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20 February 2012 Section One e off Seven e 38 Volume Number r 17

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

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Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Merging Strengths Page 3 Columnists Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly D10 Paris Reidhead

Crop Comments Auctions Classifieds DHIA

A5 D1 C21 B1

Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance Meeting ~ Page A2 “This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins.” 1 John 4:10

Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance meeting by Katie Navarra Feed and grain producers from across the Northeast gathered at the Albany (NY) Marriott on Wolf Road for the 2012 Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance annual meeting and forum. The two-day event featured guest speakers, breakout sessions and panel discussions to help Ag and Feed Alliance members stay current with trends in the industry. Opening day activities included a trip to the Capitol Building in Albany for Ag and Feed Alliance members to meet with legislators and discuss key issues surrounding the industry, most importantly, funding and regulation. “The Governor’s budget looks a whole lot better this year than last,” Rick Zimmerman Executive Director of the Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance said, “it gives us a leg up in getting things done.” Later that afternoon Kay Johnson Smith, Executive Vice President of Animal Agriculture Coalition presented Animal Rights vs Animal Welfare and Terry Fleck, Executive Director from the Center for Food Integrity discussed Earning Consumer Trust and Confidence. On day two, J.W. Allen, President of New York State FFA officially called the organization’s annual meeting to order while New York State FFA Sentinel, Lyndsay Snyder, sang the National Anthem. Before turning the meeting over to the Northeast Ag Alliance each FFA officer introduced themselves explained the significance of their position not only within FFA, but within the larger agriculture industry and summarized their personal Supervised Ag Experience (SAE) projects. Seminars on Tuesday focused on the dairy industry and the opportunity for growth and success in the Northeast. “Six percent of the U.S. population lives in New York. Twenty percent of the U.S. population lives in the Northeast. Fifty-eight percent of the U.S. population lives east of Mississippi. As far as closeness to customers, New York dairies have a distinct advantage,” Craig Alexander from Upstate-Niagara Cooperative empha-

sized during the annual forum Prospects for Growth in the Dairy Industry. Statewide New York State milk production is growing. “In WNY production is up 30 percent and in the North Country it is up 7 percent over the past 10 years,” he added. Zimmerman also commented, “milk manufacturers are looking at the Northeast to increase capacity.” During the panel discussion Dairy Industry Development from an Economic Development Perspective Patrick Hooker, Senior Manager of Agribusiness Development at the Empire State Development Corp (former New York Commissioner of Agriculture), Jay Matteson, Jefferson County Agricultural Coordinator and Charles Keeler, Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation shared their perspectives on the dairy industry. “(We have) the right climate, location and customer base in the Northeast,” Hooker said. Jefferson County has become a leader in working collaboratively with dairy farmers to improve milk quality, milk quantity and higher production per cow. Dairy Profit Teams force farmers in Jefferson County to consider all aspects of the business to overcome challenges such as milk pricing, overregulation and labor. “One of the dairy farms (that has a Dairy Profit Team) went from 70 pounds per cow to 90 pounds per cow,” Matteson explained, “any time we can improve the comfort of the cow, the better and higher production.” The county awarded 14 $2,000 “cow comfort grants” to encourage higher milk production per cow. Sessions on Tuesday also included The Chobani Yogurt Story, a panel discussion the Dairy Industry Growth from the Perspective of Agriculture Departments and breakout sessions including rail road service issues, advocating for a cause and an update on national issues. A Distinguished Service Award was presented to Dr. Charles Sniffen, during the event’s luncheon. Though

Rick Zimmerman (left), Executive Director and Art Whitman, President of Northeast Ag & Feed Alliance were in attendance. Photo by Katie Navarra

Dr. Sniffen was unable to attend, he was recognized for his lifelong contributions to the industry. “We have been fortunate he has been in the Northeast virtually all his life even though his work revolutionized the dairy industry virtually worldwide,” said Rick Grant with Miner Institute, “he could give a talk about cutting edge research and after the talk a crowd would gather around him and he would explain it on a napkin in terms anyone could understand.” Sniffen’s career has included working for University of Maine, Cornell University, Michigan State University and Miner Institute. Today Dr. Sniffen owns Fencrest, LLC., which provides consulting services to the livestock industry. The Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance A merger of the Eastern Federation of Feed Merchants and the New England Feed and Grain Council in 2004 created the foundation known today as the Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance. The organization’s membership totals 300

individuals primarily working in the feed and grain industry. “We assume we can get 300 members per year, but with all the consolidation in the industry it is getting more difficult,” Art Whitman, President said. “The mission of the Northeast Ag & Feed Alliance is to speak with a collective voice and advocate for members, animal agriculture and other stakeholders in New York and the six New England states. We will work to identify, proactively address, and help resolve issues impacting members, animal agriculture, and other stakeholders. We will provide relevant services that focus on creating a competitive advantage for all served.” (www.northeastalliance.com). During the past year, the Northeast Ag and Feed Alliance made donations in support of the North America Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge, Vermont Farm Disaster Relief Fund and Farm-Net to assist farmers affected by the flooding associated with Hurricane Irene.

Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Chipping away at the Farmland Protection backlog by American Farmland Trust staff in New York State Governor Cuomo has held the line at $12 million in funding for New York’s Farmland Protection Program in his Executive Budget Proposal for fiscal year 2012-2013. This is the same amount he proposed last year, which was supported by the legislature. Although a far cry from the $30 million the program received in 2008, it is a big improvement. During the height of the budget battles in 2010, the program’s available cash was slashed to a mere $5.2 million — not nearly enough to address the backlog of $70 million in farmland protection funds that had been awarded to 61 farm families. As we head into budget negotiations this February, the project backlog has been reduced to $46 million but we still have a long way to go.

The good news is that several farms across the state have recently closed on the sale of their development rights using state funding. In eastern New York, the Agricultural Stewardship Association, working with a combination of state funding and contributions from local foundations, shepherded through the closing on several easements, protecting a total of 1,273 acres of farmland used for dairy. Participating farms and landowners include Mat and Peggy Cannon of Cannon Cattle Ranch; landowner Theresa Baum; John and Mary McMahon and their son Dan McMahon of Hooskip Farm; and Stearns Brothers Farm and farmer Dan Clark. The Agricultural Stewardship Association coordinated funding for the farmland protection projects, with Washington and working

Rensselaer counties to use a combination of money from the New York State Farmland Protection Program, the Castanea Foundation and the Whipstock Preservation Society. “It’s a good fit for us,” said Matt Cannon of Cannon Cattle Ranch, a dairy farm in the town of Pittstown. “We worked hard to build this farm, our retirement is in it and we don’t want to see it go down the drain. We want to see another farmer here someday.” Meanwhile in central New York, the Finger Lakes Land Trust and the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Yates County, collaborating with farmers Curtis and Susan Gillette and Eugene and Francis Wilson, have successfully worked with the state’s Farmland Protection Program to permanently protect 396 acres of farmland on two farms.

The Gillette farm is a fourth generation diversified operation that grows a variety of field crops as well as grapes and raises beef steers in the town of Jerusalem less than a mile from Keuka Lake. The Wilson farm is an organic crop farm that produces corn, soybeans and small grains in the town of Torrey near Seneca Lake. “Farmland is vital to the future of Yates County and the entire Finger Lakes Region,” said Andrew Zepp, executive director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust. “We are grateful to the commitment the farmers have made to both the land and the community. We also greatly appreciate the support of Yates County, New York’s Department of Agriculture and Markets and the Partridge Foundation. Each of these partners was essential to making this project possible.”

Merging Strengths by Stephen Wagner Lancaster County, Pennsylvania’s Dairy Herd Improvement Association is located on a rural road amid a hilland-dale farmland terrain. Few other businesses populate Old Line Road. Immediately next to DHIA is a home interior design shop that operates out of a private residence. Further down the road are a plumbing-heating contractor and a vineyard. Otherwise, this headquarters for DHIA in the northeastern United States is mostly unremarkable and nearly anonymous. Yet its 20 some employees populate three eight-hour work shifts per day, and this DHIA coordinates activities for a great many dairy farmers from Maryland to Maine.

Jere High, Lancaster DHIA’s CEO believes the mergeer offers many benefits to both sides.

The Dairy Herd Improvement Association laboratory, located in Lancaster County, PA, coordinates activities for many dairy farmers from Maryland to Maine. might be construed as one company taking over another. We’re not! We’re looking at bringing two companies together and trying to improve both sides. The Vermont DHIA name is being preserved there. Their lab is closed and a small office will be maintained. You can do business so

long and run things into the ground until they disintegrate. Or you can do something about it while there’s still strength within a company, and build for the future instead of letting the future deteriorate. Vermont DHIA comes to us with strength, not weakness.”

Guy Donaldson remembered Pennsylvania Farm Bureau expresses condolences to the family and friends of Guy Donaldson, who lead PFB as its President from 1996 to 2004, and spent his life dedicated to advancing agriculture in Pennsylvania and across the nation. Donaldson, an Adams County native, died Saturday. Donaldson spent his career in agriculture as a fruit grower in Adams County, with a 250-acre operation that grew apples, peaches and cherries. The family also operated a farmer's market. Donaldson had a distinguished career with Farm Bureau, serving as Adams County Farm Bureau President and as a member of the State Board of Directors from 1983 to 1987. In 1987, he was elected PFB Vice President and

was elected PFB President in 1996. Donaldson also served on the American Farm Bureau Federation's Board of Directors and its Executive Committee. He was also selected the recipient of PFB's 2005 Distinguished Service to Agriculture Award. Donaldson represented agriculture on the Penn State Board of Trustees and was named a Master Farmer by Penn State Cooperative Extension in 1999. Condolences can be sent to: Betty Donaldson, 1746 Carrolls Tract Road, Orrtanna PA 17353. Memorial Contributions in Mr. Donaldson’s memory can be made to Orrtanna United Methodist Church, 1717 Carrolls Tract Road, Orrtanna PA 17353.

In this file photo, the late Guy Donaldson welcomed Country Folks to his Adams County farm market. Donaldson was twice nominated for the Country Folks Farm Chronicle Keystone Farmer of the Year Award. Photo by Jon M. Casey

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 3

Jere High, Lancaster DHIA’s CEO, is a focused man, a man who thinks so fast that his thoughts seem to tumble out of his mouth in a race to see which one gets out first, a man with a mission. That mission, reflected on one of the walls of its laboratory, is “To help our members, and the agriculture community, prosper while promoting a safe and abundant food supply.” How Lancaster DHIA differs today as opposed to just a few months ago is that they have merged with the Vermont DHIA. Why? According to a press release from Vermont DHIA, which also doubled as a letter to about 500 members, a juxtaposition of circumstances has forced this particular issue. “Faced with declining cow and herd numbers,” the letter says, “and the need to spend up to $400,000 to retool its laboratory, the directors of the Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Association have decided to merge their organization into the Lancaster PA DHIA.” Somehow the new machine cost coupled with the dwindling number of cows might still have allowed the company to maintain its status quo. Probably not, but there

was at least an outside chance. “Maintaining status quo isn’t enough,” says Brett Denny, Vermont DHIA’s General Manager. “I think we always need to be moving ahead to provide better services to our members, and if we just keep doing the same things that we’ve always done, that isn’t enough.” The scheduled May closing of the nearby White River Junction Post Office, DHIA’s unofficial business partner by dint of its very proximity added another problem. The closing, says High, “is a huge deal. That post office was a good thing for them because it was so close. When that closes it moves things an hour away from them, or wherever the next distribution center is going to be, which will be a major bind on their service.” Thus, what might easily and with little argument been perceived by some as bad news is coming to pass. However, upon taking a closer look there is actually cause for celebration because the pluses seem to outweigh any minuses. First of all, the Lancaster-Vermont relationship goes back a long way. “Probably from about 1991,” as High remembers it, “we started working with Vermont DHIA. When our founding group decided we were going to do this, and have our own lab, we went up to Vermont to look at their lab. Vermont has always been a key part of our existence from the standpoint that we’ve always worked together. We always had a synergistic look at ourselves insofar as how we work with each other, exchanging ideas.” Furthermore, “Brett Denny and I have been serving on a committee together for a development team at Raleigh [NC] with DRMS [Dairy Records Management Systems]. So we’ve known each other for a long time. We’ve always tried to help each other be better at what we do. It’s been an easy fit for us to work together.” “I think this is going to be a great opportunity for both our organizations,” Denny adds. “We’re both bringing things to the table. The further in we go, the more excited I am about the whole process. For Lancaster, we are broadening their base. For us, it offers us more resources and services that we can provide our members. That’s always what we’ve been focused on.” “A further benefit of merging into Lancaster DHIA,” according to Vermont DHIA President Mark Rodgers, “is access to MUN, DNA mastitis screening, and Johne’s Disease testing, plus forage analysis services available through Cumberland Valley Analytic Services of Hagerstown MD.” Denny now also assumes the mantle of Field Operations Manager. “He’ll be doing some testing,” High notes, “but will also be the guy who’s on my management team here; we work as a team as to how we approach sales and marketing in the business plan at hand.” The Vermont employees journeyed to Lancaster on Jan. 9-10 discussing how things haven’t changed a lot, but have changed a little bit. “I’m excited that the merger allows us to do so much more than we could do before,” Denny says. “When you look at two groups merging,” Jere High concluded, “it

by Jay Girvin, Esq., Girvin & Ferlazzo. P.C., Albany, New York Q. What is an agricultural conservation easement? A. An agricultural conservation easement is a legal document, similar in form to a deed, by which a landowner permanently restricts the future development of his or her agricultural property for the purpose of preserving and maintaining its agricultural character. By way of background, the State Legislature passed the Agricultural Protection Act in 1992 to add Article 25-AAA to the Agricultural and Markets Law. Article 25AAA was intended to encourage the further development of local agricultural and farmland protection programs. In 1996, Article 25-AAA was amended to provide eligible municipalities with grants to

implement farmland protection activities. One such activity for which state implementation grants were made available was the acquisition of agricultural conservation easements. Conservation easements meet the state’s interest in protecting agricultural activities in two complementary ways — easements both preserve and continue the agricultural character of land for the future, while simultaneously providing farmers with additional capital that can be used to support current farming operations. The ownership of real property includes many rights. Among these rights is the owner’s right to subdivide and develop the property for any use permitted under applicable law. Some of these permitted uses, such as residential or commercial develop-

ment, may be more economically valuable than agricultural uses. In the face of pressures that threaten the economic viability of farming operations, many farm owners are forced to consider selling their farmland for non-agricultural development. Once lost, the agricultural character of the property can never be reclaimed. The primary function of a conservation easement is to limit or eliminate the future development of land for nonagricultural uses. Article 49 of the Environmental Conservation Law authorizes local governments or “not-for-profit conservation organizations” (i.e., land trusts) to accept, hold, and enforce conservation easements conveyed by property owners. Like any other transfer of a right or interest in property, the conveyance of a conservation easement has an economic value. That economic value is determined by comparing the appraised fair market value of the property without an easement with the lower appraised

Country Folks Western Edition U.S.P.S. 482-190

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Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks West, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA, N.Y. State FFA, N.Y. Corn Growers Association and the N.Y. Beef Producers. Publisher, President ....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104........................ bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132............................ mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor............................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.................................Gary Elliott, 518-673-0143......................... cfeditor@leepub.com Page Composition...........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller......................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator.................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager.....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111.................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ................................................................................................................. Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160 Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office .......................518-673-0149 amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 subscriptions@leepub.com

Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2381 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com Ad Sales Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr ........Palatine Bridge, NY.........................................518-673-0104 Territory Managers Patrick Burk ...................................................Batavia, NY ................................................585-343-9721 Tim Cushen ...............................................Schenectady, NY ...........................................518-346-3028 Ian Hitchener ................................................Bradford, VT ..............................................518-210-2066 Rick Salmon ..................................................Cicero, NY ................315-452-9722 • Fax 315-452-9723 Ad Sales Representatives Jan Andrews ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary ............................................Palatine Bridge, NY ......................................... 518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ...........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0108 Sue Thomas ..........................................suethomas@cox.net ..........................................949-305-7447 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

value of the property with the conservation easement in place. The difference in these two figures represents the value of the development rights being surrendered by the easement. Once the value of the conservation easement is established, the owner can either donate or sell the easement to the municipality or land trust. If donated, the value of the easement can be claimed as tax deductible charitable gift. Some conservation easements may be eligible for a state grant that pays up to 75 percent of the value of the conservation easement. A conservation easement does not result in the municipality or a land trust “owning” the property. Title to the property remains in the farmer granting the easement, and the property can be sold or transferred like any other land. A subsequent purchaser or transferee, however, takes the property subject to the limitations set forth in the conservation easement. The property also remains subject to property taxes, although the conservation easement may effectively reduce the assessed value of the property. In addition, a

2006 conservation property tax credit allows owners of land subject to conservation easements to qualify for up to a 25 percent property tax credit (up to $5,000) on real estate taxes. Conservation easements can apply to an entire property, or can be limited to only a portion of property. Once a conservation easement is in place, however, the property can no longer be developed in a manner that is inconsistent with the limitations set forth in the easement. Municipalities and land trusts are empowered to enforce conservation easements by bringing legal action to enjoin inconsistent uses or development. For this reason, it is important that the scope of the easement be carefully tailored so as to not unreasonably restrict future farm operations. For example, the easement should not prohibit the future construction of buildings necessary to the farming operation, or

limit the farmer to specific agricultural practices. Like any other real estate transaction, the conveyance of an agricultural conservation easement involves a number of steps that often require the assistance of several different professionals. The terms and conditions of the conveyance must be negotiated between the owner and the municipality or land trust, the value of the conservation easement must be determined by a licensed real estate appraiser, the area of the property subject to the conservation easement must be surveyed, and the language of the easement and other legal documents must be carefully drafted. Above all, however, the owner should consult with both legal and financial advisors to ensure that he or she fully understands and appreciates both the advantages and disadvantages of conveying an agricultural conservation easement.

U.S. agriculture needs a farm bill now WASHINGTON, D.C. — “We must work to pass a farm bill in 2012 because our nation’s farmers and ranchers deserve a measure of certainty. Farmers require a safety net that works effectively, and they need access to tools that help them be good stewards of our natural resources,” said Jon Scholl, President of American Farmland Trust (AFT). “Those people less fortunate during these economic times deserve a helping hand so they don’t go hungry, while our nation as a whole needs the security which effective food policies and programs can bring.” American Farmland Trust and over 60 organizations have sent a letter echoing Scholl’s comments to the Senate and House leadership of the agriculture committees. “We, the undersigned, have heard calls for an extension of current law. We ask you to reject these calls for delay and aggressively act to ensure that a new, comprehensive bill is passed this year,” states the letter.

“A temporary extension of current policy creates tremendous uncertainty...” In the difficult fiscal climate, Scholl notes, “It is unclear exactly what budget cuts will be made and the implications for farms, farmland and food, but it’s perfectly clear that agriculture will have to do more with less.” “I believe this farm bill can be transformational. Our country must make big decisions about the nature of government and how it will spend our money, and agriculture and food policy will be no exception,” said Scholl. “I am excited about the prospects for getting one of the most important pieces of legislation Congress will consider this year done. Protecting farm and ranch land and keeping farmers on their land; providing healthy and safe food; and addressing environmental concerns are the top priorities of a majority of Americans — priorities that we believe can be a part of a farm bill this year,” Scholl concludes.

Cover photo by Katie Navarra NYS FFA members attended the organization’s annual meeting: back row (L) Nate Lundquist, State Vice President (R) J.W. Allen, State President. Front Row (L-R) Miranda Parkhurst, State Reporter; Lyndsay Snyder, State Sentinel; Ariana Juliet Kaminski, State Secretary; Elizabeth Bracken, State Treasurer.

Knock-knock … it’s OSHA Record-keeping and the inspection process by Sally Colby Dale Glacken, Compliance Assistance Specialist (CAS) with the Harrisburg area OSHA office, says that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration was formed to determine why so many fatalities were occurring. “Back in the 1970s, there were a lot of fatalities — around 14,000 a year,” said Glacken. “Congress said we needed to do something about it, so the idea of OSHA as a safety program was started. More recently, we’ve had around 5,000 fatalites, a 60 percent reduction. To me, that’s verification that safety must work.” Glacken added that when OSHA started, there were 3.5 million worksites, and today there are 7.2 million worksites. “The number of worksites and employees has doubled, but fatalities have come down 60 percent.” Although Glacken has a weighty pile of books that outline OSHA’s regulations, he says that it boils down to one concept: providing safe working conditions for workers. He added that employers and employees should always be aware of hazards and correct them whether or not those hazards are specified in the rulebooks. At what point does OSHA have coverage over a farm? Glacken read OSHA’s definition of a farm: Any operation involving the growing or harvesting of crops, raising of livestock or poultry, or related activities conducted by a farmer on sites such as farms, ranches, orchards, dairy farms or similar farming operations. Glacken says that it’s

important that farmers are familiar with SIC (Standard Industrial Code) and NAICS (North American Industry Classification System) codes. “It’s important to know where your farm stands,” said Glacken. “That determines whether or not OSHA covers you.” Farmers who are self-employed and have no employees are not covered under OSHA, nor are farms that only employ immediate members of the farmer’s family, or farms with 10 or fewer employees. Like any other government organization, OSHA has its share of forms. Glacken says that the form people should be familiar with is OSHA’s Form 300, which is where employers record details of workplace incidents. “This is what OSHA will look at when they come in,” said Glacken, noting that it might take several days for OSHA to review everything. “They’re going ask for medical records, worker’s comp records, insurance records, employee absentee records, incident logs, first aid logs.” In a recent record-keeping survey, the Government Accounting Office (GAO) discovered that many employers were not completing logs properly, including recording inadequate descriptions and locations. “Be specific,” said Glacken. “Don’t just say ‘it happened at the plant’. Say ‘it happened in the northwest corner of the plant by the xyz machine’. Be specific.” Glacken says it’s important to account for injuries properly and accurately. For example, if an employee is

injured today, returns to work tomorrow and didn’t lose any time except for the day of injury, that first day isn’t counted. Glacken says that many people over-report because they don’t want to get in trouble. Another common reporting mistake is when an injury results in later surgery, that incident should be counted once. “Someone hurt their back, they’re restricted for a while,” said Glacken. “They go for surgery two months later, and they’ve lost time. On the form, the person is counted twice — once for being restricted and again for lost time. That bumps the numbers up. If it’s one person, there should be just one ‘x’ in the box, not two. “I don’t want people to over-report,” he said. “If you do, it makes your incident rate higher than it needs to be, and you’ll be targeted for inspection.” But if OSHA does come in for an inspection, Glacken says that there are some key points to remember. “If someone comes in to do an OSHA inspection, the first thing you need to do is ask for proper identification,” he said. “No matter who comes to visit, you should ask for that. If someone can’t prove who they are, get them out of there.” The first step in an inspection is an opening conference, during which the OSHA inspector will explain the purpose of the visit, provide details about how the establishment was selected and explain the scope of the inspection. Inspections can be comprehensive, which means a substantial, complete inspection of the potential highhazard areas of the workplace; or partial, focused on certain potentially hazardous areas, operations or conditions in the workplace. “If it’s a complaint, ask for a copy of

the complaint,” said Glacken. “They’ll do a walk-around, ask you questions, and ask your employees questions.” The inspector will take notes, and may take photos or video during the inspection. The inspector will collect air samples, measure noise levels, and monitor exposure to toxic fumes, gases and dust. Employees may be consulted privately about safety and health conditions, and are protected against discrimination if they provide information. The inspector may point out unsafe or unhealthful conditions, and discuss options for corrective action. After the inspection, a closing conference is held. “They’ll go over what they found,” said Glacken. “If they took samples, they may not be able to do a complete close-out until they know what the samples show. They’ll go over everything with you, and give you a booklet, ‘Employer Rights and Responsibilities Following an OSHA Inspection’, which explains the appeal process.” Glacken explained that there are three actions a company can take in response to a citation. “If you get a citation, you can accept it and fix whatever was wrong, then send documentation to prove it was taken care of,” he said. “Another option is to have an informal conference with the area director to discuss the penalty. When you go over the citation, make sure the paperwork is clean — take care of everything before the inspector leaves.” The third option is to use an attorney, but Glacken says that his experience is that using an attorney makes the case drag on for a long time. “If you can work it out one-on-one with the area director or the compliance officer, that’s the best way to cope. It works out much better.”

Beef workshop scheduled in Canandaigua Beef Quality Assurance is a program that is promoted by the USDA, Cooperative Extension, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, New York Beef Producers Association, and basically all of the beef industry. The program provides training to beef cattle producers in food safety, proper cattle handling techniques, proper handling of animal health products, proper injection sites, and record keeping. The Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team is hosting a BQA training Saturday, March 3, from 9:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. at Tamberlane Farm, 4117 State Route 364, Canandaigua, NY. The

classroom portion of the training will begin at 10 a.m. After lunch will be the chuteside portion of the training. Cost for the training is $20 which includes a BQA manual; additional family/farm members are $8. Lunch is included in the registration fee. Once a producer is certified, he or she will have the opportunity to purchase a farm sign and receive a card verifying the BQA certification. The goal of this program is to maximize consumer confidence and acceptance of beef by focusing the producer’s attention to daily production practices that influence the safety, wholesomeness, and quality of beef and beef products. Many beef cattle buyers,

check payable to CCE, attn. Nancy Anderson at 480 N. Main St, Canandaigua, NY 14424. For questions, please call Nancy Glazier, Small Farms Support Specialist at 585-3157746. Beef Quality Assurance Program is supported by your Beef Checkoff.

Farm Disaster Preparation Certificate Course BATAVIA, NY — Cornell Cooperative Extension has developed a unique training program for farm owners to increase their resistance to small and large disasters. The Farm Disaster Preparation Certificate program will help farm owners plan for and manage disasters that might occur. This program focuses on practical pre-disaster education, preparedness, regarding farm equipment safety on the road, fire or structure collapse, storm and wind damage, criminal activity, farm chemical risks, and biosecurity. By special arrangement with several farm insurance carriers, farms that complete the Farm Disaster Preparation Certificate training will receive a certificate to provide to their insurer as a condition of eligibility for receiving a credit or discount toward the farm’s annual insurance premium. The value of the credit or discount will vary according to individual policies and policyholder circumstances, but is usually a 10 to 15

percent discount. The Farm Disaster Preparation Certificate is directed to all sizes of farms and all types of products. Dairy and livestock farms are especially encouraged to participate in the program due to their additional concerns regarding animal agriculture. The class will be held on March 8 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Genesee County Cornell Cooperative Extension office, 420 East Main Street, Batavia, NY 14020. The Class fee is $35 per person which includes lunch, handouts and complete Farm Disaster Preparation Certificate training. The person representing a farm should be the insurance policyholder but other key farm personnel are welcome. For more information or questions about the workshop contact Jackson Wright at 585-746-3016. To register contact Jan Beglinger at 585-343-3040 x 132 or at jmb374@cornell.edu by March 1.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 5

Learn about best management practices to reduce stress during cattle handling along with other topics to improve beef quality and safety at the BQA Workshop in Canandaigua on March 3. Photo courtesy of New York Beef Industry Council

feeders, packers, and retail outlets are requiring that the beef they purchase be produced by BQA certified cattle producers. Also, most “added value” sale opportunities for feeder and stocker cattle require BQA certification. To register for the event, send a

Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant (Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Paved with good intentions Between Christmas and New Years’ Day each year I pursue the ritual of purchasing a calendar book for the following year. At the shopping mall nearest us a calendar company sets up a temporary kiosk right after Thanksgiving, hoping to sell desk calendars and wall calendars at full price. The day after Christmas, when hordes are returning gifts for exchange or cash, Paris can be seen looking for a desk calendar, possibly one carefully examined a week earlier during last minute shopping. The big difference after Dec. 25: the calendars are all half price. Sometimes, if I know I will be back in the area after New Years’… and if there are lots of unsold calendars… I will wait to see if the price is halved again. Occasionally, I have

lucked out and gotten a good calendar for 75 percent off. I like Ansel Adams calendars, as well as those from Sierra Club and the Far Side cartoonist Gary Larson. One year, I waited till after New Years’ Day and was lucky to get a plain calendar with no pictures at all, for half price; it was the kiosk’s last desk calendar… period. This year I did much better and got a desk calendar featuring Pug dogs. Brittany spaniels would have been better, but Pugs are almost as cool (or cooler, depending who you ask). According to an Internet farm newsletter titled Ag Professional (check them out at www.agprofessional.com/news/An alysis), crop growers are playing a type of Russian roulette with their upcoming spring fertilizer purchases. Their writer, Tom Polansek, just

headlined his Feb. 12 article with “U.S. farmers may fail in fertilizer faceoff”. It’s a very good and timely article, the high spots of which I will try to present, then follow with my own comments. Polansek writes that many Indiana crop growers are “playing chicken with the world’s biggest fertilizer makers”. Many Indiana corn growers are postponing buying the fertilizer needed, a last minute move rarely employed by serious Hoosier farmers. But this year the common sentiment of these is anger that prices for key nutrients surged more than one-third in the fourth quarter of 2011. “I haven’t bought anything yet, prices are so high it’s ridiculous,” said Steve Georgi, an Indiana corn grower who normally purchases fertilizer around the beginning of the year. Fertilizer prices jumped last fall on global demand and expectations for a large increase in corn plantings in the United States. While those expectations have not changed, the price spike has triggered a

buying boycott by farmers across the Midwest, pushing sales volumes of key products to their lowest levels since the financial crisis crushed demand in 2008. But farmers may lose in the face-off unless they place their orders soon. Fertilizer distributors, many of whom were burned when demand evaporated in the 2008 price crash, no longer maintain large local stockpiles. That leaves some unable to accommodate a last-minute buying spree, meaning farmers who wait to buy may have to delay plantings or grow something besides corn. The buying boycott is the latest sign of a broader trend in which farmers, most of them grain belt producers now flush with cash, seize more control over their operations to exert more market power. Net farm income jumped 27.5 percent last year to a record $100.9 billion, giving many Midwest farmers (not so much Northeast dairy farmers) the flexibility to break free of traditional practices. Many have installed their own

storage bins, achieving more leeway in timing the sale of their crops so as to exact higher prices from grain companies. Farmers cashed in after Chicago Board of Trade corn prices reached a record high near $8 a bushel last July as strong demand drained supplies. Strong margins for producers of nitrogenbased fertilizers do not make high prices easier for farmers to swallow. Costs for natural gas, used to make nitrogen (N) fertilizer, are hovering near a 10-year low. But N fertilizer manufacturers haven’t passed these savings on to growers. At Potash Corp, the world’s top fertilizer producer, N fertilizer sales volumes fell by 15 percent in the last quarter of 2011 to 1.2 million tons, the lowest for that quarter since 2008. The Saskatchewan-based company has slowed production of another key nutrient, potash, at its mines due to weak demand. Potash Corp predicts sales will rebound this spring as long as corn prices support an expansion of

plantings. Will there be a lastminute rush? Logistical problems could prevent farmers from acquiring the fertilizer they want if they wait until the last minute to buy. For example, Hintzsche Fertilizer in Illinois is one company that most likely will not have enough on hand unless orders come in soon. The general feeling among fertilizer distributors and manufacturers is, in the words of Hintzsche’s general manager Jeff Eggleston, “I’m not buying it if you guys aren’t committing. I’m not going to get stuck with it.” Absent that commitment, some farmers may need to delay planting because a flood of late orders can’t be filled as needed. Fertilizer dealers, as a group, don’t feel obliged to keep enough fertilizer on hand to fulfill all the built-up demand from farmers. “If the season breaks early, then we could see this jump in purchases at the retail level,” said David Asbridge, president of NPK Fertilizer

Crop Comments A6

Farmers reach out to consumers during Food Check-Out Week by Cyndie Sirekis As they have done for the past decade and a half, farmer and rancher members of many local Farm Bureaus will reach out to consumers in their communities during Food Check-Out Week (Feb. 19-25 this year). The official theme of the week is “Stretching Your Grocery Dollar With Healthy, Nutritious Food.” The theme reflects the continuing reality that many Americans are feeling an economic squeeze and as a result, eat out less often and prepare more meals at home. Offering practical information and tips on how to put nutritious meals on the table with fewer dollars is just one aspect of Food Check-Out Week. Many participating farmers and ranchers also are committed to responding to broader questions consumers may

Crop Comments from A6

face of over-priced NPK crop inputs, growers should use what soil test info they already have to make a fertilizer choice… and order… ASAP. If you

don’t have current soil tests, take some as soon as the ground is thawed enough, even though February may not be the ideal time. Soil test time

American Farm Bureau Federation

ing and the future of food to solve today’s most challenging problems. “For too long, farmers and ranchers have not had a voice in conversations about where food in America comes from,” said Terry Gilbert, a Kentucky farmer and chair of the AFB Women’s Leadership Committee. “Now more than ever before, both during special observances such as Food Check-Out Week and as they go about their dayto-day routines, farmers are committed to participating in conversations with consumers, to answer the questions they have about food,” she said. Although the way farmers talk about food with consumers is evolving, the Farm Bureau — Ronald McDonald House Charities connection that was initiated when Food CheckOut Week first began remains strong. turn-around at most labs is better than it used to be, particularly if you avoid the spring rush. If seed corn varieties are in really tight

Recognizing the need everyone has to find solutions to feeding families healthful foods on a tight budget, many county and state Farm Bureaus will make food donations to Ronald McDonald Houses or other charities during Food Check-Out Week. Ronald McDonald Houses provide a “home-awayfrom-home” for families of seriously ill children receiving medical treatment. On the national level, the AFB Women’s Leadership Committee will make cash and food donations to the Ronald McDonald House of Central Indiana this year. The third week of February was selected for Food Check-Out Week as a bridge to National Nutrition Month in March. Cyndie Sirekis is director of news services with the American Farm Bureau Federation.

supply, consider some open-pollinated (which may sound like heresy to some). Waiting till the last minute to line up crop

inputs in the spring is much riskier than the chance taken by some cheapskate trying to buy a desk calendar for quarter price.

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 7

Advisory Service. “We could see a price spike.” That could derail intentions for large corn plantings. If they cannot get their hands on fertilizer, or decide prices are still too high, farmers can plant soybeans, requiring less fertilizer than corn and planted later in the spring. Analysts predict corn plantings will reach a 68-year high of 94.2 million acres, up 2.5 percent from 2011, according to a Reuters survey. They project soybean plantings will rise 0.4 percent to 75.3 million acres. Georgi, the Indiana farmer, is in no rush to lock in his fertilizer. He is confident he will be able to buy the supplies he needs and has already seen nitrogen prices in his area fall about 7 percent since November. The only other time Georgi waited so long to buy his fertilizer was during the price spike of 2008-09. His patience saved him money that year and he will not finalize purchases this year for at least a few weeks in case prices continue to weaken. “There’s room for them to come down,” he said confidently. How does this mostly cornbelt scenario apply to Northeast crop growers? First the fertilizer availability situation is a national (if not global) arena. Crop growers further south of the cornbelt will soon start demanding their fertilizer… even the last-minute committers. I recommend that, even in the

have about food — how it is grown or raised and long-term effects on people’s health and the planet. For many farmers and ranchers, this stepped-up interest in conversations about food, whether through inperson conversations or social media interaction with consumers, was sparked by The Food Dialogues, a new effort to bring together different viewpoints on farming and ranching, and the future of food. The Food Dialogues is an initiative of the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance, a coalition of farmers, ranchers and their industry partners, committed to continuously improving how they grow and raise food that provides healthy choices for people everywhere. USFRA strives to bring together different viewpoints on farming and ranch-

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE

Performance Premixes announces winners of Big Buck Contest by Andy Mower This year, Big Buck winners were from across the territory. With the strange weather patterns this year, the overall deer harvest was down. These three guys were able to harvest a big buck no matter what the weather was.

house, three stories high. After enjoying the scenery from his stand, Eric notice movement of some deer in an open pasture field. Eric put his sites on a buck, out 275 yards. Eric put his 270 super short mag on the buck and was successful hitting the deer, what a shot!! The buck

Tony DiNitto from Oriskany, tion winner. shot a tremendous big buck. It was opening day in the southern zone, and Kyle was up in his tree stand since 6 a.m. At first light, Kyle notice some deer activity. Four deer out in the field were getting chased by this big buck. A spike horn and a crotch horn ran right under Kyle’s stand. At 8 a.m., on the dot, Kyle saw this huge buck making his way right toward him. The huge buck kept making his way to Kyle’s tree stand, when the buck was approximately 20 yards away, Kyle was able to take a shot. The buck bolted into the thick cover. To Kyle’s relief, his shot was a heart

Northern tier winner’s buck. The northern tier winner is Eric Croniser from Boonville, NY. Posing with the buck is Eric’s son Jacob. Our northern rifle winner does come from the north. It’s Eric Croniser, from Boonville, NY. Eric was hunting in his stand behind the barn alongside some of his fields Sunday morning around 8:30 a.m. Nov. 6. This stand, from what I’m told, is more like an enclosed tree

was an 8 point with a 17 inch spread, and with a tallest tine of 6 inches. This buck is at the taxidermist’s getting mounted. Our southern rifle winner takes us over toward the western part of my territory, Vienna, NY, where a young farmer, Kyle Woodcock

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NY, is the Honorable Menshot, the huge buck did not go very far. Kyle is certainly getting this huge buck mounted and will have the rack scored. Our honorable mention big buck was also shot in the southern zone, by Tony DiNitto, on their farm in Oriskany, NY. Tony, his brother Joe and dad (Tony Sr.) all are great seasoned hunters and normally get their share of big bucks over the years. It was the Wednesday before

Thanksgiving, when Tony had a little time in the afternoon, around 3, to do some hunting. Tony was on his way to his stand for an evening watch, when Tony saw about 35 turkeys out in a corn field. Not thinking too much about the turkeys, he also saw a deer standing among the turkeys just feeding in the field. When Tony saw them, they were about 400 yards out, knowing that would be too long of a shot; Tony stalked his way along a hedge row to get a better

look of the deer. Tony got within 165 yards of the deer, to determine it was an 8 point buck. Tony got into position and took the shot to harvest this 8 point buck with an 18 inch spread and a tallest tine of 8 inches. The winners all get a Realtree Camo Jacket and a Camo hat from Pioneer Hi-bred, Congratulations to all who entered and planted high yielding and more milk per acre Pioneer Hi-bred corn and other products.

The southern tier winner is Kyle Woodcock from Vienna, NY.

USDA answers New York’s pleas to increase plum pox compensation New York State Agriculture Commissioner Darrel J. Aubertine on Feb. 9 applauded USDA for responding to New York farmers by publishing updated com-

pensation rates for orchards and nurseries infested with the stone fruit disease, Plum Pox Virus (PPV). While the rates went into effect immediately, USDA is

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seeking comments on the new rates and New York growers are encouraged to voice their opinion of the increased compensation. “I commend USDA for hearing our pleas for a higher, more adequate compensation rate for growers with trees impacted by Plum Pox Virus,” the Commissioner said. “Support from growers is key in eradicating this potentially economically devastating disease, and these increases will ensure continued cooperation from the stone fruit industry as we work to protect their crop from Plum Pox Virus in New York

State.” Orchard and nursery growers of PPV impacted species are compensated for their loss through an 85-15 federal-state cost share program. The newly proposed compensation rates are the rates proposed by a team of New York growers, coordinated by Gerald White, a Professor Emeritus in Agricultural Economics at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University. These rates more accurately reflect the loss a grower incurs when they are required to remove their trees in an effort to eradicate PPV from the state. An

example of the new rate is that an acre of threeyear old trees in a wholesale orchard will increase from $9,429 per acre to $12,737 per acre. The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, along with peach and stone fruit growers and nursery growers in New York have been advocating to USDA to increase the compensation paid to growers who are forced to remove PPV infected trees. New York growers have been at a greater disadvantage with compensation for PPV as they plant their orchards at higher densities, and thus more

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 9

trees are impacted by the mandatory quarantine and removal when PPV is detected. In addition, the value of New York peach, plum, nectarine and apricot crops has nearly doubled since USDA originally set compensation rates back in 2000, and therefore, they have not been fully compensated for the loss they incur from the required removals. While the Interim Rule for PPV compensation rates went into effect immediately, Feb. 3, USDA is seeking comments on the rates. New York growers are encouraged to comment on the increased compensation rates. Comments will be accepted through April 3 through either the Federal eRulemaking Portal or via mail, in which comments can be sent to: Docket No. APHIS–2011–0004, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A–03.8, 4700 River Road Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737–1238. New York has been working to eradicate Plum Pox Virus since 2006, and is the only remaining U.S. location with the disease. While PPV does not pose any human health risks, the virus reduces the quantity and quality of susceptible species of stone fruit, including peaches, nectarines, cherries, plums and apricots. The only method of eradication is to remove the infested plant material. There are 1,600 acres devoted to peach production in New York, ranking the state 15th in the nation. In 2010, New York growers produced 11.8 million pounds of peaches that were valued at $7.0 million. Most of the State’s stone fruit production is around Lake Ontario, with fresh market fruit produced in the Hudson Valley and on Long Island.

Budget proposal would provide level funding for ag research and extension

Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — Funding for Penn State agricultural research and extension programs would remain at 2011-12 levels under Gov. Tom Corbett’s proposed state budget for 2012-13, unveiled Feb. 7. “Considering the cur-

rent economic realities in Pennsylvania, this is excellent news,” said Bruce McPheron, dean of Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. “With revenues continuing to lag behind estimates, the governor once again had to make some very difficult fiscal

decisions,” he said. “We are pleased and grateful that he recognized the importance of our work, which is critical to the continued economic vitality of the state’s food and fiber sectors and to the long-term well-being of our communities and citizens.”

The state appropriation for ag research and extension — $44.7 million in the current fiscal year — accounts for about half of the base operating funds for the College of Agricultural Sciences. The college also receives support from federal and county governments as

part of Penn State’s mission as the state’s sole land-grant university. Those funds support research and extension programs in areas such as food safety, water quality, animal and plant disease, Marcellus Shale issues, crop and livestock production,

human health and nutrition, youth development and bioenergy. No tuition dollars are used to support ag research and extension. Base funding for the college also comes from the state’s general appropriation to Penn State in support of undergraduate education. The college — which offers 19 majors and has seen its enrollment rise nearly 50 percent since 2005 — would bear its share of the governor’s proposed 30 percent cut in that allocation. During last year’s budget negotiations, the college’s agricultural research and extension line items were moved out of the Penn State appropriations bill and placed in the Agricultural College Land Scrip Fund under the state Department of Agriculture’s budget. Use of this fund is restricted to the “Commonwealth’s land grant university for agricultural research programs and agricultural extension services.” In the 2011-12 budget, the Land Scrip Fund received revenues from the state’s general fund. The governor’s proposed spending plan for 201213, however, calls for the appropriation to the Land Scrip Fund to be transferred instead from the Race Horse Development Fund. McPheron explained that the change would not impact the use of the funds. But he said the university is assessing the implications of this proposed shift in revenue sources. McPheron emphasized that the governor’s proposal is just the first step in the state budget process. “We view the governor’s budget as a positive starting point,” he said. “We will continue to work closely with the administration and the General Assembly to communicate the value that the state receives in return for its investment in ag research and extension.” More information about how the College of Agricultural Sciences has spent its appropriated dollars and has responded to budget pressures is available online at http://psu.ag/z0a2tH.

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Pennsylvania fruit orchards remain free of plum pox virus HARRISBURG, PA — Pennsylvania’s effort to eradicate the Plum Pox Virus from fruit-bearing trees continues to be a success, Agriculture Secretary George Greig announced Feb. 14. A rigorous survey conducted last summer tested 61,056 leaf samples in Adams, Cumberland, Franklin and York counties. State and federal agriculture department crews began collecting orchard samples last May and finished at the end of October.

“Since Plum Pox Virus was first detected more than a decade ago, the department has been committed to eradicating the disease and minimizing its impact on growers’ livelihoods and the state’s economy,” said Greig. “The results of last year’s surveys show the state continues to be free of Plum Pox, and we commend the survey crews for their hard work and thank the growers for their cooperation.” Pennsylvania was de-

USDA gearing up to conduct 2012 Census of Agriculture

Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

National Agricultural Classification Survey is an important step towards a complete count Surveys are now arriving in mailboxes around the nation to help identify all active farms in the United States. The National Agricultural Classification Survey (NACS), which asks landowners whether or not they are farming and for basic farm information, is one of the most important early steps used to determine who should receive a 2012 Census of Agriculture report form. The Census of Agriculture, conducted every five years by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), is a complete count of U.S. farms and ranches and the people who operate them. “We are asking everyone who receives the NACS to respond even if they are not farming so that we build the most accurate and comprehensive mailing list to account for all of U.S. agriculture in the Census,” said NASS’s Census and Survey Director, Renee Picanso. “The Census is the leading source of facts about American agriculture and the only source of agricultural statistics that is comparable for each county in the nation. Farm organizations, businesses, government decision-makers, commodity market

analysts, news media, researchers and others use Census data to inform their work.” NACS is required by law as part of the U.S. Census of Agriculture. By this same law, all information reported by individuals is kept confidential. NASS will mail the 2012 Census of Agriculture later this year and data will be collected into early 2013. “The NACS survey is the first step in getting a complete count, so we ask everyone who receives a survey to complete and return it,” said Picanso. “The Census is a valuable way for producers and rural America to show their strength — in numbers.” The 2012 Census of Agriculture is your voice, your future, your responsibility. For more information about NACS, the Census of Agriculture, or to add your name to the Census mail list, visit www.agcensus.usda.gov. NASS provides accurate, timely, useful and objective statistics in service to U.S. agriculture. We invite you to provide feedback on our products and services. Sign up at http://usda.mannlib.cor nell.edu/subscriptions and look for “NASS Data User Community.”

clared free of Plum Pox Virus in October 2009 after three years of negative test results. The latest survey is part of the required monitoring during the recovery phase. Another full survey will be conducted this year and monitoring will continue into 2013. While no primary quarantine areas remain statewide, limited

areas in Adams and Cumberland counties are under nursery quarantine restrictions for another year. Plum Pox Virus severely affects production of fruit-bearing and ornamental varieties of almond, apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach and plum stone fruit trees. Spread by aphids, the disease causes premature fruit

drop and blemishes on fruit that make it difficult to sell as table fruit. After the virus was found in Adams County peach trees in 1999, state and federal agriculture officials teamed with Penn State University and imposed a 300 square-mile quarantine area, performed aggressive surveillance and developed an eradica-

tion program. Because the virus has no cure, affected growers were required to destroy all exposed stone fruit trees within the quarantined areas in the four affected counties. In all, 1,675 orchard acres were destroyed. For more information, t v i s i www.agriculture.state. pa.us and search “Plum Pox Virus.”

Owens introduces bill to reduce regulation on apple exports to Canada Bill would save New York apple growers time and money

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — Congressman Bill Owens (NY-23) intro-

duced legislation on Feb. 10 that would streamline U.S. apple

exports to Canada by exempting bulk shipments of apples to Canada from inspection under the Apple Export Act. “New York apple growers play a large role in the economic development and food security of our region, and this exemption will allow them to continue their contribution to New York’s economic recovery,” said Owens. “I look forward to working with my colleagues in the House to ensure that the New York apple industry receives full support from Congress to remove this burdensome regulation.” According to the New York Apple Association, the elimination of the required inspection would immediately offer a savings to growers of approximately $300 per truckload. Additionally, removing this regulation would allow

apple growers to distribute their products on their own schedule without working around costly after hours inspections procedures, providing them the opportunity to save money and streamline operations. Last year, more than 1.5 million bushels of New York apples were exported to Canada. At about 1,000 bushels per truck and 1,500 trucks exporting apples to Canada annually, this amounts to a savings of about $450,000 for New York apple exporters. “We applaud the hard work of Congressman Owens to offer legislation that will save New York apple growers hundreds of thousands of dollars,” said Jim Allen, New York Apple Association President. “By removing this requirement, apple growers will save over $300

per load in unnecessary inspection fees. This is a great example of taking the lead to help reduce costs, paperwork, and useless mandates that only impede commerce for apple growers.” H.R. 3914 would also improve efficiency within the inspection process. New York State is currently understaffed to perform required inspections of all apple exports. Exempting exports to Canada from the Apple Export Act would speed up this process for more than 500,000 bushels of apples that are exported from New York to countries other than Canada annually. Currently, the Department of Agriculture requires the inspection of all apple exports under the Apple and Pear Export Act of 1933. In 1999, the law was changed to exclude pears.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 13

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 17

Calf-Tel introduces new XXL hutch

Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Hampel Animal Care introduces the new Calf-Tel XXL, the largest XL calf hutch on the market. For decades, Calf-Tel has set the standard for superior durability and efficiency, making your investment in calf housing systems one that grows with each generation of calves it protects, says Joe Weber, marketing manager, Hampel Corporation. Now the hutches themselves have grown too. Calf-Tel XXL provides the most interior usable space for calves. The XXL hutch is 49 percent larger than the existing Pro & Deluxe II hutches from Hampel and 21 percent larger than other XL hutches on the market. This means six more square feet on the interior of the hutch for calves.

Calf-Tel has long set the standard for quality, durability and excellence in calf housing systems, says Weber. The Calf-Tel XXL comes with all of the same benefits you’ve come to expect from Calf-Tel. Benefits of the new Calf-Tel XXL hutch include: • Most efficient bedding door available. • Superior ventilation — ridge top vents and adjustable rear vent door ideal for all climates. • Extremely durable and lightweight the longest lasting hutch

on the market. • Decreased labor and healthier calves easy to move and clean. • Six more square feet on the interior of the hutch. Extra interior space provides protection in cold and damp conditions. • Maximum ultra-violet protection available. The Calf-Tel XXL will be available as of March 2012. Hampel Animal Care, a division of Hampel Corporation, began serving the agriculture industry in 1981 with the introduction of Calf-Tel housing sys-

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business to better serve our dealers and customers. We invite you to learn more about us and our new unified brand strategy by visiting our website. As a producer of high quality agricultural equipment since 1916, Kuhn Krause, Inc. is a recognized leader in the development and manufacturing of innovative tillage and grain drill equipment. KUHN Group acquired Krause Corporation and created Kuhn Krause, Inc. in May 2011.

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American Angus Auxiliary scholarships available for Junior Angus members The American Angus Auxiliary announces that this year it will award approximately $12,000 in scholarships to the top five male and top five female applicants select-

ed from finalists chosen in the applicant’s home state. Each state auxiliary is eligible to submit one male and one female application to the national contest. The winners will be announced during the closing ceremonies of the National Junior Angus Show in Louisville, KY, on July 20. In addition, the five finalists for the Miss American Angus contest are selected from the top national female applicants. The application for American Angus Auxil-

iary Scholarships is now available online. Interested junior Angus members may download the application, access directions and general information at www.angusauxiliary.com/scholarships/index.html. Applications from the state contact must be postmarked by May 1. For specific state and local Auxiliary scholarship deadlines and information, visit the Auxiliary website, or contact your state or regional Angus Auxiliary. Additional questions about the American

Angus Auxiliary scholarships can be directed to Cortney Hill-Dukehart Cates, Auxiliary Scholarship Chairman, at 410-489-4960, or at cortneyhd@gmail.com. The American Angus Auxiliary consists of individuals interested in the welfare of the Angus breed. Its members work to provide educational activities for junior Angus members, such as scholarship programs, awards and competitions. For more information about the American Angus Auxiliary, visit www.angusauxiliary.com

Jamison n R.. Reed

TWO O NEW W FARM M INSURANCE E AGENTS S JOIN N NEW K STATE'S S LEADING G FARM M INSURANCE E AGENCY. YORK

Lunserr Insurance,, a diivision n off Agri-Businesss Brokerage e Corporation,,

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 19

Terry R. Lunser, Urbana (OH) University and Jamison R. Reed, Cornell University, will increase the number of agents providing "on the farm" service to six. Lunserr Insurance has provided 56 years of dedicated e represents the Star service to New York farmers. Lunserr Insurance Insurance Company/ Meadowbrook Insurance Group, providing the most progressive agricultural insurance coverage economically to New York farmers.

Introducing Vermeer™ Net and Rebel™ Net from Vermeer Corporation The Vermeer Corporation has introduced the newest partner in its forage product line with Vermeer brand netwrap — Vermeer™ Net, available for 4’ and 5’ balers, and Rebel™ net, designed for Vermeer Rebel® Series Balers.

make the best looking bale in the least amount of time, and the strength and reliability of Vermeer brand netwrap offers another valuable tool in making that possible.” Vermeer brand netwrap is produced

provide for easier handling, and the smaller roll length and weight of the Rebel Net makes loading and unloading easier.” Vermeer Net is offered in a variety of lengths and is suitable for most round balers in today’s

marketplace. Visit your

local Vermeer dealer for

more details.

Introducing Vermeer Net and Rebel Net from Vermeer Corporation

Featuring superior net strength for ultimate bale protection, Vermeer brand netwrap is produced in a unique green, black and white color scheme for easy identification of the Vermeer quality. “Vermeer balers are one of the toughest in their class, and we are excited to offer a Vermeer brand netwrap that matches that durability,” says Joe Michaels, Vermeer Director of Forage Solutions. “Vermeer strives to help producers

with heavy-duty HDPE for a stronger tape than standard netwrap, and both Vermeer Net and Rebel Net offer optimum net spread to cover square shouldered bales with little net stretch, improving bale appearance. “In addition to enhancing the bale quality, Vermeer Net and Rebel Net offer convenient features to help producers improve efficiency,” says Russell Beyer, Vermeer Project Lead. “Handgrips on the Vermeer Net packaging

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Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

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• Dairy Supplies • Animal Health • Bagged Feed • Pet Supplies • Hand & Power Tools • Interstate Batteries • Farm Gates • Barn Windows & Fans • Roller Chain • Energy Free Waterers • Trench Plastic & Silo Tops • Calf Hutches & Mini Barns • Twine • Bale Wrap • Fencing Supplies • Energizers • V-Belts • Welding Supplies • Bunk Feeders • Welded Wire • Tillage Parts • Bearings & Seals • Water Bowls • Hydraulics • Lubricants • Door Track & Hangers • Implement Tires & Tubes • Bale Feeders • Concrete Mix • Paint • Roof Coating • Lawn & Garden • Soaps & Cleaners • Express Wagons • Washline Wheels • Tingley Boots • Wolverine Shoes • Carolina Shoes • Dog Food • Hydraulics • Housewares • Plumbing • Electrical • Stock Tanks

Humane castrator for newborn livestock introduced The U.S. company known for inventing the premiere high-tension banding castration tool on the market is now introducing a lighter, sleeker version designed to bring the same humane, user -friendly technique to newborn calves, sheep and goats. No-Bull Enterprises is unveiling the next generation of innovation in bloodless castration with the Callicrate ‘WEE’ Bander™, an instrument crafted from surgical quality, corrosion resistant stainless steel. It is designed to insure proper ligation with every application — the key to effective humane castration and a signature feature of the Callicrate Bander® which has been manufactured and distributed worldwide since 1991 with more than 50,000 units sold. Achieving adequate tightness is the single most essential component in reducing stress during banding, according to animal welfare experts like Colorado State University animal science professor Temple Grandin.

“Previously, the only banding option available for the smaller animals was the green elastrator ring,” says inventor Mike Callicrate, owner of No Bull Enterprises, based in St. Francis, KS. “We used the same simple technology, but combined it with a means of attaining proper tension, resulting in a complete ligation. In replacing the elastrator rings, which lack sufficient tension and are considered the most stressful method of castrating young animals, the ‘WEE’ Bander™ also provides an alternative to castration with a knife, which is probably the second most stressful method you can use.” Studies of high tension banding have demonstrated that the complete negation of blood flow triggers a natural analgesic effect that blocks pain while minimizing swelling and related complications. “The stress of using an elastrator ring, which lacks sufficient tension to block pain, doesn’t meet the public’s heightened standards for hu-

mane animal treatment,” Callicrate says. By insuring proper application of the band, the Callicrate ‘WEE’ Bander™ measures up to the increasingly rigorous worldwide emphasis on animal care and well-being. Not only is the Callicrate method for high-tension banding the most stress-free castration method for the animal, it’s also easiest for the person performing the operation. With the Callicrate Bander®, band application is mechanically assisted to insure consistent results every time. The ‘WEE’ Bander™ is even lighter weight, just as fast, effective and bloodless, but requires no manual cutting or crimping of the rubber loop. The process works like this: the operator loads a rubber loop on a triangular nosepiece at the front of the applicator and places it around the testicles of the newborn calf, lamb or goat. Once both testicles are within the loop, the operator simply releases a small thumb tab to secure the band firmly in place. The process of tightening the band around the testicles to reach proper compression is very quick and simple and requires no cutting of the banding material. “The bands are specially formulated to withstand and maintain the high tension needed for consistent results,” Callicrate says. “The correct formulation and curing of the rubber gives it the elasticity, strength and memory for fail-proof application.” Like the Callicrate Bander®, the Callicrate ‘WEE’ Bander™ is made in the USA using the highest quality materials. It is essentially maintenance free. Five loops are included with each ‘WEE’ Bander. Additional loops can be purchased in bags of 25 or 100. For more information, visit www.callicratebanders.com or call 800-858-5974.

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 21

Rock Windrowers 2 Models Available • 8’ to 14’

A View from Hickory Heights by Ann Swanson There’s always room for gelatin dessert! As I watched a show about the 1960s I immediately identified with some of what was being said. For a shower gift I received a whole set of gelatin molds. Now, these molds could be used purely as decoration hanging in the kitchen or as a functional piece of kitchen equipment. We lived in a trailer so the decorative route was the way to go. My molds hung on the wall so I could reach them easily to create a salad or a dessert. My youngsters certainly appreciated anything made with gelatin because it went down so easily. I remember the first time I served it to each of the children. They swished it around in their mouths until it finally went down, but they eagerly looked for more. My molds are now in my cupboard. I seldom use them, but I do still make the gelatin in salads and desserts. My favorite salad is made with lemon-lime gelatin, cottage cheese, pineapple, celery, and nuts. Usually we have it at Christmas time, but this year we did not have any. Maybe I should make it with red gelatin and serve it for Valentine’s Day! I looked up Jell-O because that is the most common name for the gelatin product. It has an illustrious history

that takes us to a place that is just to the north of here in New York State. I had to type JellO just right or my computer spell check would not recognize it. Jell-O was not an instant success. As so often happens the person who invented it did not reap the benefits. Pearle B. Wait, a cough medicine manufacturer from Leroy, NY, tried to market his product for a couple years, but when that venture failed he sold the business for $450 to his neighbor. With a little marketing expertise and the introduction of the Jell-O girl a new business was launched. I was able to find out that the first flavors offered for sale were orange, lemon, strawberry, and raspberry. That is just the tip of the iceberg these days. Many flavors have been added to satisfy customers. The early packages had the gelatin packed in waxed paper pouches that opened easily. I found out that when the company was just getting off the ground the gelatin was even hand-packed. The packages I remember, however, were packed by a machine. Back when I taught school I always had my class make blue gelatin to create mini-aquariums for our visitors. We dropped little gel fish into it and enjoyed our treat after a story about

Rainbow fish. Norman Rockwell created a quite famous picture of the Jell-O girl that appeared in magazines in the 1920s. I checked the copy of The Norman Rockwell Treasury by Thomas S. Buechner that I have but it was not in there although many other advertisement commissions were included. In the early 1940s Jack Benny launched the J-E-L-L-O song on his Sunday evening radio show. Recipe booklets were put out and mailed to people who requested them free. Of course, all of the recipes used either gelation or pudding. Another celebrity added his voice to JellO commercials in the 1970s. Who can forget Bill Cosby making his pitch for the pudding? Today people are able

to purchase small cups of gelatin or pudding to pack in lunches or take to the workplace for a snack. When the ladies went to work things changed. There are at least two humorous family stories about gelatin. I was asked to unmold the gelatin. I did not worry because I had done that many times before. This time however, the mold was different. It was made of Tupperware and had a removable disk on top. When I was attempting to unmold the salad the whole thing slipped through the top onto the plate. I was not supposed to have removed that disk until later. The salad did not look like my sister -inlaw intended it to, but it was still edible. My son is frequently reminded of a gelatin

jelly beans. She always makes those for Easter. We have tried the big egg molds that are out there, but two halves of eggs were not impressive. The company that makes Jell-O celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1997. That accidental discovery by the manufacturer of cough syrup was a popular one. It even made it through the Depression years when there was rationing. Just in case you want to know, Jell-O is uniquely American. It was discovered here, and manufactured here. There are not many things that fall into this category. I am not sure if it is exported or not. Ann Swanson writes from her home in Russell, PA. Contact at hickoryheights1@verizon.net

FEBRUARY SPECIALS 2009 JOHN DEERE 9770 Combine Premier Cab, Contour Master, Approx. 600 Hrs.

$245,000 2002 JOHN DEERE 6310 Tractor & Loader 85hp, 4WD, 2 Sevs, 540 PTO

$33,750 2001 JOHN DEERE 9550 Combine Walker, New Feeder House, Good Condition

$91,500 2004 JOHN DEERE 9860 Combine w/ Extended Wear Concave & Harvest Monitor

$149,900

Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

story that involved him. When the family was passing dishes around the table during one holiday celebration he dumped the whole salad onto his plate when the wiggly thing shifted. He was relieved when no one yelled and someone simply scooped the gelatin up and put it back onto the serving plate. Knox blocks became another favorite dessert. The colorful blocks could be cut and tucked into lunches without melting along the way. The kindergarten teacher at the school gave me her recipe for Knox blocks. There was a method in her madness. I think she hoped I would send some in for the children for the next holiday celebration. It worked, too. My daughter has a jelly egg mold that makes gelatin that looks like

2005 JOHN DEERE 9560 Combine Walker, Bin Extensions, Good Condition!

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COMBINE JD 612 Real Nice 12R 30” Corn Head . . . . . . . . $66,500 JD 625F Hydra Flex, Hi Stone Dam . . . . . . . . . .$24,500 JD 630F Grain Head, New Auger . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,900 JD 635F Hydra Flex, Exc. Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$33,500 JD 635F Flex Head w/Air Reel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 JD 643 6R Corn Head, Good Cond! . . . . . . . . . . .$7,900 JD 643 6R Corn Head, Low Tin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,900 JD 693 Corn Hd, Knife Stalk Rolls . . . . . . . . . . .$16,900 JD 893 Corn Head, Knife Stalk Rolls . . . . . . . . .$33,750 JD 893 Contour Master, good cond. . . . . . . . . . .$34,000 JD 920F Flex Head, HHS, DAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,900 JD 925F Flex Head, Good Cond . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,900 JD 9550 Walker New Feeder House, Good . . . .$91,500 JD 9560 Walker, HHS, Bin Ext. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$139,000 JD 9610 DAM, DAS, Contour Master . . . . . . . . .$69,900 JD 9610 Duals, Level Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$79,000 JD 9770 Ext. Warranty till 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . .$248,000 JD 9770 Comb., Prox. 600 Hrs. 2009 . . . . . . .$245,000 JD 9860 STS Harvest Mon., 900/65R32 . . . . . .$149,900 JD 9870 ProDrive, Low Hours!, 2010 . . . . . . .$274,000 HAY AND FORAGE Pottinger V10+356 Butterfly Mowers, 30’ . . . .$38,000 Pottinger V10+356ED Triple Mower, Tine Cond. $38,000 NH 166 Windrow Inverter w/Ext. . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,900 NH 575T+Chute Twine Baler, Excellent Cond . . .$14,800 NH HW340 SP Windrower, 15’ Platform . . . . . . . . . .$48,750 Kverneland TA9071S Twin Rotor Rake, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 JD 1360 MoCo, 9’9”, Impeller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 JD 348T+40 Ej Hyd Tilt, Manual Dist Ctrl . . . . . . .$7,500 JD 466 Round Baler, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,900 JD 5820+4R Corn SPFH, 225HP . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 JD 640B Hay Head, Trash Screen . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 JD 946 MoCo, Impeller, 2Pt Hitch . . . . . . . . . . .$14,900 GEHL 1275+3R+Hay PT Forage Harvester . . . . . .$9,800 CIH 8312 12’ MoCo, Rubber Rolls . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,750 MISC. EQUIPMENT Teagle/To 5050 Bale Chopper, 3Pt Mtd . . . . . . . .$5,500 Knight Digistar EZ150 Scale Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$495

Demco HTH Sprayer, 60’ Boom, 700 Gal . . . . . . .$6,900 Century 300 Gal. Sprayer, 33’ Boom, PTO . . . . . .$1,395 PLANTER OR DRILL JD 1590-20 No-Till Drill, Grass Seed . . . . . . .$47,500 JD 1770-16 Vacuum, Liquid Fert, Insect . . . . . .$45,000 JD 1770-16nt CCS ProShaft, SeedStar Var Rat . .$82,500 JD 7200-12 Dry Fert, Vac Seed Meters . . . . . . .$19,900 TILLAGE Unverferth 1225-43 Rolling Basket, 2010 Model . . .$21,500 Krause 8238WQF-38 Disk, Used 2 Seasons . . . . . . .$51,500 JD 16 R Strip Til w/ Demco 500 Gal. Tank . . . . . . .$45,000 JD 2500-6 In Furrow Plow, Trashboar . . . . . . . . .$2,750 JD 2500-7 Moldboard Plow, In Furrow . . . . . . . .$3,250 IH 800-10 On-Land Plow, Flex Frame . . . . . . .$13,500 DMI 32’ Basket Harrow, 5 Section . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,950 TRACTOR JD 4240 110HP, 2WD, 18.4x38 Duals . . . . . . . .$26,900 JD 5065M + 563SL Ldr, Low Hrs, Excell Cond .$36,500 JD 5320 +541 Ldr, 55HP, 4WD, Low Hrs! . . . . .$25,900 JD 6200 66HP, 2WD, Open Station . . . . . . . . . .$14,000 JD 6310 +640 Ldr, 85HP, 4WD, Open Station . . $33,750 JD 7320 105HP, 2WD, Good Cond . . . . . . . . . . .$39,500 JD 7600 140HP, 4WD, 18.4x42 Tires . . . . . . . . .$39,900 JD 7930 180HP, Front 3Pt & PTO . . . . . . . . . . .$152,000 JD 8285R 500 Hrs., Avail July, 2012 . . . . . . . .$203,500 JD 9300 360HP, No 3pt or PTO . . . . . . . . . . . . .$72,500 JD 9330 PTO, 3Pt, Avail June 10th . . . . . . . . .$235,000 FNH TS100 w/Ldr, 4WD, 80HP . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,900 CASE 2294 130HP, 4WD, 540+1000 PTO . . . . . . . . .$16,900 WAGON OR SPREADER MENSCH 3375 PT Bedding Spreader, 10 Yd. . . . . . . . . .$13,900 KNIGHT 3036 Mixer, 360 Cu. Ft., Good Cond . . . . . . . . .$11,500 KNIGHT 3036 360 Cu. Ft., Mixer Wagon. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,000 KNIGHT 3050 500 Cu. Ft. Mixer, Aircraft Tire . . .$16,900 KNIGHT 5168 Twin Auger Vertical Mixer . . . . . .$22,500 KNIGHT 8118 Spreader, Good Cond . . . . . . . . . .$15,900 KNIGHT RC160 600 Cu. Ft. Mixer, 2010 . . . . . . .$37,900 Jaylor 2425 Vert. Mixer Wagon, 425 Cu. Ft. . . . .$7,250

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by Sandra Avant Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have found that a commercial vaccine is effective against leptospirosis in cattle. A widespread zoonotic disease, leptospirosis is transmitted naturally from domestic and wild animals to humans. The contagious disease, which is caused by Leptospira bacteria, is spread through contact with food, water or soil contaminated with urine from infected animals. It can affect all farm animals, rodents and wildlife. Several years ago, retired microbiologist Richard Zuerner, veterinary medical officer

David Alt and their colleagues at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Animal Disease Center (NADC) in Ames, Iowa, tested a version of this vaccine and discovered that it induced some protection against experimental infection with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, the main cause of bovine leptospirosis. ARS is USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports USDA priority of promoting international food security. Alt and his colleagues, who work at the NADC Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research Unit, examined the vaccine’s potency

in reducing the shedding of bacteria, potentially affecting the spreading of leptospirosis in herds. They vaccinated cattle twice with this vaccine or twice with a standard or control vaccine. To test the vaccine’s ability to induce shortand long-term immunity to infection, cattle were challenged with L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo three months or one year after immunization. Scientists found that the vaccine appeared to be effective at both three-month and oneyear periods after vaccination. Although the vaccine did not provide complete protection from shedding at one

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year after vaccination, it induced greater immunologic responses and protection against shedding of leptospirosis than the standard vaccine. After cattle were challenged three months after vaccination, bacteria were detected in the urine for several weeks, but the cattle appeared to be capable of clearing the infection, whereas non-vaccinated cattle remained infected, according to Zuerner. Only one vaccinated animal in the year-long study was shown to have bacteria in the kidney at the end of the live challenge, but most animals had evidence of short-term kidney infections that eventually cleared, according to Zuerner. Although the vaccine was partially successful in protecting cattle against leptospirosis, scientists agree that improvement is still needed. Choosing the right vaccine depends on identifying the infecting serovar, according to Alt. The diverse organisms of Leptospira bacteria contain more than 200 serovars that can cause the disease. Findings from this research were published in Clinical and Vaccine Immunology. Read more about this research in the January 2012 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

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For More Info, Call Larry Price 518-673-3237 x 232

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 23

2010 Kubota Model #B2320HSD Tractor/Loader, 106 Hrs., 23HP, Factory Warranty Still Left . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,900 2007 Kubota Tractor/Loader, Factory Cab, Model #L3940HSTC, R4 Tires, Radio, 3rd Function Valve, Mid PTO Kit, 200 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,900 2006 Kubota Tractor/Loader/Cab, Model #B7610HSD-F, 482 Hrs, Heated Cab, 24 HP, 4WD, HST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,900 2005 Caterpillar Excavator, Model #303CR, 30” Ditching Bucket, Mechanical Thumb, 1990 Hrs., Excellent Shape . . . .$28,900 2005 Kubota 54” Midmount, Model # RCK54-15BX, Fits BX Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,250 2004 Bobcat Model #T190 High Flow Skid Steer Loader, 2850, New Paint Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$33,000 2003 Kubota 62” Sweeper Front Mount, Not Including Subframe, Like New, Model #L2062B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 2003 Komatsu Dozer, Model D38E, 6 Way Blade, 3,350 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,900 1992 Ford Model #1220 Tractor/Loader/Midmount Mower, 900 Hrs., 17HP, HST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,900 1966 Massey Ferguson Tractor, Model #180, 2WD . .$3,900 6’ 3Pt Hitch Snowblower, Model #72S Smyth, Excellent Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 Bush Hog Box Blade, Model #SBX72, 6’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$450 Bush Hog Brush Cutter, Model #SQ720, 6’ Footer w/Slip Clutch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,200 Kubota Subframe fits: L Series Tractor Model #L2180-1 . . .$900 Kubota Midmount Mower, 72” Fits L Series Model #RC72-38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 Woods 3Pt Hitch Landscape Rake, Model #LRC60, 60” Wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$350

Vaccine protects against leptospirosis

Crop Insurance Introduction and Program Updates Crop Insurance Introduction and Program Updates will take place on Thursday, March 1, 10:30 a.m.-12 noon at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County, 480 North Main Street, Canandaigua, NY 14424. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has classified New York as an underserved state for crop insurance.

