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Body, Mind & Spirit / Western Magick

The Key to a Masterwork of Western Occultism The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy, by Henry Cornelius Agrippa and unnamed others, is considered one of the cornerstones of Western magic, and the grimoires it contains are among the most important that exist in the Western tradition. For more than three hundred years, this mysterious tome has been regarded as difficult or even impossible to understand—until now. Occult scholar Donald Tyson presents a fully annotated, corrected, and modernized edition of Stephen Skinner’s 1978 facsimile edition of the original work, which was six tracts published as one volume in 1655. For the first time, these classic works of Western magic have been rendered fully accessible to the novice practitioner, as well as occult scholars and skilled magicians. Tyson presents clear instruction and practical insight on a variety of magic techniques, providing contemporary magicians with a working grimoire of the arcane.

Astrology • History • Geomancy • Ceremonial Magic The Nature of Spirits, Angels, and Demons Geomantic Astronomy • Necromancy Invocation and Evocation of Spirits

Donald Tyson has written more than a dozen books on Western esoteric traditions. He is the editor of the contemporary version of Agrippa’s seminal work, Three Books of Occult Philosophy.

ISBN 978-0-7387-1876-7

Llewellyn Worldwide www.llewellyn.com

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Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy


About the Author Donald Tyson is a resident of Nova Scotia, Canada. After graduating university, he developed an interest in the tarot, which led him to study all branches of the Western esoteric tradition. His first book, The New Magus, was published in 1988. He has written about such varied subjects as the runes, crystal and mirror scrying, astral travel, spirit evocation, spirit familiars, the theory of magic, the Kabbalah, and the Necronomicon. He designed the popular Necronomicon Tarot card deck, illustrated by Anne Stokes, and is the inventor of rune dice. In his spare time he enjoys hiking, kayaking, and woodworking.

To Write to the Author If you wish to contact the author or would like more information about this book, please write to the author in care of Llewellyn Worldwide and we will forward your request. Both the author and publisher appreciate hearing from you and learning of your enjoyment of this book and how it has helped you. Llewellyn Worldwide cannot guarantee that every letter written to the author can be answered, but all will be forwarded. Please write to: Donald Tyson â „o Llewellyn Worldwide 2143 Wooddale Drive, Dept. 978-0-7387-1876-7 Woodbury, Minnesota 55125-2989, U.S.A. c

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The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy The Companion to Three Books of Occult Philosophy written by

Henry Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim translated by

Robert Turner Edited and Annotated by

Donald Tyson Llewellyn Publications Woodbury, Minnesota


The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy: The Companion to Three Books of Occult Philosophy written by Henry Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim. Copyright © 2009 by Donald Tyson. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever, including Internet usage, without written permission from Llewellyn Publications, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles and reviews. First Edition First Printing, 2009 Cover design by Kevin R. Brown Editing by Tom Bilstad Llewellyn is a registered trademark of Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd. Interior art by Donald and Jenny Tyson Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Tyson, Donald, 1954– Fourth book of occult philosophy / Donald Tyson. — 1st ed. p. cm. “The companion to three books of occult philosophy written by Henry Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim.” Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-7387-1876-7 1. Occultism. I. Title. BF1411.T97 2009 130—dc22  2009036984 Llewellyn Worldwide does not participate in, endorse, or have any authority or responsibility concerning private business transactions between our authors and the public. All mail addressed to the author is forwarded but the publisher cannot, unless specifically instructed by the author, give out an address or phone number. Any Internet references contained in this work are current at publication time, but the publisher cannot guarantee that a specific location will continue to be maintained. Please refer to the publisher’s website for links to authors’ websites and other sources. Llewellyn Publications A Division of Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd. 2143 Wooddale Drive, Dept. 978-0-7387-1876-7 Woodbury, Minnesota 55125-2989, U.S.A. www.llewellyn.com Printed in the United States of America


Other Books by this author The Messenger (Llewellyn January 1990) Ritual Magic: What It Is & How To Do It (Llewellyn January 1992) Three Books of Occult Philosophy (Llewellyn January 1992) Scrying For Beginners (Llewellyn February 1997) Enochian Magic for Beginners: The Original System of Angel Magic (Llewellyn September 2002) Familiar Spirits: A Practical Guide for Witches & Magicians (Llewellyn January 2004) The Power of the Word: The Secret Code of Creation (Llewellyn March 2004) 1-2-3 Tarot: Answers In An Instant (Llewellyn October 2004) Necronomicon: The Wanderings of Alhazred (Llewellyn December 2004) Alhazred: Author of the Necronomicon (Llewellyn July 2006) Portable Magic: Tarot Is the Only Tool You Need (Llewellyn October 2006) Soul Flight: Astral Projection and the Magical Universe (Llewellyn March 2007) Grimoire of the Necronomicon (Llewellyn August 2008) Runic Astrology (Llewellyn 2009)


Acknowledgement I would like to thank my wife, Jenny, for doing the freehand drawings that appear in this book.


Contents Introduction Title Page, 1655 Edition The Preface, to the unprejudiced Reader by Robert Turner Commendatory Poems to Turner by various friends I. Of Geomancy Henry Cornelius Agrippa

Analysis 1 Of Geomancy

II. Of Occult Philosophy, or Of Magical Ceremonies: The Fourth Book Henry Cornelius Agrippa

Analysis 2 Of Occult Philosophy, The Fourth Book

III. Heptameron: or, Magical Elements Peter de Abano

Analysis 3 Heptameron, or Magical Elements

IV. Isagoge: An Introductory Discourse on the Nature of such Spirits as are Exercised in the Sublunary Bounds Georg Pictorius Villinganus

Analysis 4 Isagoge: Of the Nature of Spirits

V. Of Astronomical Geomancy Gerard Cremonensis

Analysis 5 Of Astronomical Geomancy

VI. Arbatel of Magic, or the Spiritual Wisdom of the Ancients Anonymous Analysis 6 Arbatel of Magic Bibliography Index

1 7 9 17 25 57 75 113 191 223

243 305 323 341 367 405

423 435


Introduction

T

he title of this book, Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy of Henry Cornelius Agrippa, is misleading because the book is really a collection of six separate tracts on magic, only the second of which is the Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy. The first tract, Of Geomancy, was certainly written by Cornelius Agrippa. The second tract, the titular Fourth Book, is attributed to Agrippa but was probably written by somebody else. It is closely concerned with material examined in Agrippa’s Three Books of Occult Philosophy, hence its name. It purports to be an esoteric fourth book that provides the occult key to understanding recondite matter in the previous three. The remaining four tracts have no internal connection of any kind with Agrippa. Nonetheless, there is an Agrippa connection. Over his life, Agrippa acquired a number of occult texts, which he used as sources for his studies and writings on magic. After his death, his works were

gathered together and published in two volumes at Lyons under the (perhaps false) imprint of Beringos Fratres (Bering Brothers) around the year 1580. Some of the tracts in his possession, or at least found among his papers after his death, were appended to the first volume of this Opera edition, following his Three Books of Occult Philosophy. The Opera is undated, but cannot have been published earlier than 1563, the year the modified version of the Heptameron contained in it was first published; indeed, it is unlikely to be older than 1575, the date of the first known publication of the grimoire the Arbatel. The claim of a publication date of 1550 that is penned (not printed) on the outside front cover of one original copy of the work must be spurious. The version of Agrippa’s Opera I have used for reference is the undated facsimile edition published by Georg Olms Verlag in two volumes in 1970. This edition appears to be a few years later than




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the first edition of the Opera, but seems to have the same contents, though with a slightly different presentation. The pagination varies between editions, for example, along with the formatting of pages, but the woodcuts used are the same. The Opera was reprinted several times, undated.

