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Volume 4 Issue 3 201 8

WHY 'OUTSIDE IN’ THINKING IS ESSENTIAL FOR BUSINESS GROWTH

HOW TO FUTUREPROOF YOUR BUSINESSES IS RETIREMENT FOR ENTREPRENEURS POSSIBLE?

THE IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL LISTENING HOW TO PRODUCTIVELY MANAGE YOUR LIFE

BFC BANK LAUNCHES IN LONDON Exclusive Interview With CEO, David Price


Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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CONTENTS

Lucy McCarraher: Business Essential 'Outside In’ Book Awards Founder: Page 36 thinking: Page 10

INSIDE

Cover Story: David Price, CEO BFC Bank Exclusive Interview: Page 12

Divergent Souls and Minds; A Business Perspective, Page 46 FutureproofYour Business: Page 18

Dressing Women For Success: Page 40

Social Listening: Page 50

The Need For Business Values Page 5 Mentoring London Entrepreneurs: Page 16 Entrepreneurship In UK Social Housing: Page 22 How to Productively Manage Yourself: Page 24 Sexual Harassment Or Banter?: Page 28 Is Retirement For Entrepreneurs Possible? Page 42

The London Business Journal is produced by THE LONDON BUSINESS JOURNAL, 24-26 Arcadia Avenue, Finchley, London N3 2JU. Telephone: 0208 453 7185 / 07043 020 287. Š 2014 all rights reserved. Reproduction in any manner or any language, in whole or in part, without prior written permission is prohibited. All material in this journal is provided for your information only and may not be construed as business advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this information; instead, readers should consult appropriate business related professionals on any matter relating to their profession/trade/business. The information and opinions expressed here are believed to be accurate, based on the best judgement available to the authors, and readers who fail to consult with appropriate authorities assume the risk of any financial setbacks or otherwise. In addition, the information and opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of every contributor to The London Business Journal. The London Business Journal acknowledges occasional differences in opinion and welcomes the exchange of different viewpoints. The publisher is not responsible for errors or omissions. Subscribe to The London Business Journal by visiting www.LondonBusinessJournal.co.uk or send an email to: subscriptions@LondonBusinessJournal.co.uk All other enquiries, call 0208 453 718 / 07043 020 287


Business News

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E2Exhange Launches in Brighton Paul Lindley: Founder, Ella’s Kitchen

E2Exchange launched has been launched in Brighton as part of the networking organisation's nationwide expansion. The #ScaleUp2Success event, which took place in March, also saw awards handed out to outstanding Brighton-based entrepreneurs. Special guests and keynote speakers included Paul Lindley (Founder, Ella’s Kitchen), Alison Cooper (Founder, Palm Grove International), Paul Stead (Founder, Brewery London and Growth by Design) and Richard Morris (CEO, Regus). The main presentation of the evening came from Paul Lindley, who spoke about business being about people and his journey to improve children's health via food. He also pointed out reasons why Ella's Kitchen has been successful. Some of the points included being a value-based business, having customer obsession, building an awesome team and actively finding ways to develop trust. "If you think you're too small to make a difference try going to bed with a mosquito," he said. The subsequently held panel discussion on entrepreneurial issues was moderated 4

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by E2E's Andrew Wood. Among other things Paul Stead spoke about how he got started and grew with a loan from his mum on his 30th birthday, while Alison Cooper said the secret to her success was that she loves a challenge. The five award-winners on the night were: Daryl Butlin (Startup Entrepreneur to Watch); Claire, (Social Impact Entrepreneur); Chris Andrew (Ecosystem Supporter); Heidi Carroll (Next Big Scale Up Entrepreneur to Watch); and Giles Palmer (E2E Scaled Up Entrepreneur). The event was held at SPACES, Mocatta House, Trafalgar Place, Brighton. To find out more visit: www.e2exchange.com

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Business News: Values

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THE NEED FOR BUSINESS VALUES

Midtown Big Ideas Exchange recently the Midtown neighbourhood and beyond. had a panel from the business world The panel all agreed on the importance of gather to discuss the importance of upholding positive business values – both business values; described by Tass as a sustainability exercise and an effort Mavrogordato, CEO of BEE Midtown, as to drive profits. Jacques explained that "all the great stuff done alongside businesses want to do their part to keep business as usual". the planet moving The panel explored what forward but stressed this business values really is as much for mean to society and organisational benefit as whether CSR activity can it is for more restore confidence in the philanthropic reasons, commercial economy. but added "a business Panel: Steve Woerner, Nancy Chair Will Moore, Arts Lengthorn, Mike Bonner & Jacques that doesn't have values Editor of the Evening is a bad business". Peretti Standard was joined by The event aimed to Steve Woerner from Mitsubishi Corp, reposition the rhetoric around "evil Nancy Lengthorn from MediaCom, Mike corporations" and celebrate some of the Bonner of Rosewood London and amazing things that businesses in the investigative journalist Jacques Peretti. Midtown area are integrating into their Moore opened the floor to the panel, day-to-day operations. offering them the opportunity to showcase Tass Mavrogordato, CEO of BEE how their own companies are striving to Midtown said: "Large corporations are have a positive impact both at local and often positioned in an ethically negative international levels. light, yet in reality, many of these Woerner shared the ongoing and contribute a deeper value to society that longstanding commitment Mitsubishi may go untold. Whilst we might observe have to the communities they work in, the visible manifestations of solid values while Nancy explained that a significant in positives such as charitable support, amount of her work at MediaCom focuses apprenticeships and gender diversity, on "the people inside the building" and creating purpose and belonging might be how they can be encouraged and harder to quantify. This debate seeks to supported to make a difference within explore the heart and soul of business their communities. Mike added that one values, both globally and – more of the key priorities for Rosewood was to specifically - how this extends hyper"be good neighbours to the community" locally to Midtown." and outlined some of the extensive To find out more about Midtown Big environmental programmes that Ideas Exchange events visit: Rosewood London run in order to benefit www.midtown-bie.com Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Business News

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Business Ping Pong FC Returns

Businesses across London will be throwing down the gauntlet and competing against each other in a battle to be crowned table tennis champions on 14 June at the city’s spectacular Oval Space. Among those taking part will be Funding Circle, Ratesetter, Yo Yo Wallet, Tetrad Discovery, ZPG, CarWow and last year’s winners Flyt. The Ping Pong Fight Club UK Tour, sponsored by Tsingtao Beer (pronounced Ching Dow), has already visited Liverpool and Leeds, with London marking the half-way point, before heading on to Manchester, Cardiff and Bristol in the coming months. Ping Pong Fight Club actively encourages ‘all-women’ teams to compete on behalf of their companies. This has proven to be hugely popular, increasing the level of participation of female

players in the workplace and of course at Ping Pong Fight Club. Organiser and founder of PPFC, Ade Leigh, said: “We are thrilled that Ping Pong Fight Club, with the support of Tsingtao, is returning to London. Last year’s event was feisty! The city has a competitive corporate culture that’s for sure! “Ping Pong Fight Club encourages team building and employee engagement in a fun and energetic way. Table tennis is a sport all employees can get involved in no matter what their age or ability, whether that’s to play or spectate.” Tsingtao Beer is imported by Halewood Wines & Spirits. Halewood Wines and Spirits is the UK’s largest independent alcoholic drinks manufacturer and distributor. For further information visit: www.pingpongfightclub.co.uk/london

Ladder for SME Business Growth The Growth Ladder Group have launched sustainable long-term growth. As well as a new and innovative online platform to support UK based SME's to enable sustainable, long-term growth and business development. Specialist Business Development Coaches Richard Ellis and Tim Ives have developed the platform to deliver the benefits of using a business growth specialist, but through self-learning, allowing business owners to develop at their own pace and at the fraction of the cost of a using a consultant. The platform takes you on a journey across 12 sectors, helping to identify, manage, plan, action, deliver and review your business to achieve robust and Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

the growth platform, there is also an online community zone for members to share thoughts, ideas and network with others. Ellis and Ives both bring a wealth of experience in both the Business to Business and Business to Consumer sectors having worked in many positions within the FMCG, Pharmaceutical, Apparel and Fashion, Sports and Services sectors from office to boardroom level, predominantly in Growth and Development roles. For further information visit: www.thegrowthladder.com

