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www.pratt.edu/prostudies

MANHATTAN/BROOKLYN SUMMER 2013


PRATT INSTITUTE CENTER FOR CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES CCPS serves the lifelong learning needs of non-traditional students through programs in art, design, architecture, and management for educational advancement, career change, or enrichment. aIa ProFeSSIonal DeVeloPMent For arChIteCtS anD enGIneerS

Pratt’s Center for Continuing and Professional Studies (CCPS) is an AIA/CES registered provider. The Professional Development Series is designed to meet the professional development needs and requirements of architects and engineers. It consists of a broad range of courses, workshops, and lectures. Courses can be provided on-site for corporate clients. For more information, contact Karen Adler Miletsky at kmiletsk@pratt.edu. Visit www.pratt.edu/prostudies now, and earn while you learn. CertIFICate ProGraMS

• • • • • • • • • • • •

computer-aided design and Visualization computer animation and Video design entrepreneurship electronic imaging and illustration electronic publishing fashion new media interactive media online and social media marketing perfumery photography and digital media Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design, and Management urban Green infrastructure: Green systems clean Water CertIFICate ProGraM In UrBan Green InFraStrUCtUre: Green SySteMS Clean Water

new york city’s move toward the implementation of green infrastructure to meet our national water quality standards represents both a tremendous teaching moment and an opportunity for workforce development. Training in standard designs, regulations, permitting, construction, monitoring, and maintenance of innovative tree pits, bioswales, green roofs, and green walls will be critical for successful implementation of green infrastructure citywide. The certificate curriculum was formed in collaboration with the pratt Graduate school of Architecture, several city agencies, members of the American Society of Landscape Architects new york chapter, and private sector greeninfrastructure practitioners.

CertIFICate ProGraM In SUStaInaBle BUIlDInG, InFraStrUCtUre DeSIGn, anD ManaGeMent

Designers have long been able to meet the needs of their clients and businesses by using their creativity to blend form and function. Today’s world of limited resources and changing economic and environmental values requires a new set of tools to design a sustainable world. This certificate program, Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design, and Management, brings designers into 21st-century design by building on their existing design abilities and enhancing them with cutting-edge skills and knowledge that enable designers to meet the new goals and challenges of sustainability. CertIFICate ProGraM In onlIne anD SoCIal MeDIa MarketInG

Marketing is the core of commerce—it’s the art and science of bringing products to market and introducing them to consumers. While marketing creative strategies and outlets are always evolving, nothing has shaken up the industry as much as social media and other online outreach opportunities. For more information, contact Chris Ferrara at 212-647-7370 or email prostudy@pratt.edu. CertIFICate ProGraM In PerFUMery

Since 1976, Cinquième Sens has been active in both the creation of perfumes and the transmission of a true perfume culture. Cinquième Sens is a training methodology open to perfumery professionals with a desire to learn the language of scents. Cinquième Sens’s team of perfumery experts is also eager to share its passion for fragrances and raw materials with private individuals. Five hundred managers, executives, marketing specialists, trainers, sales representatives, sales managers, and production technicians are trained every year. For more information, contact Chris Ferrara at 212-647-7199 or email prostudy@ pratt.edu. Pre-ColleGe ProGraMS

Classes are available in Brooklyn and Manhattan. For more information, contact Chris Ferrara at 212-647-7370 or email prostudy@pratt.edu.

SUMMer CreDIt IntenSIVeS

Pratt offers a unique opportunity for college students and adult learners to fulfill arts elective requirements that can be transferred as credits. For more information, contact elizabeth Kisseleff at 718-636-3453 or prostudy@pratt.edu. let oUr ProFeSSIonalS traIn yoUr ProFeSSIonalS

Pratt Manhattan offers corporate discount packages for on-site computer training and for training at our facility. For more information on these packages, contact Karen Adler Miletsky, Interim Director, Center for Continuing and Professional Studies, at 212-647-7299 or 212647-7199, or email her at kmiletsk@pratt.edu. CreDIt CoUrSeS For non-CreDIt StUDentS

Many of our credit courses may be taken on a non-credit basis. For information, contact the Center for Continuing and Professional Studies at 718-636-3453. CoUnSelInG IS aVaIlaBle at the Center For ContInUInG anD ProFeSSIonal StUDIeS—Pratt Manhattan ProGraM

Meet Perry Han or Chris Ferrara to learn more about our courses in professional development and certificate programs. For an appointment, please call 212-647-7199 or email prostudy@ pratt.edu. reGIStratIon DeaDlIneS

Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early. CaMPUS loCatIonS

Classes are available in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Pratt Institute’s Manhattan campus is located in chelsea at 144 West 14th street between sixth and Seventh avenues. Pratt’s main campus is located on a beautifully-landscaped 25-acre campus in brooklyn at 200 Willoughby avenue. eXhIBItIon SPaCe

Visit our exhibition space in Manhattan to see artwork by CCPS faculty and students throughout the year.

front coVer iMAGE: The Spy in the Mushroom Garden, detail from a watercolor by Newton Meyers, painting instructor, Center for Continuing and Professional Studies. To see more of his work, visit newtonmeyersart.com.


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S S ummer 2 0 1 3

CENTER FOR CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Acting Director Karen Adler Miletsky Acting Assistant to the Director Tenille McNeill

Non-Credit Continuing Education

Academic Director Joelle Danant

2

Art and Design

24 A  uthorized Autodesk® Training Center (ATC)

CALENDAR

2

Decorative Arts

24 AutoCAD®

March 19 Credit Registration Begins

Director, Development for Special Projects Dr. Charles W. Münster

28 A  uthorized Autodesk® Training Center Premier Media and Entertainment

25–26 Passover Continuing Ed, Classes to Cancel/ Run At the Discretion of Instructors

Director, Enrollment Management for Non-Credit Programs Perry Han

29 Certificate Program in Fashion New Media

30–31 Spring Holiday All Institute, No Classes, School Closed

2 Design 3

Fashion Design

3

Fine Arts

5 Illustration 6

Industrial Design

7

Interior Design

7

Jewelry Making

7

Museum Workshops

8 Sculpture 8

Technical Drawing

9 Certificate Program in Photography and Digital Imaging 9 Media Arts, Photography, and Digital Art 11

Career Development

11

Certificate Programs

11

Construction Management

12 Facilities and Environmental Compliance 12 Residential Home Inspection 12 LEED® Certification Exam Prep Courses 12 Online and Social Media Marketing Workshops 12 Special Programs 13 Certificate Programs in Computer Graphics 13 Interactive Media

25 Autodesk® Revit®

31 Certificate in Online and Social Media Marketing 33 Professional Development for Architects and Engineers 33 AIA/CES Registered Provider 33 H  ome Inspection Courses and Reciprocity 50 Certificate Program in Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management 52 Certificate Program in Urban Green Infrastructure: Green Systems Clean Water 55 Certificate Program in Perfumery 56 Certificate Program in Design Entrepreneurship 58 Pre-College Programs: Fall 2013 59 Pre-College Programs: Summer 2013 60 Summer Credit Intensives 62 School of Art and Design Associate Degree Programs

13 Electronic Imaging and Illustration

62 T  wo-Year Associate Degree Programs

14 Electronic Publishing

62 Associate of Occupational Studies

14 Computer Animation and Video

62 Associate of Applied Science

14 C  omputer-Aided Design and Visualization

63 Customer Testimonials

15 Computer Graphics and Technology Courses

64 Directions and Map

15 Classes for Beginners 15 Animation 19 Digital Video and Audio

64 General Information 65 CCPS Policies and Procedures 65 C  ertificate Program Completion Requirements

19 Drafting and Modeling on the Mac

65 C  hanges to Policies, Procedures, and Fees

20 Electronic Publishing and Digital Art

65 Continuing Education Units

21 Interactive Media and the Internet

65 Corporate Billing

22  Online and Social Media Marketing

65 Fees

23 Programming

65 OneKey Instructions 66 Refunds 66 Withdrawal Policy 66 Register Online 66 Supply Lists 66 Transcripts 66 Weather Emergency Line 67 Index

April 22 Open Registration Begins Continuing Ed May 15 Summer Session I Begins Credit Only 18 Summer Session CCPS Begins Continuing Ed 27 Memorial Day All Institute, School Closed June 21 Summer Session I Ends Credit Only 24 Summer Session II Begins Credit Only July 4 Independence Day All Institute, School Closed 29 Fall Registration Begins, Continuing Ed Only August 5 Summer Session II Ends Credit Only 9 Summer Session Ends Continuing Ed

Telephone 718-636-3453 (Brooklyn) 212-647-7199 (Manhattan) Fax 718-399-4410 (Brooklyn) 212-367-2489 (Manhattan) Internet pratt.edu/prostudies Email prostudy@pratt.edu Register Online my.pratt.edu

Associate Director, Enrollment Management and Curriculum Development for Non-Credit Programs Chris Ferrara Director, Marketing Karen D’Angelo Operations Manager/ Coordinator of Special Programs William Carrero Director, Enrollment Management for Non-Degree Credit Programs Elizabeth Kisseleff Director, Special Programs/Projects Fred Watson Customer Service Coordinator/ Operations Specialist Tenille McNeill Administrative Assistants, Brooklyn Johndell Wilson Veronica Darby Administrative Secretary, Manhattan Shirley McClean Technician, Manhattan Federico Savini CCPS Curriculum Committee Kathryn Cullen-DuPont, Ph.D. Chair, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences Jason Vigneri-Beane, School of Architecture Cheryl Gross, School of Art and Design Bruce Duhan, School of Art and Design ACADEMIC COMPUTING Associate Director, Technology and Program Development David Marcinkowski STEP Director, Brooklyn Dr. Georgianna Glose

Catalog Information Design: Office of Publications Printing: Conceptual Litho


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N ON-C R E DIT CO U R S E S , C ERT IF IC AT E P R OG R A M S , AN D CO R P O R AT E TR AIN IN G Pratt is committed to serving communities in the tri-state area. To this end, the Institute offers a wide range of courses at the Pratt Manhattan campus in Chelsea, and on its campus in the historic Clinton Hill section of Brooklyn. Course topics include art and design, computer graphics, photography, career development, professional development for architects and engineers, sustainable building and infrastructure design, real estate education, art appraisal, and more. Certificate programs provide essential creative, technical, critical thinking, and management skills necessary to fully engage in a chosen field of interest for aspiring or accomplished professionals within the United States or for prospective students from abroad. Corporate training is a specialty at Pratt, through collaborations with professional organizations that seek positive solution-driven programs to develop the interests and talents of their employees. Please contact the Pratt Manhattan campus at 212-6477199 to speak with an advisor, request corporate training for employees, or ask to be placed on our mailing list.

Non-Credit Campus Course Number Prefix Coding Pratt Manhattan Prefix: PM Pratt Brooklyn Prefix: X

Weather Emergency Line Pratt Institute’s Weather Emergency Line can be reached by dialing: 718-636-3700. Callers will get information on any weather-related closings at either the Brooklyn or Manhattan campuses. Visit our website: www.pratt.edu. or call 718-636-3700.

C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N

ART AND DESIGN COURSES The Center for Continuing and Professional Studies offers superior professional art and design education, with an outstanding faculty and exceptional facilities. Courses are taught by the finest professional artists and designers in the world. This, along with the cultural resources of New York City, ensures an exceptional education.

Decorative Arts Handmade Toys You will learn basic building blocks that you will use to create your own projects. You are encouraged to use recycled materials to make toys that are both classic and unconventional. Topics include: fabric sourcing, handstitching, shape building, attaching shapes, using patterns, and tricks and tips that you can use to make limitless soft creatures. Inspiring reference media and notes from the author’s book will be shared and discussed. This class is for the adventurous! Note: Tools and other supplies must be purchased for the first day of class: A list will be provided. The range of expenses depends on your budget; recycled materials are encouraged and will cut costs. Any questions that you have may be directed to the instructor at shavens88@yahoo.com • F 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Sue Havens PMDA 105 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Design Basic Typography This course is an introduction to the potential and expressive qualities of typography. Designers will be exposed to the elements of basic typography. A strong emphasis will be placed on the use of typography and its relationship to illustration and photography. This studio course uses both computer and hands-on methods to address the language of type and its effective use. “Real-life” assignments will be given such as logos/stationery, book jackets, posters, CD packaging, brochures, and editorial. All aspects of the design assignment will be addressed, from concept through presentation. Special emphasis will be placed on choosing more appropriate and effective typefaces. The type should “TALK.” A relationship between the elements and the type to be established throughout the design process is the key point. Through discussion and critiques, designers will develop a series of typographical solutions from rough ideas to final presentation. Assignments vary each semester. Topics include: appreciation of the importance of typography in visual communication. Basic historical type families will be discussed and choosing a right typeface for a particular project. To recognize, evaluate and think critically about typography will be stressed. To explore the expressive possibilities of typography and develop an individual approach will be emphasized. In the design development stage, tracing pad and markers are required for the sketching of ideas, which will be used as guidelines for execution towards the final project on the computer. Prerequisites: Knowledge of Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and InDesign is a must. • M 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Instructor TBA PMGD 466 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Design for the Web See page 21 for course description. Prerequisite: Photoshop: Imaging I. Computer facilities fee: $25 • Section 1 (m): Th 3–6 PM 10 sessions Fall 2013 Cheryl Stockton PMCG 308 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Editorial Design This course will explore the possibilities of redesigning an existing poorly designed magazine or the option of creating a new magazine. (The class chooses the category.) Everyone will refine his or her knowledge to package the entire editorial concept in a graphic style through a vigorous design process. While our focus will be on magazines, the skills developed in creating continuity and variety in the project will apply to all pagination design venues. While presenting information in context to appropriate formats, the magazine assignment can also be applicable to other common design tasks—newspapers, brochures, and books. Weekly critiques will consider every element of each page until a cohesive product is achieved that both suits the content of the editorial area chosen and appeals to the target audience. Typography, layout, illustration, photography, grids, rubrics, white space, etc., will all become familiar elements in your editorial design vocabulary. Topics include: mastheads, magazine cover with visual concept and main cover titles, content page(s) are essential, and a feature story editorial spread will be explored. There will be continuing development of computer design skills in drawing, page layout, and image manipulation using appropriate software. Emphasis will be on design and not on software. The project will encompass thumbnail roughs to final comprehensive sketches. Upon approval of final sketches, designers will continue to execute on the computer. Designers are expected to have the necessary computer skills to develop and complete the project. Prerequisites: A working knowledge of


Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. You must have access to a computer. • Th 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Niyati Mehta PMGD 467 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Graphic Design Ideas to Form Despite their best intentions (and even after years of practice), many designers harbor an underlying fear of beginning a project. Engaging in techniques that activate the creativity inside us will broaden design thinking and eliminate the fear. There are clear strategies for finding ideas and unleashing creativity. These “thought starters” allow us to take an active role in our own creative process. Learn the many ways to spark your creative energy that have nothing to do with anxiety about deadlines. Look forward to the whole process of getting started on something new by understanding the language and coordinates of professional graphic design. A set of coordinated design exercises and projects, in-depth discussions, and brainstorming sessions to deepen your capacity and take your work to a new level. You will understand what it means to find an intellectual idea, and learn how to use supportive form (shape, composition, typography, and structure). Your inhibitions to creativity will crumble as design becomes a positive and exciting experience. Any lingering anxiety about what to do is quickly replaced with anticipation for the challenge of the new project. After all, this is why we chose to become designers in the first place, isn’t it? Topics include: contemporary graphic design; how to research a graphic design project; methods to enhance creativity; procedures toward developing design ideas including the montage process; conveying ideas through typography and module structure; and visual coding through textures and treatments. Software knowledge is based on the Adobe triptych (InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator) with some basic instruction on their application. Projects include traditional and nontraditional problems that will hone and enhance the graphic design language you speak with. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator. Please note: Course will meet in a Mac lab. Computer facilities fee: $25

• Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Scott Santoro PMCG 482 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Introduction to Graphic Design This course is an introduction to the study of graphic design as a communication tool on an intensive, professional level. Areas of Exploration: The designer’s role as a communicator and innovator of design; creative, technical, and business skills will be developed to understand the need to think conceptually, creatively, and appropriately in order to reach a specific target audience; the steps in creating a project from concept through execution; the visual quality of the final artwork through the use of high-resolution imagery and dynamic composition; the value of class critiques for helpful suggestions and other points of view; the importance of graphic design as an informative and promotional presence in both commerce and society. Topics include: the graphic design field; high-resolution vs. low-resolution (including Internet) imagery; creating high-quality artwork: conventional/ digital techniques, scanning steps, pixels; design research via graphics annuals (i.e., Graphis, Print); color usage and psychology: visual, emotional, and cultural; the use of appropriate fonts to enhance concepts; aspects of dynamic page layout (giganticism, cropping, movement); the development of type fonts, printing; the history of paper, paper terminology; the development of the advertising industry. Software applications used in class: Adobe Creative Suite: InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop. The class will work on several projects applying design and technical skills covered, such as newsletter/magazine layout; logo design for product or service; brochure/poster design, unique folds, die-cuts, paper engineering. Please note: Course will meet in a Mac lab. Computer facilities fee: $25 • Section 1 (m): Th 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Elaine Tannenbaum PMCG 475 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Package Design and Brand Identity With the continuing importance of ”the brand” in our global society, this is a comprehensive course in package design and corporate identity—the building blocks of brand identity. A

strong emphasis is placed on logo/type design, color, shape, and developing rough ideas to 3D comps for presentation. A combination of constructions and computer printouts will be used. Topics include: how to go from the initial creative concepts to the printed piece and display in the marketplace; good design solutions; appropriate materials—glass, plastic, metal, paper— and printing methods for each project; logo and type design; color and shape. Prerequisite: Home access to a computer is recommended. Basic knowledge of graphic design and typography. Knowledge of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. • Tu 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Susan Meshberg PMGD 464 3.0 C.E.U.s $395 See pages 15, 20, 22, and 11 for the following course descriptions. Continuity Storyboards: The Filmmaker’s Best Friend Create a Professional Design Portfolio Great Web Design with CSS: Cascading Style Sheets Managing Your Career/Career Change

Fashion Design Fashion Design: Construction Techniques for Garments I This hands-on course teaches the actual construction of garments, using existing commercial patterns. Learn design room sewing techniques and terms, proper layout, transferring and marking techniques. This course is intended for beginners. The instructor will provide a supply list on the first day of class. You will be responsible for bringing your own supplies. Topics include: hand-sewing techniques, a variety of zipper applications, and use of industry machines and equipment. Facilities Fee: $5 payable directly to instructor on first day of class. • Tu 6–9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Adrienne Jones XFD 107 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Pattern-Making Basics for the Female Form This course introduces the beginning student to the basics of patternmaking for the female form. The goal of this course is to develop beginning patternmaking skills with the use of the basic bodice and skirt slopers. You will learn how to make a variety of bodices and skirts.

summer 2013

Topics include: creating and fitting the

basic sloper, the 8 basic darts, and dart manipulation. • Tu 6–9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Jacqueline Lamont XFD 113 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Adobe Illustrator for Fashion Design See page 20 for course description.

Certificate Program in Fashion New Media See page 29 for description.

Fine Arts Acrylic and Watercolor Painting Mastery: This is not the usual paintthe-model class, though you can have a model if you wish. All your questions about how you do it can be answered in this class. What is the simplest and most permanent fine art painting technique? You are not supposed to copy a model or still life exactly, so what are you supposed to do? Why is keeping a sketchbook so important? What are the different approaches to starting a painting and which is the most effective for your personality? What are the graphic art techniques that can be useful in fine art painting? And yes, what about the unthinkable: how might you consider sales in relation to your painting? What you don’t want is generalized comments; what you do want is a teacher who works with you on all your specific problems, one after the other. The teacher opens the door, but you must enter alone. Then the teacher opens another door, and again you enter alone. Imagine a long hallway of open doors with the satisfied student at the end of it, all smiles and master of the subject. See the teacher, exhausted but happy. Topics include: working with photographs, paint abstractly or incorporate cartoon influences. During the week, work with your trusty sketchbook toward a compositional drawing you can develop into a painting. • Th 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Newton Meyers PMFA 469 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Altered Books I We will explore the basics of book construction and the selection process for your own personal altered books. We will discuss the intention behind the altered book process and what an

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summer 2013

individual’s book can and will mean to them—what purpose it will serve to their creative selves. Participants will learn the techniques for working with the structure of the book to keep it strong and intact as they add their personal collage and imagery to it. Class will include many fun and interesting techniques for creating the student’s own, very personalized altered books— unique creations of the student’s own self-expression. Topics include: you will acquire a basic understanding of book construction, how to choose a book to alter, the mechanics of altering a book in a way that will not cause it to completely come apart, and techniques for simple repairs when the binding begins to fail during the altering process; various paints, papers, adhesives, finishes, hardware, paper engineering techniques, and a selection of book altering techniques. • Su 1–4 PM Offered in Fall 2013 Ziek Paterniti PMFA 512 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Basic Drawing Drawing is a vital means of seeing the world. This course explores how to draw using a variety of mediums and methods: pencil, pen/brush and ink, charcoal, pastel, and a touch of collage in black and white and ways of introducing color. Beginners need only enthusiasm to take the class. Advanced students will be able to expand their drawing skills. All students are given the opportunity to develop their imagery or style. Topics include: working from observation of the figure, cityscape, objects, as well as from ideas; learning the skills for the basis of any visual art. • Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Phyllis Rosenblatt PMFA 429 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Basic Drawing for Animation This drawing course is recommended for the novice who wishes to develop drawing skills for traditional and computer animation. Topics include: gesture drawing; drawing with a sense of volume; construction of animation style characters; creation of a cartoon skeleton based on threedimensional basic shapes; how to draw a character from many angles; how to imply motion in a single drawing, from REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

rough draft to clean-up (tighten it up); drawing heads, hands, feet, hips, thorax, and finally the whole cartoon and semireal body. The course finishes with how to draw from imagination. Recommended audience: Students enrolled in Traditional Animation and the computer animation program. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Greg Webb PMFA 476 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Charcoal: The Willow Branch Speaks Using the simple, flexible, and beautiful medium of charcoal, you will begin to see more deeply and feel the potential of this medium. Learning to draw and how to achieve enhanced seeing makes one a more creative, whole-brain thinker, unlocking creativity through connecting mind, eye, and hand. In this class, drawing is rooted in an exploration of our seeing, both literal and figurative. This process takes on a contemplative character as the eye and hand travel the shapes, values, lines, and color of a given interior or exterior landscape, and the focus is less on the end as it is on what each present moment offers to the eye and the heart. Your path in class will be built on your previous explorations and insights. Topics include: learn how to draw more out of that which seems familiar, experiencing the depths of the world observed closely and felt intimately. The excitement lies not only in discovering what is before our eyes and revealing and expressing this through drawing, but also recognizing its relevance to all forms of study and exploration and its potential to shed light on life, humanity, and nature. Recommended audience: Students of all levels and walks of life are welcome. The course is designed to allow for individualized attention within the group setting. • M 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Wendy Shuster PMFA 488 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Chinese Watercolor The focus of this class is to introduce both traditional and impressionist styles of Chinese painting. Through demonstration, hands-on exercises and projects, you will learn to use a variety of Chinese brushes and papers with ink and color to paint such subjects including cherry/plum blossoms, bamboos,

and orchids. Topics include: basic techniques of

using Chinese brushes, manipulating Chinese brushes in various hand and arm positions; the unique technique of loading two to three colors in one brush in impressionist style. Material fee: $35 paid to instructor at first class for Chinese materials which include Chinese brushes, Chinese watercolor papers, ink, and Chinese colors. All students will have the same materials. • Tu 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Victoria Chang PMFA 471 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

“Cinematic” Drawing: From a Walk on the High Line or Battery Park South This course provides a guide for interpreting big experience in visual ways. Taking either the High Line or Battery Park South with their multiviews, panoramic, and personal spaces and making something of it! Beginning with a walk along the site, then taking photos and printing thumbnail shots in Photoshop, we will articulate and identify your thoughts on the experience. This marks the start of work on the drawing. In the first three weeks we will do the following: Walk one of these great contemporary spaces. From the photos and from sketches done on site, you will arrive at goals for working this as a visual drawing piece on paper. We will also explore paper media and drawing ideas. Finally, you will determine the size of the work and its format and learn how to develop a seven-week time frame for completion. Topics include: ways of identifying goals visually; selecting materials in relation to paper; collecting and sorting ideas; getting skills and techniques for the work; and learning the value of finishing a work whether the idea for it is open ended (can produce more works) or has closure (this is the only idea with no sequels). Prerequisites: knowledge of basic use of Photoshop, having basic drawing skills. • Su 1–4 pm 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Phyllis Rosenblatt PMFA 489 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Contemporary Applications of Chinese Art Discover the art of Chinese calligraphy through lectures and demonstrations, and then put this knowledge into contemporary western context. The intention of this course is to broaden your visual language with emphasis on line quality; not to become an authentic Chinese calligrapher. We will also examine contemporary artists who looked to Asia for their inspiration. Topics include: four basic Chinese calligraphy styles and their principles and methods; hands-on explorations of each writing style; and helpful one-onone guidance from the instructor. Recommended audience: Students or professional fine artists, illustrators, and fashion and interior designers. Material fee: $25 paid to instructor at first class for Chinese materials which include 3 Chinese brushes and 3 sheets of Chinese paper so that all students will have the same materials. • M 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Victoria Chang PMFA 472 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Drawing and Art Workshop: Europe’s Masterpieces at the Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum of Art and MoMA In this unique five-week studio workshop at three major museums you will explore the historical influence of Western art and civilization from 12thcentury Medievalism through to the Renaissance and other movements on the aesthetic vitality of modern and contemporary 20th-century art. Through the medium of drawing, the class will embark on an analytical survey of specific works at: the Tuscan monastery on the Hudson, the Cloisters, a branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum; and the MoMA. You will freely explore and creatively interpret the historically complex visual interrelationship where, regardless of era and -ism, artists pursued the common thread of knowledge, finding inspiration and a personal, creative expression, “reintroducing fragments of reality of the past,” as Roy Lichentstein noted. Using graphite, lithograph, Sharpie, crayons, pencils, and small spiral sketchpads, students will dissect a painting, tapestry, and/or sculpture to discover how artists expressively and dramatically structured one-, two-, and three-dimensional space. You will learn spatial conceits, form, tone, movement, chiaroscuro, and texture through exam-


ples and the practice of various linear techniques and methodology to visually communicate a specific message. Emphasis is on intellectual, societal, cultural, political, and emotional studies from Leonardo da Vinci, Vincent van Gogh, Edgar Degas, Salvador Dali, Paul Klee, Pablo Picasso, Thomas Eakins, Sargent, Norman Rockwell, Modigliani, Jackson Pollack, Rivera, and De Kooning. Topics include: how modern and contemporary art relates to the past with examples of relationships, from Piero della Francesca to Francisco Goya to Arshile Gorky. Please note the following: Students will bring drawing materials, watercolor trays, pen and ink, and sketchpads, including newsprint pads, for class use. Also, please bring laptops if available. •E  xhibition of student work: To be determined. • Museum Fees: MoMA: free with Student I.D.; Cloisters and The Met: $4.00 • Sa 11 AM–2:45 PM 5 sessions Jun 1–29 Lois Lazarus PMFA 511 18.75 C.E.U. $285

Fantastic Rooms: Sketching in the Period Rooms at the Brooklyn Museum How do rooms create a mood or suggest a personality? How can historical styles become original and contemporary again? Using the 22 period rooms at the Brooklyn Museum as a study collection, you will create a portfolio of drawings that combine observation with personal invention. Emphasis will be placed on the atmospheric and narrative qualities of interior drawings. Topics include: the period room as source for new design, and the interior in fiction and film. • Su 1–4 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Hannah Barrett XFA 488 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Painting and Drawing Workshop This workshop focuses on general painting and drawing techniques. You may choose to work on class projects based on a theme, still life, nude model, or other motifs. Both beginners and “veterans” are welcome. Please bring examples of previous work to the first class, if applicable. Field trips to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden are included so that students may have an opportunity to sketch.

Topics include: basic color theory; color mixing; differences among drawing media, as well as between oil and acrylic paint; various types of brushes; and the stretching of canvas. • Sa 10 AM–1 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 John Mandile XFA 457 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Painting with Watercolors There is no medium that can be made to offer greater scope for spontaneity and directness of expression than watercolor. The essential character of watercolor painting is transparent color on white paper. This studio class will give instruction, demonstrations and critiques in color design, light and value studies, and fundamental techniques, as students work from subjects such as still life, landscape, abstraction, and imagination. Other water-based paints such as gouache and acrylic will be introduced with exploration into more experimental approaches. Topics include: basic drawing for composition; brush techniques such as wet, dry and washes; light effects; glazing; combining ink with watercolors; color relationships; cold- and hot-pressed and other types of papers. • Sa 2–5 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 6 sessions Jul 6–Aug 10 Michael Poast XFA 459 1.8 C.E.U.s $255

The Art of Collage This course is a hands-on exploration of collage as an art-form with its own distinctive history and practice. Each class will center on an aspect peculiar to collage and will place it within a historical and artistic context. You will create pictures by using a range of materials—including different adhesives, brushes, paints, magazine clippings, papers and fabrics—and by organizing them through different conceptual approaches. Art historical schools like Cubism, Surrealism, Dadaism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art will serve as examples for in-class projects. Topics include: value, color, texture, rhythm, dream imagery, political commentary, and personal reminiscence. Assignments will revolve around the above topics. • M 6–9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Mario Naves XFA 485 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Three Dimensional Design I The goal of this hands-on course is to provide students with a solid foundation of the basic three dimensional design elements so that they know how to design in space, understand the relationships between things, and can orchestrate them utilizing the x, y, and z axes, proportion, scale, negative and positive space, tension, and movement. Other goals are to give students an introduction to a variety of materials and working processes to know how to make things and be adept in creating objects that are well crafted and thought out. This course teaches the basics of three-dimensional design. We focus on the primary elements of design, giving time to each element, so that the design process will be understood no matter what major field of study you choose to enter into or are involved in. We focus on line, plane, volume, color, and texture with a hands-on approach, exploring as many materials and processes as possible. We focus on the x, y, and z axes, space, proportion, scale, tension, symmetry/ asymmetry, content, and meaning with attention to craftsmanship and detailing and the physical process of putting things together. Topics include: curve study, working with line, negative and positive space, seeing how lines define planes and also volume; plane study, working with the fibonacci numbers to determine proportion and designing a progression of planes that combine to make volume; volume study, working with solids that combine to make a composition, studying the x, y, and z axes; working with either painted or collaged color on form and using color as a design element and material; and texture study, using texture to change and enhance form, create light and dark. There are lectures about the assignment and demonstrations as to how to use the tools necessary to complete the project. During the class the professor speaks with you to give feedback and suggestions. Requirements: Students are required to have a sketchbook and to work with drawing in conjunction with their three dimensional design work. • W 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Rebecca Welz PMFA 443 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

summer 2013

Illustration Comic Book Illustration You will learn how to create and design cartoon characters and put them into a story in a comic book format. We’ll examine types and styles of comics and how to assemble the scenes into panels, and then assemble the panels on the pages. We’ll look at methods of storytelling, and how to edit a story. The story will be made to make sense, as well as work graphically. The instructor will draw in class and also bring in visuals. Topics include: how to design characters and create a comic book; drawing basics; storytelling; costumes/ clothing; inking styles and techniques; various comic art styles; model sheets; thumbnails and roughs; designing the cover of a comic book; expressions and moods of characters; movement; coloring techniques; how a character functions in the story; panel and page design; lettering and word balloons; how the central and other characters help the story; supporting characters; editing/refining; putting it all together. • Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Mark Ziemann PMFA 455 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Illustrated Science Fiction Book Project You will choose a short story from The Oxford Book of Science Fiction Short Stories. Taking ideas from this story, you will create a series of images for use in a book, digital portfolio, or gallery exhibition. You will be encouraged to focus on emotional connections, relationships and, of course, the rich visual ideas created in the stories. The goal will be to create a series of images to work with the text or as a standalone series. Topics include: ability to work with narrative structure; ability to critique work and develop an eye for quality and clarity; ability to create characters, props, and challenging environments; ability to propose ideas and directions that specifically suit the artist; ability to carry through initial ideas to a finished project which fulfills the project’s potential. • Tu 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Ryan Peltier PMFA 487 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Introduction to Botanical Illustration Botanical art is a satisfying and rewarding way to encounter natural systems. This course invites people to focus on the details of plants through close examination. Learn to record the structure and beauty of the stem, leaf, branch, root system, and flower. Students will start with an accurate pencil drawing and develop a painting strategy to achieve a detailed portrait of the specimen. Steps include studying the gesture of the plant, arranging the isolated subject on the page, drawing the distinguishing characteristics of the plant, transferring the detailed drawing to watercolor paper, and completing the work with washes of watercolor. This structured approach provides a jumping-off point for exploring a personal style. Demonstrations will be given with individual instruction. The course will benefit those interested in painting botanicals for personal enrichment and commercial uses. Topics include: the structure of plants, measuring, foreshortening, perspective, color, value, materials, technique, and history of botanical illustration. • Sa 1–4 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Nancy Glover XFA 467 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Introduction to Illustration: The Illustration Portfolio Illustrators are artists who are motivated to make pictures inspired by stories. As visual communicators, illustrators use various means in order to tell these stories. In this course you will be given assignments investigating problems such as metaphor, allegory, and narrative as ways to achieve this goal. We will focus on developing a body of work that reflects each student’s personal style, while developing clear and strong ideas. You will learn the entire process of executing an illustration, from preliminary sketch to finished product. Once a month students will draw on location at the Society of Illustrators. Guest lecturers may also be included. Sample assignments may include but are not limited to visual puns in editorial illustration, science fiction and fantasy for book jackets. Topics include: the elements of picture making, design composition, and color; how to gain and use reference; materials and techniques; presentation both digitally and traditionally; keeping REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

a sketchbook; the Broadway poster in advertising; and the artist’s book as portfolio sample. Prerequisite: Basic drawing experience. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24– Jul 26 Lynn Foster PMFA 452 3.0 C.E.U.s $395 See pages 20, 4, and 15 for the following course descriptions. Adobe Illustrator for Fashion Design Basic Drawing for Animation Traditional Animation I and II

Industrial Design The Program The classes offered are intended to help students gain knowledge and hands-on experience in a variety of topics associated with the expanding field of industrial design.

Program is geared to: • Those with minimal or no experience who are curious about the field and who wish to acquire first-hand experience in industrial design. • Professionals looking to expand their repertoire of skills and knowledge. Each course may be taken separately or together. • Prospective students who wish to gain admission to Pratt’s Master of Industrial Design (MID) program with minimal or no prior experience in the field, are encouraged to take the Graduate Preparatory (GP) courses offered through Pratt’s Center for Continuing and Professional Studies (CCPS). • The GP courses are not for credit; they are not required for acceptance to Pratt’s Master of Industrial Design program, nor do they guarantee acceptance into the program. However, they can help students gain insight into Pratt’s M.I.D. program and prepare for future graduate design studies. • Courses are offered in the fall, spring, and summer sessions.

Product Design This course is an introduction to product design and the product development process. Learn how products are designed and what it takes to bring a product to market in this hands-on class. Exercises will include analyzing and dissecting current products; brain-storming, prototyping, and materials workshops; and developing a product from concept to basic prototype. Topics include: designers and design firms, the elements of a successful product, basic prototyping, materials, manufacturing processes, understanding the current market, and patents. Please note: This class is open to all who wish to take it; however, it is recommended that you first take a drawing class and/or a 3D design/model making class before taking the product design class. • Su 9 AM–1 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 9 sessions May 19–Jul 14 Jobe Bobbee XIND 105 3.6 C.E.U.s $595

Drawing for Product Design This course will emphasize drawing as a form of visual communication. Experiment in different media, including pen, pencil, markers, and pastels to develop a broad range of skills and an understanding of two- and threepoint perspectives. You will also study composition and basic rendering techniques that will help to create a sense of light and atmosphere and make your drawings more exciting and dynamic. The course will culminate in presentation drawings, which can be valuable additions to a portfolio. Topics include: basic drawing skills geared towards developing geometric and amorphic forms; ideation through freehand sketching techniques; presentation techniques; and technical drawing/drafting. • Sa 9 AM–12 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 12 sessions May 18–Aug 3 Bethany Martin XIND 107 3.6 C.E.U.s $595

Drawing for Product Design (Intensive) This course will help you develop your drawing skills to a level that will allow you to quickly and accurately visualize your ideas. The course starts with the basics and moves quickly into more complex drawing scenarios emphasizing perspective theory, ideation, and

expressive presentation drawings. The workload is similar to that of a graduate drawing class. Requires drawing 15 hrs/wk plus class time. Topics include: two- and three-point perspective; ideation through freehand sketching techniques; presentation techniques; introduction to marker rendering and mixed media. Please note: Supplies will cost $75–$100. Please bring the following to the first class: 18x24 inch tablet of smooth newsprint; black or indigo blue Prismacolor colored pencils (soft lead); black ballpoint pen. • Sa 9 AM–12 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 12 sessions May 18–Aug 3 Bethany Martin XIND 101 3.6 C.E.U.s $595

3D Design /Model-making The primary focus of this class is to introduce students to the elements of three-dimensional design, as well as numerous types of hand-built models used by industrial designers. By way of in-class demonstrations and handson assignments, students will become familiar with a range of materials, tools, and techniques, and will acquire the skills needed to produce portfolioready models. Topics include: basic principles of three-dimensional composition, form analysis, abstraction, ideation techniques, and model-making skills. Please note: Model-making supplies will cost $100–$200. Please bring the following to the first class: #1 or #2 x-acto knife or snap-off blade utility knife; needle-nose pliers with wire cutter; sketch book/pad; pens, pencils; minimum 18-inch steel ruler; and scissors. • M 6-9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 12 sessions May 20–Aug 12 Gabriel Ruegg XIND 102 3.6 C.E.U.s $795

Product Design: Portfolio Development and Design Intended for those interested in gaining admission to Pratt’s graduate industrial design program, this class will give students an opportunity to fine tune projects that they have developed through other coursework and bring together into a final portfolio that can be used for application to the Industrial Design program at Pratt or for job applications in the industry. The class will culminate in a completed portfolio that can be used for application to Pratt’s Industrial Design program or for


job applications in the industry. Topics include: how to tell the story of their design process, the basics of page and book layout, choosing appropriate typography, simple photography technique, how to scan flat work, basic Adobe Illustrator skills, basic Adobe Photoshop skills, and basic book binding and presentation techniques. Please note: Printing and supplies will cost $100–$200. Prerequisites include: Drawing for Product Design and Modelmaking/3D Design (GP) OR Product Design (GP). Consultation is required to take this course: please contact the instructor, Bethany Martin at bmartin.mid@gmail. com. • Sa 1–4 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 12 sessions May 15–Jul 31 Bethany Martin XIND 110 3.6 C.E.U.s $795

Interior Design Feng Shui and Interior Design Discover how this ancient art can transform a home by understanding the influences of color, the psychology of symbolism, the balance of yin and yang, the energy of the five elements, and the correct placement of furniture. You will be able to implement these principles in your own living space as well as apply them to a client’s environment. You will learn how to interpret spaces differently and how to create a harmonious home that is healthy, balanced, and beautiful. Topics include: discovering how to use the feng shui map, understanding the flow of energy in a space, analyzing decorating styles, evaluating real life case studies, and examining floor plans. • M 6–9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 5 sessions Fall 2013 Laura Benko XID 111 1.5 C.E.U.s $265

Preparatory Course Graduate Interior Design (Qualifying Program) The summer course is intended for students who have been accepted into the three-year qualifying graduate program in Interior Design. It is a preparatory course for those students entering the program in the fall of the same year. This non-credit course will be taught in a studio environment on Pratt Institute’s Brooklyn campus. This course covers the material and skills required for students with no prior studio arts background. The description

is below for Drawing Foundation for Interior Design. For information, please contact Pratt Institute’s Interior Design Department, Graduate Admissions Committee at 718-636-3630, email int@pratt.edu. To register, contact Pratt Institute, Center for Continuing and Professional Studies at 718-636-3453 or email prostudy@pratt.edu.

Drawing Foundation for Interior Design You will develop your drawing skills to a level that will allow you to quickly and accurately visualize your ideas. The course will culminate in presentation drawings, which can be valuable additions to a portfolio. Topics include: introduction to various drawing media and equipment; freehand sketching; orthographic projection (plans, sections, elevations); line weights, line types, symbols, scale and dimensions; lettering; introduction to presentation and rendering techniques. Registration deadline: TBA • Tu, Th 6–9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions Jul 9–Aug 8 Ike Cheung, Christian Rietzke XID 109 3.0 C.E.U.s $455

The Importance of Interior Design in Film and Television: Using Autodesk® 3ds Max®

Most scenes on television and films take place in interiors that look real. After involved research, these interiors are specifically designed and made to represent a reality according to the story, in front of a camera. Topics include: focusing on how important interior design is to films and television. You will pick two or three interior scenes from either films and/ or television series of your choice and learn how to recreate and visualize the specific interiors as they would appear on the set with the different camera placements, using Autodesk 3ds Max. Class will include guests from the entertainment industry (i.e. production designers and/or art directors) to comment on student projects. Recommended audience: professional designers, architects, or others who wish to explore this subject. Prerequisite: Autodesk 3ds Max Registration deadline: May 13 • Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Merope Vachlioti PMCG 265 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

summer 2013

Jewelry Making

Museum Workshops

Jewelry Design Intensive I

Drawing and Art Workshop: Europe’s Masterpieces at the Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum of Art and MoMA

This four-day intensive jewelry-making class is for both beginners and those looking to learn new skills and/or refine the ones they have. You will receive a solid foundation and develop your own designs through class projects. An overview of several techniques and materials, as well as proper tools and their usage will be discussed, taught, and applied. Also covered are the abundant sources for beads, tools, findings and other materials. Your completed projects, including earrings, necklaces, and bracelets, may inspire you to create your own line or give them away as gifts. Topics include: creating jewelry working with wire; making perfect loops, wraps, and findings; stringing beads and pearls; traditional and non-traditional knotting; crimping; professional finishes; and more. Also covered is organizing your workspace; tools and materials; establishing a library of resources and materials. Materials fee: Please bring $25 cash (payable to the instructor) to the first session for materials such as (not limited to) wire, beads, elastic, etc. for projects that will be created in the first two classes. Additional supplies will need to be purchased for sessions 3 and 4. The dollar amount will depend on your budget and savvy. Estimated range: $50-$150. Note: Tools and other supplies must be purchased for first day of class; a list will be provided. If you would like to ask questions of the instructor by email please write to: teach@meleather.com • Sa–Su 9 AM–5 PM 4 sessions Fall 2013 Maria Leather PMJ 470 2.8 C.E.U.s $375

In this unique five-week studio workshop at three major museums you will explore the historical influence of Western art and civilization from 12thcentury Medievalism through to the Renaissance and other movements on the aesthetic vitality of modern and contemporary 20th-century art. Through the medium of drawing, the class will embark on an analytical survey of specific works at: the Tuscan monastery on the Hudson, the Cloisters, a branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum; and MoMA. You will freely explore and creatively interpret the historically complex visual interrelationship where, regardless of era and -ism, artists pursued the common thread of knowledge, finding inspiration and a personal, creative expression, “reintroducing fragments of reality of the past,” as Roy Lichentstein noted. Using graphite, lithograph, Sharpie, crayons, pencils, and small spiral sketchpads, students will dissect a painting, tapestry, and/or sculpture to discover how artists expressively and dramatically structured one-, two-, and three-dimensional space. You will learn spatial conceits, form, tone, movement, chiaroscuro, and texture through examples and the practice of various linear techniques and methodology to visually communicate a specific message. Emphasis is on intellectual, societal, cultural, political, and emotional studies from Leonardo da Vinci, Vincent van Gogh, Edgar Degas, Salvador Dali, Paul Klee, Pablo Picasso, Thomas Eakins, Sargent, Norman Rockwell, Modigliani, Jackson Pollack, Rivera, and De Kooning. Topics include: how modern and contemporary art relates to the past with examples of relationships, from Piero della Francesca to Francisco Goya to Arshile Gorky. Please note the following: Students will bring drawing materials, watercolor trays, pen and ink, and sketchpads, including newsprint pads, for class use. Also, please bring your laptops if available. •E  xhibition of student work: To be determined. • Museum Fees: MoMA: free with Student I.D.; Cloisters and The Met: $4.00

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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• Sa 11 AM–2:45 PM 5 sessions Jun 1–29 Lois Lazarus PMFA 511 18.75 C.E.U. $285

Fantastic Rooms: Sketching in Period Rooms at the Brooklyn Museum How do rooms create a mood or suggest a personality? How can historical styles become original and contemporary again? Using the 22 period rooms at the Brooklyn Museum as a study collection, you will create a portfolio of drawings that combine observation with personal invention. Emphasis will be placed on the atmospheric and narrative qualities of interior drawings. Topics include: the period room as source for new design, and the interior in fiction and film. • Su 1–4 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Hannah Barrett XFA 488 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Sculpture Metalworking I This introduction to metalworking as an art form includes an examination of welding, brazing, soldering, bending, cutting, forging, and drilling techniques. You will create and complete a small sculpture by the end of class. Facilities Fee: $80 • Section 1: W 6–9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Adam Apostoulos (all sections) XFA 106 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Metalworking II This course continues the in-depth study of metalworking techniques. Topics include: finishing methods, special applications of welding procedures. Prerequisite: Metalworking I or demonstrated equivalent. Facilities Fee: $80 • W 6–9 PM, Pratt Brooklyn 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Adam Apostoulos XFA 107 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Technical Drawing

Architectural/Mechanical Drafting I

Architecture Exploratory Course: The DNA of Thoughts and the Built

This course introduces you to the fundamentals and principles of drafting tools, techniques and the basic drafting of floor plans, elevations, sections, details, orthographic projections and schedules. The primary goal of this course is an introduction to fundamental drafting skills used in the architectural/mechanical and engineering fields. Topics include: developing basic technical skills with an understanding of the reasons for different views and the spatial relationships in architectural and mechanical drawings. You will ultimately draft a floor plan, elevations and sections of a simple small structure as well as several small mechanical components. Ultimately you will have a basic knowledge of required drafting skills, which will help in real life working scenarios as well as first step understanding of how these skills translate and relate in use to today’s basic 2-D digital software packages (i.e. AutoCAD®, Autodesk®, Revit® Architecture, Autodesk® Inventor®, Photoshop, etc.) You will be given a list of needed materials for the course on the first day. You will be required to have such materials in order to complete all class/home assignments. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Chris Ramirez PMTD 101 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

The aim of this course is to open up the study and practice of architecture to anyone with architectural appreciation or interest, whether hobbyist or professional. We will apply an architectural lens onto the built environment within the notions of what affects it. From its larger sense to its smallest detail, architecture—which includes more than buildings—will be scanned, analyzed, and developed. Processes and the architect’s tools will be explored. Projects will claim the economy and ecology of the environment and architectural thought, allowing for one to analyze the built environment while simultaneously creating it. A very “high-tech” mode of ideas can be applied within a low-tech mode of execution. Topics include: drawing, model building, visual representation, lectures, the conceptual and visual development of projects, and portfolio development. Participants will keep a seminar notebook, participate in class discussions, keep up with assigned readings, and prepare their own presentation formulated as a case study. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Christoph A. Kumpusch PMTD 102 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Perspective Drawing and Rendering This course, created for students, professional designers, and architectural renderers, emphasizes the skills necessary to produce quick sketches or welldeveloped renderings. Topics include: one-, two-, and threepoint perspectives, overhead projections, side elevations, measurement systems, plan and section perspectives, and various rendering techniques. • Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Sandra Rodriguez PMFA 428 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Pictorial Perspective This course is intended to further develop your drawing skills either as an artist, architect, interior, or product designer. Gain the foundation to draw in perspective and develop an intuitive approach to three-dimensional visualization. The course teaches multiple perspective methods, bearing in mind that a wide variety of pictorial approaches will guarantee masterful results. Exercises are either freehand, as a conceptual approach to a threedimensional space, or derived from a given ground plan, section, and elevation. Each class introduces drawing exercises as well as demonstrations, including a survey of techniques of representation. Topics include: shortcuts to establishing a point of view from a ground plan and calculating diminishing sizes in scale; easy and effective ways to generate your ideas for exteriors and interiors; textural values and composition; theatricality and ambiguity in pictorial perspective. Prerequisite: drawing from life or basic drafting. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Ricardo Morin PMFA 440 3.0 C.E.U.s $395


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MEDIA ARTS / P H OTO GR AP H Y Certificate Program in Photography and Digital Imaging Photography as artistic medium and visual communication crosses international divides, and the advent of digital photography has made taking photos accessible to all of us. This program is designed for photographers, artists, designers, architects or anyone else who would like to take their photographic techniques, vision and current knowledge to another level. If you are interested in changing careers, preparing for a Master’s degree or pursing personal growth, our courses will provide a course of study that will take you through the fundamentals, as well as intermediate- and advanced-level classes in black and white and digital photography. The technical principles of photography and lighting for still life, portraiture, and commercial applications will be taught. Aesthetics, process, and individual creative vision will be emphasized to help students find their own unique style. Digital imaging, including retouching, color correction, color, and asset management will prepare photographers for the new digital photography studio. Students will build a thorough body of work and a professional portfolio. Non-certificate students are welcome to take individual classes, as long as class prerequisites are met or they are admitted through a portfolio review.

