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REVOLUTIONARY INCIDENTS :

SUFFOLK AAD KINGS C

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thi battle of long :^laap,

THE BRITISH

PRISON'S A MI

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NEW-YOKK.

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A A W.YORK: LEAVITT & COMPANY. 191 BROAA 1549.


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PREFACE. The present volume completes a plan the compiler had some years since conceived, of collecting and arranging in chronological order, the scattered and fragmentary notices of the events that occurred on

Long

Island, during our

Revo-

lutionary struggle.

The

history of the Island during this soul-stirring period

has been hitherto clouded in gross darkness.

Indeed the

very name scarcely appears on the pages of our History, except

to

The

record a disastrous defeat of our arms.

contents of these volumes

show

that

Long

Island

is

not barren in Revolutionary Incidents, unique in their character,

and instructive

The Counties a

to the

student of our country's history.

of Suffolk, Queens and Kings, each played

and yet appropriate part in the great drama of

different

the Revolution.

At

we

the

first

outbreak of rebellion in the port of Boston,

find the Puritans of Suffolk

assembling in almost every

town, and voting resolutions of aid and sympathy brethren of the Massachusetts Bay. pressions heartless.

The

Nor were

for their

these ex-

people were ready to follow their

leaders in rebellion, the militia were organized, and Suffolk

armed for the contest. Far different was the state of feeling in Queens County. Here the Royal Governors, and other crown officers had occasionally resided, and exerted an overshadowing influence.

They were

often connected with other wealthy and aristo-

cratic families in the County,

and dependents. the passive

who had

also their adherents

Then, there was the peaceable Quaker,

Dutchman; and

the Church-of-England-man,


PREFACE.

G

bound spirit

army

King by

to the

All these

State.

a double

made

tie,

as head of

Church and rampant

a dead weight, that the

of rebellion could hardly move, until the Congressional marched into the County, disarmed the Loyalists and

carried off their leaders.

The population of Kings County was mostly Dutch, who made but a tardy and feeble show of resistance to the powers that be

her Deputies finally absented themselves from the

;

Provincial Congress, and the flagging spirit of revolt quickly

subsided at the approach of the British

enemy, there was

still

a

the Island to the

difference in the conduct of the

The prominent Whigs

Counties.

fleet.

army abandoned

After the American

of Suffolk fled to their

brethren on the Main, with what movables they could carry, leaving behind their stock, houses and farms to the enemy.

Those who remained, reluctantly took an oath of allegiance, which they never meant to regard, and were ever treacherous subjects of a King they had sworn to obey. The great majority of the people of Queens County, took the oath

good

allegiance in

of

and observed

faith,

it.

Most of the leading Whigs, trusting to British proclamations,

and not knowing where punished

Many

various

in

to

go,

ways

remained

for

suffered imprisonment,

their

which

to

at

home, and were

undutiful

conduct.

some ended only

in

death.

The

case of Kings County

of Queens.

Many

deserted their

of its

was somewhat

homes on the prospect of

theatre of hostilities.

similar to that

peace-loving inhabitants had already

The

leading

its

Whigs

becoming the

fled

among

their

Dutch brethren, some to New Jersey, and some up the North River, while a few who remained and trusted to the chances of British clemency, were thrown in the Provost. Within two months after the American Army had given up the Island, the principal inhabitants of the three Counties had signed a representation of loyalty to King George the


7

PREFACE.

Third

;

and in order that their wholesome example of dutiful

return to obedience might have

its

rebellious portions of the State,

was published at length names of all the signers

New- York Mercury, with

the

it

the

influence on the other in

in

Queens and Kings Counties. During the entire period of the revolution, the British held New- York City, a part of Westchester County, and all of There were Staten and Long Island under military rule. no elections

窶馬o voting except annual town meetings窶馬one pay 窶馬o judges窶馬o courts of at

except town taxes

civil ju-

to

dicature, their place being supplied

by the arbitrary

King's justice or some military character.

Court of Police was after a while established in City

and

;

at

fiat

of a

summary New- York

True, a

length, in the year 1780, for the greater con-

venience of His Majesty's loyal subjects on Long Island, a

The

Court of Police was also opened in Jamaica.

inhabit-

ants could not go to or from the city, or bring out goods,

The price of wood and farmer's produce was regulated by proclamation ; their horses, wagons and persons, could at any time be impressed into the King's serwithout a permit.

vice, at a stipulated price.

village

and hamlet was

In the winter season almost every

with

filled

British

soldiers

and

wagoners, billeted in the people's houses, or cantoned in tem-

porary huts.

The consequence was,

high price

such of the farmer's produce as had not been

for

previously pilfered.

The farmers

a ready market and

flourished on British gold

but as there were few opportunities for investing

banks of deposit their

they were compelled

for safe keeping,

money by them, and were

not of the established faith,

often robbed.

illicit

;

some were even

down.

trade forms a striking fea-

This consisted in buying imported goods

York

City, (with the professed design of retailing

subjects in

keep

soldiers,

torn

ture.

faithful

to

churches,

were mostly occupied by

or used as storehouses and prisons

In Suffolk County, the

The

;

and no

it,

in

New-

them to the County,) and then carrying them


PREFACE.

8

down

the Island to secret landing-places,

Sound

sent across the

in whale-boats,

whence they were

under cover of night,

and exchanged with the people of Connecticut

for provisions,

and farmer's produce, of which the British army stood in great need.

Though

this trade

was

prohibited by both

Ameri-

can and British authority, yet the cunning of the smugglers

(who

often acted as spies) generally eluded the sleepy vigi-

lance of government the sparse

officials.

This trade was protected by

population of Suffolk County, the extensive sea-

border, the absence of a British

armed

force,

and the prover-

bial insincerity of the people in their professed allegiance.

Owing

to this

Whiggish feeling of the

inhabitants, every

invading party of their brethren from the Main

—

—whether

to

Sag Harbor, St. George's, or Slongo always found ready and effectual aid in guides, food, or information. Indeed Washington used to say, that he always had more correct knowledge by spies, of the position and designs of the British army on Long Island, than at any other place. In fine, the British authority in Suffolk County, w as little more than an r

empty shadow. Quite different was the state of things in Queens and

Kings Counties.

Here

the great body of the people

were

at

heart loyal, the settled parts were more compact, and rarely free from the presence of

armed

troops, spreading dissipation

and shining gold with open hand.

Although the people of Long Island had taken an oath of crown in 1776, they were never deemed

fealty to the British

bona fide British subjects, and on the return of peace, in 1783, (with the exception of a few

who were

attainted of treason,)

they quietly slipped off their oath with their loyalty, and without the formality of abjuring their allegiance, took their places

among

the citizens of these free and

States.

Jamaica, L.

I.,

May, 1849.

Independent


CONTENTS.

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

PART

I.

Page

Sec.

532

— 599.

Rise and Progress of the Revolutionary 13

Spirit,

PART 600—620.

The

PART 621

—769.

II.

,42

Submission,

The Armed

III.

Occupation,

.

.

.

.

62

KINGS COUNTY.

PART 770—802,

I.

Rise and Progress oe the Spirit,

Revolutionary 113


12

CONTENTS.

PART

II.

Sec.

803

—828.

Page

Letters relating to the Battle of Long Island,

132

PART 829—830.

The

Submission,

PART 831—964.

IN.

The Armed

166

IV.

....

Occupation,

PART

172

V.

Incidents of the British Prisons and Prison Ships at

New-York,

207

APPENDIX. Forms of Orders, &c, issued

in

Additional Notes,

the Revolution

&c,

.

.

.

— .251


REVOLUTIONARY INCIDENTS OF

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

PART REVOLUTIONARY SPIRIT

I.

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

532. At a meeting of the inhabitants of the parish of South Haven, June 13, '74, Wm. Smith, Moderator ; It

1

was voted (and agreed),

ing up the port of Boston,

is

that the

Act of Parliament for block-

unconstitutional, and has a direct ten-

dency to enslave the inhabitants of America, and put an end

to all

property. 2.

nies

(And

all

it is

also the opinion of this meeting), that if the Colo-

unite and strictly adhere to a non-importation agreement

from Great Britain and the them,

we

West

of that oppressive act

;

and

for that

such an agreement may be entered 3.

Indies,

and have no trade with

should have great reason to expect in a short time, a repeal

(And

it is

purpose

we

further voted and agreed), that

Col. Nath'l Woodhull, Col.

Wm.

heartily desire that

into.

Wm.

Smith, Esq.,

Floyd, Mr. Thos. Fanning, Capt.

Josiah Smith, Capt. David Mulford, and Capt. Jona. Baker, be a

standing committee for this place, to correspond with the Committee of Correspondence in the city of N. Y., and others, and that they

immediately communicate the above sentiments to them.

2


REVOLUTIONARY

14

SPIRIT.

533. At a meeting of the inhabitants of East Hampton?

warned by the Trustees, June

legally

Eleazar Mil-

17, '74,

Esq., Moderator

ler,

That we

1st. Voted,

America

;

that

we

liberties

abilities

measures as

burdens

we

assert,

and immunities of British

will co-operate with our brethren in this

in such

fear,

utmost of our

will to the

and in a lawful manner defend the

shall appear best adapted to save

and in a measure already

feel,

Colony

us from the

from the principles

adopted by the British Parliament respecting the town of Boston in particular,

and the British Colonies in North America in general. That a non-importation agreement through the colo-

2d. Voted,

nies

the most likely

is

means

to save

us from the present and future

troubles.

That John

3d. Voted,

Chatfield, Esq., Col.

net Miller, Stephen Hedges, Thos.

Wickham,

Abm.

Gardiner, Bur-

Esq., John Gardiner,

Esq., and Capt. David Mulford be a standing committee for keeping

up a correspondence with the colony

;

and,

if

there

is

city of

N. Y., and the towns of this

occasion, with other colonies

;

and that they

transmit a copy of these votes to the committee of correspondence

N. Y. Voted unanimously, not one dissenting

for the city of

voice.

BURNET MILLER, 534. At a general

Town

inhabitants of Huntington tions

Clerk.

came

into the

following resolu-

:

1st.

man

Tovm

Meeting, June 21, '74, the

That every freeman's property is absolutely his own, and no it from him without his consent, expressed

has a right to take

either

by himself or his representative. That therefore, all taxes and duties imposed on His Majesty's

2d.

subjects in the

American Colonies by the authority of Parliament,

are wholly unconstitutional, and a plain violation of the most essential

rights of British subjects.

That the Act of Parliament lately passed for shutting up the means or device, under color of law, to compel them, or any other of His Majesty's American subjects, to submit to Parliamentary taxations, are subversive of their just and 3d.

port of Boston, or any other

constitutional liberty.


15

SUFFOLK COUNTY. That we are of opinion

Ath.

common cause

suffering in the

that our brethren of Boston are

now

of British America.

That therefore it is the indispensable duty of all the colonies some effectual measures for the repeal of said Act, and every other Act of Parliament whereby they are taxed for raising 5th.

to unite in

a revenue.

That

6th.

means all

the opinion of this meeting, that the most effectual

it is

for obtaining a speedy repeal of said Acts, will be to break off

commercial intercourse with Great Britain, Ireland, and the En-

glish

West [ndia colonies. And we hereby declare

1th.

ourselves ready to enter into these

or such other measures as shall be agreed upon by a General Congress of

all

the colonies

;

we recommend

and

to the

General Con-

gress to take such measures as shall be most effectual to prevent

such goods as are

at present in

America, from being raised to an ex-

travagant price.

And,

lastly,

we

appoint Col. Piatt Conklin, John Sloss Hobart,

Esq., and Thos. Wicks, a committee for this town, to act in con-

junction with the committees of the other towns in the county, as a

general committee for the county, to correspond with the committee

of N. Y.

ISRAEL WOOD, The

535.

and Aug.

President.

above Resolutions were also adopted at Smithtown

9, it

was voted

;

that " Sol. Smith, Dan'l Smith, and Thos.

Tredwell be a committee fully empowered, in conjunction with the committees of the other towns, to choose delegates to represent this

county

at the

General Congress, and to do

in defence of our just rights

and

all

that shall be necessary

liberties against the unconstitutional

attacks of the British Ministry and Parliament.

DAN'L SMITH, N. Y. Circular 536.

Boston,

to the several

Gentlemen The now sinking under :

and compassionate concern.

Counties,

Aug.

CPU."

9, '74.

distresses of the poor of the

town of

the hand of power, call for our tender

Every motive of

policy and humanity

should excite us to contribute liberally to their immediate redress.

They

are our

cause of

countrymen and brethren, suffering

liberty,

and their hard condition

We recommend a generous

in the

may one day

common

be our own.

subscription for the support of the indi-


REVOLUTIONARY

16

gent of that oppressed town.

SPIRIT.

In some instances

it

may

be most

convenient to contribute in wheat or flour, which will be equally serviceable.

The

vision should be

whole Continent requires that pro-

interest of the

made

for all

who become

common

sufferers in our

cause, and the honor and reputation of this Colony must animate us to distinguish ourselves on so benevolent

an occasion.

537. At a meeting of the Committees of Correspondence

county of Suffolk,

for the

at the

That we recommend

County Hall, Nov.

15, '74

towns in this county to set forward a subscription for the employment and relief of the distressed poor in the town of Boston, to be collected in such 1.

Voted,

manner

as the committees in each

it

to the several

town

shall

judge proper

;

to be in

readiness to be forwarded early next spring. 2.

Voted,

That John Foster have the care of procuring a vessel

to call at the several harbors in this county, to receive

and carry the

above donations to Boston. 3.

Voted,

That we

fully approve of the proceedings of the late

Continental Congress, and different

towns

recommend

it

to the

to see that the Association

committees of the

by them entered

into

on

behalf of themselves and their constituents, be strictly observed.

EZRA L'HOMMEDIEU,

Clerk.

538. At a meeting of the Committees of Observation for the several towns and districts of Huntington, Smithtown, Islip,

and South Haven," and some of the principal inhabitants of the town of Brookhaven, held at Smithtown, Feb. 23, '75, Col. Piatt Conklin being Chairman, 2.

Resolved nera. con., That

we

think ourselves under obligations

of gratitude to the worthy gentlemen in particular this

County

sembly

in the late Continental Congress,

in general, for their noble, patriotic

who

represented

and to that whole as-

and

faithful discharge of

their important trust. 3.

Resolved nem. con., That a letter be sent to

Wm.

Nicoll and

Nath'l Woodhull, Esqrs., Representatives of this County, informing them that, if a motion should be made in the house for appointing

Delegates to represent this Province, at the Continental Congress, to be held at Philadelphia, in May next, it is our opinion and desire, that they should join in their appointment.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 4.

17

Resolved nem. con., That in case the Assembly do not appoint

Delegates, the Committee of Correspondence for the city of N. Y., be desired to call a Provincial Convention for that purpose.

—

lic

N. B. Most of the towns and districts in this County, have at pubtown meetings, fully adopted the measures recommended by the

Congress, and determined on a

strict

observation of the Association.

539. Nathan Fordham, Burnet Miller, and Thos. Youngs, a sub-

committee, at

Sag Harbor, request of Congress, (Ap.

ammunition and warlike and that the cannon exposed

stores, suitable for

may

2d, '75,)

an inclosed list of cannon,

be mounted on carriages, as they are

to the ravages of the Ministerial

540. Robt. Hempstead

much

army.

was Chairman of a meeting of the ComCounty Hall, Ap.

mittees from the different towns in Suffolk, at the

who

6, '75,

appointed Col.

Wm.

Floyd, Col. Nath'l Woodhull, Col.

Phineas Fanning, Thomas Tredwell, and John Sloss Hobart, Esqrs., Deputies to the N.York Provincial Convention for choosing Delegates to the Continental Congress, to be held at Philadelphia, in

541.

To

the Provincial Congress, to be held,

22d, '75, Col.

Thomas Tredwell, John Ezra L'Hommedieu, Thos. Wickham, James Havens, and John

Nath'l Woodhull, Foster,

May

May.

Sloss Hobart,

Selah Strong, were elected Deputies for one year.

May

5.

542. At a meeting of freeholders and other inhabitants of Brookhaven, June

J

8,

75

By

;

a large

majority were

chosen 16 persons, as a Committee of Observation

to repre-

sent said town and deliberate on other matters relative to our

Agreed

present political welfare.

that the last

Tuesday

in

June, be appointed as the day for the Committee to meet.

The Committee met hull,

Esq., Thos.

Wm.

Brewster,

Nath'l Roe,

Manor

St.

Moriches

;

Jr.,

at Coram, June 27 Present, John WoodHelme, Esq., John Robinson, Thos. Fanning, Lt. ;

Noah Hallock,

Brown, John Woodhull, Jr., Thompson, of Smith, and Jonah Hulse, of Patentship of Jos.

Capt. Jona. Baker, Dan'l Roe, Sam'l

George

;

Wm.

Capt. Josiah Smith.

Then proceeded, and chose John Woodhull, Esq., Ch'n, and Sam'l Thompson, Clerk, and entered 1.

into the following resolutions

Resolved nem. con., That

we r

:

express our loyalty to His

Ma-


REVOLUTIONARY

18 jesty,

King Geo.

III.,

SPIRIT.

and acknowledge him as our rightful lord and

sovereign. 3.

Resolved unanimously, That

it

the opinion of this

is

Commit-

Acts passed in the British Parliament, for the purpose of raising a revenue in America also the Acts for stopping for the Port of Boston for altering their charter and government tee, that the several

;

;

;

Roman

establishing the

Catholic religion, and abolishing the equita-

ble system of English laws and erecting in their stead

French Despo-

Government in Canada as also the Act for restraining the New England fishery and further declaring they have power to make laws binding on us in all cases whatsoever, are contrary to the constitution and subversive of our legal rights as English freemen and

tic

;

;

British subjects. 4.

Resolved nem. con., That

strictly to

we

utmost endeavor

will use our

adhere to the Resolutions of the Honorable Continental

Congress, and to comply with the injunctions of our Provincial Convention,

which (under God) we hope

the most effectual

is

to obtain redress of our present grievances,

means

and save us from im-

pending ruin. 5.

We do unanimously make this our apology to

public and to our several Congresses, that

Congressional measures, and hope a veil

conduct

;

for our remissness

was not

for

want of

patriotic spirit, but

because opposition ran so high in some parts of arose,

we

verily believe,

the respectable

we have come so late into may be cast over our past this

town, which

from want of better information.

unanimously resolved, that we will keep a strict watch no provisions be transported from the bounds of our constituents,

6. It is

that

so as to 7.

fall into

the hands of our enemies.

Ordered, that the proceedings of this meeting be printed by

John Holt. 543. [The General Association (see Queens Co., 25,) was alThe most unanimously signed in Suffolk, only 236 recusants. original lists may be seen in Vol. XXX. of the MS. Papers of the

N. Y. Provincial Congress, in the Secretary of State's Office, at Albany, and are reprinted in Force's American Archives, III., 608.

—Ed.] 544.

May

Israel Youngs of Cold Spring brought in his Henry Dawkins an engraver, whom he employed

12, '75.

sloop from N. Y.


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

19

9 weeks in the garret of his house counterfeiting

Ketcham went

Isaac

bills

of credit.

They were Huntington Com-

to Philadelphia for the paper used.

Wicks, taken before the

arrested by aid of Thos.

mittee at Nath'l Williams' Tavern, and thence to N. Y. where they

were confined till July 18, when Dawkins was sent to Westchester and Israel and Isaac Youngs to Litchfield, where they lived at

jail

;

their

own expense

ÂŁ68

10 with the

till

Jour. 445, 718, 577.

June

'75.

3,

Wicks and

'76, when they went off leaving Ketcham was probably discharged Aug. 17.

Nov. 25,

jailer.

(See also 53.)

Cor. 464.

Youngs was taken

to N. Y. by Thos. Brush and Sam'l Brown The houses of George and Isaac Youngs and

Philip

Eliph. Brush, charged by Jacob

with counterfeiting.

John Williams were searched, but nothing found. [Philip was acJune 17. Ed. Jour. 471, 714.

quited,

Phineas Fanning, David Mulford, Esq., Capt. Tim. were appointed muster masters of the troops to be raised in

545. Col. Earle,

Suffolk, July 8, '75.

June

546.

John Hulbert, Capt.

1.

29, '75, Suffolk Co. Warrants,

John Davis,

;

1st Lt.

;

Philips, 1st Lt.

;

Wm.

Havens,

2d Lt.

John Grennel, Capt.

2.

;

Wm.

Philip Conklin,

2dLt. Dan'l Griffen, Capt; Benj. Marvin, 1st Lt.

3.

;

Nath'l Norton,

2d Lt. Capt. John Grenell, of Huntington, July 14, '75.

Sam'l

Wm.

Smith, 1st Lt.

;

Alex. Ketcham, 2d Lt.;

in place of

Philips and Philip Conklin declined.

547. Whilst the British were at Boston, their vessels occasionally carried off stock from Suffolk Co.

July 5, '75:

The

people of E. and S.

Capt. Hulbert's company, to

guard the stock on the

Hampton pray

or 4000 sheep) from the ravages of the enemy.

July 31, '75.

remain

to

Aug.

13

looking for stock, as der.

Jour. 75.

Congress allow Griffing and Hulbert's companies to

guard stock.

7, '75.

Congress, that

now raising for Schuyler's army, may remain common land of Montauk, (2000 cattle and 3

Jour. 95.

sail is

of British shipping are seen off Oyster Ponds,

supposed.

Lt. Norton's

company have no powCor. 69.


20

REVOLUTIONARY Aug.

SPIRIT.

Congress order Wooster to send from his camp at Har-

7, '75.

lem, four companies to

(to be under command of Col. Phineas Fanning,) guard stock on the east end of L. I. Congress also vote 200 lbs.

powder

to

the order of Ezra

L'Hommedieu and John

Foster.

Jour. 102, 103.

Aug.

Congress recommend the removal

18, '75.

Gardiners and Plum

Aug.

of stock from Jour. 110.

I.

Congress hear that 36 cattle and 1100 sheep are

21, '75.

taken from Fisher's Gardiner's

I.,

Aug. 22, to

I., and 40 or 50 cattle and 1800 or 2000 sheep from by Col. Abijah Willard. Jour. 112,119.

'75. Col.

come again with

Gardiner of Plum

I.,

says Col. Willard threatens

force sufficient to take off stock

from L.

I.

Cor. 65.

Sep. 7, '75.

men

Capt. John Hulbert marched from Montauk, but his

have borrowed guns.

Cor. 80.

Ebenezer Piatt received of Congress 100

Sep. 14, '75. der.

lbs.

of

pow-

Jour. 146.

548. Thos. Helme, 3, '75, that

Chairman pro tern., writes to Congress, Aug. Parson James Lyon, [put under guard in Wooster's

Camp, Aug. 11,] Benj. Floyd, Dr. Gilbert Smith, Joseph Denton, Richard Floyd, and John Baleys, innkeeper, have from the beginning taken every method to seduce the ignorant and counteract the measures recommended for redress of grievances.

They d n all 1. They have

Congresses and Committees, wishing they were in h

—

declared they will furnish the men-of-war and cutters with provisions.

Aug. 549.

21, '75.

List of Field Officers of 2d Bat.

David Mulford,

1st Col. Jonas Hedges, 2d Col. ; Uriah Rogers, 1st Major; Geo. Herrick, 2d Major; John Gelston, Adj. Phineas Howell, Q. M. ;

Company Capt. David Howell;

1.

Officers.

1st Lt. Jer'h Post;

2dLt. Paul Jones

;

En. Zeph. Rogers. Capt. John Dayton,

2.

John

Miller,

;

En.

jr.

Wm.

;

;

1st Lt. Isaac

Hedges, ;

Mulford Hunting 2d Lt. ;

jr.

1st Lt. Dan'l

Hedges; 2d

Lt.

David

En. Theoph's Pierson.

4. Capt.

Baker

;

Capt. David Pierson

3.

Sayre

jr.

David Fithian;

En. Dan'l Conklin.

1st Lt.

Sam'l Conklin

;

2d Lt. Thos.


21

SUFFOLK COUNTY. Capt.

5.

Wick

Wm.

Capt.

6.

Howell;

St.

Halsey

;

Rogers,

Wm.

Howell; En.

Capt. Sam'l

8.

jr.;

2d Lt. Lemuel

jr.

1st Lt.

;

Jesse Halsey

;

2d Lt. Henry

En. Nath'l Rogers.

Capt. Josiah Howell,

7.

John White,

1st Lt.

En. Isaac Halsey.

;

jr.

;

1st Lt. Nath'l

Howell

2d Lt. Mat.

;

Stephens.

L'Hommedieu

1st Lt. Silas Jessup; 2dLt.

;

ward Conklin; En. Dan'l Fordham. 1st Lt. Edward Topping 9. Capt. John Sandford Howell En. John Hildreth. ;

Ed-

2d Lt. Philip

;

;

550. Capt.

;

was chosen

Sept. 4, '75, Philetus Smith

At Smithtown,

Edmund Smith, jr. 1st Lt.

;

Dan'l Tillotson, 2d Lt.; and Richard

Smith, En., under the inspection of Dan'l Smith, Jacob Mills and

Thos. Tredwell, Committee-men. 551.

the 3d

Matthew Rose was chosen Capt.

4, '75.

Sep.

Smith, 1st Lt.

;

Company

David Fanning, 2d Lt.

Wm.

Sep. 6, '75. Sam'l

Company

;

Hugh

;

and John Smith, Ensign, of

of 1st Reg. of Suffolk, at Southhold, in presence of

Tho's Fanning and

hull, 1st. Lt.

;

Smith, Committee-men.

Thompson was chosen

Isaac Davis, 2d Lt.

;

Capt.,

Abm. Wood-

and Dan'l Satterly, Ensign, of

presence of Nath'l Roe,

of Brookhaven, in

jr.,

1st

Rich'd

Woodhull, and Sam'l Thompson, Committee-men.

552. At a meeting

at

Smithtown, Sept.

ting Field Officers for the

From Huntington, John SlossHobart, Dr.

Gilbert Potter, Capt.

5, '75, for

Western Reg. of

Timothy

nomina-

Suffolk, present,

Esq., Tho's Wickes, Esq.,

Carll,

Henry Scudder, Stephen Piatt. From Smithtown,

Ketcham,Tho's Brush jr., John Squier, Eben'r

Tho's Tredwell, Esq., Jeffery Smith, Jacob Mills, Jonas Phillips, Philetus Smith,

Mills,

Sam'l

From Brook-

Smith, Dan'l Smith.

Noah Hallock,

Wm Brews-

Jona. Baker, John Woodhull. Jos. Brown, Sam'l

Thompson,

haven, <%c, ter,

Edmund

Wm.

Smith, Tho's Fanning,

Dan'l Roe, Nath'l Roe. bert Potter, Lt. Col.

Smith, 2d Major

;

;

Wm.

Floyd was nominated Col.

;

Capt. Nathan Woodhull, 1st Major;

Philip Roe, Adj.

;

John Roe,

jr.,

Q. M.

;

Dr. Gil-

Edmund

Col. Nath'l

Woodhull, Brig. Gen. 553. Sep. hull, 1st Lt.

5, '75. ;

Eben'r Miller was chosen Capfc

Jas. Davis,

2*

2d Lt.

;

;

Caleb

Wood-

and David Davis, Ensign, of 2d Com-


REVOLUTIONARY

22 pany

SPIRIT.

Brookhaven, in presence of Tho's Helme, John Woodhull

in

and Noah Hallock, Committee-men. Committee Chamber, Huntington, Sept. 11,

554.

Officers of the 1st three Militia

'75.

Companies.

JohnWickes,Capt.; Epenetus Conklin, 1st Lt; Jonah Wood,2d Ebenezer Prime Wood, Ensign. 2. Jesse Brush,Capt. Epenetus Conklin, 1st Lt. Philip Conklin, 1.

Lt.

;

;

;

2d Lt.

Timothy

3.

2dLt.

Jos. Titus, Ensign.

;

Carll, Capt.

Nath'l Buffet,

;

The South

4.

jr.,

Gilbert Fleet, 1st Lt.

;

Joel Scudder,

;

Ensign.

part not yet elected officers.

555. At a meeting of the several committees in the 1st

Wm.

Reg. of Suffolk Co. held at Smithtown, Oct. 24, '75 Smith was appointed Chairman ; present,

Jesse Brush, Esq., John Squires,StephenKetcham,Tho's Wickes,

Henry Scudder, Dr.

Esq., Timothy Ketcham,

Gilbert Potter, Tho's

Brush, jr., Israel Wood, Stephen Kelsey, Ebenezer

Piatt, of

Hunting-

Dan'l Tillotson, Tho's Tredwell, Esq., Jeffery Smith, Philetus

ton.

Smith, Dan'l Smith, Capt. Job Smith, Jacob Mills,

Epenetus Smith, Sam'l

Philips, of

Smithtown.

Edmund

Wm.

Smith, jr,

Smith, Jonah

Hulse, of Manor St. George. Capt. Josiah Smith, of Moriches. Capt. Sam'l Thompson, Wm. Brewster, John Woodhull, Dan'l Roe, Nath'l Roe,

Noah Hallock,

Capt. Jona. Baker, Richard Woodhull,

Esq., of Brookhaven. JefFery

Smith was nominated

hull declined

Smith,

jr.,

;

1st

Major

in place of

and Capt. Jesse Brush 2d Major

Nathan Wood-

in place of

Edmund

declined.

556. Nov.

7,

'75.

John Sloss Hobart, Tho's Tredwell, Selah

Strong, Nath'l Woodhull, Ezra L'Hommedieu, David Gelston, Tho's

Wickham, and Dan'l Brown,

Esqrs.,

were elected Deputies

to Pro-

vincial Congress.

557. Nov. 27, '75.

Lt.

Tho's Hempstead, 1st Lt.;

Case took

Wm.

Horton,

his

commission [as Capt.]

jr.,

2d Lt.

;

â&#x20AC;˘

John Drake, En-

sign.

558.

Sir

Huntington, Dec. 10, :

You

will receive this

by Major Brush, who

is

'75.

appointed by

the Committee to lay before the Congress, the state of the

town

as


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

23

to their slackness in military preparations, as also that

reason to believe

We not only

indifferent in this great contest.

assistance, for

men

my

it is

we have

methods are used by our neighbors

all

to

great

make them

beg your advice but

opinion, if there is not a sufficient

number

of

immediately sent to effectually subdue Queens Co. and to intimi-

date the people

among us, a great many from here will soon be in a little Queens Co., which we have great

better condition than the rebels of

reason to believe vants.

I

is

making

interest with our slaves

have exerted myself in

by your House, individual, I I

I

my

must be obliged

but

station,

to desist

and other

nothing

if

is

ser-

done

but as to myself as an

:

am determined to live and die free, am sir, your most humble servant,

GILBERT POTTER. To John

S.

Hobart Esq.

in Pro. Congress.

559. Commissions issued Dec. 12, '75. tus, Capt.

Joshua Rogers, 1st Lt,

;

Joel Scudder, Capt.

;

;

2d

Comp. Jona. Ti3d Comp.

Tho's Brush, 2d Lt.

Nath'l Buffit, 1st

Lt Epenetus

Smith, 2d Lt.

;

John Hart, Ensign.

Manor

560.

Gentlemen

:

There have

enlisted as

St. George,

minute

Dec. 15,

men 70

'75.

able-bodied

men, within the bounds of Brook Haven, Smithtown, Manor St. George and the Patentship of Moriches, who have chosen Dan'l Roe, Capt.; ips,

Hugh Smith, 1st Lt.; Caleb Brewster, 2d Lt.; Eben'r PhilAnd as Hugh Smith and David Fanning, 1st and 2d

Ensign.

Lts. of

the 3d

Company

in

Brookhaven, (whereof Nath'l Roe

is

Capt.) have enlisted in the minute service, the

John Smith,

The

1st Lt.

;

Wm.

Baker, 2d, Lt.

;

company have chosen Doxey Lane, Ensio-n.

was made in presence of us, who are of the committee. The minute men (who are much needed to still intestine disaffection) want powder, ball, guns, drum, colors &c, which choice of the above

are not to be had here

pany not able

;

and

if to

be bought, a great part of the com-

to purchase.

Your humble

servants,

WM. SMTH. JOSIAH SMITH. To

Pro. Congress.


24

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

Congress send 1000

561. Jan. 5, '76.

lbs.

powder

to

Hunting-

ton Committee. Gilbert Potter certifies that St. Kelsey and

562. Jan. 12, '76.

Eben'r

Cow

Piatt,

Committee-men, had inspected the election of comp. of Huntington,

Harbor, 5th

Michael Heart,

1st Lt.

;

Isaac Dennis, 2d Lt.

officers at

Piatt Veal, Capt.

viz.

Jacob Conklin, En.

;

Thos. Wickes and Jesse Brush certify the election of John Buffet, Capt.

;

Isaac

Thompson,

1st Lt.

;

Zeb. Ketcham, En. of the

4th Comp. Suffolk Co., Jan. 24, '76.

563.

Gentlemen

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;In

pursuance to your order,

pointed the Field-officers for the minute

The

this county.

The

militia of this

men and

county but

we have

artillery

ap-

company

in

exceeds 2000.

little

great exposedness of the east end, and the extensiveness of the

county, induces us to desire a no. of Continental troops

We make

tioned here. this Island,

and hope a

We have

We

guns.

sufficient force

a no. of poor

the cause, and

may be

no doubt the Continent proposes

men who

would be glad

may

sta-

to protect

be stationed here.

are good soldiers and friends to

minute men, but have no some could be procured at

to enlist as

know

should be glad to

if

the public expense.

The

makes it difficult to raise and They complain that they are not sufficiently

situation of this county

the minute men.

considering the great distance they are obliged to travel 10,

and 12 miles, and that on

on the same account, are

foot, to

The

exercise.

paid,

many,

officers

8,

also,

at considerable expense, besides the ex-

pense of raising their companies, and pray they

By

may

Officers of

be considered.

order of the Committee,

WM. SMITH, 564.

;

train

Chairman.

Minute Men. Feb. 20, '76.

Josiah Smith, Col.; John Hulbert, 2d Col.

Major

Jona. Baker, 2d Major

;

;

Isaac Reeve, 1st

;

Ephraim Marvin,

Isaac Overton, declined,) Eben. Dayton, Q,.

Adj., (in place of

M.

Officers of the Artillery.

Wm. Rogers, Captain 1st Lt.

;

;

John Franks, Capt.

Thos. Baker, 2d Lt.

;

John

Lt.

;

Jerem'h Rogers,

Tuthill, Lt. fireworker.


25

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 565.

Isaac Thompson, Chairman

of the Committee of

Islip,

writes to Congress, Feb. 9, '76, that there never has been a militia

company in that precinct, but that the east part bore arms in the Smithtown company, and the west were under a Huntington Captain, which has caused uneasiness. The people, with the consent of Col. Potter, assembled and chose Benajah Strong, Captain ry, 1st Lt.

Sam'l Oakley, 2d Lt.

;

;

The company numbers 36

signed the association.

;

Jerem'h Ter-

and Annen Mowbray, En., who or 37.

566. Thos. Cooper and S. Halsey, Committee-men, certify the Nath'l Howel, jr., 1st Lt. and election of Zeph. Rogers, Capt. ;

Mat. Sayer, 2d

;

company of minute men

Lt., of a

in

South Hampton,

before Feb. 23, '76.

Maltby Gelston certifies the election of David Pierson, Capt. John Foster, jr., 1st Lt. Abm. Rose, 2d Lt. and Edward Topping, En., of another company of minute men in South Hampton. Ezekiel Mulford, Capt. John Miller, 1st Lt. and Nath'l Hand, 2d Lt., of a company of minute men at East Hampton. ;

;

;

;

567.

Wm.

Smith, Chairman, requests of Congress,

March

1, '76,

the loan of ÂŁ500, to be lodged with the Treasurer, Col. Josiah

Smith,

who

568.

is

Mar.

to

pay out the same.

4,

John Chatfield of E. Hampton, and Thos.

'76.

Cooper of S. Hampton, are directed out for the British

to station persons to

569. Mar. 27, '76.

Nath'l

Roe and Sam'l Thompson,

the election of Selah Strong, Capt.

Brewster, 2d Lt.

;

keep look-

fleet.

;

Wm.

Clark, 1st Lt.

certify ;

Caleb

and Nath'l Brewster, En., of a minute company in

Brookhaven. 570. Ap. 7, 76.

Henry Skudder, 2d

Nath'l Piatt, Capt. Lt.

;

;

Sam'l Smith,

1st.

Lt.

and Henry Blatsley, En.

ÂŁ22 18 6, for keeping when British fleet was exmember of the Committee, was

571. Account of Capt. Jeremiah Rogers, look-out at South Hampton, pected, certified by

March

Henry Herrick,

'76,

exhibited for payment, Jan. 28, '77.

572. Ap.

18, '76.

Nath'l Woodhull, Thos.

Jour. 791.

Tredwell, Selah

Strong, John Sloss Hobart, Thos. Wickham, David Gelston, Dan'l Brown, and Ezra L'Hommedien, were elected to represent Suffolk


REVOLUTIONARY

26

SPIRIT.

Co. in Provincial Congress, as appears by the certificate of

Wm.

Smith, Chairman, and Ezra L'Hommedieu, Clk. of the Committee. 573. Capt. John Davis had enlisted 70 1st Lt. of

Capt

men

and Benj. Marvin,

;

company, 75 men, before Ap.

Griffin's

3, '76.

574. In consideration of the defenceless state of E. part of Suffolk Co., the 3 companies raised for continental service,

Ap.

tinued there. 575.

May

were con-

3, 76.

3, '76.

Officers of

two companies of minute men

in

Southold, Col. Smith's Reg. 1.

2d Lt. 2.

Lt.

;

Jona. ;

Bay ley,

Capt.

Joshua Youngs, 1st Lt.

;

;

John

Tuthill,

James Reeve, En.

Paul Reeve, Capt.

John Corwin,

;

1st Lt.

;

David Horton, 2d

Nath'l Hudson, En.

576. 1.

May

9, '76.

2d N. Y. Reg.

Dan'l Roe, Capt.

Jona. Titus, 1st Lt.

;

;

Geo. Smith, 2d Lt.

Benj. Titus, En. 2.

ton,

Daniel GrifFen, Capt.

2d Lt. 3.

2d Lt.

;

John Davis, Capt. ;

577.

;

Benjamin Marvin,

1st Lt.

;

Nath'l Nor-

Jacob Conklin, En. ;

Wm.

Silvanus Conklin, En.

Return of Col. Smith?

Haven,

1st Lt.

;

Edward Conklin,


27

SUFFOLK COUNTY. Staff of Minute Regiment. Josiah Smith, Col.; John Hulbert, Lt. Col.

Overton, 2d Maj.

Eph'm Marvin, Adj.

;

;

;

Isaac Reeve, Maj.

578. Wra. Smith writes to Congress from

May

25, '76, that there

and the Ships of

War

is

;

Isaac

Eben. Dayton, Q. M.

Manor

St.

George,

a communication from Winthrop's Patent?

at the

Hook

;

that one Gyer, a skipper, had

carried off a no. of disaffected persons, mostly from Conn.,

who had

been skulking in the woods, particularly one Fountain, a gunsmith. It is

suspected the British also get water, clams, and oysters.

men have been

minute

stationed there since last

are farmers, they cannot leave the matter

is

15

Monday, but as they

home without ruining

their familes

;

referred to Congress.

579. Lt. John Holliday sends to Gen. Greene, from Far Rocka-

way,

May

29, '76,

Nathan and Lazarus Gyer, of Blue Point, and

Benj. Scribner, taken in a clam boat near against Silas Carman's

Gyer

Landing, O. Bay.

set

7

men

ashore at Fort

Neck

Point,

who

were seen by Gilbert Jones, of the O. Bay Committee, with a prospect-glass. They were examined, May 26, before Joshua Ketcham and B.

Birdsall.

580. June 8, '76.

Jona. Baker and Steph. Fountain, convicted

committees of Brookhaven, Manor St. George, and Patentship of Moriches, of taking up arms and corresponding with the

by the

joint

British ships, and promoting discord among the inhabitants and seducing many to forsake the cause of their country, were brought to Congress by Lt. Wm. Clarke, and committed to safe custody.

Jour. 484.

Nathan and Lazarus Gyre and Jona. Baker were

July 18. Litchfield jail.

581.

Quota of

Suffolk,

200

to reinforce the Continental

582. Inlet,

The

June

sent to

Jour. 530.

;

of Queens, 175; of Kings, 58 men,

army

at

N. Y.

June

7, '76.

guard-boats Montgomerie and Schuyler lay at Fire

I.

19, '76.

583. June 27, '76. Gen. Nath. Woodhull, Ezra L'Hommedieu, John Sloss Hobart, Burnet Miller, Thos. Dealing, David Gelston,

Wm.

Smith, and Thos. Tredwell,Esqs., elected to the 4th Pro. Con-


28

REVOLUTIONARY

gress, with

by a

powers

to establish

SPIRIT.

a new form of government, as appears

Wm.

committee, signed by

certificate of the

Smith, Chairman.

Jour. 515. 584. June 29, '76.

Officers of 2d

Edmund Howell,

Lt.

1st

Comp., 3d Bat., Militia.

Selah

;

Reeves,

2d Lt.

Jas

;

Wells, En. 585.

List of Officers of Col. Smith's Reg.

Col. Josiah Smith

Chaplain, ter

;

John Sands

Lt. Col.

;

Waterman

Adj't Thos.

;

Sergeant Maj. John Stratton

Surgeon, 1st

Q. Master Serg. Maj.

;

Surgeon's Mate,

;

;

Serg'ts

Hugh

;

Jas. Hollid

;

.

Company. Capt. Zeph'h Rogers

Lt. Paul Jones

Abm. Remsen

Maj.

;

Q. Master Increase Carpen-

;

;

1st Lt.

Edward Tapping

;

2d

Gelston, Tim. Halsey, David Lupton

;

Corp's Jehiel Howell, Elias Pierson, Jona. Cook.

2d Comp. Capt. Skudder

Serg'ts

;

Nath'l Piatt

1st Lt.

;*

John Stratton, John

Sam'l Smith

2d

;

Bunce

Carll, Jesse

Lt.

Henry

Corp's Jas.

;

Hubbs, Jed'h Mills, John Hart.

3d Comp. Capt. briel

Wm.

Benj.

Coe

1st Lt. Robt.

;

Furman

2d Lt.

;

Nathan Furman, Gabriel Leveridge Smith, Thos. Gillinworth, John Furman. (See Q. Co.

Serg'ts

Penfold,

4th Comp. Capt. Peter Nostrand Co., p. 85)

;

2d Lt. John Carman

Abm. Probasco

;

1st Lt.

;

Corp's

;

Ga-

p. 93.)

Thos. Williams, (See Q.

Serg'ts Benj. Cornell, Martin Ryer-

;

Rem. Hardenbergh. 5^ Comp. Capt. Thos. Wicks 1st Lt. Brush 2d Lt. Whitman Serg'ts Ketcham, Vail, Sammis Corp's Rusco, Conklin, Kelsey. 6th Comp. Capt. R. Manee 1st Lt. Jotham Townsend 2d Lt. Richard Townsend Serg'ts Wm. Roe, Sam'l Burr, Hicks Corp's son,

Corp'l

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Mitchell, Jackson. (See

Queens Co.,

1th Comp. Capt. Selah Strong [Nath'l

?]

Brewster

;

p. 94.)

1st Lt.

;

Caleb Brewster

Woodhull, Smith, Woodhull

Serg'ts

;

;t

Corp's

2d Lt.

Haw-

kins, Marvin, Lyons.

8th Comp. Capt. Youngs Serg'ts Beasley, King,

(See Q. Co.,

^9^

Conn

;

;

1st Lt.

;

;

Lawey

2d Lt. Isaac Hicks [or

Lowere], Smith.

p. 98.)

Comp. Capt. [Paul] Reeve

Benjamin

John Robert

Corp's Racket,

Serg'ts

;

1st Lt.

Curen [Corwin

?]

;

2d Lt.

Wheelock Roe, Rich'd Hubbard, Nath'l Conklin

;

Corp's Solomon, Havens, Wells.

10th Comp. Capt,

Wm.

Ludlam

;

1st Lt. Increase

Carpenter; 2d


29

SUFFOLK COUNTY. Lt.

Ephraim Marston

Noah

;

Serg'ts Thurston, Higbie

Smith. (See Q. Co.,

;

Corp's Oba. Smith,

p. 97.)

11th Comp. Capt. B. Birdsall.

12th Comp. Capt. Ezekiel Mulford

Hand Benj.

;

1st Lt.

M. Mulford^Pierson, Domini Crook, Ludlam Parsons. t Serg'ts

;

;

Sayre

;

Corp's

2d Lt. [Nath'l]

Henry

Sherrel,

* Capt. Nath'l Piatt, of Col. Smith's Reg't of militia drafts raised on L.

I.,

March 8, '77, of Congress £8, for the last half bounty paid Matthew Beal, and Thomas Peters, privates. Also £141, full of a Pay and Subsistence Roll of part of his company that

rec'd,

Nath'l Smith, 17, 6, in

joined Col. H. B. Livingston's Reg. t Jan. 16, '77.

A Pay

Jour. 828.

Roll for £70, 18, 9, of Caleb Brewster, Lt.

and Cor. Clark, Zophar Hawkins, and Jacob Jones, privates in Capt. Selah Strong's Company, in Col. Smith's Reg., who joined Col. Livingston's Reg., from July 20 to Dec. 29, was paid by Congress. Jour. 774. X

Capt. Hulbert's account current

Pay

Dr.

Roll,

Amount

Aug. 31, 1776,

of billeting,

£332.

17.

137. 15.

Acc't of supplies,

12. 12. 11.

£483.

($72

men, (£28. wages and billeting

for enlisting

officers'

Cr. cash rec'd of

5.

)

Thomas Wickham,

Esq.,

140. 00.

0.

343.

5.

9£.

£482.

5.

H-

Smith Town, Aug. 12,

586. :

I here

'76.

send you inclosed, the Resolution"of the Convention

and a Letter from the President I desire that

9i.

16.),

Balance due,

Sir

8.

2J.

you would with

all

;

likewise a Letter from Gen. Greene.

speed embody

all

the

new

raised Levies

under our command, at the most convenient place that you think proper in your county,

on the way

to

Gen. Greene's encampment.

companies in Suffolk County are

meet you

at Increase Carpenter's

now on

their

march, and

I

Sir, the

expect to

to-morrow, some time in the latter part

of the day. I

am,

Sir,

your humble servant,

JOSIAH SMITH, To

Col.

John Sands

at

Cow Neck.

Col.


30

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

In Convention of the Representatives of the State of New-York,

Harlem, Aug.

at

ately

march

1776, Resolved, That Col. Josiah Smith immedi-

8,

new Levies to

the western part of Nassau Island, and within 2 miles of Brig. Gen. Greene's encampment and that he obey such orders as he may receive" from time to time from Gen. Greene. Harlem, Aug. 8, '76. Sir You will see by the inclosed resolution that you are ordered to march the whole force under your command within 2 miles of the army all his

;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

:

at the

by

I., commanded by Gen. Greene. It is expected Convention, that you order Kings and Queens Counties first, as

west end of L.

this

they are near, and Suffolk to follow as soon as possible. tions,

with the inclosed,

I

am

These direc-

directed to send you with dispatch, not

doubting you will execute them with the utmost diligence.

From your

friend

and very humble servant.

NATH'L WOODHULL,

Pres't.

Col. Josiah Smith.

N. B. If this letter must dispatch your orders pay the cost.

finds to

you in Queens County or Kings, you officers by express, and Congress will

your

[See Greene's Letter, Sec. 93, Queens Co.

Ed.

587.

Huntington, July 23, '76. Yesterday the Freedom and Independence of the Thirteen United Colonies was, with beat of drum, proclaimed at the several places of parade, by reading the Declaration of the General Congress, to-

gether with the Resolutions of our Provincial Convention thereupon

which were approved and applauded by the animated shouts of the people who were present from all the distant quarters of tins district. After which the flag which used to erty on one side, and i.

e.

the

Union

w as T

George

cut

off,

III.

wave on Liberty-pole, having

Lib-

on the other, underwent a reform,

and the

letters

George III. were discarded,

being publicly ripped off; and then an effigy of the Personage, represented by those letters, being hastily fabricated out of base materials, its

with

its

face black like

Dunmore's Virginia [negro] regiment,

head adorned with a wooden crown, and

feathers, like Carleton

its

head stuck

and Johnson's Savages, and

its

in the Union, instead of a blanket or robe of state,

gun-powder, which the original seems

to

be fond

gether with the letters above mentioned,was ploded and burnt to ashes.

of.

hung on

full

of

body wrapped

and lined with

The

whole, to-

a gallows, ex-

In the evening the Committee of this


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

31

town, with a large number of the principal inhabitants sat around the genial board, and drank 13 patriotic toasts,

The

The Convention

gress;

among which were,

and independent States of America; The General Con-

free

the 13 States;

of

Our

principal

military-

Commanders, and success and enlargement to the American Navy. Nor was the memory of our late brave heroes, who have gloriously lost their lives in the cause of Liberty and their Country forgotten. Holt's

The Committee

588.

mounting four cannon Aug.

End

tion of the East

of L.

N. Y. Journal.

Southold expended ÂŁ24. 17.

of

I.

589. Convention send an express on Saturday morning to Suffolk Co. to

Gen. Woodhull, or

in his

Aug.

march without delay

Militia,

with 5 days' provisions into the Western part of Queens all

half the western Reg. of Suffolk Co.

25. Gen.

Woodhull arrived

in

Jamaica, whence he wrote

to the convention for further instructions, but the

my

had not arrived at

I received information

'76.

house from Jamaica half an hour, before

by express from Capt. Thompson of Brook-

haven, that two ships, one brig and three tenders had landed a ber of regular troops between Old Man's and

one o'clock were shooting

detachment designed

for

cattle.

Wading

I

am

who

your party to the eastward, and as our

men

know they

can-

expect them in our bay before morning, the only

harbor in the Sound

but

num-

Rivers,

Major Smith has ordered the

are gone and the wind fresh to the eastward, I well

not lay there.

Ed.

letter is lost

Huntington, Aug. 26,

590.

at

to

by removing or destroying them.

Aug.

I

:

Queens with the horse, to prevent the Queens from falling into the enemy's hands?

the militia of

stock and provisions in either

24,

absence to Lt. Col. Pot-

ter, to

order out

for

4.

19, '76, as field-pieces for the protec-

:

I

have not ordered any

men from

here as yet,

mustering them to make as good opposition as possible.

We must have help here I think Gen.

great tumult.

;

every thing possible for

Washington should be acquainted.

me

shall be done.

Our women

are in

In great haste, Yours,

GILBERT POTTER. To

Brig. Gen. Woodhull.

591.

Benj. Havens, Nath'l

Williams, Philip Allen,

Hendrickson and Nathaniel Seaman were empowered

to

jr.,

John

purchase

all


REVOLUTIONARY

32 fat cattle

and sheep

in

Queens and

Commissary General, and

drive

SPIRIT.

Suffolk Co's on account of the

them down

Gen. Woodhull's En-

to

campment.

Westward

592.

Gentlemen

who

me

left

:

—Inclosed

I

of Queens Co., Aug. 27, '76.

send you a copy of a letter from Col. Potter,

yesterday at 11 o'clock, after bringing about 100

at Jamaica.

Major Smith has,

from Suffolk

Co.

I expect, all the rest that

There has

about

40 of the

from the Regiments in Queens Co., and about longing to Kings and Queens Co's, which got

all

is

militia

fifty

near

men

was

me

to

come

to

me

joined

of the troop be-

all I

expect.

have

I

southward of the Hills in Kings Co. drove to the

the cattle

eastward of the cross road between the two Co's, and have placed guards

and

sentries from the

North road

to the

South side of the Island, in

order to prevent the cattle going back, and to prevent the communica-

am

within about six miles of the

Their light-horse,* has

been within two miles of

enemy.

tions of the Tories with the

enemy's camp.

me, and unless

We

shall

I

men

have more

I

our stay here will answer no purpose.

soon want to be supplied with provision,

if

we

tarry here.

I

am, gentlemen,

Your most

obedient humble servant

NATH'L WOODHULL. * See Queens Co., Sec. 99, 593.

Reg's

Aug.

to join

Note.— Ed. orders Col. Smith's and

26. Convention

Remsen's

Gen. Woodhull, and that he then take post on the

Queens

heights near the west of

for preventing the depredations

Co., or in

any convenient

and incursions of the

place,

Enemy

:

and

that he call out the militia and other inhabitants to protect those re-

moving, or to destroy stock and other provisions. vent intercourse with the

enemy and secure

He

is

also to pre-

suspicious persons and

search their houses for papers. Smith's and Remsen's Regiments were now shut up in the American Lines, so that no assistance ever reached Woodhull. Ed. Jamaica, Aug. 27, '76.

594.

Gentlemen: ing brought

all

I

am now

at Jamaica, with less than 100

have sent them off with the Troops of Horse, with orders the rest Eastward of this place to the East end of to put

am

them

men

into the fields

and

set a

to

hav-

;

the cattle from the westward, southward of the hills

;

and

take

all

Hempstead Plains,and

guard over them.

The enemy,

I

informed, are intrenching from the Heights near Howard's, South-


33

SUFFOLK COUNTY. ward.*

I

have

received yours, with several resolutions, which I

now

was in my power to put in execution, and Remsen, mentioned in yours, join me with wish

other assistance immediately,

moving East, and tinue

but, unless Col's

it

I

I shall

their

Smith

Regiments, or some

not be able, for the people are

cannot get any assistance from them.

here as long as I can, in hopes of a reinforcement

all

I shall

con-

but

none

;

if

woods.

and drive the stock before me, into the Unless you Col's Smith and Remsen, I think cannot join me.

can send

me some

comes soon,

this place.

I shall

I

retreat

other assistance, I fear I shall soon be obliged to quit

hope soon

to

hear from you.

I

Your most obedient,humble

am, gentlemen,

servant,

NATH'L WOODHULL. To *

the

A

Hon. Convention of the State of N. Y.

mistake of course.

This

appears

letter

to

at

Harlem.

have been received

and acted upon by the Convention before the preceding one, Ed. so entered in the Journal.

at least

it

is

595.

The battle of Brooklyn had now been fought

(for

an account of

which, see Kings Co.) and the enemy had so completely surprised the American scouts, on the morning of Aug. 27, that not one probably had escaped to apprize

and warn him to

flee

Woodhull of the

loss of our outposts,

from impending danger, for we find him the day

after the defeat yet at Jamaica, writing a letter to the

waiting for a reply, at

once from

when

it

his perilous proximity.

596. Major Lawrence,

Convention and

behooved him to withdraw speedily and

Ed.

who came on

a message from Woodhull,

informs Convention the morning of Aug. 28, that Dr. told

him

that a

number of

Ab'm Riker

scattering troops [British] had posted

themselves, Aug. 27, on the ridge of

maica; that they had been in

hills

many

between Newtown and Ja-

of

the

houses

;

had taken

and drink but had not plundered as he understood. Convention, Aug. 28, order Maj. Lawrence to wait on Gen. Wash-

victuals

ton with a copy of

WoodhulPs

letter,

and inform him

and Remsen's Regiments may be sent

to

how Smith

Woodhull by way of

Flushing.

Washington declined sending the Regiments as he could not Ed. Convention also order Mr. Van Wyck to repair immediately to Flushing to gain intelligence of the situation of the enemy and what spare them.

places are occupied by Woodhull, and that he dispatch a boat with


34 all

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

possible expedition with the information, at the

ing out the most suitable place for

same time pointWoodhulPs reinforcement to land. Flushing, Aug. 28, '76.

Gentlemen:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I am informed by Thos. Thorne, a member of Committee, who just came from Gen. Woodhuli, that he was at Jamaica

;

and that he [Thorne]

came from White Stone that the ships of war lay between Thorn's Point and Great Neck that there can be no danger of bringing up our men to this place, if [we] can get them up just

;

;

this evening.

I

think

will be proper to

it

soon as possible by the same boat, as just going to

Jamaica

send this intelligence off as

cannot get any other.

I

am, Gentlemen, your most

I

Humble

obt.

VAN WYCK.

the Pro. Congress.

[Whether Van Wyck ever reached Woodhuli or Perhaps he

sible to tell.

fell

into the

were

in companies of 8 or 10,

not,

impos-

it is

hands of the light-horse, who,

Ed.]

pillaging at Flushing.

Jamaica, Aug. 28, 597. press,

you

Gentlemen

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I

wrote 2

letters to

'76.

you yesterday, one by ex-

;* and also sent my Brigade-major to my situation, and I expected an answer to some of but my express informed me he was detained till last

and another by Mr. Harper

to let

them

am

servant,

COR'S To

I

to the General.

you know

last night

:

night for an answer.

a copy of the

message by tion.

I

last,

my

I

have

now

rec'd yours of the 26th,

without a single word of answer to

brigade-major.

I

must again

let

my

which

you know

have about 70 men, and about 20 of the troop, which

force I have or can expect,

and

I

am

daily

growing

less in

is

only

letters, or

my

the

situa-

is all

the

number. The

people are so alarmed in Suffolk, that they will not any more of them

march and as to Col's Smith and Remsen's regiments, they cannot join me, for the communication is cut off between us. I have sent about 1100 cattle to the great fields on the plains yesterday, about 300 more gone and I have ordered a guard of an off this morning to the same place :

;

officer

and 7

They can

privates.

and horses are worn out with toward Hempstead to take

;

them along.

get no water in those fields.

fatigue.

The

cattle are not all

My men gone off

ordered them yesterday, but they were not able

I I

brought yesterday about 300 from Newtown.

think the cattle are in as

much danger on

and have ordered the inhabitants

to

the north as

remove them.

If

on the south

I

side,

you cannot send


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

35

me an immediate reinforcement, I am afraid I shall have no men with me by to-morrow night for they consider themselves in an enemy's And if I can have no reinforcement, I beg you will send very country. ;

particular directions

them, or leave them,

what

I shall

for I shall

do with the stock, whether

not be able to get them,

I shall kill

together and

all

tend them [even] if the men I have will all stay with me. I beg you would immediately send at least 2 members as a committee that I may have their advice for unless you do, I must quit, for I hope the Con:

vention does not expect

me

to

make I

brick with [out] straw.

am, Gentlemen,

Your most

ob't,

NATH'L WOODHULL. [*

ing,

Robert Harper had just carried .£200

to the

and was on

his return to the Convention.

[The above

is

Committee of Flush-

Ed.]

the last letter ever written by the General

ten probably only a few hours before his capture

;

and

it

writ-

was while

waiting for a reply that he was overtaken by the enemy.

In com-

Aug.

28, that

pliance with his request, the Convention ordered,

Judge Hobart and Jas. Townsend be a Committee to repair to Gen. Woodhull, to assist him with their advice, and that they impress boats and persons to convey themselves to the General with the ut-

most dispatch all

as

;

and that they and the General be instructed

to

cause

such stock and grain in Queens and the western part of Suffolk,

may

be in danger of falling into the enemy's hands and cannot be

removed, to be destroyed.]

Jour. 596.

Townsend and Hobart, on arriving in Queens Co., Woodhull's capture, when they hastened on to Hunting-

[Messrs.

heard of

ton— Ed.] Aug.

Convention yet

29.

der Sam'l Townsend, a

in

member

senger to him (fearing a

letter

ignorance of Woodhull's

fate, or-

of their body, to be sent as a mes-

might

fall

into the enemies' hands) to

give an account of their proceedings upon the subject of his letters,

and of Washington's sen.

letter declining to

[Townsend probably

598.

[What

Brooklyn,

I

am

part, if any, the

L.

not able to say.

and perhaps acted as inner guards. to

New-York,

send Cols. Smith and

did not set out. I.

Ed.]

Rem-

Jour. 599.

regiments bore in the battle of

They were hemmed Col.

in the Lines,

Smith joined in the retreat

as appears by the following letter.

Ed.]


36

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

Camp To

the President of the Convention.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

at Brooklyn,

I just

Aug. 29,

now received

'76.

orders from

march my Reg. over to N. Y., and there to receive orders from the Convention of N. Y., which I desire you to send me by the bearer, Col. Phinehas Fanning.

the General to

JOSIAH SMITH,

Col.

[Convention order Col. Smith's Reg. to Hoorn's Hook, but it was soon disbanded, " the Col. giving leave for every man to shift for himself in getting their families

and

effects off L. I."

Ed.]

[The death of Gen. Woodhull has not been described

in

any

his-

tory of the Revolution, and as the accounts both written and traditional

we

are conflicting,

insert all the notices of his capture

have met with, and leave the reader

to

own

form his

and death

599- Death of Gen. Woodhull, from Wood's L.

I.,

we

Ed.]

opinion.

pages 88, 89.

Ed. o/1826. Before General Woodhull had reached the outposts of the rican

army* he

Ame-

discovered that the British had possession of the

country between him and the

left wing of the American army, and any farther advance would only expose his troops, without effecting any good purpose, and therefore ordered a retreat. The

that

Gen. remained

in the rear

companions, waiting, as

[Lawrence].

A

and retreated slowly with only one or two the return of his Brigade Major

is said, for

severe thunder shower, as

to take refuge in a public

is

lage], and before he left the house

British Dragoons, and 71st

Infantryf [Highlanders],

who had been

Reg. of British

dispatched in pursuit of the

under his command, accompanied by some disaffected inhabi-

militia

tants [of Jamaica] as guides.

The

to give

them

to be a

Major Baird$ of the

God

[vil-

he was overtaken by a detach-

ment of the 17th Reg. of

"

him

supposed, obliged

house about 2 miles east of Jamaica

his sword.

save the King."

The Gen. stept to the doorj in order who first approached him, said

ruffian

71st, as is reported, ordered

The General

which he most cowardly and cruelly

replied, "

God

him

save us

to say all,"

on

assailed the defenceless General

with his broadsword, and would have killed him on the spot,

if

had not been prevented by the interference of an

more

officer of

he

honor and humanity, said to be Major Delancy|| of the Dragoons,

who

arrested his savage violence.

The Gen. was

badly

wounded

in


SUFFOLK COUNTY. the head, and one or both arms * * * * * the wrist. It is

37

was mangled from the shoulder

to

said that one of the battalions employed in this inglorious

warfare against an unresisting individual, or some other one, was com-

manded by a Major Crewe,1T a distant kinsman of the Gen., and that when he came to be apprized of that fact and of the circumstances of the case, he was so mortified, that he either resigned his commission and quit the service, ®r obtained permission to leave the army,

and returned to England. [* It is

now

demonstrated by documents that Gen.

dered to join the A. army at

all,

W. was

not or-

but to drive off the stock towards the

east.]

[t Could foot soldiers have kept suit of the

General

Gowanus, Aug. [I

up with dragoons in

Besides, the 71st Reg.

1

their hot pur-

was engaged

in battle at

27.]

%

The accounts vary

whether mounting

of the precise

manner

of the General's capture

his horse, stepping to the door, taken in the

the barn, or after an ineffectual

dark in

attempt at concealment, or on the

piazza.] [§ In '76 there

was a Capt.

(not Major) Sir Jas. Baird of the 71st

Reg.] [11

See Queens Co., Sec. 112.]

Major Crewe (17th Dragoons),

[IT

slow about [I

it,

for

we

find his

name

if

he ever did resign, was very

in the

army

list

in '78.]

have italicised the words implying doubt or uncertainty

in the

They occur nine times! In his first edition, 1824, Wood says, " Woodhull was suffered by the officers to be so cut and mangled, that he died of his wounds a few days after his capture." above account.

—Ed.]

A New Haven paper

of Sep. 4, says, "Woodhull, late President

New-York Congress, for was wounded on the head with

of the

refusing to give up his side arms,

a cutlass and had a bayonet thrust

through his arm."

[The mention of

cutlass and bayonet

would

indicate that both

horse and foot were present at Woodhull's capture. Col. Livingston says, Southold, prisoner ter

Wed.

last,

Aug.

3

finally

31, "

wound

Ed.]

Woodhull was taken

28, and cruelly treated

he was taken he received a

language, and was

Aug.

by the horse.

in his head and

committed close prisoner

to

much

Af-

uncivil

Jamaica

jail."


REVOLUTIONARY

38 [*

Does

this refer to his

SPIRIT.

being ordered to say "

God

save the king!"

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed.}

Wm.

Warne, who

Long

left

Fishkill, Sep. 7th, that "

Island Sep. 5th, '76, reports at

one of the Light Horsemen told he had

taken Gen. Woodhull in the dark in Increase Carpenter's barn

would answer when he spoke

that before he

to the General,

he had

cut him on the head and both arms." Jour. 617, 619. " Sundry prisoners taken on L. I. Aug. 27, were, in an inhuman

and barbarous manner, murdered

arms

particularly a General

;

hacked to pieces with cutlasses, when

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ethan

Allen's Life, written

[That the

and prevent is

light horse

March

alive,

highly probable in

and

itself,

86, says

"

:

On

is

Militia,

by the

light

who was

horsemen."

'79.

were sent expressly

his driving off the live stock,

Howard, aged (who acted as and started in

had surrendered their

after they

Woodhull, of the

to capture

Woodhull's party,

which they so much needed,

confirmed by

all

scouts to the enemy), heard where Woodhull's party lay,

him

quest of

but on hearing an exaggerated account of

;

The day

his force, they returned."

after the battle, they set out

him, and entered Jamaica village at tea-time, inquiring for

after

They surrounded

hull.

who

Wm.

tradition.

the night before the battle, the light horse

again

Wood-

Hinchman, a noted Whig, who had house, expecting perhaps to find Woodhull there. the house of Robert

ran out of the back door, but was stopped by the soldiers

already surrounded the

Hinchman was next seen in front of his house on his knees with hands uplifted and the enemy flourishing their swords over his head. His life was spared, but he was put in jail that night and next day sent westward.

The

light horse rode

on east

where they saw two horses

and supposed the

riders

(as

till

they

came

to

Carpenter's inn,

Mrs. Hinchman used to

must be near.

tell

the story),

After searching a while to no

purpose, they fired their pistols into the thatched roof of the barn, but as the straw

doors and

Wm. was

was wet

felt

in the

it

would not

hay with

Everett's boot.

On

by a

till

cut at

soldier

kindle.

their

swords

They then broke open till

his putting forth his

an

officer

the

they pricked the heel of

head

stopped him.

to surrender,

he

Gen. Woodhull was

brought wounded the same evening into the back room of her house

and

laid

on a bed,

He begged pit

his

arm hacked,

as a butcher

would a shin of

beef.

Mrs. H. not to leave him alone, and that her son might

up with him that

night.

" Don't be uneasy, General," said the kind


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

39

hostess, " I don't expect to go to bed to-night."

Woodhull,

it

is

said " he

was confined

(In Knapp's Life of

in the stone church, exposed

The next morning enemy would have made Woodhull walk with other prisoners to the British army, but he was too faint. Whithead Hicks had previously offered his carriage for the use of the wounded General, but the kind offer was rejected, incredible as it may seem, by Sir Wm. Erskine At last, as David Lamberson, also a prisoner, was too unwell to walk, they made him take his own chair and Woodhull with him in it. The General, with other prisoners, was probably first taken to Howe's head-quarin his blood-stained garments, to the gaze of all.")

the

!

or

We

near Brooklyn, to be registered.

ters

manner

of his confinement

brought on board a prison-ship off

How

different

and Lord

know

New

tertained and soon exchanged.

Was

it

after,

when he was

Utrecht.

was Woodhull's treatment from

Sterling, taken prisoners the

lar or Continental

nothing of the place

about a fortnight

till

that of Gen. Sullivan

day before, who were kindly enbecause they were of the Regu-

army, while Woodhull, though President of the N.

Y. Convention, was but a general of militia

?

Ed.]

Robert Troup, Esq., a Lieutenant in Col. Lasher's battalion of

New- York

militia,

was made

prisoner by a British scouting party,

about three o'clock, A. M., Aug. 27,

five miles

west of Jamaica.

After a week's confinement at Flatbush, he with seventy or eighty officers,

was put on board

a small vessel or transport, lying between

Gravesend and the Hook, which had been employed in bringing cattle

from England.

After Troup's release, he

treatment he had received "

;

and

at the close of

That while he was confined on board

it

made oath he adds

of the

:

the said transport, Brigadier

General Woodhull was also brought on board, in a shocking mangled condition ture,

:

that deponent asked the General the particulars of his cap-

and was

told by the said General that he

of light-horse, under the

command

he was asked by the said Captain

had been taken by a party

of Captain Oliver if

De Lancey:

he would surrender

;

that

that he an-

in the affirmative, provided, he would treat him like a gentleman, which Captain De Lancey assured him he would whereupon the General delivered his sword, and that immediately after the said Oliver De Lancey, junior, struck him, and others of the said party imitating his example, did cruelly cut and hack him in the manner he then was; that, although he was in such a mangled and horrible situation, he had,

swered

;

nevertheless, been obliged to sleep on the bare floor of the said trans-


40

REVOLUTIONARY

port, if a lieutenant of the

not lent him a mattress

:

SPIRIT.

man-of-war who guarded the transport had Woodhull was afterwards car-

that General

New

ried to the hospital in the church of

Utrecht, where he perished, as

deponent was on good authority informed, through want of care, and other necessaries

and further

:

deponent saith not.

this

"

"

Sworn

the 17th of January, 1777, before

ÂŤ<

What Troup

Gouv. Morris."

heard of Woodhull 's perishing through want of care

and other necessaries, ter

Robert Troup.

me,

is

confirmed by the following extract of a

let-

from Dr. Silas Holmes, of Norwich, a prisoner and assistant

who

surgeon in the British Hospital,

He

says

himself attended Woodhull.

:

" The wounded prisoners taken at the battle of Brooklyn were put in the churches of Flatbush

and

New

Utrecht, but being neglected and

unattended, were wallowing in their fected

and putrid

air.

Ten days

own

filth,

and breathed an

after the battle, Dr.

in-

Richard Bailey

was appointed to superintend the sick. He was humane, and dressed the wounded daily, got a sack-bed, sheet and blanket for each prisoner, and

distributed the patients into

Woodhull

offered to

the

pay Dr. Bailey

adjacent barns.

for his

When

husband, he replied, he had done no more than his duty, and

was any thing

What

a pity

Samaritan in the for nine

was to me." Woodhull had not

due,

Mrs.

care and attention to her if there

it

earlier stages

fallen into the

of his illness

!

hands of

this

good

His wounds, neglected

days in the hot months of August and September, had assumed

such a malignant form, that not even the medical could avail to save his valuable

Proceedings of

the

skill

of Dr. Bailey

life.

N. Y. Convention in behalf of Gen. Woodhidl, Sep. 18, '76.

"

Whereas

this

Convention, after

many anxious

inquiries, hath at

length received certain intelligence that the Hon. Nath'l Woodhull, Brig. Gen. of the militia, and President of the Convention of this State, is at

present in the hands of the enemy, and that he

was made

captive

whilst actually employed in executing the Resolutions of this House.

And Whereas

they are loudly called upon not only by the sacred

voice of honor and public

duty, but likewise by the sympathizing

principles of personal affection and respect, to exert themselves in


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

41

restoring so valuable a person to that liberty lost in

which he has hmiself

endeavoring to secure to others that inestimable blessing

Therefore, Resolved, that a State be immediately

made

of the prisoners at the disposal of this

list

out,

and transmitted

to

Gen. Washington,

and that John Sloss Hobart, Esq. wait on his Excellency with the earnest request of this Convention, that he will be pleased to give his assistance

and advice in negotiating his exchange."

Hobart thus writes from

Gentlemen

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I

Fairfield, Oct. 7, '76

wrote to Convention

made

giving an account of the progress I had

change of Gen. Woodhull, since which intelligence of his death.

arm was taken

oft*,

The wound

but the mortification

I

:

Camp

from

at Kingsbridge,

in negotiating the ex-

have received the melancholy

in his still

arm

mortified,

and the

continued, and in a few

days put an end to that useful life. He was attended in his dying moments by his lady, who was permitted to remove the corpse to his seat, where it was interred about the 23d ult. These particulars I have from Capt. Benajah Strang, of Islip, by whose door the procession passed on its

way

to St. George's.

[The

ballad on

Cor. 346.

Woodhull's death (Thompson,

II.

423,)

was

first

published in the N. Y. Nat. Advocate, Feb. 28, 1821, and thence copied into the L. license)

I.

papers.

by some person of

called at Carpenter's Inn,

A tragedy has 1849. in

The

also

Life of

It

was probably written (with

leisure,

who

in his rides

poetic

from the

city

and heard the story from the Landlady.

been written on the same subject, by Mr. Lester,

Woodhull may be found in Thompson, and See Queens Co., Sec. Ill, 112. Ed.]

also

Knapp's Biography. [The

original Journal of Col.

