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STYLE, ART, CULTURE, + EVENTS OF THE SOUTH VALLEY DECEMBER 2017

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EPICURE

HOME TOUR

A TWIST ON TRADITION

THE CLINE HOME Adaptations from Hearst Castle.

From prime rib to candied Brussels, it’s a holiday meal fit for royalty.

32

8 Letter from the Executive Editor 10 Word Play 12 Reflections of Visalia: Visalia's Tragic Building Boom

TRAVELER'S TREK

HOLIDAYS AND HYGGE IN COPENHAGEN

38

Hygge, the feeling of warmth, welcome and tradition.

16 Fashion: By Invitation Only 18 Literary Art: Louise A. Jackson 48 Holiday Spirits: Gather Around the Glass 52 Faces + Places: Soup, Sip & Shop 54 Faces + Places: BGC Social Swirl 56 Happenings

SEASONAL

CHRISTMAS — WHAT'S IN A NAME? Tracing its origins back to the beginning.

44 4 LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

COVER: The backyard of the Cline home is a unique mix of landscape styles surrounded by lush grounds anchored by a gazebo. TOP: The Cline’s continue the home’s Christmas spirit flows to the patio and backyard with the life-sized Nutcracker and adorable train.


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For Such a Time Boutique Franey's Design Center Fugazzis Glick's and Co. ImagineU Children’s Museum Janeen’s Furniture Gallery Kaweah Delta Hospital Keller Williams Reality Max's Cookies Metropolis Day Spa Michael's Custom Jewelry Monét’s, Exeter Pacific Treasures Premier Medical Clinic Renaissance Salon Sage Salon Salon 525

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Visalia Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and is distributed via direct mail to nearly 13,000 homes in the upper-middle and high-income neighborhoods in Visalia. An additional 2,500 copies are distributed at various distribution points around Visalia, Tulare, and Exeter. Views expressed in columns are those of the columnist and not necessarily those of DMI Agency or its advertisers. Circulation of this issue: 15,500 © 2017 DMI Agency

6 LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017


FR O M TH E

EDITOR

D

ecember — the most wonderful time of the year. Starting in January, countless numbers of people anticipate December’s arrival and anxiously await everything this beautiful month offers. Many find December filled with compassion and forgiveness, extra time with family, beautifully wrapped presents, and streets lined with bright lights. Whether it’s cozy fires, watching old movies, or hearing Christmas music in every store, this time of year is the perfect time to show others you care.

neighboring communities are full of local merchants and restaurants ready to help you find that perfect experience or gift. Many of these merchants can be found inside Lifestyle, and we hope you will support them this holiday season. By shopping local, not only do you find great service and gifts, but you are also helping a mom and pop who more than likely work long hours, forego vacations, and spend their dollars in our own community. Holiday food spares no calories. Life is short, and it is okay to splurge a little. We

Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, or in another way, we hope December offers you a time to love others, to be kind to others, and to know that there are others who care about you. E X E C U T I V E

E D I T O R

K A R E N

T E L L A L I A N

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT A STORY IDEA, CONTACT ME AT KAREN@DMIAGENCY.COM

Here are a few other things that get us excited around here about December, and ways to help you get ready for what lies ahead. Decorating for the holidays. Every year we are amazed at the beautifully decorated homes we run across for Lifestyle, and we’re not just talking about the Christmas trees. This month be sure and check out the Cline home, starting on page 22. From the gazebo outside, to the home's interior, this home will help you get in the holiday spirit. Christmas activities. If you’re looking for something to do, check out our Happenings pages, beginning on page 56. Lights galore. Have you been down Visalia’s Main Street at night? The tree-lined street is lit up with little white lights, and a simple walk downtown is a sure way to make you realize there really is something special about where we live. Whether dining, shopping, or looking for a little romance, it’s all happening on Main Street. Holiday sales and gifts for giving. During the holidays, and any time of year really, remember to shop local. Our town and our

8 LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

are very proud of and grateful for all of our culinary experts who contribute their talents to Lifestyle each and every month. But, our December issue is always a little something extra, and the drinks on pages 48 and 50 give a new meaning to the words “holiday spirits.” For ideas about an exceptional holiday meal, “A Twist on Tradition" on page 32 will impress even the greatest of foodies. The real meaning of Christmas. Christmastime easily reminds us of what is most important in life. It is also a time to remember why we celebrate. This month “Christmas – What’s in a Name?” on page 44 takes us back to the origins of Christmas and the deeper meaning behind the holiday. Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, or in another way, we hope December offers you a time to love others, to be kind to others, and to know that there are others who care about you. Merry Christmas and Seasons Greetings!


T E X T

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WO R D PLAY News on writing, books + the world of publishing

L

et books take you around the world this holiday season to experience many ways of celebrating. The National Geographic series, Holidays Around the World, does just that. Out this September is a new edition of Celebrate Kwanzaa by Carolyn B. Otto. This African-American holiday takes place over seven days. Candles, music, dance and feasts bring families and communities together. The books are aimed at six- to nine-year-olds. Other books in the series include Hanukkah, Chinese New Year, Christmas, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Thanksgiving. Birthdays Around the World by Margriet Ruurs and Ashley Barron (Kids Can Press, September) describes different birthday customs, such as purple pudding in Peru and chair-lifting in Latvia. The book is suggested for four- to eight-year-olds. A World of Cookies for Santa (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, October) by M.E. Furman gets your sweet tooth craving cornstarch cookies from the Philippines, honey spice cookies from Russia, and even sweet potato cookies from Malawi. Recipes for some cookies are included. The book is geared toward four- to seven-year-olds, but can be enjoyed by cookie lovers anywhere. VALLEY WRITERS Beth Cato, who grew up in Hanford and was a Nebula finalist last year, has a new collection published last month by Fairwood Press, a small company specializing in speculative fiction. Red Dust and Dancing Horses and Other Stories includes poetry as well as stories about steampunk horses, colonies on Mars, and toilet gnomes. Also out this year, from Harper Voyager, is Cato’s latest novel, Call of Fire, a sequel to Breath of Earth. Ingrid 10 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

is a geomancer who flees the 1906 San Francisco earthquake which was caused by her father. She and her friends are sought for their powers and may become the cause of an eruption of Mt. Rainier. In Breath of Earth, Ingrid is attempting to prevent the earthquake that will release energy to evil masterminds.

Cato’s first novel, The Clockwork Dagger, published in 2014, was followed quickly by more stories of the healer Octavia and her friends: The Deepest Poison (a prequel), The Clockwork Crown, Wings of Sorrow and Bone, and Final Flight. Cato is also the author or contributing author of Deep Roots, A is for Apocalypse, and Clockwork Phoenix 5. All these books were published between September 2014 and November 2017, but that is not all. In a definite departure from steampunk, sci fi and fantasy, in October, Cato published Bready or Not: Sweet Maple Cookbook. SELF-PUBLISHING To self-publish or not to self-publish, that is the question faced by many (if not most) authors who get fed up with rejections or no responses at all from the publishing industry.

Google “Xlibris reviews” and look for “Mrs. D’s Blog – What I learned about self-publishing with Xlibris” to read an excellent description of one woman’s experiences in the land of the vanity press, along with similar experiences from many of her commenters. While the vanity press has always had a bad reputation (even television’s fictional 1930s-era JohnBoy Walton learned that the hard way), newer print-on-demand (POD) services such as Amazon’s CreateSpace require diligent effort on the part of the do-it-yourself author-publisher to produce a quality product. Most authors need a crew of talented friends or hired help to root out errors and aid in editing and design. Even artistic authors such as Sylvia Ross (East of the Great Valley) and Adrienne Peterson (The Willow Basket) seek advice from others. Do-it-yourself authors enjoy creative control over their books and reduce costs. While vanity publishers often charge an upfront cost of thousands of dollars, and throw in unexpected additional charges, authors who do it all themselves can get their book in print for almost nothing (if you don’t count blood, sweat and tears). POD also offers the advantage that books can be changed. Both Adrienne and Sylvia discovered, after the first printings of their books, there were parts they wished to revise. Check out “What Does Self-Publishing Cost: DIY” at www.thebookdesigner.com for an example of what costs might be involved. THE LAST WORD “It's like your children talking about holidays, you find they have a quite different memory of it from you. Perhaps everything is not how it is, but how it's remembered.” – Denis Norden (1922 - )


F R O M

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Y O U R S .

