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REVOLUTIONARY INCIDENTS :

SUFFOLK AAD KINGS C

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thi battle of long :^laap,

THE BRITISH

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A A W.YORK: LEAVITT & COMPANY. 191 BROAA 1549.


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PREFACE. The present volume completes a plan the compiler had some years since conceived, of collecting and arranging in chronological order, the scattered and fragmentary notices of the events that occurred on

Long

Island, during our

Revo-

lutionary struggle.

The

history of the Island during this soul-stirring period

has been hitherto clouded in gross darkness.

Indeed the

very name scarcely appears on the pages of our History, except

to

The

record a disastrous defeat of our arms.

contents of these volumes

show

that

Long

Island

is

not barren in Revolutionary Incidents, unique in their character,

and instructive

The Counties a

to the

student of our country's history.

of Suffolk, Queens and Kings, each played

and yet appropriate part in the great drama of

different

the Revolution.

At

we

the

first

outbreak of rebellion in the port of Boston,

find the Puritans of Suffolk

assembling in almost every

town, and voting resolutions of aid and sympathy brethren of the Massachusetts Bay. pressions heartless.

The

Nor were

for their

these ex-

people were ready to follow their

leaders in rebellion, the militia were organized, and Suffolk

armed for the contest. Far different was the state of feeling in Queens County. Here the Royal Governors, and other crown officers had occasionally resided, and exerted an overshadowing influence.

They were

often connected with other wealthy and aristo-

cratic families in the County,

and dependents. the passive

who had

also their adherents

Then, there was the peaceable Quaker,

Dutchman; and

the Church-of-England-man,


PREFACE.

G

bound spirit

army

King by

to the

All these

State.

a double

made

tie,

as head of

Church and rampant

a dead weight, that the

of rebellion could hardly move, until the Congressional marched into the County, disarmed the Loyalists and

carried off their leaders.

The population of Kings County was mostly Dutch, who made but a tardy and feeble show of resistance to the powers that be

her Deputies finally absented themselves from the

;

Provincial Congress, and the flagging spirit of revolt quickly

subsided at the approach of the British

enemy, there was

still

a

the Island to the

difference in the conduct of the

The prominent Whigs

Counties.

fleet.

army abandoned

After the American

of Suffolk fled to their

brethren on the Main, with what movables they could carry, leaving behind their stock, houses and farms to the enemy.

Those who remained, reluctantly took an oath of allegiance, which they never meant to regard, and were ever treacherous subjects of a King they had sworn to obey. The great majority of the people of Queens County, took the oath

good

allegiance in

of

and observed

faith,

it.

Most of the leading Whigs, trusting to British proclamations,

and not knowing where punished

Many

various

in

to

go,

ways

remained

for

suffered imprisonment,

their

which

to

at

home, and were

undutiful

conduct.

some ended only

in

death.

The

case of Kings County

of Queens.

Many

deserted their

of its

was somewhat

homes on the prospect of

theatre of hostilities.

similar to that

peace-loving inhabitants had already

The

leading

its

Whigs

becoming the

fled

among

their

Dutch brethren, some to New Jersey, and some up the North River, while a few who remained and trusted to the chances of British clemency, were thrown in the Provost. Within two months after the American Army had given up the Island, the principal inhabitants of the three Counties had signed a representation of loyalty to King George the


7

PREFACE.

Third

;

and in order that their wholesome example of dutiful

return to obedience might have

its

rebellious portions of the State,

was published at length names of all the signers

New- York Mercury, with

the

it

the

influence on the other in

in

Queens and Kings Counties. During the entire period of the revolution, the British held New- York City, a part of Westchester County, and all of There were Staten and Long Island under military rule. no elections

窶馬o voting except annual town meetings窶馬one pay 窶馬o judges窶馬o courts of at

except town taxes

civil ju-

to

dicature, their place being supplied

by the arbitrary

King's justice or some military character.

Court of Police was after a while established in City

and

;

at

fiat

of a

summary New- York

True, a

length, in the year 1780, for the greater con-

venience of His Majesty's loyal subjects on Long Island, a

The

Court of Police was also opened in Jamaica.

inhabit-

ants could not go to or from the city, or bring out goods,

The price of wood and farmer's produce was regulated by proclamation ; their horses, wagons and persons, could at any time be impressed into the King's serwithout a permit.

vice, at a stipulated price.

village

and hamlet was

In the winter season almost every

with

filled

British

soldiers

and

wagoners, billeted in the people's houses, or cantoned in tem-

porary huts.

The consequence was,

high price

such of the farmer's produce as had not been

for

previously pilfered.

The farmers

a ready market and

flourished on British gold

but as there were few opportunities for investing

banks of deposit their

they were compelled

for safe keeping,

money by them, and were

not of the established faith,

often robbed.

illicit

;

some were even

down.

trade forms a striking fea-

This consisted in buying imported goods

York

City, (with the professed design of retailing

subjects in

keep

soldiers,

torn

ture.

faithful

to

churches,

were mostly occupied by

or used as storehouses and prisons

In Suffolk County, the

The

;

and no

it,

in

New-

them to the County,) and then carrying them


PREFACE.

8

down

the Island to secret landing-places,

Sound

sent across the

in whale-boats,

whence they were

under cover of night,

and exchanged with the people of Connecticut

for provisions,

and farmer's produce, of which the British army stood in great need.

Though

this trade

was

prohibited by both

Ameri-

can and British authority, yet the cunning of the smugglers

(who

often acted as spies) generally eluded the sleepy vigi-

lance of government the sparse

officials.

This trade was protected by

population of Suffolk County, the extensive sea-

border, the absence of a British

armed

force,

and the prover-

bial insincerity of the people in their professed allegiance.

Owing

to this

Whiggish feeling of the

inhabitants, every

invading party of their brethren from the Main

—

—whether

to

Sag Harbor, St. George's, or Slongo always found ready and effectual aid in guides, food, or information. Indeed Washington used to say, that he always had more correct knowledge by spies, of the position and designs of the British army on Long Island, than at any other place. In fine, the British authority in Suffolk County, w as little more than an r

empty shadow. Quite different was the state of things in Queens and

Kings Counties.

Here

the great body of the people

were

at

heart loyal, the settled parts were more compact, and rarely free from the presence of

armed

troops, spreading dissipation

and shining gold with open hand.

Although the people of Long Island had taken an oath of crown in 1776, they were never deemed

fealty to the British

bona fide British subjects, and on the return of peace, in 1783, (with the exception of a few

who were

attainted of treason,)

they quietly slipped off their oath with their loyalty, and without the formality of abjuring their allegiance, took their places

among

the citizens of these free and

States.

Jamaica, L.

I.,

May, 1849.

Independent


CONTENTS.

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

PART

I.

Page

Sec.

532

— 599.

Rise and Progress of the Revolutionary 13

Spirit,

PART 600—620.

The

PART 621

—769.

II.

,42

Submission,

The Armed

III.

Occupation,

.

.

.

.

62

KINGS COUNTY.

PART 770—802,

I.

Rise and Progress oe the Spirit,

Revolutionary 113


12

CONTENTS.

PART

II.

Sec.

803

—828.

Page

Letters relating to the Battle of Long Island,

132

PART 829—830.

The

Submission,

PART 831—964.

IN.

The Armed

166

IV.

....

Occupation,

PART

172

V.

Incidents of the British Prisons and Prison Ships at

New-York,

207

APPENDIX. Forms of Orders, &c, issued

in

Additional Notes,

the Revolution

&c,

.

.

.

— .251


REVOLUTIONARY INCIDENTS OF

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

PART REVOLUTIONARY SPIRIT

I.

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

532. At a meeting of the inhabitants of the parish of South Haven, June 13, '74, Wm. Smith, Moderator ; It

1

was voted (and agreed),

ing up the port of Boston,

is

that the

Act of Parliament for block-

unconstitutional, and has a direct ten-

dency to enslave the inhabitants of America, and put an end

to all

property. 2.

nies

(And

all

it is

also the opinion of this meeting), that if the Colo-

unite and strictly adhere to a non-importation agreement

from Great Britain and the them,

we

West

of that oppressive act

;

and

for that

such an agreement may be entered 3.

Indies,

and have no trade with

should have great reason to expect in a short time, a repeal

(And

it is

purpose

we

further voted and agreed), that

Col. Nath'l Woodhull, Col.

Wm.

heartily desire that

into.

Wm.

Smith, Esq.,

Floyd, Mr. Thos. Fanning, Capt.

Josiah Smith, Capt. David Mulford, and Capt. Jona. Baker, be a

standing committee for this place, to correspond with the Committee of Correspondence in the city of N. Y., and others, and that they

immediately communicate the above sentiments to them.

2


REVOLUTIONARY

14

SPIRIT.

533. At a meeting of the inhabitants of East Hampton?

warned by the Trustees, June

legally

Eleazar Mil-

17, '74,

Esq., Moderator

ler,

That we

1st. Voted,

America

;

that

we

liberties

abilities

measures as

burdens

we

assert,

and immunities of British

will co-operate with our brethren in this

in such

fear,

utmost of our

will to the

and in a lawful manner defend the

shall appear best adapted to save

and in a measure already

feel,

Colony

us from the

from the principles

adopted by the British Parliament respecting the town of Boston in particular,

and the British Colonies in North America in general. That a non-importation agreement through the colo-

2d. Voted,

nies

the most likely

is

means

to save

us from the present and future

troubles.

That John

3d. Voted,

Chatfield, Esq., Col.

net Miller, Stephen Hedges, Thos.

Wickham,

Abm.

Gardiner, Bur-

Esq., John Gardiner,

Esq., and Capt. David Mulford be a standing committee for keeping

up a correspondence with the colony

;

and,

if

there

is

city of

N. Y., and the towns of this

occasion, with other colonies

;

and that they

transmit a copy of these votes to the committee of correspondence

N. Y. Voted unanimously, not one dissenting

for the city of

voice.

BURNET MILLER, 534. At a general

Town

inhabitants of Huntington tions

Clerk.

came

into the

following resolu-

:

1st.

man

Tovm

Meeting, June 21, '74, the

That every freeman's property is absolutely his own, and no it from him without his consent, expressed

has a right to take

either

by himself or his representative. That therefore, all taxes and duties imposed on His Majesty's

2d.

subjects in the

American Colonies by the authority of Parliament,

are wholly unconstitutional, and a plain violation of the most essential

rights of British subjects.

That the Act of Parliament lately passed for shutting up the means or device, under color of law, to compel them, or any other of His Majesty's American subjects, to submit to Parliamentary taxations, are subversive of their just and 3d.

port of Boston, or any other

constitutional liberty.


15

SUFFOLK COUNTY. That we are of opinion

Ath.

common cause

suffering in the

that our brethren of Boston are

now

of British America.

That therefore it is the indispensable duty of all the colonies some effectual measures for the repeal of said Act, and every other Act of Parliament whereby they are taxed for raising 5th.

to unite in

a revenue.

That

6th.

means all

the opinion of this meeting, that the most effectual

it is

for obtaining a speedy repeal of said Acts, will be to break off

commercial intercourse with Great Britain, Ireland, and the En-

glish

West [ndia colonies. And we hereby declare

1th.

ourselves ready to enter into these

or such other measures as shall be agreed upon by a General Congress of

all

the colonies

;

we recommend

and

to the

General Con-

gress to take such measures as shall be most effectual to prevent

such goods as are

at present in

America, from being raised to an ex-

travagant price.

And,

lastly,

we

appoint Col. Piatt Conklin, John Sloss Hobart,

Esq., and Thos. Wicks, a committee for this town, to act in con-

junction with the committees of the other towns in the county, as a

general committee for the county, to correspond with the committee

of N. Y.

ISRAEL WOOD, The

535.

and Aug.

President.

above Resolutions were also adopted at Smithtown

9, it

was voted

;

that " Sol. Smith, Dan'l Smith, and Thos.

Tredwell be a committee fully empowered, in conjunction with the committees of the other towns, to choose delegates to represent this

county

at the

General Congress, and to do

in defence of our just rights

and

all

that shall be necessary

liberties against the unconstitutional

attacks of the British Ministry and Parliament.

DAN'L SMITH, N. Y. Circular 536.

Boston,

to the several

Gentlemen The now sinking under :

and compassionate concern.

Counties,

Aug.

CPU."

9, '74.

distresses of the poor of the

town of

the hand of power, call for our tender

Every motive of

policy and humanity

should excite us to contribute liberally to their immediate redress.

They

are our

cause of

countrymen and brethren, suffering

liberty,

and their hard condition

We recommend a generous

in the

may one day

common

be our own.

subscription for the support of the indi-


REVOLUTIONARY

16

gent of that oppressed town.

SPIRIT.

In some instances

it

may

be most

convenient to contribute in wheat or flour, which will be equally serviceable.

The

vision should be

whole Continent requires that pro-

interest of the

made

for all

who become

common

sufferers in our

cause, and the honor and reputation of this Colony must animate us to distinguish ourselves on so benevolent

an occasion.

537. At a meeting of the Committees of Correspondence

county of Suffolk,

for the

at the

That we recommend

County Hall, Nov.

15, '74

towns in this county to set forward a subscription for the employment and relief of the distressed poor in the town of Boston, to be collected in such 1.

Voted,

manner

as the committees in each

it

to the several

town

shall

judge proper

;

to be in

readiness to be forwarded early next spring. 2.

Voted,

That John Foster have the care of procuring a vessel

to call at the several harbors in this county, to receive

and carry the

above donations to Boston. 3.

Voted,

That we

fully approve of the proceedings of the late

Continental Congress, and different

towns

recommend

it

to the

to see that the Association

committees of the

by them entered

into

on

behalf of themselves and their constituents, be strictly observed.

EZRA L'HOMMEDIEU,

Clerk.

538. At a meeting of the Committees of Observation for the several towns and districts of Huntington, Smithtown, Islip,

and South Haven," and some of the principal inhabitants of the town of Brookhaven, held at Smithtown, Feb. 23, '75, Col. Piatt Conklin being Chairman, 2.

Resolved nera. con., That

we

think ourselves under obligations

of gratitude to the worthy gentlemen in particular this

County

sembly

in the late Continental Congress,

in general, for their noble, patriotic

who

represented

and to that whole as-

and

faithful discharge of

their important trust. 3.

Resolved nem. con., That a letter be sent to

Wm.

Nicoll and

Nath'l Woodhull, Esqrs., Representatives of this County, informing them that, if a motion should be made in the house for appointing

Delegates to represent this Province, at the Continental Congress, to be held at Philadelphia, in May next, it is our opinion and desire, that they should join in their appointment.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 4.

17

Resolved nem. con., That in case the Assembly do not appoint

Delegates, the Committee of Correspondence for the city of N. Y., be desired to call a Provincial Convention for that purpose.

—

lic

N. B. Most of the towns and districts in this County, have at pubtown meetings, fully adopted the measures recommended by the

Congress, and determined on a

strict

observation of the Association.

539. Nathan Fordham, Burnet Miller, and Thos. Youngs, a sub-

committee, at

Sag Harbor, request of Congress, (Ap.

ammunition and warlike and that the cannon exposed

stores, suitable for

may

2d, '75,)

an inclosed list of cannon,

be mounted on carriages, as they are

to the ravages of the Ministerial

540. Robt. Hempstead

much

army.

was Chairman of a meeting of the ComCounty Hall, Ap.

mittees from the different towns in Suffolk, at the

who

6, '75,

appointed Col.

Wm.

Floyd, Col. Nath'l Woodhull, Col.

Phineas Fanning, Thomas Tredwell, and John Sloss Hobart, Esqrs., Deputies to the N.York Provincial Convention for choosing Delegates to the Continental Congress, to be held at Philadelphia, in

541.

To

the Provincial Congress, to be held,

22d, '75, Col.

Thomas Tredwell, John Ezra L'Hommedieu, Thos. Wickham, James Havens, and John

Nath'l Woodhull, Foster,

May

May.

Sloss Hobart,

Selah Strong, were elected Deputies for one year.

May

5.

542. At a meeting of freeholders and other inhabitants of Brookhaven, June

J

8,

75

By

;

a large

majority were

chosen 16 persons, as a Committee of Observation

to repre-

sent said town and deliberate on other matters relative to our

Agreed

present political welfare.

that the last

Tuesday

in

June, be appointed as the day for the Committee to meet.

The Committee met hull,

Esq., Thos.

Wm.

Brewster,

Nath'l Roe,

Manor

St.

Moriches

;

Jr.,

at Coram, June 27 Present, John WoodHelme, Esq., John Robinson, Thos. Fanning, Lt. ;

Noah Hallock,

Brown, John Woodhull, Jr., Thompson, of Smith, and Jonah Hulse, of Patentship of Jos.

Capt. Jona. Baker, Dan'l Roe, Sam'l

George

;

Wm.

Capt. Josiah Smith.

Then proceeded, and chose John Woodhull, Esq., Ch'n, and Sam'l Thompson, Clerk, and entered 1.

into the following resolutions

Resolved nem. con., That

we r

:

express our loyalty to His

Ma-


REVOLUTIONARY

18 jesty,

King Geo.

III.,

SPIRIT.

and acknowledge him as our rightful lord and

sovereign. 3.

Resolved unanimously, That

it

the opinion of this

is

Commit-

Acts passed in the British Parliament, for the purpose of raising a revenue in America also the Acts for stopping for the Port of Boston for altering their charter and government tee, that the several

;

;

;

Roman

establishing the

Catholic religion, and abolishing the equita-

ble system of English laws and erecting in their stead

French Despo-

Government in Canada as also the Act for restraining the New England fishery and further declaring they have power to make laws binding on us in all cases whatsoever, are contrary to the constitution and subversive of our legal rights as English freemen and

tic

;

;

British subjects. 4.

Resolved nem. con., That

strictly to

we

utmost endeavor

will use our

adhere to the Resolutions of the Honorable Continental

Congress, and to comply with the injunctions of our Provincial Convention,

which (under God) we hope

the most effectual

is

to obtain redress of our present grievances,

means

and save us from im-

pending ruin. 5.

We do unanimously make this our apology to

public and to our several Congresses, that

Congressional measures, and hope a veil

conduct

;

for our remissness

was not

for

want of

patriotic spirit, but

because opposition ran so high in some parts of arose,

we

verily believe,

the respectable

we have come so late into may be cast over our past this

town, which

from want of better information.

unanimously resolved, that we will keep a strict watch no provisions be transported from the bounds of our constituents,

6. It is

that

so as to 7.

fall into

the hands of our enemies.

Ordered, that the proceedings of this meeting be printed by

John Holt. 543. [The General Association (see Queens Co., 25,) was alThe most unanimously signed in Suffolk, only 236 recusants. original lists may be seen in Vol. XXX. of the MS. Papers of the

N. Y. Provincial Congress, in the Secretary of State's Office, at Albany, and are reprinted in Force's American Archives, III., 608.

—Ed.] 544.

May

Israel Youngs of Cold Spring brought in his Henry Dawkins an engraver, whom he employed

12, '75.

sloop from N. Y.


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

19

9 weeks in the garret of his house counterfeiting

Ketcham went

Isaac

bills

of credit.

They were Huntington Com-

to Philadelphia for the paper used.

Wicks, taken before the

arrested by aid of Thos.

mittee at Nath'l Williams' Tavern, and thence to N. Y. where they

were confined till July 18, when Dawkins was sent to Westchester and Israel and Isaac Youngs to Litchfield, where they lived at

jail

;

their

own expense

ÂŁ68

10 with the

till

Jour. 445, 718, 577.

June

'75.

3,

Wicks and

'76, when they went off leaving Ketcham was probably discharged Aug. 17.

Nov. 25,

jailer.

(See also 53.)

Cor. 464.

Youngs was taken

to N. Y. by Thos. Brush and Sam'l Brown The houses of George and Isaac Youngs and

Philip

Eliph. Brush, charged by Jacob

with counterfeiting.

John Williams were searched, but nothing found. [Philip was acJune 17. Ed. Jour. 471, 714.

quited,

Phineas Fanning, David Mulford, Esq., Capt. Tim. were appointed muster masters of the troops to be raised in

545. Col. Earle,

Suffolk, July 8, '75.

June

546.

John Hulbert, Capt.

1.

29, '75, Suffolk Co. Warrants,

John Davis,

;

1st Lt.

;

Philips, 1st Lt.

;

Wm.

Havens,

2d Lt.

John Grennel, Capt.

2.

;

Wm.

Philip Conklin,

2dLt. Dan'l Griffen, Capt; Benj. Marvin, 1st Lt.

3.

;

Nath'l Norton,

2d Lt. Capt. John Grenell, of Huntington, July 14, '75.

Sam'l

Wm.

Smith, 1st Lt.

;

Alex. Ketcham, 2d Lt.;

in place of

Philips and Philip Conklin declined.

547. Whilst the British were at Boston, their vessels occasionally carried off stock from Suffolk Co.

July 5, '75:

The

people of E. and S.

Capt. Hulbert's company, to

guard the stock on the

Hampton pray

or 4000 sheep) from the ravages of the enemy.

July 31, '75.

remain

to

Aug.

13

looking for stock, as der.

Jour. 75.

Congress allow Griffing and Hulbert's companies to

guard stock.

7, '75.

Congress, that

now raising for Schuyler's army, may remain common land of Montauk, (2000 cattle and 3

Jour. 95.

sail is

of British shipping are seen off Oyster Ponds,

supposed.

Lt. Norton's

company have no powCor. 69.


20

REVOLUTIONARY Aug.

SPIRIT.

Congress order Wooster to send from his camp at Har-

7, '75.

lem, four companies to

(to be under command of Col. Phineas Fanning,) guard stock on the east end of L. I. Congress also vote 200 lbs.

powder

to

the order of Ezra

L'Hommedieu and John

Foster.

Jour. 102, 103.

Aug.

Congress recommend the removal

18, '75.

Gardiners and Plum

Aug.

of stock from Jour. 110.

I.

Congress hear that 36 cattle and 1100 sheep are

21, '75.

taken from Fisher's Gardiner's

I.,

Aug. 22, to

I., and 40 or 50 cattle and 1800 or 2000 sheep from by Col. Abijah Willard. Jour. 112,119.

'75. Col.

come again with

Gardiner of Plum

I.,

says Col. Willard threatens

force sufficient to take off stock

from L.

I.

Cor. 65.

Sep. 7, '75.

men

Capt. John Hulbert marched from Montauk, but his

have borrowed guns.

Cor. 80.

Ebenezer Piatt received of Congress 100

Sep. 14, '75. der.

lbs.

of

pow-

Jour. 146.

548. Thos. Helme, 3, '75, that

Chairman pro tern., writes to Congress, Aug. Parson James Lyon, [put under guard in Wooster's

Camp, Aug. 11,] Benj. Floyd, Dr. Gilbert Smith, Joseph Denton, Richard Floyd, and John Baleys, innkeeper, have from the beginning taken every method to seduce the ignorant and counteract the measures recommended for redress of grievances.

They d n all 1. They have

Congresses and Committees, wishing they were in h

—

declared they will furnish the men-of-war and cutters with provisions.

Aug. 549.

21, '75.

List of Field Officers of 2d Bat.

David Mulford,

1st Col. Jonas Hedges, 2d Col. ; Uriah Rogers, 1st Major; Geo. Herrick, 2d Major; John Gelston, Adj. Phineas Howell, Q. M. ;

Company Capt. David Howell;

1.

Officers.

1st Lt. Jer'h Post;

2dLt. Paul Jones

;

En. Zeph. Rogers. Capt. John Dayton,

2.

John

Miller,

;

En.

jr.

Wm.

;

;

1st Lt. Isaac

Hedges, ;

Mulford Hunting 2d Lt. ;

jr.

1st Lt. Dan'l

Hedges; 2d

Lt.

David

En. Theoph's Pierson.

4. Capt.

Baker

;

Capt. David Pierson

3.

Sayre

jr.

David Fithian;

En. Dan'l Conklin.

1st Lt.

Sam'l Conklin

;

2d Lt. Thos.


21

SUFFOLK COUNTY. Capt.

5.

Wick

Wm.

Capt.

6.

Howell;

St.

Halsey

;

Rogers,

Wm.

Howell; En.

Capt. Sam'l

8.

jr.;

2d Lt. Lemuel

jr.

1st Lt.

;

Jesse Halsey

;

2d Lt. Henry

En. Nath'l Rogers.

Capt. Josiah Howell,

7.

John White,

1st Lt.

En. Isaac Halsey.

;

jr.

;

1st Lt. Nath'l

Howell

2d Lt. Mat.

;

Stephens.

L'Hommedieu

1st Lt. Silas Jessup; 2dLt.

;

ward Conklin; En. Dan'l Fordham. 1st Lt. Edward Topping 9. Capt. John Sandford Howell En. John Hildreth. ;

Ed-

2d Lt. Philip

;

;

550. Capt.

;

was chosen

Sept. 4, '75, Philetus Smith

At Smithtown,

Edmund Smith, jr. 1st Lt.

;

Dan'l Tillotson, 2d Lt.; and Richard

Smith, En., under the inspection of Dan'l Smith, Jacob Mills and

Thos. Tredwell, Committee-men. 551.

the 3d

Matthew Rose was chosen Capt.

4, '75.

Sep.

Smith, 1st Lt.

;

Company

David Fanning, 2d Lt.

Wm.

Sep. 6, '75. Sam'l

Company

;

Hugh

;

and John Smith, Ensign, of

of 1st Reg. of Suffolk, at Southhold, in presence of

Tho's Fanning and

hull, 1st. Lt.

;

Smith, Committee-men.

Thompson was chosen

Isaac Davis, 2d Lt.

;

Capt.,

Abm. Wood-

and Dan'l Satterly, Ensign, of

presence of Nath'l Roe,

of Brookhaven, in

jr.,

1st

Rich'd

Woodhull, and Sam'l Thompson, Committee-men.

552. At a meeting

at

Smithtown, Sept.

ting Field Officers for the

From Huntington, John SlossHobart, Dr.

Gilbert Potter, Capt.

5, '75, for

Western Reg. of

Timothy

nomina-

Suffolk, present,

Esq., Tho's Wickes, Esq.,

Carll,

Henry Scudder, Stephen Piatt. From Smithtown,

Ketcham,Tho's Brush jr., John Squier, Eben'r

Tho's Tredwell, Esq., Jeffery Smith, Jacob Mills, Jonas Phillips, Philetus Smith,

Mills,

Sam'l

From Brook-

Smith, Dan'l Smith.

