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A Temporary Home for a

Article Kory Kilmer | Photography Provided

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n a perfect world, every dog in trouble makes it to a local shelter and finds its way to a happy ending. But this is not a perfect world, and the statistics tell a much more tragic story. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) cites that across the nation more than 3.9 million dogs enter shelters every year. Only about two-thirds of those stories end as they should, either by being reunited with their original owner or through adoption. Sadly, and far too often, the rest are often euthanized, never having the chance of finding their forever home. Focusing a little closer to home, Maricopa County ranks second in the United States in euthanasia, just behind Los Angeles. Fortunately, many passionate dog advocates all over are not are not turning a blind eye. Teaming up with other like-minded folks, they are forming rescue organizations which are taking

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North Scottsdale Lifestyle | September 2014

the lead in keeping dogs out of the shelters and trying to find them permanent homes. Here in the Valley, dozens of dog rescues have emerged, specializing in everything from mutts to purebreds, from puppies to seniors, and everything in between. “I had a couple hundred bucks in a checking account and a passion for these dogs, and we just started the rescue organization from there,” says Lori Shields of Almost Home AZ Boxer Rescue, who had adopted a boxer from a rescue in North Carolina prior to moving to Arizona. Like the majority of rescue organizations, Almost Home has no facility to board the dogs that they take in, and are therefore reliant on a dedicated network of volunteer foster families to serve as temporary homes while the organization is out looking for a perfect “forever” fit. On the surface, not having a central facility might seem like an


North Scottsdale Lifestyle September 2014