Little Village magazine issue 270: Sept. 4-17, 2019

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A L W A Y S

F R E E

Where do puppies come from? A debate over pet stores is brewing in Iowa City and Cedar Rapids.

ISSUE 270 Sept. 4–17, 2019


Storm Large

FREE & OUTDOORS

Friday, September 6, 7:00 pm Outside on the Hancher Green When Storm Large came to Club Hancher last season, she blew the doors off the place—so we’re taking the tempest outside. Bursting onto the scene on Rock Star: Supernova and then forging her own eclectic career, Large is a force of nature. From jazz standards to driving rock-n-roll, Large can do it all. This is one fall Storm you’ll be happy to be drenched in. FREE – No tickets required EVENT SPONSORS: Roger and Gayle Klouda Tom Rocklin and Barbara McFadden Mindy Ramsey Douglas and Vance Van Daele

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


An Evening with Audra McDonald

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Songs from the American Music Theater Saturday, September 14, 7:30 pm Andy Einhorn, piano Mark Vanderpoel, bass Gene Lewin, drums

The numbers alone are impressive: six Tonys, two Grammys, and an Emmy. And the honors are remarkable: a spot on Time’s 100 most influential people list and a National Medal of the Arts awarded by President Obama. But the numbers and the honors are just reflections of what really matters: the talent. Supported by her trio, Audra McDonald will share her luminous soprano in an unmissable performance. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $80 | $70 | $60

Terry and Johanna Abernathy Douglas and Linda Behrendt Ann Burton Bryan and Jan Lawler Jeffrey R. and Tammy S. Tronvold Lynn and Stuart Weinstein

COLLEGE STUDENT: $72 | $10 YOUTH: $40 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: ŠAllison Michael Orenstein

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


Urban Bush Women Hair & Other Stories

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

Saturday, September 21, 7:30 pm Drawn from personal and public narratives centered on individual identity in a collective culture, Hair & Other Stories investigates issues of body image, race, gender identity, economic inequity, and more. With humor, poignancy, and thoughtfulness, Urban Bush Women — a stirring contemporary dance company committed to pushing the boundaries of storytelling through spoken word, movement, and singing—enacts the everyday pursuit of the extraordinary. Urban Bush Women will also create work for the University of Iowa Department of Dance’s Dance Gala, In Motion, which will be presented on the Hancher stage on November 15 and 16, 2019. TICKETS:

EVENT SPONSORS:

ADULT: $45 | $35 | $25

Everybody’s Whole Foods

COLLEGE STUDENT: $40 | $10 YOUTH: $22 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: ©James Morgan Owens

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


Los Angeles Guitar Quartet

$10

STUDENT TICKETS

American Guitar Masters Wednesday, September 25, 7:30 pm The Grammy-winning Los Angeles Guitar Quartet (LAGQ) returns with a concert featuring music by American composers and guitar virtuosos. Front and center: Road to the Sun, a new work by the incomparable Pat Metheny written for LAGQ. Performing music by the likes of Atkins, Hendrix, Zappa, and Flatt & Scruggs, the quartet will also perform compositions by Sousa and Copland as well as pieces by Fred Hand, Robert Beaser, and Julian Lage. TICKETS: ADULT: $45 | $35 | $25 COLLEGE STUDENT: $40 | $10 YOUTH: $22 | $10

Order online hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER

Photo: Jiro Schneider

Accessibility Services (319) 335-1158

EVENT SPONSORS: Douglas and Linda Behrendt John R. Menninger

Discover more at hancher.uiowa.edu Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Hancher in advance at (319) 335-1158.


Photos: Amy Guip

OCTOBER 4-5

HANCHER AUDITORIUM HANCHER.UIOWA.EDU . (319) 335-1160 OR 800-HANCHER

The performance on Saturday, October 5, at 1 pm, will feature an American Sign Language interpreter. Audio Description is also available for this performance.


VOL. 27 ISSUE 270 Sept. 4–17, 2019

Austin Smoldt-Saenz / Little Village

ALWAYS FREE LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM PUBLISHER MATTHEW STEELE DIGITAL DIRECTOR DREW BULMAN ART DIRECTOR JORDAN SELLERGREN MANAGING EDITOR EMMA MCCLATCHEY ARTS EDITOR GENEVIEVE TRAINOR NEWS DIRECTOR PAUL BRENNAN CONTRIBUTING EDITOR ANGELA PICO PINTO VISUAL REPORTER—PHOTO ZAK NEUMANN VISUAL REPORTER­—VIDEO JASON SMITH FOOD & DRINK DIRECTOR FRANKIE SCHNECKLOTH BUSINESS STRATEGIST CLAIRE MCGRANAHAN DISTRIBUTION GARY GREGORY, TREVOR LEE HOPKINS, BRIAN JOHANNESEN MARKETING COORDINATOR,

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28

A Bone to Pick

Goodbye, Argentina

Hair & Other Stories

A local campaign to ban third-party pet sellers pits nonprofits against Petland.

“I found myself nestled in the trunk, curled-up like a fetus.”

A groundbreaking dance company taps into the experiences of black women(+).

EMMA MCCLATCHEY

SEBASTIÁN LORES

ELAINE IRVINE

8 - Letters & Interactions 12 - Brock About Town 14 - Adopt or Shop 22 - UR Here 24 - En Español

26 - Bread & Butter 28 - A-List 32 - Events Calendar 53 - Ad Index 54 - Dear Kiki

55 - Astrology 56 - Local Albums 57 - Local Books 59 - Crossword

GRAPHIC DESIGNER JAV DUCKER ADVERTISING ADS@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM LISTINGS CALENDAR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTRIBUTORS ADRIANNE BEHNING, AUDREY BROCK, CHRIS BURNS, LEV CANTORAL, ROB CLINE, THOMAS DEAN, JULIA DESPAIN, MELANIE HANSON, ANJALI HUYNH, ELAINE IRVINE, SEBASTIÁN LORES, JOHN MARTINEK, STUART MUDIE, ALLANA C. NOYES, JAMES MORGAN OWENS, TREY REIS, MICHAEL ROEDER, AUSTIN SMOLDT-SAENZ, TOM TOMORROW, PAIGE UNDERWOOD, SAM LOCKE WARD SUBMISSIONS EDITOR@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM DISTRIBUTION REQUESTS DISTRO@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CREATIVE SERVICES CREATIVE@LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM CONTACT (319) 855-1474, 623 S DUBUQUE ST, IOWA CITY, IA 52240

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Little Village is an independent, community-supported news and culture publication based in Iowa City. Through journalism, essays and events, we work to improve our community in the Iowa City, Coralville and Cedar Rapids area according to a few core values: environmental sustainability, affordability and access, economic and labor justice, racial justice, gender equity, quality healthcare, quality education and critical culture. Letters to the editor(s) are always welcome. We reserve the right to fact check and edit for length and clarity. Please send letters, comments or corrections to editor@littlevillagemag.com. Little Village is always free; all contents are the licensed work of the contributor and of the publication. If you would like to reprint or collaborate on new content, reach us at lv@littlevillagemag.com. To browse back issues, visit us at 623 S Dubuque St, Iowa City, or online at issuu.com/littlevillage.

A L W A Y S

F R E E

ISSUE 270 SEpt. 4–17, 2019

Where do puppies come from? A debate over pet stores is brewing in Iowa City and Cedar Rapids.

Julia DeSpain

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LETTERS

LV encourages community members, including candidates for office, to submit letters to Editor@LittleVillageMag.com. To be considered for print publication, letters should be under 500 words. Preference is given to letters that have not been published elsewhere.

I AM SO TIRED OF WHINERS. Johnny’s mom doesn’t make him clean the bathroom, why should I? Suzie’s mom doesn’t make her take out the trash, why should I? China and India don’t clean up all their air, water and food problems, why should the U.S.A.? South Carolina doesn’t clean up all their contaminated rivers, why should Iowa? New York City doesn’t fix all their problems, why should Iowa City? I get it. Change is hard. Over-consumption and greed are depleting and destroying our resources. Our water, land, oil and gas are not unlimited. We have only so much on this planet. We will have to change one way or the other. We are all connected on this planet. Stop whining; start doing. Look around and clean up the mess you are causing in your home, your school, your university, your

business, your city and your state and be a part of the change. Become a better homemaker, student, farmer, politician, consumer, accountant, investor and person to make a better future. Use the skills you have to help save our land, waters and people. I will continue to learn, educate, support and change. I will stop whining and start changing. —Charlene Lange The history of public pools in Iowa City shows swimming hasn’t always been accessible Excellent article! Indeed, clean swimmable water is a god damn right! —Kyle S. What a great read! I wonder how the usage / number of visitors has fluctuated over time,


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compared to the population growth. And what is the role of splash pads? They don’t allow for people to learn to swim but they are also a safe fun way to cool off. Hmm... Waterloo IA has 67,500 residents (compared to Iowa City’s 75,800) and they have two outdoor pools and one new indoor pool. Some interesting things are happening up there with their public pools—a lengthy closure due to needed repairs and potentially replacing one of the outdoor pools with a splash park. —Amana M.

‘Little luchadores’ light up the Ped Mall during Semana Cultural Latina Week Miriam, I am so proud of you! You are an AMAZING person, woman, Latina and a luchador for me and others! —Amanda G. Congratulations Miriam! So great to see your creative passion finding a public voice and helping our community. All of Iowa is better in having a diverse culture and embracing all immigrants. Thank you! —Craig A.

Prairie Kitchen Store will open in the old Motley Cow Cafe space This sounds great; I hope they will have some featured prepared foods to take home for an easy dinner! —Cindy

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 9


INTERACTIONS

/LittleVillage Finally a kitchen store! Thank you! P.S. I would love to see different sea salts from around the world. —Michelle A. Yep. I love it. We’ve been missing a regular kitchen store on the grid since that place on Washington St. closed about 10 years ago. —Matt D.

READER POLL Should the University of Iowa allow beer to be sold at Hawkeye games?

Iowa City asked to approve a $9 million TIF for a Ped Mall-adjacent apartment complex Drive around Iowa City right now - classes have started and yet almost every single apartment building in town has vacancies - and not just one or two, but many. We really need more apartments - NOT. What we need is affordable housing. —Ronda K. They applied for TIF that means if approved taxpayers are basically footing the bill for $9 million in taxes on the new property. And have you seen

S T R E S S F R A C T U R E S

15% No. Claw, however...

53% Let the brews and $ flow!

33% Keep it at the tailgate

JOHN

MARTINEK



INTERACTIONS

NEWS YOU CAN TRUST.

90.9 910

FM

NEWS | STUDIO ONE

AM

the rent prices of some of these student housing projects? It’s ridiculous. Who gets the free stuff? Sounds like the developers of the project. No thanks. Make them pay the taxes. Tax incentives should be used for small businesses, not giant conglomerates that can afford to pay it. —Chris

(shadow) everything around it and change the character of the Ped Mall which the city just sunk millions into. I know many people who plan to retire soon who would like to live downtown, but it is not affordable unless you are so low income you qualify for Ecumenical Towers. —Sarah H.A.

So are we for or against affordable housing, encouraging people to live a walkable distance from downtown and creating alternatives to urban sprawl in the border neighborhoods this week? —Richard J.

I think this is progress. This complex would bring residents to downtown Iowa City where they would eat, attend cultural events, shop, and overall support local businesses. There should be a reduction in parking spaces because living downtown should not require a vehicle, leaving more spaces for residents who visit - but do not live in - downtown IC. Progress is GOOD. —Katy G. B.

Eventually, hopefully the price of apartments will come down due to excess capacity. However, a building that high may shade

NEWS

Stream online: IowaPublicRadio.org or the IPR app.

Coming to CSPS Hall Fri Sep 6 Sat Sep 7 Fri Sep 13 Tue Sep 17 Thu Sep 19

Sat Sep 21 Wed Sep 25 Sat Sep 28 Sun Sep 29 Fri Oct 4 Sun Oct 6 Fri Oct 11

Holly Bowling Halfloves w Treesreach Filles de Illighadad Dan Bern w Sam Weis Nobody’s Girl and Colin Gilmore Michael Glabicki The Lowest Pair Carsie Blanton Hawktail John McCutcheon Old Blind Dogs The Bros Landreth Art, music and theatre in Cedar Rapids since 1992 www.legionarts.org 319.364.1580

B R O C K A B O U T T O W N

AUDREY

BROCK

I

t’s that time of the year again. The city pools are closing, students are coming back, the average temperature has dropped exactly one degree and the sun’s setting sooner, causing the summer people in your life to lose their minds. (You know Dave at work, who has a SAD lamp on his desk and observes “Margarita Monday”? Dave’s having a bad week.) Most people see move-in time as an inconvenience, and that’s totally valid. Nobody likes having traffic disputes with middle-aged tax accountants from Northbrook, Illinois and their daughters, who absolutely need to be at Bed Bath & Beyond right this second and will not allow your petty existence to stand in their way. Speaking as a philistine who chooses her coffee based on caffeine percentages, I’m a little miffed that the Starbucks line is about to triple. However, there are some things about the beginning of the semester that are actually pretty sweet:

• Free stuff. What’s not to like about a functionally endless supply of minifridges and gently used box springs dotting the side of the road? I can basically feel you judging me through this page, but I posit that with enough bleach, it’s no different to the Salvation Army. • Context. We’ve spent the last three months wandering around in our insular little hipster fantasy, drinking PBR at DIY punk shows to which we traveled on our unicycles. We need frat parties and math classes to remind ourselves that we’re not actually in Portlandia. • Depending on what sort of person you are, watching young people starting their adult lives, eyes shining with promise, may make you feel better about your long slide into decrepitude. It’s not working for me so far. • Cool events. For me, the beginning of the school year is marked by Taste of Iowa City. I am not exaggerating when I say I live for this thing. It is my Super Bowl. However, I hope none of you were there on Aug. 28, because I spent the evening shoveling samosas from Masala into my mouth in such a manner that you guys couldn’t possibly still respect me.

