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13 August 2012 Section One of Two Volume 30 Number 21

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

$1.99

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

UNH Extension tips for improving and hayfields 4-H’erspastures bring home awards from annual Sustainable practices at Rosasharn Farm ~ Page A2

Vermont State 4-HA4 Horse Show ~ Page

~ Page A2

Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly A16 Crop Comments A6 Black Ink A23 Auctions Beef Classifieds Farm Safety Farmer to Farmer Small Ruminants VT DHIA

B1 B14 B18 A27 A26 A8 A22

For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. ~ Matthew 6:21


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Sustainable practices at Rosasharn Farm by Sanne Kure-Jensen Margiana Petersen-Rockney grew up on Rosasharn Farm, an 80-acre farm in Rehoboth, MA where her mom Anne Petersen is nationally-known for her Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats. Margiana started her own five-acre, bio-intensive farm with a five-acre lease from her mom in 2009. Plants and animals are ecologically integrated, which feeds 50 families through a vegetable CSA. Margiana also raises Cornish Cross chickens and heritage pigs for local restaurants and CSA members. The farm continues to expand its educational offerings. An assistant farm manager, two summer interns and membervolunteers work on the farm and teach together. Pasture Management Margiana raises 100 meat chickens on an eight-week cycle. Fields are mob grazed by Anne’s goats in rotating pens, moved regularly. The Polyface Farm-style chicken tractor moves daily, following the goats through the fields. The chickens eat insects, lay down more fertilizer, and their scratching spreads the goat manure while they eat fly larva and other pests. Heritage Pigs The pigs benefit the farm by helping prepare new fields. They eat goldenrod, dock and invasive plants like multi-flora rose and Asiatic bittersweet. In their rooting, pigs break up sod and turn soils. After the pigs are finished on a new area, farm staff make easy work of pulling the rose stumps and any remaining trees and/or saplings to create new pasture. To improve pigs’ field preparation, corn was layered into the compost pile through the winter. When the pigs were penned over an area covered in this compost, their rooting for the fermenting corn turned and broke up the sod and blended in the compost as well as their own new manure. Tamworths, known for great bacon, and Berkshires, known for shoulder and butt roasts, are the preferred breeds at Rosasharn Farm. These pigs can eat nearly anything; they ‘recycle’ expired rice and pasta from a local food bank, excess produce left from the farm’s CSA and extra goat milk or whey from Anne’s dairy goats. Pigs are taught to respect electric wire fencing by spending about a week in an enclosure with food inside, near and beyond a ‘hot’ fence. When the food near the fence is ignored, the piglets are

Margiana Petersen-Rockney led a tour for over 40 visitors when she hosted Young Farmer Night at Rosasharn Farm, in Rehoboth, MA. The farm is nationally known for its Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats. Photos by Sanne Kure-Jensen ready for field pasture. Margiana loves polywire fence for pig and piglet fencing. After the pigs do their fieldwork, they are sold to restaurants rather than staying to breed on the farm. This allows Margiana and her staff to get away for two to three months each winter. Micronutrient-dense compost “Compost is our only soil amendment,” said Margiana. Goat and horse manure and bedding (hay and wood chips), chicken feathers, animal carcasses, farm weeds, as well as kitchen scraps all contribute to the ‘black gold’ compost at Rosasharn Farm. Animals are bio-accumulators. Farmers often give their animals mineral and vitamin supplements. These minerals are not fully utilized, passing through in manure. Composting this animal manure in high heat (over 150 degrees F) kills any potential pathogens as well as any weed seeds that may have survived the animals’ digestive processes. Field Preparation Sustainable, chemical-free practices increase soil health while reducing weeds, pests and disease. Bio-intensive farming allows most of the farm to yield four to five crops per year using compost and rotation to maintain soil fertility. When a crop is harvested, compost is spread on that row and it will generally be replanted the next day. When pasture and/or wood-

land edges destined for vegetable production, careful preparation is key. Pasture is layered with compost, tilled and then planted with a legume mix like fava beans and peas. The shoots, beans and peas will be picked by CSA members in early summer; the remaining plants will be mowed and tilled in as green manure. Because Rosasharn Farm’s CSA run through December, late season crop beds are often frozen, preventing germination of winter cover crops. Squash and other full season crops are often followed by a cover crop blend of crimson clover and winter rye, which she tills in the spring. Watering and Soil Moisture Wetlands border the farm, and soils tend to remain moist. The farm has no permanent irrigation. Cucurbits, peppers, tomatoes and eggplants are grown in black plastic. White plastic is being tested under Cole crops, which prefer cooler soils. Where plastic is not used, short-day crops like radishes and greens are planted early under tall crops like raspberries and asparagus for harvest before the perennials fully leaf out. Seed Saving For almost 10 years, the Petersen family has been saving their largest and healthiest garlic. The rows of fallplanted garlic resembled late-season leeks already in June. Swiss chard and sorrel

seeds are routinely saved for future plantings. Unique CSA • Rosasharn Farm focuses on community, education and food. Hands-on events include food preservation workshops, farm tours and edible wild plant walks. Community building includes free familyfriendly events, a rigorous internship program, and university and school group field trips; on-farm dinners also welcome the community. • CSA members may cuddle baby goats and Bill, the baby water buffalo. Visitors may see farm cats on rabbit and rodent patrol, peacocks proclaiming their orchard territory and Great Pyrenees guard dogs protecting the goat herd. • Farm offerings include fresh, chemical-free produce,

pastured meat chickens and grass-fed, heritage pork. CSA members are invited to volunteer and share the farmer experience. • Since the CSA is six months long (June through December), Rosasharn grows 300 varieties of vegetables (including seven kales and 20 tomatoes) to help prevent dinner table boredom. A bi-weekly newsletter offers recipes for seasonal produce. • Knowledge and creativity, not chemicals, guide ecological farming practices. Farmers work to protect water quality on 60 acres of adjacent wooded wetland. Visiting the farm for CSA pickups on Tuesday or Friday afternoons throughout the season, members get to know their farmers, feel the soil, sun and water that nourishes their food and become part of a farm community. Members pay $700 for a 26-week share or $400 for a 13-week summer or fall share. Young Farmer Nights Alternate Tuesday nights from June through September, a variety of local farms host Young Farmer Nights for beginning farmers or anyone interested in what it takes to run a small, sustainable farm. Interns and farmers get together, talk about farming, share a potluck supper and build a network of peers and mentors. The next event will be hosted by Medway Community Farm on Aug. 21. For more information, contact e-mail kevin.overshiner@gmail.com or visit www.medwaycommunityfarm.org. For more information, on Rosasharn Farm, see http://rosasharnfarm.com. To arrange a farm visit, e-mail rosasharnfarmcsa@gmail.com , call 401-330-7153 or write Rosasharn Farm, 57 County Street, Rehoboth, MA 02769.

Margiana Petersen-Rockney told visitors how her Tamworth and Berkshire pigs help prepare new fields at Rosasharn Farm.


Robotics help herd management

Randy Martin, third generation dairy farmer, added a robotic system to eliminate labor issues on the farm but found that the system has also helped him achieve lower somatic cell counts. Photos by Sally Colby sooner than a human milker can. The robotic milker automatically dumps the first three squeezes from each quarter, and checks each quarter for conductivity and milk temperature. If conductivity in a quarter begins to rise, that information will show up on Randy’s computer under the ‘udder health’ icon. At milking time, Martin’s most important job is to watch the computer

monitor. “I know right away if a cow is coming down with mastitis,” he said, adding that the system is easy to use. “The cow’s number and the quarter that has high conductivity will be highlighted. The computer also indicates whether milk from that quarter is watery or bloody.” Martin will treat cows that spike repeatedly, and if treatment isn’t successful, he dries the affected quarter to

A robotic feed pusher comes out hourly, which saves labor and ensures that cows always have feed in front of them.

keep the herd cell count low. When the cows were being milked in the parlor, Martin found that it was difficult to maintain consistency. Now, the cows are treated the same way each time they enter the milking stalls. Cows in the holding area prior to milking are less stressed, and there’s no chasing or crowding in a holding pen. “I can walk through the barn without the cows getting up,” said Martin. “Before, with the parlor, when the cows saw someone coming through the barn they thought it was time to get up for milking.” For the first few weeks after freshening and until they’re fully accustomed to the system, heifers are kept in a special needs pen. “It takes about an average of two weeks for the heifers to learn to go in to be milked,” said Martin. “After that, they go with the rest of the cows. They catch on pretty fast once they realize they’re going to get some grain in there.” Prior to construction of the new barn, heifers were raised off the farm. With the new facility, all young stock are on the farm, which means less time spent traveling to other farms to care for them. Calves are started in individual pens under roof, and then in small groups as they get older. Randy’s sisters take care of calves, and although his dad and brother operate a custom harvest business, they can both fill in at the dairy when needed. The herd is fed a homegrown TMR, which is constantly in front of them with the help of a robotic feed pusher that comes out once an hour to push feed. “In the old barn, I was doing good if I

pushed feed four times a day,” said Martin, adding that the pusher is as valuable as the robotic milking system. “This really helps the cows — they always have feed in front of them. With cows coming out of the robot 24/7, the feed has to be there all the time. It isn’t the same as when they came out of the parlor and then got feed.” Although Martin has a Koster tester to check silage moisture, he relies on his feed specialist who takes silage samples for analysis. “I always pull a sample if I change feeds, use a different type of baleage or change bunkers,” said Martin. “If I pull a sample of first cut and everything is good, I wait until I push second cut.” Genex manages herd breeding; including mating selections and A.I., and tracks pregnancy checks and calving dates. For those who have or are considering a robotic system, Martin says that there are several keys to making it work most effectively. “Look at the computer twice a day,” he said. “That’s the only way you’re going to know if there’s a problem. Then obey the computer. If you see that there’s a hot quarter, don’t ignore it.” Detecting and measuring minute changes in conductivity is an opportunity to spot and treat mastitis early. “If a cow comes in with conductivity of 60, I watch her closely,” he said. “If a cow comes in at 80 or 85, I might let it go if it’s a hot day or if she was in heat. But if conductivity is 90, 100 or 110, I know without a doubt that she has mastitis and I’ll treat her. It’s a warning ahead before the cow even comes down with mastitis.”

The robotic milking system can detect minute changes in conductivity, which means cows that have signs of mastitis can be treated early.

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

by Sally Colby Despite rising temperatures on a hot, humid summer day, Randy Martin’s cows are comfortable and quiet, and remain undisturbed when a large group of dairy producers from Professional Dairy Managers of Pennsylvania (PDMP) walked through the barn as part of a dairy issue forum session held recently in Shippensburg, PA. A year and a half ago, Martin had several employees to milk 250 cows in a double eight herringbone parlor. At that time, the cows were bedded on sand, and the herd cell count averaged around 250,000. Today, Martin has no hired help, thanks to the five-unit Lely robotic system that’s incorporated in the new 280-stall freestall barn. Martin says that within two weeks of moving to the new barn, which was first bedded with compost and now with sand, the count dropped by 100,000. “I give most of the credit to the robots,” he said of the lower somatic cell count. However, Martin is quick to note that robots are just a system that milks cows, and that it still takes management. Martin, who is the third generation on the family’s Rail Side Farm, and his father Faron spent a year looking at various robotic systems before they made a decision. The new barn has freestall space for 280 cows, and Martin would like to slowly build the herd from the 240 he’s currently milking to fill the barn. An important economic and herd health benefit of the robotic system is that it can determine which cows are developing mastitis much


UNH Extension tips for improving pastures and hayfields

Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Some pastures and hayfields that need improvement aren’t well suited to conventional renovation. A pasture may be too steep or too rocky for conventional tillage operations or a hayfield so “bony” that tilling it would turn up many rocks that you’d have to remove before harrowing and reseeding. By adjusting soil pH and fertility, managing weeds and, if necessary, reintroducing desirable forage species, you can often make such areas productive again without plowing and reseeding. Your goals for your pastures and hayfields dictate what measures you will take. Before making any improvements, consider how you intend to use the land. A pasture that must meet all the forage needs for animals requires different treatment than one used primarily as an exercise yard, for example. You’ll also need to evaluate the field to determine its current condition and decide how much

improvement it needs. Some fields may require complete renovation and reseeding, while others may require something less involved. Finally, consider what resources — equipment, money, and time — you have available to devote to the project. Soil pH and fertility To remain productive, a forage stand needs a soil environment where forage plants can thrive. Most plant nutrients become available in optimal amounts in soils with a pH range of 6.0-7.0. Most grasses and clovers do well in soils with a pH between 6.0 and 6.5, while other legumes such as birdsfoot trefoil or alfalfa require a soil pH of 6.5 to 7.0. To support plant growth, plant nutrients must be present in adequate amounts. Any nutrient deficiencies will compromise the success of the stand. In particular, new seedlings require sufficient levels of available phosphorus and potassium to get established.

Cover photo by Sally Colby By adjusting soil pH and fertility, managing weeds and, if necessary, reintroducing desirable forage species, pastures and hayfields that need improvement, but aren’t well suited to conventional renovation, can be made productive again without plowing and reseeding.

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY ........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy.................................................. Reading, VT...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas ...................................... suethomas1@cox.net........................................949-599-6800 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Scott Lizio..............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 Kathy LaScala....................................katelascala@gmail.com.........................................913-486-7184 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

A soil test is the best way to determine the fertility of your pastures or hayfields. Follow recommendations closely and make any necessary corrections well in advance of any reseeding. If you need to raise soil pH, remember that lime moves down through the soil profile slowly, and it may take as long as a year before you see any response. Broadcast manure or fertilizer in spring or summer to apply nutrients without disturbing the existing sod. Soil test forms are available from the UNH Cooperative Extension office in your county, or from the UNH Cooperative Extension website at www.ceinfo.unh.edu/Agriculture/Do cuments/SoilTest.htm Weed management Weeds are often low in nutritive value, and may crowd out more desirable forage plants. Some weed species are poisonous to livestock. Therefore, any plan to renovate forage stands needs to include weed management. Many weed species cannot withstand repeated cutting throughout the growing season, so you can control these with more intensive grazing or more frequent mowing. Improving soil fertility will promote vigorous growth of desirable forage species, enabling them to compete successfully against weeds. Some weed species, such as Canada thistle and bedstraw, are more persistent and may require herbicide treatments to eliminate them from pastures or hayfields. Introducing desirable species Correcting deficiencies in soil fertility and eliminating weeds is often enough to bring a neglected stand back into production. However, sometimes you need to reseed in order to establish desirable species. There are several reseeding techniques available: Frost seeding involves spreading seed over an existing sod in late winter or early spring. As the ground heaves and contracts with repeated freezing and thawing, seed on the surface gradually works its way into the soil where it can germinate. While this can be an effective, low-cost method for increasing the proportion of certain species, it is usually successful only 60 percent to 70 percent of the time and is not an effective method for completely renovating fields. For best results: • Remove plant residue from the field with close grazing or by mowing in the fall before seeding. • Sow seed in late March or early April. Avoid spreading seed on top of snow cover (a few patches are okay), since rapid melting can cause the seed to wash away. • Certain species work better with frost seeding than others. Red and white clover germinate rapidly, toler-

ate shading from other plants, and have small seeds that can penetrate into the soil. Many grasses have bulky seeds that remain on the soil surface. The weak seedlings of birdsfoot trefoil and reed canarygrass are unable to compete in an existing sod. Sow clovers at 2 pounds per acre, grasses at 4 pounds per acre. Overseeding involves using a seed drill or cultipack seeder to sow seed during the growing season in an attempt to improve the composition of a pasture or hayfield. Simply broadcasting seed over the field usually gives poor results. Use a seeder to deposit the seed below the soil surface. Like frost seeding, overseeding will yield minor improvements but is not appropriate for complete field renovation. For best results, remove residues with close grazing or mowing prior to seeding, and sow either in early spring or in late summer to minimize competition from established plants. No-till seeding involves suppressing or killing the existing sod, then using a no-till seed drill to plant seed directly into the killed sod without tilling the soil with plows or harrows. This method is the best way to completely renovate a stand when field conditions do not allow for conventional tillage. However the equipment required may make no-till impractical for small-scale or part-time operations. No-till drills are too expensive for only occasional use, and while some equipment dealers may have one available for rent they are hard to come by. Should you choose to use this method, the following considerations will help you succeed: • Because you can’t use tillage to incorporate lime or fertilizer, address any pH adjustments or nutrient deficiencies the season before planting. • The best times for planting are late April to early May and midAugust to early September. Spring seedings are best if field conditions allow you to bring equipment on the field, but late summer seedings are better if the field is too wet to work in spring. • For spring seedings, apply herbicides the previous fall; for late summer seedings, apply herbicides in midsummer, at least three weeks before seeding. • Certain species are better suited for no-till seedings than others. Red and white clover, and timothy germinate rapidly, but reed canarygrass and birdsfoot trefoil have weak seedlings that may not compete with weeds effectively. • When seeding legumes, inoculate seed with the appropriate strain of Rhizobia bacteria for proper nodulation.

Correcting deficiencies in soil fertility and eliminating weeds is often enough to bring a neglected stand back into production.


USDA celebrates 150 years of service to the people of NH

(L-R) Rick Ellsmore of the NRCS, and Tom Wagner and Terry Miller of the Forest Service presented the “Two Chiefs” awards to partners and individuals for their conservation work in the White Mountain National Forest and the Upper Ammonoosuc and Israel River Watersheds. of New Hampshire citizens. Jeff Holmes, president of the New Hampshire Farm Bureau talked about local farms and how much the USDA field representatives have helped them, as well as his hope for the passage of a New Farm Bill that will continue to provide the programs New Hampshire farmers so desperately need. Following the speeches, Terry Miller and Tom Wagner of the Forest Service and Rick Ellsmore of the Natural Resources Conservation Service presented “Two Chiefs” awards to partners and individuals for their conservation work in the White Mountain National Forest and the Upper Ammonoosuc and Israel River Watersheds. Each year, the chiefs of the Forest Service and the Natural

USDA Deputy Undersecretary for Rural Development Judy Canales was one of the dignitaries to speak at the event celebrating the USDA’s 150 years of service to New Hampshire.

Resources Conservation Service give a few awards to individuals and organizations to recognize exemplary employees or officials from state forestry agencies, Conservation Districts, as well as the Forest Service and NRCS who have worked collaboratively to support conservation and forest stewardship. The “Two Chiefs” award highlights the very best partnerships and projects occurring across the country. NH Conservation Leaders joined forces in 2011 to enhance fish and wildlife habitat improvement on private and federal lands. This unique collaboration between USFS and NRCS

expanded the NH conservation footprint by connecting White Mountain National Forest lands and privately-owned lands to enhance fish and wildlife habitat management, including implementation of key conservation practice applications to improve cold water fisheries, control invasive species, improve dense softwood and aspen birch habitats, decommission logging roads, build fish friendly stream crossings, and reduce soil erosion and sedimentation of surface waters and wetlands. The following people and organizations were recognized: • Richard Ellsmore, NRCS; • Thomas Wagner, FS/White Mountain National Forest; • K.R. (Roger) Simmons, FS/White Mountain National Forest; • Donald Keirstead, NRCS; • Daryl Burtnett, The Nature Conservancy; • Jeff Lougee, The Nature Conservancy; • Brad Simpkins, NH Division of Forest & Lands; • Darrel Covell, UNH Cooperative Extension; • Steve Fuller, Wildlife Management Institute; • Scot Williamson, Wildlife Management Institute; • John Lanier, Wildlife Management Institute; • Steve Weber, NH Fish & Game; • Charlie Bridges, NH Fish & game; • Albert (Bert) vonDohrmann, Coos County Conservation District; • Colin Lawson, Trout Unlimited; • Will Abbott, SPNHF; and • Andrew French, U.S. Fish

& Wildlife Following the Two Chiefs’ Award ceremony, guests were treated to music provided by Drowned Valley and a special local foods farmers’ market including ice cream, local meats, cheeses, fruits, vegetables, and maple syrup and more. USDA agencies and other organizations staffed booths to provide information to the visitors on a wide array of conservation, agriculture, and forestry programs. Granite State Dairy Promotion, Contoocook Creamery, and Huckins Farm donated ice cream while Miles Smith Farm donated barbecue sausage. The schedule included a farm tour of eight sites with experts from USDA agencies, along with farmers, NH Department of Agriculture Markets and Food, and University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension, designed to give people indepth information about the Rural Energy for America Program (RD), the Value Added Producer Grant Program (RD), The Specialty Crop Block Grant (NHDAMF), Farm Loans (FSA), Agricultural Statistics (NASS), the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, including Heavy Use Areas, Nutrient Management, Pastures, Grazing, and Conservation Innovation Grants (NRCS) and Nutrient Management Grants (NHDAMF). At the close of the festivities, the 150th birthday of the USDA was commemorated with a stone set in a new “Peoples’ Garden” at the Miles Smith Farm.

Miles Smith Farm provided barbecue sausage for those in attendance at the celebration.

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

LOUDON, NH — The USDA held an event Aug. 1 to celebrate President Abraham Lincoln’s founding of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1862, when he called it “the People’s Department,” a sentiment that still rings true today as the department’s diverse portfolio boasts strong support for American agriculture and local and regional food systems, as well as critical nutrition assistance, food safety, conservation, rural development, and research programs, among many other programs and initiatives. Acting Deputy Undersecretary Judy Canales joined New Hampshire USDA leaders from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Rural Development, Farm Service Agency, Forest Service and Agricultural Statistics at the Miles Smith Farm to celebrate the USDA’s accomplishments in New Hampshire and thank hundreds of partners who have contributed to agriculture and forestry in the Granite State. Owners Carole Soule and Bruce Dawson, last year’s recipient of the NH Farmer the Year Award, hosted the crowd on their farm that was founded in the 1830s. Representatives of Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, Sen. Kelly Ayotte, Rep. Frank Guinta and Rep. Charles Bass relayed the legislators’ good wishes for the continued success of the USDA and lauded its accomplishments over the past 150 years. New Hampshire Commissioner of Agriculture Lorraine Merrill also spoke of the importance of the state and federal partnership in New Hampshire and the importance of federal help for the safety, health and security


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant (Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

for readers with Internet access.) I’ll try to hit the high spots of Ji’s article… then make my own comments. According to Ji, disturbing new research indicates that the microbial biodiversity of the soil and of our food is being dramatically impacted by the use of herbicides, particularly glyphosate, the world’s most widely used weed-killer. Researchers have proposed that many soil organisms, which are indispensable for the productivity of the soil in agriculture,

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Tiny Allies Below our Boots Several weeks ago my Texas contact e-mailed me a web site link with a very interesting article. That article dealt with the very real threat (at least in its author’s mind) of the planet’s most wide-spread herbicide destroying the microbial activity in milk. That writer’s name is Sayer Ji, and his web site is called greenmedinfo.com. (And Ji’s specific story can be located at http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/will,

as well as in raw and fermented dairy production, may be undergoing endangerment... and in some cases, extinction in certain geographic regions of the world. Research published in the journal Current Microbiology indicates that glyphosate-based herbicides are negatively impacting microorganisms of food interest, and specifically those found in raw and fermented foods. The study’s authors concluded that glyphosate’s inherent toxicity to soil organisms may explain what is behind “...the loss of microbiodiversity and microbial concentration observed in raw milk for many years.” These scientists discovered that adverse changes in selected food

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microorganisms, including death and growth inhibition, were observed at lower concentrations of glyphosate exposure than those recommended in agriculture. They also confirmed previous findings that adjuvants or so-called “inactive” ingredients accompanying glyphosate in the total herbicide package were, in some cases, more toxic than the main active ingredient itself. These findings may explain why certain species of Lactobacillus bulgaricus, used in milk production, such as the subspecies Lactobacillus cremoris (no relation to the non-dairy coffee additive, Cremora) have been difficult to isolate from the dairy environment in some geographic areas, despite having a

tremendously long history there. It is likely that the use of pesticides, herbicides and biodiversity reduction (i.e., fewer plant varieties in pasture and meadows) has contributed to the loss and endangerment of a key species used as foodstarters (cultures). When microbial biodiversity in the soil is reduced or altered, so too will be that of the plants, all the way up the food chain to the grazing animals, and ultimately humans at the top of the food chain; on average our bodies contain 100 trillion bacteria that come directly, or indirectly, from the soil. Ji also writes that microbial biodiversity is not just important for the production of certain raw and fermented food products, but is essen-

TRACTORS 2000 NHTS100 4wd, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes, 2135 Hrs. $39,995 2007 NH TL100A 4wd, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader, 2068 Hrs. . . . $43,795 2010 NH T6030 4WD, Cab, 95HP, w/NH 840TL Loader, 1100 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $67,500 2005 Kubota L3130 4wd, HST w/Loader, 1023 Hrs. . . . . . . $13,900 2007 NH TG305 255 HP, Front/Rear duals, Deluxe Cab, 1750 Hrs $139,500 2009 NH TD5050 4wd, ROPS w/NH 820TL Loader/Canopy . . . $34,375 1990 Ford 8830 4wd, Cab, Rear Duals, Power Shift, 6650 Hrs. $31,250 1974 Ford 3400 3 Cyl. Diesel w/Industrial Loader, New Paint. . . . $8,500 2000 NH TC33D 4WD, HST, 33HP w/Loader, 1038 Hrs . . . . $13,625 1995 Ford 8670 4WD Super Steer, Rear Duals, 10,900 Hrs. . . . $34,900 2000 NH TL70 2WD, ROPS, Tractor - 1499 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . $11,900 Case IH 674 2WD, Diesel Utility Tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2008 NH T1110 4WD, HST, 28HP w/Loader, 60” Belly Mower, Grass Catcher, Front Snowblower, 206 Hrs - Woods 6’ Backhoe Available for Additional $3,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,495 1973 Ford 2110 LCG 3 Cyl. Gas Engine w/Loader, 3847 Hrs . . . $3,995 2008 NH T1030 4WD, HST, 26HP w/Loader, R4 Tires, 38 Hrs . . . $12,950 2010 Mahindra 2415 4WD, Gear Trans, R4 Tires, Loader, 276 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,250 1980 JD 850 2WD, ROPS Tractor - 3502 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995 1986 Ford 1210 2WD Compact w/Ford 702A Front Blade, 1091 Hrs.. $3,500 2010 NH TD5030 4WD ROPS - 380 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 2011 NH T6030 4WD, Cab w/NH 840TC Loader, 485 Hrs.. . $79,900 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT WIC Cart Mounted Bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . $1,450 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Round Bale Carrier/Feeder . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head for a NH 900. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 Gehl 970 14’ Forage Box on Gear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,950 Gehl 940 16' Forage Box on Tandem 12 Ton Gehl Gear . . . . $2,995 Krause 2204A 14' Disc Harrow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,780 2002 NH 570 Square Baler w/70 Thrower, Ex. Cond. . . . . . . $19,600 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2003 Challenger RB46 Silage Special Round Baler . . . . . . $17,500 2011 H&S CR10 10 Wheel Hyd. Fold Rake - Like New . . . . . $5,295 1998 John Deere 3 Row Corn Head from JD 3970 . . . . . . . . $3,200 1988 NH 900 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 900W Pick-up Head . . . . $6,720 2010 Hay Rite 24” Skeleton Elevator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,150 2010 H&S BW1000 Inline Bale Wrapper - Like New . . . . . . $24,500 Case IH 415 Cultimulcher 12’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 Jaylor 2350 Vertical Cutter/Mixer/Feeder Wagon . . . . . . . . . . $6,300 2007 Krause 7400-24WR 24’ Rock Flex Disc. . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 Wil Rich 25’ Field Cultivator, Spring Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 2003 Gehl 2580 Round Baler, Silage Special, 4x5 Bale. . . . . $9,800

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tial for the health of our entire planet. The metabolic activity of microorganisms participates quite literally “at the root” of the nitrogen, phosphate, oxygen and carbon cycles, and are thus indispensable to the health of the entire biosphere. They are also the most numerous inhabitants in the web of life. There are an estimated 6 x 10 to the 30th power bacterial cells on earth, and soil microrganisms represent about 50 percent of the the total biodiversity in terms of numbers of species. (That big number, written out, is a 6 followed by 30 zeros; those zeroes are divided into threes by ten commas.) Soil organisms include

Crop A7

New Idea Box Spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 Woods RM59 3pt. Finish Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $700 2011 WIFO 3pt. Pallet Forks - 3000 lb. Capacity, Like New . . . . $795 1999 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head to fit NH 900 . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 2003 NH 27P Windrow Pickup head to fit NH 900 . . . . . . . . . $1,800 1992 Landoll 11’Tilloll one pass Tillage Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,400 NH 477 7’ Haybine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 Vicon 3pt. Wheel Rake, 4 Wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $525 Knight 3015 Reel Auggie Mixer Wagon w/Scales, 147 Cu. Ft. Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 2001 Woods BH1050 3pt. Backhoe w/PTO Pump, Very Little Use. $5,500 2007 Sweepster Quick Attach 8’ Broom w/PTO Pump and Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,000 Avalanche 10’ Quick Attach Snow Pusher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,750 2000 JD 328 Square Baler w/42 Ejector-Nice Condition . . . $11,500 1991 Case IH 8450 Round Baler, 4x6 Variable Chamber. . . . $9,500 New Holland 273 Square Baler w/54A Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 2003 EZ Trail 9x18 Steel Rack on 872W Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,995 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2010 NH B95B TLB, CAB w/heat and AC, Pilot Control, Extendhoe, 418 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $65,000 2008 NH M459 Telehandler 45’ reach, 420 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . $60,000 2011 NH W190C Wheel Loader, 4.5 Cu.Yd. Buckets, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Choice $172,500 2007 NH E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Cab w/Heat /AC 1613 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket, 1600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,500 2011 NH D85B Crawler/Dozer, LGP Trucks, OROPS, 300 Hrs. $68,750 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate, 72" Bucket, 100 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2007 NH W110 Wheel Loader, 1025 Hrs, Excellent Cond.. . . $87,500 2007 NH W170B Wheel Loader, 2743 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $76,250 1982 JD 310A 2WD TLB, Cab, Diesel Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900 1990 Hitachi EX60G Excavator w/Rubber Tracks - 3841 Hrs.$24,500 2008 NH C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat A/C, Pilot, Hi-Flow Hyd., 84” Bucket, 984 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40,000 2008 NH L160 Skidsteer w/Cab & Heat, 72” Bucket, 3476 Hrs. $13,500 2011 NH L218 Skidsteer w/Cab and Heat, Hyd. Mount Plate, 638 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,500 ATTACHMENTS 2008 NH /FFC 66" Skidsteer Tiller - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2009 Bradco 48” Pallet Forks, SSL Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $600 Wifo SSL Mount Bale Grabber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $950 2011 NH/McMillon Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9" Auger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950


Crop from A6 fungi, and the mycelium, which is technically the largest organism in

the world, and have a special importance to the health of this planet.

