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STYLE, ART, CULTURE, + EVENTS OF THE SOUTH VALLEY MARCH 2017

HOME TOUR

EPICURE

TRAVEL

CLOVER HOUSE

CHEMISTRY MEETS CULINARY

BAKU, AZERBAIJAN

ECRWSS RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMER LOCAL

ECRWSS PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID PORTLAND OR PERMIT NO. 2160


Spring into Your Bathroom Upgrade HOP INTO OUR SHOWROOM FOR THE LA RGEST SELECTION OF TILE IN TOW N


BLOOD DRIVE OPEN HOUSE Thursday May 4 • 3-7 pm

Being one in a million to have

Join Us for Our Fourth Annual Blood Drive & Open House Event

Purpura at her age, Corie’s story

Meet April Sky, host

Our beneficiary is Corie Davis, a brave 19-year-old young

woman who has been diagnosed

with a rare autoimmune disease. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic is truly an inspiration. As she

continues to fight, we are honored to help bring our community together for this special teen.

of 99.7 Classic Rock, and enjoy light refreshments while donating blood and supporting our community.

FREE GIFTS FOR THOSE WHO DONATE BLOOD

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HOME TOUR

MARDI GRAS MIXOLOGY CIRCUS

THE CLOVER HOUSE A History Restored

A Magnifique Affair

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Jack & Charlie's and The Depot teamed up to host a unique evening of mixology and food.

8 Letter from the Executive Editor 10 Wordplay

EPICURE

CHEMISTRY MEETS CULINARY The Untamed Chef

32

Albert Hernandez, The Untamed Chef, uses molecular gastronomy to create unique and fl avorful dishes.

12 Refl ections of Visalia: A New Deal for an Old Visalia Building? 44 Business Profile: AMCC—Getting to the Heart of Health Care 50 Literary Arts: Lindy Gligorijevic 54 Happenings

TRAVEL

BAKU A Tapestry Woven by Time

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World-renowned artist and Lindsay native, Shane Guffogg, gives us insight into his recent trip to Baku, Azerbaijan.

COVER: The exterior of The Clover House used to be yellow, but was painted green during the renovation, not only because it would have been period-authentic, but because it is Tricia Kirksey’s favorite color. TOP: Photo shows the portion of the living area that used to be a screened-in porch, where railroad conductors would walk through to get to John Kirkman’s office (the closed door on the left) in the early 1900s.


Ou r

Go is rgeo ou u rG sG if t if t to Wr Yo app u! in g

Celebrate Life! Celebrate Love! Happy Easter! Kitchen Gourmet BBQ Accessories Garden Candles Bath & Body Wedding Registry

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Gift Baskets Baby Gifts Pet Gifts Gourmet Tea Gift Certificates Baby Registry Great Gifts For All!

219 West Main Street • Visalia, CA 93291 • 559.733.0213 In Beautiful Downtown Visalia Since 1991


Published By

Executive Editor Editorial Coordinator Editorial Staff Senior Designer Web Designer/Designer Contributing Writers

Business Management

Operations Manager Advertising Sales

Sales Office

E-Mail WEBSITE View The Mag Online

DMI Agency 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 Karen Tellalian Kelly Lapadula Malynda Parsons Chris Bly Kaci Hansen Albert Hernandez Diane Slocum Shane Guffogg Sue Burns Terry L. Ommen Malkasian Accountancy LLP Gary Malkasian CPA Jeffrey Malkasian EA Maria Gaston Melissa Olson Melissa@DMIAgency.com 801 W. Main St. Visalia, CA 93291 559.739.1747 • Fax 559.738.0909 Lifestyle@DMIAgency.com www.VisaliaLifestyle.com Issuu.com/LifestyleMagazine Facebook.com/LifestyleMag Instagram: visalialifestyle

RACK LOCATIONS DMI Agency Evolutions Fitness Center, Tulare

Exeter Chamber of Commerce Tazzaria Coffee & Tea The Lifestyle Center

Visalia Chamber of Commerce Visalia Convention Center

COUNTERTOP LOCATIONS 210 Cafe Arts Consortium Arts Visalia Ashoori & Co. Jewelers Blend WIne Room Bravo Farms Smokehouse Chad Clark Hair Salon Café 225 Charcuterie Chelsea Street Boutique CreekSide Day Spa Skin & Laser Center Courtyard Aesthetics Downtown Visalia Alliance Ed Dena Auto Center, Visalia Exeter Chamber of Commerce For Such a Time Boutique Franey's Design Center

Fugazzis Glick's Old Fashion Meats & Deli ImagineU Children’s Museum Janeen’s Kaweah Delta Hospital Keller Williams Reality Max's Cookies Metropolis Day Spa Michaels Jewelry Monét’s, Exeter Pacific Treasures Renaissance Salon Sage Salon Salon 525 Sherman & Associates Smile Central Valley, Tulare Tazz. Coffee The Gardens at Cal Turf

The Looking Glass V Medical Spa Valley Business Bank (Downtown) Velvet Sky Visalia Ceramic Tile Visalia First Assembly Visalia Fox Theatre Visalia Marriott Visalia Medical Clinic Watsons Wildflower Café, Exeter Williams, Brodersen & Pritchett, Attorneys at Law Windows Plus, Inc. Wyndham Hotel

Visalia Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and is distributed via direct mail to nearly 13,000 homes in the upper-middle and high-income neighborhoods in Visalia. An additional 2,500 copies are distributed at various distribution points around Visalia, Tulare, and Exeter. Views expressed in columns are those of the columnist and not necessarily those of DMI Agency or its advertisers. Circulation of this issue: 15,500 © 2017 DMI Agency

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FR O M TH E

EDITOR

W

hat an incredibly beautiful winter we are having. Since moving here in 1987, I’m not sure if the view of the mountains has ever been so consistently spectacular. On a recent visit to Colorado I spent a lot of time with the Rockies in view, and they had nothing on our Sierras. Hopefully some of our fabulous local photographers are taking advantage of the clear blue skies and snow capped peaks so when it’s 110 degrees this summer, we can all remember this winter wonderland really happened.

Currently, the talks regarding the building go something like, “What on earth are we going do with this?” We hope the County finds a solution and that this near-century-old building finds someone to give it a little love. What some see as nothing but old and worn, others see as nothing but potential. If you’re the latter, you’re going to love “The Clover House: A History Restored” on page 20. Exeter residents Charlie and Tricia Kirksey fell in love with a 109-year-old uninhabitable craftsman house and

As if we don’t already take every issue to heart, the mere thought that our words and photographs could be used to trace the roots of one of our featured homes long into the future makes us proud of what we do... E X E C U T I V E

E D I T O R

K A R E N

T E L L A L I A N

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT A STORY IDEA, CONTACT ME AT KAREN@DMIAGENCY.COM

Our community’s love of history is evidenced by many of our Lifestyle readers’ favorite feature, “Reflections of History,” written by local historian Terry Ommen. Over the years, Terry has taken us on some exciting trips down memory lane as we imagine what it would have been like to live here decades ago. Stories of trains, robbers, and the occasional ghost have filled our minds with images of another life. This month, starting on page 12, Terry gives us some interesting and detailed history on the 82-year-old building at 210 N. Court Street, most commonly known as the “Welfare Building.” Since 1854, the four-story building has been owned by the County of Tulare and has been without occupants for about 10 years.

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have since painstakingly restored it to full glory. Now, not only does it have loving new tenants, the home serves as a way to share its rich local history with the community. As we close the books on this month’s issue, we are reminded that everything we say and do might one day be looked upon as part of our community’s history. As if we don’t already take every issue to heart, the mere thought that our words and photographs could be used to trace the roots of one of our featured homes long into the future makes us proud of what we do, albeit a little nervous. As we look forward to spring, give your house some TLC; perhaps the home you live in today will be a shining star tomorrow.


Your Home. Your Look.

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T E X T

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S L O C U M

WO R D PLAY News on writing, books + the world of publishing

I

n this month of March when those with a drop of blood from the Old Sod celebrate their ancestral connection to Eire, the emerald island of Ireland, we readers can find books to help us develop that relationship. Himself, a novel by Jess Kidd, was released this month by Atria Books. Dublin charmer Mahoney knows he was abandoned on the steps of an orphanage, but it isn’t until he is in his twenties that he learns that there is much more to his story, including the possibility of foul play. Distinctive characters, living and dead, join him in his quest. For children, there is How to Catch a Leprechaun by Adam Wallace, illustrated by Andy Elkerton, and published last month by Sourcebooks Jabberwocky. Catching a leprechaun may be more trouble than it is worth, as all kinds of mischief follow the little fellow wherever he goes. Black Background Celtic Mandalas and Knots to Color, by Nora Cronin from CreateSpace (January) is an adult coloring book. The adult coloring fad offers grown-ups the opportunity to relax and relieve stress while creating intricate designs of color on black backgrounds.

