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8 July 2013 Section e off Two One Volume e 32 Number r 27

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

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Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds Sipe Angus uses Wye genetics to breed cattle to thrive on fescue ~ Page A2

Checking in on Oregon Dairy’s Family Farm Days ~ Page A4 Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly

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FEATURES Auctions Beef Producers Classifieds Farm Safety Markets

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Heal me, Lord, and I will be healed; save me and I will be saved, for you are the one I praise. ~ Jeremiah 17:14


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 2

Sipe Angus uses Wye genetics to breed cattle to thrive on fescue by Karl H. Kazaks CLAREMONT, NC — Randy Sipe’s career as a cattleman has seen many twists and turns — even an upheaval or two. But Sipe has finally settled on an approach to creating cattle which looks to be his crowning achievement as a breeder. For the past 15 years he’s been using the line-bred, moderate-framed, flat-patterned Wye Angus cattle as a basis for a registered herd he’s building in North Carolina’s piedmont. He trying to build the same types of cattle found in the classic Wye line, with one exception: he is also selecting for cattle which perform on fescue. “In the Southeast we’re always going to have fescue,” Sipe said, “and our goal is to improve cattle to adapt to fescue.” When Sipe was six years old his maternal grandfather gave him a bottle calf. By the time he was 18 he had a herd of 21 cows, which he used as collateral for a loan to purchase a 50 acre farm which serves as the heart of his operation today. Currently he owns about 86 acres in Catawba County and rents another 300 in Gaston County. In 1979 Sipe bought his first purebred bull. When he saw how the quality of the calves from that bull were an improvement over the calves he had been getting, he considered moving to purebred cattle and soon bought his first purebred cow. By 1984 he had entirely switched from commercial cattle to registered Angus. Sipe fully embraced the challenge of developing outstanding registered cattle. He learned how to AI. He scoured the stud services for the next up-andcoming great bull. “I would literally stay up all night to heat check,” he said. “I was determined to AI every cow and would keep on until I got to 100 percent AI.” He sold his bulls through test stations and did well. The trend then (influenced by the introduction of exotic breeds) was for bigger, larger-framed animals. Sipe participated in that trend. In 1989 he sold a bull at test with a 9.2 frame score. That wasn’t the kind of animal he wanted to be producing, though. “We were using supposedly the greatest bulls in America and the cattle were all to pieces,” he said. “They had to be babysat.” Acknowledging that largerframed animals needed more maintenance, he increased his feeding. “If that was what it

Sipe has two mobile food trailers called Rawhide Ranchers, which he uses to sell his beef at area festivals and events. Photos by Karl H. Kazaks

took to make them function, I would do it.” But at the same time he thought the quality of animals was “going backward. Their skeletal size was beginning to look more dairy.” So he began moving to more moderate-framed animals. In order to market those cattle, he banded together with other breeders who were making like cattle for a sale in Union Grove, NC. Those sales — held from 1992-1994 — were a big success. A cow sold for $10,000, a heifer for $11,000. At the last sale, cattle sold to 24 states. Still, Sipe wasn’t happy. He had been able to scale back from the large-framed animals but was still using outcrossing, which in his mind had too many weaknesses. With them, he said, “You can disguise weaknesses with a bucket.” He didn’t want to mask flaws with a bucket — in fact, he eventually decided he didn’t want to use a bucket at all. He wanted to develop a line of cattle which would perform on grass. Not only that, he wanted to develop easy-handling, longliving cattle that had consistent offspring. So in 1998 Sipe had a dispersal sale. He recalled, “People said, ‘Randy’s lost his mind. He’s got good cows in place, selling some of the best bulls in the test stations.’” What Sipe wanted was a herd with more homogenous animals derived from Wye genetics. Using line breeding, he figured, he could have more consistent and uniform offspring and more easily eliminate flaws while maintaining desired traits.

To him, the disadvantage of outcrossing is that while it provided hybrid vigor, it could also introduce undesirable traits and minimize the desired genetics you already had in place. What’s more, even though outcrossing could produce champion, high-scoring outliers it could also produce outliers in the other direction — ‘train wrecks’. Outcrossing also introduced the possibility of heterosis. The day after his dispersal sale Sipe bought a Wye animal and he hasn’t looked back. He has grown to as large as 150 cows, but today has 100 registered Angus cows, all from the Wye line. Sipe was able to build his herd by buying from Wye sales. When he bought a cow-calf pair, he’d ask that the cow be bred back before he took possession of the pair. He also bought from other cattleman who had purchased from Wye — sometimes from breeders who, like Sipe, were continuing a Wye line breeding strategy themselves. In other cases, when the Wye cow was being outcrossed, he’d raise the outcross calf and then breed the cow back to Wye genetics. Today Sipe uses both AI and natural service, and breeds year-round. He is 100 percent grazing, and has used ryegrass for winter grazing and interseeded Sudex and millet for summer grazing. Sipe likes the Wye breed for a variety of reasons. He believes their type most closely resembles the Angus cattle originally imported from the British Isles. He likes them for their maternal

characteristics, calving ease, disposition and milk. He thinks they have “a genetic base that can produce marbling on just forage,” according to his research into ultrasound data. Sipe acknowledges that Wye cattle still have “a lot of work to

be done,” such as selecting for fescue, but it’s a task he embraces. “I love genetics,” he said. “I love creating animals.” Sipe has had to create a market for his new herd. Deciding to tap into the farm to table movement, he built a mobile food trailer called the Rawhide Ranger which he uses to cook his beef at festivals and events within about a 100 mile radius of his home. This past year he built a second, larger food trailer to be able to sell at more events. The Sipes also have an on-farm retail store where they sell their beef by the cut. In 2011, Sipe had his first large sale of his Wye-line cattle. His sold 38 cows, 10 bred heifers, 10 bulls, and some embryos. Cattle sold to 17 states, with most of the bulls going to grass-fed beef operations. Buyers are already waiting for Sipe’s next sale, but he’s in no hurry, both because he has the Rawhide Rangers and because he wants to evaluate how his heifers perform. “There’s a shortage of wonderful genetics,” he said. For more information about Sipe Angus, visit www.sipeangus.com.

Recently, Mt. Crawford Creamery celebrated both June Dairy Month and its recent opening by inviting Virginia Dairy Princess Kristina Callender to its plant. Callender, whose family operates Walkup Holsteins, has been showing cows since she was five. She visited Mt. Crawford Creamery with one of Virginia’s dairy maids, her sister Kelly Callender, as well as her show cow Flo. Photo courtesy of Cheryl Will


by Katie Navarra Grazing livestock have the potential to maximize or exceed their daily intake requirements ultimately leading to increased production than if fed stored forages. “Well-managed pastures are generally higher in quality than any other forage,” Karen Hoffman, Resource Conversationalist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, said. Livestock allowed to graze consume the plant when it is in the vegetative stage of growth before it sends out a seed head. “The plant will be lower in fiber, which means it is more easily digested by the animal, with the help of bacteria in the rumen of the animals that have one,” she added. Pastures also tend to be higher in protein and energy than other forages due to the stage of plant growth. Furthermore, grazing animals are outside and able to absorb natural vitamins and minerals, including Vitamin D.

with grain or hay to keep the animal well fed.

Getting started with grazing

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Why graze? Grazing can allow the farmer to reduce the cost of feeding animals. “They (the animals) do the work of harvesting, it’s high quality, and generally doesn’t need to be supplemented with expensive feeds,” Hoffman said. High-producing dairy animals are an exception. “It is recommended that some supplemental energy be fed as pasture can’t meet their energy needs alone,” she added. Providing pastures for grazing has the potential to reduce feed costs, but “it all depends,” said Mick Bessire with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties, “to make grazing as profitable as possible you have to keep costs under control and have a process of evaluation.” Management and operating practices play an important role to making grazing a more efficient and more profitable endeavor. “I have seen farms with 100 cows and 500 acres that can’t make it; however, I have seen farms with 150 cows and 250 acres do very well,” he said.

How much pasture do I need? Successful grazing requires daily monitoring of the animal’s health, body condition score, fluids intake and productivity.

Management and operating practices play an important role to making grazing a more efficient and more profitable endeavor. Photo by Scott Bauer

“(Farmers) need to be particularly mindful of/familiar with the animal’s body condition score,” Bessire explained. The animal’s health should be monitored on a daily basis. The pastures should also be checked daily for the amount of forage available to ensure the animals have enough to eat. The animal’s age and stage of development will require different amounts of forage. “Yearlings or those in lactation take more forage than a dry cow,” he said. For example, a dry cow requires 2.5 percent of its body weight in forage whereas a yearling needs 3 percent and lactating animals need 3.5 percent. The soil type and the type of forage available play a critical role in determining how many animals a pasture can support. “Up to 30-40 percent clover is the best option,” he said, “clover supports more animals than straight grass and it provides nitrogen fixation to help fertilize the soil.” In general, the ratio of animals to pasture land is determined using animal units. Each animal unit is equal to 1,000 pounds of body weight. Pastures with decent soil and good forage coverage should be able to support one animal unit per acre. Bessire said, “horses eat an awful lot and are actually equivalent to 2 1/4 animal units meaning it takes 2 1/2 acres for one horse.”

Pasture health critical A pasture’s nutritional value is directly related to its soil type, pH and fertility.

Soil types are measured on a scale of 1 to 8. “A type 1 soil is capable of producing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre,” Bessire explained, “a type 3 is only able to produce between 3 to 3.5 tons of dry matter per acre.” A Soil Survey Handbook is available and includes charts by county that indicate the tonnage of dry matter the soil will likely produce under optimum conditions. “If the soil is good and at optimum fertility and pH that is a good start,” he said, “but some sort of harvest is needed (i.e. hay) is the only sure way to measure.” The pasture’s viability is also based on how fertile the soil is and its ability to absorb nutrients. Soil that has been neglected may be short on micronutrients. “(You) need to look at the micronutrients as part of the tool kit these days in convention and organic agriculture because we have not been putting these back into the soil and it is out of balance,” he added. Soil pH is an important part of the pasture’s ability to produce high-quality forage. “This part of the world (Columbia and Greene County, NY) is naturally acidic,” he said. Grasses and legumes do well with a pH of 6.2-6.5. If pH is too low or too high prevents plants from picking up other nutrients in the soil. Soil samples can be taken to local Cooperative Extensions for testing. “Know your soil and what’s in it and amend it,” he emphasized. A plant that is not receiving adequate nutrients will pass the lack of nutrition onto the animal leading to poor nutritional health for the animal or the need to supplement

Incorporating grazing into the feeding routine requires planning and preparation. Infrastructure and acreage are important considerations. Newly converted lands or leased lands may require fencing and a water source. “If you are leasing land make the agreement for a long enough period of time to make it worth the infrastructure investment,” Bassire said. Tax breaks and other incentives are available to land owners who consider leasing property to farms. “There is a lot of land that is under-utilized, especially in New York,” Bessire said, “I get calls every day from people looking to lease out under-utilized land.” Funding is available through the Soil and Water Conservation Districts, the USDA and NRCS. Ultimately, neighbor relations is key. Liability and infrastructure can be stumbling blocks to connecting landowners with livestock owners, but developing solid relationships with neighbors go a long way

in smoothing this over. Once pastures are established, create a grazing management plan. “Rotational grazing can produce almost double the amount compared to continuous grazing,” Bassire explained. In a rotational system the animals are allowed to graze 1-3 days and are then moved to another pasture. The vegetation is given enough time to rebound and regrow. The length of the rest period varies based on the season. In the spring it averages two weeks, but can be as many as four to six during the middle of the summer. In conventional grazing, the livestock prefer the young tender grass rather than taller grasses. An overgrazed root system contracts and cannot take up nutrients to sustain growth. The growth slows down and turns into fodder. “Determine how many acres are needed, and how often to rotate the animals through the pastures/paddocks,” Hoffman concluded, “It’s a balance between forage supply and forage demand and making sure there’s enough pasture for the amount of time they are in the paddock.”

Live life like a goat...

Take time to pray.

Page 3 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Grazing livestock


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 4

Checking in on Oregon Dairy’s Family Farm Days by Steve Wagner here are perfect days for certain events, the kind of days people pray for to ward off rain and make it not too hot, when children and adults can have a good time and get an education as well. Oregon Dairy, located not far from the outskirts of Lancaster, PA, is one of those farms that always seem to be at the vanguard of agricultural issues, hosting seminars, earning awards, and being a good neighbor as well as a good steward of the land. At Oregon Dairy’s

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Family Farm Days, the farm resembles an amusement park with heavy ag overtones. A lot of young people exercised their curiosity and their appetites. If a youth was genuinely interested in the farming process, having had no other exposure to it other than videos or reading material, a visit to Oregon is a wonderful primer. Farming is a challenge today, not only because of its inherent problems but now there are political adversities as well. However, it takes that kind of spirit to approach farming, par-

ticularly dairy farming, with realistic expectations. “A Day in the Life of a Dairy Cow,” says Curvin Hurst, “basically tells how much a cow eats and drinks.” Hurst is Oregon’s manager and could be described as the proverbial onearmed paper -hanger with the hives. He was everywhere at the same time, soft-selling people to take wagon rides, helping them into the wagons, opening and closing doors and pounding the sides when the vehicle was full, a signal for the driver to go ahead.

Cover photo by Karl H. Kazaks Longtime Angus breeder Randy Sipe, pictured with grandson Blaine, is line-breeding Wye Angus cattle to perform on fescue.

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Guides with microphones and speakers aboard the wagons reeled off farm facts and figures. One of them was Alan Zepp of the Center for Dairy Excellence. Hurst gave a history of Family Farm Days in a video press release. “Twenty-five years ago, my dad decided it would be really great to bring people out to the farm, and let them learn something about milking cows,” Hurst recounted. “He always had this philosophy that some people actually believe chocolate milk comes from brown cows. We want to do our part in educating them and teaching them about things they probably don’t know about agriculture. We made a conscious effort every year in June to open our farm to the community.” Hurst says that Family Farm Days can be construed to be a primer on how to milk cows, how to care for chickens, and that the willing eye can discern how other things are handled on a farm. One of the beauties of this annual event, Hurst says, is that it has become generational. Folks who came when FFD first took place are now coming with their children and grandchildren. The event is worth taking a day off for a visit. It’s also interesting to note how farming techniques have changed since the first generation and the present one. Kids can come out, Hurst says, “and touch little peeps, hold the little chicks. They can ride a tractor. Buy a hotdog and eat free popcorn.” Several youngsters were fascinated and a bit stand-offish when approaching a calf kennel. They were encouraged to enter and pet the calf. “What is that, Mommy?” “That’s a calf, honey.” “Does he bite?”

“No, honey.” That particular child played it safe and petted the calf’s hindquarters. Immediately above the calf petting zone other moms with other kids could watch a milking carousel. There was a beef exhibit and endless visuals to simply look at. As Hurst was finishing his video history speech, an older gentleman

approached him. Hurst broke away from the script to ask if he might be of assistance. The man wondered if a piece of farm equipment was for sale. It was a combine situated directly in front of the camera. Spontaneou-sly, Hurst assured the man that if he happened to have a couple hundred thousand dollars with him, he could drive it home.

Youngsters were and encouraged to enter the calf kennels and pet the calves.

A family enjoys some lunch at the picnic area of Oregon Dairy’s Family Farm Days.


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being followed that does not yet qualify to be designated as certified organic acreage); and (3) Buffer zone acreage. What’s covered? Covered perils are drought, excess moisture, freeze, hail, prevented planting, insect damage, disease, and weeds — if recognized organic farming practices fail to provide an effective control method that may result in losses. Please note, contamination by application or drift of prohibited substances onto organic, transitional, or buffer zone acreage is not an insured peril. If any acreage qualified as certified organic acreage or transitional acreage on the acreage reporting date such

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organic farming practice without an organic certificate or written documentation from a certifying agency must be insured under the conventional farming practice.); (3) For both certified and transitional acreage, records from the certifying agent showing the specific location of each field of certified organic, transitional, buffer zone, and acreage maintained and not maintained under organic farming practices. Price elections, insurance dollar amounts, and premiums Separate organic price elections, projected prices, and harvest prices are currently available for eight crops: cotton, corn, soybeans, processing tomatoes, avocadoes, and stonefruit crops; and fresh freestone peaches, fresh nectarines, and plums in California. For all other crops, the price elections, insurance amounts, projected prices, and harvest prices that apply to both certified organic and transitional crops are the price elections, insurance amounts, projected prices, and har-

vest prices RMA publishes for the crop grown using conventional means for the current crop year. The Price Discovery Tool is available under the RMA “Information Browser” at www.rma.usda.gov/tools/. New contract price option Beginning with the 2014 crop year, new contract price options will be available to organic producers who grow crops under guaranteed contracts. You can choose to use the prices established in those contracts as your “price election” in place of the RMA-issued prices when buying crop insurance. This contract price option allows organic producers who receive a contract price for your crop to get a crop insurance guarantee that is more reflective of the actual value of your crop. You will also have the ability to use your personal contract price as your price election or to choose existing crop insurance price elections where this option is available. New premium organic price elections All crops are being evaluated for establish-

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Page 5 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

USDA guidelines provide crop insurance for Organic Farming Practice


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 6

Animal handling tips by Dennis J. Murphy, Professor and William C. Harshman, Instructor, Penn State Many farm people have never stopped and actually analyzed why animals behave as they do and, more importantly, what this behavior may mean to their own personal safety. Animal handling tips Often animal handling practices developed from watching others as we grow up on the farm. All too often this results in the perpetuation of poor practices. Some readers will have heard of a dairy bull or a horse kicking incident where someone lost their life. While most animal injuries are not fatal, many men, women, and children involved in agricultural activities will be needlessly injured each year because of a lack of safety awareness of how animals behave. Broken bones, crushed and mashed limbs, missed days of work and unnecessary medical expenses will be the result of injury incidents with animals. An individual may work carefully around animals a majority of the time, but then involve themselves in an animal incident because of haste, impatience, anger at another person or object or the animal, or because of a preoccupied mind. It is during these moments that a farmer really needs to understand animal behavior. Animal behavior Animal behavior can be instinctive or learned. Livestock also learn particular habits and become creatures of those habits. For example the sound of milking and feeding equipment being started has been observed to cause animals to move toward the milking or feeding area. Beef, swine, and dairy cattle are generally color blind and have poor depth perception which results in an extreme sensitivity to contrasts. This sensitivity may make an animal balk if a shadow is cast across its path. Due to little depth perception cattle and swine cannot distinguish blind turns in buildings or alleyways and will move tentatively or not at all, thus frustrating the ani-

mal handler. Sheep, too, are considered to be color blind but have no depth perception problems. Instead, they have problems picking out small details, such as the open space created by a partially opened gate. Animals can not see behind themselves, so will turn to keep the handler or perceived danger in their sight. Flight zone All livestock have a “flight zone.” That flight zone space varies with how tame or wild the animal is. An excited animal has a larger flight zone. When you enter the flight zone the animal turns to move away. If you move outside the flight zone the animal will turn to look at you. Entering the blind spot of the flight zone unannounced can cause the animal to kick at you. Most animals have a strong territorial instinct and will develop a sense of “homeland” in their pens, corrals and pastures. They become acclimated to the sights, smells and sounds of that home area and develop a very distinctive and comfortable zone in this area. One example of this homeland trait would be the well worn paths animals create in most pastures and between pastures and buildings, and water troughs and feed bunks. Animals may even challenge an intruder that comes into that space. Forcible removal from this homeland tends to disturb the animal. Also consider that animals tend to follow a leader when being moved. If no animal makes a move, the group tends not to move from the familiar home area. Considering these points, it is easy to see why animals often hesitate when going through unfamiliar gates, barn doors, squeeze chutes, etc. Additional shadows cast by lights and yelling by the handler may further compound the problem. Similar problems are created when moving animals away from feed, separating them from the herd or from their young, moving them to unfamiliar areas, or when an unfamiliar human approaches.

