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HOME TOUR

The Palacios Home

Generosity Cultivated at Home

CULINARY

WINTER VEGETABLES

Butternut Squash Lasagna with Bechamel Sauce, and More

NEXT GEN

JEFF MCLAUGHLIN

Tulare County Fire Battalion Chief

ECRWSS RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMER LOCAL

October 2012

Presort Standard U.S. POSTAGE PAID Visalia, CA Permit No. 100 ECRWSS


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26 HOME TOUR The Palacios Home

CULINARY

8

Letter from the Executive Editor

Winter Vegetables

10 Business Cents

Butternut Squash Lasagna with Bechamel Sauce, and More

14 Word Play 16 Local Adventure: Adventures Through a Lens 18 Spirits: Punk'N (Pumpkin Ale)

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34

20 Humanitarian: Pilgrimage to Armenia 24 Literary Arts: Robert Vasquez

NEXT GEN

42 Travel: Denali National Park and the Kenai Peninsula

Jeff McLaughlin

50 Performances

Tulare County Fire Battalion Chief

52 Chamber: Visalia 54 Chamber: Exeter 56 Chamber: Tulare 58 Happenings

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40 CHARITY

SoirĂŠe d'Elegance A Visalia Rotary Community Foundation Benefit PAGE

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ABOVE: Like much of Jorge and Ursula Palacios' Clovis home, the formal dining room is a mix of eclectic style, including many art pieces from their travels around the world.


LOVE THAT

SMILE! Dr. Sullivan is the Past President of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, and the only AACD Accredited Member in the Central Valley. Call us today for a free smile consultation!


OCTOBER 2012 PUBLISHED BY DMI Agency 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 EDITORIAL Executive Editor Karen Tellalian Assistant Editor TAYLOR VAUGHN Copy Editor DARA FISK-EKANGER Content Editor Kyndal Kennedy ART & PRODUCTION Art Director ROSS YUKAWA Graphic Designer CHRIS BLY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS cheryl dieter Diane Slocum DONALD K. DEJONGE elaine dakessian JORDAN VENEMA KENNETH HILDEBRAND LISA McMewen MAJOR ROGERS MARSHA PELTZER BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Malkasian Accountancy LLP Gary Malkasian CPA JEFFREY Malkasian EA Operations Manager Maria Gaston

RACK LOCATIONS

DMI Agency Evolutions Fitness Center, Tulare Tazzaria Coffee & Tea Tulare County Library The Lifestyle Center Visalia Chamber of Commerce Visalia Convention Center COUNTERTOP LOCATIONS

210 Cafe Advanced Body & Laser Center Creekside Day Spa & Wellness Center Exeter Chamber of Commerce Exeter Golf Course Holiday Inn Kaweah Delta Hospital Red Carpet Car Wash Sequoia Laser Aesthetics Smiles by Sullivan Tiffany’s Luxury Medispa Tulare Chamber of Commerce V Medical Spa Velvet Sky Visalia Community Bank (Downtown) Visalia Eye Center Visalia Imaging & Open MRI Visalia Marriott Visalia Medical Clinic Wildflower Cafe-Exeter Dr. Keith Williams Williams, Jordan, Brodersen & Pritchett, Attorneys at Law Windows Plus, Inc.

ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Bridget Elmore SALES OFFICE 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 559.739.1747 • Fax 559.738.0909 E-mail: lifestyle@dmiagency.com VIEW THE MAG ONLINE! issuu.com/lifestylemagazine

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Visalia Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and is distributed via direct mail to nearly 13,000 homes in the upper-middle and high-income neighborhoods in Visalia and Exeter. An additional 2,000 copies are distributed at various distribution points around both communities. Views expressed in columns are those of the columnist and not necessarily those of DMI Agency or its advertisers.

Circulation of this issue: 15,000 © 2012 DMI Agency

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COVER PHOTO: The piano in the Palacios home is often played by 12-year-old daughter, Catherine. LEFT: A miniature, intricate, handcarved replica of a Catholic pulpit hangs on the wall of the Palacios home. The wooden sculpture is by an artist from their native Peru.


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E EDITOR NOTE

Photo by Becca Chavez | Hair and Make-up provided by Velvet Sky

Welcome to the ninth anniversary edition of Lifestyle Magazine. For those of you who’ve told us you keep every single issue, we are ever so humbled and grateful. For us the magazine has been much like raising a child: you have the highest hopes and greatest fears, you make mistakes, learn, grow and develop a stronger bond each day. We still look forward to each month’s issue, like waiting for a child to take their first steps, say that first word, or get invited to his first party. With equal gratitude, we’d like to thank our advertisers; some are new and some have supported us since the very beginning. We know our community, and know how important it is to have independent, local business partners. The term “shop local” is quite common, but it’s important to adopt that same philosophy to where your advertising dollars go. As a free publication, we want our readers to know it’s because of the advertisers we’ve been able to grow from a 24-page publication to where we are today. Nine years later, we’re older and wiser, but our vision for a community publication has not changed; we are still wildly passionate about what we do. Part of our mission has been to give a voice to the many charities and non-profits working hard to provide for those who cannot afford many of the things we take for granted. We’ve attended countless golf tournaments, concerts, and banquets and have enjoyed them all. But the night of October 6 might have been our favorite this year. Held at the Shannon Ranch, the Visalia Rotary Community Foundation’s Soirée d’Elegance set itself apart, with fabulous Caymus wines, delectable dinner by The Vintage Press, music and art, and guests dressed to the nines. We love events like these because the funds are distributed back into the community – more than $1 million to date, with less than one percent in administration costs. That’s a record to be proud of. To see who was there, turn to page 48. If you missed the Soirée, you have another opportunity to have a “to die for” evening, while supporting a number of local charities. Take note of the date as the Visalia Chamber of Commerce 32nd Annual Christmas Tree Auction will be held November 30 this year. Last year, VIP tickets sold out and we expect the same for this year. Since changing the format to include a full-course dinner, the demand for tickets has risen and there are few single-night events that raise as much money, for as many charities. As our 108th issue goes to print, we celebrate. We celebrate every written word, every stunning photograph. We celebrate every feature that made a difference to someone, and we celebrate the individuals who’ve allowed us a glimpse into their lifestyles. Today, we celebrate. Tomorrow, we get back to meticulously planning upcoming issues, with the same resolve that allows us to celebrate today.

Karen Tellalian, EXECUTIVE EDITOR For more information or to submit a story idea email Karen@dmiagency.com or call (559) 739-1747 or fax (559) 738-0909.

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B BUSINESS CENTS

Growing a Successful Business Plan:

How to Protect Your Biggest Asset Text by Donald K. DeJonge, Financial Advisor, Northwestern Mutual

W

ith the uncertainty of today’s stock market, business owners would rather put their hardearned money into assets that they can physically see and feel (i.e. land, cows, or trees). As a result, the majority of a business owner’s assets are tied up in their business. If this holds true to your situation, do you have a solid succession plan? All business owners leave their businesses eventually. Whether the plan is to transfer assets to the next generation of actively involved family members, sell the business to a group of key employees, or having to deal with the unexpected (i.e. death or disability) that prevents you from running your company, you need to be prepared. Your business is one of your biggest assets and you need to protect it. How can you facilitate the transfer according to your wishes, minimize eventual estate taxes, and maximize assets, all while maintaining stability? If these things are not properly addressed, the business you have spent a lifetime building could face bankruptcy, loss of key employees, loss of value/market share, and fighting among family members and employees. After attending an Ag Estate and Business Succession Forum at the International Ag Center in Tulare, CA, a business owner and his wife wanted to develop a succession plan for their closely held business which has no family member interested in taking it over. Additionally, they had no wish to sell it to a competitor or outside third-party. The ultimate goal is to make sure the company continues on for years to come, providing steady paychecks for the 50 employees who have become like family to the owners.

Design a Plan Whether the business is sold to an unrelated third-party or stays in the family, there are many items that need to be addressed. These questions will help you design the foundation of your plan: • Who will own the company (in part or whole)? • Who will manage it? • How will this affect employees? • What triggers your plan? • How is the business valued? • How is the purchase financed? • What taxes are triggered in a sale? • How can taxes be minimized? Who Will Own the Company? Think about whether ownership will stay in the family, as well as to what degree. What are their goals in owning the company? If a family member will not run the business, who will? Possible options: • A key person in the business or group of key people. • An outside third-party, possibly a competitor. • Bring in outside management (this last option will most likely take the longest transition period for proper training). Gather and Analyze Data A large amount of “good” information is needed to build your succession plan. • Financial statements on cash flow, assets, and liabilities should be prepared by an independent accountant. • A list of personal financial needs, including how much you want or need to maintain your lifestyle in retirement. • Job descriptions and responsibilities of employees, including that of your successor. Establish a training plan for your successor. This will help the transition go as smooth as possible. If the successor is coming from inside the company, who will replace that person? Multiple transitions could occur. You can be prepared with a good training plan and clear expectations. Flexibility of Planning Strategies can vary widely depending on the type of business and the assets involved in the transaction. The sale of a sole proprietorship is much different than the sale of a corporation or partnership. The tax consequences of a sale should be heavily scrutinized before a decision is made. It is always important to consult with your financial advisor, certified public accountant (CPA), and attorney on these matters so you can make a decision based on all the information available.