Media Attention (2010), Don’t Get Mad, Get Even (2008), The Event Makers I’ve Known (2012), and Trouble in Dos Bayou (2009). His most recent work is Friends, Patriots and Scoundrels: A Memoir. WRITERS’ WORKSHOP Writing by Writers is currently accepting applications for the Tomales Bay Workshop, which is scheduled for Oct. 18-22. Acceptance is based on a 10-page writing sample. Application fee is $25. Deadline to apply for a fellowship is May 1. Topics include “Working in the Soul Mine: Trusting the Shadows Beneath

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UPMARKET DEFINED What is “upmarket fiction?” Let’s start with “commercial” and “literary.” Commercial fiction is generally fiction that falls into popular genres such as thriller, science fiction, and romance. Literary fiction is basically exceptionally good writing. It is often hard to categorize into a genre. So the increasingly popular term “upmarket” tends to refer to literary quality fiction with a commercial appeal. If you look for an agent, you will likely see this term. LITERARY AGENTS

VALLEY WRITERS Tim Z. Hernandez’ telling of the deportees who died in a plane crash near Coalinga in 1948 was released in January. It is a powerful historical document filled with memories that bring out the humanity of the 32 people who died in the crash, most of whom were known to the public for almost 70 years only as “the deportees.” Hernandez puts names and personalities on the victims and the residents who witnessed the tragedy. Former Fresno City Councilman Elvin C. Bell, has written about a dozen books. His most prominent include Beyond Cantua Creek: A Fascinating Series of Articles That Include National and International Events That Escaped

entries until May 1. Authors who have not published a book (including selfpublishing) are eligible. Entries may not be previously published anywhere, including online. Maximum length is 3,500 words. Prize is $1,000 Canadian. U.S. entry fee is $30 and includes a one-year subscription. Details at: malahatreview.ca/contests/far_horizons _fiction/info.html.

the Word” led by Luis Alberto Urrea and “Mapping the Interior Journey: Reading and Writing as Spiritual Practice” by Fenton Johnson. Fee before April 1 is $1,650, Details: writingxwriters.org. WRITING CONTEST The Indiana Review 2017 Poetry Prize is open for submissions until April 1. Winner receives $1,000 and publication in the review. The final judge is Vievee Francis. Entry fee is $20 and includes a one-year subscription. Details at: indianareview. org/contests. The Malahat Review Far Horizon’s Award for Short Fiction will accept

A new agent seeking to build a client list may be just what a new writer starting a search for an agent needs. Claire Roberts of Trident Media Group is one of these and she is looking for upmarket to literary fiction, especially crime fiction. Quiressa Robinson moved from an editor’s position with St. Martin’s Press to become an agent with D4EO Literary. She is looking for science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, historical fiction, family sagas, contemporary young adult and nonfiction. Keep up with new agents at writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-toliterary-agents/new-agency-alerts. THE LAST WORD “May you have the hindsight to know where you've been, the foresight to know where you're going, and the insight to know when you're going too far.” (Irish Blessing)


TASTE OF THE WINE COUNTRY

presents

SUPPORTING THE VISALIA COUNT Y CENTER ROTARY COMMUNIT Y SUPPORT ASSOCIATION

A FUNDRAISING EVENT A T T H E VISALIA COUNTRY CLUB 625 N. Ranch Street | April 8th, 2017 @ 5:30PM

Come join us for this popular, top-notch food and wine tasting experience. Spread over Visalia Country Club’s spacious Club House and lawns, guests socialize and wander among the delicious food and over 15 wine tasting stations. Enjoy views of the lush golf course, stately oak trees, water fountains, and swans effortlessly drifting in the pond that fronts the 16th green while bidding on exciting auction items. For more information or to get your tickets, please visit:

www.vccrwineauction.com sponsored by

Kenneth & Anna Zankel | Lagomarsino Group William Martin | ServiceMaster by Benevento | DMI Agency | Fylon Foundation | Bourdette & Partners | A Place to Grow Montessori | Afreen Kaelble Eagle Mountain Casino | El Rosal/Pablo Martinez | Dr. Steven and Karin Koobatian Vocational Designers, Inc. | Kaweah Delta Health Care District | Houk & Hornburg Tulare County Federal Credit Union | Tri Counties Bank | Marlene Romanazzi, CPA | Rabobank | Collins & Schoettler | Kris Lareau Office Pride | Dick Toriggino | True Legacy Quality Jewelers | Visalia Ceramic Tile, Inc. | Melissa E. Webb | Suncrest Bank | Office Pride | Total Property Management | Allen Broslovsky | Rilian Ball | Wyndham | Fox Interpreting David Dieleman, Vollmer, Daniels, Gaebe & Grove | De Jonge Financial | Sam Logan | The Auto Shop

All donated auction items are charitable contributions and help raise funds for local and international service projects.


A NEW DEAL

FOR AN OLD VISALIA BUILDING?

R

ecently, the old building at 210 N. Court Street has been getting some buzz. For 82 years this four-story county building, constructed when art-deco style was queen, has been part of Visalia’s landscape, and for the last decade or so it has been without occupants. The passage of time is taking its toll on this old-timer and more and more signs of age are appearing. The current talk is about the building’s future and what’s in store for this downtown Visalia landmark. No one seems to know what is going to happen, or if they do, they’re not talking. So as its future is being contemplated, it is helpful to know and consider its history. Courthouse Square, the block

bounded by Court, Oak, Church, and Center streets, has belonged to the County of Tulare since about 1854. The county had their eye on the parcel since Visalia wrestled county seat status away from Woodsville in the election of 1853. Early on, the county had earmarked the site for a county courthouse, and in 1857 the first justice building was built on the block, although it was small and somewhat primitive. The first substantial courthouse, jail, and county office building constructed on the site was a handsome domed structure built in 1876. It was big at the time, but as the county grew, more space was needed, so in 1908, matching style north and south wings were added to it. T EXT

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BY

TE R RY

L .

The county continued to grow, and by the late 1920s officials again began looking for more room. Offsite space was used for some county offices as a temporary measure, but it took a federal government program spurred by the Great Depression for a more permanent solution to materialize. The official beginning of the depression was Oct. 29, 1929. Later called “Black Tuesday,” the day marked a huge stock market crash and the beginning of a dramatic economic downturn. By 1932, 25 percent of the American workforce was unemployed. So when President Franklin Roosevelt took office in 1933, he introduced a series of economic measures that

O MME N

The 1876 domed courthouse with wings adjacent to the 1935 addition. View is looking southeast on Court Street, circa 1937.


collectively became known as the New Deal. One of the programs or agencies he created was called the Public Works Administration (PWA) whose purpose was to stimulate the economy by creating jobs through the construction of public buildings. It was during this time that governmental entities like cities and counties were encouraged to apply for financial assistance on public works projects. Tulare County took advantage of the offer and applied for a $40,000 grant from PWA, money that would help pay for the construction of another courthouse addition. The county was approved for the grant, and in late 1933 the project was put out to bid. Bids came in too high and all were rejected. In mid-1934, another request for bids was made. This time, Frank J. Reilly, a building contractor from San Francisco, submitted a bid of about $128,000, and he was selected for the job. As part of his award agreement, he promised to hire 10-40 men during construction and, when possible, hire only Tulare County residents. He estimated the job would take about 200 working days to complete. The new four-story building would be 50 ft. wide and 104 ft. long and 97 ft. high. It was estimated that when finished, the structure would contain 2,000 yards of concrete and contain 150 tons of reinforced steel. The work on the new courthouse project began with demolition. The new addition was going to be built directly adjacent to the west wall of the 1876 courthouse, so in order to build it tight

