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21 May 2012 Section One of Two Volume 30 Number 9

$1.99

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Big East Regional Youth and Jackpot Shows ~ Page A3 Agricultural Day celebrated in Rhode Island ~ Page A2

Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly A16 Crop Comments A6 Moo News A7 Auctions Classifieds Farmer to Farmer DHIA / Dairy

B1 B18 B10

They are like trees planted by streams of water, bearing fruit in due season, with leaves that do not wither; everything they do shall prosper. Psalm 1:3


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Agricultural Day celebrated in Rhode Island by Sanne Kure-Jensen At the Rhode Island State House, government officials recognized the importance of the state’s $1.7 billion “green” industry. Lunchtime crowds enjoyed samples of cheese, oysters and fresh produce from nearly 50 Rhode Island farmers; agricultural and horticultural exhibitors filled the State House Rotunda on April 26. Local support for Rhode Island Ag Day, as it is affectionately known, surpassed expectations and many exhibitors ran out of samples well before 5 p.m. Department of Environmental Management (DEM) Director Janet Coit opened the afternoon ceremony by saying, “Every day is Ag Day in Rhode Island.” She said the state’s growing agricultural sector is making a significant impact in Rhode Island’s economy and putting people back to work. Coit expressed her admiration for the ingenuity and creativity of farmers and urged farmers to “brag a little” and share their stories. “While many farmers do not have large financial resources, you do have lots of passion,” She said. “I salute you!” Coit described a series of Rhode Island milestones and accomplishments. To preserve farmland and open space, 90 farms have worked with the state’s Agricultural Land Preservation Commission

Department of Environmental Management Director Janet Coit opened the afternoon ceremony by saying “Every day is Ag Day in Rhode Island.” (ALPC) to retire their development rights and keep farmland available for future generations of farmers. Significant marketing efforts have helped raise awareness of “buy local” campaigns across many food sectors including produce, meats, fiber and seafood. The state also has an active Food Policy Council helping grow the state’s sustainable food system. Rhode Island has the highest ratio of direct marketing to consumers in the nation. Now that so many farms are utilizing high tunnels to extend their growing seasons, fresh local produce is more available than ever. Four winter Farmers Markets ran this past season and more are planned for next

A crowd of farmers and agriculture advocates attended Rhode Island Ag Day at the State House. Many vendors offered samples of their products.

winter. More than 50 Farmers Markets will be open in Rhode Island this summer. Agricultural and “Green” Industry Economic Impact Study Growers and farmers are well educated and well organized through a number of groups that provide resources. These organizations and their members collaborated to research and produce a Rhode Island “Green” Industry Economic Impact Study. This study assessed the economic impact of local agriculture and typical “green” industries including golf courses, landscaping, retail garden centers and more. Agricultural Economist Tom Sproul of the University of Rhode Island and a team of students helped compile the data. “We are a small state and counted every farm and related “green” business reliant on natural resources and/or plants in Rhode Island to achieve very accurate results.” This report shows that the traditional “green industry” accounts for at least 3-4 percent of the state’s annual economy. The results are deliberately conservative according to Sproul; the team rounded down and carefully verified that no one was doublecounted. Sproul and his team of analysts found 2,570 “green” firms generated over $1 billion in annual sales, with another $760,700 in indirect sales per year for a net impact of $1,795,900. The largest sectors were landscaping firms, with annual net sales of $573,300 and retail lawn and garden centers, florists, outdoor power equipment, plant brokers and landscape suppliers with $510,300 in net annual sales. The agriculture sector including food, fiber and fuel crop growers, dairy farmers, cut flower and sod growers and wholesale nurseries had a net impact of $268,200. The Rhode Island “green” industry employs 12,370 people including farms, nurseries, landscaping firms, retail garden centers, florists, golf courses and related equipment and service suppliers. This study did not include the forestry or wood products industries or the fishing or seafood industries; there are separate projects in the works to compile their economic impact. Sproul emphasized the “green industry is not on the fringe but is an important part of the state’s $50 billion economy.” The complete final report and fact sheets will be publicized in late May.

Jan Eckhart, co-owner of Sweet Berry Farm, at the podium, recognized former RI Agricultural Partnership Director Tom Sandham, at left, for his leadership in creating a Five-Year Strategic Plan for Rhode Island agriculture. Looking on are Ken Ayars, chief of the DEM’s Division of Agriculture, and Tom Sproul, agricultural economist at the University of Rhode Island, seated. Photos by Sanne Kure-Jensen Sproul and Coit strongly urged farmers and all “green industry” members to stand up and be counted in the 2012 national agricultural census. Rhode Island Sen. Susan Sosnowski, a farmer from South Kingston, described her recent visit to a local school for Career Day. Teachers had invited her as a farmer rather than as a state senator. “The kids were really excited to hear about career opportunities in farming, biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and direct marketing.” She encouraged farmers everywhere to “Keep up the great work!” Rhode Island Rep. Deborah Ruggiero reiterated the importance of the Rhode Island Food Policy Council and the state’s buying power to impact the local food system. The state is increasingly involved in helping market and promote local, healthy foods through Farm to Fork, Farm to Hospital and Farm to School programs. Ruggiero explained that because Rhode Island is a small state, farmers and growers are at a competitive advantage in seeking Federal Rural Development Grants. Rhode Island Agricultural Partnership The chief of DEM’s Division of Agriculture Ken Ayars and Sweet Berry Farm owner Jan

Eckhart recognized retiring Director Tom Sandham for his outstanding leadership in developing and producing a comprehensive Five-Year Strategic Plan for Rhode Island’s Agriculture. Ken Payne will be taking over as interim director as Sandham retires to farming. Messages from the Farmers Sarah Partyka and her father, John Partyka, of The Farmer’s Daughter and South County Farms in South Kingstown were honored for their success with agritourism at the Farmer’s Daughter. Sarah and her staff connect with families and children who are excited to learn about gardening, farming and the environment. “Kids really love learning about how food grows and where things come from,” said Partyka. John Partyka congratulated new farmers and urged everyone to recognize “existing farmers who have withstood the test of time.” He shared his family's history of starting the subsistence farm in 1935 with 116 acres. Over time, the family purchased additional land with profits from the farm, loans from family members and through frugal management. The Partykas now produce potatoes, pick-your-own strawberries, Christmas trees, turf and more.


Big East Regional Youth and Jackpot Shows Lik-It Farm. At 7 p.m. the all breeds sale was held with a total of 27 head going under the hammer for a total of $40,125 with an average price of $1,486. Top animal in the sale was consigned by Double RD Farm and bought by Plainview Farm. Saturday’s events started with the Open Jackpot Steer Show with a total of 42 head split among six groups. The Jackpot Grand Champion steer was shown by Freddie Frey of Fleetwood, PA, while the Reserve Grand Champion steer was awarded to Ethan Oatley of Exeter, RI. At the conclusion of the steer show, May discussed selecting and fitting a heifer for show. This presentation was sponsored by Honor Show Chow, a product of Purina. Drawing on his 36 years of experience in the show ring May gave his attentive audience some personal insights as to how to best manage an animal to insure that the handlers actions in the ring do not draw the attention of the judge. The handler should be certain that the judges attention is on the animal and not the handler. Questions followed that reinforced the high level of interest that the young people in the audience had when quizzing May about the fine points of showmanship. Show officials decided that any breed with more than six entries would have its own breed show. The class summaries are as follows: Grand Champion Angus heifer was shown by Tanner D. Francis of Brooklyn, CT, while Laine Jurilewicz of Washington Depot, CT, showed the Reserve Grand Champion. Julia Weaber of Culpepper, VA, showed the Grand Champion Belted Galloway and from Harwinton, CT, Alicia Audet showed the Reserve Grand Champion. A large class of Hereford cattle was shown and in the end Grand Champion went to Sarah Carter of Canaan, NH, while Dillon Pepin from Harwinton, CT, walked away Reserve Grand Champion honors. Given that the New England Simmental Association was sponsoring the event it was not unexpected that the breed would be well represented. Grand Champion Simmental heifer was shown by Jack Oattes, Cobden,

Nine-year-old Lilly Diaz and her mother, Jodie, show off their newly acquired heifer.

One of the more challenging quiz stations was the grain table, where samples of a variety of feedstuffs in numbered glass jars were displayed for identification with no taking off the lid and sniffing or tasting allowed. ON, Canada, while Aubrie Mowat, Nepean, ON, Canada, showed the Reserve Grand Champion. Shelby Patten, Levant, ME, and Kayla Deskus of Woodstock, CT, showed the Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion respectively in the Simmental cross bred heifer class. Other breeds were grouped together to provide a higher level of competition and here again Sarah Carter of Canaan, NH, had the Grand Champion and Julia Weaber of Culpepper, VA, showed the Reserve Grand Champion. Another heifer class was the Maintainer class. A Maintainer is a Maine Anjou that is under 87.5 percent Maine Anjou. In this class the Grand Champion was shown by Melanie Simon of Poughkeepsie, NY, while the Reserve grand Champion was shown by Taylor Wierzbowski of East Aurora, NY. Grand Champion in the lowline-percentage class was awarded to Lauren Pride of Livington, ME, and the Reserve Grand Champion went to Raymond Gushee-Frost of Fryeburg, ME. A lowline is an animal that has a minimum of 25 percent pure bred of another breed with at least one registered parent. In another category the low line full blood the animal has at least 25 percent of one registered parent with the other parent registered in another breed. In this class B&B Lowlines, Honey Brook, PA, came away with top honors with the follow up awarded to P.J. Claire, Fryeburg, ME. The last class of the afternoon was the commercial heifers who were led by their Grand Champion shown by Freddie Frey, Fleetwood, PA with Reserve Grand Champion shown by Blair Allnut, Brome, QC, Canada. Wrapping up the days activities there was a Big East Family Barbecue, and Ice Cream Social and a Scotch auction. Sunday morning at 8 a.m., the Youth Hereford Steer Show and the Youth Steer Show started with a total of 10

classes in the youth steer group. When everyone had had an opportunity to present their animal to the judge in the best possible way the Overall Champion Steer award was presented to Shelby Rarick, Fleetwood, PA. Runner-up was Nicholas J. Britt, Gasport, NY, who was awarded Overall Reserve Champion Steer. The final class of the event was the Open Jackpot Heifer Show with Jack Oattes again walking away with the top prize, followed by Laine Jurgilewicz in the runner up spot. It should be noted that in the Jack Pot Class there was a regular $25 entry fee plus an additional $35 that goes into a pot and was distributed at the end of the contest. In this class the five top contestants divided the money, which amounted to $2,400. The winner received $1,800, the reserve $500 and the last three entries divided the remainder. A stimulating and challenging quiz the participants took would have been a puzzler for even the most seasoned livestock owner. One of the more challenging stations was the grain table, where samples of a variety of feedstuffs in numbered glass jars were displayed for identification with no taking off the lid and sniffing or tasting allowed. Another table had pictures of various cuts of beef and the quiz takers were asked to identify the cut and where on the carcass it came from. Sound easy? Not quite. Several contestants were observed with puzzled looks as they tried to guess which cut was which. Various instruments, tools and gadgets, each of which is used in beef operations, were displayed on another table to be identified by the quiz takers. Dozens of supporters contributed their time, talent and money to support this show. Without their help, it could not have been the success that it was. The young people who participated certainly came away with an increased appreciation of the industry in which they are now so closely involved.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

by George Looby For three days in early May the Mallory Pavilion, located on the grounds of the Eastern States Exposition in West Springfield, MA, came alive, signaling the start of the 2012 season as over 200 exhibitors descended on the fairgrounds for the Big East Regional Youth and Jackpot Shows. One of the major sponsors this year was the Southern New England Simmental Association which has as one of its primary goals, the encouragement and development of youth activities relating to especially the Simmental breed. This show is designed to foster and assist young people with a strong interest in the beef cattle industry to continue to grow and develop, insuring that the next generation of cattlemen and cattlewomen have a firm foundation on which to build. Not only were the future leaders of the industry well served by this event, but there were events that were open to everyone. Cattle from all over the Northeast and beyond were represented with the first arrivals coming in on Thursday, May 3. Events began on Friday morning with a demonstration of showmanship presented by Bob May, who also served as one of the judges. May owns and operates the May Cattle Co. in Mineral Point, WI, whose activities include fitting, showing and breeding. May’s many years of experience in the show ring made him an excellent choice to pass on some of his experiences in the ring to those who are at the early stages of their careers. Following May’s demonstration, there was a youth showmanship class in the early afternoon with 14 classes being shown. The competition was intense for all those who participated and, as is true with all competitive events, there can only be one winner. In this large group, the Grand Champion Showman was Jack Oattes of Cobden, ON, Canada. The reserve Grand Champion Showman was Tanner D. Francis of Brooklyn, CT. Prior to the all breeds sale in the evening there was a pizza party sponsored by Diamond B Angus and We-


Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Give her a rest ~ cows need lots of time for lying down by Sally Colby “Cows are busy girls … they have lots of things to do.” That’s what Dr. Nigel Cook, who manages the Cow Comfort and WellBeing program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, says about cows. Cook is interested in how cows spend their time because that time budget is directly related to lameness, which impacts production. Cook compares the pastured cow to the cow that’s in a freestall or tie stall barn. “The grazing cow’s time budget involves mostly resting — about 10 hours or less per day,” he said. “The rest is eating — a grazing cow will typically spend eight hours a day chomping away at foliage. That’s a lot of time.” In a freestall barn, when the cow isn’t lying down, she’s standing in a stall. However, the cow is exposed to concrete in alleys and transfer lanes. “Standing on concrete is hard on cows,” said Cook. “Their feet weren’t designed for that. As a consequence, we see lameness.” The freestall cow’s time budget involves a big chunk of

lying time, but eating is greatly reduced; from eight hours to about four hours. Cook says that the cow should be able to ‘use’ that extra time for rest, but that isn’t always the case. “When the cow isn’t lying down, she’s often standing on concrete,” he said. “I think we need to reduce that.” Cook referenced a study conducted on dairies in British Columbia, California, New York and Pennsylvania that examined the relationship between housing and lameness. “Lameness problems (cows walking with a noticeable limp) are in the range of 28 to 55 percent of cows,” he said, “with lying times between 10.5 and 11 hours/day in freestall or drylot facilities. This leads to hock abrasions and other problems.” A more ideal situation is for cows to have 12 hours of resting (lying) time. “They need additional resting time to compensate for the increased exposure to concrete in alleyways and other barn areas,” said Cook. “In a grazing situation, 10 hours of rest a day for a grazing cow is acceptable. Do they choose to rest less because they don’t need to, or is it because

Cover photo by George Looby Judge Bob May sizes up a steer class at the Big East Regional Youth and Jackpot Shows at the Eastern States Exposition in West Springfield, MA, May 3-6.

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470 Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., Production................................Mark W.Lee, 518-673-0132...........................mlee@leepub.com V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas........................................suethomas1@cox.net. .......................................949-599-6800 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

Cows in freestall housing have improved hock scores, less lameness and higher production when stalls are comfortable. Photo by Sally Colby

they’re so busy eating that they don’t have time?” Cook says that he doesn’t know the answer to that question, but says that it doesn’t look good if cows in freestall systems average only 10 hours of rest per day. Research done in Minnesota showed that the amount of time out of the pen for milking was associated with increased lameness. “Herds managing cows with smaller parlors and larger groups and haven’t invested in parlor through-put efficiency see more lameness,” said Cook. “For the non-lame cow, we have to get it done in three hours — one hour per milking. When there’s more than three hours out of the pen, we lose lying time. The cow has to eat, socialize and drink — that’s where we lose time.” Stocking density also plays a role in resting time. “Cows can’t get 12 hours of rest in a situation where there aren’t enough stalls,” said Cook. “With more cows than stalls, cows are battling for stalls — trying to enter a stall that’s occupied, then leaving for a while, taking a drink, then returning to try again. In crowded situations, subordinate cows can only get into stalls when dominant cows give up the stall.” The bottom line is that stall comfort

— from the cow’s perspective — must be improved. “If we’re going to improve stall comfort to persuade cows to go in and rest for 12 hours a day,” said Cook, “the most important thing we need to do is fix stall comfort and surface.” Cook referred to a study done at the university that measured resting behavior. “Resting behavior is different on sand and mattresses,” he said. “On a softer surface, cows lie down for longer. It’s the wooden chair/La-Z-Boy effect. You’re going to fidget less in a La-Z-Boy than on the kitchen chair.” Cook says that cows are the same — they have a longer resting ‘bout’ before they have to change position. “If we want about 12 hours of rest per day, we’re shooting for about a dozen of these bouts a day. What we see in sand herds is fewer bouts because each bout is longer. In mattress herds, the bouts are shorter and cows have more of them. There’s a difference in the way animals are getting those hours of rest. Does it matter? If you’re a young, fit heifer, getting up and down is pretty easy. I think it matters if you’re older and stiffer.” Cook added that when cows must get up additional times in a day, the consequence is loss of total resting time.

Agroforestry workshop set for June 7 The Cheshire County Conservation District, in collaboration with Davey Wichland has scheduled an Agroforestry workshop for 10 a.m. to noon, June 7, at Wichland Woods, 64 High Street, Keene, NH, to explore the mycological possibilities of woodlands. Host and speaker Davie Wichland teach participants about eatable fungi as part of the landscape. A Natural Resource Conservation Service representative will be available to answer any questions on available programs,

like the Forest Management Plan, and how it can benefit long-range woodland plans. Attendees should come prepared to venture into the woods to explore mushroom farming at Wichland’s home site. For more information on this workshop, or to register, call the Conservation District at 603-756-2988, ext. 115, e-mail sharlene@cheshireconservation.org, or visit www.cheshireconservation.org.


Subcommittee hearing: Credit access is critical for farmers (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides direct and guaranteed loans to producers who cannot obtain credit from commercial lenders. Much of the loan dollars from FSA are reserved for beginning farmers and ranchers who do not have the required resources to obtain financing from FCS or commercial lenders. Additionally, local banks provide an important source of credit for rural constituents. “Today we heard that ensuring a stable food supply is directly connected to farmers and ranchers having access to steady sources of credit. As we prepare to write the next Farm Bill, it is critical that we continue to provide a credit system that meets the needs of our agricultural producers and rural communities,” said Chairman Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE). “I was particularly pleased to have an urban farmer and entrepreneur, Mr. Michael Walton from Cleveland, provide my colleages a different perspective. Urban farmers are legitimate agricultural producers who happen to live and farm outside of the traditional rural environment. They are filling an increasingly important role in the economic well being of urban areas As we update the Farm Bill, I am urging my colleagues to give serious consideration to the needs of urban farmers. Access to credit can make or break rural farm operations, and urban farm operations are no different,” said Ranking Member Marcia L. Fudge (D-OH).

Shown here doing the dunking honors on stage are, from left, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt), Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin, Burlington, Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger, and emcee/deejay Tim Kavanaugh of Star 92.9. In front of the stage are Make-a-Wish Vermont board members Terrell Titus, Joe Hameline, Mark Wallace, Peter Young and interim CEO Leslie Williams. Photo by David Eaton

World record set in cookie dunk The dunking of a giant cookie into a very tall glass of milk kicked off a simultaneous cookie dunk by 1,136 participants at May 12’s Great Cookie Dunk during Burlington, VT’s annual Kids Day in Battery Park. The dunk event, sponsored by the New England Dairy Promotion Board’s

Keep Local Farms organization, set a world’s record, and also raised money for Make-a-Wish Vermont. Cookies were donated by Tipped Cow Cookies, and milk by HP Hood, which provided dunk-sized cartons to all participants and provided on-site support.

Advocacy must engage the congregation by Bob Stallman Farm Bureau’s brand of advocacy has been a key part of my entire adult life. I first got involved with the organization when I was relatively young and was having problems with the state of Texas over water rights on my farm. I traveled to a committee hearing in Austin — the first time I’d been to a hearing and the first time I’d been to the state capitol — and met Farm Bureau representatives testifying on behalf of landowners’ water rights. I realized then and there that they were advocating for me and my rights. When I got home, I took a deliberate step to become involved in my home county Farm Bureau in Colorado County, Texas. I saw first-hand that farmers and ranchers have to be the ones to stand up for agriculture to influence decisions that affect us, otherwise plenty of other people would be more than happy to make those decisions for us. Now, I can’t imagine my life if that hearing in Austin had never happened. Since those early days at the Colorado County Farm Bureau, I’ve been blessed to travel our great nation, and the world on behalf of Farm Bureau members. From the formality of congressional hearings on Capitol Hill, to the international flavor of world trade negotiations, I still feel

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation most comfortable and at home when I’m headed down a country highway to a friendly, local school cafeteria for a county Farm Bureau meeting. The grassroots level is where all true agricultural advocacy begins. As I hear the voices and soak in the energy from these grassroots Farm Bureau meetings, it gives me a personal connection to the issues I deal with. Most of the time what they have to say is good, some of the time it’s not. That’s the beauty of Farm Bureau, there’s always room for healthy debate. But in all of my travels, I have never met a farmer without something to say, or more importantly, not willing to get involved to help further our grassroots process. It’s this commitment of our grassroots members who play an active role in U.S. agriculture policymaking that makes Farm Bureau one of the most successful advocacy organizations in this nation. As Farm Bureau members, it is ingrained in us to be actively involved and to fight for what we believe in and for what we think will better our pro-

fession and our country. We are not ones to rest on our laurels while others do the work. We are also not the types to make a lot of noise about an issue and stop there. Farm Bureau members roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty when it comes to matters that are close to our hearts. They talk to their neighbors and other members of their community. And they share their personal stories through many platforms, traditional and new. This, to me, is what advocacy is all about. But, it doesn’t stop there. The future of upholding agriculture lies in farmers and ranchers being able to communicate in an even deeper and more meaningful way with consumers. We are being asked to fully take in the consumer point of view. We are being asked to answer questions in a meaningful and responsive way. Times are changing. Consumers have not only grown more interested — but have greater influence — in the type of food they consume and how it is produced.

Unfortunately, without the cultivation of deeper connections with consumers, many are apt to view farmers as the unfortunate puppets of Big Ag, because that is pretty much the scope of the emotionally charged messages they read and hear from those planting seeds of doubt about today’s agriculture. It truly is time for a consumer intervention, but one that makes significant and meaningful connections through the qualities of shared values, mutual respect and common ground. The two-way conversation needs to become a connection built on a foundation of understanding and ideals. I’ve learned many things in my agriculture career. For instance, it never rains when you need it to and there will always be more taxes. More importantly, I’ve learned that farmers and ranchers are the best advocates for their land, their animals and the food they produce. But to be our best advocates, we have to stop preaching to the choir and engage the congregation. It may not be easy and it may not always be comfortable, but it is the best way to ensure the future of those who follow in our chosen profession of agriculture. Bob Stallman, a rice and cattle producer from Columbus, Texas, is president of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

On May 10, Representative Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE), Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight, and Credit held a public hearing to learn more about how credit programs are working for farmers and how they should continue in the 2012 Farm Bill. Two of the witnesses, a beginning farmer from Nebraska and an urban farmer from Ohio, explained how important it is for agricultural producers to have access to credit to both start and support their operations because of the risks inherently involved with farming. While other witnesses representing the Farm Credit System and commercial lenders described the important role they play for economic growth in rural communities. A number of institutions provide credit to our nation’s farmers, ranchers, and rural constituents. Congress established the Farm Credit System (FCS) in the Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916 to provide a reliable source of credit to agricultural producers, certain agriculture-related businesses, and rural homeowners. The Federal Agriculture Mortgage Corporation (“Farmer Mac”) provides credit for agricultural real estate, rural housing, and rural utility loans on the secondary loan market. Both FCS and Farmer Mac are regulated by the Farm Credit Administration (FCA), which is an independent federal agency. The U.S. Department of Agriculture


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

French farmer finds fabulous fungus A new, organic fertilizer created in France’s Averyon region utilizes a specially developed strain of fungus to speed up organic decomposition without any of the harmful side-effects of chemical fertilizer. Already in use by 5,000 of France’s 350,000 farmers and becoming a hot item on the international market, it just may step up to challenge the global dominance of chemical fertilizers. One day, a little over 10 years ago, while on a walk in his farm, French horse breeder Marcel Mezy discovered a natural fertilizer material which could replace much of the chemical fertilizer in use today. In the soil surrounding mushrooms growing under a certain kind of tree, he discovered a special kind of fungus which could speed up the natural decomposition of dead vegetation, as well as livestock manure. By isolating the

mold spores of these mushrooms, little by little, through selective breeding, he developed a fungus strain which would reorganize the treated organic matter of decaying materials. The resulting organic acids make the end product compost a much more nourishing plant food. Early on, Marcel tested the finished product compost by applying it to pasture grazed by Aubrac cattle, indigenous dual-purpose cows and their calves. By working with cooperating livestock growers, he determined that this special compost… when applied to manure bedding packs… greatly accelerated their rate of biological decomposition. In much less time than normal, these materials had become soil amendments ready to nourish cropland, including pasture. After 10 years of using composts “created” by these special fungi, animals consuming the resulting forages have proven to be

healthier than livestock not so privileged. Farmers using the special fungus in making their compost typically experience almost no vet bills. One of Mr. Mezy’s customers, an Aubrac cattle breeder named Matthieu Causse, commented, “We have lived through wasteful, sometimes poorly managed production, as we need to feed a growing population, whatever the costs. It’s only later when we face the consequences that we realize our mistakes. I always say that is necessary to question oneself. This (Marcel’s product) has revolutionized our operation”. Divulging the formula of this wonder fertilizer is out of the question. Thus the factory’s doors must remain closed to the public. Clearly the actual specs of the carefully bred fungi can be legitimately considered intellectual property of this French horse breeder. Nearly 5,000 French farmers are using Marcel’s microbial preparation. So he is optimistic that his product could prove extremely beneficial to Africa’s sub-Saharan farmers, where sustainable solutions to agricultural problems have been conspicuous by their

absence. More often than not, most third world nations, not just sub-Saharan, have seldom benefited from the so-called Green Revolution, which was brought about by petroleum and its by-product fertilizers and ag chemicals. What I find interesting about Mr. Mezy’s innovation is that he located the parent stock from mushrooms growing next to trees. When I researched a column, written this past winter, that dealt with truffle mushrooms in Europe (as well as the U.S.), I learned that the root systems of certain trees create an environment which makes spores of extremely valuable truffles

feel very much at home. (He may be keeping secret what kind of trees these were, that harbored these unique mushroom spores.) I believe that Averyon is pretty close to some of the prime truffle-producing real estate in France. I also believe that Mr. Mezy’s discovery/invention will benefit a lot more people than the comparatively few folks who enjoy outlandishly priced truffles, and even bargain-basement truffles priced at $100 per pound. Readers wishing to check out Mezy’s story directly can visit the online video at www.care2. com/greenliving/newfertilizer-revolutionizes-

french-agriculture .html#ixzz1v2KD0KZY. The high spots of Marcel’s story I had to transcribe from this website, which is actually a video, fortunately in English. Transcribing is not something at which I excel. I remember during Zoology 102 at Cornell, I missed a lecture and borrowed the notes of a friend who did attend the class. The lecture lasted only an hour, but it took me about an hour-and-ahalf to copy my friend’s notes… and he wrote quite a bit neater than I did. I don’t recall missing any other Zo 102 lectures, but I still only passed the course by the skin of my teeth.