The Six Tracts The Latin titles of the tracts that were gathered from the Opera by Robert Turner for his book are as follows: 1. H  enrici Cornilii Agrippae In Geomanticum disciplinam lectura. (Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa About Geomancy, an instructional commentary.) 2. D e Occulta Philosophia, sev de Caeremoniis Magicis, Liber quartus, Henr. Corn. Agrippa adscriptus. (Of Occult Philosophy, or of Ceremonial Magic, the Fourth Book, Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa writer.) 3. Heptameron, sev Elementa Magica Petri de Abano philosophi. (Heptameron, or Magical Elements of Peter de Abano philosopher.) 4. Colloqvvntvr Castor & Pollux (De Materia Daemon: Isagoge). (Dialogue of Castor and Pollux [Of the Nature of Spirits: Isagoge]). 5. Gerardi Cremonensis, Geomantiae Astronomicae libellus. (Gerard of

Cremona, his book Of Geomantic Astronomy.) 6. Libri Arbatel Magiae Tomus Primus, dictus Isagoge. (Book of the Arbatel of Magic, Volume One, called Isagoge.) It is easy to see the source for the collection of tracts known as the Fourth Book. The titles in Turner’s translation are even in the same order as they are in Agrippa’s Latin Opera. A number of occult works in the Opera were omitted by Turner, presumably because they had less to do with practical magic. For example, De Speciebvs Magiae Ceremonialis by Pictorius (Agrippa, vol. 1, pp. 584–607) is concerned with various forms of divination. Some of the works existed while Agrippa was alive and others did not. Agrippa’s study of astrological geomancy was almost certainly printed from a manuscript in his own hand. The Fourth Book, which bears Agrippa’s name as its author, did not appear until years after Agrippa’s death—it was published under the same cover with the Heptameron of Pietro d’Abano at Marburg, Germany, in 1559, and it was from this edition that the Heptameron was copied into the Opera. We know this because the editor of the Marburg edition modified the text of the Heptameron and left references to the Fourth Book that was bound before the Heptameron under the same cover. It seems probable that the text of the Fourth Book was also taken from the Marburg edition, since the compiler


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of the Opera had it at hand. The author of the Fourth Book identified himself as Agrippa in the text, but there is reason to believe he was lying. The work is out of character for Agrippa, and in clarity of presentation and evidence of scholarship is inferior to his other writings. Agrippa’s student Johannes Wier flatly stated his conviction that his master had never written it. The earliest known edition is the Marburg edition. Nonetheless, some authorities see no reason to assume that the work is not by Agrippa. The earliest known edition of the Heptameron was published in 1496 at Venice, so it is more than likely that Agrippa knew of the work and had studied it. However, the work he knew was not exactly the same work that was printed in the Opera or translated by Turner. Although the essential information on spirits remained unchanged in the Opera edition, a few introductory passages were added. It is easy to get the false impression from the wording of the Marburg edition of the Heptameron that d’Abano’s text ends just prior to the example of a magic circle that appears to have been inserted by the editor, but the text following the illustration of the circle is integral to the work and likely belongs to d’Abano. The world awaits some enterprising individual to scan the 1496 edition and post it on the Internet for comparison purposes. The Dialogue of Castor and Pollux by Georg Pictorius appeared in a collection of works by this author called the Panto-

polion, published at Basel, Switzerland, in 1563. Since Pictorius only began to write around 1530, and Agrippa died in 1535, it is unlikely that Agrippa had much, if any, awareness of his writings. The grimoire called the Arbatel was first published in 1575, also at Basel, Switzerland, but may have circulated for some time in manuscript form. In Agrippa’s time, many works that circulated in manuscript were later published as books, including his own Three Books of Occult Philosophy, so the date of first publication does not always indicate a proximate date of creation, or even dissemination. Arbatel is sometimes assumed to be the name of the author of this work, rather than of the work itself, which is then called Of Magic, or Of the Magic of the Ancients. The final text in Turner’s collection was considerably older than Agrippa. It was composed, or translated, by Gerard of Cremona, a twelfth-century Latin translator of Arabic texts on medicine, astronomy, astrology, alchemy, and other subjects. It is the general belief of scholars that Of Astronomical Geomancy is his work, but its date of composition is not known.

Robert Turner, Translator Robert Turner (1619–1664) received a bachelor of arts degree from Christ’s College, Cambridge. The introduction to the Fourth Book contains several letters of congratulation on his translation from men of Cambridge, undoubtably friends


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he made during his student years. In 1656 he translated into English the Laws of the Rosie Crosse by Michael Maier, in 1657 the Ars Notoria from a text included in Agrippa’s Opera, and, in 1659, the Archidoxes of Magic by Paracelsus. He was the author of a herbal, somewhat similar to that of Culpeper’s, titled Botanologia: The British Physician, or the Nature and Virtue of English Plants, which was published in 1664. A. E. Waite thought well enough of Turner’s abilities as a translator to compliment them in his Book of Ceremonial Magic (ch. 3, sec. 5). Referring to the Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy, Waite wrote: “I shall depart from my usual custom of translating at first hand, and make use, with some needful prunings, of the version of Robert Turner, which is quite faithful and has, moreover, the pleasant flavor of antiquity” (Waite, Cer. Mag., p. 79). Whatever his skills as translator, Turner seem to have had little knowledge of the history of magic, or at least, not enough to write about it using his own words. Much of his preface to the Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy is a direct plagiarizing of portions of Sir Walter Raleigh’s History of the World, published in 1614. To gain an idea of just how egregious Turner’s plagiarism is, refer to my notes at the end of his preface.

