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A L W A Y S

F R E E

local elections

CR & IC City Council Candidate Rundown

witching hour

Counterfeit Madison performs Nina Simone Rachel Grimes’ The Way Forth

ISSUE 273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019


Sankai Juku Utsushi

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Tuesday, October 22, 7:30 pm For the first time in 20 years, Sankai Juku, Japan’s internationally renowned butoh dance troupe, returns to Hancher. Utsushi has been crafted from restaged excerpts of choreography by company founder Ushio Amagatsu. Butoh, which has been called Japan’s most startling cultural export, is enthralling, surprising, and often deeply moving. Utsushi is the perfect introduction to the mesmerizing work of Sankai Juku. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $50 | $40 | $30

Dale and Linda Baker

COLLEGE STUDENT: $45 | $10

Gary A. and LaDonna K. Wicklund

YOUTH: $25 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: ©Sankai Juku

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


SITI Company The Bacchae

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Directed by Anne Bogart Saturday, October 26, 7:30 pm In this new English translation and innovative take on one of the Western world’s greatest dramas, SITI Company invites us to Thebes where Dionysus—god of wine, ritual madness, fertility, and theater (and in this production imagined as a rock star of the first order)—is opposed and imprisoned by King Pentheus. The struggle between wildness and order (and frivolity and seriousness) is at the heart of this play, which still resonates all these centuries later—and perhaps at this moment in particular. SITI Company’s famed co-artistic director Anne Bogart will be on hand to participate in a variety of residency events, including a post-performance conversation with the audience. Audio Description is available for this performance. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $45 | $35 | $25

The Cosmo Catalano Family

COLLEGE STUDENT: $40 | $10

Miriam Gilbert

YOUTH: $22 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: ©Craig Schwartz Photography

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


$10

Tomeka Reid Quartet

STUDENT TICKETS

Saturday, November 2, 2019, 6:30 pm & 9:00 pm If you’re in the mood for adventuresome jazz, the Thirsty Ear label offers plenty of options to quench your cravings—and one of the tastiest is cellist Tomeka Reid’s hard grooving quartet. Featuring guitarist Mary Halvorson (one of the hottest players to emerge in jazz in recent years and a newly-minted MacArthur Genius), Jason Roebke on bass, and Tomas Fujiwara on drums, the quartet offers up a menu of musical flavors, many of which flow from the spigot of Reid’s compositional and improvisational imagination. Imbibe the intoxicating brew in this intimate Club Hancher appearance. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $25 (6:30 PM) | $15 (9:00 PM)

John and Kim Callaghan

COLLEGE STUDENT: $10 YOUTH: $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


CULINARY ARTS EXPERIENCE

HANCHER’S CULINARY ARTS EXPERIENCE:

Trumpet Blossom Wednesday, November 19, 5:00 pm Join us for dinner in Hancher’s beautiful Stanley Café. Trumpet Blossom creates plant-based comfort food that reflects the season, respects the land, and is truly sustainable using organic ingredients and making dishes from scratch. TICKETS: $40 PER PERSON TICKETS GO ON SALE MONDAY, OCTOBER 21

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


CONTRA-TIEMPO & Las Cafeteras

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

joyUS, justUS

Thursday, November 21, 2019, 7:30 pm Hardship doesn’t preclude joy. In fact, a wellspring of joy is a powerful weapon of resistance in the face of injustice. The urban Latin dancers of CONTRA-TIEMPO and the musicians of Las Cafeteras—all grounded in the communities of color in South Los Angeles—celebrate this fact in an evening-length work grounded in social dance and live music that flips the script on the usual narratives about minority communities in the United States. Instead, they offer stories of hope, faith, family, and, yes, joy as we work together to build a more joyous, more just society. Following the performance, Las Cafeteras will invite the audience on stage for a sabor session—a community dance that will keep the party in full swing. TICKETS: ADULT: $40 | $30 | $20 COLLEGE STUDENT: $36 | $10 | $10 YOUTH: $20 | $10 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: ©Steve Wylie

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

EVENT SPONSORS: Ed and Ann Lorson

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


VOL. 28 ISSUE 273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 ALWAYS FREE LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM PUBLISHER MATTHEW STEELE DIGITAL DIRECTOR DREW BULMAN ART DIRECTOR JORDAN SELLERGREN Courtesy of Rachel Grimes

MANAGING EDITOR EMMA MCCLATCHEY ARTS EDITOR GENEVIEVE TRAINOR NEWS DIRECTOR PAUL BRENNAN VISUAL REPORTER—PHOTO ZAK NEUMANN VISUAL REPORTER­—VIDEO JASON SMITH STAFF WRITER/EDITOR IZABELA ZALUSKA FOOD & DRINK DIRECTOR FRANKIE SCHNECKLOTH DISTRIBUTION BRIAN JOHANNESSEN, DAI GWILLIAM, NORBERT SARSFIELD, NICOLE ELDRIDGE,

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Vote with Confidence

Inherited Memory

Sharon Udoh Sings Simone

Get to know your city council candidates before heading to the polls Nov. 5.

Family heirlooms inspired Rachel Grimes’ most ambitious piece yet.

Witching Hour performer Counterfeit Madison exalts the High Priestess of Soul.

PAUL BRENNAN

EMMA MCCLATCHEY

KEMBREW MCLEOD

8 - Letters 12 - Brock About Town 12 - Interactions 14 - Candidate Rundown 18 - Bread & Butter

20 - Rachel Grimes 22 - Prairie Pop 24 - A-List 26 - Events Calendar 48 - Photo Review

55 - Ad Index 57 - Astrology Forecast 59 - Local Albums 61 - Local Books 63 - Crossword

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Little Village is an independent, community-supported news and culture publication based in Iowa City. Through journalism, essays and events, we work to improve our community in the Iowa City, Coralville and Cedar Rapids area according to a few core values: environmental sustainability, affordability and access, economic and labor justice, racial justice, gender equity, quality healthcare, quality education and critical culture. Letters to the editor(s) are always welcome. We reserve the right to fact check and edit for length and clarity. Please send letters, comments or corrections to editor@littlevillagemag.com. Little Village is always free; all contents are the licensed work of the contributor and of the publication. If you would like to reprint or collaborate on new content, reach us at lv@littlevillagemag.com. To browse back issues, visit us at 623 S Dubuque St, Iowa City, or online at issuu.com/littlevillage.

A L W A Y S

F R E E

ISSUE 273 Oct. 16–NOv. 5, 2019

local elections

CR & IC City Council Candidate Rundown

witching hour

Counterfeit Madison performs Nina Simone Rachel Grimes’ The Way Forth

Collage by Jordan Sellergren Photo of Sharon Udoh by Chip Willis

POWERED BY CAFE DEL SOL ROASTING LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 7


DISCOVER YOUR SUPERPOWER

LETTERS LV encourages community members, including candidates for office, to submit letters to Editor@LittleVillageMag.com. To be considered for print publication, letters should be under 500 words. Preference is given to letters that have not been published elsewhere.

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Market St has become rather iconic on the Northside of Iowa City in the five years since it was designed and installed by Iowa City artist Jamie Boling. Families come to take their holiday pictures and couples come to have their wedding or prom pictures taken in front of this sign. This is home to Lutheran Campus Ministry (LCM), which is the official ELCA-affiliated Lutheran campus ministry on the campus of the University of Iowa. The ELCA stands for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, a progressive, worldwide Lutheran denomination. This year, LCM celebrates its 100th anniversary on the Iowa campus! LCM is the only Lutheran campus ministry that is a Reconciling in Christ (RIC) community, which means we welcome and celebrate

students from the LGBTQIA+ community. LCM is a student-led organization that meets weekly for supper, worship and fellowship. Students also participate in retreats and service projects; for example, last year, students raised over $5,000 to purchase Christmas presents for the families impacted by the immigration raid in Mt. Pleasant. They organize and participate in hunger walks and blood drives. LCM gathers around the concept of grace—the unconditional love that God has for all people, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, socio-economic class or race. God shows us this grace through the love that Jesus Christ pours out on all people. LCM invites the Iowa City community to come celebrate our anniversary with us on Sunday, Oct. 20 at 12 p.m. at Gloria Dei


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Lutheran Church (123 E Market St). Pulled pork sandwiches from Mosley’s and beverages will be provided; salads and dessert are potluck. Tour 109 E Market St, the oldest standing building in Iowa City, which was recently sold to the university. Come meet our current LCM students and see renderings of our future meeting space, which is currently under construction on the corner of Dubuque Street and Market Street. LCM thanks the Iowa City community for 100 years of support. We look to the next 100 years and to a future of outreach to the students on this campus. LCM is a growing and thriving campus ministry that seeks continued support—financially and spiritually—as we move into God’s expansive and inclusive future. Visit our website at www.lcmatui.org and participate in our 4X100 campaign or find us on Facebook and Instagram @lcmatui. See you on Oct. 20: Look for the Love Lives Here sign; truly, love lives here. Rev. Sarah Goettsch Lutheran Campus Ministry Gloria Dei Lutheran Church THANKS TO THE EDUCATION campaign of the Iowa City student climate strikers, the city council of Iowa City mandated its staff to update its climate action plan to fall in line with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change—namely, to cut CO2 emissions by 45 percent by 2030 and reach zero emissions by 2050. Three years ago, after a couple years of community forums and endless meetings, such a “regenerative city” climate plan was already unveiled in Iowa City. So, time to play catch up. On the heels of July, the hottest month on record, and as disastrous fires rage from the Amazon to the Congo to Indonesia and Alaska, here are nine easy steps to update Iowa City’s climate plan: 1. CALL DAVID RUFFCORN IN DES MOINES Iowa City is in a building boom,

with sadly low efficiency standards. David

To learn more, visit

icgov.org/leafvacuum LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 9


LETTERS & INTERACTIONS Ruffcorn oversees energy conservation codes for the Iowa Department of Public Safety, State Building Code Bureau. Earlier this summer, he reminded the Press-Citizen and Iowa City that “the state energy code is a D-. Anything above is fine.” Ruffcorn is the expert on energy efficiency and could help Iowa City bring up its codes for energy efficiency—the low hanging fruit, as the saying goes—in climate action. Call David now for help. 2. SUMMON PRESIDENT BRUCE HARRELD TO A PUBLIC MEETING WITH THE CITY COUNCIL: STOP BURNING COAL, DUDE. The University of Iowa coal

plant is the town symbol of climate denial. But the plant is not only a university issue, but a community issue, because it pollutes our skies (within a football field of apartments, hotels, student hubs and even daycare centers) with toxic particulates; it dumps coal

ash into unlined landfills in Waterloo; it buys coal from devastated mining communities where coal miners still die from black lung disease and people can’t drink their water; and it emits CO2, dude, in an age of climate chaos. UI wants kudos for transitioning the ancient coal plant in 2025, but that’s too late, especially when it needlessly burns coal. Just as important: The UI plant has doubled its natural gas usage, which is equally damaging with methane emissions. A similar college town—Berkeley, California, home of the [flagship campus of the] University of California—just banned the use of natural gas in all new buildings. So, we say: Dear President Harreld, you live in Iowa City, so face the city council and staff and community in a real discussion, and come into the 21st century to shut down that colossal relic. Bottom line: UI must commit to 100 percent renewable energy.

S T R E S S F R A C T U R E S

JOHN

MARTINEK

3. HIRE TREE PLANTERS TO PLANT, LIKE, 400,000 TREES. Studies abound on

the role of trees in capturing carbon, and once upon a time, Iowa City was connected to Cedar Rapids with 20 square miles of hardwood forests. Once upon a time, young Iowa City farmers were planting thousands of trees at a time. Ethiopia and India recently planted hundreds of millions of trees in a few days. New York City planted a million; Adelaide, Australia planted 3 million. Iowa City could easily work with Johnson County to set up a fund to pay young people and local residents to plant trees in their yards and on city and county property—how about 400,000 in four years? 4. HIRE A FARMER-IN-RESIDENCE, COMMIT TO 40 PERCENT LOCAL FOOD AND MAKE MOSQUITO FLATS A FOOD HUB Iowa City must revamp antiquated

zoning policies for urban farming, provide financial assistance for local food business and community garden expenses, and require public and private institutions that receive funding from the City of Iowa City to purchase a minimum of 40 percent of their food from local sources. Hiring a farmer-in-residence would be a good start. Iowa City owns 90 lots in Mosquito Flats, the neighborhood adjacent to the city park. Instead of paying taxpayer money to mow those lawns, unleash local farmers to turn those lots into a local food hub.

5. ZERO WASTE ORDINANCE

Building on Iowa City’s excellent recycling and reuse endeavors, the city council should pass a Zero Waste Ordinance like college town Boulder, Colorado, with the goal of generating new materials and compost from 85 percent of its waste by 2025. 6. TRANSIT: FREE WHEELS AND WALKING While 20 percent of commuters in the

university town walk or bike, less than 10 percent opt for mass transit. Our suggestion: Make all buses free, and transition those buses to electric ones over the next couple of years. Iowa City should continue to set walkability and bike-ability benchmarks, like Copenhagen, where 50 percent of all commute trips are made by bicycle and bicycles outnumber residents, 560,000 bicycles to 520,000 inhabitants.

10 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273


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LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 11


LETTERS 7. PUT SOLAR PANELS ON CITY HALL; SPONSOR CLIMATE MURALS Five years

ago, the City of Iowa City received a zero-down bid to put solar panels on City Hall from a local provider, who has since gone on to win awards of the top business in the Corridor. Solar panels on City Hall would send a message to the rest of the town—and gown—that the city council is committed to 100 percent renewable energy. We need the city to take public acts like this, as part of an education campaign. Just do it. And sponsor a couple of climate action murals, in the process, to raise awareness. 8. IOWA CITY’S GREEN NEW DEAL STARTS NOW: INCUBATE GREEN JOBS AND GREEN BUSINESS How do we launch

the Green New Deal? We support local green innovators. As the home of the University

BROCK ABOUT TOWN

INTERACTIONS of Iowa, Iowa City should establish green enterprise zones; provide support and assistance for green job clusters and start-ups; and set benchmarks to significantly expand the number of green jobs in the areas of energy efficiency, green building design and construction, local food and farming, technology and design. First stop: Why not establish an energy efficiency training workshop to retrofit homes, buildings and farms? 9. GET IT DONE: HIRE A CLIMATE ACTIVIST For whatever reasons, the Iowa

City staff can’t pull this off on their own, people. Iowa City needs to follow the example of Dubuque and hire a climate action coordinator—preferably someone who gets things done—to make the climate action plan a showcase for our city. —Sheila Zeithamel

READER POLL: Favorite part of fall: 15% Pumpkin mo-fuckin’ spice! 8% Flicking stink bugs 15% Election season, baby!! 62% Descent to dreary madness

AUDREY BROCK

A few weeks ago, I boldly went where this humor columnist has never gone before: a football game. I feel like it was against Middle Tennessee? Never let it be said that I haven’t stepped outside my comfort zone in the interest of journalism. You might well ask, “Audrey, how is it that you lived here your entire life and graduated from the University of Iowa and you still hadn’t been to a football game?” Well, readers, I was, um, busy. Studying. No, nobody’s going to believe that. The truth is, I thought I was too cool for it. I went to a few tailgate parties my freshman year, had a few awkward day-drunk conversations with girls in blackand-gold-striped overalls, drank a tallboy of Natural Light (which, in these circles, is referred to as a Natty Daddy) and decided that this was not my scene. But my friend had an extra ticket and I didn’t have anything going on that weekend, so I borrowed a vaguely Hawkeye-themed T-shirt and got ready to party. The day started when I met my sister and a bunch of her friends at a disturbingly early hour. We huddled around the tailgate of her roommate’s dad’s pickup truck, warming our hands over a Crock-Pot full of buffalo chicken dip. The first thing I noticed was the sheer number of moms, their SUVs festooned with black and gold streamers, furtively pouring Fireball into their coffee cups. That was encouraging; anything moms like, I probably will too. As I was grooving to some ’80s pop hits, a 12-year-old girl tapped me on the shoulder, saying, “Mom, can I—oh, sorry.” Then, I had to go to the bathroom and cry a little. Once the gratuitous-day-drinking-and-weenie-roasting portion of the day had concluded, we proceeded to the stadium. It was easily the most crowded place I have ever been. I didn’t know there were that many people living in the state of Iowa, let alone attending football games. No wonder the traffic’s so bad. In the end, it was a lot of fun. Truthfully, I didn’t understand most of what was going on—there was a ball, some guys were throwing it, sometimes they would throw it very far and there would be a lot of screaming—but I didn’t really need to get it to get why it’s so popular. When we won, by what is apparently considered a wide margin, I screamed my head off along with everyone else. As much as anything, it’s about a sense of community. And Jell-O shots for breakfast. 12 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

/LittleVillage

Dear Kiki: What is the right amount of sex in a marriage? In my experience, tolerating each other’s most baser and desperate “kinks” is critical for the survival of a sex life. That and getting plenty of exercise combined with adequate sleep. —Jason

Love Letters: An uninvited journey This beautiful story is mirrored in mine, especially the road trip account. My husband of 50 years passed on last year after his struggle with dementia. The author has a unique talent. I wish I could write like her. —Zmurrad I thought this was such a lovely and beautiful piece of writing by Ms. Carthill. “But Mom, in her wisdom, still held the map.” Xo —Devin R. Love formulated into words depicted gracefully on paper!!! I absolutely loved every word of this writing!!!! Salute and keep blessing the masses with your gift!! —Terrene C.