Happy Holidays 2 0 18 1 2 1 4 E M A I N S T. , V I S A L I A | 7 3 3 - 9 6 0 0 | W W W. E D D E N A S V I S A L I A . C O M

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The ornate Seligman-Larkins building on Church Street can be seen in the center of this photo. Notice the old Bank of America (now Bank of the Sierra) building in the background. C. 1960

VISALIA'S TR AGIC BUILDING BOOM

B

y the latter part of the 19th Century, Visalia had many substantial buildings, like the ornate Tulare County Courthouse, the stately Palace Hotel, and the towering Harrell building. But in 1898, despite this impressive inventory, the Visalia Daily Times was quick to remind everyone that there were still “a number of old fire-trap frame buildings” around town. So when Emil Seligman and Elwood “E. O.” Larkins announced in early December of that year that they were both going to construct fancy new brick buildings, the community was pleased Visalia was going to get another architectural upgrade. Seligman, a successful Dinuba businessman, and Larkins, a wellrespected Visalia attorney, hired Visalia architect L. E. McCabe to draw up their plans, and they selected T. B. Craycroft to be the builder. The plan for their respective commercial projects was to build them side-by-side on the west

side of Church Street between Main and Center. The lots were ideal as they were in the middle of the busy commercial trade area. But despite the perfect spot, construction was going to be tricky, as Mill Creek ran through the site. By December 15, 1898, bricklayers were working on the foundations and the support arch spanning the creek. As workers were building the walls, concerns surfaced about the quality of the construction and the materials used. The walls seemed weak, in fact, so weak that McCabe ordered several walls from the two buildings plus the arch to be taken down. On January 5, workers were preparing to dismantle the defective construction. At the same time, more bricks were delivered and stacked on the newly laid floor of the Seligman building, directly over the doomed arch. At 8 a.m. the next day as the work crew began taking down the brick walls, catastrophe struck. The wall, floor and arch of the Seligman building T EXT

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collapsed and crashed into Mill Creek. The noise sounded like an explosion. Bricks and timbers tumbled into the creek bed, burying workers in the debris. The sound of the collapse and the cries and moans from the injured workmen attracted attention, and impromptu rescue efforts began. Two workmen, Harry Hughes and George Harris, suffered the most serious injuries. When Hughes was dug out of the rubble, he was found doubled up with his head between his legs and covered with blood. Harris’ head was in the water and he was barely conscious. Russell Keeler and George Fry only had minor injuries as they jumped clear of most of the falling debris, but Elmer Waits fractured both legs. John Bernhard, a carpenter, heard the ominous cracking sound that came before the collapse, and he jumped to safety. The injured men were taken to various places for treatment. Hughes,


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The beautiful Seligman-Larkins building was completed in 1899. C 1960

clearly the most serious, was taken to the Visalia House, a short distance away from the scene. He languished in pain with compound bone fractures, a broken collarbone, a crushed chest, and bruised face and head. He lingered for six hours, but his mangled body could not respond. At about 2:30 p.m. he was pronounced dead. Fortunately, all the other workers survived the ordeal. Hughes was a popular young man in Visalia. He was born in England, then became a US citizen and lived in Visalia with his wife and small child. His funeral service was held at the Visalia Cemetery, officiated by his lodge, the Visalia Camp, Woodmen of the World. The building collapse and the death and injuries created an uneasy stir in town. The day after the accident the Visalia Daily Morning Delta raised the question of responsibility for the incident. Alonzo Melville Doty, the newspaper business manager, joined in and poetically wrote: Shall builders now resume their work Disgracing this fair town? Can no one be called to account For walls that crumble down? Almost immediately, Tulare County Coroner T. C. Corruthers impaneled a jury to look into the cause of the 35-year-old man’s death. For the next several days, the 12-person panel looked at evidence and heard testimony. They 14 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

called in expert bricklayers, architects, and builders, and heard testimony from Craycroft, McCabe, and others. At noon on January 11, the coroner’s jury had finished their work and issued their verdict. In part it read: “We find that in the construction and demolition of the wall which fell, Contractor Craycroft was guilty of negligence, carelessness and recklessness to such an extent as to amount to manslaughter, causing the death of Henry Hughes without an intent to do so. We also find from the evidence adduced, that the plans of the architect, L. E. McCabe, seem to have been sufficient, but acting as superintendent of construction was negligent in not exercising a more vigilant supervision over the construction and demolition of the wall in question. We recommend that the Common Council [City Council] of the City of Visalia pass

The Visalia House was where Harry Hughes was taken for treatment and died. C.1910 (Note: The Visalia House was torn down in 1916.)

such ordinances and regulations as will provide for a strict inspection of all buildings hereafter constructed…” The Visalia city fathers took the recommendation of the jury seriously. On June 11 at regular session, they ordered, “The fire marshal be authorized to employ a competent architect or mechanic at such times as he may deem proper to inspect all buildings that may now or may hereafter be constructed within the city of Visalia, for the purpose of determining whether such building or buildings are safely constructed or being constructed…” The Delta clearly was satisfied and reported on June 13, “One gratifying result of the said accident which recently occurred in Visalia will be the building of stable brick structures in this city hereafter. People who contemplate building will insist on a good building and no builder would dare now to do a flimsy job of work.” A few days later, the newspaper reported that T. B. Craycroft filed for insolvency [bankruptcy]. L. E. McCabe would later move his company to Los Angeles. Despite the accident, Seligman and Larkins continued with their plans, and in 1899 a single building with both of their names on it was completed on the same two lots. The building stood for 68 years and was torn down in 1967 to make way for a parking lot.


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M O S L E Y

hen the holiday invitations start arriving in your inbox or mailbox, one of the first things we often think about is the age-old question: "What will I wear?" And with hosts getting more and more creative with party dress codes, it's good to get into the holiday spirit with a few updates for the season ahead. The Cocktail Party. This is one of the most common holiday gatherings many of us will attend. And the dress for these affairs may be one of the easiest to decode. A short dress will always work of course. They don't call them "cocktail dresses" for nothing! The sequin sheath is a hit for this holiday season. The more glamorous the dress, the better. Add your highest heels and big, bold jewelry. If you're going to a cocktail party straight from work, then you might want to tone down the shine, and wear a simple shift dress that can easily be dressed up with a statement jacket, shawl or wrap. Add sparkling chandelier earrings or a chunky necklace to give your plain dress more party pizzazz. But cocktail party attire is not just limited to short dresses. If pants are more your style, feel free to wear a silky pair of wideleg pants with a cashmere sweater, or a short satin skirt with a velvet bellsleeve tunic. Statement accessories like faux fur scarves will always amp up the glam factor for cocktail separates. Casual Chic. This may be one of the trickiest holiday party dress codes. The invitation may read Festive-Casual, BusinessCasual, Dressy-Casual, or even Funky-Casual. Since there are so many variations on this party theme, there are just as many ways to dress. Here are a few interpretations to help you break it all down. Festive-Casual clothes have

a holiday vibe, and may include some embellishments: sequins, beading, feathers or fur. I have a shaggy black fur vest that I wear to a lot of holiday parties with skinny jeans or leather leggings. For a Dressy-Casual invite, rev it up a notch. No shredded jeans or cropped tops. Ditto for Business-Casual. This dress code is normally reserved for work-related functions. So, take your cue from your workplace, and follow suit. Pantsuits and dresses for women, sports coats for men … usually sans ties. And anything goes for FunkyCasual. Santa sweaters, anyone? Black Tie. Occasionally there are those charity balls or weddings that require Black-Tie attire. Other variations include Black-TieOptional, Semi-formal, and Formal (refer to Cocktail attire above … it’s practically the same dress code). But Black-Tie is a no-brainer when it comes to figuring out what to wear. Tuxedos are de rigueur for men; long dresses for women. Short dresses are making more and more appearances on the Black-Tie party scene. However, more and more invitations now are making it a little more challenging with creative BlackTie dress codes. Stick with festive cocktail attire for women, and tuxedos or dressy suits with colorful bow ties, cummerbunds, and neckties for men. And for the rare White-Tie affair, there is little room for getting creative. Long gowns are the ultimate for these elegant occasions. It's the perfect time to slip into those opera gloves and a sumptuous silk or satin shoulder wrap. For men, black tailcoats with high-waisted pleated trousers, white waistcoats and white dress shirts with white bow ties and black patent leather evening shoes are the epitome of style for this formal dress code. P.S. Please be sure to read your invitations carefully. Often, the dress codes (if there are any) are in small print. It's no fun to be searching for a tuxedo to wear on the day of the big party … even if you're just renting one for the night!