OneKey Account Information OneKey user names and passwords are necessary for all students and faculty of Pratt Institute. Please see page 65 for detailed instructions.

Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

VA Benefits for Certificate Program This program is approved for veterans and other eligible persons under the GI Bill for education. Contact the Department of Veterans Affairs at 1-888-GI BILL1 (1-888-442-4551), or www.gibill.va.gov regarding eligibility. Contact: Perry Han phan@pratt.edu or Karen D’Angelo kdangelo@pratt.edu

C E R T I F I C AT E P R O G R A M IN PHOTOGRAPHY AND D I G I TA L I M A G I N G Photography and computer courses may be taken individually or as part of the certificate program.

C ERT I F I C AT E REQ UI REMENTS In order to receive Pratt’s Certificate in Photography and Digital Imaging, students must complete foundation courses, required core classes, and at least five electives. A Foundation or required Core Course(s) may be waived for another Foundation Course or a more advanced course if you show competency—for example, through a portfolio review in the subject matter of the course you wish to be waived. Application fee: $100, non-refundable Required Foundation Courses: Four PMCG 180 Computer Comp (Mac) PMCG 442 Photoshop for Photographers PMPH 471 Survey of Contemporary Photography PMPH 485 Photographic Lighting I PMCG 500 Digital Photography I Required Core Courses: Four

PMCG 426 Photoshop Retouching PMPH 487 Photographic Portraiture PMCG 501 Digital Photography II PMPH 502 Editorial Photography PMPH 520 A  Portrait: Beyond the Image Is a Story Electives: Choose at Least Five

PMCG 425 Photoshop: Imaging II PMPH 481 Intro to Photography PMPH 490 A  rtwork and Museum Photography PMPH 504 Documentary Photography PMPH 518 Intro to Fashion Photography PMPH 521 Fine Art Digital Printing PMPH 530 H  andheld Film Making: Your Story–Inside and Out PMPH 531 The Digital SLR Video Revolution PMPH 600 Photography Portfolio

media arts, PHOTOGRAPHY AND DIGITAL ART Introduction to the Camera The basic principles of the camera are explained in this workshop. An adjustable SLR or 35mm camera is required. Please bring your camera to class. Topics include: F-stops, shutter speeds, exposures and light readings, backlighting, depth of field, film types, and ASA. • Sa 10 AM–4 PM 1 session May 18 Richard Beenen PMPH 480 .5 C.E.U.s $95

Artwork and Museum Photography This course is designed to teach photographers, artists, curators, and other museum professionals how to photograph artwork and other objects for presentation and publication, as well as online catalogs and portfolios. It is essential to anybody in the field of art marketing such as dealers and appraisers who seek to use photography to document or promote art effectively. The major focus will be on lighting and how the proper lighting can enhance the accuracy and beauty of the artwork or object being shot. You will have ample class time to explore these techniques. We will also have guest artists who will showcase and speak about their work as well as go on a field trip to a major museum photo studio. Topics include: 2D and 3D artwork; lighting techniques with an emphasis on difficult surfaces and situations; post-production and technical issues; portfolio and creative development. Recommended audience: Photographers, artists, curators, dealers, and art appraisers. • W 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Paul Lachenauer PMPH 490 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

Survey of Contemporary Photography Survey the diversity in photography as it has developed over the last 60 years with special emphasis on the last 30 both in America and abroad. Learn about key trends—especially the overarching intellectualization of the medium—groundbreaking exhibitions and key photographers’ books. Movements in other media will also be explored, as will the important critical debates. During gallery visits and in class conversation you will have the opportunity to hone your own critical skills in terms of looking at and evaluating photographs. A short analytical paper on a topic of your choice will be required at the end of the semester. Topics include: the critique of suburbia and the man-altered landscape, the set up photography of the eighties and nineties often inflected by academic theories, and the plastic nature of digital photography as expressed in portraits, landscape and other genres. • Sa 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Vivien Knussi PMPH 471 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Introduction to Photography Explore the fundamentals of black and white photography in this introductory course. The focus of the class is on darkroom work and individual or small group critiques. Topics include: basic technical skills needed for 35mm camera operation, exposing and developing film, making contact sheets, and enlarging and finishing of black and white photographs. Lab Time: 20 hours of lab time included. Additional lab time is available at $5/hour. • Section 1: W 6:30–9:30 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Federico Savini • Section 2: Su 1:30–4:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Federico Savini PMPH 481 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu


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summer 2013

Digital Photography I

Fine Art Digital Printing

This course is an overview of digital photography, camera systems, and an introduction to digital imaging using Photoshop. Knowing how your camera functions, how it collects information, and how you can take control of the photo-making process to create the images you want, will be the primary focus of this course. Photographic techniques including content, composition, selecting focal length, focus, and light will be explored. The course combines lectures, demonstrations, and fieldwork. Topics include: basic camera functions, exposure controls, file formats and resolution, and digital imaging; digital photography; film vs. digital; image acquisition; scanners; TWAIN and Photoshop plug-ins. Also covered are image aesthetics; composition, image editing and manipulation (software applications, file formats, and color); color correction; image and color management, workflow, storage archiving; and image output. Prerequisite: Computer Competency (Mac/PC). Please note: Digital SLR cameras or those capable of processing raw formats are recommended. Class is taught in a Mac lab. Computer facilities fee: $25 • Section 1 (m): M 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Steven Hirsch • Section 2 (m): F 3–6 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Laura Dodson PMCG 500 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

This course covers fine art digital printing on both desktop and wide format inkjet printers from planning through execution and provides an opportunity to experiment with various media and presentation solutions. You will learn essential file preparation and color management routines to control the quality of the finished print. While the emphasis is on producing archival fine art prints for exhibition or portfolio, the same techniques can be used for many commercial applications. Students can output their files on their own printers or in the 5th floor Lab or pay the Instructor to print on specific media. This course will provide a foundation for establishing workflow routines, making critical choices and gaining the knowledge and confidence to get predictable and professional results. Individual projects will be planned and fully executed. Topics include: understanding workflow in terms of input and output, color management principles and practices; reviewing paper choices—photo and fine art papers, canvas; learning file resampling options in Photoshop, Blow Up and Genuine Fractals; scanning film for optimum results, fluid mounting, pre-scanning; printing from applications Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop; understanding a software RIP such as Colorburst; wall murals—tiling, file prep, print and wall prep, installation; laminating films and mounting substrates, including Acrylic and Dibond, for home, gallery or commercial display purposes. Prerequisite: Intro to Photography or Digital 1, knowledge of Photoshop • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions Spring 2014 Ken Taranto PMPH 521 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

Digital Photography II This course will cover how to integrate camera, Adobe Lightroom, and Adobe Photoshop into a workflow process to achieve both controlled and creative results. This is a hands-on course where you will develop two projects, one involving straight photo images and one using creative techniques. Topics include: overview of monitor and camera calibration; use of the color checker library and develop modules in Lightroom; how to migrate the workflow from Lightroom to Photoshop; hdr; creative techniques; basic automation in Lightroom and Photoshop, printing and alternative printing media. Prerequisite: Photoshop: Imaging I and Digital Photography I. Computer facilities fee: $25 • Section 1 (m): F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Federico Savini PMCG 501 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Handheld Filmmaking: Your Story—Inside and Out This course is for newcomers to handheld filmmaking and broadcast on digital platforms: YouTube, Vimeo, Facebook, email, and Web. It’s for those seeking to develop their personal, expressive storytelling and technical competence in these new mediums, including artists, photographers, writers, and film/video enthusiasts. Topics include: finding a creative voice that suits mobile phone camera, digital camera video, and “Flipcam” technology; writing and structuring a story; creative and technical teamwork with fellow participants; editing on simple digital platforms such as iPhone, iMovie, and Final Cut Pro/Express; upload-

ing to social media; handheld devices; and distributing to film festivals and other channels. The course will also include analyzing and deconstructing films, documentaries and video art; the impact of broadcast and theatrical media; and discovering and dialoging with your audience. Production skills will also include handheld shooting, cell and Skype videography, basic lighting, and multi-camera projects and editing. Prerequisite: Must own your own recording devices. Basic shooting and downloading ability. Some storytelling or creative expression skills. Ability or interest to work with others. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 John Halpern PMPH 530 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

Intro to Fashion Photography This course is designed for those interested in the fashion photography genre. The course will emphasize the art and production of the fashion shoot. Primarily a hands-on studio course, all aspects of the field will be examined: editorial, advertising, and beauty. Topics include: many lighting techniques will be covered, including strobe and natural light. You will learn to produce your own photo shoots including scouting locations, working with models, makeup artists, etc. The relationship between photographer and model, art director and client will be covered. Photoshop processing and retouching techniques will also be incorporated into your photographic projects. Portfolio development discussion will include portfolio content and professional presentation. Prerequisite: Digital Photography I and Imaging I. Please note: Students must work with a digital SLR camera. Please bring samples of your work to the first session. • Tu 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Tracy Toler PMPH 518 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

enhanced by fill cards, reflectors and flash, tungsten and studio strobes with umbrellas, and soft boxes. Set ups will include art and commercial applications of portraiture, still life and food, editorial, magazine, and beauty photography. You may shoot in black and white, color, and digital formats. Topics include: historical perspectives, capturing truthful moments, new perspectives, organizing a portrait session, including scheduling and setup, managing client expectations, lighting, backgrounds, clothes, props, and makeup. In-class critiques on your personal imagery, the success of your communication, and telling a personal story will be covered. Prerequisite: Intro to Photography, Digital Photography, or portfolio review. • M 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Kevin Sweeney PMPH 485 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

A Portrait: Beyond the Image is a Story This course is a study of portraiture, both behind and in front of the camera. Knowledge of useful resources such as lighting set–ups and techniques, subject performance and establishment of a scenario are key to finding your own voice when portraying a person’s image. The class will be divided into discussion of various lighting and creative thinking exercises, readings, and artistic portraiture by other photographers. At the end, you will be prepared with the right tools that should serve as the starting point of a continuing body of work in the art of portraiture. Topics include: creative lighting techniques, self-portraiture, directing, acting, props, wardrobe, background, and equipment. There will be guest speakers as well as gallery/museum visits that will nurture and inspire the process. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Monica Felix PMPH 520 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

Photographic Lighting I This course will teach you the fundamentals of working with a variety of lighting systems and techniques and will cover the theory and application of lighting in the studio and on location. The photographic works and lighting of master photographers will be introduced to give you a background in visualizing light and lighting methodology. Work with a variety of lighting systems including existing light,

KEY (m) = Macintosh Platform


The Art of Photographic Portraiture Portraiture represents perhaps the most practical skills a photographer can have. It is the foundation of a professional photographer’s repertoire. This course offers an intensive experience on all phases of the discipline— from lighting to studio and location. The instructor will illustrate how to use portraiture within photography. Geared to both the amateur and professional, this course will integrate creative and professional skills so that each student can express his or her own individual creative abilities. Work in this class can be done in black and white, color, or digital camera formats. Students must have a camera, tripod, and cable release. Topics include: lighting studio, beauty, location, editorial, group portraits, and environment, building a cohesive portfolio of portraits for exhibition and publication. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography. • Th 6:30–9:30 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Michael Lisnet PMPH 487 3.0 C.E.U.s $405

The Digital SLR Video Revolution When DSLR cameras first came to market they were not originally designed for video. They were still cameras that had a video component. But now with hi-res capability you can shoot video that looks like film, and many professionals are choosing to use this technology. This course will introduce the DSLR camera as a tool to use for art, filmmaking, journalism, and/or commercial work. You will explore how to use the DSLR camera in all these different scenarios. The first part of the course will explain the technical aspects of the video camera from encoding the files for editing to operating the camera; types of lighting that can be used; and incorporating sound into your project. The second part off this course will be dedicated to creating your own imagery in the form of a short piece that you will present in class on our last day. Topics include: pre-production and post-production. What is this camera like in the real world? The camera technically speaking: frame rates, picture styles, ISO settings, shutter speeds, white balance, different lenses, etc.; lighting; incorporating sound into your project; studio class—setting up for an interview; personal vision and indi-

vidual projects; presentation. Prerequisites: Must own your own

DSLR camera; basic shooting and downloading ability; ability or interest in working with others. Recommended but not required is PMPH 530, Handheld Filmmaking: Your Story— Inside and Out. • Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Michael Lisnet PMPH 531 3.0 C.E.U.s $405 See pages 20–21 for course descriptions. Color Management Workshop Photoshop Beauty Retouching Photoshop for Photographers Photoshop Montage and Collage

CA REER D EVELO PMENT Exploring Careers in Visual Arts Administration This course is an introduction to learning about exciting careers available in visual arts administration such as working for an art gallery, museum, auction house, art consultancy, or nonprofit art center. Whether you are currently a student, just starting out professionally, thinking about switching fields, or returning to the work force, you will be introduced to the wide variety of positions available for both entry and midlevel job-seekers. Get practical career guidance on how to apply your existing educational background and work experience in disciplines such as fine or commercial art, art history, fashion and design, sales or business management, to name just a few. Topics include: examining various job titles and functions to gain understanding of the field; meeting art professionals on site visits to galleries, museums, art-related businesses, and nonprofit arts organizations in New York City. Expand your professional network and discover new valuable resources. Learn about paid and unpaid internships for future contacts. This is a results-oriented course. Students will identify their marketable skills, write a game plan, and determine if additional coursework or practical training is the next step for reaching their professional goals. • Sa 1–4 PM 6 sessions Jun 1–Jul 6 Vida Schreibman PMCD 220 1.8 C.E.U.s $295

Managing Your Career/ Career Change Learn the basics of writing effective resumes and cover letters that get results. Understand the importance of and differences between transferable skills, soft skills, and core skills. This class will provide students with the essential tools required to maneuver competitively through the professional world with a focus on career exploration, career transitions, and interviewing. Topics include: components of career exploration for both new graduates and career changers; developing a cover letter, resume, and “thank you” letter; and understanding the subtext of job postings. • Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 5 sessions Jun 1–29 Hera Marashian PMCD 121 1.5 C.E.U.s $255

Selling Your Art in New York City New York is a place filled with artwork, but where can you sell it? Not only are there galleries, but many stores and shops that sell artwork. There are also new venues available online. Topics include: preparing your work for galleries; sending out postcards; self-promotion; making contacts and following up with calls and e-mails; preparing art for public display; selling your art at an art fair. • Sa 9 am–5 PM 1 session Jun 22 Mark Ziemann PMCD 120 .7 C.E.U.s $105

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Certificate Programs Computer Graphics See page 15 for details. Design Entrepreneurship See page 56 for details. Fashion New Media See page 29 for details. Online and Social Media Marketing See page 31 for details. Photography and Digital Imaging See page 9 for details. Perfumery See page 55 for details. Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management See page 50 for details. Urban Green Infrastructure: Green Systems Clean Water See page 52 for details.

CONSTRUCTI ON MANAGE M E NT See pages 37 and 47 for AIA-approved course descriptions. Construction Cost Estimating Construction Specifications Writing Specifications Writing, Principles, and Practice

See pages 20–21 and 31–32 for course descriptions. Create a Professional Design Portfolio Design for the Web Social Media and Social Media Marketing

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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FAC IL IT IE S AN D ENV IR O N M E N TA L CO M P L IAN C E See pages 35–44 and 47–54 for descriptions of the following AIA-approved course descriptions. Architectural Restoration: Motivators and Constraints to the Preservation of Older Structures Capstone Project–Sustainable Building and Infrastructure Design and Management Climate Change Fundamentals for Design Professionals Designing and Renovating Carbon Neutral Buildings Drainage and Hydrology in NYC Energy Benchmarking Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Weatherization Audits, and Capital Planning Environmental Site Investigation and Remediation Freshwater Wetlands Go Green Retrofits Gray Water Heat Recovery Green Design Versus Historic Preservation Green Infrastructure Site Assessment Improving Public Health by Greening Your Specifications Indoor Air Quality Land Use Engineering New Technologies—Smart Grid and Smart Buildings Performance Modeling for Carbon Neutral Buildings Performance Rating of New Buildings: The Process Renewable/Green Energy Solar Photovoltaics Sustainability Approach to Engineering Design Sustainable Standards for Buildings and Infrastructure–BREAM, Energy Star, LEED® The Environment. SEQRA and the Engineered Project Wind Energy Systems

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

RES I D EN T I A L HOME I N S PECT I O N See pages 44–47 for descriptions of the following AIA-approved courses. Residential Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Residential Bathroom Design from Start to Finish Residential Chimney and Wood Heating and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Residential Electrical Systems and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Residential Exteriors and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Residential Gas and Oil Furnaces and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Residential Home Inspections Residential Insulation and How to Evaluate It Holistically Residential Interiors and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Residential Plumbing and How to Evaluate It Holistically Residential Roofing and How to Evaluate It Holistically Residential Steam, Electric, Floor, Wall Heat plus Hot Water Boilers and How to Evaluate Them Holistically

LEED ® CERT I F I C AT I ON EXA M PREP CO URS ES See page 41 for course descriptions of the following AIA-approved courses. LEED® for Green Associate Plus LEED® New Construction V3, Core and Shell, and K–12 Schools

Online and Social Media MARKE TING WORKSHOP S See pages 31–32 and for complete program and course descriptions. Content Development Strategies for Online Marketing Creating a Website and Blog Elements of Social Media Policy Generating Revenue Online: Monetizing Traffic Measurement: Understanding, Analyzing, and Utilizing Web and E-Mail Analytics Online Advertising—Understanding CPC, CPM, CPV, and Other Creative Ways of Driving Traffic Online Strategy: Adapting,  Integrating, and Utilizing Online and Social Media Platforms PR 2.0: The Next Evolution of Public Relations Search Engine Optimization Social Media and Social Media Marketing The Big Four and More: A Practical  Approach to Using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Linked-In, and Others

SP ECIAL PROGRAM S SUMME R 2 013 PRE-COLLEG E PROGRAM Jul 8–Aug 2, 2013 High school students will have an invaluable opportunity to sharpen their portfolios and get a taste of college life, while earning four college credits. Scholarships are available. The program is offered on both the Brooklyn and Manhattan campuses. Program includes: architecture, art history, creative writing, fashion design, foundation art, graphic design (including computer design), traditional illustration, painting and drawing, photography, and portfolio development. Tuition: $3,142, plus fees* *Tuition and fees are subject to change. For more information and a detailed brochure, contact our Brooklyn office at 718-636-3453 or email us at precollege@pratt.edu. Visit our Website at: www.pratt.edu/prostudies


The certificate program in computer graphics is designed to provide graphic and fine artists with the skills necessary to utilize the computer as a graphics tool, enabling them to incorporate computer graphics technology into their work. The curriculum includes terminology, software instruction, conceptual development, and hands-on experience. Students work on stateof-the-art equipment, using the latest software. The certificate provides a firm grounding in the basic elements of this fast-moving field, and an opportunity to use, learn, and understand the various types of specialized equipment that exist in today’s electronic design offices. Through collaboration with leading hardware and software vendors involved with computer graphics, the Center for Continuing and Professional Studies offers its students the latest in computer graphics education. Pratt’s commitment to professional education and commercial applicability is stressed in course planning, faculty selection, and the latest equipment. Pratt’s approach consists of a foundation designed to teach computer literacy, the basic terminology and operating concepts of these machines, and finally, a personalized course of study tailored to the specific educational goals and career needs of different types of students. This method combines theoretical and practical knowledge that is essential to effective education in this field.

CAREER TRACKS Interactive Media Electronic Imaging and Illustration Electronic Publishing Computer Animation and Video Computer-Aided Design and Visualization

Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

VA Benefits for Certificate Program This program is approved for veterans and other eligible persons under the GI Bill for education. Contact the Department of Veterans Affairs at 1-888-GI BILL1 (1-888-442-4551), or www.gibill.va.gov regarding eligibility. Contact: Perry Han phan@pratt.edu or Karen D’Angelo kdangelo@pratt.edu

summer 2013

C E R T I F I C AT E P R O G R A M S in COMPUTER GRAPHICS Computer courses can be taken individually or as part of a certificate program.

CERT I F I C AT E REQ UI REMENTS In order to receive Pratt’s Certificate in Computer Graphics, students must complete foundation courses, core courses, and electives within their chosen career track: interactive media, electronic imaging and illustration, electronic publishing, computer animation and video, and computer-aided design and visualization. Students will receive a letter-grade in each course and must maintain a “C” average. Eighty percent attendance must be maintained in order to pass, as well. Please see Career Tracks, on pages 14–15, for details and requirements. Students with particular application requirements outside of these career tracks can select courses from different tracks as long as the foundation and certificate requirements are satisfied. Certain courses may be waived with permission of the coordinator of the program. Eighty percent attendance is also required in these courses of study. Students must have an understanding of the basics of design before pursuing their area of concentration. Please note: Computer Competency will be waived outright, if you have PC or Mac competency. Prerequisites: The acceptance of pre-

requisites mentioned in all catalog listings is subject to the approval of the Director, Enrollment Management for Non-Credit Programs, or the Associate Director, Academic Computing. Also, if you are competent in any other software application, you may waive that course, but you do need to take another course in its place in order to complete the certificate program requirements. Application Fee: $100, non-refundable

Course Descriptions

PMCG 324 Dreamweaver/Fireworks: I PMCG 308 Design for the Web

For computer graphics courses see pages 15–28. For Autodesk Training Center and Autodesk Media and Entertainment Training Center courses, see pages 16–19 and 24–28.

Core Courses: Choose six.

Computer Facilities Fees Students registering for 30 hr computer courses are required to pay a non-refundable facilities fee of $25 per course.

Lab Time Two hours of lab time is available per week, per course. Students also receive an additional six hours of floating lab time for the semester.

Career Tracks Interactive Media This program deals with the construction and delivery of interactive information. Learn about the tools, design issues, and burgeoning technology of various forms of interactive media, such as the World Wide Web, DVD’s and mobile devices. Integrate text, sound, animation, video, and graphic elements to create content-rich interactive pieces. This certificate program is ideal for people from a variety of backgrounds. The nature of interactive media makes it a challenging and interesting creative environment for people with backgrounds in design, theater, writing, education, film and video, and publishing, as well as those in the visual arts. Students lacking a design background are required to take PMFA 429 Basic Drawing and PMGD 475 Intro to Graphic Design. Students without computer experience must also take PMCG 180 Computer Comp (Mac). Required Foundation Courses: Choose four.

PMCG 100 Overview of Digital Creation and Digital Media or PMCG 312  Social Media Marketing PMCG 180  Computer Comp (Mac) PMCG 202 Adobe Illustrator: Graphic Illustration I PMCG 422 Photoshop: Imaging I

PMCG 306 Survey of New Media in Design: Interactive Media and the Internet PMCG 322 HTML and Web Design I PMCG 325 Intro to XHTML and CSS PMCG 425 Photoshop: Imaging II PMCG 438 Flash I PMCG 444 Flash II: Action Scripting PMCG 450 Dreamweaver II: ColdFusion w/Dreamweaver PMCG 467 Intro to PHP Programming for the Web PMCG 468 Dreamweaver II: Web Standards – Content, Presentation, and Behaviors PMCG 473 Interactive Web Design with JQuery and Spry PMCG 500 Digital Photography I Electives: Choose at least two.

PMCG 317  Great Web Design w/ CSS PMCG 445 Flash II: Character Anim PMCG 446 Motion Graphics w/ Flash and Video PMCG 466 Flash Mobile PMCG 471  Theming WordPress PMCG 483 2D Character Animation for Video

Electronic Imaging and Illustration This program is designed for the art director, designer, commercial and fine artist, with the curriculum emphasis on the image itself. Whether creating a fine art piece or a commercial illustration, computer graphics technology offers a wide range of image-making tools, combining the conceptual tools of drawing and painting with photography and typography, and adding new digitally based forms of image composition. Create images for publication design, fine arts, presentation graphics, interactive systems, and broadcast and Web design. Students lacking a background in illustration are required to take PMGD 475 Intro to Graphic Design or PMFA 429 Basic Drawing and PMFA 452 Intro to Illustration. PMPH 481 Intro to Photography is recommended. REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Required Foundation Courses:

Required Foundation Courses:

PMFA 479 Traditional Animation I

Special Topics: (Four seven-hour work-

Choose four.

Choose five.

Core Courses: Choose seven.

PMCG 100 Overview of Digital Creation and Digital Media or PMCG 312 Social Media Marketing PMCG 180 Computer Comp (Mac) PMCG 202 Adobe Illustrator: Graphic Illustration I PMCG 422 Photoshop: Imaging I

PMCG 100 Overview of Digital Creation and Digital Media or PMCG 312 Social Media Marketing PMCG 304 Desktop Pub/QuarkXPress I PMCG 202 A  dobe Illustrator: Graphic Illustration I PMCG 303 Adobe InDesign PMCG 422 Photoshop: Imaging I PMCG 475 Intro to Graphic Design

PMCG 202 Adobe Illustrator: Graphic Illustration I PMCG 223 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Model and Rend I PMCG 230 Autodesk® Maya® I Fundamentals PMCG 240 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Model and Rend II PMCG 241 Autodesk® Maya® II: Modeling, Animation and Effects PMCG 243 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Game Level and Character Design PMCG 254 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Animation I PMCG 259 Modeling Manga/Anime with Autodesk® 3ds Max® PMCG 260 Autodesk® 3ds Max® CAT Animation PMCG 261 Animating w/ Autodesk® 3ds Max® and Character Studio Biped PMCG 262 Intro to Autodesk® 3ds Max® MotionBuilder® PMCG 263 Intro to Motion Capture PMCG 264 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Adv Game Character Modeling for Next-Gen Games PMCG 330 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Animation II PMCG 331 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Adv Char Design PMCG 340 Autodesk® Maya® Adv Character Design PMCG 422 Photoshop: Imaging I PMCG 436 Adobe After Effects I PMFA 480 Traditional Animation II

shops count as one course.) PMAM 224, PMAM 237, PMAM 245, PMAM 246, PMAM 249, PMAM 251, PMAM 252, PMAM 261, PMAM 262

Core Courses: Choose six.

PMCG 303 Adobe InDesign PMCG 304 Desktop Pub/Quark XPress I PMCG 324 Dreamweaver/Fireworks: I PMCG 420 Adobe Illustrator: Graphic Illustration II PMCG 425 Photoshop: Imaging II PMCG 426 Photoshop Retouching PMCG 477 Adobe Illustrator for Fashion Design PMCG 500 Digital Photography I Electives: Choose at least two.

PMCG 213 3D Modeling w/form•Z PMCG 223 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Model and Rend I PMCG 325 Intro to XHTML and CSS PMCG 352 Adv Adobe InDesign w/Photoshop and Illustrator PMCG 434 Non-Linear Video Editing and Video Effects w/Final Cut Pro PMCG 436 Adobe After Effects I PMCG 438 Flash I PMCG 440 Adobe After Effects II PMCG 442 Photoshop for Photographers PMCG 458 Photoshop Montage and Collage PMCG 462 Adv Tech in Final Cut Pro PMCG 482 Graphic Design Ideas to Form PMCG 502 Digital Photography II PMCG 510 Create a Professional Design Portfolio PMCG 511 B  randing and Licensing for the Illustrator

Electronic Publishing This program explores new tools of desktop design, including imaging, illustration, digital typography, and page design. Gain knowledge of typesetting, page layout, color separation, comp production, with projects completed through the printed piece. Students lacking a background in graphic design are required to take PMGD 463 Basic Layout and Design or PMGD 475 Intro to Graphic Design or PMCG 180 Computer Comp (Mac).

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Core Courses: Choose six.

PMCG 324 Dreamweaver/ Fireworks: I PMCG 325 Intro to XHTML and CSS PMCG 420 Adobe Illustrator: Graphic Illustration II PMCG 425 Photoshop: Imaging II PMCG 426 Photoshop Retouching PMCG 442 P  hotoshop for Photographers PMCG 479 Graphic Design II PMCG 500 Digital Photography I Electives: Choose at least two.

PMCG 352 Adv Adobe InDesign w/Photoshop and Illustrator PMCG 458 P  hotoshop Montage and Collage PMCG 468 D  reamweaver II: Web Standards – Content, Presentation, and Behaviors PMCG 477 A  dobe Illustrator for Fashion Design PMCG 482 Graphic Design Ideas to Form PMCG 502 Digital Photography II PMCG 510 C  reate a Professional Design Portfolio PMCG 511 B  randing and Licensing for the Illustrator

Computer Animation and Video This program is for those who wish to pursue careers in film, entertainment, special effects, game design, and broadcast design. Program focus is on the creation and design of time-based media. Choose an area of specialization—2D and 3D animation, digital video, and broadcast design. Study the choreography and design of complex animated sequences. Students lacking a background in illustration or design are required to take PMFA 429 Basic Drawing, PMFA 476 Basic Drawing for Animation, and PMFA 452 Intro to Illustration. Required Foundation Courses: Choose three.

PMCG 100 Overview of Digital Creation and Digital Media or PMCG 312 Social Media Marketing PMCG 250 Continuity Storyboards

Electives: Choose at least two.

PMCG 258 Autodesk® Mudbox® PMCG 265 The Import of Int Design in Film and TV w/ Autodesk® 3ds Max® PMCG 332 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Adv Char Anim PMCG 333 Special Effects w/ Autodesk® 3ds Max® PMCG 337 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Adv Projects PMCG 341 Special Effects w/ Autodesk® Maya® PMCG 342 Autodesk® Maya® and Autodesk® Mudbox™ Pipeline Integration PMCG 425 Photoshop: Imaging II PMCG 434 Non-Linear Video Editing w/ Final Cut Pro PMCG 438 Flash I PMCG 440 Adobe After Effects II PMCG 462 Adv Tech in Final Cut Pro PMCG 463 Compositing w/ Shake PMCG 483 2D Character Animation for Video PMCG 601 Special Projects Independent Study

Computer-Aided Design and Visualization This program is designed for architects, engineers, interior designers, and industrial designers. Expert CAD curriculum—from fundamental to complete customization—combined with special topics in 3D design, visualization, and scripting are included. Students lacking a drafting or technical drawing background are required to take PMFA 428 Perspective Drawing and Rendering or PMFA 440 Pictorial Perspective or PMTD 101 Architectural/Mechanical Drafting I. Core Courses: Choose seven.

PMA 401 AutoCAD® Prof Level I PMA 402 AutoCAD® Prof Level II PMA 405 AutoCAD® Architecture: Essentials PMA 406 Autodesk® Revit® Architecture PMA 407 Autodesk® Inventor I PMA 408 Set Design for Architects and Designers using AutoCAD PMA 533 Autodesk® Revit® Architecture: Core Concepts for Interiors PMCG 223 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Modeling and Rendering I PMCG 240 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Modeling and Rendering II PMCG 252 Arch Design w/Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design PMCG 254 Autodesk® 3ds Max® Animation I PMCG 255B Arch Visual using AutoCAD, Autodesk® Revit® and Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design PMCG 256 Arch Model II w/Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design PMCG 257 Arch Rendering and Lighting in Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design PMCG 265  The Import of Int Design in Film and TV w/ Autodesk® 3ds Max® Special Topics: (Four seven-hour workshops count as one course.) PMA 501, PMA 502, PMA 503, PMA 504, PMA 505, PMA 506, PMA 510, PMA 520, PMA 525, PMA 526, PMA 533, PMA 534, PMA 538, PMA 539, PMA 545, PMA 546, PMA 547, PMA 548, PMA 549, PMA 550, PMA 551, PMA 552, PMAM 224, PMA 554, PMA 555.


Certificate Program Courses Computer courses can be taken on an individual basis or as part of Pratt’s Certificate Programs in Computer Graphics. See pages 13–14 for information on the Certificate Program.

summer 2013

COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND T EC H N O LO GY CO U R S E s

Computer Facilities Fees Students registering for 30-hour computer courses are required to pay a non-refundable facilities fee of: • $25 per course

Lab Time Two hours of lab time is available per week, for those taking 10 and 15 session courses. Students also receive additional floating lab time for the semester. Students must show their student IDs to gain entrance to the lab.

Make-up Classes Make-up classes may be scheduled for a time other than your normally scheduled class time, such as a Saturday or Sunday.

Autodesk® Authorized Training Center

Autodesk® Authorized Training Center Premier Media and Entertainment courses, see pages 16–29 and 28. Autodesk® Authorized Training Center courses, see pages 24–28.

OneKey Account Information OneKey user names and passwords are necessary for all students and faculty of Pratt Institute. Please see page 65 for detailed instructions.

Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

Key (m) = Macintosh Platform (w) = Windows Platform (L) = Keynote Lecture (AIA) = AIA Professional

CLASS ES FO R BEG I NN ERS These classes are for students with little or no computing background. These classes are also prerequisites for most of the hands-on computing classes. If you are uncertain of your level of computing experience, see a counselor at Pratt Manhattan.

Overview of Digital Creation and Digital Media This seminar offers an overview of the creation and distribution of images with digital tools and media, focusing on fine arts and independent media production. The seminar looks at how digital technology has taken over most aspects of the visual communication, publishing, and entertainment industries. After viewing work in the classroom for the first half of the day, the afternoon portion will include a field trip to galleries in Chelsea that present work in the digital realm. Possible sites include: Bitforms Gallery, The Kitchen, among others (subject to gallery exhibition schedules at the time of the class.) Recommended audience: Digital artists, computer animators, designers, project managers, producers, and anybody interested in digital arts and production. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session May 18 Kathy Brew PMCG 100 .7 C.E.U.s $159

Social Media and Social Media Marketing Please see page 31 for course description.

Computer Competency (Mac) The fundamentals of computer use are explored in this hands-on laboratory and lectures. The three core programs that support the computer graphics Industry—Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign—are introduced. This course is recommended for the beginning student seeking a career in electronic publishing, computer illustration, interactive media, or Web design. Topics include: basic computing concepts for graphic artists, file management, the Macintosh operating system, graphics programs, and Internet basics. • Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Vincent Yakoumakis PMCG 180 3.0 C.E.U.s $755

ANIMATION Pratt Manhattan offers varied approaches to animation and motion-based media. We offer courses that deal with traditional animation and design as well as those that provide technical training in digital animation.

Traditional Animation I Animation is possibly the most versatile art form, since anything that can be seen can be made to move through animation, whether it’s 3D or flat, realistic or abstract. This studio course focuses on drawn animation, starting with simple flipbooks and working up to fuller character-style animation. Computer animation students will find that working in traditional animation and creating each frame by hand will give them a more instinctive understanding of animation timing. Topics include: timing and motion charts, key-framing and in-betweening, straight-ahead animation, gestures and posing, anticipation and reaction, overlapping motion, squash, and stretch. Prerequisite: Basic Drawing or Basic Drawing for Animation.

• Th 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Greg Webb PMFA 479 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Traditional Animation II This course is a continuation of Traditional Animation I. Topics include: advanced character development—creating a unique custom “walk” for a character; developing its body language, head, and hand gestures; drawings for key frames of mouth; in-betweening for proper lip-synch; character coloring; background art; multi-layer background art; multi-plane background art; illusion of movement to create parallax-shift and illusion of depth; short, finely tuned advanced projects recorded with a digital camera for viewing on the computer monitor or “dumped” to video. Prerequisite: Traditional Animation I or experience in drawn animation and with in-betweening. • Th 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Greg Webb PMFA 480 3.0 C.E.U.s $395

Basic Drawing for Animation See page 4 for course description.

Continuity Storyboards: The Filmmaker’s Best Friend This course targets all areas of visual pre-production and design for 2D, 3D computer, stop-motion and hand- drawn animation, as well as live action. Topics include: what a continuity storyboard is and its different uses; visualization of an idea or script; and how to turn them into a series of frames to use as a guide for the shooting of a film or video production—including features, shorts, animation, live action or commercials. There will be discussions, examples, and several hands-on exercises to help students practice and perfect their skills. Prerequisite: Basic Drawing • W 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Greg Webb PMCG 250 3.0 C.E.U.s $395 REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Autodesk® Maya® I Fundamentals: 3D Modeling, Animation, and Rendering Autodesk Maya is the premiere 3D animation package used by filmmakers, architects, multimedia artists, and game designers. This introductory course using Autodesk Maya gives you a solid foundation in modeling, animating, lighting, texturing, and rendering within a 3D environment. You are expected to complete a final project consisting of a fully rendered 3D scene, complete with lights and materials. Topics include: navigating the 3D workspace, NURBS modeling techniques, basic animation skills, overview of 3D lighting design, creating isometric shading networks, applying texture and bump maps, and rendering scene files. Prerequisites: Photoshop or Illustrator or equivalent. 3D Computer Graphics Theory is recommended. • Section 1 (w): Th 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Frank Collazo, ACI • Section 2 (w): Su 9:30 am–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Daniel Krengiel • Section 3 (m): Su 9:30 am–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Frank Collazo, ACI PMCG 230 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Autodesk® Maya® and Autodesk® Mudbox™ Pipeline Integration This course will illustrate the Autodesk Maya to Mudbox workflow. In this series of classes, we will learn to texture a still life scene in Maya and Mudbox. The goal of this class is to demonstrate the use of texture projections in Mudbox to make photorealistic textures. Also we will set up Materials for hard surface, organic objects, and render it all out. We’ll finish up by bringing all of that detail back into Maya. Topics include: create and modify multiple texture channels, blend together multiple paint layers to achieve specific effects, create channels such as bump and specular, get textures back and forth between Maya and Mudbox, create our own Vector Displacement Maps that we can use to sculpt, cover the Mudbox paint layer functionality, and talk about new features in 2013 like uvless PTEX painting and layer mask. Prerequisite: Autodesk Maya Fundamentals • Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Frank Collazo, ACI PMCG 342 3.0 C.E.U.s $895 REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Autodesk® Maya® II: Modeling, Animation and Effects This intermediate course builds on the skills learned in the Autodesk Maya I Fundamentals course. The focus is on advanced modeling and animation techniques and applying visual effects to your scenes. Topics include: advanced modeling techniques using NURBS, polygons and subdivided surfaces, advanced texturing applications, dynamics properties within Autodesk Maya, and visual effects using particle systems. Prerequisite: Autodesk Maya I. • Section 1 (w): F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Daniel Krengiel PMCG 241 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Autodesk® Maya® Advanced Character Design This course begins with a conceptual and historical survey of caricature and character development. You will then sketch and develop pre-production studies of your characters, followed by demos on how to create realistic faces, hands, and clothing. The emphasis will be on the design of a specialized “look” to express character. Demos will also be made on production of the students’ own designs. Final projects will be short 10-second animations of characters, after students learn to create the specialized rigs and skinning techniques for their characters’ motions. Topics include: modeling a realistic head; subdivision surfaces; advanced organic modeling, including patch modeling for seamless NURBS characters; blend shape and other deformers; lip sync, animating with sound, and advanced rigging and skinning techniques. Prerequisite: Autodesk Maya II. • Section 1 (w): Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Daniel Krengiel PMCG 340 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Special Effects with Autodesk® Maya®

This workshop covers designing with Autodesk Maya Unlimited built-in plugins. Learn to use the deep menu sets of these tools to create a customized look that vastly expands the visual potential of 3D beyond the constraints of NURBS and polygonal geometry. Topics include: Autodesk Maya Paint, Cloth, Fur, and Fluid Effects. Prerequisites: Autodesk Maya II and a working knowledge of compositing software such as Shake, Combustion, or Adobe After Effects.

