for performances. Key techniques are practiced, including tone, balance, articulation, and dynamics. Key theory concepts such as tonality, rhythm, and harmony are also taught. Participation in the winter and spring concerts is required. Students are invited to audition for the region-wide Green Mountain Music District Festival where they can be selected to play in one of several full-sized ensembles for band players. Music Exploration - Middle School Full year Two days per week Grades 6, 7 and 8 This class is an introductory laboratory for exploring instrumental and vocal music of all kinds. Through routine listening and group analysis, students learn to discuss music in terms of the fundamental elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, tempo, and texture. Students learn basic music theory and notation. Through hands-on group lessons, students have the opportunity to learn the basic techniques and concepts for playing each type of instrument found in a rock/jazz combo, including drum set, hand percussion, bass, guitar, and keyboards. Upper School Guitar Full Year - 0.5 Credits Semester - 0.25 Credits Grades 8 (by permission), 9, 10, 11, and 12 Guitar class is designed to introduce students to basic guitar techniques. Students develop skills such as musical literacy, fretting and picking techniques, chord shapes, scale patterns, and the guitar’s role in jazz, classical, and popular music. Students learn songs across a wide range of musical styles, and have the option to perform in LTSounds concerts. For those having some guitar experience, advanced techniques will be introduced. Owning a guitar is not required, but it is encouraged. Advanced 8th graders may register for Upper School Guitar with the instructor’s permission.

Upper School Band Full year - 0.5 credits Grades 8 (by permission), 9, 10, 11, and 12 This band class is a collaborative instrumental workshop where students learn how to compose, arrange, and improvise in a variety of musical settings. The repertoire is selected by the teacher with input from the students. Students rehearse regularly and perform in school and community concerts. Emphasis is on creating compelling multiinstrumental arrangements with good sonic balance and demonstrating a high level of musicianship. Music Theory Semester - 0.25 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Music Theory studies what makes music so pleasant (or not pleasant). Topics will include rhythm, consonance, dissonance, melody, scales, basic harmony, and four part voice-leading. This course will introduce the principles of harmony in music beginning with the construction of major and minor scales, the circle of fifths, interval training, triad construction, basic chord recognition, musical notation, rhythmic counting, seventh chords, and basic four-part writing. Music Appreciation - Upper School Semester - 0.25 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 This course examines the development, history, and role music played on western cultures and how it shaped the world around us. The invention of today’s music was an evolution of huge cultural importance from our ancestors and has been passed on through billions of people to YOU. What will you do to pass it on to your descendants; what will you change?

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Upper School Chorus/Vocal Ensemble Full year - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 LTS students arrive with a wide array of prior music instruction and skills. Chorus/Vocal Ensemble works with students where they are, helping them to attain individual goals as singers and to become high functioning members of an ensemble. Both ear training with interval recognition and sight reading methods will be taught. Working with a wide range of styles, musical periods, and difficulty levels, emphasis is on making excellent music and performing it with sensitivity and teamwork. Participation in the winter and spring concerts is required.

Musical Ensemble Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Approval from Music Faculty This ensemble will perform the music for Long Trail’s spring musical production. Learn to accompany actors and actresses to produce a fantastic show. This experience will provide the participant with experience reading professional manuscripts, learning to adapt the music to what’s happening on stage, and experiencing music in a unique setting. Upper School Music Techniques Full year - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Music Techniques classes are collaborative musical workshops where students learn how to perform, analyze, compose, arrange, and improvise in a variety of settings and configurations. The repertoire, selected by the teacher with input from the students, is learned by transcribing a popular recording, reading sheet music, or playing from “fake book” lead sheets. Emphasis is on creating compelling musical arrangements and performing them with a high level of musicianship. Topics include instrumental techniques, vocal techniques, ear training, music

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notation, harmony, and embodied awareness. Desktop Music Composition and Production Full year - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 Limit of three students per section. This class enables students to produce original multitrack audio recordings using the instruments, equipment, and digital audio workstation software in the Ensemble Room and eLab. Each phase of modern music production, from recording to mixing and mastering will be explored. Topics include notation, composition, arranging, engineering, sound design, and post production. Projects may be individual or collaborative, electronic or acoustic, and may involve musicians from outside the class. Perception, Analysis, and Practice of Music: HL/SL IB Music Full year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Approval from Music Faculty During this 2-year course of study, students develop advanced skills in the appreciation, understanding, and performance of music. They practice listening, analyzing, transcribing, composing, and playing. The entry point and basic framework for theory and analysis comes first, from the study of Western art music and, second, from exploration of popular music styles in the US. The course then turns to major musical genres from traditional and popular non-Western cultures, exploring their characteristic elements and relating them to those of each other and to Western music. With the additional consideration of the basic properties of sound, a picture will emerge showing connections among the rhythms of the natural world, sound, hearing, and the music of many cultures, and provide us with a deep understanding of and appreciation for how music works. Students compose two (SL) or three (HL) original musical works such as string quartet, symphonic composition, or solo improvisation. HL students submit a twenty minute recording selected from solo public performances. As a group, the IB music class serves as the leading performing ensemble at school and community events.


THEATER Middle School Drama Full year Two days per week Grades 6, 7, and 8 This course introduces our middle school students to the fundamentals of acting while teaching them basic theatre terminology. Students participate in acting exercises, improvisational games, and beginning scene work.

Improvisation is the practice of acting, singing, talking and reacting, and of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of one’s immediate environment, fellow actors and inner feelings. Students will gain understanding of the art and practices of theatrical improvisation, which can be thought of as an “on the spot” or “off the cuff” spontaneous activity that occurs within specific structures and parameters.

Acting Semester - 0.25 Credits Grades 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Middle School Drama or Approval from Theatre Faculty This is an introduction to stage performance, the theatre, and the artistic culture in which it all exists. During the course students will be given the fundamental tools to interpret and perform a piece of theatre, scripted or improv’d. In the process, students learn theatre terminology and etiquette, and basic critiquing skills. Students will be expected to engage in all physical, social, and academic activities pertaining to the course objectives to the best of their abilities. This course will cover skills in observation, listening, mime, characterization, improvisation, dialects, monologue and scene delivery, auditioning, script reading, writing, memorization, and acting, by way of acting exercises and games. Acting is a wonderful, rewarding pursuit. Its study can open the mind, sharpen the wit, and free the heart. Take advantage of this opportunity to discover your hidden talents…and have fun! Improvisation Semester - 0.25 Credits Grade 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Middle School Drama or Approval from Theatre Faculty The emphasis of this course is to provide the basic skills of improvisation: listening, clarity, confidence and performing instinctively and spontaneously. Students will experience performing improvisational scenes individually, in pairs and as part of an ensemble for a small audience.