Purpose of this Annotated Edition My reasons for producing an extensively annotated edition of Turner’s Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy are the same that motivated my annotated edition of Agrippa’s Three Books of Occult Philosophy, published by Llewellyn in 1993. First, to provide as much illumination of the meaning of the texts, and as much useful supplemental material, as is possible in so constrained a space as a single volume. This has been accomplished by the inclusion of copious sets of endnotes, and an explanatory analysis, for each treatise in the book. Second, to modernize the spelling, punctuation, and paragraphing of the text to make both reading it and comprehending its meaning easier, while at the same time retaining the antique charm of Turner’s translation. Some of the analyses are long. The grimoire known as the Fourth Book is incredibly dense in meaning, and no one to my knowledge has ever attempted to explain that meaning, until now. I am treading into uncharted territory. It goes without saying that I will have committed errors of ignorance, but perhaps even my errors will be useful to those wrestling with the texts, and seeking to truly comprehend their meaning, on a practical level. With the ex-


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ception of the Isagoge of Pictorius, all the tracts are manuals of practical instruction. They are intended by their authors not only to be read in the abstract but followed in the concrete. Before that it possible, they must be completely understood. I make no apology for treating magic as a practical study. Academics may tend to snigger, but the men who wrote these tracts held the arts of divination and ceremonial spirit evocation to be practical arts of real value to the human experience. In order for the modern reader to fully grasp what they were saying, on the deepest level, it is necessary to not only read the texts, but to do the works they describe. There is no other way to completely comprehend them, anymore than one could master a manual on bricklaying without laying bricks. My notes and analyses are the mortar of this practical work, if you will. I consider my edition of the Fourth Book to be a companion to my annotated edition of Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy, and for the fullest understanding it should be read with Agrippa’s text close at hand for reference.

By comparing Turner’s translation with the Latin text of the six tracts in Agrippa’s Opera, I was able to correct many errors that until now have passed uncorrected, and even to restore bits and pieces of text inadvertently omitted by Turner. As much as possible I have endeavored to retain the flavor of the antiquated punctuation and word choices of the original, departing from them only where it seemed necessary for clarity. This has been a lengthy and laborious task, but it is my hope that the effort I put into the corrected text, and the notes and analyses that accompany it, will reward readers with a fuller and easier understanding of this difficult but very important book on the geomancy and practical spirit magic of the Renaissance. It is six short books bound as one, but by some curious alchemy of time they have become a single work with six themes, and the shadow of Cornelius Agrippa stretches over them all. Donald Tyson Halifax, Nova Scotia November 2008


Henry Cornelius Agrippa HIS Fourth BOOK of Occult Philosophy.1 Of Geomancy. Magical Elements of Peter de Abano. Astronomical Geomancy. The Nature of Spirits. Arbatel of Magick. Translated into English by Robert Turner, filomaqh"VV.2 LONDON, Printed by J. C. for John Harrison, at the Lamb at the East-end of Pauls.3 1655.




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NOTES 1. Occult Philosophy—Although the name of this work comes at the head of the list of tracts on Turner’s title page and forms the comprehensive name for his book, it is actually the second of the six tracts that make up the body of the text. 2. filomaqh"—The Greek word used by Turner to describe himself may be transliterated into English as philomathes. It means “desirous to learn, studious.” The lexicographer John Pickering wrote that this word was used by Plato in his Phaedra in the same sense as philosophos, meaning “lover of knowledge.” Philomathes also occurs as a Greek character name in literature—for example, in the 1539 play Hecastus by the Dutch humanist Macropedius, where Philomathes is one of the characters. 3. East-end of Pauls—This is intended to signify the eastern side of Saint Paul’s Cathedral in London, where the Lamb, the shop selling this book, was located. It would probably have sported a sign depicting the figure of a lamb over or beside the door.


The Preface to the unprejudiced Reader.

A

s the fall of man made himself and all other creatures subject to vanity, so, by reason thereof, the most noble and excellent arts wherewith the rational soul was indued, are by the rusty canker of time brought unto corruption. For magic itself, which the ancients did so divinely contemplate, is scandalized with bearing the badge of all diabolical sorceries: which art (saith Mirandula),1 “Pauci intelligunt, multi reprehendunt, et sicut canes ignotos semper allatrant:� Few understand, many reprehend, and as dogs bark at those they know not, so do many condemn and hate the things they understand not.2 Many men there are, that abhor the very name and word magus, which because of Simon Magus, who being indeed not magus but goes, that is, familiar with evil spirits, usurped that title. But magic and witchcraft are far differing sciences; whereof Pliny being ignorant, scoffed thereat: for Nero (saith Pliny) who had the most excellent magicians of the East sent him by Tyridates, king of Armenia,

who held that kingdom by him, found the art after long study and labor altogether ridiculous.3 Now witchcraft and sorcery are works done merely by the Devil, which with respect unto some covenant made with man, he acteth by men his instruments, to accomplish his evil ends: of these, the histories of all ages, people and countries, as also the Holy Scriptures, afford us sundry examples. But magus is a Persian word primitively, whereby is expressed such a one as is altogether conversant in things divine, and as Plato affirmeth, the art of magic is the art of worshipping God; and the Persians called their gods Mago" . Hence Apollonius saith, that magus is either, o cata fusin Feo" or qerapeuth" Fewn, that is, that magus is a name sometimes of him that is a god by nature, and sometimes of him that is in the service of God: in which latter sense it is taken in Matth. 2.1,2 when the wise men came to worship Jesus, and this is the first and highest kind, which is called divine magic; and these the Latins did




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entitle sapientes, or wise men: for the fear and worship of God is the beginning of knowledge. These wise men the Greeks called philosophers; and amongst the Egyptians they were termed priests; the Hebrews termed them cabalistos, prophets, scribes, and Pharisees; and amongst the Babylonians they were differenced by the name of Caldeans; and by the Persians they were called magicians: and one speaking of Sosthenes, one of the ancient magicians, useth these words: “Et verum Deum merita majestate prosequitur, et angelos ministros Dei, sed veri ejus venerationi novit assistere; idem daemonas prodit terrenos, Vagos, humanitatis inimicos:” Sosthenes ascribeth the due majesty to the true God, and acknowledgeth that his angels are ministers and messengers which attend the worship of the true God; he also hath delivered that there are devils earthly and wandering, and enemies to mankind.4 So that the word magus of itself imports a contemplator of divine and heavenly sciences; but under the name of magic, are all unlawful arts comprehended; as necromancy and witchcraft, and such arts which are effected by combination with the Devil, and whereof he is a party. These witches and necromancers are also called malefici or venefici; sorcerers or poisoners; of which name witches are rightly called, who without the art of magic do indeed use the help of the Devil himself to do mischief; practising to mix the powder of dead bodies with

