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Volume 4 Issue 4 201 8

BREXIT: DEALING WITH UNCERTAIN TIMES

DO YOU SPEAK EMOJI?

IS GLOBAL CROSS-BORDER POLLUTION THE NEW ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT?

THE JOINT VENTURE FOR RECRUITERS

EXCLUSIVE

GOLDMINE!

MINING MAGNET ROB MCEWEN SPEAKS ON BUILDING TWO BILLION-DOLLAR COMPANIES AND PHILANTHROPY


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CONTENTS COVER STORY

He literally struck gold! Mining Magnet Rob McEwen speaks on Building two Billion-Dollar Companies and philanthropy: Page 14

Protecting your business IP in Asia: Page 48

INSIDE Brexit: Facing uncertain times Page 4 Communication: Do you speak emoji? Page 10

Golden nuggets from Venus Award Winners: Page 30

Former Supermodel Jodie Kidd calls on chancellor: Page 35

The Joint Venture For Recruiters: Page 24

Global cross­border pollution the new illegal immigrant? Page 44

BRITEthink: Enabling the minds of tomorrow Page 26 Entrepreneurship ends gender pay gap Page 32 PayProp: Disrupting the property industry Page 40 Entrepreneurial lessons from the World Cup. Page 50

The London Business Journal is produced by THE LONDON BUSINESS JOURNAL, 24­26 Arcadia Avenue, Finchley, London N3 2JU. Telephone: 0208 453 7185 / 07043 020 287. © 2014 all rights reserved. Reproduction in any manner or any language, in whole or in part, without prior written permission is prohibited. All material in this journal is provided for your information only and may not be construed as business advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this information; instead, readers should consult appropriate business related professionals on any matter relating to their profession/trade/business. The information and opinions expressed here are believed to be accurate, based on the best judgement available to the authors, and readers who fail to consult with appropriate authorities assume the risk of any financial setbacks or otherwise. In addition, the information and opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of every contributor to The London Business Journal. The London Business Journal acknowledges occasional differences in opinion and welcomes the exchange of different viewpoints. The publisher is not responsible for errors or omissions. Subscribe to The London Business Journal by visiting www.LondonBusinessJournal.co.uk or send an email to: subscriptions@LondonBusinessJournal.co.uk All other enquiries, call 0208 453 718 / 07043 020 287


Brexit Feature

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DEALING WITH UNCERTAIN TIMES

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very day, there are more conflicting stories about Brexit. Will it be a complete disaster or an incredible opportunity for business? In a fragile economy, this uncertainty is the last thing anyone needs. But, says Fatih Özba rıaçık, CEO of Runibex Technology Group, dealing with change is what business does best. The news from companies like Airbus and BMW is worrying. Companies with intricate, cross­border supply chains need clarity about how they can conduct operations after Brexit arrives. Uncertainty is holding back investment in a number of business sectors and the scale of job losses predicted grows. I know Brexit may create some unemployment, but I also believe it will create new opportunities.

In the technology world, you’ll often hear the term ‘disrupt or die’ to describe the way that companies are transforming their business to succeed in our new digital world. It outlines how you use digital technologies to become a disruptive force within your markets. Set in this context, Brexit is another disruptive market force. Like other disruptive forces, you can’t fully predict the change that’s coming but you can prepare for it. You want to create an environment where your business can absorb and prosper from this change and the next and the one after that.

The picture I paint is depressing but, boil it down to the basics, what I’m describing is change. And, business has proved remarkably resilient and remarkably good at dealing with change. Brexit is really just a different set of circumstances that every For this to happen, the first thing that has business will have to come to terms with and, if previous experience holds true, find to change is the traditional view of how companies manage their IT requirements. ways in which to profit. 4

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Brexit Feature

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In the past, an organisation built its own internal infrastructure installing servers, storage and networking. It spent a great deal of money on software licenses and databases and recruited a skilled staff of IT professionals to keep the whole thing running. This appeared acceptable but, in hindsight, only because there wasn’t a viable alternative. The Cloud is a disruptive technology that has changed everything.

internal systems, how easy is it for you to be confident that you are fully compliant? This doesn’t just apply to the technology itself but also the technology and business skills required for the new regulatory regimes you’re faced with. Similar questions can be asked in most other areas of your business. For instance, if Brexit delivers new opportunities to you in new markets around the world, how quickly can you scale up to meet this new demand? Conversely, can you scale down so you are only paying for the IT services you really need?

Companies like Salesforce have been game­changers questioning why you need to pay for An increasingly software when you attractive option for Fatih Özbağrıaçık: can receive your IT many companies is CEO capabilities as a Cloud Managed service. You don’t Services. By placing buy, install, manage the management of IT or maintain the system ­ simply accessing infrastructure with a trusted third party it from any web­enabled device. provider, companies are receiving performance, security, compliance and Moving to the Cloud will help an business continuity benefits that are organisation build in the flexibility and almost impossible to achieve with agility it needs to be able to react quickly internal systems. to changing market conditions or new business opportunities. However, I More importantly, you gain access to a question whether implementing a Cloud­ global platform that allows them to adapt first IT strategy will ensure you are fully quickly and effectively to whatever prepared for any type of business change. market conditions you’re faced with. This may not remove the uncertainty of Brexit For example, Brexit will involve a great but it can certainly help ensure your IT deal of regulatory change. If you have a capabilities are prepared. number of disparate Cloud­based and Fatih Özbağrıaçık is the Founder and CEO of Runibex Technology Group, a cloud managed services company that opened its first UK office in London in June 2018. See: www.runibex.com

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Networking

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n line with E2E's on­going #ScaleUp2Success series, the last London event featured the impressive lineup of Phones4u Founder, John Caudwell, Skinnydip Co­Founder, James Gold, Santoro London Co­Founder, Meera Santoro, Deputy Mayor of London for Business and Enterprise, Rajesh Agrawal and Peter Evans, Small Business and Enterprise Editor at The Sunday Times. The event was attended primarily by Founders, CEOs and C­Suite Executives. John Caudwell, who became a billionaire after selling Phones4u, said of the E2E event: “Entrepreneurs are the future life blood of Britain. All the encouragement that can be given to them by organisations like E2E, the more of that the better.” Speaking to attendees about his earlier days in business he said: “Nearly all the mistakes I made were small in relation to the size of the business.” When asked what he would have done differently he replied: “It's very difficult to think of anything I would have done differently because the growth was exponential. That was from £1 million, and then we went to £13 million and then to £40 million. I kept pushing and saying we've got to grow, and we kept the growth going” Rajesh Agrawal, Deputy Mayor of London for Business and Enterprise offered encouragement to entrepreneurs in the room saying: “When I came from India to London I never thought I would end up in politics and here I am as the Deputy Mayor. Who would have thought

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Shalini Khemka, Founder, E2Exchange with John Caudwell, Founder, Phones4u

when I landed at Heathrow airport 16 years ago that I would be the Deputy Mayor of the greatest city in the world? “That is what London is all about. London is a city of opportunities and a city that has given me so much. I see this as an opportunity to give back and support entrepreneurs that want to do exactly the same.” Santoro London Co­Founder, Meera Santoro, pointed out the importance of reputation saying: “I think people saw us as a company with integrity. It was always about the product; we set up the licensing side. “It's very easy to 'stack them high and sell them cheap', and you make profits very quickly. But we were in it for the long term. I like to say we create today the treasures of tomorrow.”