Advanced Acting Techniques Full year - 0.5 Credits Grades 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Approval from Theatre Faculty This course is intended for the serious acting student. Students will work on honing their vocal and physical skills on stage as well as focusing on intensive character work and dramatic improvisation. Various acting techniques will be explored including the Meisner and Stanislavsky methods. This course will continue skill development from Acting and Improvisation, providing additional instruction in acting, and directing. Active participation in class activities is required as well as individual and group presentations. The class will focus on the application of stage and performance principles to the performance of monologues, duets and ensemble scripts.

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Directing Full year - 0.5 Credits Semester - 0.25 Credits Grades 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Approval from Theatre Faculty This course introduces students to the fundamentals of directing. Students learn the significance of blocking as well as set, costume, and lighting design to support their directorial choices. Students work one-on-one with their instructor and are then given the opportunity to work with the middle school drama class. Stage Craft Full Year - 1 Credit Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 This course allows students to design and build the sets for the fall play and the spring musical. Students learn to create scale drawings of sets, to develop material lists and a budget, and to construct the sets. Students enrolled in this course will be using power tools.

PHYSICAL ARTS Middle School Physical Arts Full Year Four days per week Grades 6, 7, and 8 Required Guided by state and national standards, Physical Arts provides learners the opportunity to become aware of and engage in physical activity that is whole-bodied, intrinsically valuable, and personally meaningful. Physical Arts fosters personal and community wellness by empowering students to attain positive and healthy lifelong attitudes and behaviors through physical activity that is part of the total educational experience. This class will provide students the opportunity to improve their physical fitness and literacy, to develop leadership abilities, to learn new sport skills, rules, and strategies as well as to interact socially and have fun.

HL/SL IB Theater Full year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Approval from Theatre Faculty The theatre syllabus at SL and HL consists of three equal, interrelated areas: theatre in context, theatre processes, and presenting theatre. The students approach these areas in the roles of creator, designer, director, and performer. The aims of the IB theatre arts course are to enable students to explore theatre in a variety of contexts and understand how these contexts inform practice(theatre in context); to understand and engage in the processes of transforming ideas into action (theatre processes); to develop and apply theatre production, presentation and performance skills, working both independently and collaboratively (presenting theatre). HL only - enable students to understand and appreciate the relationship between theory and practice (theatre in context, theatre processes, presenting theatre).

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Upper School Physical Arts Full Year - 0.5 Credits Semester - 0.25 Credits Grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 The Upper School Physical Arts course primarily focusws on personal fitness. Students learn a variety of methods on how to stay fit. Time is set aside for students to participate in a number of physical activities that may include indoor soccer, floor hockey, badminton, tennis, ultimate frisbee, and dodgeball. Student input is considered when deveopling the curriculum.


ENGLISH Viewed freely, the English language is the accretion and growth of every dialect, race, and range of time, and is both the free and compacted composition of all. ~Walt Whitman The program of study in the English department is designed to improve students’ awareness of the important roles that language and literature play in their personal and intellectual development in the academic world and beyond. The English curriculum emphasizes the development of written and oral skills, of comprehension skills, of critical appreciation, of logical analysis, and of increasingly sophisticated expression of ideas. While the English curriculum focuses on competence in reading, writing, speaking, and listening, it also provides opportunities that help students become discriminating users of resources. Literary and media works, selected for both content and style, promote humanistic attitudes, aesthetic appreciation, global awareness, and critical evaluation skills. This program of study encourages the development of each student’s potential through critical thinking, clear writing, articulate presentation, effective communication, thoughtful risk-taking, intelligent decision-making, and respect for others. Students progression through the English Department is as follows: 6th & 7th grades: Humanities, 8th grade: Early Literature, 9th Grade: Literature by Genre/Advanced Literature by Genre, 10th Grade: American Literature/Advanced American Literature, 11th & 12th grades: English semester courses or SL/HL English. Students in 8th, 9th, or 10th grade may take an English semester course in addition to the required course for their grade, but they may not replace the required course. New English semester courses will be added each year. Humanities: Exploring the Local to the Global Full Year Two periods per day Grades 6 and 7 The Humanities course is designed as an integrated curriculum of language arts, geography, and culture. Designed for sixth and seventh graders, the course introduces students to the culture and geography of nations within the seven continents. The integrated course format allows students to read fiction and nonfiction texts relating to themed units that focus on a geographical region. The course includes writing across genres in response to geographical and cultural topics, as well as related literature.

Early Literature Full Year Grade 8 Early literature is a survey of literature, from the earliest written stories (with attention to their origins as oral tales), through the Shakespearean tragedies of the Elizabethan times, to the epics of today. Discussion topics include the balance between individualism and community in The Giver, the way ancient literature has influenced writing throughout the ages, and the way heroes more often than not exemplify a society’s value systems. In other words, our contemporary literature has grown out of the seeds of our past. Major works include Lois Lowry’s

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The Giver, Andrew Winegarner’s graphic novel Gilgamesh, excerpts from The Old Testament (Genesis/ Psalms), and Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Students also engage in several research and independent reading projects throughout the year. Literature by Genre Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 9

This course is designed to help students develop their critical reading and analytic writing skills, build their vocabularies, enhance their understanding of grammar, and broaden their research skills. Students analyze literature by type: short story, novel, literary journalism, poetry, nonfiction, and memoir. There is particular focus on themes related to identity and tolerance as ninth grade is often a time when young adults begin to truly explore who they are and what is important to them. Major core works include Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Nikki Grimes’ Bronx Masquerade, and Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. Students are expected to regularly contribute to class discussions and participate in class activities. Students also complete a substantial research paper as well as several independent reading projects throughout the year. Advanced Literature by Genre Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 9 Prerequisite: English Faculty Recommendation This course is designed to help students develop their critical reading and analytic writing skills, build their vocabularies, enhance their understanding of grammar, and broaden their research skills. Students analyze literature by type: short story, novel, literary journalism, poetry, the epic, nonfiction, and memoir. There is particular focus on themes related to identity and tolerance as ninth grade is often a time when young adults begin to truly explore who they are and what is important to them. Major core works include Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Homer’s Odyssey, Nikki Grimes’ Bronx Masquerade, and Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. Students are expected to regularly contribute to class discussions and participate in class activities. Students also complete a substantial research paper as well as several independent reading projects throughout the year.