12 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

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SCHRÖDINGER’S DOG More than 60 million Americans own dogs, but the breeder market remains shrouded in mystery. With regulations lagging, how can dog buyers be sure they’ve disconnected their dollars from puppy mills? BY EMMA MCCLATCHEY

H

ow does a dog become a pet? The ways in which an owner may meet their new best friend are as varied as dog breeds, ranging from a meticulous, months-long quest to claim a corgi from a rescue organization states away, to a neighbor casually asking if you want to pick a pup from their mutt’s latest litter. But debates around dog ownership typically boil down to one central choice: adopt or shop. Rescue a dog from a shelter, or buy one from a store or breeder. The “adopt” side claims the moral high ground, with good reason. Almost every community in the U.S. has a population of dogs in desperate need of homes, both for the health of the dogs and the sustainability

14 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

of the shelters and rescues. Adopters fill an essential need. But breeders and pet store owners argue they fill a need as well. Shelters in the Iowa City and Cedar Rapids area wouldn’t be able to keep up with the demand for dogs, particularly puppies and purebreds, without supplementing, they argue—especially since management of the unwanted dog population in the last two decades via adoption and spayand-neuter campaigns has been so effective. “I think people are still operating on the old story that there is a [dog] overpopulation,” said Ron Solsrud, owner of Petland, Iowa City’s only dog retailer and one of the largest-scale pet stores in Iowa. “Right now, you have access to checking out pets and checking out puppies. That’s a freedom of choice, bottom-line America.”

Though Solsrud resents the notion that his puppies are “commodities,” Petland’s most valuable products are not its guinea pigs, lizards or pet food, but its dogs. Sourced from dozens of breeders certified by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) across at least four states, these puppies may be sold for upwards of $4,000, depending on the breed, care package and warranty selected by the customer. Iowa City officials allow up to 75 puppies to be kept at the store on Lower Muscatine Road, and Solsrud said they sell an average of two to three weeks after they arrive at Petland. Among the more positive reviews of the business online are others critiquing everything from the Petland’s customer service (employees on the sales floor are paid “based on performance,” Solsrud says, though some customers have apparently found them pushy) to the size of the puppy enclosures (Solsrud defends the cages as more than sufficient for a temporary home, and says having several puppies to a cage allows them to socialize with one another). But the prevailing criticism of Petland and


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NICK LOWE’S ROCK + ROLL REVUE Puppies face off at Petland in Iowa City. Zak Neumann / Little VIllage

pet stores in general, locally and nationally, are that they prop up puppy mills—a claim Petland’s owner strongly denies. Still, these accusations have fueled a campaign to end the for-profit sale of dogs in Cedar Rapids and Iowa City.

The Puppy Mill Problem Definitions of “puppy mill” vary, but a widely accepted one comes from a federal ruling in the case of Avenson v. Zegart (1984): “A dog breeding operation in which the health of the dogs is disregarded in order to maintain a low overhead and maximize profits.” Such breeders cut corners in order to cut costs, filling their facilities with hundreds of dogs; feeding cheap and innutritious food; keeping dogs in small cages stacked on top of each other in crowded rooms with poor ventilation or left outside in the cold or heat; skimping on grooming and medical attention;

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or overbreeding and inbreeding dogs. “They’re worse than they look in the pictures,” said Jennifer Doll, a veterinarian who assisted in the raiding of Iowa puppy mills while working for the Muscatine Humane Society. “I’ve seen dogs in labor for days with half a puppy sticking out of them, and it’s rotting inside of them. Their faces are matted because they’re not getting the grooming, the exercise. I actually adopted a Maltese who spent 11 years in a rabbit cage.” Between the low standards required by state and federal laws and the sheer dearth of officials enforcing them (inspections of 10,342 licensed animal facilities were completed by just 116 USDA employees in fiscal year 2018, according to the department; the USDA’s animal welfare enforcement budget was also cut by a quarter million dollars between 2018 and 2019), breeders with cruel to minimally acceptable standards may still hold licenses. White Fire Kennel in Manly, Iowa, was raided by the Worth County Sheriff’s Office and ASPCA in November 2018, where the agencies found 154 malnourished Samoyeds in overcrowded kennels covered with feces 16 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

both reputable and puppy mill, stay in business by selling their dogs to dealers or distributors (characterized by Doll and HSUS as “puppy brokers”) and/or pet stores, putting literal and figurative distance between these unconscionable conditions and doting dog buyers. Solsrud “I WOULDN’T LET SOMEONE PICK ANYTHING OUT acknowlFOR ME, LET ALONE A DOG THAT I’M GOING TO edges the KEEP FOR 15 YEARS,” WHITMORE SAID. “YOU JUST issue of puppy mills, HAVE TO BE WILLING TO SACRIFICE SOME TIME AND even if he SOME GAS TO GO GET THE DOG THAT YOU WANT.” puts little stock in reports from HSUS and the ASPCA, whom he regards as biased D.C. lobbies playing on Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) emotion to elicit donations. Educating bad identified 13 Iowa breeding facilities in their breeders was one of the main reasons he and 2019 Horrible Hundred report of notorious his wife Wendy decided to purchase the Iowa puppy mills, second only to Missouri’s 22. City Petland in June 2006, he said. Large-scale breeders with USDA licenses, and urine, with little or no access to water. White Fire had been licensed by the USDA and Iowa Department of Agriculture. Even as awareness of puppy mills has grown, many continue to thrive in Iowa. The


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A mechanical engineer, Solsrud had previously worked as an inspector of pressure vessels before deciding to become a business owner. He said he applied his inspector’s eye to breeding facilities. “From the first week in this store, I was out in the field working with breeders,” he said. Neither Ron nor Wendy, who worked in human relations, had professional experience in animal husbandry. “Nobody’s out there looking at what those breeders are to improve them,” Solrud said. “Everyone just wants to say bad things about them and say we don’t need them and we need to eliminate them and all that. I think that’s a horrible approach.” The Solsruds have discontinued relationships with some of the breeders Petland’s previous owner worked with. They have new breeders sign the company’s pledge, asking them to keep dogs in cages three times the federal minimum size, provide veterinarian examinations on at least an annual basis and use temperature-controlled transportation, among other guidelines that exceed USDA standards. But neither Solsrud nor Petland corporate

have a team of inspectors enforcing these standards. Solsrud said he’s able to keep tabs on his breeders himself, traveling hundreds of miles a week. He declined to say whether he visits, or has visited, all of his suppliers, which are mostly located in Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Missouri. Solsrud doesn’t share his list of breeders with the public. He’s been there, done that, he told Little Village. Radical anti-breeding folks get their hands on the list and harass his breeders, he said, even dolling out death threats. (This response is similar to the Trump administration’s justification for removing USDA animal inspection reports from the public database.)

The Cost Of Cute Dogs are pricey. Owners should be prepared to spend $1,100 and $3,500 a year on the essentials, according to the Iowa City Animal Center’s recommendations. The costs can escalate if a dog suffers from a chronic medical condition. Even—and in some cases, especially—American Kennel Club-certified purebred dogs can develop

Puppies at Petland, 1851 Lower Muscatine Rd, Iowa City. Zak Neumann / Little VIllage

such conditions, Doll explained. For example, the breed standard for German shepherds is a sloped back, which can lead to spinal problems later in life. Some Shar-Peis are predisposed to eye disorders and ear and skin conditions. English bulldogs and pugs are prone to a soft palate condition that can disrupt their airway. Paired with narrow nostrils, they are unable to properly self-regulate their body temperature, leading to overheating in even moderately warm environments. “If you make six figures, go ahead and buy an English bulldog,” Doll said. “Get palate surgery on it so the poor thing can breathe. We don’t deserve the kindness those dogs give us; they’re so sweet.” As a veterinarian with nonprofit organizations, Doll said she has extensive experience working with people unable to afford basic pet care, even after spending (or owing— Petland offers payment plans) hundreds or thousands of dollars on a purebred puppy. She recently visited a trailer park in


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Riverside, Iowa with the Iowa Humane Alliance, offering discounted spaying and neutering services to its dog-owning residents. While there, Doll discovered the community was experiencing an outbreak of parvovirus, one of the leading killers of puppies, since most owners couldn’t afford to keep up with the necessary vaccinations. “[Pet stores] really feed on the people who just don’t look beyond how incredibly cute these puppies are and the novelty of it all,” Doll said. “You feel special—you’re walking in the park and everyone just surrounds you when you’ve got this cute dog. They’re looking for that and they’re getting this happiness out of it, but [if] something goes wrong they can’t take care of the dog.” There is no “rescuing” a dog from the puppy mill-pet store complex by purchasing it, animal welfare workers say. Only law enforcement can shut down unlawful mills and stores; well-meaning consumers trying to “save” puppies from a cage by helping the seller turn a profit are only supporting an industry they’ve judged harmful. Instead, puppy mill opponents are encouraged to adopt dogs seized from puppy mills and hoarding situations, or make donations of money or supplies to shelters receiving influxes of rescued pets. In late July, for 18 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

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example, the Cedar Valley Humane Society (unaffiliated with HSUS) received two dogs that had been confined in a house filled with trash and bugs. They were abandoned, and covered with mange. A month later, the dogs’ fur was still in the process of growing back, but Sam and Abby were new dogs, sprinting and playing on the shelter’s lawn with the gusto of puppies. Jennifer Lane, Cedar Valley’s marketing and development director, disputed the notion that there are not enough homeless dogs to meet the demand. “We see dogs surrendered to us all the time. We see animals found on the side of the road. It’s hard for us as an organization when we’re full-up with dogs and cats to see that sometimes we’re overlooked.” Even though local shelters are eager to home dogs, with fees typically under $200 (comprising all vet care administered until that point, including vaccinations and spaying/neutering procedures), they employ a relatively rigorous application process, asking a laundry list of questions. Lane quoted just a few: “‘What are you looking for [in a dog]? What’s your environment? Do you have children? Do you have other animals? What’s your time commitment? What does your job schedule look like? Are you able to be there for your

Sam and Abby were trapped inside a filthy house before being rescued and relocated to the Cedar Valley Humane Society. Zak Neumann / Little VIllage

animal?’ We ask them upfront.” Iowa City also requires an aspiring adopter to call the shelter the morning after applying in order to demonstrate their resolve, according to Chris Whitmore, coordinator of the Iowa City Animal Care and Adoption Center and formerly the city’s animal control officer. Once the dog goes home, the shelters follow up with the adopter in the weeks and months after. The goal, Whitmore and Lane said, is to find a good match, educate the adopter, avoid impulse purchases and nurture the relationship. Petland shoppers can meet a puppy, flip through the information binder with an employee, pay and take the dog home in relatively quick succession. Solsrud said he has a return and exchange rate at Petland of about 2-4 percent, which he considers a marker of successful human-dog pairings (Whitmore said the Iowa City shelter rate is comparable). Though Petland sells five-day, 14-day and three-year warranties, customers who don’t opt into these plans or have expired



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warranties may not see the benefit of returning an unwanted or sick dog to the store. Guilt can also be a motivator. Doll said it’s common for low-income dog owners to rehome pets themselves or keep a pet in less than ideal conditions. It’s misleading, she and Whitmore agree, to imply that a dog that is never heard or seen from again has been matched with a happy, healthy home. Petland offers a free vet check-up with every puppy purchase in the hope that owners will establish good care habits (including spaying or neutering their dog later on), but the store does not have a system for following up with every buyer. The city inspects Petland’s facilities on an annual basis, and Whitmore said the Solsruds consistently pass, and are open to suggestions. Dogs originally sold by Petland are occasionally surrendered to the Iowa City shelter, but Whitmore said they tend to be healthy and get adopted quickly. But if someone is committed to buying a purebred or designer-breed puppy from a breeder, she and Doll both recommend they visit the breeding facility themselves and meet the puppy’s parents before committing 20 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

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financially. If the sire and dam are friendly, you’re likely to get a friendly dog. Ask to see the parents’ medical history; if Mom and Dad have been treated for breed-specific health issues, these were also likely to be passed on to your pricey new pup. “I wouldn’t let someone pick anything out for me, let alone a dog that I’m going to keep for 15 years,” Whitmore said. “You just have to be willing to sacrifice some time and some gas to go get the dog that you want.”

Supply, Demand and a Ban The Iowa City and Cedar Rapids city councils have both considered bans on the retail sale of pets sourced from large-scale commercial breeders—ordinances that exist in more than 300 U.S. localities including the states of California and Maryland. Workers with Last Hope Animal Rescue in Cedar Rapids and Cedar Rapids City Councilmember Ashley Vanorny have been advocating for the ban since March, arguing that rescue organizations are shouldering the costs of treating animals abused by the industry. HSUS specifically called out Pet’s

Copper tries to convince Zak to adopt him at the Cedar Valley Humane Society. Zak Neumann / Little VIllage

Playhouse in Cedar Rapids, a store that buys from Maple Tree Kennels in Alta Vista, identified as a USDA-licensed puppy mill. “Unfortunately, every inch of this industry is shrouded in secrecy, which is why it is so important for cities and states to enact legislation that would protect the consumer before they unknowingly support one of these largescale puppy mills,” Mindi Callison, founder of the Davenport-based nonprofit puppy mill watchdog Bailing Out Benji, told the Gazette. When a similar proposal was introduced in Iowa City by the Iowa chapter of HSUS, the Solsruds saw it as a personal attack. If Petland should close, the community would lose a resource, Solsrud said: a space for people with special needs to see and interact with animals; coveted jobs for high school and college students; two “advocates for pets” in he and Wendy, including someone to

Cont. >> on pg. 32


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COMMUNITY

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UR Here

Sound Design Turning a home or office into a healthy space requires more than pretty decor. BY THOMAS DEAN

W

hat does your place sound like? We spend enormous chunks of our lives in our homes and workplaces. More and more, we’re coming to understand the effect these frequent haunts have on our physical and mental health, our emotional states, our creativity and productivity—in short, our very well-being. A number of recent studies have shown the positive effects of nature in our interior spaces (and the negative effects of its absence). Thus, plants, windows looking onto greenery and natural images in the form of pictures, murals and even screensavers are being incorporated more and more into offices, schools, hospitals and homes. As is often the case, the visual is given highest priority in these efforts to bring more nature, even secondarily, into our everyday lives. Yet the world and our experience of it is multi-sensory, and we often give short shrift to our ears, noses, mouths and hands when nurturing our relationships with the spaces around us. Luckily, interest in “aural architecture” is on the rise. Aural architecture considers our reactions to sound in buildings and how we