Animals are frightened or spooked easily by noise and will always try to move away from the direction or source of the noise. Their eyesight problems may cause them to crash against or through any objects (including humans!) that may be in their path of escape. Animals which are blind or deaf on one side will favor that side and may suddenly swing around to investigate disturbances on their blind or deaf side. If standing too close, you could easily be knocked down and trampled. Move animals with the minimum of noise and confusion. Moving animals can be made less risky by recognizing the animal’s point of balance. The animal’s shoulder is its point of balance. To move the animal forward, stand behind the point of balance, but out of the blind spot. To stop or slow the animal step to the front of the point of balance. The need to shout, scream, or using prodding devices to move animals will be reduced or eliminated. The young of most farm animals have the capacity to form relationships simultaneously with their own species and with human handlers. For instance, newborns raised by a bottle or bucket may develop a very strong affection for the person feeding them. Animals do respond to the way they are treated and draw upon past learning experience when reacting to a situation. Thus, animals that are chased, slapped, frightened, etc., in their early life will naturally have a sense of fear when a human is near. Since farm animals do not rate high on lists to receive tender loving care, they are often handled with force unnecessarily. Animals are often characterized as being “stubborn” because they have balked or refused to enter an area. Once this has happened the animal is likely to refuse the next several times as well and get a little more excited and dangerous with each refusal. It is very important to take time and think out the

process of moving the animals before the first attempt. Plan the movement route, observe what areas may have shadows or obstructions, and inform all helpers of what you want to accomplish in moving the animals. Many farmers are tempted to “try it” before thinking and end up in a real battle with the animal which may lead to an injury. Injury and fatality considerations Injuries and fatalities involving animals can generally be grouped into one or more of three categories which reflect the cause of the incident: animal caused, facility caused and people caused. Animals experience hunger, thirst, fear, illness, and injury. Females of the species have very strong maternal instincts. Males of the species can be aggressive. Animals develop individual behavior patterns; i.e., kickers, biters, etc., but all animals are unpredictable in behavior. The handler should be aware of these points and take the necessary precautions to work safely with the animal. The facilities play a major role in preventing injury and fatality to handlers as well. Keeping walk and work surfaces as clear as possible and properly lighted reduces risk. Pens, chutes, gates, fences, and loading ramps should be sturdy, be free of sharp projections, and operate properly. Pass through openings should be provided to allow handlers to get away from animals in an emergency. Good facilities provide a means of controlling animals while allowing easy access for feeding and cleaning, all in a safe environment. The majority of injury and fatalities due to animals are the result of “people problems.” Lack of judgment or understanding due to inexperience is a major cause of incidents involving animals. Plan ahead to allow plenty of time to move animals so there is no need to hurry. Do not try to manhandle animals when angry. Some handlers may exhibit a feeling of superiority over animals;

a foolish act when you consider the size of some farm animals. If the animal becomes nervous and agitated, wait 30 minutes before attempting to work with the animal again. Other common “people problems” • prodding an animal with no place for the animal to go • improper lifting of young animals • horseplay • looping lead straps around the handler’s hand • attempting a task without enough help • not wearing personal protective equipment, such as steel-toed, non-skid safety shoes and gloves. Children and animals Children are often assigned to work with livestock at an early age. For example showing cattle at the county fair is seen as an exercise in building the youth’s level of responsibility. For farm children and other youth, the North American Guidelines for Children’s Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) can serve as one means for parents to monitor their child’s readiness to accept such responsibilities. Check the NAGCAT website at www.nagcat.org to view the guidelines which cover many topics. For

youth employed on farms, the US Department of Labor’s Hazardous Occupations Order in Agriculture (AgHO) regulations apply as well. Youth under age 16 are prohibited from being employed to work in a yard, pen, or stall with a cow and newborn calf, bulls, boars, stallions kept for breeding purposes, or with sows with nursing pigs. Do not assign children to these areas. Conclusion What can you do to increase your level of safety when handling animals? First study animal behavior by observing animals in terms described in this fact sheet. Secondly, inspect the facilities used to house, control and move animals to be sure that these structures do not cause animals to balk when moved. Finally, recognize that our own actions may be the reason for difficulty in moving or working with animals. By understanding the animal, providing safe facilities, using proper personal protective equipment, and working with the animal’s natural instincts, a reduction in injury and fatality incidents involving livestock can be realized. Source: Penn State Extension

NCBA statement on the Senate passage of comprehensive immigration reform legislation On June 27, by a 68 to 32 vote, the full U.S. Senate passed their comprehensive Immigration and Border Security bill, S. 744. National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) President Scott George, a cattle and dairy producer from Cody, WY, issued the following statement: “Border security and immigration have been one of our top priorities as set by our members in 2013. I am pleased to see that the Senate has continued the conversation on this important issue that affects all Americans, but especially rural Americans and our members who live and ranch along our borders. This action by

the Senate is a step in the right direction and we look forward to engaging with members of the House in ensuring the priorities of cattlemen and women are met in final legislation. “A strong year-round workforce is paramount to the success of the cattle industry. Cattlemen and depend on a legal and stable workforce year round. We recognize that the first step in ensuring the success of our workforce is securing and maintaining our borders. The conversations taking place on the Hill right now are keeping these issues front and center and we truly appreciate those efforts.”


CAMP HILL, PA — Pennsylvania Farm Bureau says the new state budget approved by the General Assembly and signed by Governor Corbett maintains spending for vital agriculture programs and provides mod-

est increases for other key programs. “Overall, Pennsylvania farmers believe agriculture programs were treated fairly in the budget, increasing funding for several key programs, including agriculture re-

search and Cooperative Extension administered by Penn State University,” said PFB President Carl T. Shaffer. “The Animal Health Commission, agriculture excellence programs and county fairs will also be funded

at a higher level.” The state budget restores funding to last year’s levels for other agriculture programs, such as agriculture research administered by the Department of Agriculture and agricultural promo-

tion, education and exports, while maintaining funding to the Nutrient Management Fund. “Agriculture programs are sound investments that help farmers implement conservation practices, increase efficiency and bring

consumers face to face with those who grow our food at local venues all across the state. These investments help preserve agriculture as Pennsylvania’s leading industry,” concluded Shaffer.

at least $0.25 per hundredweight. The Pennsylvania-mandated premium will remain higher than the premium paid on all classes of milk in nearby markets. Most of the adjustment was accomplished through a re-set of the fuel adjuster. The overorder premium fuel adjuster has been in place since July 2004 and since then has adjusted the over-order premium based on diesel fuel costs and market conditions at that time. The board concluded that the fuel adjuster order no longer properly account-

ed for current diesel fuel costs and market conditions. The board issued a new fuel adjuster order to bring the fuel adjuster up-to-date. The testimony at the hearing was generally in agreement that milk prices would be relatively strong during the second half of 2013. The board concluded that the base over-order premium should be reduced $0.25 per hundredweight as part of the overall adjustment to the total premium level. Recognizing the impact of the decision, Board Chairman Luke Brubaker took a long term view. “Based on all of the evidence we had available at the hearing,” Chairman Brubaker remarked, “I believe that we set the over-order premium at a level consistent with, but still higher than, surrounding markets and that will have a greater positive impact on Pennsylvania’s dairy industry in the future.” Chairman Brubaker observed that the adjustment to the over-order premium would also reduce retail milk prices, noting that “since Pennsylvania’s retail prices directly follow the farm price, any reduction in the over-order premium will result in a direct reduction in Pennsylvania retail prices.” In its order, the board also emphasized that the mandated premiums are only one factor it will consider and reiterated its intention to examine all facets of Pennsylvania milk pricing. However, the board concluded at this time the mandated over-order premium should be adjusted to better reflect premiums in nearby markets and in recognition that it should not bear so much of the burden for other classes of milk.

Milk Marketing Board adjusts over-order premium Concerned that a combination of factors has begun to adversely impact in-state sales by instate processors, the Pennsylvania Milk Mar-

keting Board has adjusted the over-order premium for the remainder of 2013 to be more closely in line with premiums in nearby markets.

From July 2013 through December 2013, the over-order premium on Class I milk produced, processed, and sold in Pennsylvania will

be at least $1.85 per hundredweight, consisting of a base over-order premium of $1.60 per hundredweight and a variable fuel adjuster of

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Page 7 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

State budget provides modest increases and level funding for vital agriculture programs


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 8

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You Good Housekeeping Quick summery veggie tart Refrigerated ready-to-unroll piecrust is the shortcut secret to this savory tart. Slathered with basil cream cheese, it’s filled with squash, peppers and zucchini. 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 clove garlic, crushed with press 1 small red onion, finely chopped 1 large red pepper, finely chopped Salt and Pepper 4 ounces cream cheese, softened 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, finely chopped, plus additional for garnish 1 small (4 ounce) zucchini, trimmed 1 small (4 ounce) yellow squash, trimmed 1 (9-inch) refrigerated piecrust, ready-to-unroll 1. Preheat oven to 425°F. 2. In 12-inch skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil on medium-high. Add garlic and cook 30 seconds, stirring. Add onion, red pepper and 1/8 teaspoon each salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cook 4 minutes or until softened and browned, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Mixture can be refrigerated, covered, up to overnight. 3. While mixture cools, combine cream cheese, basil and 1/8 teaspoon each salt and pepper; stir until well-mixed. With vegetable peeler, peel zucchini and squash lengthwise into thin ribbons. 4. Lay piecrust flat on jelly-roll pan. Spread cream cheese mixture in even layer, leaving 1-inch border. Spread onion-pepper mixture over cream cheese; decoratively arrange zucchini and squash ribbons on top. Fold border of dough over vegetable mixture. Brush remaining teaspoon oil over zucchini and squash.

5. Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until browned. Serve tart warm or at room temperature. Makes 4 main dish servings. TIP: Make pretty zucchini and squash ribbons using a vegetable peeler: If the vegetables have a lot of seeds, rotate them 90 degrees each time you hit the seeds, and start peeling on a different side. Discard the core of seeds. • Each serving: About 395 calories, 29g total fat (12g saturated), 37mg cholesterol, 520mg sodium, 34g total carbs, 2g dietary fiber, 5g protein.

Snap peas with tarragon-mustard vinaigrette A refreshing side dish of crisp snap peas seasoned with a flavorful tarragon dressing. Whether you serve it warm or chilled, everyone is sure to love this recipe! 3/4 teaspoon salt 2 pounds snap peas, strings removed 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon leaves 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon minced shallot 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon sugar 1. In large saucepot of boiling salted water, cook snap peas 2 minutes or until tender-crisp. (Start timing as soon as snap peas are added to water.) Drain snap peas; rinse with cold water to stop cooking and drain well. 2. Meanwhile, in large bowl, with wire whisk, mix tarragon with remaining ingredients and 3/4 teaspoon salt until blended. Add snap peas and toss until evenly coated. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve or up to one day. Serves 10. • Each serving: About 75 calories, 3g total fat (0g saturated), 0mg cholesterol, 270mg sodium, 10g total carbs, 3g dietary fiber, 3g protein.

Sugar Snap Saute This recipe takes advantage of available early summer produce to create a fresh, easy side dish in only half an hour. 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated lemon peel Salt Pepper 1 tablespoon margarine or butter 3/4 cup finely chopped spring or sweet onions 5 tablespoons water 2 pounds sugar snap peas, strings removed 1/4 cup finely chopped, packed fresh tarragon leaves 1. In large bowl, combine oil, lemon peel and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. Let stand. 2. In 12-inch skillet, melt margarine on medium. Add onion and cook 4 minutes or until softened and golden brown, stirring occasionally and adding 1 to 2 tablespoons of water if browning too quickly. 3. Increase heat to medium-high. Add snap peas, 1 tablespoon water and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Cook 5 to 7 minutes or until crisp-tender and browned in spots, stirring occasionally and adding an additional 1 to 2 tablespoons water if browning too quickly. 4. Transfer to bowl with lemon oil; add tarragon and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Toss until well coated. Serves 12. • Each serving: About 55 calories, 2g total fat (0g saturated), 0mg cholesterol, 120mg sodium, 7g total carbs, 2g dietary fiber, 2g protein.

Cucumber Salad This cool side dish is simple to fix and a nice change from everyday tossed greens. 2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon Asian sesame oil 1 (about 12 ounces) English (seedless) cucumber, unpeeled and thinly sliced 1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced 1. In medium bowl, with wire whisk, mix vinegar, salt and sesame oil until blended. 2. Add cucumber and red onion, and toss to coat. Serves 4. • Each serving: About 30 calories, 0g total fat, 0mg cholesterol, 335mg sodium, 8g total carbs, 1g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefinder/. (c) 2013 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

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SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY — Farm Aid has announced a stellar lineup for its 2013 music and food festival, scheduled for Sept. 21 at Saratoga Performing Arts Center (SPAC) in Saratoga Springs, NY. Jack Johnson, Amos Lee, Kacey Musgraves, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Bahamas, JD & The Straight Shot, and Pegi Young & The Survivors will join Farm Aid board members Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, Neil Young and Dave Matthews at Farm Aid 2013. In addition, Dave Matthews will be joined by guitarist Tim Reynolds. “The Farm Aid benefit concert takes place each year thanks to the generosity of artists who donate their talent to raise awareness about the crucial need we have for family farmers on the land,” said Carolyn Mugar, executive director of Farm Aid. “We are thrilled to have an eclec-

tic lineup this year that includes returning artists, as well as artists new to the Farm Aid stage. Together, Farm Aid concertgoers and artists are changing our food system!” In addition to the allstar lineup, Farm Aid’s all-day music and food festival will spotlight family farm food and hands-on activities that will engage concertgoers in activities that give them a true understanding of why family farm agriculture is so important. Farm Aid’s HOMEGROWN Concessions® brings family farm food center-stage, showcasing local, organic, sustainable, humanelyraised family farm ingredients. In Farm Aid’s HOMEGROWN Village, concertgoers will have the chance to meet farmers, engage in hands-on food and farm activities, and learn about the ways family farmers are enriching our soil, protecting our water and

growing our economy, in addition to bringing us good food for good health. Tickets for Farm Aid 2013 went on sale starting June 28. Tickets will be available at www.ticketmaster.com, at the SPAC Box Office or by phone at 800-745-3000. Tickets range from $45 to $150, while a limited number of premium VIP seats range from $300 to $1,500. Additional ticket information can be found at www.farmaid.org. To learn more about the Farm Aid 2013 lineup, visit www.farmaid.org/lineup. Farm Aid welcomes the participation of the local business community and offers corporate sponsorship opportunities. For more information, email Glenda Yoder at glenda@farmaid.org. For concert updates, follow Farm Aid on Twitter (@farmaid) and on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ farmaid), as well as by visiting www.farmaid.org/concert.

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Farm Aid’s mission is to build a vibrant, family farm-centered system of agriculture in America. Farm Aid artists and board members Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, Neil Young and Dave Matthews host an annual concert to raise

funds to support Farm Aid’s work with family farmers and to inspire people to choose family farm food. Since 1985, Farm Aid, with the support of the artists who contribute their performances each year, has raised more than $43

million to support programs that help farmers thrive, expand the reach of the Good Food Movement, take action to change the dominant system of industrial agriculture and promote food from family farms.

National Grange supports ag funding, SNAP; says splitting Farm Bill may be ‘last resort’ On June 27, the National Grange said reports that House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is looking to separate the agriculture and conservation provisions from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program funding in the current Farm Bill could be a positive move in a divisive political climate. National Grange Legislative Director Grace Boatright said in a statement: “As an agriculture-oriented organization, we strongly believe in the need for continued sup-

port for America’s farmers through a Farm Bill. We, too, believe in helping those in need of food support through community-level programs and assistance through federal funds such as SNAP. If separating the two components of this massive bill allows the divided Congress to move past partisanship and toward passage of both the Farm Bill and a responsible spending plan for SNAP, the Grange stands behind such a move. This should be done as a last

resort to get critical funds approved before it’s too late.” Boatright went on to say: “America’s hardworking farmers and ranchers provide food, fiber and fuel for us each and every day and cannot wait until a more united Congress is able to enact legislation. The security of our food — from the perspective of growers and those who seek assistance as consumers — should not be held hostage.”

Page 9 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Farm Aid announces star-studded lineup for its 2013 Music and Food Festival


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 10

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!

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E&F Ag Systems, LLC • E-311 EasyFix Rubber Products of North America • 528 Eli Fisher Construction • 441 EM Herr Equipment, Inc • 446 Emm Sales & Service, Inc • E-369, E-370 Equipment Service • 442 Esch Mfg • E-375 Everett Cash Mutual Insurance Group • E-314 Evergreen Fence Inc • 433 Express Flighting Supply • Q Farm and Land Realty Inc • L-301 Farm-Land Bale Wrappers LLC • W-356 Farmco Mfg • O-308 Farmer Boy Ag • 125 Feedmobile, Inc • E-368 Fight Bac / Deep Valley Farm Inc • E-313 Finch Services • W-353 Fisher & Thompson, Inc • 110 F.M. Brown’s Sons, Inc • 409, 410 For-Most Livestock Equipment - Garber Farms • 451 Franklin Builders • 225, 226 Fulton Bank • 206 Garber Metrology • W-338A GEA Farm Technologies, Inc • 104A Genex Cooperative, Inc • W-312 Glatfelter Pulp Wood Co • 711 Goodville Mutual Casualty Co • E-316, E-317 Great Plains Mfg., Inc • W-348A Gro-Mor Plant Food Inc • 127 Growers Mineral Solutions • 246 Growmark FS, LLC • E-321, E-322 H&S Manufacting Co. Inc • W-354, O-304 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 445 HARDI North America Inc • E-371 Hershey Ag • E-300 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 444 Hill Top Tire • 220A Hillside Ag Construction, LLC • W-337, W-338 Hoard’s Dairyman • L-208A Homestead Nutrition, Inc • 285, 286, 287 Hoober, Inc • E-377, O-314 Hoof Trimmers Association • W-314 Horizon Organic • W-329 Horning Mfg, LLC • 501 Hubner Seed • H-302, H-303 Hunter Insurance Associates • 411 IBA, Inc • E-327, E-328 Independent Ag Equipment (formerly GVM) • 114 Iva Manufacturing • E-318, E-319, E-320, E-320A J&J Silo Co., LLC • 291, 292 J.L. Gossert & Co. Forestry • E-347 J.S. Woodhouse Co., Inc • 440 Jamesway Farm Equipment • 135 Jaylor Fabricating • W-349 Kauffman’s Animal Health, Inc • E-331 Kel-Krop Enterprises LLC • W-306, W-307 Kent Nutrition Group • L-216 Keystone Concrete Products • 271, 272, 273 Keystone Group Ag Seeds • E-361, E-362 King Construction • 254, 255 King’s AgriSeeds, Inc • 403, 404 Kirby Agri Inc • w-326 Kubota Tractor Corp • 126A Kuhn North America, Inc • 100 Kuhns Mfg LLC • 448 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • E-376 Lancaster Ag Products • 612 Lancaster Dairy Farm Automation • 542, 543 Lancaster DHIA • W-332, E-333 Lancaster Farming • L-202 Lancaster Parts & Equipment • E-378 Lanco Manufacturing • W-347 Lanco/Pennland • 429 Land O’Lakes, Inc • H-306 Lauren Agri Systems • W-322 Lawn Care Distributors, Inc • 124 Lely USA, Inc • 111 Lester Building Systems LLC • E Lincoln Highway Cattle Eq • O-310C LR Gehm, LLC / CoPulsation • 416 Magic Massage Therapy • 716 Mahindra USA Inc • A, B