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This class assumes that students are independent learners who can work with limited teacher support. Students are advanced and enthusiastic readers who can make inferences, draw connections, and comprehend texts with sophisticated themes and vocabulary at a fairly fast pace. Students’ expository and narrative writing demonstrates a strong familiarity with the rules of grammar, mechanics, spelling and sentence/paragraph structure. American Literature Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 10

This course surveys American Literature from the European arrival in the 17th century until the early 20th century. As students move through the units of reading, a sense of the American voice develops. Readings incorporate many genres as drama, journal entries, poetry, essays, novels, excerpts and short stories are analyzed in their historical contexts. Students are exposed to significant writers and writings to foster an understanding of the literary and cultural groups and movements of the country. Authors include Emily Dickinson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, Henry David Thoreau, Edith Wharton, and Walt Whitman. Students learn to develop focused analytical arguments as they critically evaluate and assess a range of American texts. Advanced American Literature Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 10 Prerequisite: English Faculty Recommendation This course surveys American Literature from the European arrival in the 17th century until the early 20th century. As students move through the units of reading, a sense of the American voice develops. Readings incorporate many genres as drama, journal entries, poetry, essays, novels, excerpts and short stories are analyzed in their historical contexts. Students are exposed to significant writers and writings to foster an understanding of the literary and cultural groups and movements of the country. Authors include Emily Dickinson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, Henry David Thoreau, Edith Wharton, and Walt Whitman. Students learn to develop focused analytical

arguments as they critically evaluate and assess a range of American texts. This class assumes that students are independent learners who can work with limited teacher support. Students are advanced and enthusiastic readers; they can make inferences, draw connections, comprehend and appreciate texts with sophisticated vocabulary and themes read at a fast pace. Students are strong expository and narrative writers who understand grammar, mechanics, spelling and sentence/ paragraph structure.

Write like a Pro! Workshop Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 Writing boot camp! If assessment of your writing is not meeting your personal goals, this course will address your concerns. Students will be guided to identify their writing weaknesses and to diligently develop patterns of editing which will improve what is turned in for assessment. Students’ skills in prewriting and writing will be built and reinforced. Reviewing, editing, and revising skills will all be practiced. Through crafting Informational, reflective, and persuasive pieces, students will hone their written communication skills. There will be opportunity to utilize assignments from other classes as coursework. In the end, invested participants will emerge with better writing habits for school and for life. Class size will be limited to ensure plenty of individual mentoring.

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Local Lore Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 Let’s investigate the past! In this course, students will explore the region surrounding Long Trail School. Largely project-based, the class will connect with local organizations and groups of local residents, such as historical societies or longtime local families. Projects could include interviews, mapping of certain town sections or elements, archival work with photographs, and on-site research. While students will choose their own focal points for investigative work, selected readings about the area and about the importance of understanding community history will be assigned. This course truly allows students to design their own inquiry and to determine the method of communication for their newly acquired knowledge. Cultural Crossroads Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 Painting, sculpture, music, fashion, literature, film, architecture, theater and more! Yes, this is an English class, but it is more accurately a course invested in the study of cultural impact. Students will learn about what people around the world were making, doing, thinking, and viewing as a reaction to the time in which they lived. For example, what effect did the Industrial Revolution have on song lyrics or women’s clothing? While students will choose their own points of interest for investigative work, readings and videos about cultural history will be assigned. Students will determine the method of communication of newly acquired knowledge for each unit of study. Class projects and field trips will be major aspects of the curriculum. SL English - Language and Literature Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year committment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: English Faculty Recommendation Language and Literature is a two year course with a dynamic literary syllabus that introduces the interconnected nature of Language and Literature. Students will explore a range of non-fiction text types alongside literary texts from different time periods and cultures. Throughout the course, students

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will examine literary themes, genres, contexts, and interpretations. The non-fiction texts are intentionally thought-provoking, leading to group discussions and pupil-led presentations which are marked as part of the course’s oral component. This course is stimulating and will suit intellectually curious people who wish to extend their understanding of great literature and controversial themes. The texts to be studied are grouped together into the following components: literature in contexts, close textual analysis, language in cultural contexts, and language in mass communication. Students who take this class should like reading and writing and be interested in finding out what great writers have to say about the ‘big issues’ of life: love, death, the individual and society, the struggle for personal significance and the power of the imagination. They should be motivated, enthusiastic and willing to become well organized in their working habits. HL English Full year - 1 Credit/year (2 year committment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Approval from English Faculty IB English HL is a two year, pre-university literature course which encourages students to view literary works as art which can be can analyzed in a variety of ways. Emphasis is on exploration of the means authors employ to convey thematic subjects. HL English provides extensive opportunities for independent, original, critical and clear thought and expression. The course also promotes respect for imagination and interpretation. This course develops understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism and promotes the ability to form independent literary judgments. Students will have a thorough knowledge of a range of texts and an understanding of other cultural perspectives. They will also have developed skills of analysis and the ability to support an argument in clearly expressed writing.


ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is provided for those students not yet ready for immersion into the humanities curriculum at Long Trail due to language differences. Based on recommendations prior to the student’s arrival to the school, placement will be in ESOL Newcomer English or ESOL Intermediate English. Students will be evaluated at regular intervals. Coursework and lessons will target individual students’ needs with the ultimate goal of mainstreaming into English and history classes. The amount of time before a student is mainstreamed in these courses depends on her/ his ability upon arrival and her/his growth while in the ESOL program. Long Trail School proudly welcomes international students and offers them the opportunity to learn the language skills necessary to succeed both academically and socially. The Admissions Office and the International Coordinator determine the need for English as a Second Language. Prospective students are recommended for ESOL based on proficiency tests. Students anticipating earning a Long Trail School diploma must successfully complete at least one year of a regular English course. To attain a diploma, students must attend Long Trail School for a minimum of two years. Students must earn a minimum of twelve credits at Long Trail School in order to receive a diploma. Students wishing to waive these expectations need to petition the Dean of Academics and the International Coordinator. ESOL Newcomer English Full Year - 1 Credit (counts toward the English requirement) Grades 9, 10, and 11 The ESOL Newcomer English course is a grammarbased course intended to build solid reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to write complex sentences, solid paragraphs, and basic essays. This course provides some content support for its participants. ESOL Intermediate English Full Year - 1 Credit (counts toward the English requirement) Grades 9, 10, and 11 Prerequisite: ESOL Newcomer English or Faculty Approval The Intermediate English course aims to transfer skills learned in the Newcomer class to other disciplines.

Once completed, students taking this course will have experience with a variety of writing genres including narrative, compare/contrast, and persuasion pieces. Students will also begin to analyze basic fiction and nonfiction texts. Students successfully completing this course will be enrolled in a regular English class. American Perspectives Full Year - 1 Credit (counts toward the Social Studies/History requirement) Grades 9, 10, and 11 This course teaches American History through art, media, film, and discussion. Topics covered in the course include American culture, religion, education, government, geography, ethnic diversity, and the American Family. This class is assessed primarily through writing activities such as essays, opinion pieces, and reflections. This class is the equivalent of one History credit.