Jordan Sellergren / Little Village

sound in your home affects your mood,” published July 30. “Dingy offices where noise rattles uncomfortably between the floor and the ceiling, old houses where the creaks and groans of ageing floorboards carry hauntingly from room to room, train stations where public announcements reverberate until they are indecipherable. While it may be hard to put a finger on why, these places can feel instinctively THE WORLD AND OUR EXPERIENCE OF IT IS uncomfortable to MULTI-SENSORY, AND WE OFTEN GIVE SHORT us.” One of the most SHRIFT TO OUR EARS, NOSES, MOUTHS AND obvious examples of HANDS WHEN NURTURING OUR RELATIONSHIPS the effect of sound WITH THE SPACES AROUND US. in our homes is the difference between hardwood and carpeted floors, which also illustrates how can best design our indoor spaces to make people can have different relationships with them acoustically satisfying, functional and different types of sounds. While I understand desirable. and often admire the aesthetic beauty of a “We have probably all been in a building nicely finished hardwood floor, I find the that sounds wrong,” writes BBC reporter sound in such homes echoey and rather harsh. Lakshmi Sandhana in the article “How the I personally much prefer the softer, quieter, 22 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

more intimate sound of a carpeted room. Paying attention to our interior soundscapes has implications beyond just aesthetics. Sandhana cites studies that show how “noisy work and home settings have been proven to annoy people, and noise annoyance itself has been linked to depression and anxiety. Furthermore, issues [over] concentrating in the workplace due to office noise and intermittent noise [have] been found to significantly reduce human performance.” Research is also being conducted into how sound environments can promote or inhibit healing and recovery in hospitals. I have garnered a reputation among my colleagues at the University of Iowa for having a “great” office. This is a result of some simple choices I’ve made to create a comfortable environment in the place where I spend more time than anywhere other than my own home. The two main choices are a healthy number of plants (remember the importance of bringing the green world into your workspace) and using table and floor lamps rather than the harsh, sterile and overly bright fluorescent ceiling lights. (A comfortable reading

Cont. >> on pg. 36


STRENGTHEN

Preserve the historic Englert Theatre and FilmScene on the ped mall

GROW

Create a state-of-the-art cinema and nurture our festivals

EVOLVE

Expand education, outreach, access, and collaboration

Building the

GREATEST SMALL CITY for THE ARTS

LEARN HOW YOU CAN HELP REALIZE OUR COLLABORATIVE VISION AT

www.strengthen grow evolve.org

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 23


COMMUNITY En Español

Pueblo chico POR SEBASTIÁN LORES

E

l piloto había parado sin entusiasmo al verme hacerle señas desde un lugar de la carretera donde solo podría encontrarse un fugitivo o un fantasma. Kilómetros de desierto alrededor. Su trajinado Ford llevaba los muelles traseros elevados para que los vigilantes no detectaran la sobrecarga, y esa mañana candente la sobrecarga tocaba ser yo. Tras devorar una hogaza de pan, dar dos tragos de agua y negociar mi salvación, me vi instalado en la maletera. Un feto añejo y cuarteado por el sol. Mi destino era el de todos los que ya no cabíamos en ese pueblo del carajo llamado Coronel Azcurra. Papeles falsos que nos hizo el Chino Guzmán. Vender lo vendible y zarpar como se pudiera. Hubo quien prefirió quedarse y aguantarla. Adaptarse, decían, a los nuevos tiempos. Eso no es pa mí. Yo me escurrí y no me lo impidió el dejar a Angelita con los dos mostritos. Ya algún día nos reencontraremos y si quieren,

YA ALGÚN DÍA NOS REENCONTRAREMOS Y SI QUIEREN, ME PERDONARÁN.

Austin Smoldt-Saenz / Little Village

me perdonarán. Ese auto seguro había contrabandeado gasolina antes de gente. La maletera tenía un olor intenso. No me molestó, es un rico olor. Me adormecí durante las horas que nos tomó llegar a Santa Isabel, donde al emerger de nuevo al mundo como animal de madriguera, vi que merodeaba gente venida de todos lados. Me había puesto los billetes en una cartuchera dentro del calzoncillo. De ahí saqué uno y caminé al puesto de una vendedora de papas rellenas. Su acento era del norte, le pregunté que si había pasado mucha gente de Azcurra. Ella negó con la cabeza. Me zampé la comida con ansiedad. En el centro de un terreno cuadrado, entre 24 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

plaza y estacionamiento, un hombre mal disfrazado de militar y que más parecía un borracho amargo, gritaba por un megáfono. El aparato, no sé si por barato o por viejo, distorsionaba su voz y daba a sus arengas un aire penoso. Logré entender que era constitucionalista, desplazado y furioso. Algo en él me hizo recordar a mi padre, quizás sus ojos ardientes o simplemente su barba blanca. Me le acerqué. Lo llamé papá, que era como uno se dirigía a otro hombre en esa parte del país. Paró su perorata y me miró sorprendido. Le ofrecí una cerveza. En seguida comenzó a caminar y lo seguí. Nos sentamos en un restaurante abarrotado que ofrecía menús con entrada, segundo, postre y refresco.

Le dije a la mesera que solo queríamos una chela grande y helada. El hombre agregó que también quería yucas fritas. Ya les traigo, dijo la mujer y desapareció esquivando las espaldas de dos comensales corpulentos. Señor, le dije, soy músico, comulgo con sus ideales y aprecio su valor. No pretendo quedarme acá. Sucede que acá me dejaron. ¿Existe una manera de?, ¿cómo decirlo?, ¿pasar al otro lado? El viejo se rio sin verme, sus manos, posadas sobre la mesa, empezaron a emular a las de un pianista. ¿Qué tocas?, preguntó. Toco el violín, respondí, y sé algo de composición. Era maestro, antes de todo. Yo he escrito un himno, me dijo él, pero


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necesita música. Si tú se la pones y queda bonito yo te hago llegar allá.

Small Town

BY SEBASTIÁN LORES TRANSLATED BY ALLANA C. NOYES

T

he driver reluctantly slowed when he saw me standing there, sticking my thumb out on the strip of highway that’s only ever inhabited by ghosts or fugitives, nothing but kilometers of desert spreading out in all directions. His weathered Ford was lifted in back so he wouldn’t get pulled over for hauling overweight loads, and on this particular white-hot morning, I was destined to be the extra load. After scarfing down a loaf of bread, taking two long gulps of water and negotiating my salvation with the driver, I found myself nestled in the trunk, curled-up like a fetus, aged and cracked by the sun. My fate was no different than anyone else who’d managed to get out of Coronel Azcurra, that damned town. I bought new papers from Chino Guzmán, sold what was left to sell and disappeared as best I could. Not everyone leaves. There are those who choose to stay and put up with it, adapt, as they say, to these strange new times. Not me, though. I got the hell out and not even Angelita or our two little terrors were going to stop me. Maybe we’ll meet again some day and if they choose to do so, maybe they’ll find it in their hearts to forgive me. The car was definitely in the gasoline-smuggling business before the human-smuggling business. The trunk had a strong smell, but I didn’t mind, it was almost sweet. I even nodded off during the few hours it took us to get to Santa Isabel, where I crawled from the trunk out into the world like a wild animal emerging from its dark burrow. There were people everywhere, prowling about. I’d stashed a pouch with a few bills into my underwear and I pulled one out as I walked up to a street-vendor selling stuffed potatoes. She had a northern accent, and when I asked if a lot of people from Azcurra had come through

Cont. >> on pg. 38

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LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 25


BREAD & BUTTER

LV Recommends:

Laos Cafe

Laos Cafe: 1405 N Elm St, Suite 105, West Liberty, 319-627-3156

I

owa has long suffered from a chronic lack of traditional Asian cuisine. With an overabundance of greasy Panda Express-like food and subpar California rolls, it’s difficult to find a restaurant delectable enough to satisfy the palates of true Asian food enthusiasts. However, a game-changer resides in an unsuspecting building on the fringes of West Liberty: Laos Cafe. It’s evident upon walking into Laos Cafe that the restaurant hasn’t been open for very long. Located in a relatively quaint space, the eclectic decor and occasional missing tablecloth hint that the owners may still be getting settled. Indeed, the restaurant has only been open for a few months, yet what it lacks in cohesive design, it makes up for in character. Laos Cafe strays from the path of well-furnished but bland chain restaurants, instead paying homage to the owners’ Laotian roots through paintings, tapestries and artifacts from across southeast Asia. 26 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

In addition to Laotian culture, Laos Cafe brings dishes unprecedented in West Liberty. The sign above the entrance reads, “Experience flavors from far away,” which is fitting in a town known for its large Latinx population and its equally large assortment of Mexican restaurants. (As of 2017, less than 3 percent of West Liberty residents identified

as Asian-American, while nearly 50 percent were Hispanic or Latino.) Because the head chef attended culinary school in Thailand, the menu includes Thai and Vietnamese favorites, like “drunken noodles” and pho, as well as Laotian dishes. Growing up eating homemade Vietnamese food, I’ve become cautious when trying


LittleVillageMag.com/Dining

Asian restaurants in the Midwest, acknowledging that I’m far more likely to be disappointed than delighted. However, Laos Cafe’s family owned, homey nature quelled any nervous thoughts I had. My waiter was attentive, kind and ready to recommend his favorites, informing me that the special of the day was Yum Seafood ($10) and his favorite dish was the Pad Kee Mao with chicken ($11), both of which I ordered in addition to an appetizer of Spring Rolls ($5). Upon tasting my appetizer, I was delighted. After hastily devouring the spring rolls, I remarked that these carefully constructed bundles of joy invoked memories of consuming similar dishes lovingly made by my Vietnamese father. The rice paper-wrapped noodles, vegetables and shrimp, accented by a light peanut sauce, could easily have been made in my kitchen at home. While the spring rolls were a pleasant introduction, entrees are where Laos Cafe truly excels. From thick, homemade, handcut wide noodles to cilantro delicately placed atop each dish, each detail was meticulously

Opposite: Spring Rolls and Yum Seafood. Above: Pad Kee Mao Anjali Huynh / Little Village

attended to, creating a dining experience that was both beautiful and delicious. The flavorful, vegetable-filled Pad Kee Mao easily rivals the drunken noodles of nearby Iowa City restaurants Thai Flavors and Thai Spice. Because some Laotian dishes are known for being spicier than the average American

palette can handle, the waiter kindly warned us ahead of time that our Yum Seafood would be a bit hot. He wasn’t wrong; I urge any visitors to not make the same mistake I did of taking their warnings lightly. However, once again, I found myself continuing to reach for more, even as I downed several gulps of water in between each bite. Laos Cafe is a gem for those that have grown tired of orange chicken or are simply looking to try food from another culture. Though it’s young, Laos Cafe has worked diligently to expand its selection of dishes, evidenced by the new menu boasting a large assortment of appetizers, stir fries, curries and soups, and its Facebook page that posts new specials each day it’s open (TuesdaySunday). Moreover, the owners plan to expand the currently cramped space in coming months, which will only enhance the dining experience for its growing fanbase. Bring lots of friends, a healthy appetite and perhaps an extra water bottle to take the edge off the savory, spicy cuisine. —Anjali Huynh

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 27


CULTURE

A-List

Every Body Dance Now Inspired by the likes of Harriet Tubman and Tori Morrison, Urban Bush Women dances for social change. BY ELAINE IRVINE

“T

his process … really predates us all.” Chanon Judson, one of the artistic directors of Brooklyn, New York-based dance company Urban Bush Women, is speaking of the company’s practice of applying culture to dance. “We are all part of a lineage that has been doing that since the beginning of time.” Urban Bush Women was founded in 1984 by dancer and choreographer Jawole Willa Zollar, who still holds the title of Chief Visioning Partner of the group. Zollar is in the educational lineage of Katherine Dunham, a dancer, choreographer and anthropologist known for bringing African dances into European-dominated spheres 28 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

while spearheading the field of dance anthropology. She trained with Joseph Stevenson, who was a student of Dunham. Like Dunham, who led the Katherine Dunham Dance Company—the first (and, at the time, only) African American modern dance company—Zollar forged new space

“WE WANT BLACK FOLKS IN THE AUDIENCE TO FEEL CELEBRATED AND VALIDATED.” —CHANON JUDSON

for people of color in the dance world: Urban Bush Women is the first (and, at the moment, only) African American women-centered dance company. Zollar has choreographed 34 works for Urban Bush Women as well

Urban Bush Women Dance for Every Body Workshop, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 6 p.m., Free James Morgan Owens

as works for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Philadanco and more. Since its establishment, Urban Bush Women has been drawing aspects of African and African American culture into dance technique and using their performances to promote social change. Urban Bush Women’s values echo this commitment; “entering community and co-creating stories,” “catalyzing for social change” and “building trust through process” are among those central principles. Their goals revolve around validating individual stories and celebrating their part in a diverse landscape; lifting up the African diaspora and highlighting the power and strength it innately holds; and advocating for the company’s home in Brooklyn, though they tour internationally. Urban Bush Women, as stated in the group’s mission statement, “seeks to bring the untold and under-told histories and stories of disenfranchised people to light through dance.”


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In 2013, Urban Bush Women kicked off their Choreographic Center Initiative, which expands on the company’s mission statement and core values. The initiative began as a way to directly combat barriers that hinder women and girls of color in the field of dance. This, again, focuses on the individual and how each person’s story can lead to change in a systemically oppressive society. Everyone involved in the Urban Bush Women, including dancers and staff, is required to attend the Summer Leadership Institute, which is also open to community artists and activists. The 10-day program teaches attendees how successful movements have worked in the past, encompassing experience-based learning, asset mapping, research, navigating assumptions and unraveling racism. It culminates in a performance emphasizing dance and song. This summer, the institute studied the effect of black women(+)’s leadership in the U.S., incorporating figures like Underground Railroad activist Harriet Tubman and Marsha P. Johnson of the Stonewall resistance. (The construction “women(+)” is used to indicate an expansive definition—the website notes, “we refer to self-identified women, gender-nonconforming people, and non-binary people who would use ‘women(+)’ to describe themselves.”) Creative figures such as author Toni Morrison and playwright Ntozake Shange are studied as inspiration. Both components—social activism and creativity—are considered when examining future catalysts of change. “While our core values grew very much out of concert work, the Summer Leadership Institute is where we really get to share them outside of the language but inside of practice,” Judson said. The Summer Leadership Institute, which was held for the 20th time in the summer of 2019, trains social justice workers for working with the arts in the spotlight in accordance with Urban Bush Women’s core values. One core element of the Summer Leadership Institute, the hour-long Dance for Every Body Workshop, will come to Iowa City as part of the Urban Bush Women’s time at Hancher in September. It will take place at the Old Capitol Museum on Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 6 p.m. Led by some of the company’s dancers, the workshop will teach attendees how to incorporate Urban Bush Women’s techniques while considering components like breath, weight, call and response and polyrhythm.