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against the wall, the massive steps of the old courthouse had to be removed. Orville Jeffers, a local heavy equipment operator, was hired to remove them. On August 9, 1934, he placed charges of black powder under the foundation, blasted them loose, and then hauled away the rubble. When he finished, the workers began digging the basement to the new building. By September, forms

for the basement walls were in place, ready for concrete to be poured. Two five-hour shifts of men worked on the building. Carpenters, plumbers, electricians, concrete pourers and cement finishers, sheet metal workers, and many others all took their turn. By January 1935, the terrazzo floor was being laid. Frank Reilly, the contractor, and Ernest J. Kump, the Fresno

architect, both came periodically to inspect the work. By May, only final touches remained. In fact, on May 23 it was announced that the courthouse grounds were being scheduled for cleanup and landscaping as soon as construction materials and equipment were cleared from the site. The county applied for funds from the California State Emergency Relief Administration (SERA), a state based organization charged with assisting the unemployed. They committed to pay 12 men for a period of four weeks to work on the grounds. When the new addition was finished, it didn’t take county officials long to make the move. On June 27, Tulare County Treasurer John Daly was first to relocate into his new office. Others soon followed. For 18 years the 1876 courthouse with its wings and the 1935 addition sat side-byside. In 1952 the big Tehachapi earthquake damaged the old 1876 building beyond repair. Eventually it was demolished leaving the 1935 addition standing by itself. Over the years, the building has been known by different names. While it was under construction, it was the “courthouse addition.” Later it became the “hall of records,” and at other times it was called the “courthouse annex.” Still to others, it was the “welfare building.” Regardless, it has served in various capacities during its life and many now wonder, what’s next? The courthouse addition shortly after it was built, circa 1936.


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M A R D I

G R A S

M I X O L O G Y

C I R C U S

A MAGNIFIQUE AFFAIR W

hile Visalia may be far removed from the festivities of New Orleans’ French Quarter, both in distance and in atmosphere, a little piece of Mardi Gras came to town in the form of food, fun, and creative mixology. In early February, a lively group of 60 guests gathered at two of Visalia’s most frequented restaurants for a unique and delicious Mardi Gras dinner. In partnership with Paso Robles’ Hovannisian Vineyard and Almesa Winery, the staff from Jack & Charlie’s

and The Depot created a Louisianainspired menu, pairing each course with specialty cocktails featuring Hovannisian’s Iago port-style Syrah. The restaurants’ manager William Sa elaborated on how the Mixology Circus event evolved. After two successful “Wine Circus” dinners that featured the Iago Syrah along with wines from Baker & Brain and Sinor La Valle, William explained, “winemaker John Hovannisian would talk…about cocktails and how he experimented at home with his Iago port replacing a gin

Dr. Richard Clutson and Maria O’Rourke.

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Each unique cocktail was made with Hovannisian’s Iago port-style Syrah.

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or vodka. We went from a wine dinner to John's new passion of mixology using his Iago port as the spirit in cocktails.” Only about 75 cases of Iago are made each year, using approximately 98 percent Syrah and two percent Viognier grapes grown at Hovannisian Vineyard, Paso Robles. Aged for three years in French Nadalie oak barrels, the resulting port-style Syrah is dark and complex, which is why John chose to name it “Iago,” after one of Shakespeare’s worst villains.

Jack & Charlie’s bartender Tate Darwin mixing up cocktails.

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TOP: Guests heading over to The Depot after enjoying drinks and appetizers at Jack & Charlie’s.


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John revealed that before becoming a winemaker, he was a trained Shakespeare actor cast as Iago in a production of Othello, directed by Brewster Mason of the Royal Shakespeare Company. Thus, his connection to the character and his many complicated layers inspired the name of the Syrah. THE MAIN EVENT It was clear from the start that this would be an extraordinary evening. With cocktails composed by Hovannisian and complementary dishes refined by The Depot, the evening’s menu was nothing short of magnifique. The experience began with a reception in the bar at Jack & Charlie’s, as the attendees arrived and donned strings of Mardi Gras beads. Passed appetizers of Fancy Deviled Eggs and Spicy Pork and Ricotta Meatballs complemented the evening’s first cocktail, the Iago Kir Royale. This delightful mixture of champagne and the featured port, in place of the Kir Royale’s traditional Crème de Cassis, made an effervescent and flavorful first toast. After the cocktail hour, the spirited crowd took the party across the street to The Depot, where they were seated for dinner at community-style tables in

the Dome Room. Bartender Tate Darwin mingled graciously with guests as he mixed the cocktails for each course, making sure they were garnished beautifully. Each dinner plate and cocktail brought exciting taste experiences that melded traditional Mardi Gras dishes with new and unique libations. The Crab Cakes Louisiana were served with the “Halo on Wheels” cocktail, a mix that included Halo juice with Iago, scotch, and orange bitters. A rich and creamy New Orleans Seafood Bisque was balanced with the interesting flavors in the “La Louisiane,” a mixture of absinthe, rye, and Iago with a Halo garnish. The decadent beef Wellington provided a smooth backdrop for the strong flavors of the “Bijou Cocktail’s” gin, Iago, Green Chartreuse, orange bitters, and an Amarena cherry garnish. Dessert was perhaps the crowning glory, made by John’s wife Karen Hovannisian. An assortment of “Kingslayer Cookies” for sharing included burnt butter chocolate chip, almond and cherry biscotti, chocolate topped with chocolate-covered Amarena cherries, shortbread with caramel and chocolate, and Mardi Gras mask iced chocolate sugar cookies. A glass of the Iago port-style Syrah, with

its fruit-forward black currant flavor and luxurious velvety finish, was the perfect companion for the sweet treats. (Lucky guests were able to take some cookies home to share.) Seated at our table, Patti Ziebol, Dr. Richard Clutson, and Tina Tetz kept our conversations lively and fun as we tasted and compared dishes and drinks. Patti’s favorite course was the crab cakes with the “Halo on Wheels” cocktail, while Tina preferred the “La Louisiane.” She shared that she thought the “Bijou” was very strong; we all agreed it was most likely because of the Green Chartreuse Liqueur, which we soon learned is a mixture of 130 herbs fermented in alcohol and made by Carthusian monks since 1737. Armed with a different perspective gleaned from this new knowledge, Tina tasted the “Bijou” again and discovered an increased appreciation for the layers of flavor. Tina also thought the crab cake was fantastic; her favorite course was the dessert. The atmosphere was warm and lively with conversation, an abundance of laughter, and the occasional “Laissez les bon temps rouler!” It was a most festive evening, enjoyed by all in attendance. Future dinner “circuses” are in the works – you won’t want to miss the chance to be part of the next extraordinary event!

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Creative appetizers were served at Jack & Charlie’s before the main event. Karen (L) and John Hovannisian (R) standing with Bryan and Kathy Wallace (center).

Bottles of the Iago port-style Syrah.

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The main course included beef Wellington and vegetables.

Art Christman (L) with Donna and Greg Morgan.


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A HISTORY

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REST


ORED O S O T P H

The front upstairs screened-in porch features a variety of antiques, including an 1880s sleeping couch in the far left corner.

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HOME TOUR

The front screen and door are original to the house, as well as all of the wood. Charlie and his crew spent months stripping layers of paint to reveal the wood.

O

ld homes can be found in nearly every community, but what exactly makes an older home significant? While its age is certainly a contributing factor, the architecture, the history, and the people who built memories inside it are what make it truly unique. Few people understand this better than Charlie and Tricia Kirksey, a local couple who lovingly restored a beautiful craftsman home near downtown Exeter. While their act of preserving a piece of history may seem like a nod to the past, it is just as much a symbol of dedication to the future. Three years ago, Charlie and Tricia were happily settled into their threebedroom Exeter home, a place where they assumed they would reside until retirement and beyond. But, as it often does, life threw an unexpected curveball in the form of a large and dilapidated 1908 craftsman home. Armed with a hammer and a lot of passion, the Kirkseys purchased the nearly unlivable home with the “impossible” dream of

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restoration. “If somebody else would have gotten this house, it would have been torn down,” said Tricia. “It was in such bad shape. A lot of people did not understand how we were going to

do what we did and thought we were crazy.” Flipping through a photo album filled with almost unrecognizable “before” pictures, Tricia pointed out spots where the floors were falling apart, where the ceiling was deteriorating, and where

siding was falling off the house. Nearly 110 years of tenants had taken its toll on the Exeter landmark, and to some it seemed the only option was to tear it down. Nine years before the Kirkseys purchased the home, a man named Wes Clover and his wife Marion became the owners with the dream of fixing it up as a venue for the Exeter community. With unplanned barriers in their way, years passed and their dream never became a reality. Faced with a tough decision, Wes approached long-time friends Charlie and Tricia about buying the house from him, knowing that if anyone could fix it up, it would be them. “Wes was very community-oriented and had a huge heart for this city and wanted to do a lot of things for it,” said Tricia. “Wes talked to Charlie at length about what his vision was and what he knew Charlie was capable of doing, so we agreed to purchase it.” In May 2014, the nine-month renovation began. As a contractor by trade, Charlie worked on the house full-

INSET: The bannisters on the staircase are original to the home, though Charlie restored and handcrafted the dentation molding.


