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A L W A Y S

F R E E

ISSUE 272 Oct. 2–15, 2019

TRUTH WILL OUT A 40-year murder investigation may be coming to a close in Cedar Rapids.


Sankai Juku Utsushi

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Tuesday, October 22, 7:30 pm For the first time in 20 years, Sankai Juku, Japan’s internationally renowned butoh dance troupe, returns to Hancher. Utsushi has been crafted from restaged excerpts of choreography by company founder Ushio Amagatsu. Butoh, which has been called Japan’s most startling cultural export, is enthralling, surprising, and often deeply moving. Utsushi is the perfect introduction to the mesmerizing work of Sankai Juku. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $50 | $40 | $30

Dale and Linda Baker

COLLEGE STUDENT: $45 | $10

Gary A. and LaDonna K. Wicklund

YOUTH: $25 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: ©Sankai Juku

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


SITI Company The Bacchae

$10

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Directed by Anne Bogart Saturday, October 26, 7:30 pm In this new English translation and innovative take on one of the Western world’s greatest dramas, SITI Company invites us to Thebes where Dionysus—god of wine, ritual madness, fertility, and theater (and in this production imagined as a rock star of the first order)—is opposed and imprisoned by King Pentheus. The struggle between wildness and order (and frivolity and seriousness) is at the heart of this play, which still resonates all these centuries later—and perhaps at this moment in particular. SITI Company’s famed co-artistic director Anne Bogart will be on hand to participate in a variety of residency events, including a post-performance conversation with the audience. Audio Description is available for this performance. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $45 | $35 | $25

The Cosmo Catalano Family

COLLEGE STUDENT: $40 | $10

Miriam Gilbert

YOUTH: $22 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: ©Craig Schwartz Photography

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


Chick Corea Trilogy

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Friday, October 11, 7:30 pm Chick Corea’s 2014 triple-disc set, Trilogy, added a live masterwork to the venerated pianist’s discography. Featuring bassist Christian McBride and drummer Brian Blade, the recording was a triumph. Now, Corea, McBride, and Blade are bringing the music from Trilogy back to live audiences. This trio is nothing short of a supergroup—and the music they make together is top-shelf jazz. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $65 | $55 | $45

The Gazette

COLLEGE STUDENT: $58 | $10

Gary and Randi Levitz

YOUTH: $32 | $10

OPN Architects, Inc. Sara Wolfson

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: Andrew Elliott

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

New World Spirit Sunday, October 13, 3:00 pm

An ensemble of 13 exceptional musicians—including David Finckel on cello and David Shifrin on clarinet—celebrate the intrepid (and diverse) American spirit in a performance highlighting two pairs of composers who helped shape classical music in the twentieth century. Harry T. Burleigh was a star student of Dvorák ˇ who exposed the Czech composer to ˇ to perform African American folk music. American spirituals and was in turn encouraged by Dvorák Two generations later, Copland and Bernstein conceived a clean, clear American sound conveying the wonder of open spaces and endless possibilities. PROGRAM (subject to change):

Burleigh: Southland Sketches, for violin and piano ˇ Quintet in E-flat Major, Op. 97 (“American”) Dvorák: Bernstein: Sonata for clarinet and piano Copland: Appalachian Spring Suite TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $60 | $50 | $40

Mace and Kay Braverman

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Bill Rubright in loving memory of Karen G. Rubright

YOUTH: $30 | $10

William and Marlene W. Stanford

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: Tristan Cook

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


CULINARY ARTS EXPERIENCE

HANCHER’S CULINARY ARTS EXPERIENCE:

Trumpet Blossom Wednesday, November 19, 5:00 pm Join us for dinner in Hancher’s beautiful Stanley Café. Trumpet Blossom creates plant-based comfort food that reflects the season, respects the land, and is truly sustainable using organic ingredients and making dishes from scratch. TICKETS: $40 PER PERSON TICKETS GO ON SALE MONDAY, OCTOBER 21

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


VOL. 28 ISSUE 272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 ALWAYS FREE LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM PUBLISHER MATTHEW STEELE DIGITAL DIRECTOR DREW BULMAN ART DIRECTOR JORDAN SELLERGREN MANAGING EDITOR EMMA MCCLATCHEY ARTS EDITOR GENEVIEVE TRAINOR Lucian Perkins

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Cold Case, Thawed

Remember Me

Punk the (Old) Capital

CR may soon see justice for Michelle Martinko, stabbed to death in 1979.

There’s no roadmap for guiding your parents through memory loss.

Inside the birth of the D.C. punk scene—and Minor Threat’s Iowa connection.

JEN MOULTON

SHARYL CARTMILL

KEMBREW MCLEOD

8 - Interactions 11 - Brock About Town 12 - Cold Case 19 - Love Letters Essay 22 - En Español

26 - Bread & Butter 28 - A-List 32 - Events Calendar 57 - Ad Index 58 - Dear Kiki

59 - Ad Index 60 - Local Albums 61 - Local Authors 63 - Crossword

CELINE ROBINS ADVERTISING ADS@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM LISTINGS CALENDAR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTRIBUTORS AUDREY BROCK, CHRIS BURNS, LEV CANTORAL, SHARYL CARTMILL, ROB CLINE, MELANIE HANSON, CATALINA IRIGOYEN, ELAINE IRVINE, JOHN MARTINEK, KEMBREW MCLEOD, STUART MUDIE, JAMES MORGAN OWENS, JEN MOULTON, TREY REIS, MICHAEL ROEDER, HELAINA THOMPSON, TOM TOMORROW, PAIGE UNDERWOOD, SAM LOCKE WARD SUBMISSIONS EDITOR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM DISTRIBUTION REQUESTS DISTRO@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CREATIVE SERVICES CREATIVE@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTACT (319) 855-1474, 623 S DUBUQUE ST, IOWA CITY, IA 52240

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A L W A Y S

F R E E

ISSUE 272 Oct. 2–15, 2019

TRUTH WILL OUT A 40-year murder investigation may be coming to a close in Cedar Rapids.

Bernadette Hornbeck

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INTERACTIONS LV encourages community members, including candidates for office, to submit letters to Editor@LittleVillageMag.com. To be considered for print publication, letters should be under 500 words. Preference is given to letters that have not been published elsewhere.

Report: Gov. Reynolds has repeatedly stopped Iowa AG Tom Miller from joining lawsuits against the Trump administration Tom Miller is experienced & proven after many years as our AG. Makes no sense that she has this power & is the only governor to have it. —Sherry H.E. She needs to go. The AG should be free to pursue any case he sees fit. —Rita A.F.

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Iowa City’s PATV is merging with Public Space One How cool! —Jen K. This is such a great next step for PATV and for PS1! —Katie R.

Trump impeachment inquiry: Iowa’s Congressional delegation reacts, Steve King spins a conspiracy theory, Grassley wants to investigate Hillary Clinton Steve King is so creative. Not even the White House talking points that were inadvertently emailed to Democrats in the Senate mentioned a Soros conspiracy. —Grainne M. This Soros guy is almost as legendary as Keyser Söze. —Dave M.

Linn Street Dive (formerly Devotay) will reopen as a brick-and-mortar Marco’s Grilled Cheese I can respect this decision—stick to what works! —Kyle S. Meh. That space is so special and deserves something truly special. Also grilled

Your Opportunity to Engage with Arts and Culture CulturalCorridor.org LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 9


INTERACTIONS cheeses kicks out a ton of people who have food concerns/allergies. Good luck, though! —Samantha F. Finally, some good news. —Bridget W.

READER PERKS

Marco’s... but make it fancy. —Gabbie M.

The Club Car is celebrating 15 years in business with a special party on Saturday Fell in love with a girl at Club Car once. —Adrian S.

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Sorry, I’ll always know it as Mike’s Tap, where you have to win a game of pool against a biker to get served. —Erin F.H.

Letter to the editor: Why I want Beto in the White House Beto reminds me of Bobby Kennedy in his commitment to justice. His vision of an America where we celebrate our differences is inspiring for me. I was initially supporting several candidates in the Democratic race — and still feel that it is an impressive slate — but Beto stands out for me for his passion, honesty, genuine concern, and his incredible knowledge of American history and public policy. (He doesn’t get enough credit for the latter but his roster of proposals on everything from healthcare to immigration to climate change to labor and trade are among the most impressive out there.) Of all the candidates I think he alone has the capacity to help heal our badly fractured Republic. We need this desperately. ––Tobie

Investigation finds deputy was harassed by coworkers at the Linn County Jail over parental leave Sounds like the only real man in the bunch was on leave bonding with his child. ––Heather B. When your place of work is under staffed you blame those in power not your coworker. ––Luke P.


S T R E S S F R A C T U R E S

BROCK ABOUT TOWN

JOHN

MARTINEK

LittleVillageMag.com

AUDREY BROCK

Wisdom of the Ages Since I graduated college, a terrifying transformation has begun to occur. The music at the hip student bars has become too loud for me, so on Saturday nights, I test out soup recipes in my Crock-Pot while I watch Jeopardy! I have purchased multiple cardigans in various shades of moss. I do the crossword puzzle every morning. In short, I am turning into a cranky old man. Like most geezers, I’m full of nostalgia for the good old days of oat-sowing and youthful hooliganism and feel compelled to corner the nearest young person and give them an earful. Unlike most geezers, I have an entire town to browbeat. Without further ado, here are some tips for all you new college students: I have never personally met someone who did not gain the Freshman 15, but I hear they’re out there. I imagine they probably go to the gym. If you know where that is, maybe check it out. If you don’t, that’s fine. At Hillcrest, they have a waffle maker and a soft-serve machine, which means you can make yourself a waffle ice cream sandwich. Just food for thought, so to speak.

I do not condone underage drinking, but I do want to save you the embarrassment of looking at some humiliating Facebook photos in a few years, so here’s a tip: Nothing says “I’m 18” like wearing five-inch heels, a pound of bronzer and a Forever 21 dress with the tags still on to get mini-pitchers of Long Island iced tea spilled on you at Brothers. And I would hope it would go without saying, but leave the lanyard you got at freshman orientation in your dorm room. Be social. It know, it is so tempting to hole up in your room watching Gilmore Girls, and those campus events can get pretty cloying (“Let’s play ultimate frisbee to build leadership skills!”) but making friends is one of the best parts of college. It’s also the key to passing all your classes without actually studying. To wit: Make a few friends in each class, then set up a Google Doc for everyone to put their notes in, so you only need to pay attention to every third lecture. It’s not cheating, it’s collaboration. God, I feel better. Now I get why old people are always trying to impart wisdom. I think I’ll call my grandma. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 11


40 YEARS LATER The brutal murder of high school senior Michelle Martinko shook the Cedar Rapids community, before the case went cold. Thanks to genetic genealogy, her suspected killer will soon go on trial. BY JEN MOULTON

12 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272


COMMUNITY

D

ec. 19, 2018. Like every year, local news stations ran anniversary pieces describing the cold case of Michelle Martinko, an 18-year-old woman stabbed to death in Cedar Rapids in 1979. The facts of the case were recounted. A tip line scrolled across the bottom of the screen. The weather report would be next, and Martinko’s story would be retired for another year. But the Cedar Rapids Police Department had a busy day—perhaps their busiest since they began investigating the homicide nearly four decades ago. They recounted their exploits at a 7 p.m. press conference, and the next morning’s headline emerged right away: At last, a suspect has been arrested in the murder of Michelle Martinko. This Dec. 19, which marks the 40th anniversary of Martinko’s death, news stations will be telling a much different story. •

MARTINKO WAS a senior at Cedar Rapids Kennedy High School in 1979. She had blonde hair, always styled to Farrah Fawcettlike perfection. She excelled in the classroom as well as in extracurriculars, making the twirling squad as a sophomore, which was nearly unheard of. She twirled her baton during halftime shows at football games, sang in the Kennedy women’s choir and Concert Choir and performed in theater productions. She planned to study interior design at Iowa State University after high school. The evening of Dec. 19, after attending a choir banquet at the downtown Sheraton Hotel, Martinko headed to Westdale Mall on the southwest side of Cedar Rapids, which had opened less than two weeks prior. She had $180 on her, and was shopping for a new winter coat. She asked her close friend and fellow twirler Jane Hansen if she’d like to join, but Hansen declined; she had some homework to catch up on. People reported having seen Martinko at the mall that night. However, nobody remembers seeing her after 8 p.m., when she was last spotted outside of a jewelry store. When she hadn’t returned home by 2 a.m., Martinko’s parents started to get worried. They called the police, and immediately, officers went out searching for the teenager. At around 4 a.m., they found the Martinko family’s 1972 tan Buick in the northeast Courtesy of Robert J. Riley

LittleVillageMag.com

corner of the Westdale Mall parking lot, near JCPenney. Martinko was inside. She had been stabbed to death.