LITTLE VILLAGE

Cedar Rapids issued more than 26,000 traffic tickets during first month after its speed cameras were reactivated Hey fellow travelers: Hi! Welcome to Cedar Rapids, smile for the camera, that will be $75. Thank you! —Jeff L. I drive under that speed trap every day and see its merit. It slows down traffic that would probably otherwise speed through Cedar Rapids at 80mph instead of the 70mph most people drive before and after they slow down for the cameras. —Carol B.

‘Change is coming,’ Greta Thunberg tells crowd of thousands at the Iowa City Student Climate Strike rally Bout time someone does something. —Zachary H. 16 years old and the most adult person in the country right now. —Nick H-B.

Waterloo teacher placed on leave after Facebook comment about not having ‘my sniper rifle’ for Greta Thunberg’s Iowa City visit And he teaches science. Reassuring. —Christie J.

Republican State Sen. Mariannette Miller-Meeks launches her fourth bid for Congress, but avoids using the word ‘Republican’ After 4 failed campaigns to get elected, if you don’t know she’s a Republican then you aren’t paying attention. —Michael T. Remember that time, as director of the Iowa Department of Public Health, she refused to issue birth certificates to children born of same-sex couples? —Sue K.

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COMMUNITY

Iowa City & Cedar Rapids

CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE RUNDOWN BY PAUL BRENNAN

A

s Democratic candidates for president endlessly cycle through the state, it can be easy to lose sight of the city council elections happening in Iowa City and Cedar Rapids on Nov. 5. Little Village sent questionnaires to all the candidates in order to offer readers a brief profile of each. (Jorel Robinson did not respond to the questionnaire, so information from a phone interview conducted last month was used for him.) Longer, more in-depth profiles of the candidate will be posted on littlevillagemag. com. Izabela Zaluska contributed reporting to this article.

14 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

IOWA CITY Two at-large seats are on the ballot. Because both of the councilmembers vacating those seats are men, and all the candidates are women, the next city council will be majority-woman. Illustrations by Blair Gauntt

Megan Alter

Test development manager at ACT

Laura Bergus

Attorney, managing partner of the Hayek, Moreland, Smith & Bergus law firm

AFTER YEARS of working with community groups—from the South District Neighborhood Association and Black Voices Project to Big Brothers Big Sisters and the Iowa Women’s Foundation—as well as her service on the Iowa City Housing and Community Development Commission, Megan Alter decided to run for office. “[W]hile I appreciate what can be done by individuals and organizations, I want to be impactful on a larger scale,” she said. Alter came to Iowa City for graduate school and decided to make it her home. She sees a series of interrelated issues forming the biggest challenge facing the city: the need to create affordable housing, improving public transportation “so that it is convenient, accessible, safe and efficient,” and addressing the lack of affordable quality child care. Alter favors creating city housing vouchers “to supplement those received from HUD.” She is also a supporter of city-lead efforts, such as “the South District Home Investment Partnership Program pilot program for home ownership.” Alter describes herself as “a staunch believer in pilot programs and community feedback to implement, correct or improve, and advance experiments so they can be successfully brought to scale.”

“LOCAL GOVERNMENT excites me,” Laura Bergus, a lifelong Iowa Citian, said. “My first job was televising Iowa City’s city council meetings, and my first career was dedicated to improving communication between the city and its residents.” Bergus lists creating more affordable housing, better local and regional transportation, and the “need to shepherd responsible growth in diverse sectors of our economy” as Iowa City’s biggest challenges. But asked what her top priority as a councilmember would be, Bergus chose “improving the process” rather than a specific issue. “Good process is transparent, reliable and accountable,” she said. “City council must focus on policy, not micromanaging ... I will speak up if the city council gets stuck in the weeds. I will push staff to make city information easier to find.” Bergus served on the Iowa City Telecommunications Commission for nine years. She has also been active with community groups, including the South District Neighborhood Association and the Community Foundation of Johnson County, and she does pro bono legal work through Iowa Legal Aid’s Volunteer Lawyer Project.


LittleVillageMag.com

10/23

Conversation:

OBERMANN CONVERSATIONS 2019–20

A Vital Tool for Mending Our Democracy Lore Baur Teacher & Certified Trainer in Nonviolent Communication Southeast Junior High

Janice Weiner Retired diplomat

“MY PARENTS instilled in me the ethos of public service, which I embraced, serving my country for 26 years as a Foreign Service Officer (diplomat),” Janice Weiner said. She believes her “dual perspective of growing up in this community, then viewing it with new eyes when I returned home” after living in many other countries will make her effective in identifying problems and creating solutions. Weiner said her legal training—she attended Stanford Law School, after graduating from Princeton—taught her how “to examine issues from all angles,” and her diplomatic background has given her the ability to deal effectively with people of all backgrounds. She lists “affordable housing, transit that works for all, lack of quality, affordable daycare and infrastructure issues,” as the city’s biggest challenges, and said she would focus heavily on daycare, “which is an economic as well as a social justice issue.” Weiner said she would be mindful of funding issues. “Solid finances must be part of the whole,” she said. “But having everyone at the table is key.” Since returning to Iowa in 2015, Weiner has been contributed to community organizations and serves on the boards of Shelter House, UNA-USA and Agudas Achim Synagogue.

Ben Hassman Director, UI Conversation Center Sherry Watt Professor, UI Higher Education & Student Affairs

Weds., Oct. 23, 4–5 p.m. Iowa City Public Library 123 Linn St. | Free & open to all

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Erin Hackathorn in advance at 319-335-4034.

Want to make a difference in Johnson County?

Apply for a board or commission! Vacancies are available on the following boards and commissions: • • • • • • • • • • •

Board of Health Building Code Board of Appeals Compensation Commission Conservation Board Historic Preservation Commission Food Policy Council Juvenile Justice and Youth Development Policy Board Medical Examiner Planning and Zoning Commission SEATS Paratransit Advisory Committee Zoning Board of Adjustment

Find applications, deadlines and more information at www.johnson-county.com/vacancies. Questions? Call 319-356-6000 or email applications@co.johnson.ia.us.


COMMUNITY CEDAR RAPIDS will have three contested city council positions on the ballot: two at-large seats and the District 2 seat.

Sofia Mehaffey

Jorel Robinson

Scott Overland

“MANY YEARS ago, I moved to Cedar Rapids in order to go to school and build a better life for my family,” Sofia Mehaffey said. “I was a single mother of two, and we lived in poverty on government assistance. What happened over the next decade was miraculous—because of the community support here, I was able to achieve masters-level education, escape the cycle of poverty and give back to the community in a truly meaningful role with Horizons [a nonprofit that assists underserved populations].” Mehaffey said she is running for city council to make sure the kind of support she received is available to everyone. Her platform focuses on senior issues, public health and food insecurity. “Public Health encompasses many components of city and community development—including housing, access to city resources and infrastructure,” Mehaffey said. “The built environment can be influenced by city incentives and ordinances, and decisions made on behalf of the community must reflect constituent needs and the public good.” Mehaffey serves on the boards of numerous community organizations, including Family Promise of Linn County and NewBo City Market, and is completing a term on the Linn-Mar School Board. If elected, Mehaffey would be the first black woman to serve on the Cedar Rapids City Council. Only one other black person, Dale Todd, has served on the council.

JOREL ROBINSON cites the need for the city to improve its response to gun violence as a major reason for running. “I had a friend who was shot by a police officer, and besides that, just the number of kids I know in this community who have experienced gun violence,” Robinson said. Robinson believes that making sure young people have productive things to do would reduce gun violence, since it would help them avoid becoming involved in the “wrong things.” If elected, Robinson said he would also focus on affordable housing and improving how city government shares information. “As a person who works at GoDaddy, that’s all I think about,” he said. “There are so many updated ways to get this information out to people.” Robinson added, “Our elected officials should be trying to create excitement in our city and give people a reason to want to live in Cedar Rapids and have a family here.”

SCOTT OVERLAND ran for city council four years ago “to reinvigorate the core neighborhoods of Cedar Rapids.” “I saw an opportunity to create a homeowner lending program, Neighborhood Finance Corporation (NFC), which would make home loans in the older neighborhoods of Cedar Rapids,” Overland said. “... After a lot of hard work, I was successful in bringing NFC to Cedar Rapids last year. So far, NFC has made 28 loans totaling over $1 million.” Overland said that if he’s elected to a second term, he will “continue to advocate for strengthening neighborhoods through promotion of NFC.” He will also work on affordable housing for both homeowners and renters. Prior to running for city council in 2015, Overland served for nine years on the Cedar Rapids City Planning Commission. He is a trustee of the Indian Nature Creek Center and works with a number of other area nonprofits.

Director of community health and nutrition programs at Horizons: A Family Services Alliance

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Productivity specialist at GoDaddy

(Incumbent) Vice president of investments at Cedar Rapids Bank and Trust


Illustrations by Blair Gauntt

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Ann Poe

Patrick Loeffler

ANN POE said it was her experience as community liaison for the Rebuild Iowa Office (RIO) following the 2008 floods that first inspired her to run for city council. “There was still so much rebuilding to complete by our City Government, citizens and businesses and believed my knowledge and experience with RIO provided me the opportunity to continue to support our recovery efforts,” Poe said. “Disasters are personal. The flood affected my family, a family home [we’d had] for over 80 years and the community I love.” Poe was first elected in 2011, and is seeking her third term as an at-large councilmember. Poe said she wants to continue to work on infrastructure—Paving for Progress and the flood control system—and targeted economic development “like supporting the Czech Village and NewBo District Plan.” Poe also includes addressing gun violence and affordable housing as top priorities. She supports expanding programs at recreation centers across the city “to keep kids active and off the streets.” “The concept is a good one, but very expensive,” Poe said. “We are actively in discussions with the school district that would open up facilities and provide programming and mentoring for our youth.”

PATRICK LOEFFLER said his reasons for running are simple: “[B]eing a lifelong CR resident, and having grandkids in the school system, has been very motivating.” “Public safety and the shooting issues lately have me very concerned,” he added. “Flood protection is personal ... I want to make sure of the follow-through for the westside protection.” Loeffler is president of a union that represents workers in the building trades throughout eastern Iowa, and owns Corner Store Apothecary & More, a Czech Village shop that sells CBD oil and hemp-based products. “I truly feel every job I have had has led me to where I am now,” Loeffler said. As a union leader, “I represent everyone no matter of race, religion or political views.” “I feel I have the knack for bringing people together and working through the obstacles and differences,” Loeffler said. Loeffler serves as co-chair of the Master Facilities Oversight Planning Committee for the Cedar Rapids school board and has been an active advocate for the legalization of medical marijuana in Iowa.

(Incumbent)

President, Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Building Trades, and owner of Corner Store Apothecary & More

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Snacking Hour

elcome to the official Witching Hour issue! Since 2015, this festival has worked to expand the consciousness of festival-goers by stretching imaginations and perceptions of what a festival can and ought to be: a two-day smorgasboard of obscure discussions and performances that take place just as the weather starts to turn horrible. I’m here to stretch how you imagine filling your gullets. Join me on a snacking and beveraging tour through the streets and pedestrian-only spaces of downtown Iowa City.

EVENING BITE & BEER

You’ve just left Kerry Howley’s reading on the American surveillance state and you need a drink. Put on your darkest sunglasses and head east on Washington Street. You’ll want to find somewhere low-key, somewhere nobody will notice it’s you. Go to Cactus, and don’t tell anybody which one. Order a Negro Modelo and a chile relleno and get the hell out of there. LIGHT DINNER & COCKTAIL

Climate change is real and is happening—Chilean scientist Marcelo Mena has just made that completely clear at his 6 p.m. talk at the Englert. Do something very good for the Earth. Walk to Trumpet Blossom Cafe for an organic, local, vegan dinner. Order the Fettucini Cashew Alfredo and the Bitter Cherry Old Fashioned cocktail, and don’t worry because they won’t even offer you a straw. If that wasn’t feast enough for you, head to Riverside Theatre for Megan Gogerty’s dinner party drama, Feast, at 7:30. LATE SNACK & CIDER

The Friday night Comedy Showcase begins at 9:30, and you’ll have a decent amount of time to laugh until you cry before sprinting to Gabe’s to see Obnox. While you’re at The Mill, take advantage of their many menu offerings. My suggestion: An order of fried pickles

and a pint of cider pairs great with comedy.

Saturday, Nov. 2 BREAKFAST

Good morning! What are you doing up so early on a weekend? Before you do a li’l yoga at the Englert for the psychedelic Dimensions presentation at 10 a.m., treat yourself to a light breakfast and cup of coffee. Dandy Lion on the Ped Mall has what you need: a range of relatively healthy breakfast options and quality coffee. My suggestion? The Breakfast Salad, which includes a runny egg and oily focaccia. JUICE BREAK

Before celebrating your bod in the All Bodies Belong discussion at Iowa City Public Library (11:45 p.m.), get to Get Fresh and order a juice. I’d recommend the What’s Up Doc, made with carrot, cucumber, apple, lemon and ginger. Drink it there so you don’t waste plastic. Fresh. LATE LUNCH

You’ve just left the Lynch: A History screening and you have a spare moment before the University of Iowa leadership talks challenges, opportunities and planning for the future. You’re gonna need some lunch, and it’s probably a good time to gaze out a window and reflect upon Iowa City and its American media-sports complex. Saigon’s Corner at Old Capitol Mall has

18 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

Corbin Booth / Little Village

Friday, Nov. 1

a few tables overlooking Clinton Street. Go have some hot soup (my suggestion: spicy beef noodle) and a plate of spring rolls.

People-watch and order the spicy beef noodle at Saigon’s Corner on Clinton Street.