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B BUSINESS CENTS

Valuation of the Business Before a sale or transfer of your business can happen, a proper valuation is needed from a qualified appraiser. Book value is based on an evaluation of the balance sheet. This technique will require future appraisals. Simply fix the sale price and use qualified independent appraisals. Because many estates are seeking appraisals before the end of the year to lock in current estate tax rates, it may be difficult to find an appraiser quickly. Don’t wait until December if you want something done by the end of the year. Another option is to fix the price by capitalizing on the net income. Using a combination of these methods is often used to determine your company’s values and is highly recommended. The Buy-Sell A proper Buy-Sell agreement between two or more parties obligates one party to buy and the other to sell upon triggering events. A “good” Buy-Sell will outline a predetermined price or formula for achieving the price. It will also define ownership within the succession plan. Another critical and often overlooked part of the Buy-Sell is whether it is funded or unfunded. All too often these agreements are put into place and the actual funding is overlooked. This is why setting up a sinking fund or using insurance to fund the Buy-Sell is very important. Having a buyer who has no money to buy your business at the end of the day is like owning a dairy with no place to ship your milk … eventually you will have to dump it at a less-than-desirable price. There are different types of Buy-Sell agreements. This is where your financial advisor and attorney can talk with you about the advantages and disadvantages of each agreement and find the one that best fits your situation. Types of Buy-Sell Agreements include: 1. Cross Purchase 2. Entity Purchase 3. Unilateral Buy-Out Plan 4. Wait-and-See Buy-Sell Plan 5. Escrowed Buy-Sell Plan 6. Disability Buy-Out Plan Keep in mind that a purchase can happen all at once or over a period of time. Make sure IRS guidelines are met for arms-length transactions to help reduce the chance of IRS objections to the agreement’s stipulated price and tax liability.

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Estate Planning Considerations It is important to consider estate planning issues throughout the business succession process as well, but don’t get so hung up on certain tax issues that you lose sight of the ultimate goal. Plans need to be communicated to all parties involved. No one wants to be limited in options or have an unpleasant surprise for their heirs. Any business interest you own is included in your estate and may be subject to estate taxes. A funded Buy-Sell agreement can help generate liquid sale proceeds to help the estate pay any taxes and other costs that may arise. Local Business Owners In the business owners' situation (mentioned above), they were able to identify four key individuals in the company that were key to the ongoing success of the business, and who had interest in owning a piece of the company they have been working to build. These people know how the company operates; the transitional period should be minimal and the impact on the company limited. An Entity Purchase Buy-Sell agreement was developed between the key individuals and business owners. The Buy-Sell was funded by putting in place a life insurance policy insuring the lives of business owners. When the dust settles So what happens at the end of the day? The four key employees stay at the business and receive matched savings for retirement, or an eventual buy-out. Upon the business owners' death, the life insurance proceeds are used to buy stock interest from their estate. The four key employees now own the company outright, ensuring proper management and success of the business while the business owners' estate has cash from the sale of the business. These funds can be used to pay estate taxes or divide amongst their beneficiaries. Having the right financial plan in place is essential for growing your business’s long-term success; both while you are running it and while you are not. You have worked hard to build and grow your business, do the same when it is time to pass it on. Creating a solid plan ensures both your family’s and company’s financial success. Donald K. DeJonge is a Financial Advisor with Northwestern Mutual. Northwestern Mutual is the marketing name for The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company (NM), Milwaukee, Wisconsin, its affiliates, and subsidiaries. Financial Representative is an agent of NM based in Visalia, CA. Don’s Web site is at www.donalddejonge.com.


W WORD PLAY

NEWS ON WRITING, BOOKS AND THE WORLD OF PUBLISHING Text by Diane Slocum

O

ctober is National Arts & Humanities Month and includes California Arts Day, which is the first Friday of the month. Among the programs offered by the California Arts Council is “Poetry Out Loud” which introduces high school students to great poetry. Details at: http://tinyurl.com/9yyvl6x. Poet Laureate The Arts Council also manages the nomination of the California Poet Laureate, who this year happens to be Fowler native, Juan Felipe Herrera. The Poet Laureate is appointed by the governor and is charged with advocating for poetry, inspiring new poets, and educating the public about our state’s rich literary heritage. Nominees must be a poet of stature with a significant body of excellent work, and be willing to undertake a specified project. Herrera’s project is “The Most Incredible and Biggest and Most Amazing Poem on the Unity of the World.” Herrera is seeking submissions of poetry on unity from everyone. Whether a word, line, stanza, or whole poem, all views, languages, and styles are welcome in this river of poetic cooperation. The poems will be broadcast on digital billboards during his two-year tenure as laureate and installed at Capitol Park in Sacramento on completion. For more information on the project, visit http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/7462. To read about Herrera, see the April 2011 issue of Lifestyle Magazine at http://tinyurl.com/94ohl4m. For more about the poet laureate program, visit http://tinyurl.com/95v7xc5. (The 1966 to 2000 poet laureate, Charles “Gus” Garrigus, also had Valley ties to Reedley and Kingsburg.) Valley Writers Former Fresno State creative writing professor, Steve Yarbrough, can list the Richard Wright Literary Excellence Award among his honors. Wright was an internationally recognized author from Mississippi beginning in the 1940s. Winners of the award must be outstanding living writers with an impressive body of work with Mississippi connections. Yarbrough hails from the Mississippi Delta and most of his work centers on the area. His latest novel, Safe from the Neighbors, tells the story of a small town teacher who can’t erase the influence of the Delta’s violent past. Yarbrough now teaches at Emerson College in Boston. Hear valley writers read their stories on KVPR’s Valley Writers Read on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. On October 24, Oscar G. Williams reads "I Scooter" which portrays the world as seen through the eyes of a dog. Scheduled for Octpber 31 is Valerie Schultz reading "Brevis" about a daughter who cares for her belligerent, ill father. The November schedule begins on the 7th with James Benelli’s "The Wonderful World of Accounting" about a C.P.A. bored with his job, wife, and lifestyle. On November 14, Armen Bacon and Nancy Miller join to read "Griefland-An Intimate Portrait of Love, Loss and Unlikely Friendship" about two grieving mothers who share the tragedy of their loss.

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Read the Book This year’s movie, Lawless, is based on Matt Bondurant’s 2008 novel, The Wettest County in the World, which itself is based on his grandfather’s generation of Bondurants. The depression-era Bondurant brothers are bootleggers in Franklin County, Virginia – a county well enough known for its moonshine and internecine violence to attract reporter Sherwood Anderson who subsequently gave the county its nickname. The viciousness of rival retaliations is graphically depicted. Writers’ Conferences The 2012 Self-Publishing Book Expo will be held on Saturday, October 27, at the Sheraton New York Hotel. The expo is an opportunity for authors to promote their books. The Fisherman’s Wharf Writers Conference will be held November 7-11 in San Francisco. Workshops run from about 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and are divided into novel structure, narrative enhancement, and marketing techniques. The fee is $495 for workshops, agent sessions and manual, but not accommodations. Writing Contests The 2013 Indie Book Awards is open to authors and publishers of small, mid-size and university presses, e-books, and selfpublished authors. The book must be published in English with a 2012 or 2013 copyright date. The contest has 60 categories and gives cash awards and other prizes. The top book in each category is offered to leading agents. The fee is $75. Deadline is February 22. For details, visit http://www.indiebookawards.com. The Ohio State University Prize in Short Fiction offers an award of $1,500, plus publication for the best manuscript collection of short stories. Manuscripts must be between 150 and 300 typed pages, with no individual story over 125 pages. Manuscripts must be postmarked during January. For details, visit https://ohiostatepress.org. Publishing Penguin’s DAW Books, Inc., will accept science fiction and fantasy submissions from authors without an agent. Gary Gecko Press will look at the first three chapters and a synopsis of most genres submitted by the authors. Milkweed Editions is interested in literary quality and transformative potential and will next accept literary, poetry, and non-fiction in January. The Last Word “What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” – Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)


C E L E B R A T I N G

O U R

9 T H

A N N I V E R S A R Y

559 739 1747 | DMIAgency.com


L LOCAL ADVENTURE

Adventures Through a Lens

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or an adventure you can revisit from the comfort of your very own couch, get outside! Wait. What? Now that fall is in full swing and the weather is perfect for exploring the Central Valley, it’s time to get outside and trek through our area with some boots, a light jacket, and a camera. Locations abound for beautiful scenery and equally beautiful shots. Do you ever see photos from your favorite local photographer and think, “How pretty!” and, “Where is that at? It looks so serene!” Well, what are you waiting for, go find out! You don’t have to be a professional photographer or even have a fancy camera to capture photos from a miniadventure that you will treasure for days to come. Here are some ideas for great fun and photos: Three Rivers Head east on Highway 198 and keep going until you reach the small, foothill town of Three Rivers. Pull off on the side of the road and walk down to the river to take in the fresh air and setting. Look around at the roaring whitewater, and the glassy calm water, and get creative with what's in front of you. Head up a little further to The Gateway restaurant for lunch on their outdoor balcony and special access to the river below for even more water features to capture. Sequoia National Park Keep heading up through the foothills to Sequoia National Park for photos of a different caliber. The fresh, crisp air is plenty enough to get oxygen into your brain for creative genius. If timing is right, there just may be a bit of snow on the ground and in the trees to make for a stunning contrast to any subject. Or, simply visit the General Sherman tree and practice taking shots from different angles – attempting to get the whole thing in one shot, is an adventure in itself. Orchards Who knew the vast trees we drive by every day could make for such a unique Central Valley photography adventure. Not everyone has access to these endless rows of orange, green, red, and yellow backdrops. Perfect for fun and dynamic photos, orchards add that inherent fall feel and color to every photo. Farms Farmland makes for a stunning, rustic display and backdrop. From wheat fields, cornrows, red barn doors, and farm animals, our valley is covered in photoshoot material. Just take a look at the engagement photos of local couples – farmland remains a favorite, and it's no wonder why. Downtown And of course, there is almost nothing more perfect than Downtown Visalia during the fall. The ever-present moisture in the air, combined with the brick-walled buildings, and twinkling window-front lights makes our downtown a great location for “city” photos. Check out the numerous alleyways or the cityscape from on top of the downtown parking garage near the movie theater. Downtown can be great for people-watching and capturing the day-to-day life of Visalia in the fall. So, what are you waiting for?

