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20 August 2012 Section One of Two Volume 30 Number 22

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

$1.99

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Chaput Family Farms honored as Vermont Dairy Farm of the Year ~ Page A3

Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly Crop Comments Focus on Ag Moo News

A13 A6 A19 A20

Auctions Classifieds Farmer to Farmer

B1 B18 A8

Dairy / DHIA

Year-round grass-fed meats at Watson Farm ~ Page A2

Let us therefore make every effort to do what leads to peace and to mutual edification. ~ Romans 14:19


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Year-round grass-fed meats at Watson Farm by Sanne Kure-Jensen When Don and Heather Minto started managing Watson Farm in Jamestown, RI, in 1980 they had to rebuild the beef herd almost from scratch. The previous owner had been ill for some time and had allowed the cattle and bulls (mainly Angus) to roam the 265acre farm without fences or breeding management. When the Mintos called beef processors, no one would take their animals because word had gotten out about how difficult and aggressive the animals were. Their Zone of Flight was about one quarter mile. Because everyone said cattle had to be finished on corn, the Mintos evaluated growing corn themselves versus buying it in. Jamestown has sandy soils with a shallow topsoil and sod layer. Disturbing that shallow covering risks erosion and potential runoff into Narragansett Bay. When the Mintos factored in the equipment, fuel, seed, fertilizers, soil amendments and labor, growing corn could not justify the risks. Buying corn would not be profitable either. Grazing Don and Heather became “grass farmers,” working to improve pasture quality for their livestock. Since the 1980s, they have purchased lime, compost and other soil amendments to raise the soil pH from its alltime low of 4.5 and raise soil fertility. In recent years, they have purchased one or two 175-gallon totes of fish emulsion and they spray the pastures annually at a 10:2 dilution with water. Don sprays at a rate of two gallons per acre for a net cost of $6 per acre. Within as little as 10 days, the animals could tell the difference; they definitely prefer the treated grasses. Twenty years ago, Watson Farm’s fields were overseeded with inoculated red and white clover at a rate of 1 pound per acre to add nitrogen. Chicory blooms dot the field each summer. The animals like it and its deep roots bring up minerals, helping improve the soils. Organic field and livestock management practices have encouraged the return of dung beetles. These insects help cow piles disappear in as little as three days, bringing nutrients deep, improving soil structure and fertility. The Mintos stockpile forage in late summer for fall and winter grazing by keeping the animals off certain pastures. Livestock at Watson Farm foraged through light snow well into January before they needed supplemental baled hay. Field stockpiling is routinely done in Wisconsin and Canada, saving farmers equipment, storage, fuel and labor costs on haying efforts. The Mintos love having their animals outside instead

of closed up in a barn or sacrificial pasture. “The animals spread their own manure so I don’t have to,” said Don. Grasses are strongest in spring. Spring is the best time for calving so mothers have fresh, high-energy food. If cow piles are loose in spring, move animals to pastures with taller grasses for more cellulose, or the animals could lose weight. Most of the 20 to 22 animals that Watson Farm processes each year are processed in June, July and August when pasture quality is at its best. This is convenient for the processors who typically have high demands in the fall. Protein levels are higher in shorter grasses. Rather than deplete plants’ energy, it is best to have animals sweep through. Don’t leave them on a pasture too long so they take a second bit of the same resprouting plants, especially on sandy soils. Don said that plants have the same amount of material below as above the ground. If the grazing gets too tight in summer, the roots may shrivel; plants can dry up and die in dry conditions. Hay and forage The Mintos grow eight to 10 acres of brassicas, Sudan grass and sorghum for summer forage. Warm season grasses are available for late summer grazing. Don suggested cutting hay at the end of the day, if possible. The Brix level is highest then and will create the highest-energy hay. If fields grow faster than the animals can graze them, harvest the fields for later use. Consider mowing to knock back invasives like multiflora rose, Canadian thistle and black swallow-wort. Mowing will prevent those plants that the animals don’t like to eat from going to seed and dominating the field. Don recommended reading the cattle management story by Steve Kenyon in the July, 2012 issue of “Stockman Pasture.” Water Thanks to an NRCS EQIP grant, water lines reach the far pastures of Watson Farm. This allows the animals to stay in various pastures rather than coming into a barn at night. As the herd grew and was shifted to heritage blends, the cattle became hardier and did not need a new barn. They spend the whole year outside with woodland shelters against extreme weather. The Mintos turn off the water taps two to three hours before moving pastures. This gives animals time to empty their water troughs/tanks and make moving easy. One important aspect of sustainability is redundancy. Don and Heather Minto know that getting

Heather and Don have a windmill to pump water into stationary and portable tanks for their livestock. This is a great backup when the power goes out on their conventional watering systems or when a hurricane strikes.

Heather and Don Minto describe their year-round grazing program at Watson Farm in Jamestown, RI at a Learning Station/Show Case on Year Round Grass Fed Beef Production presented in partnership with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. The workshop was funded by a three-year UCONN, UMASS and URI Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) Professional Development Program (PDP). Photos by Sanne Kure-Jensen

water to their livestock every day is critical. Their 1,200-gallon portable water tank sits on a dedicated trailer ready to be filled and moved to wherever the animals are pastured, should their primary pumps fail. A windmill stands ready to pump water into the portable and stationary tank (3,200-gallon capacity) should a power outage or hurricane strike. Heritage breeds Almost 30 years ago, the Mintos Heather Faubert, URI Extension researched her- agent, describes efforts to control itage breeds that Black Swallow-wort, an invasive could be raised plant in Rhode Island. completely on grass — no corn required. Devons are the oldest cattle breed. Farmers in New Zealand and southern New England breed towards shorter animals with as little as one-third of their height as legs or air below their bodies. Devons are gentle, hearty and do not require barns. Today, the Mintos graze 100 head of Red Devon cattle for meat and 100 Romney/Texel cross sheep for meat and wool. Don and Heather Minto described their year-round grazing program for 25 farmers and agricultural professionals at one of three southern New England workshops presented in partnership with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. The workshop was funded by a three-year Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) Professional Development Program (PDP) grant awarded to UConn, UMass and URI. To learn more about Watson Farm see www.historicnewengland.org/historic-properties/homes/watson-farm/watson-farm, e-mail Don and Heather at watsonfarm1796@yahoo.com or call 401-423-0005. To contact Heather Faubert, URI Extension Agent, email hhf@uri.edu or call 401-874-2967.


Chaput Family Farms honored as Vermont Dairy Farm of the Year the region’s six states every year. In Vermont, University of Vermont (UVM) Extension and the Vermont Dairy Industry Association (VDIA) present the award annually to a farm that demonstrates overall excellence in dairying, including outstanding herd performance and superior milk quality. Nominated farms also are evaluated on crop production and pasture quality, environmental practices, innovativeness and involvement in the betterment of Vermont’s dairy industry and their local communities. The brothers will be recognized at a special banquet at Eastern States Exposition in W. Springfield, MA, in September, along with Green Pastures winners from the five other New England states. They also will be honored at the VDIA banquet at the Vermont Farm Show in Essex Junction in January. “I always knew I wanted to be a farmer,” says Reg Chaput, who started with 40 cows on a 113-acre farm in Beebe, Vermont in 1979. In 1991 he and his late father, Leo, began Chaput Family Farms by incorporating their individual farms into one business. By 1993, they owned five separate 40- to 60-cow farms and realized that to remain competitive they needed to consolidate the operation. Leo, who was approaching retirement age and not interested in assuming additional debt, sold his interest to son, Michael.

Nutrition and John Lincoln of ShurGain, using these recommendations to feed their cows and heifers a total mixed ration (TMR) of corn silage, haylage and grains. This TMR is balanced according to the nutritional needs of each group of cows based on their stage of lactation and daily milk production. Tom Eaton, a certified crop advisor with Agricultural Consulting Services, developed a comprehensive nutrient management plan for the farm and monitors their grass and cornfields throughout the summer. With Tom’s guidance, their 520 acres of corn and 950 acres of grass now produce enough forage to feed their 1,800 head of cattle for the entire year. As part of their breeding strategy, the farm’s genetics team, led by Kimberley Morton, a farm manager, conducts genomic testing on all the calves when they reach nine months old to identify the best animals to keep in the herd. Testing runs $44 per animal and Chaput estimates that they will invest between $60,000 and $80,000 over the next four years before they begin to see any return on their investment. “We looked at the merits of genomic testing and the potential payback and decided that this was something we wanted to do in order to introduce the top genetics available into our herd,” he explains. The test indicates genetic merit for many traits, including milk production, fertility and longevity and allows the farmer to make the best possible genetic matches when breeding. The Chaputs raise all their own replacements, striving for a calving interval of 13 months. They breed their heifers to calve around 22 months and at a weight of 1,300 pounds. Beginning this winter, they hope to install a set of scales to chart the weights and heights of the young animals to get them to the proper height, weight and age by their first calf. To get newborns off to a good start, herdsman Paul LaVoie notes that “the calves are fed four quarts of colostrum at birth with heifer calves receiving an additional two quarts six hours later.” Following this protocol without fail has resulted in a calf loss ratio of about two to three percent compared to an industry average of around eight percent. “We then feed them milk replacer for the first month to six weeks until weaned at which point they go from their individual hutches to group hutches for another two weeks. At two months of age they are moved to the freestall heifer barn where they are slowly transitioned to a total mixed ration that includes 85 percent forages. “We only raise our top 32 calves each month as we are not growing out our herd,” LaVoie continues. “This Chaput A4

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

The following year they sold the smaller operations and purchased their current farm. Acquisition of neighboring farms and open land expanded the original 750-acre tract to 1,800 acres, including 1,100 tillable acres, all of which they conserved through the Vermont Land Trust to protect against future development. The Chaputs milk 830 cows on a 3xdaily milking schedule in a double-16 parallel milking parlor. The farm has a rolling herd average of 24,100 pounds of milk per cow with a somatic cell count of 120,000. Butterfat is 3.8 percent butterfat and protein, 3.0 percent. They have been a member of Dairylea Cooperative since 1997, earning premiums and numerous awards for quality milk. “Chaput Family Farms has earned many quality awards through the years,” notes Sue Isham, the Vermont Regional Manager for Dairylea Cooperative. “But within the past three years they have made some significant improvements to their animal housing and milking system. With these changes and their attention to detail, they have been able to achieve Dairylea’s highest quality milk award, the Special Gold Award, for three years in a row.” “This past spring we renovated the close-up barn, which had been divided into three sections,” Chaput says. “To improve cow comfort, we added 30 s t a l l s , increased individual stall size to 54 inches and added gel mattresses for the cows close to calving.” Their milkers are housed in two spacious, well-ventilated freestall barns, each equipped with a gravity flow m a n u r e transfer system and room for 420 cows. They recently installed longday lighting in these barns to encourage the cows to produce more milk. To ensure their animals receive proper nutrition, the farmers regularly consult with their nutritionists, Chaput Family Farms in North Troy was named the 2012 Vermont Dairy Farm of the Year by University of Vermont Extension and the Vermont Dairy Industry Association for its overall excellence in dairying. From left to right, Dan LaCoss of Cargill Kimberley Morton, Reg Chaput, Sasha Morton, Nathan Chaput and Michael Chaput. Photo by Peggy Manahan/UVM Extension A n i m a l

by Lisa Halvorsen, Freelance Agricultural Journalist for UVM Extension Vermont dairy farmers Reg and Michael Chaput are always looking for the next great idea to increase the profitability, self-sufficiency and sustainability of their 1,800-head Holstein operation. As owners of Chaput Family Farms in North Troy, they continually strive to make what is already a topnotch dairy farm even better. Quick to embrace new technology, they were among the first farmers in the state to install a methane digester to produce electricity and just this year purchased their own milk truck and tanks to haul milk from their farm to the processor, a cost-saving measure that also gives them more control over milk quality. They have an enviable workplace safety record and communicate well with their employees, involving them in the decision-making process and acknowledging their role in the operation’s success. These attributes, coupled with their strong commitment to dairying, led to their nomination for the prestigious Vermont Dairy Farm of the Year award earlier this year and recent selection as the 2012 recipient. The award is sponsored by the New England Green Pastures program, which recognizes an outstanding dairy farm in each of


New England Farmers Union elects new Vice President

Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

SHELBURNE FALLS, MA — The Board of Directors of the New England Farmers Union announced that on July 23, they elected Roger Noonan from Middle Branch Farm in New Boston, New Hampshire to serve as Vice President. “Roger has been a valuable member of the board since he joined us last year,” said President Erbin Crowell. “He has participated in several Washington, D.C., events to work on the 2012 Farm Bill, and represented our members at the National Farmers Union board meeting earlier this month. I look forward to our working together to build New England Farmers Union and strengthen the voice of our farmers and fishermen at the federal level.” Roger is an organic farmer. Middle Branch Farm is a diversified family farm with operations ranging from maple syrup production, greenhouse production, organic vegetable production, organic hay and forage crop

production, livestock production and on-farm composting. Membership in the CSA at Middle Branch Farm exceeds 450 members. “The more I know about Farmers Union, the more comfortable I feel in this organization,” Roger said. “The policies, the values and the people fit with my values all the way from the local members to the National Farmers Union board members. I am very pleased to have the confidence of the Board of Directors, and I look forward to serving the farmers and fishermen of New England in this new capacity.” Roger is active in New Hampshire’s agricultural community. He is a founding board member of Local Harvest CSA, a co-operative of eight organic farms. He is a supervisor for the Hillsborough County Conservation District and a member of the Government Affairs Committee for New Hamphsire Farm Bureau. He

Cover photo by Sanne Kure-Jensen Don Minto describes double-wire fencing used with their grass-fed Red Devon herd at Watson Farm in Jamestown, RI.

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Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY ........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy.................................................. Reading, VT...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas ...................................... suethomas1@cox.net........................................949-599-6800 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Scott Lizio..............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 Kathy LaScala....................................katelascala@gmail.com.........................................913-486-7184 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

was recently nominated by Governor L ynch to serve as the Agricultural Representative on the NH Rivers Management Advisory Council. Roger has used various USDA programs to develop his farm including

Environmental Quality Incentive Program, financing through Farm Services Agency, Rural Development grants and Farmer and Rancher Protection Program to protect some of his farmland.

Chaput from A3 keeps us at a 32 percent cull rate. The top 10 percent get bred with sexed semen to get heifer calves out of our best heifers.” Sexed semen is semen treated to remove the majority of male chromosomes, resulting in a higher percentage (90 percent) of female calves. Isham adds, “[The Chaputs] began tagging their newborn calves this year with RFID tags with a plan to use this technology on the entire herd within the next year. This will allow them to safeguard and track all animals on the farm.” Use of RFID also will help animal health officials control bovine tuberculosis by electronically identifying infected animals and, in case of an outbreak, linking them to their place of origin and tracking their movement. Their interest in new technology led the brothers to install a methane digester in 2010, which produces enough electricity for 300 averagesized homes. They contracted with Vermont’s Sustainably Priced Energy Development program to sell their electricity for the next 20 years for a guaranteed 16 cents a kilowatt hour (kWh). In addition, they have a fiveyear contract with Green Mountain Power’s Cow Power program to sell the renewable energy credits for an additional four cents per kWh. With roughly 72 percent of the $2.2 million cost of the digester covered by grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture; Clean Energy Development Fund; Central Vermont Power Service; the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets and a U.S. treasury grant, Chaput predicts that the system will pay for itself relatively quickly. “We saw this as a cushion for when low milk prices hit,” the dairy producer admits. “But we also like the idea of decreasing our environmental footprint on the earth. We feel this is a win-win for us and for Vermont’s green power agenda.” An equally valuable part of the equation for a successful operation is having employees who take pride in their work and want to work as a team. “Employees can make or break any business,” Chaput says, “and we’re fortunate to have a really great crew who are engaged in their work and want to do a good job. Mike and I are proud to call them not only our employees but our friends. Many have been with us for 10 to 20 years and a cousin, Francis Chaput, has been an important part of the operation since coming to work here 26 years ago.” The Chaputs raise the bar when it comes to creating a safe and pleasant working environment for their 22 employees. They offer generous financial incentives to them for maintaining

an accident-free workplace, and in 2010 they were the recipient of the Governor’s Award for Outstanding Workplace Safety, the first dairy operation to ever receive this award. They hold semi-monthly management meetings and include employees to gain their input in making many of the management decisions. They provide training on new protocols or procedures as needed and regularly send their employees to seminars or conferences that are pertinent to their areas of responsibility. As partners, Reg and Michael have learned that mutual respect is essential in maintaining a working partnership. “You could count the disagreements Mike and I have had in 30 years of working together on one hand,” Chaput says. “It comes down to trusting and respecting one another’s abilities without question.” In addition to their relationship, they also depend a great deal on LaVoie, who is in charge of all herd management decisions. “Paul has been such a great addition to our farm and we fully respect his management abilities and cow-side intelligence and skills. He’s truly a great herdsman and we’re lucky to have him.” What’s next for Chaput Family Farms? “We don’t plan to grow in size in acreage or cows,” Chaput says, “but we want to continue to improve what we do to have everything in place for the next generation.” Nathan Chaput, Reg’s son, has expressed interest in joining the business but plans to finish college and explore the world first to see if life leads him back to the farm. Recently, they signed up for UVM Extension’s current pilot program on aerial seeding of cover crops by helicopter. Thanks to a Vermont Agency of Agriculture grant they hope to begin installation of a dragline system for manure application next year to minimize nutrient loss and allow them to diminish ground impaction. In 2014 they plan to begin a five-year project to install a tile drainage system on 1,000 acres of tillable ground, which should improve crop production by 20 percent or more. In addition, Reg and Michael serve on numerous committees that deal with issues that impact the dairy industry at the state level as they feel it’s important to have farmers’ voices heard in Montpelier. “As the number of dairy farms in Vermont decline,” Chaput says, “we have to be diligent to ensure that regulatory and legislative mandates remain in place that will not perpetuate the decline of Vermont’s dairy farms.”


Plant Science Day speakers educate audience on pests, diseases very carefully. Bacterial Leaf Scorch is carried and spread by leaf feeding insects affecting shade trees in particular, especially oaks, maples and mulberries. Another condition on the watch list is Thousand Canker Disease, another fungal disease first found in black walnuts in Colorado and now found as far east as Pennsylvania. A new fungal infestation is now affecting boxwoods in the state and the station is vigorously pursuing best means of control and eradication. The Emerald Ash Borer has invaded the state and has prompted a quarantine in New Haven County. Infested firewood is looked at as a major means of spread and transport of such material is severely restricted. Three parasitic wasps are being investigated as possible means of control, these beneficial predators feed on the larval stage of the borer and and do not poise a threat to humans or pets. The station is always at the ready to deal with new problems as they surface and the likelihood is that new ones will always be on the horizon. One of the highlights of Plant Science Day is the presentation of the Century Farm Award, awarded annually to a farm that has been in the same family for 100 years. This years recipient was Futtner’s Family Farm

in East Hartford, CT which was started in 1890 by the current owner’s great grandparents who arrived in this country on their honeymoon in 1880. Jim and Honora Futtner now operate the farm representing the fourth generation of Futtners to do so. They have a roadside stand that operates seven months of the year offering an array of vegetables, herbs, hanging baskets, rose bushes and patio pots plus a pick-your -own featuring tomatoes, peppers and eggplant. Both Jim and Honora are very active in agricultural affairs. The Dr. Samuel Johnson Memorial Lecture followed the Century Farm Award with this year’s lecturer Joan Nichols, a Connecticut Certified Forester and President of the Connecticut Professional Timber Producers Ass., Inc. In her other position she serves the Connecticut Farm Bureau as Government Affairs Representative. Joan and her husband operate a forestry business in Lebanon, CT. Joan presented an overview of the evolution of the timber industry in the state from the time of the first settlers to its current position as a $250 million industry with 10,000 jobs overall and 530 certified forest practitioners. At one point in the state’s history most of the land had been cleared for agricultural pursuits but with the westward movement and changes in local industries, most of that which had been cleared gradually reverted to forest

Joan Nichols holds citation received for presenting the Dr. Samuel W. Johnson Memorial Lecture at Plant Science Day.

to the point today where 60 percent of the land in the state is forested. The recent economic downturn coupled with changes in consumer preference and technology have changed that market. The export market has shifted northward to Canada where the mills possess superior technology, thus able to process the timber in a manner that better meets the demands of today’s consumer. Truckers also benefit, as those making deliveries in the state from up north are able to make the return trip loaded. Public Act 490 supports forest management, management of state-owned land plus other activities designed to foster other activities related to good forest management. After lunch in the main tent Dr. Carole Cheah discussed biological control of Mile-A-Minute weed, an invasive species from Asia which poises a real threat to native vegetation because of its very aggressive growth. While many methods of control have been tried it appears that biological control may poise the best answer to its control. A parasitic weevil imported from China has been introduced with hopes that it may provide the answer biologists are searching for. Most of the acreage on the Lockwood Farm is devoted to experimental plots studying a wide variety of cultural and control practices that will at some point become useful tools for both commercial and back yard growers.

Jim and Honora Futtner proudly hold their Century Farm Award plaque.

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

by George Looby, DVM Located in the shadow of the Sleeping Giant State Park lies the Lockwood Farm of the Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station (CAES) which held its Annual Plant Science Day on Aug.1. The station is the oldest agricultural experiment station in the U.S., having been founded by Yale professor Dr. Harold Johnson in 1875. The list of activities conducted at the CAES is long, varied and often at the very cutting edge of experimental trials. Among the ongoing activities at the station are studies relating to pests affecting man and animals, especially those involving ticks and mosquitoes. Other studies include methods of reducing the use of pesticides and the effect of those materials on the environment. During the Plant Science Day event, Dr. Sandra Anagnostakis, Mycologist in the Department of Plant Pathology and Ecology, gave the audience an update on three new diseases of trees heading in the Connecticut direction. The first condition addressed was Oak Wilt, a fungal disease that is spread from tree to tree through the roots and currently found in southern and central U.S. Given the high value of Connecticut Oak as a commercial crop, this disease is being monitored


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

Nitrogen train derailment An Internet article titled, “Quick test for nitrates in cornstalks” appeared on the Dairy Herd Network Website on Aug. 2. As bad as the drought is in the Northeast, it’s much worse in the nation’s grain belt, centered in Iowa. In a socalled good year, moisture shortages can greatly heighten the likelihood of nitrate toxicity in corn (and occasionally other forages). In the worst drought conditions in a half century, average national corn grain yields for 2012 are forecast to drop to less than 130 bushels per acre, down some 25 percent from last year. According to agronomists at Iowa State University (ISU), when a corn plant is stunted, or not growing normally, nitrates can build up in the plant. Typically, nitrogen that is taken up by the corn plant is converted to amino acids —

the building blocks of protein — but in the stressed plant this conversion does not occur nearly as much as in unstressed plants. So producers need to know how to handle and feed drought-damaged corn in silage form, according to Steve Ensley, of Iowa State University’s Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine (VDPAM) department. “The nitrate level can be high enough in stunted plants that if harvested as silage the nitrate can be toxic to livestock that consume the silage,” Ensley said. “The most common problem is when drought stressed corn is green chopped and fed to livestock without going through ensiling.” (Ensiling will lower the amount of nitrate in the plant.) “After harvest, allow corn silage time to ferment in storage to reduce nitrates,” says Purdue University dairy specialist Maurice

Eastridge. A two-week wait can break down as much as 80 percent of the nitrates to safe levels in corn silage, according to Eastridge. Nitrogen availability to the plant, which depends on recent rain, fertilizer applied and other factors, affects the level of nitrate in the plant. The only way that corn growers can be sure about the level of nitrate is to sample and test the corn silage before feeding. “Producers have several options to help determine whether nitrate toxicity might be a problem,” Ensley said. “Assess the corn field that will be harvested to determine how much of the field has stunted corn

that’s not developing a normal ear. Take samples either by taking grab samples of silage cut by a forage chopper or by cutting several entire plants by hand that represent the various types of corn in the field.” A quick test that will screen for the presence of nitrates in stalks without having to chop the stalk can be done by ISU Extension beef and dairy specialists. A drop of diphenylamine in sulfuric acid on the surface of a stalk split in two will turn a blue-black color if nitrate is present. However, this does not provide a concentration of nitrate. Availability of this screening test varies. In some cases,

the screening test may be a part of drought meetings where the beef or dairy field specialists are present. Other options include getting a representative sample of several stalks and performing a strip test, which can help determine the concentration of nitrate by sending in a sample. ISU Extension beef and dairy specialists also will have capability for this, but due to the time required to prepare the sample for analysis, the availability will be more limited than the screening test. Samples also can be sent to commercial feed analysis labs. The critical issue is getting representative, fresh (whole or

chopped… if only with a hatchet) corn plants to a lab for analysis. Back in the good old Northeast, in his Agronomy Fact Sheet Series No. 70, Cornell University Agronomy Professor Jerry Cherney addressed the issue of nitrate toxicity in crops. Cherney recommends to livestock/crop farmers: 1) Delay harvest until drought has been over for at least a week. 2) Test suspect forage to determine whether it is necessary to dilute the forage (and its nitrates), or completely avoid feeding it. 3) Dilute high nitrate forages with a low nitrate

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Crop from A6 feed source. 4) Feed a balanced ration; cattle should have access to nitrate-free water at all times. 5) Adapt cattle slowly to forage with elevated nitrate levels. Feed forage several times a day, rather than one feeding; avoid feeding green chop, particularly green chop that has heated or was kept overnight. 6) Pregnant animals are much more susceptible to nitrate poisoning than non-pregnant ani-

mals. Forage with a nitrate concentration exceeding 1.5 percent should not be fed, even as a smaller portion of the diet. If nitrate poisoning is suspected, immediately switch animals to another forage source. Animals with moderate nitrate poisoning can be successfully treated with a methylene blue solution intravenously. Both Cherney and I recommend that nitrates be tested... particularly in chopped corn forage...

and they can be tested at any reputable forage lab. One private, reasonablypriced, source of nitrate testing listed in Fact Sheet No. 70 is Nitrate Elimination Company (NEC); www.nitrate.com); call 888-NITRATE. In studying the actual mechanism by which nitrate toxicity becomes acute in corn plants, I learned that corn plants grown on soils with higher humus levels are less prone to both drought stress and ni-

Outside Wood Heater $1,695

trate build-up. A simple definition of humus is: the organic matter of soils that had decayed sufficiently to have lost its identity with regards to its origin; the end product from the decomposition of plant and animal residue under proper environmental conditions. German-American agronomist Ehrenfried Pfeiffer (1899-1961), pioneer of biodynamic farming, explained how humus functions to make crops healthy. He said that nitrogen (N) from the atmosphere enters the soil. Various organisms (including nitrogen-fixing

bacteria on legume roots) convert this gaseous N to nitrates. Nitrates... and water... are stored in the humus, which functions as a type of savings bank. When needed, nitrate is withdrawn from the “bank” by the plants, particularly grasses (like corn). Pfeiffer showed that for each one percent of soil organic matter (OM) in an acre, organic nitrogen reserve is about 1,000 pounds. Which means that a soil with 4.5 percent OM has organic nitrogen reserve of about 4,500 pounds. Pfeiffer stressed that the process of nutrient

transfer is reversible, so that unused materials (particularly nitrates) can be returned to the reserve as long as humus balance is maintained. But... a proper humus level minimizes drought issues in the first place! Soils with sufficiently depleted OM, may be wisely pulled out of corn production by the grower. Should the moisture pendulum dramatically swing the other way (like with floods), some of these soils may be out of corn next year, because they were relocated to the Gulf of Mexico dead zone (or the Chesapeake Bay).