HOME TOUR HOME TOUR

PICTURED: The built-in cabinets in the dining room are original to the house and are filled with antique china. RIGHT: To the right of the dining room sits the office, which was used in the early 1900s by John Kirkman as a place of business for the railroad company.

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time to bring it back to life. He researched craftsman style architecture and décor and even duplicated many of the home’s original features to ensure consistency in both style and era. For example, in what used to be a front screened-in porch, Charlie handcrafted box-beamed ceilings to match the existing beams in the living area. Other duplicated features include some of the kitchen cabinets, the siding on the outside of the home, and the intricate dentation molding on the staircase banisters. The century-old house was in an unlivable state

and his crew of at least four men peeled back decades of paint, finally revealing the wood that withstood 100 years of man’s attempt to cover it up. “For Wes, bringing the wood back was one of the biggest things he wanted,” said Tricia. “You see some of the old pictures with seven to eight layers of paint, and just think ‘how could someone do that to a house of this character?’” Charlie even uncovered several pocket doors in the kitchen that had, for possibly 60 years, been preserved beneath seven layers of

when the couple got started. Even still, there were surprisingly many original features intact, including the wood flooring, most of the windows, the dining room’s built-in cabinets, the stone fireplace in the main living area, the banisters on the staircase, the entryway closet, and most of the doors throughout the house. During the renovation process, one of the most difficult and time-consuming tasks was stripping the paint off the walls to get to the original wood. For four months straight, Charlie

paint. Charlie explained, “There’s no telling how long they’ve been in there. I opened the walls and completely rebuilt the track, but the doors were in great shape. Opening it up made me think about how long ago someone even touched those doors.” While the Kirkseys were restoring the home’s physical character, they also made efforts to research and uncover its rich history and purpose, which ranges from a railroad home to a private residence to a home for the developmentally disabled.

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HOME TOUR

While remodeling the kitchen, Charlie handcrafted many of the kitchen cabinets in order to match the existing design.

In fact, Tricia grew up right across the street and, as a local real estate broker, has sold the house twice in her career. So the home’s history is significant to the Kirkseys in more ways than mere fascination. The house was originally built in 1908 by M.C. English for a man named Jonathan Grant Kirkman, who brought the railroad company to Exeter. With the railroad company located just behind the property, John would do business from his home office. The conductors would enter through the former screened-in porch (now part of the main living area) and walk directly into John’s office, which could be closed off from the rest of the house. In fact, the Kirkseys use this study today and have furnished it with craftsman era antiques that reflect that time period. Throughout the home, the Kirkseys have displayed antique furniture and special pieces they’ve purchased from close friends and family members. Perhaps some of the more rare and significant items include two genuine Stickley chairs, which Charlie restored after finding them in a Visalia antique store. Other special pieces include an authentic 1880s sleeping couch, a vintage Murphy bed acquired from a 26 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 7

friend, a craftsman-era clock placed above the mantel, a Tiffany lamp that belonged to Wes, and a tea cup that belonged to his wife Marion. The Kirkseys see their home as a place where they can bring together aspects of Exeter history; they’ve even kept a book listing the provenance of many of the antiques.

“A lot of the antiques that we’ve bought from family and friends, have history behind them,” said Tricia. “They are excited knowing that we brought those pieces here and they’re going to be used and shared with other people.” And sharing that local history, of both the home and of Exeter, has been one of the Kirksey’s greatest joys. In addition to being a wedding and event venue, the couple has made the home available

for historic tours to locals and tourists. In December 2015, they opened up The Clover House to the Exeter Woman’s Club Christmas Home Tour and had 400 guests come through while their family and friends dressed in period clothing. “We were really excited to be on the Exeter Woman’s Club tour because it brought so many people through who didn’t realize the history of Exeter and the railroad history,” said Tricia. Charlie added, “And there are still a lot of local people who don’t know about the history, so that’s what we want to share.” While most of the home is period authentic, the Kirkseys added several features to make it accessible for large events. Charlie converted both of the downstairs bathrooms to be handicapped accessible and built a large back veranda with a ramp to accommodate a variety of guests. For Charlie, an Exeter resident since 1972, taking on this project was a natural fit. Even though he spent 20 years as a truck driver before becoming a contractor, he always enjoyed doing work with his hands. Once he got into construction, much of his work revolved around remodeling older homes. “When you deal with an old home remodel, it’s very hard when you don’t

The downstairs bathroom was remodeled and serves as part of the groomsmen suite for weddings.


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Russell wasn’t feeling well after a very busy week. He saw a cardiologist and then the phone rang – get to the hospital. He had suffered a heart attack. He quickly made his way to the hospital where he underwent an urgent triple bypass surgery.

“I was pleased with the care … I feel very blessed. Everyone – my surgeon, the nurses, everyone – was wonderful. If you have to have a heart attack, Visalia is a good place to have one!”


TOP: A large veranda and ramp were added onto the house to accommodate weddings and large events. LEFT: Many of the pieces throughout the home have some sort of meaning, including the statues, which represent members of the Kirksey family. RIGHT: During events, the old carriage house is used for serving food and drinks to guests.

know what’s going to be behind a wall,” said Tricia. “But Charlie has been around old homes for a long time and knows how to do those, so that’s his specialty.” Though Tricia has played an important role in bringing this dream to life, she credits Charlie with the creative process saying, “We both had a vision for this, but this is all his gifts and talents and a showcase of what he’s had to offer for a long time…And there were a lot of people who were here helping us—a lot of my family members, like our son Jake; my sister Terri and her husband George; my sister Brenda and her husband Robert; my nieces and nephews; and 28

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just friends that have given their time and love.” Perhaps the most encouragement came from family friend and owner of Hometown Emporium, Kristy Alves. Like many Exeter natives, she was also good friends with Wes, who came in to her shop for lunch almost every day. Through that relationship, she came to understand his dream for the home, and she continues to be involved with The Clover House as their exclusive caterer. No matter what the Kirkseys did to the home, they wanted to make sure it reflected Wes’ vision. In fact, before agreeing to take on the project, they

HOME TOUR

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HOME TOUR

An upstairs bedroom is used as a bridal suite and opens up onto an upstairs sleeping porch. Wes and Marion Clover’s picture sits on the center of the hope chest.

told Wes their only stipulation was allowing them to name the house after him. And so it became “The Clover House,” not because it is painted green, as many people assume, but because of a special man with a dream for his community. Sadly, Wes passed away in 2014, about six months into the renovation, so he never got to see the final product. But his vision lives on as a piece of Exeter history where new memories will be made for years to

come. “It has been a labor of love; a lot of time, a lot of money, and a lot of resources, but it’s definitely worth it because this is home to us and something we want to share with the community,” said Tricia. While the Kirkseys never imagined taking on such an immense project, their love of history, their commitment to their community, and their dedication to the future made them the perfect, if not

only, fit for restoring The Clover House. “You wonder if in another 100 years, will the house still be here and will people be talking about our history and legacy?” asked Tricia. “There’s history behind every house, whether it’s new or not, and you want to leave that legacy.” In February, The Kirkseys were awarded with the Exeter Chamber of Commerce’s 2016 “Beatification Award” for their work restoring The Clover House as an Exeter landmark.

HOME TOUR

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Another guest bedroom features period-authentic antiques, including a wash table and a bed warmer.


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CHEMIS meets CUL

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hen it comes to Chef Albert’s approach to cooking, “untamed” is probably an understatement. During Lifestyle’s epicure photo shoot with this award-winning chef, he not only cooked for us, but he put on a show that appealed to all of the senses. While the techniques he used may be unconventional for our humble Central Valley, they are part of a modern age of culinary arts called molecular gastronomy. This method is a form of food science that explores the chemical and physical processes that occur while cooking. From smoked strawberries to frozen goat cheese and ice cream made with liquid nitrogen, each dish was prepared in a unique way meant to heighten the flavors and the experience of the dish. While Chef Albert walks us through the process of cooking with his special technology, you can use alternative methods to recreate these meals in your own home.