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S SPIRITS

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spirits S

UINTA BREWING:

Punk’N (Pumpkin Ale) Text by Kenneth Hildebrand | Photo by Taylor Vaughn

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all is here and the time for a fall beer is, too. Green leaves on trees will soon give way to the red, yellow, and orange colors of autumn, and pumpkins will soon embellish the door steps of homes. It’s nearly time to gather friends around the evening fire and celebrate the coming of winter. One way to welcome the season is with a traditional beer that has been made for centuries: pumpkin beer. That’s right ... pumpkin ale. Our founding fathers were no exception to seasonal brews; George Washington, Ben Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson are all said to have brewed beer from pumpkins. They had to use pumpkins out of necessity. Barley and other ingredients used to make ales were scarce in that day. Settlers used whatever they could get their hands on, including parsnips, molasses, squash, corn, and apples. But the main reason pumpkin was adopted as a beer ingredient during the early colonial period was its availability. Pumpkins were a native plant, while good malt was not so readily accessible. Fermentable sugars had to be found where they could, and in the first pumpkin beers, the meat of the pumpkin took the place of the malt entirely. Pumpkin beer continued to be a staple throughout the 18th century. Modern pumpkin beers tend to aim for more of a “pumpkin pie in a glass,” as opposed to “pumpkin in a glass” aesthetic. Modern drinkers may not be tasting anything like the beer's made by their colonial ancestors, but

it's still a nice nod to brewing history. Brewers have roasted pumpkins and put them in the mash as it ferments, or add pumpkin puree, or even artificial pumpkin flavorings. Most breweries also add spices such as nutmeg, ginger, clove, allspice, and cinnamon. As of today, no commercial brewery makes pumpkin beer exclusively out of pumpkin. Some pumpkin beers have subtle hints of the squash, while others taste like boozy pumpkin pie, often sweet, cloying, and rich. The majority of brewery’s add spices more than anything else. Also detectable are notes of molasses, caramel, earthiness, and hazelnut. Celebrating the fall season, we are diving into Uinta Brewing's pumpkin beer, “Punk'N”. This ale is short of being the “pumpkin pie in a glass”; the Salt Lake City, Utah, brewery took the more authentic side. Punk'N is relatively clear amber in color, and has a light to moderate amount of visible carbonation. Its light aromas of earthy and woody spices, along with very light notes of roasted pumpkin, tease the nose. It carries light flavors of the aromas throughout, while slightly gaining as the beer warms. This ale is very balanced as the sweetness or bitterness cancel each other out. Punk'N is lightbodied and very drinkable, so head down to your local shop, search out a craft brewed pumpkin ale, and usher in fall to the valley. Remember: enjoy a craft beer that is made in small batches, and drink for quality not quantity.

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H HUMANITARIAN

PICTURED: Khor Virap Monastery in Armenia. RIGHT: Grant from World Vision; Dr. Koobatian holding lahvosh (Armenian cracker bread).

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HUMANITARIAN H

Pilgrimage to Armenia:

Hands Working in Homeland

E

Text by Cheryl L. Dieter

very so often a person’s influence can be felt long after they are gone. So is the case with Markar Koobatian, who arrived in Visalia in 1920 an immigrant barber from Armenia. Now his grandson, Steven Koobatian, Ph.D., works out of his new office complex, which once served as his grandfather’s shop. Even though the property had been rebuilt, Dr. Koobatian made sure to preserve the view he would have had when sitting in his grandfather’s barber chair. The fig tree his grandfather lovingly planted in front of his shop remains a testament to his grandparents and people throughout the world who have managed to survive adversity, yet continued to grow strong. Given his Armenian heritage, it is hardly surprising that Dr. Koobatian has big plans to give back to his ancestral homeland; and he has found the perfect way to do it through a partnership with World Vision and Rotary International. Although a Christian based organization, World Vision does not proselytise meaning that they are welcome throughout the world to help children in desperate circumstances overcome the obstacles that prevent them from achieving their full potential. Koobatian's Armenia project was conceived on a local level at the Visalia County Center Rotary, his rotary club. Having worked with Nina Clancy (former Rotary District 5230 Governor) to raise over one million dollars to be used in Angola for economic development, he knew the same could be done through a collaborative effort with Rotary International, the government of Armenia, and World Vision. “In projects such as these, often the issues involved revolve around issues of clean water and education. But in Armenia, its citizens have a literacy rate of 99 percent and plentiful natural resources,” explained Koobatian. “We have other ideas in mind that we hope will make a significant impact on the country. Our focus for Armenia is economic. Things like providing micro financing and agricultural expertise so the people of Armenia can develop their own healthy economy based on what they feel their needs are.” The early 20th century history of Armenia is one of wars and upheaval. Koobatian’s grandmother, Sophia, left the country in 1915 after her parents were murdered. Then in 1920, the Soviet Union occupied the country. During the intervening years, Armenia had fairly large industries located throughout the nation that were financed by the Soviets. But with the fall of the Soviet regime in 1991, industries such as textile, machine tooling, and

agriculture collapsed, leaving the economy in a shambles. “Unfortunately, since 1991, a huge number of Armenians have had to leave the country in an effort to find work. This quickly leads to disintegration of the family unit and forces women and children into poverty,” Koobatian said. “One of our main goals of this collaboration is to help the local people develop small businesses in areas such as cheese making, milk processing, dehydration, computer technology, textile processing, and greenhouse agriculture that employ small numbers of people in order to keep the dads at home and the families intact.” Recently Koobatian and his daughter, Evy Koobatian Power, traveled back to Armenia to meet with officials from Rotary International and World Vision in an attempt to understand the needs of the people, and to gain insight into how the project needed to be developed. For Koobatian, it was his first trip back to the country of his grandparents, and he was completely unprepared for the emotional impact it would have on him. “Frankly, I didn’t expect it to happen but when we landed in Armenia I instantly felt this peacefulness wash over me that whispered to my soul, 'I’m home.' And after visiting the country, I have also developed such a spiritual and familiar connection with the people and the land. It’s a place where the people are warm and friendly, and even those with little reach out with what little they have to ensure that you will know you are welcome,” said Koobatian, who is still overwhelmed by the experience. The group used the capital, Yerevan, as its base of operations, and visited micro financed businesses, such as a woman who started a small lahvosh (Armenian cracker bread) operation, seamstresses, and several fruit dehydration plants. But they also traveled north to Gyumri where in 1988, the region was hit with a massive earthquake, killing over 30,000 people. According to Koobatian, Gyumri had huge textile plants before the quake that were quickly reduced to rubble. Following the disaster, Gorbachov visited the area promising a complete rebuilding within two years. Today there are still dirt roads where highways ran and an infrastructure that is still terribly broken with no textile firms in sight. Yet, Koobatian is encouraged and thrilled that the Rotary Club in Gyumri is interested in helping in an effort to ensure that its citizens get the economic help that is needed. While in Gyumri, Koobatian had a chance to visit with a woman whose huband left for a job opportunity in Moscow and she hasn’t heard from him in almost two years. This story is LIFEST YLE | OC TOBER 2012

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H HUMANITARIAN

that of thousands of families throughout the nation. It is these people the project hopes to serve. According to Koobatian, the woman has no skills, she is destitute, her house is crumbling, and has one light bulb hanging from the ceiling. But what disturbed him the most was the fact that she had to place her young children in foster care in order to ensure that they would get food in their bellies and an education. Who, she wonders, gets to kiss her child goodnight? Who makes sure that they are loved? Questions that World Vision and Rotary International hope that mothers will never have to ask themselves in the future. Today, Koobatian and the collaborative partners are in the process of forming a team of individuals who are interested in participating and traveling to Armenia to get the project off the ground. They are especially interested in individuals with small business expertise, technology, exporting and agriculture. With dreams of giving out the first grants in 12 months, there is a lot of money to raise and expertise to be found. But Koobatian is confident that it can be done, and he is excited to return to Armenia. “While we were in Armenia, my daughter and I arranged to take my parents ashes to be spread near Mt. Ararat, which was their final wish. It was a very special and meaningful time for both my daughter and I. A time that reminded us of family, and the lasting impact they have on your life,” shared Koobatian. “I feel blessed to walk where my grandfather did as a young man and in his final years. I feel that if I can do one thing in my lifetime to help his homeland progress, and to keep its families together, it would make my grandparents very proud and that is still important to me.” TOP: Dr. Koobatian placed his parents ashes at Khor Virap Monastery, which borders Armenia and Turkey, close to Mt. Ararat. MIDDLE: Grant from World Vision; ladies work at a small-scale dehydration plant in Talin, Armenia. BOTTOM: World Vision travelers with children who put on a puppet show.

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L LITERARY ARTS

Robert Vasquez:

Connecting Our Souls Through Poetry Text by Diane Slocum

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hat if instead of tax returns and birth certificates, politicians were required to release their poems? College of the Sequoias English Professor Robert Vasquez postulates that we would have better candidates for public office if politicians took poetry writing classes. “When they do that, I guarantee you, they would become more caring about their fellow man and woman,” Vasquez said. “They would begin to realize the inanities of this asinine commitment to (party) platforms. They would become more individuals and they’d finally get back to the elements of what makes us human – loss and love, yearning, longing, loneliness. They would tap into not only the imagination and that child-like desire to create things, but they’d also begin to tap into what really matters to them, what is painful to them.” Poetry, like dreams, can be a way to bring buried hurts and problems to the surface and provide a way to work them out. “Poetry is one way to kind of right the world,” he said. “Or at least wake us up to be more aware of and more considerate of each other, to be aware of things like public policy – how you hurt the individual