DESSERT & COCKTAIL OR COFFEE

It’s mid-afternoon and you’re heading to the Northside. You need a little pick-me-up before The Mirror/The Reaping at Public Space One and the Writers of Color series. May I suggest a modest piece or five of baklava from Oasis before popping into Goosetown, sitting at the bar and sipping a Wake-Up Wake-Up coffee-infused cocktail? Or just have a regular coffee at High Ground. Up to you. LATE DINNER & DRINK

There are just a few more events to go before the festival is over and everyone barricades themselves inside their homes till spring. Ahead of Julio Torres

at the Englert (9:30 p.m.) and Carrier Waves and Shredders at Gabe’s (10:30 p.m.), you and any companions you’ve picked up over the course of Witching Hour will need a proper dinner. Something cozy and Iowa Citycentric to reward yourselves, because you’ve done a good job this weekend attending events on topics you didn’t previously… get. My recommendation: The Sanctuary. Yeah, you’ll have to walk a few blocks, but it’s worth it because you can have a cheese plate or a Shepherd’s Pie and pick from a long list of good beers. —Jordan Sellergren


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CULTURE

Waxing Nostalgic Composer Rachel Grimes reckons with her family’s (and the nation’s) past in a dreamy folk opera and film. BY EMMA MCCLATCHEY

A

few years back, siblings Rachel and Edward Grimes were faced with a difficult but rather common responsibility: transitioning their parents into a nursing care facility. This required the pair to sort through decades—and, it turned out, centuries—worth of stuff in their parents’ Kentucky home. “Both of my parents had a really wonderful trove of photographs and mementos from their lives,” Rachel said. “[My dad] had a Scottish Bible from the 1730s. You can see your great-great-grandparents’ handwriting in sepia ink on this ancient Bible. You can read your great-grandmother’s postcards.” She was enthralled. “While I was trying to take care of this task—organizing their things, trying to put some photos into an album—it became bigger than that. I started thinking about how this could be a piece of music.” Rachel Grimes is a pianist and composer, providing music for chamber ensembles and orchestras, including the Louisville Orchestra, Kansas City Symphony, Knoxville Symphony, A Far Cry and the Dublin Guitar Quartet. Along with five albums of solo work, she was also a member of the post-rock chamber music outfit Rachel’s for more than a decade, which also included Jason Noble and her brother Edward. The spark of inspiration Grimes felt while sorting through family artifacts begat her most ambitious project yet, one that involved extensive research into her own genealogy and that of some of Kentucky’s most important but forgotten figures, as well as collaboration with dozens of vocalists and musicians. She will present the product of all this work—The Way Forth, a folk opera and film— at the Englert Theatre on Friday, Nov. 1 for Witching Hour Festival. “One day, as I was driving around with my friend Catharine [Axley], who’s been shooting this film, I said to her, ‘What do you think this piece is about?’ She says, ‘Well, I think it’s a reckoning.’ And I think that’s absolutely true,”

20 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

Creative Matters Lecture w/ Rachel

Grimes said. “I’m making a piece that’s reckoning with both my own personal history through my family, through their artifacts, with my state’s history, with my country’s history. I’m looking at it through these slivers of people’s lives, their stories. There isn’t one thesis to it all, it’s really just an exploration, an investigation.” The seeds of the project were planted during Grimes’ childhood in Louisville—playing in the woods behind their house with her brother, sight-learning piano by watching her mother and listening to Motown girl groups, Billy Joel and The Wiz. Despite receiving classical training in piano and composition, Grimes always had an interest in rock and experimental music. “I could tell from early on my destiny was not going to be in academic music departments,” she said. From composing film soundtracks to sound mixing for theater productions, Grimes’ pieces

Grimes, Voxman Recital Hall, Iowa City, Wednesday, Oct. 30 at 5:30 p.m., Free Rachel Grimes in Conversation with the Iowa Women’s Archives, University of Iowa Main Library, Iowa Women’s Archives, Iowa City, Thursday, Oct. 31, 12 p.m., Free WITCHING HOUR: Performance: ‘The Way Forth,’ Englert Theatre, Iowa City, Friday, Nov. 1, 8:30 p.m., $10-20; Free with festival pass

are often rooted in stories and visuals. Her first musical composition was inspired by a painting of a horse in the woods; more recently, she wrote a piece called “In the Vapor with the Air Underneath,” meant to capture the experience


Courtesy of Rachel Grimes

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Members of the Clifton Christian Church choir in 1910. “My great-great-grandmother is in the center, and her daughter, my greatgrandmother, is back row second from left,” Grimes said. “Both were piano players and organists and muses for the beginnings of this project.”

of soaring through the air like a bird. “For better or for worse, there’s always music present for me,” she said. “I am often kind of composing my own life as I go, whether I intend to or not. I kind of can’t help that things that are happening in my life are winding up somehow in the music.” This is especially true of The Way Forth, developed during the most difficult period of Grimes’ life. In 2012, her former bandmate Noble died of cancer. Over the next seven years, she also lost a beloved teacher, two dogs, her mother and, in March 2017, her brother Edward, who died of a heart attack at the age of 43. “A lot of The Way Forth is really a response to that loss and grief,” Grimes said. “I was supposed to premiere a piece of it the day after my brother died. I had to put the piece down; there wasn’t any room in my life for that anymore. I really didn’t intend to come back to it, but after four or five months, I got to see a rough stringout of some of the film that Catharine and I had filmed about two weeks before he died. When I saw the film, I knew I had to keep working on it, and I knew that’s what he would want.” “It was therapy for me.” The Way Forth charts Kentucky history in a non-linear format, with an emphasis

on the perspectives of women. It is perhaps most impressive as a work of arrangement: Grimes pairs old photographs and footage of Kentucky’s natural and cultural landscape with 17 songs, some written by Grimes, others adapted from historical hymns and folk tunes. Unlike much of Grimes’ musical catalog, all but one song in The Way Forth contain lyrics, many of which pulled directly from essays, articles and postcards written by her ancestors, others from history books; yet others are poetic reflections from Grimes’ own mind. “Let us find the way forth / By any means, our freedom,” read the lyrics for the song “Sisterhood of Man,” which Grimes describes as inspired by “the voices of many women through time.” “What I’m trying to do with the music is build an environment through which the different stories can be experienced and explored,” Grimes said. “It’s not so much a literal depiction of the story but an environment of going back in time and having these foggy memories.” Among these stories is that of an enslaved woman named Dolly, one of only two women who made the journey, led by the legendary pioneer Daniel Boone, across the Kentucky River to establish Fort Boonesborough in the spring of 1775. Dolly was owned by Col. Richard Callaway, the second husband of Grimes’ sixtime great-grandmother Elizabeth—and, most likely, the father of Dolly’s baby, the first born in the settlement. “Learning that the first child born in that fort was a mixed-race child, the result of rape, that had been left out of history entirely just got me really fired up,” Grimes said. “Her story needed more air and more understanding. Grimes regards Dolly as a founding mother of Kentucky. “I weep for my son, given no father’s name, no land to farm, no rightful way in this place to be a man,” reads a lyric of The Way Forth song “Dolly,” based on a newspaper account from the 1840 celebration of the establishment of Fort Boonesborough (at which time Dolly was in her 80s and was apparently still enslaved). “I am fascinated by pioneer and settlement history, especially because the more I read, the more it becomes apparent that the stories I heard in my youth are not accurate or complete,” Grimes said. “I have many mixed and conflicted feelings about being a descendant of these early settlers. These people were at times greedy, and violent, and they were participants Cont. >> on pg. 28


CULTURE

Prairie Pop

Young, Gifted and Black Counterfeit Madison is bringing the music and message of Nina Simone into Trump’s America. BY KEMBREW MCLEOD

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hen Sharon Udoh first heard Nina Simone’s music, it was a revelation. “I was struck by our similarities,” said Udoh, who performs under the moniker Counterfeit Madison. “Here was this dark-skinned black woman who was a classically trained pianist, just like me, and with a similar vocal register. My head was spinning.” Udoh, the daughter of Nigerian immigrants, was born in 1981 in Cincinnati, Ohio and first played the piano by ear at the age of 4, after watching her older sister practice the instrument. The child prodigy then began performing in the Pentecostal church her mother attended; she later adopted the pseudonym Counterfeit Madison (later also her band name) so that her mom and other members of the congregation wouldn’t know she was playing secular music in clubs. On record and in live shows, Counterfeit Madison’s mixture of rock, soul, prog, jazz and pop takes all the best qualities of those genres and goes in new, unexpected directions. On her group’s 2017 album, Opposable Thumbs, Udoh’s versatile voice shifts with ease and grace from the aching balladry of “Song for the Loyals” to the boogie-woogie sassiness of “I Hope It’s Alright,” leaving room for some gospel-infused art rock during the album closer, “Slow as Molasses.” It’s fitting that she was drawn to Nina Simone, whose androgynous voice had a melancholy tone, much like Udoh’s. Likewise, Simone’s piano technique inventively mixed European classical music styles with AfricanAmerican jazz, blues and soul. A groundbreaking singer and master pianist, she was also known for her take-no-shit attitude towards a white-dominated society (and music industry) that wanted to put her in her place. “When I first performed a concert of her songs in 2016, it was a different moment,” Udoh said. “Barack Obama was still 22 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

Chip Willis

president. It now seems so long ago, even though it’s been less than three years, so I think those songs have an added resonance now.” Simone’s songs invoke the broad range of emotions stirred up by the struggle for racial equality—from the black-is-beautiful uplift that sends “Young, Gifted and Black” into the ether to the unvarnished rage of “Mississippi Goddam,” inspired by the 1964 bombing of an African-American Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, which killed four children. “Oh, but this whole country is full of lies / You’re all gonna die, and die like flies / I don’t trust you anymore,” Simone sang. “You don’t have to live next to me / Just give me my equality.” Four years later, during a concert held the day after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, Simone told the audience, “They’re shooting us down one by one. Don’t forget that, ’cause they are, killing us one by one.”

“The King is dead, the King of Love is dead,” she mournfully declared, adding, with a sardonic laugh, “I ain’t about to be nonviolent, honey, oooooh no.” “Her music is more relevant today than ever,” Udoh said, “especially in light of the continued brutalization of black people by the police, along with a fear of outsiders that is being stirred up with the politicization of immigration.” Not only did Simone craft brilliant compositions, but when she played others’ songs, she made them her own. Her cover version of the Bee Gees’ “To Love Somebody” sounds otherworldly, yet grounded in heartache, and when she sang “I Shall Be Released” in 1969, the Bob Dylan song gained new layers of significance. Taken together, her covers and originals paint a rich, complex portrait of life as experienced by a black woman in America during the 20th century. As a black woman in America in the 21st century, two and half years into Donald


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now available

WITCHING HOUR: I Got Life, And I Got Freedom: Exploring Personal & Social Change Through the Music of Nina Simone, The Englert Theatre, Saturday, Nov. 2

Trump’s presidency, Counterfeit Madison will offer her interpretations of Simone’s music at the Witching Hour Festival. I Got Life, And I Got Freedom: Exploring Personal & Social Change Through the Music of Nina Simone will be presented at the Englert Theatre, where she will bring the past into conversation with the present in ways that might point us towards a better future. Udoh’s own encounters with racism serve as a reminder that all is still not well in the alleged land of the free—as do Simone’s songs, which are practically crying out to be heard in this day and age. The progress America made toward racial equality in the 1960s and ’70s has been eroded by a backlash that suggests that we Cont. >> on pg. 36

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CULTURE

A-List

Art for All The new Stanley Museum of Art will serve as both “a library and a laboratory,” according to its director. BY DAN BOSCALJON

L

auren Lessing began serving as the eighth director of the University of Iowa Stanley Museum of Art in July 2018, and less than nine months later, presided over the ceremonial groundbreaking of the new site for the museum. UI’s renowned art collection (arguably one of the top university collections in the United States) was displaced by the floodwaters of 2008. It has been dispersed to museums throughout the Midwest since, but will soon return to be displayed at home, hopefully by 2022. This means that Iowa City will once again feature the magnificent triptych “Karneval” by Max Beckmann, Motherwell’s “Elegy to the Spanish Republic no. 126” and—most famously—Pollock’s “Mural.” Lessing was excited, she said, to “come to a place where I can build something.” Part of that excitement stems from the flood response. She visited Iowa City and UI in 2004 for a conference and was impressed by “how the arts were woven into the community.” But she was even more impressed, in 2008, watching the community come together. “I really wanted this job,” she said. Lessing aspired “to go to the place where the community cared so much about the arts.” Lessing’s ties to the University of Iowa run a generation deep. Her parents, a painter and a sculptor, studied under Ulfert Wilke, the first director of the Stanley Museum. It was meaningful to her, she said, to be appointed to a position once held by someone so important to her family. “They spoke very reverently about him,” she said. “He was almost a God-like figure.” The Stanley Museum marks its 50th anniversary this year, although the building has not been in use as a museum for the past 10 years. The team that Lessing now helms has filled that 10-year gap with creative answers to the question of how a “museum” can be an institution beyond being anchored in a physical location. “I am incredibly impressed by how the

24 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

Courtesy of the University of Iowa

WITCHING HOUR: Challenges, Opportunities, and Planning for the Future at the University of Iowa with Bruce Harreld, Daniel Clay,

staff here, and the donors, have made it possible for us to be a museum without walls for over a decade,” Lessing said. She cited the school visitation program, which has reached more than 85,000 K-12 students since its inception in 2008 and emphasizes the importance of teaching with actual objects. It’s one example of innovations “born out of necessity” that have pioneered new kinds of models for community art integration across the country. “I know that being located on a research university campus is a huge advantage,” Lessing said. “We’re a catalyst and facilitator for the ideas that emanate from the museum as a whole. I hope the museum is a place where faculty can come together and create shared projects, and a space where a range of thinkers, whether in the university or community, can use our collection to look at projects

Monserrat Fuentes, and Lauren Lessing, The Englert Theatre, Saturday, Nov. 2, 3 p.m., Free

beyond art and art history—a space for dialogues that confront us all.” Lessing and the staff of the Stanley Museum have just completed their five-year strategic plan, which will help to ensure that the museum is “a crucial part of education for all students” regardless of program or major. Lessing also hopes that the new building will serve both as “a library and a laboratory” for students in the humanities and STEM fields. She is passionate about the ways art pieces can serve as focal points, where technology and creativity combine to facilitate new kinds of learning, such as in the program piloted earlier this year in which CT scans were used


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to reveal new details in objects from the museum’s African collection. The Stanley is not waiting for the new building to open to expand beyond art and art history. “The whole museum staff is here to teach,” Lessing said. “As we run the museum, we should be teaching as we do that.” Lessing’s event at Witching Hour 2019, titled Challenges, Opportunities, and Planning for the Future at the University of Iowa (with UI Provost Montserrat Fuentes and President Bruce Harreld), is her first immersive experience of the festival. But her approach to curating dovetails nicely with how the interdisciplinary and interactive festival tends to ignore traditional boundaries in its creative presentation of performances and topics. Her talk will be on the nature of the UI’s direction in education, but her personal artwork ties into the themes of Witching Hour as well. Her most recent creative project, “apocalyptic embroidery,” blends the traditional, polite, idealized 18th-century domestic art—used to create an orderly, idyllic home— with monsters, aliens and asteroids invading and exploding domestic spaces. “The contrast between the stitching and tiny details and the idea of the world coming apart felt personally cathartic and satisfying,” Lessing said. “I’m too busy now, but I do find myself returning to making when I need to work through something. It plays an important role in keeping me centered and making sense of how to be human in all the ways that’s fraught in the early 21st century.” Lessing said she is excited to tackle the challenge of attracting patrons who might not normally engage with an art museum. “Museums have turned around to face their audiences in new ways,” Lessing said. “Millenials and younger generations don’t relate to cultural institutions the way their parents did. Young people in the era of my parents came to cultural institutions to learn how to be middle class, bending and shaping themselves to emulate the elite. Today, young people want to be active makers of meaning. I don’t want to direct in the same way as Wilke—I’m not here just to teach people how to see, but to be part of a conversation where I learn as much as I teach, and for the museum to lead this.” Daniel Boscaljon is a public intellectual and experimental humanist. Find information about upcoming workshops, including an upcoming collaboration with the Iowa Writers House on Oct. 26, at danielboscaljon.com.

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EDITORS’ PICKS

CALENDAR EVENTS AROUND THE CRANDIC OCT. 16–NOV. 5

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Planning an event? Submit event info to calendar@littlevillagemag.com. Include event name, date, time, venue, street address, admission price and a brief description (no all-caps, exclamation points or advertising verbiage, please). To find more events, visit littlevillagemag.com/ calendar. Please check venue listing in case details have changed.

Wed., Oct. 16 One Million Cups, Merge, Iowa City, 9 a.m., Free

PARAMOUNT THEATRE Sun. Dec. 8th • 2:30 pm

ON SALE NOW! $29-$48 (incl. fees). All seating is reserved. Charge by phone at (319) 366-8203, online at ParamountTheatreCR.com, or in person at the Paramount Theatre / Orchestra Iowa Ticket Office.