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August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 7

SAVE E on n HEATING!! Mobiles,, Shops,, Houses


DEUTZ-ALLIS 7085 90HP Tractor 4wd canopy $9,500. OBO. WANTED: 4” Lay flat hose. No Sunday calls. 315-536-8803.(NY)

WALK IN COOLER with compressor and condenser. 6 Allis tractor Powell planter, 2 row Moline 607 gas. 585-526-6606.(NY)

DION UNLOADING wagon tandem gear, 3 beater roof, ready to work, silage elevator 16-20ft. 528 McMurdy Brook Rd. So. Kortright, NY. 607-538-9612

JOHN DEERE corn binder one row, PTO drive, rubber tires, nice shape, can see work $2,000. or best offer. Syracuse, NY. 315-382-6656

JD 260 LOADER, JD front silage blade, JD 46A loader, Case IH-885 w/cab JD direct cut head, 55gal. barrels w/lids. 518-3760244.(NY)

40 DORSET FINN Ewe Sheep 2-3yrs. old $150/ea. or make offer for all. Roy Miller 7725 Mosher Hollow Rd. Cattaraugus, NY. 14719.

9 ANGUS STEERS and 6 Angus Bulls 600 to 700 weight, all natural grazers $1.25/pound. 607-743-3037.(NY)

BLUE HEELER puppies, good cattle dogs or will make a friendly pet. Both parents are working cattle dogs and friendly. 607-5329582.(NY)

2003 FORD F350 DRW 4WD 6.8LV10 auto 161K 8’x9’ Gooseneck bed brake controller F+R electrical plugs, new tires and brakes. 802-376-7452 OBRO.(VT)

12.4 X 24 GOODYEAR tire 100% tread 45° angle tread pattern, $250. Came off Farmall A. Ask for Ben 607-263-5120. (NY)

FOR SALE: ROPS fits Oliver 1850-1955 stored inside, after market, no canopy $1,000. obo. 315-269-3794.(NY)

FOR SALE: D4 Winch complete $360. Daniel A. Stoltzfus 16568 County Route 161 Watertown, NY 13601.

PIGLETS FOR SALE: Pure bred Yorkshire, shots, teeth cut and wormed, good feeder Pigs. Whole grain fed, papers available. 315-858-0088.(NY)

RISSLER SILAGE conveyor silage dump table for trucks at silo always under cover 16’ silage truck. 607-627-6637 Home, 607627-6245 Farm.(NY)

7FT. BELLY MOUNT IH Dynahead mower, 12ft. IH power set drag model 401, side hill hitch for swinging draw bar. 607-3432768.(NY)

GLEANER MODEL K combine, gas engine, 12ft. grain head $2,500. obo. 814837-7336(PA)

GRAVITY WAGON w/auger $1,500. 16.9R26 tire 50% tread w/tube $250. NH 27 Blower $800. Front weights 3020 w/brackets. 585-747-7567.(NY)

DONKEY WEANLING Jenny gray halterbroke $350. Also Peacocks India blue Black shoulder crosses $30. each 2 months old. 315-717-8261.(NY)

89 FORD L8000, diesel grain hay truck, 102w 18-24L, 35000 GVW, 10sp. good rubber, scissor hoist, work ready $7,500. OBO. 607-387-6671.(NY)

WANTED: Farmall model AV with cultivators. 585-289-4143.(NY)

REGISTERED ANGUS and Angus cross Bulls for sale. Wellville Farm. 434-2923102.(VA)

FOR SALE or trade Southdown Ram born 04-02-2012 triplet, will trade for Ram of equal value, grand champion at fair. 607847-8621.(NY)

15K PTO Generator, Antique HayRake, 3 Produce Wagons, 1/2Bu. Baskets, 5/8 Potato Baskets, 50# Cabbage Bags, 50# Potato Bags, Scales. 315-853-5889.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 4440, great condition, good paint, new front tires, good back tires, runs excellent has served us well. 401-8220131 401-397-5404.(RI)

WANTED: Deutz Fair round baler 3.20 parts or repair, also 19L 16.1 manure tank tires 8 bolt rims. No Sunday calls. 315-5360235.(NY)

SHAVINGS 3.4 CU. FT. bags $5.25 per bag, quantity discount. Cherry Valley, NY area. 607-547-8536

GLENCOE CHISEL plow 10’ wide $2,000. Call evenings. 585-599-3489.(NY)

PARLOR, DOUBLE six Herringbone Boumatic, complete low- line system, pump with VF-drive, meters, chain detachers. Crowd gate also. 315-292-4229.(NY) CHEVY C-60 silage dump truck $2,500;Hesston 7155 Chopper $2,000; Harsh 303 mixer $3,000; Farmall 400 $2,200; Baby Chicks $2. 607-2869362.(NY) 1971 FORD 3000 tractor w/back blade; also Ford 8N; both in good condition $5,000 for both. 518-257-6718.(NY)

JD 218 FLEX HEAD VG $3,650, JD 216 Flex Head, fair condition $1,300. 315-4065836.(NY)

2 HESSTON SP. 110 haybine’s for parts or rebuild. 607-965-8285.(NY)

FOR SALE: Irish Dexter cattle breeding stock. Call 585-928-2725.(NY)

REGISTERED AND PET quality Nigerian Dwarf Goats for sale. Kid and adult Does, Bucks and Wethers available, $50 to $225. 716-492-4351(NY)

ONE 5 TON Schuld bin with auger and International Agitator. No hammer dents and two elec. motors $1,600. 814-3260826.(PA)

FOR SALE: JD 327 square baler with kicker, extra wide pickup, excellent condition, field ready, always stored inside $8,500/obo. 716-731-4021.(NY)

15 YEAR OLD blonde Belgian Mare, light mane and tail, good worker, rides $750, 518-673-2431.(NY)

J.D. 920 FLEX HEAD with wagon $6,000. 1978 C60 diesel grain body $2,000. obo. 315-251-4656.(NY)

NH 718 CHOPPER w/2 hay heads $800. New 8ton running gear Stoltzfus, never used $1,500. 802-464-2644.(VT)

WANTED: Qualified person or husband wife team with passion for dairying, pay by percentage of income conventional pipeline barn 90 Cows. 716-358-4762.(NY)

BRED SOWS for sale: (1) 800lb. Duroc, (1) 600lb. Tamworth, (2) 400lb. TamworthHampshire mix. Asking $200. each. 845234-7157.(NY)

NH 2R717 CORN HEAD EX NH 258 rake EX JD 70 NF rare half size PaPec ensilage cutter. 845-469-2430.(NY)

THREE REGISTERED Holstein Heifers due Sept. sired by top sires. 607-5832084.(NY) THREE FIRST CALF Heifers, two due in Oct. one in Sept, good size $3,000. obo. Will deliver Jersey Heifers. 802-4764423.(VT) 4X4 TRIPLE WRAPPED baleage pure alfalfa $85. Clover grass mix $75. Can load trailers. Forage Soybean Sept. $75. 315265-6788.(NY) 32 COW DAIRY herd Holsteins, Jerseys and H-J crosses $1,200. obo. 607-2439147.(NY) 400’ 3/4” WATER LINE Goat milking stanchion, headlocks/ramp, make offer. 4-burn barrels $20/ea. William Byler 4831-State Hwy. 10 Fort Plain,NY 13339. WESTFIELD 8” X 51’ grain auger PTO drive $2,800. Phelps, Ontario County, NY. 585-748-9474

32’ LITTLE GIANT hay elevator, fair to good condition $650. 315-852-6192.(NY)

FOR SALE: Berkshire cross feeder Pigs, farrowed on pasture $50. 315-6843228.(NY)

WOOD KICKER feeder wagon. 860-2745659.(CT) WANTED: 15-20 Ton hopper, bottom feed bin. Also small hammermill or rollermill. 315-536-3480.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 730 diesel direct start, too many new parts to list, 16.9x38 rubber, wife say’s must sell. 315-497-0323.(NY)

WANTED: 16ft. Rear dump silage wagon with roof. FOR SALE: 7700 Ford tractor; 336 square baler 3+4 bottom IH plows. 585-526-5954.(NY)

BLACK POLLED reg.Simmental Bull, Sire: Triple-C extra power. Bred 45 Cows in 60 days, ready for heavy service. 315-7967371.(NY)

WANTED: 8”-Roller mill, good shape. FOR SALE: 42ft.-Double chain-drive hay elevator, G.C. 625gal. Bulk tank. Lester Byler 8811 St.Rt.274 Holland Patnt, NY13354.

TWO TIRES 20P. 710/75/34 two tires 20P. 540.65.R30. 315-856-0483.(NY)

NH 718 WITH HAY head for parts $350. Hesston 2-row Chopper model 2000 for parts $300. 518-638-8724.(NY) HAY FOR SALE: Large round bales, 1st cutting. Call 518-762-1523.(NY)

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FOR SALE: Celtrac HG 42, JD 14T baler, woods RM 600 mower, Freeman loader with buckets off JD 2640. 315-5761573.(NY)

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Spotted Wing Drosophilia spotted in Maine The state of Maine has secured a Section 18 “Crisis Exemption” registration for a higher rate of Malathion 8Fl that is more effective for the SWD than the lower rate on the existing label. This higher rate went

Chemical Class Organophosphate Pyrethroid

Carbamate Spinosyn Pyrethrum

into effect on Aug. 13 and only lasts for 15 days (Aug. 13-28). If you decide to use this material at the higher rate, very strict reporting is required by the U.S. EPA. The forms for reporting can be acquired

from the Maine Board of Pesticide Control. Early August, spotted wing drosophila (SWD) showed up in a few more blueberry fields. We have found adult male flies in traps in two fields in Franklin (Hancock Co.),

Active Ingredient malathion phosmet zeta-cypermethrin bifenthrin zeta-cypermethrin+ bifenthrin esfenvalerate fenpropathrin methomyl carbaryl spinetoram spinosad pyrethrum

Trade Name Malathion Imidan Mustang-Max Brigade

PHI 1 3 1 1

Days of Residual 5-7 7 7 7

Hero Asana Danitol Lannate Sevin Delegate Entrust Pyganic

1 14 3 3 7 3 3 0.5

7 7 7 3-5 5-7 7 3-5 2-3

Since 1966 www.capitaltractorinc.com

(518) 692-9611 FAX (518) 692-2210

berry fields are being monitored by the Maine Department of Agriculture and the University of Maine and many additional fields are being monitored by growers. So far the picture is that SWD appears very spotty

Comments Long PHI

Spotted A10 MRL for Canada (Yes/No) Yes Yes No No

Very long PHI Long PHI Short lives, long PHI Long PHI, Not as effective as others Long PHI Short lived, Long PHI Very short lived

TRACTORS 2000 NHTS100 4wd, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes, 2135 Hrs. $39,995 2007 NH TL100A 4wd, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader, 2068 Hrs. . . . $43,795 2010 NH T6030 4WD, Cab, 95HP, w/NH 840TL Loader, 1100 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $67,500 2005 Kubota L3130 4wd, HST w/Loader, 1023 Hrs. . . . . . . $13,900 2007 NH TG305 255 HP, Front/Rear duals, Deluxe Cab, 1750 Hrs $139,500 2009 NH TD5050 4wd, ROPS w/NH 820TL Loader/Canopy . . . $34,375 1990 Ford 8830 4wd, Cab, Rear Duals, Power Shift, 6650 Hrs. $31,250 1974 Ford 3400 3 Cyl. Diesel w/Industrial Loader, New Paint. . . . $8,500 2000 NH TC33D 4WD, HST, 33HP w/Loader, 1038 Hrs . . . . $13,625 1995 Ford 8670 4WD Super Steer, Rear Duals, 10,900 Hrs. . . . $34,900 2000 NH TL70 2WD, ROPS, Tractor - 1499 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . $11,900 Case IH 674 2WD, Diesel Utility Tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2008 NH T1110 4WD, HST, 28HP w/Loader, 60” Belly Mower, Grass Catcher, Front Snowblower, 206 Hrs - Woods 6’ Backhoe Available for Additional $3,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,495 1973 Ford 2110 LCG 3 Cyl. Gas Engine w/Loader, 3847 Hrs . . . $3,995 2008 NH T1030 4WD, HST, 26HP w/Loader, R4 Tires, 38 Hrs . . . $12,950 2010 Mahindra 2415 4WD, Gear Trans, R4 Tires, Loader, 276 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,250 1980 JD 850 2WD, ROPS Tractor - 3502 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995 1986 Ford 1210 2WD Compact w/Ford 702A Front Blade, 1091 Hrs.. $3,500 2010 NH TD5030 4WD ROPS - 380 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 2011 NH T6030 4WD, Cab w/NH 840TC Loader, 485 Hrs.. . $79,900 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT WIC Cart Mounted Bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . $1,450 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Round Bale Carrier/Feeder . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head for a NH 900. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 Gehl 970 14’ Forage Box on Gear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,950 Gehl 940 16' Forage Box on Tandem 12 Ton Gehl Gear . . . . $2,995 Krause 2204A 14' Disc Harrow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,780 2002 NH 570 Square Baler w/70 Thrower, Ex. Cond. . . . . . . $19,600 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2003 Challenger RB46 Silage Special Round Baler . . . . . . $17,500 2011 H&S CR10 10 Wheel Hyd. Fold Rake - Like New . . . . . $5,295 1998 John Deere 3 Row Corn Head from JD 3970 . . . . . . . . $3,200 1988 NH 900 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 900W Pick-up Head . . . . $6,720 2010 Snowco 24’ Skeleton Elevator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,150 2010 H&S BW1000 Inline Bale Wrapper - Like New . . . . . . $24,500 Case IH 415 Cultimulcher 12’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 Jaylor 2350 Vertical Cutter/Mixer/Feeder Wagon . . . . . . . . . . $6,300 2007 Krause 7400-24WR 24’ Rock Flex Disc. . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 Wil Rich 25’ Field Cultivator, Spring Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500

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across our blueberry growing areas but please be vigilant and continue to trap for SWD in fields that you have not harvested yet. What to do if you do

No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2003 Gehl 2580 Round Baler, Silage Special, 4x5 Bale. . . . . $9,800 New Idea Box Spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 Woods RM59 3pt. Finish Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $700 2011 WIFO 3pt. Pallet Forks - 3000 lb. Capacity, Like New . . . . $795 1999 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head to fit NH 900 . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 2003 NH 27P Windrow Pickup head to fit NH 900 . . . . . . . . . $1,800 1992 Landoll 11’Tilloll one pass Tillage Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,400 NH 477 7’ Haybine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 Vicon 3pt. Wheel Rake, 4 Wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $525 Knight 3015 Reel Auggie Mixer Wagon w/Scales, 147 Cu. Ft. Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 2001 Woods BH1050 3pt. Backhoe w/PTO Pump, Very Little Use. $5,500 2007 Sweepster Quick Attach 8’ Broom w/PTO Pump and Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,000 Avalanche 10’ Quick Attach Snow Pusher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,750 2000 JD 328 Square Baler w/42 Ejector-Nice Condition . . . $11,500 1991 Case IH 8450 Round Baler, 4x6 Variable Chamber. . . . $9,500 New Holland 273 Square Baler w/54A Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 2003 EZ Trail 9x18 Steel Rack on 872W Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,995 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2010 NH B95B TLB, Cab w/heat and AC, Pilot Control, Extendhoe, 418 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $65,000 2008 NH M459 Telehandler 45’ reach, 420 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . $60,000 2011 NH W190C Wheel Loader, 4.5 Cu.Yd. Buckets, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Choice $172,500 2007 NH E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Cab w/Heat /AC 1613 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket, 2028 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $98,750 2011 NH D85B Crawler/Dozer, LGP Trucks, OROPS, 300 Hrs. $68,750 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate, 72" Bucket, 100 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2007 NH W110 Wheel Loader, 1025 Hrs, Excellent Cond.. . . $87,500 2007 NH W170B Wheel Loader, 2743 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $76,250 1990 Hitachi EX60G Excavator w/Rubber Tracks - 3841 Hrs.$24,500 2008 NH L160 Skidsteer w/Cab & Heat, 72” Bucket, 3476 Hrs. $13,500 2011 NH L218 Skidsteer w/Cab and Heat, Hyd. Mount Plate, 638 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,500 ATTACHMENTS 2008 NH /FFC 66" Skidsteer Tiller - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2009 Bradco 48” Pallet Forks, SSL Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $600 Wifo SSL Mount Bale Grabber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $950 2011 NH/McMillon Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9" Auger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

CAPITAL TRACTOR, INC. 1135 State Rte. 29 Greenwich, NY 12834

one field in Surrey, two fields in Ellsworth, one field in Harrington, and one field in Jonesboro. The trapping of adult flies from several fields in Deblois (Washington Co.) has also been confirmed. Thirty wild blue-


Streptococcus agalactiae: A practical summary for controlling mastitis by Christina S. PeterssonWolfe, Assistant Professor, Dairy Science, Virginia Tech; John Currin, Clinical Instructor, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine The incidence of Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) mastitis in the United States has been significantly reduced in recent decades. However, some farms continue to struggle with the control

of this contagious pathogen. Similarly, this pathogen still plagues other countries of the world that lack proper control programs. A successful control program includes prompt treatment of cases, the use of proper milking procedures, and dry cow therapy. All streptococci bacteria are Gram-positive and similar in structure to Staphylococcus spp. Milk

culturing laboratories can distinguish Strep. agalactiae from other streptococci using standard biochemical tests. Where are these organisms found? The reservoir for Strep. agalactiae is infected udders. This pathogen is an obligate parasite of the udder in dairy cows. Unlike S. aureus, Strep.

insecticides below). Liberal approach: Coninue to trap after you catch your first fly and when fly numbers start to increase from one fly in a trap to three, five, ten, etc., then consider applying an insecticide. Whatever strategy you pick, consider the following before applying an insecticide: 1. If you sell to a processor, check with

them to see what material can be used. 2. Make sure that the PHI for the material that you choose is in accordance with your harvest schedule. 3. A planned harvest one to two days after a confirmed trap capture may allow you to harvest the crop withpout making an application if you feel that you can get the berries out of the field immediately.

Streptococcus A11

Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Spotted from A9 find flies? Well, there are several approaches, none of which are based upon experimental evidence from wild blueberry research in Maine. Conservative and most safe approach: as soon as one fly is trapped and confirmed, apply a suitable insecticide at an interval that reflects the average persistance of kill (residual in table) of the material (see list of

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Streptococcus from A10 agalactiae does not readily colonize damaged teat skin or teat lesions. How does strep. agalactiae spread to the mammary gland? The spread of Strep. agalactiae can occur through washcloths and teat cup liners. During milking, irregular vacu-

um fluctuations can force bacteria up into the teat canal, leading to the potential for new infection. How can you prevent and control mastitis caused by Strep. agalactiae? Proper milking procedures, including the use of efficacious pre- and

post-milking teat disinfectants, will help to reduce the number of new infections. Important milking-time considerations that will help reduce the spread to uninfected cows include the use of gloves and singleuse towels and milking infected cows last. Fur-

thermore, a backflush system may help reduce bacterial numbers within the liners, but rinsing units by hand is not recommended. Testing new herdmates will help to identify reservoirs of these contagious bacteria. Finally, dry cow therapy should be adminis-

tered to all quarters of all cows at the time of milk cessation. When are Strep. agalactiae mastitis infections most likely to occur? Due to the contagious nature of these bacteria, new infections are likely to occur during lactation.

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

Cows in early lactation are at increased risk for new infections due to the increased stress and immune suppression associated with the postpartum period. Cows with high milk production are not at greater risk than cows with low milk production. How likely is Strep. agalactiae to cure? Successful treatment of Strep. agalactiae is easily achieved with the use a broad-spectrum intramammary antibiotic preparation. New clinical infections should be treated promptly and appropriately. In some instances, herd outbreaks of Strep. agalactiae have been reported. In these situations, treatment of all culture-positive animals at one time is recommended, followed with bacteriologic testing to confirm success. Retreatment may be necessary, as well as monitoring culture-negative cows to make sure they remain uninfected. This process is repeated until all animals are culture-negative for Strep. agalactiae. During a whole-herd treatment, those administering the treatment must be diligent about cleaning the teat ends prior to antibiotic infusion. Improper cleaning prior to administration can yield the introduction of a new pathogen into the gland. In general, use of a strip cup or similar device is strongly recommended for detecting abnormal milk. The use of Dairy Herd Improvement somatic cell count records in addition to visual observation of forestripped milk and milk culture results will indicate effectiveness of treatment. Quick notes • Strep. agalactiae is a contagious mastitis pathogen spread from cow to cow at milking. • New herdmates should be tested prior to entering the milking string; they should be separated from other cows until their tests are culture-negative. • Use of gloves, efficacious pre- and post-milking teat disinfectants, single-use towels, and dry cow therapy will help control this pathogen. • Strep. agalactiae responds well to antibiotic therapy. S o u r c e : http://pubs.ext.vt.edu


Hot weather calf housing alert

Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Pay extra attention to calf housing during warm weather conditions. The loss of a dairy cow, let alone a dairy calf, is not something any dairy producer takes lightly. But with hot weather continuously bombarding the Midwest lately, dairy calves have been under extreme heat stress. The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture Trade and Consumer Protection and the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory recently reported that the

number of dairy calf deaths due to heat has been on the rise. Officials indicate that heatstressed calves are dying in one of two ways this summer: the calves’ immune systems have been weakened by heat stress and they then die from a bacterial infection or they become dehydrated and die from heat stroke. Although recent rain showers have provided the Midwest with a brief respite from the heat, the National Weather Service Climate Prediction Center is projecting

the hot and dry weather patterns to continue over the next three months. To pre-empt the impact hot weather can have on calves and to provide them with better protection, it’s important for all producers to pay special attention to calf management and housing. When looking to prevent heat stress in calves, ventilation is key. “Ventilation of the calf hutches is crucial during the summer months,” explains Skipper Carlisle, calf housing specialist with Calf-Tel. “Calf

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-week k updatess and d onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations.

hutches should be placed in open areas for adequate air movement. If hutches are located in a confined area, air movement may be restricted and calves can suffer.” Carlisle adds that opaque polyethylene calf hutches provide extra protection to the calf as they completely prevent the sun’s rays from penetrating the hutch, keeping the calf protected during the warmer part of the days. Research

from the University of Florida confirms that polyethylene calf hutches are cooler during both the coolest and hottest parts of the day. Additional tips on keeping calves cool include: propping the back of the hutch up to allow extra air movement inside the hutch and installing a shade over the calf hutches. If using a shade, make sure the shade is high enough above the hutches so it

does not restrict air flow. Bedding with sand is another option to help keep calves cool. “Calves require special attention — especially during the summer,” Carlisle reminds. “Remember, calf housing not set up for summer can be deadly for your calves. As temperatures continue to break records, keeping your calves in cool, wellventilated areas will benefit the future or your operation.”


The Heat is Taking Its Toll Issued Aug. 10, 2012 The Agriculture Department has again lowered its 2012 and 2013 milk production estimates in its latest monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report “as higher forecast feed

prices are expected to pressure producer returns and encourage a more rapid decline in the cow herd. Milk per cow was also reduced due to tighter feed supplies. USDA now projects 2012 milk output to hit 200 billion pounds, down 1.6 billion from the July estimate, and 2013

output is now put at 198.9 billion, down 2.8 billion pounds from last month’s estimate. Imports for 2012 were raised on both a fat and skim-solids basis and were raised on a fat basis for 2013. Exports were raised for 2012 but exports for 2013 were reduced from last month on tighter supplies. Ending stocks were also reduced. Product prices were forecast higher for 2012 and 2013 “as tighter supplies support prices.” With higher product prices, both Class III and Class IV price forecasts

were raised. The 2012 Class III average was projected to range $16.50-$16.70 per hundredweight (cwt.), up from the $16-$16.30 projected a month ago and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. The 2013 average is now projected at $16.70-$17.70, up from $16.25-$17.25 last month, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. The 2012 Class IV will range $15.10-$15.40, up from $14.55-$14.95 expected last month. The 2013 average is project-

half-cent slip on Friday, closed at $1.82, up 13 1/2-cents on the week and 26 cents below a year ago. Fourteen cars of block traded hands on the week and 22 of barrel, 19 on Friday. The AMS U.S. average block price hit $1.7125, up 3.6 cents, while the barrels averaged $1.7189, down slightly. Cheese plants are worried about milk supplies, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News (DMN), especially in areas experiencing hot, humid weather. “Cheese plants would like to increase production schedules for fall foodservice needs, but are not getting all the milk they desire.” Butter closed 6 cents higher on the week, at $1.75, 32 1/4-cents below a year ago. Nothing sold on the week. AMS butter averaged $1.6311, up 6.2 cents. Many churning operations continue to capitalize on the good returns for cream by selling at least some of it to take advantage of the current opportunities, reports USDA. Butter churning is steady to lower. The impact of hot weather continues to affect the volume and fat content of milk in the Midwest and East, but only to a limited extent in the West. Butter holdings are adequate for current and future needs but butter is being pulled out of storage to service accounts. Retail and club store demand remains good. Food service demand is fair to good. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.48, up 8 cents on the week on 3 bids. Extra Grade closed at $1.44, up 4 cents, on 12 bids. AMS powder averaged $1.2144, up 1 1/2 cents, and dry whey averaged 51.97 cents, up a penny. DMN reports that milk production continues to be impacted by weather across wide areas of the U.S. Class I demand is beginning to increase as schools start in some areas of the country and demand will build over the next month. The Northeast and Midwest are seeing milk output leveling off and areas are receiving much-needed rainfall for crop and pasture growth.