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LITERARY ARTS

LOUISE A. JACKSON FOLLOWS THE

TRAILS OF HISTORY THROUGH THE SIERRA T E X T

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S L O C U M

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he Crowley family has made its mark on Tulare County, quite literally with the infamous road to Mineral King, a major accomplishment in its day, and still primarily unchanged since the time John Crowley cut it into the mountains in 1873. The Crowley influence didn’t stop there. The founding of Farmersville, Crowley Elementary School, businessmen, miners, preachers, ranchers, politicians, and teachers are all a part of the family’s contribution to the county. Louise A. Jackson, a multiple-great granddaughter of John, is contributing to the family legacy by chronicling the history of the Tulare County area through several books, such as The Mule Men, Mineral King: The Story of Beulah, and The Visalia Electric Railroad. Louise was born and raised in Exeter. Her father, Roy Jackson, started as an engineer for the electric railroad in 1916 and later was a superintendent and 18 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

manager for 20 years into 1945. Louise studied English and history at UCLA and did graduate studies at the University of Nevada, but she reserves praise for her summer classes at the College of the Sequoias. “The two best teachers I ever had in

college were the two I had at COS,” she said. “I tell people that all the time.” After completing her graduate degree, Louise and her husband, Anthony Di Silvestro, lived in Reno, where she raised her family. After 15 years, they moved to Lake Tahoe’s Incline Village where she taught school. “It was absolutely beautiful,” she said. “Way up on the hillside. We were as high as Mineral King is.” In 2000, she returned to Tulare County, to live in Three Rivers where she continued teaching as a substitute for about five years. Her writing career, of sorts, started very early. “Writing has always been an interest in my life,” she said. “I wrote my first novel when I was 10 years old. It was a total take-off on Bambi.” Though she laughs at this, the humble beginning did eventually lead her mother, Alice Crowley Jackson, and her aunt Elsie (for whom Crowley School


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is named) to realize that though Louise was about the youngest of the Crowley clan, she would be the best choice to inherit their research on Mineral King after their passing. Her mother had started the book, and published some stories on the topic, but it was left to Louise to finish it. “So I had no choice,” she laughs. “I loved doing it. It took me quite a while. I was raising a family at that time, but I did it.” The first version of the book, titled Beulah, a Biography of Mineral King, was published in 1988. To reissue the book in 2006 through the Sequoia Natural History Association, she had to change the title. The family’s ties to Mineral King started with John Crowley and carried down through Louise’s generation. Her grandfather, Arthur Crowley, built the first “modern” resort in the valley around 1895. Louise and her family spent their summers there throughout her childhood. Much of the resort was crushed by an avalanche in 1969. Other than writing a weekly column on education for about three years for the Reno Gazette Journal and publishing some magazine articles on the Sierra, the Mineral King book was her first publication. Her second book is The Mule Men: A History of Stock Packing in the Sierra. Norman “Ike” Livermore the California Secretary of Resources in the 1960s and ‘70s asked her to write the book. He was an Olympic athlete, a lumberman committed to sustainable yields, a Sierra Club leader, and a mule packer in Mineral King. He wrote his MBA thesis on his research on Sierra pack stations, so he was well-placed to recognize Louise as a fellow scholar on the topic. “He was wonderful,” she said. “We just had such a good rapport. That book took 10 years to write. I went over every single source in the Sierra, all the Forest Services. I reviewed every one of their documents at that time on mules. It’s my major accomplishment.” Her book is praised as a comprehensive history of the subject, but it is also filled with characters, the stories of the packers, their adventures and their sense of humor. “There were wonderful stories that the packers themselves constantly LITERARY ARTS

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told,” she said. “There were fun, wild things that the packers did.” Going earlier into the history of the mountains, Louise set her next book in The Sierra Nevada Before History: Ancient Landscapes, Early Peoples. This book covers the geology, natural history, plants and animals and the peoples who lived here for thousands of years. Special attention focuses on the Yokuts, Menache, Tubatulabal, Miwok, Ahwahneechee and Paiute. “The book’s not very well known here in California,” she said. “But it’s still selling really well in the Midwest.” Some of her books are written for a specific audience, but are still of value as historical documents and stories of interest to the general public. One of these is A Man for his Times: The Sonny Rouch Story. She originally wrote the book for Rouch’s family when they were planning a reunion, but she found his story fascinating. “They had quite a history,” she said. “It’s a wonderful, wonderful story about that family, so I was happy to do it.” Rouch was a miner, logger, master heavy equipment operator, roadbuilder and storyteller. He also believed in the sanctity of the earth, the wonders of natural resources and the beauty of the Sequoias. Another book she wrote for a family, but is nevertheless a fascinating adventure story, is Trail of Promises. This is her most recent book. It was published by cabinart books in 2016. A recreational packer, a wilderness backpacker and

a horse masseuse set out for a monthlong trip on the full length of the John Muir Trail from Yosemite and beyond to Balch Park. They learned that things don’t always turn out as you expect. “They didn’t know what they were doing,” she said. “It has a lot of beauty, drama, interesting characters and the parks. It was a story of something you didn’t want to have happen.” Louise’s latest project is a new edition of The Visalia Electric Railroad: Stories of the Early Years. The railroad began in 1904, carrying passengers until 1924, and remaining electrified until 1944. It was closed in 1992. “Railroad barons thought they were going to build an electric railway over Donner Pass,” she said. “It was the experimental railroad here that they gave the job to. What it turned into was just a side spur of the Southern Pacific Railroad for this whole agricultural area on the east side here, so it lasted and lasted.” In addition to books, Louise puts her writing skills to work on behalf of the Tulare County Historical Society, the Mineral King Preservation Society, and the Tulare County Treasures. The latter is a website devoted to the people and places that make Tulare County special. Three Rivers Museum Mineral King Room is another big part of her life, where she works on scanning and cataloguing the history of the area. With many more Crowleys of younger generations still in the area, the future may continue produce more historians and subjects of historians to carry on the tradition.”


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Decorating for the holidays has turned into a priority since Randy met Sheila and “her love for all things Christmas.” LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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HOME TOUR

Portion of a collection of brass railroad locks from many different railroads. All locks are from the late 1800's and early 1900's.

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efore meeting Sheila and her son Paden in 2007, Randy Cline hadn’t put up a Christmas tree in his home for 17 years. When his mother passed away in the early ‘90s, Randy inherited his childhood home where he lived as a bachelor until his mid50s. During those years, decorating for Christmas and participating in holiday traditions was never a priority, but that quickly changed once Sheila and her son came into his life. “Between work and travel, I just didn’t decorate,” said Randy. “I had this huge house, but I lived here by myself and I was never home, so I didn’t have a reason to decorate. But when I got married and suddenly had a little one living here, I became really excited about putting up a tree and doing all of that.” When Sheila first met Randy 10 years ago, she and her son used to sneak into his home while he was away to decorate, cleverly implementing a “Grinch” theme. While Randy is a farcry from being a “Grinch,” his nearly two-decade hiatus from participating in 24 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

holiday festivities was in stark contrast to Sheila’s love for all things Christmas. “I always went all out for Christmas, even before having kids,” said Shelia. “But I’m like that with every holiday. Even when I lived up in Sequoia National Park, out in the middle of nowhere with no visitors, I had Christmas lights.” Now that Randy’s property is home to Sheila, her 14-year-old son Paden, and their four-year-old son Stevie, decorating for Christmas has become a family tradition they all enjoy doing together. Sheila says Randy went from one extreme to the other, as the home now has a Christmas tree in nearly every room. Christmas decorating isn’t the only tradition the Clines partake in together, however. Both Randy and Sheila are avid antique collectors and have filled their home with hundreds of vintage pieces and collector items, many of which go back to the 1920s and ‘30s. From authentic art deco lighting fixtures to medieval-inspired furniture items, the Clines enjoy the

pursuit of finding authentic pieces to implement inside their 1920s Spanish Colonial Revival home. “It’s been really fun to outfit the home with stuff from the era it was built in,” said Randy. Sheila added, “Part of the fun is the search to find something, and even if we don’t find what we’re looking for, we enjoy going on the hunt together.” Randy’s fascination with antiques goes back to his childhood when he began collecting old railroad locks, but it took on a life of its own in the ‘90s when he decided to restore his family home and bring it back to its original 1920s style. When his parents moved into the house in 1958, they modernized it by painting most of the wooden surfaces white, adding a flagstone fireplace, white shag carpet, and modern fixtures. While many people might choose to update their home to coincide with today’s trends, Randy did the opposite. He set out on a mission to bring his home backwards in time. In fact, much of the inspiration for the design and décor


Your Home. Your Look.