Mark Hershey Farms, Inc • 431 Martin Limestone Inc • 257 Martin Water Conditioning • 710 Martin’s Welding • W-335, W-336 Maryland Virginia Milk • E-323, E-324 McFarlane Manufacturing Co., Inc • U McLanahan Corporation • E-312 Mensch Manufacturing LLC • R, O-202 Messick Farm Equipment • 105, 106 Meyer Manufacturing Corporation • W-346A M.H. Eby Inc • W-355, O-317 Mid-Atlantic Dairy Assoc/PA Dairy Promotion Program • 235 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • E-364, E-365 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • CV Co-operative • 138 Miller Diesel Inc • E-308 Miraco • 129 MM Weaver • 103, O-106 Monsanto Co • W-352 Monty’s Plant Food Co • 269 Morton Buildings Inc • E-332, E-333 Mount Joy Farmers Co-op • 210 Mueller • 119 Multimin USA, JDJ Solutions, SyrVet/Prima-Tech • W-336, W-337, W-338 Muscle Products Corp • 412 Mycogen Seeds / Dow Agro Sciences • 213, 214 Nachurs Alpine Solutions • 244, 245 Nasco • E-345 NASF / Dr. Register • W-304, W-305 National Dairy Producers Organization, Inc • 707 National Farmers Org - NFO • 534 National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) • 241D National Penn Bank • 227A Nextire, Inc • E-380, E-381 New Holland Agriculture • 108, 109 North Brook Farms, Inc • 239 Northeast Agri Systems, Inc • 122 Northeast Feed • 214A Northeast Stihl • 511, 512 Nuform Building Technologies Inc • F NYCAMH • 241C O.A. Newton • W-302, W-303 Old Mill Troy • 417, 418 Organic Valley - CROPP Cooperative • 415 Outback Heating, Inc • W-318, W-319 Oxbo International • 104 P. L. Rohrer & Bro. Inc • 535 PA Farm Bureau • L-209, L-210, L-211, L-212 PA Farmers Union • 715 PA Office of Rural Health - Penn State University • 241B PACMA Inc • L-304, L-305 Patterson Farms Maple Products • 240 Patz Corporation • 131 PBZ LLC - Crop Care/Zimmerman Cattle Control • 113, 115 PDM Insurance Agency, Inc • E-326 Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-310 Penn Diesel Service Co • E-329, E-330 Penn Jersey Products, Inc • E-374 Penn State Agricultural Safety & Health • 241E Pennsylvania Certified Organic • 414 Pennsylvania Grain Processing, LLC • 536 Pennsylvania Service & Supply, Inc • 425 Perma-Column East, LLC • 438, 439 Petersheims Cow Mattress LLC • 137 Pik Rite, Inc • D PNC Bank • 277 PortaCheck Inc • E-335 Power Ag • 222A, 222B Power Systems Electric, Inc • E-382, E-383 Precise Concrete Walls, Inc • 256 Priority One • 432 Provita Animal Health • 205 Quality Craft Tools • H-301 Quality Seeds Limited • W-327 R&J Dairy Consulting • 402 Rain and Hail LLC • H-304 RCM International LLC • L-203 Red Barn Consulting, Inc • 207 Red Dale Ag Service, Inc • 400 Redmond Minerals • 261 Reed Equipment Sales • W-346 Reinecker Ag, LLC • 506, 507

Renaissance Nutrition, Inc • 290 Roto-Mix LLC • W-358 RSI Calf Systems • 267, 268 Ruhl Insurance • 407 Ryder Supply Company • E-372 S&I Pump Crete LLC • 278, 279 Salford Inc • W-350, W-350A Sanimax Marketing Ltd • 436 Schaeffer Mfg. Co. • L-201 Schulte Ind., Ltd • 541 Seed Consultants, Inc • W-341 Seedway, LLC • W-342, W-343 Select Sire Power, Inc • W-308 Show Ease Inc • 116 Shur-Co, LLC • E-307 SI Distributing Inc • 420, 421, 422, 423 Silo Stop • W-331 S.K. Construction, LLC • 533 Slaymaker Group • E-366 Smucker’s Meats • W-309A Snyder Equipment, Inc - Brite Span Buildings • 430 Sollenberger Silos, LLC • 140 Steiner • 508, 509 Steinway Eq • 500, 449 Stock and Leader, LLP • L-200 Stoltzfus Spreaders • 117 Stor-Loc • E-305, E-306 Straley Farm Supply • 221, 222 Stray Voltage Testing, LLC • E-325 SuKup Manufacturing • E-355 Sundance Vacations • 617 Sunova Worx, Inc • 539 Superior Attachments Inc • 288, 289 Superior Silo LLC • 118 Susquehanna Bank • 406 Susquehanna Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram • 525 Synagro • E-344 Syngenta • W-344, W-345 TA Seeds • W-315, W-316, W-317 Taurus Service, Inc • W-310 Team Ag, Inc • E-334 Tech Mix • 428 The Mill • 275, 276, 276A The Pennsylvania State University • 713, 714 TM Refrigeration LLC • 262, 263, O-103 Topstitch of New York • H-300 Triangle Communications, Inc • 241 Trioliet • E-353A Triple-M-Farms • 283 Trouble Free Lighting • P Twin Valley Farm Service / Dryhill • 505, 515, 449A Udder Comfort International Inc • 204 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - FSA • L-206 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NRCS • L-207 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NASS • L-208 Valmetal Inc • 136 Vermeer • 123 Vigortone Ag Products • 405 Vulcan Materials Company • 227 WA Johnson, Inc • L-302, L-303 Weaver Distributing • E-301, E-302, E-303, E-304 Weaver Insurance Agency • 249 Weaver’s Toasted Grains LLC • 408 Wenger Feeds • E-339 Wengers of Myerstown • W-351A Westfield Group • W-334 White Horse Construction, Inc • 215, 216 White Oak Mills, Inc • 434 Wood-Mizer, LLC • O-310A Zartman Farms Cow Comfort • 107 Zeiset Equipment, LLC • 447 Zimmerman Farm Service • 504 Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 516, 517, 449B

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Avoid 10- to 15-percent yield loss by harvesting at higher moisture levels and using high-efficiency dryers Successful harvest starts with optimal planting. In years like this when farmers have little control over planting, they can still ensure their crop’s yield potential is maximized by managing harvest moisture. An optimal planting date and weather dur-

ing the growing season are two major factors affecting a crop’s yield potential. But, harvest moisture also significantly affects actual yield- harvesting too late can have significant consequences. Gary Woodruff, grain conditioning technology

manager with GSI® says, “The drier corn gets, or the longer it is left in the field, the more susceptible it is to yield loss. When corn hits 15-percent moisture, as it does when harvested late, losses of 10 to 15 percent or more are common. With high-

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er crop prices, drying corn with today’s more efficient dryers costs around three percent of the crop’s value (at an average moisture removal of 10 points). When corn is harvested below 19-percent moisture, harvest losses due to dry grain shatter rise above the three percent, and this doesn’t include losses from lodging or storm damage. Due to late planting this season, preventive measures should be taken to avoid these losses.” How to avoid harvest-time losses Options for handling this problem have been dismal in the past, as drying $3 corn with less efficient dryers has been viewed as too expensive. Previously, only field losses exceeding 10 percent made drying costs worthwhile. With today’s higher corn value and lower costs of drying, field losses below 19 percent reduce net income. With advances in dryer

technology, the process has become more economical and easier. Today, the cost of drying is much less than the cost of field loss. “Starting harvest earlier and drying corn with propane will improve yields when seasonable variables are out of farmer’s hands; think of drying as a type of insurance,” say Mark Leitman, director, business development & marketing with the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC). “The efficiency of today’s dryers allows farmers to harvest without consuming excess fuel. The new technology relies on propane to distribute heat and dry more evenly, increasing quality and productivity while improving fuel efficiency.” Woodruff says the new technology is making a big difference for farmers. “We are seeing many of our customers increase their drying capacity to

harvest at higher moisture levels. The new, high-efficiency dryers improve their profitability and grain quality.” Benefits beyond crop management PERC has launched the Propane Farm Incentive Program available to GSI customers who purchase the new X-Stream model dryer. Farmers enrolled in the program receive $5,000 for tracking drying costs on the GSI dryer for one season and sharing the data with PERC. “This is a great way to reduce the cost of an energy efficient dryer,” adds Leitman. Planning during the summer how to handle higher harvest moisture can ease the stress and uncertainty this season brings. To learn about the PERC Propane Farm Incentive Program, visit www.agpropane.com. Find more information about GSI dryers at www.grainsystems.com.

Page 11 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Field drying may be a thing of the past, industry experts say


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 12

Power take-off safety Summarized by Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University A power take-off (PTO) shaft transfers mechanical power from a tractor to an implement. Some PTO-driven equipment is operated from the tractor seat, but many types of farm equipment, such as elevators, grain augers, silage blowers, and so on, are operated in a stationary position, enabling an operator to leave the tractor and move in the vicinity of the implement. A PTO shaft rotates at a speed of either 540 rpm (9 rotations per second) or 1,000 rpm (16.6 rotations per second). At these speeds, a person’s

limb can be pulled into and wrapped around a PTO stub or driveline shaft several times before the person, even a person with extremely fast reflexes, can react. The fast rotation speed, operator error, and lack of proper guarding make PTOs a persistent hazard on farms and ranches. Injuries that can be sustained from PTO incidents include severe contusion, cuts, spinal and neck injuries, dislocations, broken bones, and scalping. Some incidents can result in fatalities. PTO Hazards The main PTO hazards involve the PTO stub and driveline.

Power take-off. Source: Pennsylvania State University. Agricultural Safety and Health

PTO master shield. Source: Pennsylvania State University. Agricultural Safety and Health

PTO master shield and driveline shield. Source: University of Georgia. College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

PTO stub The tractor’s stub output shaft, referred to as a PTO stub, transfers power from the tractor through a drive shaft to the implement or PTOdriven machine. The PTO stub rotates at rate of 540 or 1,000 rpm, and most incidents involving the PTO stub are entanglement incidents.

Entanglement incidents can occur when the operator is unaware that the PTO clutch is engaged, when the operator does not understand the dangers of the spinning PTO stub, or when the operator deliberately works close to an unguarded stub shaft that is in motion. Clothing, such as a pant leg, shoelace, thread from a jacket, and so on, is easily caught by the spinning shaft. Once caught,

& Accessibility both the clothing and the wearer can quickly wrap around the stub shaft. PTO driveline A PTO driveline or implement input driveline (IID) is the part of the implement drive shaft that

connects to the tractor. When unguarded, the entire shaft of the driveline is considered a wrappoint hazard. Some drivelines have guards covering the straight part of the shaft, leaving the univer-

sal joints, PTO coupling, and the rear connector, or implement input connection (IIC), as wrap-point hazards. Clothing can catch on and wrap around the driveline.

Power A14


Page 13 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 14

Mechanical hazards: stored energy Summarized by Linda M. Fetzer, Pennsylvania State University Stored-energy hazards occur when confined energy is unintentionally released. A spring is a classic example of the release of stored energy: A

compressed spring expands with great force when released, and a stretched spring quickly contracts. Springs, hydraulics, and pneumatics move and control machines and implements that are part of agricul-

tural equipment. The sudden pressurization or depressurization of such stored-energy systems can result in incidents that cause serious injury or death.

scopic movement when the machine turns or is operated on uneven ground. If the IID is attached to a tractor by only the PTO stub, the tractor can pull apart the IID shaft. If this occurs and the PTO is engaged, the tractor shaft can swing wildly, striking anyone in range and possibly breaking a locking pin, allowing the shaft to become a projectile. This type of incident is not common, but it is more likely to occur with three-point hitched equipment that is not properly mounted or aligned. Safety recommendations The first line of defense to prevent a PTO entanglement incident is to make sure that your

tractor and machinery have the proper shields. PTO master shield The above photo shows a master shield that covers and extends over the tractor PTO stub on three sides. The master shield provides protection from the PTO stub and front joint of the drive shaft when the PTO stub is connected to the tractor. Before operating PTOpowered machinery, always make sure that the master shield for the tractor PTO stub and front joint is secured properly. Replace a damaged master shield immediately. Driveline shield A PTO driveline shield is constructed of plastic or metal and completely encloses the shaft. The bell-shaped ends cover

Mechanical A15

& Accessibility

Power from A12 When clothing is caught on the driveline, the tension on the clothing from the driveline pulls the person toward and around the shaft. When a person caught in the driveline instinctively tries to pull away from wrap hazard, he or she actually creates a tighter wrap. Driveline separation In addition to injuries caused by entanglement incidents with the PTO stub and driveline, injuries can occur when shafts separate while the tractor’s PTO is engaged. The IID shaft telescopes, meaning that one part of the shaft slides into another. The sliding sleeve on the shaft allows for easy hitching of PTO-powered machines to tractors and allows tele-

Visit the All-New Accessibility Center at Empire Farm Days

August 6-8, 2013 Rodman Lott & Son Farm, Seneca Falls, NY

Featuring: • Disabled Motivational Speaker and Accessibility Product Design Consultant Ed Bell • Assistive Technology Product Exhibits • Modified Wheelchair Demos • Farm Safety Demos • Farm Safety and Accessibility Webinars • Health Screenings • Occupational Therapy Consulting • Counseling Services • Financial Planning Assistance • Accessibility Support and Referral Services Be sure to stop by and see us next to the Health & Safety Center.

the universal joints on the shaft. The shield is mounted on bearings so that it rotates with the shaft but stops spinning when a person touches it. Check the driveline shield by spinning it to make sure that it rotates freely. If the shield is damaged or does not rotate independently, it does not provide protection and must be replaced. Additional safety precautions In addition to having the proper shields in place, taking the following precautions can reduce your risk of a PTO incident: • Never step over a rotating shaft. • Do not wear loose fitting clothing around PTO-driven equipment. • Tie back long hair or

secure it under a hat before operating equipment. • Ensure that safety decals, such as “Rotating Driveline: Contact can cause death,” are readily visible. Replace decals that are obscured or incomplete. • Always disengage the PTO and shut off the tractor before dismounting the tractor. • Never work on machinery or equipment while the engine is running or is energized. • Keep universal joints in phase. • Do not switch drivelines between machines. • To reduce driveline stress and separation, position the tractor’s drawbar appropriately for each piece of machinery. • Reduce PTO shaft abuse by avoiding tight

turns, reducing excessive telescoping, engaging power to the shaft gradually, and avoiding over -tightening the slip clutch on PTO-driven machines. • Examine the driveline for protruding pins or bolts and debris such as mud that has dried onto the driveline shield. Clothing snags easily on such protrusions, resulting in entanglement incidents. • As part of the preoperation inspection, if the driveline shield is equipped with a tether, ensure that the tether is attached and in good condition and that the driveline shield rotates freely on its bearings. Source: www.extension.org

Come Hear The Truly Inspiring Story of a Courageous Farmer Who Refused to Let His Disability Defeat Him. Whether you’re able-bodied or not, Ed Bell’s personal story of triumph over the challenges of a physical disability will inspire and motivate you. Ed will present his keynote speech, "Living and Learning, One Hat At A Time" at Empire Farm Days

August 7, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. In the all-new Country Folks Accessibility Center Located adjacent to the Health & Safety Center Rodman Lott & Son Farm, Seneca Falls, NY The Country Folks Accessibility Center will also feature: • Assistive Technology Exhibitors • AT Product Demonstrations • Farm Safety & Accessibility Demos • Health Screenings • Occupational Therapy • Accessibility Counseling & Referral Services

New this year, the Country Folks Accessibility Center focuses on the physical challenges faced by farmers with disabilities, and showcases the assistive technologies and resources available to help them maintain their quality of life and passion for farming.

Empire Farm Days will be held August 6-8, 2013 Rodman Lott & Son Farm 2973 State Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY 13148

For more information, call 877-697-7837 or visit www.empirefarmdays.com

For additional information, call 877-697-7837 or visit empirefarmdays.com


On June 27, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack made the following statement on the Senate passage of the Immigration Bill: “Today’s strong bipartisan vote in the U.S. Senate to fix America’s broken immigration system is good news for farmers and ranchers, good news for farm workers, and good news for rural America. The Senate plan would en-

sure the stable agricultural workforce that U.S. producers need in order to remain competitive with other nations and maintain our abundant, affordable food supply. For millions of farm workers who today live in the shadows, it will provide an appropriate opportunity to earn legal status by contributing to America’s agricultural economy. In addition to being

a strongly pro-agriculture bill, the Senate plan would grow the U.S. economy, strengthen the Social Security system and reduce our deficit. Following today’s strong bipartisan vote by the Senate, the House of Representatives must continue the momentum toward passage of comprehensive immigration reform as soon as possible.”

Potential injuries Injuries that can result from the unintentional release of stored energy include burns, contusions, abrasions, lacerations, injection injuries (as from hydraulic fluid), and crushing injuries. Amputation of a limb may be required if an injection injury is not immediately treated at a hospital. Safety precautions The list below outlines ways of reducing the risk of a stored-energy incident. • Identify machines that may have stored energy. • Before operating a machine that uses hydraulic or water pressure, examine the hoses and fittings for wear. • Pass a piece of cardboard or flat board along the hydraulic hoses to check for leaks. Do not use a hand to check for leaks. Gloves do not provide protection from hydraulic leaks under pressure. • Turn off the engine and relieve hydraulic pressure before disconnecting hydraulic hoses or completing repairs. • Lower hydraulic components to the ground before shutting off the engine and dismounting

the equipment. • Never walk under an implement or component supported by hydraulics or winches. • Regularly check winch cables for wear. • Before executing maintenance on hydraulic implements, put in place supports, jacks, stands, or blocks to prevent unintentional movement of the implements. • Know what direction a spring will move when released and how it might affect other machine parts, and stay out of the spring’s path. • Wait for free-wheeling parts such as flywheels, cutter heads, hammer mills, rotary mower blades, and fans to come to a complete stop before touching them. • This may take up to two and a half minutes. • Never try to stop a free-wheeling winch handle by catching it. • Never point a compressed-air nozzle or pressure-washer nozzle toward a person, including yourself. • Make sure others are well out of range of flying debris when using such equipment. Source: www.extension.org

Mechanical from A14 There are many examples of stored energy in agricultural equipment: • Compressed air • Pressure washers • Springs • Winches • Hydraulic, pneumatic, and electrical systems Compressed air and fluids are used for tire inflation and power washing and in hydraulic cylinders. Springs are used as shock absorbers and as a means of keeping belts tight. Winches and hydraulic systems are used to lift or change the position of implements.

The August Issue of Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market w ww.cfmanestream.com

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Alternative Therapies & Medicine Horse Farm & Stable Equipment This Issue will go to... Best of Gymkhana, Champlain Valley Fair, Essex Junction, VT, Empire Farm Days, Seneca Falls, NY • Ag Progress, University Park, PA

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Page 15 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Statement from Agriculture Secretary Vilsack on Senate Immigration Bill passage


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 16

No brainer? by Steve Suther You’ve heard it many times, maybe even said it: “Oh yeah, that’s a nobrainer.” But how can that be when that assessment and comment took conscious thought? I submit there are very few legitimate no-brainers except autonomous functions like breathing. Illegitimate ones, sure, as in “pulling a no-brainer.” Those are actions we look back on and realize in retrospect should have been given more thought. If we’re lucky, we learn without serious injury to health or pocketbook. Technology is a good thing, but you have to understand it with brain fully engaged. I have learned much about global positioning system (GPS) units since the days when mine kept telling me to “make a legal U-turn!” But it’s not automatic yet, and I keep re-learning to maintain human control. This month I let that slip with a no-brainer while trying to find a hotel in a big city, having turned that task over to GPS with a few clicks. Frowning once or twice at the instructions to turn there and then in

that direction, I still trusted it to get to “my destination,” where I was soon said to have arrived. Only then did I realize there was more than one location for that hotel chain in the city, and this was the wrong one. Entering the right address and once again relying on the GPS, I got to the hotel just a little later, and no harm done. Earlier this spring while assisting in artificial insemination (AI) on a set of heat-synchronized heifers, I discovered a potentially fatal error in my chuteside routine. There are several models of squeeze chutes, and this one is not mine but it relies on an angled tab sliding down a rod to keep the squeeze on until released by changing the angle with a release handle. Or, if a critical juncture is affected by moisture, it turned out. A soft rain was falling that morning, and I noticed what that could mean on the second heifer. It wasn’t the first, because on that one I had held a tail out of the way and perched in what seemed like a logical spot. It was almost a no brainer. After setting the

squeeze for the next one but before I could step up where I had been, the wet rod slipped and the squeeze released in a bang microsecond. Thankful it did not hold for a minute longer, I saw then that the chute action would have dealt a serious head injury had I been standing where I had been oblivious of risk. I felt lucky and stupid all at once, and of course found another way to help secure tails after catching the heifers. Let

that be a warning to carefully study the workings of every squeeze chute or other equipment before getting down to work. It’s risky to do or casually “decide” anything as a no-brainer, even when they seem obvious. Danger or opportunity could be just around the corner, only to be avoided or engaged by thinking. Is your business on course? Have you even set a destination, or are you just following a path of least resistance at the least

Producer News possible cost and hoping for the best day to day? Are you missing some real and present danger by assuming your first idea — or somebody else’s idea that you took on as a no-brainer — was the right idea? The power of an engaged mind can use technology or sometimes

just simple logic to produce cattle that are worth hundreds of dollars more per head than those from a herd on autopilot. Whether drought and debt are knocking at the door or prosperity reigns over your pastures, every decision will brighten or dim your prospects. Stay focused.