Noah Hallock,

Wm Brews-

Jona. Baker, John Woodhull. Jos. Brown, Sam'l

Thompson,

haven, <%c, ter,

Edmund

Wm.

Smith, Tho's Fanning,

Dan'l Roe, Nath'l Roe. bert Potter, Lt. Col.

Smith, 2d Major

;

;

Wm.

Floyd was nominated Col.

;

Capt. Nathan Woodhull, 1st Major;

Philip Roe, Adj.

;

John Roe,

jr.,

Q. M.

;

Dr. Gil-

Edmund

Col. Nath'l

Woodhull, Brig. Gen. 553. Sep. hull, 1st Lt.

5, '75. ;

Eben'r Miller was chosen Capfc

Jas. Davis,

2*

2d Lt.

;

;

Caleb

Wood-

and David Davis, Ensign, of 2d Com-


REVOLUTIONARY

22 pany

SPIRIT.

Brookhaven, in presence of Tho's Helme, John Woodhull

in

and Noah Hallock, Committee-men. Committee Chamber, Huntington, Sept. 11,

554.

Officers of the 1st three Militia

'75.

Companies.

JohnWickes,Capt.; Epenetus Conklin, 1st Lt; Jonah Wood,2d Ebenezer Prime Wood, Ensign. 2. Jesse Brush,Capt. Epenetus Conklin, 1st Lt. Philip Conklin, 1.

Lt.

;

;

;

2d Lt.

Timothy

3.

2dLt.

Jos. Titus, Ensign.

;

Carll, Capt.

Nath'l Buffet,

;

The South

4.

jr.,

Gilbert Fleet, 1st Lt.

;

Joel Scudder,

;

Ensign.

part not yet elected officers.

555. At a meeting of the several committees in the 1st

Wm.

Reg. of Suffolk Co. held at Smithtown, Oct. 24, '75 Smith was appointed Chairman ; present,

Jesse Brush, Esq., John Squires,StephenKetcham,Tho's Wickes,

Henry Scudder, Dr.

Esq., Timothy Ketcham,

Gilbert Potter, Tho's

Brush, jr., Israel Wood, Stephen Kelsey, Ebenezer

Piatt, of

Hunting-

Dan'l Tillotson, Tho's Tredwell, Esq., Jeffery Smith, Philetus

ton.

Smith, Dan'l Smith, Capt. Job Smith, Jacob Mills,

Epenetus Smith, Sam'l

Philips, of

Smithtown.

Edmund

Wm.

Smith, jr,

Smith, Jonah

Hulse, of Manor St. George. Capt. Josiah Smith, of Moriches. Capt. Sam'l Thompson, Wm. Brewster, John Woodhull, Dan'l Roe, Nath'l Roe,

Noah Hallock,

Capt. Jona. Baker, Richard Woodhull,

Esq., of Brookhaven. JefFery

Smith was nominated

hull declined

Smith,

jr.,

;

1st

Major

in place of

and Capt. Jesse Brush 2d Major

Nathan Wood-

in place of

Edmund

declined.

556. Nov.

7,

'75.

John Sloss Hobart, Tho's Tredwell, Selah

Strong, Nath'l Woodhull, Ezra L'Hommedieu, David Gelston, Tho's

Wickham, and Dan'l Brown,

Esqrs.,

were elected Deputies

to Pro-

vincial Congress.

557. Nov. 27, '75.

Lt.

Tho's Hempstead, 1st Lt.;

Case took

Wm.

Horton,

his

commission [as Capt.]

jr.,

2d Lt.

;

â&#x20AC;˘

John Drake, En-

sign.

558.

Sir

Huntington, Dec. 10, :

You

will receive this

by Major Brush, who

is

'75.

appointed by

the Committee to lay before the Congress, the state of the

town

as


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

23

to their slackness in military preparations, as also that

reason to believe

We not only

indifferent in this great contest.

assistance, for

men

my

it is

we have

methods are used by our neighbors

all

to

great

make them

beg your advice but

opinion, if there is not a sufficient

number

of

immediately sent to effectually subdue Queens Co. and to intimi-

date the people

among us, a great many from here will soon be in a little Queens Co., which we have great

better condition than the rebels of

reason to believe vants.

I

is

making

interest with our slaves

have exerted myself in

by your House, individual, I I

I

my

must be obliged

but

station,

to desist

and other

nothing

if

is

ser-

done

but as to myself as an

:

am determined to live and die free, am sir, your most humble servant,

GILBERT POTTER. To John

S.

Hobart Esq.

in Pro. Congress.

559. Commissions issued Dec. 12, '75. tus, Capt.

Joshua Rogers, 1st Lt,

;

Joel Scudder, Capt.

;

;

2d

Comp. Jona. Ti3d Comp.

Tho's Brush, 2d Lt.

Nath'l Buffit, 1st

Lt Epenetus

Smith, 2d Lt.

;

John Hart, Ensign.

Manor

560.

Gentlemen

:

There have

enlisted as

St. George,

minute

Dec. 15,

men 70

'75.

able-bodied

men, within the bounds of Brook Haven, Smithtown, Manor St. George and the Patentship of Moriches, who have chosen Dan'l Roe, Capt.; ips,

Hugh Smith, 1st Lt.; Caleb Brewster, 2d Lt.; Eben'r PhilAnd as Hugh Smith and David Fanning, 1st and 2d

Ensign.

Lts. of

the 3d

Company

in

Brookhaven, (whereof Nath'l Roe

is

Capt.) have enlisted in the minute service, the

John Smith,

The

1st Lt.

;

Wm.

Baker, 2d, Lt.

;

company have chosen Doxey Lane, Ensio-n.

was made in presence of us, who are of the committee. The minute men (who are much needed to still intestine disaffection) want powder, ball, guns, drum, colors &c, which choice of the above

are not to be had here

pany not able

;

and

if to

be bought, a great part of the com-

to purchase.

Your humble

servants,

WM. SMTH. JOSIAH SMITH. To

Pro. Congress.


24

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

Congress send 1000

561. Jan. 5, '76.

lbs.

powder

to

Hunting-

ton Committee. Gilbert Potter certifies that St. Kelsey and

562. Jan. 12, '76.

Eben'r

Cow

Piatt,

Committee-men, had inspected the election of comp. of Huntington,

Harbor, 5th

Michael Heart,

1st Lt.

;

Isaac Dennis, 2d Lt.

officers at

Piatt Veal, Capt.

viz.

Jacob Conklin, En.

;

Thos. Wickes and Jesse Brush certify the election of John Buffet, Capt.

;

Isaac

Thompson,

1st Lt.

;

Zeb. Ketcham, En. of the

4th Comp. Suffolk Co., Jan. 24, '76.

563.

Gentlemen

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;In

pursuance to your order,

pointed the Field-officers for the minute

The

this county.

The

militia of this

men and

county but

we have

artillery

ap-

company

in

exceeds 2000.

little

great exposedness of the east end, and the extensiveness of the

county, induces us to desire a no. of Continental troops

We make

tioned here. this Island,

and hope a

We have

We

guns.

sufficient force

a no. of poor

the cause, and

may be

no doubt the Continent proposes

men who

would be glad

may

sta-

to protect

be stationed here.

are good soldiers and friends to

minute men, but have no some could be procured at

to enlist as

know

should be glad to

if

the public expense.

The

makes it difficult to raise and They complain that they are not sufficiently

situation of this county

the minute men.

considering the great distance they are obliged to travel 10,

and 12 miles, and that on

on the same account, are

foot, to

The

exercise.

paid,

many,

officers

8,

also,

at considerable expense, besides the ex-

pense of raising their companies, and pray they

By

may

Officers of

be considered.

order of the Committee,

WM. SMITH, 564.

;

train

Chairman.

Minute Men. Feb. 20, '76.

Josiah Smith, Col.; John Hulbert, 2d Col.

Major

Jona. Baker, 2d Major

;

;

Isaac Reeve, 1st

;

Ephraim Marvin,

Isaac Overton, declined,) Eben. Dayton, Q,.

Adj., (in place of

M.

Officers of the Artillery.

Wm. Rogers, Captain 1st Lt.

;

;

John Franks, Capt.

Thos. Baker, 2d Lt.

;

John

Lt.

;

Jerem'h Rogers,

Tuthill, Lt. fireworker.


25

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 565.

Isaac Thompson, Chairman

of the Committee of

Islip,

writes to Congress, Feb. 9, '76, that there never has been a militia

company in that precinct, but that the east part bore arms in the Smithtown company, and the west were under a Huntington Captain, which has caused uneasiness. The people, with the consent of Col. Potter, assembled and chose Benajah Strong, Captain ry, 1st Lt.

Sam'l Oakley, 2d Lt.

;

;

The company numbers 36

signed the association.

;

Jerem'h Ter-

and Annen Mowbray, En., who or 37.

566. Thos. Cooper and S. Halsey, Committee-men, certify the Nath'l Howel, jr., 1st Lt. and election of Zeph. Rogers, Capt. ;

Mat. Sayer, 2d

;

company of minute men

Lt., of a

in

South Hampton,

before Feb. 23, '76.

Maltby Gelston certifies the election of David Pierson, Capt. John Foster, jr., 1st Lt. Abm. Rose, 2d Lt. and Edward Topping, En., of another company of minute men in South Hampton. Ezekiel Mulford, Capt. John Miller, 1st Lt. and Nath'l Hand, 2d Lt., of a company of minute men at East Hampton. ;

;

;

;

567.

Wm.

Smith, Chairman, requests of Congress,

March

1, '76,

the loan of ÂŁ500, to be lodged with the Treasurer, Col. Josiah

Smith,

who

568.

is

Mar.

to

pay out the same.

4,

John Chatfield of E. Hampton, and Thos.

'76.

Cooper of S. Hampton, are directed out for the British

to station persons to

569. Mar. 27, '76.

Nath'l

Roe and Sam'l Thompson,

the election of Selah Strong, Capt.

Brewster, 2d Lt.

;

keep look-

fleet.

;

Wm.

Clark, 1st Lt.

certify ;

Caleb

and Nath'l Brewster, En., of a minute company in

Brookhaven. 570. Ap. 7, 76.

Henry Skudder, 2d

Nath'l Piatt, Capt. Lt.

;

;

Sam'l Smith,

1st.

Lt.

and Henry Blatsley, En.

ÂŁ22 18 6, for keeping when British fleet was exmember of the Committee, was

571. Account of Capt. Jeremiah Rogers, look-out at South Hampton, pected, certified by

March

Henry Herrick,

'76,

exhibited for payment, Jan. 28, '77.

572. Ap.

18, '76.

Nath'l Woodhull, Thos.

Jour. 791.

Tredwell, Selah

Strong, John Sloss Hobart, Thos. Wickham, David Gelston, Dan'l Brown, and Ezra L'Hommedien, were elected to represent Suffolk


REVOLUTIONARY

26

SPIRIT.

Co. in Provincial Congress, as appears by the certificate of

Wm.

Smith, Chairman, and Ezra L'Hommedieu, Clk. of the Committee. 573. Capt. John Davis had enlisted 70 1st Lt. of

Capt

men

and Benj. Marvin,

;

company, 75 men, before Ap.

Griffin's

3, '76.

574. In consideration of the defenceless state of E. part of Suffolk Co., the 3 companies raised for continental service,

Ap.

tinued there. 575.

May

were con-

3, 76.

3, '76.

Officers of

two companies of minute men

in

Southold, Col. Smith's Reg. 1.

2d Lt. 2.

Lt.

;

Jona. ;

Bay ley,

Capt.

Joshua Youngs, 1st Lt.

;

;

John

Tuthill,

James Reeve, En.

Paul Reeve, Capt.

John Corwin,

;

1st Lt.

;

David Horton, 2d

Nath'l Hudson, En.

576. 1.

May

9, '76.

2d N. Y. Reg.

Dan'l Roe, Capt.

Jona. Titus, 1st Lt.

;

;

Geo. Smith, 2d Lt.

Benj. Titus, En. 2.

ton,

Daniel GrifFen, Capt.

2d Lt. 3.

2d Lt.

;

John Davis, Capt. ;

577.

;

Benjamin Marvin,

1st Lt.

;

Nath'l Nor-

Jacob Conklin, En. ;

Wm.

Silvanus Conklin, En.

Return of Col. Smith?

Haven,

1st Lt.

;

Edward Conklin,


27

SUFFOLK COUNTY. Staff of Minute Regiment. Josiah Smith, Col.; John Hulbert, Lt. Col.

Overton, 2d Maj.

Eph'm Marvin, Adj.

;

;

;

Isaac Reeve, Maj.

578. Wra. Smith writes to Congress from

May

25, '76, that there

and the Ships of

War

is

;

Isaac

Eben. Dayton, Q. M.

Manor

St.

George,

a communication from Winthrop's Patent?

at the

Hook

;

that one Gyer, a skipper, had

carried off a no. of disaffected persons, mostly from Conn.,

who had

been skulking in the woods, particularly one Fountain, a gunsmith. It is

suspected the British also get water, clams, and oysters.

men have been

minute

stationed there since last

are farmers, they cannot leave the matter

is

15

Monday, but as they

home without ruining

their familes

;

referred to Congress.

579. Lt. John Holliday sends to Gen. Greene, from Far Rocka-

way,

May

29, '76,

Nathan and Lazarus Gyer, of Blue Point, and

Benj. Scribner, taken in a clam boat near against Silas Carman's

Gyer

Landing, O. Bay.

set

7

men

ashore at Fort

Neck

Point,

who

were seen by Gilbert Jones, of the O. Bay Committee, with a prospect-glass. They were examined, May 26, before Joshua Ketcham and B.

Birdsall.

580. June 8, '76.

Jona. Baker and Steph. Fountain, convicted

committees of Brookhaven, Manor St. George, and Patentship of Moriches, of taking up arms and corresponding with the

by the

joint

British ships, and promoting discord among the inhabitants and seducing many to forsake the cause of their country, were brought to Congress by Lt. Wm. Clarke, and committed to safe custody.

Jour. 484.

Nathan and Lazarus Gyre and Jona. Baker were

July 18. Litchfield jail.

581.

Quota of

Suffolk,

200

to reinforce the Continental

582. Inlet,

The

June

sent to

Jour. 530.

;

of Queens, 175; of Kings, 58 men,

army

at

N. Y.

June

7, '76.

guard-boats Montgomerie and Schuyler lay at Fire

I.

19, '76.

583. June 27, '76. Gen. Nath. Woodhull, Ezra L'Hommedieu, John Sloss Hobart, Burnet Miller, Thos. Dealing, David Gelston,

Wm.

Smith, and Thos. Tredwell,Esqs., elected to the 4th Pro. Con-


28

REVOLUTIONARY

gress, with

by a

powers

to establish

SPIRIT.

a new form of government, as appears

Wm.

committee, signed by

certificate of the

Smith, Chairman.

Jour. 515. 584. June 29, '76.

Officers of 2d

Edmund Howell,

Lt.

1st

Comp., 3d Bat., Militia.

Selah

;

Reeves,

2d Lt.

Jas

;

Wells, En. 585.

List of Officers of Col. Smith's Reg.

Col. Josiah Smith

Chaplain, ter

;

John Sands

Lt. Col.

;

Waterman

Adj't Thos.

;

Sergeant Maj. John Stratton

Surgeon, 1st

Q. Master Serg. Maj.

;

Surgeon's Mate,

;

;

Serg'ts

Hugh

;

Jas. Hollid

;

.

Company. Capt. Zeph'h Rogers

Lt. Paul Jones

Abm. Remsen

Maj.

;

Q. Master Increase Carpen-

;

;

1st Lt.

Edward Tapping

;

2d

Gelston, Tim. Halsey, David Lupton

;

Corp's Jehiel Howell, Elias Pierson, Jona. Cook.

2d Comp. Capt. Skudder

Serg'ts

;

Nath'l Piatt

1st Lt.

;*

John Stratton, John

Sam'l Smith

2d

;

Bunce

Carll, Jesse

Lt.

Henry

Corp's Jas.

;

Hubbs, Jed'h Mills, John Hart.

3d Comp. Capt. briel

Wm.

Benj.

Coe

1st Lt. Robt.

;

Furman

2d Lt.

;

Nathan Furman, Gabriel Leveridge Smith, Thos. Gillinworth, John Furman. (See Q. Co.

Serg'ts

Penfold,

4th Comp. Capt. Peter Nostrand Co., p. 85)

;

2d Lt. John Carman

Abm. Probasco

;

1st Lt.

;

Corp's

;

Ga-

p. 93.)

Thos. Williams, (See Q.

Serg'ts Benj. Cornell, Martin Ryer-

;

Rem. Hardenbergh. 5^ Comp. Capt. Thos. Wicks 1st Lt. Brush 2d Lt. Whitman Serg'ts Ketcham, Vail, Sammis Corp's Rusco, Conklin, Kelsey. 6th Comp. Capt. R. Manee 1st Lt. Jotham Townsend 2d Lt. Richard Townsend Serg'ts Wm. Roe, Sam'l Burr, Hicks Corp's son,

Corp'l

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Mitchell, Jackson. (See

Queens Co.,

1th Comp. Capt. Selah Strong [Nath'l

?]

Brewster

;

p. 94.)

1st Lt.

;

Caleb Brewster

Woodhull, Smith, Woodhull

Serg'ts

;

;t

Corp's

2d Lt.

Haw-

kins, Marvin, Lyons.

8th Comp. Capt. Youngs Serg'ts Beasley, King,

(See Q. Co.,

^9^

Conn

;

;

1st Lt.

;

;

Lawey

2d Lt. Isaac Hicks [or

Lowere], Smith.

p. 98.)

Comp. Capt. [Paul] Reeve

Benjamin

John Robert

Corp's Racket,

Serg'ts

;

1st Lt.

Curen [Corwin

?]

;

2d Lt.

Wheelock Roe, Rich'd Hubbard, Nath'l Conklin

;

Corp's Solomon, Havens, Wells.

10th Comp. Capt,

Wm.

Ludlam

;

1st Lt. Increase

Carpenter; 2d


29

SUFFOLK COUNTY. Lt.

Ephraim Marston

Noah

;

Serg'ts Thurston, Higbie

Smith. (See Q. Co.,

;

Corp's Oba. Smith,

p. 97.)

11th Comp. Capt. B. Birdsall.

12th Comp. Capt. Ezekiel Mulford

Hand Benj.

;

1st Lt.

M. Mulford^Pierson, Domini Crook, Ludlam Parsons. t Serg'ts

;

;

Sayre

;

Corp's

2d Lt. [Nath'l]

Henry

Sherrel,

* Capt. Nath'l Piatt, of Col. Smith's Reg't of militia drafts raised on L.

I.,

March 8, '77, of Congress £8, for the last half bounty paid Matthew Beal, and Thomas Peters, privates. Also £141, full of a Pay and Subsistence Roll of part of his company that

rec'd,

Nath'l Smith, 17, 6, in

joined Col. H. B. Livingston's Reg. t Jan. 16, '77.

A Pay

Jour. 828.

Roll for £70, 18, 9, of Caleb Brewster, Lt.

and Cor. Clark, Zophar Hawkins, and Jacob Jones, privates in Capt. Selah Strong's Company, in Col. Smith's Reg., who joined Col. Livingston's Reg., from July 20 to Dec. 29, was paid by Congress. Jour. 774. X

Capt. Hulbert's account current

Pay

Dr.

Roll,

Amount

Aug. 31, 1776,

of billeting,

£332.

17.

137. 15.

Acc't of supplies,

12. 12. 11.

£483.

($72

men, (£28. wages and billeting

for enlisting

officers'

Cr. cash rec'd of

5.

)

Thomas Wickham,

Esq.,

140. 00.

0.

343.

5.

9£.

£482.

5.

H-

Smith Town, Aug. 12,

586. :

I here

'76.

send you inclosed, the Resolution"of the Convention

and a Letter from the President I desire that

9i.

16.),

Balance due,

Sir

8.

2J.

you would with

all

;

likewise a Letter from Gen. Greene.

speed embody

all

the

new

raised Levies

under our command, at the most convenient place that you think proper in your county,

on the way

to

Gen. Greene's encampment.

companies in Suffolk County are

meet you

at Increase Carpenter's

now on

their

march, and

I

Sir, the

expect to

to-morrow, some time in the latter part

of the day. I

am,

Sir,

your humble servant,

JOSIAH SMITH, To

Col.

John Sands

at

Cow Neck.

Col.


30

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

In Convention of the Representatives of the State of New-York,

Harlem, Aug.

at

ately

march

1776, Resolved, That Col. Josiah Smith immedi-

8,

new Levies to

the western part of Nassau Island, and within 2 miles of Brig. Gen. Greene's encampment and that he obey such orders as he may receive" from time to time from Gen. Greene. Harlem, Aug. 8, '76. Sir You will see by the inclosed resolution that you are ordered to march the whole force under your command within 2 miles of the army all his

;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

:

at the

by

I., commanded by Gen. Greene. It is expected Convention, that you order Kings and Queens Counties first, as

west end of L.

this

they are near, and Suffolk to follow as soon as possible. tions,

with the inclosed,

I

am

These direc-

directed to send you with dispatch, not

doubting you will execute them with the utmost diligence.

From your

friend

and very humble servant.

NATH'L WOODHULL,

Pres't.

Col. Josiah Smith.

N. B. If this letter must dispatch your orders pay the cost.

finds to

you in Queens County or Kings, you officers by express, and Congress will

your

[See Greene's Letter, Sec. 93, Queens Co.

Ed.

587.

Huntington, July 23, '76. Yesterday the Freedom and Independence of the Thirteen United Colonies was, with beat of drum, proclaimed at the several places of parade, by reading the Declaration of the General Congress, to-

gether with the Resolutions of our Provincial Convention thereupon

which were approved and applauded by the animated shouts of the people who were present from all the distant quarters of tins district. After which the flag which used to erty on one side, and i.

e.

the

Union

w as T

George

cut

off,

III.

wave on Liberty-pole, having

Lib-

on the other, underwent a reform,

and the

letters

George III. were discarded,

being publicly ripped off; and then an effigy of the Personage, represented by those letters, being hastily fabricated out of base materials, its

with

its

face black like

Dunmore's Virginia [negro] regiment,

head adorned with a wooden crown, and

feathers, like Carleton

its

head stuck

and Johnson's Savages, and

its

in the Union, instead of a blanket or robe of state,

gun-powder, which the original seems

to

be fond

gether with the letters above mentioned,was ploded and burnt to ashes.

of.

hung on

full

of

body wrapped

and lined with

The

whole, to-

a gallows, ex-

In the evening the Committee of this


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

31

town, with a large number of the principal inhabitants sat around the genial board, and drank 13 patriotic toasts,

The

The Convention

gress;

among which were,

and independent States of America; The General Con-

free

the 13 States;

of

Our

principal

military-

Commanders, and success and enlargement to the American Navy. Nor was the memory of our late brave heroes, who have gloriously lost their lives in the cause of Liberty and their Country forgotten. Holt's

The Committee

588.

mounting four cannon Aug.

End

tion of the East

of L.

N. Y. Journal.

Southold expended ÂŁ24. 17.

of

I.

589. Convention send an express on Saturday morning to Suffolk Co. to

Gen. Woodhull, or

in his

Aug.

march without delay

Militia,

with 5 days' provisions into the Western part of Queens all

half the western Reg. of Suffolk Co.

25. Gen.

Woodhull arrived

in

Jamaica, whence he wrote

to the convention for further instructions, but the

my

had not arrived at

I received information

'76.

house from Jamaica half an hour, before

by express from Capt. Thompson of Brook-

haven, that two ships, one brig and three tenders had landed a ber of regular troops between Old Man's and

one o'clock were shooting

detachment designed

for

cattle.

Wading

I

am

who

your party to the eastward, and as our

men

know they

can-

expect them in our bay before morning, the only

harbor in the Sound

but

num-

Rivers,

Major Smith has ordered the

are gone and the wind fresh to the eastward, I well

not lay there.

Ed.

letter is lost

Huntington, Aug. 26,

590.

at

to

by removing or destroying them.

Aug.

I

:

Queens with the horse, to prevent the Queens from falling into the enemy's hands?

the militia of

stock and provisions in either

24,

absence to Lt. Col. Pot-

ter, to

order out

for

4.

19, '76, as field-pieces for the protec-

:

I

have not ordered any

men from

here as yet,

mustering them to make as good opposition as possible.

We must have help here I think Gen.

great tumult.

;

every thing possible for

Washington should be acquainted.

me

shall be done.

Our women

are in

In great haste, Yours,

GILBERT POTTER. To

Brig. Gen. Woodhull.

591.

Benj. Havens, Nath'l

Williams, Philip Allen,

Hendrickson and Nathaniel Seaman were empowered

to

jr.,

John

purchase

all


REVOLUTIONARY

32 fat cattle

and sheep

in

Queens and

Commissary General, and

drive

SPIRIT.

Suffolk Co's on account of the

them down

Gen. Woodhull's En-

to

campment.

Westward

592.

Gentlemen

who

me

left

:

—Inclosed

I

of Queens Co., Aug. 27, '76.

send you a copy of a letter from Col. Potter,

yesterday at 11 o'clock, after bringing about 100

at Jamaica.

Major Smith has,

from Suffolk

Co.

I expect, all the rest that

There has

about

40 of the

from the Regiments in Queens Co., and about longing to Kings and Queens Co's, which got

all

is

militia

fifty

near

men

was

me

to

come

to

me

joined

of the troop be-

all I

expect.

have

I

southward of the Hills in Kings Co. drove to the

the cattle

eastward of the cross road between the two Co's, and have placed guards

and

sentries from the

North road

to the

South side of the Island, in

order to prevent the cattle going back, and to prevent the communica-

am

within about six miles of the

Their light-horse,* has

been within two miles of

enemy.

tions of the Tories with the

enemy's camp.

me, and unless

We

shall

I

men

have more

I

our stay here will answer no purpose.

soon want to be supplied with provision,

if

we

tarry here.

I

am, gentlemen,

Your most

obedient humble servant

NATH'L WOODHULL. * See Queens Co., Sec. 99, 593.

Reg's

Aug.

to join

Note.— Ed. orders Col. Smith's and

26. Convention

Remsen's

Gen. Woodhull, and that he then take post on the

Queens

heights near the west of

for preventing the depredations

Co., or in

any convenient

and incursions of the

place,

Enemy

:

and

that he call out the militia and other inhabitants to protect those re-

moving, or to destroy stock and other provisions. vent intercourse with the

enemy and secure

He

is

also to pre-

suspicious persons and

search their houses for papers. Smith's and Remsen's Regiments were now shut up in the American Lines, so that no assistance ever reached Woodhull. Ed. Jamaica, Aug. 27, '76.