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HOME TOUR

16th century suit of armor. Reportedly at one time to be a part of the world's largest private collection of armor owned by William Randolph Hearst.

One of the home’s most festive rooms during the holidays is the formal dining room.

pieces came from the world-famous Hearst Castle in San Simeon, California. “The Hearst Castle look is what I was going for,” said Randy. “I’ve loved it since I was a little kid, so a lot of the furniture pieces I chose make it look dark and gothic in here. None of this was here when I moved back in.” Because his parents had painted over the original wood surfaces of the home in the 1950s, Randy hired a painter to strip the paint and refinish the wood throughout the house. This task was just as daunting as it sounds, and took 17 straight weeks—Monday through Friday—for the painter to strip and refinish every door and baseboard. Randy also had the the white shag carpet removed to expose the stamped concrete underneath, which added another “gothic” element to the home’s medieval flair. While Randy’s parents had updated most of the features throughout the house in the ‘50s, there were still some original elements that had been preserved. Among them were the ceiling beams in the family room, as well as the unique texturing on the walls. “I’ve had so many contractors come in here who go on and on about the texturing,” said Randy. “Just the other day we had a tile guy up here and he said, ‘I can’t believe this texturing…they don’t do things like this anymore.’” 26 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

Though Randy and Sheila have updated most of the home throughout the years, there are still areas they would like to restore, like the flagstone fireplace, the laundry room, and the kitchen, which still has a Formica backsplash from 1958.

One of the home’s most festive rooms during the holidays is the formal dining room. Though it hasn’t been used for actual dining since Randy was living there as a child, it is always decorated for each holiday and is used as a buffet when the Clines host events. While the medieval style table certainly draws some attention from guests,

the star in the room is “Max,” a suit of armor that is believed to be from the William Randolph Hearst collection. “Hearst had the largest collection ever assembled of medieval armor, and in fact, there’s a picture in a book I read on Hearst of all of his suits of armor lined up in a New York warehouse as far as the eye can see,” said Randy. “I’ve always wanted a suit of armor ever since I was a kid.” While most of the Hearst-inspired décor can be found in the interior of the home, a few elements flow into the backyard including several white marble statues, which are playfully decked out in Santa hats during the holidays. The rest of the backyard is a beautiful and unique mix of landscape styles surrounded by lush grounds, a pool, and a Spanish-style pool house. In the early ‘90s, Randy started what he calls “The Project” by removing everything in the yard right up to the edge of the house. From there, he brought in 2,000 square cubic yards of fill dirt to construct two terraces and install a swimming pool. “I completely changed everything that was in this yard all the way up to the house,” said Randy. “I took out 17 trees and an oval-shaped pond that was out there. All of this was just grass. It looks nothing like it did before.” Now when guests enter the backyard,


MARCELLA'S


HOME TOUR

Fire hydrant incorporated into a fountain flowing water down a waterway into the swimming pool. The hydrant was manufactured by the Rensselaer Valve Co. of Troy, NY. most likely between 1910 and 1920.

A beautiful white archway welcomes guests to the pool and spa.

The Hearst Castle look is what I was going for,” said Randy. “I’ve loved it since I was a little kid, so a lot of the furniture pieces I chose make it look dark and gothic in here. None of this was here when I moved back in.

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A partially-hidden pool is surrounded by a forest of trees and plants in every variety.


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HOME TOUR

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Before meeting Sheila, Randy Cline hadn’t put up a Christmas tree in 17 years.


they step onto a beautiful terrace and lawn where Randy and Sheila were married. An antique fire hydrant water fall trickles down to a partially-hidden pool, surrounded by a forest of trees and plants in every variety. Along the winding path, guests encounter a Spanish-style pool house on the left with a covered patio and quaint outdoor kitchen. When the path arrives at a beautiful, white archway, visitors are welcomed to the pool and spa, which are covered by the shade of countless billowing trees. Just west of the pool is a secret garden area called “Stevie’s Jungle,” where a long, narrow gap between trees provides a perfect hideout for the Clines’ youngest son. Just below the jungle, a path leads to “Paden’s Treehouse,” which features a wooden skywalk, a treehouse, and a deck overlooking the City of Porterville. The backyard has been a workin-progress for Randy since the ‘90s, and continues to evolve each

year with the help of their talented gardener, Guillermo, who has planted, built, constructed, and crafted countless corners of their yard. “He is amazing,” said Randy. “He is here two-and-a-half days a week, and he can do absolutely anything. He and his wife built that arch by the pool. He does electrical, concrete, floral, carpentry, pretty much anything. We were so appreciative of him building the arch that we put a plaque in there for him and his wife.” Randy and Sheila said Guillermo often starts surprise projects without telling them what he’s doing, and they always love the end result. He’s done everything from putting in walkways to planting a cactus garden to constructing “Stevie’s Jungle.” “There seems to be something new every time we come back here,” said Sheila. Randy added, “None of this was part of the original backyard design; this was all Guillermo. He just put this stuff in on his own. The only thing we

The backyard has been a work in progress and continues to evolve, including a Spanish-style pool house with a covered patio and quaint outdoor kitchen.

had in the plans for the landscape was the pool and the pool house.” Now that Randy is retired from the Porterville Fire Department after 37 years, he looks forward to spending more time enjoying his yard and home while spending time with his family. But retirement won’t keep him down for long. He continues to work for the Tulare County Sherriff’s Department and already has plans to volunteer for the fire department. As a Porterville native, Randy is passionate about serving his community, and he is proud that he could restore his childhood home and enjoy it with his new family. “Being able to live here has always meant a lot to me because I was raised here my whole life,” said Randy. “My favorite thing about this house has been taking it back to the 1920s and outfitting it with things from that era. And Sheila came in at the tail end of it, so we’ve been able to do a lot of changes together. It’s been a blessing.”

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A Twist on

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PRIME RIB ROAST INGREDIENTS: 7 lbs Eye of Prime Rib Roast, fat cap cut off (check your local butcher shop for special cuts) Salt Course ground pepper 5 sprigs fresh rosemary 5 sprigs fresh thyme

½ C olive oil (to rub down the roast) 4 T Butter 5 carrots diced 1 onion, peeled and halved 1 head garlic, peeled

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Season prime rib roast with salt and course ground pepper, then rub down the whole roast with fresh rosemary, thyme and olive oil. After the roast is seasoned, smear the cut ends of the roast with the butter. Place the roast (ribs down or fat side up) in roasting pan. Add to the roasting pan the carrots, onion, and garlic, so you have a flavorful stock to make a pan sauce once it’s all complete.

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Sear the rib roast for 15 minutes at 450 degrees, then turn the oven down to 325 degrees for the rest of the cooking time — one hour. Baste the cut ends of the roast with the fat accumulated in the roasting pan every 30 minutes. Using a digital thermometer, check the internal temperature of the roast every time you baste it, until you reach your desired temperature (135 degrees for medium-rare). Rest for at least 15 minutes before slicing.

B R U S S E L S , R O Y A L T Y .


EPICURE

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ROASTED RED POTATOES (WITH BACON VINAIGRETTE) INGREDIENTS: 2 lbs red potatoes, quartered Olive oil, to coat potatoes Salt and pepper 1 bunch parsley, chopped DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Wash the potatoes, then cut them in uniform size. (You can cut them small or large depending on your preference — I quartered mine). In a large bowl, toss potatoes with olive oil, salt and pepper. Place potatoes on a large baking sheet and roast in the oven at 325 degrees until fork tender, about 40 minutes. Remove from oven and toss with bacon vinaigrette (recipe below). Season with fresh parsley.