thought process.” Along with her grief and disbelief, Hansen said she carried a sense of guilt over the fact she didn’t join her best friend at the mall that • • • night. There was also fear of the unknown. Who could have killed Michelle? Where were CHARLES JELINEK was made captain they now? of the CRPD’s Detective Bureau in 1979 “I always wondered, was some freak and was one of the responding officers in watching the baton twirlers? Would he be afMartinko’s case. He broke the news to the ter me?” Hansen said. “It was a scary time. victim’s parents that she had been found murIt changed the community. We were so indered. Charles died in 2017, but his daughter, dependent. Michelle worked at the mall and she’d come and go. I was a cashier at Target; I’d close it down at 10 and walk to my car. Every teenager was “I WAS 17. I WASN’T EVEN ALLOWED TO like that in Cedar Rapids at the time. All of a sudden WATCH R MOVIES YET. THAT SORT OF you have to have security VIOLENT CRIME WAS NOT EVEN WITHIN walk you to the car.” CRPD had little in the THE REALM OF MY THOUGHT PROCESS.” way of leads. In June of 1980, they released a composite sketch based on descriptions from two supSue Jelinek, said she remembers her father’s posed witnesses, which showed a white man description of the crime scene. in his late teens or early 20s, about six feet “Michelle had been wearing a rabbit fur tall, with dark, curly hair. coat,” Sue said, “and there was bloody rabbit Tips flowed in at first, but soon trickled out. hair all over the car. They found Michelle lyIn the following months and years, CRPD ing on her back, slumped over the passenger practically begged the community to come seat of the Buick, and leaning against the car forward with useful information. A $10,000 door.” reward was set. Martinko had been stabbed 21 times in the face, neck and chest. Her hands were ravaged • • • with defensive wounds, which investigators saw as her trying to fight off her attacker. No NO ONE was more motivated to find jusmurder weapon was recovered; the medical tice for Michelle Martinko than her parents, examiner said that it was “sharp-pointed, not Albert and Janet. even sure if it’s a knife.” In the mid-’80s, as the homicide invesThe victim hadn’t been robbed or sexually tigation went cold, Albert Martinko filed a assaulted. Based on the location and number lawsuit against the owners and operators of of stab wounds, officers described the crime Westdale Mall, arguing they failed to provide as “personal in nature.” The murder happened “reasonable security” the night his daughter while she was in the Buick, investigators reawas killed. soned, as there was no blood on the outside of The case was appealed all the way to the the car or on the pavement. And since the killIowa Supreme Court, where, on Sept. 17, er left no fingerprints behind, police presumed 1986, the justices ruled in favor of Westdale they wore gloves. Mall. Albert Martinko died in 1995. Janet • • • Martinko followed in 1998. “I WAS one of the ones that got the 4:30 a.m. phone call from Janet, Michelle’s mom,” Hansen said. “I was 17. I wasn’t even allowed to watch R movies yet. That sort of violent crime was not even within the realm of my

THE FIRST real break in the case came 27 years after Martinko was murdered, with the discovery of new forensic evidence. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 13


COMMUNITY

The Gazette, Dec. 20, 1979

In 2006, investigators re-examined evidence, and found blood DNA from an unknown male on the Buick’s gear shift and the back of Martinko’s dress. CRPD theorized that the killer bled from injuries sustained during the attack—that, as he stabbed over and over, the murder weapon became slippery, causing him to cut himself through his gloves. Police worked closely with the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation’s crime lab to acquire a DNA profile of the suspect from these blood samples. According to the lab reports, the DNA recovered was complete enough to form a profile, which was then uploaded into the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), the national DNA database. Unfortunately, there were no hits. The years continued to pass. A tip made in 2013 through Linn County Crime Stoppers led investigators to a credible

suspect, perhaps their first since the investigation began. However, the suspect’s DNA did not match the crime scene DNA on file. •

“WE WERE kids, struggling hard to pretend we were older,” said Blair Gauntt, another friend and classmate of Martinko’s. (Gauntt is a freelance artist for Little Village.) He wistfully shared the memory of holding her hand on the choir bus, “clandestinely” and a bit awkwardly, as she was seated in the row behind him. “At that age, to get exposed to death is one thing, but man, a brutal murder—that’s what’s had the long-lasting, really traumatic effect on me.” In November of 2013, Cedar Rapids resident and Kennedy High School alum Robert

Riley created a Facebook group called “Michelle Martinko Cold Case 1979” for people to share and discuss information about Martinko and the circumstances of death. “My goal early on was to find out who Michelle was as a person,” Riley told me in a 2017 interview, his hands folded in his lap. “This has brought on a lot of people that knew her and are willing to talk and create a picture.” With breakthroughs in the police investigation lacking, Martinko’s classmates mined their memories and imaginations for leads, proposing their own theories: Was her ex-boyfriend involved? Might she have met her killer at one of the local bars frequented by Kennedy students? Could her murder be part of a conspiracy involving the Kennedy High administration? Riley shared every tip and theory with

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CRPD, though it’s unknown whether any proved fruitful. “The police have told me that [the Facebook group] is probably the biggest source of active leads that they get,” he said. “Many people ... would consider it a personal victory to get justice from this case.” Gauntt and Hansen said they joined Riley’s group near its start but didn’t last long, finding the conjecture and sensational speculation distasteful. “They would treat her like the shows I watch,” Gauntt said. He’s a fan of true crime media, but never saw Martinko’s case that way. “I was too close to it personally,” he said.

“When my niece was little, I went to the toy store to buy her a Christmas present and I found this Skipper [Barbie] doll that was a baton twirler,” Hansen said. “I ended up buying that darn Skipper doll for myself. It looks like Michelle, the big blonde hair. I still have it on the shelf at my home office.” “She was a very special person to me.” •

IN MAY of 2017, investigators contacted Parabon NanoLabs, a Virginia-based compa-

WITH BREAKTHROUGHS IN THE POLICE INVESTIGATION LACKING, MARTINKO’S CLASSMATES MINED THEIR MEMORIES AND IMAGINATIONS FOR LEADS, PROPOSING THEIR OWN THEORIES: WAS HER EX-BOYFRIEND INVOLVED? MIGHT SHE HAVE MET HER KILLER AT ONE OF THE LOCAL BARS FREQUENTED BY KENNEDY STUDENTS? COULD HER MURDER BE PART OF A CONSPIRACY INVOLVING THE KENNEDY HIGH ADMINISTRATION?

“It’s just a tragedy.” Martinko was no more than an average high school girl who’s life was cut short, Hansen asserts. She said she hasn’t spent her days dwelling on the intricacies of her old friend’s life, or the crime that ended it. “I went to college like Michelle wanted to. I got a career. Moved to Dallas for that career. Moved to New York City at one point. Married, divorce, married, divorced. It didn’t stop me from living, and it wasn’t on my mind daily,” Hansen said. But Martinko has always been present in her heart.

ny that provides DNA phenotyping services to law enforcement organizations. Parabon can predict an organism’s phenotype—including their physical appearance and biogeographic ancestry—using only genetic information from DNA. The U.S. Department of Defense contributed about $2 million to help develop Parabon’s Snapshot DNA Phenotyping Service. Parabon generated photorealistic illustrations of Martinko’s killer using the 2006 DNA profile: a white male with blond hair and blue eyes (quite a different look from the original

1980 sketch composite). The company included images estimating the man’s appearance in 1979 as well as 2017, when wrinkles and a receding hairline would likely have set in. Investigators released the images to the public in a press conference. Gauntt was watching. “As they pulled out the young 3D rendering of the guy, someone in the back—one of my classmates, and nobody will tell me who— says, ‘Hey, that’s Blair,’” Gauntt recalled with a sense of dark, weary humor. “I was like, ‘oh, shit.’” Gauntt had been visited and interviewed by police several times since 1979, including once by the FBI, and agreed to let investigators swab his cheek just a few years earlier. Gauntt’s DNA eliminated him as a suspect— as did the cheek (buccal) swabs of more than 125 others. •

A DISTANT cousin and a plastic straw were the keys to identifying the man most likely to have killed Martinko all those years ago. In 2018, Parabon offered to take the raw data from Snapshot and upload it into the public DNA database GEDmatch. Unlike Snapshot or CODIS, GEDmatch was not designed as a law enforcement aid, but a public genealogy site, much like Ancestry.com or 23andMe: Users submit their DNA voluntarily in order to test their ethnic background and find biological relatives. But this vast database of genetic information has proved a treasure trove for crime solvers. Investigators may use GEDmatch to track down a suspect’s relations through his DNA sample, a huge step towards naming the suspect himself. Scores of victims and

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COMMUNITY perpetrators have been identified using genetic genealogy, making 2018 “the year to crack cold cases”—most famously, the Golden State Killer case, in which law enforcement used GEDmatch to catch Joseph James DeAngelo 44 years after his alleged crime spree began. Parabon found one person through GEDmatch who shared a useful amount of DNA with CRPD’s suspect: Vancouver, Washington resident Brandy Jennings, who Parabon estimated to be a second cousin once removed from Martinko’s killer. They were able to create a family tree with four sets of Jennings’ great-great-grandparents at the top; the suspect is likely a descendant of one of those four sets of grandparents, they reported. If investigators could get buccal swabs from the living descendants of each set of grandparents, they could identify which family the suspect belongs to. CRPD Investigator Matt Denlinger located a woman named Janice Burns. He interviewed and collected DNA from her, which was then processed. The results came back shortly—she was first cousins with the suspect. This narrowed the suspect pool down to three brothers: Donald Burns, Kenneth Burns and Jerry Burns. Investigators surveilled them, covertly collecting each of their DNA. On Oct. 29, 2018, Denlinger observed the 64-year-old Jerry Burns drink several sodas using a clear, plastic straw. Denlinger collected it after Jerry Burns left it behind for disposal. Kenneth and Donald were eliminated as suspects. They could not eliminate Jerry. •

HOURS BEFORE their red-letter press conference on Dec. 19, 2018, investigators Denlinger and J.D. Smith went to interview their suspect at his business in Manchester, Iowa. Burns refused to give a buccal swab voluntarily, but when he was served with a search warrant, he had to give in. Assuming their perp would have scars from the attack, police also photographed his hands and arms. The interview between the officers and Burns lasted over an hour, and Burns made and accepted calls and texts throughout, even after being informed of what case they were working on. Burns insisted he had no recollection of commiting the crime. Police asked if he could explain how his DNA wound up at the crime scene. He said he could not. “Burns showed almost no emotion during the interview, even 16 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

when he was eventually told he was being arrested,” Denlinger reported. The crime lab tested Burns’ buccal swab. They found his DNA matched the blood sample on Martinko’s dress. The probability of finding Burns’ DNA profile among unrelated individuals would be less than 1 in 100 billion, according to court documents. •

The press conference was 11 minutes long. After Chief Jerman dropped the arrest bombshell, he recapped the case, speaking haltingly. Those already familiar with it anxiously waited to hear a name. Finally, Jerman offered it: Jerry Lynn Burns. “The tenacity, the dedication exhibited by these investigators and officers ... is why we’re here tonight and why we can close this case, this tragic case that’s been haunting this

AFTER CHIEF JERMAN DROPPED THE ARREST BOMBSHELL, HE RECAPPED THE CASE, SPEAKING HALTINGLY. THOSE ALREADY FAMILIAR WITH IT ANXIOUSLY WAITED TO HEAR A NAME. FINALLY, JERMAN OFFERED IT: JERRY LYNN BURNS.

FLOWERS BEGAN appearing at Martinko’s grave in Cedar Memorial Park Cemetary in the days leading up to the 39th anniversary of her murder. News reporters dared the December chill to record anniversary segments outside JCPenney, one of the last remaining businesses in the increasingly destitute Westdale Mall. At 6 p.m. on Dec. 19, 2018, CRPD announced a press conference, to be held in an hour. That evening, Hansen was braving storms on her way back to Plainview, Texas after visiting her parents in Cedar Rapids. “I get home and I turn on my computer and start checking my emails, and I had a message from one of the former detectives. He said, ‘Turn on the news at 7 o’clock.’ I messaged him and said, ‘Is this just a fluff story … or is this a real development?’ He said, ‘It’s a real development.’” When 7 p.m. rolled around, Cedar Rapids Police Chief Wayne Jerman stepped up to the podium. “Good evening, everybody, thank you for being here tonight,” he began. A chorus of camera shutters could be heard in the background. The chief’s voice was a bit raspy, and his words were long and drawn out. “I am here to announce that the Cedar Rapids Police Department, with the help of the Linn County Attorney’s Office, has made an arrest ... in connection with the homicide of Michelle Martinko.” The outpouring of social media posts that followed this announcement was the digital equivalent of a collective gasp.

community for 39 years,” Jerman said. He turned over the podium to Linn County Attorney Jerry Vander Sanden, who reminded the public that as long as there’s litigation left to be done, the case remains active. “I have to make a disclaimer at this time, under the law,” he added. “The defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.” A reporter asked if investigators had a clue of the alleged murderer’s motive. Vander Sanden declined to comment. “There was no sleeping that night,” Hansen said. “My phone was ringing off the hook. My plans of taking a relaxing shower and going to bed were [done]. I was just in shock.” Janelle Stonebraker, Martinko’s older sister, and her husband John released a statement: “Janelle and I are very pleased and grateful for the work of several generations of Cedar Rapids uniformed police and detectives in bringing Mr. Burns to justice. From the leadership on down, they never gave up.” •

ONLINE, BURNS was a ghost; there was little information to be found about him. He was best known as a respected businessman living a quiet life in Manchester, Iowa, a town of 5,000 about an hour north of Cedar Rapids. He grew up there, graduating from West Delaware High School in 1972. In 1975, he married his wife, Patricia Burns. She died in 2008. Burns owns Advanced Coating Concepts, a powder-coating business on the southside of Manchester.