• Section 1 (w): W 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Matt Cornelius, ACI PMCG 341 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

• Section 3 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jul 22–26 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMCG 223 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Introduction to Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013

Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 Modeling, Materials, and Rendering II

With the introduction of new tools and workflow operations within Autodesk 3ds Max / Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design, this class is for people new to Autodesk 3ds Max /Autodesk 3ds Max Design as well as the seasoned user. Covering the changes and enhancements to the user interface this class will smooth the transition to the new version of Autodesk 3ds Max /Autodesk 3ds Max Design and set the stage for beginners to take further classes without worry. Topics include: manipulation of materials in the new Material Editor interface, customization of the user interface, the graphite tools, ribbon menu options, modeling enhancements, texture enhancements and options. • Section 1 (w): Th–F 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions May 23–24 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMAM 250 1.4 C.E.U.s $495

Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 Fundamentals: Modeling and Rendering I Creating amazing visual effects shots, animations, broadcast graphic designs, or high-end design visualization requires software that is flexible, open, and has the rich range of tools that free your talent to create mesmerizing 3D. That’s what Autodesk 3ds Max provides the user. This course is designed for the entry-level 3D artist. Through a series of small projects, students will learn the basic skill-sets and concepts. Topics include: navigation in 3D space; polygon and spline modeling; manipulation of objects; lighting interior and exterior spaces; photorealistic and procedural texturing; creating environmental effects; cameras; rendering and output techniques; and production and efficiencies tools. Each topic will be related to real-world production examples, as well as various professional fields—i.e. gaming, broadcast, Web production, and architecture. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of Windows, Computer Graphics Basics, and 3D Computer Graphics Theory are recommended. • Section 1 (w): Tu 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 24 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 3–7 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI

This course takes the seasoned Autodesk 3ds Max user through advanced concepts and techniques for creating complex models and materials. Learn to determine project needs and incorporate correct modeling concepts, material applications, and output methods for desired results. Develop the skills to outline, prepare, execute, and output a virtual environment. Topics include: advanced modifiers; creating advanced extrusions and latched surfaces; advanced lighting applications; incorporating patch and mesh modeling tools and techniques; and creating compound materials. Prerequisite: Autodesk 3ds Max Model and Rendering I. • Section 1 (w): W 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Frank Collazo, ACI • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 10–14 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMCG 240 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 Animation I This course is an introduction to Autodesk 3ds Max’s animation environment. Learn to analyze motion, overlapping activity, and deformations, which add clarity and strength to animation. Topics include: key framing, hierarchical relationships, animated camera movement, forward and inverse kinematics, object metamorphosis and adjustments to animated splines, track editing environment, expression keying, and traditional animation principles. Prerequisites: Autodesk 3ds Max Model and Rendering I. Design for Computer Animation recommended. • Section 1 (w): M 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 am–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 17–21 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI (all sections) PMCG 254 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

KEY (m) = Macintosh Platform (w) = Windows Platform


Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 Animation II This course is an in-depth continuation of Animation I. Numerous techniques related to subtle animation control and animation rendering are discussed, as you plan and execute a project. Topics include: inverse kinematics, character studio hierarchical linkage, mesh morphing, animated maps, and other advanced level animation techniques. Audience: Autodesk 3ds Max Animation I students; advanced computer animators who wish to become fluent in Autodesk 3ds Max. Prerequisites: Autodesk 3ds Max Animation I or advanced computer animation experience. • Section 1 (w): W 8:10–10:10 PM 15 sessions Fall 2013 • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 24–28 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI (all sections) PMCG 330 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 CAT Animation Character Animation Tools (CAT) opens a new avenue for Autodesk 3ds Max users. Combining procedural animation, collision detection for walking across uneven surfaces and full Mo-Cap/ Layering controls, CAT offers new levels of flexibility to animators. Able to work in combination with custom rigs, CAT offers new levels for the seasoned and beginner animators. Topics include: CAT interface, customization of preset CAT rigs, animation layering, collision detection, procedural animation, MoCap import, use with custom controls and custom rigging. Prerequisites: Autodesk 3ds Max Modeling and Rendering I, Autodesk 3ds Max Animation I, or equivalent experience. • Section 1 (w): W 8:10–10:10 PM 15 sessions Fall 2013 • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jul 8–12 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI (all sections) PMCG 260 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 Advanced Character Design (Modeling) The ability to create convincing 3D characters is a skill that requires the blending of art and science. This class will take you step-by-step through the process of creating finished 3D characters that have believability and appeal, using the latest professional techniques aimed at the game, film, and broadcast industries. By the end of this course, you will have completed a 3D character

in class, and will have stronger knowledge and insight into the world of professional character modeling. Topics include: creating character designs based on the study of anatomy, model sheets, reference imagery, and 3D production examples. A variety of modeling methods will be explored in detail, including Patch, Spline, and advanced polygonal surface construction, using native and add-on tool sets. The course also covers texturing and mapping techniques and the creation of custom shaders. Prerequisites: Autodesk 3ds Max Modeling, Materials, and Rendering II or the instructor’s approval. • Section 1 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions TBA Matt Cornelius, ACI Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMCG 331 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 Advanced Projects For course description, please visit our Website: pratt.edu/prostudies. Prerequisites: Advanced Character Design and Advanced Character Animation required. • Student can arrange to take Advanced Projects course with special arrangements. Please contact Perry Han, phan@pratt.edu and Eric Kachelhofer, kman@kmanstudios.com PMCG 337 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Animating with Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 and Character Studio Biped Autodesk 3ds Max and Character Studio (CS) provide professional tools for animating 3D characters, whether you are creating character animation for games, film or broadcast. The CS feature set allows the animator to create customized armatures, procedural animation, free-form animation, animating with motion capture, and nonlinear clip blending and transitioning. The CS allows the production of biped character rigs quickly and effortlessly; in this class you will be taken through the process of creating character animation from the customized CS rigs through a final rendered animation. You will become familiar with all of the components of the CS: using the biped with footstep animation, pose-to-pose animating, importing motion capture, the motion mixer for blending, and non-linear animation of the biped. By the end of the course you will have an in-depth knowledge of the functionality and capabilities of CS and animating with the CS biped. Topics include: creating and managing

the biped hierarchy, weighting character mesh to the CS biped, pose-to-pose animation, animating with motion capture data, saving animation clips, nonlinear animation with the motion mixer, blending and transitioning motions. Prerequisite: Autodesk 3ds Max Animation I or the instructor’s approval. Recommended audience: This course is recommended for 3D artists, architects, and designers wanting to include character animation in their projects, as well as traditional animators looking to move to 3D character animation and 3D animators wanting to learn the Autodesk 3ds Max Character Studio tool set. This course is also great for those who wish to get into 3D character animation for film or broadcast and especially for games. • Section 1 (w): F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jul 15–19 Matt Cornelius, ACI (all sections) PMCG 261 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Autodesk® 3ds Max® Game Level and Character Design Making a 3D game is a ton of work. From gathering assets (sounds, textures, special effects) to creating model animations and level placement, this course takes you step by step into the virtual world of 3D games using Autodesk 3ds Max as the software. At the end of the course you will have all your 3D models for characters, enemies, power ups, and levels. This course is for creating characters, enemies, power ups, scenery, and animations all within Autodesk 3ds Max. It will give you the prototype to any video game demo you wish to create in 3D. Storyboards, models, and object placement will be explored as you delve into professional level and character design. If you ever wanted to create 3D video game levels and characters and have fun while you do it, this course is for you. Topics include: use of Autodesk 3ds Max for all your assets, how to turn your 3D video game demo idea into a reality, game specific modeling standards (high vs. low poly), why is image tiling so important yet sometimes done so poorly, how to keep the players interested in your art, what makes an enemy stand out, and more. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Autodesk 3ds Max construction. • Section 1 (w): Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Gabe Walter PMCG 243 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

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Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 Advanced Game Character Modeling for Next-Gen Games Character modeling—to create a character in 3D from a concept—is a very satisfying job. Creating character models for next-gen games requires an understanding of the limitations of the game engine. Using the Autodesk 3ds Max tool set and modeling in various methods you will gain a greater knowledge of how to approach different modeling tasks for elements of the character. Knowing how the character will be rendered with the game engine will give you greater insight into the process of game character creation. Details ranging from poly counts to texture requirements and how the character will be animated will determine how the character is modeled. This course will take you through the steps of creating detailed character models and modeling workflows to create the final in-game character. The aim of the course is to have you finish with a completed character model within a game engine. Topics include: setting up the Autodesk 3ds Max scene for modeling; modeling methods and workflows; advanced polygonal surface construction; box modeling; edge loop modeling; creating fine details; game engine requirements; managing poly counts; texturing and normal maps. Prerequisite: Autodesk 3ds Max Modeling, Materials, and Rendering II or the instructor’s approval. Recommended audience: 3D Artists and Designers looking to bring their character concepts to a 3D polygonal model ready to be rigged and animated. Follow this course with the Character Studio Animation course and bring your complete models with you to create model and animation pieces for your 3D reel. • Section 1 (w): Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Fall 2013 Matt Cornelius, ACI (all sections) PMCG 264 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Special Effects (FX) with Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013

This course will teach Autodesk 3ds Max users how to accomplish special effects in the Autodesk 3ds Max environment. Autodesk 3ds Max is being used more and more in film and television arenas to create special effects. As a result of a complete rewrite of Autodesk 3ds Max’s particle system, there is a new way

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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to accomplish this without the need for expensive plug-ins. With the bar being raised at every turn in animation, you will learn how to make hair and clothing for your characters as well as how to make realistic fire and other special effects in film and 3D animations. Topics include: particles for simulating dynamics with event-based (procedural) animation that expands the special effects artist/animators’ palette in an ever more demanding work place; the use of the native Autodesk 3ds Max environment vs. purchased plug-ins; specific plug-ins and reactor (part of Autodesk 3ds Max). Prerequisite: Autodesk 3ds Max. • Section 1 (w): F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 • Section 2 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jul 29–Aug 2 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI (all sections) PMCG 333 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

platform, Autodesk Matchmover can match your photographs and moving footage and output proper camera information to your package for integration of 3D elements. Using preset footage and footage shot for the class, students will track, match and export camera information to their appropriate package(s). Upon completion of export, you will then import your camera data into the package of choice and integrate a 3D element with the footage. Topics include: import of camera elements and tracking data for proper creation of virtual camera for export. Import of camera data and creation of elements for compositing. Prerequisite: Computer competency or equivalent experience. • Section 1 (w): M–Tu 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Jul 1–2 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMAM 251 1.4 C.E.U.s $495

Character Animation for Video See pages 27–28 for the following course descriptions. AIA Architectural Design with Autodesk 3ds Max Design AIA Architectural Rendering and Lighting in Autodesk 3ds Max Design AIA Architectural Visualization using AutoCAD, Autodesk Revit and Autodesk 3ds Max Design AIA Autodesk 3ds Max Design Intensive Workshop

Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design 2013 Advanced Lighting Scene lighting and animated lighting are crucial in the design of animation projects. This workshop analyzes the lighting concepts and techniques used in film, video, and computer animation, and shows you how to achieve these effects efficiently in Autodesk 3ds Max Design. Topics include: the effects of various types of light sources, setting environmental tone, specific lighting cues used to accentuate storyline, tips and tricks for faking high-end effects. Prerequisite: Autodesk 3ds Max Model and Rendering I. • Section 1 (w): W–F 9 AM–5 PM 3 sessions May 29–31 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMAM 224 2.1 C.E.U.s $655

Camera Matching with Autodesk® Matchmover 2013 Camera matching has never been easier than with Autodesk Matchmover. No matter what your visualization REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

See page 19 for course description.

Introduction to Autodesk® MotionBuilder® 2013

This course is designed to introduce users to Autodesk MotionBuilder software. Autodesk MotionBuilder is used widely throughout the 3D industry for character biped and quadruped animation. Through this course you will learn the MotionBuilder interface and what can be done with Autodesk MotionBuilder. By the end of the course you will have discovered what Autodesk MotionBuilder is best at: character rigging, using motion capture, retargeting motions and animation, augmenting motion capture with animation, and animation with motion blending. Topics include: the Autodesk MotionBuilder interface and tool sets, importing and exporting motion data, retargeting and the standard character rig, blending motion and the story window, editing F-curves, lighting, and rendering. Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites, though an understanding of 3D computer-generated imagery for film or game concepts is preferred. Previous use of a 3D graphics package will help. Recommended audience: This course is recommended for those looking to work with motion capture data and animators wanting to learn the Autodesk MotionBuilder tool set. • Section 1 (w): Sa 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20

• Section 2 (w): M–Th 9 AM–5:30 PM 4 sessions Jun 17–20 Matt Cornelius, ACI (all sections) PMCG 262 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Introduction to Motion Capture This class is designed to introduce you to the uses of motion capture in various industries such as animation, games, and broadcast. We will take a day trip to a professional motion capture production facility. You will gain real world working experience in a professional motion capture studio with a 24-camera Phasespace system. Learn both the creative and technical aspects as well as how to effectively use motion capture in your project. You will investigate the Mocap pipeline and various hardware, software, and data file formats used for motion capture. Through this course you will explore animation workflows to utilize motion capture effectively in your projects. At course completion, you will understand motion capture and its uses in various media applications, strengths and drawbacks, and how it is used by studios to accomplish realistic motion in a variety of programs such as Autodesk 3ds Max, Autodesk Maya, and Autodesk MotionBuilder. Topics include: Motion Capture overview, Mocap pipeline, various types of systems and data formats, uses for ingame animation, non-linear animation for film, cleanup and application, and motion capture animation workflows. Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites but an understanding of 3D computergenerated imagery for film or game concepts is preferred. Previous use of Autodesk 3ds Max, Autodesk Maya, or Autodesk MotionBuilder will help. Recommended audience: This course is recommended for producers and directors who wish to gain an overview and information of the Motion Capture pipeline, as well as 3D animators looking for workflows to animate with Mocap data. Please note: Please include Motion Capture Studio Fee of $250 for one day usage. This is in addition to the tuition and all other fees. • Section 1 (w): M–Tu 9 AM–5:30 PM 4 sessions Jul 8–9, 15–16 Matt Cornelius, ACI PMCG 263 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Introduction to Special Effects with Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013 and Autodesk® Composite®

This one-day workshop will introduce the concepts of special effects created inside Autodesk 3ds Max and the use

of Autodesk Composite to create content for any kind of project. Topics include: the introduction of Autodesk 3ds Max as a special effects tool; introduction to Particle Flow; use of image types and the flexibility inherent in each; using Autodesk 3ds Max with Autodesk Composite. Prerequisites: Autodesk 3ds Max Modeling and Rendering I. • Section 1 (w): W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 3 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMAM 262 .7 C.E.U.s $225

Autodesk® Mudbox™

There’s a load of software out there to help you get the job done. But not too many of them are revolutionary. Autodesk Mudbox is such a software. What would have taken a lot of planning, modeling, and rigging can now be done in a tiny fraction of the time, with much easier tools using Autodesk Mudbox. More energy can be spent on creative purposes and less energy on having to learn foreign icons and unintuitive placements of those tools. From the interface to the manageable prototype process, all the beginning steps will be covered in this course. Along with mini-assignments and lessons, an overall project will be preplanned and due at the end of the course based on your own original designs. Characters will be developed and refined! Topics include: Autodesk Mudbox character placement; tool usages for figures (life forms vs. mechanical objects); tools for details, higher mesh states; coloring schemes, materials, references; development of your characters; midterm/refining; lighting scene merging; Autodesk 3ds Max workflow; replacing different states/adding 3ds props; poses/animations in Autodesk 3ds Max; and adding refinements. • Section 1 (w): Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Gabe Walter PMCG 258 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Product Visualization in Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013

Learn special techniques to bring your client’s products to life using techniques that present products for client approval and advertisement. You will create hyper-realistic images using specialized methods that streamline texture creation and environment usage that focuses attention on the product. You will learn how to create images that are able to be used in high-end print, animation, and pre-visualization and reduce the reliance on post production to correct for client demands. Topics include: Creation of models, cre-


ation of specialized textures, preparation for various media and their respective needs, creation of ‘in-camera’ compositing, interpretation of product and environment manipulation. Prerequisites: Autodesk 3ds Max Modeling and Rendering I or equivalent experience. • Section 1 (w): M-W 9 AM–5 PM 3 sessions May 20–22 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMAM 261 2.1 C.E.U.s $795

Special Projects Independent Study Advanced 3ds Max students can arrange to take a special projects seminar with Eric Kachelhofer, kman@kmanstudios.com. You will be consulting with Eric on projects for your portfolio with advanced assignments. For further information, please contact Perry Han, phan@pratt.edu. • PMCG 601 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Texturing Autodesk® 3ds Max® 2013

With Autodesk 3ds Max users have the ability to paint directly on their models directly inside the program as well as a completely revamped material editor. Autodesk 3ds Max has enhanced all aspects of texturing to allow greater flexibility for users of all fields. Learn how to make natural looking textures and import/export to and from various programs for pipeline needs. Topics include: baking materials directly into various channels to control every aspect of the look and feel of your models. Import and export of textures for pipeline needs in various discipline needs. Customization of materials for unique project looks and needs. Navigating the new Autodesk 3ds Max /Autodesk 3ds Max Design material editor. Prerequisites: Autodesk 3ds Max Modeling or equivalent experience. • Section 1 (w) : Tu–W 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Aug 6–7 Eric Kachelhofer, ACI PMAM 252 1.4 C.E.U.s $495

The Importance of Interior Design in Film and Television: Using Autodesk® 3ds Max®

Most scenes on television and films take place in interiors that look real. After involved research, these interiors are specifically designed and made to represent a reality according to the story, in front of a camera. Topics include: focusing on how important interior design is to films and television. You will pick two or three

interior scenes from either films and/ or television series of your choice and learn how to recreate and visualize the specific interiors as they would appear on the set with the different camera placements, using Autodesk 3ds Max. Class will include guests from the entertainment industry (i.e. production designers and/or art directors) to comment on student projects. Recommended audience: professional designers, architects, or others who wish to explore this subject. Prerequisite: Autodesk 3ds Max Registration deadline: Jan 28 • Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Merope Vachlioti PMCG 265 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

D I G I TA L VI D EO A N D AUD I O Our digital video and audio courses are useful for artists and designers interested in incorporating multiple media into existing projects and the professional who needs these tools for post-production and final output.

Adobe After Effects CS6: I Adobe After Effects is essential for digital artists interested in 2D or 3D animation, digital video, Web video, broadcast graphics, and film. Examine composition and animation, using Adobe After Effects. You will produce several weekly assignments as well as a final project of your own design. Topics include: working with existing visual materials; layer compositing, rendering, and outputting movies; special effects; key-frame animation controls; and other production techniques. Aesthetic problems include motion, transparency, textures, transitions, camera movement, music, and structure. Software tools include: Adobe After Effects, Photoshop, Illustrator, Sound Booth, and Painter. Prerequisites: Imaging I or equivalent are required. Experience with timebased media is recommended. • Section 1 (w): M 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Irina Yakubov PMCG 436 3.0 C.E.U.s $855

Adobe After Effects CS6: II This course will focus on the role of the After Effects animator in the production pipeline. Topics include: advanced key-framing and motion, keying (blue-screening) and compositing techniques, 3D camera matching, motion tracking and

stabilization, advanced 3D and lighting, working with effects and tools, working with time, Expressions (After Effect’s scripting language). Also, discussions will cover a variety of common challenges faced in the production environment. Software tools include: After Effects, Photoshop, Illustrator, as well as a brief exploration of several 3D packages. Prerequisite: Adobe After Effects I • Section 1 (w): Tu 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Wesley Townsend PMCG 440 3.0 C.E.U.s $855

Non-Linear Editing and Video Effects with Final Cut Pro This course is a comprehensive overview of non-linear editing using Apple’s popular and powerful Final Cut Pro software. The course is designed to give an overall feel for Final Cut Pro. It starts with the basics and will go as far as title creation and video effects. The course focuses on the application, its interface, and relevant technicalities. Editing techniques, aesthetics, theory and basic production concepts will also be discussed. You will learn to edit shots, capture video, organize footage, edit and mix sound, apply transitions and effects, layer and composite video tracks, and output to various formats. Topics include: hardware configuration, working with time code, traditional editing techniques in digital media, capturing setups, basic sound editing and audio mixing, key framing, filters, titles, compositions, exporting footage, outputting to tape, media management, and editing terminology. Prerequisite: Comfort with Mac OS X is required. Highly recommended: some previous experience working with any Web, video, sound, or graphic applications. You may contact the instructor if unsure about these recommendations. • Section 1 (m): Tu 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Shachar Langlev PMCG 434 3.0 C.E.U.s $855

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other applications. The emphasis is on a mastery of all the applications in the Final Cut Studio 2 suite. Topics include: advanced media management; multi-resolution editing; advanced titles; post-syncing video and sound elements; basic effects, split screens; nesting; masking, and mattes; keying; compositing; color correction, and finishing. Tools include: Final Cut Pro, After Effects, Photoshop and helper applications. A digital video camera is recommended if a student wants to work on an individual project, but it is not required. Prerequisite: Non-Linear Editing with Final Cut Pro. • Section 1 (m): W 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Lauren Petty PMCG 462 3.0 C.E.U.s $855

2D Character Animation for Video With Flash CS6 you can draw, design, storyboard and animate 2D characters using digital pen with traditional animation techniques. Topics include: Animation production methods such as inverse kinematics (IK Motion using bone tool), building nested graphic and movie clip symbols for animation, create animated walk cycles, use motion tweening tools, generate sprite sheets, lip sync plugins and more. In addition to weekly animation assignments you will be compositing your flash animations in After Effects CS6 and experiment with special effects, rending video movies for broadcast, web video and mobile video. Prerequisite: Flash I, Traditional Animation I, or equivalent experience. • Section 1: M 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Lee Corey PMCG 483 3.0 C.E.U.s $855

DRAFTING A ND MODE LING ON THE MAC

Advanced Techniques in Final Cut Pro

AIA AutoCAD® 2013 Professional Level I on the MAC

This course is designed for those who have a basic understanding of Final Cut Pro and want to go beyond an introductory skill set. The emphasis is on advanced editing techniques using FCP. Students are encouraged to work on independent projects with the instructor’s guidance, to combine motion graphics and other media to enhance their projects, and to integrate their FCP workflow with

See page 24 for course description.

• Section 3 (m): W 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Chris Ramirez • Section 6 (m): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions TBA Phil Gauntt, ACI 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMA 401 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Autodesk® Maya® I Fundamentals: 3D Modeling, Animation, and Rendering on the Mac See page 16 for course description. • Section 3 (m): Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Frank Collazo, ACI PMCG 230 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

EL EC T R O N IC P U B L IS H IN G AND DI G ITA L A RT These classes focus on the computer as a design and imaging tool. They are appropriate for artists and designers going into all areas of digital media. See page 3 for the following course description. Introduction to Graphic Design

Adobe Illustrator CS6: Graphic Illustration I Adobe Illustrator is the premiere program in the computer graphics industry for Vector Drawing. It is easily the best program to learn how to create smooth-lined, clean, scalable graphics for both print and the Web. This course is an introduction to this friendly environment. Topics include: the basics of drawing with a strong emphasis on the drawing tools and the new color tools; Pathfinder; layers; importing Photoshop, or raster files. Type in all variations and functionality. Weekly assignments will be made leading to a portfolio piece at the end of the course. Prerequisites: Computer Comp. (Mac/PC). • Section 1 (m): Tu 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Herman Schaper • Section 2 (m): Tu 3–6 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Joe Miceli • Section 3 (w): M 3–6 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Joe Miceli PMCG 202 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Adobe Illustrator CS6: Graphic Illustration II This course is a continuation of the study of the more complex variations and advanced tools of Adobe Illustrator. Topics include: more advanced tools to illustrate and create vector drawings for different media such as magazines, products, patterns, logos and websites. Weekly assignments will be made leading to a portfolio piece at the end of the course. REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Prerequisites: Graphic Illustration I or

permission of instructor. • Section 1 (m): Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Carla Douglass PMCG 420 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Adobe Illustrator for Fashion Design Adobe Illustrator is the fashion industry standard for creating fashion flats. You will gain an excellent understanding of the tools needed to create fashion designs. Topics Include: an in-depth understanding of how the Pen Tool works in order to obtain a high proficiency level to create drawings. All aspects of drawing flats, garment design and working with images and color, multiple layers and special effects. You will be able to create fabric and trim libraries, stitch effects, and/or repeat prints. Prerequisites: Computer Competency (Mac/PC). • Section 1 (m): F 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Joe Miceli PMCG 477 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Adobe InDesign CS6 InDesign is an extremely capable design and production tool with unparalleled precision and control, and seamless integration with Adobe’s professional graphics applications, including Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. InDesign is capable of producing professional-quality, full-color output on high-volume color printing presses and also supports a wide range of output devices and formats such as desktop printers, PDF files, and HTML files. Simply put, it is Adobe’s alternative to QuarkXPress, with equal control capability in the sleek interface we’ve come to expect form Adobe’s suite of applications. Topics include: setting up your document; working with frames; creating and applying colors, tints, and gradients; importing and editing text; working with typography; importing and linking graphics; drawing; using advanced frame techniques; color management; ensuring consistent color and preparing documents for high resolution printing. Prerequisite: Computer Comp. (Mac). • Section 1 (m): Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Steven Newman • Section 2 (m): F 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Harley Goode

• Section 3 (m): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions Jun 5–7, 12–14 Joe Miceli PMCG 303 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Advanced Adobe InDesign CS6 with Photoshop and Illustrator Since its release, InDesign—with its consistency of color and commands across these three invaluable graphic artists’ tools—has steadily drawn more and more converts from QuarkXpress. This course is recommended for those wishing to extend their Adobe skills in all three programs with emphasis on InDesign and those who wish to integrate these three standards of the digital design studio. Topics include: utilizing Adobe’s big three in document layout, typesetting, and combining vector art and raster art to design and produce work for both print and the Web. Prerequisite: Adobe InDesign I, Graphic Illustration I, and Imaging I, at a minimum. • Section 1 (m): Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 • Section 2 (m): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions Jun 19–21, 26–28 Joe Miceli (all sections) PMCG 352 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Branding and Licensing for the Illustrator

printing resources will be discussed. Prerequisite: Photoshop: Imaging I or

equivalent experience. • Th 9 am–5 PM 1 session Jul 11 Tracy Toler PMCS 253 .7 C.E.U.s $225

Create a Professional Design Portfolio Your portfolio is your image. It represents who you are and what you are capable of. It is the key to success in the highly competitive business of graphics. Whether you are a beginner who is creating a portfolio for the first time or a more experienced designer who wants to upgrade your presentation, this course will teach you how best to present your unique identity. Learn how to put together a memorable portfolio from a professional with years of experience as a senior art director and designer. Topics include: intensive hands-on skills that will integrate Adobe InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop. Prerequisite: You must have a good knowledge of Adobe InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop. • Section 1 (m): Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Joe Miceli PMCG 510 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

This course is for illustrators to develop their work and distribute to the public as a brand. The focus of the class will be to develop a product with your artwork, create a brand and its concept, select a target market, and create a Keynote document to present your brand to licensing companies. Topics include: introduction to Keynote, study of illustrators in the mainstream, proofing assembly of products, analysis of product demographics in large communities, and marketing to the public in the modern era. This is a course for illustrators to develop their work and distribute to the public as a brand. Prerequisites: Photoshop: Imaging I or permission of instructor; please email instructor at carla@carlotas.com.br. • Section 1 (m): Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Carla Douglass PMCG 511 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Digital Photography I and ll

Color Management Workshop

Photoshop CS6: Imaging I

Have you ever wondered how to make your prints match what is on your monitor? Then this workshop is for you. This workshop will cover color management in Photoshop. Topics include: discussions of paper profiles, monitor calibration, inks and

Learn the basic tools and techniques of Adobe Photoshop, the premier image editing program used by professionals for image/photo manipulation, color correction, retouching, compositing and more. Gain the skills and confidence to work with this

See page 10 for course description.

Photoshop Beauty Retouching This workshop will focus primarily on fashion and beauty retouching. Retouching skin and maintaining texture will be the focus of the course. Topics include: specialized training of color correction, burning/dodging and use of the paint tools will be covered. Students must have an advanced knowledge of Photoshop with an understanding of Layers and Channels. Students will be provided images to retouch. Prerequisite: Photoshop: Imaging I or equivalent experience. Knowledge of Photoshop with an understanding of Layers and Channels. • Th 9 AM–3 PM 2 sessions Jul 18–25 Tracy Toler PMCS 254 1.0 C.E.U.s $355


versatile program used by graphic designers, illustrators, retouchers, production/prepress, Web designers, photographers, and animators. Topics include: the bridge; workspace and navigation; tools; improved selections; layers; resolution; color modes; content fills, image editing and retouching; painting; masking; intro to paths and shape layers; filters and effects; saving for print and Web, and an introduction to automated commands. Prerequisite: Computer Competency (Mac/PC). • Section 1 (m): Tu 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Marisa Baumgartner • Section 2 (m): Tu 3–6 PM 10 sessions Fall 2013 Cheryl Stockton PMCG 422 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Photoshop CS6: Imaging II This course is designed for experienced Photoshop users in all graphic fields and focuses on advanced and newly created additions to Photoshop. Work with complex selections, learn advanced retouching, montage, and compositing photos to create a seamless image. Vector shapes and custom Photoshop brushes will be discussed. Color correction and management will be covered in detail. Workflow options include actions, batching, and other automated tasks. Topics include: color correction and retouching; utilizing masks; alpha channels; color spaces and modes; RAW file processing, custom brushes; advanced layering techniques; automated batch techniques, and digital photography. Prerequisite: Imaging I: Photoshop or Photoshop: Imaging I. • Section 1 (m): Th 3–6 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Tracy Toler • Section 2 (m): Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Kevin Zupp PMCG 425 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Photoshop for Photographers This course is for photographers who want to learn enhanced techniques in digital imaging to make images look their best. Topics include: optimizing tone and color, retouching and repairing, some filters, exposure correction and enhancement, alpha channels, various high-end selection techniques including paths, converting color images to black and white, advanced layering and masking techniques, some non-destructive filters and resolution

issues, prepping for print and the Web. Prerequisite: Photoshop: Imaging I.

• Section 1 (m): Th 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Marisa Baumgartner PMCG 442 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Photoshop Montage and Collage The difference between this course and other Photoshop classes is that, here, we will consider the creative process at the same time we discuss specific techniques. This class is geared to designers who already understand the basic functionality of Photoshop’s many tools. The challenge is not how to use each of these tools individually, but how to use them together to transform simple images into creative and unique works of art. Topics include: selection strategies and essentials; removing the background; making complex selections (hair and fine detail); the power of layer masking; strengths and weaknesses of Paths; enhancing image focus; mastering curves; color correction techniques; adjustment layers; understanding the Blending modes; the Zen of Alpha channels; image calculations; photography for compositing; photorealistic compositing; creative compositing. You will also learn how to stitch photos together for panoramas. Prerequisite: Basic Photoshop tools and a digital camera. Ideally, the camera should have at least some ability to manually override the automatic settings, so you can change the settings creatively. • Section 1 (m): Su 9:30 Am–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Melody Reed PMCG 458 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Photoshop Retouching This course provides an overview of the problems retouchers must solve. Recommended for anyone doing visual manipulation, photography, computer graphics, and illustration. Topics include: various high-end selection techniques including paths, shadows, and hair. Photo-compositing, assessing and manipulating color, alpha channels, masking techniques, various high-end selection techniques, gamma, curves, some non-destructive filters, blending modes, and prepping for print and the Web. Prerequisite: Photoshop: Imaging I. • Section 1 (m): W 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Marisa Baumgartner PMCG 426 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

INTE RACTIVE ME DIA AND THE INTE RNE T Interactive media courses range from design and organizational classes to hands-on courses in which students create educational, personal, gaming, and other types of interactive media for the Web, DVDs and mobile devices.

Survey of New Media in Design: Interactive Media and the Internet This intensive survey course will focus on the landscape of New Media relevant to contemporary design practice. Lectures and discussions will examine New Media in the context of design in 2D, 3D, motion and interactive work, examining the themes, processes, methodologies, and production of communication in New Media. The term New Media is used broadly to refer to a variety of new communication modalities relating to the Internet and its current and future directions. Class time will be dedicated to discussing themes and trends, discovering and examining innovative New Media design work, and exploring its inherent themes and processes. These discussions will be applied in hands-on projects and assignments throughout the semester, providing a foundation of understanding and articulation in New Media, for the development and production of projects using the ideas, processes, and methodologies discussed. The goal of this course is to explore New Media as a subset of Communication Design, and as a tool for exploring new modes of visual (and other) communication. The course introduces you to New Media in a design context, exploring various techniques and examples of possible application. We will examine current software and languages— industry standard and open source— exploring different avenues of production for different types of projects. You will be required to demonstrate technical and theoretical knowledge in New Media and design, mostly in interactive assignments. Final project will incorporate areas of study determined by the individual student mid-semester, developed in consultation with the professor. Final project will be discussed more in depth towards mid-semester. Topics include: Design discipline mutations as a response to New Media and the evolution of visual communication. Trends in Design Practice: Service Design, Collaborative Consumption, Crowdsourcing, Human-Computer Interaction, 3D

summer 2013

Printing, Mobile First, Responsive Web Design, Gestural Interfaces (and non-interfaces—thought controlled interfaces), Skeuomorphics, Gamification, Autonomic Computing and algorithmic design, Reflexive Design, Interdisciplinarity. Trends in Design Theory: Quantified Self, HumanComputer Interaction, Privacy, Identity, Transmedia, Future Communication (transhumanist philosophies), Crowdsourcing, Open Source, Open data and data ethics, Geolocation, RFID and Ubiquitous Computing, Next Nature. New Media Production: Processes, Methodologies, Software and Tools, Prototyping and Testing, Production. Introduction to HTML5, CSS, Javascript, JQuery, and interactive software. Prerequisite: Familiarity with HTML and CSS, Internet proficiency. An open and engaged mind! Recommended Audience: Design is a practice of visual articulation, with New Media offering thoughts, processes, and understanding of the progress and possibilities of communication on a macro scale. This course introduces design professionals interested in addressing, discussing and applying emergent themes in communication theory to their own practices in design. • Section 1 (m): Sa 9:30 Am–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18– Jul 20 Christina Latina PMCG 306 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Design for the Web This is a Web design class using Photoshop, some Fireworks and CSS to learn what is involved in creative frontend design. This class will give you the opportunity to conceive and design your own site with faculty critique. You will learn terminology, design principles, what is involved in the design process, preproduction, layout and design through production. Topics include: your target audience and research; designing a site that can be built using standards; the user; browsers and screen real estate; accessibility; setting up Photoshop for Web design; resolution—both screen and image; color and typography; information and navigation design; creative concepts; layout; file formats and image compression; fonts on the Web; responsive design, percentage or liquid design, and more. Prerequisite: Photoshop: Imaging I. Computer facilities fee: $25

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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• Section 1 (m): Th 3-6 PM 10 sessions Fall 2013 Cheryl Stockton PMCG 308 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Dreamweaver CS6 with Fireworks: I In this hands-on course you will learn to create Web pages visually as well as gain skills in HTML and basic CSS in Dreamweaver. You will learn the difference of prototyping a design in Photoshop/Fireworks, then slice, optimize and prepare your graphics for the Web using Fireworks. These files will be organized in preparation for using them to develop and build your design in Dreamweaver. Topics include: site management, Dreamweaver interface, formatting text; introduction to html and cascading style sheets (CSS); creating, optimizing and slicing images in Fireworks; importing the resultant HTML into Dreamweaver; creating pages and style sheets in Dreamweaver; page design grids with and without tables. Prerequisite: Internet proficiency, familiarity with Photoshop. Basic HTML helpful, but not required. • Section 1 (m): Sa 9:30 am–12:30 pm 10 sessions May 18–Jul 27 Russell Ferguson • Section 2 (m): M–W 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions Jul 22–24, 29–31 Mark Solomon PMCG 324 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Dreamweaver II: Web Standards– Content, Presentation, and Behaviors This course will focus on the next level Dreamweaver usage for Web standards compliant Website Development. We cover topics such as text styling, element positioning, as well as CSS Sprites, floats, D.O.M. or Document Object Model, clearing floats, Reset Style sheets, S.E.O. or search engine optimization, all while keeping a user centered design. Exploring the Adobe Spry Java-Script Framework, we will add some interactive elements to your static Web pages while maintaining accessibility with progressive enhancement strategies. You will be surprised by the ease of use that results from employing JavaScript libraries in the WYSIWYG environment of Dreamweaver. Topics include: a fast-paced review of (X)HTML in Dreamweaver on day one. The main focus of this course is on clean code, advanced CSS and JavaScript basics 101 using a JavaScript Library. Also included is best pracREGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

tice for Web design, Web standards, Section 508—accessibility checklists, CSS sprites, creating a style guide, creating print-only style sheet and mobile-only style sheet, form styling, client-side form validation, creating page layouts without tables, many uses of unordered lists as navigation bars, including pop-out menus, CSS pseudo class. Spry Dynamic animation effects, Spry widgets/components (i.e. tab panels, menus, and accordion panel), a fast-paced review of (X)HTML with CSS. Recommended audience: useful for those who have taken Dreamweaver I (or equivalent) and want to continue learning by adding interactivity to static Web documents and more advanced design strategies. • Section 1 (m): F 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Jerome Amos PMCG 468 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Flash CS6: I Flash is the standard for interactive vector graphics and animation for the Web. Web designers use Flash to create beautiful, resizable, and extremely compact interfaces, technical illustrations, long-form animations, and other dazzling effects for your Website. Flash’s vector graphics capabilities ensure your graphics are smooth, scalable, and compact. Prerequisite: Mac Graphic Illustration I. Experience with 2D animation and interactive designing helpful. • Section 1 (m): M 12–3 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Renee Levitt • Section 2 (m): Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Eric Bintner • Section 3 (w): F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Eric Bintner • Section 4 (m): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions Jul 10–12, 17–19 Renee Levitt PMCG 438 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Flash CS6 II: Action Scripting Flash has matured over the years to be a feature-rich application capable of not just animation but interactive applications. In order to take advantage of the interactive nature of Flash, one must get familiar with Actionscript, Flash’s programming language. Using ActionScript a person can develop projects that range from image galleries to full blown desktop applications. Topics include: introduction to programming by way of ActionScript 3, the language of the Flash Platform. Understanding how to deal with external media such as images, sound and

video. Using XML as a data source for interactive applications. Prerequisite: Must have a familiarity with Flash Professional. • Section 1 (m): Tu 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Russell Ferguson PMCG 444 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Flash CS6 III: Advanced Action Scripting As you have developed projects with Flash, you may want to add additional capabilities from third-party developers or reuse features that you have developed in the past. After having a firm foundation of programming concepts the next step is to get familiar with more advanced features of ActionScipt. Topics include: how to develop reusable code by creating external ActionScript files. object-oriented programming (OOP) techniques will be discussed. Prerequisite: Must have a familiarity with Flash Professional and experience with ActionScript 3. • Section 1 (m): Sa 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Russell Ferguson PMCG 455 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Great Web Design with CSS: Cascading Style Sheets In this class we will thoroughly examine all aspects of the cascade in CSS and its most widely supported style properties in today’s Web browsers. You will learn how to use CSS specifications and then create style rules that best leverage the elements of the cascade. Topics include: hands-on exercises that demonstrate how to create effective typography, layout without the use of HTML tables, rollover links, floating images, and the use of CSS to print Web pages. We will also be exploring CSS3, which will revolutionize Web page design. For the class project you will create and optimize one Web page template. Prerequisite: A good knowledge of XHTML/HTML. Recommended audience: Those with a graphic design background and programmers, site owners, and developers who are interested in bringing an efficient and sophisticated styling sensibility to their sites. • Section 1 (w): M 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 Bud Kraus PMCG 317 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Introduction to HTML and CSS Develop fundamental Web design skills with HTML and CSS. We will use a text editor to learn how to make Web pages “by hand,” an essential skill when working with Web page editors such as Dreamweaver. Learn how to work with text markup, lists, links, tables, forms, and get a introduced to CSS, the system responsible for Web page style, layout and typography. Create a Website of your choosing as the final project. Prerequisite: Imaging I, Internet Proficiency. • Section 1 (w): W 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Bud Kraus PMCG 325 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Online and SOCIAL ME D I A Marketing Marketing is the core of commerce—it’s the art and science of bringing products to market and introducing them to consumers. And while marketing creative strategies and outlets are always evolving, nothing has shaken up the industry nearly as much as social media and other online outreach opportunities. This program is for marketers, brand managers, product developers, artists, and entrepreneurs who want to more fully understand how to use social media outlets and other online media to sell products and reach new audiences. We’ll explore social and online media from both theoretical and practical standpoints, from basic introductions to advanced insights. See pages 31–32 for complete program and course descriptions.

KEY (m) = Macintosh Platform (w) = Windows Platform (AIA) = AIA Professional


P R OG R AM M IN G These courses are for the artist who wishes to have greater technical control over his or her final piece, and for design professionals who work with programmers on a day-to-day basis.

Interactive Web Design with jQuery jQuery is JavaScript libraries that help Web developers and designers to create JavaScript applications that work well in any browser. This class demonstrates how to use jQuery to reduce the amount of code you need to write and reduce the amount of testing that is required. You will see how the separation of presentation (CSS), markup (XHTML), and script (JavaScript and Ajax) in Web pages is a crucial direction in Web development for creating maintainable, accessible, cost-effective websites. JavaScript is an important feature of every major browser because it enables enhanced user interaction on both websites and Web applications. You’ll gain a clear understanding of the components that make up a JavaScript implementation, plus you’ll examine critical areas including events and browser detection techniques so you can build dynamic user interfaces. Topics include: important Document Object Model (DOM) concepts; crossbrowser animation and effects using a small amount of JavaScript code; methods for handling events to tie JavaScript to a Web user interface; techniques for validating data, sorting tables, and dealing with errors; how to communicate between JavaScript and browsers; security issues, optimization, and intellectual property protection. Prerequisite: Dreamweaver II or by faculty permission. • Section 1 (m): Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Jerome Amos PMCG 473 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Introduction to MAXScript for AEC Professionals See page 28 for course description.

Introduction to PHP Programming for the Web PHP is a popular, open-source, serverside programming language that can be used for basic to complex websites for free. This course will provide you with a working knowledge of the fundamentals of structured programming with PHP. We will build real-world PHP programs from start to finish, with an emphasis on back-end Web programming. Using an integrated approach, we will utilize PHP with other Webcentric technologies such as HTML and MySQL. Hands-on exercises will provide you with the tools needed to build dynamic Web pages, to interact with users, manipulate data, and integrate database content. The course topics covered are essential to developing a dynamic website using PHP. Topics include: foundations of programming using PHP; understanding the 6 PHP data types; utilizing basic flow control structures; building reusable user-defined functions; manipulating user input from Web forms; and developing database enabled Web pages utilizing MySQL. • Section 1 (w): Tu 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Matt Cornelius, ACI PMCG 467 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

summer 2013

Theming WordPress Why Theming WordPress? One look at the WordPress community (http:// WordPress.org) and you will have your answer. Blogging has gone from geek to in style, appearing as the hot, new way to get the word out about a new product or the next wave of musthave gear for mainstream America. WordPress is not just a blogging engine; it is a full CMS (content management system). Using Dreamweaver, we will create a number of templates that you will import into the WordPress engine. This course will look at the ins and outs of the PHP/MySQL admin side of WordPress and just how to create themes for WordPress. This will give your next site the look and functionality with the power of CMS, like WordPress. Topics include: XHTML, advanced CSS, PHP and MySQL; WordPress, its backend for the creation of themes, the deletion and updating of content; WordPress Admin Setup for user control, and the addition of widgets for events, tag clouds for SEO, and users. Prerequisites: Dreamweaver II. • Section 1 (m): Sa 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Jerome Amos PMCG 471 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

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Pratt Manhattan Authorized Training Center Pratt Manhattan is proud to be an authorized training center for several excellent, industry standard software packages. The training centers include Autodesk and Discreet software.

Autodesk® and Autodesk® Media and Entertainment Training Centers are educational programs managed by Autodesk®. Although each ATC is monitored through evaluations from every participant, Autodesk® is not responsible for the quality of the training offered by the Autodesk® training centers or for any actions of the Autodesk Training Center. Autodesk, the Autodesk logo, AutoCAD, ATC, AutoCAD LT, AutoCAD Architecture, AutoCAD MEP, AutoLISP, Autodesk Ecotect, Autodesk Inventor, z, Autodesk Mudbox, Autodesk NavisWorks, Autodesk Revit Architecture, Autodesk Revit MEP, Autodesk Revit Structure, and character studio are registered trademarks, and Autodesk combustion are trademarks of Autodesk, Inc. in the U.S. and/or other foreign countries. © 2000 Autodesk, Inc. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. All other brand names, product names, or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Autodesk® Authorized Training Center (ATC®) and Autodesk® Authorized Training Center Premier Media and Entertainment are educational programs managed by Autodesk, Inc. Although each ATC is monitored through evaluations from every participant, Autodesk is not responsible for the quality of the training offered by the ATC or for any actions of the ATC.

AIA Provider Pratt is registered as a Premier provider with the American Institute of Architects, Continuing Education System (AIA/CES). We are committed to offering quality education in accordance with the AIA/CES criteria (provider #F163). KEY (m) = Macintosh Platform (w) = Windows Platform (AIA) = AIA Professional

AUTODESK® TRAINING CENTER Pratt Manhattan is a designated Premier Autodesk Authorized Training Center (ATC®). Since 1986, our Authorized Training Center has provided comprehensive training for beginning and advanced computeraided design (CAD) users. AutoCAD® is a powerful desktop tool that vastly increases productivity in design tasks.

AutoCAD® six-day courses include: • 30 hours instruction; 6 hours/day 9 AM–4 PM • 16 hours unsupervised lab; W, Th 4–6 PM, F 3–4 PM

Student Software, One-Year License Students who register for Autodesk Training Center courses qualify to purchase a one-year license of Autodesk software. For further information, please visit www.studica.com/dtc/pratt.