Woodhull, 3d, N. Y. Reg., kept during

the expedition of Gen. Amherst, against Montreal, in 1760,

possession of his descendants at Mastic.

Ed.]

is

now

in


PART

II.

SUBMISSION OF SUFFOLK COUNTY. 600. [The consternation of the inhabitants of Suffolk, at

hearing the news of the disastrous battle of Brooklyn and the

subsequent abandonment of the Island better understood from the following scription

to

I

can give.

to the

enemy,

may

be

documents than any de-

Ecl.~\

Hobart and Townsend who had been sent by the Convention advise with Woodhull, write as follows, from Hunting-

ton, "

Aug. 30:

To

Queens

our unspeakable mortification

we

found,

when we arrived

Co., that the militia had dispersed, and Gen.

fallen into the

hands of the enemy.

in

Woodhull had

We then proceeded with all

where we could have any enemy were in full possession of the western parts of Queens Co., as far as Jamaica, and We have orderthe Disaffected from the east were gone in to them. ed the militia of Suffolk to rendezvous here, and written to Col. Muldispatch to this town, as the only place

prospect of making an effectual stand, as the

fordof E. Hampton, to come up and take command, and have borrow-

ed ÂŁ320 from the Treasurer of Q. Co.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Aug.

31.

being able to cross at Sand's Point, has returned. of this town, are

have

left

them.

now under

We

Our express not

A

no. of militia

arms, but they complain their officers

have exerted ourselves to recover the people

from the consternation into which they were thrown by the precipitate retreat of Woodhull's party.

A

party of Kings Co. horse have

crossed the sound from this place, leaving their horses to follow in the next boat.

We

[they did not return.

stopped the horses and

Ed.].

with Gen. Woodhull are

We

rallied, to

men back who were companies. As

sent for the

purpose after the party

form the rest into


43

SUFFOLK COUNTY. to field officers

we shall

Col. Potter is gone is

be at a

off,

loss, as Col.

Floyd

with us and begins to be in

officers

Reg. of Suffolk Co., Aug. 30, Smithtown, by Eben'r Dayton, Q. M,

and men of part of Brookhaven and

at

Maj. Jeffery Smith sent orders to Adjutant Philip Roe,

29.

4 companies in Brookhaven to march immediately to

He

Piatt Carlls' in Huntington.

among

spirit

Congress, Lt.

2d Major Brush Cor. 291.

1st

Aug.

:

spirits.

Narrative of the proceedings of the

to order the

is at

Major Smith resigned

1st

By

the men.

did so,

and there appeared a high

the middle of next day

companies

3

arrived to Epenetus Smith's, Smithtown, and the other, Capt. Nich.

Roe's, was coming up. was gone to Huntington

It

was

desired the companies to wait

Meanwhile the

militia

reported at Smith's that the Major

to see Messrs. till

Hobart and Townsend, and

his return,

which was not

were uneasy and eager to march

till

dark.

Hempstead the woods E. of to

make a stand in At dusk the Major returned and called the officers into a room, and told them he thought " it dangerous to march farther West, as their forces would not be sufficient to oppose the enemy, and he very much gave up the Island they must fall in the enemy's hands, it would not be good policy to incense a cruel enemy by being taken in arms if they remained quietly at home, they would fare Col. Potter was better, and that he should resign his commission gone off and left him alone, and Maj. Brush had judged it unsafe to Plains, to bring off the stock and

the Plains.

;

;

;

Capt. Thompson said company to return home immediately."

proceed against the enemy, unless reinforced.

he would give orders,

Major

for his

he would give no orders as he designed to decline his

S. said

commission (but advised them to wait from Hobart and Townsend) their

;

till

they could have orders

whereupon the

milita repaired to

homes.

Cor. 292.

Sam'l Buell writes from Sag Harbor, Aug. 30,

'76, that

he has just

West end of the Island, that the ministerial army are on this side our army. The enemy have 200 horse whose riders were to dine, Aug. 28, at Hempstead. The Hessians fight terribly. I am with Col. Livingston. Will you throw over a numreceived direct intelligence from the

ber of Troops

2

Trumbull, V. 444.

H. B. Livingston writes from Sag Harbor, Aug. 30,

'76, that

he


44 has

SUBMISSION OF

command

to protect

danger.

of a detachment of 200 troops by order of Washington,

and stock.

inhabitants

"Send

This force

is

over forces in the night, that they

and in

insufficient

may

not be seen by

the British ships in the Sound."

Robt. Hempstead, Ch'n of a Committee meeting, at

Aug. 31,

Southhold»

have received several expresses from the middle of the Island, that the enemy's scouting party of about 300 horse and 400 foot with a no. of tory recruits, are about penetrating into Suf'76, writes that they

folk Co., as they have already marched as far as the West part of Hempstead Plains, where they took Gen. Woodhull prisoner. " Will you aid us with men and ammunition, as our men are chiefly drawn off

—not able

750

to raise over

men in the whole Co.

If you send

men, send

provisions also, except fresh."

Maltby Gelston, Ch'n of the Committee of S. andE. Hampton, met Hampton, Aug. 31, '76, writes to the same effect.

at Bridge

into the

Sag Harbor, Aug. 31, that Gen Woodhull is fallen hands of the King's troops. Two days ago they drove 1500

head of

cattle

Buell writes from

from Hempstead Plains to their army.

to enter Suffolk with

of 90

men

300 horse and a company

They

of foot.

are about

3 Companies

each are stationed here with one-third of our militia,

who

march immediately up the Island. They are fortifying 15 miles hence, where the Island is but 15 rods wide, where 200

are ordered to

men

can oppose 2,000.

H. B. Livingston,

Half our

at

militia is

away.

Camp, River Head, Sep.

1, '76, writes that

Plobart has brought a letter from Huntington.

H. B. Livingston, Saybrook Harbor, Sep. he marched

to

4, '76, writes that

on Sat.

last

River Head, within about 50 miles of the British Light

Horse, with his detachment of 200 men, and the Suffolk militia, but

when

the militia heard the Island

mit and

fled to their

homes.

He

was given

up, they proposed to sub-

retreated to Cont., having disarmed

70 of the inhabitants and brought off 4 cannon with baggage and some provisions.

To

tlie

Inhabitants of Suffolk County.

601. His Excellency Gen.

manding

enjoin and order

upon your said

Howe

having appointed

officer for the eastern part of this Island, I

;

strictly

persons whatsoever in your County of Suffolk,

all

peril, to

county

me Com-

do hereby

use your utmost

that all

efforts to preserve the

peace of

Committee-men and others acting under the

authority of the Rebels, immediately do cease and remain at their re-


45

SUFFOLK COUNTY. spective homes, that every

man

in

arms lay them down forthwith and

surrender themselves on pain of being treated as rebels

by exhort

all

and

:

by furnishing them with whatever lays in their power.

In particu-

they bring in their cattle (except milch cows and calves) for

lar that

their supply,

gage,

I here-

persons to be aiding and assisting His Majesty's Forces

&c,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

and their wagons and horses for transporting their bag-

which they

for all

shall be fully paid,

His Majesty having

sent his army, not for the oppression, but for the protection of the inhabitants

But

:

submission in

all

I

must

also signify that unless they

show

a dutiful

respects, and an immediate compliance with these

orders respecting the cattle and wagons, I shall be under the neces-

my command

of marching the forces under

sity

without delay into

the county, and lay waste the property of the disobedient, as persons

unworthy His Majesty's clemency.

WILL. ERSKINE, Head-Quarters

in

Queens County, Aug.

Jamaica, Sep.

602.

Sir

:

Brig'r Gen'L

29, 1776.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I

am

ordered by His Ex. the Hon.

commander-in-chief of

all

Wm.

his Majesty's forces in

Howe,

1, '76.

Gen'l. and

N. A., from Nova

Scotia to the Floridas, on the application of the County of Suffolk, by

Nath'l Woodhull and Sam'l Philips,

who have signified to him that the down their arms and again

inhabitants of said Co. are desirous to lay

become

loyal

and obedient subjects

security of the inhabitants, he

is

;

that for the peace

and ease and

willing to accept of their submission

and promise them protection, on the King's Colonels, or other of Militia, respectively, causing the their

roll

down

of submis-

and rejecting the orders of Congress and Committees,

totally refusing

of Gov't., and in

inferiors

through the county to lay

arms, take the oath of allegiance, and sign the said

sion, disclaiming

and

men

obedience to them, and to obey the legal authority

all

places of worship in future to pray for the

and royal family, as was used before the present unprovoked

King

rebellion.

OLIVER DELANCEY, Major Gen'l of

the Militia in the Southern

District of the Colony of

To

N. Y.

Col. Conklin.

Huntington, Sep.

603.

Sir

:

You

are hereby directed to give orders to

Capts., or next

commanding

folk Co., to call their several

3*

all

2, '76.

the King's

officers of Militia, in the 3d Bat. of

companies together,

Suf-

at the usual places,


46

SUBMISSION OF

immediately, and to order those that have taken up arms against the

King, to lay them down and take the oath of allegiance to the King,

and sign a

of submission, disclaiming and rejecting the orders

roll

of Congress or Committees, and to obey the legal authority of Gov-

This

ernment.

is

by order of Gen. Howe. O.

DELANCEY.

have inclosed a true copy of the writing sent

I

me by

Gen.

Howe.

To

Phineas Fanning.

Col.

Sep. 2, '76.

Israel

Wood,

President of the Trustees of Huntington

writes to Col. Livingston to disperse his

on him

army

or the Regulars will be

the people are in a doleful situation, have received the Procla-

;

mation and sent in

their resignations

yesterday.

Smithtown did the

same. Col.

Abm. Gardiner

Hedges to the

at

Sagg and of

oath.

the oath.

administered the oath of allegianoe to the peo-

He

and South Hampton.

ple of East

on Montauk were driven in

cattle

at

Coram,

Harrison says, Sep.

Bay and Hempstead, and proceeded as

them

forced

7, '76,

the

far as

to Erskine.

Tories

before Sep. 7, '76.

Ministerial Troops have been to O.

the

disaffected have joined to assist the

Howe

Setauket.

stock or persons going off the Island.

mission and some recruits. allegiance,

Hampton, and

Southold met by order of Col. Phineas Fanning to take

The

were enlisting

surrounded the house of Col.

Col. Mulford at East

Wm.

and Thos. Smith, of

enemy,

has set guards to prevent

Isaac

Ketcham has got a com-

Smith, of

,

Hog I., receives men were going

administers oaths of submissions.

Col.

moving westward from Con't to bring off gunpowder and flour which one Ireland had sold to the British Col. Jos. Smith was in Con't. Jour. 612. Wm. Warne, who left Nassau Island, Sep. 5, says Suffolk Co. had given up, and Gen. Howe sent word if they would testify their loyalty, they must send him 200 wagons, and they sent 300 to remove baggage from N. Utrecht to Hellgate. Jour. 619. Before Oct. 7, '76, 200 infantry and 100 cavalry were at Huntington Livingston

is

;

;

to force the people to join the British

Oba. Jones Sep. 13, '76. tion,

to

Troops.

Jour. 671.

Uriah Rogers.

Zeb. Howell, an Express, brings Delancey's Proclama-

dated Sep. 11, from Jamaica to South Hampton, and says, " British

Head-Quarters are

at

Jamaica, and 2

men must

be sent to Jamaica to


SUFFOLK COUNTY. Gen.

Howe

47

a true account of Suffolk Co."

to give

Setauket,

was appointed

Hampton

will

窶年athan "Woodhull, of

and E. and S. Sagg Meeting-House, to appoint

the west part of Suffolk,

for

meet, Sep. 14,

at

another.

Jamaica, Queens Co., Sep.

604.

His Ex. the Hon.

Wm.

5, '76.

Howe, Gen. and commander-in-chief

of

all

His Majesty's forces within the Colonies lying on the Atlantic Ocean,

from Nova Scotia

me

to raise

to

West

to re-establish order

and

gov't, within the

concealed rebels from

all

and other listing

among His

essential purposes

men

Florida, inclusive,

&c,

having authorized

a Brigade of Provincials solely for the defence of this Island, to apprehend, or drive

do hereby, for the encouragement of en-

I

;

same:

Majesty's well-affected subjects,

in the county of Suffolk, give notice, that

upon any persons

of good recommended characters, raising a company of 70 men, they

have commissions

shall

pay the

and

:

for

one Capt., one Lt., and one Ensign, and

and subsisted as the

shall be paid

it is

officers

and

soldiers are in the British

hoped the inhabitants of the county

men wanted

for the service, as it will

will cheerfully raise

prevent the disagreeable busi-

ness of detaching them, which I shall be under the necessity of doing, if

the companies cannot be raised without.

my hand, the date above. OLIVER DELANCEY, Brig. Geril.

Given under

Jamaica, Sep. 11, '76.

605. I

am

ordered by His Ex. Gen.

Howe

to write to

you, and order

the fat cattle and sheep in Suffolk Co. to be immediately driven to

all

down

Jamaica, where proper persons will be appointed to ascertain the

weight of them

may

be paid

;

;

give certificates of the value of them, that the owners

keeping a distinct account of those

long to the people forced

down

for

who

the

are in actual rebellion,

cattle,

whose

&c,

refreshment of the King's Troops.

that be-

must be

cattle

This order

must be speedily obeyed, or the county will otherwise feel the resentment of the King's Troops. Reserving only as many cattle as is necessary for their

own

subsistence.

my hand, the above date. OLIVER DELANCEY, Brig.

Given under

606. 64 men,

women, and

children

are daily coming off to the Continent.

Sam'l Buell, Sep.

Hampton,

that Gov.

7, '76,

came

to Milford,

Gen.

and nos.

Sep. 4.

supports the request of the Trustees of E.

Trumbull would not carry off

their stock

and

ef-


48

SUBMISSION OF

fects.

"

sory,

we

We

are subjects of His Majesty,

King George

and

;

if

acces-

will be exposed to his displeasure."

Wharves

Sag Harbor crowded with emigrants. Hampton, Sept. 22, '76, that the people are as a torch on fire at both ends, which will be speedily consumed, for the Con't Whigs carry off their stock and produce, and the British punish them for allowing it to go hopes the Whigs will not oppress the opSep. 15.

at

Buell writes from E.

pressed, but let the stock alone.

Dan'l Collins' Bill for going from Sag Harbor to E. Hampton, and taking from Col. Gardiner's house 130 firearms and 3 silver-hilted swords, and from Col. Mulford's, 3 casks powder and 2 boxes lead,

and

at another time, 3

Hampton, was £14.

Convention paid £44.

Dec. 24, '76.

M.

casks powder from

Gelston, Esq., of S.

16. 5. to

John Field and £630.

4.

to others, for freight of vessels to Con't.

Jas.

Webb

rec'd

$3

per day for hire of his sloop, Sep. 6 to 30, in

transporting stock and inhabitants from L.

to

I.

Con't.

Jour. 779.

Dr. Jona. Havens, Steph. Howell, and others, brought off goods from L.

I.

Convention paid £64. 10. lies

and

effects of

for freight

and passage

to Con't, of fami-

Dan'l Haines, Dan'l Hedges, Mat. Osborn, Jas. Jen-

nings, Elisha Mulford, Linus Dibble, Isa. Franks, and Jona. Tuttle.

Dec. 31/76.

Jour. 881.

Before Sep. 27, Capt. Rodgers carried off from Huntington Sam'l

Skidmore and Isaac Ketcham, who were both put

was

latter

sent

manacled

to the

The

in Fairfield jail.

former had possessed himself of the farm of Dr. Z. Piatt's brother

N. Y. Convention.

;

the

Oct. 13.

Jour. 649, 636.

Thos. Dering, John Foster, and Thos. Wickham, appointed by

N. Y. a Committee to report on the claims for transporting and effects from L. I. to Con't. Dec. 31, '76.

families,

stock,

607.

[

Capt. Hale, an American spy

was detected near Huntington

and executed in N. Y., but as the accounts are conflicting, we insert all

we have met

the original notices of his melancholy fate leave the reader to draw his

own

inferences.

with, and

Ed. ]

Extract of a Letter to the Missouri Republican from Stephen

Hempstead, Sen., aged 69, copied I

was attached

tinental Troops,

to

and

Capt. Hale's

into the L.

I.

Star, of April 2, 1827.

Company in Col. Webb's Reg.

in his confidence.

of Con-

After the retreat of our army


49

SUFFOLK COUNTY. from L.

I.,

he informed

solicited to

me

go over to L.

I,

camp, &c, expecting them

he was sent

Head

from a recent

had consented

;

and said

to go,

opportunity

Accordingly

from N. Y.

row him

galleys to

In that harbor there :

we

far

our first

sloop and one or two

was an armed all

He was

any place he should designate. I.,

left

arrived at Norwalk, 50 miles

Capt. Hale had a general order to

the sloop at Huntington, L.

we

the intention of crossing over the

but none offered until

:

must go with him as

I

as I could with safety and wait for his return.

camp on Harlem Heights, with

was Enemy's

Quarters, and

N. Y., but that he was too unwell that upon a second illness

to attack

to go, not having recovered

application he

for to

to discover the disposition of the

armed

vessels to take

set across the

Sound

in

by Capt. Pond, who commanded the ves-

Capt. Hale had changed his uniform for a plain suit of citizen's

sel.

brown of a

clothes,

with a round broad-brimmed hat

Dutch Schoolmaster, leaving

public

and private papers with me, and

;

assuming the character

his other

all

clothes,

commission,

also his silver shoe buckles, say-

ing they would not comport with his character of Schoolmaster, and retaining nothing but his college diploma, as an introduction to his as-

sumed calling. Thus equipped we parted for the last time in life. He went on his mission and I returned back again to Norwalk, with orders to stop there until

to

he should return, or

return back again to cross the

The

army had,

British

in the

I

hear from him, as he expected

Sound

if

mean time

he succeeded in his object. got

possession of

N.

Y>

whither he also passed, and had nearly executed his mission, and was passing the

British piquet guard

between the Lines of the two armies,

within a mile and a half of his own quarters, when he was stopped at a Here there was no suspicion of tavern at a place called the " Cedars. " his character being other than he pretended, until

(

most unfortunately he

crowd by a fellow countryman and an own relation, but a tory and renegade, ) who had received the hospitality of his

was met

in the

board and the attention of a brother from Capt. Hale, at his quarters at

Winter Hill

in

Cambridge the winter

before.

He

recognized him

and most inhumanly and infamously betrayed him, divulging his true charand having him searched, his diploma acter, situation in the army &c. ;

when without any formality of trial hung him instantaneously, and sent a flag over to our army, stating that " they had caught such a man within their lines this morning, and hung him as a spy." Thus suddenly and unfeelingly

corroborated his relative's statement, or delay, they

did they rush this

him an

young and worthy man

hour's preparation nor the

into eternity, not allowing

privilege of writing to his friends,


50

SUBMISSION OF

nor even to receive the

last consolations of his religion, refusing to let

the chaplain pray with him, as

Capt. Hale, of the time

all

was

his

these circumstances I

and do most

religiously believe

request.

After parting with

was authentically imformed at them. " He died on the inglo-

rious tree."

The above account by Mr. Hempstead is valuable so far as he own knowledge and yet I cannot help thinking he is in error when he says Hale carried his diploma with him. Do soldiers carry their diplomas about with them in w ar ? Besides, it [

speaks from his

;

r

would betray

Why

name.

his real

than a Yankee schoolmaster

He

?

assume

to be a

Dutch rather

could not speak or understand

Dutch, and yet was going among the Dutch with a paper in his pocket

showing him

to be a

Yankee by

his very

May

name, Nathan.

not the report of his attempting to cross from one camp to the other at " the Cedars, " ( if there ever was such a place, ) be a mere supposition, and have for

Hale

Long

Island

one

visit

)

grown out of

to take a short cut, rather

One account makes

?

Hale in Coventry

;

the idea that

it

was most

natural

than a circuitous one by his betrayer

(

if

way

the other, at Winter Hill.

of

was

there ever

Was

it

not the plans and sketches rather than the diploma that betrayed

Hale 1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed,

]

Newburyport, Feb. 13,

The following

a genuine specimen of Tory benevolence, and depended upon as a real matter offact.

is

Sam'l Hale,

an uncle

visited

as his uncle

late of

a

where he was hospitably entertained but Whig, and had a son, a young gentleman of a libe;

and most amiable

disposition,

who

strongly felt for his

bleeding country, and being very active in the military way,

urged and prevailed on

Army

be

Portsmouth, N. H., after his elopement thence,

in Conn.,

was

ral education,

'77.

may

to take

was

a commission in the Continental

consequently Samuel was obliged to conduct with caution, and counterfeit as well as he could a Whiggish phiz, w hile he tarried, which was but a short time however, before he made his escape Some time after this, Capt. Hale, at the reto Gen. Ho.ve in N. Y. quest of the General, went into N. Y. in disguise, and having nearly accomplished his designs, whom should he meet but his aforesaid ;

r

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

cousin Samuel, well.

whom

he attempted to shun, but

Capt. Hale soon found he

was

Sam knew him

too

advertised, and so particularly

described, that he could not get through L.

I.,

he therefore attempted


SUFFOLK COUNTY. to escape

by way of Kingsbridge, and so

outer guard, where he tried,

far

51 succeeded as to get to the

was suspected, apprehended,

and yet would have been acquitted, had not

carried back and

his affectionate

and

Samuel appeared and made oath, that he was a Captain in the Continental Army, and that he was in there as a Spy in consequence of which he was immediately hung up however, grateful cousin

;

gallows he made a sensible and spirited speech,

at the

among

other

them they were shedding the blood of the innocent, and he had ten thousand lives, he would lay them all down, if

things, told that if

called to do

The

it,

in defence of his injured, bleeding country.

Printers throughout the Continent are desired to exhibit

this tragic

scene to the public, that they

are to expect if they

fall

into the

may

see

what mercy they

hands of Tories.

N. H. Gaz., Feb.

18, '77.

think the above contains some gross misstatements.

[I

" In Hale's attempt

Ed.]

was apprehended, carried before Sir Wm. Howe, and the proof of his object was so clear, that he frankly acknowledged who he was and what were his views Sir Wm. Howe at once gave an order to the Provost Marshal to execute him the return he

to

:

next morning. feeling

A

The

was accordingly executed

order

in the

most un-

manner, and by as great a savage as ever disgraced humanity.

clergyman, whose attendance he desired, was refused him

;

a Bible

moment's devotion was not procured, though he requested it. Letwhich, on the morning of his execution, he wrote to his mother and

for a

ters

other friends, were destroyed

by the Provost Marshal,

had a

man

in their

'

;

and

this

very extraordinary reason given

that the rebels should not

army who could

die with so

much

Hannah Adams, as quoted

The

following

is

from the Life of Gen.

Washington spoke with Hull,

Soon

to

who opposed

after this,

Wm.

that they

by Dr. Thatcher.

Hull.

Knowlton, and he to Hale. the

know

firmness.'

Hale advised

measure as dangerous and disgraceful.

Hale was absent.

In a few days a British officer under

a flag informed Hamilton that Hale had been executed that morning as a spy.

The

seemed touched

officer

told Hull

he was present at the execution and " Hale had passed through the

at the circumstances.

armies on Long and York Islands, made sketches of fortifications and memoranda. When apprehended he was taken before Howe, and the


52

SUBMISSION OF

He

concealed papers found.

Howe, without morning, and put him

ject.

for

was

refused.

near the in

my

and

fatal spot,

marquee while and

tered calm

to give for

He asked

A

last

let

Hale

pen and ink, and wrote

for

sit

were making. Hale enletters

which were subsequently destroyed

officer,

Shortly after he

His

my

Hale asked

Provost Marshal to

I requested the

dignified.

by Cunningham. were around.

his execution next

ordered

the neccessary preparations

Mother and a Brother

to his

trial,

in custody of the Provost Marshal.

He was refused. He next asked for a Bible. That On the morning of the Execution my station was

a Clergyman.

too

once declared his name, rank and ob-

at

form of a

the

was summoned

words were, "

I

to the

only regret

gallows

;

few

have but one

I

life

country."

home from Camp on N. Y. Island, we hanged an officer of the Provincials who

British officer thus writes

Sep. 23, '76, "yesterday

came

Mid.

as a spy.

Jas. Drewett, on board British frigate

25, '76, " ington.

On

the 22d

Mercury

we hung a man who was sent

"

at

London

(

)

Jour.

N. Y. writes, Sep.

as spy by Gen.

Mid.

(

London

)

Wash-

Jour.

An American officer thus writes from Camp at Harlem, Sep. 26, '76, One Hale, in N. Y., on suspicion of being a spy, was taken up and dragged without ceremony to the Execution Post and hung up.

"

[

Hale,

'tis

said,

had

his

examination

in the

Green House

(

still

stand-

Beekman Mansion, Howe's Head Quarters, near Turtle Bay, and thrÂŤ* miles from the City Hall. The precise spot of his Exe-

ing

of the

)

cution cannot be pointed out..

Ed.]

Local Traditions

in

Queens County.

Wooden said he remembered the capture of Hale as if it were Wooden was a ship builder at Oyster Bay 2 or 3 miles from yesterday. Sol.

the scene of Hale's capture

was

in

;

and as he

built boats for the British,

constant intercourse with them, he

very crew that captured Hale.

Hale was

and

heard the story from the

set over

from Conn, to L.

I.

near Oyster Bay, by an American boat that was to return for him on a set day.

He

gave out that he was disgusted with the rebel cause,

and had deserted, but did not wish

He journeyed on

to

N. Y.

mation, he returned by L.

city, I.,

to enlist,

and would

where having obtained

making

his

way through

the

arrived at the shore about Huntington or Oyster Bay.

morning he went out shore.

boat

He

to reconnoitre,

when he saw

did not see the frigate Halifax, Capt.

belonged, and

which had come ashore

like a school.

all possible infor-

woods

till

he

Early in the

a boat rowing to the

Quarme,

for water.

to

which the

Perhaps the


53

SUFFOLK COUNTY. frigate

was hid by

taking

this for a friendly

As

Hale mis-

the fog or an intervening point of land.

boat walked deliberately

down

water

to the

side.

the boat struck the shore he discovered his mistake and retraced his

He was

steps.

ordered to stop

On

!

looking over his shoulder he saw

Escape

the whole crew standing up with their guns levelled at him.

was

impossible

he was ordered on board and his papers showed what

;

He was

he was.

taken to N. Y.

boat of the Halifax, and execu-

in the

Thompson.

ted on an apple tree in Col. Rutgers' orchard. [

See also Queens Co., Sec. 368,

tion.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; .Ed.

an account of his execu-

for

]

Robert Townsend of Oyster Bay, who died some years ago aged 85, used to say he had heard Capt. Quarme, of a British armed vessel which

was

lying in the

Sound near Huntington

say that a boat's crew belonging

at the time of Hale's capture,

to his vessel

being ashore on L.

Huntington Harbor, was mistaken by Hale

tle east of

I.,

a

lit-

people from

Sound, and thus he committed himself before he

the other side of the

was aware

for

hands of

of his mistake into the

when he found what

his

enemies

;

and that

a fine fellow he was, he was sorry he had fallen

into his power.

Wm.

Ludlam, now

Quarme's boats took a

aged 87, says "he heard that one of Capt.

living,

man

by the name of Hale somewhere near Hunt-

ington Harbor, and then the

man was

taken to N. Y., and that was

all

he ever heard of him."

The

death of Hale has been the subject of a Novel, by

Sirams.

His

life

may

608.

Saybrook, Sep. 12, '76.

Dear Brother

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

now at

I.

tell

I

the head of 400 I

I

have been ob-

have given Gen. Washington a

by the same conveyance

succeed in the attempt

you,

to this place for several reasons, that I

time to mention.

particular account

to-morrow,

have just time to

I

liged to retreat from L.

have not

R.

J.

be found in Thompson.

am

men,

this is sent by.

set out for

going to make,

I shall

Huntington

I shall

;

if I

yet save Suffolk

Co., though most of the inhabitants have been prevailed

upon to take King of Great Britain, through a persuasion that the Island was given up as indefensible. Gov. Trumbull has assisted me with 260 men. an oath of allegiance

to the

HENRY

B.

LIVINGSTON.

Robt. R. Livingston, Jr. 609.

Howe

The towns

of South and East

(to avoid the imputation of

Hampton send

a letter to

being concerned with the Conn.


54

SUBMISSION OF

whale-boats) that some arms taken from the people of East

by order of Col. Gardiner

ton,

by the subjects of the

in the

Howel, the

States.

Col. Livingston.

Hamp-

King's name, had been retaken bearer,

was caught by Cor. 401.

Before Sep. 17, '76.

610. Sai/brook, Sep. 24, '76. Last Friday a party from Lt. Col.

was put under command

Livingston's detachment

Roe, to go from Saybrook off Roe's family,

bringing

on board,

to

down

bring

down

of Capt. Dan'l

for the purpose of bringing

On

Friday night 12 o'clock,

Brook H., taking 14 men with him

to as-

the family, leaving 14 under Lt. Geo. Smith

guard the

He

vessel.

pressed teams as he went to

the goods, not being able to procure

At 9 A. M.,just

means.

Haven,

and a no. of others.

the Capt. left the sloop at sist in

to B.

as he

was ready

to return,

them by other he was inform-

ed by one of the guards that Richard Miller of B. Haven, a young

gentleman of family and fortune, but a notorious enemy to

(who had arms concealed which R. ordered on him.

fire

his

at his

men

house),

to hail him,

He was hailed 3

times,

was passing and

if

his

his country

house

he refused to

;

upon

stop, to

upon which he stopped, and 5 men kill him if

with their pieces presented told him they would instantly

he attempted

to

stir.

He

stood and viewed

them half a minute,

then discharged a pistol at them, and rode off with the utmost expedition,

on which he was several times ordered to

sing, five

guns were separately

fired at

stop,

but he refu-

him, from the last of which

a ball was shot through his body, upon which he dismounted and

was

carried into Capt. Roe's house, and left in care of a no. of the

inhabitants.

was

Capt. R. being informed that one Jacob Smith,

in conjunction with Miller,

who

and not far distant when he was taken,

had collected a party of several, and were endeavoring to surround and take him, thought it prudent to retreat on board his vessel, where he had but just time to arrive with his wife and family, being obliged to leave

all his effects

behind.

Miller and Smith had received commissions under the

King of

G. Britain, and had been raising men, pressing horses and wagons, together with persons to drive them, to assist Howe in removing his baggage.

They had

likewise taken fat cattle from the inhabitants,

and obliged them to drive them

to the Ministerial

Army.

Conn. Courant, Sep. 30,

'76.


55

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 611. This enlist

men

is

to certify that

to join

Ensign Sam'l Glover

my company

to

service, for the defence of the liberty of

Given under

my

authorized to

is

complete a Bat. in His Majesty's

America.

hand, at Brookhaven, Sep. 22d, 1776.

JACOB SMITH. iV. Y., Sep. 27, '76.

612.

S IR

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;You are

to desire the

Justices of the

Peace

to

summon

farmers of their Districts to attend at some central place, to

the

demand of

each, what grain and straw he can spareâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; as to hay we must have the whole, for which you'll give them proper Certificates to me to pay them The whole of the grain and forage of Rebels in arms is to be seized by. All persons removed off are to be deemed Rebels,

King's use.

for the

and dealt with accordingly.

JOHN MORRISON, Commissary of Forage.

To Mr.

E. Punderson.

Copy of a blank order left with

613.

the Inhabitants of Suffolk Co.

L. L, Sep. 1776.

You

are hereby ordered to preserve for the King's use

bushels of wheat,

hay,

of Indian corn, and of the same, but to

your wheat and rye straw

all

my

;

loads of

of barley,

of rye,

of oats,

and not to dispose

order in writing, as you will answer the con-

trary at your peril.

JOHN MORRISON, Major, and Commissary of Forage. 614. In pursuance

of his Excellency

the

Commander-in-Chief's

orders to me, you are hereby directed to take into your custody

all

the

and creatures you can find on L. I., being the property of persons in actual rebellion, or who have deserted their habitations, and put themselves under the protection of the rebels, taking an exact forage,

grain,

account of what

is

so seized

:

and report frequently

John Morrison,

to

respecting grain and forage, and to Jas. Christie, respecting creatures.

In execution of this duty you are to employ such persons as you think proper, boats,

who

will apply to

wagons, horses,

you may require civil

ing

His Majesty's Justices of the Peace

drivers, mills, barns

for the benefit of

all

which

this shall

and

all officers

their aid.

For do-

His Majesty's service

and military, are hereby required

to impress

and what other conveniences

to give

be a sufficient warrant.

you

:

Oct. 1, 1776.

DAN'L CHAMIER,

Com. Gen.


56

SUBMISSION OF Jamaica, Oct.

To John Hewlett, Esq L. I. You are to use your utmost endeavors to for the army when delivered a receipt will

2, 1776.

,

;

and

certain time

place.

If

bring

me

cattle

and sheep

be given, to be paid at a

any butcher or others

with you un-

interfere

der pretence of bringing them to me, without a written order from me, seize their cattle, put a fair value

the owners shall be paid

have

;

habitations,

left their

on them, and drive them

and

also seize all sheep

and employ proper people

to

me, and

of rebels

who

to assist you.

For

cattle

doing whereof, this shall be your warrant.

JAS. CHRISTIE, Com. for

cattle

and sheep.

615. Lt. Col. H. B. Livingston sends the N. Y. Convention from

Saybrook, Oct. 16,

'76, the paroles of Col.

and Geo. Howel, of L. F., a

Col.

man

driving cattle to virtue of an

old

I.,

disaffected to the

Fanning, Major Conklin,

freedom of

this country.

was apprehended for procuring and Gen. Howe's Army. He has also acted as Col. (by of influence,

commission from Geo. 3d)

in calling the people of

Southold together to see whether they would take the oath of

allegi-

Cor. 349.

ance.

Brookhaven, Oct. 18, '76. 616. Sir

:

—In consequence of

instructions I have just received

from head-quarters, you are forthwith for his Majesty's service.

not stint the cause.

teams will answer

If

to

The number-

you can't get a

—a driver

impress wagons and horses unlimited

is

sufficient

for every team,

;

therefore do

number of wagons,

which

you'll send with-

White Stone, near Flushing. I beg, Sir, you'll yourself on this occasion. Don't omit one moment, as it seems

out loss of time to exert

to be critical.

JACOB SMITH,

Capt. 1st Comp., 1st Bat.,

Delakcey's Brigade.

To Sam'l Glover. 617.

About Nov.

taken at Mastic, on broke

jail

$8 reward

at

1, '76,

Sam'l Glover, a notorious offender, was

whom were

found papers 611 and 616.

N. London on the night of Feb.

1, '77,

He

and escaped.

offered.— Con. Gaz., Feb. 14, '77.

618. Jos. Greene, Major 1st Bat., writes from Hempstead, Oct. 22, '76, to Capt. Smith, quartered at Setauket, to collect and drive in

all

rebel horses in Suffolk Co.

brought 2 prisoners to Greene.

Smith's Lieutenant, French, had


57

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

the Right Honorable RICHARD, LORD VISCOUNT HOWE, of the Kingdom of Ireland, and his Excellency WILLIAM HOWE, Esquire, General

To

of His Majesty''s forces in America, the King's Commissioners for restoring peace to His Majesty's Colo-

North America.

nies in

Your

Excellencies, by your Declaration bearing date July 14,

1776, were pleased to signify that "the King is desirous to deliver His American subjects from the calamities of war, and other oppressions which they

now undergo

His protection and peace

;

and

to restore the Colonies to

and, by a subsequent Declaration dated

;"

Sep. 19, 1776, having also been pleased to express your desire "to confer with His Majesty's well affected subjects upon the means of restoring the public tranquillity, and establishing a permanent union

with every Colony as a part of the British Empire

;"

we, therefore,

whose names are hereunto subscribed, inhabitants of the county of Suffolk, on Nassau Island, in the Province of N. Y., reflecting with the tenderest emotions of gratitude on this instance of His Majesty's

manner in which His Majesty's gracious purpose hath been conveyed to us by your Excellencies, who have thereby evinced, that humanity is inseparable from that true magnanimity and those enlarged sentiments which form the most shining characters, beg leave to represent to paternal goodness, and encouraged by the affectionate

your Excellencies,

That we bear true allegiance the Third, as well as dignity

;

warm

That we esteem the

constitutional

tain over these Colonies and other

dominions, as essential to the

whole empire

;

Sovereign Geo.

to our rightful

affection to his sacred person,

crown and

supremacy of Great

Bri-

depending parts of His Majesty's

union, security, and welfare of the

and sincerely lament the interruption of that harmony

which formerly subsisted between the parent

state

and these her

Colonies.

That many of the the calamities of

loyal inhabitants have been driven

war and

the spirit of persecution

vailed, or sent prisoners to

We,

New

which

away by

lately pre-

England and other distant parts. sufferings which our fellow-

therefore, hoping that the

inhabitants undergo for their attachment to the Royal cause,

plead in their behalf,

humbly

pray, that your Excellencies

may

would be


58

SUBMISSION OF

pleased

to

restore

county to His Majesty's protection and

this

peace.

Suffolk

Co., Oct.

,

1776.

Signed by 614 persons.

To His Excellency Win. Tryon, Esq., Capt. Gen. and Governor -in-Chief in and over the Province of Neiv-

Ame-

York, and the Territories depending thereon in rica, Chancellor

May

it

and Vice Admiral of the same.

please your Excellency

:

We the inhabitants of the coun-

ty of Suffolk, beg leave to congratulate your Excellency on your

return to the capital of your government, and to assure you, that sincerest joy on this

feel the

that

we

shall

we

happy event, which opens a prospect

once more experience the blessings of peace and se-

curity under His Majesty's auspicious government and protection

blessings which

we

formerly enjoyed under your Excellency's mild

which we ardently wish to have renewed: perour loyalty and unshaken attachment to our gracious

administration, and

severing in

Sovereign in

time of distress and

this

our affection for Him, petition the

we

trial,

have embraced the

and anxious to

testify

earliest opportunity to

King's Commissioners that they would restore this Coun-

ty to His Majesty's peace, although

much

many

of the most respectable

number of the

inferior classes

have

been driven off by the calamities of war, or sent prisoners to

New

inhabitants and a

England or other ing,

and

greater

distant parts, yet

who have

we hope the number still remainmay be deemed sufficient

voluntarily subscribed,

to entitle this district to

His Majesty's grace, whilst the sufferings

which our absent fellow-citizens undergo in their behalf with the Commissioners,

for the royal cause, plead

— from

humanity, benevolence and enlarged sentiments,

Nov. 28, 1776.

flattering expectations.

Signed

whose well known we have the most

in behalf of the inhabitants

by

RICHARD FLOYD,

THOMAS FANNING, FRED'K HUDSON. Neiu-York, Dec.

Gentlemen to

me by

:

— Agreeable

2, '76.

to the request in the address delivered

you, in behalf of the inhabitants of Suffolk Co., I have pre-


59

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

sented their very dutiful and loyal petition and representation to His

Excellency Gen.

HOWE,

one of the King's Commissioners for re-

who was

storing peace to His Majesty's Colonies,

"

He would

HOWE

Lord to

pleased to say

:

take the earliest opportunity of communicating with

Every public testimony of

on the occasion."

loyalty

our most Gracious Sovereign, and attachment to the British Con-

stitution, is at this

season particularly commendable, and the inhab-

of Suffolk Co.

itants

may

be assured of

my

good wishes

for the

completion of their desires, as expressed in their petition and representation, the granting of

which

is

wisdom

happily committed to the

and discretion of His Majesty's Commissioners. I

am, with regard, Gentlemen.

Your most

ob't servant,

WM. TRYON. To Major Richard Floyd, Mr. Tho's Fanning, Mr. Frederick Hudson, of Suffolk Co.

A

copy of what ivas sent through Suffolk Co. by order of

Gov. Try on. 620.

The Governor

of the Province

recommends

to the inhabi-

tants of Suffolk Co., the following measures, as the best

those

and

who have been

means

for

active in the rebellion, to preserve their lives

estates, viz. that all offensive

arms, indiscriminately, be forth-

with collected, in each manor, township and precinct, as soon as possible, to deliver

them up

at head-quarters, to the

Commander-in-

chief of the King's troops.

That those who have been

active in the rebellion, if

fit

to bear

arms, forthwith to wait on the Gen'l, and enlist in the regular service for the term of the present

one of their sons

some unasked

The

war

;

signal service, that

inhabitants of each

town

may

not

if

to enlist in their stead

;

if

fit

to bear arms, to send

no sons, then

to associate, to prevent

ing to the Main, and secure those coming thence deliver

up

all

persons

known

to

to

perform

merit the protection of Gov't.

;

any person go-

and to secure and

be active enemies to the rights of

the Constitution.

And

the several townships to furnish as

many men

as possible


60 fit

SUBMISSION OF to bear arms, to invite those

to enlist in

send

who have fled from the county, And lastly, thei nhabitants to

back

Gen. Delancey's brigade.

the wood, forage, and provisions they can spare, to N.

all

market or such place as the Gen'l

Y.

shall order.

[Can the above (taken from a

New Haven

paper) be genuine

?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed.] The County Committees and Committees folk Co.,

meet respectively as soon as

of

possible,

permission, for the purpose of revoking

Townships of Sufby the Governor's

all their

proceedings under

the Congress, and formally to dissolve their unlawful associations

the County having

now

:

submitted to the King, his laws and Gov't.

WM. TRYON. Note.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;When the

above

is

accomplished, the Gov'r will review

the militia.

N. Y. Gaz., Nov.

The

11. '76.

Committees of Suffolk and from to

all

following declarations from the

the

His Ex. Gov. Tryon on Thursday

Town

last,

Corn's were delivered by Major Richard Floyd

and Mr. Tho's Fanning, who were deputed by the inhabitants

to pre-

sent the same.

Huntington, Oct. 21,

The Committee injurious

and inimical tendency of our former meetings and

and willing

to manifest our hearty disapprobation of all

resolutions,

such

measures, do hereby dissolve this committee, and as far as in us

voke and disannul

'76.

of Huntington, being thoroughly convinced of the

all

illegal lies,

re-

former orders and resolutions of all committees and

Congresses whatsoever, as being undutiful to our lawful Sovereign, re-

pugnant

to the principles of the British Constitution,

and ruinous

in the

extreme, to the happiness and prosperity of this country.

Brookhaven, Oct. 24, 1776.

We

Committee of the County of Suffolk, being assembled by permission of His Ex. the Hon. Wm. Tryon, Esq., Gov. of N. Y., and the Territories depending thereon in America, do hereby dissolve ourselves, and do disclaim and reject the orders of Congress and Corn's ; and totally refusing obedience to them revoking all our proceedings the

;

under the Congress, and being desirous to obey the legal authority of Gov't, rely upon your Excellency's clemency, hoping that you will pass

by our former conduct, and be graciously pleased bly to the laws of the Province.

to protect us, agreea-

Signed by order of the Committee.

JOHN BRUSH,

Ch'n.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. Declarations of Smithtown

(Oct.

19),

of Southold

South Hampton and of East Hampton (Oct. 21), were in

61 (Oct. like

25), of

words.

Nov. 28, '76. The Dissolution of the Committee of Suffolk Co, and the Committees of the several townships, with the revocation of

all

their

fected by

my

proceedings and orders under the Congress, was particular recommendation.

TRYOK

ef-


PART *

ARMED OCCUPATION OF SUFFOLK COUNTY.

621. Oct. 28, '76.

with 36

III.

men under

Gov. Trumbull directs 6 R.

Smith, Caleb Brewster, and D.

Roe

Bay, to Canoe Place

to Southold

Bay up

as far as Mastic,

whale-boats, Lt.

Geo.

(best acquainted with the situa-

and make the best of their

tion of places), to take three transports

way

I.

Richmond, with

Cols. Livingston and

;

thence across into South

and bring off the

Floyd and

effects of Col.

others of our friends, and return as soon as possible.

Mary and Lily), Howe, and Brookhaven Harbor. They also surprised

Instead of this they, captured 2 sloops (Princess

loading with

wood by

order of Capt. Smith, for Gen.

lying at the dock, head of

Capt. Smith and part of his company, but declined marching to

Smithtown,

to

attack

the

rest

of Delancey's Brigade

stationed

there.

N. Haven, Nov. 6, '76. A few nights since, between 300 and 400 Rhode Island crossed the Sound and landed near Setauket, where they engaged a party of the troops newly enlisted into Gen.

troops from

Howe's army, commanded by one Smith 5 or 6 of his men were killed in the action, and himself and 23 of his company made prisoners, who ;

were brought

off,

The

with 75 excellent muskets.

ley herd, half being negroes

and Indians.

Of

prisoners are a mot-

the R.

I.

troops one

was

and one wounded. N. London, Nov. 8, '76. A number of troops from R. I., E. End of L. I. and Con't, embarked at New Haven and landed at Setauket, on L. I., with a view of bringing off some tories, and the effects of a gentleman friendly to the American cause being interrupted by some tories, who fired upon them, they killed 10, and brought off 23 two of the

killed

;

;

latter, deserters

the contest.

from our army.

A sergeant

in our party

was

killed in


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

63

Benj. Birdsall, Thos. Brush, and Carll 622. Nov. 9, '76. Ketcham, rec'd from Convention £10. 1. 6. for guarding and conveying, from Norwich to Fishkill, 2 prisoners, (brought from L. I.)

Jam-. 708.

Thos. Wicks and Eliph. Brush received of

623. Nov. 23, '76.

Convention

Y.

in

May

He

Nov. 15. letters

at Fishkill

and June

£4.

also received

£4

from Head-Quarters.

New

624.

London, Jan.

the ministerial

fleet,

conveying counterfeiters to N.

16. for

[Wicks had removed

last.

(See 542.) 3, '77.

625.

much from

wood

at the east

end of L.

rob them of their effects.

There are two companies of Tories stationed

ton, but not a

man E.

cers, without

any men.

of there

They

also,

;

I.,

'Tis said the inhabitants have

who

the soldiers,

Albany with

Jour. 714.

Several transports belonging to

are loading with

under guard of some men-of-war. suffered

to Saybrook, before

for riding express to

Hunting-

at

about 10 or a doz. regular

are billeted on the inhabitants,

offi-

all

of

them without pay, and have plundered, stole, and destroyed to such a decree, that the inhabitants must unavoidably starve in a little time, for want of food. Sundry of the principal men have been beaten in an unheard of manner for not complying with their unrighteous requests, particularly good Dr. Piatt and Mr. John Brush. The Meeting-House made a storehouse of, no public worship allowed of, and the good people assembled 5 miles out of town, at (British) followed them, and broke

more.

Tn '77

was

Hills

—they any

the

British troops at

Huntington took possession of the it

as a depot for military stores.

The

carried on board a British ship, but restored afterwards, so in-

jured that

626.

West

their assembling together

Gaine, Feb. 17, '77.

church, tore up the seats and used bell

up

it

was

Prime.

recast.

N. London, March

14, '77.

Last Sunday the British Fleet

took from John Brown, on Fisher's Island, 106 sheep, 8 oxen, 11

cows, 22 yearlings, 26 swine, 24 turkies, 48 fowls, 123 bushels corn,

100

do. potatoes,

5i tons pressed hay. and 3 cords wood.

barrel of pork out of the cellar, blankets, sheets, and shot

Stock chiefly paid Bav.

for.

There are 20 ships

at

Also, a

some sheep.

anchor in Gardiner's


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

64 627.

One

from Con't

robbed him of

On

niture.

week

night,

the clothing of his family and

all

came over

before last, a party of rebels

house of Solomon Smith, of Smithtown, and

to the

their return, the boat overset,

party perished, as the boat and

and

some household

'tis

fur-

supposed the whole

some dead bodies were found on the Gaine, Ap.

shore near Mr. Smith's within a day or two afterwards. 7, '77.

628. E. Dayton, under Capt. John Clark, by order of Putnam, seized (Ap. '77), a

wagon and goods on

L.

I.

the property of Oba.

Wright, of Saybrook. 629. Levi Allen (brother of Ethan) posted at Mrs. Hubbard's,

some

in Mattituck,

counterfeit bills (as a warning to the public)

;

gave one to Rufus Tuthill, at Oyster Pond, and one to John Brown,

on Fisher's Island 630.

cused, I.

Wm.

May

in the

N. London,

Smith,

4, '77,

member

May

2, '77.

of the Council of Safety,

power of the enemy. Parsons

was ex-

from acting, as he has a family and estate on L. Jour. 911.

Trumbull, N. Haven, May, 25,

to

'77.

631. I sincerely congratulate your honor on the success of our

arms on L.

Meigs

Col.

I.

Sachem's Head on Friday

left

M., with 160 men, and landed within 3 miles of Sag H. the night following

attacking the

;

till

at 1 P.

about one

and having made the proper dispositions for

enemy in 5

order and silence

at

different places,

proceeded with the greatest

within 20 rods of the enemy,

when

they rushed

with fixed bayonets upon the different barracks, guards, and quarters of the at the

there.

enemy whilst Capt. Troop, with a party under his command, same time took possession of the wharves and vessels lying :

The alarm soon became

general, and an incessant fire of

grape and round shot was kept up from an armed schooner of 12 guns, which lay within 120 yds. of the wharves, for near an hour notwithstanding which the party burnt killed

and captivated

all

the

men

all

;

the vessels at the wharf,

belonging to them, destroyed about

100 tons of hay, large quantities of grain, 10 hhds. of rum, and other

W.

stationed.

a

India goods, and secured

ail

the soldiers

man killed

or

wounded on our

side.

with the greatest order and bravery.

who

w^ere there

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Chew and Mr. Bell not The officers and men behaved N. London, May 30, '77.

90 prisoners, among them Mr.


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

65

Guilford,

May

29, '77.

Gen. Parsons having received intelligence that the enemy were col-

Sag Harbor, on L. I.; last Friday, 23d, who had previously rendezvous'd at embarked on board a number of whale-

lecting large quantities of forage at

about 200 of the Continental troops,

Sachem's Head, boats,

in Guilford,

commanded by

Lt. Col. Meigs, to destroy

it.

At about

6 o'clock,

afternoon, they arrived at the beach (Southold), this side of Plumgut,

transported their boats about 50 rods over the beach,

embarked, and landed within 4 miles of Sag Harbor, where, ing a suitable guard

to protect the

with such secrecy as not

They soon

sentry.

till

stationed there, were entirely off their guard, our troops

An armed

opposition.

known

As

the

little

Our

on them, but happily did no damage.

fire

with their small arms, but whether with

fire

enemy

met with

schooner of 12 guns, which lay not far from the

shore, kept an incessant

people returned the

marched

within a few rods of the

about destroying the forage, &c.

set

(after leav-

boats hid in the woods,) they

be discovered

to

and

when they again

effect is

enemy on shore were destroyed, and three others were made prisoners. Our people set fire to the hay (about 100 tons), which was on board transports, and on the wharves, which was entirely destroyed, with 10 transport vessels, mostly sloops and schooners, and one armed vessel of 6 or 8 guns, 2 or 3 hogsheads of rum, &c. Our troops are all returned, having pernot or

;

4 made

formed

5 or six of the

their escape

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

24 hours. [The enemy's troops on this part marched to New York two days before, but it was party was at Sag Harbor.] Sparks, IV. 441.

their expedition in

of the Island had

reported a

Prisoners Taken.

One

Capt., 2 Commissaries, (one, Jos.

Chew, formerly of N. LonSeamen

don), 3 Sergeants, 53 Privates, 10 Masters of transports, 27

Our people brought

total, 90.

632.

[May

28, '77.

Col.

the Provost where Hart

Allen kneeled

fell

off fifty muskets.

;

[See Prime, 210

]

Smith and Rev. Mr. Hart, were brought to and lay at death's door. Col. Ethan

sick,

down and made

so fervent a prayer by his side,

and oth-

erwise cheered him up, that he recovered and was admitted on parole in

New- York

City, Oct.

25.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed.]

633. David Hawley, in the Schuyler, took the sloop Peggy, Chas.

Thomas, master, and sloop Ann, Ezekiel Bishop, master. Aug. 634.

Aug.

25, '77,

from 3 Privateers

at

10, '77.

"Last Friday, Gen. Parsons landed 500 men

Setauket with several pieces of brass cannon,

and summoned the small Fort there to surrender. Col. Hewlett, desired one

The Commander,

hour to consider of the matter, when he


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

66

was allowed only 10 minutes. His answer was, he would defend King George the 3d, as long as he had a '

the Fort for his Majesty

man

alive

;'

when

a smart

were soon obliged

to

fire

immediately ensued

;

but the rebels

embark, several of them being killed and

wounded, as much blood was seen in their encampment after they went away. We had 1 killed and 2 or 3 wounded. On this occa-

Queens Co. turned out

sion the militia of

Royal cause, but the Rebels went

in order to support the

off with

such precipitation, that

the Militia were ordered to return before they reached Setauket."

Gaine.

Commanders on the above occasion. Aug. 22. Commanding officer of the troops of the

Letters that passed between the two

Brig. Gen. Parsons, the

now investing the enemy's Post at Setauket, human blood, requires the immediate surthe officers and soldiers, and those who are under

United American Army,

to prevent the effusion of

render of the Post

;

their protection, shall be entitled to their baggage,

humanity which prisoners are in 10 minutes.

I

whole strength and

am

entitled to.

fully sensible of

artillery will

oblige to the effusion of blood

;

and treated with that

Your answer

is

desired

your condition, and as

soon be here,

if

my

your refusal should

you must charge

it

to

your own ob-

stinacy.

Col. Hewlett's compliments to Gen. Parsons, and requests half

an hour

to consult his officers

on the subject of his summons.

Gen. Parsons' compliments to Col. Hewlett, and grants 10 minutes only for consideration

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;longer time

will not be granted.

Col. Hewlett presents his compliments to

determined to defend the Fort while he has a

Gen. Parsons, and

is

man left.

Gen. Parsons' compliments to Col. Hewlett, and should have been

happy visit,

to

have done himself the pleasure of paying him a longer

but the extreme heat of the weather prevents him.

[Setauket

was one of the

British outposts. Col. Hewlett, with Capts.

and 260 men, was stationed here. As a place of resort in case of attack, he inclosed the Presbyterian Church at the distance of 30 ft. with an earthen mound 6 ft. high and 5 ft. thick laid with

Lister, Hewlett, Allison,

fascines so as to be ball-proof.

3

in.

apart.

Two steps

On

the top were set pickets 6

ft.

high and

Pickets also projected from the outer side over the ditch.

of earth were

made

inside the wall for the

men to

rise

on and


SUFFOLK COUNTY. fire their

South

muskets between the pickets.

Americans landed high

hill

A heavy

Four swivels were mounted

side.

at Mt.

67 double gate

at the gallery

Misery from sloops, before daylight.

3 or 4 miles N. E. from

on the inhabitants,

to escape into^the

The It is

had

Col. Hewlett

the Fort.

guard here which gave the alarm and enabled the soldiers, billeted

was on the

windows.

a

set a

who were

Fort and send off expresses

Col. H. was quartered at Col. Floyd's, and jumped out of his bedroom window with clothes in hand, and by a circuitous route barely reached the fort. The Americans advanced from the East, and at 5 A. M., summoned the garrison. Col. H. addressed his men: Soldiers!

for help.

Shall

we

surrender

as long as there's a lery

on a rock in

commenced

?

No

man

full

!

was the response. Then I'll stick to you The Americans' then planted their artil

left.

view of the church, 300 or 400 yds.

the attack with 3 pieces.

They

force into action nor use musketry, but kept

church was perforated with

man

balls,

and one

distant,

and

did not bring their grand

up a brisk cannonade. The

rafter split its

whole length,

was very active in elevating and firing his piece. Chas. Wilson (who was soon after shot through the head) said, I will kill that red-breeched man, and he was a mark for others but as the assailants carried off the fallen, it is not known what became of him. The fire from the Fort was through the pickets with small arms, but with one

[Caleb Brewster

?]

;

far off. The principal fire was from and we kept them warm," says S. Verity. Chambers Townsend, of Duchess Co., was shot through the body. Three others were killed and 2 or 3 wounded. Thos. Pigeon, Oba. Verity, Wm. Covert, and Tim. Moore, of O. B. were in the action. The at-

no

effect, the

Americans being too

the swivels, "

tack lasted 2 or 3 hours,

when

the

Americans retreated.

It

was well

had they remained 3 hours longer they would have been cut off by reinforcements approaching from all parts. Capt. Dan'l Youngs,

they did

;

of O. Bay, had reached Smithtown, and the ships of war at Huntington,

were under way.

Six months after this the garrison

was abandoned.

The General spirited behavior

and

men under

and the Fort

desires particularly to express his approbation of the

and good conduct of Col. Hewlett, and the

officers

command, in the defence of the redoubt at Setauwhich Col. Hewlett was attacked by a large body of

his

ket upon L. L, in the

left,

Ed.]

enemy with cannon, whom he

repelled

with disgrace, Aug.

24, '77.

STEPHEN KEMBLE, Dep. Adj. Gen.


68

ARMED OCCUPATION OF $5 Reward and charges paid by Thos. Place, of Eastwoods., Widow Burk's plantation at Long Swamps.

635.

Stolen or strayed from

Huntington, a bay horse, a feather each side of his neck, &c.

Game.

Sep. 22, '77,

636. Gaine, Dec.

bound

ington,

to

1,

'77.

Last Sunday

week

a sloop from Hunt-

N. Y. with wood, was taken by 2 whale boats

of rebels, soon after she sailed.

full

Capt. Kendal in a small schooner

with 2 swivel guns being in sight, gave chase to the whale boats and plied

them so warmly with his little artillery that they relinquished made for the shore with the greatest expedition.

the prize and

In exploring the territories of Zephaniah

637. Dec. 22, '77. Piatt, of

Smithtown, father to Sam'l Broom's partner, there was found

snugly concealed in a barn, 2 whale boats, which were instantly

committed to the flames, and Mr. Piatt in propria persona, secured

who

in custody of the captors,

drove off the cattle and live stock

from his farm.

Gaine.

Zephaniah Piatt was imprisoned in N. Y., and restored

to liberty

through the personal application of his daughter Dorothea to Sir Henry Clinton

;

but having caught the small-pox while confined, he died, Jan.

27, '78.

Thompson,

638. Gen. Parsons and Col.

L.

I.

to destroy timber

Webb

2. 473.

formed a plan of descent on

and boards on the E. end, prepared

racks in N. Y., to destroy the shipping lying there for

for bar-

wood

for

Newport, to attack a Reg. stationed 8 miles E. of Jamaica, and re-

move or destroy whatever public stores could be found. Col. Meigs was to land at Hempstead harbor and attack the Reg. [at Herricks ?] near Jamaica

;

Webb

Col.

to

land near Huntington, to

sustain

Meigs and afford aid to the eastern division under Parsons. Meigs was to cross from Sawpits, but the weather prevented. The other 2 divisions sailed fell in

from Norwalk, Dec.

9,

'77, at

night.

Col.

Webb

with the Falcon, grounded and could not land, as the surf ran

With Webb, 4

too high.

were taken

Officers,

20 Continentals and 40

N. London, Dec.

19.

Militia

Sparks, V. 211.

prisoners.

A

plan having been formed to bring off or

enemy had at Setauket, some shipping loaded with timber at Southold, on Tuesday night of last week, part of 2 Battalions of troops embarked

destroy a magazine of military stores which the

on L.

I.,

and

to destroy


SUFFOLK COUNTS. from

this State,

69

under convoy of the sloop Schuyler, and Spy and Mifflin

Unfortunately next morning, just before

schooners.

light, the

a British Frigate, in her passage from N. Y. to Newport,

and 2 smaller

the Schuyler

when

vessels,

Falkland,

came

across

the latter run ashore on the

Island, but the former in attempting to get in with the land, run on a spit of

sand (called Old Man's) and was taken with about 60 troops on

among them Cols. Ely, and Sam'l B. Webb, &c. On Thursday, men under Capt. Hart, marched to Southold and were very Hear making prisoners of Capt. Ayscough and upwards of 20 men belonging to the. ship Swan, who were in a house in Southold, but they board,

a party of

getting intelligence of Capt. Hart's approach hasted

They were

to

their

boats.

and as they were getting on board, were fired upon, when most of them were killed or wounded 7 marines and Beamen were made prisoners. Our troops after tarrying several days on closely pursued,

:

L.

I.,

returned to the Main, without opportunity to effect any thing con-

siderable

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

shipping having

zine at Setauket

Riv.

Dec

left

Southold, and

has been removed.

13, '77. Last

we

Dec. 24, '77.

Wed. morning

learn the

maga-

Con. Gaz.

a party of rebels landed at

Setauket and proceeded to plunder the well-affected inhabitants, and in the afternoon a reinforcement of troops

Dec. 20, we

Co.

folk

which were

lately driven ashore

get away, as,

is

it

sent to Col. Hewlett in Suf-

Suffolk Co., had not been able to

in

said, through

His Majesty's Ships,

was

informed that the party of 200 rebels

are

the

Commanders

vigilance of the

of

the boats have been secured,

and the invaders betaken themselves to the woods. Major Greene marched on Thursday with a reinforcement of 100 men and 200 of the Hempstead militia all

;

are likewise gone

down

under Col. Hewlett

at

augment

the

advance body of horse and foot

Huntington.

Dec. 15, '77, Gaine. their

to

Three

appearance off Setauket

rebel sloops

last

Wed.

(one a Privateer) made

The

Privateer

ven ashore and taken by one of His Majesty's Ships miles east

and the crew with

)

all

at

was soon

dri-

Old Man's

(

7

made prisoners among them Cols.

the rebels on board

of war, consisting of 64 privates and some officers,

Webb and

Ely. The same day the other two Sloops run into Stony Brook (4 miles west of Setauket) and being unacquainted got on a bank. They then landed two hundred men, who immediately marched to

Setauket and returned the same evening to get off their sloop, but

their

utmost

went down

efforts

were

the Island,

miles from where they

4*

ineffectual.

The next day

the whole

body

and about 12 o'clock passed Wading River first

landed).

(

18


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

70

Hamil-

Col. Hewlett with a party of Gen. Delancey's Brigade, Col.

Newtown, and Capt. Hewlett with

ton with a troop of horse from

troop of horse from Hempstead, are gone in pursuit of the rebels, and

hoped

will give a

his it is

good account of them.

Ensign Benj. Titus

639. Jan. 4, '77.

Lieutenancy by Capt'sDan'l

Griffin,

is

recommended

for a

2d

John Davis, Dan'l Roe, and Lts.

Benj Marvin and Silvanns Conklin. All refugees from Suffolk. Jan. 10, '77. Abm. Hand, Jer. Miller and Col. Mulford's negro Jack were permitted to return to L. I., also Jos. Osborn and family. Feb. 20, Ezekiel and Dan'l Howell petition to get iheir effects from L.

Mulford Esq., resident

on L.

and took one horse and cow. John Tuthill was

I.

Mathews Nathan Fordham John Gelston Aaron Isaacs, Jr. Maltby Gelston Abm. Rose Jos. Tillinghast Sam'l L'Hommedieu Tim. Mathews John Miller Dan'l Whelden David Pierson

flax,

Jona. Howell,

wool, stock &c. from L.

I.

to

in

Conn. Mar.

'77.

Dan'l Hains

Elias

David Sayre

remove

John

I.

Stonington, returned with his wife to his estate

in

Ezekiel Howell Dan'l Howell

Zebedee Osborn Elisha Osborn Silas Norris

petition Gov. Turnbull to '11.

Conn. Feb.

now

in Haddam, E. Haddam, Lyme, Saybrook, Killingworth and Guilford, April, 10, '77, was presented to N. Y. Legislature. They want to be represented in Con-

Petition of 170 voters, refugees from

Suffolk,

vention.

Saybrook, June 12, '77. Petition of 45 Suffolk Co. refugees for relief

and permission

to pass over to L.

I.

for forage for their families

corn growing on their land which otherwise will

fall

and bread-

into the

enemy's

hands.

Nathan Benjamin and Jos.

Wm.

Halliock

Chris,

ry

;

;

Zeb. and John Cooper

Jesse Dayton

;

Oba. Jones

;

and John King Paine

;

;

Jacob, Nath'l, Benj., and

Ephraim Fordham Oba. Havens; Robert Harlow; Recompense and Elias Howell;

David Conklin

Wm.

;

Paul Reeve

;

John

Jesse

;

Dan'l and

;

John Moore

Oliver North John Lewis Stanborough and Pederick Tabor Tho's Ter-

;

and Dan'l Rackett

Jr.

Anion

Wood

;

Nath'l, Ephraim, Jeremiah, Joel, Benj.

;

L'Hommedieu

and Sam'l Tuthill

Tho's Vail

;

;

Jr.

Jas.

;

;

;

;

;

and Craveit Wells

;

John, Jos. and

Richard Youngs. 640. July 3, '77. Oba. Jones, John Hurlbut and Tho's Dering

gave permits

to

refugees going to L.

I.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 641. Jan.

3, '78.

71

Selah Strong, was incarcerated with others in

N. Y., where he was detained some time, and suffered severely for

want of

provisions,

Cunningham not even allowing him

of the food sent to him by his wife from his

own

to partake

Thompson,

house.

1.419. Jan. 3, '78. Riv. Last Monday, Selah Strong

was committed

to the

care of the Provost, on a charge of treasonable correspondence with the

enemy. 642.

New

London, Jan.

commanded by

&c,

2, '78.

Col. Hewlett

130 tories from west end of L.

came down

to Southold,

I.,

Oyster Pond,

and robbed the honest inhabitants to a large amount in clothing,

money,

grain, cattle,

From one man

&c.

Game. About two

they took

ÂŁ120

in cash.

Thursday morning, a party of 12 rebels seized at Coram, 2 wagons loaded with dry goods, the property of Oba. Wright of South Hampton. These marauders had been several days on the Island, visited most parts of the County and committed many robberies, especially at the 643.

Feb. 16, '78,

o'clock last

house of Col. Floyd, which they robbed of goods and cash, to a considerable amount,

who

rides

down

and took thence some property of Mr. Dunbar,

the Island occasionally and happened to lodge in the

house that night. 644. Riv. Feb. 26, '78. Last Friday evening a small party of re-

came from

bels,

into

the

Main

to Mattituck, rapaciously seized

and carried

Conn, a quantity of goods, landed from one of the vessels

dri-

Next day a gang of ruffians ( John Clive Symes, Peter Griffen, Wilmot Goldsmith, and Tuthill, late residents of Southold,) brought wagons from the east end of the Island, stripped the schooner Clio, Capt. Simmons, of her sails, rigging, &c, which they carried off, and have no doubt sent across ven ashore

in the late storm.

the Sound.

645. Fishkill, Mar. teers,

5, '78.

On Wed.

night a party of 30 volun-

from Col. Meigs' Reg., in 4 whaleboats under command of

Major Humphrey's, Lts. Lay and Burret, made a descent on L.

I.,

in

the neighborhood of Smithtown, for the purpose of destroying several

of the enemy's shipping, particularly a large ship of 20 guns,

aground near that place.

The

preceding day, but they set

fire to

ship

was unfortunately got

and destroyed a

burthen, a large schooner and an armed sloop,

all

off the

200 tons employed in the brig, of


4RMED OCCUPATION OF

72

They brought off 2 Capt's, and several seamen, many sails, rigging, and furniture, as the boats could

enemy's service. together with as contain

effected without loss,

all

:

The

Main, next morning.

and the party returned to the

enterprise

was well planned and con-

ducted, and such a one as in Gaine and Rivington's papers, would have filled a column with " immenses " and " infinites, " and ex-

hausted Johnson's Dictionary, of terprise, conduct,

646. N. London, Mar.

taking in wood, came to

Gaine, Mar.

647.

9,

Wm.

some weeks

sail

of the ene-

in Gardiner's

Bay,

and stood eastward.

'78.

came over from

bed the farm of

Last Sabbath 21

lain for

sail,

those terms which express en-

Con. Gaz. Mar. 11. '78.

8, '78.

my's shipping, which have

ijhelter Island,

all

and resolution.

Moses Sawyer, who formerly

lived at

the Main, a few days since, and rob^

Nicoll, Esq., of said Island, of

110 bushels

of wheat, and carried off grain, belonging to Tho's Dering, of Suffolk Co.

who had

648. Phineas Fairbank,

escaped from Worcester

was taken by P. Griffing, on L. I. On him was found a Tryon for the farm, with buildings and utensils thereon,

now in rebellion, and To whom it may concern

Glover,

:

en, to take (

now is

of Grover

:

Permit Phineas Fairbank and Jer. Bow-

possession of the house and premises

in rebellion) at Southold,

and advantage

their present use

or

the Governor's reply

Jail,

petition to

of Joshua Wells,

on condition they occupy the same, provided

;

for

does not interfere with,

it

not wanted for the King's service.

Given under

my hand

and

seal at arms,

N. Y., March 31,

'78.

WM. TRYON, By

his Excellency's

command.

B.

J.

JOHNSON,

Gov.

Pro. Sec.

was taken from Stonybrook Harbor by 2 whale manned with 13 Continental troops, a sloop and schooner,

649. Ap, 11, boats,

loaded chiefly with wood.

with 4 swivels prisoners.

650.

Widow

;

N. Haven, Ap.

ÂŁ40

The schooner

the sloop of 40

:

is

of 60 tons, and armed

both arrived in safe ports with 4

21, '78.

Currency Reward.

Stolen from

Mark Langdon,

at

Blydenburgh's, at the Branch, Smithtown. Ap. 22, '78, se-

veral pieces of Taffetas, Calicoes, 6 pieces of ble dry goods, together with

ÂŁ200

in gold

Linen and other valua-

and

silver.

Pedlers are


SUFFOLK COUNTY. Warned

Were

to

73

take notice of this advertisement.

at Setauket.-

Riv.,

May

Other small parties

13.

ÂŁ40 Reward. Taken away by the Rebels from Mark Langdon, May 12 and 20th, at Smithtown, a large quantity of DRY GOODS and CASH, to the amount of ÂŁ1000.

on

May

651. Riv.,

The

16, '78.

many

by signals from

rebels have constant information

between Hunting-

disloyal Islanders residing

ton and Setauket of every vessel passing up the Soundj as well as of the situation of persons and things in several parts of L. I.

;

and they also convey

all

information their emissaries daily

tjie

procure of the several occurrences in N. Y. City.

May

652. Riv.,

On

20, '78.

Monday

the evening of

se'nnight

a party of rebels landed at a harbor in Huntington, and attacked the

house of Shubael Smith, situated near the w.ster

Mr. Stone, a gentleman belonging

They

veral other persons.

to Col.

side,

and carried off

Ludlow's Reg't, and se-

afterwards passed the houses of Jos.

Lewis and Nath'l Williams, without molesting them, and proceeded to that of

Wm.

Hindford, a refugee, used his house and store in the

same manner they had done Mr. Smith's, and then returned

to

Con't with the prisoners and booty.* * Shubael Smith of Huntington, joined the

Norwalk was

enemy

;

his ferry boat at

seized by the Americans, Jan. 16, '77.

May

Cor. 502.

Sunday night, 10th inst, 2 whale boats, came to Blue Point, and took thence 5 boats lying there with oysters, owned by Tho's Myng, Amos Underhill, John Rapalje, Sam'l Toby, and Mr. Cameron. This party was commanded by one Dayton from Corum, and were all well armed. They 653. Riv.,

7

men

in

20, '78.

each,

brought their boats from the N. side of the Island and sent their prizes to

N. London.

Myng ._.

They put some women and

children,

and Tho's

ashore.

The head

of the Banditti

who

captured 5 vessels loaded with lum-

ber and produce for the market of N. Y., was Ebenezer Dayton, a

noted pedler,

Wm.

who

lately lived

at

in

command was

who had taken

the benefit of

Corum.

Clark, formerly a rebel Lt,

Next

Howe's Proclamation and after taking the oaths to Government, he kept a shop near B. Haven, where, by making private lotteries, &c, he converted his effects into cash, and about 4 or 5 weeks ago eloped ;


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

74 to

Conn.

distinct

This party (14

in

number) are a species of plunderers

from the rebel troops.

654. Eben'r Punderson, a noted Tory, who made his escape some time ago from Groton, Was employed and sent by the commis-

sary at N. Y. to exact of the inhabitants at E. grain which

was

it

by advertisements

possible for

them

to spare,

End

the

at different places in each town and what grain they had but his conhim, and fearing he should be met by people from

N. England, he ran

;

meeting the inhabitants according to

off without

N. London,

appointment.

I. all

meet him

to

parish, to give an account of

science so terrified

of L.

and had ordered them

May

22, '78.

E. Punderson, at Newport, Oct. 14, '78, wants his family to come in the King's lines on L.

May

655.

appearance

25, '78.