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Business News: Business Book Awards 201 8

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Business Book Awards 2018 The first Business Book Awards took place recently at the Grange City Hotel, London, to celebrate the best in business books, and was attended by the authors of many different business books that were shortlisted by specialist judges across seven categories. The awards were founded by Lucy McCarraher from Norwich in Norfolk, East Anglia. Lucy is the author of eleven books, and co-founder and Managing Editor of Rethink Press. The event was created for business authors who used many diverse ways to get their books published, and who discussed a wide range of topics from entrepreneurial management and presenting skills, to technological advancements and raising the profile of a business. Lucy McCarraher said: “We felt it was time that the wide range of business authors were celebrated for the knowledge and expertise they make available through their books. Some of them make an impact in a highly niche market; others present a vision that changes the way we all work or live.” Also in attendance was Isabelle King, also from Norwich, a representative of the Prince’s Trust, a charity for which the Business Book Awards were raising funds. Isabelle King set up a literary enterprise through the Prince’s Trust called ‘Books Talk Back’, a not-for-profit event to provide information about writing and the publishing industry. She is also a children’s author with two books; ‘The Norfolk Story Book’ and ‘Once Upon a Time in Norfolk’. Isabelle King said, “I believe passionately that encouraging and inspiring children and young people to develop a love of literature is one of the best steps we can 8

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Isabelle King: Prince’s Trust representative and Founder, Books Talk Back

Winner: Embracing Change by Minter Dial and Caleb Storkey (above)

Winner, Judges' Choice: Client Earth by James Thornton Martin Goodman (above)

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Business News: Business Book Awards 201 8

take in developing a bright and positive future. This is a value that I have always been determined to take forward with me in my career.” The next person to speak on stage was Dent Global Founder, Daniel Priestly, who said that the ability to access information is wonderful and that the world needs more people that start movements. Priestly also pointed out that there is a strong need for the awards to combat what he referred to as proximity bias, since writers are often close to their work. Another benefit of the awards he said was for others appreciate the work of peers. The overall winner of the Business Book Awards was Campbell Macpherson, author of ‘The Change Catalyst’ who also received the award in the Leading the Team Category. Winners in other categories were Will Dean with ‘It Takes a Tribe’, Tom Bird and Jeremy Cassel with ‘The Leaders Guide to Presenting’, Matthew Fuller and Tim Nightingale with ‘Strategic Tendering for Professional Services’, Minter Dial and Caleb Storkey with ‘Futureproof’ and James Thorton and Martin Goodman with ‘Client Earth’.

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Double Award Winner, Business Book of The Year & Leading The Team: Campbell Macpherson (above)

Safaraz Ali (ThinkFest), Lucy McCarraher and Terri Deli

Winner, Selling The Dream: Matthew Fuller and Tim Nightingale (above) Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Business Development

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WHY 'OUTSIDE IN’ THINKING IS ESSENTIAL TO BUSINESS GROWTH

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By Royston Guest

you to write down your answer to the question: what business are you in? Don’t over analyse or over think your answer; it is not a trick question. Just capture your immediate response in black or white or worst case, imprint the answer firmly in your conscious mind. Here’s the kicker to start with: in my experience most people answer that question from one of three angles. First, How easy are we to do business with? they think they’re in the business dictated Are we delivering a world-class customer by the name of their business; second, the industry in which they operate; or third, experience? the products or services they provide. But actually, nothing could be further What business are we really in? from the truth. Do you know something? Most business You see, I don’t think most people know owners and leaders do not know what what business they are really in. Now, I business they are really in! know that is a bold statement but let me A simple exercise for you. If you have a demonstrate my business case through a pad and pen or electronic device I’d like real world example. re you thinking ‘inside out’ or ‘outside in’? Great businesses and their leaders think ‘outside in’, the customer is the focal point of everything they do and how they do it. They are fanatical about looking at themselves through their customers’ lens and culturally are self-challenging, forever asking probing questions:

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Business Development

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Pizza Express is a global chain of over 500 restaurants, founded by a guy named Peter Boizot in 1965. If you were to ask anyone at the company what business they are in, the response might well be selling pizzas. At a logical level this is correct. However, as part of their induction, new colleagues are educated on the history, heritage, culture, and purpose of Pizza Express – guess what business they say they are ‘really’ in ... ‘Feeding great conversations since 1965.’ The product or service, which in this case is pizza, is just the prop to engage the customer in the memorable experience. The fact that a pizza restaurant makes great pizzas should simply be a given; your product is merely your licence to trade and it has to be great because in a competitive world, mediocre products quickly give way to better ones. Notice what impact the addition of one word has when you change ‘what business are you in?’ to ‘what business are you ‘really’ in?’ Your response to the first question will

drive you down the road of answering the question from a logical perspective aligned to your industry or products and services you provide. Your response to the second question creates an entirely different dynamic: great businesses think differently, they think ‘outside in’ as opposed to inside out. Adding one word ‘really’ to the question challenges you to go beyond the physical product or service you provide and delve deeper into the benefits your customer receives by choosing your products and services. Now complete the exercise again but answer the question; what business are you 'really' in? Simply changing the direction of your lens from ‘inside out’ to ‘outside in' will help you see your business through the eyes of your existing and prospective customers. And I hope you agree, it has the potential to completely transform how you think about your business, and how you engage with employees, customers, shareholders and partners.

Royston Guest is a global authority on growing businesses and unlocking people potential. He is CEO of Pti-Worldwide, author of #1 best-selling business growth book, Built to Grow, available on Amazon (also available on audible) and founder of Built to Grow Mastermind programme. For further information visit: www.roystonguest.com Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Cover Story: BFC Bank

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BFC: New Bank, New Rules

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David Price: CEO, BFC Bank (UK)

few months ago London welcomed BFC Bank. Based on the premise ofserving SME's in ways they say other banks fall short, BFC hopes to make a lasting impact. Here BFC Bank's UK CEO, David Price, tells Ronnie Ajoku why (and how) UK businesses can benefit from the BFC experience.

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ith years of experience in the banking industry to his credit, David Price is obviously in the know when it comes to spotting trends and developments for banking customers, particularly in the SME market. His customer-focused past experience and current approach is what he believes will separate BFC Bank from their competitors. “There are many SME's in this country, of which a very large percentage are actively engaged in international trade. And now

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more than ever, with this whole issue of Brexit hanging over us, it has never been more important that small businesses are connected to their suppliers and their customers around the world. “If you are a small business that's buying raw materials from suppliers or selling products to customers, and every time you go to a large bank, or even a small bank, and get charged an exorbitant amount of money to make an international payment, that's more cost to your business you simply can't afford,” he explains.

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Cover Story: BFC Bank

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David Price reading his address during the launch of BFC Bank in London

“Running a business is simple; there are perspective on Barclaycard and fintechs is only three elements. Your staff (which is a prime example. “I started working for a usually your biggest cost), your IT (which direct marketing business. It happens to be is normally your second biggest cost) and a direct marketing business that everybody all the ancillary around it. Now, I can't else thinks is a bank called Barclaycard. help them get their staff costs Barclaycard was essentially a Other banks down. I can't help them to get direct marketing company and take an their IT costs down, but what I actually one of the first can do is make their cost of exorbitant 'fintechs'. So when I hear about banking much cheaper. all these new fintechs on the margin and we “What we're doing is enabling are saying that block, I [think] worked for a them to make international fintech 30 years ago.” this is not fair It was from here that he went payments at a fraction of the cost of mainstream banks. to work for One2One, an Usually, when they make a payment, the experience that has stayed with him up to banks take a margin on the FX; they take now. “I went to One2One because the an exorbitant margin and we are saying world was changing. We were moving that this is not fair. away from the sort of banking modules “We need to make a profit, but we don't that we were used to, to one in which the need to charge the sort of margins that mobile phone was just emerging. This banks do. If we can do it, so can other wonderful thing called the internet was banks.” just coming on the scene and there was an During our conversation it becomes clear opportunity to work for this fledgling that he is quick to see alternative points business. One2One was originally known and angles many can easily miss. His as the M25 network; because it was the Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Cover Story: BFC Bank