AIA AutoCAD® 2013 Professional Level I This course is designed for new AutoCAD® software users who require comprehensive training. The objective of AutoCAD Professional Level I is to enable the user to create a basic 2D drawing in AutoCAD. Even at this fundamental level, AutoCAD is one of the most sophisticated computer applications that you are likely to encounter. Therefore, learning to use it can be challenging. This course covers the essentials for working with AutoCAD. The teaching strategy starts with a few basic tools that enable you to create and edit a simple drawing, and then continues to develop those tools. More advanced tools are introduced throughout the course. Not every command or option is covered because the intent is to show the most essential tools and concepts. Topics include: understanding the AutoCAD workspace and user interface; using basic drawing, editing, and viewing tools; organizing drawing objects on layers; inserting reusable symbols (blocks); setting up layers, styles, and templates; preparing a layout to be plotted; adding text, hatching, and dimensions; using more advanced editing and construction techniques; adding parametric constraints to objects; creating local and global blocks; using advanced

plotting and publishing options. Recommended audience: Architects,

construction managers, engineers, drafters, and design professionals. Prerequisites: A working knowledge of basic design/drafting procedures and terminology; a working knowledge of your operating system. Please note: Not accepted by NYS for LU or PDH credit. • Section 1 (w): Tu 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Gil Santiago • Section 2 (w): Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Chris Ramirez • Section 3 (m): W 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Chris Ramirez • Section 4 (w): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions Jun 5–7, 12–14 Gil Santiago • Section 5 (m): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions May 22–24, 29–31 Phil Gauntt, ACI 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMA 401 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA AutoCAD® 2013 Professional Level II This intermediate course is designed for the experienced AutoCAD® user who requires additional training. It incorporates the features, commands, and techniques for becoming more productive when creating, annotating, and printing drawings with AutoCAD. This course continues to build on the basic concepts of the AutoCAD Professional Level I course. Topics include: incorporating the features, commands, and techniques for becoming more productive when creating, annotating, and printing drawings with AutoCAD. Hands-on exercises throughout the course explore how to create 2D production drawings. The exercises are provided in both a printed format and an onscreen format that can be viewed next to AutoCAD. Prerequisites: PMA 389A, PMA 401, or permission of instructor. • Section 1 (w): Th 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Chris Ramirez • Section 2 (w): Sa 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Chris Ramirez • Section 3 (w): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions Jun 19–21, 26–28 Gil Santiago 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMA 402 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA AutoCAD® 2013 Conceptual Design This course provides a basic understanding of how to create, modify, and present conceptual designs using AutoCAD®. Building three-dimensional models to aid in the visualization of designs from all drafting disciplines is an important aspect of a project. Using AutoCAD functionality, you can quickly and easily create conceptual models to study and explore designs. This course introduces you to the steps necessary to explore CAD projects through conceptual design. Learn how to create massing and sun studies, apply different visual effects to their models, and export/distribute their designs to an extended team. Hands-on exercises throughout the course are used to demonstrate the conceptual design process through the mainstream drafting industries. Topics include: elements of conceptual design; massing shapes with 3D solids; integrating Raster images with solid models; presenting the conceptual design; visual styles; and exporting and distributing your conceptual designs. Prerequisites: Use of the current or a previous release of AutoCAD; the ability to create and edit basic AutoCAD objects; knowledge of fundamental geometric and three-dimensional drafting terms. Registration deadline: Jun 4 • Section 1 (w): Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 10 Phil Gauntt, ACI 7 AIA/CES LUs, 7 PDHs PMA 525 .7 C.E.U.s $295

AIA AutoCAD® 2013 Creating and Presenting 3D Models This course provides a basic understanding of how to design and modify 3D models with AutoCAD®. Creating 3D models helps users better visualize and present designs that are created with CAD. Topics include: the fundamental concepts and workflows for creating 3D models with AutoCAD. Explore how to create and modify both solid and surface models. Learn how to present your designs while they are still being created, using visualization tools such as visual styles, model walk and fly throughs, materials, and lighting. You will also learn how to output 3D models from the CAD system to either paper or to a distributable, electronic version. The concepts and practices taught will help you take your Auto-CAD designs to the


next dimension: 3D! Hands-on exercises throughout the course demonstrate the modeling process using techniques that can be applied to the mainstream drafting industries. The exercises printed in the book are also provided in an onscreen format that can be viewed next to AutoCAD. Prerequisite: Prior usage of the current or a previous release of AutoCAD, ability to create and edit basic AutoCAD objects; ability to create and work with layouts. Registration deadline: May 9 • Section 1 (w): Th–F 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions May 16–17 Phil Gauntt, ACI 14 AIA/CES LUs, 14 PDHs PMA 526 1.4 C.E.U.s $495

AIA AutoCAD® Architecture 2013: Essentials This course provides new users with comprehensive training in AutoCAD® Architecture. The primary objective of this course is to teach you the basic commands for architectural designing and drafting with AutoCAD Architecture software. The hands-on lessons cover features, commands, and techniques for creating, editing, and printing drawings with AutoCAD Architecture. Topics include: the tools that are necessary so that you will be able to use design resources and tools to increase productivity in the architectural design process; add ceiling grids, ceiling fixtures, column grids, and structural members to a building model; add floors, walls, and roofs to a building model; add doors, windows, spaces, and stairs to a building model; create and distribute plotting sheets for a building model design that includes views, display themes, annotations, schedules, and callouts. Prerequisite: Previous AutoCAD experience is necessary. Drafting, design, or engineering experience is a plus. It is recommended that you have a working knowledge of Microsoft® Windows® XP or Microsoft® Windows® 2000. Recommended audience: This course is designed for new users of AutoCAD Architecture. Registration deadline: Jun 11 • Section 1 (w): W–F 9 AM–3 PM 6 sessions Jun 19–20, 26–27 Phil Gauntt, ACI 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMA 405 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA AutoCAD® Architecture 2013: Advanced This course covers many of the advanced features of AutoCAD® Architecture. You will learn how to set up a project, create tool catalogs and styles, and export to different output formats. You will also practice different installation setups, create new styles, edit section/ elevation objects, use ACE dimensions, display themes, and mask blocks. Topics include: the tools that are necessary so that you will be able to install AutoCAD Architecture on a network and configure projects; apply advanced object display features using display configurations, layer key styles, and object profiles; customize design object styles; customize documentation object styles and block styles; use advanced design tools such as the Stair Tower Generator; and integrate AutoCAD Architecture with other applications and file types. Prerequisite: AutoCAD Architecture Essentials or you should be able to add grids, fixtures, floors, walls, ceilings, roofs, doors, walls, and stairs to a building model. You should also have created output that includes different views, annotations, tables, and legends. Recommended audience: Experienced users of AutoCAD Architecture. • Section 1 (w): W–F 9 AM–5 PM 3 sessions TBA Phil Gauntt, ACI 21 AIA/CES LUs, 21 PDHs PMA 510 2.1 C.E.U.s $675

AIA Autodesk® Ecotect® Analysis: Core Concepts This course offers the basics of Autodesk Ecotect Analysis’s desktop and Web-based tools. A variety of analysis types will be explored, as well as the importing and exporting of different CAD and analytical data. Topics include: you will understand the effective use of Autodesk Ecotect Analysis’s comparative analysis tools to achieve a highly sustainable design. Prerequisite: Working knowledge of drafting, design, architecture, sustainable design principles. Registration deadline: TBA • Section 1 (w): M–Tu 9 AM–5 PM 2 Sessions Fall 2013 Phil Gauntt, ACI 14 AIA/CES LUs/SD’s, 14 PDHs PMA 551 1.4 C.E.U.s $495

AIA Autodesk® Inventor® 2013 Level I This course covers the fundamental principles of 3D parametric part design, assembly design, and creating production-ready part and assembly drawings using Autodesk Inventor. Topics include: learn how to capture design intent by using the proper techniques and recommended workflows for creating intelligent 3D parametric parts; creating, placing, and constraining custom and standard components in an assembly; and simulating mechanisms, animating assembly designs, and checking for interferences. You also learn how to document your designs using base, projected, section, detail, and isometric drawing views; document assemblies using standard and exploded drawing views; and follow drafting standards while dimensioning and annotating drawing views with automated balloons and parts lists. Hands-on exercises representing real-world, industryspecific design scenarios are included. Prerequisite: Computer competency. Registration deadline: May 30 • Section 1 (w): Sa 9 AM–5:30 PM 4 sessions Jun 8–29 John Takacs 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMA 407 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA Autodesk® NavisWorks® 2013 Core Concepts You’ll learn how to open, review, and run object-interference checks on 3D models. You’ll also learn how to link to task-scheduling files and create 4D construction simulations. Using the Animator and Scripter tools, you’ll create interactive animations. In addition, you’ll learn how the Presenter tools can help create photorealistic images and animations. Topics include: knowing how to combine 3D geometry from cross disciplines into one scene to enable effective model reviews. You will also understand the Clash Detective, TimeLiner, Animator, Scripter, and Presenter tools. Prerequisite: Working knowledge of 3D design and task-scheduling software. Registration deadline: TBA • Section 1 (w): W–F 9 AM–5 PM 3 sessions Fall 2013 Phil Gauntt, ACI 21 AIA/CES LUs, 21 PDHs PMA 552 2.1 C.E.U.s $795

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AIA Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013: Basic Course This course covers the basics of Autodesk Revit Architecture, from schematic design through construction documentation. You are introduced to the concepts of Building Information Modeling and the tools for parametric building design and documentation. Topics include: the tools that are necessary so that you will be able to describe the benefits of building Information modeling; use the fundamental features of Autodesk Revit Architecture; use the parametric 3D design tools to design projects; create detailing and drafting view; create construction documentation; and use the presentation tools for presenting models. Prerequisite: No previous CAD experience is necessary, however, architectural design, drafting, or engineering experience is highly recommended, as is a working knowledge of Microsoft® Windows® XP or Microsoft® Windows® 2000. Registration deadline: May 20 • Section 1 (w): F 6–9:30 PM 4 sessions May 24–Jun 14 Paul Bretzger Registration deadline: May 24 • Section 2 (w): M–Tu 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Jun 3–4 Alex Rosman Registration deadline: Jun 24 • Section 3 (w): F 6–9:30 PM 4 sessions Jun 28–Jul 19 Paul Bretzger 14 AIA/CES LUs, 14 PDHs PMA 533 1.4 C.E.U.s $395

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013: Level I This course introduces you to Autodesk Revit software, the AEC industry’s first parametric building modeler. In Autodesk Revit, you don’t just draw 2D building plans, elevations or sections; you create a digital database of your building, composed of 3D graphical information as well as non-graphical data, using the Autodesk Revit predefined, parametric building components. Productivity is improved through increased automation of constructions documentation. New tools, templates, and constructions content extend the benefits of the building information modeling solution to the construction community. REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Topics include: general overview of

Autodesk Revit Architecture—introduction to the philosophy of creating projects; working with walls and joints; Autodesk Revit family components; setting up views such as sections, interior elevations, perspectives, schedules, and project phases; study methods and techniques for defining and modifying roofs; Autodesk Revits rendering tools. Prerequisite: Understanding of Windows® 2000 and XP operating systems, and some CAD experience. • Section 1 (w): Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Safiy Abdur-Rahman, LEED®, AP 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMA 406 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013: Level II This course introduces you to more advanced concepts in Autodesk® Revit® software, the AEC industry’s first parametric building modeler. Building upon lessons learned in Autodesk® Revit® Architecture: Level I we will expand upon building plans, elevations, and sections as well as the digital database composed of 3D graphical information and nongraphical data. Topics include: advanced techniques using system families such as walls, floors, ceilings, and roofs; working with multiple Revit files using links; custom family creation and in place families including project parameters and shared parameters; advanced scheduling techniques; work-sharing and team workflow; warnings and errors; best practice. Prerequisite: Autodesk® Revit® Architecture: Level I Registration deadline: May 14

• Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 19–Jul 21 Safiy Abdur-Rahman, LEED®, AP 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMA 412 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013: Addition and Renovation Projects Renovation and Addition projects can be very challenging in Autodesk Revit Architecture if you do not know the right tools and how to use them. Topics include: Design Options, Phasing, In Place Families, Advanced Compound Wall configurations, and Documentation as well as tips/ tricks, and methodology of designing remodeled and renovation projects in Autodesk Revit. Prerequisite: Autodesk Revit Architecture Core Concepts or equivalent working experience and a firm understanding of the Autodesk Revit user interface and basic modeling and editing tools. Registration deadline: Jun 24 • Section 1 (w): M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 1 Phil Gauntt, ACI 7 AIA/CES LUs, 7 PDHs PMA 548 .7 C.E.U.s $295

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013: BIM Management Building Information Modeling (BIM) is an approach to the entire building life cycle. Revit Architecture is a powerful BIM program that supports the ability to coordinate, update, and share design data with team members throughout the design, construction, and management phases of a building’s life. A key component in managing the BIM process is to establish a company foundation for different types of projects by creating standard templates and custom elements. Having this in place makes the process of any new project flow smoothly and efficiently. The primary objective of this course is to enable those who have worked with Revit Architecture to expand their knowledge in setting up office standards with templates that include annotation styles, preset views, sheets, and schedules, as well as creating custom element types and families. Topics include: create custom templates with annotation style, title blocks, and custom elements styles; create schedules, including material takeoff schedules; create custom wall, roof, and floor types; set up a family file; and create specific families, including custom doors and windows, inplace families. Prerequisite: Revit Architecture Fundamentals/Essentials or Revit

Architecture Basics/Level I. Knowledge of basic techniques is required, such as creating walls, roofs, and other objects, copying and moving objects, creating and working with views, etc. Registration deadline: Jun 24 • Section 1 (w) Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 2 Phil Gauntt, ACI 7 AIA/CES LUs, 7 PDHs PMA 554 .7 C.E.U.s $295

documents? This workshop explores how to turn a model into CDs using Autodesk Revit tools like callouts, exterior elevations, interior elevations, sections and sheets. Registration deadline: Jul 30 • Section 1 (w): M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Aug 5 Phil Gauntt, ACI 3 AIA/CES LUs, 3 PDHs PMA 534 .3 C.E.U.s $109

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013: Conceptual Design and Visualization

AIA Autodesk® Revit® MEP 2013: Basics Course

As architects and designers start a project, they frequently think about the overall massing of a building or the area of the footprint. Revit Architecture, using its powerful Building Information Modeling (BIM) engine, includes tools for creating mass elements that can be modified into many shapes. You can then apply walls, roofs, and floors to them to continue designing. You can also access space planning tools for setting up areas for rooms and applying colors to them to show the connections. For presentations, you can create and render perspective views. The primary objective of this course is to enable those who have worked with Revit Architecture to expand their knowledge in the areas of Conceptual Design, including massing studies, space planning, visualization, and rendering. Topics include: creating in-place conceptual mass elements and conceptual mass families; create building elements from massing studies; use Rooms and Areas for spaces planning and analysis; create perspectives, walkthroughs, and solar studies; understand the concepts of rendering and lighting. Prerequisite: Revit Architecture Fundamentals/Essentials or Revit Architecture Basics/Level I. Knowledge of basic techniques is required, such as creating walls, roofs, and other objects, copying and moving objects, creating and working with views, etc. Registration deadline: TBA • Section 1 (w): W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Alex Rosman 7 AIA/CES LUs, 7 PDHs PMA 555 .7 C.E.U.s $295

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Architecture 2013: Creating Construction Documents Have you wondered how to take a 3D model and turn it into construction

In this course you use Autodesk Revit MEP to model MEP systems. Learn the recommended workflows and basic skills required to navigate Autodesk Revit MEP and use its tools to create and modify MEP systems. Given a complete architectural building model, you will be able to produce a building information model of a commercial design for mechanical and electrical systems and extract 2D drawings for construction documents. Topics include: designing systems-creating HVAC, electrical, piping, plumbing, and fire protection designs; working in a multiplatform, multisystem environment-collaborating schedules, and coordinating designs; and documenting project information-creating schedules, views, and construction sheets. Prerequisite: No previous CAD experience required, and experience with MEP engineering processes and terminology is highly recommended. Recommended audience: Those with Autodesk Revit Architecture or Autodesk Revit Structure experience, and mechanical or electrical engineers. Registration deadline: Jul 2 • Section 1 (w): W–F 9 AM–5 PM 3 sessions Jul 10–12 Phil Gauntt, ACI 21 AIA/CES LUs, 21 PDHs PMA 538 2.1 C.E.U.s $595

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Structure 2013: Essentials This course covers the basics of Autodesk Revit Structure, from schematic design through construction documentation. You are introduced to the concepts of Building Information Modeling and the tools for parametric design, analysis, and documentation. Topics include: the tools that are necessary so that you will be able to describe the benefits of Building Information Modeling; use the fundamental features of Autodesk Revit Structure; use the


parametric 3D design tools for creating and analyzing projects; use the automated tools for documenting projects; and develop a level of comfort and confidence with Autodesk Revit Structure through hands-on experience. Prerequisite: No previous CAD experience is necessary. However, structural engineering or architectural design experience is highly recommended. Please note: Not accepted by NYS for LUs and PDH credit. Registration deadline: Jul 9 • Section 1 (w): W–F 9 AM–5 PM 3 sessions Jul 17–19 Phil Gauntt, ACI 21 AIA/CES LUs, 21 PDHs PMA 545 2.1 C.E.U.s $595

AIA Autodesk® Revit® Structure 2013: Advanced This course covers a wide range of advanced topics in Autodesk Revit Structure, continuing to build on the concepts introduced in the Autodesk Revit Structure Essentials course. Learn about detailing and detail components, rebar, families, analytical analysis, and collaborating on a design with other professionals. Topics include: the tools that are necessary so that you will be able to work with detail components and managing details; work with rebar; work with families—creating a slab on metal deck, a precast hollow core slab, a tapered moment frame, a 3D steel gusset plate, a stepped footing, and using steel stiffeners; creating trusses; exploring analytical tools; working with clients and consultants using DWG files, using Autodesk Revit Architecture; multi-user worksharing; sharing your design using DWF; and importing and exporting data with IFC format. Prerequisite: Autodesk Revit Structure Essentials course or equivalent experience using Autodesk Revit Structure. Structural engineering or architectural design experience is highly recommended. Recommended audience: The experienced users of Autodesk Revit Structure. Registration deadline: TBA • Section 1 (w): Th-F 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions TBA Phil Gauntt, ACI 14 AIA/CES LUs, 14 PDHs PMA 546 1.4 C.E.U.s $495

AIA Autodesk® Revit® 2013: Topography The site tools inside Autodesk Revit provide you with the ability to develop comprehensive site documentation as well as realistic 3D models. While these are not Civil Engineering tools, they allow you to create, manage and manipulate the site to meet your specific needs. Topics include: various ways you can create terrain, how to do cut and fill calculations, assign materials and how site pads can be used to control the site. The course also reviews how we can coordinate BIM models with the site. In addition, attention will be given to how Autodesk Revit Architecture can work with AutoCAD data created by Civil Engineers. Prerequisite: Completion of Autodesk Revit Core Concepts class or equivalent working experience and a firm understanding of the Autodesk Revit user interface and basic modeling and editing tools. Registration deadline: Jul 22 • Section 1 (w): M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 29 Phil Gauntt, ACI 7 AIA/CES LUs, 7 PDHs PMA 550 .7 C.E.U.s $295

AIA Set Design for Architects and Designers Using AutoCAD® 2013

This course is for professionals and designers who wish to explore the design of theatrical sets. You will be assigned specific plays to read and will develop your own concepts through research material, sketches, and storyboards which will develop into plans, sections, and elevations. Topics include: a quick overview of set/theater design through the ages to give you the context and historical background. Part of the course study will include one or two field trips to local plays in production, which will allow you to see firsthand how the sets work and gain an understanding of the mechanics of the stage. During some class critiques and presentations, visitors including directors, playwrights, or other members of the theatrical team will be available to give you feedback on your projects and to discuss the collaborative process of the design for a theatrical production. A class goal is to come up with one or two set design concepts that represent each one’s style and vision and could be included in your portfolio. Prerequisite: AutoCAD and 3D experience a plus.

Registration deadline: May 14

• Section 1 (w): Su 1–4 PM 10 Sessions May 19–Jul 21 Merope Vachlioti 30 AIA/CES LUs PMA 408 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design 2013 Intensive Workshop This intensive workshop uses Autodesk 3ds Max Design to create high-quality 3D still and animated images for architects, as well as interior and industrial designers. Topics include: 3D space; model types; hardware, software interfaces; 3D scenes; variable entities; lighting, cameras; creating objects; module overview; 3D editor; icons; 2D shaper; 3D lofter; animation principles. Prerequisite: Computer Comp. (PC) Registration deadline: Jul 24 • Section 1 (w): W-F 9 AM–5 PM 3 sessions Jul 31–Aug 3 Phil Gauntt, ACI 21 AIA/CES LUs, 21 PDHs PMAM 230 2.1 C.E.U.s $595

AIA Architectural Design with Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design 2013 Level I Autodesk 3ds Max Design is a 3D modeling, rendering, and animation software for creating cutting-edge design visualizations. Its straightforward modeling interface and unique interoperability simplify 3D model creation. Layers and Schematic View tools increase efficiency of data management. State-of-the-art image creation technologies, including Mental Ray® rendering technology, ensure production of accurate visualization to validate architectural design intents. Topics include: definition of space and coordinate system, the Autodesk 3ds Max Design user interface, scene navigation, parametric primitive objects, shapes, editable poly objects, transforms, modifiers, materials, texture mapping, lights, cameras, indirect illumination, photorealistic rendering, and walk-through animation setup. Prerequisite: Familiarity with Windows Operating System and 2D vector drawing programs. Recommended audience: Architecture, urban design, and interior design students and professionals.

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• Section 1 (w): W 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 22–Jul 24 Marcello Ferri, AIA, ACI 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMCG 252 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA Architectural Visualization using AutoCAD, Autodesk® Revit® and Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design 2013

Architectural and interior designs have become increasingly complex, and the need for an expanded software toolset is more important than ever. Primarily an Autodesk 3ds Max Design course, we will explore the ability of architects and interior designers to develop a workflow that also integrates Autodesk’s flagship software, AutoCAD as well as the up-and-coming Building Information Modeling (BIM) application called Autodesk Revit. Learning how to incorporate all three pieces of software will give you a good foundation for previsualizing your designs. The class will culminate with you presenting individual projects that will explore the topics discussed throughout the semester. Topics include: drawing clean-up and organization within AutoCAD; creation of basic architectural objects in Autodesk Revit; importing 2D drawings into Autodesk 3ds Max Design; importing Autodesk Revit models into Autodesk 3ds Max Design using Autodesk’s FBX file format; Autodesk 3ds Max Design userinterface; creating 3D objects in Autodesk 3ds Max Design from 2D, AutoCAD, and line-work; creating objects from scratch within Autodesk 3ds Max Design; camera creation and scene composition; standard and Mental Ray materials; basic and advanced lighting; basic and advanced Mental Ray rendering techniques. Prerequisite: Familiarity with Windows and basic 2D AutoCAD. • Section 1 (w): Th 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Paul Bretzger PMCG 255B 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

AIA Architectural Design with Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design 2013 Level II The purpose of this course is to provide the tools needed to create advanced scenes and architectural renderings in a professional production environment. This course will take the student already familiar with the content covered in Level I through the creation and management of architectural scenes using REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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advanced modeling techniques, materials, and data extraction procedures. Topics include: advanced poly object modeling, advanced architecture and design materials and texture map parameters, lighting analysis, camera match, non-photorealistic rendering, surface unfolding techniques and MAXScript concepts. Prerequisite: PMCG 252-Architectural Design with Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design Level I Recommended audience: Architecture, urban design, and interior design students and professionals. • Section 1 (w): Th 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 23–Aug 1 Marcello Ferri, AIA, ACI 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMCG 256 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Topics include: introduction to

Architectural Rendering and Lighting with Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design 2013

AUTODESK ® AUTHORIZED TRAINING CENTER PREMIER MEDIA AND ENTERTAINMENT

This course builds upon the skills acquired in the architectural modeling series and takes the student through the process of importing models from external applications, creating materials using bitmaps or procedural maps, and lighting a scene for both an interior and exterior environment for the production of convincing architectural visualization. Topics include: modeling aspects, materials, types of lights, lighting analysis, cameras, environment settings, mental ray renderer settings, and photorealistic and non-photorealistic rendering techniques. Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of Autodesk 3ds Max. Recommended audience: Architecture, urban design, and interior design students and professionals. Registration deadline: Jul 17

• Section 1 (w): M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jul 22–26 Marcello Ferri, AIA, ACI 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMCG 257 3.0 C.E.U.s $895

Introduction to Autodesk® MAXScript for AEC Professionals Autodesk MAXScript is the scripting language used within Autodesk 3ds Max, it provides Autodesk 3ds Max users with a powerful tool for expediting workflows that would otherwise require the execution of repetitive tasks. Examples of Autodesk MAXScript applications are: data extraction for the production of project schedules, generation of vector plans from three-dimensional models, and the creation of custom parametric objects (scripted plugins).

Autodesk MAXScript syntax, statements, variables, and object properties; the Autodesk MAXScript Listener and Macro Recorder; conditional statements, loops, and array functions; MacroScripts, rollouts, and user interface elements; examples of element/data association and data extraction routines. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Autodesk 3ds Max. Recommended audience: AEC professionals using Autodesk 3ds Max Recommended text: MAXScript Essentials, Second Edition (Focal Press) • M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 15 Marcello Ferri, AIA, ACI` 7 AIA/CES LUs, 7 PDHs PMAM 249 .7 C.E.U.s $295

Pratt Manhattan is authorized as an

Autodesk® Authorized Training Center Premier Media and Entertainment

(formerly known as Discreet Training Center) for its multimedia programs, which include character studio, cleaner

XL, combustion, reactor, and Autodesk® 3ds Max®, Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design.

See pages 16–28 for the following course descriptions.

Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design Autodesk® 3ds Max® Modeling and Rendering I and II Autodesk® 3ds Max® Animation I, II Autodesk® 3ds Max® Advanced Character Design and Animation Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design Advanced Lighting Autodesk® 3ds Max® Game Level and Character Design Animating with Autodesk® 3ds Max® and Character Studio Biped Architectural Modeling II with Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design Architectural Rendering and Lighting in Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design Architectural Visualization Using AutoCAD, Autodesk® Revit® and Autodesk® 3ds Max® Design Camera Matching with Autodesk® Mathmover Autodesk® Mudbox™ Special Effects (FX) with Autodesk® 3ds Max® Texturing Seminar The Importance of Interior Design in Film and Television: Using Autodesk® 3ds Max®

Autodesk’s Student/Faculty Engineering and Design Community http://students.autodesk.com Sponsored by Autodesk is a FREE Website for design students and faculty in the fields of architecture, construction, industrial design, animation, gaming, civil engineering, and mechanical engineering. Design students and faculty are able to download free student editions of Autodesk® software, find jobs, discuss projects, share work, learn from experts, and make new friends. Free downloads of Autodesk 3D design software products as well as tutorials, curriculum, and social networking are available to design students and faculty. The Student Engineering and Design Community is a vehicle for students to collaborate with other students on their campus as well as other universities around the world.

Autodesk’s The AREA http://area.autodesk.com The popular job postings section provides students with opportunities for internships as well as full-time and part-time jobs. A diverse range of employers, from large to small firms, see talent from this community. Download and installation support is available directly via the question and answer forums.
Autodesk AREA is now live! Autodesk is thrilled to announce the availability of a new community Website focused on artists and developers using Autodesk® Maya®, Autodesk® 3ds Max®, or Autodesk® Motion Builder™ software products in games, film, post production or design visualization. Visit the AREA now and register! Membership is free.

Autodesk Users Group International (AUGI) Membership to AUGI is free. For information, visit the AUGI Website: www. augi.com?source=ATC.US.10089

Resources Links Visit our website for our resources links relating to the Autodesk Training Center (ATC) program: www.pratt.edu/ccps-autodesk_training

Customized Training Customized training is available to corporate clients. For further information, please contact Karen Adler Miletsky at kmiletsk@pratt.edu concerning your training needs.

OneKey Account Information OneKey user names and passwords are necessary for all students and faculty of Pratt Institute. Please see pages 64–65 for detailed instructions.

Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

Key (m) = Macintosh Platform (w) = Windows Platform (AIA) = AIA Professional


Certificate Program in Fashion New Media The Certificate Program in Fashion New Media leverages the skillsets and technology know-how needed by graphic designers, web designers, photographers, electronic publishers, and social media marketers to meet the design aesthetics of one of the most competitive industries: Fashion! Drawing on Pratt’s Center for Continuing and Professional Studies’ rich course offerings in photography, graphic design, web design, and social media marketing, you will learn how to produce photographs, websites, and graphics with the same industry-standard tools the pros use. In addition, you will take three seminar courses in Fashion New Media and learn how to design current media for the fashion industry. Ultimately, you will create a professional design portfolio that exemplifies your voice in the new media world of fashion. Grow your network and get real world experience while completing your education. Internship opportunities are available to students of the Fashion New Media Certificate Program.

C E R T I F I C AT E P R O G R A M I N FA S H I O N N E W M E D I A CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS This certificate program requires the successful completion of the following: • Three 30-Hour Fashion New Media Seminar Courses (PMFD 101, PMFD 201, PMFD 301) • Three 30-Hour Foundation Courses • Three 30-Hour Core Courses • Three 30-Hour Elective Courses • 2.0 Average GPA • 80% Attendance Application Fee: $100, non-refundable

Foundation Required Foundation Course: One PMFD 101 Introduction to Fashion New Media Foundation Courses: Choose at least three PMCG 422 Imaging I (Photoshop) PMCG 500 Digital Photography I PMCG 475 Introduction to Graphic Design PMCG 202 Graphic Illustration I PMCG 303 Adobe InDesign PMCG 325 Introduction to HTML and CSS PMCG 324 Dreamweaver I

Core Required Core Course: One PMFD 201 Fashion New Media Design Core Courses: Choose at least three PMCG 420 Graphic Illustrator II PMCG 450 Dreamweaver II PMGD 466 Basic Typography PMGD 467 Editorial Design PMCG 482 Graphic Design: Ideas to Form PMCG 426 Photoshop Retouching PMCG 425 Imaging II (Photoshop) PMPH 518 Intro to Fashion Photography PMCG 502 Digital Photography II PMPH 512 Location Photography

Electives Required Elective Course: One PMFD 301 Fashion New Media Portfolio Elective Courses: Choose at least three PMCG 477 Adobe Illustrator for Fashion Design PMCG 352 Advanced Adobe InDesign with Photoshop and Illustrator PMPH 523 Street Photography PMCG 471 Theming WordPress PMPH 485 Photographic Lighting I PMCG 308 Design for the Web PMCG 503 Digital Black and White Photography PMPH 487 The Art of Photographic Portraiture

Social and Online Marketing Track Select 4—this track counts as 1 elective course PMSM 330 Social Media and Social Media Marketing PMSM 331 Online Strategy: Adapting, Integrating, and Utilizing Online and Social media Platforms PMSM 332 Measurement: Understanding, Analyzing, and Utilizing Web and Email Analytics PMSM 333 Creating a Website and Blog PMSM 334 The Big Four and More: A Practical Approach to using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Linked-In and Others PMSM 335 Online Advertising— Understanding CPC, CPM, CPV, and Other Creative Ways of Driving Traffic PMSM 336 PR 2.0: The Next Evolution of Public Relations PMSM 337 Generating Revenue Online: Monetizing Traffic

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Introduction to Fashion New Media

Fashion New Media Design

Fashion New Media Portfolio

This course will introduce you to how graphic designers, web designers, photographers and social media marketers fit in the broader framework of the fashion industry and how the fashion industry as a whole has branched out to encompass products and lifestyle brands. You will research and discuss a selection of marketing campaigns, blogs, websites, and print ads/fashion spreads and learn to dissect the relevant design elements of each. You will begin to develop a focus for your portfolio with a considered aim for where you see yourself in the industry. Field trips and guest speakers may be included. Topics include: new media in the fashion industry: marketing campaigns; blogs; websites; print ads/fashion spreads; social media marketing; photography. • Sa 1–4 PM 10 sessions May 18–Jul 20 Nicole Carlos PMFD 101 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

Today’s digital landscape goes way beyond text and image. In an interactive, social, multi-device, multiplatform world, potential abounds. In some cases, a simple blog may be ideal. In others, an interactive element may inspire an audience to visit your site again and again. Or perhaps your message is best served by a social media campaign. In this course, you will design new media, hone your voice, and develop strategies for reaching an audience. Both content and format will be examined through a communication design lens. Throughout the course you will be expected to share your work with your peers for constructive criticism. Topics include: fashion new media design, brand creative in the digital landscape, communication design, portfolio development. Prerequisite: Introduction to Fashion New Media • Tu 6:05–9:05 PM 10 sessions May 21–Jul 23 Maureen Carter PMFD 201 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

As a new media design er, your portfolio is critical to your success. A professional design portfolio should present a cohesive body of work; it should define the expectation of your technical ability and creativity. This course will commence with a review and critique of your portfolio pieces, with a focus on producing a professional design portfolio. You will be guided through the revision and refinement of your portfolio. Best practices for broadcast/distribution will be carefully considered. There may be an optional exhibition for the course’s finale. Topics include: portfolio refinement: execution, audience, broadcast/distribution. Prerequisite: Fashion New Media Design • Offered Fall 2013 Instructor TBA PMFD 301 3.0 C.E.U.s $805

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Fashion New Media Internship For information concerning internship, contact Chris Ferrara at cferrara@pratt. edu to apply. PMFD 302 3.0 C.E.U.s $805


Certificate in Online and Social Media Marketing Marketing is the core of commerce—it’s the art and science of bringing products to market and introducing them to consumers. And while marketing creative strategies and outlets are always evolving, nothing has shaken up the industry nearly as much as social media and other online outreach opportunities. This program is for marketers, brand managers, product developers, artists, and entrepreneurs who want to more fully understand how to use social media outlets and other online media to sell products and reach new audiences. We’ll explore social and online media from both theoretical and practical standpoints, from basic introductions to advanced insights.

C E R T I F I C AT E program ONLINE AND SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING Courses may be taken individually or as part of the certificate program.

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS This certificate program requires the successful completion of 47 hours total: • Three required 5-hour Core Courses • Minimum of eight 4-hour Elective Courses Application fee: $100, non-refundable Required Core Course: Choose three

PMSM 330 Social Media and Social Media Marketing PMSM 331 Online Strategy: Adapting, Integrating, and Utilizing Online and Social Media Platforms PMSM 332 Measurement: Understanding, Analyzing, and Utilizing Web and E-Mail Analytics Electives: Choose eight

PMSM 333 Creating a Website and Blog PMSM 334 The Big Four and More: A Practical Approach to Using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Linked-In, and Others PMSM 335 Online Advertising— Understanding CPC, CPM, CPV, and Other Creative Ways of Driving Traffic PMSM 336 PR 2.0: The Next Evolution of Public Relations PMSM 337 Generating Revenue Online: Monetizing Traffic PMSM 339 Search Engine Optimization PMSM 343 Elements of the Social Media Policy PMSM 347 Content Development Strategies for Online Marketing

CORE COURSES Social Media and Social Media Marketing This course provides a complete overview and understanding of the social media landscape: what it is, how it works, where it came from, and the reasons behind its rapid growth. Topics include: social media’s place in people’s lives, and how it has changed the consumer/brand relationship. Further, we’ll consider how marketers can use social media to more effectively speak to and reach their audiences to build trust, promote their brand, and establish relationships. • Section 1: F 9 AM–3 PM 1 session May 24 • Section 2: F 9 AM–3 PM 1 session Jul 12 Jay Miletsky (all sessions) PMSM 330 .5 C.E.U.s $295

Online Strategy: Adapting, Integrating, and Utilizing Online and Social Media Platforms The online opportunities for marketing seem endless. Marketers are faced with multiple options for outreach, ranging from online advertising and public relations to blogger outreach and social networks. Topics include: breaking down the available online marketing options, and examining methods for developing successful online brand-building and marketing strategies. In addition, we’ll explore how online marketing differs from more traditional efforts, and ways to combine both on and offline strategies to create a more cohesive, hybrid approach. • Section 1: Sa 9 AM–3 PM 1 session May 25 • Section 2: Sa 9 AM–3 PM 1 session Jul 13 Jay Miletsky (all sessions) PMSM 331 .5 C.E.U.s $295

Measurement: Understanding, Analyzing, and Utilizing Web and E-Mail Analytics The key to successful marketing is understanding consumer behavior. Multiple online outlets can provide unique insight into what your consumers do online, how they react to content, what they discuss, and what their interests are. Topics include: how to collect data from sources including website analytics, e-mail blasts, abandoned e-commerce shopping carts, and more; how to parse the information; and how to draw useful conclusions. We’ll further learn how to take the collected data and apply it to ongoing and future online marketing initiatives to improve results. • Section 1: Su 9 AM–3 PM 1 session May 26 • Section 2: Su 9 AM–3 PM 1 session Jul 14 Jason Miletsky (all sections) PMSM 332 .5 C.E.U.s $295

4-HOUR ELECTIVE COURSES Creating a Website and Blog Websites have become a key component in both online and offline sales, as visiting a site prior to making a purchase has become a regular part of the modern consumer buying cycle. How a site looks, feels, presents content, and connects through social media outlets can be the deciding factor between making a sale and driving a potential customer away. Topics include: all aspects of building a site, from planning, organizing, and designing, to getting the site built and marketed. A good portion of this course will review the step-by-step process for using the WordPress content management system for building and updating your site.

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• Section 1: Tu 9 AM–1 PM 1 session Jun 11 •Section 2: Tu 9 AM–1 PM 1 session Aug 6 Mark Sost (all sections) PMSM 333 .4 C.E.U.s $169

The Big Four and More: A Practical Approach to Using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Linked-In, and Others Most people understand how to use social media networks for personal interaction or entertainment. This course will focus on how to use these outlets for business and marketing purposes, zeroing in on the four most important networks: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn. Topics include: how each of these networks functions as a marketing tool, including a hands-on review of how to set up profiles and pages, attract consumers, and use each to improve marketing and brand exposure. Ample time will be given in this course for student questions and actual case studies. • Section 1: W 9 AM–1 PM 1 session Jun 19 • Section 2: W 9 AM–1 PM 1 session Aug 14 Instructor TBA PMSM 334 .4 C.E.U.s $169

Online Advertising— Understanding CPC, CPM, CPV, and Other Creative Ways of Driving Traffic Today’s Web is more than just social. There are numerous opportunities for direct advertising. In this course, we’ll review some of the many ways to enact an online media plan, and explore how to create a program that generates a positive ROI. Topics include: different types of online advertising, including cost-per-click, cost-per-thousand, and others. We’ll also review various providers, and gain an understanding of how search engines, social media networks, media sites, and ad networks differ in terms of structure, and the roles each plays in the development of online advertising. Finally, we’ll examine other means of creative advertising and driving traffic. • Section 1: Th 1:30–5:30 PM 1 session May 30 • Section 2: Th 1:30–5:30 PM 1 session Jul 18 Jay Miletsky (all sections) PMSM 335 .4 C.E.U.s $169

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

PR 2.0: The Next Evolution of Public Relations The timeless art of public relations took a radical turn with the popularization of the social Web. Journalists, once strictly employees of traditional media outlets, now include popular bloggers. Broadcasters, once confined to radio and television, now may include any individual with a video camera and a YouTube account. Measurement, outreach, and communication techniques have been forever changed as brands struggle to adjust. Topics include: exploring, in depth, the new public relations landscape, and what today’s PR professionals need to do to reach online consumers. • Section 1: Th 9 AM–1 PM 1 session Jun 13 Deirdre Breakenridge PMSM 336 .4 C.E.U.s $169

Generating Revenue Online: Monetizing Traffic The Web has created numerous opportunities for generating revenue. Outside of traditional brands reaching a broader audience and increasing offline sales, there are numerous ways for marketers to generate revenue from strictly online sources. Topics include: reviewing some of the many options to build online revenue, including e-commerce and selling advertising, how these methods get set up, potential pitfalls, price points, and marketing. This course will include the determination of ROI based on various revenue models and costs analysis. • Section 1: W 1:30–5:30 PM 1 session Jun 19 • Section 2: W 1:30–5:30 PM 1 session Aug 14 Jay Miletsky (all sections) PMSM 337 .7 C.E.U.s $295

Search Engine Optimization Search engine optimization can be a difficult battle to win—a battle whose rules change regularly and without notice. But successful marketers who can take command of their SEO efforts will likely reap the benefits far beyond what they’ve put into it. Topics include: exploring the importance of having a site appear high in the list of organic search results, how large engines such as Google, Yahoo, and Bing determine which sites to present, and what marketers can do to optimize their sites, blogs, and pages to appear more regularly in the first page of daily search results. • Section 1: Th 9 AM–1 PM 1 session May 30 • Section 2: Th 9 AM–1 PM 1 session Jul 18 Eric Richmond (all sections) PMSM 339 .4 C.E.U.s $169

Elements of the Social Media Policy Most companies have an employment policy that employees can refer to regarding how to dress, act, and present themselves in the office. But shockingly, relatively few companies have enacted a social media policy that outlines how employees should behave online and present themselves in social media outlets. Even on personal or private networks, employees, as a representative of a company brand, should be expected to act a certain way, say certain things, and/or refrain from making certain statements. Topics include: detailing the importance of drawing up a social media policy and the elements that need to be included to safeguard your company. • Section 1: Th 1:30–5:30 PM 1 session Jun 13 Deidre Breakenridge PMSM 343 .4 C.E.U.s $169

Content Development Strategies for Online Marketing Setting up online profiles and websites can be a daunting task. Once set up, however, there is an ongoing need to produce content on a regular basis to keep consumers’ interest piqued, and audiences coming back. Topics include: the different types of content that need to be created, including news items, articles, blogs, status updates, and more, how to develop a reliable calendar for content, and where to draw inspiration for keeping content fresh and interesting. We’ll review how content can be created and developed, including writing, video, audio, and photographic, which is the most effective, and how to blend content development strategies with ongoing campaigns. • Section 1: Tu 1:30–5:30 PM 1 session Jun 11 • Section 2: Tu 1:30–5:30 PM 1 session Aug 6 Ben Swiss (all sections) PMSM 347 .4 C.E.U.s $169

One-On-One Consultation (Optional) Three-hour consultation open to certificate students only as a final course about your online marketing efforts, tailored specifically to your own businesses and interests with Jay Miletsky. Dates to be determined on a per student basis. • PMSM 500 .3 C.E.U.s $195

Online and Social Media Marketing Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start date. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

OneKey Account Information OneKey user names and passwords are necessary for all students and faculty of Pratt Institute. Please see page 64–65 for detailed instructions.


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Professional Development Series for Architects, Landscape Architects, Professional Engineers, and Land Surveyors AIA/CES Registered Provider Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES) Approved Provider Drawing on Pratt’s historically strong architecture and engineering curriculum, we have expanded our professional development program as an authorized provider with the American Institute of Architects (AIA), Continuing Education System (AIA/CES), and the Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES) to offer continuing education courses. For additional approved AIA/CES courses, please see Autodesk Training Center, pages 24–28. Please Note • For the Architect: New York State

Licensing Board law requires architects to complete 36 professionally-related continuing education hours for every three-year registration period. Of the 36 hours, 24 must relate directly to HSW (general health and safety of the public) issues. • For the Professional Engineer and Land Surveyor: Every New York State licensed

and registered professional engineer and land surveyor must complete continuing education. Professional engineers will be required to complete 36 hours of continuing education during each three-year registration period. Land surveyors will be required to complete 24 hours of continuing education during each three-year registration period. * Please see courses with PDHs notated. • Non-HSW designation: Pratt courses that do not have the HSW designation, and which have been approved through the AIA, have been formally submitted to NYS for review.

State Approval It is your responsibility to check with the state licensing boards as to whether or not a course is acceptable to meet its continuing education credit requirements. Visit Pratt’s website: www.pratt.edu/prostudies for courses not acceptable to NYS or see courses that state: Not accepted by NYS for LU and PDH credit. For more information, visit the website for New York State Education Department, Office of the Professions: www.op.nysed.gov/

P R O F E S S I O N A L D E V E LO P M E N T F O R A R C H I T E C T S and ENGINEERS PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS Program Location Please note that all sections are held at our Manhattan Center, 144 West 14th Street, unless otherwise noted.

Pratt AIA Onsite Offerings These lectures can be delivered on-site to corporate clients. For further information, please contact Karen Adler Miletsky at kmiletsk@pratt.edu.

Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

Home Inspection Courses and Reciprocity All ten (10) courses taught by Dale Paegelow at Pratt CCPS are AIA approved for continuing education. No matter what state you live in, you will earn credit as a licensed architect or engineer by taking continuing education courses. But what if you also practice Home Inspection under your license as an architect or engineer in the State of New York or the State of Connecticut or State of New York? All of Dale Paegelow’s courses have reciprocity with Connecticut for licensed Home Inspectors, Architects, and Engineers, and are approved by the State of New York, as well, for licensed Home Inspectors. For example, you can take Residential Electrical Systems and How to Evaluate Them Holistically at Pratt and receive AIA credit in any state (say New York), PLUS you can submit your transcript to Connecticut and the State of New York and earn continuing education credits toward your Home Inspection licensing requirements in these states. You have attended one course and received credit from two states. This is also true for Home Inspection National Organizations such as ASHI or Inter-NACHI. Thus completion of one of Dale Paegelow’s courses will earn LU/PDH credit in three places: New York, Connecticut, and ASHI.

Certificate Program in Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management Designers have long been able to meet the needs of their clients and businesses by using their creativity to blend form and function. Today’s world of limited resources and changing economic and environmental values requires a new set of tools to design a sustainable world. This Certificate program, Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management, brings designers into 21st century design by building on their existing design skills and enhancing them with cutting-edge skills and knowledge, enabling them to meet the new goals and challenges of sustainability.

Why Choose Pratt Institute? • For over a century, Pratt Institute has combined the practice of art and practicality by educating artists and designers in its traditional art, design, and architecture classes at the graduate, undergraduate, and professional levels. • This program brings Pratt and you to a new level and a new world of art and design, again in a practical way. • You will learn about the driving forces that are changing your clients’ needs and about the tools needed to meet those challenges and design a sustainable world. In short, you will become part of the solution and be able to assist your clients and businesses in succeeding in a carbonconstrained world. See pages 50–51 for complete description of program.

Certificate Program in Urban Green Infrastructure: Green Systems Clean Water New York City’s move toward the implementation of Green Infrastructure (GI) to meet our national water quality standards, evident in the Department of Environmental Protection’s newly released Green Infrastructure Plan, represents a tremendous teaching moment. Professional training in standard designs, regulations, permitting and budgeting of innovative tree pits, curb cuts, green roofs, green walls, as well as monitoring and maintenance protocols will be critical for successful implementation of GI citywide. Pratt’s CCPS in collaboration with the Urban Environmental Systems Management program has rolled out the Certificate Program in Urban Green Infrastructure with a series of continuing education courses dealing with the design, implementation, permitting, and monitoring of green infrastructure in New York City. See pages 52–54 for complete description of program.