THE POLLS ARE OPEN!

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CULTURE

Nominations due online by Sept 27:

icgov.org/ HumanRights NominationForm

Wed, Oct. 23 Keynote by Dr. Melissa Shivers, Vice President for Student Life at the University of Iowa

The framework of the workshop is open and ready to be accommodating to experiences attendees bring with them. “It’s also tapping into the experiences and the knowledge that our bodies carry, and really honoring that,” said Samantha Speis, Urban Bush Women’s second artistic director. “There’s the opportunity there for you to be in charge of your learning. People will be challenged to do things they may have never done before.” Everybody and every body is welcome, regardless of age and level of dance experience. The workshop will be free and open to the public, but Hancher asks that attendees RSVP on the event page on their website, hancher. uiowa.edu. Earlier on Sept. 17, company members will participate in a lunch discussion at the Iowa City Public Library at 12 p.m. The conversation will center on Hair & Other Stories, the work Urban Bush Women will be performing at Hancher on Saturday, Sept. 21. Hair & Other Stories, which focuses in on the experiences of black women—including those of body image, gender identity, sexism and economic inequity—with spoken word, dance, movement and song. These issues and others are examined through the lens of the hair of women of color, but especially of black women. “Hair & Other Stories in particular is a creative work that intends to create conversation around systemic racism,” Judson said. “We use art as both a metaphor at times, but also as an entry point to go into this conversation. Often times, instead of audience members asking questions of the dancers, we want people to leave wanting to have new conversations. We want black folks in the audience to feel celebrated and validated.” Tickets for Hair & Other Stories start at $25 for adults, $10 for college students and youth. “The values [of Urban Bush Women] speak to how to live in a just society,” Judson said. “They’re not just useful to folks of African descent, but they’re really looking at how we can work together as a collective of humans.” Elaine Irvine is a senior at the University of Iowa studying journalism and art, and has worked with KRUI and Fools Magazine on campus. She was born and raised in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and is the mother of a twoyear-old (cat) named Juniper.


+

Present

A festival exploring the unknown, discussing the creative process, and presenting new work

e g a g n E r You Curio sity Downtown Iowa City

Nov. 1-2, 2019

PASSES ON SALE NOW witchinghourfestival.com


COMMUNITY

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>> Cont. from pg. 20 stand up for breeders against “a false narrative perpetuated from organizations outside of our community.” In April, the Solsruds submitted a letter and appeared in front of the Iowa City Council, defending their practices. In a response, HSUS called the Solsruds’ claims to putting dogs’ health first “laughable” and “hard to stomach.” “What they presented was what HSUS and ASPCA pump out all day long,” Ron Solsrud said. “This is their job, this is what they do, and people just suck it up and think this is real. They feel that burden on their heart when they go to bed at night. And I feel bad they feel that way.” “I think our society gets into this picketing and protesting and while, heck, that’s in my Christian background, protesting, I think it’s the wrong approach to most situations,” he added. While Whitmore, at the Iowa City Animal Care and Adoption Center, encourages people to donate to local shelters and organizations over national groups, she sees HSUS as an important resource, recently helping pass a trap-neuter-release ordinance in Iowa City that will help control cat overpopulation. “Are they [HSUS] a lobby? Yeah! But you don’t think puppy mills have lobbies? Look at the [Iowa] Farm Bureau,” Whitmore said. “[They’re] a huge lobby against anything we try to pass, because they think—and it’s wrong, I think—that it’s a slippery slope: Once we start inspecting these puppy mills better, our livestock is next.” HF738, a bill that would increase regulations and penalties for puppy mills, was introduced in the Iowa House on March 13 and is currently stalled. And while activists secured a victory in January when Iowa’s so-called “ag gag” law, which essentially criminalized undercover investigations of industrial livestock and breeding facilities, was struck down by a federal court, another version of the law was passed just two months later. Many animal rights proponents see dog retail bans as the best hope for fighting puppy mills locally. However, one of the few studies into the ethics of commercial dog breeding demonstrates that, at least in the current climate of minimal and minimally enforced animal welfare standards, such bans may not be the answer. Candace C. Croney of the Center for Animal Welfare Science at Purdue University visited a few select Petland breeders with Solsrud in the course of her research. (Croney said she was “very impressed” with the conditions she witnessed, though she couldn’t speak to how representative they were of Petland’s standards or Iowa’s breeding industry at large.) In her study, published earlier this year in the Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research, Croney concludes that commercial dog breeding and the pet stores it supplies are only ethically defensible because the alternative—a ban on commercial breeding, giving rise to a black market of unchecked breeders—is so much worse. As long as there is a demand for dogs, there will be breeders seeking to exploit them— and dog lovers willing to look the other way. “It is ironic,” Croney writes, “that the human-dog bond is so highly valued in western developed nations that people will (knowingly and unknowingly) tolerate various types and degrees of harm to dogs in order to perpetuate their existence.” In May, the Iowa City Council asked its staff to study whether the city should develop regulations on how pet stores source the dogs they sell. The following month, City Manager Geoff Fruin responded with a memo recommending against it. Instead, he suggested the city advocate for pet adoption over purchase and resolve to continue inspections of local pet stores—but leave the impetus on the state to pass stricter laws to prevent cruel breeding practices. Vanorny said in March she expects the Cedar Rapids City Council to vote on the proposed ban this summer. As of publication, a vote has not been held. Staff at the Iowa City Animal Care and Adoption Center and Cedar Valley Humane Society encourage the public to apply as volunteers—a free and altruistic way to get a dog fix. Meanwhile, the Solsruds are preparing for a half-a-million-dollar renovation of their store, to begin this fall. Emma McClatchey would like to give a shout-out to her family’s dog Ruby, Little Village’s office dog Chile and senior dogs everywhere. 32 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

EDITORS’ PICKS

CALENDAR EVENTS AROUND THE CRANDIC SEPT. 4–17, 2019 Planning an event? Submit event info to calendar@littlevillagemag. com. Include event name, date, time, venue, street address, admission price and a brief description (no all-caps, exclamation points or advertising verbiage, please). To find more events, visit littlevillagemag.com/calendar. Please check venue listing in case details have changed.

Wed., Sept. 4 Iowa City Open Coffee, Merge, Iowa City, 8 a.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: AFFORDABLE POWER WASHING

One Million Cups, NewBoCo, Cedar RApids, 8:15 a.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT CIRCLE

One Million Cups, Merge, Iowa City, 9 a.m., Free (Weekly) Iowa City Wednesday Farmers Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 5 p.m. (Weekly) JAX DELUCA, NEA DIRECTOR OF MEDIA ARTS

Federal Arts Funding and Resources for Artists and Organizations, Public Space One, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free READING: ‘URBAN TUMBLEWEED’

Harryette Mullen, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free Open Mic Night, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., Free (Weekly) LOS ANGELES PSYCHEDELIC ROCK

Triptides w/ Flaural, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10 Open Stage, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10 p.m., Free (Weekly)


STAFF PICKS

Adrianne Behning

WHAT ARE WE DOING?

SEPT. 4-17, 2019

Foundry Performance Lab Presents: ‘The 24th Day,’ Shores Event Center, Cedar Rapids, through Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m., $10 As

of this writing, The 24th Day has not opened yet, so I’m unable to give you a review. But I was just wondering a few weeks ago why the Foundry Performance Laboratory—the intimate Cedar Rapids company helmed by CR theater mainstay Jason Alberty and founded in 2017 with the challenging goal of creating paid opportunities for artists that didn’t break the bank for audiences—had been dormant so long, when BAM! I get a Facebook event invite to this little gem. Tony Piccirillo’s play is a tense two-hander where a man kidnaps a former one-night stand who he believes gave him HIV. For the Foundry performance, Matthew James and Kyle Shedeck play the two men—and will toss a coin each night to determine which role they’ll play. It’s a grim testament to the capriciousness of the disease in question, and also a unique opportunity to see two top-notch area actors fresh and challenged at every performance. —Genevieve Trainor

Douglas Kramer Nye Album Release Show with Liberty Leg, Old Scratch Revival Singers, Friday, Sept. 13, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $8-10 The last time I saw

Douglas Kramer Nye was in April, at Trumpet Blossom’s anniversary party. It was also the first time I’d seen him play with a full band. After the show, I told guitarist Jack Isleib, “Now this is the kind of group I’d hire to play my garden party,” words I’ve used to describe only one other band in my life (Des Moinesbased instrumental Brazillian jazz group Choro

Moingona). To be fair, I’ve only recently gained an interest in hosting garden parties, but we can talk about landscaping later. Doug Nye is a treasured xennial Iowa City songwriter whose songs have gained even more life with a solid group of supporting musicians: mellow, yet rockin’, with thoughtful, poignant lyrics. I can hear them now, notes floating amongst the coneflower and arborvitae, guests meandering through dappled sunlight, drinking summer shandies on ice. Till then, lookin’ forward to celebrating this The End is Nye album release show at the Mill. ––Jordan Sellergren Festival Latino of Cedar Rapids, Sunday, Sept. 15, McGrath Amphitheatre, Cedar Rapids, 11 a.m., Free After moving here six

years ago from Mexico, it didn’t take me long to consider Iowa my home. I love its quietness, vibrant sunsets and comfort food (I enjoy an ear of sweet and buttery corn on the cob as much as the next person). But sometimes I can’t help but miss what I left in my home country. Each year, the Latino Festival gives me a little taste of what I miss most. The hustle and bustle, the music always playing somewhere in the background, smells from multiple street food carts combining into one mouthwatering, delicious scent. This festival is a bridge that keeps the Latino community in Cedar Rapids connected to their roots but that also exposes the rest of the town to a culture that is rich, vibrant and diverse. If you enjoy lively music, traditional dances, handcrafts and, of course, tasty food, head over to the McGrath Amphitheater on Sept. 15, because you are in for a treat! ––Jav Ducker


EDITORS’ PICKS THIS WEEK: ‘THE TOUGH ONES’

THE INTERSECTION OF SCULPTURE,

SHAUN FLEMING’S ALTER-EGO

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, Film

ARCHITECTURE, URBAN DESIGN,

Diane Coffee, The Mill, Iowa City, 8

Scene, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $5.50

MATERIAL SCIENCE, STRUCTURAL

p.m., $10-13

(Weekly)

AND AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Thu., Sept. 5

Fri., Sept. 6 READING: ‘THE BEAUTIFUL NO’

Sheri Salata, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., Free

AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

BLUE OCTOBER LYRICIST’S

Creative Matters: Janet Echelman,

ONE-MAN SHOW

University of Iowa Art Building West,

Justin Furstenfeld—An Open Book

FAC Dance Party, The Union, Iowa

Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., Free

Tour, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 8

City, 7 p.m. (Weekly)

p.m., $30-45

OPENING PERFORMANCE! RUNS THROUGH OCT. 13

Lamrim Kadampa Buddhist Centre

‘Mama Mia!,’ Old Creamery Theatre,

Iowa City Meditation Class, Quaker

Live Jazz, Clinton Street Social Club,

SELLERGREN

Amana, 2 p.m., $12-32.50

Friends Meeting House, Iowa City, 6:30

Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free (1st & 3rd

Friday Night Live Music, Wild

p.m., $5-10 (Weekly)

Thursdays)

Culture Kombucha, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

Space One, Iowa City, 4 p.m., Free

Thursday Night Live Open Mic,

ILLINOIS STRING FOLK

(Weekly)

Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

Old Salt Union w/ Flash in a Pan,

READING: ‘GOD LAND’

(Weekly)

Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8:30 p.m., $10

Lyz Lenz, Prairie Lights Books & Cafe,

THIS WEEK: JORDAN “ONE SHED”

I.C. Press Co-op open shop, Public

Meet Me at the Market, NewBo City

Free

READING: ‘IN WEST MILLS’

Market, Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free EERIE AND ETHEREAL; FROM CT

De’Shawn Charles Winslow, Prairie

Evelyn Gray w/ Father Christmas,

VOCAL CHAMELEON

Lights Books & Cafe, Iowa City, 7 p.m.,

Jayce Nguyen, Trumpet Blossom

Storm Large, Hancher Green, Iowa

Free

Cafe, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $7

City, 7 p.m., Free

Daddy-O, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

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LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR CLOSING PERFORMANCE

OPENING NIGHT!

Foundry Performance Lab

RUNS THROUGH SEPT. 22

Presents:‘The 24th Day,’ Shores

‘The Importance of Being Earnest,’

Event Center, Cedar Rapids, 7:30 p.m.,

Giving Tree Theater, Marion, 8 p.m.,

$10

$27.86

HOT DOGS AND ANGELS

IOWA HIP HOP

COMEDY TOUR

ADE w/ London Fog, Tooth Ivy, Iowa

Kathleen Madigan, Englert Theatre,

City Yacht Club, 8:30 p.m., $5-10

Iowa City, 8 p.m., $37.50-57.50 IC JAZZ W/ VIBRAPHONIST ALSO SEPT. 7 AT 8 P.M.