Many mycologists (scientists who study fungi... most notably, Paul

organisms, while encouraging the growth of other, potentially less beneficial organisms — again, not unlike the effect which antibiotics have on the microbial life in the human digestive tract. Worrisome new research indicates that the biodiversity of minute organisms (with big names) of the soil and our food sysytem is being dramatically impacted by the use of herbicides like glyphosate. As stated earlier, researchers propose that many soil organisms, which are critical for the productivity of agricultural soils, as well as in raw and fermented dairy production, may be undergoing endangerment, and in some cases extinction in certain geographic regions, despite having an extremely long history there. Please forgive my delay in defining mycelium, which the glossary in Eco-Farm... an Acres USA Primer interprets thusly: “thread-like growth emanating from fungal spores such as

actinomycete molds which act as food-taking structures for the fruiting body.” And Dr. Paul Stamets places the concept in greater perspective: “Is this the largest organism in the world? This 2,400-acre site in eastern Oregon had a contiguous growth of mycelium before logging roads cut through it. Estimated at 1,665 football fields in size and 2,200 years old, this one fungus has killed the forest above it several times over, and in so doing has built deeper soil layers that allow the growth of ever -larger stands of trees. Mushroom-forming forest fungi are unique in that their mycelial mats can achieve such massive proportions.” All this wonder of nature is underfoot, thus invisible. And for most people invisible means out of sight, out of mind. Or taken one step further, “Seeing is believing.” However, a much smaller group of people, including yours truly, embrace the concept of “Believing is seeing.”

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 7

Stamets, PhD.) believe that the mycellium may in fact be the “Earth’s natural internet,” a means through which species unrelated in genetic and geographic time and space may communicate with one another, effectively acting like a nerve network within the biosphere. These tiny life forms (especially fungi, to which we are more closely tied than bacteria) also contain information buried deep within their DNA on the origin of life itself; if destroyed, Ji contends, undiscovered parts of ourselves will no doubt also perish. Glyphosate has been shown in a wide range of other ecotoxicological (environment-poisoning) studies to negatively impact the complex interactions of microbial groups, including their biochemical activity, root growth, overall plant growth and productivity. Glyphosate also alters microbial populations through changing the pH of the soil, and directly inhibits and/or kills certain soil


Page 8 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Goat reproduction selection genetic animal evaluation EPDs Genetics Although genetic-evaluation programs are new to the goat industry, producers have used information from these types of programs for many years to make genetic improvements. Most genetic-evaluation programs are managed by breed associations and are used to compare registered animals within the breed. Breeders collect individual animal performance measures and submit it to the breed association managing the program. Then, the information submitted for an animal and all of its relatives can be used to predict future offspring performance. Most of the major sheep breeds, including the Katahdin, have a breed-improvement program in place, and some Boer and Kiko goat associations have also started genetic-evaluation programs. Genetic-evaluation programs can help produce unbiased information for selection of breeding stock such as Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs). An EPD is a numerical estimate of the value of an animal for one specific trait; it tells us the possible differences of a goats’ offspring compared to the average of the breed. So, genetic-evaluation programs can help: 1. Identify and document genetic merit/value for major economically important traits, 2. Predict possible performance of the next generation, 3. Provide breeders with EPDs to be used as another tool in selecting breeding stock, 4. Provide paperwork and information to customers about what breeding stock to buy. The EPD for a young animal will be mostly based on its parents’ performance records such as birth, weaning, and/or yearling weights. After the kid’s own performance records have been processed, its EPD will be based on a combination of its parents’ records and its own performance. If that kid is selected as a breeding

animal, and records on its kids are reported, the records on its progeny will also be used to calculate its EPD. Because all relationships among animals (parent-offspring, half-siblings, cousins) are taken into account, older animals or those with a lot of relatives in the program will have more accurate EPDs. Producers can compare goats using EPDs. For example, a buck with a weaning weight EPD of +1.0 pounds (meaning his offspring should be 1 pound heavier at weaning than average) is good, but a different buck with a weaning weight EPD of +2.0 pounds is better. EPDs give the most unbiased estimation of genetic value possible. The EPDs provided by a breed association will vary. The most common EPDs usually reported include the following: • Birth weight EPD • Maternal birth weight EPD • 90-day weaning weight EPD • 150-day post-wean-

ing weight EPD • Maternal milk EPD • Milk plus growth EPD • Number born, or percent kid crop • Carcass EPD • Reproduction EPD

Small Ruminants • Production life EPD The breed association calculating the EPDs can provide more information on genetic animal evaluation programs and

how to use EPDs as a selection tool to meet production goals. Participating in an EPD program can provide producers with more information

for their own herd, and can also give producers a marketing edge for selling breeding stock. Adapted from www.luresext.edu.

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Is Snaplage a ‘good fit’ for dairy farmers in the Northeast?

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equipment that excludes the stalk and most of the leaf material, but is generally understood to include the whole ear (husk, cob, grain, part of the shank). It is harvested by a silage harvester with a snapper head and kernel processor, and ensiled at 35-40 percent moisture. Most major manufacturers of silage choppers also make snapper heads. Compatible aftermarket snapper heads can also be purchased, especially in the case of self-propelled harvesters. ‘Earlage’ is similar to snaplage, but does not include the husk and very little of the shank is retained. In addition to using various types of snapper heads, some farmers have also harvested earlage by adjusting their combines to break up the cob and return it and the grain to the bin. Farmers choose to harvest both earlage and snaplage instead of whole-plant corn silage

for very similar reasons. While these products are similar in many ways the feeding characteristics will be different, depending on how much of the husk, shank, and stalk are excluded during harvest. As with all feed decisions, snaplage has both positive and negative characteristics that will be more significant on some farms than others. While snaplage can offer major feed-cost savings to some farmers, it is not for everyone. The ‘pros’ of harvesting and feeding snaplage: • The feed characteristics are likely to improve animal health compared to corn grain; • Reduced transportation costs per ton of TDN harvested compared with corn silage; • Increased flexibility of the time of harvest compared with corn silage; • Returning stalks and leaves to the soil can improve soil quality and reduce the risk of soil erosion;

• Less fuel is used per ton of TDN harvested compared with corn silage; • Improved ruminal digestibility compared to dry corn; • Starch digestibility increases with time in storage, compared with corn grain; • It can allow less reliance on purchased corn; • Requirements for harvest equipment and storage facilities are similar to whole plant corn silage; • Low-quality leaves and stalks can be replaced in the ration with higher quality forages; and • 10-15 percent higher TDN yield per acre than shelled corn. The ‘cons’ of harvesting and feeding snaplage: • Less consistent quality characteristics compared with dry grain; • If harvested too late, cob digestibility is significantly reduced; • A ‘snapper head’ is needed;

Is A10

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TRACTORS ‘96 Agco 7600A tractor, 4WD, C/A/H w/ldr., 1 owner ‘93 CIH 5250 4WD, C/A/H w/loader, pshift, 2 remotes, 1500 hrs International 886 2WD tractor, cab, air, 540/1000, good condition ‘97 JD 7410 tractor, 4WD w/cab, hi crop, runs & works ‘07 Kubota M108 4WD, C/A/H, cast centers, 1 remote, 793 hrs ‘05 Kubota M125X 4WD, C/A/H, pshift, 2 remotes, front weights, good tires, 256 hrs. ‘06 Kubota M125XDTC 4WD, C/A/H, ldr., PS, 2 remotes, sharp tractor ‘07 Kubota M5040HD 4WD w/ldr., hyd shuttle, R-4 tires, 1 remote, 976 hrs ‘10 Kubota M5640 4WD tractor w/ldr., 1 remote, ag tires, ss qt, 228 hrs ‘09 Kubota M5640 4WD tractor w/canopy ‘09 Kubota M7040 4WD, w/loader Ag tires, 1 remote, 258 hrs. ‘10 Kubota M7040 4WD, C/A/H, 1 remote, cast centers, 67 hrs ‘02 Kubota M8200DTC 4WD w/cab setup for raised bed, 3086 hrs ‘04 Kubota M8200SDNBC 4WD, C/A/H, narrow, creeper trans 1950 hrs ‘07 Kubota M95 4WD w/loader, C/A/H, good tires, 1 remote, 32 speed ‘06 Kubota M125X 4WD, C/A/H w/loader, pshift, 2 remotes, sharp tractor, 525 hrs ‘10 Kubota M9540 4WD, C/A/H, 2 remotes, hyd shuttle, 138 hrs ‘07 Kubota MX5000 2WD tractor w/ag tires, low hrs. ‘09 Kubota MX5100 4WD w/ldr., 8x8 trans, R-4 tires, SS QT, 229 hrs. ‘00 MF 4243 2WD, C/A/H, runs and works COMPACT TRACTORS & LAWN TRACTORS ‘10 Bobcat S850 C/A/H, STD controls, 780 hrs ‘08 Bobcat CT235 4WD, TLB, hydro, R-4 tires, good condition, 510 hrs ’07 Cub Cadet 7284 TLB 4WD, Hydro mid mower, 264 hrs. Dixie Chopper XT3200 60” cut, 32hp, gas ‘08 JD 997 tractor, diesel 60” cut, clean, 578 hrs ‘10 Kubota B2320 4WD, 60” cut, R-4 tires, good condition, 194 hrs. ‘00 Kubota B2710 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, hydro, very clean, 310 hrs. ‘09 Kubota B2920 4WD, TLB hydro, R-4 tires, thumb, like new, 78 hrs. ‘07 Kubota B3030 4WD, C/A/H R-4 tires like new 100 hrs. ‘11 Kubota B3200 4WD, TLB, hydro, R-4 tires, mid pto, good cond.186 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B3200 4WD tractor, hydro, 60” mid mower, 55 hrs ‘10 Kubota B3200 4WD tractor, hydro turf tires, good condition 313 hrs ‘10 Kubota B3300 4WD TLB, R-4 tires, 3 pt., clean, 201 hrs, ‘05 Kubota B7410 4WD, w/turf tires, 132 hrs ‘08 Kubota B7510 4WD TLB, 6x2 trans, ag tires, 648 hrs ‘06 Kubota BX24 4WD TLB, R-4 tires, hydro, 1 owner, clean ‘11 Kubota BX25 4WD TLB, 27 hrs ‘05 Kubota BX1500 4Wd, w/54” mid mower hydro, turf tires, good cond., 301 hrs ‘04 Kubota BX2230 4WD tractor w/loader 54” mower, turf tires, clean, 345 hrs ‘08 Kubota BX2350 4WD tractor w/loader, R-4 tires, 1 owner, 25 hrs ‘06 Kubota L2800 4WD tractor w/loader, ag tires, good cond., 170 hrs ‘07 Kubota L2800 4WD tractor w/ldr., ag tires, 8x4 trans ‘08 Kubota L2800 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, canopy ,274 hrs ‘06 Kubota L440 DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, 8x4 trans, 538 hrs. ‘94 Kubota L2950 4WD tractor w/ ldr., SS QT, new rear tires, good cond. ‘10 Kubota L3200 2WD tractor, w/Ag tires, 1remote, like new, 31 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L3240 4WD tractor, R-4 tires, good cond., 590 hrs.

‘10 Kubota L3240DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, SS QT, like new, 101 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor w/ ldr., ag tires, 104 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3400 4WD TLB, hydro, ag tires, as new, 29 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L3540 4WD tractor w/ ldr., hydro SS QT, clean machine, 264 hrs. ‘03 Kubota L3830 4WD, tractor w/loader, SS quick coupler, 1 remote, 1204 hrs ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor w/loader, 8x8 trans., R-4 tires, SSQT, clean, 352 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD, w/ loader, R-4 tires, GST trans, 408 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor, hydro, canopy, R4 tires, clean, 149 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L4240 HST 4WD w/loader, hydro, R-4 tires, SS QT, 299 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L4400DT 4WD w/loader, ag tires, 254 hrs. ‘05 Kubota L4400DT 4WD w/ldr., R-4 tires, good cond., 523 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L4400HST 4WD w/ldr, hydro, ag tires, 238 hrs. ‘10 Kubota L5240HSTC 4WD, C/A/H w/ldr., SSQT ag tires, 1 remote, 153 hrs ‘12 Kubota T1880 lawn tractor, 18hp w/42” deck, never used ‘10 Kubota T2080 20 HP, hydro, 42” cut lawn tractor ‘05 Kubota ZD28 zero turn mower, 28 hp, 72” deck very good cond. 232 hrs. ‘10 Kubota ZD221 21hp, 48” deck, 57 hrs. ‘08 Kubota ZD321 zero turn, 21 HP diesel, 54” cut, very good cond., 71 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZD323-60 23 HP diesel, 60” cut, good condition, 770 hrs ‘10 Kubota ZD323-60 23 HP diesel, very good condition, 58 hrs ‘08 Kubota ZD326 26 HP dsl 60” pro deck ‘10 Kubota ZD326 26 hp, diesel, rear discharge, deck canopy, 135 hrs. ‘10 Kubota ZD331 zero turn, 31hp, diesel, 60” pro deck, 280 hrs ‘08 Kubota ZG222-48, 22 HP, hyd lift, canopy, 167 hrs. ‘10 Kubota ZG227 54” cut, like new, 27 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZG227 27 HP, 54” cut, good condition, 181 hrs. ‘08 NH T1110 4WD tractor w/loader, hydro, as new, 51 hrs ‘10 NH Boomer 50 tractor w/ldr., 4WD, shuttle trans, ag tires, SSQT as new, 69 hrs ‘06 NH TN60 4WD tractor, w/ldr., Ag tires, remotes, radial tires, 574 hrs Simplicity ZT844 18hp lawn tractor w/48” cut, 530 hrs SKID STEERS ‘05 Bobcat A300 cab w/heat bucket & forks, hi flow, 1459 hrs ‘04 Bobcat MT52 skid steer with bucket and ride on platform, 236 hrs ‘09 Bobcat S70 cab w/heat 48” bucket, good tires, 1012 hrs ‘07 Bobcat S175 cab w/heat, power tach, very clean, 504 hrs ‘07 Bobcat S250 C/A/H, power tach, SJC controls, very clean 586 hrs ‘09 Bobcat S250 C/A/H, power tach, 72” bucket, very clean, like new tires, 160 hrs. ‘10 Bobcat S850 C/A/H, SJC controls, new wheels, 780 hrs ‘10 Bobcat T110 OROPS, low hrs, very nice machine, 320 hrs. ‘05 Bobcat T180 skid steer, OROPS with bucket, 2nd owner ‘08 Bobcat T190 skid steer, new tracks, good cond., 808 hrs. ‘05 Bobcat T300 cab w/heat, standard controls, hi flow, good tracks, 1908 hrs. ‘03 Case 1845C skid steer, hi flow, new tires, clean, 1 owner 07 Cat 256C skid steer, cab with heat, 6’ bucket, 1 owner, clean with grouser tracks, 310 hrs. ‘11 Kubota SVL90 OROPS, hi flow, like new NH L190 skid steer, hi flow, AC, new bucket, runs & works

PLOWS W/ SPRING RESET Asst. 1, 2, 3, or 4 x 3 pt. plows Ford 101 3x plow SIDE RAKES & TEDDERS New First Choice 2 star tedder New First Choice 4 star tedder, hyd. fold New First Choice 4 star tedder, spring assist First Choice 6 star hyd fold First Choice 10 wheel converge rake NH 55, 256, 258, 259 side rakes - priced from $500 NH 256, 258 side rakes, some w/ dolly wheels INDUSTRIAL ‘03 Bobcat 325 excavator, rops, rubber tracks, 1811 hrs ‘00 Bobcat 325 excavator, runs and works, 18” bucket, 2657 hrs ‘03 Bobcat 334 excavator, rops, rubber tracks, hyd thumb, 1703 hrs ‘05 Bobcat 334 excavator, C/A/H, with thumb 627 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat 335 excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, good cond, 18” bkt, 898 hrs ‘06 Bobcat 430 excavator, C/A/H, 24” bucket, good cond., 649 hrs. ‘03 Bobcat 430 excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, good cond., 1198 hrs ‘05 Bobcat 442 excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, good cond., 1836 hrs ‘06 Bobcat 442 excavator, C/A/H, thumb, rubber tracks, very nice, ready to work, 327 hrs. ‘06 Bomag BW211D 84” smooth drum roller, very good cond. Case CX36B C/A/H 3 extra buckets, hyd thumb ‘01 Cat TH83 telehandler cab, out riggers, forks, good cond. Cat D3GXL dozer, C/A/H, 6 way blade, hy state, sharp ‘86 CDS 840D payloader cab w/heat, 2 buckets, 1 owner, 3326 hrs Doosan SL290 excavator, good cond, 4’ bkt, good undercarriage, 3476 hrs ‘09 Dynapac CA134D roller, 54” smooth drum, w/shell kit, very clean ‘06 Dynapac CA121 roller, 54” smooth drum, good cond, 1303 hrs Finn B70 strawblower, 4cyl Kubota diesel, very clean ‘07 Hamm 3205 54” vibratory roller, clean Ingersoll Rand 706H fork lift, 4WD, 15’ see thru mast 6,000 lb Cummins dsl. ‘02 JD 160 LC excavator, C/A/H, 1 owner, 36” bucket, ready to work ‘83 JD 310B 2wd cab w/diesel, 24” bucket, 4676 hrs ‘97 JD 450 6 way blade, 40% under carriage, ride and drive ‘05 JD 650JXLT dozer, C/A/H, 1 owner, good under carriage, 1236 hrs ‘07 JLG 450A lift ‘08 Kubota KX71 excavator, rubber tracks, hyd thumb, very good condition, 483 hrs ‘10 Kubota KX080 C/A/H, super double boom, hyd thumb, rubber tracks, good condition, 580 hrs. ‘11 Kubota KX41 excavator, rubber tracks, 276 hrs ‘11 Kubota KX080 C/A/H hyd thumb, good cond. w/bucket, 829 hrs ‘09 Kubota KX121 C/A/H 6 way blade, hyd thumb, 1 owner, 627 hrs ‘08 Kubota KX161 rops, hyd thumb, good cond, 1068 hrs ‘10 Kubota L45 4WD, TLB, 185 hrs ‘09 Kubota L45 4WD, TL, hydro w/ HD box scraper & aux. hyd., like new, 73 hrs. ‘10 Kubota M59 4WD, TLB, 3 pt, 3 remotes, very clean 181 hrs ‘09 Kubota U25 excavator, ROPS, hyd thumb, good cond, 302 hrs

‘07 Kubota U35 ROPS, rubber tracks, 24” qt bucket 594 hrs. ‘06 Kubota U45 C/A/H hyd thumb, angle blade, rubber tracks, good cond., 1278 hrs ‘07 Kubota U45 ROPS, rubber tracks, 24” bucket, 1437 hrs Morbark D76 stump grinder, cat, diesel w/remote, good cond., 285 hrs NH EC45 excavator cab, mechanical thumb, rubber tracks, 10,000lb. NH LB75B 4wd w/cab & heat, TLB, good tires, clean machine, 2567 hrs Rayco C87D crawler dozer, C/A/H, pilot controls, winch and forestry pkg., very clean Rayco RG1625A stump grinder, 25hp, fair condition Reinco TM35 strawblower w/Kubota 4 cyl., good cond., 147 hrs. ‘90 Skytrack 6036 telehandler CULTIPACKERS & SEEDERS 8-10-12 cultipackers Bobcat 72 seeder, 3pt. or SS mount, 6’ cultipacker seeder, good cond. MANURE SPREADERS NH 1038 stack liner wagon, good cond. HAYBINES/DISCBINES Krone AMT323CV 10 foot mower conditioner, tine conditioner, runs and works McKee 16’ 3pt. danish tines w/ rolling baskets, good cond. NH 488 mower conditioner, used 1 season on 25 acres, same as new DISCS IHC leveling disk, 14’ MISCELLANEOUS Allied 70 hydraulic tamper Asst used 3 pt. finish mowers & rotary mowers Befco 20’ batwing finish mower Bobcat 5600 Toolcat C/A/H, hi flow w/bucket, 607 hrs. Bobcat 48 fence installer, SS mount, unused stakes & fence included Brillion 3pt. 5 shank reset ripper Ferri TD42RSFM boom mower, unused Ford 309 3pt 2 row corn planter, very good cond. Ford 3000 sprayer, dsl., custom spray rig tractor Gehl 865 chopper w/TR3038 2 row corn head & pickup head Gehl 1540 blower, good condition Genset D337F 6 cyl. generator Kubota RTV900 utility vehicle ‘11 Kubota RTV900 4WD, hyd dump, same as new, 61 hrs. ‘08 Kubota RTV900 4WD, hyd. dump. canopy & windshield, same as new ‘08 Kubota RTV1100 4WD, C/A/H 1 owner, garage kept w/bed liner, 672 hrs. ‘10 Kubota RTV1140 4WD, 4 seater w/hyd dump, like new, 215 hrs. Kinner 1 row 3pt tree planter, very good cond. ‘10 Land Pride RCR3515 batwing mower, good cond, 15 foot NH 310 square baler with thrower, shed kept Pug F480 utility vehicle, 18 HP, gas, 2WD, flip seat in box, 109 hrs Sweepster RHFAM6 rotary broom 3 pt., 6’ Timberjack T40 winch for skidders Timerwolf TW5 log splitter w/log lift & 6 way wedge

We are your source for a wide range of used parts with free nationwide parts locator. Parts are dismantled, cleaned and ready for shipment.

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

Rte 9, Belchertown, MA. 01007 413-253-5456 413-478-9790 www.orchardhillsales.com

by Daniel Hudson, UVM Agronomist To state the obvious, the recent milk-to-feed price ratio has been hard on farm profitability. Because of this, some dairy farmers have become increasingly interested in using snaplage to partially or largely replace purchased corn in the ration. While the limited number of crop acres are a primary reason more farmers in the Northeast are not attempting to produce a significant portion of the concentrate needed for their dairies, snaplage deserves some consideration by those farmers who are able to overcome acreage limitations, have a large corn silage inventory, who are expecting a larger than usual crop of corn silage, or who have a corn crop that for some reason looks like it will probably make poor quality whole-plant silage. Snaplage basics ‘Snaplage’ is corn silage harvested with


New location offers ShowEase Inc. a bright future

Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

by Jon M. Casey At a time when many agribusinesses have been challenged by current economic conditions and have downsized, ShowEase Inc. has moved to a new, larger location where they can now offer their customers sales and service that has helped the company to grow steadily over the past half-century. ShowEase Inc., who will celebrate their 50th anniversary of operation in 2013, has moved from its original location in Lancaster, PA, to a new location on Trout Run Road in Ephrata, PA. Owner and President, Connie Bender, is excited about the benefits of the move.

“We had considered moving our business for the past couple of years,” she explained as we toured the new facility. “We had outgrown our previous facility in Lancaster, and there was no room to expand. After narrowing the new location possibilities down to three or four places, I kept coming back to this one,” she said. “It was the old 84 Lumber facility. It had been upgraded for the previous occupant, but I could envision a lot of possibilities for ShowEase having this as our new home.” Bender said after careful consideration, they closed on this property and immediately began upgrading the facility to

meet their future needs. “We called upon ACI Construction of Ephrata, PA to help us with the upgrades,” she said. “We built a new showroom and new offices to give us the retail and administrative space that we needed, and we added a new loading dock in the back of the building to help expedite the loading and unloading of trucks.” “When it was time to move, it took us about two months to make the move. We wanted to take our time so that we would be able to restock our parts in an orderly fashion,” she said. “That way, it is easier to locate them when customers call for them. As you can see, we have an exten-

sive supply of equipment parts and mats for all sorts of applications.” Bender said ShowEase Inc. began in 1962 as a livestock stall equipment manufacturer, when her father John Kreider began making cow stalls. The business was formerly known as ShowEase Stall Company. Since then, the company has grown and changed in the product lines that it offers its customers. “Over time, the addition of equipment lines began to diminish the stall manufacturing portion of the business,” she said. “By the time that Dad retired, the stall business played a minor part in the overall makeup of the company. That is when we changed

The clean, open display area in the front of the ShowEase Inc. building, gives customers the opportunity to see the latest in equipment and accessories outdoors, rain or shine!

Connie Bender is especially pleased with the new showroom and service area that includes a modern sales counter and expanded display area for equipment and literature. Photos by Jon M. Casey

the name to ShowEase Inc. That was in late 2011. Today, we no longer sell stalls.” ShowEase Inc. sells and services a number of equipment and farm accessory lines including Badger, Hanson and Art’s Way, Graetz Mfg., Inc. and Lancaster Level-Flo, to name a few. They are one of the largest stocking dealers of Badger farm equipment on the East Coast. In all, they sell more than 15 brands of products including silo unloaders, mats,

drinkers, feeders and other kinds of ag equipment. “We carry at least a dozen styles of mats in varying sizes,” she added. “We have mats for dairy barn floors, cattle, alpacas, horses, llamas and people. We even carry mud flaps!” Bender emphasized they currently specialize in hard to find and obsolete equipment parts. “We have parts for Starline equipment and other brands that are no longer

order to reduce purchased grain costs; • the economics of hauling snaplage from distant fields makes more sense than it does for whole-plant corn silage. Interestingly, the NEL for snaplage is very similar to high-moisture corn. This is counterintuitive because, pound for pound, pure corn clearly has more energy than snaplage. The similarity in feeding value has been attributed to improved rumen function being realized when the whole ear is fed rather than just the grain. It is common for farmers in the Midwest to round bale corn stover to feed to livestock. This practice would probably not fit well with the residue left after the snaplage has been harvested. After going through a combine, the corn stalks are generally cracked and crushed in

such a way that they can dry out somewhat. Aside from the generally wetter fall weather common in the Northeast around the time of silage harvest, the stalks from plants from which the ears have been picked are much less damaged and will not dry out as quickly or completely as if they had been run through a combine. The chances that the corn stalks remaining after snaplage has been harvested will make acceptable feed is very low. Conclusion Snaplage is an excellent source of energy for dairy livestock. While many farmers in recent years have begun to harvest snaplage to partially offset the cost of purchased grain, the associated land and management requirements are significant and need to be considered carefully before major changes are made.

New A13

Is from A9 • Returning the unharvested portion of the plants may offer more residue management challenges than regular silage stubble; • Fermentation losses can be high if a good silage making protocol is not used; • The tendency for the starch digestibility to increase requires extra diligence when balancing the ration over the time the ration is being fed out; • The amount of nongrain plant material present can vary with harvest moisture, even within the same day; • Chop-length can be more difficult to control than with whole-plant corn silage; • More tons of forage need to be harvested or purchased and stored to replace the value of unharvested portions of the corn plants; • It is not as easily marketed as dry grain; and

• Lower in protein than corn grain by about 1 percent. Snaplage is haunted by a bad reputation associated with excessively late harvests, poorly adjusted equipment, and poor silage-making practices. To end up with high-quality snaplage going into the mouths of your cows, several practices must be followed: • Harvest between 35 and 40 percent moisture (for the harvested portion). At this point the corn should be physiologically mature, and the digestibility of the cob should be high. Research has shown that the digestibility of the cob declines significantly as it dries out. It is better to err on the side of harvesting it wetter than drier. If harvested excessively dry, molds and associated mycotoxins can develop. • When deciding how

to store the snaplage, consider whether your current facilities will allow the product to be fed out rapidly enough to prevent spoilage. The density of snaplage in the silo should be at least 30 pounds of dry matter per cubic foot in order to provide a good environment for fermentation. • Maximize kernel damage by using the shortest chopping length possible, using finetoothed rollers adjusted to 2-3 mm. The differential can and should be set higher with snaplage than with silage (Mahanna, 2008). • If possible, allow at least 60 days to pass before opening the silo in order to benefit from the increase in starch digestibility over time. In much of the Northeast, farmers are significantly constrained by the lack of crop land.

