Page 1

1 AUGUST 2011 Section One of Two Volume 29 Number 20

$1.99

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Averill Farm’s loyal customers keep coming back ~ Page 3 Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly B2 Crop Comments A6 Focus on Ag A11 Alternative Fuels A8 Auctions B1 Certified Crop Advisers B14 Classifieds B19 Farmer to Farmer A20 Truck A17 EMPIRE FARM DAYS

Annual 4-H Country Fair a huge success! ~ Page 2

Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. ~ Hebrews 11:1


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Annual 4-H Country Fair a Huge Success! by Sanne Kure-Jensen “Fair attendance was the best in years,” said exhibitor Dave Warren about the 2011 Fair held July 16 and 17 at Glen Park in Portsmouth, RI. The Eastern RI 4-H Country Fair is a wonderful local Country Fair organized by volunteers offering a wide variety of family activities for an unbelievable cost of just $1 admission. The Fair is held each year on the third weekend in July. For more photos, visit www. eri4hfair.webs.com Free contests were open to the public: Skillet Throwing, Pie Eating, Watermelon Eating, Ice Cream Eating, Dairy, Beef, Goat, Poultry, Rabbit and Pet Shows, Ongoing Children Games, Tractor Driving and Tractor Pulls. There was a Climbing Wall, piñata, Farm and Garden Tractor Pull, Antique Tractor and a Children’s Bike Parade. Glen Ridge Farm brought their alpacas; Talons! Birds of Prey brought a Falcon, Raven and European Owl. Hug-a-Bunny, pony rides and a cow train ride were available for kids. Cow Chip Bingo tickets were also available for a small donation. Student Exhibits included baked goods, jams, flowers, crafts and educational posters. Demonstrations included a long row of antique tractors, a 1919 corn sheller and 1943 Hammer Mill corn mill. Members of the Aquidneck Island Indian Tribe shared traditional stories; the Barnyard Buckaroos, the Toe Jam Puppet Band and Cat Country Radio shared great music. Villari’s Martial Arts Center students showed their audience why we shouldn’t mess with them. The Town Howlers - Square Dancers and the Stage Door Dancers gave demonstration under the pavilion. The Lions

Club ran the kitchen. Local vendors offered specialty drinks, snacks, crafts, jewelry and other specialty items. A sold-out chicken barbecue was held on Saturday night. Attendees were treated to a great meal, a fundraising auction and live music performed by the Barnyard Buckaroo’s Country Band. Proceeds from the barbecue raised funds for 4H scholarships. The Eastern Rhode Island 4-H Country Fair was originally called the Newport County 4-H Fair and Horse Show, started in 1968. Organizers included the 4-H Clubs of Portsmouth and Tiverton, as well as the Tiverton and Middletown Livestock Clubs. That first event included a Dairy Show organized by the Newport County 4-H Dairy Club, and a Horse Show organized by the Aquidneck Riders 4-H Club. The Tractor operating contest winners went on to compete in a state competition. There are four annual Fairs held across Rhode Island which include 4H competitions. The Southern Rhode Island Fair was held June 24 - 26 at the Washington County Fairgrounds. The Eastern Rhode Island 4-H Country Fair held July 16-17 in Portsmouth. The Northern RI 4-H Club’s Foster Fair/Old Home Days to be held this July 29 - 31. The Washington County Fair will be held this Aug. 17 - 21 in Richmond, RI. For links to RI’s 4-H Fairs, see www.uri.edu/4h/?page_id=216. Many successful competitors go on to the Big E to be held this Sept.16 Oct. 2 in West Springfield, MA. For more information on this event, see www.thebige.com/fair.

Joe Silvia fills a 1919 Corn Sheller with shucked, dry corn. After the kernels are removed from the ear, they move onto the Hammer Mill Corn Mill for grinding.

What it takes to compete in 4-H Fair Dairy contest by Sanne Kure-Jensen PORTSMOUTH, RI — 4-H stands for Head, Heart, Hands and Health. 4-H Clubs were set up by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to train students in agriculture and raising animals. The goal was to connect education to farming while encouraging a sense of community and personal responsibility. These programs have expanded to include overall nutrition and well-being. Many 4-H Clubs still help raise and sell livestock. The Eastern Rhode Island 4-H Country Fair is held annually at Glen Park in Portsmouth, RI, on the third weekend in July. The mission is to raise funds for 4-H Club scholarships and to give the 4-H’ers a venue for competition and public outreach. To compete in the 4-H Dairy Contest, 4-H’ers started working with young heifers and registered for the Diary Competition by May 1. Louis Escobar of Highland Farms said nearly 20 4-H’ers made regular visits to his farm earlier this season, working with the farm’s heifers and practicing walking and working together. 4-H’ers also learned how to wash and groom their animals. Seven Rhode Island farms worked

with students and supplying dairy and beef cattle for the 4-H Fair. The participating farms included Escobar Highland Farm, Soares Dairy Farm, Little Acres, Cottrell Homestead Dairy Farm, Emma Acres and more. All delivered their animals to the fairgrounds Friday afternoon before the fair officially opened. State Veterinarians or Health Inspectors reviewed all required rabies vaccination papers and vet inspection certifications for Foot-Rot, Mange, Pinkeye, Ringworm, Warts, Cowpox Tuberculosis and Brucellosis before livestock could be unloaded. For handler and audience safety, horned livestock are never allowed at fairs, except for working steers, Hereford heifers, Scottish Highlander heifers, Texas Longhorn heifers and dairy heifers under 5 months old. No beef class steers are allowed with horns. Animals must be under control at all times; animals that present a danger or are unmanageable could be disqualified at any time. Farmers were advised to isolate all animals upon their return to the farm after exhibition to watch them for signs of any potential disease exposure. What it takes A4

The Watermelon Eating Contest was led by Tom and Robin Ney of Middletown, RI. The ‘7 and Under’ group was the first of many exciting races to see who could eat their piece of watermelon fastest — with no hands. Photos by Sanne Kure-Jensen


Averill Farm’s loyal customers keep coming back markets, and it’s labeled that it isn’t pasteurized.” Cider is a good fit with a PYO apple orchard. Customers pick about 90 percent of the apples, and those that aren’t picked are used for cider. To ensure that PYO customers pick only apples that can be reached easily from the ground, the Averills keep the trees well-pruned and have an employee who picks ahead of where customers will be picking. “We try to pick only what’s ready,” said Susan. “That can be challenging, but we try to stick to it because then our apples taste good. If someone picks a Macoun at the end of August and it isn’t ready until the middle of September, it isn’t going to taste as good.” When customers arrive at the farm, they check a large board at the farm stand that lists varieties ready for picking along with row identification for each variety. Susan says that many customers use their cell phones to take a snapshot of the board for reference in the field. “Because we’re small, we talk with everyone who comes and tell them what’s what,” said Susan. “If they ask for something that isn’t ready, we let them know when it will be ready. People are going crazy for Honeycrisp, but those trees are young and we don’t have a huge supply. A lot of people come in October for winter apples such as Idared and Crispin (Mutsu).” Realizing the importance of maintaining a connection with their customers prior to the PYO season, the Averills set up at two farmers’ markets and sell homemade jams, jellies and the farm’s signature product: homemade apple cider donuts. “We can forge a relationship with the customer,” said Susan, “and it’s wonderful to have something else to sell if there’s a bad apple crop. It keeps people coming early and late in the season.” Susan says on busy fall weekends, the farm kitchen’s two donut makers are running constantly. “Between using our own cider and

The farm stand at Averill Farm is busy from late summer to Christmas with offerings that include the farm's own products as well as items from nearby farms.

only selling donuts the day they’re made, we’ve become locally famous. We like the fact that people have to come to our farm or farmers’ market to get them. We have greater control over the product that way.” Each season, the Averills freeze cider so that there’s plenty for late-season donuts and before the PYO season begins. Averill Farm grows about 100 apple varieties; 20 of which are PYO. Susan says they aren’t following the trend toward dense trellis plantings for several reasons. “We have plenty of land,” she said. Sofie and Riva Martin working on thinning apples at Averill Farm. “We’re doing new Photos courtesy of Averill Farm plantings on dwarf rootstock with a events each season including local stake rather than wire trellis so that authors and book signings. “We’re very customers can walk around the trees low key,” said Susan. “We don’t have a easily. Making it a nice experience for lot going on, just a few special events. our customers is definitely most “A friend brings alpacas on Sundays in important.” October, and someone brings goats In addition to apples, the Averills milk soap on Saturdays.” At the begingrow a variety of pears for PYO. A pres- ning of the apple-picking season, sure tester on pears helps determine Connecticut chef and author Emily optimum picking time. Pears are Brooks will be at the farm, and Tractor offered as PYO only until they’re too Mac author Billy Steers will be there in ripe — remaining pears go into cold late September. storage. Averill Farm supports other “We like to be hands-on and we like local farms through purchasing fall to meet the customers,” said Susan, favorites such as mums, pumpkins, adding that Sam likes to take care of gourds, squash, garlic, maple prod- the trees himself. “It’s changed a lot ucts and potatoes for sale at their farm since we took over from his parents — stand. They also grow several acres of it’s supporting us. We’re happy with Christmas trees, which are offered as where we are now.” choose and cut. Visit Averill Farm on line at The farm features several special www.averillfarm.com

Sam Averill, on right, and long-time Averill Farm employee Warren Walker, Jr. check a load of just-picked apples.

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

by Sally Colby Sam Averill is the ninth generation to operate a historic 250-acre Washington Depot, CT, farm that’s been in the family since 1746. Sam’s father sold apples by the bushel or half-bushel directly from the field while his mother sold them from a stand in front of the house. When Sam and his wife Susan took over the farm in 1993, they knew they wanted to construct a farm stand. “Everyone told us it should be near the road,” said Susan. “But we were used to being up in the field where the view is fantastic. We decided to take a chance on that location.” It was worth the risk. The farm stand sits on a knoll in the middle of a field with outstanding views in all directions. Susan says that customers enjoy the drive up a long, dirt driveway, then seeing the farm stand and the trees when they arrive. Sam and Susan continued to develop the PYO started by Sam’s father in 1965, and added related products, such as cider. But when regulations for making and selling cider in Connecticut changed, the Averills had to come up with an alternative to satisfy their loyal customers. “We used to take our apples to a nearby cider mill,” said Susan, “but new state regulations required cider to be made and sold on site.” Susan says that for a while, they offered pasteurized cider from another orchard, but customers were disappointed with the flavor. “We were disappointed too,” she said. “We weren’t selling the kind of product we like.” Since the Averills were planning to add a commercial kitchen to their farm stand, they included a cider-making room in the plans. They purchased a rack and cloth press from a nearby orchard and were back in the cider business. “We started making cider the way we like it,” said Susan, adding that they only use fruit that’s picked from trees then washed. “We can sell it directly from farm and at farmers’


Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

MPC Board officially endorses Representative Peterson’s legislation implementing “Foundation for the Future” Recently, the Board of Directors of Milk Producers Council (MPC) voted to endorse legislation unveiled by Congressman Collin Peterson (D-Minnesota), which would implement reforms to our national dairy policies and is based on National Milk Producers Federation’s (NMPF) “Foundation for the Future” proposal. The “discussion draft” of the legislation, along with a detailed summary of the bill, can be found at: http://democrats. agriculture.house.gov/p ress/PRArticle.aspx?Ne wsID=1118. “With this vote, the MPC Board sent a strong message that it’s time for dairy farmers from coast-to-coast to rally behind a common plan,” said MPC President Sybrand Vander Dussen, a dairyman from Corona, CA. “We have a rare opportunity to get much-needed fundamental improvements for the producer side of our industry, and Rep.

Peterson’s legislation is the only shot we have at getting those positive reforms approved by Congress and implemented.” The legislative draft released by Peterson, who is the Ranking Democrat on the U.S. House of Representative’s Agriculture Committee, includes the three main pieces outlined in NMPF’s Foundation for the Future: • Dairy Market Stabilization Program (DMSP) • Dairy Producer Margin Protection Program (DPMPP) • Reform of Federal Milk Marketing Orders Prior to endorsing Foundation for the Future, the MPC Board had the opportunity to review Congressman Peterson’s draft of the legislation, which includes some modifications from the original plan outlined by NMPF. These changes were made in an effort to

make the legislation more appealing to a Congress that is clearly in a serious cost-cutting mode. “While we’d probably all prefer to operate in a world where Congressional budget constraints don’t exist, the fact is that they do, and these changes are part of that reality,” said Rob Vandenheuvel, MPC’s General Manager. “At the end of the day, the structure of the legislation remains intact, with a standby, rarelyused Market Stabilization tool that will empower dairy farmers to collectively respond to market imbalances while not impeding our ability to grow the industry longterm, a dramatically improved safety net that treats all dairies the same and fundamental reforms of Federal Orders. This is a package of reforms that the MPC Board is proud to support.” The International

Cover photo by: Sanne Kure-Jensen

Ali Costa prepares for the Dairy Show with a heifer from Escobar’s Highland Farm in Portsmouth, RI.

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470 Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $45 per year, $75 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Sales & Marketing...............Janet Lee Stanley, 518-673-0133................... jstanley@leepub.com V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas ................................................Albany, NY ................................................518-456-0603 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................802-222-5726 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) — the main lobbying organization for the nation’s dairy product processing companies that purchase a majority of the nation’s milk supply — has come out strongly against this legislation. They aim most of their opposition at the Dairy Market Stabilization Program that could temporarily trigger in when needed and empower the nation’s roughly 60,000 dairy farmers to collectively respond to market imbalances. IDFA is counting on dairy farmers doing what we often do: letting regional or size differences get in the way of unifying behind a common plan. “I’ve often said that if you put 10 dairymen in a room, you’ll get 12 opinions, and they’re all firm,” said Vander Dussen. “We’ve had that luxury in the past. But the last 2 1/2 years have taught us a valuable lesson — we have a woefully inadequate system that leaves our nation’s dairy farmers powerless in this highly volatile market. As dairy farmers, we need to put aside perceived differences and act as one unified industry.”

“This legislation will have things that producers like and things they don’t,” said Vandenheuvel. “In an industry with farmers in every region and of every size, that type of comprehensive package is the only chance we have of unifying our industry. It’s time to show Congress and the processors that buy our milk that dairy farmers are capable of working together to improve the lives of all dairies from coast-to-coast.” Background The three pieces of Rep. Peterson’s legislation are: • Dairy Market Stabilization Program (DMSP) — This is a stand-by program that triggers in only when the “margin” (U.S. all-milk price minus feed cost calculation) dips below $6 per cwt for two consecutive months. The DMSP provides a temporary incentive for all dairies to cut back milk production. Once markets recover and the “margin” is greater than $6 per cwt for two consecutive months, the DMSP is lifted, and is on standby again until the next time the margin cal-

culation compresses below $6 per cwt. • Dairy Producer Margin Protection Program (DPMPP) — This is a safety net program that would replace the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) and Dairy Product Price Support Program (DPPSP). The DPMPP would provide “margin protection” for all dairies when the margin (again, U.S. all-milk price minus feed cost calculation) dips below $4 per cwt. Individual dairies can elect to increase their “margin protection” above $4 per cwt. for a pre-determined annual premium (this is called the “supplemental margin protection”). • Reform of Federal Milk Marketing Orders (FMMO) — In short, these reforms would remove end-product pricing and the use of make allowances for milk sold to all plants other than Class I bottling plants, and replace it with a competitive, market-based system. More information can be found on National Milk Producers Federation’s Web site at www.futurefordairy.com.

More than 100 compete at Vermont 4-H horse show ESSEX JUNCTION, VT — A total of 136 young equestrians from 17 different 4-H clubs competed in the annual Vermont 4-H Horse Show, July 14-17, sponsored by University of Vermont Extension. It was held at the Addison County Fair and Field Days site in New Haven. Caitlin Ackerman, Jericho; Hillary Fay, Westford; Alexandra Glover, Newfane; and Kyla Ward, Jericho; earned the Outstanding 4-H Member award, presented for overall achievement in the UVM Extension 4-H horse program. To be eligible for this prestigious award, individuals must be selected to participate in the New England 4-H Horse Show at Eastern Exposition in West Springfield, MA, three times and the Eastern National 4-H Horse Roundup in Kentucky three times. A special award also was given to the 4-H'er with the highest point total at the show by the Ackerman family of Jericho. They presented the award in honor of their daughter Caitlin's horse Designated Hitter, who died recently. This horse helped her achieve the Outstanding 4-H Member award. This year's recipient was Alexandra Glover of Newfane. The 4-H Club Award went to the Flying Hooves 4-H Club of Colchester. This honor is given to the club whose members — based on the top three

scores in each category — perform the best at the show in general knowledge, judging, quiz bowl, horseless general knowledge test, fitting and showmanship and 4-H project classes. The Starry Nights 4-H Club of Jericho placed second and the Horsepower 4-H Club of Castleton, third. Debbie Danforth of Castleton won the Melissa Issler Alumni Equitation Class for 4-H alumni who competed in the show as 4-H'ers. Danforth participated in the first 4-H horse show in 1976. The award is given annually in memory of Missy Issler, a 4-H horse club member who died in 1999. Grace Miller of Glover took home two special awards. For her first-place finish in the pleasure class, she earned the Jim Wallace Memorial Pleasure Class Award, presented to honor the memory of Wallace, a 4-H parent who volunteered at the show for many years. The 4-H'er also won the versatility class, receiving the Marci Mac plaque, given by Mary Fay, a long-time 4-H horse leader and volunteer, in memory of her horse, Marci Mac, who was shown by several 4-H members over the years as their project horse. For information about the UVM Extension 4-H Horse Program and other 4-H horse events, contact Mary Fay, 4-H horse middle manager, at 802-656-0648 or 800-571-0668, tollfree, or mary.fay@uvm.edu


Monitoring bales can stop hay fires before they start

What it takes

with a piece of light wire. After 10 to 15 minutes, pull the thermometer out and read the temperature. George Cook, University of Vermont Extension farm safety specialist, recommends inserting a small wad of sheep’s wool into the upper end of the pipe, then ramming that down to the end of the pipe prior to lowering the thermometer. It cushions the bottom and lowers the risk of breaking your thermometer. As a rule of thumb, if the temperature is less than 130 degrees F, continue monitoring the temperature twice a day. If it falls between 130 and 140 degrees F, the temperature may go up or down. Recheck in a few hours. If the temperature is 150 degrees F, the temperature will most likely continue to climb. Move the bales to promote air circulation and cooling. If the hay is stored inside, evacuate any livestock to a safe area and remove hay from the building. Monitor the temperature every two hours. Fire is imminent if interior bale temperatures exceed 175 degrees F. Fire is present at temperatures greater than 200 degrees F. In either situation, call the fire department immediately. Continue probing and monitoring the temperature. Other symptoms of hot hay or an internal hay fire include a slight caramel or strong burning odor, visible vapor or smoke, a strong musty smell and/or hay that feels hot to the touch. If any of these symptoms occur, again, call the fire department immediately. Let firefighters take control of the situation once they arrive. Do not move hay if signs of fire are present.

As a rule of thumb, if the temperature is less than 130° F, continue monitoring the temperature twice a day. If it falls between 130 and 140° F, the temperature may go up or down. Recheck in a few hours. Moving hay exposes the overheated or smoldering hay to oxygen and may cause the fire to burn uncontrollably. I personally have experienced two fires on our farm so I know how devastating this can be to farmers. The first, a barn fire of unknown origin in 2001, changed our lives completely.

NFU leads coalition calling for resolution to debt ceiling talks

from A2

4-H’ers provided feed for their animals; bedding was provided by show managers. 4-H’ers had to remain with their animals or arrange for animal supervision during all Fair hours. Night watchmen escorted everyone off fair grounds each night as camping was not allowed at this Fair. Rhode Island Law does not allow the public to enter animal stalls or to touch livestock and birds to limit the spread of disease. All participants had to work on and show their own animals or risk disqualification. When a 4-H member entered multiple animals (owned or managed), show rules allowed another 4-H’er to show alternate animals. Parents, leaders and former 4H’ers were only allowed to guide and instruct 4-H’ers and not assist in grooming or showing. Standard 4-H show clothing was recommended: livestock exhibitors wore white or khaki pants or skirts with white collared shirts. No brief shorts or clothing advertising a farm or breed were allowed. Leather work shoes or boots were required at all times to reduce the chance of injury from animals. The Danish Group Award System is used in all 4H Competitions because all participants who reach the standard level of excellence are awarded recognition (blue, red or white ribbons). Youth compete against their personal records and no one is left out. For questions on Rhode Island State Animal Health Regulations, contact Scott Marshall, DVM, Rhode Island State Veterinarian, Animal Health Section, Division of Agriculture, 235 Promenade Street, Providence, RI 02908 or call 401-222-2781. For more information on the Eastern RI 4-H Country Fair and to view photos from past Fairs, visit www.eri4hfair.webs.com. To view the National 4-H Dairy Cattle Curriculum visit www.4h.org/resource-library/curriculum/4-h-dairy-cattle

We are no longer dairying although we continue to make dry hay, both large and small square bales, for sale to other farmers. Don’t think that it can’t happen on your farm. It can, unless you take steps to prevent spontaneous combustion in newly cut, baled hay.

Michael Small heads for the show ring with a heifer from Escobar’s Highland Farm in Portsmouth, RI.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — National Farmers Union (NFU) led a coalition of organizations in sending a letter to President Obama and leadership in the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives urging them to reach a timely resolution to the debt ceiling negotiations. “As organizations that have a stake in agriculture and a robust rural economy, we urge a timely resolution to the ongoing debt ceiling negotiations,” the letter stated. “A long-term, comprehensive solution that reduces federal deficits must be found. Such an agreement will also establish budget certainty for all federal policies, including upcoming farm bill negotiations.” NFU President Roger Johnson said that agriculture has already taken a $6 billion reduction in its budget and is willing to do its share, but that further cuts should be overseen by authorizing committees in the House and Senate. “The Senate and House Agriculture Committees must be allowed to determine how any further budget reductions are made,” said Johnson. “These committees have the expertise to best evaluate specific programs and to include any changes in the 2012 Farm Bill in a manner that does not disrupt long-term commitments reflected in current farm legislation.”

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

by Gail Lapierre, Vermont AgrAbility Project Outreach Specialist, University of Vermont Extension This is the time of year that spontaneous combustion in hay causes fires. This occurs when freshly cut hay is too moist when it’s baled. How do hay fires happen? Here’s the simple, short explanation. All bales heat up from respiration in the plant cells, which continues at a low rate if hay is baled at less than 15 to 20 percent moisture. This heating up process eventually ends without causing combustion. However, if the moisture level is too high (over 20 percent), the heat from respiration combined with the moisture promotes bacterial and mold growth. The respiration of the bacteria and mold releases more heat into the bale, increasing risk of fire. The temperature of hay, especially if it was baled at a high moisture concentration, needs to be checked twice a day for six weeks after baling. You can make a simple temperature probe using a three-quarter-inch diameter pipe. Drill eight holes, each about threesixteenth inch, around the diameter of the pipe about three inches from one end. Then hammer the sides of that end together to form a sharp edge. Always check the temperature in the center of the stacked hay. Do not walk directly on the stacked hay as pockets may have already burned out under the hay surface. Instead, place boards or a ladder on the hay and walk on those. Drive the probe from the top of the stack into the inner-most bales. Lower a thermometer to the end of the probe


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Field Crops Consultant Corn futures Grain supplies and costs continue to plague livestock people. We need to remind ourselves that ruminant digestive systems are designed to process roughages first, then grains second… a distant second. I dug up prices for commodity grains on the Chicago Board of Trade (September futures), converted from bushels to tons. As of July 26, these are the prices per ton which I consider most relevant to dairy farmers. Understand that these are Chicago prices, but that their relative costs give producers useful information for feeding management decisions. Soybean oil meal at $362,

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

soybeans at $457, shelled corn at $244, and wheat at $231. However, there are three major unknowns, for future grain prices that would affect dairymen. First, will China go on a major grain buying binge like it did earlier this year? Chinese powers-that-be say they have achieved their sought-after grain reserves and are able to maintain them at desired equilibrium with their own anticipated domestic grain harvest, particularly corn... but that situation could change overnight. Secondly, just how overly optimistic are USDA grain yield forecasts? Official, albeit un-

warranted, hints at impending bumper crops tend to keep current and future commodity prices lower than they should be. In reality, USDA’s Agricultural Research Service showed some pretty dismal starts for spring plantings, and even some pretty miserable over-wintering scenarios for fall-planted small grains. Most recently, government crop forecasters seem to ignore the massive destruction wrought by Missouri River floods on hundreds of thousands of Midwest crop acres. Thirdly, there’s cornbased ethanol, a variable which is very much up in the air. An excellent article in the June 25 issue

of The Economist, a British weekly, was titled “Fiscal sobriety: A bipartisan vote to end ethanol subsidies is a small but heartening sign”. Since 2004, blenders have received a credit, now worth 45 cents, for each gallon of ethanol they mix with regular gasoline. This benefit reaches farmers… as well as the many non-farm members of the various corn lobby groups (such as Archer Daniels Midland). Also, a 54 cent tariff on imports keeps out ethanol made more cheaply from Brazilian sugar cane. Finally, on June 16, U.S. senators from both parties voted by sizeable margins to repeal a tax credit and tariff on ethanol. Ethanol produces about 30 percent less energy than petroleum-based gasoline and requires the burning of fossil fuels in its production. How soon the House of Representatives will follow the Senate’s

attack on ethanol remains to be seen. Controversial laws establishing the subsidy and tariff in question are scheduled to run out at year’s end. What all three of these unknowns emphasize is dairymen’s need to maximize use of forages (minimize the use of concentrates), and maintain a diverse portfolio of grains fed to their cows. I am making six proposals (to counter three uncertainties). First, back down on grain fed to milking cows. If you have the barn space, plenty of good, preferably home grown, forage, and ample cow numbers, you will be able to feed less total grain to five cows averaging 60 pounds of milk than to four cows averaging 75 pounds of milk. A 60 pound cow can usually be fed one pound of grain for each four pounds of milk, while a 75 pound cow normally requires one pound of

grain for every three pounds of milk. Therefore the five cows end up requiring 25 pounds less grain than the six higher producing cows. Total milk production is the same for each group, but the lower-producing cows will want to replace some of that concentrate with more forage at a much lower cost per pound of dry matter. Another thing to consider is that the lower producing cows often stay in the herd longer enough to outproduce the higher producing cows on a lifetime basis. Second, pasture dairy cattle as early as possible in the spring, and as late as possible in the fall. Fall-planted winter small grains green up in the spring much earlier than perennial pastures. (Remember to supplement these early winter annual pastures with magnesium, since they tend to be low in this nu-

Crop A7

Capital Tractor Carries All The Parts, Equipment & Service That You Will Need www.capitaltractorinc.com

CAPITAL TRACTOR, INC. 1135 State Rte. 29 Greenwich, NY 12834

Since 1966 www.capitaltractorinc.com

(518) 692-9611 FAX (518) 692-2210

TRACTORS 1996 JD 5200 w/JD 540 Loader, 4WD, Cab, 8796 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . $12,950 2007 NH TZ25/Turf Tires w/ New 10LA Loader & New 910BH Backhoe, 73 Hrs., Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,900 1999 JD 5210 4WD w/ JD 540 MSL Loader, Curtis Cab, Power Reverser, 4,081 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,125 2002 Case IH MX240 Front/Rear Duals, 3,644 Hrs., 205 PTO HP, Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $87,500 1994 Ford 1920 4WD, ROPS w/ Ford 7108 Loader, 12x12 Shuttle Trans., 2,410 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 2008 NH TD80 2WD, ROPS, Shuttle, 73 Hrs. Like New . . . . . . . . . $24,300 2004 NH TL90 4WD, ROPS, Excellent Cond, 1,976 Hrs . . . . . . . . $25,900 1997 NH 8770 4WD, Supersteer, Mega Flow Hydraulics, Rear Duals, 7,164 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $53,750 2010 Mahindra 2816 4WD, HST, ROPS, Loader w/Grill Guard, 38 Hrs., Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 1998 NH 8560 4WD, Cab, 130 HP, - 3500 Hrs, Well Maintained.. . $44,950 2009 JD 3032E 4WD, ROPS w/ JD 305 Loader, HST -283 Hrs., Exc. Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,625 2009 NH TD5050 4WD, Cab, 90 HP, 2,500 Hrs., Excellent Cond. . $33,125 1981 JD 2640 2wd Tractor w/JD240 Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,995 2000 NH TS100 4WD, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes, 2135 Hrs. $39,995 2010 Kubota B2920 4wd, HST, ROPS, only 39 Hrs - Like New . . $13,750 2007 NH TN70A 4WD, Cab Tractor w/NH 810TL Loader, Turf Tires or New R4 Construction Tires available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.O.R. 2008 JD 5525 4WD, Cab, w/JD 542 MSL Loader, Power Reverser, 550 Hrs., Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $46,250 2005 NH TL100A 4WD, Cab, w/NH 52LC MSL Loader, 1299 Hrs. . . P.O.R. 1985 Ford 1910 4WD, ROPS, w/Ford 770B Loader, 2349 Hrs. . . . . $5,250 2008 NH TN75A 4WD, Cab, Power Shuttle w/NH 810TL Loader, 900 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,500 Yamaha Rhino UTV, 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,875 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT 2004 NH 92LB Loader w/ 108" Bucket fits NH TG Series or 8000 Series, Excellent Cond., Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 2000 Unverferth 5 Shank Zone Builder, 2 TO CHOOSE FROM . . . $8,400 2008 H & S 235 Manure Spreader Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 2008 Pequea 175 Manure Spreader w/ Hyd. End Gate, T Rod Chain, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,595 2001 Gehl 1075 Forage Harvester, 2 Row Corn Head, Hay Pickup, Metal Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 2009 NH 74CSRA 3Pt Snowblower, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 2000 Gehl 1287 Tandem Manure Spreader, 287 Bushel, Slurry Sides, Hyd. Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,495 2004 Sweepster 3pt. 7’ Broom, Steel/Poly Bristles, Hydraulic Drive, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850

Hesston 7155 Forage Harvester, Hay Pickup and 2 Row Corn Heads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,150 2006 NH 860TL Loader, Fits NH TM Series Tractors, Like New. . . . $6,250 1987 NH 790 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 790W Hay Pickup . . . . . $4,995 2003 Challenger SB34 Inline Square Baler w/Thrower, Hyd. Tension - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,375 Degelman R570P Rock Picker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 2001 Krause 6152 Landsman one pass tillage tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,450 Kelly Ryan Bagger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900 2000 LP RCR 2684 7’ Rotary Cutter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,540 2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2002 H&S XL-00 Forage Box on 10 Ton H&S Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Brillion 24’ Drag Harrow w/Transport Cart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 WIC Cart Mounted Bedding Chopper w/ Honda Engine. . . . . . . . . . $1,450 2003 Kioti KT03-59 3Pt. 59” Rototiller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195 2008 Cole 1 Row 3Pt Planter w/Multiple Seed Plates . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195 1981 NH 320 Baler w/70 Thrower, Hyd. Bale Tension. . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 2001 Keenan FP80 Mixer Wagon, needs new liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2006 LP RCR 35/0 Rotary Cutter, 10’ Good Condition. . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 2008 Case IH SBX540 Square Baler w/Thrower, Like New . . . . . . $23,750 1980 JD Bar Rake w/Dolly Rubber Teeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,395 NH 256 Roll-A-Bar Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,250 JD 336 Baler w/Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 1998 NH 451 3Pt 7’ Sickle Bar Mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $995 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2008 NH W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/ Heat/Air, Bucket/Forks, 290 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/ Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket, 1,211 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $128,500 2009 NH E50B Cab w/ Heat & Air, Blade, Rubber Track, Hyd. Thumb, 348 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,500 2004 Cat 313B-CR Cab, Heat/Air, Removable Rubber Pads on steel Tracks 32” Bucket - 5884 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 1971 6x6 Army Truck Diesel, Dump Box, 37,434 Miles. . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2007/08 (2) NH C185 Track Skid Steer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, 84" Bucket Around 700 Hrs. Each . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Choice $46,250 Mustang MS60P 60” SSL Pickup Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 2004 NH LS150 Skid Steer, Hand Controls, 60” Bucket, 3908 Hrs.. $9,750 ATTACHMENTS 1999 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Good Cond.$3,150 2002 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Like New . . $3,640 2008 Scoop Dogg 8’ Skid Steer Mount Snow Pusher, Powder Coated, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 2008 NH 96” Hyd. Angle Dozer Blade-Demo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,875 2010 N.H./Bradco 6" x 4' Trencher, Skid Steer Mount, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,995 2009 Virnig HD Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/ 9” Auger $2,195


Revisiting ethanol’s impact on corn and feed prices As the debate over ethanol policy continues in Washington, reviewing recent research on the subject of ethanol and corn prices may prove insightful especially when one set of ethanol oppo-

nents blames the biofuel as the leading cause of higher livestock and poultry feed prices. “There is a lot of false rhetoric out there about the impact of ethanol policy on corn prices and by

extension the price of food and feed,” said NCGA President Bart Schott. “The research does not support this rhetoric and it is time to move past this and work together for stronger eco-

nomic security and a broad approach to energy independence that can help reduce costs.” Last month, Bruce Babcock of Iowa State University released a report for the International

Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development that looked at the impact of the ethanol blender’s credit on corn prices and found that corn prices would have been only up to 17 percent lower had

the credit not been extended in late 2010. The report also extends its consideration to prices of corn products and sees a diminishing effect. “Ethanol subsidies

to stretch late grazing way past first snowfall. Intensely grazing cattle

tend to milk quite well and consume much less grain than their confined

counterparts. Third, row cultivate corn even if you’re not organic, because this mechanical secondary tillage not only goes after weeds which escaped the herbicide, it effectively aerates the soil. The fluffed up soil helps capture dew when weather turns dry, plus it will help surplus topsoil moisture evaporate. When the soil is too cool, the introduction of warmer air adds heat to the soil. Oxygen provided by aeration is greatly desired by most crops and actually discourages many weeds. Classic Cornell research just after World War II showed that sprayed corn, as well as unsprayed corn, both showed a 17 percenrt yield improvement caused by two passes with a row cultivator. That’s research which chemical companies would just as soon ignore. Fourth, maintain a diverse portfolio of grains in the milking cow’s diet. Each different grain (and forage for that matter) requires a different team of rumen microbes to digest it. Keeping a little of each commodity in her diet will ensure those differ-

ent microbial populations get what they want and don’t go dormant. If economics suddenly favor wheat strongly, it would be better to increase pounds of wheat per ton from 100 to 500, rather than from zero to 400. Ten pounds of wheat is nutritionally equal to nine pounds of corn and one pound of soybean meal. It’s important to remember that we’re feeding ruminant micro-organisms who then feed their bovine host. Fifth, keep your soil organic matters (O.M.) over three percent. Continuous row-cropping, particularly corn, tends to run organic matter down, and thus the ability of affected soils to hold moisture. USDA data has shown that 100 pounds of dry soil with five percent O.M. can hold 195 pounds water, equal to six inches of rain. Conversely, 100 pounds of soil with two percent O.M. only holds 45 pounds of water, equal to 1.5 inches of rainfall. Soils with less than two percent O.M. tend to experience a lot more nutrient loss through leaching. Sixth and last: Don’t throw away the cob! Researchers over 40 years

ago at the University of Wisconsin and Cornell University showed that, pound for pound, dry ear corn supports as much milk as shell corn. Five pounds of ear corn, if shelled, yields four pounds of kernels and one pound of cob. Thus, one can sensibly calculate that four acres of ear corn supports as much milk as five acres of shelled corn. A respectable yield of ear corn would be five tons per acre. When combined, that acre will place four tons of kernels in the combine bins, and will take back one ton of cobs dropped through the trash. That 2000 pound mass of cobs will have to be replaced by a ton of shelled corn at $244! We need an increased understanding of the ability of the dairy cow to utilize feedstuffs indigestible to simplestomached animals, like ourselves. This understanding will help her feed managers dodge bullets in the form of unstable grain supplies and prices…. uncertainties thrust on them by supply/demand imbalances, most of them political and/or weatherbased, and many of them international.