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A Guide to Sustainable Materials for High-Performance Buildings This introductory course lists sustainable products, services, life cycle assessment programs, and their manufactures. This course provides a key insight on the green attributes of each product and the most critical green issues for each product category. The course was created to provide products and services associated with LEED® credit achievement or to specify products to comply with a specific validating methodology. Topics include: products and how they affect green building costs: life cycle impacts; products, services, distributors and suppliers for each product category; an integrated interactive discussion between the instructor and the attendees on the pros and cons of these new green products. Products discussed include: roofing; windows; insulation; doors; indoor finishes; paints and adhesives; lighting; HVAC and R; furniture and furnishings; and site work and landscaping. Please note: The owner of Forever Green Training and Sustainable Design and the Pratt Institute does not charge for resource listings. Includes textbook. • Section 1: Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 4 • Section 2: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 12 Irene Santoro, LEED®, AP, BD+C (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 665 $345

Accessible Design and Construction Requirements of the Fair Housing Act: Are You Covered? The Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988, among other federal accessibility laws, requires that newly constructed multifamily residential buildings be designed and constructed to provide access to people with disabilities. A violation of these federal laws perpetuates discriminatory housing practices. This presentation will showcase lessons learned as a result of the presenter’s real-world experience as the fair housing expert for the plaintiff’s attorneys in the largest case filed to date against a top five REIT for widespread national fair housing violations. Topics include: an overview of federal accessibility laws and the scoping requirements of the Fair Housing Amendments Act, an overview of REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

the safe harbors for Fair Housing Compliance, detailed discussion of the seven design and construction requirements of the Fair Housing Act. Case studies of common violations and solutions to typical design and construction oversights that often lead to violations. • Th 1–4 PM 1 session Jun 6 Mark Jackson 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 711 $195

Accessible Design and Construction Requirement: Section 504 of the Rehab Act as They Apply to HUDFunded Projects Federally funded design and construction triggers the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehab Act of 1973, an often misunderstood federal accessibility law which seeks to prevent discrimination, based on disability, under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Learn how to apply the scoping provisions of the law and the requirements of its referenced technical criteria, the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS), to federally funded multifamily housing projects. Topics include: an overview of federal accessibility laws and the scoping requirements of Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act (Section 504) and a detailed discussion on the technical requirements of the Uniform Accessibility Standards (UFAS). Case studies illustrating common violations and solutions will be presented. • Tu 1–4 PM 1 session Jun 18 Mark Jackson 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 709 $195

Accessibility and its Relationship to Sustainable Design Buildings that are not accessible are not sustainable. Settlements and other legal agreements reached between developers and the courts have resulted in the substantial renovation of newly constructed buildings to incorporate legally required accessibility. If a newly constructed sustainable building must be substantially renovated to incorporate accessibility, how truly sustainable is it? The financial benefits which result from incentive programs for sustainable development mean nothing when compared to the potentially extreme cost to substantially renovate buildings which fail to incorporate legally required

accessible design and construction. This presentation will focus on helping to ensure legally required accessibility compliance during design development and construction to produce a truly sustainable project. Topics include: a brief overview of accessibility laws, codes, and standards; a review of the LEED for Homes Approved ID Request for Visitability and Universal Design and the LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED ND) Visitability and Universal Design Credit, a discussion of materials, products, and methods which comply both with the accessibility requirements and the goals of sustainability, and case studies of project examples. • Tu 1–4 PM 1 session Jul 16 Mark Jackson 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 710 $195

Adaptive Reuse Re-Imagined An existing structure presents many opportunities and many challenges. Architects are sometimes reluctant to use the existing infrastructure, hesitant to assume responsibility for unforeseen conditions or they do not recognize the valuable resource they have. It is vitally important to understand what is possible given new technologies. Part of the challenge is to discover hidden features of a property to both preserve and improve the facility by applying creativity and taking the care necessary to envision the end product. This course examines the conceptual underpinnings as well as the methods, materials, and process of reconstructing and adding to an older building. Topics include: survey existing conditions, code and zoning, planning for preservation (old vs. new), building charm and interest, the permitting process, the construction process, and case studies. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 11 Steven Zalben, AIA, NCARB, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 894 $295

Analysis of Continuous Spanned Beams I A popular choice for the analysis of continuous beams later to be used in computer programs solutions has been a classical method, known as the force method in the structural engineering community among engineers and architects. This method had become

the engineer’s tool for designing continuous beams and was deservedly recognized as the alternative method to that of moment distribution established by Hardy Cross. The seminar gives a detailed overview of designing long-spanned continuous beams providing the engineer-architect with the geometric and physical properties of the beam rendering a more effective solution to the design as well. Topics include: structural engineering principles: virtual work, bending of a beam segment, angle changes along a beam, moment area method, reciprocal relations along a beam, moment distribution; layout and solution of the n linear equations of the continuous beam’s geometry to its nth degree of indeterminate forces. From the solution, a pictorial diagram will show the beam’s structural response to the loads acting upon it. • F 9 AM–1:30 PM 1 session May 24 Kenneth Wagner, PE 4 AIA/HSW LUs, 4 PDHs PMPD 958 $199

Analysis of Continuous Spanned Beams II Established in long usage for the structural analysis of continuous beams, later to be implemented in computer program solutions, the classical method known as the displacement method is today’s selected mechanism for the design of continuous beams, the alternative to both that of the force method and moment distribution as well. This seminar will give an in-depth view of an easier and more effective solution for continuous beams than that of the force method. Topics include: theory of angle changes along a beam; moment area method; stiffness factors for structural elements; displacement method description; linear equations for rotations; moment distribution; and moment diagram for the structural continuous beam. • Sa 9 AM–1:30 PM 1 session May 25 Kenneth Wagner, PE 4 AIA/HSW LUs, 4 PDHs PMPD 959 $199


An American Revolution: The Invention of Balloon Framing and The History of Wood Frame Architecture in America We survey the last 400 years of wood framing in this country with a particular emphasis on vernacular domestic architecture. Starting with the house building methods the colonists brought with them, we look at how Americans began to take advantage of the sumptuous supplies of timber here. The course identifies particular styles of design that begin to emerge such as Greek Revival and Federal. We focus on the remarkable and little-known story of the invention of Balloon Framing. This caught on rapidly and moved West over the course of the next 50 years, abetting the occupation of the Western Territories. Balloon framing also fed our avid interest in a wide range of house styles, making the variety of American houses the most diverse in the world. Carpenter Gothic, Stick Style, Eastlake, Queen Anne, Second Empire and Shingle Style all emerged from this invention. This seminar ends with a discussion about the future of domestic construction methods. Topics include: a review of timber framing and its origins in England; early house styles; Chicago, circa 1830; Balloon Framing; Westward House!; emerging American house styles; Platform Framing and other improvements; the role of architects versus pattern books; the mail-order house; the future of wood framing. • M 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Aug 5 Warren Ashworth, RA 6 AIA/CES LUs, 6 PDHs PMPD 940 $295

Architectural Acoustic and Noise Control This seminar is intended for planners, architects, engineers, interior designers, facilities managers, and construction personnel who wish to raise their awareness, sensitivity, and technical knowledge of architectural acoustics, noise control, and the related regulations. Though related regulations have existed and been refined over four decades, serious attention is finally being paid to acoustics and noise pollution, as awareness increases about the negative impact of noise and poor acoustics to human comfort, health, safety, and welfare, and how they contribute to irritability, reduced workplace productivity, sleeplessness, anxiety, exacerbation of learning and

hearing disabilities. It makes practical sense that good acoustics and effective noise control be incorporated as determinants in the planning and the design considerations for projects. As an important frontline consideration for government funding of projects, facilities acquisition and construction, noise control and abatement have become critical determinants for proceeding with such project funding, and the impact of noise pollution is also a critical component of environmental site assessment for facilities development. However, the reality is that acoustic and noise control are often overlooked. Topics include: introduction and general information; properties and characteristics of sound wave and noise; standards and regulations; occupational standards for noise control; indoor acoustics and noise control; and outdoor noise and abatement. • F–Sa 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Jun 1–2 Alfred Yalaju, RA 14 AIA/HSW LUs, 14 PDHs PMPD 914 $595

Architectural Restoration: Motivators and Constraints to the Preservation of Older Structures This course addresses generating and controlling projects involving architectural restoration, which accounts for a significant portion of all construction. The role of the architect in such projects is pivotal; a pro-active architect with a comprehensive understanding of restoration principals can be instrumental in its success, and can also play a significant role in facilitating these projects. Technical expertise must cover an extremely broad range of knowledge. The architect must be thoroughly familiar, not only with current codes and construction methods, but those of the past as well. The role of the architect in program development, administrative issues and approvals, the technical aspects of restoration, and financial considerations will be explored in depth. Restoration often involves adaptive reuse or historic preservation, as well as broader planning issues. Beyond the technical and administrative constraints, understanding, identifying, and satisfying funding sources can determine whether a project is undertaken. The architect’s role in the funding process will also be discussed in depth. Topics include: motivators for restoration; dealing with municipal authorities, funding sources and contractors;

selecting and sourcing materials; developing method of construction; dealing with specific issues; construction costs and budgeting: the architect’s role and responsibilities; the study of a representative cross-section of projects demonstrating various types (residential single family, multi-family, commercial, municipal); program requirements (adaptive reuse, alteration/addition, pure restoration, historic preservation), and architectural styles. • Th–F 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions May 30–31 Martin Kravitt, RA 14 AIA/HSW LUs, 14 PDHs PMPD 916 $595

Basics of Building Performance with Case Studies The objective of the introductory course is to aid architects, engineers, real property appraisers, realtors, and assessors in the recognition and understanding of building performance components and systems. To date, there has been little empirical data organized by appraisers or realtors in regard to building performance, especially energy efficiency items and property design and development aspects. As a result, the contribution to market value of such items is difficult to determine. Before appraisers can measure how the market indicates the contributory value of efficient design, development, and component systems, appraisers must be able to recognize and store data to identify and track their influences on value. Topics include: construction components and high-performance installations of: building envelope, insulation, lighting, thermostats, windows and doors, UV protection technologies, R Values, and ventilation components and systems. Understanding heating and cooling systems, including furnaces, hot water heaters, and air conditioners, traditional and new high-performance options including: solar power systems— photovoltaic, hot water; geothermal options—open loop, closed loop; and heat distribution systems. Recommended audience: The primary target audience is architects, engineers, real property appraisers, realtors and assessors seeking continuing education. The course is designed so that it could also have an audience of realtors, building inspectors, and municipality employees who seek training in building performance and sustainability concepts.

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• Th 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Kathleen Bowen Ha, ASA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 669 $295

Brick Essentials Brick masonry is used in many different ways in the construction industry. Through this seminar you will gain an in depth understanding of brick masonry and its various uses. You will learn about the requirements governing clay masonry as established by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The discussion will include standards for both brick masonry units and the mortar used in conjunction with those units. Participants will develop a full understanding of brick by size, shape, exposure limitations, and compressive strength. The advantages of brick to sustainability are also described. In particular, it will be demonstrated how brick may contribute to as many as 29 LEED® points toward certification. Topics include: history of brick masonry; review of ASTM standards: brick, mortar; shapes, color, methodology: extruded, molded, sand struck, water struck, dyeing, and joints; wall types: drainage walls-cavity, veneer, rain screen wall; pavers: rigid underlayment, flexible underlayment; and LEED®. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Brian E. Trimble, PE, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 918 $295

Building and Restoring Brick Structures New York is a brick city. This beautiful material is versatile, durable, and a popular building material since 4,500 BC. This class covers the history of brick with a focus on New York buildings. We’ll cover the best techniques for restoring old brick structures, including adding insulation, making walls last, and removing paint. We’ll go on to talk about construction details using new brick with a focus on energy efficient envelopes, rainscreen walls, and keeping moisture out. We’ll also cover brick pavers and why they are a good choice when there are ADA concerns. Topics include: history of brick and brickwork, manufacturing, restoration, cavity and veneer walls, efflorescence, boosting energy performance, and movement. REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Registration deadline: TBA • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Brian Trimble, PE, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 610 $295

Capstone Project—Sustainable Building and Infrastructure Design and Management This seminar will be the capstone project for The Certificate in Sustainable Building and Infrastructure Design and Management. You will be required to complete two in-class projects involving the design and management of sustainable buildings and infrastructure. The projects will involve retrofitting, renovating or the new construction of residential or commercial buildings, or major projects such as new municipal facilities such as ports and terminals. Each project will focus on sustainable schematic design and management of buildings and infrastructure. The projects will require the use of green standards and green technologies to meet the mitigation and adaptation levels which will be needed to combat climate change and perform due to the changes from climate change. Topics include: the decision process for identifying environmental goals and standards for the project including greenhouse gas and energy reductions, adaptation to climate change risks and techniques to reduce the heat island effect and storm water runoff. The application of green standards such as BREAM, EPA–Energy Star, USGBC– LEED®, to the projects to achieve a recognized and accepted “green project.” The use of modeling and benchmark tools such as Equest and Portfolio Mgr to predict building and infrastructure performance and the ability to meet mitigation and adaptation requirements for climate change. The design and management of sustainable systems such as solar PV and thermal, green roofs, combined heat and power systems, geothermal systems and the interface with a “smart grid.” The financial analysis tools to estimate costs and paybacks for the projects and the systems. Prerequisites: For students in the certificate program, prerequisites include either Climate Change Fundamentals or Carbon Neutral Design and three other courses in the program.

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

• Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 27 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 606 $295

Chronicles of Security Technology: In the Age of Terrorism and Natural Disasters This course was specifically designed for architects and consulting engineers interested in the design of complex security systems for large urban facilities. The program offers a historic and anecdotal overview of basic concepts in physical security technology from standard locking hardware to state-ofthe-art digital computerized surveillance and monitoring systems. Two nationally recognized experts with experience in all areas of physical security will describe the effects of IP networks on digital CCTV Surveillance Systems, access control systems, and biometric devices. The course emphasizes new design criteria to incorporate wide-band Internet networks for all security systems. Case histories of security system successes and failures experienced by the presenters will be discussed. They were directly involved in the introduction of many unique and controversial security projects for public facilities (museums, hospitals, airports) and private complexes such as the World Trade Center, Co-op City, educational institutions, healthcare institutions and other complex structures. Can a security system protect against manmade and natural disasters in this age of potential terrorist attacks or against the tragic event that took place on the Virginia Tech campus? This timely course will explain how to upgrade security without creating a fortress like environment that may alienate the very public that the building was constructed to serve. Every building complex has unique area(s) of vulnerability, and the special risk factors in the following structures will be analyzed: museums; schools and colleges; banks; hospitals; hotels; residential and commercial high-rise. Topics include: door locking systems (conventional hardware to wireless smart keys); card access systems—various card formats—biometric devices; addressable IP CCTV surveillance systems and IT managed networks; upgrading analog to digital recording formats; analyzing risk assessment vs. basic security solutions; separating “competent” security consultants from opportunists; and developing specifications and bid package.

• Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 30 Ben Scaglione, CPP Charles Schnabolk, PE 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 952 $295

• W 9 AM–1 PM 1 session Spring 2014 James Convery, PE, CPP Michael J. Rzeznik, PE 4 AIA/HSW LUs, 4 PDHs PMPD 677 $195

Climate Change Fundamentals for Design Professionals and Management Professionals

Connecting Us: The Arterial Highway System of the New York-New Jersey Region

This seminar is an overview of climate change basics and their relation to the design world. The seminar is designed to give design professionals the basic tools needed to begin to design buildings, interiors, products, transportation and cities for a carbon-neutral world. Designers will learn how to measure and mitigate the carbon footprint, analyze and adapt to climate change risk, and learn carbon-neutral design standards. Topics include: introduction; effects; what is carbon neutral and how do we measure it; standards – The 2010 and 2030 Imperatives, College and University Presidents Climate Change Commitment, NYC Stds, U.S. Mayors Climate Change Commitment, The Kyoto Protocol, USGBC LEED®; mitigation and tools available; the carbon footprint—greenhouse gas protocol, The World Resources Institute; risks and adaptation—business, regulatory, physical, investment, social risk avoidance and mitigation strategies; adaptation—seawalls to power towers; and opportunities available: design, design, design, carbon-neutral buildings, products, systems, cities. • Section 1: Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session May 18 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 600 $295

In combination with the region’s transit systems and intercity rail systems, the region’s expressways and parkways provide the essential network for mobility of people and goods in the New York-New Jersey Metropolitan Area. This arterial highway system directly moves people in buses, taxis, HOVs, and automobiles, and gives access to the other “people modes,” such as bicycle, rapid transit (bus or rail), ferry, etc. Along with freight rail lines, the expressways also move the vast quantities of goods that support the region’s economy. Unlike many other areas, the New York-New Jersey region’s arterial highway system, including its key bridge and tunnel links, is provided by a multiplicity of governments and authorities, in both states. The roles of the agencies and organizations involved have undergone many changes over the past 100 years, the period within which the present network developed. This course will review that development, focusing particularly on the period from the 1930s through the present. It will examine key influences and “influencers,” system milestones, points of controversy, current system status, and the outlook for the future. The course will also present and analyze past, current, and emerging concepts for policy, planning, design and operations of the arterial highway system. Topics include: the region’s roadways at the turn of the 20th century; emergence of the automobile (1920s, 1930s); influences, inside and outside of the U.S.(1930s, early 1940s); bridges and tunnels (1880s to 1930s); programs of NYC, NYS, NJ (1920s-early 1940s); Post-World War II (1950s, 1960s); new twists (1960s, 1970s); the maturing of the highway system (1980s, 1990s); recent developments (early 2000s); and retrospective/ prospective. • W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 31 Leon Goodman, PE, PTOE 7 AIA/CES LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 924 $295

Components of Passive Fire Protection This program provides an overview of code requirements, testing, installation, and inspection of fireproofing, firestopping, and interior finishes. This presentation is intended for design professionals, including architects and engineers involved with the design or evaluation of fireproofing, firestopping, and interior finishes. Topics include: code requirements, laboratory testing procedures and requirements, system design and installation procedures, inspection and testing protocol, and products and manufactures of fireproofing, firestopping, and interior finishes.


Construction Cost Estimating This course for project managers, architects, engineers, and other construction personnel goes beyond the unit pricing and cost book approach and examines how the various trades arrive at their bids. The course will be taught by a team of professional estimators whose in-depth knowledge of New York City construction practices will give an added dimension and relevance to each topic. Topics include: basic estimating procedures for CSI Divisions 2 through 9; how to determine the cost of general conditions; an overview of bid day procedures. Prerequisites: Blueprint Reading, Construction Methods & Materials or equivalent experience. • M 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 20–Jul 29 George Lawrence, CPE Alex Mackenzie, CCI Gerald Ratner, CPE 30 AIA/CES LUs, 30 PDHs PMCM 104 3.0 C.E.U.s $685

Construction Specifications Writing Learn specifications writing techniques that give you a level of confidence required to research, evaluate, write, and edit construction specifications. Learn correct specifications writing language, use master electronic specifications systems, as well as use the Internet to research, evaluate, and specify products and systems for construction. Topics include: The Construction Specifications Institute Manual of Practices; specifications writing; history of development to present; organization of a project manual; general conditions; general requirements and specifications; coordination of specifications and drawings; specifications writing techniques; structure and language; three-part format; the “dos and don’ts” of specifications-writing language; specifications writing from the viewpoint of the contractor; current research and production techniques; use of master specifications systems; how the contractor views specification; using guides and product evaluations; researching and producing specifications using the Internet; setting up your browser for research, evaluation, and specifications writing; online specifications systems and online manufacturers systems. There will also be a discussion of The Contractor’s Guide to Change Orders, written by Andrew Civitello.

• F–Sa 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Jun 28–29 Steven Danielpour, AIA, CCS, LEED®, AP 14 AIA/HSW LUs, 14 PDHs PMPD 836 $595

Designing and Renovating Carbon Neutral Buildings This seminar will show architects, engineers, and interior designers how to design and renovate carbon neutral buildings. Architects, designers and engineers will learn how to measure and estimate energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, design to reduce energy and greenhouse gases in both embedded and operational aspects, adapt structures to the effects of climate change, and learn which software tools are needed. Topics include: review of the causes and effects of climate change, procedures for measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, green design standards; basic overview of energy and greenhouse gas calculations in reference to designing for carbon neutral buildings; overview of USGBC LEED® green building standards; LEED® certified, silver, gold, platinum, new construction, renovations, existing buildings; overview of software tools available to measure and predict greenhouse gas emissions; DOE 2, Equest; carbon and energy footprints in structural as well as operational building systems; embedded energy and carbon, operational energy and carbon; case studies of leading carbon neutral buildings; So London, NYC; design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class); new construction; green your design team, brainstorm problems and solutions; set criteria for design decision making, design carbon neutral building systems; design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class); major renovations – analyze footprint of existing building, set design criteria for the renovation, and design a carbon neutral renovation. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 8 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 601 $295

Drainage and Hydrology in NYC The introductory course in our Urban Green Infrastructure Fundamentals series. This seminar is intended for contractors, planners, engineers, architects, landscape architects, construction

managers, and green infrastructure enthusiasts who seek New York City– specific information regarding the natural and infrastructural systems influencing the design, construction, and maintenance of urban green infrastructure. For this seminar “green infrastructure” will refer to the use of green roofs, walls, parks, expanded roadside plantings, porous pavements, and other innovative technologies that allow for rainwater to seep into soils and be taken up by plants rather than being funneled off to overwhelm our sewer systems and trigger combined sewer overflows (CSOs). New York City struggles with nearly 30 billion gallons per year of CSO events. Green infrastructure treats rainwater as a resource rather than a waste. It offers a cost-effective solution to mitigating the city’s sewer overflow problems. Learning from current green infrastructure professionals, students will gain an understanding of NYC’s unique water management infrastructure and natural systems that influence green infrastructure implementation. Topics include: NYC’s watershed and sewer shed fragmentation and connectivity; hydrology of NYC including discussion of hydrographs, groundwater, water flow, percolation, and run-off; geology of NYC; types of soils, soil conditions, function and specification; organizational chart of key players in green infrastructure implementation; NYC’s natural geography and its built environment boundaries that influence prioritization of green infrastructure; and site assessment. Recommended audience: Contractors, engineers, landscape architects, architects, planners, construction managers and green infrastructure enthusiasts. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 14 Richard Shaw, PhD Zhonggii Chengi, PhD Raymond Palmares, PE Kate Zidar Bryan Quinn 7AIA/HSW LUs, LA CES, 7PDHs PMPD 706 $295

Educational Facilities Noise Control This seminar is intended for planners, architects, engineers, educators, facilities managers and construction personnel who wish to raise their awareness, sensitivity and technical knowledge of acoustics and noise control, related standards for educational facilities planning, design, construction and mainte-

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nance with a focus in classrooms and lecture halls. It is well established that young children require optimal conditions for hearing, comprehension and sustainable attention-span suitable for learning, as different from adults who have mature focus and well-developed listening skills. The negative impact of poor acoustics is well established to create a barrier in pupils’ learning abilities, attention-span and speech intelligibility. Acoustical and noise control performance standard ANSI/ASA S12.602002 has existed for over a decade, yet a significant number of schools do not conform to the standard. Conformance to the standard is voluntary except made mandatory when referenced by or adopted in state laws, municipal ordinance or regulations. It is encouraging that some states, municipalities and school districts now have regulations which reference and/or have adopted the ANSI/ASA standard. In addition, it is important to bring more awareness to the existence of a useful guide to classroom accommodations under IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act). On a global basis, some countries have developed standards unique to their national conditions while others have adopted the World Health Organization (WHO) standards. Topics include: general information, properties and characteristics of sound wave and noise; acoustical standards for classrooms and lecture halls; and architectural acoustics and noise control for classrooms and lecture halls. • Su 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 21 Alfred Yalaju, RA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 675 $295

Energy Benchmarking New York City Local Law 84, signed by Mayor Bloomberg on December 28, 2009, requires that buildings over 50,000 square feet are required to benchmark their energy and water usage annually, starting May 1, 2010. Energy benchmarking is an accounting determination of energy and water usage in a facility. Topics include: definition of energy benchmarking; which buildings are affected?; energy units; what do these numbers mean?; comparative building types; what do we do about high energy usage?; electric rate tariffs; time of day electric rates; and energy conservation. REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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• M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session May 20 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 717 $195

Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Weatherization Audits, and Capital Planning This seminar will teach architects, engineers, interior designers and facility and construction managers to perform audits (energy, greenhouse gas, and weatherization) and then develop capital plans to reduce energy and greenhouse gases while improving occupant comfort and improving productivity. Topics include: Energy audits for residences, commercial and industrial buildings, using standard and investment grade practices, monitoring and verification standards and financial analysis such as simple paybacks and return on investment (ROI); greenhouse gas audits including inventories of buildings, fleets and transport systems using software and the development of capital plans to comply with voluntary and mandatory climate change standards; weatherization audits for housing and commercial buildings to improve occupant comfort and work performance, while reducing energy and greenhouse gases. Techniques include: R-value analysis, blower door performance testing, and infrared surveys; capital plan development to identify goals, set standards to achieve the goals, and utilize savings in energy and greenhouse gases to finance projects. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 13 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 604 $295

Energy Retro-commissioning of Buildings New York City Local Law 87, signed by Mayor Bloomberg on December 28, 2009, requires that buildings over 50,000 square feet are required to perform energy audits and to retrocommission the base building systems, starting January 1, 2013. Energy retrocommissioning of buildings will dramatically reduce energy usage. Topics include: the definition of energy retro-commissioning; which buildings are affected; base building systems; energy efficiency report; operating REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

protocols, calibration, and sequencing; cleaning and repair of building equipment; and training and documentation requirements. • M 1–4 PM 1 session May 20 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 752 $195

Environmental Site Investigation and Remediation This course will provide an overview of the process involved with the investigation and remediation of contaminated property. This work is usually required as a result of regulatory mandates, property transactions and property redevelopment. It is common for professionals involved in property development to encounter soil and groundwater contamination issues that can affect the design, construction and cost of the development project. State and Federal regulatory programs provide various, and sometimes contradictory, requirements as to what level of investigation and remediation are required depending on the property history and the desired future use. Topics include: the process of researching a property for a history of potential environmental concerns (non-intrusive methods), completing the site investigation process (intrusive investigations), understanding the types of chemicals that are typically identified during the investigation process (petroleum compounds, VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganic substances) and the types of remedial actions that can be taken to address the contamination identified, including engineering/institutional controls as well as active remediation techniques. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 21 Paul Miller, PE 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 661 $295

Feng Shui and Architecture This seminar offers an overview of feng shui spanning from its ancient origins, to its various schools of interpretation, to its practical application in modern construction. Case studies of buildings erected with and without these principles will be studied and compared. Symbolic and cultural aspects in architecture will be examined including what constitutes a harmonious landscape in accordance with feng shui principals. Discussions regarding advantages for the occupants

as well as the interests of the public will be covered. Examination of feng shui strategies that have been used in luxury buildings and in entire cities will be explored. You will gain a working understanding of the laws and theories of feng shui and discover methods to identify and implement these principles for your own designs. Topics include: the historical origins of feng shui, the various schools of interpretation, the core principles, and the placement of the feng shui map will be discussed. Criteria that are a consideration in the feng shui architecture process such as location, materials, history of the land, proportion, shape, and orientation will be explained. Observations on the flow of energy and how it translates to your own past and future architectural work will be examined. The benefits to the community that feng shui offers, such as health advantages, a fervent utilization of nature, communal harmony, and cultural recognition will be discussed. Case studies of buildings using feng shui principles such as the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank in China, The Beacon Tower in Brooklyn, and The Trump International Hotel and Tower will be examined. Feng shui adjustments made to benefit the community, such as those to the global sculpture at Columbus Circle, will be discussed. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Laura Benko 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 718 $295

Fire Protection Technology The role and function of fire protection engineering systems are sometimes overlooked during the initial stages of a project. Instead of identifying fire protection as a separate discipline, the systems are often treated as subsystems bundled into the mechanical and electrical engineering scope of services. As a result, key fire protection needs may be neglected at the critical planning stages of a construction project. Working the systems in at a later date may lead to a lack of properly sized shafts for fire protection risers, or a water supply that is inadequate to meet the plumbing and fire protection needs of the building. Objective: To provide an overview of fire protection system technologies and their implications for building design and to help participants take full advantage of current fire protection technology. Its focus will be on the

state-of-the-art for fire suppression and fire alarm systems. Participants will leave understanding the concepts, strategies, and architectural requirements for the system types and have a hands-on experience with various sprinklers and fire alarm systems. Topics include: fire suppression—water based and gaseous system methodologies and architectural requirements; fire alarms—device technology, networked systems, graphical stations, and future capabilities. • Tu 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Mario Antonetti, PE Eric Babcock, PE Richard Thonnings, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 876 $195

Freshwater Wetlands Freshwater wetlands are regulated by Article 24 of the New York State Environmental Conservation Law. This course will cover the law and how it affects freshwater wetlands in New York State. The definition of freshwater wetlands is defined by statute according to vegetation and vegetation types. The NYS DEC publishes official maps of the mapped freshwater wetlands. These wetlands are classified according to size and their ecological functioning. Permits are required for certain activities, including construction, on freshwater wetlands and within a l00foot buffer zone. Issuance of permits is also subject to SEQRA. In New York City, substantial freshwater wetland areas are located on Staten Island. In Suffolk County, freshwater wetlands contain Black Tupelo trees up to about 700 years old. Topics include: definition of freshwater wetlands; mapping of freshwater wetlands and adjacent areas; wetlands classification; wetland permits; and interaction with SEQRA. • M 1–4 PM 1 session Jun 3 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 981 $195

Full-Spectrum Polarized Lighting Systems Full-spectrum polarized lighting duplicates the spectral energy distribution and polarization characteristics of natural daylight. This seminar will show you how to design a lighting system that will solve the problems of glare, flicker, and poor color rendition typical of


conventional lighting systems. Fullspectrum polarized lighting systems are more energy efficient than any other artificial lighting system, and will slash electrical usage for lighting by 60 to 85 percent. These lighting systems can be used for virtually all interior lighting applications, including offices, retail, commercial space, educational and institutional, and industrial facilities. Topics include: lamps, ballasts, fixtures, glare control, full-spectrum polarized lighting, lighting for the electronic office, national energy savings potential, and more. • M 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 10 Daniel Karpen, PE 6 AIA/HSW LUs, 6 PDHs PMPD 993 $295

Geotechnical Engineering This course is for architects and civil engineers who want to obtain a basic understanding of geotechnical engineering or who need a refresher. You will also learn when you should seek the advice of a geotechnical engineer, what a geotechnical engineer will need from you, and how to interpret the information included in a geotechnical report. Case histories will be used to provide examples of the geotechnical process and building code requirements. Topics include: defining geotechnical engineering—when do you need a geotechnical engineer; what to expect from one; soil and rock classification— various types of soils and rock; the NYC Building Code classification system; subsurface explorations—what methods are used and how many borings should be done; foundation design—how the need for a shallow versus a deep foundation system is determined and how a geotechnical engineer selects a pile foundation type; retaining walls—the types of walls available; construction—the effect construction will have on adjacent structures and types of inspection that should be performed. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Instructor TBA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 851 $295

Go Green Retrofits This course is designed to help design professionals incorporate sustainability principles into the manufacturing and building renovation process of their facilities and go green. We

will look at various businesses that have integrated green initiatives into their corporate structure to obtain environmental and employee health benefits while at the same time realizing the economic benefits of improving their bottom line by reducing costs and increasing profit. Topics include: for the manufacturing process: establishing a baseline— assessing existing processes and conducting an audit to obtain the metrics to implement profitable green practices in the areas of: energy usage; water usage; waste water generated; and materials usage and waste minimization methods to be implemented to reduce resources consumed and waste generated and increase efficiencies in the areas of: energy consumption; water consumption; waste water generated; and waste generation; for the facility renovation: green building renovation— facilities utilizing a USGBC Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) certified retrofit using either the LEED®-Existing Buildings or LEED®: Commercial Interiors rating standard as a basis in performing an overhaul of existing facilities, even if certification is not the goal. Explore the competitive advantage, potential profit, and return on investment that can be realized from implementing the green initiatives. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 27 Terese Kinsley, PE, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 809 $295

Gray Water Heat Recovery Hot water going down the drain is a largely untapped energy resource. Until the invention of the falling film heat exchanger, it has been impossible to achieve high rates of heat recovery. The gravity falling film heat exchanger consists of a coil of copper tubing wrapped around a vertical copper drain pipe. The coil of copper tubing pipes the cold water from the street around the drain pipe prior to feeding it, warmed up, to the hot water heater. Recovery rates of 85 percent are possible. Topics include: how much energy is used for domestic hot water; proper piping for the installation; residential case studies; and commercial case studies. • M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Jun 17 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 953 $195

Green Infrastructure Data and Calculations • See page 53 for description 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 LA CES, 7 PDHs PMPD 720 $295

Green Roof Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring • See page 53 for description 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 724 $195

Green Roof Design (GI and Buildings) • See page 53 for description 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 721 $195

Green Versus Historic Preservation: Collaboration or Conflict? With rising energy costs and climate change no longer a scientific guess, a renewed attention to the development of inner-city communities has become more commonplace. These urban core areas—once blighted—often contain the most historic building stock in most cities. This sets the backdrop for an emerging series of conflicts between preservation purists and newage environmentalists for potential battles to be played out at the local historic commissions, city halls, and local community boards. This seminar addresses the emerging challenges and conflicts of joining historic preservation with sustainable guidelines and offers ways to resolve them. The course demonstrates how building performance can be enhanced in older historic structures using an actual case study of the first 1890s USGBC LEED®-Platinum historic dwelling in the United States. Topics include: an examination of basic historic preservation guidelines as espoused by the Standards of the US Secretary of the Interior (also NYC LPC, and Secretary’s model); an examination of the basic USGBC LEED® precepts guiding sustainable development/ design; and an examination of the underlying rationale why a fusion of historic and green guidelines presents numerous challenges and opportunities. Registration deadline: Jun 26 • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 6 Roy Pachecano, AIA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 792B $295

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Greyfield Development — Unlocking the Doors to New Opportunities The American landscape is scarred with the remnants of postwar suburbanization, when waves of development surged from the historic city centers to the pristine suburbs. In the beginning there was simply Main Street; then the postwar decades introduced prototypes such as the mall, neighborhood center, strip centers, and finally the “big-box” one-stop shop. These developments have continued to evolve in order to incorporate all the latest retailers, entertainment venues, restaurants, and community activities; resulting in a series of economically obsolete, failing, and/or underutilized buildings or land. These sites are commonly referred to as “greyfields.” This course will explore what to do with these sites and how to make them viable environments for the future. Topics include: patterns of development—the evolution; greyfields vs brownfields vs. green-fields; principles for redevelopment; tools for redevelopment; going green: site, parking, and building opportunities; case studies; and sketch problems. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 26 David Robbins AICP, RLA, LEED® 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 715 $295

Historic Preservation: Techniques and Methods Over 85,000 properties have been listed on the National Register since its inception in 1966. As of May 2010, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has designated over 27,000 buildings including 100 historic districts and 1,265 individual landmarks in all five boroughs. With so many buildings declared historic landmarks, architects are increasingly discovering that many of their projects require preservation expertise. This course provides you with the technical and theoretical information required for the examination, documentation, and analysis of historic structures and their materials as well as increased historical and technical knowledge needed by architects for the successful solution of design problems involving historic structures. It establishes a background for the investigation of architectural history and significance and the diagnosis and treatment of building REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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pathology. With a wealth of illustrated examples and case studies it enhances aesthetic sensitivity through exposure to problems of restoration, adaptive use, and infill design of differing scales. Topics include: reviewing the various tools for preserving historic and existing buildings as established by the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties such as preservation, restoration, rehabilitation, and conservation, as well as adaptive reuse and reinvention; assessing appropriate levels of intervention; discussion of the most commonly used historic materials such as masonry (limestone, marble, sandstone, brick, terra cotta), metals, and wood; identifying materials and their physical properties and conditions; developing a methodology for determining repair recommendations; historic investment tax credit rehabilitation; working with the Secretary’s Standards; working with the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; case studies of current projects with historic buildings from start to finish; and “show and tell” review of historic preservation documents: historic structures reports, construction documents, restoration specifications, feasibility studies, conditions surveys, etc. • Th–F 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Aug 1–2 Lisa Easton, AIA Kate Lemos McHale, AIA 14 AIA/HSW LUs, 14 PDHs PMPD 844 $595

How to Determine the Age of Your Building or House This class will discuss the various methods of determining the age of a house or structure. Often, one is curious about the age of a house or building. There are a number of ways to determine the age of a house or structure. Topics include: use of historical documents, government records, any renovations or additions in the past, construction methods and materials, electrical systems, plumbing systems, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. • M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Aug 5 Daniel Karpen 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 731 $195

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

HVAC Design Learn the engineering fundamentals and practical considerations for the design of components and layout of HVAC systems. Learn how to calculate cooling and heating loads for commercial buildings and apply the principles of psychrometric processes to the design of optimal air-conditioning and heating systems. Learn and identify the different types of HVAC systems and equipment commonly used in commercial buildings. This practical course outlines the design process for all major HVAC components including equipment selection and air and water distribution (ductwork and piping) and its major components (fans and pumps). You also study best practices in HVAC system design strategies for high efficiency building design from real-world case studies. Review the implications of the energy code and ASHRAE standard 90.1 and 62.1 in the design of HVAC systems. This course is ideal for engineers, architects, contractors, real estate developers, and plant managers. Also ideal if you plan, design, install, or interact with HVAC systems for commercial buildings. This curriculum provides understanding of engineering fundamentals and systems operation, as well as knowledge of emerging technologies in HVAC Topics include: introduction to heat transfer, refrigeration cycle, and building envelope concepts; overview of commercial HVAC systems and equipment; cooling and heating load calculations; psychrometric charts and processes; air distribution design; water distribution design; HVAC equipment selection; efficiency HVAC design for high performance buildings; review of energy code requirements in HVAC design. Recommended audience: Architects, engineers, and those in the construction industry. • F 6–9 PM 10 sessions May 24–Jul 26 Juan C. Toro, PE, LEED®, AP 30 AIA/HSW LUs, 30 PDHs PMPD 792 $685

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Steam Systems Energy costs continue to go up. This course will focus on improving the efficiency of one-pipe and two-pipe low pressure steam heating systems, typically found in thousands of New York City buildings. Whether a boiler is fired by fuel oil or natural gas, this

course will show how to dramatically improve the efficiency of steam heating systems. Topics include: payback period calculation for pipe insulation; proper water treatment; solving water hammer problems; one pipe steam systems: venting of one pipe steam systems; two pipe steam systems: thermostatic steam traps; and float and thermostatic steam traps; sizing of replacement boilers; and case studies of actual buildings. Please note: Tuition includes textbook fee of $35. • M 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 24 Daniel Karpen, PE 6 AIA/HSW LUs, 6 PDHs PMPD 969 $330

Indoor Air Quality Indoor air quality continues to be an important issue in the management of buildings. This course focuses on the prevention, identification, and remediation of indoor air quality problems in buildings. The emphasis is on proper engineering and architectural design. Since identification of indoor air quality problems usually starts with complaints from building occupants, students learn to implement the surveys needed to identify the source of problems. In many cases, problems may stem from multiple sources because of system neglect and poor design. Remediation, including cost estimating, is also covered. Topics include: prevention, identification, and remediation. • M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Jul 1 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 951 $195

Industrial Facilities Noise Control This seminar is intended for planners, architects, engineers, process engineering designers, facilities managers and construction personnel who wish to raise their awareness, sensitivity and technical knowledge of noise control, related facilities planning and regulatory considerations relevant to industrial workplace noise exposure. Even with the existence of regulatory requirements, noise control is often given insufficient attention and serious considerations necessary to avoid very costly mitigation measures resulting from prolonged exposure to excessive noise pollution in industrial workplaces and facilities. Prolonged

exposure to excessive noise is an established hazard contributing to negative impact on human comfort, health, safety and welfare; in addition to cause for irritability, reduced workplace productivity, sleeplessness, anxiety, illness; potential healthrelated personnel claims. Operating industrial processes with excessive noise in a facility with poor noise control, particularly with human involvement, will very likely cause health issues with facility users, the involvement of OSHA, and may result in the imposition of very costly mitigation measures. It makes practical sense that effective noise control be incorporated as a determinant and critical consideration in the planning, design and operations of industrial facilities. Topics include: general information, course outline and objectives; properties and characteristics of sound wave and noise; overview of standards and regulatory framework; occupational safety and protection standards for noise control; and industrial facilities noise control and protection systems. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session May 31 Alfred Yalaju, RA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 674 $295

Innovative Green Infrastructure Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring • See page 54 for description 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 726 $195

Innovative Green Infrastructure Design (GI and Sites) • See page 53 for description 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 723 $195

Integrating Accessibility Accessibility for the disabled is not just the law, it is also good practice. It provides an opportunity to mainstream facilities components in a way that both the able and the not so able will find accessible. This is not always easily accomplished in new buildings, as existing spaces are usually more of a challenge to retrofit. This course examines ways in which the ADA and its variants can be creatively interpreted and used as guides to accomplishing universal accessibility. You will learn to meet the spirit of the law and not just see it a bothersome restriction imposed by the law.


Topics include: the law-existing, pro-

posed and exceptions; methods and technology; new and retrofitted facilities; and case studies. Particular attention is given to the new 2004 ADAAG and to the new 2008 New York City Building Code. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 23 Steven Zalben, AIA, NCARB, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW, 7 PDHs PMPD 895 $295

Integrating Interior Design Into Building Design: It’s Not Just Decorating With interior designers taking on far more responsibility than simply decorating, the architect’s role today in building design weighs more heavily on the design of the building “shell,” and less so on the articulation of interior space. This course will explore a variety of interior design strategies and concepts that the architect can employ during the design process to visually and functionally improve our interiors. With an emphasis on residential and light commercial spaces, this class will provide the professional with the resources, sharpened tools, and regained confidence to articulate, enhance, and maximize the functionality of our interior environments. Topics include: the use and impact of architectural features such as soffits, openings, molding, and lighting as well as the exploration of basic design elements and principles such as color, texture, line, contrast, transparency, and reflection to define and embellish interior space. Course material will include the selection of code appropriate materials and finishes, interior products which affect energy efficiency, available resources for locating sustainable products, lighting solutions, the effective use of furniture templates, and the determination of spatial clearances. In addition, this class will explore the sophisticated skill set of the trained interior designer so the architect can best integrate this professional into the design process when he/she is available for the project. • W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 31 Abby Schwartz, RA, SARA 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 668 $295

Integrating Landscape into Urban Architecture This seminar is for design professionals looking to integrate landscape into urban architectural situations. Its emphasis is on planting on slabs and in containers; exposures; and state of the art concepts dealing with wind, drainage, irrigation and environmental conditions. Architectural integration of play areas, sitting areas, special features (fountains, sculpture, etc.) and streetscapes are explored. Topics include: products for waterproof membranes, soils, filler materials, drainage and irrigation; design concepts for paving, site furnishing, lighting, play areas, etc.; plant materials, with an emphasis on the environmental conditions, exposures, winds, and seasonal aspects; a maintenance schedule for project follow-up. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 12 Charles Turofsky, RLA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 LA CES PMPD 866 $295

Land Use Engineering This land use engineering course will follow the development of a site plan design for a commercial or industrial project. Three major areas will be explored: the site selection process, preliminary technical and survey work, and site design. In the site selection process the following factors are considered: the proposed use vs. the zoning of the property, the zoning analysis, environmental and government restrictions to development, available utilities, local support or opposition, and a cost analysis. Topics under preliminary survey and technical work include property and topographic surveys, phase 1 environmental investigations, field assessments of environmental restrictions, and the development of concept plans. Finally, a step-by-step design procedure will be followed consisting of site layout, grading, drainage, utilities, lighting, and related design considerations. Topics include: the project team; site selection, includes zoning analysis, environmental restrictions, utilities, government restrictions, local support or opposition; preliminary technical work includes the property survey, topographic survey, phase 1 environmental assessment, environmental surveys and delineations, and concept plans; technical design including existing

conditions/demolition, site layout, grading, stormwater and drainage, utilities, lighting, structural engineering, construction details, and soils conservation. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Dave Egarian 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 823 $295

LEED® Commercial Interiors: Green Interior Design and Construction ID&C This one-day seminar is especially designed for architects, interior designers, electrical engineers, product managers and decorators who focus on the shades of green and will thoroughly prepare you for the LEED® ID&C professional exam. We also provide you with an excellent overview on how to save your clients money with tax incentives or rebates for renewable energy and water technology. Learning to incorporate affordable green strategies using cost-effective options and marketing techniques into your specifications will put you a cut above the rest. Topics include: minimum program requirements; LEED® project requirements; integrated renewable energy; the principles of sustainable design; credits-intents; requirements and strategies; product and material resources, and case studies. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 18 Irene Santoro, LEED®, AP, BD+C 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 794 $345

LEED® for Green Associate PLUS This two-day course prepares beginning green building professionals to pass the Green Building Certification Institute’s (GBCI) LEED® Green Associate exam. It presents the core concepts of sustainable design and all nine LEED® Rating Systems®. Passing this first exam prepares an attendee for the LEED AP status referred to as Tier Two. The program will also provide information on state or federal utility programs, tax credits, and incentives. Energy Star Performance for Homes and Commercial Buildings is cursorily reviewed to understand its contribution towards LEED certification of a building. Topics include: LEED® Green Associate PLUS is the most complete and comprehensive course available today. Our two-day education includes:

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green building principles; LEED® implementation process; LEED® credit structure and point system; credit intent and requirements; credit synergies; strategies and technologies; certificate of hours and attendance; eligibility to sit for the LEED® Green Associates Exam; and eligibility to sit for the Green Advantage Exam. Plus the following is included: financing; mortgages; tax incentives; government policies; overview of home and energy rating systems; overview of LEED®, Green Points, NAHB and Energy Star; and marketing strategies. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: F–Sa 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Jun 7–8 • Section 2: Tu–W 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Jul 23–24 Irene Santoro, LEED®, AP, BD+C (all sections) 14 AIA/HSW LUs, 14 PDHs PMPD 671 $679

LEED® (BD+C) Construction V3, 
Core and Shell, and K-12 Schools This two-day course prepares green building professionals to pass the Green Building Certification Institute’s LEED Accredited Professional with Specialty (LEED AP+) exam and prepares them for the next step. This will also give you the ability to be hired or bid on a LEED® Project. It provides the technical aspects of all material in LEED Green Associate Plus course and an in-depth look at the applicable international codes and standards. Technical requirements of Energy Star Performance and major ASHRAE standards are reviewed in depth as they are critical to the success of the LEED® certification process of a building. The course includes case studies and practice exam questions. Topics include: new construction; core and shell; schools (K-12): intents, requirements, national standards and local codes, strategies, product resources, and technology. Please note: Includes textbook, 500 questions, case studies, and 200 free online practice exam questions. • Section 1: F–Sa 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Jul 19–20 • Section 2: Tu–W 9 AM–5 PM 2 sessions Aug 6–7 Irene Santoro, LEED®, AP, BD+C (all sections)
 14 AIA/HSW LUs, 14 PDHs
 PMPD 678 $679 REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Mixed-Use Development—Beyond the City Limits The pattern of development that has dominated suburban growth in the postwar era has created a mismatch with our contemporary lifestyles. Our households have changed dramatically; the workplace and work force have transformed; our leisure time is highly programmed; and with gas prices continuing to rise, people have rediscovered old modes of transit. Over the past decade, higher-density mixed-use sustainable developments have popped up across the country with the aim to introduce urbanity as a new commodity in a landscape of quintessentially suburban development and big-box centers. Explore these new developments and the opportunities that are present across our region. Topics include: patterns of development—the evolution; horizontal vs. vertical mixed-use development; principles for development; elements of development—authenticity, density, mobility, and sustainability; transitoriented development; blending retail, residential, office, and public spaces; and case studies. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 2 David Robbins, AICP, RLA, LEED® 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 716 $295

New Technologies—Smart Grid and Smart Buildings This seminar will give architects, engineers, interior designers, and facility and construction managers an overview of new technologies including the smart grid and components, smart buildings and the relationship to the smart grid, and the design and management of new technologies such as solar PV and thermal, green roofs, combined heat and power systems, geothermal heating and cooling, and district heating and cooling. Topics include: schematic design of simple smart grids and smart buildings that will enable utilities and customers to communicate and manage power production and power demand in a constrained energy world; schematic design of solar PV and thermal, green roofs, combined heat and power systems, geothermal heating and cooling, and district heating and cooling; energy analysis tools to predict systems energy use and greenhouse gas outputs and financial tools to predict systems costs and payREGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

backs; financing mechanism such as federal and state rebates, 3rd party financing, and energy savings which will provide funds for the projects. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 1 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 605 $295

bility requirements for existing buildings including: alterations, additions, and alterations to primary function areas. • Th 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Aug 1 Jimmy Zuehl United Spinal Association 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 667 $295