You might consider harvesting snaplage in any given year if: • you have a very large inventory of high quality forages to compensate for the reduction in yield; • you have a very large inventory of corn silage already and/or have more corn standing than you need and would rather capture the value in reduced feed costs instead of selling it standing in the field to another farmer; • conditions have been such that the quality of whole-plant corn silage is expected to be poor and you would rather have some high-quality snaplage than a much larger volume of low-quality whole-plant silage; • land has become available locally, but you do not need it for hay or wholeplant corn silage and you think the economics may be favorable for planting it specifically for snaplage in


New from A10 being manufactured,” she said. “Many of our historical equipment customers have come to rely

and feed equipment products,” she said. “We recently took on this very popular line.”

ing Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, Ohio and New York. “Moving to this part of Lancaster

Parts is the name of the game at ShowEase Inc. Here is one section of parts storage in the spacious warehouse.

Currently, ShowEase Inc. has customers in Pennsylvania and surrounding states includ-

PENNSYLVANIA MM WEAVER & SONS, INC. 169 North Groffdale Rd. Leola, PA 717-656-2321

NEW YORK CORYN FARM SUPPLIES INC. 3186 Freshour Rd. Canandaigua, NY 585-394-4691

ELDER SALES & SERVICE INC. 4488 Greenville-Sandy Lake Rd. Stoneboro, PA 724-376-3740

ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT 3662 Buffalo St., Box 215 Alexander, NY 585-591-2955

MAINE KRAMERS INC. 2400 W River Rd. Sidney, ME 207-547-3345

CATSKILL TRACTOR INC. 384 Center St. Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

County has made it easier to get to our business for a number of our customers,” she noted. “We

NEW YORK SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 Sharon Springs, NY 518-284-2346

our customers, our trusted service and our quality products all remain exactly the same — the same way you have come to know us for years,” she said. “So whether you are an old,

ShowEase Inc. is located at the intersection of PA Route 272 and Trout Run Road just north of Ephrata, PA. Bender said they are currently working on developing a company website and

Cliff Hoover assembles a Hanson Uniloader in one of the equipment repair bays.

trusted customer or a new neighbor in Ephrata, we all look forward to working with you in the future.”

she hopes that it will be operational soon. Until then, phone inquiries are welcomed at 717299-2536.

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

upon us for parts for older models of equipment.” “A new line for us is the WIC line of silo unloaders

are close to Routes 222, 322, 272 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. At the same time, we are close to local areas where there are more of our customers.” “We have two service trucks that are out serving customers, mostly in a 2-hour radius of the business,” she said. “If the need is there, we will travel further, but most of our customers fall within that service area. We have a staff of five full-time and two parttime employees. They are the glue that holds this business together.” “Our wonderful team includes Tom Livengood, who has more than 30 years of silo unloader service experience; Cliff Hoover, equipment service; Jerry Offenbaker, parts and sales; Harry Wagner, parts manager; Etta Esch is our bookkeeper/ receptionist; my father John Kreider, who still works Tuesdays and Thursdays, and me.” “Our location is new, but our commitment to


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Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

York Fairgrounds ABM • E-363 ACR Metal Roofing & Siding Dist • 128 Adams Building Contractors of PA • W-320, W-321 ADM - Crop Risk Management • 212 Advanced Biofuels USA • H-308 Advanced Solar Industries, LLC AET Consulting, Inc • 260 Ag Essentials • 258, 259 AgChoice Farm Credit • 234 Ag-Com, Inc & Miller Chemical • E-359, E-360 Agri-Basics, Inc • 242, 243 Agri-King • 126 Agri-Nutrition Consulting • L-300 Agri-Plastics Mfg • 126A Agri-SC • 209 Agri-Service LLC • O-104 Agri-Trac, Inc / Agri-Trac US • W-330 Agromatic, Inc • 219, 220 Albers Dairy Equipment, Inc • W-300, W-301 Alltech • 207 American Farm Products • 531 Anderson Group • W-348B Animal Medic • E-373 Appleby Systems, Inc • 437 Art Farm USA • 247, 248 Atlantic Tractor • W-353 Automatic Farm Systems • 121 AutoVent LLC • 253 B&R Distributing, Inc • S Baker Ag Lime • 208 Balsbaugh Insurance Agency, Inc • E-348 Beiler-Campbell Realtors & Auctioneers • L-306 Benco Poly Film, LLC • 211 Bergman Mfg, Inc • 274 Bernard C. Morrissey Insurance • 424 Better Bilt Storage, Inc • 138 Binkley & Hurst LP • E-352, O-315 Bio-Vet, Inc • W-313 Bobcat of York Sales & Rental • E-379 BouMatic • 120 Business Lease Consultants • W-325 C. K. Manufacturing • E-353 Canns-Bilco Distributors, Inc • W-327, W-328 Cargill Feed & Nutrition • 218 CBM Lighting • L-213, L-214 Cedar Crest Equipment • 130 Center for Dairy Excellence • W-338A Central Petroleum (Cen-Pe-Co) • W-351 Channel Bio, LLC • 232, 233 Chase’s Farm and Home (Conklin) • H Chemgro Seed • W-323, W-324 Christian Farmers Outreach • 413 Claas of America • 102 Clean Cutter Flail & Tiller Blade Co • 419 Cobra Torches, Inc • 526 Conewango Products Corp. • 223, 224 Conklin Agrovantage • 432, 433 Conklin Co • 529, 530 Crop Protection Services (CPS) • 200, 201, 202, 203 CROPP / Organic Valley • 401 Cummings & Bricker, Inc • E-354 Dairy Marketing Services • E-341, E-342, E-343 Dairy One • E-345, E-346 Dairymaster USA, Inc • E-367 Deep Valley Farm, Inc • E-313 Deer Country • W-353 Delaval, Inc • 227B, 228, 229, 230, 231, 229A Dick Meyer Co., Inc • 284 Doeblers • W-339, W-340 Dryhill Mfg / Twin Valley Farms Service • 505, 515, 449A Dyna Products • O-307 DynaTech Power • 250, 250A E&F Ag Systems, LLC • E-311 Eli Fisher Construction • 441 EM Herr Equipment, Inc • 446 Emm Sales and Service, Inc • E-369, E-370

Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center 9 Miles SW of State College, PA

Equipment Service • 442 Esch Mfg • E-375 Everett Cash Mutual Insurance Group • E-314 Farm and Land Realty, Inc • L-301 Farmer Boy Ag • 125 Feedmobile, Inc • E-368 Fetterville Sales • H-304 Finch Services • W-353 Fisher & Thompson, Inc • 110 F.M. Brown’s Sons, Inc • 409, 410 Franklin Builders • 225, 226 Fulton Bank • 206 GEA Farm Technologies • 104A Genex Cooperative, Inc • W-312 Glatfelter Pulp Wood Co • 711 Goodville Mutual Casualty Co • E-316, E-317 Garber Farms • 503, 451 Great Plains Mfg • W-348A Gro-Mor Plant Food Co Inc • 127 Ground Water Assesment • E-340 Growers Mineral Solutions • 246 Growmark FS, LLC • E-321, E-322 GVM, Inc • 114 H&S Manufacting Co. Inc • W-354, O-304 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 445 Hardi North America, Inc • E-371 Hershey Equipment Co., Inc • 444 Hillside Ag Construction, LLC • W-337, W-338 Hill Top Tire • 220A Hoard’s Dairyman • L-209 Homestead Nutrition, Inc • 285, 286, 287 Hoober Feeds • 426, 427 Hoober, Inc • E-377, O-314 Hoof Trimmers Association, Inc • 269 Horizon Organic • W-319 Horning Mfg, LLC • 501 Hubner Seed • H-302, H-303 Hud-Son Forest Equipment, Inc • 236, 237 Hunter Insurance Associates • 411 IBA, Inc • E-327, E-328 Idiehl, LLC • 700, 701 Iva Manufacturing • E-318, E-319, E-320, E-320A J&B Contractors • E-305 J&J Silo Co., LLC • 293 J.L. Gossert & Co. Forestry • E-347 J.S. Woodhouse Co., Inc • 440 Jamesway Farm Equipment, Inc • 135 Jaylor Fabricating, Inc • W-349 Kamar Products • E-334 Kel-Krop Enterprises LLC • W-306, W-307 Kencove Farm Fence • W-318 Keystone Concrete Products • 272, 273 Keystone Group Ag Seeds • E-361, E-362 King Construction • 254, 255 King’s AgriSeeds, Inc • 403, 404 Kirby Agri Inc • W-326 Kubota Tractor Corp • 123 Kuhn North America, Inc • 100 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • E-376 Lancaster Dairy Farm Automation • 502 Lancaster DHIA • W-332, W-333 Lancaster Farming, Inc • L-202 Lancaster Parts & Equipment • E-378 Lanco Manufacturing • W-347 Lanco-Pennland • 429 Lapp’s Barn Equipment, Inc • A Lawn Care Distributors, Inc • 124 Lely USA, Inc • 111 LIRA / Kauffman’s Animal Health, Inc • E-331 LnR Feed & Grain • E-355 LR Gehm, LLC / CoPulsation • 416 M.H. Eby, Inc • W-355 Mahindra USA, Inc • B, C Mark Hershey Farms, Inc • 431 Martin Limestone Inc • 257 Martin Water Conditioning • 710

Maryland Virginia Milk • E-323, E-324 MAX, Mutual Aid Exchange • H-300 McHenry Pressure Cleaning Systems • O-311 McLanahan Corporation • E-312 Messick Farm Equipment • 105, 106 Meyer Manufacturing Corporation • O-100 Mid-Atlantic Agri Systems • W-346 Mid-Atlantic Dairy Assoc / PA Dairy Promotion Program • 235 Mid-Atlantic Seeds • E-364, E-365, 251, 252 Mid-Atlantic Waterproofing • 535 Milk-Rite, Inc • E-344 Miller Diesel Inc • E-308 Miraco • E-336, E-337 MM Weaver • 103, O-106 Morton Buildings Inc • E-332, E-333 Mount Joy Farmers Co-op • 210 Mueller • 119 Multimin USA • 526, 527, 528 Mycogen Seeds / Dow Agro Sciences • 213, 214 Nachurs Alpine Solutions • 244, 245 NASF • W-304, W-305 National Farmers Org - NFO • 534 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-NIOSH • 241C National Penn Bank • 215 New Holland Agriculture • 108, 109 Nextire, Inc • E-380, E-381 North Brook Farms, Inc • E-309, E-310 Northeast Agri Systems, Inc • 122 Northeast Feed • 214A Northeast Stihl • 511, 512 NYCAMH • 217 O.A. Newton • W-302, W-303 Outback Heating, Inc - Heatmor • 262, 263 Oxbo International • 104 P. L. Rohrer & Bro., Inc • E-300 PA Dairy Princess & Promotion • L-200 PA One Stop & Agmap Penn State • 241A PACMA Inc • L-304, L-305 Paradise Energy Solutions • 706 Patterson Farms Maple Products • 240, 241 Patz Corporation • 131 PBZ LLC/Crop Care/Zimmerman Cattle Control • 113, 115 PDM Insurance Agency, Inc • E-326 Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-310 Penn Diesel Serv. Co • E-329, E-330 Penn Jersey Products, Inc • E-374 Penn State Agricultural Safety & Health • 241E Penn State University-PA Office of Rural Health • 241D Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture • L-203 Pennsylvania Certified Organic • 402 Pennsylvania Service & Supply, Inc • 425 Pennsylvania Soybean Board • E-306 Perma-Column East, LLC • 438, 439 Petersheims Cow Mattress, LLC • 137 Pik Rite, Inc • D Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc • E-349, E-350, E-351 PNC Bank • 277 Power Ag • 222A, 222B Power Systems Electric, Inc • E-382, E-383 Precise Concrete Walls, Inc • 256 Precision Planting Reps • W-335, W-336 Prima Tech USA • 526, 527, 528 Priority One • 430 Progressive Pressure Systems, Inc • 239 Progressive Publishing • L-205 Provita Animal Health • 205 Quality Craft Tools • H-301 Rain and Hail, LLC • E-315 Red Barn Consulting, Inc • 241B Red Dale Ag Service, Inc • 400 Redmond Minerals • 261 Reed Equipment Sales • W-356, W-357 Reinecker Ag • 506, 507 Renaissance Nutrition • 294 Roto-Mix, LLC • W-358

RSI Calf Systems Inc • 266, 267 Ruhl Insurance • 407 Ryder Supply Company • E-372 S&I Pump Crete, LLC • 278, 279 S.K. Construction LLC • 533 Salford Farm Machinery, Ltd • W-350, W-350A Sanimax Marketing, Ltd • 436 Seedway, LLC • W-342, W-343 Select Sire Power • W-308 Shady Lane Curtains • 543 Show-Ease Stall Co • 116 Shur-Co, LLC • E-307 SI Distributing, Inc • 420, 421, 422 Slaymaker Electric Motor • E-366 Smucker’s Meats • W-309A Snyder Equipment, Inc • 423 Sollenberger Silos, LLC • 290, 291, 292 Superior Attachments, Inc • 288, 289 Stein-Way Equipment • 500, 449 Steiner • 508, 509 Stoltzfus Spreaders • 117 Straley Farm Supply • 221, 222 Stray Voltage Testing, LLC • E-325 Stull Equipment Company • 443 Sundance Vacations • 617 Superior Silo, LLC • 118 Susquehanna Bank • 406 Susquehanna Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram/D.K. Hostetler • 525 Sweitzers Fencing Co • 518, 519, 450 Synagro • 238 Syngenta • W-344, W-345 SyrVet, Inc • 526, 527, 528 TA Seeds • W-315, W-316, W-317 Taurus Service, Inc • W-310 Team Ag • E-335 Tech Mix, Inc • 428 The Mill • 275, 276, 276A The Old Mill Troy • 417, 418 The Pennsylvania State University • 713, 714 TM Refrigeration LLC • 280, 281, O-103 Topstitch of New York • 270, 271 Trioliet Mulles B.V. • E-353A Triple-M-Farms • 265 Udder Comfort • 204 Uncommon USA Inc • W-322 U.S. Farmer • 613 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - FSA • L-206 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NRCS • L-207 USDA US Dept. of Agriculture - NASS • L-208 Valmetal, Inc • 136 Vi-Cor • 283 Vigortone Ag Products • 405 Vulcan Materials Company • 227 WA Johnson, Inc • L-302, L-303 Weaver Distributing • E-301, E-302, E-303, E-304 Weaver Insurance Agency • 249 Weaver’s Toasted Grains LLC • 408 Wenger Feeds • 227A Wengers of Myerstown • W-351A Westfield Insurance Company • W-334 White Horse Construction, Inc • E-338, E-339 White Oak Mills, Inc • 434 Wood-Mizer Products, Inc • O-310A Yoderway Buildings • T Zartman Farms • 107 Zeiset Equipment, LLC • 447 Zimmerman Farm Service, Inc • 504 Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 516, 517

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586


Farm Credit East celebrates Farm Markets during National Farmers Market Week

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table dish you’ve always wanted to try with fresh products from local farmers. Farm markets allow consumers to have access to locally grown, farm fresh product and enables farmers the opportunity to interact one-on-one with their customer, developing consumer loyalty with the farmers who grow the produce. Late summer into early autumn gives way to abundant fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the Northeast. Consumers can expect to find produce such as fresh peaches, tomatoes, corn and potatoes, as well as protein sources from local farms such as lamb, beef, pork and much more! If you’re unsure of where to find the nearest farm market, v i s i t

FarmCreditEast.com/N ews-and-Events/FarmFresh-Guide for a Farm Fresh Guide listing resources to find locations throughout Farm Credit East’s six-state territory of Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island! Farm Credit East extends more than $4.35 billion in loans and has 19 local offices in its six-state service area. In addition to loans and leases, the organization also offers a full range of agriculturally specific financial services for businesses related to farming, horticulture, forestry and commercial fishing. Farm Credit East is governed by a 15-person board of directors from across the Northeast. For more information, go to FarmCreditEast.com.

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August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

for a full explanation of benefits call or stop & see our dealers:

ENFIELD, CT — Farm Credit East celebrated the bounty of farm fresh produce available in the Northeast during National Farmers Market Week! This year, National Farmers Market Week took place Aug. 5-11. Farm Credit East is encouraging consumers to show their support of the agriculture community by continuing to purchase from local farm markets and roadside stands. Despite the drought that has plagued the Midwest and impacted many farmers throughout the Northeast, there is still plenty of fresh, quality produce to be found throughout the region. With more than 7,000 farmers market in the country, National Farmers Market Week was the perfect opportunity to try that delec-


Maine Farm Days slated for Aug. 22 and 23 CLINTON, MAINE — Maine Farm Days — an agricultural trade show held on a working farm — is scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 22 and 23 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day at Misty Meadows Farm, 71 McKenney Road, Clinton, Maine. The event is free

and open to the public. Thirteen percent of Maine’s milk is produced in the town of Clinton. See how nearly 5,000 gallons of that milk is produced every day. Misty Meadows Farm is owned and operated by John and Belinda Stoughton and Thomas

Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Ash, Buck top showmanship contest at Junior National Hereford Expo The Junior National Hereford Expo (JNHE) was held July 5 in Grand Island, NE. Competitors for the Champion Senior Showman narrowed their field from 134 entries, with the top 10 not only having to prove themselves in the showring, but the fitting chute as well. Regional finalists included: fourth place - Kyle Lemmon, Manchester, MD.; sixth place - Marie Lock, Avon, IL.; seventh place - Corey Ruff, Wagontown, PA. In the Intermediate Division, Alexis Eudy from Harrisburg, NC received 7th place.

In the Peewee Division, Reagan Ann Dunn, Cochranton, PA received 6th place. The 2012 VitaFerm Junior National Hereford Expo was sponsored in part by Biozyme Inc., St. Joseph, MO. The NJHA is one of the most active junior programs in the country with approximately 3,000 members. The NJHA's mission is to create and promote enthusiasm for the breed while providing opportunities through leadership, education and teamwork. For more information about the NJHA, visit www.jrhereford.org.

See Us At Ag Progress Days - West 11th

and Kimberly Wright. The farm’s current milking herd numbers 600 and there are 475 young stock. The farm is currently averaging 79 pounds of milk per cow for a total average of 40,000 pounds shipped per day. The event will feature:

Ice cream vendors, a corn maze, a forest service presentation, dealer equipment demonstrations, antique tractor demonstrations, Maine Dairy Princess preliminaries, agribusiness exhibits, farm tours, children’s learning center, crafts vendors, forage

harvest trials, pie and whoopie pie contests, chicken barbeque, face painting, children’s coin scramble, children’s free ice cream making, wagon tours, 4-H working steer show, horse scooting and twitching contest and corn variety trials. In addition, pesticide credit

workshops will be offered. For more information, visit www.MaineFarmDays.com or call the Kennebec Soil & Water Conservation District at 622-7847, ext. 3. The details on the website include directions and a map in addition to a brochure.


Farmers should be aware of concerns with Influenza virus There has been increasing press about several small outbreaks of the H3N2v influenza virus throughout the country, including a recent story on WBZ News. The CDC issued a Health Advisory on Aug. 3. One of the primary means by which people contract the virus is through direct contact with pigs. The disease may also spread

through person-to-person contact. There have been approximately 30 cases nationwide. (This includes 10 cases in Ohio which have all been linked to visits to several different state fairs.) Maine has also recorded two cases, however no information is available on how those persons became infected. This is of particular concern to the farming

community as we are heading into the fair season and many directsales farms have livestock on the farm. Customers and fairgoers may express concerns and have questions. Farm Bureau Members should familiarize themselves with the background of this disease so that they can speak knowledgeably to customers, fairgoers and potentially, the press.

Good information can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/flu /swineflu/h3n2v-factsheet.htm Key Points to Highlight include: • There have been

no cases of this disease documented in Massachusetts • People should wash their hands with soap and running water after touching animals • There is no risk

of this disease being transmitted by eating properly cooked pork • Young children, pregnant women and people 65 and older should be extra careful around animals.

NFU urges house leadership to finish farm bill amid deadline, drought concerns

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15

WASHINGTON, D.C. — National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson sent a letter to Speaker of the House of Representatives John Boehner, underscoring the urgency for the House to bring the farm bill to the floor in advance of the 2008 Farm Bill’s looming Sept. 30 expiration date. “Further delay of long-term legislation will only present more challenges to passing a bill,” said Johnson. “Extension of the current legislation is merely a temporary fix, while a five-year farm bill would be a more responsible and viable solution for today and the coming years.” With nearly two-thirds of the continental United States reported to be in some stage of drought, according to the latest U.S. Drought Monitor report, Johnson noted that swift action be taken, with particular emphasis on disaster protection programs. “Standing disaster programs that protect against low yields, price volatility and high input costs are needed so that farmers, especially livestock producers, can withstand these difficult times. These disaster programs need to be included as part of the long-term farm bill. In fact, most of these necessary provisions are already included in the Senate bill and in the House agriculture committee bill,” he continued. Johnson also noted the willingness of the agriculture committees to move forward with the bill. “Leaders of both agriculture committees have indicated their willingness to conference the farm bill during the August recess so that a final bill can be passed before the end of the fiscal year,” Johnson said.


Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

average July all-milk price received by producers at $16.60 per cwt., up from $16.20 in June but down from $21.80 a year ago. The July national average price received for corn jumped New Farm Bill or Extend the Old One; Would it Have Even Mattered? Issued Aug. 3, 2012 Farm milk prices continue to climb. The Agriculture Department announced the July Federal order Class III benchmark at $16.68 per hundredweight (cwt.), up $1.05 from June, still $4.71 below July 2011, and equates to about $1.43 per gallon. That raised the 2012 Class III average to $16.01, down from $17.68 at this time a year ago and compares to $13.60 in 2010 and $10.16 in 2009. Class III futures late Friday morning were trading at $17.40 for August; $18.76 for September; $19.14, October; $19.25, November; and $19.15 for December. The July Class IV price is $14.45, up $1.21 from June and $5.88 below a year ago.

to $7.36 per bushel, up from $6.37 in June and $6.33 a year ago. The soybean price, at $15.60, was up from $13.90 in June and $13.20 last year. Baled alfalfa hay averaged

$198 per ton, down from $201 in June and compares to $189 a year ago. The University of Wisconsin’s Dr. Bryan Gould says, based on those prices, the June Milk Income Loss Contract

(MILC) payment will be $1.3677 per cwt. Dairy farmers continue to evaluate herd size, feed on hand, input needs, and other variables as widespread drought im-

Mielke A17

The AMS-surveyed cheese price averaged $1.6857 per pound, up 10.1 cents from June. Butter averaged $1.5386, up 14 cents. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.1744, up 7.2 cents, and dry whey averaged 50.23 cents, up fractionally. California’s July 4b cheese milk price is $15.18, up 53 cents from June, $4.17 below a year ago, and $1.50 below the comparable Federal order Class III price. The July 4a butter-powder price is $13.50, up 33 cents from June and $6.57 below a year ago. The 2012 4b price average now stands at $14.02, down from $16.20 at this time a year ago and compares to $12.44 in 2010. The 4a average is $14.55, down from $19.10 a year ago and compares to $13.96 in 2010. USDA’s Ag Prices report put the preliminary

SPRING 2011

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY Good Living and Good Farming – Connecting People, Land, and Communities

TARGET SMALL FARMERS THROUGH SMALL FARM QUARTERLY When looking to inform and inspire farm families and their supporters, the Cornell Small Farms Program needed the best read agricultural publication in the Northeast. The agricultural community recommended Country Folks. Cornell uses Country Folks for the same reason others do - we are the weekly voice of Northeastern agriculture.

Feature Articles Calf Rearing: An Advanced Course . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 12 Experimenting with Caterpillars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 13 Pricing Your Farm Products Honestly . . . . . . . . . . .Page 17 The Tale of Tunis Sheep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 19 Supplement to Country Folks

To place an ad in the next issue of Small Farm Quarterly contact your Country Folks sales representative or email info@leepub.com This supplement has been very well received and Cornell has had much positive feedback. Advertisers can expect the supplement to have a long shelf life. This supplement reaches all Country Folks subscribers in the East, West, New England and 2700 local Cornell Cooperative Extension offices in NY State.

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Deadline September 7, 2012 December 14, 2012 March 1, 2013

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Mielke from A16 without a new bill or interim legislation, provisions in the current farm bill, including the support price and MILC payments, would expire September 30. National Milk strongly opposed extension of the current farm bill and remains committed to the Dairy Security Act (DSA). NMPF’s Jerry Kozak warned; “The current safety net for dairy farmers is not sufficient in dealing with scenarios like we are currently facing from high feed costs associated with the drought.” NMPF pointed out that “Under the proposed extension the MILC program would not pay out for the remainder of 2012 or 2013 while the nation’s dairy farmers are experiencing razorthin margins. The 2008 farm bill extension does nothing to ensure dairy farmers and their bankers that they will have any safety net to deal with the present and future periods of tight margins and ex-

treme volatility.” When the dust settled, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced two new pieces of disaster assistance for farmers, according to Dairy Profit Weekly (DPW) Emergency haying and grazing was expanded to approximately 3.8 million acres of conservation land to bring greater relief to livestock producers dealing with shortages of hay and pastureland and crop insurance companies have agreed to provide a 30day short grace period for farmers on insurance premiums in 2012. DPW also reported that House Republican leaders, avoiding floor debate on the House Ag Committee’s 2012 Farm Bill proposal and giving up on trying to extend the 2008 Farm Bill for one year, pushed through a $383 million disaster aid package for U.S. livestock producers. H.R. 6233, the “Agricultural Disaster Assistance

Mielke A18

The September Issue of Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market w ww.cfmanestream.com

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Will Focus On: Fall Riding & Fun With Horses Pet Section Look for Mane Stream at: “Country Folks Day at the Fair ” The Fonda Fair, Fonda, NY & The Central NY Farm Progress Show, Mohawk, NY

DEADLINE: Friday, Aug. 24th For advertising contact your sales representative today... or call 1-800-218-5586

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

pacts crops, pasture and forage acreage. The drought categories of extreme and exceptional, as noted in the U.S. Drought Monitor report, has been expanded and is at the highest level since 2003. As a stopgap measure for finding livestock feed, some acreage enrolled in Conservation Reserve and Wetland Reserve programs is now eligible for haying and livestock grazing on a short term basis. The Daily Dairy Report (DDR) Sarina Sharp reported in the DDR’s Daily Dairy Discussion on its website that Congress was under pressure to pass a farm bill as the severity of widespread drought increases. Several disaster assistance programs for livestock producers in the 2008 farm bill expired last year, she said, and House leaders were crafting interim legislation to offer drought aid and delay any farm bill fight until after the election. She warned that,


Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Mielke from A17 Act of 2012,” passed by a vote of 223-197 but Senate Democratic leaders said that chamber would not take up the House disaster relief bill before leaving for an August recess, and might not address it when they return after Labor Day, because they want the disaster relief rolled into the 2012 Farm Bill. The August 2 DDR reported that dairy cow slaughter for the week ending July 21 was the highest weekly total since early April, at 60,282 head. “Strong slaughter numbers suggest the industry is contracting at an accelerating pace,” according to the DDR. “Slaughter in the East exceeded 14,000 head, while slaughter in the Midwest topped 20,000. This is only the second time this year that regional slaughter figures have surpassed those respective levels. Slaughter remains elevated in the West, but the pace does not appear to be increasing.” Last week I cited comments from the Alliance of Western Milk Producers regarding the high prices of corn and ethanol mandates from our government. California’s Milk Producers Council (MPC) added perspective in their newsletter stating that “The Federal Government’s strong support of corn-based ethanol has been creating a financial

squeeze for dairy farmers for a number of years.” “Many dairy farmers around the country, particularly those outside the Midwest, have been making the case that our government’s role in propping up corn-based ethanol has had a devastating effect on livestock agriculture and the cost of feeding our animals. It’s gotten so ridiculous that we now have more corn being consumed by ethanol plants than by livestock agriculture.” MPC praised what it called “positive movement in our efforts (elimination of the ethanol blenders tax credit and import tariff),” but warned that “the most devastating pro-cornbased-ethanol policy continues to be alive and well (the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS), or the ethanol mandate).” To read more details, log on to the MPC website. DPW reports that a coalition of dairy and livestock organizations have asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to waive the federal mandate for the production of corn ethanol due to concerns over the impact of drought conditions on corn yields and supply. Opponents argue that gasoline prices will rise if less corn goes to ethanol. In other news, June cheese production totaled 897 million pounds, down 2.1 percent from May but 0.9

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percent above June 2011, according to the latest Dairy Products report. American type cheese, at 366 million, was down 2.6 percent from May but 0.2 percent above a year ago. Butter production amounted to 137 million pounds, down a whopping 16.2 percent from May and 3.2 percent below a year ago. Nonfat dry milk output totaled 169 million pounds, down 13.2 percent from May but 15.1 percent above a year ago. Checking the markets; cash block cheese closed the first Friday of August at $1.71 per pound, up a halfcent on the week but 42 1/4-cents below a year ago. Barrel closed at $1.6850, unchanged on the week and 45 cents below a year ago. Six cars of block found new homes on the week and 20 of barrel. The AMS-surveyed U.S. average block price hit $1.6765, up 2.8 cents, while the barrels averaged $1.7180, also up 2.8 cents. Cheese production was reported slower the last week of July as reduced volumes of milk were available, according to Dairy Market News. The hot weather across much of the country has contributed to lower component levels in milk along with reduced volumes. Demand for cheese remains good with some increased in-

terest to build inventories ahead of expected price increases. Export demand has slowed but continued assistance from the CWT program is helping to move international sales. CWT accepted six requests for export assistance this week to sell 1.4 million pounds of cheese to customers in Asia, North Africa, the Middle East and South America. The product will be delivered through December and raises CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 71.5 million pounds plus 55.3 million pounds of butter and anhydrous milk fat to 33 countries. The weighted-average price for all contracts on this week’s Global Dairy Trade (GDT) auction showed a 3.5 percent increase, according to the DDR. Only anhydrous milkfat (AMF) and buttermilk powder posted declines. The average winning price for Cheddar cheese, for example, was up 3 1/2 percent, at about $1.43 per pound, far below U.S. prices but, as one insider told me this is a very thinly traded market and may not adequately represent reality. Cash butter closed Friday at $1.69, up 2 cents on the week and 41 1/4cents below a year ago. Eight cars sold on the week. AMS butter averaged $1.5689, up 2.1 cents. Cash Grade A and

Extra Grade nonfat dry milk closed at $1.40 each, up 2 1/2 and 10cents respectively. AMS powder averaged $1.2014, up 2 1/2-cents, and dry whey averaged 50.97 cents, unchanged from a week ago. Churning across the country is trending lower, as Class II operations continue to absorb steady to increasing levels of cream. The overall cream supply is lighter as milk production and butterfat tests decline. Butter production is focused on filling current orders with little added to inventory, according to USDA. Butter producers are often reaching into inventoried stock to fill demand. Butter demand is seasonally steady. The National Dairy Retail Report indicated that ads across the country reflected butter prices ranging $1.49- $3.49 per pound. Food service orders are steady. Some food service and restaurant buyers are indicating that hot temperatures may be slowing away from home eating patterns, but for the most part, restaurant traffic is holding up quite well. In fact the July 30 DDR reports that the U.S. restaurant industry expanded for the first time in three years. U.S. consumer spending at restaurants was 2 per-

cent higher than last year and the number of visits to U.S. restaurants improved by 1 percent in the first quarter of 2012, the strongest growth in restaurant traffic since the spring of 2008, according to the DDR. “Good news for the restaurant industry is good news for the dairy sector,” the DDR said. “From butter on dinner rolls to pizza, cheeseburgers, and creamladen desserts like cheesecake and ice cream, Americans typically consume more dairy products at restaurants than they eat at home.” It also pointed out that “beverage milk consumption has been declining for decades, so dairy product demand represents an increasing proportion of U.S. demand for dairy, and the food-service industry presents an opportunity for growing that demand. About one-half of U.S. milk production is used to produce cheese, and Italian varieties are the most popular thanks to Americans’ voracious appetite for pizza, the DDR said. Speaking of beverage milk consumption; USDA estimates May fluid sales at 4.4 billion pounds, down 1.5 percent from May 2011. After adjusting for calendar composition, May sales were off 2.8 percent.