Currently, farmers are NOT using crop insurance to cover our agricultural production at rates seen in other areas of the country. This will put New York at a disadvantage with the direction suggested by negotiations over the 2012 Farm Bill. Direct Payments and Disaster Assistance will be less available to producers, replaced by a

higher reliance on risk management for farmer’s protection from disaster events. Crop insurance policies are available for all major crops in the region, including vegetables, grains, forage crops, and fruits. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County is hosting a free information meeting for farmers who would like to

explore crop insurance options for the 2012 growing season. Crop insurance specialist Charlie Koines will be on-hand to present basic crop insurance fundamentals, review recent changes beneficial for farmers in the Finger Lakes region and Western New York, and answer questions about eligibility and costs. This meeting is hosted

jointly by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County and the USDA Farm Service Agency office in Canandaigua, NY. Pre-registration is required by calling Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County at 585-394-3977 x427 or email Nancy Anderson with your full contact information to nea8@cornell.edu.

Six easy steps to properly clean and sanitize calf feeding equipment Cleaning calf and heifer feeding equipment is a vital part of every dairy. Without proper cleaning and sanitation of feeding equipment, disease and illness can quickly spread between calves. Dr. Don Sockett DVM, PhD with the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory provides the following steps to ensure calf feeding equipment is properly sanitized. 1. Rinse First, using warm water, about 90 degrees F, rinse dirt and milk residues off both the inside and outside of feeding equipment. Do not use hot water to rinse. 2. Soak Next, soak the calf feeding equipment for 20-30 minutes in a mixture of hot water greater

than 130 degrees F and 1 percent chlorinated alkaline clean in place (CIP) detergent. 3. Wash Then, thoroughly wash inside and outside of the feeding equipment with a brush. You can also wash bottles and buckets in an industrial dishwasher. Fats melt at temperatures greater than 110 degrees F, so keep the water temperature above 145 degrees F during washing. Manually wash bottle nipples with a brush. Do not wash nipples in a dishwasher, as they fail to properly clean nipples and this can lead to high bacteria counts in the milk. While manually washing nipples, check for any visible cracks and signs of wear and tear. Replace those that are worn. Cracked nip-

Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Lucas makes statement on Obama’s Budget Plan WASHINGTON, D.C. — On Feb. 13, Chairman Frank Lucas released the following statement regarding President Obama’s fiscal year 2013 budget proposal. “The President’s budget demonstrates that neither rural America nor fiscal discipline is a priority for this administration. Raising taxes on small businesses and ignoring the real drivers of trillion dollar deficits is a failure of leadership. “The agriculture community remains committed to doing its part in deficit reduction. However, this proposal shows a lack of perspective and understanding in how agriculture can realistically contribute. “For example, Presi-

dent Obama’s proposal to cut crop insurance threatens the integrity of the program itself. And, he ignores other areas for savings such as streamlining or eliminating duplicative programs in conservation, or closing loopholes in nutrition spending. Nutrition spending comprises 80 percent of the agriculture baseline and there is bipartisan support in Congress to save billions by eliminating loopholes, but not one penny is cut in the President’s budget. “Not only does it fail to address our serious fiscal problems, but it undermines our investment in providing a stable food supply,” said Chairman Frank Lucas.

ples can harbor bacteria. 4. Rinse again Next, using warm water, about 100 degrees F, that contains 50 ppm of chlorine dioxide, thoroughly rinse inside and outside of calf feeding equipment. Then rinse the equipment with acid that contains 50 ppm of chlorine dioxide once or twice per week. After rinsing the nipples, keep them in a covered container filled with a sanitizing solution until they are used. 5. Dry Then, allow the equipment to drain and dry before using again. Avoid stacking upside down on a concrete floor or on boards, as this can inhibit proper drying and drainage. 6. Final preparation Lastly, spray the inside

and outside of equipment with a 50 ppm solution of chlorine dioxide two or less hours before use. Allow a minimum of 60 seconds of contact with equipment. After all six cleaning steps have been complet-

ed and the equipment is dry it should be ready to use again. The above steps refer directly to calf milk feeding equipment, but the same considerations for cleaning and sanitization should be given to the water and

starter buckets. At a minimum calf water buckets and starter buckets should be cleaned and sanitized between groups of calves. Source: Land O’Lakes Purina Feed

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Statement from Agriculture Secretary Vilsack on record U.S. farm exports for calendar year 2011 Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack made the following statement regarding data released in February showing U.S. farm exports reached a record $136.3 billion in calendar year 2011: “The data released today by USDA represents a record-breaking calendar year for farm exports, demonstrating — once again — that American agriculture remains a bright spot in our nation’s economy. We saw a rise in both the value and volume of U.S. agricultural exports worldwide in 2011, as international sales rose $20.5 billion over the previous record set in calendar year 2010. Total agricultural exports for calendar year 2011 were a robust $136.3 billion. “These figures indicate how demand for the American brand of agriculture continues to soar worldwide, supporting good jobs for Americans across a variety of industries such

as transportation, renewable energy, manufacturing, food services, and on-farm employment. During the past three years, the U.S. farm sector has continued to support and create jobs on a consistent basis, strengthening an American economy that’s built to last. Every $1 billion in agricultural exports supports 8,400 American jobs, meaning that U.S. farm exports helped support more than 1 million U.S. jobs in 2011. “And that gets to the innovation of our American farmers, ranchers and growers. American agriculture continues to apply the latest in technology and achieve a nearly unparalleled level of productivity. In fact, U.S. agriculture is the second-most productive sector of our economy in the past few decades outside of information technology. “Exports of almost all major U.S. commodities

rose in calendar year 201l, helping us to reach President Obama’s goal of doubling all U.S. exports by the end of 2014. Grains were the biggest contributor to the overall record, reaching an all-time high of $37.7 billion, a $9.2 billion increase over 2010. Cotton experienced the biggest year -to-year increase, up 44 percent from 2010, reaching a record $8.5 billion. Dairy and pork exports also set records in 2011, reaching $4.8 billion and $6 billion respectively. “Another success story is U.S. beef exports. Last year, the United States exported an alltime high of $5.4 billion worth of beef and beef products, surpassing the previous record by more than $1.6 billion. The volume of shipments also surpassed the 2003 levels, the last year before a detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington State

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Page 26 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

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disrupted U.S. trade. The return to pre-2003 levels marks an important milestone in USDA’s steadfast efforts to open and expand international markets. Despite this progress, restrictions continue to constrain exports to many of our key markets and we remain fully committed to breaking down those trade

barriers. “There was more good news for U.S. beef exporters when United Arab Emirates (UAE) officials issued a decree on Jan. 24, liberalizing imports of U.S. beef by eliminating age restrictions. The expansion of U.S. beef access to UAE — one of the largest markets for U.S. beef in the Middle East — un-

derscores the tenacity of the Obama Administration to improve our trade relationships, expand export opportunities and strengthen an American economy that’s built to last.” The latest export data is available via the Global Agricultural Trade System at www.fas.usda.gov/data. asp.

Farmers, growers asked to participate in markets The New York State Thruway Authority is seeking farmers and growers to participate in “Tailgate Farmers Markets” at selected travel plazas along the Thruway system. The markets operate from mid-May through Nov. 1, depending on the availability of product. Participation is limited to New York State farmers/growers of locally grown fresh fruits, vegetables, edible herbs, cider and horticultural products. Only produce grown or pro-

duced in New York State may be sold at the farmers markets. For more information, call the Thruway Authority at 518-436-2831. For a list of the 27 travel plazas, see the weblink www.thruway.ny.gov/ travelplazas/index.html. The Tailgate Farmers Markets are intended to offer fresh farm produce to Thruway travelers, to provide farmers and growers another outlet for their products and to promote New York’s agricultural industry.

Tapping into maple success through sanitation a27; 10.25"; 14"; Black; Composition: EPS Ads:CF: CW PDF pages:a27.pdf; -; -; -; -

The secret to success for maple syrup producers may lie in the science of sanitation. Simply changing taps and tubing or using special spouts could double the amount of sap seeping from New York’s maple trees, according to Cornell experts who have spent

six years researching the topic. “Taking steps to reduce the microbial contamination that occurs at the tap hole by replacing spouts and drop lines has produced substantial gains in sap production in trials at Cornell’s Arnot Research Forest and in

producers’ sugarbushes,” said Stephen Childs, Cornell Maple Program director. The buildup of bacteria and yeast inside tap holes can cause taps to dry up. Microbes can be pulled into the tapholes from old tubing when the tree develops a natural vacuum during

freezing temperatures, which can suck sap back into trees. Check valve spouts can prevent this by employing small balls that roll back and forth inside the spout, blocking the flow back into the tree. Through workshops and webinars, Childs and his colleagues are advocating sanitation techniques among New York’s maple producers. The results have been increased sap yields and expanded production for many, according to Mike Farrell, director of Cornell’s Uihlein Maple Forest in Lake Placid. The average volume of sap per tree varies from

10 to 20 gallons per tap, and it takes about 40 gallons of maple sap to produce one gallon of pure maple syrup. New York State Maple Producers Association President Dwayne Hill credits the Cornell Maple Program for helping to boost New York’s $12.3 million maple industry. “The research Steve Childs has done has had a huge impact on being able to tap two to three weeks earlier in the season without worrying about bacteria contaminating the tap hole,” Hill says. Chuck Winship is one producer who has benefited. He makes more

See Mike Emmert, Emmert Farm Dist. 570-879-4869 SEE US AT THE NEW YORK FARM SHOW - HORTICULTURAL BUILDING

FEBRUARY 23-25, 2012

than 1,000 gallons of syrup annually at his Sugarbush Hollow farm in East Springwater, NY, and said Cornell sanitation techniques helped make the 2011 season the best ever for sap quantity and quality. Winship hopes history will repeat itself in 2012. Hill agrees, but is hesitant to make any predictions. “The old timers say you never get two good years back-to-back,” Hill said. “We are weather dependent. The season will be determined by what happens for a few short weeks in February and March.” “The moderate, early, temperatures and limited snowfall this winter will allow most producers to more easily work in their sugarbushes, and I suspect we will eventually get the winter weather necessary to sweeten the sap and cause the flow,” adds Peter Smallidge, director of the Arnot Teaching and Research Forest in Van Etten, NY.

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 27

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State Farm Bureaus recognized for excellence State Farm Bureaus were recognized for excellence in membership achievement and for implementing outstanding programs serving Farm Bureau members in 2011. American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman presented the awards during AFBF’s 93rd Annual Meeting. Stallman announced winners of the Pinnacle Award, for overall outstanding program achievement combined with membership growth. The Idaho, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Tennessee and Virginia Farm Bu-

reaus received Pinnacle Awards. The Awards for Excellence and the President’s Awards were presented in five program areas: • Agriculture Education and Promotion • Leadership Development • Member Services • Policy Implementation • Public Relations and Information The winning states and the number of Awards for Excellence categories won by each include: Alabama (5); Arizona (5); Arkansas

(5); California (4); Colorado (1); Florida (4); Georgia (4); Idaho (5); Illinois (5); Indiana (5); Iowa (5); Kansas (4); Kentucky (5); Louisiana (4); Maryland (4); Massachusetts (1); Michigan (5); Minnesota (4); Mississippi (3); Missouri (5); Montana (5); Nebraska (4); Nevada (3); New York (4); North Carolina (3); Ohio (5); Oklahoma (2); Oregon (5); Pennsylvania (5); Rhode Island (1); South Carolina (4); Tennessee (5); Texas (5); Utah (4); Virginia (4); Washington (4); Wisconsin (5); and Wyoming (2).

The winning states and the number of President’s Awards won include: Arizona (1); Idaho (3); Indiana (1); Kansas (1); Massachusetts (1); Michigan (2); Missouri (1); Montana (3); Nevada (1); Ohio (2); Tennessee (3); Texas (2);Utah (1); Virginia (3); and Wisconsin (1). A total of 26 President’s Awards were presented. These are the “best of the best” awards presented for excellence in each of the five program areas to states by membership category size.

USDA provides $12 million for disaster assistance in Pennsylvania HARRISBURG — USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) State Conservationist Denise Coleman has announced that Pennsylvania will receive $12 million to help with natural disaster recovery efforts throughout the state. The funding will enable NRCS to assist local government entities in removing debris from streams and stabilizing severely eroding stream banks that

threaten homes, business, and utilities. This funding will be used to help restore streams whose natural flows were disrupted by the flooding from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee the end of last summer. “These funds will provide critical assistance to Pennsylvania residents and businesses and continue the federal partnership for environmental restoration projects on private lands

damaged by natural disaster,” Coleman said. The funding is being made available through the NRCS Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) Program. EWP assists with the implementation of critical emergency measures needed to address public safety and restoration efforts. Typical projects funded under EWP include removing debris from waterways, protecting eroded stream banks, reseeding

damaged areas and, in some cases, purchasing floodplain easements on eligible land. Through EWP, NRCS provides up to 75 percent of the construction funds needed to restore areas damaged by flooding. The community, local, or state sponsor for the work must pay the remaining costs, which can be provided by cash and/or in-kind services. NRCS provides products and services that enable people to be

good stewards of the nation’s soil, water and related natural resources on non-Federal lands. Additional information about EWP and other USDA con-

servation programs is available at your local USDA Service Center and online at www.nrcs.usda.gov under “Programs and Services.”

WITHOUT STRAY VOLTAGE EVERYONE FEELS BETTER

Pennsylvania to host beef cattle producer seminars United Producers Inc. (UPI) and Keystone Beef Marketing Network (KBMN) are hosting educational seminars for cattle producers throughout Pennsylvania. The six seminars will be held Feb. 20 through March 13. Seminars will address cow economics, maintaining herds during the winter, issues regarding Marcellus Shale and programs available through the Na-

tional Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Speakers include Dr. Francis Fluharty, The Ohio State University; Dr. John Cumerford, Penn State University; Jonathan Laughner, Penn State University; and the NRCS. Seminars beginning at 6 p.m. are located at the Mercer Co. Extension Office, Feb. 20; Indiana Co. Extension Office, Feb. 22; Belle Vernon Christian Center

Church, Feb. 28; and the NRCS Building in Somerset, March 5. Seminars beginning at 6:30 p.m. are located at Tioga County Fairgrounds, March 7; and Columbia County Extension Office, March 13. Visit www.uproducers.com or call Blaine Winger at 724-9968608 or Glenn Eberly at 717-9432962 for more information.

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Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

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Testimonials below are from some of the many farmers tested for Stray Voltage in 2010: States the source of the Stray Voltage. Results customer saw after the Stray Voltage was corrected. K. Drasher, Nescopeck, PA. Fence System and Off Farm: "When the Stray Voltage was corrected, I saw a very positive change in the parlor flow and an increase in milk production." G. Jackson, Westmoreland, NY. Fence System: "Cattle are much calmer in the parlor. I recently had a light fixture short out and the Stray Voltage Detector alarmed to tell me there was Stray Voltage present." J. Weaver, Canandaigua, NY. Fence System and Off Farm: "Cut SCC in half, stronger heat signs, increase in feed consumption, and a gradual continuing increase in milk production." D. Fisher, Strasburg, PA. Fence System: "We saw a gradual decrease in SCC and the milk production is increasing." L. Horst, Constable, NY. Fence Systems and Barn Lights: "Increase in milk production and an improvement in breeding." J. Rudgers (Synergy Dairy, LLC) Wyoming, NY. New Barn Lights: "Milk production increase of 8 pounds per cow, on 600 cows in just over one week." M. Nolt, Myerstown, PA. Fence System and Off Farm: Stronger heats, dramatic decrease in SCC, and a continuing increase in milk production." N. Zimmerman, Himrod, NY. Fence System: Less kicking during milking, Butter Fat increased, and the SCC decreased.

Stop in and ask about Stray Voltage at the New York Farm Show. You can also see the new Stray Voltage Detector. If you cannot make it to the Farm Show - you can see it work on the Web site: www.strayvoltagetesting.com Click on the Fence Detector link then the video link.

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Folks Per zone, Reader ads cost $9.25 for 1st 14 words and 30¢ per additional word. - Phone it in: Call Peggy at 800-836-2888 - Fax it in: Fax attn: Peggy @ 518-673-2381 - Mail it in: Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 - Email it in: classified@leepub.com

3. No purchase necessary. Send a post card with your name, farm or company name, complete mailing address, phone number, email address and date of birth to CF/Gator Sweepstakes, Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Contest closes June 1st, 2012, mailed entries must be postmarked May 31st, 2012 or before. Employees and relatives of Lee Publications, John Deere and Z&M Ag and Turf are not eligible. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. All taxes are the responsibility of the winning entry. Contest open to readers of Country Folks, Country Folks Grower, Wine & Grape Grower, Country Folks Mane Stream, Hard Hat News, WHEN & NAQN. February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section A - Page 29

Come See Us at The New York Farm Show in Booth HT-0316 NYS Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY February 23-24-25, 2012

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Page 32 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 1

New York City students throw down “Giant” challenge with dairy farmer super bowl promotion schools and the principals that was agreed to live via Skype. During the rally, each principal received an opposing team jersey from the other principal and agreed to wear it to school for a day if their local team lost. Principals also agreed to provide a local dairy food from their state to the

Fuel Up to Play 60 Schools commit to healthier eating, additional exercise to celebrate team’s playoff game Encouraging students to become life-long dairy consumers is a key goal for Dairy Checkoff staff — and, now, thanks to a joint promotion between American Dairy Association and Dairy Council (ADADC) and the New England Dairy & Food Council, chances are good students in New York City and Boston will forever associate Greek Yogurt and Cheddar cheese with the Super Bowl. That’s the result of a partnership the two organizations designed to celebrate the recent Super Bowl matchup of the New York Giants and New England Patriots. Organizing simultaneous pep rallies for their home teams at Fuel Up to Play 60 (FUTP 60) schools in New York City and Boston, the two groups devised a friendly challenge between the

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Principal Jacob Michelman of Central Park East Middle School, Manhattan and former Giants punter and two time SuperBowl champion Sean Landeta show off the Chobani greek yogurt Boston students will receive as part of the Big Game Challenge. Photo courtesy of American Dairy Association & Dairy Council Inc

CRAWFORD COUNTY, PA TOP 40 HERDS FOR JANUARY

Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

NAME RYND HOME FARMS ALRIGHT FARMS SHANNON AND BRENDA IRWIN INFIELD BROTHERS COUNTRY AYRE FARMS LLC AMAZING GRACE DAIRY GERALD R DONOVAN MARK & CHRIS CORNELL GARY LEE & PATRICIA MASE TODD & ANN KANTZ C & C DAVIS CUSTEAD-VALLEY FARMS RON & JANET TROYER JAMES MILLER JEFFREY RANEY WIL-AIRE FARM ROLLING SPRING FARM FINDLEY LAKE DAIRY JERRY BEARY MITCHELL DAIRY WEST BRANCH HOLSTEIN TOM & MISSY AUL RICHARD A KEMERER RANDY MALLORY GOLDSCHEITTER DAIRY PAT & MIKE CAREY WIL-AIRE FARM RON & DON CLOSKY NICKERSON FARM 2 BRENNER DAIRY STEVEN MILLER RON & DON CLOSKY JASON & JESS KENNEDY COUNTRY AYRE FARMS LLC SPRUCE ROW FARMS BYLER BROTHERS FARM R DEETER FARM

BRD

MILK 3X

H H H H H H H H B H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H X J H H

YES YES YES NO YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO YES NO NO NO YES NO NO NO YES NO NO NO NO YES NO NO NO

RHA FAT RHA PROT RHA MILK PCT FAT PCT PRO 28154 28710 29936 26889 25899 24541 25437 26078 22116 24863 23916 25279 25131 24247 24414 21079 22476 23790 23804 22969 23161 22367 22430 22766 22953 22740 22030 20071 22247 22358 21271 20917 21672 18990 18453 21102 21414

3.5 3.4 3.5 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.3 3.8 4.2 3.7 3.2 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.7 4.5 3.5 3.6 3.8 4.0 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.9 4.1 3.7 3.3 3.7 3.6 3.6 4.7 4.2 3.9 3.8

3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.5 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.1 3.0

882 872 855 815 795 788 775 772 764 757 757 756 752 750 746 742 726 724 721 721 717 710 699 697 696 694 692 687 683 673 670 667 662 657 657 649 641

YES 17984 4.9 877 3.5 NO 20570 3.7 770 3.1 NO 21331 3.6 759 3.0

637 637 632

TOP HERDS FOR RHI PROTEIN

COUNTRY AYRE FARMS LLC LYNWOOD HEAGY DANIEL D BYLER

opposing school for a healthy snack day if their team lost. The New York City school agreed to send the Boston school Chobani Greek yogurt and the Boston school agreed to send the New York City school Cabot cheddar cheese. All students pledged to get extra minutes of exercise after the big game based on the number of points scored by their team. “Fuel up to Play 60 is

X H H

974 985 1047 1011 945 893 833 985 936 922 760 887 911 870 898 944 793 868 904 915 853 852 810 812 801 835 852 832 832 733 780 752 791 892 770 813 810

Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 • (919) 661-3100

CENTER STATE AG SERVICE 20 West Main St., PO Box 935 Morrisville, NY 13408 (315) 684-7807 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE INC 9618 Route 26 Lowville, NY (315) 376-2991 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE INC 3003 Noble Rd. Seneca Falls, NY 13148 (315) 568-0955 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE INC 6195 Route 20A Warsaw, NY 14569 (585) 786-0177 FISHER FARMS Hwy Rt 13 PO Box 126 Canastota, NY 13032 (315) 697-7039 JONES FARM SUPPLY 39 Clinton St. Gouverneur, NY 13642 (315) 287-3210 ORTEL SUPPLY INC 268 Liberty Arcade, NY 14009 (585) 496-5050 MOUNTAIN VIEW, LLC 8092 Rt. 9 Plattsburg, NY 12901 (518) 561-3682 R&M FARM & PRO HDWE 480 RT 11 PO Box 429 Marathon, NY 13803 (607) 849-3291 Z & M AG & TURF 17 Railroad Ave. Alexander, NY 14005 (585) 591-1670 Z & M AG & TURF 56 Lindquist Rd. Falconer, NY 14733 (716) 665-3110 PENNSYLVANIA HISTAND'S FARM & HOME RD 1 Box 231 Church St. Rome, PA 18837 (570) 744-2371 PAUL JACKSON LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS Bailey Hill Rd., Rt. 1 Box 366 Troy, PA 16947 (570) 297-3872

all about getting students to make healthier choices,” says ADADC PR Specialist Brenda Beltram. “But nutrition doesn’t have to be boring. Having professional athletes talk to kids about the importance of three daily servings of milk, cheese or yogurt makes it pretty cool for kids to eat right.” In addition, local dairy farmers from New York and Boston were invited to be part of the

event and shared a few words regarding FUTP 60 and dairy farmers’ commitment to child nutrition. In New York City, Tunis Sweetman of Sweetman Dairy Farm in Warwick, NY, joined former Giants punter and two time Super Bowl champion Sean Landeta to talk to students about the importance of making healthy food choices and getting adequate exercise.

The pep rallies were held on the Thursday before the big game and attracted both broadcast and print media in New York City and Boston. Stories on the school challenge were aired on ABC, NBC and Univision in the New York market and on ABC, NBC and New England Cable News in Boston. Coverage also appeared on the New York Times blog and in the Boston Herald.

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

Molds and Mycotoxins By Janet B. Fallon, CCA Dairy One Forage and Soils Lab Sales & Technical Support

A wide range of different molds (fungi) can produce poisons called mycotoxins that affect animals when they consume contaminated feeds. Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium molds are probably the most common culprits involved. Spores of these molds can be found in the soil or on plant debris where they can infect the plant as it grows in the field. Volunteer small grains, infected seed or even grassy weeds are another source of inocula. Plants are often most susceptible to infection when growing conditions Heidi Jackson demonstrates are stressful. Spores may infect via the procedure for analyzing mycotoxins at roots and pollen tubes or by entering the Dairy One Forage Lab, Ithaca N.Y. plant tissue injured by insects, wind, or hail. Research has shown that most of the mold growth and mycotoxin production occurs in the field, but it can continue into storage and feedout as long as there is adequate moisture and oxygen to support continued growth. Mycotoxins affect animals in a number of ways. Some toxins may produce acute symptoms but most often, symptoms may be fairly non-specific and chronic in nature. Cows may show reduced feed intake and production. They may exhibit diarrhea, sometimes bloody diarrhea, reduced reproductive efficiency, rough coats, and general unthriftiness. In extreme cases, they may die. It is speculated that today's high producing animal is exposed to more toxins just by virtue of the fact that she is eating so much more feed to support higher levels of milk production. Visit our web site for information about specific toxins and problem levels at http://www.dairyone.com/ Forage/FactSheet/default.htm. If possible, avoid feeding silage, hay, or grains that are moldy. Spoilage can reduce feed intake and digestibility, which in turn can have adverse effects on animal health and production. Dilution or removal of contaminated feeds can help minimize problems. Likewise, cleaning and ammoniation can reduce the concentration of certain toxins found in grains, however it is often impractical to remove contaminated forages from the ration and there are no effective methods to detoxify them. If that is the case, it is important to talk to your veterinarian and develop a strategy for feeding affected feeds safely. • Test suspect feeds to determine the type and concentration of toxins present.

• Make sure dietary fiber and buffers are adequate since acidic diets may magnify mycotoxin effects. • Dry cows, springing heifers and calves should receive the cleanest feeds possible.

each of 3 to 5 feedings. Mix subsamples completely and take a one pound composite sample to send to the lab. Keep another one pound sample in the event additional testing (for other toxic substances) is needed. Remember, toxins may be present in feed that is not visibly moldy as well as very moldy feeds so it is important to take multiple sub-samples from several feedings. Dry feed samples should be kept in a cool dry place. Wet or moist samples should be placed in a plastic sample bag and excess air should be squeezed out before sealing the bag. Refrigerate moist sub-samples and promptly freeze the final composite sample before shipping them in an insulated mailer or box with ice packs to keep them cold until they reach the lab. Ship samples for mid-week arrival so they don't sit in the post office or lab over the weekend. Overnight express delivery is highly recommended for wet samples to avoid additional mold & toxin production in transit. Ship samples to the Dairy One Forage Lab, 730 Warren Road, Ithaca NY 14850. Consult with your veterinarian to develop a feeding strategy if you suspect that mycotoxins could be limiting herd health and production. And it is not too soon to talk to your Certified Crop Adviser about agronomic practices, i.e., tillage, variety selection, planting/harvest strategies, pest management, and crop nutrition to minimize the risk for plant diseases and mycotoxins next year!

Fields and Crops Manager The software of choice for the crop side of your business Fields and Crops Manager is a new program. It is specifically designed to help farms throughout the Northeast to manage fields and crops to the level of detail they prefer. Whether a grower is only interested in tracking spray usage, or more interested in planning rotations and manure usage, this program is available to help. Get Organized • Keep all of your crop information in one place that is complete and easily accessible. • Have access to field acres and history, manure records, soil lab results, graphs and more… • Work more efficiently with advisors by having good, up-to-date records. • Keep as much or as little information as you want. Save Time • Use the easy Rotation Planning tool for planning next year’s crops by field. • Generate a To Do List of specific fields to take action on. • Produce FSA reports instantly, without having to dig through pape records. • Make a list of manure applications for compliance reporting. Be Confident • Spray and treatment records that meet DEC requirements. • Records that help manage Nitrogen needs to improve crop production. • Optimize yields and track changes in your field’s fertility. Requirements and Recommendations While the only hardware requirements are a PC, printer and high speed internet access, we do recommend you start with good field ID.

Sampling Guidelines

In order for software to be used efficiently, good field identification is critical. The best system for entering information quickly and with a minimum of entry errors, is a simple number system. Although Fields and Crops software can handle any type of ID system, numbers are preferable.

Mycotoxins are present in very small amounts and are not always related to the amount of mold seen. Like anything else, the results are only as good as the sample. It is recommended that you take 8-12 sub-samples at

For more information or to order, call Farmland Environmental at 800-5408716 or e-mail: jack.vanalmelo@farmlandenvironmental.com

• Use mold inhibitors to minimize mold and toxin production in risky feeds during storage or feedout.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 3

• Increasing dietary levels of protein, energy and antioxidants may be helpful.

The Dairy One Improver

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

ALBANY

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

NEW YORK

STANTON FARMS LEWISDALE FARM NO B.S.T.

ALLEGANY

DHI-AP H 645.1 DHI H 47.5

23345 19162

848 3.6 719 3.1 3X 668 3.5 572 3.0

ALFRED STATE COLLEGE DHIRAPCS H 67.9 POTTER, JACK & CAROL DHI-AP H 49.1 NICKDALE FARMS DHI-AP H 137.8 THOMAS & NASON LONG DHI-AP H 27.5 FALLBROOK FARMS DHI-AP H 145.6 GROSS, KRIS & RHONDA DHI-AP H 154.4 KELLEY, RICHARD DHI-AP H 78.0 BENNETT BROTHERS DHI-AP H 211.1 BAKER, RICHARD & JEFFREY DHI-AP H 421.1 GEORGE, CHRIS & STEPH DHIR-AP H 39.2 PLOETZ, GARY & PATTIE DHI-AP H 51.9 RAMSEY, ERNIE DHI-AP H 62.1 SPEICHER, ROBERT & JIM DHI-AP H 93.5 MORNING VIEW DAIRY FARM DHI-AP J 32.2 SMITH, JERRY DHIR-AP H 35.6 BILL WAHL DHI-AP H 52.0 LARRY & DAVE SKROBACK DHI-AP X 19.0

27914 1111 4.0 878 3.1 25734 977 3.8 771 3.0 25191 893 3.5 757 3.0 24837 889 3.6 737 3.0 23451 873 3.7 723 3.1 22979 873 3.8 715 3.1 22234 797 3.6 700 3.1 22427 836 3.7 678 3.0 22899 850 3.7 673 2.9 22348 829 3.7 666 3.0 20315 779 3.8 627 3.1 20594 766 3.7 614 3.0 19886 757 3.8 599 3.0 17289 722 4.2 576 3.3 17801 711 4.0 560 3.1 17576 676 3.8 532 3.0 17218 617 3.6 527 3.1

WHITTACRE FARM LLC WHITTACRE FARM LLC DIEKOW,ARTHUR & PEGGY CHARLES MRAS TILLOTSON,DOUG AND STEVE COLEMAN, WALTER AUKEMA DOUG. JOHN AND CHARLES HAYES PRICE, LESTER AND DAVID FAIGLE, PAUL WOODFORD,DANIEL J. LEETOPS FARM ROSELAND HOLSTEINS

456.2 30.5 77.1 81.3 120.5 59.4 61.5 86.0 56.1 59.2 44.2 103.2 25.4

26572 1005 3.8 802 3.0 3X 24672 968 3.9 744 3.0 3X 23093 852 3.7 697 3.0 24806 925 3.7 694 2.8 22285 783 3.5 665 3.0 20812 825 4.0 643 3.1 20368 771 3.8 636 3.1 20587 768 3.7 633 3.1 20575 789 3.8 628 3.1 20052 737 3.7 618 3.1 19674 760 3.9 595 3.0 19423 714 3.7 573 3.0 17684 665 3.8 510 2.9

H 514.1 B 150.8 H 63.0 H 163.4 H 78.0 H 174.9 H 82.0 H 2031.9 X 287.5 H 69.7 J 72.6 H 71.4 H 53.7 H 64.5 H 60.3 X 104.3 H 99.3 H 54.8 H 48.5 H 64.1 A 39.6 X 78.6 H 31.6

29328 1053 3.6 894 3.0 3X 23883 1013 4.2 787 3.3 24545 923 3.8 781 3.2 24637 930 3.8 753 3.1 24801 931 3.8 753 3.0 23119 782 3.4 720 3.1 23283 911 3.9 715 3.1 23411 885 3.8 704 3.0 3X 21245 780 3.7 678 3.2 22078 766 3.5 669 3.0 17944 817 4.6 629 3.5 19501 750 3.8 625 3.2 20870 745 3.6 608 2.9 19277 710 3.7 591 3.1 18103 696 3.8 582 3.2 17353 749 4.3 575 3.3 19082 708 3.7 575 3.0 19048 704 3.7 570 3.0 18815 666 3.5 562 3.0 18579 714 3.8 554 3.0 17025 643 3.8 524 3.1 15479 625 4.0 510 3.3 16562 572 3.5 505 3.0

BROOME

CATTARAUGUS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

CARBU FARMS, LLC DHIRAPCS HILL'S VALLEY FARM,LLC DHIR-AP WHITEHEAD, NATE DHI-AP WILEAN FARMS DHI-AP JONES DAIRY, INC. DHI-AP DUROW,MICHAEL AND DAWN DHI-AP KARON FARMS,INC. DHI-AP CHARLES BARE DHI-AP PIMM ADELIA DHI-AP BOBERG,DANIEL F. DHI-AP MARK HANSEN DHIR-AP RONALD,PENNY,&TODD PARKER DHI-AP JOHN MOSHER DHI-AP BOBERG ALAN F. DHI-AP ANDERA,CHRIS & CATHY DHI-AP POWELL FARMS DHI-AP WOLOSZYN FARMS DHI-AP KRATTS RONALD L. DHI-AP PHILIP CLARK DHI-AP HORTON,DAIRY DHI-AP BROWN BROOK FARM DHI-AP BRUCE &LUCILLE KONINGISOR DHI-AP MICHAEL KENT DHI-AP

CAYUGA

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

B R COW E E YEARS D

H X H H H H H H H H H H H

SCIPIO SPRINGS DAIRY DHI-APCS H 804.3 FESSENDEN DAIRY,L.L.C. DHI-APCS H 686.1 OAKWOOD DAIRY, INC. DHI-APCS H 1866.3 PINE HOLLOW DAIRY DHI-AP H 671.8 AURORA RIDGE DAIRY DHIRAPCS H 1908.1 PATCHEN, KENTON DHIR-AP H 500.3 ALLEN FARMS DHI-AP H 1274.0 GREEN HILL DAIRY DHI-AP H 843.0 BLUMER,DAVID DHI-AP H 360.1 RIPLEY FARMS DHI-AP H 200.9 MILLS, GEORGE DHI H 62.4 RIPLEY FARMS DHI-AP X 51.3 BACONDALE FARMS DHI H 133.7 NOLT, RAYMOND JR DHI-AP H 87.0 LITTLEJOHN FARMS DHI-APCS H 268.3 REDMOND BROS. DHI-AP H 47.8 WHITE CLOVER FARMS DHI-AP H 73.0 VITALE, PAUL DHI H 97.9 DONLIN FARMS DHI-AP H 106.2 BRUTUS HILL FARM DHI-AP H 161.6 DONLIN FARMS DHI-AP X 113.6 RIPLEY FARMS DHI-AP G 127.4 HALF ACRE DAIRY DHI-AP H 205.3 TWIN HILLS FARM 1 DHI-AP H 108.4 ROMANO FARM LLC DHI-AP H 11.3 ROMANO FARM LLC DHI-AP X 33.5 BURHANS, DONALD & KATHY DHI-AP H 61.1

31360 30644 28553 27595 27994 27034 26856 25319 25343 24631 24369 22644 23750 23327 24099 22842 20767 21452 21857 19664 20318 18411 19512 19646 17914 15609 17067

KNIGHT,JOHN & LAURA IVETT,HOWARD&LUCY CABHI FARM TENPAS,ROGER JHIGH ACRES CARL AND KRIS NECKERS DENISE SAXTON MCCRAY FARM GRAPE VIEW DAIRY LLC. TRIVAL FARM, INC. OAK VIEW DAIRY ORMOND,FARM

28296 976 3.4 873 3.1 3X 27798 1059 3.8 860 3.1 3X 27222 1049 3.9 821 3.0 3X 24815 868 3.5 799 3.2 3X 26232 919 3.5 786 3.0 3X 25547 915 3.6 779 3.0 3X 25579 1000 3.9 767 3.0 25976 974 3.7 765 2.9 25855 920 3.6 749 2.9 3X 23992 937 3.9 739 3.1 24759 915 3.7 738 3.0 3X 23420 885 3.8 733 3.1

CHAUTAUQUA

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-APCS DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H

73.6 44.7 189.8 456.6 221.5 345.6 24.1 123.7 256.3 139.2 341.6 211.8

1130 1060 1000 1009 1028 951 972 890 858 895 888 909 895 843 896 844 768 802 776 731 741 823 744 706 647 739 622

3.6 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.6 4.0 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.6 4.5 3.8 3.6 3.6 4.7 3.6

967 943 875 859 856 834 829 789 745 735 724 708 708 688 687 685 660 658 649 622 616 595 595 572 569 544 505

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.2 3.0 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

HERD OWNER CROWELL,ROBERT CARLBERG FARM MOSS, GLEN & S. DIANE STARCESKI, PAUL AND ROBIN RHINEHART, TIM & MARY CRUMP FARMS FAIRBANKS, DOUGLAS ANDERSON,ALLEN CLINECREST FARM NICKERSON FARMS CRAIG HARVEY CHENEY,STEVEN & MORRIS BECKERINK, ROBERT LUNDMARK, NORMAN E. CARL AND KRIS NECKERS WALL STREET DAIRY 1 DAN & AL MINOR BRAD & KIM WILTSIE BEIGHTOL,JAMES,BRETT BOOZEL, MARK DWAYNE & CATHY EMKE JAQUITH DOUGLAS RAYMOND TROYER PETE & TOM SMALLBACK SPINLER FARMS JONATHAN WARD KELLEY FAMILY FARM NAGEL VALLEY HOLSTEINS

TYPE TEST

Top 40 Herds For January B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X X H H H H H H H H H H J H H H H H X H H H H H H H

531.6 111.1 173.8 49.5 99.1 133.7 170.0 69.4 76.7 909.9 81.0 60.7 72.2 111.8 161.6 42.7 91.2 109.2 124.4 81.1 95.6 108.8 38.6 57.3 137.4 44.6 48.1 101.7

24129 22285 22375 21821 22288 22045 21316 20985 20389 21231 21087 20587 20148 20510 16932 20329 20903 18784 18493 18850 18238 18548 18173 18091 17774 17181 16459 15857

896 827 797 795 814 767 805 783 725 755 739 792 747 756 830 733 744 730 704 658 692 697 624 658 698 601 641 571

3.7 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.7 4.9 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.8 3.5 3.8 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.9 3.5 3.9 3.6

711 700 696 687 685 675 657 643 639 630 629 629 625 625 620 608 598 590 567 564 564 557 551 537 533 524 516 504

2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.7 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2

LANTLAND FARMS LTD. BLAKEMORE,LANCE&GINA BOOR,DAVID TANNER FARMS LLC TURNER, DAVID

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

211.2 99.4 105.2 90.5 83.6

24268 24164 22447 21894 18878

909 863 887 802 679

3.7 3.6 4.0 3.7 3.6

749 733 708 642 596

3.1 3.0 3.2 2.9 3.2

NEWTON, HAROLD & BRIAN HOWARDS INDIAN CAMP FARM HANEHAN FAMILY FARM ANGELROSE DAIRY MARSHMAN FARMS LATHROP, BARRY & PAULA LINCKVIEW FARMS INGERTO, JAY & VIRGINIA DAVIS, ALAN & DEBRA HOFMANN, ROBERT & JOHN HOWARDS MIKALUNAS FARM DAN FRIEDEL SYLSTRA,J.C. GORRELL FAMILY MATTYDALE FARM MCKENNEY, DAVID MAPLE SHADOW FARM ANGELROSE DAIRY TOM MEADE JR. COOK, MARTIN GREENVIEW FARMS WHITE, MASON & ALLEN BLANCHARD FARMS MAPLEDREAM FARM ROBINSON, OSCAR TYNERDALE LATHROP, PETER & BRENDA EIHOLZER FARM OLIN, WILLIAM & LINDA HAPPY VALLEY FARM CROTHERS,ANTHONY FRANK, ROBERT SCHWARTZ, CARL MIRY RUN FARM MUDGE, STEVEN DENZ, ALBERT EVANS, SCOTT M. DAVIS FARM

DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHIR DHI

H H H H H H H H H H H J H H H H H H H J H H H H H H X H H H H H X H H H H H H H

195.1 19.4 405.1 693.4 61.3 395.0 80.5 154.3 106.2 53.5 63.7 59.7 105.9 73.7 66.5 101.0 59.0 83.6 112.1 14.0 91.2 101.2 83.8 60.6 168.5 122.4 85.9 33.9 95.5 62.4 128.9 247.6 87.0 194.3 93.0 96.6 60.3 79.0 68.4 75.4

27772 1058 3.8 862 3.1 3X 27580 993 3.6 842 3.1 26655 1134 4.3 830 3.1 3X 26485 967 3.7 801 3.0 26697 942 3.5 797 3.0 25276 945 3.7 770 3.0 3X 25763 970 3.8 762 3.0 23455 819 3.5 718 3.1 23785 882 3.7 717 3.0 24086 935 3.9 712 3.0 24056 849 3.5 711 3.0 20662 927 4.5 710 3.4 22529 851 3.8 702 3.1 22973 846 3.7 687 3.0 22751 866 3.8 686 3.0 22436 794 3.5 675 3.0 20810 797 3.8 665 3.2 22210 847 3.8 657 3.0 21877 756 3.5 650 3.0 18493 821 4.4 644 3.5 21840 777 3.6 642 2.9 21202 813 3.8 641 3.0 20945 804 3.8 637 3.0 20880 728 3.5 633 3.0 20377 746 3.7 629 3.1 19838 729 3.7 629 3.2 19548 687 3.5 623 3.2 19566 739 3.8 614 3.1 20829 754 3.6 611 2.9 20332 780 3.8 609 3.0 20256 767 3.8 605 3.0 18718 691 3.7 601 3.2 17888 736 4.1 599 3.3 19451 730 3.8 595 3.1 19373 700 3.6 583 3.0 19085 746 3.9 570 3.0 18641 759 4.1 568 3.0 18595 715 3.8 556 3.0 18315 700 3.8 548 3.0 17637 722 4.1 546 3.1

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

352.3 552.2 997.5 266.9 595.8 97.1 150.7 51.2 60.3 52.2

29838 1119 3.8 934 3.1 3X 30323 1132 3.7 915 3.0 28170 953 3.4 842 3.0 3X 24271 982 4.0 757 3.1 24446 911 3.7 731 3.0 22148 891 4.0 683 3.1 21998 830 3.8 664 3.0 20808 701 3.4 633 3.0 18871 676 3.6 564 3.0 17917 710 4.0 534 3.0

CHEMUNG

CHENANGO

CLINTON

MINER INSTITUTE REMILLARD FARMS CHALIZ FARM LLC. DIMOCK FARMS, LLC. HIDDEN VIEW FARM G & M FARM ALLEN,JAMES W. MCNEIL, DON & SHERRY DAMOUR,DICK SMITH,HAROLD

COLUMBIA

LONAN FARM DHI-AP LYN F. MAIN,JR DHI-APCS KELLER R & SONS HD1 DHIR DAVENPORT, JIM HERD 3 DHI ELITE DAIRY DHI-AP OOMS ADRIAN & SONS DHI-AP KIERNAN, WILLIAM DHI-AP THE DAVENPORT FAMILY HD 2 DHIR DUTCH HOLLOW FARM DHIRAPCS OOMS,ANTONIE&MICHAEL HD 1 DHI-AP RONNYBROOK FARMS DHI-AP TRIPPLE CREEK FARM DHI-AP MILLERHURST FARM DHI-AP BARRINGER, FRED DHIR-AP

H 542.0 H 1109.9 H 251.3 H 18.5 B 54.8 H 464.9 H 162.6 H 51.1 J 552.3 X 105.5 H 74.2 H 160.9 H 131.0 H 84.7

28961 26213 26416 25981 21059 25164 23886 22756 19602 20707 21217 21230 21719 20782

983 906 952 941 960 911 906 851 954 814 764 803 821 731

3.4 3.5 3.6 3.6 4.6 3.6 3.8 3.7 4.9 3.9 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.5

884 818 802 787 780 778 708 691 677 665 662 650 647 637

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.7 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.5 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1

3X

3X

3X

3X

HERD OWNER

3X 3X

B R COW E E YEARS D

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

18746 17338 18533 17830 14740

703 649 716 685 675

3.8 3.7 3.9 3.8 4.6

H H H H J

TURNER, BENJAMIN &CAROLYN DHIR BECK FARMS DHI-APCS SPRUCE EDEN DAIRY LLC DHIR-AP DRAKE, RICHARD D. DHI-AP RIVERSIDE DAIRY LLC DHI-AP CURRIE VALLEY DAIRY LLC DHI-AP CURRIE VALLEY DAIRY LLC DHI-AP HALL, BRYAN DHI-AP DOVETALES FARM DHI-AP SPRUCE EDEN DAIRY LLC DHIR-AP BROOKS, CLINTON S DHI AUGUR, DAVID DHI ROBINSON, ROLAND DHI-AP FORBES FARM DHI-AP SCHONCREST FARMS DHI-AP A & J GRINNELL DHI-AP WESTAN FARMS DHI SUNSETYOUNG FARM DHI TWIN OAKS DAIRY LLC DHI-AP MATT & KEVIN SHARPE DHI-AP MCEVOY,CHARLES & KENNETH DHIR KNAPP, PETER DHI-AP ROCKY BOTTOM FARM DHI-AP CLOSSON, RANDY DHI-AP MUGGLIN JEAN L HD I DHIR-AP BLAINE & CHRIS KELLER DHI-AP GLADTIME TOO DHIR-AP

H 113.4 H 1166.4 H 423.4 H 187.9 H 640.4 H 52.4 H 798.2 H 70.1 H 176.1 J 21.1 H 75.3 H 80.2 H 74.2 X 584.6 H 83.9 H 97.4 H 157.8 H 145.5 H 134.3 H 102.9 H 32.9 H 59.5 H 61.4 H 82.7 J 39.9 X 70.2 X 68.0

30292 1186 3.9 995 3.3 28531 948 3.3 887 3.1 3X 26581 972 3.7 823 3.1 3X 26706 974 3.6 813 3.0 3X 25486 957 3.8 765 3.0 3X 24625 938 3.8 758 3.1 3X 25136 927 3.7 750 3.0 3X 24810 879 3.5 732 3.0 3X 23347 829 3.6 709 3.0 19611 885 4.5 697 3.6 3X 22613 837 3.7 682 3.0 22613 809 3.6 682 3.0 22629 840 3.7 672 3.0 21276 836 3.9 668 3.1 19142 719 3.8 603 3.2 19263 776 4.0 600 3.1 20069 815 4.1 589 2.9 19277 725 3.8 575 3.0 18910 741 3.9 567 3.0 18417 699 3.8 563 3.1 18093 736 4.1 552 3.1 17785 698 3.9 549 3.1 18261 662 3.6 546 3.0 17189 732 4.3 537 3.1 14619 713 4.9 529 3.6 16129 681 4.2 520 3.2 15491 649 4.2 509 3.3

JOLEANNA HOLSTEINS HUMDINGER HOLSTEINS ALBANO FARM INC. HAGER FARMS PALMER,RONALD & JORDAN MATTSON, H.L. & SONS SCHAEFER, ADOLF & LARRY ACKLAND DAIRY FARM TAGGART,JEFF&LORI&BRAD LAMPORT, FRANK JR DELROSE FARM BEEBE HILL FARM DEYSENROTH, PAUL & GWEN CHAR MARIE FARM LLC HOLLEY, DAVE & ELAINE MARTIN, EDWIN & DUANE SCOTT' HILLSIDE FARM MARICK FARM,LLC JASON, SANTOBUONO MAXWELL, RUSSELL ETERNAL FLAME HOLSTEINS DAIRY SMITH HOLSTEINS DAVID GOULD SKYMAC FARM RITZ FARMS BEDFORD FARMS MUSHKODAY FARM HOSKING FARM PINEYVALE FARM SHAW,JAMES RICHNAN FARM BRUCE&SUE GREGORY MUDDY RIVER FARM SITTS CO. HOLSTEINS TERRY, MATTHEW MOUNTAIN CREST FARM 2 TERRY, MATTHEW JOHNSON,CHRISTL & TIM GRANT, DAVID ANDY & BETTYANN POST

DHIR-AP DHIR DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H J H H H

139.7 47.5 153.6 468.9 46.3 190.6 67.5 36.0 82.1 118.4 72.0 72.7 45.8 115.4 74.7 51.1 124.7 305.4 38.6 45.8 109.6 122.4 60.8 50.5 68.8 97.2 137.2 62.3 63.0 57.8 46.8 37.3 89.1 84.6 28.0 87.6 48.2 40.1 101.4 82.8

27483 983 3.6 866 3.2 3X 26435 1001 3.8 817 3.1 26369 1191 4.5 801 3.0 25618 992 3.9 790 3.1 25215 924 3.7 788 3.1 25480 906 3.6 784 3.1 24882 877 3.5 758 3.0 24631 943 3.8 751 3.0 23826 909 3.8 736 3.1 3X 23650 897 3.8 733 3.1 23694 913 3.9 731 3.1 24392 917 3.8 725 3.0 22812 867 3.8 721 3.2 23639 885 3.7 719 3.0 23023 887 3.9 716 3.1 22683 881 3.9 713 3.1 22881 847 3.7 691 3.0 22516 893 4.0 689 3.1 3X 22303 849 3.8 685 3.1 23246 857 3.7 679 2.9 22040 751 3.4 675 3.1 20783 817 3.9 672 3.2 22303 828 3.7 669 3.0 22287 837 3.8 669 3.0 20312 796 3.9 655 3.2 21311 809 3.8 652 3.1 21077 837 4.0 651 3.1 21077 773 3.7 640 3.0 21568 820 3.8 639 3.0 21174 703 3.3 636 3.0 21047 714 3.4 636 3.0 21447 780 3.6 632 2.9 19850 783 3.9 632 3.2 19932 793 4.0 631 3.2 18650 810 4.3 631 3.4 20885 770 3.7 625 3.0 16411 828 5.0 621 3.8 20588 772 3.7 618 3.0 20116 814 4.0 614 3.1 20575 779 3.8 605 2.9

COON BROTHERS HD 2 UPLANDS FARM HENRY BENEKE JACKSON BROS. STORM FIELD SWISS PULVER,JOHN & JEFFREY BRIAN DONOVAN BROOKCREST REBECCA OSBORNE COON BROTHERS HD 1

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H X H H H X G

233.0 92.2 142.2 44.4 42.8 170.6 150.3 62.5 78.0 111.1

23933 22510 20333 20872 18981 18179 17859 18923 16872 16129

908 942 803 754 730 667 677 717 680 745

3.8 4.2 3.9 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.8 4.0 4.6

720 713 654 642 602 577 575 571 534 512

3.0 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.2 3.2

AMBERWOOD FARM DHI-AP H 54.9 RICHMOND, CHARLES & JOHN DHIR-AP H 221.9 ROLLING MEADOWS FARM LLC DHI-AP H 586.6 WIDEMAN FARMS DHI-AP H 130.5 EARLY VIEW FARM DHI-AP H 113.1 PHILLIPS FAMILY FARM INC. DHI-AP H 878.1 R&D JANIGA ENTERPRISES DHI-AP H 299.7 MUNN, RICHARD DHI-AP H 78.6 HAIER, GEORGE DHI-AP H 59.0 WITTMEYER, CLAYTON JR. DHI-AP H 188.4 SCHMITZ, KEITH & ANN DHI-AP H 77.9 NORBEL DAIRY DHI-AP H 112.5 TRIPLE OAK FARMS DHI-AP H 153.2 JEFFERY SIMONS DHI-AP H 63.8 HAIER FREDRICK DHI H 53.9

25145 27039 25739 25378 24809 24442 23039 23693 23805 22854 22016 21759 21368 21208 20065

995 962 970 904 946 942 853 878 884 850 817 824 818 785 825

4.0 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.7 4.1

816 813 780 779 777 750 721 720 720 701 661 656 652 634 633

3.2 3.0 3X 3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.1 3X 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2

CORTLAND

DUTCHESS

ERIE

FRANKLIN

177.0 169.5 28.0 28.4 66.4

RHA MILK

G+H DAIRY DHI-AP B.B.T.T.FARM DHI-AP BURCH & SONS DAIRY DHI-AP BURLINGAME, DOUG DHI-AP OOMS,ANTONIE&MICHAEL HD 2 DHIR-AP

DELAWARE

3X 3X

TYPE TEST

600 584 575 546 521

3.2 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.5 3X

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER OOMSVIEW HOLSTEINS STARGO DAIRY FARM,LLC METCALF FARMS POIRIER, EUGENE DANIEL & HELENE MEIER BEAVER FLATS HOLSTEINS VINCENT FARM LLC. ARMSTRONG,THOMAS FRIEND,ALLAN AND MARY OTIS,RALPH & CINDY WOOD, WILLIAM K. ARTIC ROSE ARTIC ROSE VINCENT FARM LLC. HAMILTON, SCOTT & JUDY GEORGE MILLER THANKFUL HEARTS JERSEY'S GLENGARRY FARM LLC ALAMANA FARM'S CRAIGMOOR FARM CRAIGMOOR FARM WILLIAM JONES & SONS TUTTLE FARM LABARE , ROBERT

GENESEE

BLUMER DAIRY MOWACRES FARM KINGSLEY,HOWARD&SONS TORREY FARMS DAIRY BERKEMEIER, H. C. & SONS ROBERT WOOD ZUBER FARMS 2 JOHN KUSZLYK

GREENE

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H H H H H H H J H J J A H J G H X H

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

92.1 176.0 509.4 67.6 352.6 58.1 140.6 71.1 81.4 57.7 68.6 11.0 31.0 32.1 83.7 105.1 62.1 141.5 45.6 46.3 44.3 101.4 79.6 66.9

33803 1043 3.1 987 2.9 3X 28309 994 3.5 882 3.1 3X 25497 959 3.8 803 3.1 3X 25186 992 3.9 776 3.1 24386 893 3.7 772 3.2 25168 781 3.1 765 3.0 24510 870 3.5 744 3.0 23165 872 3.8 731 3.2 22932 861 3.8 708 3.1 21116 786 3.7 661 3.1 20353 750 3.7 657 3.2 20828 749 3.6 637 3.1 21291 732 3.4 630 3.0 17746 822 4.6 625 3.5 20390 726 3.6 617 3.0 16958 732 4.3 600 3.5 16659 728 4.4 584 3.5 19268 711 3.7 581 3.0 3X 19773 695 3.5 579 2.9 15780 748 4.7 571 3.6 17067 786 4.6 563 3.3 17672 647 3.7 532 3.0 16568 675 4.1 527 3.2 17236 658 3.8 521 3.0

H 408.8 H1545.8 H 105.7 H 886.2 H 74.7 H 84.2 H 2031.5 X 70.6

25828 978 3.8 811 3.1 3X 26325 1014 3.9 794 3.0 3X 24382 895 3.7 746 3.1 23625 846 3.6 699 3.0 3X 19812 792 4.0 638 3.2 20908 665 3.2 633 3.0 20752 835 4.0 628 3.0 3X 17142 626 3.7 523 3.1

VALLEY VIEW FARM STORY, MATTHEW C. JR.

DHIR-AP J 59.3 DHI-AP H 44.8

17959 18830

CASLER, JIM & PHIL MAYPAR FARM TIMMERMAN FARMS FOSTER'S ACRES HOLSTEINS VALLEY HIGH FARM WOLFE, HOWARD KELVISTA HOLSTEINS WINDEX FARMS BOEPPLE, RAYMOND & LISA DONALD & ERIN SHUTTS JR SCHWASNICK FARMS FREDERICK P HERRINGSHAW SPRING LAWN FARM BLACK IRON DAIRY LLC MEADOW BROOK FARM BRUCE TREADWELL HAUGHTON FARM ROBERT DELWEILER COLLINS PRIDE HOLSTEINS MARSHY ACRES FARM WINTERGREEN FARM DALE COVERT DITHMARSIA HOLSTEINS FOSTER'S ACRES JERSEYS SALMSTEAD FARMS LYON, JOSEPH & ANGELA HACKLEY, BRIAN ELM TREE FARM DONEINFARM JORDAN VALLEY GEHRING, DONALD DALE COVERT

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

27066 1156 4.3 832 3.1 25015 978 3.9 784 3.1 25524 828 3.2 771 3.0 3X 24481 818 3.3 760 3.1 24410 957 3.9 745 3.1 23584 904 3.8 743 3.2 23493 873 3.7 718 3.1 22195 840 3.8 692 3.1 22662 853 3.8 688 3.0 20722 741 3.6 653 3.2 3X 21017 815 3.9 641 3.0 20057 789 3.9 641 3.2 20155 743 3.7 630 3.1 20430 789 3.9 627 3.1 19529 731 3.7 616 3.2 20885 772 3.7 613 2.9 18440 737 4.0 588 3.2 20526 735 3.6 587 2.9 19322 688 3.6 581 3.0 19286 683 3.5 578 3.0 19326 710 3.7 577 3.0 19179 684 3.6 575 3.0 18957 713 3.8 569 3.0 15121 712 4.7 566 3.7 19655 666 3.4 565 2.9 18429 669 3.6 564 3.1 17298 660 3.8 530 3.1 18038 671 3.7 528 2.9 18124 675 3.7 527 2.9 17082 621 3.6 518 3.0 16861 638 3.8 507 3.0 14981 659 4.4 505 3.4

HERKIMER

JEFFERSON

H H H H H H H H H X H H H H X H H H H X H H H J H H H H H H H X

283.8 135.9 207.0 134.6 75.5 91.6 89.6 100.9 62.7 63.8 112.2 204.2 79.7 176.4 70.7 77.9 95.8 53.4 113.6 59.5 65.5 46.0 109.2 14.9 99.7 72.3 51.8 72.5 29.8 58.4 42.6 17.6

29684 29774 28758 28426 27078 27617 26768 23997 25116 24670 24571 23425 23625 20916 23619 23456 22756 22380 21463 22842 23079 23165 23635 21969 21091 22385 20912 20796 20878 19498 18846 18336 18069 17739

1163 1046 1143 1054 942 954 978 740 976 984 922 941 945 1033 883 786 811 808 896 807 845 846 851 799 811 817 832 681 770 695 677 678 667 643

3.9 3.5 4.0 3.7 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.1 3.9 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 4.9 3.7 3.4 3.6 3.6 4.2 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.8 3.6 4.0 3.3 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.6

899 898 889 866 821 818 804 781 761 749 749 746 733 729 726 714 704 704 690 688 685 679 675 673 659 651 648 640 621 578 576 560 539 533

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.3 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.5 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

3X

3X

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

JEFF ZIMMER YODER, TIM & ARLENE MOSER, BRAD JOSH+LISA MOSER

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H

82.8 74.4 49.8 52.7

17726 17316 17524 16891

646 695 639 637

3.6 4.0 3.6 3.8

532 531 530 511

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0

L&M FARMS WALNUTHOF FARM RIVEREDGE DAIRY ANDY SCHANTZ RIDLESIDE HERD #1 YORK, SCOTT E WILLIAMS FARM ROGGIE,KEITH SCHRAG,WILFRED & LOIS HOUSER, DWIGHT SOUTH KEENER DAIRY TERRY WALSEMAN JASDALE FARM LIMESTONE RIDGE FARM SULLIVAN,MIKE C. JEFF SIMPSON LEYDEN VIEW FARM ZEHR GLENN RODNEY CLINTSMAN TARA LYNDAKER SHERMAN ERIC & LORELLE HEBERT, RONALD YORK, MICHEAL & DYNALL ERNEST & AMY BEYER THUNDER LANE DAIRY MISTYKNOLL FARM MAST, TITUS GUS TABOLT VALMONT DAIRY FARM NORTZ, CHRISTINA BAUER, JAMES GINGERICH, LOWELL & JOYCE ROES,LOREN J. PALUCK, WILLAIM BUCKINGHAM, DALE YANCEY,HASKELL A.,JR HOPPEL,CARL & DORIS ZEHR, MYRON D. MOSER, LYNDON

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

49.4 109.4 62.5 73.4 164.7 56.3 148.7 83.6 83.0 79.6 111.9 72.9 132.7 199.8 124.9 63.6 87.2 89.3 80.9 50.3 70.8 99.0 63.5 122.9 81.4 131.1 76.7 131.6 113.7 37.5 24.8 127.2 47.6 91.6 61.6 59.6 102.8 74.1 95.4

27507 26535 22853 23665 23214 23590 22827 23816 22556 22093 22279 23284 22361 22088 20267 21403 21136 20812 20859 20418 20813 20989 20396 20236 20424 19615 19114 19143 19047 19275 18785 17080 17704 18097 17915 17757 18205 17975 16138

959 992 851 803 846 869 914 873 925 861 810 889 948 839 761 834 848 760 771 723 887 778 777 823 864 754 710 762 713 775 654 685 650 735 639 635 707 675 637

3.5 3.7 3.7 3.4 3.6 3.7 4.0 3.7 4.1 3.9 3.6 3.8 4.2 3.8 3.8 3.9 4.0 3.7 3.7 3.5 4.3 3.7 3.8 4.1 4.2 3.8 3.7 4.0 3.7 4.0 3.5 4.0 3.7 4.1 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.8 3.9

817 804 724 724 711 706 704 698 693 691 691 689 674 670 655 652 643 638 637 635 634 620 618 612 609 605 596 594 570 561 554 544 543 543 540 534 531 522 507

3.0 3.0 3X 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.1

LEWIS

LIVINGSTON

R. SCHRAMM ENT. MULLIGAN FARM, INC MULLIGAN FARM, INC DAIRYKNOLL FARMS KEVETTA FARMS MROCZEK,JOSEPH & ANDY COYNE FARMS, INC. KEVETTA FARMS MAXWELL FARMS CADYVILLE FARM DONNAN FARMS, INC.

H 195.2 H1113.2 H 119.5 H 893.2 H 24.2 H 89.0 H 912.1 J 15.1 H 87.7 H 154.1 H 3535.6

28199 1112 3.9 878 3.1 3X 28332 1060 3.7 865 3.1 3X 25898 974 3.8 794 3.1 3X 26057 923 3.5 791 3.0 3X 25562 875 3.4 780 3.1 24775 894 3.6 777 3.1 25930 1001 3.9 765 3.0 3X 20477 907 4.4 741 3.6 24471 891 3.6 725 3.0 21182 858 4.1 658 3.1 21069 731 3.5 627 3.0 3X

CHRIS AND STEPH ANDERSON DHIR-AP H 52.1 MORRISVILLE COLLEGE FOUND DHI-APCS H 261.0 CEDARKNOB FARMS,LLC DHI-AP H 323.7 DURFEE, STEVEN DHI-AP H 495.5 HOLMES ACRE DHI-AP H 452.8 SPRINGWATER FARMS LLC DHI-AP H 369.2 SWAMP BOTTOM FARM DHI-AP H 43.8 WHITE EAGLE FARMS DHI-AP H 956.7 FERN HILL FARM, LLC DHIR H 255.5 EVANS, DOUG DHIR A 39.1 ROBERTS, CHARLES & SONS DHI-AP H 126.3 MONANFRAN FARMS, INC. DHIR-AP H 187.0 BIKOWSKY,PATTY & JOHN JR. DHI-AP H 76.7 GATEHOUSE FARM DHI-AP H 251.0 TFARM DHIR H 88.3 GRANNY ANNE DHIR-AP H 82.0 MANLEY, GWEN & JEFF DHI-AP H 43.2 RENDCACH FARMS DHI-AP H 158.6 WINTERCREST FARMS DHI-AP H 120.9 WESTFALL, FRED & STEVE DHI-AP H 96.2 WRATTEN FARM DHI-AP H 36.2 WOOD, CALVIN & MATT DHI-AP H 239.3 JONES,DAVID & SCOTT DHI-AP H 79.1 PUSHLAR, PAUL & FAMILY DHI-AP H 81.5 FANNING, TERRY DHI-AP H 68.8 PARSONS, DOUGLAS DHI-AP H 116.6 HENRY, JOSEPH O. & PETE DHI-AP H 71.0 BARNES, BRUCE DHI-AP H 72.0 WEDGE FARM DHI-AP H 71.9 MORGAN, FRED & JUDY DHI-AP H 150.0 LYREKCREST HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 83.5 BRIDGEDALE FARM DHI-AP H 114.1 WOODCOCK, LOUIS L. DHI H 95.5 SCHELL, JOHN E. DHI-AP H 60.7 MEEKER, ROY E. DHI-AP H 42.0 PERRY, DONALD L.&DONALD H DHI-AP H 81.4 WRATTEN FARM DHI-AP X 32.0 WESTFALL, FRED & STEVE DHI-AP A 25.6

30395 833 2.7 929 3.1 3X 29345 1076 3.7 916 3.1 3X 27462 926 3.4 834 3.0 3X 26127 940 3.6 812 3.1 3X 26006 900 3.5 785 3.0 3X 26460 916 3.5 781 3.0 3X 24154 814 3.4 772 3.2 25846 931 3.6 762 2.9 3X 23100 912 3.9 746 3.2 23035 902 3.9 740 3.2 23754 922 3.9 734 3.1 23693 866 3.7 706 3.0 23584 838 3.6 704 3.0 23695 872 3.7 702 3.0 3X 22061 854 3.9 686 3.1 21830 815 3.7 676 3.1 21826 825 3.8 666 3.1 21155 793 3.7 655 3.1 21985 796 3.6 654 3.0 21180 772 3.6 648 3.1 20757 794 3.8 646 3.1 20390 810 4.0 644 3.2 20757 801 3.9 641 3.1 20640 747 3.6 641 3.1 20677 698 3.4 637 3.1 19900 740 3.7 625 3.1 20248 696 3.4 618 3.1 19921 704 3.5 602 3.0 19542 772 4.0 593 3.0 18434 785 4.3 593 3.2 19053 697 3.7 592 3.1 19279 727 3.8 582 3.0 17861 676 3.8 559 3.1 18874 676 3.6 557 3.0 18835 712 3.8 541 2.9 18269 709 3.9 533 2.9 17054 635 3.7 533 3.1 16290 614 3.8 508 3.1

COLBY HOMESTEAD FARMS ELLSWORTH,ROCKY & PAT

DHI-APCS H 207.3 DHIR-AP X 56.6

21922 16065

KORONA, JEREMY CANARY DAIRY LLC KORONA, JEREMY NARE FARMS DEVENDORF FARM

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

26121 1260 4.8 855 3.3 25362 985 3.9 820 3.2 24834 1164 4.7 809 3.3 24675 996 4.0 774 3.1 24218 972 4.0 770 3.2

MADISON

MONROE

MONTGOMERY

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS

H H H H H

34.6 56.7 61.6 198.9 44.9

865 3.9 667 3.0 650 4.0 542 3.4

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

KORONA, JEREMY DHIR-AP BRUMAR FARM DHI-APCS STANLEY WICHOWSKY DHI-AP HAYES THOMAS DHI-AP MEAD, GARY DHI-APCS SHUSTER, PAUL & MAXINE DHI-AP KORONA, STANLEY DHI-AP MAC VEAN, ROBERT DHI-AP ROBBIE DYGERT DHI-AP HEISER, JASON DHI-AP JAMES HUDSON DHIR-AP CLAY HILL FARM DHIR-AP SAMMONS FARM 1 DHI-AP FREDERICKS VELVET ACRES DHI-AP HANDY HILLS FARM DHI-AP FEAGLES FARM DHI-AP WILA HALA FARM DHI-AP INGHAMS HILL FARM DHI-AP KORONA, STANLEY DHI-AP MCCLUMPHA FARM DHI-AP HILL, RONALD DHI RANDY & DEBBIE FRASIER DHIR-AP KORONA, STANLEY DHI-AP ADAM HAYES DHI-AP DAMIN FARM DHI-AP TRAHAVEN DHI-AP RACANIELLO, WAYNE DHIR-AP SNYDER, CLYDE DHI-AP JUDY&HENRY CAUWENBERGHS DHI-AP FRASIER, LYN AND WILLIAM DHI CHAPMAN, RICHARD & FAMILY DHI-AP DAMIN, GLEN DHI-AP

J H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H J H H H A H H H H H J H H H

MCCOLLUM FARMS LAKESHORE DAIRY LLC J J FARMS 1 GASPORT VIEW DAIRY,INC. WILLS DAIRY FARM RED CREEK FARM RANNEY FARMS J J FARMS 1 MILLEVILLE FARMS,INC.