LittleVillageMag.com

Burns was 25 at the time of Martinko’s death. Investigators report they have not found evidence suggesting Burns and Martinko knew each other. CRPD investigator Jeff Holst was assigned the task of going through the suspect’s computers. In Burns’ business computer, Holst found evidence of internet searches and activity involving “blonde females, assault, rape, strangulation, murder, abuse and rape of a deceased individual, and cannibalism.” •

BURNS NOW sits in a safety jail smock at the Linn County jail, held on a $5 million cash-only bond, charged with first-degree murder; a criminal complaint alleges he acted with “malice aforethought, willfully, deliberately, and with premeditation.” First-degree murder is a Class A felony in the state of Iowa, meaning that if Burns is found guilty, his sentence will be life in prison without parole. Burns is represented by Iowa City lawyer Leon Spies, who has handled a number of high-profile cases—perhaps most notably serving as the defense attorney in Dustin Honken’s 2004 federal murder trial, Iowa’s first death penalty case in 40 years. (Honken was convicted of murdering five in 1993. He currently sits on death row.) Burns has entered a plea of not guilty. His trial was set for Oct. 14, 2019 at the Linn County Courthouse, but on Sept. 17, the defense filed a delay request, citing the need for more time to gather evidence. The prosecution expressed no objections. As of publication time, the request is still pending. •

“I AM so happy that [John and Janelle Stonebraker] can get answers,” Robert Riley posted in his Facebook group after the police press conference. He has since changed the name of the group from “Michelle Martinko Cold Case 1979” to “MICHELLE MARTINKO 1961-1979.” “I don’t believe in closure - because it doesn’t bring that loved one back - but justice and answers helps heal a little!” Martinko’s former classmates expressed astonishment, relief and “happy tears” upon hearing of Burns’ arrest. Many have also said their initial joy gave way to fresh feelings of

Cont. >> on pg. 36

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August 23 to December 14, 2019 The Grinnell College Museum of Art collection contains over 5,000 objects from antiquity to the present day. This fall, the Museum celebrates its 20th anniversary with an exhibition of a diverse and ever-growing collection spanning both the centuries and the globe. Free and open Monday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. grinnell.edu/museum

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Courtesy of Sharyl Cartmill

COMMUNITY

Love Letters

An Uninvited Journey A family navigates the winding road of Alzheimer’s and dementia. BY SHARYL CARTMILL

This essay won first place in the Love Letters: What Matters Most contest, hosted by Honoring Your Wishes, a division of Iowa City Hospice. The essay prompt asked writers to reflect on themes of love, forgiveness and gratitude. Read the second- and thirdplace essays at littlevillagemag.com.

F

amily road trips were usually eventful for my family and me when I was younger. If Dad knew where he was going, fine. However, if it was somewhere we had never been before, he would hand the map to Mom and ask her to navigate. Mom would pore over the map, her finger traveling down the line, never as fast as Dad would like. “Let me see.” Dad would grow impatient, then grab the map—“Give me the map, Rose”—and try to read and drive at

18 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

the same time. My sister and I would snicker, because we knew what would inevitably follow: Mom insisting that Dad needed to pull over. “Al, why don’t you ask someone at the next filling station.” Sometimes Dad would say, “I think I know where we need to go—” and take a wrong turn before finally listening to Mom. But Alzheimer’s/dementia introduced my family to a new landscape we were forced to traverse. It was not part of the original plan. The plan was that my parents, who had worked hard all their lives, would enjoy their retirement. Mom’s heart attack in 1997 and subsequent seven-bypass surgery was a setback, which she overcame with her usual grace and gratitude. This was entirely different. When Dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, my parents moved into a

facility near me in October 2013. It was the first of many challenges my parents faced. Having to relinquish your home and most of your belongings is one thing. But how do you tell an 83-year-old man who has taken care of his wife for more than 60 years that he must stop—that someone must accompany him when he wants to spend any time with her? Yet what began as inaccurate valuation of my mother’s condition (she was assessed as advanced-stage dementia when she was early-stage), coupled with culturally uninformed care snowballed into a perfect storm, culminating in dwindling finances, separate living arrangements, a sharp decline in Dad’s health and multiple moves from one facility to the next. Dad no longer trusted anyone in health care. I shared his misgivings. Language became a minefield. You want


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COMMUNITY

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after Dad died. I phoned Mom frequently and to reminisce, but you must step lightly. visited as often as possible. We talked about “Remember” was a word we hesitated to everything, especially the past. I marveled say. The word was once like the warm wathat with all that she lost, she held no resenttermelon we rolled on our tongues to savor ment. She had let everything go and encourits sticky sweetness, a word batted back and aged me to do likewise. This was a woman forth breezily. When Alzheimer’s loomed, who endured—loving unreservedly, grateful “remember” had to be rationed according to for her family, friends and little things that Dad’s mood. came her way. But Mom, in her wisdom, still held the I felt that if she would not be angry, then map. A “daddy’s girl,” Mom clung to old I could be angry for her. After all, this was stories, especially those about her father. a woman who loved me, who advocated for One story that endured involved an accident. me when I was bullied at school. She was the Mom’s father worked on the Santa Fe railone who listened to my meanderings on the road, one of the few jobs available to black piano, encouraged my dreams and admonmen in Fort Madison during the Depression. ished me when I needed that, too. A train ran over Grandpa, and, according to This was a woman who prayed every night Mom, the doctors wanted to give up on him for her children—who prayed her wayward because he had lost so much blood. “‘You daughter into might as well the Church, knock him in and who, I the head,’” THE WORD WAS ONCE LIKE THE believe, still Mom recalled prays for me people saying. WARM WATERMELON WE ROLLED now. One doctor disON OUR TONGUES TO SAVOR ITS I think agreed. “‘I’ll STICKY SWEETNESS, A WORD clarity came take the case.’” for me after Mom said BATTED BACK AND FORTH BREEZILY. exploring old that the docWHEN ALZHEIMER’S LOOMED, photos sometor amputated “REMEMBER” HAD TO BE RATIONED time after Grandpa’s leg, Mom died in but saved his ACCORDING TO DAD’S MOOD. April 2018. life. When choosMom told us ing a picture the story more for the funeral program, my sister found one frequently as time passed. For her, it repreof Mom as a young woman. My mother is sented the importance of steadfastness. And sitting on the front stoop before the house I wonder if, subconsciously, she recalled my parents shared in the early days of their that story during the more difficult moments 63-year marriage. She is clasping her hands with Dad as his Alzheimer’s progressed. She, around her knees, her toes wriggling in anticmore than anyone, would stand by her husipation through her sandals. Her expression band, no matter what. informs me, “I am ready for all that life has “Hold onto God’s unchanging Hand,” she to hold for me,” as joy and hope chase each advised my sister and me time and again. other across my mother’s face. That advice carried us, as Dad became someWhen I look closer, I detect, at last, a seone we hardly knew anymore. cret so profound, moving me to tears. The joy It carried us again in our grief, when Dad in her face reflects one holding on to God’s died in July 2016. Hand, with no intention of ever letting go. It also carried us as we watched Mom slowly shrink away. Dementia taught me to shift my gaze, to look sideways at the people Sharyl Cartmill, MA, LMSW, received her I love, because I didn’t want to see them as graduate degrees in English and social work they had become. Mom’s skin was thin folds at the University of Iowa and lives in Des that I was reticent to touch for fear of tearing Moines. In her professional career, Sharyl it. Daddy’s Rosie was dying. has worked and volunteered in a variety of So rather than cling to her hands, I clung fields, including testing and social work. to her words. During the final stages of Dad’s In addition to pursuing entrance into the disease, my parents had moved to Michigan Secular Franciscan Order, Sharyl enjoys to be near my sister. Mom remained there reading and writing. 20 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272


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COMMUNITY

En Español

Lejana POR CATALINA IRIGOYEN

Mamá, Papá, Joaco… Aba, Camo… Abu Lidia, Abeto… Ayo, Jose…Tío Martín, Tía Ale, Tío Mariano, Eze, Clari, Agus, Juan… ¿Están ahí? A veces me canso de escuchar sus voces a través de la línea telefónica A veces me siento sola Sola en Buenos Aires porque no crecí ahí Sola en Quito porque no nací ahí Sola en Iowa por no ser estadounidense Sola… Sola en mi piel porque no soy ni white ni brown Sola en Latinoamérica por tener apellido europeo Sola A veces quiero volver a casa Pero no sé cómo llegar Porque llegaría fragmentada Una parte a Argentina Otra parte a Ecuador Y parte de mí se quedaría acá No soy dueña de nada Ni de mi cultura (porque, ¿cómo se puede ser dueño de algo tan disperso por el mundo?) Ni de mi lugar (porque ¿cómo se puede vivir en un lugar donde nunca seré más que extranjera?) No soy dueña de mi idioma Porque a veces se me cruza el english con el español Y lo que queda de mi acento son recuerdos lejanos Me siento sola porque mi hogar No es cuestión de geografía… Mamá, Papá, Joaco… ¿están ahí? A veces cuento los días hasta volver a verlos (solo queda un mes) Aba, Camo… ¿están ahí? ¿Cómo fue no poder abrazar a su nieta todos los días? Abu, Abeto… ¿están ahí? Los extraño cada vez más pero solo viven en mi memoria Ayo, Jose, Clari, Agus, Juan … ¿están ahí? Perdón que no los llamo más seguido. Tío Martín, Tía Ale, Tío Mariano, Eze… ¿están ahí? Quisiera poder verlos más que solo en Navidad ¿Están ahí? ¿Estoy acá? Sé que a veces es difícil imaginarme en un lugar que desconocen Es difícil creer que estoy tan lejos Si cuando hablamos por teléfono sueno tan cerca Si no fuera por la mala señal Casi, casi, parece que estoy ahí.

22 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

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FREE A $5 donation helps JFAN protect Jefferson County’s quality of life. www.jfaniowa.org LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 23


COMMUNITY

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Distant

WRITTEN AND TRANSLATED BY CATALINA IRIGOYEN

Mamá, Papá, Joaco… Aba, Camo… Abu Lidia, Abeto… Ayo, Jose…Tío Martín, Tía Ale, Tío Mariano, Eze, Clari, Agus, Juan… Are you there? Sometimes I get tired of hearing your voices through the phone Sometimes I feel alone Alone in Buenos Aires because I didn’t grow up there Alone in Quito because I wasn’t born there Alone in Iowa because I’m not American Alone Alone in Latin America for having a European last name Alone Sometimes I want to go back home But I don’t know how I’d get there Because I’d arrive in fragments One part would go to Argentina Another to Ecuador And part of me would stay here I don’t own anything Not my culture (because how can you own something so dispersed around the world?) Not my place (because how can I live in a place where I’ll never be more than a foreigner?) I don’t own my language Because sometimes my English and Spanish get crossed And what’s left of my accent are distant memories I feel alone because my home Is not a matter of geography Mamá, Papá, Joaco… are you there? Sometimes I count the days left to see you (just one month left) Aba, Camo… are you there? What was it like not being able to hug your granddaughter every day? Abu Lidia, Abeto… are you there? I miss you more each day, but you only live in my memory Ayo, Jose, Clari, Agus, Juan… are you there? I’m sorry I don’t call more often Tío Martín, Tía Ale, Tío Mariano, Eze… are you there? I wish I could see you for more than just some Christmases Are you there? Am I here? I know sometimes it’s hard to picture me in a place you don’t know It’s hard to believe I’m so far away If when we talk on the phone I sound so close If it wasn’t for the bad signal It’s almost, almost like I’m there. 24 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

Catalina Irigoyen is majoring in English and creative writing at the University of Iowa. Born in Argentina, she has lived in six different countries.


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 25


BREAD & BUTTER

LV Recommends:

Get Fresh Cafe 109 Iowa Ave, Iowa City

F IOWA CITY DOWNTOWN

ood is imperative to a dining experience, of course, but in my opinion, it’s the windows that really define an eating establishment. Hear me out: When a ray of sunshine enters through a pane of glass and accentuates the dramatic peaks and valleys of a scoop of curry chicken salad? *kisses fingertips* Perfection. Get Fresh Cafe, located on Iowa Avenue in Iowa City, boasts large, north-facing

Open 7 days a week

windows that welcome sunlight into its teal and red brick interior. A long, bamboo countertop table extends parallel to the windows, ideal for people-watching and skimming a Little Village magazine during a solo lunch break. Leafy plants, mid-century-style chairs and yellow accents decorate the space with clean, minimalist charm. Wendy Zimmerman, owner of Get Fresh, said she wanted to create a “nurturing environment” for patrons to hang out in and enjoy the cafe’s nutrient-dense, seasonally rotating menu. The juices and smoothies made with local ingredients should be familiar to those who frequent NewBo City Market and the Iowa City Farmers Market, where Get Fresh has

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11 S. DUBUQUE ST. MICKYSIRISHPUB.COM

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • DRINKS

26 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

long had a presence. There’s strawberry-banana and triple-berry smoothies, bright green Oh Kale Yeah juice (a blend of juiced kale, spinach, pineapple, zucchini and mint) and infused water, among many other colorful beverage options. But the Iowa City cafe has an expanded menu including salads, smoothie bowls and grab-and-go items. I ordered an açai smoothie bowl, which consisted of an açai blend topped with strawberries, blueberries, coconut and a layer of ancient grain granola, for $12. The açai bowl alone would suffice for a mid-day meal, but Wendy urged me to try the curry chicken salad, which was replete with cubed chicken, peas, celery and specks of curry spices, all over fresh greens and

Helaina Thompson / Little Village

Helaina Thompson / Little Village

LittleVillageMag.com/Dining


decorated with sliced apple, carrot, red peppers and craisens. Salads range from $9 to $12, depending on their size and the protein you choose. Get Fresh chef Tyler Jordan makes all dressings in-house (the Green Goddess dressing is

divine), calling his domain a “no short-cuts” kitchen. As Get Fresh settles into its new location, the menu will continue to grow to encompass the entire food pyramid, including wraps, grain bowls and overnight oats. “I want to provide food that is as

nutrient-dense as our juice,” said Wendy, whose Get Fresh journey began with a small juice bar in NewBo City Market seven years ago. “I want to give people an easy way to eat healthy.” —Helaina Thompson

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 27


CULTURE

A-List

‘Punk Was About Action!’ A new documentary follows the minds behind Dischord Records and the D.C. punk scene. BY KEMBREW MCLEOD