Funding offered The Center for Dairy Excellence is now offering up to $1,000 in funding, as well as support for identifying appropriate resources, to farm families assembling teams to improve milk quality, animal health and to meet drug residue standards. Visit www.centerfordairyexcellence.org and click on “Producer,” then “Profit Team” for an application. Source: Friday Facts: May 11

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take in from it will often result in spare acreage for you to mechanically harvest feed for later use — less purchased feed! I went over this last month, here it is a nut shell: dry matter desired for the cows divided by what is standing there = square footage needed. Even if sizing paddocks for 100 percent dry matter intake from pasture (like for growing heifers) I find most groups of animals are in way too much area. That wasted area could become hay or baleage! Pasture is the healthiest feed because of the bovine digestive enzymes present in the gut and it makes the cows exercise and move around to harvest it. Probably the best aspect to pasturing cows is that they can pick and choose from among a variety of live, growing plants — rather than only consume a constant supply of stored, fermented

feeds. The variety of plants that they will consume no doubt includes what people commonly call “weeds”. Yet I am no longer sure what the definition of a weed really is. The conventional definition is a plant growing where we don’t want it to. But if animals eat it, then couldn’t such a plant be considered a feed source? And what if the plant that is readily eaten also contains nutrients that rival or exceed those found in alfalfa, ryegrass or clover? Then the “weed” might even be considered beneficial to their overall diet, providing both essential nutrients in addition to possible medicinal components. While not many projects are funded to study the nutritional content of “weeds” for herbivores like cows, sheep, goats and horses, there are some available. In a 2006 study, pasture “weeds” analyzed on New Zealand’s Massey

Moo News a Newsletter of

University organic and conventional dairy farms showed most “weeds” being the same or better feed quality (in terms of ADF) and higher macroand micro-nutrients than their perennial ryegrass and white clover stands. In terms of macro and micro nutrients: chicory had significantly higher levels of P, S, Mg, Na, Cu, Zn, B; narrow leaf plantain had higher levels of P, S, Ca, Na, Cu, Zn, Co; and dandelion had significantly higher amounts of P, Mg, Na, Cu, Zn, B. In a study done by Jerry Brunetti (see w w w . a g r i dynamics.com), common “weeds” were compared

to alfalfa. In terms of macro- and micro-nutrients: nettle leaf showed better results than alfalfa in 13 measurements: protein, N:S, ADF, TDN, NEL, Ca, P, K, S, Fe, Zn, Mn, and B; dandelion was better in 12 measurements, comfrey in 10, with chicory and plantain better in 8 measurements compared to alfalfa. In an old study from 1933 done in Oklahoma, all the “weeds” were higher in N, P and Ca than the native grasses and they found that young plants are higher in mineral nutrients and nitrogen than older plants. Their overall conclusion is that “the presence of these weeds in

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the hay would increase the total mineral content of the forage and under many conditions this effect would improve rather than injure its feeding value.” Secondary plant metabolites in fresh plants (pasture) can provide medicinal qualities and animals instinctively search out plants that are high in condensed tannins which help repel internal worms. Plants high in condensed tannins include the chicory mentioned above. Then there are the non-bloating legumes with high tannins such as birdsfoot trefoil, lespedeza, and sanfoin. All have

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Hi Folks, As spring happens, life unfolds in its many forms. And with plants this is especially true. While it hasn’t been terribly warm in the northeast, everything is green at this point and growing. Crops are being planted and harvested already. These are the crops that we intend to feed to the cattle as their primary source of nutrition for the time of year when green plants are no longer growing. But during the mid-spring through early-autumn we should be thinking of pasture as the main feed. Why? For one, it is a cheap feed. But probably more importantly it provides a diverse diet which the cows appreciate — wouldn’t you? Pasture is cheap feed because it is harvested by the cows themselves. They also fertilize the land. Matching what is standing there to what you desire your cows to


Subcommittee focuses on specialty crop and nutrition programs during D.C. Farm Bill hearing On May 8, Representative Jean Schmidt, Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Nutrition and Horticulture, held a hearing to continue receiving input on agricultural programs in preparation for writing the 2012 Farm Bill. This hearing focused on specialty crop and nutrition programs. The first panel of witnesses included growers and representatives of the specialty crop com-

munity to discuss the programs under Title X of the 2008 Farm Bill. They include the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, Pest and Disease Prevention, the National Clean Plant Network and others. Specifically, they explained how programs are working to enhance the competitiveness of specialty crops from research to marketing and promotion, as well as how they are working to address plant threats

such as disease, pests, and pathogens. The second panel of witnesses discussed the various nutrition programs under the Subcommittee’s jurisdiction. The nutrition title accounts for nearly 80 percent of the entire farm bill spending. The primary nutrition assistance program is the Supplemental Nutrition Assurance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps. SNAP helps supplement the food budget

of low-income households and is designed in such a way that it expands to help those households during economic downturns and contracts as the economy improves. Participation in SNAP has risen by nearly 77 percent — from 26 million in 2007 to more than 46 million individuals currently. The U.S. spent $33 billion on SNAP in fiscal year 2007 and spending has more than doubled to nearly $76 bil-

lion in fiscal year 2011. Other nutrition programs within the Subcommittee’s jurisdiction that the U.S. Department of Agriculture administers are the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP), the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP), and the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP). “With soaring deficits and an unfathomable na-

tional debt, we must be mindful of this grave fiscal situation. In order for us to reauthorize and craft responsible farm programs, it is our duty and responsibility to ensure that every dollar spent is a wise dollar spent. Investing wisely in specialty crops and ensuring that nutrition programs are being administered effectively is critical at this time,” said Chairman Jean Schmidt (ROH).

cool damp weather, horsetail, horse chestnut, false hellebore, jimpson weed (thorn apple), mountain laurel, common milkweed, horse nettle, deadly nightshade, wilted red maple leaves, pokeweed, oak acorns, white snake root, water hemlock, and the garden yew bush. Unless starving, herbivores normally avoid such plants. If seen these plants really should be removed. In pastures that are un-even in growth with normal plants (forages and common “weeds”) that might have plants older than others, consider pre-clippping a field and letting the plants wilt. This will make everything more palatable to the animals and also reduce the bloat potential of legumes. Pre-clip about 4 hours before grazing. Do not pre-clip pastures with the previously mentioned toxic plants! While you’re out moving up fence, see what the cows have eaten in the last paddock. It’ll most likely surprise you. It’s fun to watch herbi-

vores eating out on pasture and along the mar-

gins of laneways — and by their sleek hair coat,

good muscle definition and health stripes, you’ll

know that you are treating them well.

Page 8 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Moo from A7 shown in live animal studies (not test tubes) to decrease internal worm burdens that are so common in weaned groups of heifers placed on the same pasture year after year — areas where parasites are just waiting for them time and time again. I have observed that cows, heifers and steers will readily eat true forages and weeds — if they are in a young stage of life. Once a plant starts going to seed, most animals won’t eat them unless forced to (by starvation or simply nothing else to eat). From the old Oklahoma study that concluded young plants have more nutrients and the New Zealand and Jerry Brunetti’s study that showed which and how much of each nutrient is present, it is reasonable to state that having a true variety of plants in the pasture is quite beneficial for cattle. Do keep in mind, however, that there do exist truly toxic plants. These include bracken fern, wild cherry leaves that are wilted, ergot growing in small grains during

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CNCPS evolves; v6.1 maintains or improves production and profitability with lower crude protein tabolizable protein supple from feed protein. CNCPS v6.1 also is more accurate and precise in estimating metabolizable energy (ME) and metabolizable protein (MP) allowable for milk with a lower prediction bias. “Together, these changes allow nutritionists to formulate diets lower in CP while still meeting the MP requirements of the cow and maintaining milk yield and components, provided the cattle, forages and feeds are properly categorized,” Dr. Van Amburgh said. Guidelines for evaluating diets with CNCPS v6.1 include: 1. Inputted dry matter intake should be within the range of CNCPS and the National Research Council (NRC) predictions. If it is not, bodyweight, environment, and feed amounts should be reviewed. 2. Rumen ammonia should be between 100 percent and 150 percent. Diets high in hay silage

might have rumen ammonia as high as 200 percent given ingredient availability limitations. Although from an efficiency perspective this is unacceptable, it is realistic depending on total forage availability. 3. Peptide balance can be ignored. 4. Consideration for urea cost can be minimized. A urea cost of less than 0.25 Mcal/d should be targeted. 5. Non-fibrous carbohydrates for lactating dairy cow diets can vary 30 percent and 42 percent depending upon the sources. The use of sugar, starch or soluble fiber should be by user preference. Given that cattle require fermentable carbohydrate, sources of fermentable carbohydrate should vary with local availability and pricing. 6. ME and MP allowable milk should be within 1 kg of each other and should match the observed milk before any ration changes are made. For growing cat-

tle, MP allowable gain should be 0 to 250 grams greater then ME allowable gain. For replacement heifers, lactic acid should be kept to less than 3 percent of dry matter. Data from the 1980s suggests a direct link between lactic acid intake and empty body fat composition in growing cattle. 7. Physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) should be greater than 22 percent

dry matter for lactating dairy cows and 8 percent-10 percent for feedlot cattle. 8. Lysine should be greater than 6.5 percent MP and methionine greater than 2.2 percent MP. 9. The lysine-to-methionine ratio for maximum milk protein yield should be between 2.802.95:1 10. Total unsaturated fatty acid intake should be monitored. Values

greater than 500 g/d can be a risk factor coupled with quantity and quality of forage NDF. Lower quality forages and/or lower quantities of forage NDF fed increase the risk of milk fat depression. 11. CNCPSv6.1 has implemented the Dairy NRC recommendations for minerals and vitamins, as a dietary supply including bioavailability. NRC recommendations should be followed.

VGSA hosting 2012 wool pool for Vermont shepherds in June The Vermont Sheep and Goat Association is hoping to amass 8,000 pounds of Vermont wool to attract a buyer to Vermont. Producers will drop off their wool to a designated location (most likely Vermont Technical College in Randolph) and work with volunteers to appropriately bag and label the wool. The wool will be weighed and a check will be sent to the producer within a month of drop off. Each producer’s wool will be graded individually, and receive current market prices. To participate, send an e-mail with approximately how many fleeces you have, the breed, an average weight of one of your fleeces (or an estimate of the total weight that you plan to bring) to Karl Ross, VSGA president, kandk_ross@yahoo.com . When shearing, make sure to tell your shearer and be sure to keep your wool clean and skirt out belly wool. The belly wool and top knots can be saved and sold as tags. Learn more and stay informed by checking in at www.vermontsheep.org.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

The Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS) continues to evolve with improved understanding of ration formulation and the publication of new research. Version 6.1 allows nutritional professionals to reduce dietary crude protein levels while maintaining or improving production and profitability, according to Michael E. Van Amburgh, Associate Professor, Department of Animal Science, Cornell University. “Between analytical improvements, error corrections, and new research being implemented within the CNCPS framework, model accuracy has been improved,” Dr. Van Amburgh said. “The resulting changes allow nutritionists to reduce dietary crude protein (CP) levels while maintaining or improving production and profitability.” CNCPS v6.1 includes improved passage rates, feed chemistry and error corrections. As a result, it predicts a greater me-


Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

ASA urges speedy Senate consideration of Farm Bill In a letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NE) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), the American Soybean Association (ASA) and stakeholder groups from across agriculture urged the Senate to bring the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012, more commonly known as the Farm Bill, to the floor for consideration as quickly as possible. “The stakeholders we represent need to know details of the programs which will be in effect in 2013 as soon as possible,” the letter stated. “Timely action will also enhance prospects for completing new legislation this year rather than needing to extend current program authorities.” The groups noted that the proposed legislation’s impact will not be limited to farm communities. “This is one piece of legislation upon which all Americans depend, urban as well as rural,”

said the groups. Additionally, the groups underscored their collective goal of passing a farm bill this year, expressing a balanced desire to achieve organizational goals while also succeeding as a larger agricultural community. “With limited time remaining before expiration of current

program authorities, time is of the essence,” wrote the groups. “While each of our respective organizations will continue to work to accomplish our key priorities, the farm bill must move forward.” Source: ASA Weekly Leader Letter for Thursday, May 10

WASDE report shows more corn Recently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released the World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report for May. The report presents USDA’s initial assessment of the U.S. and world supply and demand prospects and prices for the 2012-2013 crop season. The season average farm price for corn is projected at $4.20-$5 per bushel, down sharply from the 2011-2012 record at $5.95-$6.25 per bushel. The first guess of corn production for 2012 is expected at 14.8 billion bushels due to a projected 5.1 million-acre increase in harvested acres and an expectation for higher yields. World corn production is also projected to increase. This could limit the increase in corn exports for the U.S. Source: Friday Facts: May 11

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1993 Ford New Holland 7840 cab, air, SLE, power shift, 7487 hrs, like new, 20.8x38 Goodyear super traction radials, 800 hrs, on new engine with turbo, very very sharp and clean, runs ex . .$16,000

2002 CIH RBX 451 silage special (same as NH) 4x5 electronic wrap wide pickup head, bale ramps, extra sharp, clean, low usage, off small farm . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000

1998 New Holland TN90F MFWD, cab, air,5947 hrs narrow orchard tractor 420/70R/28 rears 280/70R/20 fronts creeper super steer dual remotes runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1997 New Holland 7635 MFWD, 2700 hrs cab, air, 86 hp, 540 + 1000 PTO 24 speed Quicke 310 loader clean runs ex . .$24,500 1989 Ford TW 15 MFWD, cab, air, series 2 20.8x38s and 16.9x28s 10 front weights and rear weights, 6180 hrs 3 remotes very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,000 1987 Ford TW15 series 2 MFWD, cab, air, only 3821 hrs, like new 18.4x38 rears 3 remotes dual pto original runs ex . . . . . .$24,500 1977 Ford 9700 2WD cab, air, 5417 hrs, new 460/85R/38 rears dual power dual remotes and pto clean original runs ex . . . . .$12,500 1998 MF 6180 110 hp, MFWD, cab, air, 32 speed dynashift only 1225 hrs, 4 remotes 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials quicke alo 6755 SL loader one owner sharp ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,500 1979 MF 2675 2WD cab, air, 24 speed power shift like new 18.4x38s dual pto and remotes 4095 hrs, very very clean runs ex .$10,000 1967 MF 135 diesel new 13.6x28 tires dual remotes 3588 hrs extra nice and clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 1967 MF 135 diesel 14.9x28 tires power steering multi power very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 2008 McCormick MTX120 MFWD, cab, air, 118 hp, 16 speed power quad LHR, 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials 2591 hrs with L165 SL loader very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$47,500 2007 CIH Maxxum 110 MFWD, cab, air, 16x16 power shift LHR, like new 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 Michelin radials 1160 hrs, front weights and fenders very very sharp like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$47,500 2005 CIH JX95 MFWD, cab, air, 80 hp, 841 hrs, 18.4x30 and 12.4x24 Goodyear super traction radials front fenders dual remotes like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,500 1984 IH 684D only 2317 original hrs ex 18.4x30 rears roll bar and canopy with ex CIH 2250 quick tatch loader joystick very clean original one owner hobby farmer ex tractor . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1983 Case 2290 cab, air, 129 hp 20.8x38s 540+1000 pto 5400 hrs, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 1977 IH hydro 86 diesel new 18.4x34s dual remotes ex running good hydro clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1981 White 4-175 4x4 5641 hrs. 2002 cat 3208 engine 210 HP, 3ph pto quick coupler ex 20.8x38s runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 White 2-105 MFWD, cab, new 20.8x38 and 16.9x26 radials with slef levling loader clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 1977 White 2-105 cab, 4985 hrs, 3 remotes ex 20.8x38 radials front weights original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 2001 NH BB940 3x3 square baler last bale ejector, roller bale chute applicator knotter fans real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 New Holland 570 baler hydraulic bale tension hydraulic drive bale thrower extra nice very low usage baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 2 New Holland 575 wire tie balers hydraulic bale tension pickup heads and hitch with NH 77 pan type kicker real sharp ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000 each 2005 CIH RBX 452 4x5 silage special round baler net wrap and twine tie hydraulic wide pickup bale ramp only 3820 bales real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 2003 New Holland BR750 4x6 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps netwrap endless belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,000

2000 New Holland 648 silage special 4x5 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps ex belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 1998 NH 644 silage special wide pickup head bale ramps twine and netwrap 14000 bales very clean ex original one owner . . .$8,500 1998 New Holland 644 silage special 4x5 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps ex belts twine real nice clean sharp baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Claas 66 4x5 roll baler wide pickup head ex bale age baler ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,750 2009 JD 582 silage special 4x5 round baler crop cutter edge to edge mesh wrap or dual twine wide pickup 6700 bales very sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 2004 JD 467 4x6 silage special round baler, mega wide pickup dual twine, 11000 bales gauge wheels push bar ex cond . . . .$12,500 2001 JD 467 4x6 silage special round baler mega wide pickup dual twine gauge wheels and push bar ex cond . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 2000 JD 446 4x4 round baler baleage kit like new belts ex .$8,500 1996 JD 466 round baler 4x6 netwrap or twine wide pickup head bale ramps ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 Case IH 3450 4x5 round baler very nice clean . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 2007 New Holland 1412 discbine impeller conditioner very clean ex low usage discbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 2006 NH 1411 discbine rubber rolls 540 pto very low usage real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,000 2005 JD 530 impeller discbine hydra angle on head real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 Late model Kuhn KC 4000G center pivot discbine rubber rolls ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 NH 38 flail chopper real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,750 CIH No 10 flail chopper nice one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Fransguard SR4200p tandem axle hydraulic lift 13 ft 6 in width rotary hay rake very little use like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 Deutz Fahr KS2.42 rotary rake hydraulic lift . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 New Holland 258 hayrake rubber mounted teeth in ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000 Kvernland taarup 17 ft hydraulic fold tedder ex cond 2 years old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Fella TH540T 17 ft hydraulic fold hydraulic tilt hay tedder just like new hardly used at all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Taarup 90715 tandem rotary rake rakes 1 or 2 windrows brand new never used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 Kuhn GF5001 TH hydraulic fold 17 ft hay tedder ex cond low usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Fanex 500 17 ft manual fold up hay tedder ex cond . . . . . .$2,000 NH 144 windrow inverter very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 20.8x42 T-rail clamp on duals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 20.8x38, 18.4x38 and 18.4x34 clamp on duals Parmiter TR35 trailer type bale wrapper self loading arm very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6250 Wifo bale grabber hydraulic with quicke euro style quick tatch like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 JD 840 self leveling loader mounting brackets for JD 7000 series tractor high volume bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$,7,500 Brand new NH 62lb loader fits TM NHS’s or MXM case IH never used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000

Bures Bros. Equipment

23 Kings Highway Ext., Shelton, CT 06484

1-203-924-1492

useful training tools, BestInClassDairies.com provides dairy operations with access to external resources, including industry news and up-to-date market information for milk, cheese and butter.

Producers can enroll in and get more information about the Best in Class Dairies program by contacting their Merial sales representative or visiting www.BestInClassDairies.com.

Feeding wet calves for optimal growth This Tip of the Week comes from DCHA member Hugh Chester-Jones, PhD. Professor in Dairy and Beef Production Systems at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Chester-Jones, offered some useful tips on feeding wet calves for optimal growth. Holstein calf growth standards According to the DCHA Gold Standards, newborn calves should double their birth weight by 60 days of age and a frame growth goal of 4 inches. A goal of 1 pound per day daily gain within the first 2 weeks is also recommended. Calf and heifer growers are urged to keep track of the calf’s growth using devices such as scales, tape measure and stick measuring. There are many variables to consider when rearing calves, and there are several that the grower needs to emphasize. According to Dr. Chester-Jones, there are five C’s of successful calf rearing: • Colostrum • Cleanliness • Consistency • Calories • Comfort Dr. Chester-Jones further discussed the liquid feeding source option, which consists of whole milk and milk replacers. For growers who prefer the whole milk option, it is essential to make sure there is no contamination after the pasteurization process. When using milk replacer, which is considered conventional, intensive or moderately intensive, there are a few factors for the grower to consider. The nutrient content for milk replacers should range between 20-28 percent of crude protein and 15-22 percent of fat. If milk replacers are being used for feeding, it is important to limit the use of medicated milk replacers to a 1:1 neoterramycin for 14 days if medication is being used. Last but not least, it is vital to make alternative nutrient additives available. Feeding recommendations The volume of liquid feed source should range between 8 to 14 percent of birth weight with 12.5 to 17 percent solids. The feeding frequency for individual calves should be 2x daily; multiple meals with group feeding. It is also advised to make any necessary adjustments for cold or hot environmental conditions. Dr. Chester-Jones recommended increasing milk solids and volume during cold weather. However, in hot weather conditions, emphasis should be placed on water intake. Starter Feed - complete, texturized or pellet Example of nutrient content - 18-22 percent crude protein, 7-9 percent ADF, 14-17 precent NDF, 3-4 percent fat, 0.8-1 percent Ca, 0.5-0.6 percent P, other vitamins and minerals. Availability — offer on day 3 with 1/4-1/2 pound in a bucket; increase as needed (not much intake for first 2 weeks). Tips for promoting consumption — it is important to keep feed fresh and encourage intake.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

The Best In Class Dairies website, which is part of Merial’s ongoing efforts to provide dairies with the information and tools they need to maximize efficiency and profit, has recently been updated with new resources and features that will make it more valuable to a broader range of dairy operations. Enhancements to the website include new English and Spanish environmental mastitis training modules, as well as new site content in Spanish and an electronic rebate calculator. “Our goal is to increase the productivity of the dairy operation at every level,” said Steve Vandeberg, director of Merial’s endectocide marketing.


Fifteen ways to reduce Somatic Cell Counts reus, Strep ag, or mycoplasma), identify infected cows by individual cow culturing. Reduce cow-to-cow spread and remove the high SCC quarters from the milk supply. 6. If bulk tank culture results show high levels of environmental pathogens (nonag streps, coliforms, or Staph species), improve bedding management and premilking cow prep. Replace all organic bedding in every stall weekly with clean bedding. Every day, replace the bedding in the back half of the stall with fresh, clean bedding. If you use sand bedding, add fresh, clean sand at least once per week. Keep stalls leveled and remove soiled sand daily.

7. Improve consistency in milking procedures. Include a pre- and postmilking teat dip, 10 to 20 seconds of cleaning, at least 30 seconds of contact time for the teat dip, and a thorough teat end wiping before attaching the milking unit. Plan routine to achieve 60-120 second prep-lag time. 8. Include forestrip during cow prep to identify high SCC quarters and keep milk from those quarters out of the bulk tank. 9. Cull chronically high SCC cows that do not respond to therapy. 10. Treat all quarters of all cows at dry off with an approved dry cow intramammary tube. 11. Consider using a dry cow teat sealer.

Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

1. Keep cows clean and dry at all times. This assures clean teat surfaces and prevents bacteria from entering the teat end. 2. Seek assistance from a qualified dairy professional (veterinarian, milk plant field rep, milk equipment dealer, Extension educator). 3. Do individual cow SCC tests monthly to help identify herd trends and pinpoint the infected cows. 4. Run a monthly bulk tank culture through a reliable laboratory to find out what kinds of bacteria are causing intramammary infections. 5. If bulk tank culture results show a high level of contagious mastitis pathogens (Staph au-

12. Provide dry cows with adequate space, ventilation and clean bedding. (Minnesota DHIA records indicate that an average of 35 percent of cows and heifers calve with high SCCs.) 13. Keep cows as cool

and comfortable as possible during hot weather. 14. Control flies. 15. Maintain milking equipment in good working order. Develop a routine performance check and maintenance program. Replace rubber parts at recommended

intervals. Be sure system cleaning is done consistently and properly. Source: University of Minnesota Extension Factsheet F-MP-1 (December 2011), as reprinted from Udder Topics Vol. 35, No. 1 & 2 (in April 2012)

Farm organizations voice concern over “navigable” waters definition change by Bob Gray The Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency are in the midst of finalizing a “Guidance Document” dealing with “Waters of the U.S.” under the Clean Water Act. There is strong concern with these efforts in the agricultural community. The Corps and

EPA plan to remove the word “navigable” from the Clean Water Act which would significantly expand the regulatory authority of these two agencies to all waters, including ponds, ditches and other small impoundments. There is legislation pending in Congress to stop the two agencies from

issuing the Guidance Document. Farm, livestock, dairy, poultry and swine organizations are letting Congress know that they want this effort invalidated. We will keep you posted on the progress of the legislation. Source: NDFC E-letter for May 11

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CAPITAL TRACTOR, INC. 1135 State Rte. 29 Greenwich, NY 12834

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(518) 692-9611 FAX (518) 692-2210

TRACTORS 2011 NH T5050 4wd, ROPS - Rental Return - 212 Hrs. . . . $29,995 2009 NHTD5050 4wd, w/New 825TL Loader, Cab, 90 HP - 2683 Hrs. Excellent Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,750 2000 NH TS100 4wd, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes - 2135 Hr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,995 2007 NH TL100A 4wd, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader - 2068 Hrs. $43,795 2011 Mahindra 3616 4wd, Cab w/Heat & AC, HST Trans, Loader 4 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,375 2010 NH TD5050 4wd, ROPS, w/Warranty, 480 Hrs. - Excellent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2010 NH T6030 4WD, Cab, 95HP, w/NH 840TL Loader, 1100 Hrs $67,500 2005 Kubota L3130 4wd, HST w/Loader - 1023 Hrs. . . . . . $13,900 2009 NH TD5050 4wd, ROPS w/NH 820TL Loader. . . . . . . $34,375 1990 Ford 8830 4wd, Cab, Rear Duals, Power Shift - 6650 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,250 1978 IH 986 Tractor, 2wd, Cab - 6448 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 Ford 821 2wd Industrial Tractor w/Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 1965 Ford 4000 3cyl. Gas, New Tires - 3590 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . $4,995 2006 Case IH JX109OU 4wd, Cab, Like New - 200 Hrs.. . . $39,995 2006 Kioti DK40 Shuttle, Cab w/Heat, Woods Loader, 4x4 - 662 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT 2009 NH 74CSRA 3 Point Snowblower - Like New . . . . . . . $3,450 2003 Challenger SB34 Inline Square Baler w/Thrower, Hyd.Tension Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,375 2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 WIC Cart Mounted bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . $1,450 JD 336 Baler w/Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Round Bale Carrier/Feeder . . . . . . . . . $4,995 1989 N.H. 570 Baler w/72 Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,300 1996 N.H. 1411 Discbine 10'4" Cut w/Rubber Rolls . . . . $11,800 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head for a N.H. 900. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,250 Gehl 970 14’ Forage Box on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,950 Gehl 940 16' Forage Box on Tandem 12 Ton Gehl Gear . . . . $2,995 Wooden Flat bed on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350 Krause 2204A 14' Disc Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,780 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 1995 Kuhn FC400RG Hyd. Swing Discbine - Good Cond. . $10,200 2003 Challenger RB46 Silage Special Round Baler . . . . . . $17,500 2011 H&S CR10 10 Wheel Hyd. Fold Rake - Like New . . . . . $5,295 NH 258LH, NH 260 RH Rakes w/double Hitch & Dollies-Complete Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,800 1998 John Deere 3 Row Corn Head from JD 3970. . . . . . . . $3,200

1999 NH 900 Forage Harverster, Metalert, NH Processor, 824 2 Row, 27P Pickup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,900 2010 Hay Rite 32” Skeleton Elevator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,150 Wood Hay Racks on Gears - 2 Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . Each $950 2009 NH BR7060 4x5 Bale, Twine/Net, Silage Special . . . . $25,200 2010 H&S BW1000 Inline Bale Wrapper - Like New . . . . . . $24,500 1998 Hesston 1340 13’ Hyd. Swing, Disc Mower/Conditioner . $8,400 Case IH 415 Cultimulcher 12’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 Jaylor 2350 Vertical Cutter/Mixer/Feeder Wagon. . . . . . . . . . $6,300 2007 Krause 7400-24WR 24’ Rock Flex Disc . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 2002 Gehl 2580 Round Baler, Silage Special, 4x5 Bale . . . . $9,400 2003 Gehl 2580 Round Baler, Silage Special, 4x5 Bale . . . . $7,500 1990 NH 144 Merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $975 York 5’ 3Pt Landscape Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $450 Gehl 1065 Forage Harvester, Tandems, Metal Stop, Hay Pickup and 2 Row Corn Heads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 1999 Case IH 8435 Round Baler, 4x5 Bale, Silage Special, Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 Landpride AT2572 6’ Finish Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $700 1988 NH 900 Forage Harvester Metalert, 900W Pick-up Head. $6,720 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2008 NH M459 Telehandler 45' Reach - 420 Hrs. . . . . . . . . $62,500 2008 NH W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/Heat/Air, Bucket/ Forks - 375 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $61,250 2007 NH E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Cab w/Heat /AC 400 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $62,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket 1600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,500 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate 72" Bucket - 100 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2007 NH W110 Wheel Loader, 1025 Hrs, Excellent Cond. . $87,500 2007 NH W170B Wheel Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $81,250 2007 Kubota RS205 Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/Heat, 49 HP - 1080 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,900 2008 NH C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, Hi-Flow Hyd, 84" Bucket, 932 Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,750 Mustang MS60P 60" SSL Pickup Broom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 2008 NH L160 Skidsteer w/Cab and Heat, 72" Bucket-3476 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,250 2011 NH L218 Skidsteer w/Cab and Heat, Hyd. Mount plate - 535 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,500 ATTACHMENTS 2008 NH /FFC 66" Skidsteer Tiller - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2011 NH/McMillon Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9" Auger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950


The Peoples’ Department: 150 years of USDA On May 15, we recognize the 150th anniversary of the founding of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. On that date in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed into law an act of Congress establishing USDA. Two and a half years af-

ter he established the Department, in what would be his final annual message to Congress, Lincoln called USDA “The People’s Department.” President Lincoln knew the importance of agriculture to our prosperity — particularly at a

time when about half of all Americans lived on the farm. And while that number today stands at about 2 percent, our values are still rooted in rural America. As the United States has changed and evolved over the years, at USDA

we have not lost sight of Lincoln’s vision. Through our work on food, agriculture, economic development, science, natural resource conservation and a host of other issues, USDA has impacted the lives of generations of Americans.

And over the past three years, we have furthered that commitment to this nation. USDA has supported producers — making a record number of farm loans, maintaining a strong safety net, and expanding markets to

The Peoples’ A14

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

drive record exports. We’ve stood by rural communities — supporting more than 6,000 community facilities projects, providing more than 50,000 loans to help rural businesses create jobs, and investing in thousands of infrastructure projects that have delivered modern broadband, water and electric services to millions. We’ve enrolled a record number of acres in conservation programs, and laid out a sensible new planning rule for 193 million acres of National Forests to promote job growth while conserving the environment. USDA has continued its history of groundbreaking research. For example, we’ve invested about $320 million to accelerate research on the next generation of renewable energy — so we can create jobs and ensure America’s energy security for years to come. And we’re helping families lead healthy lives. USDA provides nutrition assistance for one in four Americans, enabling them to put healthy meals on the table, even when times are tough, and we’re serving healthier school breakfast and lunch to 32 million kids a day. Today, USDA truly remains a “Peoples’ Department” that touches the life of every American. Folks depend on us. That’s why I’m committed to leveraging the efforts of our Department and more than 100,000 hardworking USDA employees to continue creating jobs, supporting rural communities and helping our country prosper. As we commemorate 150 years of accomplishments, USDA is looking forward to addressing the changing needs of agriculture and rural America. For our small towns and communities looking to compete in a globalizing world, we’ll be there with access to broadband, critical infrastructure and support for new businesses. USDA will continue its support for the next generation of renewable fuels and help promote advanced, bio-based products.