H 2277.7 H 1735.2 H 331.6 H 693.7 H 307.8 H 145.7 H 116.8 H 139.0 H 76.6

24644 24908 24195 22800 21212 20654 20014 17871 16719

929 961 872 823 687 792 857 657 664

3.8 3.9 3.6 3.6 3.2 3.8 4.3 3.7 4.0

753 749 720 700 638 633 622 564 538

3.1 3.0 3X 3.0 3X 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3X 3.2

H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H X X H H X H H H H H H J H H H A H H H H

677.7 99.6 86.3 50.0 57.0 74.2 115.1 54.9 60.2 130.0 104.5 160.0 55.4 59.5 39.2 83.1 230.7 88.9 65.0 28.5 64.9 68.8 61.1 98.3 59.0 71.2 47.2 47.8 42.0 55.9 56.2 45.6 14.2 51.6 63.9 76.0 71.6

26286 24682 23847 23349 22423 21535 22140 22368 21453 21956 20016 20921 20816 21174 20033 19390 19087 19166 18234 19571 18346 17364 18075 17745 17449 17611 19107 18222 15376 18429 17247 17451 17850 16572 16623 17349 16524

884 894 868 920 881 851 835 811 819 800 788 772 748 823 786 716 728 716 748 681 694 650 677 591 706 645 650 606 738 685 691 687 677 605 604 609 637

3.4 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.9 4.0 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.7 4.1 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.3 4.0 3.7 3.4 3.3 4.8 3.7 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.9

774 763 756 742 718 693 689 673 655 646 635 633 627 626 607 605 596 595 591 581 576 555 554 554 553 550 550 547 540 537 537 534 523 522 515 511 506

2.9 3X 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.5 2.9 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1

H 458.7 H 142.9 H 1164.4 H 834.5 H 97.2 H 877.6 H 163.7 H 393.2 H 411.4 H 267.4 H 78.8 H 197.9 H 362.6 H 120.3 H 303.6 H 172.6 H 1401.2 H 650.7 H 110.6 J 58.4 X 10.1 H 46.2 A 47.4 J 123.6

28683 28682 27880 28298 27075 25957 23499 25520 24743 23386 23924 22654 22841 22882 22205 22460 21920 21881 20631 16940 19040 20933 18184 15787

1047 1083 953 1076 962 902 912 854 1004 930 902 888 830 828 870 823 818 779 845 822 728 768 680 746

3.7 3.8 3.4 3.8 3.6 3.5 3.9 3.3 4.1 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.6 4.1 4.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 4.7

893 887 857 854 833 783 756 756 734 733 715 709 699 697 691 686 677 673 654 645 639 627 564 555

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.8 3.4 3.0 3.1 3.5

NIAGARA

ONEIDA

CHAMPION FARMS LLC WILLSON, RODNEY BIELBY, JAMES ANGELL, KEVIN C. GAFNER, GEORGE GALLAGHER,CINDY & PAUL PRITCHARD, HUBERT AND JIM WILLIAMS, JAMES SMITH, WILLIAM & JOAN GREEN, PETER M. BROUILLETTE FARM GYPSY DELL FARM LLC MELODYWOOD FARM SMITH, RONALD & HOWARD VAN HATTEN, B & C STOLARCZYK, BRIAN WORMONT DAIRY HAROLD GLOUSE SHERWOOD FARM ROBERTS, JOHN & LISA FITZGERALD, JASON HD2 LWG DUTCH HAVEN FARM BALDWIN, RICHARD & SHARON JONES TERRANCE R. RED LINE FARMS LLC GROESLON FARM INC. LARRY,DOUGLAS SCHNEIBLE,BOB POOLE,BRIAN&TRACEY SPRING GROVE FARM LLC GAR LINN FARM NOBIS, TONY & PETE POOLE,BRIAN&TRACEY ROCKYLEE FARM TOLBERT FRANK LEE DAIRY FARM PLEASANT VALLEY FARM

ONONDAGA

COVALE HOLSTEINS SNAVLIN FARMS TWIN BIRCH DAIRY ,LLC VENTURE FARMS LLC ANDREW STACK FABIUS GREENWOOD FARM MOUNTFIELD FARM AIRY RIDGE FARM MAPLEHURST FARMS LLC COWLES, THURLOW, Y. OLIVER,FARM LOOMIS, JAMES W. DOODY, LARRY& SONS AMESLEA FARM 1 MARKHAM HOLLOW FARM TREGFARMS LLC RICHARDS, ELMER & SONS DALE VANERDEN BURGETT FARMS CARLSON, CHERYL HAYNES SCOTT DENNIS, CARL & CRAIG HAYNES SCOTT TUCKER JOHN

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

12.0 214.4 65.7 64.7 198.5 55.3 41.0 112.1 56.9 90.7 38.0 144.1 228.3 138.6 112.0 71.8 81.2 81.2 31.5 30.6 79.3 47.3 35.8 57.7 74.0 50.9 31.6 73.7 62.1 61.3 77.6 61.3

RHA MILK

19549 1154 5.9 746 3.8 23898 1013 4.2 742 3.1 23970 926 3.9 735 3.1 24598 977 4.0 735 3.0 23459 899 3.8 730 3.1 24368 897 3.7 727 3.0 23341 829 3.6 723 3.1 22737 892 3.9 710 3.1 23853 948 4.0 708 3.0 23374 905 3.9 702 3.0 23368 978 4.2 699 3.0 22615 834 3.7 695 3.1 22574 857 3.8 691 3.1 3X 21946 756 3.4 679 3.1 20673 810 3.9 672 3.3 22331 854 3.8 671 3.0 21808 857 3.9 663 3.0 23053 837 3.6 663 2.9 17658 839 4.8 640 3.6 20988 746 3.6 640 3.0 21362 949 4.4 634 3.0 20578 839 4.1 634 3.1 19032 781 4.1 619 3.3 19833 758 3.8 605 3.1 19849 811 4.1 600 3.0 20484 834 4.1 599 2.9 19359 768 4.0 596 3.1 19238 763 4.0 567 2.9 16177 758 4.7 557 3.4 18887 703 3.7 553 2.9 16413 671 4.1 528 3.2 18003 674 3.7 521 2.9

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

3X

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 5

HYLIGHT FARMS,LLC DHIR-AP H 248.4 NORTH HARBOR FARM DHI-AP H 781.5 HYLIGHT FARMS,LLC DHIR-AP H 85.1 MURCREST FARM DHI-AP H 696.3 SHELAND FARMS DHI-APCS H 722.1 NORTHROP,MICHAEL&SONS DHI-AP H 85.3 BIG DOG DAIRY DHI-AP H 114.1 EISEL, STEVE DHI-AP H 134.3 BROWN,DOUGLAS E. DHI-AP H 289.5 WOOD FARMS, LLC. DHI-APCS H 572.4 SOUTH SANDY DAIRY DHI-AP H 86.9 HORNING, STANLEY&SHARON DHI-AP H 55.9 MASON'S DAIRY FARM DHI-AP H 114.0 HYLIGHT FARMS,LLC DHIR-AP X 30.5 LYNDALE FARM DHI-AP H 73.5 LILAC LAWNS FARM INC. DHI-AP H 144.2 BOULTON BEACH FARMS,LLC DHI-AP H 135.7 ZEHR, JASON DHI-AP X 61.4 REFF FAMILY FARM DHI-AP H 91.4 REED HAVEN FARMS DHI-AP H 167.5 PEACH SPRING FARM DHI-AP H 58.6 PEACHEY WILMER & VERA DHIR-AP H 75.9 EASTMAN DAIRY FARM LLC. DHI-AP H 403.8 LEE,STEPHEN & SALLY DHI H 62.2 KURTZ, JOSEPH E. JR. DHI-AP H 58.3 FORRESTER,DENNIS & CAROL DHI-AP H 123.9 TMT FARMS DHI-AP H 50.3 ZUMBACH, BRIAN & AMY DHI-AP H 90.0 MURROCK FARM DHI-AP H 237.5 TOAD HOLLOW DAIRY DHI-AP H 66.7 WATSON, STEPHEN DHI-AP H 87.7 MEEKS FARM+SONS DHI-AP H 133.2 BONNYLAND FARM DHI H 65.3 HALDEMAN DAVID DHI-AP H 55.7

892 5.0 629 3.5 706 3.7 576 3.1

HERD OWNER

Top 40 Herds For January

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

49.9 119.1 32.2 48.3 132.0

18314 17331 16609 16323 14544

726 606 653 683 714

4.0 3.5 3.9 4.2 4.9

536 528 526 523 510

2.9 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.5

RAES,RONALD DHI-AP MINNS JAMES DHI-AP BLACK BROOK FARM DHI-AP LIGHTLAND FARMS DHI-AP HILTON RICHARD N DHI-AP HEMDALE FARMS, INC. DHI-APCS ELVI FARMS, INC. DHI-APCS FABA FARM DHI-AP REEDLAND FARMS DHI-AP DEBOOVER FAMILY FARMS LLC DHI-AP ROGERS DAIRY FARM DHI-AP LINHOLM DAIRY LLC DHI-AP GREEN VIEW FARMS DHI-AP WILLOCREST DHI-APCS HAYTON FAMILY FARM DHI-AP PHALEN,KEVIN & ROBERT DHI-AP DAY BROTHERS DHI-AP LAMELLA FARMS DHI-AP COSH, ANDREW S. DHI-AP CROUCH, GLENN AND JOHN DHI-AP WALKER, CHARLES & SHELLEY DHI-AP

H 151.1 H 662.5 H 171.0 H 395.2 H 391.1 H 724.9 H 1032.9 H 490.4 H 356.0 H 1009.1 H 158.4 H 174.2 H 118.2 H 1029.4 H 64.3 H 453.8 H 153.4 H 125.9 H 73.3 H 69.5 H 40.0

32423 29088 27634 27337 26438 26408 26373 25434 25952 24410 23126 22427 23232 23356 22333 22263 20697 20560 20037 16886 16778

1133 1009 1034 983 1009 878 932 934 945 933 896 883 872 807 861 845 794 762 756 674 726

3.5 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.3 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.5 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8 4.0 4.3

968 887 836 820 809 803 801 788 782 737 723 712 711 697 690 680 654 636 615 520 519

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1

SMILEY, RUSSELL W. BELLVALE FARMS STAP ROBERT & STACEY ECHO FARM GIBBS, GARY & SARA THORNDALE FARM SPRUCEGATE HOLSTEINS HOYT, MARK & KATIE JOHNSON, C. F. & SON EWANCIW, ED BALBACH,C.H. WISNER FARMS, INC. FREEDOM HILL FARM

H H H H H H H H H H H H J

26643 1052 3.9 825 3.1 22068 872 4.0 681 3.1 21591 759 3.5 672 3.1 22071 766 3.5 668 3.0 21465 832 3.9 667 3.1 20897 825 3.9 644 3.1 20046 732 3.7 639 3.2 21154 741 3.5 629 3.0 17984 757 4.2 559 3.1 18999 711 3.7 536 2.8 17807 658 3.7 535 3.0 17519 647 3.7 533 3.0 15768 731 4.6 532 3.4

COOK, PAUL KARASEK,RUDY & SON TWIN FARMS WILDB DAIRY SILVER SPRINGS FARM

ONTARIO

ORANGE

ORLEANS

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H B X J

39.7 54.6 105.9 112.4 66.9 109.3 53.4 69.9 241.1 28.3 50.7 90.0 29.4

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

3.7 776 3.0 3X 3.8 698 3.1 4.0 626 3.2

CORJESS HOLSTEINS WILKINSON, LARRY MAPLE HELP STOCK FARMS NICHOLSON,DEAN WIMLER FARM NY SUMMER VILLA HOLSTEINS

986 800 809 757 684 626

3.8 3.4 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.7

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H

83.9 76.6 53.0 94.7 156.9 58.9

26184 23656 21817 19983 17441 16972

TRIPLE J DAIRY DHI-AP TRIPLE J DAIRY DHI-AP WEBSTER, TERRY & COREY DHI-AP WOODLAWN DAIRY FARM LLC DHI-AP VAN ALSTINE, TOM & SANDY DHIR-AP ROHRING FALLS FARM DHI-AP GALLEY, DAVID DHI WATERPOINT FARMS DHIR-AP ALDRICH KEITH DHI-AP BANTA BROTHERS DHI-AP COOPERSTOWN HOLSTEIN CORP DHI-AP TRACY,ROBERT DHI-AP JORDAN BROTHERS DHI-AP POWERS, JAMES & PAMELA DHI-AP DAYDREAM FARMS DHI-AP GANTNER,RICH DHI-AP WESTBROOK, WILLIAM&WENDY DHI-AP ROCKSPRING FARM DHI-AP LICATA DAIRY DHI-AP OSBORNE,CLAYTON,JOHN,BRUC DHIR BOUCHARD, RICKY DHI-AP BOB & KAREN MELLOTT DHI-AP DAN & MAE'S DAIRY DHI-AP JAMES FERGUSON DHI-AP MATT AND DEAN UTTER DHI-AP TYLER, LESTER DHIR DULKIS, MARK DHI-AP GOD'S GRACE FARM DHI-AP TAUZEL, J & J DHI-AP WEINERT,WILLY&BECKY DHI-AP JAKE REED DHI-AP BUTTS,DAN & JOHN DHI-AP MUMFORD, JAMES & MARCIA DHI-AP ADAM & ANDREA ROBERTSON DHI-AP BUTTS,DAN & JOHN DHI-AP RIDGEVIEW FARM DHI-AP

X X H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H X H H H H B H H H H H H H H X H

11.1 11.0 147.3 167.6 74.4 77.3 76.2 368.6 35.2 74.8 281.3 80.1 92.9 51.4 47.7 38.1 82.0 90.3 33.9 53.3 33.2 59.9 77.5 80.6 123.7 136.1 66.3 49.9 62.5 41.6 58.4 35.9 109.2 118.2 48.8 66.5

36428 1227 3.41122 3.1 3X 31636 1214 3.81009 3.2 3X 27037 1031 3.8 818 3.0 25817 947 3.7 794 3.1 25172 915 3.6 762 3.0 3X 23476 857 3.7 706 3.0 23034 875 3.8 705 3.1 23460 941 4.0 697 3.0 3X 23025 876 3.8 689 3.0 23023 937 4.1 689 3.0 22497 848 3.8 677 3.0 3X 21323 760 3.6 670 3.1 21682 816 3.8 666 3.1 20904 817 3.9 643 3.1 19862 773 3.9 636 3.2 20880 758 3.6 627 3.0 20652 767 3.7 626 3.0 20306 797 3.9 621 3.1 21718 788 3.6 618 2.8 21043 790 3.8 614 2.9 19352 780 4.0 613 3.2 20051 747 3.7 613 3.1 19821 726 3.7 599 3.0 19744 814 4.1 599 3.0 18542 679 3.7 592 3.2 18158 725 4.0 591 3.3 19563 699 3.6 573 2.9 18957 723 3.8 569 3.0 18574 719 3.9 559 3.0 18771 705 3.8 550 2.9 17902 703 3.9 550 3.1 18470 683 3.7 544 2.9 17492 678 3.9 535 3.1 16671 656 3.9 535 3.2 15613 698 4.5 519 3.3 16893 646 3.8 503 3.0

GREEN, DAVID CANNON MATT & PEGGY DAN REQUATE MCMAHON, JOHN & DAN MOODY, MARK & ALICE TARBOX FARMS 1 LEWCLIF FARMS LUKELAND FARMS CRAIG A CHITTENDEN

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H J

339.9 106.4 181.6 129.0 33.4 93.3 121.5 103.8 78.9

28563 1161 4.1 881 3.1 3X 23122 923 4.0 785 3.4 23064 889 3.9 703 3.0 3X 22751 845 3.7 692 3.0 21512 823 3.8 640 3.0 20319 750 3.7 624 3.1 19079 751 3.9 612 3.2 18852 707 3.8 577 3.1 13571 642 4.7 507 3.7

GILBERT,ANDY&TONY STAUFFER,FARMS RIVERBREEZE FARMS WOODCREST DAIRY,LLC

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP

H 1190.8 H 1409.8 H 1088.4 H 2731.1

OTSEGO

RENSSELAER

ST. LAWRENCE

26732 26475 25801 25353

844 843 848 867

3.2 3.2 3.3 3.4

818 800 778 757

3.1 2.9 3.2 3.1 2.9 3.0

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

894 808 847 809 796 772 725 779 769 712 727 729 658 748 642 631 661 645 585 688 590

3.8 3.6 3.9 3.9 4.3 3.5 3.5 4.0 3.8 3.5 3.8 3.8 3.5 5.0 3.4 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.5 4.0 3.7

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H B H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H

560.0 32.9 148.9 65.9 23.4 103.2 190.5 123.4 57.7 120.2 61.0 75.5 136.3 32.6 127.3 157.0 162.8 81.5 31.2 45.9 72.7

23759 22153 21646 20777 18537 21771 21001 19603 20157 20380 19270 19342 18662 15000 18952 18292 17875 17839 16899 17113 15997

DHIRAPCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H

946.7 599.6 102.9 150.8 803.9 580.5 670.7 169.8 84.2 42.0 22.6

28440 1151 4.0 901 3.2 3X 27825 1054 3.8 861 3.1 3X 24721 914 3.7 749 3.0 24704 915 3.7 746 3.0 3X 24295 894 3.7 739 3.0 3X 24690 891 3.6 737 3.0 3X 23913 907 3.8 732 3.1 23267 898 3.9 723 3.1 22186 915 4.1 672 3.0 21168 864 4.1 665 3.1 17268 705 4.1 547 3.2

PROKOP, RICHARD,SANDY&JON SUNY AG &TECH COLLEGE ARGUS ACRES, LLC HIGH HILL FARM LLC PROKOP, RICHARD,SANDY&JON RUTHER, STEVEN & MARION SCHULTZ BROS. FARM INC. LLOYD,DAVID,DENISE,JASON STANTON,JOHNDEBERIC RKEYVALE CACCIOLA GERRY & SHARON BOULDER BROOK FARM LVA FARMS NO B.S.T. STANTON,JOHNDEBERIC EVERETT, TIM & PATTI BUCK, DANIEL & TAMMY C.D.S. TILLAPAUGH GAIGE, DAVID & DONNA

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP

H H H H J H H H H H H H H A J H H H

336.3 169.2 384.1 123.4 22.0 77.0 143.3 152.3 142.7 72.9 328.5 138.3 106.7 41.5 33.3 68.0 305.7 53.0

28900 27761 25604 25894 20811 24384 22913 22952 23504 21993 22999 22540 22237 21801 18580 18212 18292 18302

SENECA VALLEY FARM GAIGE FARMS BERGEN FARMS BURR, CHARLES AND KEN GLENVIEW DAIRY LLC HOSTETLER, MARK & MARYELE BURR, CHARLES AND KEN ALLEN, THOMAS R. LONE OAK FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

SCHOHARIE

975 861 779

819 692 690 624 510 505

C&M DAIRY LLC. CROSBY, FRANK, J. TWIN MILL FARMS, LLC REED, MARION & FRED JR. LES & IRENE HARGRAVE HD2 FAUCHER, MICHAEL PUTNEY,LESLIE G.HD 2 ROPUT FARMS NOWZ THE TIME FARM PUTNEY,LESLIE G. HD1 SCOTT&TRACI LAING MAPLE NOOK HOLSTEINS BRESETT, HAROLD JR COW BELL ACRES FREGOE PATRICK,H. DAVID SMITH MCDONALD,DONALD &ROBERT LAVACK,FRED & FAMILY HD 1 NELSON,MARK MATT REYNOLDS HOBKIRK, JOHN & RICHARD WOOD, DAVID R. PECK, WILLIAM PECK, JOSEPH FLYHIGHER HOLSTEINS LLC KINGSRANSOM FARM KEVIN PECK HANEHAN FAMILY DAIRY SMITH BROS. SPEIDEL, RICHARD ARNOLDHAVEN CURTISS, C.E. & SON

26239 22732 19457

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

SARATOGA

NEAL, EDWARD & JAMES AND JODY DHI-AP H 560.1 ZIMMERMAN CHRIS DHIR-AP H 39.1 SMITH,EDWIN & RICHARD DHIR-AP H 58.0

OSWEGO

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

HERD OWNER

Top 40 Herds For January

SCHUYLER

SENECA

1193 1128 1007 882 1110 875 953 933 866 762 837 807 802 812 826 730 771 667

4.1 4.1 3.9 3.4 5.3 3.6 4.2 4.1 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.7 4.4 4.0 4.2 3.6

723 672 666 658 650 649 633 625 622 613 592 587 557 556 553 552 548 544 516 515 503

866 847 826 772 743 716 714 707 707 692 690 681 655 654 653 563 556 545

3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.7 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1

3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.6 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.5 3.1 3.0 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X

3X 3X 3X

H 792.4 H 394.2 H 2322.2 H 121.2 H 717.4 H 77.1 A 30.4 H 52.0 X 68.5

28514 1090 3.8 862 3.0 3X 25763 995 3.9 815 3.2 3X 26274 1008 3.8 791 3.0 3X 24798 973 3.9 784 3.2 26037 1021 3.9 783 3.0 3X 24145 884 3.7 734 3.0 21320 883 4.1 698 3.3 17884 679 3.8 548 3.1 17696 626 3.5 539 3.0 25816 25222 25077 24929 24160 24530 23137 21018 21323 18679 19243

DARYL G. MARTIN MURANDA HOLSTEINS JOHN MEHLING GEORGE FARMS CANOGASPRING FARMS HORNING, CURTIS ROY MARTIN VANILLEN DAIRY ZIMMERMAN, GLENN VANILLEN DAIRY EAGLETON FARM

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H B H

SMITH STOCK FARM SMITH, GERARD M. DAMIN FARMS, LLC ROGER DUNN JA WA FARMS BURNS FAMILY FARM LLC SCHUMACRES & ASSOCIATES CLARK, EDWARD JR. DWI BET FARMS ARCHER, BRUCE KARR DAIRY FARMS,LLC DAMIN FARMS, LLC NICHOLS DAIRY KIMBLEDALE ATHERTON FAMILY BARBR FARMS WADE, LYLE & JEAN PRICE, TOM CHARLES P. WATERS FIDE FARMS ELLISON FARMS STEWART, DAVID & KATHY KRAMER, DAVID & KIMBERLY

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H 562.6 H 107.1 H1146.4 H 588.8 H 167.8 H 405.0 H 1103.3 H 86.2 H 340.2 H 55.0 H 534.4 X 61.0 H 63.9 H 69.4 A 85.3 H 150.1 H 55.9 H 40.6 H 115.3 H 85.9 H 177.9 X 102.6 H 38.3

28480 1051 3.7 861 3.0 3X 25741 1043 4.1 837 3.3 27750 931 3.4 797 2.9 3X 26856 998 3.7 794 3.0 3X 24202 956 4.0 756 3.1 25500 895 3.5 750 2.9 3X 24759 881 3.6 740 3.0 3X 22575 878 3.9 712 3.2 23975 851 3.5 708 3.0 3X 22104 822 3.7 700 3.2 22660 848 3.7 695 3.1 3X 20762 860 4.1 680 3.3 3X 21310 827 3.9 677 3.2 21253 751 3.5 650 3.1 20492 757 3.7 642 3.1 21217 756 3.6 637 3.0 19870 748 3.8 633 3.2 19783 659 3.3 598 3.0 19128 657 3.4 579 3.0 18179 680 3.7 571 3.1 18701 684 3.7 557 3.0 17870 684 3.8 544 3.0 17327 666 3.8 518 3.0

BRANDON PETERS DAIRY J&E WEISSMANN FARMS HUGHSON, WILFRED THONY'S DAIRY WEISSMANN MSHORTHORNS

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H M

20979 20190 18393 16577 16148

STEUBEN

SULLIVAN

67.7 81.7 92.7 375.6 350.0 71.0 217.6 36.1 211.3 28.4 50.1

86.3 29.4 142.4 48.5 20.3

862 885 948 929 907 853 832 810 761 728 696

708 736 710 664 624

3.3 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.9 3.6 3.9 3.6

3.4 3.6 3.9 4.0 3.9

769 767 764 760 740 706 691 655 652 606 565

641 598 561 518 501

3.0 3X 3.0 3.0 3.0 3X 3.1 2.9 3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.2 2.9

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1

HERD OWNER

TIOGA

LYON, FRANK CAMPBELL, CHARLES B. KING, DAVE ZORN, TOM & JANET R. HIDDEN VALLEY FARM STRONGHAVEN FARM HOWLAND, ROBERT C. FRISBIE BROTHERS LAWTON, MERLE KWIATKOWSKI BROTHERS HUIZINGA, HENRY & LOIS MCNEIL,MARK FRANCISCO, YVETTE HUIZINGA DAIRY TODD AND JOSIE SPENCER DEMING, CODY ROBINSON FARM

TOMPKINS

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H H J H H H H H H H H

89.4 59.7 71.3 40.9 238.6 258.1 92.4 124.0 77.8 200.9 159.5 56.8 39.2 156.7 87.1 63.0 257.4

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

27683 1053 3.8 839 3.0 26368 961 3.6 809 3.1 27103 980 3.6 799 2.9 26376 1014 3.8 780 3.0 24977 983 3.9 768 3.1 25260 959 3.8 758 3.0 3X 24965 903 3.6 747 3.0 24249 880 3.6 720 3.0 20369 958 4.7 712 3.5 22811 859 3.8 693 3.0 22289 857 3.8 682 3.1 21944 846 3.9 681 3.1 22166 835 3.8 672 3.0 21644 792 3.7 660 3.0 21066 800 3.8 641 3.0 19171 722 3.8 613 3.2 17551 622 3.5 528 3.0

HARDIE FARMS INC. DHI-APCS H 1098.0 COOK FARMS DHIR-AP H 266.7 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP H 686.7 TEACHING & REASEARCH CTR DHI-APCS H 552.2 STUTTLE, LEWIS DHIR-AP H 259.7 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP H 16.4 VISION QUEST DAIRY DHI-AP H 392.5 SWEYOLAKAN FARMS DHI-AP H 203.8 CARPENTER, EVAN & BREN DHI-AP H 77.3 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP H 10.3 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP X 73.6 VANDEBOGART, ALAN & RAY DHIR-AP H 83.2 FOUTS FARM DHI-AP H 319.9 SMITH, NIAL S. & SONS DHI-AP X 151.6 CUMMINGS, WILLIAM DHI-AP H 46.4 RANKIN FARM DHIR-AP H 57.1 PINE RIDGE FARM INC. DHI-AP H 337.5 HOUSTON, MARLIN J. DHI-AP H 124.6 KANE, DONALD DHI-AP H 164.8

29499 27653 27455 26948 26408 26956 26380 24983 25350 24970 23322 24632 22601 21297 21044 19270 19619 18769 16624

DOMINO FARM F&C BROOKS AND SONS

21484 1019 4.7 793 3.7 17670 658 3.7 530 3.0

ULSTER

WASHINGTON

DHIRAPCS J 155.7 DHI-AP H 57.0

LINCOLN HILL FARM KENYON HILL FARM RUIGVIEW FARM MAIN DRAG FARM MARNS, ALBERT & DONNA WALKER FARMS HIBROW FARM REAFIELD FARM TOOLITE FARM LLC CREEK FARM CHRISTOPHER MITCHELL STEWART FARM DEER FLATS FARM HOYT, JAY & LORI THE KUSTER FARM FAIRVIEW FARMS TUDOR, JOHN TWIN BROOKS FARM LLC SEACORD, RICHARD & BRIAN ANDREW,HOWARD & JAY ABBOTT III, ROBERT TRINKLE FARM ROUSE, EDWARD J. WEEPING BIRCH FARM CAMPBELL, REA D. PARKER'S DAIRY #2 LIDDLE, ADAM NEW GENERATION FARM PARKER'S DAIRY #1 SWEZEY VIEW FARM PARKER'S DAIRY #3 REID, KYLE & SHANNA WEEPING BIRCH FARM FOOTHILL FARM, LLC TOOLITE FARM LLC SWEZEY VIEW FARM TRINKLE FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

HORIZON DAIRY SCHULTZ, WAYNE H. WELCUMIN FARMS BOISE, STEPHEN & JEANNE SCHOEACRES KOEBERLE,E.W. & SONS DRUMLIN VIEW FARM LONELY LANE FARM SHIRRON FARMS HOAD ,BRANDON

DHI-AP DHI DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

WAYNE

WYOMING

996 954 938 850 914 872 955 900 875 916 878 956 878 849 759 789 717 722 642

3.4 3.4 3.4 3.2 3.5 3.2 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.9 4.0 3.6 4.1 3.7 3.8 3.9

913 856 828 814 805 796 786 774 770 761 759 752 699 657 636 599 596 567 503

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

H 184.2 H 361.1 H 80.8 H 99.9 H 140.7 H 1004.2 H 231.8 H 213.0 H 116.6 H 263.4 H 43.7 H 134.9 H 231.4 X 59.4 H 108.8 H 53.2 H 109.7 H 199.7 J 81.7 H 115.0 H 63.5 H 358.7 H 67.2 H 101.6 H 84.2 H 105.1 H 71.0 H 43.1 H 87.3 H 75.9 H 65.4 H 92.5 X 31.2 H 85.3 G 34.9 A 47.3 A 28.6

27926 952 3.4 842 3.0 3X 26284 1016 3.9 810 3.1 3X 25427 1015 4.0 791 3.1 25826 932 3.6 781 3.0 24435 875 3.6 770 3.2 25415 905 3.6 754 3.0 3X 24334 912 3.7 745 3.1 23251 917 3.9 735 3.2 23981 909 3.8 733 3.1 22483 912 4.1 730 3.2 23895 817 3.4 728 3.0 22921 909 4.0 723 3.2 23064 851 3.7 718 3.1 21459 940 4.4 715 3.3 22149 874 3.9 696 3.1 21805 847 3.9 673 3.1 20652 739 3.6 666 3.2 21577 776 3.6 664 3.1 17157 852 5.0 645 3.8 20423 744 3.6 635 3.1 20434 724 3.5 632 3.1 19606 756 3.9 614 3.1 20660 738 3.6 610 3.0 19209 777 4.0 606 3.2 19235 725 3.8 606 3.2 20823 730 3.5 606 2.9 20547 764 3.7 603 2.9 20095 729 3.6 593 3.0 20114 701 3.5 589 2.9 18362 675 3.7 576 3.1 19274 646 3.4 572 3.0 18204 682 3.7 549 3.0 16600 722 4.3 546 3.3 17397 656 3.8 542 3.1 15698 704 4.5 525 3.3 15713 639 4.1 517 3.3 15257 606 4.0 510 3.3

H H H H H H H H H H

29745 1049 3.5 879 3.0 3X 23145 865 3.7 704 3.0 22044 868 3.9 682 3.1 22039 850 3.9 671 3.0 21897 795 3.6 666 3.0 3X 20794 747 3.6 624 3.0 19523 732 3.7 617 3.2 21394 755 3.5 613 2.9 18595 681 3.7 558 3.0 17359 634 3.7 533 3.1

112.6 102.9 133.7 47.5 172.3 507.2 92.5 61.6 73.4 35.6

COVISTA HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 289.6 BAKER BROOK FARMS DHI-AP H 1428.2 SOUTHVIEW FARMS 1 DHI-AP H 1460.3 EMERLINGALFRED STATE DHIRAPCS H 93.9 DOUGLAS GOOD DHI-AP H 145.7 SCHREIBERDALE HOLSTEINS DHIRAPCS H 724.9 DUEPPENGIESSER, A. DHIR-AP H 1153.6 WISCOY FARMS DHI-AP H 172.8 VANSLYKES DAIRY FARM LLC DHI-AP H 1263.3 ARMSON FARMS DHIR-AP H 426.1 HIBSCH DHI-AP H 144.5 TRUE FARMS INC DHIR-AP H1086.1 FARYNA , WALTER DHIRAPCS H 399.5

29488 29132 27570 27542 26152 27054 27215 26139 28402 26476 25083 25176 25169

1079 1142 1048 932 979 985 1038 950 984 967 1051 933 938

3.7 3.9 3.8 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.5 3.7 4.2 3.7 3.7

886 878 838 824 822 811 810 810 806 800 783 779 770

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER SIMMONS,WM & MARCIA EMERLING FARMS DAVIS, JAMES F. ALAN WEST FRIENDLY ACRES FARM SICKLES, RICHARD & SANDRA PINGREY, DONALD STONEY CREEK STONEY CREEK ALLEN MASON VICTORY ACRES LLC SILVER HAVEN FARMS WOODVALE FARMS HYMAN, JOHN SILVER MEADOW FARM CHAMBERLAIN, DAVE & GREG DANIEL PINGREY VICTORY ACRES LLC BRANT'S HILLTOP DAIRY EAGLEVIEW DAIRY LLC. WING, KERRY & ALAN METZ,DAVID & CYNTHIA HD 1 NICKERSON BROTHERS ALL BRIGHT FARM

YATES

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-APCS DHIR-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

H 592.9 H 1103.1 H 255.3 H 148.1 H 555.6 H 121.4 H 271.5 H 36.8 H 84.1 H 75.2 H 67.3 H 180.3 H 577.9 H 65.6 H 179.4 J 671.7 H 249.2 B 113.9 H 150.8 H 347.8 H 80.0 H 70.6 H 173.5 J 41.8

25625 24691 24602 23851 24099 22423 22416 22504 23153 22772 23093 21887 23175 22002 21305 18476 20952 19198 21555 20023 20263 18932 18725 14100

850 866 889 790 860 861 809 802 818 867 879 883 867 842 879 919 757 789 701 732 745 765 715 741

3.3 3.5 3.6 3.3 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.7 3.8 4.1 5.0 3.6 4.1 3.3 3.7 3.7 4.0 3.8 5.3

755 750 728 720 712 712 707 704 703 701 700 695 688 684 674 666 661 639 633 623 594 589 555 538

2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.2 3.3 2.9 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.8

3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER TIMBERMAN ROBERT ROLLEN N'S DAIRY OSWALD, SAM JENSEN, RODNEY HERD #1 VINE VALLEY FARM CHRISTI FARM JENSEN, RODNEY HERD #2 CHRISTI FARM FONDA DRMS TESTING FONDA DRMS TESTING

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

Top 40 Herds For January B R COW E E YEARS D

H W H H B H A X H H

65.3 100.0 307.6 20.2 233.0 94.6 26.8 40.9 52.2 793.4

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

27084 23904 22894 21344 19080 20970 19023 18322 24746 24836

928 888 868 787 747 779 736 692 948 918

3.4 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.7

836 706 681 651 632 624 594 533 762 739

3.1 3.0 3.0 3X 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3X 3.0 3X

NEW JERSEY CENTRAL JERSEY AREA/HUNTERDON COUNTY FULPER FARMS LLC CEDAR LANE FARM,LLC MOUNTAINVIEW CORR FACILIT JONES FARM 1,2,3 DEPT.COR MIDDLEBUSH FARMS, INC. HOWARD SUTTON AND SON JONES FARM 1,2,3 DEPT.COR WENGRYN, JANET CEDAR LANE FARM,LLC CEDAR LANE FARM,LLC BSB HOLSTEIN FARM

DHI DHIR DHI DHI DHIR DHI-AP DHI DHI DHIR DHIR DHIR-AP

H 119.0 H 35.2 H 75.6 H 101.6 H 46.1 H 46.7 J 13.1 H 23.5 B 13.0 J 18.5 H 34.7

23430 23181 20923 20588 18998 19518 15783 18631 16294 15011 16510

957 998 761 821 704 642 834 698 720 828 665

4.1 4.3 3.6 4.0 3.7 3.3 5.3 3.7 4.4 5.5 4.0

715 697 663 645 577 576 571 559 543 540 506

3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.1

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MYERWOOD FARMS DHI-APCS H 380.6 WILLIAM M. DOLBOW DHI-AP H 95.6 SEBOWISHA FARMS DHI-AP H 72.4 STRING ALVIN W & MARIE DHI-AP H 123.9 BAYSIDE STATE PRISON FARM DHI H 132.2

24357 21545 20482 19669 18027

836 779 736 701 704

3.4 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.9

713 662 628 597 572

2.9 3X 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2

LOCKBURNER,MARK F VANDERGROEFF FREEBORN LARRY ALLAVALLEY FARM KUPERUS MEADOWS WINDY FLATS DAIRY SPRING HOUSE DAIRY SCHOELIER CASEY HOUGH FARM ERVEY KEVIN BYACRE HOLSTEINS LLC SPRING HOUSE DAIRY

25915 25423 25695 22603 22863 21864 21456 20107 20769 19519 19246 13492

944 943 937 891 953 760 792 736 847 812 830 719

3.6 3.7 3.6 3.9 4.2 3.5 3.7 3.7 4.1 4.2 4.3 5.3

788 782 780 723 692 673 637 612 609 590 570 511

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.8

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

SOUTH JERSEY AREA

SUSSEX

WARREN

MAKARVICH FARMS GREEN VALLEY FARM DRAKES ACRES

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H X H H H H H H H J

80.2 109.1 103.0 18.9 142.4 93.9 47.7 60.0 51.8 86.2 144.3 44.4

DHI-AP H 89.0 DHI H 151.1 DHI X 68.4

27505 1013 3.7 847 3.1 23120 898 3.9 730 3.2 20913 784 3.7 641 3.1

USDEC and NMPF raise concerns about impact reorganization proposals on trade policy, food safety agencies mine the ability of critical agencies to carry out their missions. In this instance, NMPF is very concerned that USTR’s unique role in trade negotiations and its superb level of openness to input from the public would be greatly harmed by submerging this agency within a larger bureaucracy.” In a related issue, Office of Management and Budget Director for Management Jeff Zients stated that a subsequent effort would be to consolidate USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) with the food safety unit at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). NMPF and USDEC also noted with interest this proposal, which, as announced, would not directly im-

pact dairy products, since only meat products are inspected by FSIS. However, the statement did not reference what impact such a food safety consolidation might have on the USDA Agricultural Mar-

keting Service, which currently plays a key official role as a proxy for FDA on many export-related issues, given the lack of FDA mandate to address export matters. The fact that FDA is not charged

with a responsibility for supporting U.S. food exports has in the past created unnecessary hurdles to resolving U.S. dairy export challenges, given FDA’s oversight of dairy products. NMPF and USDEC

support efforts to rationalize FDA’s role with respect to exported products in order to most effectively make use of government oversight responsibilities. Source: News for Dairy Co-Ops, 2-03-12

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 7

NMPF has expressed concerns about the potential impact on U.S. dairy exports of a recent proposal to consolidate government agencies. President Obama recently announced his proposal to reinstate the Office of the President’s authority to reorganize the government. His first proposed use of that authority would be to consolidate six agencies dealing with trade and commerce into one. NMPF, and the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC), praised the Administration’s effort to ensure that agencies involved in efforts related to trade are operating in the smoothest and most coordinated way possible. But they expressed deep concerns that including the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative in the process could detrimentally affect U.S. ability to effectively negotiate and enforce trade agreements. Both organizations indicated that they supported the overall effort, but would oppose the inclusion of USTR in such a reorganization out of concern that it would damage the agency’s effectiveness. “NMPF’s members want to see an efficiently operated and cost-effective U.S. government,” said Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. “However, as we pursue the important goal of seeking greater government efficiencies, we need to ensure that this process does not under-

Awards highlight PA Dairy Summit closing events by Jon M. Casey The 2012 Pennsylvania Dairy Summit honored five industry leaders during its closing luncheon on the second day of this year’s two-day event held Feb. 8 and 9 at the Lancaster Host Conference Center and Resort in Lancaster, PA. Hosted by the Professional Dairy Managers of Pennsylvania and the PA Center for Dairy Excellence, organizers welcomed more than 550 participants, more than

200 of whom were dairy producers from PA and nearby Mid-Atlantic states. With presentations from experts on a variety of topics that included milk marketing, dairy beef production and alternative energy production to boost farm profits, attendees enjoyed the opportunity to learn more about how to improve their own dairy operations during this annual event. PA Dairymen’s Awards Capping off Thursday’s

closing luncheon, PA Dairymen’s Association President David Smith awarded 2012 Association’s Annual Leadership Awards to Logan Bower, Blain, PA; Sheryl Vanco, Bear Lake, PA; and Robert C. Goodling Jr., extension associate at Penn State University. “These awards are intended to recognize those who have made significant contributions to Pennsylvania’s dairy industry,” said Smith “All

three of this year’s recipients have distinguished themselves in their leadership, service and ongoing commitment to dairy in the commonwealth.” Bower, who owns and operates Pleasant View Farms, received the Charles E. Cowan Memorial Award, presented in honor of Charles Cowan, who served as secretary and treasurer of the Pennsylvania Dairymen’s Association for many years. Bower’s demonstration of

Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Jerry Ringold, U.S. Dairy Innovation Center, discusses the effectiveness of profitable manure digesters. his superior management for Dairy Excellence and capabilities and outstand- the Pennsylvania Beef ing leadership qualities Council. Currently, Logan within the dairy industry serves on the Pennsylvamade him this year’s nia Dairy Leadership choice for this award. Council. Pleasant View Farms is Smith added that Bowa 500-cow, 750-acre farm er’s leadership within the in Perry County. As own- Pennsylvania Beef Couner-operator, Bower has cil and PDMP also helped served in leadership roles to transform the Dairy in both his local commu- Beef Quality Assurance nity and in state and na- Program into the Dairy tional dairy and agricul- Animal Care and Quality ture organizations as well. Assurance (DACQA) ProLocally, he serves on the gram. Smith noted that in Perry County Planning 2011, Bower was recogCommission and is a nized by the Pennsylvania member of the Blain Lions Beef Council with him reClub. Within the dairy in- ceiving the Council’s dustry, he has served on Dairy Beef Quality Assurthe boards of the Pennsyl- ance Award. At the navania Dairymen’s Associa- tional level, Bower has tion and the Professional also been recognized as a Dairy Managers of Penn- national leader in the sylvania, serving as presi- dairy industry and curdent of both organizations rently serves on the National Dairy Well-Being at one point. In his recognition of Coalition and the board of Bower, Smith acknowl- the Professional Dairy edged Bower’s involve- Producers Foundation. Sheryl Vanco received ment with PDMP, where he served as the first The Distinguished Dairy chairman of the Pennsyl- Woman Award, reflecting vania Dairy Summit and her multi-faceted interest helped to mold the pro- in the Pennsylvania dairy gram and purpose of the foods industry. Vanco and annual event. He also is a her husband, Steve, own past director of the Center PA Diary A9

NEW W YORK JIM’SS EQUIPMENT T REPAIR,, INC. 4072 Lewis Rd. Campbell, NY 14821 607-527-8872 2 • 800-450-8872 www.jimsequipment.com

NEW W YORK TRI-COUNTY Y SUPPLY,, INC. 12069 Ocean Rd. (Rt. 16) Chaffee, NY 14039 716-496-8859

NEW W ENGLAND NORTHEAST T FARM M SERVICE,, INC. 4497 Route 5 Irasburg, VT 05845 802-754-8863 Ken and Beth Raney are pleased to receive one of two 2012 Center for Dairy Excellence Pacesetter Awards.

PA Diary from A8 and operate a 95-cow dairy operation in Warren County along with their son, Chris. Smith recognized Vanco for her work on the family farm and for her service as a director of the Warren County Farm Bureau and as president of the Farmers Union Milk Cooperative. He said she has served as the chair of the Pennsylvania Holstein Association’s Junior Scholarship Foundation for the past 20 years, and she has received a presidential appointment to the

Pennsylvania Farm Service State Committee in 2008. Currently she serves as chairwoman of that committee. Additionally, Vanco is a commissioner of the Pennsylvania Animal Health and Diagnostic Commission. Recognized for his work within the Penn State Cooperative Extension, Robert C. Goodling Jr. received this year’s Extension Award for his work within Penn State’s Dairy and Animal Science Department where his skills with data and record

management excel. Smith said that Goodling was a key developer of the Profitability Assessment Dairy Tool, as well as the sole developer of a series of data analysis tools designed to help producers pinpoint production areas needed to gain improvement on the farm. Most recently, Goodling collaborated with colleagues across the nation to develop a herd assessment tool for genetic evaluation using information from parent averages and DHIA records.

Smith said that before joining the department, Goodling was an extension educator in Lebanon County, where he held a leadership role within the Capital Region’s Dairy Team. As an extension agent, Goodling worked with a number of dairy profit teams and presented workshops on enhancing reproductive management, utilizing accounting programs and building team management skills. Goodling represents Penn State on the Center for Dairy Excellence’s

Award went to Reinford Farms Inc., of Mifflintown, Juniata County. The family farm, operated by Steve and Gina Reinford, along with their four children — Chad, Brett, Drew and Dove, has grown to include 550 cows and 450 replacement animals. They farm 1,000 acres of crops including 650 acres of corn and 350 acres of hay. In the last year, the farm has shipped more than 10 million pounds of milk to Mount Joy Farmers Cooperative. Sons Chad, Brett and Drew will become partners in the family corporation by 2013. Together the family works with 10 full-time and two part-time farm employees and enjoys an employee model that encourages middle managers promoting leadership and advancement. As early adopters of innovation, the Reinfords installed a 28-stall rotary milking parlor in 1998, making them the first family east of the Mississippi River to incorporate a Westfalia carousel parlor. In 2008, the Reinfords built an on-farm anaerobic digester to complement their environmental stewardship strategy that includes odor reduction, power production and conservation tillage. In addition to digesting the waste from the entire milking herd, they take in food waste from more than 50 Wal-Mart stores. Their use of the dried material produced by the digestion process, reduces the farm’s need for bedding and fertilizer. The digester produces enough power to supply electricity and heat for their farm’s water supply, for its buildings and house, for a newly installed grain drier and calf milk pasteurizer, as well as providing electrical power for an additional 100 homes in their community.

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WHITE'S FARM SUPPLY, INC. RD 4, Box 11 Jct. Rtes. 31 & 316 Canastota, NY 13032 315-697-2214

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Pennsylvania Dairymen's Association Award winners, left to right, are Robert C. Goodling Jr., Sheryl Vanco and Logan Bower pose for a photo outside the Dairy Summit following the award ceremony. Photos by Jon M. Casey

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 9

board of directors and is a past president of the Pennsylvania Association of County Agricultural Agents. He has received several regional awards for his extension work through the National Association of County Agricultural Agents and he was one of three Pennsylvania delegates to the national NACAA meeting in 2011. Center for Dairy Excellence Awards Representing The Center for Dairy Excellence, 2011 Board of Directors Chair Lolly Lesher and 2012 Vice-Chair Gary Heckman, recognized two dairy industry leaders, Ken Raney and Reinford Farms Inc. with this year’s 2012 Pacesetter Awards. These awards honor individuals who work to build a positive image of the Pennsylvania dairy industry to create a prosperous, marketable future for producers and supporting industries. Ken Raney of State College, Centre County, is a leader in the state’s dairy industry serving as executive director of the Pennsylvania Holstein Association (PHA). In 1984, Raney joined the association as director of member services and junior programs, and was named director in 1997. Under his guidance, the association’s adult membership has grown to more than 3,500 and the junior association to nearly 1,620 members, making them each the largest in the nation. Pennsylvania junior members have competed nationally, and with Raney’s help, have produced 17 championship teams in 30 dairy bowl finals appearances, nine first place speech winners and five first place Dairy Jeopardy winners. Raney also coordinates summer junior judging schools with the help of county volunteers. The second Pacesetter

Serratia species: a practical summary for controlling mastitis

Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

by Christina S. PeterssonWolfe, Sandy Costello, and John Currin, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA Introduction The implementation of control measures for contagious mastitis pathogens has successfully reduced the prevalence of these organisms in U.S. dairy herds. However, dairy producers continue to struggle with the control of environmental pathogens. Serratia spp. are Gram-negative bacteria, similar in structure to Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species. The most common mastitiscausing species is Serratia marcescens. However, the treatment and

control of these organisms is similar across all species of Serratia. Where are these organisms found? Commonly, these organisms are found in soil and plant matter (including feed). Cows on pasture or cows housed on organic bedding material may be at an increased risk for mastitis caused by Serratia spp. Herd outbreaks of Serratia mastitis have occurred in herds where Serratia grew in bedding and/or teat dip. Poor udder cleanliness and damaged teat ends also appear to increase risk of spreading Serratia to uninfected cows.

How do Serratia spp. infect the mammary gland? Serratia spp. infect uninfected cows through environmental contact. As with control of all environmental organisms, maintaining a clean and dry environment for cows is of utmost importance. Similarly, using inorganic bedding (sand) also reduces environmental contamination by these bacteria. However, it is important to remember that recycled sand can serve as a source of environmental contamination as organic matter accumulates in the bedding material.

How can mastitis caused by Serratia spp. be prevented and controlled? Practices for controlling Serratia spp. include implementing proper milking procedures and maintaining a clean and dry housing environment containing appropriate bedding materials. At milking time, all quarters should be forestripped to begin the milk let-down process. Using an efficacious pre-milking teat disinfectant following forestripping is particularly important in controlling this mastitis-causing pathogen. Chlorhexidine is not an effective killing agent

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for Serratia spp.; therefore, producers with herds experiencing Serratia mastitis should choose a pre-milking teat disinfectant containing an alternative active ingredient. The pre-milking teat disinfectant should remain on the teats for 30 seconds and should be removed with either a paper towel or a singleuse clean and dry cloth towel. When these guidelines are followed, the time from start of manual stimulation (forestripping or wiping) until unit attachment is in the range of 60-120 seconds, an appropriate period of time for milk let-down to occur. In addition, reducing teat end exposure between milkings by scraping the back of cow stalls and applying fresh bedding frequently, will be worth your time. When herd-wide infection occurs, quick identification of the Serratia source — cows, teat dip, or bedding — is essential to reduce the spread of the infection. How can teat dip be protected from Serratia contamination? Teat disinfectants can become contaminated with Serratia marcescens on the farm. Serratia spp. are commonly resistant to chlorhexidine-gluconate disinfectants; therefore, if a container of disinfectant containing one of these active ingredients becomes contaminated, the continued use of this disinfectant on the farm can pose a threat to the rest of the herd. Dairy producers should consider culturing their teat dip if Serratia spp. is found in more than one cow, and especially if a chlorhexidine-gluconate disinfectant is used as germicide in the teat dip. It is important to remember that the product should only be removed from the original container. Leftover teat disinfectant from teat dipping cups

should never be poured back into the original container or reused for a subsequent milking. When are Serratia mastitis infections most likely to occur? New infections can occur at any time during lactation and may also occur during the dry period. Cows in early lactation are at an increased risk for new infections due to the increased stress and immune suppression associated with the postpartum period. Cows with high milk production are not at greater risk than cows with low milk production. How likely to be cured are Serratia infections? Serratia is resistant to most antibiotics, and, therefore, cure rates are limited. Thus, intramammary antibiotic treatment is not recommended. Veterinary consultation is recommended prior to the start of any treatment protocol. Due to the limited cure rates with the previously discussed options, emphasis needs to be placed on prevention of these infections, rather than on treatment. Summary • Serratia spp. are environmental organisms found commonly in soil and plant matter. • It is imperative to keep bedding clean and dry. • Use of washed sand bedding helps reduce the environmental load of Serratia spp. • Chlorhexidine-gluconate teat disinfectants are not effective in killing Serratia spp. • Proper milking procedures are critical for preventing infections. • Serratia spp. are resistant to most antibiotics and cure rates are limited. From DAIReXNET, www.extension.org/pag es/61743/serratiasppa-practical-summaryfor-controlling-mastitis Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34 No. 4 and 5, 2011

Evaluation of propane flaming of sand for reducing bacterial counts in bedding

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A key to controlling mastitis is identifying sources of the bacteria causing infections and reducing exposure of cows to mastitis pathogens. The primary source of environmental mastitis pathogens in the cow’s habitat is the bedding or material used for cows to lie upon in stalls or corrals. The use of sand as bedding for dairy cows dramatically reduces the mastitis pathogen exposure to teat ends compared with common organic bedding materials. The effectiveness of sand for reducing exposure of mastitis pathogens to mammary glands is due to the inorganic properties of sand. However, as organic content and moisture in sand bedding increases during the common NEW YORK BILLHARDTS JAMESWAY SALES & SERVICE 5807 State Route 12 Glenfield, NY 13343 315-376-2054 CENTER STATE AG SERVICE Morrisville, NY 315-684-7807 DON’S DAIRY SUPPLY, INC. 349 Roses Brook South Kortright, NY 13842 607-538-9464 DUPREYS FEED & SUPPLIES 9748 Rt. 9 P.O. Box 535 Chazy, NY 12921 518-846-7338 JOCK’S FARM EQ. & REPAIR 727 Co. Rte. 7 Brushton, NY 12916 518-529-0113 LOGAN’S SILO 9111 State Route 12 Copenhagen, NY 13626 315-688-4414 Fax: 315-688-2203

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preceding the flame. The daily movement of the 760 degree C propane fueled flame at 3.2 kilometers per hour (2 miles per hour) over the surface of recycled sand bedding in stalls provided a positive effect by reducing mastitis pathogen loads in recycled sand at different depths of bedding in a pathogen specific manner. The greatest reduction of mastitis pathogen populations by flaming was on the surface 25 mm (1 inch) of recycled sand. Reductions in bacterial counts at deeper depths were less consistent. The effects of subsequent flaming of sand over a week also differed among pathogens. In general, mastitis pathogens were reduced greatest the day recycled sand was added to stalls and flaming was less effective as sand bedding was in stalls over a six day period. The use of propane flaming of recycled sand was shown to have potential as a practice to control mastitis pathogen populations in bedding. The greatest advantage afforded by flaming was on the surface of bedding and was more effective in controlling bacterial populations of fresh recycled sand than in sand after several days use. From 3rd International Symposium on Mastitis and Milk Quality Proceedings, 2011, p. 5255 (Hogan, Raubenolt, McCormick and Weiss) Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34, No. 4 and 5

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 11

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practice of on-farm reclaiming sand from manure, the mastitis pathogen populations may also increase. The need exists for environmentally safe and effective procedures for altering physical properties and bacterial loads in recycled sand bedding. The use of propane flame for reducing pathogen populations in poultry litter has been reported as a practical means of sanitizing animal contact areas. However whether or not there could be similar applications for dairy herds was not known. Ohio State University researchers recently conducted a study to determine the effects of propane flaming on bacteriological populations of common environmental mastitis pathogens in recycled sand bedding. The experiment was conducted on a commercial 600-cow dairy farm. One row of freestalls was flamed within 12 hours after recycled bedding was added to stalls, and then daily for the next six days. One row of free stalls was left as the untreated control. Stalls received the same treatment for three consecutive weeks. After three weeks, bedding treatments were changed between rows in a switch-back design. The flaming unit was mounted on 50 hp tractor. A tractor mounted rake with tines approximately 75 mm (3 inches) in length tilled bedding 150 mm (6 inches)

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

BRADFORD

BUTLER

THIELE FARM MIKE&ANETTE SCHIEVER RICK + LINDA STUCHAL UNDER GRACE DAIRY HARTZELL FARM NORMAN H GRAHAM MARBURGER FARM DAIRY RITA KENNEDY ALBERT HOGG & SONS PAUL CRITCHLOW JR. DROVERS INN WAYNE E HIXON JOHN H RENO J L & H F KENNEDY CROFT BROS BRADLEY&CALEB COOPER CHESTNUT RUN FARM

Page 12 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PENNSYLVANIA

KLINE RON,GLENN&GARY SCOTT AND KAREN NOLT ALLFORD,JOHN&HOLLY D&L HESS FARMS WM CAR WMS FARMS ROGER + CATHY BROWN SCOTT AND KAREN NOLT SNOWCREST FARMS MERLE & LESLIE WANCK PETER SOLOWIEJ RUSSELL MAPLE FARMS DOUG STEWART SHUMHURST FARM DAVI LERAY DAIRY KEVIN VANDERPOEL JEFFERY AMMERMAN WILLIAM & GRETCHEN STEELE PECK HILL FARMS FEUSNER,JOHN&DENISE ROBBIN&RYAN KINGSLEY PISGAHVIEW FARM

CENTRE

B R COW E E YEARS D

PENNDELL FARMS VALLEYSEND FARM PINE HOLLOW FARM BROOK WAY HOLSTEINS PENN STATE UNIVERSITY STRINGERS SAND RIDGE MURMAC FARMS VALLEY WIDE FARM GLEN AND LOIS MILLER RAS HOLSTEINS DAVID HOUSER TODD AND LISA WOOMER CARL& DIANE HOMAN KENNETH C GEPHART PAUL HARTLE JONATHAN GLICK SCOTT E SWARTZ HAAGEN FARM STEPHEN L MUNDRICK TOM AND LORI HARTLE REESES DAIRYHILL CLAUDE HOMAN TI GLO FARM BARBARA ROSSMAN DOUGLAS P VONADA ROD AND TIM BRUSS BREEZY FARMS BREEZY FARMS FISHER FARMS NITTANY SPRINGS FARM MELLOTTS FARM ORE BANK ACRES ORE BANK ACRES MELLOTTS FARM FETTEROLF FARM CHARLES LINER LORI D. BROWN HAROLD.E.HARPSTER CLAUDE NYMAN TONY &SAPRINA HARTER

CLEARFIELD

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H J H H H H H H H H H H H H X H

489.3 76.4 54.8 59.6 75.3 187.0 12.1 125.6 79.0 76.9 40.4 25.3 38.3 75.4 87.9 102.8 77.4 201.6 67.8 48.8 35.8

26320 27266 26424 24140 22788 23643 19120 21624 21017 21379 21196 21199 21381 20743 21322 20001 19094 19661 17981 17737 17287

988 916 955 898 787 901 913 840 773 823 771 809 857 792 788 778 756 690 702 697 660

3.8 3.4 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.8 4.8 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.8 4.0 3.8 3.7 3.9 4.0 3.5 3.9 3.9 3.8

817 814 808 756 723 717 691 665 658 655 649 649 648 634 630 625 609 607 584 563 527

3.1 3X 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3X 3.6 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.0

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H X H X H H H B H H H

41.0 117.2 70.2 52.0 177.9 37.1 128.1 29.1 53.7 38.2 80.3 60.6 33.8 32.5 40.7 48.9 37.6

25560 24372 23614 23855 23464 22604 21050 18713 20731 17367 19777 19176 18422 16369 17771 17947 18178

936 938 801 970 811 797 811 706 808 801 724 700 731 627 688 682 700

3.7 3.8 3.4 4.1 3.5 3.5 3.9 3.8 3.9 4.6 3.7 3.7 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.9

790 760 715 709 691 665 660 644 639 621 610 597 586 576 567 566 557

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.6 3X 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.2 3.2 3.1

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H 79.6 H 67.7 H 67.0 H 171.7 H 240.4 H 91.6 H 1184.4 H 49.8 H 76.5 H 56.7 H 46.7 H 47.0 H 72.4 H 66.6 H 60.9 H 68.3 H 48.4 H 41.3 H 45.1 H 176.9 H 91.0 H 41.6 H 154.0 H 77.0 H 76.0 H 48.4 H 57.4 H 140.9 H 105.3 H 137.6 H 32.2 H 75.7 X 30.3 H 27.3 H 76.7 X 49.3 H 19.2 J 65.1 H 22.1 X 51.5

28488 1187 4.2 869 3.1 26305 1257 4.8 857 3.3 26148 911 3.5 802 3.1 26574 959 3.6 790 3.0 25391 922 3.6 777 3.1 25189 1028 4.1 776 3.1 25926 911 3.5 765 3.0 3X 25202 969 3.8 758 3.0 24758 875 3.5 752 3.0 24227 861 3.6 746 3.1 24492 884 3.6 745 3.0 24644 976 4.0 744 3.0 23663 837 3.5 727 3.1 24664 879 3.6 714 2.9 23511 872 3.7 706 3.0 23571 831 3.5 687 2.9 22249 845 3.8 683 3.1 22191 911 4.1 682 3.1 20898 873 4.2 677 3.2 22719 952 4.2 675 3.0 21711 866 4.0 675 3.1 21880 831 3.8 672 3.1 22148 837 3.8 672 3.0 21523 745 3.5 659 3.1 20599 799 3.9 657 3.2 20473 781 3.8 651 3.2 20788 763 3.7 628 3.0 20874 751 3.6 626 3.0 19686 761 3.9 626 3.2 20709 972 4.7 624 3.0 19122 735 3.8 605 3.2 19090 674 3.5 599 3.1 18474 642 3.5 595 3.2 18837 679 3.6 593 3.1 18943 769 4.1 588 3.1 18435 742 4.0 570 3.1 17763 674 3.8 554 3.1 14897 757 5.1 553 3.7 17771 689 3.9 544 3.1 16444 664 4.0 527 3.2

CLARION JOHN HENRY #

DHI H 55.8

32529 1193 3.7 967 3.0

FROSTBURG FARMS

DHI-AP H 129.0

NEXGEN DAIRY INC

DHI-AP H 104.5

24222

885 3.7 741 3.1

DHI H 68.5

22184

834 3.8 695 3.1

MABE HOLSTEINS

DHI-AP H 85.9

21880

797 3.6 683 3.1

KEB DAIRY

DHI-AP H 62.7

20427

787 3.9 647 3.2

JOHN HENRY #

24718

HERD OWNER

911 3.7 769 3.1

HICKS DAIRY FARM ORNER FARMS INC CARL G BRINK + SONS HAAG'S GREEN VALLEY SANKEYCREST FARMS

CLINTON

SCHRACK FARMS SHAWN & WANDA MOORE

COLUMBIA JAN JURBALA LYONS DEN DAIRY

Top 40 Herds For January B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

89.2 79.3 92.8 77.9 43.0

26953 25485 24940 25184 23055

946 943 913 925 870

3.5 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.8

DHI-APCS H 890.4 DHI-AP H 90.3

24286 22280

851 3.5 736 3.0 3X 874 3.9 690 3.1

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

847 794 774 769 716

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1

DHIR-AP H 58.8 DHI-AP H 83.8

29165 1191 4.1 928 3.2 25203 913 3.6 785 3.1

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

38.5 54.6 116.3 97.9 54.3

23445 24824 24696 23341 18465

928 888 888 864 624

DHI-AP H 74.6 DHI-AP H 55.5 DHI-AP H 68.2

25269 24304 18894

975 3.9 780 3.1 942 3.9 757 3.1 715 3.8 592 3.1

MARK VOGEL DHI-AP H 48.8 CURTIS HAVEN FARMS DHI-AP H 70.4 KIDSTREAT DHI-AP H 82.2 LIND FARM DHI-AP H 66.7 WILLIAM+ BRYAN LOPER DHI-AP H 61.4 CRAIG SHINKO DHI-AP H 79.4 WOODS DAIRY DHI-AP H 115.8 MARK VOGEL DHI-AP J 10.9 DEAN +SUZANNE CURTIS DHI-AP H 147.9 PALNEL FARM DHI-AP H 120.2 HIGH POINT FARM DHI-AP H 104.6 RAUSCH FARMS DHI-AP H 56.8 BRAD ROBINSON DHI-AP H 247.8 MARSHY MEADOW FARM DHIR-AP H 58.5 KRUSE FARM DHI-AP H 86.0 CONCORD VALLEY FARMS INC DHI-APCS H 155.2 MARSHY MEADOW FARM DHIR-AP B 16.5 WALTER + LISA ROYEK DHI-AP H 56.8 MIDNIGHT FIRE DAIRY DHI-AP X 36.9

24819 22921 22815 23152 23290 21620 22571 19172 19597 20560 20554 20331 19697 19072 18102 19335 16290 17461 15698

831 870 837 875 809 834 755 910 786 768 803 789 787 719 686 742 669 621 642

CRAWFORD

TRCP FARM LLC. TRCP FARM LLC. FOSTERS FAMILY FARM LOST ACRES FARM DOLLYRUN FARM

ELK

PAUL SWANSON V BELL FARMS PIERRE PONTZER

B H H H X

ERIE

FRANKLIN

ROCK GAP DAIRY DHI-APCS LOCUST HILL FARM DHI-AP JEMI CATTLE COMPANY DHIR-AP JAMES&NINA BURDETTE DHIR-AP DENNIS W BRICKER DHI-AP PAUL H.ZIMMERMAN JR. DHI-AP EVAN J BURKHOLDER DHI-AP STEVEN E RUBY DHIR-AP ANTHONY R LEHMAN DHI-AP OAKLEIGH FARM DHIR-AP JIM KAHLER DHIR-AP CURTIS KNEPPER DHI-AP ERIC NISWANDER DHI-APCS ROMARCOHOLSTEINS DHI-AP GLEN WINGERT DHI-AP DUFFIELD DAIRY DHI-AP MEYERS BROS DAIRY DHIR-AP MIDDOUR FARMS LLC DHI-AP DENNIS&JOEL SOLLENBERGER DHI-AP HONEYSUCKLE ACRES DHIR-AP LAMELLO FARM DHIR-AP PECKMAN HOMESTEAD DHIR-AP MILTON ROTZ DHI-AP ANTRIM WAY FARM DHI-AP GUILSIDE FARM DHI-AP JEREMY D. MARTIN DHI-AP EDGAR S REICHARD DHIR-AP PAUL H.ZIMMERMAN JR. DHI-AP BEIDEL BROTHERS DHI-APCS WITTERDALE FARM DHI-AP LAMELLO FARM DHIR-AP JIM KAHLER DHIR-AP JEMI JERSEYS DHIR-AP NELSON R MEYERS DHI-AP LAMELLO FARM DHIR-AP JUSTIN GEISINGER DHI-AP RYAN D MEYERS DHI-AP POVERTY LANE FARMS LP DHI-AP THOMAS E SHATZER DHI-AP VERNON W. ZIMMERMAN DHI-AP