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JD 567 round baler

round baler, 4’x6’ bales, excellent condition

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JD 466

Arctic Cat 650TRV 4-wheeler

Kubota B6200 tractor, 4WD

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Various hay equipment, tractors, skid-loaders, and lawn/garden equipment - Call For Pricing


Trowbridge Family Affair Angus Sale Aug. 29 2013 has been a landmark year for Angus breeders in New York — a record NY Angus Female Sale, a record Trowbridge Bull Sale, and many highly successful individual animal sales from breeders throughout the state. At the same time, Angus breeders alike have been under leadership from their American Angus Association President, from New York, Phil Trowbridge. Trowbridge & his family own and operate Trowbridge Farms in Ghent,

NY. Raising registered Angus cattle & merchandising to various other family operations within the region and beyond. On Aug. 29, at 6 p.m. at their farm in Ghent, NY, the Trowbridge’s, along with 18 other family Angus operations from throughout the northeast will host their Annual Angus Female Sale “The Family Affair.” This year is extra special, as the sale will be held during the National Angus Tour, drawing Angus breeders from across the na-

tion. “This gives our customers and friends more opportunities to interact with many different types of Angus breeders, from every size,” said Trowbridge. The sale will include cow/calf pairs, bred heifers, show heifers, and the biggest selection of embryos ever offered in this sale. The sale books will be sent upon request, so everyone is urged to contact phil@trowbridgefarms.com or 518-3696584. The sale cattle video preview will be available online at www.Trow-

On Aug. 29, at 6 p.m. at their farm in Ghent, NY, the Trowbridge’s, along with 18 other family Angus operations from throughout the northeast will host their Annual Angus Female Sale “The Family Affair.”

bridgeFarms.com Sale participants this year include: Angus Hill Farm, At Ease Acres, Cheer-Up Farm, Clear Choice Angus, Dorado Angus, Indian Ladder Farm, Kelley Stock Farm, McCracken Vu Farm, Mud Creek Angus, NewParadigm Farm/Welytok Angus, O’Mara Angus,

Penn State University, Punsit Valley Farm, Shale Ridge Farm, Seebacher Farm, Tullyfergus, WBB Farm, and Work Land & Cattle Co. Join the Trowbridge’s and these great families on Aug. 29 at 6 p.m., as they continue a great Angus year in New York.

Trade show booths available at National Angus Conference

Visit These North Carolina/Virginia Dealers VIRGINIA BOONE TRACTOR Bedford, VA • 540-586-2134 Salem, VA • 540-387-4240 Lewisburg, WV • 304-645-1711 Danville, VA • 434-792-0515

VIRGINIA RIDGEVIEW NEW HOLLAND 12521 James Madison Rd., Orange, VA 22960

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Clover, VA 24534

434-735-8163

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GRAHAM TRACTOR CO 109 S. Marshall St., Graham, NC 27253

336-228-7790

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Vendors of all types are encouraged to join Angus cattle enthusiasts at this year’s National Angus Conference and Tour (NAC&T) in Albany, NY. The American Angus Association® is hosting “Angus Along the Hudson,” which includes a trade show Aug. 27-28 at the Albany Marriott. The trade show will be open during the welcome reception, conference and the evening meal following the conference. Booths available for purchase are located in a high-traffic area where participants can move between the conference and the rest of the hotel. The deadline to reserve a booth is Aug. 1. Vendors have the opportunity to purchase a single booth space or sponsorship. Each booth is $600 for a 10 foot by 10 foot space that includes a skirted table, two chairs and one registration fee. Internet access is available for an additional $25 per day. The three offered sponsorships consist of the following. • General Sponsorship $1,500: Includes one

trade show space, the opportunity to place a small promotional item in the welcome packets and one NAC&T registration. • Morning Break Sponsorship $3,000: Includes one trade show space, signage in the break area, the opportunity to place a small promotional item in the welcome packets and one NAC&T registration fee. • Reception Sponsorship $5,000: Includes one trade show space, signage in the welcome reception area, the opportunity to place a small promotional item in the welcome packets and one NAC&T registration fee. Trade show spaces will be assigned as applications are received. All booths should be in place prior to Tuesday’s 6 p.m. reception and should be dismantled by 8 p.m. Wednesday, following the conference. To reserve a booth or receive more trade show information, contact Carrie Horsley at actintern@angus.org or 816383-5100. For more information about the NAC&T, visit www.ANGUS.org.

Page 17 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Family partnerships continue tradition


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 18

THESE LIVESTOCK BUSINESSES ARE READY FOR YOUR MARKET NEEDS!!!

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New study results identify most promising opportunities Price, food safety and product quality are the most important demand drivers on which the beef industry should focus to have the most compelling effects on beef demand in the long term. Other key drivers include health, nutrition, social aspects and sustainability. So concludes “Beef Demand: Recent Determinants and Future Drivers,” a newly released study commissioned by the Beef Checkoff Pro-

gram to summarize the current knowledge of consumer demand for beef and identify the best opportunities for the industry to influence demand positively. “Consumer demand for beef is one of the most important and widely discussed, yet poorly understood, concepts affecting the beef and cattle industry,” the report notes. “It is imperative that the beef industry recognize what drives consumer demand, what

expectations are for the future, and assess the industry’s ability to adjust practices to target evolving consumer preferences or to influence important demand determinants.” Authors of the report include Dr. Ted Schroeder, professor of livestock marketing, and Dr. Glynn Tonsor, associate professor of livestock marketing, both at Kansas State University, in addition to Dr. James Mintert, assistant direc-

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tor of Extension for Agriculture and Natural Resources at Purdue University, who prepared the report at the request of the checkoff. “The information gathered and analyzed for this comprehensive report is almost invaluable to the beef industry, in general, and to the Beef Checkoff Program, in particular,” said cattleman Ted Greidanus, a member of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and chairman of the Joint Evaluation Committee that commissioned the research for the checkoff. “Not only does it have the ability to help more producers understand the true meaning of strong beef demand — which has the potential to improve their bottom lines — but it provides a detailed road map for checkoff leaders in identifying how to leverage every checkoff dollar to its most effective and

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meaningful degree possible,” Greidanus said. “Members of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and directors of the Federation of State Beef Councils will be asked to use the information in this report in making decisions about how to invest checkoff dollars in Fiscal Year 2014 and beyond.” Understanding beef demand While recognizing that understanding beef demand and how to affect it is a daunting task, the report’s authors note that it also is critical to the industry’s long-term viability. One very important point in developing strategies to grow beef demand will be clarification about the role of per capita consumption in beef demand. Per capita consumption is, in effect, per capita availability of beef, so it offers little information regarding beef demand when con-

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sidered independently of prices, the economists note. Demand, on the other hand, effectively refers to the quantity of beef that consumers will purchase at one given price, with all other factors held constant. (Chapter 5 of the report explains beef demand concepts in detail.) “While it is tempting to focus on market share, per capita consumption, or other product volume flows to monitor demand, this can be very misleading,” Dr. Tonsor said. “Demand can only be accurately measured by assessing the combination of price and quantity. Demand is a key component of economic signals (prices) sent throughout the entire supply chain.” Given the state of the cattle industry’s supply, that understanding of beef demand vs. consumption is particularly critical.

Demand A20

NORTH CAROLINA C&R IMPLEMENT 301 Jonesville Road Williamston, NC 252-792-1511

Page 19 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

How to grow beef demand


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 20

Flat Andy travels to Kansas City with NJAA Juniors Share photos, win prizes while heading to the National Junior Angus Show. It’s that time of year again! Flat Andy wants to join National Junior Angus Association (NJAA) members and their families as they travel to Kansas City, MO, for the 2013 National Junior Angus Show (NJAS). NJAA members are encouraged to document their road trip by taking pictures of Flat Andy and

sharing them with the American Angus Association®’s social media accounts. Members who send in photos will be entered to win the following prizes. Third place will take home Angus clothing, second place will receive a $20 Amazon gift card, and one first place winner will receive a Kindle Fire.

Pictures of Flat Andy will be posted on the NJAA Facebook Page, as well as used in other NJAS publicity. To enter your photos with us: • Email Laurin Spraberry, the Association public relations intern, at printern@angus.org. • Text them to 816261-6398

• Tweet them to @AngusAssoc using #FlatAndy and #NJAS13. Be sure to include your name and where the photo was taken. Download a copy of Flat Andy today to print, cut out and decorate. An official, life-size Flat Andy will also be available for photos at the NJAS. For more news and in-

formation from the 2013 NJAS, visit www.ANGUS.org to find contest results, awards, scholarships and show photos. Backdrop and candid photos will be available for purchase online. Coverage will be available on the NJAA Facebook page, as well. Also, plan to tune in to a special NJAS episode

of The Angus Report at 7:30 a.m. (central) Monday, July 22 on RFD-TV.

projections include falling per capita beef consumption in the U.S. until 2015, at which time increases are projected following cow-herd expansion. If per capita consumption falls as expected, demand could still continue upward if consumers continue to be willing to pay higher prices for beef. (Chapter 6 of the report provides a related summary of the macroeconomic environment in which the beef industry operates.) What is important to consumers? The research identifies seven broad attributes

as particularly consequential demand factors that the beef industry, through the Beef Checkoff Program, likely could influence. These became the central focus of the determinant study: beef price; food safety; product quality; health; nutrition; social aspects; and sustainability. Price, food safety, and product quality rose to the top of all other attributes — both for ground beef and steak. Because the checkoff cannot control price, the researchers identified food safety and product quality the two key attributes

that the checkoff can and should influence. “There are a multitude of things, in addition to demand strength, that influence beef prices,” said Dr. Mintert, “including things that affect cattle and beef supplies — such as feed costs, land costs, energy prices, new technologies, beef packaging and processing costs, and interest rates — all of which are beyond the control of individual producers or the beef industry as a whole.” With that in mind, the research gathered and ranked issues affecting beef purchases, both ac-

cording to consumer responses and industry researcher responses, and found general agreement between the two. Food safety, product quality and form, and price were the three highest-ranking factors in both consumer and expert assessments, whereas social aspects and sustainability were ranked lowest, with nutrition and health ranked between the two. (Chapter 3 of the report summarizes consumer input about beef purchases.) Consumers indicated similar rankings for ground-beef and steak

purchasing decisions. On average, safety, freshness, taste and health were most often selected as “most important” factors, while convenience, origin/traceability, and environmental impact were most frequently identified as “least important” factors in their beef-buying process. “Beef Demand: Recent Determinants and Future Drivers” is available on the MyBeefCheckoff.com website, under the “Evaluation” link on the left side of the page, or directly at Demand Determinants 2013.

Demand from A19 “As the industry is entering a period of declining per capita supplies (and hence consumption), these clarifications are important,” the report notes. “It is entirely possible for per capita consumption to decline and beef demand to increase. In fact, this is what the industry experienced the past two years. That is, per capita beef consumption fell in 2011 and 2012 relative to prior -year volumes … (while) beef demand increased.” Looking forward to the next three years, USDA

Bill Bowen and son Sam, beef producers from Wytheville, VA have owned their NDE 1652 Vertical mixer about 9 years. They use their NDE every day over a 6 1/2 month period each year. They grind 2 or 3 wet bales along with corn silage to feed 100 cows, 60 heifers and 11 bulls each day. They are particularly pleased with how well the wet round bales grind into their ration. Over this period of time they have experienced very little wear or damage to the original knives. Aside from Accidentally dropping a bale that damaged a knife (not a good idea!) it has been trouble free. Basically its just a maintenance free, regular lubrication deal, states Sam. The Bowers offered a couple of suggestions. One: if you have a substantial number of cattle and particularly if you have high moisture hay you can grind, it’s hard to beat the uniform mixture you get. Two: one key to longevity of the mixer is to keep it in the dry and also pressure wash it after the feeding season or periodically if you are using it year round. They also complemented their NDE representative, Dennis Trissel, with excellent service and his base of knowledge. Given the years and volume of feed that has gone through their NDE, the Bowens are well pleased with their investment.

Bill & Sam Bowen

Henke 2300 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Triolet 1200 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . . .$15,900 Knight 2450 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,200 Knight 5042 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . . .$16,500 Knight 5042 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . . .$14,900 E. Rissler 285 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . .$5,500

Kuhn 3300 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 Roto-Mix 354 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . .$10,500 Agrimetal 5500 Bale Processor . . . . .$10,750 LuckNow 285 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . . . .$5,850 LuckNow 2150 Feed Mixer . . . . . . . . .$6,900

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Page 21 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 22

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!

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AG PROGRESS DAYS Jan. 7-8-9

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AUGUST 13, 14, 15 2013 2014 Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4, Thurs. 9-3

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9 Miles SW of State College, PA

DONT MISS THESE EXHIBITORS!! ABC York • W-320, W-321 ABM • E-363 ABS Global • W-309 ACR Metal Roofing & Siding Dist • 128 Adams Supply • E-346 ADM - Crop Risk Serivces • 212 AET Consulting, Inc • 260 Ag Com Inc & Miller Chemical • E-359, E-360 Ag Essentials • 258, 259 Ag-One Associates • 236, 237, 238 AgChoice Farm Credit • 234 Agpoint Construction Services • 426, 427 Agri Analysis Inc • 437 Agri-Basics, Inc • 242, 243 Agri-Dynamics, Inc • 413 Agri-King, Inc • 126 Agri-Nutrition Consulting, Inc • L-300 Agri-Plastics Mfg • W-357 Agri-SC • 209 Agri-Service, LLC • O-104 Agri-Trac US • W-330 Agromatic Inc • 219, 220 AIC Dairy Technologies • 532 Albers Dairy Equipment • W-300, W-301 Alltech, Inc • 217, 218 American Farm Products • 531 Anderson Group • W-348B Animal Medic • E-373 Appleby Systems, Inc • 537 Art Farm USA • 247, 248 Atlantic Power Solutions Inc • W-335, W-336 Atlantic Tractor • W-353 Augusta Seed • 538 Automatic Farm Systems • 121 AutoVent LLC • 241A B&R Distributing, Inc • S Baker Ag Lime • 208 Balsbaugh Insurance Agency, Inc • E-348 Beco Equipment • 721, 722 Beiler-Campbell Realtors & Auctioneers • L-306 Beka Max of America • 527 Bergman Mfg Inc • 274 Bernard C. Morrissey Insurance • 424 Binkley & Hurst Lp • E-352 BioFertile LLC • 435 Bio-Vet, Inc • W-313 Bobcat of York Sales & Rental • E-379 BouMatic • 120 Brecknock Builders, LLC • 518, 519 Bush Hog Inc • E-353 Business Lease Consulting, Inc • W-325 CBM Lighting • L-212, L-213 Cargill Feed & Nutrition • E-315 Cedar Crest Equipment • 130 Cen-Pe-Co • W-351 Channel Bio, LLC • 232, 233 Chemgro Seed • W-323, W-324 CK Replacement Stalls • 443 Class of America • 102 Clean Cutter Flail & Tiller Blade Co • 419 Cobra Torches • 526 Conewango Products Corp. • 223, 224 Conklin Company • 529, 530 CowKühlerZ • 270 Crop Production Services • 200, 201, 202, 203 CRV • 211 Cummings & Bricker Inc • E-354 Custer Products Limited • J, K, L Dairy Marketing Services, Diary Cooperative Inc, Dairy Farmers of America, Dairy One Cooperative • E-340, E-341, E-342, E-343 Dairymaster USA, Inc • E-367 Deer Country • W-353 Delaval, Inc • 227B, 228, 229, 230, 231, 229A Dick Meyer Co., Inc • 284 Diller Ag Equipment • O-312 Doeblers • W-339, W-340 Donegal Insurance Group • 401 DTN / The Progressive Farmer • W-311 DuPont - Pioneer • E-349, E-350, E-351 Dyna Products • O-307 Dyna Tech Power • 250, 250A

E&F Ag Systems, LLC • E-311 EasyFix Rubber Products of North America • 528 Eli Fisher Construction • 441 EM Herr Equipment, Inc • 446 Emm Sales & Service, Inc • E-369, E-370 Equipment Service • 442 Esch Mfg • E-375 Everett Cash Mutual Insurance Group • E-314 Evergreen Fence Inc • 433 Express Flighting Supply • Q Farm and Land Realty Inc • L-301 Farm-Land Bale Wrappers LLC • W-356 Farmco Mfg • O-308 Farmer Boy Ag • 125 Feedmobile, Inc • E-368 Fight Bac / Deep Valley Farm Inc • E-313 Finch Services • W-353 Fisher & Thompson, Inc • 110 F.M. Brown’s Sons, Inc • 409, 410 For-Most Livestock Equipment - Garber Farms • 451 Franklin Builders • 225, 226 Fulton Bank • 206 Garber Metrology • W-338A GEA Farm Technologies, Inc • 104A Genex Cooperative, Inc • W-312 Glatfelter Pulp Wood Co • 711 Goodville Mutual Casualty Co • E-316, E-317 Great Plains Mfg., Inc • W-348A Gro-Mor Plant Food Inc • 127 Growers Mineral Solutions • 246 Growmark FS, LLC • E-321, E-322 H&S Manufacting Co. Inc • W-354, O-304 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 445 HARDI North America Inc • E-371 Hershey Ag • E-300 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 444 Hill Top Tire • 220A Hillside Ag Construction, LLC • W-337, W-338 Hoard’s Dairyman • L-208A Homestead Nutrition, Inc • 285, 286, 287 Hoober, Inc • E-377, O-314 Hoof Trimmers Association • W-314 Horizon Organic • W-329 Horning Mfg, LLC • 501 Hubner Seed • H-302, H-303 Hunter Insurance Associates • 411 IBA, Inc • E-327, E-328 Independent Ag Equipment (formerly GVM) • 114 Iva Manufacturing • E-318, E-319, E-320, E-320A J&J Silo Co., LLC • 291, 292 J.L. Gossert & Co. Forestry • E-347 J.S. Woodhouse Co., Inc • 440 Jamesway Farm Equipment • 135 Jaylor Fabricating • W-349 Kauffman’s Animal Health, Inc • E-331 Kel-Krop Enterprises LLC • W-306, W-307 Kent Nutrition Group • L-216 Keystone Concrete Products • 271, 272, 273 Keystone Group Ag Seeds • E-361, E-362 King Construction • 254, 255 King’s AgriSeeds, Inc • 403, 404 Kirby Agri Inc • w-326 Kubota Tractor Corp • 126A Kuhn North America, Inc • 100 Kuhns Mfg LLC • 448 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • E-376 Lancaster Ag Products • 612 Lancaster Dairy Farm Automation • 542, 543 Lancaster DHIA • W-332, E-333 Lancaster Farming • L-202 Lancaster Parts & Equipment • E-378 Lanco Manufacturing • W-347 Lanco/Pennland • 429 Land O’Lakes, Inc • H-306 Lauren Agri Systems • W-322 Lawn Care Distributors, Inc • 124 Lely USA, Inc • 111 Lester Building Systems LLC • E Lincoln Highway Cattle Eq • O-310C LR Gehm, LLC / CoPulsation • 416 Magic Massage Therapy • 716 Mahindra USA Inc • A, B