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centenary. only area where our “We have spent the last phones worked. But the 60 years or so whole point was that it providing the ability was a young, dynamic for consumers to make company that was all payments to their loved about bringing a great ones around the world, solution to customers. so we have been “And that experience has connecting people. stayed with me and is Adam Boulton, Now what we are something I'm trying to Sunday Times columnist and doing is connecting bring to BFC Bank.” Editor at Large businesses.” Unsurprisingly, while for Sky News Keynote At the moment, the appreciating its vital role was Speaker at BFC main focus of BFC in modern-day banking, launch Bank is on SME's in he views much of the current overemphasis on technology by the UK that export to other countries. bankers as unhealthy. “The issue for me is “Any small business for whom 50% of their business is involved in international this. Too many companies talk about product, too many companies talk about trade. We are talking about pharmaceutical the technology. I actually think that the companies, businesses in the travel sector. fintechs and challenger banks are more We're talking about small manufacturing companies; all those businesses that are excited by the technology than the the bedrock upon which Britain and the customers they are serving. “I remember from my days at One2One, economic powerhouse that Britain is, is we had lots of guys who were really exited dependent. “We're looking at some obvious things about the latest mobile devices in the market place, but what I was interested in like term deposits, we'll be doing loans and we'll be looking at was, 'what problem is it going products in the trade finance to solve for customers'? The space. We are doing something lesson we learned at One2One called 'pooling accounts'; were was that customers wanted to be connected with other Panel: Ebrahim Nonoo, if they are holding money in customers. People wanted to be David Price & Robert Greene different currencies they can effectively pool those different connected with people.” currencies into a single account. Originally founded in Bahrain as the Bahrain Financing Company (BFC) 1917 “So there is a range of products and to trade gold bullion and foreign currency, services, but initially we are focusing on international payments because that's it has built a recognised and wellrespected reputation for moving money where we see the single biggest gap today, safely, transparently and efficiently over and where we can make the most the years. Last year the bank celebrated its difference,” he says. 14

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Mentorship

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Mentoring London Entrepreneurs

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By Zufi Deo

remember seven years ago when 10 ofus turned up at the Wellcome Collection's Cafe on Euston Road.

We were all buying coffee hoping the staff would not kick us out. This was the very first meeting of the Business Mentoring Meetup Group. Mitch Bourne - an Ozzie Entrepreneur - set up the group and encouraged all of us to support each other on a peer support basis. A month later he had to leave the UK. The choice was either let the group close down or step forward and take ownership. The CSR program of my Business Entrepreneur Commons, London - was organised to promote entrepreneurship in the London area. I took an open innovation based approach. I would support groups I felt would be useful to

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entrepreneurs and would help them with their marketing. I felt this would help generate the ecosystem of support entrepreneurs badly needed in London. To give you an idea, there were barely any accelerator programs in London unlike today. Now we have well over 50 accelerator programs. Back then there was the financial crisis and university educated white collar professionals faced redundancies. You could feel the uncertainty in the air. So, it was natural to take ownership of the business mentoring meetup group and ensure the much needed support was made available to the London entrepreneurs. Our first challenge was to organise space for our group and provide it with stability. UCL Entrepreneurship Society allowed us host our Business mentoring meetup

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Mentorship

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Over time we systemised the support

group at the Print Room Cafe. This was a central location for us. It was a nice open environment as well. The staff were friendly and supportive. Our members found it a great place and to most it reminded them of their time at University.

Over time we systemised the support using an offline and online mix. We would send out summaries of what we discussed in the offline sessions as a weekly update. This ensured the members who could not attend still felt part of our community. It would help them learn from the knowledge sharing that went on in the group sessions. As time went on the group attracted professional services providers. Kim Dolman, was the first professional to offer his support on a monthly basis. Gerry Creedon soon joined us in September 2011 and is still offering his support. We soon started to organise the group so trainee coaches could come by and offer their support and build up their hours while helping entrepreneurs gain clarity and direction. We would also encourage international businesses to set up in London or facilitate their market entry in London if they would support entrepreneurs for free / near free / on a freemium basis. These kind of win/win solutions have become the hallmark of our approach and continues to this day. We have now built up an ecosystem of support where entrepreneurs can access to legal, IP, Marketing and Financial support online. Helping entrepreneurs to access good quality expertise on a freemium

basis helps to educate them on what a professional support provider can do for them. There is a chronic underconsumption of professional business services - one of the reasons why entrepreneurs have such a high risk of failure. Over the seven years we have supported over 1,300 entrepreneurs. We supported local University-based entrepreneurship. For six years at King’s College, London, we supported their post graduate and staff via their internal Lion’s Den Business planning competition. We also supported London in meeting its Sustainable Development Goals. Our inclusive approach has ensured we meet the needs of all segments of society. Our members have been awarded UK Top 50 Business Adviser multiple times along the way and some members have gone on to receive awards for their entrepreneurial projects. Others accept bitcoin as payment as part of their daily operations. From established tech-based businesses to soonto-be entrepreneurs, London-based people from all walks of life have offered and received support via our approach. Without needing to set diversity targets we managed to figure out ways to ensure all our support meets the needs of the everyday London entrepreneurs. We look forward to continuing our support for London entrepreneurs and their business and now organise all the above support under the www.stairsandshares.com brand. Why not come and join us and find out more?

Zufi Deo co-creates innovation with Entrepreneurs. He was a UK Top 50 Business Adviser for 2014. He has 25 years experience in the SME sector and his business strategy solutions for high-growth enterprises have been published in Academic and Industry Journals. Zufi offers his support via www.bizstuff.co Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Business Management

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HOW TO TURN DISRUPTIVE FORCES

INTO FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

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rom the rise in power and fall in price ofleading Cryptocurrencies to Cambridge Analytica and Facebook’s tragic Big Data strategy, there’s one question that remains. How can our businesses be Futureproof? By Caleb Storkey

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hen we face change, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Hesitation becomes normality, and we retreat behind our walls of safety and busyness as normal. Working with both startups and multinationals, it’s stating the obvious to say digital transformation is difficult. But there has never been a more pressing time to embrace disruption. Never a more pressing time to welcome evolution. Never a more pressing time to avoid extinction. Some call it the fourth industrial

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revolution, others call it the survival of the fittest; either way, it’s survival of the fastest. Whether it’s Artificial Intelligence or The Blockchain, Big Data or The Cloud, Genomics or The Internet, we need the tools to understand how to turn these disruptive forces into future opportunities quickly. For your business to be Futureproof, you need to do more than blindly hope your marketing leadership will launch campaign rockets to launch you out of trouble’s orbit. However, it does start with

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Business Management

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Minter Dial and Caleb Storkey

Instead ofgiving in to a lack of willpower, we need to establish the habits that make our learning easier the CMO. A new CMO. The Chief Mindset Officer; and it’s a role and responsibility we all need to take on. 84% of all digital transformation projects fail, so all leaders need to lay good foundations for us to build on. Although all leadership skills are important, three mindsets currently needed in higher measures are Collaboration, Responsibility and Meaningfulness; a cheeky nod to a new CRM. In Meaningfulness, leaders need crystal clarity about the organisation’s purpose. This needs to be more than a list of iconheavy bullet points on the ‘About Us’ page. If you can’t communicate your point, in the time it takes to point, you probably don’t have a point. Why does your organisation exist and what’s the true purpose of it? Many employees are provocatively asking and prodding businesses with this question, looking for a greater focus on the impact Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

on the triple bottom line; People, Planet and Profit. The second mindset is Responsibility, and if the issues around morality and data has shown us anything this last year, it’s clear there are many areas where we need to collectively step up. We’re blind to opportunity if we’re not responsible for our own continuous development. How do we grow and learn best? What tools do we use to accelerate our understanding? Instead of giving in to a lack of willpower, we need to establish the habits that make our learning easier. We need a balance of Intellectual Intelligence, Emotional Intelligence and Practical Intelligence. Put another way, it’s time to learn through our Head, Heart and Hands. Where IQ and EQ are often highlighted, PQ reminds us to roll up our sleeves, get our digital hands dirty and explore technology up-close. A third key mindset is Collaboration.