“I

remember first hearing about punk in Newsweek or Time magazine in the summer of 1976, when we were living in Afghanistan,” mused Minor Threat drummer Jeff Nelson, whose father worked for the U.S. State Department. Nelson was born in 1962 in South Africa and lived in other far-flung places before the family settled in Washington D.C., where he attended Woodrow Wilson Public High School. “I heard my first punk records in 1977 when I was living in America,” he continued, “but I really didn’t start getting into it until 1978.” He connected with Ian MacKaye in a high school German class at the beginning of 11th grade, and they became fast friends. “We talked about music, exchanged cassettes of rock bands we liked, and got into punk at the same time.” “It was ’78,” MacKaye said, “and a lot of people in my high school were getting into new wave and punk, and I was a skateboarder who was into Ted Nugent, hard rock, heavy funk.” He thought this new music sucked and was happy to share that opinion, until someone asked if he had ever actually listened to a punk record. “No,” he admitted, so MacKaye borrowed Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols and some other discs from a friend. “I was struck by how unpleasant the music sounded,” he recalled. “It was so weird, but also scary. I was a little freaked about it, but I think that if something is that appalling, I tend to go towards it.” A Cramps show on Feb. 3, 1979 sealed the deal for the two friends. “A lot of the people who were early punks were there,” MacKaye said. “Guy [Picciotto] from Fugazi, that was his first show. It was absolutely an incredible, defining moment.” The next day, he cut his hair and decided to pick up the bass, an instrument he had never played before. “The thing that was so exciting to us was 28 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

the electricity in the room,” Nelson said of that Cramps show. “Compare that to Ian’s and my first concert—which we both attended, though we hadn’t met yet—which was Queen and Thin Lizzy. It was an amazing show, but it was an arena rock concert and a different experience.” Within a year, the two friends started a

band and co-founded Dischord Records, one of the most influential, venerable independent labels in the U.S. Their band, Slinkees, practiced all summer and played one show in a garage before their singer went off to college in the fall of 1979, after which they evolved into Teen Idles. “Then Teen Idles broke up,” Nelson said,


LittleVillageMag.com

Teen Idles (Nathan Strejeck, Jeff Nelson, Ian MacKaye and Geordie Grindle), taken outside of Madam’s Organ, a performance space featured in Punk the Capital. Photo by Lucian Perkins

GET OUT!

‘Punk the Capital: Building a Sound Movement’ Screening and Q&A w/ James June Schneider, Jeff Nelson, FilmScene Chauncey, Iowa City, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 7 p.m., $8 Punk Show, Gabe’s, Iowa City, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 9 p.m., Free

“but we saved $600 and decided to put out the single, and that became Dischord Records’ number one. By that point, we had already formed Minor Threat.” The punk-rock dominoes continued to fall. Before Amy Pickering became the vocalist for Fire Party—another key Dischord band—she attended H-B Woodlawn High

School, which hosted a show by Teen Idles and other early D.C. groups. “I immediately was taken,” she said. “I got involved initially volunteering to glue seven-inch single sleeves over at the Dischord house, and then that morphed into 22 years of working there.” Many of these events are captured in the

2019 documentary Punk the Capital: Building a Sound Movement, a meticulously crafted film that took 16 years to complete. “I grew up in Washington D.C. in the mid-1980s punk and skateboard communities and was introduced to the music when I was 12 by an older kid on the school bus,” said Punk the Capital co-creator James June Schneider, who will be in Iowa City with Nelson for a screening of the film at FilmScene Chauncey on Oct. 15. “The first record I ever bought was Minor Threat. It all started local for me.” Schneider said that Punk the Capital’s vintage Super-8 film footage—much of which was shot by co-director Paul Bishow—forms the film’s foundation, as do other archival LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 29


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CULTURE

LittleVillageMag.com

almost too much to take when I first heard sources. it. Clearly, it hit every button on my anger “They did an amazing job of capturing spectrum around the topic.” that era we all grew up within,” Nelson said. For many key players in the D.C. punk “The film is very carefully distilled, and realscene, the intellectualism that drove their acly conveys how shocking and different punk tivism was absorbed through osmosis from was compared to what was going on at the their families. time.” “Lots of people we knew were State D.C. punk shows in the late 1970s took Department brats or their parents were in place in a variety of D.I.Y. spaces, but one the government,” Nelson said, “and Ian’s of the main spots where the scene coalesced dad was an editor at the Washington Post.” was in a group house named Madam’s Nelson also came from a newspaper family, Organ. This old townhouse had a gallery from Iowa. and stage on the first His maternal grandparfloor and was inhabitents, Leslie G. Moeller ed by older Yippies and “I THINK THAT IF and Dorothy Wilson various remnants of the Moeller, met at the School 1960s counterculture, SOMETHING IS of Journalism at what was including a witch and THAT APPALLING, then known as the State other assorted pagans. I TEND TO GO University of Iowa, and “I went to a number both graduated in 1925 of shows there early on,” TOWARDS IT.” (Leslie became the direcMacKaye said, “and tor of that school in the late December of 1979, Teen 1940s). The couple worked Idles played our first –IAN MACKAYE at newspapers in different show, and then we got parts of Iowa before marrya call from Bad Brains ing, and they eventually beabout opening for them came owners of Waverly’s twin weeklies, the at Madam’s Organ. Playing at Madam’s Waverly Democrat and the Bremer County Organ was the big time for us. It was just a Independent. tiny house, but it had a stage, which made it After moving back to Iowa City, the famseem like a real show.” ily settled in a large house near downtown at D.C. punk was unique in the way that it 623 College St (it burned down in 2015 after was fairly bookish and also political. “The being struck by lightning). Nelson often visintellectual quotient drove the politics and ited his grandparents back in the late 1960s the music,” Pickering said. “Punk was about and early ’70s, when the future Minor Threat action! I was lucky to find myself in a group drummer would play in College Green Park of thinkers, readers and community-minded across the street, or in the back staircase of givers.” the house where his mother was raised. His Nelson observed that his early bands— parents live in Iowa City now. Slinkees, Teen Idles, Minor Threat—were For Nelson, growing up in a learned famnot overtly political. “But by the time we ily proved to be just as influential as seeing were in our mid-20s, around 1987, we startthe Cramps, something that complicates simed to have our own opinions about things and plistic punk narratives that foreground anger felt like we knew enough that we could shout and anarchy. about it.” “What I got from punk,” MacKaye said, This coincided with the emergence of “was skywriting saying, ‘Self-Definition: Fugazi and other D.C. bands that critiqued You Decide Who You Want to Be.’” both the nation-state (they lived in the U.S. capital, after all) and gender politics. “Why can’t I walk down a street free of Kembrew McLeod first saw Fugazi in 1988 suggestion?” MacKaye sang on Fugazi’s as a teen in Virginia Beach, a show that 1988 debut record, imagining himself in the stands out in MacKaye’s mind because, as shoes of a woman like Amy Pickering. he recalled, “Just before we went on stage, a “Ian wrote ‘Suggestion’ inspired in part by skinhead with a swastika earring told me that my frequent arrival at the Dischord house, there was a ‘hit’ out of me for ‘betraying the apoplectic at being harassed on the street scene’—a crime that I had not realized was while I walked there,” Pickering said. “It was punishable by death!”


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EDITORS’ PICKS

CALENDAR EVENTS AROUND THE CRANDIC OCT. 2–15, 2019 Planning an event? Submit event info to calendar@littlevillagemag. com. Include event name, date, time, venue, street address, admission price and a brief description (no all-caps, exclamation points or advertising verbiage, please). To find more events, visit littlevillagemag.com/calendar. Please check venue listing in case details have changed.

Wed., Oct. 2 Iowa City Open Coffee, Merge, Iowa City, 8 a.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: CORRIDOR DUCT CLEANING

One Million Cups, NewBoCo, Cedar Rapids, 8:15 a.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: BANKERS ADVERTISING One Million Cups, Merge, Iowa City, 9 a.m., Free (Weekly) IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Rising Together: Protest in Print Gallery Talk, UI Main Library Gallery, Iowa City, 4 p.m., Free

516 2nd Street Coralville, IA

Iowa City Wednesday Farmers Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 5 p.m. (Weekly) Unplugged Game Night, NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m. (Weekly)

    

    

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IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

John Sandford, Iowa City Public Library, 7 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

SILT (Sustainable Iowa Land Trust) Presents: Raj Patel, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free


STAFF PICKS

WHAT ARE WE DOING?

Gallery Walk: ‘Starman Press’ exhibit, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, Friday, Oct. 4, 5 p.m., Free As part of the Iowa City

Downtown District’s fall Gallery Walk, a selection of Andy Schmidt’s unique screen-printed posters will be on display at the Douglas and Linda Paul Gallery in the Englert Theatre. Schmidt, also known as Starman Press, is notorious for his music-centered and eccentric art, specifically his gig posters for Mission Creek Festival shows over the fest’s 14 years. The exhibition will take place on Oct. 4, 5-8 p.m., and is free to the public. Attendants will have the opportunity to see iconic music brought to the page in the same theater in which such music is played live. United Action for Youth, AKAR, Textiles and LUXE Interiors are some of the other stops participants may make on their adventure across the Downtown District for the fall gallery walk. —Natalie Dunlap

Susan Steinberg reads from ‘Machine,’ Prairie Lights, Iowa City, Friday, Oct. 11, 7 p.m., Free Steinberg’s weird, deeply an-

gry new novel examines the guilt and blame that reverberates through a community of privileged teenaged summer-homers after the mysterious drowning of one of their own. Was it a drunken accident? A suicide? Was she murdered? It reads at once like a mystery and the most hopeless coming-of-age story ever. Her exploration of the internal lives of gorgeous teenage girls who have it all will depress you and piss you off in equal measure. If nothing else, go just to experience Steinberg’s singular use of the semicolon— there’s truly nothing like it. —Celine Robins

OCT. 2–15, 2019

‘The Tragedy of Carmen,’ Presented by the University of Iowa School of Music, Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, Friday, Oct. 11 and Saturday, Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m., October 13, 2 p.m., $20

Oh… hello there. I’m just sorting through these gowns while I prepare for an evening at the opera. Don’t mind me––I’m happy to chat for a moment while I do. Since you’re here, darling, I’ve just had a manicure–– would you mind terribly holding up a few strings of pearls so I can decide which best go with my stole? They’re just over there, in the jewelry box on top of the vanity, near that bubbling flute of champagne. Would you like a glass? By all means, help yourself. The bottle is on ice, next to the veranda. ––Jordan Sellergren

Spooky Legends of Linn County, hosted by The History Center, Cedar Rapids, Saturday, Oct. 12, 7 p.m., $5

Autumn has arrived, whether you accept it or not. Not much says fall more than ghost stories, a campfire, s’mores and hot chocolate––all of which will be present at the History Center’s mid-October ghost-story gathering. The spooky tales (told by local storyteller, public speaker and writer Akwi Nji) and fall essentials are bound to get you in the fall-loving, Halloween spirit. But hopefully there won’t be any real spirits in attendance. If you find yourself scared at this (family friendly) event, the s’mores are bound to make everything better. Don’t forget your lawn chair! —Izabela Zaluska


EDITORS’ PICKS Open Mic Night, Penguin’s

Thu., Oct. 3

Comedy Club, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., Free (Weekly)

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LITZ, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m.,

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IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly)

James Geary: Juggling Aphorisms, Shambaugh

THIS WEEK: ‘THE FOG’

Auditorium, UI Main Library, Iowa

Late Shift at the Grindhouse,

City, 5:15 p.m., Free

FilmScene Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $5.50 (Weekly)

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Literary Kiosk Writing Workshop, Iowa City Public Library, 5:30 p.m., Free


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR Lamrim Kadampa Buddhist

‘A Night with Janis Joplin’

Centre Iowa City Meditation

Starring Mary Bridget Davies,

Class, Quaker Friends Meeting

Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids,

House, Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., $5-

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10 (Weekly) BROOKLYN PUNK IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

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Sunday, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9

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COMMUNITY >> Cont. from pg. 17 sadness and disorientation. “I just started screaming,” Elizabeth Laymon, a high school friend of Martinko’s, told CBS2/FOX28. “I don’t know that I processed it for a while because it’s just unbelievable. Now that I’ve seen his picture—that I’ve seen him make an appearance in court—it’s just a different feeling. It’s a little more anger.” Since their statement, the Stonebrakers have stayed quiet regarding the legal proceedings against Burns. “They understand the importance of letting the due process play its course,” Hansen said. Hansen was surprised to learn that her first instinct about Martinko’s killer back in ’79— that he was a stranger from out of town, despite the “personal nature” of the attack—is likely correct after all. She has “full confidence” in the detectives’ judgment. “If Jerry Burns was the perpetrator, I’d like to see him put away. They don’t have capital punishment in Iowa like we have here in Texas, but if he is found guilty, I’d like to see him put in the penetentiary and the key thrown away,” Hansen said. “If you read about Jerry Burns’ life, he got to do all the stuff Michelle never got to do. She never got to finish her education, she didn’t get to have a career, she didn’t get to get married or have children, or make the decisions not to. She didn’t get to live her life. She was just starting out, just starting to blossom as a young adult.” Despite the encouraging progress made in the Martinko investigation over the last few years, Gauntt said the numbness he developed over the first three decades of the case is slow to fade. “I should say I hope they nail that guy, but the whole bring-the-murderer-to-justice thing has never been a major factor when I think about the murder,” Gauntt said. “I can’t imagine ever having closure from this event. Because she’s gone. No matter what happens.”