DAVE HAGEDORN

Mike Mercury, Penguin’s Comedy

Thrio + Dave, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa

Club, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $12-15

City, 9 p.m., Free

TEXAS COUNTRY (“WAVE ON WAVE”)

EMO VS SCENE BATTLE REDUX

Pat Green, First Avenue Club, Iowa

Myspace Emo Prom, Gabe’s, Iowa

City, 8 p.m., $22-100

City, 10 p.m., $10

PIANO JAM

Flirty Friday’s Drag & Dance Party,

Holly Bowling, CSPS Legion Arts,

Studio 13, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., $5-

Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $17-21

10 (Weekly)

IOWA CITY ROOTS/BLUES

City Park, Famous Mockingbird, Marion, 8 p.m., $10

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COMMUNITY >> Cont. from pg. 22 chair, a good number of books and some nice pictures on the wall also help.) I’ve worked to improve my aural environment in my office as well. It shouldn’t be surprising that I need quiet to concentrate on my work as a writer. While the ethos in the office suite is to keep doors open, I keep mine partially closed without latching it, which lowers any commotion beyond my door to a comfortable murmur without my appearing to be too unwelcoming. If the decibels of the meeting or phone call in the office next door become too perceptible, some earphones plugged into my laptop playing low levels of white noise, nature sounds or gentle music calm my synapses and nerves. I’ve also discovered that sound can carry an important ceremonial purpose in my day at the office. I have a Tibetan singing bowl sitting on a small side table. In the morning, after I’ve opened the window blinds to let the day’s sun in, I stop and gently tap the side of the singing bowl with the striker. The bell chime sounds, and I stand still, breathing slowly, concentrating on only the metallic sound, listening for its overtones, reverberations and, as the tone fades toward silence, for the final moment when my ears no longer perceive the sound waves swirling about me. This little “ceremony” takes all of 30 seconds or so, but it nicely marks the beginning of my day, setting a mindful attitude, pace and perspective for the rest of my work time. But more importantly, I try to carry its experience with me throughout the hours to follow—to remind myself that often I need to briefly just stop, breathe, slow down and let my senses attune themselves to and focus on the place I’m in right here, right now. More and more, we’re realizing our spaces matter—to our well-being and even our identity. The relationships we build with the world around us occur on many levels, from inside the walls of a room where we work, to the wide expanse of the global environment that gives us life. Whether we design, create, adapt or just attune to these places, we must marshal all our senses to most effectively dwell within them. Today, I wish you happy and healthy listening in your most important places. Thomas Dean loves the sound of a bell tone in the morning. 36 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

TOP PICKS: QUAD CITIES

SEPT. 4-17, 2019

worth it just to see local metal pros Giallows. Muscatine’s Leather Parachute is the cherry on top. —MH GARP Festival, Codfish Hollow, Maquoketa, Friday & Saturday, Sept. 13-14, $35 per day Featuring Susto (two via Facebook

nights), Liza Anne, Robert Ellis, the Medium and a stacked lineup of other artists, the annual GARP Festival is exactly where you should spend your weekend. In between sets, check out the market under the barn, grab some grub or sit on the hillside and take in the beauty of the country at one of the most unique outdoor venues in existence. —PU

The Growlers w/ Pinky Pinky, Golden Fleece, The Rust Belt, East Moline, Thursday, Sept. 5, 6 p.m., $30 The

Growlers are coming to town and it’s a pretty big deal. The psychedelic surf-rockers will return to play the QC for the first time in almost 10 years. They’ll be joined by the catchy garage-rock sounds of Pinky Pinky and fuzzed-out psychedelia of local favorites, the Golden Fleece. Whatever you do, don’t miss this chance to see them in an old warehouse building turned music venue. —Paige Underwood

William Z. Villain, Cà d’Zan House, Cambridge, Sunday, Sept. 15, 6 p.m., $10-20 suggested donation After hear-

ing William Z. Villain’s voice live for the first time a handful of years back, I vowed to never miss a show of his in the QC. His style of experimental music pulls inspiration from blues, Latin, gypsy, math and jazz. Villain performs solo and uses his looping techniques to build the songs right in front of your eyes. The Cà d’Zan House concerts feature a potluck starting at 6 p.m., with music at 7 on the porch. —PU

2019 VIVA Quad Cities Fiesta!, LeClaire Park, Davenport, Saturday, Sept. 7, 1210:30 p.m., Free-$10 Support scholarships

ZUUL vinyl release w/ Leather Parachute and Giallows, Rock Island Brewing Company, Rock Island, Saturday, Sept. 14, 8:30 p.m., $5 ZUUL’s band name is a

reference to a certain ghostbustery ’80s flick that is still popular, so it’s wildly appropriate for them to release their latest album on an ever-flourishing vintage medium. And at a venue that’s been killing it since 1979! They’ve also got shows coming up at Vaudeville Mews in Des Moines on Sept. 5, with Clang! and Nostromo, and at Gabe’s in Iowa City, with Blue Movies and Hobby Horse, on Sept. 9. The cover at RIBCO is

Stuart Mudie

for Latino youth and community education while you party. All. Day. This fiesta features music, food, vendors, dancing, cultural exhibits and performers. Tejano prodigy Isabel Marie Sanchez—who recently performed Selena’s catalog with the Houston Symphony to celebrate and honor the late singer—headlines with a voice that moves me to tears. —Melanie Hanson

CHECK OUT OUR BEER GARDEN! Les Filles de Illighadad w/ Shining Realm, Rozz-Tox, Rock Island, Sunday, Sept. 15, 8 p.m., $12-15 From a secluded

commune in Niger, Les Filles de Illighadad has trashed the rule book and rewritten traditional West African music as 21st century women. The avant garde group’s lead vocalist, Fatou Seidi Ghali, is the world’s first— and for a while, only—female Tuareg (traditional style) guitarist. Fans of psych rock are going to lose their damn minds. —MH

PUB & GRILL DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS 11-2 M-F BREAKFAST DAILY UNTIL 11A

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COMMUNITY >> Cont. from pg. 25 town, she shook her head no. I anxiously wolfed down my meal. In the middle of an empty square, between the main plaza and parking lot, there was a guy dressed like a two-bit soldier, more bitter drunk than military man, shouting through a megaphone, which, either because it was cheap or because it was old, distorted his voice and gave a shrill tone to his lonely rally. I was able to make out that he was a constitutionalist, displaced and furious. Something about him reminded me of my father, maybe his fiery gaze or white beard. I walked up to him and called him pop, not an entirely unusual way to address men in this part of the country. He stopped mid-screed and looked at me, surprised. I offered to buy him a beer and then followed him as he started to walk away. We sat down in a crowded restaurant with specials that included an appetizer, main, dessert and a soda. I told the waitress that all we were after were a few big, ice-cold beers. The man added that he’d like some fried yucca. Right away, said the woman, slipping out of sight between two corpulent customers. Sir, I said, I’m a musician, I sympathize with your ideals and appreciate your courage. I’m not planning to stay here long. I just happened to get dropped off here. Do you know if there’s a way, how do I put it, to pass to the other side? The old man laughed without looking at me. His hands, which had been resting on the table, began to imitate a piano player’s and then he asked, what do you play? I play the violin, I replied, and I do some composing. I’ve mostly been a teacher. I wrote a hymn, he said, but it needs a tune. If you can come up with one that works, I’ll help you get to where you’re going.

Younger NIGHT MILK

LittleVillageMag.com/Younger

This piece is a work of creative fiction. 38 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

Sat, Sept. 7 Iowa City Sunday Farmers Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 7:30 a.m. (Weekly) Marion Farmers Market, Taube Park, Marion, 8 a.m. (Weekly) 4TH ANNUAL I.O.W.A.! CONTINUES SEPT. 8 AT 1:30 P.M.

Writers Rooms Presents: Imagine Other Worlds with Authors, Cedar Rapids Public Library, 10 a.m., Free Guest Vendor Market, NewBo City Market, Cedar Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly) Nick Jr. Live!, Paramount Theatre, Cedar Rapids, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m., $21-102 Family Storytime, Iowa City Public Library, 10:30 a.m., Free (Weekly) I.C. Press Co-op Open Shop, Public Space

AVAILABLE NOW LITTLE VILLAGE HQ

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RECORD COLLECTOR 116 S LINN ST, IOWA CITY

One, Iowa City, 12 p.m., Free (Weekly) FILMMAKER SPOTLIGHT: BEN GODAR IN PERSON

‘Birth of the Cy-Hawk,’ FilmScene, Iowa City, 4 p.m., $5

THE MAKERS LOFT

125 S DUBUQUE ST, IOWA CITY

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: LEAH Y. LATIMER

NAACP 77th Annual Freedom Fund Banquet, IBEW/Miller Hall, Cedar Rapids, 5:30 p.m., $35-60 EXHIBITION RUNS THROUGH SEPT. 15

Reception: UV Island Exhibition by Austin Caskie, Public Space One, Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., Free RAISING FUNDS FOR RED SHAMROCK FOUNDATION

Comedy for Charity 10, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Freewill donation LIVE PRO WRESTLING—ALL-AGES EVENT!

Hawkmania XI, Wildwood Smokehouse &

Sebastián Lores is from Lima, Peru. He’s currently at the University of Iowa’s Creative Writing in Spanish MFA. Allana C. Noyes is a translator from Reno, Nevada. She holds an MFA from the University of Iowa.

EDITORS’ PICKS

Saloon, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $10 LEGENDARY JAZZ

Eddie Picard Quartet, Famous Mockingbird,

BStar LittleVillageMag.com/BStar

Marion, 8 p.m., $25 CLASSIC IOWA INDIE POP

Halfloves Album Release Show w/ Nick Booth, Treesreach, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $10-13



LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

Les Butcherettes / Jordan Sellergren

TOP PICKS: DES MOINES

SEPT. 4-17, 2019

Tallboys and Tortoises, Blank Park Zoo, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 5:30 p.m., Free-$14

Upcoming Events: EVERY MONDAY - PARCHMENT LOUNGE - 6:30 PM free write session hosted by Iowa Writer's House EVERY WEDNESDAY - ANDREW'S BAR EXAM - 7:00 PM

SEPT 6 8 PM

SEPT 13 8 PM

SEPT 14 8 PM

SEPT 20 8 PM

SEPT 27 8 PM

SEPT 28 8 PM

Thrio & Dave Cedar County Cobras The Soft and Low Jarrett Purdy Quartet Dave Thacker Quartet Three Dogs and a Bone

MONDAYS ARE HAPPY HOUR EVERY HOUR! SUNDAYS ARE 1/2 OFF ALL PIZZA ALL DAY! (319) 351-5692 • 405 S GILBERT ST, IOWA CITY

Zoo Brew is a weekly tradition combining alcohol consumption with wildlife viewing at the Blank Park Zoo every summer. It’s a great opportunity to check out the zoo’s offerings without all of the lines and crowds of screaming children. Tallboys and Tortoises is the large blowout that marks the end of the Zoo Brew season. Members get in free, but it’s a fundraising event: Proceeds from alcohol sales go to support programs at the zoo, so you can turn drinking into a philanthropic cause! This year’s event will feature live music from Iowa jammers Not Quite Brothers. Social Irrigation Concert Series: Dustin Smith Band, Des Moines Botanical Garden, Thursday, Sept. 5, 5 p.m., Free$10 I’m always looking for any excuse to

visit the Des Moines Botanical Garden. Between the massive tropical plants, the vegetable-heavy eats at the Trellis Café and the garden’s programming throughout the year, the staff does a fantastic job of keeping the facility active. Social Irrigation is their summer concert series that combines all three of those things, and this week’s offerings include the soulful Americana of Maytags frontman, Dustin Smith. Kids’ activities kick off the evening; the music begins at 6:30 p.m. Kids 3 and under are free, youth 4-17 are $7, and military and seniors are $9. Tickets for the general public are $10.

Social Distortion, Flogging Molly, the Devil Makes Three, Le Butcherettes, Lauridsen Amphitheater at Des Moines Water Works Park, Tuesday, Sept. 10, 5:30 p.m., $39.50-155 This one feels a bit

like dart-board booking to me, slapping four random bands from the past three decades together for a two-month tour throughout the continental U.S. I suppose you can’t argue with the results, though. Plus, it’s the exact kind of wide-reaching show the powers that be seem eager to book for the new Lauridsen Amphitheater, based on the calendar thus far. Anyway, when else are you going to get a chance to see major acts like Flogging Molly and Social Distortion share the same stage?

Cursive w/ Oquoa, Vaudeville Mews, Friday, Sept. 13, 8 p.m., $15 There’s some-

thing to the title of Cursive’s eighth studio album, Vitriola. Is that a word? A combination of the classic Victrola record players and the word “vitriol?” Somehow, it seems like an apt musical metaphor for the relationship Cursive has always held with the music industry. It kind of reminds me of The Ugly Organ days. Yet, the album feels larger in scope than that, with frontman, Tim Kasher, turning his wellhoned ire to life in the U.S. during the Trump era. The album was released late last year and the band has pretty much been touring on it since. That tour will bring them through Des Moines for their biennial show at the Vaudeville Mews. —Trey Reis


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EDITORS’ PICKS Mektoub Trio, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free

Sun., Sept. 8

IC NOLA-STYLE JAZZ

Guest Vendor Market, NewBo City Market, Cedar

Dandelion Stompers, Moco Game Room and Hot

Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly)

LITTLE ROCK, AR EXPERIMENTAL PIANO ELECTRONICA

Beetle Box, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., Free Pub Quiz, The Mill, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $1 (Weekly)

Dog Bar, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., $5 Hiawatha Farmers Market, Guthridge Park, CHICAGO JAZZ-FUSION

Hiawatha, 10 a.m. (Weekly)

Chachuba w/ Hummingbird Horizon and Mansfield Ave, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8:30 p.m., $10

Mon., Sept. 9

Sunday Funday, Iowa City Public Library, Iowa City, 2 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Coralville Farmers Market, Coralville Community Aquatic Center Parking Lot, 5 p.m. (Weekly)

CR ROCK/POP/PUNK

The Unincorporated w/ the Want, Illegal Smile,

IOWA CITY JAZZ

404, Underground, Cedar Rapids, 9 p.m., $10

Live on the Patio: The Tanya English Band, Big

2nd Annual Feed Iowa First Charity Dinner,

Grove Brewery & Taproom, Iowa City, 4 p.m., Free

Rodina, Cedar Rapids, 5:30 p.m., $100

HOMEMADE INSTRUMENTS

SEATTLE HIP HOP

PRIDE AT FILMSCENE

rev.web w/ Gabi Vanek, Dog Hairs, Haunter,

Aaron Cohen w/ Juliano Dock, Soultru, Dillon

‘Wild Nights with Emily,’ FilmScene, Iowa City, 6

Trumpet Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $7

Fuego, Brother of Blue + Special Guest DJ

p.m., $8-10.50

WISCONSIN IMPROVISATION +

OfficeMax, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $10 Elation Dance Party, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly)