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Business Management

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There has never been a more pressing time to embrace disruption. ..Never a more pressing time to welcome evolution

All too often Senior Executives feel the pressure to be the fountain of all knowledge for everything that may impact their business. This is impossible. We need the humility to open up space for others, to learn more collectively and to collaborate effectively. For instance, in AI projects, startups need corporate data, and corporates need startup talent. Which technologies will have the biggest impact on your business? With so many disruptive forces, we need to explore how to make them accessible to ourselves and those around us. We haven’t got the time or know-how to be experts in all of them. We have got the chance to taste and understand those that are more relevant to us, so we can assess their impact appropriately. One way to look at this is to apply what we call in our book, A Slice

Of Pie. PIE invites you to consider how each of the twelve forces we outline influence you Personally, how they affect your team Internally and Externally, how they impact your customers, suppliers, investors and the wider society. Yes, in putting ideas down onto paper, and having them published in a traditional book format, we may be grappling with revolutionary ideas we fear may become dated. But to be Futureproof, do we adapt or die, upskill or innovate, disrupt or become disrupted? Instead of the fear of our book becoming dated, perhaps the bigger concern is whether your business could become dated. Writing another book from scratch is relatively easy. Starting another business from scratch is more of a challenge.

Caleb Storkey is co-author of the Business Book Award winning 'Futureproof', written along with Minter Dial. Futureproof' is out now in paperback and ebook and priced at ÂŁ14.99

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Property

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THE NEED FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN BRITAIN'S SOCIAL HOUSING

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By Lucy Chapman

On behalf of the victims, Leslie Thomas QC comments, “Do they know anything about social housing? How many of them have lived in a tower block or on a council estate, or in social housing?� As a council tower block resident, this is especially poignant. There are certain things you will have no idea about unless you have lived in social housing. The positives: the sense of community, In the press, families and survivors make melting pot of cultures, the tangible repeated appeals to have their voices importance of affordable rent and homes; heard as part of the inquiry proceedings, and the negatives: safety issues due to wanting representative panel members. chronic underfunding, repeated lack of

une 14th 2017. London reels in the wake ofthe Grenfell Tower disaster. As information is gradually disseminated over time, the horror ofthe burning building seared onto the memory ofa nation, it becomes more apparent that this was avoidable.

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Property

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basic services and populated by an underclass, as propagated by certain demonisation in the media newspapers, but by people (as if you are less of a with valuable life experience, citizen, or less deserving, due skill sets, empathy and true to your status as a council understanding of the issues tenant). faced. On my floor alone, my However, it is exactly this neighbours include a famous Grenadian basketball coach, experience and knowledge an Albanian carpenter and a that make social housing fashion designer from tenants ideally placed to Blackpool. effect change. An untapped Residents can also be heard resource, we see and hear by getting involved in their problems as they start, many own governance, as a Lucy Chapman: of us having positive, collective. Tenant Founder, CommUnify Management Organisations practical contributions on (TMOs) are voluntary elected how things can be improved. boards of resident directors, who have We are the most passionate about with local authorities and improving conditions and opportunities in agreements housing associations to run and manage estates, as we live here. These are our various aspects of estates. Depending on homes. These are our communities. the size and scope, they may employ staff Despite even the best intentions, most to deal with the day to day, whilst the local authorities are running on empty. board make policy decisions. Depending The funding simply isn’t there, budgets on their skills, residents can take on a are ever shrinking and this has had an variety of roles, running and starting new impact on facilities and quality of life for initiatives to improve their communities. residents. It’s for this reason certain Having a TMO role not only improves tenants, like myself, have stepped into the communities, but also potentially benefits breach to try and use our skills to make a individuals, providing training and other difference in our communities. opportunities. It’s through these groups For example, my project, CommUnify, interested parties can find out what would hopes to address inequality of access to help communities, forging partnerships services, drawing on my communications for support with things like educational and community work background and and cultural activities. current legal studies. I saw a gap and I am using my unique experience to do what I As a famous fictional TV ad man once can to try and fill it. There will be others, said, “if you don’t like what they’re like me, motivated by what they are saying, change the conversation”. Let’s seeing to use entrepreneurship as a way change that conversation, by asking, forward, representing our communities, instead of telling. working alongside social housing “What do you want? What do you need? providers to help improve issues such as How can we improve this together?” service delivery. Social housing is not Lucy Chapman is the Founder of CommUnify, a social housing startup that secured an investment after winning second place at City University's Pitch For Good; held during the Social Enterprise Festival, 2018 Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Mindfulness

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HOW TO PRODUCTIVELY MANAGE YOUR BUSY LIFE & GET MORE DONE

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o you find you always have a million things to do, never being able to complete your to-do list, forever being interrupted by streams ofemails, phone calls and messages? Is your mind always overloaded with thoughts whizzing around? By Dr Emily Shaw, Dr Michael Sinclair and Josie Seydel It is important to remember that our brains evolved to take in information and problem-solve, essentially to keep us alive. This means, no matter how full of information it is, our brain is always craving to take in more and more. The problem with this is that we can find it increasingly difficult to stay focused on one task, at one time, as there are so many distractions demanding our attention. Before we know it, we have created a habit of multitasking, which according to research actually isn’t a very good idea, when it comes to our productivity and

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efficiency. Trying to speak to a colleague, whilst sending out an email and completing any number of other tasks all at the same time actually takes us longer, causes us to feel more stressed out and makes it much more likely that we will make a mistake than if we truly focused on just one task, at one time. Multitasking is actually making it harder and harder for us to be the effective, efficient beings we all aspire to be. Mindfulness has become a scientifically

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Mindfulness

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proven, go-to antidote to help us manage our increasingly busy lives. Research has shown how mindfulness practice can change areas of the brain associated with improved cognitive functioning and the ability to regulate emotions. Mindfulness is about focusing your attention in a particular way (on purpose, with openness), to your present moment experience, that is your thoughts, feelings, sensations, urges and what you can see, hear, feel, smell and taste. The more you do this, the more you train your mind in staying present, and increase the likelihood of not being pulled off task by a zillion and one inevitable distractions (including your own thoughts). The good news is that you can practise mindfulness anytime, anywhere, whether it’s during a meeting, reading an email, talking to a colleague, drinking coffee or even doing the washing up! Try out this mindfulness practice Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

throughout your day to help you focus your attention on the job at hand.

•Notice and acknowledge the sensation in your body where your body makes contact with the surface on which you are sitting, laying or standing – this may be the sensation of your bottom or back where either meets the chair or bed, or the sensation of the soles of your feet touching the floor. •Simply notice and acknowledge this sensation, in other words hold it in your awareness, focus your attention on it and allow it to take centre stage at the forefront of your mind – nothing more than that. Not so much thinking about it, but curiously exploring, and noticing the feeling and the sense of touch of your body making contact with the surface. •Should any thoughts pop into your mind about what you are doing, any judgements or opinions about it or anything else at all

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(maybe about your body or what you need to get done generally), just notice these thoughts, do not try to push them away and gently bring your attention back to noticing and focusing on the sensation in your body. Using mindfulness can help you to create some space from your busyness and actually help you to be more productive with the things that really count. When your mind feels in overdrive, instead of racing ahead at full speed, put on the brakes, S.L.O.W. down and redirect your attention to what matters most to you. S Stop whatever you are doing and bring

your awareness to your breathing. L Let thoughts, opinions, judgments and urges be. O Open up your heart, body and mind to what you are feeling. W Where is most important for you to put your attention right now? (For example, being present during a meeting or finishing off important work) Like any skill, mindfulness takes regular practise. Try playing around with these practices and over time you too can reap the many rewards that mindfulness has to offer you.