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MATHEMATICS There are two versions of math in the lives of many Americans: the strange and boring subject that they encountered in classrooms and an interesting set of ideas that is the math of the world, and is curiously different and surprisingly engaging. Our task is to introduce this second version to today’s students, get them excited about math, and prepare them for the future. Jo Boaler (What’s Math Got to Do with It?, Penguin 2008) The Long Trail School Mathematics Department curriculum provides students with a “toolbox” of skills that can be put to use in any problem solving situation. The department strives to teach students to become critical and creative thinkers. This is accomplished through collaborative work in the classroom and by fostering a learning environment that promotes academic risk taking. The department philosophy is to focus on the means used to solve a problem rather than just the end result. In the process of developing math literacy in our students, we teach our students to value mathematics and its relevance in everyday life. The courses taken by a student reflect a combination of the student’s past experience, mathematical ability and future plans. Three years of high school math through Algebra 2 is the basic requirement for acceptance to a four-year college; however, more and more colleges increasingly require Pre-calculus and/or Calculus, especially for those desiring to major in a math related field. These requirements can be met by completing the IB math sequence. Course selections should reflect the future plans of each individual student. Please note that students are not allowed to take two math courses in the same year without Academic Dean approval. Students may not double in math classes prior to Geometry. The courses below are offered in sequence. Students are placed in the math courses appropriate for their level of accomplishment. Core Connections 1 Full Year Grades 6, 7 and 8 This is the first of a three-year sequence of courses designed to prepare students for a rigorous college preparatory algebra course. It uses a problembased approach with concrete models. The course helps students to develop multiple strategies to solve problems and to recognize the connections between concepts. On a daily basis, students use

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problem-solving strategies, questioning, investigating, analyzing critically, gathering and constructing evidence, and communicating rigorous arguments justifying their thinking. Students work with integers and proportions, collect, organize, and display data in multiple ways, make sense of multiple representations with fractions, decimals, and percents, define variables and simplify expressions, solve distance, rate, and time problems, compute area and volume of rectangular solids and solve percent problems including discounts, interest and tips.


Core Connections 2 Full Year Grades 6, 7, and 8 This is the second of a three-year sequence of courses designed to prepare students for a rigorous college preparatory algebra course. It uses a problembased approach with concrete models. The course helps students to develop multiple strategies to solve problems and to recognize the connections between concepts. On a daily basis, students use problem-solving strategies, questioning, investigating, analyzing critically, gathering and constructing evidence, and communicating rigorous arguments justifying their thinking. Students work with order of operations with integers and rational numbers, diagrams and equal ratios, percents and scale factors, variable expressions to represent quantities, simplify variable expressions, solve linear equations, compare experimental and theoretical probability, collect and compare data, solve distance-rate-time problems, describe and use angle pair relationships, compute area and perimeter of standard and compound shapes, and compute volume of solids. Core Connections 2 & 3 Full Year Grade 7 This is a one-year course, which combines the second and third sequences of the Core Connections curriculum and is designed to prepare students for a rigorous college preparatory algebra course. It is offered to students at the recommendation from the current Math teacher or from their performance from a placement test offered through the Mathematics Department. Students should be well organized and highly motivated for accelerating their knowledge and understanding of Mathematics in this course. Core Connections 3 Full Year Grades 7 and 8 This is the third of a three-year sequence of courses designed to prepare students for a rigorous college preparatory algebra course. It uses a problem-based approach with concrete models. The course helps students to develop multiple strategies to solve problems and to recognize the connections between

concepts. Students learn how to represent linear functions with graph and tables, learn rules and context, solve systems of equations and contextual word problems through multiple strategies, describe geometric transformations, collect and analyze data while making predictions based on a trend, analyze the slope of a line, recognize and solve problems involving proportional relationships, use the Pythagorean Theorem and square roots, represent and compare large and small numbers using standard and scientific notation, and use relationships between angles created by parallel lines. Integrated Mathematics 1 Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 9 and 10 Integrated I is an alternative path to our traditional Algebra 1 and Geometry courses and placement in this course is based upon teacher recommendation. This slower-paced course aims to deepen and extend student understanding built in previous courses by focusing on developing fluency with solving linear equations, inequalities, and systems. On a daily basis, students in Integrated I use problem-solving strategies, questioning, investigating, analyzing critically, gathering and constructing evidence, and communicating rigorous arguments justifying their thinking. Students learn in collaboration with others while sharing information, expertise, and ideas. Core Connections Algebra 1 Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 8 and 9 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Core Connections 2/3 or Core Connections 3 Core Connections Algebra aims to deepen and extend student understanding built in previous courses by focusing on developing fluency with solving linear equations, inequalities, and systems. These skills are extended to solving quadratic equations, exploring linear, quadratic, and exponential functions graphically, numerically, symbolically, and as sequences, and by using regression techniques to analyze the fit of models to distributions of data.

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Integrated Mathematics 2 Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 10 and 11

All topics will be explored with and without the aid of technology. This course is a prerequisite for students, who will be taking the IB SL Mathematics course.

Integrated 2 is a continuation of the Integrated 1 course. It aims to formalize and extend the geometry that students have learned in previous courses. This course focuses on triangle congruence and building a formal understanding of similarity. It also helps students develop the concepts of formal proof, explore the properties of two- and three-dimensional objects, work within the rectangular coordinate system and prove basic theorems. Students also study probabilities for compound events.

Math Applications Semester: 0.5 Credits Grades 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Core Connections Geometry Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 9 and 10 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 This course is structured around problems and investigations that build spatial visualization skills, conceptual understanding of geometry topics, and an awareness of connections between different ideas. Students are encouraged to investigate, conjecture, and then prove, to develop their reasoning skills. Topics that are covered include the following: transformations and symmetry, similarity and congruence, properties of plane figures, area, perimeter, and angle measure of plane figures, volume and surface area of three-dimensional shapes, the Pythagorean Theorem, trigonometric ratios, the Laws of Sines and Cosines, investigation and proof, probability, and review of algebraic concepts, especially solving equations and graphing. Core Connections Algebra 2 Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 9, 10, and 11 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry Expanding upon the concepts of Algebra 1, students will explore functions (linear, quadratic, and other polynomials; exponential, logarithmic, etc) and their graphs, sequences, exponential growth and decay models, transformations of functions and their graphs, non-linear systems in two or more variables, matrices, inverse functions, and logarithms. Students will conduct hands-on experiments that will allow them to gather data and create mathematical models.

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This course is a study of “real-life� math. Students learn about setting goals and making personal decisions, budgeting and making the most of their money, making investments and exploring investment opportunities, debt and credit, keeping their money safe and secure, banking basics, and insurance basics. Students will learn about common misconceptions in personal finance and also be made aware of financial scams and schemes. Statistics Semester: 0.5 Credits Grades 10, 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 This introductory course provides students with the opportunity to explore select topics of Statistics through hands-on work with data. Students will study methods of collecting, displaying and analyzing data, experimental design, and inference. Through the use of calculators and computers students will discover for themselves how to use mathematical models and simulations for decision making in the real world. Discrete Mathematics Semester: 0.5 Credits Grades 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 This course stresses the connections between contemporary mathematics and modern society, accommodating new ideas in mathematics and their applications to our daily lives. Topics include election theory, fair division, matrix operations and applications, graphs/sub-graphs/trees, counting, and probability and recursion.