other things by the help of the Devil prepared; and at other time to make pictures of wax, clay, or otherwise (as it were acramentaliter) to effect those things which the Devil by other means bringeth to pass. Such were, and to this day partly, if not altogether, are the corruptions which have made odious the very name of magic, having chiefly sought, as the manner of all impostures is, to counterfeit the highest and most noble part of it.5 A second kind of magic is astrology, which judgeth of the events of things to come, natural and humane, by the motions and influences of the stars upon these lower elements, by them observed and understood. Philo Judaeus affirmith, that by this part of magic or astrology, together with the motions of the stars and other heavenly bodies, Abraham found out the knowledge of the true God while he lived in Caldea, “Qui contemplatione creaturarum, cognovis creatorem” (saith Damascen): who knew the Creator by the contemplation of the creature. Josephus reporteth of Abraham, that he instructed the Egyptians in arithmetic and astronomy; who before Abraham’s coming unto them, knew none of these sciences. “Abraham sanctitate and sapientia omnium praestantissimus, primum Caldaeos, deinde Phaenices, demum Egyptios sacerdotes, astrologia and divina docuerit:” Abraham the holiest and wisest of men, did first teach the Caldeans, then the Phoenicians, lastly the Egyptian priests, astrology and divine knowledge.6


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Without a doubt, Hermes Trismegistus, that divine magician and philosopher, who (as some say) lived long before Noah, attained to much divine knowledge of the Creator through the study of magic and astrology; as his writings, to this day extant among us, testify. The third kind of magic containeth the whole philosophy of nature; which bringeth to light the inmost virtues, and extracteth them out of nature’s hidden bosom to human use: Virtutes in centro centri latentes: Virtues hidden in the center of the center, according to the chemists. Of this sort were Albertus, Arnoldus de Villa Nova, Raymond, Bacon, and others, etc.7 The magic these men professed, is thus defined: Magia est connexio a viro sapiente agentium per naturam cum patientibus, sibi, congruenter respondentibus, ut inde opera prodeant, non sine eorum admiratione qui causam ignorant: Magic is the connection of natural agents and patients, answerable each to other, wrought by a wise man, to the bringing forth of such effects as are wonderful to those that know not their causes. In all these, Zoroaster was well learned, especially in the first and the highest: for in his Oracles he confesseth God to be the first and the highest; he believeth of the Trinity, which he would not investigate by any natural knowledge; he speaketh of angels and of Paradise; approveth the immortality of the soul; teacheth truth, faith, hope, and love, dis-

coursing of the abstinence and charity of the Magi. Of this Zoroaster, Eusebius in the theology of the Phoenicians, using Zoroaster’s own words: “Haec ad verbum scribit.” (saith Eusebius) “Deus primus, incorruptibilium, sempiternus, ingenitus, expers partium, sibiipsi, simillimus, bonorum omnium auriga, munera non expectans, optimus, prudentissimus, pater juris, sine doctrina justitiam perdoctus, natura perfectus, sapiens, sacrae naturae unicus inventor,” etc. Thus saith Zoroaster, word for word: “God the first, incorruptible, everlasting, unbegotten, without parts, most like himself, the guide of all good, expecting no reward, the best, the wisest, the father of right, having learned justice without teaching, perfect, wise by nature, the only inventor thereof.” 8 So that a magician is no other but divinorum cultor and interpres, a studious observer and expounder of divine things; and the art itself in none other quam naturalis philosophiae absoluta consummatio, then the absolute perfection of natural philosophy.9 Nevertheless, there is a mixture in all things, of good with evil, of falsehood with truth, of corruption with purity. The good, the truth, the purity, in every kind, may well be embraced: as in the ancient worshiping of God by sacrifice, there was no man knowing God among the elders, that did forebear to worship the God of all power, or condemn that kind of worship, because the Devil was so adored in


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the image of Baal, Dagon, Astaroth, Chemosh, Jupiter, Apollo, and the like. Neither did the abuse of astrology terrify Abraham (if we believe the most ancient and religious writers) from observing the motions and natures of the heavenly bodies. Neither can it dehort10 wise and learned men in these days from attributing those virtues, influences, and inclinations, to the stars and other lights of heaven, which God hath given to those his glorious creatures.11 I must expect some calumnies and obtrectations 12 against this, from the malicious prejudiced man, and the lazy affecters of ignorance, of whom this age swarms: but the voice and sound of the snake and goose is all one. But our stomachs are not now so queazy and tender, after so long time feeding upon solid divinity, nor we so umbrageous13 and startling, having been so long enlightened in God’s path, that we should relapse into that childish age, in which Aristotle’s Metaphysics, in a council in France, was forbid to be read. But I incite the reader to a charitable opinion hereof, with a Christian protestation of an innocent purpose therein; and entreat the reader to follow this advice of Tabaeus: “Qui litigant, sint ambo in conspectus tuo mali et rei:” And if there be any scandal in this enterprise of mine, it is taken, not given. And this comfort I have in that axiom of Trismegistus: Qui pius est, summe philosophatur.14 And therefore I present it without disguise, and object it to all of candor and indifferency: and

of readers, of whom there be four sorts, as one observes: sponges, which attract all without distinguishing; hourglasses, which receive, and pour out as fast; bags, which retain only the dregs of spices, and let the wine escape; and sieves, which retain the best only. Some there are of the last sort, and to them I present this Occult Philosophy, knowing that they may reap good thereby. And they who are severe against it, they shall pardon this my opinion, that such their severity proceeds from self-guiltiness; and give me leave to apply that of Ennodius15 that it is the nature of self-wickedness, to think that of others, which themselves deserve. And it is all the comfort which the guilty have, not to find any innocent. But that amongst others this may find some acceptation, is the desire of R. Turner. London, ult. Aug. 1654.

Notes 1. (saith Mirandula)—Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463–1494). The reference is to a passage in Mirandola’s On the Dignity of Man: “And this is enough about magic, about which I have said these things because I know there are many people who, as dogs always bark at strangers, so also often condemn and hate what they do not understand” (Mirandola, p. 29). 2. understand not—Much of the preface by Turner is cribbed directly from Sir Walter Raleigh’s History of the World (bk. 1, ch. 11, sec. 2), which was first published in 1614. The present reference is to this passage from Raleigh: “Now for magic itself; which art, saith Mirandula, pauci intelligunt, multi reprehendunt; ‘few understand, and many repre-