New York City Accessibility Requirements: Workshop

New York City Commercial Energy Code

United Spinal Association’s New York City accessibility workshop will cover many important aspects of New York City accessible design for commercial and residential facilities. The course will begin with a focus on accessibility requirements, where attendees will gain an understanding of both federal and local laws, applicability, and pertinent reference standards. This portion of the program will emphasize information covering the new 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design. The workshop will then detail construction requirements for new commercial and new residential kitchen and bathroom facilities. You will learn key technical requirements applicable to multiple-user toilet facilities, commercial single-use toilet facilities, public kitchens, residential kitchens, and residential bathrooms. New York City accessible dwelling units, Type B dwelling units, Type A bathrooms, and Appendix P bathrooms will also be explained. In addition, attendees will discover the differences between local New York City requirements found in the building code and referenced by ICC ANSI A117.1; as compared to those requirements found in the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Fair Housing Act. The class will finish by addressing existing facilities and the general requirements for alterations and additions. Participants will learn about requirements for such work including applicability of New York City Local Law 58. Topics include: an in-depth review of federal accessibility requirements and a review of applicable federal laws that mandate accessibility (ADA, ABA, Section 504, Fair Housing); local accessibility requirements (2008 NYC Building Code); technical review of commercial kitchens and bathrooms; class exercise incorporating commercial kitchens/bathrooms key design elements; technical review of residential accessibility requirements for kitchens and bathrooms; class exercise incorporating residential kitchens/bathrooms key design elements; review of accessi-

This one-day seminar elaborates on the prescriptive compliance path of the NYC energy code. The presentation includes a review and analysis of the mechanical, envelope, and lighting/power requirements for commercial buildings. The course is based on selections of the code highlighted; explanations of the applicability of the section; and corresponding images of real-life building situations of both compliant and noncompliant constructions, as appropriate. In order to enable greater compliance with the energy code, we will encourage a discussion around interpretations and applications of the code by addressing the building science and intent behind the code’s prescriptions. The presentation includes plenty of images, clearly prioritizing the content being conveyed. Within each section of the code, there are numerous seemingly small issues (often only one sentence) that have a large impact. We will identify and discuss these points to ensure that you understand the full application of the code. The last section will be devoted to enforcement of the code to ensure compliance. Since the code is primarily a prescriptive code and the majority of projects will be able to readily comply, emphasis will be placed on the standard compliance path using COMcheck. The performance-based Energy Cost Budget Method of ASHRAE 90.1 will be introduced as an alternate method of compliance. Topics include: introduction to building energy consumption and ASHRAE 90.1; NYC commercial energy code for mechanical systems, envelope, lighting, and power systems; NYC energy code requirements and enforcement to ensure compliance, prescriptive compliance path using COMCheck, introduction to alternate performance-based compliance path using Energy Cost Budget Method of ASHRAE 90.1. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 9 Juan C. Toro, PE, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 791 $295

New York Construction Law The law influences all aspects of the construction process. Its reach extends far and wide, and its impact can be felt from the very beginning of a project, through completion, closeout, and beyond. Attendees are sensitized to the problems, issues, and concerns that can arise during major phases of a project and leave with a better understanding of how the law affects them. Topics include: bidding; contractor claims, owner defenses, and related contract clauses; subcontractor claims; owner’s rights and affirmative claims; bonds; New York Lien Law; Public and Private Improvement Mechanics Lien. Registration deadline: Apr 6 • F–Sa 9 AM–4 PM 2 sessions Jul 19–20 Robert J. Miletsky, Esq. 12 AIA/HSW LUs, 12 PDHs PMPD 802 $575

New York State Building Codes, Rules, and Regulations This course consists of a series of lectures focusing on recent changes in the industry that affect the practice of architecture and engineering in the state of New York. Starting with the New York State adaptation of the International Building Code—i.e., the Building Code of New York State, the Energy Conservation Construction Code, the Fire Code, the Fuel Gas Code, the Mechanical Code, the Plumbing Code, the Property Maintenance Code, the Residential Code—and their interpretations and applications locally. In a seminar environment, you will achieve an understanding of the existing New York City Building Code while recognizing the need for change. Topics include: the New York State Building Code and the Federal OSHA Labor Law Safety and Health Regulations for Construction, as well as the New York City Building Code; how building codes affect the cost of construction by dictating the type of materials developers can use; detailing the kind of buildings or structures which can be built; and establishing the review process that must be followed to ensure code compliance. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the Buildings Department and its authority. • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 25 Edward D. Re, Jr., AIA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 816 $295


Noise Abatement and Control: Multi-Family Housing This seminar is intended for planners, architects, engineers, facilities managers and construction personnel to raise their sensitivities, understanding and technical knowledge of noise abatement and control, related standards and regulations for multi-family residential housing facilities development, planning, design and maintenance. Prolonged exposure to noise pollution has a negative impact on human comfort, health, safety and welfare, and contributes to irritability, reduced workplace productivity, sleeplessness, anxiety and illness. With increased awareness of these adversities, considerations and actions are emerging for mitigated actions in various communities, municipalities, and metropolises. Standards and regulations for noise control and noise exposure in housing vary and overlap because they originate from different cognizant organizations that establish the standards, metrics, and related controls for different noise sources. Major noise sources in many problem facilities include poor considerations for noise control within the facility during the planning, design and construction development stages, and include noise pollution encroachment from nearby developments such as roadways, airports and railroads, and/ or commercial and industrial facilities. Significant regulatory framework for noise control in residential dwellings and multi-family housing is enforced by Housing and Urban Development (HUD), though it is not a cognizant organization. The Federal Government interests in FHA, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is a linkage with which HUD exercises regulatory oversight in the mortgage finance industry. With this linkage HUD has significant leverage in its enforcement responsibilities in technical support, insurance amount determination, and financial assistance for project facilities construction. HUD’s oversight reach is essentially based on the Noise Control Act (1972), the National Housing Act (1949), the National Environmental Policy Act (1969) with subsequent amendments and applicable statutes including 24 CFR Part 51. Topics include: properties and characteristics of sound wave and noise; acoustical considerations and noise pollution evaluation for residential and housing developments; overview of regulatory considerations and standards; and acoustical and noise control systems for residential and housing

developments. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 14 Alfred Yalaju, RA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 676 $295

Offsite Fabrication for Housing No one really knows when humans started to prefabricate buildings. Certainly nomadic herdsmen have engaged in a form of prefabrication for thousands of years, in that their tents have been made in a single place while being assembled repeatedly at different locations. Prefab started to enter the architect’s and engineer’s consciousness right along with the dawn of the Industrial Revolution and reached an early high point in Sir Joseph Paxton’s design for the Crystal Palace in London’s Hyde Park. This 1,850-ft.-long iron, glass and wood structure, with over 900,000 sq. ft. of glazing, was made in a factory and then erected on site in merely 17 weeks. But offsite fabrication in architecture in the 20th century had mostly a troublesome past, punctuated by some spectacular failures both financial and structural. And while buildings remain for the most part site-built adventures, where ungainly raw supplies are cut down to size in all kinds of weather, other industries such as airplane and auto manufacturing have leaped forward with modern procurement, contractual and fabrication methods, and dry and predictable indoor conditions. Nevertheless, things look very bright for the future of offsite fabrication for housing and similar applications. Prefab dovetails nicely with the recent surge of concern for securing a green and sustainable future. This course will examine the various aspects of offsite fabrication with respect to how architects and developers can get involved. Topics include: images of offsite fabrication from around the world; definition of terms and a short history of offsite fabrication; What is the nature of offsite fabrication in the UK vs. the USA? Why do prefabrication and why not? What are the components of a pre-fabricated building? What is the process of pre-fabricated construction? What makes offsite fabrication really sing? How is offsite fabrication a green way forward?; Technical constraints particular to offsite; the nature of innovation; and case studies. The afternoon will be devoted to a hands-

on workshop where students will be asked to respond to a particular request from the public sector to solve a problem using offsite fabrication techniques. Registration deadline: Jun 17 • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 29 Michael Hardiman, AIA, NCARB 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 966 $295

Performance Modeling for Carbon Neutral Buildings This will show architects, engineers, interior, and landscape designers how to design and renovate carbon neutral buildings using building performance modeling techniques. Carbon neutral buildings require low or net zero energy usage, and designs need to be tailored to maximize energy gains from solar, wind, and geothermal, and to minimize losses from building components such as walls, windows, and appliances. This course will show architects and engineers the software tools available to help in designing these low carbon buildings. Topics include: review of the following: causes and effects of climate change; procedures for measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions; green design standards; energy and greenhouse gas calculations in reference to designing for carbon neutral buildings; LEED® certified, silver, gold, platinum; and new construction, renovations, existing buildings. Building Performance Modeling basics: energy load estimating—lighting, heating, cooling, ventilation, plug; and solar, wind, geothermal estimating. Software tools available to measure and predict: solar gain; PV production; green roof performance—solar and water; geothermal performance—energy; and whole building energy use. Performance Modeling case studies of leading carbon neutral buildings: South London, NYC. Performance Modeling design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class)— new construction: modeling of base design for building energy loads and modeling of base design for solar, wind, geothermal. Performance Modeling design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class)—major renovations: modeling of base design for building energy loads and modeling of base design for solar, wind, geothermal. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 22 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 602 $295

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Planning and Design of Urban Transportation Infrastructure Projects Utilizing real-life case studies, this class will examine the planning and design issues unique to urban transportation projects, specifically involving airports and rail. Making use of presentation materials, hand-outs, and in-class exercises, both new construction and additions to existing facilities will be examined. Drawing upon experiences and lessons learned from recent projects (including the WTC Temporary PATH Station, the WTC Transportation Hub, Newark and JFK AirTrains), this class will highlight numerous issues including the challenges related to working with a signature architecture within the confines of a site-wide master plan, as well as achieving contemporary sustainability and security standards, resulting in an enhancement of the public experience. Topics include: project identification, programming/criteria, code compliance, accessibility, and pedestrian flow; provisions for protection of public life safety, including impacts on building design, in order to both minimize threats and provide for safety in the case of an event; achieving/surpassing required contemporary Sustainability Design Guidelines (SDGs) and LEED® certification eligibility through an integrative building design; conceptual planning, alternatives analysis, development of design, and construction document packaging; estimating, scheduling, minimization of risk; contractor procurement, construction, community outreach, funding, project delivery methods. • W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 26 Thomas L. Grassi, AIA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 660 $295

Preparing Energy Audit Reports This course will focus on preparing clear and concise energy audit reports for clients. With high energy costs, it is important that the energy audit report convinces the client to perform the recommended work. Case studies of actual reports prepared by the instructor will be discussed in detail. The class will also go over what to do when savings cannot be accurately projected for certain types of energy conservation measures. Topics include: selecting the appropriate energy conservation measures, REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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estimating energy savings, estimating cost savings, estimating implementation costs, calculating payback period. • M 1–4 PM 1 session Jul 1 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSWLUs, PDHs PMPD 659 $195

Principles of Sustainable Design—An Introduction to High Performance Buildings This introductory seven-hour course defines Green Building as an integrative and holistic process. The class introduces all the most popular certification rating systems available in the U.S. today such as: LEED®®, The Green Initiative® (Green Globes Systems), NAHB® Green, and Energy Star® and discusses their program intents and strategies along with their case studies. It includes an extensive overview to certify your business or firm through Green Advantage® for residential and commercial high-performance buildings. This course provides a solid foundation for you to be personally accredited through the GBCI as a LEED® Green Associate, and LEED® v3 training courses for the LEED®, AP status or to certify your business as being green. Topics include: the history of sustainability; the history of sustainable government policy; overview of home and energy rating systems; overview of Rating Systems® such as: LEED®, Green Initiatives®, Green Points® , NAHB Green®, and Energy Star®; marketing strategies for products; credits, intents and requirements; credit categories or the principles of sustainable design: sustainable sites, water, energy and atmosphere, material and resources, indoor environmental quality, requirements for high performance buildings; strategies and technology; renewable energy–green power–REC’s; an overview of Energy Star, HERS and RESNET; national standards and local codes; government and non–government agencies; and product resources. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 15 • Section 2: Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 30 Irene Santoro, LEED®, AP, BD+C (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 673 $345

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Protecting the Public Health by Greening Your Specifications This course will discuss the history of green design including the research, studies, and experiments that led to the adoption of the LEED® rating system. Participants will learn how to correlate studies to green design, understand the LEED® rating system, and learn how to implement LEED® principles in specifications. The course will teach participants how to create and edit Division One General Requirements Sections to cover the procedural and administrative requirements necessary to make sustainable architectural practices a reality. Participants will then learn what has to be done to individual specifications sections to make them green and sustainable. This course will prepare the general practitioner with the tools necessary to implement green design principles in contract documents, will cover the technical difficulties encountered with documenting compliance, and help the general practitioner to achieve LEED® certification by creating enforceable specifications. Topics include: the correlation between sustainable design practices and the public health (history of green/ sustainable design; reports and analyses; productivity, health and well-being); LEED® credit point system; procedural and administrative requirements for LEED® projects (Division 1 general requirements for LEED® Projects: Section 01352, Section 01524, Section 01810); what makes materials sustainable or green; and greening technical sections of the specifications. • Th 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 11 Steven Danielpour, AIA, CCS, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 955 $295

Public Right-of-Way Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring • See page 54 for description 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 725 $195

Public Right-of-Way Design (GI and Streets) • See page 53 for description 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 722 $195

Residential Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of air conditioning and heat pumps as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a Home Inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes air conditioning and heat pumps function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct the air conditioning and heat pumps system inspection component of a Home Inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public are the preservation/reuse of existing facilities, rightsizing equipment, space zoning, smart controls, geo-exchange, mass absorption, natural materials, materials selection and embodied energy, alternate energy, life cycle assessment, systems tune-up, thermal bridging, radiant heating and cooling, natural ventilation, cavity walls for insulating airspace, deconstruction and salvaged materials, and staff training. Topics include: air conditioning and heat pump inspection; introduction to air conditioners, water cooled and other types; cooling capacity of air conditioning; the compressor, corrosion of the compressor, and compressor coils; evaporator coils; condensate system and refrigerant lines; condenser fans and evaporator fan; duct system and thermostats; air cooled and water cooled inspection procedure; theory of heat, coefficient of performance and introduction to heat pumps; and heat pumps similar to air conditioners. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 3 • Section 2: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 8 • Section 3: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 680 $345

Residential Bathroom Design From Start to Finish This course will explore the fundamentals of residential bathroom design from powder rooms to hall baths to master bathroom suites. Participants

will learn to incorporate the full scope of bathroom design and execution into an architectural design: whether an addition, renovation, or new construction project; whether high-end or tightly budgeted. Technical information will be provided in detail so that the professional can develop the necessary skill set for start-to-finish residential bathroom design, such as adjacencies, proximities, critical dimensions, clearances, and budgeting. Discussion will address layout, lighting, fixtures, materials and problem areas. Topics include: history of bathroom design; programming residential bathrooms, configurations and critical dimensions; cabinetry and hardware; plumbing fixtures; countertops and finishes; “green” bathroom principles; architectural issues related to bathroom design; code issues; design for clients with special needs, and current trends in bathroom design. Other topics will include ways to incorporate sustainability and “green” principles into the design and decision-making process; materials selection relative to cost; maintenance, safety, health, and lifestyle issues. Multiple case studies will be used to exemplify the above concepts throughout the course as well as hands-on sketch problems at the conclusion of class. • Th 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 20 Abby Schwartz, ARA 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 719 $295

Residential Chimney and Wood Heating and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of chimney and wood heating as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a Home Inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes chimney and wood heating function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct the chimney and wood heating system inspection component of a Home Inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/reuse of existing facilities, rightsizing equipment, smart controls, natural materials, materials selection and embodied energy, alternate energy, life cycle assessment,


systems tune-up, deconstruction, energy modeling, energy source ramifications, energy saving appliances and equipment, salvaged materials, highefficiency equipment and staff training. Topics include: chimney inspection, flue liners, chimney caps, chimney height; fire safety, draft, chimney damage and vents, creosote; wood heat, wood stoves, wood stove conditions and wood stove owners manual; oil tank clearances, vent connectors; fireplaces, masonry fireplaces, masonry and steel fireplaces; factory built/zero clearance, factory built components; and footings and foundations, fire-place hearths, fireboxes. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 5 • Section 2: W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 10 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 681 $345

Residential Electrical Systems and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of electrical systems as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a home inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes electrical systems function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct an electrical system inspection component of a Home Inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/reuse of existing facilities including rightsizing equipment, building orientation, daylighting, natural ventilation, smart controls, efficient artificial lighting, and energy saving appliances. Topics include: service drop and service laterals; service box and service size; grounding and bonding; distribution panels; 240-volt and multi-wire circuits; introduction to branch circuit wiring; knob and tube wiring and aluminum wiring; lights; outlets and ground fault circuit interrupters; smoke detectors; and inspection procedures and tools.

Please note: Includes textbook.

• Section 1: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 7 • Section 2: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 12 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 682 $345

Residential Exteriors and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of exteriors as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a home inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes exteriors function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct the exteriors inspection component of a home inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/reuse of existing facilities including rightsizing equipment, building orientation, windows and openings, natural ventilation, smart controls, and efficient artificial lighting. Topics include: architectural styles; brick, stone, stucco and concrete problems; wood, hardwood and OSB siding problems; metal and vinyl siding problems; cement based siding problems; clay and slate shingles; asphalt shingles; wood/soil contact and exposed foundations; soffits and fascia; doors, windows-trim; flashing and caulking; gutters and downspouts; flat roof drainage; retaining wall problems; garage and carports floor and doors; and basement walk-outs. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 10 • Section 2: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 15 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 683 $345

Residential Gas and Oil Furnaces and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of gas and oil furnaces as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a home inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes gas and oil furnaces function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct the gas and oil furnaces system inspection component of a Home Inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/reuse of existing facilities including rightsizing equipment, smart controls, and energy saving appliances and equipment. Topics include: introduction to gas furnaces; gas piping, combustion air, gas burners, heat shields, heat exchangers, cabinets, fan controls, thermostats; dating furnaces; vent connectors, blowers, air filters, ducts and registers, leaky ducts; conventional furnaces, mid-efficiency furnaces, high-efficiency furnaces, gravity furnaces; oil heating systems, oil tanks, oil burners; and standards of practice. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 12 • Section 2: W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 17 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 684 $345

Residential House Inspections A proper house inspection is a must before purchasing a property. A thorough inspection can detect potential problems with a structure that might be overlooked by a person not familiar with construction. This class will teach how to perform a residential house inspection. It is important to ask the right questions and to be curious about what you are seeing. Topics include: dating the structure: How old is it? Were there any additions or alterations to the building since it was built? Structural inspection: foundations and basement floors; beams, rafters, and joists; HVAC: steam boilers, hot water boilers, forced hot air systems, and air conditioning; electrical: types of conduit, and panel boxes;

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plumbing: types of water pipes; roofing: how old is the roof? Course also includes case studies and when is a house a knock down? • M 1–4 PM 1 session Jul 8 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/ HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 663 $195

Residential Insulation and How to Evaluate It Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of insulation as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a home inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes insulation function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct the insulation system inspection component of a Home Inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/reuse of existing facilities, rightsizing equipment, smart controls, geo-exchange, mass absorption, materials selection and embodied energy, alternate energy, life cycle assessment, systems tune-up, thermal bridging, radiant heating and cooling, natural ventilation, cavity walls for insulating. Topics include: introduction to insulation and the basics, such as, R values, moisture, and the building envelope; insulation inspection including Urea Formaldehyde foam insulation, radiant barriers, air/vapor barriers; roof ventilation, living space ventilation and heat recovery ventilators; insulation inspection, attic ventilation-inspection, flat roof and cathedral inspection, above-grade inspection, basement and crawl space inspection; exhaust fan, heat recovery and ventilator inspection; insulation and ventilation procedures. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 14 • Section 2: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 19 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 685 $345

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Residential Interiors and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of interiors as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a Home Inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes interiors function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct an interiors inspection component of a home inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the building form, preservation/reuse of existing facilities, rightsizing equipment, space zoning, open, active daylight spaces, smart controls, windows and openings, natural materials, materials selection and embodied energy, alternate energy, life cycle assessment, systems tune-up, natural ventilation, deconstruction and salvaged materials, efficient artificial lighting, day-lighting, natural ventilation, and staff training. Topics include: floors, walls, ceilings, stairs, doors; trim and cabinets, windows and solariums; surface water control; foundation flaws, interior drainage tile, high water table; and implications of wet basements, wet basement clues, cures and inspection. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 17 • Section 2: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 22 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 686 $345

Residential Kitchen Design from Soup to Nuts This course will explore the fundamentals of residential kitchen design from layout to lighting, design to documentation, to tricks and trends. Participants will learn to incorporate the full scope of kitchen design and execution into an architectural design: whether an addition, renovation, or new construction project; whether urban or suburban; whether high-end or tightly budgeted. Technical information will be provided in detail so that the professional can develop the necessary skill set for soup-to-nuts residential kitchen design, such as adjacencies, proximities, critical REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

dimensions, clearances, and budgeting. Other topics include ways to incorporate sustainability and “green” principles into the design and decision-making process; material selection relative to cost; maintenance, safety, health, and lifestyle issues. Multiple case studies will be used to exemplify the above concepts throughout the course as well as hands-on sketch problems at the conclusion of class. The ability to provide such full scope services will be the “icing on the cake” you can offer to your customers. Topics include: history of kitchen design; how to program the residential kitchen; configurations and critical dimensions; cabinetry and hardware; appliances; countertops and finishes; “green” kitchen principles; architectural issues related to kitchen design; and current trends in kitchen design. • Th 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 27 Abby Schwartz, ARA 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 714 $295

Residential Landscape Architecture This seminar explores the design and construction of walkways, driveways, lighting, fencing, walls, patios, decks, swimming pools, tennis courts, sports courts, porticos, trellises, fire pits, outdoor kitchens, and other site features, with an eye toward climactic conditions and plant zones in the New York metropolitan area. Privacy screens, perennial gardens, foundation plantings, seashore planting, deer proofing, and planting on slopes will also be discussed. Topics include: client interviews, site analysis, presentations, zoning and planting considerations, filings, planning boards, architectural review boards, building departments, supervision, inspections, selection of contractors, punch lists, certificates of completion, sketch problems. • Th 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 18 Charles Turofsky, RLA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 LA CES PMPD 946 $295

Residential Plumbing and How to Evaluate It Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of plumbing as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a Home Inspection that protects the safe-

ty of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes plumbing function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct the plumbing system inspection component of a home inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/reuse of existing facilities including rightsizing equipment, smart controls, geo-exchange, water conservation, materials selection and embodied energy, alternate energy, life cycle assessment, systems tune-up, radiant heating and cooling and energy-saving appliances and equipment. Topics include: an overview of private and public water sources; public water sources—shut off valves and supply piping distribution; water heaters: components and features, plus other water heaters; piping materials and their characteristics; drain-waste and vent plumbing conditions and sewage ejector pumps; fixtures and faucets, whirlpool baths; and septic systems. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 19 • Section 2: W 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 24 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 687 $345

Residential Roofing and How to Evaluate It Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of roofing as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. This is just one of 12 legally required inspection components for a home inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes roofing function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct the roofing system inspection component of a home inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/ reuse of existing facilities, rightsizing equipment, space zoning, smart controls, windows and openings, natural materials, materials selection and embodied energy, alternate energy, life cycle assessment, systems tune-up, thermal bridging, radiant heating and cooling, natural ventilation, building orientation, deconstruction and salvaged materials, sun shading and

passive solar collection opportunities. Topics include: roofing inspection; asphalt shingle conditions; damaged roofing and ice dams; wood shingles and shakes; slate roofing, clay tile roofing, concrete tile roofing, fiber cement roofing, metal tile roofing and roll roofing; and valley flashing, chimney flashing, hip and ridge flashing, stack and vent flashing, roof/wall flashing, skylight flashing, dormer flashing, drip edge flashing, and roof wall flashing. Please note: Includes textbook. • Section 1: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 21 • Section 2: F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 26 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 688 $345

Residential Steam, Electric, Floor, Wall Heat plus Hot Water Boilers and How to Evaluate Them Holistically Architects and engineers will look at all areas of steam, electric, floor, wall heat plus hot water boilers as they pertain to residential housing in one (1) to four (4) family units. These are two of 12 legally required inspection components for a home inspection that protects the safety of a home and can bring it into code compliance. You will focus on what makes steam, electric, floor, wall heat plus hot water boilers function correctly and what are common construction, renovation errors or omissions. This will lead to an accurate understanding of how to conduct a steam, electric, floor, wall heat plus hot water boilers system inspection component of a home inspection, under the appropriate professional licenses. Benefiting the public is the preservation/reuse of existing facilities, rightsizing equipment, smart controls, natural materials, materials selection and embodied energy, alternate energy, life cycle assessment, systems tune-up, deconstruction, energy modeling, energy source ramifications, energy saving appliances and equipment, salvaged materials, high-efficiency equipment, and staff training. Topics include: steam heat introduction; steam boiler operation and components, including one pipe system, even heating, Hartford loop and equalizer, main air vents, distribution pipes and radiators, traps, condensate pumps and boiler feed pumps, low water cut-out, auto water feeder, water level gauge, general steam boiler problems, water hammer,


two steam boiler components; and hot water boilers, controls, distribution piping, air vents, distribution devices, inspection procedures, life cycles. Boiler controls, boiler inspection procedures, reporting defects, inspection, problems and implications, inspection tips. Please note: Two textbooks included. • Section 1: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 24 • Section 2: M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 29 Dale Paegelow, AIA, RA, NCARB (all sections) 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 689 $375

Restaurant Design, in New York City and Beyond Warren Ashworth has, over the last 30 years, been a principal architect of more than 150 restaurants in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Orlando. Along with his business partner, Larry Bogdanow, he designed the renowned Union Square Café and went on to national prominence in the field. This course will look at the design of restaurants from the architect’s point of view and will touch on the myriad aspects of this extremely complex and idiosyncratic niche in the world of design. Topics include: the design side: the design of one-offs versus multiple-units; and safety and health in the restaurant environment; operations: how your design can minimize your client’s labor costs and back of the house vs. front of the house—how to balance the two; the business side: keeping the customer satisfied; getting to know your client; the business benefits and pitfalls of designing restaurants; keeping up with the competition; and turning one restaurant commission into many. technical issues: demystifying the public assembly filing requirements; working with kitchen consultants; specifying finishes, furnishings and equipment; acoustics in restaurants; and sources. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Aug 2 Warren Ashworth 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 679 $295

Roofing 101 This course provides general knowledge on roofing installation, correct procedures and practices, as well as new trends. With new regulations and energy efficiency demands, the roofing industry has had to adapt to existing regulatory and climate condi-

tions. Attendees will learn details in installation of roofing materials both in residential and commercial applications. Topics include: reasons to choose a single ply system; TPO vs EPDM; vegetative roof basics and sustainability in roofing; affordable slate roofing systems; the most common mistakes in residential roofing. Recommended audience: Architects, specifiers, construction managers, and building owners. • Th 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Paulo Vieiradas, Martin Grohman, LEED®, AP, Denis Brilliant 6 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 750 $295

Security Design through CPTED Terrorism, crime, and workplace violence are issues of everyday life for millions of Americans. CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) is a design strategy that can enable architects to use their skills to create safer facilities. Many city and county governments are adopting CPTED ordinances requiring site plan reviews. The proper implementation of CPTED provides a security design that reduces crime and violence. It addresses site selection and balances the use of natural barriers with security technology to increase personal security. Topics include: natural surveillance— the placement of physical features, activities, and people in order to maximize visibility; this includes the effective lighting of public spaces, alignment of walkways and raised entrances, and the placement of windows, doors, and lobby areas. Natural access control—the physical guidance of people coming and going from a space by the judicious placement of entrances, exits, gates, barriers, landscaping, and mechanical measures, such as doors, gates, locks. Territorial reinforcement—the use of physical attributes that express ownership, such as fences, pavement treatment, art, signage, and landscaping. Registration deadline: TBA • Tu 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Robert Summers, CPP 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 857 $195

Small-Scale Real Estate Development This seminar offers design professionals insight into the lucrative yet high-risk challenges of small-scale real estate development. Covering five major components in real estate development—finance, law, design, construction and politics—this course is targeted to seasoned professionals who seek to go beyond offering traditional design services and leverage their talent for greater profit. Topics include: an examination of basic financial concepts on debt and equity structuring including: net operating income, internal rate of return, net present value, cash flow, and net cash flow before taxes. Attendees will also learn about basic legal frameworks and their tax implications, in addition to other legal forces impacting development, such as zoning, building codes, and preservation law. Participants will learn how local government affects the real estate market through the use of special use districts, empowerment zones, and land use initiatives. Participants apply welfare elements to development problems to develop affordable housing, low-income housing, and senior housing. Registration deadline: Jun 26 • M 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 8 Roy R. Pachecano, AIA 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 885 $295

Solar Photovoltaics Solar photovoltaics, also known as PV, can be incorporated into the architecture of a building as a method of generating electricity. Systems have come down in price. Utilities are encouraging their installation. This course will look at the technology of these systems and their economics. Topics include: theory of solar photovoltaics, the current technology, incorporation into building architecture, and economics of installations. • M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Jul 15 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 662 $195

Specifications Writing, Principles, and Practice This seminar discusses materials and products used in building construction; methods to research, evaluate,

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and select products; and specifications writing. Learn to establish requirements, identify attributes and products, and write biddable and binding specifications. Topics include: the Construction Specifications Institutes Manual of Practice; organizational tools used by the industry to catalog; organization of a project manual; and specifications writing techniques, structure, and language. • Th 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 25 Steven Danielpour, AIA, CCS, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 801 $295

Sustainability Approach to Engineering Design Designers, engineers, and architects are in the unique position in society of bringing ideas into form. This course challenges designers to reprioritize, rethink, and approach design opportunities from a sustainability perspective, so that nothing created adds to the environmental or health burden we currently face. By taking a whole system design approach and integrating every aspect of the lifecycle of the product or system into the design criteria, we can minimize environmental and health impacts and move forward to achieving sustainability without compromising the objective of design. Topics include: overview of sustainability, EPA’s Design for the Environment, and green engineering; innovators in the field; whole system design vs. traditional engineering design process; whole systems approach to product and process design where environmental elements are included in the initial design objectives, rather than dealt with as constraints; introduction to sustainable engineering concepts: whole systems approaches, interdisciplinary teams, pollution prevention, waste minimization, life-cycle analysis, industrial ecology; and case studies. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 13 Terese M. Kinsley, PE, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 897 $295

Subsurface Utility Engineering Underneath our streets and properties there is a complex web of pipes, cables and wiring providing us with utility services such as power, water, REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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gas, communications, sewerage, etc. When new projects are constructed, excavations often encounter underground utilities that have been omitted or shown incorrectly. Often these errors result in design conflicts, unplanned utility relocations, project redesign, construction delays, change orders, and utility damages. Learn how a Subsurface Utility Engineering (SUE) program per the recently developed ASCE Standard 38-02 will ensure a constructible design relative to existing active and abandoned underground utilities. Learn the tools and techniques used to create an accurate and comprehensive map of underground utilities, as well as the process of air/ vacuum excavation for acquiring the precise location and size of utilities at points of potential conflict. Topics include: the existing utility problem; history of Subsurface Utility Engineering (SUE); intro to ASCE 38-02; utility records acquisition; quality levels of service, A to D; cost benefits of SUE; tools and techniques used in SUE; federal highways promotion of SUE; NYS Code Rule 753; the utility designating process; electromagnetics vs. ground-penetrating radar; SUE GIS Project; mapping overhead utility systems; the air/vacuum test hole process; contracting for SUE; SUE vendor liability; in-place manhole detailing; obtaining inverts in gravity sewers; and case studies. • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 Session Jun 28 Van A. Singer, PE 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 998 $295

Sustainable Standards for Buildings and Infrastructure— BREAM, Energy Star, LEED® This seminar will teach architects, engineers, interior designers, and facility and construction managers the green standards they need to design and manage sustainable buildings and infrastructure. Topics include: an overview of green standards including basic building codes, BREAM, EPA Energy Star and LEED®; a review and class application of BREAM, EPA Energy Star, and LEED® projects; an in-depth look at, and in-class project involving a current LEED® project; a review of “green” professional certifications.

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• Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 20 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 603 $295

Sustaining Mixed-income Housing The shift towards sustainable urban housing extends beyond energy efficiency, use of recycled materials, natural resource conservation, or transit-oriented development. The preservation of human resources and neighborhood ecosystems must also be considered in development and planning efforts. In cities where the high costs of shelter routinely displace residents, our practices must account for the economic, political, and physical sustainability of housing that supports diverse communities. This seminar explores the role that policy, subsidy, design, maintenance, preservation, and right of tenure play in the sustaining of such housing and communities. In particular the seminar seeks to broaden the architect’s understanding of how multi-family housing programs function in New York City and explore how housing programs, housing policies, design issues, and architectural issues interact. By analyzing the successes and failures of specific housing developments, we will identify overlapping themes and best practices. Within this framework the seminar will also explore multiple modes of architectural practice and intervention. Topics include: preservation and reuse; housing subsidy programs and regulations; history, policy and theory of mixed-income housing development; design and architectural issues in mixed-income housing; residential rights of tenure; community-based design, architecture, and planning. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 David B. Powell 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 730 $295

The Architect’s Role in Development: Preserving the Public’s Welfare This course traces the history of the architect/engineer (A/E) in the creation of significant urban development that gave rise to cornerstone concepts of the preservation of the public’s welfare. Participants engage in a dynamic classroom environment where conventional notions of the architect’s

role in development are challenged. Notions that bend conventional wisdom on its end and tie the design professional’s actual fiduciary duties to the state, the client, and general public are addressed. Topics include: an examination of how the A/E advises the owner/client; an overview of ADA/Accessibility, federal, state, and local building codes; zoning resolution, municipal variances, and historic preservation laws and environmental regulations. A history of the architect’s fiduciary duties over the past three centuries and how they have changed is covered. Registration deadline: Jun 26

• Su 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 7 Roy Pachecano, AIA 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 793B $295

The Environment, SEQRA and the Engineered Project The State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) regulates local and state agency approval of engineered projects. This course will cover Article 8 of the New York State Environmental Conservation Law, detailing the operational aspects of the law, particularly as it affects major civil construction and the construction of residential and non-residential structures. The course will also go into the details of 6 NYCRR 6l7, the regulations promulgated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. The class will also cover the interaction of the Freshwater Wetlands Act, the Tidal Wetlands Act, and other major environmental laws as they interact with SEQRA. Topics include: article 8 Text, 6 NYCRR 6l7, selection and role of lead agency, positive and negative declarations, the Environmental Assessment Form, the Environmental Impact Statement, and major case law decisions. • M 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jul 22 Daniel Karpen, PE 6 AIA/HSW LUs, 6 PDHs PMPD 995 $295

The New York State Energy Conservation Construction Code The New York State Energy Conservation Construction Code applies to residential and commercial buildings. The code regulates the design and construction of buildings for the effective use of energy. The code is intended to provide flexibility to permit the use of innovative approaches and techniques to achieve the effective use of energy. Topics include: existing buildings; historic buildings; additions to buildings; substantial alternations to buildings; exemptions to code; definitions; residential energy efficiency; building design for commercial buildings; and NYC Department of Buildings EC-1: energy cost budget worksheet. • M 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jul 29 Daniel Karpen, PE 6 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 936 $295

The Path to Greater Architectural Freedom with Today’s Structural Steel This is a comprehensive program developed by the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), exploring the use of structural steel in the safest and most cost-effective manner, while achieving new freedom in architectural expression. Topics include: the flexibility and enhanced properties of today’s new structural steel; the latest information on fabrication and forming techniques for structural steel; structural engineering concepts such as load flow, lateral load-resisting framing systems, bracing concepts, joints, vibrations, selecting preliminary member sizes, and communication with the structural engineer; product suppliers and material availability; enclosure details and tolerances involving pre-cast elements—masonry, metal deck, and steel; the effects of fire and weather on steel as well as fire protection systems; painting and surface preparation. Highlights of the revised Code of Standard Practice will be presented, and will cover architectural-exposed structural steel (AESS). • Tu 1–5 PM 1 session Jun 25 Erleen Hatfield, PE, AIA, LEED®, AP 4 AIA/HSW LUs, 4 PDHs PMPD 835 $199


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Tidal Wetlands Tidal wetlands are regulated by Article 25 of the New York State Environmental Conservation Law. This class will cover the law and how it affects tidal wetlands in New York State. The definition of tidal wetlands is defined by statute according to vegetation and those areas which border on or lie beneath tidal waters. The NYS DEC publishes official maps of mapped tidal wetlands. Permits are required for certain activities, including construction, on tidal wetlands and within a 75-foot buffer zone. In New York State, substantial tidal wetlands exist on Long Island. Permits are also subject to SEQRA. Topics include: definition of Tidal Wetlands; mapping of Tidal Wetlands; Tidal Wetland permits; interaction with SEQRA; and town and federal approvals. • M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Jun 3 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 996 $195

21st Century Performance from 19th Century Walls Old walls are masonry walls. These workhorses have multiple jobs to accomplish. They need to support the building, keep the rain out, and keep the outside and the inside apart. The 21st-century version of indoor comfort is a lot different than the 19th-century version, and as such the tasks the wall must accomplish are more difficult and more fraught with risk. This presentation, suitable for single family homes or large buildings, will look at what we are asking of our masonry walls, and how they can be made to endure while providing better occupant comfort and energy efficiency. This class will cover moisture management, retrofit techniques, modeling for energy efficiency, repointing, and other retrofit strategies. Topics include: how old structural masonry buildings work: keeping moisture out; understanding masonry materials; basics of occupant comfort and thermal mass; modeling old buildings to understand energy function; insulation, thermal bridging, and passive solar; working with contractors and incentives; and case studies. Registration deadline: TBA

• Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Brian Trimble, PE, LEED®, AP Bill Zoeller 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 611 $295

Waterproofing Foundations and Basements Water leakage and seepage into basements and cellars is a major problem in many buildings. This class focuses on the causes of water seepage and how to correct them. There are various options available to an architect or engineer to correct the problem. While sump pumps are used to pump out leaky basements, they may fail during storms due to power outages. Sump pump pits are a potential source of indoor air quality problems in basements and cellars. Topics include: how a ground water table rises during storms; types of foundation materials; grouting and repointing of fieldstone foundations; cracks in concrete and how to fix them with hydraulic cement; when to replace the foundation; and how to install new water-tight basement floors and select materials. • M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Jul 8 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 793 $195

Wind Energy Systems Modern wind turbines, especially machines in the megawatt class, can generate electricity as a competitive cost compared with power from oilfired, gas-fired, coal-fired, or nuclear power without the resultant pollution problems. This seminar will look at currently available wind machines and their capabilities. Calculations will be provided to enable engineers to size wind turbines with the electric load. Topics include: history of wind energy systems; modern wind machines; case studies of installations; and economics of wind energy systems. • M 9 AM–12 PM 1 session Jul 15 Daniel Karpen, PE 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 PDHs PMPD 983 $195

Zoning Part 1—Zoning and Land Use: Theory, Innovation, and Impact on Architecture and the Community Analyze the various aspects of zoning and its impacts on architecture and the

community. This course examines the history of zoning and highlights studies on how zoning laws are created in order to minimize any negative aspect to the public health on architectural developments. Topics include: a focus on bulk and use zoning concepts and on technical aspects of zoning that are a part of all new developments and construction. For instance, Sky Exposure Plane ratios, set back requirements, and yard requirements help maintain ventilation and light/air for communities. Analyze the different infrastructure and light/ air needs of residential and commercial developments and show how the zoning resolutions deal with these. Review variances and zoning changes and how the community is able to respond to an architectural project and comment in public hearings and reviews. Registration deadline: Jun 26 • F 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 5 Roy Pachecano, AIA 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 992 $295

Zoning Part 2—Zoning and Land Use: Theory, Innovation, and Impact on Architecture and the Community More advanced topics about the various aspects of zoning and its impacts on architecture and the community are covered in this seminar. This course studies how zoning laws are created in order to minimize any negative aspect to the public health on architectural developments. Topics include: a focus will be on an advanced discussion of the technical aspects of zoning that are a part of all new developments and construction. For instance, Sky Exposure Plane ratios, set back requirements, and yard requirements help maintain ventilation and light/air for communities. Analyze the different infrastructure and light/ air needs of residential and commercial developments and show how the zoning resolutions deal with these. Review variances and zoning changes and how the community is able to respond to an architectural project and comment in public hearings and reviews. Registration deadline: TBA • Tu 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Fall 2013 Roy Pachecano, AIA 7 AIA/HSW LUs PMPD 994 $295

For additional AIA/CES-approved ­courses see: Autodesk Training Center on pages 24–28.

State Approval It is your responsibility to check with the state licensing boards as to whether or not a course is acceptable to meet its continuing education credit requirements. Visit Pratt’s website: www.pratt.edu/prostudies for courses not acceptable to NYS or see courses that state: Not accepted by NYS for LU and PDH credit.

For more information, visit the website for New York State Education Department, Office of the Professions: www.op.nysed.gov/

OneKey Account Information OneKey user names and passwords are necessary for all students and faculty of Pratt Institute. Please see page 65 for detailed instructions.

Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu


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Certificate Program in Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management Designers have long been able to meet the needs of their clients and businesses by using their creativity to blend form and function. Today’s world of limited resources and changing economic and environmental values requires a new set of tools to design a sustainable world. This Certificate program, Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management, brings designers into 21st-century design by building on their existing design skills and enhancing them with cutting-edge skills and knowledge, enabling them to meet the new goals and challenges of sustainability.

Why Choose Pratt Institute? • For over a century, Pratt Institute has combined the practice of art and practicality by educating artists and designers in its traditional art, design, and architecture classes at the graduate, undergraduate, and professional levels. • This program brings Pratt and you to a new level and a new world of art and design, again in a practical way. • You will learn about the driving forces that are changing your client’s needs and about the tools needed to meet those challenges and design a sustainable world. In short, you will become part of the solution and be able to assist your clients and businesses in succeeding in a carbonconstrained world.

VA Benefits for Certificate Program This program is approved for veterans and other eligible persons under the GI Bill for education. Contact the Department of Veterans Affairs at 1-888-GI BILL1 (1-888-442-4551 ), or www.gibill.va.gov regarding eligibility. Contact: Perry Han phan@pratt.edu or Karen D’Angelo kdangelo@pratt.edu

XCXE X RX T I F I C AT E P R O G R A M in S U S TA I N A B L E B U I L D I N G , INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN, A N D M A N AG E M E N T Courses may be taken individually or as part of the certificate program.

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS The certificate program requires the successful completion of all 7 courses, which totals 49 hours of study. Application fee: $100, non-refundable Required Courses: Seven PMPD 600 Climate Change Fundamentals for Design and Management Professionals PMPD 601 Designing and Renovating Carbon Neutral Buildings PMPD 602 Performance Modeling for Carbon Neutral Buildings PMPD 603 Sustainable Standards for Buildings and Infrastructure—LEED®, BREAM, Energy Star PMPD 604 Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Weatherization Audits, and Capital Planning PMPD 605 New Technologies—Smart Grid and Smart Buildings PMPD 606 Capstone Project— Sustainable Building and Infrastructure Design and Management  ecommended audience: architects, R engineers, interior designers, urban planners, facilities and construction management professionals, contractors, and government agency professionals.

Capstone Project—Sustainable Building and Infrastructure Design and Management This seminar will be the capstone project for the Certificate in Sustainable Building and Infrastructure Design and Management. You will be required to complete two in-class projects involving the design and management of sustainable buildings and infrastructure. The projects will involve retrofitting, renovating, or the new construction of residential, or commercial buildings, or major projects such as new municipal facilities such as ports and terminals. Each project will focus on sustainable schematic design and management of buildings and infrastructure. The projects will require the use of green standards and green technologies to meet the mitigation and adaptation levels that will be needed to combat climate change and perform due to the changes from climate change. Topics include: the decision process for identifying environmental goals and standards for the project including greenhouse gas and energy reductions, adaptation to climate change risks and techniques to reduce the heat island effect and storm water runoff; the application of green standards such as BREAM, EPA–Energy Star, USGBC– LEED®, to the projects to achieve a recognized and accepted “green project”; the use of modeling and benchmark tools such as Equest and Portfolio Mgr to predict building and infrastructure performance, and the ability to meet mitigation and adaptation requirements for climate change; the design and management of sustainable systems such as solar PV and thermal, green roofs, combined heat and power systems, geothermal systems and the interface with a “smart grid”; the financial analysis tools to estimate costs and paybacks for the projects and the systems.