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Networking

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Santoro London Co­Founder, Meera Santoro being interviewed on camera at E2E #ScaleUp2Success

Pointing out how Skinnydip used an unconventional method to gain publicity, James Gold, its Co­Founder, said: “What we did was pick the top 20 celebrities we would want to see wearing Skinnydip products and instead of sending it directly to them, we found out the 20 influencers that they follow and sent it to them. Like Kylie Jenner with her 120 million followers on Instagram” He said they sent the products to a stylist she follows and Kylie Jenner's stylist called asking why Kylie didn't get any, to which James replied, 'I didn't know she wanted any.' “That was our route to starting internationally.” Praising the efforts of E2E he added: “I think what E2E are doing is incredible. I found it super inspiring listening to both Meera and John.” Peter Evans, Small Business and Enterprise Editor at The Sunday Times, said: “The quality of the people in the room (the businesses) is very high. That makes a difference. There are lots of networking events were anyone can come, but that's not the case here [at E2E].” Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

Happy with the success of the evening, Shalini Khemka, Founder, Chief Executive Officer and Board Director, E2Exchange added: “Hopefully the people who have taken the time to be here tonight will take some learning away and would also have met the right people. I think nothing can substitute building relationships and education and that's what we're trying to do.”

Guests at E2E #ScaleUp2Success networking outside, following the conclusion of speakers

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Communication

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DO YOU SPEAK EMOJI?

By Chris Dyer

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hances are you’ve encountered a smiley face on a digital message recently. In business communication, what’s old is new again. We’ve come full circle from the early messages contained in cave paintings and hieroglyphics to present­day emails sprinkled with emoticons and emojis. Why the return to pictographs? Those of us who communicate digitally do our best to type out our thoughts in a coherent and professional manner. But, often, this isn’t enough to convey our true meaning. Text alone creates space between ourselves and our audience. What’s more, communication breakdown plays havoc with teamwork, individual productivity, and client relations. Adding emotional context—as pictures do—helps bridge the gap. Enter: the emoji. LIMITS OF THE PRINTED WORD Stylised images first peeked out of digital texts about twenty years ago but have

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recently been embraced as desirable elements of company culture. More than decoration, emojis facilitate clear communication. And better understanding brings staff members together. We tend to speak in shorthand, relying on the other person to correctly understand what we really mean. This may work face to face, where questions can be asked, and clarity achieved. But, language in any written form is often interpreted negatively if a positive or explanatory context is not provided. Without visual or aural hints, words must be taken at face value. Extra verbiage may be needed to transmit urgency, irony, sarcasm, or trepidation on the part of the communicator. Not everyone has the time or the skill to pull this off and present their full intent via the keyboard. At work, this may mean that people must act on partial facts, misinformation, or faulty points of view. VALUE OF THE EMOJI Suppose you send this instant message to

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Communication

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your team: people what to write, they can introduce a “Please take the attached survey and common contextual shorthand using return it to me at your earliest emojis. To lend instant meaning to print convenience.” messages, customize a menu People may wonder: of succinct (and cute!) images. · Whether they have time Let the whole team know what to take the survey each one means and when to · Whether you, personally, use it. have an interest in the My company, for instance, response or will forward it to harnesses emoji power to others acknowledge great · Whether “earliest performance by our remote convenience” means “right staff. We post a “green flag” Chris Dyer now” or “when you feel like alongside shout­outs for goals it” met and outstanding effort. Anyone in the Now suppose you add three emojis to the chat room understands that the recipient is note: to be congratulated—and emulated. Green “Please take the attached survey and flag recipients understand that their effort return it to me at your earliest is appreciated and instrumental to the convenience.” company’s success. These pictorial clues speak more directly Emojis can be overused or ill­timed and than sentences. You’ve shown that the become unprofessional annoyances. survey will take about ten minutes, you Avoid this downside by setting standards (the surfing enthusiast) need the for when emojis are acceptable and information, and it should take priority. In encouraged. Walk those who are less fact, we often “translate” words into digitally savvy through the process, so images because they are more that everyone is on the same page. memorable. It’s difficult to process large Our brains love pictures! This is volumes of written content and why advertisers bolster short tag to interpret the senders’ lines with eye­popping graphics. motives and true meanings. You can read about how great a The more accurate the burger is, but a picture of a juicy information received, the more sandwich will compel you to on­target employees’ decisions order one. will be. Like the rich context ADD EMOJI­SPEAK TO YOUR imparted in cave paintings, COMPANY CULTURE emojis and imagery add significance to the written word While companies generally don’t tell with a mouse click. Chris Dyer is the author of The Power of Company Culture: How any business can build a culture that improves productivity, performance and profits, out now and published by Kogan Page, priced £19.99

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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STRIKING GOLD!

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o say Rob McEwen is at the top of the mining industry would be an understatement. He has built two billion-dollar mining companies, Gold Corp (currently one of the largest gold mining companies in the world) and McEwen Mining, over the course of his career and remains a true philanthropist that is helping to make huge strides in medical stem cell research and education. In this exclusive interview the billionaire Canadian businessman tells Ronnie Ajoku how it all began, his take on life and the bright future of McEwen Mining

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have met Rob McEwen a couple of times. A mild­mannered man, he is soft spoken, polite and quite knowledgable. In 2007 he was awarded the Order of Canada, in 2013 received the

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Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Award and was inducted into The Canadian Mining Hall of Fame last year. He is clearly well­accomplished and has so many other accolades to prove it, but if

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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Our goal is to get into the S&P 500 Index

you didn't know who he was it would be hard to imagine that this humble man is the legendary Rob McEwen; the Founder and former Chairman and CEO of Gold Corp, one of the largest gold mining companies in the world (the current value as at time of writing is over $20 Billion). Although McEwen sold his stake and went on to set up McEwen Mining, which became another billion­dollar success, it was during his time at the helm of Gold Corp that he disrupted the mining industry with his revolutionary approach to exploration. THE DISRUPTOR The move turned the then struggling company to a billion­dollar player in the industry. "I bought a mine in Northern Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

Canada and it had a short life and was high cost. I put money into exploration and we made a discovery about a mile and half below surface, a very interesting discovery,” he tells me. He continued: “After a couple of years of further exploration, our mining engineers said; 'let's tear down this mine and build a new one.' I said we have been finding gold at this rate and you are going to build the mine too small. They said they have to build it based on what we know. I went to our Geologist and asked how big this deposit is going to grow and he said 'I don't know.' I said that was a lousy answer and asked how long it would take to find out. He said 'I don't know', another lousy answer,” McEwen pauses, shaking his head as he took the trip down memory

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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lane. "I thought about it for a while. When I went up to the mine I always used to talk to the different Geologists and I noticed they had some different ideas. I said let's have a brain storming session and get all of our Geologists together, of which there were about 14. I said we are going to have two days of brainstorming and before you come I want you to prepare and think about sharing the ideas that you haven't shared with anyone, and sharing the ideas that your boss has shut down. "The meeting started and as the CEO I thought I was just going to be a fly­on­the­ wall watching and all. The Head of Exploration started it [the meeting]. He was about a minute into starting the whole thing off and I said, 'OK, time out; you're on the bench,' and said to the fellow that had the least tenure but was a mid­career Geologist; 'I would like you to come and talk about the last idea that your boss shut down.' You could visualise this arc of electricity going across the room between the boss and this fellow I had asked to come up saying ­ 'if you say that you're fired'. I said that I have noticed that there is tension in the room and want to put it on the table that if anyone is threatening anyone with firing, I am going to fire the threatener ­ right now! 16