Sample Running Head Preface / 13 hend:’ Et sicut canes ignotos semper allatrant; ‘As dogs bark at those they know not;’ so they condemn and hate the things they understand not;” (Raleigh, p. 381). 3. ridiculous—“It is true that many men abhor the very name and word magus, because of Simon Magus, who being indeed not magus, but goes, that is, familiar with evil spirits, usurped that title. For magic, conjuring, and witchery are far differing arts, whereof Pliny being ignorant, scoffeth thereat. For Nero, saith Pliny, who had the most excellent magicians of the east, sent him by Tyridates king of Armenia, who held that kingdom by his grace, found the art, after long study and labour, altogether ridiculous” (Raleigh, p. 381). Turner even cribbed the footnote from Raleigh, “Plin. l. 30. Hist Nat.” and used it as a page gloss. Raleigh’s reference to Pliny the Elder’s Natural History is to bk. 30, ch. 5: “All these [arts of magic] in our generation the Emperor Nero discovered to be lies and frauds. In fact his passion for the lyre and tragic song was no greater than his passion for magic; . . . That the craft is a fraud there could be no greater or more indisputable proof than that Nero abandoned it; . . . Tiridates the Magus had come to him bringing a retinue for the Armenian triumph over himself, thereby laying a heavy burden on the provinces. He had refused to travel by sea, for the Magi hold it a sin to spit into the sea or wrong the element by other necessary functions of mortal creatures. He had brought Magi with him, had initiated Nero into their banquets; yet the man giving him a kingdom was unable to acquire from him the magic art” (Pliny, vol. 8, pp. 287, 289). 4. enemies to mankind—It is worth quoting the parallel passage from Raleigh, if only to show how outrageously Turner has plagiarized Raleigh’s work without ever alluding to its existence. Magus is a Persian word primitively, whereby is expressed such a one as is altogether conversant in things divine. And,

as Plato affirmeth, the art of magic is the art of worshipping God. To which effect Apollonius in his epistles, expounding the word mago", saith, that the Persians called their god magou"; whence he addeth that magus is either o cata fusin Feo", or qerapeuth" Qewn; that is, that magus is a name sometime of him that is a god by nature, sometimes of him that is in the service of God; in which latter sense it is taken, Matt. ii. 1. And this is the first and highest kind, which Piccolominy calleth divine magic; and these did the Latins newly entitle sapientes, or wise men; For the fear and worship of God is the beginning of knowledge. These wise men the Greeks call philosophers; the Indians, brachmans; which name they somewhat nearly retain to this day, calling their priests bramines; among the Egyptians they were termed priests; with the Hebrews they were called cabalists, prophets, scribes, and pharisees; amongst the Babylonians they were differenced by the name of Chaldeans; and among the Persians, magicians; of whom Arnobius (speaking of Hostanes, one of the ancient magicians) useth these words: Et verum Deum merita majestate prosequitur, et angelos ministros Dei, sed veri, ejus venerationi novit assistere. Idem daemonas prodit terrenos, vagos, humanitatis inimicos. Sosthenes (for so M. Foelix calleth him, not Hostanes) “ascribth the due majesty to the true God, and acknowledgeth that his angels are ministers and messengers which attend the worship of the true God. He also hath delivered that there are devils earthly and wandering, and enemies to mankind.” (Raleigh, p. 382) The reference to Plato is to his dialogue the First Alcibiades, Sec. 122a, where Plato wrote: “The first of these instructs the youth in the learning of the Magi according to Zoroaster, the son of Oromazes—now by this learning is meant the worship of the gods,—and likewise


14 / THE Sample FOURTH Running BOOKHead OF OCCULT PHILOSOPHY the art of kingly government” (Plato, vol 4, p. 344). 5. part of it—When writing of witches, Raleigh made reference to the Daemonologie of King James the First, published in 1597. Turner plagiarized Raleigh’s comments but for some reason excised the references to James. That witches are rightly so called venefici, or poisoners; and that indeed there is a kind of malefici, which, without any art of magic or necromancy, use the help of the Devil to do mischief, his majesty confirmeth in the first chapter of his second book; speaking also in the fifth chapter of their practice, to mix the powder of dead bodies with other things by the Devil prepared; and at other times to make pictures of wax or clay, or otherwise (as it were sacramentaliter) to effect those things which the Devil by other means bringeth to pass. (Raleigh, p. 383) King James wrote in his Daemonologie (bk. 2, ch. 5) concerning the aids given by the Devil to witches: “To some others at these times hee teacheth, how to make Pictures of waxe or clay: That by the rosting thereof, the persones that they beare the name of, may be continuallie melted or dryed awaie by continuall sicknesse. To some hee giues such stones or poulders, as will helpe to cure or cast on diseases: And to some he teacheth kindes of vncouthe poysons, which Mediciners vnderstandes not . . . Even as God by his Sacramentes which are earthlie of themselues workes a heavenlie effect, though no waies by any cooperation in them: . . . so the Deuill will haue his out-warde meanes to be shewes as it were of his doing, which hath no part of cooperation in his turnes with him” (James, p. 44). 6. divine knowledge— A second kind of magic was that part of astrology which had respect to sowing

and planting, and all kinds of agriculture and husbandry; which was a knowledge of the motions and influences of the stars into those lower elements. Philo Judaeus goeth further, affirming that by this part of magic, or astrology, together with the motions of the stars and other heavenly bodies, Abraham found out the knowledge of the true God, while he lived in Chaldea; qui contemplatione creaturarum cognovit Creatorem, saith Jo. Damascen; “who knew the Creator by the contemplation of the creature.” Josephus reporteth of Abraham, that he instructed the Egyptians in arithmetic and astronomy, who before Abraham’s coming unto them knew none of these sciences. And so doth Archangelus de Burgo, in defence of Mirandula against Garsias. Alexander et Eupolemon dicunt, quod Abraham sanctitate et sapientia omnium praestantissimus Chaldaeos primum, deinde Phoenices, demum Aegyptios sacerdotes, astrologiam et divina docuerit; “Alexander,” saith he, meaning Alexander Polyhistor, “and Eupolemon affirm, that Abraham, the holiest and wisest of men, did first teach the Chaldeans, then the Phoenicians, lastly the Egyptian priests, astrology and divine knowledge.” (Raleigh, p. 384) 7. others, etc.—“The third kind of magic containeth the whole philosophy of nature; not the brabblings of the Aristotelians, but that which bringeth to light the inmost virtues, and draweth them out of nature’s hidden bosom to human use, virtutes in centro centri latentes; ‘virtues hidden in the centre of “the centre,”’ according to the chymists. Of this sort were Albertus, Arnoldus de Villa Nova, Raymond, Bacon, and many others;” (Raleigh, pp. 384–5). Raleigh refers to Albertus Magnus, Arnoldas de Villa Nova, Raymond Lully, and Roger Bacon. For short biographies of all these authorities, see the biographical dictionary section of my edition of Agrippa’s Three Books of Occult Philosophy.