BACON VINAIGRETTE INGREDIENTS: 10 oz bacon ½ C balsamic vinegar ½ C brown sugar 1 T Dijon mustard 1 bunch parsley, chopped Salt and pepper DIRECTIONS: In a heavy-bottomed skillet, cook bacon until very crispy over low heat to render down the unnecessary fats. Once bacon is crispy, remove from pan and crumble. Heat up the pan again with all the leftover bits in it, and deglaze with the balsamic vinegar, brown sugar, salt and pepper. Whisk together and pour over potatoes to toss.

CANDIED BRUSSELS INGREDIENTS: 2 lb Brussels Sprouts 1 lemon, halved 4 T butter ½ C white wine ½ C Brown sugar 2 C Candied walnuts Pinch cayenne pepper DIRECTIONS: Start by finding the freshest Brussels sprouts you can. Clean them and cut off the outside leaves to get to the tender inside. Cut the sprouts into quarters. In a large pot, bring salted water to a boil. (I always like to add lemon to it so the sprouts — due to the acid in the lemon — will stay crisp and green.) Once the water is boiling, add the sprouts and cook for two minutes. Drain water and wash sprouts under ice-cold water to shock them and stop the cooking process. In a large sauté pan, melt the butter over medium heat and add the sprouts. Once the sprouts are back up to temp, deglaze the pan with the white wine and scrape the bits stuck to the pan and cook until the sprouts are tender. Once the liquid in the pan has evaporated, stir in the brown sugar, cayenne pepper, and candied walnuts — toss until well coated.

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ROASTED ROOT VEGETABLES INGREDIENTS: 3 lbs Root vegetables, cut in uniform size and shape to ensure even cooking (I used carrots, onion, and fennel) Olive oil, to coat vegetables Salt and pepper ½ C fresh mint, chopped Balsamic reduction (cook 3 C balsamic vinegar over low heat until it’s a syrup consistency)* DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a large bowl, toss root vegetables with olive oil, salt and pepper. Place on a large baking sheet and roast in 325 degree oven until fork tender. Remove from oven and season with any fresh herbs you like. Finish by tossing them in the balsamic reduction, or just leave them plain and toss with a nice finishing oil. *Use desired amount of balsamic reduction and save the rest for a drizzle on a caprese salad or a balsamic grilled steak.

APPLE STUFFING INGREDIENTS: 8 T butter ½ lb Chanterelle mushrooms ½ lb Wood Ear mushrooms ½ lb Oyster mushrooms ½ lb Shitaki 3 C apples, peeled and diced small 1 onion, diced small 6 stalks celery, chopped small 2 C wild rice, cooked according to package instructions 4 sage leaves, chopped 1 C toasted walnuts, chopped 1 C dried cranberries 12 C stale bread, cubed 3 C chicken or turkey stock 1 egg Salt and pepper Olive oil 3 sprigs fresh herbs (thyme works well) DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven for 350 degrees. In a saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat and add mushrooms; sauté until they are caramelized. Add the apples, onions and celery, and continue to sauté until tender. Add in the wild rice, sage, walnuts, cranberries and breadcrumbs. Stir in the chicken stock to loosen, and season mixture with salt and pepper. Beat the egg and stir into stuffing mixture. Use olive oil to grease a large casserole dish. Transfer the stuffing mixture to a casserole dish and lightly cover with foil (so the top won’t brown). Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, then remove the foil and cook another 10 minutes. Once stuffing is completely cooked, toss in your fresh herbs.

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HOLIDAYS IN HYGGE IN

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he skies were overcast and a chilly rain had just begun to fall as we walked the few blocks from the train station to our hotel. Despite the near freezing temperatures, I was filled with a sense of warmth. It was only after that visit to Copenhagen that I realized this feeling spread into every aspect of our visit to the Danish city. The term hygge (pronounced hooguh) is a Danish concept that has recently gained rapid popularity in the U.S. Along with blogs and books that focus on the topic, even the official tourism website of Denmark hosts articles instructing travelers how to embrace it during a visit. Like many similar ideas born from the cultural practices in other countries, there is no direct translation. Hygge is best described as a sense of comfort and coziness one might think of when bundling up next to a warm fire with a good book or enjoying an evening with family and friends. It isn’t a thing, it is a

Photo Photoby byLori LoriRice Rice

feeling. It comes about by slowing down and enjoying the present moment. Danes are experts at bringing hygge to everyday life, especially around the holidays. It is something that has always been engrained in the culture of the country, but when I first visited Copenhagen it was not the trend it is now in the U.S. Looking back on that trip I realize how fortunate I was to experience hygge before I knew how to define it. I wasn’t trying to find hygge. It found me. That doesn’t mean that travelers can’t find it for themselves amidst its now wild popularity. In fact, it’s impossible to escape the feeling when visiting Copenhagen during the holidays. Find it in the winter scenes and welcoming traditions As we maneuvered the streets on that wet evening, the candles burning in windows throughout the city cast a mystical light on every corner we turned. Even as a larger, bustling

city, Copenhagen had a quaint feel. Despite the drizzle turning to snow, cyclist bundled in winter coats sped past us in all directions. Warm or cold, the city lives up to its two-wheeled reputation. Winter conditions do not halt this form of active transportation. It was picturesque to say the least. Upon checking into our hotel we were greeted with brunkager, a traditional Christmas cookie similar to gingerbread. After dropping off our bags, we were informed about happy hour and the tradition of Julebryg, Danish Christmas beer. Dating back hundreds of years, J-dag or J-day occurs the first Friday of November, and is known as the day the specially brewed Christmas beer comes on the market. For travelers like us, this beer was available during evening happy hours courtesy of the hotels where we stayed. There is nothing quite like sipping a holiday beer, while eating holiday cookies by candle light, even when in a hotel lobby.

LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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Photo by Lori Rice

Embrace it in the places you go and things you see A stop at Tivoli Gardens is on the list for many visitors to Copenhagen. One might expect it to feel overrun with tourists, but given its equal popularity among locals, the attraction manages to leave a culturally-rich impression while filling you with a peaceful sense of holiday spirit. As we filed in with other visitors I was not expecting to feel any sense of peace among the crowds, but as the sun set, this attraction proved me wrong. It is something to see with lights lining the small lake, and special holiday shops and market stalls set up with gifts and traditional foods. Tivoli remains open through New Year’s so if you are staying awhile, buy a pass 40 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

that will allow you to visit on multiple days. We found ourselves popping in several times throughout our visit. Traditional Christmas Markets are also easy to find outside Tivoli where you can browse without paying an entry fee. A market lines the Nyhavn Harbor along the glistening water with bobbing boats and colorful buildings. The Deutschs Christmas Market lights up Axeltorv Square as visitors shop for gifts and enjoy holiday foods. It’s important to note that these markets typically close before Christmas Day so take advantage of them if you are there in the days prior to the holiday. Being a food-lover Torvehallerne made the top of my list for exploring the local food scene. An indoor food market that sometimes hosts a farmers market

outside, visitors can stroll through over 60 stalls and enjoy everything from a cup of coffee to seasonal treats and traditional breakfasts. In the winter, it is a welcomed break from the cold while also providing a sense of undeniable holiday cheer. Just remember when it comes to restaurants and shops, what a visit to Copenhagen provides in coziness and holiday celebration it lacks in accessibility. If you have your heart set on dining at a place you’ve read about, or seeking out the most traditional Danish foods, check restaurant schedules ahead of time. Many locations close between Christmas and New Year’s. Plenty of delicious regional foods can be found, but without some research, you could find yourself disappointed upon arrival.