IB Math SL is a rigorous, two-year course of study. The first year encompasses pre-calculus, probability, and statistics, establishing a foundation for the second year. IB Math SL year one extends concepts of intermediate Algebra. Topics include vectors, In this course, students learn general, wide-ranging probability, statistics, functions (quadratic, rational, strategies for solving problems such as: drawing exponential, logarithmic, etc) and their graphs, a diagram, using systematic lists, eliminating sequences and series, complex numbers, and possibilities, using matrix logic, looking for a pattern, trigonometry. IB Math SL year two is an introduction guessing and checking, and solving subproblems. A to the study of differential and integral calculus with variety of problems are presented - some that arise emphasis on application and extends concepts in real life, some that occur in other disciplines, and of vectors, probability, statistics, exponential, and some that are simply fun. Students work cooperatively logarithmic functions. All topics will be explored with to solve these problems and are encouraged to and without the aid of technology. discuss and present their ideas to the class. Problem Solving Semester - 0.5 Credits Grades 10, 11, and 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1

IB SL Math Studies Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year committment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Geometry The Math Studies SL program is a two-year course of study and is geared towards students who have varied math backgrounds and abilities. It is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics. Real world application in the fields of business, medicine, and social science will be addressed. Topics to be covered include pre-calculus concepts, trigonometric functions, set theory and logic, statistics, and an introduction to calculus. Graphing calculators will be used to explore and reinforce concepts. Students will complete an original project as part of the IB credit requirement. Through their study of mathematics in this course, students will develop an appreciation of mathematics from an international and historical perspective and they will incorporate this knowledge into their work. Course objectives focus on the development of critical thinking skills through group collaboration as well as individual student work. Students will learn to construct sound mathematical arguments and to communicate them in concise and precise language, both orally and in writing. IB SL Mathematics Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year committment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and recommendation from Math Faculty

AP Calculus, AB/BC Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Completion of IB SL Math 2 and recommendation from Math Faculty This course prepares students to take the Calculus AB or BC exam in May through an intense study of functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives, optimization, integration, slope-fields, and applications of integration. BC students also study techniques of integration, volume by cylindrical shells, improper integrals, sequences, series of constants, power series and Taylor polynomials, plane curves and parametric equations, polar coordinates and graphs, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, arc length and surface area, conic sections, vectors, lines, and planes in 2 and 3 dimensions. Students will learn techniques that will help them to solve typical AP calculus problems with and without the aid of technology. Earth Science Full Year

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SCIENCES Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science. ~Edwin Powell Hubble, The Nature of Science, 1954 The Science Department is committed to a rigorous college preparatory curriculum. Each of our classes is designed to provide students with a hands-on introduction to various concentrations of science. From Earth Science in 6th grade through Higher Level IB and AP sciences, students are prepared for their next year of study and ultimate success at the college level. Students are given an opportunity to design experiments that answer questions that they generate about the curricular content. Technology is seamlessly integrated into all aspects of the curriculum. Computer technology and advanced probes allow for measurement of a wide range of variables. Students study molecular biology using microscopy and genetics equipment that allows for protein and DNA electrophoresis as well as cloning of isolated fragments. Data collection and analysis is largely conducted with advanced computer technology. Both our working greenhouse and our ideal location, adjacent to diverse natural environments, benefit our science programs, easily lending themselves to the study of applied ecology in many of our classes. Students collect data, both on and off of our campus, to develop practical science skills, often in partnership with local and regional colleges, universities, and research initiatives. For example, as part of Harvard Forests’ Citizen Science Projects, middle school students study the presence and advancement in range of the Woolly Adelgid beetle in our region while ninth graders study the growing season for various tree species around campus. Long Trail’s streams research fosters a strong collaborative relationship with colleges and universities including U.V.M., St. Michael’s College and Middlebury College. These research opportunities allow students to pursue independent research and collaborate with other highly motivated students. Grade 6

Grade 7

Earth science is centered on learning more about our planet Earth. In this course students explore a variety of topics that begin with learning more about the place that they live in locally and develop a more global perspective about our Earth. Topics include place studies, the history of Vermont, Earth’s development, continental drift, plate tectonics, seafloor spreading, volcanoes, earthquakes, rocks and minerals, fossils, geologic time scale, soils, and weather and climate. The topics will be explored using a variety of resources, activities, hands on projects, labs, field experiences, and class trips. The Physical Environment Full Year

This course focuses on the nature and structure of matter and the characteristics of energy on a variety of scales. Major areas covered nutrient cycles and energy flow in the ecosystem, the organization and use of the periodic table, physical and chemical changes, temperature and heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, work, force, and motion. These topics are used to support the development of key science skills such as designing laboratory and field research projects, collecting and analyzing data, and using evidence to make scientific arguments.

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Health and the Human Body Full Year


Grade 8 This course introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body and uses student inquiry to explore how to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Students learn about various cause-and-effect relationships that determine how different body systems function. Students gather an appreciation the body’s feedback mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. Other topics include the scientific method, cell structure, the body’s major organ systems, reproduction, substance abuse, genetics, and disease. The course continues to develop key science skills of designing investigations, collecting and analyzing data, and using evidence to make scientific arguments. Integrated Science Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 9

Integrated Science is a year-long course centered on the big ideas and questions in earth science, physics, biology, chemistry and environmental science. Students will explore these topics through experiential learning, project based units and scientific inquiry. The combination of science with current technologies, engineering, and mathematics (S.T.E.M.) will also be emphasized within the course. Students will become scientists who ask and answer their own questions. This course will prepare students to continue their study of the sciences at Long Trail by developing essential habits of mind and understanding. Environmental Chemistry Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 10 Environmental Chemistry focuses on the introduction to and application of chemistry in the natural environment. Chemistry is the study of substances that make up our world, changes in these substances, and the energy needed to bring about these changes. Students taking this course will study chemistry topics as they apply to the natural world including, but not limited to water, soil, agriculture, air, energy, natural resources, and sustainability. The course will include readings, discussion, hands on labs and possible service projects in the school and community. Advanced Chemistry Full Year - 1 Credit

Grade 10 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science and recommendation of Science Faculty Advanced chemistry is a lab-based course which emphasizes the structure and behavior of atoms, composition and properties of compounds, reactions between substances and their accompanying energy changes, and laws which unite these phenomena into a comprehensive system. Numerous connections between chemistry and everyday life are made throughout this course. This course moves at a fast pace to accommodate the range of content covered. This course, taught through course readings, discussion, lab activities, projects, and field trips, prepares students for IB Science offerings. This class assumes that students are independent learners who can work with limited teacher support. Students are advanced and enthusiastic readers; they can make inferences, draw connections, comprehend and appreciate texts with sophisticated vocabulary and themes read at a fast pace. Students are strong expository and narrative writers who understand grammar, mechanics, spelling and sentence/ paragraph structure. Environmental Science Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 10, 11, and 12