Emerald Ash Borer found in Prospect and Naugatuck, Connecticut NEW HAVEN, CT — The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) and the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) have announced that the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) was detected in Prospect, CT on July 16 by staff members at CAES. The identification has been confirmed by federal regulatory officials in the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine (USDA APHIS-PPQ). This is the first record of this pest in Connecticut, which is

added to 15 other states where infestations have been detected. A new probable site of infestation is located in the Naugatuck State Forest. The beetle identification is unconfirmed. The emerald ash borer is responsible for the death and decline of tens of millions of ash trees from the Midwest to New York state and south to Tennessee. Ash makes up about 4 percent to 15 percent of Connecticut’s forests and is a common urban tree. “The detection of the emerald ash borer (EAB) in Prospect and probably in Naugatuck reaf-

firms that statewide surveys for this pest were necessary,” said Louis A. Magnarelli, director of CAES. “We expected to find the beetle in areas of Connecticut across from infestations in Dutchess County, New York; however, the EAB has great flight potential and can travel in infested wood moved by people. This pest attacks all species of ash trees. Our immediate goals are to determine how extensive the Connecticut infestation is, notify residents in the Prospect and Naugatuck area, and implement strategies to slow the

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The 406 Series from Bush Hog are just about the toughest rotary cutters you can hitch behind a tractor. Offered in a choice of lift or pull models, these 6-foot units take on brush and saplings up to 4-inches thick. Round blade holders, heavy duty gearboxes and slip clutches provide protection when operating in adverse field conditions. 1/4-inch thick steel decks and side bands, along with extra welding at high stress points, assure greater durability. To see a really tough rotary cutter, come in today and look over the Bush Hog 406.

OESCO, INC. 8 Ashfield Road on Route 116 Conway, MA 01341 413-369-4335 800-634-5557 www.oescoinc.com info@oescoinc.com R.S. OSGOOD & SONS Route 2 East Dixfield, ME 04227 207-645-4934 www.rsosgood.com FROST FARM SERVICE Route 123 East Greenville, NH 03048 603-878-2384 COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC. Box 660 Claverack, NY 12513 518-828-1781 L.F. TROTTIER & SONS INC. 401 Dairy Hill Road S. Royalton, VT 05068 802-763-8082

BUSH HOG, L.L.C. • P.O. Box 1039 • Selma, AL 36702-1039 (334) 874-2700 • www.bushhog.com

cial chemical lure, have been set across the state in all eight counties by The University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension System via an agreement with the USDA APHIS PPQ. Three additional EAB have been captured in a trap located in Prospect, while other beetles were captured in a trap in Naugatuck. “This is a disturbing discovery and one that has the potential for great environmental harm in the state,” said DEEP Commissioner Daniel C. Esty. “Connecticut has more than 22 million ash trees. The presence of EAB here could have a devastating effect on the beauty of our forests, state and local parks and neighborhoods, as well as the state’s wood product industries. Now that EAB has been detected here, it is more important than ever to limit its spread. It is imperative that residents and visitors throughout the state not move firewood. The movement of firewood that contains the presence of EAB is the quickest way to rapidly spread the insect. We will continue to work closely with the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and other state and local agencies to do every-

Orchard Hill Farm Equipment & Trailers Rte 9, Belchertown, MA. 01007 413-253-5456 413-478-9790 www.orchardhillsales.com

thing in our power to minimize the presence of EAB in Connecticut.” The EAB is a small and destructive beetle, metallic green in color, and approximately 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch wide. Adults emerge from the bark of infested trees leaving a small “D”-shaped exit hole roughly 1/8 inch in diameter. This insect is native to Asia and was first discovered in the Detroit, MI. and Windsor, Ontario regions of North America in 2002. It has since spread through the movement of firewood, solid-wood packing materials, infested ash trees and by natural flight dispersal. It is unknown how the EAB entered Prospect or Naugatuck. Movement of infested firewood is a high risk activity that can spread the beetle over long distances. Prior to the pest’s discovery in Prospect, the closest known infestation to Connecticut is in eastern New York near the Hudson River. The emerald ash borer is a regulated plant pest under federal (7 CFR 301.53) and state (CT Gen. Statute Sec. 2284-5d, e, and f) regulations. For more information about the EAB, visit the website www.emeraldashborer.i nfo.

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

A Rugged Flexwing with Features and Benefits for Mowing Contoured Fields.

spread of the insect.” The insect specimens were recovered in Prospect from a groundnesting, native wasp (Cerceris fumipennis), which hunts beetles in the family Buprestidae, including the emerald ash borer. The developing wasp larvae feed on the beetles provided by the adult wasp. The wasp provides a highly efficient and effective “bio-surveillance” survey tool and does not sting people or pets. This work was supported by the US Forest Service. In addition, 541 purple prism detection traps, containing a spe-


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You

Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Time-saving tips with go-to ingredients (Family Features) — Warm weather means time to slow down, relax and enjoy time with friends and family. But with endless opportunities to enjoy the season, it’s easy to run out of time and energy to prepare a delicious family meal. How, then, do you bring the family back to the table? One easy way to reclaim precious time is to infuse your menu with palatepleasing, leftover-friendly staples like pulled pork. Easily repurposed throughout the week, pulled pork can be cooked once and incorporated in a variety of dishes your family will love. For example, this Chili Rub Pulled Pork recipe can be prepared in the slow cooker, yielding a flavorful meal that’s ready to eat when you return home from an active day. Additionally, the leftovers can be enjoyed throughout the week in a number of different ways. Whether topping creative salads or savory pizzas, filling enchiladas or adding new flavor to baked potatoes, pulled pork is a perfect fit for the laid-back lifestyle that the season is known for. For more pulled pork tips and recipes, visit www.PorkBeInspired.com. Also, follow the National Pork Board on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ PorkBeInspired, Twitter @AllAboutPork and on Pinterest at www.pinterest.com/PorkBeInspired.

Chili Rub Slow Cooker Pulled Pork Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 5 1/4 to 8 1/4 hours Makes: 8 to 10 servings 1 3-pound boneless pork shoulder or sirloin roast 2 tablespoons chili powder 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon cayenne powder

1 tablespoon canola oil or other neutral-flavored oil 1/2 cup chicken broth Line 9 x 13-inch baking pan with foil and place pork in pan. In small bowl, combine chili powder, salt and cayenne. Rub mixture over all sides of meat, pressing to adhere (if the meat is tied together with twine or netting, just rub the seasoning right over it). Set aside. In large skillet over medium-high heat, warm oil. Add pork and brown on all sides, 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer meat to slow cooker. Add broth to skillet, scraping up any browned bits, then add broth to slow cooker. Cover and cook until pork is very tender, 6 to 8 hours on low or 4 to 5 hours on high. Transfer meat to cutting board and let rest 10 to 15 minutes. Use two forks to shred meat into bitesized pieces. Moisten and season with cooking juices to taste.

Serving Suggestions This recipe is only mildly spiced, so if you like things with a kick, try adding more cayenne to the rub or add some of your favorite hot sauce to the finished, shredded meat. Use the pork to make a traditional pulled pork sandwich, with barbecue sauce and slaw, enjoy it in your favorite chili recipe, or on top of a Tex Mex Caesar salad.

Senior News Line by Matilda Charles

Three simple steps to weight loss Far too many of us, women especially, can develop weight problems as we age. We’re less active. Menopause doesn’t help. We might have different eating patterns. Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have done a study that looked at self-monitoring as a way to reduce weight. The study results show how we can lose weight safely in three steps: 1) Keep a journal that reports

everything that’s eaten; 2) Don’t skip meals; and 3) Don’t go out to lunch. Sounds so simple, doesn’t it. They divided 123 overweight and obese senior women into two groups for the yearlong study: one group used diet and exercise, and the other only diet. Here’s what they learned: Women who kept journals of what they ate lost six pounds more than those who didn’t keep a journal. This appeared to be the most important of the three steps, and it makes sense. If we write down exactly what we eat, it’s easier to identify whether we’re meeting our goals. The trick is to be honest, and being honest means measuring portions and reading labels — and always keeping your journal with you in case you do eat while away from home. Women who went out for lunch at least once a week lost five pounds less than those who didn’t, or who ate lunch out less frequently. When you eat at a restaurant, you can’t control the size of the portions or how the food is cooked. Women who skipped meals lost eight pounds less than those who didn’t skip meals. Researchers weren’t sure why this was so, but it could be that being hungry leads to overeating or eating out. Eating at regular times gave the best success. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

This week’s Sudoku Solution


Alpaca farms nationwide celebrate national Alpaca Farm Days While most alpaca farms welcome visitors throughout the year, National Alpaca Farm Days is sure to include special activities and educational opportunities. For a complete list of participating farms and ranches, visit www.NationalAlpacaFarmDays.c om. About Alpacas Alpacas, cousins to the llama, are beautiful, intelligent animals native to the Andean Mountain range of South America, particularly Peru, Bolivia, and Chile. The United States first commercially imported alpacas in 1984. There are now more than 180,000 ARI (Alpaca Registry, Inc.) registered alpacas in North America. There

2008 NH T6030 Plus MFWD, cab, air, 16 speed powershift LHR, 1900 hrs, buddy seat, ex 18.4x38s and 14.9x28 radials, 4 remotes, NH 850TL SL loader, super sharp and clean, looks like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$58,500 2009 JD 5085 M MFWD, 16x16 trans LHR only 92 hrs, EPTO 3 remotes 16.9x30 and 11.2x24 radials with JD 563 SL loader like brand new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,000 2009 JD 7130 MFWD, cab, air, 103hp, 24 speed auto quad 1255 hrs, air seat 18.4x38 and 380/85R/24 radials front fenders real sharp and clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$60,000 2009 JD 6430 premium IVT cab, air, 1725 hrs, 3 remotes Epto 18.4x38 and 16.9x24 radials front fenders warranty till 2014 like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$61,500 2008 JD 6430 premium MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed auto quad LHR, 2802 hrs, HMS 18.4x38s and 16.9x24s with JD 673 SL loader 92 inch bucket electronic joystick real sharp runs ex . . . . .$60,000 2007 JD 6430 premium MFWD cab, air, IVT 2100 hrs, ex 18.4x38 and 16.9x24 radials 3 remotes very sharp runs ex . . . .$55,000 2007 JD 3420 telehandler cab, air, 5600 hrs, auxiliary hydraulics to front 23 feet high 6600lb lift bucket and forks real nice runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000 2005 JD 8220 MFWD, cab, air, 1809 hrs, 3 ptos 4 remotes ex 20.8x42 radial axle duals ex 480/70R/30 fronts 18 front weights quick hitch ex one owner tractor very very sharp . . . . .$125,000 2004 JD 6420 2WD cab, air, power quad 1418 hrs, 18.4x38 radials on R+P axles just like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,000 2004 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, IVT trans ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radial tires buddy seat 3824 hrs, with JD 640 SL loader electronic joystick real sharp clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,500 2004 JD 6320 2WD, cab, air, power quad, LHR, ex 16.9x38 radials, 540+1000 pto buddy seat 3079 hrs, very clean sharp original . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 2002 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed power quad LHR, 2485 hrs, R+P axles ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radials dual remotes and PTO with JD 640 SL loader real sharp ex cond . . . . . . .$55,000 1999 JD 6410 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed PQ LHR, 3300 hrs, 18.4x38s 13.6x28s clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,500 1998 JD 6410 MFWD, cab, 16 speed PQ LHR 18.4x38s 13.6x28 clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,500 1998 JD 5410 MFWD, 12x12 trans left hand reverser 3391 hrs 16.9x30 rears 11.2x24 fronts 540 loader with joystick folding roll bar 73 inch bucket very clean sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1989 JD 2355 2WD add on cab left hand hydraulic reverser dual remotes 3748 hrs, 18.4x30s clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . .$8,000 1980 JD 4240 cab, air, has turbo inline injector pump and after cooler 6020 hrs, quad range like new 20.8x38 radials dual pto and remotes very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,000 1980 JD 4240 cab, air, power shift 18.4x38 dual remotes and pto 7820 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 2008 Challenger MT475B MFWD, cab, air, 120 hp, 16x16 trans LHR, 4 remotes 1980 hrs, 18.4x38 and 16.9x28 radials ML 97B SL loader very very sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$60,000 2006 NH TS100A deluxe cab, air, MFWD, 16x16 trans LHR, 2667 hrs, ex 18.4x38 radials 14.9x28 fronts buddy seat 4 remotes NH 56LB SL loader very clean sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . .$45,000 2000 New Holland TS110 2WD cab, cold ac 4698 hrs, 16 speed power shift dual pto and remotes ex 15.5x38 radials very clean sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1998 New Holland TS100 cab, air MFWD, 80 hp, 4083 hrs, 16 speed power shift 540+1000 PTO 4 remotes 90% 18.4x34 and 14.9x24 Goodyear super traction radials very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000

are two types of alpacas in the United States today. Although almost physically identical, what distinguishes the two types of alpacas is their fiber. The Huacaya (wa-Ki’-ah) is the more common of the two and has a fluffy, extremely fine coat. The Suri (SURee), more rare, has fiber that is silky and resembles pencil-locks. Adult alpacas stand at approximately 36 inches at the withers and generally weigh between 150 and 200 pounds. They do not have horns, hooves, claws or incisors. Alpacas are alert, intelligent, curious and predictable. Social animals that seek companionship, they communicate most commonly by

softly humming. About Alpaca Fiber Alpacas are shorn, without harm, every 12 to 18 months. They produced five to 10 pounds of luxurious fiber. Long ago, alpaca fiber was reserved for royalty. Today it is purchased in its raw fleece form by hand-spinners and fiber artists. Knitters buy it as yarn. Because of its soft texture, alpaca fiber is sometimes compared to cashmere. It also has the luster of silk, making the fiber even more coveted. Alpaca fiber is just as warm as wool, yet only 1/3 the weight. It comes in 22 natural colors, yet can be dyed any desired shade. Containing no lanolin, alpaca fiber is also naturally hypoallergenic.

1983 Case 2294 2WD cab, cold AC, 4700 hrs, like new 20.8x38 Michelin radials, powershift, front weights, dual pto and remotes, very clean, runs ex . . . . . . . . .$13,500

6-2010 JD 6330 Premium MFWDs cab, air, 24 speed auto quad, auto 4WD EPTO HMS, ex 18.4x38 and 16.9x24 radials, 3 remotes, 1200-1600 hrs, factory warranty till 5-5-2015, super sharp, like new . . .$55,000 ea.

1997 New Holland 7635 MFWD, 2700 hrs cab, air, 86 hp, 540 + 1000 PTO 24 speed Quicke 310 loader clean runs ex . .$24,500 1995 New Holland 8970 MFWD, 210 hp, super steer 20.8x42 radial axle duals 18.4x30 radials front, 22 front weights 4 remotes 7597 hrs, clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,500 1998 New Holland 8160 MFWD cab cold ac 4400 hrs, 4 remotes ex 18.4x38 radials ex 14.9x28 radials front one owner one of the nicest you will find . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,500 1994 New Holland 7740 SLE MFWD, cab, air, 87hp, 4 remotes ex 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials 5073 hrs, Ford 7411 loader very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1987 Ford 7710 series 2 MFWD cab, air, ex 18.4x38 radials 16.9x24 fronts 3 remotes 4800 hrs, clean runs ex . . . . .$15,500 1984 Ford TW15 MFWD cab, like new 20.8x38 and 16.9x28 radials 5100 hrs, dual power dual pto and remotes runs ex $16,000 1981 IH 3688 cab, cold ac ex 20.8x38 radials 5200 hrs, 3 remotes very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1977 Ford 9700 2WD cab, air, 5417 hrs, new 460/85R/38 rears dual power dual remotes and pto clean original runs ex $12,500 1998 MF 6180 110 hp, MFWD, cab, air, 32 speed dynashift only 1225 hrs, 4 remotes 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials Quicke Alo 6755 SL loader one owner sharp ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,500 1997 MF 8140 MFWD, cab, air, 32 speed dyna shift 20.8x38 radials 16.9x28 radials front 5300 hrs, 145 hp, 3 remotes runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 1980 MF 275D new style steering 8 speed ex 18.4x30s dual remotes Laurin cab extra clean original . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,000 1967 MF 135 diesel 14.9x28 2068 hrs tires power steering multi power very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 2008 McCormick MTX120 MFWD, cab, air, 118 hp, 16 speed power quad LHR, 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials 2591 hrs with L165 SL loader very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$47,500 2007 CIH Maxxum 110 MFWD, cab, air, 16x16 power shift LHR, like new 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 Michelin radials 1160 hrs, front weights and fenders very very sharp like new . . . . . . . .$47,500 1981 Case 1490 2WD 75hp, cab, air, power shift ex 18.4x34s dual pto and remotes 5600 hrs, clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 1967 IH 1256D cab, 5666 hrs, dual pto and remotes ex 18.4x38 rears good TA nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 1966 Farmall 656 gas 4800 hrs recent engine overhaul wide front 3PH 15.5x38s real clean sharp one owner been shedded .$4,500 1981 White 4-175 4x4 5641 hrs. 2002 cat 3208 engine 210 HP, 3ph pto quick coupler ex 20.8x38s runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 1980 White 2-85 MFWD cab, 4406 hrs, 18.4x38 radials new 16.9x24 radials front dual remotes clean runs ex . . . . . .$10,500 White 2-105 MFWD, cab, new 20.8x38 and 16.9x26 radials with self leveling loader clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 Allis Chalmers ED 40 diesel 3PH nice clean 40 HP runs good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 2001 NH BB940 3x3 square baler last bale ejector, roller bale chute applicator knotter fans real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,500 New Holland 570 baler with model 72 hydraulic drive bale thrower real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 2 New Holland 575 wire tie balers hydraulic bale tension pickup heads and hitch with NH 77 pan type kicker real sharp ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000 each

2003 New Holland BR750 4x6 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps netwrap endless belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,000 2003 CIH RBX 452 4x5 round baler same as NH BR740 wide pickup head bale ramps real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 2000 New Holland 648 silage special 4x5 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps ex belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 2009 JD 582 silage special 4x5 round baler crop cutter edge to edge mesh wrap or dual twine wide pickup 6700 bales very sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 2005 JD 457 silage special 4x5 bale mega wide pickup head netwrap and double twine bale ramps very nice . . . . . .$10,500 2000 Deutz Fahr MP124 4x4 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps real clean and sharp ex bale age baler . . . . . . . . .$5,500 2007 New Holland 1412 discbine impeller conditioner very clean ex low usage discbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 2006 JD 530 discbine impeller conditioner super sharp like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 2005 JD 530 impeller discbine hydra angle on head real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 2002 JD 936 discbine 11 ft 6 in cut impeller conditioners hydraulic cutter head angle very very clean sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1995 JD 920 9 ft 9 in discbine impeller conditioners works good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Late model Kuhn KC 4000G center pivot discbine rubber rolls ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 2-NH 38 flail chopper real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,750 each New Idea 325 2 row corn picker and super sheller with 12 roll husking bed on picker real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 each Fransguard SR4200p tandem axle hydraulic lift 13 ft 6 in width rotary hayrake very little use like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 New Holland 258 hayrake rubber mounted teeth in ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000 Kverneland Taarup 17 ft hydraulic fold tedder ex cond 2 years old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Fella TH540T 17 ft hydraulic fold hydraulic tilt hay tedder just like new hardly used at all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Kuhn GF5001 TH hydraulic fold 17 ft hay tedder ex cond low usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Fanex 500 17 ft manual fold up hay tedder ex cond . . . . . .$2,000 Morra trailer type bale wrapper self loading very nice . . . .$4,500 White 251 10 ft disc harrow spring cushion gangs ex discs real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 New Holland 451 3PH 7ft sickle bar mower . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 Allis Chalmers 3PH balanced head mower 7ft mow ex . .$1,000 Massey Ferguson 3PH dyna balance sickle bar mower new guards and knife ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,750 Kverneland 3 bottom 3PH plow ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000 2-20.8x42 Goodyear Dynatorque2 40% on rim and rail fits JD 4455-8000 series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 Brand new NH 62lb loader fits TM NHS's or MXM case IH never used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 JD 843 quick tatch self leveling loader 3rd valve to front electronic joystick 9ft bucket like new off JD 8430 MFWD . . . . . . .$10,000 JD 840 self leveling loader mounting brackets for JD 7000 series tractor high volume bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$,7,500

Bures Bros. Equipment

23 Kings Highway Ext., Shelton, CT 06484

1-203-924-1492

Most people who are sensitive to wool find that they can wear alpaca without the itching or irritation they feel from wool because alpaca fiber is smooth. Additional performance characteristics include: stretch, water repellency and odor reduction. For travelers, clothing made from alpaca is desirable because it is wrinkle-resistant.

However, alpacas do not mind eating brush, fallen leaves and other “undesirable” vegetation, leaving the “good stuff” for species that do not have the stomach to digest such roughage. Alpacas’ pellet-like droppings are PH balanced and are an excellent, natural, slow-release, low-odor fertilizer. This rich fertilizer is per-

Green Alpacas? Alpacas come in 22 natural colors, but they are all green! Sensitive to their environment in every respect, alpacas have soft padded feet instead of hooves and can leave even the most delicate terrain undamaged. Damage to topsoil decreases longterm soil fertility and in the process, the soil is eroded and weed invasion is encouraged. Alpacas prefer to eat tender grasses, which they do not pull up by the roots. Lacking upper teeth, alpacas “cut” the grass with their bottom teeth and upper palate. This vegetation cutting encourages plant growth. Because they are modified ruminants with a three-compartment stomach, alpacas convert grass and hay to energy very efficiently and stop eating when they are full, further preserving the landscape on which they live.

fect for growing fruits and vegetables. Because alpacas consolidate their feces in one or two communal spots in the pasture, it is easy to collect and compost, and the spread of parasites is controlled. While alpacas are environmentally friendly and even beneficial - to the land, what makes them even more “green” is the fiber they produce. No chemicals are employed either during feeding or during the industrial production of alpaca fleece into fiber. If dying is desired, only 20 percent of a normal dye quantity is required. All fiber from an alpaca can be used. Even the fiber from the lower legs, belly, neck, etc is being used for things such as natural weed mats to be placed around trees. Alpaca fiber is biodegradable. Alpacas require no insecticides, herbicides or fertilizers that pollute the groundwater.

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

Alpaca Owners and Breeders Association (AOBA) invites you to visit their member farms and ranches on National Alpaca Farm Days on Sept. 29 and 30. This is a unique opportunity for the public to explore the many aspects of the alpaca livestock industry in the United States and Canada. From meeting these beautiful, inquisitive animals in person to experiencing luxurious alpaca products at individual farm stores, there will truly be something for everyone. Visitors can also learn how alpacas are a green business opportunity, as they are animals that are sensitive to their environment in every respect!


VERMONT DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER

1909 - 2012 OVER 100 YEARS OF SERVICE

Country Folks

Official Publication of Vermont DHIA

Import Tools in PCDART

Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Brett Denny

Did you know? Over the years PCDART has been made more extensible, meaning that new features have been added to the system to import different types of information. Let's cover some of the different types of information that can be imported into PCDART. Classification Scores Although it isn't possible to enter classification information directly into PCDART, both the Holstein Association and the American Jersey Cattle Association can create electronic files with your classification scores that can be imported directly into the program. Once imported, a new tab,

CtrlF4-Brd Cls, will be added to the cow page (see pictures) that contains all of this information. Four database items will also be available in User Reports, including: * 323 - Type BAA * 324 - Type final score (can be sorted) * 325 - Type classification date (can be sorted) * 326 - Type composition scores To import, with the file at hand, click on the Tasks menu, then Import/Export, and select Import Classifications..., select the file sent to you by the breed association and click Open. Service Sire Recommendations If you use a genetic mating program from one of the larger AI companies (Accelerated Genetics, Alta Genetics, ABS Global, Genex Cooperative, or Select

Sires) or from the Jersey Cattle Association or Holstein Association, you can import Service Sire Recommendations directly into PCDART. Although it's also possible to enter this information manually from the Input Desk, the import process can make managing these recommendations fast and painless, especially when working with a large number of animals. For each animal, up to three recommended service sires will appear on her cow page under the F4ID/Gen tab and as a database items 308-310 in User Reports. More conveniently, these sires will be available on each animal's breeding screen on the input desk, allowing you to easily select the recommended bull without the need to type a NAAB code for each breeding. When import-

ing, be sure to know the format by which cows are identified in the file either index number, barn name, or registration number. To import, click on the Tasks menu, then Import/Export, select Import Service Sire Recommendations.... Choose the appropriate format of the information, click on the Import button, and select the file that contains the sire recommendations and click Open. Genomic Data If you have animals that have been tested genomically, this information will be available in PCDART under nearly 50 new database items in User Reports. This information will only be available if the genomic test results are available at USDA-AIPL. Genomic data, if available, will automatically be updated in PCDART

on test-day, but AIPL will also be releasing new genomic analyses on a monthly basis. To capture this information, you can manually import these updates into PCDART, even in between test-days. Simply click on the Tasks menu and select Download Genetic Update. This is only available in the newest release, 7.15.0. Flexible Import One of the newest features of PCDART is the ability to import external animal health and status information using a tool called Flexible Import. Available beginning with version 7.15.0, you can import information that is contained in spreadsheets (CSV files), such as calving information,

Import next page

General Manager Brett Denny 1-800-639-8067 (main) 802-233-8662 (cell) bdenny@vtdhia.org Education Development Specialist Sarah Stebbins 855-211-8784 sstebbins@vtdhia.org

MAIN OFFICE/LAB: 1-800-639-8067 FAX: 802-295-5964 E-MAIL: VTDHIA@VTDHIA.ORG WEBSITE: WWW.VTDHIA.ORG

VERMONT DHIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS REGION 1 Counties: Franklin/Grand Isle, VT; Lamoille, VT (W); Chittenden, VT (N) Daren Sizen, Vice-President ..........(802) 524-4412...................dsizen@vtdhia.org

REGION 2 Counties: Orleans, VT; Essex, VT (N); Coos, NH (N) Mark Rodgers, President ...............(802) 525-3001................mrodgers@vtdhia.org

REGION 5 Counties: Caledonia, VT; Essex, VT (S); Orange, VT (N); Washington, VT (N); Lamoille, VT (E); Grafton, NH (N); Coos, NH (S) Suzi Pike.........................................(802) 253-4304....................spike@vtdhia.org

Jersey Cattle Association Classification Scores (JPI) Cow Page in PCDART.