Revisiting A8

Crop from A6 trient.) In mid-summer plant a grazeable Brassica, like kale or turnips,

FACTORY DIRECT POLE BARN AND PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS

ROOFING AND SIDING PANEL STEEL ROOF, WALL & LINER PANEL 17 COLORS AVAILABLE

$1.80 / Lin. Ft. Complete Wood Packages from 24' x 24' to 106' x 400' Penn State Style Complete All Steel Pkg. up to 200' clear span

29 Ga. Painted $2.55 / Lin. Ft.

Hurry while suppies last

We Are Now Manufacturing Mini-Self Storage Systems Call for Information

1-800-323-7739 (607) 753-9384 607 Rte. 13, Cortland, NY 13045 • A Division of Essex Structural Steel Co. Inc.

Direct-To-Farm Supporting Agriculture Since 1896

CORN & SILAGE HYBRIDS

“Our hybrids provide excellent opportunities for HIGH VALUE RETURN on your investment”.

The Page Seed Company 1A Green Street • Greene, NY 13778 Toll Free: 1-800-688-1896 • Phone: 607-656-4107 Fax: 607-656-5316 • www.pageseed.com Soybeans - Pasture & Forage Grasses Grass & Graze Mixes - Vegetable Seed

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 7

Summer Sale 29 Ga. Galvalume


Roadmap provides direction for ethanol discussions As Congress discusses possible changes to ethanol tax incentives in

ALTERNATIVE FUELS

the days ahead, NCGA and its allies in the ethanol industry are

stressing the commonsense approach of their five-step Ethanol

Roadmap as a concrete pathway for the future, especially the importance

of the need for market access and infrastructure and consumer choice.

“Americans love being offered choices but when

have occurred even without subsidies because a combination of cheap corn, a phase-out of MTBE, and higher crude oil prices made ethanol profitable. Thus, ethanol production would have expanded quite rapidly even without subsidies. The researchers state that actual corn prices increased by an average of $1.65 per bushel from 2006 to 2009 and that only 14 cents (8 percent) of this increase was due to ethanol subsidies. Another 45 cents of the increase was due to market-based expansion of the corn ethanol industry. This is not a new theory. At the height of the last spike in corn prices back in 2008, Texas A&M University’s Agriculture and Food Policy Center issued a report that drew similar conclusions. This report looks not at the ethanol incentives, but at the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) itself. “Relaxing the RFS does not result in significantly lower corn prices,” the researchers note. “This is due to the ethanol infrastructure already in

place and the generally positive economics for the industry. The ethanol industry has grown in excess of the RFS, indicating that relaxing the standard would not cause a contraction in the industry.” Ethanol production also helps the livestock industry, Schott noted, because when corn is converted to ethanol only the starch is used. Distillers grains is a valuable

coproduct that retains all the non-starch food and feed value of the corn used for ethanol. it provides all of the protein, minerals, nutrients, and oil from corn and returns it into the livestock feed supply chain. Distillers grains availability will displace approximately 1.2 billion bushels of corn in livestock rations this year, providing a high-quality, high-value feed product

for livestock producers. At approximately $200 per ton, this provides corn-equivalent protein and nutrients for livestock feed at the price equivalent of less than $1.75 per bushel. In an article July 4, agriculture reporter and commentator Gary Truitt says that the livestock industry is doing agriculture a disservice in its attack on ethanol. “Amidst our great di-

versity, we must find common ground and support each other in an effort protect a sector that is to vital to the U.S.,” Truitt said. “Having a safe and sustainable meat and milk supply is just as important as having a functioning renewable fuels industry to lessen our dependence on imported oil.” Source: NCGA News of the Day, Tuesday, July 5

Roadmap A10

Page 8 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Revisiting from A7 have not been the major driver of higher commodity prices,” the report states. “The impact of U.S. ethanol policies through higher feed costs on consumer prices of eggs, beef, pork and broilers was even smaller. The largest impact on any of these products was a two-cent-perdozen (1.1 percent) increase in egg prices. All other product prices were impacted by much less than 1 percent.” This report is similar to an April study by Babcock and Jacinto Fabiosa, which found that the corn price spike of 2008 would have happened without ethanol expansion. “First, the general pattern of corn prices that we saw in the historical period-increasing prices in 2006 and 2007, a price spike in 2008, followed by a sharp price decline in 2009 — would have occurred without ethanol subsidies or even if corn ethanol production had not expanded,” Babcock and Fabiosa state. “Second, investor fervor for corn ethanol in 2005, 2006, and 2007 would

Hello, I’m Peggy Your Country Folks Classified Ad Representative I’m here to make it easy for you to place your ad.

Call Me FREE On Our 800 Phone Line From Anywhere in the Continental United States

1-800-836-2888 Or Fax (518) 673-2381 Attn. Peggy E-mail: classified@leepub.com

Deadline is Wednesday at 3 PM

We Accept MasterCard, Visa, Discover and American Express

See Us At Empire Farm Days E. Hedge Row Ave. and Ag Progress Days - West 11th

Payment May Also Be Made by Check or Money Order

RATES

(Per Zone) FIRST 14 WORDS

One Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9.00 Two or More Weeks . . . . . . . . . $8.00 ea. wk. Each Additional Word . . . . . . . 30¢ per wk.

Lee Publications, Country Folks Classified, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

MAINE CROWN EQUIPMENT, INC. 419 Sweden St. Caribou, ME 1-800-498-3196

LIONEL THERIAULT, INC. #10 Davis St. Presque Isle, ME 207-764-4405

KRAMERS TRACTOR SALES Rt. 104, RD #3 Sidney, ME 207-547-3345

VERMONT DESMARAIS EQUIPMENT, INC. RR 2, Box 14 Orleans, VT 802-754-6629


National Biodiesel Board supports EPA renewable fuels proposal

Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

CEO Jobe: Program offers industry stability and economic, environmental benefits WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Environmental Protection Agency’s latest renewable fuels proposal will provide stability for the U.S. biodiesel industry while helping to create jobs, improve the environment, and bolster U.S. energy security, National Biodiesel Board CEO Joe Jobe testified July 12. Speaking at an Environmental Protection Agency hearing, Jobe said the EPA’s proposal represents a modest and sustainable level of growth in the Biomassbased Diesel program that is consistent with the availability of the diverse feedstocks used to make biodiesel, such as vegetable oils, recycled cooking oil and animal fats. He noted that biodiesel is the only EPA-designated Advanced Biofuel being produced on a commercial scale across the country, and he commended the EPA for sup-

porting the industry’s growth. “While we believe these are conservative targets for the U.S. biodiesel industry, we applaud the EPA for proposing a reasonable increase,” Jobe said in a statement after the hearing. “As America’s only EPA-designated Advanced Biofuel to reach commercial-scale production nationwide, we are ready to meet the challenge.” So far this year, biodiesel is demonstrating its ability to achieve the EPA’s 2011 standard of 800 million gallons. Biomass-based Diesel production has averaged some 75 million gallons in recent months, with a high of 82 million gallons in May, putting it well on track for meeting or exceeding the target. The EPA’s latest proposal calls for increasing the Biomass-based Diesel volume to 1 billion gallons in 2012 and

Roadmap from A8 it comes to what fuels their cars and trucks can use, they often have no choice,” NCGA President Bart Schott said. “Expanding flex-fuel vehicles can offer drivers a much wider selection so they can make decisions that are right for their particular uses, for the environment, and for the national economy.” The Ethanol Roadmap, released this spring by NCGA, the American Coalition for Ethanol, Growth Energy, and the Renewable Fuels Association, lays out these five broad steps forward: 1. Reform the current ethanol tax incentive program. 2. Expand consumer fuel choice by increasing the number of flex-fuel vehicles. 3. Empower consumer choice by investing in biofuels infrastructure, including blender pumps and pipelines.

4. Base greenhousegas accounting on sound science. 5. Ensure feedstock neutrality in developing advanced biofuels. “Corn growers and the ethanol industry are always looking to the future, and we take nothing for granted,” Schott said. “Just as we are committed to continuous improvement in what we do on the farm or in the mill, we also are committed to taking a fresh look at what can help stabilize the industry and allow it to grow in an atmosphere where the competition — foreign oil — has dominated for so long.” For more information on these five steps, and to download the Roadmap and its appendix, visit www.ncga.com/roadmap . Source: NCGA News of the Day, Wednesday, June 29

Automatic Wagon Hitch • Works on tractors, pickups, choppers • Built tough to pull even the largest grain wagons • Makes chopping silage fun • Increases productivity up to 25% • Bolts to drawbar • Works with PTO • Iowa State University Tested

BERGMAN MFG. 2866 Quail Ave., Arthur, IA 51431

See us at Empire Farm Days Booth #456A

800-551-4554 • www.bergmanmfg.com

almost 1.3 billion gallons in 2013. (Biodiesel makes up nearly all U.S. Biomass-based Diesel production.) Because it qualifies as an Advanced Biofuel, biodiesel is also eligible to exceed the Biomass-based Diesel targets and help meet general advanced biofuels requirements under the program. “We’re confident that we can meet these production goals. In doing so, we’ll help cure America’s oil addiction with a

clean-burning renewable fuel while creating goodpaying American jobs,” Jobe said. “This program was developed to wean the country off foreign oil with cleaner homegrown fuels, and we believe it’s working as intended.” Biodiesel is a renewable, clean-burning diesel replacement that is reducing U.S. depend-

ence on foreign petroleum, creating green jobs and improving our environment. Made from an increasingly diverse mix of feedstocks, it is the only commercial-scale fuel used across the U.S. to meet the EPA’s definition as an advanced biofuel. Its production, distribution and use will support more than

31,000 U.S. jobs in 2011 and replace nearly 1 billion gallons of imported petroleum diesel. Biodiesel is used in existing diesel engines and meets strict specifications of ASTM D6751. NBB is the national trade association representing the biodiesel industry in the United States.

www.countryfolks.com hat’s W k Loo ! New eam e Str n a M w is No ! ne Onli

Yourr connectionn too thee Northeastt Equinee Market

o Go to m www.cfmanestream.com we are just a Clic k Away!


In praise of All-American food by Stewart Truelsen Isn’t it about time we praised All-American food, the food we like to eat at a picnic or outdoor barbecue? We’re talking about hamburgers, hot dogs, fried chicken, sweet corn, potato salad, fresh fruit, ice cream and many other favorites. Yet, we are often made to feel guilty about enjoying our favorite foods. The cheeseburger has become the graphic image for any news story about overeating and obesity. The potato, a staple of the American

diet, has been unfairly criticized and threatened with withdrawal from school nutrition programs. Snacking is considered a bad habit and heaven forbid you should want an Oreo cookie. The drumbeat of negativity in the media about American food and eating habits is nothing new, of course. Throughout the nineteenth century, critics railed about condiments of all things. Mustard, ketchup, salt, pepper and cinnamon were thought to be too stimulating. Sylvester

Graham, the food critic of 150 years ago, said, “The stern truth is that no purely stimulating substances of any kind can be habitually used by man without injury to the whole nature.” Today, of course the culprits in the diet are pegged as fat, salt and sugar, and certainly there is scientific evidence to cause us to monitor our intake. But books and articles that roundly attack American food and the way we grow it simply go too far and sound remarkably

like Graham and other critics from the past. Dr. David A. Kessler, a former FDA commissioner, has written a bestselling book, The End of Overeating. He takes some of the usual swipes at food companies and marketers, but he adds, “The only eating plan that will work for you is one built around the personal likes and dislikes you have accumulated over a lifetime.” Kessler sees nothing wrong with eating a reasonable-size hamburger or strips of bacon. The

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation problem for Americans is with what he calls “hypereating,” or indulging too much. One suggestion he has is to substitute the rewards of healthy exercise for the kind of rewards we get from eating highly palatable foods. Fortune magazine recently honored the hotdog as one of the “100 Greatest Things about America,” a well-deserved accolade. We should do even more to praise the All-American foods that are such a source of pride at family gatherings around picnic tables or

backyard grills. These are the foods that have become part of the American dream and create so many happy memories. Summertime brings out the very best of these All-American food choices, including a wide array of locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables. It’s time to stand up for AllAmerican foods and drop the guilt and negativity. Stewart Truelsen is a regular contributor to the Focus on Agriculture series and is the author of a book marking the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 90th anniversary

The 27th Annual Massachusetts Tomato Contest will be held at Boston’s City Hall Plaza Farmers’ Market on Monday, Aug. 22 in conjunction with the City Hall Plaza Farmers’ Market and the start of Massachusetts Farmers’ Market Week. Tomatoes will be judged by a panel of experts on flavor, firmness/slicing quality, exterior color and shape. Always a lively and fun event, the day is designed to increase awareness of locally grown produce. Farmers who want to submit entries can bring tomatoes to the City Hall Plaza Farmers’ Market between 9 a.m. and 10:15 a.m. on Aug. 22 or drop their entries off with the corresponding registration form to one of several locations around the state on Aug. 20 or 21. These tomatoes will be brought in to Boston on Monday. For the complete details, including contest criteria and a registration form, visit www.mass.gov/agr/markets/tomato_contest.htm. The 27th Annual Tomato Contest is sponsored by the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources, New England Vegetable and Berry Growers Association and Mass Farmers Markets.

See Our Exhibit at the Summer Farm Shows Including Our NEW Line of High Efficiency Florescent Lighting

Visit Us At Empire Farm Days • Lot 518

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

Massachusetts Tomato Contest to be held Aug. 22


Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011


August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13


DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!!

Come See Us at Empire Farm Days Booth 1037 SW Main Tent

Jan. 19-20-21

2012

Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4, Sat. 9-3

Augusta Expoland

Fishersville, VA

AUGUST 9, 10, 11, 2011

Rodman Lott & Son Farms • Seneca Falls, NY

Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Don’t Miss These Exhibitors!!

AIC - Agricultural Instruments Corp • 316 Agri-King • A Agri-SC • 126 Agrotain International • 144 American Farm Products • 504 Animat, Inc • 528 Augusta Cooperative Farm Bureau • 127, 128 Beverage Tractor • 100, 102, O-4 Binkley & Hurst LP • 210 C&C Farm Supply • 134, 135 Cargill Animal Nutrition • 145 Channel Bio, LLC • 517 Charvin Farm Ag Plastics • 315 Chemgro Seeds, Inc • 139 Christian Farmers Outreach • 522 Cloverdale Supply, Inc • 216 Conklin Agrovantage • 313, 314 Country Folks Farm Chronicle • 146 Countryside Organics • 138 Croplan Genetics / Neodak Seeds • 518, 519 Cummings & Bricker, Inc • 105, 106 Dew Eze Manufacturing • O-11 Easy Way Cattle Care • 131 Ed Hoover Construction • 534 Emm Sales & Service, Inc • O-2A Farm Credit • 125 Farmer Boy Ag • 118, 119 Fetterville Sales • 143 First Bank & Trust Company • 166 Fisher Auto Parts • 329 Garber Farms • O-7 General Fertilizer Equipment, Inc • 103 Grassworks Weed Wiper • 330, 331 Growers Mineral Solutions • 155 GVM, Inc • 122 H&S Manufacturing • 200, O-1A Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 109 Haybuster / Duratech • 532, 533 Helena Chemical Company • 150 Hoard’s Dairyman • 147 Houff Feed & Fertilizer • 130 Huffman Trailer Sales, Inc • O-1 IBA, Inc • 112 Inland Tarp & Liner • 501 IntelliAir • 531B Iva Manufacturing • 300, 301, 302 James River Equipment • 530, O-17 Kioti Tractor • B, C, D, E, F Kuhn North America, Inc • 529 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • 123 Lancaster Farming, Inc • O-12 Lanco-Pennland • 309 Lawrence Ag Equipment • 104

Layman Water Solutions • 124 Liskey Truck Sales, L.C. • O-13 MAX, Mutual Aid Exchange • 507 May Supply Company • 120 Mid-Atlantic Irrigation Co., Inc • 101 Miller’s Storage Buildings • O-16 Morris Distributing • 328 Morton Buildings, Inc • 115 Northern Repair • 168 Organic Valley • 317 Outback Heating, Inc • 104B Ownby Auction & Realty Co., Inc • 149 P. Bradley & Sons • 121 PA Country Equipment • 303 PBZ LLC / Crop Care • 104A Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-10 Perma-Column East, LLC • 151, 152 Pioneer Hi-Bred • 129 Quality Craft Tools • G Recyc Systems, Inc • 339 Restora Life - Natural Way Feeds • 202 Rockbridge Farmers Coop • 148 Rural Community Insurance Service • 140 Ryder Supply Company • 502 Salford Farm Machinery, Ltd • 137 Sanimax • 310 Skyline Roofing, Inc • 312 Southern Farm Supply • 215 Stone Hill Construction, Inc • 527 Sukup / LnR Feed & Grain Sys. • 212 T.A. Seeds • 113, 114 Taylor Manufacturing, Inc • 311 Tech Mix, Inc • 505 The Power Connection • 136 Trissel Equipment • 107 Uncommon USA, Inc • 531A United DHIA • 506 VA Carolina Buildings, Inc • 141, 142 Valley Feed Co • 500 Virginia Bin Service Virginia Farm Bureau • 211 Virginia Simmental Assoc. • 510 Vulcan Materials Company • 513 Waste Solutions Forum • 132, 133 Whitesel Brothers Inc / W.S. SE Gea • 108 Williams Brothers Tree & Lawn Service • 503 Wood-Mizer Products, Inc • O-9 SKID STEER RODEO SPONSORS Virginia Farm Bureau - Diamond Level TROPHY SPONSOR Virginia Farm Bureau

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586


• Since 1964 • Specializing in Trade Publications, Trade Shows, Commercial Printing & Mailing Services

LEE PUBLICATIONS

Serving the agricultural, heavy construction, aggregates, solid waste, commercial horticulture and food service industries.

MARKET TO ANY OR ALL OF THESE INDUSTRIES WITH ONE CALL! Country Folks

Farm Weekly Newspapers - since 1972, serving fulltime farmers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic market areas. The number one agricultural publication in this market! Target your audience with 4 regional editions.

Since 1979, serving heavy construction contractors, landscaping, aggregate producers and recyclers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Markets every month. Qualified readership is guaranteed to get you results. Country Folks

Since 1990, serving the commercial greenhouses, vegetable and fruit growers, and nurseries in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Northwest market areas. Reach your target audience with this monthly publication that is by far the number one media for these industries.

GROWER W

WASTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT NEWS, since 1992, serving asphalt/concrete recyclers, composting facilities, construction demolition companies, wood waste recyclers and scrap metal recyclers with 2 monthly editions that cover the entire United States. NORTH AMERICAN QUARRY NEWS since 1998, serving the quarry, sand & gravel, hot mix asphalt and ready mix concrete industries with one national edition. This is the fastest growing publication for these markets. Material Handling/Industrial Equipment Digest is a bimonthly publication serving the Mid-Atlantic and New England markets. Reaching manufacturers and warehouses in this market area.

TRADE SHOWS Lee Publications produces trade shows, both regionally and nationally for each of the markets listed above. Go to our website at www.leepub.com for more information or call 800-218-5586.

COMMERCIAL PRINTING

We specialize in short run (5,000-100,000) copies) web offset printing. Tabloid style print jobs like this publication are available in increments of 4 pages in black & white or full color. Complete mailing sources are available as well as insertions in any of our publications

LEE PUBLICATIONS PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Phone 518-673-3237 Fax 518-673-3245

info@leepub.com

You asked for more sessions, and you’ll get them at the 2012 Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo and Direct Marketing Conference, Jan. 24 - 26, 2012 at the On Center in Syracuse, NY. This coming winter, due to overwhelming demand, the planning committee is adding a third day of concurrent educational sessions and trade show. “The 2011 Expo was a huge success. Attendees asked for more sessions and session coordinators asked for more time. So the planning committee decided to go to a three-day format,” explains Jeanette Marvin, New York State Vegetable Growers Association Executive Secretary and Expo Director. More than 1,500 growers, researchers and industry professionals flocked to the 2011 Expo featuring educational seminars and a large trade show. 2012 sessions will include: Flower Production, Flower Marketing,

Labor, Potatoes, Tree Fruit, Tomatoes & Peppers, Cultural Controls, Direct Marketing, Pesticide Safety, Vine Crops, Leafy Greens, Cover Crops, Soil Health, Reduce Tillage, Berry Crops, Cabbage and other Cole Crops, Food Safety, Onions, Garlic, Peas & Snap Beans, Greenhouse & Tunnels, Pesticide Safety, and Sweet Corn. “If you include the Becker Forum on Jan. 23 at the Holiday Inn, Liverpool, NY, we are actually four days of programming,” said Expo Planning Board Chair Stephen Reiners of Cornell. The 2012 Becker Forum will focus on: Farming in a NonFarmer World: Building Trust, Engaging Communities and Finding Common Ground. Expo Welcomes Flower Industries, livestock marketers and dairymen Joining the Expo this year will be NYS Flower Industries Inc. “We are excited. We

definitely will have to start thinking about changing our name. With the addition of Flower Industry sessions, and the Direct Marketing sessions bringing in a speaker on livestock direct marketing, plus our labor sessions which will also be important to dairymen, the name Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo 2012 just doesn’t cover it all,” laughs Marvin. NYS Flower Industries will conduct two, twohour sessions focusing on growing challenges and marketing opportunities. Keep your eyes open for the full conference agenda with more specific details. “The past several years, we’ve covered labor issues at the Becker Forum. In 2012, we are bringing the labor discussion to the main Expo site at the On Center. This will give those interested in labor a chance to attend DEC and CCA eligible sessions as well as a

Empire A16

FREPETION

I SUBSCR R OFFE

Published by the Lee Publications, Inc. PO Box 121, 6113 State Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Mail this form back or Fax to 518-673-2381

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN HORSES? SIGN UP NOW TO RECEIVE COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM AT NO CHARGE!

Name ___________________________________________ Farm/Company Name _______________________________ Address _________________________________________ City ____________________________________________ State ___________________________ Zip _____________ Signature _______________________ Date _____________ Phone ( )______________________________________ Fax ( )________________________________________ Email ___________________________________________ How Many Horses Do You Have?_______________________

www.cfmanestream.com

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15

Monthly Equine Publication covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations.

Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo adds third day


Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Empire from A15 chance to visit our amazing trade show,” adds Marvin. Hotel deals — book early This year, the best hotel deal in town will be at the Genesee Grande, located just blocks from the On Center Expo site and Syracuse University. A special Expo rate of $85 per night is bound to book the hotel early, so be sure to make your reservations now. The Grande features complimentary wireless internet, fitness gym, free outdoor parking, complimentary airport shuttle, and on-demand shuttle to the Expo. Visit www.reservationspage.com/C00264/H01 405/be.ashx?pc=ESFVG to book or call 800365-HOME. Tell them you’re coming for the Expo. Other featured hotels are: The Holiday Inn Syracuse - Liverpool - home to the Becker Forum and located right off the NYS Thruway. This hotel boasts a pool, and regular shuttle service to the Expo main site. Show special $92 per night. Call 800-Holiday to book. Staybridge Suites, Liv-

erpool - attached to the Holiday Inn. Suites start at $102 per night Expo special. Call 800-Holiday to book. The Crowne Plaza Syracuse - located just blocks from the Expo site and Syracuse University. Shuttle service available upon request. This hotel has undergone extensive renovations featuring an upscale contemporary design reminiscent of a Park Avenue hotel. Expo special $93 per night. Call 800-227-6963. Expo Web site launch The Expo Web site will have a new look and so much more this fall. The Web site for the 2012 Expo will be hosted under the NYS Vegetable Growers for the first time. But that’s not the only change. The Web site will be able to process registrations and take credit card payments from atten-

dees! “In the past, registrations were all done by hand. Imagine typing in over 1000 credit card numbers!,” notes Marvin. “Registration will also be easier for attendees. Click, click, click, payment accepted and we’ll see you at the show!” The website will include a complete listing of Expo partners and their hosted sessions, hotel information and directions. The new Web site is scheduled to be launched on Septe. 1. Be sure to visit www.nysvga.org. The 2011 Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo is sponsored by the New York State Vegetable Growers Association, Empire State Potato Growers, New York State Berry Growers Association, New York State Farmers’ Direct Marketing Asso-

BEST BUYS IN USED EQUIPMENT

EQUIPMENT BARGAINS

KEEP TRACK OF OUR WEB SITE FOR SPECIAL PRICING & PROGRAMS “Your Satisfaction Is Our Pleasure” GEHL SL5640E SKID STEER TRACTORS CASE-IH 8930 MAGNUM MFD 4400 HRS - LOADED GEHL SL3825 SKID STEER CASE-IH 7130 MAGNUM MFD - DUAL SPEED PTO BOBCAT 553 UNILOADER CASE-IH MXU125 MFD W/ LOADER MUSTANG 2070 UNILOADER CASE-IH 5240 MFD CAB P/S W/520 S/L LOADER - GEHL CTL85 TRACK LOADER RENTAL CAB/AIR HISHARP FLOW, 145 HRS CASE-IH FARMALL 95 MFD CAB 300 HRS NH L170 SKID STEER W/CAB ENCLOSURE 517 HRS CASE-IH 1896 2WD ROPS - RECONDITIONED KUBOTA KX 1613R4A EXCAVATOR-CAB-ANGLE IH 3088 2WD RECONDITIONED BLADE IH 784D MFD TRACTOR LOADER KUBOTA KX 413VR1 EXCAVATOR ROPS IH 1086 CAB 2WD HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT KUBOTA L3430HST TRACTOR LOADER CASE-IH 8312 DISC MOWER CONDITIONER-EXCELKUBOTA L2900GST TRACTOR/MWR LENT NH TC30 MFD W/7308 LOADER 60 HRS KUHN FC353GC DISC MOWER CONDITIONERJOHN DEERE 4200 W/LOADER EXCELLENT JOHN DEERE 5403 TRACTOR - 11.5 HRS - LIKE NEW CASE-IH 8575 BIG SQUARE BALER W/PRESERVE JOHN DEERE 830 W/143 LOADER APPLICATOR JOHN DEERE 301A INDUSTRIAL W/LOADER 3PT GEHL CB1285 FORAGE HARVESTER W/PROCESSOR PTO-CAB CLAAS 255 UNI WRAP ROUND BALER-NEW DEMO JOHN DEERE 110 T/L/B 985 HRS NEW MILLER (OXBO) 918 MERGER-GREAT PRICE FORD 9600 CAB - CHEAP TEAGLE 808SCD BALE PROCESSOR-ROUND OR BIG FORD 1710 MFD W/770B LOADER SQUARE FORD 4610 MFWD TRACTOR W/776F QT LOADER MISCELLANEOUS SKID STEER LOADERS JD 3800 TELEHANDLER GEHL SL7800 SKID STEER PATU DC65 PTO CHIPPER HYD FEED GEHL SL6640SXT SKID STEER KUBOTA RTV900 2011 65 HRS - WARRANTY GEHL SL6635SXT SKID STEER

COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC. Claverack, NY 12513 (approx. 40 miles south of Albany)

518-828-1781 • 800-352-3621

www.columbiatractor.com • skinne@columbiatractor.com Keep Track of Our Web Site For Special Pricing, Programs & Low Rate Financing © 2010 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLc. www.caseih.com

ciation, New York State Horticultural Society, Cornell University and Cornell Cooperative Extension.

For more information on attending the show, contact the NYS Vegetable Growers at jmarvin@rochester.rr.com or

call 315-986-9320. To exhibit call Dan Wren at 518-673-0117 or by email at dwren@leepub.com.


Trucks

ATA Truck Tonnage Index jumped 2.8 percent in June Chief Economist Bob Costello said. Tonnage recovered all of the losses in April and May when the index contracted a total of 2.6 percent. “After growing 5.5 percent in the first half of the year from the same period last year, the strength of truck tonnage in the second half will depend greatly on what manufacturing output does,” Costello noted. “If manufacturing continues to grow stronger than GDP, I fully expect truck freight to do the same.” Note on the impact of trucking company failures on the index: Each month, ATA asks its membership the amount of tonnage each carrier hauled, including all types of freight. The indexes are calculated based on those responses. The sample includes an array of trucking companies, ranging from small fleets to multi-billion dollar carriers. When a company in the sample fails, we include its final month of operation and zero it out for the following month,

with the assumption that the remaining carriers pick up that freight. As a result, it is close to a net wash and does not end up in a false increase. Nevertheless, some carriers are picking up freight from failures and it may have boosted the index. Due to our correction mentioned above however, it should be limited. Trucking serves as a barometer of the U.S.

economy, representing 67.2 percent of tonnage carried by all modes of domestic freight transportation, including manufactured and retail goods. Trucks hauled 9 billion tons of freight in 2010. Motor carriers collected $563.4 billion, or 81.2 percent of total revenue earned by all transport modes. ATA calculates the tonnage index based on surveys from its mem-

bership and has been doing so since the 1970s. This is a preliminary figure and subject to change in the final report issued around the 10th day of the month. The report includes month-to-month and year-over-year results, relevant economic comparisons, and key financial indicators. American Trucking Associations is the largest national trade association for the trucking in-

dustry. Through a federation of 50 affiliated state trucking associations and industry-related conferences and councils, ATA is the voice of the industry America depends on most to move our nation’s freight. Follow ATA on Twitter or on Facebook. Good stuff. Trucks Bring It!