literary arts L

spirit if you have public policies that make people feel terrible, that they don’t belong, that they don’t matter.” Vasquez recognized this while a student himself. As he took creative writing classes, he became more human, attempting to be a better human being. The more familiar he became with poetry, the more he utilized his imagination, tried to connect with other people and get in touch with the universal soul or spirit. He realized poetry makes people want to see the world more clearly and brings out a yearning to be connected. It also helps people feel that somehow everything is going to be okay, even if the world is ugly, because then they can make some sense out of that ugliness. They can find even the ugliness has a kind of attraction. “It’s an attraction that tells you, 'guess what? I’m normal,'” he said. “It is ugly, yes. It is terrible, but there is a reason why it exists. It’s all meant, hopefully, to make me appreciate the world that much more.” Vasquez was born in Madera to working class parents and raised in Fresno. He didn’t start out with an interest in poetry or other writing. But by the time he attended Fresno City College and took DeWayne Rail’s poetry class, he was hooked. So much so that he took the class three times, even though he would get no credit for the third session. Then came Fresno State and he couldn’t get enough of Phil Levine’s classes. “I probably hold the record for taking him,” he said. “I took his class five semesters. I used all my independent study with him. He was the one great teacher I had.” Vasquez was fortunate to have many other teachers who were only dwarfed by comparison to Levine. The one he puts closest to Levine’s pedestal was Derek Walcott, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1992. Vasquez studied under Walcott while a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford, after receiving his Master of Fine Arts from UC Irvine. Joseph Brodsky, a Russian émigré poet, was another of his outstanding instructors at Stanford. All of these teachers were very demanding in their workshops. “I always liked tough teachers,” he said. “But Phil, by far, was the harshest, the most demanding, but also the funniest, the most entertaining. I would just laugh and laugh in his class. He was being honest in his criticism, but he would always couch his criticism with humor. He has a wonderful sense of humor. I really enjoyed studying with him. He was just amazing.” Vasquez also appreciated the very different personality of Peter Everwine, another of the premiere poets at Fresno State during that time. His was a more subdued, more quiet, much more serious manner in the classroom. As a teacher himself, Vasquez said he tried at first to be harsh, but it didn’t work for him. “I felt like I was covered in blood,” he said. He toned down his criticism, still giving his opinion of students’ work, but using terms he hopes are less hurtful. While trying to find ways to help the students open up their imaginations, he realized that what he needed to do was help them improve their craft. By giving them situations they wouldn’t normally write about, having them use nouns for verbs, or inventing certain

characters to explore, he would force them to tap into their imagination, to start wondering what the characters will do or who they will meet, to take the students where they never dreamed they could go. “As adults we lose contact with our imagination,” said Vasquez. “Little kids get lost in their imagination. Creative writers are able to tap back into the imagination they had when they were kids. They can enter these worlds and make them seem just as real as the world around us. In fact, they are real worlds in terms of art, what each reader experiences in his or her mind.” Teaching helps him reinvigorate his own writing as well. He doesn’t try to rewrite students’ work, but reading it does make him think about how he would have written it. When Vasquez is telling students that they are taking the easy way out—using stereotypes, trite similes, or piecing poems and stories together mechanically— it reminds him to tell himself that so he can strengthen his own skills. “It’s a hard thing for writers to do,” he said. “To really be critical of what they are doing and not losing sight that they might be doing something they tell their students not to. They’re helping me to stay on that straight and narrow path.” This narrow path has brought Vasquez three Academy of American Poets prizes, three National Society of Arts & Letters awards, and a National Writers' Union award. At the Rainbow, his book of poems, won the San Francisco Foundation’s James D. Phelan Award. He was the inaugural judge for the Andrès Montoya Poetry Prize at Notre Dame. He also has published a chapbook, Braille for the Heart, and has had poems in numerous periodicals such as The Missouri Review, Ploughshares, and The New England Review, and anthologies including Highway 99, How Much Earth, and Latino Poets of the Nineties. He is working on expanding his chapbook into a book-length collection. Even with his work in a broad range of publications, Vasquez acknowledges the audiences for most of the journals are small. His poem, “Nocturne”, originally published in The Notre Dame Review, was exposed to a new, wider audience when it was featured online in Verse Daily. He also started a blog at http:// californiapoet.blogspot.com/, where he has written on such diverse topics as Trayvon Martin’s death, William Carlos Williams’ legacy, and a poem on the death of his dog, Brando. “All of a sudden the internet opens up so many more people who are readers,” Vasquez said. “I was getting emails from people who saw my poem. That’s when I realized the power of the internet.”

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H HOME TOUR

The Palacios Home

Generosity Cultivated at Home Text by Jordan Venema | Photos by Taylor Vaughn

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HOME TOUR H

PICTURED: The grand, formal living room is the first thing the eyes meet when walking into the Palacios' eclectic Clovis home. LIFEST YLE | OC TOBER 2012

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H HOME TOUR

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rior to buying their Clovis home in 2002, Jorge and Ursula Palacios were living in a small apartment in Los Angeles, while Jorge finished his medical residency. The family, including their children Rodrigo and Catherine, lived in a space no larger than their current kitchen and den. So when the Palacios saw the five-bedroom, four-bathroom home, their response was simply, “Whoa.” Jorge immediately knew they had found their home. “We were impressed right away, ” he said. Ursula admitted she then didn’t know what they would do with all the space, but it was not too long before they had their next three children—Melissa, Christine, and Christian—bringing their family’s number to a robust seven. The exterior front entrance of the single-storey home hints at an English garden, with its carpet-like lawns, birch trees and manicured box bushes. But both Jorge and Ursula immigrated to the United States from Peru – Jorge with his family when he was two years of age, and Ursula shortly after their marriage in 1991. Their personal histories have perhaps better prepared the Palacios to appreciate their home, which they consider a blessing and gift. Jorge’s family came to the States “to get a better life.” Ursula, too, described life in Peru as harder than here in the States. The “better life” the Palacios envisionsed has perhaps produced in them a generosity and sincerity that speak louder than any words. Their

hospitality may be a part of their Peruvian culture or the result of a life lived in gratitude, but whatever its cause, the Palacios have cultivated a life where their time and blessings are shared among themselves, as a family, and also with others. That sharing begins with the couple’s collaboration at home. “And that’s why you see a bit of everything,” said Jorge, referring to their home’s eclectic design and style. The home reflects both Jorge and Ursula’s tastes: icons of archangels and the Madonna hang next to portraits of the family; a replica of an Old-World pulpit from the Cathedral in Cusco, Peru (Ursula’s hometown), hangs in the dining room below a modern chandelier; Peruvian oil paintings and Disney figurines coexist throughout the home. That particular constant, the Disney memorabilia, “Well, that’s really the girls and me,” said Ursula laughing. Their eclectic, shared style is tied together and highlighted by a curious quality of their home: the home’s walls, ceilings and floors, its carpets and casings, even the piano and a small bust of Beethoven, all are various shades of white. These whites function throughout the home like a canvas, like a quiet backdrop for the vibrant colors of a painting. And because of this quiet backdrop, each detail in the home—the artwork and fabrics, the furnishings and knickknacks—stands out in relief, as though captured in a spotlight. ABOVE: A unique master bedroom in the Palacios home is hosts a elegant gold on both the curtains, artwork, and circular bed. An entire wall covered with mirror gives the appearance of a space double its actual size.

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H HOME TOUR

PICTURED: Spending time with the family is the Palacios family's favorite thing. When the weather is nice, they spend much of their time outdoors on their two-acre property, whether it's cooking in the outdoor kitchen, playing on the backyard basketball court, or jumping on the in-ground trampoline.

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HOME TOUR H “But if we have a theme that we like, it’s just crosses and couples,” said Ursula. Much of the home’s artwork depict couples or families holding each other. And hanging in clusters on the walls are collections of crosses. These two symbols reflect the two most important principles of the Palacio household: family and faith. One image physically represents the bond of a family, while the other symbolically suggests that bond, as a crossroads and conjoining of paths. By decorating their home with these symbols, the Palacios have surrounded themselves with reminders to cultivate their family. But the Palacios probably don’t need the reminders since, according to Jorge, “We just enjoy being together”—“a lot,” Ursula quickly added. Despite Jorge’s time-consuming job as an anesthesiologist at Kaweah Delta Medical Center, Ursula praises her husband for all the time he dedicates to the family. “He has friends and colleagues, but whatever he does he fits us in there. He takes us everywhere,” said Ursula. “If I had to congratulate myself for something that I did in my life, it’s for getting this father, this husband.” Much of the family’s time together is spent in the kitchen; Jorge barbeques while Ursula cooks dishes like Peruvian Ceviche. In the afternoons, the family lounges in the living room where Catherine, their 12-year-old daughter, sometimes practices on the piano. “Little pleasures,” the Palacios call them, the ability to spend time together. In the past year, Jorge’s schedule has become more regular, providing him more time to commit to his family, and both he and Ursula have taken on the task of home-schooling Catherine, who would like to become a doctor like her father. Catherine is already taking pre-medical coursework under her father’s instruction, in addition to her regular studies, weekly musical lessons, and gymnastic classes with the Fresno non-profit, Break the Barriers. Ursula and Catherine are also involved with the Fresno Rescue Mission’s weekly program and fellowship, Samaritan Women. The backyard, with its extended lawns and clusters of redwood trees, is the kids’ playground. They spend their summer days swimming in the pool, jumping on the groundlevel trampoline, and shooting hoops on the basketball court. In the past month, they built an aviary over a small koi pond, where Catherine enjoys doing her homework or reading among the chirps of the Zebra Finches. “Basically what we do when we stay here is stay with our kids,” said the parents. That is, homework, music, eating together, playing in the backyard. But when they aren’t here, in their Clovis home, they are in Visalia, where Jorge works for extended periods of time. For such weekend stretches, the family and their two dogs move into a hotel suite in downtown Visalia. Even when traveling for medical conferences, Jorge enjoys bringing his family. “I always take my family. Everywhere I go,” he said. And when the Palacios aren’t splitting their time between Clovis and Visalia, they are traveling to other countries for mission work and vacation. In June, the family spent a week in Dubai, and then two weeks in India, where they volunteered at an orphanage. Jorge, who knew he wanted to be a doctor since age two, also sees his profession as a potential mission field. “Hopefully,” he said, “in the near future I can put it to use.” Even Ursula, who is afraid at the sight of blood, plans to go to nursing school. “It’s something that God has put on my heart,” she said. They hope to set LIFEST YLE | OC TOBER 2012

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HOME TOUR H When asked what motivates the Palacios, Jorge points to a large mirror next to the front door. In the upper corner are printed the words, “As for me and my house we will serve the Lord.” To use their talents and gifts across the world at an orphanage in India, or to share a glass of wine with company, to open their home to guests for a benefit, or to dedicate their time to their children; “Whatever the means, to spread the gospel,” Ursula added. That it is their goal.