READING: ‘END TIMES’ (IN-STORE SIGNING TO BRINGING PROGRESSIVES TOGETHER THROUGH

FOLLOW)

COMEDY

Next Page Books Presents Bryan Walsh, CSPS

The Progressive Comedy Tour w/ Graham

Legion Arts C-Space, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free

Elwood and Ron Placone, Iowa City Yacht Club, 8 p.m., Free

READING/DISCUSSION: ‘ZIGGY STARDUST & ME’

James Brandon, Prairie Lights, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM READING: ‘A GENTLEMAN IN MOSCOW’

Prairie Lights Presents: Amor Towles, North Liberty Community Center, Iowa City, 7 p.m., $10 Open Mic, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly) ZUUL w/ Blue Movies, Hobby Horse, Gabe’s, Iowa

9/12

Not so straight & narrow:

Managing our rural & urban waterways

City, 7 p.m., Free

a walking convers ation with

Comedy Open Mic with Spencer & Dan, Yacht

Craig Just

Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Tue., Sept. 10

Civil & Environmental Engineer UI College of Engineering

Cultivate Hope Market, Cultivate Hope Urban Farm,

Rai Tokuhisa

Cedar Rapids, 4:30 p.m. (Weekly) Practice in the Prairie, Indian Creek Nature Center,

Water Resource Engineer RDG Planning & Design

6 p.m., Free (Weekly) Blues Jam, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

OBERMANN CONVERSATIONS 2019–20

Thurs., Sept. 12, 4–5 p.m. Riverfront Crossings Park 1101 S. Clinton St. Meet at the playground

Free & open to all. Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Erin Hackathorn in advance at 319-335-4034.


now available

EDITORS’ PICKS PART OF THE ‘REVOLUTION STARTS IN THE STREETS’ EXHIBITION PROGRAMMING

Point of Space: Jan Kaláb Talk and Book Signing, National Czech and Slovak Museum and Library, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (reservation required) THIS MONTH: LINDSAY PRINCE

Now Hear This, Opus Concert Cafe, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $12 Yahoo Drummers, Downtown Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) Weekly Old-Timey Jam Sessions, Trumpet Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) Dance Party with DJ MX Divine, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly) Comedy & Karaoke, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly) Karaoke Tuesdays, The Mill, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Wed., Sept. 11 Iowa City Open Coffee, Merge, Iowa City, 8 a.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: FOUNDER FIRESIDE—THE CHERRY BUILDING

One Million Cups, NewBoCo, Cedar RApids, 8:15 a.m., Free (Weekly) THIS WEEK: BUSINESS RESOURCE PANEL

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One Million Cups, Merge, Iowa City, 9 a.m., Free (Weekly)

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LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR

TOP PICKS: WATERLOO/CEDAR FALLS Jeremy Miles / Creative Commons

SEPTEMBER 4–17, 2019

Pit for the Pits 2019: Fundraiser/Music Festival, Spicoli’s Reverb, Waterloo, Saturday, Sept. 7, 2 p.m., $20-25 For the

2019 Fall Harvest Llama Show, National Cattle Congress, Waterloo, SaturdaySunday, Sept. 14-15, $3-50 I’m not sure

Scarecrow Vignettes, Cedar Valley Arboretum & Botanic Gardens, Waterloo, Sept. 13-Oct. 31, Free-$5 The Halloween

‘We Will Rock You—the Musical,’ by Queen and Ben Elton, Gallagher Bluedorn Performing Arts Center, Cedar Falls, Sunday, Sept. 15, 7 p.m., $33.7590.75 Galileo and Scaramuche are on a quest

fourth year, Spicoli’s brings together a wide selection of metal and hardcore acts from across the region and the nation to raise money for Cedar Valley Pitbull Rescue and Wild Thunder Animal Rescue and Sanctuary. California’s ENTHEOS tops the bill; Minnesota lends By the Thousands, Reaping Asmodeia and Terraform, while Wits End and Neck Wrung hail from Wisconsin. The rest of the 16-band lineup is comprised of Iowa groups, including Des Moines outfit Too Pure to Die, hitting the Cedar Valley for the first time in 15 years.

spirit is descending early on the Cedar Valley Arboretum, with their Scarecrow Vignettes on display through Oct. 31. You can view them free with your paid admission (free for members and children 4 and under, $2 for kids 5-17, $5 for adults). A wide variety of scarecrows in different costumes and configurations will be exhibited throughout the grounds.

what more you want me to say here. It’s llamas. A whole show-full of llamas. What’s not to love?! You can go see the llamas ($5 for kids 5-17; $10 for adults). If you’re the sort of ridiculously lucky person who raises llamas, you can show them (varying entry fees; visit iowallamas.org for details). Held in conjunction with the National Cattle Congress, which runs Sept. 11-15, the Fall Harvest Llama Show is the largest yearly fundraiser for the Iowa Llama Association.

to save rock and roll, joined by a small group of social outcasts, the Bohemians. Brian May and Roger Taylor served as music supervisors for this 2002 jukebox musical with book by playwright Ben Elton (The Beautiful Game, Love Never Dies), which ran for 12 years in London.

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ON SALE NOW AT LITTLEVILLAGETICKETS.COM DOWNTOWN IOWA CITY 2019 Culinary Walk September 19, 5:30 p.m. TRUMPET BLOSSOM CAFE DEAD COAST PRESENTS: Chicago Farmer with Joel Sire September 19, 8 p.m. Small Houses with Dear Rabbit and Spectral Snakee September 29, 8 p.m.

CORALVILLE MARRIOTT HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER DVIP Forty Years Forward Anniversary Celebration September 20, 7:30 p.m.

EDITORS’ PICKS Iowa City Wednesday Farmers

THIS WEEK: ‘HIGHWAY PATROLMAN’

Market, Chauncey Swan Ramp, Iowa

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, Film

City, 5 p.m. (Weekly)

Scene, Iowa City, 10 p.m., $5.50 (Weekly)

Burlington Street Bluegrass Band, The Mill, Iowa City, 6 p.m., $5 (2nd & 4th Wednesdays)

Thu., Sept. 12

KC (FORMERLY IC); DIASPORA GOTHIC

I.C. Press Co-op open shop, Public

Hadiza w/ Everyday People Say

Space One, Iowa City, 4 p.m., Free

What, Little Lizard, Trumpet Blossom

(Weekly)

Cafe, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $7 Meet Me at the Market, NewBo City

NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE Northside Oktoberfest 2019 October 5, 12 p.m.

Open Mic Night, Penguin’s Comedy

Market, Cedar Rapids, 5 p.m., Free

Club, Cedar Rapids, 8 p.m., Free

(Weekly)

(Weekly) Lamrim Kadampa Buddhist Centre KC POST-HARDCORE

Iowa City Meditation Class, Quaker

Season to Risk w/ In the Mouth

Friends Meeting House, Iowa City, 6:30

of Radness, Goatfight, Bummer,

p.m., $5-10 (Weekly)

Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10 Thursday Night Live Open Mic,

No fees for event organizers, low fees for ticket purchasers.

Open Stage, Studio 13, Iowa City, 10

Uptown Bill’s, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free

p.m., Free (Weekly)

(Weekly)

Start selling tickets today—it’s free! Tickets@LittleVillageMag.com

(319) 338-7672

46 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR Daddy-O, Parlor City Pub and Eatery,

OKTOBERFEST AND TAILGATE EVENTS

Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly)

RUN THROUGH SEPT. 15

Jingle Cross Beers and Gears THROUGH SEPT. 15

Oktoberfest, Johnson County

FUZE Afro Latin Dance Fest 2019,

Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free

Graduate Hotel, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $125 Friday Night Out, Ceramics Center, OMAHA ROCK AND ROLL

Cedar Rapids, 6:30 p.m., $40 (2nd

Bokr Tov w/ Purple Frank,

Friday)

Pleasants, Mad at You, Trumpet Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $7

FAC Dance Party, The Union, Iowa City, 7 p.m. (Weekly)

Fri., Sept. 13

ALSO SEPT. 14; HEADLINERS INCLUDE SUSTO, DAVID HUCKFELDT

Open Coffee—New Bohemia,

GARP 2019, Codfish Hollow

Merge, NewBo City Market, 8 a.m., Free

Barnstormers, Maquoketa, 7 p.m.,

(2nd & 4th Friday)

$35-40

DOZENS OF EVENTS

OPENING NIGHT!

ALL WEEKEND LONG!

RUNS THROUGH OCT. 6

Jingle Cross and Telenet UCI

‘Uncle Vanya,’ Riverside Theatre, Iowa

Cyclo-Cross World Cup, Johnson

City, 7:30 p.m., $10-30

County Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 12:45 p.m., Free-$95 for spectators


EDITORS’ PICKS SOLO FOLK TURNED ROCK AND ROLL

Anthony Worden and the Illiterati w/

Douglas Kramer Nye Album Release Show w/

Megababes, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $8

Guest Vendor Market, NewBo City Market, Cedar

Liberty Leg, Old Scratch Revival Singers, The Mill, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $8-10

Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly) Rebellion Burlesque Friday the 13th Show!, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., $5-10

HISTORY PRESENTATION BY MARK HUNTER; MUSIC FROM DEEP DISH DIVAS

ALSO SEPT. 14 AT 8 P.M.

Chris Johnston, Penguin’s Comedy Club, Cedar

Flirty Friday’s Drag & Dance Party, Studio 13,

Cherry Building Centennial Celebration, Cherry

Rapids, 8 p.m., $12-15

Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., $5-10 (Weekly)

Building, Cedar Rapids, 10 a.m., Free

Cedar County Cobras, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8

‘FRIDAY THE 13TH PART VI: JASON LIVES’

COMMEMORATIVE GLASS & WRISTBANDS + SIX

p.m., Free

Late Shift at the Grindhouse, Film Scene, Iowa

SAMPLE POURS

City, 10 p.m., $5.50 (Weekly)

Jingle Cross World Cup Wine Walk, Johnson County Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 10:30 a.m., $15

MINNEAPOLIS COUNTRY-AMERICANA

The Plott Hounds, Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10-25

Sat., Sept. 14

Family Storytime, Iowa City Public Library, 10:30

KC BLUES

a.m., Free (Weekly) Iowa City Sunday Farmers Market, Chauncey

Brandon Miller Band, Famous Mockingbird, Marion,

Swan Ramp, Iowa City, 7:30 a.m. (Weekly)

JINGLE CROSS FESTIVAL

Scheels Junior Devo Cup, Johnson County

8 p.m., $15 Marion Farmers Market, Taube Park, Marion, 8 a.m. GRITTY OKLAHOMA COUNTRY

Jason Boland & the Stragglers, First Avenue Club, Iowa City, 8:30 p.m., $15-110

Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 11 a.m.

(Weekly) T-SHIRT INCLUDED! POKER & CRAFT BEER GRAVEL RIDE

Jingle Cross Country 4K Super Hero Run,

Jingle Cross Gravel Grinder, Johnson County

Johnson County Fairgrounds, 12:30 p.m., $25-30

Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 8 a.m., $45

GOURMET POPCORN ICE CREAM BOTTLED SODA FIND

OUR

ORN POPC CAL R LO

U AT YO

EE & HY-V ’S Y CASE

48 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270

1121 3rd St. SE, Cedar Rapids (319) 366-3554 almostfamouspopcorn.com


LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/CALENDAR READING: ‘THE LAGER QUEEN OF MINNESOTA’

The Soft and Low, Sanctuary Pub, Iowa City, 8 p.m.,

Hiawatha Farmers Market, Guthridge Park,

M and M Books Presents: J. Ryan Stradal, Iowa

Free

Hiawatha, 10 a.m. (Weekly)

Brewing Company, Cedar Rapids, 12 p.m., Free COUNTRY OUT OF ARKANSAS VIA NASHVILLE

8TH ANNUAL! FEATURES MUSIC, DANCERS, CRAFTS

I.C. Press Co-op Open Shop, Public Space One,

Ward Davis w/ Josh Morningstar, Wildwood

Festival Latino de Cedar Rapids, McGrath

Iowa City, 12 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Smokehouse & Saloon, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $20-60

Amphitheatre, Cedar Rapids, 11 a.m., Free

GET YOUR PET IN ON THE COMPETITION

SOUL & GROOVE

THIS MONTH: ELIZABETH MUNGER

Jingle Cross Doggy Cross, Johnson County

Everyday People Say What w/ Jaron, ADE,

Artifactory Presents: June Art In The

Fairgrounds, Iowa City, 12:45 p.m., Free

DiviinPurcha$e, B-Tho, Jim Swim, Iowa City Yacht

Afternoon, The Center, Iowa City, 1 p.m., Free (3rd

Club, 9 p.m., $5-10

Sunday)

Elation Dance Party, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m.,

Sunday Funday, Iowa City Public Library, Iowa City,

$5-10 (Weekly)

2 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Surf Zombies w/ Doc Miller Band, The Mill, Iowa

GRINNELL LOUNGE POP

FOLK/AMERICANA

City, 7 p.m., $10

Pink Neighbor Album Release Show w/

The Good Quiet, Press Coffee Company, Coralville,

Spectral Snake, Karen Meat, Trumpet Blossom

4 p.m., Free

Brucemorchestra XII: The Planets, Brucemore, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free-$30 LANDLOCKED SURF TITANS

NICK LOWE’S QUALITY ROCK AND ROLL REVUE

Cafe, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $7

Nick Lowe w/ Los Straitjackets, Esther Rose, Englert Theatre, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., $35-55

ROOFTOP SERIES

Sun., Sept. 15

‘Back to the Future Part II,’ FilmScene, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $15

BROADWAY MEGASTAR

Guest Vendor Market, NewBo City Market, Cedar

City, 7:30 p.m., $10-80

Rapids, 10 a.m. (Weekly)

IOWA CITY DOWNTOWN

An Evening with Audra McDonald, Hancher, Iowa

Open 7 days a week

You’re with friends now.

11 S. DUBUQUE ST. MICKYSIRISHPUB.COM

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER • DRINKS

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 49


IT’S ALMOST TIME

EDITORS’ PICKS FEATURING CR’S ANDY ROWELL

Andy! (and friends) Comedy Showcase, Iowa City Yacht Club, 8 p.m., $10-15 Pub Quiz, The Mill, Iowa City, 9 p.m., $1 (Weekly)

Mon., Sept. 16 FIELD TO FAMILY LOCAL FOODS FESTIVAL

Happy Harvest Party at the Vue Rooftop

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29 • 5:30PM The Hotel at Kirkwood Center

Restaurant, Hilton Garden Inn, Iowa City, 3 p.m., Free Coralville Farmers Market, Coralville Community Aquatic Center Parking Lot, 5 p.m. (Weekly)

Join us for the 2019 Gazette Business Awards as we honor thriving businesses in and around the Corridor. Plus — the BBB Business of Excellence Award

Open Mic, The Mill, Iowa City, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly) OKLAHOMA VIA WASHINGTON UGLY POP

Skating Polly w/ Scamper, Good Devils, Gabe’s, Iowa City, 8 p.m., $10

KEYNOTE PANEL

CO-EMCEES Comedy Open Mic with Spencer & Dan, Yacht Club, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly)

Tue., Sept. 17 Ron Corbett

Lori Sundberg

Kevin Monson

Economic Alliance

Kirkwood Community College

Neumann Monson Architects

Michael Chevy Castranova

Alisabeth Von Presley

Business and Iowa Ideas magazine editor

Touring Musician

BRING A BROWN BAG LUNCH

Hancher Presents: Lunch Discussion with Urban Bush Women, Iowa City Public Library Meeting Room A, 12 p.m., Free FIELD TO FAMILY LOCAL FOODS FESTIVAL

Presenting Sponsor

Establishing Pollinator Habitat, Scattergood Friends School, West Branch, 4 p.m., Free

SPONSOR A TABLE Contact Debbie Scott – Debbie.Scott@TheGazette.com • 319-398-8352

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LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM Cultivate Hope Market, Cultivate Hope Urban Farm, Cedar Rapids, 4:30 p.m. (Weekly) “WILL MILK BE MADE AVAILABLE TO US?”

Dinner & A Movie: ‘The Breakfast Club,’ Graduate Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., $40 FIELD TO FAMILY LOCAL FOODS FESTIVAL

Open House, the Hub (F2F Local Foods Warehouse for institutional Buyers), Iowa City, 5:30 p.m., Free Practice in the Prairie, Indian Creek Nature Center, 6 p.m., Free (Weekly) FAMILY-FRIENDLY DANCE WORKSHOP

Hancher Presents: Dance for Every Body with Urban Bush Women, Old Capitol Museum, Iowa City, 6 p.m., Free (RSVP required) Blues Jam, Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., Free (Weekly) WITTY ACOUSTIC SINGER-SONGWRITER

Dan Bern, CSPS Legion Arts, Cedar Rapids, 7 p.m., $16-19 Yahoo Drummers, Downtown Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) Weekly Old-Timey Jam Sessions, Trumpet Blossom Cafe, Iowa City, 7:30 p.m., Free (Weekly) Dance Party with DJ MX Divine, Iowa City Yacht Club, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly) Comedy & Karaoke, Studio 13, Iowa City, 9 p.m., Free (Weekly) Karaoke Tuesdays, The Mill, Iowa City, 10:30 p.m., Free (Weekly)

IOWA CITY

315 E. 1ST ST. IOWA CITY, IA 52240 319.338.1196 WWW.OLDCAPITOL.COM


IOWA CITY NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE 207 NORTH LINN STREET, IOWA CITY 319.338.1332 • WILLOWANDSTOCK.COM

George’s

est. 1939

312 E Market St | 351-9614

IC’s original northside tap, serving up cold brews, lively conversation, & our award-winning burgers.


ADVERTISER INDEX

BREAKFAST • DINNER • DRINKS 203 N Linn St, Iowa City (319) 351-1924 • goosetowncafe.com Open everyday except Tuesday Dinners Wednesday-Saturday

126 LOUNGE (41) ALMOST FAMOUS POPCORN COMPANY (48) BAO CHOW (10) BARONCINI RISTORANTE (47) BLUEBIRD DINER (58) CITY OF IOWA CITY (30) CAFE DODICI (33) CEDAR FALLS PUBLIC LIBRARY (59) CHOMP (33) THE DANDY LION (58) DESIGN RANCH (60) BIOTEST (8) DODGE STREET COFFEEHOUSE (45) ENDORPHINDEN TATTOO (37) THE ENGLERT THEATRE (29) FILMSCENE (39) THE GAZETTE (50) HANCHER AUDITORIUM (2-6) ICCA (57) IOWA BREWING COMPANY (9) IOWA CITY DOWNTOWN CO-OP (49) - DEADWOOD TAVERN - DONNELLY’S PUB - PRAIRIE LIGHTS - BEADOLOGY - MICKY’S IRISH PUB - RAYGUN IOWA CITY NORTHSIDE MARKETPLACE (52) - WILLOW & STOCK - PAGLIAI’S PIZZA - GEORGE’S - OASIS FALAFEL - DODGE ST. TIRE - HIGH GROUND - HAMBURG INN NO. 2 - EL BANDITO’S - RUSS’ NORTHSIDE SERVICE - GOOSETOWN - ARTIFACTS - THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP

LittleVillageMag.com/Advertising

- BLUEBIRD IOWA CITY OLD TRAIN DEPOT CO-OP (54) - PATV - TRUMPET BLOSSOM CAFE - THE CLUB CAR IOWA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH (51) IOWA PUBLIC RADIO (12) JOSEPH’S STEAKHOUSE (43) KIM SCHILLIG (56) LEGION ARTS (12) MAGGIE’S FARM WOOD-FIRED PIZZA (25) MATTHEW 25 (44) MARTIN CONSTRUCTION (34) MOLLY’S CUPCAKES (45) NATIONAL CZECH & SLOVAK MUSEUM OF IOWA (42, 58) NEW PIONEER FOOD CO-OP (30) NODO (40) NORTHSIDE OKTOBERFEST (21) OASIS FALAFEL (13) OBERMANN CENTER (43) OLD CAPITOL SCREEN PRINTERS (51) POP’S BBQ (57) PUBLIC SPACE ONE (55) QUINTON’S BAR & DELI (44) RAPIDS REPRODUCTIONS, INC. (41) REUNION BREWERY (44) RIVERSIDE CASINO & GOLF RESORT (41) RIVERSIDE THEATRE (46) SANCTUARY (40) SHAKESPEARE’S PUB & GRILL (37) SOSEKI (56) STRENGTHEN • GROW • EVOLVE (23) TRUMPET BLOSSOM CAFE (45) UNIVERSITY OF IOWA STANLEY MUSEUM OF ART (27) THE WEDGE PIZZA (35) WHITEDOG IMPORT AUTO SERVICE (35) WORLD OF BIKES (36)

PLEASE SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS! l ittlev i lla gem a g.co m /a dverti sing READ • SHARE • SUPPORT LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 53


IOWA CITY OLD TRAIN DEPOT

DEAR KIKI

D

ear Kiki, My husband and I are yellers, and I am sick of it. We love each other, and I think we’ve found a great match in each other in just about all ways. The sex is fantastic, we’re super attracted to one another, we love spending time together, we can talk for hours, we have similar life goals and interests, etc., etc. But then we fight about whatever the topic at hand might be (and probably about the same amount that most couples do), and it is SO loud that I’m embarrassed. He thinks that’s dumb—like, why do I care what other people think? But I do worry about what the neighbors think. I want to be able to communicate without feeling like we have to raise our voices continuously to be heard. Easier said than done, believe me, when you’re angry. It’s loud, embarrassing, damaging and frankly just unattractive to me. The more it happens, even though I love him the same, the less I like him. Maybe we’re just “fiery” like he says, but I’m not sure how long I can do this, in spite of our otherwise wonderful relationship. I’d really miss him and us if we called it quits for something that seems like we should be able to control. ––Fiery

OPEN 11-2AM DAILY

TRY OUR BREADED TENDERLOIN! SERVING FOOD UNTIL 1AM DAILY

Dear Fiery, You know, if you were asking me, as a friend, “Should I be embarrassed or care what the neighbors think?” my answer would be an unequivocal, “Of course not!” Unless there’s a risk that the police will be called, your neighbors’ opinions should be meaningless to you. They’re not a part of your marriage. But do you know what I would never tell you, Fiery? That your feelings are “dumb.” Now, maybe you’re just paraphrasing there. But if your husband is telling you, especially in the context of a fight, that your opinions and feelings are lacking in worth, then Fiery, he doesn’t just fight loud: He fights dirty. And that’s where you need to start, to begin unraveling your impasse. Because a rejection of your feelings—even,

LittleVillageMag.com/DearKiki

and perhaps especially, if his instinct is that they’re “dumb”—is a sign of disrespect. Without respect, it doesn’t matter how well-matched you are, how great the sex is or how much you love each other. Compatibility, in all the ways you describe, forms the limbs of a healthy relationship, and love, perhaps, the torso: But respect is the backbone. Put a pause on all of your other arguments and ask him to respect you in this. If he can’t or won’t, you have much bigger problems than what the neighbors think. When it comes to the fighting itself, you’re both right. There’s nothing “wrong” with any volume of fighting, so long as it remains re-

WITHOUT RESPECT, IT DOESN’T MATTER HOW WELL-MATCHED YOU ARE, HOW GREAT THE SEX IS OR HOW MUCH YOU LOVE EACH OTHER.

spectful and non-violent. Healthy arguments can happen at any volume. But some partners operate on the mentality that yelling shows you care, and quiet calm means you’ve given up—that you no longer have the energy or the passion or the desire to care about the argument or, consequently, the person you are arguing with. If that’s the kind of experience he’s coming from, I can tell you that it will take real work and dedication for him to learn another way. I’ll reiterate that I believe it is incumbent on him to do that work. But you’ll maintain a healthier balance in your relationship if you can find ways to have empathy for him while he’s on that path. xoxo, Kiki

K I K I WA N T S Q U E ST I O N S ! ADVERTISING • AUTOGRAPHS BACK ISSUES • MERCH

623 S. Dubuque St. / (319) 855-1474

Questions about love and sex in the Iowa City-Cedar Rapids area can be submitted to dearkiki@littlevillagemag.com, or anonymously at littlevillagemag.com/ dearkiki. Questions may be edited for clarity and length, and may appear either in print or online at littlevillagemag.com.


ASTROLOGY

BY ROB BREZSNEY

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I don’t know if the coming weeks will be an Anaïs Nin phase for you. But they could be if you want them to. It’s up to you whether you’ll dare to be as lyrical, sensual, deep, expressive and emotionally rich as she was. In case you decide that YES, you will, here are quotes from Nin that might serve you well. 1. “It is easy to love and there are so many ways to do it.” 2. “My mission, should I choose to accept it, is to find peace with exactly who and what I am.” 3. “I am so thirsty for the marvelous that only the marvelous has power over me. Anything I can not transform into something marvelous, I let go.” 4. “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” 5. “It was while helping others to be free that I gained my own freedom.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “When you’re nailing a custard pie to the wall, and it starts to wilt, it doesn’t do any good to hammer in more nails.” So advised novelist Wallace Stegner. I hope I’m delivering his counsel in time to dissuade you from even trying to nail a custard pie to the wall—or an omelet or potato chip or taco, for that matter. What might be a better use of your energy? You could use the nails to build something that will actually be useful to you.

Public Space One is creating a new (permanent!) home for art and possibilities in two historic houses on IC’s Northside. gallery ∆ community event space IC Press Co-op ∆ Center for

Afrofuturist Studies ∆ studios

Make it happen! Pledge to our

Kickstarter by Sept. 15

publicspaceone.com/home

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I hid my deepest feelings so well I forgot where I placed them,” wrote author Amy Tan. My Scorpio friend Audrey once made a similar confession: “I buried my secrets so completely from the prying curiosity of other people that I lost track of them myself.” If either of those descriptions apply to you, Scorpio, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to secure a remedy. You’ll have extra power and luck if you commune with and celebrate your hidden feelings and buried secrets. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “No Eden valid without serpent.” Novelist Wallace Stegner wrote that pithy riff. I think it’s a good motto for you to use in the immediate future. How do you interpret it? Here’s what I think. As you nourish your robust vision of paradise-on-earth, and as you carry out the practical actions that enable you to manifest that vision, it’s wise to have some creative irritant in the midst of it. That bug, that question, that tantalizing mystery is the key to keeping you honest and discerning. It gives credibility and gravitas to your idealistic striving. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The coco de mer is a palm tree that grows in the Seychelles. Its seed is huge, weighing as much as 40 pounds and having a diameter of 19 inches. The seed takes seven years to grow into its mature form, then takes an additional two years to germinate. Everything I just said about the coco de mer seed reminds me of you, Capricorn. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ve been working on ripening an awesome seed for a long time, and are now in the final phase before it sprouts. The Majestic Budding may not fully kick in until 2020, but I bet you’re already feeling the enjoyable, mysterious pressure. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you throw a pool ball or a bronze Buddha statue at a window, the glass will break. In fact, the speed at which it fractures could reach 3,000 miles per hour. Metaphorically speaking, your mental blocks and emotional obstacles are typically not as crackable. You may smack them with your angry probes and bash them with your desperate pleas, yet have little or no effect. But I suspect that in the coming weeks, you’ll have much more power than usual to shatter those vexations. So I hereby invite you to hurl your strongest blasts at your mental blocks and emotional obstacles. Don’t be surprised if they collapse at unexpectedly rapid speeds. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the 13th century, the Italian city of Bologna was serious about guarding the integrity of its cuisine. In 1250, the cheese guild issued a decree proclaiming, “If you make fake mortadella ... your body will be stretched on

the rack three times, you will be fined 200 gold coins, and all the food you make will be destroyed.” I appreciate such devotion to purity and authenticity and factualness. And I recommend that in the coming weeks, you commit to comparable standards in your own sphere. Don’t let your own offerings be compromised or corrupted. The same with the offerings you receive from other people. Be impeccable. ARIES (March 21-April 19): John Muir (1838–1914) was skilled at creating and using machinery. In his 20s, he diligently expressed those aptitudes. But at age 27, while working in a carriage parts factory, he suffered an accident that blinded him. For several months, he lay in bed, hoping to recuperate. During that time, Muir decided that if his sight returned, he would thereafter devote it to exploring the beauty of the natural world. The miracle came to pass, and for the rest of his life he traveled and explored the wilds of North America, becoming an influential naturalist, author and early environmentalist. I’d love to see you respond to one of your smaller setbacks—much less dramatic than Muir’s!—with comparable panache, Aries. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Of all the children on the planet, 3 percent live in the U.S. And yet American children are in possession of 40 percent of the world’s toys. In accordance with astrological omens, I hereby invite you to be like an extravagant American child in the coming weeks. You have cosmic permission to seek maximum fun and treat yourself to zesty entertainment and lose yourself in uninhibited laughter and wow yourself with beguiling games and delightful gizmos. It’s playtime! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The ama are Japanese women whose job it is to dive to the sea bottom and fetch oysters bearing pearls. The water is usually cold, and the workers use no breathing apparatus, depending instead on specialized techniques to hold their breath. I propose we make them your inspirational role models. The next few weeks will be a favorable time, metaphorically speaking, for you to descend into the depths in search of valuables and inspirations. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Renowned Cancerian neurologist Oliver Sacks believed that music and gardens could be vital curative agents, as therapeutic as pharmaceuticals. My personal view is that walking in nature can be as medicinal as working and lolling in a garden. As for music, I would extend his prescription to include singing and dancing as well as listening. I’m also surprised that Sacks didn’t give equal recognition to the healing power of touch, which can be wondrously rejuvenating, in its erotic or non-erotic forms. I bring these thoughts to your attention because I suspect the coming weeks will be a Golden Age of non-pharmaceutical healing for you. I’m not suggesting that you stop taking the drugs you need to stay healthy; I simply mean that music, nature and touch will have an extra-sublime impact on your well-being. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you visualize what ancient Rome looked like, it’s possible you draw on memories of scenes you’ve seen portrayed in movies. The blockbuster film Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe and directed by Ridley Scott, may be one of those templates. The weird thing is that Gladiator, as well as many other such movies, were inspired by the grandiose paintings of the ancient world done by Dutch artist Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836–1912). And in many ways, his depictions were not at all factual. I bring this to your attention, Leo, in the hope that it will prod you to question the accuracy and authenticity of your mental pictures. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to get fuzzy and incorrect memories into closer alignment with the truth, and to shed any illusions that might be distorting your understanding of reality. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 55


LOCAL ALBUMS

DICKIE Minus Thieves DICKIEMUSIC.COM

I

f various comic book universes have taught us anything, it’s that every hero needs an origin story. For DICKIE, that was their 2015 self-titled release—a concept album summarizing songwriter and vocalist Dick Prall’s life to that point. Returning like Superman from the Fortress of Solitude, Prall has reconvened DICKIE with a different lineup—this time as a dynamic duo with drummer and multi-instrumentalist Billy Barton as his trusty sidekick. This reboot of the band is captured in their latest album, Minus Thieves. The band, along with producers Pat Sansone (Wilco, the Autumn Defense) and Josh Shapera redirected from the previous string-ladened, chamber pop leanings to a leaner version. This lack of adornment is at once subtle and dramatic. The focal center of the band has always been Prall’s vocals and songwriting,

Submit albums for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

particularly in a live setting, but in places we might expect a song to move to an instrumental break or solo, the songs fold back on themselves, maintaining the economy of structure. Minus Thieves’ opening salvo, “The Last Breath of Rock & Roll” is Prall’s rumination on the state of music today, reflecting on a time when it was more essential to life. He paints a scene of deciding whether to go out with friends to listen to music or pay the bills. With all of the usual varnish of production stripped away, the songs reveal Prall and DICKIE’s superpowers: the strength of a strong hook and melody. Nowhere is this more apparent than the first anthemic single from Minus Thieves, “Believe.” It opens deceptively with only tick-tock percussion from Barton and plucked guitar, recalling “I’m on Fire” by Springsteen (complete with “woo-o-woos”). When seemingly out of nowhere the song explodes into the driving chorus—a harmonized mantra, “Believe... I don’t believe!”— something huge and sadly beautiful happens, which sticks in the listener’s head. With Minus Thieves, DICKIE provides an album delightfully out of step with how we tend to consume music today. They aren’t the heroes we deserve, but quite possibly the ones we need. —Michael Roeder

ZUUL Zuul II IOWACITYZUUL.BANDCAMP.COM

ZUUL Vinyl Release Show w/ Leather Parachute, Giallows, RIBCO, Rock Island, Saturday, Sept. 14, $5

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o to any ZUUL show, stand in the back then watch as the screaming aggression, pulsing rhythm section and melodic shift into doomed riffs enrapture the audience. It’s hard not to be swayed by their end-ofthe-world, cathartic, danceable anthems. Capturing a sound like that in the studio is difficult. Capturing that feeling while pushing into even more experimental realms is a true trick, one that 2018’s ZUUL II pulls off, following the punk-metal riffage of ZUUL’s self-titled album with spacier instrumentals and, at times, subdued prog-like meditations. At just over 30 minutes, it’s a quick thump to the skull. Opening track “Suicide Tuesday” seems to continue the world’s-end hangover from the previous album. It’s a

brutal rush of a song finished in just over two minutes. “Before the Woods Burn Down” changes expectations not once, but twice. It begins with the drums playing what could easily be the backbeat to a ’70s funk jam. Then the guitars drop in. The beat keeps pace as the twin guitars tug back and forth between melody and menace. That’s all before the song speeds up, slows down, then speeds up again. “I Drive Now,” the third song, goes back and forth between anthem and counter-anthem, conjuring memories of Helmet in their more angry (and more relevant) moments. “Whole Step Back” spends half of its running time using sparse guitar work before reaching its brutal punchline (“You’re just dead fucking weight”). Instrumental “Out With the Old” sounds like a slightly off-kilter Sonic Youth song, closing the first side of the record. ZUUL saves the most interesting song for last. “A Dog Never Dies Where It Sleeps” finds the band going full-on studio experimental. Taking up the entirety of the 13-minute second side, it goes from folky into acid-laced space rock. They bring in Linzi Holandes (Death Valley Welcome Center) to add haunting vocals that spiral from harmonious to scream, ending with singer/guitarist JL Bolinger offering a bittersweet dirge. Released on vinyl this summer by Gentle Edward Records, ZUUL II sees the Iowa City band unafraid to experiment. Here’s hoping they continue to get weirder. —Chris Burns

Kim will help you find your way HOME kimschillig@gmail.com 310.795.2133 V/T

56 Sept. 4–17, 2019 LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270


LOCAL BOOKS

Submit books for review: Little Village, 623 S Dubuque St., IC, IA 52240

Exploring I.O.W.A.

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his year’s edition of the I.O.W.A. book festival is set for Sept. 7 and 8 at the Cedar Rapids Public Library. The acronym stands for Imagine Other Worlds with Authors, and the writers on the slate certainly represent a wide array of literary worlds. From fantasy to mystery to romance and more, the festival offers readers an opportunity to meet local authors who may be new to them. Organized this year by the Writers’ Rooms, an organization devoted to connecting the regional writing community, the event will include panel discussions, readings, signing and, of course, book sales. The I.O.W.A. book festival is free and open to the public. Here are five participating authors who caught my eye.

Tricia Anderson I first encountered Tricia Anderson when I was writing about Henry Davison: You Can Be What You Want to Be, a book she and her mother helped the legendary friend of Cedar Rapids youth write about his life in the year prior to his passing. But Anderson’s writing endeavors are certainly not limited to helping craft memoirs. As she notes on her website, her series can feature sexy werewolves, sultry gods, hot bad boys and more. Her Hard Drive series is set in the world of mixed martial arts, and it would appear all the entendres are at least double.

Eliza David David has self-published more than 10 novels, including her fivebook Cougarette series, which follows the adventures of CeeCee Banks, a woman who must build a life for herself after divorcing her cheating husband. Within the first few pages of the first book, The Cougarette, the pacing, tone and naughtiness level are all well-established, as a vibrator, a poorly received request for oral sex and a drunken escapade each appear in the very first chapter.

Shakyra Dunn The Final Lesson is the first book in Shakyra Dunn’s YA fantasy series. It’s sizeable, coming in at over 400 pages, and includes a fair amount of world building, including the creation of a lost language. Right at the beginning, Dunn reveals an ability to vary her narrative voice for effect, opening with a mysterious pronouncement from a teacher and a flippant response from a student. The book seems likely to capture the imagination of those who are up for a good quest.

E.M. Johnson The first two of a planned eight books in Johnson’s Division 53 series, The Dark and The Haven, focus on a shadowy section of Homeland Security in a dystopian American future. The set up calls

to mind Section 31 in the Star Trek universe—a dedicated group that is willing and able to cross into moral gray areas in pursuit of (we hope) noble goals. Johnson’s series is character-driven as she explores the impact of working for such an organization through different kinds of people who find themselves in the grip of a secret group kept apart from the rest of society.

Randy Roeder I love books set in our local community, whether the area is fictionalized or faithfully represented. So Randy Roeder’s two novels, Sins of Intent and Sins of Omission, piqued my interest. Set in Cedar Rapids, Roeder’s books star Cletus Efferding, a man who reluctantly investigates a murder after he is wrongly implicated. The cover of Sins of Intent features the Veteran’s Memorial Building and the Cedar River in an atmospheric image that suggests the underbelly of the town is just waiting to be explored. —Rob Cline

Photos courtesy of the authors

Your Opportunity to Engage with Arts and Culture CulturalCorridor.org LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 57


Ja n Kalรกb Join us as we welcome this genre-defying international contemporary artist.

Talk and Book Signing September 10, 7:00 p.m. Artist Workshop September 12, 6:00 p.m. Learn more at

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Smithsonian Affiliate


SHRUNKEN HEADS

BY AIMEE LUCIDO

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ACROSS 1. Angie Thomas has one in the movie version of The Hate U Give 6. Taco Tuesday libation, casually 10. Bat, as at a gnat 14. Brand of imitation fat 15. Strong desire 16. Walk through Muir Woods, say 17. Best Limburger ever? 19. The Emerald Isle 20. Like a marathoner who stops running to help a

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fallen competitor (I’m not crying, you’re crying!) 21. Beyoncé and Ariana Grande, to enthusiastic fans 23. “They’re ___, and they’re spectacular” 24. In order (to) 25. Remove the peel from 28. Backup digits for the ATM? 33. Arms race events, briefly 35. Swear word, or

swearing words 36. E•MO•TION middle name 37. Hidden stockpile 38. One of over a thousand in a box that I can’t quite bring myself to give to Goodwill 39. Antipasto array 41. Notable time 42. Org. in whose tournament Baylor won a dramatic 2019 basketball championship

44. The Allman Brothers Band, e.g., in their bestknown lineups 45. “Here lies the circuit board that fell in the toilet”? 48. Check-signing needs 49. Fourth-most common element in the earth’s crust, by weight 50. Spoken 52. Arched part 55. Pennsylvania and Paddington, e.g.

59. Common road sign animal 60. Pants storage that causes constant headaches? 62. “In ___ of gifts ...” 63. Shave parts of People, say 64. Stuck in the mud 65. National Mall trees 66. Option in a preteen game 67. Class in which you might learn about survey sampling bias

29. Exploding stars 30. So angry one could scream 31. Like Cheerios 32. Swiftlets build theirs out of saliva—and they’re edible! 34. Job security, for some 38. “Rats!” 40. What “E” stands for on some album tracks 43. Like a photo of you and your ex post-breakup, probably 44. Camera attachment 46. Buddha’s hand, e.g. (Google it, they’re so weird) 47. Work on a musical score 51. Molecule parts 52. What Tesla cars don’t do, in the traditional sense 53. Lane that makes all the rings on The Bachelor 54. Look to be 55. Show signs of life 56. Southern veggie 57. Shaving alternative, once 58. Crabs and such: Abbr. 61. Tarbell who wrote a biography of Napoleon Bonaparte

DOWN 1. Corporate shills 2. Moisturizing additive 3. It’s measured in courses 4. Fast food motto since 2000 5. Rouen relative 6. Swiss morning option 7. Bellicose Greek god 8. Some NFL blockers 9. Get excited about something highly specific 10. “Oh my GOD!” 11. Post-punk band with Pink Flag 12. Analogous 13. Hamilton bills of which it would take at least 20 to see Hamilton 18. Lots LV269 ANSWERS 22. Words often A N SON F L I C K E RM I T written in dust B A NCOR A T ORR E A D Y B U I L D I NOB I S S T EM 24. Whole bunch A S T OUND BO L DCH A P 25. Runner who U E L C L A V E L L OU I S A P A A K E L A DR S T E SON runs at a certain DONGA L L I E T AMA R I clip so others know OR K A NHU E S A R E NO T how fast to go S T A ND T E N T E D I A N E S A PGR I T C A Z T A T OM 26. Console pioneer AGR E E T OE RR A N T H I DU E L I S T S T A NG L E S 27. First few minI S L I PWA D E UN I ON S utes of This Is Us, S T A N Z AMOR Z I NN I A often T OWE L R I E S E N A G E L

SEEKING ARTIST PROPOSALS! The Cedar Falls Public Library is seeking proposals for an installation for the Library’s LeRoy and Nancy Redfern Display Case. Submissions should include: • A visual representation of the proposed installation • A written description • Photographs of previous pertinent work Complete guidelines at cedarfallslibrary.org/display-cases

PROPOSALS DUE 9/30/19 • COMPENSATION $2500 CONTACT 319-268-5541 OR DIRECTOR@CEDARFALLSLIBRARY.ORG WITH QUESTIONS LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV270 Sept. 4–17, 2019 59


Today, more than ever before, we need to relax. EERO SAARINEN

Knoll Annual Sale 15% off September 12-21

Artemide Lighting Sale 20% off through September 14

Little Village Sale at Design Ranch Bring in this Design Ranch Little Village ad and take 20% off everything in stock! Offer good through Saturday, September 21st. Ask about attending our model Furniture, lighting, housewares and accessories from the world’s greatest classic and contemporary designers On the corner of Dodge & Davenport Iowa City, Iowa 319. 354. 2623 info@designranch.com www.designranch.com

condominium opening at The Chauncey!


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