(Weekly) Iowa City Wednesday Farmers Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 5 p.m. (Weekly) ILLUSTRATOR, ‘HOW TO READ A BOOK’

Melissa Sweet, Prairie Lights, Iowa CIty, 6 p.m., Free LAUDED JAZZ SAXOPHONIST

An Evening With Branford Marsalis, Englert

A Benefit for Camp Courageous of Iowa

Theatre, Iowa City, 7:30p.m., $20-65

Also Appearing In: Anamosa (Nov. 29), Ottumwa (Nov. 30), Davenport (Dec. 1), Des Moines (Dec. 7), Cedar Falls (Dec. 14), Dubuque (Dec. 15)

Open Mic Night, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar

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Rapids, 8 p.m., Free (Weekly) Underground Karaoke with Spencer, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

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STAFF PICKS

WHAT ARE WE DOING? Cider Sip & Shop, Czech Village/New Bohemia, Cedar Rapids, Friday, Oct. 18, 5 p.m., Free Since moving to Iowa and

exploring Cedar Rapids, I’ve quickly grown fond of the NewBo area. There’s so much to do, from shopping to finding new coffee shops to trying new food. On Oct. 18, all of that gets better, believe it or not. For three hours, you can supplement your NewBo/ Czech Village adventures with free samples of cider and other delicious apple-flavored treats. Caramel apple sangria? Yes, please. Apple cider caramels? Sign me up. So gather a group of friends or bring your significant other along and enjoy some delicious treats (as long as you and whoever you bring are 21 or older). And yes, you read that right: this event is free! —Izabela Zaluska

OCT. 16– NOV. 5, 2019

Orchestra Iowa Pops II: ‘Wizard of Oz,’ Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, Friday, Oct. 25 and Saturday, Oct. 26, 7:30 p.m., $18-$59 Surround

sound, move aside! Nothing beats the experience of watching a film while its score is being performed live by a full orchestra! This will make the third time I watch a film accompanied by Orchestra Iowa–– first was Michael Curtiz’s Casablanca and then Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. Music plays such a vital role in a film. It sets the mood, helps guide the story, informs the audience. And now, with Wizard of Oz, the music is front and center. While I must admit that the story is not my favorite, I have to appreciate how groundbreaking this film was, plus it’s full of catchy and iconic tunes. To the surprise of absolutely no one, my favorite is “Over the Rainbow,” and I can’t wait to hear the sound of strings and brass swelling all around me while this classic film plays on a screen. ––Jav Ducker

Via the artist

FilmScene 101: Fact or Fiction, FilmScene—Ped Mall, Iowa City, four Mondays starting Oct. 28, 6 p.m., $50-60 for full course There’s a certain

Mark Broussard w/ James Tutson and the Rollback, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 7 p.m., $15-28.50

Marc Broussard’s single “Home” was my most-listened-to track on iTunes in 2008. Why do I remember what my most-listenedto track on iTunes was in 2008? That’s not the question, and I’ll ask you kindly to mind your own business. Broussard’s got blues, roots and Southern rock chops married with all the catchiness of contemporary pop sensibility. This is smoky, soulful, cornbread-sopping-up-barbecue-juices music—the kind that makes you pronounce “Louisiana” with only four syllables. Your dad would probably like it. You should take your dad. —Celine Robins

kind of person in this world, of which I am the exemplar, who is generously referred to as a “lifelong learner” by folks looking to take our money, but more colloquially known in our own fine circles as an “uber nerd.” You know who you are. Starting this month, FilmScene is catering to the cinema buff subcategory of uber nerd with this four-week course that dives deep into the muddy boundary waters between documentary and fiction. The first exploration is, of course, This Is Spinal Tap. Stories We Tell, Symbiopsychotaxiplasm and I’m Not There follow. The class is taught by LV’s own Prairie Pop columnist Kembrew McLeod and Corey Creekmur, whose comic book class I fought and begged to get into, and who was hugely influential on my comic-editing side hustle (but who undoubtedly doesn’t remember me). Both are storied University of Iowa profs slummin’ it with the townies for this unmissable opportunity. Oh yeah, and bottomless popcorn is included with tuition. —Genevieve Trainor

NEWS YOU CAN TRUST.

90.9 910

FM

NEWS | STUDIO ONE

AM

NEWS

Stream online: IowaPublicRadio.org or the IPR app.


CULTURE

LittleVillageMag.com

>> GRIMES: Cont. from pg. 21 in slavery. They participated in the extortion of the Cherokee Nation and the lands on which they and many other peoples had lived for millennia. At this point, I feel it is my responsibility to participate in the ongoing historical account of what we know and can uncover of those colonial days.” Tracing her own family tree was difficult enough, Grimes said, but tracking down records of slaves, like Dolly, “was truly a breadcrumb trail.” Women are underrepresented in historical archives, women of color much more so. “You look for census records, you look for wills, you look for all kinds of documents you may not have thought about containing reference to a person or place.” With the help of researcher Paula Falvey, Grimes was able to piece together Dolly’s lineage. Her son Frederick appears to have been freed after serving in the War of 1812. He married, and his own son, Henry Hart, became a celebrated violinist and composer. Hart in turn married pianist Sarah Smith, and they formed a family band with their daughters. Grimes tracked down the Harts’ hit song “Good Sweet Ham” (1873) in the Library of Congress and incorporated the tune into The Way Forth. Sixty-three minutes in length, The Way Forth calls for soloists and instrumentalists as well as a choir, their performance accompanying the film. Grimes said local singers will help form the chorus for her Iowa City performance of the piece. She plans to release a feature-length version of the film—with the addition of four documentary-style interviews with family, friends and researchers—next year. Grimes hopes The Way Forth will shed light “on a place battered by greed, civil war, bigotry and the exploitation of natural resources” in a time when warts-and-all reflections on history—including the efforts of indigenous people to shed light on colonial atrocities, and The New York Times’ 1619 Project—are met with pushback. “There’s a lot of anger and rebellion from the people who believe they are losing power,” Grimes said. “I think transparency and a more complex understanding of our past is going to help everyone. But I think a lot of people feel very threatened by it.” “It’s disturbing to look back at these very early origin stories of the development and settlement both of my state and of the country and recognize that violence was fundamental. For instance, I live on a piece of property that is at the very edge of the Transylvanian Purchase 28 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

which is 20-million-acre piece of land that was heisted from the Cherokee Nation in 1775, and that’s one of the stories I go into. I’m looking at a map one day when I was researching that story early on, and I was like, ‘Oh my God, there we are.’ I’m living on that land. It’s a horrible feeling. There were so many broken treaties, so many broken agreements, so many people massacred in order for the people with the guns to get more land, to get more goods and be more rich.” The stories of our ancestors can tell us more than where we came from, but who we are, Grimes said. “One subject I’m really interested in is inherited memory and inherited experience,” she said. “It has now been proven that mice can inherit trauma that they’ve never personally experienced but that their parents have. ... I think there must be some cellular-level amount of knowledge that we all carry with us and that could be in music, it could be in certain proclivities that we have, it could be the kind of land that we feel most associated with or comfortable in, but it also could be things like trauma and more physical issues.” The Way Forth serves as more than an investigation of atrocities and trauma. It is the story of her grandmother Margaret, born in 1903, a rural teacher who returned to college in her sixties to earn her degree; of communities bonding over food and dance; of the beautiful Kentucky and Dix Rivers. Grimes hopes her impressionistic history project can embody—and, in some ways, redefine—the concept of nostalgia. “I feel like Norman Rockwell-era on, nostalgia kind of means a syrupy or overly fond feeling about the better memories and a filtering out of the not-so-good ones—an unhealthy attachment to times gone by,” she said. “For me, nostalgia is an experience, it’s something that comes along out of the blue. You pick up an object or a photograph and you’re just swept into it. You look at a person’s face or you look at the way their clothes are made, or you look at the furniture in a room and you think, ‘Wow, what would it have been like to live then? Can you imagine?’ Your imagination just takes you on a ride. That’s a lot of what this piece is.” Emma McClatchey’s most precious possessions are two blankets woven by her many-times great-grandmother in the 1770s and passed down through the generations.

Upcoming Events: EVERY MONDAY - PARCHMENT LOUNGE - 6:30 PM free write session hosted by Iowa Writer's House EVERY WEDNESDAY - ANDREW'S BAR EXAM - 7:00 PM

OCT 18

Choro Moingona

8 PM

OCT 19 8 PM

Saul Lubaroff Trio

OCT 20

2 Carries Pub Quiz

OCT 25

Dave Thaker Quartet

8 PM 8 PM

OCT 26 8 PM

NOV 1 8 PM

Coppers & Brass Bluetone Jazz Collective Mike Maas & Carlis

MONDAYS ARE HAPPY HOUR EVERY HOUR! SUNDAYS ARE 1/2 OFF ALL PIZZA ALL DAY! (319) 351-5692 • 405 S GILBERT ST, IOWA CITY


EDITORS’ PICKS DENVER DUBSTEP

Dirt Monkey w/ Lucii, sfam, Zia, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $17 Open Stage, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: ‘THE EVIL DEAD’

CEDAR RAPIDS NEW BOHEMIA/ CZECH VILLAGE

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, FilmScene— Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $4 (Weekly)

Thu., Oct. 17 NewBo Happier Hour, NewBo City Market, 5:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) READING: ‘BAND OF SHADOWS: THE SCARLET ONYX SAGA’

H.P. Waitt, Prairie Lights, Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free CINEMA SAVANT: CHARLES BURNETT

‘To Sleep With Anger,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $8.50-11 Homecoming: Reentry Summit Kickoff and Voting Rights Panel, St Andrew Presbyterian Church, Iowa City, 6 p.m., Free Iowa City Meditation Class: How To

the

DAISY

CLOTHING • GIFTS & DECOR Marion

319-249-1898 1105 8th Ave

New Bo

319-362-3615 208 12th Ave

Tu, Wed, Fri 11-5 Th 11-7 • Sat 11-4 ~ closed sunday & monday ~

www.shopthedaisy.com

Black Earth Gallery Art Consulting

Transform Your Life, Quaker Friends Meeting House, Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly) Line Dancing and Lessons, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) Novel Conversations, Coralville Public Library, 7 p.m., Free (3rd Thursday) Thursday Night Live Open Mic, Uptown Bill’s,

for businesses and personal homes, pop-up shows and public art events blackearthgallery.com @black_earth_gallery blackearthgallery@gmail.com If art isn’t important, then why does it have so much power?

Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly) Daddy-O, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly) READING: ‘THE PROBLEM OF THE MANY’

Timothy Donnelly, Prairie Lights, Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., Free INTIMATE PERFORMANCE WITH A LEGENDARY SONGWRITER

An Acoustic Evening with John Hiatt, Englert Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $49.50-69.50

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 29


EDITORS’ PICKS Live Jazz, Clinton Street Social Club, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free (1st & 3rd Thursdays) DALLAS DANCE-PUNK

Sub-Sahara w/ Good Morning Midnight, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free Karaoke Thursday, Studio 13, Iowa City, 8

WEDNESDAY, October 16

Branford Marsalis Quartet Sponsored by Tallgrass Business Resources + the African American Museum of Iowa

THURSDAY, OCTober 17

John Hiatt

p.m., Free (Weekly)

rhiannon giddens + francesco turrisi wednesday, October 30 8:00 pM Sponsored by Sankofa Outreach Connection

EVIDENTIAL MEDIUM

Cindy Kaza—Medium, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $20-22.50 SOULFUL FOLK

Anna Lilly w/ Justin K. Comer, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free

WEDNESDAY, OCTober 23

Marc Broussard

DJ Loomer Thirsty Thursday Dance Party, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly)

THURSDAY, October 24

Bianca Del Rio

Fri., Oct. 18

Presented by AEG

Homecoming: Reentry Summit, St Andrew Presbyterian Church, Iowa City, 8:30 a.m., Free-

Saturday, october 26

$10

Rocky Horror Picture Show Co-Presented by Comics in Action!

sunday, October 27

navigating your narrative

Co-Presented by FilmScene

thursday, October 31 9:30 aM

Alloy Orchestra: Speedy

A workshop by Englert Wavelength

thursday, november 7

The Talbott Brothers

ALL AGES DANCE PARTY

The Kid Fraze and Brad Varsity, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 5 p.m., $8 Opening Reception: Open Air, Gilded Pear Gallery, Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m., Free IOWA CITY DANCE FESTIVAL

On the Street: Free Performance, Ped Mall,

+ Dickie

Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free

Live at The Mill

Cider Sip & Shop, Czech Village/New Bohemia,

thursday, november 14

The Cinematic Orchestra

Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m., Free

Sponsored by Record Collector + The Maker's Loft Iowa City

FAC Dance Party, The Union, Iowa City, 7 p.m.

thursday, november 21

ACOUSTIC DUO

The Marcus King Band + Aaron Lee Tasjan

(Weekly)

Bob + Lovita, The Artisan’s Sanctuary, Marion,

witching hour november 1 - 2 A festival presented by The Englert + Little Village

7p.m., $10 IOWA CITY DANCE FESTIVAL

On the Screen: Iowa International ScreenDance Festival, FilmScene—Ped Mall, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $10 Orchestra Iowa Masterworks: Reflections, Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Coralville, 7:30p.m., $16-56

englert.org | 221 E. Washington St. | 319.688.2653


9:30 P.M., THE MILL

RECLAIMING YOUR STORY: CREATIVE TOOLS STORYTELLING WORKSHOP FOR THE APOCALYPSE

10:30 A.M., MERGE

1 P.M., MERGE

4:30 P.M., VENUE TBA

Downtown Iowa City

PRE-FESTIVAL COMEDY SHOWCASE

Nov. 1-2, 2019 WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30 5:30 P.M., VOXMAN RECITAL HALL

Nina is a curated performance of some of Nina Simone’s most poignant material. Nina’s music remains relevant today with everlooming racial tension between Black Americans and police, the politicization of immigration, and the general rhetoric from our nation’s capital. [PERFORMANCE]

counteRFeit madison, musician

I GOT LIFE, AND I GOT FREEDOM: EXPLORING PERSONAL & SOCIAL CHANGE THROUGH THE MUSIC OF NINA SIMONE

7 P.M., ENGLERT THEATRE

onny tax Through story circles, skillshares, and organizing strategies, this workshop will explore how to reach creatives from other walks of life than our own, exchange creative processes, and join forces for social transformation. [WORKSHOP]

s

BRIDGING DIVIDES TO MOBILIZE A CREATIVE FORCE

1 P.M., FILMSCENE @ THE CHAUNCEY

LYNCH: A HISTORY david shields, wRiteR & F

[SCREENING] [DISCUSSION]

ilmmaKeR Lynch: A History is a kaleidoscopic look at NFL star Marshawn Lynch and his use of silence as a form of protest. The film is a powerful political parable about the American media-sports complex and its deep complicity with racial oppression. A screening of the movie will be followed by a conversation and Q&A with director David Shields. 3 P.M., ENGLERT THEATRE

CHALLENGES, OPPORTUNITIES, AND PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BRuce haRReld, daniel clay, monseRRat Fuentes, and lauRen lessinG, univeRsity oF iowa senioR l

eadeRship Leaders of the UI will discuss the strategic priorities and challenges of the university which will beget a promising

j

BeatRice thomas, aRts ecosystem i ,p

Betsy RippentRop, yoGa instRuctoR & saRah dRiscoll, aRtist and yoGa i

ALL BODIES BELONG: POSITIVE ACCEPTANCE OF OUR PHYSICAL SELVES

11:45 A.M., IOWA CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY

[WORKSHOP]

1 or 2 at 7:30. Space is limited.

Megan’s play, FEAST at Riverside Theatre on Nov.

G

m

[PERFORMANCE]

aRish sinGh, cameRon Gillette, and meRedith Kachel, comedians

CREATIVE MATTERS LECTURE SERIES Rachel GRimes, musician & composeR

10 P.M., GABE’S

OBNOX, MUSICIAN

Cleveland’s Obnox is a modern day punk legend. While he spent time playing in several bands in the ’90s, it’s the years since the turn of the decade that has seen Lamont “Bim” Thomas releasing forward thinking punk music at a furious rate, with eight albums and countless EPs and singles.