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"There was a bit of nervous laughter and two days go by; everybody's charged up, full of energy, new focus. They ran out of the door and I walk out of the door and think; 'Hmm, how can we do this on a larger scale?' We should invite our retired Geologist, government Geologists, we have competitors next door; let's invite them in. As time went along the seeds germinated in my mind. On every continent there's a similar geological setting. Maybe there's some expertise there so how do we get it? I ended up in Boston at MIT, taking a course in information technology and there were 40 of us from around the world and they were just hitting us with all the current ideas on IT. "On the second day, right after lunch we started talking about Linux and Open Source code and the lightbulb flashed and I said, 'there's the template!' I ran back home after the course and said, we're going to take our geological data, put it up on the web and make it available for free, and the mining industry never did that. It was always confidentiality agreements ­ you did not give away your geological data!” Challenging what had up until that point appeared to be the hush­hush nature of the mining industry he continues: "We put it

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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up and asked the world to tell us where we could find the next 6 million ounces of gold in our mine (this is a mine that had been going for 50 years) and offered prizes of $500,000 and that was in [the year] 2000. The net effect of this was that we spent $500,000 in setting it up and $500,000 in prize money and we found $3 billion worth of gold! "There were 1,400 people from 52 countries that took our database, which was 400 megabits. We made it so you could see it in two or three dimensions ­ a very extensive bibliography. The industry though it was crazy, they thought it was like a child's game. My Geologists were quite hesitant at first, but after a while they accepted it when I showed them all the benefits. They said may be we would be taken over and I said well, if we're taken over you have stock options and Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

you're going to get a higher price and make money on your options. If they don't take us over and we make a discovery, your name is going to be written in big lights and your career is improved. Our Head of Exploration said he wasn't sure of the process but I said it was a world­class deposit and we are using the best methodology ­ so what are your concerns? If this goes to every mining school in the world, is this going to hurt your career? He said no, so he was finally giving me the right answers.” The whole process and ensuing experience taught him a valuable yet simple lesson. "What I did find was that not only was it a good economic success, but I discovered (and maybe I should have known it all the time) that the biggest goldmine in the world is between everybody's ears! And if you can connect

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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that, you suddenly create all sorts of excellent events and results. We went on and today Goldcorp is one of the largest gold mining companies in the world.” For nearly two decades McEwen ­ who holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Western Ontario, a Master of Business Administration from the Schulich School of Business and an Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from York University ­ dedicated himself to building Goldcorp, but then decided that it was time to move on. "I built and ran it for 19 years and decided that it was time to leave. There had been a death in my family, two deaths actually. I grew up in a family of six and had three younger sisters, and in 2002 one of my sisters died and then my mother died four months later. You just don't plan for that and upon my mother's death, there was only my younger sister and I left standing, everybody else had passed away. "So I met mortality for the first time and he was sitting across the table. I thought I'd better start looking at life in another way and reorder some priorities. I felt it was time to really focus on the important things in my life; my wife, my two sons, my remaining sister and friends. So I started looking at other situations. While I Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

was in hospital visiting my Mother and my sister I saw a health system under an enormous strain and I didn't see how it was going to be able to scale up and provide the same service that parents of the baby boom were expecting.” THE MCEWEN CENTRE FOR REGENERATIVE MEDICINE Determined to do something about the situation and help people he set about starting the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine. "I thought of Einstein's definition of insanity, 'doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result', and felt that was what our medical system is doing ­ and we can't scale up fast enough. So my wife and I set up a medical research centre in regenerative medicine ­ stem cell research. In a way it was the outcome of the challenge ­ using crowdsourcing. We set up a research centre and we also set up a prize of $100,000 a year for innovation in stem cell research for scientists that are doing really exciting work. The first researcher that received that prize around 2009 won the Nobel Prize in 2012 for the same work! "Bayer AG, the big pharmaceutical company, have decided that regenerative medicine is a place where they are going

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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put it back into society and benefit a very large number of people. My wife and I have done it in education and medical research and continue to do so. "I look at McEwen Mining and the money is going into medical research, it's going to leadership development and education ­ hopefully to contribute to a better world.” In addition to medical research, his donations have led to establishing the McEwen School of Architecture at Laurentian University and the McEwen Leadership Program at St. Andrew’s College. Some other significant donations have been made to the Schulich School of Business, the Margaret Cochenour Memorial Hospital, Lakefield College and Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre. MINING OPPORTUNITIES It's no secret that given the modern­day to be able to find products that they can coverage focused on new­age startups commercialise, so they committed $225 such as ethical businesses, technology, million to funding research in media and fast­growth industries, mining regenerative medicine and the first place is seen as old and probably not at the top they chose to put the money in was our of most entrepreneurs lists of industries to lab! They went around the world looking tackle. From our conversation I gather for the best research and they decided that there are more opportunities than one they wanted to start in our lab at the may think for today's entrepreneur McEwen Centre for Regenerative looking to target this area. "I grew up in Medicine.” the investment industry and jumped into the mining industry 18 years later. I'm not PHILANTHROPY a geologist and I'm not a mining engineer. He is clearly a man that believes in It uses a lot of technology and skills today giving back and has an interesting take on that in the past it didn't. the generation of wealth and the “Mining has to be much more conscious importance of purpose. "Mother nature in safeguarding the environment. There's can deliver all sorts of things from the community relations that never used to be ground and create great wealth, but you part of it if you went back 25­50 years look at it and say, 'what can I do with and more. Usually it's in relatively remote that?' You don't want to sit on it. You can 20

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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areas (at least in Canada it is) and in other While many may argue about the ethical parts it's in deserts, cold places or in the nature of the mining industry in relation to middle of a jungle. So you have to put a harming the environment, the demand for lot of infrastructure in. Then products resulting directly there's the question of from mining has not The biggest sustainability, which is a big slowed down and has in goldmine in the issue today. How can you fact increased. "The get the people living around world is between world is becoming it involved? Often it's by 'Urbanised'. If you look at everybody's ears! giving them skills that they the massive movement of didn't have, or maybe people in China from the giving them aspirations to reach a little countryside to the cities, the same thing is further and letting them know that there happening in India, Africa and South are more opportunities in life than what America; all around the world. People are they originally thought. moving out of the countryside because "One of my agriculture does concerns with not generate as mining today is it much income being 'Uberised'; and going from that someone self sufficient to comes from urban settings totally left field requires all sorts and does what of metal. Airbnb did to the Whether it is hotel industry, or copper for the what Uber did to wiring etc. An the taxi industry electric vehicle, or Tesla to the car say a Tesla, is industry. When 140 lbs of does that happen to mining? If you are in copper! We had hardly any copper in cars IT, Intent of Things, machine learning, 10 years ago, it might have been 25 lbs, Artificial Intelligence ­ those are going and now we are going to have 140. A into mining. I think that mining is at a Chevy Volt is somewhere up around 70 or point where you can drop costs 80 lbs a car. And if you look at the growth considerably and make it a safer and more of electric vehicles that are forecast, I profitable business. Right now only a think China is growing to 10 million by small sector of the market invests in it and 2020 and they are saying 75 million by not many people think of it; they usually 2030, that's a lot of copper. think of it as destroying environments.” "You have buildings that are made of steel and glass, stainless steel for THE NEED TO SUSTAIN THE MINING production and the high pressure metals. INDUSTRY