ATA calls for Congress to limit overlapping security rules ARLINGTON, VA – The American Trucking Associations asked Congress to direct the Transportation Security Administration to work with industry rather than issuing excessive, burdensome and duplicative security rules. “The private sector is an essential partner and part of the solution for combating terrorism,” ATA Vice President of Security and Operations Martin Rojas told the House Subcommittee on Transportation Security during a July 12 hearing.. “We don’t need more regulation, we need more cooperation.” Rojas pointed to the apprehension by federal authorities of Khalid Ali-M Aldawasri following tips from ATA-member company Con-way Inc., as a model for future private sector-public sector partnerships. Rojas told the subcommittee that in the decade since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks there have been a number of programs initiated to minimize the risk of

another attack on U.S. soil that while “well intended... have resulted in a multiplicity of overlapping and burdensome security requirements on trucking companies.” “Unfortunately,” he testified, “rather than augmenting the security of the transportation sector, the focus has been more on regulatory compliance than evaluating the impact of existing security requirements.” In addition to limiting future security mandates, Rojas recommended that as Congress looks to reauthorize TSA they encourage information sharing between the public and private sectors; improve coordination between federal agencies, many of whom already play a role in transportation security; and ensure that the roll out of readers for the Transportation Worker Identification Credential moves forward promptly.

TRADE SHOW OPPORTUNITIES • KEYSTONE FARM SHOW •

January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

• VIRGINIA FARM SHOW • Jan. 19, 20 & 21, 2012 • Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-3 Augusta Expoland • Fishersville, VA

• BIG IRON EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• EMPIRE STATE FRUIT & VEG EXPO • Jan. 24, 25 & 26 2012 Oncenter Convention Center • Syracuse, NY

• HARD HAT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO EXHIBIT AT OR ATTEND ANY OF THESE SHOWS

CALL 800-218-5586 www.leetradeshows.com • mwhite@leepub.com

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

ARLINGTON, VA — The American Trucking Associations’ advance seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index increased 2.8 percent in June after decreasing a revised 2.0 percent in May 2011. May’s drop was slightly less than the 2.3 percent ATA reported on June 27. The latest gain put the SA index at 115.8 (2000=100) in June, up from the May level of 112.6 and the highest since January 2011. The not seasonally adjusted index, which represents the change in tonnage actually hauled by the fleets before any seasonal adjustment, equaled 122.3 in June, which was 5.3 percent above the previous month. Compared with June 2010, SA tonnage jumped 6.8 percent, the largest year-over-year gain since January 2011. In May, the tonnage index was 3 percent above a year earlier. “Motor carriers told us that freight was strong in June and that played out in the data as well,” ATA


LOT # 436A 1026 613 540

Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

726 730 723 220 1028 916 1039 24 522 441A 16 429 427 1015 411 421 475B 400 461B 473B 518 820 926 551 1058 471B 529 1048 21 1014 460B 213 124 306 29 1004 67 731 35 66 606 542 400 54 703 703 72 439A 1006 18 19 7 724 429 431 1032 25 10 46 525 465B 428 210 309 68/70 64 720 309 306 729 456A 702

EMPIRE FARM DAYS

COMPANY ACCELERATED GENETICS ACCU-STEEL COVER BLDGS ADAMS SUPPLY "ADVANCED COMFORT TECHNOLOGY, INC" AEMSCO INC AERWAY AG BAG A MILLER ST NAZIANZ INC CO. AG CORE INC AG EXPRESS ELECTRONICS AG IN THE CLASSROOM TRAILER AGRI BUSINESS BROKERAGE CORP/ LUNSER INSURANCE AGRI-DYNAMICS INC AGRI-FAB & REPAIR INC AGRI-KING AGRI-MARK INC AGRI-MAX AGRI-PLASTICS MFG AGRI-SC AGRI-SLIDE AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING SVCS AGRICULTURAL INSTRUMENTS CORP AGRICULTURE EDUCATION AGRILIGHT INC AGROCHEM INC AGROMATIC INC AGSHIELD AIRPORT SHUTTLE AITCHISON AKE SAFETY EQUIPMENT AKEY ALBERS DAIRY EQUIP INC ALFRED STATE COLLEGE ALL STATES AG PARTS INC ALLEGANY INSURANCE CO ALLFLEX USA INC ALTERNATE HEATING SYSTEMS LLC ALTERNATIVE HEATING SOLUTIONS ALUMN LTD AMANS CONSTRUCTION/ BARN ROOFING AMERICAN DAIRY ASSN & DAIRY COUNCIL INC AMERICAN FARM MORTGAGE COMPANY AMERICAN HONDA MOTOR CO INC AMERICAN SEED CO INC/ CARLTON POPCORN AMSOIL AN MARTIN GRAIN SYS ANDERSON ANIMAL SCIENCE ANIMAL WELFARE APPROVED ANTIQUE POWER ANTIQUE TRACTORS ANTWERP MACHINE & REPAIR "APC, INC" AR SANDRI-MIDSTATE CLEAN BURN ARCHER DANIELS MIDLAND COMPANY (ADM) ARMOR BUILDING SUPPLY ARMTEC ART'S-WAY MFG CO INC ASA ASAP INTERIORS LLC ASHLEY LYNN WINERY AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL INC AUSSAN LABORATORIES AVERY WEIGH-TRONIX/ FREEMAN SCALE BADGER BAG MAN LLC "BAKER & BRO., INC., HJ" BARNEY MORAVEC INC. BAUMALIGHT BCA AG TECHNOLOGIES BEATON INDUSTRIAL INC BEFCO INC BELLTEC BELMONT BENCO POLY FILM LLC BERGMAN MFG INC "BERKSHIRE SOLAR, WIND,

730 206 223 914 628 422 523 535 725 716 611 130 1017 519 514 803 511 33 705 547 925 1063 442A 905 816 301 728 920 45 100 115 715 50 34 1010 1034 232 821 502 1052 62 818 607 809 703 615 513 920 927 306 400 400 400 400 400 400 400 400 600 1056 208 1024 614 6 201 630 726 622 535 309 32 528 429 429 454A 428

HEATING & COOLING" BERNIE RIOPEL MFG REP BIBBENS SALES & SVC BIG DOG MOWERS BILL CRAM CHEVROLET BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENINGS BLU-JET BY THURSTON MFG CO BOBCAT OF CENTRAL NY BOMBAUER EQUIP BOUMATIC BRANSON TRACTORS BRENT BUILT-RITE MFG CORP BURKHOLDER VACUFLO BUSH HOG INC BUTCH & JUDY'S CURLY FRIES BUTLER'S SALES AND SERVICE INC CALHOUN SUPERSTRUCTURE "CALLAHAN WEBER HYDRAULICS, INC." CAMPING WORLD RV SALES CAN AM PRECAST PROD LTD CANNS-BILCO DISTRIBUTORS INC. CANY-CONSERVATION ALLIANCE OF NEW YORK CARGILL DAIRY EXCHANGE CARROLL EQUIPMENT CASE IH CATTLE HANDLING DEMO CAZENOVIA EQUIPMENT CB STRUCTURES INC CDL USA (MAPLE PRO INC) CENTRAL BOILER INC CENTRAL PETROLEUM CO (CEN-PE-CO) CHANNEL BIO LLC CHASE'S FARM AND HOME CHEMGRO SEEDS CHEROKEE ENTERPRISES LTD CHRIS FESKO CID CLAAS OF AMERICA CLEAN AND SAFE BOAT CLEAN CUTTER FLAIL & TILLER BLADE CO CLEANFIX NORTH AMERICA LTD CLUB CAR INC-SATCH SALES INC CNY FARM SUPPLY "CNY SOLAR, INC" COCKSHUTT ANTIQUE TRACTORS COMMANDER COMMUNITY BANK NA CONESTOGA BULDLINGS CONTEST CENTER CORN PRO CORNELL AG AND FOOD TECHNOLOGY PARK CORNELL COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES CORNELL COOPERATIVE EXTENSION CORNELL FARMWORKER PROGRAM CORNELL MAPLE PROGRAM CORNELL SHEEP PROGRAM CORNELL SOIL HEALTH LAB AND AGRO-ONE SOIL LAB CORNELL UNIVERSITY CORNELL UNIVERSITY/DEPT ANIMAL SCIENCE CORREIA'S GENERAL CONTRACTING COUNTRY CLIPPER COUNTRY FOLKS COUNTRY FOLKS EXHIBITOR HOSPITALITY CENTER COUNTRYWAY INSURANCE CO. COYOTE TRAILERS CRARY CROP SWEEPER CUB CADET/ YANMAR CUFF FARM SERVICES CUMMINGS & BRICKER INC CUSTOM MARKETING CO LLC D & W DIESEL INC DAIRY FARMERS OF AMERICA DAIRY MARKETING SVCS DAIRY ONE COOPERATIVE INC DAIRYBUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS

449A 429

DAIRYLAND SEED CO INC DAIRYLEA COOPERATIVE/ DAIRY FARMERS OF AMERICA 538 DAIRYMASTER USA INC 428 DAIRYPROFIT SEMINAR CENTER 65 DAKOTA MICRO INC 306 DAVIS TRAILER WORLD LLC 501 DAVON SALES INC 726 DEGELMAN 111 "DEINES MFG/OH, MY! MOWERS" 722 DEMCO 704 DEWALT TOOLS 306 DIAMOND C 522 DICKEY JOHN 27 DIG SAFELY NY 438A DIGI-STAR LLC 623 DILLER EQUIPMENT 430 DNB MARKETING SOLUTIONS LLC 535 DODA USA 810 DOEBLERS 317 DOUBLE S EQUIPMENT 470B DR. REGISTER & ASSOC INC 429 DRMS 916 DRYDEN SERTOMA CLUB 20 DTN/ THE PROGRESSIVE FARMER 309 DURABILT 920 DUTCHWAY POLE BARNS 129 DYNA PRODUCTS 1050 E/Z PRODUCTS 429 EAGLE DAIRY DIRECT 230 EDM DISTRIBUTORS INC 447A ELANCO DAIRY HEALTH AND NUTRITION 123 ELITE SALES AND SERVICE 425 EMM SALES & SERVICES INC 400 EMPIRE BUILDING 429 EMPIRE LIVESTOCK 1071 EMPIRE RADIATOR SERVICE 401 EMPIRE STATE MEAT GOAT PROD ASSOC 450A EMPIRE STATE MILK QUALITY COUNCIL 526 EMPIRE TRACTOR INC 120 EMPYRE GASIFICATION WOOD BOILER 104 ENERGY PANEL STRUCTURES 600 EQUINE CENTER 1023 ERIE & NIAGARA INSURANCE ASSOCIATION 506 ERNST CONSERVATION SEEDS INC 4 EVERDRY WATERPROOFING 917 FARM BUREAU FAMILY CENTER 532 FARM CREDIT EAST 1059 FARM FAMILY LIFE & CASUALTY INSURANCE CO 220 FARM FANS 14 FARMCHAINS.COM 410 FARMER BOY AG SUPPLY 1019 "FARMER'S FRIEND, THE" 1013 FARMING MAGAZINE/ MOOSE RIVER MEDIA 63 FARMLOGIC 1021 FASTLINE PUBLICATIONS 413/306 FEATHERLITE TRAILERS 73 FEHER RUBBISH REMOVAL INC 909 FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN FARMERS 630 "FERENBAUGH, LARRY " 216 FERRIS & SNAPPER PRO 1065 FETTERVILLE SALES 467B FIGHT BAC/ DEEP VALLEY FARM INC 703 FINGER LAKES ANTIQUE POWER 725 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE 628 FINGER LAKES MIGRANT HEALTH 1060 FINGER LAKES RAILWAY CORP 628 FINGER LAKES RED CROSS 1049 FINGER LAKES TIMES 703 FINGER LAKES TWO-CYLINDER CLUB 700 FINGERLAKES CONSTRUCTION CO 47 FLUID POWER SVC CORP 1027 FOCUS ON FARMING 1045 FOOD BANK ASSN OF NYS 117 "FORD, UPSTATE DEALERS" 913 FOWLERS TAFFY 408 FRED'S TENTS & CANOPIES 1062 FRIENDS OF NATURAL GAS NY 619 FRITSCH EQUIP CORP 128 FUTURE FOREST CONSULTING INC

212 GABEL BELTING INC 718 GEHL CO 322 GEORGE KAHLER SALES 726 GERINGHOFF 919 GFS WHOLESALE 204 GIANT RUBBER WATER TANKS 403 GOAT CARE DEMONSTRATIONS 133 GPS RIDE AND DRIVE EXPERIENCE 412 GRAHAM'S LP GAS & FUEL OIL INC 419 GREAT PLAINS MFG INC 59 GREAT PRODUCTS 112 GREEN EXPRESSIONS 432 GRIFFITH ENERGY 617 GROUSER PRODUCTS 711 GROWERS MINERAL SOLUTIONS 22 GROWMARK FS LLC 220/522 GSI 116 GVM INC 310 H & S MFG CO INC 309 HAGEDORN 709 HAINSWORTH FARMS LLC 336 HALCO 325 HANOVA HILLS LIVESTOCK EQUIP 525 HANSON 615 HARDI NORTH AMERICA INC 820 HARDY 220 HARVESTEC 326 HAUN WELDING SUPPLY 434 HAYBUSTER/ DURATECH INDUSTRIES 628 "HAZARDS OF FLOWING GRAIN DEMO, SPONSORED BY AN MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS & SUKUP MFG" 69 HEALTHY HOME INSULATION SOLUTIONS 916 HEARING TESTING VAN 226 HEATMASTER SS/ STEELTECH INC 329 HEATMOR STAINLESS STEEL OUTDOOR FURNACES 309 HLA 440A HOARD'S DAIRYMAN 415 HOLDEN COAL 39 HOLSTEIN USA 731 HONDA 620 HONDA/ TELE-LITE INC 423 HOOF TRIMMERS ASSOC INC 309 HORST 51 HORST'S REPAIR SHOP LLC 221 HUBNER SEED 131 HUD-SON FOREST EQUIP INC 315 HUSKY FARM EQUIPMENT LTD 232 HUSTLER 522 HUTCHINSON/MAYRATH 906 ICCO DESIGN/ BUILD INC 703 INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CHAPTER 35 2 IRON EAGLE ATV'S 524 JAMESWAY FARM EQUIPMENT 543 JAYLOR FABRICATING INC 500 JIFFY HITCH SYSTEMS INC 1055 "JOHN BIRCH SOCIETY CHAPTERS, CENTRAL NY" 309 JOHN BM 823 JOHN DEERE 822 JOHN DEERE COMMERCIAL WORKSITE PRODUCTS 812 JOHN'S TOYS 125 K-FAM MFG LLC 613 "KELLY RYAN," 464B KEMIN-LAND O LAKES 908/1042 KENCOVE FARM FENCE SUPPLIES 517 KENZEL TOYS & APPAREL 303 KEPNER EQUIP INC 611 KILL BROS 228 KIMBERS INC 122 KING HITTER POST POUNDERS 476B KING'S AGRISEEDS.COM 526 KINZE MFG 232 KIOTI 8 KLEIN STEEL RETAIL 232 KLEIS EQUIP 613 KLERK BAG ALL 309 KODIAK 719 KRAUSE CORP 719 KRAUSE/ MONROE TRACTOR


EXHIBITOR LIST AND SHOW MAPS 406 107 445A 915 318 211 400

NEXTIRE INC NIAGARA WIND DEVELOPERS NOFA NY CERTIFIED ORGANIC LLC NOLT'S TIRE SVC NORTH BROOK FARMS INC NORTHEAST FLAGPOLE CO NORTHEAST PLANT DIAGNOSTIC NETWORK 227 NORTHEAST STIHL 435 NORTHERN 416 NORTHLAND CAPITAL FINANCIAL SVCS LLC 521 NUHN INDUSTRIES LTD 400 NY AG INNOVATION CENTER 400/917 NY AGRICULTURE IN THE CLASSROOM 512 NY ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 202 NY BEEF INDUSTRY COUNCIL 300 NY BEEF PRODUCERS ASSN 118 NY CORN GROWERS ASSOC 444A NY CROP INSURANCE EDUCATION PROGRAM 1057 NY FARM BUREAU 400 NY FARMLINK 400 NY FARMNET 400 NY FFA 1053 NY OUTDOOR NEWS 800 NY PORK PRODUCERS 400/502 NY SEA GRANT 119 NY SOYBEAN BOARD 400 NY WOMEN FOR NY WINES 628 NYCAMH/ NY Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health 400 NYS AG EXPERIMENT STATION 1012 NYS AGRICULTURAL MEDIATION PROGRAM 1035 NYS BLUEBIRD SOCIETY INC 1000/1001 NYS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND MARKETS 628 NYS DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 1007 "NYS DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, RURAL EMPLOYMENT" 628 NYS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 405 NYS DRAFT HORSE CLUB 110 NYS GRANGE FAMILY CENTER 600 NYS HORSE COUNCIL 628 NYS POLICE 1005 NYS PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION 628 NYS ROPS PROGRAM 400 NYS SEED TESTING LAB 1000/1001 NYS SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICTS 1061 NYS TRAPPERS ASSOC 337 O'NEILL & ASSOCS 111 "OH, MY MOWERS" 628 OPERATION LIFE SAVER 451A ORGANIC VALLEY 315 ORTEL SUPPLY INC 610 "OTTMAN INC, RB" 133 OUTBACK GUIDANCE 469B OVID WILLARD LIONS CLUB 418 OXBO INTERNATIONAL 333 PACEMAKER STEEL AND PIPING CO 457B "PAGE SEED CO, THE" 611 PARKER 430 PATZ CORP 628 PENN STATE UNIVERSITY 109 PENSKE TRUCK LEASING CO LP 721 PENTA TMR INC 44 PERDUE AGRIBUSINESS/ PACMA 1 PERMA-COLUMN EAST LLC 448A PFIZER ANIMAL HEALTH 533 PIK RITE INC 910 "PIONEER, A DUPONT BUSINESS" 222 PJ TRAILERS 400 PLANT DISEASE DIAGNOSTIC CLINIC 108 PLEASANTCREEKHAYEQUIPMENT.COM 624 POETTINGER US INC. 616 POLYTANK CALF HUTS & BINS 219 PORTAGE & MAIN OUTDOOR WATER FURNACES 325 POWDER RIVER 223 "PRECISION WORK, INC"

466B 820 907 1037 903 1069 717 615 400 551 508 730 927 220 1038 610 610 806 722 804 1043 610 546 548 628 433 516 11 327 541 820 1020 41 1031 36

PROGRESSIVE PUBLISHING PRONOVOST PYRUS ENERGY & 911 GENERATORS QBE AGRI INSURANCE QUALITY CRAFT TOOLS RAINBOW OF NY RAM TRUCKS RANGER RECYCLING AG PLASTICS PROJECT REESE AGRI REINECKER AG PRODUCTS REMLINGER RIDE & DRIVE EXPERIENCE RILEY RIM GUARD INC RITE WAY MFG CO LTD RJ EQUIPMENT RLS STRUCTURES INC ROADBOSS ROBINSON CONCRETE INC ROSTECH ELECTRONICS ROTOMIX RSI CALF SYSTEMS RYDER SUPPLY CO SAFETY & HEALTH CENTER SALFORD FARM MACH SALSCO INC SCAFER FISHIEIES SCHAEFER VENTILATION SCHULER MFG & EQUIP CO INC SCHULTE SCOTSMAN MEIDA GROUP SECOR BUILDING SOLUTIONS SEEDWAY LLC SENECA COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 912 SENECA COUNTY CORNELL COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 4-H 1025 SENECA COUNTY DAIRY HALTERS/ PERENNIALS 1003 SENECA COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 9 SENECA FALLS ROTARY 531 SENECA FALLS VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT INC 302/304 SENECA IRON WORKS 713 SENNINGER IRRIGATION INC 916 SERTOMA HEARING TESTING 56 SHAVER-HILL MAPLE 522 SHIVVERS 43 SHOUP MFG CO 714 SHUR-CO 712 SI DISTRIBUTING INC 545 SIKKEMA'S EQUIP 527 SILO-MATIC FEEDING SYSTEMS 628 SKIN CANCER SCREENINGS 708 SOIL REGENERATION UNLIMITED 414 SOUTH SENECA SPORTSMAN CLUB 601 SPECIAL EVENTS CENTER 612 STOLTZFUS SPREADERS 15 STOR-LOC 38 STRAY VOLTAGE TESTING LLC 402 STUBBE'S PRECAST 606 SUKUP MFG 613 SUNFILM 307 SUNNYCREST PRECAST 443A SUNOVA WORX INC 1033 SUNY COBLESKILL 463B SUPERIOR ATTACHMENTS INC 924 SUPERIOR WALLS 42 SUSTAINABLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENTS INC 23 SWP ENTERPRISES LLC 1008 SYRACUSE DIESEL & ELEC INC 1036 TA SEEDS 201 TANTIVY FARM TRAILER SALES 808 TARM BIOMASS 472B TAURUS SERVICE INC 222 TEITSWORTH TRAILERS 616 TH RISSLER 1029 THE SHIRT HOUSE 902 THERMO-CONTROL HEATING SYS 814 THIS WARM HOUSE BY BOX43 LLC

551 232 611 220 921 55 308 515 628 52 600 727 325 309 820 820 223 3 462B 511 214 17 611 1002 503

503

503 503 503 503 503 437A 503 503 503 525 1046 632 417 309 40 1030 319 229 223 309 101 904 309 1009 504 121 335 1051 722 600 309 621 539 819 550 132 328 618 1047 722 526 722 332 200 918 616 57

TIGERCO DIST CO TIMBERWOLF TIP AIR TONUTTI TOOLIN AROUND/ MPP TOPSTITCH OF NY TRACEY ROAD EQUIPMENT TRACKMAN TRACTOR CAB ROLL SIMULATOR TRACTORHOUSE TRI-STATE HORSE TRIOLIET TRU TEST SCALES TUBE-LINE TUDOR AND JONES INC TUFLINE TURF TEQ EQUIP TYTAN INTERNATIONAL LLC UDDER COMFORT UNIQUE BUILDING SYSTEMS INC UNITED WAY OF SENECA COUNTY UNITEDHEALTHCARE UNVERFERTH MFG CO INC UPSTATE NIAGARA COOPERATIVE INC USDA-APHIS-PP: ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE-PLANT PROTECTION AND QUARANTINE USDA-APHIS-VS: ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICEVETERINARY SVCS USDA-ARS: AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE USDA-FSA: FARM SERVICE AGENCY USDA-NASS: NATIONAL AGRICULTURE STATISTICS SERVICE USDA-NRCS NY: NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SVC USDA-RD: RURAL DEVELOPMENT USDA-WILDLIFE SVCS USDA: NY FEDERATION OF RC & D COUNCILS USDA: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE USDA: US FOREST SERVICE VALMETAL INC VALU-BILT TRACTOR PARTS VERMEER CORP VERSATILE VICON VIGORTONE AG PRODUCTS VINTAGE AERIAL VP SUPPLY WAGNER MILLWORK INC. WALKER MOWERS WALLENSTEIN WANDERING COWBOYS WATERLOO ROTARY CLUB WEAVERLINE WEILER'S GRAIN ROASTING SERVICE WELCOME CENTER WELLSCROFT FENCE SYS/ BEKAERT WESLOR ENTERPRISES INC WESTERN NY ENERGY LLC WESTFIELD WESTWIND UNLIMITED WIFO WILL'S EQUIPMENT REPAIR & FABRICATION WILLIAMS LUBRICANTS INC WILLOW RUN FARMS WINGFIELD FLEXIBLE HARROWS WOOD-MIZER PROD INC WOOD'N THINGS WOODCHUCK BEDDING SPREADER WOODFORD BROS INC "WOODHOUSE CO INC, JS" WOODS EQUIP CO WORKSAVER XZERES WIND CORP YAMAHA MOTOR CORP USA YMCA AUBURN CHICKEN BBQ ZARTMAN FARMS ZERK ZAPPER/ HORIZON PRODUCTS

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

732 KRONE NA INC 608 KUBOTA TRACTOR CORP 817 KUHN KNIGHT 817 KUHN NORTH AMERICA INC 631 KUHNS MFG LLC 309 KVERNELAND GROUP USA INC 1040 LAFORGE SYSTEMS INC 606 LAMBTON 30 LANCASTER DHIA 37 LANCASTER FARMING INC 710 LANCO MFG CO 608 LAND PRIDE 609 LANDOLL CORP/ BRILLION FARM EQUIP 610 LANDOLL CORP/ BRILLION FARM EQUIP 48 LANSING TRADE GROUP LLC 53 LAPIERRE USA 627 LARRY ROMANCE & SON INC 231 LAWN CARE DIST INC 224 LAWSON MILLS BIOMASS SOLUTIONS 813 LAYDEN FENCE & LIVESTOCK SVCS 400 LEAD NEW YORK 58 LEADER EVAPORATOR CO INC 536 LEIDEN LAND AND CATTLE CO INC 725 LELY 505 LERAY SEALED STORAGE 801 LESTER BUILDING SYSTEMS LLC 313 LIFETIME WAGONS-GL NAUSE CO INC 424 LIFTECH JCB 203 LIVERPOOL SHOES INC 215 LOCKE ENTERPRISES 420 LS TRACTOR 309 LUCKNOW 409 "LYONS NATIONAL BANK, THE" 468B M MEYERS & ASSOCIATES 311 MAHINDRA USA INC 1018 MAHONING OUTDOOR FURNACES 323 MARATHON HEATER CO INC 113 MARTIN PLUMBING & HEATING 49 MARTIN WATER CONDITIONING 1064 MASS VISION 13 MASSAGING INSOLES 607 MASSEY FERGUSON TRACTORS 12 MAST ROOF AND COATINGS CO LLC 314 MAY'S FLEET SALES AND SOURCE 606 MC 400 MCCADAM CHEESE 309 MCHALE 334 MCLANAHAN CORPORATION 1041 MEADOWBROOK INS GROUP 504 MEDIA CENTER 426 MENSCH MFG 474B MERIAL 309 METEOR 312 METZGER GEAR INC 217 MEYER MFG CORP 201 MH EBY TRAILERS 304/305 MID YORK DISTRIBUTORS 722 MILLCREEK 407 MILLER ELECTRIC MFG CO 724 MILLER PRO-BADGER 626 MILO MFG 807 MIRACO 719 MONROE TRACTOR/ KRAUSE 114 MONSANTO COMPANY 31 MONTEZUMA WINERY 815 MORRISVILLE STATE COLLEGE 26 MORSE-COLLINS INC 404 MORTON BUILDINGS INC 105 MUD LAKE STALLS LLC 725 MUELLER 127 MULTITEK NORTH AMERICA LLC 220 MY D HAN D 5 MY RAIN REPORT.COM 544 "N-TECH/ NTH, INC" 534 NACHURS 61 NATIONWIDE AGRIBUSINESS & INSURANCE 615 NAVIGATOR 207 NAVILLUS IRRIGATION LLC 225 NELSON TRACTOR LTD 60 NEPTUNE SOFT WATER INC 218 NEW HOLLAND AGRICULTURE 520 "NEWTON, OA"


FARMER T O FARMER M ARKETPLACE

WANTED: Manure spreader and running gear, and hay wagon. Also, 12-4 38 tractor tires in good shape; Also, tractors, running /not. 315-250-3248.(NY)

JD 220 20’ discs, $3,750 obo; 32’ barn beams and used galv. metal roofing; Two roof ventilators, IH bull dozer. 518-5296160.(NY)

KOVAR spring tine weeder, 20’ wide, 3 ph, 2 folding wings, 3 years old, excellent shape, $2,000. 315-788-6722.(NY)

213A Dairy/Horse farm, with milking equipment, 4 br home, 26’x80’ shop, ponds, fruit, berries, west Edmeston, NY $398,000. 315-855-4757.(NY)

About 500 bales of hay still on wagons, mixed grass, $2.05 per bale. 585-4935989.(NY)

JOHN DEERE MODEL 64 silage blower, very good condition, $500 or best offer. 518-848-4898.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 2010 forklift 5000 lb capacity, gas, $2,600; Ford 2N with extra engine, $1,200; Both need mechanical work. 315271-7198.(NY)

HEREFORD Cows, bred to calve spring 2012, $1,200. 518-332-9143.(NY) ALPINE milking goats, good disposition, milking four months. 315-268-1018.(NY)

ABASH PUPPIES: Great sheep guardian dogs, ready by August 5th, Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257(NY)

BELGIAN blue cattle and crossbred for sale, cows and heifers and bulls, no steers, 25 head, pick from herd. 802-7750546.(VT)

BOBCO 4000 tanker spread steerable rear axle, $15,570.76 FIRM. Bis square baler, Hesston 4800 4x4 Bale, $8,026.33 FIRM. 315-436-5484.(NY)

M7 65 diesel parts or repair, $1,000. 802457-2501.(VT)

3 Ton grain bin with auger, oil furnace with hot water heater.. Christ D. Zook, 546 Butler Road, Poland, NY 13431 HEREFORD heifer calf (April), daughter About Time, raised small farm good care, registered AHA replacement stock for Maine owner breeder. 207-947-5125.(ME)

2011 LARGE Square bales 700+ pounds, timothy clover, $50 each. 802-989-0479, 2nd cut $90 each. Addison, Vt. WANTED: 411 or 415 NH discbine, work or parts machine. 607-435-9976.(NY) WANTED: Grimm hay tedder, dead or alive. 518-673-5474.(NY)

JD 653 row head set up for sunflowers, $1,500; 12 ft. truck box with twin piston hoist, $800. 315-789-8859.(NY)

JD 2950 4x4, Cab, ldr.; Belarus 400A diesel w/ loader; Ford 2000 1-2-3-4 bottom plows, sickle bar mowers, potato digger. 585-457-7061.(NY)

50 HP Mitsubishi engine with radiator, runs excellent, $850 obo. 585-554-4506.(NY) JOHN DEERE 2 row corn head, green, ex. condition, $2,650. 315-420-3396.(NY)

1069 NEW HOLLAND bale wagons; gas & diesel, must see, make offer; H&S high capacity 16 wheel rake, $4,500. 315-3647936.(NY)

WANTED: Up to 20 sheep. Also, wanted: Horse drawn Mower. John J. Byler, 9311 Owens Road, Remsen, NY, 13438

AVCO New Ideal model #327 2 row corn picker, wide row, with 12 row husking bed, good condition, $2,800. 315-7764590.(NY)

NH 489 haybine for sale. Woeble box needs to be rebatted, stub nose guards, very good condition, asking $1,500 OBO. 315-858-1617.(NY)

REG. and grade Nigerian dwarf goats for sale. Does, bucks, and 2011 kids. For show, milk, and pets. 716-492-4351.(WNY)

(4) HEREFORD heifers, 4 black white, bred to black Angus due Aug., Sept. 607829-2837.(NY)

OLIVER 68” wide, no motor, $1,200; 40 JD Dozer, 5 roll with winch, vg, $3,500; AC C, vg, $1,500. 603-869-5819.(NH)

1991 CASE 1840 skid loader, hyd.; pump for IH 800 planter, pressure washer, 2,500 psi. New, $190.00; Pr. Bichon dogs 315536-1112.(NY)

NEW HOLLAND 58 kicker bale spear manure fork with universal quick attach. WANTED: Bale chute for older New Holland baler. 315-858-2729.(NY)

FEEDER PIGS, $50 each. WANTED: Corn binder. Samuel A. Gingerich, 34529 Zan Road, LaFargeville, NY 13656

AUTOMATIC roller mill, model 400, stationary unit, runs perfect, rolls excellent. $600. 518-332-8116.(NY)

I AM PARTING OUT my gleaner, model E combine, engine is bad, rest is in good cond., located in Boonville 315-9424475.(NY)

IH 885 tractor w/ IH 2250 loader, $8,000; NH 1465 haybine, $6,250; Finn B50 hay/straw mulcher on trailer, $5,000. 570376-3981.(PA)

TWO MONTHS OLD Jersey bull calf, dehorned, AI sired by Lexicon out of Registered Dam, $450. Can be registered. 401-640-1083.(MA)

REG. paint yearling colt, $500. Polled herefords, 3 cows, 5 steers, most approx 1,400 - 2,000 lbs., some registered. $8,000, or will separate. 315-363-8966.(NY)

CLEAN BURN multi-oil furnace. Has oil holding tank. Is 170,000 to 180,000 BTU, 2,078 hours. Like barn new, Chester. 845774-8112.(NY)

WILDEN 1 inch air operated pump, model P2R, plastic, teflon fitted, $1,000/bo; 1942 Farmall H w-4 rear weights, cub cadets 315-939-9336.(NY)

CASE 1390 tractor, fire damage outside motor, radiator, panel wires, hoses, has 1690 front axle, $1,500. Frey loader off tractor. 607-227-7334.(NY)

BEAR CAT 1101 grinder mixer, 3 Killbros gravity wagons, White 435 10 shank chisels; WANTED: AC or IH pull type combine. 315-219-9090.(NY)

2000 New Holland baler. Call 607-5328927 for info. Asking $9,500 or best offer.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 2440 tractor, 600 hp, newly completely rebuilt engine, Hi Lo, new rubber, $7,500. 315-866-1131.(NY)

FORD DEARBORN 14” 2 bottom plow model 14A, complete, very good cond., $400. Albany. 518-439-1547.(NY)

CASE IH 1420 combine with two heads, $12,000, good working condition; (2) 4x5 brown cow mats, like new, $800. 585-3158127.(NY)

JOHN DEERE double auger self propelled harvester box, used, rebuildable, needs repairs, save money over new, asking $500. 814-683-4383.(PA)

WANTED: Larch logs any quantity, call 585-765-2215, leave message.(NY)

JD 520 WFE tractor, new rears, p/s original. 315-684-9349.(NY)

JOHN DEERE BALER, model 24T, runs good, $1,500. Cell No. 774-200-0385 or 508-867-7608.(MA)

APPROX. 2,000 ft. 4 inch irrigation pipe with pipe trailer, 30 ft. sections and fittings, $2,100. Young Heirloom turkeys, Bourbon Red and Norragansett. 315-789-9759.(NY)

MOBILE CHICKEN HOUSE, 11’x55’, has two entry doors, great for pastured poultry, $800. Also, 1 ton brock poly feed bin, $800. 315-536-6406.(NY)

DEUTZ DX 140 4wd $12,500 B.O.; New IDea two n row corn picker, $1,600 B.O. Hesston 4600 baler, $2,800, all good cond. 716-474-8222.(NY)

WANTED: Want to buy open Holstein heifers directly from farmer. Call Bob at Sunset Farm, evenings. 207-7863324.(ME)

JD 2940wd, Hi & Lo, 8,600 hours, new clutch in Spring of 2010, Runs & drives, $6,500. Yates Co. 585-554-4577.(NY)

WANTED: Steel combine wheels, 55” - 58” tall, 24” - 30” wide, prefer rebar with rubber blocks. 315-536-0235.(NY)

DARI KOOL BULK MILK tank, 600 gallon with agitator, very good condition, $1,000. Romulus. 607-543-0555.(NY)

WHITE ROMNEY ewe lambs for sale, in fleece, natural colored ram lamb, all registered clean flock. Call: 315-822-3478.(NY)

PIGLETS $80 each, nice size, avg. weight 80 lbs; One lge boar hog, nice, tame, $300, approx. 900 lbs. Gouvernneur 315-4080471.(NY)

NH 70’ overhead mow conveyor, Danusel hyd. post pounder, Apache 5 on a side transport creep feeder, all vg shape. 315406-5836.(NY)

BOER BUCKS for sale, 3 months old, full blood, nice, chunky fellas. $200 each. Vaccinated, Disbudded, nice temperament. 716-592-7857.(NY)

MASSEY HARRIS 50, same as MF 50, 3 pt hitch, live power, live hyd., rear tires 60%, good fronts, Hyd. remote, $2,000. 607-265-3221.(NY)

Tractor Parts - Cat D-2, D4-7U, Cat D6-9u, logging grapple (rotary), T.D. 15-15B hydraulics/clutch, Tracks/Shoes, (JD 450 D3ABC-931-D6C) 508-278-5762 Evenings.(MA)

SUBSCRIBE Country Folks The Weekly Voice of Agriculture

Your paid subscription to Country Folks earns you 1 FREE Farmer to Farmer Marketplace ad Each Month.