NRCS announces water quality initiative in Connecticut TOLLAND, CT — State Conservationist Jay T. Mar announced the launch of a new National Water Quality Initiative committed to improving one impaired waterway in Connecticut. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will manage the initiative

by making funds available to farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners in selected watersheds. “The Water Quality Initiative will further NRCS’ partnership efforts to improve water quality using voluntary actions on private lands,” Mar

said. “This initiative is a focused approach in areas facing significant natural resource challenges. It bolsters the positive results of landscape conservation initiatives NRCS and its partners already have under way.”

NRCS A15

Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

The Peoples’ from A13 And we’ll keep working closely with America’s agricultural producers to maintain a dependable safety net for their work — which ultimately is connected to 1 in 12 American jobs — and ensure the food supply we need to feed a growing world population.

I hope Americans will join us in our commemoration of 150 years of USDA. This is a great time to learn about this Department’s contributions to the strength of our nation, and to see how we can continue to partner with Americans working to provide a bet-

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ter life for their families. I invite everyone to visit www.usda.gov/usda 150 to learn more about USDA’s history and our plans for the future — as the “Peoples’ Department” continues serving all Americans, every day and every way.

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New Kuhn fertilizer spreader The Kuhn Axis® 50.1 fertilizer spreader provides operators with high flow rates, precise material flow and accurate spreading and reduced spreading time for more profitable operation. A flow rate of up to 1,100 pounds per minute provides a high working rate of 500 pounds per acre when moving at 12 MPH due to the specially designed hopper base. The broken angles on the hopper allow for better material flow and less

residue after spreading. The slow-rotating agitator provides gentle handling of seed and fertilizer, while maintaining consistent material flow without plugging. With the Coaxial Distribution Adjustment® (CDA) system, accurate spreading can be achieved over the entire width of the machine without having to adjust the disc vanes. In addition, Kuhn thoroughly tests all fertilizer spreaders to ensure that they accurately spread

all types of fertilizer. The weighing system on the Axis 50.1 automatically adjusts the outlet openings when spreading conditions change for precise application. Critical components are made of stainless steel for less corrosion and maintenance and longer working life. Kuhn North America, Inc., of Brodhead, WI, is a leading innovator in the field of agricultural and industrial equipment, specializing in The Kuhn Axis® 50.1 fertilizer spreader provides operators with high flow rates, precise material flow and accurate spreading.

spreaders, mixers, hay tools and tillage tools. Kuhn- and Kuhn Knightbrand products are sold

by farm equipment dealers throughout the United States, Canada, and many other countries.

Through this effort, eligible producers in Little River Watershed will invest in voluntary conservation actions to help provide cleaner water for their neighbors and communities. This watershed was identified with help from state agencies, partners and the NRCS State Technical Committee. Using funds from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, NRCS will provide funding and advise producers to install conservation practices such as cover crops, filter strips and animal waste storage structures in watersheds with impairments where the federal investment can make a difference to improve water quality. “American farmers are good stewards of the environment, especially when they have the tools they need to protect or improve fish and wildlife habitat and water quality,” said NRCS Chief Dave White. “We look forward to collaborating with producers in key watersheds to help them have a positive impact on streams with impaired water quality.”

The Little River Watershed is a public water supply serving approximately 7,000 residents (78 percent of the population) in the Town of Putnam. The watershed covers over 35 square miles, and includes four water body segments listed by the State of Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection as impaired by bacteria and nutrients. NRCS accepts applications for financial assistance on a continuous basis throughout the year. If you aren’t sure, contact the Danielson Field Office at 860-7790557 to see if you are located in the Little River Watershed. All applications for funding consideration, during this fiscal year, must be received by June 15. This summer, NRCS will notify all applicants of the results and begin developing contracts with selected applicants. Since 1935, NRCS’s nationwide conservation delivery system has worked with private landowners to put conservation on the ground based on specific, local conservation needs, while accommodating state and national interests. For more information about NRCS’ programs, initiatives, and services in Connecticut, visit us online at www.ct.nrcs.usda.gov/p rograms.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15

NRCS from A14


Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

price forecasts were reduced. The benchmark Class III milk price was projected to average $15.80-$16.30 per hundredweight (cwt.), according to USDA, down from the $16.10-$16.60 Is the ‘Darkest Hour’ Just Before Dawn? Issued May 11, 2012 The Agriculture Department raised its 2012 milk production forecast for the fourth month in a row in its World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report (WASDE). The report also stated that “High feed prices and weakening milk prices during 2012 are expected to pressure producer returns, leading to declines in 2013 cow numbers. However, improvements in returns during 2013 will moderate the rate of decline,” USDA said, but cautioned; “Milk per cow is expected to continue to grow supporting increased milk production.” The 2012 production estimate, at 201.9 billion pounds, was up 800 million pounds from last month’s estimate and “reflects a slower decline in cow numbers and slightly faster growth in

milk per cow,” says USDA. The 2012 estimate is 202.6 billion. 2011 output totaled 196.2 billion, up from 192.8 billion in 2010. Commercial exports were forecast to increase as the global economy improves and milk production increases. Imports will be slightly lower as domestic supplies increase. With improving demand and only modest increases in production, 2013 cheese, butter, and nonfat dry milk (NDM) prices were forecast higher but whey is expected to average near 2012 levels. Class III and Class IV prices for 2013 were thus forecast higher. In the meantime; cheese, butter, and NDM prices were reduced from last month on weakerthan-expected demand but whey demand is stronger than expected so the price forecast was raised while 2012 milk

projected a month ago, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. The 2013 range was put at $16.20$17.20. The 2013 Class IV price was projected at

$14.50-$15.10, down from $15.35-$15.95 expected last month, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. The 2013 average was projected at $15.40$16.50 per cwt.

FC Stone’s May 10 eDairy Insider Opening Bell adds that the WASDE showed 2011-12 corn ending stocks were raised by an unexpected 50 million bushels to

Mielke A17


Mielke from A16 851 million, well above the average estimate of 758 million. Corn ending stocks for the 2012-13 crop year also came in higher than expected at 1.881 billion bushels, compared with an average estimate of 1.704 billion bushels. Soybean stocks were

lower than anticipated with old-crop ending stocks at 210 million bushels, compared with an average estimate of 221 million. New-crop bean stocks of 145 million bushels were lower than the expected 170 million. The Mamas and the Papas in 1967 sang “the

have been hit “as long as we can maintain the $1.45-$1.55 price through May,” but he admitted it’s a “big request this early on as the butter and powder markets remain weak.” “There is still room to go to the downside for cheese and Class III,” he

Townline Equipment 1474 Rte. 12A Plainfield, NH 03781 603-675-6347

warned. “I’m not saying that is not going to happen,” but warned that dairy producers may have to “make some drastic farm level decisions sooner rather than later as the profit margin on the farm is akin to the second quarter of 2009.” “There are good times to put hedges on and not so good times, right now we are in that no so good time to be putting a hedge on,” he said. Even with $14-$15 prices out there, “The market has just taken a severe decline over the past three to four weeks and markets don’t typically go straight down.” He advised listeners; “If you are looking to put some hedges in place, monitor the grain and feed costs, which also could show some weakness moving forward.” “The market is making it real easy for you,” he said. “As a producer it’s real difficult to put any hedges of any worth on at this point and time.” He advised producers to “sit back and be concerned with other aspects of the business rather than hedging. Hopefully, a Class III rally in May will change the tune and producers can start to look at places to mitigate some risk.” For more details, call Kurzawski at 1-800-231-3089. Looking “back to the futures;” after factoring in the announced Class III milk prices and the remaining futures, the average Class III milk price for the first six months of 2012 stood at $15.65 on March 2 and $15.70 on May 10. The last half of 2012 was averaging $16.52 on April 5, $16.26 on April 13, $15.95 on April 20, $15.61 on April 27, $15.08 on May 4, and was trading around $15.37 late morning May 11. Speaking of milk prices, California’s June Class I price for the north is $16.81 per cwt. The southern price is $17.08. Both are down for the sixth month in a row, down 13 cents from May and $4.60 below June 2011. The northern price average now stands at $17.83, down from $19.42 at this time a year ago and $16.09 in 2010. The southern av-

erage is $18.10, down from $19.69 a year ago and $16.36 in 2010. The June Federal order Class I base is announced by USDA on May 23. Meanwhile; cash cheese prices saw some slippage the week of May 9 but inched a little higher in Friday’s trading. The blocks closed at $1.50 per pound, still down 3 1/2-cents on the week and 12 1/4-cents below a year ago. The barrels closed at $1.45, down 2 cents on the week and 19 1/4-cents below a year ago. Three cars of block found new homes on the week and 14 of barrel. The lagging AMS-surveyed block average gained 1.4 cents, hitting $1.5169, while the barrels averaged $1.4835, down 0.7 cent. Cheese plants are being offered surplus milk as butter/powder plants are operating at near capacity, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. Cheese manufacturers are cautious about building excess inventories as overall production is up. Cheese demand is less than hoped for as retailers are not featuring cheese as heavily as a few weeks ago. Export demand is being assisted through the CWT program. Cash butter ended the week higher, closing Friday at $1.32, up a penny on the week but 63 cents below a year ago when the price crashed 14 1/2cents, to $1.95. It then rebounded 23 cents the following two weeks and stayed above $2 until early September. The latest AMS butter averaged $1.4133, down 1.4 cents. Churning schedules across the country remain very active as cream supplies are readily available. As has been the case for past weeks, churning continues to outpace demand, thus inventories are building. Overall butter demand is fair. Buyers are hesitant and cautious with their orders, USDA says, as the cash price declines. Retail butter feature activity has slowed following the recent holiday but butter continues to be advertised in print ads. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.1225 and Extra

Mielke A19

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

Frost Farm Service, Inc. PO Box 546 Greenville, NH 03048-0546 603-878-1542

darkest hour is just before dawn in Dedicated to the One I Love. FC Stone dairy economist Dave Kurzawski reported in Tuesday’s DairyLine that we might have seen the low for cheese this year.” Buying interest is out there, he said, and he believes the low might


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You National Egg Month more incredible than ever

Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Beat the heat with salads with eggs May is National Egg Month, it’s an important time for your family to eat high-quality protein at meals. The all-natural protein in eggs can help your kids perform their best on big days, when it matters most. And, with recent USDA data showing that one large egg is now 14 percent lower in cholesterol (down from 215 mg to 185 mg) and 64 percent higher in vitamin D, there’s no excuse not to get cracking. “National Egg Month is a terrific time to take a closer look at eggs — they are a good source of high-quality protein and contain 13 essential vitamins and minerals, all for just 15 cents apiece,” said Dr. Mitch Kanter, executive director of the Egg Nutrition Center. “Choosing eggs for breakfast is an easy way to deliciously — and nutritiously — celebrate.” Once hard-boiled eggs are cooked and peeled, most recipes have prep times under 10 minutes. For tips on hard-cooking eggs, more incredible recipes and nutrition information, visit www.incredibleegg.org or www.facebook.com/incredibleedibleegg.

Zesty summer steak salad 1 beef top sirloin steak, cut 3/4” thick (about 1 lb.) 1 tbsp. Mrs. Dash Garlic & Herb Seasoning Blend 1 medium sweet onion, cut into 1/2” thick slices 6 cups chopped romaine lettuce 1 medium tomato, sliced 6 Hard-boiled eggs peeled and quartered New York Style Sea Salt Bagel Crisps Dressing: 1/3 cup red wine vinegar 2 tbsp. honey 1 tbsp. olive oil 2 tsp. dried basil leaves 1 tsp. Mrs. Dash Seasoning Blend

Combine dressing ingredients in small bowl. Reserve 1/3 cup for salad. Brush remaining dressing on onion slices. Press 1 tablespoon seasoning blend evenly onto beef steak. Place in center of grid over medium ash covered coals. Grill steak, covered, 7 to 11 minutes (on gas grill, 8-13 min over medium heat) for medium rare (145°). Grill onion 10-12 minutes or until tender, turning occasionally. Carve beef into slices. Arrange lettuce on serving platter. Top with beef and tomato slices, onions and eggs. Drizzle with reserved dressing. Serve with Bagel Crisps as desired. Makes 4 main dish servings

Pink potato salad 3 lbs. baby red potatoes, washed, skins on 1 small onion, diced 7 hardboiled eggs, sliced, 1 reserved 1/2 green bell pepper, diced 6 sliced radishes 1 cucumber, peeled and diced 1 cup frozen peas, thawed 3 Tbsp. fresh, chopped parsley Dressing: 1/2 cup chili sauce 2 cups mayonnaise 1/2 cup French dressing 2 tsp. salt 3 tsp. onion powder 1/2 tsp. pepper 1/4 tsp. garlic powder Paprika for garnish Prepare dressing. Boil potatoes until tender but firm. Cool slightly, cut in half and add dressing while still warm. Let sit while preparing other ingredients; then fold them in. Refrigerate. Garnish with sliced egg and paprika. Makes 8-10 servings

Mushroom and egg salad* 3 slices brown bread and olive oil

3-4 eggs, hard boiled and peeled, set aside 1 head frisée lettuce 1 bunch watercress 9 oz. chanterelle (or your choice) mushrooms 1 tablespoon butter 2 cloves garlic chopped For dressing: 1 Tablespoon capers 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 1/2 Tablespoons red wine vinegar 1/4 cup olive oil Tear bread into 1” chunks. Drizzle with light olive oil and a touch of salt. Bake in 350° oven for 20 minutes, moving chunks around halfway through. They should be golden. Wash and tear up lettuce and watercress and spin-dry. Trim soiled ends of mushrooms and wipe clean. Melt butter in skillet, add garlic; swirl in bubbling butter until they begin to turn brown; add mushrooms. Season with S&P, cover; toss again and fry on high heat, uncovered, until soft. Make dressing by whisking those ingredients together. To Serve: Coat salad greens with dressing; arrange on plates with croutons scattered. Toss on mushrooms and arrange sliced eggs on top. Add a grind of cracked pepper and a touch of Kosher salt on yolks. Makes three main dish or six appetizer salads *Recipe adapted from Coloring the Seasons, by Allegra McEvedy

Corn chip salad 1 large head iceberg lettuce, washed, spun and torn 6 hard boiled eggs, chopped large 1/2 lb. bacon, fried, drained and crumbled 3/4 lb. grated Cheddar (or your favorite) cheese 4-6 cups corn chips, crushed Dressing: 1/4 cup brown sugar 1 cup mayonnaise 2 Tbsp. vinegar 1/4 cup milk Mix lettuce, eggs, bacon, cheese and corn chips together in a large bowl. Mix Dressing ingredients together and pour over salad just before serving. Makes 6 entrée servings

Lettuce salad roll ups Whole lettuce leaves (Romaine or Iceberg), washed and dried Tuna, Chicken or Egg Salad Put a scoop of salad in each leaf. Roll up and enjoy or wrap each in plastic wrap for a carb-free sandwich to go. Alternately, you may place the rolls in wraps or pitas. Source: Virginia Egg Council

This week’s Sudoku Solution


Farm Credit East’s annual Winery Benchmarks program kicks off ENFIELD, CT — Farm Credit East’s Winery Benchmarks program will hold its annual meeting in the Finger Lakes Region on Aug. 8. The focus at this year’s meeting will be a better understanding of the interaction between the retail and wholesale sides of the business. Farm Credit East is excited to announce the

2012 Winery Benchmarks guest speaker will be Nicolas Quillé. Quillé has studied winemaking in various locations throughout the world, including Dijon, Burgundy and Reims, Champagne and will share his expertise in marketing wine and his knowledge of the various wine grapes he has worked with, including

Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon. Today he works primarily with Riesling as the Winemaker and General Manager of Pacific Rim Winery in Washington. “The Farm Credit East Winery Benchmarks program is a unique way to measure one’s business against industry peers” said Gregg McConnell, director of the

benchmark program. “Participants receive indepth financial and operational analyses of their business, interact with other successful winery owners, take part in dialogue to better understand the industry and gain constructive feedback from an experienced Farm Credit East consultant.” Data collection for this

year’s program is currently underway. Results will be compiled in July and individual benchmark reports will be provided to each of this year’s participants just in time for the annual meeting. For more information on the Farm Credit East Winery Benchmarks program contact Gregg McConnell at 800-929-

7102 or visit the following link: www.farmcrediteast.com/winerybenchmarks.aspx In addition, Farm Credit East is the largest lender to the wine and grape industry in the Northeast, lending more than $90.7 million to wineries and grape growers across New England, New York and New Jersey.

AMS-surveyed nonfat averaged $1.2169, down

0.1 cent, and dry whey averaged 56.97 cents, up 0.1 cent. Fluid milk supplies

across the U.S. remain heavy. The Southernmost milk producing states are moving past peak yearly

production. Heat and humidity is increasing and slowing production. The Northern states are still approaching peak production with pastures greening and planting on the minds of many dairy farmers. Western states are dealing with excess supplies in many cases and milk is being moved to find production facilities. Class I demand is mostly flat as the end of the school year approaches. Interest from ice cream manufacturers is increasing and helping to clear

some cream volumes from butter churns. USDA data shows commercial disappearance of dairy products for December 2011 to February 2012 totaled 48 billion pounds, down 6.1 percent from a year earlier. Butter was down 22.2 percent; American cheese, down 3.5 percent; other cheese, down 5.3 percent; Nonfat dry milk was up 17.7 percent, and fluid milk products were off 3.1 percent. Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted

Mielke from A17 Grade closed at $1.0825, both down 2 1/2-cents.

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May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

Mielke A21


DHI TOP 40 FOR APRIL NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

Following is the April 2012 VT DHIA Top 40 herds of 10 or more animals based on protein pounds in each County serviced by VT DHIA and processed through the Dairy Records Management Processing Center, Raleigh, NC during the calendar month. Rolling herd averages will appear on this list for herds which have chosen the option to have their herd average published and the herd has 12 consecutive tests including components for each test.

CONNECTICUT NEW LONDON H H H H H H H J J

103 120 134 79 35 28 56 12 54

3.5 4.3 3.2 4 4 3.7 3.8 4.7 4.4

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

20074 21064 14692 14839 14313

777 803 684 578 615

3.9 3.8 4.7 3.9 4.3

661 649 533 468 456

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

SCHOHARIE

Vermont DHIA Country Folks List for the Month Ending April 2012

JOHN OSGA CLARK WOODMANSEE III STEVE SNURKOWSKI JACK TIFFANY GARY PISZCZEK REW FARM GIGLIO LEONARD SANKOW BEAVER BROOK FARM LLC. CATO CORNER FARM

NAME

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

25126 24421 25781 23585 17663 17523 17217 12683 13028

867 1055 821 942 707 644 652 590 579

778 768 762 750 559 550 542 470 466

3.1 3.1 3 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.7 3.6

22607 19673

925 4.1 781 4

649 2.9 * 600 3

24529 22381 22391 22915 21260 16631 17786 16846 15119

975 916 828 845 872 821 670 676 632

752 734 708 693 683 617 566 532 510

SEVEN VIEW FARM SLATEHILL FARM GEORGE B. WILSON GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT

H H J X G

117 145 115 22 38

H H H H H H H B X H

945 152 98 138 145 78 78 17 36 102

890 726 703 694 633 615 538 528 511 324

28663 23820 23158 22591 20399 20269 17444 15372 16501 14881

1091 854 918 875 841 859 644 627 689 405

3.8 3.6 4 3.9 4.1 4.2 3.7 4.1 4.2 2.7

3.1 * 3 3 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.4 3.1 2.2

19111

768

4

599 3.1

17859 14435 3121

673 626 134

3.8 4.3 4.3

543 3 479 3.3 99 3.2

16054

728

4.5

573 3.6

29297 27712 27123 25992 27513 26515 25709 25853 25229 24352 24988 24769 24430 22355 22886 19915 21744 20943 20587 20380 21356 18792 19292 19010 16662 18525 17077 19289 19119 17331 16436 16101 14065 17092 16510 14463 13930 11929 11287 1973

1084 1034 1038 931 1029 977 1000 958 963 960 996 918 986 859 828 811 724 777 813 812 823 764 728 748 686 731 751 733 740 638 586 624 643 596 598 586 518 558 441 61

3.7 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.9 4 3.7 4 3.8 3.6 4.1 3.3 3.7 3.9 4 3.9 4.1 3.8 3.9 4.1 3.9 4.4 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.9 4.6 3.5 3.6 4.1 3.7 4.7 3.9 3.1

923 836 834 828 824 823 821 806 770 761 759 753 750 709 686 645 644 639 638 634 634 609 592 585 577 576 576 566 566 539 502 502 497 493 488 471 422 413 344 55

23003 23542

899 992

3.9 4.2

753 3.3 745 3.2 *

25127 24684 24400 23587 22455 21479 19920 18872 17126 16997 19852 15487 18702 17997 17566 15030 15406 15424 15090 16067 11030

886 928 912 831 859 887 750 763 794 744 768 791 743 714 707 787 722 713 693 608 507

3.5 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.8 4.1 3.8 4 4.6 4.4 3.9 5.1 4 4 4 5.2 4.7 4.6 4.6 3.8 4.6

786 770 762 709 704 662 632 625 602 599 592 588 587 562 558 546 535 529 493 471 387

22757 22506 21787 20076 20591

970 885 765 784 717

4.3 3.9 3.5 3.9 3.5

748 3.3 683 3 655 3 654 3.3 611 3 *

ORGANIC H

65

TOLLAND BRADWAY FARMS INC. HILLSIDE FARM

H H

458 59

Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

HIBBARD HILL FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 2 FAIRHOLM FARM INC. ELM FARM ELM FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 1 DESJARDINS DORIS KINGSWOOD FARM SELBUORT VALLEY FARM

H H H H X J H A X

85 36 218 90 51 110 163 97 66

4 4.1 3.7 3.7 4.1 4.9 3.8 4 4.2

KEVIN BREENE KEVIN BREENE THE WOLOOHOJIAN FAMILY

3.1 3.3 3.2 3 3.2 3.7 3.2 3.2 3.4

30

H H H H H H J H J

30 35 128 94 60 46 16 59 47

10670

460 4.3

363 3.4

25831 22534 23435 22348 21071 20921 16434 17939 12207

1018 897 997 862 863 849 872 765 664

3.9 4 4.3 3.9 4.1 4.1 5.3 4.3 5.4

768 715 710 703 653 629 584 570 466

3 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3 3.6 3.2 3.8

25477 24130 22128 20668 17528 8741

931 882 845 816 696 337

3.7 3.7 3.8 3.9 4 3.9

809 724 687 636 566 261

3.2 3 * 3.1 3.1 3.2 3

18785

712 3.8

563

26057 25147 22229 22299 19967 19462 14513 12565 10799 2650

995 981 866 846 774 750 557 612 411 95

812 769 692 688 633 620 468 452 322 74

WORCESTER CV & MARY L SMITH JR OTTER RIVER FARM LLC WHITTIER FARMS INC. JIM & KRISANNE KOEBKE CHERRY HILL FARM RAYMOND & PAMELA ROBINSON

H H H H H X

32 217 145 72 80 36

NEW HAMPSHIRE CHESHIRE VINCENT & CAROL MALNATI

H

89

3

GRAFTON TULLANDO FARM INC. PATCH FAMILY GRAFTON COUNTY FARM RICH & DOREEN MORRIS JOHN C. PERKINS WILLIAM & DIANNE MINOT PUTNAM GLEN RUSSELL & MARY HICKS LYMAN ROBIE CATHARINE MABIE

H H H H H H X J H A

451 110 89 148 133 30 27 50 32 13

3.8 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.8 4.9 3.8 3.6

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.6 3 2.8

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP PINELANE FARM TOPLINE JERSEYS TOPLINE JERSEYS

H X J

239 16 67

30052 26382 18826

1008 3.4 1041 3.9 906 4.8

922 3.1 * 797 3 661 3.5

29645

1086 3.7

894

3

24193 23075 20504 20510 19490 19166 16705 18207 15627

884 812 896 741 858 686 782 612 656

3.7 3.5 4.4 3.6 4.4 3.6 4.7 3.4 4.2

734 682 635 626 596 588 549 538 496

3 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 3 3.2

24357 21744 18809 16671 19111 10309 6711

962 841 859 912 768 411 316

3.9 3.9 4.6 5.5 4 4 4.7

783 696 694 646 599 335 246

3.2 3.2 3.7 3.9 3.1 3.2 3.7

STRAFFORD-CARROLL ATHMOR HOLSTEINS

H

177

SULLIVAN PUTNAM FARMS INC. TAYLOR FARM INC. EDWARD MACGLAFLIN JOHN W. LUTHER GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK ASCUTNEY VIEW FMS.LLC GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK TAYLOR FARM INC. GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK

H H H H X H B X M

480 48 474 38 10 31 15 14 34

NEW YORK MONTGOMERY SKIFF-S DAIRY FARM LLC HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD GLEN MEADOWS FARM HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD JOHN G. KELLETT JR. DELLAVALE FARM DELLAVALE FARM

H H J J H H J

86 31 168 17 65 29 25

OTSEGO M. CHARLES EVANS

H

53

24027

892 3.7

732

3

16911

660

545 3.2

RENNSSELAER TERRANCE & MICHAEL H0AG

H

85

3.9

J

31

ADDISON

FRANKLIN DARRIDGE FARM HERBERT & ROBERT PURINGTON HAGER BROS. FARM LLC. GUNN STEVE DAVID DUPREY KAREN HERZIG HAGER BROS. FARM LLC. PAUL L WILLIS CRAIG W. AVERY

33 27 11

VERMONT

BERKSHIRE B

H X G

WASHINGTON THE LAPRISEFAMILY

MASSACHUSETTS CRICKET CREEK FARM

RHODE ISLAND KENT

WINDHAM

*

VORSTEVELD FARM KAYHART BROTHERS LLC JONATHAN LUCAS TIM & JULIE HOWLETT B DANYOW FARM LLC WAYNE & JEANNINE PARTRIDGE WOODNOTCH FARMS INC. GOSLIGA FARM INC. FOSTER BROTHERS FARM INC. CHARLES & BRENDA CHARRON CHIMNEY POINT FARM L.P HATCH FARM INC. BRACE ALEX & MICHELE BRIAN & CINDY KAYHART TERRIER LEE HAROLD & ANJE DEGRAAF HANSON STEPHEN & SYLVIA ROBERT & SUZANNE HUNT ARTHUR & JOAN HUESTIS ANTHONY & BARBARA CORREIA JEFF & BRIAN TREADWAY KATE INGWERSEN ORR ACRES MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE FIFIELD JEFF & LISE KATE INGWERSEN JEFFREY & OLIVE PHILLIPS LESLIE RUBLEE JOHN BUZEMAN SCAPELAND FARM MARTHA SEIFERT KATE INGWERSEN KETTLE TOP FARM SCOTT & MARY PURINTON JOHN & LISA ROBERTS COTA BROTHERS FARM INC. DAVID & MELANIE CARMICHAEL MIEDEMAS THE MICHAEL LEE

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X X H H H H H H B H X H H H A H X H H B X J H X

776 597 174 527 740 112 297 587 482 54 140 572 151 83 38 128 53 246 305 450 375 101 100 45 33 144 30 55 68 61 53 12 38 21 58 167 88 60 124 32

3.2 3 3.1 3.2 3 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.2 3 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.1 3.4 2.9 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.5 2.9 3 3.3 3 3.5 3 2.8

* * * * * * * * * *

*

*

BENNINGTON WILHELM & KARL STROHMAIER RUPERT VALLEY HOLSTEINS

X H

109 335

CALEDONIA WAYSIDE MEADOW FARM LLC PHILIP BROWN ROGER & JOY WOOD DON-SIM FARM DOROTHY & ANGELA WILLSON KEITH DAY SCOTT LANGMAID JAMES W. SEYMOUR LAGGIS BROS. BRIAN NICHOLS MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD LUCKY HILL FARM BILL & JENNIFER NELSON PLYN N BEATTIE HOWARD & JACQUELINE BENNETT DWAYNE & DEBORAH MARCEAU WILLIAM & GWEN PEARL MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD BILL & JENNIFER NELSON ROLAND & SHONNA HEATH JR. ERIC BEAN

H H H H H H H H J X H J H H H J J X X H J

210 58 57 177 117 69 52 58 429 21 57 170 188 74 68 49 68 14 11 52 37

3.1 3.1 3.1 3 * 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.5 3.5 3 3.8 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.3 2.9 3.5

CHITTENDEN MURRAY THOMPSON CREAM PAT FITZGERALD PAT FITZGERALD NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC

H H H B H

16 23 43 22 131

B H G H J

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

121 148 28 27 18

16641 19447 16139 19457 15309

729 697 837 660 772

4.4 3.6 5.2 3.4 5

587 3.5 585 3 * 577 3.6 574 3 551 3.6

304 228 28

25614 23810 20597

948 3.7 973 4.1 781 3.8

795 3.1 741 3.1 646 3.1

25591 25258 24759 23824 23877 23976 23110 21870 22423 22464 23224 22463 22052 21588 21846 21728 20985 20333 17467 16402 15721 18730 16962 20868 16334 15601 13471 14021 14781 12111 9980 10043

934 1038 939 896 956 819 881 810 865 876 864 857 1093 819 826 838 821 766 860 761 743 703 703 690 642 579 570 544 561 470 448 441

813 779 750 746 742 734 721 701 701 692 692 683 667 661 660 659 650 628 618 589 583 564 558 550 517 464 462 436 419 367 357 348

37 87 58 28

22307 14461 16450 16684

886 4 716 5 790 4.8 621 3.7

670 3 541 3.7 524 3.2 494 3

126 45 102 236 82 64 65 35 11 56 50 26 20 46 36 89 80 45 57 41 15 81 14 63 48 50 51 36 39 67 85 30 12 58 22 22 51 11 48 35

25307 25432 23631 24216 22479 23820 21194 19745 18546 16583 16645 19388 15730 18436 18616 14982 18250 15366 16803 15077 15650 18083 13844 15701 13667 13989 13614 16387 15614 12611 14519 14562 14430 14382 12834 13381 12569 12026 11558 11129

928 963 943 936 880 884 884 749 752 773 781 780 727 693 694 789 683 736 593 708 702 691 684 643 627 664 604 583 535 608 555 584 592 581 595 540 566 595 517 507

3.7 3.8 4 3.9 3.9 3.7 4.2 3.8 4.1 4.7 4.7 4 4.6 3.8 3.7 5.3 3.7 4.8 3.5 4.7 4.5 3.8 4.9 4.1 4.6 4.7 4.4 3.6 3.4 4.8 3.8 4 4.1 4 4.6 4 4.5 4.9 4.5 4.6

810 778 760 756 724 713 691 636 593 591 590 588 576 569 567 566 561 550 550 531 530 530 510 494 493 491 486 473 469 466 456 452 449 439 433 430 422 419 397 387

3.2 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.6 3.5 3 3.7 3.1 3 3.8 3.1 3.6 3.3 3.5 3.4 2.9 3.7 3.1 3.6 3.5 3.6 2.9 3 3.7 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.5

24259 23554 22430 24022 22371 22358 20936 20510 19686 18735 18107 18273 17315 17791 18210 14451 16401

918 940 883 861 886 861 870 777 742 712 689 659 686 655 652 692 624

3.8 4 3.9 3.6 4 3.9 4.2 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.6 4 3.7 3.6 4.8 3.8

747 742 696 695 689 686 657 629 580 566 564 547 542 537 530 516 501

3.1 3.2 3.1 2.9 * 3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3 3.1 3 3.1 3 2.9 3.6 3.1

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

ESSEX

MONTGOMERY JOHN G. KELLETT JR.