Dr Emily Shaw, Dr Michael Sinclair & Josie Seydel are Practitioner Psychologists at City Psychology Group in London, and the authors of Mindfulness for Busy People: turning frantic and frazzled into calm and composed (2nd Edition)

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Leadership

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Harassment or Banter... Does the action of your leadership team match your complying words?

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he recent attention paid to sexual harassment in the entertainment industry and politics has many ofus, hauling out our political correctness manuals and heading for the cover ofour own space in the office. At least that is what the media would like us to think. Maybe more to the point, it is what social media would like us to believe. As much as we hate the idea, social media is here to stay as an influencer ofthe general public on what is happening out there in the world. By Maggie Georgopoulos Just after the Westminster ‘trial by media’ started, my partner and I were having a conversation about sexual harassment in the workplace. Being someone who is quite sensitive to how he might impact other's feeling, he suddenly started wondering if conversations he had in the past crossed the line. I hurried to reassure him that anyone he'd been talking to would have let him know at the time. It did get me thinking though. Are we really heading into a space where men might start to worry about whether conversations in the past were on the right side of the line? Or if they are going to say the wrong thing now? Not to be

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divisive but there are women who are going to worry about this too. I will be honest here. There were times in the past where some of the ‘banter’ that I was involved in crossed the line, and that’s what I said - not necessarily the men I was in conversation with. I am also concerned that the men and women who are worrying about this are not the ones we need to reach. Media sensationalism aside, we do need to take a good look at our business and see what is going on. DO OUR WORDS MATCH OUR ACTIONS? We need to check that our actions are matching the words in our policies. I am

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Leadership

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not saying it needs to be a ‘witch hunt’ like what seemed to happen at Westminster, but we do need to check if we are following up with actions that our policies say. Recently I was working with a woman who was unhappy with her job. She was feeling unsupported and harassed. When we dug into why she had these feelings, it turned out that recently one of her fellow employees had cornered her on the stairway and showed her a picture of his genitals on his phone. She was shocked as you would expect and told him so. He laughed and said it was just a bit of fun. She obviously did not feel this way. She escalated this to her HR Manager and was promptly told she was over reacting and that he was just having a bit of fun. I could see why she was unhappy at Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

work! Not only had her colleague crossed a very clear line, all companies have very clear policies on this sort of behaviour. She was then left to feel like she was the one in the wrong. This is what I mean about actions matching our words. This is a very clear case of where an investigation, followed by disciplinary action should have been taken. I will say that after we spoke she went back to her HR Manager and let him know his response was not good enough. He reflected on this and action was taken. She is now happier in her workplace knowing that she is being respected and supported; although the company still needs to do some work in this area. STOP MAKING EXCUSES AND TRYING TO PUSH THE BLAME AWAY

The #metoo campaign has highlighted

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Leadership

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many cases like the one above. It exposes the fact that for way too long we have had policies, procedures and even laws that say one thing and actions which say something else. It has also (in the responses) highlighted the need to push blame elsewhere. Before you say that is a minority, let’s look at this a little closer. There is appreciation – “you look good today” (said to someone you are close enough to say that to), often followed with “great dress” or “that colour looks good on you”, and there is harassment - “you look edible”, “smoking hot!”, “I could take you right here”... and so on. The #metoo and what has happened in Hollywood and Politics put a mirror up to our businesses and shines a spotlight on our management teams in particular. Whether we have done it ourselves or not, many of us have been complacent in allowing a locker-room culture to enter our workplaces. Let me be clear here, relationships between people will develop in work environments; you cannot stop the course of nature. There is however a big difference between something that is consensual and something which isn't. What we do need to understand is that a person’s business ‘uniform’ is not an invitation for you to hit on them, nor are they going to make themselves unattractive just to help you. Women don't expect that just because a man has taken the care to look his best that he is looking to hook up. Men need to understand that

women often dress to make themselves feel good and not for anyone else. Each and every one of us needs to stop coming up with excuses for our actions, regardless of gender. As managers, business owners and employees alike, we need to ensure that the workplace is a safe environment for all and take action to see that is true.

Maggie Georgopoulos is the author ofUp The Ladder In A Skirt and a leading authority in the retention offemale talent and building a sustainable mental health culture in organisations. She is currently working with organisations to help them implement their mental health policies. For further information visit: www.magsinspires.com

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Women in Business

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CALLING ALL FEMALE ENTREPRENEURS IN WAITING GET GOING AND GET BETTER…..

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By Jane Kenyon

et going and get better has become a mantra for me and many ofmy business clients. Our world is too unpredictable to ever have all the answers and how boring would it be ifit did? Being an entrepreneur these days demands vision, tenacity, self-belief and most of all courage. As Seth Godin states in his latest book, The Icarus Deception, entrepreneurs today are modern day artists, with no rule book, no tried and

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tested system, very little structure, a plethora of new technologies and very few mass markets. Creation is now about connection, leading a tribe, failing often and having absolute faith in your art. The internet has made it possible to create a new kind of business and the rule book is out of the window. He describes the old world of work as… “Bale that cotton; mow that hay; load that barge; fill in this form; obey these instructions, take this test.”

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Women in Business

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response to your offer or your art, you just make more, better art. Every successful And believes the new world of work business I have ever been involved in only looks like this… survived and prospered because it “Start something; figure it out; connect; constantly improved and re-energised the make the call; ask; learn; repeat; risk it; way it did business. The mission and open; what’s vision remained the next?” same, but the way of attracting I so get this and business and feel excited to be an delivering did not. artist at this time in “You don’t make history. This shift art after you is so liberating and become an artist. opens up so many You become an possibilities for so artist by many. However, in ceaselessly making my role as a art.” business coach I have so many conversations with women Being the boss of your own destiny today who are on the cusp of launching or growing a business but the final step, the is about making a difference in some way leap, the jump is eluding them. They talk and there are no rules for this. Nine times about needing more time to perfect their out of ten you are entering new territory web site, or just needing to attend a few and it may be useful to look at similar companies and people doing similar stuff, more courses to top up their already bulging knowledge bank or they create but no one will be doing what you propose, in the way you propose doing it. very complex stories to validate their belief that the timing is not right, or they Research and extensive business planning need to do more research etc. This is all tend to be out of date before they are simple procrastination based on fear. Fear written and only useful to the dinosaur of the unknown, fear of failure, fear of bank manager and old fashioned investors rejection, fear of risk, fear of debt, fear of who still operate on the ‘old system’ success, fear of not getting it right first paradigm. So be brave, be bold, believe in your time. There is no guarantee of getting it right, idea, champion your art, build your tribe but unless you jump in how will you ever and just leap! You will learn all you need to know on know? Markets and customers are changing all the time. If at first you get no the journey. Jane Kenyon is a serial entrepreneur, coach, author, female champion and CEO of www.girlsoutloud.org.uk. Find out more about her and her work at www.jane-kenyon.com Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Women in Business: Fashion

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Fashion & Fragrances From Najla

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Photo Credit: Terry ScottŠ

Saudi Arabian influencer turned designer Najla Abdulaziz recently launched her first clothing line called 'Eid' for women and children at a private fashion show held at the De Vere Grand Connaught Rooms in Covent Garden. Abdulaziz also debuted two fragrances named Gold and Silver (eau du perfume 100ml) created in Germany by one of the finest perfumers. The fragrances will go on sale exclusive for the Saudi market in highend perfume shops. The designer's collection channeled her journey over the last 10 years of designing one-off pieces as a hobby before taking the plunge to starting her label. She is also inspired by the fusion of cultures; an east meet west theme that is visible in her designs and reflected in her scents. Model and reality star Chloe-Jasmine Whichello was amongst a diverse cast of models, again demonstrating the designers love of different cultures people and travel. Najla Abdulaziz says of her launch event: "I am over the moon and very proud to be the first Saudi Arabian designer to launch in London. This is just the beginning and I am still learning. I also want to on bring out a makeup line, sportswear for men and women, handbags, nightwear and more seasonal lines." The event was produced by Fashions Finest, a London-based events company renowned for their trade events during London Fashion Week. Amongst guests were TV personality Jay Kamiraz, singer Paul Manners, actress Joanna Andr and actor Julian Gamm.