INCLUDE Your Mailing Information Found on the Front of Your Country Folks Paper!

E Chec Are You LOT**R002 REAID ERS W02888 ***************CAR-RT F Eleg k You 1 P IB r L1/01/11 YOUR NAME abel ible? For T TOSCR LY YOUR MAILING ADDRESS he “A ” B YOUR CITY & STATE, NY 13428 N U O S

Your Label Looks Like This Gray SAMPLE Label

You Must Include The ( A ) That Is Found In This Area Of Your Label, It Signifies That You Are A A PAID SUBSCRIBER

YOUR Label Is Found On The Lower Right Hand Corner Of The Front Page Of Your Paper

YOU MUST MAIL THIS FORM & YOUR LABEL TO: Country Folks FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE PO Box 121 Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

 WANTED

_______________________________________________ 1ST word 2ND word 3RD word 4TH word _______________________________________________ 5TH word 6TH word 7TH word 8TH word _______________________________________________ 9TH word 10TH word 11TH word 12TH word _______________________________________________ 13TH word 14TH word 15TH word 16TH word _______________________________________________ 17TH word 18TH word 19TH word 20TH word ( ) _______________________________________________ Area Code & Phone Number (Counts as the 21ST word)

Please PRINT Clearly!

 FOR SALE

REQUIREMENTS: 1. P a i d S u b s c r i b e r s a r e allowed ONE Farmer to Farmer Marketplace ad Per Month. (Ads Will Appear For 1 Issue Only) 2. Must MAIL this form & your Current Label to us. (NO Phone Calls, NO Faxes, NO E-Mails, NO Photo Copies Accepted). 3. (21) Word Limit. Please Print Clearly.

(If we can’t read your writing we can’t enter it in the paper.) 4. Include your Phone Number with area code. (Phone #’s count as 1 word).

5. The following types of ads WILL NOT be accepted: BUSINESS, Personals, Help Wanted, For Lease, For Rent, Wanted To Rent, Wanted To Lease. The above types of ads WILL NOT be accepted. 6. Information not received

in our office by Noon on Wednesday will be held until the following issue.

Lee Publications staff has the right to reject and/or edit any Farmer To Farmer Marketplace ads.

A nd 1 F F G Ma arme R et E r r E ke To F E

TO

FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE

Please PRINT Clearly!

Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

(5) ANGUS Hereford cross steers, 5 months old, (1) two year old black bull, (1) Hereford steer. 203-266-7907.(CT)

FOR SALE: 3 white male alpacas for $1,000. 315-823-1605.(NY)

ve

t ry plac arm Mo e er nth Ad !

CALL Toll Free 888-596-5329

or FAX form with credit card information to (518) 673-2699 or e-mail your request to subscriptions@leepub.com

Rush This Subscription Form with Check or Credit Card Information To:

Country Folks

Country Folks is Published Weekly By Lee Publications, Inc.

P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428-0121 Name ______________________________________________ Farm/Company Name__________________________________ Address ____________________________________________ City __________________________State ____Zip ________ Signature ______________________________Date ________ Phone (

) ____________________________________

E-mail ______________________________________________ Fax (

) ________________________________________

- Publication  Country Folks Eastern Edition  Country Folks Western Edition  Country Folks New England Farm Weekly  Country Folks MidAtlantic (Farm Chronicle)

 Print  Digital

- Subscription Price  1 Year (52 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45.00  2 year (104 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$75.00  Canadian (52 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$140.00  Canadian 1st Class (52 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$265.00  New  Renewal (include label from paper if possible)  Gift Subscription Signature __________________________________Date ________ Payment Method VISA MC AMEX DISC Exp. Date

____

Acct. # ________________________________________________

One Year (52 Issues) $45.00 Two Years (104 Issues) $75.00 Every Week

Country Folks

Brings You: • Award Winning Editorial • Feature Stories • Latest in National, Local, and State News • New and Used Equipment for Sale • Auctions

New Subscribers Please Allow 3-4 Weeks Delivery

NOW AVAILABLE DIGITALLY!!

Get your copy every Saturday from anywhere you have web access!! By getting your subscription digitally you also will have access to our archived issues since January of 2009 and have the ability to search your current issue or the past issues.


w w w. c o u n t r y f o l k s . c o m

KRAMER'S INC. RFD #3 Box 245, Augusta, ME 04330 207-547-3345

CLINTON TRACTOR & IMPLEMENT CO. Meadow Street, PO Box 262 Clinton, NY 13323-0262 315-853-6151

FOSTERDALE EQUIPMENT CORP. 3137 Route 17B Cochecton, NY 12726 845-932-8611

WHITE'S FARM SUPPLY, INC. RD 4, Box 11 Jct. Rtes. 31 & 316 Canastota, NY 13032 315-697-2214

LAMB & WEBSTER INC. 601 West Main Springville, NY 14141 716-592-4924

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The National Farmers Union (NFU) Board of Directors passed a resolution on July 18 in response to U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture Ranking Member Collin Peterson’s recent dairy reform proposal. The proposal, based on the National Milk Producers Federation’s proposed “Foundation for the Future,” attempts to resolve a number of critical issues that prevent the current dairy safety net from functioning adequately. “While we are very appreciative of Ranking Member Peterson’s proposal to initiate meaningful and necessary dairy reform, our Board of Directors feels that the proposal in its current form is inadequate,” said NFU President Roger Johnson. “The current proposal would not provide a safety net for all dairy farmers, particularly family-sized operators. A fundamental problem with this proposal is that it appears that the largest farmers will reap the greatest benefits at the expense of smaller family farms.” The resolution outlines several solutions that would benefit all U.S. dairy farmers, including: • An effective supply management program that utilizes a fixed base, which is critical to reforming the current dairy safety net. Com-

bined with the current Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) program, such a supply management program would provide a fiscally responsible way to manage risk in dairy production at minimal or no cost to the American taxpayer; • A refundable assessment collected on all milk at all times, not only when margins are low, and adjustment of the current Dairy Product Support Price Program to reflect an adequate safety net level; • Implementation of a variable make allowance. When the market price is strong, the make allowance would increase correspondingly. When depressed, the make allowance would shrink so both farmers and processors have an incentive to raise milk prices; and • Maintain the existing federal milk marketing order system with the addition of a price discovery mechanism such as a Consumer Price Index (CPI) formula. “It is encouraging that the issue of reform in the dairy industry is being taken up in Congress, but it is clear that this legislation is not the answer,” said Johnson. “We will continue working with policymakers to ensure that any proposed dairy policy reforms do not exacerbate an already dire situation. We must be certain that the cure is not worse than the disease.”

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

Visit These New York-New England Dealers

NFU Board of Directors passes resolution in response to dairy proposal


THE FARM SHOW FOR FARMERS!

JANUARY 3, 4 & 5, 2012 Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 • York, PA

DONT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO EXHIBIT OR ATTEND!! CHECK OUT THESE EXHIBITORS!

The Keystone Farm Show Has More Commercial Exhibits Than Any Other Farm Show In PA!

Come See Us at Empire Farm Days Booth 1037 SW Main Tent

AUGUST 9, 10, 11, 2011

Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

York Fairgrounds ABS Global, Inc • W-309 ACR Metal Roofing • 128 Adams Building Contractors of PA • W-320, W-321 Adams Supply • W-314 ADM Alliance Nutrition • E-378 ADM - Crop Risk Management • 212 Advanced Biofuels USA • L-209 Advanced Biological Marketing • E-363 Advanced Solar Industries, LLC • H-308, H-309 Aerotech Ventilation Systems • 288, 289 AET Consulting • 260 Ag Com, Inc & Miller Chemical • E-359, E-360 Ag Essentials • 258, 259 AgChoice Farm Credit • 234 Agpoint Construction Services • 129 Agri-King • 126 Agri-Nutrition Consulting, Inc • L-300 Agri-Plastics Mfg • 448 Agri-SC • 209 Agri-Trac, Inc • W-330 Agromatic, Inc • 219, 220 AIC - Agricultural Instruments Corp • 532 Albers Dairy Equipment • W-300, W-301 American Farm Products • 531 Anderson Group • W-348B Animal Medic • E-373 APC, Inc • 430 Appleby Systems, Inc • 437 Art Farm USA • 236, 237 Atlantic Tractor and Deer Country • W-353 Automatic Farm Systems • 121 AutoVent, LLC • 253 AXA Advisors, LLC • 537 B&R Distributing • S Bag Man, LLC • 270, 271 Baker Lime • 208 Balsbaugh Insurance Agency, Inc • E-348 Beco Equipment • 215, 216 Beiler-Campbell Realtors & Auctioneers • L-306 Benco Poly Film • 211 Bergman Mfg., Inc • 274 Better Bilt Storage, Inc • 138 Binkley & Hurst LP • E-352, O-315 Bio-Vet, Inc • W-313 Bobcat of York • E-379 Boumatic • 120 Business Lease Consultants, Inc • W-325 CB Structures • 412 CBM Electronic Lighting • L-213, L-214 C.K. Replacement Stalls • E-353A Canns-Bilco Distributors, Inc • W-328, W-329 Cedar Crest Equipment • 130 Central Petroleum Company (Cen-Pe-Co) • W-351 Channel Bio, LLC • 232, 233 Chemgro Seed Co • W-323, W-324 Chesapeake Bay Foundation • L-204 CHR Hansen • 535 Claas of America • 102 Clean Cutter Flail & Tiller Blade Co • 419 Cobra Torches, Inc • 218 Conewango Products Corp. • 223, 234 Country Folks • H-300 CPS • 200, 201, 202, 203 Cramaro Tarp Systems, Inc • 413 Crop Care Equipment by Paul B, LLC • 113 Cummings & Bricker, Inc • E-354 Dairy Marketing Services • E-341, E-342, E-343 Dairy One • E-345, E-346 Dairymaster USA, Inc • E-367 Dauphin Co • 235 Deep Valley Farm • E-357 Dekalb / Asgrow • W-352 DeLaval, Inc • 227B, 228, 229, 229A, 230, 231 Demuth Steel Products, Inc • 278, 279 Dick Meyer Co., Inc • 284 Diesel Pro Inc • 606 Doeblers • W-339, W-340 Donegal Insurance Group • 411 Dow Agriscience • 213, 214

Rodman Lott & Son Farms • Seneca Falls, NY Dr. Register & Assoc., Inc • W-305 Dryhill Mfg / Twin Valley Farms Service, LLC • 505, 515, 449A DTN - The Progessive Farmer • 220A Dyna-Tech Industries • 250, 250A E&F Ag Systems, LLC • E-311 Ed Hoover Construction, LLC • D Elanco Animal Health • E-334, E-335 Eli Fisher Construction • 441 EM Herr Equipment • 446 Emm Sales & Service, Inc • E-369, E-370 Equipment Service • 442 Esch Mfg • E-375 Everett Cash Mutual Insurance Group • E-356 Evergreen Fence, Inc • W-311 Farm and Land Realty, Inc • L-301 Farm Works Software • 414, 415 Farmco Mfg • O-308 Farmer Boy Ag Supply • 125 Farming, The Journal of Northeast Ag • 618 Fastline Publications • 610 Feedmobile, Inc - FMI • E-368 Fetterville Sales • H-304 Fisher & Thompson, Inc • 110 F.M. Brown’s Sons, Inc • 409, 410 Franklin Builders • 225, 226 Frontlink, Inc • 417, 418 Fulton Bank • 206 Garber Farms • 503 GEA Farm Technologies, Inc • 104A Genex Cooperative • W-312 Goodville Mutual Casualty Co • E-316, E-317 Great Plains Mfg., Inc • W-348A Gro-Mor Plant Food Co Inc • 127 Ground Water Assesment • E-340 Growers Mineral Solutions • 246 Growmark FS, LLC • E-321, E-322 GVM, Inc • 114 H&S Manufacting Co. Inc • W-354, O-304 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 445 Hardi North America, Inc • E-371 Harsco Minerals • 536 Helicopter Applicators, Inc • L-212, O-107 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 444 Hillside Ag Construction, LLC • W-337, W-338 Hoard’s Dairyman • E-310 Homestead Nutrition, Inc • 285, 286, 287 Hoober, Inc • E-377, O-314 Hoof Trimmers Association, Inc • 269 Horning Mfg., LLC • 501 Hubner Seed • H-302, H-303 IBA, Inc • E-327, E-328 International Silo Association • L-208A Iva Manufacturing • E-318, E-319, E-320 J&B Contractors • E-305 J&D Manufacturing • 280, 281 J&J Silo Co., LLC • 291 J. L. Gossert & Co. Forestry • E-347 J.S. Woodhouse Co., Inc • 440 Jamesway Farm Equipment • 135 Jaylor Fabricating, Inc • W-349 Jefo USA, Inc • 207 Kamar Products, Inc • E-358 Kel-Krop Enterprises LLC • W-306, W-307 Kencove Farm Fence • W-318, W-319 Keystone Concrete Products • 272, 273 Keystone Group Ag Seeds • E-361, E-362 King Construction • 254, 255 King’s Agri-Seeds, Inc • 403,404 Kubota Tractor, Corp • 123 Kuhn North America, Inc • 100 Kuhns Mfg., LLC • B Kutz Farm Equipment, Inc • I, J, K, L M, N, O, P, Q Lancaster Ag Products • 427 Lancaster Dairy Farm Automation • 502 Lancaster DHIA • W-332, W-333 Lancaster Farming, Inc • H-305 Lancaster Level-Flo, Inc • 118 Lanco Manufacturing, Inc • W-347 Lanco-Pennland • 429

Land O’Lakes, Inc • H-309A Lapp’s Barn Equipment • A Lawn Care Distributors, Inc • 124 Lely USA, Inc • 111 Lira / Kauffman’s Animal Health • E-331 LR Gehm, LLC / CoPulsation • 416 M. Meyers & Associates • 290 Mahindra USA • 540, 541 Mahoning Outdoor Furnaces, Inc • 222A, 222B Mark Hershey Farms, Inc • 431 Maryland Virginia Milk • E-323, E-324 Martin Limestone Inc • 257 Mastitis Management Tools • 205 MAX, Mutual Aid Exchange • 214A McLanahan Corporation • E-312 Melvin R. Weaver & Sons, LLC • 527, 528 Mensch Manufacturing LLC • L-215, L-216 Messick Farm Equipment • 105, 106 Meyer Manufacturing Corporation • O-100 MH Eby, Inc • W-355 Micron-Bio Systems, Inc • W-304 Mid-Atlantic Agri Systems • W-346 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • E-364, E-365 Mid-Atlantic Seeds / Cumberland Valley Co-Operative • 251, 252 Milk-Rite, Inc • E-301 Miller Diesel Inc • E-308 Miraco • E-336, E-337 MM Weaver • 103, O-105 Monty’s Plant Food Co., Inc • W309A Morrissey Insurance • 424 Morton Buildings, Inc • E-332, E-333 Mount Joy Farmers Co-op • 210 Mueller • 119 National Farmers Org - NFO • 534 Nachurs Alpine Solutions • 244, 245 New Holland Agriculture • 108, 109 Nextire, Inc • E-380, E-381 NIOSH / NPPTL • 241B North Brook Farms, Inc • W-335, W-336 Northeast Agri Systems, Inc • 122 Northeast Stihl • 511, 512 Northern Repair • E-306 O.A. Newton • W-302, W-303 Organic Valley • 401 Outback Heating, Inc • 262, 263 Owens Corning Basement Finishing Systems • 603 Oxbo International • 104 PA Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) • L-203 PA Dairy Princess & Promotion Services • 624 PA Farm Bureau • 275, 276, 276A, 277 PA Farmers Union • E-309 PACMA Inc • L-304, L-305 Patterson Farm Maple Products • 240 Patz Corporation • 131 PDM Insurance Agency, Inc • E-326 Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-310 Penn Diesel Serv. Co • E-329 Penn Jersey Products, Inc • E-374 Penn State Agricultural Safety & Health • 241E Penn State University LAL Lab • 241A Pennfield Corporation • 247, 248 Pennsylvania Certified Organic • W-341 Pennsylvania Service & Supply, Inc • 425 Pequea Planter • 432, 433 Perma-Column East, LLC • 438, 439 Petersheims Cow Mattresses, LLC • 137 Pioneer Hi-Bred International • E-349, E-350, E-351 P.L. Rohrer & Bros., Inc • E-300 PNC Bank • 407 Power Pro Equipment • 443 Power Systems Electric, Inc • E-382, E-383 Precise Concrete Walls, Inc • 256 Precision Planting Dealers • W-326, W-327 Priority One • 426 Progressive Pressure Systems • 239 Progressive Publishing • 241 Quality Craft Tools • H-301 Quality Milk Production Services • 261 Rain and Hail, LLC • E-315

RCM International LLC • L-202 Red Dale Ag Service • 400 Reed Equipment Sales • W-356, W-357 Reinecker Ag Products • 506, 507 Renaissance Nutrition • 294 Roto-Mix, LLC • W-358 RSI Calf Systems • 266, 267 Ruhl Insurance • 402 Ryder Supply Company • E-372 Salford Farm Machinery, Ltd • W-350, W-350A Sanimax • 436 Schulte Industries • C Seedway, LLC • W-342, W-343 Select Sire Power • W-308 Show-Ease Stall Co • 116 Shur-Co • E-307 SI Distributing, Inc • 420, 421, 422 Smuckers Meats, LLC • W-338A Sollenberger Silos, LLC • 292, 293 Snyder Equipment, Inc • 423 Steiner • 508, 509 Stein-Way Equipment • 500, 449 Stoltzfus Spreaders • 117 Straley Farm Supply • 221, 222, O-101 Stray Voltage Testing • E-325 Stull Equipment Company • 542 Sukup / LnR Feed & Grain Sys. • E-355 Summit Glove Inc / Milkers Helpers • 408 Sunlion Energy Systems • 619, 620 Susquehanna Bank • 406 Susquehanna Dodge Chrysler Jeep / D.K. Hostetler • 525 Sweitzers Fencing Co • 518, 519, 450 Synagro • 238 Syngenta Seeds • W-344, W-345 T.A. Seeds • W-315, W-316, W-317 Tam Systems • E-376 Taurus Service, Inc • W-310 Team Ag Incorporated • E-313 Tech Mix, Inc • 428 The Fertrell Co • 533 The Old Mill-Troy • 538, 539 Tigerco Dist. Co • E-353 TM Refrigeration • 268, O-102 Tractor House • 605 Triple-M-Farms • 265 Udder Comfort • 204 Unique Building Systems, Inc • 126A U.S. Farmer • 613 USDA US Dept of Agriculture - APHIS-VS • L-205 USDA US Dept of Agriculture - FSA • L-206 USDA US Dept of Agriculture - NRCS • L-207 USDA US Dept of Agriculture - NASS • L-208 Valmetal, Inc • 136 Van Beek Natural Science • R Vi-Cor • 283 Vigortone Ag Products • 405 Vulcan Materials Company • 227 WA Johnson, Inc • L-302, L-303 Weaver Distributing • E-30, E-303, E-304 Weaver Insurance Group • 249 Weaver’s Toasted Grains LLC • E-330 Wenger Feeds • 217 Wengers of Myerstown • W-351A Westfield Group • W-334 White Horse Construction, Inc • E-338, E-339 White Oak Mills, Inc • 434, 435 Yoderway Buildings, LLC • T Zartman Farms • 107 Zeiset Equipment • 447 Zimmerman Cattle Control by PBZ, LLC • 115 Zimmerman Farm Service, Inc • 504 Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 516, 517, 449B

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586


August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23


A warranty like no other!

2008 Lexion 585R

2009 Lexion 575R

* Residence restrictions apply.

Have peace of mind when buying a used Lexion with this loaded 75 hr factory warranty.*

2009 Lexion 585R

770 hrs, 458 separator hrs, U17744 (AC) $264,900

Canandaigua NY • John Poppoon 800-388-6119 Elmira NY • Tom Sutter • 585-730-1953 Hornell NY • Kris Bower • 607-481-1562

Plus much more. Sprayers • Spray trailers • Mergers • Grain drills • Windrowers • Rotary forage heads • Windrow forage heads • Skid Steers • Tractors 40HP to 175HP plus.

BALERS IH 3450 U17823 (H) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,555 Claas 250RC round, 2003 U17997 (B). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,87 MOWER CONDITIONERS NH H8080 2008, 699hrs, 15.5ft disk mower, SP, A/C, heat, buddy seat U17645 (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $93,750 Kuhn merge maxx 300 PTO pump, 9ft pickup head with 3ft. table extension very clean (C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,913

View more pre-owned equipment at

Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Admas Center NY • Mike Gaylord • 800-962-4686 Auburn NY • Clay VanNostrand • 800-362-4686 Batavia NY • James Kingston • 800-388-4113 Binghamton NY • Tom Sutter • 585-730-1853

COMBINES Case IH 1460 1981, U17380 (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,000 Case IH 2377 4WD, 2020 25ft flex head air reel, 2005yr (A). . coming In Case IH 2366 MFD, specialty rotor, 2 spd hydro, yield & moisture monitor, 30.5x32 rice & kane 65%, 3,510 eng, 2422 rotor (C). . $89,813 Case IH 2366, specialty rotor, rock trap, bin extensions, MFD, 30.5x32 front; 18.4x26 rear, 2825 engine hrs, 2220 rotor hrs U16164 (C) . . . . . . $82,333 Case IH 2388, 1999, AFS pkg, power guide axle, 54” feeder house with trap U17238 (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $98,500 Case IH 1680 4WD, duals (A). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . coming in JD 9500 4WD rock trap, chopper, 2688 eng. hours, 1781 separator hrs (A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . coming in COMBINE HEADS Gerhinghoff corn head, 2008 U17665 (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $81,600 Case IH 863 corn 1990 U17336 (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995 Case IH 2208 corn head 8R U17269 (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,200 Case IH 963 corn head, 6RN (A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 Case IH 1020 flex head, 2005 U17938 (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,873 Case IH 2020 platform head, 2007, 30ft flex head U17235 (C) . . . . $19,619 Case IH 2408 8-row 30” (A). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40,000

Chopper parts. • Engine • Gearbox Clutch Universal drive shaft • Chassis • Brake • Steering • Hitch • Drives • Hydraulic system • Belts • Electrical Electronic equipment • Feeder unit • Chopping • Central lubrication system • Various components

www.monroetractor.com

1221 hrs, 665 separator hrs, U17772 (B) $261,250

2003 Claas 890 2597 hrs U17684 (H) $119,000

2003 Claas 900 3605 hrs U19429 (H) $129,995

Any make any model.

824 hrs, 670 separator hrs, U17580 (B) $299,900

2002 Claas 900 2441 hrs U17683 (B) $127,900

2001 Claas 870 2961 hrs U14751 (C) $119,850

We have the lowest chopper prices in North America!

2001 Claas 830 2100 hrs U19413 U19413 (A) $129,900

2002 Claas 890 2268 hrs U17764 (B) $133,333

New trades coming in daily.

See you at Empire Farm Days, August 9, 10, 11, Booth #719


Section B

Country Folks

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 1


Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

June Dairy Month milk production in the 23 major States slipped to 15.4 billion pounds, according to the Agriculture Department's preliminary data, up 1.4 percent from June 2010. May output totaled 16.1 billion after revisions added 20 million pounds to last month's estimate, up 1.6 percent from a year ago. The 50-State total for June, at 16.53 billion pounds, was up 1.1 percent from 2010. Cow numbers in the 23 states, at 8.46 million head, were up 11,000 from May and 106,000 above a year ago. Output per cow averaged 1,819 pounds, up just 2 pounds from June 2010. California production was up 3.4 percent from a year ago, thanks to 19,000 more cows and a 45 pound gain per cow.

Wisconsin was down 1.6 percent on a 35 pound loss per cow. Cow numbers were up 4,000 head. New York was up 0.3 percent on a 5 pound gain per cow. Cow numbers were unchanged. Idaho was up 5 percent on 16,000 more cows and a 40 pound gain per cow. Pennsylvania was down 2 percent on a 40 pound loss per cow. Cow numbers were up 2,000. Minnesota was down 4.6 percent on an 80 pound loss per cow. Cow numbers were up 1,000 head. The biggest gain was in Texas, up a Texas-sized 10.3 percent, thanks to 24,000 more cows and a 75 pound gain per cow. Colorado was next, up 6.8 percent, followed by Washington, up 6.3 percent. Minnesota showed the biggest decline, followed by Ohio, down 4.2

FLAME STOCKYARD BRIGHTON COMMISSION CO.