Blue

in

sorting thither

;

I.,

and he was

Pt. Bay, and intend to prevent

their

any boats

re-

they lay on the beach and get necessaries from the

inhabitants in that neighborhood.

656. Gaine,

E. Hampton, Sept. 21, '83.

at

4 more whale-boats have again made

Ju. 15, '78.

May

25, Gaine.

Friday 5th

inst.,

Eben. Dayton, with 6

by stratagem, took Mr. M'Intire's sloop whilst they lay

others,

near Blue Pt., and stripped a sloop of Lindley Murray.

Next day

another party composed of Rogers, Halsey, Sayer, and White, collected at S.

Hampton with

ing sent to N. Y.

;

a no. of others, to prevent provisions be-

and that night a party from the Main

boat seized a sloop at the entrance of

in a whale-

Brook Haven harbor, with a

quantity of goods from N. Y. for the use of the inhabitants of that

neighborhood

;

Philip Roe, at

and the same night they plundered the house of

Drowned Meadows,

3 miles east, of a considerable

quantity of goods and cash.

Last Sat. night a party of 14 armed tered the house of

W.

men

Nicoll, Esq., Islip,

landed on

I. I.,

and en-

and robbed him of a

sum

of money, plate, some arms, a quantity of clothing, and other properties to

a very considerable amount.

acquainted in the family, as they

they wanted. 657.

New

command L.

I.,

June Lon.,

of Cap.

They appeared to be very well knew where to find every thing

22, Gaine.

May

15.

Sunday night

last,

2 boats under the

Dayton and Chester, with 14 men

and carrying one of the boats across a narrow

in both,

went to

part of the island


SUFFOLK COUNTY. at S.

75

Hampton, they went about 60 miles up the

to Fire

which

I.

and took possession of 5

Inlet,

provisions,

the prisoners

The

&c.

More might have been brought

Among

S. side of the island

of coasting vessels

laden with lumber, oysters, household furniture,

lay there,

some dry goods,

sail

prizes are all safe arrived.

could they have

off,

manned them.

Gaine, June

a British Sergeant.

is

1, '78.

Dayton and others, were filed before R. Law, Judge of the Maritime Court, N. London county, against the following vessels, taken between high and low water mark, viz. Peggy, Cha's Cameron, Commander Polly, Geo. Hallock George, Sam'l Tobey Libels in favor of

;

Dalancey, Tho's Ming JV.

London,

May

;

;

Tuesday night 8 whale-boats arrived

22, '78.

here taken by Dayton, S. side of L.

658.

;

Jacob, Ja's Smith.

N. London, June 12,

I.

Capt. E. Dayton, in an armed

'78.

boat, carried 3 prizes (coasters) into

N. Haven, which he took near

Fire Island Inlet.

Last Thursday night a party of rebels assembled at the house of

one Weser, 8 miles E. of Huntington, where one Robertson, a pedler, had lodged,

money

whom

they robbed of

of Mr. Weser.

659. June 15, '78.

June

Jona Vail,

Allen, at Soulhold, a horse.

660. June 27, '78.

in

his goods,

and took a sum of

Gaine. the Revenge, took from one

Peter Griffing took 6 oxen from Tho's

Seaman and Mat. Smith, July

of

all

15, '78,

24.

Tho's Fanning, of South Hampton, brother

Edmund Fanning, was

carried off

last

week by

a

party

of

rebels from Conn.

June 20, '78. J. Youngs, of Stirling, writes to Nath'l Shaw in beFanning says he got Youngs out of prison in N. Y. T. F., and Q. M., was exchanged for Jos. Chew, Esq.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

half of Lt.

N. Haven, Aug.

661.

'78.

5,

Last Friday about

1000 new

Levies arrived at Huntington, from N. Y., said to be a foraging party.

N. London, Aug. at the E.

end of L.

14, '78.

We

hear 1000 troops from N. Y. were

a few days ago, collecting provisions for the British

I.

army. 662. Fairfield, Island,

and

is

Aug.

now

at

7, '78.

Gov. Tryon has marched down the

Setauket with 1200 men.

He

orders the


ARMED OCCUPATION Of

76

The

farmers to thresh out the grain immediately. is

stock on L.

I.ÂŤ it

expected, will be taken for the Kings's use.

N. London, Aug.

J

21, 78.

A sergeant

and 5 privates, deserters from

Tryon's plundering party, arrived here from L.

were

on their return, on Tuesday

to set out

Aug.

663.

who had

29. '78, Riv.

On Tuesday

They say

the

troops

se'night, a party of

Rebels

I.

last.

crossed over from Con't, having concealed themselves in a

wood below Huntington,

fired

upon

3 light dragoons, returning from

E. end of the Island, and killed one of them on the spot

A

two, with the horses, got off unhurt.

parly

;

the other

was immediately

patched from Huntington in quest of these assassins

;

Two

caped over to their brethren, on the other side of the Sound. days after

this,

dis-

but they es-

a Lt. and a few of the hands belonging to the Pri-

vateer lately wrecked on E. end of L.

were apprehended and pro-

1.,

perly secured.

664. Sep. 5, '78.

L.

I.,

I arrived last

marched

all

fat cattle for

the army.

had

the

to

in obtaining

about

the oath I administered to

or

remove with

their families

Not one of the whole chose the latter rebels said my proposal was generous, which

Conn.

hottest

me

convinces

is

on the north side of the Island, giving them the

the inhabitants

and furniture

Commissary

Inclosed

alternative, either to take the oath,

even

I

to secure the peaceable behavior of the disaffected inhabit-

ants in that quarter, and assist the

1000

evening from the East end of

with a detachment of near 1000 Provincials, where

that the acrimony of opposition

is

much

the late concessions of Government.

softened by

Tryon.

665. Last Sat. sundry inhabitants of Huntington were brought to

our

jail for

on L.

I.

piloting the rebels in their different excursions

from Con't

Gaine, Sep. 14, '78.

666. Oct 8, '78.

I

have, in a 2d excursion, brought

habitants on the E. end of L.

I.,

as far as

Montank

all

the in-

Point, under an

oath of peaceable behavior to his Majesty's Government, and with

good humor.

Tryon.

[Major Isaac Reeve was informed against by Maj. Parker Wickham.

When the light horse, led by Tories, first came to his house, he escaped. Soon after he was taken and pinioned at his own house, and carried before Tryon at Mattituck, 2 miles distant, and threatened to be hung on


77

SUFFOLK COUNTY. a big tree there. his father

He

refused at

first to

give up, but at the solicitation of

James, he took the oath, but spurned the Bible from his

lips.

Major Reeve was afterwards appointed Commissary, a post that gave him an opportunity of favoring many poor Whigs.

John Benjamin said to Mr. Reeve, " Are you going to take the V " Yes." " I wont." " You must." " No, I wont." When

oath

"

Benjamin's turn came, he was asked his occupation. " I mean, what is your business " rian. "

V

"

What

do you bring

away."

this fool

here for 1"

A

A

Presbyte-

Presbyterian."

Tryon, " Take him

said

Ed.]

N. London, Sep.

667.

Major Eben'r Gray, with a party

18, '78.

of Col. Meigs' Reg., went to Huntington on L.

and brought off

I.,

16 prisoners, disaffected, (who had gone over to the enemy from this state)

3 others

;

w ere T

and 2 made

killed,

their escape.

Last Tues. se'nnight, a number of armed rebels in

Sep. 19, '78, Eiv.

20 whale-boats came over from Norwalk and landed

Widow

Huntington, and attacked the house of the

at

Oak Neck

in

Chichester, in which

25 refugees were quartered, who made some resistance, but were soon overpowered. r

16

made

668. Oct. 10, '78.

wants

to

Lyon, were

2 of them, Capt. Coffin and

w ounded,

badly

prisoners

the rest

;

made

killed,

one

their escape.

Buel writes to Gov. Trumbull that Tryon

exchange rum, sugar, molasses,

tea,

and whatever

may

please the ladies, for beef.

669. N. London, Newport from L. I.

30

Oct. 16, '78.

670. Last Tuesday afternoon 3

Sail of

men

woodmen

arrived at

in a small schooner, with

4

was attacked by 2 whale-boats with about 10 Fire Place. The boats went up with full resolution

swivels and a cohorn,

men

in

each

at

to board the schooner,

and when within about 20 yards, they received off, when most who were spec-

such a dose from the cohorn, as obliged them to sheer of their oars were seen to drop by the people on shore tators of the action,

boats, after

which was well fought on both

having 9 of their

men

obliged to return to the shore.

671. David 6, '78, in

killed

Gaine, Nov.

Landon took dry goods on L.

possession of David Howell,

sides

;

but the

and several wounded, were

now

2, '78.

I.,

near Southold, Nov.

of Killingworth.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

78

From 672. " fested

it,

a Privateer off Smithtown, Nov. 28,

We have

cleared the

Bay

'78.

of the piratical crew that in-

and look upon the greater part of the inhabitants to be dis-

affected to Gov't,

and believe they give every intelligence, as well as Riv. Dec.

subsistence to the rebel party."

673. 14 days since a prize Brig

2.

came ashore

opposite St. George's

Friday following a privateer sloop and

Manor, loaded with tobacco.

4 whale-boats from N. London appeared in the Bay, and were seen to ply

between the prize and privateer, and 'tis supposed, carried off Next day the boats made an attack on a schooner

part of the cargo.

and a sloop that had arrived from N. York, but were repulsed by both

;

when Mr. Dayton, who, 'tis said, commanded the boats, carwounded men ashore to the house of Capt. Josiah Smith, of

ried his

Moriches, and the privateer sloop driving ashore, was taken by the people belonging to the 2 small vessels from N. Y.

Gaine, Nov.

30, '78.

674. Dec. 2, '78. Riv.

Last Friday night, a few minutes after

Col. Benj. Floyd, of Setauket, had

gone

to bed,

George, son of Job

Smith, of Smithtown, and Isaac, son of Epenetus Smith, with 12 others beset the house, and

where the Col.

slept,

waiting at the door.

George obliged a domestic

whom

he surprised and led

They then

to

show him

to the thieves

triumphantly hurried him over to

Norwalk. 675. Capt. Eben. Dayton, in the sloop

Ranger of 45 men, 6

car-

riage guns, and 12 swivels, blunderbusses, muskets, hand grenadoes (to

throw on the deck of the vessel attacked as they run her aboard

with whale-boats), was taken in South Bay, [Nov. 20, "78] by Capt. Stout of a N. Y. Privateer, and brought to N. Y.

Dec.

Wed.

last.

Riv.

5, '78.

676.

The

Bay, Dec.

Wm.

Seaman, was taken near Oyster

with cargo of wood, plank,

flour,

&c.

Petitions of Suffolk Co. Refugees, in Conn.

677. '78.

Betsey, Capt.

5, '78,

Jona. Havens, Dan'l and

Nathan Fordham, Benj. Conklin,

Paul and Step. Howell, Francis Furnier and Son, and Thos. Currier refugees from L. Oct. '78.

I

,

brought over their

David Parsons,

effects, [to

in service of

U.

Lyme S.,

?]

1776, transported


SUFFOLK COUNTY. from S. Hampton

his family off,

Haddam,

to E.

but can exchange for salt or steel

Capt. Jer. Rogers, of L. L,

—has wheat he

cannot ge«

— has liberty to go.

now (May

is

79

6, '78,) at Killingworth, in

whale-boat business.

L.

Jas. Sayre, of

I.,

now

at

Saybrook, wants to engage in the

Hampton, Silvanus Howell, and want

Capt. David Howell, of S.

Youngs, who over to L.

fled

from L.

I.

to Killingworth, in the fall of '76,

They were plundered

I.

and pray Gov. Trumbull

fing,

Orange Webb,

dam

;

illicit

Oct. 12, '78.

trade.

of produce on L.

Nov. 11,

for relief.

late of L. I., at

N. London

John Hudson, of Sag Harbor,

go

by Capt. Grif-

'78,

John

;

I.

Jos. to

Miller, at E.

at Stonington

;

Had-

Thos. Dering, of

Oba. S. Hampton are on the Main Benj. Paine, of Southold B. Y. Sag Harbor Prime, at N. Haven Oba. Haven, of Shelter I. at Saybrook Ezekiel Sandford, at E. Haddam Thos. Lester, killed by a wad at N. London Mary King, at Middletown Mr. Burnet Miller, at Stonington Josiah Smith, at N. London. Nov. 1, '76, to Oct. 1, '78. Shelter

I.

and Rich. Howell, of

;

Guildersleeve, of

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Ap. 22,

Thos. Dering, Middletown, wants to go to L.

'79.

I.

for

effects.

Aug. 24, L.

I.

'79.

Rev. Henry

Van Dyck,

at

Norwalk, wants

to

go to

[H. V. D., taken prisoner by Capt. Fitch, before

with his family.

Oct. '82.]

Henry Booth, of L.

Sep. '79. Gaitis Gardiner and

Nov. '79. Hugh and Wm.Gelston, petition

Nov.

2, '79. Jona.

to

I.,

at

Norwich.

winter their horses on L.I.

Osborn, of Southold, seized and brought over by

Peter Griffin, June 14, as a person unfriendly to U. S., wishes his apparel

and

May

liberty

— negatived.

24, '79. Jas. Curren, of Southold, to Guilford, asks relief from

taxation.

John Hubbard, from Southold, makes a deposition respecting Dan'l

No

Dibble, a refugee.

date.

Gershom Culver and Thos. Tapping, have permits, Nov. 16, '79, to bring off from L. I. some flour and grain, the produce of their land. Dec. 3, '79.

Hugh

Gelston allowed

to

go

to L.

I.

for

300 bushels of salt,

without carrying goods, produce or money.

Hartford, June 10, for proceeds of his

and

flax

Wm.

;

'79. Jesse

house and

Hannah White

lot

;

Wood

Aaron

for clothing

;

petitions to go to S.

Wm.

Philips

Floyd's and Ezra L'Hommedieu's effects

the effects of his father.

Hampton

Hampton, for horse for his own, and Col.

Isaacs to E.

;

John Pelletreau

for


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

80

678. Riv. Jan. 20, '79. Last Sat. se'nnight, 3 whale-boats with

detachments from Meigs and Willis's Continental Reg., under com-

mand

of a Capt. and Lt.,

to secrete

came from Greenwich,

Cont., with intention

themselves in Huntington Bay, until an opportunity offered

on their passage to this city but a violent gale them to make for the nearest part of L. I., in attaining which one of their number containing 7 privates and a Capt. was lost, and the crew perished. The other 2 as soon as they struck the ground, hauled up their boats and covered them with branches. After lying 26 hours concealed, they were discovered by a soldier of Gen. to interrupt vessels

;

arising, obliged

Delancey's Regt.,

who immediately got assistance and secured them at off. They were brought

the very instant they were ready to push to

town on Thursday

last.

1

Feb.

679.

tons, navigated

1, '79.

Capt. Elderkin took the sloop

Mary Ann, 28

by Stent Raymond, in Huntington Harbor, below

high- water mark.

N. London, Feb.

680.

5, '79.

Last Sat., the Ranger, a British

Privateer Brig of 12 guns that had been cruising in the Sound,

was

taken from a wharf at Sag Harbor, after a short resistance, by the

Brig Middleton, Capt. Sage, sloop

Beaver, Capt. Havens, sloop

Eagle, Capt. Conklin.

On Sunday

these 3 again sailed for

discovered 7 British vessels just arrived

Sag Harbor, where they

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one a brig of 8 or 10 guns,

when

a fair prospect appeared of making capture of the whole but wind ahead, the Middleton struck on the Middle Ground, in beating up the harbor, ^ of a mile from the shore, where she was bravely de;

fended for 4 or 5 hours by her crew against an incessant the brig and several field-pieces on shore shots, several

:

fire

after being hulled

under water, and the vessel careening by the

from

by 30

tide's fall-

guns could not be worked, all except 4 left the ship and were taken on board the other 2 vessels. These on their return, took 2 brigs from Cork, via. N. Y. with rum, wine, and 12,000 bushels of oats for the troops on the East end ing, the

of

Long

Island.

Hog Neck, Sir

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; At daybreak

11 o'clock at night, Feb.

the Brig Middleton

guns each, were seen standing in

for

1, '79.

and 2 Sloops of 14 and 10

Sag Harbor.

Betwixt 8 and 9

they came within cannon shot of the King's armed vessel, which fired


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

81

3 shots ahead of them, neither of which being answered, the Neptune fired at

them, which was returned on their side, hoisting rebel colors,

and

standing on until they came within reach of the guns on shore,

still

which having thrown a few 12 pound shot the

changed

for

some time,

till

at

Hog Neck

Harbor, towards the end of

them, they stood out from long shot was then ex-

:

Brig having the appearance of

the rebel

being aground, or having met with some accident, a 12 pounder was

moved down

to the

end of Long Wharf, which being nearly on a

level

with the water, had the effect of deterring the sloops from giving her

much

assistance

:

while

I

crossed over to

Hog Neck

of the British Legion, and the 3 pounder attached to

with the infantry

from whence

it,

we

bore with such advantage on her, that she struck to us, but unfortunate-

whale boats on board,

ly having 5

sloops immediately

left

all

the

We

the Bay.

crew got

and the

off except 3,

met with but one

accident, a

corporal being wounded.

CHAS. COCHRAN, Maj. B. Legion, Commanding Troops

To

W.

Sir

[Maj. Cochran was killed at Yorktown.

Caution

681.

A

at S.

H.

Erskine.

to

Ed.

Travellers on

L.

I.

party of Rebels have a place of resort at Bread and Cheese

Hollow, on a bye road that leads from the houses of 2 bellion, viz.

:

men now in

re-

Nath'l Piatt and Thos. Treadwell, to that of the noted

Sam'l Philips, near the Branch. said Philips' to the

They extend along

the road from

well-known Piatt CarlPs, and have stopped several

persons on horseback and in wagons, and robbed a number of houses

Smithtown, and Islip, within the last 10 days. They are said to be commanded by a rebel Maj. Brush, formerly of Huntington. Two of these thieves are known to be Nich. Tillotson and Steph. Woodhull, in

(the former) son of Dan'l Tillotson of the Branch, ow^ner of the barn

formerly mentioned in this paper, which the Rebels look-out to waylay passengers.

The

make use

of as a

unfortunate Loyalists in this

part of the country are greatly exposed to the savage cruelty of these

They

assassins.

are

few

in

number, and unable

selves from the frequent incursions of the parties

Cont.,

8

and*

intelligence

who by

are

to defend

who

them-

land from

harbored and supplied with provisions and

their confederates

above mentioned. Riv. Mar. 10, '79.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

82

14 companies light infantry (700)

682. Feb. 16, '79.

at

South-

25

sails in

ampton. Gen. Clinton at Southampton with about 2500 troops

and near Sag Harbor

12 or 14 driven on Gardener's

:

;

I.

by a

N. London, Mar. 25,

The enemy

N. London, Mar. 5/79. flat

boats for the invasion of this State.

arrived there from N.

and went, it Mar. 31,

Ap.

We

marched from N. Y.

1.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;31

end of L.

I.

are building

A reinforcement of 1500

sail

lately

came down Sound from N. Y.

Sag Harbor.

into

is said,

'79.

Y.

at E.

gale.

'79.

hear Gen. Clinton, with 3 or 400 troops, lately

end of L.

to the E.

been there several weeks, said

to

I.,

amount

and joined those who had whole to 3 or 4000.

in the

Ap. 7, '79. 10 days since, Gen. Clinton in haste returned to N. Y. accompanied by a small guard, for fear the French would attack New York. British troops on L. I., 'tis said, are commanded by General

New Haven

Vaughan.

paper.

by permission, was carrying a white bag of peaches from the orchard of Mrs. Hunting, at E. Hampton, when Nath'l D., supposing he had a goose under his arm, fired and killed him. Domini at first

[A

soldier,

determined

to stand

a

trial,

(conscious of his innocence,) but by advice

Ed.]

of his friends, fled.

N. London, Ap.

5 French prisoners escaped here from L.

15, '79.

who say there are only 500 foot and 50 horse at Southold, and 100 men at Sag Harbor with 2 field-pieces, which force is kept there to faciI.,

litate the

wood

taking off

vessels,

wood and hay from Sag Harbor.

and a 12 gun brig

from N. Port.

there,

kill

poor milch cows

Gen. Clinton was returning

breastworks,

A fleet of

1

6 sail of

and a ship with provisions lately

Before her arrival provisions were so scarce, that the in-

habitants were obliged to sickly.

lie

&c,

for food,

and the troops

after

throwing up some

in consequence of a report that

Gen. Parsons was

to

N. Y.,

preparing for an attack on Sag Harbor with 4000 troops.

Mr. Buel was on friendly and intimate terms with Gov. Tryon his lively disposition, ready wit, and fondness for the chase, was a favorite with Sir Wm. Erskine, and often had it in his power to ;

and from

soften the severity of war.

Sir William, one

Saturday, said to Mr.

Buel, " I have ordered the people of your parish to appear with their teams at Southampton to-morrow." Mr. B. replied, " I know it, but as

I

am

der."

commander-in-chief on the Sabbath, Sir

William did not

I

have annulled the or-

insist.

Mr. Buel frequently joined the parties of the British

officers,

which


83

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

Once had

he enlivened by humorous anecdotes and agreeable conversation.

when he was behind

the appointed hour for a deer-hunt, Sir

mount

to receive him.

was introduced

the floor,

now mounted, when men to dis-

Tired of waiting, they had

detained the party.

seeing his friend Buel approaching, Sir

Wm.

ordered his

Lord Percy, an aid, while impatiently pacing to Mr. Buel, who thereupon asked him what

command

portion of His Majesty's forces he had the honor to

bow, "

I

by Sir

suppose

have the honor of addressing Beelzebub, the prince

I

His lordship put his hand on his sword.

!"

Wm., and

restored to good

"A

?

" Then," said Mr. Buel with a low

legion of devils just from hell."

of devils

Wm.

the laugh turned

humor by

the

on Percy, who,

This was rebuked after a while,

was

attention of the parson.

Prime,

16 sail came out of Gardiner's

Bay and

marked

179.

May

N. London, stood for N. Y.

683.

£40

May

11, '79.

— supposed

for

N. York.

Widow Case

ter Griffing recovered

684. Gaine, Islip,

woodmen

David Gardiner of Southold, was robbed of and her son of goods and clothes. Pe-

11, '79.

cash, and

to be

May

was robbed

and restored them. 31, '79.

The house

of

Wm.

of sundry sorts of goods to the

Nicoll, Esq., of

amount of many

hundreds, by a party from Conn, a fortnight ago,

May

18,

under

Eben'r Drake and Capt. Peter Foster. 685. Riv. Ju. parture of Sir this place, ter,

by a

we

W.

9, '79.

Suffolk Co.,

May 31.—"Since

the de-

Erskine and the troops under his command from

have been continually plundered both by land and wa-

set of (worse than savage) rebels.

They are become so bold The great quantity

as to attack us at noonday as well as at midnight.

of goods carried from N. Y. to this county, I think,

is

the cause of

what we call your town (N. Y.), who are concerned with a number of

inviting the rebels over.

There

is

a set (of

traders) in disaffected

persons in carting goods to the different parts of this county."

A

Loyal Subject. 686. Gaine, Ju. 14, '79.

On Sunday

evening, June

of rebels and plunderers entered the house of

and stripped

it

of

all

W.

6,

Nicholl,

a party

jr., Islip,

the furniture and clothing that were valuable

;

which they proceeded to the house of Ob. and John Greene, and robbed them of about £140 value. These villains are commis-

after


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

84

sioned by Gov. Trumbull to take every thing below highwater mark.

There being no vessels

South Bay

at present in

them

for

to take,

rather than return without booty, they have robbed old Mr. Nicholl's

family several times to a considerable amount.

Every 6th man drafted on L. I. from 16 Sandy Hook.

687. June 16, '79.

to

60, in consequence of our fleet [French] off

688. Riv. July

" Suffolk Co., Ju. 21.

3, '79.

The most

ous Rebels boast they can have goods from N. Y. as usual.

notori-

Several of

our inhabitants entertain and join with the plundering parties.

week a

party of Rebels had a feast at the house of Benj.

Moriches, (a most pernicious attended at this

caitiff.)

Wm.

frolic.

Last

Havens

at

and several of the inhabitants

Philips,

Benajah Strong, (who was

privy to the murder of Maurice Seaman, at Islip,) and Caleb Brewster,

gave

this entertainment.

The

689. Huntington.

friends of

Government here have been

greatly distressed ever since the King's troops left the E. end of L. I.

in

;

the rebellious part of the inhabitants in this town,

awe while

more

were stationed E. of

the troops

who were kept now become

us, are

insolent than ever, and publicly threaten to have

ists carried

off to Con't.

The

principal

all

the loyal-

of these miscreants are

Nath'l Williams, Stephen Kelsey, Eliphalet Chichester, John Brush,

Jonas Rogers, Marlboro Burtis, and Israel

smuggled goods out of N. Y.

Wood

;

several of

whom

to this place for the sole purpose of

supplying the rebels in Con't.

These scoundrels

live in perfect safety,

when

scarcely a night

passes but some of their loyal neighbors are plundered by the sons

and other relations of those rebels troops landed on the Island.

these traitors,

your

city to

if

I

who

fled to

Con't

when

the King's

hope you will keep a good look-out for

they should have the assurance to return again to

buy goods

any troops quartered

;

and

if

we

should be so happy as to have

in this part of the

these perjured villains will be

made

rebellion against the best of kings.

county again,

to rue the

I

hope

in

God

day they entered into

Gaine, Ju. 28, 1779.

The British put powder in the cellar and 690. July 21, '79. blew up the house lately improved by John Brown, on Fisher's I., fired the out-houses, hay, &c.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 691. Spies on L.

June 27,

I.

madge 10 guineas

for

and

Sparks,

satisfactory.

July

will replace the guineas.

—Sparks,

vi.

Washington sends

'79.

to Col. Tall-

Culper, Jr., whose accounts are clear, intelligent, vi.

Washington

5, '79.

85

278. is

Tallmadge

sorry that

lost his letter,

T. must notify H. in the Bowery, of the

but

loss.

285.

Washington wishes

Sep. 24, '79.

spies to write their information

on margin of almanacs, reviews, pamphlets, &c, or on blank leaves at the end or write a familiar letter in tory style, and interline with a ;

stain their private intelligence.

Feb. 5, '80.

W.

sends 20 guineas and 2 vials of stain and counter-

part of stain, for Culper, Jr.

Sparks,

vi.

460.

Washington) with some Y. and Abraham Woodhull of Setauket, which lasted war. He kept, one or more boats constantly employed in Sound on this business. Thomspon, ii. 483.

Col. T. opened a secret correspondence (for

persons in N.

through the

cruising the

In

summer

went to N. Y. under sanction of a flag, those who had transmitted intelligence of the

of '83, Major T.

to grant protection

to

enemy's doings from time

who, on entering the Isaac

L.

I.

insults of their

in-

Simms, 547.

Whippo, Geo. Smith, Silvanus Dickerson, refugee Whigs from last two obtained pensions for secret service as spies. They access to the city of N. Y., bought goods. Stratford, notori-

The

had

free

ous

for illicit trade,

exported to L.

cheese, and small stock of

condemned 692.

;

men

Was

all

small articles

Some

kinds.

set at liberty.

murdered

I.

Owners

at Islip,

June

—hams, eggs,

supposed by 3

butter,

boats were captured and

sold all kinds of goods. 18, Morris

Simmons, a

who occupied the farm of one villains, who first wounded him with

gee from Duchess Co., rebel,

these spies

countrymen,

might have treated them with indignity

city,

stead of merited respect.

Thus

time during the war.

to

and private emissaries were saved from the

refu-

Strong, a a pistol in

the knee, stabbed him in several places, and then beat his brains out

with an axe. Gaine, July

[He had

As he

lived alone, he

was not found

notice to quit.

By

next day.

Ed.] Suffolk Co.,

693.

till

5, '79.

a late proclamation,

Y„ must have a pass

5

;

all

I find several

Aug.

4, '79.

persons going to and from N. persons have surreptitiously ob-

.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

86 them

tained

the loyalists of this county not daring to oppose, as

;

their lives and property lie entirely at the

mercy of the Con't

rebels.

Several persons from Queens, (notoriously disaffected,) have lately

moved

county

into this

purpose of trading with their rebel

for the

connections in the Con't towns. 694. Riv.,

Aug.

Riv.,

A

14, '79.

blacked, entered the house

Aug.

party of rebels, with their faces

Fred. Hudson, Esq., of

of

Co., on Friday night, 6th inst, and robbed

and bedding

24, '79.

him of

Suffolk

provisions, clothing

amount of £200 and upwards, scarcely leaving

to the

This

the family their wearing apparel.

is

the fourth time Mr.

H.

has been plundered since his captivity.

£5

695.

Reward.

—Taken

out of the lots of Dan'l Blatsy, one

Aug.

mile from Piatt Carll's, Huntington, a horse and mare, &c.

16,

Game.

'79.

To

696.

Hammond,

Sir A.

or Tx¥th part of the Privateer sailed from Huntington, 14th inst., on a cruise,

be sold at Auction,

-|th

14 six-pounders, completely victualled and manned, and

Aug.

close quarters.

fitted

with

Gaine.

23, '79.

owned by Tory refugees, comN. London, Aug. 25, '79.

697. 40 privateers at Huntington,

manded by one Hatch, of Mass.

698. Riv., Oct. 2, '79.— N. Lond., Sep. 22.

ing been made to Gen. Delancey, of L.

men,

to parade

lyn, to be

I.

A

requisition hav-

500

Militia, to furnish

with their blankets on Aug. 23, to march for Brook-

employed in repairing and constructing new works there ; to be from Suffolk County, who were also to

210 of which were

furnish and send to the magazine at Brooklyn, 5,000 fascines, 9 long, and stripped of leaves

;

25,000 pickets, from 3 to 4

5,000 fraisings or stockades, from 9 to 10 thick

;

5,000 railing of 6 or 7

The was

ft.

sition

is

;

long, and 6 to 8 in.

ft.

:

JY. :

ft.

long

inhabitants having refused to comply, the following letter

sent to Gen. Delancey

Sir

ft.

—You

Y. Aug. 26, '79.

will signify to the people of Suffolk Co. that if the requi-

not immediately complied with a detachment of troops will be

sent into that district, and every person

out of L.

I.,

and

their

farms will be

have suffered from real attachment

to

who

all

shall refuse shall be turned

for the support of those

who

Government.

RAWDON, Ad.

Gen.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. N. London Gaz.

Sep. 22, '79.

from L.

I.

to

Saybrook,

who

87

men came homes on account of being or-

Last Friday 35 young their

left

dered to work on the fortifications on the west end of L.

apprehend-

I.,

ing they should be ordered thence to the West Indies.

699.

made

Aug.

Aug. 14, a party of about 20 rebels Corum, and took 2 of Isaac [or Isaiah]

28, '79. Riv.

their appearance at

Thence they proceeded 6 miles westward

Smith's sons.

to the

house of Isaac Smith, and also made him and 3 more of his sons

Mr.

prisoners. his escape. at

threw one of the rebels over the stoop and made

S.

Thence they proceeded

to B.

Haven Town and stopped time. Thence they

John Baley's, where they remained some

went

to

lay.

Between

made

his escape.

Crane Neck, 3 miles west of B. Haven, where

Next morning-

The same day

Neck.

their boats

were seen near Crane

a party of militia were in motion, and their

Drowned Meadow, known Eben. Dayton was

orders were to march to

Haven.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The

well

their boats

and Crane Neck one of Mr. Smith's sons

this place

party, 2 of the sons of Israel Conklin, of

3 miles east of B. at the

head of

this

Huntington South, Stephen

Woodhull, of B. Haven, the noted Isaac Smith, of Corum, ( commonly called Petticoat Isaac, ) and one of his sons the two latter joined the rebels about 3 months ago. Mr. Petticoat Isaac has been :

remarkably industrious in harboring and supplying the Rebels with provisions and intelligence.

The above

party

made

their appearance at

and ordered Isaac Smith's family

to depart

Corum.,

at noon-day,

from that place, by Tues-

day following, otherwise their house should be destroyed by I.

S. is the only Loyalist in the

700. Capt. Elias Glover

left

whole

Conn,

district of

fire.

Corum.

after the passage of

Treason

Act, Sep. 10, '79, and was captured by Major Talmadge, at Lloyd's

Neck.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sep. 701.

'79,

Chatham, Sep. 28.

'79.

number of men from every county, visit

from the French, our

blue, a gun,

to fortify the Island.

mounted and gold touch-hole

clothes, gilt oval buttons

;

fears a

Stolen, Sep. 15, from Jos. Ketcham's,

40 miles east of N. Y., by 7 or 8 armed silver

He

illustrious ally.

702. Gaine, Oct. 11, '79. at Nesiscop,

General Clinton has demanded a

;

men

dressed in

a suit of green

a suit, light-colored silk jean, solid silver


AR3IED OCCUPATION OF

88 buttons

a suit nankeen.

;

The above made

a short

fit

for shooting.

Also, 4 ruffled shirts, 4 cravats, 4 handkerchiefs, fowling bag,

&c,

10 gallons shrub, 18 Madeira wine, also a gun of Major [John]

£ 10

AntilFs, [of Skinner s Brigade].

reward

for one,

and

£5

for

every other of the robbers.

N. B. Any of the gang who will inform, may depend on every means being used to obtain his pardon, by Richard Deane, distiller, N. Y.

On the night of Oct. 2, a party of men attempted to break into Widow Piatt, Huntington, where Jas. Houston and John Stewart kept store, but was prevented by Mr. Stewart, who 703.

the house of

threatened to

fire

on them.

The

night following they returned with

a greater force and attacked the house in like manner,

when they

were again prevented. On 5th returned a third time, at 12 at night, broke up a window with a sledge, and fired several shot into the house, when a hot engagement commenced. Mr. John Stewart, Mr. Piatt, and a negro, prevented their getting into the

kitchen,

house for some time, but one of the

where John Stewart

habitants,

who

killed him.

villains got into the

The firing alarmed

the in-

immediately took to their arms, and drove the robbers

The negro

into the woods.

received a

wound

in the head, the only

damage done. Oct. 18, '79. Game. (100 guineas reward.) A most daring robbery was committed at the house of Jesse Conklin, Bushy Plains, by persons unknown, on the night of Oct. the 6th. 100 guineas reward, and a (free) pardon from the Commander in Chief, ( is offered ) to any accomplice

who

shall prove evidence against the rest.

704. Nov.

3, '79,

Riv.

Oct.

We hear from B.

18, '79.

Haven, that

Game. last

Mon-

day evening, a party of 20 rebels, in 3 whale-boats, arrived near the house of Col. Benj. Floyd. They attacked the house, and robbed

him of £600, and the most valuable the party had their faces blacked

Andrew Seton was robbed (by effects

:

;

the

part of his household goods. 2 of

and the same night the house of

same party) of the most valuable

and on the preceding evening the house of Capt. Solomon

Davis (see 767)

at

Old Man's was attacked.

They

fired several

shot through the house, but Capt. Davis stood ready to receive the first

who

told

them he was accustomed

should dare enter, either at the doors or windows.

He

to having balls fly around him, and


SUFFOLK COUNTY. some of the

89 went

inhabitants being alarmed, the rebels

doing any more damage in that quarter.

have been committed on the south 705. Nov.

away, Nov.

3, in

side.

2 guineas reward.

6, '79, Riv.

off without

Several other robberies

A

nut brown horse run

disembarking at Brooklyn ferry, belonging to the

Major of the Hess. Reg. of Ditfourth, marching

to

Huntington.

Not easy caught. 706. N. London, Dec. L.

last

I.,

Monday

4, '79.

5 green coats arrived here, from

night.

Petitions of Suffolk Co. Refugees 707. Ap. 24, '80. Gilbert Fanning,

Stonington, wants to return to L.

which

his grandfather

also to get

to settle

Carolina, and '80.

left

Conn.

in

nephew of

Lt. Palmer, at

about land in Stonington,

to his father (at his death in June last),

left

power of attorney from Phineas and

to dispose of estate of

May,

F.

I.

a

jr.,

Jas. F., at Southold,

Richard F., who died 8 years ago in North

2 children

who

died lately.

David Palmer wants permit

produce of Col. Gardi-

to get

Plumb I. Ap. 11, '80. Thos., Amaziah, and Selah Corwin, Peter Halliock, Israel Youngs, David Vail, Daniel Tuthill, at Lyme, are permitted to

ner, his father-in-law, off

go

L.

to

They

I.

for grain, wool, flax,

are to carry over

and 1^ bushels

salt

each

for their families.

no provisions nor bring off any British goods.

Capt. John Conklin, refugee, has a pass to cross

June 30,

'80.

wishes a pass

He

I.

L.

Wm.

Lawrence,

for his wife

in

I.

'80.

late of S.

Hampton, now of Saybrook, to go and stay on L.

up

his mother's estate.

Andrew Ward wants permit

for

Rev. Mr. Rose to

and procure proof that certain captured goods, worth jÂŁ800,

were bought and not captured on L.

Aug.

illicit

'80.

and Elizabeth Simmons

to return after settling

July 12, visit

Sound

June 13,

trade.

10, '80. Doctor

trade seized, but

showed

I.

Howell and Mr. Leavenworth in the

illicit

a permit from President of Congress.

Capt. Zach. Rogers, Jacob Titus and Thos. Conklin, of L. taken in a wood-boat on the Sound before Aug. 26, '80.

Before Sep. 14, '80. Capt.

Lockwood took from

L.

I.

I.,

were

Cable and Lud-

lam.

John I.

Storrs, Hartford, Oct. 25, '80,

and bring back presents.

wants

to

go and preach on L.

Capt. Gamaliel Baley to

command the

boat.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

90 Oct. 31, '80.

family ofTL.

I.

Wm. He

Lawrence,

at

Saybrook, wishes to bring his

12 months ago.

left

Jacob Titus, Thos. Conklin, Zach. Rogers, taken 10 weeks ago in a wood-boat and ford, will aid the

American cause,

now

of Huntington,

war

to

go

at Hart-

Oct. '80.

if liberated.

Geo. Smith, at Hartford, wishes

Smithtown now and then

to

Has

His father lately died.

to see to his estate.

late

prisoners of

large family to sup-

port.

Geo. Howell wishes

to

bring over from L.

I.

his secreted effects.

No Mar. go

13, '80. Oba. Johnes, Nath'l

date.

Tuthill, pray to

to L. I. at all times for provisions for their families.

Mar.

Reeve and Nath'l,

10, '80. Eben'r

Chelsea, were refugees from L.

Mar. 20, L.

King and Daniel

Henry White,

'80. Dr.

his

nephew,

at school at

I.

at Stonington,

wishes to return to

I.

Mar. 21,

'80.

Nath'l

Overton, at

Groton, wants to return to

Southold.

John Franks, Elias Howell, Dan'l Fordham, Henry Hopping, Silas Jessup, David Woodruff, Geo. Fordham, Dan'l Rackett and Capt. Paul

Reeve, want permits

Nov., '80

to cross to L. I.

Joshua Smith and Capt. D. Roe, of B. Haven, D. Roe at Woodbury, '80

;

?

Middletown; Capt.

at

Lt. Caleb Brewster of Continental

Seth and Ephraim Marvin, of B. Haven, at Norwalk, '80

;

Army,

Cornelius

and Eben'r Conklin, Alex, and Carll Ketchum, W. Sammis, Jas. Hubbs, Benj. Blachly, Pearson Brush, Epenetus Smith, Jos. Titus, Tim. Williams, at Norwalk

;

Isaac Smith at N. Haven.

Ap. 27,

'80.

Jan. 24, '80. John Hulbert, David Sayre, Theoph's Halsey, Maltby Gelston, David Pierson, Zeb. Osborn, Uriah Rogers and Stephen ell, all

of E.

to go to L.

May, ed

Haddam, and Gamaliel Bayley,

I.

for flax.

'80. Benj.

— returned

in a

Nathan, from Southold

Hannah Cupper and from Southold to

— wife

became discontent-

year with the children and back one year since,

cows— allowed

asks to take over 2 or 3

return

How-

of Hartford, have permits

to

take one.

P. Tillenness, widows, fled with their husbands

Haddam

— unable

to

Eben. Edwards, Southampton

to

— desire

to

—indigent —wants

to

support their families

— granted. Farmington

go over and bring back avails of his farm.

Wm. Floyd from L. I.

to

Middletown

— Gen. Tryon allowed two

tories


SUFFOLK COUNTY. to take his estate,

his effects

and

steward

his

—asks

Guilford

—has

— granted.

—asks

send over for

Ap.

cattle for continental

turn

quiet

is

granted.

Jona. Havens, from L.

— allowed, with

I.

to

East Haddam, 1776

money, which

spent

is

— in need

and wants

asks to return

—negatived.

I.

to re-

negro boy, family stores, furniture, &c.

his family,

Havens, from L.

'80.

— sold his grain and Ap.

Wm.

|jj

who

—property gone — out

return as the east end of the Island

to

'80.

a family in want,

Dr. Silas Halsey, Southampton to Killingworth of business

to

Ap.

Zeb. Hallock, Southold to

wish his return

Conn.

fled to

— granted.

91

— can't

'80.

support his family at Saybrook

June, '80.

David and Silvanus Hoel, and Jer. Rogers, Southampton to Killingworth, 1776 ask to go over to rent their farms and bring back

the avails

—negatived.

Ap., '80.

Sam'l Landon and Barnabas Horton

ask

to return

Wm.

—granted.

fled to

possessed E. end of Island

Saybrook leaving

—wife

sick

— asks

negatived.

Seth Overton asks to bring over from Southold to parents

who

are insulted by the British

Elias Pelletreau, goldsmith, and

Southampton ed him, 1776

to

Simsbury

—asks

—negatived. two

his

charged

I.

to

two sons

Saybrook

can't support his family

Major King, Oyster Pond wants

to

to return

to

John and

to bring over avails of his

in the

to return

Ap. '80. army and dis-

—negatived.

Saybrook, with his aged parents

farm

—allowed under inspection. Date

Abigail and Bethiah Terry, Southold in decline of

life

Elias,

and ruin-

with goldsmith's tools

— was Captain and asks

return

Oct. '80.

sons,

— enemy made a store of his house

for his

'80.

his family

May, '80. Chatham his aged

negatived.

Paul Reeve, L.

Guilford

to

May,

Lawrence, Southampton

when enemy

— Southampton

— can't obtain support —

lost.

Durham, 1776 single and want to return granted. to

Sep. '80. Jos. Topping, L.

farm

I.

to

Middletown

—in need— a large family—has

— an aged father on the Island —allowed

to return.

May,

'80.

Rufus and Christ'r Tuthill, widow Dolly Baley and John King Southold

to

N. London

— ask

to take

over a

cow each

—granted. May,

'80.

a


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

92

Benj. Vail, Jona. Conklin, Jona. and Joshua Horton, and Joshua

Reeve

— Southold

to Guilford

return and take over cattle

David Welden, L. aged mother

to E.

I.

allowed

if

— cannot

support their families

—granted. Haddam,

to return

1776— in want

Sep.,

— has

Ap.

John Preston, and Tim. Welles, large estates at

Southold

—money

and

Sr.

gone

at

Jr.,

want

in

—ask

—negatived.

'80.

return

to

Ap.

Southampton

an

Stonington— left

allowed.

Henry White wishes

to

'80.

take no part against U. S.

will

granted.

Dr.

— ask

Ap.

'80.

Rev. Mr. "White, at

to return to his father,

Feb. '81.

Thos. Topping, tanner and shoemaker, South Hampton to Wethersfield

—spent the

effects

— allowed

he brought over

to return.

Ap.

'80.

Jan. '80. John, Cornelius, and Selah Conklin, Sam'l Vail, Rob't

Brush, Conklin Shaden, Ezekiel Wickes, Carll and Alex. Ketcham,

John

Carll,

Henry Scudder, Joshua and Jarvis Rogers, Jesse Arthur,

Josiah Buffet, Seth Marvin,

— L.

which had been taken by the

I.

British

Conn.

to

—ask

—forsook

relief of Poll

their

Wm.

Feb. '80. Eph. and Benj. Marvin, Zebulon Williams, Gabriel Smith, Benj. and Gabriel North, L.

—ask

they brought over

relief

I.

to

Norwalk

Salmon,

—spent

all

from Tax.

Smith, Smithtown to Stratford

Oct. '80. Geo.

homes,

Tax.

—asks

to return to

bring off the avails of the sale of his estate in merchandise.

Wm.

Philips

Col. Floyd

Downs.)

and

wants permit

go

to

to

L.

I.

and bring

off effects of

own, (and get =£600 then due Col. F. from Dan'l Philips was Floyd's overseer and had resided 2 years at his

Milford.

708.

New Haven, Feb.

were attempting drowned 709.

;

Last week, as 3 Hessian soldiers Sound from Lloyd's Neck, 2 were

2, '80.

to cross the

the 3d got safe ashore

on the Main.

$20 Reward and Charges. Stolen

out of the barn of Zo-

phar Rogers, Huntington, Feb. 19, '80, 2 horses, &c. 710. Public thanks are hereby rendered to His Ex. Brig. Gen.

LELAND,

for his amiable

by a vote (nem.

March

command during

his stay at

con.) of the inhabitants, at a

9, '80.

711. July 19, '80.

Sol.

Symcoe crossed

the

Huntington

town meeting, held

Keicham,

Sound

at

Town

Clerk.

Flushing, and


SUFFOLK COUNTY. marched

93

Huntington, where 100 of the

to

nication overland,

militia

This corps was destined

Island joined him.

between the Fleet which lay

cavalry of the

to secure the

off the

commu-

East end of the

The Queen's Rangers remained about the

Island and N. Y.

Points,

on the E. end of the Island till Aug. 9, when they fell back to Corum, whence they returned Eastward, Aug. 15, being joined by

Amer. Reg., which Symcoe was ordered

the King's

to detach to

Riverhead, and he himself met the Commander-in-Chief (Clinton),

who was now on

journey by the Admiral's invitation, to hold a

his

conference with him.

whose

fleet

Symcoe

in Gardiner's

to

Adm'l Arbuthnot,

Bay, but sailed before Clin-

The Queen's Rangers

ton could arrive.

Aug.

Clinton sent

was anchored

returned to Oyster Bay,

This march of near 300 miles had been made very

23.

fatiguing by the barren, through

uncommonly hot weather, which rendered which the roads

the night as in the daytime.

A

on the country. Adj. Gen. [Andre

?]

militia

to

principally lay, as close

the Pine

and sultry in

The troops had been obliged to subsist who was sent express to the

dragoon

inform him what difficulty there was in pro-

the hardships which conupon the inhabitants, was waylaid, taken and robbed As this had been at Smithtown, by a party from the Rebel shore. formerly the case, and it was obvious no party could remain se-

curing provisions for the troops, and

sequently

creted

fell

unknown

to the

inhabitants, Lt. Col.

Symcoe

obtained leave

of Clinton, to raise a contribution from the inhabitants of rency, one-half to reimburse the militia

man

for

ÂŁ80

cur-

what was taken

from him, and the other to recompense him for the chagrin he must have been under

in

not being able to execute his orders. Jour. 149, 150.

712. Last Friday night a party of Rebels surrounded the house of

Dr. Punderson of Setauket, took him prisoner and carried him to Con't:

in that night the

same party took

Wm.

Jayne,

jr.

The

rebels told Mrs. P. they had taken the Dr. to exchange for John

Smith and Mr. Jayne town, at

Widow

for

Wm.

Philips,

who were

seized at Smith-

Blyenbury's, on a trading expedition.

Gaine, July 17, '80. 713. Sep.

came here

N. L. Tw o deserters from the Queen's Rangers Sunday from L. I., who say Gen. Clinton was at E.

1, '80,

last

5*

t


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

94

Hampton, Wed. before, and that day set out with his attendants for N. Y., and that the rest of the Troops set out on Thursday.

Taken up by John Hill,

714. Riv. Sep. 16, '80.

Inspector, Brook-

lyn Ferry, a dark bay horse and 2 mares, in the possession of John

Brown being

of Huntington,

who

is

now

on suspicion of

in custody

their

stolen.

715. Ship Watt, struck on \ moon shoal, Montauk Pt, sunk 2 hours, Capt. Coulthart and 20 of the crew drowned.

Gaine, Sep. 20,

in

'80.

716. Sep. 26, '80. Col. Ludlow writes to Gen. Silliman, that " plundering inhabitants and taking off innocent farmers, is a mode

of warfare

Outrages are committed by mercenary

I detest.

Any

of our people plundering on the Main,

among

us.

by me,

will be returned to

you and

restoration

men

detected

if

made."

717. Those Refugees desirous of locations in Suffolk Co. will Oct. 5, '80.

leave their petition with P. J. Livingston, Hellgate.

718. Capt. Elisha Elderkin in the True Blue, took the Betsey,

Dan'l Pardue, master, in South Bay. Oct. 9, '80.

719.

Michael Veal, Joshua Rogers, Cor. Conklin,

John Conklin, and Jesse Brush, weather on L.

stress of

" Oct.

11.

(see 722) of the

Monday

Capt.

J.

last,

viz.

:

were brought

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maj.

were forced by

in a whale-boat,

shore, and are

I.

Royal Refugees, and

lowing rebel gentry,

Oct. 8, '80.

now to

prisoners in N.

Town by

Y.

Luke,

Capt.

safely lodged in Provost, the fol-

Brush,

Capt. Cornelius Conklin,

Conklin, Capt. Rogers, and Lt. Farley,

all

notorious offenders,

long practised in coming from the N. England shore to murder and plunder the King's loyal subjects, on L.

I.

They were taken

last Sat.

by Lt. Pendergrass and a party of Col. Cuyler's Refugees, at Smith-

town, with their whale-boat, and considerable booty. Capt.

Ketcham was

A

certain

killed in attempting to escape."

Oct. 10, '80, Bob. Roy.

Jesse Brush had sent the following warning " to John

Amer. Gaz.

Ketcham and

his associates."

Head T

This

Quarters, Aug. 25, '80.

have repeatedly ordered you, especially Ap. 15, is

the last invitation.

If

you do

to leave

my

farm.

not, your next landfall will be in


SUFFOLK COUNTY. a warmer climate than any you make your escape. "

It

95 20 days you have to

ever lived in yet.

Riv., Oct. 21, '80.

was a dark, moonless midnight in Sep. '80, that Maj. Brush, a man, with red hair, sandy complexion, and a bright

small, well-built

eye, strong as Hercules,

and bold as a Lion, 2 brothers Conklins, from whose farm had been ravaged

Virginia, Capt. Rogers, a hardy old fellow,

by Cornwallis's army, Lt. Ketcham, a polished gentleman and brave

Tim. Williams,* a noble, generous fellow, full of vivacity and humor, and Abm. Leggetj landed from a whale-boat on a Beach near officer,

The

Smithtown.

boat was hauled up in a cove, and carefully covered

with branches of trees, seaweed,

Then they proceeded to who had been apprized

&c, so

as to prevent

its

being noticed.

owner of which was a True Blue, Maj. Brush was about to be dispatched on

a house, the that

a secret mission by Gov. Clinton to raise a loan of specie on L.

For 3 weeks they passed

to

and

fro in

s

I.

various disguises, generally

choosing the night for their peregrinations, sometimes venturing out by

broad daylight, with assumed names, and some pretended business

which they would puisue with a great deal of seeming earnestness. After they

left

L.

I.

stress of

weather forced them back to North Swamp,

when

they hauled up their boat, capsized

ter.

In the afternoon

it

it,

cleared up, they

and crawled under

came

surprised by a shout from a neighboring height "

out,

when

for shel-

they were

There they are

The

!

on the sand.

and a volley of musketry followed, which laid 2 dead Legget and Williams escaped in a swamp, and recrossed

in the night to

Conn, in a large whale-boat which Gen. Washington kept

d

d Rebels

!"

cruising in the Sound, and

commanded by

Capt. Brewster."

N. York, Dec. 1845. * At the close of the war, a merchant

at

Huntington, where he died,

1811. t

Late of N. Y. City, and father of

Wm. L

,

Editor of Evening

Post.

Gen. Parsons wants H. Scudder

to

go

to

L.

I.

to negotiate the

ex-

change of Maj. Brush, Capt. Joshua Rogers and other refugees from L.

I.

now

Oct. 19, '80.

prisoners.

720. Ft. St. George

was

built at a point projecting into

South

Bay, on Smith's Manor, being the enemy's easternmost defence.

was a

triangular inclosure of several acres of ground, at

It

two angles

of which was a strongly barricaded house, and at the third, a

fort,

with a deep ditch and wall, encircled by an abattis of sharpened pickets, projecting at

an angle of 45 degrees.

The

fort

and

haw*-


96

ARMED OCCUPATION OF

A Plan of Ft. St. George, were

ses

taken by Col. Tallmadge, Nov. 22,

entirely connected with a strong stockade,

'80.

12 feet high,

every piece sharpened, and fastened to each other by a transverse rail,

strongly bolted to each.

The work was

nearly finished, and

The Fort was 96

had embrazures for 6 guns, and but 2 mounted. ft.

square, and had one gate and sally port, leading into the grand

parade.

The Fort and

days, and had 50

Wm.

obtained from

other works had been completed only a few

men.

The above information, and a draft, was who lived near the Fort, and actually The Fort was the depository of stores,

Boothe,

guided Tallmadge to

it.

dry goods, groceries, and arms, whence Suffolk Co. could be supplied.

Nov. 21. barked

my

At 4 P. M., with 8

'80.

em-

boats and a fair wind, I

detachment, consisting of 2 companies of dismounted

dragoons, (80

men

o'clock, landed

at

avoid a large body of the cinity, partly in

at Fairfield,

in all.)

Old Man's.

I

and the same evening

was obliged

enemy which

to

go so

Huntington and

laid at

our direct route from Stamford.

Soon

landed, say 10 o'clock, I put the troops in motion to cross L.

had not gone

far,

at

8

far east to

I.

vi-

we

after

We

say 4 or 5 miles, before the wind began to blow

from S. E. and rain soon followed.

I

faced the troops about, re-

turned to our boats, which were drawn up and concealed in the bushes, under guard of 20

men

;

to attacking the Fort.

must be paid as well Sound (20 miles wide) as

as attention

to a favorable time for re-crossing the

There we remained through the night and

next day, and at evening the rain abated, and

I

again ordered the


97

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

march (7 o'clock) for our destined place S. side of L. L At 3 next morning I found we were within 2 miles of Ft. St. George, when we halted a short time to take refreshment. Having made my arrangements for 3 different attacks at the same time, I placed 2 small detachments under command of officers of high spirit, at diftroops to

ferent positions from the Fort, with orders to keep concealed until

the

enemy should

(4 o'clock,) I put Lt. Brewster,

who

my

column.

Just as day began to dawn,

fire

on

my

detachment in motion.

my

preceded

The

pioneers, under

column had reached within 20 yds.

of the stockade before they were discovered.

At

this

moment

the

sentinel in advance of the stockade halted his march, looked attentively at

our column, demanded "

Who

comes there ?" and

Before the smoke from his gun had cleared his vision,

who marched by my trated him.

when

all

side,

fired.

sergeant,

reached him with his bayonet and pros-

This was the signal

seemed

my

to vie with

for the other troops to

move forward, So

each other in entering the Fort.

were the men that a breach was soon made in the stockade, where the rear platoon under Mr. Simmons halted to prevent the [There was a detachment around each prisoners from escaping. house also.] I led the column directly through the grand parade against the main fort, which we carried with the bayonet in less than 10 minutes, not a musket being loaded. At the same instant that I

resolute

entered one side of the

fort,

the officers

commanding the smaller

tachments mounted the ramparts on the other

sides,

de-

and the watch-

word, " Washington and Glory

.'" was repeated from 3 sides of the While we were standing, elated with victory, in the centre of the Fort, a volley of musketry was discharged from the windows of one of the large houses containing the main body of the enemy, which induced me to order my whole detachment to load and return the fire. I soon found it necessary to lead the column directly to the house, which being strongly barricaded,

Fort at the same time.

As soon

required the aid of the pioneers with their axes. troops could enter, the confusion and conflict erable portion of those

who

the colors had been struck, to the ground. all

Having

would have been

great.

A

as the consid-

had fired after the Fort was taken, and was thrown headlong from the 2d story

forfeited their lives

killed,

was

had

I

by the usages of war,

not ordered the slaughter to cease.

In less than 10 minutes the garrison were prisoners.

The

prisoners


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

98 being secured,

was soon discovered

it

The guns

under weigh.

(I

All things were

detached a party

now

seen the sun rise more pleasantly. the enemy's works

English,

&c, was

and

2,

safe It

and

who

quiet,

boarded and

and

I

had never

became necessary to demolish

valuable

The

shipping and their stores

articles of

and thus carried across the Island

were

dry goods were made up

on the prisoners' shoulders,

in bundles, placed

near

getting

and an immense quantity of various goods,

;

destroyed.

Some

also burnt up.

laid

&c, was

of the Fort were brought to bear on her

and she was soon secured. took her.)

which

that a vessel

the Fort, loaded with stores, wine, rum, sugar, glass,

to

who were

pinioned, 2

our boats.

Having given the command of the detachment

Edgar,

to Capt.

with orders to halt at a given point near the middle of the Island, selected

10 or 12

men

I

with Lt. Brewster, and mounted them on

horses taken at the Fort, with which I intended to destroy the King's

This place was nearly half way to at Corum. where a large body of British troops were encamped, E.

magazines of forage the place

of Huntington.

I

reached

it

in about

an hour and a

vigorous charge upon the guard placed to protect

it.

made

half,

set

it

on

a

fire,

(say 300 tons of hay) and in about an hour and a half more reached

the place where I had ordered the troops to halt, having rode 15 or

16 miles. As I arrived I was glad to see the head of the detachment under Capt. Edgar advancing with the prisoners. As none of us had halted since we parted, we sat down for nearly an hour and After this we took up our line of march. By this time refreshed. the militia began to muster, but prudently avoided coming near us.

Some guns were

fired,

but no damage received.

reached our boats, and before sunset were

By

all

By

afloat

4 o'clock

we

on the Sound.

midnight every boat arrived at Fairfield Beach, although

we had

entirely lost sight of each other in the darkness of the night.

This

was executed entirely without the loss of one man, and only one was badly wounded and him we brought ofF. Thus in 21 hours we marched near 40 miles, took the Fort, burnt the magazines, &c. The enemy's loss was 7 killed and wounded, most of the latter mortally. We took one Lt. Col. Commandant, one Capt., one Lt., one service

Surgeon, and 50 rank and

whom we

left

behind

;

file,

with a host of others in the garrison

also one garrison standard.

Mr. Muirson was a volunteer, and deserves commendation.


99

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

He

advanced with Lt. Jackson over the

Thompson,

Fort.

Rw., Dec.

ii.

2, '80.

Syms,

484.

p.

abattis

and wall into the

542.

80 Rebels headed by Maj. Talmadge, assisted by

Heathcot Muirson, Benajah Strong, Thos. Jackson, Caleb Brewster, belonging to the same party, formerly

officers

all

of L.

I.,

came

across

and landed between Wading R. and Old Man's, (suphave been concealed 2 or three days by their old friends on the

in 8 whale-boats

posed

to

On Thursday

Island).

morning, 23d Nov., about 50 marched across

the Island (the remainder being

left to

guard the boats) just after daylight,

arrived at Smith's Point, St. George's Manor, where they surprised a re-

spectable body of loyal refugees from R.

I.

and the

vicinity,

who were

establishing a post to get a present subsistence for themselves

and

their

The sentry on observing them, fired, which they returned, and mortally wounded him, and rushed into a house. Mr. Isaac Hart, of N. Port, was inhumanly fired on, wounded and bayoneted in 15 different parts of his body, and beat with their muskets in a shocking manner in the very act of imploring quarter, and died of his wounds a few hours after. Four more refugees were wounded also, but are in fair way of recovery. A poor woman was also fired on at another house and barbarously wounded through both breasts, of which wound she families.

now lingers. The Rebels

carried off about 40 prisoners

;

on

their return at

Corum,

they burnt a magazine of hay, about 100 tons, and same day embarked for the Con't shore.

721.

The

Culloden, in pursuit of French ships from R.

Monday night, Jan. 22, '81, was Culloden Point.] Her men, guns, and masts,

dreadful storm on [at

We

I.,

in a

driven on L. will be

I.,

saved.

have the inhuman consolation to hope the French have fared

Gen. Robertson.

worse.

722. Gaine, Jan. 21, '81.

Address by the

Refugee Volunteers established under Col.

Abm. Cuyler,

officers of the

his auspices at

Loyal

Smithtown, to

previous to his departure for England.

They

approve his conduct, thank him for his kind endeavors to alleviate their disagreeable situation,

their loyal attachment.

Luke,

Wm.

J.

V. D. Poel, B. Dyer, Capt's

Castilles,

723.

and beg him

to assure

His Majesty of

Signed by P. V. Alstyn, Maj. Com't; P.

John Huyck, Lts

Gaine, Mar. 12,

'81.

;

;

M. Pendergrass, Q. M.

P. Hoff,

P. Durland,

A

party of rebels from Con't in


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

100

8 whale-boats and an armed schooner, to the amount, as

is

supposed,

of 150 men, arrived at S. Hampton, last Monday, plundered the inhabitants of several thousand pounds worth of goods, and carried several of

them away

Mar.

724.

prisoners.

16, '81.

Gardiner's Bay, set

sail

The

British fleet, that

southward.

had

lain

some time

at

N. London.

â&#x20AC;˘

N. London, Ap.

725.

20, '81.

Capt. Pierpont, in an armed

whale-boat from N. Haven, was taken by surprise at Canoe Place,

by a party of refugees who lay in ambush 726. Capt. Fitch visited Corum,

goods

;

He

most were secreted.

May

for him.

and found a few

2, '81,

took Glover, Ap. 27, '81, on Conn,

shore.

727. Valentine Rider, with three boats duly commissioned, land-

ed at Mt. Misery, went into the country and robbed David

and

Widow

Taylor of furniture,

&c,

equal to ÂŁ600.

Munro

Before leav-

ing the coast, 17 of them landed a second time, and shot at a son of Philip Roe, beat and robbed clothing, cash,

728.

made

May

their

&c.

;

him and

his brother Nath'l of furniture,

broke looking-glass and windows.

23, '81.

May,

'81.

Five whale-boats, containing about 50 men,

appearance in the South Bay, where they attacked and

took a sloop loaded with lumber belonging to Messrs. Keteltas

N. Y., which they dispatched with one of

Nicoll, of

&

their boats for

N. Haven.

A Blue

few evenings Pt.,

clothing,

after, the

remaining crews, 38 in

no.,

landed at

and plundered several of the inhabitants of provisions,

and money, to a considerable amount

another small vessel of K.

;

and carried off

& N.

Early next morning, by the exertions of two or three principal sufferers, the militia

were assembled under command of Capt's Rose

and Baker, and marched 10 or 12 miles with cheerfulness, but

find-

ing no prospect of overtaking the plunderers without proceeding 30 miles farther, to a place they

knew

cross, the Capt's declined going.

the rebels

must of necessity

22 men, however, on promise of

ha\ing their expenses defrayed, and a

little

persuasion, consented to

continue their march, and after suffering every inconvenience from

a heavy road, and want of sustenance, had the good fortune to over-


SUFFOLK COUNTY. take them, taking their

the Canoe Place, about 2 in the

rest at

Knowing themselves

morning.

ately attacked

them

at

still

undiscovered, they immedi-

15 yards distance, and so completely sur-

prised them, as to kill one, mortally ers,

101

wound

make 20

another,

prison-

and secured their boats and plunder, with 38 stand of arms, with-

out the

smallest

The

opposition.

prisoners, under guard,

were

ordered in their boats, and arrived in N. Y. on Saturday evening,

and are safely lodged

At

in the

Sugar House.

auction, near the ferry stairs,

days since on S. side of L.

I.,

in

4

good

6, '81.

Riv. Ju.

prize whale-boats, repair,

taken a few

and well found

in oars,

&c. 729. May 31, '81, N. London. Some days ago Major Ayres made an excursion from Say brook to L. I., and took 2 vessels near Wading River. After taking some goods out of the vessels they went ashore and as they were cooking provisions under a bank, they were suddenly fired on, when Major A. and one or two of the party were killed. ;

730. June 11, '81. Goods and furniture, equal to £31. 19. 8, were taken from John Bayley of Brookhaven, by Ezekiel Wicks, Jacob Conklin, Benj. Nicoll and others; from Dan'l Downs, equal to £4. 2 from Capt. Wm. Brewster, equal to £68. 12. 6. ;

731. Before June 12, '81.

St.

Martin took goods from L.

&c,

Geo. Smith, of Hartford, took corduroys, calicoes,

Eben'r Ayres, of Stamford, took goods at

Cow

Harbor

;

at

I.

Corum

;

;

E. Jones, of

Stamford, took law books. 732. Gaine, July 2, '81. rebels from

New

On Wednesday

night

last,

a party of

England, with 5 whale-boats and about 50 men,

landed at Crane Neck, Setauket, and early next morning went to the house of Capt. Nathan Woodhull, which, after they had plundered, with three others adjoining, of considerable value, carried

Capt.

W.

and his son along with them

;

fortunately, the boats

discovered by two brigs and a sloop lying in the Sound, diately

gave them chase, which obliged the rebels to run their boats

ashore and

make

plunder behind. Capt.

were

who imme-

W.

their escape to the

woods, leaving their boats and

The goods were

returned to their owners, and

and son prevented from being carried

Jackson, of Newark, was commander of the party.

off.

One Dan'l


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

102

Sir

On Wednesday morning, June 20, the Associators (in the brig H. Clinton, sloop Association and brig Keppel) returning from an

expedition to Conn., discovered seven rebel boats off Setaukets but the rebels being too near the shore to be cut

boats into the woods, and then ran all his

force,

and

in

two hours brought

off,

landed, hauled their

Capt. Hubbel landed with

off.

off

a very fine 12 oared barge

or gunboat, called Gen. Wooster, with two swivels and a blunderbuss, and six very good whale-boats, most of

Every method was taken out success.

which are

to discover the rebels

entirely

new.

on shore, but with-

In the boats was found a quantity of plunder worth

ÂŁ100. Caleb Brewster and John Grennel, swear to

733. June 22, '81.

abuses committed on L.

I.

by whale-boats.

List of Persons Robbed.

Ruth Blydenburgh,

David Longbottom,

Tyler,

Sam'l Hare,

Tho's Hicks,

Brewster,

Cha's Dallas,

Jona. Tucker,

John Bailey,

Ja's Smith,

Selah Havens,

David Munroe,

Tim. Smith, Edward Tappan, Langdon,

Nath'l Fanning,

Selah Strong,

Wm.

Mary

Taylor,

Ja's Gardiner,

David Gardiner, Ja's

M'Cleure

Nath'l and Philip Roe, were twice plundered and once whipped.

.ÂŁ100 was paid to ransom a house from being burnt.

734. Aug. to the

A

3.

body of armed

men

with fixed bayonets, came

house of Gilbert and Simon Fleet, near Huntington, and robbed

the 2 families of

all

the

money and

plate they could find (in their

possession), and had nigh strangled one of to a

Trumbull, xv. 27.

beam

735.

in his kitchen.

Wm.

Aug.

15, "81.

Fowler and John Strong

them by hanging him up

Gaine.

in the

armed boat

Wm.

the

Conqueror, took a small skiff in Accabonic Bay, Aug. 23, '81, with

300

lbs. coffee,

736.

and 120

Sep. 14, '81.

lbs. tea.

Two

whale-boats with 40 armed

men from

Conn., landed on South Hampton, and killed and dressed 4 sheep of Jos.

Havens.

On

the evening of 15th they ransacked the house of

Nicoll Havens, Esq., on Shelter

I.,

hilted sword, silver-mounted hanger,

took 2 fowling-pieces, a silver-

some

tea,

&c. thence to Capt. &c. thence to Wi-

Ja's Havens', took a watch-coat, fowling-piece,

;

;


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

dow

103

Payne's, insulted and threatened to burn the house,

made them

produce silver tankard, linen, watch-coat, fowling-piece, &c.

16th

they landed at E. end of Southold, disarmed the people on their

way

up

some unarmed people, entered the house of David Gardiner (who was about removing to Conn.) with fixed bayonets, took goods and family articles knocked down Jos. to the settlement,

and

fired at

;

On

Peck.

their

way down

to the shore, they beat with a

gun-breech

Mr. and Mrs. Lommedieu, an aged couple, threatened to burn Widow Moore's house, because armed men had assembled there to resist

them, flashed a gun at John Vail, aged 60

;

said they

of Delancey's cowboys with them, would burn the whole position

were made, and put men,

A

737.

had some

town

op-

if

women

and children to death. representation of the inhabitants of Shelter I., and South-

old to Gov. Trumbull, Sept. 21, '81, complaining of whale-boats, signed

Sam'l Landon,

David Conklin,

Oba. Vail,

Jos.

Jos. Prince,

Benj. Vail,

Jared Langdon,

Peck,

738. N. London, Sep. 21, '81.

Benj. Prince,

John Hubbard.

400 of Arnold's men landed

at

Southold, and plundered and carried off to the value of £3000.

Ebn'r Conklin, of Norwalk, took at

739. Before Sep. 26, '81.

Huntington sundry pieces of

&c.

calico, lace, cambric,

740. Petition of Suffolk Co. Refugees in Conn.

Capt. John Grennel,

Feb. 5, '81. mily, and

Mar.

is

now

8, '81.

who

left

L.

I.

in '76 with his fa-

reduced, wishes to return to recover some debts.

Lodowick Hackstaff,

Jos. Hibbard,

Tim. Rand, were

taken by Americans at Greenwich.

Mar. 20,

'81.

Mrs. Shelton and Mr. Strong, living at Stratford,

aged parents

Brookhaven.

wish

to visit

May

22, '81, wishes to return with family and family stores, to his aged

father on L.

at

Elias Howell, at Saybrook,

I.

Richard Seamans, a refugee, largely engaged in

Wm.

Hart and Kelsey.

Dr.

Wm.

No

Lawrence, L.

illicit

trade

;

also

date.

I.

to

Saybrook, employed

to obtain intelli-

gence from the enemy, and had permit from Gov. Tryon to bring off his family, furniture, medicines, &c.

Feb. '81.

two campaigns

Jona. Corwin

— discharged

Nov. '81

— Southold

for infirmity,

to

?

Norwich, Sep. '76

wishes

to return

—served

with family to


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

104

Selah Dickerson, Dan'l Booth, Joshua Horton,

his father's estate.

Welles

— Southold Guilford — not return — negatived.

able to procure subsistence

to

Wm.

— ask

liberty to

John Goldsmith turn

from Southold

fled

to Guilford

—negatived.

Theoph's Halsey, S. Hampton

&c,

farm, stock,

May,

brought with him.

John Lloyd,

jr.,

E.

Haddam,

to return, as

liberty to re-

Sep. '76, leaving a

he has spent

all

he

'81.

— and stock Norwich, Sep. 1776 —infirm — allowed from L.

at Hartford, fled

exempted from taxation. Isaac Overton

to

which he wishes

to

— asks

— Southold

to

1776

I.,

polls

to return.

Benj. Sears, Zebedee Osborn, Theoph's Halsey, Dan'l, Ezekiel, Steph. and Ed. Howell, Ezekiel Stanford S. Hampton to E. Haddam, Sep. '76

—spent Eben'r

money

and

their property

Wade

— Southold

desire to return. to Guilford

and

for property sold,

— asks

to carry splints,

liberty to go over for and remain 3 weeks to

bottom chairs. Ezekiel Wicks, a commissioned cruiser, wants his family removed

from L.

I.

Conn

to

Sep. 4, '81.

Jesse Wicks, on L. tish,

wants

to

741. Last

remove

has aided Whigs, and being detected by Bri-

I.,

lo

Conn.

Sunday night a party of

Heacock, made an attempt

rebels

to plunder the

commanded by Sam'l

house of Moses Jarvis,

down the doors, one of the window where Mr. J. and his wife were

merch't of Huntington, and after beating party fired into the chamber

standing, but fortunately they

enough

to prevent

buckshot.

Mr.

J.

Mrs.

J.

fled

N. H.,

at the flash, but not

which

killed

Wm.

spot.

— Gaine,

Oct. 11, '81.

and landed

in the

Tuesday

afternoon,

evening near a small

fort

week, 150

last

on L.

of Lloyd's Neck, which they approached with so

they were not discovered

them and ran

till

time to shut the gate.

I.,

much

challenged by the sentinel,

was followed so close Some opposition was made

into the fort, but

man

Oct. 1, '81.