The goal of the Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas of study and will be taught using readings, discussion, hands on learning activities, field trips, and community service projects. Students make extensive use of the school’s greenhouse and local environment to explore sustainable food systems. Unity and Diversity of Life Semester - 0.5 Credits

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Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science and Chemistry This inquiry-based course explores characteristics that are shared by all living organisms as well as the ways in which they have developed unique adaptations to their habitats. Major topics include: evolution, inheritance, cellular life, organismal structure and function, and ecology. Projects prepare students for a world facing global environmental challenges and the consequences and opportunities of genetic technology. Anatomy and Physiology 1 Anatomy and Physiology 2 Semester - 0.5 Credits each Grade 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Integrated Science and Chemistry This survey course covers the basics of human anatomy and physiology including anatomical terminology, basic biochemistry, cells and tissues, and skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems. Students are also introduced to human health concerns ranging from infectious disease and genetic disorders to cancer and cardiovascular disease, so that they can make informed decisions for their future. Innovations in diagnosis and treatment will also be investigated. Highly interested students may register for both semesters of Anatomy and Physiology (1 & 2).

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IB SL Biology Full year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisites: Chemistry and recommendation from Science Faculty In the study of life, SL Biology introduces students to the key unifying themes that are shared among all of life as well as the diversity of strategies that are utilized for survival. The living world is explored from the micro to the macro scale using many different approaches, technologies, and techniques. The urgency of understanding and applying biological sciences is only increasing as the human population grows and exerts increasing pressure on the Earth’s limited resources. Key advances in cell culturing and genetic technology also place the biological sciences in a powerful place in the treatment of long standing diseases. Students of this course will explore these and other topics as they become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other and apply the scientific method. Extensive laboratory research and an interdisciplinary project are key components of this course. IB HL Biology Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Chemistry and recommendation from Science Faculty The HL Biology course provides students with higher-order investigative experiences and activities to promote a deeper understanding of critical concepts in Biology. Such concepts will include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetic patterns of inheritance, plant form and function, evolution, ecology, animal physiology and the


international nature of science. It will emphasize the development of inquiry skills and higher order thinking via experiential learning in both a classroom and laboratory settings. Students will be required to demonstrate knowledge in experimental methodology, data collection, and the interpretation of experimental data. The classroom environment will stimulate student understanding and open-mindedness by providing authentic application to the biology content, thus enabling students to make the broad connections to how these biological concepts are applicable to the global community.

Physics will make connections within the three domains of physics: laws of physics, experimental skills, and the social and historical aspects. Physics SL is limited to the eight core topic areas and one additional optional topic. The standard level course is identical to the higher-level course, but does not include the additional material, which tends to be more mathematically intensive. The standard level course is designed for those who enjoy mathematics and science but do not hunger for the intensive study that comes with the higher level. Along with studying physics content, students will investigate a wide variety of physical phenomenon through laboratory work. Students will take a rigorous approach to planning, data collection, data analysis, and evaluate their work with a critical mind. IB HL Physics Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grade 12 Prerequisite: Chemistry and recommendation from Science Faculty

IB SL Physics Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Chemistry and recommendation from Science Faculty

The IB HL Physics course exposes students to this most fundamental experimental science, which seeks to explain the universe itself— from the very smallest particles to the vast distances between galaxies. Students develop traditional practical skills and techniques and increase facility in the use of mathematics, the language of physics. They also develop interpersonal skills as well as information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavours—and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right. Students, moreover, study the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. Throughout this challenging course, students become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. Furthermore, students enjoy multiple opportunities for scientific study and creative inquiry within a global context.

The standard level physics course is a study of classical and modern physics. The core syllabus describes a non-calculus based study of the fundamental topics of physics. The emphasis is on personal experience in the scientific method. While focusing on the development of both scientific knowledge and scientific activity students of SL

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SOCIAL STUDIES/HISTORY History cannot give us a program for the future, but it can give us a fuller understanding of ourselves, and of our common humanity, so that we can better face the future. ~Robert Penn Warren The Social Studies Department believes the study of history and the social studies disciplines enrich those who pursue it by developing a greater understanding of self and others. We employ a humanities-based approach that seeks to nurture responsible and informed national and international citizens who think critically, communicate articulately, and respect one another’s differences. Faculty model and motivate students to cultivate effective writing, research, and thoughtful inquiry skills that connect diverse bodies of knowledge. They also utilize technology extensively in everyday teaching. The Department actively encourages following student interests within the context of their subject matter. Members also promote student input into how to reach curricular goals. The Social Studies Department is committed to developing life-long learners and thoughtful, active citizens. Students progression through the Social Studies Department is as follows: 6th & 7th grades: Humanities, 8th grade: World History, 9th Grade: United States History, 10th Grade: Modern World History/Advanced Modern World History, 11th & 12th grades: Social Studies semester courses or SL/HL History of the Americas and 20th Century World History. Students in 10th grade may take an Social Studies semester course in addition to the required course for their grade, but they may not replace the required course. New Social Studies semester courses may be added each year. Humanities: Exploring the Local to the Global Years One and Two Full Year Two periods per day Grade 6 and 7 The Humanities course is designed as an integrated curriculum of language arts, geography, and culture. Designed for sixth and seventh graders, the course introduces students to the culture and geography of nations within the seven continents. The integrated course format allows students to read fiction and nonfiction texts relating to themed units that focus on a geographical region. The course includes writing across genres in response to geographical and cultural topics and related literature.

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World History Full Year Grade 8 In this class students explore different locations and time periods across the world, as well as, considering common themes throughout history. The central question examined during this course is “What makes a civilization?”. It is impossible to learn all of world history in one year, so rather than rushing through the entire planet’s history, this class focuses on identifying common themes across the globe, understanding essential concepts throughout human history. Students explore the six main parts of civilization through different historical case studies ranging from examining the development of stable food sources in Ancient Mesopotamia to the role of technology in kickstarting the Age of Exploration and the Scientific Revolution.