594.

Gentlemen: ing brought

all

I

am now

at Jamaica, with less than 100

have sent them off with the Troops of Horse, with orders the rest Eastward of this place to the East end of to put

am

them

men

into the fields

and

set a

to

hav-

;

the cattle from the westward, southward of the hills

;

and

take

all

Hempstead Plains,and

guard over them.

The enemy,

I

informed, are intrenching from the Heights near Howard's, South-


33

SUFFOLK COUNTY. ward.*

I

have

received yours, with several resolutions, which I

now

was in my power to put in execution, and Remsen, mentioned in yours, join me with wish

other assistance immediately,

moving East, and tinue

but, unless Col's

it

I

I shall

their

Smith

Regiments, or some

not be able, for the people are

cannot get any assistance from them.

here as long as I can, in hopes of a reinforcement

all

I shall

con-

but

none

;

if

woods.

and drive the stock before me, into the Unless you Col's Smith and Remsen, I think cannot join me.

can send

me some

comes soon,

this place.

I shall

I

retreat

other assistance, I fear I shall soon be obliged to quit

hope soon

to

hear from you.

I

Your most obedient,humble

am, gentlemen,

servant,

NATH'L WOODHULL. To *

the

A

Hon. Convention of the State of N. Y.

mistake of course.

This

appears

letter

to

at

Harlem.

have been received

and acted upon by the Convention before the preceding one, Ed. so entered in the Journal.

at least

it

is

595.

The battle of Brooklyn had now been fought

(for

an account of

which, see Kings Co.) and the enemy had so completely surprised the American scouts, on the morning of Aug. 27, that not one probably had escaped to apprize

and warn him to

flee

Woodhull of the

loss of our outposts,

from impending danger, for we find him the day

after the defeat yet at Jamaica, writing a letter to the

waiting for a reply, at

once from

when

it

his perilous proximity.

596. Major Lawrence,

Convention and

behooved him to withdraw speedily and

Ed.

who came on

a message from Woodhull,

informs Convention the morning of Aug. 28, that Dr. told

him

that a

number of

Ab'm Riker

scattering troops [British] had posted

themselves, Aug. 27, on the ridge of

maica; that they had been in

hills

many

between Newtown and Ja-

of

the

houses

;

had taken

and drink but had not plundered as he understood. Convention, Aug. 28, order Maj. Lawrence to wait on Gen. Wash-

victuals

ton with a copy of

WoodhulPs

letter,

and inform him

and Remsen's Regiments may be sent

to

how Smith

Woodhull by way of

Flushing.

Washington declined sending the Regiments as he could not Ed. Convention also order Mr. Van Wyck to repair immediately to Flushing to gain intelligence of the situation of the enemy and what spare them.

places are occupied by Woodhull, and that he dispatch a boat with


34 all

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

possible expedition with the information, at the

ing out the most suitable place for

same time pointWoodhulPs reinforcement to land. Flushing, Aug. 28, '76.

Gentlemen:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I am informed by Thos. Thorne, a member of Committee, who just came from Gen. Woodhuli, that he was at Jamaica

;

and that he [Thorne]

came from White Stone that the ships of war lay between Thorn's Point and Great Neck that there can be no danger of bringing up our men to this place, if [we] can get them up just

;

;

this evening.

I

think

will be proper to

it

soon as possible by the same boat, as just going to

Jamaica

send this intelligence off as

cannot get any other.

I

am, Gentlemen, your most

I

Humble

obt.

VAN WYCK.

the Pro. Congress.

[Whether Van Wyck ever reached Woodhuli or Perhaps he

sible to tell.

fell

into the

were

in companies of 8 or 10,

not,

impos-

it is

hands of the light-horse, who,

Ed.]

pillaging at Flushing.

Jamaica, Aug. 28, 597. press,

you

Gentlemen

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I

wrote 2

letters to

'76.

you yesterday, one by ex-

;* and also sent my Brigade-major to my situation, and I expected an answer to some of but my express informed me he was detained till last

and another by Mr. Harper

to let

them

am

servant,

COR'S To

I

to the General.

you know

last night

:

night for an answer.

a copy of the

message by tion.

I

last,

my

I

have

now

rec'd yours of the 26th,

without a single word of answer to

brigade-major.

I

must again

let

my

which

you know

have about 70 men, and about 20 of the troop, which

force I have or can expect,

and

I

am

daily

growing

less in

is

only

letters, or

my

the

situa-

is all

the

number. The

people are so alarmed in Suffolk, that they will not any more of them

march and as to Col's Smith and Remsen's regiments, they cannot join me, for the communication is cut off between us. I have sent about 1100 cattle to the great fields on the plains yesterday, about 300 more gone and I have ordered a guard of an off this morning to the same place :

;

officer

and 7

They can

privates.

and horses are worn out with toward Hempstead to take

;

them along.

get no water in those fields.

fatigue.

The

cattle are not all

My men gone off

ordered them yesterday, but they were not able

I I

brought yesterday about 300 from Newtown.

think the cattle are in as

much danger on

and have ordered the inhabitants

to

the north as

remove them.

If

on the south

I

side,

you cannot send


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

35

me an immediate reinforcement, I am afraid I shall have no men with me by to-morrow night for they consider themselves in an enemy's And if I can have no reinforcement, I beg you will send very country. ;

particular directions

them, or leave them,

what

I shall

for I shall

do with the stock, whether

not be able to get them,

I shall kill

together and

all

tend them [even] if the men I have will all stay with me. I beg you would immediately send at least 2 members as a committee that I may have their advice for unless you do, I must quit, for I hope the Con:

vention does not expect

me

to

make I

brick with [out] straw.

am, Gentlemen,

Your most

ob't,

NATH'L WOODHULL. [*

ing,

Robert Harper had just carried .£200

to the

and was on

his return to the Convention.

[The above

is

Committee of Flush-

Ed.]

the last letter ever written by the General

ten probably only a few hours before his capture

;

and

it

writ-

was while

waiting for a reply that he was overtaken by the enemy.

In com-

Aug.

28, that

pliance with his request, the Convention ordered,

Judge Hobart and Jas. Townsend be a Committee to repair to Gen. Woodhull, to assist him with their advice, and that they impress boats and persons to convey themselves to the General with the ut-

most dispatch all

as

;

and that they and the General be instructed

to

cause

such stock and grain in Queens and the western part of Suffolk,

may

be in danger of falling into the enemy's hands and cannot be

removed, to be destroyed.]

Jour. 596.

Townsend and Hobart, on arriving in Queens Co., Woodhull's capture, when they hastened on to Hunting-

[Messrs.

heard of

ton— Ed.] Aug.

Convention yet

29.

der Sam'l Townsend, a

in

member

senger to him (fearing a

letter

ignorance of Woodhull's

fate, or-

of their body, to be sent as a mes-

might

fall

into the enemies' hands) to

give an account of their proceedings upon the subject of his letters,

and of Washington's sen.

letter declining to

[Townsend probably

598.

[What

Brooklyn,

I

am

part, if any, the

L.

not able to say.

and perhaps acted as inner guards. to

New-York,

send Cols. Smith and

did not set out. I.

Ed.]

Rem-

Jour. 599.

regiments bore in the battle of

They were hemmed Col.

in the Lines,

Smith joined in the retreat

as appears by the following letter.

Ed.]


36

REVOLUTIONARY

SPIRIT.

Camp To

the President of the Convention.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

at Brooklyn,

I just

Aug. 29,

now received

'76.

orders from

march my Reg. over to N. Y., and there to receive orders from the Convention of N. Y., which I desire you to send me by the bearer, Col. Phinehas Fanning.

the General to

JOSIAH SMITH,

Col.

[Convention order Col. Smith's Reg. to Hoorn's Hook, but it was soon disbanded, " the Col. giving leave for every man to shift for himself in getting their families

and

effects off L. I."

Ed.]

[The death of Gen. Woodhull has not been described

in

any

his-

tory of the Revolution, and as the accounts both written and traditional

we

are conflicting,

insert all the notices of his capture

have met with, and leave the reader

to

own

form his

and death

599- Death of Gen. Woodhull, from Wood's L.

I.,

we

Ed.]

opinion.

pages 88, 89.

Ed. o/1826. Before General Woodhull had reached the outposts of the rican

army* he

Ame-

discovered that the British had possession of the

country between him and the

left wing of the American army, and any farther advance would only expose his troops, without effecting any good purpose, and therefore ordered a retreat. The

that

Gen. remained

in the rear

companions, waiting, as

[Lawrence].

A

and retreated slowly with only one or two the return of his Brigade Major

is said, for

severe thunder shower, as

to take refuge in a public

is

lage], and before he left the house

British Dragoons, and 71st

Infantryf [Highlanders],

who had been

Reg. of British

dispatched in pursuit of the

under his command, accompanied by some disaffected inhabi-

militia

tants [of Jamaica] as guides.

The

to give

them

to be a

Major Baird$ of the

God

[vil-

he was overtaken by a detach-

ment of the 17th Reg. of

"

him

supposed, obliged

house about 2 miles east of Jamaica

his sword.

save the King."

The Gen. stept to the doorj in order who first approached him, said

ruffian

71st, as is reported, ordered

The General

which he most cowardly and cruelly

replied, "

God

him

save us

to say all,"

on

assailed the defenceless General

with his broadsword, and would have killed him on the spot,

if

had not been prevented by the interference of an

more

officer of

he

honor and humanity, said to be Major Delancy|| of the Dragoons,

who

arrested his savage violence.

The Gen. was

badly

wounded

in


SUFFOLK COUNTY. the head, and one or both arms * * * * * the wrist. It is

37

was mangled from the shoulder

to

said that one of the battalions employed in this inglorious

warfare against an unresisting individual, or some other one, was com-

manded by a Major Crewe,1T a distant kinsman of the Gen., and that when he came to be apprized of that fact and of the circumstances of the case, he was so mortified, that he either resigned his commission and quit the service, ®r obtained permission to leave the army,

and returned to England. [* It is

now

demonstrated by documents that Gen.

dered to join the A. army at

all,

W. was

not or-

but to drive off the stock towards the

east.]

[t Could foot soldiers have kept suit of the

General

Gowanus, Aug. [I

up with dragoons in

Besides, the 71st Reg.

1

their hot pur-

was engaged

in battle at

27.]

%

The accounts vary

whether mounting

of the precise

manner

of the General's capture

his horse, stepping to the door, taken in the

the barn, or after an ineffectual

dark in

attempt at concealment, or on the

piazza.] [§ In '76 there

was a Capt.

(not Major) Sir Jas. Baird of the 71st

Reg.] [11

See Queens Co., Sec. 112.]

Major Crewe (17th Dragoons),

[IT

slow about [I

it,

for

we

find his

name

if

he ever did resign, was very

in the

army

list

in '78.]

have italicised the words implying doubt or uncertainty

in the

They occur nine times! In his first edition, 1824, Wood says, " Woodhull was suffered by the officers to be so cut and mangled, that he died of his wounds a few days after his capture." above account.

—Ed.]

A New Haven paper

of Sep. 4, says, "Woodhull, late President

New-York Congress, for was wounded on the head with

of the

refusing to give up his side arms,

a cutlass and had a bayonet thrust

through his arm."

[The mention of

cutlass and bayonet

would

indicate that both

horse and foot were present at Woodhull's capture. Col. Livingston says, Southold, prisoner ter

Wed.

last,

Aug.

3

finally

31, "

wound

Ed.]

Woodhull was taken

28, and cruelly treated

he was taken he received a

language, and was

Aug.

by the horse.

in his head and

committed close prisoner

to

much

Af-

uncivil

Jamaica

jail."


REVOLUTIONARY

38 [*

Does

this refer to his

SPIRIT.

being ordered to say "

God

save the king!"

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed.}

Wm.

Warne, who

Long

left

Fishkill, Sep. 7th, that "

Island Sep. 5th, '76, reports at

one of the Light Horsemen told he had

taken Gen. Woodhull in the dark in Increase Carpenter's barn

would answer when he spoke

that before he

to the General,

he had

cut him on the head and both arms." Jour. 617, 619. " Sundry prisoners taken on L. I. Aug. 27, were, in an inhuman

and barbarous manner, murdered

arms

particularly a General

;

hacked to pieces with cutlasses, when

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ethan

Allen's Life, written

[That the

and prevent is

light horse

March

alive,

highly probable in

and

itself,

86, says

"

:

On

is

Militia,

by the

light

who was

horsemen."

'79.

were sent expressly

his driving off the live stock,

Howard, aged (who acted as and started in

had surrendered their

after they

Woodhull, of the

to capture

Woodhull's party,

which they so much needed,

confirmed by

all

scouts to the enemy), heard where Woodhull's party lay,

him

quest of

but on hearing an exaggerated account of

;

The day

his force, they returned."

after the battle, they set out

him, and entered Jamaica village at tea-time, inquiring for

after

They surrounded

hull.

who

Wm.

tradition.

the night before the battle, the light horse

again

Wood-

Hinchman, a noted Whig, who had house, expecting perhaps to find Woodhull there. the house of Robert

ran out of the back door, but was stopped by the soldiers

already surrounded the

Hinchman was next seen in front of his house on his knees with hands uplifted and the enemy flourishing their swords over his head. His life was spared, but he was put in jail that night and next day sent westward.

The

light horse rode

on east

where they saw two horses

and supposed the

riders

(as

till

they

came

to

Carpenter's inn,

Mrs. Hinchman used to

must be near.

tell

the story),

After searching a while to no

purpose, they fired their pistols into the thatched roof of the barn, but as the straw

doors and

Wm. was

was wet

felt

in the

it

would not

hay with

Everett's boot.

On

by a

till

cut at

soldier

kindle.

their

swords

They then broke open till

his putting forth his

an

officer

the

they pricked the heel of

head

stopped him.

to surrender,

he

Gen. Woodhull was

brought wounded the same evening into the back room of her house

and

laid

on a bed,

He begged pit

his

arm hacked,

as a butcher

would a shin of

beef.

Mrs. H. not to leave him alone, and that her son might

up with him that

night.

" Don't be uneasy, General," said the kind


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

39

hostess, " I don't expect to go to bed to-night."

Woodhull,

it

is

said " he

was confined

(In Knapp's Life of

in the stone church, exposed

The next morning enemy would have made Woodhull walk with other prisoners to the British army, but he was too faint. Whithead Hicks had previously offered his carriage for the use of the wounded General, but the kind offer was rejected, incredible as it may seem, by Sir Wm. Erskine At last, as David Lamberson, also a prisoner, was too unwell to walk, they made him take his own chair and Woodhull with him in it. The General, with other prisoners, was probably first taken to Howe's head-quarin his blood-stained garments, to the gaze of all.")

the

!

or

We

near Brooklyn, to be registered.

ters

manner

of his confinement

brought on board a prison-ship off

How

different

and Lord

know

New

tertained and soon exchanged.

Was

it

after,

when he was

Utrecht.

was Woodhull's treatment from

Sterling, taken prisoners the

lar or Continental

nothing of the place

about a fortnight

till

that of Gen. Sullivan

day before, who were kindly enbecause they were of the Regu-

army, while Woodhull, though President of the N.

Y. Convention, was but a general of militia

?

Ed.]

Robert Troup, Esq., a Lieutenant in Col. Lasher's battalion of

New- York

militia,

was made

prisoner by a British scouting party,

about three o'clock, A. M., Aug. 27,

five miles

west of Jamaica.

After a week's confinement at Flatbush, he with seventy or eighty officers,

was put on board

a small vessel or transport, lying between

Gravesend and the Hook, which had been employed in bringing cattle

from England.

After Troup's release, he

treatment he had received "

;

and

at the close of

That while he was confined on board

it

made oath he adds

of the

:

the said transport, Brigadier

General Woodhull was also brought on board, in a shocking mangled condition ture,

:

that deponent asked the General the particulars of his cap-

and was

told by the said General that he

of light-horse, under the

command

he was asked by the said Captain

had been taken by a party

of Captain Oliver if

De Lancey:

he would surrender

;

that

that he an-

in the affirmative, provided, he would treat him like a gentleman, which Captain De Lancey assured him he would whereupon the General delivered his sword, and that immediately after the said Oliver De Lancey, junior, struck him, and others of the said party imitating his example, did cruelly cut and hack him in the manner he then was; that, although he was in such a mangled and horrible situation, he had,

swered

;

nevertheless, been obliged to sleep on the bare floor of the said trans-


40

REVOLUTIONARY

port, if a lieutenant of the

not lent him a mattress

:

SPIRIT.

man-of-war who guarded the transport had Woodhull was afterwards car-

that General

New

ried to the hospital in the church of

Utrecht, where he perished, as

deponent was on good authority informed, through want of care, and other necessaries

and further

:

deponent saith not.

this

"

"

Sworn

the 17th of January, 1777, before

ÂŤ<

What Troup

Gouv. Morris."

heard of Woodhull 's perishing through want of care

and other necessaries, ter

Robert Troup.

me,

is

confirmed by the following extract of a

let-

from Dr. Silas Holmes, of Norwich, a prisoner and assistant

who

surgeon in the British Hospital,

He

says

himself attended Woodhull.

:

" The wounded prisoners taken at the battle of Brooklyn were put in the churches of Flatbush

and

New

Utrecht, but being neglected and

unattended, were wallowing in their fected

and putrid

air.

Ten days

own

filth,

and breathed an

after the battle, Dr.

in-

Richard Bailey

was appointed to superintend the sick. He was humane, and dressed the wounded daily, got a sack-bed, sheet and blanket for each prisoner, and

distributed the patients into

Woodhull

offered to

the

pay Dr. Bailey

adjacent barns.

for his

When

husband, he replied, he had done no more than his duty, and

was any thing

What

a pity

Samaritan in the for nine

was to me." Woodhull had not

due,

Mrs.

care and attention to her if there

it

earlier stages

fallen into the

of his illness

!

hands of

this

good

His wounds, neglected

days in the hot months of August and September, had assumed

such a malignant form, that not even the medical could avail to save his valuable

Proceedings of

the

skill

of Dr. Bailey

life.

N. Y. Convention in behalf of Gen. Woodhidl, Sep. 18, '76.

"

Whereas

this

Convention, after

many anxious

inquiries, hath at

length received certain intelligence that the Hon. Nath'l Woodhull, Brig. Gen. of the militia, and President of the Convention of this State, is at

present in the hands of the enemy, and that he

was made

captive

whilst actually employed in executing the Resolutions of this House.

And Whereas

they are loudly called upon not only by the sacred

voice of honor and public

duty, but likewise by the sympathizing

principles of personal affection and respect, to exert themselves in


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

41

restoring so valuable a person to that liberty lost in

which he has hmiself

endeavoring to secure to others that inestimable blessing

Therefore, Resolved, that a State be immediately

made

of the prisoners at the disposal of this

list

out,

and transmitted

to

Gen. Washington,

and that John Sloss Hobart, Esq. wait on his Excellency with the earnest request of this Convention, that he will be pleased to give his assistance

and advice in negotiating his exchange."

Hobart thus writes from

Gentlemen

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I

Fairfield, Oct. 7, '76

wrote to Convention

made

giving an account of the progress I had

change of Gen. Woodhull, since which intelligence of his death.

arm was taken

oft*,

The wound

but the mortification

I

:

Camp

from

at Kingsbridge,

in negotiating the ex-

have received the melancholy

in his still

arm

mortified,

and the

continued, and in a few

days put an end to that useful life. He was attended in his dying moments by his lady, who was permitted to remove the corpse to his seat, where it was interred about the 23d ult. These particulars I have from Capt. Benajah Strang, of Islip, by whose door the procession passed on its

way

to St. George's.

[The

ballad on

Cor. 346.

Woodhull's death (Thompson,

II.

423,)

was

first

published in the N. Y. Nat. Advocate, Feb. 28, 1821, and thence copied into the L. license)

I.

papers.

by some person of

called at Carpenter's Inn,

A tragedy has 1849. in

The

also

Life of

It

was probably written (with

leisure,

who

in his rides

poetic

from the

city

and heard the story from the Landlady.

been written on the same subject, by Mr. Lester,

Woodhull may be found in Thompson, and See Queens Co., Sec. Ill, 112. Ed.]

also

Knapp's Biography. [The

original Journal of Col.

Woodhull, 3d, N. Y. Reg., kept during

the expedition of Gen. Amherst, against Montreal, in 1760,

possession of his descendants at Mastic.

Ed.]

is

now

in


PART

II.

SUBMISSION OF SUFFOLK COUNTY. 600. [The consternation of the inhabitants of Suffolk, at

hearing the news of the disastrous battle of Brooklyn and the

subsequent abandonment of the Island better understood from the following scription

to

I

can give.

to the

enemy,

may

be

documents than any de-

Ecl.~\

Hobart and Townsend who had been sent by the Convention advise with Woodhull, write as follows, from Hunting-

ton, "

Aug. 30:

To

Queens

our unspeakable mortification

we

found,

when we arrived

Co., that the militia had dispersed, and Gen.

fallen into the

hands of the enemy.

in

Woodhull had

We then proceeded with all

where we could have any enemy were in full possession of the western parts of Queens Co., as far as Jamaica, and We have orderthe Disaffected from the east were gone in to them. ed the militia of Suffolk to rendezvous here, and written to Col. Muldispatch to this town, as the only place

prospect of making an effectual stand, as the

fordof E. Hampton, to come up and take command, and have borrow-

ed ÂŁ320 from the Treasurer of Q. Co.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Aug.

31.

being able to cross at Sand's Point, has returned. of this town, are

have

left

them.

now under

We

Our express not

A

no. of militia

arms, but they complain their officers

have exerted ourselves to recover the people

from the consternation into which they were thrown by the precipitate retreat of Woodhull's party.

A

party of Kings Co. horse have

crossed the sound from this place, leaving their horses to follow in the next boat.

We

[they did not return.

stopped the horses and

Ed.].

with Gen. Woodhull are

We

rallied, to

men back who were companies. As

sent for the

purpose after the party

form the rest into


43

SUFFOLK COUNTY. to field officers

we shall

Col. Potter is gone is

be at a

off,

loss, as Col.

Floyd

with us and begins to be in

officers

Reg. of Suffolk Co., Aug. 30, Smithtown, by Eben'r Dayton, Q. M,

and men of part of Brookhaven and

at

Maj. Jeffery Smith sent orders to Adjutant Philip Roe,

29.

4 companies in Brookhaven to march immediately to

He

Piatt Carlls' in Huntington.

among

spirit

Congress, Lt.

2d Major Brush Cor. 291.

1st

Aug.

:

spirits.

Narrative of the proceedings of the

to order the

is at

Major Smith resigned

1st

By

the men.

did so,

and there appeared a high

the middle of next day

companies

3

arrived to Epenetus Smith's, Smithtown, and the other, Capt. Nich.

Roe's, was coming up. was gone to Huntington

It

was

desired the companies to wait

Meanwhile the

militia

reported at Smith's that the Major

to see Messrs. till

Hobart and Townsend, and

his return,

which was not

were uneasy and eager to march

till

dark.

Hempstead the woods E. of to

make a stand in At dusk the Major returned and called the officers into a room, and told them he thought " it dangerous to march farther West, as their forces would not be sufficient to oppose the enemy, and he very much gave up the Island they must fall in the enemy's hands, it would not be good policy to incense a cruel enemy by being taken in arms if they remained quietly at home, they would fare Col. Potter was better, and that he should resign his commission gone off and left him alone, and Maj. Brush had judged it unsafe to Plains, to bring off the stock and

the Plains.

;

;

;

Capt. Thompson said company to return home immediately."

proceed against the enemy, unless reinforced.

he would give orders,

Major

for his

he would give no orders as he designed to decline his

S. said

commission (but advised them to wait from Hobart and Townsend) their

;

till

they could have orders

whereupon the

milita repaired to

homes.

Cor. 292.

Sam'l Buell writes from Sag Harbor, Aug. 30,

'76, that

he has just

West end of the Island, that the ministerial army are on this side our army. The enemy have 200 horse whose riders were to dine, Aug. 28, at Hempstead. The Hessians fight terribly. I am with Col. Livingston. Will you throw over a numreceived direct intelligence from the

ber of Troops

2

Trumbull, V. 444.

H. B. Livingston writes from Sag Harbor, Aug. 30,

'76, that

he


44 has

SUBMISSION OF

command

to protect

danger.

of a detachment of 200 troops by order of Washington,

and stock.

inhabitants

"Send

This force

is

over forces in the night, that they

and in

insufficient

may

not be seen by

the British ships in the Sound."

Robt. Hempstead, Ch'n of a Committee meeting, at

Aug. 31,

Southhold»

have received several expresses from the middle of the Island, that the enemy's scouting party of about 300 horse and 400 foot with a no. of tory recruits, are about penetrating into Suf'76, writes that they

folk Co., as they have already marched as far as the West part of Hempstead Plains, where they took Gen. Woodhull prisoner. " Will you aid us with men and ammunition, as our men are chiefly drawn off

—not able

750

to raise over

men in the whole Co.

If you send

men, send

provisions also, except fresh."

Maltby Gelston, Ch'n of the Committee of S. andE. Hampton, met Hampton, Aug. 31, '76, writes to the same effect.

at Bridge

into the

Sag Harbor, Aug. 31, that Gen Woodhull is fallen hands of the King's troops. Two days ago they drove 1500

head of

cattle

Buell writes from

from Hempstead Plains to their army.

to enter Suffolk with

of 90

men

300 horse and a company

They

of foot.

are about

3 Companies

each are stationed here with one-third of our militia,

who

march immediately up the Island. They are fortifying 15 miles hence, where the Island is but 15 rods wide, where 200

are ordered to

men

can oppose 2,000.

H. B. Livingston,

Half our

at

militia is

away.

Camp, River Head, Sep.

1, '76, writes that

Plobart has brought a letter from Huntington.

H. B. Livingston, Saybrook Harbor, Sep. he marched

to

4, '76, writes that

on Sat.

last

River Head, within about 50 miles of the British Light

Horse, with his detachment of 200 men, and the Suffolk militia, but

when

the militia heard the Island

mit and

fled to their

homes.

He

was given

up, they proposed to sub-

retreated to Cont., having disarmed

70 of the inhabitants and brought off 4 cannon with baggage and some provisions.

To

tlie

Inhabitants of Suffolk County.