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Women in Business: Publishing

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RETHINKING PUBLISHING TODAY

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ucy McCarraher is the Founder ofthe Business Book Awards and the CoFounder ofRethink Press. She is also an accomplished author, with a number ofbusiness, self-help and fiction books to her name. Here she speaks to Ronnie Ajoku on her entrepreneurial journey and the BBA.

I started my first publishing company while I was still at university in Australia (I’m British, but did my degree there). Publishing a monthly national theatre magazine led to me being a TV presenter and freelance journalist for major papers and magazines,” she says of her earlier days. “When I got back to the UK, I worked behind the camera as a TV writer, producer and script-editor. A highlight was spending three summers in Martinique writing and script-editing a children’s series called Runaway Bay (ITV), starring a young Naomie Harris, Craig Charles and John Woodvine.” Then came a slight shift in her career. “I became a work-life balance expert and had my first non-fiction books commissioned on that subject. The first novel I wrote was short-listed in the Richard and Judy Novel Competition and was published by Macmillan. To date I’ve written 11 business, self-help and fiction

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books.” Lucy then went on to Co-Found Rethink Press with Joe Gregory in 2011 to publish the business books of entrepreneurs, coaches, consultants and experts; and became the Publish Mentor for the Key Person of Influence programme in 2013. The inaugural Business Book Awards took place on March 16th. The glamourous event was held at the Grange City Hotel, London, and attended by the who-is-who of business writers. Speaking on how the whole idea came about she said: “The idea of Business Book Awards had been in my head for a

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Women in Business: Publishing

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few years – Joe (Gregory) and I had discussed it for sometime, but we didn’t have the infrastructure to make it happen until we partnered with ThinkFest. They have the experience of developing and running awards and events, and have been brilliant to work with in getting these new awards up and running. “The business book publishing sector has changed and developed over the last few years to meet the needs of a wider range of authors and readers. Selfpublishing and hybrid publishing have become as accepted as traditional publishing.” Despite the current state of what many may categorise as information-overload, Lucy believes that an entrepreneur's book -if well written and informative - is more than a glorified business card. “A good business book can both deliver great value to readers and act as a brilliant business card and ambassador for an entrepreneur. A book that doesn’t deliver valuable content and is written like a marketing brochure won’t work for anyone. During the last seven years, while I’ve worked with hundreds of entrepreneurs on their books, I’ve watched small - and not so small businesses flourish and grow and become smarter, more agile, more professional and more successful. And I’ve seen their owners gain confidence, become both more creative, more savvy and more Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

mature in regard to their business practices. “I believe that one of the reasons for this is because of the growth of the business book sector. Increasing numbers of business owners, coaches, consultants, entrepreneurs and experts are sharing "A well-written their insights, their and knowledge and their professionally experience by produced book writing and has a value" publishing books on their specialist subjects – whether they are in a niche market or talking to the broad business community. They are generous with their information, and they spread the word about good practice, smart processes, innovative leadership and management, insightful selfdevelopment etc. “It’s also true that these business people have recognised that publishing a book is an excellent way to demonstrate their authority in their own field, and that a good book will generate leads, increase their turnover and raise their profile.” There are several advantages an entrepreneur has with a publisher like Rethink when compared to a traditional non-fiction publisher. “The business model of a traditional publisher is that they invest in the production of a book and their ROI is simply through sales of books. This means they are only able to publish authors with broad market appeal who will sell the highest number of books

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Women in Business: Publishing

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possible. Many entrepreneurs have very niche markets and won’t sell enough copies of their book to attract a traditional publisher. “Many also want to keep control of the content and design of their book and get it out quickly – rather than go through the comparatively slow machine of traditional publishing. As a hybrid publisher, our business model allows the author to pay for the publishing services – editing, cover design, interior design, proofreading, publishing in different formats – and we work closely with them to produce a professional book that is right for their market and their brand, rather than ours. We work with successful entrepreneurs who want to pay professional experts to do what they do best, rather than take time out from their businesses to learn the ropes of selfpublishing.” Working with super smart entrepreneurs who are at the top of their game means Lucy gets to “learn something with every new book I work on! And I just love helping people to express their ideas and knowledge in written form – and a book is a different format from any other writing. What is key, and something I’m very hot on, is structure. Get the planning right in great detail before you start writing, and you’ll end up with a good result. I love seeing entrepreneurs who thought they’d never be able to write their own book, suddenly get it – they realise they have the content, can provide value and, by following my step-by-step framework, can get a great book written.” 38

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As a mentor she has influenced many entrepreneurs. “Some stand out mentees include Martin Norbury, one of our judges in the BBA, and a highly successful business coach and consultant (‘I Don’t Work Fridays’); Richard Woods, star of The Apprentice a couple of years ago (‘Digital Trailblazer’) and Simon de Cintra, our host for the BBAs (‘Unlock Your Business Voice’).” While the debate over print versus digital rages on and many entrepreneurs offer badly written 'free' e-books for lead capture, Lucy remains unfazed. “Over the past two years, print book sales have risen and e-books have fallen back a bit. Audio books are getting more and more popular. There’s something unique, special and valuable about a printed book, whether it’s given away or sold. All formats are useful and important – we advise our authors to have their book in all three. If you think about it, an audio book goes back to the earliest oral tradition of passing on information; tablets were the first format for written language, in stone, slate, wood and sand; the printing press, from the 15th century, is the most modern! “A well-written and professionally produced book has a value, and the right readers continue to be happy to pay for these.” If you would like to find out more about writing your own book, Lucy and Joe’s, ‘How To Write Your Book Without The Fuss’ is a must read. “My top tips for planning, writing and publishing a great business or self help book are in there,” she added.

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Women in Business: Charity

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Dressing Women For Success

Dress for Success volunteers dedicated to helping women get back to work

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By Ronnie Ajoku

ress for Success is a charity that helps women to get back into the workplace by preparing them for upcoming job interviews. They deliver a one-to-one styling session and provide clothing to help women feel confident and boost self-esteem. After this they deliver an interview preparation session with one of their volunteer interview coaches who will enable them to perfect their interview techniques. Patrons of the charity include Angie Greaves (Presenter, Magic Radio), Lucy Choi (entrepreneur, designer footwear) and Anne Robinson (television Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

personality). Susan Denmead, who brought Dress for Success to the UK, got to find out about the charity while watching a television programme that highlighted some of the good work that the organisation was doing. “While visiting my daughter in Vancouver, I was watching the Oprah Winfrey show where they had shown the work of Dress for Success. I thought it was a wonderful idea, combining my passion for fashion and helping women become more confident inside and out through confidence building with clothes and good communication skills for interviews. On returning to London, I immediately contacted the Worldwide

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Women in Business: Charity

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Trustees committed to the organisation's success and growth

headquarters to set the wheels in motion to bring Dress for Success to the UK,” she explained. Dress for Success has been embraced by the UK and has assisted a good number of women in their quest for employment, proving the need for the organisation's activities. Speaking on the UK's acceptance Denmead says: “Dress for Success has been greatly received in the UK, especially in London where we are based. We have helped an enormous amount of women to succeed in their journey of employment. In 2017 we assisted 644 women with a 67% success rate, saving the public purse nearly £1.8 million. “This is a remarkable achievement and would not have happened without all our supporters, referral organisations, corporate sponsors and of course the women we serve who all want to 40

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succeed.” Last year, Dress for Success created The Power ofWomen Awards (an award ceremony aimed at celebrating inspirational women). In its inaugural year, Power ofWomen was held at CBI London, with a cocktail and canapé reception for an audience of over 200. “We wanted to create a signature fundraising event that we could run annually and what better way than to celebrate women that are an inspiration to others?” This year's Power ofWomen Awards (which was held at the Lloyd's Building, London, on May 6 2018) had Anne Robinson as the guest speaker. Anne told of how childhood experiences instilled in her a strong work ethic, determination and an appreciation for money. She went on to highlight how she believes the taboo surrounding discussion of salaries