691 Great Road, Littleton, MA 01460 978-486-3698

SALE EVERY TUESDAY Goats, Lambs, Sheep, Pigs 12:30 Calves 3:00pm followed by Feeders & Beef Animals

BUYERS FROM 3 NATIONAL SLAUGHTER HOUSES 15+ LOCAL BUYERS Same Day Payment The Highland Agricultural Society is proud to present the program for

156th Middlefield Fair 7 Bell Road, Middlefield, MA

"Come on out to the beautiful town of Middlefield"

Gate: $6 for adults; $5 for Seniors and children under 10 are free

*** The Program is still in the works, and events may be subject to change***

Friday Night, August 12th - Gate opens @ 4pm

4:00 PM 4.00 PM 4:00 PM 6:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:30 PM

Fair officially opens - Exhibits, Midway, et al Opening ceremony-Ray Gero of the Dalton American Legion Post Rocky Acres Petting Zoo Car, truck and motorcycle BurnOut Contests Bike Giveaway Rock Hounds Band

Saturday, August 13th - Gate opens @ 7am

7 to 11 AM 9:00 AM 9:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 1:00 PM 1 to 5 PM 12:30 PM 2:30 PM 2:30 PM 3:00 PM 7:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:00 PM

Breakfast - Fair Food Booth Rocky Acres Petting Zoo Chili Cook Off & Salsa competitions begins Horse Pull - 3000 lbs. 12 ft. class KIX 97.9 4x4 Truck Pulls Roast Pork Dinner - Hinsdale Lions Club Chili Cook Off Tasting Family Fun Contest - Kid's Chicken Chuckin, Women's Skillet and Men's Chainsaw Throwing Horse Pull - 3300 lbs. 12 ft. class Chili Cook Off & Salsa judging and sampling Bike Giveaway Horse Pull - Free-for-All 3300 lbs. 12 ft. class Summit Hill Band

Sunday, August 14th - Gate opens @ 8am

7 to 11 AM All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast/Fair food booth 9:00 AM Rocky Acres Petting Zoo 10:00 AM Lulu & The Shoemakers Band 10:30 AM Youth Cattle Show 11:00 AM Oxen Pull - 2800 lbs. class 11 to 5 PM Huntington Lions Club- Free Vision Screening 1 to 4 PM Dinner - Hinsdale Lions Club 2:30 AM Oxen Pull - 3200 lbs. class 4:00 PM Oxen Pull - Free-for-All class 5:00 PM Bike Giveaway On Display: Exhibit Hall, Farm Museum, Antique Equipment

percent, and Illinois, off 3.7 percent. USDA reports in its weekly update that California production has declined in most areas, being affected by hot weather. Heat is also impacting Midwest and Eastern output as the "heat dome" covered 1 million square miles of the U.S. USDA's latest Livestock Slaughter report morning shows 219,000 dairy cows were culled under Federal inspection in June, 1,000 head less than in May, but 5,000 more than June 2010. A total of about 1.46 mil-

lion cows were culled in the first six months of 2011, up from 1.37 million in 2010. The August Federal order Class I base milk price is $21.43 per hundredweight, up 40 cents from July, $5.66 above August 2010, the highest since November 2007, and equates to about $1.84 per gallon. The 2011 Class I base average now stands at $18.91, up from $14.74 a year ago and $10.95 in 2009. The Class III advanced pricing factor became the "higher of" in driving the Class I value and National Milk's

TRACTORS Ford 8N w/Blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4240 Quad Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5425 w/54R Loader . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5510 w/540. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500 . . . . . . Fultonville (2) JD 244 J Loaders . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7810 w/840 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . Chatham AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 4610 Narrow, MFWD, cab . Coming In . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 5320 MFWD w/ldr . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota MX5000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,400 . . . . . . Fultonville NH 8240 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,800 . . . . . . Fultonville NH TL90 cab 2WD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,900 . . . . . . . Chatham AC 200 w/ cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . Schaghticoke JD 5325 2WD/Cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/Cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,000 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5065M w/553 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen Ford 8N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,750 . . . . . . . Chatham COMPACT TRACTORS Ford 1520 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 3005 w/300. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,350 . . . . . . . Chatham MF 1220 w/mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,595 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 855 w/cab, & loader . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800. . . . Schaghticoke JD 2520 w/loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,900 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 4520 w/cab, loader, low hours . . $39,900. . . . Schaghticoke Kubota L39 TLB, canopy. . . . . . . . . $28,400 . . . . . Clifton Park Kubota L5450 loader/backhoe . . . . $21,000 . . . . . . . Chatham NH TZ25DA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,900 . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 317 Skid steer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 320 w/cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,900. . . . Schaghticoke MOWER CONDITIONERS NH 477. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,900 . . . . . . Fultonville TILLAGE JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2500 4 bottom plow . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000 . . . . . . Fultonville HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/Heads . . . . . $169,500. . . . Schaghticoke DBL Rake Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $950 . . . . . . Fultonville Dion Forage Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 . . . . . . Fultonville NH 258. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . Fultonville NH 169 Tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . Fultonville NH 28 blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . Fultonville H&S merger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . Schaghticoke Miller Pro Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900 . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500. . . . Schaghticoke

Roger Cryan does not predict a MILC payment for producers. The NASS-surveyed butter price averaged $2.0291 a pound, down 10 1/2-cents from July. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.6571, up a penny. Cheese averaged $2.1308, up 33.7 cents, and dry whey averaged 54.7 cents, up 2.7 cents. Cash cheese prices strengthened the third week of July, particularly the block price. It closed Friday at $2.1550 per pound, up 9 3/4cents on the week, reversing three weeks of declines, and is 55 1/4-

cents above a year ago. The barrels closed at $2.1250, up a penny and a half on the week, and 56 1/2-cents above a year ago. Nineteen cars of block traded hands on the week and only one of barrel. The NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price hit $2.1336, up 2.3 cents, while the barrels averaged $2.1243, up 2 1/2-cents. Jerry Dryer wrote in his July 15 Dairy & Food Market Analyst that "Sub-two-dollar cheese prices are not too likely too soon." He reports that demand is "holding

Mielke B3

Miller 1416. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500. . . . Schaghticoke JD 714 Forage Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit. . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970 w/ 7’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,900 . . . . . . Fultonville NH 166 inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . Fultonville Fahr KH500 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 3pt hitch, 6’ sickle bar mowerComing In . . . Schaghticoke Vicon 4 Star Tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 945 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen Vicoh 423 TN Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Kuhn FC 302 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Kuhn FC 4000 Disc Mower . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . Chatham Kuhn 500 Disc Mower . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Krone 550 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . Fultonville Rossi 7’ sickle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Sitrex 302 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE Brillion 18’ Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900. . . . Schaghticoke JD 220 disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville Taylorway 16’ disc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500. . . . Schaghticoke JD 2500 4 btm hyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 4RH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,550 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 12’ BWA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS NH 326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . Schaghticoke NH 279 baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,000 . . . . . . . . Goshen NH 316 baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 447 Round Baler . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 335 Round Baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,850 . . . . . . Fultonville NH BR 7030 Round Baler. . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . Fultonville Pequea Fluffer 81⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville Hesston 530 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston Rounder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS HARDI 210 3pt Sprayer . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . Fultonville POLARIS RAZOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,250 . . . . . . Fultonville ARCTIC CAT 650 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,850 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 135 mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JD 6600 combine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JD 215 Grain HD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch $4,950 . . . . . . Fultonville JD HPX Gator 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,750 . . . . . Clifton Park Keenan 140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 . . . . . . Fultonville Great Bend loader for JD 7000’s . . . $5,500 . . . . . . Fultonville Bush Hog 4 ft. mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 9600 w/643, combine. . . . . . . . . $41,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 850 Gator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2 BTM Plow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $450 . . . . . . . . Goshen 3 pt. Disc 4’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . Goshen

HUDSON RIVER TRACTOR COMPANY LLC FULTONVILLE 518-853-3405

GOSHEN 845-294-2500

CHATHAM 518-392-2505

SCHAGHTICOKE 518-692-2676

CLIFTON PARK 518-877-5059


Mielke from B2 up much better than almost everyone had thought" and that "Mother Nature is now starting to take a bite out of the milk supply and the solids content of the milk." One of his sources

told him; "The block price will move through the previous high ($2.28) with ease as reality settles into the marketplace this summer. That reality: There will not be enough cheese to go

around this fall." Cash butter closed a penny higher on bids, at $2.04, 24 cents above a year ago. Nothing was sold on the week. NASS butter averaged $2.0250, down a penny.

Palletized Bluestone / Flagstone Auction (500) Pallets of Cut Stone / Landscape Stone For: Endless Mountain Stone Co. Susquehanna, PA 18847 (Great Bend Area)

Saturday

August 6, 2011

9:30 AM

Auction To Be Held At Endless Mountain Stone Co.'s Yard @ 5284 Brushville Road, Susquehanna, PA 18847. From I-81: Take Exit 230 (Great Bend) To Route 171 Towards Susquehanna PA, Go Approx. 8 Miles To Susquehanna, Go Over Bridge Take Right On Brushville Road, Go 3 Miles To Yard On Left. (500) Pallets Of Quality Bluestone, Pavers, Landscape Stone, Etc. (500)

Mel & Matt Manasse PA Auctioneers License # AU571L & AU3517L Sales Managers & Auctioneers Whitney Point, NY 607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE www.manasseauctions.com

s

down 11 percent, anhydrous milkfat was $2.09 per pound, down 19 percent. Cheddar cheese for industrial use debuted on the auction and garnered an average winning bid of $2.10 per pound for September delivery and $1.86 for October. Speaking of the international market; Cooperatives Working Together accepted six requests this week for export assistance from Dairy Farmers of America and Darigold to sell 1.6 million pounds of Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese to customers in North Africa, Asia, and Central America. Grade A nonfat dry milk headed the opposite direction closing Friday at $1.5250, down 8 1/2cents on the week. Extra Grade remained at $1.61. NASS powder averaged $1.6510, down 1.4 cents, and dry whey averaged 55.21, up 1.1 cent. The MPC reports that "Buyers of dry whey may be more interested in looking ahead than are manufacturers. Supplies are tight in the eastern part of the country and in balance elsewhere. Demand is steady from domestic users while exports in April and May

were lower than the year before as well as the two preceding months. Production is being controlled by the rate of cheese manufacturing, which is being influenced by the amount of milk that is available, which is being affected by the weather." Looking "Back to the futures;" the Federal order Class III contract's average for the last half of 2011 was $18.34 per hundredweight on June 10 and 17, $18.21 on June 24, $18.19 on July 1, $18.54 on July 8, and $19.29 on July 15. Milk production continues to rise despite high feed prices, according to USDA's Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook. Climbing domestic commercial use and exports act to keep milk and dairy product prices high, the report said. Cow numbers were forecast to fall slightly in 2012, but production is expected to continue to climb. Higher milk production will likely lead to lower milk and product prices in 2012, according to the Outlook. The June Acreage report indicated that pro-

Mielke B11

USED EQUIPMENT BLOW-OUT! CLAY

CREEK DAIRY ARM DISPERSAL F

DATE: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2011; TIME: 10am LOCATION: 2474 VT 22A WEST HAVEN, VT 05743. DIRECTIONS: 4.8 MILES FROM FAIR HAVEN LOCATED NEXT TO DEVIL BOWL SPEEDWAY ON RTE 22A.

200 FREE STALL HOLSTEINS

(2) Big MII’s Disc Mower TRACTORS JD 4300 KUBOTA L4300 KUBOTA BX2200 IH 784 JD 5200 IH 666 IH 1086 KUBOTA L185 JD 4600 JD 1050 CASE MXM 190 IH 3288 CASE MX180 KUBOTA B 2410 IH 3688 IH1086 KUBOTA L3450 JD 4510 KUBOTA L3130

KUBOTA L3940 W/CAB TILLAGE BRILLION WLS 3003 MULCHER JD 235 DISC HARROW CASE 496 HARROW PERFECTA 25’ CULTIVATOR KRAUSE 12’ DISC HAY & FORAGE (2) BIG MII’S JOHN DEERE 4890 SP MOWER (2) VICON 773 RAKES NH 1432 DISC MOWER KUHN GA 7302 RAKE KUHN GA 4121 GTH RAKE NI 5209 DISC MOWER VICON 833 TEDDER

John Deere 4890 SP Mower JD 456 ROUND BALER JD 930 DISC MOWER MATERIAL HANDLING KNIGHT 3050 MIXER KNIGHT 3170 MIXER KNIGHT 3042 MIXER NH 3110 SPREADER CONSTRUCTION GEHL 3935 SKIDSTEER GEHL 5640 SKIDSTEER GEHL 4635 SKIDSTEER KUBOTA KX 121 EXCAVATOR CASE 580 CK T-L-B

MISC. & USED CONSUMER PRODUCTS

ERSKINE FPM 78 SNOWBLOWER (2) KUBOTA GR 2100 GARDEN TRACTORS SIMPLICITY LAWN TRACTOR KUBOTA ZD21 ZERO TURN MOWER CUB CADET UTILITY VEHICLE KUHN TB 181 FLAIL MOWER DR SERIES CHIPPER JD 322 LAWN TRACTOR PLANTERS KINZE 2000 PLANTER WHITE 8106 PLANTER JD 1780 PLANTER

This herd consist of 108 mature cows with 80 milking cows averaging 70+ lbs per cow, 18 fresh, 9 due in August, 11 in September, 8 in October, 8 in November, 4 in December, 4 in January, 4 in February & the balance due in different lactations. SCC 118,000, 3.7% butter fat, 3% protein. 92 Holstein heifers, 38 bred heifers; 7 due in August, 8 in September, 4 in October, 5 in November, 2 in December and 12 short bred heifers. 13 heifers ready to bred, 20 heifers 8-12 mos old, 9 heifers 3-6 mos old & 12 calves 0-2 mos old. This herd is on the Bovi-Sheild GOLD program & has over 50 years of AI breeding, 70% of this herd is milking 1st & 2nd calves. All cows will be inoculated & pregnant checked prior to sale. EQUIPMENT TRACTORS: JD 7810 4wd tractor w/cab (snap on dual wheels, power shift, 4671 hrs), JD 7400 4wd tractor w/cab (power quad, 8927 hrs), JD 6420 4wd w/JD 640 loader (snap on dual wheels, 3789 hrs), JD 6400 4wd tractor w/cab JD 640 loader (snap on dual wheels, 8500 hrs), JD 970 4wd tractor w/ rubber tire scrapper, JD 5300 tractor, JD 320 skid steer w/attachments & sawdust shooter (scrapper, spear, fork & bale roller) HARVEST: Kuhn 4000FC RG 14’ discbine, (2) Kuhn 6000GA 17’ rakes 1- for parts, Kuhn 15’ tedder, JD 3970 chopper w/ 2 row corn head w/ metal detector, JD 582 round baler silage special w/ netting, 16’ round bale wagon, 18’ steel side tandem hay wagon (can be used either way round bale or dry hay), bale spear w/ fork, AL 4099 Frontier bale grabber, Richardton 700 hi-dump wagon w/ wide tires & narrow frame, Miller Pro 5200 forage trailer, SPREADERS: Houle 3600gal manure tank, 3632 New Idea tandem dry manure spreader w/ new chain, 3 pth fertilizer, tag-a-long fertilizer spreader, ATV seeder, Unverferth 275 fertilizer wagon, LuckNow 350 mixer wagon TILLAGE: Kverneland BB15 - 5 bottom plow, 3 shank deep till, JD 960 21’ field cultivator, Bearcat 15’ pulvimulcher, Brillion 16’ spring tooth harrows, 10’ land leveler, drags, JD 7200 4-row corn planter w/ dry fertilizer box TRUCKS: 1990 International 4900 w/ 466 engine w/ 16’ dump body w/ 72,330 miles & 1 owner, 1999 Dodge 3500 4x4 w/plow & dump w/ 50,000 miles, 2005 GMC 1500 4x4 pickup w/ 43,000 miles MISC: Semen tank & semen, 10 calf hutches, 1000 gal fuel tank w/ electric pump, JD MX8 8’ bush hog w/ v off set & sim mount, 306 6’ bush hog (needs work) goose neck dump trailer w/ like new hoist, 5’ Woods side bush hog, shaver post driver, feed wagon, (2) round bale feeders (heavy duty 1- round, 1- square), JD heavy duty back blade, Kato light 50kw continuous generator 50-80, (1) set dual tires 18.4 x 34, (2) sets dual tires 20.8 x 38, 150 BTU space heater, 40 gal water heater, assorted cattle gates, many small items to be ready day of sale. CORN SILAGE: 100+ TON AUCTIONEER’S COMMENT: This is the sale we’ve all been waiting for!!

5109 State Route 22, Salem, NY 12865

1-800-999-3276

©2007 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLC. www.caseih.com

TERMS: Cash or good check w/ID. ***Purchases will not be released until paid in full. For buyers unknown to management, they must provide letter of credit issued to Wright’s Auction Service. *** Lunch catered by Wright’s Catering Service. Sale managed by Wright’s Auction Service, Newport, VT & CC Miller Jr., Morrisville, VT Email: info@wrightsauctions.com Website: www.wrightsauctions.com AUCTIONEER: Ron Wright - TEL: (O) 802-334-6115 (C) (802) 673-9840 CC Miller Jr. - TEL: (O) (802) 888-3670 (C) (802) 793-1583 Ring man: Roland Ayers - TEL: (802) 343-3750 Owners: Jim Richards: (802) 265-3576; Peter Richards: (802) 537-3562

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 3

Including: Lg. Qty. Of Natural Cleft Pattern; Tumbled Pavers; Tumbled & Non-Tumbled Drystack Wallstones; Bluestone Slabs; Treads / Sills; Landscape Boulders; Bluestone Tiles; Bagged Gravels; Specialty Items Including: Waterjet Murals; Bluestone Patio Kits; Benches; Bluestone Welcome Stones / Gift Items; Many Other Items; Palletized Stone To Be Sold By The Pallet Or By Square Ft. And Take The Pallet Full. Alike Pallets & Types Will Be Offered By The Pallet And Buyer Can Take Multiple Pallets. Selling Arrangements Will Depend On Types, Varieties And Way Stone Is Palletized. Decorative & Specialty Items Will Be Sold Individually. Types, Sizes, Selling Terms & Other Pertinent Info Will Be In Detailed Catalog, Which Will Be On Our Website @ www.manasseauctions.com, After July 28th. Loading Of Stone: Stone Will Be Loaded For Buyer Free Of Charge For 2 Weeks Following Auction, From Monday - Friday 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM, By Appointment. Terms & Conditions: 13% Buyer's Premium Will Be Charged. Payment In Full Day Of Auction In Cash, Good Check or Major Credit Card, 3% Discount For Payments Made By Cash Or Check. Nothing Removed Until Settled For. Auctioneers Note: This Is The First Auction Of This Kind In Northern PA. These Are Top Quality - Endless Mountain Stone Is Reducing Their Inventory. All Selling Absolute To The Highest Bidder, Plan To Attend. Smaller Items & Specialty Items Selling First. Real Estate For Sale By Private Treaty: 20 Acre Vacant Parcel In Jackson Township, Wayne County, With 5 Acre Permitted Quarry - Sold With Gas Royalty Rights. For More Info Contact Butch Coleman @ (570) 465-7200.

The California Milk Producers Council (MPC) newsletter says "There's increased interest in cream for manufacture of soft and frozen products, which gives some butter plants the option to sell cream rather than build butter inventories. Buyers are having to roll the dice," says MPC, "Buy now for the fall and be sure of a full supply or wait until prices come down." It adds that USDA's Dairy Market News reports butter sales are "about normal for this time of year, a surprising observation considering the level of retail prices and the listless restaurant business." May butter exports were slightly higher than the year before, but MPC warned, "There are signs that the end of the global shortage of butterfat may be in sight." Prices continued to weaken in the July 19 Global Dairy Trade (Fonterra) auction. The CME's Daily Dairy Report shows the weighted average price for skim milk powder was $1.58 per pound, down 20 percent from the June 1 event. Whole milk powder, at $1.58 per pound, was


AUC TION CALENDAR

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-3237 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, August 1 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: New Berlin, NY (Former Welch Livestock). Misc. produce & small animals @ 12:30 pm. 1 pm dairy, lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following the dairy. Calves & cull beef approx. 4:40-5:30 pm. Monthly Feeder & Fat Cattle Sale. All times are approximate. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-847-8800 or 607699-3637 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. • 6:00 PM: Town of Windham. Pickup & Equip. ‘02 GMC Sierra 2500 HD pickup with plow, push mowers, pole saw, weed eater, air compressor & Police car dividers. • 6:10 PM - Onondaga Community College Assets - Nexlink computer towers, Colex Studio M 50 film processor, conference table & chairs, Tandum lab table & more. . Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com Tuesday, August 2 • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Tuesday. Groceries, hay, straw, grain & firewood. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A,

Central Bridge, NY. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800321-3211. • 6:00 PM: National Grid MA . Culvert Cylinders - (4) various sized, 2-oz/610-gram cylinders: (1) 30” diameter x 6’ L, (1) 40” x 15’ L, (1) 60” x 18’ L, (1) 84” x 23’ L. . Auctions International, 800536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com Wednesday, August 3 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104 Thursday, August 4 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef.

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd. Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Friday, August 5 • Queretaro, Mexico. Late Model Construction Equip., Trucks, Trailers, Support & Attachments. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 9:30 AM: Tuscaloosa, AL. Complete Dump Truck & Truck Tractor Liquidation plus Construction & Logging Equip. for SLG Trucking. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Friday. Full line of produce, bedding plants & flowers. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, August 6 • Edison, NH. Retirement Auction. High Quality Construction, Paving Equipment, Snow & Sander Equipment, Attachments, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-6332944 www.lyonauction.com • 10:00 AM: 415 Dewey St., Churchville, NY. Evelyn (Sorce) Pengelly Auction. Quilts, machinery, lawn equip., barn items, livestock, nursery stock, 1950 silver quarters. Harris Wilcox Inc., Auctioneers, Realtors & Appraisers 585494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Saturday, August 6 • 10:00 AM: Farmersville, NY (Cattaraugus Co.). Raisin Acres Farm Auction. 5th Wheel Camper, Cattle Handling System, Farm Machinery. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Sunday, August 7 • Detroit, MI. Complete Liquidation of Construction, Agricultural Equip., Support & Vehicles. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, 315633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

YO U

BY

Monday, August 8 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY (Former Welch Livestock). Monthly Heifer Sale. Call to advertise. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637 or 607-972-1770 Tuesday, August 9 • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Tuesday. Groceries, hay, straw, grain & firewood. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 6:00 PM: Canaseraga Central School District . Equipment - 30,000 & 75,000 BTU Modine heaters, (24) 400w ‘03 Chevy Silverado 2500 HD Fleetside 4X4 pickup, metal Halide lamps, fluorescent ceiling lights & wood planks. . Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com Wednesday, August 10 • 10:00 AM: West Haven, VT. Complete Dispersal of Oak Creek Farm including 200 free stall Holsteins, complete extensive line of equip., 100 tons of corn silage. Wrights Auction Service, 802-334-6115 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 2:00 PM: NY Steam Engine Assn. Grounds, Gehan Rd, off Rts. 5 & 20, 5 mi. east of Canandaigua, NY. NY Steam Engine Associations 3rd Annual Consignment Auction. Selling antique and modern farm and construction equipment. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Thursday, August 11 • Route 414, Seneca Falls, N.Y. Farm & Equipment Auction. Next to Empire Farm Days Show. Farm Equipment, Tractors, Antique Equipment, Construction Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 6:00 PM: Town of Fishkill Police - Crown Vic. ‘03 Ford Crown Vic 4 door police interceptor. In overall good condition. New motor at 50,000 miles, everything works. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-3237 • Fax 518-673-2381 Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607776-2000 or 315-427-7845. • 5:00 PM: Dansville, NY. Slaight Farm Real Estate Auction. Selling Slaight homestead including house barns and approx. 20 acres w/more land available. See our Web site for more info. William Kent Inc., Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Friday, August 19 • Lebanon County Expo Center, Lebanon, PA. Arethusa-Kueffner Klassic II. Hosted by Arethusa Farm & Kueffner Holsteins. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Mobile, AL. One Owner Complete Liquidation of Disaster on the Spot Construction Equipment, Recycling Equipment, Tub Grinders, Debris Dump Trucks, Truck Tractors, Pickups, Office & Dump Trailers & much more. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Friday. Full line of produce, bedding plants & flowers. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 6:00 PM: Village of Depew Fire. Chevy Tahoe ‘01 Chevy Tahoe 4 door SUV. Comes with code 3 lights & siren package. Transmission rebuilt at GM dealership at 106,000 miles. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com Saturday, August 20 • Racine, WI. Secured Creditor’s Auction-Late Model Truck Tractors, Dump Trucks, Pickups, Equipment & Reefer Trailers, Late Model Construction, Earthmoving Equipment, Attachments, Support Equipment. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 10:00 AM: Prattsburgh, (Steuben Co.) NY. 206 Acre Farm in two (2) Parcels. 153 acres with buildings and 53 acres Farmlands & Woods along County Rd. 75 & Townline Roads in Prattsburgh Township for the John Brezinski Trust. Absolute Auction! Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

• 10:30 AM: Carthage, NY. Woodell Holsteins Complete Cattle & Machinery Dispersal. 45 registered & grade Holsteins, 28 milking age, balance young stock. Full line of machinery, 3 tractors, skidsteer, tillage, haying & barn equip. Pictures and full listing on Web site. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637 or 607-9721770 www.hoskingsales.com Tuesday, August 23 • Houston, TX. Late Model Construction Equipment, Aerials, Forklifts, Attachments, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-6332944 www.lyonauction.com • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Tuesday. Groceries, hay, straw, grain & firewood. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 5:00 PM: Albion, NY (Orleans Co.). James F. Davis Farm Machinery Auction. Selling a complete line of farm machinery including JD tractors, JD combine, hay, tillage & barn equip. and much more. Visit our Web site for more information. William Kent Inc., Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Wednesday, August 24 • The Pines Farm, Barton, VT. 148th Top of Vermont Invitation Dairy Sale. Sales Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 neks@together.net • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Feeder Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585738-2104. • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, August 25 • 5:00 PM: Elba, NY. Dan & Penny Bridge Farm Machinery Auction. Selling a full line of farm machinery including New Holland 1915 forage harvester, 7 tractors, mixer wagon and more. William Kent Inc., Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 585-343-5449

www.williamkentinc.com Friday, August 26 • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Friday. Full line of produce, bedding plants & flowers. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 Saturday, August 27 • 9:00 AM: 140 Perrin Rd., Woodstock, CT. Estate of Ernest Levesque. JD 2355 tractor w/loader, JD 327 baler, Woods backhoe, equipment, huge collection of horse drawn equip. & collectibles, lumber, tools, real estate, barns & 57 acres. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413-5696421 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Produce Auction. Inc. Fall Machinery Consignment Sale. For info contact Edwin Zimmerman at 315-536-6252. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 9:00 AM: Oswego County DPW, Oswego, NY. Oswego County Municipal Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com Tuesday, August 30 • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Tuesday. Groceries, hay, straw, grain & firewood. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 4:00 PM: Wayland, NY (Steuben Co.). Jablohski Brothers Retirement Auction. Potato & Grain Farm Machinery. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Wednesday, August 31 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 10 • Morrisville, NY. Morrisville Autumn Review Sale. Hosted by the Morrisville College Dairy Club. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Town of Lansing Highway Dept., Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing, NY. Municipal Surplus & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563.

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 607-699-3637 • Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com

LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE R.D. 1, Little Falls, NY 315-823-0089 We Buy or Sell Your Cattle or Equipment on Commission or Outright In Business Since 1948! MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550 MOHAWK VALLEY PRODUCE AUCTION 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY 13339 518-568-3579 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. • Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774 NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 • www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 • www.wrightsauctions.com

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 5

Friday, August 12 • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Friday. Full line of produce, bedding plants & flowers. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 Saturday, August 13 • 10:00 AM: 3277 Lexington Rd., Richmond, KY. Over 50 Cars Sell! Corvette Extravaganza! Corvettes & Other Classics. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com Monday, August 15 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY (Former Welch Livestock). Monthly Lamb, Sheep, Goat & Pig Sale. Call to advertise. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637 or 607-9721770 • 6:00 PM: Harrison Central Schools - Van & Equip. ‘99 GMC Savana G2500 cargo van, Toro 580D mower, Harper Turbo vac 4D, Garland ranges, Traulsen refrigerator & more. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com Tuesday, August 16 • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Tuesday. Groceries, hay, straw, grain & firewood. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 10:00 AM: 12601 State Rd. 545, North Winter Garden, FL. Rental Return Auction. Construction, Support Rental Fleet Equip., Attachments, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944, Site Phone 407-239-2700 www.lyonauction.com Wednesday, August 17 • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104. • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 5:00 PM: Penn Yan, NY (Yates Co.). Curvin & Bertha Stauffer Real Estate & Farm Machinery Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Thursday, August 18 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special


Auction Calendar, Continued

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

(cont. from prev. page) www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, September 15 • Belleville, PA. First String Holsteins Complete Dispersal. Andrew Fleischer, owner. Co-managed by Stonehurts Farms & The Cattle Exchange. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Saturday, September 17 • Canton, CT. Estate of Dean Moulton. 1922 IH 8-16 Tractor, Cat 15 Dozer, Boat Motors, Early Canoe; Early Mowers & Gravely’s, Horse Drawn Equipment, Early tools, Antiques & Collectibles. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413-569-6421 • Atlantic City, NJ. Rental Returns of Construction, Aerials, Attachments, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland, NY. Special Fall Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment Heavy & Light Trucks. Consignments welcome. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-2431563. www.teitsworth.com • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Horse Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 21 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, September 23 • South Bend, IN. 2 Auctions in One Day! Complete Liquidation of Late Model Construction, Support Equip. & Large Job Completion of Late Model Construction, Support Equipment & Large Job Completion of Late Model Earthmoving Equip., Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com Saturday, September 24 • Betty & Nelson LeDuc, Champlain, NY. Dairy Dispersal. 180 head. Northern New York Dairy Sales, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-5690503, Harry Neveett 518-561-1818 www.nnyds.com • Woodward, PA. Houserdale Holsteins Dispersal. Featuring 100 registered Holsteins. David Houser & family, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction of Farm Tractors & Machinery. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Tuesday, September 27 • Ben K. Stolzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. Dairy

Classic Sale featuring herd reductions for Liddleholme, (NY) and Schug’s Holsteins (OH). 100 head will sell. Co-managed by The Cattle Exchange and Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, September 28 • Hardwick, VT. Mapleview Jersey Dispersal. 110 head of top quality registered Jerseys. RHA 15,035 M, 4.7%, 3.6 protein. Art & Sharon Ling, owners. Sales Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 neks@together.net • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, September 29 • 10:00 AM: Bath, NY (Steuben Co,). Steuben Co. Surplus Vehicles, Heavy Equipment & Accessories. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-7282520 www.pirrunginc.com Friday, September 30 • 9:00 AM: 44 Hair Rd., Newville, PA. Public Auction of rare & unique memorabilia. Two day event - Sept. 30 - Oct. 1. Quality collection of Farmall, McCormick & IH. Leaman Auctions Ltd., 717-464-1128, AuctionZip Auctioneer ID #3721 ed@leamanauctions.com www.leamanauctions.com Saturday, October 1 • 9:00 AM: 145 Paul Rd., Exit 17, Rt. 390, Rochester, NY. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction. Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars & Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, October 5 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 8 • 9:00 AM: Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY. Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-2431563. www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, October 12 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, October 14 • Detroit, MI. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • Intercourse, PA. Plankenhorn Farms Complete Dispersal. Co-managed with Stonehurst Farms. Dr. Sam & Gail Simon, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 5:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Saturday, October 15 • Sweet Water Farm Auction, 26 Barker St., Three Rivers, MA. IH 5088 & 1086, JD 2020, Dozer, IH Silage Trucks, Equipment, Owner George Foskit. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413569-6421 • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: Richfield Springs, NY. 63rd OHM Holstein Club Sale. 100 head of quality regis-

tered Holsteins sell. Hosted by Roedale Farm, the Pullis Family. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607847-8800 or 607-699-3637, Brad Ainslie Sale Chairman 315-822-6087 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, October 19 • Allentow, PA. State Auction. Complete Liquidation of Automotive Dismantling Operation. MAC Car Crusher, Rubber Tired Loaders, Rollback & Dump Trucks, Vans. Over 100 Cars (40-50 running), UNBELIEVABLE Accumulation of Motors, Transmissions, Shocks, Glass & Much More.Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, October 20 • Gordonville, PA. Jo-Lan Farm Complete Dispersal. John & Rachel Lantz, owners. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Thursday, October 20 • Gordonville, PA. Jo-Lan Farm Complete Dispersal. John & Rachel Lantz, owners. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Friday, October 21 • Ben K. Stolzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. VisionGlen & Partners Elite Offering. Hosted by Vision Genetics. Co-managed by The Cattle Exchange and Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 26 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, October 28 • Bloomfield, NY. Bennett Farms Milking Herd & Bred Heifer Dispersal. Bennett Farms, Inc. owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, November 2 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, November 5 • Ithaca, NY. New York Holstein Fall Harvest Sale. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Ithaca, NY. NY Fall Harvest Sale. Hosted by Cornell University Dairy Science Club. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 9 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, November 10 • Ben K. Stolzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. Reserved for a major New York Herd Dispersal w/ a BAA of 110%! Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com

www.cattlexchange.com Friday, November 11 • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Fall Premier All Breeds Sale. 100 head of quality all breeds sell. Call to participate in this sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607847-8800 or 607-699-3637 Saturday, November 12 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • Maidson, NY. Fern Hill Farm II Milking Herd Dispersal. 100 outstanding registered Holsteins sell. Jack Russin & Family, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, November 16 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, November 17 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Wednesday, November 23 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 30 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 3 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland, NY. Special Winter Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 10 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Horse Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, December 15 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Wednesday, December 21 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 28 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT July 25, 2011 On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt Calves:45-60# .24-.28; 6175# .30-.35; 76-90# .40-.50; 91-105# .55-.60; 106# & up .65-.72. Farm Calves: .75-.87 Started Calves: .25-.32 Veal Calves: .70-1.47.5 Heifers: Open .50-1.05; Beef .77-.97. Feeder Steers: 65-82.50 Beef Steers: .65-.98 Stock Bull: .79-.95 Beef Bull: .80-.96 Replacement Cows: one @ 636 Lambs, ea: 85-165 Goats, ea: 30-165 Kids, ea: 50-85 Canners: up to 65.75 Cutters: 66-71 Utility: 72-77.50 Chickens: 4-16 Ducks: 5-18

CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY No report CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No report

FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA No report

CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY No report

NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA July 26, 2011 Calves: (/cwt) 0-60# 14-18; 61-75# 23-55; 76-95# 3455; 96-105# 41-55; 106# & up 43-50. Farm Calves: 60-240/cwt Start Calves: 130/cwt Feeders: 47-81/cwt Heifers: 64-77/cwt Steers: 40/cwt Bulls: 88-90.50/cwt Canners: 34-66/cwt Cutters: 67-70.50/cwt Utility: 72.50-76.50/cwt Sows: 41-51/cwt Hogs: 56-57/cwt Boars: 5/cwt Pigs: 50/ea Lambs: 160-210/cwt Sheep: 55-117.50/cwt Goats: 30-155/ea. Rabbits: 1-34/ea. Poultry: 1-6.50/ea. Hay (12 lots): .504.90/bale. northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com

CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY No report

HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ

DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY No report GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY No report PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY No report BATH MARKET Bath, NY No report FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY July 20, 2011 Cows: Bone Util 64-80; Canners/Cutters 42-74. Bulls: Dairy 72-86. Calves: 95-110# 15-25; 8095# 10-22; 60-80# 5-20; Ret. to Feed Bull over 95# 30-132; 80-94# 25-130; 7080# 20-100; Hfrs. 205. Steers: Beef Ch 94-113; Sel 79-85; Hols. Ch 85-104;

Sel 75-84. Hogs: St. 50-71; Feeder pigs 60/hd. Lambs/Goats: Lambs 100190; Sheep 30; Goats 70142.50/hd. FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY July 27, 2011 Beans (1/2 bu): 8-20 Beets (bunch): .60-1.80 Blueberries (pt): 2.10-2.55 Broccoli (hd): .35-.65 Cabbage (hd): .85-1 Cantaloupes: .65-1.95 Cauliflower (hd): 1.30-1.85 Cherries (peck): 16-22 Cucumbers (1/2 bu): 2-12 Eggplant (1/2 bu): 7.5010.50 Eggs (dz): .35-1 Hot Peppers (1/2 bu): 4-11 Lettuce: .25-.80 Onions (bunch): .27-.70 Peaches (1/2 bu): 22-27 Peppers (1/2 bu): 2-10 Pickles (1/2 bu): 2-25 Plums (peck): 10-22 Potatoes (1/2 bu): 9.5015.50 Salad Tomatoes (pt): .251.95 Salt Potatoes (1/2 bu): 1620 Sweet Corn (dz): 1.40-4 Summer Squash (1/2 bu): 3-14.50 Tomatoes (25#): 11-45 Watermelon: 1.05-5.25 Zucchini (1/2 bu): 3-15.50 Produce Mon @ 10 am, Wed-Fri @ 9 am sharp. HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY July 25, 2011 Cattle: Bone Util .70-.80; Canners/Cutters .60-.70; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls & Steers .79.88 Feeders: Dairy .50-.82 Calves: Bulls 96-120# .801; up to 95# .10-.95; Hfrs. Hols. under 100# 2.40. Dairy: Gauquie Herd Avg. 1198; Milking Age up to 1900; Bred Hfrs. up to 1400; Hfr. Calves up to 230. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA July 20, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 68-72.75; Boners 80-85% lean 62.2566, lo dress 57-62.75; Lean 85-90% lean 58.75-63.75, lo dress 54.75-58. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1555-2075# 82.25-82.50. Feeder Steers: S 3 Jerseys 325-330# 72-73. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 95-115# 75-92; No. 2 100-110# 70-75; 80-90# 5065; No. 3 95-105# 40-55; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 85-100# 120-145/hd; Beef X 75-115# 50-72.