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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built of, and yet we are all gathering, more The demand is there, but will we see recycling of metals? Is there enough metal and more, in the bigger cities of the in the world that we can recycle and is it world.” less expensive than mining? OF MCEWEN Maybe it's not even a We have become THE FUTURE MINING question of expense; is it disconnected from He is actively working hard less damaging to the environment? Do you use how our cities to see the company that bares his name thrive. "We more energy to recycle than were built have three mines; Argentina you do to mine? Mobile (which is a partnership with phones, computers, anything a Peruvian company), one in Mexico and internet is metal. You look at cryptocurrencies for a moment; I read an one in Canada. We just got a permit to construct a mine in Nevada; it took about article that said that to create a [single] three years. It Bitcoin takes would take the same about a year amount of to build and power as to would be in power a three production by bedroom 2019. house for two "We produce weeks. gold and “There are silver and we over 1,200 have a very cryptocurrenci large copper es right now deposit. We'd and they use be looking an enormous for a joint amount of power and a lot of that is coal­generated; venture partner, but it's just under 30 and that's creating CO2 that is warming up billion lbs of copper. It has a 36­year mine­life and robust economics. It costs a the environment. If you look at Google they use an enormous amount of power to lot to build and will take a number of power their servers. One of them is using years to get there. a quarter of a nuclear power plant output. "Our goal is to get into the S&P 500 Metal is here and we don't think about it. Index and we have to get bigger to do that, but 99% of the precious metal companies Our cars, elevators and everywhere you in the world can't get in the S&P 500 by look ­ even a glossy magazine is 40% virtue of where the companies are clay. "We have become disconnected from how incorporated. Post 9/11 the S&P Index was remade and they removed all the our cities were built and what they are foreign companies, so the only companies 22

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Cover Story: Rob McEwen

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in the S&P 500 are American companies hedgfund in the world and he made and McEwen Mining is a Colorado comments saying that everyone should incorporated company, so it's eligible. have 5­10% of their portfolio in gold. He Only 1% of the precious gives a fairly concise Mining has to be statement as to why. metal companies in the world (public ones) are “If you look through time, much more American, with a chance right now we are in an conscious in of getting in there. So in economic bubble created the S&P 500 there are safeguarding the by low interest rates that actually 501 companies force people to take more environment and their total market risky investments than they capitalisation is equal to normally would. For the 80% of the public market valuation of saver, or anyone on a fixed income, a companies in the USA. There's one gold considerable element of their money is stock in it. The total market capitalisation being crucified by zero interest rates of these 501 companies is equivalent to $7 because they have to eat into their capital, Trillion and there's one gold company and and I think there is a huge amount of its value (market cap) is $20 Billion. anxiety in society right now. There is a big "There will be a day coming when people divide being created. The markets are say, 'I need more gold in my portfolio.' In being led by fewer and fewer leaders and the United States if that stops we are seeing people will turn more passive to hard assets investments in the which would market. More include gold, index funds and silver, diamonds more ETF's; they and others. In the move like a herd other markets it and 1­5 % of the would appear that money should be it's not a bad in gold. There's a trade to take a huge amount of profit and rotate money so our goal is to get into the S&P it into something that has a cyclical trend 500, lower cost of capital and have a more and you can see very large movements. stable shareholder base. Lower cost of "Our stock is $2 right now and it's been capital means you can grow cheaply.” as high as just under $10 twice in the last McEwen believes most people investing 12 years, so you have these big swings. I should have gold in their portfolio. "I'd think gold is coming back and my long­ say that people should start looking at term view is that it's a $5,000 number for gold. You might want to look at Ray gold.” Dalio; he's the head of the largest Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

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HR/Business Development

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The Joint Venture For Recruiters

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f setting up a new business from scratch or buying a franchise doesn't appeal, an exciting third option - the Joint Venture - can give experienced recruiters the opportunity to hit the ground running and still be their own boss. By Paul Mizen

n Britain, we love small businesses. The Federation of Small Businesses states that small enterprises made up 99.3% of all private sector businesses at the start of 2017. Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) make up 51% of the UK’s private sector turnover. Business start­ups are seen as a key metric for the health of the economy generally. And look no further than the UK Government’s own industrial strategy, published in November 2017, where fostering the right environment for new start­ups to thrive is seen as a key pillar to the future of the country’s economy. Entrepreneurship matters. We like to think that talented people in their field, with the drive and ambition to start their own business, should have

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access to the means to do so. In my own sector, recruitment, I have seen lots of talented people working very hard, and very successfully, for a fairly static monthly salary, who would be obviously well­suited to taking the plunge and starting their own business. Some do, of course, but a great many don’t and feel that business ownership is simply not for them. It’s not difficult to see why. Starting a business is hugely exciting and liberating, but there’s no denying there is baggage that must be faced. Finance is the big one, and I’ve seen many gifted, driven people who think they will never be able to raise the funding needed to get a business

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HR/Business Development

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off the ground and are certainly not prepared to put life savings and their home on the line. Not only that, but they feel like sorting out HR, payroll, accounts, marketing, IT and other less glamourous aspects are too costly, and too distracting from the things they do best. If people are put off starting their own business in the recruitment sector for these reasons – a sector where barriers to entry are not that high – then I would wager good money that many other sectors have the same problem. Franchising takes away many of those headaches – people buy into an established business model, which they get to drive forward, expand, and can make a lot of money from. I’m not knocking franchising at all (it has many positives) but for people who have a seed of an idea and the desire to create something new, clearly an alternative is needed. Joint ventures are perhaps more famous among big business, such as Sony Ericsson, where expertise between two enterprises is shared to break into new markets. But joint ventures work very well on the smaller scale too. My own company has entered into joint venture arrangements on 43 new start­ups in the recruitment sector. Essentially, we have opened the door to entrepreneurship for talented recruiters across the UK who felt cut off from starting their own business. This is not

franchising – it is very much their own brand, their own idea, and definitely their own energy and drive. Our expertise is lent taking care of the financial side of things, as well as those daunting back­ office functions previously mentioned. It then allows those new entrepreneurs to focus on what they are good at – namely filling job vacancies with quality candidates and generating turnover. Paul Mizen: MD I believe joint ventures very much offer a ‘third way’ for people to start their own business. It is not truly going it alone, in the same way as starting something from scratch, but neither is it a franchise which ties people into an established model. I have found that once people have that confidence to get over the initial trepidation, they don’t look back. But joint ventures have much potential in all sorts of new business start­ups. In essence, it is about two parties with different skills coming together to reduce the risks that new enterprises bring and improve the chances of success. But of those who have ever considered running their own business, how many ever even think about a joint venture to get it off the ground? If Whitehall wants to see fertile conditions for new business start­ups then maybe schemes supporting joint ventures should be promoted more. If you want more entrepreneurs, you need to break down barriers, and I believe joint ventures play an important role in doing just that.