[PRESENTATION] [DISCUSSION]

nstRuctoR A discussion about achieving true acceptance of our bodies and the bodies of others. A presentation of the All Bodies Belong photography exhibit will be shown in conjunction with this session. The exhibit showcases images and stories of body diversity within a yoga practice. This event is free and open to the public. [PERFORMANCE]

SATURDAY, NOV. 2

presentation grounds magic in

daniel Boscaljon, wRiteR This

PRACTICAL MAGIC: TRANSFORMING REALITY

11:45 A.M., MERGE

10 A.M., ENGLERT THEATRE

DIMENSIONS, YOGA + SOUND + VISUAL

A new multimedia project wherein musicians Nicholas Naioti (Fairfield) and Ryan Stier (Des Moines) will partner

nnovatoR This workshop presents an opportunity to dig into the creative planning tools for the apocalypse. The process will include personal reflection through writing and sharing. [WORKSHOP]

eGan oGeRty laywRiGht Telling the truth is a radical act. In this hands-on workshop, would-be storytellers will learn techniques and strategies to shape personal experiences into universal revelations. Witching Hour passholders will also be invited to a complimentary showing of

In this Creative Matters event, Rachel Grimes will discuss her creative process for The Way Forth, share clips from the film, and play musical excerpts on the piano. A Q&A session will follow her presentation. The event is free and open to the public. [PRESENTATION] [DISCUSSION] THURSDAY, OCT. 31 12 P.M., UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LIBRARIES, IOWA WOMEN’S ARCHIVES, MAIN LIBRARY

&c

RACHEL GRIMES m usician omposeR Rachel Grimes will discuss how women’s historical documents inspired her latest multimedia composition, The Way Forth. Iowa Women’s Archive librarian, Anna Tunnicliff, and Stanley Museum of Art curator, Vero Smith, will facilitate this conversation about creative expression and archival sources. This event is free and open to the public. [DISCUSSION]

FRIDAY, NOV. 1 4 P.M., UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LIBRARIES, MAIN LIBRARY GALLERY

BOTTOMS UP AND THE


Ignite Your

discussing the creative process, and presenting new work

A festival exploring the unknown,

Present

+


Nov. 1-2, 2019

$55/two-day $35/one-day $20/student two-day

witchinghourfestival.com

Passes on sale now

Downtown Iowa City

a e r C y t i v i t


h

,a

DEVIL LAUGHS: NOTES ON THE AMERICAN SURVEILLANCE STATE

K

eRRy owley uthoR Kerry Howley will read from her forthcoming book about the American surveillance state, Bottom’s Up and The Devil Laughs. [READING] [DISCUSSION] 6 P.M., ENGLERT THEATRE

FROM IMPOSSIBLE TO INEVITABLE: HOW CLIMATE ACTION IS MAINSTREAMED GLOBALLY maRcelo mena, scientist and p F

olitical iGuRe Currently serving as the World Bank’s climate advisor to the CEO, Marcelo Mena will share his process for understanding a problem and how to address it, speaking as a scientist, a political figure, and a cultural leader. [PRESENTATION]

8:30 P.M., ENGLERT THEATRE

THE WAY FORTH Rachel GRimes, musician and c

[PERFORMANCE]

omposeR The new folk opera and film from Rachel Grimes, encompasses lush layers of voices and orchestrations in an experiential, non-linear investigation highlighting perspectives of Kentucky women from 1775 to today.

Thanks to our Sponsors and Partners

with local yoga instructors and provide live ambient music to projected visual meditations for a unique yoga experience. [PERFORMANCE] 10 A.M., IOWA CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY

LOWERCASE LIBRARY / COMMUNITY PRINT STUDIO The Iowa City Press Co-Op will host a community screen printing session that will result in a member-designed poster and takeaway in support of the Stanley Museum of Art exhibition Pollinators. Lowercase library will be present with a selection of zines and alt. publications with themes stemming Rachel Grimes’ The Way Forth and the UI Stanley Museum of Art’s exhibition Pollinators. 10:30 A.M., IOWA CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY

CREATIVE TOOLS FOR THE APOCALYPSE

BeatRice thomas, aRts ecosystem i nnovatoR The winds of change are blowing and some would say we are already going through the apocalypse. Through personal narrative, Beatrice will share how she uses three creative tools to make artistic, personal, and professional decisions. This event is free and open to the public.

[PRESENTATION]

everyday human thinking (no supernatural entities required) identifying the role attention, intuition, and intention play in secular magic; discusses exercises that develop these skills; and concludes by describing how these skills help in everyday life, creative pursuits, and political change. [PRESENTATION] [WORKSHOP] 11:45 A.M., ENGLERT THEATRE

FOOLS MAG EXHIBIT & READING

Fools maGazine contRiButoRs, w RiteRs Members will introduce visual and literary art that is inspired by other works being presented at Witching Hour, as well as the larger festival themes. The Englert Theatre gallery space on the second floor will display this visual work, and the literary work will be read onstage. [READING]

1 P.M., PRAIRIE LIGHTS

MY TIME AMONG THE WHITES

jennine capo cRucet, wRiteR

[DISCUSSION]

In her sharp and candid collection of essays, My Time Among the Whites, critically acclaimed writer and first-generation American Jennine Capó Crucet explores the condition of finding herself a stranger in the country where she was born. [READING]

[PRESENTATION] [DISCUSSION]

future for our students, our community, our state, our nation, and world. This event is free and open to the public.

4:30 P.M., PUBLIC SPACE ONE

THE MIRROR / THE REAPING

chRistopheR Rasheem-mcmillan, d

anceR This work will use formality, abstraction, and chance procedures as a conduit in which to explore and interrogate white supremacy. The installation’s scenography will be sourced from interviews with a white supremacist, viral videos of college fraternities chanting racist epithets and common stereotypes of people of color. [PERFORMANCE] 4:30 P.M., VENUE TBA

tBa

WRITERS OF COLOR READING SERIES

w

The Writers of RiteRs Color Reading Series is an ongoing event that celebrates undergraduate, graduate, and local writers in the Iowa City community. Co-founded by T. Geronimo Johnson and Andre Perry in 2015, the series seeks to ensure that local literary voices from across the spectrum have a community and a time and place to be heard. The Witching Hour 2019 installment of the series will feature Jennine Capó-Crucet and a collection of local writers. [READING]

GET PASSES

9:30 P.M., ENGLERT THEATRE

JULIO TORRES

c

[PERFORMANCE]

omedian Julio Torres gained fame starring in HBO’s Los Espookys alongside Fred Armisen and writing for Saturday Night Live. In his recently released HBO comedy special, My Favorite Things, Julio examines seemingly ordinary objects with hilarity in what the Los Angeles Times calls “defiantly unique comedy”.

10:30 P.M., GABE’S

CARRIER WAVES

limit inFRaRed, musician & anGelia mahaney, choReoGRapheR & visual d

[PERFORMANCE]

esiGneR Carrier Waves is a collaboration combining live electronics, dance, and live video projection to explore our understanding of physical bodies in digital mediums.

10:30 P.M., GABE’S

SHREDDERS

m

[PERFORMANCE]

usician Shredders features rappers POS and Sims and beat-makers Paper Tiger and Lazerbeak from the Minneapolis rap collective Doomtree. Their work has been described as “Run the Jewels’ aggressive production blended with Major Lazer’s dance floor beats”. The group recently released their sophomore album, Great Hits.

TWO-DAY PASS: $55 / STUDENTS: $20 ONE-DAY PASS: $35 / INDIVIDUAL TICKETS TO SELECT EVENTS AVAILABLE. PURCHASE PASSES AT THE ENGLERT BOX OFFICE: 221 E. WASHINGTON STREET, IOWA CITY OR ONLINE AT WITCHINGHOURFESTIVAL.COM

media sponsors


LITTLEVILLAGE MAG.COM/CALENDAR

TOP PICKS: QUAD CITIES

OCT. 16– NOV. 5, 2019

AREA HAUNTS SLW

Campus Activities Board Presents: Haunted House Iowa Memorial Union, Iowa City, Saturday, Oct. 26, 9 p.m., Free Circle of Ash 201 Central City Rd, Central City Open Friday-Saturday through Nov. 2, as well as Sunday, Oct. 27 and Thursday, Oct. 31. Hours: 8 p.m.-12 a.m. FridaySaturday, 8 p.m.-10 p.m. Sunday and Thursday; Cost: $25, Friday and Saturday, $22. Sunday and Thursday for three atChris Monaghan

tractions (Circle of Ash, Pandemonium, Frightmare Forest) or $37 to skip the lines; $15 for Cursed Escape Room (Oct. 18-31 only)

Writing Your Life in Very Short Bursts— Prose Workshop, Midwest Writing Center, Rock Island, Saturday, Oct. 19, 2 p.m., Free-$20 This event is run by Misty Urban,

author of short fiction collections A Lesson in Manners and The Necessaries. She’s a recipient of the Midwest Writing Center’s award for Outstanding Literary Arts Educator. It’s free for high school and college students, $15 for MWC members and $20 for the general public. The workshop focuses on the skills needed for micro-fiction and applies them to memoir for a chance to tell your own story in a circumscribed fashion.

Toronzo Cannon w/ the Candymakers, River Music Experience, Davenport, Thursday, Oct. 24, 8 p.m., $12-50 The pinnacle Chicago blues expe-

rience invades the Redstone Room at River Music Experience. South Side guitarist Toronzo Cannon is a nine-time veteran of the Chicago Blues Festival, headlining the event in 2015. He’s touring in support of his September release, The Preacher, The Politician Or The Pimp. He’s a Chicago Transit Authority bus driver during the day, pulling that wealth of human experience into his fiery, astute, sometimes political music.

Field of Screams, 2991 Black Diamond Rd SW, Iowa City Kiwanis of North Liberty is taking over the annual Field of Screams haunted corn maze fundraiser. The attraction is $10 per person (cash only); dates are Friday and Saturday, Oct. 18-26 at 7:30 p.m. each night. The Haunted Garage 6914 Terrazzo Dr NW, Cedar Rapids Open Friday-Saturday, Oct. 25-26 and Thursday, Oct. 31. Hours: 6:30-10 p.m. Cost: Free Nevermoor: The 5th Realm 4444 1st St NE, Suite 3001, Cedar Rapids Open

Miranda Lambert: Roadside Bars and Pink Guitars Tour, TaxSlayer Center, Moline, Illinois, Thursday, Oct. 24, 7 p.m., $29.7593.75 Everything about Miranda Lambert—

from her Texas roots to her twangy, buoyant voice—is country music personified, and hits like “Gunpowder and Lead,” “It All Comes Out in the Wash” and “Tin Man” are modern country classics. The two-time Grammy winner and recipient of more than 50 country music awards will bring her Roadside Bars and Pink Guitars tour to the Quad Cities on Oct. 24, joined by bluesy country-rock artist Elle King (most famous for the break-up banger “Ex’s & Oh’s” and anthemic “America’s Sweetheart”). Dress to the Nashville nines, take a shot of tequila and prepare for a night of boot-tapping power tunes.

Mystery Science Theater 3000 Live!, Adler Theatre, Davenport, Sunday, Nov. 3, 6 p.m., $33-68 MST3K originator

Joel Hodgson is taking his final tour as Joel Robinson, to host the Great Cheesy Movie Circus Tour with pals Tom Servo, Crow and Gypsy. This all-new follow-up to last year’s 30th Anniversary Tour is slated to be Hodgson’s last, making it a can’t-miss for fans of hilarious riffing on B-movies and this classic series that pioneered it as a formal art. Superfans can happily hit the event on Oct. 30 in Des Moines as well as this one, as that show will feature the film Circus of Horrors (1960) while the Davenport stop will screen 1986’s No Retreat, No Surrender.

Thursday-Sunday through Nov. 2. Hours: 7 p.m.-12 a.m. Friday-Saturday, 7-10 p.m. Thursday and Sunday; Cost: $25 for three haunts (223 Maple Street, Fractured Mind, Awakening) Scream Acres Scream Park 3260 69th St, Atkins Open Friday and Saturday through Oct. 26. Hours: 6:30-10:30 p.m. Cost: $20.95 in advance, $23.95 at the gate for two attractions; $33.95 in advance, $36.95 at the gate for the four-haunt pass (Cell Block Z, Haunted Cornfield, The Slaughterhouse, 3-D Sinister Silo) or $43.95 in advance, $46.95 at the gate for a VIP pass to all four. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 35


CULTURE >> Prairie Pop: Cont. from pg. 23 haven’t actually traveled that far from the moment that prompted Simone to sing, in 1964, “Alabama’s gotten me so upset / Tennessee made me lose my rest / And everybody knows about Mississippi, goddamn.” During a performance at the 2018 Mission Creek Festival, Counterfeit Madison floored the audience at The Mill, which went bonkers for this largely unknown opening act. Everyone loudly demanded an encore until the schedule-conscious festival organizers finally relented, lowered the house lights and let the group play one more spectacular song. Udoh attributes her performance style in part to her time witnessing those Pentecostal flights of religious ecstasy as a kid. And while her set of Simone songs is more on the subdued side of the performative spectrum, it’s still charged with emotion and electricity. “With these shows,” Udoh explained, “I decided to keep my own voice, the way I usually sing, but I wanted to channel her piano style.” For Witching Hour, she plans to play “Young, Gifted and Black,” along with “Ain’t Got No, I Got Life,” “Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair” and other songs that, Udoh said, have the power to heal and spark social change. “America is gripped by fear, by racial fear,” she said. “And I truly believe that we cannot move past this without a very personal, individual revolution of the mind. Nina showed us how this can be done, and her music is more alive now than ever.” Kembrew McLeod highly recommends Nina Simone’s RCA records, released between 1967 to 1972, though there are plenty of other great places to start.


EDITORS’ PICKS OPENING NIGHT! RUNS THROUGH 10/26

Latin Night w/ FUZE, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m.,

The Odd Couple, RHCRTheatre, Cedar Rapids, 7:30

$5-10 (Weekly)

p.m., $16-19 SoulShake, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly) OPENING NIGHT! RUNS THROUGH 11/3

Dracula, Theatre Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $12-27

PROGRESSIVE BLUEGRASS

Still Shine w/ Twisted Roots, Rubbur, Gabe’s, Iowa The Harp Twins, The Famous Mockingbird, Marion,

City, 10 p.m., $10

8 p.m., $20 Sasha Belle Presents: Friday Night Drag & ALL-NIGHT HORROR MARATHON

Dance Party, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., $5

FilmScream, FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 8

(Weekly)

p.m., $20-35 TEXAS COUNTRY

Sat, Oct. 19

Josh Ward w/ Randall King, First Ave Club, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15-110

Iowa City Saturday Farmers Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 7:30 a.m. (Weekly)

ALSO OCT 19

April Macie, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar Rapids,

Guest Vendor Market, NewBo City Market, Cedar

8 p.m., $15-18

Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly)

BRAZILLIAN JAZZ

Family Storytime, Iowa City Public Library, 10:30

Choro Moingona, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m.,

a.m., Free (Weekly)

Free IOWA DANCE FESTIVAL

COMING UP AT

CSPS HALL

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PIETA BROWN W/ ALPHA CONSUMER NOV 9TH 8PM

RADOSLAV LORKOVIC NOV 22ND 8PM

TIX AVAILABLE AT LEGIONARTS.ORG

STEELY DAN TRIBUTE

On the Stage: Movement Workshop, Englert

The Fez, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City,

Theatre, Iowa City, 12 p.m., Free (pre-registration

8 p.m., $15-25

required)

GEORGIA SINGER-SONGWRITER

IOWA DANCE FESTIVAL

Logan Thomas, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $5-10

On the Stage: Master Dance Class, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 2 p.m., $5-10

MINNEAPOLIS INDIE FOLK

Greta Ruth w/ Jacqui Alpine, Trumpet Blossom,

8th Annual Bead Challenge Exhibit Opening

Iowa City, 8:30 p.m., $7

Reception, Beadology, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., Free

Floodwater’s Freshest Comics Contest 2019

Magic Square LLC Presents: The Fairy Tale

Finals, The Mill, Iowa City, 8:30 p.m., $7

Market, Groundswell, Cedar Rapids, 5:30 p.m., $8.75-17.50

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 37


EDITORS’ PICKS BLUES & FUNK

Funkdaddies, National Czech and Slovak Museum and Library, Cedar Rapids, 6 p.m., Free MINNESOTA COLLEGIATE SYMPHONY

St. Olaf Orchestra, Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Coralville, 7p.m., $10 (Free for students) IOWA DANCE FESTIVAL

On the Stage, On the Street, On the Screen Concert: 10 Interdisciplinary Performances, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $5-15 NASHVILLE SONGWRITER

Mark Burke, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10-20 TCHAIKOVSKY’S BLARING BRASSES

Reflections: Orchestra Iowa Masterworks, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $16-56 Bawdy Bawdy Ha Ha Presents: Macabaret Halloween Burlesque!, Johnson County Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10-25 SOULFUL BLUES VOCAL POWERHOUSE

Matt Andersen, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 8p.m., $16-19 PARTY HIP-HOP

Afroman, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $20 JAZZ

Saul Lubaroff Trio, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free LOCAL POWER-POP RELEASE SHOW

Sugar Shield Album Release Party, Trumpet Blossom, Iowa City, 8:30 p.m., $7

    

    

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TOP PICKS: DES MOINES

OCT. 16– NOV. 5, 2019

TsuShiMaMiRe w/ Pleasants, Art Monk, Vaudeville Mews, Oct. 23, 6:30 p.m., $810 As a band, Pleasants has been incubating

for some time now through its three players solo monikers: Goatfoam, Huxley Maxwell and Zap Tura. You can hear the individual influences in the cascading layers of the band’s particular blend of psychedelic pop. For every segment of structured songwriting, there’s an equal amount of sonic experimentation woven into the textures of the transitions between them. And then they throw in a healthy dose of reverb, for good measure. We’re still waiting on that debut album, so the live iteration will have to suffice in the meantime.