JEFFERSON

HIGHLAND H FARMS MOWREYS SPRUCELAWN DAN KELLER LONDONDALE FARM MITCHELLS DAIRY FARM HIGHLAND H FARMS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP

4.0 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.4

3.3 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.5 3.9 3.3 4.7 4.0 3.7 3.9 3.9 4.0 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.1 3.6 4.1

798 763 759 753 624

751 725 725 712 704 681 678 676 665 635 630 629 619 595 593 569 560 544 504

3.4 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.4

3.0 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.5 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 2.9 3.4 3.1 3.2

H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H X H H H H H J H H B J J H X H H H H H

153.6 115.5 18.0 116.1 64.4 45.5 186.9 200.0 103.3 121.8 100.7 67.9 44.3 39.9 91.6 242.9 193.5 155.6 96.8 117.2 66.1 122.6 359.9 107.0 195.7 92.4 54.4 20.6 177.2 191.3 125.0 22.7 31.5 58.3 19.0 78.8 36.4 146.6 67.9 71.6

26827 1016 3.8 820 3.1 26402 989 3.7 795 3.0 25530 1093 4.3 789 3.1 24834 955 3.8 778 3.1 25827 902 3.5 777 3.0 24894 925 3.7 775 3.1 23902 963 4.0 746 3.1 24087 895 3.7 733 3.0 24056 864 3.6 724 3.0 23302 845 3.6 719 3.1 21834 893 4.1 718 3.3 22796 879 3.9 713 3.1 22882 838 3.7 712 3.1 21978 935 4.3 712 3.2 22341 825 3.7 708 3.2 22869 851 3.7 705 3.1 3X 21085 809 3.8 683 3.2 21265 854 4.0 681 3.2 23488 841 3.6 678 2.9 21798 770 3.5 671 3.1 21725 738 3.4 669 3.1 20937 870 4.2 668 3.2 20868 790 3.8 668 3.2 21032 861 4.1 665 3.2 21971 794 3.6 650 3.0 20833 779 3.7 650 3.1 19879 795 4.0 638 3.2 17408 822 4.7 638 3.7 19971 808 4.0 632 3.2 19503 730 3.7 624 3.2 18069 700 3.9 610 3.4 16713 815 4.9 596 3.6 15738 863 5.5 588 3.7 19423 733 3.8 587 3.0 17750 720 4.1 583 3.3 18353 677 3.7 564 3.1 17010 686 4.0 561 3.3 17198 677 3.9 546 3.2 17682 683 3.9 546 3.1 17636 687 3.9 540 3.1

H H H H H J

49.7 120.0 20.6 63.9 85.4 15.9

29727 1030 3.5 922 3.1 26067 953 3.7 820 3.1 26059 987 3.8 790 3.0 25369 959 3.8 780 3.1 24637 904 3.7 777 3.2 19392 932 4.8 712 3.7

HERD OWNER SMITH OAK FARM DAN RAYBUCK WINGARD DAIRY FARM D & L FARM PINE VALLEY FARM KNAPP BROTHERS FARM HARVESTORE HILL FARM LAUREL VALLEY DAIRY PARADISE ACRES WINDFALL RUN FARM

LACKAWANNA GEORGE YEDINAK PAUL MANNING

LAWRENCE

LEFTMAC FARM ROBIN&JOHN THOMPSON CAMPRUN HOLSTEIN HILLMAR FARM TROTACRE FARM HENRY FARMS MARTINHOLM FARMS TROTACRE FARM

LUZERNE

SCOTT RINEHIMER C K TROXELL FARMS

LYCOMING

BENJAMIN MCCARTY BOSCH FARMS ED+CHRISKITZMILLER ED+CHRISKITZMILLER BRYNN BOWER FANTASYFOUND HOLSTEINS MICHAEL & LARRY FRY

MCKEAN

DETRICKS FARM SYN TANN JAMES&JUDITH LARSON THREE MILES DAIRY NEAL D GORDON JAMES&JUDITH LARSON

MERCER

CANON DAIRY CINDA L GANDER DALE L KEPNER CLAN CAMPBELL PAUL J CRITCHLOW HILLVIEW ACRES DEWAYNE&BILL COULTER J. D. PHILSON J. D. PHILSON IRISHTOWN ACRES DANE YEAGER LENGEL BROTHERS WILLOW BROOK FARM

MONTOUR

SAMUEL + ADA BYLER

NORTHAMPTON VALKIES REG HOLSTEINS KLEIN FARMS EXCELSIOR FARMFLECK BREWER FARMS RALPH HAHN REDMAPL SPRING FARM BREWERS JERSEYS JOHN BOCKO MACK FARMS JOAN A WILLIAMS KLEINTOP FARMS KOEHLER FARM

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

130.2 13.7 37.4 42.5 44.9 122.8 69.1 26.8 44.9 44.3

21736 21596 20861 21013 20786 19991 16251 18111 17381 16866

792 816 713 765 760 793 780 685 739 684

3.6 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.7 4.0 4.8 3.8 4.3 4.1

DHIR H 55.1 DHI-AP H 78.7

22172 17384

921 4.2 671 3.0 659 3.8 509 2.9

61.4 50.5 122.9 64.6 118.7 42.3 226.8 45.9

24903 23253 22909 22329 21106 19297 19502 16174

896 889 811 797 714 730 703 708

DHI-AP H 75.4 DHI-AP H 184.8

22646 22719

847 3.7 706 3.1 811 3.6 679 3.0

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H J H G H

H H H H H X H G

3.6 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.4 3.8 3.6 4.4

694 692 680 663 658 631 582 558 555 546

766 735 711 681 654 584 571 530

3.2 3.2 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.6 3.1 3.2 3.2

3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3X 3.0 2.9 3.3 3X

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H

40.2 105.9 20.4 67.2 42.3 126.3 77.2

24101 20635 21118 19492 19127 18941 18319

854 917 797 761 791 728 797

3.5 4.4 3.8 3.9 4.1 3.8 4.4

731 666 652 610 599 590 573

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H W H H H B

46.2 55.2 81.7 53.9 39.3 46.8

23210 23286 21815 20150 19589 16042

893 823 768 769 735 685

3.8 3.5 3.5 3.8 3.8 4.3

733 710 657 649 614 557

3.2 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.5

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H J J X H X

122.3 50.8 121.3 65.2 123.5 102.7 145.2 33.9 28.7 492.5 21.3 92.0 68.3

26392 25838 24330 22774 24028 20613 19795 20650 16828 15465 17366 15705 16399

973 860 913 879 829 722 787 745 766 789 709 605 618

3.7 3.3 3.8 3.9 3.5 3.5 4.0 3.6 4.6 5.1 4.1 3.9 3.8

793 783 727 720 712 643 639 636 598 594 544 521 513

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.0 3X 3.1 3X 3.2 3.1 3.6 3.8 3.1 3.3 3.1

DHI-AP H 53.2

22694

826 3.6 686 3.0

DHIR-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H J H H H H H

98.7 59.2 92.2 98.0 82.8 100.8 18.5 54.4 23.9 116.3 119.6 36.1

29132 1146 3.9 864 3.0 25412 967 3.8 790 3.1 23681 857 3.6 727 3.1 24426 910 3.7 725 3.0 21884 832 3.8 688 3.1 21816 868 4.0 682 3.1 17858 895 5.0 659 3.7 19100 748 3.9 576 3.0 18241 613 3.4 562 3.1 18291 721 3.9 560 3.1 16995 668 3.9 520 3.1 17006 637 3.7 501 2.9

JOHNCAROL FOWLER # DHI-AP ROGER+RHODA LENT DHI-APCS RON+CANDY COONEY DHIRAPCS CADY FARMS DHI-AP RISSER, DAVID & NELSA DHI-AP J J FARMS # DHI-APCS THOMPSON, DONALD & CATHY DHIR-AP GARY & TINA HAMILTON DHI-AP ROWN FARMS DHI-AP KURT KOSA DHIR-AP LEON AND CATHY TICE DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H J H

62.8 58.7 57.0 89.0 108.7 59.3 61.1 84.8 68.0 84.2 60.8

22649 23086 21886 22193 20572 20840 20318 17833 17057 15236 17159

H H H H H H

62.5 88.2 104.6 68.4 64.7 105.6

27058 1041 3.8 872 3.2 24420 958 3.9 777 3.2 24111 921 3.8 769 3.2 25624 950 3.7 761 3.0 24665 938 3.8 753 3.1 24414 786 3.2 753 3.1

POTTER

SUSQUEHANNA LLOYD & DENISE PEASE KEITH BRANT RANSOMED RANSOMDAIRY WALKER FARMS COTTRELL BROTHERS HARVATINE FARMS

DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI

821 829 801 829 797 784 797 685 691 696 644

3.6 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.8 4.1 4.6 3.8

706 699 681 674 641 640 630 557 546 532 520

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.0

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER JOHN CASTROGIOVANNI EMPET FARMS KENNETH S. GESFORD R M SHIPSKY & SONS REUBEN EVERITT JOE VALENTINE EMPET FARMS JO AM SAN DAIRY ROBERT JOHNSON JON ANN FARMS DONALD C ROBBINS HAROLD&NANCY SHAY CRAIG ROBERTSON

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H J H H H H X H

120.3 87.6 49.4 57.4 33.9 36.1 14.8 54.3 61.1 36.8 47.6 62.3 47.5

24430 23752 22583 22291 21876 23202 18141 20388 19590 17861 17770 16261 16441

791 876 870 804 819 825 853 727 761 661 663 684 640

3.2 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.7 3.6 4.7 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7 4.2 3.9

750 739 704 692 689 672 640 600 599 567 563 533 524

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.5 2.9 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.3 3.2

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

843.4 53.8 113.7 69.9 46.5

25265 24083 22029 22838 18752

881 834 817 836 687

3.5 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.7

751 702 671 669 578

3.0 3X 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.1

TIOGA BISHCROFT FARM MARK HALTEMAN SHERMAN HENRY&KELLY KEN MARTIN CARL K ZIMMERMAN

UNION FLOYD MARTIN

DHI-AP H 62.4

30562 1156 3.8 931 3.0 3X

HERD OWNER BUFF RUN COW COMFORT INN DAIRY ARRON HOOVER GARY B. HOFFMASTER AMOS M STOLTZFUS BREEZYVUE FARM LOCUSTRIDGE FARM IVAN NOLT GEORGE & JOHN HAUCK COW COMFORT INN DAIRY VERNON MARTIN SPRUCE RUN FARM DALE L.METZLER COW COMFORT INN DAIRY HILL CRAFT FARM

TYPE TEST

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

Top 40 Herds For January B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H H H J H H H X H

53.5 66.2 67.4 95.1 71.8 33.0 64.8 52.7 123.4 74.1 38.3 54.4 102.1 198.8 60.9

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

27751 1067 3.8 865 3.1 27776 1035 3.7 848 3.1 3X 26576 948 3.6 797 3.0 24408 913 3.7 772 3.2 23857 852 3.6 701 2.9 22451 852 3.8 695 3.1 22228 879 4.0 683 3.1 21956 798 3.6 679 3.1 22109 798 3.6 675 3.1 19685 874 4.4 668 3.4 3X 21244 782 3.7 661 3.1 21660 844 3.9 660 3.0 20598 790 3.8 659 3.2 18371 851 4.6 631 3.4 3X 19927 779 3.9 610 3.1

VENANGO DICKMAR FARMS MITCHHILL DAIRYFARM

WARREN

JARED LINDELL KURTIS MESSENGER

DHI-AP H 157.2 DHI-AP H 59.7

24528 20777

798 3.3 771 3.1 811 3.9 654 3.1

DHI-AP H 141.7 DHI-AP X 23.1

24160 22743

869 3.6 743 3.1 3X 886 3.9 736 3.2

B R COW E E YEARS D

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

PINE TON FARMS MARTHA BEARDSLEY LINDELL FARMS LLC KEVIN LONG CONNEATTEE WEST FOGGY MEADOWS FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H

288.7 46.0 343.5 56.3 96.3 95.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H J H H H H

78.4 29.7 94.7 48.4 54.8 80.3 56.3 95.2 74.7 45.1 50.2 56.4

WAYNE

ROWE BROS JACK AND ELLA CHYLE HIGHLAND FARMS KEV&GERARDA BURLEIGH N GARY KRAVETSKY ROCK RIDGE FARM DAVID&SHEILA BANICKY CHYLE LAND DAIRY TRI NON FARMS DON STILES D ELLIS DIX CARL A ROBINSON#

WYOMING

HIRKEY BROTHERS SHADOW PRACTICE2 DAIRY

DHI-AP H 42.3 DHI-AP H 135.1

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

22937 21904 22521 19436 15675 16504

848 828 819 738 587 603

3.7 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.7

713 691 677 601 519 509

3.1 3.2 3.0 3X 3.1 3.3 3.1

27838 1059 3.8 818 2.9 25274 935 3.7 773 3.1 24488 1075 4.4 771 3.1 24120 926 3.8 735 3.0 21842 786 3.6 667 3.1 20471 770 3.8 634 3.1 20814 826 4.0 631 3.0 17865 817 4.6 626 3.5 20229 758 3.7 598 3.0 18094 709 3.9 582 3.2 17899 672 3.8 539 3.0 15843 637 4.0 501 3.2 18644 21055

699 3.7 603 3.2 811 3.9 659 3.1

Winter calf management; 2011 forage analysis recap and comparison to 2010 Consider the use of calf blankets. Ensure the calf is dry and the blanket doesn’t encourage sweating. Various types are available including a “dual” blanket Renaissance offers. This allows you to remove the outer coat and keep the liner on as the calf ages or weather warms. Put blankets on at birth and for several weeks thereafter. Wash blankets between animals. A common and effective recommendation is to add an additional feeding of milk or replacer during cold weather. The Calf Notes website provides access to detailed calculations on extra feeding in Note #121 and #139 at

www.calfnotes.com/CNli quid.htm. The calf has a greater need for energy to combat cold stress. Adding a high fat supplement to the milk or replacer will supply the needed energy without the added cost of the protein. Typically these supplements are at least 60 percent fat, can be added at 2 to 6 ounces/hd/d, go into suspension when mixed and are well consumed with the milk. Additional cold weather tips are at http://savacaf.com/assets/frontlines/74/front line.pdf Providing warm drinking water allows the calf to warm up. Greater water intake will encourage more grain intake. The

process of digesting grain produces body heat which is beneficial and reduces cold stress. Is the ability to stay warm or added energy intake more important? A 2007 comparison of bedding and level of milk replacer fed in cold weather in Ohio, showed that using straw bedding vs shavings resulted in 5-12 percent better growth. An added milk replacer feeding improved growth 4 percent, but not if the extra milk lowered starter intake. The researchers concluded “Choice of bedding material was as or more effective than MR feeding rate in improving ADG of calves in cold temperatures.” (PAS 23:

656). Combining both practices can result in positive calf health and growth in cold weather. 2011 Forage Recap A wet spring delayed planting and first crop harvest. This was followed by dry weather, then more than usual rain, including flooding. A challenging forage management year resulted in widely variable forage analysis results. This year in particular it is essential to test your forages frequently and make needed adjustments. Early season 2011 haylage results tended to be drier, higher in lignin and lower in fiber digestibility than 2010. This fits the scenario of

larger plant stems, more structural fiber and later harvest due to a wet spring. These forages will likely result in more gut fill and lower feeding value. A UW Focus on Forage factsheet describes the reduced quality as maturity increases (www.uwex.edu/ces/cro ps/uwforage/MaturityNDF-FOF.htm). With increasing maturity, plants increase in complex carbohydrates bound to indigestible lignin, and digestibility decreases. As usual, 2011 corn silage quality depended on where it was grown, when it was planted and when the rains came. If

Management B14

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 13

by Dr. Tim Snyder, Nutrition Manager, Renaissance Nutrition, Inc. Winter calf management To stay comfortable in winter do you put on more clothes, stay inside more, eat more or all three? When outside you probably dress more warmly and may eat more when coming in for dinner. Your calves should be given that consideration also. Persistent cold, especially with windy or wet conditions, can lower calf average daily gain to zero. If that is prolonged without protection and/or extra energy, calves can die. Calves grow best in cool, dry weather. Cool, variable and wet weather in fall and spring increases the chance of respiratory illness. Hot and humid weather reduces gains and can increase illness also. Recheck hutch housing to ensure continuous dry, deep bedded straw that allows “nesting” so legs are not visible. For other housing options provide the same, and review ventilation as well. Recent UW DairyLand Initiative recommendations call for forced-air tube ventilation to provide a constant and consistent supply of fresh air at the calf resting level. This reduces pathogen load and can reduce respiratory stress.

Now is the time to make your estate plans Attendees of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 93rd Annual Meeting picked up valuable advice from Christopher Hesse on how to protect their estates. Hesse is a CPA with LarsonAllen FirmWide Tax Resource Group and a partner in a family farm. According to Hesse, proper planning is critical to ensure an estate will be passed down to future generations, and not the government. The current death tax exemption for 2012 is $5 million. While Con-

gress is expected to extend the current exemption to 2013, Hesse warns that if this is not the case, it will be reduced to $1 million. Any amount over the death tax exemption is subject to a taxable amount of 55 percent of the asset’s present value. “It’s important to start the estate planning process now, because no one has a crystal ball that can predict the future,” said Hesse. With the high price of farmland today, farmers and ranchers can easily

find themselves having an estate worth more than $5 million. For these individuals, Hesse says there are several ways to transfer ownership of their estates. One option is to start reducing total net assets through annual gifting. The government currently allows gifts up to $13,000 to be given to one individual without being taxed. While Hesse encouraged members to begin setting up their estate plans, he offered some words of caution regarding estate trusts.

know your forage quality to be able to make the

best decisions to optimize profitability.

Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Management from B13 weather is dry during the vegetative stage (before silking), the stalk will be shorter and less lignified. The result is usually higher fiber digestibility. Warm nights can limit that however. Rain after pollination helps ear fill and kernel development, increasing starch. The mid Atlantic 2011 samples from Cumberland Valley illustrate this. The opposite is common if the rainfall pattern is the reverse. Cumberland Valley samples from another region showed that effect. The New York samples from DairyOne illustrate a pattern where there may have been more rain, taller plants, more fiber, but cooler nights improved digestibility. Lower late season rain may have limited ear fill. Van Soest and others described the effect of growing season on forage quality years ago. The Sept. 25, 2011 issue of Hoards Dairyman has additional discussion on the effect topic. Snyder (Progressive Dairyman 2011, http://bit.ly/s1K4Fr ) discussed the importance of testing fiber digestibility and the value of comparing relative forage quality (RFQ) of forages instead of Relative Feed Value (RFV). That article illustrated the potential economic loss when adjusting rations to compensate for lower RFQ. Lower digestibility and RFQ reduces intake potential (which is hard to make up) and results in higher supplementation to try and maintain production. Test and

“One of the things people sometimes don’t realize is that if you

just change your will, if you have an estate trust, the changes you

make in the will do not effectively change the estate trust.”

For Records Processed Through DHI Provo COUNTY HERD NAME CATTARAUGUS MARIVALE FARM CHAUTAUGUA C & W FARM ERIE ROBERT MEYER GENESEE MIKELHOLM HOLSTEINS POST DAIRY FARMS LLC PAGEN FARMS I DEN KEL HOLSTEINS DEN KEL JERSEYS WYOMING LOGWELL ACRES MARTIN FARMS BECKER DAIRY FARM BIGFOOTE HOLSTEINS

HERD NUMBER RHA BREED OF COWS MILK

Top Herds For January

RHA FAT

% FAT

RHA PRO

% PRO 3X

H

78

19,231

609

3.17

600

3.12

W

108

20,458

728

3.56

630

3.08

H

96

22,480

777

3.46

680

3.02

H H H H J

42 369 628 22 102

24,277 23,617 23,065 22,336 19,651

1,002 832 868 891 1,022

4.13 3.52 3.76 3.99 5.20

748 719 701 710 750

3.08 3.05 3.04 3.18 3.82

H H H H

300 117 162 53

25,520 23,635 22,021 15,959

919 962 817 580

3.60 4.07 3.71 3.63

778 741 692 491

3.05 3.14 3.14 3.07

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The Moo News

Newsletter of Penn Dutch Cow Care by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, I’d like to talk about fresh cow problems as we come towards a lot of freshening cows in the next few months. If you don’t have any fresh cow

problems, count yourself very fortunate and you probably don’t have U.S./Canadian Holsteins. This is especially true in regards to digestive disturbances after obstetric problems and not enough

effective fiber is eaten to rapidly create a healthy rumen. I personally like Holsteins a whole lot as my family is from Holland. I also like to easily see black and white animals on green pastures.

The only other breed that has a well known problem is Jerseys when they are older and are famous for getting milk fever. Let’s first talk about preventing problems. Proper exercise is as critical as a high forage diet for health for all cows, and especially dry cows so the uterine muscles have good tone. If feeding

only baleage to dry cows, watch out for too high a soluble protein as that can upset a cow’s system. Metabolic energy will be required of the cow to process the excessive protein and this can lead to loss of body condition. Always be feeding some sort of DRY hay to DRY cows. Also with dry cows, feed relatively more nega-

Moo News B16

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 15

tive ions (S-2, SO4-2, Cl-1, HCO3-2), while with “wet”/milking cows feed relatively more positive ions (Ca+2, Mg+2 and K+1 ). If you have a bred cow that is showing a red discharge you MUST check her to see what is going on. A red discharge in a pregnant animal is a red flag! A red discharge later in pregnancy may mean that she’s calving early, which is common with twins. Restrain the cow, tie the tail out of the way, wash up the vulva area really well, put on a sleeve, apply lube and then reach into the birth canal and feel what is going on. Most likely a calf will be nearby and you might need to help rearrange its limbs. Always have a cow standing when rearranging limbs. Cup your hand over a hoof and bring the hoof towards center midline of the calf while bending the leg the way it naturally wants to. Then straighten the leg and bring forward. Always keep calving fluids away from other cows! In an A.I. bred cow that freshens on time but doesn’t pass the placenta, this is a problem and you’ll have to deal with it. But if it happens to a few animals, look to dry cow nutrition. If seen in a bunch of younger animals, you need to start feeding organically bound selenium for a few weeks or one injection of MuSe® 2-3 weeks prior to due date. If it’s in older cows, think calcium — especially if there are some muscles occasionally quivering over the shoulder blades, upper belly and leg muscles. Use apple cider vinegar 2 ounces twice daily for two weeks prior to freshening to keep blood calcium levels up. Be careful of low calcium since the muscles that control the teat sphincters at the very bottom of the teat may be weak and not close tightly between milking times. This is how environmental bugs get in and cause horrible problems (especially coliforms). Springing heifers with a lot of fluid under their belly (edema) is almost always due to getting too much salt. Remember: where salt goes, water goes. Too much salt in the system will retain water, creating edema. Don’t let springers have free choice salt if edema is a

Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Moo News from B15 problem. In older cows, udder edema can be due to so much protein going to the udder to make colostrum and vessels become leaky. Cows and heifers with udder edema can be treated by using four capsules of regular coffee right out of the container (not decaf) twice daily as needed. They’ll reduce fluid build up by urinating more. If for any reason a cow has anything other than a normal start to lactation, always feed DRY hay (not only baleage) for the first week of lactation. Make sure she gets extra dry hay as this will create the fiber mat she needs from which to chew cud. If a heifer has a hard calving and she is all of a sudden eating a radically different ration than she was when happily running freely outdoors, she will be in for a difficult first couple weeks. An almost certain recipe for a twisted stomach (especially a heifer) is a hard calving with a retained placenta fed lots of high moisture corn, corn silage and grain, with little dry hay or long stem baleage. I’ve done hundreds of DA surgeries on such cows. Feed dry hay!! If a cow doesn’t pass the placenta (usually due to twinning, a large calf or if calving early), what should be done? After about 4-5 days of a festering uterine infection, this is where “the solution to pollution is dilution” for sure. You need to manually lavage (cleanse) the uterus. You’re kidding yourself if you think working on her one time will mean she’ll be just fine. It’s exactly those cows that will have a pus discharge over the next months. You need to cleanse the uterine environment every single day before the cervix closes down and traps bad stuff in the uterus to linger and fester into pus. Using 300 cc of aloe everyday is good. But sometimes it’s good to place 1 gram of iodine pills or mix in 1 gram of liquid iodine with the aloe to infuse into the uterus daily. Old and cold cows that have some muscle quivers need calcium — even if they are standing. I prefer IV treatment because I have seen way too many cows drowned

when oral fluids were given wrong. To give an IV, have the cow’s head tied downward with her face tied real snug against something. The jugular vein will bulge and show itself. Hold the calcium bottle no higher than the backbone. AVOID giving any IV in

the milk vein of a first calf heifer, as their milk veins are not big like in older cows. If an animal starts getting kicky, she is telling you that the needle is not in the vein and an abscess will develop, keeping her painful and slow for about 3 weeks (very

counter-productive). Cows with hot coliform mastitis show a hot hard quarter with a watery secretion are usually offfeed and have a fever of about 104. DO NOT delay treatment! Give the well known organic IV treatment (Plasma Gold anti-toxin, 500cc vitamin

C antioxidant and 6090cc of goldenseal, garlic, ginseng Phyto-Biotic antibacterial). This also happens to be the same treatment for those first calf heifers with signs of pneumonia or any animal that is systemically ill with a fever. In this article are ex-

amples of problems I’ve successfully treated hundreds of times over the years. Until grazing season is here, dry bedding, fresh air, high forage diets and the tips above will keep animals healthy and help you treat those that need to be.

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Northeast is in a milk deficit situation by Bob Gray A few weeks ago I was watching an excellent presentation that Leon Berthiaume, the CEO of St. Albans Cooperative, was making to a group of Young Cooperator’s. He

showed a chart that was part of the Federal Milk Marketing Administrator’s November Bulletin which illustrates the fact that in past years the Northeast Federal Order would ship large vol-

umes of milk to the Southeastern part of the U.S. in order to supplement local milk supplies that were deficient. However in recent years this trend has changed as the volume

of milk shipped from southern states to plants in the Northeast order have actually been larger than the volume shipped south. The main reason for this is the growing demand for milk at plants

in the Northeast region for use in Class II Greek yogurt production. All of this has occurred over the past four years and is a trend that is likely to continue as there are several potential additional plant expansions that are planned for the

production is usually lower at a time when demand increases due to schools getting back in session and manufacturing plants beginning to increase production runs for upcoming holiday sales. In past years, handlers pooling milk on the

Northeast and New York State in particular. Included here is a chart and the explanation from the bulletin. During the late summer and early fall, milk

Northeast order would often ship significant volumes of bulk milk to states in the southeastern part of the country to supplement local milk supplies. In more recent years, these shipments declined as other regions have been supplying this milk deficit area, and in the past three years, the volume of bulk milk received from southern states at plants in the Northeast Order actually has been larger than the volume shipped. Source: NDFC E-letter for Feb. 10

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 17

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What is overmilking and what can be done to avoid it? Overmilking occurs when the milking unit remains on the cow after milk flow has dropped below a predetermined amount, usually in the range of about 0.5 - 1.0 pounds per minute. Overmilking is something to be concerned about because it may have an adverse affect on teat condition and udder health. Milking units are often left on cows for longer than necessary because it is assumed that all milk should be removed from the udder in order to maximize the milk yield. However, there is no benefit from overmilking since overmilking increases teat irritation, increases the amount of time the machine is on the cow, and decreases the number of cows milked per hour. Signs that overmilking is occurring in a herd may include a combination of some of the following conditions: • restless, stepping, kicking cows at the end

of milking • cows kicking off the milking unit • discolored teats after the unit is detached • ringing at the base of the teat after the milking unit is detached • teats that are firm or hard to the touch • cows reluctant to allow hand stripping after the milking unit is detached • high numbers of teats with excessive hyperkeratosis (thickening of the skin that lines the teat canal and surrounds the external teat orifice) • nervous first lactation cows • cows reluctant to enter the parlor • long milk hoses or claws without milk To reduce the incidence of overmilking, dairy operators should work with their equipment dealer to adjust the automatic milker detacher settings to increase the threshold value for activating the

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detachers, and/or decrease the delay time from when the threshold value is reached until the unit is removed. Milking procedures also influence overmilking. Proper premilking teat preparation will ensure that cows are stimulated and the milk ejection response is ful-

ly evoked so that milk flows continuously shortly after the milking unit is attached. Immediately after attachment, the milking unit should be adjusted to assure the milking unit has an equal weight distribution and is balanced on the cow’s udder. Observation of the

milking units for two minutes after attachment and finding periods of no milk flow is indicative of poor udder preparation. Dairy operators should evaluate their milking equipment and milking procedures, and make the changes needed to minimize or elimi-

nate overmilking. Cows will respond with short machine-on times, calmer behavior in the parlor or barn, better teat condition, and proper milkouts that require fewer adjustments by the milker. Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34, NO. 4 and 5, 2011

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 19

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New York Youth Dairy Discovery Workshop The New York Youth Dairy Discovery Workshop will be held on Friday and Saturday, March 23-24, at Morrison Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. The program will be sponsored by The New York State 4H Dairy Cattle Program. We will also be hosting a Dairy Judging Clinic in Morrison Hall for coaches, parents, and educators held in conjunction with the Dairy Discovery on March 24. More information on registration form www.ansci.cornell.edu/4H/dairycattle/DairyDiscovery/Dair y_Discovery_2012.pdf Eligibility: Due to the hands-on approach of the sessions, participation is limited to the first 60 individuals to enroll by the March 15 deadline. Youth who are 1519 years of age as of Jan. 1, 2012 with an interest in dairy cattle are eligible to attend. This year’s registration fee will include cost of the program activities, materials and dinner and

lunch. Overview: Dairy Discovery is an opportunity for dairy interested youth of various knowledge levels to come together and learn about many aspects of the dairy business and production management. It is bringing the future of the industry together in one location to share knowledge and experience’s to better prepare and gain a broader perspective of the dairy field. Having a general understanding of nutrition, reproduction, milking procedures, animal health, housing, and financial management is important for operating or owning a dairy business and preparation for dairy careers. Along with having an understanding of these areas, it is important to apply the learning to the real world of a working dairy business. For this reason Dairy Discovery will be focusing this years’ workshop on “Whole Farm Management and Analysis”

Page 20 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

NFU’s Beginning Farmer Institute now accepting applications National Farmers Union (NFU) encourages individuals who are contemplating starting a career in farming or ranching to apply for the Beginning Farmer Institute. The program is also open to those across the nation who have just begun farming or are in the process of transferring an operation from a parent, relative, or nonrelative. Beginning farmers and ranchers face a seemingly unlimited number of decisions to make, from drawing up a business plan and arranging financing to learning what programs are available to make it easier to start up and sustain a successful operation. “This program will answer the questions new farmers have, and more importantly share our expertise to answer questions that people do not always think of asking when they begin farming,” said NFU President Roger John-

son. “The Beginning Farmer Institute underscores our commitment to growing family agriculture.” Applicants accepted into the 2012 program will attend three separate education sessions, to be held in April in Washington, D.C., November in Minneapolis, MN, and at the NFU Convention in March 2013 in Springfield, MA. Program topics will cover business planning, understanding U.S. Department of Agriculture programs, tax and record keeping, and marketing. A $25 registration fee is required for accepted candidates. The NFU Foundation will cover the costs of materials, transportation, and lodging. This program is supported by the NFU Foundation, Farm Credit and CHS Foundation. To apply, visit www.nfu.org/education, fill out the form and return it by the March 14 deadline.

with a team approach. Following the hands-on learning and technical skill training of the concepts listed below youth will receive information from a real-life dairy in these areas and work as a team to develop a farm analysis and recommendations to report back to the group. • Dairy Nutrition • Reproduction • Animal Health

• Housing • Milking procedures and Quality • Financial management Registration: The deadline for registration is Thursday, March 15, or before if registration limit of 60 is reached. The cost of the workshop will be $45 per person. This fee includes activities, materials, dinner Friday night and

lunch Saturday. Registration forms should be signed by a Cooperative Extension Educator, FFA Advisor or Club Leader. Adults accompanying the youth should also include a registration form and check the adult box. Lodging: 25 rooms have been blocked at the Ramada Inn, 2310 Triphammer Rd, Ithaca, 14850 for the night of March 23. Rate is $89.95

per room. Ask for room block “Dairy Discovery” when you call the hotel and tell them you’re with a Cornell function and you should be tax Exempt. Phone: 607-2573100. The block of rooms will be held until March 1 so make your reservation before this date. Please call 607- 2550656 or e-mail djc27@cornell.edu if you have questions.

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Dairy center program offers assistance in employee relations HARRISBURG, PA — Pennsylvania dairy producers can access a new tool to assess employee relations and development through the Dairy Decisions Consultant, or DDC, Program administered by the Center for Dairy Excellence. “Dairy farm families invest a substantial amount of time and money into farm employees,” said John Frey, executive director of the center. “That investment can become costly if the business lacks an effective strategy for employee relations and human resource development.” As a new consultant program option, farms can apply to receive professional consulting in employee development through the DDC program. Introduced in 2010, the program provides dairy farm owners and operators with professional consulting

resources to help make decisions that will shape the future of their farms. “Making this professional expertise available will lead to improved protocols and standard operating procedures on participating farms,” said Frey. The two consultants designated as Dairy Decisions Consultants for Employees are:

• Chris Barton, VMD — With 40 years of experience in dairy veterinary medicine with Lancaster Veterinary Associates, he conducts formal and informal employee, owner and management consulting for dairy farms throughout southeastern Pennsylvania. • David C. Welch, VMD, MBA — A dairy business consultant from White Oak Con-

sulting in Berlin, Somerset County. He is experienced in developing and writing feasibility, business and human resource plans for expansions and startups. The program covers the cost for dairy farm families and dairy farm business owners to visit with a consultant for a maximum of 15 hours, valued at $1,500, to evaluate the

farm’s current business performance, financial condition and/or employee relations. Producers must complete an application and provide a $250 application fee, which is returned if the application is not approved. They also must demonstrate a need for unique consulting services and show a sincere interest in improving perform-

ance, financial position and/or employee relations. For more information, call Emily Yeiser, dairy initiatives manager at the Center for Dairy Excellence, at 717-346-0849 or visit www.centerfordairyexcellence.org and click on the DDC logo in the middle of the home page. Applications are also downloadable from the website.

Advice for problem breeders Virgin heifers should be the easiest animals to get pregnant on your farm. Apply tail chalk, watch for it to rub off and then breed ... right? But what about the ones that never seem to come into heat? Out of 100 heifers we always seem to have one or two that do not come into heat within the first 22 days of entering the breeding pen,” said DCHA South Central Director Vance Kells of

Circle Bar Heifer Ranch in Satanta, KS. There are a number of reasons why a heifer just doesn’t seem to come into heat, Kells explains. The heifer might be sick or was sick in the past, her reproductive organs may not be fully developed or she is a freemartin. And if there are any bulls on the farm, you will also want to rule out that she is pregnant by a bull that got out a

couple months back. Fortunately, there are also a number of great synchronization programs available to help heifers come into heat. “We use all of these on our heifer ranch,” Kells said. “It just depends on how much help the heifer needs.” Here is his advice: 1. Give a prostaglandin shot. If it has been at least 7 days after a heifer’s

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last cycle, she should come into heat within 72 hours. 2. Give a shot of GnRH and follow that with a shot of prostaglandin 7 days later. 3. Give a GnRH shot on day 1, another GnRH shot on day 7 and prostaglandin on day 14. 4. Insert a CIDR (a progesterone-releasing insert) in conjunction with GnRH on day 1 and then give a shot of prostaglandin on day 7. Watch for heat. Breed if you see a heat or use timed-AI at 72 hours after the prostaglandin shot. Make sure your herd veterinarian is involved

in the decisions regarding your reproduction program and for help with pregnancy detection following estrus synchronization and AI. For guidelines covering breeding and pregnant heifers, review DCHA’s Gold Standards II, DCHA’s production and performance standards established for Holstein heifers, from 6 months of age to freshening. “We do a vet check every Monday and our veterinarian ultrasounds the ovaries looking for follicles or a developing corpus luteum,” Kells said. Source: Dairy Calf & Heifer Association Tip of the Week

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 21

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Employee ownership of farm assets is one way to involve employees

Page 22 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

One of the complaints that dairy owners often have about employees is they don’t seem to care or that they don’t take ownership in the operation. Yet, should we be surprised when employees don’t take ownership in a business in which they have no ownership? Maybe the answer is to give employees the opportunity to have skin in the game. That phrase or idiom means that a person has a personal stake in the success of something. It may be a financial stake another kind of stake they are risking in order to achieve success. That is the opportunity that Willow Bend

Farm, LLC of Clifton Springs, NY, provides for employees, and it pays dividends to the farm. For more than 30 years, Willow Bend founder George Mueller, and now son John Mueller, have encouraged employees to own cattle in the herd. For employees, there are two main benefits. They can build their asset base and someday leave and take their cattle with them to establish a dairy of their own, and there are tax advantages to them as they have business expenses that they can deduct against business profits. For the owners, there are also benefits. Originally, George

needed others as he expanded the original herd. He needed key employees to commit to the business and he needed employeeowned cattle as part of the base of that expansion. But now, that the herd is established, they continue the program because they know that employees who own cattle in the herd are more committed and interested in the operation. Tucker Coryn, a herdsman at Willow Bend Farm in his midtwenties, currently owns 10 head of cattle, five youngstock and five cows. Coryn owns cattle to build his equity. “It really engages me. I have a vested interest in the

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health of the herd, in the success of the herd,” says Coryn. “It engages me more than coming to work to manage someone else’s cows. I may only have five cows in the herd but I want every animal to have the best treatment.” That’s what John Mueller is trying to achieve. He says “You have to keep your labor

excited and focused on the industry.” Willow Bend, as well as other farms, has implemented a simple system in which employees can purchase cattle, be compensated for milk cow production and pay for the expenses of raising heifers. Mueller considers the cattle ownership program as one of the ben-

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efits offered to employees. Not all employees take advantage of it but they all have the opportunity to do so. The point is that when employees feel that they have a stake in the business, or skin in the game, they respond with greater loyalty, interest and commitment. Source: www.extension.org

Teat dipping vs spraying: is one method better than the other? Applying teat disinfectant to the teats immediately after removing the milking unit is an important part of a mastitis control program. The primary purpose of teat disinfection is to reduce the number of bacteria on teats and control the spread of mastitis. Teat disinfectants can be applied by dipping or spraying. Either method is acceptable if done in a manner that covers the entire area of the teat that had contact with the milking unit. The most common failure in most teat dipping/spraying programs is not adequately covering the teat: • When using dip cups, often the coverage is only half-way up the teat. This can happen if the whole cup is not filled with teat dip prior to application or overzealousness in avoiding dip wastage. • When using a spray system, the spray

It is critical to prevent the teat disinfectant from becoming contaminated: • For spray systems, keep sprayers clean, and do not let sprayers come in contact with the floor. • If using dip cups, empty and clean cups

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every time you fill the dip cup reservoir, or if they become contaminated during milking. Never pour used disinfectant back into the original container. Keep containers closed to prevent contamination. Regardless of the system used, the reservoir

of teat disinfectant should be checked before each shift to make sure there is enough for the entire shift or pen. Consistent and complete application of a teat disinfectant after every milking is a key to good udder health. When applied properly,

teat disinfection will reduce bacteria counts in milk, reduce the number of mastitis cases and improve teat skin condition, which makes cows easier to keep clean and milk out. Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34, No. 3 and 5, 2011

Cleaning needles and syringes This week’s T ip is brought to you by the Beef Checkoff. For treating animals, Dairy Animal Care Quality Assurance (DACQA) guidelines for proper injections recommend the use of disposable equipment, including single-use needles, whenever possible. However, if you administer your injections with reusable syringes and needles, this equipment should be heatsterilized by boiling prior to use. If any disinfectants are used — including alcohol — they must be thoroughly rinsed from equipment

because they neutralize vaccine and can chemically react with some antibiotics. If a disinfectant is used, syringes should be thoroughly rinsed with sterile water before use. Sterile water can be purchased. Note, distilled water is not sterile water. Consult your veterinarian before sterilizing equipment to ensure proper sanitation techniques. Improper sterilization can reduce the effectiveness of future injections and result in infection at the injection site. And, remember, do not contaminate modified live virus products with disinfectants as effectiveness

will be decreased or even eliminated. To learn about sterilizing equipment, watch this BQA education module featuring Dr. Dee Griffin of the Great Plains Veterinary Center in Clay Center, NE, or visit BQA.org for more information. DCHA’s Gold Standards III vaccination recommendations • Work with a veterinarian to develop vaccine protocols to address local disease conditions and promote best management practices. • Immunity should support the standards for mortality, morbidity and growth defined in the Gold Standards I

and II. • Store, process and administer vaccines according to manufacturer’s label and best management practices. • Avoid vaccinating during times of stress, in extreme ambient heat or with more than two Gram-negative vaccines concurrently. • Keep epinephrine and flunixin readily available to treat adverse reactions. • Dispose of vaccine containers, needles and syringes properly. • Keep handwritten and/or computerized records of all vaccinations. Source: Dairy Calf & Heifer Association

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 23

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should be applied from below the teat to ensure complete coverage. Spraying from the side results in the far side of the teat not being covered. Spray nozzles should be checked at the beginning of each shift to ensure proper distribution of the spray. A good way to test for proper teat disinfectant coverage is the “white towel test.” Immediately after the teats have been dipped or sprayed, wrap a clean towel around the base of the teat while blotting the teat dip from the entire teat. Open the towel to display the areas of the teat which were covered by the teat dip. If the pattern shows incomplete coverage, training should be implemented to show the milkers the proper procedures which will result in the bottom twothirds of the teat completely covered with disinfectant.

Penn State Block and Bridle Club recognized at national convention Penn State’s Block and Bridle Club members gained national recognition for their outstanding programs in competition at the 92nd annual Block and Bridle Convention, held Jan. 31Feb. 2 as part of the Cattle Industry Conference in Nashville, TN. Twentyfive club members participated in the national meeting. The Club placed second for its published yearbook, third for its webpage and fourth for chapter activities. In addition, member Brianna Isenberg, an animal science major from Indiana, PA, was awarded fourth place for Outstanding Junior. Dr. Terry Etherton, head of the Department of Dairy and Animal Science, said, “This is welldeserved recognition for the members of B & B, who work exceptionally hard throughout the year, providing strong leadership within the Department and in the

College of Agricultural Sciences. I offer my sincere congratulations to the students and their advisors for their many accomplishments.” B & B advisers are Research Support Associate Vivian Baumer, Assistant Professor of Dairy and Animal Science Dan Kniffen and Professor of Animal Science Ken Kephart. Attended by over 500 students, the convention was held in conjunction with the NCBA national convention and students were able to participate in Cattlemen’s College, a series of educational sessions that directly affect or pertain to the beef cattle industry. Students heard from a variety of speakers who provided a great deal of advice on the job market and stressed the importance of educating the public and promoting the industry. There was an opportunity to network with leaders in

the industry as well as their peers from other colleges. Students participated in some of the tours offered, including the

Stones River Battlefield National Park, the Tennessee Farmers Cooperative, Jack Daniels Distillery and the Dye & Ray cattle operation, which

feeds the distillery’s byproducts. National Block and Bridle Club is a collegiate organization with 92 chapters across the

United States with the purpose of promoting animal agriculture and developing professional and leadership skills in its members.

Penn State representatives who attended the National B & B Convention are, from left, front row, Kristen Stufft, Amanda Mosier, Kim Langhans, Erica Marshall, Courtney Cowden, Hannah Izer, Katie Harvison, Julie Ivicic, Kelsey Derstein and Justene Testa. In the back row are Danielle Sheppard, Brooke Milbrandt, Ashley Hughes, Tyler Nishnick, Olivia Rush, Matt Trypus, Mallory Perchinski, Melissa Boess, Dr. Ken Kephart and Marlee Manwiller.

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Penn State students sweep national Beef Quiz Bowl Students representing Penn State’s De-

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Cattle Industry Conference in Nashville, TN.

Penn State Beef Quiz Bowl members are, from left, Steve Bond, Brianna Isenberg, Sarah Doyle and Dustin Dreyfus.

The conference was held from Feb. 1-4. This year’s win continues a strong tradition with Penn State teams having won the contest 10 times — more than any other university since the contest’s inception in 1993. It placed second six times. Members of the 2012 team included Steve Bond, Jim Thorpe, PA; Sarah Doyle, York, PA; Dustin Dreyfus, Hampstead, MD; and Brianna Isenberg, Indiana, PA. This is the 17th time Penn State has represented the Northeast Region in the National Championship event. Last year the Regional contest was hosted by the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Dan Kniffen, Assistant Professor of Dairy and Animal Science, and Dale Olver, Instructor of Dairy and Animal Science, advise the team. Dr. Terry Etherton, head of the Department

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 25

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of Dairy and Animal Science, said, “I congratulate the team for their outstanding performance in a very challenging contest, with the very best young people from around the country. This continues a long legacy of high excellence by our students at the national Beef Quiz Bowl and reflects the strong academic background they have received in our undergraduate program. It also reflects their diligence and dedication in preparing for the contest.” In the event, students are asked questions pertaining to various disciplines related to cattle and beef production, including nutrition, physiology, meat science, and genetics, as well as current events in the national cattle industry. With four members to a team, the contest features double elimination, and the team with the best record wins. The second highestscoring team in the invitation-only contest was Texas A&M University. Other teams included Ohio State University and the University of Wyoming. The Collegiate Quiz Bowl develops future leaders through decision making, broadening communication skills, expanding their knowledge and developing personal character and leadership. The contestants have the outstanding opportunity to be a part of the Cattle Industry Annual Convention where the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) hosts the largest beef-focused trade show in the country. This year boasted the largest attendance ever, with more than 8,200 beef enthusiasts attending. The competition was presented by the National Cattlemen’s Foundation and the American Society of Animal Science and was sponsored by Farm Credit Services.

National FFA shares input with USDA on upcoming Farm Bill With more than 100,000 new farmers needed over the next few years, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack issued the young leaders of the National FFA Organization a challenge in 2011. “I would like you to with your fellow students and the adult leadership of the organization to develop a series of recommendations around the upcoming Farm Bill that will encourage more young people to pursue careers in farming,” Vilsack said. It was a challenge that the national FFA officer team for 2010-11 took seriously. The students immediately began work — framing key questions, consulting FFA members, engaging leaders in agriculture, compiling input and formulating recommendations. “Never before had we been invited to submit direct input to the Secretary of Agriculture that could enhance the ability of agricultural education and FFA to help students succeed and strengthen American agriculture,” said Riley Pagett, national FFA President, 2010-11. “We were honored to be invited to be a part of this process.” In December 2011, the 2010-11 national officer team met with Sec. Vilsack to share their recommendations which fell under four main categories. Those are: getting started in production agriculture; creating vibrant

rural communities; who should care about agriculture and why; planning for the future. Items that were recommended were as follows: USDA and other agencies should encourage and assist beginning farmers to start or continue in production agriculture; USDA should help transition farms from older related and non-related farmers to younger or beginner farmers who may not come from a farm; USDA should help keep young people in rural communities and make rural communities an even more important part of our nation’s economy and society; USDA should support efforts to increase the public’s knowledge of agricultural literacy; USDA should strengthen the capacity of agricultural education to produce more students who pursue production agriculture and other agriculturally related careers and the USDA should provide authority, responsibility and support for schoolbased agricultural education and FFA. “We believe it is in the best interest of the nation for the department of agriculture to affirm its commitment to develop strong, experience leadership for agricultural education,” Kent Schescke, director of strategic partnerships, said. “FFA is prepared to assist in every way

Page 26 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

New York State Senate Resolution honoring FFA The Pine Plains Central School FFA had front row seats when the New York State Senate on Feb. 7 supported a resolution honoring FFA activities across the state. Members of the local FFA chapter watched as lawmakers spoke in support of the legislation. Speaking in support of the resolution were: Senators Patty Ritchie (R-Oswegatchie), George Maziarz (R-Newfane), and Velmanette Montgomery (DBrooklyn). There were 118 students and Agricultural Educators in attendance at the governmental

awareness seminar. FFA members were able to visit with over 20 of their elected officials and share about their agricultural education experiences. A video about this event has been posted on You Tube at www.youtube.com/watc h?v=YkXvzh4n1tTk&sns =em. Thanks to the New York State Farm Bureau for being such a strong supporter of New York FFA and Ag Education. With this resolution, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has proclaimed Feb. 18-25 as FFA Week in the state of New York.

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2012 produced in New York food presentations At the end of January, 41 Livingston County 4H members demonstrated how to use locally grown products at the Produced in New York Food Presentations held at the Geneseo United Methodist Church. Each demonstrator is required to include at least one cup of a food item grown in New York State. Participants also provide a Menu Planning Sheet discussing the nutritional value of the recipe, a meal plan using their chosen recipe, the origin of the recipe, and interesting facts about the specific New York State food item. The 4-H members presented favorite family recipes, recipes gathered from the internet, and one self-created recipe. Kristie Webster developed Apple Pecan

Chicken, a delicious blend of local apples, chicken tenderloins, and spices. Cloverbud Luke Mensinger gave his silent demonstration for his first grade class. First year presenters were: Jordan Daubert, Nate Grey, Matthew Mulvaney, Madyson Pickard, Emmaline Putnam, Natalie Putnam, Bradley Smith, and Madelyn Smith. Other participants included: Lauren Hanglow, Thomas Herberger, Aydan Low, Luke Mensinger, Evelyn Miller, Mackenna Mulvaney, Mackenzie Pickard, Abby Bean, Clara Benham, Kyra Burgess, Maggie Dempsey, Sophie Grey, Emily Haubner, Andrew Herberger, Jeffrey Herberger, Robbie Herberger, Hollie Johnson, McKenzie Low,

Ben Lyness, Caleb Miller, Rose Miller, Sarah Murray, Austin Pickard, Brianna Raniewicz, Michael Sanza, Rebecca Sanza, Rachel Schofield, Matthew Short, Sarah Watkins, Kristie Webster, Ethan Low, Rebecca Lyness, and Leah Watkins. These demonstrators were chosen for State Fair: Clara Benham (Berry Cream Puffs), Maggie Dempsey (Plantation Casserole), Robbie Herberger (Zucchini Bread), Emily Haubner (Cinnamon Apple Muffins), Hollie Johnson (Classic Waldorf Salad), Ethan Low (Cheeseburger Chowder), Rebecca L yness (Scalloped Potatoes and Ham), Michael Sanza (Berry Fruit Smoothie), Rebecca Sanza (Mild Vegetarian

Chili), and Kristie Webster (Apple Pecan Chicken). Thank you to our evaluators who intently watched the demonstrators, taste tested their products, or evaluated their Menu Planning Information Sheet. The following individuals served as evaluators: Anna May Allenbrandt, Pat Auinger, Peggy Auinger, Cathy Clark, Mary Clark, Jessica DeMarte, Harry Hellwig, Betty Holden, Donna Lindsay, Becky Minich, Joan Stead, and Bonnie Turner. The recipe booklet featuring these locally grown food recipes is available at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Livingston County website: www.ccelivingstoncounty.org. If you would like more information about this program or about enrolling in 4-H, visit our website or call 585-6583250.

Jordan Daubert from Caledonia, Sparkling Stars Club. Photo courtesy of CCE Livingston County

4-H members send loving wishes to U.S. troops JAMESTOWN, NY — Cornell Cooperative Extension of Chautauqua County 4-H Stockton Panthers and Stockton Panther Paws Clubs are no stranger to community service. Last year the club completed multiple community service projects and this year they have continued to give. The Cornell Cooperative Extension 4-H Program, provides quality youth development and encourages generosity. 4-H youth members age 9-19 years old and Cloverbud members age 5-8 years old, participate in a variety of projects from animal rearing to drawing and painting. There are 26 4-H Clubs throughout Chautauqua County, encompassing 412 members and 58 Cloverbuds. 4-H programs are made possible through the generous time and efforts of over 150 registered

adult volunteers. The mission of Cornell Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development is to create supportive learning environments in which diverse youth and adults reach their fullest potential as capable, competent and caring citizens. Club activities and additional community wide projects are held throughout the year and showcased annually at the County Fair in Dunkirk, NY. Quality youth development opportunities through 4-H, work to capture the four essential elements of positive youth development; belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity. Community Service is highly recommended for each 4-H youth member. Youth club members often find very creative methods for completing community service.

special pin of recognition from the ‘Friends of Our Troops’ organization. For more information about Chautauqua County 4-H, call the 4-H Office at 716-664-9502 Ext. 214. Our Chautauqua County Cornell Cooperative Extension 4-H works hard to provide positive youth development experiences for all the youth of Chautauqua County. You may have experienced the smiles of 4-H youth at the county fair, one of our other programs or at one of our various community service activities. Cornell Cooperative Extension, is a not-forprofit 501©3 and all donations are considered a charitable contribution.

2012 Tractor Safety Certification Course offered The 4-H Youth Development Program of Cornell Cooperative Extension in Cayuga County will be conducting Tractor Safety Certification classes beginning on Monday, Feb. 27. This tractor safety course is open to all youth; not just 4-H members. In order to give students the best experience, class locations will vary. The Hazardous Occupation in Agricultural Law requires that youth ages 14 to 16 must have at least 24 hours of tractor safety and maintenance instruction in order to drive a tractor on a farm other than that owned by their parents. Every employer of a young hired employee should consider this class for their present and summer help. Youth who are only 13 may take the course for the safety experience, and may be eligible to receive certification. Please call Cornell Cooperative Extension Cayuga County to verify eligibility. This is the only course to be held in Cayuga County for

2012 to certify youth with a tractor safety certificate. Pre-registration is required. Please call Cornell Cooperative Extension at 315-255-1183 to sign up, by Feb. 17. Class size may be limited. The cost of the course is $35 per person (fee can be waived for certain circumstances). The fees are for a student manual and must be paid before the first class. Attendance is required at all classes in order for students to become certified. This Tractor Safety Certification Course will be offered on Mondays, Feb. 27, March 5, 12, 19, 26 and Saturday, April 7. Monday classes are from 6-9 p.m. The Saturday class starts at 1 p.m. and includes a the written/skills/driving tests. Class location varies. Call for complete schedule. Cost is $35 for ALL Youth (includes the student manual). Make your reservations by Feb. 17 by calling 315-2551183 or e-mail Dorothy @ dld83@cornell.edu.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 27

Mary Dorman 4-H Club Leader (L-R); Alexis Ruedinger; Kendra Dorman; Kayla Anderson; Jared Dorman; and Brittany Woodard. Absent from photo: Cheyanne Wolcott, Zachary Wolcott, Erma Jean Wolcott, Ben Wolcott and Mathew Wolcott. Photo courtesy Chautauqua County CCE

Community Service is a core competency that is embraced by 4-H though the modeling of adult volunteers. Members of the Chautauqua County Stockton Panthers 4-H club and the Chautauqua County Stockton Panther Paws 4-H Club began this year with a very special community service project supporting our overseas troops. The Cassadaga area 4-H members created 130 handmade Valentines Day Card for U.S. Troops. Cheyanne Wolcott, an 11 year-old member of the Stockton Panthers, was the biggest card contributor making 26 Valentines Days Cards. Cheyanne’s generosity earned her a

Dairy Pricing Association third donation Dairy Pricing Association Mission Statement is to establish the minimum price the Dairy Industry receives for it’s production while at the same time maintain a level of milk production to meet the needs of the consumer. Dairy producers are the owners of Dairy Pricing Association who pay a 10 cents per hundredweight (cwt) monthly assessment. This assessment is

used to purchase surplus dairy commodities which are donated to Feeding America. Dairy Pricing Association members milk was processed into cheddar cheese and purchased at Meister Dairy of Muscoda, WI. Dairy Pricing Association will donate 2,000 pounds of cheddar cheese to Second Harvest Foodbank of Southern, WI. This is DPA member’s third

donation since August, 2011 to the Feeding America network. The donation to Second Harvest will be 50 40-pound blocks of cheddar cheese. Once received, volunteers will split the blocks of cheese into two-pound, family size portions that will be distributed through a network of partner agencies to thousands of individuals, families, children and seniors who strug-

gle with hunger. “Dairy products are a critical component to achieving our goal of providing high-quality, nutritionally balanced food to those struggling with hunger. We are thankful to the Dairy Pricing Association for their continued commitment to ending hunger,” said Dan Stein, president and CEO, Second Harvest Foodbank of Southern Wisconsin.

Dairy Pricing Association current members would be able to utilize 100,000-150,000 pounds of milk in 2012. These numbers will increase as the membership grows. The current 28 members involve 12 handlers from six different states. This nationwide program is strictly voluntary and has no time limits or contracts.

Robin Berg, Chairman of Dairy Pricing Association Inc. said, “This program is not being funded by any processor or marketer. We welcome all dairy producers, no matter what size, or what grade of milk you produce.” To learn more about Dairy Pricing Association go to www.dairy pricing.org or 715-2842590.

New Yorker among new members appointed to the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack appointed eight members to the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee, which provides advice on private forestry and USDA’s programs that assist landowners in managing their forests. The appointed members are: • Linda Casey, Prattville, AL, representing state foresters from the Southern U.S. • Mary Jane Packer, Trumansburg, NY, representing private forest landowners • Rob Olszewski, Marietta, GA, representing private forest landowners • Michele Curtis, Perry, FL, representing forest industry • Amadou Diop, Mableton, GA, representing conservation organizations • Tom DeGomez, Flagstaff, AR, representing a land grant college or university • Clifford Rushton, Olympia, WA, representing a conservation district • James Houser, Jacksonville, Texas, representing consulting foresters The new committee members will be joined by the heads of four USDA agencies — the Forest Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Farm Service Agency and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture. USDA is also soliciting nominations through March 2 for an additional eight committee members to serve staggered terms from one to three

years. These positions will represent the forestry, natural resources, and conservation sectors. The USDA has a special interest in assuring that women, minority groups, and persons with disabilities are adequately represented on this advisory committee. The Forest Resource Coordinating Committee provides expert counsel on actions and funds allocation that enhance the diversity and public benefits of forests. Important areas of focus include wildfires, natural disasters, disease outbreak, air and water quality, soil conservation, carbon storage and wildlife habitat.

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Register now for the 2012 New York Small Farms Summit Register now for the 2012 New York Small Farms Summit that will take place on Wednesday, Feb. 29, from 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m., with lunch provided. What is the New York Small Farm Summit? The Summit is an interactive meeting with an opportunity for all participants to take

part in lively discussion, both locally, and across the state. The goals of the Summit are to increase visibility of small farmers and their needs, encourage local collaboration among regions, and to prioritize emerging opportunities to enhance viabilities of small farms in New York and the Northeast.

Who should attend the Summit? Farmers, educators or agricultural service providers, farm businesses, policy makers, students, and members of the community who are interested and committed to a vibrant small farm sector in New York State. What can I expect?

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In the morning, we will hear from two 2011 recipients of Small Farms Program grants to understand how ‘stakeholder’ feedback turns into meaningful projects that have direct benefit in the ‘field’. Then, we will hear from two farmer speakers about the visions they have for the short-term future of small farms in their regions. We’ll also have a brief visit with Dean Boor, from the College of Agriculture and Life Science, to learn more about how Cornell is supporting the small farm sector. In the afternoon, we will work in small groups to evaluate emerging opportunities and prioritize investments to enhance the viability of small farms. We plan to end the day with a list of top priorities that can inform small farm research, education and policy over the next five years. Why should I participate? The New York Small Farms Summit is the only event in the state that brings together the entire small farm com-

munity. You should attend the Summit if you are interested in voicing your ideas, if you enjoy networking with others, or if you want to learn more about supporting small farms. How do I register? The Summit will take place in five locations across the state. Sign up at the site nearest you. The event is free to attend and lunch will be provided. After you register, your site host will be in touch regarding directions, parking information and an agenda for the day. See contact information below. Pre-Summit Survey Please take the survey, regardless of your attendance at the Summit. It helps to identify and prioritize issues you care about! The link to the survey is: https://cornell.qualtric s.com/SE/?SID=SV_bx rjyekn3mqaUy8 2012 Summit Host Sites: Central New York location: Mann Library, Agriculture Quad, Cornell University Campus, Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853. To register: Contact Violet Stone at 607-255-9227

or vws7@cornell.edu. Eastern New York Location: Albany County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office, 24 Martin Road, Voorheesville, NY 12186. To register: Contact Gale Kohler at gek4@cornell.edu. Northern New York location: St. Lawrence County, Cornell Cooperative Extension office, Extension Learning Farm Classroom at 2043 SH 68, Canton, NY 13617. To register: Contact Brent Buchanan at bab22@cornell.edu or 315-379-9192 Ext 231 Western New York location: Wyoming County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office, 401 North Main Street, Warsaw, NY 14569. To register: Contact Joan Petzen at jsp10@cornell.edu or 585-786-2251 Long Island location: Suffolk County, Cornell Cooperative Extension Office, 423 Griffing Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901 To register: Contact Sandy M e n a s h a at srm45@cornell.edu o r 631-727-7850.

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 29

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Page 30 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Biogas plant to let us run on rotten tomatoes Mushy tomatoes, brown bananas and overripe cherries — to date, waste from wholesale markets has ended up on the compost heap at best. In future it will be put to better use: Researchers have developed a new facility that ferments this waste to make methane, which can be used to power vehicles. Drivers who fill up with natural gas instead of gasoline or diesel spend less on fuel and are more environmentally friendly. Natural gas is kinder on the wallet, and the exhaust emissions it produces contain less carbon dioxide and almost no soot particles. As a result, more and more motorists are converting their gasoline engines to run on natural gas. But just like oil, natural gas is also a fossil fuel, and reserves are limited. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB in Stuttgart have now developed an alternative: They have found a way to obtain this fuel not from the Earth’s precious reserves of raw materials, but from fruit and vegetable waste generated by wholesale markets, university cafeterias and canteens. Fermenting this food waste produces methane, also known as biogas, which can be compressed into high-pressure cylinders and used as fuel. In early 2012, the researchers will begin operating a pilot plant adjacent to Stuttgart’s wholesale market. The facility uses various microorganisms to generate sought-after methane from the food waste in a two-stage digestion process that lasts just a few days. “The waste contains a lot of water and has a very low lignocellulose content, so it’s highly suitable for rapid fermentation,” says Dr.-Ing. Ursula Schließmann, head of department at the IGB. But it still presents a challenge, because its precise compo-

sition varies every day. Sometimes it has a high proportion of citrus fruits, while other times there are more cherries, plums and lettuce. On days with a higher citrus fruit content, the researchers have to adjust the pH value through substrate management, because these fruits are very acidic. “We hold the waste in several storage tanks, where a number of parameters are automatically calculated — including the pH value. The specially designed management system determines exactly how many liters of waste from which containers should be mixed together and fed to the microorganisms,” explains Schließmann. It is vital that a correct balance be maintained in the plant at all times, because the various microorganisms require constant environmental conditions to do their job. Another advantage of the new plant lies in the fact that absolutely everything it generates can be utilized; the biogas, the liquid filtrate, and even the sludgy residue that cannot be broken down any further. A second subproject in Reutlingen comes into its own here, involving the cultivation of algae. When the algae in question are provided with an adequate culture medium, as well as carbon dioxide and sunlight, they produce oil in their cells that can be used to power diesel engines. The filtrate water from the biogas plant in Stuttgart contains sufficient nitrogen and phosphorus to be used as a culture medium for these algae, and the reactor facility also provides the researchers with the carbon dioxide that the algae need in order to grow; while the desired methane makes up around two thirds of the biogas produced there, some 30 percent of it is carbon dioxide. With these products

put to good use, all that is left of the original market waste is the sludgy fermentation residue, which is itself converted into methane by colleagues at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland and at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Others involved in this network project,

which goes by the name of ETAMAX, include energy company EnBW Energie Baden-Württemberg and Daimler AG. The former uses membranes to process the biogas generated in the market-place plant, while the latter supplies a number of experimental vehicles designed to run on natu-

ral gas. The five-year project is funded to the tune of six million euros by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). If all the different components mesh together as intended, it is possible that similar plants could in future spring up wherever large quantities of or-

ganic waste are to be found. Other project partners are the Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV in Freising, FairEnergie GmbH, Netzsch Mohnopumpen GmbH, Stulz Wasser und Prozesstechnik GmbH, Subitec GmbH und the town Stuttgart.