Paul Mizen is Managing Director of the Recruit Venture Group, the largest venture partner of their kind in the UK. For more information visit www.recruitventures.com

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Education/Personal Development

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ELEVATING MINDS OF TOMORROW By Ronnie Ajoku

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months later, when we he brainchild of wanted to make more use Robert Mitton, of the content which we BRITEthink is a had from all the workshops community learning project and courses. It made sense aimed at developing to turn these into online professional education for courses so that we can people looking to “up-skill, support people further stretch and challenge afield and grow a learning themselves through quality community.” and affordable measures.” Since then BRITEthink has Mitton got the idea for continued to grow. “The BRITEthink while working business has come along in a management role that way since we started,” he saw him deliver learning added. “I'm currently and development working with a co­founder, programmes to increase Robert Mitton: Founder of Augusto, on another staff performance. He then BRITEthink business where we are decided to combine his helping to create learning experience, ideas and content acquired and development content ­ and portals for into something that would support him other businesses. They all interlink and while providing the opportunity to do we can leverage off what he loved. each one.” “BRITEthink was With so many on initially developed and offline courses from my work as an available these days assessor for from numerous vocational courses sources, one is and apprenticeships. tempted to ask Companies also Mitton what the wanted alternative difference between training methods and BRITEthink and I was willing to other training adapt, change and offer what people organisations is, to which he answers: wanted, as I developed an entire learning “We have a key value of customer plan specific to each client. “The website came about around 18

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Education/Personal Development

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centricity and we prepare people for tomorrow. This means that we are looking for the skills of tomorrow, alongside career development for the present day. We understand that with a growth in automation, the future of human work will need to be more creative. Therefore, we have been developing content on critical, creative and strategic thinking; alongside developing cultures, communities and soft skills in presentation, accepting critique and leadership areas. “My Learning Manager, Panos, has a strong background in organisational psychology, which has been interesting to develop more into our content. He is a member of the Association for Business Psychology, which is a badge that we proudly showcase alongside our CPD accredited learning. “We are also huge believers in the power of transcultural communities and leaders, and we have been able to deliver workshops across Europe and the Middle East. Understanding the mindset of workers in different countries helps to develop stronger skills in areas such as leadership, negotiation and business skills ­ which we embed into our programmes.” Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

Some of the organisations BRITEthink has Panos Trakas, delivered training to Learning include Chelsea FC Manager Foundation, Reed, NHS, Department for Digital Culture, Media and Sport and London councils such as Islington, Westminster and Hackney. “Within corporate training, we have have had some excellent feedback. “Our learners have really enjoyed a great range of workshops, online learning, personal support and growth in their journeys. We have now set the website up to offer an alternative subscription­ based learning community, which is having a positive feedback. The benefit of all this includes short courses, the ability to download content (to watch or listen to on the tube or during a commute) and online support from a team member when needed. Our community has benefited from achievable learning, which comes with a CPD accreditation.” Mitton is a supporter of Ellingham, an East London based charity that helps people with disabilities by assisting them with employment programmes, training and day opportunities. “I am raising money through the sales of my book,

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'How to Build a Community in your Business.' The book is being published by Motivational Press and on Amazon,” he said of his fundraising effort for the charity. On how he got involved he says: “I delivered some level 5 training to the managers of the charity last year, and I felt strongly about the excellent work they were doing... the rest is history.” BRITEthink.co is also supporting those less fortunate across the Commonwealth, with their Commonwealth Development Challenge. How this works is when someone subscribes to a BRITEr membership, they give one other person across the 53 countries a free membership to support their own growth. BRITEthink is also keen to reach people who are at a lower level of work looking to up­skill and develop their CV. “Within the UK we reach much of our audience through marketing via Jobcentres and recruitment agencies, alongside different touch­points which includes social media, online webinars and a strong mailing and SMS list. “The other side of the business is corporate training, and the main growth in this market has come from word of mouth, advertising and promoting the business through the London Entrepreneur's Network and through free 28

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workshops that have helped to get my name out We have a key there.” value of customer His next centricity and we venture, also in prepare people the learning arena, is just as for tomorrow exciting to him. “We are developing a platform which is supporting businesses with a learning platform and the content to go with it... like an all­in­ one package and something which is useful for corporations and other training organisations. This is just about to launch as outcourse.co.uk “I'm really excited about this. We have always outsourced content before, however, we are now taking this to the next level and helping organisations with the platform, interactive games, engagement and assessments,” he added.

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Women in Business

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recognition and workable life­balance.” The Venus Awards have already presented over 30 ceremonies across 14 regions of the Country with London 2018 to be the 35th. She says: “I created the Venus Awards to For those looking to follow in their applaud and reward working women who footsteps, here are some words of advice are so often starved of adequate from the winners. nown as the "Working Women's Oscars", the Venus Awards was created in 2009 by Tara Howard and has grown ever since.

Beatrice Lafon – Category: Influential Business Leader. Company: Kondor: Nugget: “Be flexible, be open to opportunities and accept that the route to the top is not a straight line. Put people first. Keep true to your values. Honesty and integrity matter a great deal. Be sure that you care, without being emotional but do not be afraid to show you have a strong backbone as well."

Dawn Crossingham – Category: Networker of the Year. Company: D52ltd: Nugget: “I believe networking is the key to business success.” “The best way for us all to grow our businesses is to work collaboratively, and I truly believe networking is the key for this.”

Debbie Ruth – Category: Inspirational Woman in Music. Company: Cordelectra Electric String Trio: Nugget: “We are the only ones who can decide […] our future and our present and we’ve just got to grab life with both hands.”

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Emily Murphy – Category: HR Manager of the Year. Company: Ikea Group: Nugget: “Believe in your talent, follow your heart and make sure that you are always yourself.”

Jenny Oag – Category: Musical Talent. Company: Jenny Oag Music: Nugget: “Don’t let anybody tell you that you can’t do anything.”

Rachel Bell – Category: Marketing & PR. Company: Bell and Loxton: Nugget: “Our business has taken quite a while to grow, so you just have to be patient and believe in yourself.”

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Georgina Hurcombe ­ Category: Entrepreneur of the Year. Company: LoveLoveFilms: Nugget: “If you don’t ask you don’t get, and I’ve, throughout my career, just asked people.”

Katherine Knight – Category: Influential Woman of the Year. Company: Intelligent Health: Nugget: “Just stand in someone else’s shoes, whenever you’re working with them or talking with them or spending any time, because you actually don’t know what they are going through or what’s happening, it’s not about you, it’s about the people.”