Brd Cows

SHELBURNE FARMS NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC MURRAY THOMPSON WAYNE BARR CREAM

3.3 3.1 3.6 3.2 3.2

WASHINGTON IDEAL DAIRY FARMS WILLIAM LUNDY HOLLISTER BROTHERS TAYLOR & ALAN HENDERSON WINDY LEA FARM DON DURKEE SKIFF FARMS INC. SKIFF FARMS INC. ALAIN ETHIER MICHAEL & LOUISE WOODDELL

NAME

ROUTHIER & SONS AUBURN S STEPHEN & CARLA RUSSO

H H H

FRANKLIN HOWRIGAN HOME FARM DAN & SHAWN GINGUE ANDREW & SUSAN BROUILLETTE BERKSON DAIRY MIKE BENJAMIN WYNN PARADEE BALLARD ACRES LTD. CARPSDALE FARMS WRIGHT FAMILY FARM TOM & MARY MACHIA SIMON DEPATIE LLOYD DIANE & BRADLEY LUMBRA SIZEN DAIRY FARM DANIEL & KAREN FORTIN WARREN HULL & SONS PAUL & RAMONE & DANIEL COUTURE HAROLD J. & LAWRENCE HOWRIGAN HOWRIGAN HJ & A & LAWRENCE GARY & CRAIG TINKER PAUL-LIN DAIRY J. & MACCAUSLAND S. WOLCOTT BEN WILLIAMS BEN WILLIAMS NEWTON FARMS INC. PARADEE DORA & BRAD CALLAN PAUL & ANITA MACADAMS MARC & CAROL JONES LONGE LLOYD & MARIE GARRY & EILEEN TRUDELL KIRT WESTCOM NEIL H. & JOANNE W. DOANE FLEURYS MAPLE HILL FARM

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H J J J H X H H H X X H H J J

250 535 78 111 534 40 219 84 526 184 128 128 137 88 90 133 271 246 116 31 25 45 33 91 80 34 53 75 117 117 76 34

3.6 4.1 3.8 3.8 4 3.4 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.8 5 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.8 4.9 4.6 4.7 3.8 4.1 3.3 3.9 3.7 4.2 3.9 3.8 3.9 4.5 4.4

3.2 3.1 * 3 3.1 3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 * 3.1 3 3 3 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.7 3 3.3 2.6 3.2 3 3.4 3.1 2.8 3 3.6 3.5

LAMOILLE ARTHUR & LARRY MORRILL LES & CLAIRE PIKE BEAUDOIN GREG & KATHY DEBORA WICKART

H J X H

ORANGE WHITE FARM ROBERT & MELANIE SWENSON VERMONT TECH COLLEGE PINELLO FAMILY FARM ZACHARY FEURY SILLOWAY FARMS HARKDALE FARM INC. DAVID P. DAVOLL CHAPMAN COREY & ANN TIM & JANET ANGELL DERRICK & BEVERLY WRIGHT ROBERT J HOWE RAY E. CHURCHILL JEFFREY & BETH BAILEY CHAPMAN COREY & ANN HARKDALE FARM INC. PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE JOSEPH O. ANGELL KENNETH & LISA PRESTON ANTHONY & CHRISTINE BROWN OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP ALLENVILLE FARM ROBERT J HOWE L.JR. & GORDON HUNTINGTON DAVID CHILDS OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP THOMAS & REBECCA LOFTUS DUANE & DALE WILLIAMS STEVEN SMITH LLOYD & JASON BAKER WARREN PRESTON FARM 1 JAMES WILLIAMS A. & K. BURGESS HERD 1 DEAN & TERRI CONANT A. & K. BURGESS HERD 1 M. GARY MULLEN CHESTER & SCHEINDEL ABBOT PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE STEVEN & LINDA SMALL M. GARY MULLEN

H H H H H H H H X J J H J H H J H J H J J H J X J J J H H J H X H A G X X G J J

ORLEANS PATRICK & KAREN O'DONNELL VERNON & MARY JUDITH HURD TAFT WILLARD & TED J DENIS & CLAIRE MICHAUD NEIGHBORHOOD FARM AARON & CHANTALE NADEAU ANDERSONVILLE DAIRY LLC WEBSTER DANIEL & MEGAN BRUCE & LAURIE PERRON MICHAUD BARN 2 GARY & GAIL LYMAN JAMES & SHARLYN JORDAN ADAM & JOANNA LIDBACK ANDY ANDREWS JACQUES COUTURE PAMELA HELENEK RANDALL DEXTER & ALICE

H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H J H

51 46 395 451 836 165 206 80 61 89 73 264 34 92 67 28 108


Mielke from A19

www.countryfolks.com

tions are “a painful re-affirmation that market cycles will continue even as demand, over time, outstrips supply,” said USDEC president Tom Suber. “In fact, it’s this period of temporary retrenchment that many of our work programs are intended to address.” USDEC marketing, technical and research activities are supported by U.S. dairy producers through their checkoff. Suber urged U.S. suppliers to protect volume and market share gains accrued in 2010-11. “We can’t take the hit and balance the world market through our own inventories every time supply and demand run into an imbalance,” he said. Speakers emphasized that although challenges to U.S. global dairy growth remain “USDEC trade policy and market access efforts continue to bear fruit.” In another important

DHI TOP 40 FOR APRIL NAME

Brd Cows

MICHAEL LACROSS JONATHAN & JAYNE CHASE JACK & ANNE LAZOR RYAN BROS ANDREW KEHLER ERIC DAGGETT WAYNE SR. DONCASTER

H X J X A J J

90 119 50 207 52 65 49

RUTLAND

RICHARD SHELDON WOOD LAWN FARMS INC. CASH & KAREN RUANE CARABEAU LARRY BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 HARVEY FARMS CASH & KAREN RUANE PAUL & KARI LUSSIER CLIFTON & D.R. CRESSY BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 JOESPH & OR UNA MORRISSETTE MILLER ANGELA

H H H H H H X H H A H B

187 172 70 140 100 128 11 150 27 29 27 87

WASHINGTON

FAIRMONT FARM LYLEHAVEN FARM DAVID PULLMAN WALTER C'O RAYMON BO BOTHFELD DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER FARM LLC. NEILL DAVID PULLMAN STANLEY & CATHERINE SCRIBNER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON CHARLES P. CARRIER STEPHEN & AMY BOTHFELD SETH GARDNER JAMES ACKERMANN HARVEST HILL FARM WOODARD FARM

H H H H H H X H H H H H H A X

821 77 185 63 41 73 30 282 66 87 57 232 58 12 25

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

NAME

Brd Cows

16824 14087 13212 13205 13032 11263 9505

622 656 655 663 513 531 421

3.7 4.7 5 5 3.9 4.7 4.4

491 483 480 465 420 412 331

2.9 3.4 3.6 3.5 3.2 3.7 3.5

HARVEST HILL FARM JOHN ARMSTRONG GEORGE CARPENTER JR. VONTRAPP FARMSTEAD

A J H X

25106 22738 20179 19934 19315 17251 15471 18220 17777 14889 15242 1857

911 890 727 915 770 638 655 583 654 621 565 63

3.6 3.9 3.6 4.6 4 3.7 4.2 3.2 3.7 4.2 3.7 3.4

747 723 613 612 587 532 529 511 510 473 454 50

3 * 3.2 3 3.1 3 3.1 3.4 2.8 * 2.9 3.2 3 2.7

26150 24223 23416 22533 23376 20723 18901 18986 20850 18359 16899 17305 15838 15562 14921

1023 938 892 829 731 770 852 730 723 730 647 652 643 598 650

3.9 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.1 3.7 4.5 3.8 3.5 4 3.8 3.8 4.1 3.8 4.4

795 740 728 721 705 667 650 613 611 567 511 511 495 478 471

3 * 3.1 3.1 * 3.2 3 3.2 3.4 * 3.2 2.9 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.1 3.2

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

VERN-MONT FARM LLC MARK RUSHTON MARK RUSHTON KEVIN HAMILTON PETER MILLER CLARK FARM LLC LILAC RIDGE FARM MALCOLM SUMNER THE CORSE FARM THE PUTNEY SCHOOL

15 22 52 45

WINDHAM H H J H H H H J H X

571 35 23 43 166 79 40 37 57 37

WINDSOR

ROBETH HOLSTIENS LLC. RHOMAN WAI RICHARDSON FAMILY FARM DAVID AINSWORTH MICHAEL & HEIDI DOLLOFF GEORGE MILLER BASSETT ROBERT P JEFFREY & DAVID TOWNSEND SPRING BROOK FARM MIKE L CLARK GREEN ACRES MILKING SHORTHORNS

H H J H H H J H J X M

97 459 57 42 85 61 90 140 49 34 40

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

NAME

15182 12479 14414 10074

569 537 509 494

3.7 4.3 3.5 4.9

463 3 444 3.6 417 2.9 331 3.3

BEAUDOIN GREG & KATHY

26146 24111 17242 19504 19492 18694 17705 14217 16545 15992

1003 974 845 771 823 780 727 702 650 687

3.8 4 4.9 4 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.9 3.9 4.3

800 773 649 611 589 575 546 504 498 498

3.1 * 3.2 3.8 3.1 3 3.1 3.1 3.5 3 3.1

23697 23531 17579 22978 22456 21325 17698 18991 15166 14473 14800

928 858 1029 821 913 761 902 701 701 598 526

3.9 3.6 5.9 3.6 4.1 3.6 5.1 3.7 4.6 4.1 3.6

732 721 701 694 689 661 650 604 531 464 452

3.1 3.1 * 4 3 3.1 3.1 3.7 3.2 3.5 3.2 3.1

11287

441

3.9

344

18730 16962 14781 12111

703 703 561 470

3.8 4.1 3.8 3.9

564 3 558 3.3 419 2.8 367 3

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

ORGANIC MIEDEMAS THE

ADDISON H

124

3

FRANKLIN BEN WILLIAMS BEN WILLIAMS GARRY & EILEEN TRUDELL KIRT WESTCOM

H X H H

45 33 117 117

front; Dairy Profit Weekly (DPW) reports that corn and soybean planting is running well ahead of last year and the 5-year average, according to USDA’s weekly Crop Progress report. About 71 percent of U.S. intended corn acreage in 18 major states was planted as of May 6, compared to 32 percent on the same date last year and 47 percent for the five-year average. More than 90 percent of the corn acreage in Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, and Tennessee is already planted. About 32 percent of the planted corn had emerged by May 6, compared to 6 percent a year ago and the five-year average of 13 percent. The 18 surveyed states represent about 92 percent of U.S. corn acreage. About 24 percent of U.S. intended soybean acreage in 18 major states (representing 95 percent of the U.S. total) was planted as of May 6, compared to 6 percent on the same date last year and 11percent for the five-year average. More than 50 percent of the soybean acreage in Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi is already planted this year, according to DPW.

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

58

16450

790

4.8

524 3.2

11 26 36 41 15 81 14 48 50 51 58 22 51 35 30 53 56

18546 19388 18616 15077 15650 18083 13844 13667 13989 13614 14382 13381 12569 11129 12325 12808 12407

752 780 694 708 702 691 684 627 664 604 581 540 566 507 499 500 479

4.1 4 3.7 4.7 4.5 3.8 4.9 4.6 4.7 4.4 4 4 4.5 4.6 4 3.9 3.9

593 588 567 531 530 530 510 493 491 486 439 430 422 387 387 373 372

17791 16401 14087 13212

655 624 656 655

3.7 3.8 4.7 5

537 3 501 3.1 483 3.4 480 3.6

23376 20850 18359 16899 15838 14921

731 723 730 647 643 650

3.1 3.5 4 3.8 4.1 4.4

705 611 567 511 495 471

19492 14217 16545

823 702 650

4.2 4.9 3.9

589 3 504 3.5 498 3

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

LAMOILLE CHAPMAN COREY & ANN ROBERT J HOWE CHAPMAN COREY & ANN ANTHONY & CHRISTINE BROWN OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP ALLENVILLE FARM ROBERT J HOWE DAVID CHILDS OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP THOMAS & REBECCA LOFTUS DEAN & TERRI CONANT M. GARY MULLEN CHESTER & SCHEINDEL ABBOT M. GARY MULLEN DANIEL J CILLEY CRAIG RUSSELL THEODORE & LINDA HOYT ANDY ANDREWS RANDALL DEXTER & ALICE JONATHAN & JAYNE CHASE JACK & ANNE LAZOR DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON CHARLES P. CARRIER STEPHEN & AMY BOTHFELD JAMES ACKERMANN WOODARD FARM PETER MILLER MALCOLM SUMNER THE CORSE FARM

X

ORANGE X H H J J H J J J J A X X J X X A

ORLEANS H H X J

92 108 119 50

WASHINGTON H H H H H X

41 66 87 57 58 25

WINDHAM H J H

166 37 57

3.2 3 3 3.5 3.4 2.9 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.5 3.1 2.9 3

3 2.9 3.1 3 3.1 3.2

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

10 requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 749,572 pounds of cheese and 518,086 pounds of butter to customers in North Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The product will be delivered through July 2012 and raised CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 47.6 million pounds and 41.3 million of butter to 26 countries. The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) reports that global dairy prices are off 20-30 percent from their spring 2011 peaks as “swelling milk production worldwide has turned supply deficits into surpluses.” As a result, rising inventories are expected to keep downward pressure on international dairy markets in the second half of 2012 according to presenters at USDEC’s spring Board of Directors and Membership Meeting May 2 in Chicago. Current soft condi-


For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MAINE

ANDROSCOGGIN-SAGADAHOC HEMOND HILL FARM DHI STEPHEN BRIGGS DHIR-AP R.E.HEMOND FARM INC. DHI-AP TWIN BROOK DAIRY LLC DHI-AP ALDEN FISHER DHIR-AP EAST LEDGE FARM DHIR WATERMAN FARM INC. DHIR-AP ALDEN FISHER DHIR-AP BOTMA FARM DHI-AP LOWELL FAMILY FARM DHIR JOHN & SANDY NUTTING DHIR CHRIS & JEANIE LEWIS DHI-AP BARKER FARMS INC DHI-AP JOSEPH & VIRGINIA ROSEBERRY DHI-AP GOODNOW JERSEY FARM INC DHIR

CUMBERLAND

KAYBEN HOLSTEINS HALL C.W. BAKER BROOK FARM PINELAND FARMS, INC GARY WINSHIP AND FAMILY YOUNG C.E.

Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

FRANKLIN

DAVIS, JIM & RICK BAILEY HILL FARM THOMAS BAILEY FARRINGTON, THAYDEN JOHN DONALD MARC BAILEY RICHARD COREY

KENNEBEC

SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 CLEMEDOW FARM PEARSON RICHARD SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 NICK MICHAUD PEARSON RICHARD GAIL QUIMBY JASON & JOY RAY

KNOX-LINCOLN

RALPH PEARSE & SONS HAWES LINCOLN J NEWBERT, GARY & ANDREA TIBBETTS, BARRY & ELAINE

OXFORD

BISSELL JOHN & CINDY CONANT ACRES INC. KUVAJA FARMS INC LONE MOUNTAIN FARM KUVAJA FARMS INC BRIAN M. BAILEY SIMPSON RON,BETH VEAZLAND FARMS SCOTT KEITH STONYVALE INC. UNIVERSITY OF MAINE SAWYER WILLIAM & SONS HOWARD BROS LIBBY LAND VELGOUSE FARM, LLC EATON FARM

3.2 4.0 4.4 3.6

707 624 561 524

3.1 3.2 3.6 3.2

FITCH FARM, LLC KNOXLAND FARM INC POMEROY, KEITH E. ALVIRNE SCHOOL FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

100.7 333.8 74.2 18.8

26333 24528 23284 20824

891 987 840 921

3.4 4.0 3.6 4.4

791 784 724 634

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X

222.1 59.5 62.3 157.3 78.8 81.2 13.9

25446 25032 24560 23520 21411 19872 15975

939 960 951 861 791 689 697

3.7 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.5 4.4

773 761 753 706 633 609 546

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.4

BODWELL, H & SONS FERNALD FARM DAIRY, LLC GREAT BAY FARM

DHI-APCS H 239.7 DHI-AP H 191.4 DHI-APCS H 98.3

24965 23520 20910

937 3.8 765 3.1 959 4.1 699 3.0 816 3.9 623 3.0

UNH CREAM UNH RESEARCH HERD SCRUTON'S DAIRY, INC. NAUGHTAVEEL FARM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

21.6 73.3 242.4 110.3

26369 1011 3.8 806 3.1 25454 975 3.8 780 3.1 24819 888 3.6 737 3.0 23771 858 3.6 710 3.0

LECLAIR GARY D. JOHNSON, JOLYON KEITH KIMBALL MC NAMARA, PATRICK ECCARDT FARM, INC. HOLMES, JEFF AND STEVE

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H J

176.1 37.4 561.2 183.3 111.1 63.0

27039 1003 3.7 858 3.2 23835 913 3.8 703 2.9 22219 847 3.8 699 3.1 3X 21827 849 3.9 675 3.1 21263 771 3.6 631 3.0 16954 766 4.5 599 3.5

749 687 642 631 572 533

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0

DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X

56.9 30.7 14.1 55.2 76.7 59.8 40.7

20478 19499 20303 19262 20185 19151 17871

806 678 670 761 728 655 716

3.9 3.5 3.3 4.0 3.6 3.4 4.0

648 604 597 595 581 564 552

3.2 3.1 2.9 3.1 2.9 2.9 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H J H X X J

120.6 96.5 97.3 87.6 135.6 17.0 76.6 62.5

27352 23483 22759 20331 20511 16689 19312 14459

999 764 943 958 787 819 797 640

3.7 3.3 4.1 4.7 3.8 4.9 4.1 4.4

820 733 729 717 622 606 586 512

3.0 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.0 3.6 3.0 3.5

SULLIVAN

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

32.4 35.1 57.8 49.7

24309 19271 17255 17147

873 749 632 635

3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7

725 602 518 515

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0

ADDISON

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H X H

75.3 102.2 35.8 21.5 19.6 30.6

25454 22120 20473 19056 16422 17966

833 848 744 713 697 669

3.3 3.8 3.6 3.7 4.2 3.7

748 677 633 575 572 546

2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.5 3.0 2.9 3X 3.1 3.1 3.0 3X 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H X H H X H H H H J X H

123.0 73.3 264.1 268.6 149.2 405.8 87.4 377.7 59.9 51.8 55.7 39.5 44.7 46.0

27175 24359 23619 19989 20786 21428 19516 20136 19975 18595 19357 15792 16892 16194

933 841 920 858 862 806 830 775 720 760 702 743 631 591

3.4 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.1 3.8 4.3 3.8 3.6 4.1 3.6 4.7 3.7 3.6

823 731 708 672 664 655 635 597 597 576 573 553 514 508

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.2 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.5 3.0 3.1

THE THOMPSON FARM DHI-AP H 73.1 LARRABEE HAROLD & GALEN DHI-APCS H 475.1 INGRAHAM JOHN W & SONS DHI-APCS H 450.5 SCHOFIELD, WAYNE DHI-AP H 23.6 KEENE DAIRY DHI-AP H 103.5 CLEMENTS WALTER DHI-AP H 36.6

23439 23701 21548 20363 20033 18896

907 904 869 765 766 677

3.9 3.8 4.0 3.8 3.8 3.6

731 692 673 617 612 559

3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0

23681 20390 17694 20187 19485 18115 17290

861 743 866 692 726 706 638

3.6 3.6 4.9 3.4 3.7 3.9 3.7

764 636 626 626 597 576 505

3.2 3.1 3.5 3.1 3.1 3.2 2.9

WALDO

JOHNSON FARM INC. ALDERWOOD FARM, INC. HIGHLAND FARMS INC GIRARD,RYAN DUNN, FRED HARRISON FARM LEARY FARM INC.

728 793 675 582

3.8 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.7 3.7

742 741 729 719 687 642 630 630 621 508

YORK

22531 19740 15510 16324

942 870 781 812 706 657

3.5 3.6 3.8 3.4 3.9 4.0 3.8 3.6 3.7 4.2

DANIEL HARRIMAN DICKINSON FRANK CHARTRAND FARMS INC. CAMBRIDGE FARMS MARK OUELLETTE JR. SOMERSET FARMS L.P SEVEY LAROY L BOSWORTH FARMS INC. FARRAND CHARLES SMITH ROGER DEAN PAINE JOSHUA CLARK GRASSLAND JAMES STROUT

14.9 215.2 24.9 74.5

DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H J H H H H

80.9 86.0 253.1 26.1 51.4 42.5 51.5

HILLSBORO

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP HIGHWAY VIEW FARM BACHELDER, KEITH JONES, MARION & GORDON MORRILL FARM DAIRY BARTLETT ,A.S.&S.A. GLINES, PETER & ERIC GLINES, PETER & ERIC

ROCKINGHAM

STRAFFORD-CARROLL

VERMONT

BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC DEER VALLEY FARM M AND J DAIRY BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC FOUR HILL FARMS SABOURIN, GERARD & JUDY MIDDLEBROOK FARM INC. THOMAS, BRAD AND JILL PLOUFFE HILL FARM

H1372.1 H 465.4 H 298.7 A 60.9 H1476.7 H 100.1 H 179.4 H 176.2 H 36.5

24644 25103 24300 21825 22402 21484 20902 20181 18779

903 919 890 835 844 798 800 739 665

DHI-AP H 65.0

27826

948 3.4 840 3.0

BURT, JASON AND CHRISTINA DHI-AP H 258.7 FOURNIER INC, RENE & SON DHI-AP X 73.8 GORT0N,GRANT JOHN DHI-APCS H 105.4

22226 19618 19069

821 3.7 658 3.0 758 3.9 605 3.1 778 4.1 597 3.1

DHI-AP H 378.5

26787

946 3.5 797 3.0 3X

DHI-AP H 874.3

25139

958 3.8 787 3.1

CHITTENDEN

TWIN OAKS DAIRY FARM LLC

FRANKLIN

GRAND ISLE QUINTIN, ANDRE

ORANGE

KNOXLAND FARM

RUTLAND

BOOK BROTHERS MACH FARM, INC. GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.5

670 657 655 599

3.1 3.0 3X 3.1 3X 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

H H H B

119.1 154.5 87.8 12.4

22389 21307 21368 17593

814 775 842 778

VERMONT FARMSTEAD CHEESE DHIR-AP H BILLINGS FARM MUSEUM DHIR J WADE MAXIM DHI-AP J

54.5 41.5 75.9

20388 15914 15637

787 3.9 657 3.2 797 5.0 595 3.7 734 4.7 566 3.6

WINDSOR

3.6 3.6 3.9 4.4

764 752 748 688 683 652 625 609 564

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.4

MASSACHUSETTS

BERKSHIRE

MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP H 103.9 FAIRFIELDS DAIRY FARM,LLC DHI-AP H 230.2 MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP J 22.2 HIGH LAWN FARM DHIRAPCS J 209.7 TURNER FARMS, INC. DHI H 120.9 ZIEMBA, MICHAEL, MARK & TIM DHI-AP H 178.3 LEGEYT, RICHARD & BETTY DHI-AP H 67.4

FRANKLIN

WHOLEY COW FARM WHOLEY COW FARM BOYDEN BROS. DAIRY ROBERTSON,CHRIS & BOB MT.TOBY FARM

HAMPSHIRE

COOK,GORDON,JR. & HANK JOYNER DAIRY FARM BELDEN,LUTHER A.INC DEVINE FARM, INC. PARSONS, HENRY & EDWARD ALLARDS FARM INC. KOKOSKI, JOHN HD1 COOK, GORDON, JR. & HANK

22119 21936 16592 16243 19832 18489 18006

883 867 823 790 741 686 720

4.0 4.0 5.0 4.9 3.7 3.7 4.0

693 677 621 584 568 561 550

3.1 3.1 3.7 3.6 2.9 3.0 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

X X H H H

41.2 19.3 88.9 88.4 104.0

27023 1015 3.8 847 3.1 23422 1051 4.5 825 3.5 24141 909 3.8 749 3.1 22526 921 4.1 696 3.1 22051 853 3.9 685 3.1

DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H B J J

56.2 32.5 111.5 189.2 107.0 129.1 103.5 11.1

23249 21628 21960 21286 20057 18956 15202 14815

931 853 839 831 808 729 779 770

4.0 3.9 3.8 3.9 4.0 3.8 5.1 5.2

753 691 672 658 639 631 585 566

3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.8 3.8

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHIR-AP H 89.9

16987

646 3.8 523 3.1

PALMER,TERRY POMEROY & SONS

DHI-AP H 155.7 DHI-AP H 71.8

21380 19241

806 3.8 655 3.1 745 3.9 623 3.2

TULLY FARMS, INC. PICKARD, JAMES & ELEANOR

DHI-AP H 125.6 DHI-AP H 88.0

20085 17797

805 4.0 642 3.2 687 3.9 549 3.1

HERRICK,DAVID SAM RICHARDSON'S DAIRY, INC.