Mielke A14

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

ed at $15.90-$17, up from $15.40-$16.50 a month ago, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. U.S. feed grain supplies for 2012/13 were projected sharply lower again with corn production forecast 2.2 billion bushels lower. The forecast U.S. corn yield was reduced 22.6 bushels per acre to 123.4 bushels as extreme heat and dryness continued, and in many areas worsened, during July across the Plains and Corn Belt. As forecast, the 2012/13 corn yield would be the lowest since 1995/96. Corn area harvested for grain was lowered 1.5 million acres from the last month’s forecast that was based on the June Acreage report. U.S. corn production for 2012/13 was forecast at 10.8 billion bushels, the lowest since 2006/07. The report projects the 2012/13 season-average farm price for corn at a record $7.50 -$8.90 per bushel, up sharply from the $5.40-$6.40 per bushel projected in July. The U.S. season-average soybean price is projected at $15.00-$17.00 per bushel, up $2 on both ends. Soybean meal prices are projected at $460-$490 per ton, compared with $365$395/ton last month. Dairy Profit Weekly reported that potentially affecting cull cow prices, beef price forecasts for 2012 and 2013 were reduced as producers liquidate cattle due to high feed costs, although beef prices still remain high. The August projection put the 2012 average steer price at $119-$122 per cwt., down $4 from last month’s forecast. The 2013 average price is forecast at $122-$132 per cwt., down $2-$3. Meanwhile the cash dairy markets continue to reflect what’s happening weather-wise in the country. Block cheese closed the second Friday of August at $1.8550 per pound, up 14 1/2-cents on the week, the highest it’s been since November 2011, but still 17 cents below a year ago when they tumbled almost 11 cents, to $2.0250. They plunged another 12 1/2 cents the following week and 11 cents after that before recovering. The barrels, despite a


Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Mielke from A13 Southeast and Florida milk output is at seasonal low levels and manufacturing is also at low levels. Southwest milk output is trending lower. UDA reports commercial disappearance of dairy products in the first five months of 2012 totaled 83.1 billion pounds, up 1.8 percent from 2011. Butter was off 0.2 percent; American cheese, up 1.7 percent; other cheese, up 1.4 percent; NDM, up a whopping 36 percent; but fluid milk products were down 2.9 percent. Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted seven requests for export assistance this week to sell 2 million pounds of cheese and 597,453 pounds of butter, to customers in Asia, Central America and the Middle East. The product will be delivered through January 2013 and raises CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 73.5 million pounds plus 56 million pounds of butter and anhydrous milk fat. National Milk is calling on members of Congress to meet with their dairy farmer constituents over the August recess to discuss the “perilous economic conditions affecting farmers and the urgent need to pass a new farm bill in 2012.” It says that this will enable members in both the House and the Senate to “see firsthand the need for passing a five-year farm bill, including the vital reforms to the nation’s dairy policy in the form of the Dairy Security Act (DSA).” NMPF President and CEO Jerry Kozak warned; “We are approaching a crisis comparable to or worse than 2009, when dairy farmers lost $20 billion in equity and thousands of farmers went out of business.” Opponents argue however that “Dairy producers want tools that will limit risk, that are easy to navigate, and which are not tied to supply management.” A Dairy Business Association (DBA) press release this week reported that was the message from Dr. Eric Erba, Chief Strategy Officer at California Dairies, Inc. Erba joined Dr. Mark

Stephenson, Director of Dairy Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at a briefing attended by dairy farmer and Wisconsin DBA vice president John Pagel of Pagel’s Ponderosa Dairy in Kewaunee, along with nearly 50 House and Ag Committee staffers. Rep. Tom Petri (R-WI), Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) and Rep. Ron Kind (DWI), members of the U.S. House of Representatives Dairy Farmers Caucus, sponsored the briefing which was offered to present an alternative view point to that presented at a session last week on the Dairy Security Act. Dr. Stephenson’s presentation on “Dairy Options for the Farm Bill” called attention to the “Unintended Consequences” of the Dairy Market Stabilization Program, including the speed at which circumstances change in the dairy industry, and the fact that the current drought situation has moved the dairy industry into concern about not having enough milk. In other dairy news; a national class action lawsuit alleging false reporting of nonfat dry milk (NFDM) prices to USDA, resulting in lower milk prices to producers, will be allowed to proceed. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a February 2010 U.S. District Court ruling dismissing the case, according to Dairy Profit Weekly’s Dave Natzke in Friday’s DairyLine. The suit, Carlin et al v. DairyAmerica Inc. et al, was originally filed in California Eastern District Court, March 6, 2009. Court documents name DairyAmerica, the nation’s largest marketer of NFDM, and dairy processor California Dairies Inc. (CDI) as defendants. Filing the lawsuit were dairy farmers Gerald Carlin, Pennsylvania; Paul Rozwadowski, Wisconsin; Bryan Wolfe, Ohio; and John Rahm, Ohio. (Wolfe died as the result of a farming accident, Aug. 7, 2012.) The lawsuit, filed on behalf of approximately 50,000 dairy farmers who sold milk from 2002

to 2007, charges DairyAmerica, the largest marketer of nonfat dry milk, and dairy processor California Dairies Inc. (CDI), for misreporting information used by USDA to set farmer milk prices under the federal milk marketing order system. Under the complex federal order system, large dairy product manufacturers and marketers are required to report weekly sales volumes and wholesale prices for cheese, butter, nonfat dry milk and dry whey. That information is then used to determine the minimum milk prices paid to dairy farmers. The reporting requirement prohibits inclusion of prices for long-term contracts, which might not represent current market conditions. However, a USDA audit found some reports included the contract prices, and the lawsuit alleges the reporting errors started in 2002. At its peak, in 2006 and 2007, it is estimated nonfat dry milk prices were underreported by about 4 cents per pound. “That may sound like pennies,” Natzke said, “But those pennies add up. A 1-cent increase in the nonfat dry milk price raises the minimum price

paid to dairy farmers by about 9 cents per hundredweight, and USDA’s Ag Marketing Service estimates dairy farmers lost about $50 million due to

the errors.” “However, under USDA policy, prices can only be adjusted for the previous three weeks, so there was no mechanism for

farmers to receive back payments. That prompted the class action lawsuit, which was filed in 2009, and now has new life,” Natzke concluded.


New leaders in sales management at Doebler’s agriculture my entire life.” Jerrod grew up on a small family grain farm in Wayne County, Ohio and graduated from Ohio State University with a degree in Ag Business. Before coming to Doebler’s he worked for a small ag retail outlet where he worked his way to becoming its agronomy manager. Jerrod says he chose to represent Doebler’s because of the comprehensive product selection and quality of its seed lines. Bill Johnston will be managing northern and western Pennsylvania, western Maryland and northern West Virginia. He grew up in the small farm community of Mill Run, Somerset County, Pennsylvania. Bill graduated from Connersville area schools and immediately began working at the local farm and country store. He moved on to becoming a district manager for a tractor supply

company and later a dairy automation equipment company. Bill came to Doebler’s because “here is where one can build relationships that go beyond selling, ones that can last a lifetime.” Joshua Holland is from Suffolk, VA, and will represent central and southern Virginia and North Carolina. A graduate of Virginia Tech, he received his Bachelor’s degree in Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences and is now pursuing a Master’s in Business at Liberty University. He is currently working towards getting his CCA certification. Prior to coming to Doebler’s, Josh worked for Meherrin Agricultural & Chemical Company, serving as seed coordinator for 29 retail locations. Josh remarks “it is such an exciting time to work in the field of agriculture, and I look forward to working for Doebler’s.”

www.leepub.com

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15

Doebler’s is expanding its leadership in the market place and is pleased to introduce four new district sales managers in its Eastern region. Serving central and eastern New York State and sections of New England is Peter Bell. Peter lives in northeastern Pennsylvania where he and his family operate Bell Farms LLP, a commercial meat goat enterprise in Auburn Center. He attended Penn State University where he majored in Business Management. He is a member of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, the American Boer Goat Association and the Empire State Meat Goat Producer’s Association. Peter shares with us that “being in ag sales is an honor and privilege — I get to work with the best people on earth — farmers!” Jerrod Lance will serve in northern Ohio. He tells us he’s “been around


For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MAINE

ANDROSCOGGIN-SAGADAHOC DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H M J H H H A H

477.6 63.8 311.1 106.6 41.3 62.5 53.5 93.3 27.3 73.1 116.8 29.6 106.2 17.4 80.1

KAYBEN HOLSTEINS HALL C.W. BAKER BROOK FARM PINELAND FARMS, INC GARY WINSHIP AND FAMILY YOUNG C.E. TRUDY GRAFFAM

DHIR DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP

H H X H H H A

75.1 52.6 57.2 78.6 48.1 54.1 25.7

25119 21781 20620 20608 19402 18413 16406

928 864 783 806 712 683 623

3.7 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.8

752 676 650 625 584 559 505

3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1

DAVIS, JIM & RICK BAILEY HILL FARM FARRINGTON, THAYDEN MARC BAILEY JOHN DONALD THOMAS BAILEY RICHARD COREY SHADY LANE FARM

DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X X

56.4 32.0 55.4 61.1 76.9 13.7 41.3 36.6

21290 18931 18728 19705 19804 17959 16784 14788

838 669 741 661 700 602 691 641

3.9 3.5 4.0 3.4 3.5 3.4 4.1 4.3

669 582 581 573 573 535 524 504

3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.4

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H J H X X J

121.6 97.5 93.8 90.2 137.7 76.0 15.2 62.2

FRANKLIN Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

STONEHOLM FARM SAWYER SHELDON S STONEWALL FARM

STEPHEN BRIGGS HEMOND HILL FARM R.E.HEMOND FARM INC. TWIN BROOK DAIRY LLC ALDEN FISHER WATERMAN FARM INC. EAST LEDGE FARM BOTMA FARM ALDEN FISHER LOWELL FAMILY FARM CHRIS & JEANIE LEWIS JOHN & SANDY NUTTING BARKER FARMS INC CHRIS & JEANIE LEWIS JOSEPH&VIRGINIA ROSEBERRY

CUMBERLAND

KENNEBEC

SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 PEARSON RICHARD CLEMEDOW FARM SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 NICK MICHAUD GAIL QUIMBY PEARSON RICHARD JASON & JOY RAY

KNOX-LINCOLN RALPH PEARSE & SONS HAWES LINCOLN J

OXFORD

BISSELL JOHN & CINDY CONANT ACRES INC. KUVAJA FARMS INC KUVAJA FARMS INC LONE MOUNTAIN FARM BRIAN M. BAILEY

DHI-AP H 31.9 DHIR-AP H 35.1 DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H J H H

75.6 101.1 35.9 20.8 21.3 30.5

PENOBSCOT-PISCATAQUIS MATT ROGERS VEAZLAND FARMS STONYVALE INC. SIMPSON RON,BETH SCOTT KEITH UNIVERSITY OF MAINE SAWYER WILLIAM & SONS VELGOUSE FARM, LLC LIBBY LAND HOWARD BROS

27890 977 3.5 827 3.0 3X 26633 1021 3.8 810 3.0 26393 926 3.5 801 3.0 25643 961 3.7 784 3.1 3X 23286 865 3.7 689 3.0 20869 777 3.7 628 3.0 19949 767 3.8 611 3.1 19479 721 3.7 601 3.1 19758 710 3.6 595 3.0 16084 753 4.7 586 3.6 18975 707 3.7 575 3.0 18398 685 3.7 572 3.1 18002 663 3.7 552 3.1 18126 689 3.8 541 3.0 17870 650 3.6 529 3.0

27369 1015 3.7 818 3.0 23267 960 4.1 743 3.2 23564 767 3.3 739 3.1 20864 989 4.7 731 3.5 20538 794 3.9 621 3.0 3X 19880 836 4.2 613 3.1 16870 812 4.8 603 3.6 15100 648 4.3 530 3.5 24775 18978

894 3.6 740 3.0 734 3.9 596 3.1

25479 22410 21129 16857 18332 17733

836 852 758 719 690 651

3.3 3.8 3.6 4.3 3.8 3.7

748 689 646 583 563 542

2.9 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.1 3.1

DHI-APCS DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

315.1 379.1 993.5 650.3 51.2 45.2 175.0 125.5 190.2 202.0

27270 24522 24583 24978 23031 22453 20343 20405 19981 19484

966 863 831 883 879 875 800 758 722 734

3.5 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.8

807 754 736 732 712 671 651 627 620 606

3.0 3X 3.1 3.0 3X 2.9 3X 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H X H H X H H H J H X H

124.6 72.5 265.3 269.8 408.2 169.6 84.9 379.1 59.5 56.9 42.6 50.2 43.9 46.2

27166 24591 23837 20003 21717 20139 18944 20507 20282 19747 16089 17936 16988 16360

919 839 922 866 813 830 810 781 734 711 768 733 619 606

3.4 3.4 3.9 4.3 3.7 4.1 4.3 3.8 3.6 3.6 4.8 4.1 3.6 3.7

825 733 710 672 661 654 613 608 608 579 570 563 520 513

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.5 3.1 3.1 3.1

THE THOMPSON FARM DHI-AP H 70.3 LARRABEE HAROLD & GALEN DHI-APCS H 467.0 INGRAHAM JOHN W & SONS DHI-APCS H 464.5 SCHOFIELD, WAYNE DHI-AP H 21.8 KEENE DAIRY DHI-AP H 103.2 CLEMENTS WALTER DHI-AP H 36.9

23566 23773 21681 20411 19564 19287

940 921 863 754 742 683

4.0 3.9 4.0 3.7 3.8 3.5

733 699 677 617 599 567

3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9

23412 20301 17646 19667 20113 18653 17090

840 732 856 691 733 717 643

3.6 3.6 4.9 3.5 3.6 3.8 3.8

755 635 621 613 613 595 506

3.2 3.1 3.5 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0

SOMERSET

DANIEL HARRIMAN DICKINSON FRANK CHARTRAND FARMS INC. CAMBRIDGE FARMS SOMERSET FARMS L.P MARK OUELLETTE JR. SEVEY LAROY L BOSWORTH FARMS INC. FARRAND CHARLES DEAN PAINE JOSHUA CLARK SMITH ROGER GRASSLAND JAMES STROUT

WALDO

YORK

JOHNSON FARM INC. ALDERWOOD FARM, INC. HIGHLAND FARMS INC GIRARD, RYAN DUNN, FRED HARRISON FARM LEARY FARM INC.

CHESHIRE

DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H J H H H H

82.2 87.7 255.8 25.1 50.7 42.2 50.5

NEW HAMPSHIRE

WINDYHURST FM PARTNERSHIP

DHIR-AP H 181.7

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

26345 1006 3.8 790 3.0

GRAFTON

Top 40 Herds For July B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

DHI-APCS H 772.4 DHI-AP J 320.6 DHI-AP H 26.6

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHI-AP H 155.1 DHI-AP H 72.5

21546 18482

812 3.8 664 3.1 718 3.9 599 3.2

TULLY FARMS, INC. PICKARD, JAMES & ELEANOR

DHI-AP H 124.3 DHI-AP H 87.4

20490 17792

820 4.0 650 3.2 681 3.8 551 3.1

HERRICK,DAVID SAM RICHARDSON'S DAIRY, INC.

DHI-AP H 95.3 DHI-AP H 159.0

27148 24092

943 3.5 814 3.0 768 3.2 711 3.0

BRISTOL COUNTY

DHI-AP H 18.8

22137

793 3.6 645 2.9

DHI-AP H 14.8 DHI-AP X 63.5

20607 19538

769 3.7 630 3.1 731 3.7 596 3.1

20.8 46.2 29.9 41.0 112.9 47.0 27.0 15.4 76.0 28.9

21903 22465 20857 20242 20407 16669 17027 16649 18376 18357

762 792 776 737 770 706 751 763 686 784

3.5 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.8 4.2 4.4 4.6 3.7 4.3

678 657 646 632 606 574 571 561 552 548

3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.0 3.0

H 1006.6 H 40.6 H 90.7 H 284.1 H 114.4 H 81.0 H 68.9 J 26.6 H 34.1 H 367.2 H 58.5 X 54.2

27514 21678 22346 22273 20691 20810 20225 15914 17870 16675 17402 15917

934 832 819 809 776 847 811 800 741 641 664 589

3.4 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.8 4.1 4.0 5.0 4.1 3.8 3.8 3.7

812 677 668 659 652 613 598 573 561 544 542 511

3.0 3X 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.2 2.9 3.0 3.6 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.2

DHIR-AP H 130.8 DHI-AP H 15.8 DHIR H 74.3

19313 17031 16072

652 3.4 577 3.0 640 3.8 508 3.0 607 3.8 501 3.1

SPIELMAN FARM RIVER PLAIN DAIRY BLUESLOPE FARM, INC

DHI-AP H 368.7 DHI-AP H 51.7 DHI-APCS H 115.2

21967 20413 17726

846 3.9 684 3.1 756 3.7 627 3.1 671 3.8 530 3.0

BAHLER FARMS INC. BAHLER FARMS INC. HYTONE FARM UNIV OF CONNECTICUT MAPLELEAF FARM, INC SHADOW VALLEY FARM SHADOW VALLEY FARM UNIV OF CONNECTICUT SHADOW VALLEY FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

968.4 937.2 256.5 88.1 232.5 90.9 51.3 23.2 20.6

26352 24963 23512 25587 22894 19906 18065 16583 15595

917 875 932 877 890 731 782 786 751

DHIR-AP H 113.6 DHI-AP H 116.8 DHIR-AP J 149.7

21856 20298 15999

883 4.0 664 3.0 757 3.7 635 3.1 801 5.0 561 3.5

22530 19759 15443 16752

691 803 662 586

3.1 4.1 4.3 3.5

705 630 554 536

3.1 3.2 3.6 3.2

FITCH FARM, LLC KNOXLAND FARM INC POMEROY, KEITH E. ALVIRNE SCHOOL FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

101.2 332.1 74.5 18.9

26545 24312 24040 21068

872 978 863 879

3.3 4.0 3.6 4.2

799 782 744 629

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0

62.8 230.2 60.9 158.7 78.5 81.7 13.3

25231 25330 24521 23719 21214 20211 16183

981 941 931 868 785 685 696

BODWELL, H & SONS FERNALD FARM DAIRY, LLC GREAT BAY FARM

DHI-APCS H 238.9 DHI-AP H 191.5 DHI-APCS H 92.8

24713 23724 21134

923 3.7 755 3.1 914 3.9 706 3.0 817 3.9 634 3.0

UNH CREAM UNH RESEARCH HERD SCRUTON'S DAIRY, INC. NAUGHTAVEEL FARM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

18.7 68.7 244.6 115.2

27333 1074 3.9 836 3.1 26277 1018 3.9 808 3.1 25300 891 3.5 748 3.0 24368 885 3.6 724 3.0

LECLAIR GARY D. JOHNSON, JOLYON BOB & SUE FOULKS KEITH KIMBALL MC NAMARA, PATRICK ECCARDT FARM, INC. HOLMES, JEFF AND STEVE

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H J

177.2 37.0 82.1 559.3 184.9 111.6 63.6

27294 24411 22368 22021 22040 21124 16878

ROCKINGHAM

STRAFFORD-CARROLL

SULLIVAN

H H H H H H X

3.9 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.4 4.3

777 764 738 712 632 614 544

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.4

997 953 808 853 859 761 761

3.7 3.9 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.6 4.5

866 719 703 693 682 626 600

3.2 2.9 3.1 3.1 3X 3.1 3.0 3.6

3.7 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.5

778 764 754 658 658 653 644 594 544

3.1 3.0 3X 3.1 3X 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0

VERMONT

ADDISON

BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC DEER VALLEY FARM M AND J DAIRY BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC SABOURIN, GERARD & JUDY FOUR HILL FARMS MIDDLEBROOK FARM INC. THOMAS, BRAD AND JILL PLOUFFE HILL FARM

H 1412.9 H 473.1 H 293.2 A 60.3 H 102.8 H 1470.4 H 182.0 H 180.9 H 34.4

25076 25428 24294 20562 21520 21358 21471 19672 18266

921 927 885 792 804 798 823 722 646

DHI-AP H 65.9

27323

948 3.5 819 3.0

DHI-AP H 256.4 DHI-AP X 73.5

22592 19777

839 3.7 672 3.0 756 3.8 611 3.1

DHI-APCS H 105.1

19220

784 4.1 602 3.1

DHI-AP H 376.4

26677

956 3.6 789 3.0 3X

DHI-AP H 876.0

25039

941 3.8 781 3.1

MACH FARM, INC. DHI-APCS H 156.1 GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD DHI-APCS H 87.2 GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD DHI-APCS B 11.6

21391 21616 16028

770 3.6 658 3.1 844 3.9 656 3.0 702 4.4 549 3.4

20089 15161

764 3.8 640 3.2 755 5.0 576 3.8

CHITTENDEN

TWIN OAKS DAIRY FARM LLC

FRANKLIN

BURT, JASON AND CHRISTINA FOURNIER INC, RENE & SON GORT0N, GRANT JOHN

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

GRAND ISLE QUINTIN, ANDRE

ORANGE

KNOXLAND FARM

RUTLAND

WINDSOR

VERMONT FARMSTEAD CHEESE DHIR-AP H BILLINGS FARM MUSEUM DHIR J

59.1 41.8

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PALMER, TERRY POMEROY & SONS

15.0 216.8 24.0 74.9

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

FAT

HAMPDEN

H H X A

JONES, MARION & GORDON HIGHWAY VIEW FARM BACHELDER, KEITH MORRILL FARM DAIRY BARTLETT, A.S.&S.A. GLINES, PETER & ERIC GLINES, PETER & ERIC

RHA MILK

833 3.4 735 3.0 3X 832 4.9 622 3.6 655 3.8 512 3.0

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP

B R COW E E YEARS D

24577 17059 17098

RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD2 KEITH DAVID RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD3 RITCHIE GEORGE F HD 1

HILLSBORO

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

MIDDLESEX ESSEX

BRISTOL

RHODE ISLAND

WASHINGTON COTTRELL HOMESTEAD KENYON, FRANCIS

HARTFORD

CONNECTICUT

MILLBORNE FARM FUSIEK, D, & COULTER FUSIEK SMYTHS TRINITY FARM COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. HASTINGS FARM COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. MILLBORNE FARM HASTINGS FARM H0USE OF HAYES PERRY, SCOTT

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

JACQUIER, ROBERT & PETER CHRIS & TODD HANNAN WEIGOLD FARMS LLP FREUND'S FARM, INC. TANNER T. ARETHUSA FARM LLC MEADOW RIDGE FARM LLC. ARETHUSA FARM LLC THORN, CLINTON JACQUIER, DAVID & MELODY CARLSON,DOUGLAS J. NUTMEG ACRES

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

LITCHFIELD

NEW HAVEN/MIDDLESEX GREENBACKER, C & SNS FM 2 CEDAR RIDGE DAIRY PAGE, ROBERT A.

NEW LONDON TOLLAND

WINDHAM

TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2 MAY HILL FARM TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2

H H H H H X G J H H

H H H H H H X J J

3.5 3.5 4.0 3.4 3.9 3.7 4.3 4.7 4.8

800 758 722 722 706 622 618 567 566

3.0 3.0 3.1 2.8 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.4 3.6

3X 3X 3X

3X

MASSACHUSETTS

BERKSHIRE

FAIRFIELDS DAIRY FARM, LLC DHI-AP H 228.8 MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP H 106.1 MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP J 23.8 HIGH LAWN FARM DHIRAPCS J 208.8 TURNER FARMS, INC. DHI H 124.0 ZIEMBA, MICHAEL,MARK&TIM DHI-AP H 180.2 LEGEYT, RICHARD &BETTY DHI-AP H 67.7

FRANKLIN

WHOLEY COW FARM WHOLEY COW FARM BOYDEN BROS. DAIRY MT.TOBY FARM ROBERTSON,CHRIS & BOB

HAMPSHIRE

COOK,GORDON,JR. & HANK DEVINE FARM,INC. LONGVIEW FARM BELDEN,LUTHER A.INC PARSONS,HENRY & EDWARD ALLARDS FARM INC. JOYNER DAIRY FARM KOKOSKI, JOHN HD1 COOK,GORDON, JR. & HANK HARTSBROOK FARM

22968 22363 16406 16279 19775 18565 17926

907 889 813 795 754 690 705

3.9 4.0 5.0 4.9 3.8 3.7 3.9

718 690 606 588 571 560 537

3.1 3.1 3.7 3.6 2.9 3.0 3.0

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H

39.8 19.5 88.8 102.6 87.7

28258 1058 3.7 879 3.1 23490 1035 4.4 822 3.5 24427 918 3.8 758 3.1 22509 864 3.8 702 3.1 22330 911 4.1 695 3.1

DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP

H H H H H B H J J H

54.2 187.7 234.0 110.0 108.8 129.2 22.1 109.3 11.1 87.9

24205 21858 21881 21695 20511 19349 19600 14703 14071 17822

930 854 816 832 814 728 737 745 745 660

3.8 3.9 3.7 3.8 4.0 3.8 3.8 5.1 5.3 3.7

772 674 670 664 648 640 617 569 553 549

3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.9 3.9 3.1

NO BULL TOO BIG OR NASTY Semen Freezing Since 1983 Semen Fertility Evaluations A Value Adding Company

ZIMMERMAN’S CUSTOM FREEZING www.semenfreezing.com

131 Red Well Road New Holland PA

Cell 717-940-1430 717-355-2048


NFU: Disaster relief not a replacement for comprehensive Farm Bill WASHINGTON, D.C. – National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson issued the following statement on Aug.1 regarding a letter written by a coalition of

agriculture and rural organizations urging the U.S. House of Representatives to pass a comprehensive, long-term farm bill before the 2008 Farm Bill expires on Sept. 30:

“This letter highlights the sense of urgency the House should have in passing a comprehensive, five-year farm bill before time runs out. An incomplete disaster package is a

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wastes precious legislative time. “This proposed disaster package is designed to make it appear as though Congress is taking action to help farmers in need before members go home to their districts this month. However, this ill-considered action only holds farmers hostage with uncertainty, and does nothing to address specialty crops, dairy, commodities and other non-insured produce. Instead, the House should pass a 2012 Farm Bill before it leaves

for August recess.” The coalition letter was signed by American Farm Bureau Federation, American Soybean Association, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Barley Growers Association, National Corn Growers Association, National Farmers Union, National Milk Producers Federation, National Sunflower Association, United Fresh Produce Association, U.S. Canola Association, USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council and Western Growers.