REGION 6 Counties: Addison, VT; Chittenden, VT (S) Melanie Carmichael .......................(802) 759-2089 .............mcarmichael@vtdhia.org John Roberts..................................(802) 462-2252..................jroberts@vtdhia.org

REGION 7 Counties: Windsor, VT (N); Orange, VT (S); Washington, VT (S); Grafton, NH (S); Sullivan, NH (N) Kelly Meacham, Secretary .............(802) 295-8563...............kmeacham@vtdhia.org

REGION 8 Counties: Bennington/Rutland, VT; Washington/Saratoga, NY Brian Hollister, Treasurer ................(518) 361-4526.................bhollister@vtdhia.org

REGION 9 Counties: Windsor, VT (S); Windham, VT; Cheshire/Hillsboro/Rockingham, NH; Sullivan, NH (S); Franklin/Essex, MA; Worcester, MA (N); Middlesex, MA (N) Susan Rushton...............................(802) 843-2719.................srushton@vtdhia.org

REGION 10 Counties: Berkshire/Hampshire/Hampden/Norfolk/Suffolk/Plymouth/Bristol/Barnstable, MA; Worcester, MA (S); Middlesex, MA (S); CT (All); RI (All) David Schillawski............................(860) 303-2866 ..............dschillawski@vtdhia.org

REGION 11 Counties: Albany/Delaware/Montgomery/Otsego/Schoharie, NY Ray Steidle .....................................(518) 234-4659.................rsteidle@vtdhia.org

Holstein Association Classification Scores (Scoreboard) Cow Page in PCDART.


Dream big the likes of “Tom and Jerry,” “The Flintstones,” “Smurfs” and “Scooby-Doo”) died in 2006, Roombas were already cleaning floors while you were gone to work. So who needs Rosie the robot? And so the trend continues. What seems a cartoon impossibility in one decade becomes commonplace in the next. Before it becomes reality though, somebody has to dream that big. There is the rat race called everyday chores and ranch improvements. In the bustle, have you stopped to imagine what your herd could be like in 5, 10 or 20 years? It would be pretty great if you could identi-

fy which cows just won't make good mothers before you give them the chance to express that. It might make that calving season snowstorm a tick more bearable. What about a quick, chute-side blood test that could tell you which females will have calves less likely to get sick? Or even if the bulls came with that information. Think about the marketing possibilities: “Hello, Mr. Feedyard Manager. I have a set of feeder calves that are all from sire XYZ, proven to have progeny more resistant to BRD.” What if that same instantaneous DNA test could tell you which cattle would grade well? “Mr. Feeder?” Oh, never mind. If that technology

helps you make cattle that good and you can eliminate all that risk, you might decide it’s the year to own them yourself. The list could go on…tools designed to create cattle that won’t bloat, that have increased efficiencies and more tender meat. Genetic selection is a big component, but don’t stop there. What if an implant not only increased average daily gain but improved marbling? What about a new feeding technique that trains cattle to eat the right amount at precisely the right time to maximize gains? As you read this, there is probably somebody thinking about the above advances. There

is a scientist painstakingly developing a DNA test and checking its validity. There is a researcher studying how marbling is formed so he can find ways to get more of it. There are people dreaming big, not just because they’re paid to, but because they have that same spark for the science that you have for your cattle. The beef business is your shared passion. Folks used to talk about hitting 100 percent Choice like it was a hardly achievable gold standard.

Not anymore. Some producers reach more than 50 percent Prime as routine. The change may not be as visible as today’s electronic gadgets but in the cattle world, what seemed impossible is now attainable. And that’s sure to happen again. One thing is certain: in 2022 it will look different than it does today. In 2062 (the year of “The Jetsons” setting), it will likely look dramatically different. Maybe your heifers will tag their own calves. Hey, we're dreaming big, right?

VERMONT DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER

1909 - 2012 OVER 100 YEARS OF SERVICE Import previous page

breedings, new animals, or health data. Nearly any type of data that can be entered into PCDART can be imported using Flexible Import. There are a wide variety of uses for this information. For example, let's say you purchased 50 new animals from another farm that did not do any kind of DHI testing, but had their records stored electronically in some other system. If you can export those records into a spreadsheet, you could then import all of that information using Flexible Import - saving hours of time entering new ani-

Country Folks

Official Publication of Vermont DHIA

mals. Or, suppose you are setting up an electronic milking system and want to add transponders to all of your animals. By creating a simple spreadsheet with Index number and Transponder number, you could quickly and easily import all of that data into PCDART. Or perhaps you have a consultant that evaluates your herd and records body condition scores for all of your animals. Flexible Import can provide an easy way to import that data directly into your herd's database. Flexible Import allows you to "map" certain types of data in a CSV file to various fields in

PCDART. If you regularly import the same types of data, you can also save these mappings for quick and easy imports in the future. Although the feature is available from the Tasks menu by selecting Import/Export and then Flexible Import, please give us a call if you're interested in using this tool. We'd be happy to walk you through the setup of your import and guide you through the process, sharing some caveats and avoiding some common mistakes. As always, if you have any questions on PCDART or what it can do, please feel free to give us a call!

Record It… Manage It… Improve It…

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

by Miranda Reiman I wonder what the creators of “The Jetsons” would have thought about Skype or FaceTime on iPhones, or any number of other video chat services now available? George Jetson could actually call up Jane in that manner today. The animated cartoon wrapped up in 1987, before the advent of fit-inyour pocket cell phones or wireless internet and way before chatting virtually face-to-face in real-time, via built-in computer cameras. But just a few decades later, many of those wildest imaginations are real. When the second of the HannaBarbara duo (the company that also created


Hello I’m P eggy

Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

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FARMER T O FARMER M ARKETPLACE

30-HP ELECTRIC motor, like new! $550; 5-6x8’ round Locust fence posts, $10. each; Makita heavy duty angle drill, nice! $150. 585-554-6188.(NY) aluminum truck body with hoist $1,400. Vacuum pump $350. Debeaker for Chicken $250. Antique wagon wheel. 413-5622981.(MA) JD 1010 DOZER with winch ROP $4,500. OBO. Badger S.U. wagon 3’ beater with roof $1,500. 315-536-3259.(NY) SUNSET BULK tank 625 with washer $1,200. 467 Haybine for parts #35 Massey Harris combine for parts $500. Leave message. 518-842-0229.(NY) DORSETX EWES, possibly bred. CheviotX lambs. No foot rot. Flashy Arabian mare, healthy and sound. Single axle NH manure spreader. 585-526-5393.(NY)

POLLED HEREFORD Yearling Bull, working, available Sept. 01, great EPD’s, dark red. Call 315-626-2881.(NY) TANDEM TRAILER 7x16 $1,200. OBO. 300 Gallon fuel tank with pump $125. 315348-8243.(NY)

BLACK AND WHITE pony approx. 40” high lots of snap, needs a boss $350. OBO. 607-243-8282.(NY) NEW HOLLAND 275 hay baler with kicker. Hesston PT10 haybine. Kuhn hay tedder, all in good shape. 315-858-1566.(NY)

D&S LIVESTOCK Equipment galvanized Sheep/Goat chute. Auto-catch headgate opening sides, sliding gate. $600.00 sacrifice. maxthecattledog@hotmail.com for pictures. 315-945-9006.(NY) HAY WAGON, metal, used once, good condition $2,100. Paint sprayer Wagner $17. Medium plastic dog house $16. Toyota Tonneau cover. 315-531-8670.(NY)

JD 430 ROUND baler $4,000. OBO. 585591-0795.(NY)

GRAVITY FLOW grain wagon on 10 ton’s running gear $650. or BRO. 315-6627636.(NY)

FLOCK OF 30 bred Ewes, $200. each, many twins and triplets. Hereford cattle bred. Hereford Bull owner has health issue. 315-380-0089.(NY)

1971 FORD 3000 tractor w/back blade also Ford 8N both in good condition $15,000. for both. 518-257-6718.(NY)

JD-4020 $7,800. NH-144 Merger $1,200. NH Super-66 baler w/Wisconsin engine $1,200. 12KW PTO generator on 5x10 trailer $1,200. 315-744-4941. (NY)

NEW HOLLAND 492 haybine, good condition $4,600. Miller Pro 4100 silage wagon, 3 beater roof $3,800. 315-536-8522.(NY)

NH #36 FLAIL Chopper, good condition, stored inside, asking $3,250. Leave message. 518-895-2230.(NY) NH 718 TWO row corn head. NH 185 spreader. JD 2840, runs good. Wanted: Dion silage wagon, working or parts. 845778-7080.(NY) NH #718 2-row corn chopper, excellent condition. 860-886-3943.(CT)

BLACK ANGUS Heifers, 4 bred yearlings and 6 2011 fall and 2012 spring calves. AI and Throwbridge sired. 315-440-3083.(NY) REGISTERED ANGUS and Angus cross Bulls for sale. Wellville Farm. 804-2923102.(NY) L.N STOLTZFUS 6’X28’ feeder wagon $2,500. JD 640 rake, mint $1,800. 9’x24’ Stoltzfus tandem steel hay rack wagon L.N. $4,500. 518-885-5106.(NY)

KERNAL PROCESSOR for 1275 Gehl chopper used 90 acres after complete rebuild $1,000. or best offer. 315-7764110.(NY)

500 GALLON stainless steel bulk tank $700. Goats six month old Nubian cross Bucks $85. each, cash only. No Sundays. 315-823-4928.(NY)

PEACOCKS 2 MALES, one year old $100. each, or best offer, also Black Sex-Link Pullets $7.50 each. 315-843-7563.(NY)

NEW IDEA one row corn picker, good working condition, ready for the field, asking $1,500. Located near Albany, New York. 518-852-0262.(NY)

DOUBLE FOUR milking parlor complete 7.5 HP Masport pump universal equipment $5,000. Four tunnel fans 52 inch with thermostats $1,600. 518-859-8085.(NY)

JOHN DEERE E-Gator in very good condition, new batteries charger and manuel’s only 28hrs. $4,500. 716-674-4742.(NY)

WANTED: Hay loader green crop belt driven feed grinder, young dairy Heifer calves. Samuel Schwarz 2157 Huth Sayer Rd. Oriskany Falls, NY 13425.

THREE HOLSTEIN short bred Heifers, ground driven. New Idea spreader 10-38 rear tire Terratrac dozer four restored John Deere tractors. 607-369-7656.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 210, 13’ disk, very good condition, new blades on front $3,000. Neg. 315-855-4331.(NY) OAT STRAW 3x3x8 bales $110. ton at farm. 607-542-6742.(NY) REGISTERED JERSEY Cows for sale. 30 to 40 head. Please call for more info. 845386-1112 or 845-469-7753.(NY) CASE IH 1020 grain head, late style, nice $10,700. Case IH 1063 corn head $7,200. Gravity wagon $1,400. 315-536-1112.(NY) WANTED: Rissler round bale unroller cart model 444. 570-690-1017.(PA)

HAY AND STRAW, first cutting hay, mixed grasses, great for horses $3.50/bale. Bleached rye straw, clean $4.25/bale. Regular straw $3.50/bale. 518-673-2669.(NY)

WANTED: Breeding age Hereford Bull, lease or buy. 315-868-4460 or 315-8913290.(NY)

MINIATURE DONKEYS: Foals and adults. Dwarf Goats: Kids and adults. Proven pair breeder Mute Swans. Mute Cygnets, Whooper Cygnets, Trumpeter Cygnets. 315-896-2336.(NY)

GREENHOUSE 24X40 quonset center beam endwall treated posts 2-48” motorized shutters one 48” 1/2HP fan with hood controls disassembled $1,400. 585-7371572.(NY)

WANTED: Farmall cultivators wanted for model SA to 1410 tractors. 716-9423994.(NY)

JD 6620 side hill 213 flex and 643 corn heads excellent condition, used this season for wheat, retiring $20,000. firm. 716457-3124.(NY)

FOR SALE: 750 Bales mulch or bedding hay, best offer to remove all. Ben Weaver 8063 Evans Rd. Holland Patent, NY 13354

REGISTERED POLLED Hereford Bull born 4-25-11, very nice dark red collar $1,700. or trade for Hereford Heifers. 315371-5757.(NY)

FAHR TEDDER 2 reels complete for parts $300. 2 8.25-20 truck tires mounted on 10 hole rims $100. each. 413-967-7590.(MA)

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Page 26 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD puppies for sale, farm raised, shots, wormed, all colors $250. $300. ready to go now! No Sunday calls. 315-549-8776.(NY)

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Farm Safety Quiz you have an abandoned well on your property, look for a certified well contractor who can help. Question: When you dial 911, you should: a) provide details and wait for someone to tell you to hang up b) quickly give details and return to the scene Answer: a) Provide details and wait for someone to tell you to hang up. The dispatcher may start an emergency response procedure and then come back to ask additional questions. While you may know how to get help during an emergency, does your child? What would happen if your child found you injured on the farm? Plan ahead. If your children are old enough to have a cell phone, encourage them to keep it with them. If they aren’t old enough for a cell phone, discuss with them the locations of the nearest phone and how important it is for them to immediately call for emergency help if they

discover an injured person. Post the number they should call on or near every phone. Be sure that they can tell the dispatcher how to get to your farm. Practice what they would say to a dispatcher in an emergency situation. At the same time, stress the importance of never calling the emergency number(s) unless there is an actual emergency. Question: How fast can a stick or toy fly out of a lawn mower discharge chute? a) 10 miles per hour b) 20 miles per hour c) 200 miles per hour d) 500 miles per hour Answer: c) 200 miles per hour. he cutting edge of a mower blade can travel at speeds up to 200 miles per hour. Materials such as toys, stones, sticks and equipment parts can become projectiles when struck by a blade. Traveling at speeds up to 200 miles per hour, these items can do serious damage to anything they hit. This includes people, an-

Farm Safety

imals and property. Always pick up toys, debris and other loose ob-

jects in an area before you mow. Keep children well away from the area

where you are mowing so they are not injured by flying debris.

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August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 27

Question: Open, abandoned wells are dangerous because: a) bacteria and pesticides can enter them and contaminate groundwater b) people or animals can become trapped in them c) people could stumble on wells hidden beneath grass or brush d) farm equipment operators could mistakenly drive over them e) all of the above Answer: e) All of the above. As small farms merge into larger ones, farmsteads are abandoned, leaving unused wells. Abandoned wells are often hidden beneath grass, brush or collapsed buildings and are especially hazardous to children who may play in the area. The only way to reduce safety hazards and groundwater contamination caused by abandoned wells is to plug them. However, there is more to plugging a well than simply dumping something down an open hole. If


Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

SEE ONE OF THESE AUTHORIZED KUBOTA DEALERS NEAR YOU! MAINE

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NEW YORK

EAST DIXFIELD, ME 04227

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R. S. OSGOOD & SONS

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SALEM, NY 12865

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29 Goshen Road (Rte. 9) 413-268-3620

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HAMMOND TRACTOR COMPANY 216 Center Road 207-453-7131

SALEM FARM SUPPLY 5109 State Rte. 22 518-854-7424 • 800-999-3276 www.salemfarmsupply.com


C ountry F olks

Section B

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS ur tO n u o Ab uctio g Ask rse A Listin Ho ndar e Cal

Having A Horse Auction?

Issue Date

Deadline Date

September 1 October 1 Nov. & Dec. 1 Jan. & Feb. 1, 2013 Early Deadline

August 24 September 21 October 19 December 20

ABSOLUTE E PUBLIC CONSIGNMENT

AUCTION

Located at Gray's Field, 1315 US ROUTE 5 North in Fairlee, VT 05045. Take exit 15 off I-91 go North on RT 5 and field is on the left.

SATURDAY - AUGUST 18TH, 2012 STARTING @ 8:30 AM

SELLING CONSTRUCTION & FARM EQUIPMENT, AUTOS, TRUCKS, TRAILERS & MORE Alsoo forr thiss sale:: Cub Cadet 7195 4WD w/loader, turf tires; Bobcat 753 diesel skid steer, aux hyd; Gehl 1065 chopper w/2 row corn head & grass head; Woods Heritage 54 rotary mower, Versatech skid steer, pallet forks, hyd grapple bucket.

Alll vehicless mustt havee properr titlee paperss orr previouss registrations. This is a small list of consignments as they are mostly accepted on Friday - Aug 17th from 8:00 to 12:00. Small items will be accepted from 8:00 to 10:00 and only 2 1/2 rows will be accepted. NO CONSIGNMENTS ACCEPTED ON THURSDAY! TERMS S CASH H OR R GOOD D CHECK,, VISA A & MASTER R CARD D ACCEPTED D W/A A 3% % CHARGEE LUNCH H BYY WRIGHT'S AUCTIONEERS: C W GRAY & SON'S, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT VT LIC #128 • NH LIC #2890 Timothy Gray 802-785-2161 • Field 802-333-4014 Email address: cwgray@valley.net Web address: www.cwgray.com • Try: www.auctionzip.com

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 1

Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream.


Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Farm Aid responds to drought devastating farmland nationwide On July 31, Farm Aid activated its Family Farm Disaster Fund to raise funds to provide relief for farm families whose crops and farmland are being devastated by the country’s worst drought in more than 50 years. “Our farmers and the soil they depend on are crucial for the future of agriculture,” said Willie Nelson, Farm Aid’s founder and president. “Farm Aid works to keep every family farmer on the land, no matter what extreme conditions they face.” With thousands of farmers coast-to-coast affected by the drought, raising funds for those in need is urgent. The Family Farm Disaster Fund (farmaid.org/disasterfund) allows Farm Aid to respond directly to farm families in crisis. Every dollar raised supports local farm groups, churches and rural organizations that can distribute emergency resources quickly to the farm families most in need, as well as farm groups who advocate for long-term solutions to address chronic drought and extreme weather. “The drought of 2012 is massive, unlike anything family farmers or the nation have experienced in a long time. And there are few signs that it will let up any time soon,” said Joel Morton, Farm Aid’s farm advocate. “Every day, we

hear from family farmers facing crop losses and ruined pastures due to severe heat and dryness. Farm Aid has a long history of delivering immediate help to farmers around the country; donations at this time are crucial to help farm families stay on the land.” Small- and mid-sized family farms are especially threatened by this drought, particularly those without crop insurance. Even farmers with crop insurance will only be reimbursed for a portion of their loss. With pastures scorched and their feed crops lost, livestock and dairy farmers must purchase feed to sustain their animals, driving up their production costs. As this record drought continues and intensifies, feed costs will continue to rise and feed may become difficult to access. These small- and midsized farmers most at risk are the ones building the local food systems that are so crucial for thriving local economies and emerging food systems. “When family farms suffer, so do local economies,” said Morton. “We can’t afford to lose a single farmer — we must rally now to protect our farmers’ livelihoods.” If you or your family have been affected by the drought and are seeking assistance, please contact Farm Aid

at 800-FARM-AID (800327-6243) or farmhelp@farmaid.org. Additional resources are available at farmaid.org/disaster. To donate, please visit far maid.org/disasterfund. Farm Aid 2012, the organization’s annual benefit concert, will be held in Hershey, PA, on Sept. 22. For more information, visit farmaid.org/concert.

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TRACTORS Case IH 9110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 450H Dozer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 750 B Crawler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 2555 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 3150 w/740 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4430 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4555 Cab/2WD/Duals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5525 Cab/MFWD / Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . $42,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 6430 Rental Return 2.5% Financing . . . . $65,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JD 7130 Rental Return 2.5% Financing . . . . $71,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville (2) JD 7930 IVT . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting at $123,000 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 4630 cab, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville COMPACT TRACTORS JD 850 w/cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 855 w/Loader, Mower Deck & Blower . . . $10,900. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 950 w/Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,350 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 1600 wam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 2210 w/Loader/Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2520 w/Loader & Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3720 w/blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,900 . . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 3720 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 4320 cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,800. . . . . . . Schaghticoke Kubota L39 TLB, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MF 205 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,900 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 728 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 78” skid steer blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 96’ pwr rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 318 Cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH LS 180. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH L175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke NH LS180 cab/heat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MOWERS CONDITIONERS JD 925 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,550 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 926 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 1217 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 1219 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 1411 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Chatham HAY AND FORAGE JD 74 rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 552 3pt tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 552 Tedder 3PT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,250 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke (2) JD 2 Row Corn HD. . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 / $3,250 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3rn corn head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 676 corn head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 751 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit . . . . . . . . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville

JD 3970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 2 row corn head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $650 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville HS HSM9 hydra-swing merger . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,950. . . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 166 inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pequea fluffer 8 1/2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 550 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE Amco 27’ disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,250 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 750 15’ No-till drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville IH 710 4 bottom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2500 5 bottom (nice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2800 6 btm trip plow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 8300 23 x7 drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 8300 23 x7 drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS Krone 1500 w/knives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 335 RB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 328 w/chute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 338 w/out chute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 348 w/ 1/4 Turn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 348 w/40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,000 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 446 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 446 w/mega tooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 458 silage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 567 RB w/Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH 740 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Chathm Hesston rounder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Tubeline Wrapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS New 10 bolt duals 480/80R 46 . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pronovost SP Bale Carrier. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Dynaweld trailer w/hyd tail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville 300 HUSKER w/243 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD HPX Diesel Gator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville (3) JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 40 Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,700 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 655 Tiller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham Hardi Ranger 2200 (NEW) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville HS 125 spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000. . . . . . . Schaghticoke Vermeer TS30 Tree Spade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham 7’ loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville 8N/9N loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Sweepster 6’ 3pt broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Sweepster S32C 6’ front broom . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Used 20.8-38 snap on duals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Woods 3100 loader (fits IH 66/86 series) . . . . . $4,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Woods RB72 rear blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham

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Native Americans to celebrate white bison in Connecticut GOSHEN, CT (AP) — The birth of a white bison, among the rarest of animals, is bringing Native Americans who consider it a sacred event to celebrate at one of the least likely of places, a farm in New England. Hundreds of people, including tribal elders from South Dakota, were expected to attend naming ceremonies at the northwestern Connecticut farm of Peter Fay, a fourth-generation Goshen farmer.

Native Americans in the area have come with gifts of tobacco and colored flags for Fay and the bull calf since it was born there a month ago, and Fay is planning to offer his hay field as a campsite for the expected crowds. “They say it’s going to bring good things to all people in the world. How can you beat that? That’s the way I look at it,” Fay said. Connecticut farms host only about 100 bi-

son, a tiny fraction of the populations in Western states, such as South Dakota, the home of Sioux tribes that attach the greatest spiritual meaning to white bison. As some push for greater recognition of the bison’s significance to both the United States and Native Americans, advocates say the event on the farflung East Coast is wellplaced to boost exposure for the cause. Fay, whose family traditionally stuck to dairy

farming, took on bison four years ago as a hobby, enamored by the animals’ toughness. He built his herd to 40 before recently selling half of them. Word spread rapidly after the arrival of the white bison, which experts say is as rare as one in 10 million, and Fay invited Native Americans for the ceremonies at his farm below Mohawk Mountain. In turn, he and his two daughters were asked to par-

PUBLIC EQUIPMENT AUCTION for

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ONE OF THE AREAS MOST REVERED JD AG DEALERSHIPS IN BUSINESS SINCE 1958 PARTIAL LISTING: CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT: AG & UTILITY TRACTORS: FARM IMPLEMENTS: THREE PT HITCH ATTACHMENTS: BUCKETS & ATTACHMENTS: COMMERCIAL LANDSCAPE & GROUNDS CARE EQUIPMENT: UTILITY VEHICLES: S/A DUMPS: FLEET VEHICLES: COLLECTOR VEHICLES: EQUIPMENT & TRUCK PARTS & COMPONENTS: SUPPORT EQUIPMENT: AND MORE!

Quality Consignments are now being accepted for this sale!

has sent its DNA for testing to confirm there was no intermingling with cattle. Fay, who also works at an excavating and rock-crushing business, focuses on breeding and selling the bison calves, but he has not determined what will happen with the white one. To address concerns for the calf’s safety, he also has at least one person stay at the farm around the clock. Last year, a white bison calf born in Texas was found dead and skinned — a slaughter that some suspect as an anti-Indian hate crime. Fay did not want the date of the ceremonies to be publicized. Tens of millions of bison once roamed America’s plains, but the overhunted population shrank to about 1,000 toward the end of the 1800s. Their numbers have rebounded to several hundred thousand, and wildlife and tribal groups are now pushing Congress to have the bison recognized as America’s “national mammal.” The National Bison Legacy Act was introduced in the Senate in May. “Any kind of awareness we can raise around bison is a good thing,” said Jim Matheson, assistant director of the National Bison Association in Denver.