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up and support a medical clinic in rural Peru, a place that they could visit periodically. That goal is “always in the back of our minds,” said Jorge. But back in Clovis, the Palacios have set their eyes on sharing themselves with others in more immediate ways. In late November, Ursula and Jorge will open their home to guests for La Comida Guild’s Holiday Home Tour, a fundraiser for the Children’s Hospital of Central California. Their summer-white home will be transformed into a white winter wonderland: Christmas trees in every bedroom, decorations hanging from the ceiling, lights wrapped around every tree in the yard. The Palacios aren’t doing this to showcase their home, but to open their home for the sake of the community – a true sacrifice of time, energy and money.

PICTURED: The Palacios family of seven enjoy spending time together, especially in the kitchen. LIFEST YLE | OC TOBER 2012

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C CULINARY

Winter

Butternut Squash Lasagna with Bechamel Sauce (white sauce) BECHAMEL SAUCE

BUTTERNUT SQUASH

Ingredients: 4 T butter 4 T flour 4 C milk 1 C freshly grated parmigiano-reggiano 1 tsp nutmeg Salt and pepper to taste (I like white pepper)

Ingredients: Butternut squash Bunch sage leaves Oil for frying

Directions: In a medium saucepan, heat the butter until melted. Add the flour and stir over medium heat until it turns a light brown color, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the milk in a separate pan until just simmering. Add the hot milk to the butter mixture, a little at a time, whisking constantly until smooth. Add the parmesan and continue whisking until incorporated. Remove from heat, season with nutmeg, salt and pepper.

RICOTTA MIXTURE Ingredients: 1 lb ricotta 4 T flat leaf parsley 2 cloves garlic Directions: Combine ingredients in a medium bowl and set aside.

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Directions: Peel and slice the squash. I use a mandoline or V-slicer; it can be cut lengthwise or across. Heat oil in medium skillet. Fry the sage leaves and place on paper towel. Fry the slices of squash on each side until lightly browned and set on paper towels to drain oil.

ASSEMBLING THE LASAGNA Ingredients: 1 lb lasagna noodles, about 18 strips, cooked and cooled (or pasta sheets) 2 C shredded mozzarella Direction: Assemble in standard lasagna pan. Place noodles in pan to cover the bottom. Place squash in a single layer to cover the bottom. Crumble 1/3 of the sage leaves on top. Use 1/3 ricotta mixture, dotting the squash, 1/3 bechamel, and then sprinkle with 1/3 mozzarella. Place noodles on top and repeat this 3 times. (I drizzle a little olive oil on the last or top layer and sprinkle additional mozzarella and I like a little extra parmesan as well.) Bake, covered, at 350 degrees for approximately 40 minutes. Remove foil and continue baking an additional 10 or so minutes to brown the top. Let rest for 15 minutes before cutting into.


Vegetables

CULINARY C

Text by Elaine Dakessian | Photos by Taylor Vaughn

Tip: I spray a non-stick spray on the side of the foil that touches the lasagna. This prevents the cheese from sticking to the foil.

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C CULINARY

Blue Cheese Dip with Sweet Potato Chips Ingredients: 2 long, thin sweet potatoes, sliced on a V-slicer, mandoline, or with a sharp knife by hand (relatively thin) Oil for frying Coarse salt (kosher or sea salt will work fine) Directions: Heat oil in a heavy bottomed pan to approximately 360 degrees. Test one potato to make sure the oil is hot enough. Have a pan lined with paper towels and a slotted spoon or spider (a wide, meshed kitchen tool with a long handle) to scoop out the chips as they turn golden brown. Fry a handful at a time; don’t over crowd. Lay on paper towels and sprinkle with coarse sea salt.

BLUE CHEESE DIP Ingredients: 2 C mayonnaise 2 C sour cream 1 C crumbled blue cheese 2 T honey Chives to garnish Directions: Whisk all the ingredients together and garnish with chives. 36

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CULINARY C

Brussel Sprouts with Spiced Pecans SPICED PECANS

BRUSSEL SPROUTS (ONE POUND FEEDS FOUR)

Ingredients: 2 C pecan halves 1 T brown sugar 1 T melted butter 1 T rosemary 1 T kosher salt Âź tsp cayenne pepper

Ingredients: 4 slices thick cut bacon, applewood preferred Pecans, spiced Olive oil to toss Salt and pepper to taste Brussel sprouts

Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place the pecans on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven. Season the pecans with the sugar, butter, rosemary, salt, and cayenne pepper. Toss together until the pecans are coated. Return to the oven for 2 to 3 minutes more.

Directions: Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Have an ice bath ready before you blanche the brussel sprouts. Take a medium bowl, fill half way with water and add ice. Bring a medium saucepan of water to a boil. Trim end off brussel sprouts, add to water for 1 to 2 minutes, depending on the size. Remove and put in the ice bath immediately. Drain, let cool, and set aside. Cut bacon into lardons or wide pieces; thick cut is much better. (I even will buy my bacon unsliced and cut it into big cubes myself.) Brown the bacon in a small skillet. Drain on paper towels and set aside. Toss brussel sprouts with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and bake in a preheated oven for 20 to 30 minutes, until golden and cooked through. Remove and place in a bowl. Toss with bacon and spiced pecans. Drizzle with olive oil.

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C CULINARY

Braised Short Rib with Oven-Soft Polenta Serves 4 Ingredients: 8 boneless short ribs (have the butcher cut them wider and a bit longer to produce a 5-6 ounce rib) Olive oil 1 large yellow onion, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 2 celery ribs, chopped 2 cloves garlic 1 C decent quality port or you can use all red wine 1 C drinkable red wine, preferably something with body, a cabernet or zinfandel 2 T balsamic vinegar 4 sprigs fresh thyme 4 springs flat leaf parsley 6 C low sodium beef broth

Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Drizzle a large sautĂŠ pan with olive oil, about 3 to 4 tablespoons. Brown the short ribs on all sides. Be patient and get a nice sear on each side, it makes a difference. Remove from pan and set aside. In the same pan, turn down the heat to medium and add the onion, carrots and celery. Caramelize onions slowly for about 15 minutes, until the mire poix is golden brown. Add the garlic and continue for another 2 to 3 minutes. Add the port, wine, balsamic vinegar, thyme, and parsley. Turn the heat up to a boil. Reduce the liquid to about one half cup. When the braising liquid is almost gone, add the beef broth or stock. Place the short ribs in a roasting pan, pour the braising liquid over and seal with foil. Place in a 350 degree oven and bake for 2.5 hours. Remove from oven. Take the short ribs out of the roasting pan, place on a platter, and keep warm with foil. Strain the liquid and place on stovetop. Continue cooking the braising liquid until is thickens.

POLENTA Ingredients: 4 C chicken stock or low sodium chicken broth 1 C polenta 2 T butter 1 C good quality parmigianoregianno Thyme leaves Directions: Bring stock to a boil. With a whisk, slowly stir in the polenta, a little at time, incorporating completely before adding more. After you have added all the polenta and it starts to thicken, change to a wooden spoon. When it has reached a pudding consistency, remove from heat. Add the butter and parmesan. To plate, put polenta in the center, lean 1 to 2 short ribs against the polenta, and drizzle with thickened braising liquid. Garnish with thyme leaves.

Tip: I like to cook these the day before. I place the short ribs in a pan and the braising liquid in a bowl overnight. In the morning, you will be able to lift the congealed fat right off. It produces a richer tasting sauce without the greasy residue that is difficult to skim. To reheat, pour the liquid over and reheat for 30 minutes. Then follow the instructions above and reduce the braising liquid to thicken a bit. 38

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N NEXT GEN

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NEXT GEN N

next Gen:

Jeff McLaughlin I Text by Major Rogers | Photo by Taylor Vaughn

t's not hard to figure out what drew Battalion Chief Jeff McLaughlin to the profession of firefighting. “It runs in the family,” he said. McLaughlin is a third generation firefighter, and the youngest Battalion Chief working for the Tulare County Fire Department. At only 30 years of age, McLaughlin moved up the ranks, and assumed the position, tranfering over from his native Tehachapi, where he worked the seven years prior. There are eight Battalion Chiefs county wide, the next closest one in age to McLaughlin is 19 years his senior. However, with youth comes fresh ideas to be proposed and implemented, and that is what he plans on doing for the 21st century fire department. Chief McLaughlin is currently in charge of a standardizing committee. This is an important task in this day and age of fire fighting and prevention. Tulare County Fire district covers from the Kings to Inyo County. McLaughlin is in charge of 14 fire stations within the boundary. However, his committee has the goal of maintaining the same equipment standards at every station. When disaster strikes, it’s important to have all responders on the same page when it comes to equipment usage, so all hands can work together. With committees comes communication, which is the freeway of shared knowledge, the power source for all thriving agencies. When McLaughlin is asked of a memorable fire emergency, he brings up a large structure fire at an empty former True Value hardware store in Earlimart. The building was tied to several retail stores; McLaughlin said, “This fire had the potential to lose a set of buildings in the heart of the town. It would have been detrimental.” The surrounding businesses were spared. Along with powerful memories such as this, he also sights his enjoyment within his position as allowing him to “mentor” fire captains. To help them become better at their job, or to aid in their efforts of seeking advancement. Other factors he sites about his job as being enjoyable is

that every day can be a different day on the job. “There is a variety of stuff to do, lots of excitement,” said McLaughlin. He also sights what most who are attracted to the position say about what drew them in, “I enjoy working with and helping others.” Along with the exciting aspects of the job of firefighting, come the more mundane, but no less important administrative jobs. In a day and age of multiple services, you no longer only have a city fire department working, you have county, and state, and federal agencies pulling together to effectively combat fire emergencies. McLaughlin calls this “complicated power of engagement”, where multiple agencies respond to a disaster, and at some point the costs need to be distributed and assigned to different agencies, a tricky task in itself. Within mutual aid agreements, boundaries are drawn up on exactly who is responsible to be the first responders. When asked about the future of Tulare County Fire, McLaughlin has an answer. In three to six years, there will be a large number of retirements in management. “A big opportunity for promotions, which can bring change,” said McLaughlin of the wave of new blood that will be taking the helm of Tulare County Fire over the next half-decade. McLaughlin has a positive rapport with his co-workers. Lieutenant Jason Moule who has been involved with Tulare County Fire since 1998, speaks highly of the young Battalion Chief. “We enjoy working for Chief McLaughlin. He has a commanding presence, and he is definitely a team player,” says Moule of his supervisor. This is an important factor tied to the job of firefighting, team work here not only gets the job done, but may in fact save a co-worker, or member of the communities life. But then again, that’s just another day on the job of Tulare County Fire Department.