601. His Excellency Gen.

manding

enjoin and order

upon your said

Howe

having appointed

officer for the eastern part of this Island, I

;

strictly

persons whatsoever in your County of Suffolk,

all

peril, to

county

me Com-

do hereby

use your utmost

that all

efforts to preserve the

peace of

Committee-men and others acting under the

authority of the Rebels, immediately do cease and remain at their re-


45

SUFFOLK COUNTY. spective homes, that every

man

in

arms lay them down forthwith and

surrender themselves on pain of being treated as rebels

by exhort

all

and

:

by furnishing them with whatever lays in their power.

In particu-

they bring in their cattle (except milch cows and calves) for

lar that

their supply,

gage,

I here-

persons to be aiding and assisting His Majesty's Forces

&c,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

and their wagons and horses for transporting their bag-

which they

for all

shall be fully paid,

His Majesty having

sent his army, not for the oppression, but for the protection of the inhabitants

But

:

submission in

all

I

must

also signify that unless they

show

a dutiful

respects, and an immediate compliance with these

orders respecting the cattle and wagons, I shall be under the neces-

my command

of marching the forces under

sity

without delay into

the county, and lay waste the property of the disobedient, as persons

unworthy His Majesty's clemency.

WILL. ERSKINE, Head-Quarters

in

Queens County, Aug.

Jamaica, Sep.

602.

Sir

:

Brig'r Gen'L

29, 1776.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I

am

ordered by His Ex. the Hon.

commander-in-chief of

all

Wm.

his Majesty's forces in

Howe,

1, '76.

Gen'l. and

N. A., from Nova

Scotia to the Floridas, on the application of the County of Suffolk, by

Nath'l Woodhull and Sam'l Philips,

who have signified to him that the down their arms and again

inhabitants of said Co. are desirous to lay

become

loyal

and obedient subjects

security of the inhabitants, he

is

;

that for the peace

and ease and

willing to accept of their submission

and promise them protection, on the King's Colonels, or other of Militia, respectively, causing the their

roll

down

of submis-

and rejecting the orders of Congress and Committees,

totally refusing

of Gov't., and in

inferiors

through the county to lay

arms, take the oath of allegiance, and sign the said

sion, disclaiming

and

men

obedience to them, and to obey the legal authority

all

places of worship in future to pray for the

and royal family, as was used before the present unprovoked

King

rebellion.

OLIVER DELANCEY, Major Gen'l of

the Militia in the Southern

District of the Colony of

To

N. Y.

Col. Conklin.

Huntington, Sep.

603.

Sir

:

You

are hereby directed to give orders to

Capts., or next

commanding

folk Co., to call their several

3*

all

2, '76.

the King's

officers of Militia, in the 3d Bat. of

companies together,

Suf-

at the usual places,


46

SUBMISSION OF

immediately, and to order those that have taken up arms against the

King, to lay them down and take the oath of allegiance to the King,

and sign a

of submission, disclaiming and rejecting the orders

roll

of Congress or Committees, and to obey the legal authority of Gov-

This

ernment.

is

by order of Gen. Howe. O.

DELANCEY.

have inclosed a true copy of the writing sent

I

me by

Gen.

Howe.

To

Phineas Fanning.

Col.

Sep. 2, '76.

Israel

Wood,

President of the Trustees of Huntington

writes to Col. Livingston to disperse his

on him

army

or the Regulars will be

the people are in a doleful situation, have received the Procla-

;

mation and sent in

their resignations

yesterday.

Smithtown did the

same. Col.

Abm. Gardiner

Hedges to the

at

Sagg and of

oath.

the oath.

administered the oath of allegianoe to the peo-

He

and South Hampton.

ple of East

on Montauk were driven in

cattle

at

Coram,

Harrison says, Sep.

Bay and Hempstead, and proceeded as

them

forced

7, '76,

the

far as

to Erskine.

Tories

before Sep. 7, '76.

Ministerial Troops have been to O.

the

disaffected have joined to assist the

Howe

Setauket.

stock or persons going off the Island.

mission and some recruits. allegiance,

Hampton, and

Southold met by order of Col. Phineas Fanning to take

The

were enlisting

surrounded the house of Col.

Col. Mulford at East

Wm.

and Thos. Smith, of

enemy,

has set guards to prevent

Isaac

Ketcham has got a com-

Smith, of

,

Hog I., receives men were going

administers oaths of submissions.

Col.

moving westward from Con't to bring off gunpowder and flour which one Ireland had sold to the British Col. Jos. Smith was in Con't. Jour. 612. Wm. Warne, who left Nassau Island, Sep. 5, says Suffolk Co. had given up, and Gen. Howe sent word if they would testify their loyalty, they must send him 200 wagons, and they sent 300 to remove baggage from N. Utrecht to Hellgate. Jour. 619. Before Oct. 7, '76, 200 infantry and 100 cavalry were at Huntington Livingston

is

;

;

to force the people to join the British

Oba. Jones Sep. 13, '76. tion,

to

Troops.

Jour. 671.

Uriah Rogers.

Zeb. Howell, an Express, brings Delancey's Proclama-

dated Sep. 11, from Jamaica to South Hampton, and says, " British

Head-Quarters are

at

Jamaica, and 2

men must

be sent to Jamaica to


SUFFOLK COUNTY. Gen.

Howe

47

a true account of Suffolk Co."

to give

Setauket,

was appointed

Hampton

will

窶年athan "Woodhull, of

and E. and S. Sagg Meeting-House, to appoint

the west part of Suffolk,

for

meet, Sep. 14,

at

another.

Jamaica, Queens Co., Sep.

604.

His Ex. the Hon.

Wm.

5, '76.

Howe, Gen. and commander-in-chief

of

all

His Majesty's forces within the Colonies lying on the Atlantic Ocean,

from Nova Scotia

me

to raise

to

West

to re-establish order

and

gov't, within the

concealed rebels from

all

and other listing

among His

essential purposes

men

Florida, inclusive,

&c,

having authorized

a Brigade of Provincials solely for the defence of this Island, to apprehend, or drive

do hereby, for the encouragement of en-

I

;

same:

Majesty's well-affected subjects,

in the county of Suffolk, give notice, that

upon any persons

of good recommended characters, raising a company of 70 men, they

have commissions

shall

pay the

and

:

for

one Capt., one Lt., and one Ensign, and

and subsisted as the

shall be paid

it is

officers

and

soldiers are in the British

hoped the inhabitants of the county

men wanted

for the service, as it will

will cheerfully raise

prevent the disagreeable busi-

ness of detaching them, which I shall be under the necessity of doing, if

the companies cannot be raised without.

my hand, the date above. OLIVER DELANCEY, Brig. Geril.

Given under

Jamaica, Sep. 11, '76.

605. I

am

ordered by His Ex. Gen.

Howe

to write to

you, and order

the fat cattle and sheep in Suffolk Co. to be immediately driven to

all

down

Jamaica, where proper persons will be appointed to ascertain the

weight of them

may

be paid

;

;

give certificates of the value of them, that the owners

keeping a distinct account of those

long to the people forced

down

for

who

the

are in actual rebellion,

cattle,

whose

&c,

refreshment of the King's Troops.

that be-

must be

cattle

This order

must be speedily obeyed, or the county will otherwise feel the resentment of the King's Troops. Reserving only as many cattle as is necessary for their

own

subsistence.

my hand, the above date. OLIVER DELANCEY, Brig.

Given under

606. 64 men,

women, and

children

are daily coming off to the Continent.

Sam'l Buell, Sep.

Hampton,

that Gov.

7, '76,

came

to Milford,

Gen.

and nos.

Sep. 4.

supports the request of the Trustees of E.

Trumbull would not carry off

their stock

and

ef-


48

SUBMISSION OF

fects.

"

sory,

we

We

are subjects of His Majesty,

King George

and

;

if

acces-

will be exposed to his displeasure."

Wharves

Sag Harbor crowded with emigrants. Hampton, Sept. 22, '76, that the people are as a torch on fire at both ends, which will be speedily consumed, for the Con't Whigs carry off their stock and produce, and the British punish them for allowing it to go hopes the Whigs will not oppress the opSep. 15.

at

Buell writes from E.

pressed, but let the stock alone.

Dan'l Collins' Bill for going from Sag Harbor to E. Hampton, and taking from Col. Gardiner's house 130 firearms and 3 silver-hilted swords, and from Col. Mulford's, 3 casks powder and 2 boxes lead,

and

at another time, 3

Hampton, was £14.

Convention paid £44.

Dec. 24, '76.

M.

casks powder from

Gelston, Esq., of S.

16. 5. to

John Field and £630.

4.

to others, for freight of vessels to Con't.

Jas.

Webb

rec'd

$3

per day for hire of his sloop, Sep. 6 to 30, in

transporting stock and inhabitants from L.

to

I.

Con't.

Jour. 779.

Dr. Jona. Havens, Steph. Howell, and others, brought off goods from L.

I.

Convention paid £64. 10. lies

and

effects of

for freight

and passage

to Con't, of fami-

Dan'l Haines, Dan'l Hedges, Mat. Osborn, Jas. Jen-

nings, Elisha Mulford, Linus Dibble, Isa. Franks, and Jona. Tuttle.

Dec. 31/76.

Jour. 881.

Before Sep. 27, Capt. Rodgers carried off from Huntington Sam'l

Skidmore and Isaac Ketcham, who were both put

was

latter

sent

manacled

to the

The

in Fairfield jail.

former had possessed himself of the farm of Dr. Z. Piatt's brother

N. Y. Convention.

;

the

Oct. 13.

Jour. 649, 636.

Thos. Dering, John Foster, and Thos. Wickham, appointed by

N. Y. a Committee to report on the claims for transporting and effects from L. I. to Con't. Dec. 31, '76.

families,

stock,

607.

[

Capt. Hale, an American spy

was detected near Huntington

and executed in N. Y., but as the accounts are conflicting, we insert all

we have met

the original notices of his melancholy fate leave the reader to draw his

own

inferences.

with, and

Ed. ]

Extract of a Letter to the Missouri Republican from Stephen

Hempstead, Sen., aged 69, copied I

was attached

tinental Troops,

to

and

Capt. Hale's

into the L.

I.

Star, of April 2, 1827.

Company in Col. Webb's Reg.

in his confidence.

of Con-

After the retreat of our army


49

SUFFOLK COUNTY. from L.

I.,

he informed

solicited to

me

go over to L.

I,

camp, &c, expecting them

he was sent

Head

from a recent

had consented

;

and said

to go,

opportunity

Accordingly

from N. Y.

row him

galleys to

In that harbor there :

we

far

our first

sloop and one or two

was an armed all

He was

any place he should designate. I.,

left

arrived at Norwalk, 50 miles

Capt. Hale had a general order to

the sloop at Huntington, L.

we

the intention of crossing over the

but none offered until

:

must go with him as

I

as I could with safety and wait for his return.

camp on Harlem Heights, with

was Enemy's

Quarters, and

N. Y., but that he was too unwell that upon a second illness

to attack

to go, not having recovered

application he

for to

to discover the disposition of the

armed

vessels to take

set across the

Sound

in

by Capt. Pond, who commanded the ves-

Capt. Hale had changed his uniform for a plain suit of citizen's

sel.

brown of a

clothes,

with a round broad-brimmed hat

Dutch Schoolmaster, leaving

public

and private papers with me, and

;

assuming the character

his other

all

clothes,

commission,

also his silver shoe buckles, say-

ing they would not comport with his character of Schoolmaster, and retaining nothing but his college diploma, as an introduction to his as-

sumed calling. Thus equipped we parted for the last time in life. He went on his mission and I returned back again to Norwalk, with orders to stop there until

to

he should return, or

return back again to cross the

The

army had,

British

in the

I

hear from him, as he expected

Sound

if

mean time

he succeeded in his object. got

possession of

N.

Y>

whither he also passed, and had nearly executed his mission, and was passing the

British piquet guard

between the Lines of the two armies,

within a mile and a half of his own quarters, when he was stopped at a Here there was no suspicion of tavern at a place called the " Cedars. " his character being other than he pretended, until

(

most unfortunately he

crowd by a fellow countryman and an own relation, but a tory and renegade, ) who had received the hospitality of his

was met

in the

board and the attention of a brother from Capt. Hale, at his quarters at

Winter Hill

in

Cambridge the winter

before.

He

recognized him

and most inhumanly and infamously betrayed him, divulging his true charand having him searched, his diploma acter, situation in the army &c. ;

when without any formality of trial hung him instantaneously, and sent a flag over to our army, stating that " they had caught such a man within their lines this morning, and hung him as a spy." Thus suddenly and unfeelingly

corroborated his relative's statement, or delay, they

did they rush this

him an

young and worthy man

hour's preparation nor the

into eternity, not allowing

privilege of writing to his friends,


50

SUBMISSION OF

nor even to receive the

last consolations of his religion, refusing to let

the chaplain pray with him, as

Capt. Hale, of the time

all

was

his

these circumstances I

and do most

religiously believe

request.

After parting with

was authentically imformed at them. " He died on the inglo-

rious tree."

The above account by Mr. Hempstead is valuable so far as he own knowledge and yet I cannot help thinking he is in error when he says Hale carried his diploma with him. Do soldiers carry their diplomas about with them in w ar ? Besides, it [

speaks from his

;

r

would betray

Why

name.

his real

than a Yankee schoolmaster

He

?

assume

to be a

Dutch rather

could not speak or understand

Dutch, and yet was going among the Dutch with a paper in his pocket

showing him

to be a

Yankee by

his very

May

name, Nathan.

not the report of his attempting to cross from one camp to the other at " the Cedars, " ( if there ever was such a place, ) be a mere supposition, and have for

Hale

Long

Island

one

visit

)

grown out of

to take a short cut, rather

One account makes

?

Hale in Coventry

;

the idea that

it

was most

natural

than a circuitous one by his betrayer

(

if

way

the other, at Winter Hill.

of

was

there ever

Was

it

not the plans and sketches rather than the diploma that betrayed

Hale 1â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed,

]

Newburyport, Feb. 13,

The following

a genuine specimen of Tory benevolence, and depended upon as a real matter offact.

is

Sam'l Hale,

an uncle

visited

as his uncle

late of

a

where he was hospitably entertained but Whig, and had a son, a young gentleman of a libe;

and most amiable

disposition,

who

strongly felt for his

bleeding country, and being very active in the military way,

urged and prevailed on

Army

be

Portsmouth, N. H., after his elopement thence,

in Conn.,

was

ral education,

'77.

may

to take

was

a commission in the Continental

consequently Samuel was obliged to conduct with caution, and counterfeit as well as he could a Whiggish phiz, w hile he tarried, which was but a short time however, before he made his escape Some time after this, Capt. Hale, at the reto Gen. Ho.ve in N. Y. quest of the General, went into N. Y. in disguise, and having nearly accomplished his designs, whom should he meet but his aforesaid ;

r

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

cousin Samuel, well.

whom

he attempted to shun, but

Capt. Hale soon found he

was

Sam knew him

too

advertised, and so particularly

described, that he could not get through L.

I.,

he therefore attempted


SUFFOLK COUNTY. to escape

by way of Kingsbridge, and so

outer guard, where he tried,

far

51 succeeded as to get to the

was suspected, apprehended,

and yet would have been acquitted, had not

carried back and

his affectionate

and

Samuel appeared and made oath, that he was a Captain in the Continental Army, and that he was in there as a Spy in consequence of which he was immediately hung up however, grateful cousin

;

gallows he made a sensible and spirited speech,

at the

among

other

them they were shedding the blood of the innocent, and he had ten thousand lives, he would lay them all down, if

things, told that if

called to do

The

it,

in defence of his injured, bleeding country.

Printers throughout the Continent are desired to exhibit

this tragic

scene to the public, that they

are to expect if they

fall

into the

may

see

what mercy they

hands of Tories.

N. H. Gaz., Feb.

18, '77.

think the above contains some gross misstatements.

[I

" In Hale's attempt

Ed.]

was apprehended, carried before Sir Wm. Howe, and the proof of his object was so clear, that he frankly acknowledged who he was and what were his views Sir Wm. Howe at once gave an order to the Provost Marshal to execute him the return he

to

:

next morning. feeling

A

The

was accordingly executed

order

in the

most un-

manner, and by as great a savage as ever disgraced humanity.

clergyman, whose attendance he desired, was refused him

;

a Bible

moment's devotion was not procured, though he requested it. Letwhich, on the morning of his execution, he wrote to his mother and

for a

ters

other friends, were destroyed

by the Provost Marshal,

had a

man

in their

'

;

and

this

very extraordinary reason given

that the rebels should not

army who could

die with so

much

Hannah Adams, as quoted

The

following

is

from the Life of Gen.

Washington spoke with Hull,

Soon

to

who opposed

after this,

Wm.

that they

by Dr. Thatcher.

Hull.

Knowlton, and he to Hale. the

know

firmness.'

Hale advised

measure as dangerous and disgraceful.

Hale was absent.

In a few days a British officer under

a flag informed Hamilton that Hale had been executed that morning as a spy.

The

seemed touched

officer

told Hull

he was present at the execution and " Hale had passed through the

at the circumstances.

armies on Long and York Islands, made sketches of fortifications and memoranda. When apprehended he was taken before Howe, and the


52

SUBMISSION OF

He

concealed papers found.

Howe, without morning, and put him

ject.

for

was

refused.

near the in

my

and

fatal spot,

marquee while and

tered calm

to give for

He asked

A

last

let

Hale

pen and ink, and wrote

for

sit

were making. Hale enletters

which were subsequently destroyed

officer,

Shortly after he

His

my

Hale asked

Provost Marshal to

I requested the

dignified.

by Cunningham. were around.

his execution next

ordered

the neccessary preparations

Mother and a Brother

to his

trial,

in custody of the Provost Marshal.

He was refused. He next asked for a Bible. That On the morning of the Execution my station was

a Clergyman.

too

once declared his name, rank and ob-

at

form of a

the

was summoned

words were, "

I

to the

only regret

gallows

;

few

have but one

I

life

country."

home from Camp on N. Y. Island, we hanged an officer of the Provincials who

British officer thus writes

Sep. 23, '76, "yesterday

came

Mid.

as a spy.

Jas. Drewett, on board British frigate

25, '76, " ington.

On

the 22d

Mercury

we hung a man who was sent

"

at

London

(

)

Jour.

N. Y. writes, Sep.

as spy by Gen.

Mid.

(

London

)

Wash-

Jour.

An American officer thus writes from Camp at Harlem, Sep. 26, '76, One Hale, in N. Y., on suspicion of being a spy, was taken up and dragged without ceremony to the Execution Post and hung up.

"

[

Hale,

'tis

said,

had

his

examination

in the

Green House

(

still

stand-

Beekman Mansion, Howe's Head Quarters, near Turtle Bay, and thrÂŤ* miles from the City Hall. The precise spot of his Exe-

ing

of the

)

cution cannot be pointed out..

Ed.]

Local Traditions

in

Queens County.

Wooden said he remembered the capture of Hale as if it were Wooden was a ship builder at Oyster Bay 2 or 3 miles from yesterday. Sol.

the scene of Hale's capture

was

in

;

and as he

built boats for the British,

constant intercourse with them, he

very crew that captured Hale.

Hale was

and

heard the story from the

set over

from Conn, to L.

I.

near Oyster Bay, by an American boat that was to return for him on a set day.

He

gave out that he was disgusted with the rebel cause,

and had deserted, but did not wish

He journeyed on

to

N. Y.

mation, he returned by L.

city, I.,

to enlist,

and would

where having obtained

making

his

way through

the

arrived at the shore about Huntington or Oyster Bay.

morning he went out shore.

boat

He

to reconnoitre,

when he saw

did not see the frigate Halifax, Capt.

belonged, and

which had come ashore

like a school.

all possible infor-

woods

till

he

Early in the

a boat rowing to the

Quarme,

for water.

to

which the

Perhaps the


53

SUFFOLK COUNTY. frigate

was hid by

taking

this for a friendly

As

Hale mis-

the fog or an intervening point of land.

boat walked deliberately

down

water

to the

side.

the boat struck the shore he discovered his mistake and retraced his

He was

steps.

ordered to stop

On

!

looking over his shoulder he saw

Escape

the whole crew standing up with their guns levelled at him.

was

impossible

he was ordered on board and his papers showed what

;

He was

he was.

taken to N. Y.

boat of the Halifax, and execu-

in the

Thompson.

ted on an apple tree in Col. Rutgers' orchard. [

See also Queens Co., Sec. 368,

tion.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; .Ed.

an account of his execu-

for

]

Robert Townsend of Oyster Bay, who died some years ago aged 85, used to say he had heard Capt. Quarme, of a British armed vessel which

was

lying in the

Sound near Huntington

say that a boat's crew belonging

at the time of Hale's capture,

to his vessel

being ashore on L.

Huntington Harbor, was mistaken by Hale

tle east of

I.,

a

lit-

people from

Sound, and thus he committed himself before he

the other side of the

was aware

for

hands of

of his mistake into the

when he found what

his

enemies

;

and that

a fine fellow he was, he was sorry he had fallen

into his power.

Wm.

Ludlam, now

Quarme's boats took a

aged 87, says "he heard that one of Capt.

living,

man

by the name of Hale somewhere near Hunt-

ington Harbor, and then the

man was

taken to N. Y., and that was

all

he ever heard of him."

The

death of Hale has been the subject of a Novel, by

Sirams.

His

life

may

608.

Saybrook, Sep. 12, '76.

Dear Brother

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

now at

I.

tell

I

the head of 400 I

I

have been ob-

have given Gen. Washington a

by the same conveyance

succeed in the attempt

you,

to this place for several reasons, that I

time to mention.

particular account

to-morrow,

have just time to

I

liged to retreat from L.

have not

R.

J.

be found in Thompson.

am

men,

this is sent by.

set out for

going to make,

I shall

Huntington

I shall

;

if I

yet save Suffolk

Co., though most of the inhabitants have been prevailed

upon to take King of Great Britain, through a persuasion that the Island was given up as indefensible. Gov. Trumbull has assisted me with 260 men. an oath of allegiance

to the

HENRY

B.

LIVINGSTON.

Robt. R. Livingston, Jr. 609.

Howe

The towns

of South and East

(to avoid the imputation of

Hampton send

a letter to

being concerned with the Conn.


54

SUBMISSION OF

whale-boats) that some arms taken from the people of East

by order of Col. Gardiner

ton,

by the subjects of the

in the

Howel, the

States.

Col. Livingston.

Hamp-

King's name, had been retaken bearer,

was caught by Cor. 401.

Before Sep. 17, '76.

610. Sai/brook, Sep. 24, '76. Last Friday a party from Lt. Col.

was put under command

Livingston's detachment

Roe, to go from Saybrook off Roe's family,

bringing

on board,

to

down

bring

down

of Capt. Dan'l

for the purpose of bringing

On

Friday night 12 o'clock,

Brook H., taking 14 men with him

to as-

the family, leaving 14 under Lt. Geo. Smith

guard the

He

vessel.

pressed teams as he went to

the goods, not being able to procure

At 9 A. M.,just

means.

Haven,

and a no. of others.

the Capt. left the sloop at sist in

to B.

as he

was ready

to return,

them by other he was inform-

ed by one of the guards that Richard Miller of B. Haven, a young

gentleman of family and fortune, but a notorious enemy to

(who had arms concealed which R. ordered on him.

fire

his

at his

men

house),

to hail him,

He was hailed 3

times,

was passing and

if

his

his country

house

he refused to

;

upon

stop, to

upon which he stopped, and 5 men kill him if

with their pieces presented told him they would instantly

he attempted

to

stir.

He

stood and viewed

them half a minute,

then discharged a pistol at them, and rode off with the utmost expedition,

on which he was several times ordered to

sing, five

guns were separately

fired at

stop,

but he refu-

him, from the last of which

a ball was shot through his body, upon which he dismounted and

was

carried into Capt. Roe's house, and left in care of a no. of the

inhabitants.

was

Capt. R. being informed that one Jacob Smith,

in conjunction with Miller,

who

and not far distant when he was taken,

had collected a party of several, and were endeavoring to surround and take him, thought it prudent to retreat on board his vessel, where he had but just time to arrive with his wife and family, being obliged to leave

all his effects

behind.

Miller and Smith had received commissions under the

King of

G. Britain, and had been raising men, pressing horses and wagons, together with persons to drive them, to assist Howe in removing his baggage.

They had

likewise taken fat cattle from the inhabitants,

and obliged them to drive them

to the Ministerial

Army.

Conn. Courant, Sep. 30,

'76.


55

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 611. This enlist

men

is

to certify that

to join

Ensign Sam'l Glover

my company

to

service, for the defence of the liberty of

Given under

my

authorized to

is

complete a Bat. in His Majesty's

America.

hand, at Brookhaven, Sep. 22d, 1776.

JACOB SMITH. iV. Y., Sep. 27, '76.

612.

S IR

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;You are

to desire the

Justices of the

Peace

to

summon

farmers of their Districts to attend at some central place, to

the

demand of

each, what grain and straw he can spareâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; as to hay we must have the whole, for which you'll give them proper Certificates to me to pay them The whole of the grain and forage of Rebels in arms is to be seized by. All persons removed off are to be deemed Rebels,

King's use.

for the

and dealt with accordingly.

JOHN MORRISON, Commissary of Forage.

To Mr.

E. Punderson.

Copy of a blank order left with

613.

the Inhabitants of Suffolk Co.

L. L, Sep. 1776.

You

are hereby ordered to preserve for the King's use

bushels of wheat,

hay,

of Indian corn, and of the same, but to

your wheat and rye straw

all

my

;

loads of

of barley,

of rye,

of oats,

and not to dispose

order in writing, as you will answer the con-

trary at your peril.

JOHN MORRISON, Major, and Commissary of Forage. 614. In pursuance

of his Excellency

the

Commander-in-Chief's

orders to me, you are hereby directed to take into your custody

all

the

and creatures you can find on L. I., being the property of persons in actual rebellion, or who have deserted their habitations, and put themselves under the protection of the rebels, taking an exact forage,

grain,

account of what

is

so seized

:

and report frequently

John Morrison,

to

respecting grain and forage, and to Jas. Christie, respecting creatures.

In execution of this duty you are to employ such persons as you think proper, boats,

who

will apply to

wagons, horses,

you may require civil

ing

His Majesty's Justices of the Peace

drivers, mills, barns

for the benefit of

all

which

this shall

and

all officers

their aid.

For do-

His Majesty's service

and military, are hereby required

to impress

and what other conveniences

to give

be a sufficient warrant.

you

:

Oct. 1, 1776.