Continental troops, under Major Talmadge, crossed the boats,

soon

Lownsbury, when the

with the utmost precipitation, leaving the dead

and his arms on the 742.

back

being exasperated at such inhuman conduct, imme-

diately returned the fire,

whole party

fell

from being wounded in the breast by a

Sound

in

15 miles E. secrecy that

who

fired

on

that he had not

as our people


SUFFOLK COUNTY. entered the

and 4 of the enemy were

fort,

The

they soon surrendered.

had one

man

slightly

743. There

armed

well

Neck.

at

Col.

"On

to Fairfield

next morning with 20

We

muskets and a brass 3 pounder.

wounded.

was a

garrison of 140 men, chiefly woodcutters,

Tallmadge says in

evening of Oct.

it,

and 2 wounded, but

Fort Slongo, TreadwelPs Neck, 8 miles E. of Lloyd's

tuck River part of

head of

killed

barracks and magazines, were

fort,

Major T. returned

destroyed.

prisoners, and brought off 70

105

my

his Journal:

9 o'clock, I embarked from Sauga-

2, '81,

detachment, and placed Major Trescott at the

The

with orders to assail the Fort on a particular point.

troops landed on L.

was made and

I.

by 4 o'clock, and

dawn

at

of day the attack

The Block-house and

the fortress subdued.

other

combustible materials were burnt, and the troops and prisoners re-

turned in safety, bringing off one piece of handsome brass

field

artillery.

Gen. Washington congratulates the army on the success of the American arms in the reduction of Fort Slongo on the morning of Oct.

3,

1

the

Lt, and 18 privates prisoners, besides several

and wounded and 2 iron double-fortified 4 pounders destroyed.

killed

The

Of

without the loss of a man, and only one wounded.

enemy, 2 Capts.,

colors of the Fort, a brass 3 pounder, a

ammunition,

&c,

number of small arms,

are the trophies of the victory,

[Henry Skudder was furnished by a neighbor with a

draft

and

Smithtown River. boat (hid in a swamp)

description of Ft. Slongo, on the high land near

With

this in his

pocket, in

making

his

way to

his course lay through a forest, in the field

by which ran the road from Smithtown

sunset he heard the tramp of horses

under which he could see 50 or 60 of him.

He was

744. privateer,

;

his

middle of which was a clear to

Fresh Pond. Just before

he hid behind a large fallen tree,

light horse passing within

not noticed and escaped to his boat.

N.London,

Oct. 16, '81.

10 rods

Ed.]

Capt. Thos. Parks, in a small

and Capt. Wattles of the Comet, with 50 volunteers, pro-

ceeded to Oyster Pond, where they discovered 2 galleys near Shelter I.

endeavoring to get out of the bay, but being closely pursued, both

galleys ran ashore at Southold, and the people (60 or 70)

escape.

One mounted

variety of articles

3,

the other, 2 cannon

were found aboard.

the Vineyard Sound.

;

made

their

16 muskets and a

They had been

cruising in


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

106

Nathan Peet Jackson, of

745. Before Oct. 17, '81.

took cambrick, gauze,

&c, at South Hampton, June

&c, at Sag Harbor, July 2 Brook Haven, Aug. 4 and 5.

muskets,

&c,

at

746. N. London, Nov.

747.

JV.

Last

1, "81.

from the British Regt. stationed

Capt. Grinnel, being ashore at

Monday

Sag

town.

to

week Major Davis and

Last

'81.

cable,

night 3 deserters

Huntington came

at

London, Nov. 30,

44 yds. check, a

also

;

Fairfield,

18; also sugar,

were

Llarbor with several men,

betrayed and taken prisoners by a Hessian Major and 20 light horse.

They had

2 armed boats with them, which the

setting on

fire,

Wickham

but Capt.

same time coming

ton, about the

to

in

enemy were about

an 8 gun sloop from Stoning-

near the boats, brought them

off.

Hampton, where he was buying goods for N. Y. State, Nov. 3, '81, and was kept in Provost till March 26, '82. The Legislature in '84 allowed him 106 guineas which he had Capt. John Grinnel

was taken

at S.

spent while in captivity.

748. Ap. 11, '82.

Two

deserters (natives)

came

to

N. Haven

from Lloyd's Neck. 749. Rob. Roy. Amer. Gaz.,

May

23, '82.

The

inhabitants in

Suffolk Co. give their thanks to Mr. Walter Humphreys, Dep.

Com-

missary of forage, serving under Dan'l Wier, Esq., Com. Gen.,

&c, &c, for

his just

&c,

and upright conduct in receiving and weighing

the hay and straw delivered on Lloyd's Neck, for the use of His

Majesty's troops, and for his ready compliance in giving proper receipts,

whereby they have, or may by immediate application, Dated Huntington, March 27, 1782.

re-

ceive their payment.

Jacob Brush, Tim. Carll, Capt. Philip Conklin, Capt. Lt.

Ketcham,

Ste.

;

;

Eliph't Chichester,

Gilbert Fleet, Lt.

Jos. Lewis, President

;

Esq.

;

;

Silas

John Rogers, David Rusco,

Sammis,

Jas.

Sandford,

Nath'l, Philetus, and Jonas Smith Militia

;

Dan'l

Wiggins, M. D.

;

;

Hubbard Conklin,

Jona. Jarvis, John and

Jona. Mills, Jesse Oakes, Nath'l

Oakley, Sam'l Philips, Zophar Piatt, Justice of Forage

;

jr.

M.

;

D.

Henry

Jonas Rogers, Collector

;

John Squier, Selah Strong, ;

Epenetus, Caleb, Aaron,

Titus,

John Wickes, Capt.

Nath'l Williams,

jr.

;

Nath'l Wil-

liams, Jonas Williams, Israel Youngs, Collector of Hay.

750. Riv.,

May

29, '82.

On

15th, Capt.

Marks of the Delancey

whale-boat proceeded up the Sound to the neighborhood of Mattituck


SUFFOLK COUNTY. on L.

107

where he discovered a whale-boat commanded by Maj. Ayres manned with 8 men, whom he attacked, killed Ayres,

I.,

of Stamford, and

wounded one, took

his boat, oars, muskets,

filched from the honest inhabitants,

made of this merciless

and quantity of goods

feel great joy at the

example

plunderer.

751. Sep. 4, '82, Riv. I.,

who

Some

whale-boats put ashore S. side of L.

near B. Haven, and robbed the house of Deacon Hedges of sundry

wearing apparel and household goods,

sorts of

&c, &c.

752. N. London, Sep. 6, '82. Last Friday enemy came here from Oyster Bay.

Capts. Peter Vail and John Wilkinson, from

753. Sep. 8, '82.

East

Haddam

6 deserters from the

Henry Conklin at Southold, Long Branch. They first went to Canoe Place, and robbed a wagon of tea and

in 2 whale-boats, robbed

of dry goods, and returned to

South Bay, landed

at

powder. 754. N. London, Sep. 20, '82. Last week, two armed boats from

Con't River, crossed the Sound and landed at Canoe Place ple going a mile or

and took

it

two on the

They

from him.

Island,

:

the peo-

met a man with a box of

tea,

afterwards plundered sundry of the in-

The next morning

habitants of cash and clothing.

a no. of people

belonging to the Island assembled, and finding the boats' crews on a beach, dividing their goods, they fired on them, killed one on the spot,

wounded

mortally

755.

another,

They have

2 others.

Fislikill,

They have

who

died soon after, and badly

wounded

detained 5 of the boats' crews.

Dec.

The enemy are

5, '82.

fortifying Huntington.

pitched on a burying yard, and have

dug up graves and when they

gravestones, to the great grief of the people there, who,

remonstrated against the proceeding, received nothing but abuse.

[See Prime, 251.]

The

inhabitants were

Thompson, against used for the Fort, &c. Col.

made

their

to assist in pulling the

Church down by

solemn remonstrances, and

its

materials

Petitions of Suffolk Co. Befugees, Conn. Jan. '82.

756.

— Southold Branford — poor, — allowed under inspection. Canterbury — granted exemption from

Abijah Corey

to

old,

asks to bring over avails of his property Jos.

Moore

Poll tax.

S.

Hampton

to

Oct. '82.


108

ARMED OCCUPATION OF

Wm.

Welles, Southold

to Guilford

— asks

to return

—negatived. Jan. '83.

Oct. 25, '82.

Nath'l Gardiner wants to return to E.

has served in army

Nov. his

farm of 20 acres,

go

to

till

to L.

I.

July last,—his father, Col.

Ichabod Cole, refugee from L.

'82.

G. died Sept.

last.

Lyme, wants to sell on L. I.— Nathan Fordham, of E. Haddam, wants

with his family.

to return to L.

Abm.

Hampton

I.

at

Rev. John Storrs

Mansfield) wants

(at

I.

July 16, '83.

Benj. King, of

Lyme, wants

to return to Southold.

[Jeremiah King also at Lyme.] Feb. 27,

'83.

Eben'r Piatt

at Hartford

—wants

go

to

to L.

to get

I.

cash.

Mar. 4, '83. Maltby Gelston, at E. Haddam, wants to carry boards Hampton to build a barn, his house also is decayed. John Gelston wants to go to L. I. Jas. Fanning a Whig (who has been in N. Carolito S.

na) wants to go to L.

go

I.

David Howell,

to L. I. to bring off flax,

is at

New

757. teer,

was

late of S.

Hampton, wants

and wool on sheep-skins.

Windsor.]

Mr. Isaac Smith, of Brook Haven, killed in boarding the ship

Marines, a very brave man, and

is

Rennet.

much

in the

Virginia priva-

He was

an

officer of

regretted.

Rob. Gaz. Dec. 26, 758.

to

[Elias Parshall

'82.

Thos. Wickham, Esq., commander of an armed sloop, took

a boat laden with provisions, bound and proceeding on a voyage to L.

Jan. 30, '83.

I.

759.

March

27, '83.

Most of the barracks

burnt, reported to be fired by the soldiers,

who

at

are dissatisfied with

Whig

the service.

760.

By

Paper.

permission of Gov. Robertson, a lottery for the benefit

of Caroline Church will be drawn at Brook the

Huntington are

Wardens and

vestry of the Church.

Haven under

direction of

Selah Strong, Esq., John

Moore, Esq., Joseph Brewster and Henry Nicoll, Managers. Riv. Ap. 761. 5, '83, for

Henry Hawley, of

L.

I.

to the

Four

May

Stratford, Con't, put in Provost,

carrying a sergeant. and 5 Yagers from Huntington

had deserted) 762.

9, '83.

(who

N. England shore.

deserters from the

enemy came

to

N. London,

May

via.

23, '83.


109

SUFFOLK COUNTY. Riv. June

763.

May

night of

marked on

part.,

4, '83.

Stolen out of a stable at Huntington,

28, 2 chestnut Horses, belonging to

Q. M. Gen. De-

2 guineas reward will be paid

off thighs J. C.

Dewormb at McGowan's Pass. O" Any officer commanding on L.

by-

Col.

I. is

Ran away,

$10 Reward.

764.

English well and plays on the

fiddle,

requested to forward them.

a negro man, Retus, speaks

took with him a pair of brown

&c.

velvet breeches, fiddle,

WM. CLARKE. Brook Haven, July

8, '83.

Isaac Alger and Nath'l Parker put in Provost, July 18, '83,

765.

for robbing Piatt Carll,

—and

violently beating

by Court Martial, and ordered

tried

July 29,

766.

'83.

An

affray

to be

Cowboys), in which B. was

767.

who

to his residence

I.

(of the class of people

Norton escaped.

killed.

at

was returning

we

him dead on the

Gaine, Aug.

John Benson, a mulatto, who shot Capt. at

N. Y.

He was

spot.

are informed that his watch with 8 guineas

found in his pockets.

was hung

wagon, from

in his

Setauket, he was intercepted by 2 men,

firing their pistols or fusils, shot

not robbed, as

768.

were

On Thursday last, as Solomon Davis (formerly a commander

of a vessel in the London trade)

N. Y.

family,

happened between Elisha Brown

of N. Hampton, and one Norton, late of L. called

him and

executed Sept. 10.

for burglary,

Annanias

Piatt,

Sol. Davis,

Friday before Sep 26,

were

4, '83.

near Jamaica,

'85.

Loudon.

John Smith, David Ralph, Nath. Skudder,

of Huntington, were put in Provost, Sep. 2, '83, accused of robbery

on L. days

;

I.,

and sentenced

pay a

to

fine of

£100

sterling, each, in

15

or should his Majesty's troops leave before that time, and the

fine not paid, they are to receive cat-o'nine-tails.

—Cornelius

Carll,

1000 lashes on the back, with the

Esa Whitman,

Silas

Sammis, and

Jacob Lawrence were put in Provost, but acquitted. Riv. Nov. '83. 769.

Whigs made

What money may

have been loaned to the State by the

of Suffolk, cannot be

known

till

Gov. Clinton's papers are

(See Queens Co., 316.)

accessible.

was secretly commissioned by Gov. money from wealthy Whig inhabitants of

In '81, Capt'. Nath'l Norton Clinton, to obtain loans of

6


ARMED OCCUPATION OF SUFFOLK COUNTY.

110 L.

for the use of Gov't,

I.

and

to conceal the object,

he was appoint-

of the " Suffolk," which cruised between Sands

command

ed to the

He obtained

Point and N. Haven.

ment.

There are many

traditions

sums on the faith of GovernThompson, II. 496. of the war to which we can barely large

allude without vouching for their truth

:

such as that a Maj. Davis,

of E. Hampton, became a prisoner in the latter part of the war, and died in N. Y. by poison administered in his chocolate

Strong was murdered by the

was taken prison,

at the battle of

and that Ezra

The accounts the

Brooklyn, and

Weeks

;

and that Maj.

Wm.

Tallmadge

starved to death in

literally

waylaid and shot a British

officer.

of British

receipts

or other

officers,

£7249. 9. 6 and was supposed not to conone-fourth of what was taken. They were sent to N. Y. to be

evidence, amounted to tain

and that

of the people of Huntington, for property taken by

supported by

British,

British,

:

Commissioners, but were not attended

laid before the

Wood's L.

May

6,

The

'84.

to. I.

p. 90.

Legislature imposed a tax of £37,000 on L.

I.

(making £10,000 for Suffolk, £13,000 for Kings, and £14,000 for Queens,) as a compensation to the other parts of the State for not having been in a condition to support the war from '76 to '83, called the " back tax."

We

Wood's L.

I. p. '81.

have no account of the celebration of peace in Suffolk Co.

except the following

At return of peace Col. Tallmadge visited his native place, where the patriotic citizens got up a festival, roasted an ox whole, Slmms, 549. and made the Major master of ceremonies. The influences of war are always demoralizing, but it was especially disastrous to

farms and stock debt,

and

at the

Suffolk.

fled to

Many Whigs had

abandoned their

the Main, where they became involved in

peace returned poor.

They found

their farms out

of order, buildings dilapidated, fences gone, stock carried land cut

off,

churches deserted or torn down.

sued for trespass some Loyalists

no accounts of the

trials.

who remained

No

off,

doubt the

behind, but

wood-

Whigs

we

have


KINGS COUNTY.


REVOLUTIONARY INCIDENTS OF

KINGS COUNTY.

PART

I.

REVOLUTIONARY SPIRIT 770. Flatbush, Ap. 15, '75.

KINGS COUNTY.

At a meeting of

the

Com-

mittee chosen by the several towns of Kings County, at the

County Hall

:

present from Flatbush,

David Clarkson, Ad-

rian Voorhies, Jacobus Vandeventer, John Vanderbelt

;

from

Bushwick, Theodoras Polhemus, John Titus, Jost Duryea,

Abm. Van Ranst, Abm. Lequere from Brooklyn, Simon Boerum, Henry Williams, Jeremiah Remsen, John Suydam, Johannes Bergen, Jacob Sharpe, Rem Cowenhoven ; from JV. Utrelcht, Petrus Van Pelt, Denice Denice, Adrian Hege;

man

;

from

Gravesend, Richard

Stillwell,

Isaac

Denice

Simon Boerum, Esq., was chosen Chairman, when it was resolved unanimously, that Simon Boerum, Richard Stillwell, Theodoras Polhemus, Denice Denice and Jeremiah Vanderbilt,

or a major part of them, be appointed Deputies to the

Convention, for choosing Delegates to the Continental Con-

May. Cowenhoven appeared and said,

gress, to be held at Philadelphia, in

Justice

that Flatlands


REVOLUTIONARY

114

SPIRIT.

would not put a negative on the proceedings, but chose remain neutral.

ABM. At

771.

a general

May 20,

Brooklyn,

J

Town

VAN RANST,

to

Clerk.

Meeting, regularly warned, at

75, the Magistrates and Freeholders met,

and voted Jer. Remsen, Esq.,

the chair,

into

and Leffert

Lefferts, Esq., Clerk.

Taking

our serious consideration the expediency and

into

propriety of concurring with the freeholders and freemen of the City and

County of N. Y., and the other Colonies, Town-

ships and Precincts, within this Province, for holding a Provincial Congress to at this

liberties

watch over and defend,

advise, consult,

very alarming

crisis, all

our

and privileges, according

civil

to

and religious

rights,

pru-

collective

their

dence.

After duly considering the unjust plunder and inhuman

carnage committed on the property and persons of our brethren in the Massachusetts, who, with the other N. Eng-

land Colonies, are

now deemed by

the Mother Country to

be in a state of actual rebellion, by which declaration Eng-

beyond her own power

treat with

New

land hath put

it

England, or

propose or receive any terms of reconciliation,

to

submit as a conquered country.

until those Colonies shall

The

effort to

first

which was by military and naval

effect

force, the next attempt

is,

by depriving them of both which the powers

driven

to

bring a famine

their natural

all

in their

at

home, by oppressive measures, have

the other Protestant Provinces,

power

to fear, as

Resolved, That

Esqrs., be

May

now

we have

all evils

they have already declared

Provinces aiders and abettors of rebellion 1st.

among them,

and acquired right of

Further contemplating the very unhappy situation

fishing. to

to

:

all

the

Therefore,

Henry Williams and

Jer.

Remsen,

elected Deputies for this Township, to meet

22, with other Deputies in Provincial Convention,

in


KINGS COUNTY.

N. Y., and tial

115

there to consider, determine and do, all

pruden-

and necessary business.

That we, confiding

2d. Resolved,

in

Signed by order of the

Town

warrantable

all

and orders, as said Congress

acts, associations

wisdom and

the

equity of said Convention, do agree to observe

shall direct.

Meeting,

LEFFERT LEFFERTS, At a meeting

772. ships in

Kings Co.,

(at Flatbush,

May

electing Delegates to represent said

now

Clerk.

of the several Deputies of the different

held in the City of N. Y.

;

Town-

22, '75,) for the purpose of

County

in Provincial Congress,

agreeable to said meeting, they here-

by appoint Richard

Stillwell, Theodorus Polhemus, John Lefferts, Cowenhoven, Johannes E. Lott, John Vanderbilt, Henry Williams, and Jer. Remsen, Esqrs., or any three of them, Delegates

Nich.

to represent and fully to act in behalf of the before-mentioned County.

ABM. 773.

At a meeting of

15, '75, at

Wm.

the

company of light horse

Adolph Waldron's, Innholder,

Rem

Boerum,

Isaac J. Sebring,

Sam'l Etherington,

at

E.

LOTT,

for

Brooklyn, Sep.

Brooklyn Ferry, present

A. Remsen,

Adolph Waldron,

David Titus,

Geo. Powers,

Wm. & Thos. Everitt,

Jos. Smith,

Jacob Kemper,

John Hicks,

John Reade,

John Guest,

Wm.

Rob. Galbraithe,

Nich.

Jacob Sebring,

jr.,

Sec.

Van Dam,

Chardavoyne,

Thos. Hazard.

Adolph Waldron was chosen Chairman, and Isaac J. Sebring, They then elected Adolph Waldron, Capt. Wm. Boerum, 1st Lt. (in the place of Rem. A. Remsen declined) Thos. Everitt, 2d Lt. Jacob Sebring, jr., Cornet, and Isaac Sebring, Q. M. Clerk.

;

;

;

774. In consequence of the ill-success of the British arms at Boston, the Ministry resolved to

with the design of cutting

and

New

England

remove the seat of war

off

all

to

New-York,

intercourse between the Southern

States.

Gen. Lee with 1700

men reached NY,

Feb.

3, '76, for the

purpose

of disarming the Loyalists and constructing fortifications in and about

N. Y.

He

barricaded

all

the streets leading into Broadway, erected

a battery on an eminence in the rear of Trinity Church, at Hellgate,


REVOLUTIONARY

116

SPIRIT.

the Highlands, Kingsbridge, Paulus Hook,

N.

W.

Red Hook, and on

the

side of Governor's Island.

Feb. 18, he posted 400 of the Penn. troops from Wallabout to

Those who could not procure lodgment were

Gowanus.

billeted

on

the inhabitants of Brooklyn.

775. Feb. 28.

The

people of Brooklyn wish to

shall be paid for billeting soldiers.

week

room

for a

for officers,

and

know

New-York, Feb. is

they

7s.

per

Is. Ad. for privates.

776.

Gen. Lee

if

Congress allowed them

23, 1776.

taking every necessary step to fortify and defend ;

the Phenix

is at

the

vast

number of houses shut up, one would think the

city almost

The men of war Hook the Asia

the city.

lies

daily

coming

any houses they

in

see the

are scarce to be seen in the streets.

they break open and quarter themselves

:

Mr. Jacob Walton was ordered

find shut up.

give up his house, which

To

near Bedlow's Island.

Women and children

evacuated.

Troops are in

are gone out of our harbor

;

now

is

to

occupied with soldiers.

FRED'K RHINELANDER. March

777.

6, '76.

Congress recommended to the Committee

of Kings Co., to furnish Col.

and other timber

pickets,

to

Ward

brush for fascines, wood for

complete the works on L.

had 519 men. 778.

20

men

Col.

I.

W.

Jour. 341.

Col.

Ward was

ordered (March 8) to detach 2 parties of

each, with 3 days' provisions, in order to stop the

cation of the people with the Phenix.

He was

bushes near the shore, and just about daylight

communi-

to hide his to

send a

guard in

man

along

shore below the Narrows to cut a hole in the bottom of the boats, or

take

away

779. tinued in

sails. He was also to Frank Jones, who decoyed vessels

the oars and

pecially one

March 6. command

March

Lord till

13, '76.

Stirling succeeded

Washington's

seize the pilotsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;esto the Phenix.

Gen. Lee, and con-

arrival in April.

Extract from Regulations for defence

of N. Y., agreed to between Stirling and Provincial Congress, 1.

when

the English

were expected from Boston.

All whites and negroes shall do fatigue duty.


KINGS COUNTY.

The

6.

Kings Co.

inhabitants of

Ward, by turning out hoes, and pickaxes

A

7.

shall give assistance to Col.

for service at least

lation (negroes included) every to

day

117

one half

male popu-

their

at the fortifications, with spades,

begin Friday next.

guard of six of the Kings Co. troop to be posted on some

heights near the west end of Nassau Island, to reconnoitre the en*

enemy

trance of the coast,

into

Sandy Hook, or

and give immediate information

appearance on the

their

commanding officer.—

to the

See Queens Co., 42. Capt. Waldroivs light horse kept a look-out on the southern coast of Kings Co. (stationed at

till

Ap. 10, when Col. Hand's regiment of riflemen was

N. Utrecht.

[Waldron

N.

lived at Preakness,

Monday

780. Ap. 15, '76.

during the war.

J.,

possession of Governor's Island and began to fortify

ment went over June 11,

N. Y.

It is

to

'76.

I

Red Hook and

am now

barbette, that

be

stationed at

is,

we have

a fort

it

likewise.

it,

and a

regi-

Gaine.

Red Hook, about 4 miles from command the entrance of the

to

with four 18 pounders, to

over the top of the works, which

is

fire

en

vastly better than

we can now bring all our guns to bear on The fort is named Defiance, and thought to one of the most important posts we have. There are two families here, Mr. Van Dyke and his son, good

firing

the

fortified

on an island situated so as

harbor entirely, where

Ed.]

night 1000 Continental troops took

through embrasures, as

same

object at once.

stanch Whigs, and \ery clever folks. to .Flushing, 16 miles off,

I

rode out with the young

man

where, and in most of the country towns about,

the forces from

the city have taken shelter. Scarce a house we rode Mr. Van Dyke would say, " there lives a rascally Tory." Shaw. When the Rose and Phenix ran by our batteries, July 12, they did

by, but

not compliment says,

two miles

Red Hook distant.

so

much

as to return her

fire,

being, as

781. Explanation of the American Lines of Defence at

See a.

Shaw

Ed.

M'Dougal's Battery, on a

New-York.

Map. hill

west

of,

and very near, Trinity

Church. 6.

c.

now the Battery. North of it was the " Broadway Bowling Green, or King's Statue. It had 2 guns.

Fort George,

Barrier," near the

Battery at the ship yards.

6*


REVOLUTIONARY

118

now

Corlaers Hook.

d.

Crown Point

e.

Main, or Battery Channel, where

Battery,

SPIRIT.

think chevaux de frise were

I

sunk. /.

Governor's Island.

Red Hook, on Long

g. Fort at

Pierrepont i.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;open

nis

in the rear

Fort Putnam, on a

was

Boschje,) which j.

Island.

Fort Greene

on land of Jacob Hicks.

;

A

conical

Corkscrew Fort.

partly cut

down.

round, and

It

on land of Johan-

had 5 guns.

very steep, called Ponkiesbergh, Cobble Hill, or "

had 3 guns.

It

had a platform on top

it

had 7 guns.

had 5 guns.

It

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the southeast front of the Lines

hill,

It

then covered with heavy wood, (Conover's

hill

Debevoice and Rutger Vanbrunt. k.

had 5 guns.

It

Fort Stirling, between Hicks and Clinton streets, and east of

A.

The for

trenches went round and

So says and old

cannon."

soldier. I.

hill.

Redoubt It

at

the Mill, (was

commanded

it

Batteries in and near

Fort Box

1)

on Nicholas Boerum's

and had one gun.

the Mill (4),

yew-York, March

Force, V. 480.

24, '76.

Grenadier's, or Circular Battery, 5 guns, near the air-furnace on the

bank of the North River. Jersey's Battery, 5 guns, a

very near

northward of the

to the

little

M'DougalPs Battery, 4 guns,

to the

first.

west of Trinity Church, and

it.

Broadway Barrier, 2 guns, very near

the

Bowling Green, or King's

Statue.

Ten Eyck's

Coentie's Battery, 5 guns, on Stirling's

Market.

Battery, 8 guns, on L.

In the rear of this there

is

I.,

wharf.

and nearly opposite the Fly

to be

a citadel, which will take up

about 5 acres, called The Congress.

Waterbury's Battery, 7 guns, at the ship yards.

Badlam's Battery, 8 guns, on Rutger's

first

hill,

just

above the

last

mentioned.

Thompson's Battery, 9 guns,

at

Hoorne's Hook.

Independent Battery, 12 guns, on Bayard's Mount. Besides the above, there

is

abreast-work, or barrier, at Peck's, Beek-

man's, Burling's, and Fly Slips

;

also at the Coffee

Coentie's Market and the Exchange, and one this construction

;

House, Old

midway

and the same are made

Slip,

of Broad-st. of

in several streets

leading from the North River to Broadway. Also a line of circumvallation from river to river.


KINGS COUNTY.

Names

of Batteries,

May

22, '76, at

Grand Battery, south part of town, three 18's, two 12's, one brass mortar, 3 Fort George, immediately above

White Hall Battery,

119 New-York

thirteen

City.

32 pounders, one 24,

iron mortars prepared.

two 12 pounders, four

it,

32's.

Grand Battery, two 32 pounders. Oyster Battery, behind Washington's head-quarters, two 32 poundleft

of

ers, three 12's.

Grenadier's, or Circular Battery, neax Brewhouse on

N. River,

three

12 pounders, 2 mortars prepared. Jersey Battery,

left

of Grenadier,

two 12 pounders, three

Bayard's Hill redoubt, 9 eight pounders, four

3's, six

32's.

and co-

royal

horn mortars. Spencer's Redoubt, on a

hill

where Gen. Spencer

is

encamped, two

12 pounders, four field-pieces proposed.

Waterbury's Battery, cer's redoubt,

is

a fascine Battery on a wharf below Spen-

two 12 pounders.

Badlam's Redoubt,

is

on a

hill directly

above

it,

near Jew's burying

ground.

On Long At

the redoubts are no artillery

Island.

men, two 12 pounders, two

9's,

four

3's of brass.

Fort Stirling, Lt. Randall and 12 men, four 32 pounders, two

Red Hook,

18's.

Capt. Foster, one 3 pounder, four 18's.

Governor's Island, Capt. Craft, four 18 pounders, four 32's.

Paulus Hook, Capt. Dana proposed, two 12 pounders, two

The Park, as a makes the greatest 3's,

three 32's,

3's.

reserve, Capt. Drury, to be run

where the enemy

attack, twelve 6 pounders, eight 3's, one 24, three

nine 12's.

782. Officers chosen by the different .

Companies in Kings Co.,

who have signed the Declaration and taken missions. March, '76.

their

Com-

LIGHT HOESE. Brooklyn. Everitt,

2d

— Adolph Waldron, Capt. Jacob Sebring, Ensign — Lamb't Suydam, Capt.

Lt.

Kings

Co.

Bloom, 2d

Lt.

;

;

;

;

Wm.

;

Isaac Sebring, Q. Master.

Boerum,

1st Lt.

Dan'l Rapelye, 1st Lt.

Peter Vandevoort, Ensign

;

;

;

Thos. Jacob

Peter Wykoff, Q. Master.


REVOLUTIONARY

120

SPIRIT.

MILITIA. 1st Lt,

Albert StoohofF, Flatlands.— Jeremiah Vanderbilt, Capt. Thos. Elsworth, 2d Lt. Peter Vanderbilt, Ensign. Samuel Hubbard, Gravesend. Rem Williamson, Capt. ;

;

;

John Lane, Ensign.

Half of Brooklyn.— Bar eut Johnson, Capt. Jost Debevoice, 2d Lt.

Flatbush.

Half

Wm.

Lt.

of Brooklyn.

Bushwyck. Colyer, 2d Lt.

1st Lt,

Vandeveer, Capt.

;

Peter LefFerts, 1st Lt.

John Benham, Ensign.

;

— Fer'd Suydam, Capt.

Brower, 2d Lt.

Barent LefTerts,

;

Martin Schenck, Ensign.

;

— Cornelius

John Vanduyn, 2d

Lt.

1st

;

Garret Williamson, 2d Lt.

;

Simon Bergen,

Lt.

1st

Jacob Stellenwert, Ensign.

;

— John

Titus, Capt.

;

Abm. Van

Ranst, 1st Lt.

;

Peter

John Skillman, Ensign.

;

N. Utrecht. Adrian Van Brunt, Capt. Adrian Hegeman, Harmanus Barkulo, 2d Lt. Wm. Barre, Ensign. ;

1st Lt.

;

March

783.

Rutgert

Van

11, '76.

Kings Co. Committee appointed Nich. Cowenhoven, Lt. Col.

Brunt, Col.

;

:

;

Johan-

nes Titus, 1st Major; John Vanderbilt, 2d Major; Geo. Carpenter, Adj.

;

Nich. Cowenhoven, Q.

M.

of their

Regiment of

militia.

Jour. 351.

Feb. 18, '76.

784.

Congress requests the attendance of the

absent members from Kings Co. Vanderbilt,

Vanbrunt and

Accordingly Messrs. Cowenhoven,

LefFerts, take their seats.

[Their previous attendance had been quite irregular.

Ed.]

Ap. 16, '76. John LefFerts, Nich. Cowenhoven, Jeremiah Remsen, Theodorus Polhemus, Leffert LefFerts, Rutgert Vanbrunt, Jeremiah Vanderbilt and John Vanderbilt, were chosen to make a representation out of their body for the Provincial Congress, and that any four, three,

two, or one, LefFerts,

may

be

a quorum, as appears by the certificate of John

Chairman, and Abm. Van Ranst, Clerk of the Committee of

Kings Co. 785.

June

21, '76.

the bay S. and S. sails

W.

Convention recommend that

of Kings Co., be

all

boats in

drawn up, and the oars and

secured, so as to prevent the communication of the disaffected

with the enemy.

June

21.

fore Congress.

Col. G. Brewerton, at Flatlands,

Mayor Matthews was

seized

was summoned at

Flatbush.

be-

His


KINGS COUNTY, house surrounded one o'clock

He was

his papers.

786.

Col.

at night,

sent to Conn,

Van Brunt

and a vain search made for

where he broke

Army

at

N. ÂĽ.,

viz.

Jacques Rapalje, Capt., and Geo. Carpenter, 2d Lt.

On

787. in the

and escaped.

jail

delivered to Congress the quota of

Continental

Co., to reinforce the

121

58

:

June

Kings

men and

27, '76.

Thursday, the Asia being in rear of the British

Narrows, was

fired

returned the compliment with forty 24 pounders.

fleet

I.,

when she

One

of which

on by a small battery on L.

lodged in the wall of Mr. Bennet's house, and 3 shot had near done

damage

to

his barn,

Mr. Denyse's house, one missed

of the mansion house.

Gen.

788.

July

Howe

to

8, '76.

Lord Geo. Germaine. Sxalen Island, July

The

2d struck

his kitchen, a

and a 3d destroyed the garden fence opposite the front door

7, 8, '76.

Sandy Hook, where I arrived four days sooner. I met with Gov. Tryon on board ship at the Hook, and many gentlemen, fast friends to Government, attending him, from whom I have had the fullest information of the state of the Rebels, who are numerHalifax

fleet arrived

June 29,

at

ous and very advantageously posted, with strong intrenchments,both upon

and at N. Y., with more than 100 pieces of cannon for the defence of town towards the sea, and to obstruct the passage of the fleet up the North river, besides a considerable field train of artillery. We passed L.

I.

the

the

Narrows with

three ships of war,

and the

1st division of transports

;

landed the Grenadiers and Light Infantry, as the ships came up, on this Island, to the great joy of a

most

loyal people, long suffering on that ac-

count under the oppression of the Rebels stationed precipitately fled on the approach

the troops landed next day

of the shipping.

and night, and are now distributed

ments, where they have the best refreshments. for the

English

fleet,

to proceed, unless by

in the

mean

789. fourth

among them, who The remainder of in

canton-

propose waiting here

I

or for the arrival of Lt. Gov. Clinton, in readiness

some unexpected change of circumstances

it

should

time be found expedient to act with the present force.

To the Hon. Provincial Congress, July 26. Whereas Col. Rutgert Van Brunt has demanded every

man

of our companies,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;we, Jeremiah

Vanderbilt, Cornelius

Vandeveer, Barent Johnson, Lambert Suydam,

and John Titus, Captains of Kings indulge us with the

Co.- militia,

men under our command

Rem

Williamson,

pray Congress to

to execute said

Re-

<


— 122

REVOLUTIONARY

solves of July 20, relating to

provided

it

SPIRIT.

Kings Co. stock, without being

be in Kings Co., and

we

promise to be ready

when

paid,

called

on, to drive stock into the interior, guard the coast and protect the inhabitants.

Ed]

[July 30. Congress refused the above request.

790.

Aug.

pair to said

The Convention having

10.

had determined not

to

heard that Kings Co.

oppose the enemy, ordered a Committee to re-

County, and

the report should be true, to disarm and

if

secure the disaffected inhabitants

remove or destroy the stock of and for the execu-

;

grain, and if necessary, lay the whole county waste, tion of these purposes, to apply to

Gen. Greene

for

such assistance as

they may want. 791.

Thos. Lane, Capt.

command command 20 men, Lt.

;

Jour. 568.

Col. Conover,

to

;

Aug.

14, '76,

requests Commissions

Nich. Vanbrunt, 1st Lt.

the drafts.

Also

for

;

Mich'1

Van

for

2d

Cleef,

Harmanus Casper,

Lt., to

not militia, but to be under Capt. Lane.

Kings Co. not having elected any deputies since May last, 792. Mr. Polhemus (Aug. 14) appeared in Convention, and said the County Committee had met, and directed him to attend as a member, until another election is

ordered that Mr.

had

Polhemus take his which related to

seat and represent said County, except in matters

the formation of Government.

793.

The Convention

Journal, 572.

vote the election of Kings Co.

defective, as the Deputies are not authorized to frame a

government.

—New election ordered, Aug. 24, but never

794.

Kings

Aug.

new form held.

Co. Troop of Horse.

Lambert Suydam, Capt. *Jacob Bloom, 2d Lt.

*Dan'l Rapalje, 1st Lt.

*Peter Vandevoort, Ensign.

Hend'k Suydam, Cl'k. Hend'k Suydam, jr., Serg't. *John B!aw, Trumpeter.

*Hend'k Johnson, John Nostrand,

Peter Wykoff, Q.

Serg't.

do.

M.

Privates.

*Reynier Suydam,

Jacob Suydam,

Isaac Boerum,

*John Vanderveer,

Isaac Snedeker,

John Ryerson,

Seaman,

Rutgert Vanbrunt,

Chas. Debevois,

Benj.

Roelof Terhune,

Andrew

Thos. Betts,

Martin Kershaw,

Peter Miller,

Casper,

Hend'k Wykoff.

19,

of


KINGS COUNTY.

123

Brooklyn Troop of Horse.

*YVm. Boerum,

Thos

1st Lt.

Everitt,

2d Lt.

* Isaac Sebring, Q.

* Jacob Sebring, Ensign.

M.

Privates. * Joseph Sebring,

*John Hicks,

*George Povvel,

*Wm. *Wm.

Elswortb,

*Jerem'h Brovver,

* James Casper.

Boerum,

*Adolphus Brower,

Wm.

Abm.

Everitt,

Joseph Smith,

Stephen Schenck,

Rapalje,

Nicholas Vandam.

Sam'l Etherington,

Robert Galbraith,

[The above Troops were first in service under Gen. Greene, who bid them seize for Commissary Brown the fat stock of the disaffected next they drove off stock under Gen. Woodhull; after the defeat at

;

Brooklyn, as they were proceeding east to join Col. Livingston, they

were ordered off the Island by Col. Potter, and accordingly, those

whose name a

star is prefixed, crossed the

Sound

walk, leaving their horses behind, which were

were

in

Duchess Co., Oct.

4, '76, in

destitute

ceived their pay from the Convention.

XXXII,

— MS.

at

Huntington them.

lost to

to

to

Nor-

The men

circumstances, and reJour.,

XVII, 529, and

46, 62.

P. Vandevoort,

jr.,

left

father,

mother, wife, and two children at

Bedford, and had not yet seen them, Feb. 14/82,

when he was

at Fish-

kill.— £d.]

795. Washington

came

to

N. York before April 13, and ap-

pointed Greene to superintend the fortifications on L. eral

had made himself acquainted with every pass and

I.

This gen-

defile leading

few days before the battle, from over was brought down with bilious fever. Sullivan took place till Aug. 23, when Putnam took command within the

to the city, but unfortunately, a

exertion, he his

Lines.

Stirling

Aug.

and Sullivan appear to have acted under him. Return of American Army at N. Y.

3.

Present

fit

for duty,

Present sick,

Absent

3,039

629

sick,

Absent on command, Absent on furlough, Total.

These were

distributed

Paulus Hook, and Hurlgate.

10,514

2,946

97 17,225

on Governor's, York, and Long Island,


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

:

124

REVOLUTIONARY

A

Whig 8,000

SPIRIT.

paper thus sums up the British army

men who

sailed with

Howe

from Halifax,

2,350 Scotch Troops,

2,500 defeated Troops of Cornwallis and Clinton, from Sullivan'g Island,

9^000 Hessians and English guards,

150 Dunmore's Negroes, Tories, &c. 22,000 5,000 3d division of Hessians expected.

The Regiments

April 28, '76.

Nixon, Stark,

Prescott, Varnurn,

of Cols.

Hand, Learned, Reed,

Parsons, Hitchcock, Little, Reed,

Webb, Arnold, Ward, Wyllys, Bailey, Wayne, Wind, McDougall, Ritzema, Dayton, Irvine, and Baldwin, were at N. Y. con-

Huntington,

sisting of 10,325

men.

Force V, 1151, 1198.

In July, Col. Furman's N. Bradley's, and Col. Carey's

Hinman

J.

Levies, Col.

Van

Regiments were stationed

Cortland's, at

Col.

N. Y.

says 14 Regiments of Conn. Militia, (9 or 10,000) under

Gen. Wolcot, were ordered

to N. Y. But Washington says only 9 Regi* ments (3,150) arrived before Aug. 16 and 3 Regiments (1,120) Aug. .19 in all, 4,170 men. If two more Regiments should be added, the ;

;

number of militia would hardly equal half of that staled by Hinman. Aug. 26. Washington writes, " There are here 9 militia regiments

men

from Conn, of 350

each."

After the battle of Aug. 27, the militia disbanded and went home.

The

regular troops were in one division of

two brigades under Maj.

Gen. Spencer and Brig. Gens. Wadsworth and Parsons. July 17.

Washington

writes, "

charged, though their assistance

is

refused all kind of fatigue duty, or

Hinman, p. 59. The Conn, light horse are now dismuch needed, having peremptorily even to mount guard, claiming an

exemption as troopers." [It is

a popular story on L.

I.,

quarters at the Cortelyou House. the Lines at Brooklyn.

went over

to

Brooklyn

Howe

796.

15,000

men were

warped

in

fall

Washington

or

Putnam had

Washington's quarters were in N. Y.

had begun, Aug. 27.

to carry the

works on L.

an easy prey into

landed at

Gravesend Bay.

their

In fact they were neither ever outside

after the Battle

determined

the city itself would

that

He

Ed.] I.,

when

Aug. 22, Bath under cover of armed vessels

The

rifle

his hands.

regiment under Col.

Hand


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 125

KINGS COUNTY.

made no

withdrew

opposition, but

to the

Lines, setting

fire to

the

stacks of hay and grain.

Howe

Cornwallis was where he had some skirmishing with the Ameri-

established his quarters at N. Utrecht.

ordered-to Flatbush,

can outposts. "

On

Friday, 23d, a party of British took possession of Flatbush,

which brought on a hot

fire

from our troops

camped a little to somewhat west of

the

N.

W.

who

An

posted in woods and on every eminence.

are advantageously

advanced party are en-

of Flatbush Church, and have a battery

Jer'h Vanderbilt's,

whence they

fire

briskly on our

who often approach and discharge rifles within 200 yds. of their works. One of our gunners threw a shell into Mr. Axtell's house where a number of officers were at dinner, but we have not heard what damage people,

it

did."

This afternoon the enemy formed and attempted

Aug. 23. the

wood by

Bedford, [Flatbush?] and a smart

A

riflemen ensued. the riflemen,

whose

fire

number of musquetry came up with that of the

fire

field

to pass

between them and the to the assistance

of

pieces caused a retreat of

the enemy. Our men followed to the house of Judge Leff'erts, (where a number of them had taken lodgings), drove them out, and burned the house and contiguous buildings. We have driven them half a mile

from their former station.

Aug. 24. wasteful

fire

Sullivan.

Washington disapproves of a from our people at the enemy.

Washington's Instructions

The wood next Red Hook

men

should, at

and

will

Putnam, Aug.

to

it.

The

militia

25. to.

Put some

are the most

do for the interior works, whilst your best

hazards, prevent the enemy's passing the

all

approaching the works. traps

unmeaning, and

should be well attended

of the most disorderly riflemen into indifferent troops

scattering,

The woods

and ambuscades should be

wood and

should be secured by abatis;

laid for their parties sent after cattle.

Aug. 26. Considerable reinforcements are sent over to L. I. There was a little skirmishing and irregular firing between the British and American advanced guards, in which Col. Martin of the New Jersey Levies received a

broke by a cannon

wound

ball,

in his breast, and a private had his leg and another received a musket ball in his groin.

[Hermanus Rutgers was struck bush Pass and

fell

forward dead.

in Strong's Flatbush.

Ed]

in the breast

by a 6

lb.

shot at the Flat-

Many curious particulars may be

found


REVOLUTIONARY

126

A

f97.

By

Proclamation.

WM. HOWE, General and ComHis Majesty's forces within the Colonies Atlantic Ocean, from Nova Scotia to West Florida,

Excellency,

his

SPIRIT.

the

Hox.

7iiander-in- Chief of all

lying on the

inclusive, <$>c, rfc,

Whereas, this Island

it is

<SfC.

represented that

many

of the loyal inhabitants of

have been compelled by the leaders in

rebellion, to take

up arms against His Majesty's Government, Notice to all persons so forced into rebellion, that

up

at said quarters

subjects, lings,

of the

hereby given

will be received as faithful

have permits peaceably to return to their respective dwel-

and meet with

All those

Army, they

is

on delivering themselves

who

full

protection for their persons and property.

choose to take up arms for the restoration of order

and good government within

this Island, shall

be disposed of in the

best manner, and have every encouragement that can be expected.

Given under

my

hand

at

Head Quarters on Long

By

his Excellency's

798.

Island,

Aug.

WM. HOWE.

23, 1776.

command.

ROB'T MAKENSIE,

Examination of Col. Covenhoven,

at

Sec.

Harlem, Aug. 28,

suspected of giving intelligence to the enemy, and arrested by order of the Convention. " Left L.

Jour. 598.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Sunday morning, Aug. 25 came last from Wilhelmus Stoothoof's Island. The day the enemy landed, as he was returning from the lines, he was taken by them, and treated roughly, took his sword and cockade and carried him to Head-quarters, was politely received by Gen. Howe, who asked him if he would stay at home, and send his produce, which he 'promised to do. They sent for him a 2d time same day, ordered him to get fowls, &c. Under pretence of which, he went off, got a horse and went to Gen. Washington and asked him what part he should take, who directed him to go back and collect information, which he did, and sent it to Washington, and got back withThey never questioned him further. He afterwards out being missed. met some Hessians, who took him to get cows, and agreed among themselves, in Hessian language, to put him to death, after he had shown them the cows, as they were forbid to kill cattle. He showed them a cow and left them. Most of the stock had been driven off before. He then went to Flatlands, where he saw many Regulars and Gov. Tryon. Gens. Howe, Clinton and Pigot, were on the Island, and were joined by I.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; KINGS COUNTY. a few people from the Island.

Left L.

and was arrested when he got

gress,

to

I.

127

on Sunday

McGowen's

[Parson Schoonmaker requested two Stillwells

come

to

at

Con-

to

Harlem.

to leave

Harlem and

not act as witnesses, for which act of kindness the Colonel gave the

Ed.]

Parson eight guineas. 799.

He

left

Sam'l Hubbard, of Gravesend, was examined by Congress.

home

for Bedford,

He

British had landed.

Aug.

22,

removed

and could not return because the

Lt. Vanderbilt's wife

wife and daughter to Mr. Benson's.

Schoonmaker

said

and Ryerson's

John Sickles says Parson

Mr. Hubbard was a hearty friend

to the

American

cause.

800.

lem

in

1,500

Mr. Abm. Van Ranst of Bushwick arrived Aug. 27,

Har-

at

a boat with his family, and says he understood that last night

men surrounded

companies of

Simon Duryea, a mile south and wagon that 2 the neighborhood of Bedford were disarmed

the house of Mr.

of his house, and took militia in

away

his arms, horses

;

and perhaps taken prisoners."

Journal, 594.

801. Explanation of the operations of the two Armies,

Aug. 22-29.

See Map. m. Denyse's large stone house, now Fort Hamilton, (where 'tis said were a cannon and body of men posted.) abreast of which lay the Rainbow, so as to enfilade the road from N. Y. 7i.

N. Utrecht beach, where

the farms of Isaac Cortelyou the

Bath House,

anciently called o.

the

i.

e.

between the Cortelyou road and the Bath road,

De Bruyn

road.

Schoomaker's Bridge,

(still

army under Clinton might p.

A

passage over the

or a detachment of q. r.

the British landed, Aug. 22 and 24, on and Adrian Van Brunt, which lay W. of

it,

hill

extant,) a very

easily

narrow passage where

have been stopped.

by which

J.

Howard

led the British

army

about 2 o'clock A. M., Aug. 27.

The Jamaica Pass. The road The Hunder-fly Road.

s.

Baker's Tavern.

t.

Bennett's Cove, where

'tis

in

1776 went around a large

said, 3,000 British landed

hill.

on the morn-

ing of Aug. 27. u.

Martense's Lane, by which Stirling says the forces came,

were opposed v.

to

him.

Red Lion Tavern,

.

as

is

.

supposed, mentioned by Stirling.

w. Stirling's force [on Wykoff's Hill?] morning of Aug. 27.

who


REVOLUTIONARY

128

SPIRIT.

x.

Grant's force, morning of Aug. 27.

y.

The scene

of Stirling's last encounter with the enemy, while his

main body escaped over the Creek and Mill-dam. N. B. The precise spots w, x, y, cannot now perhaps be

The

hills

remain, but

all else is

identified.

changed.

Cortelyou House, built of brick and stone, 1699, by N. Vechte,and

z.

Probably the scene of some fighting. One writer says " Cornwallis was posted in a house above where the crossing was to be made ;" and another says " the British had several field-pieces stationed standing.

still

by a brick house, and were pouring cannister and grape on the Americans crossing the creek." British redoubt

1.

thrown up on the night of Aug. 28, on high land

of George Debevoise. 2.

Buttermilk Channel.

3.

Stone (Dutch) church in the road, where

held his military council.

It

was

the

'tis

said,

Washington

alarm post on the night of the

retreat.

Brower's Mill.

4.

as to expose

it

The

side

toward the Fort

to the fire of the Fort, in case

In the confusion of the retreat,

it.

before

mill

drowned

retreating

in the mill-pond.

a foot path. 5.

the

The

mill

Flatbush Pass.

said, Col.

(I) was ripped off so enemy should occupy

Ward

set

fire to this

Americans got over. Hence they were There was then no road over the dam, only

is still

A

'tis

the

standing, the pond mostly

large old

oak was

felled as

filled up.

an abatis across

the road, to cover the small redoubt of 3 six pounders. 6. 7.

swam

Americans retreating across the mouth of A party of Americans who covered the

retreat of those

who

over the creek.

8.

Port or Mill Road, by which

9.

Brooklyn Ferry.

10. Wallebocht.

11. East River. 12.

PaulusHook.

13.

North River.

14.

Gowanus Bay.

15.

Yellow Hook.

16.

18.

The Narrows. Road to the Narrows. Road to New Lots.

19.

Howard's Halfway House.

17.

the creek.

De

Heister

may have

descended.


129

KINGS COUNTY.

The

N. B.

dotted lines indicate the supposed routes of the three

divisions of the British

army on

802. Aug. 26. Gen.

proceeded to Flatbush,

De

the

morning of Aug. 27.

Heister landed with the Hessians and

when Cornwallis moved

off to Flatlands.

Learning from the disaffected inhabitants that the Jamaica pass was unoccupied, 1.

lane.]

2.

arranged his plan of attack.

towards Brooklyn, and

were

ships

Howe

Gen. Grant, was to advance by the shore road [or Martense's

De

to

make a feint in at Red Hook.

The

that direction.

bombard the Fort

Heister

Flatbush pass,

till

was

to take

up the attention of the Americans

he should hear the British

fire in their rear,

at

when

he was to push on in earnest. 3.

The main body

of the

army was

to

draw

off

under cover of

night towards Flatlands, and take a circuitous route through

New

Lots, and so surprise the Jamaica pass, and get in the rear of the

American

forces.

Accordingly at 9 A. M., Aug. 26 (some respectable farmers acting as guides), the van of the army under Clinton, the main body

under Percy, and the reserve under Cornwallis, moved off by the road leading to Flatlands Neck, and came out at Schoonmaker's Bridge.

There (E. of D. Rapalje's) they

the road, threw open

left

the fence and crossed the fields towards Howard's, where they arrived 2 hours before day.

The American

patroles

were

Jamaica pass was secured.

all

At

seized and no alarm given.

daylight, the

The

whole British army

had passed through the woods and then halted to take refreshments.

While they are breakfasting,

As he was

let

us

visit

Grant near the shore.

advancing, his advance guard, about midnight,

fell in

with

American outposts, who were driven back on the main body under Stirling, who was now posted on a side hill [Wykoff's?]

the

that

up

commanded

the road,

where an indecisive cannonade was kept

for several hours.

Let us

now go to the Flatbush pass. According to the preconDe Heister commenced a moderate cannonade on the

certed plan,

American redoubt

at

daybreak.

Meantime, the main body having past,

now

finished their

hastened on to Bedford, intercepting on the

of Americans

who were

retreating from the

way

woody

morning

re-

small parties

heights on dis-


REVOLUTIONARY

130 covering the the

firing,

enemy

in their rear.

SPIRIT.

The moment De

Heister heard

he ordered Col. Donop to storm the redoubt, and

fol-

lowed on himself.

The Americans now

w ere way

essayed to retreat towards Brooklyn, but

forced back by Clinton, upon the Hessian bayonets, and in this

T

they were driven to and

fro,

till

a few boldly cut their

through the enemy and escaped within the

lines.

was now 9 A. M., when Cornwallis

fired

It

Grant, and pushed on to cut off Stirling's rear.

day was

way at till

lost,

Gowanus, while he with a overpowering numbers in

make their meadows and creek

forlorn hope kept Cornwallis in check,

front and rear forced

him

to surrender.

supposed about 5.000 Americans were engaged in

ent parts of the battle-field, and twice that is all

2 signal guns for Stirling, seeing the

ordered the main body of his division to

into the lines as best they could across the

It is

number of

differ-

British, but

it

conjecture.

Hardly had the discomfited Americans escaped within the

when

way

the King's forces pushed in hot pursuit nearly

trenches, regardless of shot from cannon

up

and musketry.

lines,

to the

Howe',

On the evening of the next

however, did not care to risk an assault.

day, the British had a redoubt thrown up E. of Fort Putnam, and

were preparing

to

cannonade the American works.

The Americans were

ordered not to quit the lines, but

now

and then a lawless rifleman would spring over the works and pick oft'

a British scout.

But the no

rain

A

constant skirmishing was kept up.

was so excessive

tents, the lines so extensive,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

fine

and the

penetrating drizzle

men

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and

so few, that the troops

Aug. 29, a council of war was it was all-important to keep this secret from the British, Washington gave out that he was going to attack the enemy in the rear, and wanted a great number of boats to transport a detachment up th? East River and land on L. L, at Hellgate. Accordingly in the evening there was marching and counter-marching, 2 Reg's would march down to the Ferry and one up, 2 down and one up, till but one Reg. was left to embark. The retreat was to commence with the militia at 8 o'clock, but the wind was N. E., and with difficulty a few passed over. A. 11, the wind chopped round S. W., and then the boats crossed rapidly.

were

quite exhausted and dispirited.

held,

and

it

was decided

to retreat.

As


131

KINGS COUNTY. This was the

critical

moment

for the British fleet

(which had been

Narrows 3 days by adverse wind) to sail up, fire on and sink the American boats, but their drowsy sentinels did not obkept

down

the

serve the change. A fog also hung over the Brooklyn shore till a late hour next morning, and thus the entire American army of 9,000 men, with their prisoners, most of the wounded, baggage and mili-

were saved. Meanwhile the British reconnoitering parties drew nearer and As they were not annoyed by any firing, and stillness nearer. By and reigned along the lines, they suspected all was not right. tary stores

by one more daring than the rest cautiously crept into the works, and seeing a perfect solitude, gave the alarm.

The King's

rushed in and hastened to the Ferry, regardless of the

American battery

at the ship yards,

But they were too boats,

and

'tis

said,

late

!

They

and the vessels

fired

fire

forces

from the

in the stream.

indeed on a few straggling

compelled one to return.

Intense must have been the anxiety of Washington.

He

says,

he had no sleep, and indeed was scarce out of his saddle for two entire days. that Mrs.

It is said,

pected what

was going

John Rapelye, who

lived at the Ferry, sus-

on, and sent her slave to inform the British

general of the preparations for a retreat, by the

The make morning, when he

American army.

negro was apprehended by a Hessian guard, and not being able himself understood, was detained under guard

was escorted

to

to be too late.

Head

till

to

Quarters, and delivered his message just in time


PART

II.

LETTERS RELATING TO THE BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. Lord Howe's 803. " Gen.

Howe

Letter describing the Landing.

giving

me

I.,

on the morning of the 22d, the

necessary disposition was made, and 75

and 2

galleys, built for the occasion,

The command

make a

notice of his intention to

descent in Gravesend Bay, on L.

flat-boats,

with

were prepared

of the whole remained with

batteaux

11

for that service.

The

Com. Hotham.

Capts. Parker, Wallace, and Dickson, in the Phenix, Rose, and

Greyhound, with the Thunder and Carcass bombs, under the direcwere appointed to cover the landing. The flat

tion of Col. James,

and 3 batteaux, manned from the ships of war, were formed into divisions commanded respectively by the Capts. Vande-

boats, galleys,

put,

Mason,

Curtis, Caldwell, Phipps, Caulfield, Uppleby,

Reeve of the Eagle. a 10th division, manned from the

The

can, and Lt.

and Dun-

making were under the conduct Early in the morning of the 22d, rest of the batteaux,

transports,

of Lt. Bristow, an assistant agent.

the covering ships took their station in Gravesend Bay.

The

light

infantry, with the reserve to be first landed, forming a corps together

of 4000 men, entered the boats at Staten Island the same time.

The

transports in which the several brigades composing the 2d debarka-

5000 men) had been before embarked, were moved down and suitably arranged without the covering ships by 8 o'clock. The

tion (about

first

debarkation not meeting with any opposition, the second suc-

ceeded immediately after; and the other transports, carrying- the

The

rest of the troops, following the former in proper succession.

whole force then destined

for this service, consisting of about

1

5,000

men, was landed before noon. On the 25th an additional corps of Hessian troops under Gen. Heister, with their field artillery and


:

BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

133

baggage, were conveyed to Gravesend Bay.

day by Gen.

Howe

Being informed next of his intentions to advance with the army that

night to the enemy's lines, and of his wishes that

might be attempted by the ships on

some

diversion

gave directions to Sir Peter Parker for proceeding higher up in the channel toward the this side, I

town of New-York next morning, with the Asia, Renown, Preston, (Com. Hotham embarked in the Phenix, having been left to carry on the service in Gravesend Bay,) Roebuck, and Repulse, and to wind veering

require; but the

umn

when

ron,

to the distance proposed

the troops under Gen. Grant, forming the left col-

enemy

of the army, were seen to be engaged with the

morning, the Roebuck, Capt.

to

northward soon after the break

to the

moved up

of day, the ships could not be therefore

employed as occasion might

for being

keep those ships in readiness

was the only

ship that could fetch high

exchange a few random

the ebb making strongly signal to be

shown

"The Admiral dawn

Hammond, leading

of day in the

for the

enough

with the battery on

shot,

down

in the

the detached squadto the

northward

Red Hook

;

and

the river soon after, I ordered the

squadron to anchor."

directed Sir Geo. Collier to place the

Narrows abreast of a

Rainbow

at

large stone building called

Denyse's, [now Ft. Hamilton,] where he understood the rebels had can-

non and

which situation she would

a strong post, in

sent to the rebel outposts as well as to their troops to

Joseph Reed

to

Head Quarters, Aug. 24. with the enemy on L. I. with them back

;

several

Our were

exceedingly well, and the whole army it

at

The

any time.

There

is

a

killed

The is

on both

officers

is

ge-

Most

and men behave

an emulation

wood between our works and

camp, of which each party

we have sides.

in better spirits than I

have

men has who shall

gallantry of the southern

spired ail others, so that there will be

have best.

troops have been skirmish-

various fortune, but

of the Penn. troops are ordered over.

known

stationed Officer.

Mrs. Reed.

804.

nerally driven

who were

Journal of a British

oppose the landing."

ing

also be able to en-

road leading from N. Y., and prevent reinforcements being

filade the

in-

be-

the enemy's

endeavoring to possess themselves.

As yet we have kept it, and hope we shall, as it is very important. The enemy's ships are moving so much downwards, that we begin to Indeed, the citv think their grand attack will be on Long Island.


;

134 is

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

now

would

so strong, that in the present temper of our men, the enemy-

army

lose half their

writing there

a

is

heavy

in attempting to take

The

man was

old

am-

quite miserable at being kept here.

British Official Account of the Battle.

805.

Camp

My Lord

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; On the 22d of

at

Newtown,

last

month,

L.

I.,

in the

Sept. 3, 1776.

morning, the Brit-

with Col. Donop's corps of chasseurs and Hessian grenadiers,

disembarked near Utrecht, on L.

without opposition, the whole

I.,

being landed, with 40 pieces of cannon, in two hours and a

under the direction of Com. Hotham

;

ing the

The enemy had

ties

I

Gen. Putnam was made happy hy obtaining leave to go

wood. over.

ish,

While

it.

and clouds of smoke rising from that

firing

first

on the

woody

division of the troops.

who upon

coast,

at

only small par-

the approach of the boats, retired to the

commanding a

heights,

bush to their works

half,

command-

Lieut. Gen. Clinton

principal pass

on the road from Flat-

Lord Cornwallis was immediately

Brooklyn.

detached to Flatbush with the reserve, two battalions of light infantry,

and Col. Donop's corps, with

not to risk an attack upon the pass,

which proving

six field-pieces, if

and the army extended from the ferry

Narrows, through

at the

5

De

occupied

it

to be the case, his lordship took pdst in the village,

Utrecht and Gravesend to the village of Flatland.

Gen.

having orders

he should find

Heister, with

On

the 25th, Lt.

two brigades of Hessians from Staten

Island,

joined the army, leaving one brigade of his troops, a detachment of

the 14th regiment from Virginia,

some convalescents and

under the command of Lieut. Col. Dalrymple, that island.

bush

;

I

On

the 26th, Lt. Gen.

De

Heister took post at Flat-

About 9 o'clock the same night the van of the army,

commanded by and brigade of

Lt.

Gen. Clinton, (consisting of the

light infantry, the reserve

field-pieces,

New

began

to

first

light

dragoons

under the command of Lord

Cornwallis, excepting the 42d regiment, which

of the Hessians, the

was posted

to the left

brigade, and the 71st regiment.) with 14

move from

Flatland across the country through

Lots, to seize a pass in the heights extending from east to

west along the middle of the ford

recruits,

security of

and in the evening Lord Cornwallis with the British drew off

to Flatland.

the

for the

on the road

at Flatbush.

island,

and about three miles from Bed-

to Jamaica, in order to turn the

enemy's

left,

posted

Axis. 27th. Gen. Clinton beingr arrived within half a


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

135

mile of the pass about two hours before daybreak, halted and settled his

One

disposition for the attack.

patrol of the

enemy's

officers,

of his patrols, falling in with a

took them

and the general, learning

;

from their information that the rebels had not tached a battalion of light infantry to secure his corps

upon the

first

the pass, de-

and advancing with

appearance of day, possessed himself of the

heights, with such a disposition as

he found the enemy

fortified

it,

in force to

must have secured success, had The main body of the

oppose him.

army, consisting of the guards, 2d, 3d, and 5th brigades, with 10

field-

by Lord Percy, marched soon after Gen. Clinton, and halted an hour before day in his rear. This column (the country pieces, led

not admitting of two columns of march) was followed by the 49th regiment, with four

medium 12 pounders and the baggage closed As soon as these corps had passed ;

the rear, with separate guard.

the heights, they halted for the soldiers to take a after

which the march was continued

;

little

refreshment,

and about half an hour past

8 o'clock, having got to Bedford, in the rear of the enemy's attack

was commenced by

left,

the light infantry and light dragoons

large bodies of the rebels, having cannon,

who were

the

upon

quitting the

woody heights before mentioned to return to their lines upon discovering the march of the army, instead of which they were drove back, and the army still moving on to gain the enemy's rear, the grenadiers

and 33d regiment, being in front of the column, soon approached

within musket shot of the enemy's lines at Brooklyn, from these battalions, without regarding the

fire

whence

of cannon and small-arms

upon them, pursued numbers of the rebels

that

were

retiring

from

the heights, so close to their principal redoubt, and with such eager-

ness to attack

upon them on,

it is

my

it

by storm, that

to desist

it

required repeated orders to prevail

from the attempt

:

ha&they been permitted

opinion they would have carried the redoubt

was apparent

;

sustained in the assault, and ordered them back to a hollow

Be Heister began

soon after daybreak to cannonade the

and upon the approach of our

advance to the attack of the

the brigades.

it

must have been ours at a very cheap rate would not risk the loss that might have been

the front of the works, out of the reach of musketry.

to

go

that the lines

by regular approaches. I

front,

to

but as

The

hill,

right, ordered Col.

way

in

Lt. Gen.

enemy in

the

Bonop's corps

following himself at the kead of

light infantry about that time,

having been rein-


LETTERS RELATING TO THE

136

forced by the light company, the grenadier company, and

two other

companies of the guards, who joined the m with the greatest activity

and

spirit,

had taken three pieces of cannon, and were warmly en-

gaged with very superior numbers sians advancing, the

On

that quarter.

in the

woods, when, on the Hes-

enemy gave way, and was

the

left,

entirely routed in

Maj. Gen. Grant, having the 4th and 6th

42d regiment, and two companies of New-York Provinby Gov. Try on in the spring, advanced along the coast with 10 pieces of cannon, to divert the enemy's attention from their About midnight he fell in with their advanced parties, and at left. daybreak with a large corps having cannon, and advantageously

brigades, the cials, raised

whom

posted, with

was skirmishing and a cannonade

there

for

some

hours, until, by the firing at Brooklyn, the rebels suspecting their retreat

would be cut

secure

it

works

;

across a

off,

made a movement

swamp and

to the right in order to

creek that covered the right of their

but being met in their

way by

a part of the 2d grenadiers,

by the 71st regiment, and Gen.

who were

soon after supported

Grant's

coming up, they suffered considerably: numbers of them,

left

however, did get into the morass, where many were suffocated or drowned. The force of the enemy detached from the lines where

Gen. Putnam commanded was not less, from the best accounts I who were under the orders of Maj. Gen.

have had. than 14,000 men,

Lord Stirling and Woodhull. Their loss is computed to be about 3,300 killed, wounded, prisoners, and drowned, A return of the with five field-pieces and one howitzer taken. Sullivan, Brig. Gens.

prisoners

is

inclosed.

On

the part of the King's troops, 5 officers

and 56 non-commissioned officers, and rank and file killed; 12 officers, and 245 non-commissioned officers and rank and file wounded one officer and 20 grenadiers of the marines taken, by mistaking the :

enemy

for the Hessians.

The Hessians had two privates The wounds file wounded.

three officers and 23 rank and

general very slight.

Lt. Col.

Monckton

is

killed,

are in

shot through the body,

but there are the greatest hopes of his recovery. The behavior of both officers and soldiers, British and Hessians, was highly to their honor. More determined courage and steadiness in troops have never

been experienced, or a greater ardor to distinguish themselves, as all those who had an opportunity have amply evinced by their actions. In the evening of the 27th, the army encamped

in front of the ene-


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

On

my's works.

137

the 2Sth, at night, broke ground 600 yards distant

from a redoubt on their

left

and on the 29th,

;

evacuated their intrenchments and

at

Red Hook with

night, the rebels

the utmost silence,

and quitted Governor's Island the following evening, leaving their

cannon and a quantity of stores

was

the 30th their flight

in all their

At daybreak on

works.

discovered, the pickets of the line took

possession, and those most advanced reached the shore opposite to

New-York as among them. island of

their rear

guard was going over, and

The enemy

New-York,

is

still

many

of

whom

the

some shot town and

and making demonstration of opposing

in force,

The

us in their works on both sides of Kingsbridge. this island,

fired

in possession of

had been forced into

inhabitants of

rebellion,

submitted, and are ready to take the oath of allegiance.

who

I trust will

may

ther information as

be able

to. give

all

dis-

my

first

patch will be delivered to your lordship by Major Cuyler, aid-de-camp,

have

This

your lordship such fur-

be required. I

have the honor to be,

&c,

WILL. HOWE. To Lord Geo. Germaine. P. S.

I

have omitted to take notice, in

its

proper place, of a

movement made by

the King's ships towards the town, on the 27th

at daybreak, with a

view of drawing off the attention of the enemy

from our real design, which,

I believe, effectually

answered the intended

purpose.

About Aug. 22, we embarked

in boats for L.

I.,

and landed without

opposition in Gravesend Bay, marched 6 miles inland and halted

till

26th, a large body of the Americans near us keeping up a firing from

behind walls and

trees.

About 4

p. m.,

Aug. 26, struck tents and lay on

our arms during the night about 3 miles from Bedford

;

and though

it

was summer, it was the coldest night I have experienced up to Nov. 25. At daybreak, Aug. 27, the light infantry attacked and forced several small posts

which the Americans had on the road leading This appeared

lines at Bedford.

to

be the

first

notice they

to their

had of our

About 9 we fired two signal guns to a part of the army under Gen. Grant, who was to make a feint in the front of the Americans, while we got round to their rear, and immediately marched being near them.

briskly up to them, their post

when, almost without

and retreated

men were most

to their lines

firing a shot, they

abandoned

under cover of their guns.

eager to attack them in their

lines, but

Our

were ordered

to


.

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

138

retreat out of reach of their guns,

pm.

and lay from about 4

near dark at the entrance of a small wood exposed to the

During the whole evening they

riflemen.

Their

us.

killed

loss

is

acknowledged by them

"

in the trees

have been 2600

above

ours 300

;

Lord Harris.

Officer in

The Hessians and

Gen. Frazer's Bat., list Regt.

our brave Highlanders gave no quarters

;

and

it

a fine sight to see with what alacrity they dispatched the rebels

with their bayonets,

We

sist.

to give

and put

we had surrounded them

after

took care to

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

to

death

all

From

a British Officer of rank.

them

in particular,

came

that

till

them

fight des-

(to

do them justice) could not

they were greatly outnumbered and taken in flank, front,

We

rear.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;which made

into their hands."

" The Americans fought bravely, and be broken

so they could not re-

the Hessians that the rebels had resolved

tell

to

no quarter

perately,

and

to

of their

but one man, though their

and wounded.

From an was

hit

heads and lodged

balls continually whistled over our

very

till

fire

were greatly shocked

sians and Highlanders after victory

Lord Percy writes from camp

at the

massacre made by the Hes-

was decided." at

Newtown,

Sep. 4, " It

General's orders that the troops should receive the rebels'

was

the

first fire,

and

then rush on them, before they had recovered their arms, with our bay-

which threw them into the utmost confusion." " General Robertson says " The battalion of grenadiers led by

onets,

:

Col. Stuart, and

33d

reg., ran across a field

beyond the Flatbush road

wards the principal redoubt. Gen. Vaughan asked lines,

if

to-

he should attack the

(which were semicircular and the parapets lined with spears and was ordered back." The London Chronicle says " Col

lances,) but he

:

Monckton and Gen. Vaughan They saw the advantage, and tween the British and the stopped, and sent

word

to

led

the grenadiers and

told

Howe

sea.

Howe

the rebels

light infantry.

were shut up be-

Vaughan stormed with rage

at

being

that he could force the lines with incon-

The A)nerican cannon were not well pointed a great number of shot came over the British, but some were killed and some wounded by small arms from the lines. [One of the L. I. militia says

siderable loss."

;

.

he heard the bullets whistle over

Putnam

his

head as he stood

rode along the lines and ordered them not to

see the whites of the enemies' eye3.

wounded

into

A

in the ditch.

fire till

British officer

they could

was brought

Boerum's bolt-house, which was used as a hospital, where

were several rows of beds occupied by the wounded. Wm. Howard, aged 87, says the British army was guided by N.

W


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

139

along a narrow road across Schoonmaker's bridge, (where a small force

might easily have brought the whole British army

to a stand

Thence

)

they turned off east of Dan" 1 Rapalje's and crossed the fields to the south of Howard's half-way house, where they halted in front of his house.

About 2 o'clock

Howe,

morning, after the market wagons had passed,

in the

with a citizen's hat on and a camblet cloak over his uniform

[?]

dress, entered

Win. Howard's

tavern, attended by Clinton

and asked

something

conversed with him, and asked if he Howard said he had. " That's all very

for

had joined the association] Stick to your integrity.

well.

me

lead

and two

aids,

to drink,

But now you are

across these hills out of the

my

prisoner,

way of the enemy,

and must

the nearest

way

to

Gowanus." Howard accordingly conducted the army by a passage way between his house and horse shed over the hills and woods east of his house,

drew brow

The

they came to the cleared land north of the woods.

till

the artillery up the to breathe a little.