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge Chatham

Vealers: Util 65-100# 2046. Slaughter Pigs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 220-270# 145-190/hd; 45-50% lean 230# 130/hd. Sows: US 1-3 400-450# 140/180/hd; 550-600# 210230/hd. Boars: 300# 60/hd; Jr. 230240# 70-90/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 1555# 27-66; 60-100# 53-80; Roasters 150-200# 78112/hd. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 2-3 30-65# 90-170; 75-95# 125170. Slaughter Yearlings: 8595# 50-75. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 95-185# 35-50. Slaughter Rams: 125# 70. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 100# 150; Sel 2 under 20# 3-14; 30-45# 22.50-60; 5060# 45-70; 70-90# 87.50120. Slaughter Nannies: Sel 2 110-120# 50-80; Sel 3 80100# 40-47.50. Slaughter Billies: Sel 1 160# 195; Sel 2 90-150# 115-170. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA July 26, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Sel & Ch 1305-1515# 109-114.25; Hols. Ch full 1480-1600# 95-99; cpl Sel 88-94.75. Slaughter Cows: Boners 71.50-78; Lean 68-76; Big/Middle/Lo Dress/Lights 58.50-67.50; Shelly 58 & dn. Bulls: Hols. 1670# 76.50. Feeder Cattle: Hfrs. X colors 180-275# 123-150; Bulls Jerseys 160-175# 90-95. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 102112; No. 2 90-120# 75-100; No. 3 80-130# 45-75; Util 45 & dn; Hols. Hfr. No. 1 95# 190. Hogs: 220-235# 69-70; 200# 64. Swine: Sows US 1-3 300400# 58.50-64.50; 425490# 56-61.50; 500-615# 59-64.50; Thin/Weak/Rough

395-510# 44-52.50. Goats: M&L Nannies/Billies 80-200; Fancy Kids 110120; Fleshy Kids 90-107; Small/Thin/Bottle 25-68 3865. Lamb: Gd & Ch 40-75# 150-172; Thin 20-35# 100137. Sheep: all wts. 57. Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with Calves * Special Fed Cattle Sale Tues., Aug. 2. * State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Fri., Aug 5 @ 1 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA Small Animal Sale July 26, 2011 Rabbits & Bunnies: .50-15 Chickens/Peeps: .25-7.25 Ducks: 2-11 Pigeons: 2.35-3.50 Guinea Keets: 3 Pot Belly Pigs: .22-32 Parakeet: 8 Ducklings: 1.50-2.50 Guinea Pigs: .1.50 All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report. *Next State Graded Sales Fri., Aug. 5 & 26. Receiving 7:30 am till 10 am. Sale time 1 pm. DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC Dewart, PA July 25, 2011 Cattle: 82 Holstein Steers: 13701566# 95-98.50. Heifers: 1054-1122# 106108.50. Cows: Prem. White 75-76; Breakers 70-73; Boners 65.50-69; Lean 55-63.50. Bulls: 1282-1480# 84.5092 Feeder Heifers: 442-554#

85.50-93. Calves: 170. Bull Calves No. 1 94# & up 97.50112.50; 80-92# 70-92.50; No. 2 94# & up 80-100; 8092# 60-70; No. 3 80-110# 60-87.50; Hols. No. 2 80114# 160-255. Veal: Util 30-67.50 Lambs: 50-90# 167.50187.50. Kid Goats: (/hd) Sel 1 6090# 105-125; Sel 2 30-45# 51-67.50; 60# 70; Sel 3 3040# 34-47.50; Nannies 90120# 80-95. Hay: 10 lds, 75-130/ton Straw: 1 ld, 175/ton EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA No report GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA July 25, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1252-1448# 116118; Ch 2-3 1192-1440# 112.50-116.50; Sel 1-3 1080-1314# 102-107.50. Slaughter Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1498-1588# 98.50-100; Ch 2-3 15081588# 95-97; 1706-1766# 91.50-93; Sel 1-3 13261650# 86-88.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1170-1370# 112.50113.50; Ch 2-3 1086-1264# 108-111.50; Hols. 12321530# 85-89.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 81.5085.25; Breakers 75-80% lean 75.25-80, hi dress 80.50-82; Boners 80-85% lean 70-75.75, lo dress 68.50-70; Lean 85-90% lean 64.50-70, hi dress 7075.50, lo dress 57-62.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1091-2066# 83-91, hi dress 1014# 98; YG 2 1270-1952# 75-81. Feeder Steers: M&L 2 300500# 110-117.50; L 3 Hols. 300-500# 84-95. Feeder Heifers: M&L 2 300-500# 102.50-111; 500700# 94-97.50.

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 7

COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA July 27, 2011 Cows: Canners 25-68; Cutters 68.50-73; Util 71-77. Bulls: 71-77 Calves: 18-87/ea. Feeders: 61-97 Sheep: 103-105 Goats: 57-197/ea; Kids 1888/ea. Boars: 15.50 Hogs: 30/ea. Feeder Pigs: 48-71/ea. Chickens: 2-6.50 Rabbits: 1.50-18 Ducks: 3-15 * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm.

July 26, 2011 46 Calves .05-1.16, Avg .42; 36 Cows .46.5-.83.75, Avg .69; 14 Easy Cows .23.5.63.5, Avg .48; 1 Feeder 300-600# 1.32; 2 Heifers 1.10-1.28, Avg 1.19; 4 Bulls .74.5-.99, Avg .87; 8 Steers .69-1.46, Avg .93; 15 Sheep .50-1.02, Avg .82; 8 Lambs (ea) 27-64, Avg 41.25; (/#) 1.26-1.88, Avg 1.70; 13 Goats (ea) 35-120, Avg 71.15; 13 Kids (ea) 11-75, Avg 45.08; 1 Alpaca 100. Total 223. Poultry & Eggs: Heavy Fowl (ea) 2.50-5.50; Chicks (ea) 1-3.50; Pullets (ea) 26.50; Rosters (ea) 3; Rabbits (/#) 1.40-2.05; Pigeons (ea) 3.25-15; Guineas (ea) 13-16.50. Grade A Eggs: White Jum XL 1.30; L 1; M .80; Brown Jum XL 1.45-1.50; L 1.40; M .95. Hay, Straw & Grain: 2 Alfalfa 5.70-6.10; 8 Mixed .363.40; 1 Grass 6. Total 11


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 500700# 110-115. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 96-120# 110-117.50; 86-92# 50-77.50; No. 2 96116# 80-105; No. 3 94-114# 40-80; 7 Hols. Hfrs. 80-96# 160-220; No. 2 80-92# 95145. Vealers: Util 72-104# 5-45. Sows: US 1-3 562-604# 4852. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 2-3 40-60# 172.50-182.50; 6060# 182-185; 80-100# 180187.50; Sheep Gd 2-3 7585. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 72.50-115; 60-80# 115-128; Sel 2 20-40# 5567.50; 40-60# 70-75; Sel 3 20-40# 20-35; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 95-115; Sel 2 5080# 57.50-60; 80-130# 67.50-95; Sel 3 80-130# 6275; Billies Sel 1 50-80# 115142.50; 100-150# 137.50150; 150-250# 225. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA No report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA July 23, 2011 Mixed Hay: 7 lds, 105-300 Timothy: 2 lds, 160-190 Oat Hay: 1 ld, 245 Grass: 3 lds, 80-180 Straw: 8 lds, 130-165 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA July 22, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1310-1590# 114117.25; Ch 2-3 1145-1520# 109-114.50; Sel 2-3 12151485# 105-111; Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1280-1535# 114116.50; Ch 2-3 1270-1405# 108-113; Sel 2-3 11601370# 104-108. Slaughter Cows:Prem. White 65-75% lean 79-81, lo dress 75.50-78.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 74.5078.50, hi dress 79.50-82, lo dress 70.50-74; Boners 8085% lean 71-76.50, hi dress 74.50-77.50, lo dress 65-71; Lean 85-90% lean 65-70, hi dress 69-73.75, lo dress 59.75-65. Slaughter Bulls: Mon.YG 1 1805-1845# 85.50-88; Bullocks 920-1460# 88-92; hi dress 1080-1420# 94.5096.50, very hi dress 110115, lo dress 955-1560# 84-87; Thurs. YG 1 12601800# 88-91, hi dress 10401205# 95-99, lo dress 10451160# 81-85.50. Holstein Bull Calves: Mon. No. 1 95-115# 105-120; 8090# 85-100; No. 2 95-120# 85-105; 80-90# 60-80; No. 3 95-135# 55-72; 70-90# 3242; Util 70-105# 25-45; Hols. hfrs. No. 1 85-105# 275-310; No. 2 100-115# 220-225; 65-85# 130160; Jersey X bred 75-85# 110-150; non-

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four tubing 60-80# 12-44. Graded Holstein Bull Calves: Tues. No. 1 90121# 75-97; pkg 85# 50; No. 2 91-115# 70-97; 84-90# 40-57; pkg 75# 15; No. 3 82110# 25-62; pkg 74# 12; Util 74-101# 12-23; Graded Hols. Hfrs No. 1 93-113# 320-340; pkg 82# 225; No. 2 pkg 108# 295; 81-90# 215-250; non-tubing 64-84# 12-47. Graded Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 94-128# 100117; 86-92# 50-95; No. 2 120-128# 95; 94-118# 105117; 80-92# 45; No. 3 100130# 80; pkg 90-98# 20-40; Util 60-110# 15-25; Hols. hfr. calves No. 1 95-115# 300330; 90# 250-270; No. 2 100-110# 125-160; 70-90# 80-100. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA July 21, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 75.50-76.50; Boners 80-85% lean 7074.50; Lean 85-90% lean 62-68. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 100-120; No. 2 95-115# 90-100; No. 3 80110# 40-70; Util 70-105# 10-40. LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA July 20, 2011 Slaughter Holstein Steers: Ch 2-3 1355-1460# 92.5096; Sel 1-3 1150-1435# 7685. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 4-5 1045-1250# 99-102. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 77.5081.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 73-77; Boners 80-85% lean 67.50-72; Lean 8590% lean 64.50-67.50, lo dress 60-64. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 hi dress 1460-1495# 93-94; YG 2 1245-1405# 78.50-81. Feeder Steers: L 3 640805# 63-66. Vealers: Util 70-105# 2040. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-130# 82.50-97.50; 80-90# 60-85; No. 2 95-

120# 70-87.50; 80-90# 5065; No. 3 95-125# 30-60; 7090# 40-57.50. Holstein Heifers: No. 2 90# 270. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 30-45# 180-202.50; 55-65# 167.50-180; 75-95# 172.50-188; Ewes Gd 1-2 65-90# 122.50-130; 190195# 86-95. Goats: Kids Sel 1 20-35# 67.50-75; 50-60# 70-99; Sel 2 10-20# 22.50-30; 30-40# 40-62.50. MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA July 19, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1225-1515# 116119; Ch 2-3 1160-1585# 112-116.50; Sel 1-3 10451500# 105-111. Slaughter Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1370-1465# 100-106; Ch 2-3 12601605# 95-100; 1620-1640# 93-95; Sel 1-3 1395-1535# 90-91. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1195-1470# 112.50116.50; Ch 2-3 1085-1285# 108-110.50; Sel 1-3 9901100# 103-103.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 82; Breakers 75-80% lean 75.50-78, lo dress 69-74.50; Boners 80-85% lean 6974.50, hi dress 78.50, lo dress 65-69.50; Lean 8590% lean 64-69, lo dress 57-63.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9202065# 86.50-97; hi dress 1295# 100.50; YG 2 10651085# 82-82.50; Bullocls 950-1095# 101-127. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400455# 110-115; 667-850# 99-113; M&L 2 540-740# 85-100; L 3 Hols. 262-485# 71-95; 585-985# 80-92. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 450# 110; 525-670# 95104; M&L 2 395-460# 7592; 530-720# 70-96. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 625730# 85-100; M&L 2 315470# 89-105; 505-760# 722; L 3 Hols. 705# 97. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-130# 75-95; 90# 70-80; No. 2 95-115# 60-75; 80-90# 52-67; No. 3 95-

105# 45-60; 75-90# 30-50; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 95# 240; No. 2 80-85# 85-157. Vealers: Util 60-115# 10-47. Barrows & Gilts: 49-54% lean 230-282# 72.50-75.25; 282-290# 72-74.50; 45-50% lean 230-247# 68-71; 360# 62. Sows: US 1-3 400-425# 4850.50; 540-655# 49.50-53. Boars: 310-815# 28-35; Jr. Boars 245-280# 55-58. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 1545# 41-61; Roasters 135200# 80.50-89/cwt. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 45-65# 162-205; 70105# 172-195; Ewes Gd 2-3 155-185# 62-80; Rams 245310# 62-65. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 3545# 97-110; 50-75# 120140; Sel 2 under 20# 10-25; 20-40# 25-70; 45-60# 67110; 65-70# 77-92. Slaughter Nannies: Sel 1 110-140# 85-117; Sel 2 90110# 75-95. Slaughter Billies: Sel 2 120# 130-137. MORRISON’S COVE * LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA July 25, 2011 Cattle: 88 Steers: Ch 100-108; Gd 95100 Heifers: Ch 100-105; Gd 95-99 Cows: Util & Comm. 70-75; Canner/lo Cutter 69 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 79-89 Bulls: YG 1 72-77 Feeder Cattle: Steers 7595; Bulls 70-90; Hfrs. 70105. Calves: 88. Ch 105-120; Gd 75-90; Std 10-50; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 60-115. Hogs: 50. US 1-2 70-72; US 1-3 65-68; Sows US 1-3 4555; Boars 28-65. Feeder Pigs: 5. US 1-3 2050# 40-65 Sheep: 30. Lambs Ch 180210; Gd 140-175; SI Ewes 70-70. Goats: 20-120 MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA July 25, 2011 Alfalfa/Grass: 220-235 Rd. Bales: 60-85

Lg. Sq. Bales: 130 Straw: 130-180 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA July 25, 2011 Roosters: 4.50-7 Hens: .25-2.50 Banties: .25-2 Pigeons: 1.50 Ducks: 3-7.75 Bunnies: .50-3.50 Rabbits: 4.75-8 Lg. Rabbits: 11-22 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA July 25, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 72-76, hi dress 77-79, lo dress 66.50-69.50; Boners 80-85% lean 6973.50, hi dress 74.50-76.50, lo dress 63.50-66; Lean 8890% lean 61-66, hi dress 67.50-70, lo dress 55-60. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1670-1905# 84-89; Bullocks 980-1425# 89-94; hi dress 995-1430# 97-100, lo dress 885-1355# 83-87.50. Graded Bull Calves: Hols. No. 1 95-125# 105-122; 8090# 80-100; No. 2 95-115# 85-105; 80-90# 60-75; No. 3 95-130# 50-80; 75-90# 4255; Util 70-115# 25-50. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 85-100# 280-350; No. 2 65-85# 190-260; non-tubing 60-75# 12-55. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA July 20, 2011 US 1-2: 13 hd, 20-30# 140170; 46 hd, 135-150; 15 hd, 40-50# 130-140; 7 hd, 6575# 105-110. US 2-3: 36 hd, 20-30# 145185; 89 hd, 30-40# 125-150; 23 hd, 40-50# 120-160. *Next Feeder Pig Sale will be Wed., Aug 3. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA July 25, 2011 Slaughter Lambs: Non-traditional markets: Wooled & Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 178-199; 60-80# 175-199; 80-90# 179-192; 90-110# 180-193; 110-130# 175189; Wooled & Shorn Ch 23 40-60# 151-171; 60-80# 159-176; 80-90# 153-175; 90-110# 163-177; 110-150# 160-174. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 87-101; 160200# 88-102; 200-300# 8498; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120160# 69-83; 160-200# 5771. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 3040# 85-99; 40-60# 109-133; 60-80# 127-165; 80-90# 163-177; Sel 2 30-40# 6074; 40-60# 77-108; 60-70#

108-122; Sel 3 30-40# 4559; 40-50# 47-61; 60-70# 63-77. Slaughter Nannies/Does: Sel 1 80-130# 106-118; 130-180# 118-130; Sel 2 50-80# 78-92; 80-130# 96110; Sel 3 50-80# 62-76; 80130# 80-94. Slaughter Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 161-175; 150-250# 177-191; Sel 2 100-150# 142-156. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary July 25, 2011 Compared to last week corn sold .05-.50 higher, wheat sold steady to .30 lower, barley sold steady to .20 higher, oats sold .40-.50 higher & soybeans sold .10.90 lower. EarCorn sold steady to 10 lower. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 8.05-8.50, Avg 8.19, Contracts 6.24-6.80; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.326.70, Avg 6.46, Contracts 6.75; Barley No. 3 Range 4.20-5, Avg 4.60; Oats No. 2 Range 3.75-5.20, Avg 4.48; Soybeans No 2 Range 14.05-14.30, Avg 14.15, Contracts 13.17-13.40; EarCorn Range 220-239, Avg 229.50. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 8.10-8.65, Avg 8.34; Wheat No. 6.70; Barley No. 3 Range 4.60-5, Avg 4.78; Oats No. 2 Range 3.504.80, Avg 3.96; Soybeans No. 2 Range 12.75-14.30, Avg 13.71; EarCorn 165225, Avg 209.66. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.50-8.05, Avg 7.84; Wheat No. 2 Range 57.40, Avg 6.09; Barley No. 3 Range 4-5.30, Avg 4.61; Oats No. 2 Range 3-4.20, Avg 3.56; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.80-14.10, Avg 13.93. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 7.80-8, Avg 7.92; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.60-6.95, Avg 6.78; Barley No. 3 Range 5.05; Oats No. 2 Range 4.30-4.60, Avg 4.45; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.60-13.85, Avg 13.73; Gr. Sorghum Range 7.40. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 8.058.65, Avg 8.12, Mo. Ago 7.67, Yr Ago 3.87; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.32-6.70, Avg 6.37, Mo Ago 5.86, Yr Ago 5.49; Barley No. 3 Range 4.20-5, Avg 4.70, Mo Ago 4.84, Yr Ago 2.21; Oats No. 2 Range 3.50-5.20, Avg 4,


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Mo Ago 4.31, Yr Ago 2.29; Soybeans No. 2 Range 12.75-14.30, Avg 13.90, Mo Ago 13.33, Yr Ago 10.03; EarCorn Range 165-239; Avg 217.60, Mo Ago 207.60, Yr Ago 114. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.10-7.50, Avg 7.26;Wheat No. 2 Range 6.37; Oats No. 2 Range 33.50, Avg 3.25; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.55.

107; 60-80# 106-117; Sel 3 40-60# 56-69; 60-80# 6576. Nannies: Sel 1 80-130# 120-133; 130-180# 117131; Sel 2 80-130# 104-118; Sel 3 50-80# 70-84; 80130# 84-98. Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 167181; 150-250# 198-211; Sel 2 100-150# 136-150. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary July 25, 2011 Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. Compared to last week hay & straw sold steady. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Alfalfa 130-210; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 130-175; Timothy 120-160; Straw 135-150 clean; Mulch 45-60. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 118 lds Hay, 36 Straw. Alfalfa 170-325; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 110350; Timothy 160-225; Grass Hay 110-310; Straw 127-230 clean. Diffenbach Auct, N. Holland: July 18, 51 lds Hay, 17 lds Straw. Alfalfa 170-325; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 110-350; Timothy 160-225;

Grass Hay 110-310; Straw 135-185 clean. Green Dragon, Ephrata: July 22, 18 lds Hay, 7 Straw. Alfalfa 225; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 145-310; Timothy 225; Grass Hay 157-265; Straw 145-160 clean. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: July 21, 12 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 160-185; Timothy 220; Grass Hay 125-200; Straw 165-190 clean. Wolgemuth Auct, Leola: July 20, 31 lds Hay, 8 lds Straw. Alfalfa 180-275; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 150360; Timothy 180-210; Grass 140-180; Straw 125185 clean. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 72 Loads Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa 192.50-305; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 90-250; Timothy 115-200; Grass 95-175; Straw 115-220 clean. Belleville Auct, Belleville: July 20, 24 lds Hay, 2 lds Straw. Alfalfa 192.50-305; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 90240; Timothy 117.50-150; Grass Hay 110-175; Straw 140-142.50 clean. Dewart Auction, Dewart: July 20, 9 Lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 125-160; Timothy 180-347; Grass 110-130.

Greencastle Livestock: July 18, 12 lds Hay, 0 ld Straw. Alfalfa/Grass 80122.50; Timothy 150; Straw 82.50-92.50 clean. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: July 9, 18 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Alfalfa 230-245; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 130250; Timothy 115-200; Grass Hay 95-130; Straw 150-220 clean. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: July 19, 9 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 60-255; Timothy 150; Grass Hay 75-220; Straw 90 clean. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: July 9 & 12, 15 lds Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed Hay 75-160; Grass Hay 140-150; Straw 110165 clean. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: July 22, 16 lds Hay, 1 ld Straw. Timothy 100; Grass Hay 110; Straw 120. VINTAGE SALES STABLES Paradise, PA July 25, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1340-1620# 114116.75; Ch 2-3 1230-1555# 111-115; Sel 2-3 11251450# 108-111. Slaughter Heifer: Ch 2-3

1195-1345# 108- 110; Sel 2-3 1125-1285# 105.75107. Slaughter Cows: Boners 80-85% lean 65-67; Lean 85-90% lean 60-66, lo dress 56-59.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 100-115# 100-107; No. 2 95-120# 75-90; 85-90# 5055; No. 3 95-115# 55-65; 6590# 30-45; Util 75-105# 1535; Hols. No. 2 80-120# 95150. Holstein Heifers: No. 1 few 80-130# 105-175 * Next Feeder Cattle Sale August 12. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA July 21, 2011 Loads: 16 Timothy: 1 ld, 220 Mixed Hay: 7 lds, 160-135; 1 Mixed old 275. Grass: 4 lds, 125-200 Straw: 4 lds, 165-190 WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA July 27, 2011 Loads: 32 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 260-275 Mixed: 15 lds, 193-265 Timothy Hay: 3 lds, 192200 Grass: 5 lds, 193-300 Straw: 5 lds, 163-180 Soybean Stubble: 1 ld, 140

LETT USS DESIGN N ANDD PRINTT YOUR R N BROCHUREE OR R FORMS OWN 4 to 48 Page Tabloids on Newsprint or Offset Paper • Spot Color and Process 4 Color Available 8 1/2 x 11 or 11 x 17 Single Sheets Printed One or Two Sides, Spot Color, Variety of Paper Colors and Weights and Folding is Available In Quantities from 5,000 to 100,000 We can work from your layout or provide a custom designed piece for you.

Let Us Take Out The Headache . . .

Let Us Take Out The Red Tape . . .

Let our expert and professional graphic department create the image you are looking for in all of your business forms, brochures, handouts, newsletters, payroll stuffers, invoice stuffers etc.

No more jumping from the printers to the mail room. No more cutting checks to several out-sourcers to complete one job.

Fast Turn Around On All Your Commercial Print Jobs. Our fast and professional service will keep you on target. No more missed deadlines, no more coordination problems. Let our professionals get the job done...ON TIME!

We offer complete mailing services and mail processing including labeling, inserting and folding!

And All Without Breaking Your Wallet . . . Call us for an estimate on your next job!!

Lee Publications Job Printing Depart. 1-800-218-5586

PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 518-673-3237 • 1-800-218-5586 • Fax: 518-673-2699

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 9

PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary July 22, 2011 Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 114118; Ch 1-3 108-115; Sel 12 104-111. Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 97-105; Ch 2-3 9396.50; Sel 1-2 89.50-91. Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110116.50; Ch 1-3 105.75110.50; Sel 1-2 103-105. Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 75-70-80; Boners 8085% lean 69.50-76; Lean 85-90% lean 64.50-69.50. Bulls: YG 1 86.50-94; YG 2 82-84. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 115-142; 500-700# 103-132; M&L 2 300-500# 105-117; 500-700# 88-100. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 109-132.50; 500-

700# 107-117.50; M&L 2 300-500# 102-112.50; 500700# 93-104. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 127-130; 500-700# 103-129; M&L 2 300-500# 116-125; 500-700# 95-106. Vealers: Util 60-120# 10-45. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-125# 95-115; No 2 95-125# 70-95; No. 3 80120# 30-70; No. 1 84-105# 205-340; No. 2 80-105# 145-225. Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 4954% lean 220-270# 66-70; 45-50% lean 220-270# 66.50-67.50. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 5052.50; 500-700# 52.5055.50. Feeder Pigs: US 1-2 2030# 140-170; 30-40# 135150; 40-60# 130-140; 6575# 105-110; US 2 20-30# 145-185; 30-40# 125-150; 40-50# 120-160. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 208235; 60-80# 205-221; 80110# 196-216; Ch 1-3 4060# 150-177; 60-80# 175191; 80-110# 171-191. Ewes: Gd 2-3 120-160# 103-117; 160-200# 99-113; Util 1-2 120-160# 53-67; 160-200# 75-89. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 101-129; 60-80# 120-136; Sel 2 40-60# 71-


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You

Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

The Kitchen Diva by Angela Shelf Medearis Beautiful Blackberries Blackberries are one of the great gifts of summer. The berries bloom from mid- to late June, and in most parts of the county, start ripening toward the middle of July. Ripe and unripe blackberries frequently appear on the plants at the same time. The berries are small, green, hard and sour at first, becoming larger, juicier and sweeter as they ripen. Here are some great blackberry facts, tips and a recipe to help you with your summer berry picking and eating! Blackberry Facts: • Select plump, firm and fully black berries. Unripe berries will not ripen once picked. • Do the math and be careful not to over-purchase, as blackberries quickly mold when left at room temperature and only last a few days in the refrigerator. • You easily can freeze berries that you can’t use right away — just wash, cut the hulls off and spread the berries out on a baking pan. Place the berries

in the freezer. When frozen, place them into a re-sealable bag, pressing out as much air as possible, and then freeze the berries. • The U.S. Department of Agriculture says 1 cup of blackberries has about 62 calories. • A cup of blackberries, not packed down, weighs almost one-third of a pound. • Blackberries were enjoyed by the ancient Greeks, who believed them to be a cure for diseases of the mouth and throat, as well as a preventative against many ailments, including gout. • The blackberry leaf also was used as an early hair dye, having been recommended by Nicholas Culpeper, the 17th-century English herbalist, to be boiled in a lye solution in order to “maketh the hair black.” • Blackberry tea was said to be a cure for dysentery during the Civil War. During outbreaks of dysentery, temporary truces were declared to allow both Union and Confederate soldiers to “go blackberrying” to forage for blackberries to ward off the disease.

Seasonal vegetables add a splash of color and fresh flavor (NAPSA) — Vegetables are an ideal canvas for showcasing sunny and seasonally inspired flavors, including fresh citrus, garlic, ginger and fresh herbs. The experts at Campbell’s Kitchen have made it deliciously simple to enjoy eating vegetables. Following are two recipes to try. Visit www.CampbellsKitchen. com for more recipes, cooking solutions and tips.

Blackberry, honey pecan and goat-cheese salad This salad beautifully showcases the best blackberries of the season. It’s also a refreshing accompaniment to grilled or spicy barbeque dishes. 1/4 cup pecan pieces 1 1/2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 small garlic clove, finely chopped 1/2 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard 1/4 teaspoon sea salt 1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 package (6 ounces) salad greens 2 packages (4 to 5 ounces each) fresh blackberries, washed and drained 1 large avocado, diced 3 tablespoons crumbled goat cheese

stock.xchg photo

2 tablespoons fresh lemon or lime juice 1. In a small, non-stick skillet, add the pecans and drizzle with 1/2 tablespoon of the honey. Stir and saute until the nuts are lightly browned and fragrant, about 4 minutes. Cool and set aside. 2. In small bowl, whisk together the oil, vinegar, the remaining 1 tablespoon of honey, garlic, mustard, salt and the black and cayenne pepper. Set aside. 3. In salad bowl, toss together salad greens, blackberries and pecans. Add the avocado and goat cheese on top. Sprinkle with the lemon or lime juice. Pour on dressing and toss gently. Serve immediately. Serves 4. (c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

Good housekeeping Steak and vegetable grill

Chilled shrimp gazpacho Prep: 15 minutes Cook: 3 hours Makes: 6 servings (11/2 cups each) 2 cups Swanson Vegetable Broth (Regular or Certified Organic) 3/4 cup V8 100% Vegetable Juice 1 slice Pepperidge Farm Farmhouse Soft Hearty White Bread, torn into pieces 4 cups grape or cherry tomatoes, cut into quarters 1 small cucumber, peeled, seeded and diced (about 1 cup) 1 cup diced cantaloupe or Cavaillon melon 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 3 fresh basil leaves, cut into very thin strips 1/2 pound cooked small shrimp Additional fresh basil leaves (optional) Place the broth, juice and bread in a blender. Cover and blend until the mixture forms a paste. Pour into a large bowl. Stir the tomatoes, cucumber, cantaloupe, vinegar and basil in the bowl and season to taste. Place 1/2 of the broth mixture into a blender. Cover and pulse about 5 times for a partially blended mixture. Pour the mixture into a medium bowl. Repeat the blending process with the remaining broth mixture. Stir into the pureed mixture. Cover and refrigerate for 3 hours or until the soup is cold. Ladle 1 cup of the gazpacho into each

• Researchers have known for quite some time that berries contain antioxidants, which help to fight cancercausing free radicals. A study at the University of Ohio has found that blackberries are the most potent cancer fighting berries of them all, by nearly 40 percent! • This delicious Blackberry, Pecan and Goat Cheese Salad showcases the sweetness of the berry while providing the crunch and smoothness of the pecans and goat cheese. It’s the perfect summer salad!

Savory Spinach with Blue Cheese and Walnuts of 6 chilled serving bowls. Top each serving of soup with about 2 shrimp and additional basil for garnish, if desired.