DAN'L CHAMIER,

Com. Gen.


56

SUBMISSION OF Jamaica, Oct.

To John Hewlett, Esq L. I. You are to use your utmost endeavors to for the army when delivered a receipt will

2, 1776.

,

;

and

certain time

place.

If

bring

me

cattle

and sheep

be given, to be paid at a

any butcher or others

with you un-

interfere

der pretence of bringing them to me, without a written order from me, seize their cattle, put a fair value

the owners shall be paid

have

;

habitations,

left their

on them, and drive them

and

also seize all sheep

and employ proper people

to

me, and

of rebels

who

to assist you.

For

cattle

doing whereof, this shall be your warrant.

JAS. CHRISTIE, Com. for

cattle

and sheep.

615. Lt. Col. H. B. Livingston sends the N. Y. Convention from

Saybrook, Oct. 16,

'76, the paroles of Col.

and Geo. Howel, of L. F., a

Col.

man

driving cattle to virtue of an

old

I.,

disaffected to the

Fanning, Major Conklin,

freedom of

this country.

was apprehended for procuring and Gen. Howe's Army. He has also acted as Col. (by of influence,

commission from Geo. 3d)

in calling the people of

Southold together to see whether they would take the oath of

allegi-

Cor. 349.

ance.

Brookhaven, Oct. 18, '76. 616. Sir

:

—In consequence of

instructions I have just received

from head-quarters, you are forthwith for his Majesty's service.

not stint the cause.

teams will answer

If

to

The number-

you can't get a

—a driver

impress wagons and horses unlimited

is

sufficient

for every team,

;

therefore do

number of wagons,

which

you'll send with-

White Stone, near Flushing. I beg, Sir, you'll yourself on this occasion. Don't omit one moment, as it seems

out loss of time to exert

to be critical.

JACOB SMITH,

Capt. 1st Comp., 1st Bat.,

Delakcey's Brigade.

To Sam'l Glover. 617.

About Nov.

taken at Mastic, on broke

jail

$8 reward

at

1, '76,

Sam'l Glover, a notorious offender, was

whom were

found papers 611 and 616.

N. London on the night of Feb.

1, '77,

He

and escaped.

offered.— Con. Gaz., Feb. 14, '77.

618. Jos. Greene, Major 1st Bat., writes from Hempstead, Oct. 22, '76, to Capt. Smith, quartered at Setauket, to collect and drive in

all

rebel horses in Suffolk Co.

brought 2 prisoners to Greene.

Smith's Lieutenant, French, had


57

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

the Right Honorable RICHARD, LORD VISCOUNT HOWE, of the Kingdom of Ireland, and his Excellency WILLIAM HOWE, Esquire, General

To

of His Majesty''s forces in America, the King's Commissioners for restoring peace to His Majesty's Colo-

North America.

nies in

Your

Excellencies, by your Declaration bearing date July 14,

1776, were pleased to signify that "the King is desirous to deliver His American subjects from the calamities of war, and other oppressions which they

now undergo

His protection and peace

;

and

to restore the Colonies to

and, by a subsequent Declaration dated

;"

Sep. 19, 1776, having also been pleased to express your desire "to confer with His Majesty's well affected subjects upon the means of restoring the public tranquillity, and establishing a permanent union

with every Colony as a part of the British Empire

;"

we, therefore,

whose names are hereunto subscribed, inhabitants of the county of Suffolk, on Nassau Island, in the Province of N. Y., reflecting with the tenderest emotions of gratitude on this instance of His Majesty's

manner in which His Majesty's gracious purpose hath been conveyed to us by your Excellencies, who have thereby evinced, that humanity is inseparable from that true magnanimity and those enlarged sentiments which form the most shining characters, beg leave to represent to paternal goodness, and encouraged by the affectionate

your Excellencies,

That we bear true allegiance the Third, as well as dignity

;

warm

That we esteem the

constitutional

tain over these Colonies and other

dominions, as essential to the

whole empire

;

Sovereign Geo.

to our rightful

affection to his sacred person,

crown and

supremacy of Great

Bri-

depending parts of His Majesty's

union, security, and welfare of the

and sincerely lament the interruption of that harmony

which formerly subsisted between the parent

state

and these her

Colonies.

That many of the the calamities of

loyal inhabitants have been driven

war and

the spirit of persecution

vailed, or sent prisoners to

We,

New

which

away by

lately pre-

England and other distant parts. sufferings which our fellow-

therefore, hoping that the

inhabitants undergo for their attachment to the Royal cause,

plead in their behalf,

humbly

pray, that your Excellencies

may

would be


58

SUBMISSION OF

pleased

to

restore

county to His Majesty's protection and

this

peace.

Suffolk

Co., Oct.

,

1776.

Signed by 614 persons.

To His Excellency Win. Tryon, Esq., Capt. Gen. and Governor -in-Chief in and over the Province of Neiv-

Ame-

York, and the Territories depending thereon in rica, Chancellor

May

it

and Vice Admiral of the same.

please your Excellency

:

We the inhabitants of the coun-

ty of Suffolk, beg leave to congratulate your Excellency on your

return to the capital of your government, and to assure you, that sincerest joy on this

feel the

that

we

shall

we

happy event, which opens a prospect

once more experience the blessings of peace and se-

curity under His Majesty's auspicious government and protection

blessings which

we

formerly enjoyed under your Excellency's mild

which we ardently wish to have renewed: perour loyalty and unshaken attachment to our gracious

administration, and

severing in

Sovereign in

time of distress and

this

our affection for Him, petition the

we

trial,

have embraced the

and anxious to

testify

earliest opportunity to

King's Commissioners that they would restore this Coun-

ty to His Majesty's peace, although

much

many

of the most respectable

number of the

inferior classes

have

been driven off by the calamities of war, or sent prisoners to

New

inhabitants and a

England or other ing,

and

greater

distant parts, yet

who have

we hope the number still remainmay be deemed sufficient

voluntarily subscribed,

to entitle this district to

His Majesty's grace, whilst the sufferings

which our absent fellow-citizens undergo in their behalf with the Commissioners,

for the royal cause, plead

— from

humanity, benevolence and enlarged sentiments,

Nov. 28, 1776.

flattering expectations.

Signed

whose well known we have the most

in behalf of the inhabitants

by

RICHARD FLOYD,

THOMAS FANNING, FRED'K HUDSON. Neiu-York, Dec.

Gentlemen to

me by

:

— Agreeable

2, '76.

to the request in the address delivered

you, in behalf of the inhabitants of Suffolk Co., I have pre-


59

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

sented their very dutiful and loyal petition and representation to His

Excellency Gen.

HOWE,

one of the King's Commissioners for re-

who was

storing peace to His Majesty's Colonies,

"

He would

HOWE

Lord to

pleased to say

:

take the earliest opportunity of communicating with

Every public testimony of

on the occasion."

loyalty

our most Gracious Sovereign, and attachment to the British Con-

stitution, is at this

season particularly commendable, and the inhab-

of Suffolk Co.

itants

may

be assured of

my

good wishes

for the

completion of their desires, as expressed in their petition and representation, the granting of

which

is

wisdom

happily committed to the

and discretion of His Majesty's Commissioners. I

am, with regard, Gentlemen.

Your most

ob't servant,

WM. TRYON. To Major Richard Floyd, Mr. Tho's Fanning, Mr. Frederick Hudson, of Suffolk Co.

A

copy of what ivas sent through Suffolk Co. by order of

Gov. Try on. 620.

The Governor

of the Province

recommends

to the inhabi-

tants of Suffolk Co., the following measures, as the best

those

and

who have been

means

for

active in the rebellion, to preserve their lives

estates, viz. that all offensive

arms, indiscriminately, be forth-

with collected, in each manor, township and precinct, as soon as possible, to deliver

them up

at head-quarters, to the

Commander-in-

chief of the King's troops.

That those who have been

active in the rebellion, if

fit

to bear

arms, forthwith to wait on the Gen'l, and enlist in the regular service for the term of the present

one of their sons

some unasked

The

war

;

signal service, that

inhabitants of each

town

may

not

if

to enlist in their stead

;

if

fit

to bear arms, to send

no sons, then

to associate, to prevent

ing to the Main, and secure those coming thence deliver

up

all

persons

known

to

to

perform

merit the protection of Gov't.

;

any person go-

and to secure and

be active enemies to the rights of

the Constitution.

And

the several townships to furnish as

many men

as possible


60 fit

SUBMISSION OF to bear arms, to invite those

to enlist in

send

who have fled from the county, And lastly, thei nhabitants to

back

Gen. Delancey's brigade.

the wood, forage, and provisions they can spare, to N.

all

market or such place as the Gen'l

Y.

shall order.

[Can the above (taken from a

New Haven

paper) be genuine

?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ed.] The County Committees and Committees folk Co.,

meet respectively as soon as

of

possible,

permission, for the purpose of revoking

Townships of Sufby the Governor's

all their

proceedings under

the Congress, and formally to dissolve their unlawful associations

the County having

now

:

submitted to the King, his laws and Gov't.

WM. TRYON. Note.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;When the

above

is

accomplished, the Gov'r will review

the militia.

N. Y. Gaz., Nov.

The

11. '76.

Committees of Suffolk and from to

all

following declarations from the

the

His Ex. Gov. Tryon on Thursday

Town

last,

Corn's were delivered by Major Richard Floyd

and Mr. Tho's Fanning, who were deputed by the inhabitants

to pre-

sent the same.

Huntington, Oct. 21,

The Committee injurious

and inimical tendency of our former meetings and

and willing

to manifest our hearty disapprobation of all

resolutions,

such

measures, do hereby dissolve this committee, and as far as in us

voke and disannul

'76.

of Huntington, being thoroughly convinced of the

all

illegal lies,

re-

former orders and resolutions of all committees and

Congresses whatsoever, as being undutiful to our lawful Sovereign, re-

pugnant

to the principles of the British Constitution,

and ruinous

in the

extreme, to the happiness and prosperity of this country.

Brookhaven, Oct. 24, 1776.

We

Committee of the County of Suffolk, being assembled by permission of His Ex. the Hon. Wm. Tryon, Esq., Gov. of N. Y., and the Territories depending thereon in America, do hereby dissolve ourselves, and do disclaim and reject the orders of Congress and Corn's ; and totally refusing obedience to them revoking all our proceedings the

;

under the Congress, and being desirous to obey the legal authority of Gov't, rely upon your Excellency's clemency, hoping that you will pass

by our former conduct, and be graciously pleased bly to the laws of the Province.

to protect us, agreea-

Signed by order of the Committee.

JOHN BRUSH,

Ch'n.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. Declarations of Smithtown

(Oct.

19),

of Southold

South Hampton and of East Hampton (Oct. 21), were in

61 (Oct. like

25), of

words.

Nov. 28, '76. The Dissolution of the Committee of Suffolk Co, and the Committees of the several townships, with the revocation of

all

their

fected by

my

proceedings and orders under the Congress, was particular recommendation.

TRYOK

ef-


PART *

ARMED OCCUPATION OF SUFFOLK COUNTY.

621. Oct. 28, '76.

with 36

III.

men under

Gov. Trumbull directs 6 R.

Smith, Caleb Brewster, and D.

Roe

Bay, to Canoe Place

to Southold

Bay up

as far as Mastic,

whale-boats, Lt.

Geo.

(best acquainted with the situa-

and make the best of their

tion of places), to take three transports

way

I.

Richmond, with

Cols. Livingston and

;

thence across into South

and bring off the

Floyd and

effects of Col.

others of our friends, and return as soon as possible.

Mary and Lily), Howe, and Brookhaven Harbor. They also surprised

Instead of this they, captured 2 sloops (Princess

loading with

wood by

order of Capt. Smith, for Gen.

lying at the dock, head of

Capt. Smith and part of his company, but declined marching to

Smithtown,

to

attack

the

rest

of Delancey's Brigade

stationed

there.

N. Haven, Nov. 6, '76. A few nights since, between 300 and 400 Rhode Island crossed the Sound and landed near Setauket, where they engaged a party of the troops newly enlisted into Gen.

troops from

Howe's army, commanded by one Smith 5 or 6 of his men were killed in the action, and himself and 23 of his company made prisoners, who ;

were brought

off,

The

with 75 excellent muskets.

ley herd, half being negroes

and Indians.

Of

prisoners are a mot-

the R.

I.

troops one

was

and one wounded. N. London, Nov. 8, '76. A number of troops from R. I., E. End of L. I. and Con't, embarked at New Haven and landed at Setauket, on L. I., with a view of bringing off some tories, and the effects of a gentleman friendly to the American cause being interrupted by some tories, who fired upon them, they killed 10, and brought off 23 two of the

killed

;

;

latter, deserters

the contest.

from our army.

A sergeant

in our party

was

killed in


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

63

Benj. Birdsall, Thos. Brush, and Carll 622. Nov. 9, '76. Ketcham, rec'd from Convention £10. 1. 6. for guarding and conveying, from Norwich to Fishkill, 2 prisoners, (brought from L. I.)

Jam-. 708.

Thos. Wicks and Eliph. Brush received of

623. Nov. 23, '76.

Convention

Y.

in

May

He

Nov. 15. letters

at Fishkill

and June

£4.

also received

£4

from Head-Quarters.

New

624.

London, Jan.

the ministerial

fleet,

conveying counterfeiters to N.

16. for

[Wicks had removed

last.

(See 542.) 3, '77.

625.

much from

wood

at the east

end of L.

rob them of their effects.

There are two companies of Tories stationed

ton, but not a

man E.

cers, without

any men.

of there

They

also,

;

I.,

'Tis said the inhabitants have

who

the soldiers,

Albany with

Jour. 714.

Several transports belonging to

are loading with

under guard of some men-of-war. suffered

to Saybrook, before

for riding express to

Hunting-

at

about 10 or a doz. regular

are billeted on the inhabitants,

offi-

all

of

them without pay, and have plundered, stole, and destroyed to such a decree, that the inhabitants must unavoidably starve in a little time, for want of food. Sundry of the principal men have been beaten in an unheard of manner for not complying with their unrighteous requests, particularly good Dr. Piatt and Mr. John Brush. The Meeting-House made a storehouse of, no public worship allowed of, and the good people assembled 5 miles out of town, at (British) followed them, and broke

more.

Tn '77

was

Hills

—they any

the

British troops at

Huntington took possession of the it

as a depot for military stores.

The

carried on board a British ship, but restored afterwards, so in-

jured that

626.

West

their assembling together

Gaine, Feb. 17, '77.

church, tore up the seats and used bell

up

it

was

Prime.

recast.

N. London, March

14, '77.

Last Sunday the British Fleet

took from John Brown, on Fisher's Island, 106 sheep, 8 oxen, 11

cows, 22 yearlings, 26 swine, 24 turkies, 48 fowls, 123 bushels corn,

100

do. potatoes,

5i tons pressed hay. and 3 cords wood.

barrel of pork out of the cellar, blankets, sheets, and shot

Stock chiefly paid Bav.

for.

There are 20 ships

at

Also, a

some sheep.

anchor in Gardiner's


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

64 627.

One

from Con't

robbed him of

On

niture.

week

night,

the clothing of his family and

all

came over

before last, a party of rebels

house of Solomon Smith, of Smithtown, and

to the

their return, the boat overset,

party perished, as the boat and

and

some household

'tis

fur-

supposed the whole

some dead bodies were found on the Gaine, Ap.

shore near Mr. Smith's within a day or two afterwards. 7, '77.

628. E. Dayton, under Capt. John Clark, by order of Putnam, seized (Ap. '77), a

wagon and goods on

L.

I.

the property of Oba.

Wright, of Saybrook. 629. Levi Allen (brother of Ethan) posted at Mrs. Hubbard's,

some

in Mattituck,

counterfeit bills (as a warning to the public)

;

gave one to Rufus Tuthill, at Oyster Pond, and one to John Brown,

on Fisher's Island 630.

cused, I.

Wm.

May

in the

N. London,

Smith,

4, '77,

member

May

2, '77.

of the Council of Safety,

power of the enemy. Parsons

was ex-

from acting, as he has a family and estate on L. Jour. 911.

Trumbull, N. Haven, May, 25,

to

'77.

631. I sincerely congratulate your honor on the success of our

arms on L.

Meigs

Col.

I.

Sachem's Head on Friday

left

M., with 160 men, and landed within 3 miles of Sag H. the night following

attacking the

;

till

at 1 P.

about one

and having made the proper dispositions for

enemy in 5

order and silence

at

different places,

proceeded with the greatest

within 20 rods of the enemy,

when

they rushed

with fixed bayonets upon the different barracks, guards, and quarters of the at the

there.

enemy whilst Capt. Troop, with a party under his command, same time took possession of the wharves and vessels lying :

The alarm soon became

general, and an incessant fire of

grape and round shot was kept up from an armed schooner of 12 guns, which lay within 120 yds. of the wharves, for near an hour notwithstanding which the party burnt killed

and captivated

all

the

men

all

;

the vessels at the wharf,

belonging to them, destroyed about

100 tons of hay, large quantities of grain, 10 hhds. of rum, and other

W.

stationed.

a

India goods, and secured

ail

the soldiers

man killed

or

wounded on our

side.

with the greatest order and bravery.

who

w^ere there

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Chew and Mr. Bell not The officers and men behaved N. London, May 30, '77.

90 prisoners, among them Mr.


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

65

Guilford,

May

29, '77.

Gen. Parsons having received intelligence that the enemy were col-

Sag Harbor, on L. I.; last Friday, 23d, who had previously rendezvous'd at embarked on board a number of whale-

lecting large quantities of forage at

about 200 of the Continental troops,

Sachem's Head, boats,

in Guilford,

commanded by

Lt. Col. Meigs, to destroy

it.

At about

6 o'clock,

afternoon, they arrived at the beach (Southold), this side of Plumgut,

transported their boats about 50 rods over the beach,

embarked, and landed within 4 miles of Sag Harbor, where, ing a suitable guard

to protect the

with such secrecy as not

They soon

sentry.

till

stationed there, were entirely off their guard, our troops

An armed

opposition.

known

As

the

little

Our

on them, but happily did no damage.

fire

with their small arms, but whether with

fire

enemy

met with

schooner of 12 guns, which lay not far from the

shore, kept an incessant

people returned the

marched

within a few rods of the

about destroying the forage, &c.

set

(after leav-

boats hid in the woods,) they

be discovered

to

and

when they again

effect is

enemy on shore were destroyed, and three others were made prisoners. Our people set fire to the hay (about 100 tons), which was on board transports, and on the wharves, which was entirely destroyed, with 10 transport vessels, mostly sloops and schooners, and one armed vessel of 6 or 8 guns, 2 or 3 hogsheads of rum, &c. Our troops are all returned, having pernot or

;

4 made

formed

5 or six of the

their escape

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

24 hours. [The enemy's troops on this part marched to New York two days before, but it was party was at Sag Harbor.] Sparks, IV. 441.

their expedition in

of the Island had

reported a

Prisoners Taken.

One

Capt., 2 Commissaries, (one, Jos.

Chew, formerly of N. LonSeamen

don), 3 Sergeants, 53 Privates, 10 Masters of transports, 27

Our people brought

total, 90.

632.

[May

28, '77.

Col.

the Provost where Hart

Allen kneeled

fell

off fifty muskets.

;

[See Prime, 210

]

Smith and Rev. Mr. Hart, were brought to and lay at death's door. Col. Ethan

sick,

down and made

so fervent a prayer by his side,

and oth-

erwise cheered him up, that he recovered and was admitted on parole in

New- York

City, Oct.

25.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed.]

633. David Hawley, in the Schuyler, took the sloop Peggy, Chas.

Thomas, master, and sloop Ann, Ezekiel Bishop, master. Aug. 634.

Aug.

25, '77,

from 3 Privateers

at

10, '77.

"Last Friday, Gen. Parsons landed 500 men

Setauket with several pieces of brass cannon,

and summoned the small Fort there to surrender. Col. Hewlett, desired one

The Commander,

hour to consider of the matter, when he


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

66

was allowed only 10 minutes. His answer was, he would defend King George the 3d, as long as he had a '

the Fort for his Majesty

man

alive

;'

when

a smart

were soon obliged

to

fire

immediately ensued

;

but the rebels

embark, several of them being killed and

wounded, as much blood was seen in their encampment after they went away. We had 1 killed and 2 or 3 wounded. On this occa-

Queens Co. turned out

sion the militia of

Royal cause, but the Rebels went

in order to support the

off with

such precipitation, that

the Militia were ordered to return before they reached Setauket."

Gaine.

Commanders on the above occasion. Aug. 22. Commanding officer of the troops of the

Letters that passed between the two

Brig. Gen. Parsons, the

now investing the enemy's Post at Setauket, human blood, requires the immediate surthe officers and soldiers, and those who are under

United American Army,

to prevent the effusion of

render of the Post

;

their protection, shall be entitled to their baggage,

humanity which prisoners are in 10 minutes.

I

whole strength and

am

entitled to.

fully sensible of

artillery will

oblige to the effusion of blood

;

and treated with that

Your answer

is

desired

your condition, and as

soon be here,

if

my

your refusal should

you must charge

it

to

your own ob-

stinacy.

Col. Hewlett's compliments to Gen. Parsons, and requests half

an hour

to consult his officers

on the subject of his summons.

Gen. Parsons' compliments to Col. Hewlett, and grants 10 minutes only for consideration

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;longer time

will not be granted.

Col. Hewlett presents his compliments to

determined to defend the Fort while he has a

Gen. Parsons, and

is

man left.

Gen. Parsons' compliments to Col. Hewlett, and should have been

happy visit,

to

have done himself the pleasure of paying him a longer

but the extreme heat of the weather prevents him.

[Setauket

was one of the

British outposts. Col. Hewlett, with Capts.

and 260 men, was stationed here. As a place of resort in case of attack, he inclosed the Presbyterian Church at the distance of 30 ft. with an earthen mound 6 ft. high and 5 ft. thick laid with

Lister, Hewlett, Allison,

fascines so as to be ball-proof.

3

in.

apart.

Two steps

On

the top were set pickets 6

ft.

high and

Pickets also projected from the outer side over the ditch.

of earth were

made

inside the wall for the

men to

rise

on and


SUFFOLK COUNTY. fire their

South

muskets between the pickets.

Americans landed high

hill

A heavy

Four swivels were mounted

side.

at Mt.

67 double gate

at the gallery

Misery from sloops, before daylight.

3 or 4 miles N. E. from

on the inhabitants,

to escape into^the

The It is

had

Col. Hewlett

the Fort.

guard here which gave the alarm and enabled the soldiers, billeted

was on the

windows.

a

set a

who were

Fort and send off expresses

Col. H. was quartered at Col. Floyd's, and jumped out of his bedroom window with clothes in hand, and by a circuitous route barely reached the fort. The Americans advanced from the East, and at 5 A. M., summoned the garrison. Col. H. addressed his men: Soldiers!

for help.

Shall

we

surrender

as long as there's a lery

on a rock in

commenced

?

No

man

full

!

was the response. Then I'll stick to you The Americans' then planted their artil

left.

view of the church, 300 or 400 yds.

the attack with 3 pieces.

They

force into action nor use musketry, but kept

church was perforated with

man

balls,

and one

distant,

and

did not bring their grand

up a brisk cannonade. The

rafter split its

whole length,

was very active in elevating and firing his piece. Chas. Wilson (who was soon after shot through the head) said, I will kill that red-breeched man, and he was a mark for others but as the assailants carried off the fallen, it is not known what became of him. The fire from the Fort was through the pickets with small arms, but with one

[Caleb Brewster

?]

;

far off. The principal fire was from and we kept them warm," says S. Verity. Chambers Townsend, of Duchess Co., was shot through the body. Three others were killed and 2 or 3 wounded. Thos. Pigeon, Oba. Verity, Wm. Covert, and Tim. Moore, of O. B. were in the action. The at-

no

effect, the

Americans being too

the swivels, "

tack lasted 2 or 3 hours,

when

the

Americans retreated.

It

was well

had they remained 3 hours longer they would have been cut off by reinforcements approaching from all parts. Capt. Dan'l Youngs,

they did

;

of O. Bay, had reached Smithtown, and the ships of war at Huntington,

were under way.

Six months after this the garrison

was abandoned.

The General spirited behavior

and

men under

and the Fort

desires particularly to express his approbation of the

and good conduct of Col. Hewlett, and the

officers

command, in the defence of the redoubt at Setauwhich Col. Hewlett was attacked by a large body of

his

ket upon L. L, in the

left,

Ed.]

enemy with cannon, whom he

repelled

with disgrace, Aug.

24, '77.

STEPHEN KEMBLE, Dep. Adj. Gen.


68

ARMED OCCUPATION OF $5 Reward and charges paid by Thos. Place, of Eastwoods., Widow Burk's plantation at Long Swamps.

635.

Stolen or strayed from

Huntington, a bay horse, a feather each side of his neck, &c.

Game.

Sep. 22, '77,

636. Gaine, Dec.

bound

ington,

to

1,

'77.

Last Sunday

week

a sloop from Hunt-

N. Y. with wood, was taken by 2 whale boats

of rebels, soon after she sailed.

full

Capt. Kendal in a small schooner

with 2 swivel guns being in sight, gave chase to the whale boats and plied

them so warmly with his little artillery that they relinquished made for the shore with the greatest expedition.

the prize and

In exploring the territories of Zephaniah

637. Dec. 22, '77. Piatt, of

Smithtown, father to Sam'l Broom's partner, there was found

snugly concealed in a barn, 2 whale boats, which were instantly

committed to the flames, and Mr. Piatt in propria persona, secured

who

in custody of the captors,

drove off the cattle and live stock

from his farm.

Gaine.

Zephaniah Piatt was imprisoned in N. Y., and restored

to liberty

through the personal application of his daughter Dorothea to Sir Henry Clinton

;

but having caught the small-pox while confined, he died, Jan.

27, '78.

Thompson,

638. Gen. Parsons and Col.

L.

I.

to destroy timber

Webb

2. 473.

formed a plan of descent on

and boards on the E. end, prepared

racks in N. Y., to destroy the shipping lying there for

for bar-

wood

for

Newport, to attack a Reg. stationed 8 miles E. of Jamaica, and re-

move or destroy whatever public stores could be found. Col. Meigs was to land at Hempstead harbor and attack the Reg. [at Herricks ?] near Jamaica

;

Webb

Col.

to

land near Huntington, to

sustain

Meigs and afford aid to the eastern division under Parsons. Meigs was to cross from Sawpits, but the weather prevented. The other 2 divisions sailed fell in

from Norwalk, Dec.