Sample Running Head Preface / 15 8. inventor thereof – The magic which these men professed is thus defined: Magia est connexio a viro sapiente agentium per naturam cum patientibus, sibi congruenter respondentibus, ut inde opera prodeant non sine eorum admiratione qui causam ignorant; “Magic is the connexion of natural agents and patients, answerable each to other, wrought by a wise man to the bringing forth of such effects as are wonderful to those that know not their causes.” In all these three kinds, which other men divide into four, it seemeth that Zoroaster was exceedingly learned, especially in the first and highest. For in his oracles he confesseth God to be the Creator of the universal; he believeth of the Trinity, which he could not investigate by any natural knowledge; he speaketh of angels, and of paradise; approveth the immortality of the soul; teacheth truth, faith, hope, and love, discoursing of the abstinence and charity of the magi; which oracles of his, Psellus, Ficinus, Patritius, and others, have gathered and translated. Of this Zoroaster, Eusebius, in the theology of the Phoenicians, using Zoroaster’s own words: Haec ad verbum scribit, saith Eusebius, Deus primus incorruptibilium, sempiternus, ingenitus, expers partium, sibi ipsi simillimus, bonorum omnium auriga, munera non expectans, optimus, prudentissimus, pater juris, sine doctrina justitiam perdoctus, natura perfectus, sapiens, sacrae naturae unicus inventor, etc. Thus writeth Zoroaster, word for word. “God the first incorruptible, everlasting, unbegotten, without parts, most like himself, the guide of all good, expecting no reward, the best, the wisest, the father of right, having learned justice without teaching, perfect wise by nature, the only inventor thereof.” (Raleigh, pp. 385–6) 9. natural philosophy—“Seeing therefore it is confessed by all of understanding, that a

magician (according to the Persian word) is no other than divinorum cultor et interpres, ‘a studious observer and expounder of divine things;’ and the art itself (I mean the art of natural magic) no other, quam naturalis philosophiae absoluta consummatio, ‘than the absolute perfection of natural philosophy’” (Raleigh, p. 390). 10. dehort—Dissuade. 11. glorious creatures – Notwithstanding this mixture every where of good and evil, of falsehood with truth, of corruption with cleanness and purity; the good, the truth, the purity in every kind may well be embraced; as in the ancient worshipping of God by sacrifice, there was no man knowing God among the elders, that therefore forebare to offer sacrifice to the God of all power, because the Devil in the image of Baal, Astaroth, Chemoth, Jupiter, Apollo, and the like, was so adored. Neither did the abuse of astrology terrify Abraham (if we may believe the most ancient and religious historians) from observing the motions and natures of heavenly bodies; neither can it dehort wise and learned men in these days from attributing those virtues, influences, and inclinations to the stars and other lights of heaven, which God hath given to those his glorious creatures. (Raleigh, p. 394) 12. obtrectations—Detractions. 13. umbrageous—Apt to take offense. 14. philosophatur—A famous saying of Hermes Trismegistus. John Donne wrote in his 33rd sermon: “He was not a Christian in profession, but worse than he are called Christians, that said, Qui pius est, summe philosophatur; The chartable man is the great philosopher;” (Donne, vol. 2, p. 75). The reference is to the fourth line of the first book of Hermes Trismegistus, as arranged by Everard: “Be Pious and Religious, O my Son; for he


16 / THE Sample FOURTH Running BOOKHead OF OCCULT PHILOSOPHY that doth so, is the best and highest Philosopher, and without Philosophy it is impossible ever to attain to the height and exactness of Piety and Religion” (Everard, p. 1).

15. Ennodius—Magnus Felix Ennodius, bishop of Pavia (474–521).


TO HIS SPECIAL FRIEND MR. R. TURNER, ON HIS JUDICIOUS TRANSLATION OF CORN. AGRIPPA. As one that just out of a trance appears, Amaz’d with stranger sights, whose secret fears Are scarcely past, but doubtful whether he May credit ’s eyes, remaineth steadfastly Fix’d on those objects; just like him I stand, Rapt in amazement to behold that can By art come near the gods, that far excel The angels that in those bright spheres do dwell. Behold Agrippa mounting th’ lofty skies, Talking with gods; and then anon he pries Int’ earth’s deep cabinet, as t’ Mercury, All kinds of spirits willing subjects be, And more than this his book supplies: but we Blind mortals, no ways could be led to see That light without a taper: then thou to us Must be Agrippa and an Oedipus. Agrippa once again appears, by thee Pull’d out o’ th’ ashes of antiquity. Let squint-ey’d envy pine away, whilst thou Wear’st crowns of praise on thy deserving brow. I. P. B. Cantabrigiae.

17


TO HIS INGENIOUS FRIEND MR. TURNER, UPON HIS TRANSLATION. Thrice-noble soul! renown’d epitome Of learning and occult philosophy; That unknown geomancy dost impart; With profound secrets of that abstruse art! T’ expound natural magic is thy task; Not hell-born necromancy to unmask; Exposing mysteries to public view, That heretofore were known to very few. Thou dost not keep thy knowledge to thy self, (As base-covetous misers do their pelf; Whose numerous bags of rust-eaten gold, Profits none, till themselves are laid in mold) But studious of public good, dost make All of th’ fruits of thy labours to partake. Therefore if some captious critic blame Thy writings, surely then his judgement’s lame. Art hath no hater but an empty pate, Which can far better carp, than imitate. Nay Zoilus or Momus will not dare Blame they translation, without compare Excellent. So that if an hundred tongues Dame Nature had bestow’d, and brazen lungs; Yet rightly to ehuccinate thy praises, I should want strength, as well as polite phrases. But if the gods will grant what I do crave, Then Enoch’s translation shalt thou have. W. P. S. John’s, Cambr.

18


TO HIS FRIEND THE AUTHOR, ON THIS HIS TRANSLATION. What, not a Sibyl or Cassandra left? CHAPTER NUMBER Apollo ceas’d? Has sharp-fang’d Time bereft Us of the oracles? Is Dodan’s grove Cut down? Does ne’er a word proceed from Jove Into the ears of mortals that inherit Tiresias’ soul, or the great Calcha’s spirit? What is become o’ th’ augurs that foretold Nature’s intentions? Are th’s Magi dead, that could Tell what was done in every sphere? Shall we Not know what’s done in the remot’st country Without great travel? Can’t we below descry The mind o’ th’ gods above? All’s done by thee, Agrippa; all their arts lie couch’d in thee. Th’ art that before in divers heads did lie, Is now collect int’ one monopoly. But all’s in vain; we lack’d an Oedipus, Who should interpret’s meaning unto us: This thou effect’st with such dexterity, Adding perhaps what th’ author ne’er did see; That we may say, thou dost the art renew: To thee the greater half of th’ praise is due.