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VALLEY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

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PHOTOS BY: Lori Rice

Feel it when you ring in the New Year The spirit of the holiday does not end on Christmas Day in Copenhagen, making us happy that we extended our trip through the New Year celebration. As we walked the streets of the city on New Year’s Eve, despite speaking no Danish, we could make out that most of the supermarkets would be closing mid-day. Upon making this discovery, we also witnessed every person, and I mean that quite literally, leaving the store with a bottle of champagne or sparkling wine. Not wanting to feel left out, we headed inside to find the beverage selection still well stocked, but dwindling by the minute. We grabbed a bottle and headed back to the hotel assuming we’d pop it open at

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some point throughout the evening. With a fireworks celebration at around 10 p.m., you might choose to ring in the New Year early as we did at Tivoli Gardens. Standing shoulder to shoulder among merry families and a beautiful display of lights was a festive way to close out the year behind us. Exhausted from travel and with an early flight planned the next day, we almost ignored what seemed to be a migration of people towards the bridges. We mustered up our last bit of energy and headed out to the Copenhagen Lakes. As we followed the pack, our eyes grew large at seeing the vast number of people lining each bridge and nearly every spot on the banks that lined the water. All had a bottle of bubbly and some chose to sport goggles or protective glasses, something that

became much more logical as midnight struck and corks began popping off in the dark. Soon after, fireworks erupted in every direction. It was a display unlike any we had ever seen. The New Year was upon us and we felt honored to celebrate it in a such a lovely place. I had no idea how attached I’d become to Copenhagen and the Danish way of living, or at least what I could observe of it with a few days of exploration. It is a place that won me over immediately and leaves a longing inside me each time I think of our experiences there. Many people travel to Denmark in the warmer months, and I will someday as well. But as I quickly found out, the hygge, the feeling of warmth and welcome, the tradition, and celebration around the holiday season, make it an equally intriguing time to visit. n


Wishing you a

HAPPY

HOLIDAY

and a PROSPEROUS

2018

5601 W. Hillsdale, Visalia 559.625.7000 www.sequoiadental.com


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D I R E C T O R ,

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M I S S I O N

CHRISTMAS

WHAT'S IN A NAME?

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ctually quite a lot! Our English word “Christmas” evokes all sorts of pleasant and wonderful images, from Santa Claus and his reindeer to renderings of a manger surrounded by shepherds, as well as a host of others. We see it often as a time of togetherness, reflection on faith and family, and for the giving of gifts. Of course there is the yearly discomfort with the ever-present secular merchandising of Christmas, but we all seem to get past those feelings and enjoy the season all the same. But what about the name “Christmas?” The term comes from the shortening of two older words: “Christ” and “Mass.”

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The word Mass is derived from the Latin word misse, which means to “dismiss” or “send away”. It is a reference to “The Christ” dismissing or sending away the sins of His people. If you noticed that the reference to “Mass” has more to do with Good Friday and Easter than with the birth of the Lord, you are correct! Early Christians did not celebrate the birth of the Lord, (or other birthdays for that matter) until around 300 A.D. Until that time, Christians in the Roman Empire were heavily persecuted, and some even killed for their faith. Christians placed more emphasis on celebrating the death and resurrection of Christ than on His birth.

Now, if the Christ was able to just “send away” the sins of His people on the event of his death, how was he able and qualified to do something that significant? The answer to that question is in the meaning of the title “Christ.” Many people think “Christ” is Jesus’ last name! It is not. “Christ” is a title that could only be assigned to a very special person. The word Christ comes from the Greek word “Christos” which means “Anointed” or “Designated One.” It is a Greek translation of the Hebrew word, “Messiah”. The word Messiah also means “Anointed One.” In the Old Testament, it sometimes referred to a king chosen by God, but it is also used


to refer to a future “Anointed One” who would be born to be very special. One evening around 4-6 B.C., an angel appeared to shepherds in a field just east of Bethlehem, in the Roman Province of Judea. A short distance away, King Herod—who had been declared “King of the Jews” by the Roman Senate—was comfortable and perhaps asleep in his warm palace. Luke, the physician/historian who was the companion of the apostle Paul, records the events and dialogue of that night in chapter 2:11. “For today, in the city of David (Bethlehem), there has been born for you a Savior, who is Christ, the Lord.” There are three main titles in this announcement. First the term “Savior.” In the Hebrew language, the word Savior is “Yeshua”, translated Joshua or Jesus. In Matthew 1:21 Joseph was commanded to name the child Jesus, “for He will save His people from their sins.” The second term is “Christ” the “Anointed One”, and the third names the identity of the “Anointed One” who is “The Lord.” While the term for Lord (kurios) can

mean simply someone of honor or authority, in this context it is clearly referring to God Himself! This Savior is “the Christ” and is God Himself, and thus qualified to “send away“ the sins of His people — even the sins of the world! One rarely noticed fact about the Christ is that both His entrance and exit from this world were unlike any human being either before or after Him. His entrance was a miraculous event, a conception by a virgin with no human father. This was prophesied hundreds of years prior and announced by angels. After the birth of the Christ, Herod the King attempted to murder Him. But that was not God’s plan because the Christ was intended to live a sinless and perfect life, keeping and fulfilling the Law of God perfectly. His exit from this world was also unlike any other human being. He died an innocent death, executed on a Roman cross, a punishment that was reserved for state criminals. Yet he did not remain dead and buried. In three days He showed himself alive to his disciples and even to a large gathering of more than five hundred people!

His exit from this world was a bodily ascension into heaven! No one but He has ever done something like that! Thus, the celebration of Christmas encompasses the Birth, Life, Death, Resurrection and Ascension and future Return of Jesus of Nazareth, who is the Christ. These events made possible the “Great Exchange”: our sins were taken from us by “the Christ”, and the “righteousness” of “the Christ” was given to those who believe in Him as a gift! His death was for our sins, His righteousness is for our life! The celebration which some call the Eucharist, others the Lord’s Supper, the “Christ Mass” is a celebration that remembers His death, which was the payment for sins, His righteousness was given to those who trust in Him, and a promise of His return to the earth. He has saved and will save His people from their sins. This is what “Christmas” means. Isaac Watts, who wrote the Christmas Hymn “Joy to the World” did not originally write the hymn about the birth of the Lord, but rather the return of the Lord! If you read the lyrics carefully, you will recognize this fact.

Below: Several artists renditions of Saint Nicholas in various styles.

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As years have passed, additional cultural traditions have grown up alongside Christmas. Here are just a few you may recognize: As previously mentioned, the formal celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ began around the year 300 A.D., but the actual terms which are equivalent to “Christmas” were not recorded until 1038. In 331 A.D., the Edict of Milan was issued by the Roman Empire, when it became legal for anyone to openly worship and celebrate “Christ the Lord.” Official Roman government persecution of Christians ceased, although a later emperor, Julian the Apostate, brought Christian persecution back for a short time. Everyone has heard of Saint Nicholas. Saint Nicholas was a third century Christian Bishop in ancient Asia Minor (modern day Turkey). The tradition of an anonymous visitor arriving at a home in the middle of the night and delivering bags of gifts stems from the story of Nicholas sneaking into a house of a destitute friend on three consecutive nights, and each time leaving a bag of gold coins. The story goes that he was caught on the third

SEASONAL

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night of his generous escapade by his friend. However, his friend agreed to keep his identity secret! Nicolas was of course motivated to show the love of Christ to his friend. Other stories reveal him as “Jolly Saint Nick” being a lifelong generous giver of gifts to many. In the eighth century, a British Missionary, Saint Boniface, was evangelizing in Bavaria in Germany. Fierce and warlike tribes in the German Alps were resistant to the good news of Jesus Christ. In the town of Giesmar, human sacrifice was still practiced in front of a large oak tree dedicated to Thor, the Norse God of Thunder. The tribe was preparing to sacrifice a young child when Boniface arrived on the scene. There are a few different storylines that have survived concerning this event. One says Boniface chopped down the tree with an axe before the stunned tribesmen, others say the oak tree was struck by lightning and destroyed, and all the people thought Boniface exhibited superior power over Thor. Whatever the case, the aftermath was that Boniface called their attention to a nearby young evergreen tree, which symbolized

eternal life in its green needles, the top of the tree that always pointed toward heaven, and the three corners of the evergreen tree that symbolized and illustrated the Trinity. The tradition of the “Christ Mass” tree began here. In the Netherlands, the character of Sinterklass (a contraction of Sint Nikolass) emerged as a jolly man who visited homes and left sweet treats for those who were good, but left lumps of coal in the stockings of children who were bad. Dutch and German immigrants brought these traditions to America and the stories were transformed into the Santa Claus of today. Though these stories sometimes obscure the true meaning of Christmas, the meaning of the name “Christmas” reveals the core truth: the mystery of God in human flesh, born for a purpose of suffering and dying in order to dismiss the sins of His people and reconcile all of creation to Himself. Only the Christ has the authority and the power to do such a tremendous thing and give the truly best gift of Christmas, which is peace with God. Merry Christmas!! n

Statue of Saint Boniface in front of Saint Boniface Church, Wiesbaden, Germany


E XC LU S IVE S H OWI N G

3 1 6 W. M A I N , V I S A L I A

559.73 4 .7079

DECEMBER 14TH

10:00AM to 8:00PM

T- F 1 0 A - 5 : 3 0 P S AT. 1 0 A - 4 : 3 0 P

M I C H A E L S C U S T O M J E W E L R Y. C O M


Gather Around the Glass R E C I P I E S

B Y

P U B L I C

H O U S E

D O W N S T A I R S

PH D EGGNOG 4 eggs ½ C sugar ¼ C brown sugar 1 pint milk ½ pint heavy cream 1 tsp vanilla extract Tuaca (brandy liqueur) Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey In a cup or small bowl, whisk the eggs, then whisk sugar and brown sugar in with the eggs. In a separate cup or bowl, heat the milk and heavy cream to 160 degrees. Slowly whisk into the egg/sugar mixture. Double boil mixture to 160 degrees, then add vanilla extract and refrigerate. Add in Tuaca and whiskey to your liking.