Prerequisite: For students in the certificate program, prerequisites include either Climate Change Fundamentals or Carbon Neutral Design and three other courses in the program. • Su 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 27 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 606 $295

Climate Change Fundamentals for Design and Management Professionals This seminar is an overview of climate change basics and their relation to the design world. The seminar is designed to give design professionals the basic tools needed to begin to design buildings, interiors, products, transportation, and cities for a carbon neutral world. Designers will learn how to measure and mitigate the carbon footprint, analyze and adapt to climate change risk, and learn carbon neutral design standards. Topics include: introduction; effects; what is carbon neutral and how do we measure it; standards—the 2010 and 2030 Imperatives, College and University Presidents Climate Change Commitment, NYC Stds, U.S. Mayors Climate Change Commitment, the Kyoto Protocol, USGBC LEED®; mitigation and tools available; the carbon footprint—greenhouse gas protocol, The World Resources Institute; risks and adaptation—business, regulatory, physical, investment, social risk avoidance and mitigation strategies; adaptation—seawalls to power towers; and opportunities available: design, design, design, carbon-neutral buildings, products, systems, cities. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session May 18 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 600 $295


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Designing and Renovating Carbon Neutral Buildings This seminar will show architects, engineers, and interior designers how to design and renovate carbon neutral buildings. Architects, designers, and engineers will learn how to measure and estimate energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, design to reduce energy and greenhouse gases in both embedded and operational aspects, adapt structures to the effects of climate change, and learn which software tools are needed. Topics include: review of the causes and effects of climate change, procedures for measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, green design standards; basic overview of energy and greenhouse gas calculations in reference to designing for carbon neutral buildings; overview of USGBC LEED® green building standards; LEED® certified, silver, gold, platinum, new construction, renovations, existing buildings; overview of software tools available to measure and predict greenhouse gas emissions; DOE 2, Equest; carbon and energy footprints in structural as well as operational building systems; embedded energy and carbon, operational energy and carbon; case studies of leading carbon neutral buildings; So London, NYC; design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class); new construction; green your design team, brainstorm problems and solutions; set criteria for design decision making, design carbon neutral building systems; design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class); major renovations—analyze footprint of existing building, set design criteria for the renovation, and design a carbon neutral renovation. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 8 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 601 $295

Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Weatherization Audits, and Capital Planning This seminar will teach architects, engineers, interior designers, and facility and construction managers to perform audits (energy, greenhouse gas, and weatherization) and then develop capital plans to reduce energy and greenhouse gases while improving occupant comfort and improving productivity. Topics include: energy audits for residences, commercial and industrial buildings, using standard and investment grade practices, monitoring and verification standards and financial analysis such as simple paybacks and return on investment (ROI); greenhouse gas audits including inventories of buildings, fleets, and transport systems using software and the development of capital plans to comply with voluntary and mandatory climate change standards; weatherization audits for housing and commercial buildings to improve occupant comfort and work performance, while reducing energy and greenhouse gases. Techniques include: R-value analysis, blower door performance testing, and infrared surveys; capital plan development to identify goals, set standards to achieve the goals, and utilize savings in energy and greenhouse gases to finance projects. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 13 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 604 $295

New Technologies—Smart Grid and Smart Buildings This seminar will give architects, engineers, interior designers, and facility and construction managers an overview of new technologies including the smart grid and components, smart buildings and the relationship to the smart grid, and the design and management of new technologies such as solar PV and thermal, green roofs, combined heat and power systems, geothermal heating and cooling, and district heating and cooling.

Topics include: schematic design of

simple smart grids and smart buildings that will enable utilities and customers to communicate and manage power production and power demand in a constrained energy world; schematic design of solar PV and thermal, green roofs, combined heat and power systems, geothermal heating and cooling and district heating and cooling; energy analysis tools to predict systems energy use and greenhouse gas outputs, and financial tools to predict systems costs and paybacks; financing mechanisms such as federal and state rebates, 3rd party financing, and energy savings which will provide funds for the projects. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 1 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 605 $295

Performance Modeling for Carbon Neutral Buildings This will show architects, engineers, interior, and landscape designers how to design and renovate carbon neutral buildings using building performance modeling techniques. Carbon neutral buildings require low or net zero energy usage, and designs need to be tailored to maximize energy gains from solar, wind, and geothermal power and to minimize losses from building components such as walls, windows, and appliances. This course will show architects and engineers the software tools available to help in designing these low carbon buildings. Topics include: review of the following: causes and effects of climate change; procedures for measuring and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions; green design standards; energy and greenhouse gas calculations in reference to designing for carbon neutral buildings; LEED® certified, silver, gold, platinum; and new construction, renovations, existing buildings; building performance modeling basics: energy load estimating—lighting, heating, cooling, ventilation, plug; and solar, wind, geothermal estimating; software tools available to measure and predict: solar gain; PV production; green roof perfor-

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mance—solar and water; geothermal performance—energy; and whole building energy use; performance modeling case studies of leading carbon neutral buildings: South London, NYC; performance modeling design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class)—new construction: modeling of base design for building energy loads and modeling of base design for solar, wind, geothermal; performance modeling design charette for a carbon neutral building (in class)—major renovations: modeling of base design for building energy loads and modeling of base design for solar, wind, geothermal. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jun 22 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 602 $295

Sustainable Standards for Buildings and Infrastructure— BREAM, Energy Star, LEED® This seminar will teach architects, engineers, interior designers, and facility and construction managers the “green” standards they need to design and manage sustainable buildings and infrastructure. Topics include: an overview of green standards including basic building codes, BREAM, EPA Energy Star and LEED®; a review and class application of BREAM, EPA Energy Star, and LEED® projects; an in-depth look at, and in class project involving, a current LEED® project; a review of “green” professional certifications. • Sa 9 AM–5 PM 1 session Jul 20 Tony Gelber, LEED®, AP 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 PDHs PMPD 603 $295

Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Certificate Program in Urban Green Infrastructure: Green Systems Clean Water The permeability of our land and the quality of our surrounding water bodies are directly connected. Impermeable surfaces account for roughly 70% of New York City’s acreage; as such the runoff from these surfaces represents serious water quality and infrastructural challenges for the City. As the impacts of climate change bring more severe wet weather events to our shores, the need for innovative storm water management is paramount. New York City’s move toward the implementation of green infrastructure to meet our national water quality standards represents both a tremendous teaching moment and an opportunity for workforce development. Training in standard designs, regulations, permitting, construction, monitoring, and maintenance of innovative tree pits, bioswales, green roofs, and green walls will be critical for successful implementation of green infrastructure citywide. The certificate curriculum was formed in collaboration with the Pratt Graduate School of Architecture, several city agencies, members of the American Society of Landscape Architects New York Chapter, and private sector green infrastructure practitioners. The term green infrastructure represents the ability of vegetation and other natural systems to capture and evapotranspire rainwater, treating rain as a resource rather than a waste.

Why Study Green Infrastructure at Pratt? • Pratt Institute can uniquely convene the professional scientists, designers, and policy makers needed to transfer the leading edge professional skills, which, when applied in total, result in successful urban green infrastructure. • Pratt can offer a wide range of continuing education units for a diverse range of disciplines. • Pratt has been at the forefront of urban green infrastructure in New York. Our professional instructors represent city agencies, community based organizations, and private design firms. Our interdisciplinary approach to green infrastructure is surely what helped us win a 2012 NYC Environmental Protection Green Infrastructure grant. • Pratt is an authorized provider with the American Institute of Architects (AIA), Continuing Education System (AIA/CES), and the Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LA CES).

XCXE X RX T I F I C AT E P R O G R A M I n U rban G reen I nfrastructure : G reen S ystems C L E A N WAT E R VA Benefits for Certificate Program

Career Tracks

This program is approved for veterans and other eligible persons under the GI Bill for education. Contact the Department of Veterans Affairs at 1-888-GI BILL1 (1-888-442-4551 ), or www.gibill.va.gov regarding eligibility. Contact: Perry Han phan@pratt.edu or Karen D’Angelo kdangelo@pratt.edu

Specialize Your Green Infrastructure Study

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS This certificate program requires the successful completion of 21 hours of study. Successful completion includes 14 hours of required study and seven hours of study in one of the three specialized tracks. Application fee: $100, non-refundable

Our certificate offers an ability to focus on green roofs, public right-of-way, or innovative green infrastructure projects. Study a specialized area of green infrastructure by adding design and construction, maintenance, and monitoring courses to your required courses. Recommended audience: Intended for landscape, architecture, engineering, construction, and facilities maintenance professionals as well as green infrastructure enthusiasts. Required Courses: Two

PMPD 706 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC PMPD 720 Green Infrastructure Data and Calculations

Specialization in Green Roofs, Public Right-of-Way, or Innovative Green Infrastructure Core Courses: Two Green Roof

PMPD 721 Green Roof Design (GI and Buildings) PMPD 724 Green Roof Construction, Maintenance and Monitoring Public Right-of-Way

PMPD 722 Public Right-of-Way Design (GI and Streets) PMPD 725 Public Right-of-Way Construction, Maintenance and Monitoring Innovative Green Infrastructure

PMPD 723 Innovative Green Infrastructure Design (GI and Sites) PMPD 726 Innovative Green Infrastructure Construction, Maintenance and Monitoring


Drainage and Hydrology in NYC The introductory course in our Urban Green Infrastructure foundation series, this seminar is intended for contractors, planners, engineers, architects, landscape architects, construction managers, and green infrastructure enthusiasts who seek New York City specific information regarding the natural and infrastructural systems influencing the design, construction, and maintenance of urban green infrastructure. For this seminar “green infrastructure” will refer to the use of green roofs, walls, parks, expanded roadside plantings, porous pavements, and other innovative technologies which allow for rainwater to seep into soils and be taken up by plants rather than being funneled off to overwhelm our sewer systems and trigger combined sewer overflows (CSOs). New York City struggles with nearly 30 billion gallons per year of CSO events. Green infrastructure treats rainwater as a resource rather than a waste. It offers a cost-effective solution to mitigating the City’s sewer overflow problems. Learning from current green infrastructure professionals, students will gain an understanding of NYC’s unique water management infrastructure and natural systems, which influence green infrastructure implementation. Topics include: NYC’s watershed and sewershed fragmentation and connectivity; hydrology and geology of NYC; types of soils, soil conditions, soil function, and specification; and green infrastructure stakeholders. • Section 1: F 9 AM-5 PM 1 session Jun 14 Richard Shaw, PhD Zhonggii Chengi, PhD Raymond Palermes, PE Kate Zidar Bryan Quinn 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 LA CES, 7 PDHs PMPD 706 $295

Green Infrastructure Data and Calculations This course is designed as a classroom lecture, followed by a computer laboratory session that applies the general lessons learned in Drainage and Hydrology in NYC towards quantifying the stormwater management, urban cooling, and ecological productivity potential of green infrastructure applications. The course will also touch on formulating cost estimates and maintenance schedules. During the first part of the class, you learn where and how to gather appropriate data and how to calculate price per

square foot, stormwater volume, percolation rates, one-inch storm capture potential, evapotranspiration rates and other values necessary to plan, size, and manage a green infrastructure installation. Students then apply these hydrological principles and calculations to a conceptual project, working with an instructor’s guidance to determine appropriate sizing, functionality, and benefits of green infrastructure given the constraints of a site. Topics include: percolation rate, evapotranspiration rate, one-inch storm capture, stormwater volume calculation, catchment area, permeability rate, ecological productivity, maintenance schedule, project cost estimate, average flow rate, urban heat island reversal, and pollutant binding rate. Prerequisites: PMPD 706 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC • Section 1: Sa 9 AM-5 PM 1 session Jun 15 Alfred Yaleju, RA 7 AIA/HSW LUs, 7 LA CES, 7 PDHs PMPD 720 $295

Green Roof Design (GI and Buildings) This green roof design course is for those interested in green roofs and green infrastructure on building surfaces. Students apply the lessons learned upon completion of the Fundamentals courses to gain an understanding of the design process of a green roof, from identifying specific code and site constraints such as structural loads and roof penetrations and slopes, to choosing appropriate materials and methods for a site. Different types of green roof constructions are introduced, as are various species of sedum and other plants commonly used in green roofs; students thus gain an understanding of the design palette used in this type of green infrastructure. Students also gain basic understanding of the proper permitting process for green roof designs. Topics include: extensive vs. intensive green roof, green roof materials, roof penetrations, dead and live roof loads, green roof design process, plant choice, sedum, code restrictions, and permitting. Prerequisites: PMPD 706 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC, PMPD 720 Green Infrastructure and Calculations • Section 1: Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 1 session Jun 16 Bryan Quinn, RLA Alec Baxt 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 721 $195

Public Right-of-Way Design (GI and Streets) Those interested in bioswales and other green infrastructure within the public right-of-way can choose to take this public right-of-way design course. Students apply the lessons learned upon completion of the Fundamentals courses to gain an understanding of the design and regulatory processes of projects within the public right-of-way. The course will cover identification of specific code and site constraints as well as choosing appropriate materials and methods for a site. Different types of right-of-way constructions are introduced, as are various species of native and other plants commonly used; students thus gain an understanding of the design palette used in this type of green infrastructure. Students also gain basic understanding of the proper permitting process for public right-ofway designs. Topics include: various city agency jurisdictions, permitting, watershed delineation, and stakeholder engagement. Prerequisites: PMPD 706 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC, PMPD 720 Green Infrastructure and Calculations • Section 1: Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 1 session Jun 16 Mary Nunn Jeanette Compton 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 722 $195

Innovative Green Infrastructure Design (GI and Sites) Those interested in innovative green infrastructure projects that do not deal with rooftops or the public right-of-way can choose to take this design course. Students apply the lessons learned upon completion of the Fundamentals courses to gain an understanding of the design process of green walls, constructed wetlands, and living machines. Students will learn relevant code and site constraints as well as selection of the appropriate materials and methods. Varying types of innovative green infrastructure constructions are introduced along with various species of native and other plants commonly used in these systems; students thus gain an understanding of the design palette used. Students also gain basic understanding of the proper permitting process for these innovative designs. Topics include: basic design of green walls, constructed wetlands and living machines, pollutant binding and nutrient breakdown potential, rainwater har-

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vesting systems, and wetland ecology. Prerequisites: PMPD 706 Drainage and

Hydrology in NYC, PMPD 720 Green Infrastructure and Calculations • Section 1: Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 1 session Jun 16 Jeff Keiter 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 723 $195

Green Roof Construction, Maintenance and Monitoring This course picks up at the conclusion of the design course, implementing the site constraints, materials, and methods of green roof design in the construction process. Students learn about proper construction order and layering of materials, assembly techniques, and necessary modifications to the existing roof. Additionally, the maintenance process of a green roof is explained, including weeding, watering, and general care for the plants, soils and other sensitive components of the system. Monitoring of system performance is emphasized as necessary to the longterm viability of a green roof project, and various techniques for tracking the storm water management, evaporative cooling, and ecological performance of a project relative to background data. Topics include: green roof construction techniques, green roof performance, rate of water retention, roll out mat, tray systems, pressure gauge, weather station, temperature and moisture probes, weeding, and compilation of database. Prerequisites: PMPD 706 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC, PMPD 720 Green Infrastructure and Calculations, PMPD 721 Green Roof Design (GI and Buildings) • Section 1: Su 1-4 PM 1 session Jun 16 Eric Dalski Mark Dalski 3.5 AIA/HSW LUs, 3.5 LA CES, 3.5 PDHs PMPD 724 $195

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Public Right-of-Way Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring

Innovative Green Infrastructure Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring

This course picks up at the conclusion of the design course, implementing the site constraints, materials, and methods of public right-of-way design in the construction process. Students learn about proper construction order and layering of materials, assembly techniques, and necessary modifications to the existing infrastructure (curbs, sidewalks, etc.). Additionally, the maintenance processes for public right-of-way projects are explained, including weeding, watering, and general care for the plants, soils and other sensitive components of the system. Monitoring of system performance is emphasized as necessary to the longterm viability of a green roof project, and various techniques for tracking the stormwater management, evaporative cooling, and ecological performance of a project relative to background data. Topics include: right-of-way construction techniques, performance and maintenance, rate of water retention and evapotranspiration, watershed delineation, and use of monitoring equipment, including pressure gauge, weather station, temperature and moisture probes, and compilation of database. Prerequisites: PMPD 706 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC, PMPD 720 Green Infrastructure and Calculations, PMPD 722 Public Right-of-Way (GI and Streets) • Section 1: Su 1–4 PM 1 session Jun 16 Tricia Martin 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 725 $195

This course picks up at the conclusion of the design course, implementing the site constraints, materials, and methods of innovative green infrastructure design into the construction process. Students learn about proper construction order and layering of materials, assembly techniques, and necessary modifications to the existing infrastructure (walls, shoreline, etc.). Additionally, the maintenance processes for innovative green infrastructure projects are explained, including weeding, watering, and general care for the plants, soils, and other sensitive components of the system. Monitoring of system performance is emphasized as necessary to the long-term viability of a project, and various techniques for tracking the stormwater management, evaporative cooling, resulting water quality, and ecological performance of a project relative to background data. Topics include: green wall, living machine, and constructed wetland construction techniques and performance, rate of water retention, cycling and or evapotranspiration, roll out mat, monitoring protocol including use of pressure gauges, weather stations, temperature and moisture probes, maintenance plans, and compilation of database. Prerequisites: PMPD 706 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC, PMPD 720 Green Infrastructure and Calculations, PMPD 723 Innovative Green Infrastructure Design (GI and Sites) • Section 1: Su 1–4:30 pm 1 session Jun 16 Jeff Keiter 3 AIA/HSW LUs, 3 LA CES, 3 PDHs PMPD 726 $195

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C E R T I F I C AT E P R O G R A M S IN PERFUMERY Certificate Programs in Perfumery: The Technique and Language of Perfumery and The Fragrance Sales Program Pratt Instititute’s Center for Continuing and Professional Studies and Cinquième Sens is proud to announce its new certificate program in Perfumery. Since 1976, Cinquième Sens has been active both in the creation of perfumes and the transmission of a true perfume culture. Cinquième Sens is a training methodology open to perfumery professionals with a desire to learn the language of scent. Cinquième Sens’s team of perfumery experts have now teamed with Pratt Institute to share its passion for fragrances and raw materials with individuals and professionals in the development of the certificate programs in Perfumery.

Why Choose Pratt Institute? • The Center for Continuing and Professional Studies offers superior professional perfumery education with an outstanding faculty and exceptional facilities. • Courses are taught by the finest perfumery experts and this, along with the fragrance cultural environment of New York City, ensures an exceptional education.

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS There are two career tracks in this certificate program. • The two tracks are The Technique and Language of Perfumery and The Fragrance Sales Program (Selling Fragrances). • Each track has a course that totals 18 hours. • Upon completion of the 18-hour course in either track you will receive a certificate of completion. Application Fee: $100, non-refundable

Career Tracks The Technique and Language of Perfumery Required Course: One PMPF 310 The Technique and Language of Perfumery

The Fragrance Sales Program (Selling Fragrances) Required Course: One PMPF 320 Selling Fragrances

Program Announcements Registration Deadlines Registration deadlines for all courses are two weeks prior to course start dates. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early and order your olfactorium to purchase. Call CCPS at 212-647-7199 and ask for Chris Ferrara. Cost: $250

The Technique and Language of Perfumery by Cinquième Sens You will experience a voyage into the world of perfumes, test your sense of smell, and review the whole fragrance process from concept to market product. You will smell the key raw materials, understand the fragrance structure, and memorize the various olfactive families. Topics include: the sense of smell: physiology of olfaction, olfaction and emotions; the world of perfumery from the perfumer’s formula to manufacturing and distribution; the perfumer’s palette: natural raw materials, molecules, specialties, and reconstitutions; the fragrance composition: profile, structure, perfume families, technical and regulatory aspects; the language of perfumery: analytical and emotional; the key role of words and spoken expression. Recommended audience: Marketing professionals in perfumery brands or fragrance houses, perfumery distribution or fragrance enthusiasts. Please Note: Tools (such as our olfactorium, cost $250) may be purchased for the first day of class, or will be provided to share in class; space is limited. • Section 1: M, W 1–4 PM 6 sessions May 20, 22, 27, 29, Jun 3, 5 • Section 2: Sa 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 6 sessions Jun 22–Aug 3 • Section 3: Tu, Th 1–4 PM 6 sessions Jul 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25 Ray Matts (all sections) PMPF 310 1.8 C.E.U. $950

The Fragrance Sales Program by Cinquième Sens (Selling Fragrances) The emotional dimension in selling fragrances You will get a deeper understanding of the emotional dimension in selling fragrances and master the competencies for an emotional sale. You will learn by a psychological approach to identify the “olfactive profile” of your customer and to make the right fragrance selection to fullfill her/his expectations. Topics include: identify emotional status and adopt the right one to optimize the selling process; understand and share your customer’s emotions; socio-styles, look, and olfactive profiles; review of fragrance families; secure the best perfume selection for your customer with a relevant argument. Recommended audience: Sales and Marketing professionals in perfumery brands or fragrance houses, perfumery distribution, or fragrance enthusiasts. Please Note: Tools (such as our olfactorium, cost $250) may be purchased for the first day of class, or will be provided to share in class; space is limited. • Section 1: Sa 9 AM–12 PM 6 sessions Jun 1–22 • Section 2: Tu, Th 1–4 PM 6 sessions May 21, 23, 28, 30, Jun 4, 6 • Section 3: M, W 1–4 PM 6 sessions Jul 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24 Ray Matts (all sections) PMPF 320 1.8 C.E.U. $950


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Certificate Program in Design Entrepreneurship (CDE) Do you dream of turning your idea into a business? This certificate program is specifically for designers who want to become design entrepreneurs. Participants choose from seven distinct intensives that focus on fashion, footwear, jewelry, product design, social innovation, or design consulting. This program will build your business acumen and set the stage for you to build a viable business that is driven by design. Sustainable best practices are integrated throughout the program, ensuring that you learn how to make decisions that consider the environmental and social impacts along with economic success. This flexible program is created to work around a busy schedule and can be completed within three to four weeks.

Why Choose Pratt Institute • Since 2002 the Pratt Design Incubator has been helping designers turn their ideas into successful businesses. •T  his program puts you into a creative community that will motivate and inspire you to reach your goals. • This program has been specifically designed for the creative professional and incorporates case studies and assignments that are specifically relevant for fashion designers, industrial designers, interior designers, architects, communication designers, digital media designers, social innovators, and service designers. • This program integrates sustainability throughout, building on Pratt’s leadership in educating artists and designers to be responsible contributors to society. • As a student in this program you will be a member of the Pratt community and have access to our extensive services and activities including housing, athletic facilities and activities. Housing packages are available through Residential Life on a weekly basis. For further information, please contact cde@pratt.edu or visit http://csds.pratt.edu/cde-program.

C E R T I F I C AT E P R O G R A M I N DESIGN ENTREPRENEURSHIP Courses may be taken individually or as part of the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements The certificate program requires the successful completion of seven courses as follows: • Four Business Core courses • One required Design Intensive course • Two electives Application fee: $100, non-refundable Required Business Core Courses: Four XCDE 605 Business and Design XCDE 608 The Impact of Design on the Environment and Society XCDE 670 Getting To Your Market PMCDE 650 Staying Out of Trouble Required Design Intensive Course: One XCDE 610 Start Up Your Design Consultancy XCDE 625 Turn Your Idea Into a Product PMCDE 630 Starting a Fashion Business XCDE 642 Social Entrepreneurship XCDE 640 Starting a Jewelry Studio XCDE 635 Getting Your Foot in the Shoe Business XCDE 700 RampUP!TM Electives: Two XCDE 600 Design Your Life Like an Entrepreneur XCDE 609 Tools and Strategies for Sustainable Design XCDE 660 How To Give a TED Talk XCDE 675 The Power of Negotiation XCDE 680 Made in NYC

Design Your Life Like an Entrepreneur

Tools and Strategies for Sustainable Design

You don’t have to own a business to live an independent life. Design the life you want to lead by applying the basic principles of entrepreneurship. As a creative professional, you are in a unique position to take advantage of the market to define your own career path. Topics include: identifying opportunities, risk assessment, long and short term goal setting, contract negotiations, financial planning, and dynamic proposals. • M 6–9 PM 1 session Jun 3 (Brooklyn) Debera Johnson with Guests XCDE 600 .3 C.E.U.s $175

This course will arm you with practical methods for understanding the environmental impact of your designs. Topics include: quantification of environmental impacts using life cycle assessment, estimating ecological performance, and eco-design strategies. • Section 1: Tu, Th 6–9 PM 2 sessions Jun 4, 6 (Brooklyn) • Section 2: M, W 6–9 PM 2 sessions Jun 17, 19 (Brooklyn) Carolyn Schaeberle XCDE 609 1.2 C.E.U.s $295

Business and Design Understanding the business world has never been more critical for the creative professional. Topics include: This course covers the basics and will help you understand how businesses operate, make decisions, develop markets, build profits, forecast trends, and see how business trends impact the design entrepreneur. • Section 1: M, W 6–9 PM 2 sessions Jun 3, 5 (Brooklyn) • Section 2: M, W 6–9 PM 2 sessions Jun 25, 27 (Brooklyn) Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman, IDSA XCDE 605 .6 C.E.U.s $295

The Impact of Design on the Environment and Society This course is an introduction to sustainable best practices for designdriven businesses. Topics include: understanding the supply chain, life cycle assessment, lean manufacturing, triple bottom line accounting, and business models for the social entrepreneur. • Section 1: Tu, Th 6–9 PM 2 sessions Jun 4, 6 (Brooklyn) • Section 2: Sa 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 22 (Brooklyn) Carmen Malvar XCDE 608 .6 C.E.U.s $295

Start Your Design Consultancy From start to finish this course will take you through the steps of starting your own design consulting or freelance business. Topics include: creating an LLC, writing proposals and contracts, what to charge, financial planning and accounting, hiring interns, finding clients, and professional and ethical practices. • M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 10–14 (Brooklyn) Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman, IDSA with Guests XCDE 610 3.0 C.E.U.s $1,295

Getting Your Foot in the Shoe Business This intensive course will give you all the information you need to set up and run with your new shoe designs. You will design footwear from concept through development and learn the process it takes to get it to retail. Topics Include: ergonomics, inspiration sources, presentation, the development team, prototyping, marketing and manufacturing. • M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 10–14 (Brooklyn) Kevin Crowley XCDE 635 3.0 C.E.U.s $1,295


Getting to Your Market This interactive workshop will develop clear strategies for understanding, reaching, and selling to your customers. Topics include: branding and marketing strategies, social networks, and how online crowd-funding for start-up businesses has become critical for success. • Section 1: Sa 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 8 (Brooklyn) • Section 2: Tu, Th 6–9 PM 2 sessions Jun 18, 20 (Brooklyn) Thomas Klinkowstein XCDE 670 .6 C.E.U.s $295

Starting a Fashion Business Fashion Business Bootcamp (FBB) will train rising fashion entrepreneurs who are looking to hone their business sense. FBB will take you step by step through the process of building a successful business plan, with a focus on bringing sustainability and ethics into the design process and making responsible decisions about sourcing and manufacturing. We will start with creating your financial model, including trademarks, copyrights, accounting, branding and positioning, and managing your supply chain. Topics include: learn how to position yourself by understanding your competition, create your mission statement, and research the resources available to you as a design entrepreneur here in New York City. FBB concludes with the creation of your elevator pitch for future investors, and a presentation of your business plan. • M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 17–21 (Brooklyn) Sam Shipley Carmen Artigas Nina Zilka and others XCDE 630 3.0 C.E.U.s $1,295

RampUP!TM The Incubator’s RampUP! TM program has been developed specifically to help designers make the transition from designer to design entrepreneur and lead early start-ups through the process of turning a great idea into a successful business. The course is led by Debera Johnson with guest mentors from the Pratt Design Incubator’s network who will provide insight in marketing, strategic planning and finance. Individual coaching sessions will give students personal feedback on their progress. Through a series of nine interactive workshops participants will clarify their idea into a solid vision, mission and business proposition.

Topics include: understand how to build an effective team to ensure success; understand how business/products stand out from the competition; develop an operations plan, business model, and roadmap; learn how to assess the environmental and social impacts of your business. The RampUp!™ culminates with a presentation to a group of friendly investors and business experts. • M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 10–14 (Brooklyn) Debera Johnson, IDSA with Guests XCDE 700 3.0 C.E.U.s $1,295

Social Entrepreneurship This one-week intensive will help you solidify your mission, identify your community, and clarify your impact. The course will provide a deep dive into the field and business structure. Topics Include: Mission development, community/need assessment, impact matrix and evaluation, social enterprise business structures, community engagement, telling your story, and funding platforms. • M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 10–14 (Brooklyn) Kristina Drury and Guests XCDE 642 3.0 C.E.U.’s $1,295

Staying Out of Trouble This foundation course will focus on the basics of a small business’s legal and tax responsibilities, human resources, liability and risk mitigation, and other key topics that new business owners need to know. • Section 1: Sa 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 8 (Manhattan) • Section 2: Sa 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 22 (Manhattan) Flann Lippincott (all sections) PMCDE 650 .6 C.E.U.s $295

S u mm e r 2 0 1 3

Made in NYC

Turn Your Idea Into a Product

This course is a comprehensive tour of the manufacturing resources in NYC that will allow you to produce your product locally. • W 6–9 PM 1 session Jun 5 (Brooklyn) Miquela Craytor XCDE 680 .3 C.E.U.s $195

Got a great idea but not sure what to do next? This two-week, from start-tofinish bootcamp will help you turn your design concept into a product that can be manufactured locally. Topics include: Packaging, branding, and strategies for sales are also covered. Please note: You are selected through an interview process and will be required to sign a non-disclosure agreement. Limited to 12 participants. • M–F 9 AM–1 PM 9 sessions Jun 10–14, 24–27 (Brooklyn) Robert Langhorn XCDE 625 30.0 3.1 C.E.U.s $1,295

Starting a Jewelry Studio Whether you specialize in handmade, one-of-a-kind art pieces, fine jewelry, or found materials, this intensive will take you through the steps in setting up a successful jewelry studio. Topics include: Setting a price for your jewelry and finding customers, materials sourcing, local manufacturing, and sustainable best practices. • M–F 9 AM–4 PM 5 sessions Jun 10–14 (Brooklyn) Patricia Madeja with Guests XCDE 640 3.0 C.E.U.s $1,295

The Power of Negotiation Turn opponents into partners with the power of strong negotiation skills. This course starts with self-evaluation and helps you build a framework of effective negotiation approaches. It will help you build and enhance your ability to communicate well under pressure and give you tips for contract and salary negotiations. Topics Include: Evaluating alternatives, converting opponents into partners, identifying personal negotiating styles, building coalitions, and getting around opposing parties. • Sa 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 8 (Brooklyn) Kelly Kocinski XCDE 675 .6 C.E.U.s $295

How To Give a TED Talk The course will focus on techniques for making better presentations with or without slides. Topics include: presentation formats, “TED-type talks,” one-minute elevator pitches, and investor presentations. • Section 1: Sa 9 AM–4 PM 1 session Jun 8 (Manhattan) • Section 2: Tu, Th 6–9 PM 2 sessions Jun 18, 20 (Brooklyn) Instructor TBA PMCDE 660 .6 C.E.U.s $295

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Fall 2013 PROGRAMS Saturday and Sunday Pratt introduces high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors to the professional world of architecture, and art and design, with our weekend PreCollege Program, located at our Pratt Manhattan campus. Students have the unique opportunity to explore these disciplines while developing their skills and building portfolios for college admission. Pre-College courses that are offered for credit are offered at a substantial discount over regular Pratt tuition. For further information and a detailed brochure, contact us at 718-636-3453 or 212-647-7199.

Summer 2013 PROGRAMS Jul 8–Aug 2, 2013 High school students will have an invaluable opportunity to sharpen their portfolios and get a taste of college life, while earning four college credits. Scholarships are available. The program is offered on the Brooklyn campus. Program includes: architecture, creative writing, fashion design, foundation art, graphic design (including computer design), traditional illustration, painting and drawing, photography, art history, and portfolio development. Tuition $3,142, plus fees*. *Tuition and fees are subject to change.

Pre-College Director Elizabeth Kisseleff Customer Services Specialist Chris Ferrara Administrative Assistants, Brooklyn Johndell Wilson Veronica Darby Manhattan 212-647-7199 Brooklyn 718-636-3453 Email preco@pratt.edu Internet www.pratt.edu/precollege

Fall 2 0 1 3 P R E - C O L L E G E PROGRAMS Fall 2 013 Introduction to Architecture What is architecture? What is its purpose? What is it like to be an architect? How can we use architecture in our own lives? Useful for students considering architecture as a profession, this course is designed to answer these questions through design projects, field trips, presentations, and class discussions. Students develop solutions to a series of architectural problems through hands-on work; producing sketches, drafting plans, and building models. Students will strengthen their ability to discuss architecture through critiques. The course is an introduction to the study of the discipline. Materials fee: $20 paid to instructor at first class. • Sa 9:30 AM–1:20 PM 12 sessions between Sept 7–Dec 14 Instructor TBA ARCH 100S 2 credits $745+ $25 registration fee Pratt Manhattan

Architectural Design Studio Design studios are the core of every college architectural program. Students will be assigned design problems and then work in close contact with the instructor to develop solutions. Students will take into account basic notions defining space, form, and how architecture communicates, while developing solutions through drawings and models. The work may be used to help build a portfolio. This course must be taken in conjunction with or after Introduction to Architecture. Materials fee: $20 paid to instructor at first class. • Sa 2–4:50 PM Pratt Manhattan 9 sessions between Sept 7–Dec 14 Brent Porter PMPC 107 2.7 C.E.U.s $375+ $25 registration fee Non-credit Pratt Manhattan

Foundation Art This is an intensive studio course providing students with a solid base for beginning a career in design and fine art. The program features interdisciplinary classes in color, drawing, and three-dimensional design, supplemented by fieldtrips to professional design studios, museums, and galleries. Observational drawing is the studio core, and the drawings become the source for works exploring color phenomena in 2D and 3D. Please note: Nude figure drawing is included. • Sa 9:30 AM–1:20 PM 12 sessions between Sept 7–Dec 14 Thomas Eberharter FDN 100S 2 credits $745+ $25 registration fee Pratt Manhattan

Fine Arts: Painting and Drawing This studio course enhances perceptual and aesthetic awareness through the creation of fine art. Instruction in drawing and painting incorporates a variety of techniques, media, and subject matter. On-location work is an essential element of this studio, as are visits to galleries, museums, and artists’ studios. Please note: Nude figure drawing is included. • Sa 1:40–5:30 PM 12 sessions between Sept 7–Dec 14 Young Hah FAU 100S 2 credits $745+ $25 registration fee Pratt Manhattan

Introduction to Digital Imaging and Photography Students will learn the basics of digital imaging: scanning, shooting with a digital camera, using graphic software, and various forms of manipulating and outputting images. Using primarily Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop, students will explore how to create and develop imagery. Emphasis will be placed on developing conceptual and technical skills, while incorporating art elements and the principles of design. Familiarity with a computer is helpful,

but not necessary. Students must have access to a digital camera. • Su 1–4:50 PM 12 sessions between Sept 8–Dec 15 Instructor: Federico Savini PHOT 106S 2 credits $745+ $25 registration fee Pratt Manhattan

Media Arts/Photography The photograph as a fine print is the focus of this studio course. A broadbased knowledge of black and white photography is achieved by studying 35mm camera operations, lighting techniques, and darkroom procedures. Exposing and developing film, making contact prints, enlarging and finishing photographs as well as specific shooting techniques are explored. You must have access to a 35mm manual camera for this course. Extensive fieldwork is an integral part of this studio course. • Su 9 AM–12:50 PM 12 sessions between Sept 8–Dec 15 Federico Savini PHOT 103S 2 credits $745+ $25 registration fee Pratt Manhattan

Portfolio Development Your portfolio is the key to success in being admitted to a top art school. The goal of this studio course is to provide you with how-to advice on portfolio development to assure your entry into the college of your choice. Instruction focuses on areas in the portfolio that need improvement, and include life drawing, 2D, and 3D design projects. Please bring examples of work (your portfolio), an 18” x 24” all-purpose drawing pad, and soft vine charcoal to the first class. Please note: Nude figure drawing is included. • Section 1: Su 9:30 AM–12:30 PM 10 sessions between Sept 8–Dec 15 • Section 2: Su 1–4 PM 10 sessions between Sept 8–Dec 15 Heidi Metcalf (all sections) PMPC 114 3.0 C.E.U.s $395+ $25 registration fee Non-credit Pratt Manhattan


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Summer 2013 PROGRAMS Jul 8–Aug 2, 2013 High school students will have an invaluable opportunity to sharpen their portfolios and get a taste of college life, while earning four college credits. Scholarships are available. The program is offered on the Brooklyn campus. Program includes: architecture, creative writing, fashion design, foundation art, graphic design (including computer design), traditional illustration, painting, and drawing, photography, art history, and portfolio development. Tuition $3,142* (subject to change), plus fees.

Fall PROGRAMS Saturday and Sunday Pratt introduces high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors to the professional world of architecture, and art and design, with our weekend Pre-College Program located at our Manhattan campus. Students have the unique opportunity to explore these disciplines while developing their skills and building portfolios for college admission. Pre-College courses that are offered for credit are offered at a substantial discount over regular Pratt tuition. For further information and a detailed brochure, contact us at 718-636-3453 or 212-647-7199.

Pre-College Director Elizabeth Kisseleff Customer Services Specialist Chris Ferrara Administrative Assistant, Brooklyn Johndell Wilson Veronica Darby Manhattan 212-647-7199 Brooklyn 718-636-3453

S ummer 2 0 1 3 P R E - C O L L E G E PROGRAMS J uly 8 – A ugust 2 , 2 0 1 3 The Program

Living on Campus

Deadlines

The highly structured Pre-College curriculum is modeled after Pratt’s undergraduate program. The curriculum is composed of four mandatory courses. Students take an elective of choice (2 credits—see list below), a foundation course (2 credits—see list below), an art history appreciation course, and a portfolio development course. The program also includes a lecture series and a Cultural Insights track. The Cultural Insights track comprises weekend social and cultural activities such as plays, museums, gallery and studio visits. The lecture series is mandatory for all Brooklyn resident students. The Cultural Insights track is mandatory for Brooklyn residential students, and optional for commuters.

Residence halls are double-occupancy and are air-conditioned.

April 1: The completed application forms, along with the $40 application fee and a nonrefundable $500 deposit, are due. After this date, applications will be accepted only if there is space available in the program. Since many classes fill quickly, we strongly encourage you to apply early in order to get your first choice for your elective course. March 15: Scholarship deadline. April 25: International Student Forms are due (for visa). May 1: Full payment of all tuition and fees is due. Subtract your deposit from the total due. You will receive confirmation within two or three weeks of our receipt of your deposit. May 15: $40 late fee if full payment is not received. June 1: $75 late fee if full payment is not received. June 15: $100 late fee if full payment is not received.

Electives Art and Design Track: Architecture Art and Design Discovery Fashion Design Fine Arts (Painting and Drawing) Graphic Design (including Computer Design) Illustration (Digital) Illustration (Traditional) Industrial Design Interior Design Jewelry/Metal Arts Media Arts/Video Photography Sculpture Sequential Art and the Comic Book Creative Writing Track: Creative Writing Foundation Courses: Art and Design (for all the above Art and Design electives) Creative Writing (for the Creative Writing elective)

Costs Application Fee: $40 (non-refundable) Deposit: $500 applied to tuition (nonrefundable due with application) Tuition: $3,142 cost for all electives Tuition costs for 4 credits includes: Foundation, Elective, Art History, and Portfolio. Student Administration Fee: $325

Other fees, if applicable: Housing: double occupancy $841 Meal Plans: Brooklyn Resident Students (Mandatory) $700 Board (lunch) only—optional $175 (For commuters to Brooklyn campus) Pratt Health Coverage: Health insurance is required for all students attending the Pre-College program. If a student is not currently covered, a short-term policy with variable costs is available. Transportation Fee: Local Transportation Fee** $104 Brooklyn Only—30-day MetroCard of unlimited access ** Prices subject to change.

Cancellation and Refund Policy Before June 1: Refund of payments made minus the $40 application fee and the $500 deposit. Between June 1 and June 25: 50% refund minus the $40 application fee and the $500 deposit. As of June 25: No refund. For More Information For more information on the program, you can email the Pre-College Director, Elizabeth Kisseleff at preco@pratt.edu or visit our website www.pratt.edu/ precollege for more information.

Email preco@pratt.edu Internet www.pratt.edu/precollege

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INFORMATION Audience These intensive courses are designed for the college level or adult learner seeking exposure to new subject areas in fulfillment of academic or professional interests and objectives.

Program Dates Session 1: May 28–June 27, 2013 Session 2: July 1–August 1, 2013

S ummer credit intensives : M ay 2 8 – J une 2 7, 2 0 1 3 J uly 1 –A ugust 1 , 2 0 1 3 Spark up the Summertime and earn college credits at New York’s leading school of Art, Design, & Architecture! Are you going to be home for the summer with nothing to do?

Registration Deadline Session 1: May 20 Session 2: June 24 After the deadlines, students will be admitted on a space available basis. For more information or to register online, please visit www.pratt.edu/prostudies. You may also contact Elizabeth Kisseleff at 718-399-4533 or ekissele@pratt.edu.

Tuition Tuition and fees are due upon registration. Undergraduate per credit $1,267 Application Fee/non-refundable $30 Studio Fees (where applicable) Photo Lab fee $130 Fashion Design fee $20 Graphic Design fee $45 Digital Photography fee $55

Course Cancellation and Modifications All courses are subject to minimum enrollment. When courses are withdrawn or cancelled by Pratt for any reason, you may transfer to another course or receive a full refund. Pratt Institute reserves the right to cancel any class for which there is insufficient enrollment and to withdraw or modify course offerings. Course location, fees and instructors may also be changed when necessary. Students that apply for more than 5 credits must comply with NYS health laws.

Make the best use of your time! The prestigious Pratt Institute is opening its doors so that you can learn from our distinguished faculty, who are noted experts in their fields. Experience classes outside your major and satisfy your art or elective degree requirements in Pratt’s state-of-the-art Manhattan Campus. • Earn up to 9 credits in 19 days or sign up for both sessions • Most classes meet Monday–Thursday • Keep up academic momentum over the summer • Fulfill elective requirements and transfer credits back to your school • Develop new skills or rediscover your artistic aptitude • Cultivate your creativity and create a portfolio • Be a part of creating a greener world • Explore NYC from our convenient Chelsea/Greenwich Village location

Architecture Intensive This course serves as an introductory exposure to the field of architecture and 3D design processes. Course content will be emphasized through a combination of lectures, studio exercises, and projects including sketching, drafting, and model building. Students cultivate basic technical skills and develop an understanding of spatial relationships and structures; as well as acquire knowledge of professional practices in the field. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 5:20–9 PM • Session 1: Sec 02: M–Th 1–4:40 PM • Session 2: Sec 03: M–Th 1–4:40 PM ADAR 205 3 credits

Art Appreciation Intensive Cultivate your visual literacy. Investigate the creative process through lectures and discussions delving in to the worlds of various artists. Explore art media, major artistic styles, periods, and movements throughout the history of art. Learn how to understand, appreciate, and interpret works of art in their cultural, historical, political, social, economic, and aesthetic contexts. • Session 1: Sec 01: Tu–W 6–9 PM ADAA 205 3 credits

Drawing Intensive Explore the fundamentals of drawing as a descriptive and expressive medium. Create symbolic representations of objects while strengthening hand-eye coordination and understanding spatial relationships. Students will develop individual drawing skills through historic references, direct visual observation, and hands-on practice with a variety of materials and techniques. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 9 AM–12:40 PM ADDR 205 3 credits

Digital Photography Intensive In this intensive immersion course, students will explore digital photography as an art form. The course will cover digital image capture using a digital SLR camera, digital editing using professional computer software, and digital printing using archival inks, as well as foster the development of artistic skills such as aesthetic awareness, composition, movement, and light and shade. Students must provide their own digital SLR camera. •S  ession 2: Sec 01: M–Th 9 AM–12:40 PM ADDP 205 3 credits

Fashion Design Intensive This course is an introduction to the fashion industry, exploring various aspects of design, inspiration, and terminology. Through hands-on experience, students gain knowledge of sketching, collection development, patternmaking, and the fundamentals of clothing construction. Field trips to related industry exhibits and designer showrooms will enhance the depth of learning. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 1–4:40 PM • Session 2: Sec 02: M–Th 1–4:40 PM ADFD 205 3 credits

Fine Arts/Painting and Drawing Intensive Develop skills of observation and expression through visual media. This intensive elective fosters the development of conceptual as well as technical skills. Course content will include instruction in drawing and painting utilizing a variety of techniques, media, and subject matter to enhance students’ perceptual and aesthetic awareness through the creation of fine art. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 2–5:40 PM • Session 2: Sec 02: M–Th 2–5:40 PM ADFA 205 3 credits


Graphic Design Intensive

Photography Intensive

Cultivate visual communication skills for industry application. This course shows when to use photography, illustration, typography, and computer graphics to design logos, Web pages, books, posters, and packaging. Students will develop an understanding of theoretical concepts through lectures and hands-on practice, as well as gain knowledge of professional practices in the field. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 1–4:40 PM • Session 2: Sec 02: M–Th 1–4:40 PM ADGD 205 3 credits

Capture life in the moment. This elective covers 35mm camera operations, lighting techniques, and darkroom procedures. Students achieve a broadbased knowledge of black and white photography. Digital and color photography will also be introduced, as well as exposing and developing film, making contact prints, and enlarging and finishing photographs. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 1–4:40 PM • Session 2: Sec 02: M–Th 1–4:40 PM ADPH 205 3 credits

Illustration Intensive Explore visual story-telling by creating images that communicate new ideas for commercial purposes, combining both traditional and digital illustration to produce a professionallevel portfolio. Maximize your full creative expression by developing technical and artistic skills, from drawing through life studies, to skillfully using software such as Photoshop for creating images. Examine current and future styles and directions generated by the digital world in the illustration field. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 3–6:40 PM ADIL 205 3 credits

Interior Design Intensive Engage in the study of interior design in this intensive overview of the professional world of the interior designer. Explore the resolution of basic interior design problems in the context of human and environmental factors. Understand and use the elements of color, form, light, texture, and space, along with the principles of design, such as scale and proportion, through hands-on studio work, lectures, discussions, and extensive critique. A class discourse on the history and contemporary practices in the field, as well as the relationship between design and society, will further inform the student’s learning experience. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–Th 9 AM–12:40 PM • Session 2: Sec 02: M–Th 9 AM–12:40 PM ADIT 205 3 credits

Towards a Sustainable World by Design Learn the vocabulary, concepts, practices, skills, and resources of sustainability. This course addresses sustainabilityrelated challenges as well as effective sustainability practices as applicable to design fields. Topics include: principles of ecology and systems thinking, concepts of climate change, environmental risks and toxicity, the real costs of manufacturing, life cycle assessment, designing for disassembly, and biomimicry. Case studies will be drawn from the fields of architecture, communication design, and industrial design. Course content incorporates guest lectures, films, field trips, and interactive class exercises. Students will have opportunities to apply new concepts to individual projects. • Session 1: Sec 01: M–W 6–9 PM ADSD 205 3 credits

N otes

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Acting Dean, School of Art and Design Leighton Pierce Acting Chair C. Stewart Parker Assistant to the Chair Chandra Singh 3D Technician Zach Whitehurst Telephone 212-647-7375 Fax 212-367-2480 Internet www.pratt.edu/AOS Email aos@pratt.edu

A S S O C I AT E D E G R E E PROGRAMS: SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN T WO -Y EA R ASSO C I AT E D EG REE PRO GRAMS The Associate Degree program is concise, comprehensive, and demanding, offering students the choice of an intensive two-year career (A.O.S.) or transfer (A.A.S.) track education. Located in Manhattan at 144 West 14th St., 3rd floor, these programs integrate the best of new technologies with a strong commitment to the traditional art and design curriculum.