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Women in Business: Charity

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Anne Robinson was the guest speaker at Power of Women Awards 2018

and wealth allows the gender pay gap to exist and grow ever wider. The growth of the event saw this year's activities split over two days instead of just one like they did last year. “We decided to run the event over two days so that we could give the discussion panel the dedicated time it deserved to discuss women's issues. This enabled attendees to have more time to network with each other and to really experience the energy in the room,” Denmead points out. The journey back to employment with Dress for Success starts with a referral and they have over 200 referral organisations registered that support women facing particular disadvantages in life. These organisations include the Department for Work and Pensions (Jobcentre Plus), local authorities, educational institutions, social housing providers and other charities such as Crisis, Single Homeless Project, Twining Enterprise, London CRC, Resugo Spear

and more. They are also looking for new organisations to register to allow their clients to access services rendered by Dress for Success. “Dress for Success is a wonderful charity that provides a small intervention that has a massive impact on a women's journey to success. We could not deliver our services without the crucial support of our volunteers who style the clients and provide interview coaching. Our service goes beyond the suit as we provide ongoing vital support for women who gain employment to enable them to network with their peers, provide ongoing professional development and be included in a wealth of experience from corporate facilitators. We greatly appreciate all our Corporates and businesses who not only support us in providing clothing donations but also through financial sponsorship and fundraisers,” says Denmead.

To find out more about Dress for Success visit: www.dressforsuccessgl.org To find out more about the Power of Women Awards visit: https://powerofwomen.events/ Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Women in Business: Retirement

I

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By Vicki Ashman

retired from a twenty plus year career in law in my mid-forties and soon found that my friends remaining in the corporate world had a very low tolerance for any of my moans along the lines of, “it’s not easy being retired, you know”. While their sympathies were limited, the reality is that a post retirement struggle is, for many people, a common experience. A psychiatrist friend of mine actually laughed out loud when I said I was finding it tough. “It’s a myth,” she crowed. “People like you can’t retire and it’s actually very dangerous to try”. Our problem was that, as entrepreneurs building and running businesses, we had become hard wired to achieve and to be active. In the beginning our retirement

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was like an extended holiday and it was as great as one would expect for relieving years of stress and exhaustion. However, after just a few months, we both started to feel listless, anxious, perhaps even slightly depressed. The problem is similar to an athlete who is used to exercising every day. In fact, we see the same symptoms in our elite swimming daughter when she is out of the pool for more than a day or two. For us though, we struggled to accept the reality of what we were feeling. We’d waited a long time to be free of the constraints of the rat race so expectations were very high. We were the lucky ones, right? Behaviours change. In our quest to find what was missing we started spending more, eating and drinking more

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Women in Business: Retirement

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lost no more time in and doing less and less. setting about various Demotivated and Most entrepreneurs projects and challenges. lethargic, we learnt the will likely find total Our new development truth of the expression, “if you want something retirement impossible company built 11 new homes. We educated done ask a busy person”. ourselves on the Once jugglers of eight complex world of coloured diamonds and meetings a day, for us now a dental appointment constituted a busy morning! started to trade precious gems. We even Business people who successfully retire set up our own hedge fund. In our most inevitably have a new arena to enter, a audacious move, we set up our clothing post retirement mission. It wasn’t enough brand Scrumpies of Mayfair – designing, manufacturing and selling what we for my husband to focus on his golf handicap or for me to do the school run. A modestly call “the world’s most beautiful knickers”. Almost straight away we few hours on the driving range wasn’t going to replace the energy we once took started to feel that we were living again, from our work and the children started to happily immersed once more into the find the new era mildly worrying. Mum business world of strategy, decisions and risk. had got rather clingy and Prior to our experience, Dad had become We had become we wouldn’t have believed embarrassingly chatty to hardwired to we would miss work once their friends in the kitchen. A achieve retired. However, the colleague of ours retired difference we felt once we around the same time as us. started on projects again made it clear that His six-year-old’s teacher was asking about parents’ jobs in class. The little lad we simply weren’t ready to tend the allotment yet. Retirement from one paused puzzled for a few seconds and then told his teacher that he thought his industry is a great opportunity to press the reset button. However, most dad’s job was “probably lying on the entrepreneurs will likely find total sofa”. Clearly the issue isn’t just a problem for the retired parent. Without a retirement impossible. The answer is life of their own and living vicariously found in new challenges that are through their children, retired parents can demanding enough to require the old actually damage the children themselves. skills but fun enough to keep the retiree energised and motivated. Just four years Even retired parents need to find their after leaving our dependable comfort own meaning outside the family. In our case there were two of us facing zone of corporate law, we are happily established entrepreneurs selling knickers this the post-retirement crash to earth. When, finally, my husband and I realised worldwide and living proof that a change that our time of doing nothing was up, we is as good as a rest. Vicki Ashman is the CEO of luxury knicker brand Scrumpies of Mayfair. Knickers are priced from £25 and available at www.scrumpiesofmayfair.com Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Home Comforts

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MADE IN CHELSEA

Located in South London, Chelsea Sofa & Beds is a new business aimed at offering bespoke furniture for customers looking for something different. Founded by Samuel Tsegai, who worked for his family's furniture business before branching out on his own, Chelsea Sofa & Beds has one-of-a-kind pieces of furniture that are suitable for both commercial and private environments. “I had always wanted to start my own business and I now have exactly what I wanted – with the support of my family,” Tsegai says of his venture. Chelsea Sofa & Beds craft a wide variety of bespoke beds, headboards, and bedroom furniture, all expertly handmade by craftsmen from their local London-based workshop. They also create both contemporary and classic styles. Ideal for enhancing the decor of any bedroom, the luxury handcrafted beds are available in a range of fine fabrics and leathers. Available in various fabrics and finishes, the sofas are created in both modern and vintage styles and can be used for the home or business premises. The type of chairs they produce range from modular sofas, sofa beds, armchairs, occasional and dining chairs to bar stools. When asked what the USP of Chelsea Sofa & Beds really is, Tsegai answers simply: “We offer quality at a reasonable price.” As a conscious business, they also care about environmental issues and as such the wood they use is sustainably sourced to ensure minimal environmental impact. For further information visit: www.chelseasofabedlimited.co.uk 44

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Personal Development & Creativity

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THE MYTH BEHIND THE MADNESS: DIVERGENT SOULS AND MINDS FROM A BUSINESS PERSPECTIVE

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here is a beliefproliferated in society which asserts that, “one can only be great at a single thing.” An idea rooted in the earliest ofsocial constructs, civilizations assigned members specific roles and responsibilities to build and maintain order. By Dr. Virginia LeBlanc

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call it “the myth behind the madness.” The concept has morphed into a narrow thinking and limiting application over time as to individual capability and aptitude, hindering productivity, and innovation. Consider the great minds of our time, in any field, who have helped advance their fields and the world. They all possessed divergent souls and minds. They were/are what I call “divergent thinkers.” Nevertheless, we have been conditioned to see them as outliers in acceptance of our own limitations. Such a mindset is unacceptable, particularly when applied to an industry. Let us examine the application of such thinking to business in general, as all industry is fundamentally a subset of business. Concession #1: It is challenging focusing on more than one thing at a

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time; Concession #2: Some ofus are disadvantaged due to socioeconomic barriers.

Supposition: It is not impossible to overcome the past and present for the future possibility if you change your way of thinking. Viewing from an individual perspective (manpower drives industry), ever wonder why artists, particularly performing artists, have the capability and aptitude for success in any industry of their choosing? Support for the arts is not merely a political pawn but an invaluable foundational message for societal growth and development. While a box may exist enclosing others, we artists develop the capability of thinking outside and without a box in perfecting our craft by applying and nurturing both hemispheres of the brain - exercising divergent thinking.