9,

'77, at

night.

Col.

Webb

with the Falcon, grounded and could not land, as the surf ran

With Webb, 4

too high.

were taken

Officers,

20 Continentals and 40

N. London, Dec.

19.

Militia

Sparks, V. 211.

prisoners.

A

plan having been formed to bring off or

enemy had at Setauket, some shipping loaded with timber at Southold, on Tuesday night of last week, part of 2 Battalions of troops embarked

destroy a magazine of military stores which the

on L.

I.,

and

to destroy


SUFFOLK COUNTS. from

this State,

69

under convoy of the sloop Schuyler, and Spy and Mifflin

Unfortunately next morning, just before

schooners.

light, the

a British Frigate, in her passage from N. Y. to Newport,

and 2 smaller

the Schuyler

when

vessels,

Falkland,

came

across

the latter run ashore on the

Island, but the former in attempting to get in with the land, run on a spit of

sand (called Old Man's) and was taken with about 60 troops on

among them Cols. Ely, and Sam'l B. Webb, &c. On Thursday, men under Capt. Hart, marched to Southold and were very Hear making prisoners of Capt. Ayscough and upwards of 20 men belonging to the. ship Swan, who were in a house in Southold, but they board,

a party of

getting intelligence of Capt. Hart's approach hasted

They were

to

their

boats.

and as they were getting on board, were fired upon, when most of them were killed or wounded 7 marines and Beamen were made prisoners. Our troops after tarrying several days on closely pursued,

:

L.

I.,

returned to the Main, without opportunity to effect any thing con-

siderable

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

shipping having

zine at Setauket

Riv.

Dec

left

Southold, and

has been removed.

13, '77. Last

we

Dec. 24, '77.

Wed. morning

learn the

maga-

Con. Gaz.

a party of rebels landed at

Setauket and proceeded to plunder the well-affected inhabitants, and in the afternoon a reinforcement of troops

Dec. 20, we

Co.

folk

which were

lately driven ashore

get away, as,

is

it

sent to Col. Hewlett in Suf-

Suffolk Co., had not been able to

in

said, through

His Majesty's Ships,

was

informed that the party of 200 rebels

are

the

Commanders

vigilance of the

of

the boats have been secured,

and the invaders betaken themselves to the woods. Major Greene marched on Thursday with a reinforcement of 100 men and 200 of the Hempstead militia all

;

are likewise gone

down

under Col. Hewlett

at

augment

the

advance body of horse and foot

Huntington.

Dec. 15, '77, Gaine. their

to

Three

appearance off Setauket

rebel sloops

last

Wed.

(one a Privateer) made

The

Privateer

ven ashore and taken by one of His Majesty's Ships miles east

and the crew with

)

all

at

was soon

dri-

Old Man's

(

7

made prisoners among them Cols.

the rebels on board

of war, consisting of 64 privates and some officers,

Webb and

Ely. The same day the other two Sloops run into Stony Brook (4 miles west of Setauket) and being unacquainted got on a bank. They then landed two hundred men, who immediately marched to

Setauket and returned the same evening to get off their sloop, but

their

utmost

went down

efforts

were

the Island,

miles from where they

4*

ineffectual.

The next day

the whole

body

and about 12 o'clock passed Wading River first

landed).

(

18


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

70

Hamil-

Col. Hewlett with a party of Gen. Delancey's Brigade, Col.

Newtown, and Capt. Hewlett with

ton with a troop of horse from

troop of horse from Hempstead, are gone in pursuit of the rebels, and

hoped

will give a

his it is

good account of them.

Ensign Benj. Titus

639. Jan. 4, '77.

Lieutenancy by Capt'sDan'l

Griffin,

is

recommended

for a

2d

John Davis, Dan'l Roe, and Lts.

Benj Marvin and Silvanns Conklin. All refugees from Suffolk. Jan. 10, '77. Abm. Hand, Jer. Miller and Col. Mulford's negro Jack were permitted to return to L. I., also Jos. Osborn and family. Feb. 20, Ezekiel and Dan'l Howell petition to get iheir effects from L.

Mulford Esq., resident

on L.

and took one horse and cow. John Tuthill was

I.

Mathews Nathan Fordham John Gelston Aaron Isaacs, Jr. Maltby Gelston Abm. Rose Jos. Tillinghast Sam'l L'Hommedieu Tim. Mathews John Miller Dan'l Whelden David Pierson

flax,

Jona. Howell,

wool, stock &c. from L.

I.

to

in

Conn. Mar.

'77.

Dan'l Hains

Elias

David Sayre

remove

John

I.

Stonington, returned with his wife to his estate

in

Ezekiel Howell Dan'l Howell

Zebedee Osborn Elisha Osborn Silas Norris

petition Gov. Turnbull to '11.

Conn. Feb.

now

in Haddam, E. Haddam, Lyme, Saybrook, Killingworth and Guilford, April, 10, '77, was presented to N. Y. Legislature. They want to be represented in Con-

Petition of 170 voters, refugees from

Suffolk,

vention.

Saybrook, June 12, '77. Petition of 45 Suffolk Co. refugees for relief

and permission

to pass over to L.

I.

for forage for their families

corn growing on their land which otherwise will

fall

and bread-

into the

enemy's

hands.

Nathan Benjamin and Jos.

Wm.

Halliock

Chris,

ry

;

;

Zeb. and John Cooper

Jesse Dayton

;

Oba. Jones

;

and John King Paine

;

;

Jacob, Nath'l, Benj., and

Ephraim Fordham Oba. Havens; Robert Harlow; Recompense and Elias Howell;

David Conklin

Wm.

;

Paul Reeve

;

John

Jesse

;

Dan'l and

;

John Moore

Oliver North John Lewis Stanborough and Pederick Tabor Tho's Ter-

;

and Dan'l Rackett

Jr.

Anion

Wood

;

Nath'l, Ephraim, Jeremiah, Joel, Benj.

;

L'Hommedieu

and Sam'l Tuthill

Tho's Vail

;

;

Jr.

Jas.

;

;

;

;

;

and Craveit Wells

;

John, Jos. and

Richard Youngs. 640. July 3, '77. Oba. Jones, John Hurlbut and Tho's Dering

gave permits

to

refugees going to L.

I.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 641. Jan.

3, '78.

71

Selah Strong, was incarcerated with others in

N. Y., where he was detained some time, and suffered severely for

want of

provisions,

Cunningham not even allowing him

of the food sent to him by his wife from his

own

to partake

Thompson,

house.

1.419. Jan. 3, '78. Riv. Last Monday, Selah Strong

was committed

to the

care of the Provost, on a charge of treasonable correspondence with the

enemy. 642.

New

London, Jan.

commanded by

&c,

2, '78.

Col. Hewlett

130 tories from west end of L.

came down

to Southold,

I.,

Oyster Pond,

and robbed the honest inhabitants to a large amount in clothing,

money,

grain, cattle,

From one man

&c.

Game. About two

they took

ÂŁ120

in cash.

Thursday morning, a party of 12 rebels seized at Coram, 2 wagons loaded with dry goods, the property of Oba. Wright of South Hampton. These marauders had been several days on the Island, visited most parts of the County and committed many robberies, especially at the 643.

Feb. 16, '78,

o'clock last

house of Col. Floyd, which they robbed of goods and cash, to a considerable amount,

who

rides

down

and took thence some property of Mr. Dunbar,

the Island occasionally and happened to lodge in the

house that night. 644. Riv. Feb. 26, '78. Last Friday evening a small party of re-

came from

bels,

into

the

Main

to Mattituck, rapaciously seized

and carried

Conn, a quantity of goods, landed from one of the vessels

dri-

Next day a gang of ruffians ( John Clive Symes, Peter Griffen, Wilmot Goldsmith, and Tuthill, late residents of Southold,) brought wagons from the east end of the Island, stripped the schooner Clio, Capt. Simmons, of her sails, rigging, &c, which they carried off, and have no doubt sent across ven ashore

in the late storm.

the Sound.

645. Fishkill, Mar. teers,

5, '78.

On Wed.

night a party of 30 volun-

from Col. Meigs' Reg., in 4 whaleboats under command of

Major Humphrey's, Lts. Lay and Burret, made a descent on L.

I.,

in

the neighborhood of Smithtown, for the purpose of destroying several

of the enemy's shipping, particularly a large ship of 20 guns,

aground near that place.

The

preceding day, but they set

fire to

ship

was unfortunately got

and destroyed a

burthen, a large schooner and an armed sloop,

all

off the

200 tons employed in the brig, of


4RMED OCCUPATION OF

72

They brought off 2 Capt's, and several seamen, many sails, rigging, and furniture, as the boats could

enemy's service. together with as contain

effected without loss,

all

:

The

Main, next morning.

and the party returned to the

enterprise

was well planned and con-

ducted, and such a one as in Gaine and Rivington's papers, would have filled a column with " immenses " and " infinites, " and ex-

hausted Johnson's Dictionary, of terprise, conduct,

646. N. London, Mar.

taking in wood, came to

Gaine, Mar.

647.

9,

Wm.

some weeks

sail

of the ene-

in Gardiner's

Bay,

and stood eastward.

'78.

came over from

bed the farm of

Last Sabbath 21

lain for

sail,

those terms which express en-

Con. Gaz. Mar. 11. '78.

8, '78.

my's shipping, which have

ijhelter Island,

all

and resolution.

Moses Sawyer, who formerly

lived at

the Main, a few days since, and rob^

Nicoll, Esq., of said Island, of

110 bushels

of wheat, and carried off grain, belonging to Tho's Dering, of Suffolk Co.

who had

648. Phineas Fairbank,

escaped from Worcester

was taken by P. Griffing, on L. I. On him was found a Tryon for the farm, with buildings and utensils thereon,

now in rebellion, and To whom it may concern

Glover,

:

en, to take (

now is

of Grover

:

Permit Phineas Fairbank and Jer. Bow-

possession of the house and premises

in rebellion) at Southold,

and advantage

their present use

or

the Governor's reply

Jail,

petition to

of Joshua Wells,

on condition they occupy the same, provided

;

for

does not interfere with,

it

not wanted for the King's service.

Given under

my hand

and

seal at arms,

N. Y., March 31,

'78.

WM. TRYON, By

his Excellency's

command.

B.

J.

JOHNSON,

Gov.

Pro. Sec.

was taken from Stonybrook Harbor by 2 whale manned with 13 Continental troops, a sloop and schooner,

649. Ap, 11, boats,

loaded chiefly with wood.

with 4 swivels prisoners.

650.

Widow

;

N. Haven, Ap.

ÂŁ40

The schooner

the sloop of 40

:

is

of 60 tons, and armed

both arrived in safe ports with 4

21, '78.

Currency Reward.

Stolen from

Mark Langdon,

at

Blydenburgh's, at the Branch, Smithtown. Ap. 22, '78, se-

veral pieces of Taffetas, Calicoes, 6 pieces of ble dry goods, together with

ÂŁ200

in gold

Linen and other valua-

and

silver.

Pedlers are


SUFFOLK COUNTY. Warned

Were

to

73

take notice of this advertisement.

at Setauket.-

Riv.,

May

Other small parties

13.

ÂŁ40 Reward. Taken away by the Rebels from Mark Langdon, May 12 and 20th, at Smithtown, a large quantity of DRY GOODS and CASH, to the amount of ÂŁ1000.

on

May

651. Riv.,

The

16, '78.

many

by signals from

rebels have constant information

between Hunting-

disloyal Islanders residing

ton and Setauket of every vessel passing up the Soundj as well as of the situation of persons and things in several parts of L. I.

;

and they also convey

all

information their emissaries daily

tjie

procure of the several occurrences in N. Y. City.

May

652. Riv.,

On

20, '78.

Monday

the evening of

se'nnight

a party of rebels landed at a harbor in Huntington, and attacked the

house of Shubael Smith, situated near the w.ster

Mr. Stone, a gentleman belonging

They

veral other persons.

to Col.

side,

and carried off

Ludlow's Reg't, and se-

afterwards passed the houses of Jos.

Lewis and Nath'l Williams, without molesting them, and proceeded to that of

Wm.

Hindford, a refugee, used his house and store in the

same manner they had done Mr. Smith's, and then returned

to

Con't with the prisoners and booty.* * Shubael Smith of Huntington, joined the

Norwalk was

enemy

;

his ferry boat at

seized by the Americans, Jan. 16, '77.

May

Cor. 502.

Sunday night, 10th inst, 2 whale boats, came to Blue Point, and took thence 5 boats lying there with oysters, owned by Tho's Myng, Amos Underhill, John Rapalje, Sam'l Toby, and Mr. Cameron. This party was commanded by one Dayton from Corum, and were all well armed. They 653. Riv.,

7

men

in

20, '78.

each,

brought their boats from the N. side of the Island and sent their prizes to

N. London.

Myng ._.

They put some women and

children,

and Tho's

ashore.

The head

of the Banditti

who

captured 5 vessels loaded with lum-

ber and produce for the market of N. Y., was Ebenezer Dayton, a

noted pedler,

Wm.

who

lately lived

at

in

command was

who had taken

the benefit of

Corum.

Clark, formerly a rebel Lt,

Next

Howe's Proclamation and after taking the oaths to Government, he kept a shop near B. Haven, where, by making private lotteries, &c, he converted his effects into cash, and about 4 or 5 weeks ago eloped ;


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

74 to

Conn.

distinct

This party (14

in

number) are a species of plunderers

from the rebel troops.

654. Eben'r Punderson, a noted Tory, who made his escape some time ago from Groton, Was employed and sent by the commis-

sary at N. Y. to exact of the inhabitants at E. grain which

was

it

by advertisements

possible for

them

to spare,

End

the

at different places in each town and what grain they had but his conhim, and fearing he should be met by people from

N. England, he ran

;

meeting the inhabitants according to

off without

N. London,

appointment.

I. all

meet him

to

parish, to give an account of

science so terrified

of L.

and had ordered them

May

22, '78.

E. Punderson, at Newport, Oct. 14, '78, wants his family to come in the King's lines on L.

May

655.

appearance

25, '78.

Blue

in

sorting thither

;

I.,

and he was

Pt. Bay, and intend to prevent

their

any boats

re-

they lay on the beach and get necessaries from the

inhabitants in that neighborhood.

656. Gaine,

E. Hampton, Sept. 21, '83.

at

4 more whale-boats have again made

Ju. 15, '78.

May

25, Gaine.

Friday 5th

inst.,

Eben. Dayton, with 6

by stratagem, took Mr. M'Intire's sloop whilst they lay

others,

near Blue Pt., and stripped a sloop of Lindley Murray.

Next day

another party composed of Rogers, Halsey, Sayer, and White, collected at S.

Hampton with

ing sent to N. Y.

;

a no. of others, to prevent provisions be-

and that night a party from the Main

boat seized a sloop at the entrance of

in a whale-

Brook Haven harbor, with a

quantity of goods from N. Y. for the use of the inhabitants of that

neighborhood

;

Philip Roe, at

and the same night they plundered the house of

Drowned Meadows,

3 miles east, of a considerable

quantity of goods and cash.

Last Sat. night a party of 14 armed tered the house of

W.

men

Nicoll, Esq., Islip,

landed on

I. I.,

and en-

and robbed him of a

sum

of money, plate, some arms, a quantity of clothing, and other properties to

a very considerable amount.

acquainted in the family, as they

they wanted. 657.

New

command L.

I.,

June Lon.,

of Cap.

They appeared to be very well knew where to find every thing

22, Gaine.

May

15.

Sunday night

last,

2 boats under the

Dayton and Chester, with 14 men

and carrying one of the boats across a narrow

in both,

went to

part of the island


SUFFOLK COUNTY. at S.

75

Hampton, they went about 60 miles up the

to Fire

which

I.

and took possession of 5

Inlet,

provisions,

the prisoners

The

&c.

More might have been brought

Among

S. side of the island

of coasting vessels

laden with lumber, oysters, household furniture,

lay there,

some dry goods,

sail

prizes are all safe arrived.

could they have

off,

manned them.

Gaine, June

a British Sergeant.

is

1, '78.

Dayton and others, were filed before R. Law, Judge of the Maritime Court, N. London county, against the following vessels, taken between high and low water mark, viz. Peggy, Cha's Cameron, Commander Polly, Geo. Hallock George, Sam'l Tobey Libels in favor of

;

Dalancey, Tho's Ming JV.

London,

May

;

;

Tuesday night 8 whale-boats arrived

22, '78.

here taken by Dayton, S. side of L.

658.

;

Jacob, Ja's Smith.

N. London, June 12,

I.

Capt. E. Dayton, in an armed

'78.

boat, carried 3 prizes (coasters) into

N. Haven, which he took near

Fire Island Inlet.

Last Thursday night a party of rebels assembled at the house of

one Weser, 8 miles E. of Huntington, where one Robertson, a pedler, had lodged,

money

whom

they robbed of

of Mr. Weser.

659. June 15, '78.

June

Jona Vail,

Allen, at Soulhold, a horse.

660. June 27, '78.

in

his goods,

and took a sum of

Gaine. the Revenge, took from one

Peter Griffing took 6 oxen from Tho's

Seaman and Mat. Smith, July

of

all

15, '78,

24.

Tho's Fanning, of South Hampton, brother

Edmund Fanning, was

carried off

last

week by

a

party

of

rebels from Conn.

June 20, '78. J. Youngs, of Stirling, writes to Nath'l Shaw in beFanning says he got Youngs out of prison in N. Y. T. F., and Q. M., was exchanged for Jos. Chew, Esq.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

half of Lt.

N. Haven, Aug.

661.

'78.

5,

Last Friday about

1000 new

Levies arrived at Huntington, from N. Y., said to be a foraging party.

N. London, Aug. at the E.

end of L.

14, '78.

We

hear 1000 troops from N. Y. were

a few days ago, collecting provisions for the British

I.

army. 662. Fairfield, Island,

and

is

Aug.

now

at

7, '78.

Gov. Tryon has marched down the

Setauket with 1200 men.

He

orders the


ARMED OCCUPATION Of

76

The

farmers to thresh out the grain immediately. is

stock on L.

I.ÂŤ it

expected, will be taken for the Kings's use.

N. London, Aug.

J

21, 78.

A sergeant

and 5 privates, deserters from

Tryon's plundering party, arrived here from L.

were

on their return, on Tuesday

to set out

Aug.

663.

who had

29. '78, Riv.

On Tuesday

They say

the

troops

se'night, a party of

Rebels

I.

last.

crossed over from Con't, having concealed themselves in a

wood below Huntington,

fired

upon

3 light dragoons, returning from

E. end of the Island, and killed one of them on the spot

A

two, with the horses, got off unhurt.

parly

;

the other

was immediately

patched from Huntington in quest of these assassins

;

Two

caped over to their brethren, on the other side of the Sound. days after

this,

dis-

but they es-

a Lt. and a few of the hands belonging to the Pri-

vateer lately wrecked on E. end of L.

were apprehended and pro-

1.,

perly secured.

664. Sep. 5, '78.

L.

I.,

I arrived last

marched

all

fat cattle for

the army.

had

the

to

in obtaining

about

the oath I administered to

or

remove with

their families

Not one of the whole chose the latter rebels said my proposal was generous, which

Conn.

hottest

me

convinces

is

on the north side of the Island, giving them the

the inhabitants

and furniture

Commissary

Inclosed

alternative, either to take the oath,

even

I

to secure the peaceable behavior of the disaffected inhabit-

ants in that quarter, and assist the

1000

evening from the East end of

with a detachment of near 1000 Provincials, where

that the acrimony of opposition

is

much

the late concessions of Government.

softened by

Tryon.

665. Last Sat. sundry inhabitants of Huntington were brought to

our

jail for

on L.

I.

piloting the rebels in their different excursions

from Con't

Gaine, Sep. 14, '78.

666. Oct 8, '78.

I

have, in a 2d excursion, brought

habitants on the E. end of L.

I.,

as far as

Montank

all

the in-

Point, under an

oath of peaceable behavior to his Majesty's Government, and with

good humor.

Tryon.

[Major Isaac Reeve was informed against by Maj. Parker Wickham.

When the light horse, led by Tories, first came to his house, he escaped. Soon after he was taken and pinioned at his own house, and carried before Tryon at Mattituck, 2 miles distant, and threatened to be hung on


77

SUFFOLK COUNTY. a big tree there. his father

He

refused at

first to

give up, but at the solicitation of

James, he took the oath, but spurned the Bible from his

lips.

Major Reeve was afterwards appointed Commissary, a post that gave him an opportunity of favoring many poor Whigs.

John Benjamin said to Mr. Reeve, " Are you going to take the V " Yes." " I wont." " You must." " No, I wont." When

oath

"

Benjamin's turn came, he was asked his occupation. " I mean, what is your business " rian. "

V

"

What

do you bring

away."

this fool

here for 1"

A

A

Presbyte-

Presbyterian."

Tryon, " Take him

said

Ed.]

N. London, Sep.

667.

Major Eben'r Gray, with a party

18, '78.

of Col. Meigs' Reg., went to Huntington on L.

and brought off

I.,

16 prisoners, disaffected, (who had gone over to the enemy from this state)

3 others

;

w ere T

and 2 made

killed,

their escape.

Last Tues. se'nnight, a number of armed rebels in

Sep. 19, '78, Eiv.

20 whale-boats came over from Norwalk and landed

Widow

Huntington, and attacked the house of the

at

Oak Neck

in

Chichester, in which

25 refugees were quartered, who made some resistance, but were soon overpowered. r

16

made

668. Oct. 10, '78.

wants

to

Lyon, were

2 of them, Capt. Coffin and

w ounded,

badly

prisoners

the rest

;

made

killed,

one

their escape.

Buel writes to Gov. Trumbull that Tryon

exchange rum, sugar, molasses,

tea,

and whatever

may

please the ladies, for beef.

669. N. London, Newport from L. I.

30

Oct. 16, '78.

670. Last Tuesday afternoon 3

Sail of

men

woodmen

arrived at

in a small schooner, with

4

was attacked by 2 whale-boats with about 10 Fire Place. The boats went up with full resolution

swivels and a cohorn,

men

in

each

at

to board the schooner,

and when within about 20 yards, they received off, when most who were spec-

such a dose from the cohorn, as obliged them to sheer of their oars were seen to drop by the people on shore tators of the action,

boats, after

which was well fought on both

having 9 of their

men

obliged to return to the shore.

671. David 6, '78, in

killed

Gaine, Nov.

Landon took dry goods on L.

possession of David Howell,

sides

;

but the

and several wounded, were

now

2, '78.

I.,

near Southold, Nov.

of Killingworth.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

78

From 672. " fested

it,

a Privateer off Smithtown, Nov. 28,

We have

cleared the

Bay

'78.

of the piratical crew that in-

and look upon the greater part of the inhabitants to be dis-

affected to Gov't,

and believe they give every intelligence, as well as Riv. Dec.

subsistence to the rebel party."

673. 14 days since a prize Brig

2.

came ashore

opposite St. George's

Friday following a privateer sloop and

Manor, loaded with tobacco.

4 whale-boats from N. London appeared in the Bay, and were seen to ply

between the prize and privateer, and 'tis supposed, carried off Next day the boats made an attack on a schooner

part of the cargo.

and a sloop that had arrived from N. York, but were repulsed by both

;

when Mr. Dayton, who, 'tis said, commanded the boats, carwounded men ashore to the house of Capt. Josiah Smith, of

ried his

Moriches, and the privateer sloop driving ashore, was taken by the people belonging to the 2 small vessels from N. Y.

Gaine, Nov.

30, '78.

674. Dec. 2, '78. Riv.

Last Friday night, a few minutes after

Col. Benj. Floyd, of Setauket, had

gone

to bed,

George, son of Job

Smith, of Smithtown, and Isaac, son of Epenetus Smith, with 12 others beset the house, and

where the Col.

slept,

waiting at the door.

George obliged a domestic

whom

he surprised and led

They then

to

show him

to the thieves

triumphantly hurried him over to

Norwalk. 675. Capt. Eben. Dayton, in the sloop

Ranger of 45 men, 6

car-

riage guns, and 12 swivels, blunderbusses, muskets, hand grenadoes (to

throw on the deck of the vessel attacked as they run her aboard

with whale-boats), was taken in South Bay, [Nov. 20, "78] by Capt. Stout of a N. Y. Privateer, and brought to N. Y.

Dec.

Wed.

last.

Riv.

5, '78.

676.

The

Bay, Dec.

Wm.

Seaman, was taken near Oyster

with cargo of wood, plank,

flour,

&c.

Petitions of Suffolk Co. Refugees, in Conn.

677. '78.

Betsey, Capt.

5, '78,

Jona. Havens, Dan'l and

Nathan Fordham, Benj. Conklin,

Paul and Step. Howell, Francis Furnier and Son, and Thos. Currier refugees from L. Oct. '78.

I

,

brought over their

David Parsons,

effects, [to

in service of

U.

Lyme S.,

?]

1776, transported


SUFFOLK COUNTY. from S. Hampton

his family off,

Haddam,

to E.

but can exchange for salt or steel

Capt. Jer. Rogers, of L. L,

—has wheat he

cannot ge«

— has liberty to go.

now (May

is

79

6, '78,) at Killingworth, in

whale-boat business.

L.

Jas. Sayre, of

I.,

now

at

Saybrook, wants to engage in the

Hampton, Silvanus Howell, and want

Capt. David Howell, of S.

Youngs, who over to L.

fled

from L.

I.

to Killingworth, in the fall of '76,

They were plundered

I.

and pray Gov. Trumbull

fing,

Orange Webb,

dam

;

illicit

Oct. 12, '78.

trade.

of produce on L.

Nov. 11,

for relief.

late of L. I., at

N. London

John Hudson, of Sag Harbor,

go

by Capt. Grif-

'78,

John

;

I.

Jos. to

Miller, at E.

at Stonington

;

Had-

Thos. Dering, of

Oba. S. Hampton are on the Main Benj. Paine, of Southold B. Y. Sag Harbor Prime, at N. Haven Oba. Haven, of Shelter I. at Saybrook Ezekiel Sandford, at E. Haddam Thos. Lester, killed by a wad at N. London Mary King, at Middletown Mr. Burnet Miller, at Stonington Josiah Smith, at N. London. Nov. 1, '76, to Oct. 1, '78. Shelter

I.

and Rich. Howell, of

;

Guildersleeve, of

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Ap. 22,

Thos. Dering, Middletown, wants to go to L.