[Lt.

horses

and halted on the

in a slanting direction,

The army then proceeded west and came

out

by the Gowanus road. The British took Adj. Jeromus

at Baker's tavern

Hoogland

hill

Troup] and Lt. Dunscomb, American patroles, at the

big white oak (since struck by lightning) in the middle of the road by the mile post, a

New Lots, was

little

also

Isaac Boerum, a trooper, of

east of Howard's.

taken in Bushwick, and died of small-pox in prison.

—Ed.] R. H. Harrison

806.

to

the President of

New-York, 8 Sir

where

I

have

this

to

Congress.

P. M., Aug. 27, 1776.

minute returned from our lines on Long Island,

Excellency, the General.

I left his

command

o'clock

From

him,

I

have

it

in

inform Congress, that yesterday he went there, and con-

enemy having landed a considmany of their movements, there was reason to apprehend they would in a little time make a general As they would have a wood to pass through before they attack.

tinued

till

evening, when, from the

erable part of their forces, and from

could approach the lines,

of

men on

it

was thought expedient where they were

the roads leading from

to place a

number

stationed, in order

annoy them in their march. This being done, early morning a smart engagement ensued between the enemy and

to harass and this

our detachments

— which being unequal

to the force

tend with, have sustained considerable loss.

men

are missing.

Among

;

but

we

they had to con-

least,

many

of our

those that have not returned, are Gen.

Sullivan and Lord Stirling. tainly

At

The enemy's

loss

are told by such of our troops as

is

not

were

known

in the

cer-

engage-


140

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

ment, and have come

Our

they had

in, that

many

killed "and

wounded.

party brought off a lieutenant, sergeant and corporal, with 20

While these detachments were engaged, a column of the enemy descended from the woods, and marched toward

privates, prisoners.

the centre of our lines, with a design to

were repulsed.

the skirts of the woods

where they have pitched

his Excellency inclines to think they

from our

lines

other manner.

make an

impression, but

This evening they appeared very numerous about

mean

several tents

to attack

by way of regular approaches, rather than

To-day

five

;

and

and force us in

any

came up toward the

ships of the line

town, where they seemed desirous of getting, as they tacked a long time against an unfavorable wind

;

and on

found a deserter from the 23d Regt, sign, as soon as the

wind

who

my

me

that they de-

permit them, to come up to give us a

will

severe cannonading, and silence our batteries

honor to be,

return this evenings I

informed

if possible.

I

have the

your most obedient.

in great haste, sir,

Sparks, IV. 513.

Gen. Sullivan

807.

President of Congress.

to the

Whitemarsli, Oct. 25, 1777.

know it has been generally reported that I commanded on Long This is by no means true. Island when the action happened there. Gen. Putnam had taken the command from me four days before the Lord Stirling commanded the main body without the lines. action. I I was to have commanded under Gen. Putnam within the lines. was uneasy about a road through which I had often foretold that the enemy would come, but could not persuade others to be of my opinI

ion.

I

went

picket of 400

to the hill near Flatbush to reconnoitre, and with

men was surrounded by

by the very road patrolling

I

had

foretold,

by night while

purpose.

What

I

the enemy,

and which

I paid

had the command, as

I

a

who had advanced horsemen $50 had no foot

for

for the

made with these four hundred men who were with me

resistance I

against the British army, I leave to the officers -

to declare.

Let

it

suffice for

me

to say, that the opposition of this

small party lasted from half past 9 to 12 o'clock.

The

reason of

was because it was generally supposed that the enemy's landing there was a feint to draw our troops thither, that they might the more easily possess themselves of New-York. I often urged, both by word and writing, that, as the enemy had doubtless both these objects in view, they would so few troops being on

Long

Island


;

BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

141

and then try for Long Island, which commanded the other New-York, which was completely commanded by it, would fall of course. But in this I was unhappy enough to differ from almost every officer in the army, till the event proved my conjectures were just. first

;

Lord

808.

Stirling to Gen.

Washington. Eagle, Aug. 29, 1776.

My

dear General:

I

you of what has happened

About

seeing you. called up,

now an

have to

me

opportunity of informing

since I last had the pleasure of

morning of the 27th,

3 o'clock in the

was

I

and informed by Gen. Putnam that the enemy were ad-

vancing by the road from Flatbush to the Red Lion, and ordered me to march with the two regiments nearest at hand to meet them

;

these happened to be Haslet's and Smallwood's, with which

I

accord-

ingly marched, and was on the road to the Narrows just as the day-

began

light

We

appear.

to

proceeded to within about half a mile

met Col. Atlee, with his regiment, who informed me the enemy were in sight indeed, I then saw their front of the

Red

Lion, and there

;

between us and the Red Lion. regiment on the I

went

to

left

desired Col. Atlee to place his

I

of the road, and to wait their coming up, while

form the two regiments

had brought with

I

ridge from the road up to a piece of this

was done

instantly

wood on

me

along a

the top of the

hill

Our oppo-

on very advantageous ground.

nents advanced, and were fired upon in the road by Atlee's regi-

ment, left,

who

after

two or three rounds, retreated

and there formed.

part of

them

and the rest

were two

I

in

By

this

and

fifty

my

wood on

placed along a hedge under the front of the the front of the wood.

The

light troops to within

;

hill,

me

troops opposed to

brigades, of four regiments each, under the

Gen. Grant, who advanced their there,

to the

time Kichline's riflemen arrived

command

of

one hundred

yards of our right front, and took possession of an orchard

and some hedges which extended towards our

brought on an exchange of

men, which continued light troops

for

fire

;

this

between those troops and our

rifle-

left

about two hours, and then ceased, by those

retiring to their

main body.

In the meantime Capt.

Carpenter brought up two field-pieces, which were placed on the side of the hill so as to for

some hundred

field-pieces

;

yards.

command

On

one howitzer advanced

7*

the road and the only approach

the part of Gen. Grant there were twT o to within

300 yards of the front


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; LETTERS RELATING TO THE

142

of our right, and a like detachment of artillery to the front of our left,

on a

rising ground, at about

One

600 yards distance.

of their

brigades formed in two lines opposite to our right, and the others

extended in one line to the top of the this position

when being

me and

all

made

near

till

was

to pass the creek near the this the

more

make

it

commanded by Lord

Cornwallis, posted at the house near the Upper Mills

the other troops to

Yellow

practicable, I found

ly did, with about half of Smallwood's regiment,

;

this I instant-

ordering

first

all

way through the creek. time, the men having been

the best of their

continued the attack a considerable

rallied

in

o'clock,

and saw that the only chance of escaping

lines,

prisoners,

absolutely necessary to attack a body of troops

We

1 1

Gen. Howe, with the main body of the army, was

our

and in order to render

;

of our left;

hills in front

stood cannonading each other

I found that

between Mills

we

and the attack renewed

five or six several times,

and were on

the point of driving Lord Cornwallis from his station, but large succors arriving rendered I

ty.

impossible to do more than provide for safe-

it

endeavored to get in between that house and Fort Box

on attempting

it,

I

found a considerable body of troops in

me

and several in pursuit of

on me.

firing

ered I

I

me from

soon found

therefore

their fire, it

went

on the right and

left,

immediately turned the point of a

my

;

but

front,

and a constant

which cov-

hill,

my pursuers. make my escape, and

and was soon out of reach of

would be

in vain to attempt to

to surrender

myself

to

Gen.

Be

Heister,

commander-

in-chief of the Hessians.

Grant had said that with 5000 men he could march from one end of Stirling after forming his troops said, " Grant

the continent to the other.

may

have his 5,000

men

with him,

are enough to prevent his Stirling, at the

we

are not so

many, but

I

think

we

advancing further than that mill-pond."

head of 400 Maryland troops, attacked a corps under

Cornwallis, stationed in a house at some short distance above the place at

which he proposed

to cross

Gowanus Creek.

Duer's Life of Stirling,

p. 163.

[Was

this the old

809.

On Sunday Lord

Cortelyou brick house

Col.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed.]

Halset

to

Thos. Eoclney.

Camp

at

Mt. Washington, 4th Oct., 1776.

25th of Aug.

Stirling's Brigade,

1

last,

my

regiment was ordered

composed mostly of the southern

to

L.

I.,

in

troops, by


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

whom we

143

were much caressed, and highly complimented on our ap-

On

pearance and dexterity in the military exercise and manoeuvres.

Tuesday 27lh,

his brigade, consisting of 5 regiments,

van's, not exceeding 5,000

men, were ordered

To

and repulse the enemy.

lines

regulars,

much

oppose

this

dispersed soon after the

Sulli-

advance beyond the

to

small band were 17,000

and every other mili-

better furnished with field-pieces

Several of the regiments were broken and

tary appointment than we.

stood firm to the last

and a few of

The Delawares and Marylanders

onset.

first

and, after a variety of skirmishing, the Dela-

;

wares drew up on the side of a

and stood upwards of four hours

hill,

with a firm, determined countenance, in close array, their colors flying,

them

the enemy's artillery playing on

vance and attack them, though

Nor

rounding them.

six

all

the while, not daring to ad-

times their number and nearly sur-

did they think of quitting their station,

commanded

an ex-

till

marsh and over a creek, the only opening left, which they effected in good order, with the loss of one man drowned in passing. The Delawares alone had the honor of bringing off 23 prisoners. I must also do Col. press order from the

general

Smallwood's battalion the justice

by them on the enemy

their retreat through a

to say, that the spirited attack

27 of the Delawares

retreating, greatly facilitated the escape of both.

number were

next morning were missing.

In that

Harney, the

and the other not yet heard

latter a prisoner,

McDonough was wounded

in the

knee

:

Lieuts. Stewart

ball

lodged in his throat, Lt. Corn a ball

The

recovered.

still

Lt.

I.,

which was conducted with great pru-

lect,

were called into council, and requested

lines

upon

to

I

do not recol-

take the defence of the

while the main body of the army crossed the East River

us,

N. York, which

thank God,

Anderson had

in his back: they are

dence, Cols. Shee, Smallwood, Hand, and some others

to

and

Major

standard was torn with grape-shot in Ensign Stephen's

In the retreat from L.

hand.

of.

a ball passed through the sleeve

of his coat without wounding the nrm or his body.

a

made

Delawares and themselves were

at the time the

v/as accepted

;

and

last

of

all

crossed ourselves,

in safety.

From, an American

810.

Officer,

dated Aug. 28, 1770.

Yesterday's occurrence, no doubt, will be described to you various

ways

:

I

count as

embrace I

am

since on L.

I.,

this leisure

moment,

an ac-

A

at the

end of a beautiful plain, had extended their troops

large

body of the enemy, that landed some time

about six miles from the place of their this time, 11

to give as satisfactory

able.

first

landing.

There were,

at

regiments of our troops posted in different parts of the


144

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

woods, between our lines and the enemy, through which they must pass, if

they attempted

any thing against

Early in the morning, our

us.

scouting parties discovered a large body of the enemy, both horse and foot,

advancing on the Jamaica road towards us:

Gen. Putnam,

inform him of

to

I thought, our battalion

and was going

who

soldiers,

on a

to join

told

me

hill

coming

in,

I

was dispatched

back,

to

I discovered, as

dressed in hunting shirts,

them, but was stopped by a number of our

they were the

vailed on a sergeant and

duced a shower of

On my way

it.

two men

bullets,

enemy

to halt,

in our dress,

and

fire

and we were obliged

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on

this I pre-

on them, which proIn the

to retire.

mean

time the enemy, with a large body, penetrated through the woods on our right and centre or front

body on our field

right, [at

and about nine o'clock, landed another

;

Bennet's Cove

the whole stretching across the

?]

and woods, between our works and our

parties,

accompanied with

light

troops,

and sending out

which harassed or surrounded

horse,

new troops, who, however, sold their lives dear. Our made towards our lines, but the enemy had taken possession

'and surprised our orces then

Our men broke through

of the ground before them by stolen marches. parties after parties, but

still

found the enemy's thousands before them.

Cols. Smallwood's, Atlee's, and Haslet's battalions, with

but the

enemy

Gen. Stirling

an eminence and made a good stand

at their head, had collected on fired a field-piece

on them, and being greatly superior

;

in

finding it out of their to retreat into a marsh power to withstand about six thousand men, they waded through mud and water to a mill opposite them their retreat was covered by the second battalion, which had reached our lines. Col. Lutz's and the N. England regiments after this made some resistance in the woods, but were obliged by superior numbers to retire. Cols. Miles's and Brod-

number, obliged them

;

;

head's battalions, finding themselves surrounded, determined to fight

and run

:

they did so, and broke through English and Hessians, dis-

persed the horse, and at last

came

in

with

considerable loss.

Parry wr as, early in the day, shot through the

men.

Eighty of our battalion came in

this

hea'l,

Col.

encouraging his

morning, having forced

way through the enemy's rear, and come round by Hellgate we expect more, who are missing, will come

their

:

the

way

in the

of

same

way. 811.

Extract from

The enemy from

Col.

troops on the lower part of L.

ment, and ours and

Smallwood's Letter, Oct. 12,

the 21st to the 27th of

their

I.,

Aug, were

'76.

landing their

where they pitched a large encamp-

advanced

parties

were daily skirmishing


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 145

BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

which neither party suffered much. On the 26th, the troops, which composed part of Lord Stirling's

at long shot, in

Delaware and Maryland

Col. Haslet and myself were detained on the

brigade, were ordered over.

of Lt. Col. Tedwitz.

trial

After our dismission,

but pushing over early next morning

Lord

Stirling having

woods and

the

difficult

off before

his brigade

in his rear.

:

day

;

to take possession of

stole a

march on our gen-

lines.

Lord Stirling drew

headed by the Gens Cornwallis [Cornwallis

in front,

Ed] and

Grant, and in his rear the main body stood

ready drawn up to support their ours

late to get over,

on an advantageous rising ground, where he was attacked

by two brigades

was

was too

our regiments engaged

having got through those passes, met and surrounded our troops

on the plain grounds within two miles of our

up

it

passes between our lines and the enemies' en-

But the enemy, overnight, had

campment. erals,

marched them

we found

this excellent disposition,

own

and

parties,

and intercept the

their superior

retreat of

numbers, ought

to

have

taught our generals there was no time to be lost in securing their retrent,

which might

at first

have been effected, had the troops formed into a

heavy column and pushed

their retreat

;

but the longer this

was delayed

became the more dangerous, as they were then landing more troops in Our brigade kept their ground [Bennet's Cove 1] front from the ships for several hours, and in general behaved well, having received some it

heavy

fires

from the

artillery

repulsed several times

;

and musketry of the enemy,

whom

they

but their attacks were neither so vigorous or

was expected, owing, as it was imagined, to their being cermaking the whole brigade prisoners of war, for by this time they

lasting as tain of

had so secured the parses on the road to our lines, (seeing our parties were not supported from thence, which indeed our numbers would not admit of,) that there was no possibility of retreating that way. Between the place of action and our lines there lay a large

marsh and deep

creek, not above 80 yds. across at the mouth, (the place of action upon a direct line did not

much exceed

a

mile from a part of our lines,)

towards the head of which creek there was a mill and bridge, across which a certain Col. Ward, from New England, who is charged with having acted a bashful part that day, passed over with his regiment and then burnt them down, though under cover of our cannon, which would

have checked the enemy's pursuit

might have afforded a secure

at

retreat.

prospect but to surrender, or attempt to at the

any time, otherwise

this bridge

There then remained no other retreat over this marsh and creek

mouth, where no person had ever been known

interim I applied to Gen. Washington for

to cross.

some regiments

to

In the

march out


146

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

to support

and cover

their retreat,

which he urged would be attended

with too great risk to the party and the

me

He immediately

lines.

after-

march down a New England regiment, and Capt. Thomas's company, which had just come over from N. York, to the mouth of the creek opposite where the brigade was drawn up, and ordered two field-pieces down to support and cover their retreat, wards sent

should

began sides,

for

and ordered

make

they

to retreat, till

a

and

to

Soon

that way.

push

for a short

time the

fire

march, they

after our

was very heavy on both

our troops came to the marsh, where they were obliged to

break their order, and escape as quick as they could to the edge of the creek, under a

brisk

kept up a continual

and

fire,

notwithstanding which they brought off 28

The enemy taking advantage

prisoners.

fire

of a

commanding ground,

from four field-pieces, which were well served

heavy column advancing on the marsh must have guns being wet and muddy, not one of them but having drawn up the musketry and disposed of

directed, and a

cut our people

could have

their

ofT,

fired,

some riflemen conveniently, with orders within shot. However, the latter began

to fire

on them when they came

200 which notwithstanding had the desired effect, for the eneimmediately retreated to the fast land, where they continued paradtheir fire too soon, being at

yds. distance,

my

ing within 600 yds.

who swam

till

our troops were brought over.

who attempted

over, and others

Most of those

to cross before the covering

party got down, lost their arms and accoutrements in the

and some fellows

their lives, particularly

mud and creek, two of the Maryland, two of

the Delaware, and one of Astley's

Hessian prisoners were drowned. bringing over this party.

amounting

I

Pennsylvania regiments, and two Thomas's men contributed much in

have inclosed a

to 256, officers included.

It

list

of the killed and missing,

has been said the

the action also attacked our lines, but this

was a mistake.

enemy during Not know-

ing the ground, one of their columns advanced within long shot, without

knowing they were

so near, and upon our artillery and part of the

ketry's firing on them, they immediately fled.

The

mus-

28th, during a very

hard rain, there was an alarm that the enemy had advanced to attack our lines, which alarmed the troops much, but was without foundation.

The tions

29th,

it

was found by a general council of war, that our it was therefore judged expedient

were not tenable, and

army should

retreat from the Island that night.

To

effect

fortifica-

that the

which, not-

withstanding the Maryland troops had but one day's respite, and other troops had been

many

many

days clear of any detail duty, they were

ordered on the advanced post at Fort

Putnam within 250

yds. of the


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

147

enemy's approaches, and joined with two Pennsylvania regiments on the

left,

were

remain and cover the retreat

to

army, which was

of the

happily completed under cover of a thick fog and a southwest wind,

both which favored our retreat, otherwise the fear, disorder, and confu-

some of

sion of

must have retarded and discovered

the eastern troops

our retreat, and subjected numbers to be cut

[See also Col. Graydon's Memoirs. 812.

N. York,

Seji.

1,'76. Last

off.

Ed.]

Monday we went

over to L.

about midnight were alarmed by some of our scouting parties,

and

I.,

who

advis-

ed us that the enemy were coming up the Island with several field-pieces. Upon which near 3,000 men were ordered out, chiefly of Marylanders and Pennsylvanians, to attack them on their march. About sunrise we came up with a large body of them. The Delaware and Maryland batCol. Atlee, with his battalion, a little before us, talion made one part.

had taken post

in

an orchard, and behind a barn

of the enemy, he gave them a very severe till

;

and on the approach considerable time,

a

fire for

when he retreated to the woods. when Lord Stirling, who commanded,

they were near surrounding him,

The enemy then advanced immediately drew up in a

The

lish taste.

British then

and began a very heavy and

the balls

to us,

shells

and

line,

fire

offered

them battle

Eng-

in the true

advanced within about 300 yards of us, from their cannon and mortars

flew very fast,

now and

:

for

both

then taking off a head.

Our men stood it amazingly well, not even one showed a disposition to Our orders were not to fire till the enemy came within 50 yards of us but when they perceived we stood their fire so coolly and resoluteIn this ly, they declined coming any nearer, though treble our number. shrink. ;

situation

we

stood from sunrise

the chief part of the time,

never dreamed

of,

when

12 o'clock, the

till

the

main body of

enemy

British,

firing

on us

by a route

had surrounded us, and driven within the

we

lines, or

all our men except the Delaware and Maryland who were standing at bay with double their number. Thus situated, we were ordered to attempt a retreat by fighting our way through the enemy, who had posted themselves and nearly filled every

scattered in the woods, battalions,

road and ter of

field

between us and our

a mile, before

we were

lines.

fired

enemy, and those in the rear playing fought with more than

which

first

valor.

not retreated a quar-

their artillery

We

on

forced the

Our men

us.

advanced party

attacked us to give way, through which opening

passage down

we

Roman

We had

on by an advanced party of the

to the side of

passed, and then

swam

a marsh, seldom before

a narrow river,

all

waded

we

over,

got a

which

the while exposed to the


LETTERS RELATING TO THE

14S enemy's

Capts. Ramsay's and

fire.

and sustained the

The whole of

wing of our

the right

companies were in front

Scott's

when

of the enemy,

first fire

hardly a

battalion thinking

it

man

fell.

impossible to

march through the marsh, attempted to force their way through the woods, where they, almost to a man, were killed or taken. The Maryland battalion has lost 259 men, amongst whom are 12 Muse, Prawl soners

;

Lts. Butler, Sterrit, Dent, Coursey,

;

Who

Ensigns Corts, Fernandes.

missing

in

killed

and who

pri-

Cols. Atlee, Miles and Piper, are also taken.

yet uncertain.

is

men

1,000

Bowey

Capts. Veasy and

officers:

We

all.

Many

took a few prisoners.

officers

Most of our Generals on a high hill in the viewed us with glasses, as we were retreating, and saw the enemy

lost their

lines,

we had

swords and guns.

to pass

would surrender through

[to cut

]]

body without

the

brave fellows

Maryland

both at York,) Capts.

Ramsay, and

Many thought we When we began the attack,

could not.

firing.

Gen. Washington wrung

"Good God! what commanded

we

through, though in a

I

must

battalion,

(

his hands,

this

out,

Major Guest being

and Lt. Col.

the Col.

Adams and Lucas were

and cried

day lose!"

The Major, Capt.

sick.

were foremost and within 100 yards of the fired on by the enemy, who were

Lt. Plunket

enemy's muzzles, when they were

under cover of an orchard, save a few that showed themselves

chiefly

and pretended

40

yards,

faces

to give

when

up

;

clubbing their firelocks

they immediately

presented,

they entirely overshot us, and killed some

;

the rear.

so near

I

From an

813.

I

discharged

my

rifle 7

men went

within

our

blazed in

behind in I

first fire.

was

times that day.

Officer in Col. Atlee s Battalion,

Yesterday, about 120 of our

we came

men away

had the satisfaction of dropping one the

could not miss.

I

till

and

dated Aug. 27.

as a guard to a place on L.

called Red Lion; about 11 at night the sentries descried 2 men coming up a water-melon patch, upon which our men fired on them. The enemy then retreated, and about 1 o'clock advanced with 200 or 300 T.

men, and endeavored gave them 2 or 3

to

fires,

surround our guard, but they being watchful,

except one Lt. and about 15

About 4

when

alarm the remainder of the

bat.,

have not been heard of as

yet.

o'clock this morning, the alarm

was given by beating

to

arms,

the remainder of our battalion, accompanied by the Delaware and

Maryland

battalions,

went

retreated from.

About

enemy, when we got

into the

to the place our

a quarter of a mile this side,

we saw

the

men

(our battalion being the advance guard) amidst the incessant of their field-pieces, loaded with grape shot, which continued till

woods fire

to

men who

and retreated


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. The Marylanders on

10 o'clock.

the

left,

149

and we on the

right,

kept up

amid all their cannon, and saw several of them fall but they being too many, we retreated a little, and then made a stand. Our Lt. Col. Parry was shot through the head, and I retreated with a constant

him

fire

;

I

enemy

hear the

are within 60

lines.

An

814.

which,

his effects, since

to secure

yards of our

of

officer

encomiums on

distinction in the

having seen

battle,

high

Col. Miles, writes the following, as a corrective, dated,

N. Y., Sep. 10/76: "

The enemy were some days encamped

South and East of our

at Flatbush, about

Through

North-east toward Jamaica, about 6 miles.

vent the

this

which we kept strongly guarded, 800 men

enemy penetrating

is

a

wood, running from the Narrows about

ridge of hills covered with

three passes,

3^ miles

Within half a mile of the enemy

lines.

The

the woods.

woods are

at each, to pre-

night before

Aug.

27,

on

the west road were posted Col. Hand's regiment, a detachment from

Penn. and N. Y., next East were posted Col. Johnson, of Jersey, and Lt. Col.

Henshaw, of Mass. Wills, of Conn.

Col.

Lt.

;

;

next East were posted Col. Wyllys and

East of

all

these Col. Miles of Penn.

was

posted toward Jamaica, to watch the motion of the enemy, and give in-

lity,

what

to the

some fatamarch their main body woods, and advance near two miles in rear of our

Col. Miles's guard on the East of the woods, by

telligence. I

don't

know,

East of the

suffered the

enemy

to

guards in the woods without discovery.

Con. Gaz. No. 673.

Extract of a Letter from an American

815.

Officer.

some time in the night before, the British landed a large body on a neck of land, on this side the mountains, and on a place where our guards were stationed. [Was this Bennet's Cove ?] "Yesterday morning,

This soon brought on a

or

warm engagement, which

o'clock in the morning, to

deavored

to

1 or

force our lines.

2 in the afternoon.

Our

batteries

lasted from 2 or 3

The

British en-

mowed them down

like

grass."

816. Samuel Mills, of Jamaica, L.

I.,

enlisted in

Jacob Wright's company of 6 mo. volunteers; his from

Newtown

Wright's teers

co.

May, 1776, in Capt. was North,

1st lieut.

one Wilson of Jamaica was orderly sergeant.

;

was

principally from

Jamaica

;

Cap.

another company of volun-

from Kings county, under Capt. Van Nuys, united with Cap.

Wright's co.

to

Scott's brigade.

fill

On

up Col. Lasher's 1st

New-York regiment

the day of the battle of L.

inside guard and stationed in Cobble Hill fort,

I.

Mills

was not

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gen.

was one of the in

the battle

;


150

LETTERS RELATING TO THE was

his station

There were 120 grenadiers in that the Americans were

in the fort for that day.

Col. Lasher's regiment.

When

retreating, the grenadiers

were stationed

American arms.

it

was known

at regular distances inside the

each one having 6 hand-grenades beside their other In the afternoon and evening, previous to crossing over to N. lines,

Y., the soldiers were continually marching and countermarching

one regiment would march up and two down, one up and two down, so that the troops were kept in ignorance of what the final move would be, but ;

generally supposed that an attack of the British would take place the

The

next day.

boats were constantly going and coming to and from

N. Y. during the

was

final retreat,

and when

Mills' co. landed in

N. Y.,

it

3 o'clock a. m.

From Mrs.

Catharine E. Williams' Life of Stephen Olney of

Rhode Island. 817. " Soon after the evacuation of Boston, Olney's regiment, under

was ordered to N. Y.

Lt. Col. Ezekiel Cornell of Scituate, after a tedious overland

and employed in throwing up

was ordered on their

arms

wood within one mile

in a

we were

Tew's platoon,

I

which

to

When

belonged, to

camp

perceived

we were

move

in front to protect our sen-

where the

forts,

firing

Many who

after night.

But

to return to Capt.

way

came in He marched a lit-

hid in the woods

Tew.

distance in front, but as the firing continued in our rear, he detached

me

men

with 20

and shared the

in front to protect the

I

fire.

I

sentries,

and he marched

placed

balls

seemed

my men

behind

to

make most havoc

trees,

in the tops of the

and they kept up a deliberate

In half an hour the firing in the rear ceased, and

party of the

enemy coming

and marched

to us in

off in very quick time

enemy were between woods

after

fate of those

and some small arms into the woods, where our sentries

were placed, but the trees.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

who fell on tb.3 sword marched forward and found the enemy firing their

fate of his reg.

of the enemy. field-pieces

the

we

they came in sight of the enemy, they run their

through and gained the camp. the

be-

Lt. Col. Cornell ordered Capt.

as yet.

and he marched our regiment toward our

continued.

The ground

of the enemy.

not exactly apprized of our situation.

daylight hearing a firing in front and rear,

enemy

tle

Olney, with his regiment,

fortifications.

surrounded, but saw no

tries,

arrived

picket guard, and lay the night preceding the battle on

ing covered with wood,

At

They

march, and were posted on Brooklyn Heights,

us and the

that direction.

I

I

discovered a

formed

my men

towards our home, believing the

forts.

into a field beside the road

In about a mile

we came

out of

which led by a school-house, by


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. which we must pass

151

On

to get over the mill clam to our fort.

getting

saw the enemy into the road, as near the school-house we were, drawn up in line viewing our works. The enemy saw us

over the fence as

I

and ran ahead and

fired

After

school-house.

we

;

nevertheless I got nearly

all

my men

past the

passed them 100 yards, they huddled together

my men to face about, give them one well disaw from the staggering had taken good effect. After we got in our fort there came on a dreadful heavy storm with thunder and lightning, and the rain fell in such torrents that the wa!er was soon ankle-deep in the fort. With all these inconveniences, and an enemy just without musket-shot, our men could not be kept awake. They would sit down and fall asleep, though Lt. Col. Cornell threatened on the road.

rected

fire,

I

ordered

which

I

make daylight shine through them. All that seemed to prevent the enemy taking our main fort was a scarecrow row of palisades from the fort to low water in the cove, which Major Box had set up that morning. On our retreat to N. Y., we had to take our baggage, camp-equipage, &c, on our shoulders to the boats, and tedious was the operation through mud and mire." Page 170-5. to

[The above account, as well as many of the fused,

owing

ginal letters

to

would clear up some obscure passages

Major Popham's account of

On

818.

or about

Haslet's regiment

regiment

saw

the

;

Aug to

the part he took in the Battle of L.

Next day,

Y. a 2d

was ordered with

L. L, on Saturday,

Maryland regiment reviewed by fort.

quite con-

is

Perhaps the

Col.

I

I.

Lt. in Col.

the

Delaware

On Sunday

believe.

Smallwood

or next but one, I

ori-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed.]

21, '76, I arrived in N.

a few days after I

over

to cross

Corkscrew

others,

Olney's ignorance of the localities.

I

in front of the

marched toward

the

ground occupied by our army, in the summit of the high ground in front of

Gowanus, near

the edge of the river,

where the enemy were landing

from their ships, [Bennet's Cove,] one or two lying near the shore cover the landing.

enemy. hill

Many

shots were exchanged between us and

About 12 o'clock Gen.

Stirling

came

and ordered the Delaware regiment up.

order to load with ball, and take care that our

to

the east

to

the

brow of the

Here we received the

first

men (who were awkward

We then marched up first. and joined the army which was drawn up in line, my regiment and my company on the left. The whole bay was covered with the enemy's

Irishmen and others) put in the powder

shipping.

we

The

lost several

firing

men.

continued

About

this

all

the time of the

time the

enemy's landing, and

enemy began

to

send detach


'

152

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

ments as scouts on our

when

left,

Capt.

Wragg and

18 men, supposing

us to be Hessians by the similarity of our dress, approached too near

when my company attacked and took them prisoners. I was immediately ordered with a guard to convey them across the creek in our rear to our lines. On descending the high ground we reached a salt meadow, over which we passed, though not miry, yet very unfavorable to silk stockings and my over-clothes. When we had reached about half way to the creek, the enemy brought a couple of pieces to bear upon us, which, when Wragg saw, he halted,

before he discovered his mistake,

in the

hope of a rescue

stantly, or I should fire

my

but on

;

ordering him to march forward in-

When we

on him, he moved on.

got to the

waists.

bank of which was exceedingly muddy, we waded up to our I got in after my people and prisoners, and an old canoe that

had been

split

creek, the

wood, served

and incapable of

creek, by pushing

advanced so

it

Wragg's

bank which it had reached. I had mud, and was so fatigued with anxiety and

down on

fusee, cartouch-box,

situation I sat

till

help to cross a deep hole in the

across from the

far into the

exercise, that I sat

by the buoyancy of the

floating except

who wanted

to help those

my

the

mud

with the water up to

my

and bayonet on

charge were

shoulder

my ;

in

breast,

which

landed on the rear.

all safely

JVm. Popham, at. 92. 819. Extract of a Letter from a British Officer on L. to his

The 2d

I.,

Sep.

4/76,

friend in Aberdeen.

battalion of grenadiers,

which was sent from our right

to

support Gen. Grant, unfortunately mistook a rebel regiment (blue faced

with red)

for the

returning

it

Hessians, and received several

and Lt.

;

Wragg

made

out to speak to them, were

fires

from them without

of the marines, and 20 men, being sent

At length

prisoners.

ing discovered, they were soon beat and dispersed, but officers

and men, and some of the rebels got

820.

Aug.

James

1830, a sketch of his

we r

lost several

off.

Narration of the Battle fought on 27, '76.

the mistake be-

Long

Island.

S. Martin, a native of Conn., published in

life,

under the

title

of

;

The Adventures

of a

Revolutionary Soldier." " In the latter part of the month of August, fatigue party

;

we had

I

was ordered upon a

scarcely reached the grand parade,

when

I

saw

our sergeant major directing his course up Broadway, towards us, in rather an unusual step for

him

;

he soon arrived, and informed us and


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. commanding

then the

belonging

off all

to

he had orders to take

officer of the party, that

our regiment and march us to our quarters, as the

Long Island, the British having landed in was not unexpected to me, yet it gave me disagreeable feeling, as I was pretty well assured I should have a little gunpowder. However, I kept my cogitations to my-

regiment was ordered

rather a to snuff

went

to

Although

force there.

self,

153

my

to

this

my

quarters, packed up

clothes,

readiness for the expedition as soon as possible. top of the house, where

I

had a

full

I

and got myself in then went to the

view of that part of the Island

;

I

smoke of the field-artillery, but the distance and the unfavorableness of the wind prevented my hearing their report, at least distinctly

saw

The

but faintly.

mind I

the

horrors of battle then presented themselves to

in all their hideousness

will

endeavor

to

my

do

I

;

to

duty as well as

We

event with Providence.

must come

I

it

am

were soon ordered

rade, from which, as soon as the regiment

now, thought able,

to

I

my

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; well,

and leave the

our regimental pa-

was formed, we were marched

At the lower end of the street were placed several casks of sea bread, made, I believe, of canel and pease-meal, nearly

off for the ferry.

hard enough for musket

flints

was allowed

many

to take as

good luck would have

it,

the casks

;

were unheaded,and each

as he could, as he

marched

was a momentary

there

made

halt

man

As my

by. ;

I

im-

proved the opportunity thus offered me, as every good soldier should

upon

all

could as

;

important occasions, to get as

no one said any thing

many

we

as I could hold in

my

to

many

me, and

my

them away

quickly embarked on board the boats

;

in

all,

and when

my

knapsack.

as each boat started, three

was returned by

cheers were given by those on board, which

merous spectators who thronged the wharves

I possibly

bosom, and took

hand, a dozen or more in

arrived at the ferry-stairs I stowed

We

of the biscuit as filled

I

;

they

all

the nu-

wished us good

luck, apparently although it was with most of them, perhaps, nothing more than ceremony. We soon landed at Brooklyn, upon the Island, marched up the ascent from the ferry to the plain. We now began to meet the wounded men, another sight I was unacquainted with, some with broken arms, some with broken legs, and some with broken heads. The sight of these a little daunted me, and made me think of home, but ;

the sight and thought vanished together.

when we

halted to refresh

tuals beside the hard

gnawing

One

at

them

;

We inarched

a short distance,

Whether we had any other do not remember, but I remember

ourselves.

bread

I

vic-

my

they were hard enough to break the teeth of a rat.

of the soldiers complaining of thirst to his officer

;

look at that


154

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

man,

said he, pointing to me, he

is

not thirsty,

be styled a man.

a little elevated to

were warmly engaged within sight of

ings of most or

young

the

all

;

What were

us.

soldiers at this time, I

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

know what were mine but let mine or saw a lieutenant who appeared to have

theirs be

I

;

thought

fear at the time

it

;

know

what they might,

among

of his company, snivelling and blubbering, praying each one

aught against him, or

I ;

cannot determine

T

he ran round

for

the feel-

not, but I

feelings not very enviable

whether he was actuated by fear or the canteen,

now

I felt

it.

which was

here,

twenty minutes or half an hour, the Americans and

not more than British

warrant

I will

While resting

men

the

he had

if

he had injured any one that they would forgive

if

him, declaring at the same time that he, from his heart, forgave them gave him

if

they had offended him, and

I

had he been

with a halter about his neck, he could not

at the gallows

have shown more fear or penitence. a fine

new

officer,

levies

an exemplary

man

wore cockades of

for

A fine young

soldier

you

;

for

;

are, I thought,

The

soldiers.

officers of the

different colors to distinguish

they were called

the standing forces, as

credit for his assertion

full

them from

wore red, While we were

the field officers

the captains white, and the subaltern officers green.

resting here our Lieutenant-Colonel and Major, (our Colonel not being

with

us,)

took their cockades from their hats

the Lieutenant-Colonel replied, that he the cause of his country, but

enemy

He was

to fire at.

soon called upon to half a mile,

was

;

I

when

1

being asked the reason,

to

stand a

and a brave

mark

in

We

were

far,

about

soldier.

W e had not gone T

and proceed.

life

for the

heard one in the rear ask another where his musket

looked round and saw one of the soldiers stemming off without

his gun, having left

it

where we

last halted

as if undetermined whether he had

ranks to go in search of (wishing to see

We

;

willing to risk his

was unwilling

a fine officer

in

fall

was

how

far

it:

left it

;

he was inspecting his side

or not, he then

one of the company

fell

who had

he would go before he missed

it)

out of the

brought

gave

it

to

it

on

him.

overtook a small party of artillery here, dragging a heavy twelve

pounder upon a

field carriage,

sinking half

way

into sandy

soil.

plead hard for some one to assist them to get on their piece

;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; They

our

offi-

cers paid no attention to their entreaties, but pressed forward towards

a creek, where a large party of Americans and British were engaged.

By

the time

we

arrived, the

enemy had

driven our

men

into the creek,

or rather mill pond, (the tide being up,) where such as could

across

;

swim

got

those that could not swim, and could not procure any thing to

buoy them up, sunk.

The

British having several field-pieces stationed


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND.

155 Amer-

by a brick house, were pouring the cannister and grape upon the icans like a shower of hail

they would doubtless have done them

;

much more damage than they did, but tioned above the men having gotten ;

reach them, and opening a

troops (volunteers),

mud

and

ter

in

action a regiment of

this

When

young men.

all

water

to us, looking like

of

Some

of us went into the water after the

killed in

the

pond and creek.

Our regiment

fall

of the tide, and took out

were sunk

that

in the

we then occupied afternoon, we had a consid-

lay on the ground

The next day

the following night.

they came out of the

it

many arms

a number of the corpses and a great

to shift

Maryland

wawas truly a pitiful sight. pond, and more were drowned. rats,

Many

them were

men-

twelve pounder

within sufficient distance to

upon them, soon obliged them

fire

There was

quarters.

their

for the it

in the

erable tight scratch with about an equal

began rather unexpectedly, and a

little

number of

the British,

A

whimsically.

which

few of our

regiment went over the creek, upon business that usually employed us, that

is,

something

in search of

There was a

to eat.

field

of Indian

corn at a short distance from the creek, with several cocks of hay

about half

way from

the creek to the cornfield

;

men

the

purposed to

was eatable. When they got up with the haycocks, they were fired upon by about an equal number of the British, from the cornfield our people took to the hay, get

some of

the corn, or any thing else that

;

and the others

to the

fence,

where they exchanged a number of shots

A number, say forty more of our men, went over and drove the British from the they were by this time reinforced in their turn, and drove us The two parties kept thus alternately reinforcing, until we had

at

each other, neither side inclining to give back.

or

fifty

fence

;

back.

the most of our regiment in action.

mand,

them army was in follow

After the officers came to com-

the English were soon routed from the place, but for fear of falling into

the vicinity of us

killed outright, but

we had

;

I

some

we

dare not

snare, as the whole British

do not recollect that

several severely

we had any one

wounded, and some

I

be-

Our regiment was alone, no other troops being near where we were lying we were upon a rising ground, covered with a young growth of trees we felled a fence of trees around us to prevent

lieve mortally.

;

;

We

the approach of the enemies' horse.

lay there a day longer

latter part of the afternoon there fell a very

and much damaged our ammunition

all to

the skin,

when

the shower had passed over,

charge our pieces.

We

we were

attempted to

fire

:

in the

heavy shower, which wet us ;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about

sunset,

ordered to parade and dis-

by platoons

for

improvement,


156 but

LETTERS RELATING TO THE

we made blundering work

than firing by divisions

of

it

it

;

stomachs, and with half the trouble, nor reloaded them, for

was more

like a

running

fire,

however, we got our muskets as empty as our

:

we had wherewithal

was

it

half the trouble to have

to do that, but not so with our

stomachs. " Just at dusk,

I,

with one or two others of our company, went off to

a barn, about half a mile distant, with intent to get

some straw

upon, the ground and leaves being drenched with water, and

to lodge

we

as wet was quite dark in the barn, and while I was fumbling about the floor, some one called to me from the top of the mow, inquiring where I was from I told him. He asked me if we had not had an engagement there, (having heard us discharge our guns;) I told him we had, and a severe one too he asked if many were killed I told him that I saw none killed, nor any very badly wounded. I then as they

;

it

;

;

heard several others, as

it

;

appeared, speaking on the

mow.

Poor

fel-

lows, they had better have been at their posts, than skulking in a barn

on account of a British

wet, for I have not the least doubt but that the

little

had possession of

I could not find

by the side of the

floor

off the

the ranks.

ground

We

When I I left my

while on the march.

communicated

we

;

were

to the

noon of next day.

in the sheaf, standing

took a sheaf or two and returned as fast as

I

;

could to the regiment.

march

their mortal parts before the

any straw, but found some wheat arrived the

men were

my

wheat, seized

strictly enjoined

all

musket, and

could not diyine.

marched

officer,

Some were

and

such secrecy could mean

off in the

same way we had come

on the Island, forming various conjectures among ourselves as destination.

into

What

in whispers.

We

fell

not to speak, or even cough,

All orders were given from officer to

men

I

paraded to

of opinion that

the flank or in the rear of the enemy.

we were

to

Others, that

endeavor

we were

to

to get

our

on

going up

them in that quarter but none, it seems, knew We marched on, however, until we arrived at the ferry, where we immediately embarked on board the batteaux, and were conveyed safely to New-York, where we were landed about three the East River, to attack

;

the right of the matter.

o'clock in the morning, nothing against our inclinations."

Aug. 23. Before day the enemy began to land a body of troops The morning was foggy. They were discovered to be still landing after sunrise. By about 2 o'clock they reached Flatbush, where they were met by a body of our people, who skirmished with them to 821.

at Utrecht.

advantage.

After that

we

kept a picket guard of 1500 between Flat-

bush and Brooklyn in the woods and on eminences,

who were

continually


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. From

skirmishing with the enemy.

Bushwick

down forts,

to

in a line

we had

Our

Greene the

;

forts,

the south part of the

straight

on a

Bay below

to the left of (j)

little

inclosed a tract of land to the westward, next

On

lines fronted east.

the above described bay,

of

(i)

creek running up to and by Brooklyn, were our lines and

to the

by which

N. Y.

drawn from

157

and towards the

wick, crossing the

flat

left,

near the lowest part of

;

:

redoubts, breastworks, &c.

enemy, with 50 or 60

the

was Fort Putnam near the middle, Fort the whole were composed creek, Fort Box

On Monday

night about 5,000 of

light horse, filed off to the right

lands, and

making

upon our

posts, with a design of falling

up

to

Bush-

a circuit to avoid our advanced

We

left.

had made the roads

leading to our lines from the different adjacent towns quite inconvenient

A

or unsafe.

heavy detachment marched on Tuesday morning before

day from the Narrows

went

off

our advanced guards in that quarter,

to attack

and on coming up with, began

to

On

engage them.

Lord

that,

Stirling

Ere he arrived, the enemy

with about 1200 to support them.

landed a body of 3,000 in the small bay just below the mouth of the

him

creek, which obliged

to

form his

men

in

two

meeting in an

lines

obtuse angle, one stretching up to the creek between the regulars and

Brooklyn, the other leading

away from

that,

where

it

formed the angle

towards Flatbush, and was joined by a number of the picket guard.

Lord

Stirling

two hours

began

to

after that,

engage the enemy a

little after

About

sunrise.

between 9 and 10, the 5,000 that had marched

night and taken a circuit to Bushwick,

fell

all

upon the rear of our north

road picket guard under Gen. Parsons, which occasioned another body of our

men under Gen.

A

supporting them. their

way down

Plains,

Sullivan to advance that

way

with a view of

great part of the north road picket guard fought

to the creek.

and formed a middle

The Hessians marched over Flatbush

line in

such a direction as to prevent Gen.

Sullivan's getting into our lines in the usual

way

;

and

his

men were

therefore obliged to cross the creek at the upper part, next to a mill-dam.

Lord

Stirling's

men,

after

having fought a long while, forded the mouth

of the creek next to the bay.

When

the 5,000 had got

right of our lines, next to the creek, they

made an

down

attack, but

to the

were

re-

the day before.

between Box Fort and the creek were not completed There was an opening adjoining the creek, which it

was thought

enemy was acquainted with

pulsed.

The

lines

the

;

for

when

they

came

to

and found the entrance closed with a breastwork and other defences, they appeared confounded. However, they made the attack with one party, and then with another, supposed with a view chiefly of carrying

it

8


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; LETTERS RELATING TO THE

158 off the

dead and wounded under cover of the

My

afterwards about 100 packs. this part of the line

saw

the

movement

fire.

informer rode

with a message from an

Our people found

down

officer

more

to the troops in to the left,

who

of the enemy, intimating his apprehension that they

would be attacked, and they were in immediate readiness. The enemy proposing to cut off and make prisoners as many of our men as possible, pressed

killed.

We

hard upon them.

near the creek,

who were

The enemy's

fire

had great numbers

in a salt-marsh

upon without having more than one

fired

did but

little

erally over the heads of our people.

execution, the balls flying gen-

Several of our

men having no

chance of escaping otherwise, betook themselves to the woods and

wards came

in.

When

the

engagement began our

lines

after-

were thinly

manned, but 4 regiments being called in and others brought over from N. Y., there was a sufficient number before an attack could be made. On Wednesday, in a heavy Our artillerymen behaved heroically. shower of rain, the enemy attacked our lines between Forts Greene and Putnam. Our men were directed (and readily complied) to lie upon the ground, with their bodies over their firelocks, so that the

enemy

got

We

went over with boats about 7 o'clock. The brigades were ordered to be in readiness with bag and baggage to march, but knew not where or for what the 2d did not know where the 1st had gone nor the 3d, the 2d. The last marched off at the firing of the

repulsed.

;

;

3 o'clock gun on Friday morning.

The

the water smooth as glass, so that

our boats went over safe, though

all

night

was remarkably

still,

but about 3 inches out of water. At sunrise a great fog came up. We left half a dozen large guns. 3 or 4 men were missing, who came off in a batteau. On Friday or Saturday the British vessels came up to the desired place. My informant was on horseback in the Gen. Parlines, and had a spy-glass, and saw most of the proceedings. sons was surrounded in a swamp and narrowly escaped. Grant said he was slain by our Gen. Parsons. Independent (Boston) Chronicle, Sep.

many were

19, '76.

New-York, ers with the

friends

Sep. 5, 1776.

A list

enemy, who sent by

were desired

to

of the American officers prison-

flag for their

baggage and cash. Their

send next door to Gen. Putnam's their trunks,

&.c, properly directed, and leave their cash at the General's, that they

might be sent by the

O"

The names

first flag.

included in brackets are inserted by the editor.


159

BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. Pennsylvania Battalion.

1st

Cols.

Miles, Piper

Capts.

;

Brown, Peebles, Crawl

Lts. Scott,

;

Gray, Spear, Drasbach, Mcpherson, Lee, Brodhead, Davis, Wert, Topham Drs. John and Jos. Davies. Col. Lutz, Mr. David Duncan, Mr. ;

Young, Major

Bird, Capt. Heiden.

han, missing.

2d

Jacquet and CarnaChas Taylor, 3d Lt.,

[2d Lts.

Sloan and Brownlee.

Lts.

killed.]

Col. Kichline's

Eegiment.

Capt. Graff; Lts. Lewis, Middah, Shoemaker.

Adj. Hoogland

;

Col.

Lasher's N. Y. Battalion.

Lts.

Troup and Dunscomb

Gilliland, volunteers.

;

Mr. Van Wagenen and

[Maj. Abeel, killed]

Smallwood's Battalion.

Col.

wounded

Capt. Dan'l Bowie,

Lts.

;

Wm.

Wm.

Steret,

Ridgely,

Hatch Dent, Walter Muse, Sam'l Wright, Jos. Butler, wounded Edward Praul, Edward De Courcey Ensigns Jas. Fernandes, William ;

;

Courts. Col.

Huntington's Eegiment.

Lt. Makepeace, Capt. Brewster

;

Ensigns Lyman, Chapman, Hin-

man, Bradford Lt. Orcutt, Ensign Higgins, Capt. Bissel Lts. Gillet and Gay Adj. Hopkins, Dr. Holmes, Col. Clark. [Missing, 6 Capts, ;

;

;

6 Lts., 21 sergeants, 2 drummers, 126 rank and file] Col. Atlee's

Col. Atlee

;

Eegiment.

Capts. Howell, Nice, Herbert,

Finney, Henderson

John Toms, of

;

Murray

Lts. Houston,

;

Dr. Young, volunteer.

Col. Johnson's Reg., Mr. Callender, Cadet of artille-

Mr. Kearnes, Del. Bat.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maj. Wells, of Col. Willys' Reg.

ry.

sign Davies.

En-

Capt. Hurst.

[Lt. Col. Parry, killed.

Lt.

Moore,

killed.

Ensign App, missing.

Killed and missing, 13 sergeants and 235 privates.]

American account of Prisoners

in the 3

Pennsylvania Battalions.

1st Battalion.

Col. Lts.

Sam'l Miles, Lt. Col. Jas Piper, Capt. Richard Brown; 1st

Wm.

Grey, John Spear, John Davis, Geo. Wert

Wm.

;

2d

Lts. Jos.

Mcpherson, Luke Brodhead Drs. John and Jos. DaMissing of Farmer's, Brown's, [2d Lt. Jos. Jaquet, missing. vis. Long's, Allbright's, Shade's, Weitzell's, 9 sergeants, 4 drummers, 107 Friesback,

privates.]

;


— 160

LETTERS RELATING TO THE 2d Bat. of

Wm.

Capt.

David Sloan 3d

Peebles

3d Lt

;

;

Rifle

Regiment.

Mat. Scott, Dan'l

1st Lts.

Jos. Brownlee.

Lt. Chas. Taylor, killed.

Topham

2d

;

Lt.

[2d Lt. Jas Carnagan, missing.

Missing of Murray's, Peeble's, Marshall's,

Erwin's, Grubb's, Christ's, 6 sergeants,

1

drummer, 40

privates.]

Bat. of Musketry. Col. Sam'l J

Atlee, [Lt. Col. Caleb Parry, killed

Murray, Thos. Herbert, John Nice,

Wm.

Ensigns

Jos.

Howell

Lt. Jos.

Moore,

Finney

;

Septimus Davis, Michael

Henderson, Alex. Huston,

App, missing.

Capts. Francis

;]

Lt. "Walter

;

Missing of Anderson's, Mur-

killed.

ray's, Herbert's, DehofT's, Nice's, Howell's,

McClelland, late Lloyd's,

1

sergeant, 1 drummer, 75 privates.

Howe's return of prisoners taken Aug. 27. 3 Generals.—3 Cols; Penn. Rifle Reg.

1.—4 Lt

J. Militia

Cont. Reg.

1.— 3 Majors; Penn.

— 18 Capts; Penn.

tia 5,

17th Cont. Reg. 4, Train of artillery

43 Lts; Penn

Rifle

1,

Reg. 2, Penn. Musketeers 1,

1,

N.

Penn. Militia 2, 17th

Militia 1, 17th Cont. Militia

do. 1.

Rifle

Penn. Musketeers

1,

Cols; Penn. Rifle Reg.

4,

1,

Maryland Provincials

Reg. 11, Penn. Musketeers

1,

22d

Penn. Mili2.

Penn. Militia

6,

17th Cont. Reg. 6, Del. Bat. 2, 1st Bat. N. Y. Cont. 5, 11th Bat. Cont.

Maryland Independents 2, L. I. Militia 2, Maryland Provincials 5. 11 Ensigns; Penn Musketeers 4, 17th Cont. Reg. 5, Maryland Provincials 2. Staff; Adjutant 1, Surgeons 3, Volunteers 2, Privates 1006.— Total 1097. N. B. 9 officers and 58 privates of the above wounded. 1,

N.

1st Bat.

J. Militia 1,

Train of

artillery 1,

822. Mifflin and Grayson rode to the outposts on the west extremity of the lines, near

Red Hook, where

there

was

a

small bat-

which had suffered severely from the cannonade of the Roebuck, Aug, 27. While there the fog, which lay heavily over this part of the harbor, was lifted by a shift of wind, and the British fleet, lying at its tery

anchorage off Staten I., and within the Narrows, could be plainly seen. Boats were passing to and from the Admiral's ship. They returned to Washington and urged the withdrawal of the army. Capt Montresor, with a small party,

camp last

deserted.

first

crossed the crest of our works and found the

The advanced

parties

arrived at the ferry, just as the

boat-load of Americans had passed out of musket range.

Reed, 823.

On

I.

229.

the night of the 28th, the British threw up a redoubt on the

heights east of Ft.

Putnam, from which they opened a

fire

on the

fort

;

and


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. on the 29th they made a show of attacking the

menaced

this

161

A

lines.

strong column

The Americans were

on land of Geo. Powers.

here pre-

pared to receive them, and orders were issued to reserve their they could see the white of their eyes.

American

tered the

Van

A few

when one coming too near, was shot by Wm. who then put up his gun, and said he had done his

lines,

Cott of Bushwick,

Col. Philip Johnson of Sidney, N. J.,

part.

He was

of Sullivan's division,

who

fell

in the battle of the 27th.

says of him, "

No

N.

Wednesday

Aug. 29.

Y.,

army attacked our

with their utmost force

;

them

precipitately.

The men-of-war

come up

to

lines

on L.

at

which time

so that they were obliged immediately to retreat at the

same time made an attempt day before, but the wind

the city, as they did also the

N. E.

both times entirely obstructed them.

The Retreat of

the

to

at

Chronicle.

American Army.

PROCEEDINGS OF A COUNCIL OF GENERAL OFFICERS.

825.

At

;

at three different places,

I.,

but the intrepidity of the soldiers of the United

States repulsed

;

could be

afternoon a great hail and rain

storm came on, attended with thunder and lightning the ministerial

officer

Gen. Johnson.

braver in this action." 824.

fire till

British officers reconnoi-

War

a Council of

Long

held on

Present, His Excellency Gen.

Spencer

;

Brig. Gens. Mifflin,

Island,

August 29th, 1776

Washington, Maj. Gens. Putnam,

McDougal, Parsons,

Scott,

Wadsworth,

Fellows. It

all

was submitted

circumstances,

it

to the consideration of the Council, whether,

would not be

dependencies, and to remove to

eligible to leave

New- York.

the affirmative, for the following reasons 1st.

Long

Island,

:

Because our advanced party had met with a defeat, and the

able officers,

and

their battalions, or a large portion of

sioned great confusion and discouragement

The heavy

rain which

fell

among

;

lines,

the troops.

two days and nights without

and the soldiery, being without cover, and obliged were worn

them by any 4th.

out,

and

it

was

to be feared

valu-

them, had occa-

mission, had injured the arms, and spoiled a great part of the tion

its

Unanimously agreed in

wood was lost, where we expected to make a principal stand. 2d. The great loss sustained in the death or captivity of several

3d.

under

and

inter-

ammuni-

to lay in the

would not be retained in

order.

From

the time the

enemy moved from

Flatbush, several large

ships had endeavored to get up, as supposed into the East River, to cut


LETTERS RELATING TO THE

162 off our

communications, (by which the whole army would have been

destroyed,) but, the 5th.

Upon

wind being N.E., could not

effect

it.

consulting with persons of knowledge of the harbor, they

were of opinion that small ships might come between Long Island

and Governor's Island, where there are no obstructions, and which off the communication effectually and who were also of opinion the hulks sunk between Governor's Island and the city of New-

would cut

;

York were no sufficient security for obstructing that passage. 6th. Though our lines were fortified by some strong redoubts,

yet a

great part of them were weak, being abattied with brush, and affording

no strong cover,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so that

there

was reason

to

apprehend they might be

which would put our troops in confusion, and, having no they must have been cut to pieces or made prisoners.

retreat,

forced,

The

7th.

carious,

divided state of the troops, renders our defence very pre-

and the duty of defending long and extensive

different places, without proper conveniences

ing, that the troops

had become

dispirited

lines in so

and cover, so very

by

their

many

fatigu-

incessant duty

and

watching.

Because the enemy had sent several ships of war into the

8th.

Sound,

to a place called

Flushing Bay

;

and, from the information re-

was moving across Long Island that apprehend they meant to pass over land, and

ceived that a part of their troops

way, there was reason

to

form an encampment above Kingsbridge, in order all

to cut off

and prevent

communication between our army and the country beyond them, or

to get in

our rear.

826. " that

By

ten o'clock the troops began to retire from the lines, so

no chasm was made

;

but as one regiment

left

their station or

moved to the right and left, and filled up the vacancies, while Washington took his station at the ferry and superintended the embarkation. As the dawn approached, those of us who remained in the trenches became very anxious for our safety, at which guard, the remaining troops

time there were several regiments to rise,

and seemed

atmosphere, that a the sun rose

to settle over

man

we had

had

der came, and

we

;

so dense

could not be discerned six yards

was ordered back

to the lines,

risen, but the fog

on duty, and a dense fog began

orders to leave the lines, but before

the ferry the regiment

about and returned

still

both encampments

was

the

When

we reached

Col. Chester faced

again.

where the regiment

remained as dense as ever.

off.

tarried

till

the sun

Finally a second or-

joyfully bid those trenches a long adieu.

When we

reached Brooklyn ferry the boats had not yet returned from their last


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. trip,

but they soon appeared.

when

ferry stairs

I

I

think

saw Gen. Washington on

I

stepped into one of the

at the ferry, tied to a post.

The

my

for

and

finally

by

had got

from the

we were

the

horse

and the

off

with him some

As

saluted merrily from their

mus-

their field-pieces.

artillery,

my

in Brooklyn.

When

possession of the heights opposite the city of firing

I left

got leave to return with a I

enemy appeared

distance into the river before the

ketry,

I

favorite horse.

soon as they reached the ferry

boats.

last

troop3 having all safely reached N.

Y., and the fog continuing thick as ever,

crew of volunteers

163

fleet

pretty

enemy had taken

the

N. Y., they commenced soon were in motion to

take possession of those waters." Col.

The guns

the retreating Americans.

batteau,

fell

Talhnadge, as quoted by Simms.

of Fort Stirling were unspiked and turned on the boats of

Three persons who

left

into the enemy's hands.

the Island last in a IV".

E. Chronicle.

Hand's Account of the Retreat.

Col.

827. In the evening of the 29th of August, 1776, with several other

commanding officers of corps, I received orders to attend Major Gen. Mifflin when assembled, Gen. Mifflin informed us that in conse:

quence of the determination of a board of General tion of

night

mand

Long

Island,

where we then were, was

to

that the Commander-in-chief had honored

;

officers, the

evacua-

be attempted that

him with the com-

of the covering party, and that our corps were to be employed

that service

he then assigned us our several stations which

;

was dark, and pointed out Brooklyn Church as to repair and unitedly opin case they discovered our movements and made an consequence. My regiment was posted in a redoubt on the

to occupy as soon as

an alarm post, pose the enemy attack in

m

we were

to

it

which the whole were

and in the lines on the right of the great road below Brooklyn Church; Capt. Henry Miller commanded in the redoubt. Part of a regiment of the flying camp of the State of New- York, were in the begin[eft,

ning of the night posted near

me

;

they showed so

much

uneasiness at

them to march off, lest they might communicate the panic with which they were seized to my people the General granted my request, and they marched off their station, that I petitioned General Mifflin to suffer

;

accordingly.

After that nothing remarkable happened at

my

post

till

about two o'clock in the morning, when Alexander Scammell, since Adjutant General, chief,

who

came from

be with

me

the

that day acted as A. D. C. to the left

at the time.

inquiring for Gen'l Mifflin,

Scammell

told

him

Commander-in-

who happened

that the boats

to

were wait-


;

164 ing,

LETTERS RELATING TO THE and the Commander-in-chief anxious

for the arrival

of the troops

Gen'i Mifflin said he thought he must be mistaken, that

at the ferry.

he did not imagine the General could

mean

the troops he immediately

commanded. Scammell replied he was not mistaken adding that he came from the extreme left, and had ordered all the troops he had met to march that in consequence they were then in motion, and that he would go on to give the same orders. Gen. Mifflin then ordered me ;

;

my advanced pickets and sentinels, to collect and form my regiment, and to march as soon as possible, and quitted me. Having

to call in

marched

into the great

road leading to the church, I

troops returning from the

left

of the lines

fell

in with the

having arrived at the church

;

up my camp equipage which, in the course of the night, had carried there by a small party. Gen'l Mifflin came up at the instant and asked the reason of the halt ? I told him, and he seemed I halted to take

I

very

much

displeased, and exclaimed

wish the devil had them

march on

:

before I perceived the front

cause,

I

met

that Col. lie

?

was surprised

my

I at

"

Damn I

your pots and kettles, I

obeyed, but had not gone far

had halted, and hastening

the Commander-in-chief,

Hand

abandoned

:

!"

who

answered in the affirmative.

me in

post.

I

particular

;

to

inquire the

perceived me, and said,

is

not

His Excellency said

that he did not expect I

answered that

I

would have had not abandoned itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; that I

my immediate commanding officer he said it him I hoped if I could satisfy him I had the orders of Gen'l Mifflin, he would not think me particularly to blame he said he undoubtedly would not. Gen'l Mifflin then coming up, and asking what the matter was, his Excellency said, " Good God Gen'l had marched by order of

was

impossible.

;

I told

;

!

am

Mifflin, I

afraid

you have ruined us by so unseasonably withdraw-

ing the troops from the lines." Gen'l Mifflin replied with some warmth, " I did it by your order." His Excellency declared it could not be Gen'l Mifflin swore by God, " I did," and asked " did Scammell act as

an A. D. C. he

did.

for the day, or did he not ?" his Excellency acknowledged " Then," said Mifflin, " I had orders through him." The

Gen'l replied

were

in

much

it

was a

posts before the

him

dreadful mistake, and informed

confusion at the ferry, and unless

enemy

discovered

we had

left

we

them, in

the most disagreeable consequences would follow.

that matters

could .resume our

We

all

probability

immediately

returned, and had the good fortune to recover our former stations and

keep them

for some hours was going forward.

longer, without the

enemy

perceiving what


BATTLE OF LONG ISLAND. British Account of the Lines and Retreat.

828.

The

165

lines could not be taken

had no fascines

to

by assault

no axes

ditches,

fill

to

;

but by approaches.

The

ladders to assault so respectable a work.

We

cut abatis, and no scaling lines

were a mile and a

half in extent, including angles, cannon-proof, with a chain of five redoubts, or rather fortresses with ditches, as had the lines that formed the intervals

;

the whole surmounted with a most formidable abatis,

A

finished in every part.

ting through the abatis. at

4 o'clock discovered the

25 minutes and

after.

his brigade

ferry

corporal and six

They were

were evacuated.

lines

was ordered

ing there with an army.

to

march

We

to

The

at 8, but while

pickets

marched

afloat

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; some boats not

We

saw

to the

to be land-

were on the rear of the enemy

killed or taken prisoners in Brooklyn.

about 8 or 9 o'clock.

marching

meet Lee, reported

were

and

a difficulty in get-

General Robertson heard of the retreat at 7 o'clock,

he was ordered toward Hellgate

ers in the city

men had

reconnoitering before daybreak, and

;

some

three or four boats

off. The debris of their rear guard embarked The Americans fired grape from their 32 pound-

at the ship yards,

850 yards

off.

Their retreat was

secured by forts on Brooklyn heights and floating batteries in the river.

No

boat could be stationed so as to see the passing at Brooklyn ferry

without exposure to the American batteries.

Parliamentary Register, Vol.

13.


;

PART

III.

SUBMISSION OF KINGS COUNTY. 829.

Thus

the people of Kings County, after a few had

been persuaded or forced into rebellion, were abandoned by their

countrymen

to all its penalties.

no time in seeking

to

make

Accordingly they

their peace with the King's

lost

Com-

missioners.

To

RICHARD, LORD the RIGHT HONORABLE VISCOUNT HOWE, of the Kingdom of Ireland, and his EXCELLENCY WM. HOWE, Esquire, General of His Majesty's forces in America, the King's Commisfor restoring peace to His Majesty's Colonies in

sioners

North America.

Your Excellencies by your Declaration bearing July 14, '76, were pleased sirous to deliver his

to signify that

American

date is

de-

subjects from the calamities

of war, and other oppressions which they

and

" the King

to restore the Colonies to his

now undergo

protection and

peace;"

and, by a subsequent Declaration, dated Sep. 19, '76, having also been pleased to express your desire " to confer with His Majesty's well-affected subjects, upon the means of restoring the public tranquillity, and establishing a permanent union with every colony as part of the British Empire ;" we therefore,

whose names are hereunto subscribed, freeholders and

inhabitants of Kings County, in the Province of

New- York,

reflecting with the tenderest emotions of gratitude on this in-


:

107

SUBMISSION OF KINGS COUNTY.

stance of His Majesty's paternal goodness, and encouraged

by the

affectionate

manner

which His Majesty's gracious

in

purpose hath been conveyed

to

us by your Excellencies,

have thereby evinced, that humanity

is

who

inseparable from that

true magnanimity and those enlarged sentiments which form the most shining characters, beg leave to represent to your

Excellencies,

That we bear true allegiance Geo. the Third, as well as son, crown, us,

and dignity

warm

to

to testify

;

our rightful sovereign,

affection to his sacred per-

which, we, and each of

have voluntarily taken an oath [in the church at Flat-

bush]

before

Council

Wm.

Axtell, Esq., one of His Majesty's

Province, in the following words, viz

for this

/ do sincerely promise and swear, that I will he faithful and hear true allegiance to His Majesty, King Geo. the Third, and thai I will defend his crown and dignity, against So help me God. all persons whatsoever. That we esteem the constitutional supremacy of Great Britain over these Colonies and other depending parts of His

Majesty's dominions, as essential to the union, security, and

and sincerely lament the inharmony which formerly subsisted between

welfare of the whole empire terruption of that

;

the parent State and these her Colonies.

humbly pray to restore

that

this

your

County

to

Excellencies

We,

therefore,

would be pleased

His Majesty's protection

peace.

Nov., 1776.

Rem

Evert Banker, jr.

Cor's Bennet,

Rob't Aitkins, 2,

Wm.

Wm.

Amberman, Harman Ando 1

Chas. Barre,

John Beenem,

Wineant Bennet,

John Antonides,

Jas. Bennet,

Jacob Bennet,

Lucas Benberg, Moses Beedle,

Adriance,

Petrus

Barre,

Peter Antonides,

Peter Bennet,

Vincentius Antonides,

John Bennet,

Wm.

Jan Bennett,

Axtell,

Lodowick Bamper, n.y. Ab'm Bennet,

Bennet, 2,

Jere'h Bennett,

Ded'rick Bergen, 2,

Simon Bergen,

2,

and


168

SUBMISSION OF KINGS COUNTY.

Teunis Bergen,

Peter Cortelyou,

Johannes Bergen,

Jaques Cortelyou,

Cor's Duryee,

Michael Bergen,

John Covert, 3,

Peter Duryee, 2,

Thos. Betts, 2,

Rich'd Covert,

Christian Duryee,

Cor's Bise,

Jeremiah Covert,

Isaac Eldert,

John Blake,

Jacob Cosyn,

Johannes Eldert,

Nich's Blom,

Cor's Cozine,

Thos. Elsworth,

Gerret Boerum,

Jacob Boerum,

John Cowwenhoven, John Emens, John R. Cowenhoven, Jacobus Emens, Jas. Cowenhoven, Ab'm Emans, 2,

Johannes Boerum,

Nich. Covenhoven,

Thos. Everit,

John Boerum,

Rem

John Foorhest,

Ab'm

Ferdinand Berou?

Couwenhoven,

Charles T. Duryee,

2,

John Crawley,

Colen Folkertson,

Cor's Bogert,

Casper Crisper,

Wm.

Gisbert Bogert,

Crispeer,

Robert Galbreath,

Crispeer,

John Gavel,

Bogart, 2,

Furman,

John Boyce,

Harmon Andrew

Dan'lfBoyel,

Johannes Debevoise,

Jaques Borkeloo,

John Debevoise,

Sam'l Gerresen,

Jan Booryes, Martin Brevoort,

Chas. Debevoise, 2,

Jacobus Golden,

Jacobus Debevoice,

Geo. Gosling,

Harmanus Burkuloo,

Sam'l Debevoise,

John Hallet,

Cor's Buys,

Geo. Debevois,

Rob't Hargrave, n. t-

Dan'l Buys,

Joost Debevoise,

John Harris,

John Buys,

Ab'm

Fred'k Hatfield,

Thos. Colange,

Johannes Degraf,

Adrian Hegeman, 2,

George Carpenter,

John Demott,

John Hegeman,

Martinus Carshow,

Is.

Jacob Cushow,

Denyse Denyse,

Wm.

Chardavoyne,

Deforest,

Denyse,

2,

Hegeman, 2, Jacobus Hegeman, Jas. Hegeman, Evert Hegeman, Petrus Hegeman, Jos. Hegeman, Ab'm Hegeman, Rem Hegeman, Dennis Hegeman, Peter

Rutgers Denyse,

John M'Clenachan,

Fred'k Depeyster,

Joseph Compton,

John Devoe, 2,

Andries Conselye,

John Ditmars,

John Conselje,

Johannes Ditmars, 3, John J. Ditmars,

Gabriel Cook, 2,

Samuel Garrison,

Jacobus Cornell,

Gab'l Duryee, 2,

Peter Cornell, 2,

Ab'm Duryee,

Wm.

Charles Duryee,

Israel Horsefield,

Isaac Cornell,

Johannes Duryea,

Thos. Horsefield,

John Cornell,

Jacob Duryea,

C.

Whit'd Cornell,

Simon Duryee,

Jos.

Cornel],

2,

Stephen Herriman,

Wm. Howard, Howard,


169

SUBMISSION OF KINGS COUNTY. Johannes Remsen,

Jacob Hicks,

Jurrien Lott,

Sam'l Hubbard,

Maurice Lott,

Barnardus Hubbard,

John McClenachan,

Ab'm Remsen,

Elias Hubbard, 2,

Gerret Martense, 2,

Wm. Remsen,

Adrian Martense,

Geo. Remsen,

Jas.

Hubbard,

John A. Remsen,

2,

John Hulst,

Jores Martense, 2,

Derick Remsen, 2,

William Johnson,

LefTert Martense,

Aris Remsen,

John Johnson, Hend'k Johnson,

Isaac Martense,

Jacob Remsen, 2,

Leonard May,

Jeromus Remsen,

Coert Johnson,

Jacob Meserole,

Rem

A. Remsen,

Fornant Johnson,

John Milber,

Joris

Remsen,

Barent Johnson, 3,

Garret Middagh,

Rem Remsen,

Dan'l Jones,

John Middagh,

Marten Reyers,

Jacob Kershow,

David Molenaor,

Jos. Reyers,

Tunis Kershow,

Geo. Moore,

Edw'd Reynolds,

Wm.

Kowenhoven, Kowwenhoven, Gerret Kowenhoven,

Ab'm

John Casp. Rubel,v.D.

Peter

John Murphe,

Barnardus Ryder,

Petrus Muerenbeldt,

Lawrence Ryder,

Court Lake,

John

Derick Lake,

Philip Nagel,

Dan'l Lake,

Peter Neefus,

Wilhelmus Ryder,

LerTert LefTerts, 2,

Petrus Neefus,

Jacob Ryerson,

Hend'k

John Nostrand,

John Ryerson, 2, Hend'k Schenck,

LefTerts,

Murff,

My ford,

2,

Sam'l Ryder,

Stephen Ryder,

Jacob LefTerts,

Garret Noorstrandt,

Barent LefTerts,

John Oake, Hend'k Oake,

Stephen Schenck,

Nich's LefTerts,

Jan Lequier,

Thos. Pearsall,

Martin Schenck, 2,

Nich's Schenck,

Ab'm Luquer,

Wm.

John Lewis,

Theod's Poihemus,

RoelofTLott,

Ab'm Poihemus,

Jan Schenck,

Engelbert Lott, 2,

John Poihemus,

Caleb Scofield,

Johannes Lott, 2,

Jotham Post,

Benj.

Petrus Lott,

Thos. Powels,

Chas. Semper,

Plowman,

Stephen Schenck, 2,

John Schenck,

2,

Seaman,

Dennis H. Lott,

Peter Praa Provoost,

Isaac Selover,

Johannes E. Lott,

John Rapalje,jr.