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Corn gene helps fight multiple leaf diseases by Sharon Durham A specific gene in corn seems to confer resistance to three important leaf diseases, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their university colleagues. This discovery, published in 2011 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could potentially help plant breeders build disease-resistance traits into future corn plants. The research team included Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant geneticists Peter Balint-Kurti, Jim Holland and Matt Krakowsky in the agency’s Plant Science Research Unit in Raleigh, NC, and scientists with the University of

Delaware, Cornell University, and Kansas State University. ARS is the USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency. Three diseases — southern corn leaf blight, northern leaf blight, and gray leaf spot — all cause lesions on corn leaves worldwide. In the U.S. Midwest Corn Belt, northern leaf blight and gray leaf spot are significant problems. The researchers examined 300 corn varieties from around the world to ensure a genetically diverse representation. No corn variety has complete resistance to any of these diseases, but varieties differ in the severity of symptoms they exhibit. The researchers set out to look for maize lines

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with resistance to the three diseases to determine which genes underlie disease resistance, according to Balint-Kurti. When they tested the lines for resistance, they found that if a corn variety was resistant to one disease, chances were favorable that it was also resistant to the other two. The researchers applied a statistical analysis technique called “association mapping” to identify regions of the genome associated with variation in disease resistance. According to Balint-Kurti, the scientists knew there was a strong correlation between resistance of one disease and the other two. They postulated that some resistance genes conferred resistance to two or more different diseases, and they identified a gene that seemed to confer multiple disease resistance. This gene, a GST (glutathione S-transferase), is part of a family of genes known for their roles in regulating oxidative stress and in detoxification. Both of these functions are consistent with a role in disease resistance. Read more about this research in the February 2012 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

A specific gene in corn seems to confer resistance to three important leaf diseases — southern corn leaf blight, northern leaf blight, and gray leaf spot — all of which cause lesions on corn leaves worldwide. Photo by Regis Lefebure

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section B - Page 31

Page 32 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

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Weed Science Society of America to co-sponsor national summit on the management of herbicide-resistant weeds at the University of California-Riverside, who will speak on the epidemiology of herbicide resistance. • Stephen Powles, professor of weed science at the University of Western Australia, who will discuss what his country is doing to combat herbicide resistance. • Harold Coble, agronomist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service, who will speak on ways to address the pressing problem of herbicide resistance. • Dale Shaner, plant physiologist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service, who will participate in a panel discussion on impediments to the use of best management practices. • John Soteres of Monsanto Company, chairman of the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee, who will participate on a panel discussing ways to encourage the adoption of best management practices. Last fall WSSA introduced a free training program on herbicide resistance that is tailored for pesticide applicators, growers, agrichemical retailers, farm consultants and other industry stakeholders. The peer-reviewed materials are currently available in English and in Spanish on the WSSA website at http://wssa.net/Lesso nModules/herbicide-resistant-weeds and on the Pesticide Environmental Stewardship (PES) website at pesticidestewardship.org. For more information on the National Summit, visit http://nassites.org/hr -weedssummit.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 1

The Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) announced it will cosponsor an upcoming scientific summit on how to manage herbicide-resistant weeds — a costly and growing problem threatening crop production across the U.S. and around the globe. The May 10 event is being organized by the National Research Council, the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences, and will be held at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Several WSSA members will deliver presentations or participate in panel discussions. Among them is David Shaw, former president of WSSA and immediate past chairman of its Herbicide Resistance Education Committee. He will address best management practices that can combat herbicide resistance. “A significant contributing factor in the evolution of resistance is the repeated use of a single herbicide mode of action,” Shaw said. “To counter this dangerous trend, we need to move to integrated weed management programs that incorporate a variety of other control methods. Doing so can help us preserve crop yields, herbicide effectiveness and the sustainability of vital agricultural production systems.” Other WSSA scientists on the program include: • Michael Owen, professor of agronomy at Iowa State University, who will speak on the nature of herbicide resistance in weeds. • Jodie Holt, professor of plant physiology

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Natural selenium coproduct good for sheep by Sandra Avant A more cost-effective, longer-lasting selenium supplement for livestock may soon be available, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist. Animals as well as humans need selenium, a trace mineral and component of antioxidants, to stay healthy. Inadequate selenium in sheep reduces conception rates, increases neonatal mortality, and in some instances, causes “white muscle disease” — nutritional muscular dystrophy. Selenium deficiency in sheep and cattle costs livestock producers an estimated $545 million annually in losses and affects livestock in more than 35 states where regions are deficient in the mineral. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) animal scientist Bret Taylor at the ARS U.S. Sheep Experiment Station (USSES) near Dubois, Idaho, along with researchers at North Dakota State University, studied the effects of a milling coproduct, derived from selenium-rich wheat harvested in South Dakota, on ewes and their lambs. ARS is USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports USDA’s priority of

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 3

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Page 4

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Acting Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services Michael Scuse announced a package of technology enhancements from the Farm Service Agency (FSA) that include Web access for handheld and smartphone users, as well as a more efficient and timely option for receiving news and critical program information. The technology improvements will allow users of FSA information to gain access to easy-to-read data, including key features such as loan deficiency payment (LDP) rates, posted county prices (PCP), FSA news releases and AskFSA, the agency’s online self-help knowledge base. The announcement by FSA underscores USDA’s Blueprint for Stronger Service, a plan introduced in January by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack that takes a realistic view of the needs of American agriculture in a challenging budget climate, and lays out USDA’s plans to modernize and accelerate service delivery while improving the customer experience through use of innovative technologies and business solutions. Three of the 27 initial recommendations implemented by USDA focus on information technology, while other process improvements already put into place by FSA have strengthened the agency’s electronic customer service and online presence. “As an increasing number of farmers and ranchers move to mobile devices and other high-tech tools, we need to

keep pace by investing in the best possible customer service while making the best use of taxpayer resources,” Scuse said. “The mobile website is an added convenience for farmers and ranchers and an effective, efficient way for USDA to deliver news, program information and reliable guidance on a variety of agricultural issues. And investments in technology help USDA continue to make other, more significant investments in rural America, preserving the success of U.S. agriculture in the long term.” Scuse announced the new services recently at the Maryland Farmer’s Breakfast in Crumpton, MD. Like all websites, the FSA site is accessible through any device that connects to the Internet. The mobile site organizes the information on the website in a way that makes for easy reading on a small, hand-held screen. It does not require screen adjustments or constant scrolling and panning across the information. A 2011 study conducted by the Pew Research Center indicated that mobile Internet access is growing rapidly. From May 2010 to July 2011, the number of adults with mobile applications jumped from 43 percent to 50 percent. The trend is expected to continue. In addition, USDA’s Economic Research Service found 57 percent of all rural households use broadband Internet at home, but some 6 percent of all rural households (or over 1 million rural

households) access the Internet at home solely through wireless broadband services. The new FSA site makes the information available to these households. In addition to the mobile website, FSA is now offering farmers and ranchers a more efficient and timely option for receiving critical program information. Such things as eligibility requirements, deadlines and related information can be accessed through an electronic news service hosted by GovDelivery. By signing up for free online communications through GovDelivery, farmers and ranchers can receive news, via email, directly to their home or farm office or to their mobile devices — allowing them to receive immediate notification of farm program news that is pertinent to their agricultural operation. Through GovDelivery, producers can establish subscriber preferences by choosing to receive federal farm program and farm loan information by topic, by state and/or by county. Producers can also select as many subscriber options as they want, which allows producers in multiple counties or across state lines to receive updates from each county in which they opeate or have an interest. FSA also offers AskFSA and AskFSAmobile, an easy-to-use knowledge database with automated answers to website visitor questions. In 2011, AskFSA received 351,119 visitors —

99.7 percent of whom found their answer online without the need for additional assistance. The Obama Administration, with Agriculture Secretary Vilsack’s leadership, has worked tirelessly to strengthen rural America, implement the Farm Bill, maintain a strong farm safety net, and create opportunities for America’s farmers and ranchers. U.S. agriculture is currently experiencing one of its best years in decades thanks to the productivity, resiliency, and resourcefulness of our producers. Today, net farm income is at record levels while debt has been cut in half since the 1980s. Overall, American agriculture supports 1 in 12 jobs in the United States and provides American consumers with 86 percent of the food we consume, while maintaining affordability and choice. The Obama Administration has aggressively worked to expand export opportunities and reduce barriers to trade, helping to push agricultural exports to record levels in 2011 and beyond. Strong agricultural exports are a positive contribution to the U.S. trade balance, support nearly 1 million American jobs and boost economic growth. To access FSA’s mobile website visit www.fsa.usda.gov/mobile. To sign up for FSA’s GovDelivery electronic news service, visit www.fsa.usda.gov/subscribe. For information on USDA’s Blueprint for Stronger Service, please visit www.usda.gov/strongerservice.

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Improperly heated barns may cause horse health problems by Donald Stotts Horse owners who use heated barns to keep water from freezing and to protect horses from cold temperatures during winter should remember supplemental heat can cause problems if used incorrectly. Ventilation is important when horses are kept inside a barn, said Dave Freeman, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension equine specialist. “Closing up a barn to

maintain heat may increase respiratory diseases because of high ammonia content and bacterial growth in stalls,” Freeman said. Closed barns usually have increased humidity. High humidity combined with warm temperature can cause enough nitrogen smell or bacteria growth to irritate the horse’s respiratory system. These frequently result in chronic, minor respiratory problems that interfere with animal per-

formance. Freeman said controlled research to define acceptable humidity and temperature levels to lessen the chance of respiratory illnesses is difficult because of the variability between barns, the horse’s daily routines in and out of the barn and lack of controlling research conditions. However, many veterinarians attest to an increase in respiratory problems in heated barns with high humidity.

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Solution to closed barn problems “The solution is to turn down the heat and get rid of the humidity by increasing air flow,” Freeman said. Some farm operators have reported beneficial results by installing exhaust fans that move air when the humidity rises. There are methods to make these systems automatic by installing reostats that respond to humidity levels. Another problem is that while the ideal temperature for horses is around 45 degrees to 65 degrees Fahrenheit, this “ideal range” may be neither cost effective nor a way to promote equine health. “Increasing the heat of a barn above 55 degrees Fahrenheit not only can be expensive, it also may have negative effects when moving horses out of the barn into colder temperatures,” Freeman said. Equine managers also

need to remember that horses under artificial lighting programs for reproductive or show reasons will shed hair. Therefore, special considerations must be given to protect these animals from cold, windy and wet weather. Even though hair growth is largely a photoperiodic response, warm environments assist in keeping hair short. Adequate hair cover is extremely important during cold conditions, providing the horse with needed insulation to combat the cold stress of near freezing or freezing temperatures. Frequent movement into and out of heated barns from cold outside environments may in itself be a significant source of stress that can be avoided. Freeman said one alternative is to maintain barn temperatures at around 45 degrees to 55 degrees Fahrenheit and use blankets to keep horses with short

hair coats protected from cold temperatures in and outside of the barn. “Part of the problem with maintaining proper barn temperature is that people working in the barn often like it a bit warmer than is recommended for the horses,” he said. “Horse managers should maintain barn temperatures at a level that will help promote healthy horses and not at a level dictated by a worker’s personal comfort.” This might require periodic checks by the barn manager to ensure temperatures are set at the proper level. “It’s often just a case of human nature. If you’re cold, you don’t think twice about turning up the heat a bit,” Freeman said. “But that oversight can cause health-related problems for horses, which in turn can mean money lost to the horse owner.” Source: www.extension.org

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 5

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In Pennsylvania budget, a wilting farm fund by Josh Mrozinski, The Times-Tribune SCRANTON, PA (AP) — Farming is costly. Paul Manning, a third generation dairy farmer and owner of Manning Dairy Farm in North Abington Twp., knows all too well how stagnant milk prices combine with rising fuel, insurance and other costs to squeeze producers. Farmers, he said, have in part survived by finding savings by using new efficient, equipment or techniques they learned about from a nonprofit organization known as the Center for Dairy Excellence. The state Agricultural Excellence program that funds the organization is slated for elimination in the 2012-13 budget proposal released by Governor Tom Corbett — and that concerns Manning. “Farmers need to do everything they can to be more efficient,” Manning, 65, said. “Where do you get your knowledge?” Manning, who noted the center provides speakers and other resources, said the governor “gutted” the agriculture budget, continuing cuts that have happened several times under Governor Ed

Rendell and now potentially two times under Corbett. “You always lose a percentage of the guys” from bad management, Manning said. “What concerns me is a lot of the better guys are quitting.” Manning has joined a chorus of people who have criticized the governor’s plans to eliminate, reduce or redirect funding and eliminate programs in his budget proposal. The critics say the cuts will hurt the state’s number one industry and stunt job creation and economic development. The Agricultural Excellence, Livestock Show and Open Dairy Show would be eliminated. Funding would be eliminated for agricultural research, agricultural promotion, education and exports, hardwoods research and promotion, and food and marketing research. Department of Agriculture spokeswoman Samantha Krepps said the program funding elimination is only in the 2012-13 budget proposal, but the programs remain intact for now. She said the state is looking for private

funding for the Center for Dairy Excellence and the Center for Beef Excellence, both of which have been supported by Agricultural Excellence. The governor’s budget proposal moves about $121 million from the Pennsylvania Race Horse Development Fund to the general fund and to Department of Agriculture programs, including Pennsylvania Fairs, Agricultural College Land Scrip Fund, University of Pennsylvania veterinary activities and University of Pennsylvania Center for Infectious Disease. Krepps said the adjustment to the horse race fund is a “one-time reduction” that helps to fund “programs that are very important to the state’s number one industry.” “There is still $133 million in the purse fund, and it will go back to its 2011-2012 figures,” Krepps said. Noting the state’s financial constraints, she said the budget focuses on the department’s core mission, which includes food safety and animal health. “You have to pick and chose what you can do,” she said.

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And some of those who rely on funding in the Agriculture Department say they may be forced to pick and chose what to do if the department’s budget continues to be cut. After 40 years of racing horses in the state, William Mullin fears he may be forced to hang up his saddle before he’s ready. With the governor proposing to direct money away from race horse fund used for purses at horse races, Mullin worries he may not be able to maintain his horse farm in Lehman Twp. “I don’t know. If we

took that much of a cut, I don’t know if the farm would be feasible anymore,” Mullin, 55, said. “I really don’t want to uproot myself. I’ve raced my whole life in PA. The last thing I want to do is uproot the kids.” Mullin takes care of nine horses that race at Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs and the Harrah’s Chester Casino & Racetrack. Ron Batoni, executive director of Pennsylvania Harness Horsemen’s Association, which represents more than 1,000 horsemen who race at Mohegan Sun and Harrah’s

Chester, said the governor’s cuts would be “devastating.” He said the governor’s cut would result in about $9 million out of purses at Mohegan Sun and about $11 million at Harrah’s Chester. Batoni said the total purses at Mohegan Sun was $27 million and at Harrah’s Chester was $36 million in 2011. Batoni said cuts in the purses wouldn’t make it worthwhile for horsemen to “stay around.” Horse racing, he said, helps spur economic development and job creation.

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Biodiesel and other renewable fuels must be part of a sustainable society On Feb. 8, experts from the U.S. and Canada called for increased usage of biodiesel in North America, saying the sustainable transportation fuel protects the continent’s energy security and augments the food supply of the entire world, while providing a positive impact on climate change. The scientists, academics and economic analysts gathered in Orlando for

the “Sustainability Symposium on Renewable and Transportation Fuels,” part of the National Biodiesel Conference and Expo and organized by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Central to the discussions at the day-long conference was biodiesel’s ability to alleviate dependence on

foreign oil, a dependence that threatens national security and is subject to the uncertainty produced by the world’s most politically unstable regions. According to the Economist Magazine, the U.S. paid approximately $125 billion more for oil imports in 2011 than it did in 2010 because of unrest in the Middle East. The result, argued

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Energy Victory author Robert Zubrin, PhD., is that the United States’ foreign policy is largely driven by a thirst for oil in countries that are considered unfriendly to American interests. “In the early 1970s, we imported less than a third of our oil and the total cost was less than five percent of our defense budget,” Zubrin said. “Today, we are 60 percent dependent on imported oil and spend more on imported oil than we spend on national defense. “It’s a disaster waiting to happen,” he said. Other panelists noted that a lack of an effective energy policy also weakens the nation’s economic recovery, calling for increased usage of renewable fuels that provide an important alternative to petroleum and support tens of thousands of domestic jobs. Biodiesel is one of the more promising biofuels and the nation’s only commercially available advanced biofuel. In 2011, biodiesel production jumped by more than 300 percent, topping one billion gallons for the first time in the industry’s history.

“Biofuels — particularly biodiesel — are a shining star within the declining U.S. manufacturing sector and provide significant economic, environmental, and energy security benefits,” according John Urbanchuk, a nationally recognized economic analyst. Central to biodiesel’s appeal is its positive impact on the environment when compared to other fuels. The fuel reduces lifecycle greenhouse gases by as much as 89 percent, lowers particulate matter and reduces smog. Experts are being conservative when they quantify the numerous benefits of biodiesel. The lifecycle analysis used to quantify biodiesel’s emissions relative to petroleum, for instance, is very comprehensive. Nothing is left out, and many indirect emissions are included. Years ago, biofuel critics speculated that they could depict biofuels to be as bad as fossil fuel by adding such indirect emissions to biofuel analysis. Today, science is showing that biodiesel maintains a significant benefit, even when held to a

higher standard than conventional fuels. “Biodiesel is the perfect example of liquid solar energy,” said Kansas State University’s Richard Nelson. “Burning these fuels does not add net carbon to the atmosphere, because we end up burning biomass that is already part of the biosphere’s biogenic carbon cycle.” Ultimately, biofuels fit well into a comprehensive energy policy, the experts said. They noted that a sustainable and cleaner energy source that boosts American jobs and displaces billions of gallons of petroleum can help guide the nation toward a more sensible energy policy and secure energy future. “It is urgent that we reduce emissions lest we lose our ability to mitigate climate change as feedbacks amplify climate warming,” said Steven Mulkey, Ph.D. “ When managed sustainably, biofuels can be an important part of our transition to a lowemissions economy.” For more information go to www.biodieselconference.org/2012

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 7

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USDA announces funding for two renewable energy programs

Page 8

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced the availability of funds for Fiscal Year 2012 for two key programs to encourage the use of renewable biomass and production of advanced biofuels. About $25 million will be made available through each program. “President Obama has laid out a new era for American energy — an economy fueled by homegrown and alternative energy sources that will be designed and produced by American workers,” said Vilsack. “These programs support that vision by helping biorefineries use renewable biomass as a replacement fuel source for fossil fuels and supporting advanced biofuel producers as they expand production.” The Repowering Assistance Program provides

approximately $25 million in funding to biorefineries that have been in existence on or before June 18, 2008. The purpose of the program is to provide a financial incentive to biorefineries to use renewable biomass in place of fossil fuels used to produce heat or power. By providing this assistance, USDA is helping these facilities install new systems that use renewable biomass. The amount of the payment will be based

on (1) the cost effectiveness of the renewable biomass system; and (2) the percentage reduction in fossil fuels used by that biorefinery. The maximum amount an individual biorefinery can receive under the Notice is 50 percent of total eligible project costs up to a maximum of $10 million. Eligible costs must be related to construction or repowering improvements, such as engineering design, equipment

installation and professional fees. The application deadline for this program to receive funds for Fiscal Year 2012 is June 1, 2012. For additional details, please see pages 5232 through 5234 of the Feb. 2, 2012, Federal Register, or go to www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg / F R - 2 0 1 2 - 0 2 02/pdf/2012-2244.pdf. USDA also announced the availability of up to $25 million to make payments to advanced biofuels producers who

expect to produce eligible advanced biofuels at any time during Fiscal Year 2012. To be eligible for these funds, an advanced biofuels producers must have enrolled in the program by Oct. 31, 2011, even if the producer has an existing contract with the Agency. Payments will be made to producers of advanced biofuels derived from renewable biomass, other than corn

kernel starch. These include cellulose, sugar and starch, crop residue, vegetative waste material, animal waste, food and yard waste, vegetable oil, animal fat, and biogas. Contract payments will be made quarterly. For additional details, please see pages 5229 through 5232 of the Feb. 2, 2012, Federal Register, or go to www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg / F R - 2 0 1 2 - 0 2 02/pdf/2012-2240.pdf.

Pennsylvania Shale Gas Impact Fee approved The Pennsylvania legislature recently approved a Shale Gas Impact Fee Bill that would establish an impact fee on gas extracted from the shale formation. The cost per well will range from $190,000 to a maximum of $355,000 by 2027. Sixty percent of the fee’s proceeds would be allocated to areas directly impacted by drilling and 40

percent to statewide environmental and infrastructure projects. The legislation would also prohibit counties and municipalities from imposing their own regulations on gas operations that are stricter than those imposed on other industries. Source: Friday Facts Feb. 10, 2012

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crops. How to apply for USDA-NRCS conservation programs Learn what steps you will need to take to prepare for, and submit, your application to become a USDA-NRCS Conservation Program participant. For EQIP, WRP, WHIP, GRP and CSP programs, eligible applicants must maintain or update the following information, records, certifications and financial documents before submitting an application. In addition to NRCS program requirements, producers are advised to carefully review all other eligibility requirements including update of farm records administered by the Farm Services Agency (FSA). Producers are strongly encouraged to contact their local NRCS and FSA offices to make sure all records are current and correct before submitting a program application. Producers who submit incomplete applications or whose farm records and certifications are not up-to-date and eligibility is not verified may be deferred. Specific records include, but are not limited to: • Form NRCS-CPA1200: Conservation Program Application – Signed and dated by all program participants or authorized persons. Depending upon the applicant and existing records, these additional forms and documentation may need to be completed. • Proof of Identity: Authorized persons may be required to show a valid state driver’s license, passport or other personal identification as well as Social Security or EIN numbers, address and other information. • Form CCC-931: Payment Eligibility • Average Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) Certification and Consent to Disclosure of Tax Information • Form AD-1026: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wet-

land Conservation Certification • Form CCC-901: Entity Member Information, if applicable. • Form SF-1199A: Direct Deposit Sign-up form. • Signature Authority: Self-certification of signature authority as indicated on Form CCC901 or documents such as articles of incorporation, charter, bylaws, partnership agreements, trust agreements, wills and similar legal evidence. • Land Ownership or control: The applicant may be required to provide evidence of control of land through ownership documents (deeds, etc.) or lease information (rental agreements, permits, lease, etc) for the length of the contract. • Map depicting ownership boundaries for all land the applicant owns and operates. • Form FSA-211: Power of Attorney, if applicable. • Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number: All entities/organizations using an Employer Identification Number (EIN) are required to obtain a DUNS number and be registered on the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) Web site when submitting a conservation program application. Many of the program application forms require the applicant to provide sensitive financial or other confidential information. Disclosure of this data is voluntary, but failure to provide the required information may result in the deferral of an application or denial of a payment. By law, “confidential, private and sensitive information” is protected by USDA. Certain forms must be resubmitted each year an application is submitted. For more information, contact your local USDA Service Center, or visit the USDANRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program Web site.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 9

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contract obligation and contract lengths are typically limited to two years. Note: Applying for the Farmstead Energy Improvement conservation practice requires an energy audit before an applicant can apply for that practice. This is the only conservation practice where the energy audit is a prerequisite. Eligible conservation practices The list of eligible Energy Initiative conservation practices are: • Conservation Crop Rotation • Cover Crop • Farmstead Energy Improvement • Pumping Plant • Residue and Tillage Management, Mulch Till • Residue and Tillage Management, No Till/Strip Till/Direct Seed • Residue and Tillage Management, Ridge Till Additional information for many of these practices can be found on our Conservation Practices Web page. Funding is available for two separate energy AgEMPs or on-farm energy audits. One plan can be developed for the farm headquarters area and another plan is available for the landscape or field areas of an agriculture operation. The AgEMP (Headquarters) will be individually tailored to ensure coverage of the primary energy use areas on the farm headquarters, such as milk cooling, irrigation pumping, heating and cooling of livestock production facilities, manure collection and transfer, and other common on-farm activities. The AgEMP (Landscape) determines and documents current energy usage, over the past annual cycle, and provides cost-effective alternatives and recommendations for energy conservation. The evaluation of energy conservation activities shall include energy used in the cultivation, protection, and harvesting of agricultural

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MARCH 7-8, 2012 Wednesday 10-7 • Thursday 9-4 • NY State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY Make Your Plans Now to Attend or Exhibit at The Largest Heavy Construction Equipment Show East of the Mississippi! Foland Sales, Inc • 57 Ground Effects • 44, B-5 Ground Force Training • 39 Haun Welding Supply • A-6 Hard Hat News • A-32 HD Supply Waterworks Ltd • 12 Horizon Energy Services • 144 Hybrid Building Solutions, LLC • 143 Hydrograss Corporation • H-26 Iron Planet • 82 J.C. Smith • 62 J&J Equipment • A-8 James V. Spano Containers • B-7 Joe Johnson Equipment • H-18, B-12 Jones Specialty Services Group • 46 Kepner Equipment, Inc • 23 Keystone Precision Instruments • 100, 101 Kimbers, Inc • A-14 Kraft Power Corp • H-1 Kurtz Truck Equipment • A-21A Liftech Equipment Companies • A-19 Linemen’s Supply, Inc • H-27, H-28 Liverpool Shoes & Repair • H-29 Mabie Bros., Inc • A-9 Manlius Shade Tree Farm • 42 McQuade & Bannigan • 48 Milton Cat • A-3A Mirabito Energy Products • 175 Modern Welding School • 153 Mohawk Ltd • H-24 Monroe Tractor • A-16 Montage Enterprises • 75 MS Unlimited • A-24B Nextire, Inc • 8,9 NYLICA • 55 Progressive Commercial Insurance • 59, 60 Pump Service and Supply of Troy, Inc • 26, 27 Quality Craft Tools • A-44 R. O. Allen & Son • 17 Ransome • 61

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 11

A-Verdi • 2, 3, 4 Admar Supply Co., Inc • A-3B American Concrete Casting • 40 Amerseal Tire Sealant • 142 Anderson Equipment Co • A-4 Antwerp Machine & Repair • 5 AR Sandri / Midstate • 1 Arista Power, Inc • 150 Asphalt Zipper, Inc • 14 Atlas Fence • 32, 33 Bad Dog Tools • 146 Bath Fitter • 147 Beam Mack • H-19 Beck Equipment, Inc • A-11B Beka-Max of America, Inc • 155 Biz Tech • 141 Blair Supply Corp. • 58 Bobcat of Central New York • A-15 Burdick Chevrolet • 88, 89, A-33, A-34, A-35, A-36, A-37, A-38, A-39, A-40, A-41, A-42, A-43 C&S Crane & Rigging • 28B Carpenter Industries • 79 Cazenovia Equipment Company • A-20A, A-20B Clark Equipment Co. • 86, 87, B-4 ClearSpan Fabric Structures • 41 Clinton Tractor & Implement Co. • H-23 Club Car • A-1 Columbia Southern University • 49 Conviber, Inc • 16 Corfu Machine Co., Inc • 78 Curry Supply Co. & Stellar Industries, Inc • A-24A D&W Diesel, Inc • 31 Design Crete of America • 29, 30 Dings Co. Magnetic Group • 7 Emergency Services Communications • 13 Everett J. Prescott, Inc • 43 Featherstone Supply • 50 Feher Rubbish Removal • 81, B-3 Ferguson Waterworks • 6 Five Star Equipment, Inc • 76, 77, A-23

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Biodiesel production surpasses requirements, increases optimism Soy biodiesel helps America’s advanced biofuel top 1 billion gallons Biodiesel became a one-billion gallon industry, setting an all-time production record last year. That’s thanks in part to its predominant fuel source: soy biodiesel. U.S. biodiesel production far exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2011 production requirement of 800 million gallons. In fact, production reached nearly 1.1 billion gallons, which surpassed the previous record of 690 million gallons set in 2008. U.S. soybean farmers and their checkoff helped establish soy’s role in the biodiesel marketplace, originally looking for a new use of surplus soybean oil more than 20 years ago. Today, the soybean checkoff continues to support biodiesel through research and education efforts. “As Americans, we have a need for an American fuel and the checkoff is seeing their investment start to come to fruition,” said Robert Stobaugh, soybean farmer from Atkins, AR, and

United Soybean Board farmer-director. “The checkoff marketing efforts at the state and national level helped soy become the primary source and we still have room for growth.” The industry expects biodiesel production to grow even larger in 2012. And the Environmental Protection Agency’s Renewable Fuel Standard requires it to meet 1 billion gallons again next year. As production continues to increase, diesel users will be able to find biodiesel more readily than ever before. “Biodiesel is now more available and as it expands into metropolitan areas it will be easier for the rural areas to get a hold of it,” added Stobaugh. “As our urban neighbors pick up the torch and carry it, we won’t have to ask for it — fuel suppliers will already have it.” For more information on the United Soybean Board, visit www.unitedsoybean.org

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Pork producers celebrate key milestone speaking out for agriculture 5000th speech helps reach audience of more than 24 million American pork producers are celebrating a key milestone that is helping millions of consumers understand where their food comes from and is empowering leaders for modern agriculture. The National Pork Board’s Operation Main Street (OMS) program achieved its 5,000th speech. Arcola, IL, pork producer Pat Titus delivered the 5,000 OMS speech to the Ambucs Club in Danville, IL. “This program has allowed me to have a dialogue with consumers who rarely have any contact with agriculture,” said Titus. “It’s really up to us to tell our story and connect with consumers so they know we are committed to producing good, safe food, and to caring for our animals and the environment.” Through the Pork Checkoff funded community outreach program, more than 150,000 people have heard firsthand from

OMS volunteer speakers how the pork industry is working to improve how food is raised and to provide consumers with healthy choices. Media coverage of their speeches has reached an estimated audience of more than 24 million. “Without a doubt, OMS speakers have achieved a lot thanks to their hard work, dedication and desire to take on new challenges, address industry issues and make a lasting difference for the pork industry,” said Chris Novak, chief executive officer of the National Pork Board. “We’ve also learned a lot through their efforts and we’re proud to be able to share that knowledge to benefit all of modern agriculture.” Now in its seventh year, the OMS program has trained almost 950 volunteer speakers in more than 30 states. OMS speakers are reaching out to consumers, youth, and important opinion leaders

such as dietitians who can also earn Continuing Professional Education credits for attending an OMS speech. And, the Pork Checkoff has developed partnerships with the National FFA Organization and the American Association of Swine Veterinarians (AASV) to extend the OMS program’s value beyond the pork industry. “OMS is truly a dynamic community outreach program,” said Don Lipton, public relations director of the America Farm Bureau Federation. “I’ve watched this program grow through the years and applaud the pork industry’s commitment to raising awareness about modern agriculture and to growing leaders for the ag industry.” OMS started as a grassroots effort in 2004 to improve the pork industry’s image in rural America. Today, OMS speakers have reached beyond their local civic

organizations to connect with consumers in cities like Chicago, Detroit and San Francisco; they’re educating opinion leaders, setting the record straight with the news media and utilizing social media to reach influencers. Through the AASV partnership, OMS speakers are helping educate the next generation of animal health professionals by speaking to students at schools of veterinary medicine across the country. “Veterinarians

are a trusted source of information among consumers, but very few veterinary students today have a background in pork production,” said Dr. Gene Nemechek, a swine veterinarian with Pfizer Animal Health. “I want to show them how today’s production practices ensure a safe, healthy food source.” During the H1N1 crisis in 2009, OMS speakers also took it upon themselves to call their local media to set the record straight that

pork was a safe and healthy food. And, OMS speakers are being tapped for new and important industry initiatives. OMS speakers have been trained to help with the Pork Checkoff’s social media efforts and to participate in its Adopt-A-Retailer program where they are working with the Checkoff’s retail marketing managers to meet with meat directors, managers and supervisors for the top grocery store chains in the country.

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- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

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New York dry bean growers to meet March 19 in LeRoy by Carol MacNeil, Cornell Regional Vegetable Program The 2012 New York State Dry Bean Growers Meeting will be held Monday, March 19, at the LeRoy Country Club, 1 mile east of LeRoy, NY. The featured speaker is Paul Varner, Treasure Valley Seed Co, who will describe the process of producing the high quality, disease-free dry bean seed, and will explain why using certified seed is so important. Varieties, dry bean breeding progress, insect, disease and weed control updates, cover crops, dry bean promotion and markets, and Worker Protection Standard news will be covered. Lunch will include delicious, healthy New York State dry beans. Two DEC credits, plus CCA credits, will be available. Save $5 by pre-registering! Cornell staff will give

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bean crop through dry spells. Crucifer cover crops offer the promise of reduced soil-borne diseases and/or weeds, and reduced compaction. Share your experiences and join the discussion. There will be an update on the promotional activities of the National Dry Bean Council as well as a discussion of current dry bean markets. United States dry bean acreage in 2011 was the smallest since about 1921 and the crop was down about 38 percent from the previous year. Learn what all agricultural employers need to know about complying with the Worker Protection Standard (WPS). Even if only family members work on the farm you need to comply with certain provisions of the law. More WPS inspections are coming. John Wainwright, DEC Region 8, Bath, will review what you need to do to be prepared. The Dry Bean Meeting is sponsored by the Treasure Valley Seed Company. If you’d like to be a sponsor contact Carol MacNeil at 585313-8796 or crm6@cornell.edu . Sponsors can exhibit and can give a brief update on “What’s New” with their business. The New York State Dry Bean Meeting will be held March 19 at the LeRoy Country Club, 1 mile east of LeRoy, NY, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Save $5 by pre-registering by March 12. Send a check to Cornell Vegetable Program – Dry Beans, to Cornell Cooperative Extension, 480 N Main St, Canandaigua, NY 14424, Attn: Angela Parr. Pre-registration is $20 for those enrolled in the Cornell Vegetable Program and receiving Veg Edge. Cost is $30 for others. In case of bad weather and possibility of cancellation call 585-394-3977 x406 for a recorded message.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 15

Available This Year VAPOR BARRIER SHEETING

complete reports on the progress made in bean breeding and varietal/breeding line evaluation for yield, early maturity, quality, processing and heat tolerance. Trials were conducted on-farm in Western New York and at the Cornell Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville. Robin Bellinder, Cornell, will report on her research on weed management in zone till production, and will review new herbicides with promise for controlling weeds in dry beans. New York dry bean growers may see the first damage from the Western bean cutworm in 2012. The pest feeds on bean pods and seed and has been increasing each year in corn and dry bean fields in New York, since its first occurrence in 2006. Luckily we’ve learned much from the experience of growers and researchers in Michigan and Ontario, Canada, where it appeared a few years earlier. This information will be shared so New York growers can be prepared. There were never so many good cover crop choices! Thomas Bjorkman, Cornell, will describe the benefits of specific cover crops in a dry bean rotation. Several grass cover crops can increase soil organic matter and improve soil water -holding capacity to help get the

LAMB & WEBSTER FIVE

EVENTS

OPEN HOUSE DATES Grove City, PA March 1st North Java March 6th-7th Springville March 13th-19th Woodhill March 21st

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- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

PARTS CASH & CARRY 10% PURCHASES UP TO $750 15% PURCHASES UP TO $750 USE YOUR CNH CAPITAL CARD 0% INTEREST AND NO PAY FOR 120 DAYS

& LW

IN SPRINGVILLE IN NORTH JAVA 800-888-3403 800-724-0139

INWOODHULL IN GROVE CITY, PA 607-458-5200 877-264-4403 • 724-234-4403

LAMB & WEBSTER FIVE

EVENTS

USED EQUIPMENT VALUES Location Grove City Grove City North Java North Java Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Woodhull Woodhull Woodhull Grove City Grove City North Java North Java North Java North Java North Java Springville Springville Springville Springville Woodhull Grove City Grove City Grove City Springville Springville

Manufacturer PRIME-MOVER NEW HOLLAND CASE John Deere NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND GEHL NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND CASE NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND CASE NEW HOLLAND JOHN DEERE NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND CLAAS CLAAS CLAAS CLAAS NEW HOLLAND JOHN DEERE JOHN DEERE NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND JOHN DEERE MASSEY-FERGUSON JOHN DEERE JOHN DEERE CASE IH

Model L1300 185B 420 320 C190 C185 C175 5640 LS160 C175 LS180 LS170 1530B L150 LS160 L170 L150 420 LS160 6750 FX60 FP230 850 JAGUAR 880 900 900 FX28 6750 7400 1900 FX28 7800 8140 7520 7810 MX135

Category Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Skid Steers Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Harvesters - Forage - Self-Propelled Tractors - 100 HP to 174 HP Tractors - 100 HP to 174 HP Tractors - 100 HP to 174 HP Tractors - 100 HP to 174 HP Tractors - 100 HP to 174 HP

List Price $8,995.00 $21,995.00 $21,995.00 $17,995.00 $38,500.00 $27,500.00 $37,995.00 $23,995.00 $12,995.00 $25,995.00 $19,295.00 $16,995.00 $5,500.00 $15,200.00 $12,995.00 $15,995.00 $18,500.00 $19,995.00 $9,995.00 $129,995.00 $169,995.00 $33,995.00 $159,995.00 $139,995.00 $228,900.00 $299,500.00 $110,500.00 $145,000.00 $199,000.00 $29,500.00 $124,995.00 $49,995.00 $49,995.00 $84,995.00 $69,000.00 $52,500.00

Location Springville Grove City North Java Grove City Grove City Grove City North Java Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Woodhull Woodhull Woodhull Woodhull Woodhull Woodhull Woodhull Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville Springville

Manufacturer FORD JOHN DEERE CASE IH INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL NEW HOLLAND CASE IH CASE IH JOHN DEERE FORD CASE IH FORD INTERNATIONAL KUBOTA KUBOTA INTERNATIONAL CASE IH OLIVER FORD INTERNATIONAL CASE IH KUBOTA NEW HOLLAND NEW HOLLAND INTERNATIONAL CASE IH OLIVER NEW HOLLAND JOHN DEERE KUBOTA KIOTI KUBOTA FORD INTERNATIONAL MASSEY-FERGUSON KUBOTA

Model TW25 9400 9380 886 684 TC45A CX90 FARMALL 80 5065M 3000 595 4630 560 M120 L4330HSTC 544 FARMALL 70 880 7700 574 JX1070C L4240 TD80D 3010 686 1690 1850 T5070 4020 L3130HST LK3054 L2900GST 231 CUB 184 LO-BOY GC2310 B2100

Category Tractors - 100 HP to 174 HP Tractors - 175 HP Or Greater Tractors - 175 HP Or Greater Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - 40 HP to 99 HP Tractors - Less than 40 HP Tractors - Less than 40 HP Tractors - Less than 40 HP Tractors - Less than 40 HP Tractors - Less than 40 HP Tractors - Less than 40 HP Tractors - Less than 40 HP

List Price $19,995.00 $94,995.00 $78,495.00 $8,995.00 $7,995.00 $26,995.00 $31,500.00 $32,995.00 $29,995.00 $6,995.00 $12,995.00 $11,950.00 $5,495.00 $29,995.00 $32,900.00 $6,500.00 $26,500.00 $4,995.00 $7,995.00 $6,995.00 $21,500.00 $23,500.00 $34,995.00 $11,995.00 $8,995.00 $8,695.00 $5,495.00 $52,995.00 $9,995.00 $17,900.00 $10,300.00 $14,995.00 $3,750.00 $2,500.00 $14,850.00 $10,000.00

AUCTION MARCH 31ST 9:00 AM SPRINGVILLE

NORTH JAVA 800-724-0139

GROVE CITY, PA 877-264-4403 • 724-234-4403

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 17

SPRINGVILLE 800-888-3403

Page 18

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

NFU will not support legislative changes to COOL National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson issued the following statement to urging U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Ron Kirk to pursue a robust appeals process on the recent decision of the World Trade Organization (WTO) that ruled against the United States’ implementation of the country-of-originlabeling (COOL) law: “NFU has a proud record of supporting COOL. We were instrumental in getting the COOL laws passed in 2002 and again in

2008. “We will oppose any attempt to change that law. Fortunately, the WTO decision against U.S. country-of-originlabeling did not find fault with our law. It simply found fault with the rules and regulations which were used to implement the law. “As the office of the USTR contemplates its approach to the WTO decision, we urge them to mount a robust and vigorous defense of COOL. “We are aware that behind the scenes at-

CATSKILL TRACTOR, INC. 384 Center St. Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

CORYN FARM SUPPLIES, INC. Freshour Rd. Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-394-4691

SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20, Sharon Springs, NY 13459 518-284-2346

COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC. Box 660 Claverack, NY 12513 518-828-1781

SALEM FARM SUPPLY, INC. Rt. 22 Salem, NY 12865 518-854-7424

COLUMBIA CROSS ROADS RR 2 Box 62, Rt. 14 Columbia Cross Roads, PA 16914 570-297-2991

tempts at negotiating a settlement to the WTO decision have some stakeholders arguing that we must weaken our law. We strongly disagree and urge a fervent defense. “Consumers have a right to know where their meat comes from — and they overwhelmingly want to know just that.” The labeling law was passed as a part of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 and amended in 2008. COOL requires retailers to notify their

customers of the source of certain foods. Canada and Mexico filed a com-

plaint against the United States’ law, which led to the recent ruling.

The deadline for filing an appeal to the WTO decision is March 23.

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You A toast to pot roast (NAPSA) — Whether it’s for the nostalgia, the convenience or the reasonable cost, flavorful pot roast is making a comeback. Home cooks in the know are seeking out cost-effective cuts like boneless beef chuck, bottom round roast or rump roast and tossing them in a crock pot with simple pantry staples for melt-in-your-mouth dishes. Pot roast is easier to prepare than you might think, and it’s simple to customize by using different beef cuts, seasonings, liquids and vegetables. Plus, sandwiches, soups, tacos and hardy salads are among the possibilities for leftovers. When you’re busy and want a deliciously affordable meal, this recipe from Whole Foods Market makes it easy:

roast and brown on all sides. Remove to a plate and set aside. Add onions and 1/4 cup water and cook about 8 minutes or until tender and golden, stirring occasionally. Stir in broth and juice and bring to a boil. Add roast back to pot, cover and transfer to oven. Roast 2 hours. Stir in potatoes and carrots, cover and continue roasting 45 minutes longer or until vegetables and meat are tender. Transfer roast and vegetables to a large serving platter and drizzle with pan juices. For additional recipes, tips and a how-to video, visit www.wholefoodsmarket.com.

1 1/2 teaspoons dried parsley 1 teaspoon sea salt 1/2 teaspoon minced onion 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 (2 1/2 to 3 pounds) boneless beef chuck roast 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 sliced onions 1 3/4 cups reduced-sodium beef broth 1 cup tomato juice 1 1/2 pounds potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks 1 pound carrots, cut into 1-inch chunks Preheat oven to 350° F. In a small bowl, combine seasonings, salt and pepper. Pat roast dry with paper towels and rub all over with seasoning mixture. In a large Dutch oven or ovenproof heavy saucepot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add

by Sarah Gerow, Lewis County Dairy Princess Do you find the weather getting you down? Well don’t worry — spring is right around the corner. Here are helpful hints to kick start your taste buds. Try adding cheese to your favorite meal or snack. Since cheese is such a versatile food, experiment with it in different ways; like adding it to a casserole or pour it on vegetables and crackers with more than 300 varieties of domestic cheeses available the possibilities are endless! Remember that February is national children’s dental health month. Research suggests that several varieties of cheese may protect against tooth decay. January and February have been a little slow. I have done radio announcements on Froggy 97. Sylvia Larkins and Cami Steiner attended the annual Holstein Banquet on Jan. 28 at Steak and Brew. On Feb. 20-21, I will be attending the annual State Dairy Princess Pageant and ADADC meeting in Syracuse. Wish me Luck! Once again I want to thank all the farmers and

Beef pot roast

Whether you're cooking for a crowd or a crowded schedule, pot roast can be the answer.

A recipe to warm you up

ADADC for their check off dollars that fund the Dairy Princess Program. Also thank you for all the hard work that you do 365 days a year. Here is a good recipe for cold winter days that uses a variety of cheese:

Cheese Chili

2 tbs. butter 2 large onions 3 chopped carrots 3 ribs celery 3 small jalapeno peppers, seeded and minced 1/4 cup tomato 1 tbs. chili powder 1 tbs. cocoa powder 1 tbs. Cumin seed 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes 6 12-ounces tomato juice 2 cups cooked or canned black beans, rinsed 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Monterey jack cheese 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded sharp cheddar cheese Sauté onions in butter over medium high heat in large saucepan until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add tomato paste, chili powder, cocoa powder and cumin; cook until mixture caramelizes to a dark brown, about 10 minutes. Stir in carrots, celery and jalapenos and stir to coat. Add crushed tomatoes and beans. Stir in tomato juice. Simmer for at least 1 hour, up to 2 hours. Preheat broiler. Stir Mozzarella and Monterey Jack cheese into chili and top with shredded Cheddar. Broil until cheese is bubbly, about 4 minutes. Dairy Fact: Milk remains fresh for 7-10 days after the expiration date if refrigerated at 3540°F. Each 5° (F) rise in temperature shortens milk’s shelf life by 50 percent because of bacteria growth. February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 19

This week’s Sudoku solution

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You Tea time for vegetable soup (NAPSA) — To make the most of the all-natural benefits associated with green tea, the average person should drink three to five cups a day. Fortunately, besides drinking a cup of tea in the morning or in the evening, there are many tasty and perhaps surprising ways to incorporate the goodness of tea into your lifestyle. A quick alternative is making iced tea to go by brewing green tea and pouring it into an ice-filled pitcher or chilling it in a reusable water bottle. “Bottled teas are typically higher in sugar, calories and price,” said clinical nutritionist Tara Coleman. “Compared to an equal-size serving of bottled tea, freshly brewed tea made with tea bags is better for you, your wallet and the environment. Every time

Good Housekeeping

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- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Double cornbread Frozen corn enhances the texture and flavor of hearty cornbread without a lot of extra expense. Bake and freeze the cornbread, tightly wrapped, up to one month ahead. Thaw; then, when ready to serve, reheat, covered, at 450°F for 15 minutes. Cut into serving pieces. 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal 1/4 cup sugar 4 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 2 1/2 cups buttermilk 3 large eggs 1 package (10 ounces) frozen corn, thawed 6 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 2 jalapeno chiles, seeds and membranes discarded, finely chopped 1. Preheat oven to 450 F. Grease 13- by 9-inch metal baking pan. 2. In large bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In medium bowl, with wire whisk or fork, beat buttermilk and eggs until blended. 3. Add corn, melted butter and jalapenos to buttermilk mixture; then add to flour mixture. Stir until ingredients are just mixed. 4. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 22 to 25 minutes or until golden at edges and toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cut lengthwise into 4 strips, then cut each strip crosswise into 6 pieces. Serve warm. Makes 24 pieces. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/ recipefinder/. (c) 2012 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

The Great Sphinx of Egypt was built to face the sunrise of the vernal, or spring, equinox.

you ‘unbottle’ your tea by filling a reusable beverage container at home instead of purchasing a bottled tea at the store, that’s one more single-use plastic bottle you are keeping out of the landfills.” Green tea can also be used as an unexpected ingredient in many types of dishes. Flavored teas, such as Salada’s Pomegranate Berry Green Tea, can add refreshing fruit flavor to oatmeal, smoothies or punch. You can add green tea to the water used for pasta, rice or as an added boost to your favorite soup recipes, like this one: Vegetable Soup with a Green Tea Twist 1 can (14 ounces) chicken broth or vegetable broth 1 can (11.5 ounces) tomato-vegetable juice cocktail 1 cup brewed Salada 100% Green Tea 1 large potato, diced 2 carrots, sliced 2 stalks celery, diced 1 can (14.5 ounces) undrained diced tomatoes 1 cup chopped fresh green beans 1 cup fresh corn kernels Salt and pepper to taste Creole seasoning to taste (optional) In a large stock pot, combine broth, tomato juice, brewed green tea, potatoes, carrots, celery, undrained diced tomatoes, green beans and corn.

Give your soup a boost with a cup of green tea.

Season with salt, pepper and optional Creole seasoning. Bring to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes or until all vegetables are tender. Enjoy immediately or freeze for a later meal. For more information plus great-tasting recipes, go to www.greentea.com/recipes

Chow Line: Limit sodium, boost potassium for health Q: Can you explain how sodium and potassium work in the body? A: Both sodium and potassium are minerals that perform many tasks to keep your body working properly. Both play important roles in maintaining fluid balance. They also help in the conduction of nerve impulses. However, sodium primarily functions outside of cells, while potassium operates inside. In fact, there’s about 10 times more sodium outside of cells than inside, and about 30 times more potassium inside cells than outside. A sodium-potassium exchange pump on cell membranes helps sodium and potassium ions move in and out of cells. The problem is that most Americans consume way too much sodium, and the body absorbs almost all of it. Most people know that too much sodium is associated with high blood pressure. Although that’s true only for people who are salt-sensitive — estimated at about 10 percent of the population — recent research has uncovered other concerns about high-sodium diets. One major study, published in 2011 in the Archives of Internal Medicine, followed more than 12,000 adults for nearly 15 years. Researchers found that during that time, people who ate a diet high in sodium and low in potassium had about a 50 percent increased risk of death. A previous study, published in 2008 in the Journal of Clinical Hypertension, found that simply increasing intake of potassium could reduce cases of high blood pressure by more than 10 percent. Yet another study, this one in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, showed that older people who consumed diets high in sodium and who engaged in little physical activity had a higher risk of cognitive decline. Most U.S. adults consume about 3,300 milligrams of sodium a day, far more than the 220 to 250 milligrams the body needs, and more than twice as much as the 1,500 milligrams a day that the 2010

Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends for people 51 and older, African Americans, and anyone who has high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease. Other people should limit sodium to 2,300 milligrams a day. Everyone should try to get 4,700 milligrams of potassium a day; most don’t achieve that goal. Ideally, experts say, people should consume about twice as much potassium as they do sodium. Reduce sodium and increase potassium by eating more fresh fruits and vegetables and cutting way back on processed and restaurant foods. For more guidance, see the Sodium and Potassium fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, available to download at www.csrees.usda.gov/nea/food/pdfs/hhs_facts_so dium.pdf. Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

While gelatin was invented in 1845, JELL-O, which is a packaged gelatin dessert, did not get its name until 1897. Pearl B. Wait was the first person to develop a fruit-flavored gelatin and his wife gave the dessert its name.

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

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ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 bsnyder@leepub.com YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering. CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Bedding

Bedding

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Gypsum Bedding • Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Reduce mastitis & cell counts. • Use in place of Hydrated Lime. • Improves your soil • Available in bulk or bag.

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves. • Use less! More absorbent than lime products.

Try Grip X1 Today! www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Dealers wanted in select areas Also Available at: Central Dairy & Mech. Delmarva Farm Service Elam Miller Himrod Farm Supply Homestead Nutrition Genesee Valley Nutrition Levi Fisher Martin’s Ag New Bedford Elevator Norm’s Farm Store Robert Rohrer Steve B. Stoltzfus Walnut Hill Feeds

Martinsburg, PA Kennedyville, MD Fort Plain, NY Penn Yan, NY New Holland, PA Piffard, NY Honey Grove, PA Shippensburg, PA Baltic, OH Watsontown, PA Millmont, PA Lykens, PA Shelby, OH

Barn Repair BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580. BARNS, STEEL BUILDINGS, GARAGES. We repair them! From extensive renovations to minor repairs. 585-739-0263

Barn Equipment

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Bedding ANIMAL BEDDING: Kiln dried sawdust/woodchips. Bulk, up to 120yd. loads. Willow Creek Farms, 716-741-2599 CERTIFIED ORGANIC BEDDING HAY: 4x5 dry wrapped bales. Larchar Farms, 607847-8393 WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

Beef Cattle BRITISH WHITE HEIFERS, mostly July 2010. ready to breed, $1,500 OBO. 518-3292405 BULLS BULLS BULLS: 3 British White, 3 Murray Grey. Very nice! Call for prices 518-329-2405

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CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Beef Cattle

Beef Cattle

Trowbridge

BULL L SALE

May 5, 2012

Buildings For Sale

View Video Preview at www.TrowbridgeFarms.com Phil 518-369-6584

CUSTOM BUILT

Freestall Heifer Commodity Machinery Storage Bldgs

R.. & C.. Konfederath Corfu, NY

Building Materials/Supplies

Building Materials/Supplies

VISTA BUILDERS, INC. GENERAL CONTRACTORS for

AGRICULTURAL & COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Freestalls, Parlors, Commodity Sheds, Machinery & Heifer Buildings

CALL (315) 492-1289

585-599-3640 716-474-3348 Business Opportunities

Concrete Products

SAFE A T LA ST

• Gluelam Poles, Lumber, Trusses (Direct Shipments - Wholesale, Retail)

Dairy Cattle 14 CERTIFIED ORGANIC crossbred springing heifers, due April. 585-593-1631 35 HEIFERS bred 4-5 months for sale. 607-769-5199 50 COW AI Holstein herd, 70# average, SCC 150,000, 35 first & second lactation. 717468-1561

All Cuts Vacuum Packed and Bar-Coded for Tracking and a Complete Printed Inventory of Your Product

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Call For Appointment

95 WELL-GROWN freestall trained Holstein heifers due February & March. Had all shots. 315-269-6600

315-204-4089 or 315-204-4084 Custom Services

Custom Services

B.K. Transfer 5324 County Rd 14 Odessa, NY 14869

Barb Kelley Owner/Operator Licensed & Bonded

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete

24 ga, 26 ga, 28 ga, 29 ga, Plus Aluminum

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• Metal Roofing and Siding in Many Colors

Now Open & Booking Animals

EXPANDING COMPANY Looking for distributors of America’s #1 Pro-Biotics. 607351-1593

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS®

Midlakes Metal Sales

Rt. 8, Bridgewater, NY

Complete Renovations

ALL TYPES OF CONCRETE WORK

Custom Butchering

New York Custom Processing, LLC

ROCK CONSTRUCTION

60 bulls sell - Angus, Red Angus, Hereford Single Source - Family Operation - 100% Guarantee at Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, Canandaigua, NY

Custom Butchering

Herd Expansions

WANTED All Size Heifers

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Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

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• Trucking Available

Cell 607.227.5282 Working With You, The Farmer

Monday 9am - 4pm Thursday 9am - 3pm

HOLSTEIN HEIFER for sale, due in March, $1,300. 315595-2537

Custom Services

Custom Services

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

• Free Stalls • Holding Areas • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

See Us at The New York Farm Show - Booth HT0367 Cow Mats

Cow Mats

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Page 22

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

607-869-9483

Buildings For Sale

Buildings For Sale

Designed, Constructed and Warranted by Morton Buildings, Inc.

ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS Can Erect & Finish

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E

THES SAVE ERS FOR B NUM PARLOR THE

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

OVERSTOCKED!

WANTED: Freestall parlor barn for 120 cows. Financially secure, have equipment and cows. 806-685-0126

REG. BROWN SWISS COWS & HEIFERS Records to 30,000lbs.

Sunny Acres Farm Over 50 Years of Breeding

Lester Tyler

607-286-7620 REG. HOLSTEIN COWS High Type - High Production Fresh Cows Milking 80-100 lbs.

Show Calves - Breeding Bulls Call Greg 518-284-2991

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

40 Years Experience

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250 HEIFERS

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds (ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Dairy Equipment 6000 Mueller 900 Mueller 4500 Mueller 850 Sunset 4000 Mueller 800 Universal 3500 Mueller 800 Sunset 3000 Girton 800 Mueller 3000 Mueller 800 Surge 2-3000 S.S. 735 Sunset Sugar Tanks 700 Mueller 2500 Mueller 625 Sunset 2-2000 Mueller 600 Mueller 1500 Mueller 545 Sunset 1500 Surge 500 Mueller 1350 Mueller 400 Mueller 1000 Zero 310 Sunset 3-1000 Mueller 300 Mueller 1000 Surge 250 Mueller New Sunset Tanks New & Used Compressors 200-4000 Gal. StorageTanks Used Freheaters

585-732-1953 1000’S OF PARTS FOR SALE Mueller, Westfalia, Surge, Ritchie, Clay, Norbco, Condi & More!

61 Years in Business

Tarryk’s Farm Supply 860-822-6013 625 GALLON SUNSET bulk tank w/cooling unit, Surge Alamo vacuum pump, 6½HP, 3” line; Complete DeLaval pipeline system, 1½” line; (2) 12x50 cement silos. 315-5369781 Approx. 250’ Berg L.H. High Flite G.C. Chain, VGC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.00’ Berg Sandmark 12’x12” Belt Conveyor w/Balder Motor, Like New .$850.00 Kelly Single Chain, H.D. 12’ Conveyor, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000 Several Used G.C. Units by Patz, Badger, Malco, Jamesway, Clay, Etc. CALL

716-532-2040

COMPLETE MILKING SYSTEM: MUELLER bulk tank, 500 gallon, with compressor; Surge pipeline, electronic pulsation, 5 units, 160-200’ of pipe, plus more. Call For Details, 315-737-5095

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

2 JOHN DEERE 348 Wire Balers, good condition, $10,000 & $15,000; 10 hay wagons w/good running gears, $1,850 each. 315-2461648

ARRIVING NOW! Several trailer loads of Case IH 1640 & 1660 combines. Eleven (11) now in stock. Prices reduced. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322

SEVERAL USED Double 6 and 8 parlors w/ATO’s and 3” low lines complete. Several 2”: pipelines, used vacuum pumps, receiver groups, claws, ATO’s, washer boxes, etc. 585-732-1953

2 WESTFIELD grain augers, 8”x61’, 1-2008, 1-2011, wind damaged. For information call 585-746-6205 days

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

Call 888-596-5329 for Your Subscription

THINK SPRING! IH & WHITE PLOWS & PARTS

JD 9420 4500 HRS . . . . . . . . . . . . .$92,500 JD 4650 MFD NEW PS . . . . . . . . . .$29,500 JD 4050 MFD PS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,500 CIH 7120 MFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,500 CIH 4366 NICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 IH 3588 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,250 IH 1086 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,250 IH 1066 MFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 IH 1066 W/LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 IH 1066 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,900 IH 966 FENDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,250 IH 856 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,250 IH 806 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 IH 656 WEAK HYDRO . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 IH 424 W/LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 FD 4100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 FD/NH 8870 MFD NICE . . . . . . . . . .$33,500

BOBCAT CT225 W/LDR NEW . . . . .$14,900 JD 9510 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$69,900 JD 9510 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,000 JD FLEX HEADS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL JD CORN HEADS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL JD 8300 DRILL W/GRASS . . . . . . . . .$3,750 KILLBROS 350 GRAVITY BOX NICE .$2,200 CORN PLANTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL ELWOOD 4WD UNIT . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 IH & WHITE PLOWS 4X-10X . . . . . . .CALL FRONT END LOADERS NEW & USED CALL CASE 8430 ROUND BALER . . . . . . .$5,000 1ST CHOICE GS520-4 TEDDER . . . .$4,250 CHISEL PLOWS 9-17 SHANK . . . . . .CALL 33FT AL DUMP TRAILER . . . . . . . . . .CALL LOTS OF DUALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL IH, JD, FD TRACTOR WEIGHTS . . . . .CALL

Alternative Parts Source Inc. Chittenango, NY •

Farm Equipment ALLIS CHALMERS dozer, HD4, 6-way blade, and brush rake. $8,000 or best offer. 585-993-2173

Farm Machinery For Sale 1 YEAR Motor & transmission warranty on all combines sold. Nobody has warranty like this! zeisloftequip.com 800-9193322 $1,000 OFF ALL Corn Heads & Grain Heads in Stock. Largest Selection on East Coast. Zeisloft Farm Eq. 800919-3322 1996 JD 9500 sidehill 4x4, used on our farms over 600 acres. Really did well. Was $66,500, now $64,500. 1 year motor & trans. warranty. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322 1997 JD 8100 8.1 5200hrs, 4x4, radar, duals, 4-remotes, 540/1000, clean, $65,000 OBO. 315-253-3409 1999 JD 7810 MFWD, 18.4x42 75%, 4 hyd., very sharp tractor, $59,900. JD 4450, $4,455, 2WD. 800-9193322 zeisloftequip.com

315-687-0074

Farm Machinery For Sale

B&E MANUFACTURING: Kicker racks, slant bar feeders, headlock feeders, round bale carriers, low profile bale carriers. 315-536-9513 NEW HOLLAND 258 hay rake w/ dolly wheels. Not very old, excellent condition, with nice paint. Asking $2,800. IH 710 4 bottom auto-reset plow, excellent condition, with all new wear parts. Asking $1,800. 607-532-8512

Best Price! Buy Now! • Pallet Forks - $595.00 Universal Attach Also Buckets for Skid Steers Price Subject to Change

Farm Machinery For Sale

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist 1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

BRILLION 26’ X-FOLD PACKER, nice, $9,200; 4 Kilbros gravity bins w/gears. 315-5363807

Burkholder Repair LLC 315-536-8446

CASE IH 7140 MFWD, 6000 hours, local trade, new interior, new exhaust, $42,900. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

‘07 JD 6615 cab, 4WD, syncro, 4800 hrs . . . .$27,500 ’83 JD 2950 cab, 4WD, high&low dual hyd . .$13,500 JD 5510 ROPS 4WD, pwr reverser w/541 ldr. . . .Call ‘07 JD 5325 ROPS, 4WD, dual hyd . . . . . . . .$15,800 ’97 Daewoo DD80 cab, 6-way blade, hydro . .$12,500 Penn Yan, NY 315-536-8919

PRICES REDUCED Bes t in Nor theas t No w in the South

2-JD 9550 sidehill combines just arrived. One is exceptional quality. Both low hours, 3.7% fin. Zeisloft Eq. 800-9193322. 1 yr. warranty on eng. trans. 2008 NEW HOLLAND T5070 MFWD, cab, low hours, only $33,900; Case IH 5240 MFWD, cab, with big loader, $32,900; Ford 6710 MFWD, cab, loader, $24,000. All great buys! Zeisloft Farm Eq., Bloomsburg, PA 800-9193322 2010 NH 163 tedder, very little use, $6,000; 2002 NH 1412 discbine, flail conditioner, field ready, $8,500; White 588 6 bottom, plow, spring reset, sidehill hitch, full set of dished coulters, $3,800. 315-3918949 430 S.S. WEAVERLINE electric silage feed cart w/new motor, charger included, good shape, $1,800. 814-334-5452

BEST WARRANTY: 1 Year Parts on Motor & Transmission, most all combines BEST QUALITY: Selected Direct from Farm or OEM Dealers BEST SELECTION: Just visit website; We got em BEST TRUCKING: Lowest Rates Available BEST “TRUE” INTEREST: 3.7% 3 Years • 4.2% 5 Years • 4.9% 7 Years Over 25+ Years Selling Combines WE WANT TO SELL YOU YOUR NEXT COMBINE Bloomsburg, PA • Route 44 (Jerseytown) 328 Danville Rd. (Near I-80)

9’ ROTO-PRESS BAGGER Bag Lift, Nice Shape $

12,500 OBO

518-829-7790

TOLL FREE 800-919-3322 www.zeisloftequip.com

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 23

 WANTED 

We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email

Dairy Equipment

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Combine Salvage

K & J Surplus 60 Dublin Rd. Lansing, NY 14882 (607) 533-4850 • (607) 279-6232

TRANSPORT HAY ELEVATORS 1 1/2” square tubing, 14 gauge 24’ - 48’ Includes Motor & Wheels Other sizes available Call for prices.

We Custom Build Wagon Gears - 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 Ton

MILO MFG. • PENN YAN, NY

315-536-8578

Lower your feed cost! Save an average of 3 to 4 lbs of grain per cow per day Going from non processing to a processor. $6.00 corn. . . .

Farm Machinery For Sale CASE IH MX110, 2 or 4WD; MXM155, cab, 4WD; Maxxum 5220, cab, PS, 4WD; Quicke loader; Same 45 compact, cab, 4WD, loader, 600 hours; MF 1529, 4WD, L100 loader, 29hp, 7 hrs.; White 2-110, 4WD; IH 885 highway wing mowers; JD 4630, PS, 4WD, nice; one owner Ag Chem 544 Rogator sprayer, 500 gallon 80’ boom, Raven radar controller, 27mph, 3 speed hyrdo, 4WD, 14.9x38 tires, wash-off tank w/pressure washer; low hour Krone Big M 30’ discbine, 4WD, 28mph; NH L885 skid loader, 2 spd. Penn Yan, 315-536-8718 CASE/AMCO, 24’ folding disc, H.D. bearings, 18” blades, rock flex, asking $6,000/OBO. 716-213-7843

LANSING, NY 607-533-4850 Nights 607-279-6232 Days

Page 24

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

USED COMBINE & CHOPPER PARTS

TRACTORS Minot dsl., 3pt. . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 JD 5210 dsl. . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 JD 4x2 Gator, exc. . . . . . . . $4,200 ENGINES JD 404T, 466T, 329, AC 3500, AC F2 MISC. TCI 5 Ton Fertilizer Spreader SS. . $2,850 Goosen Bale Chopper, 3pt., Commercial. . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 Winpower Generator 12-20kw . . . $1,250 Brillion Cultipacker, 12' . . . . . $750 TILLAGE JD 2700 5x18 . . . . . . . . . . . $2,200 JD 2600 5x18 . . . . . . . . . . . $2,200 Chisel Plow 3pt., 7 Shank. . $1,200 DRILLS Brillion 10' Seeder . . . . . . . $2,350 JD 8250 w/Seeder . . . . . . . $2,250

DRILLS JD 8350 DD . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 IH 5100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 JD 4 Row Precision Planter. . $850 SPRAYERS Century 300 Gallon Chicken Wing Booms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 Century 500 Gallon . . . . . . $1,250 BALERS JD 336 w/Kicker . . . . . . . . . $2,450 NH 273 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 Steel Rack Wagons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,200 & $2,600 COMBINES Header Cart . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 JD 643. . . . . . . . . $5,700 & $4,750 JD 343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,200 213-216 Grain Heads . . . . . . . Call IH 810 16.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 IH 863 4x30. . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,600 JD Chopper Mount Plate . . . . $950

Farm Machinery For Sale

HYRDAPUSH Manure Spreader, Leon 585, top beater & gate, excellent condition, $15,000. No Sunday calls. 315-946-0087

IH 6-Bottom Spring-Reset Plow, on-land hitch, could be in-furrow, coulters & hitchiker, VGC, $6,000/OBO. 585-7348457

IH 800 12 bottom spring reset trailer plow; IH 11 shank disk chisel; IH 10 shank disk chisel; Glencoe 7 shank disk chisel. 315-536-3807

IH 700 trailer, 7 bottom, good condition; White 498, 4,5&6 bottom; IH 720 6 bottom onland, nice. 315-536-3807

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

MABIE BROS., INC. See the Krone Difference for Size, Strength and Unmatched Durability

CIH 8575 big square baler, 60,000 bales, works good, $28,000. Call Lewis at 315531-9315 COLLECTION of restored Farmall F12 & BN offset; A offset Woods belly mower; JD 3020 power shift, gas. 315536-8718

Corn Planter Sale

K & J SURPLUS

Farm Machinery For Sale

CIH 5500 grain drill; Krause Dominator; CIH Steiger STX375; CIH 7088 Combine. 585370-4653

COMBINE:Case IH 2388, 4WD, loaded, w/2 heads 2206 & 2020, great condition, $135,000. 540-825-6929

GET A

Farm Machinery For Sale

JD 7200 4 Row Vac, No-Till Dry Fert., Nice Shape . . . . . . .$6,500 JD 7200 6 Row Vac, Dry Fert., Nice Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 CIH 955 6 Row No Till, Dry Fert. w/15” Interplants . . . . . . .$15,000

518-848-4669 Farmall 706 gas Int. 1486 dsl. 12 Row C-Shank Cultivator Int. 5100 Grain Drill w/Seeder Large Selection of Gravity Wagons & Running Gears to Choose From JD Chisel Plows Available Pull Type & 3pt. Hitch Wide Selection of Used Plows & Tillage Parts On Hand

KEN BENSON FARM EQUIPMENT Avon, NY

585-330-5555 Cell 585-624-1751 Glencoe F511A 9-shank chisel plow, with coulters & 4 wheels. $9,000. 585-948-5843

SW 42T 13’ 9” Rake

$149/Mo. with 15% down

1.9% for 60 Mos.

On Most Rakes, Tedders, Mowers and Balers Offer good til 2-28-12

8571 1 Kinderhook k Rd. . Kirkville, , NY Y 13082

315-687-7891 1 • 315-510-2400

MabieBros.Com m

2010 Case IH 335 & 305 Both Loaded, 3 PTO’s, 5 Remotes, Duals front & rear, H.D. Drawbar, Q-hitch, Luxury Leather Cab, “EXTENDED” warranty, 200 Hrs, . . . . . . . . . Call for Great Price 2010 Case IH 245 C/A MFD, 46” Duals, Wts., 4 Remotes, Q-hitch, Only 1045 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $137,500 2008 Case IH 245 Magnum C/A MFD, 46” Duals, Wts., 4 Remotes, Q-hitch, 3100 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $112,000 Case IH 255 Magnum C/A MFD, 46” Duals, Wts., 4 Remotes, Q-hitch, 4500 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $79,500 Case IH 7140 C/A MFD, Duals, Wts., 4 Remotes, 4800 Hrs . $52,500 Case IH MX 120 C/A MFD, 1900 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $46,500 Case IH MXM 120 C/A MFD, Loader, 3400 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . $47,500 JD 8330 C/A MFD, 46” Duals, 4 Remotes, Green Star Ready, Q-hitch, Sold New in Ohio, 1200 Hrs., Warranty . . . . Call for Great Price JD 8410 C/A MFD, 46” Duals, 4 Remotes, Q-hitch, Front & Rear Wts., 4300 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,000 JD 6715 C/A MFD, P.Q. w/L.H. Rev, Only 1775 Hrs . . . . . . . . $45,500 JD 4020 w/JD 148 Ldr., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,500 JD 2550 2 Wheel, Nice Little Tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 JD 313 Skid Steer, Only 148 Orig. Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 New Holland D-C 85 Dozer, Hydro, 6-way, 2200 Orig. Hrs., ex. cond., Compare Anywhere! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,500 New Holland 115-A C/A 4x4 w/Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,500 New Holland 4630 Turbo 4x4 w/Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 Ford 7740 2 Wheel, PTO, 3ph, 2 Remotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,700 Ford 3000-D 2 Wheel, PTO, 3ph, Remotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500

See us at www.andrewsfarm.com

ANDREWS FARM EQ. INC. Conneautville, PA 814-587-2450

IH dsl. dump truck, $3,000; new dump trailer, $5,000; 9 ton trailer, $1,500; Excavator, $12,500; Case 450 Dozer, $8,500; JD 350C Dozer, $11,500; White 4x4 ldrhoe, $9,000; Case ldrhoe, $6,000. JD 4630, nice, $12,500; JD tractor & ldr, compact, $10,500; Hesston 4x4 w/cab, $9,000; White 4x4 w/cab, 135hp, nice, $12,500; Int. 4x4, $13,500; David Brown, $3,500; Baler, $2,000; Round Baler $1,500; Corn Picker, $1,500; Corn & Flail Choppers, $1,200 up. 6 4x4 Blazers & pickups. Several balers; many discbines; hay wagons; hay rakes; tedders; land plows; discs; 300+ tractors; several Woodsplitters; Brush Hogs, Harrows, Plows & more. Acres of equipment; also parts. Buying Machines Dead or Alive

518-634-2310

JD 4630, 5,140Hrs., 2WD, Pwr. Shift trans., cab w/AC, 2 Hyd., 20.8x38 rear tires, runs strong. $16,000/OBO. 585750-6208 JD 8300 drill, 21x7, seeder, double disc, packer wheels, excellent, $4,500; JD 230 disc, 26’, 22” disc blade, like new, $6,700; White 271 Rock flex disc, 23’, 20” blades, $6,500; White Oliver 252 disc, 16’, mechanical fold, good blade, $2,950; JD 13’ B-W disc, $2,300; (6) Yetter no-till coulters for liquid fertilizer, $75.00/each. Mike Franklin, 607-749-3424 JD 8420, 8200, 7920, 7700, 7405, 7210, 6615, 5500, 5400, 4955, 4560; Case IH 215, MX200, 8930, 7140, MX135, MX120, JX95, C80. NH 900 chopper. Degelman 14’ blade. 585-732-1953 JD BALER PARTS: Used, New Aftermarket and rebuilt. JD canopy new aftermarket, $750. Call for pictures. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705

John Deere 2840 w/148 loader, 80hp, 500 hrs. on new engine, tires 90%, no cracks or welds on loader, nice shape . . . . . .$13,000 OBO Tubeline Bale Boss 1 big bale shredder, skid steer mount, like new . . .$10,500

315-725-0139 JOHN DEERE 4890 self propelled winrower, one owner, excellent condition, 2300 hours; 1850 Oliver tractor, 100hp, w/Perkins diesel engine. 518-843-0999

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

JOHN DEERE 6400 MFWD, dual hydraulics, open station, rebuilt trans, 540/1000 PTO, good condition, $14,500. 315536-3807

NEW SKID LOADER ATTACHMENTS

JOHN DEERE 7000, 6 row corn planter, dry fertilizer, $5,500. 607-769-5199 JOHN DEERE 8420, duals, weights, power shift, $104,000. Brand New NH TD5050, 4x4, cab. 315-447-3008 JOHN DEERE sound guard cab for 3150 w/new compressor & condenser, $3,600 OBO. Nelson Parts 315-5363737

JOHN DEERE TRACTOR PARTS Many New Parts in Stock RECENT MODELS IN FOR SALVAGE:

•6420 burnt •6215 burnt •E4020 •L4020 PS •E3020 •4240 •3010 • 2950 4WD • 2840 • 2630 • 2550 4WD • 2010 • 830 We Rebuild Your Hydraulic Pumps, SCV Valves, Steering Valves, etc. All Units are Bench Tested Many Used Tractor Parts Already Dismantled CALL FOR YOUR NEEDS

NELSON PARTS Penn Yan, NY

800-730-4020 315-536-3737 JUST PURCHASED: JD 2755, 2WD, local tractor, nice; JD 4450 & JD 4455, just arrived. Sharp JD 4620, 2WD, new transmission (power shift), w/duals $34,900. 800919-3322 zeisloftequip.com

• Buckets • Manure Forks • Pallet Forks • Bale Spears • Round Bale Grabbers • Feed Pushers • Adapter Plates • Skid Steer Hitch

Truck Freight Available

MARTIN’S WELDING 315-531-8672

SITREX TEDDER, $2,200; Deutz-Fahr tedder, $2,100; JD 336, ejector, $2,950; JD 224, chute, $1,500; JD 328, chute, $6,500; JD 338, ejector, $7,900; NH 853 round baler, $1,900; NH 315, thrower, $1,900; H&S 14 wheel rake, $3,400; Diller rack wagon, $2,600; JD #40 ejectors, $1,400-$1,750. Nelson Horning, 585-526-6705

MACK ENTERPRISES Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

NH 8560, TW15, 8830, 9700; Case 4890, 4494, 2870, 2470, 1370, 2590, 2390. Schulte Jumble 320 rock picker. 585732-1953

Organic Weed Control

Weeder w/Kovar Tines Horse Drawn 5’-15’ - 3pt. 5’-46½’ Many Options Available

PARTING OUT: Case 450 crawler loader w/ripper, good 207 engine, undercarriage & bucket, etc. Or sell as is for $4,900.00. 607-243-8810

KICKER BALE WAGONS $2,350; 8 & 10 Ton Running Gears, $1,325-$1,500; 20’ Bale Carriers, $2,750. Horst’s Welding, 585-526-5954

PATZ 98C 16’-20’ SILO Unloader, unloaded 2 silos; 8’ Kelly Ryan bagger; 2-34” IH cast centers 3-1/4” axles. 716-665-9416

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293

1-800-599-71500 315-258-4394 Grieg Dougherty • Richard Damaske Carter Riley • Greg Creeden Jeff Kuney • Dan Campbell (Distiller Sales)

WANTED TO BUY: Weathervanes, lightning rods, glass balls, arrows, insulators for lightning rods. 315-497-1704 WANTED: 80-100 tons of corn silage; hay head for 900 New Holland chopper. 585-5546116 WANTED: DC2350 GEHL discbine for parts. 315-5760163 WANTED: Potato sprayer (high pressure); also Allis Chalmers farm implements working or non-working. 315677-9511

All New Contraction Options - Call For Details

GRAIN AND INGREDIENT MERCHANDISERS ORIGINATING CORN & MARKETING DISTILLERS FOR SUNOCO ETHANOL PLANT , F ULTON , NY

Custom Roasting and Cooling Your Soybeans, Corn, Etc. at Your Farm or Mill. “ R O A S T I T, C O O L I T ! ” Serving All of NY State.