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SALE EVERY TUESDAY Goats, Lambs, Sheep, Pigs 12:30 Calves 3:00pm followed by Feeders & Beef Animals BUYERS FROM 3 NATIONAL SLAUGHTER HOUSES 15+ LOCAL BUYERS Same Day Payment

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 3

AREA CONTRACTORS & EQUIPMENT DEALERS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 9:30 AM

ticipate in the celebrations, which will include a feast and talks by the elders. “They’re here almost every day, teaching me,” said the 53-year-old Fay. Marian White Mouse, a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe in South Dakota, said the birth of a white bison is a sign from a prophet, the White Buffalo Calf Woman, who helped them endure times of strife and famine. White Mouse’s family of four is flying to Connecticut for the ceremonies. “For me, it’s like a surreal event. I never thought in my wildest dreams I would ever come in contact with one of them in my lifetime,” said White Mouse, 51, of Wanblee, SD. Jim Stone, the executive director of the InterTribal Buffalo Council in Rapid City, SD, said the oral traditions of many tribes honor white bison, which have become a universal symbol for hope and unity. He said each such birth is also an opportunity for tribes to share their history, and the celebration in Connecticut is likely to touch many non-tribal people. The calf, born on June 16, is off-white — not an albino — and Fay said he is certain the bloodlines are pure, although he


AUC TION CALENDAR

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, August 13 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. Monthly Heifer Sale. Tom & Brenda Hoskings, 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 www.hoskingsales.com • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Tuesday, August 14 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. &

Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518868-2006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, August 15 • Lee, New Hampshire. Ath-Mor Holsteins Complete Equipment Dispersal. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-5254774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 • 12601 State Rd. 545 North WINTER GARDEN FL 34787. Late Model Rrental Fleet Construction Equipment, Aerials, Trucks & Trailers. A. Lyon & son 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • Pike, NY. Wyoming County 4H Meat Animal Sale - Come support the local 4H youth by bidding on their animals! See our website for more information. William Kent, Inc. 585-3435449 www.williamkentinc.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-4500558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager,

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Thursday, August 16 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:00 PM: Cohoes & Camden NY. Former Bank of America Branch Auction. Selling at absolute auction two former Bank of America branch buildings. William Kent, Inc., 585-3435449 www.williamkentinc.com • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-3213211. Friday, August 17

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• 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Saturday, August 18 • 1755 S. E. Frontage Road STURTEVANT WI 53177. Complete Liquidation of Late Model Earthmoving Equipment, Truck Tractors, Equipment Trailers & Support. A. Lyon & Son 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 8:25 AM: New Oxford, PA (Adams Cty.). 4+1 Acre Farmette, Antiques, Collectables. Leaman Auctions, 717-9464-1128, 610-662-8149 cell leamanauctions.com or auctionzip#3721 • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Route 5, Fairlee, VY. Public Consignment Auction of farm machinery, construction equip., autos & trucks, trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Fri., from 8 am to noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., 802-785-2161 • 11:00 AM: Marathon/Freetown Area, NY. James Munro Multi-Parcel Absolute Real Estate Auction. 474 acres, 23 parcels. Mel Manasse & Sons Auctioneers, 607-692-4540 www.manasseauctions.com Monday, August 20 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 5:00 PM: Robert Smith, 859 Dale Rd., Dale, NY. Consignment Auction, Tractors, Farm

THESE

D.R. CHAMBERS & SONS 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY 13849 607-369-8231 • Fax 607-369-2190 www.drchambersauction.com EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Saturday, August 25 • 10:00 AM: 66 N. Brookfield Rd., Spencer, MA. Real Estate & Personal Property Auction. By owner. Jacquier Auctioneers, 413-5696421 www.jacquierauctions.com Wednesday, August 29 • The Pines Farm, Barton, VT. 153rd Top-ofVermont Invitation Dairy Sale. 150 head expected. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Wednesday, September 5 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, September 6 • 1:00 PM: 10400 Gillette Rd., Alexander, NY. WNY Gas & Steam Engine Assoc. 2nd. Annual Consignment. 1st day of show Sept. 6-9. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676

www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Friday, September 7 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, September 8 • North Country Storage Barns. 2nd Annual Shed and Shrubbery Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • 9:00 AM: Town of Lansing Highway Dept., Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing, NY. Municipal Surplus & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: Morrisville, NY. 30th Annual Morrisville Autumn Review Sale. 90 head. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Monday, September 10 • 1:00 PM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. Monthly Feeder Sale. Followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hoskings, 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, September 12 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515

www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, September 14 • 11:00 AM: Smyrna, NY. Frog Rock Farm Complete Milking herd & Bred Heifer Dispersal. 55 head All AI sired Holsteins. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, September 15 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Fall Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment. Heavy & Light Trucks. Consignments welcome. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: H&L Auctions, Malone, NY. 2nd Annual Franklin County Auction. Seized vehicles, cars, trucks, 4 wheelers, snowmobiles, heavy equipment. H&L Auctions, Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787, cell 518-569-0460, Edeard Legacy 518-483-7386, cell 518-8320616. Wednesday, September 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 • Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com

KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE 817 State Rt. 170 Little Falls, NY 13365 315-823-0089 • 315-868-6561 cell We buy or sell your cattle or equipment on commission or outright! In business since 1948 LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550

NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774 NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung

TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 5

Equip., Trailers, etc. R.G. Mason Auctions, 585-567-8844 www.rgmasonauctions.com Wednesday, August 22 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, August 24 • 11:00 AM: Lighthall Farm, Fort Plain, NY. Complete AI sired herd dispersal for Karl & Joanne Gebhardt, consisting of 90 milking age cows in all stages of lactation, 22 bred heifers, 60 open heifers & calves.. Tom & Brenda Hoskings, 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 5:30 PM: 5279 Ridge Rd., New Hope, PA. Collection of 200+ & high quality toys and 1,000 pcs. of collectable farm literature. Leaman Auctions, 717-9464-1128, 610-662-8149 cell leamanauctions.com or auctionzip#3721 Saturday, August 25 • 9:00 AM: 5279 Ridge Rd., New Hope, PA. 35+ Minneopolis-Moline & Oliver tractors. Leaman Auctions, 717-9464-1128, 610-6628149 cell leamanauctions.com or auctionzip#3721 • 9:00 AM: Penn Yan, NY. Finger Lakes Produce Auction Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-7282520 www.pirrunginc.com


Auction Calendar, Continued

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

(cont. from prev. page) Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-4500558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 22 • Scranton, PA. Complete Liquidation: Aggregate, Construction, Support Equipment, Truck Tractors, Dump Trucks & Trailers. A. Lyon & Son 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. . Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 26 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 29 • Twister Valley, Fort Plain, NY. Power Sports Consignment Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 Wednesday, October 3 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, October 5 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, October 6 • 9:00 AM: 145 Paul Rd., Exit 17, Rt. 390, Rochester, NY. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction. Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars & Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. . Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, October 10 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, October 13 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. OHM Holstein Club Sale. Sale hosted by Roedale Farms in

Richfield Springs. Brad Ainslie sale chairman 315-822-6087. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 9:00 AM: Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY . Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Ben K. Stoltzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. Vison-Gen & Friends Sale. Comanaged with Stonehurst Farm. 100 outstanding Holsteins, many with contract Genomic pedigrees. The Cattle Exchange, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 17 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-4500558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 20 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. Eastern Breeders Brown Swiss Sale. Sale managed by Modern Associates, Hosking Sales assisting. Call with your consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: Hobart, NY. Hosking Farm Complete Dispersal. 120 Holsteins. Don & Joanne Hosking. Tremendous cow families, quality, low SCC & lots of type & production. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 24 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, October 26 • Pigeon Acres Farm, Manheim PA. Selling complete dairy of 175 mature cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, October 27 • 9:00 AM: Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds). Onondaga Co. area Municipal Equipment Auction. Municipal & Contractor Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 11:00 AM: Cornell Livestock Pavilion, Ithaca, NY. The NY Holstein Harvest Sale. 100 of the finest Holsteins to sell all year! The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Wednesday, October 31

• 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, November 1 • 11:00 AM: Reserved for major Holstein Herd Dispersal in NY. The Cattle Exchange, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Friday, November 2 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, November 3 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Fall Premier All Breed Sale. Call early to consign to make catalog & advertising deadlines. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, November 9 • Pleasant Lane Beef Farm, Hannibal, NY. Selling complete line of late model equipment. (Save the date, late model equip. you don’t find at absolute public auction.) Ray was very successful and equip. is in great shape with most only few years old. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, November 10 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 14 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Wednesday, November 21 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-4500558 Wednesday, November 21 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 28

• 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, November 29 • 11:00 AM: Lampeter, PA. Destiny Road Holstein Dispersal. Jay Stolzfus, owner. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, December 1 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Winter Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 5 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, December 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 12 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-4500558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 26 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT No report COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA No report FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA August 7, 2012 Beef Cattle: Canners 4372; Bulls 90-105; Cutters 62-76; Steers 98-115; Util 75-79; Heifers 75-85. Calves: Growers 75-110; Veal 80-115; Heifers 75110. Hogs (/ea): Sows 20-30; Roasters 75-125; Boars .02-.05; Market 45-58. Sheep: 40-70 Lambs: 1.40-2 Goats (ea): 75-140; Billies 140-180; Kids 50-110. NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA August 8, 2012 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 5-34; 61-75# 31-60; 76-95# 4570; 96-105# 65-80; 106# & up 69-70. Farm Calves: 95-120/cwt Start Calves: 68/cwt Feeders: 64-69/cwt Veal: 77-110/cwt Heifers: 59/cwt Steers: 60-66/cwt Canners: 10-50/cwt Cutters: 53-67/cwt Utility: 72-80/cwt Sows: 26.50-31=cwt Boars: 8.50/cwt Feeder Pigs: 35-44 ea. Lambs: 130-160/cwt Sheep: 45-97.50/cwt

Goats: 25-150 ea. Rabbits: .50-11 ea. Poultry: 1-8.50 ea. Hay: 8 lots, .80-3.10/bale. *Special Notice: Aug. 14 Dairy Cattle Dispersal.

Beef: Feeders .60-1.10 Lamb & Sheep: Market .80-1.50; Slaughter Sheep .20-.60. Goats: Billies .75-1.70; Nannies .765-1.20; Kids .10-.70.

HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ August 7, 2012 Livestock: 20 Calves .201.10, Avg .69; 27 Cows .29.98, Avg .59; 3 Easy Cows .05-.26, Avg .15; 13 Feeders 300-600# .91-1.50, Avg 1.19; 6 Heifers .62-.96, Avg .75; 1 Bull .78; 7 Steers .701.15, Avg .81; 4 Hogs .60.69, Avg .65; 12 Roasting Pigs (ea) 48-68, Avg 52.33; 19 Sheep .40-2, Avg .99; 20 Lambs (ea) 42-80, Avg 54.50, 94 (/#) .55-1.95, Avg 1.34; 17 Goats (ea) 28-180, Avg 93.59; 9 Kids (ea) 4258, Avg 49.11. Total 252. Poultry & Egg: Heavy Fowl (ea) 2-10; Light Fowl (ea) 7.50; Chicks (ea) 1.50; Bunnies (/#) 1; Cockatiel (ea) 21; Quail (ea) 1-4.50; Bantam (ea) 3.50-8.75; Roosters (/#) 1.30; Bunnies (ea) 1.25-9; Ducks (ea) 2-5.75; Rabbits (/#) 1-2.10; Pigeons (ea) 1.75-4.50; Roosters (ea) 3-8.75; Turkeys (ea) 9-29. Grade A Eggs: Jum XL 1.50-1.55; L 1.35-1.45; M 12.50. Hay, Straw & Grain: 533 Mixed 1.90-4.20; 375 Grass 1.50-4.20; 128 Mulch 1.201.40; 40 Rye Straw 3.10; 12 Shelled Corn (bgs) 8.75; 18 Ground Corn (bgs) 8.50; 12 Oats (bgs) 7.75. Total 1118

CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY July 17, 2012 No Report

CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET No report BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY July 30 - August 2, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. .30-1; Grower Bull over 92# .60-1.10; 80#92# .50-.85; Bob Veal .10.60. Cull Cows: Gd .64-.79; Lean .40-.68; Hvy Beef Bulls .70-.94. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 850-1500; Springing Cows 800-1350; Springing Hfrs 880-1400; Bred Hfrs 700-1100; Fresh Hfrs 750-1400; Open Hfrs 400-800; Started Hfrs 150400; Service Bulls 400-900.

CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY August 6, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 1; Grower over 92# 90-125; 80-92# 65-85; Bob Veal 58-66. Cull Cows: Gd 73-80; Lean 63.50-69.50; Hvy. Beef Bulls 68-85. Beef: Feeders 398-725# 133-139; Veal 133; Hfrs. 85;Steers 131-139. Lamb/Sheep: Feeder 110140; Market 100-130; Slgh. Sheep 30-40. Goats: Billies 110-130; Nannies 115-127.50; Kid 50-85. Swine: Feeder Pig 37.5060. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY August 1, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. .85-1.70; Grower Bulls over 92# .701; 80-92# .70-.90; Bob Veal .10-.60. Cull Cows: Gd .68-0.775; Lean .49-.64; Hvy. Beef Bulls .75-.88. Beef: Ch 1.01-1.10; Sel .89-.95. Lambs: Feeder 1-1.70; Market .85-1.30; Slaughter Sheep .40-.60. Swine: Feeder Pig/hd 3045 DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY July 16, 2012 No Report GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY August 2, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. .80-1.75; Grower Bulls over 92# .851.35; 80-92# .50-.80; Bob Veal .20-.59. Cull Cows: Gd .77-.85; Lean .60-.78; Hvy. Beef Bulls .775-.87. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY No report BATH MARKET Bath, NY August 2, 2012 Calves: Hfr. Calves 1-1.70; Grower Bulls over 92# .80-

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge

Bath

Chatham

1.20; 80-92# .60-.95; Bob Veal .10-.50. Cull Cows: Gd .68-.79; Lean .58-.68 Hvy Beef Bulls .82-.95. Beef: Feeders .70-1.04; Ch 1.05-1.10; Hols. Ch .851.02; Hols. Lamb/Sheep: Market 1.301.40; Slaughter Sheep .45.60. Goats: Billies .75-.90; Nannies .40-.60; Kids .15-.20. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY No report FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY August 1, 2012 Beans (1/2 bu): 9-26 Beets (bunch): 1.20-1.60 Blackberries (pt): 2.753.50 Blueberries (pt): 1.70-2.20 Broccoli (hd): .25-.55 Cabbage (hd): .25-.55 Cantaloupes: .20-1.55 Cucumbers (1/2 bu): .10-9 Eggplants (1/2 bu): 3-7.50 Eggs (dz): .60-1.20 Hot Peppers (1/2 bu): 1.50-15 Nectarines (1/2 bu): 22-32 Onions: .10-.80 Peaches (1/2 bu): 19-31 Peppers (1/2 bu): 3-12 Pickles (1/2 bu): 1-26 Potatoes (1/2 bu): 5-15.50 Plums (8 qt): 6-17.50 Salad Tomatoes (pt): .501.30 Salt Potatoes (1/2 bu): 7.50-18 Sweet Corn (dz): 1.303.60 Summer Squash (1/2 bu): .50-9 Tomatoes (25#): 2.50-34 Watermelons: .50-3.50 Zucchini (1/2 bu): 2-9

FINGER LAKES FEEDER SALE Penn Yan, NY No report FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No Report HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY August 6, 2012 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util .70-.82; Canners/Cutters .58-.70; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls/Steers: .74-1.01 Feeders: Bulls .50-1.29; Hfrs. .60-1.55; Steers .80-1; Dairy .42-.72. Calves: Bull calves 96120# 1.10-1.25; up to 95# .0-1; Hfrs. Hols. under 100# 1.55. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA No report CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA August 7, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 1475-1575# 116.25-118.50; Ch 11901540# 111-116; Sel & Lo Ch 1175-1495# 106110.50; Hols./Jersey Hi Ch & Pr 1160-1605# 101.25104; Ch 1175-1610# 97101; Sel & Lo Ch 12101530# 94-97; cpl thin 8792; Hfrs. Ch 975-1435# 104-110.50; Sel & lo Ch 1020-1330# 96-103; Dairy X Ch & Pr 1125-1680# 90-

104. Slaughter Cows: Breakers Beef tpes 84.50-87; Hols. 77-83; Boners 74-78.50; Lean 70-79; Big Middle/Lo Dress/Lights 60-72; Shelly 58 & dn. Bulls: 1125-1835# 87-99. Feeder Cattle: Steers 1 hd 880# 100.50; Dairy types 175-430# 75-122; Hfrs. 1 hd 850# 90; Dairy (beef) 495845# 71-90; Bulls 3005800# 103-130. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 114124; No. 2 90-120# 105115; No. 3 55-120# 60-100; Util 25-60; Hols. Hfrs 55110# 102-135. Swine: Pigs 140-215# 5865; Boars 240-250# 42-50; Hogs 240-270# 64. Goats (/hd): M&L Nannies/Billies 105-165; Fleshy Kids 84-116 Small/Thin/Bottle 25-78. Lambs: Gd & Ch 40-60# 128-140; 60-80# 122-148; 80-100# 122-134. Sheep (all wts): 48-90. Sale every Tuesday 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. Special Fed Cattle Sales Aug 21. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA August 7, 2012 Rabbits: 1-12.50 Bunnies: .50-2 Roosters: .50-7.50 Chicken Families: 5 Hens: .50-7.50 Pullets: 2-3.50 Ducks: 3-8 Ducklings: 1-2.50 Duck Family: 9 Pigeons: 2 Pheasants: 6.50-9

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 7

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT August 6 2012 Calves: 45-60# 22-325; 6175# 40-42.50; 76-90# 4555; 91-105# 57.50-60; 106# & up 70-77.50. Farm Calves: .80-1 Started Calves: .30-.35 Veal Calves: .55-1.40 Open Heifers: .70-1.20 Beef Heifers: .76-1.24 Feeder Steers: .6750-.89 Beef Steers: .65-.86 Beef Bull: .65-.81 Butcher Hogs: 2 at 1 ea. Feeder Pigs (ea): 20-87.50 Sheep (ea): 50-150 Lambs (ea): 45-250 Goats (ea): 50-130 Kids Goats (ea): 35-80 Canners: up to 69 Utility: 74-77.50 Rabbits: 5-27 Chickens: 4-15 Ducks: 4-26


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Guinea: 7.50 Pot Belly Pig: 12 Peeps: .50 Guinea Keets: 4.50-5 Eggs (/dz): XL Brown 1.40-1.90; L Brown 1.401.50; L White .95; M Brown .90; S Brown .45; Fertile Green/Brown Chicken Eggs 1.70; Fertile Guinea Eggs 2.50; Fertile Nest Run Duck Eggs 2. Sale starts at 5 pm.

Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC August 6, 2012 Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 34 1112-1436# 112-114; Ch 2-3 1124-1362# 107110.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 23 1412# 99; Sel 1-3 12461494# 88-93. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 74-77; Boners 70-74; Lean 60-73. Bulls: Grade 1 1428# 82. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 3 800-1000# 79-81. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 110-117.50; 550# 102.50. Calves: 156. Bulls No. 1 94-118# 105-120; 80-92# 90-112; No. 2 94-120# 87110; 80-92# 77-90; No. 3 80-104# 62-80; 76-78# 4060; Util 70-100# 25-67; 5068# 12-25; Hfrs. No. 1 80108# 127-142; No. 2 78100# 100-125; 58-72# 5072; non-tubing 64-76# 2257. Feeder Pigs (/hd): 10-20# 25-40; 30-40# 40-52; 60# 57. Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 60# 125; 70-80# 122-130; 90100# 117-132; 128# 107120. Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 1 3040# 67-80; 70# 117; Nannies Sel 2 120# 102. Hay (/ton): Alfalfa 244; Grass 115-200; Mixed 155160. Straw (/ton): Wheat 115; Oat 110. Oats: 5.20/bu EarCorn: 275-305/ton EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA No report GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA August 3, 2012 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 500500# 149-153; 550-600# 147-157; 600-650# 136-

142.50; 650-700# 119-122; 700-750# 117-126; M&L 2 400-450# 142.50, Herefords 110-117.50; 500-550# 112.50-123; 650-700# 101125; Hols. L 3 300-350# 102; 450-500# 84-93; 500550# 89-90; 750-850# 7991. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-450# 142; 500-550# 127-132; 550-600# 125127; 600-650# 114-122; 650-700# 107.50-113; 800900# 108-112; M&L 2 300450# 127.50-140; 450-500# 112.50-127.50; 550-600# 112.50-115; 650-700# 116120. Feeder Bulls: 350-400# 159; 400-450# 135; 450550# 130-135; 550-650# 126-127; 650-750# 111118. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 72-77, hi dress 78.25-81; Boners 8085% lean 68-73.50, hi dress 75-78, lo dress 64.50-69; Lean 85-90% lean 60-65, hi dress 6670.50, lo dress 52-58. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1288-1706# 88-96. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 96-126# 125-135; 80-94# 85-105; No 2 80-128# 100120; No 3 80-118# 50-85; Util 60-124# 10-55. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 2 80-122# 50-110. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA June 21, 2012 No report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA August 4, 2012 Alfalfa: 5s, 200-295 Mixed Hay: 12 lds, 80-250 Grass: 7 lds, 115-255 Straw: 5 lds, 140-165 Rye Seed: 2 lds, 11.50-13 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA August 3, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi ch & Pr 3-4 1155-1560# 112115.50; Ch 2-3 1120-1630# 109-113; Sel 2-3 11251465# 105-109; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-4 1360-1650# 96.60-103; Ch 2-3 12101680# 92.50-98; Sel 2-3 1185-1500# 85.50-93. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1200-1300# 111113; Ch 2-3 1100-1290# 106-109. Slaughter Cows: Prem.White 65-75% lean, 82-83.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 73-77, hi dress 77.5080, lo dress 69.50-73; Bon-

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Eighty-Four ers 80-85% lean 70-75, hi dress 75.50-79, lo dress 65-70; Lean 85-90% lean 63.50-69.50, hi dress 7072, lo dress 58-63.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 850-2150# 89-95, hi dress 97-109, lo dress 82-89. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 94-128# 115-123; 86-92# 50; No. 2 98-128# 109-115; 94-96# 85-90; 80-92# 4550; No. 3 90-130# 50-60; 80-88# 40; 72-78# 20; Util 60-110# 20-40; Hols. Hfr. Calves No. 1 85-105# 100140; No. 2 85-100# 30-70; Jersey Xbred 45-95# 2050. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA July 24, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 73.5079; Breakers 75-80% lean 68-72, hi dress 73-75.50; Boners 80-85% lean 6370; Lean 85-90% lean 6165, lo dress 45-59. Return to Farm Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 110-130; No. 2 95-120# 95110; No. 3 70-120# 60-80; Util 65-115# 20-60 LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA June 27, 2012 No report MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA August 7, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1220-1480# 117120.50; Ch 2-3 1085-1490# 111-116; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1200-1550# 101106.50; Ch 2-3 1210-1685# 96-101.50; Sel 1-3 11401455# 81-86. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 115-1400# 113117.50; Ch 2-3 1025-1445# 109-112.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem.

Whites 65-75% lean 80; Breakers 75-80% lean 7679.50; Boners 80-85% lean 70-76.50, hi dress 76.5078.50, lo dress 66-68; Lean 85-90% lean 65-69, hi dress 69.50-75, lo dress 57-62; Light Lean 85-92 % lean 45-49. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1270-1655# 89-96; hi dress 1165# 102. Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 102; 500-700# 85-115; Hols. L 3 300-500# 80-92, fancy 97-102; 500-700# 7789, fancy 92-105. Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 112; M&L 2 500-700# 95109. Bulls: M&L 1 300-500# 115-122; 500-700# 94-120; M&L 2 300-500# 97-112; 500-700# 72-97. Holstein Bulls Calves: No. 1 95-120# 1150-127; 8090# 70-95; No. 2 80-120# 92-117; No. 3 75-115# 6585; Util 65-95# 10-67.50. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 80-110# 110-117; No. 2 70-95# 72-107. Holstein/Beef Cross Calves: 80-95# 75-92. Barrows & Gilts: 49-54% lean 230-275# 66.50-68.50, few to 73; 45-50% lean 235315# 66-68; 40-45% lean 265-280# 62-63. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 20-34.50; 500-700# 2735.50. Boars: 640-795# 8.5011.50. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 2025# 28-36; 30-40# 47-51. Lambs: Ch 2-3 40-60# 110-130; 60-80# 112-122; 80-120# 100-110. Ewes: Gd 1-3 160-205# 45-55. Kids: Sel 1 30-50# 65-77; Sel 2 10-20# 25-50; 20-30# 45-70. Nannies: Sel 1 130-160# 130-150; Sel 2 80-130# 6577; Sel 3 80-130# 40-67. Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 172-207.

MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA July 30, 2012 Steers: Ch 100-109; Gd. 95-100. Heifers: Ch 100-108; Gd 90-100. Cows: Util & Comm. 70-85; Canner/lo Cutter 75 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 85-95. Bulls: YG 1 70-80 Cattle: Steers 90-105; Bulls 75-95; Hfrs. 60-90. Calves: Ch 110-130; Gd 80-100; Std 15-80; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 80-125. Hogs: US 1-2 68-70; US 13 63-65; Sows US 1-3 2040; Boars 6-40. Sheep: Lambs Ch 130140; Gd 100-125; SI Ewes 50-60 Goats: 25-175. MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA July 30, 2012 Alfalfa: 175-305 Mixed Hay: 80-150 LG Bales: 120-175 Straw: 120-165 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA July 30, 2012 Roosters: 3.20-7.75 Hens: 1.75-3.75 Bantys: .50-2.00 Pigeons: 2.40 Guineas: 4.50 Turkeys: 12.50 Bunnies: 2.50-4 Rabbits: 8-24 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA August 2, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1155-1560# 112115; Ch 2-3 1150-1575# 109-112; Sel 1-3 1205-

1465# 105-108. Slaughter Holsteins: Hi Ch & Pr 2-4 1360-1650# 99-103; Ch 2-3 1210-1680# 94-98; Sel 1-3 1185-1500# 90-93. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1200-1300# 111113. Slaughter Cows: White 65-70% lean 82-83.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 7780; Boners 80-85% lean 70-75, hi dress 76-79, lo dress 69-71; Lean 88-90% lean 65-70, lo dress 60-64. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1085-2150# 90-95, hi dress 97.50-103, lo dress 84-89. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 94-128# 115-123; 86-92# 50; No. 2 98-128# 109-115; 94-96# 85-90; 80-92# 4550; No. 3 90-130# 50-60; 80-88# 40; 72-78# 20; Util 60-110# 20-40. Holstein Heifers: No. 1 85-105# 100-140; No. 2 85100# 30-70; Jerse7 Xbreds 45-95# 20-50. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA August 1, 2012 US 1-2: 30-40# 150-180; 40-50# 110-130. US 2: 20-30# 165-180; 3040# 145-160; 40-50# 130140. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA August 6, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: NonTraditional, Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 167197; 60-80# 164-198; 8090# 140-156; 90-110# 128148; 110-130# 118-137; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 6080# 130-174; 80-90# 130142; 90-110# 100-132 110130# 110-125; 130-150# 88-108. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 100-130# 64-78; 130160# 72-88; 160-190# 7078; Util 1-2 Thin Flesh 100130# 74; 130-160# 48-64; 160-190# 54-64. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 80-100# 114-130; 100130# 130-167; Sel 2 60-80# 80-92; 80-100# 100-108; Sel 3 40-60# 48-56; 60-80# 82-110; 80-100# 80-114. Slaughter Nannies/Does: Sel 1 80-120# 88-110; 130150# 140-155; Sel 2 80130# 122-135; Sel 3 50-80# 58-78; 80-130# 78-98. Slaughter Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 133-155; Sel 2 100-150# 132-148;. Slaughter Whethers: Sel 2 100-150# 135-152; 180220# 240-260 fancy.


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report

PA DEPT OF

54% lean 220-270# 65-69; 45-49% lean 250-300# 6366; Sows US 1-3 300-500# 30-33; 500-700# 33-38. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 1-2 30-40# 150-180; 4050# 110-130; US 2 20-30# 165-180; 30-40# 145-160; 40-50# 130-140. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 160187; 60-80# 146-180; 80110# 122-158; Ch 1-3 4060# 110-153; 60-80# 98158; 80-110# 86-144; Ewes Gd 203 120-160# 60-68; 160-200# 49-50; Util 1-2 120-160# 48-58. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 86-114; 60-80# 88-112; 80-110# 108-118; Sel 2 40-60# 70-78; 60-80# 98-118; 80-100# 90-112; Sel 3 40-60# 50-62; 60-80# 60-82; Nannies Sel 1 80130# 106-120; Sel 2 80130# 84-106; 130-180# 8692; Sel 3 50-80# 50-68; 80130# 62-76; Billies Sel 1 100-150# 132-142; 150250# 196-200; Sel 2 150250# 147-152; Sel 3 80100# 74-112; Sel 3 80-100# 74-112; Wethers Sel 1 160170# 230-250. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices

paid by dealers at the farm and/ton. Compared to last week hay sold mostly steady. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Alfalfa 140-325; Mixed Hay 100325; Timothy 100-200; Straw 80-160; Mulch 65-75. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 141 lds of hay, 39 of Straw; Alfalfa 150300; Mixed Hay 125-430; Timothy 150-310; Grass 115-410; Straw 120-220. Diffenbach Auction, July 30, 54 lds Hay, 16 lds Straw. Alfalfa 185-255; Mixed Hay 130-430; Timothy 175-240; Grass 125410; Straw 120-170. Green Dragon Auction, August 3, 32 lds Hay, 9 lds Straw. Alfalfa 150-290; Mixed Hay 125-320; Timothy 150-280; Grass 115330; Straw 135-185. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: August 2, 25 lds Hay, 5 Straw. Alfalfa 170300; Mixed Hay 160-300; Timothy 310; Grass 125225; Straw 130-220. Wolgemuth Auction, August 1, 37 lds Hay, 8 lds Straw. Alfalfa 175-300; Mixed hay 150-350; Timothy 175; Grass 180-230; Straw 145-205. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton,

74 Loads Hay, 15 Straw. Alfalfa 192-300; Mixed Hay 80-250; Timothy 107.50250; Grass 100-255; Straw 130-165. Dewart Auction, Dewart: No report. Greencastle Livestock: JuAugust 2 & 6, 4 lds Hay, 0 Straw. Timothy 107.50127.50. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: August 4, 26 lds Hay, 5 lds Straw. Alfalfa 200-300; Mixed Hay 80-250; Grass 115-255; Straw 140-165. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: July 31, 15 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Mixed 105-180; Timothy 135-160; Grass 60245; Straw 140-155. Shippensburg Auction: July 28 & 31, 20 lds hay, 3 lds straw, Alfalfa 192-195, Mixed Hay 140-185, Timothy 140-250, Grass 100175, Straw 145. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: No report.

1165-1335# 111.50113.50; Sel 2-3 10051160# 106-109.50. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 74-79, lo dress 68.50-71; Boners 8085% lean 70.50-73.50, hi dress 75-78, lo dress 6869; Lean 85-90% lean 6871.50, hi dress 74-76.50, lo dress 58-66. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 few 1445-1720# 87-89.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-115# 100-117; No. 2 85-110# 85-95; No. 3 80115# 50-70; Util 65-90# 2545.