Jacob Sickels,

John Lott, Hend'k Lott,

Dan'l Rapalje,

Hend'k

Geo. Rapalje,

Dan'l Simonsen,

Christopher Lott,

Tennis Rapalje,

Fred'k Simonson,

Simon

Folkert Rapalje,

Evert Shareman,

Jores Rapalje,

John Skillman,

Lott,

Jeromus Lott,

Sickels,


SUBMISSION OF KINGS COUNTY.

170 Thos. Skillman,

Fernandus Suydam,

Vernant Van Sickel,

John Smith,

Jacob Suydam,

Fernandes Van Siclen,

Lewis Sness,

Sam'l Sullen,

Johannes Van Sicklen,

Isaac Snedeker, 2,

Albert Terhune,

Jeremias Vanderbilt,

Ab'm Snedeker,

Roeloff Terhune,

John Vanderbilt,

Johannes Snedeker,

Chas. Titus,

Rem

Jacob Snedeker,

David Titus,

Peter Vanderbilt, 2,

David Sprong,

Frans Titus,

Wm.

Tetus Titus,

Paul Vandervoort,

2,

Stephen Sprong,

2,

Vanderbilt,

Vandervoort,

Gabriel Sprong,

Teunis Tiebout,

Jan Vandervoort,

Wm.

Henry Van Beuren, Isaac Van Brunt,

John Vandervoort,

Lamb't Vandervoort,

Peter Stoothoff,

Van Brunt, Adrian Van Brunt, Wm. Van Brunt, Rutgert Van Brunt, Cor's Van Brunt, Cort Van Brunt, Jan Van Duyn, Cor's Van Duyn, 3, Jan Van Dyne,

Garret StoothofT,

John Vandyck,

Burger Vandewater,

Wm. VanDyck, 2,

Peter Vandewater,

Sprong,

Volkert Sprong,

jr.

Jacob Stellenwerf,

John Stewart, Nich's Stillwell,jr.2,

Thos.

Stillwell, 2,

Joost Stilwell,

Rutgert Stillwell, Rich. Stillwell, 2, Christ'r Stillwell,

Johannes Stoothoff,

Wilhelmus

Stoothoff, 3

Albert Stoothoff,

Michael Vandervoort,

Albert

:

Hend'k Van

John Van

Cleef,

Cleef, 2,

John Vanderveer, 2, Hend'k Vanderveer, 4,

Cor's Vanderveer,

Gerret Vandine,

Mat. Vandyke, Isaac Vangelder,

Jacobus Vandeventer,

Bernardus Vandewater,

John Van Varck,

Van

And. Stockholm,

David Van Cott, Aert Van Pelt,

Niclase Vegte,

Sam'l Strycker,

John Stryker,

Wynant Van Pelt, Johannes Van Pelt,

Adrian Voorhees,

Michael Stryker,

Peter

Cornelius Strycker,

Rem Van

Jacobus Suydam, Hend'k Suydam, 4, John Suydam, 3, Lambert Suydam, Vernandt Suydam, Hend'k H. Suydam, Andrew Suydam, Evert Suydam,

Jacob

Tunii Suydam,

Van

Pelt, 2,

Pelt, 2,

jr.

Jacobus Vanderveer,

Garret Stryker, 2,

2,

Cor's

Jos.

Zinze,

Vonck,

Ab'm Voorhees, Lawrence Voorhees,

Van Nuys, Peter Voorhees, Wilhelmus Van Nuys, Stephen Voorhees, Joost

Van Nuys,

Robert Voorhees,

Ulpianus Van Sinderen John Voorhees,

U. Van Sinderen, v.d.m. Aert Voorhees,

Van Sice, Van Sise, Chas. Van Sice, John Van Siclen,

2,

Cor's

Thos. Whitlock,

Garret

Jos.

White,

2,

Garret Williamson, Nich's Williamson,


171

SUBMISSION OF KINGS COUNTY.

Wm.

Cor's Wykoff,

Barent Wyckoff,

Williamson,

Jeremiah Williamson, Nich's Wyckoff,

Joost Wykoff,

John Williamson,

Gerret Wyckoff,

Peter Wyckoff, 2,

Peter Williamson,

Hend'k Wykoff,

David Wortman,

Johannes Wyckoff,

To His Excellency 830.

Wm.

John Youngs,

2,

Sam'l Zeller.

Tryon, Esq., Gov.

<SfC.

We, the members of the Provincial Congress, the County-

Committee and the Committees of the

different townships elected

and by the inhabitants of Kings Co.,

feel the highest satisfaction

for

in having

it

in

County being

our power to dissolve ourselves without danger of the desolated, as

We

time ago.

and disclaiming

it

was by repeated

threats,

some short

do hereby accordingly dissolve ourselves, rejecting all

power of Congress and Committees,

fusing obedience thereto, and revoking

all

totally re-

proceedings under them

whatsoever, as being repugnant to the laws and constitution of the British Empire, and undutiful to our sovereign, and ruinous to the

welfare and prosperity of this County.

your Excellency

we

shall

authority of government, to call us forth, being

We

beg leave to assure

be exceeding happy in obeying the legal

whenever your Excellency

shall be pleased

from long experience well assured of your

Excellency's mild and upright administration. Signed, 3d and 4th

Dec,

1776.

Philip Nagel,

John Suydam,

Ab'm Laquere,

Wm. Johnson,

Wilh's Stoothoff,

Derick Remsen,

Evert Suydam,

Casper Crisper,

Ab'm

Rich'd Stillwell,

Isaac Cortelyou,

Isaac Denyce,

Johannes E. Lott,

Petrus Lott,

Johannes Bergen,

Rem

Voorhies,

Cowvenhoven, Nich's Cowvenhoven,

Denyse Denyse,

John Vanderbelt,

Engelbert Lott,

Theodo's Polhemus,

Joost Duryea,

J.

Jerem'h Vanderbilt,

Garret Wykoff,

Hubbard,

Wm.

Vanbrunt,

Jacobus Vandeventer,

Stephen Voorhees,

Rich'd Stillwell, jr.

John Titus,

Adrian Voorhies,

Rutgert Vanbrunt,

Cor's Wykoff,

Van Pelt,

Leffert Lefferts,

Adrian Hegeman, *Ab'm Van Ranst,

*Nich's Grudendyck,

* Albert Vanbrunt,

Petrus

[Those

to

the County.]

whose names a

star is prefixed

Johannes Debevoice, *Wilhelmus Van Nuys, *Jeremias Remsen,

were either

sick, or out of


PART

IV.

ARMED OCCUPATION OF KINGS COUNTY. 831. His Majesty has observed with great satisfaction the effusions of loyalty and affection

upon

his faithful subjects

which break

their deliverance

pression of the rebel Committees

forth in the addresses of

from the tyranny and op-

and the proof given by the inhabiKings Co. of their zeal for the success of His Majesty's measures, by so generously contributing toward the expense of rais:

tants of

ing Col. Fanning's battalion, cannot

His Majesty's

them Lord Geo. Germaine.

of recommending

fail

favor.

832. Jan. 27, '77, Gaine.

from motives of loyalty

The

corps of militia in Kings Co.,

to their sovereign,

and zeal

to the consti-

tution,

have voluntarily deposited in the hands of the Hon.

Axtell,

ÂŁ310.

battalion

now

8. as

to

Wm.

an addition to the noble provision made to the

raising under the

command

of Col. Fanning, to be ap-

pointed according to the direction of His Excellency Gov. Tryon.

Gen. Edmond Fanning died in London, 1818, at an advanced age. The world contained no better man in all the relations of life, as friend,

He lost a large property He was appointed Lt. Gov.

landlord and master.

by raising a regiment

in the Revolution.

of

he was Gov. of Prince Edward's Island 19 years. ill

and

health,

widow and 833.

Nova

He

Scotia, next

resigned from

to attend to his private affairs, to the grief of all.

3 accomplished daughters.

The wounded

He

Gent.

prisoners taken,

Aug. 27, were put

left

a

Mag. in the

churches of Flatbush andN. Utrecht, but being neglected and unattended, air.

were wallowing

Ten

Island,

days

after,

was appointed

in their

own

filth,

and breathed an infected

Dr. Richard Bailey, from the hospital on Staten to superintend the

sick, aided

by Dr. Silas


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ARMED OCCUPATION OF KINGS COUNTY.

Holmes represents Bailey

Holmes, of Norwich, Conn., a prisoner,

wounded

as humane, and dressing the

173

He

daily.

got a sack-bed,

sheet and blanket for each prisoner, distributed the patients into the adjacent barns, without consent of the owners, and allowed them to

go to the neighboring houses to buy milk. One tried to escape when Campbell, Capt. of the guard, opposed their going, but gave way to the Doctor's request. When the wounded were sent to N. Y.,

N. Y. Indep. Gaz., Dec.

Dr. B. accompanied them.

20, '83.

834. [In Jan. '77, the American prisoners in N. Y. were paroled

and

billeted

on the inhabitants of Kings Co.

pay $2 per week for their board.

Col.

Congress agreeing to

Graydon thus describes

his

Ed.]

sojourn there.

Flatbush was the place assigned for the officers of our regiment, Col. Shee's and Col.

Magaw's.

Here

also

Miles, Atlee, Rawlins, and Maj. Williams.

were stationed Cols.

The indulgence

of ar-

ranging ourselves agreeably to our respective circles of acquaintance

was granted us by Mr. Loring. Lt. Forrest and myself were billeted on Mr. Jacob Suydam, whose house was pretty large, consisting of

The

buildings wmich appeared to have been erected at different times.

was occupied by Mr. Theophylact Bache and family, from N. Y. Though we were in general civilly enough received, it cannot be supposed we were very welcome to our Low Dutch hosts, whose habits were extremely parsimonious, and whose winter provision was barely sufficient for themselves. Had they front and better part

been sure of receiving the $2 per week, it might have reconciled them, Congress or ourselves being looked on as paymasters. They were, however, a people to

who seemed

any power that might be

might have been they were

George

III.

now

their propensities at

an

on them

A

sorry

we

found clean

wash made up of a

and the darkest sugar on the verge of bread (fuel being little

among

clams

stale butter, constituted

;

;

King

but their living

sprinkling of bohea,

fluidity,

with half-baked

the scarcest articles at Flatbush) and a

small piece of pickled beef to the beef

and whatever

:

earlier stage of the contest,

the dutiful and loyal subjects of His Majesty

Their houses and beds

extremely poor.

thoroughly disposed to submit

imposed

our breakfast. At our was occasionally boiled

first

coming, a

for dinner,

but

which was soon consumed, there succeeded clippers or

and our unvaried supper was supo?i or mush, sometimes with


;

ARMED OCCUPATION OF

174 skimmed hogs.

I

more generally with buttermilk, blended with was kept for weeks in a churn, as swill is saved for

milk, but

molasses, which

found

however, after a

it,

my best

per soon became

little

The

meal.

use, very eatable

company

table

;

and sup-

consisted of the

master of the house, Mr. Jacob Suydam, an old bachelor

;

young

a

man, a shoemaker, of the name of Rem Hegeman, married to Jacob's niece, who with a mewling infant in her arms, never failed to appear. A black boy too, was generally in the room not as a waiter, ;

but a sort of enfant de maison,

no

airs

;

Rem Hegeman,

and Yonicky

gave themselves

his wife,

nor was harmony with uncle Jacob ever interrupted

when soured a

once,

about or took post in the

his hat on, and occasionally joined in the con-

chimney corner with versation.

who walked

little,

drawn from

Forrest, with a pair of yarn stockings he had just legs, as

he sat

in the

chimney corner one evening preparing

but moments of peevishness were allowable to our host, for

been consuming

his provisions, while

The

our money.

religion of the

unostentatious and plain

;

but

;

he made a show of knocking down Mr.

we

Dutch, like their other

Suydam.

silent

habits,

was

grace before meat

When we

were

all

seated,

he suddenly clapped his hands together, threw his head on one closed his eyes, and remained

had

he had never seen a penny of

and a simple,

prevailed at the table of Jacob

his

for bed

mute and motionless

side,

for about a mi-

His niece and nephew followed his example, but with such

nute.

an eager solicitude that the copied attitude should be prompt and simultaneous, as to give an air of absurdity to what might otherwise

Although

have been very decent.

little

of the vernacular accent

remained on the tongues of these people, they had some peculiarities in their phraseology.

they invited you to

The morning Bache

in the

after

piazza,

ing on the South loyalist, did

knew

side.

sit

down

our arrival at Flatbush,

we

encountered Mr.

daughter.

build-

His being an Englishman, and a determined

not prevent him from accosting us very

represent us.

to table,

which extended the whole length of the

that opposition to the mother country

low and desperate lin's

Instead of asking you to

sit by.

faction, as

it

civilly.

was not confined

was the fashion among

He to a

loyalists to

His brother was a Whig, and had married Dr. FrankIn addition to frequent invitations to tea, and to par-

take of his Maderia, " to help us along a

little,"

as he expressed

it,


KINGS COUNTY. in allusion to the

it,

meagre

fare of Jacob's table, I

of his purse, though he did not

for the offer

as I had no need of

175 to

him

declined

I

availed myself of his services in exe-

I

it.

was indebted

know me.

me when he went to N. Y., which was almost daily. There were several New-Yorkers with their families residing in Flatbush. Of these Col. Axtell was apparently the first in wealth and importance. He was neatly seated at a country house, at the encuting small commissions for

had once the honor

trance of the village [since Dr. Robinson's] and

I

of supping with him, together with 8 or 10 of

my

fellow-prisoners.

In this family was a Mr. Frederick Depeyster, a young man, better

known by the all relations

much Next

fondling appellation of " Feady," and

One

of Col. Axtell.

toleration for our cause, as to in

two young ladies,

of these, a Miss Shipton, had so

marry a Col.

army.

Giles, of our

consequence to Col. Axtell, might be placed Mayor Matthews,

of N. Y.,

who

divided his time between the village and city, in each

There were

of which he had a house.

and Mr. Jauncey.

also here Miles Sherbrook,

Major Moncrieffe, of the British army, a relation

of Mr. Bache, also spent

much

time here, where he had a daughter,

[the beautiful Mrs. Coglan.]

The principal person in a Low Dutch village appears to be Domine or minister; and Flatbush, at this time, revered her do-

835.

the

mine, Rubel, a rotund, jolly-looking man, a follower of Luther, and

whom were billeted Cols. Atlee and Miles. At Flatlands, was also a domine, Van Zinder, a disciple of Calvin, and a Whig. He was in person and principle a perfect contrast to Mr.

a Tory, on there

Rubel, being a lean and shrivelled

little

man, with a triangular sharp-

pointed hat, and silver locks which " streamed like a meteor flowing to the troubled air," as

he whisked along with great velocity

chaise through Flatbush. pulpit eloquence, to

He was

which might be truly

men's business and bosoms."

said to " bring matters

Mr. Bache assured

me

sneaking and skulking about to get a shot

in shooting of which,

it

of

home

that in once

descanting on the wily arts of the devil, he likened him to lord,

in his

distinguished by a species

my

land-

at a flock of snipes,

seems, Jacob was eminently

skilful.

[Van Sinderin and Rubel were both ministers of the Reformed Dutch Church.

An

account of them

may

be found in Strong's Flatbush.

The


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

176

following inscriptions are taken from their tomb-stones, which I have

Dutch

translated from

Hier

het

leyt

Van Sinderen

in

into English.

Liechaem van den Wel-Eerwaerde Heer Ulpianus zyn leeven Predicant in Kings County, Overleeden

den 23 July, 1796, oud Zynde 88 Jaeren, 7 Maanden en 12 daegen. Here lies the body of the very worthy Mr. Ulpianus Van Sinderen,

Kings County, died July 23, 1796, aged 88 months and 12 days.

in his lifetime preacher in

years, 7

M. Geboren den 6de 1719.— Overleden den 19de Maii 1797. To the memory of John Caspar Rubel, minister of God's Word, born March 6th, 1719, 0. S., died May, 19th, 1191.— Ed.] Tot gedachtenis van Joh's Casp's Rubel V. D.

March, O.

S.,

Some fish,

fellows, one morning, on the road to N. Y. market with were stopped by Capt. Lenox, Lt. Wright, of Maryland, and

Lt. Stewart, of Delaware,

who wished

to

by the fishmongers, that they would not duced reproachful language on both hold of the

muffins

fish,

began

who had

to

sides,

:

but were told

to rebels.

when

This pro-

the officers laying

bandy them about the jaws of the raga-

insulted

lodged with Gen. Robertson to

buy some

sell

them. :

A

complaint was immediately

the accused were escorted by a guard

N. Y., and on the statement of the fishmongers, being found in

make acknowledgments which refusing were forthwith consigned to the custody of the Provost With him they remained 2 or 3 weeks, but at length

aggression were required to to do, they

Marshal.

;

were released without the apology. well, partly owing, perhaps, to

Cunningham had used them

Gen. Robertson's instructions, and

Mr. Lenox's being well supplied with money. There were five of the Misses Van Homes (avowed Whigs,

partly to

notwitstanding their

well bred,

who

civility to British

with their mother, a

New

officers), all

widow

lady,

handsome and

had removed from

Jersey to Flatbush. Mr. Clarkson, a connection of theirs, at whose house they staid in Brunswick, had a house also at Flatbush. Being a Whig, he had left it on the approach of the enemy, and it had been a good deal injured by the Germans. He was now permitted to return to it and Mrs. Van Home and her daughters came along with him. Perhaps the way to his return was smoothed by the ladies' influence with the British officers. Miss Susan Van Home used to walk the streets of Flatbush with a British Baronet, Sir John Wrottesley, whose demeanor was gentlemanly and worthy of ;

his rank.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; KINGS COUNTY.

Magaw,*

Col.

beguile

to

177

tedious hours of captivity had

the

taken to him a wife (Martha, daughter of Col. R.

Van Brunt)

There was a fatiguing sameness

had one or two others.

as

our oc-

in

which we had no cure. During a residence of 5 I was but once beyond our limits and that was to Jamaica. [See Queen's Co. p. 155], At length my mother

cupations, for

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

months on L. L, dine at

came from Penn. and

boldly waited on Sir

Wm. Howe. On request-

ing to speak with him she was shown into a parlor, where taking a she was meditating upon the manner of addressing him,

seat,

Sir William entered the room. I

presume

Rising she

said, " Sir

He

!"

answered by a bow. She then begged permission go home on parole. " And then to take up arms

for her son to

against us again, I suppose," said Sir William. I solicit his release

and

when Howe,

Wm.

on parole

;

that will restrain

"

By no means,

him

till

sir,

exchanged,

have any influence over him, he shall never take up arms

if I

The General seemed

again."

to hesitate, but

On

gave no answer.

the renewal of her suit, he appeared by his

manner (for he was sparShe asked, " Have I your excellency's

ing of words) to assent. permission for "

May

my

son to go home

also ?" "

Now madam,"

requests

instead of one."

Miles and West,

who

?

Bowing, he answered, " Yes."

she, " be permitted to go observed the General, " you are making two

Col. Miles and Maj.

left

West," added

The boon was, however, extended

the village by their less lucky fellow prisoners. first to

to

Flatbush, July, '77, escorted to the end of

The

boarding had

be paid, however, and old Jacob's heart was gladdened by

the sight of a

sum

of

money he had

despaired

of.

The

prisoners re-

paired to the office of Mr. Loring, and signed a parole, and then

barked in a sloop for Elizabethtown Point. * Col. Robt.

Magaw, an eminent

em-

Graydon's Memoirs.

Attorney, died at Carlisle, Penn.,

1795.

836. Stephen Rapalje

is

taken at

New

Rochelle with

quantity of cash, locked in saddle-bags, brought from L. roled.

837.

Jan. 23, '77.

Rem Cowenhoven

I.,

-a

large

and pa-

Jour. 784. offers

$15 reward

for Jaff, a

runaway

negro a pretty forward chap, had on a claret-colored coat and breeches, scarlet jacket, supposed to be at

Brunswick or Amboy. Gaine, Feb. 10,

'77.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

178 838.

March

Gaine,

3, '77.

accidentally shot in the leg by a

A few days ago, S. Bergen was musket he was buying of a sailor,

and died from loss of blood. 839.

L.

May

to the

I.

200 wagons have

17, '77.

enemy's head-quarters

at

lately

Brunswick, to

been sent from assist in

remov-

ing their baggage thence. 840. will

Ethan Allen,

Col.

at

N. Lots, has recovered his health, but July 27,

need money.

[Allen was billeted at Daniel Rapalje's.

On

'77.

hearing the news of the

Bennington, he mounted on the roof of Howard's Inn, and gave three cheers, which so exasperated the British officers present, that he was thrown in the Provost. See his Life. Ed.] battle of

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

841. lands, a

842.

ÂŁ3

Taken by

reward.

force from Isaac Selover, Flat-

Gaine, Sep. 22, '77.

negro woman, Bet.

Died

at

New Lots, Oct. 23, Elbert Hegeman, Esq., in the Few men ever possessed a more humane and

91st year of his age.

He was

compassionate heart. his benevolence,

and exhibited

no to

remarkable for his piety than

less

us a remarkable instance of his

at-

tention to the divine laws of his Creator, having read the Bible

through no

less than

365 times.

Lots on Sunday. 843.

"

On Sunday

His remains were interred at New Gaine, Nov. 8, '77,

morning, April

tion of the inhabitants, the

Church

5,

at

divine service, according to the ritual

1778, to the great satisfac-

Brooklyn was opened, and of the Church of England,

performed by the Rev. Mr. Jas. Sayre,

who

preached an excellent

which was the first infant admitted to that sacrament within said church, where there will be prayers and a sermon next Sunday and on Good Friday, also on the three Sunsermon and baptized a

days following

;

child,

every fourth Sunday afterwards the church will be

occupied by the Dutch congregation." 844. N. J. Gaz., June 17, '78.

Wm.

Marrener, a volunteer,

men, and Lt. John Schenck, of our militia, went last Sat. evening from Middletown Point, and returned by 6 next morning, (having travelled by land and water above 50 miles) with Major Moncrieffe, T. Bache, with 4 slaves, and brought them to Princeton, The worshipful Mayor and Torto be delivered to the Governor.

with

1 1


KINGS COUNTY.

who

mentor General Matthews,

179

has inflicted on our prisoners un-

heard of cruelties, and was the principal object of the expedition,

was unfortunately

in the city.

845. " I chose," says Marrener, to Gen. Johnson, " a fine after-

noon about midsummer, and prepared

no

fishing

house of ed,

on the beach

my

old landlord,

and two were

well,

at

I arrived at the

night.

1

and intended

I started

24 of us land-

stopped at the house of Mr. Vanpelt,

pay Col. Axtell a

to

beach near the

with the boat to keep her from the beach.

left

bedroom window, and

at his

good wishes

Utrecht about

Mr. Vanpelt, unmolested.

We marched up the road, and I and rapped

New

to visit

This season was chosen, because there was then

in the evening.

him

told

I

was

was With his

there,

visit that night.

along the road to Flatbush.

We

arrived at

the church unobserved, and divided into 4 parties, determined to

Mayor Matthews, and Messrs. Sherbrook and Bache. Each party was provided with a heavy post for breaking in the doors. It was agreed, that when the party detached for Col. Axtell struck

take Col. Axtell,

his

door,

each

should do

party

the

same

at

the other

houses.

This was done to admiration, and every door yielded at the stroke.

Col. Axtell and

Matthews were

and Bache were taken. took his lodgings for

in

first

N. Y., but Sherbrook

Sherbrook had often insulted me, and

my

share of the capture.

He

resided

I

at

Geo. Martense's, and one stroke at the door alarmed him, and he fled to the garret.

I

entered his room, found his bed warm, and

ordered aunt Jannetie to get a candle.

We

ran to the garret, and found our prize shivering behind the large Dutch chimney, with his breeches in hand. took him to the church, our place of ren-

We

dezvous, where he put on his clothes, and

we marched

when our men

mustered,

uninterruptedly along the road to our boat, where

we

arrived about break of day, and returned in safety to N. Brunswick.

Domine Rubell rang the bell before we were half a mil? from the church. Dr. Von Samper, who lived at Mr. Martense's, sung out, '

Goedt luck

!

Goedt luck

!

not me, not me.' " L.

I.

Star, June, 1827.

Marrener, a shoemaker, of N. Y., in revenge for some ill-treatment from Matthews (he had been confined and cruelly used by him) crossed from the Jersey shore to Flatbush, with 20 militiamen in

two

flat-bottom boats.

At

his landing

he

left his

boats under guard


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

ISO of 5

men, while he

firing,

which was kept up on Marrener by the Flatbush guards

visited the interior

;

but these 5 hearing a

while he was taking his prisoners, concluded he was defeated and taken, so without ceremony, they took one of the boats and

The other boat as Marrener reached the going adrift. The party was much crowded in her,

their escape.

just

made was but it was

shore,

fortunately very calm, otherwise the boat could not have weathered it.

Marrener's party staid near two hours at Flatbush, for they were

some time before the alarm was taken, and there was afterto dispatch an express to Brooklyn, and the reinforcement which came, was pretty close on them, as it could be seen on

there

wards time

when

M. had wished John Flahaven, of N. J. billeted on Jacob Suydam, but as he had changed his quarters, Lt. Forrest was carried off in Mr. Bache was overwhelmed with his disaster, on achis stead. shore,

the party had left about 15 minutes.

to liberate Capt.

,

count of the consternation in which his wife and daughter had been

thrown by the attack on in the dead of night. offices

his house, and his being forcibly borne

He

away

interceded with Lt. Forrest to use his good

with Gov. Livingston.

Major Moncrieffe,

like

an old

soldier,

submitted with more equal mind, reminding Bache, however, that he

had often

told

him they were not safe

on the top of the house

at Flatbush.

taken from the landing to Princeton in crieffe

were shortly sent home as prisoners on

exchange soon

Matthews was

The men were wagons, Bache and Mon-

at the time of the search.

parole.

Biv. June 17, '78.

A

general

Graydon.

after took place.

Last Saturday night about 11 o'clock, a small

party of Rebels from Jersey, landed at N. Utrecht, and proceeded im-

mediately

to

Flatbush, where several gentlemen of N. Y. have country

houses.

They were joined and

on parole

there,

rebel officers

led on by a rebel officer

named

Forrest,

(who deserted with them,) and assisted by many of the then on parole and residing at Flatbush, (who, it appears,

had intelligence of

their coming.)

They

divided themselves into 3 parties

and surrounded the houses of Major Moncrieffe, David Matthews, Esq., Mayor of N. Y. city, and Theophylact Bache. They found easy access to the houses of the Major and Mr. Bache, and surprised them both before they

had the

least

suspicion of danger.

They were

Major, but at Mr. Bache's behaved in their usual savage

civil

to

the

style, giving

Mrs. B. several blows on her entreating them not to use her husband ill, wounding one of the female servants with their bayoneis, plundered the


KINGS COUNTY. house of what plate they could

find,

and dragged away Mr. Bache with-

out giving him time to put on his clothes.

Mayor's,

at the

ful

He had

who seemed

181

They were not

have been

to

taken care that his doors and windows should be well secured

and never opened at night on any pretence, within,

so success-

their principal object.

who were

The

without.

until

it

was well known was in a

tap at the door (which

first

seeming friendly manner) alarmed the Mayor, who took such a post, it would require a considerable same time ordered one of his blacks to

that though they should force in below,

He

time to reach him.

an upper window

was

the

to

at the

The loud cry of murder had of their being suspected, upon attack on the door with the butts of

alarm the inhabitants.

intelligence the Rebels

first

which they began a most furious their muskets,

and threatened destruction

were

One

sion

let in.

made on

or

two of

the door,

their

to the

whole family unless they

muskets being broke and no impres-

and the alarm being

still

kept up by the servant,

they attacked the windows which afforded room for entrance, cry of the servant

ran out and

when

the

awakened a negro of Chief Justice Horsemanden, who

fired a

musket, which so

terrified these

shabby cordwainers,

Mayor and Mr. Bache. Messrs. Miles Sherbrooke and Aug. Van Cortlandt were also to have been taken off, had they not been alarmed by the Ethiopithat they fled with the greatest precipitation, carrying off the

an's

fire.

Immediately on the intelligence being received at Brooklyn,

where Col. Cockburn commanded, Capt. Drew with a detachment from the 35th Regiment, marched to Flatbush, but the wonted speed of the Rebels saved them

846.

It

to fight

another day.

was deemed impossible

bush unobserved by the people.

for

Marrener

Therefore those

to

march

to Flat-

who knew

or had

seen the party, were guilty of treason, for net giving the alarm. Col.

Van

Aert,

all

Rem Van

Brunt, his brother Adrian,

separately in the Provost.

Col.

Pelt and his brother

up on suspicion and confined

of N. Utrecht, were taken

Van

Brunt,

when

arrested,

had the

precaution to provide himself with a purse of gold, and inquired of the sergeant of the Provost

if

he could furnish him good provisions

The sergeant said yes, but Cunningham must not know it. He received a guinea, and sent the fare by his wife. The Col. gave her also a guinea to provide food for breakfast, dinner,

and supper.

for his fellow prisoners

and inquire

how

they fared.

returned and said they were fearful and sad.

The

The woman Col. begged of

the sergeant, an opportunity of seeing his neighbors privately.

9

They


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

182 were brought

in about midnight,

of the

At

affair.

last

and agreed to deny

all

knowledge

they were examined separately, and as they

all

agreed in their story, and nothing appeared against them, were discharged. The purse of gold held out, the sergeant was liberally

rewarded

for his kindness,

and his wife received an additional guinea

for her importunities with her

husband

in favor of the prisoners.

L. Letter from L.

I.,

I.

Star,

June 27, 1827.

Biv., June 20, '78.

dated June 17.

" Yesterday, three of Capt. Kinlock's troop, with a guide, set out from the Ferry, about 11 o'clock, and going round the county, to prevent an alarm, arrived at old Van Pelt's, when without seeming to have any thing to do there, one of the light horse stopped and asked for a drink

of water, and desired

Van

walk out with him as

Pelt to

party then proceeded without suspicion to young

The

his prisoner.

Van

Pelt's,

and

took him to his father's, and having allowed them to do what was requisite,

went

(The

to J. Covenhoven's, Lieut, of militia.

officer to pre-

vent suspicion ordered his party a contrary road, and went to the house and made the Lieut, prisoner). Had he known the party was coming,

he would have retired to his nest in the woods, as he has often done before, when suspicious that his presence might be needed in N. Y.

The

officer

then gave his

men

a

little

refreshment, and having comforted

the different families as well as he could,

when sired

came with them

to

the 3 were ordered to the Provost, and on the road to

them

to

it,

N. Y., he de-

have whatever they wanted, and stopped with them while

they refreshed themselves."

847. Wanted immediately 50 horses, 15 hands high, fit for the dragoon service, by Jacob Wykpff, Ass. Com. of Horse, Brooklyn Riv.,

Ferry. 848.

Riv. July

8, '78.

sonable terms.

849.

ÂŁ4

8, at

Due

18, '78.

Peter Witherspoon notifies the public

that he intends to teach a small

not exceeding 6 or

June

number of Greek and Latin

Bushwick.

scholars,

Education and board on rea-

attention paid to education and morals.

above the usual bounty, a

new

suit of clothes,

every other necessary to complete the gentleman

soldier,

and

given to

all

wanton and unnatural rebellion) in the Roman Catholic volunteers, Major John Lynch, encamped at Yellow Hook. Present pay and good quarters. One

willing to serve His Majesty (during the present

guinea to bringers.

God

save the

King!

Gaine, July 13, '78.


KINGS COUNTY.

$6 Reward.

850.

183

Stolen from Lt. Cuppaidge, 26th Reg., at the

camp, Flatlands, by a person clothed

in artillery uniform, a

hogged mane, &c. Riv., July 30, '78.

851. Cornell,

New

horse with

Riv., July 18, '78.

Lots, a negro

$5 Reward. Ran away from Jacobus man Hector, who speaks English and

Dutch.

Capt Stevens, of the Penn. Loyalists at Yellow Hook,

offers

2

guineas reward for a mare strayed from pasture. Riv.,

852.

Aug.

8, '78.

Capt. Douglass offers a reward for a dark bay gelding,

branded S, on each shoulder, which strayed from the encampment of 1st bat. light infantry,

between Bedford and Bushwick. Riv.,

Jacob

Mowat

offers 3

at Bedford.

Riv.,

853.

New

Riv.,

Aug.

15, '78.

guineas reward for a silver watch stolen

from the encampment of 44th Reg.,

of

Aug.

A. Bainbridge,

22, '78.

Aug.

19, '78.

at Flatbush,

surgeon

Jersey volunteers, offers 2 guineas reward for a runaway

mulatto negro boy, Priam, hair light colored and of the woolly kind. 854.

Aug.

2 Guineas Reward. Stolen or strayed from Bedford camp,

15, a mare,

D. 37th, marked on her buttock. Riv., Sep. 23, '78.

855.

bay

Capt. Benson, at the Ferry, offers 2 guineas reward for a

colt, lost

856.

from the camp near Brooklyn.

20 Guineas Reward.

Gaine, Oct.

5, '78.

Stolen out of an officer's tent, 46th

Reg., in camp, near Bedford, a large portmanteau, containing clothes,

maps, sketches, paints, mathematical instruments, spy-glass, compass,

&c.

Riv., Oct. 7, '78.

857.

Half Guinea Reward. Lost from the encampment of 37th

Reg., at Bedford, 5 weeks ago, a

engraved on her

ment

for the

collar.

New

It is

little

bitch, Lt. Teasdale

Cockell,

supposed the departure of the Regi-

England expedition was the cause of her not

being delivered up, since which time they have never been at the old

encampment. ris's corps.

She was seen

in possession of a soldier of Col.

Mor-

Riv., Oct. 7, '78.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

184

858. Col. Axtell offers a reward of

door, at Flatbush, (fixed there

the

public,)

ÂŁ10

for the discovery of the

down on Wednesday evening

person that took

the

by

Manifesto and Proclamation,

Excellencies His Majesty's Commissioners.

Wm. pitality

many

from the church

last,

his direction, for the inspection of

issued by their

Riv., Oct. 10, '78.

Axtell died in England, 1795, aged 75, respected for his hos-

He was

and good humor.

years in N.

Y., where he

born in Jamaica,

W.

I.,

but resided

was a member of

married, and

Having been appointed Col. war he was put on half pay, and received considerable sums from Parliament as a loyalist. He was descended from Dan'l Axtell, a Col. in Cromwell's army, who was beheaded at the restoration, when his family removed

the King's council long before the war.

of the Provincial forces by

Howe,

at the close of the

Gent.

to Jamaica.

Mag.

859. Lt. Digby, 37th regiment, offers 2 guineas reward for a

brown mare,

stolen

Aug.

25, '78, from Bedford heights.

860. 5 Guineas Reward. lus

Hook

to

Lost 16th Oct.,

'78,

Gaine.

coming from Pau-

Brooklyn Ferry, a Portmanteau Trunk, marked Lt.

Stewart, 42d regiment,

now

in

861. Sergeant Jennings,

camp near Bedford.

camp of

37th, at Bedford,

offers

a

Riv., Oct. 21, '78.

guinea reward for a stray chestnut mare.

862. Lt. Col. Turnbull of N. Y. volunteers, at Brooklyn Ferry, offers 2 guineas

863.

reward

Gaine, Oct. 26, '78.

for a stray horse.

ÂŁ5 Reward. Ran away to city of N. Y. from Widow Hende-

rickie Lott, Flatlands, a black

4 trowsers, 2

negro man,

pair breeches,

stockings,

&c, took 3 coats, 8 &c, wears in his

864. Strayed from Bedford

Camp, a brown

horse, bob

tail,

squirrel head, (late the property of Capt. Galbreath, of

lancey's brigade).

A

Guinea reward,

865. One Guinea Reward.

N. Utrecht, a officer

if left

hog De-

with Mr. Titus, BrookRiv., Nov. 4, '78.

lyn Ferry.

an

shoes

Riv., Nov. 4, '78.

a large pair of square silver buckles.

mane,

shirts,

silver

Lost between Brooklyn Ferry and

mounted double-barrelled

Pistol,

belonging to

of 16th light dragoons, at N. Utrecht. Riv., Nev. 14, '78.


185

KINGS COUNTY. Two\Guineas Reward.

866.

Stolen or strayed, a fortnight ago,

from the encampment of 17th light infantry, near Bedford, a bay mare, &c.

Riv., Nov. 4, '78.

867. Trenton, Nov.

Lord

11

,

The 3d inst. Marrener, with 7 men of

'78.

Stirling's division, landed at

N. Utrecht and brought off Simon

and Jacques Cortelyou, two famous

tories in the enemies' lines,

amount of $5000. are on parole at Brunswick, and are to be exchanged of Jersey, in captivity with the enemy.

The

specie and other property, to the

Capt. Marrener took

for

Simon Cortelyou, of N. Utrecht,

two

to

and

prisoners citizens

N. Bruns

wick, as a return for his uncivil conduct to the American prisoners.

He

took his silver tankard and several other articles.

On Tuesday

night,

Nov. 3d, between 11 and

12,

Gen. Johnson.

Simon and Jaques

Cortelyou were carried off by a party of rebels, from the Narrows.

The house

of the former

was robbed

of cash to the

sides a large quantity of linen, blankets,

&c.

amount of ÂŁ200, be-

The marauders behaved

with their usual insolence and inhumanity, and frequently threatened the terrified children of the family, then in bed, with immediate death.

Gaine, Nov. 8, '78.

[Marrener was a shoemaker by trade, but kept tavern in N. Y.

and

at

Harlem.

He

died, 1814,

aged 85, by

falling out of his

wagon.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed.] 868. Martin Schenck, Wallebocht, advertises for a schoolmaster to teach reading, writing

and arithmetic, to about 18 scholars. Gaine, Dec. 7, '78.

869. Mr.

Van Buren and some

been on their parole their escape last

870. '79,

week.

$8 Reward.

other rebel officers,

at Flatbush, for several

months

who have

past, effected

Gaine, June 14, '79. Stolen or strayed, on Sunday night, Aug.

1,

out of the pasture of Garret Stryker, at Flatbush, a black geld-

ing, property of Capt.

Chapman, King's American regiment. Riv., Aug. 7,

'79.

871. Rev. Mr. Foley has opened an academy at Aram, in Bush-

wick, for the reception of young gentlemen, to be instructed in

Greek, Latin, and the English tongue, grammatically.

Would be

ing to accommodate a few young gentlemen with board. apply to the printer.

will-

For terms

Gaine, Aug. 30, '79.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

186 872.

$5 Reward and

Charges. Lost or strayed from Lawrence

Van

Buskirk, at Gowanus, the night of 18th inst., a sorrel mare, property of Capt. Bessonet. Riv., Sep. 25, '79. 873.

A

Greenwich A. M.

match

cricket

for

50 guineas, between Brooklyn and

clubs, to be played this day at Loosley

Game,

The Rev.

874. Riv., Oct. 2, '79.

and Elms, 10

Sep. 27, '79.

Jas. Sayre, lived in the large

white house of Isaac Cortelyou, on the bay side of N. Utrecht,

which was burned, Nov. 15. Mr. S. published a translation from German, " God's thoughts of peace in war." At the peace he went to

Nova

John

Scotia.

He

died at Fairfield, 1798, aged 53.

died in N. Brunswick.

875.

One Guinea Reward. Stolen

strawberry colored horse, marked L.

or strayed from

I.,

$50 Reward

Duryea, with

made oath

Riv., Oct. 9, '79. _j

offered by

their wives,

Gov. Tryon.

George and Peter

Sarah and Catherine, being one family,

before Richard Alsop, Esq., of

evening of Oct. 15, 4 or 5

Gowanus, a

property of the battalion of

light infantry, near Bedford.

876.

His brother

(See 842.)

men

disguised,

Newtown, meanly

that at 9 in the

habited, with faces

blackened, armed with a gun, bayonet fixed, a pistol, a

number of

clubs and a cutlass, forced in their house at Bushwick, west side of the creek, (some of the party being at the at the doors

same time posted outside George received 4 head, which settled him on the floor. Not

and windows.) and assaulted them.

dangerous blows on his

quite deprived of reason, he crawled under a bed, and laid

avoid being murdered.

and one on

his arm, but at length escaped

Meantime the

ÂŁ220

in

villains

good cash,

marked P. D.,

to

and alarmed his neighbors.

broke open 2 desks, and a cupboard, and took

(all

gold and silver) a pair of silver knee-buckles,

silver spoons,

robbery, Catherine

still

Peter received 6 wounds about his head

was

I.

D., and a silver bowl. Previous to the

seized by the throat,

almost choked to death.

thrown on the

floor

and

Riv., Oct. 23, '79.

877. $20. Reward. Stolen or strayed from the farm of John

Hulst, at Gowanus, 4 miles from the Ferry, 10 fat cattle. Riv., Nov.

20, '79.

878. Riv., Dec. 29, '79. Woodcutters will meet with the best en

couragement by applying

to Galbreath

& Atkins,

Smiths, Brooklyn


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 187

KINGS COUNTY. Ferry, Mr. Polhemus,

New

Lotts,

Mr. Betts, Innkeeper, Jamaica,

Mr. Van Water, Innkeeper, New Utrecht, at which places persons will attend to show them the wood to be cut, which is within a short distance of Brooklyn Ferry, on the Narrows.

Accommodations and

other necessaries provided contiguous to the place of cutting.

A large square

879. is late

repair

;

fort is built

not a blade of grass.

The

on Brooklyn heights ; the season people within the lines begin to

and rebuild houses, and manure and inclose

Gov.

fields.

May

Robertson.

18, '80.

Citizens of Brooklyn thank the 76th

880. Riv., June 14, '80.

commanded by the Earl of

Caithness, and afterwards by

Capt. Bruce, for their constant good

order and decorum, during

regiment,

their residence in Brooklyn.

881. Gaine, July 2, '80. bull-baiting at

Brooklyn Ferry.

Pro bono publico. Thursday next, The bull is remarkably strong and

active, the best dogs in the country expected,

and they that afford

the best diversion will be rewarded with silver collars.

Address

882. Guine, July 17, '80.

to

Gov. Robertson on his

accession, in behalf and at the request of the inhabitants of

county, signed by well,

Jeromus

Wm.

Lott,

Axtell, Rutgert

Van

Brunt, Richard

Ab. liquere, M. Cowenhoven,

Kings Still-

Rem Cowenho-

ven, Maj. Jeromus V. D. Belt, Adrian Vanbrunt, Leffert Lefferts,

Johannes Bergen.

and

They concur with His Excellency in ascribing to self-interested views of a few who conceal from

the ambitious the multitude

the offers of Great Britain, that our countrymen, once so happy, are

brought to feel the miseries held up to their fears to seduce them

from the

felicity

they once enjoyed, subjected as they

now

are to a

usurpation that has annihilated their commerce, shed their blood and

wasted their property, and

from the plough

is

now dragging

the laborious

husbandman

to the field of battle to support their unauthorized

combinations with designing popish and arbitrary powers.

"

We

cannot sufficiently applaud your Excellency for affording them the

means of

extricating themselves, and assure

you of our

vors for His Majesty's service."

883. 3 Guineas Reward.

loyal endea-

Riv., July 12.

Stolen or strayed from the encamp-

ment of the 43d regiment near Brooklyn, a bay

horse,

&c.

Riv., July 19, '80.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

188 884.

PRO BONO PUBLICO.

'

Saturday next being the birth-day of His Royal Highness the

Prince of Wales, Loosely, agreeably to an honest old custom, wishes to see his royal

—dinner

and constitutional friends

The

at 3.

A good

ing to conclude with fireworks and illuminations.

even-

band of

music.

KF REBELS, approach

no nearer than the heights of Brooklyn. Riv.,

885.

$8 and no

Aug.

9, '80.

Stolen or strayed from Cornelius

questions.

Duryea, Brooklyn, a chestnut brown gelding, branded N. on near

Aug.

thigh.

886.

Gaine, Aug.

28, '80.

$8 Reward and

strayed out of the pasture of Adrian

charges.

16, '80.

Stolen or

Hegeman, Flatbush, Aug

22,

a

black mare, branded O. on her buttock.

887. Gaine, Aug. 28, '80.

from Dennis Dennis,

at the

40 Shillings Reward.

Ran away

Narrows, a negro boy, Lawrence

has

;

been on board the Grand Duke. 888. 2 Guineas

Reward by John

Cornell, Brooklyn Ferry.

away, a negro, Jack, branded on back part of the

ear, arm,

Ran

and but-

Gaine, Sep. 18, '80.

tock.

889. Stolen or strayed, Friday night, from the pasture of Thos. Horsefield, at Brooklyn Ferry,

890. Riv., Sep. 20, '80.

two horses.

Riv., Oct. 18, '80.

Anniversary of the Coronation of our

ever good and gracious King, will be celebrated at Loosely's, 22d inst.

It is

expected that no rebel will approach nearer than Flat-

bush wood. 891.

By permission

— 3 days*

sport on Ascot Heath, formerly

Flatlands Plain.

Monday. 1. The Noblemen's and Gentlemen's purse of £60 > any horse except Mr. Wortman's, and Mr. Allen's Dulcimore, who won the plate at Beaver Pond last season. 2. A saddle, free for

bridle,

and whip, worth £15, by ponies not exceeding 13| hands. 2. To be run 1. Ladies' subscription purse of £50.

Tuesday. for

by women, a Holland smock and chintz gown,

run the best 2 in

3,

quarter-mile heats

;

the

first

full

to

trimmed

—to

have the smock


KINGS COUNTY. and gown, of 4 guineas value

189

the second a guinea, the third a half

;

guinea.

No

Wednesday. County subscription purse £50. erect a booth or sell liquor without

ward the expense of the meet

at

first

person will

subscribing 2 guineas to-

Gentlemen fond of fox hunting

race.

will

Loosely 's King's Head tavern at daybreak, during the races.

God Save

the

King

played every hour.

Riv., Nov. 4, '80.

Wednesday

892. Gaine, Jan. 20, '81.

last four

armed men

found concealed in a barn at Bushwick, were brought to N. Y. under a strong guard of militia. 893.

Pro bono

By

publico.

Monday, on Ascot Heath.

permission, 4 days' sport on Easter

Purses of £50, £50, £100, £100. Gaine, Feb. 12, '81.

Last Sunday evening a sloop from N.

894. Riv., Ap. 14, '81.

Y. was captured

off

Coney

two

Island by

After plundering

was ransomed

the vessel of goods to a considerable value, she

500 hard

for

dollars.

Brunswick, Ap. 24,

To Mr.

Loring.

— Sir

In a

:

New-York

cerned in taking a sloop, such a report parole,

from

rebel whale-boats

Brunswick, commanded by Dickie and Marrener.

which

is

paper

it is

said I

without foundation.

She was taken by

I shall give the strictest attention to.

Hyler and Dickie.

'81.

was conI am on

Yours,

&c,

WM. MARRENER. Marrener was obnoxious have been exchanged but rener had saved his

life,

for

to the

N. Y. magistrates.

when a boy was about

lay senseless on the ground.

895. Chatham,

May

He would not how Mar-

Simcoe's explaining to Clinton

2, '81.

to

bayonet him as he

Simcoe,

On Sunday

Hyler, of Brunswick, went over to L.

I.,

night,

p.

288, 264.

Ap.

15, Capt.

[Michael Bergen's,

Gow-

anus,] and brought off a Hessian major and ensign with their waiters,

who

are

now

here on parole.

They were

picket guards, yet the address of Hyler

were not alarmed 896.

till

in the centre of

was such,

two

that the guards

he was out of their power.

Ran away from

Flatlands, a black

the regiment of Brunswick dragoons at drummer named Prince Dermen, light blue clothes.

Proper reward.

Riv.,

9*

May

5, '81.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

190 897. Gaine,

May

Saturday night

21, '81.

a pilot boat of

last

Capt. David Morris and two other boats, were taken between Robin's

Reef and Yellow Hook, by a whale-boat from Brunswick. Mr. Morris's boat was plundered of several articles, and afterwards ransomed for $400. 898.

Grand Races

at

Ascot Heath postponed

count of the King's birth day

;

June

till

on which occasion

it

is

on ac-

6,

expected

every true subject will so strain his nerves in rejoicing as to prevent

amusement being agreeable before

this

on the ground, June

5,

when

those

A hurling match

that time.

who have

a curiosity to play (or

see) that ancient diversion, will get hurls and bats at the Irish Flag.

Gaine, 899.

Riv.,

June

May

30, '81.

Stolen out of the house

$4 Reward.

6, '81.

of Mr. Chatham, near Bedford, a silver watch.

The

soldiers of the

corps of guides and pioneers, quartered near, are suspected. 900.

Gaine, June 18, '81.

About

10,

last

Thursday

night,

the house of Nicholas Schenck, near 3 miles South of Flatbush,

The

was

2 rebel whale-boats from Brunswick.

surprised by the crews of

when the rebels entered the house, and make any resistance. They therefore

family were at supper

of course not prepared to

took away every thing they could carry, wounded Peter Bogart, of N. Y., a lodger in the house, in the side with a bayonet, took

away

his

money and

plate,

and the plate of the family, to a con-

siderable amount.

Hyler took a sergeant's guard at Canausie from the house of their The guards were at supper, and their muskets He seized the arms, and standing in the hall, when he entered.

Capt., Schenck.

after jesting

their

with the guard, borrowed the

muskets and a few other

articles,

silver spoons,

took

and made one prisoner.

all

He

then sent the guards to report themselves to Col. Axtell, and reJohnson.

turned to N. Jersey. 901.

To

all

who know

Pro bono

publico,

not, be

This day will be exhibited the true English manner. past 3.

Some good dogs

it

understood

means mankind's good. at

Taurus

Brooklyn ferry a bull-baiting will

after

be brought to the ring at half

are already provided, but every assistance


;

191

KINGS COUNTY. of that sort will be esteemed a favor.

A

dinner exactly British will

be upon Loosely's table at two o'clock, after which there the song of " oh, the roast beef of old

harmony and

England"

no doubt sung with

is

will be

glee.

This, notice gives to

all

who

covet

Baiting the bull, and dearly love

it

To-morrow's very afternoon,

At

three

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;or rather not so soon,

A bull of magnitude

and

spirit

Will dare the dogs' presuming merit,

Taurus

And True

And

the

is steel to

back bone,

canine cunning does disown, British blood runs through his veins,

barking numbers he disdains.

Sooner than knavish dogs

shall rule,

He'll prove himself a true

John Bull. Riv.,

June 20, '8L

902. Situation of British forces in Kings Co, obtained from spies

and Mar.,

'77.

N. Utrecht.

deserters.

Sir Jas. Grant, and about a dozen ragged troops, at

Feb. 16, '79.

33d Reg.

light infantry, (300)

and 2d

Bat. Highlanders (750) at Bedford, 3d Prince Hereditary 350, and

4th Charles (300) at Brooklyn.

Ferry

Hill,

which

July

7, '81.

54th,

two miles from Brooklyn, two companies

Fort- they are repairing.

The new Fort

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;only 18 cannon mounted.

imperfect

July

at

8, '81.

encamped on

at

Cobble Hill,

Brooklyn

is

yet

In Brooklyn Fort

are 200 Brunswickers, 2 bomb-proof magazines in the Fort, 200

Grenadiers at Bedford.

made

lower, for fear

it

Cobble Hill commanded Brooklyn Fort, but

might

fall

into the

hands of the Continentals.

At Flatbush are 38th Reg. (300) and 54th (400). Feb. 6, '82. At Brooklyn is the Anhault Zerbet Reg., at the Narrows, the Brunswick Reg., at Flatbush, Delancey's 3d Bat. and King's American dragoons. June 3, '82. The lines drawn between Brooklyn Church and Ferry by Clinton, are not likely to be comThey are carting fascines now. On L. I. are pleted by Carlton. about 3,500 men. July 5, '82. At Flatbush is Col. Ludlow's Reg.

Jan.

8, '82.

903.

Riv., Sep.

1, '81.

About 2 o'clock Wednesday morning,

a man named Brown was taken up by a picket of the Flatlands, on whom was found a quantity of jewelry, &c.

militia 5 at


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

192

904. $10 Reward. Stolen from the Mills of J. Rapalje, Jr., Sunday night a Moses built boat. Riv., Sep. 1, '81.

$16 Reward.

905.

house of Mr. Rubel,

Absconded from

owners, from the

their

2 negro slaves, Betsey, marked

at Flatbush,

T. A. on right shoulder, and Polly, without any mark, both speak bad English.

Riv., Sep.

1, '81.

Strayed or stolen from the pasture in the rear of Lt. Col.

906.

Lowenstein's Bat. of Hessian Grenadiers, at Yellow Hook, a sorrel horse,

Also two King's wagon horses, marked G. R.

&c.

Riv., Sep. 5, '81.

907.

low Hook

Sunday

night, a rebel galley

to plunder, but a party of

and whale-boat, came to Yel-

Hessian Troops stationed there

secured them and their boats. 908.

Riv., June

Riv., Sep. 12, '81.

30, '81. Jas.

Rankin, Ch'n of the Board of Re-

fugees, requests the Loyal Refugees of Kings Co., to appear at the

house of Dr. Van Buren, Flatbush, on Wednesday next

at noon, to

consult on matters of importance. 909.

by 2

ÂŁ8

Reward.

Stolen from the Stakesby

sailors of the ship at the

King's Brewery , L.

Navy

I.,

victualler,

a clinker built

Riv., Sep. 5, '81.

skiff.

910.

Dr. Allemand offers a handsome reward for a mouse-col-

ored horse, marked C. D. B., on his

left

buttock,

which was stolen

or strayed out of the pasture of John Debevoice, near Brooklyn

Church. 911.

Riv., July 21, '81.

Brooklyn Hunt.

The hounds

A

Ferry, at 9, Thursday morning.

will

throw

a good strong bag fox by Chas. Loosely. 912.

Riv., Dec. 19, '81.

ÂŤ

off at

Denyse's-

guinea or more will be given for

The

Riv., Nov. 14, '81.

Loyalists in the village of Flat-

bush are pleased in expectation that a certain long, tall, spindleshanked miscreant, who resides here, will be brought to condign punishment

for

Though he took him as

holding private correspondence the oath of allegiance

when

with the rebels.

the royal

army found

in Jersey, his heart is as black as his skin, and his skin as blue

when he

assisted Isaac Sears

and others in stealing the King's

cannon from the Battery in New-York.

If

he escapes the cord he so


193

KINGS COUNTY.

may he

justly merits

where such a

safe

be banished these Lines

$6 Reward.

913.

Ryerson

;

for loyalists can't

be

traitor resides."

Strayed or stolen from the lands of John

at the Wallebocht, a

bay horse,

tail nickt,

&c.

Riv., July 21, '81.

Chatham, Aug. 15,

914.

with his wonted

spirit

A

'81.

few days

since, Capt. Hyler,

of enterprise, went over to L.

I.,

marched

3ÂŁ miles into the country, and brought off to N. Brunswick, Col. Jeromus Lott, a person notorious for his cruelty to our prisoners,

and John Hankins, Capt. of a vessel.

On

the night of

Aug.

4th, the

crew of a rebel whale-boat from N.

Jersey, landed at Flatlands, and robbed the house of Col. Lott of about

They

JC600 in cash, and carried him off with two of his slaves.

also

robbed the house of Capt. Lott in the same neighborhood, of a consid-

sum

erable

The

was known

Col.

to be rich.

His person and money were the

His cupboard was searched for money, and some silver

objects desired.

found

Gaine, Aug. 13, '81.

in specie.

on further search, two bags, supposed to contain guineas, were

;

discovered.

In the morning, on their passage up the Raritan, the Capt.

and crew agreed opened,

when

to

count and divide the guineas.

to the mortification of the crew, they

The bags were

tain only half-pennies belonging to the church at Flatlands Col. discovered that his guineas were safe at

and the

;

They compelled when he returned home

home.

the Col. to ransom his negroes at N. Brunswick,

Johnson.

on parole. Gaine, Dec. 24, '81.

916.

took from Barren gert

to con-

were found

Van

I.,

Nov.

1,

some evil-minded person

Gravescnd township, a brown

Colt,

&c,

of Rut-

Brunt, Esq., Sheriff, burnt with letter Q, on near thigh,

supposed carried up the Island and

sold.

3 guineas reward

is

offered

by Hend'k Johnson. 917. infantry,

Riv., Jan. 12, '82.

Last Wednesday evening, a party of

under Capt. Beckwith, embarked in 6 boats, and

at

5 next

morning, arrived off Brunswick, where they landed and brought off all

Capt. Hyler's boats.

This Hyler

is

a deserter from the royal

and has ever since his defection, been too successful an hear Capt. Hyler launched enterpriser. Gaine, Feb. 28, '82. " service,

We

a

new

boat, at

Brunswick, that rows 30 oars."


—— ARMED OCCUPATION OF

194 918. Riv.,

complain

Mar.

bitterly,

We hear the inhabitants of Kings Co

16, '82.

against the rebel chiefs, on the score of a heavy-

debt contracted by their prisoners, from

$2

board and washing, which at

May,

'79, to Feb., '81, for

per week, has accumulated to near

Their Commissary had given notes of hand.

£20,000.

was

.

voted by Congress, to pay this debt.

— [$30,000

Ed.]

919. Riv., Ap. 27, '82. A sweepstakes of 300 guineas, was won by Jacob Jackson's mare, Slow and Easy, over Mercury and GoldThe two beaten horses are to run for 100 finder, on Ascot Heath. guineas a side, on Wednesday next, on the same ground. 920. Conn. Courant, the

enemy began

to break

May

7, '82.

ground

May

on Monday se'nnight,

3,

to cut a canal

on L.

to

I.,

run from

The

the Wallebocht to the Pond, taking in Cobble Hill Fort.

length

2$ miles. The militia are called out in rotation one day in a week, none above 15 being excused from labor. [A strong line of intrenchment was made from the hill of Rem A. Remsen along the highland of John Rapalje, crossing Sand St. near Jay St., and thence over the highest land at Washington St. across the Jamaica

of the trench

is

road, to the large fort

921.

on the Heights.

Ascot Heath Races.

Johnson.']

—Monday next a match

for

60 guineas

between Mr. Van Mater's Juniper and Mr. Ryerson's Calf Skin.

To

run the best of 3 two-mile heats. 922.

zer's

One Guina Reward.

— Stolen or

Quarters of the Pioneers,

28th May, 923.

'82.

Riv.,

at

May

25, '82.

strayed from Capt. Fra-

Bushwick, on the night of the

a small chestnut-colored horse, &c.

Last Tuesday night a whale-boat attempted to land at the

Narrows, near the house of Denise Denise, Esq., but were so warmly received by 4 of the Queen's Rangers, sentries, that they were soon obliged to take to their oars.

Some

of the sentries were wounded

Gaine, July

in several places.

924.

Last Tuesday night Mr. Hyler took 2 fishing-boats near

the Narrows, and ransomed

them

for

$100

each.

July 24,

'82.

One

of them has

Gaine, July 15, '82.

been twice captured. 925.

1, '82.

A little

before sunset,

Tuesday

last,

Mr.

Hyler, with 3 large 24 oared boats, made an attack on the galley stationed at Prince's Bay, south side of Staten

I.

There being

little

or


KINGS COUNTY.

195

no wind, he came up with a good deal of resolution, but Capt. Cash18 pounder, which went through the stern of one

man gave him an

of the boats, and obliged Hyler to put ashore on the island, where

make

w as

combat he

after a smart

T

obliged to leave one of his boats, and

way home with

the best of his

the other two.

John Althouse, with 12 men, was on board a guard-boat at anchor in Prince's Bay, when two whale-boats were descried under South

Amboy

shore.

The

was a calm.

It

cable

was sprung and a 24 pounder

brought to bear, which sent a shot through Hyler's boat.

were taken in the other boat, (Dickey's) and

wick with Gen. Jacob

S. Jackson,

Bay, and kept prisoner

till

Died, Sep.

6, '82, after

whom

all

made

they had captured in South

he was ransomed. a tedious and painful illness, which he bore

with a great deal of fortitude, the brave Capt.

many

His

Brunswick.

the enemy, endeared

has

left

His crew

N. Bruns-

off for

Adam

New

Hyler, of

enterprising acts in annoying and distressing

him

to the patriotic part of his acquaintance.

a wife and two small children to bewail his death.

He

His remains

were decently interred with a display of the honors of war

Dutch

in the

burial-ground, attended by a very numerous concourse of his acquaint-

N.

ances.

J. Gaz., Sep. 25, '82.

" Hyler died of a wound in the knee, accidentally given by himself

some time ago." 926.

To Baron

Riv., Sep. 11, '82.

de Walzogen, Capt.

Commandant of

detachment of Brunswick and Hessian

Hanau

the

combined

troops,

now

at

Brooklyn camp.

The

inhabitants of

good order, and during your

command

warmest thanks

New

Utrecht, sensible of the vigilant care,

among the officers and soldiers Narrows, beg your acceptance of their

discipline prevailing

for

at the

your attention to the security of our persons and

property, from Oct. 7, '81, to July 30, '82.

Adrian

Van

Brunt, John Counhoven,

nys Denys, Nich. Counhoven. 927.

The

crops of corn and wheat are very indifferent in

parts of the country.

Indeed L.

I.

very dry summer. 928. ferry, a

Hermanns Barkelow, DeAug. 6, '82. Gaine.

Stolen,

Aug. Thursday

night,

many

has experienced the effects of a 26, '82.

Gaine.

from John Drawyer, Brooklyn

trunk containing 2 fowling-pieces, some battle powder, 4


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ARMED OCCUPATION OF

196 agate

one

flints,

like

yellow marble, 2 old bird-nets, and a 3 gallon keg

of remarkably good Antigua

2 guineas reward, by John Hill,

spirits.

Gaine, Sep. 11, '82.

Inspector.

To

929.

be sold, Sep.

2, '82,

near the wagon-yard at Brooklyn,

large and small wagons, carts, harness,

930. Capt. Peter

New

Nephew

Brunswick, was taken, Sep.

March,

&c.

Gaine.

of the Gen. Greene whale-boat, from 8, '82,

and kept in Provost

till

'83.

Carlton appoints Mr. Ernest de Die-

Riv., Jan. 8, '83.

931.

mar, Major of the Fort of Brooklyn. junction of

Henry and

932. Riv., Nov. to kill wild fowl,

he

[The

2, 82.

Wed.

laid his

gun

last,

old Fort

was near the

Ed.]

Pierrepont Sts.

as Sam'l

in the canoe,

Brower was agoing which was aground,

it, endeavored to work off the stern, gun discharged by the rocking of the canoe. The load entered Mr. B.'s breast and killed him instantly. He has left a young family.

and setting his shoulders to

when

the

933. N. J.

Gaz., Nov. 13, '82.

The

brave Capt. Storer, com-

missioned as a private boat-of-war, under the States, and

mises

to be the

fair

genuine successor of the

who

late valiant

pro-

Capt.

Hyler, has given a recent instance of his valor and conduct in capturing one of the enemy's vessels, and in cutting out a vessel tying

under the

guns

flag-staff

at the

and within half

pistol shot

of the battery of 14

watering place, Staten Island.

934. Address of the principal inhabitants of Kings and

Queens

Cos. to David Scott, Esq., Capt. and commissary of artillery horse,

Dec, 1782. civil

They lament

and military conduct,

service

;

his departure for

his zeal

England, admire his

and attention in His Majesty's

his behavior as a civilian, has been distinguished with justice

and agreeable manners, so necessary interest in this country,

to

promote His Majesty's

and they hope his endeavors

will be re-

warded. Arch'd Hamilton, Col. Com. Q. Co. Mil.

Jerem. V. D. Belt, Major K. Co. Mil.

Nich's Schenck, Capt. K. Co. Mil.

John Rapalje,

late

Col. K. Co.

Mil.

Dowe

Ditmars, En. Q. Co. Mil.


197

KINGS COUNTY. Dan'l Rapalje, Lt. Q. Co. Mil.

Maurice Lott,

Johannes Remsen, Lt. K. Co. Mil.

Cor's Wykoff, Jus.

Jos. French, Jus.

Quorum, Q. Co.

K. Co.

Quorum, K.

Co.

Sam'l Hallet, Capt. Delancey's

Dan'l Lent, Cornet, Q. Co. Horse, Christ. Benson, Capt.

late Sheriff,

N. Y. Ran-

Brigade.

Peter Lott, Capt.

gers.

John Polhemus, Lt.

Jeromus Lott, Lt. Col. Richard Betts,Capt.

Whitehead Cornell,

Isaac Cortelyou,

John Wetherhead,

Hendrick Eldert,

Isaac Eldert,

Jaques Cortelyou,

Denyse Denyse,

Isaac Rapalje,

Simon Cortelyou,

Dan'l Luyster,

Jacob Rapalje,

Jos. Hallet,

Garret Luyster,

Abraham Lent,

Wm.

Nath'l Moore, 3d.

John Moore,

Sam'l Doughty,

Nath'l Moore, 2d.

Jos.

David Moore,

Thos. Harriot,

Wm. Doughty,

Nich's Wykoff,

Hend'k Wykoff, John Benham,

Jurrian Lott,

Nich's Williamson,

Wm. Van Nuise,

Joost Wykoff,

John Williamson, Gozen Ryers, Henry Van Buren,

Albert Terhune,

Wm. Cowenhoven, Aug. Van Cortland, John Waters,

Jacob Snedeker,

935.

ward the

Hallet,

Cha's Doughty,

Moore,

Johannes Lott,

Theophylact Bache,

John Johnston,

Gaine, Jan. 27, '83. Leffert Lefferts, offers 2 guineas re-

for 2 colts, (branded L. L.

common

on near

side), stolen or

strayed off

about Bedford, last summer.

936. Gaine, Jan. 27, '83.

On

Tuesday, 21st, was drawn up

at

Flatbush, on the green in front of Col. Axtell's house, the regiment

of Waldeck, to consecrate the colors present Gen. Campbell commanding on the Island, and Maj. Gen. Hackenbergh commanding :

The regiment was

the Hessians on the Island, with their suites.

formed in a

circle,

wherein the Auditeur took the solemn vow of

men to support the new colors their Prince had sent They then returned to the ground, wheeled by subdivisions,

the officers and

them.

marched and passed the General, the splendid officers,

dinner

was given by

and the principal

ladies

Col.

officers

saluting.

De Hoorn,

to the

and gentlemen of the

A

most

Generals,

village.

The Each

evening concluded with a splendid

ball,

and elegant supper.

of the ladies presented the officer

who

escorted the colors, with a

knot of blue and yellow ribbons.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

198 937.

May

30, '83. Albert

Conrad de Hoorn, Lt. Col. Com't of

the Prince of Waldeck's 3d regiment, at Flatbush, in the service of

the

King of Great 938.

Britain, offers pardon

Game, Feb.

Hessian deserters.

to all

Subscription assembly at Loosely 's,

24, '83.

Brooklyn Hall, every other Thursday during the season, for the gentlemen of the army and navy, public departments and citizens.

Half a guinea each night

to provide music, tea, coffee, chocolate,

negus, sangaree, lemonade, &c. 939. Riv., Feb. 26, '83.

A

whale-boat was taken up by the

guides and pioneers quartered near Bushwick church.

On

940. 50 Guineas Reward.

the night of

March

4, '83, be-

tween 7 and 10 o'clock, a number of villains entered the house of Maurice Lott, violently assaulted and robbed him of between 4 and 500 guineas, chiefly in gold, a silver watch, 6 silver teaspoons, tea-

marked

tongs, a pair of round gold buttons

R.

I.

Riv.,

March

[Richard Thompson and Isaac Bunting, inhabitants of L. put in Provost, on charge of this robbery.

941. Riv., April

5, '83.

Race

at

12.

I.,

were

Riv., Ap. 2, '83.

Ascot Heath.

A purse

of 100

guineas, on April 9, between Calfskin and Fearnought, the best of

3 one mile heats.

Last Thursday, Catharine, daughter

942. April 26, '83. Gaine.

of Leffert Lefferts, Esq., in Bedford, a very amiable and accomplished

young

lady, having observed to her

mother that a loaded

pistol left

by a drover, who had been watching his cattle with it the preceding night, upon a chest of drawers, was rather dangerously placed, and that some of the children might get hurt by it, proceeded to remove and put

it

in a holster that

pistol discharged, the shot

hung close by but in the operation the went through her body, and she expired ;

immediately.

ELEGY. What

doleful tidings in

The maid Alas,

'tis

true

I love, !

is

my

ear they ring.

she for ever gone ?

her funeral dirge they sing

*******

:

In rueful notes, her hapless end bemoan.


;

;

;

199

KINGS COUNTY. No

consolation can this world

No

pleasing prospect can

The bloom of

now yield, my cares beguile

;

flowers, nor verdure of the fields,

Her presence

only, could

make

all

things smile.

Accursed pistol, by some demon primed, Malignant to the gem the world contained, Wast thou by dire explosion thus ill-timed, To rob the world of excellence, ordained 1

my

No

more

No

Like eastern Sol, in her own beauty's light more the rose of Sharon shall adorn Her lovely visage in the welcome morn ;

shall Cath'rine rise

Jill this is lost,

The Rose

is

upon

sight,

her cheeks, alas

now

I

are pale,

the Lily of the vale

Covered with earth, into the

!

silent grave,

*******

She

Then

entombed, deaf to every cry

lies

pray descend,

Into

my

Catharina's shade,

fair

dreams and visions of the night

Put rapturous illusions in my head, That sad realities may have respite. Too much an angel for a world of woe Eternal wisdom hath conceived

On

;

it

;

best,

her a crown of glory to bestow,

Among

the saints in her Redeemer's rest.

Ran away from Rem Riv. $8 Reward. 943. April H. Remsen, Wallebocht, Sam, a mulatto negro man. He speaks 30, '83.

English and

Low

Dutch.

944. July 30, '83. Riv.

Jeromus 945.

At

5 Guineas Reward.

away from

Flatbush, in honor of the King's birthday, the ladies and

gentlemen were most elegantly entertained

and supper, by the 946.

—Ran

negro boy, Jack.

Lott, a

officers of the

At auction

at the

at a truly splendid

Waldeck regiment.

King's naval Brewery, L.

ball

April 28, '83. I.,

60 or 70 tons

of iron-hoops, and 70,000 dry and provision casks, staves, and headRiv.,

ing, in lots of 10,000.

947. Jufy2,'83. Riv.

STORES,

viz

;

soldiers'

Auction shirts

;

at

948. Riv., July 26, '83.

Beach.

Apply

Quarters,

New

to Jas.

Lots.

Flatbush.— The

blue, white,

thread stockings, shoe-soles, heel-taps,

May

26, '83.

WALDECK

and yellow cloth

&c, &c.

A negro boy came

to

me on Rockaway

Foreman, Ensign, Royal Garrison

Bat., at


,

ARMED OCCUPATION OF

200 949. Riv.,

Aug.

Tunis Bennet of Brooklyn

1, '83.

is

from the Hessian Reg. du corps,

for carrying deserters

in Provost

to the Jer-

sey Shore.

Aug.

950.

Gains.

4, '83.

Stolen out of the pasture of Johan-

nes E. Lott, Flatbush, night of Aug. 27, a bay mare, branded

on near

I.

L.

thigh.

951. Johannes Snedeker offers $10 reward for a fishing-boat with " 1776 " on her stern, taken from Remsen's Landing, south side of L.

Gaine, Aug. 4, '83.

I.

952. About 75 persons, mostly farmers of Kings Co., were indicted in

Duchess and Albany Cos.,

the prosecution

was abandoned.

Gaine, Dec. 20, '79

and in Riv., Aug. 9 and 13,

;

953. Died at Brooklyn,

son of

Gen.

late

for adhering to the British, but

Their names

W.

be found in

'83.

Wednesday last, Pelham Winslow, Esq., He commanded the Mass.

of Marshfield.

troops in several expeditions in the

French war. Riv.,

954. Sep. 8, '83.

may

16, '83.

Saddle horses, wagons, carts, har-

Gaine.

ness, &c.j at auction every

Aug.

Wednesday,

at the

wagon-yard, Brook-

lyn.

955. Q.

M. Uloth

offers

$2 reward

for a

bay mare of 60th Reg.,

strayed from Bedford camp.

956. John Harrison, Brooklyn Ferry, offers one guinea reward

brown horse

for a

957. Riv.,

stolen from him.

Aug.

27, '83.

King's draft and saddle horses, wag-

[The

ons, carts, and harness for sale at the wagon-yard, Brooklyn.

entrance to the army yard, where forage, blacksmith's shop,

were

kept,

958.

was near

the junction of

£100 Reward.

—The

Main and Fulton

Sts.