The London Finalist Announcement will take place at a ceremony held at The Ritz on October 9th 2018

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Women in Business: Finance

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ELIMINATE THE GENDER PAY GAP BY WORKING FOR YOURSELF

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By Ronnie Ajoku

hen it comes to earning power (in terms of wages and salaries), one issue that is constantly discussed is the gender pay gap. Simply put, it is the difference in the amount paid to male and female employees for the exact same role. Whether this is fair or not has been the subject of many a debate, and with the increasing move towards a fairer society and equal opportunities for all, it has remained a hot topic. One way of ensuring you do not receive less than you are worth is to take control of your own destiny and work for yourself. After all, why be limited when female empowerment initiatives are on the rise? “I dreamed of having my own business and Genistar gave me that dream and turned it into reality,” says Executive Vice President (EVP) Melchorita Berganio. Initially uncertain of how things would turn out, she was encouraged by the results

that is dependent on your hard work.” For Ching Dela Cruz, a Senior Vice President ( SVP), it was an unforeseen redundancy that made her take the plunge: “I have always wanted to be in business, being inspired by so many great people. But it was only when I was made Ching Dela Cruz

redundant from my previous job ­ at a time when I was lost ­ that I decided to go out of my comfort zone and try something new.” Regarding the rising number of initiatives promoting female entrepreneurship she said: “The number of initiatives that the government and other organisations are promoting is an indication that females in general are no longer on the sidelines. It shows that we are now being recognised and the importance of our contribution to society.” On the other hand Sharon Gordon was not new to entrepreneurship before Genistar, having run businesses in the past: “I have owned several other businesses, some Melchorita Berganio more successful than others. With every one I have learnt how to survive the she began to see after applying herself: “At first I felt it wouldn't work for me. Not failures, duplicate the successes and appreciate challenging myself every day to until I tried it and it started showing visible results that I was pleased to have, do better and not stand still for too long.” as well as the gradual increase in income Sharon has been lucky to have been 32

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accepted into one of the government­ even have imagined earning a quarter of funded initiatives aimed at encouraging as a professional.” female entrepreneurship. Barbara goes further to encourage other “I was privileged to have been accepted women looking for financial freedom into the Inspiring Women course ­ for saying: “I recently read somewhere that a women who have started a business and chance at guaranteed success is better need support with growth, development than the certainty of failure. A job is never and finances. This led to my business designed for an employee to become partner and I being selected for the wealthy from it. You will never own your Female Founders Accelerated position. Growth programme with a very Whilst the Jan Owbridge prestigious city bank. However, the initial issue for me is less about the course, journey for which there are a number. At the might be end of each course there were still a challenging, number of gaps in my financial the business knowledge, gaps that I believe are success and now being filled through Genistar. It satisfaction is a very true saying that one hour in is/will be the field is worth 20 in the yours. It classroom,” she added. might Barbara Anderson (EVP) has stretch you experienced the pains of gender pay but it will gap firsthand and acknowledges the certainly opportunity being in control of her strengthen own destiny has provided her. “As a you. The former Accountant my salary was only 'what never anywhere near what my male if' you must ask yourself is 'what if I succeed?'” For Jan Owbridge, being an 'army wife' and living in different Barbara Anderson countries meant it made more sense for her to run businesses than seek conventional employment. However, her real success came when she discovered Genistar. As she puts it: “I didn't really make money until Genistar”. Comparing possibilities offered to women in employment to that of being self­ employed, the EVP says: “It's the only way to go. There is no age colleagues were earning, especially limit (I'm a pensioner) and no­one will tell working in a male­owned business where you that 'you can't' ­ you will never all Directors were male and the rest of the become financially free in a job and it's department was male. What I currently only with a business that you can achieve earn running my own business I could not the freedom you want. Go for it!” Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

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JODIE KIDD CALLS ON CHANCELLOR

Images: PA/David Parry

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ormer supermodel turned businesswoman, Jodie Kidd, is calling on the Government to cut high beer tax to help keep British pubs open. It is estimated that with increasing financial pressures from a range of taxes, three local UK pubs close their doors for good every day. Kidd, who is the Landlord of The Half Moon Inn Kirdford, launched "Long Live the Local" – a nationwide campaign backed by Britain's Beer Alliance – from The Chancellor's local, The Red Lion in Westminster. "The role of pubs has never been more diverse with two in three Brits saying pubs are a social centre and bring the community together. This campaign celebrates the vital role the local pub plays in our culture and communities. Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

"As a publican, I can see the devastating effect rising beer tax is having on local pubs like my own, and the communities they serve. By supporting the "Long Live the Local" campaign, I am calling on Brits to sign a petition asking the government to cut beer tax and help keep local pubs open for generations to come," says Kidd.

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Property

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AIR AGENTS OPEN FIRST SHORT STAY ADVICE ONE-STOP-SHOP first 10 minutes of meeting them! They have a brilliant business idea.” Air Agents Founders Fran Milsom and Mark Hudson Over the next three months, the Air Agents team will be on hand imparting their knowledge, dispelling myths and ultimately helping Londoners utilise the short stay market in an ethical way. There will be workshops on how to prepare your home to let, a how­to guide, and information on security, regulation and Air Agents, a London short stay insurance. Londoners will also be able to management company and the world’s sign up to Air Agents services, first Airbnb professional co­host, has with waived fees on their first booking for launched the capital's first one­stop­shop any business that for all things short­ comes through the stay. shop front. The temporary Fran Milsom, Co­ high street shop, Founder of Air which will be open Agents said: “We are for the next three excited to be months on the Old opening a ‘first of its Brompton Road in kind’ short­stay high Kensington, will Tej Lalvani with guests street shop in at Air Agents launch see Air Agents London. We are helping to raise passionate about what we standards when it comes to do, and as proud Londoners, the short stay market. we want to help our The Founders of Air Agents, neighbours make the most of Fran Milsom and Mark their property and provide Hudson, were fortunate to great accommodation to have secured an investment those visiting our from Touker Suleyman and Touker Suleyman, Tej Lalvani magnificent city.” and Mark Hudson Tej Lalvani, both well The full address of the pop­ known investors from the up shop is 111­113 Old Brompton Rd, BBC show, Dragons' Den. South Kensington, London SW7 3LE, Touker Suleyman said: “I made up my and workshops will be advertised on the mind to invest in these guys within the shop front. Visit: www.theairagents.com Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

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Property

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By Ronnie Ajoku

uoyed by rising trends such as out-of-hours business transactions, an increasing preference for working from home and a reliance on mobile devices, the property industry is facing its own fair share of disruption in the form of Property Technology (PropTech) businesses.

they say,” he tells us. Over time he has witnessed changes in the relationship between landlords, estate agencies and tenants. “The relationships are hugely different. The advent of the Internet removed the mystery and access blockers for landlords, which has changed the agent­landlord relationship considerably. At the same time, regulatory changes have meant agents have gone from being an A major player in this arena is introductory pipeline to PayProp. Launched in the UK in providing a risk and 2015, the automated rental compliance solution. payment provider has “This is hugely experienced rapid growth by beneficial to the helping many letting market and has agencies streamline boosted the and grow their image of the businesses. The sector in the company’s eyes of the platform data Neil Cobbold: Chief Operating Officer, PayProp UK wider suggests that its customers typically grow their lettings public. Unfortunately, I think bad press continues to dog the industry, but portfolios by 23% each year. In the UK PayProp is headed by its COO, hopefully regulatory changes will do a lot to remedy the situation as it did for the IFA Neil Cobbold, who is well­seasoned in different parts of the property sector. Over market post the crash. Truth, trust and the past 20 years Neil has been an agent, transparency – the key values of PayProp – have never been more key to both maintenance and facilities management provider, software developer and Founder tenants and landlords, and agents who embrace these values will thrive.” of a housing association. “I had almost Despite the number of new platforms, decided I was finished with the industry and ready to start something new when I particularly websites, springing up was introduced to PayProp by an associate claiming to make it easier for both within the sector and immediately saw the property owners and renters, Cobbold application and benefits of the solution. I believes PayProp still has a major role to met the Founders and the rest is history, as play in the industry insisting that:

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Property

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tenant­facing financial management processes, thereby gaining competitive advantage. By transferring their client money accounting to the PayProp system, which exists within the real­time banking environment, property managers can seamlessly reconcile all incoming payments to the correct tenants at the click of a button. “PayProp is a tried and tested solution. Next, they can make rule­based payments Where a lot of new startups claim to solve out to multiple recipients (commission, problems for agents, many need to not contractors, utilities and landlords) for all only prove their product but their ability properties across their entire rent role – to change with a market that has never again at the click of a button. In addition, had this many changes to contend with. invoicing, arrears management and “Although new to the UK, PayProp has reporting are automated, relieving the been trading as a bank­integrated solution admin that makes month­end for over 13 years and has a such a resource­heavy, error­ resilient, secure, tailored Values of prone pain. product matched to an The UK has been receptive PayProp have ongoing need. I believe, with and “PayProp has gone from all the experience I have, that never been more strength to strength. With the I have never seen a product key to tenants, help of organisations like with a better value landlords, and PropertyMark, NALS and proposition within the market The Guild, we have seen – but perhaps I'm a little agents rapid uptake of the product. biased.” This has allowed us to Since launching in the UK establish relationships with some of the PayProp has automated over 20 million larger players in the industry within the transactions, over six million invoices and first two years,” he says. over one million arrears reminders. PayProp is primarily focused on the Globally, the platform now manages the residential lettings (instead of payments on more than 23,000 active commercial) market, where they predict a tenancies. high growth over the coming years. “Over PayProp’s payment automation platform the next 5 years, the growth in this sector offers a simple and pain­free way for alone will keep us more than busy agencies to automate their landlord­ and Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

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Property

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providing our service to the market. In other areas where we have a larger market share we are exploring these possibilities but PayProp will never be all things to all people. Our speciality is knowing where we are a leader and capitalising on that market niche.” Unlike most commercial companies PayProp started out from a charitable foundation. “What started out as a donation settlement platform for charities became the basis of our rent settlement platform for letting agents, landlords and

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tenants. We have always kept this humble beginning at the heart of our business philosophy and values. We provide an excellent product, helping our clients wherever we can and are always trying to do the best we can for our clients at every interaction. This is why we never tie clients into a contract; we want agents who embrace PayProp and, like us, want to provide the best service they can to their clients, be that tenant or landlord, as these agents are the future of a regulated professional property industry.”

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Pollution

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GLOBAL CROSS-BORDER POLLUTION: THE NEW ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT?

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s nations focus upon the ongoing issue of illegal human immigrants, such as the Trump administration’s focus upon the Mexican border, is the real issue at hand the ongoing unmeasurable cross-border pollution which effects nations worldwide? By Portia Vincent-Kirby

ir pollution is a serious issue. Recent studies show that more than 95% of the Earth’s population is “breathing dangerously polluted air”, with annual deaths from poor air increasing by 20% since 1990. This is despite several measures taken by multi­national platforms such as the EU to tackle the crisis, by implementing environmentally conscious legislation such as the EU ‘Air Quality Directive’ and the ‘Pollution Prevention and Control Act’ (1999).

means that every government should take “appropriate measures to safeguard life”, so that the average life expectancy of each citizen is not affected, as it may be by air pollution and climate change. However, although each individual nation may take protective measures such as to reduce its carbon footprint through the decreasing use of plastic, or to make its major cities “car­free” to decrease its air pollution, how effective is this protection whilst citizens are still burdened with the unmanageable cross­border pollution from neighbouring nations?

Furthermore, these protective measures coincide with Article 2 of the Human Rights Act (HRA), in which every nation Unlike the physical borders placed upon worldwide must comply with the securing citizens between nations, air pollution knows no boundaries when it comes to of every citizens “right to life”. This 44

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Pollution

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travelling between one nation and another. Therefore, should there be an increase in global governance, so as to tackle the ongoing crisis of air pollution and climate change? By doing so, not only will nations become more unified in their co­ operation against the issue of global air pollution and climate change, but the implementation of their own citizens Human Rights would be greatly exemplified, specifically the application of the human ‘right to life’. In addition, the potentially increased global governance of the management of global pollution and the ongoing war against climate change could also see

alternative future trade deals arising between nations, as the need for more ‘environmentally friendly’ commodities arise – such as demonstrated by highly polluted countries like China increasing their demand for ‘fresh air’ and related products from other countries. Thus, due to the ongoing rise of air pollution and the serious impacts of unpredictable climate change upon every nation worldwide, a need for an enhanced global governance between all nations may be the only solution to tackling not only the management of cross­border pollution, but also the implementation of Human Rights law globally.

Portia Vincent­Kirby the Public Relations Coordinator at Hudson McKenzie. If you would like to discuss this article further or have any general legal enquiries, visit: www.hudsonmckenzie.com

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ICHIBA The Japan Centre Group, Cool Japan Fund, Gekkeikan and Kikkoman have launched Europe’s largest Japanese Food Hall – Ichiba. The launch night of Ichiba was an exciting evening that featured a spectacular performance from traditional Japanese Taiko drummers and Japanese dance troupes entertaining with a traditional Japanese Obon dance. Guests on the day were treated to tasty food that included ramen, curries and sushi from dedicated food stations. Tak Tokumine, Founder and CEO of Japan Centre, said: “I’m delighted to announce this new concept for people to experience Japanese food culture at Westfield London. Ichiba is a dynamic and inspiring addition to the expanded centre and retail landscape in the Capital.” Keith Mabbett, Director of Leasing, Westfield UK and Europe, added: “We’re thrilled to welcome Europe’s largest Japanese food hall, Ichiba, to our £600m Westfield London expansion. The arrival of Ichiba will give our visitors the opportunity to get a taste of Japanese cuisine and culture in a unique way.” The main food hall offers a large range of Japanese staples and kitchen essentials, from rice, miso and tea, to a wide selection of sake and confectionery, alongside books, beauty products and handpicked ceramics from the leading craft prefectures. There are also exclusive Hello Kitty and Gudetama products available, from teapots and plates to bento boxes and lunch accessories. 46

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Ichiba is located just off the new Westfield Square on the lower ground floor at Westfield, Shepherd’s Bush. For further information visit: www.ichibalondon.com

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HIPCHIPS

Lovers of crisps, get a bite of this. If you're looking for something a bit different, say unusual but trendy, HipChips is for you. First off, you won't find these flavours anywhere else, so if you are looking to enjoy a new twist on an old snack with family or friends, it is definitely the place to go. You never would have thought crisps could come in such unusual flavours and colours, or be pleasurable with sweet­tasting dips until you go to HipChips. With an array of delicious and cleverly handcrafted crisps made from a heritage variety of British potatoes by the seasoned chef, Scott Davis, the options range from Highland Burgundy, 1936 to the Red Duke Of York, 1942. There is also a choice of uniquely flavoured sweet and savoury dips, ranging from Blue Cheese & Damson to Chocolate Salted Caramel to go alongside. All this is carefully packaged for the customer in a neatly branded box, ready to be eaten in or taken away. As if that's not enough customers can also order online and they can have it delivered. HipChips have found a way of turning eating crisps to an experience. Eating crisps has never been so much fun! Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

Hip Chips is located at 49 Old Compton Street, Soho, London, W1D 6HL. See: www.hipchips.com