The Lantern Cinema Presents: Classic Halloween Horror, Vaudeville Mews, Oct. 30, 5 p.m., $10 Bold and well-curated

as ever, Lantern Cinema is showing a triple-decker of black-and-white horror classics in honor of this year’s All Hallow’s Eve. Featured films include The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari, Night Tide and Night of the Living Dead. Here is a list of things one can expect at the show: a madman, a mermaid, costumed attendees, hypnotism, cheap alcohol, a horde of brain-eating zombies, popcorn, potent social commentary and nearly five hours of classic horror gold with pre-movie talks by a few local film geeks. Oh, and Milk Duds. Can’t forget the Milk Duds.

LVVMAKING’s Halloween Freakout ft. Goatfoam, XBk Live, Oct. 31, 8 p.m., $710 Fresh off the release of a new album, a

live performance on IPR’s Studio One and their booking in the lineup of this year’s newly revived Gross Domestic Product music festival, 2019 is turning out to be

LVVMAKING’s year. The band, never ones to stray away from an opportunity to throw a massive, costumed extravaganza, is breaking in the fresh paint of Des Moines’ newest venue, XBk Live, on Halloween this year. They’re sure to bring their usual stock of electro-laden pop experiments and Of Montreal-esque shenanigans, which tend to be pretty well suited to the costumes and stage props expected at a Halloween blowout. Misfits Karaoke, Vaudeville Mews, Nov. 2, 10 p.m., $5 Perhaps one of the lon-

gest-running and certainly one of the best of Des Moines’ Halloween traditions, Misfits Karaoke returns once again to the Vaudeville Mews. This year will feature the NY hardcore of Raybeez and an Alkaline Trio tribute by All On Black, followed by live band karaoke slamming through all of your favorite Misfits hits. You’ll find me in full devilock, fumbling to remember all the lyrics of “Where Eagles Dare.” Costumes are encouraged, of course. Reggie’s Sleepout Homelessness Fundraiser, Drake Stadium, Nov. 2, Overnight, $25 In 2001, the body of a

young man named Reggie Kelsey was pulled from the Des Moines River after he had spent years of moving between foster homes and homeless communities around the city. His story is a sad one, but his legacy lives on in the form of an annual fundraiser hosted by the Iowa Homeless Youth Center. The event opens up the Drake Stadium field to members of the public for an overnight campout to raise awareness and funds to combat homelessness in our communities. —Trey Reis


EDITORS’ PICKS FOR ALL YOUR

DIGITAL PRINTING

Elation Dance Party, Studio 13, Iowa

HALLOWEEN FAMILY FUN +

City, 9 p.m., $5 (Weekly)

ADOPTABLE ANIMALS

Wag-O-Ween, Big Grove Brewery, DJ Loomer Homecoming After

Iowa City, 1p.m., Free

Party, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5-10

LOCAL BEER TASTING

Vuetober Fest, Vue Rooftop, 1p.m., $15

THIS WEEK: ‘BLOOD SIMPLE’

Bijou After Hours, FilmScene—

DESIGN NEEDS

Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free-$7

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE

(Weekly)

ALSO 10/21, 8 P.M.

‘Fleabag,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 2 p.m., $15-18

Sun., Oct. 20

Sunday Funday, Iowa City Public Hiawatha Farmers Market,

Library, Iowa City, 2 p.m., Free

Guthridge Park, Hiawatha, 10 a.m.

(Weekly)

(Weekly)

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CIty, 4 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Market, Cedar Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly) HomeBrewed Benefit Concert THIS MONTH: JOHN MCGLINN

for Strengthen Grow Evolve, The

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Mill, Iowa City, 4:30 p.m., suggested

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LITTLEVILLAGE MAG.COM/CALENDAR IWP Cinematheque, FilmScene—

Open Mic, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

Ped Mall, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Free (Weekly)

‘MIDNIGHT FAMILY’

NYC METAL

Vino Vérité, FilmScene—Chauncey,

Burgerkill w/ Suaka, Gabe’s, Iowa

Iowa City, 7 p.m., $20-25

City, 7 p.m., Free

INDEPENDENT & UNDERGROUND

READING: ‘BRIDGE OF CLAY’

HIP-HOP

Markus Zusak, Iowa City Public

Freakshow Showcase Networking

Library, 7 p.m., Free

Festival, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 7:30 Comedy Open Mic with Spencer

p.m., $10

& Dan, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., FINAL PERFORMANCE

Free (Weekly)

Drac’s Back, Giving Tree Theater, Say Anything Karaoke, Gabe’s, Iowa

Marion, 8 p.m., $16

City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly) Pub Quiz, The Mill, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $1 (Weekly)

Tue., Oct. 22

Mon., Oct. 21

‘BRIEF STORY FROM A GREEN PLANET’

THIS MONTH: ‘LIZZIE’

Bijou Horizons, FilmScene—

Pride at FilmScene, FilmScene—Ped

Chauncey, Iowa City, 6 p.m., Free-$7

Mall, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $7-10.50

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EDITORS’ PICKS Blues Jam, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar Rapids,

Karaoke Tuesdays, The Mill, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m.,

ILLINOIS HIP HOP

7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Free (Weekly)

Futuristic w/ Yonas, Scribe Cash, FOE Savo, Benny The Jet, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $17

Weekly Old-Timey Jam Sessions, Trumpet Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Wed., Oct. 23

JAPANESE DANCE TROUPE

THIS WEEK: DEMYSTIFYING MEDIA STRATEGY

Sankai Juku, Hancher Auditorium, Iowa City, 7:30

One Million Cups, NewBoCo, Cedar Rapids, 8:15

TCHAIKOVSKY’S TIMELESS CLASSIC

p.m., $10-50

a.m., Free (Weekly)

Russian Ballet Theatre Presents ‘Swan Lake,’

CLASSIC ROCK AND ROLL

One Million Cups, Merge, Iowa City, 9 a.m., Free

HOLOGRAM TOUR

(Weekly)

READING: ‘A COSMOLOGY OF MONSTERS’

Shaun Hamill, Prairie Lights, Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., Free

Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $32-88 TULSA SONGWRITER

Roy Orbison and Buddy Holly: The Rock ‘N’

Dead Coast Presents: John Calvin Abney,

Roll Dream Tour, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids,

Burlington Street Bluegrass Band, The Mill, Iowa

7:30 p.m., $35-55

City, 6 p.m., $5 (2nd & 4th Wednesdays)

ROTTEN ROLL FROM VERMONT

BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAIN BLUEGRASS

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, FilmScene—

Swimmer, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free

The Steel Wheels, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids,

Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $4 (Weekly)

Trumpet Blossom, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7-10 THIS WEEK: ‘THE WISHMASTER’

7p.m., $17-21 Dance Party with DJ Jamaican Daddy, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Thu., Oct. 24

LOUISIANA SOUL & BLUES

Marc Broussard w/ James Tutson and the Comedy & Karaoke, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m.,

Rollback, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7p.m., $15-

OPENING PERFORMANCE! RUNS THROUGH 11/10

Free (Weekly)

28.50

‘The Unexpected Guest,’ Old Creamery Theatre, Amana, 2 p.m., $12-32.50

Younger NIGHT MILK

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Brian Johannesen

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BStar LittleVillageMag.com/BStar

AVAILABLE NOW 42 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

LITTLE VILLAGE HQ

623 S DUBUQUE ST, IOWA CITY

RECORD COLLECTOR 116 S LINN ST, IOWA CITY

THE MAKERS LOFT

125 S DUBUQUE ST, IOWA CITY


LITTLE VILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR CINEMA SAVANT: CHARLES BURNETT

‘My Brother’s Wedding,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $8.50-11

TOP PICKS: WATERLOO/CEDAR FALLS OCT. 16–NOV. 5, 2019

READING: ‘A CERTAIN ARC’

David Hamilton, Prairie Lights, Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., Free GUITAR VIRTUOSO

Adrian Legg, The Mill, Iowa City, 8p.m., $20-25 RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE STAR

Bianca Del Rio, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $39.50-199 LOS ANGELES DUBSTEP Via the artist’s website

Champagne Drip and Luzcid w/ TVBOO, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15-18

Fri., Oct. 25 Fall Shop Crawl, Downtown Iowa City, 5 p.m., $15

Gimme Shelter—Benefit for Hospitality House!, Spicoli’s Reverb, Waterloo, Friday, Oct. 18, 6 p.m., $7 suggested donation Iowa bands Above Ground and

Artificial Motive provide the sonic trappings for this fundraiser, which also includes a 50/50 raffle and encourages donations of canned food and cleaning supplies. Hospitality House is a volunteer-run, interfaith initiative celebrating a decade this December of offering daytime shelter (open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily) to the homeless of the Cedar Valley, including showers, food and coffee, computer and telephone access, clothing and more. Queer College Conference 2019, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Friday-Saturday, Oct. 25-26, $50-100

This is the second year of the Queer College Conference from Iowa Safe Schools, an org founded in 2002 to foster safe, supportive learning environments for Iowa LGBTQ youth. It bills itself as “the only conference of its kind dedicated to addressing the barriers and adverse conditions facing LGBTQ college students and their faculty/staff advocates.” More than 30 colleges are expected to have representation at the event, which features workshops (both expert- and peer-led) and Drag-A-Ganza, an all-student opening night drag show. UNI Proud are this year’s co-hosts. Cost to attend is $50 for students, $100 for faculty/staff, community members and family members.

Horror in the Valley Film Festival, Grout Museum District, Waterloo, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 6 p.m., Free (donations accepted) This first-ever Cedar Valley horror

film fest offers three hours of bone-chilling excitement exclusively from Iowa-based production teams. Six films will be screened over the course of the evening, which also includes a costume contest sponsored by Heart of Darkness haunted attraction and an opportunity to meet the filmmakers. Films include The Girl In the Photograph, Play Dead, Nocturnal, A Talk With the Devil, The Woe Land Saga, Chapter 1: ingrID and Sunday Morning Meeting. All donations at admission will be split between the production teams.

Melissa Etheridge—The Medicine Show Tour, Gallagher Bluedorn Performing Arts Center, Cedar Falls, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 7 p.m., $45.25-182.50

In the 30+ years since her self-titled debut dropped, Melissa Etheridge has released a total of 14 studio albums (five of them platinum). Her latest, The Medicine Show, came out in April. Her 1993 and 1995 Grammys combine with her 2007 Oscar (for “I Need to Wake Up,” on the soundtrack for An Inconvenient Truth) to put her halfway to an EGOT. Though the country music that kicked off her career is ever-present in her tonality and her longing lyrics, her breakthrough was in rock and roll, and she embodies the quintessential rock singer-songwriter.

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 43


EDITORS’ PICKS PROGRESSIVE GROOVE METAL

Who Runs The World Burlesque, Theatre Cedar

IHEARIC

JINJER w/ The Browning, Sumo Cyco, Wildwood

Rapids, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $32-47

Project c4, Trumpet Blossom, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free

OPENING NIGHT! RUNS THROUGH 11/3

Sat., Oct. 26

Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $20-25 OPENING NIGHT! RUNS THROUGH 10/27

ICCT Presents: ‘Evil Dead, The Musical,’ Johnson

Young Footliters Presents: ‘Dear Edwina, Jr.,’

County Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $19-29

Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Coralville,

ALSO OCT 26

READING & CONVERSATION: ‘MOVE ON UP’

Aaron Cohen, Prairie Lights, Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., Free

7p.m., $13-19 Jimmy Pardo, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar CREATIVE MATTERS LECTURE

Rapids, 8 p.m., $18-20

Coppers & Brass, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 5 p.m.,

Anne Bogart, Hancher Auditorium, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

JAZZ

Free

Dave Thaker Quartet, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8

Czech Village New Bo 2019 Halloween Parade,

p.m., Free

Cedar Rapids, 6:30 p.m., Free

GEORGIA COUNTRY

’90S COUNTRY STAR

Jacob Bryant, First Ave Club, Iowa City, 8:30 p.m.,

Tracy Byrd w/ Boot Jack Band, First Ave Club,

$15-110

Iowa City, 8 p.m., $30-200

WISCONSIN BLUEGRASSY AMERICANA

Morbid Curiosities - An Evening with Edgar

Them Coulee Boys, Big Grove Brewery, 9p.m., Free

Allan Poe, Giving Tree Theater, Marion, 8 p.m., $11

FEAST, Riverside Theatre, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $30

HIGH ENERGY IOWA BRASS BAND

BLUES/JAZZ

ALSO OCT 26

BYOBrass w/ Willy’s Wacky Wiener Warehouse,

Bluetone Jazz Collective, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City,

Jacuzzi King, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $8

8 p.m., Free

Free ONE-NIGHT PERFORMANCE

SITI Company: ‘The Bacchae,’ Hancher Auditorium, 7:30 p.m., $10-45 LIVE FILM SCORE OF A CLASSIC

‘Wizard of Oz’ - Film w/ Orchestra, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $18-59 OPENING NIGHT! RUNS THROUGH 11/10

44 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273


LITTLEVILLAGE MAG.COM LOCAL COVER BANDS FOR A CAUSE

Halloween Cover Band RVAP Benefit, Trumpet Blossom, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10 GRATEFUL DEAD TRIBUTE

Winterland Halloween Show, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15-25 DANCE/ELECTRONIC

The Trifinity w/ Otto Von Schirach, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $17-20 BOOK OF 1,000 WHORES

Rebellion Burlesque, The Mill, Iowa City, 9:30p.m., $10-15 THIS WEEK: ‘AND THEN THERE WERE NONE’

Bijou After Hours, FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free-$7 (Weekly) ELECTRONIC JAM FUSION

Undercover Organism, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5

(WITH SPECIAL BONUS PERFORMANCE ON HALLOWEEN NIGHT!) BOOK NOW AT:

SPONSORED BY RYAN COMPANIES AND PART OF THE GRANDON SERIES


EDITORS’ PICKS SCREENING AND LIVE PERFORMANCE

READING: ‘FACTORY GIRLS’