Associate of Occupational Studies (A.O.S.) With degrees in Graphic Design, Illustration, and Digital Design and Interactive Media, the A.O.S. Degree program grants a professional degree designed for high school graduates and adults with or without previous college experience. This is an intensive, twoyear, art- and design-based curriculum, offering students a strong foundation in design along with capstone courses, internship opportunities, and a professional portfolio upon graduation. The program attracts highly motivated students who, upon completion, move quickly into the fields of advertising, illustration, Web and CD-ROM design, digital video, package design, and publishing.

For more information, visit our website at www.pratt.edu/aos, or call the Office of Admissions at 718-636-3669 or 3514 for a catalog and application. You may also apply online. For specific program information, or to make an appointment to tour the facilities, call 212-647-7375, or email aos@pratt.edu.

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) With degrees in Graphic Design/ Illustration and Painting/Drawing, the A.A.S. degree is a pre-professional program providing the student with the first two years of a four-year B.F.A. course of study. Upon completion, students graduate with an A.A.S. degree and have the option of entering an art profession, or applying for transfer into a four-year B.F.A. program at Pratt, or another school of choice. The program offers a strong foundation, advancedlevel art and design courses, as well as a liberal studies component, all combined to create a comprehensive transfer degree.

These programs feature: Small classes, personal instruction, and critiques, designed to maximize the student’s creative potential. The faculty consists of New York’s leading professionals, who bring to the classroom the highest standards in their fields. Internships provide invaluable professional experience and affiliations while students complete the program. Financial aid is available to qualified part-time students who take between six and 11 credits per semester. Parttime students may participate fully in Pratt programs and activities. The primary requirement for entrance is a portfolio review, which is an opportunity to discuss your work, your career aspirations, and the many professional opportunities that are available. If you do not have a portfolio, you may submit a home examination. Please call the department for details at 212-647-7375.

Associate of Occupational Studies (A.O.S.) Degrees Offered • Digital Design and Interactive Media • Graphic Design • Illustration

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degrees Offered • Graphic Design/Illustration • Painting/Drawing


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AIA Professional Development for Architects and Engineers “Pratt’s Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design & Management program offers a helpful introduction to Sustainability and LEED certification. Tony Gelber is an excellent speaker and he brings his passion for sustainability and conservation to all his classes.” –Robert Fonfrias, P.E.

“I really enjoyed Roy Pachecano’s and David Reck’s class on “Green Design vs Historic Preservation.” It was very informative and inspiring. With the economy the way that it is, I am trying find ways to reinvent myself as an Architect. Your class gave me much to consider. “My business partner and I are in contract to purchase a landmark house on Staten Island. The case study of the Nix House gave me a renewed appreciation of the restoration process. “I look forward to attending more of your seminars in the future.” –Michael A. Biagioli, AIA, Architect

“I have taken many courses over the years at Pratt and other institutions to meet my PE license continuing education needs. I am pleased to tell you that the course “Greyfield Development—Unlocking the Doors to New Opportunities,” taught by David Robbins A.I.C.P., R.L.A., LEED, was the best I have attended. The subject matter was interesting, but David’s approach to covering the topic and the opportunity for the interactive discussion made the experience more educational and enjoyable. Thanks again.” –Bruce Levy, P.E.

Autodesk training center “Your institution should be proud to have Mr. Chris Ramirez as part of your group of instructors/professors. I was very impressed with Mr. Ramirez’s pedagogical skills when I participated in the AutoCAD Level I. The skills I refer to are: clear way to express ideas; organized sequence of lessons; structured and logical daily agenda; concern for students’ difficulties; and was always available when needed. I will certainly recommend this course to my col-

CUSTOMER TESTIMONIALS Read what other people are saying about CCPS certificate programs and courses.

leagues and personally look forward to my next course in your department. As a former adjunct professor at college level institutions in New York and New Jersey and as a licensed educator in in both places, I appreciate taking courses in which the instructor, besides having the expertise in the subject, is also a good pedagogue.” –Arnaldo Cardona, BEnv.Design, B.S.L.A., M.Art, M.S. Educ.

“Eric Kachelhofer was an excellent instructor. He was knowledgeable, engaging, gave personalized instruction, and enabled me to resolve specific issues unique to my field (Crime Scene Reconstruction). It was a great experience and I would like to continue taking classes in the future.” –Detective Matthew Steiner, New York City Police Department, Crime Scene Unit

“Three-dimensional craniofacial imaging is the future for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Temple University has developed this technique with hopes that it will become commonplace in the future office. Several types of software programs must be utilized for development. Temple University has teamed with Pratt’s Autodesk Authorized Training Center Premier Media and Entertainment (formerly known as a discreet Training Center) to enhance the knowledge and usage of the software. Pratt has provided a certified instructor to teach within a private and custom teaching environment. Continuing support has been an outstanding attribute from Pratt. I believe the success of this project will be ensured due to the strong commitment Pratt has given us.” –Ched Smaha, DMD, Temple University Department of Orthodontics, Philadelphia, PA

“The nature of our business is very deadline-driven. In order to get our designers proficient and up to speed on Autodesk VIZ, we feel it is best to routinely provide them with offsite training. That way, they can fully con-

centrate on learning about the design tools without any daily distractions. Our ATC, Pratt Institute, has been a valuable resource in training our product teams, and keeping our workflow proceeding smoothly and efficiently.”

lesson plans. I am very surprised at how much I learned, and I am definitely at a level where I can apply those skills to jobs. I would be thrilled to be able to take an advanced After Effects class with her in the fall.”

–Donald Strum, Senior Director of Product Design, Michael Graves Design Group, Princeton, NJ and New York, NY, USA

–Josh Graver, Pratt Institute, Graphic Designer

fine arts “In brief, I feel so grateful and indebted to Ms. Rosenblatt for the masterly way she brought drawing into my life. I have, in the past, been too impatient to tackle the elegantly simple process of drawing (‘simple’ as in ‘uncluttered,’ not ‘easy’). “Ms. Rosenblatt has skillfully guided me through one obstacle after another. The result is I’ve tapped into the JOY of the process, regarding the frustrations, dissatisfactions, etc. as valuable components in the creative process rather than as markers of defeat. This is a very precious gift, which I greatly value.” –Annica Davis

“The quiet, soft-spoken instructor, Newton Meyers, taught me more about drawing and painting than I had learned at the two colleges I attended.” –Michelle Delecki

computer graphics “I think the seminar—Overview of Digital Creation and Digital Media, taught by Kathy Brew­—was probably one of the best and most informative classes I’ve taken, in terms of exposure and resources. I’m so happy I got to take it! I am sad it was only one day though.“ –Danielle King, Curatorial Director

“The After Effects I class I just took with Irina (Ira) Yakubov was absolutely fantastic. She is a great instructor who is very well-organized and clear in her

Photography and Digital Creation “Coming from an island in the Caribbean I’ve always been into building bridges that can take me somewhere else. Pratt Manhattan’s Photography and Digital Imaging program has been the provider of the iron, bolts, and wires for this enterprise: my own photography work and business. I’m very happy and thankful for all I learned and developed while I was there. I recommend this program to anyone who is looking to learn and create, to expand and take a chance on passion for art.” –Mónica Félix, Professional Photographer, Photography and Digital Imaging, Certified Program Alumna

DESIGN “Since taking Elaine Tannenbaum’s class, “Introduction to Graphic Design”, I have dived into the design world and am actually in the process of applying to design MFA programs. I am hoping to combine my background in anthropology and writing to do design for social change. I also started a series of drawings after the class ended called Simplifood—minimalist vector drawings of food from an aerial view. They have become a true outlet for me, and have started to gain some traction (www. cargocollective.com/simplifood)! Thank you for inspiring me to pursue this path and helping me learn the basic skills I needed to make all this possible.” –Lana Z. Porter

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu


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G E N E R A L I N F O R M AT I O N

DIRECTIONS Brooklyn Campus 200 WILLOUGHBY AVENUE

Public Transportation By Subway FROM GRAND CENTRAL STATION

Take the downtown 4 or 5 train to the Fulton Street station. Take the Brooklyn-bound A or C train to the Hoyt-Schermerhorn station. Cross platform and take the G train (front car) to the Clinton-Washington station. Use Washington Avenue exit. On Washington, walk one block to DeKalb Avenue. Turn right onto DeKalb and proceed one block to Hall Street/Saint James to the corner gate of the Pratt campus. FROM PENN STATION AND PORT AUTHORITY BUS TERMINALS

Take the Brooklyn-bound A or C train to the Hoyt-Schermerhorn station. Cross platform and take G (front car) train to the Clinton-Washington station. Use Washington Avenue exit and then follow directions above to campus. FROM DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN

Take the B51 bus from City Hall to Fulton and Smith Streets in downtown Brooklyn. Change to B38 bus and take it up Lafayette Avenue to the corner of Saint James Place, which turns into Hall Street. Entrance to the campus is one block north on Hall Street.

By Car FROM BQE, HEADING WEST/ SOUTH, EXIT 31-WYTHE AVENUE/ KENT AVENUE

Stay straight to go onto Williamsburg Street W, which becomes Williamsburg Place, and then Park Avenue. Turn left onto Hall Street. Take Hall to Willoughby Avenue. Make a left on Willoughby. Campus is on right. FROM BQE, HEADING EAST/ NORTH, EXIT 30– FLUSHING AVENUE

Bear left onto Classon Avenue, then turn left onto Flushing Avenue. Turn left on to Washington Avenue. Proceed two blocks to Willoughby

Avenue. Make a left on Willoughby. Campus is on right.

side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue.

Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue.

FROM WEST SIDE OF MANHATTAN, VIA MANHATTAN BRIDGE

By Car

Parking in Manhattan

Travel east on Canal Street to Manhattan Bridge. Exit bridge to Flatbush Avenue. Follow the directions above to campus.

FROM QUEENS

Via 59th Street Bridge Go south on the FDR Drive. Take 23rd Street exit. Make a right turn onto 23rd Street. Make a left turn on Second Avenue. Take Second Avenue to 14th Street. Make a right turn. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue.

Limited street parking is available on weekdays and weekends. Parking is available for a fee in nearby garages.

FROM EAST SIDE OF MANHATTAN, VIA BROOKLYN BRIDGE

Travel south on the FDR Drive (also called East River Drive) to Brooklyn Bridge exit. Exit bridge to Tillary Street. Turn left on Tillary Street to Flatbush Avenue. Turn right onto Flatbush Avenue. Follow the directions above to campus.

Manhattan Campus 144 WEST 14TH STREET NEW YORK, NY 10011

Public Transportation By Subway Take the A, C, or E train to 14th Street/ Eighth Avenue, the F or M train to 14th Street/Sixth Avenue, the 1, 2, or 3 train to 14th Street/Seventh Avenue, or the 4, 5, 6, N, R, or Q train to 14th Street/ Union Square. Take crosstown buses or the L train to travel east or west on 14th Street. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue.

By Bus If uptown, take the M20 to 14th Street/ Eighth Avenue. You may also take the M6 to 14th Street/Avenue of the Americas. If downtown, take the M20 to 14th Street/Seventh Avenue. You may also take the M6 to 14th Street/ Union Square. Take crosstown buses or the L train to travel east or west on 14th Street. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue.

By PATH Train from New Jersey Take the PATH train to 14th Street in Manhattan. Exit at 6th Avenue and 14th Street. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south

FROM BROOKLYN

Via Brooklyn Bridge, north on FDR Drive Drive to Houston Street exit. Take left on Houston to Third Avenue. Make a right. Take Third Avenue to 14th Street, and make a left turn. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue. FROM NEW JERSEY

Take the Holland Tunnel to Manhattan. From tunnel, bear right to Eighth Avenue. Travel east to Sixth Avenue. Go south and make a left turn onto 14th Street. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue. FROM WESTCHESTER

Take the West Side Highway South. Make a left turn onto 14th Street. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh

Going from Pratt Brooklyn to Pratt Manhattan By Subway Take the G train from the ClintonWashington station. Go one stop to Hoyt-Schermerhorn. Change for the A or C train, and take it to 14th Street/ Eighth Avenue. Walk east, or take the crosstown buses or L train for eastbound travel. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue.

By Bus and Subway Take the #38 bus to Flatbush Avenue. Exit at DeKalb Avenue Station. Take the N, R, or Q train to 14th Street/Union Square. Walk west or take crosstown buses or the L train west for westbound travel. Pratt is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues on the south side of the block, closest to Seventh Avenue.


CCPS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Center for Continuing and Professional Studies Brooklyn Campus Office 200 Willoughby Avenue, ISC 205 Telephone: 718-636-3453 Fax: 718-399-4410 Manhattan Campus Office 144 West 14th Street, Room 209 Telephone: 212-647-7199 Fax: 212-367-2489 Email: prostudy@pratt.edu Website: www.pratt.edu/prostudies or http://prostudies.pratt.edu

Certificate Program Completion Requirements Choose the appropriate courses that will maximize your educational experience at Pratt’s Center for Continuing and Professional Studies. Within two weeks of completion of your certificate program, please contact Perry Han: prostudy@pratt.edu to request a program audit and to receive your final transcript and certificate of completion.

Changes to Policies, Procedures, and Fees Pratt Institute reserves the right to change tuition, fees, the calendar, course offerings, graduation requirements, rules, policies, and procedures as necessary. Students are provided with written notice of these changes, whenever possible, through such means as posted notices, letters, or through the student handbook. No exceptions may be made to any of the academic or academic-related policies or procedures without written authorization by the provost of the Institute. No representation by any college employee to the contrary may be considered authorized or binding. CCPS reserves the right to deny enrollment to, or to expel any student whose behavior, attitude, or level of development is inconsistent, in the sole discretion of CCPS, with the creative environment, student growth, and harmony in the educational process.

Classroom Assignments Please contact the Brooklyn office at 718-636-3453, or the Manhattan office at 212-647-7199.

Continuing Education Units All students receive continuing education units (C.E.U.s) upon successful completion of the program. C.E.U.s are nationally recognized units earned by participants in qualified continuing education programs, making it possible to document non-credit work completed. C.E.U.s are not equivalent to college credits. One C.E.U. is awarded for each 10 hours of participation. Continuing education courses in the Center for Continuing and Professional Studies are not automatically attributed to Pratt Institute’s degree programs.

Corporate Billing Purchase Orders as well as Letter of Intent to pay must be submitted at time of registration. All Letters of Intent must be verified prior to first day of class.

Course Cancellation All continuing education courses are subject to minimum enrollment. When courses are withdrawn or cancelled by Pratt for any reason, students may transfer to another course or receive a full refund. Pratt Institute reserves the right to cancel any class for which there is insufficient enrollment and to withdraw or modify course offerings. Course locations, fees, and instructors may also be changed when necessary. Please note: Allow 60 days for refunds to be processed.

Discounts Discounts listed below apply to all continuing education courses, unless otherwise noted in the course description. The discount is computed on the actual tuition, minus the registration fee. Only one discount can apply, per semester. Please note: Multiple types of discounts do not apply. Senior Citizen Discount Senior citizens 65 and older who present evidence of age at the time of registration will receive a 10 percent discount. Pratt Alumni Discount Alumni of Pratt degree programs receive 10 percent discount, on noncredit courses, only if stated at the time of registration.

Pratt Full-Time Faculty and Staff Discount Pratt full-time faculty and staff may be eligible for tuition remission, excluding lab fees and the $10 registration fee per course, subject to the guidelines published by Human Resources, and are permitted to register only after registration has been closed for paying students. Pratt Part-Time Faculty Discount Pratt part-time faculty receives a partial credit for tuition, exclusive of fees, based on established guidelines available in the Human Resources office. Corporate Discounts Corporate discounts apply to three or more registrations from a company in the same section of a course or seminar. For further information about discounts, call 212-647-7199 or 718-636-3453 or email prostudy@pratt.edu.

Fees Payment in full must be mailed with the registration form, or paid at the time of registration in person, for both non-credit and credit courses. Any student placed on a Bursar hold will not be able to register for any courses or receive transcripts and certificates until balance is paid in full. For questions about a Bursar hold, please contact William Carrero at 718-399-4525 or email wcarrero@pratt.edu. Registration Fee There is a $10 registration fee charged for each non-credit course for which you enroll. The fee is non-refundable, unless classes are cancelled due to lack of enrollment. • $10 per course Certificate Program Application Fee • $100 non-refundable

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OneKey Account Information OneKey user names and passwords are necessary for all students and faculty of Pratt Institute. Register Online: To Get your OneKey user name and password you must register. • Visit www.my.pratt.edu • Click on the link—Instant Enrollment, CCPS • Enter the course code in the Course Code field (PMPP 455 for example) • You will be taken to the Payment Screens • A receipt will be emailed to you upon successful registration. • Your login and password are mailed to your street address. Allow 24 hours for processing, so register early to guarantee yourself a seat and start using your benefits. Login: Your username will be your first initial, followed by your last name, for no more than 8 characters total. Password: Your initial password will be your student ID. Once in, you can change your password if desired. Please Note: If you can’t get in using the simple rules above, send an email to the helpdesk at helpdesk@pratt.edu, and give them your student ID number. They will send you back a way to get in. How to use my.pratt.edu with your OneKey password: Visit my.pratt.edu and enter your OneKey username and password in the upper right side of the screen. See Web Services for the Instant Enrollment link. Privacy Pratt Institute is a private educational institution and does not share email addresses or any personal data with external resources. Instant Enrollment is a secure server—use this with confidence to pay for classes.

Facilities Fees Students registering for 30-hour computer courses are required to pay a non-refundable facilities fee of: • $25 per course Please note: All facilities fees are non-refundable. Uncollectible Checks A $20 surcharge will be imposed for processing.

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Student IDs and Visitors’ Passes

Refunds

Supply Lists

Weather Emergency Line

Semester Student Photo ID Semester Photo IDs will be required for students regis­tered in semester-long courses and students in 1-6 day computer and appraisal courses, workshops or lectures. In order to facilitate this process, please make arrangements to have your photo taken for your ID at least 30 minutes before your first class, or on a day prior to the start of your course.

Students who, for any reason, find it impossible to complete the course for which they are registered should inform the Center for Continuing and Professional Studies, CCPS, in writing that they wish to withdraw. Failure to complete the course does not constitute official withdrawal, nor does notification to the instructor. Lack of attendance alone does not entitle a student to a refund. Pratt cannot be responsible for providing make-ups or issuing refunds for programs missed as a result of illness, emergencies, or other events beyond our control. Withdrawals do not necessarily entitle the student to a refund of tuition and fees paid, or the cancellation of tuition still due. See withdrawal policy. Please note: Allow 60 days for refunds to be processed.

Supply lists for several courses are available in PDF format on the website at www.pratt.edu/prostudies. Some courses require supplies or textbooks (with pre-course reading) to be purchased and brought to the first class. Please make sure to look for a supply list PDF on the CCPS home page, under Resources, as you begin your registration. Or call the CCPS office in Manhattan or Brooklyn for help in finding your supply list PDF.

Pratt Institute’s Weather Emergency Line can be reached by dialing 718-636-3700. Callers will get information on any weather-related closings at either the Brooklyn or Manhattan campuses. Visit our website at www.pratt.edu.

Manhattan Campus IDs • IDs will be issued at the security desk located in the lobby. For additional information on hours for receiving IDs, please call Sharon Boddie at 212-6477776 or email at pmcsec@pratt.edu. Brooklyn Campus IDs • IDs will be issued at the security office located in the Engineering Building, 1st floor. Visitors’ Passes A visitor’s pass will be issued for students registered in short term 1-6 day seminars, workshops, or lectures. Photo IDs will only be issued as specified (see Semester Student Photo ID above).

Financial Aid CCPS does not accept Financial Aid at this time, which includes the Continuing Education Loan Program (CEL).

Scholarship Information

Class schedule and catalogs can be downloaded from our website at www. pratt.edu/prostudies

For a directory of scholarship websites, please visit: www.freescholarshipguide. com or write to: Free Scholarship Guide Inc. 132 E. 43rd Street, Suite 535 New York, NY 10017

Guarantee yourself a seat!

Registration Deadlines

On the Web

Don’t wait for the last moment to register. Please register early to avoid a course cancellation and to guarantee yourself a seat in classes that fill quickly. Registration deadlines are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted.

Registration deadlines for all courses are one week prior to course start dates, unless otherwise noted. Exceptions will be allowed based on space availability. We recommend that you register early.

Register Online Non-credit online registration: my.pratt.edu Please note: Online registrations received through my.pratt.edu will receive a confirmation via email. Please visit the CCPS website at www. pratt.edu/prostudies

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Transcripts To check your grades online and request transcripts visit my.pratt.edu and log in with your OneKey. • click on Student, choose Academic Tools; then • click on Current Term Grades; or • you may view an Unofficial Transcript on your computer by selecting that option. Students enrolled in the certificate programs in computer graphics or photography and digital art automatically receive one transcript free of charge each semester. A fee of $5 is charged for additional transcripts. Students in all other courses must pay a $5 fee for each transcript, letter of completion, or any additional certificate requested. Requests for transcripts, certificates of completion, certifications, and other statements relating to the record should be addressed to either Pratt Manhattan, Center for Continuing and Professional Studies, or the Brooklyn Campus, Center for Continuing and Professional Studies, Attention: Continuing Education Transcripts— along with the correct remittance. Requests must state name while in attendance, dates of attendance, and course(s) of study, list the name and address to which information is to be mailed, and bear the signature of the student.

Withdrawal Policy Withdrawal or refund requests cannot be made by telephone or through the instructor. Withdrawals and refunds are computed from the date and time written or electronic notice of withdrawal is received. Requests can be faxed, emailed, or mailed. • 2 business days before 1st meeting 100% tuition refund • 2 business days before 2nd meeting 80% tuition refund • 2 business days before 3rd meeting 60% tuition refund • 2 business days before 4th meeting 40% tuition refund •P  lease note: There will be no refunds for any reason after the fourth class meeting. Seminars and 4–6-day courses • Withdrawals 6 business days before start date 100% tuition. • No refunds after this date. •P  lease note: All requests must be made in writing. Allow 60 days for refunds to be processed. Withdrawal by Email • Email: prostudy@pratt.edu Withdrawal by Fax • Brooklyn classes: 718-399-4410 • Manhattan classes: 212-367-2489 Withdrawal by US Mail • See address for Brooklyn or Manhattan CCPS office.


SUmmer 2013 COURSE INDEX 2-D Character Animation for Video, 19 3D Design/Model-making (GP), 6 A Accessibility and its Relationship to Sustainable Design, 34 Accessible Design and Construction Requirement: Section 504 of the Rehab Act, 34 Acrylic and Watercolor Painting Mastery, 3 Adaptive Reuse Re-Imagined, 34 Adobe After Effects CS6: I, 19 Adobe After Effects CS6: II, 19 Adobe Illustrator CS6: Graphic Illustration I, 20 Adobe Illustrator CS6: Graphic Illustration II, 20 Adobe Illustrator CS6 for Fashion Design, 20 Adobe InDesign CS6, 20 Advanced Adobe InDesign CS6 with Photoshop and Illustrator, 20 Advanced Techniques in Final Cut Pro, 19 AIA Architectural Design with Autodesk 3ds Max Design 2013 Level I, 27 AIA Architectural Design with Autodesk 3ds Max Design 2013 Level II, 27–28 AIA Architectural Rendering and Lighting with Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, 28 AIA Architectural Visualization using AutoCAD, Autodesk Revit and Autodesk 3ds Max Design 2013, 27 AIA AutoCAD 2013 Architecture Advanced, 25 AIA AutoCAD 2013 Architecture Essentials, 25 AIA AutoCAD 2013 Conceptual Design, 24 AIA AutoCAD 2013 Creating and Presenting 3D Models, 24–25 AIA AutoCAD 2013 Professional Level I, 24 AIA AutoCAD 2013 Professional Level I on the Mac, 19 AIA AutoCAD 2013 Professional Level II, 24 AIA Autodesk Ecotect Analysis: Core Concepts, 25

AIA Autodesk Inventor 2013 Level I, 25 AIA Autodesk NavisWorks 2013 Core Concepts, 25 AIA Autodesk Revit 2013: Topography, 27 AIA Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013: Addition and Renovation Projects, 26 AIA Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013: Basic Course, 25 AIA Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013: BIM Management, 26 AIA Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013: Conceptual Design and Visualization, 26 AIA Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013: Creating Construction Documents, 26 AIA Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013: Level I, 25–26 AIA Autodesk Revit Architecture 2013: Level II, 26 AIA Autodesk Revit MEP 2013: Basics Course, 26 AIA Autodesk Revit Structure 2013: Advanced, 27 AIA Autodesk Revit Structure 2013: Essentials, 26–27 AIA Autodesk 3ds Max Design 2013 Intensive Workshop, 27 AIA Introduction to MAXScript for AEC Professionals, 28 AIA Professional Development for Architects & Engineers courses, 33–49 Customer Testimonials, 63 AIA Set Design for Architects and Designers using AutoCAD 2013, 27 Altered Books I, 3–4 An American Revolution: The Invention of Balloon Framing and The History of Wood Frame Architecture in America, 35 Analysis of Continuous Spanned Beams, 34 Analysis of Continuous Spanned Beams I, 34 Analysis of Continuous Spanned Beams II, 34 Animating with Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 and Character Studio Biped, 17 Animation Basic Drawing for, 4 Computer Animation and Video, 14

Animation courses, 15–19 Architect’s Role in Development: Preserving the Public’s Welfare, 48 Architectural Acoustic and Noise Control, 35 Architectural Design Studio, 58 Architectural Intensive, 60 Architectural/Mechanical Drafting I, 8 Architectural Rendering and Lighting with Autodesk 3ds Max Design 2013, 28 Architectural Restoration: Motivators and Constraints to the Preservation of Older Structures, 35 Architecture, Introduction to, 58 Art Appreciation Intensive, 60 The Art of Collage, 5 Art and Design courses, 2–8 The Art of Photographic Portraiture, 11 Artwork and Museum Photography, 9 Associate of Applied Science (AAS), 62 Associate Degree Programs, 62 Associate of Applied Science (AAS), 62 Associate of Occupational Studies (AOS), 62 Associate of Occupational Studies (AOS), 62 Audio courses Digital Video and Audio courses, 19 Autodesk Maya and Mudbox Pipeline Integration, 16 Autodesk Maya I Fundamentals: 3D Modeling, Animation, and Rendering, 16, 20 Autodesk Maya II: Modeling, Animation and Effects, 16 Autodesk MotionBuilder 2013, Introduction to, 18 Autodesk Mudbox, 18 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Advanced Character Design (Modeling), 17 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Advanced Game Character Modeling for Next-Gen Games, 17 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Advanced Projects, 17 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Animation I, 16 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Animation II, 17 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 CAT Animation, 17

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Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Design Advanced Lighting, 18 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Fundamentals: Modeling and Rendering I, 16 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Game Level and Character Design, 17 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, Intro to, 16 Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 Modeling, Materials, and Rendering II, 16 Autodesk 3ds Maya Advanced Character Design, 16 Autodesk Training Center, 24–28 Customer Testimonials, 63 B Basic Drawing, 4 Basic Drawing for Animation, 4 Basics of Building Performance with Case Studies, 35 Basic Typography, 2 The Big Four and More: A Practical Approach to Using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Linked-In, and Others, 32 Botanical Illustration, Introduction to, 6 Branding and Licensing for the Illustrator, 20 Brick Essentials, 35 Building and Restoring Brick Structures, 35–36 Business and Design, 56 C Calendar, 1 Camera, Introduction to the, 9 Camera Matching with Autodesk Matchmover, 18 Capstone Project – Sustainable Building and Infrastructure Design and Management, 36, 50 Career Development courses, 11 CCPS Policies and Procedures, 65 CCPS Staff, 1 Certificate Programs Certificate Program Completion Requirements, 65 Computer-Aided Design and Visualization, 14 Computer Animation and Video, 14 Design Entrepreneurship, 56–57 Electronic Imaging and Illustration, 13–14 Electronic Publishing, 14 Fashion New Media, 29–30 Interactive Media, 13 REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Online and Social Media Marketing, 31–32 Perfumery, 55 Photography and Digital Imaging, 9–13 Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management, 33, 50–51 Urban Green Infrastructure: Green Systems Clean Water, 33, 52–54 Changes to Polices, 65 Character Animation for Video, 19 Charcoal: The Willow Branch Speaks, 4 Chinese Watercolor, 4 Chronicles of Security Technology: In the Age of Terrorism and Natural Disasters, 36 “Cinematic” Drawing: From a Walk on the High Line or Battery Park South, 4 Classes for Beginners (computers), 15 Climate Change Fundamentals for Design and Management Professionals, 36, 50 Color Management Workshop, 20 Comic Book Illustration, 5 Components of Passive Fire Protection, 36 Computer-Aided Design and Visualization, 14 Computer Animation and Video, 13–14, 14 Computer Competency (Mac), 15 Computer Graphics Certificate Programs, 13–14 Computer Graphic and Technology courses, 15–23 Customer Testimonials, 63 Connecting Us: The Arterial Highway System of the New York-New Jersey Region, 36 Construction Cost Estimating, 37 Construction Management courses, 11 Construction Management for Sustainable Projects, 59 Construction Specifications Writing, 37 Contemporary Applications of Chinese Art, 4 Content Development Strategies for Online Marketing, 32 Continuing Education Units, 65 Continuity Storyboards: The Filmmaker’s Best Friend, 15 Corporate Billing, 65 Course Cancellation, 65 REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Create a Professional Design Portfolio, 20 Creating a Website and Blog, 31–32 Customer Testimonials, 63 D Decorative Arts courses, 2 Design courses, 2–3 Customer Testimonials, 63 Design Entrepreneurship Certificate Program, 56–57 Design for the Web, 2, 21 Designing and Renovating Carbon Neutral Buildings, 37, 51 Design Your Life Like an Entrepreneur, 56 Digital Imaging and Photography, Introduction to, 58 Digital Photography I, 10 Digital Photography II, 10 Digital Photography Intensive, 60 Digital SLR Video Revolution, The, 11 Digital Video and Audio courses, 19 Directions, 64 Discounts, 65 Drafting and Modeling on the Mac courses, 19–20 Drainage and Hydrology in NYC, 37, 53 Drawing and Art Workshop, 4–5, 7–8 Drawing for Product Design (GP), 6 Drawing Foundation for Interior Design, 7 Drawing Intensive, 60 Dreamweaver CS6 with Fireworks: I, 21 Dreamweaver II: Web Standards – Content, Presentation, and Behaviors, 21 E Editorial Design, 2–3 Educational Facilities Noise Control, 37 Electronic Imaging and Illustration courses, 13–14 Electronic Publishing courses, 14 Electronic Publishing and Digital Art courses, 20 Elements of the Social Media Policy, 32 Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Weatherization Audits, and Capital Planning, 38, 51 Energy Benchmarking, 37–38 Energy Retro-commissioning of Buildings, 38

Environment, SEQRA and the Engineered Project, The, 48 Environmental Site Investigation and Remediation, 38 Exploring Careers in Visual Arts Administration, 11 F Facilities and Environmental Compliance courses, 12 Fall 2013 Pre-College Programs, 58 Fantastic Rooms: Sketching in the Period Rooms at the Brooklyn Museum, 5, 8 Fashion Design: Construction Techniques for Garments I, 3 Fashion Design courses, 3 Fashion Design Intensive, 60 Fashion New Design, 30 Fashion New Media, Introduction to, 30 Fashion New Media Certificate Program, 29–30 Fashion New Media Portfolio, 30 Fashion Photography, Introduction to, 10 Fees, 65 Feng Shui and Architecture, 38 Feng Shui and Interior Design, 7 Financial aid, 66 Fine Art Digital Printing, 10 Fine Arts: Painting and Drawing, 58 Fine Arts courses, 3–5 Customer Testimonials, 63 Fine Arts/Painting and Drawing Intensive, 60 Fire Protection Technology, 38 Flash CS6 I, 21–22 Flash CS6 II: Action Scripting, 22 Flash CS6 III: Advanced Action Scripting, 23 Foundation Art, 58 Freshwater Wetlands, 38 Full-Spectrum Polarized Lighting Systems, 38–39 G General Information, 1, 64–66 Administration, 1 CCPS Policies and Procedures, 65 Changes to Policies, Procedures, and Fees, 65 Continuing Education Units, 65 Corporate Billing, 65 Course Cancellation, 65 Directions, 64 Fees, 65

OneKey Account Information, 65 Pre-College Programs, 58–59 Refunds, 66 Register Online, 66 Registration Deadlines, 66 Student IDs and Visitors’ Passes, 66 Supply Lists, 66 Transcripts, 66 Weather Emergency Line, 2, 66 Withdrawal Policy, 66 Generating Revenue Online: Monetizing Traffic, 32 Geotechnical Engineering, 39 Getting to Your Market, 57 Getting Your Foot in the Shoe Business, 56 Go Green Retrofits, 39 Graphic Design, Introduction to, 3 Graphic Design Ideas to Form, 3 Graphic Design Intensive, 61 Gray Water Heat Recovery, 39 Great Web Design with CSS: Cascading Style Sheets, 22 Green Infrastructure Data and Calculations, 39, 53 Green Roof Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring, 39, 53 Green Roof Design (GI and Buildings), 39, 53 Green Versus Historic: Collaboration or Conflict, 39 Greyfield Development—Unlocking the Doors to New Opportunities, 39 Guide to Sustainable Materials for High-Performance Buildings, A, 34 H Handheld Filmmaking: Your Story— Inside and Out, 10 Handmade Toys, 2 Historic Preservation: Techniques and Methods, 39–40 Home Inspection courses, 33 How to Determine the Age of Your Building or House, 40 How To Give a TED Talk, 57 HTML and CSS, Introduction to, 22 HVAC Design, 40 I Illustrated Science Fiction Book Project, 5 Illustration courses, 5–6 Illustration Intensive, 61


Impact of Design on the Environment and Society, The, 56 Importance of Interior Design in Film and Television, The: Using Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, 7, 19 Improving the Energy Efficiency of Steam Systems, 40 Indoor Air Quality, 40 Industrial Design courses, 6–7 Industrial Facilities Noise Control, 40 Innovative Green Infrastructure Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring, 40, 54 Innovative Green Infrastructure Design (GI and Sites), 40, 53 Integrating Accessibility, 40–41 Integrating Interior Design Into Building Design: It’s Not Just Decorating, 41 Integrating Landscape into Urban Architecture, 41 Interactive Media courses, 13 Interactive Media and the Internet courses, 21–22 Interactive Web Design with jQuery, 25 Interior Design courses, 7 Importance of Interior Design in Film and Television, The: Using Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, 19 Interior Design Intensive, 61 Interior Design Preparatory Course (Qualifying Program), 7 Intro to Architecture, 58 Intro to Autodesk MotionBuilder 2013, 18 Intro to Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, 16 Intro to Botanical Illustration, 6 Intro to the Camera, 9 Intro to Digital Imaging and Photography, 58 Intro to Fashion New Media, 30 Intro to Fashion Photography, 10 Intro to Graphic Design, 3 Intro to HTML and CSS, 22 Illustration: The Illustration Portfolio, 6 Intro to MAXScript for AEC Professionals, 28 Intro to Motion Capture, 18 Intro to Photography, 9–10 Intro to PHP Programming for Web, 23 Intro to Special Effects with Autodesk 3ds Max 2013 and Autodesk Composite, 18

J Jewelry Design Intensive I, 7 Jewelry Making course, 7 L Land Use Engineering, 41 LEED Certification Exam Prep Courses, 12 LEED Commercial Interiors, 41 LEED for Green Associate Plus, 41 LEED New (BD+C) Construction V3, Core and Shell, and K-12 Schools, 41 M Made in NYC, 57 Managing Your Career/Career Change, 11 MAXScript for AEC Professionals, Introduction to, 28 Measurement: Understanding, Analyzing, and Utilizing Web and E-mail Analytics, 31 Media Arts/Photography, 9–12, 58 Media Arts/Photography/Digital Art courses, 9–12 Metalworking I, 8 Metalworking II, 8 Mixed-use Development—Beyond the City Limits, 42 Motion Capture, Introduction to, 18 Museum Workshops, 7–8 N New Media Fashion New Media Certificate Program, 29–30 Survey of New Media in Design: Interactive Media and the Internet, 22 New Technologies–Smart Grid and Smart Buildings, 42, 51 New York City Accessibility Requirements: Workshop, 42 New York City Commercial Energy Code, 42 New York City, Drainage and Hydrology in, 53 New York City, Restaurant Design in, 47 New York City, Selling Your Art in, 11 New York Construction Law, 42 New York State Building Codes, Rules, and Regulations, 42 New York State Energy Conservation Construction Code, 48 Noise Abatement and Control: Multifamily Housing, 43

Non-Linear Editing and Video Effects with Final Cut Pro, 19 O Offsite Fabrication for Housing, 43 OneKey Account Information, 65 One-On-One Consultation, 32 Online Advertising: Understanding CPC, CPM, CPV, and Other Creative Ways of Driving Traffic, 32 Online and Social Media Marketing courses, 12, 22, 31–32 Online Strategy: Adapting, Integrating, and Utilizing Online and Social Media Platforms, 31 Overview of Digital Creation and Digital Media, 15 P Package Design and Brand Identity, 3 Painting and Drawing Workshop, 5 Painting with Watercolors, 5 Path to Greater Architectural Freedom with Today’s Structural Steel, The, 48 Pattern-Making Basics for the Female Form, 3 Performance Modeling for Carbon Neutral Buildings, 43, 51 Perfumery Certificate Program, 55 Perspective Drawing and Rendering, 8 Photographic Lighting I, 10 Photography, Introduction to, 9–10 Photography and Digital Art courses, 9–12 Customer Testimonials, 63 Photography Intensive, 61 Photoshop Beauty Retouching, 20 Photoshop CS6: Imaging I, 20–21 Photoshop CS6: Imaging II, 21 Photoshop for Photographers, 21 Photoshop Montage and Collage, 21 Photoshop Retouching, 21 PHP Programming for Web, Introduction to, 23 Pictorial Perspective, 8 Planning and Design of Urban Transportation Infrastructure Projects, 43 Portfolio Development, 58 A Portrait: Beyond the Image is a Story, 10 The Power of Negotiation, 57 PR 2.0: The Next Evolution of Public Relations, 32 Pratt alumni discount, 65

S u mm e r 2 0 1 3

Pre-College Programs Fall 2013, 58 Summer 2013, 59 Preparatory Course Graduate Interior Design, 7 Preparing Energy Audit Reports, 43–44 Product Design (GP), 6 Product Design: Portfolio Development and Design (GP), 6–7 Product Visualization in Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, 18–19 Professional Development for Architects & Engineers courses, 33–49 Programming courses, 24 Protecting the Public Health by Greening Your Specifications, 44 Public Right-of-Way Construction, Maintenance, and Monitoring, 44, 54 Public Right-of-Way Design (GI and Streets), 44, 53 R RampUP!, 57 Refunds, 66 Register Online, 66 Registration Deadlines, 66 Residential Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps and How to Evaluate Them Holistically, 44 Residential Bathroom Design from Start to Finish, 44 Residential Chimney and Wood Heating and How to Evaluate Them Holistically, 44–45 Residential Electrical Systems and How to Evaluate Them Holistically, 45 Residential Exteriors and How to Evaluate Them Holistically, 45 Residential Gas and Oil Furnaces and How to Evaluate Them Holistically, 45 Residential Home Inspection courses, 12 Residential House Inspections, 45 Residential Insulation and How to Evaluate It Holistically, 45 Residential Interiors and How to Evaluate Them Holistically, 46 Residential Kitchen Design from Soup to Nuts, 46 Residential Landscape Architecture, 46 REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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Residential Plumbing and How to Evaluate It Holistically, 46 Residential Roofing and How to Evaluate It Holistically, 46 Residential Steam, Electric, Floor, Wall Heat plus Hot Water Boilers and How to Evaluate Them Holistically, 46–47 Restaurant Design, in New York City and Beyond, 47 Roofing 101, 47 S Scholarship Information, 66 Sculpture courses, 8 Search Engine Optimization, 32 Security Design through CPTED, 47 Selling Your Art in New York City, 11 Senior citizen discount, 65 Small-Scale Real Estate Development, 47 Social Entrepreneurship, 57 Social Media and Social Media Marketing, 29, 31 Solar Photovoltaics, 47 Special Effects with Autodesk Maya, 16 Special Effects (FX) with Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, 17–18 and Autodesk Composite, Introduction to, 18 Special Programs, 12 Special Projects Independent Study, 19 Specifications Writing, Principles, and Practice, 47 Starting a Fashion Business, 57 Starting a Jewelry Studio, 57 Start Your Design Consultancy, 56 Staying Out of Trouble, 57 Student IDs and Visitors’ Passes, 66 Subsurface Utility Engineering, 47–48 Summer 2013 Pre-College Programs, 12, 58, 59 Summer Credit Intensives, 60–61 Supply Lists, 66 Survey of Contemporary Photography, 9 Survey of New Media in Design: Interactive Media and the Internet, 22 Sustainability Approach to Engineering Design, 47 Sustainable Building, Infrastructure Design and Management Certificate Program, 33, 50–51 REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

Sustainable Standards for Buildings and Infrastructure-BREAM, Energy Star, LEED, 48, 51 Sustaining Mixed-income Housing, 48 T Technical Drawing courses, 8 The Technique and Language of Perfumery by Cinquième Sens (Selling Fragrances), 55 Testimonials, Customer, 63 Texturing Autodesk 3ds Max 2013, 19 Theming WordPress, 23 3D Design/Model-making (GP), 6 Three Dimensional Design I, 5 Tidal Wetlands, 49 Tools and Strategies for Sustainable Design, 56 Towards a Sustainable World by Design, 61 Traditional Animation I, 15 Traditional Animation II, 15 Transcripts, 66 Turn Your Idea Into a Product, 57 21st Century Performance from 19th Century Walls, 49 2-D Character Animation for Video, 19 Typography, Basic, 2 U Urban Green Infrastructure: Green Systems Clean Water Certificate Program, 33, 52–54 V VA Benefits for Certificate Program, 13, 50, 52 Video courses Computer Animation and Video, 14 Digital Video and Audio courses, 19 Visitors’ passes, 66 W Waterproofing Foundations and Basements, 49 Weather Emergency Line, 2, 66 Wind Energy Systems, 49 Withdrawal Policy, 66 Z Zoning—Zoning and Land Use: Theory, Innovation, and Impact on Architecture and the Community (Parts I and II), 49


S u mm e r 2 0 1 3

N otes

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu

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N otes

REGISTER ONLINE: my.pratt.edu


how to register

Manhattan Online/Instant Enrollment: http://my.pratt.edu

Brooklyn Online/Instant Enrollment: http://my.pratt.edu

We ACCEPT • American Express • Discover • MasterCard • Visa • Check/Money Order

By Telephone Call 212-647-7199 with your credit card. M–Th, 10 AM–6 PM; F, 10 AM–2 PM

By Telephone Call 718-636-3453 with your credit card. M-Th, 10 AM–4:30 PM; F, 10 AM–3:30 PM

In Person 144 West 14th Street, Room 209 Between Sixth and Seventh avenues M–Th, 10 AM–6 PM; F, 10 AM–2 PM

In Person 200 Willoughby Avenue ISC Building, 2nd Floor M–Th, 10 AM–4:30 PM; F, 10 AM–2 PM

By Mail Fill out the registration form and mail with check or money order to our office.

By Mail Fill out the registration form and mail with check or money order to our office.

Pratt Institute Center for Continuing and Professional Studies 144 West 14th Street, Room 209 New York, NY 10011

Pratt Institute Center for Continuing and Professional Studies 200 Willoughby Avenue, ISC 205 Brooklyn, NY 11205

By Facsimile Send your fax to 212-367-2489. Be sure to have your registration form filled out with your credit card number and expiration date.

By Facsimile Send your fax to 718-399-4410. Be sure to have your registration form filled out with your credit card number and expiration date.

CORPORATE BILLING Purchase orders accepted. Please forward billing information with registration.

mail application

Mail application with a check or money Last Name first middle

order payable to Pratt Institute/Center for Continuing and Professional Studies.

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Pratt Manhattan

Center for Continuing and Professional Studies street 144 West 14th Street, Room 209

New York, NY 10011-2700 city state zip 212-647-7199 or phone Pratt Institute

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200 Willoughby Avenue

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pratt/manhattan certificate program ($100 fee)

computer graphics

Brooklyn, NY 11205-9975

pratt brooklyn

photography

718-636-3453

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design, and management URBAN GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE:

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GREEN SYSTEMS CLEAN WATER Perfumery

note: All courses with numbers beginning with PM meet in Manhattan.

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Pratt Manhattan 144 West 14th Street New York, NY 10011-2700 Telephone 212-647-7199 Pratt Institute 200 Willoughby Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205-9975 Telephone 718-636-3453

PRATT INSTITUTE CENTER FOR CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

NEW CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Design Entrepreneurship Fashion New Media Online And Social Media Marketing Perfumery Urban Green Infrastructure: Green Systems Clean Water Open registration begins April 22, 2013

Classes begin May 18 www.pratt.edu/prostudies

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Pratt Institute

112 ccps sum 2013 catalog 2  

ccps summer course catalogue 2013

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