10/23

Conversation:

OBERMANN CONVERSATIONS 2019–20

A Vital Tool for Mending Our Democracy Lore Baur Teacher & Certified Trainer in Nonviolent Communication Southeast Junior High

Ben Hassman Director, UI Conversation Center Sherry Watt Professor, UI Higher Education & Student Affairs

Weds., Oct. 23, 4–5 p.m. Iowa City Public Library 123 Linn St. | Free & open to all

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Erin Hackathorn in advance at 319-335-4034.

Want to make a difference in Johnson County?

Apply for a board or commission! Vacancies are available on the following boards and commissions: • • • • • • •

Jen Moulton grew up in Cedar Rapids and attended Kennedy High School, as did her mother, who was a year older than Michelle Martinko. Jen is a University of Iowa graduate, and currently lives in the Chicago area.

• • •

Emma McClatchey contributed reporting to this article.

Board of Health Building Code Board of Appeals Compensation Commission Conservation Board Historic Preservation Commission Food Policy Council Juvenile Justice and Youth Development Policy Board Medical Examiner Planning and Zoning Commission SEATS Paratransit Advisory Committee Zoning Board of Adjustment

Find applications, deadlines and more information at www.johnson-county.com/vacancies. Questions? Call 319-356-6000 or email applications@co.johnson.ia.us. 36 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

Via Matt Braunger’s website

TOP PICKS: QUAD CITIES

OCT. 2–15, 2019

fresh • local • organic

Opening Reception: EDEN—The Photography of Laura Heath, Rozz-Tox, Rock Island, Friday, Oct. 4, 5 p.m., Free

Murnau w/ Giallows, and Chew Toy, Rozz-Tox, Rock Island, Friday, Oct. 11, 9 p.m., $5-10 sliding scale This show prom-

At the beginning of each month, the walls of Rozz-Tox transform to feature works by a local artist. This month, local photographer Laura Heath shows her third exhibition, EDEN. Heath shoots her daring subjects in both natural and contorted states, mostly in black and white, giving her photography a mysterious, powerful touch. Come with an open mind, ready to appreciate the human form. The show is up through Nov. 3. —Paige Underwood

ises to be “intimate and intense”—i.e., sweaty and loud. I can’t wait! Giallows is playing a two-piece synth-punk set they say sounds like Suicide’s first album. Murnau gives us karmic metal (what I imagine a modern D.I.Y. Nine Inch Nails might sound like) while Chew Toy balances the show with poppier experimental garage rock. —MH

Matt Braunger at Tomfoolery on Tremont, Renwick Mansion, Davenport, Sunday, Oct. 6, 8 p.m., $30 This special

Oktoberfest. They go all out, each year bigger and better than its predecessor. This year’s is so big, they had to stretch it out over the first two weekends of the month. Oct. 12 is the last day to enjoy Bavarian pretzels and every type of sausage known to mankind alongside live music, prizes—oh, and beer. It’s bigger than New Year’s Eve. Bigger than St. Pat’s. This is the main event. —MH

edition of Tomfoolery welcomes actor-writer Matt Braunger (you’ve probably seen him on MADtv or NBC or Netflix) to the historic downtown estate-turned-venue. Pretend to be a callow socialite as you wander the grounds during the pre-show happy hour. Local support includes the guy named “Funniest Comedian in Iowa.” —Melanie Hanson

18th Annual Oktoberfest, Bierstube, Moline, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 4-5 and 11-12, 5 p.m., Free Bierstube. Loves.

Come to Groundswell Cafe for healthy, fresh, and locally-sourced food. Your tips and donations provide meals for those who cannot afford to pay.

Located just off I-380! 201 3rd Ave. SW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

319-200-2791 • groundswell.hub25.org/cafe Vegan and vegetarian options available!


EDITORS’ PICKS

Fri., Oct. 4

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

James Geary, UI EnglishIOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Philosophy Building, Iowa City, 4

Dr. Angela Williamson,

p.m., Free

University of Iowa Main Library, Iowa City, 10 a.m., Free

Gallery Walk, Downtown Iowa City, 5 p.m., Free

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

IWP Panel Discussion:

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Speaking Freely?, Iowa City

Jessica Laser and Daniel

Public Library, 12 p.m., Free

Poppick, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., Free

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Drop-in Zine Making

FAC Dance Party, The Union,

Workshop, University of Iowa

Iowa City, 7 p.m. (Weekly)

Main Library Gallery, 1 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Lauren Markham: One

Documentary Screening:

Community One Book, UI

‘A Poetry Reading in Four

Art Building West, Iowa City, 7

Chapters,’ The Center, 2:30

p.m., Free

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Nehring, Trumpet Blossom Cafe,

Show, Paramount Theatre, Cedar

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CORRIDOR CAREER FAIR

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FAST PUNK OUT OF GREEN BAY YOUTH PRODUCTION; OPENING

The Pseudo Feds w/ ZUUL

NIGHT! RUNS THROUGH OCT. 20

and Shock Treatment, Iowa

‘Drac’s Back,’ Giving Tree

City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., $5-10

Theater, Marion, 8 p.m., $16 Brad and the Big Wave w/ Cole Peterson Trio, Sanctuary

Purple Frank, The Mill, Iowa

Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free

City, 8 p.m., $7

FOLK MUSIC’S RENAISSANCE

SoulShake, Gabe’s, Iowa City,

MAN

10 p.m., Free (Weekly)

John McCutcheon, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 8

Flirty Friday’s Drag & Dance

p.m., $20-25

Party, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly)

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EDITORS’ PICKS

Sat, Oct. 5 Iowa City Sunday Farmers Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 7:30 a.m. (Weekly) IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Don Waters, FilmScene Ped Mall, Iowa City, 10 a.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Dr. Angela Williamson, Iowa City Public Library, 10 a.m., Free

journalism interviews essays events

RAISE YOUR

VOICE. TIPS AND SUBMISSIONS:

editor@littlevillagemag.com

Guest Vendor Market, NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly) IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Panel Discussion: Immigration, Masonic Building, Iowa City, 10 a.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Eileen Pollack, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 10 a.m., Free Family Storytime, Iowa City Public Library, 10:30 a.m., Free (Weekly) IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Amanda Lee Koe, FilmScene Ped Mall, Iowa City, 11:30 a.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Panel: University of Iowa Press 50th

READ • SHARE • SUPPORT

Local Independent Media

LittleVillageMag.com

Anniversary, Masonic Building, Iowa City, 11:30 a.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Kendra Allen, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 11:30 a.m., Free


COMING UP AT

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

TOP PICKS: DES MOINES

OCT 2–15, 2019

Opening Reception: Monument Valley Exhibition, Des Moines Art Center, Oct. 4, 6 p.m., Free The Wild West has long

been subject to artistic interpretations of its role in American history. Westerns came about, first in novel form and later on film, romanticizing much of the lawlessness and brutality involved in the settling of the western states. Many paintings can be found in museums nationwide depicting both conflicts and agreements between settlers and natives. To what extent any of these interpretations are rooted in reality is a central question of the Des Moines Art Center’s new exhibition. “Monument Valley” features work from 12 different North American artists, peeling back the layers of myth regarding the American West and analyzing how its history is reflected in modern times. The exhibit runs Oct. 5 through Jan. 12, 2020; the opening reception in the Art Center lobby offers complimentary beverages and hors d’oeuvres.

GWAR w/ Sacred Reich, Toxic Holocaust, Against the Grain, Wooly’s, Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m., $25-30 It was 35 years

ago now that Oderus Urungus and the other members of GWAR descended to Earth and used human technology to record their debut album, Hell-O. Since then, the shapeshifting cast of musicians have gone on to record 14 albums and develop their reputation as one of the planet’s finest live acts. Their shows tend to feature jagged suits of alien armor; plenty of fake gore and violence; and a giant worm the band feeds audience members to. And that’s all while keeping the mosh pit

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Manhattan Short Film Festival, Des Moines Art Center Levitt Auditorium, Oct. 6, 1:30 p.m., Free I’m always amazed

at the scope of films the Manhattan Short Film Festival manages to bring in from all around the world every year. In fact, inclusivity is really what the festival is all about, as proven by their process of picking the winners. Here’s how it works: The films are sent out to over 400 cities to hold screenings. As a viewer, you pick your favorites and the totals are tallied from all viewing locations around the world to determine the winners in each category. That’s about as democratic as it gets—although, year after year, my picks never seem to end up the fan favorites.

CSPS

Zak Nuemann

active with their particular take on the metal genre in its many forms. Regardless of your musical interests, I believe that experiencing the GWAR live show should be on every one of those lists of things people must do before they die, so if you haven’t yet had the opportunity during your puny little life on this planet, now’s your chance, earthling! Pizza Party III, Vaudeville Mews, Oct. 12, 3 p.m., $20 Pizza Party is an annual,

no-nonsense celebration of regional punk rock stylings. The event is actually split into two parts—the all-ages early show runs until 9 p.m., and the 21+ show starts after that. The cover gets you into both shows and also snags you a free go at the mountain of pizza available to all attendants. That’s it! No gimmicks. Just punk rock and pizza (while supplies last). Bands include: Make Your Mark, Finger Betty, the Shidiots, No Coast Criminals, Loi!L Pride, Virgin Whores, Squared Off, Drink Fight Thugs, Victimized Youth, Exlex, and the Shame. —Trey Reis


EDITORS’ PICKS IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

William Steele, Iowa City Public Library, 11:30 a.m., Free FREE TO WANDER, TICKET TO TASTE!

2019 Northside Oktoberfest, Northside Neighborhood, Iowa City, 12 p.m., Free-$55 IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

John Domini, The Center, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Panel: Who Do You Read?, Masonic Building, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Lori Erickson, The Center, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Paula Becker, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

William Steele, Iowa City Public Library, 1 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Joseph Dobrian, The Center, Iowa City, 2:30 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

A Sense of Place, Masonic Building, Iowa City, 2:30 p.m., Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Andy Douglas, The Center, Iowa City, 2:30 p.m., Free

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EDITORS’ PICKS IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

DREAMY, EXPERIMENTAL

Donika Kelly and Melissa

SOUNDSCAPES

Febos, Prairie Lights Books &

Deep Sea Diver w/ Purple

Cafe, Iowa City, 2:30 p.m., Free

Frank, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10-12

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Kassandra Montag, Iowa City

MEMPHIS ROCK AND ROLL

Public Library, 2:30 p.m., Free

Lucero w/ the Huntress & Holder of Hands, Wildwood

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City,

Christina Ward, Shambaugh

8 p.m., $25

Auditorium, UI Main Library, Iowa City, 2:30 p.m., Free

Steve Grismore Trio, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

A Celebration for Connie

Elation Dance Party, Studio

Brothers, UI Macbride

13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5-10

Auditorium, Iowa City, 4 p.m.,

(Weekly)

Free THIS WEEK: ‘THE BIG SLEEP’ IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Bijou After Hours, FilmScene

Panel: Politics, Masonic

Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $8

Building, Iowa City, 4 p.m., Free PRESENTED BY TAU PSI OMEGA

Sun., Oct. 6

CHAPTER OF ALPHA KAPPA

Winners will be published in our special issue

A Reader-Selected

Locals' Guide to the CR and IC Area hitting stands Dec. 4 and online at:

LittleVillageMag.com/CRANDIC

ALPHA SORORITY INC.

Guest Vendor Market, NewBo

Films of the Harlem

City Market, Cedar Rapids, 10

Renaissance, FilmScene Ped

a.m. (Weekly)

Mall, Iowa City, 4 p.m., $5-10 Hiawatha Farmers Market, IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Guthridge Park, Hiawatha, 10

Joe Michaud, The Center, Iowa

a.m. (Weekly)

City, 4 p.m., Free KITES, GAMES, RACES AND IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

CANDY DROPS!

Lisa Tetrault, Prairie Lights

Take Flight!, Centennial Park,

Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 4 p.m.,

North Liberty, 11 a.m., Free

Free IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Read Aloud, Iowa City Public

Josh Gondelman and Lyz

Library, 1 p.m., Free

Lenz, Iowa City Public Library, 4 p.m., Free

FEATURING STORYTELLER DARRIN CROW; ALSO OCT. 26!

FROM THE DEPTHS OF DREAMS

Morbid Curiosities—An

TOUR

Evening with Edgar Allan

Senses Fail w/ Yours Truly,

Poe, Giving Tree Theater, Marion,

Hot Mulligan, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 7

2 p.m., $11

p.m., $18

LITTLE VILLAGE’S BEST OF THE CRANDIC IS PRESENTED BY:

CLOSING PERFORMANCE PRESENTED BY THE IOWA HARM

‘Uncle Vanya,’ Riverside

REDUCTION COALITION

Theatre, Iowa City, 2 p.m., $30

The Overdose Crisis In

44 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

America: 2020 Dem. Pres.

Sunday Funday, Iowa City

Candidate Forum, Englert

Public Library, Iowa City, 2 p.m.,

Theatre, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $20

Free (Weekly)


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

TOP PICKS: WATERLOO/CEDAR FALLS

Tom Nicol

OCTOBER 2-15, 2019

‘Korczak’s Children,’ Waterloo Community Playhouse/Black Hawk Children’s Theatre, Waterloo, through Oct. 5, $10 Korczak’s Children, a 2006 play

by Jeffrey Hatcher, explores the life and legacy of Dr. Janusz Korczak, a pediatrician and children’s book author (born Henryk Goldszmit) who worked in an orphanage in Warsaw, Poland during the Nazi occupation. He gave up many offers of sanctuary for himself to stay with the children he served; among other things, he allowed them to stage a play to help them come to terms with the notion of death. Due to the themes explored, the theater encourages caution when considering bringing children under 10. In addition to the ticket price, attendees are asked to bring a donation of a jar of peanut butter or make a cash donation to combat child hunger in the region.