Chapter title

J. B. Cantabrigiae.

19


TO THE AUTHOR, ON HIS TRANSLATION OF CORNELIUS AGRIPPA. Pallas of learning th’ art, if goddess nam’d; Which prototype thy knowledge hath explain’d; Which Nature also striving to combine, Science and learning, in this form of thine, To us not darkly, but doth clearly show Knowledge of mysteries as the shrine in you. By thy permission ’tis, we have access Into geomancy; which yet, unless Thou hadst unmask’d, a mystery ‘t had lain, A task too hard for mortals to explain. Which since thou hast from the Lethaean floods Preserv’d, we’ll consecrate the laurel buds To thee: (Phoebus dismissed) thine shall be The oracle, to which all men shall flee In time of danger; thy predictions shall, To whatsoever thou command’st, inthrall Our willing hearts; yea, thou shalt be Sole prophet, we obedient to thee. J. R.

20


TO THE AUTHOR, ON HIS TRANSLATION OF CORNELIUS AGRIPPA. Doth Phoebus cease to answer t’ our demands? CHAPTER NUMBER Or will he not accept at mortals’ hands A sad bidental? And is Sibyl’s cave Inhabitable? Or may Tiresias have No successor nor rival? How shall we Then Oedipus to th’ world direct? If he Do incest add to parricide, th’ are dumb, That could predict what things should surely come: And they are silent that knew when t’apply T’ our body politic purge and phlebotomy. How will bold thieves our treasures rob, who shall Lost goods regain, or by his charms recall The nocent? Th’ art is by thee repriv’d: In thee the Magi seem to be reviv’d. Phoebus is not brain-sick, Jove’s doves not dead, Th’ oracles not ceas’d: Agrippa’s bed (Like the Arabian bird’s self-builded nest, Which first her urn proves, then her quickning rest) Hath thee produc’d more than his equal sure, Else had this art as yet remain’d obscure, A miracle to vulgars, well known to none, Scarce read by deepest apprehension. Then I’ll conclude since thou dost him explain, That th’ younger brother hath the better brain.

Chapter title

John Tomlinson, of St. John’s in Cambridge.

21


TO HIS GOOD FRIEND THE AUTHOR, ON HIS TRANSLATION OF OCCULT PHILOSOPHY AND GEOMANCY. Most noble undertakings! as if art And prudence should a bargain make, t’ impart Refulgent lustres: you send forth a ray Which noblest patrons never could display. Well may Diana love you and inspire Your noblest genius with celestial fire, Whose sparkling fancy with more power can quell, And sooner conquer, than a magic spell. The Author thought not (when he penn’d the book) To be surmounted by a higher look, Or be o’ertopt b’ a more triumphant strain, Which should exalt his then-most pleasant vein. But seeing that a later progeny Hast snatch’d his honour from obscurity, Both shall revive, and make spectators know The best deserves of the laurel bow. Nature and art here strive, the victory To get: and though to yield he doth deny, Th’ hast got the start: though he triumph in praise, Yet may his ivy wait upon your bays. M. S. Cantabrigiae.

22


TO THE AUTHOR, ON THIS HIS INGENIOUS TRANSLATION OF CORNELIUS AGRIPPA. CHAPTER NUMBER

What is ’t I view? Agrippa made to wear An English habit? Sure ’tis something rare. Or are his Roman garments, by thy wit, Translated to an English garb so fit T’ illustrate him? for that thou hast, we see, Enlightned his obscure philosophy; And that which did so intricate remain, Thou hast expos’d to ev’ry vulgar brain. If then thy beams through such dark works shine clear, How splendent will they in thine own appear! Then go thou on, brave soul, to spread such rays Of learning through the world, may speak thy praise. And fear no critics: for thou, by a spell, Canst force their tongues within their teeth to dwell.

Chapter title

Jo. Tabor, of St. John’s in Cambridge.

23


Henry Cornelius Agrippa, of Geomancy.

G

eomancy is an art of divination, whereby the judgment may be rendered by lot, or destiny, to every question of everything whatsoever; but the art hereof consisteth especially in certain points whereof certain figures are deducted according to the reason or rule of equality or inequality, likeness or unlikeness; which figures are also reduced to the celestial figures, assuming their natures and proprieties, according to the course and forms of the signs and planets; notwithstanding this, in the first place we are to consider that whereas this kind of art can declare or show forth nothing of verity, unless it shall be radical in some sublime virtue, and this the authors of this science have demonstrated to be two-fold.1 The one whereof consists in religion and ceremonies; and therefore they will have the projectings of the points of this art to be made with signs in the earth, wherefore this art is appropriated to this element of earth, even as pyromancy to the fire, and hydromancy to the element

of water: then whereas they judged the hand of the projector or worker to be most powerfully moved, and directed to the terrestrial spirits; and therefore they first used certain holy incantations and deprecations, with other rites and observations, provoking and alluring spirits of this nature hereunto.2 Another power there is that doth direct and rule this lot or fortune, which is in the very soul itself of the projector, when he is carried to this work with some great egress of his own desire, for this art hath a natural obedience to the soul itself, and of necessity hath efficacy and is moved to that which the soul itself desires, and this way is by far more true and pure; neither matters it where or how these points are projected; therefore this art hath the same radix with the art of astrological questions: which also can no otherwise be verified, unless with a constant and excessive affection of the querent himself.3 Now then, that we may proceed to the praxis of this art; first it is to be known

25


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that all figures upon which this whole art is founded are only sixteen,4 as in this following table you shall see noted, with their names. Now we proceed to declare with what planets these figures are distributed; for hereupon all the propriety and nature of figures and the judgement of the whole art dependeth. Therefore the Greater and Lesser Fortune are ascribed to the sun; but the first or Greater Fortune is when the sun is diurnal, and posited in his dignities; the other, or lesser Fortune is when the sun is nocturnal, or placed in less dignities.5 Via, and Populus (that is, the Way, and People) are referred to the moon; the first from her beginning and increasing, the second from her full light and quarter decreasing.6 Acquisitio, and Laetitia (which is Gain, Profit; Joy and Gladness) are of Jupiter: but the first hath Jupiter the Greater Fortune, the second the Less, but without detriment.7 Puella and Amissio are of Venus; the first fortunate, the other (as it were) retrograde, or combust.8 Conjunctio and Albus are both figures of Mercury, and are both good; but the first, the more fortunate. Puer and Rubeus are figures ascribed to Mars; the first whereof hath Mars benevolent, the second malevolent. Carcer and Tristitia are both figures of Saturn, and both evil; but the first, of the greater detriment. The Dragon’s Head and Dragon’s Tail do follow their own natures.9 And these are the infallible comparisons of the figures, and from these we may easily discern the equality of their