NFU: Do not mess with the RFS

WASHINGTON, D.C. — National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson issued the following statement responding to the recent study “The RFS, Fuel and Food Prices, and the Need for Statutory Flexibility” by Thomas Elam, president of FarmEcon, LLC: “The main culprits in the current rise in commodity prices are the drought and high petroleum costs, not the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) as this study suggests. Commodity prices were actually declin-

ing in the months prior to the drought. “Some are erroneously using this study as a reason to reduce the RFS. NFU opposes the proposed legislation by Reps. Bob Goodlatte, R-VA, and Jim Costa, D-CA, that could potentially reduce the RFS as suggested by the study. The legislation would require a biannual review of ending corn stocks relative to their total use and the RFS would be reduced if that ratio fell below certain thresholds. “Many in the livestock

industry are saying that we must choose between food and fuel as the drought continues and production estimates decline, but this is a false choice. Rather than dramatically altering RFS, we need to look at policies such as the Market-Driven Inventory System (MDIS) to save back some grain during periods of high production and low prices so that it can be used during times of low production and high prices like we are now experiencing.”

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DYKEMAN FARMS Fultonville, NY 518-922-5496 CHAMPLAIN DAIRY SERVICE INC. Swanton, VT 802-868-3144

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Lowville, NY 315-376-2991

DON'S DAIRY SUPPLY, INC. South Kortright, NY 607-538-9464

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Seneca Falls, NY 315-568-0955

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Warsaw, NY 585-786-0177 FISHER FARMS Canastota, NY 315-697-7039 KUENZLER DAIRY EQUIPMENT Norwood, NY 315-353-2075 Watertowm, NY 315-353-2095

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August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

519-765-4230 BERKELMANS’ WELDING & MFG.

blatant attempt to kill any chance of enacting a new farm bill in this Congress. While NFU fully supports providing disaster assistance to farmers and ranchers, we are extremely concerned with the limited disaster package that is being offered. “All of the programs the standalone disaster legislation temporarily extends could be extended for the full life of the 2012 Farm Bill if [the 2012 Farm Bill] were conferenced and enacted. This duplicative step only


DHI TOP 40 FOR JULY NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

Vermont DHIA Country Folks List for the Month Ending July 2012 Following is the July 2012 VT DHIA Top 40 herds of 10 or more animals based on protein pounds in each County serviced by VT DHIA and processed through the Dairy Records Management Processing Center, Raleigh, NC during the calendar month. Rolling herd averages will appear on this list for herds which have chosen the option to have their herd average published and the herd has 12 consecutive tests including components for each test.

NAME

Brd Cows

JOHN G. KELLETT JR. PHILLIPS & SUSAN FERRY DELLAVALE FARM DELLAVALE FARM

H J H J

NEW LONDON 371 101 124 82 131 35 42 34 31 49 13 60

27916 25237 24551 23612 25043 23039 20305 17900 17073 16592 13213 12704

1027 882 1084 952 804 763 803 708 633 633 621 566

3.7 3.5 4.4 4 3.2 3.3 4 4 3.7 3.8 4.7 4.5

888 776 776 751 741 703 664 560 539 524 486 453

3.2 * 3.1 3.2 3.2 3 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.7 3.6

22231 19377

929 4.2 770 4

642 2.9 * 594 3.1

24511 22283 22591 16292 17560 17068 17126 15442

973 900 1036 806 657 677 783 634

751 733 700 605 555 542 538 516

TOLLAND BRADWAY FARMS INC. HILLSIDE FARM

H H

453 62

Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

WINDHAM HIBBARD HILL FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 2 WOODHILL FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 1 DESJARDINS DORIS KINGSWOOD FARM MOLODICH FARMS INC. SELBUORT VALLEY FARM

H H H J H A H X

86 35 346 108 163 96 303 74

%

PRO %

NAME DWAYNE & DEBORAH MARCEAU WILLIAM & GWEN PEARL BILL & JENNIFER NELSON ROLAND & SHONNA HEATH JR. BRIAN & KATHLEEN SOMERS ERIC BEAN

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

60 62 31 27

18793 15082 12837 8745

752 4 730 4.8 494 3.8 407 4.7

587 560 410 317

3.1 3.7 3.2 3.6

H

52

23789

879 3.7

726 3.1

H

83

4 4 4.6 4.9 3.7 4 4.6 4.1

3.1 3.3 3.1 3.7 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.3

SEVEN VIEW FARM SLATEHILL FARM MIKE SWART GEORGE B. WILSON GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT

H H H J G X

109 140 83 101 35 28

H H H H H H J H B H

963 151 100 144 14 151 18 81 19 100

CREAM PAT FITZGERALD PAT FITZGERALD SHELBURNE FARMS CREAM

15767

608 3.9

501 3.2

21119 21448 19779 14761 14573 14483

806 805 763 691 628 566

3.8 3.8 3.9 4.7 4.3 3.9

693 657 604 535 464 459

3.3 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.2 3.2

60

28316 24732 22895 22033 22509 20619 17145 17832 15199 14914

1081 854 911 837 888 803 789 657 612 465

3.8 3.5 4 3.8 3.9 3.9 4.6 3.7 4 3.1

884 745 698 671 670 634 577 550 524 368

3.1 * 3 3 3 3 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.4 2.5

18793

752

4

25841

983

3.8

786

3

29030 28124 27063 26788 27505 26446 25578 24629 25281 25081 24865 24029 24340 24823 22890 22711 21023 23116 22456 21848 19851 20814 18327 20468 20882 19468 17120 19064 18432 19390 18528 17794 16409 16702 15936 13887 11265 11333 2107

1057 1023 1029 946 1029 975 984 887 959 921 991 941 928 924 890 826 821 829 813 731 808 806 739 754 804 720 704 738 723 732 705 644 585 572 580 555 543 437 63

3.6 3.6 3.8 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.7 4 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.9 3.6 3.6 3.3 4.1 3.9 4 3.7 3.9 3.7 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.4 3.6 4 4.8 3.9 3

919 847 842 842 827 819 814 783 772 763 763 752 739 732 731 694 682 681 673 650 643 643 638 624 624 591 588 586 572 571 549 547 500 484 473 451 404 343 58

3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1 3 3.1 3.1 3 2.9 3.2 3.1 3.2 2.9 3 3 3.2 3.1 3.5 3 3 3 3.4 3.1 3.1 2.9 3 3.1 3 2.9 3 3.2 3.6 3 2.8

24021 22876 22597 19943

1007 4.2 906 4 919 4.1 814 4.1

770 3.2 * 749 3.3 700 3.1 601 3

25381 24299 24664 24085 23035 21843 21615 20797 20556 16140 19292 18825 16851 17817 17696 16155

886 914 894 853 914 827 886 776 766 823 748 739 774 696 700 698

791 763 762 723 722 685 674 650 613 612 605 594 592 558 557 555

587 3.1

RHODE ISLAND PROVIDENCE H

147

MASSACHUSETTS BERKSHIRE B

31

10980

469 4.3

369 3.4

24198 22428 22361 22760 21506 20210 16431 17721 12448

964 858 896 950 857 814 847 750 676

4 3.8 4 4.2 4 4 5.2 4.2 5.4

726 704 703 688 667 607 583 562 471

3 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3 3.5 3.2 3.8

25643 25490 24153 21881 20067 20211 19045 18041 15146

943 936 893 825 785 888 878 700 758

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.9 4.4 4.6 3.9 5

811 765 723 677 616 612 597 578 577

3.2 3 * 3 * 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.2 3.8

18774

704 3.7

566

25778 24666 23477 22215 21779 19081 14893 12026

978 977 936 838 839 706 561 575

3.8 4 4 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.8 4.8

801 762 729 687 675 586 477 433

27550 25560 21959 18607

974 990 934 879

3.5 3.9 4.3 4.7

820 3 * 780 3.1 714 3.3 659 3.5

23508

909 3.9

720 3.1

29711

1079 3.6

899

3

24225 22316 20668 19418 17058 18843 16538

882 785 875 689 782 623 672

737 664 644 588 560 555 523

3 3 3.1 3 3.3 2.9 3.2

FRANKLIN DARRIDGE FARM GUNN STEVE HERBERT & ROBERT PURINGTON HAGER BROS. FARM LLC. DAVID DUPREY KAREN HERZIG HAGER BROS. FARM LLC. PAUL L WILLIS CRAIG W. AVERY

H H H H H H J H J

29 99 34 125 63 48 16 59 48

WORCESTER CV & MARY L SMITH JR JORDANS DAIRY FARM INC. OTTER RIVER FARM LLC WHITTIER FARMS INC. JIM & KRISANNE KOEBKE TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR CHERRY HILL FARM PETER HAWKES

H H H H H H X H J

32 323 221 141 81 29 26 77 107

NEW HAMPSHIRE CHESHIRE VINCENT & CAROL MALNATI

H

92

3

GRAFTON TULLANDO FARM INC. PATCH FAMILY DOUGLAS & DEBORA ERB RICH & DOREEN MORRIS GRAFTON COUNTY FARM SCOTT & COLLEEN JOHNSTON PUTNAM GLEN RUSSELL & MARY HICKS

H H H H H H X J

471 108 83 151 81 24 30 51

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.6

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP BOHANAN FARM TOPLINE JERSEYS YEATON DAIRY FARM TOPLINE JERSEYS

H X H J

198 13 92 66

ROCKINGHAM STUART F

H

248

STRFFD-CARROLL ATHMOR HOLSTEINS

H

49

VERMONT ADDISON VORSTEVELD FARM KAYHART BROTHERS LLC JONATHAN LUCAS TIM & JULIE HOWLETT B DANYOW FARM LLC WAYNE & JEANNINE PARTRIDGE WOODNOTCH FARMS INC. LORENZO & AMY QUESNEL HERD 1 FOSTER BROTHERS FARM INC. HATCH FARM INC. BRACE ALEX & MICHELE CHARLES & BRENDA CHARRON CHIMNEY POINT FARM L.P PHIL & DIANE LIVINGSTON BRIAN & CINDY KAYHART MARC & NORRIS BRISSON LORENZO & AMY QUESNEL HERD 1 MILLBORNE FARM TERRIER LEE HANSON STEPHEN & SYLVIA HAROLD & ANJE DEGRAAF ARTHUR & JOAN HUESTIS LORENZO & AMY QUESNEL HERD 1 ROBERT & SUZANNE HUNT JEFF & BRIAN TREADWAY ORR ACRES MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE FIFIELD JEFF & LISE JEFFREY & OLIVE PHILLIPS LESLIE RUBLEE JOHN BUZEMAN SCAPELAND FARM KETTLE TOP FARM SCOTT & MARY PURINTON JOHN & LISA ROBERTS TACONIC END FARM MIEDEMAS THE MICHAEL LEE

H H H H B X M

484 43 505 39 15 16 31

NEW YORK H H H H J

112 32 110 88 19

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* *

*

H X H H

339 117 80 59

CALEDONIA 3.6 3.5 4.2 3.5 4.6 3.3 4.1

MONTGOMERY SKIFF- DEBLOCK HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD JOHN & CHRIS NELLIS PETERSHEIM SAMUEL & SADIE HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD

770 603 179 527 767 110 302 875 483 569 149 56 140 400 80 837 12 165 36 57 129 318 150 299 367 98 40 46 149 53 65 61 46 19 58 158 31 132 34

BENNINGTON RUPERT VALLEY HOLSTEINS WILHELM & KARL STROHMAIER DAVID TOOLEY KEN LEACH

SULLIVAN PUTNAM FARMS INC. TAYLOR FARM INC. EDWARD MACGLAFLIN JOHN W. LUTHER GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK TAYLOR FARM INC. GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H X H H X X H H B H H H H H A H H B J H X

23160 21259 21322 21620 16526

907 820 807 787 888

3.9 3.9 3.8 3.6 5.4

760 3.3 681 3.2 650 3 642 3 635 3.8

WAYSIDE MEADOW FARM LLC PHILIP BROWN ROGER & JOY WOOD DON-SIM FARM SCOTCH BURN FARM DOROTHY & ANGELA WILLSON KEITH DAY SCOTT LANGMAID MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD LUCKY HILL FARM BILL & JENNIFER NELSON JAMES W. SEYMOUR LAGGIS BROS. PLYN N BEATTIE HOWARD & JACQUELINE BENNETT MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD

H H H H H H H H H J H H J H H X

211 54 56 173 114 104 66 51 53 179 182 55 450 70 77 16

3.5 3.8 3.6 3.5 4 3.8 4.1 3.7 3.7 5.1 3.9 3.9 4.6 3.9 4 4.3

%

PRO %

15247 14928 15451 15940 12619 11049

793 693 701 625 567 498

5.2 4.6 4.5 3.9 4.5 4.5

551 518 504 469 451 386

20 36 23 122 21

22582 21210 19239 16909 15706

886 761 750 745 791

3.9 3.6 3.9 4.4 5

683 3 * 639 3 631 3.3 590 3.5 567 3.6 *

311 27 101

25913 20862 17774

961 3.7 784 3.8 755 4.2

803 3.1 642 3.1 568 3.2

25798 23906 24425 23588 24178 22504 22858 22810 22600 22061 21983 20383 21773 21013 21179 21257 20798 17642 16476 15781 18839 20620 16965 16167 15229 15209 12805 15144 13373 10463 10743 11802 9172 10642

941 948 925 886 801 816 884 884 867 832 1073 858 808 808 813 809 777 868 750 744 701 704 700 625 590 558 542 567 516 464 453 455 430 415

3.6 4 3.8 3.8 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.8 4.9 4.2 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 4.9 4.6 4.7 3.7 3.4 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.7 4.2 3.7 3.9 4.4 4.2 3.9 4.7 3.9

819 748 746 741 738 725 709 708 696 670 670 658 655 654 650 647 643 631 594 594 568 565 559 514 475 455 443 434 417 378 371 360 327 327

22269 19352

1113 589

5 3

30 94 26

22373 14967 16485

880 3.9 743 5 606 3.7

674 3 567 3.8 493 3

H 1275 H 120 H 45 H 102 H 236 H 85 H 67 H 64 H 29 J 20 J 56 J 47 J 57 H 51 J 91 H 45 H 88 J 13 H 55 H 81 X 41 J 16 X 69 J 49 H 36 X 29 H 81 J 70 A 59 G 10 J 46 G 57 J 65 X 25 X 51 J 39

26507 25051 25668 23298 24103 22506 24016 21711 19530 16687 16547 16398 15631 18602 15211 18339 18187 15865 16657 18167 15745 13706 16023 13889 16361 15068 14575 12413 14036 12022 11590 12028 10515 11644 12518 8377

1012 922 972 920 949 878 881 889 779 804 761 761 755 707 788 687 681 722 600 689 616 667 646 655 574 603 560 589 563 587 507 523 499 474 479 399

3.8 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.7 4.1 4 4.8 4.6 4.6 4.8 3.8 5.2 3.7 3.7 4.6 3.6 3.8 3.9 4.9 4 4.7 3.5 4 3.8 4.7 4 4.9 4.4 4.3 4.7 4.1 3.8 4.8

826 803 788 755 751 726 723 701 602 601 587 581 577 576 572 570 556 547 547 532 508 507 502 491 472 468 457 456 429 417 400 394 373 367 366 301

25022 23232 22340 22312 20168 19098

933 923 888 864 755 689

3.7 4 4 3.9 3.7 3.6

755 3 * 733 3.2 684 3.1 677 3 * 615 3 597 3.1

50 67 12 50 48 35

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

3.6 3.5 3.3 2.9 3.6 3.5

ESSEX

ORGANIC H

FAT

H H B B J

ROUTHIER & SONS STEPHEN & CARLA RUSSO K. DEAN & CLAUDETTE HOOK

MONTGOMERY JOHN G. KELLETT JR.

Milk

J J X H J J

H H H

WASHINGTON IDEAL DAIRY FARMS LUNCREST FARMS HOLLISTER BROTHERS TAYLOR & ALAN HENDERSON GARY & DEBBIE MOORE WINDY LEA FARM GARY & DEBBIE MOORE SKIFF FARMS INC. SKIFF FARMS INC. MICHAEL & LOUISE WOODDELL

WRIGHT'S DAIRY FARM

CRICKET CREEK FARM

Brd Cows

CHITTENDEN

RENSSELAER SCHOHARIE

CONNECTICUT H H H H H H H H H H J J

FAT

OTSEGO M. CHARLES EVANS TERRANCE & MICHAEL H0AG

BERIAH LEWIS FARM INC. JOHN OSGA CLARK WOODMANSEE III JACK TIFFANY STEVE SNURKOWSKI DAVID HYDE VALLEY VIEW DAIRY GARY PISZCZEK REW FARM GIGLIO LEONARD SANKOW BEAVER BROOK FARM LLC. CATO CORNER FARM

Milk

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

3.1 3.1 3.1 3 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3 3.8 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.1 3.1 3.4

FRANKLIN HOWRIGAN HOME FARM MIKE BENJAMIN ANDREW & SUSAN BROUILLETTE BERKSON DAIRY WYNN PARADEE LTD. CARPSDALE FARMS BALLARD ACRES WRIGHT FAMILY FARM TOM & MARY MACHIA LLOYD DIANE & BRADLEY LUMBRA SIZEN DAIRY FARM TOM & MARY MACHIA WARREN HULL & SONS HAROLD J. & LAWRENCE HOWRIGAN PAUL & RAMONE & DANIEL COUTURE DANIEL & KAREN FORTIN HOWRIGAN HJ & A & LAWRENCE GARY & CRAIG TINKER PAUL-LIN DAIRY J. & MACCAUSLAND S. WOLCOTT BEN WILLIAMS NEWTON FARMS INC. BEN WILLIAMS PARADEE DORA & BRAD CALLAN DENIS RAINVILLE PAUL & ANITA MACADAMS MARC & CAROL JONES GARRY & EILEEN TRUDELL LONGE LLOYD & MARIE NEIL H. & JOANNE W. DOANE FLEURYS MAPLE HILL FARM KIRT WESTCOM GARY HANNA WALTER & DIANE BERTHIAUME

H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H J J J H H X H H H X H X J J H J X

259 522 79 110 43 83 222 539 158 132 149 23 94 273 125 92 241 121 32 25 50 90 33 78 120 32 51 110 81 82 36 119 95 39

3.2 3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 * 3.1 3 3 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.6 3.6 3.8 3 2.7 3.3 3.2 3.1 3 3.5 2.9 3.1 3.6 3.5 3.1 3.6 3.1

GRAND ISLE LAKESIDE JERSEY'S J & M LADD FAMILIES FARM

J H

44 66

884 4 567 2.9

LAMOILLE ARTHUR & LARRY MORRILL LES & CLAIRE PIKE DEBORA WICKART

H J H

ORANGE WALTER & MARGARET GLADSTONE WHITE FARM ROBERT & MELANIE SWENSON VERMONT TECH COLLEGE PINELLO FAMILY FARM ZACHARY FEURY SILLOWAY FARMS HARKDALE FARM INC. ROBERT J HOWE GRAY KIM TIM & JANET ANGELL DERRICK & BEVERLY WRIGHT HANFIELDBJ CHAPMAN COREY & ANN HARKDALE FARM INC. JEFFREY & BETH BAILEY PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP KENNETH & LISA PRESTON ALLENVILLE FARM NONEMACHER CHRIS ROBERT J HOWE L.JR. & GORDON HUNTINGTON OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP DUANE & DALE WILLIAMS JAMES WILLIAMS WARREN PRESTON FARM 1 LLOYD & JASON BAKER DEAN & TERRI CONANT PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE STEVEN & LINDA SMALL ROCK BOTTOM FARM JAMES & DAWN BLODGETT DANIEL J CILLEY CRAIG RUSSELL STANLEY & LAURENCE ARMSTRON

3.1 * 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3 3.2 3.1 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.1 3.8 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.3 2.9 3.2 3.7 3.1 3.5 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.7 3.1 3.5 3.5 3.3 3.5 3.2 2.9 3.6

ORLEANS FAIRMONT DAIRY LLC VERNON & MARY JUDITH HURD AARON & CHANTALE NADEAU NEIGHBORHOOD FARM WEBSTER DANIEL & MEGAN DOUG NELSON

H H H H H H

403 48 159 826 81 105


West Virginia farmer won’t go down without a fight by Tracy Grondine West Virginians are nothing if not hardworking, honest and humble people. So, when West Virginia farmer Lois Alt was told by the Environmental Protection Agency that she needed a discharge permit for her non-discharging poultry farm, she was dumbfounded.

Alt’s farm is immaculate. She’s even won several environmental stewardship awards. But, when EPA paid her a visit last year, they told her they spotted some feathers and dust on the ground in her farm yard and saw a splotch of litter outside her chicken houses — things that exist on all

animal farms. But, according to EPA, because of these everyday farm elements, runoff from Alt’s farm should be regulated as a Clean Water Act discharge. Alt told the inspector that if there was something she was doing wrong to let her know and she would correct it immediately. But, to

Conventional + Robot: still equals mastitis and slaughtered cows!

American Farm Bureau Federation this date, she hasn’t heard a peep from EPA, except that she needs to get a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. And until she does, she’s looking at a fine of $37,500 per day. “It’s very, very intimidating,” says Alt, who worries about having to mortgage — and possibly even losing — her farm. Alt believes that, as one of the larger poultry farms in her state, if she’s intimidated into applying for a permit, most other West Virginia poultry farmers

will feel compelled to do the same. That’s why she’s brought a lawsuit against EPA. Although she’s a West Virginia farmer, the issues raised in her lawsuit are national in scope and affect all livestock and poultry farmers. The American Farm Bureau Federation, as well as the West Virginia Farm Bureau, has asked the court to join the suit. The lawsuit challenges just how much power EPA has to sweep into the Clean Water Act permitting system. AFBF

See a video of young woman reacting to the pain of a conventional liner action at www.Facebook.com/CoPulsation and understand why your cows are milking poorly. CoPulsation™ Milking System LR Gehm, LLC 607-849-3880

www.CoPulsation.com

DHI TOP 40 FOR JULY NAME

Brd Cows

MICHAUD BARN 2 BRUCE & LAURIE PERRON PADDLEBRIDGE HOLSTEINS ADAM & JOANNA LIDBACK JACQUES COUTURE JAMES & SHARLYN JORDAN JOHN & DEANNA BROE ANDY ANDREWS JOHN & DEANNA BROE RANDALL DEXTER & ALICE JONATHAN & JAYNE CHASE JACK & ANNE LAZOR JOHN & DEANNA BROE ANDREW KEHLER LAURENCE LUMSDEN & FAMILY WAYNE SR. DONCASTER

H H H X H H H H X H X J J A H J

RICHARD SHELDON WOOD LAWN FARMS INC. CARABEAU LARRY CASH & KAREN RUANE BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 CLIFTON & D.R. CRESSY CASH & KAREN RUANE PAUL & KARI LUSSIER BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 JOESPH & OR UNA MORRISSETTE PARKER DAVID & MICHELE SHAUN YOUNG MCCULLOUGH BURTON & SON SHAUN YOUNG

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

NAME

Brd Cows

89 60 52 32 64 250 21 94 35 108 116 49 21 55 50 51

18806 19433 18833 17792 18843 18353 18089 17409 15948 16478 14067 12744 12038 13143 13810 9727

714 717 697 690 668 662 679 646 694 619 653 626 573 514 491 425

3.8 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.5 3.6 3.8 3.7 4.4 3.8 4.6 4.9 4.8 3.9 3.6 4.4

577 573 570 553 552 549 548 531 529 503 488 466 433 421 413 338

3.1 2.9 3 3.1 2.9 3 3 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.2 3 3.5

CHARLES P. CARRIER MOLLY BROOK FARMS JAMES ACKERMANN STEPHEN & AMY BOTHFELD WOODARD FARM GEORGE CARPENTER JR. JOHN ARMSTRONG VONTRAPP FARMSTEAD SHARON PECK

H J H H X H J X D

H H H H H H X H A H H H H X

187 183 130 73 111 34 12 144 25 27 90 41 37 28

26141 22691 20202 20089 18869 18062 15044 18038 14753 14741 13613 14594 12421 11180

939 892 898 731 750 658 630 576 611 529 519 553 473 455

3.6 3.9 4.4 3.6 4 3.6 4.2 3.2 4.1 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.1

781 724 629 617 570 523 519 505 469 442 435 409 381 346

3 * 3.2 3.1 3.1 3 2.9 3.4 2.8 * 3.2 3 3.2 2.8 3.1 3.1

H H H H H X H H X

830 57 75 198 39 32 73 281 88

25854 23494 23576 23125 23587 18872 21457 18984 17188

1008 851 915 876 749 837 745 729 711

3.9 3.6 3.9 3.8 3.2 4.4 3.5 3.8 4.1

795 746 727 715 707 642 635 609 564

3.1 * 3.2 3.1 3.1 3 3.4 3 3.2 3.3

RUTLAND

WASHINGTON

FAIRMONT FARM WALTER C'O RAYMON BO BOTHFELD LYLEHAVEN FARM DAVID PULLMAN DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER DAVID PULLMAN FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON STANLEY & CATHERINE SCRIBNER MORGAN & JENNIFER CHURCHILL

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

VERN-MONT FARM LLC MARK RUSHTON MARK RUSHTON CLARK FARM LLC PETER MILLER LILAC RIDGE FARM THE CORSE FARM MALCOLM SUMNER THE PUTNEY SCHOOL BRANDON BUCOSSI

FAT

%

PRO %

82 114 55 56 25 52 21 44 50

18047 14427 16303 16670 14690 14612 11501 10241 716

712 705 647 633 642 514 500 506 42

3.9 4.9 4 3.8 4.4 3.5 4.3 4.9 5.9

556 553 511 501 468 421 412 339 28

3.1 3.8 3.1 3 3.2 2.9 3.6 3.3 3.9

H H J H H H H J X J

583 33 24 75 162 40 52 35 38 60

25930 23842 16881 19178 19329 17929 16787 14252 15793 12646

992 966 828 801 804 740 659 723 665 554

3.8 4.1 4.9 4.2 4.2 4.1 3.9 5.1 4.2 4.4

799 765 638 589 586 552 510 509 494 436

3.1 * 3.2 3.8 3.1 3 3.1 3 3.6 3.1 3.4

H H H H H J H J H J J J M A G

57 103 472 93 83 58 66 86 151 47 57 16 42 28 17

25504 23802 23532 22603 22641 16907 20921 17126 19418 14889 13680 12782 14455 13132 9472

904 910 826 876 905 990 745 870 704 676 614 530 504 475 456

3.5 3.8 3.5 3.9 4 5.9 3.6 5.1 3.6 4.5 4.5 4.1 3.5 3.6 4.8

791 735 726 718 696 682 653 625 612 516 489 439 438 404 325

3.1 3.1 3.1 * 3.2 3.1 4 3.1 3.6 3.2 3.5 3.6 3.4 3 3.1 3.4

11265 11333

543 437

4.8 3.9

404 3.6 343 3

WINDSOR

UPWEY FARM ROBETH HOLSTIENS LLC. RHOMAN WAI LEMAX FARM MICHAEL & HEIDI DOLLOFF RICHARDSON FAMILY FARM GEORGE MILLER BASSETT ROBERT P JEFFREY & DAVID TOWNSEND SPRING BROOK FARM JAMES S. LEWIS JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. GREEN ACRES MILKING SHORTHORNS JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. ROYAL TERRACE GUERNSEYS

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

Milk

WINDHAM

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

ORGANIC TACONIC END FARM MIEDEMAS THE

ADDISON J H

31 132

hopes it will be a case that generates positive law to help other livestock and poultry farmers nationwide that face the same kind of intimidating EPA inspections and enforcement efforts. “A farm is a farm. It’s not a laboratory,” says AFBF General Counsel Ellen Steen. But, “EPA has come up with an interpretation of the federal Clean Water Act that says basically if you’re a farm you’re going to be regulated if you have enough animals.” So, that’s why it will be a real setback to all livestock and poultry farmers if the lawsuit doesn’t go Alt’s way. But for Alt, who embodies some of the most prevalent characteristics of West Virginians — a strong sense of justice and an independent will — the fight’s not over. As they say in West Virginia, “Montani Semper Liberi,” or mountaineers are always free. Tracy Taylor Grondine, a proud West Virginian at heart, is director of media relations for the American Farm Bureau Federation.