Red Herring Theatre Presents: Compleat Female Stage Beauty, Hearst Center for the Arts, Cedar Falls, Thursday, Oct. 10, 7 p.m., Free Red Herring Theatre kicks off

their 2019-20 season with a reading of another Jeffrey Hatcher play, 1999’s Compleat Female Stage Beauty. The play was

adapted by Hatcher into the 2004 film *Stage Beauty*, with Claire Danes and Billy Crudup. It tells the story of Ned Kynaston, the last female impersonator in 1600s London, right as the ban is lifted on women performing on stage. Greater Iowa Reef Society Presents: Fall Fest 2019, National Cattle Congress, Waterloo, Saturday, Oct. 12, 10 a.m., Free-$5 The Greater Iowa Reef Society is an

organization dedicated to promoting understanding and knowledge of home aquariums. The group hosts regular community events, including this day-long festival that will include presentations (such as on aquascaping), a raffle and a kids’ area. Society members and kids under 18 are free; $5 to the general public.

Brotherhood of the Mudkat w/ Space Virus, Frontal Assault, Allt Minna, Vestige, Toppling Despots, Spicoli’s Reverb, Waterloo, Saturday, Oct. 12, 7 p.m., $5-7 Some of Cedar Rapids’ heaviest

are trekking north for a slamming show at Spicoli’s. Leading the pack are CR metal/punk stalwarts Brotherhood of the Mudkat.


EDITORS’ PICKS IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

Mon., Oct. 7

The Terrain of No Words: An Elegy for Refugees A

Coralville Farmers Market,

Reading of Bejan Matur’s Sea

Coralville Community Aquatic

of Fate, Iowa City Public Library,

Center Parking Lot, 5 p.m.

2:30 p.m., Free

(Weekly)

IOWA CITY BOOK FESTIVAL

RESCHEDULED FROM MAY!

Little Village Magazine

MEET AT LINN ST ENTRANCE.

Presents: The Roast of Iowa

REGISTRATION ENCOURAGED.

City, The Mill, Iowa City, 5:30

Mural Walk with Thomas

p.m., Free

Agran, Director of Public Art, Iowa City Public Library, 6 p.m.,

EAST COAST PUNK

Free

Doc Hopper w/ Rad Owl, TV Cop, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m.,

READING: ‘THE BODY PAPERS: A

donations accepted

MEMOIR’

Grace Talusan In Pub Quiz, The Mill, Iowa City, 9

Conversation with Shirley

p.m., $1 (Weekly)

Wang, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free Open Mic, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)


D A O L N DOW APP THE ER V O C S I TO D N

R E T S EA IOWTAS

EVETN ED BY A R CU LAGE L I V E LITTL

LittleVillageMag.com/App


EDITORS’ PICKS SCOTLAND’S ROOTS REVIVAL

LOS ANGELES PROG ROCK / JAZZ FUSION

Old Blind Dogs, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar

Virgil Donati Band w/ Igneous, Pale Blue

Rapids, 7 p.m., $20-25

Erf, the Unsettled Serenade, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $20

LUSH ELECTRONICA

Com Truise w/ Ford., Thoma, Gabe’s, Iowa

Blues Jam, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar

City, 7:30 p.m., $20

Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Comedy Open Mic with Spencer & Dan,

READING: ‘THIS TENDER LAND’

Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

William Kent Krueger, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Tue., Oct. 8

HOST: MIKE LUCAS

Back Room Comedy, Big Grove Brewery & Food Truck Tuesdays, NewBo City Market,

Taproom, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $5

Cedar Rapids, 11 a.m. (Weekly) Yahoo Drummers, Downtown Iowa City, 7:30 Cultivate Hope Market, Cultivate Hope Urban

p.m., Free (Weekly)

Farm, Cedar Rapids, 4:30 p.m. (Weekly) Weekly Old-Timey Jam Sessions, Trumpet LOS ANGELES ELECTRONICA

Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free

Mystery Skulls, Iowa City Yacht Club, 5 p.m.,

(Weekly)

$15 Sinkane, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $16-18

Unique Looks. Complete Costumes. Incredible Value.

Upcoming Events: EVERY MONDAY - PARCHMENT LOUNGE - 6:30 PM free write session hosted by Iowa Writer's House EVERY WEDNESDAY - ANDREW'S BAR EXAM - 7:00 PM

OCT 4

Cole Peterson Trio

OCT 5

Steve Grismore Trio

8 PM 8 PM

OCT 11 8 PM

OCT 12 8 PM

OCT 18 8 PM

OCT 19 8 PM

OCT 20 8 PM

Robert “One Man� Johnson Cole Thomas Trio Choro Moingona

Saul Lubaroff Trio 2 Carries Pub Quiz Trio

MONDAYS ARE HAPPY HOUR EVERY HOUR! SUNDAYS ARE 1/2 OFF ALL PIZZA ALL DAY! (319) 351-5692 • 405 S GILBERT ST, IOWA CITY



Coupon Code: 03-09019


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR DENVER DANCEABLE PSYCHEDELIC ROCK

Iowa City Wednesday Farmers Market,

Joyce Manor, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $17-

RADO, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m.

Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 5 p.m.

20

(Weekly) Nasty Boys w/ A Day Without Love, Miss

Dance Party with DJ JD, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Unplugged Game Night, NewBo City Market,

Christine, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., $5-10

Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m. (Weekly) Open Stage, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10 p.m.,

Comedy & Karaoke, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Burlington Street Bluegrass Band, The Mill,

Free (Weekly)

Iowa City, 6 p.m., $5 (2nd & 4th Wednesdays) Karaoke Tuesdays, The Mill, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Wed., Oct. 9

THIS WEEK: ‘BAD BLACK’ READING: ‘GOOD AND MAD: THE

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, FilmScene

REVOLUTIONARY POWER OF WOMEN’S

Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $5.50 (Weekly)

ANGER’

Rebecca Traister, Iowa City Public Library, 7 p.m., Free

Thu., Oct. 10

CANADIAN SINGER-SONGWRITER

I.C. Press Co-op open shop, Public Space

Royal Wood, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids,

One, Iowa City, 4 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Iowa City Open Coffee, Merge, Iowa City, 8 a.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: PULSE FINANCIAL SERVICES

7 p.m., $16-19

One Million Cups, NewBoCo, Cedar Rapids, 8:15 a.m., Free (Weekly)

ACTIVITIES AND PERFORMANCES TO BOOST THE EVOLUTION TOUR

CHILDREN’S INTEREST IN STEM FIELDS

Disturbed w/ In This Moment, U.S. Cellular

Johnson County STEM Festival, Kirkwood

Center, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m., $49.50-89.50

Regional Center, Coralville, 4 p.m., Free

One Million Cups, Merge, Iowa City, 9 a.m.,

Open Mic Night, Penguin’s Comedy Club,

‘La Bamba,’ FilmScene, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m.,

Free (Weekly)

Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Free

THIS WEEK: EXPERIENCE/CORNELL COLLEGE STUDENTS


EDITORS’ PICKS VISITORS FROM SCREAM ACRES

Daddy-O, Parlor City Pub and

Friday Night Out, Ceramics

SOUTHERN ROCK WITH SOUL

CELEBRATE THE NEW ZOMBIE

Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m.,

Center, Cedar Rapids, 6:30 p.m.,

The Bros. Landreth, CSPS

AWAKENING (BLACK ALE W/

Free (Weekly)

$40 (2nd Friday)

Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 8

Dine with Zombies, Lion

DES MOINES PUNK ROCK

READING: ‘MACHINE: A NOVEL’

Bridge Brewing Co., Cedar

The Insomniacs, Gabe’s, Iowa

Susan Steinberg, Prairie Lights

Robert ‘One Man’ Johnson,

Rapids, 6 p.m., menu prices

City, 8 p.m., Free

Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m.,

Free

Free

p.m., $17-21

COFFEE)

Lamrim Kadampa Buddhist

Smith + Lodurr & Beardthug

Centre Iowa City Meditation

w/ ONO, the Colorless,

FAC Dance Party, The Union,

EXILE SPOTLIGHT SERIES SHOW

Class, Quaker Friends

Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $10

Iowa City, 7 p.m. (Weekly)

Ryan Phelan Trio, The Mill,

YACHT CLUB DEBUT

‘TRILOGY’ LIVE

Porch Fire, Iowa City Yacht

Chick Corea, Hancher

CHICAGO IMPROV ROCK

Club, 9 p.m., $5-10

Auditorium, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m.,

Stray Bolts w/ 6 Odd Rats,

$10-65

Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m.,

Meeting House, Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly) READING: ‘STORM LAKE: A

Iowa City, 9 p.m., $7

CHRONICLE OF CHANGE, RESILIENCE, AND HOPE FROM A HEARTLAND NEWSPAPER’

Fri., Oct. 11

Art Cullen, Prairie Lights Books

$5-10 OPENING PERFORMANCE! RUNS THROUGH OCT. 13

MIAMI-BASED INDIE FUNK

BANDS COMPETE FOR A

University of Iowa School of

Magic City Hippies with

SUMMER OF THE ARTS FRIDAY

Music Presents: ‘The Tragedy

LUTHI, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m.,

Thursday Night Live Open

NIGHT CONCERT SERIES

of Carmen,’ Coralville Center

$15

Mic, Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 7

SPOT; DONATIONS ACCEPTED

for the Performing Arts, 7:30

p.m., Free (Weekly)

THROUGHOUT TOWARD KIDS’

p.m., $20

& Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

MUSIC LESSONS

Battle of the Bands, West Music, Coralville, 6 p.m., Free


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR SoulShake, Gabe’s, Iowa City,

A FULL DAY OF ALL-AGES

10 p.m., Free (Weekly)

HISTORY, ART, MUSIC AND LITERATURE EVENTS

Flirty Friday’s Drag & Dance

CELEBRATING THE LGBT

Party, Studio 13, Iowa City,

COMMUNITY

10:30 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly)

You, Me, and LGBT, Cedar

ON SALE NOW AT LITTLEVILLAGETICKETS.COM NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE Northside Oktoberfest 2019 October 5, 12 p.m.

Rapids Public Library, 10 a.m.,

Sat., Oct. 12

Free Family Storytime, Iowa City

Iowa City Sunday Farmers

Public Library, 10:30 a.m., Free

Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp,

(Weekly)

DOWNTOWN IOWA CITY Fall Shop Crawl 2019 October 25, 5 p.m.

Iowa City, 7:30 a.m. (Weekly) I.C. Press Co-op Open Shop, Guest Vendor Market, NewBo

Public Space One, Iowa City, 12

City Market, Cedar Rapids, 10

p.m., Free (Weekly)

a.m. (Weekly) FAMILY-FRIENDLY CAMPFIRE CLOSING PERFORMANCE

STORYTELLING WITH AKWI NJI

‘Madagascar: A Musical

Spooky Legends of Linn

Journey,’ Old Creamery Theatre,

County, History Center, Cedar

Amana, 10 a.m., $10.50

Rapids, 7 p.m., $5

TRUMPET BLOSSOM CAFE DEAD COAST PRESENTS: John Calvin Abney October 23, 8 p.m.

No fees for event organizers, low fees for ticket purchasers.

Start selling tickets today—it’s free! Tickets@LittleVillageMag.com


EDITORS’ PICKS LEGION ARTS BENEFIT

Karen Savoca & Greg Brown, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $30-40 Cole Thomas Trio, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free OverTime & the Blue Collar Soldiers Band, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15-20 Showcase Benefit for the State Historical Society Of Iowa’s Music Project, Trumpet Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7 Drop Dead Dangerous, The Mill, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $7 Elation Dance Party, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly) Mersiv, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $15-20 Rebellion Burlesque Student Showcase!, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9:30 p.m., $10-15 THIS WEEK: ‘THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER’

Bijou After Hours, FilmScene Chauncey, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $8

Sun., Oct. 13 Guest Vendor Market, NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly) Hiawatha Farmers Market, Guthridge Park, Hiawatha, 10 a.m. (Weekly)

Iowa City

Cedar Rapids

Kim will help you find your way HOME

Coralville

Des Moines

kimschillig@gmail.com 310.795.2133 V/T

QuintonsBarandDeli.com 319-354-7074 215 E. Washington St. 319-625-2221 2500 Corridor Way Ste 5

319-200-4192 450 1st St SW #101 319-625-2221 506 E. Grand Ave


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM A READING ON THE 21ST ANNIVERSARY OF MATTHEW SHEPARD’S DEATH, TO BENEFIT ONE IOWA

‘The Laramie Project,’ New Song Episcopal Church, Coralville, 1 p.m., Freewill Donation 4TH ANNUAL EVENT CELEBRATING CANINE CAREGIVERS

2019 Bark For Life of Johnson County, Big

witching hour

Grove Brewery & Taproom, Iowa City, 2 p.m.,

PRESENTED BY THE ENGLERT + LITTLE VILLAGE

$5-30

november 1-2, 2019

Sunday Funday, Iowa City Public Library, Iowa City, 2 p.m., Free (Weekly) CLOSING PERFORMANCE!

‘Mama Mia,’ Old Creamery Theatre, Amana, 2 p.m., $12-32.50

Rhiannon Giddens

+ francesco turrisi

SPONSORED BY THE SANKOFA OUTREACH CONNECTION

wednesday, october 30 @ 8 pm

CLOSING PERFORMANCE!