&c,

Ed.]

house of Michael B. Grant, near

Brooklyn Church, was on Friday evening, 24th, between 8 and 9, beset by a gang of thieves, 5 of whom armed with pistols and cutlasses, tity,

robbed

clothing,

959.

it

of

£90

cash in gold and

silver, plate in great

£20 Reward.

quan-

Riv., Oct. 25, '83.

&c.

—Last

night,

Nov.

5,

about 8 o'clock, 4

men

with weapons forced into the house of Johannes Ditmars, Flatlands


201

KINGS COUNTY. and beat him and his mother

in a cruel

Through his rewas put in Flatbush

manner.

sentment, three of them went off; the fourth jail,

but escaped the same night

name was 960.

wounded

in the head,

$5 Reward.

Jesse, a negro boy

—has a great turn

The "

8, '83.

—Ran away from Henry Stanton, Nov.

961. Doubtless there are are forgotten.

and said his

Gaine, Nov.

Jos. Mosier.

following

A Mrs.

Gen. Johnson

:

soldier while

sitting in

8, '83,

Gaine.

at whistling.

many incidents of the revolution that among others have been recorded by was wantonly

Lott, of Flatlands,

her window

;

three

men

shot by a

of the 33d Reg.,

(under Col. Webster, quartered at Lambert Suydam's,) had killed

one of his

cattle,

and were skinning

Newtown

;

one

killed at

it,

when he

shot the three with

two were killed in Bushwick three in a shanty, by a man named Cypher, near the

one discharge of buckshot

;

;

Half-way house. Lt. Sam'l

Dodge, Capts. Gilleland and Mott, (taken

gomery,) were stationed at B. Johnson's.

at Ft.

Mont-

Dodge was exchanged

in

a month, and reported the practicability of borrowing specie from

Whigs in Kings Co.. who would hazard all

for the use of the State,

and mentioned B.

J.

was agreed that confidential officers should be exchanged, who were to act as agents in the transactions. Col. Wm. Ellison was fixed upon to receive the loan. He was exchanged in Nov. '77, and carried $2,000 in gold to Gov. Clinton a simple receipt was given. Before '82, large sums had been loaned. Major H. WyckofF was hid two days, in 1780, in the undertaking.

It

;

at

Rem

A. Remsen's, Wallebocht, in the upper room, while the

Lieut, of the guard of the Jersey

sen loaned him as sleigh at night to

much

Cow

was quartered

Rem-

in the house.

as he could carry, and conveyed

him

in a

Thence he crossed

to Poughkeepsie.

Ran away from Jeromus

Lott, Flatlands, a

Neck.

(See Queens Co., 316.) 962.

May

20, '84.

negro boy Jack, 16 years old 963.

£20 Reward.

;

had on an iron

— Seven men

collar

marked

J.

L.

surrounded the house of Peter

Neefus and Joseph Vonck, of Flatbush, Saturday night, Nov. 20, '84, made them prisoners, carried off £120 cash, 5 large silver spoons, 4 silver salts, a silver punch-strainer, 9 teaspoons, a silver

watch, 2 gold rings, a silver-mounted sword, and pocket-pistol. free pardon to the informers.

A


202

CELEBRATION OF PEACE. Bushwick, Kings Co., Nov. 25,

964. This day their Excellencies Gov. Clinton and Gen. ington, with part of the

of N. Y.

:

'83.

Wash-

American army, took possession of the

on the occasion, a number of gentlemen of

met and appointed Dec. 2d

this

city

township

as the day, and the banks of the East

River, in full view of the city, as a place of rejoicing, and sent an

address and invitation to Washington.

To His Excellency GEORGE WASHINGTON, Esq., General and Commander-in-chief of the armies of the United States of America.

ADDRESS of the Freeholders and Inhabitants of Kings Co., on Nassau Island, in the State of N.

The

Y.,

who are attached

the

to

freedom and independ-

ence of America.

With

hearts full of duty and

preme Director of found respect

for

all

human

acknowledgment

events,

to the

Su-

and with the most pro-

your Excellency, we beg leave

to present

you our sincere congratulations, on this glorious and ever memorable era, of the sovereignty and independence of the United States of America, sanctioned by the Definitive Treaty, and the evacuation of the city of N. Y. ; your Excellency's entry into which, with his Excellency Gov. Clinton,

was with such

dound

dignity, order,

to the lasting

and regulation, as

will re-

honor of your Excellency, be revered by

foreign powers, and certainly obtain the affection of many whose sentiments are averse to that liberty which with the divine assistance your Excellency has so happily acquired Our unfeigned prayers will ever be for your health for us.

and happiness, whether you peace, or hereafter

may

retire to the private

be called

to

move

of war, in the defence of your country. fection,

equal duty and respect,

paths of

in the

busy scenes

With

sincere af-

we humbly beg

leave to


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

:

203

KINGS COUNTY.

,

subscribe ourselves, in behalf of the freeholders and inhabit-

Your Excellency's very obedient, and very humble servants,

ants aforesaid.

Jeremias Vanderbelt,

Johannes Bergen,

Abraham Luquer, Elias Hubbard, Abraham Voorhies, Stephen Van Voorhies, Adrian Van Brunt, Barent Lefferts,

John Titus,

â&#x20AC;˘

Cornelius Wykoff,

Philip Nagel,

R.

Van

Brunt,

Johannes Covenhoven.

To which His

Excellency was pleased to return the following

answer

To

FREEHOLDERS AND INHABITANTS

the

Co., on

Nassau

Island, in the Stale of

and independence of America.

attached to the freedom

Gentlemen

:

While you speak

the language of

the magnitude of our obligations to the

man

of King% New-York, who are

events, suffer

glorious and ever

me

my

heart, in

acknowledging all hu-

Supreme Director of

to join

you

in the celebration of the present

memorable

era,

and

your kind expressions in that the national dignity

my

favor.

and glory

I

to return

my

best thanks for

cannot but rejoice sincerely,

will be greatly increased, in conse-

quence of the good order and regularity which has prevailed universally, since the city of

N. Y. has been repossessed by us.

This con-

duct exhibits to the world a noble instance of magnanimity, and will doubtless convince any who, from ignorance or prejudice,

been of a civil

different sentiment, that the

may have

laws do govern, and that the

magistrates are worthy of the highest respect and confidence.

my own part, Gentlemen, in whatever situation of life I shall be hereafter, my supplications will ever ascend to heaven for the prosperity of my country in general, and for the individual happiness of

For

those

who

are attached to the freedom and independence of America.

GEO. WASHINGTON. N.

Y., Dec.

1, '83.

Celebration of the Peace at Bushwiclc, Dec. 2, 1783.

The day was ushered ing a salute

welcome

:

in by hoisting the American flag, and firan ox was roasted, and an entertainment provided to

their brethren,

who have

suffered seven years' exile, and


204

CELEBRATION OF PEACE.

who have all

sacrificed their all at the shrine of liberty.

After they had

partook of the feast, the following toasts were drank, attended by

a salute, huzzaing, and music. 1.

The United

2.

His most Christian Majesty.

States of America.

3.

The

States of Holland.

4.

May

the State of N. Y. be entirely abandoned by her enemies.

5.

His Excellency Gov. Clinton.

6.

His Excellency Gen'l Washington.

7.

The Hon. The Hon.

8.

9. Prosperity

May

10.

the

the Council.

the

House of Assembly.

and honor to the sons of Liberty.

memory

who have

of those

fallen

in the

cause of

America, be ever precious to her sons. 11.

A

12.

Success to agriculture.

13.

As

free

and extensive

the roaring of a lion

America be

is to

animals, so

may

the frowns of

to princes.

The day was corum.

trade.

spent in the greatest good humor, decency, and de-

Every countenance displayed

in the

most

lively

manner, the

joy and gratitude of their hearts upon this most happy and important

and what added to the cheerfulness of the day, was the once more beholding the metropolis of this State, emerging from that scene of ruin and distress, which it has severely experienced, during

event

;

the late contest, from a cruel, unrelenting, and insulting foe.


INCIDENTS BRITISH PRISONS AND PRISON-SHIPS AT

NEW-YORK.

10


:

â&#x20AC;˘

Let the dark Scorpion's hulk narrate

The

dismal tale of English hate

Her

horrid scenes let

And mock

Jersey

the shades where

;

tell,

demons dwell

There shrieks of pain, and dying groan,

Unheeded

fell

on

ears of stone." J.

M. Scott.


BRITISH PRISONS AND PRISON-SHIPS.

British Prisons in

[The

New- York, during

British took possession of

the

Revolutionary

New-York,

War.

Sept. 15, 1776; and

the capture of Fort Washington, Nov. 16, threw nearly 2700 pris-

oners in their power.

To

these

must be added over 1000 taken

at

the battle of Brooklyn, and such private citizens as were arrested for their political principles in the vicinity of

Long

Island

had at

many

least

:

and

we may

5000 prisoners

New-York

safely conclude that Sir

The sudden

to provide for.

it,

threw his

and on

Howe

influx of so

and the unlocked

prisoners, the recent capture of the city,

conflagration of a fourth part of

city

William

affairs into

for

such con-

fusion, that, from those circumstances alone, the prisoners

must have much, from want of food and other bodily comforts but there was superadded the studied cruelty of Capt. Cunningham, the suffered

;

Provost Marshal, and his deputies, and the criminal negligence of Sir

Wm.

Howe.

To

contain such a vast

dinary places of confinement were

number of

prisoners, the or-

Accordingly the Brick Church, the Middle Dutch and the North Dutch Churches

were appropriated

to their use.

the Sugar House, the

City Hall, were Till within a

New

filled to their

insufficient.

Besides these, Columbia College,

Jail,

the

new

Bridewell, and the Old

utmost capacity.

few years, the Sugar House stood

in Liberty-street,

south of the Middle Dutch Church, a dark stone building, with small deep, port-hole looking windows, rising

dungeon-like aspect. divided into

was

nail.

initials

tier

On

above

high

five stories

two dreary apartments.

wall were to be seen

penknife or

It

;

tier,

exhibiting a

and each story was

the stones and bricks in the

and dates, as

There was a strong,

if

done with a prisoner's

jail-like

door opening on


INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

208

Liberty-street, and another

mal

enough

for a

on the southeast, descending into a

cart to travel

was surrounded by a cating heat of

around

walked

British or Hessian guards

it,

their

where, night aad day, two

The yard

weary rounds.

close board fence, nine feet high. " In the suffo-

summer," says

aperture of those stone walls

Wm.

filled

summer

Dunlap, "

with

seeking a portion of the external raging, in the

I

saw every narrow

human heads,

air."

face above face,

While the

of 1777, the prisoners were

jail-fever

let out, in

panies of 20, for half an hour at a time, to breathe fresh air side they

were so crowded,

of 6 each.

No.

1

dis-

There was a walk nearly broad

used as a prison.

cellar, also

that they divided their

numbers

stood ten minutes as close to the

could crowd, and then No. 2 took their places

;

;

was com-

and in-

into squads

window

as they

and so on. Seats there

beds were but straw, intermixed with vermin. ; and their For many weeks the dead-cart visited the prison every morning, into which eight to twelve corpses were flung and piled up, like sticks of wood, and dumped into ditches in the outskirts of the city. The North Dutch Church, corner of William and Fulton-streets, was made to hold 800 prisoners its pews were ripped out, and used for fuel probably its mahogany pulpit was sent to London, and put

were none

;

;

in a chapel there, other.

and a

floor laid across

from one gallery to the

Bayonet marks are yet discernible on the

walls, that

pillars

;

and those

had reverberated with the praises of the Most High,

now

resounded with curses and blasphemy. the Post Office) was at first Mr. John Pintard (an assistant to his uncle Lewis Pintard, who was appointed by Congress to look after the prisoners) says, " In the Middle Dutch Church the prisoners taken on Long Island and at Fort Washington, sick, wounded and well, were all

The Middle Dutch Church (now

used as a prison.

indiscriminately huddled togother, by hundreds and thousands

;

large

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

numbers of whom died by disease and many undoubtedly poisoned by inhuman attendants, for the sake of their watches or silver buckles." Soon afterwards it was turned into a riding-school, to train dragoon horses. The floor was taken up, and the ground covered with tan bark.

A

pole ran across the middle, for the horses to leap over.

The glass was taken from the windows, and the shutters unhung. The church was left in this ruinous condition till 1790, when we read in Greenleaf 's Paper of July 6th, that " On Sunday last, the new Dutch Church was re-dedicated to the King of kings. The Rev.


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YOKK. Dr. Livingston preached from Ex. xx. 24.

It

209

had been prostituted to

horse-schooling while the British had possession of the city, thus

House of God into a den of thieves." The Brick Church (Dr. Spring's] was at first

turning the

it,

a prison, but soon and the Presbyterian Church in Wall-street, the Scotch Church

[Dr. Mason's], in Cedar-street, and the Friends' Meeting House,

were converted

At the Peace,

into hospitals.

Presbyterian church

fit

in 1783, there

to preach in, so that Dr.

was no

Rogers delivered

his

famous Thanksgiving Sermon in St. Paul's Chapel. The French Church, in Pine-street, was a storehouse for ordnance stores. bly.

Columbia College was used as a prison only a short time, probaOne of Capt Vandyke's grenadiers saw the great fire, Sept.

21, 1776, from

The New

windows.

its

Bridewell, between the present City Hall and Broad-

way, was for a time used as a prison for American

Woodruff,

who

recently died at the age of 90,

Fort Washington, and has

left

soldiers.

Oliver

was taken prisoner

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;" We were marched New-York, and went ent prisons â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 816 went the New Bridewell, among the ment here

at

the following record of his confineto

:

into differ-

into

I

rest;

some into the Sugar House others into the Dutch Church. On Thursday morning they brought us a little provision, which was the ;

first

morsel

we

got to eat or drink after eating our breakfast on Sat-

We never

urday morning.

drew as much provision

common

allowance as a

man would

months during

that inclement season,

what was in the

in the

eat at a

lamps of the

windows, and nothing

city.

to

meal.

I

for three days'

was

and never saw any

there three fire,

except

There was not a pane of glass

keep out the cold except the iron

grates."

The

old City Hall stood on the site of the present

and was converted It

into a

Custom House, guard-house for the main guard of the city.

had dungeons and prisons below

;

and a court-room on the second

where the refugee clergy preached during the latter part of the war. At first, civil offenders were confined here but subsequently whaleboatmen and robbers. The New Jail, or " the Provost [now the Hall of Records] was destined," says Pintard, " for the more notorious rebels, civil, naval and military. An admission into this modern bastile, was enough to On the right hand of the main door was appal the stoutest heart. Capt. Cunningham's quarters opposite to which was the guard-room

floor,

;

;


210

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

Within the

barricade

first

the entrance door

Two

more

at the

and chained

;

two 1st

also, at

was Sergeant O'Keefe's apartment.

door, at the foot of the second flight of steps, leading to the

and

by

cells in the

soldiers,

second and third

was

stories.

led into the hall, the

he was delivered over with

all

When

rooms

a prisoner, escorted

whole guard was paraded, and

formality to Capt.

Cunningham

deputy, and questioned as to his name, rank, size, age,

which were entered

At

were always posted, by day and night. and 2d barricades, which were grated, barred the rear door, and on the platform at the grated sentinels

in a record book.

What

or his

&c,

all

of

with the bristling of

arms, unbolting of bars and locks, clanking of enormous iron chains,

and a vestibule dark as Erebus, the unfortunate captive might well shrink under this infernal sight and parade of tyrannical power, as he crossed the threshold of that door which possibly closed on him for

The

life.

northeast chamber, turning to the

on the second

left,

was appropriated to officers, and characters of superior rank, and was called Congress Hall. So closely were they packed, that when they lay down at night to rest, when their bones ached on the hard oak planks, and they wished to turn, it was altogether by word of command, " right left" being so wedged as to form almost a solid floor,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

mass of human

bodies.

In the day-time the packs and blankets of

the prisoners were suspended around the walls, every precaution be-

ing used to keep the rooms ventilated, and the walls and floors clean, to prevent jail-fever,

American prisoners

and as the Provost was generally crowded with

or British culprits of every description,

wonderful that infection never broke out within

gloomy abode were incarcerated officers

and citizens of

its

at different periods,

distinction, awaiting

protracted period of their liberation.

it is

walls.

really

In this

many American

with sickening hope, the

Could these dumb walls speak,

what scenes of angush might they not disclose The Captain and his Deputy were enabled to fare sumptuously, by dint of curtailing !

the prisoners' rations, exchanging good for bad provisions, and other

embezzlements.

In the drunken orgies that usually terminated his

Cunningham would order the rebel prisoners to turn out and parade for the amusement of his guests, pointing them out " this is the d d rebel, Col. Ethan Allen," " that is a rebel judge," &c. The other prisons were cleared at or before the close of hostilidinners,

:

ties, till

but the Provost and Old City Hall were continued as prisons

Evacuation Day.

" I

was

in

New-York, Nov. 26th," says Gen.


— AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Johnson, " and at the Provost, about ten o'clock, A. M., criminals

were yet

in

bunch of keys on the

211

a

few

British

custody, and O'Keefe threw his ponderous

and

floor

retired,

—when

an American guard

which joined a detachment of British troops, Broadway, and marched down to the Battery,

relieved the British guard,

then on parade in

where they embarked

for

England."]

Ed.

Robt. Troup, late Lt. in Col. Lasher's battalion, says he, Lt. Ed.

Dunscomb, Adj. Hoogland, and two volunteers were made prisoners by a detachment of British troops, 3 o'clock A. M., Aug. 27, '76. They were carried before the Generals, interrogated and threatened to be

Thence they were

hung.

led to a house near Flatbush.

9 A. M., they were led in rear of the army to Bedford.

At

18 officers

taken that morning were confined in a small soldiers' tent for two nights and near three days

it

raining most of the time

;

60 privates

Cunthem the negro had already hung several, and he imagined he would hang some more. The negro & C, also insulted the prisoners, showing them the halter, and with the officers and soldiers calling them rebels, From Bedford they were led scoundrels, robbers, murderers, &c. to Flatbush, and confined a week in Mr. Leffert's house, on short

also had but one tent, while at Bedford the Provost Marshall,

ningham, brought with him a negro with a

allowance of biscuit and pity

salt pork.

halter, telling

Several Hessian soldiers took

on them, and gave them apples, and once fresh

Flatbush. after a week, he with 70 or 80 officers,

beef.

From

was put on board

a snow lying between Gravesend and the Hook, without bedding or blankets, afflicted with lice and other vermin, soap and fresh water

They drank and cooked with The Captain charged a very large commission for purchasing necessaries for them with the money they procured from their friends. From the snow, after 6 weeks, for washing, being refused them. filthy

water brought from England.

(Oct. 17.) they were carried to N. Y., and confined in a house near

they were not allowed any fuel, and afterwards,

Bridewell.

At

only a

coal for 3 days in the

little

first,

week.

Provisions dealt out very

negligently, scanty and of bad quality; and from the bad health of

the prisoners, most would have died had they not been supported by

poor people and

common

after the capture of Fort

lowed

to

prostitutes,

walk about the

taken on L.

I.,

have

who

took pity on them. Shortly

Washington, the above prisoners were

died.

city.

— Nearly

The

al-

one half of the prisoners

privates being treated with great


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

212

inhumanity, without fuel or the

common necessaries

of

life,

and were

obliged to obey the calls of nature in their places of confinement.

Cor. 411.

The

British

hung no one of the

prisoners of

Aug.

27, but played

the fool by making them ride with a rope around their necks, seated

on

Otho H. Williams, was

coffins, to the gallows.

treated so.

Thatcher,

Adolph Myer,

late of Col. Lasher's bat., says

the British, at Montresor's Island.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;They threatened twice He was

him, and had a rope fixed to a tree. quarters, (Jas.

p.

77.

he was taken by

led to

to

hang

Gen. Howe's

Beekman's) near Turtle Bay, who ordered him pin-

He was confined 4 days on bread and water, in the condemned hole of the New Jail, without bedding or straw. He was next put in the College, and then in the New Dutch Church, whence he escaped, Jan. 24, '77. He was treated with great inhumanity, and ioned.

would have

died,

had he not been supported by his

allowance was one loaf for 6 days, of the bread tion of

left

friends.

The

on the evacua-

N. Y., (and which had been made for an allowance of 3 days),

one quart of pease, half a pint of

Many

pork, for 6 days.

and one and a half pounds of

rice,

prisoners died from want, and others were

reduced to such wretchedness as to attract the compassion of com-

mon prostitutes, from whom they received considerable assistance. No care was taken of the sick, and if any died, they were thrown at the door of the prison, and lay there till next day, when they were put on a cart and drawn out to the intrenchments, beyond the Jews' burial ground,

when

conducted thither

they were interred by their fellow-prisoners,

for that purpose.

The

dead were thrown into a

hole promiscuously, without the usual rites of sepulture. frequently enticed to enlist.

Game, Nov. 25, many of them half

'76.

Myer was Cor. 412.

There are now 5,000 prisoners in town, Congress desert the poor wretches

naked.

have sent them neither provisions nor clothing, nor paid attention to their distress, or that of their families.

Their situation must have

been doubly deplorable, but for the humanity of the King's

Every

possible

attention has

numbers and necessary confinement, to from

guilt, sickness

officers.

been given, considering their great

and poverty.

alleviate their distress arising


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Sergeant Hubert

from

New

carried to

1,

who

offers a

reward for three prisoners

8, '76.

Yesterday arrived E. Thomas, captured

broke

Jail.

N London, Nov, Sep.

213

N. Y., and put on board the Chatham.

He

es-

caped Wednesday se'nnight.

Nov. 20,

American

'76.

walking about the

officers

but half allowance, sickly and died

N. London, Nov. seamen only.

(prisoners on

parole)

were

but soldiers were closely confined and had

streets,

A

29, '76.

fast.

exchange of

cartel arrived here for

Prisoners had miserable confinement in store-ships

and transports, suffering

for

want of the common necessaries of

life.

Whitby Prison ship, N. Y., Dec. 9, '76. Our present situation is most wretched more than 250 prisoners, some sick, and without the least assistance from physician, drug or medicine, and fed on two;

thirds allowance of salt provisions,

and crowded promiscuously with-

the small room of a ship between decks, allowed to walk the main deck only from sunrise to sunset. Only 2 at a time allowed to come on deck to do what na-

out regard to color, person or

office, in

ture requires, and sometimes denied even that, and use tubs and

buckets between decks, to the great offence of every delicate cleanly person, and prejudice of all in

all

Lord

our healths.

Howe

has liberated

the merchant service, but refuses to exchange those taken in

arms but

48 hours

Trumbull Papers,

for like prisoners.

Lt. Catlin, taken Sep. ;

for

1 1

15, '76, confined

p. 76.

with no sustenance, for

days, had only 2 days' allowance, pork offensive to

the smell, bread hard, mouldy and

wormy, made of

canail and dregs

of flax seed; water brackish, I have seen $1,50 given for a com-

mon

pail full

;

3 or 4 lbs. of poor Irish pork were given to 3

In one church were 850 prisoners, for near

3 days.

About Dec.

25, he with 225

men

men

for

3 months.

put on board the Glasgow, at N.

Y., to be carried to Con't, for exchange.

They were aboard

11

days, and kept on coarse broken bread and less pork than before, and

had no

fire

through

ill

for sick or well,

usage and

cold.

crowded between decks, and 28 died Hist. Litchfield, p. 39.

N. Y., Dec. 26, '76. " The distress of the prisoners cannot be communicated by words, 20 or 30 die every day, they lie in heaps unburied what numbers of my countrymen have died by cold and 10* ;


INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

214

hunger, perished for want of the

have seen

This,

it.

common

necessaries of

the boasted British clemency

sir, is

life

I

!

!

I

myself

had well nigh perished under it. The New England people can have no idea of such barbarous policy, nothing can stop such treat-

ment but retaliation. I ever despised private revenge, but that of the must be in this case both just and necessary it is due to the manes of our murdered countrymen, and that alone can protect the public

;

survivors in the like situation. barbarity and insults, S.

Young

may

says, Dec. 15,

and with 500 was kept night,

when

as if to so

Rather than experience again their

by the sword of the Hessians." '76, he was taken at Fort Washington,

I fall

in a stable,

and had no provisions

till

Monday

enemy threw in the stable, in a confused manner, many hogs, a quantity of biscuit in crumbs, mostly

the

mouldy, and some crawling with maggots, which the prisoners were Next day they had a obliged to scramble for without any division. little

pork,

which they were obliged

to eat raw.

Afterwards they

got sometimes a bit of pork, at other times biscuit, peas and rice.

They were

confined two

women, and even

weeks

in a church,

not being allowed

greatly with cold,

negroes.

sometimes a day.

Great numbers died, three, four or more

Afterwards they were carried on board a ship,

Hinman,

where 500 were confined below deck.

W.

p. 134.

D. says the prisoners were roughly used at Harlem, on their

way from the

where they suffered

Insulted by soldiers,

fire.

Ft.

Washington to N. York, where 800 were stowed in which was a cold open house, the windows not

New Bridewell,

glazed.

They had

not one mouthful from early Saturday morning,

were a half pound of biscuit, half pound pork, half pint peas, half gill rice, half ounce of butter, the whole enough for one good meal and defrauded in this petty alno straw or hay to lie on no fuel but one cartload per lowance till

Monday,

rations for three days

;

week for the 800 men. At 9 o'clock in the evening the Hessian guards would come in and put out the fire, and lay on the poor prisoners with heavy clubs, for sitting round the fire water very bad as well as bread except once, good biscuit, and once good baker's bread. ;

Prisoners died like rotten sheep, with cold, hunger and

who had good apparel, such necessitated to sell Lt. Col.

them

to

dirt,

and those

as buckskin breeches, or good coats, were

purchase bread to keep themselves

alive.

Selah Hart, presented to the Assembly of Connecticut


;

215

AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK.

the petition of 38 Continental officers, prisoners on parole on L.

They had been

money.

for hard

May,

there from Sep., '76, to

Hinman,

who

This may inform those

p.

I.,

'77.

277.

have friends in N. Y., prisoners of

war, that Maj. Wells, a prisoner, has come thence to Conn, on parole, to

money

collect hard

soldiers there,

much

for the

Norwalk Capt. Benjamin's, Hezekiah Wylly's, Hartford ;

proper accounts from

N. B. a

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The

whom

and

;

be

left at

landlord Beer's, N.

received, and to

whom

ÂŁ500,

6, '76.

(who had

in Conn.,

John Rapalje and Miles Sherbrook, prisoners been sent there by Washington, Aug.

with

any thing of

Conn. Paper, Dec.

letter of credit for

Haven

to be delivered.

sealed, nor contain

political nature.

drew a

landlord Bett's,

at said Wells's, Colchester,

must not be

letters

may

Stratford ;

and

distressed and suffering officers

and desires the money

'76, as disaffected persons)

in favor of Maj.

Levi Wells, for

the use of the Continental troops, then in captivity in N. Y., Dec.

[They owed

13, '76. palje,

this

money probably

for

John Ra-

board.

way with

with Jas. Coggswell, had been seized while on his

sheep for Howe's army.]

and Howe, on

Correspondence of Washington

the

treatment

cruel

of American prisoners, taken from Sparks' s Washington. '76.

Dec. 20, appointed

;

They

notice.

Washington says a Commissary of prisoners should be

for prisoners

from

all

quarters are pushed in our

are also travelling

all

camp without

over the country with certificates of

Committees, without control, and some have even gone in the enemy's

camp.

Washington writes

to

Howe,

of prisoners in the Ships at N.Y.

and famine, may not be added to us rebels, and say we deserve no feelings

keen and sensible, as

Jan. 13, '77, on the cruel treatment

"

I

hope the miseries of cold, disease,

better treatment, but

loyalists,

and

sorry I

am

me

to

countrymen

obtain redress of their grievances.

I

am

again under the necessity of remonstrating to you on the

lately

been sent out, giving the most

their barbarous usage,

confirm.

on the unjust

My injured

treatment, which our prisoners continue to receive in N.

have

call

remember we have

will retaliate

invaders of our rights, liberties, and properties.

have long called on

You may

their other misfortunes.

If

a

real

which

their miserable

scarcity of provisions

and

Y.

shocking

Those who accounts

of

emaciated countenances fuel, at

this

inclement


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 216

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

season,

is

the cause that our prisoners are debarred from them,

humanity points out a mode, which

common

them to go home under parole, not to serve during the war, or until an equal number are released by us. Most of the prisoners who have returned home, have informed me they were offered better treatment, provided they would ento suffer

is,

in your service.

list

[Wm. Gamble

deposes,

(Conn. Gaz., Feb. 8, '77,) that prisoners

were huddled together with negroes ; had weak grog no swab to clean the ship bad oil raw pork seamen refused them water called them d d rebels ; dead not buried, &c. Lt. Wm. Sterret, taken Aug. 27, his clothing stolen abused by soldiers stinted in food slight wounds became mortal by neglect recruiting officers seduced prisoners, &c. ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed.] Howe port

is

replies to

exaggerated.

Washington, Jan. 17/77. That Capt. Gamble's reThe prisoners were confined with the more general

liberty of the prison ship,

The

rest

till

a successful attempt

was made

were then restrained within such narrow

to

escape.

limits as left the

more commanding parts of the ship in possession of the guard. Provisions were the same as given to British sailors the want of cleanliness is owing to the prisoners, who have had constant attendance of a surgeon and medicines from the King's store. The fleet physician has also attended and prescribed, 7 have died of 500 sufferers. The prisoners petitioned ;

for

f

enlargement, but did not complain of

rom

different Provinces,

were

to their unnvoidable sufferings,

and army. 38 landed

ill

treatment.

The

set free in separate corps, in

and the confined situation of the

104 not taken in arms, were landed in Conn, in Penn.,

30

prisoners

compassion

last

fleet

month,

set free here.

Jan. 20, '77. Washington proposes Lewis Pintard, a merchant of N.

Y., to reside there as an agent

Ap. 21, 77.

Howe

for prisoners.

(in reply to

Washington of

9thinst.) says all pri-

soners are confined in the most airy buildings, and largest

being the healthiest places. British

hospitals,

with medicines, Clothing and

May

and

till

money

their

Near half

own

transports,

the prisoners were received in

surgeons without restriction supplied

they disposed of large quantities at private sale. are

all

the prisoners want.

Washington disapproves of Gen. Parson's proposition of a descent on Flatbush, to release American officers, prisoners there 17, '77.

on parole.

American

[The

British in apprehension of a rescue, had

officers to close prison in

N. Y.

Ed.]

removed the


217

AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK.

May

28, '77. Washington says a great proportion of prisoners sent

out by British are not

fit

subjects of exchange,

severity of their treatment

June 10,

'77.

Washington says

clothing to British prisoners

rican prisoners to purchase

till

too late

and being made so by the

and confinement, a deduction should be made.

;

;

a long reply to Howe,) he gave

(in

Ame-

hear of the sufferings of

did not

he was refused a procuring agent at N. Y.

what was necessary

to supply the prisoners'

wants.

Washington complains to Howe of cruelties exercised on American prisoners, without Howe's knowledge or approbation, proceeding from the inhumanity of Mr. Cunningham, Provost Marshal. Nov. 14,

'77.

Nov. 23,

'77.

Washington threatens

retaliation, if

Howe

does not

accede to his letter of Nov. 14, '77, and was about giving orders to

Boudinot,

when he

Mrs. White

New De

Jail,

la

received Howe's letter of Nov. 27.

left

N. Y., Jan. 20,

'77,

says Bridewell, College,

Baptist Meeting, and the tavern lately occupied by

Montaigne, and several other houses, are

wounded of the enemy.

rilled

Mr.

with sick and

Gen. Lee was under guard, in a small

mean-looking house, at the bottom of Kings

Jour. 789.

street.

Washington and Wm. Lee, were put in the North hurch. Dec.Jst, 300 were taken from Dec. 2d, he with others was marchthe church to the prison ship. ed to the Grosvenor transport in- the N. River 500 were crowded Slade says 800 prisoners taken

at

Ft.

;

on board

;

he had to lay down before sunset

to secure a place.

Trumbull Papers, VII. 135.

Henry Franklin North Church,

He

in

about two days after

affirms, Jan. 16, '77, that

the taking of Fort Washington, he

was

in

N. Y., and went to the

which were about 800 prisoners taken in said Fort. him they fared hard

inquired into their treatment, and they told

on account both of provisions and lodging,

for they

were not allowed

any bedding or blankets, and the provision not been regularly out, the modest and backward could get

little

dealt

or none, nor had they

been allowed any fuel to dress their victuals.

The

prisoners in

N. Y. were very sickly, and died in considerable numbers. Cor. 411.

Joshua Loring, Commissary of prisoners, says, but visions

had been sent in by the rebels

little

pro-

for their prisoners.

Feb. 11, '77.


INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

218

Forty-six prisoners from the Glasgow, transport ship, were land-

ed at N. Haven, where Capt. Craige died, and was buried.

names are published

March 7,

in Con't Courant.

Their '77.

Ap. 30, '77. Con't Assembly sent to N.Y. a sufficient quantity of tow shirts and trowsers for her prisoners, also ÂŁ35 to Col. Ethan Allen, by his brother Levi. Lt. Thos. Fanning,

now on

parole from L.

I.

at

Norwich, a

pri-

Howe, will be at Hartford on his return to N. Y., about Sep. 8, '77, whence he proposes to keep the public road to Kings bridge. Letters and money left at the most noted public soner to Gen.

houses, in the different towns, will be conveyed safe to the prisoners.

Conn. Gaz.,Aug. 15,

Extraordinaries excepted.

Jan.

4, '77. Prisoners

went

Sugar House.

into the

'77.

N. Murray

men were in Bridewell. The doctor gave poison powders to prisoners, who soondied. Some were sent to Honduras to cut logwomen came to the prison gate to sell gingerbread. wood says 800

;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Trumbull Papers, IX. 203.

A flag of truce vessel arrived at Milford, after a tedious passage of 11 days, from

N. Y., having above 200 prisoners, whose rueful

countenances too well discovered the while in N. Y.

(names of sick Dec.

1, '77.

treatment they received

ill

20 died on the passage and 20 since they landed,

N. Haven, Jan.

follow.)

The American

prisoners

on L.

I.

8, '77.

were on account

of a suspected descent on that place, put on board a prison ship and boat one evening happened to be detained there two weeks.

A

fastened to the vessel's side.

The chance

of escaping in her

was

immediately suggested by Lts. Forrest and Woodside, but previously

they stepped between decks, for some papers or clothing in their trunks.

Meantime Major Jack Stewart, and one or two others

[with Lt. Col. Livingston taken at Ft. Montgomery,] quietly let

themselves of the ship.

down into the boat, cast her They were lucky enough

off,

and

let

her

drift

astern

to get clear of her unper-

ceived, and at length to reach the Jersey shore in safety, notwith-

standing their elopement was soon discovered. suit

and random shot were unavailing.

rest

and Woodside was extreme.

The

It

being dark, pur-

disappointment of For-

Graydon.


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Memorandum

in the Provost Jail,

Jan. 7, 1778, by John

JPeZZ,

219

N. Y.,from Ap. 23, 1777,

to

one of the Council for N. Jersey.

Ap. 23. Last night I was taken prisoner from my house by 25 armed men, who brought me down to Col. Buskirk's, Bergen Pt., and from him sent to Gen. Pigot, at N. Y., who sent me with Capt. Van Allen

Provost

to the

jail.

24. Received from Mrs. Curson, by the hands of Mr. Amiel, $16,

2

2 stocks, some

shirts,

tea, sugar, pepper, towels, tobacco, pipes, paper,

and a bed and bedding.

May 2.

Dr. Lewis Antle and Capt. Thos. Colden (his son-in-law?)

1.

at the door 6,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;refused admittance.

10 m.

p. m.,

died John

Thomas,

Esq., of small-pox, aged 70

;

inoculated.

Capt. Colden has brought from Mr. Curson, $16.

5.

came

11.

Dr. Antle

13.

Cold weather.

20.

money 21.

;

me

Nero

;

(his slave ?) at the door.

Lewis Pintard came per order of Elias Boudinot to refused admittance. Capt. Colden came to visit me. Capt. and Mrs.

stairs to see

23.

to visit

Come came

to visit

me, and

I

was

offer

called

me

down

them.

Lewis Pintard came as Commissary

in order to assist

to take account of officers

them with money.

24.

Every person refused admittance

25.

All prisoners paraded in the hall, supposed to look for deserters.

27.

Rev. Mr. Hart and Col. Smith brought

29.

Stormy

to the Provost.

to

Provost from L.

I.

in Provost.

Not allowed to fetch good water. Bad water proposed buying tea water, but 10 prisoners from opposite room ordered into ours 30. 31.

;

;

June

refused.

This night

in all 20.

Continued same to-day.

1.

2.

The

3.

Capt.

people ordered back to their

Van Zandt

own room.

sent to dungeon for resenting Capt. Cunning-

ham's abusing and insulting me. Capt.

Adams

7.

Capt.

Van Zandt

8.

All prisoners paraded and called over, and delivered to care of

4.

brought in our room

;

at 9 p. m. candles ordered

out.

Sergeant Keath, (O'Keefe to be 10.

returned from dungeon.

?)

and

made. Prisoners very sickly.

told

we were

all alike.

No

distinction


220

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS Mr. Richards from Conn, exchanged. strict and severe " out lights." Melancholy scene, women refused speaking

11.

Exceeding

12. 13.

to their sick hus-

bands, and treated cruelly by sentries. 14. Mr. Jas. Ferris released on parole and not allowed a doctor.

Come came

;

people in

jail

very sickly,

me— not allowed.

17.

Capt.

18.

Letter from prisoners to Sergeant Keath, requesting more privi-

to

speak to

leges.

Received 6 bottles claret and sundry small

19.

articles, but the

note

not allowed to come up.

Memorandum

20.

sent

by prisoners

to

General Pigot with

list

of

grievances.

Ans. Grant no requests made by prisoners. Mrs. Banta refused speaking to her son.

21.

22. 23.

Mr. Haight

24.

19 prisoners from Brunswick

25.

Dr. Bard came to

died.

18 sent to Sugar House.

;

visit Justice

Moore, but

his wife

was

refused

though her husband was dying.

Moore died and was

26.

Justice

27.

Several sick people removed below.

30.

Provost very sickly, and several

July

carried out.

die.

Received from Mrs. Curson per Mrs. Marrener, 2 half Joes. Received of Elias Boudinot per Pintard, 10 half Joes.

6.

3.

Capt. Thos. Colden came to the grates to see me. 2 men carried out to be hung for desertion, reprieved. Mr. Langdon brought into our room.

7.

9.

11.

13.

The Sergeant removed a number

14.

Messrs. Demarests exchanged. Dr.

15.

A

at the

Peter Zabriskie had an order to speak with

was well

that all

to visit sick.

at

me and

let

Capt.

me know

home.

Sergeant from Sugar House came to take account of

Provost. 21.

Romaine ordered

declaration of more privileges, and prisoners allowed to speak

windows.

17.

19.

of prisoners from below.

Cunningham

affairs in

in town.

Sergeant took another account of

officers.

Capt. Jas.

Lowry

died.

22.

Mr. Miller

Aug. 5.

1.

died.

Very sick

Capt.

Barry sent to dungeon

leave of Sergeant.

Lowry

—weather very

buried.

hot.

for bringing

rum

Every thing looks stormy.

for

Mr. Philips without


221

AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. 6.

—growing

Warm

weather

Mr. Pintard came

better.

to supply

prisoners of war with clothes. 10. 11. ly

1

I., and 4 Lawrences from near Tappan. John Coven Cromwell from White Plains. Freeland from Pol-

2 prisoners from L.

Fly whipped about

12.

salt.

Sergeant Keath took

all

pens and ink out of each room, and for-

bid the use of any on pain of dungeon. 13.

Abm.

14.

Jacobus Blauvelt died in morning

16.

Capt. Ed. Travis brought in our

Miller discharged.

—buried at noon. room from dungeon, where he

has long been confined and cruelly treated. 17. Mr. Keath refused pound of tobacco.

me

liberty to

Hyer discharged from

send a card to Mr. Amiel

for

Provost.

21.

Capt.

25.

Berry brought up from dungeon, and Capt. Travis sent

down

again without any provocation. 26.

put on

Badcock sent the doors

all

to

dungeon

brought to Provost from L. 27.

for cutting

and threatened

wood

Col.

Ethan Allen

and confined below.

I.,

Badcock discharged from below.

30.

5

31.

a. m., Col.

Sep.

p. m., all

1.

rooms locked up

close.

Allen brought in our room.

—bad water.

Pleasant weather

4.

Horrid scenes of whipping.

6.

Lewis Pintard brought some money

Otho H. Williams brought from L.

I.,

Tappan

for officers,

p. m.,

Major

and confined in our room, Major

Wells, from same place, confined below,

8.

Locks

in evening.

to be locked up.

a.

m.,

Wm.

Lawrence of

died.

Campbell, Taylor, John Cromwell, and Buchanan from Phila-

delphia, discharged.

— pork very rusty, biscuit bad.

10.

Provisions exceeding ordinary

12.

Capt. Travis, Capt. Chatham, and others, brought out of dun-

geon. 14.

2 prisoners from Jersey,

viz.

:

Thos. Canfield of Newark, and

Jwalemon. 16.

Troops returned from Jersey. Several prisoners brought

vost, viz.

:

Capt. Varick,

Wm.

17.

Prisoners from L.

22.

Nothing material.

to

Pro-

Prevost, Brower, &c.

I.

Major Wells brought from below up

stairs.

Received from Mr. Curson per Mr. Amiel, 4 guineas, 6 bottles wine, and 1 lb. tobacco. 24.


222

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS Mr. Pintard carried

26.

list

of prisoners and account of grievances

Chatham and others carried to dungeon. Yesterday number of soldiers sent below, and several prisoners Capt.

to the general.

28.

brought out of dungeon.

State of grievances presented to Gen. Jones,

which much displeased Sergeant, who threatened Last night Sergeant locked up

29.

Sears admitted up

list

Candles ordered out at 8

Locked

4.

up.

up rooms.

Rev. Mr. James

of clothing wanted per continental and

Sergeant locks up

state prisoners in Provost.

Oct. 2.

to lock

the rooms.

stairs.

Sent Mr. Pintard

30.

all

all

the rooms.

—not locked up.

Great number of ships went up N. River. Received

sundries from Grove

Bend

—3 pair ribbed hose, 3 towels.

Garret Miller of Smith's Clove signed his will in prison, in presence of Benj. Goldsmith, Abr. Skinner, and myself. 5.

6.

G. Miller died of small-pox

7.

Wm.

Prevost discharged from Provost.

8.

Capt.

Chatham and Lewis Thitcher brought

p. m.

buried.

out of dungeon.

Mr. Pintard sent up blankets, shoes, and stockings

10.

for pri-

soners. 11.

Several prisoners from N. River.

12.

Lt. Col. Livingston

gomery and Clinton,

and upwards of 20

Mr. Noble came

14. to the

15. 17.

19.

me. 21.

officers

from Ft. Mont-

below.

Received from Mr. Pintard a

13. a. m.

all

to the grates to

letter

by flag from Peter R. Fell.

speak

to

me.

Sergeant Keath sent Lt. Mercer and Mr. Nathl. Fitzrandolph

dungeon

for complaining their room had not water sufficient. Mr. Pintard brought sundry articles for prisoners. Mr. Antonio and other prisoners brought here from up N. River. Ben. Goldsmith ill of small-pox, made his will and gave it to

Died 2

a. m., Oct. 20.

Glorious news from Northward.

22. Confirmation strong as Holy Writ. drawn to-day. 23. Weather continues very cold ice of vessels came down North River. Mr. ;

Beef, loaf-bread and butter,

in the tub in hall.

Wm.

Bayard

Number

at the door to

take out old Mr. Morris. 24.

Prisoners from Sugar House sent on board ships.

25.

Rev. Mr. Hart admitted on parole in the

from Sugar House came is

to take

city. Serg. Woolley names of officers, and says an exchange

expected. 28.

Last night and to-day storm continues very severe.

Provost


223

AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK.

Lt. Col. Livingston admitted up stairs a few

in a terrible condition.

minutes.

Nov.

1.

— Lt.

Callender of the train ordered back on L. I.; also

several officers taken at Ft.

evening

3. In

my

Montgomery

sent on parole to

L

I.

daughter Eliz. Colden came to see me, accompa-

nied by Mayor Matthews. E. Colden

5.

came

to let

me know

Yesterday Sergeant refused her bertson's 16.

Aid-de-camp came

Jail

exceeding disagreeable

Town

18.

Major and

was going

out of town.

speaking to me.

Gen. Ro-

to inquire into grievances of prisoners.

— many miserable and

and hunger

jects nearly starved with cold

ing

she

liberty of

shocking ob-

— miserable prospect before us.

Town Adjutant came

with a pretence of view-

jail.

Van

Peter and Cor.

19.

Tassel, two prisoners from Tarrytown in

our room.

Mr. Pintard sent three

20.

barrels of flour to be distributed

among

prisoners.

account of what clothing prisoners wanted.

21.

Mr. Pintard came

24.

Six tailors brought here from prison ship to work in making

clothes for prisoners.

for

They say people on board very

sickly

;

300 sent

on board reduced to 100.

Mr. Dean and others brought to jail from the town. Dean locked up by himself, and Mr. Forman brought up attended by Rev. Mr. Inglis, and afterwards ordered down stairs. 25.

26.

order

— one of prisoners

stairs

New

ordered to go to commissary's and see provi-

sions dealt out for prisoners.

Vast number of people assembled at Pro-

vost in expectation of seeing an execution. 27.

John, the milkman, locked up stairs with sentry at his door. by Mr. Webb that a prisoner, Herring, was come down to be

A report

exchanged 30.

Dec. for

for

Capt. 1.

Mr. Van Zandt or me.

Cunningham came Capt.

to Provost.

Money came down with Mr. Webb

to be

exchanged

Major Wells.

Col. Butler visited Provost, and promised a doctor should atReceived from Mr. Bend cloth for a great coat, &c. Mr. Pintard took list of clothing wanting for prisoners. Several prisoners of war sent from here on board prison ship, 3. and some of sick sent to hospital. Dr. Romaine being ordered by Sir H. 2.

tend.

Prisoners Clinton to examine the sick. Prisoners sickly ; cause, cold. scanty clothing in upper rooms, and only two bushels coal for a room of 20

men, a week.


224

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS Mr. Blanch ordered out

5.

get prisoners exchanged.

Mr.

7.

;

said to be to go to Morris

Town

to

Cold.

Webb came

Major Wells

to acquaint

his

exchange was

agreed to with Capt. Money.

Maj. Gen. Robertson with Mayor, came

8.

prison.

said I had

come

ter

was

I

called

made bad

me

to see

to

Provost to examine

and examined, and requested

my

;

Gen.

parole.

use of indulgence granted me, in letting

my

daugh-

by ordering Mr. Parker and Mr. Ruderford con-

fined.

Major Wells exchanged. Mr. Pintard sent 100 loaves for Thurston died. Prisoners very sick, and 9.

10.

and prison

prisoners,

a. m.,

Walter

die very fast from hospitals

ships.

11.

Some

13.

Abel Wells died

flags

from N. River.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

tailor

from prison ship.

Mr. Pintard brought letters for sundry people. 14. Sunday guards more severe than ever, notwithstanding Gen. Robertson's promise of more indulgence. Capt. Van Zandt brought 12.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

from L. 16.

I.

Sent message to Mr. Pintard

for

wood.

Cold, and entirely out

of wood. 17.

Commissary Winslow came and released Major Williams on

parole on L. 18.

19.

his

I.

Mr. Pintard sent four cords wood for Capt. John Paul Schoot released on

prisoners.

parole.

Mr. Pintard with

clothing for the people. 21. ers

A

paper found at door of Provost, intimating that three prison-

had a rope concealed

their escape.

were

all

in a

bag

in

one of the rooms, in order

The Sergeant examined

all

to

make we

the rooms, and at night

locked up.

22.

Received from Mr. Pintard 100 loaves bread and quarter

24.

Distributed clothing,

28.

Gen. Robertson sent a doctor

the petition sent

&c,

by Col. Allen

beef.

to prisoners.

for

to

my

examine me

releasement.

in consequence of

The Dr.

reported

to Dr. Mallet.

29.

Gen. Robertson sent

me word I should

be liberated in town, pro-

vided I procured a gentleman in town to be responsible for ance. 30.

In consequence

I

my

appear-

wrote to Hon. H. Wh.te, Esq.

Dr. Romaine, with

whom

I sent the letter, said

Mr. White had

a number of objections, but the Dr. hoped to succeed in the afternoon.

Mr. Winslow came and told

me

the

same

story I heard the

day

before.


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK.

225

31. Sergeant Keath brought a message from the General same purpose as yesterday. N. B. I lost the memorandum from this date to the time of

to

the

my

be-

ing liberated from Provost, on Jan. 7, 1778.

N. Y., Feb. 11, 1778. Received a letter from Jos. Loring, Esq., Com. of Prisoners, with leave from Gen. Robertson, for my having the bounds of the city allowed me.

Mar.

23.

the eleventh

Wrote to Maj. Gen. Robertson, and month of my imprisonment.

My Note I

General Robertson

to

— (See Journal Dec.

this

was

28.)

received your Excellency's message this morning per Sergeant

Keath, respecting the condition of ill

him

told

state of health.

out, I

make not

can desire

;

If

my

but to write to a gentleman I

am

afraid will

most earnestly entreat your Excellency and give orders

I

have not seen

grant this

me

his request

till

Mr.

my

humble

My Sir

Letter :

to

—Being

Fell's note

;

finds

;

for

A

Hon. Henry White, Esq. in a very

which purpose

it

impossible to

him sufficient secuMr. Langdon having broken

Fell's friends give

which

it is

out

to dispense with.

ill

amination, has consented that curity

am, &c.

— (See Journal Dec. 29.)

he will not attempt to escape.

power

request,

such gen-

to I

his faith in like circumstances, has given rise to a rule,

of Gen. Robertson's

up-

for

the house of Mrs.

to

can have an opportunity to send

I

Card from Gen. Robertson. comply with

you

Therefore, I do

think will satisfy your Excellency.

Gen. Robertson has received Mr. rity that

to

to the Sergeant to liberate

Marrener, from whence I

whom

answer no end.

me

let

the least doubt of giving you all the satisfaction

wards of two years,

tlemen as

being liberated on account of my

your Excellency will be so obliging as to

I

— (See Journal Dec. 30.)

state of health, I

Gen. Robertson, on ex-

be liberated to a house in

town on

se-

have taken the liberty to request that you

will be so obliging as to be responsible for

me.

I

conceive

it

a happi-

ness to be released on such terms, and shall esteem your friendship as a singular favor.

On your

appearing at the General's, I

to a house in town.

Feb. 4, 1778.

sent, E. Boudinot.

I

I delivered

and Benj. Goldsmith,

may be

to be

Lewis Pintard the

forwarded

permitted

am, &c.

wills of Garret Miller

to their respective families.

Pre-


;

226

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

May

20, '78.

left

I

I

my own

Jones, to

home and

my

had

parole extended by order of Gen. Daniel

house in Bergen county, for 30 days.

June 20. I Hook, Col. Turnbull not being at home and then sent with an officer to N. Y. to Maj.

arrived at Paulus

was detained

night,

till

Gen. Val. Jones, who ordered me to wait on Commissary Winslow next morning, who waited on Gen. Dan'l Jones, and by his order I was detained in town

out

my

July

till

when

1st,

parole, not to return

day arrived

safe

Nov. 15.

my

for.

from Abm. Skinner, Dep. Com. of Prisons, a Signed by Joshua

being exchanged for Gov. Skene.

Com. Gen.

Loring,

Commissary was ordered to make July 2d I left town, and next

the

sent

home.

I received

certificate of

till

N. Y., Oct. 26, 1778.

of Prisons, dated

The following persons were my security for .ÂŁ100 each, being demanded by Gen. Robertson on my release from Provost to lodgings in N. Y., on my parole. Jan. Lawrence Kortright,

7, 1778.

Henry Haydock,

Richard Yates,

Jas. Jauncey,

St. Skinner,

Henry White, John Amiel,

Dr.

McAdam,

Wm.

Seton,

Grove Bend.

Grievances that the Prisoners are under, sent

to

Gen. Jones per

Mr. Pintard.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;(See Journal, Sep. 2& and " Close confined in

amongst

felons, (a

number

28.)

without distinction of rank or character,

jail

of

whom

are under sentence of death,) with-

out their friends being suffered to speak to them, even through the grates.

pork per

On the scanty allowance of man per week, without fuel

with water from a der

when good water

is

hard biscuit and 2 it.

kinds of filth

as easily obtained.

a hospital, not allowed to send ted to visit

who

all

lbs.

to dress

is

lbs.

raw

Frequently supplied

thrown that can ren-

obnoxious and unwholesome, (the effects of which are too often

it

felt,)

pump where

2

them when

for medicine,

in the greatest distress

Denied the benefit of

nor even a doctor permit;

married

men and

others

lay at the point of death, refused to have their wives or relations

admitted to see them, and for attempting

Commissioned thrown vilely

into

officers

it

often beat from the prison.

and other persons of character, without a cause,

a loathsome dungeon, insulted in a gross manner, and

abused by a Provost Marshal,

who

is

allowed to be one of the basest

characters in the British army, and whose

he has caned an

officer

on a

trivial

power

is

so unlimited, that

occasion, and frequently beats the


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. when unable

sick privates

New Corps

enlist in the

of

to stand,

many

of

made

are daily obliged to

prevent perishing for want of the necessaries

to

Neither pen, ink, or paper allowed,

life.

being

whom

227

(to

prevent their treatment

the consequence of which, indeed, the prisoners

public,)

themselves dread, knowing the malignant disposition of their keeper.

Nurses wanted immediately

5, '78.

Gaine, Jan.

prison hospitals in this city.

by two respectable

Good recommendations

to attend the

required, signed

inhabitants.

LEWIS PINTARD. The Board

War

of

report, Jan. 21, '78, that there are

900

pri-

vates and 300 officers in N. Y., and that the privates have been

crowded

all

summer in sugar-houses and the officers boarded on L. I., who have been confined in the provost-guard, and

except about 30, in

most loathsome

and that since Oct.

jails,

1, all

those prisoners,

both officers and privates, have been confined in prison, prison-ships, or the Provost. Lists of prisoners in Provost, Nov. 5, '77

:

those taken by the

Falcon, Dec. '77 (see 638), and those belonging to Conn., Jan. '78,

Quaker and Brick Meeting Hospitals, may be found Trumbull Papers, VII, 170, 228, 258 VIII, 62. in the

in the

;

" Gen. Lee, on receiving $500, which he drew in the Lottery, immediately distributed It is said that

sary in

it

among

the American prisoners, since

New- York,

New- York

the American prisoners.

we have had

are well served with good provisions,

Commiswhich are

a

furnished at the expense of the States, and are in general very

healthy.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; N. London, Feb. 20,

May 6, '78.

N.

J.

only 800 are

now

and 50 more prisoners

of Stonington,

made

prison-ship.

were thrust

at Ft.

Washington,

living.

Conn. Gaz., July 10,

on board a

Irvin,

Report says, of 3000 prisoners taken

exchanged.

field,

'78.

Gaz. Col. Miles,

'78.

About three weeks ago, Rob't Shef-

his escape

from N. Y.,

after

into the forepeak

and put

in irons.

On

N. Y., they were carried on board a prison-ship and

on opening which,

tell

confinement

After he was taken, he with his crew (10) their arrival at

to the

hatchways,

not of Pandora's Box, for that must be an

alabaster-box, in comparison to the opening of these hatches.

there were gratings but they kept their boats upon them.

True

The steam


— 228

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

of the hold was enough to scald the skin and take the stench enough to poison the air

all

around.

away the breath—

On

his

descending

these dreary mansions of woe, and beholding the numerous spectacles of wretchedness and despair, his soul fainted within him. little

A

epitome of hell

—about 350 men confined between decks, half French-

He was

men.

informed there were three more of these vehicles of

contagion, which contained a like

who

also,

number of miserable Frenchmen

are treated worse (if possible) than Americans

so intense (the hot sun shining

all

the heat

;

day on deck) that they were

all

naked, which also served the well to get rid of vermin, but the sick were eaten up alive. Their sickly countenances and ghastly looks

were

truly horrible

some swearing and blaspheming

;

;

some crying,

praying, and wringing their hands, and stalking about like ghosts others delirious, raving, and storming

panting for breath

all

;

;

;

some groaning and dying

some dead and corrupting

air

so foul at

times that a lamp could not be kept burning, by reason of which the

boys were not missed

till they had been dead ten days. One person only admitted on deck at a time after sunset, which occasions much

filth to

run into the hold and mingle with bilge-water, which was not

pumped out while he was leaky, and the prisoners

pump

were

aboard, notwithstanding the decks

begged permission

While Mr.

to let in fresh water

and

was on board (6 days) 5 or 6 died daily and 3 of his people. He was sent for on shore as evidence in a court of admiralty for condemning his own vessel and happily escaped. He was informed in N. Y. that the fresh meat sent in to our prisoners by our Commissary, was taken by the men of war for their

own was

it

out again.

use. in,

This he can say

:

S.

he did not see any aboard the ship he

but they were well supplied with soft bread from our

missary on shore. complaint.

Fresh

But the provision (be air

it

what

it

Com-

will) is not the

and fresh water, God's free

gift, is all

their

cry.

July 31,

'78.

N. London.

Last

week 500

or 600

American

pris-

oners were released from confinement at N. Y., and sent out chiefly

by way of N. Jersey, being exchanged.

N. London, Sep.

26, '78.

All American prisoners are nearly

sent out of N. Y., but there are 615 French prisoners Oct. 18, '78.

Ship Good Hope

lies in

still

there.

the North River.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Dec. 14,

The

Gaine.

'78.

Jersey hospital-ship

229

lies at

Franklin,

men from

the hor-

near Tolmie's Wharf, E. River.

N. London, Dec. rible prison-ships,

A

18, '78.

N. Y., arrived

Flag with 70 30 very

;

sickly,

two

died since they

arrived.

N. London, Dec.

A

25, '78.

172 American prisoners.

cartel arrived here

from N. Y. with

They were landed here and

Osoton

in

greater part sickly and in most deplorable condition, owing- chiefly to the ill-usage in the prison-ships,

and legs Col.

where numbers had

their feet

froze.

Magaw,

Lt.

Col

Kichline, Nich's Lutz, Maj. Aquilla Giles,

and Lt. Sam'l Dodge, who went home on parole, are ordered back to N. Y. by Loring, Oct 31, '78. Gaine, Jan. 18, '79. Jan. 15, '79. Riv.

Privateers arriving in N. Y. Harbor are to

Hope

put their prisoners on board the Good

or Prince of

J AS.

prison-ships.

Boston, Feb. 4, '79.

A

brought 136 prisoners from

cartel lately

Such was

London.

prison-ships in N. Y. to N.

Wales

DICK.

the condition in

which these poor creatures were put aboard the cartel, that in this short run, 16 died on board and 60, when they landed, were scarcely ;

The

able to move, and the remainder greatly emaciated.

inhumanity was experienced in a

Scotchman, had the superintendence.

There was but one small

on board.

fined at a time

In the short days of

begun

to be delivered out

served

till

half raw.

November and December,

till 1 1

At sunset the

3.

some had not

A.

fire

3VL, so that

was ordered

their food dressed at all

No

flour, oatmeal,

condition of infirm people,

fireplace to

cook

The allowance was moreover frequently

the food of such a number. delayed.

greatest

which one Nelson, a Upwards of 300 were con-

ship, of

;

were allowed

was not

to be quenched, so that

many were

and things of

it

the whole could not be

obliged to eat

it

like nature, suited to the

to the

many

sick

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;nothing

but ship-bread, beef, and pork.

N. London, June 1 6, '79. Our prisoners on board the prison-ships beyond description, being turned down in great numbers

eufFer

below decks, where they are compelled dirt,

H

to languish in stench ana*


230

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

N. Haven, June

23, '79.

200 prisoners were landed

in

N. Jersey

from the prison-ships. Sir Geo. Collier forbids privateers landing prisoners on L.

the

damage and annoyance of His Majesty's

I.,

to

Ju.

faithful subjects.

29, '79.

Aug. 23, '79. To be sold, the sails and rigging of the Good Hope. Masts, spars, and yards, good as new. Aug.

ship

Last week, 5 or 600 American prisoners ex-

18, '79.

changed.

A flag returned

here with 47 American prisoners, and though

taken out of the Good Hope prison-ship,

it

knowledged,

:

all

are very well and healthy

must

(for once) be ac-

only 150

left.

Aug.

25,

N. London.

'79.

N. London,

Sep.

1,

'79.

put in the Jersey prison-ship.

D. Stanton was taken, June

An

5,

and

allowance from Congress was

About 3 or 4 weeks past, we were removed on board Good Hope, where we found many sick. There is now a hos-

sent aboard. the

pital-ship provided, to

which they are removed, and good attention

paid.

Returned to

this

from N. Y., with a

port,

cartel,

Alex. Dickey, Commissary of Prisoners,

having on board 180 American prisoners.

Their countenances indicate they have undergone every conceivable inhumanity.

New

Boston, Sep. 2, '79.

London, Sep. 29,

'79.

A

Flag arrived here from N. Y.,

with 117 prisoners, chiefly from N. England.

N. J. Gaz., Oct. 12, '79. Last Wednesday morning, one o'clock, 9 Capts., among them Thos. Dring and Jas. Munroe, and 2 privates made their escape from the Good Hope, prison-ship, in the N. River.

They

confined the Mate, disarmed the sentinels, and hoisted out the

was on deck. They brought off 9 stand of arms and They had scarce got clear before the alarm was given, when they were fired on by 3 ships, but none were hurt. Capt.

boat which

ammunition.

Prince speaks in the highest terms of the commander of the prisonship, Capt. Nelson,

manity.

who

used the prisoners with a great deal of hu-


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. N. London, Feb. 16, '80. weeks ago escaped from the

231

who

15 prisoners arrived here, prison-ship in the E. River.

three

A num-

ber of others escaped about the same time from the same ship, some of whom being frost bitten and unable to endure the cold, were taken up and carried back, one frozen to death before he reached the shore.

Riv.,

Mar.

Last Sunday afternoon, the Good Hope,

8, '80.

was

prison-ship, lying in the Wallebocht Bay, after

bury,

having been wilfully set on

who

confessed the

fire

He

fact.

with others of the incendiaries

The

are removed to the Provost.

consumed,

entirely

by a Con't man, named Wood-

down

prisoners let each other

from the port-holes and decks into the water. Col.

John Ely and Capt. Ed. Bulkley,

in behalf of officers

in debt for clothing

paid to I

May

and sickness in the

Ap. 24,

lie

down

we

;

once

all at

hole that can be thought

beer while

though

I

are confined so that to sleep.

of.

I lay unpitied at

had money,

I

I

was

It is

sick,

and longed

was not permitted

his hat overboard,

small boat, which lay alongside. on, got into the boat. sentinel and

made

I

am just

some small I

it.

offered

able to creep about.

One

begged leave

A

having, as by ac-

to

go

after

it

in a

sentinel with only his side-arms

Having reached the

for the

for

send for

to

prisoners have escaped from this ship.

thrown

not room

The wretch who went forward

and backward would not oblige me. cident,

we have

the most horrible cursed

death's door, with a putrid fever, and

repeatedly a hard dollar for a pint.

Four

'80.

a prisoner on board the ship Falmouth, in N. Y., a

place the most dreadful

even to

are

Their board has been

fall.

last.

am now

pris-

They

oners at Flatbush, petition Gov. Trumbull for hard cash.

hat, they secured the

Jersey shore, though several armed boats

pursued, and shot was fired from the shipping.

Con. Gaz., May, 25,

Two young

men, brothers, belonging

prisoners, and sent

to a rifle corps,

The

on board the Jersey.

and in a few days became

delirious.

One

'80.

were made

elder took the fever,

night (his end

was

fast

approaching) he became calm and sensible, and lamenting his hard fate,

and the absence of

his mother,

begged

brother, with tears entreated the guard

for a little water.

to give

His

him some, but

in


INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

232 The

vain.

sick youth

was soon

in his last struggles,

when

his bro-

ther offered the guard a guinea, for an inch of candle, only that he

might see him

Even

die.

ing up his tears, "

this

please

if it

was refused. God that I ever

"

Now,"

regain

said he, dry-

my

liberty, I'll

enemy !" He regained his liberty, rejoined the army, and when the war ended, he had 8 large, and 127 small Capt. Talbot was removed to the notches on his rifle stock Provost or Jail, where he was locked up in a small room with 30 The dog in office, Cunningham, when Capt. T. and his prisoners. be a most

bitter

!

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

fellow prisoners entered the prison, and gave in their names, abused

and insulted them with the most indecent language. " Yes, I knew e many your family well your mother or sister has been my w ;

To

a good time."

army

Aye,

?

I

another, "

Was

thought as much.

not your brother in the rebel

The

d

d

Yankee was hung

few days since." The prisoners on board the Strombolo, in the N. River, having been irritated by ill treatment to rise one night on their guard, several in attempting to escape, were either as a spy a

A poor fellow lying on deck almost exhausted killed or wounded. by a mortal wound, begged of the Captain " for God's sake a little The Capt. applied a light to his face, water, for he was dying." d n you take that, you d and exclaimed, " What is it you, d rebel rascal !" and dashed his foot in the face of the dying man. !

!

Life of Silas Talbot, 127.

Gaz., June

N. Jmade their escape from the

Game, July

For

1, '80.

ship, Kitty, as they

35 Americans, including

4, '80.

now

five officers,

prison-ship at N. Y., and got safely sale,

lie at

off.

the remains of the Hospital prison-

the Wallebocht, with launch, anchors

and cables.

N. Haven, July in

20, '80.

Only three marine

prisoners,

'tis

said,

N. Y.

N.

J. Gaz.,

Aug.

23, '80.

from the Scorpion prison-ship, says

:

More

lenity is

shown

Capt. Grinnel, at

who made

his escape

N. Y., on the evening of the

the prisoners.

There are 200

1

5th,

in the

Strombolo, and 120 in the Scorpion.

Freneau,

sailor

and poet, was confined in the Scorpion in the prisoners, and has given a poetical account

N. River, 1780, with 300 of his treatment.


233

AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Chatham, N.

Nov.

J.,

Forty of our

'80.

8,

and 150

officers,

enemy) were exchanged

privates (prisoners with the

at Elizabeth-

Town. For

Riv., Dec. 6, '80.

Scorpion and Hunter

sale,

the hulls of his Majesty's sloops

and of the Strombolo

;

N. River, by order of the Naval Storekeeper.

fire-ship,

Washington's Letters on Treatment of Prisoners. Nov.

W.

23, '79.

treatment of prisoners

says the

now

lying in

[Not sold].

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sparks. is

more within

the line of humanity under Clinton.

Ap. 14,

Amboy,

Commissioners

'79.

officers, prisoners

Jan. 4, '80.

on L.

Cols.

oners at N. Y.)

came

July 10, '80.

W.

manity,

is

little to

our own.

for the

They then

but disagreed.

exchange of prisoners, met at a partial cartel for

tried

American

I.

Magaw,

Ely,

Matthews and Ramsay,

out on parole with

new

(yet pris-

propositions of exchange.

says, exchanges of prisoners, though urged by hu-

not politic.

would give

It

Few

force to the British,

and add but

of the American prisoners belong to the army,

and the enlistment of those who do,

is

Before Nov. 7, '80, 140 officers and

nearly expired. all

American

prisoners, in

N. Y.

(476) are exchanged.

Jan. 25, '81.

W.

writes to Arbuthnot, that the

American naval

N. Y., suffer all extremities of distress, from too crowded, disagreeable and unwholesome situation in prison-ships, and want of food and other necessaries. He wants a permit for an American officer

prisoners in

to visit

them.

Ap. 21,

'81.

conduct of

all

Arbuthnot

replies,

he has ordered a scrutiny into the

concerned in victualling and treatment of prisoners, and

Washington their testimony is true. Aug. 21. '81. W. complains to the British Commanding officer, at N. Y., of the inadequacy of room in prison-ships, there is room on shore, wishes an agent may be allowed to visit prison-ships, and report. Aug. 30, '81. Capt. Affleck replies that he feels for the distress of prisoners, and has endeavored to regulate the Hospital and prison-ships. assures

Tables of Diet are affixed grievances

;

their

an American

officer

can't be confined

;

officers visit

weekly, redress and report

numbers are thinned, when shipping can be provided,

may

witness the treatment of prisoners, but they

on shore.

Dec. 27, '81, and Mar. '82. complaints have been

made

W.

says, for above

two years past no

of treatment of land prisoners in

N. Y.


234 The

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS seamen

suffering of

some time past

for

arises mostly

from the want

of a general regulation, that no American privateers should set their prisoners free

;

whereas now the British prisoners enter the American

service, or are allowed to escape, so that the

balance of prisoners

is

against the Americans.

W.

Feb. 18, '82.

declines Sproat's proposition to

exchange British

American seamen, as it will give the British considerable reinforcement, and be a constant draft hereafter on prisoners of war in our hands. Few or none of the naval prisoners in N. Y. belong to the soldiers for

Continental service.

Captains of

all vessels,

public and private, should

throw their prisoners into common stock under the direction of a Commissary General of prisoners

and there are few

He was

it is

now, the greater part

prisoner on board the prison-ship at

condemned bread per day, and 8

oz. of

;

to free

came on board, and

recruiting officers

ing American officers persuaded the

was

dispersed,

The

told) to the Provost.

men

had a pint of water

hospital ship,

till

they were so

fore they got out of the Jersey.

ders were,

if

was

the ship took fire

find-

not to enlist, removed them

prisoners were tempted to enlist

themselves from confinement, hopeless of exchange.

prisoners

oz. of

afterwards put on board the Jersey, where were (as

supposed) 1,100 prisoners

(as he

is

for British prisoners.

who had been

Geo. Batterman,

N.Y., deposes that he had 8 meat.

as

;

exchange

to

for the day,

Dec. 5,

and sick not sent

to the

weak and ill, that they often expired The commanding officer said his

we

should be

all

beor-

turned below and perish

By accident the ship took fire in the steward's room, when the Hessian guards were ordered to drive the prisoners below, and fire among them if they resisted or got in the water. in the flames.

Riv., Dec. 19, '80. Riv., Feb. 7, '81. Sproat writes to Skinner, that very

on board the Jersey are sick and dying, but from

dirt, nastiness,

many

their disorders

and want of clothing.

On

the

first

prisoners

proceed only

complaint

about provisions, I went on board the prison-ship, wrote

down

made

in large-

hand on a folio sheet, the quantity of each kind of provisions allowed to prisoners, and caused it to be posted up in the most public place in the vesand I ordered when a sel, that each prisoner might get his full quantity :

cask of provisions was damaged, out.

When

I

it

should be headed up and not served

was appointed Commissary,

into the state of the prisoners and prison-ships not,

who

ordered

me

to

make

modation of the prisoners.

Oct.

13, '79, I

and reported

to

examined

Ad. Arbuth-

every necessary regulation for the accom-

Accordingly carpenters ran a bulkhead


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Good Hope

across the prison-ship

Two

before this partition.

same manner, and every

ding, surgeons.

the officers berthed abaft

;

and the

men

excellent large stoves were erected, one for

the officers, another for the

the

235

men. sick or

The hospital ship was equipped in wounded person had a cradle, bed-

In this comfortable situation did the prisoners remain

till

March 5, '80, when they wilfully burnt the best prison-ship in the world. The perpetrators were not hanged, but ordered to the Provost, (see p. 231). The ship lay in the Wallebocht, near a number of transports, whose people were so alert in snatching the prisoners from the flames, that but

They were

two out of some hundreds were missing.

ship the Woodlands, where they remained a short time

bolo and Scorpion were got ready.

The

officers

to parole in that pleasant village, Jamaica,

till

put in the nearest

till

the ships Strom-

were always admitted

July 10, '80,

of them had broke their paroles and otherwise behaved so refused them. This alteration had not taken place above the prisoners were

all

moved

to the ship Jersey,

when many

ill,

that

it

was

two months when

where there

is

a variety

and plenty of room between decks for men. I have offered to exchange prisoners man for man, but if Congress retaliate, it will only hurry on the miseries of the American prisoners faster than of apartments for

officers,

Congress are aware to the test

who

is

of,

and

in a short time put the

honor of every

man

Riv., Jan. 29, '81.

out on parole.