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T TRAVEL

Denali National Park and the Kenai Peninsula Text and Photos by Lisa McEwen

LEFT: An hour's worth of gold panning in Soldotna, Alaska yielded these pretty gold flakes. RIGHT: A clear and stunning view of Denali, or Mt. McKinley, from inside Denali National Park and Preserve. Denali is referred to "The High One" in native Athabaskan language.

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hen sharing our travel destination with friends and colleagues this summer, one question continually popped up: "Are you taking a cruise?" If there was ever a time I wished I had collected a dollar for each time that query was posed, this was it. I could have paid for my airline luggage fee. Though cruising Alaska is a popular way to experience the state's stunning scenery, our goal with this trip was to mix traditional sightseeing with off-the-beaten path adventures. After 10 days in "The Last Frontier," that's exactly what we got. This was a good balance for a varied group of travelers: my children, ages nine and 10; my husband, who marked his fourth trip to the 49th state; and my parents, Marvin and Sally Hansen, who had already taken a cruise to southern Alaska and were anxious to experience more of 42

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the state's natural wonders. Departing Fresno, our 12-hour, three-leg journey found us spending the night in Fairbanks, just 15 minutes from The North Pole. Promptly the next morning, we climbed aboard The McKinley Explorer for our train tour through the interior of Alaska on our way to Denali National Park and Preserve. This train ride on the famed Alaska Railroad, which at 470 miles long is the northernmost railroad in North America, was a welcome relief after the rigors of cramped airline travel. With its domed glass ceiling, excellent dining car, and a platform for taking in the sights and smells of the forested landscape, it definitely felt like we were on vacation. We feasted on local foods at breakfast including fresh Alaskan blueberries and, yes, reindeer sausage, which was literally a little tough for the kids to swallow.


TRAVEL T

Text by Marsha Roberts

Employees on the McKinley Explorer are often college students working their way through the summer; cooking in a mobile kitchen, offering facts and tidbits on tours, and leading the halfmillion tourists who visit Denali National Park and Preserve every year. Bartenders also serve up signature Alaskan drinks: the Alaskan Mosquito Bite (a tongue-in-cheek tribute to the unofficial state bird, made with vodka, orange juice, strawberry puree and pineapple juice), and the Moose Mary, dubbed the "best Bloody Mary south of the Brooks Range." A tour guide narrated much of the four-hour journey to the park's gate. On our way we were treated to a wealth of information about the boreal forest which covers much of inland Alaska, and a surprise fly-over by two Warthog jets on a training mission from

Joint Base Elmendorf-Fort Richardson, much to the delight of my son, who excitedly announced their presence from the deck with pink cheeks and windblown hair. We also spotted plenty of wildlife, including moose and eagles, from the luxurious full dome cabins. Denali National Park After bunking in "Alaska-style" chalets (read: spartan and cramped) in the seasonal resort town at the park's entrance, we dove into our 'Northern Exposure' adventure with a bus tour through the park. This was not a luxury vehicle (think school bus painted brown). Permits to enter the park are regulated, as the six million-acre park has a goal to "Keep Wildlife Wild."

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T TRAVEL

So most tourists hop on these buses at their hotels for tours of this vast wilderness. We chose a nine-hour wilderness tour and our experience lived up to its title. At first, sitting on a bus for so long made me wonder if we'd lost our minds—perhaps we should have opted for the four-hour ride—but we traveled so far to see this part of our nation that we had to give it a try. And so we were off on a 92-mile round-trip journey … on a dirt road. Maybe we had lost our minds. Within 20 minutes, our driver/guide showed us how well she can hit the breaks at the first animal sighting. There it was, a moose cow at 2 o'clock foraging in the bush. (To determine the gender of a moose, remember that females have no antlers). Bus riders are encouraged to yell out an animal sighting using a clock system. Once you hear a fellow passenger yell, my best advice is to brace yourself. Tour guides take their wildlife seriously. So seriously, in fact, that they pull out a video camera with an impressive zoom lens. Video is then fed into several small screens placed throughout the bus so everyone can get a good view of the animal. Bus drivers are often locals who live near Denali's park entrance year-round, and thus have an intimate knowledge of the park's ecosystems. Facts and figures are tossed about regularly. For example, 17 percent of the park is glaciated (that's 702,000 acres that is permanently frozen). Also, more than two million acres are under snow or ice year-round. Denali National Park and Preserve sits in a subarctic climate at a latitude of 63 degrees north. For this tour, however, we traveled through the lower valleys with the best habitats for viewing wildlife. The most exciting sightings were several bears, including black and grizzlies, who were munching on blueberries and soapberries. Caribou, eagles,

Dall sheep, and a fox also caused the bus to come to a bone-jarring halt. We were instructed to remain silent when viewing wildlife; park management encourages visitors to follow the motto: "Keep Wildlife Wild" to prevent the animals from becoming acclimated to the human presence. In fact, just a month after our return, a solo backpacker who didn't follow the rule of maintaining at least a half-mile distance while photographing a grizzly bear was fatally mauled by the bear. This was the first mauling in the park in more than 30 years. Back on the bus, our guide pointed out that though it was just the end of July, she could tell that autumn was quickly approaching by the amount of animals foraging. Winter is a bone-chilling six months long and starvation is a very real possibility for many animals. (By the time this article publishes, winter will be in its second month in Denali, while Visalians are still basking in 70 degree fall days.) With beautiful weather and clear skies, we were treated to an unprecedented view of the jewel of Denali National Park, Mt. McKinley, the tallest mountain in the United States and North America at 20,320 feet. Only one in three visitors sees the mountain – clouds often roll in, obscuring a full view. Still more than 55 miles away at one of our first stops, the snowcovered mountain loomed large and impressive. The mountain and the park share interchangeable names, but Alaskans prefer the native Athabascan name, Denali, which translates to "The High One." President William McKinley, for whom the mountain is named, never even visited Alaska. Because of fierce winters, park patrols are conducted with sled dog teams. Alaskan Huskies are magnificent animals, and we were lucky enough to visit the PICTURED: Matt McEwen, Alex McEwen and Marvin Hansen had a successful "boys day" fishing on the Kenai River with Jimmie Jack Fishing based in Kenai, Alaska.

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T TRAVEL kennels of four-time Iditarod champion Jeff King, who lives in the shadow of Denali. This two-hour tour started with every guest offered a puppy upon arrival; this is the socialization puppies need to become champion sled dogs. This moment was treasured by our children, as it provided a tactile reminder of our three dogs at home. King houses more than 70 dogs at his "Husky Homestead," and while the children played with the puppies, we were treated to a spirited speech by the champion, who affectionately called us "sissies" for needing modern conveniences such as beds and warm showers. We also got a first-hand look at his uniquely designed sled, race gear, and learned just how self-reliant one must be to survive 10 nearly-sleepless nights in the Alaskan wilderness with just a sled, a dog team, and a few supplies. Kenai Peninsula We made a lengthy but relaxing train journey to Anchorage, Alaska's capital, to pick up a car and balance our sightseeing with another of Alaska's famous activities: salmon fishing. In this case, my husband called upon the expertise of his cousin, Jimmie Drath, owner of Jimmie Jack Fishing, based along the banks of the world-renowned Kenai River, about three hours southwest of Anchorage. The salmon fishery here attracts thousands of fishermen from around the globe, often in July. These fishermen are in search of the majestic and sought-after king salmon, which travel from the Pacific Ocean upriver to their spawning grounds every year. Later in the summer, silver, pink, coho, and steelhead salmon follow suit. With Jimmie's 20-plus years of experience, he guided "the boys" on a day trip to the middle of the Kenai River, where they came home with a bounty of 14 silver and red salmon, and were then dropped off at a local fish processor and packaged for the trip back to California. We also booked a half-day charter for the entire family, during which my daughter reeled in a fish that was half as long as she is. The smile on a child's face when hooking such a fish is priceless! Many tourists and business owners noticed the slow return this summer of the salmon, which affected everyone's catch. Coming from the farming-rich Valley, it is similar to having a slow start to the tree fruit season, for example. This trip, we had to work a little harder and wait a little longer, but we did enjoy incredibly fresh salmon for dinner a few nights. In between fishing, we took in many of the other activities available along the Kenai Peninsula, including gold panning and a day trip to Homer, the halibut capital of the world. Homer is commonly known as the location from which boats from the television show "Deadliest Catch" start their adventures. At the farmer's market there, the phrase, "Everything is bigger in Alaska," rang true at the sight of huge dahlias, carrots, and cabbages. With such a short growing season, produce here seem to know to take advantage of sunlight and “warm" temperatures. TOP: A moose grazes in Denali National Park and Preserve. MIDDLE: Veronica's Coffee House in Old Town Kenai, Alaska, is a beautiful and historical spot to enjoy a steaming cup of coffee or a healthy lunch. Huge delphiniums are examples of the colorful flowers that decorate many Alaskan businesses. BOTTOM: One of the more than 70 Alaskan huskies who make their home near Denali National Park and Preserve as part of Iditarod champion Jeff King's dog sled team.