Mark Hershey Farms, Inc • 431 Martin Limestone Inc • 257 Martin Water Conditioning • 710 Martin’s Welding • W-335, W-336 Maryland Virginia Milk • E-323, E-324 McFarlane Manufacturing Co., Inc • U McLanahan Corporation • E-312 Mensch Manufacturing LLC • R, O-202 Messick Farm Equipment • 105, 106 Meyer Manufacturing Corporation • W-346A M.H. Eby Inc • W-355, O-317 Mid-Atlantic Dairy Assoc/PA Dairy Promotion Program • 235 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • E-364, E-365 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • CV Co-operative • 138 Miller Diesel Inc • E-308 Miraco • 129 MM Weaver • 103, O-106 Monsanto Co • W-352 Monty’s Plant Food Co • 269 Morton Buildings Inc • E-332, E-333 Mount Joy Farmers Co-op • 210 Mueller • 119 Multimin USA, JDJ Solutions, SyrVet/Prima-Tech • W-336, W-337, W-338 Muscle Products Corp • 412 Mycogen Seeds / Dow Agro Sciences • 213, 214 Nachurs Alpine Solutions • 244, 245 Nasco • E-345 NASF / Dr. Register • W-304, W-305 National Dairy Producers Organization, Inc • 707 National Farmers Org - NFO • 534 National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) • 241D National Penn Bank • 227A Nextire, Inc • E-380, E-381 New Holland Agriculture • 108, 109 North Brook Farms, Inc • 239 Northeast Agri Systems, Inc • 122 Northeast Feed • 214A Northeast Stihl • 511, 512 Nuform Building Technologies Inc • F NYCAMH • 241C O.A. Newton • W-302, W-303 Old Mill Troy • 417, 418 Organic Valley - CROPP Cooperative • 415 Outback Heating, Inc • W-318, W-319 Oxbo International • 104 P. L. Rohrer & Bro. Inc • 535 PA Farm Bureau • L-209, L-210, L-211, L-212 PA Farmers Union • 715 PA Office of Rural Health - Penn State University • 241B PACMA Inc • L-304, L-305 Patterson Farms Maple Products • 240 Patz Corporation • 131 PBZ LLC - Crop Care/Zimmerman Cattle Control • 113, 115 PDM Insurance Agency, Inc • E-326 Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-310 Penn Diesel Service Co • E-329, E-330 Penn Jersey Products, Inc • E-374 Penn State Agricultural Safety & Health • 241E Pennsylvania Certified Organic • 414 Pennsylvania Grain Processing, LLC • 536 Pennsylvania Service & Supply, Inc • 425 Perma-Column East, LLC • 438, 439 Petersheims Cow Mattress LLC • 137 Pik Rite, Inc • D PNC Bank • 277 PortaCheck Inc • E-335 Power Ag • 222A, 222B Power Systems Electric, Inc • E-382, E-383 Precise Concrete Walls, Inc • 256 Priority One • 432 Provita Animal Health • 205 Quality Craft Tools • H-301 Quality Seeds Limited • W-327 R&J Dairy Consulting • 402 Rain and Hail LLC • H-304 RCM International LLC • L-203 Red Barn Consulting, Inc • 207 Red Dale Ag Service, Inc • 400 Redmond Minerals • 261 Reed Equipment Sales • W-346 Reinecker Ag, LLC • 506, 507

Renaissance Nutrition, Inc • 290 Roto-Mix LLC • W-358 RSI Calf Systems • 267, 268 Ruhl Insurance • 407 Ryder Supply Company • E-372 S&I Pump Crete LLC • 278, 279 Salford Inc • W-350, W-350A Sanimax Marketing Ltd • 436 Schaeffer Mfg. Co. • L-201 Schulte Ind., Ltd • 541 Seed Consultants, Inc • W-341 Seedway, LLC • W-342, W-343 Select Sire Power, Inc • W-308 Show Ease Inc • 116 Shur-Co, LLC • E-307 SI Distributing Inc • 420, 421, 422, 423 Silo Stop • W-331 S.K. Construction, LLC • 533 Slaymaker Group • E-366 Smucker’s Meats • W-309A Snyder Equipment, Inc - Brite Span Buildings • 430 Sollenberger Silos, LLC • 140 Steiner • 508, 509 Steinway Eq • 500, 449 Stock and Leader, LLP • L-200 Stoltzfus Spreaders • 117 Stor-Loc • E-305, E-306 Straley Farm Supply • 221, 222 Stray Voltage Testing, LLC • E-325 SuKup Manufacturing • E-355 Sundance Vacations • 617 Sunova Worx, Inc • 539 Superior Attachments Inc • 288, 289 Superior Silo LLC • 118 Susquehanna Bank • 406 Susquehanna Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram • 525 Synagro • E-344 Syngenta • W-344, W-345 TA Seeds • W-315, W-316, W-317 Taurus Service, Inc • W-310 Team Ag, Inc • E-334 Tech Mix • 428 The Mill • 275, 276, 276A The Pennsylvania State University • 713, 714 TM Refrigeration LLC • 262, 263, O-103 Topstitch of New York • H-300 Triangle Communications, Inc • 241 Trioliet • E-353A Triple-M-Farms • 283 Trouble Free Lighting • P Twin Valley Farm Service / Dryhill • 505, 515, 449A Udder Comfort International Inc • 204 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - FSA • L-206 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NRCS • L-207 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NASS • L-208 Valmetal Inc • 136 Vermeer • 123 Vigortone Ag Products • 405 Vulcan Materials Company • 227 WA Johnson, Inc • L-302, L-303 Weaver Distributing • E-301, E-302, E-303, E-304 Weaver Insurance Agency • 249 Weaver’s Toasted Grains LLC • 408 Wenger Feeds • E-339 Wengers of Myerstown • W-351A Westfield Group • W-334 White Horse Construction, Inc • 215, 216 White Oak Mills, Inc • 434 Wood-Mizer, LLC • O-310A Zartman Farms Cow Comfort • 107 Zeiset Equipment, LLC • 447 Zimmerman Farm Service • 504 Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 516, 517, 449B

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Page 23 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

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July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section A - Page 24


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Section B or 24 percent above May 2012. American type cheese, at 717.9 million pounds, was up 3 percent from April and 10 percent above a year ago. Total cheese stocks stood at 1.16 billion pounds, 3 percent more than the April inventory and 8 percent above a year ago. FC Stone dairy economist Bill Brooks, said in

the June 24 eDairy Insider Opening Bell that "The production and (milk) supply reports show trends of the past couple of months are continuing. We have a decent amount of milk production, but it's not burdensome," though "A combination of weather and economics has driven demand to a point

Mielke B2

Page 1 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Country y Folks


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 2

Mielke from B1 where it's not keeping up with growth in production." He adds that "The arrival of warm weather probably boosted demand, but not enough to recoup demand lost during March and April. Jerry Dryer warned in his June 21 Dairy and Food Market Analyst that "Naysayers" told him the cheese market was about to break lower. Buyers are waiting for the $1.60s, the mid $1.60s, according to a broker source. But, Dryer asks; "Where are the international buyers?" He points out that the Oceania price is pegged at more than two bucks a pound; European price quotas are as high or higher. He adds that, "If the cheese prices break below $1.70, I don't expect them to stay for very long. However, the new Cold Storage report certainly challenges my position." He pointed out that April butter and American cheese inventories were already at record highs. Cheese prices plunged the last week of June. The blocks closed Friday at $1.6375 per pound, down 8 3/4-cents on the week and a penny and a quarter below a year ago. Barrel closed at $1.5875, down 12 cents on the week and 7 3/4-cents below a year ago. Eleven cars of block traded hands on the week and eight of barrel. The AMS-surveyed U.S. average block price lost another half-cent, slipping to $1.7502. Barrel averaged $1.7963, up 2 1/2-cents. Cheese production continues at a steady pace with plants trying to maximize schedules, according to the USDA's Dairy Market News (DMN). Domestic sales are steady with some increased interest from export markets. Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) has helped to accelerate export sales this year, says DMN. CWT announced this week that it accepted another 10 requests for export assistance to sell 3.439 million pounds of cheese to customers in Asia, the Middle East and North Africa.

Cash butter saw a third week of decline, closing the last Friday of June at $1.4275, down 7 1/4-cents on the week and a dime below a year ago. Two cars were sold. The AMS surveyed butter price averaged $1.5501, down 1.9 cents. Increased butter

in cold storage is weighing on the market, according to DMN. FC Stone dairy broker Dave Kurzawski stated in the June 27 Insider Opening Bell that "trade reports indicate ice cream sales in June were off 3-5 percent. "That's a big chunk of product

that's not moving at the margin," he said. The only good news in the cash market was that Grade A and Extra Grade nonfat dry milk remained at $1.73 and $1.70 respectively. AMS powder averaged $1.6878, up 0.7 cent, and dry whey averaged 58.64 cents, up 1.3 cents.

Availability of spot loads of milk in the Midwest was uneven the week of June 17, according to USDA's weekly update. Some cheese manufacturers indicate their internal milk supplies are declining seasonally and access to additional supplies would be help-

ful to meet near term orders. A few manufacturers with nonfat dry milk and cheese production capabilities are sending additional loads of milk to powder operations as that market appears to be gaining near term strength.

Mielke B3


The goal of a heifer nutrition program is to allow each calf the opportunity to maximize nutrient intake of protein and energy in the appropriate ratio in order to optimize its growth rate, health and future productivity, without over-conditioning. A good nutrition program accompanied by timely management practices is critical to the success of reaching that goal. After all, these are the tools that enable a calf to reach its genetic potential and enter the milking herd at the proper size and maturity to reach peak lactation performance. However, seasonal

challenges like heat stress can quickly derail nutrition programs if dairies don’t take timely steps to keep programs on track. Heat stress struggles For example, as with adult animals during periods of heat stress, calf feed intake drops and maintenance energy needed for the calf to help cool itself is estimated to increase by 20 to 30 percent. Heat stress puts calves in a catch-22 situation. Calves are uncomfortable due to the high temperatures and that causes a reduction in feed intake, according to experts

at Alabama A&M University. At the same time, calves’ bodies require more maintenance to cool them off — which often results in a decrease in average daily gain. Calves sometimes experience compensatory growth that allows them to “catch up,” but if they are neglected during critical times — such as during heat stress — they may not experience this growth spurt. The reduced growth rates can haunt you later in your calves’ lives by increasing time to puberty, delaying breeding and increasing calving age. In addition, although

calves may experience compensatory gain at a later age, their body composition will differ from calves with normal growth patterns. The calves that did not gain weight properly will be smaller in stature with a higher percentage of body fat. Higher growth rates the first 50 days of life set the stage for better feed efficiency and production while lowering the risk of adverse health events. Management solutions Use the following tips to help minimize heat stress effects to calves and keep your nutrition program — and heifer growth — on

target this summer: • Increase water availability to prevent dehydration and perhaps increase starter intake. Use solid dividers between buckets to prevent water from being slopped into the bucket containing the starter ration. Replace soiled water frequently and provide fresh grain daily. • Make housing adjustments and other changes that lower the ambient temperature to help prevent elevated calf temperatures. If housed outdoors, calves should be able to move out of the elements and away from drafts.

• Perform stressful activities (such as moving, handling or vaccinating) early in the morning. • Provide shade to hutches — add supplemental shading if needed. • Promote good airflow in and around hutches. In enclosed facilities, if natural cross-ventilation is not possible, then a total air exchange every two minutes through a mechanized system is a must. • Control flies. Implement practices to breakup fly life cycles. Source: Dairy Calf & Heifer Association Tip of the Week, June 20

$19.82, up from $17.79 a year ago and 3 cents shy of the average in 2011. The southern average now stands at $20.09, up from $18.06 a year ago and also 3 cents shy of the average in 2011. California Ag Secretary Karen Ross announced the temporary milk pricing formula adjustments on June 21, resulting in an estimated 12.5 cent per cwt. increase in the milk price paid to the state's dairy producers for July 1 through December 31, 2013. Formula adjustments for the period FebruaryMay 2013 had boosted the state's milk price by about 25 cents per cwt., but expired at the end of May. DairyBusiness Update (DBU) reported that, effective July 1, the Class 1 milk fat price was increased 3 cents per pound; the Class 1 milk solids-not-fat price was raised by 23 cents per pound; and the Class 1 milk fluid carrier price by 0.01 cents per pound, for a total impact of about 3 cents per cwt. to the Class 1 price. The mandate increases the Class 2 and 3 milk fat and milk solids-not-fat price by 41 cents per pound., with the impact of boosting the Class 2/3 prices by about 5 cents per cwt., according to DBU. The Class 4a and 4b milk fat and milk solidsnot-fat price is raised by 1.23 cents per pound, with the impact of boosting the Class 4a/4b prices by about 15 cents per cwt. On average, these adjustments will in-

crease the monthly pool prices about 12.5 cents per cwt. for the period of July 1-December 31, 2013, according to DBU. Looking "back to the futures;" second half Federal order 2013 Class III contracts portended an $18.48 per hundredweight average on June 14. That figure slipped to $18.34 on June 21 and was hovering around $17.86 late morning June 28. The University of Wisconsin's Dr. Brian Gould forecast a May MILC payment of 69.79 cents per cwt. and he expects no further MILC payments for the foreseeable future regardless of the Farm Bill situation. Speaking of the Farm Bill; DBU reported that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said the Senate will not pass another temporary Farm Bill extension and urged House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) to instead to pick up the Senate version and bring it up in the House. The Dairy Business Association and the Wisconsin Farm Bureau Federation praised passage of the GoodlatteScott amendment and stated in a press release that they "applaud the House of Representatives for adopting, on a vote of 291-135, to modernize the dairy safety net program without interfering with milk production or the dairy market by providing a dairy margin insurance program without supply management." "Even though the final vote on the passage

of the farm bill failed, the overwhelming support of the Goodlatte/Scott amendment will send a strong message in the future that farmers do not want the government controlling their milk production." But, Three Purdue University agricultural economists believe that another extension of 2008 Farm Bill is a distinct possibility, according to DBU. Chris Hurt, Otto Doering and Roman Keeney question whether Republican House leadership will allow debate on the contents of the farm bill again anytime soon. With the one-year extension set to expire September 30, farmers could see another extension of the five-year agricultural spending plan, DBU reported. Meanwhile, the Senate on Thursday by a 68 to 32 vote, approved an immigration reform measure that National Milk (NMPF) says "will help dairy farmers with their current and future workforce needs, and provide the entire agriculture sector with much-needed economic certainty." An NMPF press release stated that the bill "strengthens the border security apparatus to discourage the flow of illegal immigrants to the U.S. From the standpoint of farm employers, it creates an entirely new visa category for their workers, both current employees, and prospective new employers. This new visa system will be administered through the U.S. Department of

Agriculture, making it easier for farmers and ranchers to access and use. It will also assure a future flow of new workers, so that as the economy evolves and jobs shift between sectors, farmers will have the means to recruit and hire new dairy workers." Five separate lawsuits involving dairies in the Pacific Northwest may have a warning for all U.S. dairy producers. DBU editor Dave Natzke had details in Friday's DairyLine, reporting that U.S. District Judge Thomas Rice, in the Eastern District Court of Washington, denied motions to dismiss environmental lawsuits against several Yakima Valley, Washington dairy producers, allowing the lawsuits to proceed to trial. The judge's ruling covers lawsuits filed In February by two environmental advocacy organizations. The lawsuits were filed against five Yakima Valley dairies, alleging they violated the federal Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Since the lawsuits were filed in February, those dairies have signed agreements with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address manure management issues. No trial date has been set and the Washington State Dairy Federation says the lawsuits seek to have routine manure management activi-

ties at dairies classified as solid waste dumps and, if successful, they could set legal precedent affecting livestock farms throughout the U.S. USDA announced new rules affecting foods sold in schools this week. National Milk says the rules will "ensure that nutrient-rich dairy products will continue to be offered to the nation's students in a variety of forms and settings." The "Smart Snacks in Schools" nutrition standards, affecting the calorie, fat, sodium and sugar content of foods that are offered apart from the school lunch line, according to NMPF. These "competitive" foods may be offered in vending machines or other a la carte settings. The snack regulations are similar to overall nutritional rules applied last year to school lunches and breakfasts by the adoption of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. The International Dairy Foods Association also commended USDA for "highlighting the importance of dairy in children's diets and taking the necessary steps to help kids meet the dietary recommendations for milk and dairy products." And, in an effort to revitalize and build awareness of the dairy industry's iconic REAL(r) Seal, NMPF introduced a cartoon character modeled after the logo. A contest is being held to name the character. Details are posted at www.realseal.com . All entries must be received by August 31, 2013.

Mielke from B2 April milk production in New Zealand was down was 34.5 percent from April 2012, according to DMN. The June April output, at 18.9 million tons, is running 0.2 percent lower than the previous season. Australian production is expected to continue at the light side of normal with projections being eased lowered. USDA's latest Ag Prices report showed increased feed prices in June while the all-milk price was steady. The June milk-feed price ratio, at 1.53, was unchanged from May and up from 1.38 in June 2012. The U.S. average all-milk price was $19.70 per hundredweight (cwt.), unchanged from May but up $3.40 from a year ago. Corn, at $7.02 per bushel, was up 3 cents from May and up 65 cents from a year ago. Soybeans averaged $15.10 per bushel, up 20 cents from May and $1.20 more than June 2012. Alfalfa hay averaged $220 per ton, down $1 from May, but $19 more than a year ago. California's July Class I milk price was announced by the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) at $19.59 per cwt. for the north and $19.86 for the south, down $1.25 and $1.26 respectively from June but both are $1.99 above July 2012. The prices include another temporary increase mandated by CDFA as a result of a May 21 hearing. The northern 2013 average now stands at

Page 3 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Cool calves and heifers to maximize nutrition effectiveness


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 4

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A farmer, a local lawn and garden supply store, and a department store chain were fined recently for pesticide disposal violations. In each of these cases, the pesticide product itself was disposed of improperly. “Regulations on proper pesticide disposal govern the product and much more,” explains Fred Fishel, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy and Director, University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Pesticide Information Office. “They address excess or damaged product, unused spray mixture, rinsate from containers and application equipment, empty containers, leftover treated seed, contaminated clothing and personal protective equipment, material from cleanup of spills and leaks, and other pesticide residues. If anything contains or is contaminated with a pesticide, appropriate disposal is a must.” It is important to note that state and local laws regarding pesticide disposal may be stricter and more detailed than federal requirements on the pesticide label. Also, many disposal facilities can accept only certain types of waste. Here are a few important tips about pesticide disposal: Excess Product. Avoid having to dispose of excess product by purchasing only the amount needed. Excess pesticides can be given to another qualified user (if the product registration has not expired), taken to a qualified disposal site or collection location, or disposed of through a waste transporter. Special disposal programs may exist for products missing identifying labels. Unused spray or dip mixture. Whenever possible, eliminate or minimize excess spray or dip mixture by practicing careful measurement, calibration and application. Apply excess mixture to another labeled site or follow all disposal regulations. Rinsate. Rinse the pesticide container or

spray equipment over an impermeable surface and in a way that allows recovery of the rinsate. If the rinsate contains no debris, it can be used the same day as part (up to 5 percent) of the water (or other liquid) portion of the next spray mixture of that chemical. Rinsate can also be applied to the original site, provided registered rates are not exceeded and the application is consistent with label directions. If practical, take clean water to the treatment site to rinse equipment immediately after the application. Never pour excess product, unused spray/dip mixture or rinsate onto a roadway or into a sink, toilet, sewer, street drain, ditch or water body. Do not mix pesticides or load or rinse equipment near a wellhead. Pesticides may interfere with the operation of wastewater treatment systems, pollute waterways or harm nontarget organisms. Many municipal systems are not equipped to remove all pesticide residues. Empty containers. Rinse containers of liquid products thoroughly at the mixing site as soon as they are emptied using the triple rinse method or a pressure rinser. Puncture the top and bottom of disposable containers to prevent reuse. When disposable containers holding dry formulations are empty, open both ends to help remove any remaining pesticide. If containers are nonrefillable, high-density polyethylene, there are collection/recycling programs for agricultural and commercial applicators in most states. Contact the Ag Container Recycling Council for more information. Where there is no recycling program, deposit all empty containers in a licensed sanitary landfill. Do not reuse or stockpile empty disposable containers. If containers are refillable/returnable, follow all rinsing and collection instructions provided by the manufacturer, distributor or retailer. Leftover treated seed. The best way to

dispose of a small quantity of leftover seed that has been treated with a pesticide is to plant it in an uncropped area of the farm or garden. Use the normal seeding rate and depth and plant at the proper time of year. Do not put treated seed in your compost pile or leave it on the soil surface. Additional options exist for large quantities, but consult first with state and local authorities to make sure you are in compliance with appropriate regulations. Contaminated clothing. Discard clothing that has been drenched or heavily contaminated with concentrated product. Most of this clothing can be discarded as normal solid waste. However, if the pesticide is regulated as hazardous waste, the contaminated clothing may have to be disposed of as hazardous waste. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Discard PPE (or a PPE component) that has been damaged or designated as one-time use, or has expired or reached its use limit. Follow the most strict disposal directions, which may be state or local laws, the pesticide label or the PPE manufacturer’s instructions. Material from cleanup of spills or leaks. Absorbent material such as pet litter, sawdust, or soil should be used to absorb small liquid pesticide spills or leaks and any water/detergent mixture used to clean the spill area. The absorbent material and any soil contaminated in a spill must be placed in a suitable container for proper disposal and treated as pesticide waste. Sweep up dry spills and return the product to the container only if any contamination with soil, etc. will not impact use. Contact your state to determine notification and cleanup requirements that may be applicable to a larger spill or leak. C o n t a i n m e n t pad/sump residue. A containment pad/sump is a safety system designed to contain and recover rinsate, spills, leaks, etc.