‘Hello Dolly,’ Theatre Cedar Rapids, 2:30 p.m., $25-53 NEW WORLD SPIRIT

Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Hancher Auditorium, Iowa City, 3 p.m., $10-60 JAZZY JAMBOREE

Red Cedar Chamber Music with Christine

saturday, october 5

deep sea diver + purple frank LIVE AT THE MILL

Bellomy, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 3 p.m., $22 ALL-AGES DANCE PARTY

Koo Koo Kanga Roo, Wildwood Smokehouse

Tuesday, october 8

sinkane

PRESENTED BY MISSION CREEK

& Saloon, Iowa City, 6:30 p.m., $15-40 Pub Quiz, The Mill, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $1 (Weekly)

Tuesday, october 15

mat kearney

CO-PRESENTED BY FIRST FLEET CONCERTS ROOFTOP SERIES: ‘THE WOLF MAN’

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, FilmScene Ped Mall, Iowa City,

tuesday, october 15

sarah shook & the disarmers LIVE AT THE MILL

wednesday, october 16

branford marsalis quartet SPONSORED BY TALLGRASS BUSINESS RESOURCES + THE AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM OF IOWA thursday, october 17

john hiatt AN ACOUSTIC EVENING

Come work with us

JOHN@NEWBO.CO • (319) 382-5128

ENGLERT.ORG | 221 E. WASHINGTON ST. | 319.688.2653


EDITORS’ PICKS

Mon., Oct. 14

Cultivate Hope Market, Cultivate Hope Urban

COUNTRY VIBES WITH A DEFIANT ATTITUDE

Farm, Cedar Rapids, 4:30 p.m. (Weekly)

Sarah Shook & the Disarmers, The Mill, 8

Open Mic, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Blues Jam, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar

(Weekly)

Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

READING: ‘THE WILDLANDS’ / ‘FALSE BINGO’

BIJOU FILM FORUM

Abby Geni and Jac Jemc, Prairie Lights

‘Punk the Capital: Building a Sound

Comedy & Karaoke, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9

Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Movement,’ FilmScene Chauncey, Iowa City, 7

p.m., Free (Weekly)

p.m., $15-18 Dance Party with DJ JD, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

p.m., $8 Karaoke Tuesdays, The Mill, Iowa City, 10:30

Comedy Open Mic with Spencer & Dan, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Yahoo Drummers, Downtown Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Tue., Oct. 15

Weekly Old-Timey Jam Sessions, Trumpet Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free

Food Truck Tuesdays, NewBo City Market,

(Weekly)

Cedar Rapids, 11 a.m. (Weekly) CELEBRATING THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF ‘CITY OF BLACK & WHITE’

Mat Kearney, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $32.50-55

54 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

p.m., Free (Weekly)


S Y A D 5 FOR 1 15%

S E L A S L OF AL

L A C O L 15 T R O P P SU

S T I F O R NONP Oct. 1: Field to Family Oct. 2: Emma Goldman Clinic Oct. 3: Riverside Theatre Oct. 4: Strengthen Grow Evolve Oct. 5: CommUnity Oct. 6: Table to Table Oct. 7: UI Dance Marathon Oct. 8: United Action for Youth

Iowa City

A CITY W O I N ST N I L N 206

Oct. 9: Kretzmeyer Fund for Young Musicians Oct. 10: Iowa Harm Reduction Coalition Oct. 11: IC Bruisers Junior Roller Derby Oct. 12: Summer of the Arts Oct. 13: Public Space One

t The firs

s r a e y 15 ‘04-’19

Oct. 14: Free Medical Clinic Oct. 15: Horace Mann PTO


IOWA CITY NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE 207 NORTH LINN STREET, IOWA CITY 319.338.1332 • WILLOWANDSTOCK.COM

George’s

est. 1939

312 E Market St | 351-9614

IC’s original northside tap, serving up cold brews, lively conversation, & our award-winning burgers.

56 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272


ADVERTISER INDEX

BREAKFAST • DINNER • DRINKS 203 N Linn St, Iowa City (319) 351-1924 • goosetowncafe.com Open everyday except Tuesday Dinners Wednesday-Saturday

126 LOUNGE (40) ALMOST FAMOUS POPCORN (43) ARNOTT & KIRK (15) BAO CHOW (35) BARONCINI RISTORANTE (54) BIOTEST (8) BREAD GARDEN MARKET (33) CITY OF IOWA CITY (17) CHOMP! (48) DODGE STREET COFFEEHOUSE (39) THE ENGLERT THEATRE (53) FILMSCENE (31) GAZETTE (14, 43) GOODWILL OF THE HEARTLAND (48) GRINNELL COLLEGE MUSEUEM OF ART (17) HANCHER AUDITORIUM (2-6) ICCA (9) IOWA BREWING COMPANY (61) IOWA CITY DOWNTOWN CO-OP (26-27) - BEADOLOGY - MICKY’S IRISH PUB - RAYGUN - DEADWOOD TAVERN - DONNELLY’S PUB - PRAIRIE LIGHTS BOOKSTORE & CAFE IOWA CITY NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE (56) - WILLOW & STOCK - PAGLIAI’S PIZZA - GEORGE’S - OASIS FALAFEL - DODGE ST. TIRE - HIGH GROUND - HAMBURG INN NO. 2 - EL BANDITO’S - RUSS’ NORTHSIDE SERVICE - GOOSETOWN - ARTIFACTS - THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP - BLUEBIRD IOWA CITY OLD TRAIN DEPOT (58) - PATV - TRUMPET BLOSSOM CAFE - THE CLUB CAR

LittleVillageMag.com/Advertising

IOWA DANCE FESTIVAL (50) IOWA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH (36) JEFFERSON COUNTY FARMERS & NEIGHBORS, INC. (23) JOHNSON COUNTY COMMUNICATIONS (34) JOSEPH’S STEAKHOUSE (49) KCCK JAZZ 88.3 (44) KIM SCHILLIG, REALOR (52) LEGION ARTS HALL (37) LINN COUNTY CONSERVATION (47) MAD MODERN (64) MAGGIE’S FARM WOOD-FIRED PIZZA (21) MAILBOXES OF IOWA CITY (35) MARTIN CONSTRUCTION (42) MATTHEW 25 (35) M.C. GINSBERG (20) MOLLY’S CUPCAKERY (32) NATIONAL CZECH & SLOVAK MUSEUM & LIBRARY (42) NEWBOCO (53) NEW PIONEER FOOD CO-OP (52) NODO (39) OASIS FALAFEL (55) OBERMANN CENTER (34) OLD CAPITOL SCREEN PRINTERS (60) PARAMOUNT THEATRE (44, 47) POP’S BBQ (9) PUBLIC SPACE ONE (59) QUINTON’S BAR & DELI (52) RAPIDS REPRODUCTIONS (40) REUNION BREWERY (32) RIVERSIDE CASINO & GOLF RESPORT (40, 42) SANCTUARY (48!) SCRATCH CUPCAKERY (63) SOSEKI (36) STRENGTHEN, GROW, EVOLVE (19) TEN THOUSAND VILLAGES (47) TRUMPET BLOSSOM CAFE (37) UNIVERSITY OF IOWA STANLEY MUSEUM OF ART (51) VITALITY FITNESS & DANCE (36) THE WEDGE (41) WILLOW & STOCK (41)

PLEASE SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS! l ittlev i lla gem a g.co m /a dverti sing READ • SHARE • SUPPORT LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 57


IOWA CITY OLD TRAIN DEPOT

DEAR KIKI

D

ear Kiki, I have a very personal question. I love my husband more than anything else in the world, but over the past few years we have been having very little sex (perhaps once a month). We still “get along” amazingly well and he’s still my best friend, but the fact that we don’t have sex very often is always in the back of my mind (and his, too). We’re not sure if it’s a problem, but the fact remains that it’s somewhat stressful. Last week a friend of mine shared an interview with me which featured a couple offering a completely different (and somewhat scary) perspective [Interesting People You’ve Never Heard Of, S3E5: “Just Say No”]. They advocate for a sexless lifestyle between couples and claim that the pressure of sex takes a psychological toll on people. I’m not sure if I agree with everything they said, but a lot of it rang true. Have you heard of these people before? What do you think of this perspective? … They seem like nice people, but a little off. Thank you, Stressed and Sexless

OPEN 11-2AM DAILY

TRY OUR BREADED TENDERLOIN! SERVING FOOD UNTIL 1AM DAILY

Dear Stressed and Sexless, From a very basic and trivial perspective, here’s the thing: literally no approach to sex and marriage is going to be right for everyone. Not agreeing with “everything they said,” but having “a lot of it [ring] true” is exactly the way you should approach all sex advice, including mine. I’m glad that you’re exploring different perspectives and I encourage you, in all your exploration, to utilize the parts that ring true and simply ignore the rest, thoroughly and without regret. Now, as for pressure. And sex. And marriage. Yikes, it can be a killer cocktail, can’t it? Are you having too little sex? Too much sex? The right kind of sex at the right time of day in the right position(s) using the right toys and fulfilling the right fantasies? If you’re on the verge of hyperventilating right now, I don’t blame you. Sex is a huge topic,

LittleVillageMag.com/DearKiki

and it’s not one that we’re socialized to talk about openly and frankly to anyone, not even our nearest and dearest. Which leads me to the good news. There are some extremely positive threads to tease out of your letter. You speak to a knowledge of how your partner is feeling (“the back of my mind (and his, too)”) and you use language that indicates that you’ve talked about this (“We’re not sure if it’s a problem”). That’s awesome! Because the only people you have to please in this matter are each other.

SEX IS A HUGE TOPIC, AND IT’S NOT ONE THAT WE’RE SOCIALIZED TO TALK ABOUT OPENLY AND FRANKLY TO ANYONE.

The best advice I can give you is talk, talk, talk! If you agree together to take a break from worrying about sex, that’s fine. There is certainly no law that marriage or intimacy or happiness requires sex. Many people who are ace enjoy extremely fulfilling marriages, often even with partners who are not asexual. Many marriages where one partner suffers a catastrophic accident that precludes sex for a long time or forever still thrive. But the two of you need to be on the same page. What does damage relationships is an inability to honestly ask for what you need, whether it’s sexual or emotional or practical. Keep talking to each other and exploring your options. And remember, there need not be an ultimate solution. You can decide today to live without sex and then be tearing each other’s clothes off tomorrow. You can change your minds a dozen times. Just make sure that you’re both all-in, together. xoxo, Kiki

K I K I WA N T S Q U E ST I O N S ! ADVERTISING • AUTOGRAPHS BACK ISSUES • MERCH

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Questions about love and sex in the Iowa City-Cedar Rapids area can be submitted to dearkiki@littlevillagemag.com, or anonymously at littlevillagemag.com/ dearkiki. Questions may be edited for clarity and length, and may appear either in print or online at littlevillagemag.com.


229 N Gilbert

Crow and the Abstraction of Materiality Elizabeth Munger the Inaugural Exhibition of the Iowa City Correspondence School The AfroCaribbean Mythopoetic Tradition curated by manuel arturo abreu 229 N Gilbert

Poetry reading with Matt Hart Lauren Haldeman Skylar Alexander Izzy Casey 206 Lafayette

an acoustic set by

Tatsuya Nakatani

sound artist and master percussionist details at publicspaceone.com IC’s artist-led, community-driven contemporary art center