Savory spinach with blue cheese and walnuts Prep: 15 minutes Cook: 15 minutes Makes: 6 servings (1/2 cup each) 1 tablespoon butter 1 large sweet onion, halved and thinly sliced (about 1 cup) 2 cloves garlic, sliced 2 large tomatoes, seeded and chopped (about 3 cups) 3/4 cup Swanson Chicken Broth (Regular, Natural Goodness or Certified Organic) 1 bag (11 ounces) fresh baby spinach Ground black pepper 1/4 cup crumbled blue cheese (about 2 ounces) 2 tablespoons chopped walnuts Heat the butter in a 12-inch nonstick skillet. Add the onion and garlic and cook until they’re tender, stirring occasionally. Add the tomatoes, broth and spinach. Cook for 2 minutes or until the spinach is wilted. Season with the black pepper. Sprinkle with the cheese and walnuts, if desired.

To boost the flavor of this dish, the steak is sprinkled with balsamic vinegar just before serving. 4 (10-inch) wooden skewers 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary leaves 2 teaspoons salt 3/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 1 (1 1/2-pound) beef flank steak 5 tablespoons olive oil 3 medium tomatoes, each cut in half 2 large (about 1 pound each) onions, each cut into 3/4-inch-thick slices 1 small (1-pound) eggplant, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar Sprig fresh rosemary, for garnish 1. Soak wooden skewers in water 20 minutes. Meanwhile, in cup, mix chopped rosemary, salt and pepper. Rub flank steak with 4 teaspoons herb mixture; set aside. Mix remaining herb mixture in cup with olive oil. Reserve for brushing on vegetables. 2. Thread onion slices onto skewers. Place skewered onions on grill over medium heat; brush with some oliveoil mixture. Cook 25 to 30 minutes until tender and lightly browned, turning skewers occasionally. At same time, place tomato halves and eggplant slices on grill, brushing with remaining olive-oil mixture. Cook 12 to 15 minutes or until lightly browned, turning occasionally. 3. When tomatoes and eggplant are done, place on large platter; keep warm. Place steak on grill with onions and

cook steak 15 to 20 minutes for medium-rare or until desired doneness. 4. Thinly slice steak; sprinkle with balsamic vinegar. Serve with grilled vegetables; garnish with rosemary sprigs if you like. Serves 6. • Each serving: About 390 calories, 21g total fat (5g saturated), 47mg cholesterol, 780mg sodium, 21g total carbohydrate, 0g dietary fiber, 30g protein.

Cantaloupe boats Drizzle honey and toasted almonds over raspberries, frozen yogurt and sweet melon for a simple summer treat. 1/4 cup sliced almonds 1/4 cup honey 1 medium ripe cantaloupe, cut into quarters, with seeds removed 1 pint vanilla frozen yogurt 1/2 pint raspberries 1. In small nonstick skillet, toast almonds over medium heat just until golden, stirring frequently. Remove skillet from heat and stir in honey; set aside. 2. To serve, place cantaloupe quarters on 4 dessert plates. Top with frozen yogurt, raspberries and warm almond mixture. • Each serving: About 330 calories, 8g total fat (3g saturated), 2mg cholesterol, 125mg sodium, 64g total carbs, 8g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our Web site at www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefi nder/. (c) 2011 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved


Mielke from B3 ducers planted 92.3 million acres of corn, up 4.1 million acres from last year, and the second highest since 1944. The prospects for a larger crop in 2010/11, coupled with larger beginning stocks, resulted in lower expected corn prices compared with last month's forecast. Corn prices were forecast at $5.50-$6.50 a bushel. Soybean meal prices were lowered from last month's forecast to $345-$375 a ton. While

corn and soybean prices in 2011/12 are likely to be lower than earlier season expectations, forage prices could remain near record highs. Nationally, alfalfa prices set a record high in May. The June Acreage report confirmed expectations that the harvested area of alfalfa hay and alfalfa mixtures had declined from 2010. The expected harvested area decline, along with severe drought in parts of Texas

and the southwest and excessive wetness in parts of the northwest (which adversely impacted first cutting), will keep alfalfa hay prices high for the rest of 2011 and into 2012. "On balance, the change in feed ingredient prices will offer only scant relief for dairy producers," says USDA, "As the benchmark 16-percent protein ration will likely remain well above 2010 for both the balance of 2011 and 2012."

May fluid milk sales totaled about 4.4 billion pounds, according to USDA data, down 1.9 percent from May 2010 after adjusting for calendar composition. Estimated sales of total conventional fluid milk products decreased 2.4 percent while total organic fluid products increased 21.9 percent. The slippage in milk consumption has long plagued the industry and was the topic of conversation in Monday's

scoring of National Milk's "Foundation for the Future" (FFTF) dairy policy proposal by the Congressional Budget Office, that two changes had to be made in order to have a program cost that is less than the current system. First: when the Margin Protection part of the program is activated the percentage of a producer's production base milk that will be paid the guaranteed minimum margin will be reduced to 75 percent from 90 percent. Second: whenever the Milk Stabilization program is in force and there are penalties paid by producers who produce in excess of their bases, 50 percent of that penalty money will be paid directly to USDA. The other 50 percent will be used to either buy product from the market place for distribution to the needy or will be invested in enhancing markets for dairy products. The balance of the FFTF program will remain as proposed. The National Farmers Union weighed in on last week's draft legislation which incorporates key elements of the FFTF, made available by the House Agriculture Committee's ranking member, Collin Peterson (DMN.) NFU President Roger Johnson said,

Mielke B12

HOS-COT BUILDERS, INC. Box 12, South Street Hoosick, New York 12089

Phone: (518) 686-4422 Toll Free 1-800-685-6385 We Salute Our Farmers During June is Dairy Month

# Free Stall Barns # Milking Parlors # Machine Sheds # Farm Shops # Tie Stall Barns # Milkhouses # Horse Barns # Heifer Barns

Frost Farm Service, Inc. PO Box 546 Greenville, NH 03048-0546 603-878-1542

Townline Equipment 1474 Rte. 12A Plainfield, NH 03781 603-675-6347

Salem Farm Supply 5109 Rte. 22 Salem, NY 12865 518-854-7424

= CUSTOM DESIGN SERVICE = A SPECIALTY Concrete Forming and Flat Work Quality Construction At Reasonable Cost Excellent References

Where One Call Brings It All! Celebrating Our 38th Year in Business

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 11

DairyLine with Dairy Management Incorporated's David Pelzer. Per capita consumption has fallen for all but one of the past 25 plus years, he said, but total milk sales continue to grow because the U.S. population is growing. Milk consumption per person is slipping, he admitted, but DMI does not agree with those who believe that we can't change that trend no matter what we do. He warned however, that we can't reverse that trend until we do what our competitors are doing, be they bottled water, soda, or other beverages. Modern packaging and modern market techniques are a couple areas, Pelzer cited, and he said we need to tap into the value added market such as what McDonalds has done with fluid milk sales to build its beverage business. He mentioned their latest additions, lattes, Frappes, Smoothies, and now Liquados, a Mexican drink targeting the growing Hispanic population. "Milk is a prime ingredient in those beverages," he concluded, "Plus the market prowess that McDonalds has and you can see the potential for increased sales." The Alliance of Western Milk Producers reported in its newsletter that, in response to the


Kingdom Farm & Food Days The Center for an Agricultural Economy, High Mowing Organic Seeds, Pete’s Greens, New England Culinary Institute and Craftsbury Outdoor Center are once again hosting the Kingdom Farm & Food Days, a weekend celebration of local food and Vermont agriculture. This mostly free event will take place on Aug. 20 and 21. Many area farms, nurseries and agricul-

tural businesses will be open for visits and tours and the 2nd Annual Kingdom Farm & Food Days Bike Tour will be hosted by the Craftsbury Outdoor Center on Saturday, Aug. 20. Don’t miss this chance to see the places and meet the people who produce the food we eat! Pete’s Greens will offer guided farm tours in the afternoon as well as music and a picnic starting at 4

p.m. The Vermont Food Venture Center will also offer tours of its new building and many more farms and businesses are signing up to participate. Two bicycle tours will be hosted by the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, for which registration will be available soon. On Sunday, Aug. 21, join High Mowing Organic Seeds for guided tours of their Trials Garden, as

tends its members would have been penalized under the proposed FFTF Dairy Market Stabilization Program. In addition, MMPA says the "margin insurance" safety net provision of the plan "falls far short of current Milk Income Loss Contract program benefits; and fed-

eral order reforms benefit areas with higher Class I (fluid milk) utilization, further discriminating against Upper Midwestern milk producers." And, Editor Pete Hardin of the Milkweed blasted the FFTF. It's posted on his website at www.themilkweed.com .

Page 12 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Mielke from B11 "While we are very appreciative of Ranking Member Peterson's proposal to initiate meaningful and necessary dairy reform, our Board of Directors feels that the proposal in its current form is inadequate." He said "The current proposal would not provide a safety net for all dairy farmers, particularly family-sized operators. A fundamental problem with this proposal is that it appears that the largest farmers will reap the greatest benefits at the expense of smaller family farms." Dairy Profit Weekly reports that, through the first two quarters of 2011, Minnesota milk production has been down 1.1 and 3.2 percent, respectively. Yet, the Minnesota Milk Producers Association con-

weekend celebration will conclude with a Farmer Mixer and bonfire. Complete schedules of events and directions can be found on our Web site, www.kingdomfarmandfood.org. If you are a farm or

agricultural business who would like to be involved in the weekend’s events or want to donate to the Local Foods Showcase, please call us at 802-472-5840 or e-mail us at center@hardwickagriculture.org.

The September Issue of Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market www.cfmanestream.com

Will Feature: Colleges

DEADLINE: Friday, August 19th For advertising contact your sales representative today... or call 1-800-218-5586

for a full explanation of benefits call or stop & see our dealers: Batavia, NY 585-343-9263 Elizabethtown, PA • 717-361-4804 Empire Farm Days #719

well as workshops on pickling, seed production and more starting at 10 a.m. A Local Foods Showcase will follow at 4 p.m., presented by New England Culinary Institute students and Chef Ryan O’Malley. The

Ag Progress Days West 8th St

www.rmhjonesequipment.com info@jonesequipmentcompany.com 12667 Massey Road • Massey, MD 21650 • (800) 801-2082


How dairy farms contribute to greenhouse gas emissions by Ann Perry U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have produced the first detailed data on how large-scale dairy facilities contribute to the emission of greenhouse gases. This research was conducted by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists at the ARS Northwest Irrigation and Soils Re-

search Laboratory in Kimberly, Idaho. ARS is USDA’s principal intramural scientific research agency, and these studies support the USDA priority of responding to climate change. ARS soil scientist April Leytem led the year-long project, which involved monitoring the emissions of ammonia,

carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide from a commercial dairy with 10,000 milk cows in southern Idaho. The facility had 20 open-lot pens, two milking parlors, a hospital barn, a maternity barn, a manure solid separator, a 25-acre wastewater storage pond and a 25-acre compost yard. Concentration data

was collected continuously for two to three days each month, along with air temperature, barometric pressure, wind direction and wind speed. After this data was collected, Leytem’s team calculated the average daily emissions for each source area for each month. The results indicated that, on average, the faIn the first detailed study on emissions from largescale dairies, ARS researchers found that a commercial dairy with 10,000 milk cows generated an average of 3,575 pounds of ammonia, 33,092 pounds of methane, and 409 pounds of nitrous oxide every day. Photo by Peggy Greb

Page 12

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 13

cility generated 3,575 pounds of ammonia, 33,092 pounds of methane and 409 pounds of nitrous oxide every day. The open lot areas generated 78 percent of the facility’s ammonia, 57 percent of its nitrous oxide and 74 percent of the facility’s methane emissions during the spring. In general, the emission of ammonia and nitrous oxide from the open lots were lower during the late evening and early morning, and then increased throughout the day to peak late in the day. These daily fluctuations paralleled patterns in wind speed, air temperature and livestock activity, all of which generally increased during the day. Emissions of ammonia and methane from the wastewater pond and the compost were also lower in the late evening and early morning and increased during the day. Results from the study were published in the Journal of Environmental Quality. Read more about this work in the July 2011 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.


CERTIFIED CROP ADVISER

Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Chairperson’s Corner by Judy Wright, Chair, Northeast CCA Region What a turn around in the weather since I wrote last in May! What I thought would be a cool wet growing season has really turned the corner into one with plenty of heat and now needing rain. Who would have thought less than two months ago we would have been looking for rain? In central New York we had a good second cutting of hay, the winter wheat is almost ready for harvest and corn is starting to tassel in some areas. I now have my fingers crossed for any rain to hold off until the winter wheat is harvested to prevent sprouting and then it can rain to ensure any potential drought stress will be reduced and good pollination of the corn crop will occur. Last I looked prices from the commodity grains still looked good. According to the May 2011 New York Crop and Livestock Report acreage of winter wheat in New York was up slightly over 2010, yet yield is expected to be down slightly to 64 bushels compared to 2010 and the national winter wheat crop is down from 2010. Let’s continue to keep our fingers crossed for favorable harvest conditions. I have been surprised to see a few oat fields that some how got planted this spring now also ripening for harvest! I spoke with our local dairy feed supplier and he was not expecting to

receive any locally grown oats this year. Our fresh vegetable growers, however, are seeing the effects of the wet cool spring planting weather. In some areas the change to hot dry conditions have allowed some crops to respond favorably while other crops did not develop the deep root system needed to withstand the current hot dry conditions. I am personally holding out for the local sweet corn to come to market which also was delayed because of the wet soils. The farm market I buy from has planted all the acreage and is expecting sweet corn into October this year — such a treat! With most of the difficult decisions behind us for this growing season, now is the time to think about cover crops to hold those nutrients not used by the current crop for next year. Your Certified Crop Adviser is available to help with these important decisions and can offer you some timely information. I just became aware that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is accepting applications for grants to provide economic assistance to independent producers, farmer and rancher cooperatives and agricultural producer groups through the ValueAdded Producer Grant Program. The maximum grant amount for a planning grant is $100,000 and the max-

imum grant amount for a working capital grant is $300,000. The application deadline is Aug. 29. If you are interested you find more information at www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?contentid=2011/06/0281.xml Be sure to contact your Certified Crop Adviser to learn more about how they can be a partner in your decision making process today and what programs are available to keep farmers and agricultural advisers up to date on Best Management Practices, environmental stewardship, and any future regulatory measures. Together we can keep New York agriculture a strong part of the local economy and help revitalize our state’s economy.

Crop Meetings and Field Days for Farmers and CCAs Note; Many of these meetings offer pre-approved CCA Continuing Education Units August 2011 Aug. 4: 6th Annual UVM Extension Crops & Soils Field Day, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Borderview Research Farm, 146 Line Road, Alburgh VT. Contact Heather Darby heather.darby@uvm.edu Aug. 5: CCA Exams, 9 a.m.-noon and 1- 4 p.m., Skaneateles Lake Watershed Program Offices C/O Soil & Water Conservation District of Onondaga County, 2571 US Rt. 11, 2nd Floor Lafayette, NY 13084, 315-677-4630, or contact Janet Fallon 315-696-0167. Aug. 10: Exploring New Ideas at the Choiniere Dairy Farm, Highgate Center VT, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Choiniere Family Dairy, 2465 Gore Road, Highgate Center, VT. Owner and operator Guy Choiniere will talk about grain production and innovative ways to integrate small grains into a dairy ration, as well as using bedded pack compost to improve pastures and extend the grazing season, and growing tillage radishes to reduce compaction. Contact Heather Darby heather.darby@uvm.edu, phone: 802-524-6501 Aug. 16: New York Corn & Soybean Growers Association Summer Crops Tour featuring Ken & Isaac Ferrie, Crop Tech Consulting and Scott Stewart, Stewart-Peterson, Inc., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Du Mond Farms, 5083 White Road, Union Springs NY 13160; Contact 518-783-1322. Cost per person $40 before Aug. 7, $50 after Aug. 7. Aug. 25: Soybean Grower Field Day Southeast PA Ag Research and Extension Center, 1446 Auction

Road, Manheim, PA 17545, Contact Del Voight at dvg1@psu.edu Aug. 25: UVM Extension Hop Harvester Showcase, Northfield MA, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Four Star Farms - 496 Pine Meadow Road, Northfield, MA Join growers and brewers for a workshop on harvesting, preserving and packaging hops to maintain the highest level of quality. Contact Heather Darby heather.darby@uvm.edu Aug. 26: UVM Extension Hop Harvester Showcase, Borderview Farm, 146 Line Road, Alburgh, VT Learn more about hop harvesting, including the determination of harvest moisture and readiness and the maintenance and use of a hop harvester. Also check out our research roaster, used for drying small quantities of hops. Contact Heather Darby heather.darby@uvm.edu September 2011 Sept. 1: Southeast PA Crops Conference Field Meeting, Contact Bob Leiby rel5@psu.edu Sept. 20: Processing & Storing Small Grains Field Day 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Butterworks Farm, 421 Trumpass Road, Westfield, VT. This workshop, hosted by Jack and Anne Lazor at Butterworks Farm, will highlight post-harvest techniques for cleaning, storing, and processing small grains. Contact Heather Darby heather.darby@uvm.edu FALL (Date TBA): Oilseed Production and Biofuels Processing Field Day, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Rainbow View Farm, Orwell, VT. Mark Mordasky will host an oilseed workshop at his farm and describe his processing equipment and op-

2011 North East Region Certified Crop Adviser Board Members Judy Wright, Co Chair Farmland Protection Consultant, jlw4220@yahoo.com Auburn,NY Quirine Ketterings, Co Chair, Cornell University Qmk2@cornell.edu, Ithaca, NY Jeanette Marvin, Administrative Assistant, JFM Solutions, jmarvin@rochester.rr.com, Macedon, NY Ryan Akin Hemdale Farms, rakin1@rochester.rr.com Canandaigua, NY Carl Bannon DuPont Crop Protection, carl.d.bannon@usa.dupont.com Amherst, MA

Brian Boerman Farmland Environmental, bib@acsoffice.com , Ithaca, NY Rich Bonanno U Mass Extension, rbonanno@umext.umass.edu Methuen, MA Mike Contessa Champlain Valley Agronomics Inc., fieldteck@aol.com , Peru, NY Heather Darby U of Vermont Extension, Heather.Darby@uvm.edu , Vermont Matt Eckhard Capital Area Ag Consulting, mreconsulting@hotmail.com Stephentown, NY

Janet Fallon Dairy One, janet.fallon@dairyone.com Tully, NY Dale Gates NRCS , dale.gates@ny.usda.gov , Marcy, NY Jessica Heim SWCD-Madison County jessica-heim@verizon.net Hamilton, NY Doug LaFave Hewitt Brothers dlafave@a-znet.com , Locke, NY Joe Lawrence CCE-Lewis County, jrl65@cornell.edu , Lowville, NY Jeff Ten Eyck NYS Dept. of Agriculture & Markets, jeff.teneyck@agmkt.state.ny.us Groton, NY

eration, as well as detailing his on-farm biofuel production. The Mordaskys raise field crops for their livestock and produce fuel for their own farm using recycled farm equipment. Nov. 5: Fall Hops Conference and Annual Northeast Hop Alliance Meeting, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Brown’s Brewing Co., 417 River Street, Troy, NY. The Northeast Hop Alliance (NeHA) will meet to discuss ongoing research and hop production, plan events for the coming year, and get together to celebrate hops in our region. Nov. 21: Cornell Field Crop Dealer Meeting, one day event - Details to follow SAVE the DATE! Jan. 20 and 21, 2012: 16th Annual VT Grazing & Livestock Conference, featuring keynote speaker Dr. Temple Grandin

CCA Winter Training Event Nov. 29 – Dec. 1, Double Tree Inn Syracuse, NY The 2011 Annual Training for Certified Crop Advisers is scheduled for Nov. 29 through Dec. 1 at a new location in Syracuse. The Double Tree Inn will host this year’s three day event with topics on Pest Management, covering topics on Scouting, disease management in corn and using tillage for weed control. Crop Management topics will include presentations on Using GIS and remote sensing organic field crop management and growing hops. Soil and Water topics will include manure management for difficult weather conditions, cover crops, prescribed grazing and nutrient placement and protected streams. Nutrient Management presentations will include precision manure management, corn starter nitrogen, potassium trials in alfalfa and feed management planning. There will be a joint session focused on developments in agricultural environmental management looking at 590 standard, managing for the Chesapeake Bay and winter manure spreading. Professional development training will also be available on farm safety and how to respond if you are first on the scene of a farm accident and a panel presentation on how to conduct on-farm research. More information will be available early fall and can be accessed on the CCA Web site. Contact Jeanette Marvin, JFM Solutions, NYSABA/NRCCA, PO Box 268 Macedon, NY 14502, 315-986-9320 or Fax 315986-8534.


CERTIFIED CROP ADVISER Pennsylvania’s 2011 Machinery Custom Rates of all reports used regardless of geographic location. Of the 82 rates reported with yearto-year comparisons, 52 increased, 24 decreased, and 6 are virtually unchanged from last year. Overall, custom rates were up 1.88 percent compared to the previous year. Because of the potential variation in size and overall productivity of equipment, a range of reported rates for each job has been included. The range represents the middle 80 percent of all reported rates for each job, thus the lowest 10 percent and the highest 10 percent of all reported values were excluded.

Keith Severson, CCA, Cayuga County CCE I am Keith Severson and I was delighted to learn that I can once again claim to be a card carrying Certified Crop Adviser. This might be confusing to some considering I have worked in an advisory capacity as an educator with responsibilities in agronomy with Cornell Cooperative Extension for over 30 years. I became CCA certified nearly 25 years ago when I was working in Oswego County but found it very difficult to keep current with the continuing education unit (CEU) requirement while working and attending classes to obtain an MBA. Shortly after obtaining the MBA, I took an administrative position with Chenango County for Extension and staying current with my CEU’s became even more challenging so I decided to let my CCA expire. Seven years later, I retired as a Federal employee, married Roberta Harrison, another long time CCE Extension Educator, and moved to Onondaga County, where we currently reside. I decided to renew my CCA and Pesticide Certification when I accepted an

opportunity to work as a Field Crops extension educator in Cayuga County. I prepared for the exams, found them more challenging than before, and am participating in training opportunities to remain current in both categories. I can honestly say that today’s requirements ask more of an educator and service provider than they did in the past, considering the volume of research and discoveries that have developed over the years. Technology now provides new methods to obtain and verify that training has been completed but the body of knowledge in today’s world is ever expanding. One of the items that I have always appreciated while working for Extension is the ability to receive training opportunities from the researchers that are determining the future of the science we will work with. I have always enjoyed the opportunity to learn in a fashion that allows me to provide more accurate recommendations and greater options for agricultural producers to manage their business.

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 15

by Adam W. Pike, Agricultural Statistician The custom rates shown are averages from voluntary reports by custom operators and farmers throughout Pennsylvania. Most of the rates are stated per acre, cwt., ton, bale, or bushel rather than per hour to reduce the variation due to machinery size. The rates shown include the cost of hiring machine with fuel and operator and exclude the cost of seed, fertilizer, and other materials used unless otherwise specified. Individual rates vary due to differences in working conditions, services performed, or even the operator’s eagerness to do custom work. Therefore, the average rates shown should not be considered absolute indications of fair charges. Average rates are shown separately for two regions of the state, labeled “Mountain” and “Valley”. The differences in rates between regions reflect differences in terrain, soils and alternative opportunities for the labor and equipment used. Figures labeled “State” represent the straight average

Meet Your CCA


Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

A Fun and Easy Way To Read Country Folks...

NOW AVAILABLE IN DIGITAL FORMAT DOWNLOADABLE Read it on your computer anytime, anywhere

GET IT FASTER

National Pike Steam, Gas and Horse Association 31st Annual Reunion The National Pike, Steam, Gas and Horse Association 31st Annual Show will be held Aug. 12, 13, and 14 at the Fairgrounds located just off Route 40, 4 miles west of Brownsville, PA. The association was founded in 1980 to help preserve the technology used by our fore fathers who helped shape this nation. This will be their 31th year. And like every year, we expect it to be bigger and better. Gravely Tractor Club of America will be hosting the “Gravely Mow-In.” Highlights of the show include: Threshing and Baling Shingle Making Sawmill Rope Making Primitive Camping Free Parking Antique Shovels, Tractors & Engines Great Food Large Flea Market Large Craft Area Live Entertainment Porter Locomotive Gas Engine Displays Oil Field Area Daily Parades

Grinding Cornmeal and Flour Nature Ride Hay Rides Park-like Setting with lots of shade Rock Crusher Working Blacksmith Shop Antique Trucks and Cars 180 HP FairbanksMorse Generator Horse & Wagon Rides Schedule Friday, Aug. 12 — The Traveling Road Show 12:30-4:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 13 — International SNPJ Button Box Group - 12-2:30 p.m., Tap N Toes - 3-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14 — Broken Spoke Band 12:30-4:30 p.m. 9:45 - Opening Ceremonies 10:00 - Threshing & Baling (Fri & Sat) Church Service (Sunday) 11:00 - Sawing, Feed Grind, Stone Crusher 11:30 - Parade Noon - Dinner Time Whistle Blow 1:00 - Threshing &

Baling - Shingle Making 2:00 - Feed Grinding, Shingles, Sawing Pedal Power Tractor Pull (Sunday) 3:00 - Shingle Making, Stone Crusher 3:30 - Threshing & Baling 4:00 - Feed Grinding, Shingle Making 5:00 - Parade 5:30 - Supper Time Whistles 6:00 - Shingle Making, Stone Crusher 6:30 - Sawing (Friday & Saturday) Continuous All Day Events: Heavy Equipment Demos, Rope Making, Kiddie Train Rides, Open Air Flea Market, Huge Craft Area, Blacksmith Shop, Free Shuttle Service, Nature Rides (weather permitting), Horse and Wagon Rides Donation: Adults $5 under 12 Free Friday - Senior Citizens are $3 For more information call 724-785-6855, em a i l info@nationalpike.com, or visit www.nationalpike.com

Arrives every Saturday morning

USER FRIENDLY Search and print ads and articles, even from past issues

THINK GREEN Save trees — no ink and paper necessary!

Email subscriptions@leepub.com to start a new digital subscription or change your current print subscription to digital. Visit us at Empire Farm Days Lot 725

www.countryfolks.com

CHAMPLAIN DAIRY SERVICE INC. Swanton, VT 802-868-3144 DON'S DAIRY SUPPLY, INC. South Kortright, NY 607-538-9464

DYKEMAN FARMS Fultonville, NY 518-922-5496 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Lowville, NY 315-376-2991

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Seneca Falls, NY 315-568-0955

FISHER FARMS Canastota, NY 315-697-7039

SOUTHERN TIER DAIRY SERVICE Conewango Valley, NY 716-358-9152

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Warsaw, NY 585-786-0177

R&M FARM & PRO HARDWARE Marathon, NY 607-849-3291

SOUTHERN TIER DAIRY SERVICE Java Center, NY 585-457-4350


Country Folks Proud to be the Official Publication of: • Northeast Dairy Herd Improvement Association • New York Forage & Grasslands Council • New York Beef Cattlemen • New York Brown Swiss Association • New York Corn Growers • New York Meat Goat Association • New York Milk Producers • New York Pork Producers • Empire Sheep Producers • FARMEDIC • Maine Beef Cattlemen • New England Milk Producers Association • New England Sheep & Wool Growers Association • Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Association

Country Folks Your connection to agriculture.

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 17

• New York Ayrshire Club


Are You Involved In More Than One Industry? We Are Here to Help You. FREE E SUBSCRIPTIONS S BY Y REQUEST * Please check off the publications you would like to receive and answer the questions below each.

Regional/National Solid Waste Recycling (monthly)

Regional Heavy Construction (monthly) - Send me Ì YES Hard Hat News!

Handling Ì YES - Send me Waste Equipment News!

Page 18 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Hard Hat News focuses on heavy equipment construction including excavating, construction/demolition, paving, bridge building, and utility construction in the northeastern third of the United States. TITLE 1 Ì President/CEO 2 Ì Manager/Supervisor 3 Ì Other FULL TIME EMPLOYEES 1 Ì 1-5 2 Ì 6-25 3 Ì >25 NUMBER YOUR PRIMARY BUSINESS #1, SECONDARY #2, ETC. 1 Asphalt Paving _____________________ 2 Concrete Paving ___________________ 3 Oil & Stone Paving__________________ 4 Bridge Construction _________________ 5 Excavating ________________________ 6 Utility/Underground _________________ 7 Construction Demolition______________ 8 Landscaping ______________________ 9 Land Clearing _____________________ 10 Logging _________________________ 11 Other ___________________________

HOW MANY OF THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF EQUIPMENT DO YOU OWN OR LEASE? 1 Excavators ________________________ 2 Dozers ___________________________ 3 Track/Wheel Loaders ________________ 4 Trucks____________________________ 5 Backhoes, TLB’s ___________________ 6 Other Heavy Equipment _____________

National Aggregate

(bi-monthly)

Do you perform contract snow removal? Ì Yes Ì No If so, how many pieces of equipment do you use for snow removal? ______________________ Do you have plans for your company’s expansion? Ì 1-2 Years Ì 3-5 Years Ì No plans at this time Ì Other

Recycling professionals involved in the wood waste, C&D, scrap metal, asphalt & concrete, and compost recycling industries will find Waste Handling Equipment News a valuable source of new products, product innovation and site adaption. Two regional editions cover the United States. TITLE J Operations Manager J Other TYPE OF BUSINESS (Check all that apply) Construction Demolition Recycling J Scrap Metals Recycling Construction Demolition Landfill J Ferrous J Non-Ferrous Woodwaste Recycling/Land Clearing J Equipment Manufacturer Composting J Equipment Dealer Asphalt/Concrete Recycling

J Owner/President/VP J J J J J

Regional Horticulture

Country Folks Grower is the regional newspaper for all segments of commercial horticulture since 1991. Each monthly issue is filled with important news, information, and advertising for the Greenhouse, Nursery, Garden center, Landscaper, Fruit, Vegetable Grower and Marketers.

North American Quarry News covers quarries, sand and gravel pits, HMA and ready mix concrete operations in the United States. NAQN provides a combination of strong editorial and advertising for industry professionals.

Your company produces these products or services: (Check All That Apply) Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì

Crushed stone and sand & gravel Crushed stone Sand and gravel Recycled materials, concrete/asphalt Cement Lime Industrial minerals Concrete

Regional Agriculture

Ì

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì

*This publication costs $22 for one year. *This publication costs $38 for two years.

Asphalt Consulting engineer Machinery/equipment manufacturer Equipment dealer/distributor Government, association or school Drilling Blasting

(

Paid Subscription

weekly

monthly

Folks Ì YES - Send me CountryGROWER!

- Send me North Ì YES American Quarry News!

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Paid Subscription

Business Type: K Greenhouse K Tree Fruit K Nursery

)

YES - Send me Country Folks!

Our premier weekly agricultural newspaper has four editions covering agriculture from Maine through North Carolina. Every issue is loaded with national, regional and local agricultural news, equipment, service advertising and auctions. *This publication costs $45 for one year. *This publication costs $75 for two years.

(Check All That Apply)

K Small Fruit K Christmas K Garden Center K Supplier

K Farmers Market K Direct Market K Vegetable

LEE PUBLICATIONS PO Box 121, 6113 State Hwy., Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 800-218-5586 • FAX 518-673-2381

SUBSCRIPTIONS 888-596-5329 email: subscriptions@leepub.com Name _______________________________________________ Farm/Business Name ___________________________________ Address______________________________________________ ______________________________________________

Business Type: K Dairy K Horse K Alfalfa

K Beef K Goat K Corn

(Check All That Apply)

K Poultry K Sheep K Soybeans

City ________________________ State _____ Zip __________ County ____________________Email _____________________ Phone (

) _______________Fax (

) _________________

Date ___________Signature______________________________


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

580 585 590 595 610 620 630 640 645 650 655 670 675 680 700 705 730 735 740 760 780 790 805 810 815 860 885 900 910 915 950 955 960 1035 1040 1050 1060 1075 1080 1085 1100 1115 1120 1130 1135 1140 1160 1170 1180 1190 1195 1200 1205 1210 1220 1225

CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Announcements

Barn Repair

Announcements

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, August 3rd For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111

HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED? Structural repairs of barns, houses, and garages. Call Woodford Bros., Inc. for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs. 1-800-OLD-BARN. www.1-800-OLD-BARN.COM In MDDC add:“MHIC#05-121861” after website.

or email classified@leepub.com Announcements

Auctions

# # # # #

HUGE Equipment Auction

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 CAMPAIGN ROAD SIGNS: Awesome prices. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518673-0101 or email bsnyder@leepub.com CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-6730111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call Lee Publications 518-673-0101 Beth bsnyder@leepub.com

of Seed Cleaning, Grain Handling, and Feed Milling Machinery August 18, 2011 9:00 am CST At Cropmax in Charleston, IL

WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. Call SAVE! 1-800-688-1187

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS® CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

Beef Cattle

Custom Services POLITICAL PROMOTIONAL PACKAGES available for reasonable prices. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or email bsnyder@leepub.com

Dairy Cattle 20 CERTIFIED Organic Jersey cross bred heifers, due July-August, AI sired, asking $1,800. 518-638-8357 50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-344-7170.