VINTAGE SALES STABLES August 6, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1225-1570# 113116; Ch 2-3 1240-1580# 112.50-115.50, hi dress 116-119; Sel 2-3 11601340# 108.50-112.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3

WOLGEMUTH AUCTION August 1, 2012 Alfalfa: 6 lds, 223-300 Mixed Hay: 25 lds, 187-350 Timothy: 1 ld, 175 Grass: 5 lds, 194-230 Oat Hay: 1 ld, 125 Straw: 8 lds, 164-205 Fodder: 1 ld, 135

WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA August 2, 2012 Alfalfa: 4 lds, 170-300 Timothy Hay: 1 ld, 310 Grass: 5 lds, 125-225 Straw: 5 lds, 130-220 Ear Corn: 2 lds, 270 Rye: 1 ld, 15/bale.

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August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 9

PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Report Compared to last week corn sold .05-.10 higher, wheat sold .10-.15 lower, Barley sold .15-.20 lower, Oats sold steady to .05 lower & Soybeans sold .10-.15 lower. EarCorn sold steady to 1 higher. All prices per bushel except EarCorn is per ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 8.65-9.10, Avg 8.89, Contracts 8-8.08; Wheat No. 2 8.71-9.11, Avg 8.93, Contracts 8-8.02; Barley No. 3 4.30-5.05, Avg 4.85; Oats No. 2 4.50-4.70, Avg 4.60; Soybeans No. 2 15.81-16.16, Avg 16.13, Contracts 15.22-15.50; EarCorn 240. SouthCentral PA: Corn No. 2 8.20-9, Avg 8.64; Wheat No. 2 7.21-8.94, Avg 7.93; Barley No. 3 3.754.60, Avg 4.11; Oats No. 2 3.25-3.65, Avg 3.46; Soybeans No. 2 15.39-15.91, Avg 15.60; EarCorn 205. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 8.20-9.10, Avg 8.80, Month Ago 7.24, Year Ago 8.11; Wheat No. 2 7.21-9.11, Avg 8.53, Month Ago 7.48, Year Ago 6.33; Barley No. 3 3.75-5, Avg 4.55, Month Ago 4.17, Year Ago 4.67; Oats No. 2 3.254.70, Avg 3.97, Month Ago 4.01, Year Ago 4.09; Soybeans No. 2 15.11-16.50, Avg 14.37, Month Ago 14.37, Year Ago 13.55; EarCorn 205-240, Avg 221.66, Month Ago 197, Year Ago 197.16. Western PA: Corn No. 2 7.80-8.50, Avg 8.08; Wheat No. 2 8-8.60, Avg 8.30; Oats No. 2 3.50-4, Avg 3.83 Soybeans No. 2 15.55. Central PA: Corn No. 2 8.30-9, Avg 8.74; Wheat No. 2 8.91; Barley No. 3 5; Oats No. 2 4-4.50, Avg 4.18; Soybeans No. 2 15.11-16.50, Avg 15.91; EarCorn 220. Lehigh Valley: Corn No. 2 8.80-9.05, Avg 8.94; Wheat No. 2 8.50-9.11, Avg 8.88; Oats No. 2 3.55-3.85, Avg 3.70; Soybeans No. 2 16.10-16.46, Avg 16.22.

AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary August 3, 2012 Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 113116; Ch 1-3 107-112; Sel 12 104-107; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 96-103; Ch 2-3 92-98; Sel 1-2 85-93. Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110-114; Ch 1-3 102-109; Sel 1-2 95-102. Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 72-77; Boners 80-85% lean 68-74; Lean 85-90% lean 62-67. Bulls: hi dress 102-109; avg. dress 88-98; lo dress 84-88. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 300-500# 172-175; 500700# 137-155; M&L 2 300500# 137-150; 500-700# 97-112; Hfrs. M&L 1 300500# 125-155; 500-700# 121-152; M&L 2 300-500# 112-140; 500-700# 100135; Bulls M&L 1 300-500# 130-145; 500-700# 125145; M&L 2 300-500# 122132; 500-700# 130-135. Vealers: Util 60-120# 1070. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-120# 105-160; 8090# 85-110; No. 2 95-120# 90-125; 80-90# 50-95; No. 3 80-120# 50-100; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 100160; No. 2 80-105# 50-130. Hogs: Barrows & Gits 49-


Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

House approves farm-ranch disaster aid — Senate delays action until September The House of Representatives passed a one-year farm-ranch disaster bill by a vote of 223-197. The House now plans to be out of town until Sept. 9. Senate leadership indicated before the House action that it would only entertain passing a disaster package that was the same as the one included in the Senate’s approved multi-year Farm Bill. The Senate will be out of the district until Sept. 7 and did not take action on an agriculture disaster bill. The House-passed disaster legislation would reauthorize for 2012 only the Livestock Indemnity Payments (LIP), Livestock Forage Disaster Programs (LFP), Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees and Farm-Raised Fish and the Tree Assistance Program providing for payments totaling $383 million. The money to pay for the disaster package comes from cuts to the Environmental Quality Incentives Program and from the Conservation Stewardship Program. Under the LIP program, the House language retains the 75 percent payment on the value of sheep killed, including loss from federally reintroduced or regulated predators and

avian predators. The LFP would allow producers to receive 60 percent of feed costs for one to three months for stock on the range, depending on the severity of the drought in a locality. There is also $20 million for feed and water shortages for livestock producers, bee keepers and fish farmers. According to Peter Orwick, executive director of the American Sheep Industry Association, “The unfortunate part for producers in drought areas who are facing expensive feed purchases and making decision on how many ewes to keep or whether or not to feed lambs rather than sell them on the lower market is that there is no opportunity for them to even apply for LFP or Non Insured Acres Program payments through the Farm Service Agency. In a normal situation, drought payments would be available now to help cash flow feed purchases and assist in making decisions about selling or feeding lambs. Given the narrow window for House and Senate action in September, it could be months, not weeks, for a definitive answer on availability and timing of disaster assistance.” Senate Agriculture Chairman Stabenow

PUBLIC AUCTION SATURDAY AUGUST 25TH 2012 9 A.M.

(MI), on the Senate floor on Thursday, said she would pursue a dual strategy when the Senate returns in September. She said she would do everything possible to pass and send to the President a complete five-year Farm Bill; however, if that effort should fail, she is committed to passing comprehensive disaster aid. Stabenow noted that the disaster provisions contained in the Senate-passed Farm Bill would make larger

payments to livestock producers hurt by the drought and would also provide for payments to fruit producers who lost their fruit whereas the House-passed disaster legislation would only make payments to fruit producers if they lost their trees. “Finding floor time when Congress returns in September to consider and pass a complete Farm Bill will be difficult,” said Fran Boyd with Meyers and Associ-

ates. “The House only has seven or eight legislative days available to them in September.” Following the disaster vote in the House, House Agriculture Chairman Lucas (OK) and Ranking Member Peterson (MN) met with Stabenow and Senate Agriculture Ranking Member Roberts (KS) and other Senators to discuss movement of a five-year Farm Bill. Lucas said committee staffs can work to resolve some issues but the four com-

mittee leaders would need to be present for any major decisions. Congress will be in a “pro forma session” for the remainder of August and part of September since the House rejected the Senate’s resolution to recess. Orwick encouraged producers to share the drought and feed-crisis discussion with U.S. Senators and Representatives while they are home during the August congressional break.

Farming, food, and climate activists call on Agriculture Secretary Vilsack to discuss links between drought and climate change In light of the crushing drought currently sweeping the nation, over 10,000 Americans are calling on Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack to directly address the massive implications of manmade climate

change for our entire farming sector. Scientists are clear that climate change is already leading to more extreme weather, such as longer and more severe droughts. But in multiple press appearances, Secretary Vilsack

dodged questions about what drought-stricken farmers need to know about climate change, saying that he’s “not a scientist,” and the department is focused on the “near term.” Organized by Forecast

the Facts and FoodDemocracyNow!, activists and farmers responded to Vilsack’s evasiveness by signing a petition which reads: Please tell farmers and

Farming B11


Fact sheet: President Obama leading Administration-wide drought response As communities across the country struggle with the impacts of one of the worst droughts in decades, President Obama is committed to ensuring that his Administration is doing everything it can to help the farmers, ranchers, small businesses, and communities being impacted. To respond to immediate needs, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other federal agencies are using their existing authorities wherever possible to address the hardships aris-

ing from the lack of water, feed, and forage. Within the last month, USDA has opened the Conservation Reserve Program to emergency haying and grazing, has lowered the borrower interest rate for emergency loans, and has called on crop insurance companies to provide more flexibility to farmers. The Department of the Interior has provided additional grazing flexibility on federal lands and the Small Business Administration is working to help with access to invest-

ment capital and credit in affected communities. On Aug. 7, 2012, President Obama convened his White House Rural Council for one of a continuing series of policy meetings to review Executive Branch response actions and to develop additional policy initiatives to assist droughtstricken Americans. Following the meeting, the White House announced several new measures the Administration is implementing to help those impacted by the drought, including providing addi-

tional assistance for livestock and crop producers, increasing the capacity for lending to small businesses, and waiving certain requirements on trucks helping to provide relief. President Obama also stressed the need for the entire Administration to continue to look at further steps it can take to ease the pain of this historic drought. As the drought continues, the Administration will actively implement its longer-term strategy for assessing and man-

aging the effects of the crisis. In addition to impacts on farming and ranching operations, a long-term, widespread drought will also have implications for wildfires, water availability, navigation, and power generation across much of the country and across other sectors. As we move forward, the Administration will work closely with state and local governments, farming and ranching communities and others to ensure an effective and efficient response and recovery.

Finally, while the Administration is exploring every possible avenue to provide relief from the impacts of the drought, Congress still needs to act to ensure that the needed disaster assistance is available to these communities. The best way to do that is by passing a comprehensive, multi-year farm bill that not only provides much-needed disaster assistance but gives farmers and ranchers the certainty they deserve while enacting critical reforms.

rector for Forecast the Facts, an organization devoted to ensuring that Americans receive accurate information about climate change. “In fact, Secretary Vilsack’s own department contributed to a 2009 report warning that manmade climate change would create worsening water shortages, longer heat waves,

and deeper droughts in the Great Plains. It’s simply not credible for Vilsack to now claim he is unaware of the science, and it contradicts the USDA’s mission of providing farmers with the scientific information they need to do their jobs.” “Helping farmers cope with the current drought is an important priority,”

said Dave Murphy, executive director for FoodDemocracyNow! “But the USDA also has a responsibility to explain to farmers and the American public that climate change makes droughts like the current one far more likely and severe. This won’t be the last climate-related disaster of Secretary Vilsack’s

tenure, and he should show leadership by talking about the major implications that climate change has for our entire farming sector.” Farmers who signed the petition emphasized the need to hear from Secretary Vilsack about the causes of the drought. In the coming weeks, Forecast the Facts and

FoodDemocracyNow! will be monitoring Secretary Vilsack’s statements about the drought and climate change, and will use a host of online and offline tactics to ensure that Secretary Vilsack hears from farmers and other Americans who are looking to him for leadership on this important issue.

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the American public about the connections between climate change and the current drought, as well as the massive implications that climate change has for the future of American farming. “The science tying climate change to longer and more severe droughts is clear,” said Daniel Souweine, Campaign Di-


Page 12 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

NMPF asks members of Congress to meet with dairy farmers during August recess to discuss need to pass new farm bill ARLINGTON, VA – The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) is asking members of Congress, as they return home for the August congressional recess, to meet with struggling dairy farmers in their districts to discuss the perilous economic conditions affecting farmers, and the urgent need for Congress to pass a new farm bill yet in 2012. “NMPF believes this type of one-on-one dialogue will enable members in both the House and the Senate to see firsthand the need for passing a five-year farm bill, including the vital reforms to the nation’s dairy policy in the form of the Dairy Security Act (DSA),” said NMPF President and CEO Jerry Kozak. “We hope that Members of Congress will take time to visit local dairy farms to experience upclose the challenges dairy farmers are facing and understand why it is so imperative to pass a fiveyear farm bill which includes a better safety net for farmers,” Kozak said. “We are approaching a crisis comparable to or worse than that of 2009, when dairy farmers lost $20 billion in equity and thousands of farmers went out of business.” “When you factor in additional operating costs, such as labor and energy costs, on top of the sky-high price of feed caused by the ongoing drought, dairy farmers are currently selling their milk for far less than the cost of production,” said Kozak. “The Dairy Security Act would give producers and their bankers the assurances they need to continue their operations through these tough times.” Kozak said that farmers themselves should take this message to their elected officials during the next four weeks, with the hope that Congress can be

spurred to action after Labor Day. “We applaud the pledge from Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and House Agriculture Com-

mittee Chairman Frank Lucas (R-OK), and Ranking Members Pat Roberts (R-KS) and Collin Peterson (D-MN), to continue their push for full passage of a comprehensive, five-year farm bill after

the August recess. NMPF will continue to stand behind our agricultural leaders in this effort to pass a five-year farm bill this year.” The National Milk Producers Federation,

based in Arlington, VA, develops and carries out policies that advance the well-being of dairy producers and the cooperatives they own. The members of NMPF’s 30 cooperatives produce the

majority of the U.S. milk supply, making NMPF the voice of more than 32,000 dairy producers on Capitol Hill and with government agencies. Visit www.nmpf.org for more information.

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Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Heat stress in cattle When we think about heat stress in cattle, the first thing that comes to mind are cattle that are in confinement, such as dairy animals. Interestingly enough, the animals that are most susceptible to heat stress are those that are in fields where shade and/or air movement may be limited given that animals in confinement have some means of artificial cooling to relieve stress. Usually, those animals in confinement are in a controlled situation in regards to air movement, usually with fans or misters to make them more comfortable. It is important to remember that cattle become uncomfortable at temperatures 20 degrees less than the temperature where humans become uncomfortable. This means that if you are uncomfortable at 80 degrees, and feel hot at 90 degrees, cattle may already be in the danger zone at these temperatures. Cattle that are heavier (in excess of 1,000 pounds), and dark-hided cattle, along with cattle that may be stressed due to disease or transportation will be more susceptible to heat-related stresses than any others. Producers should realize that it is not possible to control the weather

and some instances will occur that are beyond their control. Not all stresses can be eliminated under usual and customary production practices, but measures should be taken to make cattle more comfortable where possible and practical. Some of those measures are listed below: • Shade. Where possible, provide either natural or artificial shade for cattle. Altering fencing or opening up a new pasture for animals will sometimes allow cattle access to areas where air movement and shade are more available. Portable shades can be utilized as well especially when placed on higher ground to allow air movement to help cool the animals. Shade can be built or be as simple as parking machinery or trailers in the field to provide shade in the afternoon. • Water. Assure that your animals have a water source that is clean to insure adequate water intake. While water temperature is not important up to about 90 degrees, keep in mind that a lot of black or dark colored tanks can increase water temperature to more than 100 degrees. The same is true for black plastic pipe supplying water to animals in

the field; therefore, it is wise to place water tanks in shady areas near where the animals will be loafing during the hot part of the day or use lighter colored tanks to reduce water temperature. Intake is extremely important as cattle can drink 1 percent of their body weight per hour when stressed by temperature. • Reduce Management Stress. Try not to do any more management related practices such as health programs, castration, weaning, etc. when temperature results in dangerous THI values. If necessary to treat animals or move them through a handling facility, try to do these practices at night when it is cool or very early in the morning to reduce stress. Cattle should not spend more than 30 minutes in the facility when the THI value is above 79. This would also apply to any necessary movement of cattle from field to field. • Plan Transportation. When transporting cattle during hot weather, plan to haul cattle during the cooler parts of the day such as later at night or early in the morning while allowing ample time for the cattle to become adjusted and find shade once they reach their des-

2012 Angus Foundation Silent Auction Grosses $13,800 Proceeds will benefit the Angus Foundation and its youth, education and research efforts. Angus supporters of all ages came together at the National Junior Angus Show (NJAS) in Louisville, KY, to support the 2012 Angus Foundation Silent Auction on

July 18-21. The auction grossed $13,800 in proceeds benefiting the Foundation’s youth, education and research programs. Individual donors and state Angus associations contributed 131 items to the 17th annual auction. “It’s truly an honor each year for the Angus

Foundation to receive the generous levels of support and participation in the silent auction from attendees during the National Junior Angus Show,” says Milford Jenkins, Angus Foundation president. “Our primary goal for this activi-

2012 B16

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tination. Don’t crowd cattle in trailers during hot weather, allowing extra space to reduce stress. • Know the Signs of Heat Stress. When cattle are extremely stressed, they will become lethargic and may be seen panting for breath. Some cattle will breathe with their mouth open and be seen with excess saliva hanging from the mouth. When these signs are noticed, producers should take every effort practical to cool the animals immediately. This might include spraying with water, moving the animal to an area where air movement is better, moving the animal under a fan, or providing artificial shade if the animal is non-ambulatory. Heat stress is a real concern for producers and can greatly decrease profitability. It is important to remember, however, that there are usual and customary production practices that are commonly accepted in beef cattle management. While producers should provide certain measures of comfort, there will be limits as

Beef

to what is practical and appropriate to provide. Source: Milton W. Orr,

Extension Agent, The University of Tennessee Extension – Greene County

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Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Who’s your daddy? Solving sire mysteries by Miranda Reiman Give or take a week or more, gestation varies enough to make cattlemen wonder: Is this an AI (artificial insemination) calf or a natural service? Multi-sire pastures raise even more™ questions. “There are some unique things you can do if you know which bull sired which calf,” says Tonya Amen, with Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI). From bull behavior to replacement heifer selection, the possibilities are both interesting and applicable. Commercial Angus producers now have that ability. In July, GeneMax™ (GMX), a DNA test to measure gain and grade potential, added a function without adding cost: sire match. If bulls that could have bred a cow have been Pfizer50K tested, the $17 commercial test can reveal her calf’s sire. Barb Downey, a registered and commercial Angus producer near Wamego, KA, says knowing complete parentage would give

her another layer of information for selection. “We use performance data, the 205-day weights and the frame sizes. Then we look at history of the dam,” she says. “We’ll kick out some of the extremes on both ends.” After visual appraisal, they’re either sent to the feedyard, developed for retention in the Downey Ranch herd or sold as bred heifers. “Having a little bit more information for your buyer is always good,” she says. After an aggressive AI season, Downey turns out females with as many as 22 cleanup bulls in the same pasture. “We are going more and more to rotational grazing,” she says. “With my commercial cows, we have one large group and swing them through pastures. That makes managing my grazing better and easier. “After AI, we wait a couple days before we turn out bulls, but with natural differences in gestation length, there is always a big question as to who is

the sire of that calf.” With numerous bulls, Downey says, “There is a wide variety of sires and genotypes and phenotypes in there.” Adding a DNA test could help sort that out. “Anything I can do to get those cows up in the front of the season — and those are generally your AI calves with more highly accurate, proven genetics — serves me and my customers well in the long run,” she says. GMX adds genetic predictions for performance and carcass measures in the form of a percentile ranking. “If she’s got everything else going for her and you can tell me that she’s got stellar grading genetics, then maybe I could use that for a high-end sort,” Downey says, looking to future applications. Widespread AI breeding to a relatively few prominent bloodlines causes a challenge for Patsy Houghton, of Heartland Cattle Co., at McCook, NE. As her staff makes mating decisions for commercial heifers, knowing the sire could

help avoid pitfalls. “The relatively narrow pool of popular sires used can easily lead to accidental line breeding, and even inbreeding,” she says. “In turn, that can result in decreased fertility, longevity, immune response and growth. The DNA technology provides an opportunity to solve this problem.” Not everyone is interested in sire assignment purely from an AI standpoint. “In multi-sire pasture situations, it’s pretty valuable to be able to identify the bulls that are getting the job done for you and those that aren’t,” Amen says. “That’s based not only on quality of calves, but also quantity of calves.” Downey says finding out more about the bulls is as intriguing as the heifer information. “I do know there are real differences in how well bulls manage themselves in terms of getting cows covered, how aggressively they breed and how smart they are in their breeding behavior,” she says.

The sire match function could be added to GMX test results without charging more because it draws on information already in the system. “The markers we use for GeneMax are a subset of the 54,000 markers that are used on the Pfizer high-density test [50K],” Amen says. “When we have calves that we’ve tested for that reduced set, and bulls that have been tested for all of them, we then go back and see which markers might have been inherited from which sire.” The test will return results ranging from the “most likely” to “not likely” candidates. “The one that comes back ‘most likely’ is probably the sire,” Amen says. “If it lists, ‘other possible’ - those are bulls that meet some of the criteria, but it’s still most likely the first one.” Bulls with similar pedigrees may show up as “other possible,” for example. Commercial cattlemen can order 50K tests on registered and transferred Angus bulls, or

work with their seedstock suppliers to order them as an aid in analyzing subsequent calf crops. “You can choose to request the sire match feature up front when you order the test, or you can go back and request it after you receive GMX results,” she says. Anyone who has already run a GMX test may request this new layer of information in retrospect if they have the sire information. “You may like the looks of a set of cattle, but it can pay to know more than that,” Amen says. “GMX results are one tool that can help you keep the right candidates in your herd, and guide strategic mating decisions if you discover strengths or weaknesses in the individuals.” GeneMax was introduced in February 2012 by CAB and AGI in cooperation with Pfizer Animal Genetics for use on high-percentage Angus cattle. It is not intended for use on registered animals. For more information visit: www.CABpartners.com/genemax.

ASA joins other Ag groups in response to House Disaster Assistance legislation The American Soybean Association (ASA) and 11 other agricultural organizations released a joint statement on Aug. 2 on the disaster assistance legislation introduced by the House after the withdrawal of its proposed one-year farm bill extension: “The undersigned farm organizations support finding a path forward to reaching agreement on a new five-year farm bill before current program authorities expire on Sept. 30. We are disappointed that the House Republican leadership has decided to not move forward with the House Agriculture Committee’s bill before adjourning for the August recess. That bill would provide the disaster relief our farm and ranch families need at this time.

“Instead, we understand the House may consider a separate disaster bill, under suspension of the rules on August 2, to make supplemental agricultural disaster assistance available for Fiscal Year 2012… “We do not oppose passage of a disaster assistance bill, but note that almost identical provisions to retroactively extend these four programs are included in the Senate-passed farm bill and the bill reported by the House Agriculture Committee. Those measures would likely be included in any conference committee report. It is imperative that we pass a comprehensive, long-term farm bill. Farmers and ranchers always face decisions that carry very serious financial ramifications, such as

planting a crop, buying land or building a herd, and we need clear and confident signals from our lawmakers… “Both the Senate and the House Agriculture Committees have produced reform-minded, bipartisan bills that address many of the core principles we believe are important, such as strengthening crop insurance as a reliable risk management tool or ensuring strong agricultural research and development. We remain committed to attempting to pass a five-year farm bill as soon as possible, including the long-term provisions it includes that would help alleviate the emergency conditions we are seeing across the country.”

2012 from B14 ty is to create a setting for adults and youth alike to socialize with other Angus enthusiasts, learn more about the Angus Foundation, while simultaneously helping to raise funds used for scholarships, education and research important for the advancement of the Angus breed. All credit for the silent auction’s success goes to the donors of the items, along with everyone who placed bids on the items.” Two items generated $1,100 each and were

the top sellers at this year’s auction. The first was a hand-made, oneof-a-kind toy corral set, purchased by Leonard and Agnes Bayer of Country Lane Farm, Weston, WI. Leo and Sam McDonnell of McDonnell Angus, Columbus, MO, donated the corral set. The other top-selling item for $1,100 was a limited-edition Louisville Slugger bat, No. 1 of 150, engraved especially for the 2012 NJAS. The bat was purchased by Scott and Elaine Foster of Seldom Rest Farms,

Niles, MI, and was donated by the 2012 NJAS. From its inception in 1995, the silent auction has grown annually as a fundraiser that generates unrestricted financial support for various activities sponsored by the Angus Foundation, such as the Leaders Engaged in Angus Development (LEAD) Conference, Beef Leaders Institute, Cattlemen’s Boot Camps and a variety of Angus-related research projects. A list of regional auction donors and buyers

follows: 2012 Angus Foundation Auction Donors 2012 National Junior Angus Board of Directors 2012 National Junior Angus Show Frey Family Angus, Quarryville, PA. Frey Livestock Supply, Quarryville, PA. Holshouser Farm, Gold Hill, NC. Maryland Junior Angus Assn. Pennsylvania Junior Angus Assn. Sunrise Sunset Farm, Sykesville, MD. Triple Tree Farm,

Snow Camp, N.C. West-Mar Angus, Eglon, WV. 2012 Regional Angus Foundation Auction Buyers: Cedar Hill Farms, Wellsville, PA. Chris & Carol Wojciechowski, Middlebrook, VA. Cropp Family Farm, Damascus, MD. Dry Creek Farm, Berryville, VA. ErReR Hill Farms, Friedens, PA. Glenmary Farm, LLC, Rapidan, VA. Holshouser Farm,

Gold Hill, NC. Kate Livingston, Dover, PA. Lisnageer Farm, Coatesville, PA. Mitchell Farm, Reinholds, PA. Moulden Farms, Clear Brook, VA. Pamela Armes, Forest, VA. Peyton Lee, Forest, VA. Sunrise Sunset Farm, Sykesville, MD. Sunset Hills Farm, Woodford, VA. Triple S Farm, Moneta, VA. Wheat Swamp Angus, Kinston, NC.


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Beef Cattle

Concrete Products

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS®

Herd Expansions

 WANTED 

Announcements

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday • 2:00 PM For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com

At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

40 Years Experience

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250

Dick Meyer Co. Inc.

Building Materials/Supplies

Page 18 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Florida Osceola Turkey • Alligator • Hog Hunts

Lorne Twist

863-443-0519

twister@embargmail.com

Leach Farms Wanted all year

Spent Hens/Roosters All breeds 20 to 1000+ Also Ducks, Pigeons, Goats and Rabbits Cash paid at pickup

James 315-871-7262 Announcements     

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101 or bsnyder@leepub.com

Barn Repair BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Bedding

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

Seward Valley 518-234-4052

CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

Metal Roofing

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

Cut to the INCH

Dairy Cattle

Agricultural Commercial Residential

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

16 s Color

24-29 G Pane a. ls

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822 978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

Buildings For Sale

Buildings For Sale

Double O Builders LLC

518-673-1073 or 518-774-7288 • Dairy Facilities • Machinery Sheds • Pole Barns • Free Stall Barns • Tie Stall Barns • Garages • Gravity Flow Manure Systems • Horse Barns • Riding Arenas

All Size Heifers

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

315-269-6600

(ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds Lower your SCC & improve conception. Low cost, effective, easy use. Our 39th year. If over 50,000 SCC call today. 1-800876-2500 1-920-650-1631 www.alphageneticsinc.com

Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

OPEN HEIFERS NEEDED

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

Call Us with your information or email

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

REG. JERSEY Heifer Calves, $150.00 without papers, $200.00 with papers. FREE bull calves. Call days only 8am-8pm 207-322-2767

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Call today and join our family of satisfied customers!!