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SMOKED STRAWBERRY BASIL ICE CREAM INGREDIENTS 2 eggs 1 C sugar 1 vanilla bean, split and seeded 2 C fresh strawberries Fresh basil 1 C heavy cream Liquid nitrogen, one cup at a time* DIRECTIONS In a bowl using a hand cold smoker, place your whole strawberries into a bowl and apply smoke, then cover with plastic wrap or aluminum foil for 10 minutes. In a stand mixer add in your eggs and sugar, mixing well until frothy. Add in vanilla bean seeds. Mix for 20 seconds and add in strawberries as well as your fresh basil and heavy cream, allow to mix for 3 minutes to smash up and purée the strawberries. Carefully add in your liquid nitrogen while the mixer is on low-medium speed. Add in one cup at a time until soft serve ice cream starts to form; then add in one more cup and put your mixer on medium-high to capture the frozen chunks on the side of the bowl. Serve immediately or cover and place in the freezer. *You can use an alternative method to make the ice cream.

AJO PICANTE DE GAMBAS CON ESPUMA DE LIMÓN (spicy garlic prawns with lemon foam) INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

12 prawns, size 8/12 ½ C bacon oil ½ a whole head of garlic, cut down the middle, skin on 2 tsp each: Cayenne pepper Lemon pepper Onion powder Dry cilantro Chili powder Paprika 2 C lemonade 2 T sugar 1 T soy lecithin powder

Carefully place your prawns into a heavy-duty gallon zip bag with all the ingredients except the lemonade, sugar, and soy lecithin powder. Set your Immersion Circulator* to 135°F. Once the water reaches the right temperature, place your prawns in the water and cook for 30 minutes. While the prawns are cooking, place lemonade and sugar in a bowl. Using an Immersion Blender on low speed, add in your soy lecithin powder and start blending. Tilting your blender at a 45-degree angle slightly submerged will allow you to see foam bubbles forming in the corner of the bowl. It is important to repeat this process for 3 minutes or until you see enough foam to satisfy 12 prawns. Once timer is up, carefully put prawns in a hot skillet to sear the sides about 3 seconds per side, top with lemon foam. *You can use an alternative method to cook the shrimp.

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PRESSURE COOKED BEETS WITH JALAPEÑO-PEACH JELLY INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

2 large beets, cut into medium cubes 2 T jalapeño peach flavored jelly 6 large asparagus (tips only) Pistachios, roughly chopped Goat cheese, frozen

Place your goat cheese in the freezer for at least 2-4 hours to harden properly. Add the beets and 2 quarts of water in a pressure cooker. Cook for 20 minutes at full pressure. Meanwhile, sauté the asparagus tips for 2 minutes. Carefully remove beets from pressure cooker, gently dry, and top with asparagus tips and jelly. Using a small torch, carefully brulée the jelly and finish with pistachios and shaved frozen goat cheese.

GORGONZOLA STEAK HOUSE RISOTTO INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1 ½ C Arborio rice 4 T Arbosana olive oil 1 shallot, diced small 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 T brandy 1 quart of beef stock 2 sprigs each of thyme and rosemary 1 C heavy cream 1 C Gorgonzola blue cheese TT salt and pepper 12 asparagus tips 8 oz Hon Shimeji mushrooms, cleaned 10 oz ribeye steak, diced into chunks (cooked sous-vide*)

Turn on your stove to medium-high heat and in a deep sauté pan, add Arbosana olive oil, rice, and shallot. Once rice is toasted, add in garlic and sauté for 30 seconds, then carefully add in brandy (I highly recommend removing from the heat before adding the alcohol to prevent a flair up). Now allow the brandy to become “au sec,” which means completely reduced to dry or evaporated. Add in one cup at a time of heated beef stock while stirring constantly, keeping the rice from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Continue this process until your rice is al dente. Add in heavy cream and cook for 4 minutes. Separately, gently sauté the mushrooms and asparagus tips for 2 minutes. Add in the blue cheese, cream, asparagus tips, and mushrooms, season to taste. Top with the cooked ribeye steak.

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* If using the sous-vide method to cook the steak, cut steak into medium chunks, and season with salt and pepper on both sides. Place into a heavy-duty zip bag along with 1 sprig each of thyme and rosemary. Set the temperature of your Immersion Circulator to 132.5°F for 50 mins. Once done, take out and dry with a paper towel. Season again with salt and pepper to taste and put in a hot skillet with 1 tablespoon olive oil and 1 tablespoon butter. Sear for 1 minute on medium-high heat and enjoy.


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TRAVELER’S

TREK

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The Four Seasons Hotel. On the left, you can see how the old castle wall butts right up to it.


BAKU A TAPESTRY WOVEN BY TIME

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hane Guffogg is a worldrenowned artist who grew up in the Lindsay/Strathmore area. Shane’s art has taken him around the world, most recently to Baku, the capital city of Azerbaijan. While Shane currently resides in LA, he frequently visits his art studio in Lindsay and has hosted multiple local exhibits in recent years.

City with parts of the stone structures dating back 2,800 years. The ancient streets are made of cobblestone and the area is surrounded by a castle wall. At one of the main entrances is the Maiden Tower, which I was told by people from the Ministry of Culture, dates back to 800 BC. The Tower got its name because of a king who had

The Persian meaning of Baku is Wind Pounded, but the Arabic meaning is God's Town. I can start off by saying this capital city is a tapestry of time and cultures that are woven together in a profoundly beautiful way. The ancient is nestled with the old–eastern designs and patterns framed by European elegance, all while being watched over by the recently built towering flames made of glass and steel. In the heart of this great cosmopolitan center is the Old

arranged for his daughter to marry into an equally powerful family, but she was in love with someone else. Instead of granting her father his wish, she climbed to the top of the tower and jumped to her death. This tower leads up a hill to the Palace of the Shirvanshahs, built in the 15th century when the capital of Azerbaijan was moved to Baku. The stone carvings on this great masterpiece are breathtaking and I found myself quietly saying “wow” a lot as I walked around the palace.

T E X T INSET: A sitting area in one of Baku’s many parks.

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Throughout the Old City there are a number of boutique hotels, one of which I stayed in (the Sultan Inn Hotel) and loved it. Most of these buildings are two to three stories, so be prepared to climb stairs because there are no elevators. Throughout the city there are little shops that line the narrow cobblestone streets, selling Azerbaijani carpets and souvenirs, usually by men from a bygone era, patiently waiting for tourists to stop and take a look. And there are amazing restaurants serving the Azerbaijani cuisine, which is part Greek, Turkish, Armenian, and Georgian with a little Russian sprinkled in. It all adds up to traditional Azerbaijani cuisine. Outside of the Old City Castle walls is another part of the tapestry – streets that are straight out of Paris, with the grand stone buildings and rounded metal rooftops. These were built in the late 1800s and early 1900s as a result of the money that began pouring in from

the oil discovered in Baku. In fact, the very first oil well in the world was drilled in Baku in 1847, which has made it a much-contested area throughout the 20th century. The Parisian area is where most of the high-end stores are, like Gucci, Dior, Armani, and the likes, and it is where you will see a lot of Range Rover and Mercedes Benz vehicles. But the shiny car image is in sharp contrast to the somewhat popular old Soviet cars that look like an early, boxy Datsun from the 1970s. I was in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2015 and that city has managed to completely white-wash the old Soviet ways of life away. Certain areas and people in Baku, however, look like old photographs of the hard working Soviet people of the 1920s and '30s. That image is in sharp contrast with a young, very hip and affluent group that look like they just got back from a shopping spree on rodeo drive in Beverly Hills.

Baku is a city of visual contrast, but it all works and is reflected in the people. The last part of the thread that makes up this visual tapestry is their investment in the future. Azerbaijan took back its independence from the Soviet Union in 1992 after the communist economy and government collapsed. Since then, the President, his son, and the First lady are in the driver's seat, and are investing in beautiful contemporary architecture that is being designed by the best architects from around the world. They are also investing in the arts and culture. For example, two years ago they built a museum dedicated to the history of Azerbaijani Carpets while also building a museum for contemporary art; again, a beautiful blend of the old with the new. The reason for my trip to Baku was actually for a museum exhibit of my artwork, which traveled there from a museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, where I spent five weeks in the summer and

The ancient is nestled with the old – eastern designs and patterns framed by European elegance, all while being watched over by the recently built towering flames made of glass and steel. S H A N E

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The Nizami Museum of Azerbaijan Literature in Baku. The statues are of famous Azeri writers.