DHI-AP H 92.8 DHI-AP H 155.6

25521 23076

905 3.5 776 3.0 748 3.2 685 3.0

BRISTOL COUNTY

DHI-AP H 19.0

21376

769 3.6 633 3.0

HAMPDEN

H H X A

GRAFTON

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER HARTSBROOK FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

25019 22345 20430 20550 19041 17666

892 869 901 813 888 789 766 723 745 656

NEW HAMPSHIRE

RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD2 KEITH DAVID RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD3 RITCHIE GEORGE F HD 1

76.2 52.4 57.1 75.7 48.4 56.9

25200 23984 23785 23736 22811 19816 20264 20040 20169 15457

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

26321 1000 3.8 785 3.0 24329 827 3.4 724 3.0 3X 16917 834 4.9 622 3.7 18061 682 3.8 548 3.0

H H X H H H

644.8 378.0 50.7 998.8 47.1 169.8 200.8 200.9 125.0 38.1

RHA MILK

H 182.4 H 783.3 J 319.2 H 26.5

DHIR DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H H H

B R COW E E YEARS D

WINDYHURST FM PARTNERSHIP DHIR-AP STONEHOLM FARM DHI-APCS SAWYER SHELDON S DHIRAPCS STONEWALL FARM DHI-AP

64.6 481.3 305.4 107.7 42.5 53.4 61.3 26.8 93.0 67.8 27.6 116.3 101.7 76.9 28.8

DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

SOMERSET

CHESHIRE

H H H H H H H M H J H H H H J

PENOBSCOT-PISCATAQUIS

26780 1026 3.8 821 3.1 27481 952 3.5 818 3.0 3X 26233 925 3.5 796 3.0 25081 954 3.8 782 3.1 3X 23194 849 3.7 686 3.0 20371 785 3.9 625 3.1 20733 765 3.7 622 3.0 19570 697 3.6 593 3.0 19224 719 3.7 590 3.1 16128 750 4.7 588 3.6 19156 705 3.7 587 3.1 18836 704 3.7 572 3.0 18061 659 3.6 552 3.1 18370 677 3.7 548 3.0 14294 677 4.7 505 3.5

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

Top 40 Herds For April

MIDDLESEX ESSEX

BRISTOL

RHODE ISLAND

WASHINGTON COTTRELL HOMESTEAD KENYON, FRANCIS

DHI-AP H 14.5 DHI-AP X 63.2

19351 19454

729 3.8 606 3.1 736 3.8 593 3.0

CONNECTICUT

HARTFORD

MILLBORNE FARM SMYTHS TRINITY FARM FUSIEK,D, & COULTER FUSIEK COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. HASTINGS FARM COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. H0USE OF HAYES MILLBORNE FARM HASTINGS FARM PERRY, SCOTT

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H X H G J H

21.2 28.5 47.1 42.5 116.5 48.3 75.8 26.2 14.7 29.4

22516 21266 21742 20088 20222 16976 19022 17417 15867 17921

788 796 775 733 770 705 710 750 738 757

3.5 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.8 4.2 3.7 4.3 4.7 4.2

698 662 638 622 609 578 574 572 540 530

3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.4 3.0 3.3 3.4 3.0

JACQUIER, ROBERT & PETER CHRIS & TODD HANNAN WEIGOLD FARMS LLP FREUND'S FARM, INC. ARETHUSA FARM LLC TANNER T. MEADOW RIDGE FARM LLC. THORN, CLINTON ARETHUSA FARM LLC JACQUIER, DAVID & MELODY CARLSON,DOUGLAS J. NUTMEG ACRES BIRCH MILL FARM

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H J H H X X

995.9 39.7 89.4 279.9 79.3 131.3 69.4 34.3 26.0 370.2 60.1 52.4 42.4

27659 22565 23028 22550 21888 20378 19889 18163 15900 17438 17056 15828 16601

928 884 848 812 895 769 794 753 806 653 660 592 623

3.4 3.9 3.7 3.6 4.1 3.8 4.0 4.1 5.1 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.8

816 702 692 672 644 641 588 581 572 565 532 511 508

3.0 3X 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.6 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.1

DHIR-AP H 138.1 DHI-AP H 59.7

20752 17034

715 3.4 612 2.9 631 3.7 527 3.1

SPIELMAN FARM RIVER PLAIN DAIRY BLUESLOPE FARM, INC

DHI-AP H 370.8 DHI-AP H 52.4 DHI-APCS H 118.7

21692 20198 17406

853 3.9 682 3.1 747 3.7 617 3.1 657 3.8 513 2.9

BAHLER FARMS INC. BAHLER FARMS INC. UNIV OF CONNECTICUT HYTONE FARM MAPLELEAF FARM, INC SHADOW VALLEY FARM SHADOW VALLEY FARM UNIV OF CONNECTICUT SHADOW VALLEY FARM FISH FAMILY FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

976.5 953.3 85.5 256.0 230.7 51.2 98.0 23.4 23.5 28.3

25910 24614 25726 23322 22643 18149 19929 16323 15461 14458

911 867 878 925 886 770 716 779 732 693

DHIR-AP H 114.9 DHI-AP H 122.6 DHIR-AP J 149.0

22256 20212 16031

892 4.0 679 3.1 732 3.6 629 3.1 795 5.0 570 3.6

LITCHFIELD

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H H H H H X H J J J

3.5 3.5 3.4 4.0 3.9 4.2 3.6 4.8 4.7 4.8

786 746 725 720 695 621 616 571 555 506

3.0 3.0 2.8 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.5

3X 3X 3X

3X

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All-American Dairy Show announces 2012 judges The 2012 All-American Dairy Show will welcome 11 judges to place classes in 14 youth and open shows Sept. 15-20, at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center in Harrisburg. The judges are: Tom Agnew of Hartland, WI, will judge the Premier National Junior Ayrshire and Milking Shorthorn shows on Monday, Sept. 17. Jeff Brown of Jackson Center, Ohio, will place the Premier Junior Jer-

sey Show on Monday, Sept. 17. Stanley Chupp of Inola, OK, will judge the AllAmerican National Guernsey Show on Wednesday, Sept. 19. Kelli Cull of Lomira, WI, will make her AllAmerican Dairy Show judging debut by placing the Premier National Junior Holstein Show on Monday, Sept. 17. Ted DeMent of Kenney, IL, will return to the All-American Dairy Show to judge the All-American

Jersey Show at Harrisburg on Wednesday, Sept. 19, and Thursday, Sept. 20. Chris Lahmers of Marysville, Ohio, will pull double duty by placing the Premier National Junior Guernsey Show on Monday, Sept. 17, and the All-American Milking Shorthorn Show on Tuesday, Sept. 18, and Wednesday, Sept. 19. Norm Magnussen of Lake Mills, WI, will judge the All-American Brown Swiss Show on Tuesday,

Sept. 18, and Wednesday, Sept. 19. Mark Rueth of Oxford, WI, returns to Harrisburg and will judge the All-American Holstein Show on Wednesday, Sept. 19 and Thursday, Sept. 20. Chad Ryan of Fond du Lac, WI, will make his first judging appearance at the All-American with the Red & White Show on Wednesday, Sept. 19. Jeffrey Zeigler of Plain City, Ohio, will place the Premier National Junior

Brown Swiss Show on Monday, Sept. 17, and the All-American Ayrshire Show on Tuesday, Sept. 18, and Wednesday, Sept. 19. Kelly Zepp of New Windsor, MD, will judge at the All-American for the first time at the Premier National Junior Red & White Show on Monday, Sept. 17.

NFU releases free cooperative education curriculum

HAGERTY FARM COOLING EQUIPMENT P.O. Box 63 Hinchley, ME 04944 207-453-6727

HANDFIELD DAIRY EQUIPMENT 789 Rt 32 North Franklin CT, 06254 860-642-7147 TARRYK’S FARM SUPPLY, LLC. 387 Canterbury Turnpike Norwich, CT 06360 860-822-6013

TERRITORY REPRESENTATIVES ROBIN SHIRLEY New York & New England 417-872-7094 VIC LEININGER New York & Pennsylvania 417-872-5715

ative business model. Farmers Union members have helped organize hundreds of successful cooperative businesses, some of which are among the Fortune 500 companies. The curriculum provides six separate lessons each for collegiate and adult students. The lessons are written to introduce how cooperation works to help individuals accomplish as a group what they could not on their own. To download the curriculum, visit www.nfu.org/education/education-materials. To learn more about ways to use the curriculum, contact Miller at mmiller@nfudc.org The curriculum was developed with support from CHS Foundation in cooperation with the NFU Foundation.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

Families, communities, and businesses large and small depend on the spirit of cooperation to succeed. National Farmers Union (NFU) is introducing a special curriculum to highlight 2012 as the International Year of Cooperatives. “Cooperation is at the heart of America, from its largest cities to its smallest towns,” said NFU President Roger Johnson. “Schools, organizations, and community leaders are invited to use these lessons. The co-op curriculum is available to everyone for free.” A White House Community Leaders Briefing hosted by the National Cooperative Business Association was held today where NFU Director of Education Maria Miller and others raised awareness of the cooper-

DICK SOULE, INC. 3598 Vermont Route 105 Enosburg Falls, VT 05450 802-933-6167

The All-American Dairy Show features 23 shows in six days in addition to the nation’s only all-dairy antiques show. Last year’s show featured more than 2,400 animals and 935 exhibitors from 26 states and Canada. For more information, visit www.allamerican. com, or call 717-7872905.


Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

FFA develops online TV channel Following the successful live broadcast of its 2011 National FFA Convention, the National FFA Organization has decided to take up permanent residence on the iHigh.com platform with its own channel. The FFA Channel, which will be powered by Alltech and iHigh, will capitalize on the latest in Web technology to bring greater unity to their membership base, which is more than a half-million students strong throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The ability of a Web channel to provide such a platform was exemplified in the October live broadcast of 2011 National FFA Convention, which was attended by more than 53,000 attendees and joined live on the Internet by an ad-

ditional 550,000 viewers who would have otherwise missed the experience. “We are very excited about the opportunity that this channel will afford our members,” said Dwight Armstrong, chief executive officer of the National FFA Organization. “Having an FFA iHigh channel will create another vehicle for us to share the FFA message of premier leadership, personal growth and career success.” In a nod to social Web trends, FFA has entered into a licensing agreement with Alltech, which will allow an element of personalization for state and local chapters. Each state chapter will have their own site, which may be used to highlight awards banquets and other special events.

Likewise, each local chapter will be integrated into their high school’s site, creating a platform for the promotion of agriculture with a distinct community-focused tone. Because of the unique business model, all sites have the ability to generate revenue for their organization. “Once again FFA has taken a leadership position in the field of agriculture,” said Billy Frey, Senior Vice President of the Alltech/iHigh Joint Venture. “FFA chapters around the country can bridge the urban-rural divide by giving anyone with a computer an inside view to the world of agriculture. Many states such as New Hampshire and Minnesota already are spreading FFA’s message by broadcasting

their state conventions live and on-demand.” Considered the Global Youth Network, iHigh.com is designed to provide free feature-rich Web services to schools, students and youth organizations, and enables live broadcast of events, mobile broadcasting, unlimited photo uploads and more. Using iHigh.com’s unique feature-rich Web and broadcast platform, high schools and organizations such as the FFA, the National High School Rodeo Association, USA Swimming, iHoops and many others are able to

share their events in real time with a global audience that can access the streaming video on any computer or mobile de-

vice. Currently, iHigh receives 1.6 million unique visitors per month with a year over year growth of 200 percent.

Expecting to beat 400K backwashing teats with milk "Since the milking machine is one of the best washing machines ever built, the teats are bathed with milk during the milking process" Dr. Andy Johnson - 2000 NMC Annual meeting Do you really need to know more about the true cause of mastitis in your herd when the NMC tells you your machine bathes the teats in milk? Further consider research by Dr. Derek Forbes proving your milking machine physically forces the bacteria up the canal to cause an infection due to the liner pinching which you can feel with your own finger! CoPulsationTM: Eliminates the backwash, stops the pinching action, milks faster and basically milks the cow in a humane and natural action similar to a calf. Call for a video, see it for yourself www.CoPulsation.com

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New EU Agreement Drives Milk Quality Focus Access to international markets is an important area of growth for U.S. dairy producers. Participating in this global market means meeting the recently adopted European Union-USDA marketing agreement (EC 853/2004 regulation) milk quality standards. Having a new regulatory requirement has naturally led the industry toward focusing on achieving and maintaining somatic cell counts below the 400k limit. In April, producers began seeing calculated values of their rolling 3 month SCC mean, which indicates whether or not they are below the required limit. PENNSYLVANIA MM WEAVER & SONS, INC. 169 North Groffdale Rd. Leola, PA 717-656-2321

NEW YORK CORYN FARM SUPPLIES INC. 3186 Freshour Rd. Canandaigua, NY 585-394-4691

ELDER SALES & SERVICE INC. 4488 Greenville-Sandy Lake Rd. Stoneboro, PA 724-376-3740

ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT 3662 Buffalo St., Box 215 Alexander, NY 585-591-2955

MAINE KRAMERS INC. 2400 W River Rd. Sidney, ME 207-547-3345

CATSKILL TRACTOR INC. 384 Center St. Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

NEW YORK SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 Sharon Springs, NY 518-284-2346

A simple way to think about the complicated system that the EU has put in place is to look at cows in a herd that are infected. They are either infected or not, based on their SCC. Cows with higher SCC than others that are over the infection threshold (200,000) simply contribute to the bulk tank at different rates, based on their production and SCC. They are not "more infected". That said, once a producer reaches a geometric mean over 400,000, they are out of compliance, and it doesn't matter by how much. To make the calculation a bit easier, simply take the product of the three months averages; if below 64 million, you are fine. For instance, a herd with 3 consecutive months at 400K average SCC would have a product of 64 million, since 400K x 400K x 400K= 64,000,000. Producers below the limit will benefit from evaluating their SCC maintenance and monitoring options, while those above need options to help reduce overall cell counts while maintaining compatibility with the management of their farm business.


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800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

The Dairy One Improver

400K Beat It! Program Uses a Team Approach to Improve Milk Quality Dairy One and Quality Milk Production Services have created a service package that provides a short-term--but intensive--boost to your milk quality management. The program, 400K Beat It!, is short-term in the sense that we will work with farms individually each month over a 6-month timeframe, but is long-term since our intention is to build a process by which the farm can manage and monitor SCC into the future. Identifying the factors that are impacting milk quality involves evaluating several aspects of the dairy operation. It can be difficult to isolate these factors and to develop appropriate monitoring tools without information and the experience of people who are working across many farms.

Page 26 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Milking procedure, milking equipment, cow housing, bedding, consistency of the herd staff, dry cow programs, and nutritional programs are just some of the areas that need to be investigated before a good, whole farm program can be developed. Forming a milk quality team that supports and works with you to reach your milk quality goals is a positive first step. The team members are those advisors you work with and trust. For example, you might invite your Dairy One market manager or technician, milk inspector (CMI), herd veterinarian, and/or regional QMPS veterinarian to participate. One member will work as a facilitator, keeping everyone informed as new data is available, while other members will participate in setting goals, management changes, and monitoring progress during the program. Below is a graph featuring a case study herd where a team approach was used to improve SCC. It shows the bulk tank SCC for each tank for a one-year period. The oldest data is on the left, and most recent data is on the right. The broken line is at the 400K level, and timing for each meeting is indicated.

How the 400K Beat It! program works: Step #1: Complete a “Management Survey” or short risk assessment of your farm situation. The team will review and discuss the information, and come up with a plan to work on the identified priorities. In many cases, it is most efficient and cost effective to conduct this team meeting by conference call. Step #2: Set up the testing program for your farm. The testing program will include a 6-month bulk milk monitoring program and 6 months of individual cow production and cellcount tests. Step #3: Collect and interpret all the data. Before the team can suggest improvements, it is key to measure precisely what is happening in the herd: if you don't measure it, you can't manage it. QMPS veterinarians will analyze each month’s collected data with bulk tank cultures. They will look at the major bacteria causing SCC problems, and they will review cow-level SCC to identify dynamics of infections in the herd. Reports and recommendations for strategies to lower bulk tank SCC will be sent back to the dairy and distributed to the team. Step #4: The final step consists of another team meeting. The team will review all the data and decide on the necessary steps to ensure continued production of high-quality milk. The combination of monthly test-day information combined with regular team reporting on the results may be a process that continues in your day-to-day management. Sharing information during the 6-month duration of the program can provide the foundation for a process used by the dairy going forward.

Figure 1: 400K Beat It! case study This bulk tank SCC case study indicates the following: 1. The cost of the 400 Beat It! program is an investment in udder health and milk quality. 2. The 400 Beat It! program is a process, not an event, and functions better as time goes on. 3. Using teams is a powerful management strategy. Significant improvements are evident when teams meet and work for a common cause. 4. We are seeing success in achieving our goal of improved bulk tank SCC.

Teams are an integral part of the program because reducing SCC takes teamwork. The path to progress is not always easy to find, particularly while steeped in day-to-day management of the farm. With the 400K Beat It! program, we help you by developing a short-term, very focused program. Through the program, you receive the guidance and support of your professional milk quality team, as well as the data and monitoring solutions necessary to maximize milk quality. The return on investment will be evident in a very short time because it is two-fold: increased milk quality premiums and increased milk production. For producers who are consistently below 400K, we can explore a similar approach through our 200K Get It! program. For more information about the program, contact Randy Perkins, Marketing and Sales Director by phone at 607-227-6528 or by e-mail at randy.perkins@dairyone.com.


Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-week k updatess and d onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations.

New tool for tracking a voracious pest by Dennis O’Brien Since it first appeared in Texas in 1986, the Russian wheat aphid has cost U.S. wheat growers an estimated $200 million each year. But U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have developed a new tool to keep track of this nasty worldwide threat to wheat and barley and to provide guidance to researchers and plant breeders on control strategies.

veloped will be effective against emerging biotypes. Aphid species typically produce eggs in the fall and place them in wheat and wild grass leaves. The eggs of various aphid species are often placed together and that makes locating new biotypes difficult. Puterka and Kevin Shufran, a former ARS scientist who recently retired from the Stillwater unit, have developed a way to tell them apart. The researchers extracted DNA from the eggs of 10 previously identified species of aphids, including several of the Russian wheat aphid’s closest relatives, and sequenced a variable part of the CO1 mitochondrial gene. In a blind experiment, Shufran compared DNA

ARS scientists have developed a system using DNA "barcodes" to identify emerging biotypes of Russian wheat aphids, an insect pest that does more than $200 million in damage annually to wheat and other cereal crops in the United States. Photo by Gary Puterka Russian wheat aphids from eggs of species prohave been controlled by vided by Puterka, who resistant wheat varieties, masked their identities. but the appearance of a Through genetic analynew biotype that over- ses, Shufran was able to came resistance in 2003 DNA barcode the differhas forced growers to ent aphid species. This rely on insecticides while will greatly improve their breeders develop new, effort in locating new resistant varieties. Moni- biotypes. Results were toring of Russian wheat published in Annals of aphid populations for the Entomological Socithe emergence of new ety of America. biotypes is important beRead more about this cause researchers and research in the April breeders need to know 2012 issue of Agriculturresistant crops being de- al Research magazine.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 27

Gary Puterka, who is with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research Unit in Stillwater, OK, and his colleagues have developed a system that uses DNA “barcodes” to identify emerging biotypes of Russian wheat aphids that threaten wheat and other cereal crops. In DNA barcoding, scientists sequence a designated part of an organism’s genome and produce a barcode from it for a systematic comparison with the sequenced DNA of other closely related species. ARS is USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports the USDA goal of promoting agricultural sustainability.


Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

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Country Folks

Section B

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS Judges named for the Diamond Jubilee All American Jersey Shows The judges have been selected for The 60th All American Jersey Shows, sponsored by the Ameri-

can Jersey Cattle Association of Reynoldsburg, Ohio. The largest exhibition

Nov. 3, 4 and 5 in conjunction with the North American International Livestock Exposition in

JD 567 RB w/Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 74 rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke Krone 42 Like new rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville (2) JD 2 Row Corn HD . . . . . . . . $2,850 / $3,250 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 446 w/mega wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 3960 forage harv., base unit . . . . . . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 166 inverter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pronovost wrapper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Pequea fluffer 81⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Fahr KH500 tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Vicon 4 Star tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Vicon 423T rotary rake . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 550 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE Frontier RT 1280 Roto Tiller . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 750 15’ No-till drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Glencoe 7 shank tillage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville IH 710 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 8300 23 x7 drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 8300 23 x7 drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS JD 458 R baler silage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Krone 1500 w/knives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 335. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 348 w/ 1/4 Turn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 446 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 457 silage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 316 baler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Gehl 1470 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston 560. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston rounder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS 300 HUSKER w/243 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 390 flail mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 6x4 Gator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SOLD . . . . . . . $5,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 920 Flex HD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Hardi Ranger 2200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Bush Hog 4 ft. mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham 7’ loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . . . Fultonville . . . . $1,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke Landpride 7’ HD blade . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD Woods 1035 backhoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,650 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Woods RB72 rear blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Degelman R570 rock picker . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville

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Louisville, KY. Kevin Lutz, Lincolnton, NC, will officiate in The All American Jersey Show on Monday, Nov. 5. This will be his third time in the open show ring, having previously served as judge in 2003 and consultant judge in 2008. Lutz also officiated at the National Jersey Jug Futurity in 1999 and The All American Junior Jersey Show in 1998. He judged the 2011 Royal Melbourne (Australia) Show, and over the years numerous state fairs across the United States. His consultant will be Kevin Williams of McConnelsville, Ohio, who was the judge of the 2004 National Jersey Jug Futurity. Dean Dohle, Half Way, MO, will judge the 59th National Jersey Jug Futurity on Nov. 4. He has twice been an associate judge at the national level, for the Brown Swiss show at World Dairy Expo in 2005 and at the 2011 All American Junior Jersey Show. Dohle has judged at the state fairs of Ohio, North and South Carolina, Texas,

Oklahoma and Kansas. His consultant will be Tom “Moss” McCauley, Lowell, MI. The National Jersey Jug Futurity is the oldest and richest class for dairy cattle. The 2011 futurity paid $11,565 in premiums, with the winner receiving over $2,100. Judge for The All American Junior Jersey Show on Nov. 3 will be Chris Lahmers, Marysville, Ohio. In 2011, Lahmers judged the National Jersey Jug Futurity, the International Brown Swiss Show at World Dairy Expo, and New York Red & White Spring Show. Previously he judged the 2007 MidAtlantic Ayrshire Show and 2008 Eastern National Brown Swiss Show, both in Harrisburg, PA, Sean Johnson, Glenville, PA, will be the consultant. The first and second place winners in each class of these shows will become the All American and Reserve All American honorees for 2012 of the American Jersey Cattle Association.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 1

TRACTORS Case IH 9110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 416 Backhoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800. . . . . . Schaghticoke Farmall Cub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 750 B Crawler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 2950 cab/MFWD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 4430. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5045D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5075 w/553 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 6430 Rental Returns (3) . . . . . . . . . . . $65,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JD 7130 Rental Return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $71,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7400. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7830. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $126,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen (3) JD 7930 IVT. . . . . . . . . . . Starting at $123,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville COMPACT TRACTORS MF 1220 w/mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,595 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 110 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 850 w/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 375 backhoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 755 Loader/Mower/Blower. . . . . . . . . . . $6,895 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 855 w/cab, & loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 1600 wam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2210. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,750. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 2520 Loader/Mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 3120 w/300CX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3120 w/300CX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 3320 w/300/448. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3720 w/blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,900 . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 4410 w/420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kioti DK455 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota L39 TLB, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 72” Sweepster broom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 . . . . . . . . . Chatham 78” skid steer blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 96’ pwr rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH LS 180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH L175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke NH LS180 cab/heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MOWERS CONDITIONERS Gehl DC 2412 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 1411 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 530 mo-co/rolls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kuhn FC 302 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kuhn FC 313 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/heads . . . . . . . . . . $169,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 1465 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville

of Registered Jersey™ cattle in the world, the three shows of The All American will be held


ABA testifies on agriculture credit recommendations for the Farm Bill

Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Repeal term limits on USDA guaranteed loans and preserve crop insurance WASHINGTON, D.C. — The American Bankers Association testified May 10 before the Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight, and Credit of the House Committee on Agriculture offering recommendations to preserve and improve access to agriculture credit in the upcoming Farm Bill. ABA Chairman-Elect Matthew H. Williams recommended that term limits on loans guaranteed by the USDA’s Farm Service Agency be repealed to expand access to credit for small and beginning farmers. Williams also said Federal Crop Insurance should be preserved as it is a broadly used tool that allows farmers and bankers to manage the risk presented by weather and volatile agriculture conditions. Williams is the chairman and president of Gothenburg State Bank headquartered in Gothenburg, NE. The bank was founded by Williams’ grandfather in 1902 and has since been family-operated with a focus on agriculture lending. “As a result of term limits on loans guaran-

teed by the USDA Farm Service Agency, an increasing number of farmers and ranchers are no longer eligible for additional credit under the program, which could make access to credit in the future very difficult, if not impossible, for these producers,” Williams said. “For this reason, the American Bankers Association and many other lender and farm organizations recommend the repeal of term limits on the USDA Farm Service Agency Guaranteed Loan Program.” Williams noted that over 35,000 agriculture producers use the guaranteed loan program for credit, yet the practical application of term limits has caused hardships for producers that can least weather a financial setback. Williams testified that given the volatile nature of the agricultural economy, Federal Crop Insurance is a key risk management tool used to protect against unpredictable weather and potential catastrophic losses. “Federal Crop Insurance provides my customers with the certain-

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ty they need to make responsible planting decisions and provides my bank with the confidence we need to extend credit to our customers,” Williams said. “The program is widely accepted by farmers as a key element of a solid risk management plan that they can take to the bank.”

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Search for all types of auctions at any time. New w updatess alll the e time!!

ABSOLUTE PUBLIC

AUCTION

As we are reducing our used inventory, we will sell the following at public auction located at 401 Dairy Hill Rd, South Royalton, VT 05068. Take exit 2 off I89, to RT 14 West to Dairy Hill and watch for auction signs.

SATURDAY - JUNE 2nd, 2012 STARTING @ 9:30 AM

SELLING TRACTORS, FARM EQUIPMENT, IMPLEMENTS, LAWN & GARDEN

TRACTORS JD 5425 4WD w/542 loader JD 5410 4WD w/cab, heat & air JD 4620 tractor JD 2350 JD 2240 JD 4100 4WD w/mower deck & loader, 1073 hrs JD 4100 4WD w/mower deck & 535 hrs JD 650 4WD w/loader & 827 hrs JD 1010 gas JD B 2002 Holder C9700H 4WD w/hyd dump body w/McConnell over the rail mower, sander, snow blower, front blade, 2 sets of tires & wheels, cab w/ heat & air Oliver 1365 4WD w/loader MF 35 diesel Ford 3000 Ford 1100 4WD David Brown 1200 w/loader Massey Harris Mustang 1941 Case LAI Farmall 560 gas Ford 1910 4WD w/loader (needs work) Trojan wheel loader w/bucket & forks Tow Motor 4000# forklift VEHICLES 77 Ford F700 dump truck 1973 Mercury Cougar XR7 convertible IMPLEMENTS Int 5' rotary cutter Ford 5' 3pth scraper blade 8' box scraper LAWN & GARDEN JD X485 54" deck JD 285 w/bagger JD GT262 w/bagger JD 170 w/bagger JD 110 JD RX 63

JD 48 walk behind mower JD L120 JD 180 JD 345 JD 330 JD 212 JD GT262 JD LT155 Simplicity Conquest 16hp Cub Cadet 125 Husqvarna 1542 Cub Cadet GT1554 FARM EQUIPMENT New Frontier SB1107 3pth sickle bar mower JD 660 rake JD 336 baler w/thrower Kuhn FC202 3pth disc mower JD 1209 9' mower (needs pto shaft) Kuhn FC300 10" mower (needs pto shaft) 2004 New Idea 3726 manure spreader (Used very little, been in storage for 4 yrs) Ford 542 baler Fanex 400 tedder JD 3pth sickle bar mower 2-3pth scraper blades New Delta 8' chain harrow JD kicker IMPLEMENTS Valby CH/SH250 3pth chipper w/hyd feed Valby CH150 3pth chipper Henki CG650 chipper w/power feed Baker 3pth chipper Kelly model 30 3pth backhoe w/pump

JD backhoe attachment for 550 dozer Pronovost P50 hyd dump trailer Farmi JL501 3pth winch Woods 60 Brushbull rotary mower Woods MD160 rotary mower Toro aerothatch 83 spreader (like new) Pronovost Puma 94" 3pth snow blower Pronovost Puma 64" (Nearly new) Schulte 3pth snow blower Modern MT25 tow behind rock rake Hurd 3pth fert spreader Danuser hyd drive 3pth post hole auger Douglas 60" finish mower 7' snow bucket 3pth boom pole 2-41x14.00-20 turf tires on wheels 16.9x24 tires on wheels Box of hyd hoses & pto shafts 3pth wood splitters 9' hyd snow plow

TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK LUNCH BY WRIGHT'S

AUCTIONEERS: C W GRAY & SON'S, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT • VT LIC #128 802-785-2161 L F Trottier's 802-763-8082 Email address: cwgray@valley.net • Web address: www.cwgray.com Try: www.auctionzip.com


UNH Cooperative Extension soils lab reaches 20,000 samples UNH Cooperative Extension reached a milestone April 11 — it

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UNH and UNH Cooperative Extension have provided soil analysis and

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nutrient recommendations to researchers, farmers and homeowners. The current services, a collaboration between UNH Extension and Penn State, began in April 2005 when the Analytical Services Lab run by the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture, closed its doors. Extension continued to offer the service by working with the Analytical Services Lab at Penn State, which uses the same testing methods, ensuring continuity with the results. The Extension program began with a Commercial Turf sample from a rugby field in April, 2005. The 20,000th sample was submitted in April on the newly-offered High Tunnels form. In addition to soil fertility information for homeowners, the soils program also offers specific fertilizer and lime recommendations for commercial fruit and vegetable farmers, commercial corn, forage and pasture, non-commercial hay and pasture,

commercial landscape, commercial turf, commercial greenhouse and container grown crops, biosolids, compost, and Christmas trees. A new high tunnels form initiated in 2012 gives specific recommendations for growing in high tunnel greenhouses. The soil testing procedures used are best suited to typical New England soil types. Lab results are reviewed by an Extension state or field specialist and the report is then sent to the client. The recommendations are based on the latest research conducted in New Hampshire and the northeastern states. The annual seven-year average number of soil samples processed is close to 3,000. The majority are submitted by New Hampshire residents looking for fertilizer and lime recommendations for vegetable gardens and lawns. Since 2005, when 2,148 samples were submitted, there has been a 50 percent increase. The

home, grounds and garden standard test, which now includes both organic and conventional fertilizer recommendations, also includes a lead screening analysis. This is important information for those who are growing vegetables for consumption. Many factors drive soil sample numbers; weather plays a significant part. March and April are typically the busiest months. March 2011 was colder than average and the ground remained frozen in many parts of the state. The soil testing office processed 57 samples. The warm weather this March sent people outside to their gardens in droves, and 336 samples were received. The cost for a Standard Home Grounds and Garden test is $17 and includes both conventional and organic recommendations. The form is available for download a t http://extension.unh.ed u/Agric/Docs/HG_G201 2edited.pdf

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 3

FREIPETION

processed its 20,000 soil sample. Since the early 1900s,


AUC TION CALENDAR

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, May 21 Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. 1 pm dairy followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 55:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • Village of Oxford DPW. Online Auction Closing at 6 pm. 06 Case 580M Series 2 backhoe. Auctions International, 800-5361401 ext. 115. www.auctionsinternational.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. . Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule.

Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-3223500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Tuesday, May 22 • Town of Watertown. Vehicles & Equipment Online Auction Closing at 6:10 pm. 4 lots including Ingersoll roller. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 ext. 115. www.auctionsinternational.com • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, May 23 • Marine Surplus/ Loader & Mowers Online Auction Closing at 7 pm. 5 lots including 01 JD 344H loader. Auctions International, 800536-1401 ext. 115. www.auctionsinternational.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Man-

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

ager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231

YO U

BY

www.drchambersauction.com Thursday, May 24 • May 2nd Chance Auction. Online Auction Closing at 6 pm. 21 lots including 00 Daewoo megaloader. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 ext. 115. www.auctionsinternational.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-3223500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800321-3211. Friday, May 25 • Clark Bros. Farm, DeRuyter, NY. 158 Hi Grade cattle. Farming since 2967. Top dairy averaging 60# out of the tank. AI breeding. Closed herd. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com • D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Spring Round up. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com

THESE

D.R. CHAMBERS & SONS 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY 13849 607-369-8231 • Fax 607-369-2190 www.drchambersauction.com EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm

Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 fresh. Over 1/2 the dairy are 1st & 2nd’s. Nice young herd with a lot of milk. SCC75,000. 4.0F 3.2P. Also consigned 28 open heifers from 300# to breeding age. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, June 2 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 9:30 AM: South Royalton, VT. Selling tractors, farm equip. & implements, lawn & garden. Inventory reduction for L.F. Trottier’s. Monday, June 4 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Feeder & Fat Cow Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, June 9 • North Bangor, NY. Craigmoor Farms Dis-

persal. Eric & Joel Craig. 140 head of reg. Guernseys, reg. Jerseys & reg. R&W Holsteins. Complete line of machinery. Delarm & Treadway, 518-483-4106 • 9:00 AM: Don Rice Jr., 5761 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 15 MM farm tractors & parts, 150 MM farm toys, MM & gas signs. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm • 10:00 AM: 1046 Cty. Rd 23, Sherburne, NY. Lok-N-Logs, Sawmill Consolidation Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Monday, June 11 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. . Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Friday, June 15 • Gene Woods Auction Service, Cincinnatus, NY. Pedersen Farms 100 head Holstein Cattle & some machinery. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com • 4:00 PM: Wayne & Roxanne Force, 7819 High Rd., off CR 75, 4 mi. NE of Prattsburg, NY. Kubota BX2230 4wd w/deck, excellent contractor shop tools, antiques, household. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm

Saturday, June 16 • 9:00 AM: Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Watertown, NY. Jefferson County Area Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Selling Heavy Equipment, Trucks & Trailers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, June 20 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, June 21 • Sharon Springs, NY. High Hill Farm Complete Dispersal. 120 plus head will sell. C/O Greg Law, owners. Managed by The Cattle Exchange. The Cattle Exchange, 607-7462226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 6:30 PM: 210 Pottsville St., Port Carbon, PA. 4.92 Approx. Industrial Acreage w/Building. Leaman Auctions, 717-464-1128, cell 610-662-8149 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip #3721

Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers

KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE 817 State Rt. 170 Little Falls, NY 13365 315-823-0089 • 315-868-6561 cell We buy or sell your cattle or equipment on commission or outright! In business since 1948 LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 • Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 5

• 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. . D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Saturday, May 26 • 10:00 AM: Middlefield, MA. Estate Auction. Case 580 backhoe, Ford & AC tractors, hay equip & tools, horse equip, furniture & antiques. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com Monday, May 28 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Memorial Monday we will be open for business for the farmers convenience. Special Plant Auction. Starting at 10 am. Selling hanging baskets, bedding plants, vegetable plants, shrubs, trees all you need for your gardening needs. We will then follow with misc. small animals, etc. followed by our normal schedule. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, May 30 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, June 1 • Gene Woods Auction Service, Cincinnatus, NY. Price Farm. 50 Head Dairy. 25 recently


Auction Calendar, Continued

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

(cont. from prev. page) Tuesday, June 26 • At the Farm, Newport, VT. Poulin-Royer, Inc. Complete Dispersal of all cattle and most equipment. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-6268892 Wednesday, June 27 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, July 6 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, July 7 • Garden Time LLC in Glens Falls, NY. 3rd Annual Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 Friday, July 13 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, July 18 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 :Saturday, July 21 • Middleburgh, NY. Reflections of Maple Downs Sale. Hosted by Maple Downs Farm II. Held in conjunction with the NY Holstein Summer Picnic. The Cattle Exchange, 607746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Leyden, MA. Selling trucks, trailers, shop tools & farm equip. including pay loader and farm tractor for Zimmerman Livestock Trucking. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 Wednesday, July 25 • West Addison, VT. Bodette Farm Complete Equipment Dispersal. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 Thursday, July 26 • 6:00 PM: County Highway Maintenance Facility, Geneseo, NY. Livingston County Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Friday, July 27 • 10:00 AM: Haverling Central High School, Bath, NY. Steuben County Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Saturday, July 28 • 9:30 AM: Martins Country Market. 3rd Annual Large Summer Equipment Auction. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Sunday, July 29

• 10:00 AM: Washington Co. Fairgrounds, Rt. 29 & 392 Old Schuylerville Rd., Greenwich, NY. Tri-State Antique Tractor Club Inc. antique Wheels and Iron Showw. 1st time consignment auction. Selling antique & modern farm, construction, gas engine, signs, toys, literature and related items. Show: Sat-Sun July 28-29. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Friday, August 3 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, August 4 • 10:00 AM: 1507 Pre-Emption Rd., Penn Yan, NY (Yates Co.). Real Estate Absolute Auction. 103 acre DeWick farm w/100 acres tillable, farmhouse, shop 2 machine sheds. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Wednesday, August 8 • 2:00 PM: Gehan Rd., off Rts. 5-20, 5 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. NY Steam Engine Assoc. 4th Annual Consignment Auction. 1st day of pageant of Steam Show Aug. 8-11. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Thursday, August 9 • 1:00 PM: Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY. Farm & Equipment Auction. Next to Empire Farm Days Show. Farm Equipment, Tractors, Antique Equipment, Construction Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, August 15 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Wednesday, August 22 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, August 25 • 9:00 AM: Penn Yan, NY. Finger Lakes Produce Auction Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-7282520 www.pirrunginc.com Thursday, September 6 • 1:00 PM: 10400 Gillette Rd., Alexander, NY. WNY Gas & Steam Engine Assoc. 2nd. Annual Consignment. 1st day of show Sept. 6-9. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Saturday, September 8 • North Country Storage Barns. 2nd Annual Shed and Shrubbery Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • Morrisville, NY. 30th Annual Morrisville Autumn Review Sale. Hosted by Morrisville State College Dairy Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Town of Lansing Highway Dept., Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing, NY. Municipal Surplus & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder

Sale. . Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 15 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Fall Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment. Heavy & Light Trucks. Consignments welcome. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, September 22 • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. . Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, September 26 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, September 29 • Twister Valley, Fort Plain, NY. Power Sports Consignment Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 Saturday, October 6 • 9:00 AM: 145 Paul Rd., Exit 17, Rt. 390, Rochester, NY. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction. Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars & Trucks.. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 13 • Hosking Sales . OHM Holstein Club Sale. Brad Ainslie sale chairman 315-822-6087. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 9:00 AM: Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY . Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, October 17 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Saturday, October 20 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 27

• Ithaca, NY. NY Fall Harvest Sale. Hosted by Cornell University Dairy Science Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds). Onondaga Co. area Municipal Equipment Auction. Municipal & Contractor Equipment.Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 @Saturday, November 3 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Fall Premier All Breed Sale. Call early to consign to make catalog & advertising deadlines. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, November 10 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 21 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, November 29 • Lampeter, PA. Destiny Road Holstein Dispersal. Jay Stolzfus, owner. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, December 1 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Winter Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 12 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Wednesday, December 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT No report COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA May 16, 2012 Cows: Canners 71-85.50; Cutters 86-92; Util 92.5098. Bulls: 110-115.50 Steers: Ch 113.-117; Sel 109-115.50. Heifers: Ch 109-111; Sel 101.50; Hols. 84-91. Calves: 67-156 ea. Feeders: 97-129 Goats: 141-270 ea.; Kids 55-58 ea. Sows: 40-43.50 Boars: 19 Hogs: 50.50-57 Feeder Pigs: 74-105 ea. Chickens: 4-14 Rabbits: 5.50-26 Ducks: 5.50-21 * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA May 15, 2012 Beef Cattle: Canners 5078; Cutters 75-87; Util 8288; Bulls 95-115; Steers Hols. 100-115; Hfrs. 85-100. Calves: Growers 1.25-2.35; Hfrs. 1.50-2; Veal .90-1.20. Hogs: Feeders 60-100 ea; Sows 40-45; Roasters 70110 ea; Boars 22; Market 50-55 ea. Sheep: 75-90; Lambs 1.502. Goats: 90-150 ea; Billies 150-220 ea; Kids 15-35 ea.

NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA May 15, 2012 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 31-32; 61-75# 50-95; 76-95# 4685; 96-105# 50-75. Farm Calves: 100-230/cwt Start Calves: 71-72/cwt Feeders: 72-110/cwt Veal: 93-106/cwt Heifers: 74-85/cwt Steers: 110-115/cwt Bulls: 85/cwt Canners: 30-75/cwt Cutters: 75.50-85/cwt Utility: 86-95/cwt Sows: 42-57/cwt Hogs: 52-77/cwt Shoats: 95-114 ea. Feeder Pigs: 51-93 ea. Lambs: 105-255/cwt Sheep: 47.50-140/cwt Goats: 60-285 ea. Rabbits: 2-20 ea. Poultry: 2-17.50 ea. northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ May 15, 2012 Livestock Report: 43 Calves .24-2.16, Avg 1.27; 32 Cows .385-1, Avg .79; 2 Easy Cows .34-.50, Avg .42; 1 Feeder 300-600# 1.40; 9 Heifers .65-1.03, Avg .82; 10 Bulls .65-1.02, Avg .82; 8 Steers .55-1.02, Avg .85; 2 Hogs .20-.285, Avg .24; 8 Roasting Pigs .95-1.30, Avg 1.20; 11 Sheep .74-2.12, Avg 1.37; 7 Lambs (ea) 6675, Avg 68.14, 12 (/#) 1.902.28, Avg 2.16; 35 Goats (ea) 27-160, Avg 66.14; 4 Kids (ea) 42. Total 184. Poultry & Egg Report: Heavy Fowl 1.25-4; Pullets 2; Bantams 2; Roosters 2.25-9.50; Rabbits 2-6.25; Pigeons 3-7.75. Grade A Eggs: Brown Eggs Jum XL .89-1.25; L .70-1.15. Hay, Straw & Grain Report: 6 Mxed 3.20-4.60. Total 6. CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY May 12, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 70-200; Grower Bulls over 92# 100-250; 80-92# 70-230; Bob Veal 1075. Cull Cows: Gd 72-92; Lean 45-75; Hvy Beef Bulls 72104. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 800-1800; Springing Cows 850-1700;

Springing Hfrs. 850-1650; Bred Hfrs. 750-1300; Fresh Hfrs. 750-1550; Open Hfrs. 400-900; Started Hfrs. 150400. Beef: Feeders 50-110; Hols. Sel 82-98. Lamb/Sheep: Market 100230; Slaughter Sheep 2060. Goats: Billies 75-200; Nannies 65-130; Kids 10-60. Swine: Sow 30-60. CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No report CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY May 14, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 150-160; Grower over 92# 185-230; 80-92# 150-200; Bob Veal 78-83. Cull Cows: Gd 87-91.50; Lean 83-85.50; Hvy. Beef Bulls 90-92. Beef: Veal 107-122; Steers 109-111. Lamb/Sheep: Feeder 240255; Market 145-170; Slaughter Sheep 60-70. Goats: Billies 160-285; Nannies 140-165. Swine: Boar 12-14 *Buyers always looking for pigs. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY No report DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY May 9, 2012 Calves: Grower Bull over 92# 200-270; 80-92# 180240; Bob Veal 10-70. Cull Cows: Gd 84-92; Lean 78-89; Hvy. Beef 85-93. Beef: Hols. Ch 100-108; Sel 96-101. GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY May 10, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 80-175; Grower Bull over 92# 175-230; 80-92# 160-240; Bob Veal 30-81. Cull Cows: Gd 83-95; Lean 77-88; Hvy. Beef 89-99. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 2200; Springing Cows 1750; Springing Hfrs. 1200-1700; Bred Hfrs. 9001200; Open Hfrs. 600-900; Started Hfrs. 300-600; Service Bulls 800-1200. Beef: Feedes 80-167.50. Swine: Sow 42-54. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY May 10, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 220; Grower bulls over 92# 190-257.50; 80-92# 150-240; Bob Veal 50-80. Cull Cows: Gd 84-90; Lean

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge

Bath

Chatham

75-82; Hvy. Beef 94.50-99. Beef: Ch 112.50-121; Hols. Ch 98-102. Lamb/Sheep: Slaughter Sheep 50-82.50 BATH MARKET Bath, NY No report FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Penn Yan, NY May 216, 2012 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 78-92; Canners/Cutters 48-84; HY Util 91.50-104.50. Dairy Replacements (/hd): Bred Heifers 1070-1130. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95-110# 50-67.50; 80-95# 45-65; 60-80# 40-60. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 95-237.50; 8095# 85-240; 70-80# 75-225; Hfrs. 100-195. Beef Calves Ret. to Feed: bull over 95# 140-200. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed 112-125.50; Sel 101-107; Hols. Ch grain fed 96112.50; Sel 86-92. Hogs: Sows US 1-3 42-45; Feeders US 1-3 27.5092.50. Feeder Lambs: Ch 50-80# 180-240. Nannies: L 80-122.50 FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY May 16, 2012 Flats: Flowers 3.50-11.50; Vegetable Plants 3-12.50. Hanging Baskets: 2.50-15 Planters: 8-24 Pots: .10-5.25 Asparagus: 2.20-2.35 Eggs: 1.60-1.70 Rhubarb: .25-1.20 Strawberries (qt): 5.60 Produce Mon., Wed. & Fri. at 9 am sharp, Hay Auctions Fridays@ 11:15.

FINGER LAKES FEEDER SALE Penn Yan, NY No report FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY May 11, 2012 Hay: 1st cut 85-240; 2nd cut 135-360; 3rd cut 235-240. * Hay Tuesdays & Fridays @ 11:15 am. Produce Friday @ 9 am sharp! HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY May 14, 2012 Cattle: Dairy Cows for Slaughter Bone Util .70-.90; Canners/Cutters .58-.70; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls & Steers .721.07. Calves: Bull Calves 96120# 1-2.65; up to 95# .102; Hols. under 100# 2. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA May 9, 2012 Slaughter Holstein Steers: Ch 2-3 1366# 98. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 87-89, lo dress 85.50-87.50; Boners 8085% lean 84-88, hi dress 89.50-90, lo dress 76.5080.50, very lo dress 70.50; Lean 85-90% lean 7984.50, hi dress 87, lo dress 75-78, very lo dress 7474.50; Light Lean 85-92% lean 75.50, very lo dress 5561. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1478# 95.50. Holstsein Bull Calves: No. 1 94-126# 216-257; 88-92#

207-242; No. 2 94-112# 170-220; 86-90# 185-207; No. 3 74-110# 124-162; Util 62-90# 38-96. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 90-110# 205-225/hd; No. 2 70-85# 90-100/hd. Slaughter Hogs (/hd): Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 260-275# 130-145; Sows US 1-3 450# 150; Boars Jr. Boars 240# 85. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 2050# 27-54; 90# 60; Roasting Pigs 150-170# 74-98. Slaughter Sheep: Ch 2-3 36-62# 182.50-200; 72-74# 197.50-215; Ewes Gd 2-3 122-186# 70-102.50. Slaughter Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 2 20-45# 25-65; Nannies Sel 1 110-180# 130-175; Sel 2 130# 140; Billies Sel 1 150# 190. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA May 15, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 1355-1535# 115-120; Sel 1250-1495# 111-114; full/YG 4-5 1770-1850# 97.50-105; Thin/Ret. to Feed 1065-1355# 100-109; Hols. Ch 1465-1560# 101-106; full/YG 4-5 1375-1785# 9697.50; Sel 98-100; cpl Cowish 89-94; Hfrs. Sel & Ch 1155-1450# 110-115; Beef Fed Cows 100-110. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 88-94; Boners 84.50-91; Lean 82-94; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 73-84; Shelly 72 & dn. Bulls: 1050-2110# 94.50105. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 930-1005# 99-105; Hfrs. dairy types 390-405# 101112; Hereford 710# 105; M&L 825-1075# 96-100. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 80-120# 222237; No. 2 65-115# 200-220;

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 7

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT May 14, 2012 Calves: 45-60# .50-.65; 6175# .82-1.38; 76-90# 1.401.70; 91-105# 1.75-1.80; 106# & up 1.82-1.85. Farm Calves: 1.95-2 Started Calves: .65-.72 Veal Calves: .85-1.25 Open Heifers: 1-1.25 Beef Heifers: .70-.90 Feeder Steers: 1.12501.2750. Beef Steers: .96-1.09 Stock Bull: .97-1.05 Beef Bull: .87-1.04 Replacement Cows: 1 at 1100. Boars: 1 at 50 Butcher Hogs: 1 at 105 Feeder Pigs: 45-75 Sheep (ea): 80-140 Lambs (ea): 105-275 Goats (ea): 55-155; Kids 25-95. Canners: up tp .7750 Cutters: .78-.81 Utility: .83-.88 Rabbits: 5-20 Chickens: 3-20 Ducks: 12-24 On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

No. 3 55-120# 110-185. Swine: Hogs 240-285# lean 56-59; Sows 490-740# 4045.25; 310-475# 38.50-52; Thin/Weak/Rough 20-36.50; Boars 450-585# 26.50-27. Goats (/hd): L Nannies 132182; Small/Thin 75-107; Fancy Kids 132-175; Fleshy Kids 115-130; Small/thin 4792. Lambs: Gd & Ch 35-45# 180-214; 50-70# 165-207; 1 110# 165; Sheep (all wts) 70. Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. * Special Fed & Feeder Cattle Sale May 29. * State Graded Feeder Pig Sale May 18@ 1 pm. Receiving 7:30 until 10 am. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA May 15, 2012 Rabbits: 11.50-16.50 Bunnies: 2-11 Hens: 2.50-10.50 Roosters: 2-10.50 Pullets: 1-2.50 Turkin: 6 Turkeys: 14-24 Pheasants: 11-13 Ducks: 2.50-7 Ducklings: 2-3.50 Guinea Pigs: 1-3.50 Peeps: .50-6.50 Eggs (/dz): XL Brown 1.451.55; L Brown 1.10-1.30; Nest run Brown .50-.70; Sm. Banty .60; Duck Eggs 1.20; Fertile Bobwhite 1.20; Fertile Old English Game 1.50; Fertile Guinea 2.25; Fertile Duck Mixed 1.20; Fertile Mxed color & Sizes .50; Eggs Sold Single: Fertile Pheasant .55-1; Fertile Turkey 1.05. All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report Receiving 7:30 - 10 am. Sale time 1 pm. DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC May 14, 2012 Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1470-1596# 104.75106.75; Ch 2-3 1306-1514# 101-104; Sel 1-3 13301350# 95-97. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 89-91.50; Breakers 85-87.50; Boners 82-84.50; Lean 71-81. Bulls: Grade 1 1284-1800# 97.50-102; Grade 2 11861640# 93-94. Feeder Heifers: L 2 300-

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four 400# 115-136. Feeder Bulls: L 2 300400# 123-138; 500-600# 96-110. Calves: 153. Bull Calves No. 1 94-124# 240-265; 7892# 240-270; No. 2 94-126# 220-250; 76-92# 205-245; No. 3 76-116# 140-210; Hfrs. No. 1 90-126# 220267; No. 2 84-90# 125-200; 70-78# 100-140; Util 70100# 55-90; 60-68# 25. Hogs: 230-282# 53.50-56. Lambs: 40-50# 180-192; 50-70# 170-187; 70-80# 175-190. Ewes: Gd 1-2 112-192# 7292; Util 1-2 122-190# 57-70. Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 1 2030# 55-67; Sel 3 30-40# 5570; Nannies 90-100# 115130. EarCorn: 2 lds, 215285/ton. Hay (/ton): 8 lds, Mixed 125-240; Timothy/Grass 220-305. EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA May 14, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Hols. Steers Sel 1-2 1325-1460# 96-99; Hfrs. Sel 1355-1375# 110-117. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 92-97, hi dress 97.50, lo dress 90; Boners 80-85% lean 84.5090.50, hi dress 96, lo dress 83-84; Lean 85-90% lean 77-83, hi dress 84-85, lo dress 73-76. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1370-2485# 101.50-106, few hi dress 114;YG 2 11751410# 95-101. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300400# 187.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 157.50-165; 500600# 145-150; 600-700# 128-130; M&L 2 300-500# 120-145; 500-700# 120130. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300400# 180; 400-500# 152.50155; 500-600# 155; M&L 2

300-500# 137.50-162.50; 500-700# 125-137.50. Ret. to Farm Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 85-120# 250280; No. 2 80-120# 190-240; No. 3 80-120# 140-160; Util 70-120# 55-70; Beef type 100-250# 167-225. Slaughter Hogs: Sows US 1-3 400# 50. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 50# 155; 70-80# 167-172.50; 120# 141; Ewes Gd 1-2 285# 60. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 63# 130; Nannies Sel 2 90# 125-130; 135# 112.50/cwt. GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA May 14, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1478-1508# 121.50122; Ch 2-3 1165-1462# 117-121.50; full/YG 4-5 115119; Sel 1-3 1065-1352# 114-117.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1404-1494# 107.50108; 1634-1674# 105-107; Ch 2-3 1188-1500# 102107; 1634# 98; Sel 1-3 1076-1548# 96-101.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1308-1368# 117.50121.50; Ch 2-3 1160-1520# 110-115; full/YG 4-5 105.50; Hols. 1448-1570# 95-99.50; Sel 1-3 1034-1368# 106.50110.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 96.50101.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 89.75-95, hi dress 96.50-97.50, lo dress 8590.75; Boners 80-85% lean 85.25-90.50, hi dress 9196.50, lo dress 80-85; Lean 85-90% lean 81-86.50, hi dress 86-89.50, lo dress 75.50-80.50, very lo dress 69-75; Light Lean 85-92% lean 76-81, lo dress 72.5074, very lo dress 61-69. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1116-1958# 98-109.50; hi dress 113.50-116. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 2 340-470# 127.50-172.50;

570-735# 114-135; Hols. L 3 580-960# 92.50-113; Hfrs. L 1 804# 116; M&L 2 300480# 132.50-173; 505-525# 117.50-154; Bulls L 1 380# 172.50; 700-772# 1227.50127.50; M&L 2 350-485# 140-158; 540-670# 117120; Hols. L 3 700-1065# 95-97. Ret. to Farm Hols. Bull Calves: No. 1 Hols. 96-124# 215-240; 80-92# 235242.50; No. 2 94-122# 185225; 76-92# 190-237.50; No. 3 68-120# 105-180; Util 60-96# 27.50-90; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 80-96# 205-255; No. 2 70-88# 105-180. Slaughter Hogs: Sows US 1-3 744# 46; Boars 654# 22.50. Feeder Pigs: Roaster pigs 132-202# 62-75/cwt. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 32-68# 155-215; 7088# 185-200; 126# 127.50; Ewes Gd 2-3 148-188# 62.50-90; 210-254# 55-60; Util 1-2 156-176# 47.5057.50; Rams 172# 75. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 65# 137.50; 100# 155; Sel 2 under 20# 15-35; 20-40# 3.50-105; 45-75# 77.50130; Nannies Sel 1 170# 170; Sel 2 100-140# 110142.50; Billies Sel 3 100# 65. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA No report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA May 12, 2012 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 170-250 Mixed Hay: 10 lds, 120-335 Timothy: 4 lds, 180-280 Grass: 8 lds, 85-260 Straw: 7 lds, 85-230 Oats: 1 ld, 3.60 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA May 11, 2011

Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1280-1635# 117-123; Ch 2-3 12601570# 114-119; Sel 2-3 1155-1325# 112-115; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1455-1665# 106-110; Ch 2-3 13251660# 102-106; Hfrs. Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1205-1315# 117120; Ch 2-3 1125-1430# 113-117; Sel 2-3 10751315# 110.50-113.50. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 86-90, hi dress 90-96.50, lo dress 83-84; Boners 80-85% lean 83-88, hi dress 88-93, lo dress 8081; Lean 85-90% lean 7682, hi dress 82-86.50, lo dress 70-75. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 8451960# 95.50-102, hi dress 105-110, very hi dress 114120, lo dress 90-95. Graded Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 120-128# 197; 94118# 230-250; 86-92# 210235; No. 2 120-128# 190; 94-118# 212-227; 80-92# 240-242; No. 3 90-130# 212227; 80-88# 237-242; 7278# 160; Util 60-110# 25-45. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA No report LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA No report MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA May 8, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1305-1495# 122.50123.50, fancy 127.50; Ch 23 1175-1575# 117-121.50; full/YG 4-5 115; 1605-1710# 112-117.50; Sel 1-3 11301575# 112-117.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1255-1575# 107-110; 1700# 104.50; Ch 2-3 1340-1585# 101104.50; Sel 1-3 1180-1520# 95.50-101. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1230-1500# 119120.50; Ch 2-3 1110-1550# 1174.50-119.50; full/YG 4-5 109.50; Hols. 1140-1485# 91-95; Sel 1-3 1020-1190# 108.50-112. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 92.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 85.50-89.50, lo dress 80-84; Boners 80-85% lean 80.5085.50, hi dress 87-90.50, lo dress 75-80, very lo dress 72-72.50; Lean 85-90% lean 75-79.50, hi dress 81-84, lo dress 70-72.50, very lo dress 61-67; Light Lean 8592% lean 67-73, lo dress 63.50-65, very lo dress 40.50-57.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1220-1770# 98-106, hi

dress 112-114; 2260# 100; YG 2 965-1535# 83.50-96. Feeder Cattle: Steers M 1 700-775# 135-140; L 2 540635# 118-137; L 3 Hols. 335# 112; 507-1075# 80-92; Hfrs. L 1 525# 133; M&L 2 285-500# 110-137; 530640# 106-128; Bulls M&L 1 585-590# 109-130; M&L 2 380-430# 107-117; 525705# 97-100; 725-820# 8086; Hols. Bulls L 3 250-300# 107-110; 460-480# 80-92; 520-1010# 72-90. Ret. to Farm Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-125# 230252; 80-90# 230-242; No. 2 95-120# 210-232; 75-90# 190-232; No. 3 70-120# 125185; Util 50-110# 15-102; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 85# 195215; No. 2 70-105# 100-160. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 230-275# 59.75-62.50, fancy 65; 280325# 58.50-61.50; 45-50% lean 244-275# 55.50-60.50; Sows US 1-3 325-465# 3542; 510-625# 41-49; Boars 370-590# 21-35; Jr. Boars 215-355# 42-51. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 1050# 34-70; 60-70# 67-80; Roasting Pigs 126-190# 661-72/cwt. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 30-67# 150-215; 7090# 140-192; 120-125# 120-137; Yearlings 130145# 85-115; Ewes Gd 2-3 110-155# 75-85; Util 1-2 165# 57; Rams 240# 60. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 70-80# 127-167; Sel 2 under 20# 15-40; 20-40# 52-115; 45-60# 100-132; 6575# 100-137; Nannies Sel 1 120-180# 172-185; Sel 2 80-110# 80-130; Sel 3 7090# 45-50; Billies Sel 1 180# 250. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA May 14, 2012 Cattle: 112 Steers: Ch 109-118; Gd 102-109. Heifers: Ch 108-115; Gd 100-107. Cows: Util & Comm. 85-95; Canner/lo Cutter 84 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 95-105 Bulls: YG 1 88-99 Cattle: Steers 100130; Bulls 100-125; Hfrs. 90-125. Calves: 91. Ch 130-150; Gd 90-110; Std 15-90; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 150-250; Hols. Hfrs. 90-130# 120160. Hogs: 38. US 1-2 62-63; US 1-3 55-58; Sows US 1-3 4250; Boars 22-40. Feeder Pigs: 17. US 1-3 20-50# 35-60. Sheep: 17. Lambs Ch 180200; Gd 160-175; SL Ewes 50-80. Goats: 30-185


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA May 14, 2012 Timothy: 190 Mixed Hay: 150-180 Round Bales: 50-180 ea. Straw: 180 New Hay: 165-195 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm.

NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA May 10, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1280-1600# 117-120; Ch 2-3 1200-1550# 114118; Sel 1-3 1120-1400# 112-115. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 86-90; Boners 80-85% lean 84-88; Lean 88-90% lean 78-82. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 120-128# 197; 94-118# 230250; 86-92# 210-235; No. 2 120-128# 190; 94-118# 212227; 80-92# 240-242; No. 3 90-130# 212-227; 80-88# 237-242; 72-78# 160; Util 60-110# 25-45. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA No report NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA May 14, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: NonTraditional, Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 50-60# 220240; 60-80# 195-230; 8090# 204-218; 90-110# 196212; 150-200# 168-186; Hair sheep 60-80# 178-205; 80-90# 186-200; 90-110# 190-196; 110-130# 175180;Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 40-60# 170-194; 60-80# 170-192; 80-90# 160-178; 90-110# 124-140; Hair sheep 70-90# 160-185; 90110# 170-184. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 76-94; 160200# 74-90; 200-300# 6984; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120160# 80-95; 160-200# 7286. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel

NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to last week corn sold .20-.25 lower, wheat sold steady to .05 lower, barley sold steady to .05 higher, Oats sold steady & Soybeans sold .30-.40 lower. EarCorn sold 3-5 lower. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.25-6.83, Avg 6.49, Contracts 5.07-5.10; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.506.25, Avg 5.97, Contracts 5.65-5.93; Barley No. 3 Range 4.50-5.90, Avg 4.96, Contracts 4.25; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50-4.80, Avg 4.60; Soybeans No 2 Range 13.31-13.96, Avg 13.61, Contracts 12.40-12.44; EarCorn 185-190, Avg. 187.50. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.40-6.95, Avg 6.60; Wheat No. 2 5.88; Barley No. 3 Range 5; Oats No. 2 3.50-5, Avg 4.16; Soybeans No. 2 Range 12.80-14, Avg 13.37; EarCorn Range 195220, Avg. 207.50. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.30-6.65, Avg 6.39; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.90-6.20, Avg 6.03; Barley No. 3 Range 4.25-5.30, Avg 4.86; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-4.90, Avg 4.03; Soybeans No. 2 Range 1314.41, Avg 13.27; EarCorn 180-195, Avg 187.50. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 6.25-6.51, Avg 6.40; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.47-6.70, Avg. 6.58; Oats No. 2 Range 4.75; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.1013.40, Avg 13.26; Gr. Sorghum 5.92. Eastern & Central PA:

Corn No. 2 Range 6.256.95, Avg 6.50, Month Ago 6.86, Year Ago 7.53; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.50-6.70, Avg 6.09, Month Ago 6.54, Year Ago 6.71; Barley No. 3 Range 4.25-5.90, Avg 4.91, Month Ago 4.98, Year Ago 5.14; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-5, Avg 4.26, Month Ago 4.26, Year Ago 3.96; Soybeans No. 2 Range 12.80-14.41, Avg 13.39, Month Ago 13.52, Year Ago 13.25; EarCorn Range 195220; Avg 194.16, Month Ago 201.25, Year Ago 184.50 Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 5.53-6.50, Avg 6.11; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.62; Oats No. 2 3.80-5.30, Avg 4.27; Soybeans No. 2 13.61. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary May 11, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 117-123; Ch 1-3 114118; Sel 1-2 112-115; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 106-110; Ch 2-3 102-106; Sel 1-2 95101. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 117-120; Ch 1-3 113119.50; Sel 1-2 108-112. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 86-90; Boners 80-85% lean 83-88; Lean 85-90% lean 75-83. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 105-114; Avg dress 97-106; lo dress 86-95. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 175-200; 500-700# 144-170; M&L 2 300-500# 130-167.50; 500-700# 127151. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 155-177; 500700# 130-159; M&L 2 300500# 130-155; 500-700# 122-147. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 151-193; 500-700# 147-167; M&L 2 300-500# 122.50-152.50; 500-700# 113-135. Vealers: Util 60-120# 25105. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 80-120# 230-270, few to 290; No. 2 80-120# 190240, few to 270; No. 3 80120# 125-205; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 200-330; No. 2 80-105# 125-180. Hogs: Barrows & Glts 4954% lean 220-270# 58.5063; 45-50% lean 220-270# 56-60. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 4043; 500-700# 48-51. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 1220-30# 200-230; 30-40# 170-200; 40-50# 170; 5060# 180-200; 65-75# 130140; 75-85# 120-130; US 2 20-35# 150-190.

Slaughter Sheep Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 178230; 60-80# 166-228; 80110# 170-190; 110-150# 124-143; Ch 1-3 40-60# 165-188; 60-80# 167-188; 80-110# 158-176; Ewes Gd 2-3 120-160# 60-78; 160200# 66-82; Util 1-2 120160# 54-71; 160-200# 6982. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 20-40# 122-132; 40-60# 140-167; 60-80# 158-185; 80-100# 180-199; Sel 2 2040# 64-69; 40-60# 98-131; 60-80# 122-156; Sel 3 2040# 45-68; 40-60# 60-102; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 162180; 130-180# 167-185; Sel 2 80-130# 142-159; Sel 3 50-80# 96-110; 80-130# 119-133; Billies Sel 1 100150# 205-236; 150-250# 235-260; Sel 2 100-150# 165-180; 150-250# 200212. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and/ton. All hay and straw reported sold/ton. Compared to last week hay & straw sold steady. Alfalfa 140-325; Mixed Hay 100325; Timothy 100-220; Straw 100-160; Mulch 6080. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 151 lds, 37 Straw; Alfalfa 150-345; Mixed Hay 135-400; Timothy 190-330; Grass 147-370; Straw 1350-215. Diffenbach Auct, May 7, 59 lds Hay, 6 lds Straw. Alfalfa 200-39; Mixed Hay 170-420; Timothy 170-260; Grass 220-430; Straw 155-270. Green Dragon, Ephrata:

May 11, 32 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa 170-340; Mixed Hay 145-330; Timothy 190-305; Grass Hay 145-345; Straw 187-225. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: May 10, 28 lds Hay, 9 Straw. Alfalfa 235250; Mixed Hay 160-280; Timothy 240-360; Grass 160-205; Straw 105-205. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola, PA: May 9, 31 lds Hay, 13 Straw. Alfalfa 255-320; Mixed Hay 160-295; Timothy 270; Grass 190-280; Straw 145-205. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 142 Loads Hay, 18 Straw. Alfalfa 180-300; Mixed Hay 75-360; Timothy 140-275; Grass 70-360; Straw 97.50230. Belleville Auct, Belleville: No report. Dewart Auction, Dewart: May 7, 15 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa 180; Mixed Hay 125325; Timothy 165-260; Grass 160-225; Straw 75125. Greencastle Livestock: May 7 & 10, 6 lds Hay, 0 Straw. Alfalfa 137.50-230; Timothy 177.50; Grass 300. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: May 12, 25 lds Hay, 7 Straw. Alfalfa 170-250; Mixed Hay 120-335; Timothy 180-280; Grass Hay 85-260; Straw 85-230. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: May 8, 11 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Mixed Hay 200-240; Timothy 205-280; Grass 75260; Straw 120-200. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: May 5 & 8, 23 lds Hay, 5 Straw. Alfalfa 175-185; Mixed Hay 120-290; Timothy 200; Grass 125-210; Straw 140-195. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington:

May 11, 25 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa 190; Timothy 140; Grass 200; Straw 200. VINTAGE SALES STABLES May 8, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 83-86, lo dress 76-79; Boners 80-85% lean 82-85, hi dress 88.50-90, lo dress 76-78.50; Lean 8890% lean 75-79, hi dress 80-83, lo dress 68.50-73.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1335-1950# 95.50-101. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 pkg 121# 230; 90-112# 250275; 80-85# 280-290; pkg 70# 230; No. 2 75-112# 237247; pkg 84# 272; No. 3 94109# 220-232; 83-84# 247; pkg 74# 190; Util 80-105# 32-50. Graded Holstein Heifers: No. 1 93-103# 322-330; No. 2 94-103# 280-290; pkg 83# 135; non-tubing 73-80# 5070. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA May 10, 2012 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 235-250 Timothy Hay: 4 lds, 240360 Mixed Hay: 19 lds, 160-280 Grass: 2 lds, 140-205 Straw: 9 lds, 105-205 EarCorn: 1 ld, 220 *There will be no auction on May 17, 2012 because of Ascention Day. WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA May 16, 2012 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 245-335 Mixed: 30 lds, 180-310 Timothy: 4 lds, 249-335 Grass: 12 lds, 184-230 Straw: 12 lds, 173-185 Fodder: 1 ld, 135 Baleage: 1 ld, 65

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 9

MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA May 14, 2012 Roosters: 4.50-7 Hens: 2.75-4.75 Banties: 2-3.50 Pigeons: 1.50-1.75 Ducks: 6-10 Geese: 6-13 Bunnies: 1.50-3.25 Rabbits: 7-13 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm.

1 30-40# 100-112; 40-60# 118-161; 60-80# 160-174; 80-100# 181-202; Sel 2 3040# 79-92; 40-60# 108-144; 60-80# 140-164; 80-90# 154-169; Sel 3 20-40# 6077; 40-60# 69-102; Nannies/Does Sel 1 80-130# 165-181; 130-180# 180200; Sel 2 80-130# 142-162; Sel 3 50-80# 98-111; 80130# 118-142; Wethers Sel 1 100-150# 230-247; 150250# 245-264; Bucks/Billies Sel 1 100-150# 231-246; 150-250# 264-290; Sel 2 100-150# 165-190; 150250# 194-207.


FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE BUSH HOG 6 foot rotary mower, $500. International 56 4-row corn planter, both good condition $500. 585-703-2001.(NY)

WANTED: Jersey Heifers, Springing and Short bred for grazing dairy farm. 585-5904948.(NY)

ANTIQUE CORN SHELLER, best offer, good condition. 315-696-5565.(NY)

IH 510 DOUBLE DISC drill grain only $1,000. Case IH 8312 discbine $15,000. 4 Row cultivator w/side dresser $1,500. 716941-5123.(NY)

WANTED: Used metal grain bin 6 ton or more and used rubber cow mats. 315-7615897.(NY)

NH SUPER 717 + 770 choppers, Gehl Hithrow blower, Dion unloading wagons. Also Craftmatic adjustable bed. 607-5663312.(NY)

LINEBACK BULL calves from good milk breed stock good grazers, longetivity, Central NY $300. 607-847-8438 EBY G.N. stock trailer in good shape. 518568-2901.(NY) WANTED: Dairy cattle beef, bull steers feeders, veal sheep and goats. 413-4413085.(MA)

FARM TRACTOR TIRES 12.4x28, 11.2x16 with tubes, 11.2x20 570-756-2764. Also contents of floor and wall tile business, $5. case obo. 570-442-1310.(PA)

1949 FARMALL “M” runs good, good tires, nice sheet metal $3,600. John Deere “H” 1940, not running, not stuck $1,800. 401662-9131.(RI)

2-5FT.ROTARY MOWERS, Ford 2 bottom plow, Ford 8ft. disc- Ford cycle mower 7ft., all 3 points. 315-923-5011.(NY)

LILLISTON ROLLING Cultivator with fertilizer attachment $2,000. 1040 Massey quick hitch loader fits 471 and 481, like new $2,500. 508-410-7996.(MA)

WANTED: 540 Hydraulic pump for IH 800 planter, also 3 point disc mower. 216-4011052.(NY)

PLASTIC MULCH layer lays 4ft. wide plastic mulch 3pt. hitch excellent condition $800. 716-945-5221.(NY)

CATTLE BELTED Galloways 22mo., old service bull, cows, calves, steers, all grass fed. Call anytime. 607-387-9383.(NY)

WHITE PINE SHAVINGS, kiln dried. 3.25 cubic foot paper bags excellent to absorb moisture. 529 Klock Rd. Fort Plain, NY. 518-568-3203

WANTED: Barrel spreader or smaller PTO spreader also 20.8 38 tire chains 1175 Case door. 315-855-4353.(NY)

SADDLE BRED MARE seven years old, come and drive her $1,000. 585-5543818.(NY)

1968 D-6 CATERPILLAR bulldozer, full cab, 75% undercarriage, battery start, 2 way blade $12,000. OBO. 607-8634928.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 457 4X5 round baler net wrap or string, like new condition, always kept inside. 518-744-1703.(NY) FOR LEASE 15 acres, pasture, barn waterer, ele. 4 wire high tensile fence, 15 min. from Owego, NY. 607-687-4679. CASE IH TWIN hitch for 5100 grain drills $600. or best offer. John Deere 2840, good condition $7,000. or best offer. 315-7298018.(NY) 2 ROW 3PT JD Max Emerge corn planter with insecticide $2,500. 315-5313324.(NY) FOR SALE: Combine International 403 12ft. cut, field ready, excellent condition, always stored inside $3,500. obo. 716-7314021.(NY)

FOR SALE: Tires two 13.6-28 FWD 10 ply. 25% tread $150. each. John 315-6623861.(NY)

INT MODEL “1100” sickle bar mower. Ferguson “T035”. Farmall “M” with loader. Misc. Int. tractor parts. JD four bottom trailer plow. 607-794-8380.(NY)

DRY 4X4 500LB. round bales, grass mix, stored inside $25. each. Wayne County, NY. 315-923-2410

RICHERTON 16 foot blower dump table. Gehl 1540 blower. 518-895-2590.(NY)

CASE 430 loader backhoe, old but in good condition $4,500. 4 Horse tractor needs work $700. Windham, NY area. 518-7343198

CAB FOR JOHN DEERE 7410 Power Quad, all glass and parts $7,000. OBO. 607-434-5691.(NY) JOHN DEERE 4440, good tires, front tires new, runs well, looks good, has served us well $19,500. Call Dave Henry. 401-8220131.(RI)

12FT. CEDAR HILL Transport Harrow $800. 275 Gal. fuel tank $100. Joel King 392 Elwood Rd. Fort Plain, NY 13339. 518993-2118

820 LAWN MOWER transmission $40. Lawn mower trailer $25. 6 Bean cups for John Deere 7,000 planter $50. each. 315536-8919.(NY)

GENERATOR, 75K Katolight, like new $3,500. Inverter 166 NH with extension $1,200. 518-643-8052.(NY)

FOR SALE: Yearling Holstein and Ayrshire bulls, 98 4x4 Dodge truck. WANTED:Pull type AC 60, 66 or 72 Combine. 607-5465588.(NY)

HIGH QUALITY forage soybean baleage 25 4x4 triple wrapped at $20. obo. Conrad Cook. St. Law. County, NY. 315-265-6788 STOCK TANK 50 gallons $45., tarp 16x18 $15., dog houses medium $20., Goats Alpine Young $55., ATV winch, levels 7.00. 315-531-8670.(NY)

WANTED: 4-6ft. Woven or American wire, steel T-posts. 585-554-6219.(NY)

WANTED: Round bale chopper not shedder trailer type preferred, also 2RN pull type corn sheller, good condition Troy, NY. 518-279-3241

WANTED: Skipper Key male dog for breeding. Andrew D. Hershberger 392 County Route 30 Williamstown, NY 13493.

DUMP TRUCK, 1971 IH, roadable, single axle, pintle hitch $1,500. 607-8293183.(NY)

IH 1050 GRINDER mixer JD 7ft. Sickle mower Mel-Cam rock picker pair of 16.9-30 rear trac tires 75% tread. 518-8720651.(NY)

WANTED: Two 13.00/ 24 good condition loader tires. 401-374-0077.(RI)

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Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

JD 918 FLEX HEAD for sale for $7,500. Niagara County. Hydro D50 spray pump 13.7 GPM $150. 716-297-4350.(NY)

SALE DION self unload wagon 16ft. 3BTR. roof $1,000. Little Giant 40ft. elevator $1,200. pair 18.4/30 tires worn sound $100. 585-535-7006.(NY)

4x4 TRACTOR 90H same cab, loader, A/C, heat, PTO 540-1,000 low hrs., 2wd Massey 253 clean lance truck camper loaded. 607865-5678.(NY)

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ASA welcomes launch of U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement With a proclamation from President Barack Obama on May 14, the United States entered into the U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement. ASA congratulates the governments of both countries for their collaboration and cooperation in the inter-

est of trade expansion. “The free trade agreement with Colombia holds a great deal of potential for America’s soybean farmers,” said ASA President Steve Wellman, a soybean farmer from Syracuse, NE. “The pact expands a valuable and

growing export market for American soybeans, meal, oil and products that require soy inputs like dairy, meat and poultry. The agreement also helps us regain lost market share in Central and South America’s third largest economy.”

The agreement ensures that more than half of all U.S. farm exports to Colombia — including soybeans and soybean meal and flour — will become duty-free, with virtually all of the remaining tariffs to be eliminated over the next 15 years.

The agreement also provides duty free tariff rate quotas (TRQ) on soybean oil, as well as livestock and dairy exports that utilize soybean inputs. To commemorate the event, ASA staff joined Colombian Ambassador Gabriel Silva for a reception at the

Colombian Embassy in Washington. Soybeans and soybean products are the largest U.S. agricultural export commodity, totaling nearly 1.5 billion bushels in 2011, with a value of more than $22 billion. Last year, the U.S. exported more than $182 million in soybeans and soybean products to Colombia, as part of $832 million in agricultural products. The International Trade Commission (ITC) estimates that the agreement will expand overall exports to Colombia by more than $1.1 billion and support thousands of additional American jobs.

WALPOLE, NH — The Cheshire County Conservation District in collaboration with Natural Resource Conservation Service is offering a Rotational Grazing: Invasive Species workshop for pasture enthusiasts of all kinds. The workshop will take place from 10 a.m. to noon on May 23 at Walpole Valley Farms, home to beef, poultry and pigs on pasture, at 663 Wentworth Road, Walpole, NH. Whether you have cattle, horses, sheep, chickens or pigs, learn how to identify and eliminate invasive pasture species. Heidi Konesko, NRCS soil conservationist and New Hampshire grazing specialist, will lead an informative pasture walk on seeding choices, the importance of soil fertility and the challenges of controlling the unwanted. This is a perfect opportunity to bring questions to the hillside for both the local expert and your peers and also to learn about NRCS programs available to help farmers meet their goals. To register and for more information on this workshop call the Conservation District at 603756-2988, ext. 115, email sharlene@cheshireconservation.org, or visit www.cheshireconservation.org.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 11

Rotational Grazing: Invasive Species workshop slated


Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Farmers’ Market Promotion Program grants Agriculture Deputy Secretary Kathleen Merrigan announced recently that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is seeking grant applicants for the 2012 Farmers’ Market Promotion Program. Approximately $10 million is available for marketing operations such as farmers markets, community supported agriculture and road-side stands. The grants, which are administered by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), are available through a competitive application process on www.grants.gov. The grants aim to increase the availability of local agricultural products in communities throughout the county. They will also help strengthen farmer -to-consumer marketing efforts. Projects that expand healthy food choices in food deserts or low-income areas (where the percentage of the population living in poverty is 20 percent or above) will

receive additional consideration. USDA, in coordination with the Departments of the Treasury and Health and Human Services, seeks to increase access to fresh, healthy and affordable food choices for all Americans, while expanding market opportunities for farmers and ranchers. Applications will only be accepted via grants.gov and must be received by May 21, 2012. Applications that are incomplete, hand-delivered, or sent via U.S. mail will not be considered. Applicants should start the grants.gov registration process as soon as possible to meet the deadline. Contact Carmen Humphrey, Program Manager, by phone: 202-720-8317, or e-mail: usdafmppquestions@ams.usda.gov for more information. Authorized by the Farmer -to-Consumer Direct Marketing Act of 1976 and amended by the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008

(the Farm Bill), the Farmers’ Market Promotion Program is in the seventh year of funding direct markets that benefit local and regional economies. The Farmers Market Promotion Program is part of USDA’s commitment to support local and regional communities. These investments are highlighted in USDA’s Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food (KYF) Compass. The KYF Compass is a digital guide to USDA resources related to local and regional food systems. The Compass consists of an interactive U.S. map showing local and regional food projects and an accompanying narrative documenting the results of this work through case studies, photos and video content. Get the latest AMS news at www.ams.usda.gov/ne ws or follow us on Twitter @USDA_AMS. You can also read about us on the USDA blog.

Country Folks has partnered with the New York State Corn and Soybean Growers Association to publish the summer edition of the Association's newsletter, The NY Crop Grower. This will be a special insert to the JULY 9th edition of Country Folks East and West, with details about the 2012 Summer Crop Tour. It will also be mailed to all of the members of the association and to prospective members. Additional copies will be available at Empire Farm Days in the New York Corn and Soybean Association booth.

2&# "#"*',# 2- "4#02'1# ', 2&'1 '113# '1 (3,#2& If you sell harvesting equipment, grain drying equipment, grain storage, seed or provide custom harvesting you need to be in this issue!

2I JF;=? ;H ;> IL NI CHKOCL? ;<ION ;>P?LNCMCHA IJJILNOHCNC?M CH NBCM IL @ONOL? CMMO?M JF?;M? =IHN;=N SIOL !IOHNLS $IFEM M;F?M L?J IL =IHN;=N G? ;N D;H>L?QMF??JO<=IG IL ;N  ?RN 


USDA advances water quality conservation across the U.S. Agricultural Producers located in selected watersheds will be able to participate WASHINGTON, D.C. — On May 8, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the launch of a new National Water Quality Initiative committed to improving one to seven impaired water-

sheds in every U.S. state and territory. The 157 selected watersheds were identified with assistance from state agencies, key partners, and NRCS State Technical Committees. USDA’s

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initiative provides them with additional tools to protect and improve fish and wildlife habitat and water quality.” Using funds from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, NRCS will provide financial and technical assistance to producers for implementing conservation practices such as cover crops, nutrient management, filter strips and terraces. To deliver the initiative, NRCS worked in collaboration with local partners and state conservation and water

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quality agencies to identify watersheds where on-farm investments have the best chance to improve water quality. NRCS also will work with state and federal partners, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey, to assess results over the long term. The initiative will build on ongoing efforts in the Mississippi River Basin, Great Lakes, Chesapeake Bay and other landscape conservation initiatives across the Nation. All eligible applications must be submitted by June 15 in order to be considered for this fiscal

year’s funding opportunity. However, NRCS accepts applications for financial assistance on a continuous basis throughout the year. Producers can view an online map or check with their local NRCS office to see if they are located in a selected watershed. This summer, NRCS will notify all applicants of the results of the competitive selection process and begin developing contracts with applicants approved for funding. For more information about the National Water Quality Initiative, visit us online.

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*MARSHALL MACHINERY INC.

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2009 Kubota L39 4WD, TLB, 1 owner, like new, 157 hrs. $29,900

2008 Kubota L4400 4WD tractor w/loader, R-4 tires, 389 hrs. $18,900

2010 Kubota L5240 4WD, C/A/H with loader, SS QT, ag tires, 1 remote, 153 hrs. $33,500

Haybuster model 256D bale chopper, Good Condition $7,950

TRACTORS ‘96 Agco 7600A tractor, 4WD, C/A/H w/ldr., 1 owner International 504 2WD tractor, WFE, very nice tractor International 886 2WD tractor, cab, air, 540/1000, good condition International 1066 hydro trans., 18.4x38 tires, 540/1000, runs great ‘07 Kubota M108 4WD, C/A/H, cast centers, 1 remote, 793 hrs ‘10 Kubota M110XDTC 4WD, w/loader, C/A/H, p shift, 2 remotes, 868 hrs. ‘06 Kubota M125XDTC 4WD, C/A/H, ldr., PS, 2 remotes, sharp tractor ‘07 Kubota M5040HD 4WD w/ldr., hyd shuttle, R-4 tires, 1 remote, 976 hrs ‘10 Kubota M5640 4WD tractor w/ldr., 1 remote, ag tires, ss qt, 228 hrs ‘09 Kubota M5640 4WD tractor w/canopy ‘10 Kubota M7040 4WD, C/A/H, 1 remote, cast centers, 67 hrs ‘07 Kubota MX500 4WD, R4 tires, 1 remote, 108 hrs. ‘07 Kubota MX5000 2WD tractor w/ag tires, low hrs. ‘09 Kubota MX5100 4WD w/ldr., 8x8 trans, R-4 tires, SS QT, 229 hrs. MF 4370 2WD, C/A/H w/boom axe mower, new tires, 3950 hrs COMPACT TRACTORS & LAWN TRACTORS ’07 Cub Cadet 7284 TLB 4WD, Hydro mid mower, 264 hrs. Dixie Chopper XT3200 60” cut, 32hp, gas ‘08 JD 4005 4WD w/loader, ag tires, 888 hrs ‘11 Kubota B2320 4WD, ag tires, 6x2 trans, 20 hrs ‘10 Kubota B2320 4WD, 60” cut, R-4 tires, good condition, 194 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B232OHSD 4WD with loader 60” mid mower, hydro R-4 tires like new 83 hrs ‘00 Kubota B2710 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, hydro, very clean, 310 hrs. ‘00 Kubota B2910 4WD, 60” mid mower turf tires 748 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B2920 4WD tractor hydro, R-4 tires, 24 hrs. ‘09 Kubota B2920 4WD TLB hydro, R-4 tires, thumb, like new, 78 hrs. ‘07 Kubota B3030 4WD C/A/H R-4 tires like new 100 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B3200 4WD TLB hyrdro, R-4 tires 3pt., clean 1 owner tractor 23 hrs ‘11 Kubota B3200 4WD, TLB, hydro, R-4 tires, mid pto, good cond.186 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B3200 4WD tractor, hydro, 60” mid mower, 55 hrs ‘10 Kubota B3200 4WD tractor, hydro turf tires, good condition 313 hrs ‘08 Kubota B7510 4WD TLB, 6x2 trans, ag tires, 648 hrs ‘06 Kubota BX24 4WD TLB, R-4 tires, hydro, 1 owner, clean ‘06 Kubota BX1850 4WD, 54” mid mower, grass catcher, 664 hrs. ‘09 Kubota BX1860 4WD, 54” mid mower, 286 hrs. ‘01 Kubota F2560 4WD, front mount mower w/72” mower deck, good condition, 468 hrs ‘08 Kubota GR2010 20hp, AWD 48” cut w/ catcher, clean 151 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L2800 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, canopy ,274 hrs ‘09 Kubota L4240 HST 4WD w/loader, hydro, R-4 tires, SS QT, 299 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L440DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, 8x4 trans, 538 hrs. ‘11 Kubota L2800 4WD TLB ag tires, 8x4 trans 161 hrs ‘07 Kubota L2800 4WD TLB, good cond., ag tires, thumb, 249 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L2800 4WD tractor w/ldr., ag tires, 8x4 trans ‘94 Kubota L2950 4WD tractor w/ ldr., SS QT, new rear tires, good cond. ‘08 Kubota L3240 4WD tractor, R-4 tires, good cond., 590 hrs.