Weiler’s Grain Roasting (315) 549-7081 SEE US AT THE NEW YORK FARM SHOW CENTER OF PROGRESS BUILDING LOT 177 Call 800-836-2888 to place your classified ad.

Farm Supplies

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Green Haven Open Pollinated Corn Seed ***Silage, Grain, Wild Life Plots ***Available Certified Organic ***Early Varieties ***Free Catalog ***Green Haven Open Pollinated Seed Group

607-566-9253

www.openpollinated.com

Buy New Tractors?

GIVE ME A BREAK Mowing is the easiest Task it’ll ever perform!

PleasantCreekHay.com

Save Time - Labor - Fuel with Extended Drain Intervals & Better Protection = $ Used Oil Analysis Available

RIDER OIL

Independent Dealer

585-657-6496 or 585-261-0593 www.rideroil.com

roger@rideroil.com

(315)) 549-82266 Romulus, NY 14541

MEDIUM RED CLOVER, good cover crop, very good nitrogen supply, excellent feed for $1.30Lb, over 2,000Lb $1.20Lb. Bay Farms 585-7476272 OAT SEED: Cleaned. Available bulk or bagged, 98% germ. 585-737-6465 RED CLOVER SEED for sale, $70.00 per bushel or $1.20 per pound. 315-536-8675

REED CANARY GRASS SEED, tested for purity and germ, $2.50/lb. Pete Block 814-757-8495, 814-730-5595 please leave message, speak clearly.

Fencing

R & R FENCING LLC • • • •

Equine Livestock Post Driving Pasture & Paddock Design BRIAN ROSS

585-599-3489 9479 Alleghany Rd Corfu NY 14036 15 Years of Professional Fencing Installations “Quality You Can Trust”

STABLE FENCES & VINEYARDS LLC

POST POUNDING

3 Board • Split Rail HT Wire • Ag Fence Chain Link • Vinyl Residential • Commercial www.stablefences.com

585-349-4119

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 25

Maine e To o North Carolina

WANTED TO BUY: Used farm & construction equipment, running or not. Early or late models 1970’s & newer. Will 315-777-2357

Farm Supplies

NEW AND USED CHOPPER PARTS for New Holland 770 to FP240. John Deere 3940 to 3975. NEW Horning crop processors. NEW & USED New Holland baler parts & service. Closed Sundays. 607-243-5555

188 Genesee St. - Suite 209 Auburn, NY 13021

814-793-4293

Call Bob at 716-984-7442

PARTING OUT: Case 930, 970, 1070, 1370, 2290, 1394, 1494; Ford 8000, 6000, 4000; Int. 5088, 1586, 986, 886. New & Used tires & rims of all sizes. 585-732-1953

LOWEST PRICES on combines are always Feb. & March. Save some major money this time of year. 1 year motor & tran. Warranty loves you to next February. 800919-3322 zeisloftequip.com

Buying Corn, Feed Wheat & Oats

165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

Farm Machinery Wanted

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

YOUR SOURCE FOR:

WANTED

WHITE 4/5 bottom plow, spring reset, parts available. 315-331-5942

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

• Livestock Feeds • Ration Balancing • SeedWay Seeds • Crystalyx Products

Massey Ferguson

JUST PURCHASED: JD 4555 MFWD, low hours & sharp, farm sale tractor, $55,000. Zeisloft Farm Eq. 800-9193322

LOOK! BEST VALUE ON LOT. 1995 Case IH 5240, MFWD, w/excellent loader, only $32,900. Tractor alone is worth that! Zeisloft Eq. 800919-3322

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Farm Machinery For Sale

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Fencing

Fencing

SHAMROCK FARMS (585) FENCING

• Posts • Board • Split Rail • HT Wire • Vinyl • Energizers

669-2179

DAN FITZPATRICK

8408 CARNEY HOLLOW RD., WAYLAND, NY 14572 Sales & Installations Building Since 1981

E FARM FENCE & SUPPLY EMPIR “Miles of Quality Start Here”

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Heating

Help Wanted

DAIRY MANAGER

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

This position is ultimately responsible for the health, safety and performance of the milking herd. Position is a leadership and supervisory role with a team of employees who assist you in completing the day to day activities required to operate a large commercial dairy. Salary range $60,000+, with future ownership opportunity. Please send resume to

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

• High Tensile • Split Rail • Misc. Types of Fence • Energizers • Fencing Supplies

Dirk@twinbirch.net & Steve@twinbirch.net Or call Steve at

4097 Rt. 34B, Union Springs, NY 13160 RUSTIN WILSON

315-730-4111

(315) 364-5240

E & A FENCE

Help Wanted

771 State Highway 163, Fort Plain, NY

DAIRY FARM EQUIPMENT OPERATOR/MECHANIC

Bringing Security For Them Peace of Mind For You ~ Sales & Installation of All Types of Fence ~ Visit Our Retail Location by Appointment

518-993-5177

Quality First - Always Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

LIME Kersch’s Ag

585-322-7778 585-734-0003

GYPSUM

Page 26

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Financial Services

For Sale

TINGLEY

• Hi-Top Work Rubbers* #1300 - $17.00/pr • 10” Closure Boots* #1400 - $22.00/pr • 17” Knee Boots #1500 - $26.00/pr Sizes S, M, L, XL, 2X, & 3X

Naples Distributors (888) 223-8608

www.NaplesDistributors.com

Financial Services

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY FOR SALE: 4x5 dry wrapped bales. Larchar Farms, 607-847-8393

ALWAYS WANTED

HAY SAVER Plus Hay Preservative, 68% Propionic Acid. 87¢ per pound. Product available in Waterloo, NY. Delivery Available. Conoy Ag, Elizabethtown, PA 717-367-5078

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cuttings Also Small Square Mulch

TIMOTHY MIXED HAY ALFALFA MIXED HAY Call 4M FARMS 315-684-7570 • 315-559-3378

H AY

Help Wanted

Farmer to Farmer

Help Wanted

Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

WRITERS WANTED

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper.

519-482-5365 MADE IN AMERICA!!! Quality Hay = Healthier Animals! All hay is tested and meets production and nutrient needs... Dry Round, Square & Wrapped, 1st, 2nd, 3rd & 4th. Delivery available. 845-9857866

Knowledge of the industry a must.

WANTED

NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

Assist in operating equipment used in agricultural production. Responsibilities will also include maintaining and repairing modern farm equipment in heated shop. Competitive salary & benefits. Respond with references & phone numbers to set up appointment for interview.

315-696-8051

Hay & Straw - All Types

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Job opportunity immediately available in CNY for full time year-round work.

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

WANTED: 1st & 2nd cut big & small squares. 315-363-9105

Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles. Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Help Wanted

HEAD FEEDER POSITION

Available on an Expanding 1,000 Cow Dairy in CNY A successful candidate will be a motivated individual who will be responsible for mixing and delivering a total mixed ration to the dairy herd as well as overseeing bunk management and feed equipment preventative maintenance. Experience operating machinery, a valid driver’s license, a willingness to learn, and a positive attitude are a must. Experience as a feeder is helpful, but we are willing to train the right person. Contact Chris At 315-729-3186 after 7PM A job description is available upon request

HERDSPERSON wanted on a 200 cow dairy, salary and benefits based on experience. Call 315-823-7004.

Large Dairy Farm Located in Cayuga County, NY Is seeking a goal-oriented team player to join our crop crew. Ideal candidate will have a class A CDL, knowledge of dairy farming, and strong mechanical and operation skills. A positive attitude and willingness to learn are also a must.

Call

315-729-0438

SERVICE TECH NEEDED For Leading Feed & Manure Handling Dealer Clean license, mechanical, electrical, welding, concrete experience required. Pay based on experience & ability to get to the job and get it done right in a timely fashion. If your employer is not doing you justice and you are good at what you do call

716-532-2040

Hoof Trimming

Affordable Hydraulic Hoof Trimming Tables • Heavy Duty Professional Quality • Increased Production With Less Effort

Parts & Repair

$ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Agricultural Belt Service

1-800-370-8454

SMALL White Percheron gelding, broke for wedding carriage, also rides. Also, team of well broke, older Belgian geldings, sound, shod. Erin C. Lundy 315-493-1051

Lawn & Garden MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

Livestock Equipment TAKING ORDERS for Calf Feeder Boxes. Complete, ready to feed calves. 607-7598354

Clearview Hatchery

Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT

PO Box 296, Chiefland, FL 32644 • www.shepswelding.net

Horses

Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction

SHEP’S WELDING, INC.

DRAFT HORSE Implements and Equipment. Having sold the Team of Drafts Offer the Following Equipment: Parade Wagon: Fifth Wheel, Metal, Seats 10 Adults. Built-in stairway for easy access, rubber tires, two poles, kept inside, excellent condition. Party or Ride Wagon: Wooden, stairs for easy access, holds 12 adults, kept inside, like new, two poles, attractive. White Horse Sulky Plow: Brand new, 12”, steel eveners, plow tongue with neck yoke, coulter, beautiful plow, kept inside. Syracuse 2-way Plow: New points, mold board, jointer, needs pole. Fore Cart: Seats two, heavy duty. Miscellaneous Equipment for Draft Horses: Neck Yokes, Eveners, Nylon Harnesses, Collard, etc. Call 585-542-9134

Poultry

“BELT T BUSTERS”

The Ultimate in Tilt Tables

Horse Equipment

Poultry & Rabbits

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services

• Models Available In Stationary & Portable • Limited Warranty

Parts & Repair

PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

Maintenance & Repair

Maintenance & Repair

Attention Building Owners Don’t tear down Your failing structures. We can repair them.

(717) 365-3234

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1. PHONE IT IN IT IN - For MasterCard, Visa, 2. FAX American Express or Discover customers, fill out the form below completely and Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381

3. calculate the cost, enclose your check or MAIL IT IN - Fill out the attached form,

credit card information and mail to:

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

4. E-MAIL E-mail your ad to classified@leepub.com - Go to 5. ON-LINE www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES! Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word. (Phone #’s count as one word) If running your ad multiple weeks: Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

West

East

New England

Classified Ad button to Mid-Atlantic place your ad 24/7!

Before

After

Performing structural renovations and general construction since 1965. With having been involved in over 30,000 projects we feel confident we can solve your problems

Place my ad in the following Zones:  Country Folks East  Country Folks West  Country Folks of New England  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle Number of weeks to run___________ Name(Print)________________________________________________________________ Farm/Company Name_________________________________________________________ Street___________________________________________County_____________________ City____________________________________________State______Zip______________

Woodford Bros., Inc.

Phone_______________ _______________ ____________________________________

Box 108, Apulia Station, NY 13020 1-800-OLD-BARN WWW.1-800-OLD-BARN.COM

Cell_________________ _______________ ____________________________________

Fax_________________ _______________ ____________________________________

e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard Card # ______________________________________________Exp. Date ______________ (MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card(Print)____________________________________________________

Maple Syrup Supplies

Parts & Repair

Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for credit card payment only)

4x12 STAINLESS STEEL evaporator and arch, good condition, 585-591-2952, Attica, NY

Parts

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

607-642-3293

(MM/DD/YY)

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS BATES CORPORATION 12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS! Call the IH Parts Specialists:

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

1-800-248-2955

15

16

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

17

18

1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week Call 800-836-2888 to place your classified ad.

STARTERS, ALTERNATORS, and GENERATORS for all domestic and import engines. Also HIGH TORQUE DIESEL STARTERS. Prompt Service 315-826-7892 Gary Sneath

19

20

1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

21

22

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week 1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week

23

24

1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 27

PROGRESSIVE Dairy, located in Cooperstown, NY, position available immediately for the right individual. Duties include: all types of field work with some maintenance, year round work. Class A or B CDL. Flexible hours, a team player with a passion for Ag. Eric 607-547-2797, 607-4355345

Hoof Trimming

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Poultry & Rabbits

Day Old Chicks: Broilers, Layers Turkeys, Ducks

NEPPA Hatchery Jill & Ken Gies 660 Fordsbush Road Ft. Plain, NY 13339 email: giespasture@frontiernet.net Write or call for prices & availability

518-568-5322 Real Estate For Sale CENTRAL VERMONT DAIRY for sale, 394 acres, double 8 parlor, 200+ cow capacity, slurry store, harvestore, bunk silos. $750,000 firm. Cows, machinery, and feed available. Call 860-836-1524 CHRISTMAS TREE FARM and split level house. Unique entrepreneurial opportunity, earn a second income, fourth bedroom off family room and office, large closets and pristine floors, open kitchen atmosphere, 2½ baths. Bloomfield,CT 860-989-2783

Roofing

Real Estate For Sale

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

WE HAVE OVER 20 FARMS FOR SALE THROUGHOUT PA. JOHN MATTILIO, BROKER

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

FARM AND LAND REALTY, INC. 717-464-8930

www.farmandlandrealtyinc.com

Real Estate Wanted

Real Estate Wanted

FARM WANTED: Married couple looking to buy farm now, but allow existing owners to live on and work the farm for up to 10 years. Farm must be at least 125 acres either tillable, pasture, or combination. We are looking for a farm that has a livable house and small workshop.

717-817-8480

facebook.com/Countryfolks Real Estate For Sale

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

(607)) 334-97277 Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net - Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Services Offered

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel

Fan Us On Facebook

Page 28

Roofing

e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture



David C. Posson, Broker

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING

ORGANIC DAIRY FARM/ CREAMERY, 318 acres. 8 miles from Cooperstown,NY. Two 3 bedroom homes, 100 cow freestall, Double 6 milking parlor. Many outbuilding for young stock, hay & equipment. New cheese room, aging facility & solar electric system. 200 acres fenced for grazing. $998,500. 607-2869362

Inquiries please call

Real Estate For Sale

Roofing

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2223 3 - Madison n Countyy Freee Stalll Operation- 500 acres, 330 tillable well drained high lime very productive soils w/additional 200 acres rented with more land available. 2 Modern Barns w/305 free stalls 2 other barns for 100 head of young stock or dry cows. 36x80 machinery building with heated shop. Large pad for corn silage and haylage. Separate heifer facility for 200 head of heifers available for rent close by. Good remodeled 2 story 3 bdrm home. This is a great area of Central NY to farm in. Everything is close by. 5 million Long growing season, good milk markets Askingg $1.35 #2254 4 - Neat,, Clean,, & Turn-key.. 220 acre farm, 160 exceptional well drained tillable acres with additional 40+ acres to rent. Balance mostly pasture, some woods. Two story 68 stall dairy barn with attached 80 stall free stall for dry cow and young stock. 3 very nice Morton machinery buildings. Nice 2 story 5 bedroom 3 bath Modern Home. This is truly an exceptional farm that has everything. Great milking facility, room for heifers and dry cows, plenty of

Real Estate For Sale

1-800-836-2888

To place a Classified Ad Real Estate For Sale

machinery storage, and enough supporting lands. Farm recently appraised by leading Ag Bank at close to $550,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $550,000,, cattle, machinery, and feed available 2311 1 - Madison n Countyy Farm m - 240 acre Farm bordering large State Land and the Brookfield Equine Trail System. 60+ acre tillable mostly hay 70 acres in pasture, balance woods. Older 2 story barn for 70 head of cattle. 2 out buildings for machinery storage. Older 2 story 5 bedroom home. Excellent hunting. Sits on a very quiet road with lots of possibilities. Raise beef or horses. Excellent hay making farm. Road frontage on two roads. Farm could be easily sub-divided for investment. Gas and Mineral rights convey. Owners are relocating their dairy operation to another area this spring and have priced this farm very reasonable to move it. Priced to sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $310,000 2280 0 - Otsego o Coun ntyy Dairyy Farm.. 25 acres total, 10 tillable, balance pasture. Plenty of additional land close by to rent or purchase feed dealers in the area. Single story conventional barn with 55 ties set up to milk. 20x80 young stock barn. 2 upright silos 20x60 & 18x60. Older 2 story 4 bdrm 2 bth home in good condition. New windows, new septic. All located on a quiet road, mins to Cooperstown. Buy for Dairy or would make a nice farm for horses or beef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $175,000. 2315 5 - Nearr Cortland d NY.. 26 acres of land with road frontage on two roads. Power and telephone. Mineral rights intact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $55,000. Owner would consider financing for qualified buyer.

• Sales & Installation • On The Farm Service • A Large Parts Inventory • Willing to Travel for Service Work • 7 Days a Week, Parts & Service • Financing Available

ART TIMMEL

3626 Brown St., Collins, NY 14034 Shop - (716) 532-2040 Eves & Weekends (716) 532-2919

Sheep 1-REG. TEXEL Ram, 3 year old, $350.00; 1-Cheviot Ram, 3 year old, $250.00. 607-8685648 SHEEP SHEERING: Quality sheering for flocks of any size. Will travel. Tate Reifsteck, 585-350-5740

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment NORTHEAST SILO DEMO: Need a cheap, quick & easy way to get your silo down? Will travel, give us a call. 518568-3560

REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

WANT TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD? CALL: 1-800836-2888 SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Tires & Tire Repair Service

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

The NEW

Tires & Tire Repair Service

SILO Corp.

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

www.leepub.com Trucks

Trucks

Martin’s Farm Trucks, LLC

Trucks for All Your Needs - Specializing in Agri-Business Vehicles

Arcade, N.Y.

(585) 492-1300 • Precast Bunk Silos 6’x8” to 13’-4” High • Silo Repair Service • Salt Storage Structures

11’ center wall

10’ side wall

13’4” side wall

Tractors, Parts & Repair FOR SALE: Farm machinery parts and older tractor parts. DON’s PLACE, formerly Knapp’s. 585-346-5777

11’T wall

2007 F/L FL112-M2 Day Cab Tractor, C13 Cat 380hp, Jake, 10spd 12/40 Axles, Air Susp, Quad Lock, Wet Line, 244 mi. $49,500

2005 F/LFL112-M2 Day Cab Tractor, Mercedes MBE4000, 450hp, Jake, 10spd, 12/46 Axles, Air Susp, Quad Lock, Wet Line, 296k mi. $49,500

2007 F/L CL120 Columbia 14L Det 515hp, Jake, 18spd, 20/20/46 Axles, All Alum Wheels, 17.5’ Steel Dump Body, Steerable Lift Axle, Spring Susp, 30k original mi. $99,500

1998 Mack RD688S Feed Truck E7-400hp, Jake, Mack T2090, Double Frame, Air Susp, 18/13/44/20 Axles, Steerable Lift Axle, 24’ Ledwell Auger Body, 584k mi. $29,500

Trailers TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

WANTED: Used Slurrystore. Please call 717-363-6741.

Skid Steer Loaders FOR SALE: Bobcat 743 B skid steer, $5,000 OBO. 607359-2826

888-497-0310

Trucks

CALEDONIA DIESEL, LLC

Tires & Tire Repair Service

TRUCK & EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE “The Diesel People!”

2905 Simpson Rd., Caledonia, NY

585-538-4395 • 1-800-311-2880 Since 1982

Just 1 mile south of Route 20 on 36 south

FARM AND FLEET TIRE SERVICE 3165 Route 246 Perry, NY 14530 585-237-2124

CALL FOR YOUR PRICING NEEDS

1999 Kenworth C500B HD Dump Truck Cummins N14 460hp, 8LL, 18k front axle, 65k full locking rears, 17’ x 84” high body, 234,725 miles, double frame. $38,900

2000 Sterling Drywall Boom/Flatbed, Cat 3306 300hp with engine brake, 8LL, 18k front axle, 46k full locking rears, double frame, 25’ deck, 30’ of frame behind cab, 177,269 miles. Fasse 300SE boom lift. Rubber 90%. $38,500 We will separate the boom from the chassis.

2007 IH 4300 Single Axle Cab & Chasis, DT466, Automatic, 272” wheelbase, 202” cab to axle, 21 1/2’ frame. 141,280 miles, 25,999 GVW $31,000

(Qty 3) 2000 IH 4700 Bucket Trucks 7.6L 230hp, Allison automatic, double frame Dakota utility body, rear mount 50’ bucket with 4 stabilizers, 26,000 miles. $19,900 each

2009 Peterbilt 367 Daycab Cat C-15 475hp, 8LL, air ride cab, 20k front axle, 46k rears, air ride, 220” wheelbase, aluminum wheels, 364,000 miles. Call for Price

Your Firestone Farm Tire Headquarters

• Radial • Implement • Bias • Flotation

• Front • Rice & Cane • Rear • Specialty

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

2008 Kenworth W900 Daycab, Cat C-15 475hp, 13 speed, 13,200# front axle, 46k full locking rears, aluminum wheels, 165k miles, southern truck $94,900

Please check our Web site @ www.caledoniadiesel.com

1999 Western Star 4964SX Cat 3406E 600hp, 18 speed, 20k front axle, 46k full locking rears, 4 lift axles, 25’ of frame behind the cab (double), 195” C-T, Chalmers suspension, aluminum wheels $55,000

2005 Sterling LT9522 Dump Truck, Detriot 14L 515hp, 8LL, 18k front, 46k rears, clean southern truck, 16’ aluminum body with tarp, 230,000 miles, good rubber $54,000

SIX 9x20 TRUCK TIRES, $10.00 each. 315-539-0339

It’s easy & economical to add a picture to your ad!

For Information Call

1-800-836-2888

(Qty 2) 2005 IH 9400i Cummins ISX450hp, 10 speed, air ride, 410k miles, 72” double bunk sleepers, rubber 90%, $34,900 each

2003 Deere 160C LC Excavator 5523 Hours, cab with heat & A/C, Good U/C, long stick, 28” pads, 36” bucket $53,500

Aluminum Grain Hopper Trailers in stock and arriving weekly. Prices Starting at $22,500

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 29

2006 Deere 310G 4x4 Backhoe, EROPS, Extenda-hoe, 2050 Hrs. Excellent Condition $46,950

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Trucks

Trucks

19755 PROGRESSS TANKER 7,500 gallon, hub pilot, new 16 ply recap tires, 24x24 rear filler with doors, 24’x8’ boom, can field spread, 30 feet long trailer, clean sharp trailer.

Call Chuck Hainsworth at 585-734-3264

1990 International 4900 DT466 6 Speed Trans., 33,000 GVW, Air Brakes, 22’ Dump Flat, Cheap! Priced To Sell Or Trade

1997 J&B 36’ x 102” Aluminum Dump Trailer, 92” Sides, Swing Gate, Electric Tarp, Spring Suspension, Double Landing Gear, VERY CLEAN Priced To Sell Or Trade

2004 International 7500 All Wheel Drive, Full Locking Rears, DT530 300HP, Fuller 9 Speed O.D. Transmission, Exhaust Brake, Air Brakes, 33,000 GVW, Only 53,000 Miles, NO RUST, With or Without 14’ Dump Flat, Pintle Hook, Priced To Sell Or Trade

1997 Ford L9000 350 Cat - Jake, 9 Speed Trans., 18,000 Front, 20,000 Lift Axle, 46,000 Rears, Hendrickson Walking Beam, Double Frame, 16’ Steel Ox Body, Cheap! Priced To Sell Or Trade

ADVANTAGE TRUCKS (716) 685-6757 www.advantagetrucks.com

Calendar of Events WEST

Page 30

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

FEB 7 - SEP 17 Raising Livestock in Tioga County 56 Main St., Owego, NY. 6-8 pm. You will learn how to assess your land and choose livestock, review infrastructure requirements and get tips on pasture/hay management. Tioga County livestock farmers will host the second part of the series. Learn how they raise hogs (April 18), beef (May 15), sheep and goats (June 19), poultry (July 17), and horses (Aug. 21). At the final class, Sept. 17, you will learn how to navigate New York State regulations and sell your local meat products. Cost per class is $10/farm ($75 for the whole series) and includes light snacks and handouts. Call 607-6874020 or e-mail meh39@ cornell.edu. FEB 20 - MAR 13 Pennsylvania to host Beef Cattle Producer Seminars Seminars beginning at 6 pm are located at the Mercer Co. Extension Office (Feb. 20), Indiana Co. Extension Office (Feb. 22), Belle Vernon Christian Center Church (Feb. 28), and the NRCS Building in Somerset (March 5). Seminars beginning at 6:30 pm are located at Tioga

WE DELIVER

“Exporters Welcome”

County Fairgrounds (March 7), and Columbia County Extension Office (March 13). Visit www.uproducers.com or call Blaine Winger at 724996-8608 or Glenn Eberly at 717-943-2962 for more information. FEB 20 & 23 Quality Forage Production Canandaigua & Warsaw extension Offices Connected via a Teleconferencing System. 6:30-9 pm. Cost is $50/person and includes resource materials. Contact Cathy Wallace, 585-3433040 ext. 138. FEB 20 & 27 2012 Pesticide Training and Recertification Classes Cornell Cooperative Extension - Ontario County. 79:30 pm. Exam being offered on March 5, 2012 from 7-11 pm. The cost for the pesticide training to obtain a license is $120. This does not include the $100 DEC exam fee, due the day of the exam. Certified applicators, private and commercial, seeking recertification credits will receive 2.5 core credits per class. The cost for recertification is $70 for all four classes or $20/class. To receive registration material or for additional information, contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County at 585-394-3977 ext. 427, email nea8@cornell.edu or ext. 436, e-mail rw43@cornell.edu. The registration form is available online at www.cceontario.org. FEB 21 2012 Crop Symposium Civil Defense Center, Bath, NY. 10:30 am - 2:30 pm. Lunch is $10/person. Registration requested. Contact Steuben CCE, 607-6642300.

Raising Livestock on Tioga Soils Tioga County Office Building, 56 Main St., Owego, NY. 6-8 pm. This class is the second in a series, for details visit http://ccetompkins. org/calendar/12/01/12/rai sing-livestock-workshopseries. Attend individual classes or sign up for the whole series. Cost per class is $10/farm ($75 for the series) and includes light snacks and handouts. Call 607-687-4020 or email meh39@cornell.edu. FEB 22 Farm Market Merchandising Jordan Hall, NY State Agricultural Experiment Station, 630 West North St., Geneva, NY. 9 am - 1:30 pm. $25 per person includes lunch, handouts and expert advice on farm market merchandising. Pre-registration is required by Feb. 20.. Contact CCE Ontario Co. 585394-3977 ext. 427 or e-mail Nancy Anderson with your full contact information to nea8@cornell.edu. Grow Food During the Winter Town of Chenango Community Hall. 6 pm. $10 per person. Contact Carol, 607772-8953. Introduction to Social Networking Applications for Farms and Agri-business ACCORD Corporation Computer Lab, 6087 State Route 19N, Belmont NY. 6:30-8:30 pm. Please call the office to register. Space will be limited and pre-registration is required. Call 585-268-7644 ext. 18. FEB 22 & 23 CDL Training for Agriculture Producers Cornell Cooperative Extension building at 420 E. Main St., Batavia, NY. 7:30 pm. Classroom training dates will be Feb. 22 and 23 at 7:30 pm at the same location. Register before Feb. 15. Contact Jan Beglinger, 585343-3040 ext. 132. FEB 23 Grazing Planning Management Meeting Civil Defense Building, Route 54, in Bath, NY. 10 am - 3 pm. There will be a satisfying local lunch and a 12 month grazing chart sponsored by the Upper Susquehanna Coalition for every participant but you need to register for this indepth program. Contact John Wickham - Schuyler County SWCD 607-5356878 or Jonathan Barter Steuben County SWCD 607776-7398. FEB 23 & MAR 29 Sustainable Cortland’s Soup and Sustenance Winter Reading Series The Beard Building, 9 Main St., Cortland, NY. 6-8 pm. Soup and bread provided. Contact Sara Watrous, sustainablecortland@gmail.com FEB 23-25 New York Farm Show State Fair Grounds; Syracuse, NY. Contact Scott Grigor, 315-457-5145 or email sgrigor@ne-equip.com. FEB 25 7th Annual Central Region Forest Landowners Conference Penn State University Forest

Resources Building Auditorium, Room 112, University Park, PA. 9 am - 4 pm. Registration is $25/person (includes program materials and lunch). Registration deadline is Feb. 17. You may pay online with any major credit card (Master Card, Visa, Discover or American Express) or you may mail your check, made payable to “Penn State,” to Central Region Forest Landowners Conference, ATTN: Registration, 323 Ag. Administration Building, University Park, PA 16802. American Chestnut Grower School Penn State Extension office in Warren County. 9 am noon. The cost to attend is $20. Contact Penn State Extension, 814-755-3544 or e-mail forestext@psu.edu. CSA Farm School CCE of Ontario County, 480 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY. $25/person includes lunch with vegetarian options, handouts, expert advice and networking with other CSA farmers. Pre-registration is required by Feb. 23. Contact CCE of Ontario County, 585- 3943977 ext. 427 or e-mail Nancy Anderson with your full contact information to nea8@cornell.edu. Opportunities for Your Rural & Forested Land Program Cornell University Cooperative Extension of Broome County. 9 am - noon. $15/person. $5 for each individual from the same family. Contact Carol, 607584-9966. JAN 25-26 Northeast Pasture Consortium Annual Meeting Century House Hotel & Conference Center, Route 9, Latham, NY (Albany County). This year’s sessions will cover nutrient management on pastures, conservation benefits of pasture, grass species and varieties grazing trials, organic methods for seeding and managing pastures, silvopasture techniques and more. Contact Jim Cropper, e-mail jbcropper@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.grazingguide.net FEB 27 Agricultural Taxes Seminar Town of Chenango Community Hall. 6 pm. $25/business. Contact Carol, 607772-8953. CCE Invasives Webinar Jamestown Audubon Center, 1600 Riverside Rd., Jamestown, NY. 5:15-7:45 pm. A webinar for Green Industry Professionals designed to update green industry professionals about the early detection and integrated management of the invasive insects; the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). Registration is required by Feb. 20, and a fee of $10 will be charged to cover a light meal. Two 2 NYS DEC Credits and 2 ISA CEU’s have been applied for these programs. Contact CCE of Chautauqua County, 716-664-9502 ext. 202. Cornell 2012 Winter Grower Meeting 4-H Training Center, NiagaraCCE, 4487 Lake Ave., Lockport, NY. DEC Pesticide

Applicator Credits Available. AM Program - Fresh Market Vegetables - for more info contact Robert Hadad at 585-739-4065 or rgh26@ cornell.edu registration 8:30, program from 9-12:30. PM Program - Berries - for more info contact Craig Kahlke at 585-735-5448 or cjk37@cornell.edu, registration 12:30, program 1-4. Registration fee is $20 for enrollees of either the Cornell Vegetable Program or Lake Ontario Fruit Program and $30 for non-enrollees. The fee is to cover lunch, breaks, materials and other costs of programs. The fee is for a half day program (with lunch) or the full program. At the door, the registration fee will be $35. Please Pre-register by Feb. 24 to accommodate planning for lunch and handouts. Send registration information and check payable to “Cornell Cooperative Extension” to Karen Krysa, 4487 Lake Ave., Lockport, NY 14094. Last minute? Call Karen at 716433-8839 ext. 221. Detection & Management of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) & Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) CCE of Allegany County, 5435A County Rd. 48, Belmont, NY. 5:15-7:45 pm. Two New York State DEC Credits and two 2 ISA CEUs have been applied for this program. To pre-register, please contact Colleen Cavagna by Tues., Feb. 21 at 585-268-7644 ext. 12 or cc746@cornell.edu. Program fee is $30/person (includes snacks/drinks). Checks should be made payable and mailed to Cornell Cooperative Extension of Allegany County, 5435A County Rd. 48, Belmont, NY 14813. Medicaid Planning Survival Guide Hornell Senior Center, Broadway Mall, Hornell, NY. 1-3 pm. Reservations are requested by Feb. 24. To register, call Cornell Cooperative Extension of Steuben County at 607-664-2300. On Internet at www.put knowledgetowork.com FEB 27-29, FEB 28 Biogass Economics workshop • Feb. 27 - 9 am - 3 pm Genesee County CCE (Batavia, NY) • Feb. 28 - 9 am - 3 pm Auburn Holiday Inn (Auburn, NY) • Feb. 29 - 9 am - 3 pm Madison County CCE (Morrisville, NY). Registration is required to attend the event. We are targeting lenders, bankers and dairy farmers considering anaerobic digestion and those that support and advise farms who may be interested in the economic side of anaerobic digestion. Call e-mail jlp67@cornell .edu. FEB 28 Beginning Tree Fruit 4-H Acres, 418 Lower Creek Rd., Ithaca, NY. 6-8 pm. $5/person or $8/couple for 1 class; $10/person or $15/couple for both classes. Contact CCE Tompkins Co., 607-272-2292. Southern Tier Field Crop Workshop Horseheads Holiday Inn Express, Horseheads, NY. Variety Selection, Pest Resistance and Plant Population

Effects on Corn and Soybeans; New Challenges with Field Crop Diseases and Drainage Systems for Improved Crop Health and Environmental Quality. Lunch is $10/person.This program has been approved for 2 NYS-DEC recertification credits in categories 1a, 10 and 21 and 1.5 credits in category 23. Those who attend the Bath Crop Symposium will only be eligible for 1 credit in 1a, 10 and 21 and 0.5 credits in category 23. Contact Steuben CCE, 607-664-2300. FEB 29 Baby Calf Care - Raise them Right! Club 57, Hornell, NY. 10:30 am - 2:30 pm. $30/person, includes lunch & handouts. Contact CCE Steuben, 607664-2300. On Internet at www.putknowledetowork.com Small Farms Summit Cornell in Ithaca, NY. 9:30 am - 3 pm. And at four other locations around New York State: Voorheesville (Albany County), Canton (St Lawrence County), Warsaw (Wyoming County) and Riverhead (Suffolk County). A video connection will allow us to communicate across sites. The Summit is free to attend and lunch will be provided. MAR 1 Crop Insurance Introduction and Program Updates CCE of Ontario County, 480 North Main St., Canandaigua, NY. 10:30 am - 12 noon. Pre-registration is required by calling Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County at 585-3943977 ext. 427 or e-mail Nancy Anderson with your full contact information to nea8@cornell.edu. MAR 1, 15 & 29, APR 12 Farm Business Planning Course Ithaca, NY. All classes 6-9 pm. Cost: Sliding scale, $80 - $300 Application required. Visit www.groundswellcenter.org for online application. For more information e-mail info@groundswellcenter.org. MAR 2-3 New York Agri-Women Annual Meeting Hyatt Place Long Island/East End in Riverhead, NY. To register for the New York Agri-Women Annual Meeting and/or AgriTour, please visit www. newyorkagriwomen.com/ind ex.html.. Contact NYAW, 646-717-2659 or e-mail newyorkagriwomen@gmail.com. MAR 3 Beef Quality Assurance Program Training Tamberlane Farm, 4117 State Route 364, Canandaigua, NY. 9:30 am - 2:30 pm. The classroom portion of the training will begin at 10 am. After lunch will be the chuteside portion of the training. Cost for the training is $20 which includes a BQA manual; additional family/farm members are $8. Lunch is included in the registration fee. To register for the event, send a check payable to CCE, attn. Nancy Anderson at 480 N. Main St., Canandaigua, NY 14424. Contact Nancy Glazier, 585315-7746.

3 Options for Insuring Vegetable Crops Crop Insurance Rates on file in selected counties.

Written Agreement May make additional policies available in non-select counties. Crop insurance and written agreements are available through insurance agents.

NAP - Non-insured Assistance Program Coverage may be available when Crop Insurance is not available. Contact your county FSA office.

MARCH 15 SIGN-UP DEADLINE

NEW FOR 2012

USDA Risk Management Agency

CROP P INSURANCE E EDUCATION New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets www.agriculture.ny.gov/ap/CropInsurance.html 1-800-554-4501

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section C - Page 31

Crop Insurance for Fresh Market Green Beans grown under contract in 9 counties.

- Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012 Page 32

ADAMS CENTER 315-583-5486 800-962-4686 APALACHIN 607-754-6570

AUBURN 315-258-0122 800-362-4686

CANANDAIGUA 585-394-7260 800-388-6119

BATAVIA 585-343-9263 800-388-4113

HORNELL 607-324-2110

HORSEHEADS 607-739-8741

IN SPRINGVILLE 800-888-3403 IN GROVE CITY 877-264-4403 IN NORTH JAVA 800-724-0139

Section D

Country y Folks AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS JO PO FARMS DAIRY DISPERSAL Auction to be held Monday Feb. 27th @ 1:30PM at Maplehurst Livestock Market, Inc., 1421 Kent Rd., Hinsdale, NY just off Rt. 16, 1.5 miles North of So. Tier Expressway.

This is the best dairy to be sold this year, 48 cows (31 - 1st calf heifers) with a 25,700# herd average with 3.9F and low cell count. These cows are milked 2 times a day, have no BST, are Purebred, but no papers, AI bred and sired by most popular bulls. Jack and Carol Potter - Owners Phone Barry @ 716-557-2266 or Bob @ 716-557-2584 for information.

AUCTIONS

REALL ESTATE

3/10/2012 LeRoy Historical Society Auction, LeRoy, NY

NEW LISTING - Equestrian Center, 100 plus acres with trails, pastures, streams. Indoor arena, Nice 4 bedroom home, Plus other good buildings. Box stalls for 25. Private setting, Buffalo area. Call David at 585-739-5609

3/17/2012 Single Family Home Real Estate Auction, Gates, NY 3/23/2012 Jeff & Kathy Thompson Farm Machinery Auction, Batavia, NY 3/30/2012 Estate of Ronald Milcarek Farm Machinery, Vehicle, Tool & Household Auction, Batavia, NY

4/13/2012 Agricultural Education Consignment Auction, Batavia, NY sponsored by the Farm Bureau NOW ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS!

Watch Our Website, www.williamkentinc.com, for complete listings and photos!

NEW LISTING - Niagara County Farm, 70 acres with house and barns. Excellent land on a quiet country road. NEW LISTING - Wyoming County Dairy Operation, 395 free-stalls with double 10 Boumatic parlor, heifer facility, bunk silo, and nice home! CALL OUR OFFICE (585) 343-5449 FOR MORE INFORMATION!

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 1

4/6/2012 Alfred State Spring Fling All Breed Cattle Auction, Alfred, NY

NEW LISTING - Lewis County Farm, Available Complete! Includes 290 free-stall barn built in 2005, double 8 Boumatic, rapid exit parlor, heifer barn, machinery shed, bunk silo, two beautiful homes and 280+ acres! Full line of machinery including JD and NH equipment. Herd with 25,000lb average and many excellent pedigrees!

Doody Farms, LLC • Large Public Retirement Auction Wed., Feb. 22, 10:30 AM at 5541 Large Rd. Auburn, NY 13021 DIRECTIONS: From Thruway Exit 41: take 414 South to 318 East to 50 & 20 East to Half Acre Rd., which is right after Monroe Tractor. Turn right and go 1 mile to stop sign. Go straight ahead 1 mi., turn left on Large Rd. Auction 2 miles on right. TRACTORS: ‘08 JD 8330 1102 hrs., powershift, axle duals front and back, 4 remotes, quick hitch, 12 front weights, inside wheel weights, Green Star ready, active seat, S. RW8330P026358 ‘09 JD 9230 831 hrs., p.s. 4 remotes, PTO, Green Star ready, inside wheel weights, selling w/and seperate 16’ Degelman 7900 6-way blade S. RW9230P004809 ‘06 JD 7520 2844 hrs., power quad, 4wd, 3 remotes, 6 front w/ inside wheel weights, S. RW7520R019467 ‘08 JD 7830 1085 hrs., 4wd, rear axle duals, quick hitch, heavy draw bar, 8 front weights, rear ext. fenders, 3 remotes, Green star ready, power quad, S. RW7830R011930 ‘06 JD 7720 1707 hrs., 4wd, Power quad, axle duals, 3 remotes, 540-1000 front susp., quick hitch, Green Star ready, 2 doors w/746 self-leveling loader w/bucket; selling seperate 10’ big-Multi-purpose bucket S. RW7720A000125 ‘08 JD 6430 699 hrs., 2wd, quad- powershift, 2 remotes, 8 front weight, rear wheel weights S. XL06430H581582 ‘96 JD 7600 8186 hrs., power quad, snap-on duals, 2wd, 3 remotes, 5401000 PTO S. RW7600H008806 CHOPPERS: ‘09 JD 7350 Chopper, 375 hrs., 4wd, w/applicator, 10 rear weights, processor, S. Z07350X510413; Selling 640B pick-up head 12’, JD 686 rotary corn head

MOWER: ‘07 Krone Big M II, disc bine, 652 eng. hrs., 452 mowing hrs., 4wd, 32’ cut, S. 727325 TRUCKS: 2 - ‘99 Sterling dump trucks, 10-wheeler, 1 w/ 36,166 mi. and 1 w/26,541 mi., heavy susp., Cat motors, Eaton trans., both selling w/22’ box w/ hyd. tailgate, also selling w/extra side ext. (forage) also selling seperate: 8 Alliance flotation tires on 10 hole rims to fit on both trucks ‘79 Mack 10-wheeler w/20’ aluminum dump box PLANTERS: ‘09 JD 1770 SSC Corn Planter, 12 row, central hopper, no-till, liquid fertilizer S. A017702715108 ‘02 JD 5160 Grain Drill, 15’, no-till, with extra weights, S. NO 1560X695931 Like New w/ Seeder HAY EQUIPMENT: Oxbo 334 merger, 34’ continuous pickup (like new) S. 627840-200063 2yrs. old Pronovo ST, tandem axle 12 bale wagon w/hyd. gate and dump model P6812 S.1092 JD 582 maxi-cut round baler w/Harvest Tec automatic liquid applicator, net wrap, silage special 750 Richardson tandem axle dump wagon trailer H&S Gyro rakel model 5R 420 H/H 11’ rotary

TILLAGE: JD 714 17 shank chisel plow w/front disc (folding) JD 637 35’ rock-flex disc, good blades nice Wilrich 35’ field cultivator Wilrich 2900 8 bottom moldboard plow JD 9700 Cultimulcher 24’ Brillion 35’ Packer SKID LOADER: JD 320 5620 hrs., 8 extra back weights w/bucket GRAIN CART: Unverferth 5225 grain cart (very little use) SPREADER: 6000 gal. Husky tandem axle, liquid MISC: Kawasaki 3010 Mule, 4WD, diesel, dump, Canopy 1997 Ford motor home 36’, double push-out, satellite, 23,000 miles (nice) Haybuster Bale Grinder (Like New) Vermeer RP78 stone picker w/hyd. reel Degelman hyd. rock rake 300 gal. liquid fertilizer tank w/frame 2000 gal. liquid transfer tank 2 direct - inject liquid inoculant applicators Forks w/grapple for Skid Loader Roto-grind grain grinder S. 1690908 (new in 2010) JD rotary broom model BA 72 w/ hitch plate for skid loader 3-pt. hitch weight bar Misc. truck tires Plus a few more small items

Auctionerss Note: Having auctioned their large dairy in April, we now have the privilege of offering you this top notch equipment at absolute public auction. Most all equipment bought new, and in excellent condition. d & Dorriss Doody. Not a lot of small things - so be on time. Owners:: Donald LIVE E ONLINE E BIDDING G PROVIDED D BY Y EQUIPMENTFACTS.COM M (MUST T REGISTER R BEFORE E AUCTION) Termss off Auction: Cash or honorable check. Nothing to be removed until settled for. Out-of-State buyers must have a bank letter of guarantee made out to Hill Top Auction Co. or leave equipment at site until check clears. (No Exemptions) No Buyers Premium To o Discusss methodss calll Jay y Martin n 315-521-3123 3 Lunch h Provided d by y the e Zeisett Giirls

Page 2 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

www.aaauctionfinder.com m • www.auctionzip.com

Jay Martin Clyde, NY 14433 315-521-3123

Elmer Zeiset Savannah, NY 13146 315-729-8030

March h 17 7 att 10:00 0 AM M 3rd d Annuall Spring g Auction n att Martin’ss Country y Market,, Waterloo,, NY.. Large e publiic auction n selling g forr farmers,, dealers,, bank k repo,, and d construction n equipment,, lightt and d heavy truck ks.. A few w complete e dispersalss already y listed. 1.. From m Marvin n Leee Hurst: JD 338 baler w/#40 injector, hyd. tongue, elec. controls; NH 166 inverter w/ext.; 3 hayrack wagons; Zimmerman 36’ hay elevator; JD 915 flex head, poly-nice!; NH 354 grinder mixer. 2.. Selling g forr Mrs.. Rogerr Claeyson: (2) JD 4020 tractors; 3 steel hayrack wagons; balers; etc. 3.. Forr Horizon n Dairy,, selling g manuree equipment,, etc.:: 2005 JD 7520 4WD, IVT, w/741 self-leveling loader, 3900 hrs, Green Star ready (nice) selling absolute; 1998 Houle 9500 gal. manure spreader, 4 axles, good tires, new brakes; 32’ Houle manure pump w/6” pipe; Houle 8”-10” manure pipe discharge w/50’ hose (2008); 24’ DMI rolling crumbler; 4.. Otherr Equipmentt committed d already:: Patz V350 vertical mixer wagon (only a few years old); 08 Tubeline bale wrapper X25500 automatic; 27’ Ziegler mower (tractor mount); Shulte rock picker; 1060 Gehl blower; Pequea tedder; JD 348 square baler, string, injector; 18’ steel hay wagon; (2) 16’ wooden hay wagons; NH 314 square baler; 400 bu grain cart; Bush Hog 6 row cultivator; Glencoe 6row cultivator; 12 row cleaners for 7000 corn planter; (4) 15” wagon tires; set of 38” axle duals

ASA advocates biodiesel incentive as Senate holds hearing on expired tax credits The Senate Finance Committee held a hearing recently to touch on comprehensive tax reform, which could be considered over the next year or two. During the hearing, titled “Extenders and Tax Reform: Seeking Long-Term Solutions,” committee chair Max Baucus (D-MT) expressed support for evaluating each tax credit as part of the tax reform efforts, but knowing that

process will take time, the chairman voiced support for immediate action on the extenders as part of the payroll tax relief package currently being negotiated in a conference committee. The dollar-per-gallon biodiesel tax incentive expired Dec. 31 for the second time in three years, despite clear evidence that the incentive is working to stimulate production and economic

activity. An analysis commissioned by the National Biodiesel Board found that under projected expansion, with the tax incentive in place, the U.S. biodiesel industry is expected to support more than 74,000 jobs by 2015 and some $7.3 billion in GDP. In both the House and the Senate, bipartisan legislation (H.R. 2238/S. 1277) has been introduced to extend

the tax incentive for three years. ASA urges all members and industry supporters to contact their congressional representatives to encourage their co-sponsorship of the biodiesel tax credit legislation and support the immediate retroactive reinstatement of the credit. Source: ASA Weekly Leader Letter for Thursday, Feb. 2

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 3

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, February 20 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Special 16 Boer X kids from one farm. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire

Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 2:00 PM: Windsor Meat Market, 73 West First Ave., Windsor, PA. Public Auction Online and On Site. For updates go to auctionzip.com 3721. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-4641128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Tuesday, February 21 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, February 22 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752 • 10:00 AM: Doody Farms LLC, 4451 Large Rd., Auburn, NY. Large Public Retirement Auction. Hilltop Auction Com-

B RO U G HT

Page 4 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

pany, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Calf Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716296-5041 or 585-447-3842 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716296-5041 or 585-447-3842 Thursday, February 23 • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. February Heifer Consignment Sale. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315829-3105 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire

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Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-8682006, 800-321-3211. Tuesday, February 28 • 10:00 AM: 97 Loop Rd., Quarryville, PA (Lancaster Co.). 53 Acre Dairy Farm. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 Friday, March 2 • 10:30 AM: Chesterfield (Burlington Co.) New Jersey. Katona Farms and Neighbors Farm Machinery Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, March 3 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Columbus (Burlington Co.)

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 New Jersey. IH Tractors and Haying Equipment for “Ralph” Dubell. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Monday, March 5 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, March 10 • 9:00 AM: Penn Y an, NY (Yates Co.). Finger Lakes Produce Auction Spring Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 9:00 AM: Penn Yan (Yates Co.) New York. Finger Lakes Produce Auction Spring Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 9:30 AM: 653 Youkers Bush Rd., St. Johnsville, NY. Public Auction. Farm Equip., Guns, Stoves, Tools & Household. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • 3:30 PM: Benton Fire Dept., 932 Rt. 14A, Benton Center, 3 mi. N. of Penn Yan, NY. Seneca Farm Toy Auction. Show 8:30 am - 2 pm. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.h tm Saturday, March 17 • 1138 Rte. 318, Waterloo, NY. Third Annual Spring Equipment Auction. Large

public auction selling for farmers, dealers, bank repo & construction equipment. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 8:00 AM: Mendon, NY. Saxby Implement Corp. Public Auction. 200 Lawn Mowers, Vehicles, New Trailers & much more. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:30 AM: Nathan Mason, Callaway, VA (near Rocky Mount). Another Absolute Auction by Ownby. Farm Equipment Dispersal. No Buyer’s Premium!. Ownby Auction & Realty Co., Inc., 804-730-0500 Wednesday, March 21 • 8:55 AM: Rising, MD. 3 Day Retirement Auction. Business Liquidation. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-6628149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 9:00 AM: 3186 Freshour Rd., Canandaigua, NY. Coryn Farm Supplies, Inc. Public Auction of Farm Equip. & Tools. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire

Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842 Friday, March 23 • 10:00 AM: Batavia, NY. Jeff & Kathy Thompson Farm Machinery Auction. Selling a full line of farm machinery including Case IH Maxxum 115, Case IH MX110, Case IH 7220, Case IH CX70 plus hay, tillage, barn equipment and much more. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Saturday, March 24 • Atglen, PA. The Gala at Glen Valley II. Hosted by Glen Valley Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Clymer, NY. Z&M Ag and Turf Farm Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Monday, March 26 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Special Holiday Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, March 28

• 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Easter Lamb & Goat Sale approx. 5 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, March 30 • 10:00 AM: Warsaw, Wyoming Co. Estate of Ronald Milcarek Auction. Selling vehicles, farm machinery, tools, & household including ‘07 Chevy Silverado, NH TB100 tractor, MF 573 tractor and more! Watch our website for a complete list and photos. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Saturday, March 31 • Cobleskill, NY. 31st Annual Cobleskill Dairy Fashion Sale. Hosted by SUNY Cobleskill Dairy Cattle Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Windmill Farm Market, 3900 Rt. 14A, 5 mi. S. of Penn Yan, NY. Equipment Consignment Auction. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.h tm • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery, Lawn & Garden Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Thursday, April 5 • 11:00 AM: 2324 Ridge Rd., Penn Yan, NY. Marvin & Mildred Koek Excellent Farm

HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net

TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 5

HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com

Auction Calendar, Continued

Page 6 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

(cont. from prev. page)

Equipment Retirement Auction. IH 1420 4WD combine, ‘95 Ford 16’ grain truck, tillage, planting & harvest equip. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies, registered and grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-5213123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Friday, April 6 • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Spring Premier All Breed Sale. Selections are underway. Accepting registered high quality cattle. Give us a call. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, April 7 • Champlain, NY. Betty & Nelson LeDuc Farm Machinery Auction. Full line of machinery: Case MX120 w/ldr., Case IH 8920, Case 5130, NH TB110 w/ldr., Ford 6610. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • 10:30 AM: Independence Township (Allegany Co.) New York. Complete Line of Good Farm Machinery and Livestock Handling and Support Equipment for Lyon View Farm. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Monday, April 9 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Friday, April 13 • 10:30 AM: Catskill Tractor, Inc., 384 Center St., Franklin, NY. Farm Equipment Consignment and Inventory Reduction. Franklin Used Equipment Sales, Inc. Auction Service, 607-829-2600 Saturday, April 14 • B&R Dairy, West Chazy, NY. Livestock. Full line of JD farm machinery & tiling equip. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • Syracuse, NY. New York Spring Holstein Sale. Held in conjunction with the New York Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:00 AM: Farm of Don & Betty Duska, 1820 Co. Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman,

610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 8:00 AM: Beaver Mountain Farms, 1820 County Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. On the Farm of Don & Betty Duksa, 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-6628149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 Saturday, April 21 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Annual Spring Machinery Sale & Plant, Tree & Shrub Auction. Accepting consignments groups or single items. Consignments already coming in call today to get into advertising it will make a difference. Expecting a field full of quality farm equipment. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • Quarryville, PA. Wea-Land Holsteins Complete Dispersal. Landis Weaver & Family, Owners. Co-managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Gerry Rodeo Grounds, RT. 60 Gerry, NY. Chautauqua County Area, Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: Argyle Livestock Station, 8 McEachron Hill Rd., Argyle, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Franklin Used Equipment Sales Inc., Frank Walker Auctioneer 607-829-5172 • 10:30 AM: Dalton (Livingston Co.) New York. Dr. Lonnie and Donna Meeusen Retirement Auction. Clydesdale Horses, Show Wagon, Tack, new JD Tractors, haying line & general purpose line. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Friday, April 27 • Waddington, NY. Complete Dispersal for Gary Tiernan. 200 head of AI sired dairy cattle. Delarm & Treadway, 518-483-4106 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Machinery Consignment Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, April 28 • Heifer Haven, North Bangor, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 42nd Annual New York’s Favorite Consignment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 8:00 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 9:00 AM: 796 No. Cream Hill Rd., Brid-

port, VT. Jim Ferguson Farm Machinery & Small Equipment Sale. All machinery like new. Wide selection of tractors, tools, hay & farm equip. Well maintained. Addison Co. Commission Sales E.G. Wisnowski & Sons, 800-339-COWS or 802-388-2661 • 10:30 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 11:00 AM: On the farm Otego, NY. Gretna Acres Registered Brown Swiss Complete Dispersal. 100 Head sell. This is a long established breeding herd (50 years) DHI tested, AI sired. Regular herd health program. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Tuesday, May 1 • 5:00 PM: Greenwood (Steuben Co.) New York. “Warrinerdale Homestead.” The estate of Wayne Warriner, Sr. Farm Equipment. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Saturday, May 5 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Also selling Trowbridge Angus Bulls. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, May 11 • Arcade, NY. Co-Vista 20th Anniversary Sale. Hosted by Co-Vista Holsteins. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, May 12 • 9:00 AM: 3080 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY. Estate of Tom Oliver. Excellent farm collectibles, signs, 2 Oliver 66 tractors. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, May 19 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, June 1 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, June 9 • 9:00 AM: Don Rice Jr., 5761 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 15 MM farm tractors & parts, 150 MM farm toys, MM & gas signs. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m Friday, July 13 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, July 21 • Middleburgh, NY. Reflections of Maple Downs Sale. Hosted by Maple Downs

Farm II. The Cattle Exchange, 607-7462226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, July 28 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, August 3 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 15 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 22 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 6 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 20 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, November 3 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, November 10 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 1 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. . Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, April 5 • Intercourse, PA. Past Present Future Sale hosted by C.K. Kerrick & Matt Kimball. Held at te Ben K. Stolzfus sale barn. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT February 13 , 2012 Calves: 45-60# .40-.50; 6175# .7750-.80; 76-90# .85.8750; 91-105# .90-.9750 106# & up 1-1.05. Farm Calves: 1.10-1.25 Started Calves: .50-.62 Veal Calves: 1.30-1.50 Open Heifers: .95-1.20 Beef Heifers: .73-.8850 Feeder Steers: .95-1.20 Beef Steers: 1.03-1.1250 Stock Bull: .90-1.20 Beef Bull: .95-.99 Butcher Hogs: 1.05-1.15 Feeder Pigs (ea): 50-55 Sheep (ea): 85-110 Goats (ea): 50-160; Kids ea. 120-135. Canners: up to 77.50 Cutters: 78-81 Utility: 82-85 Rabbits: 5-23 Chickens: 5-30 Ducks: 13-17 *Next Sale is Feb. 20. On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT February 13, 2012 Cattle: 125 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean not well tested; Breakers 75-80% lean 85-91; Boners 80-85% lean 73.50-89.50; Lean 8590% lean 58-81.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls 92-125# 82.50-145; 80-92# 85-125. Vealers: 100-120# 70-85; 90-100# 55-85; 80-90# 6085; 70-80# 72.50-82.50; 6070# 40-62.50.

FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA February 14, 2012 Beef Cattle: Canners 40-70; Cutters 58-75; Util 75-85; Bulls 78-99; Steers 95-120; Hfrs. 65-85. Calves: Growers 120175;Hfrs. 80-120; Veal 90120. Sheep: 80-120; Lambs 2-

NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA February 14, 2012 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 23-42; 61-75# 20-62; 76-95# 38-70; 96-105# 30-75; 106# & up 60. Farm Calves: 85-160/cwt Start Calves: 115/cwt Feeders: 49-74/cwt Heifers: 70-93.50/cwt Steers: 60/cwt Bulls: 73-89/cwt Rep. Heifers: 1276 ea. Canners: 40-75/cwt Cutters: 76-87/cwt Utility: 88-94/cwt Lambs: 120-255/cwt Sheep: 42.50-120/cwt Goats: 55-190 ea. Rabbits: 2.50-18.50 ea. Poultry: 3.50-12 ea. Hay: 16 lots, 2.80-4.70/bale northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ February 14, 2012 Livestock Report: 43 Calves .05-1.40, Avg .75; 34 Cows .20-.84.5, Avg .73; 7 Easy Cows; 6 Feeders 300500# .62-1.22, Avg .91; 8 Heifers .56.5-.96, Avg .78; 5 Bulls .67-.98, Avg .85; 8 Steer .83-1.25, Avg 1.11; 8 Hogs .70-1, Avg .78; 5 Roasting Pigs (ea) 76-80, Avg 78.40; 1 Boar 55; 24 Lambs (/#) 1.80-2.62, Avg 2.29; 2 Goats (ea) 25-185, Avg 105; 9 Kids (ea) 20-115, Avg 78.87; 7 Hides (ea) 3-30, Avg 13.14. Total 167. Poultry & Egg Report: Mixed Fowl (/#) .50; Roosters (ea) 3; Bunnies (ea) 3.257.25; Rabbits (/#) 1.90-3; Pigeons (ea) 2-4.50; Guineas (ea) 7.50. Grade A Eggs: White Jum XL 1.15; Brown Jum XL 1.151.30; L 1.05-1.20; M .90-1. Hay, Straw & Grain Report: 1 Alfalfa 6.80; 22 Mixed 1.204; 8 Grass 1-3.90; 1 Mulch 1.40; 1 Oat Straw 1.60; 2 Wheat Straw 2-3.30; 2 Rye Straw 3.30-3.60; 1 Ground Corn 6.80; 1 Oat 5; 4 Firewood 25-65; 2 Cedar Posts 60-80. Total 45 . CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 50-150; Grower Bulls over 92# 100-170;

80-92# 70-130; Bob Veal 1050. Cull Cows: Gd 68-88; Lean 45-67; Hvy. Beef Bulls 74-93. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 800-1400; Springing Cows 800-1300; Springing Hfrs. 750-1450; Bred Hfrs. 700-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 7501550; Open Hfrs. 300-750; Started Hfrs. 100-300; Service Bulls 400-1000. Beef: Feeders 50-115; Hols Sel 75-108. Lamb/Sheep: Market 70180; Slaughter Sheep 20-60. Goats: Billies 75-175; Nannies 60-125; Kids 20-80. Swine: Sow 30-55. CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 40-150; Grower Bulls over 92# 100-175; 80-92# 70-135; Bob Veal 1045. Cull Cows: Gd 68-85; Lean 45-67; Hvy Beef Bulls 75-92. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 700-1400; Springing Cows 750-1250; Springing Hfrs. 800-1350; Bred Hfrs. 800-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 7501450; Open Hfrs. 400-800; Started Hfrs. 150-500; Service Bulls 600-1000. Beef: Feeders 50-110; Hols. Ch 82-104. Lambs: Market 75-180; Slaughter Sheep 25-60. Goats: Billies 80-175; Nannies 60-120; Kids 20-80. Swine: Sow 40-70. CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY February 13, 2012 Calves: Grower over 92# 100-130; 80-92# 90-135; Bob Veal 58-66. Cull Cows: Gd 79-86; Lean 68-77; Hvy. Beef Bulls 88-92. Beef: Feeders 85-115; Hfrs. 69-115; Steer 69-85. Lamb/Sheep: Market 160195; Slaughter Sheep 65-70. Goats: Nannies 130-165; Kids 65. Swine: Hog 35. *Buyers always looking for pigs. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY February 8, 2011 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# 120-142.50; 80-92# 115140; Bob Veal 25-55. Cull Cows: Gd 74-83.50; Lean 58-74.50; Hvy Beef Bulls 83-92. Beef: Ch 115-120; Sel 92100; Hols. Ch 100-110; Sel 82-88. Swine: Sow 55-68; Feeder Pig/hd 20. DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY February 13, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 70-130; Grower Bulls over 92# 110-170; 80-92# 100-150; Bob Veal 10-50.

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge Chatham

Cull Cows: Gd 75-89; Lean 60-74; Hvy. Beef Bulls 82-96. Beef: Feeders 75-85; Hols Sel 104-109. Goats: Billies 125. GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 80-135; Grower Bulls over 92# 90-172.50; 80-92# 80-137.50; Bob Veal 30-79. Cull Cows: Gd 75-88; Lean 68-78; Hvy. Beef Bulls 8290.50. Beef: Hols. Sel 99-108. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY February 13, 2012 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# 120-145; 80-92# 80-140; Bob Veal 35-60. Cull Cows: Gd 74-82; Lean 65-77; Hvy Beef Bulls 91.Beef: Feeders 118-134. Lambs/Sheep: Slaughter Sheep 67.50. BATH MARKET Bath, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 90-130; Grower Bulls over 92# 110-155; 80-92# 90-140; Bob Veal 2060. Cull Cows Gd 73-85; Lean 58-70; Hvy Beef Bulls 82-94. Beef: Sel 100-104; Ch 101; Hols. Sel 92-98. Lamb/Sheep: Market 160180; Slaughter 40-50. Goats: Billies 45-85. Swine: Hog 70-77; Sow 4755; Feeder Pig/hd 27-45. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY No report FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No report Produce Mon. @ 10 am,

Wed-Fri. @ 9 am sharp! FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY February 7 & 10, 2012 Hay: 95-205, 1st cut; 110275, 2nd cut; 125-300. Straw: 155-255 Firewood: 42 EarCorn: 180 * Hay Tuesdays & Fridays @ 11:15 am. Produce Friday @ 9 am sharp! HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY February 13, 2012 Cattle: Dairy Cows for Slaughter Bone Util .70-.90; Canners/Cutters .58-.65; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls & Steers .80-.95. Feeders: Dairy .70-.89. Calves: Bull Calves 96-120# .80-1.5250; up to 95# .10.95; Hols. under 100# 1. Dairy: Milking age up to 1750; Bred Hfrs. up to 1150. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA February 8, 2012 Slaughter Heifers: 11861360# 116-120.50. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 79-83.50, hi ddress 84-84.50, lo dress 76.50-77; Boners 74-78, hi dress 80, lo dress 67.50; Lean 68-73, hi dress 74, lo dress 66-67.50. Bulls: YG 1 1244-2042# 88.50-90.50; YG 2 10881390# 82-84.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 3 400-500# 71-87; 950-1100# 76-83; Hfrs. M&L 1 600# 114; M&L 2 600# 94-96. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bullss 95-120# 115-132.50; No. 2 90-130# 92.50-110; No. 3 90-120# 57.50-85. Vealers: Util 65-120# 37.5047.50 Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 249280#

72.50-76; 40-45% lean 248286# 70-72; Boars 500# 22. Feeder Pigs: 40-50# 3547.50/hd. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 1-2 66-86# 183-202.50; Ewes Util 1-2 182-234# 7-86. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 70# 146; Sel 2 70# 132.50; Nannies Sel 1 110# 127.50; Billies Sel 1 90# 157.50; 180# 185. BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA February 8, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 76.50-80.25, hi dress 82, lo dress 70-73.50; Boners 71-75.50, hi dress 75-79, lo dress 64-68; Lean 85-90% lean 65-69.50, hi dress 75.50, lo dress 57.5064.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9901566# 79-81.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers S 3 Jersey 620# 72; L 3 Hols. 330-428# 76-87; 650# 82; L 3 Hols. 766# 81. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 94-118# 115-132; 8892# 115-132; No. 2 94-106# 102-120; 80-88# 100-120; No. 3 84-106# 72-100; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 80-86# 70-100; Vealers 72-102# 40-77. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 230# 195/hd; Sows US 1-3 350# 175/hd; Boars 280-350# 60120/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 15-40# 10-29; 60-90# 28-42; Roasting Pigs 150-170# 135140/cwt. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 46-68# 165-210; 70104# 120-195; 114# 177.50; Ewes Gd 1-2 196# 95; 270# 85; Rams 196-230# 100-110. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 70-80# 95-125; Sel 2 35-40# 35-75; 60# 80; Nannies Sel 1 90-130# 85-135; Billies Sel 1 170-180# 215.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 7

COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA February 15, 2012 Cows: Canners 50-79.50; Cutters 80-86.50; Util 8793.50. Bulls: 96.50 Steers: Ch 124; Sel 102104; Hols. 93. Heifers: Holstein 83.50 Calves: 54-141 ea. Feeders: 62-138 Lambs: 155 Goats: 118-202 Kids: 41-158 ea. Sows: 51 Hogs: 55-56 Feeder Pigs: 72 ea. Chickens: 3-13 Rabbits: 2-16.50 Ducks: 4.50-19.50 * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm.