The skills developed during this course include critical thinking, learning how to ask questions, and finding your own answers. We work on communication and writing skills. Students also learn the steps to writing a research paper, focusing on how to develop a research question, note taking, and the writing process. Group work and class participation are also skills we work on in this class. Hands on learning and project work help students actively engage with the information in a number of different learning styles. United States History Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 9 A course designed for freshmen, U.S. History traces the origins and development of U.S. political, economic, and social systems. The course is presented in a chronological and thematic approach. Students examine the emergence of the United States as a unique entity from its native and colonial roots through the end of the 20th century. Modern World History Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 10 This class explores major themes in modern history from 1750 to present, focusing on big events which lead to the creation of the modern world. Student focus on a number of different topics including Revolutions in the Industrial and Atlantic World, Colonization and Migration, Conflict and Genocide in WWI, Great Depression, WWII, Human Rights and Social Change, and Globalization: Economic, Environmental, and Political Effects. It also draws comparisons to current events in each unit as a way of tracking larger historical patterns. Advanced Modern World History Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 10 Prerequisite: Recommendation from Social Studies/ History Faculty This class explores major themes in modern history from 1750 to present, focusing on big events which led to the creation of the modern world. Student focus on a number of different topics including Revolutions in the Industrial and Atlantic World, Colonization

and Migration, Conflict and Genocide in WWI, Great Depression, WWII, Human Rights and Social Change, and Globalization: Economic, Environmental, and Political Effects. It also draws comparisons to current events in each unit as a way of tracking larger historical patterns. As an advanced course, this class will require depth of thought and development of study, research and writing skills. Students continue to develop historical skills including source analysis, research skills, and constructing well supported arguments. This class assumes that students are independent learners who can work with limited teacher support. Students are advanced and enthusiastic readers; they can make inferences, draw connections, comprehend and appreciate texts with sophisticated vocabulary and concepts read at a fast pace. Contemporary U.S. Presidents Semester - Credit: 0.5 Grades 10, 11, and 12 The purpose of this course is to explore the modern U.S. Presidency and consider how its many dimensions affect us as individuals and as members of the larger, global community. International, national, state, and local documents will be examined and discussed with the intent of interpreting the significance of the President of the United States on historical events. The students will also examine the role of the presidency within historical and future perspectives. Resources used will include: historical primary sources, newspapers, magazines, the internet, movies, and national television media. Contemporary Military History Semester - Credit: 0.5 Grades 10, 11 and 12 This course provides a military perspective on the modern US political system, focusing on the military industrial complex and the objectives of war. The course begins with a tour of the philosophical foundation for modern war theory looking at Bentham, Kant, and others. After this review, a chronological look at the 20th century military engagements of the US will be conducted. Resources used will include: historical primary sources, newspapers, magazines, the internet, movies, and national television.

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Contemporary Global Politics Semester - Credit: 0.5 Grades 10, 11 and 12 The purpose of this course is to foster an understanding of daily events and to show how these events affect us as individuals and as members of larger, global community. International, national, state, and local items will be examined and discussed with the intent of interpreting the significance of these events. The students will also place current events within a historical perspective and suggest future implications of these events. Resources used will include: newspapers, magazines, the internet, and national television media as major news source.

Contemporary Global Leadership Semester - Credit: 0.5 Grades 10, 11, and 12 The purpose of this course is to foster an understanding of leadership styles as well as daily events and to show how these events affect us as individuals and as members of larger, global communities. International, national, state, and local documents will be examined and discussed with the intent of interpreting the significance of these events. Students will also place current global leadership events within a historical perspective and suggest future implications of these events. Resources used will include: historical primary sources, newspapers, magazines, the internet, movies, and national television media.

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IB HL/SL History of the Americas Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 11 The course explores political, economic, social, and ideological implications of the first half of the 20th century in the Americas (Canada, USA, and Latin America) as well as examining the lead up to WWII in Japan, Italy and Germany. Students will develop an understanding of, and continuing interest in, the past. They are encouraged to engage with multiple perspectives and to appreciate the complex nature of historical concepts, issues, events and developments. A primary goal of this course is to promote international-mindedness through the study of history from more than one region of the world. The class seeks to develop an understanding of history as a discipline and to develop historical consciousness including a sense of chronology and context, and an understanding of different historical perspectives. Students will also develop key historical skills, including engaging effectively with sources. The ultimate goal is to increase students’ understanding of themselves and of contemporary society by encouraging reflection on the past. IB HL/SL 20th Century World History Full Year - 1 Credit Grade 12 This course prepares students for the IB external and internal examinations. It is the continuation of IB History of the Americas, examining a selection of world history events using the study of US history as a contextual tool. Year two focuses on the study of the causes and effects of 20th century wars and the Cold War. Students also complete a major Research Project of their choosing, with instructor approval. This course requires students to identify patterns in historical events whether they are political, economic, or social. It invites comparisons between, but not judgments of, different cultures, political systems and traditions. This practice provides an excellent foundation for the promotion of international understanding and intercultural awareness necessary to prepare students for global citizenship. Above all, it fosters respect and understanding of people and events in a variety of cultures throughout the world.


WORLD LANGUAGES Learning a foreign language not only reveals how other societies think and feel, what they have experienced and value, and how they express themselves, it also provides a cultural mirror in which we can more clearly see our own society.� -Chancellor Edward Lee Gorsuch The World Language Department recognizes the importance of intercultural communication in the 21st century and aims to foster an open-minded and reflective attitude towards foreign languages and cultures. The LTS language program strives to prepare its students in the four essential skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in French, Spanish and German. Respect for cultural diversity is highly valued at Long Trail School and to this end, a crucial part of the World Language Department’s mission is to expose its students to the traditions, food, music, and other cultural expressions of the foreign language they study. Our goal is to foster students’ appreciation for other ways of life and teach them the skills they need to achieve communicative proficiency in the target language. Students are placed in world language courses by the faculty based on their proficiency. Introductory courses are offered in both Middle School and Upper School. Native speakers and transfer students will be placed depending on their proficiency. Please note that the following refer to the French, Spanish, and German courses. Novice Language 1 Novice Language 2 Full Year - 1 Credit (Upper School students only) Grades 6, 7, 8 , 9, 10, and 11 Students in these classes will achieve a novice high level in reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency (based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages standard) in either one or two years. Students will be assessed on active participation as well as their daily preparation for class. As absolute beginners, students will learn basic vocabulary and memorize words and phrases

for everyday conversation. They will simultaneously explore the cultures and traditions of the languages they are studying. Classroom instruction and directives are primarily in the target language. Second year or accelerated students will further develop their vocabulary and master their use of basic language structures in order to talk about themselves, their family, where they live, their likes and dislikes, and other daily topics; combine learned structures and vocabulary to write simple sentences on these daily topics; learn about cultural differences and culturally appropriate behavior.

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Advanced Language 1 Advanced Language 2 Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 SL Language 1 & 2* HL Language 1 & 2* Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Students must obtain a final grade of at least a 78% on their final exam in the Intermediate 3 year in order to move on to Advanced Level. Intermediate Language 1 Intermediate Language 2 Intermediate Language 3 Full Year - 1 Credit Grades 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 Ab Initio Language 1* Ab Initio Language 2* Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Students must obtain a final grade of at least a 78% on their final exam in Novice Language 2 in order to move on to Intermediate Level. *Ab Initio courses are accelerated IB language courses designed for students who may not be ready for SL Level coursework at the end of their sophomore year. These courses move more quickly than regular Intermediate courses and result in SL credit towards the student’s IB Diploma. Students in these classes will achieve an intermediate high level in reading, writing speaking and listening proficiency (based on the ACTFL standard) in one to three years. Students will be assessed on active participation as well as their daily preparation for class. First year students will learn vocabulary and structures for addressing social and travel situations. Second year students will continue to expand their range of expression in these areas. Third year students will be able to converse on a wide variety of common topics in the major time frames (present, past and future) and write simple descriptions and narrations of paragraph length on everyday events and situations in present, past and future. These classes are conducted primarily in the target language.