NAME BEN WILLIAMS BEN WILLIAMS GARRY & EILEEN TRUDELL KIRT WESTCOM WALTER & DIANE BERTHIAUME ROBERT J HOWE CHAPMAN COREY & ANN OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP ALLENVILLE FARM ROBERT J HOWE OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP DEAN & TERRI CONANT ROCK BOTTOM FARM DANIEL J CILLEY CRAIG RUSSELL PADDLEBRIDGE HOLSTEINS ANDY ANDREWS RANDALL DEXTER & ALICE JONATHAN & JAYNE CHASE JACK & ANNE LAZOR SHAUN YOUNG SHAUN YOUNG DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON MORGAN & JENNIFER CHURCHILL CHARLES P. CARRIER JAMES ACKERMANN STEPHEN & AMY BOTHFELD WOODARD FARM PETER MILLER THE CORSE FARM MALCOLM SUMNER JAMES JR. & TINA SPAULDING JAMES JR. & TINA SPAULDING

Brd Cows

FRANKLIN

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

H X H H X

50 33 110 119 39

18839 16965 15144 11802 10642

701 700 567 455 415

3.7 4.1 3.7 3.9 3.9

568 559 434 360 327

3 3.3 2.9 3.1 3.1

H H J H J J A G X X

29 51 13 81 16 49 59 57 25 51

19530 18602 15865 18167 13706 13889 14036 12028 11644 12518

779 707 722 689 667 655 563 523 474 479

4 3.8 4.6 3.8 4.9 4.7 4 4.3 4.1 3.8

602 576 547 532 507 491 429 394 367 366

3.1 3.1 3.4 2.9 3.7 3.5 3.1 3.3 3.2 2.9

H H H X J

52 94 108 116 49

18833 17409 16478 14067 12744

697 646 619 653 626

3.7 3.7 3.8 4.6 4.9

570 531 503 488 466

3 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.7

H X

41 28

14594 11180

553 455

3.8 4.1

409 2.8 346 3.1

H H X H H H X

39 73 88 82 55 56 25

23587 21457 17188 18047 16303 16670 14690

749 745 711 712 647 633 642

3.2 3.5 4.1 3.9 4 3.8 4.4

707 635 564 556 511 501 468

H H J

162 52 35

19329 16787 14252

804 659 723

4.2 3.9 5.1

586 3 510 3 509 3.6

J A

16 28

12782 13132

530 475

4.1 3.6

439 3.4 404 3.1

ORANGE

ORLEANS

RUTLAND

WASHINGTON

WINDHAM

WINDSOR

3 3 3.3 3.1 3.1 3 3.2

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

A recent article featuring prior CoPulsation™ customer David Dallam states that when switching from CoPulsation™ to a Lely robot that SCC went from under 150,000 to over 700,000 and production from 26,000 to under 20,000. If you look inside any robot you will see the same 60 year old pulsation technology in your parlor and the same meters, basically the only new technology is the robot arm. The robot simply provides the consistent milking protocols the NMC supports. The liner pinching causing new infections and damaged quarters is the same with a robot as it is in your herd. The end result is mastitis and culled cows.

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE


Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, Parasites love heat and humidity. Unless you’re in the drought stricken areas that are extremely dry, the very warm summer temperatures this year are helping parasites multiply in very short times. Parasites are those creatures which serve no real purpose but to live for themselves — at the expense of other living beings. Parasites can be internal or external. Important internal parasites of livestock usually bring to mind stomach worms and coccidia. There are many more, but those probably cause the most problems. External parasites bring to mind flies, lice and mange. Flies torment animals during the warm season while the effects of lice and mange tend to be seen during the indoor housing times of colder season. Right now, unless your paddocks are scorched, parasites are thriving and sending millions of eggs out onto pasture as your herd animals drop their manure on the ground. The eggs hatch in a few hours, soon crawl up the blades of nearby grass hoping to be eaten by animals as they graze, then start their life again in the host, sucking blood from the stomach walls. This is basic biology and there’s no getting around it completely. Parasites

(of any kind) will always be present wherever there is a high animal density in a contained area. Only the free roaming bison on the American Plains could constantly move along and not encounter heavy pressure of internal parasites. However, there are ways that you can reduce the pressure while also keeping your animals healthier by eating better. How? By using rotational pasture management so animals get new paddocks every 12 hours and by giving the paddocks a rest once grazed in order to regrow. Just as important, dragging pastures to spread out manure will allow quicker drying out of manure to kill the fragile microscopic larva crawling about. The ideal time to drag out manure pies is 2-3 days from when the cows are on the paddock. This will not hinder pasture regrowth and more importantly will allow the dung beetles to do their work. This timing also allows time for horn flies and face flies to lay their eggs, so eggs will be hatched and the fragile young larva can also be killed by spreading out the manure pies and quickly drying out their living areas of internal parasites and developing flies. Speaking of flies... it seems impossible to tell

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when a farm may experience a bad season. In the same season, farms in the same area may experience vastly different fly populations. Why is that? I certainly don’t have the answers, but when farmers apply concepts of biology, chronic problems like flies can be managed better. Take for instance that flies like warm, humid conditions and flies don’t like wind. How many times are you bothered by flies on a windy day? Applying this basic concept to farms would indicate that air flow in the barn would mean dramatically less fly problems in the barn. Lo and behold, go into a barn that has tunnel ventilation and you will experience few if any flies. It certainly need not be tunnel ventilation, but something about tunnel ventilation simply works extremely well against flies. You have probably heard by now off the Spalding Fly-Vac: a machine which generates high velocity wind in a large walk through

Moo News a Newsletter of

chamber. It also has a vacuum aspect which sucks the flies into a large jar that have been blown off the cows. Without a doubt this is the best way to reduce the amount of flies from tormenting your cows as well as eliminating them from the breeding population, thereby lowering fly numbers throughout the fly season. They are now commercially available (see your trade magazines). It was developed at North Carolina State University. At the 180 cow dairy herd at NC State Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CEFS) in a time of one week, 410,000 flies were elimi-

nated and during the second week another 457,000 were eliminated. Horn fly densities were reduced from 775 per cow to 263 in the first week and down to 150 per cow by the second week. This is a 70 percent reduction in flies compared to cows not going through the fly trap. In the 3 month study between late May and late September, over 2.4 million flies had been removed from the 180 cows. That is an amazing amount of flies taken out of the system, no longer tormenting the cows nor rapidly reproducing. These same fly traps have also removed over 15,000 face flies and

8,000 stable flies. Face flies are the ones that carry the pinkeye bug. In bad situations, there may be as many as 100 flies per face. It is well known that reducing face flies to less than 1015 per face will reduce the spread of pinkeye and maximize animal comfort. (from: Managing Parasite Flies in Pasture-based Dairy Systems by Dr. Wes Watson and Steve Demming, presented at the Mid-Atlantic Grazing Conference, July 2012). Horn flies are smaller than other kinds of flies and are usually found on the bellies and backs of

Moo A23

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The Dairy One Improver

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

What a Difference a Year Makes!

By Janet B. Fallon, CCA - Dairy One Forage Lab & Agro-One Soils Lab What a difference a year makes. Last year, we dealt with the effects of too much water, but this year, we are dealing with the opposite problem: not enough water. I don't think I have to tell you that drought has had a significant impact on crop yield and quality in much of the Northeast this summer. If you are feeding livestock, then chances are good that you are concerned about the nitrate content of your homegrown or purchased forages. Below is a “refresher”about nitrates and dairy cows, followed by information about drought impact on soil fertility and crop management in 2013.

Nitrates and Dairy Cattle Nitrate is a major precursor of plant protein. At certain times, environmental conditions can cause excessive nitrate accumulation in the plant. These conditions include heavy nitrogen fertilization, drought, low light intensity, and low temperatures. Nitrate concentrations can rise immediately after a drought-ending rain, which is an important consideration when making harvest decisions. Crops susceptible to nitrate accumulation include sorghum, sorghum-sudangrass hybrids, sudangrass, corn forage, small grain forages, and certain weeds, including red root pigweed, lambsquarters, and Johnsongrass. Drought can also result in elevated levels of prussic acid in sorghum, sorghum-sudangrass hybrids, sudangrass, and Johnsongrass, so extra precautions should be taken to protect against prussic acid poisoning as well.

Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Ensiling can reduce nitrate concentration by up to 50%, but safety precautions should be taken to protect farm workers and livestock from silo gas, which may be more likely when ensiling high nitrate forages.

Nitrate levels (DM Basis)

% Nitrate

ppm Nitrate Nitrogen

Comments

< 0.44

< 1012

Safe to feed

0.44 - 0.66

1012-1518

Safe for non-pregnant animals. Limit to 50% of ration dry matter intake. Animals may go off feed, experience a slow drop in milk production or abort in some cases.

0.66 - 0.88

1518 - 2024

Limit to 50% or ration dry matter. Above symptoms, some death.

0.88 - 1.54

2024 - 3542

Limit to 35% - 40% of ration dry matter. DO NOT FEED TO PREGNANT ANIMALS.

1.54 - 1.76

3542 - 4048

Limit to 25% of ration dry matter. DO NOT FEED TO PREGNANT ANIMALS.

> 1.76

> 4048

TOXIC - NO NOT FEED.

http://www.dairyone.com/Forage/FactSheet/Nitrates.htm For more information on dealing with the risk of nitrate toxicity in drought-stressed forages, please refer to Cornell’s new Agronomy Fact Sheet, 70 Drought and Risk of Nitrate Toxicity in Forages, found at http://nmsp.cals.cornell.edu/publications/factsheets/factsheet70.pdf. This provides additional information on the causes of nitrate buildup in drought-stressed plants, nitrate testing guidelines, signs of nitrate poisoning in livestock, and management options if high nitrate levels are known or suspected. In a nutshell, if high nitrates are suspected: 1. Delay harvest until a week or two after drought is “over”. 2.

3.

Raise the cutter bar for harvest to avoid the highest concentration of nitrates located in the lowest part of the plant. This may be difficult but necessary to do when yields are already compromised by the long drought. In hard-hit areas, grain producers may decide to harvest their crop for silage. This is good because it helps alleviate potential feed shortages and provides a market for drought-damaged corn crops that will produce little grain, but it is very important to know the nitrate status of this “salvaged” grain crop.

4.

Make silage instead of hay or green chop. But beware, elevated nitrates will also increase the risk of potentially deadly silo gas, so be sure to follow adequate precautions to avoid injury to farm workers or livestock.

5.

Test suspected forage to determine if it can be diluted with a low-nitrate feed, or to determine if you should avoid feeding it altogether.

6.

Feed a balanced ration and make sure that livestock have ready access to nitrate-free water.

7.

Introduce forage with elevated nitrates gradually. Feed cows low-nitrate hay before turning them into a suspected high-nitrate pasture.

8.

Avoid feeding greenchop, especially if it has heated in the forage wagon or feed bunk.

9.

Don't overstock high-nitrate pastures, since it encourages consumption of the lower canopy, which will be highest in nitrates.

10. Consult with your nutritionist or veterinarian for other management practices to reduce the risk of nitrate toxicity on your farm. 11. Observe livestock frequently. Remove animals and call a veterinarian promptly if symptoms occur. Dairy One Forage Lab can test suspected forages for nitrate content. If added to a routine package, it will cost an additional $6 per sample. Nitrate alone costs $12 per sample. For a complete list of services and prices, please refer to http://www.dairyone.com/Forage/ services/Forage/ForageInfoForm.pdf

Impact of Drought on Soil Fertility and Crop Management in 2013 Some areas of the Northeast got some much needed rain the last week in July…an inch or two or three…enough to green things up a bit, but it was too little and way too late. Even if we get normal rainfall for the rest of the summer, much of the damage is already done. At this point, we really need to start thinking about the impact of the drought of 2012 on soil fertility and crop management in 2013. After reading numerous publications on the subject, I would like to offer these observations and suggestions. Fertilizer use can become an important consideration during the year after a drought. Low crop yields during the drought year means that a significant amount of unused nutrients could remain in the soil or in the crop residue of unharvested crops and weeds. In other words, if your 2012 crop yield was 1/3 of your goal and nutrient uptake is proportional to yield, then roughly 2/3 of the phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) applied in the 2012 was not used and may be available for use by your 2013 crop. Nitrogen is a bit more tricky, but there may be a lot of that left over as well.

Nitrogen (N) As most of you know, N is perhaps the most critical and costly nutrient of all. It is also the most volatile and mobile nutrient with the shortest life in the soil. Carryover is most likely if: • The 2012 crop received moderate-to-high amounts of N from fertilizer, legume or manure inputs. • If yields were lower than expected. • If soils are heavy textured. • If winter precipitation is normal or below normal. The use of fall cover crops may help hold expensive N in place for the 2013 crop, as well as provide a much needed source of supplemental feed. However, be mindful of herbicide residues that may damage more sensitive crops like oats or wheat. Check herbicide labels for replanting restrictions. Consider reducing your total nitrogen rate or splitting nitrogen applications to corn the year following a drought if the prior crop was heavily fertilized or low yielding and the fall and winter precipitation was below normal. Using a Pre Plant Nitrate Test can be used to determine if and how much additional nitrogen is needed at side-dress time.

Boron (B) Drought reduces B availability and may be quite noticeable in high B-requiring crops like alfalfa. In alfalfa, deficiency shows up as a bronzing to yellowing of the top leaves, especially on dry ridges and light sandy soils. It can be also be confused with potato leafhopper damage. Drought also reduces leaching of B from the soil (especially sandy or coarse textured soils), so it is hard to tell if your soil is truly deficient or if you have a drought induced deficiency. The amount of B required by any crop is quite small, so application should always be based on soil test results, since excess B can be toxic to many other crops at levels that are needed by high-B crops like alfalfa, beets, or brassicas. Boron is NOT included in the standard soil test analysis, but can be requested as an additional test for a cost of $10 per sample. http://www.dairyone.com/AgroOne/soiltesting/SoilTestingServices.pdf

Phosphorus (P) and Potassium (K) Phosphorus and potassium are more stable in the soil than nitrogen. Fertilizer that is not used by the 2012 crop due to lower yield caused by the drought will most likely be available in 2013 for use by the next crop. It is important to determine the levels of these nutrients through soil testing to avoid applying excess fertilizer, which is hard on your wallet and bad for the environment. Unfortunately, taking a representative sample in dry hard soil can be very difficult. Shallow sampling depth that is common in these conditions can result in very different and misleading results. Specifically, you may see higher levels of P and K and lower soil pH. If the soil is too hard to sample, it is better to wait until you can sample to the correct depth and take the appropriate number of sub-samples per field vs. compromising accuracy. In addition to soil fertility, it will be important to consider persistence and carryover of 2012 herbicides into the 2013 cropping season. Drought can reduce microbial activity and breakdown of some herbicides, which can increase their persistence and potential for carryover and damage to the rotational crop. Check with your Certified Crop Adviser, the herbicide label and/or University Herbicide Restrictions included in their Agronomy Guidelines, especially if you used herbicides that are at a higher risk of carryover, such as Atrazine or Command. Forage analysis and soil testing are important management tools every year, but they are even more important in a year of extreme drought like we had in many areas in 2012. For a complete list or our forage analysis and soil testing services, please visit www.dairyone.com.


Lee Publications Subscriptions/ Classified Ad Sweepstakes Grand Prize winner James Barr (second from right) of 4-Barr Stock Farm, Arkport, NY was the lucky winner of the Lee Publications Subscriptions/Classified Ad Sweepstakes Grand Prize — a John Deere Gator 825. With him are (L-R) Ian Hitchener, sales representative for Lee Publications, John Griffith, sales representative for Z & M Ag and Turf and Bruce Button, general manager of Lee Publications. The JD Gator was supplied by Lee Publications in cooperation with Z & M Ag and Turf, with seven locations serving SW New York and NW Pennsylvania. Be sure to enter Lee Publications newest Subscriptions/Classified Ad Sweepstakes and have the chance to win a Club Car XRT 1550. Three ways to enter: 1. Buy a subscription. Your paid subscription to Country Folks will automatically get you entered to win a Club Car XRT 1550. 2. Place a classified reader ad. To place an ad call Peggy at 800-836-2888, fax 518-673-2381, e-mail classified@leepub.com or mail it to CF Grower Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 3. No purchase necessary. Send a post card with your name, farm or company name; complete mailing address, phone number, e-mail address and date of birth (must be at least 18 years of age on Dec. 30, 2012 to win). Limit one post card entry per address.

Moo from A20 Just wait 2-3 days so the dung beetles can drill manure into channels they create in the soil. This action of dung beetles is incredibly important. While I will always promote a multi-prong approach to solving problems, if there was ever a “one- stop shopping” method of dealing with flies, the wind/vacuum chamber is it. (I have no financial interests in the product.) While other methods like sticky tape catch random flies and parasitic wasps will help reduce flies from becoming adults, the fly-vac basically wipes out large numbers quickly — right off the cows — which will make your cows more comfortable, allowing them to graze better. The fly-vac may well be the single best invention yet for non-chemical fly control. Applying basic biological concepts such as the action of wind will reduce fly burdens and dryingby-dragging will reduce the habitat of parasites in pasture, making your cows happier and more productive.

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

cows; horn flies deposit eggs in fresh manure and it takes 9-12 days to develop into an adult. They take 10-12 blood meals per day and can transmit Staph aureus between animals. Face flies also lay eggs in fresh manure and are adults in 14 days; face flies have been found to carry over 30 bacterial diseases and are the main carriers of the pinkeye bug. Stable flies are found on the lower body and legs of cattle and take about 2-3 blood meals a day; stable flies prefer aging manure and bedding or round bale feeder areas to deposit their eggs. Cattle bunch up trying to avoid painful bites. House flies will use a variety of organic materials to lay their eggs and it takes about 7 days for them to become adults. (Watson and Demming, 2012). With these things in mind, maybe it is easier to see why I have always promoted clipping and/or dragging pastures to destroy the manure pies and allow even re-growth of pasture.


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Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

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Feature Articles Calf Rearing: An Advanced Course . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 12 Experimenting with Caterpillars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 13 Pricing Your Farm Products Honestly . . . . . . . . . . .Page 17 The Tale of Tunis Sheep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 19 Supplement to Country Folks

To place an ad in the next issue of Small Farm Quarterly contact your Country Folks sales representative or email info@leepub.com This supplement has been very well received and Cornell has had much positive feedback. Advertisers can expect the supplement to have a long shelf life. This supplement reaches all Country Folks subscribers in the East, West, New England and 2700 local Cornell Cooperative Extension offices in NY State.

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C ountry F olks

Section B

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS Prevent heat stress and lowered productivity: monitor moisture and mycotoxins in your fields this summer by Evan Wisell The heat is on and it’s seriously affecting the

yond. The intense heat is combined with the most severe and extensive

States Department of Agriculture. This combination has wreaked havoc

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The September Issue of

As of July, approximately 73 percent of cattle areas were affected by moderate to intense drought.Typically for dairy cows, heat stress is noticed in the production of less milk with lower milk fat and protein.

agriculture industry in the Northeast and be-

drought in 25 years, according to the United

on more than 62 percent

Prevent B3

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r Ou t u n o Ab uctio ng k A s ti A rse Lis o r a H nd e Cal

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August 24 September 21 October 19 December 20

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 1

www.aaauctionfinder.com


Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012


Prevent from B1 of the nation’s farms. According to Dr. Swamy Haladi, global technical manager of the Alltech Mycotoxin Management Team, drought not only causes obvious losses in crop yield but brings more mycotoxins to the farm as plants become stressed and more susceptible to diseases. “It is not just excess rain that brings with it the increased mycotoxin challenge but historically the worst mycotoxin years are also drought years,” Haladi said. Mycotoxins are harmful compounds produced by molds (fungi) that are found in soil and can grow on vegetable matter

including grain, forages and silages. Mycotoxins can be formed in the field pre-harvest and may continue to be formed under suboptimal storage conditions post-harvest. Temperature is an important factor influencing mold growth and mycotoxin production and plants stressed by drought and high temperatures are commonly invaded by mold spores, which can produce mycotoxins. Insect challenge in the field is directly proportional to temperature and such damage reduces the plant protection against molds. The fact that some of the crop produc-

ers are not spraying fungicides to keep the cost down only compounds the problem. No matter what the cause, all the elements associated with drought are precursors for Aspergillus and some of the Fusarium molds such as Fusarium verticilloides and Fusarium moniliforme. Haladi recommends producers take field checks to look for grayish, yellow green mold near the tips of or all over the ears. Producers should check in several areas of the field to be sure. While the Midwest may be used to seeing incidences of vomitoxin

(DON) and zearalenone, Haladi warns that this year may be worse due to the dry conditions and insect damage. Such conditions allow some Fusarium molds to pro-

“Reduced feed intake is a main effect of heat stress.” ~ Max Hawkins

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amount of mold spores. “Producers should positively identify any situations that may arise with this year’s corn crop and not assume it is only Aspergillius,” Haladi said. In order to indentify more of the risks associated with mycotoxins, Alltech recently launched its 37+ Program. Once mycotoxins have made their way into the feed, there are still a few options available to producers. They can choose not to feed the contaminated feed or they can use an effective mycotoxin adsorbent. There are two types of adsorbents: silica-based polymers and carbon-based organic polymers. Silica-type materials, such as clays, are readily available and many have shown to be effective against aflatoxins but ineffective against other types of mycotoxins. Haladi recommends an organic mycotoxin sequestering agent that can be used at practical levels of inclusion for all species of mycotoxins, including DON. Keep them cool too Our fields aren’t the only ones battling the dry conditions and increased temperatures. Our livestock have also been suffering. As of July 17, approximately 73 percent of cattle areas were affected by moderate to intense drought. The USDA expects the combination of heat stress and higher feed costs to restrain growth this year on U.S. cattle and hog numbers as well as poultry and milk production. Dr. Max Hawkins, Alltech, explains that producers need to keep in mind the TemperatureHumidity Index (THI). THI is a combination of temperature and relative humidity to create a value for heat stress. At 80 degrees there is no stress until 30 percent relative humidity; after 30 percent there will be mild stress. At 90 degrees, the cows are already in mild stress up to 30 percent relative humidity. At 100 degrees, cows are in mild stress up to 50 percent humidity and above that they are in moderate. Signs of heat stress in livestock and poultry

Prevent B10

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 3

duce another group of mycotoxins called fumonisins. These toxins can compromise immune and gut systems at lower concentrations but cause pulmonary edema (fluid accumulation in lungs) at higher concentrations. According to Dr. Elizabeth Santin in The Mycotoxin Blue Book, Fusarium species can survive in corn residue, which is probably the most important source of inoculums for kernel infection. These fungi can be associated with every part of the corn plant and 50 to

100 percent incidence of kernel infection is not uncommon, with the majority of kernels showing no visible damage. Many experts have recommended that farmers let the corn plants grow more and not chop too early to aid in nitrates. However, farmers should still monitor moisture levels. “Silage that is too dry, less than 65 percent moisture, will not pack well,” Haladi said. “This situation can increase the chances of Penicillum molds from making an appearance in our silage. Unlike other mycotoxins, these silage mycotoxins can act as antibiotics and kill beneficial microbes in the rumen. The net result is lowered productivity.” Haladi also warns if producers are cutting the silage lower to increase tonnage, they may also be increasing the amount of soil contamination and thus further increasing the


AUC TION CALENDAR

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, August 20 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-3223500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. • 5:00 PM: Robert Smith, 859 Dale Rd., Dale, NY. Consignment Auction, Tractors, Farm Equip., Trailers, etc. R.G. Mason Auc-

tions, 585-567-8844 www.rgmasonauctions.com Tuesday, August 21 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, August 22 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

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BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

& Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, August 23 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-3223500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800321-3211. Friday, August 24 • 5:30 PM: 5279 Ridge Rd., New Hope, PA. Collection of 200+ & high quality toys and 1,000 pcs. of collectable farm literature. Leaman Auctions, 717-9464-1128, 610-6628149 cell leamanauctions.com or auctionzip#3721 Saturday, August 25 • 9:00 AM: 5279 Ridge Rd., New Hope, PA. 35+ Minneopolis-Moline & Oliver tractors. Leaman Auctions, 717-9464-1128, 610-6628149 cell leamanauctions.com or auctionzip#3721 • 9:00 AM: Penn Yan, NY. Finger Lakes Produce Auction Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-

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2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 10:00 AM: 66 N. Brookfield Rd., Spencer, MA. Real Estate & Personal Property Auction. By owner. Jacquier Auctioneers, 413569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com Wednesday, August 29 • The Pines Farm, Barton, VT. 153rd Top-ofVermont Invitation Dairy Sale. 150 head expected. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, August 30 • 9:30 AM: Newark Valley, NY. Large Public Auction. Farm Tractors, Combines, Grain & Gravity Wagons, Farm Machinery, Skid Steers & more. Consignments welcome. Goodrich Auction Service, Inc., 607-6423293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com or auctionzip.com Friday, August 31 • The Pines Farm, Barton, VT. 153rd Top-ofVermont Invitation Dairy Sale. 150 head expected. Sale Managers, Northea• 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday.