'79.

I.

for

effects.

Aug. 24, L.

I.

'79.

Rev. Henry

Van Dyck,

at

Norwalk, wants

to

go to

[H. V. D., taken prisoner by Capt. Fitch, before

with his family.

Oct. '82.]

Henry Booth, of L.

Sep. '79. Gaitis Gardiner and

Nov. '79. Hugh and Wm.Gelston, petition

Nov.

2, '79. Jona.

to

I.,

at

Norwich.

winter their horses on L.I.

Osborn, of Southold, seized and brought over by

Peter Griffin, June 14, as a person unfriendly to U. S., wishes his apparel

and

May

liberty

— negatived.

24, '79. Jas. Curren, of Southold, to Guilford, asks relief from

taxation.

John Hubbard, from Southold, makes a deposition respecting Dan'l

No

Dibble, a refugee.

date.

Gershom Culver and Thos. Tapping, have permits, Nov. 16, '79, to bring off from L. I. some flour and grain, the produce of their land. Dec. 3, '79.

Hugh

Gelston allowed

to

go

to L.

I.

for

300 bushels of salt,

without carrying goods, produce or money.

Hartford, June 10, for proceeds of his

and

flax

Wm.

;

'79. Jesse

house and

Hannah White

lot

;

Wood

Aaron

for clothing

;

petitions to go to S.

Wm.

Philips

Floyd's and Ezra L'Hommedieu's effects

the effects of his father.

Hampton

Hampton, for horse for his own, and Col.

Isaacs to E.

;

John Pelletreau

for


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

80

678. Riv. Jan. 20, '79. Last Sat. se'nnight, 3 whale-boats with

detachments from Meigs and Willis's Continental Reg., under com-

mand

of a Capt. and Lt.,

to secrete

came from Greenwich,

Cont., with intention

themselves in Huntington Bay, until an opportunity offered

on their passage to this city but a violent gale them to make for the nearest part of L. I., in attaining which one of their number containing 7 privates and a Capt. was lost, and the crew perished. The other 2 as soon as they struck the ground, hauled up their boats and covered them with branches. After lying 26 hours concealed, they were discovered by a soldier of Gen. to interrupt vessels

;

arising, obliged

Delancey's Regt.,

who immediately got assistance and secured them at off. They were brought

the very instant they were ready to push to

town on Thursday

last.

1

Feb.

679.

tons, navigated

1, '79.

Capt. Elderkin took the sloop

Mary Ann, 28

by Stent Raymond, in Huntington Harbor, below

high- water mark.

N. London, Feb.

680.

5, '79.

Last Sat., the Ranger, a British

Privateer Brig of 12 guns that had been cruising in the Sound,

was

taken from a wharf at Sag Harbor, after a short resistance, by the

Brig Middleton, Capt. Sage, sloop

Beaver, Capt. Havens, sloop

Eagle, Capt. Conklin.

On Sunday

these 3 again sailed for

discovered 7 British vessels just arrived

Sag Harbor, where they

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one a brig of 8 or 10 guns,

when

a fair prospect appeared of making capture of the whole but wind ahead, the Middleton struck on the Middle Ground, in beating up the harbor, ^ of a mile from the shore, where she was bravely de;

fended for 4 or 5 hours by her crew against an incessant the brig and several field-pieces on shore shots, several

:

fire

after being hulled

under water, and the vessel careening by the

from

by 30

tide's fall-

guns could not be worked, all except 4 left the ship and were taken on board the other 2 vessels. These on their return, took 2 brigs from Cork, via. N. Y. with rum, wine, and 12,000 bushels of oats for the troops on the East end ing, the

of

Long

Island.

Hog Neck, Sir

:

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; At daybreak

11 o'clock at night, Feb.

the Brig Middleton

guns each, were seen standing in

for

1, '79.

and 2 Sloops of 14 and 10

Sag Harbor.

Betwixt 8 and 9

they came within cannon shot of the King's armed vessel, which fired


SUFFOLK COUNTY.

81

3 shots ahead of them, neither of which being answered, the Neptune fired at

them, which was returned on their side, hoisting rebel colors,

and

standing on until they came within reach of the guns on shore,

still

which having thrown a few 12 pound shot the

changed

for

some time,

till

at

Hog Neck

Harbor, towards the end of

them, they stood out from long shot was then ex-

:

Brig having the appearance of

the rebel

being aground, or having met with some accident, a 12 pounder was

moved down

to the

end of Long Wharf, which being nearly on a

level

with the water, had the effect of deterring the sloops from giving her

much

assistance

:

while

I

crossed over to

Hog Neck

of the British Legion, and the 3 pounder attached to

with the infantry

from whence

it,

we

bore with such advantage on her, that she struck to us, but unfortunate-

whale boats on board,

ly having 5

sloops immediately

left

all

the

We

the Bay.

crew got

and the

off except 3,

met with but one

accident, a

corporal being wounded.

CHAS. COCHRAN, Maj. B. Legion, Commanding Troops

To

W.

Sir

[Maj. Cochran was killed at Yorktown.

Caution

681.

A

at S.

H.

Erskine.

to

Ed.

Travellers on

L.

I.

party of Rebels have a place of resort at Bread and Cheese

Hollow, on a bye road that leads from the houses of 2 bellion, viz.

:

men now in

re-

Nath'l Piatt and Thos. Treadwell, to that of the noted

Sam'l Philips, near the Branch. said Philips' to the

They extend along

the road from

well-known Piatt CarlPs, and have stopped several

persons on horseback and in wagons, and robbed a number of houses

Smithtown, and Islip, within the last 10 days. They are said to be commanded by a rebel Maj. Brush, formerly of Huntington. Two of these thieves are known to be Nich. Tillotson and Steph. Woodhull, in

(the former) son of Dan'l Tillotson of the Branch, ow^ner of the barn

formerly mentioned in this paper, which the Rebels look-out to waylay passengers.

The

make use

of as a

unfortunate Loyalists in this

part of the country are greatly exposed to the savage cruelty of these

They

assassins.

are

few

in

number, and unable

selves from the frequent incursions of the parties

Cont.,

8

and*

intelligence

who by

are

to defend

who

them-

land from

harbored and supplied with provisions and

their confederates

above mentioned. Riv. Mar. 10, '79.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

82

14 companies light infantry (700)

682. Feb. 16, '79.

at

South-

25

sails in

ampton. Gen. Clinton at Southampton with about 2500 troops

and near Sag Harbor

12 or 14 driven on Gardener's

:

;

I.

by a

N. London, Mar. 25,

The enemy

N. London, Mar. 5/79. flat

boats for the invasion of this State.

arrived there from N.

and went, it Mar. 31,

Ap.

We

marched from N. Y.

1.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;31

end of L.

I.

are building

A reinforcement of 1500

sail

lately

came down Sound from N. Y.

Sag Harbor.

into

is said,

'79.

Y.

at E.

gale.

'79.

hear Gen. Clinton, with 3 or 400 troops, lately

end of L.

to the E.

been there several weeks, said

to

I.,

amount

and joined those who had whole to 3 or 4000.

in the

Ap. 7, '79. 10 days since, Gen. Clinton in haste returned to N. Y. accompanied by a small guard, for fear the French would attack New York. British troops on L. I., 'tis said, are commanded by General

New Haven

Vaughan.

paper.

by permission, was carrying a white bag of peaches from the orchard of Mrs. Hunting, at E. Hampton, when Nath'l D., supposing he had a goose under his arm, fired and killed him. Domini at first

[A

soldier,

determined

to stand

a

trial,

(conscious of his innocence,) but by advice

Ed.]

of his friends, fled.

N. London, Ap.

5 French prisoners escaped here from L.

15, '79.

who say there are only 500 foot and 50 horse at Southold, and 100 men at Sag Harbor with 2 field-pieces, which force is kept there to faciI.,

litate the

wood

taking off

vessels,

wood and hay from Sag Harbor.

and a 12 gun brig

from N. Port.

there,

kill

poor milch cows

Gen. Clinton was returning

breastworks,

A fleet of

1

6 sail of

and a ship with provisions lately

Before her arrival provisions were so scarce, that the in-

habitants were obliged to sickly.

lie

&c,

for food,

and the troops

after

throwing up some

in consequence of a report that

Gen. Parsons was

to

N. Y.,

preparing for an attack on Sag Harbor with 4000 troops.

Mr. Buel was on friendly and intimate terms with Gov. Tryon his lively disposition, ready wit, and fondness for the chase, was a favorite with Sir Wm. Erskine, and often had it in his power to ;

and from

soften the severity of war.

Sir William, one

Saturday, said to Mr.

Buel, " I have ordered the people of your parish to appear with their teams at Southampton to-morrow." Mr. B. replied, " I know it, but as

I

am

der."

commander-in-chief on the Sabbath, Sir

William did not

I

have annulled the or-

insist.

Mr. Buel frequently joined the parties of the British

officers,

which


83

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

Once had

he enlivened by humorous anecdotes and agreeable conversation.

when he was behind

the appointed hour for a deer-hunt, Sir

mount

to receive him.

was introduced

the floor,

now mounted, when men to dis-

Tired of waiting, they had

detained the party.

seeing his friend Buel approaching, Sir

Wm.

ordered his

Lord Percy, an aid, while impatiently pacing to Mr. Buel, who thereupon asked him what

command

portion of His Majesty's forces he had the honor to

bow, "

I

by Sir

suppose

have the honor of addressing Beelzebub, the prince

I

His lordship put his hand on his sword.

!"

Wm., and

restored to good

"A

?

" Then," said Mr. Buel with a low

legion of devils just from hell."

of devils

Wm.

the laugh turned

humor by

the

on Percy, who,

This was rebuked after a while,

was

attention of the parson.

Prime,

16 sail came out of Gardiner's

Bay and

marked

179.

May

N. London, stood for N. Y.

683.

£40

May

11, '79.

— supposed

for

N. York.

Widow Case

ter Griffing recovered

684. Gaine, Islip,

woodmen

David Gardiner of Southold, was robbed of and her son of goods and clothes. Pe-

11, '79.

cash, and

to be

May

was robbed

and restored them. 31, '79.

The house

of

Wm.

of sundry sorts of goods to the

Nicoll, Esq., of

amount of many

hundreds, by a party from Conn, a fortnight ago,

May

18,

under

Eben'r Drake and Capt. Peter Foster. 685. Riv. Ju. parture of Sir this place, ter,

by a

we

W.

9, '79.

Suffolk Co.,

May 31.—"Since

the de-

Erskine and the troops under his command from

have been continually plundered both by land and wa-

set of (worse than savage) rebels.

They are become so bold The great quantity

as to attack us at noonday as well as at midnight.

of goods carried from N. Y. to this county, I think,

is

the cause of

what we call your town (N. Y.), who are concerned with a number of

inviting the rebels over.

There

is

a set (of

traders) in disaffected

persons in carting goods to the different parts of this county."

A

Loyal Subject. 686. Gaine, Ju. 14, '79.

On Sunday

evening, June

of rebels and plunderers entered the house of

and stripped

it

of

all

W.

6,

Nicholl,

a party

jr., Islip,

the furniture and clothing that were valuable

;

which they proceeded to the house of Ob. and John Greene, and robbed them of about £140 value. These villains are commis-

after


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

84

sioned by Gov. Trumbull to take every thing below highwater mark.

There being no vessels

South Bay

at present in

them

for

to take,

rather than return without booty, they have robbed old Mr. Nicholl's

family several times to a considerable amount.

Every 6th man drafted on L. I. from 16 Sandy Hook.

687. June 16, '79.

to

60, in consequence of our fleet [French] off

688. Riv. July

" Suffolk Co., Ju. 21.

3, '79.

The most

ous Rebels boast they can have goods from N. Y. as usual.

notori-

Several of

our inhabitants entertain and join with the plundering parties.

week a

party of Rebels had a feast at the house of Benj.

Moriches, (a most pernicious attended at this

caitiff.)

Wm.

frolic.

Last

Havens

at

and several of the inhabitants

Philips,

Benajah Strong, (who was

privy to the murder of Maurice Seaman, at Islip,) and Caleb Brewster,

gave

this entertainment.

The

689. Huntington.

friends of

Government here have been

greatly distressed ever since the King's troops left the E. end of L. I.

in

;

the rebellious part of the inhabitants in this town,

awe while

more

were stationed E. of

the troops

who were kept now become

us, are

insolent than ever, and publicly threaten to have

ists carried

off to Con't.

The

principal

all

the loyal-

of these miscreants are

Nath'l Williams, Stephen Kelsey, Eliphalet Chichester, John Brush,

Jonas Rogers, Marlboro Burtis, and Israel

smuggled goods out of N. Y.

Wood

;

several of

whom

to this place for the sole purpose of

supplying the rebels in Con't.

These scoundrels

live in perfect safety,

when

scarcely a night

passes but some of their loyal neighbors are plundered by the sons

and other relations of those rebels troops landed on the Island.

these traitors,

your

city to

if

I

who

fled to

Con't

when

the King's

hope you will keep a good look-out for

they should have the assurance to return again to

buy goods

any troops quartered

;

and

if

we

should be so happy as to have

in this part of the

these perjured villains will be

made

rebellion against the best of kings.

county again,

to rue the

I

hope

in

God

day they entered into

Gaine, Ju. 28, 1779.

The British put powder in the cellar and 690. July 21, '79. blew up the house lately improved by John Brown, on Fisher's I., fired the out-houses, hay, &c.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. 691. Spies on L.

June 27,

I.

madge 10 guineas

for

and

Sparks,

satisfactory.

July

will replace the guineas.

—Sparks,

vi.

Washington sends

'79.

to Col. Tall-

Culper, Jr., whose accounts are clear, intelligent, vi.

Washington

5, '79.

85

278. is

Tallmadge

sorry that

lost his letter,

T. must notify H. in the Bowery, of the

but

loss.

285.

Washington wishes

Sep. 24, '79.

spies to write their information

on margin of almanacs, reviews, pamphlets, &c, or on blank leaves at the end or write a familiar letter in tory style, and interline with a ;

stain their private intelligence.

Feb. 5, '80.

W.

sends 20 guineas and 2 vials of stain and counter-

part of stain, for Culper, Jr.

Sparks,

vi.

460.

Washington) with some Y. and Abraham Woodhull of Setauket, which lasted war. He kept, one or more boats constantly employed in Sound on this business. Thomspon, ii. 483.

Col. T. opened a secret correspondence (for

persons in N.

through the

cruising the

In

summer

went to N. Y. under sanction of a flag, those who had transmitted intelligence of the

of '83, Major T.

to grant protection

to

enemy's doings from time

who, on entering the Isaac

L.

I.

insults of their

in-

Simms, 547.

Whippo, Geo. Smith, Silvanus Dickerson, refugee Whigs from last two obtained pensions for secret service as spies. They access to the city of N. Y., bought goods. Stratford, notori-

The

had

free

ous

for illicit trade,

exported to L.

cheese, and small stock of

condemned 692.

;

men

Was

all

small articles

Some

kinds.

set at liberty.

murdered

I.

Owners

at Islip,

June

—hams, eggs,

supposed by 3

butter,

boats were captured and

sold all kinds of goods. 18, Morris

Simmons, a

who occupied the farm of one villains, who first wounded him with

gee from Duchess Co., rebel,

these spies

countrymen,

might have treated them with indignity

city,

stead of merited respect.

Thus

time during the war.

to

and private emissaries were saved from the

refu-

Strong, a a pistol in

the knee, stabbed him in several places, and then beat his brains out

with an axe. Gaine, July

[He had

As he

lived alone, he

was not found

notice to quit.

By

next day.

Ed.] Suffolk Co.,

693.

till

5, '79.

a late proclamation,

Y„ must have a pass

5

;

all

I find several

Aug.

4, '79.

persons going to and from N. persons have surreptitiously ob-

.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

86 them

tained

the loyalists of this county not daring to oppose, as

;

their lives and property lie entirely at the

mercy of the Con't

rebels.

Several persons from Queens, (notoriously disaffected,) have lately

moved

county

into this

purpose of trading with their rebel

for the

connections in the Con't towns. 694. Riv.,

Aug.

Riv.,

A

14, '79.

blacked, entered the house

Aug.

party of rebels, with their faces

Fred. Hudson, Esq., of

of

Co., on Friday night, 6th inst, and robbed

and bedding

24, '79.

him of

Suffolk

provisions, clothing

amount of £200 and upwards, scarcely leaving

to the

This

the family their wearing apparel.

is

the fourth time Mr.

H.

has been plundered since his captivity.

£5

695.

Reward.

—Taken

out of the lots of Dan'l Blatsy, one

Aug.

mile from Piatt Carll's, Huntington, a horse and mare, &c.

16,

Game.

'79.

To

696.

Hammond,

Sir A.

or Tx¥th part of the Privateer sailed from Huntington, 14th inst., on a cruise,

be sold at Auction,

-|th

14 six-pounders, completely victualled and manned, and

Aug.

close quarters.

fitted

with

Gaine.

23, '79.

owned by Tory refugees, comN. London, Aug. 25, '79.

697. 40 privateers at Huntington,

manded by one Hatch, of Mass.

698. Riv., Oct. 2, '79.— N. Lond., Sep. 22.

ing been made to Gen. Delancey, of L.

men,

to parade

lyn, to be

I.

A

requisition hav-

500

Militia, to furnish

with their blankets on Aug. 23, to march for Brook-

employed in repairing and constructing new works there ; to be from Suffolk County, who were also to

210 of which were

furnish and send to the magazine at Brooklyn, 5,000 fascines, 9 long, and stripped of leaves

;

25,000 pickets, from 3 to 4

5,000 fraisings or stockades, from 9 to 10 thick

;

5,000 railing of 6 or 7

The was

ft.

sition

is

;

long, and 6 to 8 in.

ft.

:

JY. :

ft.

long

inhabitants having refused to comply, the following letter

sent to Gen. Delancey

Sir

ft.

—You

Y. Aug. 26, '79.

will signify to the people of Suffolk Co. that if the requi-

not immediately complied with a detachment of troops will be

sent into that district, and every person

out of L.

I.,

and

their

farms will be

have suffered from real attachment

to

who

all

shall refuse shall be turned

for the support of those

who

Government.

RAWDON, Ad.

Gen.


SUFFOLK COUNTY. N. London Gaz.

Sep. 22, '79.

from L.

I.

to

Saybrook,

who

87

men came homes on account of being or-

Last Friday 35 young their

left

dered to work on the fortifications on the west end of L.

apprehend-

I.,

ing they should be ordered thence to the West Indies.

699.

made

Aug.

Aug. 14, a party of about 20 rebels Corum, and took 2 of Isaac [or Isaiah]

28, '79. Riv.

their appearance at

Thence they proceeded 6 miles westward

Smith's sons.

to the

house of Isaac Smith, and also made him and 3 more of his sons

Mr.

prisoners. his escape. at

threw one of the rebels over the stoop and made

S.

Thence they proceeded

to B.

Haven Town and stopped time. Thence they

John Baley's, where they remained some

went

to

lay.

Between

made

his escape.

Crane Neck, 3 miles west of B. Haven, where

Next morning-

The same day

Neck.

their boats

were seen near Crane

a party of militia were in motion, and their

Drowned Meadow, known Eben. Dayton was

orders were to march to

Haven.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The

well

their boats

and Crane Neck one of Mr. Smith's sons

this place

party, 2 of the sons of Israel Conklin, of

3 miles east of B. at the

head of

this

Huntington South, Stephen

Woodhull, of B. Haven, the noted Isaac Smith, of Corum, ( commonly called Petticoat Isaac, ) and one of his sons the two latter joined the rebels about 3 months ago. Mr. Petticoat Isaac has been :

remarkably industrious in harboring and supplying the Rebels with provisions and intelligence.

The above

party

made

their appearance at

and ordered Isaac Smith's family

to depart

Corum.,

at noon-day,

from that place, by Tues-

day following, otherwise their house should be destroyed by I.

S. is the only Loyalist in the

700. Capt. Elias Glover

left

whole

Conn,

district of

fire.

Corum.

after the passage of

Treason

Act, Sep. 10, '79, and was captured by Major Talmadge, at Lloyd's

Neck.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sep. 701.

'79,

Chatham, Sep. 28.

'79.

number of men from every county, visit

from the French, our

blue, a gun,

to fortify the Island.

mounted and gold touch-hole

clothes, gilt oval buttons

;

fears a

Stolen, Sep. 15, from Jos. Ketcham's,

40 miles east of N. Y., by 7 or 8 armed silver

He

illustrious ally.

702. Gaine, Oct. 11, '79. at Nesiscop,

General Clinton has demanded a

;

men

dressed in

a suit of green

a suit, light-colored silk jean, solid silver


AR3IED OCCUPATION OF

88 buttons

a suit nankeen.

;

The above made

a short

fit

for shooting.

Also, 4 ruffled shirts, 4 cravats, 4 handkerchiefs, fowling bag,

&c,

10 gallons shrub, 18 Madeira wine, also a gun of Major [John]

£ 10

AntilFs, [of Skinner s Brigade].

reward

for one,

and

£5

for

every other of the robbers.

N. B. Any of the gang who will inform, may depend on every means being used to obtain his pardon, by Richard Deane, distiller, N. Y.

On the night of Oct. 2, a party of men attempted to break into Widow Piatt, Huntington, where Jas. Houston and John Stewart kept store, but was prevented by Mr. Stewart, who 703.

the house of

threatened to

fire

on them.

The

night following they returned with

a greater force and attacked the house in like manner,

when they

were again prevented. On 5th returned a third time, at 12 at night, broke up a window with a sledge, and fired several shot into the house, when a hot engagement commenced. Mr. John Stewart, Mr. Piatt, and a negro, prevented their getting into the

kitchen,

house for some time, but one of the

where John Stewart

habitants,

who

killed him.

villains got into the

The firing alarmed

the in-

immediately took to their arms, and drove the robbers

The negro

into the woods.

received a

wound

in the head, the only

damage done. Oct. 18, '79. Game. (100 guineas reward.) A most daring robbery was committed at the house of Jesse Conklin, Bushy Plains, by persons unknown, on the night of Oct. the 6th. 100 guineas reward, and a (free) pardon from the Commander in Chief, ( is offered ) to any accomplice

who

shall prove evidence against the rest.

704. Nov.

3, '79,

Riv.

Oct.

We hear from B.

18, '79.

Haven, that

Game. last

Mon-

day evening, a party of 20 rebels, in 3 whale-boats, arrived near the house of Col. Benj. Floyd. They attacked the house, and robbed

him of £600, and the most valuable the party had their faces blacked

Andrew Seton was robbed (by effects

:

;

the

part of his household goods. 2 of

and the same night the house of

same party) of the most valuable

and on the preceding evening the house of Capt. Solomon

Davis (see 767)

at

Old Man's was attacked.

They

fired several

shot through the house, but Capt. Davis stood ready to receive the first

who

told

them he was accustomed

should dare enter, either at the doors or windows.

He

to having balls fly around him, and


SUFFOLK COUNTY. some of the

89 went

inhabitants being alarmed, the rebels

doing any more damage in that quarter.

have been committed on the south 705. Nov.

away, Nov.

3, in

side.

2 guineas reward.

6, '79, Riv.

off without

Several other robberies

A

nut brown horse run

disembarking at Brooklyn ferry, belonging to the

Major of the Hess. Reg. of Ditfourth, marching

to

Huntington.

Not easy caught. 706. N. London, Dec. L.

last

I.,

Monday

4, '79.

5 green coats arrived here, from

night.

Petitions of Suffolk Co. Refugees 707. Ap. 24, '80. Gilbert Fanning,

Stonington, wants to return to L.

which

his grandfather

also to get

to settle

Carolina, and '80.

left

Conn.

in

nephew of

Lt. Palmer, at

about land in Stonington,

to his father (at his death in June last),

left

power of attorney from Phineas and

to dispose of estate of

May,

F.

I.

a

jr.,

Jas. F., at Southold,

Richard F., who died 8 years ago in North

2 children

who

died lately.

David Palmer wants permit

produce of Col. Gardi-

to get

Plumb I. Ap. 11, '80. Thos., Amaziah, and Selah Corwin, Peter Halliock, Israel Youngs, David Vail, Daniel Tuthill, at Lyme, are permitted to

ner, his father-in-law, off

go

L.

to

They

I.

for grain, wool, flax,

are to carry over

and 1^ bushels

salt

each

for their families.

no provisions nor bring off any British goods.

Capt. John Conklin, refugee, has a pass to cross

June 30,

'80.

wishes a pass

He

I.

L.

Wm.

Lawrence,

for his wife

in

I.

'80.

late of S.

Hampton, now of Saybrook, to go and stay on L.

up

his mother's estate.

Andrew Ward wants permit

for

Rev. Mr. Rose to

and procure proof that certain captured goods, worth jÂŁ800,

were bought and not captured on L.

Aug.

illicit

'80.

and Elizabeth Simmons

to return after settling

July 12, visit

Sound

June 13,

trade.

10, '80. Doctor

trade seized, but

showed

I.

Howell and Mr. Leavenworth in the

illicit

a permit from President of Congress.

Capt. Zach. Rogers, Jacob Titus and Thos. Conklin, of L. taken in a wood-boat on the Sound before Aug. 26, '80.

Before Sep. 14, '80. Capt.

Lockwood took from

L.

I.

I.,

were

Cable and Lud-

lam.

John I.

Storrs, Hartford, Oct. 25, '80,

and bring back presents.

wants

to

go and preach on L.

Capt. Gamaliel Baley to

command the

boat.


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

90 Oct. 31, '80.

family ofTL.

I.

Wm. He

Lawrence,

at

Saybrook, wishes to bring his

12 months ago.

left

Jacob Titus, Thos. Conklin, Zach. Rogers, taken 10 weeks ago in a wood-boat and ford, will aid the

American cause,

now

of Huntington,

war

to

go

at Hart-

Oct. '80.

if liberated.

Geo. Smith, at Hartford, wishes

Smithtown now and then

to

Has

His father lately died.

to see to his estate.

late

prisoners of

large family to sup-

port.

Geo. Howell wishes

to

bring over from L.

I.

his secreted effects.

No Mar. go

13, '80. Oba. Johnes, Nath'l

date.

Tuthill, pray to

to L. I. at all times for provisions for their families.

Mar.

Reeve and Nath'l,

10, '80. Eben'r

Chelsea, were refugees from L.

Mar. 20, L.