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Home, sweet home Returning home to the Valley's 100-plus temperatures felt good (for a few days, anyway) after the cloudy, nippy 50-degree weather along the river. With our suitcases unpacked and photos downloaded, we began to appreciate the wonderful family memories made during our journey. And within a day of our arrival, a giant ice chest landed on our porch, harboring our beautiful, fresh salmon. Talk about knowing where your dinner comes from!


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C CHARITY

Soirée d'Elegance:

A Visalia Rotary Community Foundation Benefit

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t was simply an exquisite evening in every way. Just days before, temperatures in the triple digits suddenly cooled as if ordered by event organizers. Glamour filled the canopies – ladies in satin and sequins, gentlemen in tuxedos and suits; it was clear everyone expected to have a wonderful time, and Visalia Rotary Community Foundation’s Soirée d’Elegance delivered on that expectation. Wines provided by the Wagner Family of Wine and Caymus Vineyards flowed generously – each specially paired, by Chuck Wagner himself, with the array of handcrafted Bravo Farms cheeses. On the green at the home of Eric and Kathy Shannon, guests mingled and laughed, bid on silent auction items and viewed art on display, while musicians entertained with soothing, classical sounds. Already the perfect evening, yet the best was still to come. Inside the dining room, guests were seated at tables beautifully decorated and adorned with several wine glasses. An absolutely fabulous culinary event, The Vintage Press prepared a meal eliciting raves from across the room. Served with the salad course, baby iceberg with balsamic vinaigrette pears, toasted pecans, and dried cranberries, was a 2011 Mer Soleil Silver Unoaked Chardonnay. Dinner, roast filet with cognac and mustard, whole roasted baby pumpkin, spicy soft polenta and french green beans, included a vertical tasting of three Caymus wines; 1986, 1997, and 2007 Special Selection Cabernet Sauvignon. Cabernet and Caymus are synonymous among wine lovers everywhere. But the highlight of the evening was the amount of money raised that goes back into the community. Although the final numbers have not yet been tallied, since 1991 VRCF has donated more than $1 million to enhance programs and services, and to provide assistance in the development of individuals who show they are capable of helping themselves. To "put a cork in it", the evening was a roaring success. A success for all of those who organized and implemented the event, but most importantly a true success for our community as the good work that will benefit from the outpouring of support for this evening is sure to be seen throughout our city.

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Janet Thomas and Chuck Wagner

Mike and Sheri Jefferis


CHARITY C

Gene and Dru Quesnoy

Eric and Kathy Shannon

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P PERFORMANCES Text By Marsha Peltzer

TULARE COUNTY SYMPHONY MASTERWORKS SERIES New and Old World “Mash up” November 17 | 7:30 p.m. | Visalia Fox Theatre Rachmaninoff, Piano Concerto #2, Dvorak, New World Symphony

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re you curious about the title of this second Masterworks Series concert, especially the phrase “Mash Up”? Maestro Bruce Keisling stated, “They are words that have been around now for a couple of years, and means an arrangement that combines two songs, usually quite different. So I was using the term loosely describing a concert of somewhat unrelated pieces, old and new.” Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. Rachmaninoff is widely considered one of the finest pianists of his day, and as a composer, one of the last great representatives of Romanticism in Russian classical music. Early influences of Tchaikovsky, RimskyKorsakov and other Russian composers gave way to a tonal palette of rich, distinctive orchestral colors. The piano is featured prominently in Rachmaninoff’s compositional output. At age 14, he moved to Moscow to study with Nikolai Averev in his home. He showed great skill in both piano and composition. As a teenager, he met the composer Tchaikovsky who became an important mentor and commissioned Sergei to arrange a piano transcription of the suite from his ballet, “The Sleeping Beauty”, thereby launching his brilliant career. The sudden death of Tchaikovsky in 1893 was a great blow to young Rachmaninoff. His compositions thereafter revealed the depth and sincerity of his grief in an overwhelming aura of gloom. After the disastrous premier of his first symphony, he fell into a deep depression which kept him from composing for three years. Intensive auto-suggestive therapy with the famous Dr. Dahl followed. The doctor would quietly intone words over and over: “You will begin to write your concerto,” and, “You will work with great facility,” and, “The concerto will be of excellent quality.” Soon Rachmaninoff did begin composing again. The works moved very quickly and the result was the enormously popular second piano concerto, which Rachmaninoff premiered with the Moscow Philharmonic, where he was the soloist. Even after the composition of the legendary third piano concerto, the composer preferred and requested to perform the second whenever possible. The third movement of the concerto contains a sweeping second theme, which was adapted for the popular song “Full Moon and Empty Arms” in 1946.

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Andrew Tyson, soloist for the concerto, is an upcoming young pianist who is rapidly emerging as a distinctive and intriguing musical voice. An experienced and versatile performer in both solo and chamber recitals, Tyson was hailed by the Philadelphia Inquirer as a pianist “whose tone covered everything from sensitive to brawny.” He has appeared worldwide and is the recipient of numerous awards. His style will undoubtedly enhance the popular Rachmaninoff concerto. Dvorak’s Symphony From the New World is considered by many to be his love letter to America. Andrew Tyson Born to an amateur musician in 1841, Dvorak displayed his musical gifts on the fiddle at an early age. In his teens, Dvorak was sent to Prague for a fundamental musical education. There, he was inspired by the music of Smetana, and particularly the composer’s use of Bohemian folk songs and rhythmic idioms in his music. He spent the early part of his career writing orchestra tone poems, many inspired by local folklore. Gradually, however, enamored with the music of Western Europe (especially the great romantics), he composed works in traditional forms, including symphonies. In the 1890s, Dvorak spent three years in America as director of the National Conservatory of Music in New York City. He traveled extensively and studied a great deal of indigenous music, especially Native and African-American folk songs. His compositions from this period include music inspired by the wealth of musical material in America; as a result, Dvorak composed his ninth symphony, From the New World. Arranged in a rather traditional symphonic form, the symphony is clearly influenced by American idioms. Many of the themes of the different movements will remind the audience of favorite American pieces such as, “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,” and the second movement features the theme of the popular spiritual, “Goin’ Home.” Music Director Keisling will further enlighten the audience about the different and varied movements of this exceptional symphony at his preconcert discussion at 6:45 p.m. For tickets and more information, call the Tulare County Symphony Office at (559) 732-8600. Corrections from September 2012 article: November concert is November 17, 2012; March concert is March 2, 2013.


PERFORMANCES P

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C CHAMBER

De a

s R e d Cr o s Americ an athleen Remill ard K ana and nna S ald

Visalia Rescue Mis sion Danny Lit tle and Nanc y Anthony

Peter Perkins Blair and Kristi Jensen (owners) with their kids, Kahlia, Tyler, and Lyla.

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CHAMBER C

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C CHAMBER

rden S ecr e t G a aya Johnnie M d n A i t t a P (o w n e r s )

Capell a Coffee House Jennifer Brisco, Kara Unger (owner), and Co

lette Bole y

Ca Communications Jesenia Calderon and er) Angie Calderon (own

Women's Club Mixer Becky Heaton, Rosemary Hellwig, and Sar a DeJager

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Sequoia Community Corps ip and Teresa Guzman Blankensh Sandy


CHAMBER C

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C CHAMBER

sal Exhibit Pena’s Dispo es r tu en V g A erpoel III nd Pete Vand a es u g o N a Lind

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AT T E N T I O N

TULARE COUNTY PHOTOGRAPHERS

Raise Magazine is looking for cover photo submissions.

What kind of photos?

• Children (ages 5-15), or children with pet • Single children only; no group or family photos • Vertical format Please submit high-quality, electronic files only. Email photos to Bridget@dmiagency.com (Photos are free to submit but submission does not guarantee placement.)

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h happenings

Springville Apple Festival For the 32nd year, Springville welcomes all to enjoy this annual event. The Apple Festival is filled with craft booths, music, clowns, kids’ games, carnival rides, and of course, apples! When: Oct. 20 & 21, 7a-5/4p Where: Springville Veterans Park, Springville Contact: 539-0619

Theater & Performances

OCT 20

The Kingston Trio In 1957, The Kingston Trio emerged from San Francisco's North Beach club scene to take the country by storm, bringing the rich tradition of American folk music into the mainstream for the first time. During the late 50s & early 60s, the Trio enjoyed unprecedented record sales and worldwide fame, while influencing the musical tastes of a generation. When: Oct. 20, 7p Where: Fox Theatre, 300 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: 625-1369 Hansel and Gretel the Opera Visalia Opera Company presents Hansel & Gretel, the Opera. When: Oct. 20, 7p; Oct. 21, 2p Where: Main Street Theatre, 307 E. Main St., Visalia Contact: www.visaliaoperacompany.org

OCT 26 OCT 27 NOV 3 58

What Would Jefferson Say? A founding fathers take on the 2012 Election, featuring Thomas Jefferson, played by Clay Jenkinson. Jenkinson is one of the most sought-after humanities scholars in the United States. He is a cultural commentator who has devoted most of his professional career to public humanities programs. When: Oct. 26, 7p Where: Fox Theatre, 300 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: 625-1369 Twilight Park’s Nashville Challenge They’ve rounded up 10 rising stars of country music, straight from Nashville, to compete on the big stage in Twilight Park for cash and prizes! Watch these talented artists battle it out for first place. Headlining band is The Farm. Tickets: $55. When: Oct. 27, 12p Where: Twilight Park, 1099 W. Ropes Ave., Woodlake Contact: 1-800-GO-TWILIGHT B.B. King His reign as King of the Blues has been as long as that of any monarch on earth. Yet B.B. King continues to wear his crown well. Come and enjoy his timeless music on Main Street. When: Nov. 3, 7:30p Where: Fox Theatre, 300 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: 625-1369

