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F ROM HE RE

TO T HE RE

: AUST RALIAN A RT AND WALKING


F R O M H ER E

TO T H ER E

: AU ST R AL I AN ART A N D WAL K I N G


CURATED BY JANE DENISON AND SHARNE WOLFF

7 JULY – 26 AUGUST 2018

LAUREN BRINCAT

FR O M H ER E

DEAN BROWN DANIEL CROOKS NICI CUMPSTON REBECCA GALLO AGATHA GOTHE-SNAPE

TO T H ER E

ALEX KARACONJI NOEL MCKENNA SARAH MOSCA NELL LIAM O’BRIEN SARAH RODIGARI

Previous page

Sarah Mosca Untitled Walk No. 7 (detail) 2014–2018

pigment print on Hahnemühle 115 x 95 cm Edition of 2 + 1AP

courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney

: AU ST R AL I AN ART AN D WAL K I N G

This exhibition is supported by the Dobell Exhibition Grant, funded by the Sir William Dobell Art Foundation and managed by Museums & Galleries of NSW


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

Foreword Brett Adlington Director, Lismore Regional Gallery

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Walking is an act that is generally done without thought, planning or intent. Yet for some people it is a job, a mode of transport, a form of fitness, or a way to clear the head. From Here to There: Australian art and walking brings together an outstanding collection of contemporary artists whose work hones in on this simplest of actions. The curators of this exhibition, Jane Denison and Sharne Wolff have brought a high degree of curatorial vision to such a broad idea, with a range of ideas conveyed. These include works related to the idea of walking and the sublime, as a performance, responding to the minutiae of daily life, through to the mechanical aspect of walking itself. I expect our audiences will come away with renewed thinking of such a humble act. For the gallery, this exhibition is a perfect illustration of our enhanced capacity in showcasing more complex contemporary art; as well as an onsite artist residency, performances and a range of diverse public programs, including partnerships with the Byron Bay Writers Festival and Southern Cross University.

Thanks to writers Vanessa Berry and Andrew Frost for their contributions to this publication, and to Lismore Regional Gallery curator Fiona Fraser for her meticulous assistance. To the curators, Jane Denison and Sharne Wolff, thank you for your commitment and professionalism brought to this project. Thank you to all the gallerists and lenders for their assistance: Anna Schwartz Gallery, Australian Galleries, Michael Reid, The Commercial, Amanda Love, Darren Knight Gallery, Sarah Cottier Gallery, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery and Sullivan + Strumpf. And finally, a huge thank you to the artists for embracing this project and sharing their vision: Lauren Brincat, Dean Brown, Daniel Crooks, Nici Cumpston, Rebecca Gallo, Agatha Gothe-Snape, Alex Karaconji, Noel McKenna, Sarah Mosca, Nell, Liam O’Brien and Sarah Rodigari.

A project of this depth relies on great support from an assortment of partners. Most importantly is the support of the Sir William Dobell Art Foundation with the Gallery being the recipient of the 2018 Dobell Exhibition Grant, which is managed by Museums & Galleries of NSW. I would also like to acknowledge Linnaeus Estate’s support of Sarah Rodigari’s artist residency, and to our program partners, Create NSW.

Lauren Brincat Walk the Line (detail) 2016

single channel High Definition video, 16:9, colour, sound duration: 5:16 min sound: Nick Wales

courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery

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Nici Cumpston Ringbarked II, Nookamka Lake 2011/2016

crayon on archival pigment print on HahnemĂźhle 72 x 170 cm

courtesy the artist and Michael Reid Sydney + Berlin


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

The artist is walking Andrew Frost Art critic, editor and curator 8

Walking in the practice of Australian contemporary artists serves as a theme, a way of working, and an exploration of how the very act can be interpreted as an aesthetic act. From Here to There: Australian art & walking offers a fascinating insight into the connective lines between a range of practitioners, artists who use walking to make comment on a range of subjects from the political realities of our time, to the way technology can alter our perceptions of reality, to intimate and personal records of the everyday. Nell’s A white bird flies in the mist, a black bird flies in the night, a woman walks, wild and free, she is not afraid to die [2008] abounds in the mix of classical and pop cultural motifs that are typical of the artist’s work. The human figure is classical in its pose – a woman with a walking stick, her eyes aglow as if seeing to another level of existence – the companion ghosts taken from the classic video game Pac Man. Nell offers the viewer the suggestion that the figure is an embodiment of the idea that walking has spiritual and transcendent qualities that step into the beyond, the mother goddess shepherding ghosts into the afterlife. She also points the way forward. If a spiritual theme underscores Nell’s work, Liam O’Brien’s Whistling in The Dark [2013] is a video piece that acts as an analogy of life under late capitalism, a humorous modern myth of Sisyphus where walking has been transformed from the feet to fingers, and the body to the hand, a deft if unlikely commentary on the worth of the individual in a modern economy of labour. By contrast, Nici Cumpston’s hand coloured photographs were

produced in part from the act of walking, a process where the artist investigated sites of ecological devastation on the Murray-Darling Basin in NSW, places that were also sites of Indigenous occupation, a subtle history witnessed by marks and carvings. A former forensic investigator, Cumpston brings her training to landscapes that are only accessible on foot, places brought alive once more by the act of observation and revelation. Dean Brown’s suite of etchings [2009] are, in many ways, one of the most direct representations of walking in the exhibition, yet their bold and graphic form renders something prosaic equally poetic. The shadow forms of figures of walkers in the city are reduced to their essential qualities, and like Nell’s ghosts, they are ephemeral traces on the hard surfaces of the cityscape. Alex Karaconji’s animation The Flaneur [2013] – the title referencing Walter Benjamin’s formulation of the poetic outsider – offers a contrasting view of the city, this time from the perspective of the itinerant walker, a privileged observer of the everyday life of the city. There are fleeting self-portraits of the artist to be found here, such as the artist’s face reflected in the shiny duco of a parked car, in the windows of houses, or in the translucent cover of street advertising. The graphic quality of the animation once again produces phantoms - passers-by, tourists – the whole experience suggests the quality of something fleeting, immaterial. Daniel Crooks’ On Perspective and Motion Part 2 [2007] is a seven channel video work that uses computer software to stretch and warp time, featuring a pan and dolly camera movement across Sydney’s Martin Place, a sweep that captures pedestrians

as they traverse the public space. Crook’s approach explodes and expands the ‘normal’ time frame of the screen image, these ambulating bodies reimagined by the computer’s ‘eye’, at first irresistibly exotic, later taking on a more sinister sense of surveillance. Where many of the works in the show depict walking literally, a number of the artists use walking as a means to generate their art. Noel McKenna’s trio of works from his exhibition A Walk from One Tree Hill to Half Moon Bay [2014] and the multi-sheet drawing 14 Days in New York [2013] are representative of the artist’s method of taking long walks, the resulting paintings, watercolours and drawings finding commonalities between sites such as dogs on leads, whimsical or gently absurd suburban signage, encounters with old shops and houses, or picturesque views, all rendered in the artist’s unmistakable style. Through a similar process, Rebecca Gallo’s sculptures are derived from long expeditionary walks of discovery along train lines, on riverbanks, or suburban streets, where she finds detritus that she later fashions into pieces derived from specific walks. By contrast, Sarah Mosca’s Untitled Walk [2014–2018] series is also the result of walking, but where McKenna creates pictures and Gallo makes sculptures, these are abstract photographs that are the consequence of strapping photo sensitive paper to the artist’s body, the final muted colour fields a heat map of the artist in motion. Lauren Brincat’s video performances, including This Time Tomorrow, Tempelhof [2011] and Walk The Line [2016] place the act as walking at the aesthetic centre of the

artist’s practice. In both videos, the landscape places limits on what is physically possible; in the earlier work, a documentation of a long walk along the runway of Berlin’s now defunct central airport, ends with the disappearance of the artist from view, while in the latter work, shot at Cape Leeuwin where the Indian and Southern Oceans meet, the ocean presents an unmistakable limit that also subsumes the artist. Sarah Rodigari’s Work in Movement [2018], is a performance commissioned for the exhibition that uses walking as a way to establish knowledge of the local land and people of the Lismore region. Through the walks, Rodigari seeks to find an understanding of local Indigenous customs and belief, along with the lives and values of non-Indigenous communities. The physical walker in Agatha Gothe-Snape’s We all walk out in the end [2012] is absent, but as suggested in the title, the work is a punning play on the idea that all visitors to a gallery must eventually leave, but perhaps on a larger scale, we all eventually, metaphorically speaking, walk out on our lives.

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FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Noel McKenna 14 days in New York 2013

13 diary pages of drawings from spiral sketch book 26 x 60cm each

courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

Walk Ways

The act of walking connects people and places, as it also connects to other human activities such as storytelling and writing. Like a story, a walk unfolds in time. It creates a narrative structure: beginning, continuing through a series of events, then coming to an end. Another way to consider this similarity, as the anthropologist Tim Ingold has described, is that walking and storytelling both proceed along lines. These lines need not be a single track, rather one of “movement and growth” that can be complex, interconnected and idiosyncratic, a knot or a meshwork.

Vanessa Berry Writer

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“Stories walk, like animals and men.” John Berger, Another Way of Telling.

From Here to There brings together a selection of contemporary Australian artists who deliberately use walking in their practice. The artists’ walks, some shaped by intention, others by chance, connect us with life and landscape. We move through the physical and imagined territories that their work traverses, continuing their journeys and reflecting on our own. Sometimes, while walking, I imagine that all the walks I’ve taken in my life, from the mundane to the exceptional, are visible to me as an overlay upon the present moment. My most frequent routes are saturated with footsteps. Elsewhere, like discarded threads, faint lines stretch across the places I have walked only once, and to where I may never return. On an individual level the traces of walked journeys are often invisible or ephemeral. However all around us walking has shaped the fabric of the physical environment: places are in part structured by the networks of roads and pathways that traverse them. Within these networks are material markers of journeys on foot that communicate across time, from spans of short duration to those on a scale of many thousands of years. To walk in Australia is to walk on Aboriginal land. As I make my way on foot down King Street, Newtown, in my home town of Sydney, I follow a trail that long

predates the city. As with a number of the city’s main thoroughfares, here underlying the urban scene is the ongoing presence of an ancient pathway. It follows a high ridge line, through Gadigal and Wangal country, into what once were grasslands where kangaroos were hunted, and are now the residential and industrial areas that make up the inner-city’s edge. Over time, through the accumulation of walked journeys, relationships are forged between people and environments. Places are given meaning and order. For Aboriginal Australians walking is a way to connect with the stories embedded in their country, and this knowledge and belonging is reflected in language. The author Melissa Lucashenko writes of the literal meaning of the Yugambeh greeting jingawahlu, being “from where? Where have you travelled, stranger, and can you a tale unfold?” The significance of walking to the production of knowledge varies across cultures. It can be a part of routines and ceremonies, or be associated with actions such as pilgrimages or protests. Whatever the context, by walking, an exchange occurs between self and world. In Rebecca Solnit’s elegant cultural history of walking, Wanderlust, she writes that “on foot everything stays connected”. A connection is forged, linking the body that is walking, step after step, to the places it moves through. This occurs whether the walk is a functional journey, one with spiritual significance, a walk for survival, or a walk in pursuit of a creative or philosophic goal.

Walking can be a capricious activity, given to detours and the contingencies of travelling on foot. Nothing shows this more than desire paths, those trails etched in the grass or the earth by multiple feet as they reroute official walkways. Whenever I notice one cutting across a corner I’m compelled to take it, drawn to this minor act of subversion. It feels like an act of reshaping or reinscription. The philosopher Michel de Certeau refers to this kind of walking as a “pedestrian speech act”, as it appropriates space similar to how a speaker appropriates language. He goes on to describe the variable trajectories of walking as a “long poem”, defining walking as a means of expression as much as a form of movement. It is these expressive and communicative qualities that make walking so readily adaptable for artistic interpretation. Walking has long been a part of artistic practices. In the Western tradition of landscape painting, the artist would have travelled to places on foot to paint en plein air. While walking was involved in the painting’s production, it was incidental to its reception. In the twentieth century, as the making and understanding of art moved towards incorporating process, walking began to be used selfconsciously, as a creative practice in itself. The walk was the creative act, as with the dérives, or drifts, that the members of the Situationists took on foot across Paris in the 1960s. Their intention was to use walking subversively, to disrupt urban order and determine sites suitable for revolutionary transformation. Texts and maps were produced as documentation, but not to stand in for the dérives themselves.

When, in the mid-twentieth-century, artists turned to walking as a medium and a method, they physically connected the space of the gallery to the world outside. Walking happened in streets, in landscapes, and in and with the body. By encountering the artworks that arose from walking, audiences could sense and see these journeys: the stamped-down grass of Richard Long’s A Line Made by Walking [1967]; or the line of green paint on the ground in The Green Line [2004] in which Francis Alys walked through Jerusalem with a leaking can of green paint, following the “green line” of demarcation assigned between Israel and Palestine. Other works engaged non-visually, such as in the audio works of Janet Cardiff that take place in locations such as New York [Her Long Black Hair, Central Park, 2004] and Sydney [The City of Forking Paths, 2014]. In these works the participant’s own walk is directed by a recorded voice, overlaying past or fictional details over their immediate experience. Art produced by walking is connective and communicative. It builds on the relationships walking forges between self, world, place and time, as it brings about a transference between the artist and the viewer or participant. By engaging with the traces of an artist’s walk we move alongside them in the physical action, connecting with the wider implications of their journeys: identities, histories, environments, and the forces that shape human relationships with places and each other.

References de Certeau (1984). The Practice of Everyday Life. Berkeley: University of California Press. Ingold, Tim (2007). Lines: a brief history. Abingdon: Routledge. Lucashenko, Melissa (2004). “Not Quite White in the Head”, Griffith Review, edition 2. https://griffithreview.com/articles/not-quite-white-in-the-head/ Solnit, Rebecca (2000). Wanderlust: a history of walking. New York: Penguin.

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FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Lauren Brincat

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It’s no surprise that when you love to do something it creeps into your work. Walking is my favourite studio practice. To be in the studio, but to take the pleasure of walking seriously; to observe the feeling of the ground under your foot, to move. I use the landscape as my personal canvas. Walking becomes a self-portrait, mapping where I’ve been. Walking is an immediate way to be in a place or to interfere with space.

Lauren Brincat This time tomorrow, Tempelhof (detail) 2011

single channel digital video, colour, sound duration: 5:20 min

courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

Dean Brown

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Walking has always been a source of inspiration for me in life and art. When walking I’m excited about what might happen on the way to my destination. I’m inspired by chance encounters as well as the special nature of the individuals I might pass. They are a constant source of stimulation for my art practice and I often carry a sketchbook on my travels. I enjoy the slowed-down pace that walking offers in a fast-paced world. It gives me time to process, meditate and think about all the things going on in and around my life.

Dean Brown In passing #II (detail) 2009

etching 29 x 21 cm

courtesy the artist and Australian Galleries, Sydney and Melbourne


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Daniel Crooks

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I love walking, particularly as a flâneur getting lost in the back streets of foreign cities. I also spend a lot of time watching and filming people walking in cities. It might have something to do with my training as an animator analysing people’s ‘walk cycles’. There is something about the speed of walking; that rate of movement with a particularly human scale – not too fast, not too slow – the Goldilocks point for objects moving through a frame. And walking is not only a linear movement through space, it also contains the internal pendulum cycles of swinging arms and legs, the sine wave bobbing of the head, the last-second infinitesimal raise of the toes. As a subject for exploring normally unseen temporal structures, walking is almost perfect. There is a fundamental familiarity to it that offers the viewer a thread or a bridge between the known experience of the everyday and the abstract objects of our imagination.

Daniel Crooks On Perspective and Motion: Part 2 (detail) 2006

single channel digital video, PAL, stereo duration: 23:00 min

courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Nici Cumpston

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I am connected to the Murray and the Darling River systems through my Barkindji family, and since 2000 I have been documenting the backwaters and inland lake systems in the Riverland of South Australia. I have found many ‘signs’ in the landscape, Aboriginal artefacts and trees that bear witness to Aboriginal occupation and reflect the connection people have had with this place over many tens of thousands of years. Everywhere I walk I see evidence of Aboriginal occupation prior to European settlement. I find remnants of flints and grindstones that were used to manufacture stone tools and to grind native seeds and grains. Bark was removed from the outer layers of eucalypt trees to create canoes and coolamons – vessels used to carry food and small babies. The scars left in the trees act like street signs, indicating areas of abundance and safe shelter. I get the strong sense that the ancestors had only just gone, leaving subtle callingcards to let me know how important these sites are for them. Using a medium format film camera slows my pace. Spending as much time as I can in the environment, and speaking with cultural custodians to get a true sense of place are significant steps in my process.

Nici Cumpston Shelter II, quartzite ridge (detail) 2011

archival inkjet print on canvas hand coloured with synthetic polymer paint, 98 x 196 cm

courtesy the artist and Michael Reid Sydney + Berlin


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Rebecca Gallo

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On walking: in mid-2014, I adopted a dog and I started walking. We would walk for at least an hour a day, and she was quick to sniff out scraps of food: half-eaten kebabs, chicken bones, that sort of thing. So, I would scan the ground, trying to spot hazards before she did, and quickly I started to notice other things. Bright coils of wire from electrical repairs; stray nuts and washers; the translucent green of expired whipper snipper cords. Handwritten notes, packaging moulds and small weights from the rims of car tyres nestled into the crooks of gutters. Collecting and using found objects was already part of my artistic practice, but the act of walking changed and focused this. A walk came to be told through the haul of items I could hold in my hand or fit in my pockets. Human movement, traced and told through human discards.

Rebecca Gallo One Walk Sculptures 2016

found objects, plywood shelf installation view at Delmar Gallery, Sydney

courtesy the artist photo by Silversalt


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Agatha Gothe-Snape

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Walking connects our body to time and space whilst giving us time to survey place. Walking moves us surely, from one place to another. There is no guarantee, however, that the room we walk out of is any different to the one we walk into.

Agatha Gothe-Snape We all walk out in the end (detail) 2012/18

acrylic paint dimensions variable to site

courtesy the artist and The Commercial, Sydney collection: Amanda Love, Sydney


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Alex Karaconji

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The creative relationship between walking and my art practice is clear in The Flaneur, which depicts an autobiographical walk from Sydney’s Taylor Square to Circular Quay. Walking played two roles in the animation. It helped me hunt down images and combine them into a more ambitious and meaningful whole. Walking’s slow pace ensured that nothing in my environment was overlooked, and its maneuverability meant I had more areas to explore – like empty lanes and lesser-known parks. Walking also ensured that the animated scenes had a longer life span than mere impressions. In this sense, walking made storytelling possible. It has introduced me to new subject matter, and a new way of making art that is narrative-based and keenly aware of time and art.

Alex Karaconji The Flaneur (detail) 2016

DVD duration: 7:17mins

courtesy the artist


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Noel McKenna

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Walking has been and still is a big part of my life. I often carry my camera with me on my walks and photograph things which grab my eye. I find walking, which is slower than being in a car, gives me the chance to notice many things that I would not see from a car. Walking is enjoyable for me as well, a way of slowing down the often-relentless pace of contemporary life where I am bombarded with information, a lot of which is not often that important.

Noel McKenna Auckland Archery Club inc, Auckland (detail) 2014

oil on plywood 37 x 44cm

courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Sarah Mosca

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Walking is both a physical and meditative action. Declaring, “I am going for a walk”, is an unapologetic decision to pursue the quiet. Walking is an act of slowing down, an unsocial rambling. Navigating trodden-down lawns, bitumen highways and slippery rocks with slow and careful awareness. Whilst walking you leave a material trace imprinted in the dust. At the same time you are quietly collecting a nuanced narrative of the landscape itself.

Sarah Mosca Untitled Walk No. 7 2014–18

pigment print on Hahnemühle 115 x 95 cm Edition of 2 + 1AP

courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Nell

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I love walking. I love the pace of seeing and thinking as I walk — it is the most natural thing in the world. I have walked part of the Camino de Santiago in Spain, to Everest Base Camp on the Nepalese side and the Overland Track in Tasmania twice. And yet, it’s the ordinariness of each step in day-to-day life that is closer to my art practice. Each step while walking determines the next step, each moment in the studio determines the direction of an artwork and so it goes on and on in every moment of life waiting for me to become aware of it.

Nell A white bird flies in the mist, a black bird flies in the night, a woman walks, wild and free, she is not afraid to die 2008

bronze, mother of pearl, resin, 33 individually hand-blown clear glass ghost sculptures installation view at Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne

courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney and STATION, Melbourne photo by Mark Ashkanasy


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Liam O’Brien

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For several years now, the distance and contemplative time that aimless walking allows has formed an invaluable part of my practice. I find that walking, video production and narrative storytelling share a kind of temporal and experiential linearity. In recent years, this has led to my growing interest in ‘narrative identity’ and the ambiguous potential inherent in the shaping of one’s own historical narrative.

Liam O’Brien Whistling in the Dark (detail) 2013

video duration: 4:50 min

courtesy the artist and Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

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Sarah Rodigari

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Walking is a type of process-based research which informs my performance practice. I use walking alongside other social modalities such as conversation to document relational knowledge and to consider how place is historically determined, invented and retold.

Sarah Rodigari Strategies for Leaving and Arriving Home (detail) 2011

performance duration: 6 weeks

courtesy the artist photo by Jess Olivieri


FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING

List of works FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING 7 JULY – 26 AUGUST 2018

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Lauren Brincat born 1980 Sydney, NSW lives and works in Sydney, NSW This time tomorrow, Tempelhof 2011 single channel digital video, colour, sound duration: 5:20 min courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery Walk the Line 2016 single channel High Definition video, 16:9, colour, sound duration: 5:16 min, sound: Nick Wales courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body. Dean Brown born 1981 Sydney, NSW lives and works in Sydney, NSW I’ll be there in five 2009 etching 29 x 21 cm courtesy the artist and Australian Galleries, Sydney and Melbourne In passing #II 2009 etching 29 x 21 cm courtesy the artist and Australian Galleries, Sydney and Melbourne Urgent Delivery 2009 etching 29cm x 35cm courtesy the artist and Australian Galleries, Sydney and Melbourne Back to work again 2009 etching 29 cm x 35cm courtesy the artist and Australian Galleries, Sydney and Melbourne

Moving On 2009 etching 29 cm x 31cm courtesy the artist and Australian Galleries, Sydney and Melbourne Daniel Crooks born 1973 Hastings, New Zealand lives and works in Melbourne, Vic On Perspective and Motion: Part 2 2006 single channel digital video, PAL, stereo duration: 23:00 min courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery Nici Cumpston born 1963, Adelaide, SA lives and works in Adelaide, SA Shelter I & II, quartzite ridge 2011 archival inkjet print on canvas hand coloured with synthetic polymer paint 98 x 196 cm courtesy the artist and Michael Reid Sydney + Berlin Ringbarked II, Nookamka Lake 2011/2016 crayon on archival pigment print on Hahnemühle 72 x 170 cm courtesy the artist and Michael Reid Sydney + Berlin Rebecca Gallo born 1985, Sydney, NSW lives and works in Sydney, NSW mixed media assemblages and installation created following a Lismore Regional Gallery residency 2018 courtesy the artist

Agatha Gothe-Snape born 1980 Sydney, NSW lives and works in Melbourne, Vic

Sarah Mosca born 1980, Sydney lives and works in the Blue Mountains, NSW

Liam O’Brien born 1987 Gold Coast, Qld lives and works in Melbourne, Vic

We all walk out in the end 2012/18 acrylic paint dimensions variable to site courtesy the artist and The Commercial, Sydney, collection: Amanda Love, Sydney

Untitled Walk No. 7 2014–2018 pigment print on Hahnemühle 115 x 95 cm edition of 2 + 1AP courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney

Whistling in the Dark 2013 video duration: 4:50 min courtesy the artist and Sullivan + Strumpf, Sydney

Alex Karaconji born 1989 Sydney, NSW lives and works in Sydney, NSW

Untitled Walk No. 9 2014–2018 pigment print on Hahnemühle 115 x 95 cm edition of 2 + 1AP courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney

Sarah Rodigari Born 1976 San Francisco, US Lives and works Sydney

The Flaneur 2016 DVD duration: 7:17 min courtesy the artist Noel McKenna born 1956 Brisbane, Qld lives and works in Sydney, NSW 14 days in New York 2013 13 diary pages of drawings from spiral sketch book 26 x 60cm each courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney Sign from One Tree Hill to Half Bay Moon show 2013 enamel on wood, 2 parts 15 x 18cm and 9 x 55.5cm courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney Pigeon Mountain Slope, Auckland 2014 oil on plywood 37 x 44cm courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney Auckland Archery Club inc, Auckland 2014 oil on plywood 37 x 44cm courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney House Ellerslie, Auckland 2014 oil on plywood 37 x 44cm courtesy the artist and Darren Knight Gallery, Sydney

Untitled Walk No. 10 2014–2018 pigment print on Hahnemühle 115 x 95 cm edition of 2 + 1AP courtesy the artist and Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney Nell born 1975 Maitland, NSW lives and works in Sydney, NSW A white bird flies in the mist, a black bird flies in the night, a woman walks, wild and free, she is not afraid to die 2008 bronze, mother of pearl, resin, 33 individually handblown clear glass ghost sculptures 175 x 300 x 430 cm courtesy the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney and STATION, Melbourne Sprite guide me 2017 epoxy clay, wood, iron 100 x 8 x 8 cm as part of With things being as they are…, 2017 mixed media, dimensions variable courtesy the artist, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney and STATION, Melbourne

Work in Movement 2018 commissioned opening night performance courtesy the artist

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Acknowledgements FROM HERE TO THERE : AUSTRALIAN ART AND WALKING CURATED BY JANE DENISON AND SHARNE WOLFF 7 JULY – 26 AUGUST 2018

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Featuring: Lauren Brincat, Dean Brown , Daniel Crooks, Nici Cumpston , Rebecca Gallo, Agatha Gothe-Snape, Alex Karaconji , Noel McKenna, Sarah Mosca, Nell, Liam O’Brien, Sarah Rodigari

Catalogue published by Lismore Regional Gallery 11 Rural Street, Lismore NSW Australia 2480 T. +61(2) 6627 4600 E. artgallery@lismore.nsw.gov.au www.lismoregallery.org ISBN 978-0-6481226-2-3 Catalogue Design: rangestudio.com

Lismore Regional Gallery staff: Brett Adlington, Director Kezia Geddes, Curator Fiona Fraser, Curator Sarah Harvey, Administration Manager Claudie Frock, Learning Officer Marisa Snow, Placemaking Officer (Lismore Quadrangle)

Catalogue credits: The artworks and images are courtesy the artists and their galleries. Images and text are copyright of the artists, writers, photographers and Lismore Regional Gallery. All rights reserved. Except under the conditions described in the Australian Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, duplicating or otherwise, without the prior permission of the copyright owner. Contact Lismore Regional Gallery for all permission requests.

Lismore Regional Gallery is supported by Lismore City Council, and by the NSW Government by Create NSW. This exhibition is supported by the Dobell Exhibition Grant, funded by the Sir William Dobell Art Foundation and managed by Museums & Galleries of NSW. Additional support of artist residency and exhibition by Linnaeus Estate.

cover image:

Sarah Rodigari Strategies for Leaving and Arriving Home (detail) 2011

performance duration: 6 weeks

photo credit: Adeo Esplago


Profile for Lismore Regional Gallery

From Here to There: Australian art and walking  

'From Here to There: Australian art and walking' presents the work of leading Australian artists who use the everyday act of walking in thei...

From Here to There: Australian art and walking  

'From Here to There: Australian art and walking' presents the work of leading Australian artists who use the everyday act of walking in thei...

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