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DIVERGENT THINKING Consider Jazz—living, breathing, constantly changing. Its essence is not to get caught up in a plan but to know it and be prepared for the unexpected; it’s operating without a box. To play the tune successfully requires grounding, an open mind, vision, spatial awareness, instincts, flexibility, and improvisation. The beauty and risk are the organic experiences - ebb and flow - a fusion of the arts, sciences, metaphysical, and spiritual with discipline, judgment, deduction, accuracy, agility, creativity, recovery, and understanding simultaneously as guides. The ability to create order from this organised chaos for a productive result is an illustration of divergent thinking. Divergent thinking is possessing a heightened presence of mind with conscious control over absolute, undiminished (conscious and subconscious) knowledge recall at your disposal. It facilitates a simultaneous 360° real-time view, synthesis, and analysation of a situation based on subject knowledge; which in turn provides faster recognition, response time, and resolution (conventional or inferred) in plans of action, decisionmaking, and execution. MERGING HALVES FOR THE WHOLE E XPERIENCE Divergent thinking is the single most powerful concept, strategy, and tool for success. Accessors must identify with and cultivate both halves of the brain toward instinctual responses, marrying and Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

employing not only creative and emotional, but also logical and analytical experiences harmoniously. Developmental facets: 1. Grounding (Skills and Knowledge): Identify the missing tools in your toolkit and fill them with study and experience. 2. Open-mind: The more exposure to different experiences, the more your resource knowledge base, and capabilities grow. 3. Vision: Know where you want to go and be prepared to navigate the waters. 4. Spatial Awareness: Understand framework, timeline, manpower, budget, and resources for your goals but do not allow them to paralyse you. 5. Instincts: Once you’ve done the work, trust in it and develop from lessons learned. 6. Flexibility: Be disciplined, use good judgment, and work the plan but be flexible. 7. Improvisation: Life happens, and you will need to get extremely creative.

E MPLOYING A DIVERGENT MINDSET IN BUSINESS Set up your business plan like a jazz chart, leaving room for improvisation to expect the unexpected (plans falter!). Muhammad Ali said: “The man who has

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Personal Development & Creativity

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Divergent thinking is possessing a heightened presence ofmind with conscious control no imagination, has no wings.” To change trajectory, think apart from the norm. Take the leap. You will find that what is seemingly not connected in your mind’s eye (imagination) is and only distorted because of the missing parts. Find those through exploration, exposure, diversification, and experience. The risk tolerance for most is low and fear is high. Make the decision, combat fear, and commit.

care not to limit your potential for success with antiquated thinking. Innovation is the breath of life and achievable through divergent thinking!

THE WIN-WIN Limited thinking manifests in every aspect of a business, negatively affecting the bottom-line. Divergent thinking defies limits and gives birth to a possibility. The win-win in business is approaching strategy and product with the right perspective; diverse, multi-faceted, functional, and efficient capability in business management, operations, marketing, manpower, and customerservice. Divergent thinking will not only directly improve these areas but also your work environment and bottom-line. Take

Dr. Virginia LeBlanc is an author, speaker, singer, coach, and consultant. She is a highly sought after multi-disciplinary expert and scholar. Her new book, “Love the Skin YOU’RE in: How to Conquer Life through Divergent Thinking”, is written to encourage and empower all those seeking their place, trying to connect the dots, and fulfil their purpose in life. Visit: www.lovetheskinyourein.club/

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Business Development

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Why Social Listening is Important

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By Virginia Phillips

eduction in pensions, layoffs, the emergence ofartificial intelligence, and many other factors are creating uncertainties in the long-term income ofyounger professionals. They are being pushed to innovate their future, unlike the previous generation. Their journeys may not be any easier or more difficult, but they are different and include critical tasks like social listening.

Many people desire more control over their future, and entrepreneurship is one course of action that they are choosing. But, this comes with its challenges. They are the same challenges many entrepreneurs are facing these days. Technology Advances are changing the way businesses generate leads and conduct business. It used to be if a company had a good product and was good at sales, they would likely have a successful business, but that is no longer the case. Now, businesses must be trendsavvy, quick to action, and be willing to take significant risks, if they will prosper. They must listen to the potential client or risk losing them forever. Product Launches have always been risky and a key factor in overall success. 50

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But now, timing and brand reputation have as much, if not more, to do with success than the quality of the product itself. One such business with a good reputation for creating automated social media products recently launched an Instagram marketing suite. It offers users a tool to help them on one of the fastest growing social media platforms to date. Timing of the product launch was so successful that it crashed their server. If this company launched their product six months prior or waited to launch this for another six months, they would not have seen as much success. People are coming to Instagram in droves and the best opportunity is now. The business anticipated this trend, worked feverously and launched a product during an increase in the usage of a new social media platform. This

company also knows their product might be obsolete in five years as the trends in social media change swiftly and new platforms emerge. Therefore, they are already working on their next product to stay relevant in their industry. Research and Development. It used to be a sign of trouble when a company’s product wouldn’t last a few weeks, months or years. Investors and customers steered clear of any company who couldn’t show longevity with their product. Companies spent enormous

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Business Development

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amounts of time and money on research and development to deliver a viable sustainable long-term product forecast for investors. Today, developers and investors alike must be willing to launch when a product is viable enough and can demonstrate a proven path for profit, regardless of the length of its life expectancy. The risk of competition beating them to market and missing their optimum chance is too high to wait for perfection, and investors and customers will no longer wait. They will shift to another company moving faster. Launching a product for beta testing solely to gain investors and customers during the development phase, is widely accepted. Customers want their feedback heard before a final product goes to market. Entrepreneurs who fail to take the risk and socially listen risk their future. Communities of like-minded people are the new pinnacle indicator of success. For years and years and years, the email list was regarded as the ultimate money maker for any entrepreneur. But, email has become a necessary evil for many people and more emails get deleted than read. There was a movement to develop robust Facebook groups to create an engaged communities. While many Facebook groups achieve continued success, many groups struggle to get members or people engaged at all. Newer networking platforms, including membership platforms and common workspace areas, can create stronger

communities. Newer platforms can offer brand recognition and support, but they can also offer potential customer interaction with the company and one another; something the Facebook platforms cannot duplicate at this time, which might be why many are embracing other alternatives they may not have had a year ago. As newsfeeds and email boxes get more crowded, companies will need to listen to social feedback and anticipate trends. The entrepreneurs who can figure out how to do this and pull other businesses forward by being on the leading edge of trends will outperform and outlast businesses that cannot do so.

Virginia Phillips is the Founder of The Academy of Entrepreneurial Excellence, a part-owner of Molder Rubber and Plastics Corp, an inspirational speaker, and a survivor. She is also the author of Yes, You Can! Your Roadmap to Dream, Create, and Profit. For more information visit: www.aoeenow.com Volume 4 Issue 3, 201 8

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Restaurants/Venues

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No. 90 Celebrates 4th Birthday Number 90 Bar & Kitchen, in Hackney Wick, recently celebrated its 4th Birthday with its biggest party to date, which took place over four days The venue played host to an array of special guest DJs, including music legend Norman Jay, interactive entertainment, live music, all topped off with delicious food and drink offerings. Each day of the birthday extravaganza celebrated a different theme relating to the world of music, art and dance. The first night paid homage to World Music Day, featuring bands such the funky Haggis Horns, alternative pop band Toytown Hustle, as well as multinational gypsy folk group Dila V & The Oddbeats – to name a few. Fashion lovers were able to rifle through a vintage clothes stall, whilst art-lovers enjoyed live painting sessions with the Number Gallery Artists, who showcased their talents throughout the weekend by doing live art murals. The next evening saw Capital Xtra's Coco Cole heading up Womb 2, an event created to celebrate women in music, art, and fashion industries, and featured guest performances from the likes of Loraine James, Aziza as well as SISU Crew. The night also included female-focused film screenings, DJ technique workshops and a dance show. The day after was the BLOCK PARTY, a day-party on the La Terazza, with Norman Jay showcasing his 'good Times' sounds from a special party bus, before taking the celebrations inside until the early hours of morning. The final day of festivities focused on an assortment of live music talent.

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Profile for The London Business Journal

Vol4 issue3 2018 finalised  

Entrepreneur Stories, Business news, Business Features & Tips

Vol4 issue3 2018 finalised  

Entrepreneur Stories, Business news, Business Features & Tips

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