2.80. Goats: 140-170 ea; Billies 140-210 ea; Kids 80-140 ea.

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA February 14, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 1515# 126; Hols. lineback 1480# 117.50. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 87.50-91.50; Boners 81.5087; Lean 79-88.50; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 68-78.50; Shelly 66 & dn. Bulls: Hols. 1155# 89; Longhorn 1065# 59. Feeder Cattle: Hfrs. Hols 360-445# 97; Bulls L 1 605630# 104-116; Dairy types 895-1020# 78-86.50. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-125# 132-146; No. 2 80-120# 105-132; No. 3 75-115# 85-115; Util 85 & dn. Swine: Hogs 235-240# 6669; 255-285# 63-68; 385465# 52-59.50; Barrows 505615# 45-49.50; Gilts 505550# 5455.50. Goats (/hd): L Nanny 142; Fancy Kids 140-164. Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. * Special Fed Cattle Sales Feb 21 & March 6 & 20. Receiving 7:30 until 10 am. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA February 14, 2012 Rabbits: 5-24 Chickens: 2.50-7.50 Bunnies: 8.50 Guineas: 7.50 Guinea Pigs: .50-1.50 Ducks: 6.50 Eggs (/dz): Brown Jum 1.351.70; XL 1-1.20; L 1; Mixed .85. All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm.

Page 8 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report *Next State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Fri., Feb. 17. Receiving from 7:30 until 10 am. Sale time 1 pm. DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC February 6, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 82-83.50, hi dress 91; Breakers 77-81; Boners 73.50-77, hi dress 76.50-78, lo dress 70-72; Lean 6972.50, lo dress 62-67.50. Bulls: 1424# 84.50. Feeder Steers: 500-776# 115-117. Feeder Heifers: 650-772# 99-114. Feeder Bulls: 462-500# 110-125. Calves: 172. Bull Calves No. 1 94-120# 127-145; 80-92# 137-147; No. 2 94-124# 120135; 80-92# 120-140; No. 3

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four 94-120# 85-120; 80-92# 90115; Hfrs. No. 1 82-114# 175197; No. 2 82-98# 100-172; Util 70-118# 42-82; 58-68# 15-30. Sows: 478-550# 61-65 Sheep: 118-182# 85-95 Goats: Kids 92-100; Billies 210. EarCorn: 6 lds, 185-210/ton Hay (/ton): 20 lds, Timothy Grass 175-300; Mixed 135250; Grass 100-330; Alfalfa/Grass 100-330. Straw: 9 lds, 155-200/ton. Firewood: 7 lds, 32-80/ld. Round Bales: 3 lds, 40-47 EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA February 13, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75# lean 91-94; Breakers 75-80% lean 8589.50; Boners 80-85% lean 79-84.50; Lean 85-90% lean 73-78, hi dress 79.50, lo dress 68-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 2 1460# 86. Feeder Cattle: Heifers M&L 1 400# 149; 500# 145 M&L 2 300-500# 117.50-130; Bulls M&L 1 600# 136; M&L 2 300500# 119-120; 800# 97.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-120# 140-165; No. 2 90-130# 115-135; No. 3 85120# 67.50-107.50; Vealers Util 65-120# 30-62.50. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 205-235# 78-79.50; 40-45% lean 210335# 70-73; Boars 400# 25. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 50-60# 205-235; 80# 217.50; Yearlings 120-125# 162-165; Ewes Util 1-2 125160# 69-96. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 55# 127.50; Nannies Sel 2 100-105# 90-137.50/cwt; Sel 3 50-70# 46-67.50. GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA February 13, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1374-1540# 128.50131.50; Ch 2-3 1226-1530# 123-128.50; Sel 1-3 1192-

1446# 116-121.50; Hols. Ch 2-3 1472-1512# 109.50-110; 1690# 109; Sel 1-3 13041594# 95-102. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1292-1420# 128.50132.50; Hols. 1384# 103; Ch 2-3 1108-1374# 122-127; 1350# 90.50-94; Sel 1-3 1084-1266# 114. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 81.75-86, hi dress 87.75-92.25, lo dress 77.75-81.50; Boners 80-85% lean 77-82.50, hi dress 81.25-86.25, lo dress 71.2576.50; Lean 85-90% lean 73.50-79.50, hi dress 79.5082.50, lo dress 66-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 10081938# 88-99.50, hi dress 1560-1920# 102-103, lo dress 1080-1465# 83-89. Feeder Calves: Steers M&L 1 553-626# 137.50-140; 8871018# 112-116; L 3 Hols. 700-1010# 89-99; Hfrs. M&L 1 510-624# 132.50-140; 780# 117.50; M&L 2 368422# 137.50-145; Bulls L 3 Hols. 438# 92.50; 888# 96 Hols. Bull calves No. 1 94124# 130-147.50; 86-92# 132.50-140; No. 2 94-124# 110-135; 76-92# 125-137.50; No. 3 76-110# 70-110; Hols. Hfr. calves No. 1 92-98# 157.50-200; No. 2 78-84# 95132.50. Vealers: Util 66-116# 52.5087.50. Slaughter Hogs: Boars 346# 38. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 76-108# 187.50192.50; 124# 175; Ewes Gd 2-3 178# 90-92.50; 218# 87.50. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 30-40# 100-132.50; 50-65# 132.50; Sel 2 under 20# 1015; 20-40# 42.50-112.50; 4555# 90-122.50; Nannies Sel 1 100-170# 140-180; Sel 2 90-140# 122.50-147.50; 130200# 132.50; Billies Sel 2 100-110# 145-152.50; Wethers Sel 1 180# 1225. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA February 9, 2012

Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 2-3 1410# 122.50; Sel 1-2 1370-1482# 117.50-118.50; Hols. Steers Sel 1-2 13061816# 90.50-95; Hfrs. Ch 2-3 1208-1326# 120-121.50; Sel 1-2 1174-1524# 116-117. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean hi dress 91; Breakers 75-80% lean 79.50-83.50; Boners 80-85% lean 75-79; Lean 85-90% lean 71.50-74.50, lo dress 64.50-68. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 2 400# 132.50; Hfrs. M&L 1 600# 120; M&L 2 300-400# 125-147.50; Bulls M&L 1 400# 152.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-125# 135-155; No. 2 90-125# 110-130; No. 3 85120# 90-110; Hfrs. No. 1 70135# 130-155; Vealers Util 70-120# 25-45. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 306# 79. Sows: US 1-3 600# 54. Boars: 300-500# 24-27. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3-45# 55/hd. Slaughter Sheep: Ewes Util 1-2 148# 70. Goats: Kids Sel 1 60# 100. KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA February 11, 2012 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 180 Mixed Hay: 12 lds, 165-290 Timothy: 6 lds, 220-270 Grass: 5 lds, 170-270 Straw: 6 lds, 175-180 Firewood: 8 lds, 50-105 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA February 10, 2011 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1265-1645# 126.50-130; Ch 2-3 11151575# 122-127; Sel 2-3 1085-1410# 116-124; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1425-1630# 108-114; Ch 2-3 1290-1640# 101-111; Sel 2-3 11501560# 94-105; Hfrs. Ch 2-3 1070-1575# 117-126; Sel 2-3 1065-1335# 111-116. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 80.50-

86, hi dress 86-91, lo dress 72-79; Breakers 75-80% lean 76-81, hi dress 81-86, lo dress 71-76; Boners 80-85% lean 74-78.50, hi dress 78.50-82, lo dress 68.50-74; Lean 85-90% lean 65-73, hi dress 73-77.50, lo dress 5965. Slaughter Bulls: Thurs. YG 1 1045-2085# 88-93. Holstein Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 114-128# 120-127; 90112# 135-148; 86-88# 125; No. 2 112-128# 120-129; 80110# 137-144, pkg 129; No. 3 100-130# 107-116; 72-98# 117-127, pkg 138; Util 90110# 40-88; 60-88# 17-25; Hfrs. No. 1 85-105# 160-210; No. 2 70-95# 125-150. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA February 7, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 82-87; Breakers 75-80% lean 7580.50; Boners 80-85% lean 68-74.50; Lean 85-90% lean 62.50-65.50, lo dress 50-55. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 120-145; 8090# 100-120; No. 2 95-120# 110-120; No. 3 80-110# 7085; Util 70-105# 20-70. LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA February 8, 2012 Slaughter Holstein Steers: Ch 2-3 1295-1560# 107.50110; Sel 1-3 1305-1660# 93.50-98.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1300# 120; Sel 1-3 10001360# 90-95.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 83-87.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 75.508050, hi dress 84-87.50; Boners 80-85% lean 71.5076, hi dress 77.50-81.50; Lean 85-90% lean 64-70, hi dress 71.50-73.50, lo dress 54-59. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 11052460# 87-92, hi dress 94. Feeder Cattle: Vealers 70110# 10-50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 127.50-140; 85-90# 100-140; No. 2 95130# 110-130; No. 3 80120# 80-120. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 140# 137.50; Yearlings Gd 2-3 90-140# 77.50110; Sheep Gd 2-3 180# 883. Goats: Kids Sel 1 30-60# 105-125; Nannies Sel 2 100130# 115-125; Billies Sel 1 150# 172. Slaughter Hogs: 45-50% lean 130-190# 61-65. MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA February 7, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1160-1535# 129-133;

Ch 2-3 1125-1480# 123-129; full/YG 4-5 1135-1460# 118123; Sel 1-3 1300-1485# 117.50-123; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1335-1565# 110-113; Ch 2-3 1280-1565# 104.50110.50; 1640-1680# 98-102; Sel 1-3 1175-1600# 96-102. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1250-1285# 127-129; Ch 2-3 1035-1390# 120126.50; full/YG 4-5 11901480# 119-120; Hols. 13851395# 94.50-95; Sel 1-3 1050-1395# 115-120. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 78.5080.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 74-79, lo dress 68.50-73.50; Boners 80-85% lean 69-75, hi dress 76.50-78, lo dress 65-70; Lean 85-90% lean 64.50-70, hi dress 73-74, lo dress 60.50-65. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 13651925# 87-95, hi dress 1745# 95.50; lo dress 990-1370# 72-85. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 600-730# 125-130; Hereford 835# 105; M&L 2 225# 160; 435-447# 137-165; L 3 Hols. 232# 115; 300-495# 85-102; 510-920# 78-97; Hfrs. M 1 470# 147; M&L 2 230-255# 127-135; 365-488# 115-147; 552-675# 115-137; 710-823# 88-95; Bulls M&L 1 457-465# 165-167; M&L 2 200-280# 125-147; 375-495# 150-158; 535# 149; 765-805# 90-97; L 3 Hols. 225# 100; 855-960# 79-80. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-115# 120-140; 8590# 125-137; No. 2 95-115# 105-127; 80-90# 100-127; No. 3 70-120# 72-107; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 95-110# 140-160; No. 2 80-85# 100-122; Vealers Util 85-100# 65-80. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 238-275# 75-80, late sale 69-71; 280295# 76-81, late sale 70-75; 300-340# 74-79, late sale 68-72; 45-50% lean 240275# 70-76, late sale 65-68; 280-330# 70-78, late sale 67-69; Sows US 1-3 310490# 58-67; 515-670# 55-57; Boars 345-420# 29-36. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 20-40# 16-36; 60-90# 38-51; Roasting Pigs 160-195# 50-65/cwt. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 25-50# 240-290; 7375# 182-202; 115-130# 132140; Ewes Gd 2-3 103-170# 95-110; Rams 170-180# 102-107. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 50-60# 117-137; 70-100# 147-170; Sel 2 20-40# 50-85; 45-65# 90-122; Sel 3 40-65# 45-65; Nannies Sel 1 90# 135; Sel 2 90-150# 117-125; Sel 3 70-80# 77-85; Wethers Sel 2 150# 167. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA February 13, 2012 Cattle: 77

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Cows: Steers Ch 112-117; Gd 106-112; Hfrs. Ch 110115; Gd 100-108; Util & Comm. 72-82; Canner/lo Cutter 72 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 82-92 Bulls: YG 1 72-85 Cattle: Steers 80-110; Bulls 75-125; Hfrs. 70-100. Calves: 82. Ch 100-120; Gd 80-95; Std 15-85; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 90-140. Hogs: 43. US 1-2 75-78; US 1-3 70-75; Sows US 1-3 5565; Boars 27-47. Feeder Pigs: 6. US 1-3 2050# 30-65. Sheep: 23. SI Ewes 60-80. Goats: 20-140 MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA February 13, 2012 Alfalfa: 170-315 Alfalfa/Grass: 275-355 Grass: 230-345 Timothy: 145-180 Mixed Hay: 180-330 Round Bales: 135-180 Lg. Sq. Bales: 128-260 Straw: 130-240 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA February 13, 2012 Roosters: 3-5 Hens: 1.50-3.75 Banties: .05-2 Pigeons:-2-3.80 Bunnies: 3.25-7 Rabbits: 8-12.50 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm.

NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA February 1, 2012 US 1-2: 20-30# 140-145; 3040# 135-145; 40-50# 155; 60-90# 70-90. US 2: pkg 31# 150; pkg 42# 110; pkg 57# 140. *Next Feeder Pig Sale is Wed., Feb. 15. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA February 6, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: Non-Traditional, Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 50-60# 256-260; 6080# 235-258; 80-90# 215230; 90-110# 200-215; 110130# 206-220; 130-150# 185-200; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 60-80# 220-242; 80-90# 208-223; 90-110# 175-190; 110-130# 160-175; 130-150# 146-161. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 106-121; 160-200# 102-117; 200-300# 88-102; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120-160# 104-120. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 109-140; 60-80# 144160; 80-100# 152-171; 100110# 163-178; Sel 2 40-60# 90-118; 60-80# 112-134; 8090# 126-142; Sel 3 30-40# 50-61; 40-60# 64-82; 60-90# 74-89; Nannies/Does Sel 1 80-130# 140-155; 130-180# 152-167; Sel 2 80-130# 118133; Sel 3 50-80# 79-93; 80130# 95-110; Bucks/Billies Sel 1 100-150# 178-193; 150-250# 218-240; Sel 2 100-150# 145-165; 150-250# 165-181. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to last week corn sold .05 to .10 lower, wheat sold steady to .05 lower, barley sold .05 to .10 higher, Oats sold steady & Soybeans sold steady. EarCorn sold steady to 3 higher. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.92-7.28, Avg 7.10, Contracts 5.64-5.74; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.106.80, Avg 6.42, Contracts 6.26-6.28; Barley No. 3 Range 4.70-6, Avg 5.40, Contracts 4.50; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50-4.80, Avg 4.60; Soybeans No 2 Range 11.54-12.09, Avg 11.85,

Contracts 11.76-12.05; EarCorn Range 200-205, Avg 202.50. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.80-7.10, Avg 6.94; Wheat No. 2 6.29; Barley No. 3 Range 6.50; Oats No. 2 4-4.40, Avg 4.23; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11.4012.09, Avg 11.66; EarCorn Range 195-225. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.70-7.10, Avg 6.96; Wheat No. 2 Range 67.10, Avg 6.56; Barley No. 3 Range 4-6.20, Avg 4.97; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-5.10, Avg 4.27; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11-11.94, Avg 11.57; EarCorn Range 195-200, Avg 197.50. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 7-7.25, Avg 7.14; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.50-7.50, Avg 7; Barley No. 3 Range 6; Oats No. 2 Range 4.55; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11.20-11.80, Avg 11.60; Gr. Sorghum Range 5.90. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.70-7.25, Avg 7.02, Month Ago 6.82, Year Ago 7.07; Wheat No. 2 Range 6-7.50, Avg 6.56, Month Ago 6.27, Year Ago 8.15; Barley No. 3 Range 46.50, Avg 5.29, Month Ago 5.20 Year Ago 4.28; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-5.10, Avg 4.36, Month Ago 4.27, Year Ago 2.84; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11-12.09, Avg 11.67, Month Ago 11.03, Year Ago 13.59; EarCorn Range 195225; Avg 205.71, Month Ago 196, Year Ago 156.25. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.10-6.50, Avg 6.34; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.95; Oats No. 2 3.20-4.85, Avg 4.01; Soybeans No. 2 11.84. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary February 10, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 127-131.50; Ch 1-3 122-127; Sel 1-2 116-121; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110114; Ch 2-3 104-109; Sel 1-2 94-102. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 127-129; Ch 1-3 120126.50; Sel 1-2 112-118. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 76-81; Boners 80-85% lean 71-78; Lean 8590% lean 64-71.50. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 94-101; Avg dress 84-94; lo dress 77-83. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 150-212; 500-700# 125-165; M&L 2 300-500# 130-182.50; 500-700# 110142.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300500# 147-166; 500-700# 129-155; M&L 2 300-500# 115-145; 500-700# 115-137. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 165-217.50; 500-700#

132-161; M&L 2 300-500# 125-158; 500-700# 107.50127.50. Vealers: Util 60-120# 20-80. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-125# 120-150; No. 2 95-125# 105-130; No. 3 80120# 70-115; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 160-220; No. 2 80-105# 80-160. Hogs: Barrows & Glts 4954% lean 220-270# 6068.50; 45-50% lean 220270# 52-65.50. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 53.50-55; 500-700# 5558.50. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 12 20-30# 140-145; 30-40# 135-145; 40-50# 155-165; 60-90# 70-80; US 2 pkg 30# 150; pkg 40# 110; pkg 55# 140; 80-125# 60-70. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 265-310; 60-80# 220-250; 80-110# 175-219; 110-150# 146-188; Ch 1-3 40-60# 218-232; 6080# 197-217; 80-110# 155200; Ewes Gd 2-3 120-160# 103-116; 160-200# 96-111. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 115-138; 60-80# 126160; 80-100# 143-159; Sel 2 40-60# 90-105; 60-80# 105144; 80-100# 127-145; Sel 3 40-60# 56-79; 60-80# 85101; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 130-145; 130-180# 144-159; Sel 2 80-130# 120-134; Sel 3 50-80# 77-93; 80-130# 911104; Billies Sel 1 100-150# 154-200; 150-250# 202-217; Sel 2 100-150# 146-161; 150-250# 170-185. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Compred to last week hay & straw sold steady. Alfalfa 175-335; Mixed Hay 170-335; Timothy 150-240; Straw 120-180; Mulch 60-100. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 285 lds 52 Straw; Alfalfa 157-400; Mixed Hay 100460; Timothy 140-400; Grass 100-350; Straw 140-200, mostly 150-180. Diffenbach Auct, February 6, 119 lds Hay, 18 lds Straw. Alfalfa 175-350; Mixed Hay 150-460; Timothy 170-400; Grass 210-350; Straw 140200. Green Dragon, Ephrata: February 10, 79 lds Hay, 13 Straw. Alfalfa 157-400; Mixed Hay 100-335; Timothy 142300; Grass Hay 100-305; Straw 150-172. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: February 9, 30 lds Hay, 10 Straw. Alfalfa 210-270; Mixed Hay 150-400; Timothy 160-200; Grass 180-290; Straw 165-200. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola,

PA: February 8, 57 lds Hay, 11 Straw. Alfalfa 205-360; Mixed Hay 145-415; Timothy 175-210; Grass 185-260; Straw 140-200. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 170 Loads Hay, 51 Straw. Alfalfa 135-365; Mixed Hay 95-320; Timothy 115-275; Grass 80-270; Straw 120220, mostly 160-205. Belleville Auct, Belleville: February 8, 42 lds Hay, 3 lds Straw. Alfalfa 200-305; Mixed 120-312.50; Straw 135-220. Dewart Auction, Dewart: February 6, 33 lds Hay, 13 Straw. Alfalfa 310; Mixed Hay 100-320; Grass 100-250; Straw 160-205. Greencastle Livestock: February 6 & 9, 21 lds Hay, 5 Straw. Alfalfa 170-365; Mixed Hay 95-207.50; Timothy 147.50; Grass 82.50-270; Straw 110-137.50. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: February 11, 24 lds Hay, 6 Straw. Alfalfa 180; Mixed Hay 165-290; Timothy 220-270; Grass Hay 245270. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: February 7, 50 lds Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa 135-320; Mixed Hay 95-285; Timothy 115-275; Grass 80-235; Straw 120-175. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: January 7 & 10, 80 lds Hay, 23 Straw. Alfalfa 145320; Mixed Hay 85-295; Timothy 175-250; Grass 135285; Straw 150-210. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: February 10, 40 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Alfalfa 180-200; Timothy 160-200; Grass 160-180; Straw 75190. VINTAGE SALES STABLES February 13, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1315-1465# 125-

129.50; Ch 2-3 1235-1570# 122.50-126.50, mostly 119.50-122; Sel 2-3 12551460# 119.50-121.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1320-1730# 109-110.50; Ch 2-3 13001705# 102.50-106.50; Sel 23 94-100.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 75-80% lean 80.5085.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 77.50-82, hi dress 82-84, lo dress 70-73.50; Boners 8085% lean 75-80, hi dress 8185, lo dress 70-73; Lean 8890% lean 73-78, hi dress 7880.50, lo dress 68-72.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-120# 115-125; 80-90# 8595; No. 2 95-115# 85-90; 8090# 75-80; No. 3 80-100# 6080; Util 80-110# 30-60. Holstein Heifers: No. 1 90105# 120-130. *Next Feeder Cattle Sale is March 9. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA February 9, 2012 Alfalfa: 4 lds, 210-270 Timothy Hay: 2 lds, 160200 Orchard Grass: 1 ld 175 Mixed Hay: 17 lds, 150-400 Grass: 6 lds, 185-290 Straw: 10 lds, 165-200 EarCorn: 1 ld, 85 Firewood: 7 lds, 55-115 Wrapped Baleage: 1 ld, 50/bale. Baleage: 1 ld, 60/bale Baleage Mixed: 3 lds 5560/bale. WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA February 8, 2012 Alfalfa: 7 lds, 226-300 Mixed: 32 lds, 215-325 Timothy: 4 lds, 230-265 Grass: 13 lds, 184-240 Straw: 13 lds, 167-195 Fodder: 1 ld, 120 Baleage: 1 ld, 40 Firewood: 3 lds, 82-105

FUTURE AUCTIONS Tuesday, Feb. 28th • 9 AM 53 Acre Dairy Farm

Quarryville, Lancaster County, PA

Three Day Retirement Auction - Business Liquidation March 21st, 22nd & 23rd • 9 AM Greeger Home And Hardware 111 Greenmount Rd., Rising Sun, MD

22nd Annual Auction @ Beaver Mountain Farms Saturday, April 14th • 8 AM

Inventory Reduction - Farm Tractors & Equipment Saturday, April 21st • 8:25 AM Newton, PA

Saturday, April 28th • Rising Sun, MD 40 plus tractors.Watch for future ads.

LEAMAN AUCTIONS 717-464-1128

www.leamanauctions.com or Auctionzip #3721

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 9

NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA February 9, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1265-1625# 126.50130; Ch 2-3 1115-1565# 122-126; Sel 2-3 1085-1340# 116-121; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 24 1425-1630# 110-114; Ch 2-3 1300-1640# 101-106; Sel 2-3 1115-1560# 90-94. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1070-1320# 117-122; Sel 2-3 1065-1335# 111-116. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 79-83.50, hi dress 84-88; Breakers 7580% lean 76-80, hi dress 8085, lo dress 72-76; Boners 80-85% lean 72-76, hi dress 77-81, lo dress 67-71; Lean 88-90% lean 64-68.50, hi dress 70-72.50, lo dress 5762. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 10452085# 88-93. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 114-128# 120-127; 90-112# 135-148; 86-88# 125; No. 2 112-128# 120-129; 80-110# 137-144, pkg 129; No. 3 100130# 107-116; 72-98# 117127, pkg 138; Util 90-110# 40-50; 60-88# 17-25. Holstein Heifer Calves: No.

1 85-105# 160-210; No. 2 7095# 125-150.

Where Is The Silver Lining? Issued Feb. 10, 2012 Dairy prices saw more weakness the first full week of February. The cash block cheese price closed that Friday at $1.4750 per pound, down a penny on the week and 44 cents below a year ago when they jumped 10 1/2 cents. The barrels saw some gains but still lost a penny on the week, closing at $1.4850, 41 1/2-cents below a year ago when they gained 12 1/2 cents, but they’re a penny above the blocks despite a fair amount of product being sold. Nine cars of block traded hands and 29 of barrel. The NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price fell to $1.5587, down 2 1/2-cents. The barrels averaged $1.5409, down 3.7 cents. Cash butter saw its fourth consecutive week of loss, losing another 6 cents and closing at $1.4325, 65 3/4-cents below a year ago. Four cars traded hands on the week. NASS butter averaged $1.5470, down

4.3 cents. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.3350, down 2 1/4cents on the week, while Extra Grade held all week at $1.2975. NASS powder averaged $1.3853, down 0.8 cent, and dry whey averaged 66.48 cents, down a penny. Commercial disappearance and the production of dairy products finished 2011 strong and rounded out a big year of output and usage, according to USDA data reported by Jerry Dryer in his February 3 Dairy and Food Market Analyst. Cheese production was up 1.7 percent (173 million lbs.) to a record high 10.609 billion pounds and commercial disappearance grew by 3 percent (317 million lbs). American cheese disappearance grew 1.2 percent (49 million lbs) and other cheese, by 4.2 percent (268 million lbs). Dry whey output fell about 1 percent (10 million lbs to 950.6 million) and commercial disappearance was down 0.9

PLAN AHEAD

MacFaddens Spring Auction

Sat., March 31st, 2012

Worldwide Advertising & Internet Bidding Call early to consign to this big event! MACFADDEN N & SONS,, INC. 1457 Hwy. Rt. 20, Sharon Springs, NY

Page 10 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

(518) 284-2090 Email: info@macfaddens.com web site: www.macfaddens.com

• Cabbage • Peppers • Tomatoes • Broccoli

• Squash • Melons • Lettuce • Onions

• Cauliflower

MAIER FARMS

Vegetable Plug Transplants Webster, NY

585-265-3273

www.maierfarms.com

percent (8 million lbs to 952 million lbs). Butter production increased 15.4 percent (241 million lbs) and commercial disappearance was up 10 percent (163 million lbs). Milk powder (NFDM and SMP) output neared the twobillion-pound threshold at 1.964 billion; up 8 percent (147 million lbs). Commercial disappearance was up even more, wrote Dryer, plus 8.8 percent (159 million lbs). He also touched on the growing milk supply and, based on plant operators he has talked to, warned that “the traditional spring peak in daily milk production is one to four months early across most of the U.S.” He speculated whether there would be even more to come “as warmer weather and longer days push their way north to the milk-sheds across the upper tier of states” and posed the question; “Will there be enough plant capacity for all of the milk by March, April, and May.” Several people he spoke with are concerned, he reported. Zeroing in on nonfat dry milk (NFDM), the CME’s Daily Dairy Report says U.S. NFDM prices have dropped steadily the last seven months, falling 25-30

cents from the July 2011 peak. Buyers are often waiting for prices to stabilize before ordering too far out, according to the DDR, and inventories are building. Meanwhile, Oceania skim milk powder prices have held mostly steady since October. “Traders and handlers indicate that powder stocks are sufficient to fulfill commitments with minimal volumes remaining as uncommitted,” DMN said. Mild winter weather across much of the country is helping to increase milk production and thus more milk is finding its way to cheese vats, according to Dairy Market News. Inventories are building as sales are reported as slow after the New Year. In most regions, the winter season has been much less stressful on the herd and increasing milk receipts at processing plants are being reported. Except for Florida, milk volumes coast to coast are building to the point that milk is not moving from one region to another to supplement shortages. Milk volumes are increasing, but processing capacity is generally sufficient within close proximity of production at this time, according to USDA. Cream markets

are weak and pricing multiples are easing. Cream volumes are heavy and often clearing from one region to another to find processing. Producers of higherclass cream product items are seeing declines in orders after a recent boost from football related interest, thus more cream is available to churns coast to coast. The Oceania milk production season continues to trend lower. New Zealand weather patterns are favorable for production at this time of the annual cycle and handlers continue to project a 3-4 percent annual increase over last season, with some handlers adjusting their estimates to a strong 4 percent plus increase. Fluctuating weather in Australia is not having an overall negative impact on milk output. Producers and handlers indicate volumes are lower but maintaining levels that are often higher than projected. Producers project a 2-3 percent annual increase when the current fiscal year ends in June. Back on the home front, the Agriculture Department raised its 2012 milk production forecast in this week’s World Agricultural Sup-

ply and Demand Estimates report (WASDE) after lowering it slightly a month ago. Look for output to hit 199 billion pounds, up 500 million pounds from last month’s projection. Milk cow numbers were raised for much of the year as USDA’s Cattle report indicated 1 percent more dairy cows on January 1, 2012. However, producers are holding 1 percent fewer heifers for addition to the dairy herd, which is expected to push cow numbers lower later in the year. Milk per cow forecasts were raised as data for the last quarter of 2011 was higher than expected and mild weather in much of the country is supporting increased early year yields. 2011 output was put at 196.2 billion, up 200 million pounds from last month’s projection and compares to 2010’s 192.8 billion. With higher forecast 2012 production, cheese and butter prices were lowered. The nonfat dry milk (NDM) price was lowered to reflect slightly weaker early year prices. With stronger forecast demand for whey, the whey price forecast was raised. The lower cheese

PRIVATE AUCTION BEDETTE FARM AND HOME UP FOR BID 43639 FERGUSON CORNERS ROAD RUSHVILLE, NEW YORK 14544 YATES COUNTY, TOWN OF POTTER CALL KEN BEDETTE 585-455-6198 FARM 65 Acres, 30+ Tillable HOME Private appraisal on home was over $200,000 Log Home built in 1994 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms Full basement 35 X 50 16 X 50 deck 14 X 50 Overhang

POLE BARN Built in 2000 40 X 60 X17 Pole Barn 36 X68 Overhang & Cattle Pens

Bids start at Full assessed value: $223,100 * Also on bid 20 acres that adjoin the main farm, bids start at full market value: $24,000 * Also on bid 65.5 acres of rental ground 8 miles from the main farm The three highest bidders are invited to the closing!! BIDDING STARTS NOW AND CLOSES ON APRIL 1ST, 2012 AT 3:00P.M. EST GOD IS NOT MAKING LAND ANYMORE, PLEASE COME AND LOOK!!!

Dairyline D11

Dairyline from D10 price is expected to more than offset the higher whey price, resulting in a reduced forecast Class III price. Look for the 2012 Class III average to range $16.70-$17.40 per hundredweight (cwt.), down from the $17.10-$17.90 expected a month ago, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. Lower butter and NDM prices result in a lower Class IV price, now projected to average $16.25-

$17.05, down from $16.45-$17.35 expected in the last report, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. The WASDE report was the topic of Dairy Profit Weekly editor Dave Natzke in his Friday DairyLine update. He reported on the weakening cheese, butter and milk powder prices and the rising futures prices for corn and soybeans. He gave as an example, February 8 annual average 2012 Class III milk fu-

tures contracts traded 85 cents per cwt. below the average on January 5, with prices for February through March down nearly $2 per cwt. compared to a month ago. He reported that the WASDE indicates the trend could continue and cited the rising milk production data and lowered milk price projections detailed above and warned that; “If lower milk prices aren’t enough incentive for dairy farmers to reduce milk production, higher feed costs might be.” USDA forecasts the season-average corn price to be 60 cents to $1.40 per bushel higher than the year before, and soybean prices up to $1 per bushel higher. Higher beef prices might be an incentive to more culling, Natzke said. Latest USDA projections raised beef prices by $6-$14 per cwt. compared to last year. Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted 35 requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 3.763 million pounds of Cheddar cheese and 3.411 million pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The product will be delivered through June 2012.The sales raised CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 17 million pounds plus 14.4

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 11

million pounds of butter to 14 countries. Looking “back to the futures;” the Class III milk price average for the first six months of 2012 stood at $17.60 on January 6, $17.28 on January 13, $16.81 on January 20, $16.85 on January 27, $16.35 on February 3, and was hovering around $16.15 late morning February 10. Meanwhile; the Livestock Gross Margin insurance program (LGM) has been a “very workable way for dairy producers to set some minimum floors on their revenue,” according to the University of Wisconsin’s Dr. Brian Gould in Tuesday’s DairyLine but is severely limited by a budget of just $20 million a year for all of the pilot livestock revenue programs, including the LGM. Gould said the Congressional Budget Office 10 year forecast of direct payments to agriculture is about $60 billion, with $22 billion going to corn producers and $11 billion to wheat. $443 million would go to dairy or less than 0 .3 percent. He predicted continued volatility in dairy but said the LGM program works however it may need to be removed from “pilot status,” so more funds could become available for the LGM. The LGM ran out of money after two months, Gould reported, but he speculated that about 2 1/2 percent of U.S. annual milk production was insured and was equivalent to what’s sold on the Class III futures. The relative small amount of milk represented is only because of the lack of money, according to Gould. Gould encouraged listeners to be involved in the hearing process as the Farm Bill process moves ahead and to contact lawmakers. He said there are groups of dairy farmers that are examining changes that could be made to the LGM to make it more workable and get it out of pilot status and now is the time to do it.

Page 12 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Hearing on Future of the Family Farm misses the point On Feb. 2, the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Energy and Trade met for a hearing entitled The Future of the Family Farm: The Effect of Proposed DOL Regulations on Small Business Producers. Chaired by Congressman Scott Tipton (R-CO), the hearing focused on the implications the U.S. Department of Labor’s proposed update to the Hazardous Orders for child labor in agriculture would have on the farm industry. The Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs (AFOP)was disappointed by the lack of focus on the dangers posed to children working in agriculture. “The reality is that children are needlessly killed and maimed every year in agriculture,” said Norma Flores López, the Children in the Fields Campaign Director at AFOP, and a former migrant farmworker child. “The proposed rules are common sense changes that put the well-being and safety of children working on farms above corporate interests.” The subcommittee members present, with the exception of Congresswoman Judy Chu (D-CA), were not in favor of the implementation of the proposed updates to the child safety rules in agriculture. Nancy Leppink, Deputy Administrator of Wage and Hour Division at the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), testified on behalf of the agency, discussing the proposed updates that were issued in September 2011. “One of the highest priorities of the Secretary of Labor has been and continues to be the prevention of the death and injury of children as a result of their employment in hazardous occupations,” Leppink said. “The changes would only prohibit children under 16 from performing tasks that are hazardous. Once a child reaches the age of 16, he or she may be employed in agriculture to do any work at any time.” She also went on to note that children, regardless of their age, would be able to perform any type of work

on their parents’ farm. The second panel, which consisted of four non-agency stakeholders from the agriculture industry, testified before the subcommittee giving their perspective on the proposed DOL updates to the Haz-

585-534-5935

ardous Orders. Two of the witnesses, including the one Democratic witness, represented the Farm Bureau. All of the panelists took issue with the definition of a family farm, which is prescribed in the Fair Labor Standards Act of

585-343-1822

1938 (FLSA). On Feb.1, the DOL announced they would be separating and re-proposing the parental exemption portion. “We are glad the Department of Labor did not completely withdraw the proposed changes to

315-655-8146

the parental exemption, but instead opened the dialogue for further discussion,” said Flores López. “Furthermore, we are glad to know the process to implement the rest of the proposed hazardous orders updates continues to move for-

607-753-9656

315-446-5656

ward. We applaud Secretary Solis’s resolve on protecting the safety of our country’s most vulnerable workers — children working on farms — and look forward to the swift implementation of these much needed child labor safety rules.”

315-539-7000

Agriculture Department announces specialty crop grant deadline HARRISBURG, PA — Proposals for projects that increase the visibility and competitiveness of the state’s nursery, horticultural and nut products are being ac-

cepted through Feb. 29. The proposals are part of a two-phase competitive process for the federal Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, which was authorized under

the federal Farm Bill. “Specialty crops, including fruits, vegetables, flowers and trees, play a significant part in the state’s economy, contributing more than

$1 billion in sales each year,” said Agriculture Secretary George Greig. “By investing in the specialty crop industry, we can make these healthy, affordable products

more accessible to consumers and more profitable for producers.” Applicants must submit a short concept paper for projects that solely enhance the competi-

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 13

tiveness of specialty crops through market development, technology innovation, food safety, nutrition knowledge, sustainable practices and pest management. Requests may be made for any amount, providing the amount reasonably represents the cost of the intended project. Each project must have measurable outcomes for the specialty crop industry and/or the public rather than a single organization, institution or individual. Single organizations, institutions and individuals are encouraged to participate as project partners. The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture administers the grant program, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service. Proposals will be reviewed by a state-appointed specialty crop advisory board and approved by the state agriculture secretary. Successful applicants will then be asked to submit a full proposal by April 20, based on the concept paper. Last year, 17 projects were approved in Pennsylvania totaling more than $1 million. Projects addressed a range of priorities in the agriculture industry, including food safety, marketing, nutrition and sustainability. Concept papers must be received by 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 29. Completed applications may be mailed to Lela Reichart, Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Market Development, 2301 N. Cameron St., Room 310, Harrisburg, PA 17110-9408. Handdelivered applications can be dropped off at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center, 2300 N. Cameron St., Room F6, Harrisburg, PA 17110. For more information about the grant program, contact Reichart at 717-783-1394 or lreichart@state.pa.us, or v i s i t www.agriculture.state.p a.us to download an application.

District Finalists selected for New York Farm Bureau Scholarship

Page 14 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

loading pumpkin and, as he got older, driving the wagon rides. Justin has been accepted to SUNY Cobleskill where he will major in Agricultural Equipment Technology. SUNY Cobleskill works close-

Justin Bakewicz Justin Bakewicz advances to state-level competition CALVERTON, NY — Justin W. Bakewicz, the son of William and Marianne Bakewicz of Rocky Point, has advanced one step closer to the potential $1,500, $1,200, and $1,000 scholarships that will be given by New York Farm Bureau’s Promotion and Education Committee. A senior at Rocky Point High School, Justin will compete against 10 other finalists from districts across New York State. In addition to his hands-on status at the family farm, Hank’s Pumpkintown in Southampton and Kraszewski’s Farms in Water Mill, Justin volunteers his time as a junior fire fighter with the Rocky Point Fire Department, plays Lacrosse and owns and operates his own landscape, maintenance and snow removal company. However, Justin has a great interest in hunting and offers local hunting guides to anyone who wants to learn the ropes. Hank from Hank’s Pumpkintown describes Justin as “very enthusiastic when working on the farm and has truly developed a great work ethic.” Justin started working on the farm as a boy, spending weekends on the South Fork farm picking corn, un-

ly with John Deere to encourage students to obtain “hands on” experience. Justin will also have an internship with La Corte Equipment in Calverton. The scholarship competition began at the district level where

Justin and others from Long Island competed against one another for the right to be named the District 11 Scholarship Winner. Justin was required to write an essay entitled “If I had the power to change something in

my community or on your farm, what would you change and why?” His application and essay factored into the judging. At the statelevel competition he will compete against winners from ten other New York Farm Bureau

districts. “We’re so proud of Justin,” says Kristina Sidor, LI Farm Bureau Promotion and Education Chairperson, “He is clearly going to make a difference in the world and in agriculture here on Long Island.”

Farm transition planning The long term needs of the farm should be your primary concern by Donald G Schreiber, J.D., CLU, ChFC You’re involved in the day-to-day operation of your farm — making decisions, meeting deadlines, planning for next year. You’re up to your ears in machinery maintenance, input purchases and marketing — not to mention getting this season’s crop harvested. That’s why it can be challenging to step back from the fires you’re putting out today to think about a bigger picture: your farm’s legacy. Have you developed a transition plan for when you retire or when it’s time to pass the farm on? You’ve worked so hard to build your operation. Having a succession plan is the best way to ensure your farm’s legacy continues as you wish. Good farm transition planning involves: • identifying your values, goals and objectives • getting the business side of the farm operation in order • completing personal estate planning • setting up you assets so that you are financially independent • thinking through all areas of risk management • ensuring the proper legal documents are in place When family members enter into the equation, planning can become more complicated. To date, small business succession planning trends don’t look good. One study estimates that 70 percent of family businesses will fail to make it to the next generation. With 98 percent of all farms owned by families, the imperative for planning is clear for farm operators who would like to transition their land and operation to the next generation.

KENNLAND TRUCKING Scott Kennedy 518-857-7423 cell • 518-993-3902 home

While legal structure, estate documents, business documents and financial instruments are all important to a successful farm transition plan, this article focuses on another important part of the planning equation: People. Consider this hypothetical farm situation. Here is the background: • The farm operator is 60 years old • He is married to a supportive wife, a trusted partner in the farm operation • They have 4 children — three sons and a daughter - Oldest son works on the farm. He has always been expected to help out with the workload and carries more of it than the other three children - Second son also works on the farm, never finished school and is a bit of a problem child - Third son went to college, majored in business administration with a minor in agricultural science. He is a lot like his dad which causes relationship problems - Last child is a daughter. She has a close relationship with her mom and is the apple of dad’s eye. She is married and works in town as an elementary school teacher • Dad has a preconceived notion the farm should be operated by the oldest son who spends the most time working with him • Dad also feels, like Mom, that all four children should equally own the farm and the two active sons should make decisions on operating the farm. They believe this is “fair” • Estate documents reflect equal ownership; no business documents have been drafted or installed Taking the above scenario into consideration, it’s

REAL ESTATE FARM AUCTION

House - Barn - 24 Acres

SATURDAY, MARCH 10TH at 1PM • Dairy Cows & Heifers • Complete Moves

• Feeders/Feedlots • Sales

• Shows • Load Chute

Also Equipment/Corn

OPEN HOUSE - Sunday, Feb. 26th

WEEKLY SALES EVERY MONDAY HOSKING SALES - FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK

607-699-3637 or 607-847-8800 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771

2 - 4 PM

Surveyed 24 acres w/mostly remodeled house, barn w/horse stalls & tack rooms, machine shed, fenced training ring, above ground pool, fenced pasture w/stream 'Gravel Run', over 1500' road frontage. Taxes only $1,902.00 per year. See website for brochure & photos. TERMS: 10% down at time of sale, balance within 45 days. 10% buyer's premium added to the final bid to determine selling price. Owner: Pam McKee.

NICOLLS & AUCTIONS (814) 333-1988 Bruce Nicolls Au-1185-L www.nicandauctions.com

Nathan Nicolls Au-5325-L nicandauctions@windstream.net

— Canandaigua, NY —

2012 AUCTION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 * 9AM *

ST

CONSIGNMENTS WANTED Farm Tractors - Farm Equipment Cars - Trucks - Trailers Construction Equipment • Trucking Available • Please get your list in for advertising Please call Charlie or George 585-394-4691

LLAND SALES STABLES, IN W HO E N Located 12 Miles East of Lancaster, PA Just Off Rt. 23, New Holland C.

Dairy Cow & Heifer Sale Wed., Feb 22ND • 10:30 AM Special Mention: 20 Started Heifers from 27,000 Lb. Herd Birth dates, sire & dam info at ringside All Consignments Welcome: Cows - Bull - Heifers From Started Calves to Mature Cows Consignors: Please send all info w/Truckers

Thank You

SALE MANAGED BY: New Holland Sales Stables, Inc. David Kolb 61-L

717-354-4341 (Barn) 717-355-0706 (FAX)

Reminder: Special Heifer Sale • Wed., March 14TH M.C.C. Donation Heifer Sale • Wed., March 21ST

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 15

Weekly Sales Every Monday 12:30 Produce, Misc. & small animals; 1:00 Dairy; **We will now sell lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves and cull approx. 5:00-5:30PM. Help us increase our volume - thus making a better market for everyone. **We are Independent Marketers - working 24/7 to increase your bottom line. Competitive marketing is the way to go. Monday, Feb. 13th sale - Top cow .90 wt. 1431 $1287.90 cows up to $1580.32 Bulls/Steers top $.95, bull calves top $1.5250. Dairy feeders up to .90. Dairy milking age top $1750, bred heifers up to $1150. Monday, Feb. 20th - Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Special 16 BoerCross kids from one farm. Monday, March 5th - Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Monday, March 26th - Special Holiday Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Note this date is the last week of March. Friday, April 6th - 11:30AM Spring Premier All Breed Sale. Selections are underway. Accepting registered high quality cattle give us a call. Monday, April 9th - Monthly Heifer Sale. Saturday, April 21st - Annual Spring Machinery Sale & Plant, Tree & Shrub Auction - accepting consignments groups or single items. Consignments already coming in call today to get into advertising it will make a difference. Expecting a field full of quality farm equipment. Saturday, April 28th - Sale held on Farm. Otego, NY. 11:00 AM. Gretna Acres Registered Brown Swiss Complete Dispersal. 100 Head sell. This is a long established breeding herd (50 years) DHI tested, AI sired. Regular herd health program. LOOKING TO HAVE A FARM SALE OR JUST SELL A FEW - GIVE US A CALL. **Trucking Assistance - Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on our Web-Site. Call to advertise in any of these sales it makes a difference. Directions: Former Welch Livestock 6096 NYS Rt. 8, 30 miles South of Utica & 6 miles North of New Berlin, NY. www.hoskingsales.com Call today with your consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 6096 NYS Rt. 8 New Berlin, NY 13411

Located at 23723 Gravel Run Road, Saegertown, PA, Woodcock Twp., Crawford County, PA. 1 mile east of Woodcock Boro and Rt. 86. Saegertown or Cambridge Springs Schools, your choice.

time to ask some hard questions, like: • Can the farm survive if you divide into it four equal parts? • Will a farm that is barely providing a living for two families be able to successfully provide for four? Usually, fractionalizing a farm is not a good idea. When you cut up a pie and continue to cut it up, the pie eventually gets so small that no one can enjoy it. The same is true with a farm. It can be divided so much over generations that it is no longer viable or beneficial to anyone. Equal distribution of the farm to four children means splitting up ownership, control and the farm’s income. • Can the farm survive? • If not, how will that affect the farm’s ability to support those who are caring for it? Who will be in charge? Who will make critical decisions on its care? Another common choice farm operators make is consolidating ownership of the land and operations with the active children. But, that may mean that the non-active children receive less, maybe much less than an equal share of the farm operator’s estate. There are alternatives that can help make the distribution more “equitable” and ease the concerns of inequitable treatment among the children. One way to compensate children who will not receive a share of the farm is a buy-sell agreement funded by life insurance. The farm operator can buy a life insurance policy, the proceeds of which will allow the children who will operate the farm to purchase the remaining shares of the farm from the children who will not operate it. This compensates them financially for being “left out” of the farm operation. The focus should be maintaining the farm’s economic integrity and getting the right caretakers in place to continue the success of your farm. But is focusing on the two active sons the right choice in this case? If you can step back from personalities and preconceived notions and make succession decisions based on what’s best for the continued success of the farm, this farm operator may need to examine other alternatives. For example, the best decision might be allowing the business major to run the business side of the farm and the oldest, most experienced son to manage the field operations. Birth order does not always indicate which child has the capacity and skills to run the increasingly complex financial and business operation that modern farming has become. Our farm operator’s preconceived notion may be faulty. While planning for the future success of your operation, you and your family may have to face tough decisions that can be contentious. The best approach is to confront the issues, not avoid them. The decisions are not easy, but doing the right thing seldom is. In the end, the long-term needs of the farm should be the primary priority to increase the odds of success for the transition and the ability of your farm to provide for your family into the future. Neither Nationwide nor its representatives give legal or tax advice. Please consult with your attorney or tax advisor for answers to your specific tax questions.

Page 16 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Convention continues work to “grow our flock” The best lamb, wool and pelt markets in a generation of producers fueled the productive meetings during the 2012 American Sheep Industry Association (ASI)/National Lamb Feeders Association (NLFA) Convention held in Scottsdale, AZ, Jan. 25-28. The meetings, held under the “Grow Our Flock” banner, brought together more than 400 sheep farmers, ranchers, lamb feeders, processors, mills and wool warehouseman from 42 states. “The great attitude of our industry is very evident,” stated Margaret Soulen Hinson (Idaho), ASI president. “Every segment and organization affiliated with the sheep business is located here under one roof providing for great networking opportunities. An understanding of each sector’s issues from gate to plate and from farm to fabric is promoted with this industrywide convention.” While in Scottsdale, the annual Sheep Inventory Report produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) was released showing a 2-percent decline from 2010 numbers due to the devastating and gamechanging drought in the largest sheep-producing state in the nation, Texas. Yet, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky and Minnesota claimed double-digit growth. In spite of the record displacement of sheep from Texas due to lack of feed and water, the breeding animals went to herds elsewhere rather than to slaughter. The industry nearly matched the ewe lamb replacement level of 2010 demonstrating the record demand for breeding sheep. One of the more obvious successes emphasized during the threeday meeting was the

interest and commitment of the American wool-sock industry to buy American wool, which is being credited to the buy American movement and to the reintroduction of the superwash process into the United States through ASI programs. Production on the shrink-resistant treatment equipment line began in 2011 and alters the fiber in wool products, allowing them to be washed and dried without shrinking. This is the most reliable, shrink-resistant treatment for wool available on the market. Additional commercial textile and knitting firms in the United States have purchased U.S. top and wool because they can buy domestic wool and have the entire process completed in America. It also allows products to be sold to the Department of Defense as allAmerican made with shorter lead times in getting precuts, reduced freight costs and an opportunity to buy smaller quantities. “Superwash has opened new markets and created more demand for American wool,” said Diego Paullier, Chargeurs Wool USA commercial manager, explaining that some textile manufacturers want to work with American wool and like to have everything done in the United States. A successful wool program could provide

millions of dollars in new revenue and outlets for sheep producers across the country and help ensure the United States maintains a domestic wool processing industry. At the request of the American Sheep and Goat Center (ASGC), ASI favorably responded to a merger proposal that retains the authorities and assets of the center under ASI for the benefit of the sheep industry. It was unanimously approved by the ASI Board of Directors that ASGC would merge into ASI allowing the sheep industry to continue the partnership with the National Livestock Producers Association’s Sheep Loan Fund Committee. The center was fully invested in an insurance company to support Livestock Risk Program for Lamb and that will continue under the forprofit subsidiary of ASI. The inaugural meeting of the Emerging Entrepreneurs Committee was hailed a success. The program, designed to bring relevance to the day-to-day operations of sheep producers between the ages of 25 and 40, touted attendees from 11 states with many of them being first-time attendees to this annual meeting. Through interactive presentations, issues such as “money matters,” the impact of the animal rights movement on livestock producers, identifying new markets, sheep and

Massachusetts Blue Ribbon Calf Sale March 24th

Eastern States Exposition - Mallary Building West Springfield, MA CLINICS START AT 10 AM • SALE STARTS AT NOON

50 CALVES OF ALL BREEDS For more information we can be found on Facebook and our website is

www.blueribboncalfsale.com YOUTH CAN RECEIVE A 5% DISCOUNT ON A PURCHASE OF ONE CALF All proceeds go to the Massachusetts 4-H dairy program

land usage and options for other revenue streams were presented and discussed. “This group is the future leadership of the industry and will have a large impact on the industries direction in years to come. We challenged each person to not only come back next year but to bring someone new with them. It was exciting to be a part of this energetic and motivated group of younger producers,” said John Cubiburu, co-chair of this committee. “This activity was also a great fit with the Let’s Grow initiative that ASI launched in 2011 to increase wool production by two million pounds with an increase of 300,000 lambs annually to meet growing demand.” The campaign is twofold — to attract new producers of sheep and to encourage existing producers to expand. The www.growourflock.org website showcased the campaign support materials for budgets, production management efficiencies and the advantages of sheep production for all interested in the

sheep industry. A media campaign focused in six states last fall generated nearly a hundred local, state and regional print, radio and television articles on the sheep industry and was described by sheep industry leaders as the largest media blitz in over a decade. The new sheep industry mentor program was promoted during the convention highlighting the $75,000 already approved for state sheep producer association work with newer producers. The second year of the program blends more sheep management information to the website, toolkits and catalogues of sheep production ed-

ucation as well as industry promotion to expand lamb and wool numbers. Remarks by U.S. Senator Max Baucus (MT) capped the legislative tone of the convention with Farm Bill recommendations of the sheep industry. The senator mentioned the importance of the disaster trust fund with programs such as livestock indemnity and livestock forage being key for risk management when weather wrecks occur. He emphasized his support for the industry and for the reauthorization of the current sheep programs. Source: American Sheep Industry Weekly, Feb. 3

5TH ANNUAL SPRING DRAFT & DRIVING HORSE AUCTION SHERMAN LIVESTOCK AUCTION

SAT.,, FEB B 255 @ 111 AM M TACK PROVIDED BY STEVE ARMSTRONG

HORSES S PROMPTLY Y ATT NOON

CONSIGNED: FROM ACME, PA BILL HOWARD LOAD OF DRAFTS; MILLERSBURG, OH DANIEL HERSHBERGER LOAD OF DRAFTS; BERLIN, OH DEAN BEACHY LOAD OF STANDARDBREDS; MILLERSBURG, OH BERT BEACHY LOAD OF STANDARDBREDS.

ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS NOW THRU SALE DAY. HAULING AVAILABLE Dan Johnson Auctioneer AU-3967-l 716-761-6167 - 716-499-0611 DEAN BEACHY AUCTIONEER AU-2992

(2)) DAIRIES S OF F REGISTERED D & HII GRADE E CATTLE,, PRODUCE

FRIDAY

FEBRUARY 24, 2012

11:00 A.M.

Directions: Sale to be held at Jack Wood's Sale Barn, located on Taylor Valley Rd. Cincinnatus, Just off of NYS Rte. 26. (25) Head Dairy. (15) Registered Holsteins. Good, young dairy with (18) 1st calf heifers. Cattle milking up to 90 lbs. Good, fresh heifers in this dairy, with several short bred & milking 60-70 lbs. Sires include Speedy, Bigshot, Gusto & Durham. SCC 90,000, 3.9F, 3.6P. Vaccinations. Cattle raised in free stall, milked in tie stall. From m Kriss & Maureen n Creeden,, Marathon,, NY: Many years of farming, have consigned (35) Head dairy of Hi Grade cattle. Will have Sires & bred dates. Good milk cows in this dairy, with (16) due for February, March & April. Cows look like they will be heavy milkers when they freshen. (3) R&W Holsteins, (2) Jersey. Milked in tie stall. (25) Head consigned from our heifer raisers. (12) Heifers from 300 lbs. to shortbred. (18) Open heifers. All home raised. Some nice Holsteins and Crosses in this group, from 200 lbs. to breeding age. More cattle being consigned daily. Milkingg Units: (3) Wai-Kato auto take off milking units w/claws, and parts. Produce: (24) Big Square bales of 3rd cutting. Good quality and will have test results. Semen n Tank: Taylor Wharton XT-34 tank, charged. (Like New!)

Sale Managed By:

Gene Wood’s Auction Service, Inc. Cincinnatus, NY 13040

Tel: (607) 863-3821

Visit us on the Web @ genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com ADVANCE NOTICE, SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 2012: Troy & Lory Irwin, Earlville, NY. Selling Trucks, Tankers, Trailers, Machinery, Recreational Vehicles & Tools. 1999 Peterbuilt 379 EXT. Ultra cab, 1999 Mack Daycab Tractor CH613, 2000 Sterling AT9 tandem axle tank truck. (2) Insulated transport trailers. Yanmar VIP-35 Excavator. JD 6675 Skidsteer, enclosed cab. 2008 Hallmark trailer. MARCH 30, 2012: At Jack Wood’s Sale Barn. (40) Head Dairy & Machinery Sale.

Don’t let liver flukes take a bite out of your bottom line In today’s market, every competitive edge makes a difference to a producer’s bottom line. That’s why it is so important to control potentially harmful parasites in beef cattle and dairy heifers. While all parasites pose a threat to profitability, liver fluke infestations have been identified as one of the top 10 beef quality issues. Although they were traditionally prevalent only in Gulf and Pacific Coast areas, liver flukes are now found in 26 states, largely due to the movement of both cattle and hay across state lines. Liver flukes are microscopic creatures present on vegetation, and are ingested by grazing cattle. Once ingested,

the flukes can migrate from the intestine to the liver, potentially causing hemorrhage or blood loss. In a National Beef Quality Audit conducted by Colorado State University, Oklahoma State University and Texas A&M University, 24.1 percent of U.S. cows and bulls suffered from liver fluke infestation at slaughter, leading to the condemnation of those livers and ultimately, significant financial loss. In Florida, for example, liver flukes are estimated to cost the beef industry $10 million each year. Specific estimates of financial impact to the entire industry are difficult to calculate. However, another report indicates that overall, in-

13TH ANNUAL SENECA

Farm Toy Show & Auction SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2012 Show 8:30 A.M. To 2:00 P.M. Auction 3:30 P.M. BENTON CENTER, NY FIRE DEPT., RT. 14A

Consignments Needed - For More Information Call 585-747-5025 Hosted by David and Debra Dean Food & Refreshments Available.

Delos Dann, Auctioneer

adequate parasite control programs can cost producers as much as $200 per head each grazing season. In addition to the direct damage to the liver, there are hidden costs. Liver flukes can also lead to decreased weight in weaning calves and slower growth and reproductive development of heifers. In the dairy industry,

liver flukes can also take a toll on the herd, as they can cause as much as a 10 percent decrease in milk production. Another challenge that can result from liver flukes is an infected animal’s increased susceptibility to other diseases. “If cattle have parasites, health and development problems can be compounded,” says Joe Dedrick-

son, DVM, Ph.D., Director, Field Veterinary Services, Merial. “When there is liver damage, the immune system is also compromised, diminishing an animal’s ability to handle illness, medications or vaccines. Ultimately, it results in producers sacrificing profits.” The best way to help prevent liver flukes from impacting prof-

itability is to maintain a sound parasite management program. “Not all products kill liver flukes, so producers need to be sure they are carefully checking labels and consulting with their veterinarians,” says Dr. Dedrickson. “In today’s economy, it is imperative producers have all the right tools available to keep their herds at optimum health.”

Advanced Ethanol leaders urge tax extensions in farm bill On Feb. 14, the Advanced Ethanol Council (AEC) urged Senate Ag Committee Chair Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and Ranking Member Pat Roberts (R-KS) to include two key tax extensions for advanced and cellulosic ethanol producers. In a letter to the committee leaders, AEC Executive Director Brooke Coleman wrote, “The Cellulosic Biofuels Producer Tax Credit (PTC) — created in the 2008 Farm Bill — and the Special Depreciation Al-

lowance for Cellulosic Biofuel Plant Property are vital to the ongoing development of the domestic advanced ethanol industry. … Several billion dollars have been invested in advanced biofuels development with the expectation that Congress will stay the course with regard to its commitment to the industry. A tax increase on advanced biofuels at this time would curtail investment and undercut an industry just starting to close deals

and break ground on first commercial plants.” Beyond the tax extension, Coleman also highlighted four areas in which the Farm Bill could help accelerate the commercialization of advanced and cellulosic ethanol technologies. These areas include: • Extend the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Loan Guarantee program for biorefinery projects, but improve critical provisions of the program to more effectively facilitate par-

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ticipation by lending institutions. • Support USDA’s efforts to build out ethanol refueling infrastructure via the Rural Energy for America Program to allow ethanol to compete in the market based on price. This will facilitate market access that is critical to the ongoing development and deployment of advanced ethanol fuels. • Reform the Biomass Crop Assistance Program to increase cost effectiveness and better encourage and reduce the risk of energy crop production for the advanced biofuel sector, including efforts to preserve the environmental benefits of land coming out of conservation programs by incenting sustainable energy crop production. • Modify the Repowering Assistance program to help existing bio-refining operations deploy advanced ethanol technologies and feedstock utilization. “We are aware that the funding available for new Farm Bill will be reduced significantly. We look forward to thinking creatively with you about comprehensive solutions that reduce cost but continue to provide meaningful value to an emerging advanced ethanol industry. We appreciate your ongoing support for the advanced biofuels industry and look forward to further discussion of this important matter,” Coleman concluded.

Page 18 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Integrated weed management best response to herbicide resistance Over -reliance on glyphosate-type herbicides for weed control on U.S. farms has created a dramatic increase in the number of genetically resistant weeds, according to a team of agricultural researchers, who say the solution lies in an integrated weed management program. “I’m deeply concerned when I see figures that herbicide use could double in the next decade,” said David Mortensen, professor of weed ecology in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. Since the mid-1990s, agricultural seed companies have developed and marketed seeds that were genetically modified to resist herbicides such as Roundup — glyphosate — as a more flexible way to manage weeds, Mortensen said. About 95 percent of the current soybean crop is modified by inserting herbicide-resistant genes into the plants. “We do understand why farmers would use the glyphosate and glyphosate-resistant crop package,” Mortensen said. “It is simple and relatively cheap, but we have to think about the longterm consequences.” The researchers said that increased use of herbicides is leading to more species of weeds that also are resistant to the chemicals. They report their findings in the current issue of BioScience, noting that 21 different weed species have evolved resistance to several glyphosate herbicides, 75 percent of which have been documented since 2005, despite company-sponsored research that the resistance would not occur. “Several species have developed amazing biochemical ways to resist the effects of the herbicide,” said J. Franklin Egan, doctoral student in ecology at Penn

State. “If weed problems are addressed just with herbicides, evolution will win.” One way the weeds develop resistance is to make an enzyme that is insensitive to the herbicide but still maintains cellular function, Egan said. Weeds also have developed ways for the plant to move the herbicide away from targeted enzymes. “For instance, glyphosate-resistant strains of Conyza canadensis — horseweed — sequester glyphosate in leaf tissues that are exposed to an herbicide spray so that the glyphosate can be slowly translocated throughout the plant at non-toxic concentrations,” Egan said. “To the horseweed, this controlled translocation process means the difference between taking many shots of whiskey on an empty stomach versus sipping wine

with a meal.” In response to the increasing number of weeds resistant to current applications, companies are developing new generations of seeds genetically modified to resist multiple herbicides. This continual insertion of more genes into crops is not a sustainable solution to herbicide resistance, according to the researchers. They add that companies are creating a genetic modification treadmill similar to the pesticide treadmill experienced in the mid-20th century, when companies produced increasingly more toxic substances to manage pests resistant to pesticides. “Specifically, several companies are actively developing crops that can resist glyphosate, 2,4-D and Dicamba herbicides,” said Mortensen. “Such genetic manipulation

makes it possible to use herbicides on these crops that previously would have killed or injured them. What is more troubling is that 2,4-D and Dicamba are older and less environmentally friendly.” Egan said there are several problems with the treadmill response. First, weeds eventually will evolve combined resistance to Dicamba, 2,4-D and glyphosate herbicides. Globally, there are already many examples of weeds simultaneously resistant to two or more herbicides. Increased use of 2,4D and Dicamba applied over the growing corn and soybean means much more of these herbicides will be applied at a time of year when many sensitive crops, such as tomato and grape, are most vulnerable to injury. Such injury results when these herbicides

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move from the targeted field during or following an application. Overuse of chemical weed killers may increase chances that farmers will use the herbicide during inappropriate or non-recommended weather conditions, leading to herbicides drifting from the targeted area and killing or harming other plants and crops. Egan also said that if farms become too reliant on herbicides, farmers will find it more difficult to use integrated weed management approaches. Integrated weed management includes planting cover crops, rotating crops and using mechanical weed control methods. Farmers can use herbicides in this management approach, but must use them in a targeted, ju-

dicious fashion. The researchers, who also worked with Bruce D. Maxwell, professor of land resources and environmental sciences, Montana State University, Matthew R. R yan, post-doctoral student, Penn State, and Richard G. Smith, assistant professor of agroecology, University of New Hampshire, said that in previous studies, integrated weed management had lowered herbicide use by as much as 94 percent while maintaining profit margins for the operations. “Integrated weed management is really the path forward,” said Egan. “We believe these methods can be implemented, and we already have a lot to show that they’re effective and straight forward to incorporate.”

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NCGA notes refuge compliance report reflects new Bt corn requirements implemented to improve refuge compliance As planting for the 2012 season approaches, the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) notes that newly revamped on-farm refuge assessments are part of the enhanced Compliance Assurance Program (CAP) implemented last year, which is designed to improve compliance with Insect Resistance Management (IRM) requirements. Corn growers found to be out of compliance with refuge requirements will be checked more frequently by the Bt corn registrants and have a higher probability of losing access to Bt corn if compliance is not established and maintained. The Agricultural Biotechnology Stewardship Technical Committee (ABSTC), a consortium of Bt corn registrants, submits an annual CAP report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) describing industry-coordinated compliance assurance efforts for Bt traits. The year’s report is the first following the implementation of the enhanced CAP. “To implement the CAP, technology providers made some major changes to their

procedures last year as directed by EPA,” said Mike Smith, ABSTC IRM subcommittee cochairman. “One of the changes was the selection process for on-farm assessments. In past years, we’ve randomly selected those participants, but in 2011 we used a more targeted approach and conducted assessments based on purchase history, and, as anticipated, using this methodology resulted in the identification of more non-compliant growers than in years past. Changes were also made to the grower survey and included more Bt corn products with differing refuge requirements.” The survey results include compliance with refuge requirements for corn borer traits and rootworm traits, either alone or in stacked Bt corn products, regardless of refuge size differences. Highlights of the report include: • The CAP for all Bt corn products with structured refuge requirements continues to be effective. In 2011, the majority of growers surveyed planted the required refuge size on

their farms and the majority of growers surveyed planted a refuge within the required distance for all of their Bt corn fields. Furthermore, the survey indicates that the vast majority of all Bt corn fields have an associated refuge. • The majority of growers found out of compliance in 2010 were found to be complying with the IRM requirements during the 2011 growing season. This result is consistent with previous years and confirms that the CAP’s phase compliance approach in which noncompliant growers were provided additional educational materials and re-assessed in 2011 is working. • As in previous years, adherence to refuge requirements in the cotton growing region was lower than in the Corn Belt. Factors contributing to lower adherence in the cotton region include larger required refuge size, smaller field sizes, more diverse cropping systems, and greater complexity of operations. The cotton region will receive increased focus for onfarm assessments in

Page 20 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Past environmental stewards encourage participation; apply by March 31 Apply by March 31 to be a 2012 Environmental Steward to showcase your farm’s dedication to demonstrating the industry’s ethical principles as it relates to the environment. The Pork Checkoff and National Hog Farmer magazine annually recognize up to four U.S. pork production operations of all types and sizes that demonstrate a positive commitment to environmental stewardship. Nominations should focus on one single production site or farm. Applications and nominations are welcome from pork producers, operation managers and other industry-related professionals. The application form is available on pork.org. A national selection committee selects the award winners following a review of: • General production information • Manure/nutrient management • Soil conservation management • Water conservation management • Air quality management • Wildlife habitat management • Neighbor and community relations efforts

• An essay on the meaning of environmental stewardship Past award winners encourage other producers to apply, calling the process both fairly simple and rewarding. Here are comments from two recent winners. “I didn’t know what to expect, but the process was very good. The recognition in our state and community was great. The public really does recognize when producers do the right things for the environment,” said Brandon Schaffer, Goodhue, MN, Class of 2009 “It’s easy to share our story because producing pork isn’t just a job, it’s a way of life that’s been handed down to us and is something we want to hand down to the next generation. We need to do things the right way so we’ll have the opportunity to do that,” said Rod and Missy Bice, Woodward, Iowa, Class of 2011. For more information, contact Allan Stokes at AStokes@pork.org or 515223-3447 or Mike King at MKing@pork.org or 515-223-3532. Source: Pork Leader, Feb. 9

2012. Education programs continue to highlight the specific refuge requirements in the cotton region and, in tandem with the on-farm assessment program, growers have the opportunity to correct individual instances of noncompliance for future growing seasons. • As anticipated, targeted on-farm assessments identified more than three times as many corn growers who were out of compliance than in years past. Each member company independently reviewed available sales data for its Bt corn customers and assessments were conducted with growers who, according to the sales records, may have purchased little or no refuge seed. All noncompliant growers will undergo a second onfarm assessment to help ensure compliance in 2012. “The objective of the on-farm assessment program is to identify individual non-compliant growers and bring them back into compliance through a phased

approach,” said Joanne Carden, ABSTC IRM subcommittee co-chairwoman. “The new approach to conducting IRM on-farm assessments has resulted in more non-compliant growers being identified, demonstrating that the enhanced CAP is working as planned.” Carden added that the ABSTC is pleased with the outcomes from the phased compliance approach. “The goal of these enhancements is to help growers understand the importance of following refuge requirements, provide clarity on how to meet the minimum refuge requirement for each product and ultimately improve compliance,” she said. IRM refuge calculator helps growers develop plans for refuge compliance. “Since the introduction of biotech traits, the vast majority of corn growers have followed refuge requirements to help protect the efficacy of this important technology,” said Chad Blindauer, Chairman of the Na-

tional Corn Growers Association Trade Policy and Biotechnology Action Team. “All growers must follow these requirements to help preserve the long-term value of this technology. We encourage growers to work with their seed dealers and trait developers to understand the enhanced requirements under the CAP and improve refuge compliance.” To assist farmers in developing an IRM plan and a refuge strategy for their farms, Blindauer said NCGA has established a number of resources, including recently launching an updated IRM calculator to clarify refuge system options and show growers how to execute the requirements properly. The IRM calculator was developed in collaboration with ABSTC companies to ensure it reflects all Bt products available in the industry. Farmers can access the IRM calculator via computer or a smart phone by simply logging on to www.irmcalculator.com.