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! Business Opportunities

Do You Grow Grapes? Do You Make Wine? CHECK OUT

DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

BERG-BENNETT, INC. RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866 www.wineandgrapegrower.com Or Call For a Sample Copy

800-218-5586 Cattle

WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

Dairy Equipment

HERD OF JERSEY COWS, 65 head, mostly first, second & third calf. 518-358-4183

Business Opportunities

HEIFERS

WANTED

REG. TEXAS LONGHORNS: Cow/calf pairs, heifers, bulls, exhibition steers. See www.triplemlonghorns.com Tom/Julie (w)607-363-7814, 607-287-2430

Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS

We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 500 Gal. Mueller MW • 6000 Gal. Storage • 500 Gal. Mueller M • 1000 Gal. DeLaval • 3000 Gal. Storage • 415 Gal. Sunset • 1000 Gal. Mueller M • 2000 Gal. Mueller OH • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 900 Gal. Mueller OH • 2000 Gal. Mueller OE • 400 Gal. Majonnier • 800 Gal. Majonnier • 2000 Gal. Surge • 300 Gal. DeLaval • 800 Gal. Mueller OH • 1600 Gal. Surge NY • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 735SOLD Gal. Sunset • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 300 Gal Mueller M • 735 Gal. Sunset SOLD PA OH Mueller • 1500 Gal. • 300 Gal. Sunset • 700 Gal. Mueller OH • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH PA • 200 SOLD Gal. DeLaval • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 1250 Gal. Surge • 200 Gal. Mueller RS • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 1250 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 200 Gal. Sunset • 1250 Gal. Majonnier • 150 Gal. Mueller RH • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 1250 Gal. DeLaval • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 100, 180, 250 Gal. Milkeeper Self-Cont. • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 545 Gal. Sunset

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Int’l 5288, 4WD, ROPS, 200 hp, 4,000 hrs., $18,000; Itn’t 766, Black Stripe, Cab, 3,100 hrs. orig, Super nice! $12,500; JD 750, 2WD, 23hp, turf tires, $4,200; Int’l 574, 50 hp, gas, 3ph., $3,800; NH 1412, 10’ Discbine, flail cond., $8,500; Kverneland Round Bale Processor, $2,500; Kelly Backhoe #30, 6’, 3ph., good cond., $2,800; NH 329 Manure sprdr., 90 bu., $2,200; Full line of farm equipment available! www.youngsmilkywayfarm.com 802-885-4000

Krone 1250 Combi-Pack round baler & wrapper, exc., 100K new, $24,000; Int’l 966, open, 115 hp., Nice machine! $9,500; Kuhn GA6000 Double Rotary Rake, field ready, $8,900; Sitrex 17’ tedder, $2,300; 2- Grapple buckets, hyd., 6’ $1,800 & $2250; NH 66 Square baler, $1,500. 802376-5262

Used Tanks For Sale

JD 213 flex head with cart, very good, $4,500; JD 6 row cultivator, $1,500; Paul livestock scale, $650; square bale grabber, $650. 802-644-5974

HEAT EXCHANGERS S • TUBE E COOLER We e Do o Tank k Repair

SHENK’S

505 E. Woods Drive,

Sales 717-626-1151

Farm Equipment

Lititz, PA 17543

Farm Equipment

SUMMER

B A R GA I N S !! ‘81 IH 1086 w/ Cab, 4,000 Hrs., Local Trade . . . . . .$12,750 Nice JD 325 55 Ldr., 3,900 Hrs., Wgts . . . . . . . . . . .$13,900 ‘70 JD 4000 Diesel, 2 Hyd., 5,900 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 Claas 180 Round Baler w/ Netwrap, Very Good Condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,000 Claas 66 4x5 Round Baler, Very Good Condition. . . . .$8,750 JD 458 Standard Round Baler, LIKE NEW. . . . . . . . .$13,750 NH TB120 4WD Tractor, 115hp, Open Station, 2000 Hrs., Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,500 New Galfre 17 ft. Hyd Fold Hay Tedders, Only 4 Left!. . .$5,750 NH 1037 Bale Wagon, Very Good, Bargain!. . . . . . . . $12,500 NH 1033 Baler Wagon, 105 Bale, Good Condition. . . .$4,500 Agco Massey Ferguson 3435GE 4WD Orchard Tractor w/Cab & Alo 710 Loader, 1600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 NH 269 Baler w/Thrower, Used Last Week, Very Good. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Ingersoll Rand VR530 Telehandler w/Cab, Bucket Forks, 1500 Hrs., Like New Condition! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000 1967 JD 3020 Dsl, 2021 Original Hrs., Original Paint, 4 New Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,000 Bobcat 743 SS Ldr, 3000 Hrs., Very Good . . . . . . . . . $6,500 Bobcat 440B SS Ldr, Very Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500

Kennedy Tractor of Williamstown, NY (315) 964-1161

Kuhn Knight 8110 Slinger Spreader (1) yr old, 540 PTO, Single Axle, Like New $10,500; Bush Hog 2610 Trailer Mower 10’ Batwing, 540 PTO $6,450; 4x4 Landini Globus 75-80HP Dsl, Full Glass Cab w/AC/Heat, Dual Outlets, Clean! $15,900; 1999 NH 4835 60-65HP Dsl w/Sd Mt Sicklebar Mower 2000 hrs, Clean! $9,750; Ford 540 w/Sd Mt Sicklebar Mower Canopy, 50HP Dsl, 2000 hrs $8,450; 4x4 Long/Canopy/ Reverser, 50HP Dsl, 3000 hrs, Clean! $6,950; Landpride RCR2570 Trailer Mower 10’, 540 PTO Demo $5,500; 4x4 Kubota 85-90HP Dsl, Full Cab AC/Heat 85-90HP Dsl, All New Tires, Lots of Wts, Dual Outlets $11,900

Farm Machinery For Sale

1457 Hwy. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 13459

www.macfaddens.com Lots More On Our Website! Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

1981 JOHN DEERE 4040, diesel, 5800 hours, rear radials tires, excellent condition, made in USA, must see, $20,000. 802-848-7875

FOR SALE: New Holland bale wagons, and parts for all models at wholesale prices. Sod Buster Sales, Polson MT 1877-735-2108 or 406-8832118

2006 Case 621D Wheel Loader; 5100 hrs; 2.5 yard bucket; quick coupler; heated cab. Located in Ithaca,NY area. Call 607-319-9875.

JOHN DEERE Kernel processor, fully reconditioned, new rollers and bearings, fits all 6000 series John Deere silage chopper $5,000. or best offer. 802-758-2138

TWO 1224 DION Choppers w/2-3 row corn heads & 1-2 row, 2 grass heads, $2,500; 1-Knight 3050 mixer wagon, working condition, w/scales, $2,500; 2-electric Weaver 430 stainless feed carts, $1,000 each. Cecily 802-375-5795

With Saddle, 3/16 Steel, Size 64” X 18’ $1495. Tanks Never in Ground Good Condition and Painted. OBO Will Deliver Within Reason

Farm Machinery For Sale

BUY ~ SELL ~ TRADE 570-833-5214

MESHOPPEN, PA 18630

Maine to North Carolina Forage short? Shred your corn silage with a

PleasantCreekHay.Com

Napless Distributors (888)) 223-8608

www.NaplesDistributors.com

SIPPIN ENERGY

Generators

203-880-6814

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

Farm Machinery Wanted BRILLION CULTIPACKER or seeder. 413-267-3396

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348 Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS 10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

518-768-2344

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

MORRISON'S

CUSTOM F E E D S Quality Organic and Conventional Feeds

We ship pallets of bagged organic & conventional feed to any farm in the North East by Land Air Express

Partnership!

Welsarth@Msn.com

Lower your feed cost! Save an average of 3 to 4 lbs of grain per cow per day Going from non processing to a processor. $6.00 corn. . . .

Sizes S, M, L, XL, 2X, & 3X

234 Main St., Monroe, Ct.

LANSING, NY 607-279-6232 Days 607-533-4850 Nights

TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY • UTILITY TRAILERS

PH:570-869-1551 Cell:607-759-4646 4698 ST. RT. 3004

3000 Gal Tank

USED COMBINE PA R T S K & J SURPLUS

Charles McCarthy Farm Machinery

MACFADDEN & SONS INC. 518-284-2090 • email: info@macfaddens.com

K

1000 Gal Tank

With Saddle, 10 Ga. Size 48” X 10.8” $495.

TINGLEY

• Hi-Top Work Rubbers #1300 - $17.00/pr • 10” Closure Boots #1400 - $22.00/pr • 17” Knee Boots #1500 - $26.00/pr

AMARAL FARMS 1st & 2nd cutting good quality hay, round silage bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-4506536 BIG SQUARE BALES, 1st cut, nice hay. 51” round bales net wrapped, baled tight, later cut, cheap feed. 51” round bales, made right, June hay, nice. Call for delivered price. 315737-0820 FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

FOR SALE All Grades Hay & Straw Horse & Dairy Quality Bagged Shavings & Sawdust

WILL DELIVER www.morrisonsfeeds.com

ROBERT ROLLE

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

802-633-4387

(518) 234-4052

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN GET A

• Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 19

300-6000 0 Gall Storage e Tanks

L

STOLTZFUS feeder wagons on sale, 6 gauge steel floor. 8’ by 20’ round bale hay saver feeder $3,350.00, 5-1/2’x20’ headlock feeder $3,750.00, 12 bale round bale carrier $3,500.00. 518-885-5106

1000 Gal Tank

With Saddle, 10 Ga. Size 64” X 7’6” $495.

For Sale


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

GOOD QUALITY HAY & STRAW. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802849-6266

“The Breathable Hay Cover”

LARGE SQUARE BALES, processed first & second cut. Call 802-864-5382 or 802578-7352

Hay-Guard©

STOP THE WASTE!!

• • • •

Reusable Light Weight No Condensation 10+ years life

Page 20 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Cowco, Inc. LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT North Vernon, IN

(800) 240-3868 www.cowcoinc.com

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix

Stop In & See Us at Ag Progress Booth # West 6th

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

Hay - Straw For Sale

Help Wanted

TOO MUCH HAY?

For a Progressive New Hampshire Dairy Farm

HERDSMAN

CLASSIFIEDS

MORRILL FARM DAIRY

Call Peg At

Andy Morrill 603-731-9864 Rob Morrill 603-496-4820

Penacook, NH

800-836-2888 or email

classified@leepub.com

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY & STRAW

Herdsman Wanted for 80 cow tie stall family owned dairy. Must be experienced milker and knowledgeable in calf care. References required. Salary negotiable. Call 518-398-7640 leave name and number. HIGH PROFILE NE DAIRY FARM seeks self-motivated individual to work with award-winning cows and heifers. Experience in milking, feeding, treating and record-keeping required. AI training and/or CDL would be a plus. Must understand cleanliness, organization, communication and team work. Housing & benefits provided. Salary based on experience. Email resume with references to terri@arethusafarm.com or fax 860-567-2426.

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers Heating

Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141 Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Maine to North Carolina Got free time? Sign up now to become a weekend warrior Or submit a resume for full time employment with

PleasantCreekHayEmploymentServices.com

WRITERS WANTED Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper. Knowledge of the industry a must. Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles. Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

(607)) 334-97277 Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealtyfarmsandland.com possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2318 8 - Otsego o Countyy Farm - Crop and Nursery Farm - 130 acres with 3/4 mile of river frontage, 90 acres usable with 40 acres currently in nursery trees. Balance woods and pasture. Good 2 story barn. 40x60 machinery shed. Remodeled 2 story 5 bdrm home. Awesome soils for growing trees and vegetables. Great fishing and canoeing, awesome hunting. Priced right. . Askingg $299,900. An additional 135 acres of woods 0 buyss both h parcels also available. . . . . .$475,000 4 - Nearr Cortland,, NY. 35 acres mostly wooded 2314 on a quiet road with mineral rights intact. Excellent hunting. Great investment property. Minutes to City of Cortland and the beautiful Finger Lake Winery area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $59,900 d - 2331 1 - Beautifull setting.. Madison Reduced Countyy Gentleman'ss Farm. 100 acres. 65 tillable all

Parts

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE

For More Info Go To www.morrillfarmdairy.com

Try Selling It In The

TOP QUALITY 1st cut 4x4 wrapped round bales, timothy/rye & grass/clover combination, $55.00. 413-626-1379

Hoof Trimming

1685 Cty Hwy 35 Milford, NY

Bill Konchar Cell: (618) 975-5741 Office: (607) 286-3353

Horses 2 BELGIAN GELDINGS ages 10 and 11 years old used for farming, logging, sleigh rides, hay rides, parades, very good in traffic. 413-834-2526

Livestock Equipment ALPACA SHEARING TABLE excellent condition makes shearing Alpacas easy, $590.00 OBO. Monroe, CT. Westview Farm. 203-8806814

Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

607-642-3293

Real Estate For Sale FA I R H AV E N V E R M O N T DAIRY FOR SALE. 200+ cow capacity, approx. 400 acres, Double 8 parlor, two houses & one trailer, $750,000 bare. Equipment & cattle available. Call 860-836-1524

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or bsnyder@leepub.com. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

ORGANIC DAIRY FARM/ CREAMERY, 318 acres. 8 miles from Cooperstown,NY. Two 3 bedroom homes, 100 cow freestall, Double 6 milking parlor. Many outbuilding for young stock, hay & equipment. New cheese room, aging facility & solar electric system. 200 acres fenced for grazing. $998,500. 607-2869362

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

Miscellaneous

in hay, excellent well drained soils. Balance pasture and woods. 2 story barn 30x80 with drive in mow. Box stalls for livestock. Hay storage for 4000 bales. Older 2 story 4 bedroom home partially remodeled. Farm has a very nice location 1/2 hour to Syracuse, 15 mins to Oneida. 25 mins to Oneida Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reduced d from $199,900 0 to o $189,000,, this farm will be sold - make an offer. 2325 5 - New w Listingg - Neatt and d Clean n Showplace Farm - Exceptionally nice house. Jefferson County 180 acres, 100 tillable, good soils. Good 2 story dairy barn with 43 stalls and dbl 2 milking parlor. New 48x75 Morton Building, large 2 car garage, Beautiful 2 story 4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Very well maintained home. High ceilings, big rooms, original woodwork. All on a quiet road, great farming area, close to shopping, schools, and hospitals. Farm could be certified organic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $379,000 2337 - 137 7 acree parcell off baree land. Located mins south of Utica, NY. 30 acres in fields rented to local farmer. 20 acres of pasture balance woods. 2 man-made stocked fish ponds. Lots of deer and turkey. Property would make an excellent place to build or have for the weekend. Property is mins from the Brookfield Equine Trail System. Priced right . . . . . . . .Askingg $195,000 Note* Owner would consider holding a large mortgage with a qualified buyer.


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Real Estate For Sale

Services Offered

Services Offered

Trailers

SCHOHARIE NY: 101 acre farm. Features 250 yr old 4 bedroom 2 bath stone house in original condition. Pond. Stocked stream. Private and picturesque country setting. $335,000. Call Broker- Alton Makely 518-231-0304

CANVAS PRINTS: All sizes. Mounted or Unmounted. Just bring in or send us your photo at Lee Publications. Call 518673-0101 bsnyder@leepub.com

TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

WEDDING INVITATIONS printed and designed by Lee Publications: 100 (4.5x6) Invitations including envelopes with 100 RSVP postcards. Only $150.00 +tax. We can also do smaller and larger amounts. Call for pricing and designs 518-673-0101, or bsnyder@leepub.com Also Save the Dates • Shower Invitations • Baby Announcements and more.

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com

Roofing

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Calendar of Events NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

AUG 14 Hops Production Field Day Clover Hill Farm, Gilbertville, MA. 11 am to 3 pm. Registrations will be accepted until Aug. 9 either by phone or online. The fee is

$15 and includes lunch. Contact Susan Brouillette or Heather Darby, 800-6392130 or 802-524-6501. On Internet at www.uvm.edu/ extension/cropsoil Value Added Processing Tour at Vemont Smoke & Cure Vermont Smoke & Cure, Hinesburg, VT. 6-8 pm. Open house opportunity to walk through the new Hinesburg facility and mix with others fans of valueadded meat processing. VSC will have a grill going for some tasty treats and participants are invited to bring potluck items. Contact Jenn Colby, 802-656-0858 or jcolby@uvm.edu.

1. PHONE IT IN IT IN - For MasterCard, Visa, 2. FAX American Express or Discover customers, fill out the form below completely and

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!

Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word. (Phone #’s count as one word) If running your ad multiple weeks: Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381

3. calculate the cost, enclose your check or MAIL IT IN - Fill out the attached form,

credit card information and mail to:

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

1987 LN8000 10 wheel dump truck, 17’ body, $7,900; 2005 Ford F450 cab & chassis, dual wheels, diesel, one owner, $8,100. 978-544-6105

AUG 22-23 Maine Farm Days Misty Meadows Farm, Hill Rd., Clinton, ME. It will run from 9 am to 5 pm daily. Admission is free and open to the public. A chicken lunch will be served each day sponsored by Pine Tree Camp. An entire range of displays and exhibits will be on hand for folks of all ages and interests. It is an excellent opportunity for the entire family to visit a working farm and learn about how the farm works. Visit www.kcswcd.org and select the Maine Farm Days 2012 tab for more information. AUG 23 Hopyard Design and Maintenance Field Day Addison Hop Farm, Town Line Rd. Addison, VT. 3-6 pm. Part of UVM Extensions NW Crops & Soils 2012 Field Days. Kris Anderson has been growing organic hops for three years, and will share some tip’s he’s learned along the way about design, construction and maintenance of a small hopyard. Contact Susan Brouillette, 802-524-6501 or 800-6392130 or susanbrouillette@ uvm.edu. AUG 24 Growing a Honey Business 34570 State Highway 10, Hamden, NY. Sign-in begins at 9:30 am and the program will start at 10 am, running through 4 pm. The fee for this program is $15/person or $25/farm couple. A light lunch is included. Please make check payable to Cornell Cooperative Extension and mail to PO Box 184, Hamden, NY 13786. Write “honey” on the check. Preregistration and payment is requested by Aug. 17. AUG 25 Grass Fed Seasonal Raw Milk Dairy Blue Hill Farm, 398 Blue Hill Rd, Great Barrington, MA. $30/person, w/ $5 discount for NOFA members or for registering 14 plus days before workshop. Contact Ben Grosscup, 413 549 1568 or e-mail ben.grosscup@nofamass.org On Internet at www. nofamass.org/programs/ext ensionevents/beef-dairypigs.php

AUG 28 Nutrient-Dense Forages and Soil Health Field Day Butterworks Farm, Westfield VT. 10-3 pm. Part of UVM Extensions NW Crops & Soils 2012 Field Days. Jack and Anne Lazor have been operating a dairy farm in the Northeast Kingdom since 2979, and are proud to open their farm to visitors who would like to learn more about forage crops, nutrient dense land management, soil health and amendments, and ongoing research and collaboration with UVM extension. Contact Susan Brouillette, 802-524-6501 or 800-639-2130 or susanbrouillette@uvm.edu. AUG 30 Cattle Behavior and Handling Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Rd., Grafton MA. 3-5 pm. Special guest instructor for this event is Dr. Temple Grandin, a renowned expert in livestock behavior and handling facilities. Due to limited space, this event is intended for beef cattle farmers, either those currently raising beef cattle or those with a strong interest in doing so. Cost $25. Contact Sam Anderson, 978-654-6745 mail to: sanderson@comteam.org. SEP 11 Invasive Woodland Plants Maple Wood Nursing Home Conference Room, County Complex River Rd, Westmoreland NH. 9:30 am - 1 pm. Join us for an informative presentation on identifying invasive woodland plants, discussion on the challenges and the benefits of controlling them and how to address the problems associated with them. Bring a bag lunch and come prepared to venture out! Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext. 115, email sharlene@cheshirecon servation.org. On Internet at www.cheshireconservation. org SEP 14 Taste the View Dinner & Auction Quonquont Farm, Whately, MA. 6-9 pm. To benefit CISA. Call 413-575-4680 or e-mail info@quonquont.com.

Trucks

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Place my ad in the following Zones:  Country Folks East  Country Folks West  Country Folks of New England  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle Number of weeks to run___________ Name(Print)________________________________________________________________ Farm/Company Name_________________________________________________________ Street___________________________________________County_____________________ City____________________________________________State______Zip______________ Phone_______________ _______________ ____________________________________ Fax_________________ _______________ ____________________________________ Cell_________________ _______________ ____________________________________ e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard Card # ______________________________________________Exp. Date ______________ (MM/YY)

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1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week SEP 14-30 The Big E West Springfield, MA. Call 800-745-3000. On Internet at TheBigE.com OCT 2 Building a Strong Management Team Alliant Energy Center, 1919 Alliant Energy Center Way, Madison, WI (Mendota 2 meeting room). 1 pm. Dr. Bernard Erven will outline

the three critical steps in forming an effective management team. Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1). On Internet at www.worlddairyexpo.com OCT 2-3 “Come Home to Kansas” 2012 National Angus Conference and Tour Doubletree Hotel-Airport, Wichita, Kansas. Call 816-383-5100 or sstannard@angus.org.

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 21

#722 - A nice hobby farm not far out of Morrisville. 18 acres, 2 story barn 30’x65’ with 42 stalls - barn cleaner, 16’x40’ wood silo with unloader. 7 room home with kitchen, dining room, living room, 4 bedrooms. A good buy at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$80,000 #40 - DAIRY OF DISTINCTION - Very nice 395 acre river bottom dairy farm w/240A tillable, 70 pasture & 80 woods - 350 ft. stone barn w/108 tie stalls & room for 75 young stock - 1500 gal. B.T. & 2” pipeline - 6 stall garage & 100x25 ft. carriage barn - 4 concrete silos w/unloaders & 40x80 ft. bunk silo - 3 bdrm. brick home & 2 fam. tenant house - also 5 rm. mobile home - 1 lg. pond, 2 springs & 100 ft. well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $1,500,000 - machinery available. #261 - 43.4 A. on Woodcreek Rd. - Town of Verona with 620 ft. road frontage - borders Barge Canal in back - 25 A. open & 18 A. wooded. Asking $198,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED TO $125,000 (WANTS QUICK SALE MAKE OFFER) #B-106 - This is a beautiful home that has been restored to keep its character but still have the modern conveniences. It has 4 bedrooms and a full bath upstairs. Living room and another bedroom downstairs. A family style kitchen overlooks the many gardens. It is set on 250 acres that include both sides of the road with 6600 feet of frontage on State Route 170. Over 100 acres are tillable, 22 are pasture and 130 are in woods. It includes a 2 car garage and small shed. The hill top setting provides great views. Two wind turbines that are located on the property can be added which will create a minimum income of $16,000 annually for 25 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $525,000 C-77 - 213 Acre Farm, 191A tillable, 12A woods, remainder brush lot. Level open fields presently used in hay production all on one side of a paved road in the Flat Creek area. This property includes road frontage on both ends. 8 Room farmhouse in good condition, 5BR, 2 baths, full cellar, new steel roof, front deck with L-shaped covered front porch, attached one-car garage. Old dairy barn in need of repair, two concrete stave harder silos, 20x50 with unloader, and 14x35. Separate 16x20 storage bldg., excellent drilled well with 21 gal. per minute output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $435,000 C-79 - Two-Story Colonial type home situated on 26.9 acres in the Town of Oppenheim, 13 acres wooded area, remainder open fields. Living area of 2036 sq. ft., 4BR, 1 1/2 baths, forced air heat, small woodstove, new windows, enclosed porch, vinyl siding, dug well. Also, 32x42 two-story barn for storage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $130,000

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House tackles death tax, Senate strays

Page 22 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Leaders looking for permanent estate tax relief National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Associate Director of Legislative Affairs Kent Bacus offered attendees of the 2012 Cattle Industry Summer Conference an update on recent movements in Washington, D.C., regarding the estate tax. This issue, according to Bacus, is the number one priority for NCBA, which is the oldest and largest national organization representing cattlemen and women. The issue rises to the top policy issue for family-owned small businesses, such as farms and ranches, because of the burden it places on families hoping to pass their business on to the next generation. “The estate tax is a prime example of bad tax policy and Congress should repeal. Unfortunately, we hear from some elected leaders who claim to be defenders of the little guy. Meanwhile, they avoid opportunities to kill the death tax,” said Bacus. “In order to

sustain these family businesses, the future must contain a level of certainty. The next generation cannot possible afford to take over the family business if they are taxed to death.” Bacus gave some good news to cattlemen seeking permanent relief from the estate tax. Bacus reported that Congressman Kevin Brady (R-Texas) has 218 cosponsors on his Death Tax Repeal Permanency Act. This legislation would essentially provide full and permanent relief from the tax. Senator John Thune of South Dakota also introduced a companion bill — the Death Tax Repeal Permanency Act of 2012 — in his chamber and that bill has 37 co-sponsors. They also released an updated study proving how harmful and ineffective the death tax is from the Joint Economic Committee. Bacus said the study’s key points are the estate tax continues to hurt the economy,

fails as a revenue generator, creates a barrier to economic equality and could increase revenue if it were abolished. The bad news conveyed at the conference was the recent action taken by the Senate. The Senate voted on two tax packages that will be used for messaging purposes this election season. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) led efforts to secure passage of a tax package that extends tax rates for family income up to $250,000

for a year, raises the top rate on capital gains and dividends, as well as continue several targeted tax provisions. The Reid package, according to Bacus, does not address the estate tax and would leave small business owners and ranchers vulnerable to a reversion of the pre-2001 levels of a 55 percent tax on estates worth $1 million or more. Bacus said this is unacceptable. “Most farmers and ranchers would trip the

$1 million threshold on land values alone. Land values are through the roof and all of the assets it takes to operate a farm or ranch, including livestock, farm machinery and more, would hit the majority of farm and ranch families throughout the country,” said Bacus. “This is not a tax on the wealthy. We must find permanent relief or risk taking land out of production agriculture, threatening our ability to provide food for U.S.

consumers and abroad.” Bacus said NCBA supports Representative Brady and Senator Thune in their quest to abolish the tax. Given the current political environment, however; NCBA would also support making the current tax levels of 35 percent on farms and ranchers valued at $10 million per couple. Bacus said this tax level, which is set to expire on Dec. 31, 2012, misses the majority of farmers and ranchers.

American Soybean Association statement on proposed House Farm Bill extension

With a proposed extension of the 2008 Farm Bill on the House floor, American Soybean Association (ASA) First Vice President Danny Murphy, a soybean farmer from Canton, MS, issues the following statement on this legislation: “The American Soybean Association believes that U.S. farmers and

The September Issue of

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Will Focus On: Fall Riding & Fun With Horses Pet Section Look for Mane Stream at: “Country Folks Day at the Fair ” The Fonda Fair, Fonda, NY & The Central NY Farm Progress Show, Mohawk, NY

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livestock producers need certainty in programs which help them manage risk in order to make decisions which will affect their operations over the long-term. This is particularly true today, with devastating drought conditions covering over half of the country. A oneyear extension of the 2008 Farm Bill, com-

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bined with short-term disaster assistance to livestock producers, will not provide the certainty that agriculture needs now. We need a new fiveyear farm bill with longterm risk management and disaster assistance programs. “ASA understands that a one-year extension of the 2008 Farm Bill may

be all that can pass the House before it adjourns this week. We support moving the farm bill process forward, so that a Conference can be convened in September, when Congress returns. ASA supports a one-year extension provided there are assurances that a new five-year bill can be negotiated at that time.”

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Don’t Miss These Exhibitors!!

Lancaster Farming, Inc • O-21 Lanco-Pennland • 161 Lawrence Ag Equipment • 104 Liskey Truck Sales • O-12 LnR Feed & Grain Systems • 176 May Supply • 120 Mid-Atlantic Irrigation Co., Inc • 101 Morris Distributing • 228 Morton Buildings, Inc • 115 Outback Heating, Inc • 104B Outdoor Furnace Distributing • O-2A Ownby Auction & Realty Co., Inc • 149 P. Bradley & Sons • 120A, 121 PA Country Equipment, King’s Agri Seed • 202A, 203 PBZ LLC / Crop Care / Zimmerman Cattle Control • 104A Pearson Livestock Equipment • O-13 Pioneer Hi-Bred • 129 ProAg • 153 Quality Metal Works • 170, 171 Recyc Systems, Inc • 162 Rockbridge Farmers Coop • 148 Rockydale Quarries Corp • 160 Rural Community Insurance Service • 140 Ryder Supply Company • 302 See-Mor Truck Tops & Customs • O-20 Shady Lane Curtains, LLC • 334 Sigora Solar • 158, 159 Southern Farm Supply • 173 Stone Hill Construction, Inc • 301 T.A. Seeds • 113, 114 Taylor Manufacturing • 211 Tech Mix Global • 305 The Power Connection • 136 Trissel Equipment • 107 Trouble Free Lighting • 204 Uncommon USA Inc • 131 United DHIA • 306 Valley Feed Co • 300 Valmetal Inc / Jamesway Farm Equipment • 174 Virginia Bin Service • 312 Virginia Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services • 124 Vulcan Materials Company • 313 Williams Brothers Tree & Lawn Service • 303 Wood-Mizer Products, Inc • O-9 Zimmerman’s Glasslined Storage • 151, 152

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL YOUR SALES REPRESENTATIVE OR KEN MARING AT 800-218-5586

August 13, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 23

Advanced Agra Service, LLC • 137 AGCO Corporation • 180, O-3 Agri-King • A Agri-SC • 126 Airgas • 141, 142 American Farm Products • 304 Animat, Inc • 328 Augusta Cooperative Farm Bureau • 127, 128 Bath Fitter • 226 Beverage Tractor • 100, 102 Binkley & Hurst LP • 178 C&C Farm Supply • 134, 135 Cargill Animal Nutrition • 145 Channel Bio • 317 Charvin Farm Ag Plastics • 215 Chemgro Seeds, Inc • 139 Christian Farmers Outreach • 322 Cobra Torches • 309 Country Folks CROPP / Organic Valley • 220 Cummings & Bricker, Inc • 105, 106 Dew Eze Manufacturing • O-10 Dyna Products • O-14A Farm Credit • 125 Farm Family Casualty Ins. Co • 169 Farmer Boy Ag • 118, 119 Fetterville Sales • 143 First Bank & Trust Company • 138 Fisher Auto Parts • 230 Garber Farms • O-7 General Fertilizer Equipment • 103 Grasshopper Company • 108A Growers Mineral Solutions • 155 GVM, Inc • 122 Hamilton Equipment, Inc • 109 Haybuster / Duratech • 332, 333 Headwaters Construction Co., Inc • 327, O-2AA Headwaters Soil & Water Conservation District • 132,133 Helena Chemical Company • 150 Hill Top Tire • 146 Hoard’s Dairyman • 147 Houff’s Feed & Fertilizer • 130 IBA, Inc • 112 Iva Manufacturing • H James River Equipment • 330 Koch Agronomic Services, LLC • 144 Kuhn North America, Inc • 329 L Cubed Corp dba Tam Systems • 123


Page 24 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • August 13, 2012

Coutry Folks New England 8.13.12  

Country Folks New England August 13, 2012

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