A main boulevard in Baku showing the European influence in the architecture.

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A Gucci store in the Paris area.

The Heydar Aliyev Cultural Center.


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The Flaming Towers.

The museum where my exhibition is, called The Museum Square.

Inside the carpet museum

The Maiden Tower.

They are a people who have great respect for the past, and equal respect for each other now. I think that may be one of the reasons I didn't see one piece of trash or any graffiti scrawling anywhere, which only helped to enhance the beauty of Baku. S H A N E

fall of 2015. I have always loved to travel, see new places, and meet new people. The more I travel, the more I realize how similar we all are. Because of my museum exhibition, I got little perks, like always having a driver to pick me up at the airport and having a translator by my side if I needed one. I didn't visit Baku on a tourist Visa, but a cultural Visa. Azerbaijan is one of those countries, like Russia or China, where you need to get a Visa along with your passport, which requires applying as a tourist. For most countries that require a Visa to enter, you also have to have your travel dates, plane tickets, and hotel reservations made to show the country's embassy you have a plan and won't be wandering around lost in translation. But they are easy to get and there are companies that handle that sort of thing for a small fee. To give a quick background of Baku, it has a long history of being invaded, starting with Alexander the Great in the ancient Greek times. Then, off and on by Azerbaijan's neighbors – 42 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 7

G U F F O G G

Turkey, Armenia, the Ottoman Empire, and Persia. Keep in mind, every time Azerbaijan was invaded, their way of life was erased and they were forced to speak a different language and often take up a new religion. The Russian Empire invaded in the late 19th century until 1918 when Azerbaijan won back the independence of the Azerbaijani republic, which was significant but brief. On April 28, 1920, the 11th Red Army invaded Baku and reinstalled the Bolsheviks, making Baku the capital of Azerbaijan. The USSR took control of the oil and access to the Caspian Sea to get the oil out. From 1920 to 1992, the Azerbaijani people were forced to learn Russian in school and follow the communist ideology. When you look at the people in Baku, the different facial features, mannerisms, and dress that are associated with their ethnicity, is very apparent. But they all live in harmony and their three major religions – Judaism, Islam, and Christianity – are practiced freely. They are a people who have great respect

for the past, and equal respect for each other now. I think that may be one of the reasons I didn't see one piece of trash or any graffiti scrawling anywhere, which only helped to enhance the beauty of Baku. Since 1992, learning English has replaced Russian in school, which means that within just one generation, people speaking Russian will be a thing of the past. The Three Flame Towers (completed in 2012) are not only a work of art, but they consist of apartments, hotels, and offices, and can be seen from almost anywhere in the city. By day, they shimmer, reflecting the light and atmosphere. But by night, the 10,000 LED luminaries that cover the surfaces put on the most amazing light show, becoming giant symbols of fire and wind. The city of Baku is one of the oldest cities in the world with cave art nearby dating back some 40,000 years. And it is a city that lies on what was once the ancient Silk Road. It is a tapestry woven by time itself, making for a beautiful image of what was and what will be.


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BUSINESS PROFILE

AMCC

GETTING

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terile waiting rooms and whirlwind doctors visits with unfamiliar physicians leaves the concept of a “family practice” feeling a little lost. Gone are the days when patients could walk in to see the family doctor and get immediate and complete care; that is, unless you’re a patient at a place like Advanced Medical Care Center (AMCC) in Visalia. Since the fall of 2015, AMCC has been providing family practice and urgent care services to patients throughout Tulare County. Since the first day the doors opened, their average patientvolume has almost tripled. While their unique model for family practice is certainly a draw for new patients, many would attribute that growth to their friendly and capable staff led by husband and wife team, Shawn Cardoza FNP-C, MSN and Stephanie Cardoza RN, MSN. When Shawn and Stephanie first met in the mid-1990s while working in Kaweah Delta’s ICU, neither of them imagined one day starting their own practice. But, their experiences over the years and background in medicine P H O T O S

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inspired them to pursue opening a true family practice for Visalia. “We saw such a big need in the community and wanted to focus on that,” said Stephanie. “We both grew up here – I’m from Tulare and Shawn’s from Tipton – we’ve been here in Visalia our whole nursing careers; we just wanted

The design of the new office promotes efficiency and communication.

to make sure that we could provide a service that’s going to take care of our community.” After working several years as a nurse in Kaweah Delta’s emergency department, Shawn’s upward career path eventually led him to manager of the department. He spent 10 years in

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emergency medicine before deciding to shift gears and open a walk-in urgent care clinic in 2009. It was there that he and Stephanie both recognized a serious need for “A to Z” care in Visalia. With Stephanie’s extensive background in nursing, education, and administration, together their skills complemented each other as they sought to open a family practice. “I wanted to get more in-tune with my patients and have a relationship with them,” said Shawn. “Here, all of my patients I see, I know them, their families, their kids, their grandkids. I give my personal number out to almost all of my patients. That type of relationship of the true family provider has been lost, so we’re trying to bring it back.” In fact, Shawn’s own family’s experience with health care is the reason he entered the profession more than 20 years ago. Growing up, he spent a lot of time at Stanford Hospital with his dad, who was ill for much of his adult life with a serious heart condition. After witnessing the level of care his dad received at Stanford, which extended his life by 15 years, Shawn

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

TOP: Shawn Cardoza FNP-C, MSN and Stephanie Cardoza RN, MSN, owners of AMCC in Visalia.


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knew he belonged in the medical field. Today, Shawn and Stephanie have dedicated one of their exam rooms to his dad, who was a dairyman in Tipton. Lovingly calling it their “cow room,” it stands as an ode to his father’s memory and a reminder of why Shawn pursued such an honorable career. “Shawn has a true gift, and his dad’s illness steered him to that gift, so we wanted to do a tribute to him,” said Stephanie. “So that’s where the ‘cow room’ came from.” At AMCC, it really is all about the patient. From their no-appointment system to their extended weeknight and weekend hours, patients are BUSINESS PROFILE

their blood pressure checked, they’re able to have that flexibility.” Because of this convenience, AMCC has implemented systems and trained its staff to work efficiently and effectively when things get busy. On a high-volume, 95-patient day, Shawn says the wait is usually no more than one hour and 15 minutes, which is fast, even for many appointment-only offices. But AMCC’s providers are not only dedicated to efficient care, but to complete care. If they can’t address an issue in-house, they will work quickly to refer patients to specialists they trust. “We demand quick access to all of the specialists we refer to,” said Shawn. “Scheduling

Every exam room is dedicated to local firstresponders, this being the firefighter room.

Practitioner Kathleen Rooney FNP-C, MSN with a patient.

I’m from Tulare and Shawn’s from Tipton. We’ve been here in Visalia our whole nursing careers; we just wanted to make sure that we could provide a service that’s going to take care of our community. S T E P H A N I E

able to see their provider on their own time and when they need it most. And while AMCC does offer walk-in urgent care services, about 95 percent of their practice is providing primary care to families with the added benefit of urgent care services. “Patients don’t need to call to see if they can get an appointment,” said Stephanie. “They have the peace of mind knowing that if they aren’t feeling well, or if today is the day that works for them to get 46 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 7

appointments three or four months out is not going to work for us, nor does it work for the patient.” When it comes to building a consistent patient-provider relationship at AMCC, patients have the option to choose which provider they want during their visit. AMCC has a team of six skilled providers, with three full-time practitioners, including Shawn, Kathleen Rooney FNP-C, MSN, and Devin Rhyman FNP-C, MSN. In addition to their

C A R D O Z A

The “cow room” is dedicated to Shawn’s father, who was a dairyman and is the reason Shawn entered health care.