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U.S. Department of Transportation’s proposed budget invests $74 billion in safe, efficient, and innovative transportation programs Investments support President Obama’s plan to boost economic development and create an America ‘Built to Last’ U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood on Feb. 13 praised President Obama’s $74

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ca’s transportation network, the 6-year budget includes $305 billion to rebuild America’s roads and bridges, a 34 percent increase over the previous authorization. The new budget also reaffirms Secretary LaHood’s strong commitment to maintaining the highest safety standards for Americans traveling by any mode of transportation. While road, transit, and air travel are currently the safest they have ever been in America, the Department will build on previous successes to make them even safer. To accomplish that goal, the budget provides nearly $30 billion over the next six

years for surface transportation safety programs, an increase of 137 percent over the previous authorization. This includes $330 million over six years for the Department’s ongoing campaign against distracted driving. The Administration’s budget also prioritizes research, innovative programs, and technological solutions to address our transportation challenges and ensure that America remains competitive in the global marketplace. A budget summary document is available at www.dot.gov/budget/2013/dot_budget_hi ghlights_fy_2013.pdf.

NFU: Existing data adequate for EPA to monitor water quality around CAFOs National Farmers Union (NFU) submitted comments to the Envi-

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ture and relevant state agencies, the EPA can adequately access necessary information regarding CAFOs and water quality.” The proposed rule would require CAFOs to submit basic operational information to the EPA so the agency can more effectively carry out its permitting programs on a national level and ensure that CAFOs are implementing practices to protect water quality and human health. “NFU supports the implementation of alternative mechanisms for promoting environmental stewardship and compliance,” said Johnson. “This alternative is in alignment with NFU policy and would work more efficiently than other data collection efforts. By expanding technical assistance, outreach tools, and partnerships, this alternative provides an avenue to address the most significant water quality problems.”

FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE THREE 20 ft steel feeder wagons, slant bar made by Schoessow, all in good condition with flotation tires. 315-398-9211.(NY) JD 7’ pull type Bush Hog, 525 woods RM 59, 3 pt mower, $300; WANTED: Seat for Int. W-4. Bucks. 215-431-6459.(PA) 6 trash wheels, 5 Dawn, 1 martin, off Kinze 2200, $100 each. 585-526-6755.(NY) NH 790 chopper w/ both heads. 2 Knight forage wagons, both tandem w/ roofs, all good condition. Sold cows. 315-7509164.(NY) FOR SALE: 12 in. wood master planer; Also, center belt; Cumberland nest boxes, 10 units. WANTED: 10 inch roller mill. 585554-4154.(NY) 2005 Toy hauler camper, R-wagon, Rvision, kept inside, 2 5/16 ball hitch, $12,900. 413-329-4112.(MA) REG. Boer goat, American purebred buck, Proven excellent breeding show stock, $450. Same tractor round bailer. 607-8655678.(NY) 85 FORD 250 ext. cab, auto, 6.9 diesel, 89K miles, EZ dump, 8’ fisher plow, aluminum rims, $4,500 OBO. 845-586-2870 , 607-262-0720.(NY) TAILGATE FOR M.I. 3632 manure spreader cylinder and hoses included. 585-3947041.(NY)

WANTED: GOOD BROKE work horse, good used set of work harness; Big chest freezer, does not have to work. 315-8589151.(NY)

10 yr. black gelding, top driver, surrey or boys, $1,400. 12 Fancy Saanen Doelings. Gingerich, 9036 Stryker Road, Avoca, NY 14809

DORPER KATAHDIN 9 ewes, 1 ram, 10 lambs, $2,500. Call between 7 - 7:15 pm Tues. to Fri. 585-322-7168.(NY)

TIMOTHY SEED, $45 bu., round bales, stored inside, 1st cut Timothy, $40, bred angus cows, pure bred, 70hp loader tractor, 607-329-0301.(NY)

IH 756D on steel, runs great, very straight, will have a new TA, $8,000 OBO. 315-5367653.(NY) FOR SALE: Snap max grow tubes for grapes and other fruits, 30 cents each. Used once. Yates Co. 315-536-6747.(NY)

WANTED: AG TECH 5004 sprayer for parts, has to be the 1984 model or somewhere in that time period. Call Dave. 401822-0131.(RI) BOAR billy goat, 2 yrs old, $100, excellent shape. Call 518-686-9602.(NY)

17 YEAR OLD Arabian gelding. Sound. good health. loves to run. well mannered, great for the intermediate to experienced rider. $800. 570-605-0341.(PA)

20 ft. Patz silo unloader wheel drive, $1,500 obo. WANTED: Maytag washer. 518-673-2431.(NY)

ALLIS CHALMERS corn picker with manual, $450; Oak lumber, 5/4 rough cut wide planks. 518-731-1590.(NY)

FARMALL H tractor, good shape; Also, stock trailer, holds two horses with storage in front, ex. shape. 315-250-3248.(NY)

HAY ROUND BALE 800# to 900#, square bales, 40# to 45#, also ear corn. Corning Area, Landolf Farms, Call 607-9621741.(NY) WANTED: Pop up camber. Call Charles. 315-694-3580.(NY) BALEAGE 4x4, 1st, 2nd, 3rd cutting, NOFA certified, 1st cutting, small square bales. 315-865-8297.(NY)

ROUND BALES, fescue cattle hay, 4x5 approx. 20 bales available, $25 each, stored outside. Louisa. 804-513-4013.(VA)

JD 347 bale thrower $3,500; 56 IH corn planter, $1,000; Dutch dairy bull, 15 months, works good, tie stall, $800. 607435-9976.(NY)

12 Kw generator w/ 6x10 trailer, $1,300; Bobcat model 907 backhoe attachment, $3,500; Farmall cub lowboy, $1,500; 1940 Chevy truck, $8,500 315-744-4941.(NY)

GOOSENECK cattle trailer 18 ft., 92/94 w/ rust, $2,500 or BO. Knowles 25 ft. fold up drags, good condition, $2,500. 315-6965832.(NY)

1953 JOHN DEERE “60”, several new parts, $2,950; 1949 Farmall “M”, nice, $3,600; Both run good and look good! 401662-9131.(RI)

FORAGE WAGON, GEHL 970 tandem gear, metal sides w/ roof, 14’, good condition, $4,500. No Sunday Calls! 607-2439018.(NY)

14’ KEWANEE disk, rock flex, 18” disks, $3,000; 18” GSI bin fan w/ 3 hp motor and transition, new, $650. Geneva. 315-7812572.(NY) TWO Seal-o-matic 340 u cardboard former filler machines, $15,000 each; 1987 GMC top kick milk truck, 2,500 gallon, $8,000. 607-263-5340.(NY) ‘04 Pioneer Club Car, 4x4, gas, dump, hitch, $6,500 B/o. Dynmark lawn tractor with 18 hp, B/s, $500 bo. 315-4041752.(NY) CLUTCH pulley for 620-630 JD tractor, $500; JD M tractor, excellent, $3,000; Cleatrac B dozer, excellent, $2,200; 315737-8622.(NY) BACK BLADE, 3 point hitch; 325 gal. plastic water tank; 4x5 dry round bales, stored, nice. 585-593-5685.(NY) 1069 NEW HOLLAND bale wagons, vg; Mack tandem silage grain truck, vg; Ford, F-Series cab & parts. 315-364-7936.(NY)

FOR SALE: Case IH 781 chopper, two heads, $2,000 obo; 234 IH compact, 2wd, $2,500 OBO. 315-536-4834.(NY)

PARTING OUT Knight 3300 TMR Mixer; Also, John Deere 148 front end loader for sale $3,800 OBO. Leave Message 607432-3238.(NY)

FOR SALE: Cedar fence posts, 6 1/2’ round and split mixed, $3.00 each or $275 per hundred. Call after 6 pm. 315-8225492.(NY)

MASSEY HARRIS grain drill, with fert. and seeder boxes, 15 run mechanical lift, planted 15 a/c, 2011 good condition, $1,000 firm. 315-697-3812.(NY)

NH 1411 discbine, good condition, light, kit, $12,000, Bethlehem.CT 203-266-7907, 203-228-9428.(CT)

WOOD TRAILER with loader, 14’ reach, with own power, $5,400 or trades; JD dozer winch, $3,500. 603-869-5819.(NH)

ANGORA buck, three years old, registrable, from Champion stock. $200. 315-3737193.(NY)

2940 JOHN DEERE Tractor, 4WD, Steele radial tires, 2420 hours, $10,900 OBO. Please, No Sunday Calls. 717-6374887.(PA)

WANTED: Clean 45 lb. bales first and second cut hay, Eastern New York Area, min load 450. 203-263-5334.(CT) WANTED TO BUY: owners manual for STARLINE 70R silo unloader. 518-8422789.(NY) (2) Myers 620 wagons, 4 beater. Tandem roofs. New Floors. Good cond., $4,000 each. Gehl 1060 chopper, both heads, $7,000. 518-642-2305.(NY) (1) STARTED Holstein heifer; New 9x16 wood kicker rack, Golby running gear. 607847-6665 leave message.(NY) PIGS: 2 silts, 8 months old, (1) Boar/Duroc, 10 month, (1) sow, Berk/Duroc cross, and more. Call for info. 315-420-4682.(NY) AC 426 Turbo Diesel, complete, $1,100 OBO. GENERAC 15 Kw generator, $950, 20*58 rebar wheels BO 585-526-6240, No Sunday Calls.(NY) FEATHERLITE Aluminum stock trailer, 1997 Gooseneck, 20 foot, used for draft horses, few miles, excellent condition. 585542-9134.(NY) 2nd cutting grass or Alfalfa hay, small squares; Also, mulch hay, 3x3 or round bales. 610-273-7547.(PA) 5 HOLSTEIN HEIFERS, due in June. Jonas Hershberger, 201 Irish Settlement Road, Heuvelton, NY 13654 2008 KUHNS 103H hay accumulator, with grabber, $9,500. Call 585-526-4785.(NY)

JOHN DEERE L, not running, no tag, ready to restore, $850. 585-975-9435, Rochester, NY.

WANTED: 15’-16’ Grain truck body with hoist to fit Chevy C-70. Can Remove. 607343-1082.(NY)

BILLBOARD tarps, assorted size and weight. Chevy 263 engine with clutch, trans, $850; Various sizes, locust posts. After 5 pm weekdays, 585-554-6188.(NY)

ENGINE, International 262 6 cyc. gas for 656 etc. runs good, $1,800 complete. Troy. 518-663-7693.(NY)

IH 720 five bottom plow, 18”, $3,500, JD 8300 drill, seeder, $3,000. Bred registered heifers. 518-376-8409.(NY)

GOATS: Alpine & Saanen bred does & dry yearlings for show & milking stock, must sell. 607-838-8227 or 607-280-6617.(NY)

WANTED: Iie stall pipe and clamps with chain and hooks, bale spear, water buckets, 2 wheel wheel barrow. 315-8458618.(NY)

GEAR BOX for Steiner TMR Tumble mixer, $200; Digi Star 4 weight bars, EZ 210, 1 7/8 load, cell calibration. 315-2468707.(NY) CASE IH 2250 loader, complete with brackets for utility574-895, tractors, like new, $3,500; LX118 loader, fits DX55/TC55 tractor, new, $3,000. 607-6564568.(NY)

SWANS, GEESE, wild and domestic ducks, peacocks, pheasants, Nigerian Dwarf Goats, Miniature donkeys and more! North of Utica, 7pm - 9pm. 315-8962336.(NY)

FOR SALE: Semen tank, 49 units, Charolais semen from WCR Sir T, WCR Sir Impressive, WR Benefit. Potter Co. 814848-7401.(PA)

WANTED: Hydraulic drive fertilizer auger for Gravity Wagon; FOR SALE: Smucker barn lime spreader. 607-346-1067.(NY) WANTED: Patz 98B silo unloader, rotary hay rake, tine weeder, batch grain dryer. 315-496-2357.(NY)

4 row 3 point Spider cult., $500. Same Bu 7710 130, cab, 4 wheel, 6,800 hours, 80% rubber, vgc $9,500. 315-344-2232.(NY) 6 LUG steel wheels for skid loader, like new, $350; Chocolate lab puppy, $200. 607-243-7142.(NY)

FIVE FOOT TWO Gang disc with truck, $500; John Deere Three section nine foot tine harrow, both horse drawn, $800. 315729-2369.(NY)

BRILLION 12’ transport cultipacker, 18’ Brillion transport drags with Hydraulic cylinder, both in excellent condition. 315963-3826.(NY)

FEED CART: Bodco model C-30-1 5.5 hp Honda motor; New Holland 272 baler, Fahr tedder, four star. 315-926-5689.(NY)

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Asian markets will benefit ag in 2012 As global demand for U.S. agricultural products continues to grow, American farmers can expect to see an increasing number of opportunities in China and other Asian markets in 2012, according to William Westman, Vice President for International Trade at the Meat Institute, speaking at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 93rd Annual Meeting. “There are tremendous opportunities in China,” said Westman. “You have four times the population of the United States on two-thirds the size of the land and 225 cities anticipated to have populations of at least 1 million people by 2025. And just like us, they want what is best for their families. They want safe food and, with their emerging middle class, they now want more proteins and higher quality food.” China also has more than $3 trillion in foreign exchange reserves and is starting to use it. The country’s agricultural production isn’t adequately keeping pace with its rapidly growing population, even in areas where farmers are producing multiple crops per year on intensively utilized land. Westman explained that

the Chinese government is trying to improve the nation’s agricultural infrastructure and productivity by investing in new technologies, heavily subsidizing machinery and changing the efficiencies of the way farmers plant and harvest crops. However, water shortages in northern portions of the country hinder this progress and make the nation in-

creasingly dependent on agricultural imports. “China is our largest market for ag exports in all commodities and our trade with the country is up more than 1,000 percent since 2002,” said Westman, “But this remains one of the world’s most challenging markets. Even as interest in U.S. commodity exports rises, the Chinese government is going

to continue to invest primarily in pork and poultry.” The consumer market in China is shifting, too. Consumers are not only concerned about the quality of the food they are buying, but are also increasingly demanding high-quality presentations for that food. This becomes more apparent when factoring in the number of five-star hotels open-

ing in China — and could become the missing piece needed for U.S. beef exports to succeed. “The demand for our beef is accelerating in north Asia, but we have to have patience,” said Westman. “Our U.S. products have a wonderful image in China. They want what we are producing, but, for now, pork and poultry still reign.”

President’s budget threatens to tax agriculture out of business NCBA calls estate tax counterproductive to Obama’s stated goals President Barack Obama, on Monday, Feb. 13, proposed a multi-trillion-dollarbudget. The president said the budget is designed to spur job creation and impose higher taxes on the rich. However, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President J.D. Alexander said the president’s take on the estate tax threatens job creation and punishes the producers of food and fiber. “President Obama has much to learn about the realities of small businesses and production agriculture. Most of these farm and ranch families are not wealthy. Instead, their value is tied up in the land they work and the equipment they use to provide a safe and affordable food supply for a growing population,” said Alexander. “The President’s war against the rich will negatively impact

farmers and ranchers who are simply trying to feed their neighbors. Increasing land values and the rising costs of equipment drive up the value of farm and ranch estates. If allowed to continue, the estate tax will continue to break up farms and ranches across America and will make it much more difficult to meet the increasing demand for food around the world.” The president’s budget proposes an estate tax at a $3.5 million exemption level with a maximum tax rate of 45 percent. As a result of a last-minute fix passed through Congress in December 2010, the current estate tax exemption level is $5 million per individual and $10 million per couple with a maximum tax rate of 35 percent. Alexander said the president’s proposed fix is not a solution but

rather a continuation of unnecessary and outdated tax burdens on farmers and ranchers. “Farmers and ranchers are asset rich and cash poor. Land and machinery does not equate to cash unless it is sold. When families are forced to sell off property to pay for the estate tax, the land seldom remains in production,” he said. “This outdated tax is escalating the depopulation of rural America.” Alexander said people need to be aware that Obama’s budget is only a suggestion and the actual budget will be determined by Congress. “The details are in Congress. We will be engaging members of Congress over the next several months to ensure a permanent fix to the estate tax is achieved,” Alexander said.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section D - Page 23

ROY TEITSWORTH INC. SUCCESSFUL AUCTIONS FOR 42 YEARS

PH (585) 243-1563 FAX (585) 243-3311 6502 Barber Hill Road, Geneseo, New York 14454 WWW.TEITSWORTH.COM

Teitsworth Auction Yard, Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Landscape Tools, Building Materials, Nursery Stock

Saturday, March 3, 2012 @ 9:00 A.M. Groveland, N.Y. (Geneseo Area) SELLING - Heavy Construction Equipment; (Bucket trucks; Vans from utility company; Trucks, Pickups, Cars & Trailers; Farm Tractors & equipment; Lawn Tractors, Mowers & Toys; trees, shrubs & many more misc items!

Consignments being accepted starting Feb 27th Keep checking our website at www.teitsworth.com for terms, updates & pictures. Terms, pics and updates available soon at www.teitsworth.com

AUCTION NOTICE BENTLEY BROTHERS Inventory Reduction & Consignment Auction

Kubota Tractors & Farm Equipment

Thursday, March 8, 2012 @ 10:00 AM Route 31, 2 Miles West Of Albion, NY

Selling (25+) Farm & Compact tractors, (20+) Mowers, Tillage, Tools, Hay & Forage equipment. Please visit www.teitsworth.com for terms, updates & pics. HOST - Dave Bentley (585) 589-9610

Roy Teitsworth, Inc. ~ Successful Auctions for 42 Years Plain old-fashioned hard work, experience and market knowledge make this the team to choose for successful auctions. Now is the time to call for a no obligation consultation or appraisal. There are many options available to market your business assets. We would be pleased to discuss the auction methods with you. Give us a call today. If you are looking for clean, well-maintained municipal equipment and trucks, at absolute public auction, here are some tentative dates to keep in mind. Please also visit www.teitsworth.com

Saturday, March 3, 2012 9:00 A.M. CONSIGNMENT AUCTION Teitsworth Auction Yard Farm & Construction Equipment Heavy & Light Trucks Geneseo, NY Thursday, March 8, 2012 10:00 A.M. Bentley Brothers Inventory Reduction & Consignment Auction Kubota Tractors & Farm Equipment Rt 31, 2 miles west of Albion, NY

Page 24 - Section D • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Saturday, March 17, 2012 8:00 A.M. Saxby Implement Corp. Public Auction 200 Lawn Mowers, Vehicles, New Trailers & Much More Mendon, NY Wednesday, March 21, 2012 9:00 A.M. CORYN FARM SUPPLIES, INC. Public Auction of Farm Equipment & Tools 3186 Freshour Rd. Canandaigua, NY Saturday, March 24, 2012 9:00 A.M. Z&M Ag and Turf Farm Equipment Auction Clymer, NY Saturday, March 31, 2012 9:00 A.M Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction Farm Tractors & Machinery, Lawn & Garden Equipment Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY

Saturday, April 21, 2012 9:00 A.M. Chautauqua County Area Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction Gerry Rodeo Grounds, RT. 60 Gerry, NY Saturday, April 28, 2012 8:00 A.M. 42nd Annual New York's Favorite Consignment Auction Teitsworth auction yard Barber Hill Rd. Geneseo, NY Saturday, May 12, 2012 9:00 A.M. 27th Annual Palmyra Municipal Equipment Auction Town of Palmyra Highway Department Palmyra, NY (Rochester area) Saturday, May 19, 2012 9:00 A.M. Important Public Auction Recreational Equipment, Farm Machinery, Heavy Construction Equipment C.N.Y. Power Sports Rt. 11 Cortland, NY Saturday, June 2, 2012 8:00 A.M. Special June Auction Teitsworth Auction Yard Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks Geneseo, NY Saturday, June 16, 2012 9:00 A.M. Jefferson County Area Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction Selling Heavy Equipment, Trucks & Trailers Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Watertown, NY

Thursday, August 9, 2012 1:00 P.M. Farm & Equipment Auction Next to Empire Farm Days Show Farm Equipment, Tractors, Antique Equipment, Construction equipment Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY Saturday, September 8, 2012 9:00 A.M. Municipal Surplus & Contractor Equipment Auction Town of Lansing Highway Dept. Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing, NY Saturday, September 15, 2012 8:00 A.M. SPECIAL FALL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland Farm & Construction Equipment Heavy & Light Trucks Consignments Welcome Geneseo, NY Saturday, September 22, 2012 9:00 A.M. LAMB & WEBSTER USED EQUIPMENT AUCTION FARM TRACTORS & MACHINERY Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY Saturday, October 6, 2012 9:00 A.M. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars & Trucks 145 Paul Rd. Exit 17, Rt. 390, Rochester, NY Saturday, October 13, 2012 9:00 A.M. Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY

Saturday, October 27, 2012 9:00 A.M. Onondaga County Area Municipal Equipment Auction Municipal & Contractor Equipment Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds) Tuesday November 6, 2012 Ending November 13, 6pm Monthly Online Auction Check it out at www.teitsworth.com Saturday, December 1, 2012 9:00 A.M. Special Winter Consignment Auction Teitsworth Auction Yard, Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments Geneseo, NY Check it out at www.teitsworth.com March 6-13, 2012 April 3-10, 2012 May 1-8, 2012 June 5-12, 2012 July 10-17, 2012 August 14-21, 2012 September 11-18, 2012 October 9-16, 2012 November 6-13, 2012 December 4-11, 2012 RTI Online Auctions Keep in mind we also have a web based auction monthly! This is an efficient and convenient way to sell equipment of all kinds. It runs from the first to the second Wednesday of every month. Please contact Milo @ 585-739-6435, Richard @ 585-721-9554 or Cindy @ 585-738-3759 to consign to any of these auctions.

“WE SPECIALIZE IN LARGE AUCTIONS FOR DEALERS, FARMERS, MUNICIPALITIES AND CONTRACTORS”

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section E - Page E1

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Page E2 - Section E • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Land Pride Rotary Cutters offer fast, clean, dependable mowing and have been extensively tested to ensure operating safety. Our cutters feature top quality steel, welding standards second to none, fist-tight quality control, and gearboxes we’re so sure about, we offer a 5 year limited warranty.

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Smooth header flotation Less scalping and skipping Reduction in wear and damage Cleaner cut crop Greater productivity

FC Disc Mower Conditioners 26 models from 6' 7" – 28' 11" cutting widths

• Cat. 1 • Clevis hitch for easy hook-up • Floating 3-point permits deck to hug the terrain • Fully welded deck adds additional strength • High blade tip speed ensures clean cut • Cutting height - 60” = 13”, 72” = 11-1/2” • 1 Cutting capacity • Cat. 3 driveline with shear bolt or 2-plate slip-clutch

V-MAX 2636 Single or Tandem • 260 bu / 360 bu No height ext. / With height ext. • Capacity Bushels/cu.ft./gallons Without Height Extension 260/181/1355 With 9” Height Extension 360/233/1745

• Axle Single/Tandem • HP Requirements Min. 65

• Auger Diameter 20” • Auger Flighting Thickness 3/8” sectional • Height w/14L-Tire 58 1/2” w/9” Height Ext. Add 9” Opt. 16.5 Tire Add 1 1/2”

THE MOST VERSATILE BALER AVAILABLE TODAY • All crop capable— hay, straw, silage

THE VARIANT® ROUND BALER • 2 sizes to choose from; 4 x 5 Variant 260 4 x 6 Variant 280 • 82" wide pickup with rotor feed • Endless belts • Optional ROTO CUT®

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New Hartford man’s project aids African farmers

by Jon Ericson, WaterlooCedar Falls Courier NEW HARTFORD, IOWA (AP) — For a year and a half James Norton has been tinkering with a plow to help Ugandan farmers. In a month, he will get to see the fruits of his labors. Norton and his wife, Mary, will travel to Africa to help their son work with farmers there to make their land more productive year after year. The New Hartford man has created a small plow to be dragged by oxen in the fields where Ugandans grow corn and beans. “I’m anxious to get

over there and see how it works out,” Norton said. Norton retired from Schoitz Engineering a decade ago. His son, Jay Norton, is a professor at the University of Wyoming who secured a grant from the United States Agency for International Development for five years of work to promote sustainable farming in Kenya and Uganda. After traveling to Africa to analyze the situation, Jay Norton realized a major problem was soil compaction. The type of plow they use loosens top soil, but turns the ground 4 inches beneath into hardpan. As a re-

sult, the farmers do well in wet years, but in dry years the ground is unable to hold water and crops fail. Jay Norton approached his father in 2010 about constructing a plow that allows farmers to get deeper into the soil. They set about work and came up with a number of models. James Norton created several models in his workshop at his home near New Hartford. Eventually, they contracted with Custom Blacksmithing in Waterloo to produce the parts for the final model. Two models of the final version were shipped to

Africa recently to try in the fields. James Norton already gave it a try, going to Amish country and hooking the plow to a horse. In addition to testing the plow, the Nortons will visit local blacksmith shops in Uganda to see if they could produce the plows themselves.

“Our goal is to see how happy they are with it and then look for someone to build it over there,” Norton said. Part of the design process was to make it simple, a design that could be replicated in African shops. Norton thinks he has done a good job of that, but is

concerned one complex part may have to be constructed in the United States and shipped overseas. If this project goes well, James Norton already has his sights set on the next one. He wants to design a corn planter farmers could use along with the plow.

Want

to promote your product at the Fair? Apply now!

Do you have a product that is fresh and innovative? How about an idea for the new must-try fair food? Do you have an ex-

hibit that will draw crowds of all ages? Here’s your chance to become a favorite among the vendors at the Great

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section E - Page E3

New York State Fair. The Fair is always looking for a variety of new concessionaires and exhibitors who will bring quality items that are unique, diverse, and high in demand, and the search for 2012 is well under way. If interested, an application for space can be found on the Concessions and Exhibits portion of the New York State Fair Website. Applications will be accepted Jan. 1 through Aug. 1. If you think you’ll need further locations, or have more than one exhibit you wish to bring to the Fair, an additional application must be completed for each added location. Be sure to attach a photo or sketch of your concession or exhibit, as well as a list of products you wish to sell, display, promote, or give away to insure that your application is reviewed as quickly as possible. Applications are reviewed on a first-come, first-serve basis as space is very limited. New vendor applications will be considered beginning April 15. Don’t let this opportunity for your product or exhibit to reach nearly one million consumers pass you by, and submit an application to be a part of the fun. The 2012 Fair will run from Aug. 23 to Sept. 3. For the latest announcements and Fair news, sign up for e-mail and text message updates at www.nysfair.org. Find The Great New York State Fair on Facebook or follow NYS Fair on Twitter.

Page E4 - Section E • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Groundswell’s Sustainable Farming Certificate Program now accepting applications New Farmers: Apply online for the 100hour, April-November program ITHACA, NY — This spring, the Groundswell Center for Local Food & Farming will again offer its fullseason training program for aspiring and beginning farmers and market gardeners. Running April 18 to Nov. 14, the Sustainable Farming Certificate Program provides 124 hours of classroom training, hands-on workshops, farm visits, and supervised work experience on sustainable farms. Trainees can choose to concentrate their studies on the management of vegetables and fruits, livestock and poultry, or pursue a diversified curriculum. Each trainee will have an individualized Learning Contract, and will be evaluated on the basis of that contract before being awarded Groundswell’s Sustainable Farming Certificate. Instruction will be provided by experienced farmer mentors, as well as subject matter experts from our partner institutions such as Cornell University, USDA, and Cornell Cooperative Extension. Trainees who complete 100 hours of training or more are eligible to receive Groundswell’s Sustainable Farming Certificate. Groundswell is committed to the vision of a regionally self-reliant food system that provides good food and economic opportunities for everyone. The Sustainable Farming Certificate Program, like each of Groundswell’s New Farmer Training Programs, seeks to engage trainees from diverse cultural, racial, and economic backgrounds to participate in a supportive, trainee-driven learning environment. People of color, new immigrant and limited resource trainees are especially

encouraged to apply. Tuition for the Sustainable Farming Certificate Program is on a sliding scale and ranges from $125 to $800, with substantial support offered to people of color, new immigrant and limited-resource trainees. Applications for the Sustainable Farming Certificate Program are now online. Visit www.groundswellcenter.org to learn more and apply today. The Groundswell Center for Local Food & Farming is an initiative

of the EcoVillage Center for Sustainability Education/Center for Transformative Action. Support for Groundswell comes from individuals and businesses who believe in the importance of strong local food systems, and from the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program of the National Institute for Food and Agriculture-USDA, Grant #2010-4940021799. For more information, visit www.groundswellcenter.org.

Supreme Court ruling benefits consumers and America’s agriculture industry WASHINGTON, D.C. — National Farmers Union (NFU) is pleased with the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent unanimous decision in National Meat Association v. Harris in which the court ruled that hogs suffering from fatigued hog syndrome are fit for slaughter once they have rested and recovered from their travel. NFU was a party on the victorious side of this lawsuit. The decision overturned an earlier ruling by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals which prevented such animals from being slaughtered. “We are pleased that the Supreme Court used sound science to determine that animals that are fatigued from being transported are simply tired, not sick, as the state of California attempted to allege,” said NFU President Roger Johnson.

The lawsuit was filed by National Farmers Union and a group of agricultural organizations in response to a California statute that would have prohibited non-ambulatory animals, including those with fatigued pig syndrome, from being used for human consumption. “These animals represent absolutely no health risk for consumers, so they should not be removed from the supply chain,” said Johnson. “Removing them only decreases the number of animals available for consumption and drives up food costs, while increasing bureaucratic red tape. The Supreme Court’s ruling is supported by science, and benefits consumers, slaughterhouses, and America’s family farmers and ranchers.”

NASS releases new geospatial data in CropScape The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released updates to its online geospatial exploring tool, CropScape. 2011 Cropland Data Layer products, which are derived from satellite image observations at 30-meter (0.22 acres per pixel) resolution, help users visualize how the

volatile weather events of 2011 affected cropland in the United States. “We are very pleased to release updates to the CropScape Web-based data tool,” said NASS Research and Development Division Director, Mark Harris. “These satellite-derived land cover images show firsthand the ever-changing

face of U.S. agriculture and contribute extensively to research on various issues including biodiversity, agricultural sustainability and extreme weather events, such as flooding and drought.” The CropScape tool is designed to provide the public with easy access to interactive visualization, geospatial queries

and dissemination without the need to download specialized software. Coinciding with the release of the 2011 Cropland Data Layer, NASS will also release a new CropScape version with new functional capabilities and enhancements. The Cropland Data Layer images were collected from the Disaster Monitoring Con-

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stellation: Deimos-1 and UK2, and Landsat Thematic Mapper satellites. In addition to the current update, CropScape includes historical data. The NASS CropScape team compiled the remaining historic state Cropland Data Layers for 2008 this past year. Cropland data layers are now available back to 2008 for 48 states and at some locales; data are available tracing back to 1997. CropScape was developed in cooperation with the Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems at George Mason University, Fairfax, VA. The online tool is operated

by NASS’s Research and Development Division and hosted and maintained by the Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems at George Mason University. For more information about CropScape, and the Cropland Data Layer visit http://nassgeodata.gmu.edu/CropScape. NASS provides accurate, timely, useful and objective statistics in service to U.S. agriculture. We invite you to provide feedback on our products and services. Sign up at http://usda.mannlib.cor nell.edu/subscriptions and look for “NASS Data User Community.”

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ber. Speakers include Jim Bagley, NYSDEC Region 8 Service Forester, Gary Goff, Cornell University, Sr. Extension Associate, Department of Natural Resources, and John Hammer, MFO and cofounder of Yates County QDM Co-op. This is a great opportunity to tap the local forestry knowledge and even schedule a time for a Master Forest Owner to come visit your woodlot. This workshop is open to the public. Fee is $10 per family, which includes one set of handouts and refreshments. To be held on: Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Yates County Auditorium, 417 Liberty Street, Penn Yan. Pre-registration for the workshop is required and easy! To register by Wednesday, March 14, call the CCE Yates County office at at 315-536-5123 or send your name, address and phone number and a check made out to “CCE Yates County” to: CCE Yates County, 417 Liberty Street, Penn Yan, NY 14527. You can also email vfj1@cornell.edu to register as well.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section E - Page E5

2008 MF 573

Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m.–1 p.m., at the Yates County Building Auditorium, 417 Liberty Street, Penn Yan, NY 14527. The Master Forest Owners and Cornell Cooperative Extension of Yates County will host their 2nd annual workshop titled “Yates County Forestry Workshop: Forest Management and Enhancing Wildlife Habitat on Your Woodlot ”. There are many threats (both human and natural) to our local woodlots but forest management can help maintain a healthy and productive woodlot. The workshop will cover how to enhance wildlife habitat in your woodlot, the Yates County Quality Deer Management (QDM) Cooperative and managing your local deer population, and things to consider when contemplating or having a timber harvest. Participants will learn how to meet a broad range of woodlot goals, including bird watching, enjoying nature, hunting, recreation, producing firewood, restoring and/or maintaining a healthy forest, or growing quality tim-

USDA Rural Development helps support business development and marketing opportunities in Eastern New York State Investing in rural New York is essential to job creation and business growth NEW YORK, NY — On Feb. 3, USDA Rural Development New York State Director Jill Harvey announced seven projects in the Capital Region and Long Island that have received funding through Rural Development’s Value Added Producer Grant Program (VAPG). Value-added products are created when a producer increases the consumer value of an agricultural commodity in the production or processing stage. This announcement is part of 21 projects funded throughout the state, totaling nearly $2 million. The following is a listing of projects funded in the Capital Region and Long Island areas of New York State: • Edgwick Farm: $120,000 • Catskill Dudukju LLC: $49,000 • King Brothers Dairy: $49,500 • Dagele Brothers Produce; Christopher Dagele: $79,425 • Food Gems, LTD: $35,004 • Maple Shade Farm: $49,750 • Martin Sidor Farms: $49,990

Page E6 - Section E • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Regional Winter Agriculture Marketing Seminar Featuring Vermont farmer Richard Wiswall, author of “The Organic Farmers Business Handbook” Farms Working Together: Collaborative Marketing for Profitability will be held on Tuesday, March 20, 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., at Ravenwood Golf Club Conference Center, L ynaugh Road, Victor, NY 14564. Cornell Cooperative Extension is hosting a one-day seminar devoted to the modern ways family farms can increase their marketing power through collaboration, including food hubs, online farm markets, joint ventures, and multifarm marketing groups. Richard Wiswall of Cate Farm in Plainfield, VT, will explain the farm business implications of collaboration, when one farm is just part of a larger marketing entity. Taken from 25 years as a member of the Deep Root Organic Co-Op, he will describe positive scenarios and pitfalls to avoid going forward. Wiswall is the author of “The Organic Farmers Business Handbook,” a popular guide for any farmer aiming to build wealth through good habits and savvy decisions. Other speakers in-

clude: • Carol Maue of Boylan Code LLP, discussing legal aspects of collaborative agreements for farms • Kim Mills of SUNY Cobleskill, explaining new software to support online sales of local food in consumer, commercial, and institutional markets • Jack Montague of FoodLink, unveiling a new food hub for the Rochester metro region This is a good opportunity for farm owners in Upstate New York who have considered joint marketing, or are striving to supply new or existing markets with more products. The day will include additional presentations, expert interviews, and opportunities for networking. Registration: $35 per person, space is limited. Please register by March 15 by calling Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County at 585-394-3977 x 427 or send name, address and phone number to nea8@cornell.edu. Hosted by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County with support from the Genesee Valley Regional Market Authority.

The funded projects will create jobs for agricultural producers, businesses and families. The grants act as a catalyst for business development and entrepreneurship by providing access to capital and technical assistance. Edgwick Farm will use funds to promote and expand sales of artisanal goat cheese products throughout the Hudson Valley. King Brothers Dairy will use the grant to assist their milk bottling and home delivery service, which features glass bottles. Funds will help expand the service to retail outlets. Food Gems will use their organically grown produce

to produce and market baked goods, pickled vegetables, salads, and sauces. “By creating value-added products, farmers can expand economic opportunities, create jobs and keep wealth in rural communities,” Jill Harvey said. “These projects will promote business expansion and entrepreneurship by helping local businesses get access to capital, technical assistance and new markets for their products and services.” Further information on rural programs is available by visiting Rural Development’s web site at www.rurdev.usda .gov/ny.

January milk prices decreased from December Prices received by New York producers for milk sold during January were down from a month earlier, according to King Whetstone, Director of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, New York Field Office. The price of soybeans and apples decreased

also. The price of corn and hay increased. The price of potatoes remained unchanged. Many previous month prices were revised due to more complete sales information. Dairy farmers in the Empire State received an average of $20.30 per

hundredweight of milk sold during January, down 40 cents from December but $2.50 more than January a year ago. Grain corn, at $6.60 per bushel, was up 23 cents from December and up $1.01 cents from last year. Hay averaged $107 per ton, up $11

from December but unchanged from prices received January 2011. Potatoes averaged $13.20 per cwt., unchanged from December but down 50 cents from last year. Soybeans averaged $11.17 per cwt., down 21 cents from December.

Apples, at $31.70 per cwt., were down $4.00 from last month but up $7.80 from last January. The preliminary All Farm Products Index of Prices Received by Farmers in January, at 186 percent, based on 19901992=100, increased 7 points (3.9 percent) from

December. The Crop Index is up 10 points (5.1 percent) but the Livestock Index decreased 1 point (0.6 percent). Producers received higher prices for cattle, broilers, soybeans, and corn and lower prices for eggs, milk, wheat, and lettuce. In addition to prices, the overall index is also affected by the seasonal change based on a 3-year average mix of commodities producers sell. Increased monthly movement of corn, soybeans, cattle, and rice offset decreased marketings of milk, broilers, cotton, and cottonseed. The information in this release is available by free email subscription by subscribing to New York reports at www.nass.usda.gov/ny.

New York meat goat inventory decreased

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section E - Page E7

New York meat goats totaled 27,000 head for Jan. 1, 2012, down 10 percent from the Jan. 1, 2011 total, according to King Whetstone, Director of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, New York Field Office. Milk goats totaled 12,800 head for Jan. 1, 2012, down 2 percent from the previous year. All goat inventory in the United States on Jan. 1, 2012, totaled 2.86 million head, down 4 percent from 2011. Breeding goat inventory totaled 2.38 million head, down 4 percent from 2011. Does one year old and older, at 1.78 million head, were 3 percent below last year’s number. Market goats and kids totaled 487,000 head, down 5 percent from a year ago. Mohair production in the United States during 2011 was 865,000 pounds. Goats and kids clipped totaled 149,000 head. Average weight per clip was 5.8 pounds. Mohair price was $4.12 per pound with a value of 3.56 million dollars. The information in this release is available by free email subscription by subscribing to New York reports at www.nass.usda.gov/ny.

Page E8 - Section E • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Country Folks Section nF

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success stories, Cilia added. The researchers are now trying to validate the aphid biomarkers in a range of vector insects. If successful, the researchers hope to develop a test kit that can be used in the field to identify if an insect population is likely to be a virus vector. Once identified, growers can then target particular insects with pesticides at a certain time in their lifecycle. Currently, growers must spray crops indiscriminately to prevent disease outbreaks. “Prophylactic spraying of crops to eliminate all potential vectors is not efficient from an economical or environmental standpoint,” said Gray. Common diseasecausing viruses include the barley yellow dwarf viruses spread by aphids and Geminiviruses transmitted by white flies. In Africa, viruses commonly destroy entire fields of such staple crops as bananas, cassava, maize and sweet potatoes. In the United States, barley yellow dwarf viruses reduce annual wheat yields by about 5 percent. Last year in Kansas, a severe outbreak of barley yellow dwarf virus caused the highest economic loss from any wheat disease. The international team also includes researchers from the University of Washington in Seattle, the USDA-ARS U.S. Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, SC, and the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture in Nigeria and Cameroon. BREAD seeks to partner advanced research expertise with the developing world and is jointly funded by the NSF and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section F - Page F1

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The team, headed by Stewart Gray, a U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDAARS) research plant pathologist and Cornell professor of plant pathology, and Michelle Cilia, a USDA-ARS research molecular biologist, received a threeyear, Basic Research to Enable Agricultural Development (BREAD) grant of $868,896 to develop protein biomarkers that distinguish insect populations capable of transmitting disease from those that do not. “One problem with managing viral diseases is there is no cure,” said Gray, of the plant diseases that cause an estimated $60 billion in damages worldwide each year. “To control them, you have to develop a resistant crop, or you have to prevent the vector from feeding on and infecting the plant.” Another challenge is that within insect species, such as aphids and whiteflies, that spread these viruses, researchers find populations vary widely in how efficiently they spread a virus. That’s because mutations or changes in genes alter specific proteins that viruses use to move through an insect. Slight changes in a gene can drastically alter the way a protein functions, Cilia said. The researchers have identified protein biomarkers that allow them to determine whether an aphid will efficiently transmit disease or not. “Finding these biomarkers for virus transmission is an exciting major breakthrough,” said Cilia. In medicine, for example, biomarkers for breast cancer and prostate cancer are rare

Page F2 - Section F • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

New York sheep inventory decreases New York sheep and lambs totaled 62,000 head on Jan. 1, 2012, according to King Whetstone, Director of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, New York Field Office. This is down 11 percent from the 70,000 head of the previous year. A total of 43,000 lambs were born in New York during 2011, down 12 percent from the 2010 total. Breeding ewes one year old and older in 2011 totaled 43,000 head, yielding a lambing rate of 100 per 100 ewes, which is 15 percent down from the 2010 rate. New York wool production during 2011 totaled 210,000 pounds, down 14 percent from a year earlier. The average price received for wool increased 20 cents to 60 cents per pound. The value of production increased to $126,000. All sheep and lamb inventory in the United States on Jan. 1, 2012, totaled 5.35 million head, down 2 percent from 2011. Breeding sheep inventory decreased to 3.98 million head on Jan. 1, 2012, down 3 percent from 4.08 million head on Jan. 1, 2011. Ewes one year old and older, at 3.16 million head, were 2 percent below last year.

Market sheep and lambs on Jan. 1, 2012, totaled 1.37 million head, down 2 percent from Jan. 1, 2011. Market lambs comprised 94 percent of the total market inventory. Twenty-two percent were lambs under 65 pounds, 12 percent were 65-84 pounds, 22 percent were 85105 pounds, and 38 percent were over 105 pounds. Market sheep comprised the remaining 6 percent of total market inventory. The 2011 lamb crop of 3.51 million head, was down 2 percent from 2010. The 2011 lambing rate was 109 lambs per 100 ewes one year old and older on Jan. 1, 2011, an increase of 2 percent from 2010. Shorn wool production in the United States during 2011 was 29.3 million pounds, down 4 percent from 2010. Sheep and lambs shorn totaled 4.03 million head, also down 4 percent from 2010. The average price paid for wool sold in 2011 was a record high $1.67 per pound for a total value of 48.9 million dollars, up 40 percent from 35.0 million dollars in 2010. The information in this release is available by free email subscription by subscribing to New York reports at www.nass.usda.gov/ny.

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section F - Page F3

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Endurance rider glad to go to Abu Dhabi despite disappointment UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — Standing on the sidelines watching his U.S. teammates compete at the Young Rider World Endurance Championship in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Steven Hay couldn’t help but feel he was missing out. The senior in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences had expected to compete in the championship on Dec. 10, 2011, after placing second in the country amongst those who applied (see http://live.psu.edu/story/56315). The night his horse was scheduled to depart for Abu Dhabi, however, Hay received a phone call informing him that the animal was not approved to travel by the organizing committee in the United Arab Emirates. “The people who were supposed to review the papers didn’t do so before sending them to the

organizing committee overseas,” explained Hay, a 21-year-old Port Matilda, PA, native. The call came as the Environmental Resource Management major was leaving his last final exam of the semester and just days before he was scheduled to depart himself. Regardless, Hay put his disappointment aside, packed his bags and made his way to the Middle East to support his teammates. “I was pretty upset, but I’m really glad I went — it was a great experience,” he said. “It’s a different world over there.” When he wasn’t watching his teammates compete, Hay helped by taking horses from the stable out on the trail. During his free time, he also had the opportunity to sight see and explore the city. “I got to see the world’s tallest building, ride the world’s fastest rollercoaster and visit some of the biggest

mosques in the world,” he said. “My favorite part was touring the enduranceriding stable there,” Hay said. “To see how they compete and take care of their horses was fascinating. The stable even had its own veterinary clinic and state-of-theart equipment for monitoring horses.” The United States placed fourth out of 18 teams. “The whole expe-

rience was enjoyable, even if I didn’t get to compete,” he said. “Just knowing I was picked to go was quite the honor.” Hay won team gold medals at the 2011 and 2010 North American Championships and Individual Bronze medals at the 2010 and 2011 North American Junior Young Riders Championships. His passion for horses started at a young age.

By the time he was six, he was riding and taking lessons, taking part in local horse shows and events over the next couple of years. When he was a 12-year-old, Hay started to compete in trail riding — distance riding that is less than 50 miles. His interest in trail riding eventually led to endurance riding on courses that are 75 to 100 miles long.

“It was exciting to watch and be a part of everything in Abu Dhabi,” Hay said, adding that he is motivated to continue riding. “Competing is my passion.” With 2,850 miles of endurance riding completed so far, Hay is moving forward and hoping to train for the 2013 North American and 2014 World Equestrian Games as a senior rider.

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CSA Farm School: Growing Success One Share at a Time The CSA Farm School: Growing Success One Share at a Time workshop will be held on Saturday, Feb. 25, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m., at the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County, 480 North Main Street, Canandaigua, NY 14424. This one-day workshop is dedicated to the business decisions Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farmers need to make to be successful. Some of the top names in CSA agriculture in New York will be on hand to explain how they handle marketing, growth, communications, shareholder retention and other business decisions. Speakers include Elizabeth Henderson of Peacework Organic Farm, Jamie Edelstein of Wyllie Fox Farm, Lisa Bloodnick of Bloodnick Family Farms, and Chris Hartman of the Good Food Collective. They will share insights borne from their experiences and observations about what works, and what doesn’t. Plus, participants will get insights about insurance and liability issues faced by CSAs and how CSA farming has been adapted in other parts of the globe. New and experienced CSA farm owners and shareholders are welcome to participate. Fee: $25 per person includes lunch with vegetarian options, handouts, expert advice and networking with other CSA farmers Hosted jointly by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County and the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York. Pre-registration is required by Feb. 23 by calling Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County at 585-394-3977 x427 or e-mail Nancy Anderson with your full contact information to nea8@cornell.edu Support provided by the Genesee Valley Regional Marketing Authority.

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Reducing Repetitive Motion Injuries by Anna Meyerhoff, Farm Safety Educator, The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health - NYCAMH Sometimes, the nature of agricultural work may require stressful positions and activities for workers. Work that involves frequent bending at the wrist, grasping objects, lifting or raising of the arm and shoulder, twisting or squeezing motions can lead to repetitive motion injuries (RMIs). RMIs can also result from awkward positions or movements, muscle fatigue, vibrations, and poor work postures. Workers performing tasks that require repeated use of hands, wrists and forearms for long periods of time are especially prone to this type of injury. Here are a few examples of some tasks that could cause RMIs: • pruning • weeding • potting plants • picking fruit • packing boxes • using sharp or vibrating tools • assembly line work Repetitive motion injuries can be mild or severe. The most common areas affected are fingers, hands, elbows, wrists, shoulders, back, arms and

neck. Pain may develop slowly and generally get worse over time. These injuries can eventually cause permanent damage to the muscles, nerves, tendons and ligaments of the body. In some cases, RMIs such as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, which affects the wrists, may even require surgery. It is important to recognize the warning signs early enough to do something about them. Workers should be aware of symptoms and report pain or other signs of repetitive motion injuries to their supervisor. Symptoms of repetitive motion injuries include: • pain or soreness • muscle fatigue • tingling • numbness • stiffness • swelling or redness • loss of flexibility • loss of strength There are a few ways to reduce the risk of repetitive motion injuries among workers. Since RMIs are caused by performing an action or motion over and over again without interruption, one of the best ways to prevent such injuries is by limiting the time workers spend performing the

same task. Having workers take short breaks allows the affected body part time to rest and recover. Switching between different tasks throughout the day can also help reduce strain from stressful postures and repetitive motions. Another way to reduce the risk of injuries is through proper stretching. Workers should be encouraged to take micro-breaks and stretch before, during and after the workday to help prevent RMIs. While stopping the motions that cause pain isn't always possible, making even small changes to the way work is performed can make a big difference in reducing injuries and increasing productivity. Ergonomics is the science of designing the workplace to fit the worker. Ergonomics takes into consideration things like the weight of objects handled, worker postures and movements, grip, and repeti-

tion of tasks. The goal is to reduce excessive exertion, awkward postures and physical strain by modifying the work environment and tools. By making these changes, workers will be more productive, lose less work time to injuries, and experience less pain and fatigue. By using good ergonomic work practices and following these guidelines, you can help reduce the risk of repetitive motion injuries among your workers. Tips for reducing repetitive motion injuries: • adjust the work environment where necessary, where possible keep the work around waist level trying to avoid excessive bending down or reaching up • limit or rotate repetitive tasks • have workers take short breaks and properly stretch

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section F - Page F5

• Farm Accidents • Tractor Accidents • Insurance Lawsuits • Defective Equipment • Farm Losses Caused by the Fault of Another

NCGA, other ag organizations urge new farm bill in 2012 As the Senate begins to prepare for farm bill hearings, the National Corn Growers Association signed a letter with more than 80 other agriculture groups urging Congress to pass a new bill this year. The letter was sent to the chairs and ranking members of the Senate and House Ag Committees. “The 2012 farm bill is among the most important pieces of legislation the U.S. Congress will consider this year,” the letter stated. “We ask you to reject calls for delay and aggressively

act to ensure that a new, comprehensive farm bill is passed this year. Farmers need a safety net that works more effectively, and they need access to tools that help them be good stewards of our natural resources.” The letter also stated that a temporary extension of current policy would create uncertainty without addressing important issues such as job creation hunger prevention resources. Source: NCGA News of the Day, Monday, Feb. 13

Injuries from F5

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• maintain good posture while working • hand tools should be the appropriate size for workers • when possible, choose ergonomically designed hand tools (some examples: small, medium or large pruners, left or right handed pruners, comfort grips, bent or angled handles that keep the wrist in a neutral position) • electronic or pneumatic pruners may be a good alternative • select chainsaws or other power tools that have vibration dampening handles or systems For more information on repetitive motion injuries, ergonomics and other agricultural safety topics, or to schedule an on-farm safety training session, please contact me at 800-343-7527,

ext 291 or email me at ameyerhoff@nycamh.com. NYCAMH on-farm safety programs are funded by a grant from the New York State Department of Labor Hazard Abatement Board, are offered at no cost, and are available in English and Spanish. Topics include packing house and personal hygiene, food safety and biosecurity, mechanical hazards, WPS pesticide safety, orchard ladder safety, and safe lifting and carrying. We also offer free CPR and first aid training through the Farm Emergency Response Program, funded by the New York State Department of Health. NYCAMH, a program of the Bassett Healthcare Network, is enhancing agricultural and rural health by preventing and treating occupational injury.

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Page F6 - Section F • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

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Capitol Comments: Farmland assessments rise again by Larry DeBoer, professor of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University Here comes this column topic again: Property taxes on farmland are increasing. The base rate for the assessment of an acre of farmland was $1,290 for taxes in 2011. It will be $1,500 per acre for taxes in 2012. And Indiana’s Department of Local Government Finance has announced the base rate will be $1,630 for taxes in 2013. Farmland is assessed starting with this base rate. It is multiplied by a soil productivity factor, which varies from about 0.5 to 1.3, based on soil type. Some acreage is adjusted by an influence factor, a percentage reduction that accounts for fac-

tors such as frequent flooding. The result is the assessed value of farmland. That assessment times the property tax rate, less any credits, is the tax bill. The base rate is adjusted each year with a formula. The DLGF offers the details on its website, at www.in.gov/dlgf/7016. htm. It’s complicated, but three of its features tell the story. First, it’s a capitalization formula. It divides the estimated net income earned from a farm acre by an interest rate to get the amount that a “rational” investor would pay for that acre. For example, in 2008 the DLGF estimated that a landowner renting the acre, or an operator growing corn

or beans, could earn an average of $165. The Chicago Federal Reserve reported several farm-related interest rates that averaged 6.56 percent. Divide the earnings by the interest rate and (after some rounding) the result is $2,508. Now imagine an auction for an acre that earns $165. The first bid is $1,000. Earnings of $165 on an investment of $1,000 give a rate of return of 16.50 percent. That’s a really great deal, because our rational investors get a rate of return of only 6.56 percent on other investments. They bid more, say $2,000. That’s a rate of return of 8.25 percent, still a good deal. At a bid of $2,508, the rate of re-

turn is no better or worse than other investments. A rational investor would not bid more. The second important feature of the base rate formula is that it’s a six-year rolling average. For taxes in 2011, capitalization results from 2002-2007 were averaged together. For 2012, the years are 20032008. The base rate changed because the results for 2002 were dropped, and the results for 2008 were entered. Back in 2002, corn and bean prices were pretty low, and the net income estimate was only $63. The interest rate was higher — 7.02 percent — so the capitalization result was only $890. That low number was dropped from the average for 2012 taxes. Here’s where a new

quirk in the formula comes in. The DLGF drops the highest value of the six from the average. The General Assembly changed the formula for 2011 taxes, to make the increases in the base rate a little smaller. For 2011 taxes, they dropped the highest value of $1,927 from 2007 data. The 2008 value is higher, so now it is dropped, and the 2007 figure enters the average. For 2012 taxes, the base rate average dropped the value $890 and added the value $1,927. The base rate increased from $1,290 to $1,500. Without dropping the highest value, the base rate for 2012 taxes would have been $1,670. The calculation change reduced the base rate by about 10 percent. The third important feature of the formula is

the four-year lag. The DLGF used data from 2004-2009 for the 2013 calculation of $1,630. We know the data for 2010 and most of the numbers for 2011. That means we can project what will happen to the base rate for 2014 and 2015. Commodity prices have remained high and interest rates have remained low. So for taxes in 2014, the base rate will be about $1,760. For taxes in 2015, the base rate will be about $2,030. The six-year average and the four-year lag have another implication. The expected high prices and low interest rates in 2012 will first enter the formula for taxes in 2016 and will remain in the formula for six years, dropping out in 2022. The base rate is likely to increase and remain high for a long, long time.

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February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section F - Page F7

If you own a pole building, chances are you’ve seen rotten posts before. Our pre-cast concrete post solves the problem for both repair and new construction. Perma-Column offers the economy of post-frame construction and the durability of concrete. What are you building on?

NEW YORK ATLANTA, NY 14808

NEW YORK (cont.)

NEW YORK (cont.)

NEW YORK (cont.)

PENNSYLVANIA

Johnson City, NY 13790

SALEM, NY 12865

TROY, NY 12180

ABBOTTSTOWN, PA 17301

SHARON SPRINGS FARM & HOME CENTER

MESSICK’S FARM EQUIPMENT, INC.

1175 Hoosick St. 518-279-9709

7481 Hwy. East (Rt. 30) 717-367-1319 800-222-3372 www.messicks.com

GOODRICH IMPLEMENT

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Route 371 • 585-534-5935

745 Harry L. Drive • 607-729-6161

ALEXANDER, NY 14005

Greenville, NY 10586

5109 St. Rte. 22 518-854-7424 • 800-999-3276 www.salemfarmsupply.com

EMPIRE TRACTOR

ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT 3266 Buffalo Street • 585-591-2955

GREENVILLE SAW SERVICE, INC. 5040 State Route 81 West 518-966-4346

CLAVERACK, NY 12513

Page F8 - Section F • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC. 841 Rt. 9H • 518-828-1781 www.columbiatractor.com

MENDON, NY 14506

SAXBY IMPLEMENT CORP.

SHARON SPRINGS, NY 13459

SHARON SPRINGS FARM & HOME CENTER 1375 Rt. 20 518-284-2346 • 800-887-1872

180 State Rt. 251 • 585-624-2938 SYRACUSE, NY 13205

CORTLAND, NY 13045

EMPIRE TRACTOR 3665 US Route 11 • 607-753-9656

NORTH JAVA, NY 14113

LAMB & WEBSTER, INC. 4120 Route 98 585-535-7671 • 800-724-0139

FULTONVILLE, NY 12072

RANDALL IMP. CO. INC. 2991 St. Hwy. 5S • 518-853-4500 www.randallimpls.com

EMPIRE TRACTOR 2700 Erie Blvd. East 315-446-5656 SPRINGVILLE, NY

PALMYRA, NY 14522

JOHN S. BLAZEY, INC. 111 Holmes Street 315-597-5121

LAMB & WEBSTER, INC. Crs Rt. 219 & 39 716-392-4923 • 800-888-3403

WATERLOO, NY 13165

EMPIRE TRACTOR 1437 Route 318 • 315-539-7000 WATERTOWN, NY 13601

WALLDROFF FARM EQUIPMENT, INC. 22537 Murrock Circle 315-788-1115

WHITE’S FARM SUPPLY, INC. CANASTOTA, NY • 315-697-2214 WATERVILLE • 315-841-4181 LOWVILLE • 315-376-0300 www.whitesfarmsupply.com

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 17022

MESSICK’S FARM EQUIPMENT, INC. Rt. 283, Rheems Exit 717-367-1319 800-222-3373 www.messicks.com HONESDALE, PA 18431

MARSHALL MACHINERY INC. Rt. 652, 348 Bethel School Rd. 570-729-7117 www.marshall-machinery.com

Country Folks Section nG

ACT NOW

Photo Courtesy of the Miner Institute

March 15 Deadline for Enrollment Crop Insurance Pays for losses resulting from

Contact a crop insurance agent to help you evaluate your risk exposure and your crop insurance options. If you don’t have a crop insurance agent, look on the USDA Risk Management Agency website at their list: http://www3.rma.usda.gov/apps/agents, or call us for a list of agents. USDA Risk Management Agency

CROP P INSURANCE E EDUCATION

New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets www.agriculture.ny.gov/ap/CropInsurance.html 1-800-554-4501

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tioga County is delighted to announce the election of Jim Mead as Board President of the 2012 Board of Directors. Jim was elected at the Annual Meeting of CCE Tioga, which was held in December at the Owego Treadway Inn. Jim will serve with Drew Griffin who will continue as Vice-President, John Feavearyear who will serve as Treasurer, and Rose Blinn who will continue as Secretary. The Board welcomed new Board member Patti Brunk from Waverly who was elected by Tioga County residents present at the meeting. The Board also welcomes William Standinger, recently elected Tioga County Legislator, who will serve as County representative. Other Board Members include: Tom Doty, Kris Engelbert, Ruthanne Orth, Matthew Frisbie, Leslie D’Arcy, Michael Glos, Thomas Gartung, Karen Lindhorst, Cheryl Strickland-Ward, and Cornell State Specialist Charlie Fausold. To find out more about our association visit our facebook page at www.facebook.com/ ccetioga or contact Andrew Fagan, Executive Director at 607-6874020.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section G - Page G1

Adverse Weather Conditions Insects (Unavoidable) Plant Disease (Unavoidable) Wildlife Others Other Options you can insure most crops for are: Replant Payment Late Planting Protection for up to 25 days after normal planting deadline Prevented Planting

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tioga County elects 2012 Board of Directors at Annual Meeting

Empire State Fruit & Vegetable Expo continues to grow by Pat Malin SYRACUSE, NY — Taking a cue from the theme of its conference, the annual Empire State Fruit & Vegetable Expo continues to grow and exhibit a healthy glow. With 138 exhibitors participating and over 1,200 attendees this year, this expo proved to be a success. Sales manager for the Expo, Dan Wren of Lee Publications and Trade Shows, said a diverse mix of vendors and presentations, and expanding the exhibits, is the key to organizing a successful event. “We’re very happy with the show. The show

has grown and improved by groups working together. The addition of the New York State Flowers Industries this year opens up many new opportunities for both attendees and exhibitors.” The four -day Expo began on Monday, Jan. 23, with the annual Becker Forum at the Holiday Inn in nearby Liverpool. The topic of the day-long conference was “Farming in a Non-Farmer World: Building Trust, Engaging Communities and Finding Common Ground.” Addressing the overall theme of Growing for the Health of New

Paul Geisterfer talks with a customer about the benefits of the products available from Agricultural Data Systems in tracking produce and harvesting labor.

Matt Peters (left) of N.M. Bartlett demonstrates the controls of the Orsi self propelled fruit harvester.

York, the speakers included experts in economics and marketing, researchers and Cornell Cooperative Extension agents. The Farmers’ Direct Marketing Conference started the next day on the lower level of the OnCenter with multiple workshops, educational lectures and presentations scheduled for morning, mid-day and late day. In the meantime, the trade show was going on for the

entire day on the main floor. Fruit and vegetable growers, producers, distributors and wholesale dealers from the western New York region bordering Lake Ontario, the “fruit belt,” seemed to predominate the crowd during the show. The conference is organized cooperatively by Cornell Cooperative

Extension, NYS Vegetable Growers Association, Empire State Potato Growers Inc., NYS Berry Growers Association, NYS Flower Industries, Inc., NYS Horticultural Society, NYS Farmers’ Direct Marketing Association, Associated NYS Food Processors and Cornell University. “I see a lot of people here from New England,” observed Bob James, a sales representative for Paige Equipment Sales and Service of East Williamson, NY, a suburb of Rochester, after showing off a large

apple tree pruner to one customer. “They’re here to learn what’s new in the industry, how to grow produce, how to package and get the items to the customer. It’s a good show; the people are enthusiastic.” He said Paige Equipment owner John Paige has been attending the Fruit & Vegetable Expo (ESFVE) since it started 14 years ago. Ed Fairweather of Wessels Farm in downstate Otisville has looked forward to the show every year for

ESF&V G3

The Kifco Water-Reel drew lots of attention at the O.A. Newton booth.

PolyDome Announces New Improved Calf Housing Country Folks has partnered with the New York State Corn and Soybean Growers Association to publish the spring edition of the Association's newsletter, The NY Crop Grower. This will be a special insert to the MARCH 26th edition of Country Folks East and West. It will also be mailed to all of the members of the association and to prospective members.

Page G2 - Section G • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

PolyDome has the right hut to fit your needs from the Mini Dome to the Mega Hut. Plus, products that outperform the competition.

THE DEADLINE TO ADVERTISE IN THIS ISSUE IS MARCH 15TH If you sell harvesting equipment, grain drying equipment, grain storage, seed or provide custom harvesting you need to be in this issue!

To place an ad or to inquire about advertising opportunities in this or future issues please contact your Country Folks sales rep or contact me at jandrews@leepub.com or at 1-800-218-5586 ext 110 Many other farm products available

Call for the Dealer Nearest You Visit www.polydome.com CONTACT US FOR for more details AQUA FARMING TANKS 1-800-328-7659 email: Dan@polydome.com

ESF&V from G2 many years. The farm sells plugs for vegetables, perennial and annual flowers, while also specializing in mums and poinsettias, almost all going to greenhouses, farmer’s markets and retailers. “Economy and weather are the No. 1 factors in this business,” said Fairweather. “The die-hard gardeners will still be out there, but the best ones in our business need to attract the fringe customer to be successful.” In view of that special customer, Wessels Farm has branched out

into developing deer-resistant varieties of vegetables and flowers for the suburban gardener. Wessels has worked for many years with horticultural researchers at Penn State, Cornell and Rutgers to develop these new products. “We will be offering 20 new (deer -resistant) items this year,” Fairweather said. Growing vegetables in greenhouses was among the many lectures that dealt with practical matters. There were other lectures devoted to pesticide safety, irrigation,

processing vegetables, food safety following a flood, or specific lectures devoted solely to onions, tomatoes, eggplant, corn or winter greens. There were businessrelated and more technical seminars, such as boosting workforce productivity, business and labor management, and discussions on changes in government regulations. The conference also presented several sessions in Spanish. The Expo came to the OnCenter in 2005. “It’s continued to grow for

Ed Fairweather of Wessels’ Farms talks with attendees about their availability of finished material for the spring. Wessels’ produces quality plugs and finished material.

the two years I’ve been here,” said Expo Executive Director Jeanette Marvin. “And it’s growing despite the recession. We had a tough growing year in New York state, but when times are tough, farmers concentrate more on their education.” That explains why a seminar on high tunnels and greenhouses, for example, was packed with a standing-room only crowd. “When you have bad weather, such things as irrigation and greenhouses allow you to extend the season,” Marvin noted. “We got a late start planting last spring, so we’re continually looking for ways to outsmart Mother Nature.” The Expo organizers also feel a responsibility to keep farmers, growers and producers informed of changes in state or federal agricultural policies. “I think there is a concern about state government in Albany as it seeks to downsize,” Marvin said. “It will mean some changes for agribusiness.” The dates for next year’s Expo are Jan. 2224 at the same location.

Linda Johnson and Janet Fallon, Agri-One Soils Lab, pose for a quick photo.

Butch McQueen, RE & HJ McQueen, explains the benefits of this New Holland tractor with front linkage.

Mike Magee (left) talks with attendees about the refrigerated and ventilated storages available from Arctic Refrigeration Co. of Batavia. February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section G - Page G3

John Peterson, Stanley Paper Co. shows Mike Athanas how easy the donut making machine is to operate.

Page G4 - Section G • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section G - Page G5

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section G - Page G5

Hello I’m P eggy Your Country Folks Classified Ad Representative I’m here to make it easy for you to place your ad.

Call Me FREE On Our 800 Phone Line From Anywhere in the Continental United States

1-800-836-2888 Or Fax (518) 673-2381 Attn. Peggy E-mail: classified@leepub.com

Page G6 - Section G • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

Deadline is Wednesday at 3 PM

We Accept MasterCard, Visa, Discover and American Express

Payment May Also Be Made by Check or Money Order

RATES

(Per Zone) FIRST 14 WORDS

One Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9.25 Two or More Weeks . . . . . . . . . $8.25 ea. wk. Each Additional Word . . . . . . . 30¢ per wk.

Lee Publications, Country Folks Classified, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

HARD HAT EXPO MARCH 7-8

2012

NEW YORK STATE FAIRGROUNDS SYRACUSE, NY WEDNESDAY 10-7 • THURSDAY 9-4

Hard Hat Expo is Produced by the Trade Show Division of Lee Newspapers, Inc., Publishers of Hard Hat News P.O. Box 121, 6113 St Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Show Manager: Ken Maring 1-800-218-5586 or 518-673-2445 Fax 518-673-3245 Visit Our Website: www.leepub.com

26th

Consecutive Year February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS West • Section G - Page G7

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 1-800-218-5586

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Page G8 - Section G • COUNTRY FOLKS West • February 20, 2012

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CF West 2.20.12