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International Trade

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PROTECTING YOUR BUSINESS FROM INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THREAT IN ASIA

By Siddharth Shankar

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sia offers a whole new world of possibilities for UK businesses – to export their products there and become global brands. In total, UK exports to Asia are now worth £98.6 billion – 18% of the UK export market. The UK’s trade with China is increasing rapidly (China is now the eighth largest export market for the UK), whilst India and Singapore are among the UK’s largest trading partners within the commonwealth. Many Asian countries are boasting rapid economic and population growth; improved infrastructure; cheap warehousing and logistical costs; as well

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as rising middle classes, with increasingly disposable incomes and a penchant for high­quality British­made goods, such as whiskey and chocolate. Given this – and the fact that the UK’s future relationship with the European Union (which currently accounts for a whopping 48% of all British exports) is currently unclear – the lure of exporting to Asia may never have been greater or more pertinent. However, it’s impossible to ignore the risks and confusion surrounding exporting to Asia. One of the most pressing issues which UK businesses face is the risk to intellectual property within Asia. It can be a very slippery problem to get a handle on

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International Trade

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and it’s important to grasp all the facts before embarking on exporting to Asia. Neither the law nor the level of protection you can expect for your intellectual property is constant across Asia. In a few countries it can take up to four years to simply register a trademark.

handling things – even if they’re within the same country. This not only often causes great confusion but can also be a huge waste of your time, energy and resources.

INFRINGEMENT AND COUNTERFEITS Patent and trademark infringement is REGISTERING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY common and the counterfeit of goods is The first hurdle you’ll come up against is also a big problem. Many Asian countries are infamous for the process of registering Intellectual Property. It can prove to be an expensive intellectual property theft and extortion. and very time consuming task. Make sure There is a real lack of control over you build this into your timeline in order counterfeit products and this is a reason for worry amongst old and new, big and to avoid nasty delays. Siddharth Shankar small brands alike. The regulatory environment that protects intellectual Asia does not operate like a property in Asian countries is single market but, due to the often difficult to navigate. rise of digital technology, new There are language barriers products and news of new and cultural difference to products easily reaches contend with. With the right neighbouring countries, thereby team around you, you can inviting trouble from a market easily surmount the language you may plan to penetrate a few barriers, but the extensive years later. cultural differences can be harder to navigate – much greater than LAW ENFORCEMENT when exporting to other European Many countries within Asia are pretty countries – and can throw up problems. inconsistent in the way they enforce both There are 50 different governments the law and government policies. It can within Asia and the majority don’t have well­established processes or procedures often depend on the individual official or judge you are dealing with – who may – which can result in it being incredibly differ wildly in their execution of a policy challenging to make progress. from one of their counterparts. There are also a few Asian countries which are very DIFFICULTIES WITH GOVERNMENT volatile and where it isn’t unusual for AUTHORITIES laws to be changed without any prior The different government authorities indication, but with potentially game­ you’ll come into contact with will often have quite different practices and ways of changing consequences. Siddharth Shankar is a leading expert in trading with Asia and CEO of Tail’s Trading, an innovative new solution for SMEs exporting to Asia. For further information visit: www.tailstrading.com

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SIX ENTREPRENEURIAL LESSONS FROM THE 2018 WORLD CUP

D

id 2018’s World Cup surprise you? Germany, Argentina, Spain and Portugal didn’t get far, and France didn’t play well in all the games but won the Cup. The results surprised millions of football lovers around the globe and in this article Hamid Safaei shares six lessons Entrepreneurs can learn from this year’s World Cup. CHANGE IS THE FUEL OF SURVIVAL The only guarantee in a world of “snap­chat” moments is change. Winners are able to initiate change because they are smart enough to recognise a changing wind and follow its direction. Renowned teams such as the Netherlands and Italy did not evolve their soccer teams’ strategies. Consequently, they failed to qualify for the World Cup. Failing to change welcomes failure. In business, the same rules apply: If you resist the inevitable, you are destined to perish. Kodak was once a pioneer in the age of digital cameras but could not cope with the rapid flow of change.

HUMILITY IS THE KEY TO GREATNESS

The big winners of yesterday will be tomorrow’s losers if their leaders do not learn new algorithms to grow to the next level. The movie giant Blockbuster comes to mind: their business model lost out to new comers for not refreshing its strategy and preparing for competition. Start­ups founded in a basement five to ten years ago, like Uber and Air BnB, are now powerful, multibillion dollar businesses. EFFECTIVE TEAMS MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

In my new book, “First­Class Volume 4 Issue 4, 201 8

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Entrepreneurship

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FEAR OF FAILURE CAN BE Leadership,” I demonstrate how highly PARALYSING effective teams are built. These teams do Teams aspire to grow to a level not necessarily have elite players. Nor are where they can beat their they too dependent on such individuals competition. The truth is that the when they have them. In fact, depending competition grows as well. If a top team too much on an elite player may be a fails to embrace change and evolve, the gamble and does not guarantee success. Argentina depended too much on Lionel upcoming teams who do evolve become tomorrow’s threats. Fear of failure can Messi during this year’s World Cup. lead to failure. Some sport France bested Argentina 4­3 in Hamid Safaei: Founder, coaches believe in the adage, the quarter finals. All teams FCL1.com “Never change your winning can learn from Belgium and team.” Perhaps Löw and the France, even when Belgium Argentinian soccer coach, came third. Sampaoli belong to this As an entrepreneur and author, category. New situations I believe that highly effective require new approaches. teams book better results than Fear of failure keeps individual stars do. If you are entrepreneurs hostage. A fear an entrepreneur and want to of failure sounds like, “What if make it to the next round, you I fail and lose everything?” It do not need to rely upon is important to remember that indecision individual stars but rather a team of is more destructive than making poor players with complementary skills and decisions! who desire to function as a team. TEST YOUR STRATEGIES, EVEN ON

ALWAYS CONDUCT A REALITY CHECK

THE TOP

Past success is not a predictor of future results. The big losers are often those who do not evolve their success strategies and stay with the old playbook despite an advancing game. This was the case with the German team. Joachim Löw tested his strategy. While his team did not book convincing results during friendly matches prior to the World Cup, he did not evolve his team to be competitive in the Cup. Blackberry is a comparable example. The tech company that wowed the world in the mid 2000s stayed too long with its “qwerty keyboard.” Apple’s and Samsung’s smartphones embraced a new approach in software and touch screen technology and soon eclipsed Blackberry’s ageing approach.

As I’ve covered in my new book First­Class Leadership, the first principle that many great entrepreneurs apply in new situations is conducting a reality check ­ instead of thinking, guessing and assuming. By checking we consider that we may not know everything and may need to verify facts. Today’s world of entrepreneurship is a gladiatorial arena. Every battle in business is won using “fit­for­purpose” tactics. Your adversary may not care about who you are or what your reputation is. To prove your merit, employ a forward­ looking, evolutionary strategy to win the day. On guard!

Hamid Safaei is the bestselling author of First­Class Leadership and Your Journey to Fulfillment. He is also the Founder of FCL1.com and a certified executive mentor

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Profile for The London Business Journal

The London Business Journal Volume 4 Issue 4 2018  

Business interviews, articles and information.

The London Business Journal Volume 4 Issue 4 2018  

Business interviews, articles and information.

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