BUSINESS PROFILE

regular providers, AMCC has a Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, Dena Tilley, on-site two days a month. The Cardoza’s commitment to two and bettering the community is evident through their approach to health care, as well as in their new office, which is decorated as a tribute to local firstresponders. Photos of local heroes adorn the walls, as a way to honor their selfless contributions to our community. “We started with some themed rooms to pay tribute and decided that we were going to do local people of service,” said Stephanie. “We’re definitely thankful for everything we have and we know that we couldn’t do what we do without them, so we wanted to pay a little tribute to our firefighters, police, military, and other first-responders. They don’t get the recognition they deserve, so we wanted to say thank you.” Since opening, Shawn and Stephanie have been blown away by the support they’ve received from the community. And now with their new building on Caldwell Avenue, which they just moved into in January of this year, they are grateful that they can reach even more patients throughout Tulare County. “We have great patients with huge hearts,” said Stephanie. “They support the facility, they believe in us, and they share with their friends. We thank them because our number one referral is our patients, and a lot of that is attributed to our staff. Patients come in, they get a friendly welcome at the desk, they get their health needs addressed, and it’s a positive experience. We love taking care of our patients, so when we get such positive feedback, such as a patient referring their friends and family, it’s very rewarding.” TOP: The AMCC staff. 48 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 7

BOTTOM: Shawn Cardoza with a patient.


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LINDY GLIGORIJEVIC INVESTIGATING THE ART OF WRITING

W

Lindy is a native of Norwalk in Orange hen a career in law County. During her childhood, her family enforcement includes pulling bounced back and forth between the body parts out of a recycling Los Angeles area and Minnesota, as center and the closeness that develops a compromise between her parents’ between partners sharing such elemental choice of a place to call home. experiences, a creative cop’s imagination Lindy was always interested in writing can readily begin fashioning characters and plots out of her experiences. Lindy Gligorijevic is currently the Chief of Investigations for the Tulare County District Attorney’s LITERARY Office. Throughout her 20 years ARTS as a police officer and a detective in Los Angeles, she investigated homicides, rapes, child abuse, domestic violence, and robbery. And she is writing what she hopes to be a 12-book series of novels about a pair of homicide detectives, fictionalizing events that she has kept notes on during her career. “Like most writers, there hasn’t been a time when I haven’t been writing,” said Lindy. “Over my entire career, I was diarying and journaling, writing down scenes, knowing that at some point I was going to write this series.” The first novel, Hold Fast, is written from the point of view of Shea Reed, a single woman. Her partner, Jack Rainier, is married with two little girls. The story opens with a body of a woman found outside a restaurant where LAPD officers are celebrating Christmas. Photos of nude police and in art. In high school, she was editor officers found in the victim’s locker of the school paper and she started implicate the department. Shea and college as an art major. But while there, Jack must find out if the perpetrator is in she took a course on criminal justice and their own homicide unit. decided that would be a better way to Like Shea, Lindy was single when support her family. she started working for the police Once she was out on her own, Lindy department in 1985, but she was also stayed in the L.A. area. Besides her a mom, at a time when being a woman journals and notes, her writing at the cop meant facing extra hurdles. The time was mostly confined to police work. Hollywood Division, where she started at “Being a police detective, you’re 23 years old, did not even have a female writing all the time,” she said. “You’re locker room.

T E X T 50 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 7

B Y

D I A N E

S L O C U M

writing very detailed reports. I tell people all the time, you’ve got a pen in your hand far more often than you have a gun in your hand. Throughout my entire career, I’ve had assignments that require a little more writing than usual. I’m always tasked with whatever the additional writing is.” She met her husband, a fire captain, at the 1992 Rodney King riots. When he retired, they moved to Nevada. “That’s when I did my writing, sunup to sundown, seven days a week,” she said. “So, the lion’s share of the novels were actually written 10 years ago. Two are currently available. Then I have two more completed, and I’m in the finishing stages of the fifth one.” Her second novel, Bell Lap, is from Jack’s point of view. She said Jack is as devoted to his job as Shea, and she really enjoys writing in his head. Lindy became frustrated attempting to go through traditional publishing houses, so her books are self-published. “I was doing the usual things,” she said. “I went to all the San Francisco writing conferences. I actually had two agents over the years, but I couldn’t get farther in the publishing part of it.” She calculated that attempting to get a publisher had cost her about $10,000 over the years for professional editing, all the conferences and related expenses. She began to feel that spending all this money on a project that wasn’t for her family was just folly. “I can’t articulate how frustrating it is,” she said. “So, I stopped writing. I stopped pursuing everything for three years.” By this time, she and her husband had moved back to California – this time to the foothills of Elderwood, near


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Woodlake. Living on an acre or so, next to a cattle ranch and dealing with rattle snakes is quite a switch for Lindy. “To me it’s the wilderness, because I’m from Los Angeles,” she said. “But it’s absolutely lovely where we live.” In making the move, she also returned to her career in law enforcement, joining the County D.A.’s office as an investigator. During the three years of her disenchantment with publishing, she concentrated on her career. “And it did work out, because I’m now the chief investigator,” she said. She also found a way around her weariness with writing when she spoke with a woman who was self-published. “She said I am an author no matter how small the audience,” Lindy said. “And that resonated with me, but I

They can like it or not like it. They can talk to me about my characters, which is probably the biggest blessing about this whole thing. My characters exist in other people’s imaginations. That’s one of the biggest delights of my life – having people come up to me and talk about my characters.” Members of book clubs have insisted that Shea is Lindy, but she disagrees. Shea does have some of the same experiences, but Lindy believes she is an entirely different person. In fact, she feels Jack more closely represents her world view. She is pleased with her sales results as well. They have spread word-ofmouth within the Visalia area and the Los Angeles police community. She describes her style as a cross between Michael Connelly and

I am transported when I’m writing. To me, it’s the most natural, most wonderful sense in my life. I love everything about writing. I love the idea that I can create characters that will mean something to someone else. L I N D Y

said I’m not going to put any more money into it. Self-publishing costs more money. And she said go on CreateSpace. It doesn’t cost you anything.” Lindy said her book was already formatted for presentation to publishers so she had little to do to get it ready for self-publishing. Unfortunately, she made some mistakes on her first attempt and the publication turned out to be what she calls “a garbled mess.” However, since the CreateSpace books are printed on demand, not much was lost and she was able to make corrections for the next release. “What it did do for me is it no longer had me waiting around for someone else to do something about this,” she said. “I can put books in people’s hands. 52 L I F E S T Y L E | M A R C H 2 0 1 7

G L I G O R I J E V I C

Joseph Wambaugh. She writes police procedurals. She strives for realism using her experience as a detective. For example, while there is one main murder for the characters to solve, they have many cases going at once, showing how much detectives have hanging over them. She said the biggest difference between writing about police work and living it, is time to reflect. When you are living it, she said, “you’re hanging on by the seat of your pants.” When writing it, she can look at the situation from many different perspectives. “I am transported when I’m writing,” she said. “To me, it’s the most natural, most wonderful sense in my life. I love everything about writing. I love the idea that I can create characters that will mean something to someone else.”

LITERARY ARTS


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HAPPENINGS

T H E AT R E & A R T S FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK Every month, the Arts Consortium presents First Fridays to explore the Visalia Art District. During the walk, you’ll experience a diverse range of local art in the downtown Visalia area. Check out the website for more information. When: April 7, 5–8 p.m. Where: Arts Consortium, 400 N. Church St., Visalia Contact: artsconsortium.org

MENOPAUSE: THE MUSICAL Turnaround Artists presents Menopause: The Musical – Four women at a lingerie sale with nothing in common but a black lace bra and memory loss, hot flashes, night sweats, not enough sex, too much sex, and more! This hilarious musical parody set to classic tunes from the ‘60s, ‘70s, and ‘80s will have you cheering and dancing in the aisles. See what millions of women worldwide have been laughing about for over 10 years. When: March 25, 4 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: foxvisalia.org

SECOND SATURDAY CRAFT FAIR AT THE LOOKING GLASS From now through October, The Looking Glass in Visalia will be hosting a “Second Saturday” artisan and crafters fair. Come out and enjoy a day of shopping from local crafters. When: April 8, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Where: The Looking Glass, Court and Caldwell in Visalia Contact: thelookingglassvisalia.com

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In March, Francisco Alonzo will be showing new works in a show entitled "Iconografíca": an investigation of the role of capitalism on contemporary culture. He explores how important iconographic images are reduced to everyday knick-knacks and the interweaving of other images into contemporary culture.

Where can you see Dusty Springfield, Diana Ross, and Bette Midler on one stage? Only at Bette & Her Divine Divas. Sherie Rae Parker is back! In her incomparable tribute to Bette Midler, Sherie has performed on TV, radio, and movies. Direct from Legends in Concert, the longest running show in Las Vegas, and Stars in Concert in Berlin, Sherie joins her talented Divas for an unforgettable evening.