YAMS WITH THE FAM 1 oz raw yam, juiced ¾ oz brown sugar/cinnamon simple syrup (equal parts water and sugar) 2 oz Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey 1 egg white ¼ oz heavy cream 2 dashes Angostura Bitters Place all ingredients in a glass. Shake dry and double strain, pouring into another glass over ice. Serve.

MISTLETOE MARTINI ½ oz simple syrup ¼ oz lime juice ¾ oz sweet vermouth 8 fresh cranberries 6 mint springs 2 oz Medley Brothers bourbon Muddle cranberries, shake with ice and double strain. 48 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7


HOLIDAY SPIRITS

AN APPLE A DAY KEEPS THE GRINCH AWAY 2 oz Apple vodka 1 oz Vermouth ¾ oz simple syrup ¼ oz lime juice ¼ oz Campari Apple slices or peel (optional) Combine all ingredients in a glass. Stir and double strain, then put into glass. Garnish with apple slices or peel.

WINTER SANGRIA 3 oz Cabernet 1 bar spoon Allspice Dram 1 oz brown sugar simple syrup Orange slice 1 oz brandy Combine cabernet, allspice dram, and simple syrup in a glass, floating orange slice on top. Steam brandy separately and pout on top of orange slice, then light a match!

FIRESIDE SPRITZER 2 oz Union gin 3 dashes Angostura Bitters Sparkling cider Rosemary for garnish Combine gin and angostura bitters in a glass. Top with sparkling cider and garnish with rosemary.

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Building Homes To A Higher Expectation! B U I L D I N G

N E I G H B O R H O O D S

www.summithomebuildersinc.com Summit Homebuilders Inc. Lic. #961587

&

C U S T O M

H O M E S

(559) 679-0465

LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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FACES + PLACES Abigail Cramer, Lorraine Vargo

The Creative Center's "Soup, Sip & Shop" It’s become a tradition in Visalia for hundreds of people who come together every year to sip wine, eat soup, and to admire and purchase art from the people served at The Creative Center. Artists from the Center were excited to talk with art goers about their work, and to see their masterpieces be sold.

P H O T O S

BY:

TAY L O R

K A R R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

Michelle Ducey and Shannon Fox

Renee, Ellie, Susan

Jumana Ghattas

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LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017


Welcome to VMC! Lara Atchabahian, MD, is an internal

medicine physician now seeing patients at VMC. Dr. Atchabahian completed her residency in internal medicine at Los Angeles County + Lara Atchabahian, MD University of Southern California Medical Center and received her medical degree from Keck School of Medicine at USC. She completed her undergraduate studies in biochemistry at UCLA.

To make an appointment, call 739-2000.

Sherman & Associates specializes in upscale Visalia residential properties. With over 30 years experience, Nola Sherman is “the recommended realtor.” SOLD ON R EAL EXPER IENCE.

Be Well Visalia Medical Clinic

www.vmchealth.com

nola@nolasherman.com

5400 W. Hillsdale Ave. • 559.739.2000

“Glitzy Bella has been chosen to participate in the First Ladyʼs Luncheon, May 2018 in Washington D.C. in their official Gift Bag with a Glitzy Bella jewelry orginal. A tradition since 1912, hosted by the Congressional Club.”

CHIC SWAROVSKI CRYSTALLIZED FASHION FOR THE MODERN GIRL! FIND LOCALLY AT POSH, ENVIE OR OUR WEBSITE WWW.GLITZYBELLA.COM

LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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FACES + PLACES Boys & Girls Clubs “Social Swirl” Fundraising Weekend This year’s annual Social Swirl fundraising weekend was a success for the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Sequoias. On Friday, November 10, 116 golfers participated in the Golf Classic, and the following day another 240 guests gathered for the Gala, complete with cocktail hour, live and silent auctions, and a three-course meal prepared by The Vintage Press. The weekend netted more than $114,000. The Boys & Girls Clubs "exists to help enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens." To learn more about the work and mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Sequoias, visit www.bgcsequoias.org.

Chairman, Bill Adams and Bill Hoover

Richard Hawes, Donn Ritter, Dr. Ian Duncan, Ryan Purkiss

Bill Bettencourt, Boomer Batchman, Duane Scott, Dennis Cohen

The Boys & Girls Clubs would like to thank their Major Sponsors: Platinum Sponsor: Groppetti Automotive Family. Silver Sponsors: Advanced Body & Laser Center; Brown’s Custom Jewelry; Central Valley Critical Care Medicine; LaSalle Medical Associates. Bronze Sponsors: Adams & Chrisman Families; B & R te Velde Ranch; BJ Perch Construction; Carpenter Family Children’s Foundation; Equity Group; Gold Star; Cattle Co.; Ian Duncan, MD, Inc.; Kaweah Delta Health Care District; Lagomarsino Group; Rabobank; Ultra Gro Plant Food Co.; Will Tiesiera Ford. Hole-in-One Sponsors: Nielsen & Associates Insurance Services; Olson & Pratt Farm Management. Friends of the Club: Automated Office Systems; Galen & LeAnne Quenzer; Tulare County Board of Supervisors.

Ruben Garcia, Cameron Murphy, Dustin Stewart, Garrett Chojnacki

Walter Dwelle, Tom Johnson, Bill Lutterbein, Ed Sullivan

Johnny Gailey, Brett Dwelle, Scott Pratt, Greg Loverin 54 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

Brian Gilbert, Carlos Aleman, Frank Romine, Steve Duerre

Dr. Mike Boone, Ray Owen, George Crites, Dr. Sid Frank

Mike Pitman, Joan Watte, Julie Starr, Jason Starr


“IN TEN SESSIONS YOU WILL FEEL THE DIFFERENCE, IN T WENT Y SESSIONS YOU WILL SEE THE DIFFERENCE, AND IN THIRT Y YOU WILL HAVE A WHOLE NEW BODY.” -JOSEPH PIL ATES

111 S. Court Street, Ste. 208 Downtown Visalia 559.904.3912 layne@flowstudios.net 01841795

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PI L ATE S BAR R E BO U TI Q U E

YOUR HEALTH, YOUR TIME, OUR PRIORITY

Your Primary Care Practice

Not feeling well? Come see us so we can get you healthy for the holidays WALK-IN CLINIC OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK UNTIL 7PM WEEKDAYS

PROVIDERS H.James Princeton, M.D. Charles Newton, M.D. Debbie Jo Bird, FNP/PA Rochelle Wileman, PA-C

(559) 733-4505 4025 W. Caldwell Ave, Suite A Visalia, CA 93277

LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS

T H E AT R E & A R T S THE NUTCRACKER PRESENTED BY LIVELY ARTS FOUNDATION Central California Ballet’s highly entertaining The Nutcracker is coming to the Saroyan Theatre. The whole family will enjoy the festive Party Scene, the Battle of the Nutcracker General and Mouse King, and the lovely Waltzing Flowers! Tickets are $30.00, $40.00, $50.00, $62.00. After the Sunday Matinee, there will be refreshments and favors. $12 per child with no fee for accompanying parents. When: Dec. 9, 10 Where: Saroyan Theatre, 700 M St. Fresno Contact: info@fresnoconventioncenter.com, www.fresnoconventioncenter.com

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TERRA BELLA

AN IRISH CHRISTMAS

Come down to the Hanford Fox Theatre to enjoy the music of country duo Terra Bella. Local country duo Cottonwood Creek and local rock/Americana group Motel Drive will be opening. Tickets are $20. When: Dec. 15, Doors: 6 p.m. Show: 7 p.m. Where: Hanford Fox Theatre, 326 N Irwin Street Contact: (559) 584-7823

Take a journey through Christmas in Ireland with dancing, singing and Irish traditional music celebrating the international spirit of the holiday season. Tickets are $25, $35, $45, $60. When: Dec. 17, 2 p.m. Where: Saroyan Theatre, 700 M St, Fresno, CA 93721 Contact: info@fresnoconventioncenter.com, www.fresnoconventioncenter.com

HOLIDAY MADNESS One of the Central Valley’s most popular holiday traditions, with more than 300 performers launches the season of celebration with a spirit of song. Come and share the joy in experiencing all our holiday favorites—old and new! Tickets are $22-$45. When: Dec. 16, Doors: 6:30 p.m. Show: 7:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 300 Main Street Contact: 559-625-1369, www.foxvisalia.org


TO ALL THOSE THAT HELPED US ALONG THE WAY

Happy Holidays!