THESE

D.R. CHAMBERS & SONS 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY 13849 607-369-8231 • Fax 607-369-2190 www.drchambersauction.com EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 plus & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: North Rd., (Wyben Section) Westfield, MA. Tractors & Cattle Trailer; Horse related items & Antiques Furniture Toy Trucks, Tonkas, early games & comics. Jacquier Auctioneers, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 11:00 AM: Morrisville, NY. 30th Annual Morrisville Autumn Review Sale. 90 head. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Monday, September 10 • 1:00 PM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. Monthly Feeder Sale. Followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hoskings 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, September 12 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Man-

ager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, September 14 • 11:00 AM: Smyrna, NY. Frog Rock Farm Complete Milking herd & Bred Heifer Dispersal. 55 head All AI sired Holsteins. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, September 15 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Fall Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment. Heavy & Light Trucks. Consignments welcome. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E.

of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Saturday, September 22 • Scranton, PA. Complete Liquidation: Aggregate, Construction, Support Equipment, Truck Tractors, Dump Trucks & Trailers. A. Lyon & Son 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: Fuller St, Ludlow, MA. JD Skidsteer; Tractors; Tools; Horse Drawn Mowers & Equipment, Bumper Livestock Trailer. Jacquier Auctioneers, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com Wednesday, September 26 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 • Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com

KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE 817 State Rt. 170 Little Falls, NY 13365 315-823-0089 • 315-868-6561 cell We buy or sell your cattle or equipment on commission or outright! In business since 1948 LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550

NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774 NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung

TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 5

Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Saturday, September 1 • 9:00 AM: Glimmerglass Pools, 55 Willett St., Fort Plain, NY. Public Auction. Shrubs, nursery stock, guns, antiques, tools, fruit. Consignments wanted. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 Wednesday, September 5 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, September 6 • 1:00 PM: 10400 Gillette Rd., Alexander, NY. WNY Gas & Steam Engine Assoc. 2nd. Annual Consignment. 1st day of show Sept. 6-9. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Friday, September 7 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, September 8 • North Country Storage Barns. 2nd Annual Shed and Shrubbery Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • 9:00 AM: Town of Lansing Highway Dept., Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing, NY. Municipal Sur-


Auction Calendar, Continued

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

(cont. from prev. page) Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 29 • Twister Valley, Fort Plain, NY. Power Sports Consignment Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • 10:00 AM: 43 Meadowbrook Rd, Granby, CT. Complete Commercial Woodworking Shop & Antiques. Jacquier Auctioneers, 413569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com Wednesday, October 3 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, October 5 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, October 6 • 9:00 AM: 145 Paul Rd., Exit 17, Rt. 390, Rochester, NY. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction. Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars & Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, October 10 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, October 13 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. OHM Holstein Club Sale. Sale hosted by Roedale Farms in Richfield Springs. Brad Ainslie sale chairman 315-822-6087. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 9:00 AM: Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY. Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Ben K. Stoltzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. Vison-Gen & Friends Sale. Comanaged with Stonehurst Farm. 100 outstanding Holsteins, many with contract Genomic pedigrees. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 17 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Live-

stock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 20 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. Eastern Breeders Brown Swiss Sale. Sale managed by Modern Associates, Hosking Sales assisting. Call with your consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: Hobart, NY. Hosking Farm Complete Dispersal. 120 Holsteins. Don & Joanne Hosking. Tremendous cow families, quality, low SCC & lots of type & production. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 24 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, October 25 • Pigeon Acres Farm, Manheim PA. Selling complete dairy of 175 mature cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, October 27 • 9:00 AM: Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds). Onondaga Co. area Municipal Equipment Auction. Municipal & Contractor Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 11:00 AM: Cornell Livestock Pavilion, Ithaca, NY. The NY Holstein Harvest Sale. 100 of the finest Holsteins to sell all year!. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 31 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, November 1 • 11:00 AM: Reserved for major Holstein Herd Dispersal in NY. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Friday, November 2 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction

Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, November 3 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Fall Premier All Breed Sale. Call early to consign to make catalog & advertising deadlines. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, November 9 • Pleasant Lane Beef Farm, Hannibal, NY. Selling complete line of late model equipment. (Save the date, late model equip. you don’t find at absolute public auction.) Ray was very successful and equip. is in great shape with most only few years old. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, November 10 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Wednesday, November 21 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 28 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, November 29 • 11:00 AM: Lampeter, PA. Destiny Road Holstein Dispersal. Jay Stolzfus, owner. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, December 1 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Winter

Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 5 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, December 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 12 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Wednesday, December 19 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 26 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 26 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, April 5 • Intercourse, PA. Past Present Future Sale hosted by C.K. Kerrick & Matt Kimball. Held at te Ben K. Stolzfus sale barn. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT August 13, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 82.5089.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 68-80.50; Boners 8085% 68-80.50; Lean 8590% lean 1000# & up 5075.50; Lean 85-90% lean under 1000# 40-66.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls 92-125# 70-110; 80-90# 70-90. Vealers: 100-120# 55-65; 90-100# 50-75; 80-90# 4560; 70-80# 30-45; 60-70# 20-40. COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA August 8, 2012 Cows: Canners 43-61; Cutters 62-68; Util 68.50-79. Bulls: 69-96 Steers: Ch 115-117; Sel 110-114; Hols. 90-93. Calves: 31-127 ea. Feeders: 68-154 Sheep: 65-98 Lambs: 100-156 Goats: 41-220 ea. Kids: 21-128 ea. Hogs: 52 Chickens: 1.50-11.50 Rabbits: 1.50-15.50 Ducks: 2-10.50 Horse: 175 ea. Colt: 105 ea. *Sale every Wed. at 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA August 14, 2012 Beef Cattle: Canners 4472; Bulls 85-110; Cutters 67-79; Steers 90-110; Util 78-84; Heifers 70-85. Calves: Growers 70-107;

Veal 90-110; Heifers 60-85. Hogs (ea): Feeders 50-60; Roasters 75-130; Market 50-62. Sheep: 50-70 Lambs: 1.20-1.50 Goats (ea): 80-120; Billies 125-190; Kids 20-90.

LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report

NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA August 14, 2012 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 1036; 61-75# 30-67; 76-95# 10-75; 96-105# 40-68; 106# & up 66-80. Farm Calves: 90/cwt Start Calves: 49-145/cwt Feeders: 40-116/cwt Bulls: 85-99/cwt Rep. Heifers: 650-1050 ea. Rep. Cows: 510-1200 ea, Canners: 30-63.50/cwt Cutters: 64-78/cwt Utility: 83-97/cwt Sows: 35.50-43/cwt Boars: 13/cwt Lambs: 120-190/cwt Sheep: 35-115/cwt Goats: 25-220 ea. Rabbits: 1-10 ea. Poultry: 1.50-9 ea. Hay: 6 lots, .90-3.40/bale.

BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY August 6-9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. .50-1.20; Grower Bull over 92# .701.50; 80-92# .60-1.20; Bob Veal .10-.65. Cull Cows: Gd .68-.81; Lean .42-.72; Hvy Beef Bulls .72-.95. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 850-1350; Handling Hfrs. 850-1250; Springing Hfrs 800-1400; Bred Hfrs 700-1100; Fresh Hfrs 750-1300; Open Hfrs 400-800; Started Hfrs 100400; Service Bulls 500-900. Beef: Feeders .60-1.15 Lamb & Sheep: Market 11.80; Slaughter Sheep .20.60. Goats: Billies .80-1.75; Nannies .75-1.25; Kids .15.60. Swine: Sow .30-.60

HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ August 14, 2012 Livestock: 15 Calves .241.10, Avg .74; 21 Cows .40.84, Avg .59; 1 Easy Cow .10; 2 Feeders 300-600# .70-1.08, Avg .89; 2 Heifers .64-.90, Avg .77; 2 Bulls .40-1, Avg .70; 6 Steers .60-.99 Avg .81; 22 Roasting Pigs (ea) 37.50-57.50, Avg 46.93; 36 Sheep .101.70, Avg .98; 18 Lambs (ea) 47.50-97.50, Avg 70.87, 124 (/#) .05-1.85, Avg 1.24; 27 Goats (ea) 32.50-127, Avg 48.47; 8 Kids (ea) 45-60, Avg 52.19. Total 284. Poultry & Egg: Heavy Fowl (/#) .40-.50; Heavy Fowl (ea) 6.25-8; Mixed Fowl (ea) 1.50-3.75; Broilers (/#) .50;Pullets (ea) 5-9; Geese (ea) 14.50-15.50; Bantams (ea) 4-8.25; Roosters (/#) 1.20, (ea) 59; Turkey (ea) 42.50; Bunnies (ea) 4.25-5.50; Ducks (ea) 5.50-8.50; Rabbits (/#) .80-2.30, (ea) 1-3.75; Pigeons (ea) 1-6.25; Chicks (ea) .25-1.70; Quail (ea) 2.50-3.25; Silkies (ea) 4.25; Guinea Pigs (ea) 2. Grade A Eggs: Brown Jum XL 1.40-1.65; L 1.50-1.55; M .80-1.40. Hay, Straw & Grain: 252 Mixed 1.10-2.70; 552 Grass .50-2.75; 180 Mulch .201.70. Total 984. CAMBRIDGE VALLEY

CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No Report

Gouverneur

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET No report

CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY August 13, 2012 Calves: Grower over 92# 85-120; 80-92# 65-85; Bob Veal 60-68. Cull Cows: Gd 79-84.50; Lean 72-80.50; Hvy. Beef Bulls 80. Beef: Feeders 398-725# 75-94; Steers 70-79. Lamb/Sheep:Slgh. Sheep 90. Goats: Billies 125-147.50; Nannies 90-117; Kid 40-75. Swine: Hog 28-35; Feeder Pig 42-60. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY August 8, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. .85-1.65; Grower Bulls over 92# .801.175; 80-92# .70-1.125; Bob Veal .10-.60. Cull Cows: Gd .72-.81; Lean .38-.72; Hvy. Beef Bulls .85-.88. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 575-960; Springing Hfrs. 940-1300; Springing Cows 685-1100; Bred Hfrs. 800-1300; Fresh Hfrs. 740-1310; Service Bulls 475-700. Beef: Ch 1.03-1.07; Sel .85-0.905; Hols. Ch .95; Sel .78-0.865. Lambs: Feeder 1-1.70; Market .85-1.30; Slaughter

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge

Bath

Chatham

Sheep .40-.60. Swine: Feeder Pig/hd 3045 DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY August 6, 2012 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# .90-1.40; 80-92# .70-1; Bob Veal .10-.50. Cull Cows: Gd .76-.84; Lean .67-.75; Hvy. Beef Bulls .78-.83. Goats: Nannies 70-125 Swine: Hog .54-.55 GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY August 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. .70-1.60; Grower Bulls over 92# .801.55; 80-92# .60-1.10; Bob Veal .20-.58. Cull Cows: Gd .77-.85; Lean .60-.78; Hvy. Beef Bulls .70-0.915. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY No report BATH MARKET Bath, NY August 9, 2012 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# 1.30-1.75; 80-92# .901.20; Bob Veal .10-.50. Cull Cows: Gd .75-.82; Lean .62-.76 Hvy Beef Bulls .82-.90. Goats: Billies 1.20; Nannies .70-.80. Swine: Boar .10-.20; Feeder Pig (/hd) 45-60. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY No report FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY August 8, 2012

Beans (1/2 bu): 5-23 Beets (bunch): .75-1.40 Blackberries (pt): 1.853.20 Blueberries (pt): 1.85-2 Broccoli (hd): .55-1.20 Cabbage (hd): .45-.95 Cantaloupes: .20-1.85 Cucumbers (1/2 bu): 2-10 Eggplants (1/2 bu): 3.50-6 Eggs (dz): .70-1.25 Grapes (1/2 bu): 16-22 Hot Peppers (1/2 bu): 3-8 Nectarines (1/2 bu): 15-29 Onions: .12-.70 Peaches (1/2 bu): 19.5028 Peppers (1/2 bu): 3-19 Pickles (1/2 bu): 3-30 Potatoes (1/2 bu): 5-10.50 Salad Tomatoes (pt): .251.05 Salt Potatoes (1/2 bu): 812.50 Sweet Corn (dz): 1.303.40 Summer Squash (1/2 bu): 5-12.50 Tomatoes (25#): 4-34 Watermelons: .25-3.75 Zucchini (1/2 bu): 1-12.50 FINGER LAKES FEEDER SALE Penn Yan, NY No report FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No Report HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY August 13, 2012 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util .70-.79; Canners/Cutters .58-.70; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls/Steers: .98 Feeders: Dairy .42-.80. Calves: Bull calves 96120# 1.10-1.40; up to 95# .10-1; Hfrs. Hols. under 100# 1.05.

BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA No report CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA August 14, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Char 1580# 108; Hols. Ch 145-1605# 101-104; Sel 1495# 93. Slaughter Cows: Breakers/Boners 77.50-84; Lean 74-88; Big Middle/Lo Dress/Lights 70-76; Shelly 65.50 & dn. Bulls: Hols. 1615# 91.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers Char 1000# w/horns 101.50; Hols. Hfrs. 625800# 80.50-89.50; Bulls dairy types 165-635# 74125. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 116124; 100-110# 108-115; No. 3 85-110# 70-100; Util 70-105# 52-67; Hols. Hfrs No. 2 80-130# 85-105. Goats (/hd): L Nannies/Billies 140-197; Nannies 92105; Small/Thin/Bottle 3495. Lambs: Gd & Ch 45-65# 104-140. Sale every Tuesday 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. Special Fed Cattle Sales Aug 21. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA August 7, 2012 Rabbits: 1-12.50

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 7

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT August 13 2012 Calves: 45-60# 20-32; 6175# 37.50-42.50; 76-90# 45-50; 91-105# 53-57.50; 106# & up 60-67.50. Farm Calves: .70-.76 Started Calves: .22-.30 Veal Calves: 1-1.55 Open Heifers: .65-1.1750 Beef Heifers: .65-1.10 Feeder Steers: .90-1 Beef Steers: .85-1 Stock Bull: .75-1.1750 Beef Bull: .67-.88 Sows: 5-25 Feeder Pigs (ea): 50-80 Sheep (ea): 75-105 Lambs (ea): 65-210 Goats (ea): 45-155 Kids Goats (ea): 40-60 Canners: up to 68 Cutters: 69-72.25 Utility: 73-80 Rabbits: 6-36 Chickens: 5-32 Ducks: 3-17


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Bunnies: .50-2 Roosters: .50-7.50 Chicken Families: 5 Hens: .50-7.50 Pullets: 2-3.50 Ducks: 3-8 Ducklings: 1-2.50 Duck Family: 9 Pigeons: 2 Pheasants: 6.50-9 Guinea: 7.50 Pot Belly Pig: 12 Peeps: .50 Guinea Keets: 4.50-5 Eggs (/dz): Jum Brown/White 1.50; L Brown 1.35-1.50; L Mixed .85; L White 1-1.10; L Green .85; Sm. Banty .30; Fertile Green/Brown .80; Fertile Brown .85-1; Fertile Guinea 4.50. Sale starts at 5 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC August 13, 2012 Cattle: Steers Ch 2-3 1320-1490# 114-116.50; Sel 1-3 hi dress 13201456# 114-117.50; Hols. Ch 2-3 1386# 98;. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 80-83; Breakers 7580; Boners 72-79.50; Lean 62-76.50. Bulls: Grade 1 1000-1754# 88-91; Grade 2 2188# 80.50. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 3 500-700# 91-94. Calves: 194. Bulls No. 1 94-114# 120-135; 88-92# 97-117; No. 2 94-114# 112130; 82-92# 75-95; No. 3 80-112# 62-100; 76-78# 40-60; Util 70-134# 30-60; 60-68# 10-32; Hfrs. No. 1 92-94# 145-155; No. 2 8494# 105-122. Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 5060# 115-120; 70-90# 122127; 100-120# 110-125; 130-160# 105-110; Ewes Util 1-2 128-196# 50-55. Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 1 40# 52; 60-70# 95-117; 80-90# 120-140; Sel 2 30-40# 3742; 60-70# 62-70; Billies Sel 1 200# 250. Hay (/ton): Alfalfa/Grass 210; Grass 110; Mixed 145205; Timothy Grass 80-120. Oats: 4/bu EarCorn: 260-270/ton EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA No report GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA

August 6, 2012 Feeder Catle: Steers M&L 1 500-700# 112.50; Hols. L 3 700-900# 77-83; Hfrs. M&L 1 200-300# 135-140; 300-500# 147.50; 500700# 119-125; Bulls M&L 1 300-500# 147; 500-700# 120. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 96-124# 120-130; 80-92# 60-80; No. 2 80-122# 90120; No. 3 76-108# 60-85; Util 56-104# 10-65. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 94-96# 110-135; No. 2 78-98# 60-80. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 50-60# 160; 60-70# 112-122.50; 70-90# 135152; 90-120# 127.50-130; 120-140# 127.50-135; Ewes 150-260# 45-69; Rams 164-232# 50-55. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 10-20# 23-25; 60-80# 105-115; Sel 2 30-40# 3234; 60-80# 58-62; Sel 3 2040# 17.50-25; Nannies Sel 1 100-130# 90-105; Sel 2 80-120# 59-92.50; Billies Sel 1 100-150# 175. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA June 21, 2012 No report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA August 11, 2012 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 230 Mixed Hay: 7 lds, 100-300 Grass: 5 lds, 100-190 Straw: 2 lds, 125-185 Rye Seed: 1 ld, 10.50 Oats: 1 ld, 4.50/bu LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA August 10, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1225-1570# 113118; Ch 2-3 1240-1580# 110-115.50; Sel 2-3 11601340# 104-112.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-4 1400-1680# 101-105; Ch 2-3 12701620# 95-99. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1100-1335# 110-114; Sel 2-3 1005-1320# 104109.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem.White 65-75% lean 77.50-80; Breakers 75-80% lean 75-80.50, hi dress 80.50-86, lo dress 6672.50; Boners 80-85% lean 70-75.50, hi dress 76.5078.50, lo dress 65-70; Lean 85-90% lean 64-70.50, hi dress 70.50-71.50, lo dress 59-64. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 925-1815# 91-100, hi dress 100-109, lo dress 84-91. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1

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Eighty-Four 120-128# 100; 94-118# 121-129, pkg 94# 94; 8692# 87-95; No. 2 112-128# 100; 98-110# 124-130; 9496# 112-117; 80-90# 8082; No. 3 80-130# 60-70; 72-78# 25; 72-78# 25; Util 60-110# 20-30; Hols. Hfr. Calves No. 1 90-110# 140170; No. 2 80-110# 80120. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA July 24, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 73.5079; Breakers 75-80% lean 68-72, hi dress 73-75.50; Boners 80-85% lean 6370; Lean 85-90% lean 6165, lo dress 45-59. Return to Farm Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 110-130; No. 2 95-120# 95110; No. 3 70-120# 60-80; Util 65-115# 20-60 LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA June 27, 2012 No report MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA No report MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA August 13, 2012 Steers: Ch 105-112; Gd 98-104. Heifers: Ch 103-110; Gd 100-102. Cows: Util & Comm. 72-85; Canner/lo Cutter 72 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 85-98. Bulls: YG 1 84-90 Cattle: Steers 95-120; Bulls 90-115; Hfrs. 80-120. Calves: Ch 115-125; Gd 90-110; Std 15-70; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 60-125. Hogs: US 1-2 63-68; US 13 60-63; Sows US 1-3 28-

35. Sheep: Lambs Ch 130150; Gd 115-130; SI Ewes 45-60 Goats: 15-175.

70; Util 70-120# 50-70. Holstein Heifers: No. 1 85-95# 110-130; No. 2 75100# 80-110; non-tubing 70-95# 50-70.

MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA August 13, 2012 Alfalfa: 245 Alfalfa/Grass: 210-265 Grass: 245-320 Timothy: 125-165 Mixed Hay: 125-140 Rd. Bales: 50-95 Lg. Sq. Bales: 115-150 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm.

NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA No report

MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA August 13, 2012 Roosters: 5-7.25 Banty Roosters: 1-3.75 Heavy Hens: 2-4.75 Banty Hens: .25-4 Pigeons: 2-4.25 Ducks: 4-5 Bunnies: 1.25-4 Rabbits: 10-21 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA August 13, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-70% lean 82-84, hi dress 91-94; Breakers 75-80% lean 79-82.50, hi dress 84-87, lo dress 7476; Boners 80-85% lean 75-79, hi dress 80-84, lo dress 71-73.50; Lean 8890% lean 73-78, hi dress 81-81.50, lo dress 63-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 900-1775# 106.50-112.50, hi dress 114-119.50, lo dress 92-104. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-120# 125-140; 80-90# 97-100; No. 2 95-120# 100120; 80-90# 70-80; No. 3 95-120# 70-85; 80-90# 60-

NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA August 13, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: NonTraditional, Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 177220; 60-80# 152-195; 8090# 142-160; 90-110# 125150; 110-130# 130-147; 130-150# 146; 150-200# 130-136; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 40-60# 130-175; 6080# 126-172; 80-90# 112146; 90-110# 108-128; 110-130# 100-126; 130150# 120-128. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 80-100# 90-98; 100130# 68-80; 130-160# 5468; 160-200# 80; Util 1-2 Thin Flesh 100-130# 5080; 130-160# 40-68; 160200# 42-55; 200-300# 40. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-80# 97-138; 80-120# 126-154; 140-150# 168177; Sel 2 40-80# 90-126; 80-90# 120-126; Sel 3 2060# 42-92; 60-80# 86-110; 80-90# 106-117. Slaughter Nannies/Does: Sel 1 80-130# 137-157; 130-180# 148-166; Sel 2 80-130# 115-130; 130180# 135-150; Sel 3 5080# 64-75; 80-130# 70-80. Slaughter Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 162-174; 150-250# 198-237; Sel 2 100-150# 136-146; 1150250# 162-190; Sel 3 100150# 90-135; 150-250# 190. Slaughter Whethers: Sel 1 100-120# 110-127; Sel 2 90-110# 100-112; Sel 3 6080# 64-87.

NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Report Compared to last week corn sold steady to firm, wheat sold steady, Barley sold .20-.25 higher, Oats sold .10 to .015 higher & Soybeans sold .15-.20 higher. EarCorn sold steady to 1 higher. All prices per bushel except EarCorn is per ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 8.55-9.01, Avg 8.76, Contracts 8; Wheat No. 2 8.65-9.05, Avg 8.93, Contracts 8; Barley No. 3 4.305.85, Avg 5.05, Contracts 5.85; Oats No. 2 4.50-4.70, Avg 4.60; Soybeans No. 2 15.98-16.78, Avg 16.41, Contracts 15.40-15.42; EarCorn 240. SouthCentral PA: Corn No. 2 8.50-8.90, Avg 8.97; Wheat No. 2 7.15-8.85, Avg 8.14; Barley No. 3 4-5.50, Avg 4.62; Oats No. 2 3.255, Avg 3.96; Soybeans No. 2 15.80-16.44, Avg 16.24; EarCorn 210. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 8.40-9.23, Avg 8.81, Month Ago 8.17, Year Ago 8.17; Wheat No. 2 7.15-9.05, Avg 8.54, Month Ago 8.09, Year Ago 8.61; Barley No. 3 4-5.85, Avg 4.83, Month Ago 4.66, Year Ago 4.67; Oats No. 2 3.255, Avg 4.15, Month Ago 4, Year Ago 4.25; Soybeans No. 2 15.35-16.78, Avg 16.17, Month Ago 15.31, Year Ago 13.51; EarCorn 195-240, Avg 215, Month Ago 210, Year Ago 198.75. Western PA: Corn No. 2 88.90, Avg 8.34; Wheat No. 2 8-8.60, Avg 8.36; Oats No. 2 3.50-4.50, Avg 4.05; Soybeans No. 2 16.09. Central PA: Corn No. 2 8.40-9.232, Avg 8.85; Wheat No. 2 8.84; Barley No. 3 5; Oats No. 2 4-4.50, Avg 4.18; Soybeans No. 2 15.35-16.78, Avg 15.93; EarCorn 195. Lehigh Valley: Corn No. 2 8.80-9.10, Avg 8.85; Wheat No. 2 9; Oats No. 2 3.553.85, Avg 3.70; Soybeans No. 2 16.10-16.34, Avg 16.23. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Summary No Report

mostly 105-145. Shippensburg Auction: August 4 & 7, 27 lds hay, 7 lds straw, Alfalfa 225, Mixed Hay 65-215, Timothy 120220, Grass 70-162, Straw 115-137.50. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: No report.