HEIFER BOARDING Concentrate Your Efforts on Making Milk - Let Us Raise Your Heifers - Quality Care ~ References Available ~ SILAGE ALSO AVAILABLE Springfield, VT • 802-885-4000

FOR SALE

See www.commoditytraders.biz for a list and pictures or call 217-235-4322

Quality Holstein Free-Stall Herd Pick 40 Out of 50

Partial List Cimbria Delta 144-1 Seed Cleaner Forsberg 15-D Oat Huller Amos 100 Spiral Separator Ferrell Ross 10x42 Roller Mill Bag-O-Matic 7’ Sewing Line Universal Bucket Elevator, model D Carter Day 412 Precision Sizer Howe Richardson G17 Bagging Scale Forsberg 90V Gravity Table And much, much more!

Complete list at www.commoditytraders.biz

Bauer Auction Service – Lic.#040000178

Call for More Information

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

Beef Cattle Barn Repair

Don’t Miss Out!! Plan Ahead

Country Folks

Will Be Handed Out At Our Booth EMPIRE FARMS DAYS August 9, 10 & 11 & AG PROGRESS DAYS August 16, 17 & 18 Take Advantage of the Extra Circulation Sell your dairy or farm equipment, trucks, trailers, dairy or beef cattle, goats, sheep, horses, dogs, hay, straw, corn silage, real estate, etc.

or if you provide a service Place a Classified Ad By Calling Peg At

1-800-836-2888 518-673-0111

or e-mail classified@leepub.com

MURRAY GRAY Bull, excellent, super nice, $2,000. 3/4 Red Devon yearling heifer, polled, $1,000. 518-329-2405 REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050

Building Materials/Supplies

Metal Roofing Cut to the INCH 16 s Color

Agricultural Commercial Residential

802-933-2039

Dairy Cattle

Bedding

Seward Valley 518-234-4052

BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

or

Bedding

Concrete Products

24-29 G Pane a. ls

TOP QUALITY REGISTERED JERSEYS 40 TO 50 COWS - ALL CLASSIFIED & ON TEST High Components, Excellent Type, Low SCC Great group of cows. Mainly grass based freestall herd. Cows never pushed and work well in ties. Cows are vaccinated, health tested, trimmed and ready to go. Prime Bulls Available, some out of multiple generations. 92 point dams w/good numbers & some bulls Genomic tested.

Located in Connecticut

860-268-2979

QUALITY FREE STALL HERD A young herd averaging 65#

SEC 200,000 Pick 40 out of 53 Phone 802-782-4939 ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822

WANTED HEIFERS

Cattle

HEIFER HAVEN 518-481-6666

978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

REG. TEXAS LONGHORNS: Cows/calf pairs, bulls, heifers exhibition steers. See them www.triplemlonghorns.com Tom/Julie (w)607-363-7814

~ ALL SIZES ~

Harry Neverett Joey St. Mary

518-651-1818 518-569-0503

“Heifers R Us”

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 19

CODE 35 40 45 55 75 80 85 90 95 105 115 120 130 140 155 160 165 175 190 210 215 235 325 335 340 370 410 415 440 445 455 460 465 470 495 500 510 560


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Equipment

Herd Expansions

 WANTED 

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

All Size Heifers

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

WANTED Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

315-269-6600

Page 20 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

FOR SALE Registered Ayrshire 40 Cow Herd Call for more information

802-274-0179 Dairy Equipment

HEIFERS (ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

1954 JD 40 UTILITY, wide front, 3 point hitch. 518-2563169

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

Lower your feed cost! Save an average of 3 to 4 lbs of grain per cow per day Going from non processing to a processor. $6.00 corn. . . .

Farm Machinery For Sale

(3) 36” FANS; (1) 48” fan belt drive, 1 hp motor; (1) 18” basket fan; $600 for all! (12) used Westfalia ACR 3 automatic takeoffs, make an offer! 802325-3127

IRRIGATION PUMP: 6” inlet & outlet, diesel, on trailer, $1,800. 518-695-6180

DEUTZ ALLIS round baler for sale. Palatine Bridge, NY 518673-5474 Ford/ NH TC45, 4WD, ldr., backhoe, $18,950; Case Int’l 695, 4WD, ldr., ROPS, F/R, $13,500; Ford 1520, 4WD, w/ldr., $6,500; Krone 4013, 13’ center pivot, flail cond. mower, exc., $8,200; JD 1207 MoCo, exc., $2,800; NH 477 haybine, $1,800; JD 327- 346 sq. balers w/ kickers, nice, $4,800 ea. Full line of farm equipment available! 802885-4000 INT’L 826 turbo, cab, runs good, $6,500; NI #483, dry, round baler, $5,500; JD 680 manure sprdr, 220 bu., $1,800; 4’-7’ bush hogs, ready to mow! 802-376-5262

Farm Machinery For Sale

GET A

JD 2940, 90hp, ROPS, canopy, $6,000; Kelly backhoe, 6’, 20-40hp, exc., $3,400; 24’ hay elevators, $650. 802376-5262 JD 6310 4x4 w/640 loader; JD 6405 2WD loader; 5320, $13,000; 986, $8,500; NH 575 baler w/thrower; NH 311 baler w/chute; JD 336 baler w/kicker; JD 530 & 730; JD B; Farmall 300; JD & IH front & rear weights. Augur Farms, 203530-4953 JOHN DEERE 2630 diesel, new paint, runs and drives good, $7,000. 518-695-6180

Farm Machinery For Sale

TRANSPORT HAY ELEVATORS

Dairy Equipment

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866 Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us

• 1000 Gal.DeLaval • 900 Gal.Mueller OH • 800 Gal.Mueller OH • 800 Gal.Majonnier • 735 Gal.Sunset • 700 Gal.Mueller OH • 700 Gal.Mueller V • 700 Gal.Mueller M SOLD NY • 600 Gal.Majonnier • 600 Gal.Mueller OH • 600 Gal.Mueller M • 600 Gal.DeLaval Rnd • 545 Gal.Sunset

• 500 Gal.Mueller MW • 500 Gal.Mueller M • 500 Gal.Majonnier • 415 Gal.Sunset • 400 Gal.Jamesway • 400 Gal.Majonnier • 300 Gal.Majonnier • 300 Gal Mueller M • 300 Gal.Sunset • 250 Gal.Jamesway • 200 Gal.Sunset SC • 150 Gal.Mueller RH

HEAT EXCHANGERS • TUBE COOLER 300-6000 Gal Storage Tanks

We Do Tank Repair

SHENK’S

Sales 717-626-1151

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

www.cattlesourcellc.com

RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

505 E. Woods Drive,

BORDER COLLIE PUPPIES: Working Homes Only. Call Caleb at 413-824-2869 or visit: mapleshadefarmbordercollies.yolasite.com

We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email

BERG-BENNETT, INC.

• 3000 Gal.Girton D5 • 3000 Gal.Storage • 2000 Gal.DeLaval • 2000 Gal.Mueller OE • 2000 Gal.Mueller OH • 2000 Gal.Mueller O SOLD OH • 1500 Gal.Mueller • 1500 Gal.Mueller OH • 1500 Gal.Mueller OHF • 1250 Gal.DeLaval • 1000 Gal.Mueller O • 1000 Gal.Mueller M • 1000 Gal.Mueller OH • 1000 Gal.Sunset F.T.

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

Dogs

Lititz, PA 17543

1 1/2” square tubing, 14 gauge 24’ - $2,900 48’ - $3,650

SUMMER B A R GA I N S

JD 2750 4x4 w/cab, 7300 hrs, very nice tractor! . . . . . . . . . . .$18,500 JD 2755 2wd w/cab, fresh overhaul by us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,500 Case IH 885 w/2255 ldr., joystick, ROPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 Ford 6610 Series 2, sharp fresh paint, ROPS, canopy, nice!! .$12,500 Krone KR160 Classic 4x5 round baler, ’06, NICE!! . . . . . . . . .$8,750 NH 8160 4x4, ROPS & canopy, 4,100 hrs., LH reverser, nice big tractor for the money!! New tires! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 Case IH 8309 discbine, 9ft., very good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,750 JD 1350 8ft. discbine, field ready, nice! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 JD 1219 9ft. haybine, hyd. tongue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Case IH round bale chopper, very good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 New Galfre 17ft. hyd fold tedders, only 3 left . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,900 100+ New Rotary Cutters, 4-15 ft. In Stock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call ‘04 Landini Vision 95 4WD w/cab & ldr, 700 hrs . . . . . . . . .$29,000 2006 Landini PowerFarm 105 4WD w/Alo ldr, 99HP, ROPS & canopy, 2 year warranty, very low hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000 NEW McCormick X10-40 4WD w/ldr, 40HP . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,900 NEW McCormick X10-55 4WD w/ldr, 55HP . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,900 Kuhn 9ft. 3pt discmower, less than 50 acres use! . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 JD 4440 quad, 4 post, good rubber, runs good, ugly, rough, beat up, needs clutch, good rubber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 JD 721 loader, fits 4450 2WD or similar, like new . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 IH 1466 cab, runs good but rough appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500

Price Includes Motor & Wheels Other sizes available Call for prices.

We Custom Build Wagon Gears - 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 Ton

MILO MFG. • PENN YAN, NY

315-536-8578

NEW & USED PARTS FOR ALL KINDS OF TRACTORS Check our web site for more good deals! MACFADDEN & SONS INC. 1457 Hwy. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 13459

518-284-2090 or www.macfaddens.com

Farm Equipment

SKOTT FARM & EQUIPMENT NEW FARM EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

• Salford Tillage • Amco Disks • Stoll Hay Equipment • Macerator by Agland Industries • Farmco Feeders & Bale Wagons 1 Used Available • MDS Loader Attachments • Corn Stoves and Furnaces • Vermeer Hay Equipment • Tanco Bale Wrappers - 1080 in Stock • Artsway & Miller Pro Equipment

• Quick Attach 6 foot Rock Buckets in stock $1,200 • Salford RTS for Conservation Tillage in Stock

Buskirk, NY

(518)488-2696

Sales@skottfarmandequipment.com www.skottfarmandequipment.com

Farm Machinery For Sale JOHN DEERE BALER PARTS: New & used. New Miller bale wrappers, basic, $7,200; with cut and hold, $8,400. New Super Crimp hay conditioners, $4,200; 8’, $4,626. New bale grabbers, $1,750; HD $1,950. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale Landpride 10’ Rotary Mower (Demo) Model RCR2510 Trailer Type w/(3) gearboxes, hard rubber tires (New List $7000) Our Price $5,950 Farmi Log Winch Good used Model 601 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,150 4x4 Kubota B1750 w/Kubota Ldr & Belly Mower 20HP Dsl, 800 hrs, hydro ‘06 4x4 NH TC45D w/NH Loader & Bkt 4045HP Dsl, hydro w/rabbit/turtle control. Well maintained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,900 Ford NH 4630 full factory cab, 55-60HP Dsl, 1800 hrs, dual outlets, clean inside & out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 Pequea 175Bu Spreader Demo (List over $8,000) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Our Price $5,950 4x4 Ford 2120 w/Ford Ldr 40HP Dsl . .$10,750 Pequea 710P Fluffer (never used) . . .$2,250 Disk Sets 8’, 10’, 12’ (6) In Stock Dayton PTO Generator on nice cart, 50/25KW (like new) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,450

Kennedy Tractor (315) 964-1161 Williamstown, NY “We Deliver” L2 GLEANER COMBINE, 16’ flex & 16’ rigid head, good condition, $15,000 OBO. 585721-7684

MAINE TO N. CAROLINA See our ad in the Aug. 8th EFD insert. Visit us @ Lot #108 @ EFD’s. We broker and manage Multi Farm Partnerships. CUT THE HEAT and become one of our smallest partnerships with a tree spade! See our Proposed 001 Corn Silage partnership on the web @ PleasantCreekHay.com Welsarth@Msn.com NEW HOLLAND 790 chopper, 2 row corn head plus grass head, excellent condition. Connecticut 860-949-2434 NEW HOLLAND bale wagon parts available for all models. Sodbuster Sales, Polson, MT. 406-883-2118 NEW HOLLAND tandem axle running gear with mounted all-metal hay racks and floor, 19’ long, 8’ wide, 8’ 6” tall, 12.5Lx15 tires, all in very good shape. $2,800 FIRM. 203-272-7457

Farm Machinery For Sale

USED COMBINE PA R T S K & J SURPLUS LANSING, NY 607-279-6232 Days 607-533-4850 Nights

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

Fencing

WELLSCROFT FENCE SYSTEMS Hi Tensile & Portable Electric Fences Solidlock Woven Wire Pressure Treated Posts King Hitter Post Pounder

Great Prices/Fast Service Call For Brochures 603-827-3464 or info@wellscroft.com

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

Generators

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

Farm Machinery Wanted

Call For Price

AMARAL FARMS 1st cutting good quality hay, round bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-450-6536

MORRISON'S

CUSTOM F E E D S Quality Organic and Conventional Feeds

We ship pallets of bagged organic feed to any farm in the North East by Land Air Express

FOR RENT OR LEASE Three Rivers, Mass FREESTALL DAIRY With Milking Parlor 80 Stall Barn Facility For Young Cows Includes House

413-297-0035 For Sale

Can be shipped UPS

Cowco, Inc.

Dairy and Livestock Manager: Oversee all aspects of organic, 50-cow, grass-based dairy and beef herds and on-site processing plant on publicly accessible, diversified farm owned by Massachusetts non profit organization. Competitive salary and benefits, including housing. Full posting at: www.thetrustees.org

LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT North Vernon, IN

(800) 240-3868 www.cowcoinc.com

INDIVIDUALS FOR CUSTOM HARVESTING OPERATION Texas through Montana 2011 Season

Must be honest, hard working with farm background.

402-364-2222

TOO MUCH HAY?

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Try Selling It In The

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

CLASSIFIEDS

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix For Rent or Lease

Reusable Light Weight No Condensation 10+ years life

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900 HAY & STRAW: Large or small square bales. Wood Shaving Bagged. René Normandin,Québec,Canada 450347-7714

Seeks Person to milk, take care of fresh & sick cows and other general farm work. Salary dependent on experience.

802-723-4503

• • • •

4’x5’ ROUND BALES first cut, good quality. Picked up or delivered. Augur Farms 203530-4953

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Hay-Guard©

STANTON BROTHERS

Delivered by the Dump Trailer Load

814-793-4293

400 COW DAIRY In Northern Vermont

STOP THE WASTE!!

518-768-2344

413-268-7095

“The Breathable Hay Cover”

Hay - Straw For Sale

AG LIME

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

Help Wanted

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

814-793-4293

WANTED

Hay - Straw For Sale

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

Call Peg At

Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices

800-836-2888

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

or email

WANTED:

ASSISTANT HERDSPERSON with recent experience to work on large

Northern Vermont Dairy Farm Housing Package

802-782-9058 SEND RESUME TO:

519-529-1141

classified@leepub.com

m32rhs@yahoo.net

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Alltech is currently looking for Territory Sales Representatives for Vermont and New York. Alltech sales people are highly motivated professionals who provide a natural link between marketing, research and the customer. Alltech ranks among the top 10 animal health companies in the world. The company has experienced consistent growth since it was founded in 1980. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has a presence in over 110 countries with distributors around the world. Today it employs 2,600 people and growth continues at a rate of 20 percent.

Key responsibilities include:

www.morrisonsfeeds.com

802-633-4387 Farm Machinery For Sale

TINGLEY

• Hi-Top Work Rubbers* #1300 - $17.00/pr • 10” Closure Boots* #1400 - $22.00/pr • 17” Knee Boots #1500 - $26.00/pr Sizes S, M, L, XL, 2X, & 3X

Naples Distributors

• Regularly visit our industry partners (feed companies, consulting nutritionists, veterinarians, producers, government agencies, etc) across the territory to manage existing relationships while cultivating new relationships • Drive sales by identifying customer needs and finding solutions • Attend industry events and tradeshows to showcase Alltech in a positive, professional manner

The ideal candidate should have: • A strong technical background: BSc, MSc or higher • Strong verbal and written communication skills • Interest and experience in the animal health or nutrition industries • Self-motivated and proactive • A valid driver’s license Alltech

| Pennsylvania 1860 Charter Lane, Suite 203 Lancaster, PA 17601 Fax: 717-393-9774 • mgast@allltech.com

(888) 223-8608

www.NaplesDistributors.com

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Kioti DK-55 4x4 with Industrial tires, loader w/self leveling quick attach bucket, shuttle shift, double remote hydraulics, comes with a 4 Year Warranty 0% for 60 months OR $4,000 off price for cash Call Orchard Hill Farm Equipment for A Super Deal!

413-253-5456 • 413-478-9790 (cell) Or See Our Web Site www.orchardhillsales.com

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

Hay - Straw Wanted

WANTED

Hay & Straw - All Types We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 21

LANDPRIDE 72” finish mower, 3pt. hitch, good condition, $800. 518-695-6180

Farm Machinery For Sale


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Help Wanted

Parts

Help Wanted

WRITERS WANTED

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper.

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

607-642-3293

Page 22 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

Knowledge of the industry a must. Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles. Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-3237 ext 241

Horse Equipment English Saddle Set (Complete) Wintec 500 Close Contact CAIR 16 ½” Seat Color: Caramel, 50” Professional Choice English Girth, Stirrup Straps and Irons, Leather Bridle, Reins, and Breast Collar to match, 2 Pads, Complete Gullet System, $650.00. 518673-2858

C A M PA I G N P O S T E R S : Very reasonable prices. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or email bsnyder@leepub.com

20x50 UNADILLA WOOD SILO for sale. 518-256-3169

Available With Sandmaster Agitation Kit

NEW JAMESWAY Unloaders In Stock. Sales, Parts and Service on Jamesway, VanDale, J-Star and Big Jim Unloaders. Converting Harvestore silos to top unloading. 717-768-7456

19777 HEILL 7,500 Gal. Aluminum Tanker, 4 Interior Baffles, Virgin Pump & 8” Transfer Boom, Can Field Spread, Mint Condition

Tractor Parts

SHARON SPRINGS: 289 acre farm. 4 bedroom 2 bath farmhouse. Large cattle and horse barn. Picture perfect country setting. $495,000. FREE CATALOG Country Boy Realty, 753 East Main Street, Cobleskill, NY 12043. 518-234-4371. www.countryboyrealty.com

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Trailers

WANTED: Used roofing on or off the building. Call 802-2653200

TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

Roofing

Roofing

September Mane Stream Sell Your Horse, Hay, Trailer, Truck, Equipment, Real Estate, Etc. For as little as $9.00 place a classified ad

Deadline Fri., August 19th Call Peg at

800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 classified@leepub.com

SMALL Black Percheron 12 year old gelding, rides under saddle and street safe to drive. Also, 6 year old light dapple grey Percheron-cross gelding, rides under saddle, will stand quiet when hitched. 315-493-1051

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1. PHONE IT IN

Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

IT IN - For MasterCard, 2. FAX Visa, AMEX or Discover customers, fill out the form

3.

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN Place my ad in the following zones: YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!  Country Folks East

New

 Country Folks West West East England Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, below completely and FAX to plus 30¢ for each additional word.  Country Folks Peggy at (518) 673-2381 Number of New England (Phone #’s count as one word) MAIL IT IN - Fill out the If running your ad multiple weeks: Mid-Atlantic of weeks to  Country Fol k s attached form, calculate the Discount $1.00 per week, per zone. cost, enclose your check or

run_______ Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle credit card information and Name: (Print)________________________________________________________________ mail to: Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

4. classified@leepub.com E-mail your ad to E-MAIL

5. www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a ON-LINE - Go to

Classified Ad button to place your ad 24/7!

Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________ Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________ City: __________________________________________ State: ________ Zip: __________ Phone #_____________________Fax #________________Cell #_____________________ e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard Card # __________________________________________Exp. Date __________________ (MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card:(Print)____________________________________________________ Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for credit card payment only)

15

16

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

17

18

19

20

1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week 1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

BUY DIRECT – We manufacture Metal Roofing & Siding. LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

Don’t Miss Out!

Call 585-734-3264 Located in NY

ROOFING & SIDING

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Real Estate For Sale

Trucks

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

ABM & ABX Panel - Standing Seam - PBR Panel

Horses

Trucks

FOR SALE: Dorset Finn ewe lambs, aseasonal breeders, $135 each. Call 315-246-4572

Real Estate For Sale

Roofing

Miscellaneous

Sheep

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com #718 - Nice 210A. free stall dairy farm w/170 tillable flat to rolling acres w/sandy/loam soil - 120 cow free stall barn w/double 10 Beco Parlor w/ATO’s, 3,000 gal bulk tank also 160 ft. free stall heifer/dry cow barn, 20x41 ft. Sealstore grain silo & 170x100 ft. bunk silo w/concrete floor - Good 9 rm home w/5 bdrms. & 2 baths - corn & wood stoves - nice fireplace, also village water & Artisian spring . . . . . . . . . . . . .$550,000 #70 - 178 ACRES IN STARK, HERKIMER COUNTY, NY - 60 acres tillable - 30 pasture - 80 nice woods, 2 story barn w/72 ties - 26x40 ft. heifer or horse section off main barn. V.G. 8 rm. home with H-W-HEAT - 3 car garage with nice work shop. Across rd. from #69. Ex. buy at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$289,000 #69 - Farm w/150 A. - 130 tillable, 20 woods, nice apple orchard, outstanding looking property w/very good 2 story home w/beautiful lawns and nice inground swimming pool - also outside wood furnace, 2 story barn with lg. heated shop at one end - nice creek borders this property - located across the road from #70. Priced at .$435,000 #62 - THUNDER MOUNTAIN - A GREAT PLACE FOR FAIRS OR SPORTS - 1.5 MILES FROM RTE 90, NY STATE THRUWAY. Also know for its large supply of Herkimer Diamonds and also a large supply of commercial spring water for future use - 210 acres - 100 tillable, 20 pasture, 86 woods. Only one entrance to property. Nice road one mile long with electric all the way back thru center of property (private), 40x192 ft. one story barn with office, good 7 rm. home w/3 stall garage, GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500,000 #15-A - Great commercial buy on Rte. 5S just outside of Herkimer & Mohawk, NY on 50 acres of mostly flat & tillable land w/1730 ft. of rd. frontage - has lg. 2 story house with kitchen, dining area, living rm. & one bedroom downstairs & 2.5 bedrooms upstairs all on one side of house with room for lg. kitchen, living rm., 2 lg. bedrooms upstairs on other side of house - this property would be a nice location for a new shopping mall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $950,000 C-71 - Well-kept 50 A. Hobby Farm, recently surveyed; 5A. woods, remainder tillable; 25x56 modular home on slab, 3BR, 2 full baths, central air, new steel roof; drilled well. 28x52 barn used for hay storage; 40x60 heated shop w/two 12’ overhead doors w/openers; 14x32 pole bldg. addition w/overhead doors; 28x38 open pole shed; 14x28 shed w/overhead door; 22x26 storage bldg.This property has a SPECIAL USE VARIANCE PERMIT (Agricultural or Commercial). . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $299,000

Calendar of Events NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

AUG 2 Fiber Art Series with Joanne Darling Twin Pond Retreat, Brookfield, VT. 9 am - 2 pm. Cost is $150-$250, sliding scale. Contact Jennifer, e-mail jennifer.jennifer@twinpond retreat.com. On Internet at www.twinpondretreat.com AUG 3 Raising Quality Pigs in VT North Hollow Farm, Rochester, VT. 4:40-7 pm. $10 for NOFA-VT & VSGA members, $20 for non-members. Contact NOFA-VT, 802-434-4122 or e-mail info@nofavt.org. AUG 6 Introduction to Starting a Commercial Goat Dairy Consider Bardwell Farm, West Pawlet, VT. 9:30 am - 3 pm. $25 for NOFA-VT & VSGA members, $40 for non-members. Includes lunch. Contact NOFA-VT, 802-434-4122 or e-mail info@nofavt.org.

21

22

23

24

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week 1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week 1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

25

26

27

28

1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week 1 Week $12.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.85 per zone per week 1 Week $13.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.15 per zone per week 1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week

AUG 9-10 New Hampshire Breed Show for Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Milking Shorthorn Lancaster Fairgrounds in Lancaster, NH. Fitting and showing will start on Aug. 9 at 6 pm and the Type Breed Show will start at 8 am on Aug. 10. Contact Michal Lunak, 603-787-6944 or michal.lunak@unh.edu. AUG 11 From Cow to Consumer: Producing Raw Milk for Direct Sale Farm, Washington, VT. 11 am - 3 pm. $10 for rural Vermont members, $20 for all others. Applicable to goat, sheep and cow dairies. Bring a bag lunch & we’ll provide milk and cookies. Contact Shelby Girard, 802-2237222 or e-mail shelby@ruralvermont.org. AUG 12-14 37th Annual Summer Conference UMass Amherst. 200+ exciting workshops on organic farming & gardening, land care, food politics, health & nutrition and sustainable living. Also special workshops for kids and teens. Exhibitors and vendors, old fashioned country fair, Contra dance, Zydeco band, drumming, teen dance and DJ, farmers and crafters market, delicious organic meals, affordable accommodations and camping. Online registration opens May 1. Contact Ben Grosscup, 413-549-1568. On Internet at www. nofasummerconference.org

AUG 15-18 Certified Wool Classing School Land Mark College, Putney, VT. 8 am - 4 pm each day. The cost of the school is $150/student and includes all supplies, manuals, a DVD and wool education publications. Contact Lisa Letendre, 802-387-4841 or e-mail lisaletendre@yahoo.com. AUG 20-21 Wool Handling School Town Hall in Tunbridge, VT. 8 am - 4 pm each day. Focus on wool fiber growth and development, fiber characteristics, wool traits, wool value traits, marketing options and wool trends. The cost of the course is $35/student and all materials will be provided by ASI including the manual, a DVD, wool education handouts and wool samples. Contact Jane Woodhouse, 805592-3062 or e-mail vsga.jane.w@fairpoint.net. SEP 10 Scaling Up: Producing and Processing for the Larger Regional Market SE VT Community Action & Westminster Meats, 91 Buck Dr., Westminster, VT. 10 am - 3 pm. Contact Chelsea Lewis, 802-828-3360. SEP 22-24 3rd International Symposium on Mastitis and Milk Quality St. Louis, MO. Submission of abstracts for presentation at this fall symposium (either as a poster or orally) will be due by March 1. Watch the NMC Web site at nmconline.org for more details.


“Gathering of the Green” A biennial nationwide conference for John Deere collectors, restorers & enthusiasts March 14-17, 2012 at the River Center in Davenport, Iowa Gathering of the Green Belt Buckles for 2012 Do you like the 2012 Gathering logo? We think it's terrific!! And to that end, 100 pewter (in color) belt buckles with the tractors from three eras will be cast and available for sale at the Gathering. See the logo at www.gath-

eringofthegreen.com. Price to be determined but the cost will be reasonable - as is everything at the "Gathering of the Green." A Chronicle of John Deere History and Americana – Theo Brown Willie Cade, the grandson of famous Deere engineer, Theo Brown, will lead a workshop at the 2012 Gathering which will introduce you to the interesting and successful career of Theo during the first half of the 20th

century. At Deere & Company, Theo Brown headed the Experimental Department where he was responsible for over 150 patents involving farm machinery designs. Amazingly, from 1893 to 1971, Theo kept an extensive series of diaries – 65 volumes, detailing his career at Deere, his dayto-day family life and events of his time. Many of his design concepts were sketched out on pages of the diaries. Plan to attend Mr. Cade’s workshop at the 2012

Gathering as he introduces you to Theo including his many tractor and implement innovations for John Deere. Interesting Workshop Planned – Lindeman Power Equipment Company Most John Deere enthusiasts are familiar with the Lindeman crawler but they may not know the interesting and creative history of Jesse Lindeman and the Lindeman family. Interestingly, the Gathering planners have learned about Ted

Calling for vendors at Mass Marketplace • Locally grown agriculture: produce, fruits, etc. • Specialty foods: homemade baked goods, honey, maple syrup, gourmet jams, jellies and marmalade, pesto, hummus, farmstead cheeses, etc. • Flora culture: plants, pots, tools, and garden sculptures • Natural Crafts: hand- made

baskets, woolens, hemp, pottery (stoneware), soaps, greeting cards, dog-friendly foods, etc. If you are interested in exhibiting at this event or have questions please e-mail us at massmarketplace@masshort.org, or contact Penni Jenkins at 617933-4988. Please visit our Web site at: www.masshort.org.

Gathering fees for the 2012 conference will remain the same as in 2010. Registration will remain at $35 and the banquet will be $30. Where can you get a better deal with so much for so little? Have you made your hotel reservations? The Blackhawk (888-525-4455) located next door to the RiverCenter still has some rooms available as does the Clarion (563-3911230) located 3.8 miles from the RiverCenter. Note that registration will open on or about November 1, 2011. Visit www.gatheringofthegreen.com/new s.html on a regular basis for the latest information.

Committee focuses on the impact of Dodd-Frank on Main Street Businesses WASHINGTON, D.C. — On July 21, the House Agriculture Committee held a public hearing to review the impact of derivatives reform on end users and smaller financial institutions. This hearing comes at a pivotal point in the implementation of Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act as the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) moves from proposing rules to finalizing regulations. Members of the Committee heard from a diverse group of witnesses representing community banks, public power companies, rural electric coops, and manufacturers who expressed concerns that the CFTC’s regulations may go too far, imposing unnecessary costs on their businesses. The witnesses expressed concerns that these costs would be passed on to their customers in the form of higher costs. “Today’s witnesses confirmed our concerns that overreaching proposals will negatively impact the very businesses we’re relying on to create jobs. If a rural electric cooperative finds itself in the same regulatory category as Goldman Sachs, the CFTC simply doesn’t have it right. We need to bring some balance and common sense back to this process,” said Chairman Frank Lucas.

August 1, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 23

Mass Marketplace at Massachusetts Horticultural Society Elm Bank, Wellesley, MA - Aug. 6 Massachusetts Horticultural Society’s Mass Marketplace goal is to showcase the finest products from Massachusetts’ fields, farms, gardens, kitchens, local artists and artisans. We are looking for…

Adams of Yakima, WA, a friend of Jesse Lindeman who worked for him in the new family business, Northwest Equipment Company, after the family sold the Lindeman Power Equipment Company which modified the John Deere tractors into crawlers. Over the years, Ted was able to acquire photos, scrapbooks and detailed history of the company and he has graciously agreed to lead a workshop on this topic during the 2012 Gathering of the Green. Gathering Planners Explore Possible Registration through Internet Our Gathering registration coordinators are exploring the possibility of ONLINE registration for the 2012 conference (March 14-17, 2012) where you will be able register and pay for the conference including trips and tours, banquet and hats and pins.


Page 24 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 1, 2011

SEE ONE OF THESE AUTHORIZED KUBOTA DEALERS NEAR YOU! MAINE

MASSACHUSETTS

NEW YORK

EAST DIXFIELD, ME 04227

WILLIAMSBURG, MA 01096

R. S. OSGOOD & SONS

BACON’S EQUIPMENT

SALEM, NY 12865

U.S. Route 2 207-645-4934 • 800-287-4934 www.rsosgood.com

29 Goshen Road (Rte. 9) 413-268-3620

FAIRFIELD, ME 04937

HAMMOND TRACTOR COMPANY 216 Center Road 207-453-7131

SALEM FARM SUPPLY 5109 State Rte. 22 518-854-7424 • 800-999-3276 www.salemfarmsupply.com

Profile for Lee Publications

Country Folks New England 8.1.11  

Country Folks New England August 1, 2011

Country Folks New England 8.1.11  

Country Folks New England August 1, 2011

Advertisement