Any solids left in the containment pad/sump should be dried and spread evenly over a large part of the field in accordance with label directions. If this is not possible, the solids should be taken to an approved waste disposal site. “Proper pesticide disposal depends upon state and local regulations, the pesticide(s) involved, the waste classification, the quantity of waste and the disposal facility,” says Fishel. “Ul-

timately, the only acceptable approach is to be diligent with pesticides from start to finish. Purchase and prepare only what you need, avoid contamination and spills, and discard the container and other pesticide wastes according to the instructions on the pesticide label and all other laws.” The Association of American Pesticide Control Officials (AAPCO) provides contact information for state offices

that regulate pesticides. Check with your local solid waste management authority, environmental agency or health department to find out whether your community has a household hazardous waste collection program. Some resources on pesticide disposal: • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), www.epa.gov • Pesticide Environmental Stewardship (PES), www.pesticidestewardship.org

Better together! Fundraising partnership builds service reach CENTRE HALL, PA — This year’s 2nd Annual Pennsylvania Organic FarmFest on Aug. 2 and 3 at the Centre County Grange Fairgrounds brings with it a fantastic opportunity for financially supporting two of Pennsylvania’s greatest agricultural organizations. Pennsylvania Farmers Union (PFU) will be coordinating the event’s auction activities with Pennsylvania Certified Organic (PCO) in an effort to support the strengthening and outreach of each organization’s services. Hosted by PCO, FarmFest offers a number of opportunities for businesses and organizations to connect with a broad and diverse audience in its Exhibit Hall, Organic Classroom, Homemade & Homegrown Market, Organic Kidspace and more. FarmFest is a fun and free community-building event that fosters knowledge of organic agriculture and sustainable liv-

ing through educational opportunities, local foods, lively entertainment and interactive activities. Attended by thousands of regional farmers, backyard gardeners, and families, FarmFest includes both a silent auction and raffle sure to please everyone! The manner in which the auction is organized provides a fantastic opportunity for item donors to receive broad PR and grow their customer base. Event attendees come from all across Pennsylvania and surrounding states, so donors need not be central Pennsylvania based. FarmFest is looking for contributions of Silent Auction and raffle items. Additionally, we hope attendees will visit the auction area to bid on items and participate in the raffle drawings. This year will include a live auction for a few choice pieces that will take place on Saturday Aug. 3 at 6 p.m. and is being led

by auctioneer, Brian Magaro of Enola, PA. Requested items include but are not limited to: specialty foods and beverages, books, crafts, pottery, paintings, vacation packages, farm tools, and more! All contributions are tax-deductible for the fair-market value. We gratefully welcome items in all categories and price ranges. We look forward to showcasing your wares and services at this year’s FarmFest Benefit Auction and welcome promotional materials to accompany your donation! Online item commitments can be made at either farmfest.paorganic.org/silentauction or pafarmersunion.org/pco farmfest2013. Email and phone commitments can be made at farmfest@paorganic.org or 814-422-0251. Find out more about the event, including sponsorship opportunities, at farmfest.paorganic.org

Jaindl Scholarship to be awarded at Allentown Fair The Frederick J. Jaindl Scholarship will be given to a student enrolled in agriculture in a two or four year institution of higher learning. This $2,000 scholarship will be awarded on Wednesday, Aug. 28 at the Ag Awards Program in the Agri-Plex building during the 2013 Great Allentown Fair. To apply for the scholarship you must have exhibited a competitive entry at the Allentown Fair for at least one year. You

must complete a two section application and send it to the Allentown Fair office before Aug. 12. Application forms are available from the Fair office at 17th and Chew St. or by calling Beverly Gruber at 610-767-5026. Frederick J. Jaindl was

an ardent supporter of the Fair, serving on the Board of Directors, and was fourth Vice-President at the time of his death. The scholarship was established in 2004 by his wife, Anne L. Jaindl and the late Martin H. Ritter, a close friend.

Page 5 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

WSSA Pesticide Stewardship Series: Proper disposal of pesticides extends far beyond the container


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 6

AUCTIONS

Market Reports -

FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: Feeder Steers: 700-950# 105-114; 1000-1100# 107111, Hols. 1000-1200# to 84. Feeder Heifers: few 525# at 116; few 800-975# 107112. Feeder Bulls: 600-850# 100-107; Hols. /hd 9501100# 800-950; Jersey 642# at 84. Beef Stock Cows: 2 prs. w/small calfs at 1000. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 200-230#155-164; 260265# 135-150; 310-335# 138-156; 375-395# 132-151; 435-445# 134-137; 455495# 128-138; 523# 133; 560-580# 123-128; 640643# 120-126.50; 735-745# 116; S 1-2 305# 115-125; 355-380# 106-124; 460495# 117-126; 450-460# full 100-104. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 355-395# 129-138; 440447# 125-127; 450-465# 123-128; 525-547# 122-127; 550-562# 126-127; 615645# 110-120; 650-665# 110; 700-745# 107-110; 760# 108; 845# 100; S 1-2 510-535# 104-110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 435# 126-130; 454-490# 127-131; 535-549# 127-130;

605-627# 121-126; 763# 105; S 1-2 450-495# 115127; 550-570# 102-125; 685-695# 98-114; 800-840# 95-101. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 965-1145# 975/hd 79 mos. bred; M&L 1-2 Middle Aged 925-1185# 7001225/hd 4-6 mos. bred; S 12 Young 680-765# 600775/hd 7-9 mos. bred SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 1150. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 215-225# 136-141; 250295# 130-160; 300-345# 120-155; 350-395# 120-142; 400-445# 120-152; 450487# 126-137; 503-538# 129-137; 550-595# 121136; 600-640# 128-132; 655-695# 124-127; 700738# 120-128; 755-775# 119-124; 806-810# 116-123; 881# 119; S 1-2 270-285# 106-124; 305-340# 100-115; 360-395# 110-116; 400445# 100-119; 500-545# 110-120. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 250-295# 120-150; 305340# 120-146; 350-398# 120-146; 400-440# 116139; 450-495# 111-130; 500-545# 110-129; 550590# 110-131; 600-647# 108-128; 650-675# 102-123; 700-738# 100-107; S 1-2 270-290# 100-112; 310340# 106-110; 350-390# 101-118; 415-445# 101114; 460-495# 100-109;

502-545# 91-104; 560-580# 100-107; 600-640# 97-102. Feeder Bulls: Me&L 1-2 450-495# 115-133; 500546# 110-145; 550-595# 114-133; 600-640# 112-128; 650-695# 105-125; 700745# 111-123; 775-795# 110-114; 800-830# 104109; S 1-2 450-495# 100113; 500-530# 100-109; 555-595# 102-109; 600645# 100-108; 675-690# 9399; 765-790# 99-108. SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 518 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 139-151; 300400# 139-160; 400-500# 124-153; 500-600# 126-144; 600-700# 120-133; 700800# 113-121; 800-900# 109.50-119; 900-1000# 101109.50; 1000-1100# 100; M&L 2 200-300# 137-151; 300-400# 150-151; 400500# 115-150; 500-600# 123-141.50; 600-700# 120131; 700-800# 105-119; 800-900# 114; 900-1000# 93-101; 1000-1100# 84.50; M&L 3 300-400# 126-128; 400-500# 118; S 1 300-400# 111; 400-500# 120; 500600# 110. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 108; 400500# 108; 500-600# 99; 700-800# 90.50; 800-900# 90.50; 1100# & up 84. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 120-123; 300400# 120-141; 400-500#

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Farm Weekly Newspapers - since 1972, serving fulltime farmers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic market areas. The number one agricultural publication in this market! Target your audience with 4 regional editions. Monthly Equine Publication Covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations. since 1979, serving heavy construction contractors, landscaping, aggregate producers and recyclers in the Northeast and MidAtlantic Markets every month. Qualified readership is guaranteed to get you results. Country Folks

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118-129; 500-600# 119127.50; 600-700# 112-123; 700-800# 101-115; 800900# 99-112; M&L 2 200300# 117-131; 300-400# 123-131; 400-500# 112-128; 500-600# 112-127; 600700# 106-116; 700-800# 96107; 800-900# 83-98; S 1 400-500# 100-109; 600700# 98-100. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 133-152; 300400# 129-152; 400-500# 120.50-139; 500-600# 111132; 600-700# 106-126; 700-800# 81-120; 800-900# 76.50-94; 900-1000# 93.50; M&L 2 200-300# 123-130; 300-400# 115-126; 400500# 117-132; 500-600# 115-124; 600-700# 109-118; 700-800# 105-115.

600# 115.50-116.50; 600700# 112.50; M&L 2 300400# 134; 400-500# 110116; 500-600# 113; 600700# 103-109; M&L 3 400500# 115; 500-600# 107; 600-700# 102; S 1 500-600# 108. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 135; 400-500# 127-138.50; 500-600# 116120; 600-700# 109.50; M&L 2 400-500# 127-136; 500600# 126; 600-700# 117; S 1 500-600# 101.

700# 108; 700-800# 110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 132.50-146.50; 500-600# 128; 600-700# 122; M&L 2 300-400# 145; 400-500# 135.75-148.25; 500-600# 123-129.75; 600700# 123.50; S 1 300-400# 130; 400-500# 110-136.50, mostly 124-136.50; 500600# 119.

FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No Report

NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No Report

N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 898 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 157.50; 300-400# 146-160; 400-500# 131-158; 500-600# 132-149; 600700# 126-138; 700-800# 120.50-130.50; 800-900# 123-127; 900-1000# 109123.35; M&L 2 300-400# 129-146; 400-500# 127.50146; 500-600# 116-136; 600-700# 113-127; 800900# 106; S 1 200-300# 128; 300-400# 117-127.50; 600-700# 96. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 600-700# 77.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 145-160; 300400# 121-153; 400-500# 122.50-134; 500-600# 119130; 600-700# 114-122.50; 700-800# 107-116; M&L 2 200-300# 139; 300-400# 122-145; 400-500# 118-129; 500-600# 120.50-128; 600700# 119-122; 700-800# 103; S 1 300-400# 118; 600700# 105. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 172.50-182.50; 300-400# 135-153; 400500# 123-150; 500-600# 127-142; 600-700# 113-124; 700-800# 112.50-115; 800900# 107; M&L 2 200-300# 149; 300-400# 127-139.50; 400-500# 120-130; 500600# 119-131; 600-700# 107-118.50; S 1 300-400# 117; 400-500# 110-114; 500-600# 104.

HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 104 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 147-151.50; 500600# 135.50-136; 600-700# 122-132; 800-900# 117.50; M&L 2 500-600# 133; 600700# 120-127.50; 700-800# 117; Hols. L 2-3 300-400# 114. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 129; 400-500# 127.50-130; 500-600# 125126; 600-700# 122; 700800# 109; M&L 2 300-400# 115-127; 400-500# 123-127; 500-600# 127-128; 600700# 118. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 137; 500-600# 121-126; 600-700# 108; M&L 2 400-500# 128; 500600# 125; 600-700# 102.

BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 149 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 135; 400-500# 135-140; 500-600# 135; 600-700# 127.50-130; 800900# 115; M&L 2 300-400# 138; 500-600# 135; 600700# 118; M&L 3 400-500# 126; 700-800# 111; S 1 600700# 117. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 115-118; 500-

FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No Report

LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 989. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 157; 400-500# 141.50-148; 500-600# 136143.50; 600-700# 138-141; 700-800# 125-132.75; M&L 2 300-400# 160; 400-500# 139-149; 500-600# 130142.50; 600-700# 126136.75; 700-800# 115125.50; M&L 3 300-400# 148; 400-500# 136.50; 500600# 128-135.25; 600-700# 110-129.75, mostly 129.75; 700-800# 109; S 1 400-500# 128; 500-600# 133; 600700# 114.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 133.25; 500-600# 126.50-128.50; 600-700# 117-120.25; 700-800# 117.75; M&L 2 300-400# 148.50; 400-500# 128.50131.50; 500-600# 125128.75; 600-700# 117.50121.75; 700-800# 115117.50; M&L 3 300-400# 132-144.50; 400-500# 118128.50; 500-600# 117125.50; 600-700# 110-112; S 1 300-400# 122; 400-500# 117; 500-600# 120.25; 600-

MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No Report

SPRINGLAKE STOCKYARD MONETA, VA Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-495# 141; 500-595# 130-135; 600-695# 123131.50; 700-795# 117-148; M&L 2 400-495# 144; 500595# 132-138; 600-695# 124; M&L 3 400-495# 133; 500-595# 130; 600-695# 121. Feeder Heifers: 400495# 119-125.50; 500-595# 119-123; 600-695# 116.50120; 700-795# 107; M&L 2 300-395# 131; 400-495# 120.50-124; 500-595# 119124.75; 600-695# 117; M&L 3 300-395# 118-121; 400495# 116-119; 500-595# 121.50; 600-695# 109-112; S 1 400-495# 110; 500-595# 106-110; 600-695# 100. Feeder Bulls: 380-455# 148; 460-535# 121-132; 540-615# 131; 620-700# 110; M&L 2 380-455# 130144; 460-535# 126-132; 540-615# 131.50-136.50; 620-700# 106-116; M&L 3 460-535# 128; 540-615# 119-123.50; S 1 460-535# 116. Cows: Cows weighed 2182; per head 650-1400; Pairs 925-1375. Calves: per head 30-115; Weighed 142. Misc: Goat 8-75 STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 464. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 148; 400-500# 131-146; 500-600# 136-147; 600-700# 126-138; 700800# 120.50-130.50; 9001000# 123.35; M&L 2 300400# 129-139; 400-500# 129-137; 500-600# 134.50136; 800-900# 106. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 145; 300-400# 121-144; 400-500# 122.50126; 500-600# 122.75-130; 600-700# 115-122.50; 700800# 107-110; M&L 2 400500# 123-129; 500-600# 124-128; S 1 300-400# 118; 600-700# 105.

Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 135-149; 400500# 123-137; 500-600# 127-131; 600-700# 113.50; M&L 2 300-400# 131139.50; 500-600# 119; 600700# 107-118.50; S 1 400500# 110; 500-600# 104. TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 280 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 142-160; 400500# 139-145; 500-600# 136-144; 600-700# 120-131; 700-800# 121; 800-900# 118-119; M&L 2 200-300# 137-151; 300-400# 150; 400-500# 130-136; 500600# 123-124; 600-700# 120-128; 700-800# 119; 900-1000# 93; M&L 3 300400# 126-128; 400-500# 118; S 1 300-400# 111; 400500# 120; 500-600# 110. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 130-141; 400500# 119-129; 500-600# 119-126; 600-700# 114-123; 700-800# 115; 800-900# 102-112; M&L 2 200-300# 131; 300-400# 123-131; 400-500# 112-120; 500600# 112-120.50; 600-700# 106-116; 700-800# 100-106; 800-900# 83-98; S 1 400500# 100-109; 600-700# 98100. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 129-139; 400500# 125-139; 500-600# 120-132; 600-700# 116-126; 700-800# 118-120; M&L 2 200-300# 130; 300-400# 115-126; 400-500# 117-129; 500-600# 115-124; 600700# 112-118; 700-800# 105-115. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 379 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 121; 500-600# 134-138; 600-700# 132-134; 700-800# 125; 900-1000# 106-111; M&L 2 500-600# 119-130.50; 600-700# 119121; 800-900# 105-118; 1000-1100# 96; Hols. L 2-3 400-500# 96-105; 500-600# 97; 700-800# 85-92; 800900# 86. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 126-130; 400500# 128-132; 500-600# 120-131; 600-700# 119123.50; 700-800# 115.50; 800-900# 104-111.50; M&L 2 300-400# 110; 400-500# 103-115; 500-600# 115.50118; 600-700# 101-115; 700-800# 109-109.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 145; 300-400# 136-144; 400-500# 124-139; 500-600# 127-137; 600700# 119; 700-800# 101114; 800-900# 106; 9001000# 98; M&L 2 300-400# 125-131; 400-500# 109-111; 500-600# 99-119; 600-700#

93-97; 700-800# 87-96; 9001000# 86-91. ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No Report WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 81 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 139; 300-400# 139; 400-500# 124-139; 500-600# 126-135; 600700# 127; 700-800# 113; 800-900# 114; 900-1000# 101-109.50; 1000-1100# 100; M&L 2 400-500# 115130; 500-600# 125-132; 600-700# 120-126; 700-00# 113; 800-900# 114; 9001000# 101; 1000-1100# 84.50. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 108; 400500# 108; 500-600# 99; 700-800# 90.50; 800-900# 90.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 120; 300-400# 120; 400-500# 119; 500600# 119-120.50; 600-700# 112; 700-800# 101; 800900# 99; M&L 2 400-500# 118-119; 500-600# 115; 600-700# 112; 700-800# 96105. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 133; 300-400# 133; 400-500# 120.50; 500600# 111; 600-700# 106; 700-800# 81; 800-900# 76.50-945; 900-1000# 93.50; M&L 2 200-300# 123. SLAUGHTER CATTLE HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 75-77.50; Breakers 73-78, hi dress 83-85. lo dress 69-72; Boners 69-75, hi dress 77-84; Lean 66-72, hi dress to 76. Bulls: YG 1-2 12502150# 92-94.50; Guernsey 1060# at 87. Fed Steers: L Ch Hols. 1638# at 98.50; Std. Hols. 1300-1450# 85-95. Fed Heifers: Ch 1142# at 114. Dairy Replacements: Springing Cows to 1185; M Springing Hfrs. 850-950; Breeding size Hfrs. 750-950; 1 Jersey at 825; Smaller Hfrs. 350-700. Calves: Hols. Bull Ret. to Farm No. 1 94-115# 115127; 118-125# 102-115; No. 2 94-115# 97-115; 84-92# 90-112; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 88110# 90-105; Beef X Bulls & Hfrs. 84-115# 125-190. Slaughter Calves: Hi Ch 80-375# 110-114; Gd 80100# 45-55. SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE:

Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1405-1999# 75-84; 1420-1745# hi dress 86.50-92.50; 1405-1820# lo dress 71-74.50; Boner 8085% lean 905-1395# 75-82; 1020-1270# hi dress 85-86; 965-1395# lo dress 61-74; Lean 85-90% lean 9301230# lo dress 54-59. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1035-1385# 93-100; 10101315# lo dress 81-89.50; 1605-2065# 95-101.50; 1525-2025# hi dress 103107. Cows/Calf Pairs: 3. S 1-2 875# young cows w/250# calves 975/pr; M&L 1-2 9251000# young to middle age cows w/200-275# calves 825-1325/pr. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1130-1380# 78.50-84; 1415-1930# 8084; Boner 80-85% lean 845870# 82-84; 915-1350# 7786.50; 995-1250# hi dress 86.50-88; 930-1200# lo dress 70-76.50; 1405-1765# 78-85.50; Lean 85-90% lean 660-785# 72.50-73; 800-915# 70-72; 805-1170# lo dress 40-63. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1095-1370# 91.50-94.50; 1560-1880# 93-101. Cows/Calf Pairs: 14. S 1 -2 610-800# middle age cows w/ 55-150# calves 825-1150/pr; M 1-2 8201080# middle age cows w/65-325# calves 9251400/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 50-85. SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 214 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 850-1200# 72-83; 1200-1600# 7585.50; HY 1200-1600# 82.50-85; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 60-80; 1200-2000# 65-85.50, HY 1200-2000# 74.50-78.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 55-72; 850-1200# 60-74. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 81-106.50; 1500-2500# 95-109, HY 1000-1500# 96-102; 15002500# 98.50-108. Cows Ret. to Farm: 16. M&L 1, 5-12 yrs. old 9501510# 700-1180/hd; L 1 Hfr., 18 mos. old 760# 640/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 1. M 1, 8 yrs. old w/100# calf 1175# 990/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 4. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 7090/hd. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 223 Slaughter Cows: Breaker

Page 7 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

MARKET REPORTS


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 8

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, July 8 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale starting with calves. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-420-9092 or Auction Barn at 518-392-3321. www.empirelivestock.com • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, July 10 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 Thursday, July 11 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 3:00 PM: NY Steam Engine Assn. Show Grounds, 3349 Gehan Rd., off Rts. 5& 20, 5 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. NYS Two Cylinder Expo XI JD Consignment Auction. 1st day of Expo XI Show. For show info contact John & Cheryl Jensen 585-526-6607. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676, 585-233-9570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Friday, July 12