59-65.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 few 1450-1535# 91-93. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-115# 100-127; No. 2 85-110# 75-95; No. 3 80115# 50-70; Util 60-90# 1245. *Next Feeder Cattle Sale Sept. 14.

WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA August 9, 2012 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 195-225 Orchard Grass: 3 lds, 150225. Mixed Hay: 11 lds, 100325 Grass: 5 lds, 80-325 EarCorn: 250-260 Oats: 1 ld, 5.35/bu

Rye: 2 lds, 14.75-15/bu. Shavings: 1 ld, 2.60/bg WOLGEMUTH AUCTION August 15, 2012 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 280 Mixed Hay: 19 lds, 80-360 Timothy: 4 lds, 125-305 Grass: 10 lds, 55-300 Straw: 6 lds, 155-220 Rye: 1 ld, 145/bu.

VINTAGE SALES STABLES August 13, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1300-1580# 117119, hi dress 120-121; Ch 2-3 1220-1540# 113.50116.50, Sel 2-3 12101460# 109-113; Hols. Ch 23 1280-1656# 97-100; Sel 2-3 1245-1445# 92-97. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1180-1315# 111-114.50; Sel 2-3 1135-1150# 108111. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 73.50-79.50, lo dress 69-71; Boners 8085% lean 71.50-74.50, hi dress 74.50-78; Lean 8590% lean 67-72.50, hi dress 73-76.50, lo dress

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August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 9

PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and/ton. Compared to last week hay sold steady to 10 lower & straw sold steady. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Alfalfa 140-325; Mixed Hay 110-325; Timothy 100-250; Straw 100180; Mulch 50-75. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 83 lds of hay, 13 of Straw; Alfalfa 190-415; Mixed Hay 100-420; Timothy 185-320; Grass 120320; Straw 120-185. Diffenbach Auction, August 6, 50 lds Hay, 6 lds Straw. Alfalfa 240-415; Mixed Hay 100-420; Timothy 180-320; Grass 120320; Straw 120-170. Green Dragon Auction, August 10, 9 lds Hay, 4 lds Straw. Alfalfa 190-200;

Mixed Hay 185-205; Grass 140-240; Straw 160-210. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: August 4, No report. Wolgemuth Auction, August 8, 24 lds Hay, 3 lds Straw. Alfalfa 225-280; Mixed hay 100-300; Timothy 245-305; Grass 165250; Straw 167-185. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 62 Loads Hay, 20 Straw. Alfalfa 225-230; Mixed Hay 65-300; Timothy 80-220; Grass 70-190; Straw 55185, mostly 110-175. Dewart Auction, Dewart: No report. Greencastle Livestock: No report Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: August 11, 14 lds Hay, 2 lds Straw. Alfalfa 230; Mixed Hay 100-300; Grass 100-190; Straw 125185. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: August 7, 12 lds Hay, 9 Straw. Mixed 125-300; Timothy 80-165; Grass 105-120; Straw 55-145,


Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Prevent from B3 range from an elevated breathing rate, restlessness, and drooling, animals standing in pens and grouped together in Stages 1 through 3 to labored breathing, decreased heart rate, tongue protruding, open mouth breathing, head down and isolation in Stages 4 through 6. Typically for dairy cows, heat stress is noticed in the production of less milk with lower milk fat and protein. “These take approximately three days to be seen,” Hawkins said. “Initially, the cows will have a higher respiration rate (80 per minute), more standing, less dry matter intake, more water consumption and seeking the shade or cooler locations.” He suggests calling a veterinarian when body temperature is over 102.5 degrees, there is increased ketosis, and the respiration rate is over 90. Hawkins recommends the following management tips to prevent heat stress:

• Provide adequate shade, fans, misters; • Provide extra cooling in holding areas, cool water; • Use propionic acid to prevent feed heating in bunk; • Feed multiple times and at cooler parts of the day to encourage intake; • Keep feed pushed up and as fresh as possible to enhance intake. “Reduced feed intake is a main effect of heat stress,” Hawkins said. “The loss of nutrition intake needs to be of concern to maintain cow performance and health.” According to Dr. Mike Hutjens, University of Illinois, producers should consider the following nutrient guidelines during periods of heat stress: • Maintain 20 to 22 percent effective NDF (neutral detergent fiber) in the ration to maintain cud chewing and forage raft in the rumen; • Limit total crude protein to less than 18 percent on a dry matter basis with 6.5 to 7 percent

as RUP (rumen undegraded protein); • Maintain 28 to 30 percent NDF, 18 to 20 percent ADF (acid detergent fiber); • Target 24 to 26 percent starch and 4 to 6 percent sugar to adjust the rate of carbohydrate fermentation in the rumen and favor microbial growth; • Raise DCAD over 350+ meq per kg; • Increase total ration potassium to 1.4 to 1.6 percent, sodium to 0.4 to 0.5 percent, and magnesium to 0.35 percent. Feed additives can also be beneficial. According to Hutjens, yeast culture and fungal products can help to stabilize rumen pH and improve the rumen environment while maintaining fiber digestion. These products can also reduce lactic acid levels in the rumen that can drop rumen pH. For more information, contact your local Alltech sales representative or e-mail AlltechDairyAdvantage@alltech.com.


Save money by properly sealing your silage by Keith Bolsen, Professor Emeritus with Kansas State University and Ruthie Bolsen, Managing Director with Keith Bolsen & Associates With the price of feedstuffs today, sealing and protecting silage has never been more important. When it comes time to seal corn silage this harvest remember, what you choose to cover and seal it with matters. Many different products exist on the market to seal bunkers and drive-over piles, but not all are equal.

Selecting the right covering material and properly sealing corn silage can have a significant economic impact. Losses from unsealed or incorrectly sealed corn silage exceed a quarter billion dollars every year. Money is lost from both spoiled silage, which has to be discarded, and from decreased nutritional value of the silage itself. Pitching spoiled silage is also a safety hazard for employees. Eliminating the need to pitch surface spoilage could save

your life or someone else’s, because you’ve eliminated the hazard. To protect ensiled feeds and combat these losses look to an oxygen barrier film. Oxygen barrier film is 60 times more effective at protecting silage from oxygen than standard plastic covers. Oxygen barrier film will reduce dry matter loss in the outer 1.5 to 3 feet of silage by 50 percent or more compared to regular bunker covers. It is advised to look for the term “oxygen trans-

mission rate” or OTR when selecting a covering material. Choose a product with a very low OTR number and ask for the test data that backs the number. The lower the number, the less oxygen will get through. It’s also advisable to consider using a two-layer system to cover ensiled forage or grain. The first layer prevents oxygen from getting in and the second layer protects the oxygen barrier film from damaging ultraviolet light.

For more information, e-mail Keith Bolsen at

keithbolsen@hotmail.co m.

Oxygen barrier film is being placed over a pile of alfalfa. Oxygen barrier film is more effective at protecting silage from oxygen than standard plastic covers.

PUBLIC EQUIPMENT AUCTION for PADULA BROS

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August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 11

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Producers to learn about nutrient-dense forages

Page 12 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

WESTFIELD, VT — Farmers are invited to visit Butterworks Farm in Westfield on Aug. 28 for a field day focusing on nutrient-dense forages and soil health. The 350-acre certified organic dairy farm, owned and operated by Jack and Anne Lazor, is known throughout the Northeast for its quality dairy products including yogurts, heavy cream and cheeses. The Lazors will describe their nutrient-dense land management practices, including how they improve soil health to produce high-quality forages and grains for their high-pro-

ducing Jersey herd. The longtime Northeast Kingdom dairy producers also will discuss their ongoing forage research conducted in collaboration with University of Vermont Extension, sponsor of the field day, which runs from 10 a.m.

to 3 p.m. Their goal is to reduce the need for additional grain feeding of their herd by growing forage crops with exceptionally high levels of lipid or plant fats to increase whole plant energy. In addition, John Kempf of Advancing Eco-

Agriculture in Middlefield, Ohio, will be on hand to answer questions about whole farm health and discuss his work with nutrient-dense soil amendments and ways to maximize photosynthesis and root growth to help crops achieve their full

potential. The registration fee is $15 and includes lunch from NOFA-VT’s mobile pizza oven. Registrations will be accepted online until Aug. 23 at www.uvm.edu/extension/cropsoil. For more information

or to register by phone, call 800-639-2130 (tollfree in Vermont) or 802524-6501 to speak to Susan Brouillette or Heather Darby. To request a disability-related accommodation to participate, contact Brouillette by Aug. 20.

FIRST ANNUAL PET SECTION!

Pets are an important part of our lives. Let our Pet Owners know what products or services you offer. Take advantage of the coverage area of our regional and local papers.

Trucking industry stakeholders asked to rank top concerns ARLINGTON, VA — The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI), the trucking industry’s not-for-profit research organization, on Aug. 7 launched the 2012 Top Industry Issues Survey. The annual survey, commissioned by the American Trucking Associations (ATA), asks trucking industry stakeholders to rank the top issues of concern for the industry along with appropriate strategies for addressing each issue. This year the survey has been streamlined to allow the industry to give feedback more quickly, while also providing a broader range of issues to consider. The results of the 2012 survey will be released at the ATA Annual Management Conference and Exhibition, to be held Oct. 7-10 in Las Vegas. Industry stakeholders are encouraged to complete the survey online. Alternately a paper copy is available on ATRI’s website at www.atri-online.org.

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Your ad will appear in the September Issue of Mane Stream. Choose additional coverage in Country Folks, Country Folks Grower, The Original Valley Pennysaver, The Original Family Pennysaver, and The Dollar Saver. FEEDERS • VET SERVICES • FOOD PET ADOPTIONS • BEDDING • TREATS RESCUES • SUPPLEMENTS • GROOMING TRAINING • REPELLANTS • BOARDING FENCING & KENNELS • CARRIERS & CRATES • SUPPLIES

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• Country Folks Grower is a monthly trade newspaper that serves the horticultural industry. Published in 3 regional editions that cover the northern 2/3 of the US, CF Grower covers monthly topics for commercial greenhouses, nurseries, fruit & vegetable growers, producers of specialty foods, gardening centers, landscapers and the Christmas industry. www.cfgrower.com

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of web. t Foodan even greater numberthe ing on the 2002 the Gourme In 2001 and and 29 the customers. Most of Gourmet On June 28 ip came togeth their last year will membersh its first the Maine SFP’s will stage Food vendors from and we exand completed ifying MG& again Gour met ucerand’sexhibit erstrate History of 2 Annual in- be back have many new Prod gic plan ident to includ- Festival. Last year 25 Food ty to- pect en to be Trade Show the three major goals ial at happ came posicts inec you a If ote members a susta to bers produ trip And Sp And to prom g the ing, Creating tent on ones. a s- trepid pro- mem

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large aggre ol durin group of of foods of planning Maine on that gether in a State capit of Agricul- able organization, tive image In 1987 a small in front marssed in t Freeport, producers see and proce the green Departmen at the Legis- sively promote and member come by and specialty food ia- duced ization, its SFP’s samfirst assoc ’. weekend ture’s ‘Ag day ket the organ products MG& r’s lots of free Chocolates formed the ote Maine’s Maine. the organiza- lature’. and to us. With ‘Wilbu from you Since then MG&SFP’s members tion to prom try. lent exposure a ples to choose to over 60 ber ben’! In 1999 the food indus has grown Ejust expand mem nt em- With excel ‘free lunch specialty traffic and selves tion bers with a diverse launched WWW.MAIN et and 1 curre can get a them the Route serving for mem mark efits. With away from its They set ers will be cts. Their S.ORG to upgrading stones throw managed to Memb treats from musgoals: range of produ s have re- FOOD specialty phasis on imfour basic , cowe and of great ilities et up effort spirit LL Bean the web site capab , cheese to combined crowd of To foster a organi- gourm cts through of a regular attract a nice in sels to salsa stability and sulted in a strong food produ Since plementation year we are cookies and everything operation, being has developed World Wide Web. r for members buyers. This your well , zation that advertising ization has e-newslette ded ad cameconomic to maren. Just bring fun. more site organ bers, g betwe the web e mem addin expan more a uniqu and have pro- then the Uni- and an amongst its is steadily a larger banner and taste buds ered with a framework ket their products, to attract To provide sem- partn of Maine at Orono paign the group ess towards temporary signs and coopy shops and n beng for re- making progr for networking d- duce work the members. versit be the liaiso ties, inclu pursue fundi eting op- these goals. for will to activi e He e inars parMain erativ clariand adver- Each year members hing mark the Heart of y that will help De- searc analyzing ing marketing ies surve value - tween and the MG&SFP the Maine nities and needs of opportunit RC&D ticipate in project ulture portu tising, marketing cers fy the food producers in an advocacy partment of Agric carrying out as the food produ To provide added and for for Maine ature, . Part of his terms of marketing ties, such will activi Gritty Details of role in legisl and processors t in the tools that assis to oping “Nitty the be ar and job will web devel exposure al Selling” semin process of nt. generate greater Food Festiv cts. He will in- ongoing developme try and to nt for their produ to update Gour met taking place is food indus profitability of conte ermore, he will be be helping which is 29 in ct whose goal - Furth n of a also crease the Strategic Plan June 28 and ment proje strengthen small, farm-based value ing on the desig MG&SPF’s of Maine help a marketing Freeport. to cers and work The Heart added n. and design food produ Inc. and the Maine’s value organizatio pro- added project is RC&D Area, plan for the met and Spe- farm producers. The are processors. The a Federal Gour e Main Producers main goals t, being funded by ject’s two et Imcialty Food exten State Mark are working to survey the size, state’s and (MG&SFP) rtProgram (FSMaine Depa a and needs of the essed provement with the June 4 ulture in - added/proc MIP) grant. na, a gradment of Agric ing op- value mic devel Stefano Tijeri Spring Meet nic Web Listings Dejoint econo nt from the Orga uate stude ntation Adof Harvey Marof Public Feature Prese y - Managing Partner about how to ent partm n at the UniElizabeth Harve discuss the latest buzzengines. Techministratio h p will e, has come source keting Grou site noticed by the searc e an on line versity of Main the Heart e cases to dissome onlin maine becom ation relevant to to help your web view get www. board will on we SFP inform itting This year its of the MG& food indus nology perm undergoing of Maine and project. He the specialty of the site works best. 12 Bangor foods.org is what this When g de. out cover upgra June carry This part ils of Sellin first major ing as a Reprotectare try. Gritty Deta vements will be work be password be limThe Nitty Marketing and the impro de a will will Seminar it will provi search and June 13 Portl ons will focus on selland access completed bringing with processor locati of serv- ed alist, two food level in r ito Speci ct placement ar held iate much highe and ited years of exper , out and produ This semin and assoc restaucustomers him seven ct from roll , media alty stores, e members It will provide produ ice to our eting speci to your resum mark cts ing shows, corWe will produ ence in members. line gement. He members. Tijerina, Maine to marketing your tips for trade hly drawings members with on ing, alty and web mana Columbia. Stefano s etc. with offering mont and Speci of cuslicens , chain store g. ivate the to sites for is a native the Houston Gourmet cers’ new intern rants and and react sales and pricin 28 and 29 reg- links in al on InFood Produ letter with and porate June ess assistancerelatHe worked years prior tomer news of new prod- busin to assess met Food Festiv products will work area for three al Maine GourMaine. ’s farmsources of e. line Annu t ular features d On Maine Main to abou try. g ve Secon ort, impro articles to movin ed to the indus be avail-added food dependence Green, Freep be conductucts and based, value ssors. Stefano will Specialty food conferencing will market rethe Maine proce informaand other ing extensive ding on-line producers industry. g as able as deterinclu servin h, to needs searc l In addition marketing tiona bers. for d by the mem a showplace will mine products it member’s

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August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 13

Press Releases? Advertisements? Trade Shows? Signs? Banners? Direct Mail? Buyers Guide? Inserts? Some examples of what some other organizations have done to promote their Members, Association, and Industry...


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You

Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

The Kitchen Diva

by Angela Shelf Medearis Spice up your rice Rice is a staple food for two-thirds of the world’s population. In fact, 85 percent of the rice consumed in the U.S. is grown right here! Farmers in Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Texas, Missouri and Mississippi produce more than 20 billion pounds of rice each year. They produce high-quality varieties of short-, medium- and long-grain rice, as well as specialty rices including basmati, arborio, red aromatic, black japonica and jasmine. Jasmine is a long-grain rice variety, also known as fragrant, aromatic or scented rice. Grown in the mountain highlands of Thailand for centuries, jasmine rice was first cultivated for the royalty of the kingdom of Siam. It’s named after the sweet-smelling jasmine flower of Southeast Asia. Jasmine rice has a naturally distinctive scent released during the cooking process and is likened to a flowery perfume. Jasmine rice is praised for its whiteness and silkiness. When cooked, it is soft, white and fluffy. According to the American Dietetic Association, rice is a good choice for a healthy diet. It is a good source of complex carbohydrates and can help you achieve a reduced-fat diet. Rice also is gluten-free — as long as you watch how it’s prepared. Many recipes and restaurants use chicken stock instead of water to cook their rice. Some chicken stocks contain gluten, so any rice cooked in such stocks is not gluten-free. This recipe is a perfect way to create a gluten-free side dish using jasmine rice. Nutrient-dense parsley adds to the health benefits and flavor.

Lemon-lime jasmine parsley rice

1 3/4 cups water 1 1/2 cups jasmine or white rice

1 teaspoon salt, divided 1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup diced green onions 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 1/2 teaspoons stevia or agave syrup 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper to taste 1 cup finely chopped parsley 1. Place rice in a glass bowl containing 3 cups cool water. Move your fingers through grains of rice to remove some of the excess starch. Drain, refill bowl with cool water and repeat the process until the water looks clear and without any milky residue. Drain off the water. 2. Place rice in a pot with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Bring rice to a boil, uncovered. Turn heat down to the lowest setting. Cover and simmer until the rice is cooked through (about 20 minutes). Remove rice from the heat and allow to sit, still covered, for at least 10 minutes before fluffing with a fork. 3. While rice cooks, toast pine nuts in a dry skillet over medium-low heat. Shake skillet frequently, about

stock.xchg photo every 30 seconds, to ensure even browning. Pine nuts are small and full of rich oil, and will burn quickly if not watched carefully. When nuts are fragrant and lightly browned, remove pan from heat. Transfer pine nuts to a plate to cool. 4. Add oil to the pan and saute green onions for 2 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another 1 to 2 minutes. Add in lemon and lime juice, stevia and remaining salt. Add cooked rice, pine nuts, black pepper and parsley. Continue to cook until parsley is slightly wilted. Serves 4. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

Senior News Line

by Matilda Charles Three simple steps to weight loss Far too many of us, women especially, can develop weight problems as we age. We’re less active. Menopause doesn’t help. We might have different eating patterns. Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have done a study that looked at self-monitoring as a way to reduce weight.

The study results show how we can lose weight safely in three steps: 1) Keep a journal that reports everything that’s eaten; 2) Don’t skip meals; and 3) Don’t go out to lunch. Sounds so simple, doesn’t it. They divided 123 overweight and obese senior women into two groups for the yearlong study: one group used diet and exercise, and the other only diet. Here’s what they learned: Women who kept journals of what they ate lost six pounds more than those who didn’t keep a journal. This appeared to be the most important of the three steps, and it makes sense. If we write down exactly what we eat, it’s easier to identify whether we’re meeting our goals. The trick is to be honest, and being honest means measuring portions and reading labels — and always keeping your journal with you in case you do eat while away from home. Women who went out for lunch at least once a week lost five pounds less than those who didn’t, or who ate lunch out less frequently. When you eat at a restaurant, you can’t control the size of the portions or how the food is cooked. Women who skipped meals lost eight pounds less than those who didn’t skip meals. Researchers weren’t sure why this was so, but it could be that being hungry leads to overeating or eating out. Eating at regular times gave the best success. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

This week’s Sudoku Solution


Why has the 20:20 milk replacer been the industry standard? by R. E. James, Extension Dairy Scientist, Dairy Nutrition For many years milk replacers containing 20 percent protein and 20 percent fat fed at a rate of 1 pound of powder per day have been commonly accepted as the best diet

for dairy calves. The powder was diluted with water to yield one gallon of liquid with about 12 percent solids. Why? At the time these recommendations were developed, the goal in raising dairy calves was to provide limited nutrients

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milk replacer solids per day which contains 25 percent protein supports optimal growth and later performance. Desired fat content of the dry matter portion of the diet can vary from a low of 10 percent (summer) to as much as 30 percent during the coldest weather. These diets have commonly been referred to as “intensive” or “accelerated” programs when “biologically normal” is probably more appropriate. The greatest risk in feeding limited amounts (1 pound powder or one gallon liquid) of a 20:20 milk replacer occurs dur-ing the first two weeks of life when calf starter intake is minimal regardless of the liquid feeding program. Preweaned calves should double their birth weight by the time the reach 60 days of age. This requires an average daily gain of only 1.5 pounds per day for Holsteins and about 1 pound per day for Jerseys. “Biologically normal” feeding programs will cost more per day. The return is in a lower cost per unit of gain, improved health and less treatment for respiratory disease and scours and higher production during the first lactation. Cornell studies found that each pounds of average daily gain during the preweaning period was worth more than 1,000 pounds of milk in the first lactation. Cutting feed cost by limit feeding calves a 20:20 milk replacer is a short sighted management decision which sacrifices future health and productivity of the animal. Source: Dairy Pipeline, July/August 2012

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 15

Very early consignments include: JD 2355 w/ 2900 hrs; MF 394H High Clearance tractor; Bobcat 440 Skid Steer; Oliver 550; 2011 McCormick X10-25 4wd w/ ldr-25 hrs like new; Small Essick vibratory roller; Irrigation pump w/ 6cyl Ford eng; New 3pt fence line mower; New Skid Steer attachments; New Taylor Way dump trailer; Pneumasem 2row vegetable planter used only for test plots at University-like new; 100s more items coming in. Call or email us early to add yours to this growing list!

milk replacer solids is barely enough nutrition to support 200g of gain per day when the temperature is 60 degrees. As the temperature drops to 46 degrees, there isn’t enough energy to support any gain and the calf will begin mobilizing body fat. The consequences of limit feeding calves are higher mortality and disease as demon-strated by a Minnesota study where 52 percent of calves fed this diet were treated for disease during the winter and approximately 13 percent during the summer. In this same study, calves fed pasteurized cow’s milk had corresponding treatment rates of 20 percent and 4 percent. Extensive research conducted at multiple universities — as well as feed company research — indicates a positive relationship between the composition of the liquid diet fed to calves and their growth, health, and performance once they reach the milking herd. Feeding recommendations are heavily dependent upon environmental conditions, but indicate that feeding at least 1.5 to 2.5 pounds of milk or


Maine Farm Days event Aug. 22 and 23 in Clinton CLINTON, MAINE — Maine Farm Days is scheduled this year for Aug. 22 and 23 in Clinton, Maine. The event will be at Misty Meadows Farm on the Hill Road. It will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. dai-

ly. Admission is free and open to the public. A chicken lunch will be served each day, sponsored by Pine Tree Camp. An entire range of displays and exhibits will be on hand for folks of all

Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Commemorative book honors 50 years of mastitis control and milk quality

ages and interests. It is an excellent opportunity for the entire family to visit a working farm and learn about how the farm works. Plan to visit the farm and see what goes on in those big barns and throughout the fields. Misty Meadows invites

you as a neighbor to see what they do throughout the year. For example, The Misty Meadows farm produces enough milk every day — 4,000 gallons — to make over 2,500 gallons of ice cream. Come and take advantage of their productivity.

The event includes activities for both farmers and non-farmers alike. Included are a range of agribusiness exhibits, equipment dealers, wagon tours, children’s learning center, craft tent, farmers market and educational speakers

and presentations. It is an extravaganza of animals, farm information, interesting people, equipment, food and entertaining displays. Visit www.kcswcd.org and select the Maine Farm Days 2012 tab for more information.

VERONA, WI — The National Mastitis Council announces the release of its commemorative book. The commemorative book is a collection of the past 50 years of mastitis control, milk quality, the history of the National Mastitis Council, personal recollections from current and past members as well as a look at what the future of milk quality holds. “Through the years NMC has grown from humble beginnings into an organization of internationally recognized experts in the field of milk quality,” says Sheila Andrew, president of NMC. “As you read this historical tribute, we hope it reminds you of the great strides in mastitis research, the importance of the original five-point plan and how NMC has been successful in providing current, science-based educational information to generations of dairy producers and their consultants for more than 50 years.” Special thanks are given to everyone who contributed to this book, including past presidents, members, staff, sponsors and industry publications. Sponsors include: A&L Laboratories, Inc., Alltech, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc., BouMatic, DairyBusiness Communications, Dairy Farmers of America, Inc., Dairy Herd Management, Dairy Today, DeLaval, Inc., Ecolab Inc., Elanco Animal Health, Filament Marketing, GEA Farm Technologies, Inc., Hoard’s Dairyman, IDEXX Laboratories, Land O’Lakes, Inc., Lauren AgriSystems, Pfizer Animal Health and Progressive Dairyman. To view a copy of the commemorative booklet visit: http://bit.ly/MXkO46.