WITH COMICS IN ACTION

Poet Arai Takako and Translator

Rocky Horror Picture Show, Englert

Jeffrey Angles, Prairie Lights, Iowa

Theatre, Iowa City, 11:50 p.m., $20-22

CIty, 7 p.m., Free

Sun., Oct. 27

“LUMBERCANA”

My Dog Junior, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free

Family Yoga with Twisted Yoga, Indian Creek Nature Center, Cedar Rapids, 1 p.m., $20-50

Tue., Oct. 29

PUMPKIN CARVING FOR A CAUSE

CHICAGOLAND SHORTS VOLUME 5

Carving For Hope, Big Grove

Bijou Film Forum, FilmScene—

Brewery, Iowa City, 1p.m., Free

Chauncey, Iowa City, 6 p.m., Free-$7

TEXAS HEAVY METAL

READING: ‘THE ADVENTURE OF THE

Texas Hippie Coalition, Wildwood

PECULIAR PROTOCOLS’

Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 5:30

Nicholas Meyer, Prairie Lights,

p.m., $20-25

Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., Free

WORLD-CLASS ILLUSIONISTS

CONNECTICUT HIP-HOP

Champions of Magic, Paramount

Chris Webby w/ Jarren Benton,

Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 6 p.m., $34-

Locksmith, Ekoh, Sam Maxfield,

124

Gabe’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $25

Emma Goldman Clinic Presents:

SOUNDS TO MAKES YOU FEEL

Trick or Trivia, The Mill, Iowa City, 7

DIFFERENT

p.m., $5-20

Free Weird Music 2, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free

IWP Cinematheque, FilmScene— Ped Mall, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Wed., Oct 30

SILENT FILM, LIVE SCORE

Alloy Orchestra Presents:

THIS WEEK:

‘Speedy,’ Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7

HIGHER LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES

p.m., $10-20

One Million Cups ICR, Hills Bank and Trust, North Liberty, 8 a.m., Free

OAD L N OW

D

PP THE A VER ISCO TO D RN

E T S A E A IOW NTS EVE

Y TED B CURA LAGE

L LE VI

LITT

LittleVillageMag.com/App

46 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273

EAST COAST SKA PUNK REGGAE

(Weekly)

Bumpin Uglies w/ Project 432, Rude Punch, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8

Creative Matters Lecture Series:

p.m., $12-15

Rachel Grimes, Voxman Recital Hall, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., Free

Mon., Oct. 28

GRAMMY WINNING FOLK AMERICANA

WEEK 1 OF 4: ‘THIS IS SPINAL TAP’

Rhiannon Giddens w/ Francesco

FilmScene 101: Fact or Fiction,

Turrisi, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 8

FilmScene—Ped Mall, Iowa City, 6

p.m., $36.50-56.50

p.m., $50-60/full course SOUTHERN GOTHIC AND CENTER FOR AFROFUTURIST STUDIES

SWAMPY HILLBILLY BLUES

& STANLEY MUSEUM PRESENT

Legendary Shack Shakers,

Black Curators’ Roundtable, Iowa

Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon,

City Public Library, 7 p.m., Free

Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15-20


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 47


REVIEW The view looking northwest over the Cedar River on the First Ave Bridge in Cedar Rapids

48 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273


EDITORS’ PICKS ZOMBIE EDITION

Underground Karaoke with Spencer, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly) Zeta June w/ 6 Odd Rats, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $10 THIS WEEK: ‘HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH’

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, FilmScene— Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $4 (Weekly)

Thurs., Oct 31 INCLUDES FREE WITCHING HOUR PASS!

Navigating Your Narrative Workshop, Merge, Iowa City, 9:30 a.m., $245-295 Rachel Grimes in Conversation with the Iowa Women’s Archives, University of Iowa Main Library, Iowa City, 12 p.m., Free CINEMA SAVANT: CHARLES BURNETT

‘Killer of Sheep,’ FilmScene—Chauncey, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $8.50-11 Halloween Monster Bash!, Artisan’s Sanctuary, Marion, 7 p.m., $10 Halloween Trivia Night, Big Grove Brewery, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free SAVE $ IN COSTUME!

Halloween Tribute Show, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7-10 REGGAE JAM BLUES ROCK

Aaron Kamm and the One Drops w/ Reggae Rapids, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $10 HALLOWEEN DANCE PARTY

DJ Loomer, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free

Fri., Nov 1 KERRY HOWLEY

WH: Bottoms Up and the Devil Laughs— Notes on the American Surveillance State, University of Iowa Main Library Gallery, Iowa City, 4 p.m., Free

Zak Neumann / Little Village

Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 49


EDITORS’ PICKS MARCELO MENA

RACHEL GRIMES

WH: From Impossible to

WH: ‘The Way Forth,’ Englert

Inevitable: How Climate Action

Theatre, 8:30 p.m., $10-55

is Mainstreamed Globally, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 6 p.m.,

WH: Comedy Showcase, The

Free-$55

Mill, Iowa City, 9:30 p.m., $5-55

ICONIC SHOWTUNES

WH: Obnox w/ Starry Nights,

An Evening with Jerome Kern,

Gabe’s, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $5-55

Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Coralville, 7:30 p.m., $17-22

Sat., Nov 2

OPENING NIGHT! RUNS THROUGH 11/17

WH: Lowercase Library /

The Dixie Swim Club, Giving Tree

Community Print Studio, Iowa

Theater, Marion, 8 p.m., $27

City Public Library, Iowa City, 10 a.m., Free

ALSO NOV 2

Sam Tallent, Penguin’s Comedy

WH: Dimensions: Yoga + Sound

Club, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $12-15

+ Visual, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 10 a.m., Free

TEXAS COUNTRY & WESTERN SWING

Mike and the Moonpies, First Ave Club, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $12-100


LITTLEVILLAGE MAG.COM/CALENDAR BEATRICE THOMAS

WH: Creative Tools for the

WH: Creative Tools for the

Apocalypse—Workshop, Merge,

Apocalypse—Presentation, Iowa

Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free

City Public Library, Iowa City, 10:30 a.m., Free

DAVID SHIELDS

WH: ‘Lynch: A History,’ WH: Reclaiming Your Story:

FilmScene—Chauncey, 1 p.m.,

Storytelling Workshop, Merge,

$10-55

Iowa City, 10:30 a.m., Free UI LEADERS IN CONVERSATION

WH: Practical Magic:

WH: Challenges, Opportunities,

Transforming Reality, Merge, Iowa

and Planning for the Future at

CIty, 11:45 a.m., Free

the University of Iowa, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 3 p.m., Free

WH: All Bodies Belong: Positive Acceptance of Our Physical

SOUL JAZZ

Selves, Iowa City Public Library,

The MFK Trio featuring Annie

Iowa City, 11:45 a.m., Free

Kemble w/ Ross Clowser, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 4 p.m., $5

WH: Fools Mag Exhibit and Reading, Englert Theatre, Iowa City,

WH: The Mirror / The Reaping,

11:45 a.m., Free

Public Space One, Iowa City, 4:30 p.m., Free

JENNINE CAPÓ CRUCET

WH: My Time Among The

WH: Writers of Color Reading

Whites, Prairie Lights, Iowa City, 1

Series, Venue TBA, Iowa City, 4:30

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EDITORS’ PICKS WH: Bridging Divides to Mobilize a Creative Force, Venue TBA, Iowa City, 4:30 p.m., Free ADVENTURESOME JAZZ

Tomeka Reid Quartet, Hancher Auditorium, Iowa City, 6:30 & 9 p.m., $10-25 WH: Counterfeit Madison: ‘I Got Life, And I Got Freedom,’ Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $5-55 CINEMA SAVANT: CHARLES BURNETT

Award Ceremony and Reception, FilmScene— Chauncey, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $10-75 THROWBACK EARWORMS

Boy Band Review, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $29.50 KCCK HOMECOMING

Chad Eby w/ Ariel Pocock, Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Coralville, 7:30 p.m., $17-47 Villains Dance Party, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $12-20 WH: Julio Torres, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 9:30 p.m., $10-55 WH: Shredders w/ Carrier Waves, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., $10-15

Sun., Nov 3 A CAPELLA PHENOMENON

Straight No Chaser, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 7:00 p.m., $39.50-59.50

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LITTLEVILLAGE MAG.COM IWP Cinematheque, FilmScene—Ped Mall, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free ONE-MAN BAND

That 1 Guy, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15 HICK-HOP

Bubba Sparxx and Alexander King, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $18-35

Mon., Nov 4 THIS MONTH: ‘A BIGGER SPLASH’

Pride at FilmScene, FilmScene—Ped Mall, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $7-10.50 WEEK 2 OF 4: ‘STORIES WE TELL’

FilmScene 101: Fact or Fiction, FilmScene— Ped Mall, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $50-60/full course READING: ‘THE TRAVELERS’

Regina Porter, Prairie Lights, Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., Free

FOR CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY: THE COLLECTION OF THE GRINNELL COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART

Tues., Nov 5 MINNEAPOLIS FOLK BLUES

Jack Klatt w/ Brian Johannesen, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $16-19 READING: ‘ORDINARY GIRLS’

Jaquira Diaz, Prairie Lights, Iowa CIty, 7 p.m., Free

August 23 to December 14, 2019 The Grinnell College Museum of Art collection contains over 5,000 objects from antiquity to the present day. This fall, the Museum celebrates its 20th anniversary with an exhibition of a diverse and ever-growing collection spanning both the centuries and the globe. Free and open Monday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. grinnell.edu/museum


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126 LOUNGE (41) ALMOST FAMOUS POPCORN COMPANY (11) BAO CHOW (28) BIOTEST (8) BREAD GARDEN MARKET (43) CAFE DODICI (39) CEDAR RAPIDS NEW BOHEMIA / CZECH VILLAGE (29) - RAYGUN - THE DAISY - PARLOR CITY PUB & EATERY - BLACK EARTH GALLERY - GOLDFINCH CYCLERY - MAD MODERN CHOMP! (21) CITY OF IOWA CITY (9) CROWDED CLOSET (40) CSPS HALL (37) THE DANDY LION (36) DODGE STREET COFFEEHOUSE (37) THE ENGLERT THEATRE (34) FILMSCENE (58) THE GAZETTE (19, 26) GRINNELL COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART (53) HANCHER AUDITORIUM (2-6) IOWA BREWING COMPANY (53) IOWA CITY DOWNTOWN (56-57) - DONNELLY’S PUB - THE KONNEXION - THE MILL - IOWA CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY - THE CONVENIENCE STORE - RELEASE - BREAD GARDEN MARKET - RECORD COLLECTOR - TEN THOUSAND VILLAGES - YOTOPIA - WHITE RABBIT - CRITICAL HIT GAMES IOWA CITY NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE (54-55) - OASIS FALAFEL - BLUEBIRD - JOHN’S GROCERY - ARTIFACTS - DODGE ST. TIRE - HAMBURG INN NO. 2 - R.S.V.P. - WILLOW & STOCK

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ASTROLOGY

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Get 10% off when you mention Little Village

BY ROB BREZSNEY

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Inventor Buckminster Fuller (1895–1983) was a visionary genius in numerous fields, including architecture, design, engineering and futurism. In the course of earning 40 honorary doctorates, he traveled widely. It was his custom to wear three watches, each set to a different time: one to the zone where he currently was, another to where he had recently departed and a third to where he would journey next. “I know that I am not a category,” he wrote. “I am not a thing—a noun. I seem to be a verb.” I recommend his approach to you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Be a verb! Allow your identity to be fluid, your plans adjustable, your ideas subject to constant revision. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Art is good for my soul precisely because it reminds me that we have souls in the first place,” said actress Tilda Swinton. How about you, Sagittarius? What reminds you that you have a soul in the first place? Beloved animals? Favorite music? A stroll amidst natural wonders? Unpredictable, fascinating sexual experiences? The vivid and mysterious dreams you have at night? Whatever stimuli bring you into visceral communion with your soul, I urge you to seek them out in abundance. It’s Soul-Cherishing and Soul-Enhancing Time for you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The coming weeks will be a favorable time to arrange a series of high-level meetings between your body, mind and soul. You might even consider staging an extravagant conference-like festival and festival-like conference. The astrological omens suggest that your body, mind and soul are now primed to reveal choice secrets and tips to each other. They are all more willing and eager than usual to come up with productive new synergies that will enable each to function with more panache and effectiveness. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I believe in inhabiting contradictions,” writes Aquarian author and activist Angela Davis. “I believe in making contradictions productive, not in having to choose one side or the other side. As opposed to choosing either or choosing both.” I think Davis’s approach will work well for you in the coming weeks. It’s not just that the contradictions will be tolerable; they will be downright fertile, generous and beneficent. So welcome them; honor them; allow them to bless you with their tricky opportunities and unexpected solutions.

Magic the Gathering. Video Games. Warhammer. Warmachine. RPGs. Board Games. X-Wing. Dice. LotR. HeroClix. Miniatures. GoT. Blood Bowl. L5R. Pokemon. Yu-Gi-Oh. Kidrobot Vinyl. Retro toys. Pop vinyl & plushies. Gaming & collectible supplies. Huge Magic singles inventory plus we buy/trade MtG cards. Weekly drafts, FNM, league play, and frequent tourneys. Now buying/selling/trading video games & toys! Bring in your Nintendo Gameboy, NES, SNES, N64, Gamecube, Sega, WiiU, Xbox 360, PS1-2-3, & other used games, consoles, action figures, and toys for cash or trade credit! Fun atmosphere and great customer service!

115 S. Linn Street (by the Public Library), Iowa City Tel: 319-333-1260; Email: chg@criticalhitgames.net www.criticalhitgames.net @criticalhitgamesiowacity

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean pianist Frédéric Chopin (1810–1849) was a poetic genius whose music was full of sweetness and grace. “Without equal in his generation,” said more than one critic. Today, more than 170 years after his death, his work remains popular. Recently, an Italian sound designer named Remo de Vico created an original new Chopin piece that featured all 21 of the master’s piano nocturnes being played simultaneously. (You can hear it here: tinyurl. com/NewChopin.) As you might imagine, it’s a gorgeous mess, too crammed with notes to truly be enjoyable, but interesting nonetheless. I’ll counsel you to avoid a similar fate in the coming weeks, Pisces. It’s fine to be extravagant and expansive and multifaceted; just don’t overdo it. ARIES (March 21-April 19): “We can’t change anything until we get some fresh ideas, until we begin to see things differently,” wrote Aries psychologist James Hillman. I agree. And that’s very good news for you Aries people. In my view, you are more attracted to and excited by fresh ideas than any other sign of the zodiac. That’s why you have the potential to become master initiators of transformation. One of my favorite types of plot twists in your life story occurs when you seek out fresh ideas and initiate transformations not only in your own behalf, but also for those you care about. I bet the coming weeks will bring at least one of those plot twists.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Metaphorically speaking, Taurus, you are now crossing a bridge. Behind you is the intriguing past; in front of you, the even more intriguing future. You can still decide to return to where you came from. Or else you could pick up your pace, and race ahead at twice the speed. You might even make the choice to linger on the bridge for a while—to survey the vast vistas that are visible and contemplate more leisurely the transition you’re making. Only you know what’s best for you, of course. But if you asked me, I’d be in favor of lingering on the bridge for a while. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): As I write this, I’m sitting in a café near two women at another table. One sports a gold cashmere headscarf and pentagram necklace. The other wears a dark blue pantsuit and a silver brooch that’s the glyph for Gemini the Twins. HeadScarf shuffles a deck of Tarot cards and asks PantSuit what she’d like to find out during the divination she is about to receive. “I would very much like you to tell me what I really, really want,” PantSuit says with a chuckle. “I’m sure that once I find out that big secret, I’ll be able to accomplish wonders.” I hope the rest of you Geminis will be on a similar mission in the coming weeks. Do whatever it takes to get very clear about what you want most. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates was meandering through an Athenian marketplace, gazing at the appealing and expensive items for sale. “How many things there are in this world that I do not want,” he exclaimed with satisfaction. I recommend you cultivate that liberated attitude. Now is a perfect time to celebrate the fact that there are countless treasures and pleasures you don’t need in order to be charmed and cheerful about your life. For extra credit, add this nuance from Henry David Thoreau: People are rich in proportion to the number of things they can afford to let alone. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I invite you to try this exercise. Imagine that one springtime you grow a garden filled with flowers that rabbits like to nibble: petunias, marigolds, gazanias, and pansies. This is a place whose only purpose is to give gifts to a wild, sweet part of nature. It’s blithely impractical. You do it for your own senseless, secret joy. It appeals to the dreamy lover of life in you. Got all that, Leo? Now, in accordance with current astrological omens, I suggest you actually try to fulfill a fantasy comparable to that one in the coming weeks. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): My Virgo friend Lola got a text message from her Scorpio buddy Tanya. “Why don’t you come over and chill with me and my demons? It’ll be entertaining, I promise! My inner jerks are howlingly funny tonight.” Here’s what Lola texted back: “Thanks but no thanks, sweetie. I’ve been making big breakthroughs with my own demons—giving them the attention they crave without caving in to their outrageous demands—and for now I need to work on stabilizing our new relationship. I can’t risk bringing extra demons into the mix.” I suspect this is an accurate description of what could be happening for you, Virgo. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In ancient holy texts from India, soma was said to be a drink that enhanced awareness and alertness. According to modern scholars, it may have been a blend of poppy, ephedra and cannabis. In Norse mythology, the beverage called the Mead of Suttungr conferred poetic inspiration and the ability to solve any riddle. One of its ingredients was honey. In Slavic folklore, raskovnik is an herb with the magic power to unlock what’s locked and uncover hidden treasures. It’s not a four-leaf clover, but resembles it. I invite you Libras to fantasize about using these three marvels. To do so will potentize your imagination, thereby boosting the cosmic forces that will be working in your favor to enhance your awareness, confer inspiration, solve riddles, unlock what’s locked and find hidden treasures. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 57