* The SL and HL courses are part of the IB curriculum for juniors and seniors. A student may enter at an advanced level prior to their junior year, but they cannot receive IB credit until their junior year. Students in this 2-year program achieve an advanced low/mid level (for SL) or advanced mid/high level (for HL) in reading, writing speaking and listening proficiency (based on ACTFL proficiency standards). Students are assessed on active participation as well as daily preparation for class. These are accelerated courses in which students continue to build their proficiency and confidence in the target language while using authentic, unabridged materials, such as newspaper articles, opinion pieces, works of fiction and feature films. Discussions and writings are developed around the Core Topics and Options offered in the IB curriculum, and include activities, such as exploring current events and cultural trends and preparing skits and presentations. At the culmination of their second year SL students are able to converse clearly and fluidly on a variety of familiar topics with accuracy and precision and compose multiple paragraph texts that clearly and concisely communicate the intended message. At the culmination of their second year HL students are able to contribute actively to live conversations, providing structured arguments and construct hypotheses to support their opinions, write extensively about topics that are familiar to them as well as show some ability to deal with abstract, global or interpersonal themes, and show good control of all of the major time frames in their speaking and writing. At the Advanced Level, instruction is provided almost exclusively in the target language.

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TECHNOLOGY/MEDIA Introduction to Computers Full Year Two classes per week Grade 6 Students become familiar with the following: keyboarding, word processing and spreadsheets, desktop publishing, web page design, and Internet research. Mastery of basic computer skill is essential to success in today’s technological world. Media Literacy Full Year Two classes per week Grade 7 Group discussions, written personal reflections, and individual and group research projects and presentations provide students the opportunity to share their thoughts and demonstrate their developing skills. The ability to create various forms of media is part of attaining media fluency so students create mock search engines, public service announcements, and advertising campaigns for local businesses. Once per semester, the class unplugs from technology and heads outdoors to discuss tech/life balance and the need to maintain connectedness with each other.

Introduction to Computer Coding 1 Introduction to Computer Coding 2 Semester Two classes per week Grade 8 Introduction to Computer Coding is a technical exploration of how computers function. The class covers basic hardware, software, and networking principles. During the Fall semester, students create a simple HTML website from scratch and learn to use Photoshop. The Spring semester moves faster and introduces algorithms, JavaScript programming and video game design. Introduction to Computer Coding 1 is required for all 8th grade students. Students with an interest in coding are encouraged to all sign up for Introduction to Computer Coding 2.

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INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE IB – Theory of Knowledge Full Year - 0.5 Credits (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Required for all IB Diploma Candidates Theory of Knowledge is an interdisciplinary, critical thinking course focusing on the nature of knowledge and understanding through the different lenses by which humans come to know and understand their world. It answers the questions. “What can be known?” and “How can I know it?” It seeks to make the informed into the seeker, and the knowing into the wise. It is a full-year course that meets two periods each week and carries a half credit.The course examines the nature of knowledge. Each individual in the class, as a distinct seeker of knowledge, will be placed at the center of this enterprise. We shall consider the following ways or means of knowing: sense perception (the body), reason (the mind), imagination and emotion (the heart), technology (the hand), language (the tongue), and faith (the spirit). Over time, the class considers various disciplines of knowledge, such as Science, Mathematics, Human Sciences, History, the Arts, and Ethics. We examine the differences in scope and method between these types of knowledge, how we gain knowledge in and from these disciplines, what the connections are between them, what the limitation of each might be, and how they might offer knowledge and understanding in particular and illuminating ways.

This class adopts the power of the interrogative as its method, because the assumptions and knowledge of the members of the class are the starting point. The course aims to train an interrogative and independent habit of mind that will direct a knowledgeable habit of heart. CAS - Creativity, Activity, Service Required for all IB Diploma Candidates The three strands of CAS, which are often interwoven with particular activities, are characterized as follows: • Creativity – arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking. • Activity – physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the DP. • Service – an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student. The rights, dignity and autonomy of all those involved are respected. In order to demonstrate these concepts, students are required to undertake a CAS Project. The project challenges students to: • show initiative • demonstrate perseverance • develop skills such as collaboration, problem solving and decision making CAS enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development by learning through experience. It provides opportunities for self-

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determination and collaboration with others, fostering a sense of accomplishment and enjoyment from their work. At the same time, CAS is an important counterbalance to the academic pressures of the Diploma Program Extended Essay Required for all IB Diploma candidates The extended essay provides practical preparation for undergraduate research an opportunity for students to investigate a topic of special interest to them, which is also related to one of the student’s six DP subjects. Through the research process for the extended essay, students develop skills in formulating an appropriate research question, engaging in a personal exploration of the topic, communicating ideas, and developing an argument. Participation in this process develops the capacity to analyse, synthesize and evaluate knowledge. Pamoja - IB Online Classes Additional Fee Required Full Year - 1 Credit/year (2 year commitment) Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Prior approval from Dean of Academics and the IB Coordinator IB courses that are not offered in person at Long Trail School are often offered through Pamoja. Course offerings include: SL Business Management SL/HL Informational Technology in a Global Society SL/HL Economics SL Philosophy HL Mathematics

SUPPORT SERVICES Long Trail School’s Support Services Program provides a comprehensive range of individualized academic support services, accommodations, and self-advocacy skills that promote the full integration of students with learning differences into the mainstream college-preparatory environment. A Learning Specialist, an academic coach, provides guidance, scaffolding, but most importantly leads the student to a path towards independence, and is also a liaison with teachers when necessary. Students enrolled in the Support Services Program work with an individualized plan, and work one-on-one or in small groups to build skills with a variety of materials. Skills worked on include: • Basic language skills: orthography (spelling), grammar, mechanics, and decoding • Written expression: sentence variety, paragraph structure, and thesis formulation • Reading comprehension: understanding text structures, vocabulary, textbook format, expository and narrative forms, preview text, inquiry, active marking of text, gleaning of main idea and supporting details, inferential reasoning, and written response • Study skills: time management, management of resources, using a planner and calendar, scheduling of projects, notetaking, and test preparation • Content support: Provide content support in English, science, social studies and world languages.

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1045 Kirby Hollow Rd Dorset, VT 05251 802.867.5717

2017-18 Course Catalog  
2017-18 Course Catalog  
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