When: Now-March 24 Where: Arts Visalia, 214 E. Oak Ave., Visalia Contact: artsvisalia.org

When: April 22, 7 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., VIsalia Contact: foxvisalia.org

FRANCISCO ALONZO AT ARTS VISALIA

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“THE HAPPIEST CONCERT ON EARTH” Join The Mighty Oaks Chorus for their annual show, “The Happiest Concert on Earth.” There will be both a matinee and evening show, so get your tickets now. When: April 29, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Where: Central Valley Christian High School Auditorium, 5600 W. Tulare Ave., Visalia Contact: 901-4615

DIVERSIONS & EXCU R S I O N S KELLIE PICKLER IN CONCERT The talented country singer and American Idol contestant will be coming to the Visalia Fox Theatre to perform her latest country hits. This event will also benefit Hands in the Community, a local nonprofit that provides referral services to those in crisis in Tulare County. Tickets are $40, $62, and $83 dollars. When: March 18, 8 p.m. Where: Visalia Fox Theatre, 308 W. Main St., Visalia Contact: hncvisalia@gmail.com

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LIFEST YLE | MARCH 2017

HAPPENINGS

VISALIA SENIOR GAMES The City of Visalia Parks & Recreation Department proudly announces Visalia Senior Games 2017. This Olympic-style competition for adults ages 50 and better promotes healthy living and the benefits of staying active. Not ready to compete just yet? There are lots of ways for you to be involved. The Senior Games is $15 per athlete, and individual event fees apply. When: March 17-19, 24-26 Where: Locations vary throughout Visalia Contact: visaliaseniorgames.com or 713-365

THIRD ANNUAL LAWN-FREE GARDEN TOUR The Sequoia Garden Club is again sponsoring a garden tour focusing on drought tolerant plantings to help homeowners see that it is possible to conserve water, save money, and have a beautiful yard. Tour five different Visalia garden venues with unique ideas, plus a sixth venue, which includes City of Visalia Natural Resources Dept., Sequoia Riverlands Trust/Dry Creek Plant Sale. This is a self-guided tour. Tickets are available at Sequoia Plaza Flowers, Luis’s Nursery, and Curry Copy Center. Tickets are $20. When: March 25, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Where: Homes throughout Visalia Contact: dmekeel@att.net


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SEQUOIA CYCLING CLASSIC Come out to downtown Visalia for the annual Sequoia Cycling Classic race. There will be exciting thrills and spills of road racing throughout the streets of downtown, including a kids race, food booths, fixie race, and a beer garden. This race has been around since 1987 and continues to be a fun event for the community. When: April 2, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Where: Downtown Visalia Contact: sequoiaclassic.com

VISALIA NAZ 25TH ANNUAL EGGSTRAVAGANZA You are invited to Visalia Naz’s 25th annual Eggstravaganza. There will be a petting zoo, train rides, pony rides, egg hunts, and a food court. This event is free and open to the public (food court is not free). When: April 15, 9 a.m. – noon Where: Visalia Nazarene Church, 3333 W. Caldwell Ave. Contact: visalianaz.org

C H A R I TA B L E EVENTS VISALIA CHAMBER’S 9TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT

HAPPENINGS

Join the Visalia Chamber of Commerce for their 9th Annual Leadership Visalia Golf Tournament. Secure your spot early and enjoy a great morning of golf and networking while supporting leadership education in Visalia. When: March 24, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Where: Valley Oaks Golf Course, 1800 S. Plaza St., Visalia Contact: visaliachamber.org

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HAPPENINGS

BIRDHOUSE AUCTION FOR HABITAT FOR HUMANITY Join Habitat for Humanity this spring for their 12th Annual Birdhouse Auction as they raise funds to help build, renovate, or repair homes with low-income families in Tulare-Kings Counties. There will be wine tasting, hors d’oeuvres, custom made birdhouses, and this year’s theme will be “Tropical Fiesta.” Tickets are $75 per person or $600 for a table of eight. When: March 31, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Where: Wyndham, 9000 W. Airport Dr., Visalia Contact: info@hfhtkc.org

BARKS & BOURBON Join us for our 3rd annual dinner evening to raise funds for Friends of Tulare Animal Services. There will be live and silent auctions, bourbon tasting, cigar bar, wine grab, and much more. Come help us raise money for Friends of Tulare Animal Services that is used to directly save the lives of animals at the shelter. Tickets are $50. When: April 8, 5:30 p.m. Where: International Agri-Center Social Hall, 4500 S. Laspina St., Tulare Contact: 303-6930

BARK ‘N’ BID BENEFIT

INAUGURAL ROCKIN’ RUN FOR HOPE Bank of the Sierra’s Rockin’ Resolution Run and Visalia Rescue Mission’s Run for Hope become one, as they proudly present the inaugural Rockin’ Run for Hope. After working up an appetite, participants will be able to enjoy food and dessert from Quesadilla Gorilla’s food truck, Bite Me Donuts, and Cool Cow Scoops ice cream. Musical guest, Run River North, a sextet from Los Angeles, will take the stage to wrap up one rockin’ evening. When: April 1, 4:30 p.m. Where: Cutler Park next to St. John’s River Contact: vrmhope.org

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HAPPY AND KOSHER PASSOVER 2017 You are invited to join congregation Beit Shalom to hear traditional stories with blessings, songs, and music. Dinner includes Kosher chicken and other traditional foods. The event is $25 for adults, $10 for children ages five-17, and free for children four and under. When: April 14, 7 p.m. Where: 115 E. Paseo Ave., Visalia Contact: 308-1333

Join the Central Valley Rescue Railroad for their 5th Annual fundraiser, where it’s all about the dogs! There will be a nohost beer and wine bar, dinner, music, dancing, a raffle, and a silent and live auction. All proceeds benefit Central Valley Rescue Railroad, a volunteer-run non-profit, no-kill dog rescue. Tickets are $50 per person. When: April 22, 5-10 p.m. Where: Whitney Barn, 30162 Road 192, Exeter Contact: Hayley, 731-0757


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HAPPENINGS

IMAGINEU DREAMBUILDER’S BASH Step right up to the biggest event of the year – the fifth annual ImagineU Children’s Museum Dreambuilder’s Bash. A vintage circus comes to town for one night only under the big top at ImagineU in Visalia. Bring your friends to enjoy cocktails, dinner by The Vintage Press, and exciting auctions, all to benefit the museum’s expansion projects. When: April 22, 6 p.m. Where: ImagineU Children’s Museum, 210 N. Tipton St., Visalia Contact: Imagineumuseum.org

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CASA OF TULARE COUNTY’S “ONCE UPON A DREAM” GALA

Join Family Builders Foster Care for their Golf Tournament to raise funds for their services in Tulare County. The fee is $100 with all proceeds benefitting local foster children. Contact the number below for more information.

Join CASA for their annual “Once Upon a Dream” fundraiser, featuring dinner by The Vintage Press. This event raises funds to support CASA’s mission to be a voice in court for children who are victims of abuse and neglect.

When: May 12, 12:30 p.m. Where: Tulare Golf Course, 5300 Laspina St., Tulare Contact: Selena McNair, 685-1200

When: May 12, 5:30 p.m. Where: Visalia Convention Center, 303 E. Acequia Ave., Visalia Contact: casatulareco.org

WALK-A-DOG-A-THON & FURRY 5K KENTUCKY DERBY PARTY OF FOODLINK OF TULARE COUNTY Join FoodLink of Tulare County for their annual “party with a purpose,” featuring big hats and southern hospitality. Place bets on horse races, sip mint juleps, and enjoy delicious hors d’oeuvres, all while supporting FoodLink. When: May 6, 1 p.m. Where: Visalia Country Club, 625 N. Ranch St., Visalia Contact: foodlinktc.org

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Join the Valley Oak SPCA for one of their biggest fundraisers to support their no-kill animal rescue mission. The Furry 5K will begin at 7:30 a.m. and the Walk a Dog A Thon will start at 9 a.m. Following the event, there will be vendors, raffles, and canine games. When: May 13, 7:30 a.m. and 9 a.m. Where: Mooney Grove Park, 27000 S. Mooney Blvd., Visalia Contact: 624-7227


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Lifestyle Magazine - March 2017  

Style, art, culture, and events of the South Valley.

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