• 10:00 AM: Bath, NY (Steuben Co.) Haverling High School Auditorium. Steuben Co. Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp & James P. Pirrung licensed Real Estate Brokers. Pirrung Auctioneers, 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Saturday, July 13 • 9:00 AM: 601 North Peterboro St., Canastota, NY. Annual Lyon’s Hay Camp & Large Rental Return Auction of Late Model Construction Equipment and more. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-6332944 www.alexlyon.com • 11:00 AM: Maguire Family Farm / Vineyard, Lodi, NY (Romulus-Trumansburg area). Quality Vineyard Equipment & Antique Farm Collectible Auction. Mel Manasse & Son Auctioneers, 607692-4540 www.manasseauctions.com Sunday, July 14 • 12:30 PM: Raymond & Josephine Caprari, 7 Flagg Rd., Colesville, NY (Binghamton area). JD 3720 Tractor, Joyner UTV, Nice Tools, Household Items, Etc. Mel Manasse & Son Auctioneers, 607692-4540 www.manasseauctions.com Monday, July 15 • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, July 17 • Cortland, NY. City of Cortland Real Property Tax Foreclosure Auction. Mel Manasse & Son Auctioneers, 607-692-4540 www.manasseauctions.com • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Friday, July 19 • Virgil / Cortland, NY (Cortland Co.). Multi-Parcel Absolute Real Estate Auction. Mel Manasse & Son Auctioneers, 607-692-4540 www.manasseauctions.com • 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Saturday, July 20

• 9:00 AM: Wellsboro, NY. J&C Wholesale Auction. From antique to modern. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 11:00 AM: Tully, NY. Slice of Summer at Currie Holsteins & NY Holstein Summer Picnic. 100 of the finest Holstein in North America will sell. NY Picnic hosted by the Currie family & all are invited. Sale managed by The Cattle Exchange, 607-7462226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Monday, July 22 • 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, July 24 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 Friday, July 26 • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704399-6111, 704-399-9756 Saturday, July 27 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Horse sale. Tack at 9 am, horses at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 9:30 AM: 48 Spellman Rd., Plattsburgh, NY. Job Completion Auction. Construction Equipment, Aerials, Forklifts, Trucks and large quantity of support equipment. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.alexlyon.com • 10:00 AM: 2139 Ganaan-Southfield Rd., Southfield, MA. Gillette Welding & Fabrication Auction. Trucks, trailers & equip., welders, equip., shop equip., tools & other misc. equip. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 auctioneer2@jacquierauctions.com www.jacquierauctions.com Sunday, July 28 • 10:00 AM: Washington Co. Fairgrounds, Rts. 29 & 392, Old Schuylerville Rd., Greenwich, NY. Tri State Antique Tractor Club, Inc. 2nd Annual Consignment Auction of antique & modern equipment. 2nd day of Antique and Irwin Show. For info contact Bill Herrick, 518-692-1106. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676, 585233-9570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Monday, July 29

• 11:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY. Weekly Livestock Commission Sale starting at 12:30 pm with Produce, Small Animals, Dairy, Feeders, Sheep, Lamb, Goats, Pigs. Calves & cull cows at approx. at 5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, July 31 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 Wednesday, August 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 • 2:00 PM: New York Steam Engine Assoc. 5th Annual Consignment Auction. 1st day of Pageant of Steam show. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676, 585-233-9570 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Thursday, August 8 • Next to Empire Farm Days, Rt. 414, Seneca Falls, NY. Important 2 Day Auction. Aug. 8 & 9. Trucks, Farm Equipment, Large Construction Equipment, Landscape Supplies &Equipment, Recreational Equipment, Fleets, Complete Liquidations, Repo’s, Leas Returns & Consignments of all types! Roy Teitsworth, Inc, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, August 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 Wednesday, August 21 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

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104/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 10. M&L 1-2, 3-10 yrs. old w/40-230# calves 9001200# 900-1000/pr. Heifers: 1. bred. L 1, bred 7 mos. 910# 760/hd. Calves Ret. to Farm: 57. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 50125/hd; 100-130# 119. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 850-1200#

70-78; 1200-1600# 72-79; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 67.50-75; 12002000# 68-78; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 48-62; 8501200# 50-65. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 77-88. FREDERICKSBURG, VA 19. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1300-1500# 122; Sel 2-3 1100-1300# 106-115. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-

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Market Reports 3 1000-1200# 110; 12001400# 119-121; 1400-1600# 120.50. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 121; 13001500# 120-127.75; 15001850# 106.50-125, mostly 118-122.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1000-1200# 109-117; 1200-1400# 115.50-127.25; 1400-1600# 113-119.50; 1500-1850# 119.50. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 1200-1600# 67.50-75; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 55-63; 1200-2000# 53.50-69; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 54.

HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 25 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 1200-1600# 78-79.50, HY 1200-1600#

80.50-84; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 75-79; 1200-2000# 75-78.50, HY 1200-2000# 82; Lean 8590% lean 850-1200# 6472.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 92-94.50. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 239 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7279.50; 1200-1600# 68-81; HY 1200-1600# 82-99; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 67-75; 1200-2000# 66-74, HY 1200-2000# 76-81; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 5062; 850-1200# 55-68. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 92-96; 15002500# 92.50-96.50; HY 1000-1500# 96-99; 15002500# 97-98. MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE:

58 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 79-81.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 66.50-70; 1200-2000# 75-77, HY 1200-2000# 76-82.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 6267.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 94-97; 15002500# 86. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls 70-100# 5065/hd; 100-130# 67.50-80. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 109 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 1200-1600# 74-84.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 75; 12002000# 72-78; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 68-75.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 85.50-86; 15002500# 99-102. Calves Ret. to Farm: 57. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 50-125; 100-130# 119. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 77 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 800-1200# 72-81; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 72-81; 12002000# 78.50-79.50, HY 1200-2000# 82.50-85.50; Lean 85-90% lean 8501200# 67.50-75. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 93-101.50. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 125 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 76.50-83; 1200-1600# 7885.50; Boner 80-85% Lean 800-1200# 71-80; 12002000# 76-85.50, Lean 8590% Lean 850-1200# 63-70. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 94.50-106.50; 1500-2500# 97-109. WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 80. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 850-1200# 73-80; 1200-1600# 71.5077, HY 1200-1600# 78-82; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 70-84; 1200-2000# 68-78, HY 1200-2000# 78.50-80.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 45-54; 8501200# 47.50-65.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 93.50; 15002500# 93.50-98.50; HY 1500-2500# 109.50-110. Cows Ret. to Farm: 35. M 1, few 2, 3-9 yrs. old, bred 38 mos. 870-1385# 7601250/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 5. M&L 1-2, 6-9 yrs. old

Page 9 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

75-80% lean 1200-1600# 67.50-84.50, HY 12001600# 81-82; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 55-75; 1200-2000# 53.50-78, HY 1200-2000# 84; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 62; 8501200# 54-75.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 81-90.50; 15002500# 82.50-102.50; HY 1500-2500# 114.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 29. M&L 1-2, 3-10 yrs. old bred 3-7 mos. 930-1460# 560-


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 10

Market Reports w/170-245# calves 10251305# 1120-1325/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls 70-100# 17.50105/hd; 100-130# 100170/cwt. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 53 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7278; 1200-1600# 77-80, HY 1200-1600# 84-85; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 6065.50; 1200-2000# 65-74, HY 1200-2000# 74.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 5566.50; 850-1200# 60-73. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 94.50-95; 15002500# 95-102; HY 10001500# 102; 1500-2500# 105-108. Cows Ret. to Farm: 14. M 1, 6-8 yrs. old, 1280-1510# 1080-1180/hd; L 1, 5-12 yrs. old 950-1320# 700-1040. Cows w/Calves at Side: 1. M 1, 8 yrs. old w/100# calf 1175# 990/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls 70-100# 70/hd. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats (/hd): 3555# 50-58; 70-90# 70-75; 2 at 90; (/#)100-110# 80-87; 150-180# to 63; 4 hd 203#nat 64. Stock Boars: 240# at 45. Butcher Hogs: No. 1-3 340-400# 55-59. Sows: 540# at 59 Boars: 376# at 13.50. NC SOWS: 300-399# 5358; 400-449# 55.22-60; 450499# 50-62; 500-549# 47.35-61.37; 550# & up 59.50-63. FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No Report HOLLINS, VA HOGS: No Report MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No Report N VA HOGS: No Report ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No Report S VA HOGS: No Report STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No Report WINCHESTER, VA No Report WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No Report

LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 11 Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 125; 60-90# 125. Slaughter Ewes: 17. 4043. S VA SHEEP: No Report HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS/SHEEP: 24. Lambs: Gd 58-88# 114119; few Ch 95-110# 135147; Gd 95-120# 117-118. N VA GOATS: 93 Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 145150; 40-60# 185-195; 6080# 147.50-152.50; Sel 3 20-40# 131; 40-60# 125145; 60-80# 100. Slaughter Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 147.50-161. Slaughter Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 70. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: L Nanny 135; Kids Sel 2 30-80# 69-80; Sel 3 25-35# 35-45.

MT. AIRY SHEEP: 18 Slaughter Lambs: Gd 60-100# 50-67.50. MT. AIRY GOATS: 72. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 20-40# 52.5055; 60-80# 110-145; Sel 2 20-40# 30-50; 40-60# 50-75; Sel 3 20-40# 20-25. Does/Nannies: Sel 2 70100# 40-65; 100-140# 7087.50. Wethers: Sel 2 70-100# 47.50-60. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: No Report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No Report HOLLINS, VA GOATS: No Report MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No Report MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No Report ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: No Report

ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: 41 Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 80110# 115; 110-125# 118; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 30-60# 108; 60-90# 110. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-4 61; Util 1-3 42. S VA GOATS: No Report SHENANDOAH SHEEP: No Report SILER CITY, NC GOATS: No Report

SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No Report STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No Report STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No Report TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No Report WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 14 Slaughter Lambs: Wooled Ch & Pr 3-4 167# 102.50; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 120122.50; 60-90# 105-135. Slaughter Rams/Ewes:

Ewes Ch 2-4 40-45 WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 33 Kids: Sel 1-2 1 20-40# 197.50; 40-60# 210-222.50; 60-80# 132.50; Sel 3 40-60# 125. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 140-165; 100-150# 114-155. Does: Sel 1-2 100-150# 87.50. WYTHE CO SHEEP: No Report WYTHE CO GOATS: No Report CASH GRAIN MARKET

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Soft Red Winter Wheat was 14¢ lower. Prices were 5.336.25, mostly 5.33 at the elevators.Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 526.40/ton for 48% protein.

Roaring River 7.65, -----, ---; Rose Hill 6.40, -----, ----; Selma ----, -----, ----; Statesville ----, -----, ----; Warsaw 6.40, -----, ----; Pantego #2 7.35, -----, ----.

Feed Mills: Bladenboro 6.40, -----, ----; Candor 7.41, -----, ----; Cofield 7.04, 15.70, ----; Laurinburg 6.40, -----, ----; Monroe 7.55, -----, ----; Nashville 7.25, -----, ----;

Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement ----, -----, ----; Creswell 6.85, 15.80, 6.13; Elizabeth City 6.74, 15.45,

6.18; Greenville ----, -----, ---; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, 15.35, 5.33; Norwood 6.91, 14.96, 6.16; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ----, -----, 6.25; Warsaw #2 7.25, -----, ----. Soybean Processors: Fayetteville, 15.95, Raleigh, 15.95. RUSHVILLE SEMI-

MONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50/mile. Hay 63 tons. Alfalfa/Orchardgrass: Sm. Sq. Prem. 4.20/bale; Sm. Rd. Gd 22/bale. Mixed Grass: Sm. Sq. Gd 2.30/bale; Lg. Rd. Gd 67/bale. Orchardgrass: Lg. Rd. Fair 26; Sm. Rd. Gd 36/bale.

POULTRY REPORT NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly heavy. The estimated slaughter for Wed-nesday in North Carolina is 2,839,000 head compared to 2,871,000 head last Wednesday. NC EGGS: The market is steady on all sizes. Supplies are adequate. Retail demand is fair. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of Grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 112.49, L 109.39, M 91.86 & S 87. NY EGGS Prices are 2¢ higher on XL & L, unchanged on M. The undertone is steady to fully steady. Supplies are light to moderate. The NY shell egg inventory is 9% less than last Monday. Demand is light. Market activity is moderate to slow. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A, white eggs in ctns, delivered store door, cents per dz. XL 109113, L 107-111, M 94-98. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beans (bu) Green 25; blueberries (flat) 30; Cabbage (40# ctn) Green 14; Collards (18-20# bx) 10; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Pickling 20, Long Green (40# ctn) 18; 10-13; Greens (18-20# bx) Turnip, Mustard, Kale 10; Peas (40# crate) Garden 20; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red 25; Strawberries (8#) clamshell 12, (8# clamshell organic) 18; Squash (3/4 bu) Yellow 15, (3/4 bu) Zuchinni 15; Tomatoes (25# ctn) Greenhouse 22-30. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn 100 count) WA Red Delicious (traypack ctn) 3236.85, WA Golden Delicious (Traypack ctn) 34-38, Granny Smith WA (traypack ctn) 34-39.50, Gala WA 3638, WA Fuji (traypack ctn) 36-41, WA Pink Lady (traypack ctn) 38-41.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 27.95-38; Bananas (40# ctn) 21-23; Beans, Round Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 20-24.15, Pole (1-1/9 bu) 34-42; Beets (25lb sack) 12.15-22.65; Blue-berries (Flat 12 1-pt cups 28-30; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 22.8530.25; Cabbage (50# ctn) 15.50-21.25; Canta-loupe (case 12 count) 22.1527.75, (bin) 225; Carrots (50# sack) 19.85-20.75;

Page 11 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 89¢ lower. Prices were 6.407.65, mostly 6.40-7.35 at the feed mills and 6.74-7.25, mostly 6.91 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were steady to 5¢ lower. Prices were 15.95 at the processors, 15.70 at the feed mills, and 14.96-15.80, mostly 15.80 at the elevators. US 2


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 12

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AUGUST 6, 7, 8 2013

Rodman Lott & Son Farms • Seneca Falls, NY

Don’t Miss These Exhibitors!! Advanced Agra Service, LLC • 131 Agco Corp • 180, O-3 Agri-King • A Agri-SC • 126 Airgas • 141, 142 American Farm Products • 304 Animat, Inc • 328 Augusta Co-op Farm Bureau • 127 Bath Fitter • 308 Beverage Tractor • 100, 102 Binkley & Hurst Lp • 178 Bonny View Farm • 120A, 121 C&C Farm Supply • 134, 135 Cargill Animal Nutrition • 145 Channel • 318 Charvin Farm Ag Plastics • 215 Chemgro • 166 Christian Farmers Outreach • 322 Cobra Torches • 309 Conklin Agrovantage • 319 Crop Care • 104A Cummings & Bricker Inc • 105, 106 Dupont Pioneer • 129 Dyna Products • O-14A Family Farm Casualty Ins. Co • 169 Farm Credit • 125 Farmer Boy Ag • 118, 119 First Bank & Trust Co • 138 Fisher Auto Parts • 230 For-Most Livestock Equipment-Garber Farms • O-7 GCR Tire Center • 162, 163 General Fertilizer Equipment • 103 Growers Mineral Solutions • 155 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 109 Haybuster / Duratech • 332, 333 Headwaters Contruction Company, Inc • 327, O-2AA Headwaters Soil & Water Conservation District • 132, 133 Helena Chemical Company • 150 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 156, 157 Houff’s Feed & Fertilizer • 130 Huffman Trailer Sales • O-1 IBA, Inc • 112 Independent Ag Equipment (formerly GVM) • 122, 123 Iva Manufacturing • 179 James River Equipment • 330 Koch Agronomic Services, LLC • 144 Kuhn North America, Inc • 329 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • 124 Lancaster Farming • O-21 Lanco-Pennland Milk Producers • 161 Lawrence Ag Equipment • 104 Liskey Truck Sales • O-4A Marco Metals LLC • 324

May Supply • 120 Mid-Atlantic Irrigation Co., Inc • 101 Morris Distributing • 228 Morton Buildings, Inc • 115 Organic Valley - CROPP Cooperative • 310 Outback Heating, Inc • 108 Outside Heating, Inc • 314 P. Bradley & Sons • 104B, O-2 PA Country Equipment • 202A, 203 PBZ LLC • 104A Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-13 ProAg • 153, 154 Quality Craft Tools • G Quality Metal Works Inc • 184, 185 Recyc Systems, Inc • 313 Rockbridge Farmers Coop • 148 Rockydale Quarries Corp • 160 Ryder Supply Company • 302 Stor-Loc • 320, 321 SuKup Manufacturing • 181 T.A. Seeds • 113, 114 Taylor Manufacturing, Inc • 211 Tech Mix Global • 305 The Power Connection, Inc • 136, 137 Tractor Care Inc • 176, 176 Trissel Equipment Sales • 107 Trouble Free Lighting • 146 United DHIA • 306 Valley Feed Co • 300 Valmetal / Jamesway Farm Equipment • 174 Virginia Bin Service • 312 Virginia Farm Bureau • 177 Virginia Silo • 166 Whitesel Brothers Inc • 128 Williams Brothers Tree & Lawn Service • 303 Wood-Mizer, LLC • O-9 Zimmerman Cattle Control • 104A Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 151, 152 SKID STEER RODEO SPONSORS Virginia Farm Bureau ~ Diamond TROPHY SPONSOR Virginia Farm Bureau

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586


Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 2435.15; Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 45.2549.50; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 21.15-28.25; Oranges, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 29.95-40.95, FL (4/5 bu ctn) 21-22; Pink Grapefruit, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 26-33.15; Tangelos, FL (80 count bx) 25-26.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 34-39.35; Limes (40# ctn) 24-26; Oranges, CA Naval (4/5 bu ctn) 23.0535.35, FL Naval (64 count) 23.05-26.15; Tangelos (80 count) 20; Tangerines (120 count) 22; Corn (ctn 4 ?-5 dz) Yellow 15-20.65, White (ctn 4 ?-5 dz) 15-20.65; Cranberries (24 12 oz pkg) 24.50; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Long Green 21-26, Pickles

(ctn 40#) 30-34; Eggplant (25# ctn) 22-26; Grapes, Red Seedless (18# ctn) 2834, White Seedless 28-34, Black Seedless 31-44, Red Globe 28 (19# ctn); Grapefruit (36 size - 40# ctn) 2330.55; Greens, Collard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 10.5512.95, Turnips (bu ctn) 11.55; Honeydews (ctn 5s) 24; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 15.9516.95; Lettuce (ctn 24s) Iceberg (wrapped) 23.5033.65, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 20-21.50, Romaine (ctn 24s) 23.50-24.50; Nectar-ines, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 24; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 20.75-21, White (25# sack) 18-21, Red

(25# sack) 23-24, Green (ctn 24s) 20.05-28.50, Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 2331.25; Peaes, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 30; Peanuts (35#) Green 53-69; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn) 34; Bell Peppers, Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 25.35-31.05, Red (11# ctn) 25-32.50, Yellow (11# ctn) 25-29; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red size A 18-24, Red Size B 19.50-32, White size A 21-27.55, Russett 1722.95; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) Red 13.65; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 27; Squash, Yellow Crookedneck (3/4 bu ctn) 12.50-15, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 15-18.95; Strawberries, FL/NC/CA (flat 8 1-qt conts) 15-21.25; Sweet

Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45, White (40# ctn) 20-20.75; Tomatoes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 2131.45; Tomat-oes, Cherry (flat 12 1-pt conts) 23.6524.35, Romas (25# ctn) 2224, Grape (flat 12 1-pt conts) 22-22.50; Turnips (25# film bg) Topped 10.55-17.15; Watermelons (bin) 200-225 WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET (Wholesale Apples (traypack ctn) Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 26-34, Golden Delicious 32-38, (bu bulk)Rome, Red & Golden Delicious, Stayman, Fuji, Gala 22-28; Bananas (40# bx) 19.50-20; Beans (bu) Snap