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NOV 9 NOV 10

The World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra The World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra is the most popular and sought after big band in the world today for both concert and swing dance engagements. When: Nov. 9, 7p Where: Fox Theatre, 300 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: 625-1369 Visalia’s Most Talented A talent competition for any Visalia Unified student performer (solo or group). Proceeds to benefit the Visalia Education Foundation in support of grants and scholarships for the performing arts and classrooms in Visalia. When: Nov. 10, 2p Where: L.J. Williams Theatre, 1001 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: www.visaliaef.org

Art Exhibits Near and Far: Landscapes by Japanese Artists; Rotation 1: Imagination of Nature This rotation focuses on works by Japanese painters that feature fictitious landscapes. It introduces to the visitor not only the principles of landscape painting in Japan, but also the concept of creating an ideal landscape and its role within the art of painting. When: Sept. 2 – Dec. 22 Where: The Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, 15770 Tenth Ave., Hanford Contact: 582-4915 the Whey (way) n. to center A major solo exhibition, which will unveil the latest work from Amie Rangel. When: Oct. 3 – 27; Reception: Oct. 5, 6-8p Where: Arts Visalia, 214 E. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: 739-0905 Granite Territory: Solo Exhibition by Jane Ziegler A solo-exhibition of drawings and paintings of the Sierra Nevada by artist Jane Ziegler. An avid horsewoman, Ziegler takes annual summer pack trips into the Kings Canyon backcountry, hauling paper and canvas along the way. When: Oct. 31 – Nov. 30 Where: Arts Visalia, 214 E. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: 739-0905


happenings H

NOV 3

First Saturday Food, fun and fabulous art. Every 1st Saturday of the month, the artists, restaurants and merchants of Three Rivers open their doors and invite you to join in a town-wide celebration. You can pick up a map and schedule at Anne Lang's Emporium or the Historical Museum – the flier shows all participating venues, art to see, locations and times for special events. When: Nov. 3, 10a-5p Where: Anne Lang’s Emporium, 41651 Sierra Dr. (CA 198), Three Rivers Contact: Nadi Spencer, 561-4373 or www.1stSaturdayTR.com

Diversions & Excursions Vossler Farms Cornmaze and Pumpkin Patch The cornmaze and pumpkin patch are open through the end of October. The cornmaze is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays but your family can still enjoy the pumpkin patch every day of the week. Come out for fun and Halloween memories! When: Open Sept. 22 – Oct. 31 Where: Vossler Farms, S. Mooney Blvd., Visalia Contact: 888-528-1724

OCT 20

Healthy Visalia Festival Bring the family out for a fun-filled day of entertainment, music, prizes, family activities, informational booths, health screenings, and much more! When: Oct. 20, 1-4p Where: Riverway Sports Park, 3611 N. Dinuba Blvd., Visalia Contact: www.healthyvisalia.com Tales from the Tomb Local professional actors dressed in period costume, will portray early-day Tulare County pioneers who repose in the Visalia Cemetery. Don't miss this annual living-history event and graveyard walking tour sponsored by the Tulare County Historical Society. $15 Adults; $7.50 children age 11-15; under 10 free. When: Oct. 20, 10a-1p Where: Visalia Cemetery Chapel, W. Goshen & N. Giddings Contact: Dallas Pattee, 591-3878; Twila Cruzen 732-2581

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559.734.2436 559.936.1260

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h happenings

Halloween at Crystal Cave Join Sequoia Natural History Association's team of experienced cave naturalists for a day of spooky Halloween fun at Crystal Cave. This special one-hour long tour will stop in beautiful cave rooms and along the way we'll meet the "ghosts" of Crystal Cave's past. Participants must be 8 years old or older, and tickets must be purchased at either the Foothills or Lodgepole Visitor Centers in Sequoia National Park. When: Oct. 27 & 28, 11a; 1p; 3p Where: Crystal Cave, Sequoia National Park Contact: 565-3759 or www.sequoiahistory.org

Clay Monoprint Art Workshop In this two-day workshop, attendees learn the basics of clay-printing, an innovative, new monotype technique. This art form is limited solely by your imagination: the design, colors, and possibilities are endless. $165 for Arts Alliance members $215 for non-members $30 materials fee. Lunch on both days is included in registration. When: Oct. 20 & 21, 10a-4p Where: Saint Anthony Retreat, Three Rivers Contact: 561-4671 or http://artsalliance.wordpress. com/workshop2012-marthacastillo/

OCT 21 OCT 27 OCT 29

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NOV 10

Armenian Shish-Kebab Luncheon St. Mary Armenian Church of Yettem presents the 4th Annual Sunday Shish-Kebab Luncheon. Take a break from cooking and enjoy an Armenian meal that features Richard Hagopian’s delicious shishkebab. When: Oct. 21, 11a-3p Where: Visalia Veterans Memorial Building, corner of Center and Willis Contact: 936-2227 Spooky Sprint 5K Run/Walk The Spooky Sprint offers fun and excitement to participants of all ages. Showcase your Halloween spirit and wear your favorite costume. Costume awards will be given. Refreshments, Halloween goodies and awards will be awaiting participants at the finish line. The Kids’ Fun Run will be prior to the 5K run. When: Oct. 27, 7a Where: Plaza Park, Plaza Drive & Airport Road, Visalia Contact: www.healthyvisalia.com 20th Annual Taste Treats in Tulare The Tulare Historical Museum presents this highly anticipated food-tasting extravaganza featuring the area’s finest restaurants and caterers. Tickets: $45. When: Oct. 29, 6-8:30p Where: Heritage Complex International Ag-Center, 4500 S. Laspina St., Tulare Contact: 686-2074 or www.tularehistoricalmuseum.org

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AfterCHOICE Symposium Come learn how you can help others to get to the root of their emotional hurts and find healing from the trauma of abortion at this one-day seminar. Featuring David C. Reardon, Ph.D., whose work has been to promote a pro-woman/pro-life choice approach to the abortion issue; and Chaplain Don and Sandy White share from a personal experience how the complicated grief and forbidden pain of abortion affects the whole family dynamic. Tickets $30/person; lunch included. When: Saturday, November 10; 9a-4p Where: First Christian Church, 1023 n. Chinowth, Visalia Contact: (559) 732-5000; diane@theIRMAnetwork. org; www.theIRMAnetwork.org Visalia Farmers’ Market – Harvest of the Valley Weekly event open to the public featuring free live music, kids’ activities, cooking demonstrations and local, fresh produce available for purchase. The market also accepts EBT and WIC. When: Saturdays, 8-11:30a Where: Sears parking lot at Mooney and Caldwell, Visalia Contact: 967-6722 or www.visaliafarmersmarket.com

Charitable Events

OCT 20

Justice Run The Tulare County District Attorney’s office hosts their second annual domestic violence awareness run with a 5K run and 1-mile walk. All proceeds go to Family Services of Tulare County and the Central California Family Crisis Center. When: Oct. 20, 8a Where: Mooney Grove Park, Visalia Contact: 636-5471 or www.da-tulareco.org/justicerun.htm


happenings H

OCT 20 OCT 27

Throwback to Fashion “Everything Old is New Again” at this year’s Lions Club fashion show. Apparel will be provided by Chelsea Street Boutique and Dress Barn. Attendees can enjoy no-host cocktails and lunch before the show. All proceeds support local charities and scholarships. When: Oct. 20, 11:30a Where: Lamp Liter Inn, 3300 W. Mineral King Ave., Visalia Contact: 733-1483 Fall Wine Cornucopia The Cornucopia brings San Joaquin Valley wines, gourmet foods, renowned local artists and the people of our Valley together to celebrate the goodness that comes from our fields. The festivities include wine tasting, grape stomping, cooking demonstrations, wine-by-the-bottle sale, entertainment and live music. All proceeds support non-profit activity in the San Joaquin Valley. When: Oct. 27, 2-6p Where: Chukchansi Park, Downtown Fresno Contact: www.idrinkwine.net

Make a Difference Day Help make a difference in Tulare County this Make a Difference Day. This day of philanthropy and activities was started by USA Weekend in 1992 as way to get people involved in improving their communities. When: Oct. 27, 8a Where: Various locations Contact: 713-4384 or www.liveandplayvisalia.com

NOV 2

Earth, Moon & Sun How do the Earth, Moon and Sun work together as a system and what is the myth and science behind it? Why does the Sun rise and set? Why do we see different constellations during different seasons? What is an eclipse? Learn about the Moon's phases and orbit. Explore past and future space travel to our moon and beyond. When: Nov. 2, 7p Where: Pena Planetarium, 2500 W. Burrel Ave., Visalia Contact: Impact Center 737-6334 or www.tcoe.org/impactcenter

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h happenings

NOV 10

Run for HOPE The Visalia Rescue Mission is teaming up with the Central Valley Roadrunners running team to organize this First Annual RUN FOR HOPE. It will consist of a 10k race, a 2-mile race and a 2-mile walk along the St. John’s River Trail. The event promotes community health and fitness; with the proceeds benefitting the Visalia Rescue Mission. When: Nov. 10, 7a Where: Cutler Park, Visalia Contact: cvroadrunners@gmail.com or 362-2722.

Event Listings If you would like to have your event considered for a free listing in our “Happenings” section, please email your submission to lifestyle@dmiagency.com or fax to 738-0909, Attention Happenings. Please note, we do not guarantee listing of any submission. Submissions are due six weeks prior to publication.

Writers & Readers Tulare County Library First Tuesday Book Club (Nov. 6, 6:30p) Socrates Cafe (Nov. 13, 6:30p) Mystery Readers (Nov. 21, 6:30p) Where: Tulare County Library, 200 W. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: 713-2700 or www.tularecountylibrary.org

MAGAZINE

Direct Magazine is direct mailed monthly into 33,000 upper-middle, middle, and lower-income homes in Visalia. Inserted into the magazine is a Coupon Tab that has valuable coupon offers each month. CULTURE, COMMERCE, AND COMMUNITY IN VISALIA AND TULARE — THE HEART OF THE SOUTH VALLEY

MAGAZINE

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October 2012  

Style, Art, Culture and Events of the South Valley.

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