Peter Robinson, acting purser of His Majesty's prison-ship, the Jersey,

maketh

oath, that he has acted as purser, during the time she

has been employed as a prison-ship, and that the allowance to each oner

for

one week

is

66

oz.

of bread, 43 oz. of beef, 92 oz.pork,

1%

pris-

pint

of peas, 2 pints of oatmeal, and 8 oz. butter, which quantity of provisions hath been and

still is

served out to each prisoner (by daily allow-

ances) every week, without any deduction, for eighths or otherwise, and that such provisions have always been the

same

in goodness

and quality,

as were supplied to the crews of His Majesty's said hospital ship, and the other King's ships on the

American

Gaine, Feb. 12, '81.

station.

Jeremiah Downer maketh oath, that he commanded His Majesty's prison-ship the Strombolo, in the harbor of 10, 1780, (provisions as above,)

fined

on board, was never

less

N. Y., from Aug. 21,

than 150

at

Gaine, Feb. 12, '81.

Jersey was a large and roomy vessel, once had carried 64

guns, but ports

Dec.

one time, and frequently

above 200: and only one died in that time.

The

to

and that the number of prisoners con-

now was

stripped and reduced to a

naked hulk.

were close shut, which prevented any current of

air

All her

between


238

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

decks, where the prisoners were all shut down from sunset to sunrise, and during these melancholy hours all intercource with the upper deck was prohibited. The guards were forbid on pain of severe pun-

ishment, to relieve the wants of any distressed prisoner.

She was

anchored in a solitary nook, called the Wallebocht, where at low water her rotten remains are still to be seen, 1803. At the time I

was on

board, there were about 1,100 prisoners, no berths to

benches to

sit

on

;

many

almost without clothes.

pleurisy, and despair prevailed.

The

lie in,

scantiness and bad quality of

provisions, the brutality of the guards,

and the sick pining for com-

forts they could not obtain, altogether furnished the greatest

of

human

distress ever beheld.

or

Dysentery, fever,

The weather was

scene

cool and dry, the

nights frosty, so that the

number of deaths were reduced to an average of 10 per day, which was small compared with the mortality months

for three

before.

ing on the shore of L. the

I.,

The human bones and skulls yet bleachand daily exposed by the falling down of

high bank, on which the prisoners were buried,

ing sight.

is

a shock-

Talbot, p. 106.

I was one of the 850 souls confined in the Jersey, in the summer of '81, and witnessed several daring attempts to escape. They

generally ended tragically. night, after

wrenching or

They were always undertaken

filing the

bars of the port-holes.

been on board several weeks, and goaded four of us concluded to run the hazard. the bars

off,

and waited impatiently

twenty yards

bow and

We

pier- head,

There were two guard

distant.

set to ;

work and got

we lay

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the

first

two were lowered

in front

and not more than sloops,

one on our

the other off our quarter, a short distance from us.

dark night" came

ways,

to death in various

for a dark night

of Mr. Remsen's door, inside of the

in the

Having

"

The

quietly into the water

third made some rumbling. I was the fourth that descended, but had not struck off from the vessel before the guards were alarmed, and fired upon us. The alarm became general, and I was

immediately hauled on board. their lights

They manned their boats, and with and implements of death, were quick in pursuit of the un-

fortunates, cursing and swearing,

awful to witness

this

on board trembling to

their

rebels.

and bellowing and

scene of blood.

for our shipmates.

It lasted

firing.

It

about one hour

was

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

all

These desperadoes returned

different vessels rejoicing that they

killed three d

d


— AND PRISONS-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. About three years near Nassau, I could

who

me " Is

not recollect him.

immediately said to him, "

I

We both

replied.

thus it

:

"

possible

in John street, Manley, how do you do ?"

you do not know me

?

re-

and he opened his vest and bared his breast.

collect the old Jersey,"

he

saw a gentleman

after this, I

accosted

237

You

" I

James McClean."

are

am,"

stepped into Marrener's public house, at the

corner, and he related his marvellous escape to me. " I

They pursued me

came

up, they fired

frequently dived to evade them, and

I

on me.

my

dove again, and held

caught

I

breath,

till

I

my

crawled along on the mud.

They no doubt thought they had killed me. exertion, though weak and wounded, made and got

into a barn, not far

The

Remsen's house. barn

—saw me

him

to

I

come

was from

wounds

;

to

—how

from the ship, a

did.

I

little

me

me

me

;

came

into his I

several others.

begged

—where

He saw my my me into his

sent for his wife, and bound up

in the barn

secretly,

much

north from Mr.

gave an account of myself

was pursued, with

I

took pity on

—nursed

however, with

lying on the floor, and ran out in a fright.

wounds, and kept house

I,

out to reach the shore,

farmer, the next morning,

me, and he

when

breath, and immediately

till

nightfall

—took

and then furnished

me

with clothing,

was restored, he took me with him, into his market boat, to this city, and went with me to the west part of the city procured me a passage over to Bergen, and I landed somewhere in &c. and when ;

Communipaw. then of

all

I

worked

my

I

Some

my

friends helped

way,

until I

me

across

Newark Bay, and

reached Baltimore, to the great joy

friends."

JNO. New-York, September

Wm.

1st,

Burke says (N. Y.,May, 1808)

the Jersey 14 months

;

death by the bayonet.

time to go on deck.

has It

One

bled at the grate at the their turn to

that he

was a prisoner

known many American

hatchway

to obtain fresh air, and waiting his bayonet

them, and 25 next morning were found to be dead.

down among This was the

when sometimes 5, sometimes 6, and somewounds thus received.

times 8 or 10, were found dead by

Hist, of the Martyrs, p. 89.

11*

in

prisoners put to

was the custom for but one prisoner at a night while many prisoners were assem-

go on deck, a sentinel thrust

case several mornings,

MANLEY.

1845.


INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

238

N. London, Jan. 30, '81. Thirty American prisoners came They left 170 in the prison-ship sick, and 200

a flag from N. Y.

another ship

The gun

Scorpion, Hunter, Strombolo, and Jersey, were

ship

same time within 7 months.

Feb.

used for the reception of prisoners

is

in

7 or 8 died every 24 hours.

;

ships at the

in

The

allowed to go ashore to buy provisions.

21 to Dec. 10,

'81,

4, '81.

all

An

prison-

Strombolo, from Aug.

had never less than 150 prisoners on board

Game, Feb.

ener over 200.

64

old

2 or 3 of each rank

;

;

oft-

12, '81.

Capt. Cahoon, with 4 others, escaped from the prison-ship to L. 1.

in a boat,

March

8,

notwithstanding they were fired on from the

prison and hospital ships, and pursued by guard-boats from three in

the afternoon

till

left

200 prisoners

Conn. Jour., Mar. 22,

Chatham, flour

He

seven in the evening.

N. Y.

May

9, '81.

Our

in

'81.

prisoners are allowed only 6 oz.

They took

and same quantity of pork (often very bad) per day.

250 prisoners out of prison-ship and put them on board a man-ofwar.

1100 French and American prisoners died

last winter.

Conn, paper, May,

'81.

Extract of a letter dated on board the Jersey (vulgarly called

HELL) PRISON SHIP, New-York, Aug. " There

is

Our

before me.

10, 1781.

nothing but death or entering into the British service ship's

company

is

reduced to the small number (by

There

death and entering into the British service) of 19. tial

arrived and brought 11 prisoners, and the

cartel

many [American ber, sent

prisoners to be exchanged] as

from Boston by somebody

that way,

though there

widows and

to th?

all,

on Boston, and

and d

many such

fatherless children

sary told us one and fault lays

is

;

makes up

窶馬 the

all.

number of 400 men,

we might

all

a par-

that

num-

villain that trades

in Boston, that are

a curse on them

;

is

names of so

making

The Commisthat the

whole

be exchanged, but they never

I am not able to give you even the outlines of my much I will inform you, that we bury 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, men every day we have 200 more sick and falling sick

cared about us. exile

and

;

1 1

but thus

every day

:

;

the sickness

is

the yellow fever, small-pox, and in short

every thing else that can be mentioned. I had almost forgotten to

you

that our morning's salutation

is,

tell

'Rebels! turn out your dead!'

"


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Chatham, N. of

J., Sep. 5, '81.

They

our prisoners.

all

There has been an

received

flesh,

1 lb.

2

239

The

very bad,) and a pint of rice per man, for 3 days. ers taken at Ft. Griswold

were confined

Barber's Conn., p. 287, 309.

— Sep.

in the

Nov.

Fishkill,

1, '81.

A number I.,

of officers returned on

A flag

17, '81.

They

of truce returned here from

(Names of

sick.

off"

by Ar-

some from the

are chiefly from the prison ships, and

Sugar House, and are mostly

Mon-

by way of N. Jersey.

N. Y. with 132 prisoners, with the rest of those carried nold.

See

All our prisoners here

11, '81.

Couranl.

day from a tedious captivity on L.

N. London, Nov.

prison-

Sugar House.

the Sugar House.

left

exchange

entire

lbs. bread, (often

sick and dead fol-

low.)

Dec. 14,

A Flag from White Stone,

'81.

waited 10 days, and re-

turned without answer or prisoners. Alex. Coffin,

jr.,

was put

Conn, paper.

1100 prisoners in a most deplorable manity had

Yankee

where he found Every spark of hu-

in the Jersey in '82, situation.

"

fled the breast of British officers.

rascals,"

was common language.

You

tion

hammocks and kept

fed with putrid beef and pork

—d

rebellious

many

prison-

To keep warm

ers had scarcely clothes to cover their nakedness.

they stayed below, lay in their

d

In winter

in constant

mo-

and worm-eaten bread the scent ;

of the water would have discomposed the olfactory nerves of a Hottentot.

Hogs were fed on

deck, and the prisoners would scoop bran from

the troughs with their tin pots.

A second time he went in the Jersey,

Feb. and March, '83, and though absent but a few months, he found

more prisoners than he had left but four of his former fellow-prisoners some had got away, but most had died. There were so many prisoners in the Jersey, that 2 or 300 were sent aboard the John, Transport, converted into a prison-ship. Treatment here much worse for a month no fire to cook food thinks prisoners were poisoned. One Gavot of R. I. died, (as was supposed,) and being sewed up in his hammock, was carried on deck the hammock ;

;

;

moved. with him

A ;

seaman if

he

is

said that

man

is

not dead, the officer replied, " in

not dead, he soon will be."

however, ripped open, and the of rain during the night.

man

alive

!

The hammock was,

revived perhaps by a dash

Hist, of Martyrs, p. 28, 37.


— 240

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

N. London, Jan. 4, '82. 130 prisoners landed here from N. Y., Dec. 3d, in most deplorable condition great part since dead, and the ;

survivors so debilitated, that they will drag out a miserable exist-

ence. It is enough to melt the most obdurate heart to see these miserable objects landed at our wharves, sick and dying, and the few

rags they have on, covered with vermin and their

Many

Philadelphia, Feb. 20, '82.

on board the prison-ships

in the

the late extreme weather, for

N. London,

May

own

excrements.

of our unfortunate prisoners

East River, have perished during

want of fuel and other

necessaries.

1000 of our countrymen remain

3, '82.

prison-ships at N. Y., a great part in close confinement for 6

and in a most deplorable condition.

past,

past five or six months, 300 sick lease, are entering the British

;

in

months

500 have died during the

many

seeing no prospect of re-

service to elude the

contagion with

which the prison-ships are fraught. The sloop Chance was taken to N. Y., May 15, '82. Of 57 men, 17 died in 7 weeks 8 in the hospital 25 arrived sick at Pro;

;

vidence

—only 3 or 4 could walk.

To Abm. Skinner Sir

—His

Nov.

2, '80.

New-York, June

1,'82.

Fishkill,

:

Excellency Rear Admiral Digby, has ordered

me

to

in-

form you that the very great increase of prisoners, and heat of the wea-

now

our care and attention to keep them healthy. Five been taken up for their reception, to prevent their being crowded, and a great number permitted to go on parole. In winter and ther,

baffles all

ships have

during cold weather, they lived comfortably, being fully supplied with

warm

clothing, blankets,

&c,

from the charitable of the city

purchased with the money ;

but

now

I

collected

the weather requires a fresh

supply, something light and suitable for the season, for which you will

be pleased to

make

the necessary provision, as

to be healthy in the rags they

now

To David

ers

:

—From the present

on board your

impossible for them shift

of cloth-

Spj'oat.

NewYork, June 9, 1782. American naval prisonam induced to propose to you the

situation of the

prison-ships, I

exchange of as many of them as f or,

is

DAVID SPROAT.

ing to keep them clean.

Sir

it

wear, without a single

I

can give you British naval prisoners

leaving the balance already due you to be paid

when

in our


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK.

(Upwards of 1300 naval prisoners have been sent more We are unable, at present, to give you received.)

power. than

241

we have

seamen

for

seamen, and thereby relieve the prison-ships of their

dreadful burden

but

;

it

ought

remembered, that there

to be

a large

is

Ed.] of British soldiers due the

balance [Sproat says only 245.

U. S. since February last, and we may be disposed to place the British soldiers in our possession, in as disagreeable a situation as

men

these

are.

on board the prison-ships.

ABM. SKINNER. [Sproat replies, June

Skinner

9,

Sproat, respecting published Letters.

to

Camp Sir

*

:

*

Ed.]

and refuses a partial exchange.

The

'82.

Highlands, Ju. 24,

design of the British

is,

by misrepresenting

the state of facts with regard to exchanges, to excite jealousy in the

minds of our unfortunate seamen, that they are neglected by countrymen, that

all

the miseries they are

want of

inclination in

power

in

;

hopes by

Gen.

W.

compel them

inevitable death)

suffering, arise

their

from

exchange them when he has the and by the severity you make

this insinuation

use of in confining them ships, to

to

now

the

in

contaminated holds of prison-

(to avoid the dreadful alternative of almost

King of Great

to enter into the service of the

was present when Capt. Aborn and Dr. Bowen waited on Gen. Washington. He told them that exchanging seamen for soldiers, was contrary to the original agreement, which specified Britain.

that

I

officers

should

be exchanged for

diers, citizens for citizens,

officers,

soldiers

and seamen for seamen

trary to the practice of other nations,

;

as

it

for

sol-

was con-

and would be contrary

to the

soundest policy, by giving the enemy a great and permanent strength, for

which we could receive no compensation, or at best, but a partial but as did not think it would be admissible

and temporary one, he

;

the misery and mortality which prevailed

was produced almost closely

many to

entirely

crowded in infectious

years,)

remedy the

by the mode of confinement, being (which had not been cleaned for

to

Ad. Digby, in whose power

by confining them on shore, or having a

number of

ships provided

to confine

800 men

to shut

the naval prisoners

ships,

he would write evil,

among

in

;

one

for

it

was

it

was

sufficient

as preposterously cruel, he said,

ship, at this sultry season, as

up the whole army of Lord Cornwallis

it

would be

to perish in the

new


INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

242 jail

of Philadelphia

we

;

which he should not

had the means of

hesitate to use,

suffered into the

A

for their liberation or relief.

been due us since Feb. in,

our hands,

much severity as our seamen were held. His Ex. (W.) me to go to N. Y., (see my letter, June 9th,) to examine ground of the suffering of the prisoners and devise some way

with as

sent

retaliation in

by confining the land prisoners

you

(not 250, as

balance of 495 land prisoners has

'82, besides

which,

400 had been

I believe

falsely state in a note to

my

Not-

letter.)

withstanding this balance, I was then about sending in your lines, a

number of

land prisoners, as an equivalent for ours confined in the

Sugar-house, without which liberated.

which

I

I

could not

was refused permission

make

interest to

to visit the

have them

prison-ships, for

can conceive no other reason than your being ashamed to

I

who

have these graves of our seamen seen by one

dared to repre-

sent the horrors of them to his countrymen. 8, '82.

Gaine, July Sprout

When Digby for

to

Skinner, N. Y., June 30, '82.

met

the Commissioners

offered to

at Elizabethtown, April 1st,

exchange American seamen

man, because you had not

give in exchange for your own,

when

of keeping them healthy

a sufficient

for British

number

of British

and because he foresaw the hot season

came on

the British sailors

much crowded

phia, as

and

soldiers

to

the impossibility ;

cooped up in the

but this gener-

jail at

Call to Philadel-

as the prison-ships are, fed on a scanty allow-

ance of dry, stinking clams, and bread and water only, to enter

man

seamen

ous proposal was rejected by Washington's Commissioners.

mind

Admiral

soldiers,

to

compel them

on board your privateers.

Six masters of vessels, captured by British cruisers, were paroled,

and requested Surgeon,

who

possible for

to visit the prison-ships in

report

them

22, '82), and

:

to be

That they found on board of

much more

the provisions good

:

company with Sproat and

the

the prisoners as comfortable as is

ships, this season of the year, (June

so than they

had any idea of; and found

all

which survey being made before the prisoners,

they acknowledged the same, and declared they had no complaint to

make, but the want of clothes and a speedy exchange : We therefore, from this Report, and from what we have all seen and know, do declare that great commendation is due His Ex. Rear Ad. Digby for his humane disposition and indulgence to the prisoners and to the officers and Capt. ;

of His Majesty's piison-ship Jersey, for their attention in preserving


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK.

243

good order, having the ship kept clean and awnings spread over the whole of her, fore and

aft

to Dr.

;

Rutherford and his mates, for their constant

whom we

care and attendance on the sick,

awnings

ships, also covered with

a cradle, bed, and sheets, to lay in bles,

that

and

fore ;

found in wholesome clean

aft,

man

every

furnished with

the best of fresh provisions, vegeta-

wine rice, barley, &c, served out to them and we further declare, Mr. Sproat and the gentlemen acting under him, conscientiously ;

duty with great humanity and indulgence

do

their

we

freely give without constraint.

:

which testimony

Gaine,July 1,'82.

[This Report, doubtless drawn up by Sproat, was signed merely to

and with a view of obtaining

gratify the British authorities

when once

Ed.]

story.

Washington

to

Ad. Digby. Head-Quarters, Ju.

Sir

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;By

and Bovven, to

come

I

perceive your excellency has granted them permission

me

to

with a representation of the sufferings of the naval

made

plication is

As

to

me

I

have no agency on naval matters,

on mistaken grounds.

to inquire into the nature

and cause of

formed that the principal complaint

This circumstance, your excellency, of war,

I

their sufferings, I

am

on board of foul and

where disease and death are almost

am

this ap-

curiosity leading in-

in-

inevitable.

persuaded needs only to be mentioned to

which

in

your power only

and which humanity so strongly prompts.

If the fortune

sir,

your hands,

to

obtain that redress

is

has thrown a number of these miserable people into I

am

certain your excellency's feelings for your fellow

men, must induce you fined

But

that of their being crowded,

is,

especially at this season, in great numbers, fectious prison-ships,

to afford,

5, '82.

a parole granted to two gentlemen, Messrs. Aborn

prisoners at N. Y.

me

liberty, for

out of the reach of the enemy, the captains told a different

to proportion the ships (if they

must be con-

on board ships) to their accommodation and comfort, and not

by crowding them together in a few

ships, bring

on disorders which

consign them by half-dozens in a day to the grave. his Britannic Majesty, prisoners with us,

crowded together

in close

The

were they

and confined prisons,

soldiers of

to be equally

at this season,

would

be exposed to equal loss and misery.

Digby his,

Washington's feelings are like

replies, (IV. Y., Ju. 8,) that if

he will not hesitate one

Americans

moment

relieving both the

suffering under confinement.

British

Gaine, July 8, '82.

and


244

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

N. London, June

21, '82.

Sir

Guy

Carlton has visited

the

all

prison-ships at N. Y., minutely examined into the situation of the prisoners,

and expressed

They were

for.

his intention of

having them better provided

on Black well's Island

to be landed

in the daytime,

during the hot season.

A

Cartel returned to Stonington with 40 naval prisoners from N.

Many

Y.

are sick with the prison fever and small-pox. JV.

Aug.

We

15, '82.

New

are

now

London, July 26,

prisoners with the British,

in

Jail

or Provost,

some

mouth, others

in the brig

Lord Dunluce, and others on Blackwell's

the

Though Mr. Sproat

Island.

in the Jersey ship,

we

many things money and clothing,

suffer for

[not in the province of the Commissary] such as

our dear

all,

liberty.

Let us urge our friends

We

seriously of our situation and get us exchanged.

supplied with medicines and good doctors, yet so

gether this season, to

we

in the Fal-

furnishes us with the King's allow-

ance of choice beef, pork and bread, yet but most of

some

'82.

some

are sickly, and

many

many

to think

are

well

of us are to-

We must first look

die.

our parents, and connections, then to our employers, Captains and

friends,

urging their doing every thing to get our releasement

not mind the expense.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; (100 signers.)

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; do

Conn. Gaz.

Letter from a Privateer Officer on board the Jersey.

Nov.

The

vost, but they

am

left

The

9, '82.

pressed.

deplorable condition I

Capts., Lts.

am

in,

cannot be ex-

and sailing-masters are gone to the Pro-

have only got out of the frying pan into the

fire.

here with about 700 miserable objects, eaten up with

I

lice,

and daily taking fevers which carry them off fast. Jan. 29,

'83.

Carlton, in his great clemency, has paroled near

100 marine prisoners, 60 of Boston,

my

March

whom came By

17, '83.

cartel

to Elizabethtown.

from N. Y.

we

learn the ene-

have burnt their prison-ship and set the prisoners on shore. Soldiers' cribs, boards,

&c,

for sale

Riv.,

Aug.

16, '83.

For

at the

Brick Meeting, and

Gaine, Nov. 12,

Friend's Meeting, Queen-St. sale, the

and Bristol Packet," Prison Hospital Ships, as they Wallebocht.

'83.

Hulls of the "Perseverance

now

lie

at the


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

!

245

AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. Fishkill,

Tell

it

May

To

8, '83.

and

to the world,

all

let

it

Printers of public Neiospavers.

be published in every Newspaper

throughout America, Europe, Asia and Africa, to the everlasting disgrace and infamy of the British King's commanders at New-York :

That during the

war,

late

said,

it is

11.644 American prisoners have

suffered death by their inhuman, cruel, savage and barbarous usage

and malignant British prison-ship, called the Jer-

on board the

filthy

sey, lying at

N. Y.

fall

on your

isle, for

Britons tremble, lest the vengeance of

Heaven

the blood of these unfortunate victims

AN AMERICAN. [The above paragraph is the original source of all the reports of numbers who perished in the prison ships. What number all is rumor and conjecture, whethdied, cannot be even guessed at the vast

;

er

it

was

11,500, or half that number.

Ed.]

David Sproat, Esq., formerly merchant

at Philadelphia,

pointed Oct. '79, Commissary of naval prisoners, died Oct. at his

Joshua Loring, formerly Com. Gen. of prisoners

1799,

Life, Confession,

was executed

in

North Amer-

1789, aged 45.

and

last

dying Words of Capt. Cunningham,

formerly British Provost-Marshal in

I,

1,

house in Kirkcudbright, Scotland, aged 64.

ica, died at Englefield,

The

and ap-

the City of

New-York, who

in London, the 10th August, 1791.

William Cunningham, was born

My

in

Dublin Barracks, in the

was Trumpeter in the Blue Dragoons and at the age of eight years I was placed with an officer as his servant, in which station I continued until I was sixteen, and being a great proficient in horsemanship, was taken as an assistant to the riding master of the troop, and in 1761, was made sergeant of dragoons but the peace* coming the year following, I was disbanded. Being year 1738.

father

;

;

bred to no profession,

I

took up with a

woman who

kept a gin shop,

Quay, but the house being searched doxy taken to Newgate, I thought it pru-

in a blind alley, near the Cole

my

for stolen goods,

and

dent to decamp

accordingly

;

I set off for

Drogheda, where, in a few months

an exciseman, by

removed

to

whom

I

had three sons.

Newry, where

I

the North, and arrived at

after, I

commenced

married the daughter of

About the year 1772, we the profession of scaw-


246

INCICENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS

banker, which

is

that of enticing mechanics

and country people to

ship themselves for America, on promise of great advantage, and then artfully getting

an indenture upon them,

their arrival in

America, they were

of years for their passage.

ham,

embarked

I

consequence of which on

in

sold, or obliged to

Newry,

at

serve a term

in the ship

Need-

New-York, and arrived at that port the 4th day of August, 1774,f with some indented servants I had kidnapped in Ireland but they were liberated in New-York, on account of the bad usage they for

;

had received from

me

during the passage.

In that city I used the

profession of breaking horses and teaching ladies and gentlemen to ride

;

but, rendering

myself obnoxious^ to the citizens in their infant

struggle for freedom, I

was

obliged to fly on board the Asia man-of-

war, and from thence to Boston, where

my own

opposition to the

measures pursued by the Americans in support of their the

thing that recommended

first

and when the war commenced,

me

to the notice of

rights,

was

Gen. Gage

;

was appointed Provost-MarshalJ to the Royal army, which placed me in a situation to wreak my venI

I shudder to think of the murders I have and without orders from Government, eswhile in New- York, during which time there were more than

geance on the Americans. been accessory pecially

to,

both with

2000 prisoners starved in tions,

which I

sold.

the different churches,

by slopping their ra-

There were also 275 American prisoners and

||

obnoxious persons executed, out of all which number there were only about one dozen public executions, ichich chiefly consisted of British

and Hessian

deserters.

The mode for

private executions

was thus

conducted: a guard was dispatched from the Provost, about half past twelve at night, to the

Barrack

street,

and

the

barracks, to order the people to shut their their lights, forbidding

them

at the

neighborhood of the upper

window

same time

to

shutters,

presume

and put out

to look

out of

windows and doors on pain of death,^ after which the unfortunate prisoners were conducted, gagged, just behind the upper barracks, their

and hung without ceremony, and the Provost.

At the end of

there buried by the black pioneer of

the war, I returned to

England with the

army, and settled in Wales, as being a cheaper place of living than in

any of the populous

London,

I entered so

soon found

mortgaged

cities

warmly

;

but being

at

length persuaded to go to

into the dissipations of that capital, that I

my circumstances much embarrassed, to relieve which I my half pay to an army agent but that being soon ex;


— AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. pended,

I

forged a draft for

£300

but being detected in presenting

and convicted, and

tried

minious death.

I

for acceptance, I

am

for that offence

beg the prayers of

pardon and forgiveness of God

been accessory

on the Board of Ordnance,

sterling,

it

for the

all

was apprehended,

here to suffer an igno-

good Christians, and also

many

horrid murders I have

to.

Wm. [*

The war

247

Cunningham.

against Spain began 1762, and ended the same or next

year. Riv.,

t

vers, with

Aug.

4, '74.

Yesterday arrived the Needham, Capt. Chee-

300 passengers, from Newry.

The

times of servants of both

sexes to be disposed of [to pay for their passage.]

March 9, '75. Cunningham and John Hill went among the who seized and draggpd him to the Liberty-pole, and would have forced him to go down on his knees and d n his popish Riv.,

X

" Liberty boys,"

King George, had he not been rescued by

the police.

He had ample

opportunity of avenging this affront after he was appointed Provost

Marshal.

Wm. Jones

§

was Gage's Provost Marshal

till

1775,

when

his

name

no longer appears.

Common

j|

fame charges Cunningham with

selling, and

even poison-

ing prisoners' food, exchanging good for bad provisions, and drawing " He fed the dead and their rations after death, or as they worded it :

starved the living." list

It

was not

till

the spring of 1783, that a

monthly

of prisoners was printed in Rivington's Gazette. IT

hung

In Watson's Annals of five or six of a night,

New- York,

it is

stated that

Cunningham

and that the women of the neighborhood,

Howe

pained by the prisoners' cries for mercy, petitioned

to

have

this

practice discontinued.

All the dates, historical and local allusions, in this confession, as far as I

know, are

correct

;

which would almost

in the startling disclosures prisoners.

The

referring to the

it

question of

makes of the its

incline

secret

any one

to put faith

murdering of American

genuineness can be put at rest only by

London newspapers

or the records of

Newgate.

It

was

printed in a Philadelphia paper towards the close of 1791, (about the

time

it

would probably reach there from England,) and

just received

from London, and "

is

authentic."

into the Boston papers, but does not appear to

tention.

Ed.]

is

Thence

spoken of as

it

was copied

have attracted much

at-


248

INCIDENTS OP THE BRITISH PRISONS

Ritter, a

Quaker

Cunningham, when

preacher, says

visiting the

prisons, carried his large key, and

was offended

knocked any one on the head he Ritter was often beat and bruised severely with

with.

Cunningham

the butt-end of his whip.

There appears N. Y.,

few

acted with peculiar bursts of

when he had heard bad news.

passion

to

have been no systematic plan of the citizens of

for relieving the prisoners.

We

have scattering notices of a such as the following Mrs. Deborah

charitable individuals,

:

Franklin was banished from N. Y., Nov. 21, '80, by the British com-

mandant, for her unbounded

Ann Mott was

lieving the suffering of lution

John

;

in

;

American prisoners

Fillis died at Halifax,

American prisoners

American prisoners Mrs. Todd and Mrs. Whilten in re-

liberality to

associated with Mrs.

N. Y.

;

in

N. Y., during the revo-

1792, aged 68.

He was

kind to

Jacob Watson, Penelope Hull,

&c,

are also mentioned.

The

burials

small hole was

from the prison-ships, were thus conducted

dug

A

:

at the foot of the hill, the bodies cast in,

and

the hill upon them. Many were some on the farm. The whole shore from Rennie's Point to Mr. Remsen's dooryard was a place of graves, as was the slope of the hill near the house, (dug down by Mr. Jack-

covered by shovelling sand

buried in a ravine of the

son,

when he

down

hill

;

got the bones for the procession) and the shore from

Mr. R.'s barn along the Mill-pond,

to Rapalje's farm,

and the sandy

between the flood-gates and the mill-dam, while a few were

island

buried

on the east shore of the Wallebocht.

More than

half the

dead buried outside the Mill-pond (see map) were washed out by the waves at high tide, during N. E. winds.

Their bones lay ex-

posed along the beach (drying and bleaching in the sun, and whiten-

ing the shore)

when them

till

reached by the violence of a succeeding storm,

as the agitated waters receded, the bones into the deep.

The

were washed with

prisoners in the Jersey had obtained a

crowbar which was kept concealed in the berth of some trusty

and used

to break

off port-gratings in

who were good swimmers

thus escaped.

stormy nights.

A

officer,

number

Cap. Doughty, had charge

of this bar while a prisoner, and escaped by this means.

Gen. Johnson.

The

long detention of prisoners on board the prison-ships must

in part at least be attributed to the Americans themselves.

Our


AND PRISON-SHIPS AT NEW-YORK. privateers captured

them

to

exchange

to enlist, as

ships

:

many

British seamen,

for our

was generally

countrymen

249

and should have retained

in captivity, but

when

willing

the case, they were received on board our

and even those brought in port were suffered

on account of the expense of maintaining them

till

to

go

at large,

they could be ex-

changed. British account of the mortality of Prisoners.

P. Dobbyn, master of a transport, thus writes from N. York, Jan. 15, '77

We

;

had 4 or 500 prisoners on board our ships, but

they had such bad distempers, that each ship buried 10 or 12 a day.

Another writer (Jan. rican prisoners, in N.

Y.

who

14, '77,) says, the

Howe

city.

Churches are

full

of

Ame-

died so fast, that 25 or 30 are buried at a time,

gave

all

who

could walk their liberty, after

taking their oath, not to take up arms against His Majesty.

Mid. {London) Journal.

The

prisoners taken in the hot

only the lightest off the chill of a

among them,

to

month of August, 1776, had on

summer clothing, and this was all they had to keep The dysentery had also prevailed December night which now was added the small-pox and other pri!

son diseases.

One Schureman and Lawrence taken at N. Brunswick, once They were fed by Philip Kissick,

broke out of the Sugar House.

and bribing the keeper for the privilege of the yard, they gave the guard liquor drugged with laudanum. They dug through a wall and escaped

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;found

a fishing-boat in the upper part of the

city,

paddled over the river, and went to Morristown.

Eager''s Hist, of Orange Co., p. 155. Jos.

Hedden, of Newark, an ardent Whig, had eluded the

ance of the refugees for some time, but being he returned to

his family.

He was

afflicted

vigil-

with the gout

taken from his bed in the month

of January, 1780, and on one of the coldest nights ever known, was forced to walk 10 miles without shoes or stockings (his feet wrapped in flannel

on account of his disorder) over the snow and

ice,

with-

out any garment except a bed blanket on his shoulders, to the Sugar

House,

N. Y., where he remained

in

tinguished. fered

him

He was

till

the lamp of

life

was ex-

not allowed to accept of another blanket of-

at the Ferry.


— 250

INCIDENTS OF THE BRITISH PRISONS.

For a further account of the life,

discipline, daily routine of prison

curious adventures, escapes, anecdotes,

&c,

the reader

is

re-

ferred to Recollections of the Jersey Prison Ship, by Capt. Thos.

Bring, Providence, R. L, 1829. Thos. Andros, Boston, 1833.

Boston, 1838. ton, Vt., 1846.

the

Captive,

by

Narrative of Col. Ethan Allen's Captivity, Burling-

TJie Interment of the

prisoners at the Wallebocht,

on

The Old Jersey

Life of Ebenezer Fox, of Roxbury,

Prison Ship.

remains of 11,500 American

New-York, 1808; and Freneau's Poem


APPENDIX Forms

of orders, tfc, issued in the Revolution.

Jamaica, 29, Aug., 1776. Permit Isaac Bennet

to pass

and repass without molestation.

WILL. ERSKINE, Pursuant to His Excellency Sir 17th July, 1777 to carry to

plied

;

Permission

is

Wm. Howe's

Brig.

Gen.

Proclamation of the

Van Nostrand, He having com-

hereby given to Aaron

Jamaica across the Ferry one bush.

salt.

with the directions contained in the above-mentioned Procla-

mation.

New-York, Superintendent's

Office, Sep.

29th, 1777.

JOHN NUGENT, Dep. To

Superintend.

the Officers attending. Office

The highways

in

of Police, Jamaica, Ap. 18, 1781.

Kings and Queens Cos. requiring immediate

re-

work necessary and covering them with earth, to

pairs, the several overseers are directed to set about this

without delay, and by laying fascines

render the sloughs passable the ensuing season.

JAS.

CREIGHTON,

Office of Police,

Aaron Van Nostrandt

is

directed forthwith to

of Jamaica, in the district that usually

Flushing, and set them to order.

Those who

making a

work on

16th Aug., 1781.

warn

the

Clerk.

the inhabitants

highway leading to

work on said highway, and put it into good work after being properly warned, and not

refuse to

sufficient excuse,

he

is to

agreeably to the former order of this

fine 8s. for

each day's neglect,

office.

DAVID COLDEN,

Ass. Sup't.


252

APPENDIX. Office

of Police, Jamaica, Oct. 16, 1782.

Aaron Van Nostrandt, Marshal of

this office, is

of the weight and quality of bread in this visit the several

appointed inspector

town, with directions to

bake-houses once a week, for the purpose of examining

the bread.

GEO. D. South Hempstead, Queens Co.

These are

1776, before the troops landed on L.

and Col.

Cornell

oxen and a

five

came

I.,

LUDLOW,

Sup't.

to certify that in the

year

a certain Col. Benj. Birdsall

to Jos. Pettet's,

and took away one pair of

year old steer.

SAM'L PETTET,

Executor.

Hempstead, Nov. 26, 1776. To Mr. Ashley; Sir: Please to pay the bearer, Mr. Sam'l Pettet, the money due for my wagon and horses for

38 days

charge in

in

full

His Majesty's service, and his receipt shall be your dis-

from your humble servant.

CHRISTIAN SNEDECOR. Hempstead, Nov. 20, 1776. Sam'l Pettet, the money due

Sir:

for

—Be

my wagon

pleased to pay the bearer,

and horses

for

43 days in

His Majesty's service, and his receipt shall be your discharge in

from your

full

friend.

FLOWER HULST. Hempstead, Jan. tet, jr., to

N. Jersey, or service

4, 1777.

Permit the bearer hereof, Mr. Sam'l Pet-

pass without hindrance to N. Y. Island, and from thence to until

he find his wagon and horses,

now

in

His Majesty's

— said Samuel has always acted as a friend to government. S.

Feb. 2, 1780.

CLOWES, It is

Col.

a Justice of the Peace of Queens Co.

Hamilton's positive orders, that

I

Benj. Rainer and his son Ezekiel, before him, to answer to the plaint laid against them. to take both of their sled

ton to

and horses

let the

I

do hereby

them, and go to carry

to Col.

command Sergeant

send

com-

Elijah Spragg

Hamilton's with them, and to press

himself and them, and desire Col. Hamil-

know who shall pay him for his trouble. By order of the Colonel. BENJ. HEWLETT, Capt. Q. Co. Militia.

Sergeant

To Mr. Sam'l Pettet

:

It is Col.

tants fetch the provisions for the

are appointed to go.

It fell to

Hamilton's orders, that the inhabi-

Segoond

[?]

officers.

Several persons

your brother Michael's turn to go to-


— APPENDIX. morrow morning, and he

but as he

things to bring

unwell, you must take his turn of duty

and there

in,

it

is

You must

shall take yours.

Saturday morning, April

6,

2->U

go

to the

widow

June

go with you.

HEWLETT,

Capt.

Permit the bearer hereof, Silas Pettet, of HempsteaJ,

8, 1782.

N. Y. and

return, by order of

HEWLETT,

BENJ. MS.

Extracts from a

to

you must go.

BENJ.

to pass to

Mott's to take the

some person

will be

Capt. Q. Co. Militia.

Cow Neck, Queens

book of Peter Onderdonk, of

County.

My wagon and horses My son Andrew returned

Sep. 14, '76.

entered the King's service.

Nov. 21.

sick from the

wagon and

camp

left

my

horses.

Jona. Dix pressed a mare from

Oct. 26.

me

to

go in His Majesty's

service.

Be

April 12, '79.

remembered

it

upon me, 18 Frenchmen, (Canadians longing to

May

Wm.

that, April 12, '79,

1) in

order to cut

were the

all

billeted

wood

be-

Cornell and Richard Sands.

When Tyranny holds

up

Then

is fled.

glorious liberty

its

head,

The above Frenchmen went away, but returned again week afterwards, and then quit, not cutting Rieha;d

14.

in parties for a

Sands's woods.

Dec. 23, '79.

Jos.

Thome's order

to bring the

Hessian guard wood,

of a cord, 2 sled-loads.

\\\\\

July 30,

'80.

of wood, out of

Was cut and carted by order of Robt. my woods, without asking me liberty.

Sep. 24, '81.

wagon-sides.

Nov. 13, quarters, (a

Hope

Mills, Dr. to

[Impressed '82.

Ed

?

hireling,)

two loads of hay and one pair

]

Capt. Westerhagen

German

Sutton, 12 loads

came

here with his

and with violence drove

Elizabeth and Jannetie Rapalje out of their sick beds.

He

quit his quarters here Jan. 7, '83

Jan. 17, '83. left,

Feb.

28— a

Ensign Wagner came here hireling

Edward Thorne, neglect of

Dodge's) rails,

Ingratitude

!

with his guard

;

hireling

to quarter

to

daughter

!

!

Dr. (on account of the

furnishing

to cutting

£20.

—a German

company

my sick

the

troops

with

damage

wood,

sustained by his

quartered

at

Wm.

40 walnut saplings and upwards of 100 chestnut


254

APPENDIX.

The above damage

from the troops of Capt. De Wes-

I received

terhagen and Ensign Wagner, done in 11 weeks; some of the

was

Wm.

carried to

my

burnt at

by his

Salts's

besides the

is

wood wood

house by Capt. Westerhagen, SO loads, value, £60.

Note

May

This

soldiers.

18, '77.

to Sec.

218.

Representatives in Convention from Kings Co. were

Henry Williams and Wm. Boerum: from Suffolk, Burnet Miller, David Gelston, Ezra L'Hommedieu, Thos. Tredwell and Thos. Wicks. Note

Sec. 689.

to

Nath'l Williams, of Huntington, swore July 4, '79, that he had

been twice robbed by the rebels of £450 money, and £70

and had had no correspondence with live

with the rebels.

to Conn't)

;

is

said to

Gaine, July 12.

I.

Rev. Ahm. Keteltas

In

goods

Jonas Rogers (also accused of smuggling goods

— Note

to Sec. 3.

the outbreak of the revolution, Mr. K.

Jamaica.

in

and two daughters, who

swore he had no intercourse with his son, who

have come plundering on L.

At

his son

was

a leading

Gaine's paper of Feb. 13, 1775, he

is

Whig

at

charged with

threatening to shoulder his musket before he would pay the tax on tea.

He was

In the next paper appears an able vindication of his conduct.

chosen deputy to the Provincial Congress, and at the abandonment of the Island, he fled to the Main, leaving three houses in N. Y. city, a large farm with slaves, cattle, and a furnished house on

100 acres of woodland cut ner and other Tories, and bury, and other parts of

much

reduced.

His house was occupied by Gen. Skin-

off.

much

New

and

He had

it.

injured.

He

lived at

Norwalk, Dan-

England, and at the peace returned home

See Trumbull papers,

the following have been printed.

vol. 18, 117.

The

— Of

his

sermons

Religious Soldier, preaehed at

Elizabethtown, to the regular officers and soldiers going to the Canadian war,

March

8, 1759.

A

Charity Sermon preaehed in the French

Protestant Church, N. Y., (of which he

Sermon at an evening Lecture, Sermon on Extortion, preached Note

was

pastor), Dec.

27, 1773

Newburyport, Oct.

at

Newburyport, Feb. 15, 1778.

to Sec.

5,

;

1777, and a

at

721.

July, 1815. 12 tons of pig iron and a long 331b. cannon were taken

up by a diving machine loden.

in

Fortpond Bay, being the wreck of the Cul£.

J.

Star, July 26.


255

appendix. Note

Wm.

John, son of late overseer of

Smith, of

Wm Floyd,

George's Manor, and Win. Philips,

St.

L.

left

707.

to Sec.

with much money

I.

Gaine,

Note

No

30, '78.

119.

to Sec.

sooner had Jost Monfort fled than Capt. Sneden and N. C. came

with a view to

&c,

and were taking an inventory of stock, grain,

his residence,

to

for Con't.

March

when

confiscation,

its

his father told

them the property

was not Jest's but his. Thereupon they went off. Jost had three sons, Abraham, and George, in the army at Brooklyn. They had just returned home, when some British light horse rode up to the house by They escaped by a back door. The light horse, however, by night. Peter,

who had

mistake seized their brother Jacobus,

all

He

night by the fireside.

fled,

made her draw

sit

up undressed

pointed a pistol at his mother, threatened

open the feather beds because she could not

to rip

had

not been in arms, and

drunken guard made him

to prevent his escaping, the

cider,

&c.

and

;

tell

where her sons

to terrify her

still

more, he

presented his sword to Jacobus, and then drawing forth his pistol, insisted on a

mock

After he had thus

fight.

next morning he went off with his prisoner

Van Wyck, where wrong

person.

to his house,

his mortification

to

At another time some

and wantonly

fired

trifled the

to

the

night away, early

Hollow before Squire

he found he had caught the

soldiers piloted

by Tories came

into the turkey-roost, took four loads

of corn from his crib, jumped into the hog-pen, run their swords into

two of

the hogs, threw

They

Jamaica.

them

into

also drove off

two

a

thus annoying him, Monfort used to

when he should have " you

may

live in

wagon and

fat cattle. tell

satisfaction.

carried

While

them, he hoped

" Ah,"

them

the Tories

off to

were

to see the

said Squire

day

Van Wyck,

hope, but you'll die in despair."

Raising the Hulk of the Hussar

窶年ote

to Sec.

146.

In July, 1821, Mr. Palmer on board a U. S. gun-boat, had got up the rudder of the Hussar with his diving bell.

Davis had raised 40 fore part settled

feet of the stern,

down on

the

rocks.

In Dec. 1819, Sam'l

when the vessel broke, and the Some cannon and shot were

brought up with the stern, but no specie, of which she was said to have nearly $100,000 on board.

ployed as engineer,

who

In Oct., 1825, Major Bayard

was em-

placed several chains under her bottom, and

by the aid of screws, hoped

to raise her to the surface, but failed.


256

APPENDIX. Note

to Sec.

336.

Henry Allen, of Great Neck, was robbed by some persons who first called up David Allen and made him cross the creek with them, and knock in a seeming friendly way at his door. On hearing the sound of David's voice, the door was at once opened and the robbers entered.

Note

As

the Rev.

to Sec.

412.

John Bowden rode up to a house

in

Smithtown, he

was captured by a concealed party of whale-boatmen. Why, gentlemen, said he, what shall I do 1 I am too feeble to go with you, it will kill me Then you can sign a parole, and we will exchange you for the Rev. Mr. Mather, said they. That I will readily do, rejoined !

the Parson.

Note

to Sec. 3G8.

Tunis Bogart and Dan'l Luyster, were returning from a funeral, Sep. 2, 177G,

(who had It all

was

late

put in a

man

when

they were arrested by the Halls, of Lloyd's Neck,

Main shore) and carried to Herricks. and the guard would not disturb the officers. So they were

also a prisoner from the

room

in charge

of the Halls,

who were now

morning, Bogart and Luyster were examined and set

home

they had not yet reached

wagons

to cart

had a load in

wagon

for

In the

at liberty, but

before they were impressed with their

cannon and shot from his

The

drunk.

from the Main slipped off while the Halls were asleep.

New

Utrecht to Hell Gate.

some weeks, and

finally crossed

B.

over at

There he saw wagon in care of a hired driver and returned home. His brother George was sent to take charge of the wagon, but as he was passing through Jamaica, he was betrayed by one Remsen, his fellow-traveller, and was forced to enlist Hell Gate and

left

his load in the

in Capt. Dunbar's

upper part of the

Becoming

the execution of Hale.

company,

to

city.

sick, he left his

escape imprisonment.

When

his father

heard of his being in duress, he went to Jamaica, and procured his release

and sent him on

to

N. Y.

He was

present as a wagoner, at the

capture of Ft. Washington, and afterwards crossed with the

Jersey

;

army

into

where Dan'l Luyster died of small-pox.

Note

to Sec.

769.

One Green, it is said, shot a whale-boatman at the head of Patchogue swamp, who had come over from the Main after the peace, and collected some ransom money from persons he had liberated during the war. Nothing was ever done with him.


APrENDix. Note

At

11 this evening, 250

marched

to

pick up such

rout a

men

to Sec.

257 65.

men under Majors

number of Tories

and Livingston

swamps of

the

in

L.

I.,

and

to

as are inimical to the liberty of America.

Webb, June 23.

Note

to Sec.

109.

Eagle and Penfold, Committee-men, report to Gen. Heath, at Kingsbridge,

Aug. 29, that

the light horse in

companies of 8 or 10, are

Major Bowne was seen bound

laging at Flushing.

pil-

in their hands.

" Their scouting parties consist of about 300 horse, and 400 foot,

with Tory recruits."

Livingston, Soutkold, Aug. 31. Sexton's Bill

—note

259.

to Sec.

Jamaica, Oct. 24, 1780.

Gen. Delancey,

To Grace Church, To

digging a grave for Maj. Waller,

-

-

Dr.

-

-

10 5

-

-

16

.£0

-

" Funeral Bell, " Use of Church Pall,

4

" Inviting, and attending funeral,

-

-

-

£1 Sexton's

bill

— note

to Sec.

15

245.

Jamaica, Sep. 12, 1779.

Mrs. Brewerton,

To

Inviting,

To Grace Church, Dr. £0 16

and attending Col. Brewerton,

....

" Funeral Bell, " Digging grave and burying corpse, " Cleaning the Church,

5 1

12

£3 Note Dover, June 23,

'77.

to Sec.

plundered of

remove on account of She signed the paper with-

F. B., said she did not

She suffered much by the

it.

many

They

valuables.

threats about her rebel husband.

cows, 30 store

cattle,

new wagon, 90

5

292.

expense, being discouraged by P. Corney. out reading

12

She

lost

2 pair

2 pair work oxen, 2 ox

sheep, poultry,

Her house was

British.

her with

left

many

fat

carts,

curses

and

oxen, 6 head

&c, &c &c. ,

XXXVIII.

fat

2 horses, a good 147.

Ms. Jour.


258

APPENDIX. Note

to Sec.

555.

Field and Staff Officers, 1st Reg. of Suffolk Co.

Wm.

Floyd, Col.

Jesse Brush, Majors;

Capt's.

Names.

;

Gilbert Potter, Lt. Philip Roe, Adj.

;

Col.

;

Jeffery

John Roe, Q. M.

Smith, and


1780.


APPENDIX.

20U changed

favoring wind and tide, which carried Jones to

vessels, the

my

N. Y. that evening, prevented

home

reaching

next day even-

till

ing.

Lyman, who had some time

Capt. George

command

Floyd, and had

previously robbed Col.

of 3 whale-boats, lost his liberty in carrying

Judge Jones, and was put in the Sugar House.

off

Note

who was

Alex. Grant,

162.

to Sec.

afterwards killed at Ft. Montgomery, took ?

His family kept

possession of B. Coe's farm, in 77.

it

the peace.

till

repay him for the waste and injury the State indemnified him from

To

Grant's estate in N. Y., and allowed him to

a declaration against

file

Ap. 23, r 85.

Grant's heirs, as G. had a large estate in N. Y. Passed,

Fort on Lloyd's Neck

The Fort on

Neck

Lloyd's

deep and wide, nearly surrounding pickets 8

ft.

high and 4

in.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Note

to Sec.

410.

an irregular square, has

is

it

;

frized

on every

a fosse

4

ft.

part, upright

diameter, (mostly of round staddlewood) are

placed in the centre of the ditch and another row of pickets without the ditch,

and an

the Fort, is a

abattis without the whole.

and

A

wagon passage opens into Near the centre of the Fort

not obstructed by a gate.

is

blockhouse of 4

in.

On

plank without loopholes.

the walls of the

Fort are mounted 4 long 12 pounders and two 3 pounders, and in the Fort a brass 4

field-piece.

lb.

8: the rest in barracks and Fort.

A

picket

Two

Harbor.

is

By day 2 men are in the Fort, by night encamped from 100 to 300 yds. from the

kept at a high bluff near the entrance of Huntington

miles west

is

a sandy beach and no guard there.

Trumbull, XV. 325. Troops in Queens Co.

Aug. 250.

7, '77.

British

They have made them.

Forts around

(Scotch) at Flushing

Jamaica. (50) on L. lion

of Spies.

Huntington

;

at Setauket

One regiment

at

Brooklyn, one

one regiment Greencoats, at Herricks

;

one at

Feb. 16, '79. 17th Dragoons (300) and Lord Cathcart's Legion I.

;

14 companies Grenadiers (700)

Hessian Chasseurs (350)

at Lloyd's

at

store-houses of the meeting-houses, and erected

Feb. 9, '78. ;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Eeport

have 300 men

Neck

;

at

Flushing;

at

Jamaica

;

1st batta-

Ludlow's battalion (150)

Simcoe's Rangers (250) on L.

I.

July

7, *8I.

Jagers

removed from N. side of Hemp. Plains to Kingsbridge. Lloyd's Neck evacuated by Col. Hewlett and his party, who now lie encamped just out of the town spot of Jamaica, a little to the East. The Loyal


201

APPENDIX. Refugees,

The 17th

now commanded by

Hubbel, amount to 200 or 300 men.

from Hemp,

horse removed

convenience of

to Success, for

Major Fitch says, regular troops on L. I. lay as 17th dragoons (300) in the vicifar east as Jamaica, where are 300 150 Associated Loyalists at Lloyd's Neck, who draw nity of Flushing pasture.

June, '81.

;

;

270

rations,

At Jamaica corps,

200;

one

man, half

for

date.

Flushing Fly, Arnold's

at

Fresh Meadows, 17th dragoons; between Jamaica and

German

giment, and some

little

No

quarter for child.

men

Ludlow's regiment, 350

Bedford are Murray's corps, 150

Slongum

woman,

for

is

at Brooklyn, Grenadiers of 47th re-

None

recruits.

Slongum mounts 2

Neck.

or Lloyds

;

at

;

of the above can help

and

six pounders,

is

Feb. 6, '82.

At Jamaica 2

men

Grenadiers, 800

battalions

Herricks, Hessian Jagers

;

at Mallet's

commanded by Maj. Hubbel

off their guard

subsist

Their protection by water

is

ments of Jagers and Anspach,

yesterday at Vendue.

the

—200

men

is

at

New-

without discipline

Col. Murray's horse

Col.

and 2

regi-

men 300 of which said to Wormb. May 23, '82. The

in all 1,000

commanded by

all

wagons and horses of

at

by trading to Con't, daily diminishing. At Success a brig, sloop, and galley.

Church, one or 2 miles from Herricks, be horse, and

;

;

July 5, '82. Lloyd's Neck, supposed to

town, Garrison of Pensacola. be weak,

Cove, Royal Forresters

at

;

Flushing, 38th and 54th regiments; at Hempstead, 17th dragoons

and

of

strength.

;

Refugee Post, at Lloyd's Neck, were sold

Dec. 18, '82.

Fitch

says,

Thompson's corps,

the remains of the Queen's Rangers, and Tarlton's Legion (5 or 600)

At Norwich the and Anspach

are at Huntington, to protect the trade with the Main.

remains of the Anspach regiment, 150

men

the Hessian

;

Jagers lay at Wheatly, Jericho, Westbury, Herricks, Northside, Cow and Great Neck, (in all 930,) under Wormb and Preuschenck ; at Hempstead are

4 companies of 17th dragoons

Kniphausen's regiment

;

Troops ox Long Information by O.

S.

5$

at

;

Jamaica, are Pinon's and

at Flushing, Delancey's

Island— Report

of Sfies.

T. L., Inhabitants of

and

— number

in the large

;

at

New

Fort back of the

uncertain; at Bedford, the Gar-

rison Battalion of invalids, about 100 total, half officers

inhabitants' houses

Dec, 1782.

Kings County, at Brooklyn

the Ferry.

Hackenbergh's regiment of Hessians, Ferry, and in the redoubts

3d battalion.

;

quartered in the

Utrecht and Gravesend, Col. Purbeck's

regiment of Hessians, about 350

total, in the inhabitants'

houses

;

at


;

202

APPENDIX.

Hook and Denyse's, are Col. Chambers' Maryland, and Col. Allen's Pennsylvania, Loyalists, 170 total, half officers at Bushwick, 2 companies pioneers, 60 total, chiefly blacks, in the inhabithe Narrows, Yellow

;

The above troops have been a considerable time in the abovesaid places, and are supposed to be stationary for the winter sea-

tants' houses.

son

at Flushing, Ludlow's regiment, about 380 total head of the Fly, remains of Col. Fanning's and Col Robinson's regiments, number un;

;

known

at Jamaica, remains of 2 Hessian regiments, about 250 total Hempstead, 4 companies of the 17th Light Dragoons. These have been some time in the above places, chiefly in the inhabitants' houses, ;

at

cannot

whether stationary or not

tell

;

at

Huntington, Col. Thompson's

corps, the remains of the Queen's

Rangers and Legion, number unknown,

supposed

Cow Neck,

wich

be stationary

to

Queens

in

Co.,

is

cavalry, quartered in

weeks

at

;

Wormb's regiment, about 800

the

inhabitants' houses, have

supposed to be stationary

;

and from Herricks

Col.

for the

foot

to

Nor-

and 100

been there four

winter season.

Information by P. T., an inhabitant of Queens Co.

At Hempstead, 4 companies of the 17th Light Dragoons, exactly 100 total, commanded by a Capt., the horses very poor and unfit for service this corps consists of 6 companies, 2 of which are on York Island Col. Wormb's regiment, about 900 total, 160 of them mounted ;

;

;

they begin at Jericho and Norwich, and extend 12 miles westward, as Herricks, and the head of the Necks.

far as

inhabitants' houses,

The

be stationary.

and Hempstead Harbor ;

at

are chiefly in the

;

;

supposed to

Hempstead Harbor. MaHerricks, Jericho, Norwich, Westbury,

chief picket guard

gazines of forage to be fixed at

use

They

and have been there about 4 weeks is

at

no forage on hand

at present only for present

Huntington, Col. Thompson's regiment, the remains of the

Queen's Rangers, and the Legion, being 580

effectives.

This was

taken from the Quarter Master's return made out to draw clothing

;

supposed to be stationary. Information by T.

At Cow Neck, months

since, being the last

number, commissioned unfit for duty.

They

lay as

S.,

are the Hesse

an inhabitant of Cow Neck.

Hanau

troops which arrived about 18

Dutch troops which

officers excepted,

arrived, being

470 in

70 of said number sick and

This return was taken from the Quarter Master's book.

low as Doctor Brooks's, where a guard

is

kept, about a ^

mile from the water-side, quartered in the inhabitants' houses, com-

manded by

Lt. Col.

Yannakie, under command of Col.

Wormb

;

have


AITENDIX.

2f)3

'

been there near 4 weeks, and supposed to be stationary for the winter very strong picket kept at Hempstead Harbor of Col. season.

A

Wormb's Yagers v Information by

The

troops at

Cow Neck,

Jericho, and Norwich, total

;

J. T.,

an inhabitant of Queens County.

Herricks, Westbury, Wheatly, Northside,

commanded by

Col.

Wormb, do

not exceed 1000

quartered in the inhabitants' houses, and expect them to be sta-

An

tionary for the winter season.

been and marked the houses troops,

for quarters for the

in

and a Quarter Master have

Officer

Wolver Hollow, and Cedar Swamp,

which are arrived from Charleston

officers

could

;

The Hessian

not learn the number, expect they will be stationary.

on parole at Matinecock and Lattingtown, say they expect

removed

Jerusalem, in order to

to

make room

to be

from

for the troops arrived

Charleston.

Information by T. B., a Refugee from Queens County, residing in Sta?nford : went over and got the following account:

At Huntington, Thompson's corps, and the remainder of the at Norwich, the remains of the total

Queen's Rangers and Legion, 500

Anspach, 130

total

;

at Jericho,

wich, 300 Anspach, and 500 are

ters

Westbury, at

at

Wheatly

;

Wheatly, Westbury, Northside and NorHessian Yagers

Wm.

Titus's

;

;

Col.

Wormb's

quar-

Col. Prussian's quarters at

Hempstead, 4 companies 17th Light Dragoons; at Jamaica, Penosand Knyphausen's regiments, numbers unFlushing, 3d battalion of Delancey's corps, numbei 8 unknown.

at

;

the remains of Cols.

known

;

at

N. B.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; From

west 3 miles

to

Norwich a southerly

course, 3 miles to Jericho, then

Westbury, same course 3 miles

to Northside,

then

northwesterly 3 or 4 miles to Herricks, also from Westbury to Wheatly is

Herricks

3 miles.

is

about 2 miles from Judge Ludlow's, and

1

mile

from the edge of the Plains. Information by D.

On

31.,

an inhabitant of Stamford.

Dec, he was at Huntington passing for an inhabitant, and passed within 4 rods of the front of the Fort which faces the north. It is

the 1st

about 5 rods in front with a gate in the middle,

siderable distance north and south

:

the

it

extends a con-

works were altogether of earth,

about six foot high, no pickets or any other obstruction to the works, except a sort of ditch, which was very inconsiderable, some brushlike small trees fixed on the top of the works, in a perpendicular form

was

told

it

encompassed near 2 acres of ground.

It is built

;

he

on a rising


APPENDIX.

264

ground, and takes in the burying-ground pulled down.

The

troops consist of

:

the Meeting-house they have

Thompson's regiment,

the remains

of the Queen's Rangers and the Legion, being 550 effective; they are quartered as compact as possible in the inhabitants' houses and barns,

and some hutted along the the hut.

The

sides of the Fort,

treatment they receive from the troops,

County are

all

which makes one side of

inhabitants of Huntington do suffer exceedingly from the

who

say the inhabitants of that

Rebels, and therefore they care not

how

they suffer.

Dec. 8th, 1782.

When

Washington was President, he made an excursion on L.

passing up the south side as far as Patchogue

;

I.,

thence crossing over to

Smithtown, he returned through Oyster Bay, Hempstead Harbor and He was attended by his suite of officers, and rode in a coach

Flushing.

drawn by

four grays, with outriders.

ant anecdotes of him.

and begged the landlord

He

The

old people

tell

many

pleas-

dined at Z. Ketcham's, Huntington South,

to take

no trouble about the

ing gave a half Joe and a kiss to his daughter.

around the Inn and were desirous

to

As

fare,

and on leav-

the people collected

have a sight of him, he good na-

turedly took two or three turns on the stoop with his hat

off,

and then

Jonah Willets,an eccentric Quaker, was ploughing with several teams of oxen, and when Washington stopped to look at him, one of the officers told Jonah that was General Washington. " George WashAt ington, eh," says Jonah, " who hoy, gee up," and on he went.

went

in.

Patchogue, he called at a

little

shop (there being no hotel)

for oysters

and bread and butter. At Capt. Daniel Youngs', at the cove, Oyster Bay, where he took tea, he called for a bow! of milk, and begged them As he passed some people " working on the road," to take no trouble. according to custom, they levied a contribution on him, which he cheerHe breakfasted at Hendrick Onderdonk's, Hempstead fully paid. Harbor, and visited his paper mill, being the oldest in the State.


INDEX Atlee, Col , 808, 812. Allen, Ethan, 632, 840. Althouse, John, 925. Antill, John, 702. Axtell, Wm., 796. Ayres, Major, 729, 750. Bache The., 834, 845. Baiid, Sir Jas., 599. Bailey, Dr. R., 599. Baker, Jona., 580. Baley, John, 699. Bainbridge, A., 853. Beekman, Jas , 607.

,631. Benjamin, John, 666. Benson, Capt., 855. Bennet, Tunis, 949. Bergen, Michael, 895. Bergen, S 838. Bell,

,

Bishop, Ezekiel, 633. Blatsly, Dan'l, 695. Blydenburgh, 650, 712. Boerum, Isaac, 805. Bogart, Peter, 900. Booihe, Wm., 720. Bowen, Jer., 648. Box, Major, 817. Brewerton, Col G., 245, 785. Brown, John, 626, 690. Brewster, Caleb, 585, 621, 720. Brower. Sam'l, 932. Brush, Eliph., 623. Brush, Jesse, 719. Brush, John, 620, 625. Brush, Thos , 622. Buell, Sam'l, 600. ,

Burret, Lt., 645. Cameron, Chas., 653. Carll, Piatt, 681, 765.

Case,

Widow,

683.

Chamier, Dan'l, 614. Chester, Chichester,

Chew,

,

657.

Widow,

667.

Jos., 631, 660.

Chrystie, James, 614. Clark, John, 628. Clark, Wm., 580, 653,764.

Clarkson,

,835.

Cochran, Chas., 680. Coffin,

,667.

Collins, Dan'l, 606.

Conklin, Conklin, Conklin, Conklin,

Eben., 739.

Henry, 753. Jesse, 703. Piatt, 538.

Cornell, Jacobus, 851. Cornell, John, 888. Cornell, Lt. Col. Ezekiel, 817. Cortelyou, S. J., 867. Covenhoven, Rem, 837. Crewe, Richard, 599.

&

Cunningham, Wm., 607. Cuyler, Ab'm, 722. Dayton, Eben., 600, 675. Davis, Major, 747, 769. Davis, Solomon, 704, 767. Deane, Richard, 702. Debevoice, John, 910. Delancey, 0,599, 602. Denyse, Denyse, 787, 803, 887. Depeyster, Fred., 834. Dering, Thos., 640, 647.


206

INDEX.

Dickie, 894. Ditmars, John, 959. ,

Domini, Nath'l, 682. Drake, Eben., 684. Drawyer, John, 928. Dunbar, 643. Duryea Cor., 885. ,

Dunscomb, Duryea, Geo

,

805.

&

Peter, 876. Elderkin, Capt., 679, 718.

Ely, Co!., 638. Erskine, Sir Wm., 601, 682. Fairbank, Phineas, 648. Fanning, Col , 832. Fanning, Gilbert, 707. Fanning, Thos., 619, 660. Field, John, 606. Fitch, Capt., 726. Flahaven, John, 845. Fleet, Gilbert Simon, 734. Floyd, Benj., 674, 704. Floyd, Rich., 619. Floyd, Wm., 621, 707. Foley, Rev., 871. Foster, John, 537.' Foster Peter, 684. Fountain, Steph., 580. French, Lt, 618. Gardiner, Ab'm, 603. Gardiner, David, 683, 736. Galbreath, Capt., 864. Glover, Elias, 700. Glover, Grover, 648. Glover, Sam'l, 617. Goldsmith, Wilmot, 644. Gray, Eben., 667.

&

Greene, Jos., 618,638. John, 686. Greene, Oba.

&

Griffen, P., 644, 648, 659. Grenell, John, 545, 740, 747.

&

Gyer, N. L., 580. Hale, Capt. N., 607, Hallock, George, 657. Hand, Col., 796, 814, 827. Hart, Capt., 638. Hart, Isaac, 720. Hart, Rev. Joshua, 632. Harper, Robt., 597. Harrison, 603. , Harrison, John, 956. Haslet, Col, 809.

Havens, Benj., 688. Havens, Jos., 736. Havens, Nicoll, 736. Hawley, David, 633. Hawley, Henry, 761. Heacock, Sam'l, 741. Hedges, Deacon, 751.

Hegeman, Adrian, 886. Hegeman, Elbert, 842. Hegeman, Rem, 834. Hewlett, John, 614. Helme, Thos., 548. Hempstead, Robt., 540,600.

Hempstead, Steph., 607. Hewlett, Rich., Col., 634, 638, 642. Hicks, Whithead, 599. Hill, John, 714, 928. Hinchman, Robert, 599. Hindford, Wm., 652. Hobart, J. S., 597. Holliday, John, 579. Holmes, Dr. Silas, 599, 833. L'Hommedieu, Ez.,537. Houston, Jas., 7U3. Howard, 805. , 599, Howell, David, 671. Hoogland, Jeromus, 805. Hubbard, Sam'l, 799. Hudson, Fred'k, 619. Hulbert, John, 546, 535, 640. Hulst, John, 877. Humphreys, Major, 645. Humphreys, Walter, 749. Huntington, Col., 821. Hylei, Adam, 895, 900, 925. Jarvis, Moses, 741. Jackson, N. P., 745. Jackson, Thos., 720. Jayne, Wm., 712. Johnson, Barent, 961. Johnson, B. J., 648. Johnson, Col Philip, 814, 823. Johnson, Hend"k, 916. Jones, Gilbert, 579. Jones, Oba., 603, 640. Kelsey, Steph., 562, 689. Kendal, Capt., 636. Kemble, Steph., 634. Ketcham, Carll, 622. Ketcham, Isaac, 544, 603. 606. Ketcham, Jos , 702.

Wm


267

INDEX. Kichline, Col., 821. Landon, David, 671. Langdon, Mark, 650. Lamberson, D., 599. Lasher, Col., 821. Lawrence, Major, 596. Lawrence, Wm., 740. Lay, Lt., 645. Lefferts, Leffert, 771, 942.

Lee, Gen., 774. Legget, Ab'm, 719. Lewis, Jos., 652. Livingston, H. B., 600, 608.

Ab'm E., 772. Lott, Joh. E , 950. Lott, Jeromus, 914, 962. Lott, Maurice, 940.

Lott,

Loosely

&

Elms, 884, 938.

Lownsbury, Wm., 741. Ludlam, Wm., 607.

Popham, Major, 818. Parks, Thos 744. ,

Parsons, Gen., 631, 634, 638.

Peck, Jos., 736. Pierreponr, Capt., 725. Wm., 707, 712. Philips, Sam'l, 681. Piatt, Dr. Z., 606, 625, 637. Piatt, Nath'l, 585, 681. Place, Thos., 635. Polhemus, Th , 792. Pond, Capt., 607. Potter, Gilbert, 558, 590.

Philips,

Punderson, E., 612, 654, 712. Rankin, Jas 908. Rapaije,D ,840. ,

Rapalje, John, 653, 802. RapaljV, Stephen, 836. Raymond, Stent, 679.

Reeve, Isaac, 577,666.

Luquer, Ab'm 882, 964. Lynch, Maj. John, 849. Lyon, Rev. Jas., 548.

Remsen,

Lyon,

Rhinelander, Fred

667. 656. Magaw, Col., 835. Marks, Capt 750. Martense,Geo., 845. Martin, Col., 796. ,

Mclntire,

,

,

Martin, Jas. S.,820. Marrener, Wm., 844, 846, 894.

Matthews, Mayor, 785. Meigs, Col, 631, 638. Mifflin, Gen., 827.

Miles, Col., 814, 835. Miller, Burnet, 533. Miller, Henry, 827. Miller, Richard, 610. Ming, Thos., 653. Monerieffe, Major, 845. Morris, Capt David, 897. Morris, Gov., 599.

Morrison, John, 612,613. Mowat, Jacob, 852. Muirson, Heathcot, 720. Munro, David, 727. Murray, Lindley, 656. T

l\ eefus,

Peter, 963.

Wm,647,

656,684. Norton, Nath'l, 766, 769. Olney, Stephen, 817.

Nicol),

Reed,

Jer., 771.

Jos., 804.

Remsen,

Rem H

,

943,961.

, 776. Col., 621. Rider, Valentine, 727. Riker, Ab'm, 596. Robertson, 658. Rodgers, Capt., 606. Roe, Dan'l, 610,621. Roe, Philip, 656, 733. Rogers, Zophar, 709. Rubell, J. C, 835,845. Rutgers, H&rmanus, 796. Ryerson, John, 913. Sawyer, Moses, 647. Sayre, Rev. Jas., 843, 874. Scribner, Benj 579. Scott, David, 934. Schenck, Lt. John, 844. Schenck, Martin, 868. Schenck, Nicholas, 900. Seamnn, Maurice, 688, 692. Seaman, 676. Seton, Andrew, 704. Shaw, Lemuel, 780. Shaw, Nath'l, 660. Sherbrook, Miles, 845. Simmons, Capt., 644. Simms,J. R. 607. Simms. John C, 644-

Richmond,

,

,

Wm

,


INDEX.

268 Simcoe,Lt. Col., 711. Skidmore, Sam'l, 374 COG. Skudder, Henry, 743. Smallwood, Col., 811. Smith, Dan'l, 535. Smith, Geo., 610, 674. Smith, Jeffrey, 555, 590, 600. Smith, Isaac, 674, 699, 757. Smith, Josiah, 586,598, 632. Smith, Jacob, 610, 616, 621. Smith, Jas., 657. Smith, Shubael, 652. Smith, Sol., 627. Smith, Win., 532, 555, 563. Stanton, Henry, 960. Stevens, Capt., 851. Stewart, John, 703. Stirling, Lord, 779, 808. 652. Stone, ,

Striker, Garret, 870.

Strong, Benajah, 600, 688, 720. Strong, Selah, 541,641,760. Storer, Capt., 933. Sullivan, Gen., 796, 807. Suydam, Jacob, 834. Suydam, Lamb't, 961. Tallmadge, Benj., 720, 743.

Thomas, Chas 633. Thompson, Isaac, 565. Thorne, Thos 596. ,

,

Tillotson, Nicholas, 681. Titus, Benj , 639.

Toby, Sam'l 653. Townsend, James, 597. Townsend, Robert, 607. Treadwell, Thos., 541, 681. Trescott, Major, 743. Troop, Capt., 631. Troup, Robert, 599. Tryon, Win., 620, 664. Tuthill, Rufus, 629. Turnbull, Lt. Col , 862. Underhill, Amos, 653.

Vail, John, 736.

Vail, Jona., 659. Vail, Peter, 753.

Van Alslyne, P., 722. Van Brunt, R., 783; 846,916. Van Buskirk, Lawrence, 872. 869, 908. Van Buren, Van Cortland, Aug., 845. ,

Van Cott, Win., 823. Vanderbilt, Jer., 796. Vanderpool, J. 722. Vandevoort, P., 794. 780. Van Dvke, 677. Van Dyck, Rev. Van Pelt, Rem, 846. Van Ranst, Ab'm, 770, 800. Van Sinderin, U.. 835. Van Wyck, Cor., 596. Vonck, Joseph, 963. Waldron, Adolph, 773, 779. Wattles, Capt., 744. ,

H

Ward,

Col.,

,

777,801,811.

Warne,Wm.,

599, 603. B., 638. 606. 658. Weser, Wickham, Thomas, 758. Wicks, Thomas, 544, 623. Wilkinson, John, 753. Williams, Nath'l, 544, 652, 689. Winslow, Pelham, 953. VVitherspoon, Peter, 848. Wood, Israel, 534, 603, 689. Wooden, Sol., 607. Woodhull, Nathan, 732. Woodhull, Nath'l, 590, 599. Woodhull, Stephen, 681. Wright, Oba., 628, 643. WykofF, Jacob, 847. Youngs, Dan'l, 634. Youngs, J., 660. Youngs, Israel, 544.

Webb, Col S. Webb, James, ,


c\


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