TWO DAY PUBLIC C AUCTION Dayy Onee

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Dayy Two o AUG. 25th Same Location, Saturday @ 9 AM 35 + Minneopolis-Moline and Oliver Tractors (all are MM based). Collectable Tractors, Parts, Later Model Tractors, Trucks, Equip. !! NO BUYERS PREMIUM FOR ONSITE BUYERS !! Auctionzip.com #3721 for Online Bidding Leaman n Auctionss Ltd.. AY002063

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Bedding

    

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101 or bsnyder@leepub.com

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

40 Years Experience

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250

www.wineandgrapegrower.com Or Call For a Sample Copy

 WANTED 

HEIFERS

800-218-5586 Cattle

REG. TEXAS LONGHORNS: Cow/calf pairs, heifers, bulls, exhibition steers. See www.triplemlonghorns.com Tom/Julie (w)607-363-7814, 607-287-2430

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

Dairy Cattle

(ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

Herd Expansions

WANTED All Size Heifers

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170. FOR SALE: Registered Holstein heifer, Hill Daughter bred to Denim, due 9/18, $1,700. 518-257-6718

Building Materials/Supplies

Building Materials/Supplies

Agricultural Buildings Metal Roofing Pressure Treated Posts

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101 Dairy Equipment

Lower your SCC & improve conception. Low cost, effective, easy use. Our 39th year. If over 50,000 SCC call today. 1-800876-2500 1-920-650-1631 www.alphageneticsinc.com

2” PIPELINE 360’ with receiver and washer $1,850. Patz HD unit rebuilt 360’ CCW 12” Hi-Flites $1850. 2 Boumatic FR4 Vacuum pumps, 5hp motors and tanks, $900 each. 10’ hairpin precooler, $900. mur phytc@frontier net.net 315-691-6723

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE:

CENTER HILL BARNS RICHARD PITMAN, INC

P.O. BOX 262  EPSOM  NEW HAMPSHIRE 03234

TELEPHONE 603.798.5087

LOOKING FOR PRIVATE SALE of our Holstein milking herd. 50-60 Holsteins, miking at 60Lbs. each. Also have dry cows for sale. Please call Margaret at 203-627-5867

- WANTED -

Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Barn Repair BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Business Opportunities

Do You Grow Grapes? Do You Make Wine? CHECK OUT

Dairy Cattle

Cow Power Registered Angus Sale: September 15th in Millbrook, NY. For more information www.conoverauction.com or call 641-227-3537

Call Us with your information or email

REG. JERSEY Heifer Calves, $150.00 without papers, $200.00 with papers. FREE bull calves. Call days only 8am-8pm 207-322-2767

315-269-6600

Beef Cattle

OPEN HEIFERS NEEDED

www.cattlesourcellc.com

978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

Seward Valley 518-234-4052

HEIFER BOARDING Concentrate Your Efforts on Making Milk - Let Us Raise Your Heifers - Quality Care ~ References Available ~ SILAGE ALSO AVAILABLE Springfield, VT • 802-885-4000

24-29 G Pane a. ls

Business Opportunities

Lorne Twist

Dairy Cattle

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822

or email classified@leepub.com

Florida Osceola Turkey • Alligator • Hog Hunts

Dairy Cattle

FAX 603.798.5088

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Dairy Equipment

DAIRY BARN EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 50 Cow Pipeline, 5 HP Vacuum pump, 650 gal. Dairy Cool Tank, 50 Stanchions & Bowls, 200’ Hay Elevator, Gutter Chain, Houle Magnum Pump

CALL 802-782-9058 Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

Farm Equipment

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

Case IH 600 blower $1,700, Richardton 1016 table tender $2,500, Rissler 230 stationary mixer $3,500. All is in good working condition. 802-3494037

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159 Dogs BORDER COLLIE PUPS. Red, Black, Blue & Merle, working lines, ABCA Reg. Shots.Dep. 518-673-5456

Dairy Equipment

BERG-BENNETT, INC.

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866 Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

2 CATERPILLAR 15’s, one w/rear crank & ice tracks, $4,500 OBO/both. 315-5933529 2006 Case 621D Wheel Loader; 5100 hrs; 2.5 yard bucket; quick coupler; heated cab. Located in Ithaca,NY area. Call 607-319-9875. CASE/IH 7130 Magnum 4x4, 18spd. power shift, 4revs, 42” rubber, $29,500; Case/IH 3394 4x4, 6spd., power shift, 20.8-38 duals, $18,500; 6500 gal. Semi-Tanker for manure, field spread or transfer w/boom, good working condition, $12,500. Must sell. 607382-7722

Farm Machinery For Sale

Int’l 5288, 4WD, ROPS, 200 hp, 4,000 hrs., $15,000; Int’l 766, Black Stripe, Cab, 3,100 hrs. orig, Super nice! $12,500; JD 750, 2WD, 23hp, turf tires, $4,200; Int’l 574, 50 hp, gas, 3ph., $3,800; NH 1412, 10’ Discbine, flail cond., $8,500; Kverneland Round Bale Processor, $2,500; Kelly Backhoe #30, 6’, 3ph., good cond., $2,800; NH 329 Manure sprdr., 90 bu., $2,200; Full line of farm equipment available! www.youngsmilkywayfarm.com 802-885-4000

JOHN DEERE TRACTOR PARTS

JD 213 flex head with cart, very good, $4,500; JD 6 row cultivator, $1,500; Paul livestock scale, $650; square bale grabber, $650. 802-644-5974 JD BALER PARTS: Used, New Aftermarket and rebuilt. JD canopy new aftermarket, $750. Call for pictures. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705 JOHN DEERE 5603, 85pto hp, cab, 4wd, 500 hrs., $35,000. NH TN60A, 4wd, loader 900 hrs., $22,000. Woods 9000 3ph backhoe, $4,500. Land Pride RBT4096 backblade $1,650. 300 gal. fuel tank $500. mur phytc@frontier net.net 315-691-6723

FARMALL 340 pulling tractor, new tires, weight brackets, $5,800/OBO; Farmall 560 pulling tractor, $6,400/OBO. 518-945-1715, 518-567-1532

JOHN DEERE Kernel processor, fully reconditioned, new rollers and bearings, fits all 6000 series John Deere silage chopper $5,000. or best offer. 802-758-2138

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

SUMMER

B A R GA I N S !! ‘81 IH 1086 w/ Cab, 4,000 Hrs., Local Trade . . . . . .$12,750 Nice JD 325 55 Ldr., 3,900 Hrs., Wgts . . . . . . . . . . .$13,900 ‘70 JD 4000 Diesel, 2 Hyd., 5,900 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 Claas 180 Round Baler w/ Netwrap, Very Good Condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,000 Claas 66 4x5 Round Baler, Very Good Condition. . . . .$8,750 JD 458 Standard Round Baler, LIKE NEW. . . . . . . . .$13,750 NH TB120 4WD Tractor, 115hp, Open Station, 2000 Hrs., Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,500 New Galfre 17 ft. Hyd Fold Hay Tedders, Only 4 Left!. . .$5,750 NH 1037 Bale Wagon, Very Good, Bargain!. . . . . . . . $12,500 NH 1033 Baler Wagon, 105 Bale, Good Condition. . . .$4,500 Agco Massey Ferguson 3435GE 4WD Orchard Tractor w/Cab & Alo 710 Loader, 1600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 NH 269 Baler w/Thrower, Used Last Week, Very Good. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Ingersoll Rand VR530 Telehandler w/Cab, Bucket Forks, 1500 Hrs., Like New Condition! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000 1967 JD 3020 Dsl, 2021 Original Hrs., Original Paint, 4 New Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,000 Bobcat 743 SS Ldr, 3000 Hrs., Very Good . . . . . . . . . $6,500 Bobcat 440B SS Ldr, Very Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500

Many New Parts in Stock RECENT MODELS IN FOR SALVAGE:

•6215 burnt •3020 •4240 •L4020 • E3020 syncro • E3020 PS • 4030 • 3010D • 2955 4WD •2840 •2550 4WD •1020D •830 We Rebuild Your Hydraulic Pumps, SCV Valves, Steering Valves, etc. All Units are Bench Tested Many Used Tractor Parts Already Dismantled CALL FOR YOUR NEEDS

NELSON PARTS Penn Yan, NY

800-730-4020 315-536-3737 Kennedy Tractor of Williamstown, NY (315) 964-1161 Kuhn Knight 8110 Slinger Spreader (1) yr old, 540 PTO, Single Axle, Like New $10,500; Bush Hog 2610 Trailer Mower 10’ Batwing, 540 PTO $6,450; 4x4 Landini Globus 75-80HP Dsl, Full Glass Cab w/AC/Heat, Dual Outlets, Clean! $15,900; 1999 NH 4835 60-65HP Dsl w/Sd Mt Sicklebar Mower 2000 hrs, Clean! $9,750; Ford 540 w/Sd Mt Sicklebar Mower Canopy, 50HP Dsl, 2000 hrs $8,450; 4x4 Long/Canopy/ Reverser, 50HP Dsl, 3000 hrs, Clean! $6,950; Landpride RCR2570 Trailer Mower 10’, 540 PTO Demo $5,500; 4x4 Kubota 85-90HP Dsl, Full Cab AC/Heat 85-90HP Dsl, All New Tires, Lots of Wts, Dual Outlets $11,900; 04 JD 5520 Deluxe Cab AC/Heat/Stereo, 75-80 HP Dsl w/JD loader, 12 Spd Power Reverser, Dual Outlets, Super Clean $23,500

Krone 1250 Combi-Pack round baler & wrapper, exc., 100K new, $24,000; Int’l 966, open, 115 hp., Nice machine! $9,500; Kuhn GA6000 Double Rotary Rake, ready to save you lots of time! $8,900; Fransgard Winch V-5000, $2,300; Sitrex 17’ tedder, $2,300; 2- Grapple buckets, hyd., 6’ $1,800 & $2,250; NH 66 Square baler, $1,500. 802376-5262

MACK ENTERPRISES Randolph, NY

Combine Salvage

K & J Surplus 60 Dublin Rd. Lansing, NY 14882 (607) 533-4850 • (607) 279-6232

You can’t afford downtime!

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

Maine to North Carolina Forage short? Shred your corn silage with a

SANDY DODGE

McCormick MCX140 Power Shift, 4WD, cab, AC, quick-tach 810 loader . . . . . . . . . . .$38,500 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ‘88 GMC 18’ Platform Dump, Cat Diesel, 53,000 GVW, Lots of Extras, Very Good . . . . .$11,500 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • New 8x18 Bale Wagon, Steel Sides & Oak Floor, 8 Ton Gear w/11Lx15 Implement Tires, Ready for Field $3,585 *With All Steel Construction .Add $300 •••••••••••••••••• New Running Gear - 3 Ton $750 6 Ton $900; 8 Ton $1150; 10 Ton $1295; 12 Ton Tandem . .$1,995 With 11L by 15 Implement Tubes & Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . .$90 Ea. •••••••••••••••••• Exchange 15” for 16” Wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Plus $15 Ea. Wide Track Gear . . . . .Plus $60. •••••••••••••••••• Dry Hill Bale Grabbers Round Bale . . . . . . . . . . $1,150 Heavy Duty Round or Square Bale double piston . . . . . $1,795 •••••••••••••••••• 16’ & 20’ Aluminum Ladder Conveyor w/Belt for Hay or Bag Shavings, 120# w/Motor . .$1,450/$1,550 •••••••••••••••••• Morra Tedder 17’, Used .$4,350 New . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,950 Morra Rotary Rake, Tandem 9’ 3pt. Hitch, New . .$4,500 11’ Pull Type, New . .$7,200 Tandem Rake Hitch . . . .$1,850 CIH DCX101 Discbine (Same as NH 1411) . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 CIH SBX540 Baler w/Thrower (Same as NH 575) . . . .$15,500 J&L Hay Saver, Feeders Avail Call Other Sizes Wagons,Tedders, Rakes, Feeders & Gates Available Call SANDY DODGE 668 RT. 12, PLAINFIELD, CT 06374

860-564-2905 TWO 1224 DION Choppers w/2-3 row corn heads & 1-2 row, 2 grass heads, $2,500; 1-Knight 3050 mixer wagon, working condition, w/scales, $2,500; 2-electric Weaver 430 stainless feed carts, $1,000 each. Cecily 802-375-5795

Farm Machinery Wanted BRILLION CULTIPACKER or seeder. 413-267-3396

PleasantCreekHay.Com

Use

Partnership! Dual-Cut Rolls For Peak Performance

Fencing

Welsarth@Msn.com

WELLSCROFT FENCE SYSTEMS

Y QUALIT EED T N A GUAR

Hi Tensile & Portable Electric Fences Solidlock Woven Wire Pressure Treated Posts King Hitter Post Pounder

MACFADDEN & SONS INC. 1457 Hwy. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 13459

518-284-2090 • email: info@macfaddens.com

www.macfaddens.com Lots More On Our Website!

Farm Machinery For Sale

Questions? Call us. PH#

NEW HOLLAND 790 chopper, 2 row corn head plus 6’ grass head, excellent condition, $9,500. CT 860-949-2434

Great Prices/Fast Service Call For Brochures 603-827-3464 or info@wellscroft.com

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 19

RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888

Pumpkins, Gourds, Winter Squash, etc.

Pie, Jack-O-Lantern, White & Munchkin Pumpkins Acorn, Butternut, Spaghetti, Buttercup, Ambercup, Sweet Potato, Sweet Dumpling Squash

ANY SIZE LOTS AVAILABLE From Bushels to Tractor Trailer Loads

Hoeffner Farms Hornell,NY

607-769-3404 607-324-0749 eves

Page 20 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay - Straw For Sale

Help Wanted

Premium Western Alfalfa

Herdsman Wanted for 80 cow tie stall family owned dairy. Must be experienced milker and knowledgeable in calf care. References required. Salary negotiable. Call 518-398-7640 leave name and number.

Bright Clean WHEAT STRAW All Hay Tested

Reasonable Prices - Delivered

Large Square Bales

Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS

Parts & Repair

Call 800-836-2888 to place your classified ad.

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Clyde, NY

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service Hay - Straw For Sale

TOO MUCH HAY?

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

HIGH PROFILE NE DAIRY FARM seeks self-motivated individual to work with award-winning cows and heifers. Experience in milking, feeding, treating and record-keeping required. AI training and/or CDL would be a plus. Must understand cleanliness, organization, communication and team work. Housing & benefits provided. Salary based on experience. Email resume with references to terri@arethusafarm.com or fax 860-567-2426.

Maine to North Carolina Got free time? Sign up now to become a weekend warrior. Or Submit a resume for full time employment with

Call Peg At

PleasantCreekHay EmploymentServices.com

800-836-2888

Help Wanted

or email

classified@leepub.com

BIG SQUARE BALES, 1st cut, nice hay. 51” round bales net wrapped, baled tight, later cut, cheap feed. 51” round bales, made right, June hay, nice. Call for delivered price. 315737-0820

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS!

Miscellaneous

adenbrook.com

CLASSIFIEDS

LARGE SQUARE BALES, processed first & second cut. Call 802-864-5382 or 802578-7352

12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

Call the IH Parts Specialists:

518-768-2344

GOOD QUALITY HAY & STRAW. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802849-6266

Cell: (618) 975-5741 Office: (607) 286-3353

2 BELGIAN GELDINGS ages 10 and 11 years old used for farming, logging, sleigh rides, hay rides, parades, very good in traffic. 413-834-2526

Try Selling It In The

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

Bill Konchar

1685 Cty Hwy 35 Milford, NY

BATES CORPORATION

800-747-3811 845-901-1892

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

AMARAL FARMS 1st & 2nd cutting good quality hay, round silage bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-4506536

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS

Horses

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

Parts & Repair

Semi Load or Half Load

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Hoof Trimming

TOP QUALITY 1st cut 4x4 wrapped round bales, timothy/rye & grass/clover combination, $55.00. 413-626-1379

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY & STRAW

Heating

1-800-248-2955

Just Ask For Peggy or send her an e-mail at:

classified@leepub.com

Parts & Repair

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or bsnyder@leepub.com. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Parts

Agricultural Belt Service

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services

“BELT T BUSTERS” $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES

Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE

Real Estate For Sale

Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

FA I R H AV E N V E R M O N T DAIRY FOR SALE. 200+ cow capacity, approx. 400 acres, Double 8 parlor, two houses & one trailer, $750,000 bare. Equipment & cattle available. Call 860-836-1524

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

Call 888-596-5329 for Your Subscription

607-642-3293

Help Wanted

WRITERS WANTED Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper. Knowledge of the industry a must. Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles.

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

800-836-2888 To Place Your Classified Ad

800-836-2888

Fresh Produce, Nursery

800-836-2888

classified@leepub.com

Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com 93-A - HUNTING CLUB SPECIAL!!! 716 ACRES IN ADIRONDACK PARK - Great for recreation - all wooded with creeks & ponds thru out property - great hunting and fishing - hunting cabin - logging road up thru middle of property - 4 wheeler trails thru property - Town of Ohio - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Price $798,000. REDUCED TO $494,000 93-B - Great property for hunting & fishing is joined on it’s northern border by 93-A, it’s mostly wooded, 475 acres with creek going thru - road goes by East end of property & log road thru west end - mostly level with hills on East end. Located in Town of Ohio, Herkimer Co., Southern part of Adirondack Park, Poland School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . priced to sell fast at $327,750 REDUCED TO $235,125 93-C - Another great property for hunting & trout fishing is joined by 93-B on the East mostly wooded, 157 acres, log road thru property, trout stream going thru center of property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sale price $108,330 93-D - 574 ACRES OF LAND BORDERS 93-A - great for recreation and hunting - mostly wooded, creeks & ponds - trees marked for cutting with over ONE MILLION BOARD FEET OF LUMBER. Priced at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$575,000 93-A + 93-B + 93-C + 93-D form a square of 1,922 acres. This great piece of property in the Adirondack Park joined together sells for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,411,455 C-80 - 2011 Newly Remodeled Certified Organic Dairy Operation Located Along The Hudson River with NYS Dock Access. 50 Acres total, 40 Acres grazing 36x122 TwoStory Gabled Roof Barn, 50 lg. Tie Stalls Milkhouse, 1000 Gallon Bulk Tank, 2” Pipeline, 3” Vacuum Line, 8 Units, Two Steel Grain Bins; 40x100 Coverall Barn with Curtains, Cement Floor with Pens for Heifers and Calving Areas, Concrete Barnyard; Residence Is In Poor Condition, 200 Acres of Neighboring Land is Rented and Lease Could be Continued. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $289,000 C-81 - Very Nice Beef or Crop Farm Consisting of 101 Acres, 58 Tillable Sandy Loam and Gravel Loam Soils, 43 Acres Woods. Approximately 200’ Open Housing for Cattle, Attached Shop with Water and Electricity; 36x60 Metal Bldg., Gravel Floor, Electricity, Used for Hay and Equipment Storage, Attached 16x36 Propane Heated Shop with Wt. Steel Lining, Electricity, Concrete Floor. 2520 Sq. Ft. Two-Story Home Completely Remodeled, Drilled Well for House and Barns; Excellent Soil, well Maintained Bldg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $365,000


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

Northern New York 365 acre farm 220+ tillable 175 ac tiled, 90 cow tie stall 4.5 foot stall, mattresses and rubber walk mats. 8 auto take off units, 2 bunk silos 1 upright, Dry cow free stall, coverall heifer barn, TMR mixer, 2 machine sheds. Ex 4 br home. One of the nicest facilities in the north east . . . . . . . . . . . . . $760,000 Also has 5 wind turbines for income that can be purchased separate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call for Details Purchase feed or horse farm, 28 ac. 40 stalls, pipeline, etc. Heifer facilities, machine shed, storage barn, 3 br remodeled home buildings in good condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Only $113,500

Services Offered

Tractor Parts

WEDDING INVITATIONS printed and designed by Lee Publications: 100 (4.5x6) Invitations including envelopes with 100 RSVP postcards. Only $150.00 +tax. We can also do smaller and larger amounts. Call for pricing and designs 518-673-0101, or bsnyder@leepub.com Also Save the Dates • Shower Invitations • Baby Announcements and more.

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

We have others! Also, looking for listings.

North h Countryy Realty Malone,, NY Y • 518-483-0800 www.northcountryrealty.com

POSSON REALTY LLC

Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealtyfarmsandland.com possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

2324 4 - Neatt and d Clean.. Lewiss Countyy Freee Stalll Dairy Farm 150 acres mostly tillable. High Lime well drained soils. Grows excellent alfalfa and corn. Modern 150 stall 3 row free stall barn w/drive thru feed. 30x50 heifer barn for 30 head of large heifers plus some machinery storage. Good 2 story 60 stall barn with dbl 6 flat barn parlor with large holding area. Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Services Offered CANVAS PRINTS: All sizes. Mounted or Unmounted. Just bring in or send us your photo at Lee Publications. Call 518673-0101 bsnyder@leepub.com

TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

Real Estate For Sale

Calf pens, side addition for 36 head of young stock. 30x100 bunker silo. Very nice remodeled 2 story 6 bdrm home. Farm is turn-key. Good dairy area. Machinery and feed dealers close by. Great milk market . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $450,000

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2325 5 - Jefferson n County - Neat and Clean Showplace Farm - Exceptionally nice house- 180 acres, 100 tillable, good soils. Currently in hay. Good 2 story dairy barn with 43 stalls and dbl 2 milking parlor. New 48x75 Morton Building, large 2 car garage, Beautiful 2 story 4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Very well maintained. High ceilings, big rooms, original woodwork. All on a quiet road, great farming area, close to shopping, schools, and hospitals. This would make an awesome farm for raising beef and making hay. Could be dairy again. Land could be certified organic . . . . . . .Askingg $379,000

Roofing

Trailers

W - 2341 1 - Madison n Countyy 35 5 acree Hobbyy Farm. 20 NEW acres tillable, 10 acres in pasture, 5 acres woods. 2 story 6 bdrm modern home, 80% finished. Nice big roomy home with large fireplace, nice setting, and a beautiful view. Large 2 car garage. Property sits on a very quiet road. Would work well for beef or horses. Close to Cazenovia, Morrisville College, and Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $160,000

(607)) 334-97277

Trucks

2 - Otsego 2302 o Countyy Freee stalll Operation. Buildings for 300 head. Double 8 milking parlor, pad for feed storage. Good 2 story 4 bdrm home. All situated on 70 acres of land w/40+/- acres tillable, gravel loem soils w/lots of additional land to rent reasonable. Great location. Mins from Cooperstown or Oneonta. Farm would work well for dairy although buildings are conducive for horses and beef. Farm has 2 trout streams. Excellent deer and turkey hunting. Nice d to o $199,900 area to live and farm. Priced to sell Reduced

1999 Autocar 6x6 with Husky Tank Field Spread or Transfer with 8” Boom, Low Miles, Good Condition, Must Sell! $45,000

607-382-7722

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

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IT IN - For MasterCard, 2. FAX Visa, AMEX or Discover customers, fill out the form

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FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN Place my ad in the following zones: YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!  Country Folks East

New England

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run_______ Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle credit card information and Name: (Print)________________________________________________________________ mail to: Country Folks Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________ Classifieds, Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________ PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

4. classified@leepub.com E-mail your ad to E-MAIL

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1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

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1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week 1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

6 - Otsego o County,, Cooperstown n NY.. 88 8 acre 2336 Geentleman'ss Farm. Bordering a beautiful year round trout stream. 45 acres in fields. Excellent ground. Balance woods. 2 story partially remodeled farm house. New septic and well. Farm would work well for horses, or beef, make hay or vegetables. Phenomenal fishing and hunting. Great location for kids. REA electric. Cooperstown School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $174,900 Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

St. Lawrence Silo Service • New Stave Silos • Stave Replacement • Silo Retensioning • Shotcrete Relining • Footer Repairs • Fill Systems • Silo Parts • Chute Repairs CALL FOR ESTIMATE

(315) 393-3399 Lisbon, NY 13658 www.slsilo.com

Trucks 1987 LN8000 10 wheel dump truck, 17’ body, $7,900; 2005 Ford F450 cab & chassis, dual wheels, diesel, one owner, $8,100. 978-544-6105

Calendar of Events NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

AUG 22-23 Maine Farm Days Misty Meadows Farm, Hill Rd., Clinton, ME. It will run from 9 am to 5 pm daily. Admission is free and open to the public. A chicken lunch will be served each day sponsored by Pine Tree Camp. An entire range of

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1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week 1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week 1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

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1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week 1 Week $12.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.85 per zone per week 1 Week $13.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.15 per zone per week 1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week

displays and exhibits will be on hand for folks of all ages and interests. It is an excellent opportunity for the entire family to visit a working farm and learn about how the farm works. Visit www.kcswcd.org and select the Maine Farm Days 2012 tab for more information. AUG 23 Hopyard Design and Maintenance Field Day Addison Hop Farm, Town Line Rd. Addison, VT. 3-6 pm. Part of UVM Extensions NW Crops & Soils 2012 Field Days. Kris Anderson has been growing organic hops for three years, and will share some tip’s he’s learned along the way about design, construction and maintenance of a small hopyard. Contact Susan Brouillette, 802-5246501, 800-639-2130 or susanbrouillette@uvm.edu. AUG 24 Growing a Honey Business 34570 State Highway 10, Hamden, NY. Sign-in begins at 9:30 am and the program will start at 10 am, running through 4 pm. The fee for this program is $15/person or $25/farm couple. A light lunch is included. Please make check payable to Cornell Cooperative Extension and mail to PO Box 184, Hamden, NY 13786. Write

“honey” on the check. Preregistration and payment is requested by Aug. 17. AUG 25 Grass Fed Seasonal Raw Milk Dairy Blue Hill Farm, 398 Blue Hill Rd, Great Barrington, MA. $30/person, w/ $5 discount for NOFA members or for registering 14 plus days before workshop. Contact Ben Grosscup, 413 549 1568 or e-mail ben.grosscup@nofamass.org On Internet at www. nofamass.org/programs/ext ensionevents/beef-dairypigs.php AUG. 28 Nutrient Dense Forages and Soil Health Field Day Butterworks Farm, Westfield VT. 10-3 pm. Part of UVM Extensions NW Crops & Soils 2012 Field Days. Jack and Anne Lazor have been operating a dairy farm in the Northeast Kingdom since 2979, and are proud to open their farm to visitors who would like to learn more about forage crops, nutrient dense land management, soil health and amendments, and ongoing research and collaboration with UVM extension. Contact Susan Brouillette, 802-524-6501 or 800-639-2130 or susanbrouillette@uvm.edu.

August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 21

787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

Real Estate For Sale

Trucks


Hello I’m P eggy

Page 22 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

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Lee Publications, Country Folks Classified, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


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August 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 23

Monthly Equine Publication Covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations.


Page 24 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 20, 2012

Country Folks New England 8.20.12  

Country Folks New England August 20, 2012

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