Henry Cornelius Sample Agrippa, Running of Geomancy Head / 27

signs; therefore the Greater and Lesser Fortunes have the signs of Leo, which is the house10 of the sun. Via and Populus have the sign of Cancer, which is the house of the moon. Acquisitio hath for his sign Pisces; and Laetitia Sagittary, which are both the houses of Jupiter. Puella hath the sign of Taurus, and Amissio of Libra, which are the houses of Venus. Conjunctio hath for its sign Virgo, and Albus the sign Gemini, the houses of Mercury. Peur and Rubeus have for their signs Aries and Scorpio, the houses of Mars.11 Carcer hath the sign Capricorn, and Tristitia Aquary, the houses of Saturn. The Dragon’s Head and Tail are thus divided: the Head to Capricorn, and the Dragon’s Tail adhereth to Scorpio. And from hence you may easily obtain the triplicities of these signs after the manner of the triplicities12 of the signs of the zodiac. Puer therefore, both Fortunes, and Laetitia do govern the fiery triplicity; Puella, Conjunctio, Carcer, and the Dragon’s Head the earthly triplicity; Albus, Amissio,13 and Tristitia, doe make the airy triplicity; and Via, Populus, and Rubeus, with the Dragon’s Tail, and Acquisitio, do rule the watery triplicity, and this order is taken according to the course or manner of the signs. But if anyone will constitute these triplicities according to the nature of the planets,14 and figures themselves, let him observe this rule, that Fortuna Major, Rubeus, Puer, and Amissio doe make the fiery triplicity; Fortune Minor, Puella, Laetitia, and Conjunctio triplicity of the air; Acquisitio, the Dragon’s Tail, Via, and Populus

do govern the watery triplicity; and the earthly triplicity is ruled by Carcer, Tristitia, Albus, and the Dragon’s Head. And this way is rather to be observed then the first, which we have set forth; because it is constituted according to the rule and manner of the signs. This order is also far more true and rational than that which vulgarly is used, which is described after this manner: of the fiery triplicity are Cauda, Fortuna Minor, Amissio, and Rubeus; of the airy triplicity are Acquisitio, Laetitia, Puer, and Conjunctio; of the watery triplicity are Populus, Via, Albus, and Puella; and Caput Draconis, Fortuna Major, Carcer, and Tristitia are of the earthly triplicity. They do likewise distribute these figures to the twelve signs of the zodiac, after this manner: Acquisitio is given to Aries; Fortuna, both Major and Minor to Taurus; Laetitia to the sign Gemini; Puella and Rubeus to Cancer; Albus is assigned to Leo; Via to Virgo; the Dragon’s Head and Conjunctio to Libra; Puer is submitted to Scorpio; Tristitia and Amissio are assigned to Sagittary; the Dragon’s Tail to Capricorn; Populus to Aquarius; and Carcer is assigned the sign Pisces. And now we come to speak of the manner of projecting or setting down these figures, which is thus; that we set down the points according to their course in four lines, from the right hand towards the left, and this in four courses. There will therefore result unto us four figures made in four several lines, according to the even or uneven marking, every several line; which four figures are wont


28 / THE Sample FOURTH Running BOOKHead OF OCCULT PHILOSOPHY


Henry Cornelius Sample Agrippa, Running of Geomancy Head / 29

to be called Matres: which do bring forth the rest, filling up and completing the whole figure of judgement, an example whereof you may see here following.15 Of these four Matres are also produced four other secondary figures, which they call Filia, or succedents, which are gathered together after this manner; that is to say, by making the four Matres according to their order, placing them by course one after another16 + + ; then that which shall result out of every line, maketh the figure of Filiae, the order whereof is by descending from the superior points through both mediums to the lowest: as in this example.17

And these eight figures do make eight houses of heaven, after this manner, by placing the figures from the left hand towards the right:18 as the four Matres do make the four first houses, so the four Filiae do make the four following houses, which are the fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth: and the rest of the houses are found after this manner; that is to say, out of the first and second is derived the ninth; out of the third and fourth the tenth; out of the fifth and sixth the eleventh; and out of the seventh and eighth the twelfth: by the combination or joining together of two figures according to the rule of the even or uneven number in the remaining points of each figure.19


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After the same manner there are produced out of the last four figures;20 that is to say, of the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth, two figures which they call Coadjutrices, or Testes;21 out of which two is also one constituted, which is called the Index22 of the whole figure, or thing quesited: as appeareth in this example following.23 And this which we have declared is the common manner observed by geomancers, which we do not altogether reject neither extol; therefore this is also to be considered in our judgements. Now therefore I shall give unto you the true figure of geomancy, according to the right constitution of astrological reason, which is thus. As the former Matres do make the four angles24 of an house, the first maketh the first angle, the second the second angle, the third maketh the third angle, and the fourth the fourth angle; so the four Filiae arising from the Matres, do constitute the four succedent houses; the first maketh the second house, the second the eleventh, the third the eighth, and the fourth maketh the fifth house:25 the rest of the houses, which are cadents are to be calculated according to the rule of their triplicity; that is to say, by making the ninth out of the first26 and fifth, and the sixth out of the tenth and second, of the seventh, and eleventh the third, and of the fourth and eighth the twelfth.27 And now you have the whole figure of true judgement constituted according

to true and efficacious reasons, whereby I shall show you how you shall complete it. The figure which shall be in the first house shall give you the sign ascending, which the first figure showeth;28 which being done, you shall attribute their signs to the rest of their houses, according to the order of the signs: then in every house you shall note the planets according to the nature of the figure.29 Then from all these you shall build your judgement according to the signification of the planets in the signs and houses wherein they shall be found, and according to their aspects30 among themselves, and to the place of the querent and thing quesited.31 And you shall judge according to the natures of the signs ascending in their houses, and according to the natures and proprieties of the figures which they have placed in the several houses, and according to the commixture of other figures aspecting them: the Index of the figure which the geomancers for the most part have made, how it is found in the former figure.32 But here we shall give you the secret of the whole art, to find out the Index33 in the subsequent figure, which is thus: that you number all the points which are contained in the lines of the projections, and this you shall divide by twelve: and that which remaineth project from the ascendant by the several houses, and upon which house there falleth a final unity, that figure giveth you a competent judgement of the thing quesited; and this together with the significations of the


Henry Cornelius Sample Agrippa, Running of Geomancy Head / 31

judgements aforesaid. But if on either part they shall be equal, or ambiguous, then the Index alone shall certify you of the thing quesited. The example of this figure is here placed. It remaineth now, that we declare, of what thing and to what house a question doth appertain. Then, what every figure doth show or signify concerning all questions in every house. First therefore we shall handle the significations of the houses; which are these.

The first house showeth the person of the querent, as often as a question shall be proposed concerning himself of his own matters, or any thing appertaining to him. And this house declareth the judgement of the life, form, state, condition, habit, disposition, form and figure, and of the color of men. The second house containeth the judgement of substance, riches, poverty, gain and loss, good fortune and evil fortune: and of accidents in substance, as theft, loss, or negligence.


The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy