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COFFEE/MOORE COUNTY'S FUN FAMILY NEWSPAPER

APRIL 2009

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WWW.KIDSVILLENEWSTN.COM

APRIL 2009


Dear Kids, Spring has sprung! It’s a great time to get outside and do something fun, like fly a kite. And while you’re outside, take a moment to appreciate your surroundings. Think about what you can do to help preserve your environment and take care of our earth. Earth Day is coming up on April 22, and we have a few tips to get you started. We’ll be featuring more earth-friendly tips during the next few months in a new section titled “Conservation Corner.” In April, we celebrate April Fool’s day and Easter, and April is also National Poetry Appreciation Month. Try to write a poem about something you like to do or care about. Here’s my poem. There once was a dragon who loved to read, and was always quick to do a good deed. He loved to play outside and fly his kite, which tired him out so he slept well at night! I hope you have an awesome April. Be sure to visit my Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com for more fun and games. Your friend,

APRIL 2009

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APRIL 2009


APRIL 2009

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What is the history of Easter? Where does it come from? Today’s Easter is derived from the ancient Jewish and Christian religions. Christians have celebrated the Resurrection — the day Jesus arose from the dead — around the time of the spring equinox for many centuries. Equinox means “equal night.” That’s the day when the night and day are of equal length, 12 hours each. This year, Easter is on April 12. How did Easter get its name? Some believe it was the name given to Jesus’ resurrection (when he rose from the dead) by the Frankish (French) church and comes from the Latin word alba which means white, because people wore white robes when they celebrated the resurrection. But alba also means sunrise, so when the name of the feast was translated into German, the sunrise meaning was picked instead of the white meaning. In old German, the word for sunrise was ostern, which became Easter, or the feast of the Lord’s Resurrection. Some scholars believe the name Easter came from the Scandinavian Ostra and the Teutonic Ostern or Eastre, both goddesses of mythology signifying spring and fertility, whose festival was celebrated

on the day of the vernal equinox. So what about the Easter Bunny and colored eggs? In pagan times, before there was Christianity or other organized religion, the Easter hare came to be. This was no normal hare (which is similar to a rabbit, but larger). The Easter hare was thought to be a sacred companion of the goddess of spring, Eostre. The hare and the rabbit were the most fertile animals known (this means they have lots of babies!), and they served as symbols of the new life during the spring season. Since long before Jesus Christ was born, parents told their children that the magic hare would bring them presents at the spring festival. The presents were often painted eggs, as these represented the new life starting at this time of year. Some accounts say that during the 4th century, consuming eggs during Lent (a period of fasting for six weeks before Easter) was taboo. Since spring is the peak egg-laying time for hens, people began to cook eggs in their shells to preserve them. Eventually people began decorating and hiding them for children to find during Easter, which gave birth to the Easter Egg Hunt. It is believed that the Chinese are the first people who painted eggs. During spring festivals almost 3,000 years ago, they exchanged red eggs as part of their celebration. Whether you celebrate the religious part of Easter or just enjoy the Easter Egg hunts and the legend of the Easter Bunny, the Easter holiday is a wonderful part of springtime.

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS... INDONESIA?

It’s time to get out your globe! You need to know about the imaginary lines on globes and maps. These lines are called lines of latitude and longitude, and they tell a pilot or ship’s captain exactly where in the world a certain place is located. Basically, latitude lines (also called parallels) are the horizontal lines on your map. Lines of longitude (also called meridians) are the vertical lines that run from the North Pole to the South Pole. This mapping system is written in degrees and uses the symbol °. Get ready to travel the world! Indonesia is an archipelago, a large group or chain of over 17,000 islands in Southeast Asia along the equator between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Six thousand of the islands are inhabited, and the largest islands include Bali, Java, Kalimantan, the Moluccas Islands, the Nusa Tenggara Islands, Sumatra and Irian Jaya or West Papua. To find Indonesia, get out your globe, and find longitude 120º E and latitude 5º S. About three times the size of Texas, Indonesia is bordered by the countries of Timor-Leste, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea. Formerly known as Dutch East Indies, Indonesia was once a colony of the Netherlands. The islands were occupied by the Japanese during World War II, and on August 17,1945, Indonesia declared its independence from the Netherlands. The capital is Jakarta. Though most of the country consists of coastal lowlands, the larger islands have mountains, and the climate is tropical. Indonesia’s industries include oil and natural gas, textiles, mining, rubber and tourism, and the islands are one of the world’s top destinations for surfing! Indonesia is part of the Pacific “ring of fire,” a horseshoe-shaped area with 452 volcanoes, and Indonesia has the greatest number of active volcanoes in the world – 120! Earthquakes frequently occur, and on December 26, 2004, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the west coast of Sumatra created a tsunami, a series of large waves in the Indian Ocean that severely damaged a dozen countries in Asia, including Indonesia. Where in the Each year, Indonesians celebrate their rich and varied culture through festivals and fairs highlighting dance, art, music, World Word tsunami [tsoo-nah-mee], cow races, the rice harvest –– even kites. Another popular holiday, Kartini Day, takes place on April 21, with special a very large sea wave exhibitions and cultural performances to honor Raden Ayu (Ajoe) Kartini, a Javanese woman who a started a girl’s school and caused by an underwater worked for women’s rights in Indonesia. earthquake or volcanic Sources: “Indonesia,” The World Factbook, Central Intelligence Agency, www.cia.gov; “Indonesia,” www.iexplore.com/ eruption. dmap/Indonesia; “Indonesia: History, Geography, Government and Culture,” www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107634.html.

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APRIL 2009


WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... A DISNEY IMAGINEER? Recently I made a trip down to Orlando, Florida. While I was there, I had the wonderful opportunity to meet Melissa Jeselnick, an Imagineer at Disney World. Imagineers are the people that make the stories come to life through the amusement parks and attractions at Disney World. She took me behind the scenes of Toy Story Mania for a first hand look at what goes into creating the fun and exciting rides at Disney World. TRUMAN: What exactly is your job as an Imagineer at Disney World? MELISSA: I’m an assistant project manager, which means on small jobs, I act as the project manager, and on larger jobs, I serve as the assistant to the project manager. We handle the business side of building an attraction. We have a creative partner who handles the storytelling and makes sure that we are creating a good experience for our guests, and we handle the business side — the time and the money and making sure we achieve our goals in the time frame that we’ve been given. We deal with the schedule, making sure that everything is happening in the right order. We have a planner who deals with all of the scheduling and coordinating all of the different inputs, and we sort of take all of that and assess it. We figure out where to make compromises if we need to, while making sure that we are staying on track with all of those different elements. It’s all about telling the story and what’s the best way to tell the story. We may adjust the schedule and spend a few extra dollars because it’s the right thing to do, or to make it happen, we take all of the resources available and make it work the best way that we can.

We are always trying new things. You can do anything, and be anyone, and be an Imagineer. I have a degree in mechanical engineering. When I first came here, I thought I wanted to design rides, and that’s a really important part of what we do because it helps tell the story; it takes you through the story when the attraction is a ride experience. And I thought that the process of designing and coming up with what that ride is, was very interesting to me in college. But when I got here and started actually applying it, I realized that the process of actually creating the attraction and the story itself was much more interesting to me. I still get to use the same logical thought process I learned in my training and apply the technical elements where we have rides or shows that have mechanical features to them, but I get to look at a much bigger picture. I get to put much bigger and more complex pieces together that come from all different disciplines. It’s really interesting to me. TRUMAN: Where do the ideas for new rides or attractions come from?

TRUMAN: What inspired you to want to work at Disney?

Melissa Jeselnick working on a project site at Disney World. MELISSA: The ideas usually come from MELISSA: When I was at home, my us. We have a creative team whose job it is, through a process called sophomore year in college, my sister and I were watching the Disney channel, and there was a segment where they talked to the Imagineer who “blue sky,” to come up with ideas. There are rooms that are dedicated to “blue sky.” They fill up the tables with toys and cards and markers so the came up with the idea for the ride “Soarin’” by playing with his erector people can play around while they are brainstorming. No idea is a bad set at home. And I said, “That is the coolest thing I’ve ever heard.” I was idea. If it’s a totally free blue sky session, all of the ideas get put up and studying engineering at the time, and I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do, talked about. One idea that may be totally crazy could lead to another and hearing that story, that was it. That was where I wanted to go and what I wanted to do. So I started to apply for different jobs and ending up idea that is exactly what we need. Nobody’s allowed to say any idea is bad. Sometimes the sky’s the limit, and they can come up with whatever coming down, getting an internship and doing something different to try they want. Sometimes it’s more targeted: like we know we need an attracto meet people who worked here. I ended up a couple months later comtion for Disney’s Hollywood Studios, and we know we have the space of ing over and working on the “Soarin’” project here in Florida. And I was working with the same guy that I had seen on TV talking about his model. “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” where we want to bring in an updated attraction to that space. That may have been how the “Toy Store Mania” It was a pretty magical thing of how it all worked out. attraction came about. Toy Story is a great story that everybody loves. TRUMAN: What does it take to become an Imagineer? Everybody loves all the characters, Woody and Buzz, and they are very popular and very timeless, so it was a great idea that happened to fit in MELISSA: There isn’t really one route you can take to become an the space available. What happens then is they take that idea and think Imagineer. It’s all about what you like and what makes you happy. The about what type of experience they would like it to be, and we pitch that one thing that I think it does take is passion. You need to figure out what idea. We develop a budget associated with it, and eventually we settle on it is that excites you and learn as much as you can about that. We have a concept and a budget that matches the needs of the company, of the people that do more than 140 different things on our projects. We have park; everybody comes to the table and agrees on the schedule, budget architects and artists, writers, people whose job it is to pick out paint and concept all at once. Once we have that, it’s the creative lead’s job to colors that create certain moods in different places, people that do all the manage the story and make sure we’re telling the right story. It would be graphics that we have. Themed concrete even is one of the disciplines my job, as the business lead, to make sure that we’re meeting the schedule that we have. For just about everything out there, we have a position for and the budget and that we’re accomplishing what we signed up for. somebody to do that. Anything that you see while you are on vacation at Disney is somebody’s specialty. So while there isn’t one way to become an Imagineer, it’s important that you have passion and like to try new things.

APRIL 2009

TRUMAN: There’s so much to talk about! Read the rest of this interview with Melissa on our Web site at www.kidsvillenews.com.

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Go Fly a Kite!

Earth Day Word Find Find the words below that have to do with protecting our environment and celebrating Earth Day!

Truman is flying a kite with his friends. Can you help them make their way through the park?

COMPOST CONSERVE DONATE EARTH

➜ ➜

E I G I P D V W G E G M T N V

R N S C I E C P N Y Y I K T E

C A V J O T L D R X U G F M W

ENDANGERED ENVIRONMENT POLLUTION RECYCLE

Z O H I N N A C S M V U N D G

D O M A R N S E Y H N K O Y G

Q O R P G O C E M C R H I R P

W T N E O U N B R E E D T O Q

X M R A D S R M H V M R U N S

A E P E T H T P E Z E C L C N

D S R G H E T D Y N J B L E A

REDUCE REUSE TRASH WASTE

Q R E U S E X R E Y T H O T Z

Y F G W N T L G A Y A X P S D

Q U Y F F Q I E L E U C V A I

C X C S A E H S A R T M N W R

U H N Z N W A G X J H S X L H

KIDSVILLE COUNTS Help Truman complete this math square. Try to fill in the missing numbers. Use the numbers 1 through 16 to complete the equations. Each number is used only once. Each row is a math equation. Each column is a math equation. Remember that multiplication and division are performed before addition and subtraction.

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APRIL 2009


COLORING CONTEST WINNERS CONGRATULATIONS TO NORTH COFFEE ELEMENTARY ON WINNING $100 FOR THE MOST ENTRIES

MARCH GRAND PRIZE WINNER

5

Alexis Johnson from Mrs. Bryan's 6th Grade Class at College Street

with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

FIRST GRADE WINNER

Quenna Seese

from Mrs. Gilliam's Class at North Coffee Elementary with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

FOURTH GRADE WINNER

Karson Young

from Ms. Talley's Class at North Coffee Elementary with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

KINDERGARTEN WINNER

SECOND GRADE WINNER

Arin Stout

from Ms. Kriz's Class at New Union Elementary

with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

FIFTH GRADE WINNER

Steven Marshall

from Mrs. Long’s Class at New Union Elementary

with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

Madison Smith

from Mrs. Goodwin's Class at Lynchburg Elementary with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

THIRD GRADE WINNER

Isaiah Rader

from Mr. Bradshaw's Class at Hillsboro Elementary with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

SIXTH GRADE WINNER

Thomas Buholzer

from Mrs. Clark's Class at College Street Elementary with Rebecca Micciche from VanVranken Family Dentistry

931-454-0001 1958 North Jackson Street • Tullahoma

KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 10

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APRIL 2009


A Shy Superstar? It’s OK to be ordinary. Even our awesome Sun is ordinary. As stars go, the Sun is of average size. It is middleaged, even though it is about 5 billion years old. The long and stable life of this average star has warmed Earth and provided just the right amount of energy to support life like us. Average is more than OK! Totally not average is a star that scientists recently discovered. This one shines with the light of 3.2 million Suns! It is the second brightest star in our galaxy. It is called the Peony Nebula star. So, if the Peony Nebula superstar is so bright, why did it take so long to discover it? Because the Peony Nebula star has been hiding in the Peony Nebula! A nebula is a cloud of gas and dust in space. The Peony Nebula is a particularly thick cloud, and very little visible light can break through the dust. This Spitzer Space Telescope image shows the thick, dusty But infraPeony Nebula near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. red light can Hiding inside it (shown in the white circle in the cutout) is the get through the galaxy’s second brightest known star, the Peony Nebula star. dust. This kind of light is not visible to our eyes, but we do feel it as heat. NASA operates a special telescope, called the Spitzer Space Telescope, that is able to see the infrared light through the dust cloud. Scientists used the Spitzer, along with another telescope in South America, to discover the true brightness of the Peony Nebula star. Superstars such as the Peony have short, intense lives compared to our Sun. They are like ticking time bombs. They burn their fuel rapidly—in just a few million years—and then, kablooey! They explode in a spectacular supernova. There could be many more stars like this hiding in the dust clouds of our Milky Way Galaxy. The Spitzer Space Telescope will help to find them. Read about Lucy, the girl who dreamed of using a telescope like the Spitzer to look for unknown planets. Go to spaceplace.nasa.gov/ en/kids/spitzer/lucy. This article was written by Diane K. Fisher. It was provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

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KIDSVILLE KITCHEN Together Time — Ask an adult for help with projects!

Budget-Friendly Family Meals As Americans see food and gas prices continue to rise, there’s good news for families looking for affordable meal options. Grocery bills and restaurant and fast-food meals can really add up, but families can prepare nutritious, convenient meals inexpensively at home. Believe it or not, there are quick and easy recipes that can feed a family of six for around $2 per person. Even better, this recipe from Pampered Chef can be made in only 30 minutes, using nine ingredients or less. The Deluxe Cheeseburger Salad proves healthy enough for parental approval and tasty enough for kids.

DELUXE CHEESEBURGER SALAD WHAT YOU NEED:

• 4 sesame seed hamburger buns • 1 small red onion, divided • 2 plum tomatoes • 3/4 pound 95 percent lean ground beef • 1/2 cup finely diced pickles • 3/4 cup ketchup • 1 tablespoon yellow mustard • 8 cups thinly sliced romaine lettuce • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese HOW TO MAKE IT (makes 6 servings):

• Preheat the oven to 425º F. Slice the bun tops into 1/4 inch strips. Arrange the buns in a single layer on a large bar pan; then bake them until they look toasted, about eight to 10 minutes. Allow the buns to cool. • (With adult help!) Use a mandoline or a sharp knife to cut half of the onion into thin rings. Cut tomatoes into quarters lengthwise and slice crosswise. In a sauté pan, cook the ground beef over medium-high heat for five to seven minutes or until the meat becomes brown. Break the beef into crumbles. Chop the remaining onion. Finely dice pickles. In a large bowl, combine the onion, pickles, ketchup and mustard. Add the cooked ground beef, and mix well. • To serve, put the lettuce on a large platter, and then spoon the beef mixture over the lettuce. Top the salad with cheese, tomatoes and sliced onion. Arrange the toasted hamburger buns around the edge of the plate and serve. For a free download of more high-value recipes that cost around $2 per serving, visit pamperedchef.com. Courtesy of NewsUSA and Pampered Chef.

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APRIL 2009


Earth Day Word Find E (Over, Down, Direction) I COMPOST (3, 1, SE) G CONSERVE (2, 4, SE) I DONATE (5, 1, SE) P EARTH (13, 10, NW) ENDANGERED (1, 10, NE) D ENVIRONMENT (1, 1, SE) V POLLUTION (12, 13, W) W G RECYCLE (8, 12, NW) REDUCE (10, 3, SW) E REUSE (11, 2, S) G TRASH (14, 11, N) M WASTE (14, 14, W) T

R N S C I E C P N Y Y I K N T V E

C A V J O T L D R X U G F M W

Z O H I N N A C S M V U N D G

D O M A R N S E Y H N K O Y G

Q O R P G O C E M C R H I R P

W T N E O U N B R E E D T O Q

X M R A D S R M H V M R U N S

A E P E T H T P E Z E C L C N

D S R G H E T D Y N J B L E A

Q R E U S E X R E Y T H O T Z

Y F G W N T L G A Y A X P S D

Q U Y F F Q I E L E U C V A I

C X C S A E H S A R T M N W R

U H N Z N W A G X J H S X L H

Go Fly a Kite! ➜ ➜

KIDSVILLE COUNTS!

APRIL 2009

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ART GALLERY Charlie Chaplin: Greatest Actor in Movie History Charlie was an instant success in Hollywood! He starred in more than Charlie Chaplin was an Academy Award-winning 12 short films in six years and went on to star in some English comedian and filmmaker. He full-length feature films as well. In 1919, he joined was voted the “greatest actor in movie history” by an international survey of with three other artists and formed the United Artists Corporation. This company allowed Charlie to make movie critics in 1995. and distribute his own movies — Charlie was now an Charles Spencer Chaplin was independent filmmaker! He made eight full-length feature born on April 16, 1889, in London, films; most were silent, but some were “talkies,” meaning England. His parents were both that they had sound. One of Charlie’s most recognizable entertainers, but the family was very film characters was The Tramp. The Tramp wore baggy poor. His father left when Charlie was pants, big shoes, a derby hat and mustache and carried a three and died when Charlie was still cane. He got into all kinds of mischief! a boy. And, his mother suffered from mental illness. So, Charlie and his Charlie lived and worked in the United States until 1952, when he left for what was supposed to be a short brother took care of themselves from trip back to England. Deciding to stay in Europe, Charlie an early age. Charlie was a natural moved to Switzerland with his family and made his last entertainer and joined up with a group two movies in London. He returned to the United States in of young tap dancers called The Eight 1972, but only to receive an Academy Award. Lancashire Lads when he was about Charlie Chaplin in costume as Charlie died on December 25, 1977. 10 years old. The group performed in The Tramp. Written by Tamar Burris, a former elementary school teacher who now Great Britain’s music halls for several years. works as a freelance writer and curriculum developer for PBS, the Discovery When Charlie was about 14, he got his first acting job. He played the Channel and other education-related companies. Sources: Charlie Chaplin on role of a funny servant boy in Sherlock Holmes. From there, Charlie went Wikipedia, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Chaplin; The Time 100: Charlie to work in vaudeville, starring in comedic acts on stage. When he was 21, Chaplin, www.time.com/time/time100/ he went on tour in the United States as a featured star with the Fred Karno artists/profile/chaplin.html; The Official Charlie Chaplin Web Site, Repertoire Company, a group of British comedians. The American www.charliechaplin.com. audiences loved Charlie! In 1912, when the group returned to the United States for another tour, Charlie was given a movie contract.

COME OUT AND PLAY! Go Fly a Kite! It’s finally spring. On many days, spring means windy, and windy means — it’s a great day to fly a kite! That must be why April is National Kite Month. Although no one knows the exact origin of kites, they have been around for thousands of years. The first recorded use was about 200 B.C., when the Chinese General Han Hsin used a kite for military purposes. Over the years, kites have been used for a wide variety of things, like delivering messages, measuring the weather, photographing the Earth, catching fish and even lifting people into the sky. Today most kites are flown for pleasure and sport. Kites come in many shapes and sizes. According to the National Kite Month office, “Deltas, Diamonds and Dragon kites fly well in light to medium winds (approximately 6-15 mph) while Box Kites and stickless Parafoil kites fly better when the winds get a little stronger (approximately 8-25 mph).” The first thing you need to do is choose a kite. Second, make sure the winds are right — not too strong or too light. About 5-25 mph is best for most kites (when leaves and bushes start to move, but before it really starts to blow). Next, make sure you have a clear, open area, away from airports, power lines and other people. And last, never fly in rain or lightning because it is dangerous. The National Kite Month office gives the following hints for getting your kite to fly: • Stand with your back to the wind. Hold your kite up by the bridle point and let the line out. If there is enough wind, your kite will go right up. Let the kite fly away from you a little, and then pull in on the line as

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the kite points up so it will climb. Repeat this until your kite is high enough to find a good steady wind. • Light wind? Have a helper take the kite downwind and hold it up. On command, the helper releases the kite, and you pull the line hand-over-hand while the kite gains altitude. If you don’t have a helper, prop the kite up against a bush, post or wall. Reel out enough line for altitude and simply pull the kite up. • If the kite sinks tail first, there might not be enough wind. If it comes down headfirst or spins, there might be too much wind. Different kites fly in different winds. • Bridles: The bridle is the place on the kite where the string attaches. It helps keep the kite at the proper angle to the wind. If your kite has an adjustable bridle, move the string closer to the top in higher winds and closer to the tail in lower winds. • Tails: Adding tails to your kite helps it remain stable in stronger winds. Use lightweight materials so you can use lots! It looks great! No matter what you choose, flying a kite can be lots of fun! For more information about National Kite Month and local events, visit www.nationalkitemonth.org. Sheri Collins is a contributing writer for Kidsville News! Sources: National Kite Month Office, www.nationalkitemonth.org; Encyclopædia Britannica Online, www.britannica.com.

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APRIL 2009


APRIL 2009

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At the Movies

Dragonball Evolution (In Theaters: April 8) Goku (Justin Chatwin - War of the Worlds) seeks to fulfill his adoptive grandfather’s dying request to track down Master Roshi (Chow Yun-Fat) and assemble all of the seven Dragon Balls that together can be used to control the universe. Goku must assemble the Dragon Balls before the evil Lord Piccolo (James Marsters) does in order to stop the warlord from using them to take control of the Earth. This science fiction martial arts action/adventure movie was adapted from the manga graphic novels created by Akira Toriyama. Look for plenty of fiery spectacle, high kicks and video-game imagery. Emmy Rossum (The Phantom of the Opera) and Jamie Chung (Samurai Girl) star. Rated PG for intense sequences of action/violence and brief mild language. (20th Century Fox) Hannah Montana: The Movie (In Theaters: April 10) Miley Stewart (Miley Cyrus), AKA Hannah Montana, finds her busy life as a pop star isn’t all it’s cracked up to be when all of the fame and adulation become too much for a young girl to bear. With the help of her dad (Billy Ray Cyrus), Miley takes a trip back to her hometown of Crowley Corners, Tennessee, to look at her life from a more down-home way of thinking. Miley discovers that there are plenty of local adventures to be had enjoying small-town life in a rural community where she can be free of the pop culture demands that threaten to confine her. Rated G (Walt Disney Pictures) Earth (In Theaters: April 22) The voice of Darth Vader, James Earl Jones, narrates this lively and majestic nature documentary that traces a year in the life of our planet by way of some its most enchanting species. Fledgling birds take their first flight, monkeys contort their little bodies while crossing a river and a polar bear floats on a lone iceberg looking for his next meal. Beautiful lush photogra-

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phy from the team of highly skilled filmmakers behind the Emmy Award®winning Planet Earth, take the audience on an unforgettable global adventure. It’s no coincidence that the movie opens on “Earth Day.” Rated G (Disneynature) Movies on DVD

Bob the Builder: On Site Skyscrapers (DVD Release: March 17) The ever-smiling construction worker Bob the Builder shows how the high-rise foundations of urban life are built with plenty of real-life support from workers and machines shown doing the actual work of building skyscrapers. Even parents can learn a thing or two about how skyscrapers are put together. This particular DVD hasn’t been shown on television, and includes playtime encouragement for kids to build their own living room skyscrapers. The DVD includes English, French and Spanish language choices, a bonus episode, a “Build It with Bob Puzzle” and a trivia game. Not Rated (All Ages) (Hit Entertainment/Lionsgate) The Tale of Despereaux (DVD Release: April 7) Although it’s rated G, The Tale of Despereaux is probably a little too dark and violent for very young kids. Matthew Broderick is the voice of Despereaux, a little mouse with big ears who likes to think “outside the box.” This is one brave little guy who isn’t scared of much, not even of facing pure evil in order to rescue a damsel in distress. Despereaux believes in courage, honor and decency to guide his life, even if it means being banished from Mouseworld to fend for himself in the big, bad Ratworld outside. Dustin Hoffman provides the voice of the rat Roscuro, whose surprising appearance in the Queen’s soup bowl causes troubles from which only Despereaux can deliver the old gray city of Dor. The movie is based on Kate DiCamillo’s 2004 Newbery Medal-winning novel. Rated G (Universal Pictures) Cole Smithey, also known as “the smartest film critic in the world,” has been a film critic for 11 years and writes for over 50 publications, in print and on-line. Truman loves to watch movies and has the highest appreciation for great popcorn.

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APRIL 2009


Manners Matter

• To tell someone they did a good job. Everyone likes to get personal mail, like thank-you notes and invitations. What kinds of letters or invitations have you gotten in the mail? About note cards and personal with Truman and Mrs. F letter stationery: A well-mannered person, male A Note about Notes or female, should have a set of note cards and This is National Letter Writing Month, and I matching envelopes to be used for writing wanted to talk a little about a funny word: thank-you and other kinds of personal notes. stationery. This is pronounced stey-shuh-ner-ee While it is true that you should buy the best and means letter or note paper used quality that you can afford, and paper with a for writing or typing either business high cotton content is the most desired, the only or personal correspondence; usually thing that you absolutely must remember is accompanied with matching that you should thank people in writing for envelopes. gifts, favors, dinner parties, etc., given. Do you know what What kind of paper and design the correspondence is? All it means is notes are matter not nearly as much as letters that are written! the actual effort and content of the One kind of “personal correspondence” is written thank you. It is nice if you can splurge called a “note.” Most often, we write “notes” to (spend a lot) on engraved note cards, but when thank someone, but there are other reasons we that is not an option, the person who gets your may want to write to them, too. These may be: thoughtful note will greatly appreciate any off• To express thanks to someone for giving the-shelf (plain) note that you took the time to you any kind of gift — Christmas, birthday or send! Personal note stationery is about the size other. of a post card and can either be a single card or • To say thanks for inviting you to a party or fold over. a dinner or other get together (commonly called Check the office supply store for an affordthe bread and butter note). able option: they have blank note cards, and it is • To say thanks for any special treatment or simple enough to print your own on your home favor you received. computer with little technical expertise and little

expense. Note cards can have your initials or some other design at the top. Again, the goal is to make the effort to let someone who has done something nice for you know how much you appreciate it. Some people prefer to write letters instead of cards — these personal writing sheets should be 7-1/4 to 7-1/2 wide X 10-1/2 inches long and have envelopes to match. These are used for letter writing, as well as thank-you letter writing, and are generally not used in business. Most any color is acceptable nowadays, but white, ecru, light blue and perhaps pale pink are most traditional and are always appropriate. These can have your monogram (the letters of your first, last and middle names combined in a pretty design) or your name at the top, and the envelopes can have your address printed on the back flap. Again, plain letters are perfectly fine — it is always the thought behind the letter that counts. Truman and Mrs. Susan Fleming will be glad to answer your questions on manners and etiquette. Mrs. F is a home economist, editor and lifestyle writer specializing in entertaining and children’s etiquette. E-mail your question to manners@ kidsvillenews.com. If we use your question in the paper, you will receive a Kidsville News! t-shirt!

Are You Ready for Camp?

Visit boomerandhalley.com for the answer! Series by Mary Jane McKittrick Illustrations by Bob Ostrom

Paws for a lesson in TEAMWORK.

A community project takes on new meaning when Boomer and Halley get involved and try to help. “I’ll stir the paint with my paw,” says Halley, “That should work.” “Have you ever done this before?” asks Boomer. “Get ready with the brush,” says Halley. Boomer shakes his head. “I sure hope this works!” “Oh Boomer,” says Halley, “What could go wrong?”

T T T T T T T T T T T T

Boomer and Halley are working as a team because: a) They don't like each other. b) Halley's in charge. c) They're in trouble. d) They have a goal.

For the answer and a chance to win a prize, go to the FUN STUFF page at boomerandhalley.com!

APRIL 2009

Spring has sprung, and that means the weather is warmer and you are spending more time outside. It also means that your parents are starting to think about what kinds of activities you will be doing during the summer. Have you ever been to a summer camp? There are all kinds of camps to consider. Sports, music and arts camps let you focus on one type of activity, and there are summer camps where you get to try lots of activities, like crafts, canoeing and swimming. Camp can be a great way to discover new things and make new friends. At day camp you go for just the day (or part of a day), and at overnight camp you actually spend the night! If you are not quite sure if you are ready for sleepover camp, take the following quiz. Just answer True or False and share the answers with your parents. F F F F F F F F F F F F

I have never slept over at anyone’s house before. I have slept over at a friend’s house a couple of times, but I didn’t like it. I’ve gone on more sleepovers than I can count! I like to spend lots of time by myself at home. I like to spend some time with friends, but I need time alone, too. I love spending time with my friends — the more time the better! If I had to choose between reading or swimming, I’d choose reading. I love to play games and sports with other kids. I have never slept outside before. I think it would be scary. I’ve never slept outside, but it sounds fun! I’ve slept outside and hated it. I’ve slept outside, and it was great!

(Parent’s note: Use the answers to help you decide if your child is ready for sleepover camp.)

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 19


TM

A SECTION ESPECIALLY FOR PARENTS

BOOKSHELF S is for Save the Planet: A How-to-Be Green Alphabet

Queen of Easter

Author: Brad Herzog, Linda Holt Ayriss (Illustrator)

Publisher: Harper Collins Publishers

Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press

Age Range: 4 to 8

Age Range: 12 and up Did you know that Americans produce almost 250 million tons of trash each year? Readers will learn this fact and much more in S is for Save the Planet. Short prose for each letter of the alphabet highlights easy-to-take actions to help protect the environment. A sidebar on each page features longer text for more advanced readers, with more in-depth facts and information on environmental issues. The last page of the book features an excellent list of Web resources on topics ranging from battery disposal to vermicomposting. —JK

My Teacher Dances on the Desk Authors/Illustrator: Eugene Gagliano, Tatjana Mai-Wyss (Illustrator) Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press Age Range: 8 and up “My teacher dances on the desk, Which may seem kind of strange. Mom and Dad think he’s weird, But I hope he doesn’t change.” My Teacher Dances on the Desk is a fun and refreshing collection of poems about school, life as a kid and even bubblegum. April is National Poetry Month and a great time to explore all types of poetry. This small book is full of fun, with 39 poems that will have kids and parents alike laughing and giggling, or maybe rolling their eyes!— JK

Author/Illustrator: Mary Engelbreit

From the Publisher: With the neighborhood Easter Parade coming up, Ann Estelle dreams of wearing a hat covered with ribbons and pretty flowers galore. But when her mother gives her a plain straw hat instead, she wonders how she can be the Queen of Easter in a hat like that! Luckily Ann Estelle has plenty of ideas up her sleeve, and nothing could be more fun than watching her get to work on her masterpiece. But the magic of spring brings unexpected visitors, who make a hat so cute that not even Ann Estelle would want to compete! Mary Engelbreit’s irrepressible alter ego is back in a story full of all the warmth and humor that her many fans have come to expect. Perfect for tucking in Easter baskets or reading aloud on the porch swing, this Ann Estelle story is just in time for spring!

Jazz Author/Illustrator: Walter Dean Myers, Christopher Myers (Illustrator) Publisher: Holiday House, Inc. Age Range: 4 to 8 From the Publisher: From bebop to New Orleans, from ragtime to boogie, and every style in between, this collection of Walter Dean Myers’s energetic and engaging poems, accompanied by Christopher Myers’s bright and exhilarating paintings, celebrates different styles of the American art form, jazz. Includes time line and jazz glossary. This smash-hit picture book of jazz music poems, from award-winning father-son team Walter Dean Myers and Christopher Myers, has won a number of awards. This book is perfect for celebrating National Jazz Appreciation Month in April.

P ARENTOWN

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APRIL 2009


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S MART Recession-Proof Resilience: What Mothers Can Do To Stay Strong in Tough Economic Times

La recesión-Prueba de resistencia, Parte II:

Continued from last month... These are the times that try moms’ souls. When you’re worried about job loss and keeping a roof over your family’s head, it’s hard to be an effective parent. Jamie Woolf, author of Mom-in-Chief, offers practical strategies to help you and your kids deal with adversity (financial and otherwise). Your children count on you to teach them the life skills they’re going to need—and resilience in uncertain times is one of the most important. “The most successful leaders and family members can help people not only survive crises but also turn them into opportunities to grow,” says Woolf. In Mom-in-Chief, Woolf teaches mothers how to use “best practices” from the workplace to make family life run more smoothly. Here, adapted from the principles in her book, are her business-inspired strategies for what you can do for yourself and your kids to boost resilience during the economic downturn: What Moms Can Do for Their Kids Develop caring connections: Display kindness, empathy, and compassion for your kids. If you’re feeling extra vulnerable these days, your kids may be, too. So make an effort to make them feel loved and secure at home. Be careful not to take your frustrations out on them—it’s a trap that even the most loving mother can fall into, especially in tough times. Create motivating conditions: Express your faith that things will get better and help your kids shift from discouragement to optimism. When you cancel a planned family ski trip or vacation, assure them that they’ll be able to go next year, when the economy is in better shape. Set an example: Model resilience when you confront challenges. If you get laid off and don’t fall apart, or if you have to start taking on extra work but still manage to get dinner on the table at the same time every night, this tells kids that no matter what happens, Mom can get through it, which will give them confidence that they can, too. Focus on the big picture: If your goal is to provide a happy, healthy home for your children, don’t feel bad that you can’t buy them an iPhone—or go further into debt to get one! The importance of the basics has never been clearer. When the Sharper Image went out of business this year, it showed that maybe people realized they didn’t need an endless supply of high-tech gadgets to be happy. The most precious commodity is time. Figure out a way to give that to your kids and it will pay big dividends. The most important lesson to keep firmly in mind—and to share with your kids—is that the hard times won’t last forever. They never do, because change is life’s only constant. And it’s that knowledge that lies at the heart of resilience itself. “Resilience is grounded in optimism, in hope for a better tomorrow,” says Woolf. “You will find a new job or settle into a new home or, worst case scenario, adjust to living a simpler, less materialistic life. Remind yourself of that. Remind your kids of that. Believing that your circumstances will improve is the first and probably the most important step in making them improve. “The truth is, resilience breeds more resilience,” she adds. “It makes you stronger. And when you look at it that way, you can see that the hardships that help you hone it are more a gift than a curse.”

Estos son los tiempos en los que se pone a prueba el espíritu de las madres. Cuando uno está preocupado por perder su trabajo y por mantener un techo sobre la cabeza de su familia, es muy duro ser un padre/madre eficiente. Jamie Woolf, autora de Mom-in-Chief, (‘Mamá a cargo’ en español ) ofrece estrategias practicas para ayudarle a usted y a sus hijos a tratar con la adversidad (financiera o de cualquier otro tipo). Sus hijos cuentan con usted para enseñarlos las habilidades de la vida que necesitarán después -- y la resistencia en tiempos de incertidumbre es una de las más importantes. “Los líderes y los miembros de la familia con mayor éxito pueden ayudar a los demás no solo a sobrevivir las crisis sino tambien a convertirlas en oportunidades para crecer” dice Ms Woolf. En Mom-in-Chief, Woolf enseña a las madres como utilizar las ‘mejores prácticas’ adoptadas del lugar de trabajo para llevar a la familia más fácilmente. Aqui, adaptadas de los principios que enseña en su libro, están sus estrategias inspiradas en los negocios explicándole lo que usted puede hacer por usted mismo y por sus hijos para aumentar la resistencia durante los tiempos ecónomicos más duros. Lo que las mamás pueden hacer por sus hijos Desarrollar relaciones cariñosas: Muestre amabilidad, empatía y compasión con sus hijos. Si usted se siente más vulnerable estos dias , puede que sus hijos tambien se sientan asi. Así que haga un esfuerzo para hacerles sentir amados y seguros en la casa. Tenga cuidado de no pagar sus frustraciones con ellos— es una trampa en la que incluso la madre más cariñosa puede caer, especialmente en los tiempos difíciles. Cree condiciones motivadoras: Exprese su fe que las cosas van a mejorar y ayude a sus hijos a cambiar de la decepción al optimismo. Cuando usted cancele el viaje familiar para esquiar que ya habían planeado, asegúrelos que irán el próximo año, cuando la economía sea mejor. Sea un ejemplo: Modele la resistencia cuando se confronte con los desafios. Si le echan del trabajo pero no se derrumba, o si tiene que empezar a realizar trabajo extra pero aún se maneja para tener la cena lista en la mesa a la misma hora todas las noches, esto les dice a sus hijos que no importa lo que suceda, su madre puede superarlo, lo cual les dará confianza que ellos tambien pueden hacerlo. Plantee su objetivo a largo plazo: si su meta es proveer un hogar feliz y sano para sus hijos, no se sienta mal si no puede comprarlos un iPhone—o no se endeude más para comprar uno! La importancia de las cosas básicas nunca ha estado tan clara. Cuando la compañia Sharper Image fue a la quiebra este año, este hecho nos mostró que quizás la gente se dio cuenta de que no necesitaban un número indefinido de aparatos de alta tecnologia para ser felices. El lujo mas preciado es el tiempo. Averigüe un método para dárselo a sus hijos y le será devuelto con creces. La lección mas importante que hay que tener en mente constantemente—y que debe compartir con sus hijos—es que los tiempos duros no duran para siempre. Nunca lo hacen, porque el cambio es la única constante en la vida. Y es el conocimiento de este hecho lo que está en el centro de la resistencia. “Resistencia es basarse en el optimismo y en la esperanza para un mejor mañana,” dice Woolf. “Usted encontrará otro trabajo o se mudará a una casa nueva, o en el peor escenario, se ajustará a vivir de manera mas sencilla, una vida menos materialista. Recuérdeselo a si mismo. Recuérdeselo a sus hijos. El creer que sus circunstancias mejorarán es el primer y mas importante paso en hacerlas mejorar. “La verdad es, la resistencia atrae más resistencia,” ella añade. “Le hará más fuerte. Y cuando usted lo mira de esta manera, vera que las penurias que le ayudaran a mejorar sus destrezas son un don y no una maldición.” Jamie Woolf es una contribuidora regular para la revista Working Mother y fundadora de The Parent Leader and Pinehurst Consulting, una firma consultora de desarollo y organizacion. En su libro, Mom-in-Chief: How Wisdom from the Workplace Can Save Your Family from Chaos, Woolf trata sobre todos los dilemas de la vida real y cubre todo lo que la mujer professional necesita saber para dar rienda suelta a su potential como madre y hacer frente a todos los desafios con gracia y con destreza.

Jamie Woolf is a regular contributor to Working Mother magazine and founder of The Parent Leader and Pinehurst Consulting, an organization development consulting firm. In her book, Mom-in-Chief: How Wisdom from the Workplace Can Save Your Family from Chaos, Woolf addresses real-life quandaries and covers everything that career-oriented women need to know to unleash their parenting potential and navigate challenges with skill and grace.

APRIL 2009

Lo que las madres pueden hacer para que sus hijos se matengan fuertes durante los tiempos difíciles.

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 21


P ARENTOWN’S K ID S HAPE April Is Youth Sports Safety Month. Have Fun! Be Safe! The month of April has been proclaimed National Youth Sports Safety Month. The national health event was initiated by the National Youth Sports Safety Foundation, Inc., in 1993 to promote safety in sports participation. More than 60 national medical and sports organizations support National Youth Sports Safety Month. They include the American College of Sports Medicine, The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports and The United States Olympic Committee. The Stats on Sports Injuries • Sports participation has become a major cause of serious injury among youth. • Sports activities are the second most frequent cause of injury for both male and female adolescents. • Each year it is estimated that more than five million children seek treatment in hospital emergency rooms because of sports injuries. • The American Academy of Ophthalmology has launched a campaign for mandatory protective eyewear for children participating in school-related or community-sponsored athletic events. Eye injuries are the leading cause of blindness in children, and sports are the major cause of eye injuries in school-age children. • As many as one-third of in-line skating emergency-room-treated injuries could be prevented or lessened in severity by the use of protective equipment. • Less than 10% of the two and a half million volunteer coaches and less than one-third of the interscholastic coaches in the United States have had any type of coaching education. • Forty thousand knees are injured due to sports participation each year in the United States. In addition, 50% of these injuries have some lasting residual effect which impacts the quality of life. • Most sports injuries are preventable. Tips for Parents • Don’t force your child to participate in sports. • Remember that children participate to have fun and that the game is for youth, not adults. Show good sportsmanship from the sidelines!

PAGE 22 - KIDSVILLE NEWS

• Inform the coach of any physical disability or ailment that may affect the safety of your child or of others. • Learn the rules of the game and the policies of the league. • Be a positive role model for your child and encourage sportsmanship by showing respect and courtesy and by demonstrating positive support for all players, coaches, officials and spectators at every game, practice or other sporting event. • Teach your child to play by the rules and to resolve conflicts without resorting to hostility or violence. • Demand that your child treat other players, coaches, officials and spectators with respect regardless of race, creed, color, sex or ability. • Teach your child that doing one’s best is more important than winning so that the child will never feel defeated by the outcome of a game or his/her performance. Emphasize skill development and practices and how they benefit the child. Praise him or her for competing fairly and trying hard. Tips for Kids • The most important thing is to Have Fun! • Remember, youth sports are only a game designed for your enjoyment. Play to please yourself and have a good time. • Learning how to play the game is more important than winning and losing. • Some children grow faster than others, and some have better coordination earlier than others. Everyone catches up eventually. Be patient. • Who you are as a person does not depend on your wins and losses. • Treat other athletes and your coaches with respect. Everyone is trying his or her hardest. • Honor the rules of the game. • Be a good sport. • Support your teammates. Sources: National Youth Sports Safety Foundation, Inc., www.nyssf.org; Sport Parent Code of Conduct, Massachusetts Governor’s Committee on Physical Fitness and Sports.

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APRIL 2009


APRIL 2009

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KIDSVILLE NEWS - PAGE 23


Kidsville News - April 2009  

We are excited to bring KidsvilleNews to Middle Tennessee. KIDSVILLE NEWS IS THE NATION'S FAVORITE AND FASTEST-GROWING CHILDREN’S NEWSPAPER....

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