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COMING SOON AT FILMSCENE ON THE PED MALL LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE OPENS OCTOBER 18

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58 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273


LOCAL ALBUMS

Pink Neighbor Time Beach Universe WWW.PINKNEIGHBOR.COM

T

he brightly illustrated Peter Max-influenced pop-art cover of Time Beach Universe, the debut album from Grinnell band Pink Neighbor, gives us a pretty good idea of what lies within. But, it’s not all tangerine trees and marmalade skies—it’s a perfect pastiche of the full variety of 1960s party pop. The neighborly tone of the record is set at the opening, with the appropriately named “Welcome,” a mission statement wrapped up in a 40-second campfire sing-along. “Welcome to the party, let’s put our minds together and off we go, my friend!” Then we’re instantly in rocketship liftoff in the form of the distorted guitar riff opener of “Words Are Never Enough.” A Badfinger-esque jam, the combination of electric guitar and acoustic is a time-proven song propellant that lifts the listener to quintessential track three, “Nebula.” No ’60s-influenced record would be complete without a tribute to a dance move. “Do the Nebula!” is shouted Fred Schneider-style over a groove that would make his bandmates in the B-52s get down at the shack. “Wait ’til we collide / to do the Nebula! / Bring it in all together now / Do the Nebula / Get down with your neighbor now / to do the Nebula / Shake your arms and float it on out …”

Submit albums for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

The pace picks up until its big choral climax, and the frantic dancers on the floor can then appreciate the dramatic slowdown in the form of track four, “Not Gonna Hide It”—a bluesy, harmony-drenched, Dusty-inMemphis track with an impressive, soulful chorus delivered by Katie In. Tracks five and six work as a couplet of swinging spacey themes. “Green Light Nights,” a song about Pink Neighbors’ party spot, mixes chiming, clean guitars and surf guitar runs to make a great transition to the album’s sole instrumental, “Ursula’s Fingers.” The reverb-y guitars and stabbing Farfisa organs provide what should be the soundtrack to some long-lost go-go dancing Martian beach party movie. The chorus of “ohs” remind me of David Axelrod’s ’60s albums. “Out On The Block” follows—a slow, slinky heat dream describing a summer block party. “Out on the block, summertimes steppin’ in / Bring what

Al Naylor Friends STORE.CDBABY.COM/CD/ALNAYLOR12

I

t’s impossible to consider Al Naylor’s album Friends without addressing the underlying fact behind its creation. Naylor—nothing short of a legend in the region’s jazz community as both an educator and a player—has been diagnosed with a health condition that will soon force his early retirement from performing. In the face of the news, many of Naylor’s titular friends came together to create an album that highlights the trumpeter’s chops, which are still in top form. As an educator, Naylor spent nearly three REVERB-Y GUITARS AND STABBING decades buildFARFISA ORGANS PROVIDE WHAT ing the SHOULD BE THE SOUNDTRACK TO LinnSOME LONG-LOST GO-GO DANCING Mar MARTIAN BEACH PARTY MOVIE. High School you got, everyone’s comin’.” music program into a jazz powThe harmonies remind me of erhouse. He went on to teach “Twelve Thirty (Young Girls trumpet at Coe College. At the Are Coming To the Canyon)” by same time, he was making music the Mamas and the Papas. with many of the area’s best and Time Beach Universe is a most popular outfits, including short record, clocking in at just his own I-380 Express, Bob 25 minutes, but the final track, Dorr and the Blue Band, the Rod “Meet Me Somewhere,” wraps Pierson Big Band, the CR Jazz all the way around again, with Big Band, the Moe Band and its loping Rhythm Ace beat, Orquesta Alto Maiz, among othsynths and anthemic sax solo. er ensembles large and small. During my repeated listenThe record features 13 cuts ings, I began to anticipate the performed by a variety of line“Welcome” again from my new ups made up of 29 musicians neighbors as I started the ride who have played for or with over. —Michael Roeder Naylor (or both) over the course

of his long career. Pianists, for example, include Steve Shanley (a former student of Naylor’s and eventually his peer at Coe College, who penned a moving tribute in the liner notes) and Bob Washut. Eric Thompson, Tim Crumley, Jim Dreier (a long-time UI jazz faculty member whose composition “Nubbs (For Al)” is one of the record’s bright spots), John Rohlf, Dave Tiede and Christopher Jensen take turns on the drums. Various horn players, bassists, guitarists and percussionists, as well as the great Bob Dorr on harmonica, can be heard playing with Naylor over the course of the record. These multiple, shifting voices imbue Friends with energy—an energy one suspects is also underpinned by the strong relationships among the musicians and the inherent urgency of the project. All of these artists donated their time and musicianship, adding to the sense that this is an album of music made by true friends. For me, Naylor’s own compositions on the record—“Cruisin’ for Home,” “Groove in the First Degree,” “It’s Da Blues”—are particularly engaging cuts because they give him the opportunity to speak, as it were, in his own voice. For a project created under these circumstances, these three numbers are, it seems to me, essential statements of identity. Friends is a strong record on its own, but it is also an excellent companion to Naylor’s Legacy album, released in 2011. That recording featured the long-serving teacher playing with a strong selection of his former students. Taken together, the two recordings are a testament to an extraordinary life in music that has enriched the lives of fans and musicians locally—and well beyond—in significant and lasting ways. —Rob Cline

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 59


60 Oct. 16–Nov. 5, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV273


LOCAL BOOKS

Andre Perry Some Of Us Are Very Hungry Now TWO DOLLAR RADIO

T

he memoiristic essays in Andre Perry’s Some of Us Are Very Hungry Now (2019, Two Dollar Radio) reconstruct—from journal entries, memory and fictionalized correspondence and dialogue— Perry’s youthful encounters with American music, women, culture and racism-loaded language. Most accounts are positioned in three geographic locations: San Francisco, Hong Kong and Iowa City: cities in which the author, as a young man, sought out opportunities for professional development and whatever life experiences that might come his way. He played in a rock band, composed music, wrote music criticism and, finally, back in the Midwest, entered a graduate writing program. Shocked along the way by what had been the naivete of his early college days, Perry meandered through sex clubs, Cantopop performances, house parties and intimate relationships. Although the descriptions of these encounters only allude to the graphic, the unattuned reader could find some narratives disquieting. The literary elements of the book are gathered in a basket of honest, direct and unadorned prose. The text is backlit by poignant sentiments—a black man’s feeling of otherness and brokenness and that very human, universal sense of being lost and “invisible” in our own world. The visage of James Baldwin

Submit books for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

and the ghosts of his essays, such as “Notes of a Native Son” (1955) and “The Fire Next Time” (1963), seem to shadow the pages as probable and logical sources of literary inspiration. Consequently, the tone feels intermittently bitter, perhaps because at the heart of Hungry Now is the nagging suggestion of despair with recurrent expressions of racism. The author pushes this issue to the fore, from the opening pages where, as a 10-year-old boy, he is bullied and name-called on a playground, to near the book’s end, in an after-hours scene in The Mill where he separates a fight over a clueless racial indignation. But Hungry Now is also subtly melancholic. This gray mist is well expressed by Perry’s beautiful and sensitive rendering of the inevitable demise of his relationship with Miranda, both in the fractured structure of the text and the diction. The essence of a work like this would be lost if it were other than unapologetic, unremorseful. The author counterbalances this tone and unifies the text with riffs of musical reference, from Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground to Mobb Deep to Kendrick Lamar, inviting the reader to recall and identify with the music and lyrics of the evolving, though persistently troubling, times. Written from today’s more mature vantage point, Hungry Now reads like a retrospective in self-discovery, a final gesture that extends the author’s coming-ofage experience, a nod to finally coming to terms with selfhood. The essays insightfully relate what it meant to be a relatively privileged, yet undeniably still challenged, young black man in early 21st century America. Perry’s recollections will linger in our collective and personal consciences, serving as a call to consider our perceptions of blackness in American culture. —William Blair

Brook Hoover Guitar Chords by Brook Hoover FACEBOOK.COM/ GUITARLESSONSWITHBROOK

B

rook Hoover is an Eastern Iowa music scene staple. He plays out every week, whether it’s a solo gig with his cover band the Flaming Camaros or a tour stop with his surf-rock group the Surf Zombies. When he’s not in the spotlight, he’s teaching guitar to folks from the very young to the, well, older. His classes are

THE BOOK IS A POTPOURRI OF THINGS THAT HE TEACHES HIS STUDENTS; IN THAT REGARD, IT’S ALSO THE TEXTBOOK FOR HIS GUITAR LESSONS. tailored to the goals of the student, but also include bits of his colorful history playing guitar. Usually the student comes home with some hand-illustrated sheets of paper with exercises. I have a three-ring binder of them I keep in the open back of one of my amps from the lessons I took. At the suggestion of a student, Hoover has self-published his first book on playing the guitar. Guitar Chords By Brook Hoover is part memoir, part reference, part howto—ultimately, it’s Brook Hoover in book form. Every page is lovingly illustrated in pen and ink: a testament to his love of teaching music.

When you see the book with its brightly illustrated cover, done by local artist Russ Fagle, you can’t help but pick it up. When you open it, you are immediately greeted by a collage of photographs of Brook: school pictures, photos of him in bands over the years, and of his family and guitars (lots of guitars). As its title suggests, this is a chord book. If you’ve been playing guitar for a while, chances are you’ve run into some version of this. They’re tablature indexes showing all of the various chord shapes. Seeing these all drawn out by hand is impressive, but the true fun exists in the margins of the pages, where he puts little comments, like the one on E minor: “Open strings rule!” Beyond the chord charts, he has tips on how to strum, and covers the magical “circle of 5ths” and various blues progressions; he also he has a whole page of chords used by the Beatles. The book is a potpourri of things that he teaches his students; in that regard, it’s also the textbook for his guitar lessons. But even if you aren’t taking lessons from Hoover, the book is really a great primer for anyone who has had some experience with the guitar. “Start at the beginning and work your way through if you want,” he advises in the book’s forward, “or start at the back and skip around. There is no point A to point B in my opinion, and I like a little chaos.” Paging through the book, I can’t help but be awestruck by the amount of effort he put into illustrating each page. In these days of being able to use a computer to produce a book like this, Hoover steps back and pours his heart into it. He offers this bit of heartfelt wisdom: “I sincerely believe music saves lives and improves nearly everything it touches.” I’m not crying, YOU’RE CRYING. —Michael Roeder

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AGENCY REFORM

BY LAURA BRAUNSTEIN

LittleVillageMag.com

The American Values Club Crossword is edited by Ben Tausig.

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ACROSS 1. E-Z___ (toll transponder system) 5. Some email attachments 9. Parodied 13. Artist who sang, “What if rich, white, straight men didn’t rule the world anymore?” 14. Lemon in a lot 15. Hurricane forecasting agcy. 16. The sign on Monsieur Bonaparte’s door, back

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when he was busting students for smoking weed in their dorm rooms? 18. Member of an Iraqi minority 19. Dansko alternative 20. Retired California Superior Court judge Lance 21. Medicare ___ (outpatient coverage) 22. Comedian Margaret’s greatest resource—her bold and outrageous satire? 26. The L Word channel:

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Abbr. 27. “Steal My Sunshine” band 28. Riotous, like 30–50 feral swine 30. Song title for Starship, Fleetwood Mac or Bob Dylan 33. Have, as your cake 34. “___ a truth universally acknowledged ...” 35. “Ok, I confess: I plagiarized my tenure file”? 39. Ole Miss rival 40. Univ. that hosts an

annual Mystery Hunt 41. Put up 42. 18th-century Nova Scotian settler 44. Enjoy fresh powder, say 46. Eponymous knitting machine breaker Ludd 47. Fitting actor Patel for a costume in a Harry Potter film? 53. Gathers intelligence 55. Crow’s call 56. Showed one’s face 57. Stat for a middle reliever

58. Political movement advocating elimination of a certain DHS branch, particularly since it began implementing inhumane policies toward refugees, migrants and their families; or, a hint to this puzzle’s theme 61. Perry and Della’s creator 62. Funny one, quaintly 63. Less common 64. Single-sex school founded in 1440 65. Hamiltons 66. Eye disorder

for (be attracted to) 29. Bygone Nintendo platform 30. Mos Eisley, for one 31. Hard-shelled mammal 32. Cormac McCarthy novel, with The 33. AED expert 36. Activist barrister Clooney, or Dorai who organized a time-travel convention 37. Fred and Wilma’s pet 38. Place for splints 39. Member of Siouxsie’s band 43. Suffix with electron or robot 44. Old Norse versifiers 45. Fruit that is not, in fact, native to New Zealand 48. Oak progenitor (and offspring) 49. Hangouts predecessor 50. Buffalo product, e.g. 51. Wanda Sykes, for the 2018 GLAAD Media Awards 52. Swerve 54. Setting for some earlydisobedience 58. Join the show 59. Modern flame 60. HS students who may be chronically over HS

DOWN 1. “What’s so funny ’bout ___, love and understanding?” (Elvis Costello lyric) 2. Org. that spays its own way? 3. 1993 Salt-N-Pepa hit 4. Actor and bi icon Mineo 5. Light particle 6. ___ Thieves (bestseller about insider trading scandals of the 1980s) 7. Not even close 8. Pedi place 9. Paul who duetted with Lisa Simpson 10. Overeggs the pudding, so to speak 11. Elliott, to E.T. 12. Cuddlymorphic LV272 ANSWERS types T H A T SMA R T S A N A L A E R I A L ROO T D E S E 13. Had down B L A N K S T A R E MU T T 17. One for Werner A L B E E I D E A L RUM COS B U S H I DOCOD E 21. 1990s colBOS T ON GA P E S lectible P A L ME G T S K A N E 23. Saint with a W I N E B A R OC T E T T E college named after P A T E S E C U H O H S A N I T A D I GS I N him MO T H E R S RU I N L A H 24. Hebrew word U SO R I CC I C E L I E R O X Y F A L L C O L O R S for life A L I A F R E E P A S S E S 25. Have the ___ L OC K S E T S A T E A S E

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Profile for Little Village Magazine

Little Village magazine issue 273: Oct. 16 - Nov. 5, 2019  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

Little Village magazine issue 273: Oct. 16 - Nov. 5, 2019  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

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