Celebrate with family! Walnut Park

Independent Retirement Living

Visalia, CA walnutpark.net Call 559-664-3673 today to schedule a visit and ask about our winter specials!*

Penney Renee Sick

REGISTERED PRINCIPAL CA Insurance #0D39906

Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC

303 E. Caldwell Avenue | Visalia, CA 93277 | 559.429.4270 Investment advisory services offered through Raymond James Financial Services Advisors, Inc.

*SPECIAL PROMOTIONS ARE LIMITED WITH SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS. TALK WITH COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT FOR DETAILS. ©2017 HARVEST MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL NIC MANAGEMENT LLC

Interior plantscaping and some simple design elements can make your place of business or home more warm and inviting. Call 559.734.4920 to see what we can do for your interior.

STAGING

DESIGN AND INSTALLATION

LIVE PLANT RENTAL AND LEASING LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS

SHEN YUN WORLD TOUR!

CIRQUE DREAMS HOLIDAZE

SHEN YUN WORLD TOUR!

Cirque Dreams Holidaze lights up the holiday season with its critically acclaimed holiday extravaganza. This circus-like holiday stage spectacular features ornaments, costumes and acrobatics that celebrate holiday themes, music and traditions for the entire family. Ticket prices TBA. When: Dec. 19, 20, 7:30 p.m. Where: Saroyan Theatre, 700 M St, Fresno, CA 93721 Contact: info@fresnoconventioncenter.com, www.fresnoconventioncenter.com

Shen Yun brings the profound spirit to life on stage with unrivaled artistic mastery. Every dance movement, every musical note, makes this a stunning visual and emotional experience you won’t find anywhere else. Tickets are $63, $73, $83, $103, $123, $153. When: Dec. 26, 7:30 p.m., Dec. 27, 2 p.m. Where: Saroyan Theatre, 700 M St, Fresno, CA 93721 Contact: info@fresnoconventioncenter.com, www.fresnoconventioncenter.com

SCROOGED (1988) CHOICES presents Scrooged from 1988, A traditional Christmas movie that is a perfect way to kick off the holiday spirit. Tickets are $5. When: Dec. 21, 6:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 300 Main Street Contact: 559-625-1369, www.foxvisalia.org

SONS OF THE SAN JOAQUIN PRESENTS A TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION Come kick off the holiday season and celebrate Christmas with the music of the Sons of the San Joaquin. Tickets are $15 - $30. When: Dec. 23, Doors: 2 p.m. Show: 3 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre 300 Main Street Contact: 559-625-1369, www.foxvisalia.org 58 L I F E S T Y L E | D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS


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LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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THE SHINING (1980) CHOICES presents The Shining! Tickets are $5. When: Jan. 4, 6:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 300 Main Street Contact: 559-625-1369, www.foxvisalia.org

THE PLANETS The Tulare County Symphony turns its gaze skyward for its January program. Holst's "The Planets" and Ravel's Piano Concerto in G Major performed by Steven Lin. Tickets are $22 - $45 When: Jan. 20, Doors: 6:30 p.m. Show: 7:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 300 Main Street Contact: 559-625-1369, www.foxvisalia.org

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS

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DIVERSIONS & EXCU R S I O N S ICE SKATE VISALIA Looking to host a fun corporate or company holiday party? Grab your friends and family and enjoy a day or evening of fun! See website for dates and times. When: Dec. 2-31, 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Where: Garden Street Plaza, Visalia CA Contact: (559) 713-4365, recreation@visalia.city

WINTER WONDERLAND SHOPPING BAZAAR Come down to the Winter Wonderland Shopping Bazaar to make your holiday shopping experience much easier. There will be over 30 vendors and crafters, with door prizes, raffle prizes, and entertainment. When: Dec. 10, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Where: Visalia Veterans Memorial Building, 609 W Center Ave, Visalia, CA Contact: Sandra Jones, (559) 623-2475


10 MINUTE LUBE OIL-N-FILTER

TAKING CARE OF YOUR VEHICLE SINCE 1985 OPEN Mon.-Sat. 8-5 Now open Sundays 9-3

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223 E. Tulare Ave., Visalia 1630 E. Main St., Visalia 3550 S. Demaree, Visalia 1542 Tulare Ave., Tulare

COMMERCIAL CLEANING SERVICES Janitorial Service For dependable commercial cleaning service ServiceMaster Clean can help. daily, weekly, or monthly janitorial service Medical & professional office cleaning

Office system cleaning

Aggregate floor cleaning

Nearly any other cleaning you want

Tile & grout cleaning

Window washing

Carpet cleaning using various processes

ServiceMaster by Hellstern

Ron Hellstern owner 559.738.8927 Serving the Visalia area | Locally owned and operated for over 25 years LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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FEE FREE DAY AT SEQUOIA NATIONAL PARK Take a hike to the Nation’s Christmas Tree, the General Grant Tree, and celebrate the holidays among the snow and trees, all free of charge! When: Dec. 10 Where: Sequoia National Park Contact: 559-565-3341, www.nps.gov/seki

CRAFT FAIR EVENT Come join us for a craft fair to kick off the holiday spirit! There will be a raffle and prizes. When: Dec. 16, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Where: Visalia Unified School District Office, 5000 W Cypress Ave Contact: Linda McClure, lmcclure@vusd.org, 559-730-7572

CAMP IGLOO

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS

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The Lifestyle Center invites kids ages 5-12 years old to attends a week long camp filled with fun games & activities, indoor swimming, Rockwall climbing, movies, jiu-jitsu and a trip to Adventure Park. Snacks will be provided! Members: $80, Guests: $95. When: Dec. 18-22, 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Where: The Lifestyle Center Contact: Trish Bozzo, 559-624-3416, pbozzo@kdhcd.org


Lic. # 939967

Replace Broken Tile Cut and Repair Valleys Replace Damaged Vapor Barrier Replace Water Damaged Wood Reset/Seal Roof Flashings Dryer Vent Clean Out Pressure Wash/Treat Gutter Clean Out Call Today For your FREE Estimate Jason Hickox hickoxrooong@gmail.com

559-651-6689

AMER ICA’S

HERI TAGE JOIN THE CHAMBER FOR A SLIDESHOW PRESENTATION

JANUARY 17 AT 12:00 P.M. AT THE CITY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 220 N. SANTA FE

JUNE 7-16, 2018 INCLUDES 10 DAY TOUR, 15 MEALS, ROUNDTRIP AIRFARE FROM FRESNO, TRANSPORTATION TO THE FRESNO AIRPORT, 4 HIGH END HOTELS

FOR PRICING OR REGISTRATION DETAILS CALL THE VISALIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

at 559-734-5876 or visit VisaliaChamber.org/travel

HIGHLIGHTS Boat ride to the foot of Niagara Falls, Dinner at the historic 1923 Red Coach Inn, Corning Museum of Glass, Lancaster’s Amish Country with traditional dinner, Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitors Center, Arlington National Cemetery and Changing of the Guard, Capital and Memorial Tours, Jamestown Settlement and Colonial Williamsburg with traditional tavern dinner

VISALIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 222 N. Garden St. Suite 300, Visalia

LIFEST YLE | DECEMBER 2017

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Breast Augmentation

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MD, FACS Board-Certified Plastic & Reconstructive Surgeon

Lifestyle Magazine - December 2017  
Lifestyle Magazine - December 2017  

Lifestyle Magazine - December 2017