20-25, Halfrunners 38; Beets (25# sack) 13.50-15; Broccoli (ctn 12s) 20-22.50; Cabbage (50# sack) 14.25-15, (50# ctn/crate) 15-16; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12 count) 1718.75, (ea) 1-4, (bin 120-140 count) 225; Carrots (50# sack) 20-25.75; Cauliflower (ctn) 24-26; Lemons (ctns 95 count) 29.50-32, (165 count)30-32; Limes (ctn 150 count) 33.75; Cucumbers (1-1/9 bu) Long Green 16.75-20, Picklers (11/9 bu crate) 25-27; Grapes (18# ctn) Red & White Seedless 18.75-33.75; Lett-uce (ctn) Iceburg 21.75-24, Green Leaf 16-18.25, Romaine 19-20; Onions (50# ba) Yellow Jumbo 15.50-17;

Peanuts, Raw (50# sack) 5662; Bell Pepper (1-1/9 bu ctn) L & XL 20; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) White 18.25-28, Red 22.75-30, Russet 16.7519; Squash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 14-20, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 12-15; Strawberries (4 qt cont) NC & SC 1214; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 12.50-15; Tomatoes, Vine Ripe (25# bx) XL & Larger 25-27, M 2224, Green 27, Roma 18-21; Turnips (25# sack) 12-13; Watermelons (ea) 3.50-7, Seedless (45/60 count) 210-240, Seeded (28/35 count) 160-190. MARKETS

Four questions to ask prior to purchasing a colostrum replacer Choose wisely, not all colostrum replacers are created equal. Feeding clean high quality maternal colostrum is considered the gold standard for getting proper nutrients and antibodies into newborn calves. However, accessing maternal colostrum that is both high in IgG and low in bacterial counts can be a challenge on many dairy operations for a variety of reasons. In situations where access to quality colostrum is not feasible, a quality

colostrum replacer can provide a healthy alternative. However, making a decision on what type of colostrum replacer to purchase can be a daunting task. “The easiest decision sometimes is to simply buy the product with the lowest price,” says Jason Leonard, calf and heifer specialist with Purina Animal Nutrition. “However, it is in the calf and dairy’s best interest to make a more informed decision when deciding which

colostrum replacer to use. “Calves born today represent the future of every herd. The decisions made at birth are critical to a calf’s survival and subsequent contribution to the herd’s future profitability,” notes Leonard. Leonard advises calf managers to ask a few important questions prior to making a colostrum replacer purchasing decision. 1. Is this product a

true colostrum replacement or is it a colostrum supplement? Although very similar, it is important to note the difference between a colostrum replacer and a colostrum supplement. A colostrum replacer is designed to be fed as the calf’s only source of colostrum in the event that no high quality colostrum is available (ex. dam is Johne’s positive). A colostrum replacer can also be used as a booster for the dam’s colostrum by using a fraction of the full dose. A colostrum supplement on the other hand is designed to boost the quality of on-farm colostrum collected. 2. Is the product made from real bovine colostrum or is it made from blood serum collected at slaughter houses? Products listed as real colostrum are just that, they contain colostrum collected from dairy cattle that has been dried down and heat-treated to eliminate any harmful agents such as Johne’s disease and mycoplasma. Serum products are essentially built from the ground up using collected blood as the source of antibodies for the calf. These products can be effective in transferring immunity to the calf, but Leonard notes that they can be short on soluble factors and maternal cells that are present in maternal colostrum. The calf depends on these other factors and cells to create an immune re-

sponse that will last until the calf’s own immune system starts working. Some studies have shown greater feed efficiency through 30 days of age when calves were fed a maternal colostrum instead of a serum-based replacer. Serum replacers lack colostral fat, which is very energydense and is well digested by the calf. Serum products typically use animal fat or vegetable fat which are less digestible. 3. Is the product labeled with a claim for Bovine IgG or just globulin proteins? IgG, more specifically IgG1, are the actual antibodies that protect the young calf from pathogens that may cause scours and respiratory diseases. Leonard recommends that calves receive at least 100 grams of IgG to receive adequate immunity from the colostrum. Alternatively, globulin proteins are comprised of a variety of other proteins as well as the IgG antibodies. It is nearly impossible to know what percentage of the globulin protein is IgG by looking at the package. So, a product could be labeled as providing 130 grams of globulin protein but may contain much less than the crucial 100 grams of IgG that are needed by the calf. “Don’t let the number on the package be the deciding factor in your buying decision unless the number guarantees a specific IgG

level,” says Leonard. 4. Is the product licensed by the USDA as a total replacement for maternal colostrum? “There is no way of guaranteeing the potency or effectiveness of a product unless it is licensed by the USDA,” says Leonard. Some serum-based replacers will use blood from USDA-certified slaughter houses. The pitfall with this method, Leonard says, is that the replacer product containing this blood has never been tested by the USDA for effectiveness in transferring immunity to calves. Leonard strongly recommends purchasing a colostrum replacer that is USDA-licensed as a colostrum replacement to ensure calves are getting the crucial energy and antibodies they need the first 12 hours of life. All colostrum replacers are not created equal, but paying closer attention to the product details and making a more informed purchasing decision should help lead you to the colostrum replacer product that is suited best for your operation. “Your decision is an important one because you only get one chance to start a calf off on the right foot (or in this case hoof),” adds Leonard. For more information, contact Jason Leonard at 717-360-3473, email: JRLeonard@landolakes.com or go to: www.amplicalf.com.

Page 13 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

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July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 14

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Page 15 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

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July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 16

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Dairy Equipment SEVERAL USED Double 6 and 8 parlors w/ATO’s and 3” low lines complete. Several 2”: pipelines, used vacuum pumps, receiver groups, claws, ATO’s, washer boxes, etc. 585-732-1953

Dogs PYRENEESE MAREMMA cross, 3 males, 1 female, first shots and wormed, ready to go July 29th. 540-292-2642

Farm Machinery For Sale 10’ CULTIMULCHER, wheels inside, $800; S.C. Case tractor, 2 bottom break away plow, foot clutch, 3pt. hitch, new tires, new paint, $2,900; “770” Oliver redone, new paint, new parts, new tires, $4,800; 8’ 3pt. snowblower, $800. Near Harrisburg, PA 717-564-2277

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Hesston 4550 Baler Miller Pro 1150 Rake Bush Hog 3210 Rotary Cutter Stoltzfus 8x18 Bale Body White 5100 4R Planter Kuhn Knight 8114 Manure Spreader Int’l. 440 Baler White 458 Chisel Plow White 6100 4R Planters NI 9800 4R Planter White 281 Disc Hardi 210 Sprayer NH 57 Rake NI 1507 Forage Box Bush Hog 15’ Rotary Cutter Woods RM660 Finish Mower Case IH 8330 Windrower White 445 Disc Chisel MF 245 Tractor Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill

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Farm Equipment 5.5 TRANSPREAD FROM GVM, purchased new, GC, field ready, $6,500. Stoltzfus 8T tandem-axle Lime spreader, 1,000RPM, one owner, GC, $8,000. NC 6000 Newton Crouch fert. spreader, tandem-axle, 540RPM, ground drive, like new, $12,500. 540229-8803.

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USED D EQUIPMENT Special Incentives Available On All Vermeer Hay Tools New McCormick CX90 Xtra Shift, Power Shuttle w/Self Leveling Loader, $5,000 Discount and 0% 60 Month Financing...........Call for Details! New Vermeer 664 Round Baler Rancher, Net Wrap, Auto Tie, Monitor - Special Discount .............................Call for Details! Vermeer 605M, w/Net and Bale Ramp, Complete Rebuild (Belts, Chains, Sprockets) Wide Pickup................................................$19,900 2012 Leftover New Tubeline Bale Wrapper, TLR 500 AX2 w/Remote Steer....Call For Pricing! Pequea TT 6000 6 Rotor Tedder, Good Condition ....................................$8,900 Vermeer 504M Wide Pickup, Net, Good Cond.........................................$17,900 Hesston 5585, Round Baler, Good Cond .. ..................................................$3,900

Free Loader and Additional Discounts on McCormick Compact Tractors

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HAY & STRAW: Large or small square bales. Wood Shaving Bags and Grain. René Normandin,Québec, Canada 450-347-7714

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Miscellaneous

MIXED GRASS HAY, $25.00 per roll. 2012 hay $15.00 per roll. 540-860-2145

YARD SIGNS: Full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Starting at $15.00 each. Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or bsnyder@leepub.com. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

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SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17202. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

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DOEBLER’S is searching for professional seed sales men and women in all of its Eastern regions from New York State into Ohio and as far south as North Carolina. Ideal candidates must demonstrate an ability to quickly learn new seed product information, a desire to not only grow Doebler’s business but also the businesses of his or her customers, and a thorough understanding of and ability to communicate Doebler’s reputation in agribusiness as “Your Regional Advantage”. If you would like to be considered for a dealership position with a company nearly eight decades in the industry, please call 1-800-853-2676. Thank you.

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Tires also available in Fuquay - Varina, NC

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Tractor Parts Services Offered NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

WEDDING INVITATIONS printed and designed by Lee Publications: 100 (4.5x6) Invitations including envelopes with 100 RSVP postcards. Only $150.00 +tax. We can also do smaller and larger amounts. Call for pricing and designs 518-673-0101, or bsnyder@leepub.com Also Save the Dates • Shower Invitations • Baby Announcements and more.

Roofing

Roofing

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Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers

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High producing 400 cow dairy seeks caring, experienced person to assist with daily health & reproductive programs of cows & heifers. May also include parlor staff supervision & administration of mastitis program. Experience or 2 year dairy science degree required. Competitive salary with housing available. 50 to 55 hours per week. Wonderful location in Western New York with excellent school district.

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Country Folks and Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle

have over 40,000 readers split among 4 geographic editions covering from North Carolina to Maine. Give us a call today to place your ad and reach as many of them as you wish!

800-836-2888

Do You Grow or Sell Fruits, Vegetables, Greenhouse or Nursery Crops? If You Answered Yes You May be Interested in Our

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Page 17 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 18

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. E m a i l : jkarkwren@leepub.com JUL 8-12 Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association & the American Society of Animal Science Indianapolis, IN. 35 symposia on topics such as animal genetics, food science and animal well being. On Internet at jtmtg.org JUL 9 Maryland Horse Industry Board to Meet Capitol Polo Club (CPC), 14660 Hughes Rd., Poolesville, MD. 10 am. The meeting will include a discussion on updates of MHIB initiatives, reports from Board representatives and stable inspector. In addition, David Plummer, district manager of the Montgomery Soil Conservation District, will present information on new soil conservation and water quality plans and how they affect equine establishments. At the conclusion of the regular meeting, Neil Agate, a CPC board member and player, will give a presentation about polo. For more information, contact MHIB Executive Director Ross Peddicord at ross.peddicord@maryland.gov or at 410-841-5798. MDA’s Invasive Plants Advisory Committee to Meet Capitol Polo Club (CPC), 14660 Hughes Rd., Poolesville, MD. 9:30 am noon. The committee will discuss status of risk assessments, signage for Tier 2 plants, permitting and destruction process for Tier 1 plants, outreach to the regulated community, and phasein considerations. JUL 10 Maryland Agricultural Commission to Meet Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA), 50 Harry Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. 8:30 am. Contact Rachel Melvin at 410-841-5882 or Rachel.melvin@maryland.gov Nutrient Management Certification Program for Nursery/Greenhouse Operators Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. 9:30 am. A two day training and certification program for nursery and greenhouse operators who want to become certified by MDA to write and update their own nutrient management plans. For an application, call the MDA or visit www.mda. maryland.gov. Click on Nutrient Management and follow the links to “training classes.” Call 410-841-5959. Rock Springs Agronomy Weed and Insect Tour Penn State Agronomy Research Farm, Rock Springs, PA (Meet at the Agronomy Farm, Rock Springs, Rt. 45 west of State

College, enter Gate D). Directions to the research farm and additional information about the facility can be found at http://agsci.psu.edu/ research/centers/ rock-springs. Registration will begin at 8:30 am, lunch at noon, and we will conclude with the insect tour by 2 pm. Registration is $20 and includes a tour book and the noon meal. To register, go to http://agsci.psu.edu/ weed-insect-tour, you may pay online with any major credit card or mail your check made payable to ‘Penn State’ to Rock Springs Agronomy Weed and Insect Tour, Attn:

Registration, 323 Ag Administration Building, University Park, PA 16802 or call toll free 877-489-1398 or FAX 814863-7776. For additional information contact Lisa Crytser or 814-865-2543 or Bill Curran or 814-863-1014. JUL 17 SSCC Meeting Holiday Inn in Solomons. The meeting is open to the public and will focus on soil conservation and water quality program implementation and policy development. It is being held in conjunction with the summer meeting of the Maryland Association of Soil Conservation Districts. For more

information, contact Louise Lawrence at 410-841-5863. JUL 23-24 National Mastitis Council Regional Meeting DoubleTree Hotel, Portland, ME. This two day conference will consist of educational seminars in addition to specialized, interactive short courses. Individuals will be able to select specific topics of interest to them. Contact NMC Office, 608-848-4615 or e-mail nmc@nmconline.org AUG 2 Nutrient Management Certification Exam Annapolis, Salisbury and

McHenry. Individuals who provide nutrient recommendations, professionals who provide technical assistance or are engaged in the development of waste management systems, nursery personnel, and farmers interested in developing nutrient management plans for other farmers are encouraged to take the exam. The cost is $50, however, government employees and farmers who have previously taken the exam are exempt from the certification fee. The application deadline is July 26. For registration forms, call the Maryland

Department of Agriculture. Call 410-841-5959. AUG 14-16 10th Annual NAMA Boot Camp Sheraton Crown Center, Kansas City, MO. On Internet at www.nama.org/ programs/index.html OCT 22-24 75th Annual Cornell Nutrition Conference Syracuse, NY. Contact Heather (Howland) Darrow, 607-255-4478 or e-mail dmconf@cornell.edu

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Come See Us at Jan. 16-17-18

AG PROGRESS DAYS Booth ECMB - ECM Bldg

2014 AUGUST 13, 14, 15 2013 Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4, Sat. 9-3

Augusta Expo

Fishersville, VA

Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center 9 Miles SW of State College, PA

Don’t Miss These Exhibitors!! Advanced Agra Service, LLC • 131 Agco Corp • 180, O-3 Agri-King • A Agri-SC • 126 Airgas • 141, 142 American Farm Products • 304 Animat, Inc • 328 Augusta Co-op Farm Bureau • 127 Bath Fitter • 308 Beverage Tractor • 100, 102 Binkley & Hurst Lp • 178 Bonny View Farm • 120A, 121 C&C Farm Supply • 134, 135 Cargill Animal Nutrition • 145 Channel • 318 Charvin Farm Ag Plastics • 215 Chemgro • 166 Christian Farmers Outreach • 322 Cobra Torches • 309 Conklin Agrovantage • 319 Crop Care • 104A Cummings & Bricker Inc • 105, 106 Dupont Pioneer • 129 Dyna Products • O-14A Family Farm Casualty Ins. Co • 169 Farm Credit • 125 Farmer Boy Ag • 118, 119 First Bank & Trust Co • 138 Fisher Auto Parts • 230 For-Most Livestock Equipment-Garber Farms • O-7 GCR Tire Center • 162, 163 General Fertilizer Equipment • 103 Growers Mineral Solutions • 155 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 109 Haybuster / Duratech • 332, 333 Headwaters Contruction Company, Inc • 327, O-2AA Headwaters Soil & Water Conservation District • 132, 133 Helena Chemical Company • 150 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 156, 157 Houff’s Feed & Fertilizer • 130 Huffman Trailer Sales • O-1 IBA, Inc • 112 Independent Ag Equipment (formerly GVM) • 122, 123 Iva Manufacturing • 179 James River Equipment • 330 Koch Agronomic Services, LLC • 144 Kuhn North America, Inc • 329 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • 124 Lancaster Farming • O-21 Lanco-Pennland Milk Producers • 161 Lawrence Ag Equipment • 104 Liskey Truck Sales • O-4A Marco Metals LLC • 324

May Supply • 120 Mid-Atlantic Irrigation Co., Inc • 101 Morris Distributing • 228 Morton Buildings, Inc • 115 Organic Valley - CROPP Cooperative • 310 Outback Heating, Inc • 108 Outside Heating, Inc • 314 P. Bradley & Sons • 104B, O-2 PA Country Equipment • 202A, 203 PBZ LLC • 104A Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-13 ProAg • 153, 154 Quality Craft Tools • G Quality Metal Works Inc • 184, 185 Recyc Systems, Inc • 313 Rockbridge Farmers Coop • 148 Rockydale Quarries Corp • 160 Ryder Supply Company • 302 Stor-Loc • 320, 321 SuKup Manufacturing • 181 T.A. Seeds • 113, 114 Taylor Manufacturing, Inc • 211 Tech Mix Global • 305 The Power Connection, Inc • 136, 137 Tractor Care Inc • 176, 176 Trissel Equipment Sales • 107 Trouble Free Lighting • 146 United DHIA • 306 Valley Feed Co • 300 Valmetal / Jamesway Farm Equipment • 174 Virginia Bin Service • 312 Virginia Farm Bureau • 177 Virginia Silo • 166 Whitesel Brothers Inc • 128 Williams Brothers Tree & Lawn Service • 303 Wood-Mizer, LLC • O-9 Zimmerman Cattle Control • 104A Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 151, 152 SKID STEER RODEO SPONSORS Virginia Farm Bureau ~ Diamond TROPHY SPONSOR Virginia Farm Bureau

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586

Page 19 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • July 8, 2013

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!


July 8, 2013 • COUNTRY FOLKS MID-ATLANTIC • Section B - Page 20

SMITH’S IMPLEMENTS, INC. YOUR LOCAL JOHN DEERE DEALER

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HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT 530 MoCo, Roll Conditioner, 9’9” Cut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 (M) 446 Round Baler, 4x4, 540 PTO, Single Hyd. Tie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,900 (M) 457 Round Baler, hyd, twine tie only, hi-flo tires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,900 (M) 567 Round Baler, 5x6, Net Wrap, Push Bar, Mega-Wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,900 (H) 625 MoCo, Impeller Conditioner, Very Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,200 (M) 926 MoCo, Impeller, 9’9” Cut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,900 (CH) 930 MoCo, Impeller Conditioner, Consignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,000 (H) 3950 PTFH with 2 Row Head, Nice Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 (H) 3970 Pull Type Forage Harvester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 (M) SKID STEERS NH L185 SS Foot Control, 6850 Hrs., Cab, Heat, A/C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,500 (CH) JD 260 SS Loader, Series 2, 2 Sp., Foot Control, 1400 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,900 (M) JD 320 SS-cab, heat, air, 5850 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming in (CH) TRACTORS Agco 6670 4WD, Cab, 70hp, Approx 7,000 Hrs, 3 SCV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,900 (M) Ford 4610 4WD, loader, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming in (CH) Kubota M7040HD 4x4 Loader, Open Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26,000 (CH) JD 5510N with 520 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In (CH) JD 6410 Open State 4x4, 16 Spd., Power Quad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,900 (M) JD 7920 w/IVT, w/746 SL Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$126,900 (M) JD 7920 IVT, TLS, 3000 Hrs, 3 SCV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$114,700 (CH) JD 7930 IVT, TLS, 746 SL Loader, 4 SCV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$159,900 (M) (2) JD 8320R w/IVT, ILS, 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call For Details (M) PLANTERS JD 1770NT 12 row, 2007, XP row units, markers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In (H) JD 1780 6/11 row XP row units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call (M) JD 7000 6 row conservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call (CH) MISC. Bush Hog CR15 15’ Batwing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 (H) JD 215 Disk 12’ Dual Wheel, C Spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 (M) JD 950 12’ Roller Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 (M) *NEW* Sno-Way 90” Snowplow, JD 500 Series Loader Mounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 (M) 4-N-1 Bucket, As Is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800 (M) NI 3739 Spreader, Single Beater, End Gate, Tandem Axle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In (CH) JD JD JD JD JD JD JD JD JD

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DRAMATIC PRICE REDUCTION TO MOVE AGED EQUIPMENT

Hay Merger, 12’ Wide Pickup, Side Pull, NEW! $26,300

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Smith’s Implements, Inc. Your Forage Harvester Specialist Locations in

(M) Mercersburg, PA 12258 Buchanan Trail West 717-328-2244

(CH) Chambersburg, PA 3213 Black Gap Road 717-263-4103

(CA) Carlisle, PA 1 Roadway Dr. 717-249-2313

(H) Hagerstown, MD 13115 Cearfoss Way Pike 301-733-1873


Country Folks Mid-Atlantic 7.8.13