ASTROLOGY

BY ROB BREZSNEY

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Every time my birthday season comes around, I set aside an entire day to engage in a life review. It lasts for many hours. I begin by visualizing the recent events I’ve experienced, then luxuriously scroll in reverse through my entire past, as if watching a movie starring me. It’s not possible to remember every single scene and feeling, of course, so I allow my deep self to highlight the moments it regards as significant. Here’s another fun aspect of this ritual: I bestow a blessing on every memory that comes up, honoring it for what it taught me and how it helped me become the person I am today. Dear Libra, now is an excellent time for you to experiment with a similar celebration. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Depression is when you think there’s nothing to be done,” writes author Siri Hustvedt. “Fortunately I always think there’s something to be done.” I offer this hopeful attitude to you, Scorpio, trusting that it will cheer you up. I suspect that the riddles and mysteries you’re embedded in right now are so puzzling and complicated that you’re tempted to think that there’s nothing you can do to solve them or escape them. But I’m here to inform you that if that’s how you feel, it’s only temporary. Even more importantly, I’m here to inform you that there is indeed something you can do, and you are going to find out what that is sooner rather than later. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “How inconvenient to be made of desire,” writes Sagittarian author Larissa Pham. “Even now, want rises up in me like a hot oil. I want so much that it scares me.” I understand what she means, and I’m sure you do, too. There are indeed times when the inner fire that fuels you feels excessive and unwieldy and inopportune. But I’m happy to report that your mood in the coming weeks is unlikely to fit that description. I’m guessing that the radiant pulse of your yearning will excite you and empower you. It’ll be brilliant and warm, not seething and distracting. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I envision the next 12 months as a time when you could initiate fundamental improvements in the way you live. Your daily rhythm 12 months from now could be as much as 20 percent more gratifying and meaningful. It’s conceivable you will discover or generate innovations that permanently raise your long-term goals to a higher octave. At the risk of sounding grandiose, I predict you’ll welcome a certain novelty that resembles the invention of the wheel or the compass or the calendar. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Modern literary critic William Boyd declared that Aquarian author Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was “the best short-story writer ever,” and “the first truly modern writer of fiction: secular, refusing to pass judgment, cognizant of the absurdities of our muddled, bizarre lives and the complex tragi-comedy that is the human condition.” Another contemporary critic, Harold Bloom, praised Chekhov’s plays, saying that he was “one of the three seminal figures in the birth of early modernism in the theatre.” We might imagine, then, that in the course of his career, Chekhov was showered with accolades. We’d be wrong about that, though. “If I had listened to the critics,” he testified, “I’d have died drunk in the gutter.” I hope that what I just said will serve as a pep talk for you as you explore and develop your own original notions in the coming weeks. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Pisces-born Dorothy Steel didn’t begin her career as a film actress until she was 91 years old. She had appeared in a couple of TV shows when she was 89, then got a small role in an obscure movie. At age 92, she became a celebrity when she played the role of a tribal elder in Black Panther, one of the highest-grossing films of all time. I propose that we make her one of your inspirational role models for both the coming weeks and the next 12 months. Why? Because I suspect you will be ripening fully into a role and a mission you were born to embody and express.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 1956, the U.S. federal government launched a program to build 40,000 miles of high-speed roads to connect all major American cities. It was completed 36 years later at a cost of $521 billion. In the coming months, I’d love to see you draw inspiration from that visionary scheme. According to my analysis, you will generate good fortune for yourself as you initiate a long-term plan to expand your world, create a more robust network, and enhance your ability to fulfill your life’s big goals. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus-born YouTube blogger Hey Fran Hey has some good advice for her fellow Bulls, and I think it’ll be especially fresh and potent in the coming weeks. She says, “Replacing ‘Why is this happening to me?’ with ‘What is this trying to tell me?’ has been a game changer for me. The former creates a hamster wheel, where you’ll replay the story over and over again. Victimized. Stuck. The latter holds space for a resolution to appear.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “The soul has illusions as the bird has wings: it is supported by them.” So declared French author Victor Hugo. I don’t share his view. In fact, I regard it as an insulting misapprehension. The truth is that the soul achieves flight through vivid fantasies and effervescent intuitions and uninhibited longings and non-rational hypotheses and wild hopes—and maybe also by a few illusions. I bring this to your attention because now is an excellent time to nurture your soul with vivid fantasies and effervescent intuitions and uninhibited longings and non-rational hypotheses and wild hopes. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I know people of all genders who periodically unleash macho brags about how little sleep they need. If you’re normally like that, I urge you to rebel. The dilemmas and riddles you face right now are very solvable if and only if you get sufficient amounts of sleep and dreams. Do you need some nudges to do right by yourself? Neuroscientist Matthew Walker says that some of the greatest athletes understand that “sleep is the greatest legal enhancing performance drug.” Top tennis player Roger Federer sleeps 12 hours a day. During his heyday, world-class sprinter Usain Bolt slept 10 hours a night and napped during the day. Champion basketball player LeBron James devotes 12 hours a day to the rejuvenating sanctuary of sleep. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Actor and dancer Fred Astaire was a pioneer in bringing dance into films as a serious art form. He made 31 musical films during the 76 years he worked, and was celebrated for his charisma, impeccable technique and innovative moves. At the height of his career, from 1933 to 1949, he teamed up with dancer Ginger Rogers in the creation of 10 popular movies. In those old-fashioned days, virtually all partner dancing featured a male doing the lead part as the female followed. One witty critic noted that although Astaire was a bigger star than Rogers, she “did everything that Fred Astaire did. She just did it backwards and while wearing high heels.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, you may soon be called on to carry out tasks that are metaphorically comparable to those performed by Rogers. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your number one therapy in the coming weeks? Watching animals. It would be the healthiest thing you could undertake: relax into a generously receptive mode as you simply observe creatures doing what they do. The best option would be to surrender to the pleasures of communing with both domesticated and wild critters. If you need a logical reason to engage in this curative and rejuvenating activity, I’ll give you one: It will soothe and strengthen your own animal intelligence, which would be a tonic gift for you to give yourself. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 59


LOCAL ALBUMS

Halfloves Dazer HALFLOVES.COM

W

hen a band takes the time to create an album as a single work and does it well, as Iowa City band Halfloves has done with their second album Dazer, the investment of experiencing the whole work pays off. Overall, Dazer explores a theme of human connection or, in some cases, the lack thereof. There is a subtle, dark undertone to the album that belies it’s electro-pop-with-guitars foundation. The lyrics provide no obvious signposts or details for the listener, but instead present a black mirror of those connections—sometimes bright and hopeful, but ultimately fragile and tentative. The video for track three, “Polvo,” came out last month, and illustrates the song’s context a little bit. We see the narrator watching his love interest on his computer—he’s an internet stalker, or at least a guy with a strong fascination with someone

Submit albums for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

who only exists on the internet. The word “polvo” describes dust particles; giving the love interest this name adds to the tentative existence of the person on the other side of the screen. The use of morse-code-beeping keyboards under the song is a perfectly on-theme addition. The song that bubbled to the surface as my favorite over repeated listenings is “Dedication.” The jazzy clean guitar lines really grab me. This song seems to be vaguely about addiction. “You came around like a bad disease / I’m shaking, shivering; you stuck with me.” It kind of flips the idea of “dedication” on its ear, seeming to imply that the addiction is dedicated to the narrator. The cacophonous bridge adds to this by derailing the song for a bit with a dissonant kicking and screaming. The album isn’t without moments of brightness, however. “Quilted Hearts,” an acoustic guitar snapshot of teenage lust, seems to work as a panacea to the rest of the underlying darkness. It spins seamlessly from the closing of the previous track, “Undone”: “In your heart there’s a song that still needs sung / Open up; you can face what’s yet to come / In the end there’s a reason to carry on.” —Michael Roeder

Dan Padley Perfectly Whelmed DANPADLEY.BANDCAMP.COM

D

an Padley, a graduate of the University of Iowa College of Music, has been a versatile asset to Iowa City’s music scene. From touring with singer/songwriter Elizabeth Moen to performing with his band Laranja, he’s a player’s player, meshing seamlessly with the music at hand. Perfectly Whelmed seems more personal and reflective than his work elsewhere; each song is imbued with his personality, in turns whimsical and moody. Perfectly Whelmed isn’t exactly jazz, either, though Padley seems comfortable incorporating jazz harmonic progressions into his songs. His guitar sound is warm and gentle, never taking off into wailing high notes or rapid-fire shredding. “Telerubato” is perhaps the most traditionally jazzy track, recalling sophisticated composers like Bill Evans and using a guitar tone like Kenny Burrell at his mellowest. But in between the

IOWA CITY

315 E. 1ST ST. IOWA CITY, IA 52240 319.338.1196 WWW.OLDCAPITOL.COM 60 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272

simple statement of the melody and its reprise at the end there’s a long improvisatory section that abandons regular meter and ebbs and flows with its own logic. “From Rubble” builds on repeated arpeggiated notes that change harmonic meaning depending on the root note, defined by Blake Shaw’s bass. The chord progression seems to climb perpetually, and the subtle drumming and slowly changing bass are powerfully quiet, rather than restrained. “Bull is Free” finds Padley using guitar effects to make a “backwards” guitar sound subtly swing over a 6/8 beat, sounding at the same time like a human voice and something alien and electronic. Other songs recall Larry Coryell (“Steep Spiral Staircase”) and even Radiohead (“Suddenly Sunday”), but to the extent that Padley’s work is rooted in jazz, it isn’t constrained by it. Dan Padley takes the lessons of a formal education to heart, but like Huckleberry Finn, he’s not afraid to light out for the territory. Perfectly Whelmed is a warm, inviting exploration of his own personal, inner jazz. —Kent Williams


LOCAL BOOKS

Submit books for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

Iowa City Book Festival Roundup

efforts to understand his absent father with all too few details to build upon. Sunland established Waters’ creativity and reach; this new book will likely extend and enhance that legacy.

B

y the time this issue of Little Village hits newsstands, day one of the Iowa City Book Festival will be, well, in the books. But the celebration of writers and readers will just be amping up. Here are six of the many authors on this year’s schedule worthy of your attention.

Wednesday, Oct. 2

Sandford lives in Minnesota these days, but the CR Washington and University of Iowa alum is an Eastern Iowa original. Friday, Oct. 4

John Sandford, Iowa City Public Library, 7 p.m. John Sandford, the Cedar Rapids native who is both a juggernaut in the mystery/thriller genre and a Pulitzer Prize winner for his coverage of the 1980s farm crisis, is making his first Book Festival appearance in support of Bloody Genius, the 12th offering in his series featuring investigator Virgil Flowers. Next spring, he is expected to release the 30th entry in his hugely successful Prey series, featuring his most successful character, Lucas Davenport.

James Geary, UI English Philosophy Building, 4 p.m. Geary’s book Wit’s End: What Wit Is, How It Works, and Why We Need It is not just a study of humor and the mechanisms that elicit laughter. It is also an exercise in creative nonfiction of the sort embraced by the University of Iowa’s Nonfiction Writing Program. In Wit’s End, Geary writes each chapter in a style keeping with the kind or characteristic of wit he is considering. For example, he writes about the neuroscience undergirding wit in the style of a scientific paper. It’s a bold move, which one hopes this presentation, given its topic, will be as well. Lauren Markham, UI Art Building West, Room 240, 7 p.m. This year’s selection for the UI Center for Human Rights’ One Community, One

Book program is Markham’s The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life. Markham, who is both a journalist and a fiction writer, recounts the story of two immigrants from El Salvador hoping to find a better life in the United States. The story couldn’t be more timely. Saturday, Oct. 5 Don Waters, FilmScene Ped Mall, 10 a.m. Waters is an alumus of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and author of a novel I admire, 2013’s Sunland, which is populated by quirky characters, all of whom seem to be in the midst of reinventing themselves. His new book, These Boys and Their Fathers, is part memoir, part fiction and part investigative reporting as Waters recounts his

William Steele, Iowa City Public Library, 11:30 am Steele offers the first biography of W.P. Kinsella, a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the author of many baseball novels and stories—among them Shoeless Joe, the basis for the 1989 film Field of Dreams. Kinsella holds a special place in the hearts of many Iowans, particularly those who love baseball— but Steele tackles problematic aspects of Kinsella’s fiction (including his portrayals of Native Americans) while exploring both the positive and negative aspects of the author’s oeuvre and life. John Domini, The Center, Room 202, 1 p.m. John Domini’s new novel, The Color Inside a Melon, completes his Naples trilogy, which began with 2007’s Earthquake I.D. The latest entry brings a new cast of characters to Domini’s quake-ravaged Naples, but longtime readers will recognize the prose style and themes. The Des Moines author writes sometimes thorny, often beautiful prose; his Naples is a place of tragedy and mystery. —Rob Cline

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272 Oct. 2–15, 2019 61


+ Present

A festival exploring the unknown, discussing the creative process, and presenting new work

Nov. 1-2,

2019

Ignite Your Creativity

Downtown Iowa City

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$55/two-day $35/one-day $20/student two-day 62 Oct. 2–15, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV272


CROSSWORD

BY KAMERON AUSTIN COLLINS

The American Values Club Crossword is edited by Ben Tausig. 1

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ACROSS 1. “Gahhhh freaking paper cut FML ...” 11. Like some sweating too much 15. Vascular, aboveground organ in mangrove and banyan trees 16. Dose alternative? 17. Sign of mystification 18. Mixed hound 19. Three Tall Women

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playwright 20. Worth fantasizing about, maybe 22. Coke companion 23. Firms, for short 24. What samurai follow 27. “Where do I go to school? Up in ___. Well, technically Cambridge I suppose, but ...” 28. Opens wide

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29. Cannes prize, informally 31. Striped racers 33. Welles role 34. Place to sit for a flight 36. Mendelssohn work in E-flat major, in French 38. Chopped liver, maybe 39. Jiffy 41. Frightened utterances

42. Baker of soul 44. Doesn’t wait for everyone else’s dishes to arrive, say 46. Gin, moralistically 48. Di-dah lead-in 51. Tour gp. 52. Christina of Casper 53. Whoopi’s role in The Color Purple 55. Bryan Ferry’s ___

Music 57. Red, orange, and yellow (but not green) 59. Inter ___ 60. Certain radio station giveaways 61. Have on ___ (control) 62. Soothes

27. Yasmine of Baywatch 29. Wonder highlight 30. Like a venom neutralizer 32. Little Italy apology 34. Scene in a courthouse, maybe 35. Fearful ’50s phenomenon 37. Minimal protection in winter 40. Ornamental ring 43. ___ Lingus 45. “And count thy specious gifts no gifts, but ___” (Milton) 47. Licks 48. Nobel Prize in Literature recipient, 2010 49. Buenos ___ 50. Nobel Prize in Literature recipient, 1946 54. “All ___ being equal ...” 56. Schmooze 58. Expert at deductions, for short

DOWN 1. Une pipe filler 2. Word that precedes the lyric “Is it me you’re looking for?” in a Lionel Richie hit 3. ___ Got Talent (popular competition show in the Middle East) 4. Pitchfork feature 5. Beer cocktail that involves balancing a shot glass on chopsticks 6. New England Revolution org. 7. Choreographer, e.g. 8. Lane menace 9. Lambasted 10. Home addition? 11. USN rank 12. One feeling LV271 ANSWERS numb, perhaps B A T H N I P S F U S S 13. Class standouts O C H O A D E P T O G L E S T EW R E P RO L L OW COBO R A T I ON I T S 14. “Going to have S N I D E I N T E RN to ponder that RD S A ND T H E B E E S S L OE I S T O one ...” MOMT OB E CROS S E D A X E L I T EM 21. Record HO L D F OR S A F E K E B R I B E E N I E C E 25. “___ needed” E E L G I V E A D S P UD 26. Apply rather S N A T T ONGA S I R I S Y NC S T ORM UN I T grossly E A CH EWA N PGA S

Life’s Celebrations...

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Profile for Little Village Magazine

Little Village magazine issue 272: Oct. 2-15, 2019  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

Little Village magazine issue 272: Oct. 2-15, 2019  

Little Village | The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids Area's News and Culture Magazine

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