King and Daniel

Henry White,

'80. Dr.

his

nephew,

at school at

I.

at Stonington,

wishes to return to

I.

Mar. 21,

'80.

Nath'l

Overton, at

Groton, wants to return to

Southold.

John Franks, Elias Howell, Dan'l Fordham, Henry Hopping, Silas Jessup, David Woodruff, Geo. Fordham, Dan'l Rackett and Capt. Paul

Reeve, want permits

Nov., '80

to cross to L. I.

Joshua Smith and Capt. D. Roe, of B. Haven, D. Roe at Woodbury, '80

;

?

Middletown; Capt.

at

Lt. Caleb Brewster of Continental

Seth and Ephraim Marvin, of B. Haven, at Norwalk, '80

;

Army,

Cornelius

and Eben'r Conklin, Alex, and Carll Ketchum, W. Sammis, Jas. Hubbs, Benj. Blachly, Pearson Brush, Epenetus Smith, Jos. Titus, Tim. Williams, at Norwalk

;

Isaac Smith at N. Haven.

Ap. 27,

'80.

Jan. 24, '80. John Hulbert, David Sayre, Theoph's Halsey, Maltby Gelston, David Pierson, Zeb. Osborn, Uriah Rogers and Stephen ell, all

of E.

to go to L.

May, ed

Haddam, and Gamaliel Bayley,

I.

for flax.

'80. Benj.

— returned

in a

Nathan, from Southold

Hannah Cupper and from Southold to

— wife

became discontent-

year with the children and back one year since,

cows— allowed

asks to take over 2 or 3

return

How-

of Hartford, have permits

to

take one.

P. Tillenness, widows, fled with their husbands

Haddam

— unable

to

Eben. Edwards, Southampton

to

— desire

to

—indigent —wants

to

support their families

— granted. Farmington

go over and bring back avails of his farm.

Wm. Floyd from L. I.

to

Middletown

— Gen. Tryon allowed two

tories


SUFFOLK COUNTY. to take his estate,

his effects

and

steward

his

—asks

Guilford

—has

— granted.

—asks

send over for

Ap.

cattle for continental

turn

quiet

is

granted.

Jona. Havens, from L.

— allowed, with

I.

to

East Haddam, 1776

money, which

spent

is

— in need

and wants

asks to return

—negatived.

I.

to re-

negro boy, family stores, furniture, &c.

his family,

Havens, from L.

'80.

— sold his grain and Ap.

Wm.

|jj

who

—property gone — out

return as the east end of the Island

to

'80.

a family in want,

Dr. Silas Halsey, Southampton to Killingworth of business

to

Ap.

Zeb. Hallock, Southold to

wish his return

Conn.

fled to

— granted.

91

— can't

'80.

support his family at Saybrook

June, '80.

David and Silvanus Hoel, and Jer. Rogers, Southampton to Killingworth, 1776 ask to go over to rent their farms and bring back

the avails

—negatived.

Ap., '80.

Sam'l Landon and Barnabas Horton

ask

to return

Wm.

—granted.

fled to

possessed E. end of Island

Saybrook leaving

—wife

sick

— asks

negatived.

Seth Overton asks to bring over from Southold to parents

who

are insulted by the British

Elias Pelletreau, goldsmith, and

Southampton ed him, 1776

to

Simsbury

—asks

—negatived. two

his

charged

I.

to

two sons

Saybrook

can't support his family

Major King, Oyster Pond wants

to

to return

to

John and

to bring over avails of his

in the

to return

Ap. '80. army and dis-

—negatived.

Saybrook, with his aged parents

farm

—allowed under inspection. Date

Abigail and Bethiah Terry, Southold in decline of

life

Elias,

and ruin-

with goldsmith's tools

— was Captain and asks

return

Oct. '80.

sons,

— enemy made a store of his house

for his

'80.

his family

May, '80. Chatham his aged

negatived.

Paul Reeve, L.

Guilford

to

May,

Lawrence, Southampton

when enemy

— Southampton

— can't obtain support —

lost.

Durham, 1776 single and want to return granted. to

Sep. '80. Jos. Topping, L.

farm

I.

to

Middletown

—in need— a large family—has

— an aged father on the Island —allowed

to return.

May,

'80.

Rufus and Christ'r Tuthill, widow Dolly Baley and John King Southold

to

N. London

— ask

to take

over a

cow each

—granted. May,

'80.

a


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

92

Benj. Vail, Jona. Conklin, Jona. and Joshua Horton, and Joshua

Reeve

— Southold

to Guilford

return and take over cattle

David Welden, L. aged mother

to E.

I.

allowed

if

— cannot

support their families

—granted. Haddam,

to return

1776— in want

Sep.,

— has

Ap.

John Preston, and Tim. Welles, large estates at

Southold

—money

and

Sr.

gone

at

Jr.,

want

in

—ask

—negatived.

'80.

return

to

Ap.

Southampton

an

Stonington— left

allowed.

Henry White wishes

to

'80.

take no part against U. S.

will

granted.

Dr.

— ask

Ap.

'80.

Rev. Mr. "White, at

to return to his father,

Feb. '81.

Thos. Topping, tanner and shoemaker, South Hampton to Wethersfield

—spent the

effects

— allowed

he brought over

to return.

Ap.

'80.

Jan. '80. John, Cornelius, and Selah Conklin, Sam'l Vail, Rob't

Brush, Conklin Shaden, Ezekiel Wickes, Carll and Alex. Ketcham,

John

Carll,

Henry Scudder, Joshua and Jarvis Rogers, Jesse Arthur,

Josiah Buffet, Seth Marvin,

— L.

which had been taken by the

I.

British

Conn.

to

—ask

—forsook

relief of Poll

their

Wm.

Feb. '80. Eph. and Benj. Marvin, Zebulon Williams, Gabriel Smith, Benj. and Gabriel North, L.

—ask

they brought over

relief

I.

to

Norwalk

Salmon,

—spent

all

from Tax.

Smith, Smithtown to Stratford

Oct. '80. Geo.

homes,

Tax.

—asks

to return to

bring off the avails of the sale of his estate in merchandise.

Wm.

Philips

Col. Floyd

Downs.)

and

wants permit

go

to

to

L.

I.

and bring

off effects of

own, (and get =£600 then due Col. F. from Dan'l Philips was Floyd's overseer and had resided 2 years at his

Milford.

708.

New Haven, Feb.

were attempting drowned 709.

;

Last week, as 3 Hessian soldiers Sound from Lloyd's Neck, 2 were

2, '80.

to cross the

the 3d got safe ashore

on the Main.

$20 Reward and Charges. Stolen

out of the barn of Zo-

phar Rogers, Huntington, Feb. 19, '80, 2 horses, &c. 710. Public thanks are hereby rendered to His Ex. Brig. Gen.

LELAND,

for his amiable

by a vote (nem.

March

command during

his stay at

con.) of the inhabitants, at a

9, '80.

711. July 19, '80.

Sol.

Symcoe crossed

the

Huntington

town meeting, held

Keicham,

Sound

at

Town

Clerk.

Flushing, and


SUFFOLK COUNTY. marched

93

Huntington, where 100 of the

to

nication overland,

militia

This corps was destined

Island joined him.

between the Fleet which lay

cavalry of the

to secure the

off the

commu-

East end of the

The Queen's Rangers remained about the

Island and N. Y.

Points,

on the E. end of the Island till Aug. 9, when they fell back to Corum, whence they returned Eastward, Aug. 15, being joined by

Amer. Reg., which Symcoe was ordered

the King's

to detach to

Riverhead, and he himself met the Commander-in-Chief (Clinton),

who was now on

journey by the Admiral's invitation, to hold a

his

conference with him.

whose

fleet

Symcoe

in Gardiner's

to

Adm'l Arbuthnot,

Bay, but sailed before Clin-

The Queen's Rangers

ton could arrive.

Aug.

Clinton sent

was anchored

returned to Oyster Bay,

This march of near 300 miles had been made very

23.

fatiguing by the barren, through

uncommonly hot weather, which rendered which the roads

the night as in the daytime.

A

on the country. Adj. Gen. [Andre

?]

militia

to

principally lay, as close

the Pine

and sultry in

The troops had been obliged to subsist who was sent express to the

dragoon

inform him what difficulty there was in pro-

the hardships which conupon the inhabitants, was waylaid, taken and robbed As this had been at Smithtown, by a party from the Rebel shore. formerly the case, and it was obvious no party could remain se-

curing provisions for the troops, and

sequently

creted

fell

unknown

to the

inhabitants, Lt. Col.

Symcoe

obtained leave

of Clinton, to raise a contribution from the inhabitants of rency, one-half to reimburse the militia

man

for

ÂŁ80

cur-

what was taken

from him, and the other to recompense him for the chagrin he must have been under

in

not being able to execute his orders. Jour. 149, 150.

712. Last Friday night a party of Rebels surrounded the house of

Dr. Punderson of Setauket, took him prisoner and carried him to Con't:

in that night the

same party took

Wm.

Jayne,

jr.

The

rebels told Mrs. P. they had taken the Dr. to exchange for John

Smith and Mr. Jayne town, at

Widow

for

Wm.

Philips,

who were

seized at Smith-

Blyenbury's, on a trading expedition.

Gaine, July 17, '80. 713. Sep.

came here

N. L. Tw o deserters from the Queen's Rangers Sunday from L. I., who say Gen. Clinton was at E.

1, '80,

last

5*

t


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

94

Hampton, Wed. before, and that day set out with his attendants for N. Y., and that the rest of the Troops set out on Thursday.

Taken up by John Hill,

714. Riv. Sep. 16, '80.

Inspector, Brook-

lyn Ferry, a dark bay horse and 2 mares, in the possession of John

Brown being

of Huntington,

who

is

now

on suspicion of

in custody

their

stolen.

715. Ship Watt, struck on \ moon shoal, Montauk Pt, sunk 2 hours, Capt. Coulthart and 20 of the crew drowned.

Gaine, Sep. 20,

in

'80.

716. Sep. 26, '80. Col. Ludlow writes to Gen. Silliman, that " plundering inhabitants and taking off innocent farmers, is a mode

of warfare

Outrages are committed by mercenary

I detest.

Any

of our people plundering on the Main,

among

us.

by me,

will be returned to

you and

restoration

men

detected

if

made."

717. Those Refugees desirous of locations in Suffolk Co. will Oct. 5, '80.

leave their petition with P. J. Livingston, Hellgate.

718. Capt. Elisha Elderkin in the True Blue, took the Betsey,

Dan'l Pardue, master, in South Bay. Oct. 9, '80.

719.

Michael Veal, Joshua Rogers, Cor. Conklin,

John Conklin, and Jesse Brush, weather on L.

stress of

" Oct.

11.

(see 722) of the

Monday

Capt.

J.

last,

viz.

:

were brought

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maj.

were forced by

in a whale-boat,

shore, and are

I.

Royal Refugees, and

lowing rebel gentry,

Oct. 8, '80.

now to

prisoners in N.

Town by

Y.

Luke,

Capt.

safely lodged in Provost, the fol-

Brush,

Capt. Cornelius Conklin,

Conklin, Capt. Rogers, and Lt. Farley,

all

notorious offenders,

long practised in coming from the N. England shore to murder and plunder the King's loyal subjects, on L.

I.

They were taken

last Sat.

by Lt. Pendergrass and a party of Col. Cuyler's Refugees, at Smith-

town, with their whale-boat, and considerable booty. Capt.

Ketcham was

A

certain

killed in attempting to escape."

Oct. 10, '80, Bob. Roy.

Jesse Brush had sent the following warning " to John

Amer. Gaz.

Ketcham and

his associates."

Head T

This

Quarters, Aug. 25, '80.

have repeatedly ordered you, especially Ap. 15, is

the last invitation.

If

you do

to leave

my

farm.

not, your next landfall will be in


SUFFOLK COUNTY. a warmer climate than any you make your escape. "

It

95 20 days you have to

ever lived in yet.

Riv., Oct. 21, '80.

was a dark, moonless midnight in Sep. '80, that Maj. Brush, a man, with red hair, sandy complexion, and a bright

small, well-built

eye, strong as Hercules,

and bold as a Lion, 2 brothers Conklins, from whose farm had been ravaged

Virginia, Capt. Rogers, a hardy old fellow,

by Cornwallis's army, Lt. Ketcham, a polished gentleman and brave

Tim. Williams,* a noble, generous fellow, full of vivacity and humor, and Abm. Leggetj landed from a whale-boat on a Beach near officer,

The

Smithtown.

boat was hauled up in a cove, and carefully covered

with branches of trees, seaweed,

Then they proceeded to who had been apprized

&c, so

as to prevent

its

being noticed.

owner of which was a True Blue, Maj. Brush was about to be dispatched on

a house, the that

a secret mission by Gov. Clinton to raise a loan of specie on L.

For 3 weeks they passed

to

and

fro in

s

I.

various disguises, generally

choosing the night for their peregrinations, sometimes venturing out by

broad daylight, with assumed names, and some pretended business

which they would puisue with a great deal of seeming earnestness. After they

left

L.

I.

stress of

weather forced them back to North Swamp,

when

they hauled up their boat, capsized

ter.

In the afternoon

it

it,

cleared up, they

and crawled under

came

surprised by a shout from a neighboring height "

out,

when

for shel-

they were

There they are

The

!

on the sand.

and a volley of musketry followed, which laid 2 dead Legget and Williams escaped in a swamp, and recrossed

in the night to

Conn, in a large whale-boat which Gen. Washington kept

d

d Rebels

!"

cruising in the Sound, and

commanded by

Capt. Brewster."

N. York, Dec. 1845. * At the close of the war, a merchant

at

Huntington, where he died,

1811. t

Late of N. Y. City, and father of

Wm. L

,

Editor of Evening

Post.

Gen. Parsons wants H. Scudder

to

go

to

L.

I.

to negotiate the

ex-

change of Maj. Brush, Capt. Joshua Rogers and other refugees from L.

I.

now

Oct. 19, '80.

prisoners.

720. Ft. St. George

was

built at a point projecting into

South

Bay, on Smith's Manor, being the enemy's easternmost defence.

was a

triangular inclosure of several acres of ground, at

It

two angles

of which was a strongly barricaded house, and at the third, a

fort,

with a deep ditch and wall, encircled by an abattis of sharpened pickets, projecting at

an angle of 45 degrees.

The

fort

and

haw*-


96

ARMED OCCUPATION OF

A Plan of Ft. St. George, were

ses

taken by Col. Tallmadge, Nov. 22,

entirely connected with a strong stockade,

'80.

12 feet high,

every piece sharpened, and fastened to each other by a transverse rail,

strongly bolted to each.

The work was

nearly finished, and

The Fort was 96

had embrazures for 6 guns, and but 2 mounted. ft.

square, and had one gate and sally port, leading into the grand

parade.

The Fort and

days, and had 50

Wm.

obtained from

other works had been completed only a few

men.

The above information, and a draft, was who lived near the Fort, and actually The Fort was the depository of stores,

Boothe,

guided Tallmadge to

it.

dry goods, groceries, and arms, whence Suffolk Co. could be supplied.

Nov. 21. barked

my

At 4 P. M., with 8

'80.

em-

boats and a fair wind, I

detachment, consisting of 2 companies of dismounted

dragoons, (80

men

o'clock, landed

at

avoid a large body of the cinity, partly in

at Fairfield,

in all.)

Old Man's.

I

and the same evening

was obliged

enemy which

to

go so

Huntington and

laid at

our direct route from Stamford.

Soon

landed, say 10 o'clock, I put the troops in motion to cross L.

had not gone

far,

at

8

far east to

I.

vi-

we

after

We

say 4 or 5 miles, before the wind began to blow

from S. E. and rain soon followed.

I

faced the troops about, re-

turned to our boats, which were drawn up and concealed in the bushes, under guard of 20

men

;

to attacking the Fort.

must be paid as well Sound (20 miles wide) as

as attention

to a favorable time for re-crossing the

There we remained through the night and

next day, and at evening the rain abated, and

I

again ordered the


97

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

march (7 o'clock) for our destined place S. side of L. L At 3 next morning I found we were within 2 miles of Ft. St. George, when we halted a short time to take refreshment. Having made my arrangements for 3 different attacks at the same time, I placed 2 small detachments under command of officers of high spirit, at diftroops to

ferent positions from the Fort, with orders to keep concealed until

the

enemy should

(4 o'clock,) I put Lt. Brewster,

who

my

column.

Just as day began to dawn,

fire

on

my

detachment in motion.

my

preceded

The

pioneers, under

column had reached within 20 yds.

of the stockade before they were discovered.

At

this

moment

the

sentinel in advance of the stockade halted his march, looked attentively at

our column, demanded "

Who

comes there ?" and

Before the smoke from his gun had cleared his vision,

who marched by my trated him.

when

all

side,

fired.

sergeant,

reached him with his bayonet and pros-

This was the signal

seemed

my

to vie with

for the other troops to

move forward, So

each other in entering the Fort.

were the men that a breach was soon made in the stockade, where the rear platoon under Mr. Simmons halted to prevent the [There was a detachment around each prisoners from escaping. house also.] I led the column directly through the grand parade against the main fort, which we carried with the bayonet in less than 10 minutes, not a musket being loaded. At the same instant that I

resolute

entered one side of the

fort,

the officers

commanding the smaller

tachments mounted the ramparts on the other

sides,

de-

and the watch-

word, " Washington and Glory

.'" was repeated from 3 sides of the While we were standing, elated with victory, in the centre of the Fort, a volley of musketry was discharged from the windows of one of the large houses containing the main body of the enemy, which induced me to order my whole detachment to load and return the fire. I soon found it necessary to lead the column directly to the house, which being strongly barricaded,

Fort at the same time.

As soon

required the aid of the pioneers with their axes. troops could enter, the confusion and conflict erable portion of those

who

the colors had been struck, to the ground. all

Having

would have been

great.

A

as the consid-

had fired after the Fort was taken, and was thrown headlong from the 2d story

forfeited their lives

killed,

was

had

I

by the usages of war,

not ordered the slaughter to cease.

In less than 10 minutes the garrison were prisoners.

The

prisoners


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

98 being secured,

was soon discovered

it

The guns

under weigh.

(I

All things were

detached a party

now

seen the sun rise more pleasantly. the enemy's works

English,

&c, was

and

2,

safe It

and

who

quiet,

boarded and

and

I

had never

became necessary to demolish

valuable

The

shipping and their stores

articles of

and thus carried across the Island

were

dry goods were made up

on the prisoners' shoulders,

in bundles, placed

near

getting

and an immense quantity of various goods,

;

destroyed.

Some

also burnt up.

laid

&c, was

of the Fort were brought to bear on her

and she was soon secured. took her.)

which

that a vessel

the Fort, loaded with stores, wine, rum, sugar, glass,

to

who were

pinioned, 2

our boats.

Having given the command of the detachment

Edgar,

to Capt.

with orders to halt at a given point near the middle of the Island, selected

10 or 12

men

I

with Lt. Brewster, and mounted them on

horses taken at the Fort, with which I intended to destroy the King's

This place was nearly half way to at Corum. where a large body of British troops were encamped, E.

magazines of forage the place

of Huntington.

I

reached

it

in about

an hour and a

vigorous charge upon the guard placed to protect

it.

made

half,

set

it

on

a

fire,

(say 300 tons of hay) and in about an hour and a half more reached

the place where I had ordered the troops to halt, having rode 15 or

16 miles. As I arrived I was glad to see the head of the detachment under Capt. Edgar advancing with the prisoners. As none of us had halted since we parted, we sat down for nearly an hour and After this we took up our line of march. By this time refreshed. the militia began to muster, but prudently avoided coming near us.

Some guns were

fired,

but no damage received.

reached our boats, and before sunset were

By

all

By

afloat

4 o'clock

we

on the Sound.

midnight every boat arrived at Fairfield Beach, although

we had

entirely lost sight of each other in the darkness of the night.

This

was executed entirely without the loss of one man, and only one was badly wounded and him we brought ofF. Thus in 21 hours we marched near 40 miles, took the Fort, burnt the magazines, &c. The enemy's loss was 7 killed and wounded, most of the latter mortally. We took one Lt. Col. Commandant, one Capt., one Lt., one service

Surgeon, and 50 rank and

whom we

left

behind

;

file,

with a host of others in the garrison

also one garrison standard.

Mr. Muirson was a volunteer, and deserves commendation.


99

SUFFOLK COUNTY.

He

advanced with Lt. Jackson over the

Thompson,

Fort.

Rw., Dec.

ii.

2, '80.

Syms,

484.

p.

abattis

and wall into the

542.

80 Rebels headed by Maj. Talmadge, assisted by

Heathcot Muirson, Benajah Strong, Thos. Jackson, Caleb Brewster, belonging to the same party, formerly

officers

all

of L.

I.,

came

across

and landed between Wading R. and Old Man's, (suphave been concealed 2 or three days by their old friends on the

in 8 whale-boats

posed

to

On Thursday

Island).

morning, 23d Nov., about 50 marched across

the Island (the remainder being

left to

guard the boats) just after daylight,

arrived at Smith's Point, St. George's Manor, where they surprised a re-

spectable body of loyal refugees from R.

I.

and the

vicinity,

who were

establishing a post to get a present subsistence for themselves

and

their

The sentry on observing them, fired, which they returned, and mortally wounded him, and rushed into a house. Mr. Isaac Hart, of N. Port, was inhumanly fired on, wounded and bayoneted in 15 different parts of his body, and beat with their muskets in a shocking manner in the very act of imploring quarter, and died of his wounds a few hours after. Four more refugees were wounded also, but are in fair way of recovery. A poor woman was also fired on at another house and barbarously wounded through both breasts, of which wound she families.

now lingers. The Rebels

carried off about 40 prisoners

;

on

their return at

Corum,

they burnt a magazine of hay, about 100 tons, and same day embarked for the Con't shore.

721.

The

Culloden, in pursuit of French ships from R.

Monday night, Jan. 22, '81, was Culloden Point.] Her men, guns, and masts,

dreadful storm on [at

We

I.,

in a

driven on L. will be

I.,

saved.

have the inhuman consolation to hope the French have fared

Gen. Robertson.

worse.

722. Gaine, Jan. 21, '81.

Address by the

Refugee Volunteers established under Col.

Abm. Cuyler,

officers of the

his auspices at

Loyal

Smithtown, to

previous to his departure for England.

They

approve his conduct, thank him for his kind endeavors to alleviate their disagreeable situation,

their loyal attachment.

Luke,

Wm.

J.

V. D. Poel, B. Dyer, Capt's

Castilles,

723.

and beg him

to assure

His Majesty of

Signed by P. V. Alstyn, Maj. Com't; P.

John Huyck, Lts

Gaine, Mar. 12,

'81.

;

;

M. Pendergrass, Q. M.

P. Hoff,

P. Durland,

A

party of rebels from Con't in


ARMED OCCUPATION OF

100

8 whale-boats and an armed schooner, to the amount, as

is

supposed,

of 150 men, arrived at S. Hampton, last Monday, plundered the inhabitants of several thousand pounds worth of goods, and carried several of

them away

Mar.

724.

prisoners.

16, '81.

Gardiner's Bay, set

sail

The

British fleet, that

southward.

had

lain

some time

at

N. London.

â&#x20AC;˘

N. London, Ap.

725.

20, '81.

Capt. Pierpont, in an armed

whale-boat from N. Haven, was taken by surprise at Canoe Place,

by a party of refugees who lay in ambush 726. Capt. Fitch visited Corum,

goods

;

He

most were secreted.

May

for him.

and found a few

2, '81,

took Glover, Ap. 27, '81, on Conn,

shore.

727. Valentine Rider, with three boats duly commissioned, land-

ed at Mt. Misery, went into the country and robbed David

and

Widow

Taylor of furniture,

&c,

equal to ÂŁ600.

Munro

Before leav-

ing the coast, 17 of them landed a second time, and shot at a son of Philip Roe, beat and robbed clothing, cash,

728.

made

May

their

&c.

;

him and

his brother Nath'l of furniture,

broke looking-glass and windows.

23, '81.

May,

'81.

Five whale-boats, containing about 50 men,

appearance in the South Bay, where they attacked and

took a sloop loaded with lumber belonging to Messrs. Keteltas

N. Y., which they dispatched with one of

Nicoll, of

&

their boats for

N. Haven.

A Blue

few evenings Pt.,

clothing,

after, the

remaining crews, 38 in

no.,

landed at

and plundered several of the inhabitants of provisions,

and money, to a considerable amount

another small vessel of K.

;

and carried off

& N.

Early next morning, by the exertions of two or three principal sufferers, the militia

were assembled under command of Capt's Rose

and Baker, and marched 10 or 12 miles with cheerfulness, but

find-

ing no prospect of overtaking the plunderers without proceeding 30 miles farther, to a place they

knew

cross, the Capt's declined going.

the rebels

must of necessity

22 men, however, on promise of

ha\ing their expenses defrayed, and a

little

persuasion, consented to

continue their march, and after suffering every inconvenience from

a heavy road, and want of sustenance, had the good fortune to over-


SUFFOLK COUNTY. take them, taking their

the Canoe Place, about 2 in the

rest at

Knowing themselves

morning.

ately attacked

them

at

still

undiscovered, they immedi-

15 yards distance, and so completely sur-

prised them, as to kill one, mortally ers,

101

wound

make 20

another,

prison-

and secured their boats and plunder, with 38 stand of arms, with-

out the

smallest

The

opposition.

prisoners, under guard,

were

ordered in their boats, and arrived in N. Y. on Saturday evening,

and are safely lodged

At

in the

Sugar House.

auction, near the ferry stairs,

days since on S. side of L.

I.,

in

4

good

6, '81.

Riv. Ju.

prize whale-boats, repair,

taken a few

and well found

in oars,

&c. 729. May 31, '81, N. London. Some days ago Major Ayres made an excursion from Say brook to L. I., and took 2 vessels near Wading River. After taking some goods out of the vessels they went ashore and as they were cooking provisions under a bank, they were suddenly fired on, when Major A. and one or two of the party were killed. ;

730. June 11, '81. Goods and furniture, equal to £31. 19. 8, were taken from John Bayley of Brookhaven, by Ezekiel Wicks, Jacob Conklin, Benj. Nicoll and others; from Dan'l Downs, equal to £4. 2 from Capt. Wm. Brewster, equal to £68. 12. 6. ;

731. Before June 12, '81.

St.

Martin took goods from L.

&c,

Geo. Smith, of Hartford, took corduroys, calicoes,

Eben'r Ayres, of Stamford, took goods at