‘10 Kubota L3240DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, SS QT, like new, 101 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor with loader, R-4 tires, 43 hrs ‘08 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor w/ ldr., ag tires, 104 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3400 4WD TLB, hydro, ag tires, as new, 29 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor w/ canopy, ag tires ‘08 Kubota L3540 4WD tractor w/ ldr., hydro SS QT, clean machine, 264 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor w/loader, 8x8 trans., R-4 tires, SSQT, clean, 352 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD, w/ loader, R-4 tires, GST trans, 408 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor, hydro, canopy, R4 tires, clean, 149 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L4400DT 4WD w/loader, ag tires, 254 hrs. ‘05 Kubota L4400DT 4WD w/ldr., R-4 tires, good cond., 523 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L4400HST 4WD w/ldr, hydro, ag tires, 238 hrs. ‘04 Kubota L4630 4WD tractor, C/A/H, creeper good cond., choice of tires ‘10 Kubota L5240HSTC 4WD, C/A/H w/ldr., SSQT ag tires, 1 remote, 153 hrs ‘12 Kubota T1880 lawn tractor, 18hp w/42” deck, never used ‘10 Kubota T2080 20 HP, hydro, 42” cut lawn tractor ‘08 Kubota ZD321 zero turn, 21 HP diesel, 54” cut, very good cond., 71 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZD323-60 23 HP diesel 60” cut good condition 770 hrs ‘08 Kubota ZD326 26 HP dsl 60” pro deck ‘10 Kubota ZD331 zero turn, 31hp, diesel, 60” pro deck, 280 hrs ‘08 Kubota ZG222-48, 22 HP, hyd lift, canopy, 167 hrs. ‘10 Kubota ZG227 54” cut, like new, 27 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZG227 27 HP, 54” cut, good condition, 181 hrs. ‘10 NH Boomer 50 tractor w/ldr., 4WD, shuttle trans, ag tires, SSQT as new, 69 hrs Simplicity ZT844 18hp lawn tractor w/48” cut, 530 hrs SKID STEERS ‘03 Case 1845C skid steer, hi flow, new tires, clean, 1 owner 07 Cat 256C skid steer, cab with heat, 6’ bucket, 1 owner, clean with grouser tracks, 310 hrs. ‘04 Bobcat MT52 skid steer with bucket and ride on platform, 236 hrs ‘09 Bobcat S250 C/A/H, power tach, 72” bucket, very clean, like new tires, 160 hrs. ‘11 Kubota SVL90 OROPS, hi flow, like new ‘08 Bobcat T190 skid steer, new tracks, good cond., 808 hrs. PLOWS W/ SPRING RESET Asst. 1, 2, 3, or 4 x 3 pt. plows Ford 101 3x plow Ford 309 2x plow SIDE RAKES & TEDDERS New First Choice 2 star tedder New First Choice 4 star tedder, hyd. fold New First Choice 4 star tedder, spring assist First Choice 6 star hyd fold First Choice 10 wheel converge rake NH 55, 256, 258, 259 side rakes - priced from $500 NH 256, 258 side rakes, some w/ dolly wheels

INDUSTRIAL ‘00 Bobcat 325 excavator, runs and works, 18” bucket, 2657 hrs ‘05 Bobcat 334 excavator, C/A/H, with thumb 627 hrs. ‘05 Bobcat 334 excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, 1 owner, sharp, 568 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat 335 excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, good cond, 18” bkt, 898 hrs ‘06 Bobcat 430 excavator, C/A/H, 24” bucket, good cond., 649 hrs. ‘06 Bobcat 442 excavator, C/A/H, thumb, rubber tracks, very nice, ready to work, 327 hrs. ‘06 Bomag BW211D 84” smooth drum roller, very good cond. Cat D3GXL dozer, C/A/H, 6 way blade, hy state, sharp Doosan SL290 excavator, good cond, 4’ bkt, good undercarriage, 3476 hrs ‘09 Dynapac CA134D roller, 54” smooth drum, w/shell kit, very clean ‘06 Dynapac CA121 roller, 54” smooth drum, good cond, 1303 hrs Gehl 353 excavator ROPS, hyd thumb, good cond, 700 hrs ‘07 Hamm 3205 54” vibratory roller, clean Hamm BW172D 66” smooth drum w/vibratory Ingersoll Rand 706H fork lift, 4WD, 15’ see thru mast 6,000 lb Cummins dsl. International TD20 dozer, runs and works good undercarriage ‘07 JLG 450A lift Kobelco 35-SR2 excavator, rubber tracks, front blade, aux hyd, 2515 hrs ‘08 Kubota B26 4WD TLB, 4WD, hydro, R4 tires, 207 hrs. ‘01 Kubota K008 excavator, 1 owner, good condition, 760 hrs. ‘11 Kubota KX41 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 92 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX41 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 12” bkt, 933 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX71 excavator ,rubber tracks, hyd thumb,, very good condition, 483 hrs ‘10 Kubota KX080 C/A/H, super double boom, hyd thumb, rubber tracks, good condition, 580 hrs. ‘07 Kubota KX080 C/A/H, hyd. thumb, rubber tracks, straight blade, clean, 1 owner, 799 hrs. ‘03 Kubota KX121 excavator cab with heat hyd thumb rubber tracks 2000 hrs. ‘10 Kubota KX121 excavator, C/A/H, angle blade, hyd thumb, rubber tracks, 127 hrs ‘09 Kubota KX121 ROPS, hyd thumb, angle blade, 24’ bucket, 368 hrs. ‘09 Kubota KX121 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, angle blade, 133 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX121 excavator, rubber tracks, hyd. thumb, angle blade, 237 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX121-3 excavator, ROPS, angle blade, hyd. thumb, rubber tracks, 343 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L39 4WD TLB, 1 owner, 18” bucket, like new, 157 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L39 4WD TLB, SSQT, 24” QT bkt w/3pt, sharp, 113 hrs ‘09 Kubota L45 4WD, TL, hydro w/ HD box scraper & aux. hyd., like new, 73 hrs. ‘09 Kubota U25 excavator, ROPS, hyd thumb, good cond, 302 hrs ‘07 Kubota U35 ROPS, rubber tracks, 24” qt bucket 594 hrs. ‘07 Kubota U45 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, hyd. thumb, sharp, 198 hrs. Rayco C87D crawler dozer, C/A/H, pilot controls, winch and forestry pkg., very clean

Rayco RG1625A stump grinder, 25hp, fair condition ‘90 Skytrack 6036 telehandler BALERS Haybuster 256DS bale chopper, good cond., dairyman special Tanco 580S new, 30” wrap, cable controls, standup CULTIPACKERS & SEEDERS 8-10-12 cultipackers Bobcat 72 seeder, 3pt. or SS mount, 6’ cultipacker seeder, good cond. MANURE SPREADERS Bodco LAGU-42” manure pump lagoon type NH 1038 stack liner wagon, good cond. HAYBINES/DISCBINES McKee 16’ 3pt. danish tines w/ rolling baskets, good cond. NH 488 mower conditioner, used 1 season on 25 acres, same as new NH 1411 disc mower, 1 owner, good condition DISCS IHC leveling disk, 14’ MISCELLANEOUS Allied 70 hydraulic tamper Asst used 3 pt. finish mowers & rotary mowers Befco 20’ batwing finish mower ‘10 Bobcat 3400 4WD, gas, manual dump, 159 hrs. Bobcat 48 fence installer, SS mount, unused stakes & fence included Brillion 3pt. 5 shank reset ripper Ferri TD42RSFM boom mower, unused Ford 309 3pt 2 row corn planter, very good cond. Ford 3000 sprayer, dsl., custom spray rig tractor Gehl 865 chopper w/TR3038 2 row corn head & pickup head Gehl 1540 blower, good condition Genset D337F 6 cyl. generator JD 1240 4 row corn planter ‘09 Kubota RTV500 4WD, camo, windshield, canopy, very clean, 134 hrs ‘07 Kubota RTV 900 4WD, wind shield, canopy, hyd dump, 1 owner Kubota RTV900 utility vehicle ‘11 Kubota RTV900 4WD, hyd dump, same as new, 61 hrs. ‘10 Kubota RTV900 4WD w/cab heat and snowplow, 208 hrs. ‘08 Kubota RTV900 4WD, hyd. dump. canopy & windshield, same as new ‘11 Kubota RTV1100 4WD utility vehicle C/A/H hyd dump & commercial snow plow 27 hrs. ‘07 Kubota RTV1100 ‘10 Kubota RTV1140 4WD, 4 seater w/hyd dump, like new, 215 hrs. LuckNow 87 snow blower, 7’ 3 pt., 2 stage, good cond. NH 185 single manure spreader ‘08 Polaris Ranger utility vehicle, AWD, 1 owner, clean, 402 hrs Skinner 1 row 3pt tree planter, very good cond. Stanley MB950 hammer Sweepster RHFAM6 rotary broom 3 pt., 6’ Timberjack T40 winch for skidders

We are your source for a wide range of used parts with free nationwide parts locator. Parts are dismantled, cleaned and ready for shipment.

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 15

6,700

$

Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will make available at least $33 million in financial assistance to farmers, ranchers and forest landowners this year to implement conservation practices to help provide cleaner water for their neighbors and communities. “The National Water Quality Initiative signifies a bold step by USDA to improve water quality in some very challenging watersheds,” Vilsack said. “American farmers are good stewards of the environment, and this


Hello I’m P eggy

Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

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May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 17

National Aggregate

Recycling professionals involved in the wood waste, C&D, scrap metal, asphalt & concrete, and compost recycling industries will find Waste Handling Equipment News a valuable source of new products, product innovation and site adaption.


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

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Page 18 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

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CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Announcements

Announcements

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ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Barn Repair

Bedding

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call your sales representive or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering. CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Bedding

Seward Valley 518-234-4052 WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

Beef Cattle 25 CROSS BRED cow calf pairs and bred cows, some of the cows with calves are already bred back, $1,900$2,300 depending on cow, group pricing also available. Call Bob 802-673-6629 RED DEVON CATTLE: All grass fed genetics, cows w/new calf at side, breeding bulls, yearlings. 401-423-2441 REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050 REGISTERED Yearling Angus Bull, out of Net Worth, $2,000/Negotiable. Call 802352-4586

Bedding

DRY SAWDUST

Attention Vermont Dairy Farmers Dry Sawdust Delivered in Walking Floor Trailer Loads Reliable & Sustained Supply. Call For Details

802-228-8672

The Williams Contracting Co.

Concrete Products

Metal Roofing Cut to the INCH 16 s Color

Agricultural Commercial Residential

24-29 G Pane a. ls

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822 978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill. NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101

Building Materials/Supplies

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS® CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

Dairy Cattle 25 REGISTERED Jerseys tiestall & freestall trained $1,100 each. 203-263-3955 50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170. FOR SALE: NOFA Certified Organic Holstein, Milking Shorthorn Cows, Bred Heifers. You choose 15 out of 100 head. 315-653-7819

HEIFER BOARDING Concentrate Your Efforts on Making Milk - Let Us Raise Your Heifers - Quality Care ~ References Available ~ SILAGE ALSO AVAILABLE Springfield, VT • 802-885-4000

Herd Expansions Building Materials/Supplies

Building Materials/Supplies

WANTED All Size Heifers

Agricultural Buildings Metal Roofing Pressure Treated Posts

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

315-269-6600

CENTER HILL BARNS RICHARD PITMAN, INC

P.O. BOX 262  EPSOM  NEW HAMPSHIRE 03234

TELEPHONE 603.798.5087 Business Opportunities

FAX 603.798.5088 Business Opportunities

Do You Grow Grapes? Do You Make Wine? CHECK OUT www.wineandgrapegrower.com Or Call For a Sample Copy

800-218-5586

REG. JERSEY Bred Heifers, pick 6 out of 12, $1,700 each. CV vaccinated & dehorned. Due July on. Bull was put in September 29th. Call 8am8pm only 207-322-2767 SCC Over 100,000? Call Us. Only 13 cents/cow. 39 years easy use. Effective, no withholding, results. PH: 800-876-2500, 920-650-1631 www.alphageneticsinc.com

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

40 Years Experience

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250

Cattle REG. TEXAS LONGHORNS: Cow/calf pairs, heifers, bulls, exhibition steers. See www.triplemlonghorns.com Tom/Julie (w)607-363-7814, 607-287-2430

HIGH QUALITY REG. Jerseys For Sale. Cows, bred heifers. Pictures & references available. 207-672-4892

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

 WANTED 

HEIFERS

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds (ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

OPEN HEIFERS NEEDED Call Us with you information or email

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Dairy Equipment USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

BERG-BENNETT, INC. RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866 Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us

• 6000 Gal. Storage VA (99) • 4000SOLD Gal. Surge • 4000 Gal. Surge NY • 3000SOLD Gal. Storage • 3000 Gal. Storage • 2000 Gal. Mueller OH NH • 2000SOLD Gal. Mueller OE • 1600 Gal. Surge • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. Surge • 1250 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. Majonnier • 1250 Gal. DeLaval • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 1000 Gal. DeLaval

• 1000 Gal. Mueller M • 900 Gal. Mueller OH • 800 Gal. Majonnier • 800 Gal. Mueller OH SOLD NY • 735 Gal. Sunset • 735 Gal. Sunset • 700 Gal. Mueller OH SOLD MD V • 700 Gal. Mueller • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 545 Gal. Sunset • 500 Gal. Mueller MW • 500 Gal. Mueller M • 500 Gal. Majonnier

• 415 Gal. Sunset • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 400 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal. DeLaval • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal Mueller M • 300 Gal. Sunset • 200 Gal. DeLaval • 200 Gal. Mueller RS • 200 Gal. Sunset • 180 Gal. Milkeeper • 150 Gal. Majonnier • 150 Gal. Mueller RH • 100, 180, 250 Gal. Milkeeper Self-Cont.

HEAT EXCHANGERS S • TUBE E COOLER 300-6000 0 Gall Storage e Tanks

SHENK’S

Sales 717-626-1151

Farm Equipment JD 337 Square Baler with kicker. Excellent condition. Kept under cover. Used s p a r i n g l y. $10,000. E:dresserhillfarm@aol.com T:508-765-3444 JD 5730 chopper, 4wd processor hay & 4 row chain heads. 585-746-5050 RICHARDTON 1400 dump wagon, no roof, $4,000. 585746-5050

Farm Machinery For Sale

L

K

Farm Machinery For Sale

1987 LN8000 10 wheel dump truck, 17’ body, $9,400. 978544-6105

JD 2840, 2WD, w/loader, cab, $9,500; JD 750, 2WD, 23hp, turf tires, $4,200; ‘95 Samsung Wheel Loader, SL120/2, 3800 hrs., Nice! $22,500; NH 1412, 10’ discbine, flail cond., $8,500; JD 1350 Disk Mower/ Cond., $4,800; JD 680 manure sprdr w/end gate, $1,200; JD 450 hydra push, $2,200; MF 823 round baler, wet or dry, $5,500; Gehl 2340, 10’ Disk Mower, $5,500. Full line of farm equipment available! www.youngsmilkywayfarm.com 802-885-4000

1987 NEW HOLLAND 1900SP forage harvester, 4WD, 2400 cutter head hours, 340W pickup head, 4 row corn head, auto sharpener, 3306 Cat, many new spare parts, machine works excellent! $32,500 OBO. 207-717-7000 8’ BRINLY AERATOR 3pt. hitch. Taylor way 12’ harrow. IH 56 4 row corn planter. Call after 4PM. 860-274-9146 EXCELLENT CONDITION John Deere 3955 forage harvester, 2 row corn head & grass head, $17,000; Knight 3030 Reel Auggie mixer wagon, $2,900. 978-544-6105

17 WAGONS IN STOCK. 21 GEARS IN STOCK. 7 ROUND BALE CARRIERS IN STOCK. Stoltzfus hay wagon 9’x18’ $3,600; 9’x20’ $3,800; w/8 ton WIDE TRACK gears. ALL STEEL w/PTF. E-Z Trail wagon 9’x18’ $3,700. 8 ton 890W E-Z Trail WIDE TRACK gear. 12 bale 31’ long low profile round bale carrier, $3,500. Round bale, headlock & slant bar feeder wagons. 3PT.H. round bale wrapper, $9,400. Round bale grabber w/QA included, $2,000. BIG DISCOUNTS FOR TWO OR MORE ITEMS! 518-885-5106

INT. 766, Black Stripe, cab, 3100 hrs. orig., super nice! $12,500; Int’l 966, open, 115 hp, nice machine! $9,500; Vicon RS510T, 17’ Tedder, $2,500; JD/ Frontier 7’ Disk mower, 3ph, $4,950; Kuhn 13’ tedder, $1,850; Krone KR151 round baler, $4,800; NH 269 Square baler- nice, $3,200. 802-376-5262

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

INT. PUMA 195 CVT trasmission, 210 hours, Michelin tires, loaded, owner downsizing, $135,000. 518872-1386

SPRING

B A R GA I N S !!

2008 Agco Hesston 7433 3x3 square baler, like new condition, preservative kit, only 5000 total blades since new! . . . . . . . . . . . . .$65,000 ‘08 MF 3635 4WD w/cab & Ldr, LH reverser, 78HP, 274 hrs! $35,000 IH 966 Black Stripe w/ROPS & canopy, 6000 hrs., nice 18.4-38, good original paint, a hard combination to find! . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,750 Case IH 800 9x flex frame reset plows, good unit . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 IH 4166 4WD, 3100 orig. hrs., 3pt., straight as an arrow! . . . . .$9,500 DMI 7 shank disk ripper, pull type, Very Good . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 Hesston 765 5x6 round baler w/netwrap, Like New . . . . . . . .$12,500 Hesston 730 round baler, 500 lb. bale, Brand New . . . . . . . . . .$8,900 White 273 23 ft. rockflex discs, very low acres, big axle . . . . . .$15,000 14 sets of IH, White, JD spring reset plows 4-x all VG to EX . . . .Call Claas RC250 Rotocut 4x4 silage baler w/net wrap, good condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,750 IH 1586 w/cab, new tires, 1981, 4200 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,900 Case IH 1620 combine w/15’ grain head, very good . . . . . . . .$18,000 IH 5488 4WD w/duals, late S/N, w/inline pump, good rubber, cheap power! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,500 Landini Vision 105 2WD w/cab & Tiger boom mower, 2400 hrs, 99HP, nice! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 Gehl 2580 Silage Special Round Baler w/Wide Pickup, Very Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,750 NH TB120 4WD, ROPS, 115HP, 200 Hours, 2008, Excellent Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,500 (4) NH 315-316-320 Balers w/Throwers . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000-$7,500

518-284-2090 • email: info@macfaddens.com Lititz, PA 17543

JD 2940 80hp, w/JD 148 Loader, 2WD, 540/1000 PTO, 2 new tires, 2 tires 75%, New hyd pump, batteries & seat. Recently serviced, in good running condition. $12,500. Charlestown, NH. Call 802866-5333 JD 3010 w/ ldr., 50hp, diesel, $6,500; JD/Frontier 10’ Rotary Rake, exc., $4,800; Buffalo vegetable/ corn planter, 2 row, 3ph., good cond., $2,800; Kuhn 452T, 17’ tedder, $2,100; Pequea 13’ Rotary Rake, $3,400; JD 327 Square baler w/ kicker nice $5,500; NH 66 Square baler $1,500. 603-477-2011

Farm Machinery For Sale

www.macfaddens.com Lots More On Our Website!

Farm Machinery For Sale JD 4055 mfwd cab,powershift, $25,000.00; JD 7200 4row corn planter, monitor, dry fert. $4,500.00.860-4657366

JD 450B Bulldozer, $5,000; JD offset harrow, $1,000; 23pt. hitch, 2 row cultivators; JD 6310, 4x4, 640 loader, $26,000; JD 6405, 2WD w/loader, low hours, $26,000; IH 986, 2WD, $8,500; JD 5320, 2WD, $13,000; NH 492 haybine; NH 575 baler w/thrower, $11,000; NH 311 baler; NH 256-258 rakes; JD 660 rake; New Pequea 11’ rotary rake; New 17’ Morra hydraulic fold tedder; New & Used metal kicker wagons; Case IH SBX-520 baler same as NH 565, like new, $7,500; NH 590 tandem axle spreader, $8,500; JD & IH front and rear wheel weights. Augur Farms, 203-530-4953 JOHN DEERE 4955, excellent condition, 4 wheel dr., very low hours, $49,500. 413-5305369

Farm Machinery For Sale

Charles McCarthy Farm Machinery TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY • UTILITY TRAILERS

BUY ~ SELL ~ TRADE 570-833-5214

PH:570-869-1551 Cell:607-759-4646 4698 ST. RT. 3004

MESHOPPEN, PA 18630

New Hay Wagons-SALE! STOLZFUS S HAY Y WAGONS All Steel w/PT Floor-Heaviest & Best Built on the Market Today! COMPLETE WAGONS RACKS ONLY: EZ TRAIL WAGONS: 18’ w/8 ton gear $3,600 18’ $2,400 18’ w/8 Ton Gear Prices so low I’m not allowed to print! 20’ w/8 ton gear $3,750 20’ $2,550 Buy 2 or More Any Size Complete Wagon or Just Rack, Take $100 Off the Price of Each! Free Delivery On 3 or More!

Feeders, Headlocks, Round Bale Wrappers, and more! Multiple purchase discs! “Farmer to Farmer” Sales that can’t be beat! Call Today! 802-875-2031

Lower your feed cost! Save an average of 3 to 4 lbs of grain per cow per day Going from non processing to a processor. $6.00 corn. . . .

MACFADDEN & SONS INC. 1457 Hwy. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 13459

We e Do o Tank k Repair 505 E. Woods Drive,

Westfalia/Surge double 6 milk parlor ato, 3”lowline, 2” washline, 2000 gal. Surge milk tank. 860-465-7366

Farm Machinery For Sale

GET A

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 19

Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

Dairy Equipment


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Page 20 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

Kennedy Tractor Williamstown, NY

(315) 964-1161 “We Deliver”

4x4 Landini Globus 75-80 HP Dsl glass cab w/AC & heat dual outlets $15,900; 4x4 Kioti CK30 HST hydro, 30 HP, Dsl, 100 hrs, just like new $9,750; Ford 2000 w/LDR $2,950; MF 85 62 HP, gas, wfe, live PTO, 3pt, ps $2,950; 3pt SB mowers 6’ & 7’ cut; New 3pt Rototillers for compacts 48”, 41” & 33”; Oliver 550 all orig., live PTO, nice $4,250; New 25 bu Ground Driven Spreader All galvanized $1,850; Bush Hog model 2610L rotary mower, 10’ cut w/Batwing super clean; Ford 540B Industrial w/canopy & Sd mt SB mower; 4x4 Kubota M8980 fully heated factory cab (also AC) 85-90 HP, Dsl, all new tires, dual outlets $11,900; ‘04 JD 5520 2x4 w/ Deluxe Cab & JD LDR heat, AC, stereo, 12 spd, power reverser, dual outlets, 2500 hrs, 75-80 HP, Dsl, super clean inside & out! $24,500; NH 4835 55-60 HP, Dsl, 2000 hrs w/canopy & Hyd. Sd mt, SB mower; Lots more

KICKER WAGON 8x18 Complete Wagon w/Removable Steel Sides Oak Floor, 8 Ton Running Gear, 11Lx15” Tires, Ready For Field

$3,585 •••••••••••••••••• Put on 16” Wheels and Used Pick Up Tires -

Save Another $80 •••••••••••••••••• 8x18 Bale Box Same As Above Your Running Gear

$2,295 •••••••••••••••••• Replace Oak Flooring with Expanded Metal Grading All Steel Construction

Add $300 •••••••••••••••••• Tandem Rake Hitch New $1,750 •••••••••••••••••• 8 Ton Running Gear $1,050/$1,150

•••••••••••••••••• New Morra 11’ Rotary Rake, Tandem 3 Pt. Hitch

$6,500 •••••••••••••••••• New Morra 17’ Tedder with Hyd. Fold

$4,950 •••••••••••••••••• New Stoltzfus Slant Bar Feeders •••••••••••••••••• J & L Haysavers Feeders •••••••••••••••••• Other Size Wagons, Rakes,Tedders & Feeders Gates Available

SANDY DODGE 668 RT. 12, PLAINFIELD, CT 06374

860-564-2905 NEW HOLLAND 790 chopper, 2 row corn head plus 6’ grass head, excellent condition, $9,500. CT 860-949-2434

Farm Machinery For Sale

Maine To N Carolina

Forget the Hay! Forget the Strawwwwwww?

ANNOUNCING IMMEDIATELY We are only forming Shredder Partnerships. Join us! Let’s shred the competition before the competition shreds us!!!

PleasantCreekHay.com

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

MORRISON'S

CUSTOM F E E D S Quality Organic and Conventional Feeds

PROTECT YOUR FEED FROM THE WEATHER Save money in prevented feed losses & up to 5 seasons of use Large Inventory • Next Day Shipping

We ship pallets of bagged organic & conventional feed to any farm in the North East by Land Air Express

810 South 14th Ave., Lebanon, PA 17042

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

802-633-4387

HAVE WET FIELDS? Have compaction issues? Low yields? Call D&D Farm Service/Agri-SC 1-888-401-4680

For Rent or Lease LARGE 500 COW freestall barn with 16 unit milking parlor 4,000 gallon refrigerator tank. Barn is also suitable for heifer rearing or beef production. (13339) 516-429-6409

Generators

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

WANTED

SAFE GUARD 12,000 WATT PTO driven generator for sale in Southern Connecticut, model #955, on trailer, $600 OBO. Call before 8pm. 860267-8134, 860-343-3307

814-793-4293

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Green Haven Open Pollinated Corn Seed. ***Silage, Grain, Wild life plots ***Available Certified Organic ***Early Varieties ***Free Catalog ***Green Haven Open Pollinated Seed Group 607-566-9253 www.openpollinated.com

Hay - Straw For Sale

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

Check out OUR used Rotocut Claas Balers! WOW!

WANTED

1-866-887-2727 • 1-717-228-2727 www.supertarp.com • rockymeadowfarm@evenlink.com

STANTON BROTHERS

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

LANSING, NY 607-279-6232 Days 607-533-4850 Nights

ROCKY MEADOW FARM

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale ROUND BALES for sale 4x5, net wrap, Fairhaven, Vermont. 860-836-1524

TOO MUCH HAY? Try Selling It In The

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

800-836-2888 or email

www.morrisonsfeeds.com

USED COMBINE PA R T S K & J SURPLUS

Hay - Straw For Sale

The Best Method For Covering Hay Stacks

Compare our Front PTO tractors, speed options and prices.

TRACTOR JOHN DEERE H $2,500. 2008 Eby Cattle Trailer 24’x8’, $20,000. Two 24” fan’s half horsepower $150 each. Sullivan show box 21”x24”x58”, $275. Camper Jayco 2003 29’ with one slide ouy, $12,500. 603-446-3324

Hay - Straw For Sale

518-768-2344 4X4 ROUND SILAGE BALES, 1st & 2nd cutting, FOB SE Mass. 508-648-3276

EARLY JUNE 4x4 BALEAGE feed analysis available $25. loaded. Jericho, VT. 802-5987591 FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

FOR SALE All Grades Hay & Straw Horse & Dairy Quality Bagged Shavings & Sawdust

WILL DELIVER

ROBERT ROLLE (518) 234-4052

GOOD QUALITY HAY & STRAW. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802849-6266 LARGE SQUARE BALES, processed first & second cut. Call 802-864-5382 or 802578-7352

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

Hay - Straw Wanted

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

HAY & STRAW

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers

90 ROUND BALES, 1st cut hay, approx. 4x6, net wrapped Will load. Call 802-352-4586

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

classified@leepub.com

REDUCED PRICES-NEED ROOM FOR NEW CROP 3x3x8 Squares Bales; 4x5 Round Bales Really Early Cut & Timothy Hay. All Hay Stored Inside on Pallets. Outside Round Bales, Good for Beef Cattle Picked Up or Delivered, Any Amount, Large Quantity

Heating

518-929-3480-518-329-1321

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

WRITERS WANTED Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper. Knowledge of the industry a must. Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles. Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Help Wanted Dairy Cattle Feeder position on a 700 cow dairy farm located in Southern Cayuga County. The eligible candidate will have experience in TMR feeding with a payloader and mixer truck. Knowledge of FEEDWATCH is preferred, but not necessary. Excellent compensation package provided. Please submit resume to: feedcowz@yahoo.com

Poultry & Rabbits

Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers (7 Meat Varieties)

Extremely hearty & perfect for free range Layer Chicks, Turkeys Ducklings, Guineas, Much More

(814) 539-7026

Lawn & Garden MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

Livestock Equipment

Poultry Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Clearview Hatchery PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

(717) 365-3234 Real Estate For Sale CENTRAL VERMONT DAIRY for sale, 394 acres, double 8 parlor, 200+ cow capacity, slurry store, Harvestore, bunk silos. $750,000 firm. Cows, machinery, and feed available. Call 860-836-1524

Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

Parts

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE

ORGANIC DAIRY FARM/ CREAMERY, 318 acres. 8 miles from Cooperstown,NY. Two 3 bedroom homes, 100 cow freestall, Double 6 milking parlor. Many outbuilding for young stock, hay & equipment. New cheese room, aging facility & solar electric system. 200 acres fenced for grazing. $998,500. 607-2869362

Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45



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Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

607-642-3293

Parts & Repair

Parts & Repair

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services

“BELT T BUSTERS” $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Agricultural Belt Service Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

Real Estate For Sale

www. equipmentexplorer. com Search All of our Auction and Used Equipment Ads at One Time! Auction & Used Equipment Ads From:

• Country Folks • Country Folks Grower • Hard Hat News • North American Quarry News • Waste Handling Equipment News are combined into our searchable database

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Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

POSSON REALTY LLC

horses, or make hay. For anyone that likes to hunt or fish. Use year round or on the weekends . . .Greatt Buyy att $174,900

787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

2334 4 - Oneidaa County. Beautiful log home on 45 acres of flat to gently rolling land. Half in field, half in woods. 30x60 three sided buildings with doors for equipment storage and vehicles. Very nice 2 story log home on a full finished basement. 2 bedrooms could be more, large eat in kitchen, nice living room with cathedral ceilings. Very open spacious home. This would make a nice gentleman's farm. Very nice location, central part of the county. Utica, Syracuse, Oneida and Rome all close by. Land is conducive to growing vegetables. Small pond for irrigation or watering cattle. Owners are retiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $179,900

(607)) 334-97277 Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

FAMILY LOOKING for dairy farm w/tillable land to support the herd. Serious buyer. Finances arranged. 518-9653725

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com #722 - A nice hobby farm not far out of Morrisville. 100 acres with 48A. tillable, 2 story barn 30’x65’ with 42 stalls - barn cleaner, 16’x40’ wood silo with unloader. 7 room home with kitchen, dining room, living room, 4 bedrooms. A good buy at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$225,000 #261 - 43.4 A. on Woodcreek Rd. - Town of Verona with 620 ft. road frontage - borders Barge Canal in back - 25 A. open & 18 A. wooded. Asking $198,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED TO $125,000 (WANTS QUICK SALE MAKE OFFER). #67 - Very quiet, private location 3 miles from Little Falls, NY with 46 A., 14 tillable, 30 pasture - great hobby farm - 9 room farm house in good condition has combination oil/wood hot water heat, a clean & comfortable home - also like-new doublewide with 6 rooms, 2 decks, 1 porch, above ground pool, work shop with electric, dependable year-round creek, drilled well & 2 springs - all for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$198,000 #26 - Ten plus acres between Middleville & Herkimer on Rte. 28 near KOA campgrounds with 40x80 ft. maintenance/shop/garage w/two 16 ft. overhead doors, one 14 ft. door, 16x30 ft. storage space inside plus office space - radiant heat in floors, 250 gal. oil tank, dug well & septic - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$149,000 REDUCED TO $129,000 B-301 - This income producing property is located on 6 acres. The house is completely remodeled and updated. It has a large sprawling yard with an in ground pool right out the back door.The 50x90 pole barn is rented for $1000/month. It also has a 3 bedroom attached apartment as income. The main barn has 9 overhead doors and has been seasonally rented.The main residence in the house is 3 large bedrooms including a large master bedroom. It has hot water baseboard heat with a new furnace in 2009. Close to Clinton & Utica. Asking $349,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED TO $300,000 C-52 - Certified Organic Dairy Farm Operation w/340 A. - 285 tillable, remainder woods & pasture - 50x75 two story dairy barn w/50 tie stalls, 2 box stalls & 22 calf ties - 2 inch pipeline, 3 units, 800 gal. bulk tank, 20x30 & 20x60 ft. Harvestores w/unloaders - unrestored 8 rm. stone home; prime certified organic farmland; 1.8 mi road frontage; drilled well; stream runs thru property - parcel could be divided into 185 A. with no bldgs & 149 A. or 149 A. w/homestead. . . . .Asking $1,350,000 - CERTIFIED ORGANIC DAIRY ALSO AVAILABLE. C-68 - 107.6 A. farm, 81.6 A. prime, river bottom farmland with 27 A. woods; spacious, 2400 sq. ft. well-maintained, 150 yr. old farmhouse, 10 rm., 5BR, 1 1/2 baths, new windows and furnace, full cellar, enclosed porch, furnishings included; two-story dairy barn, 48 stanchions, heifer/calf tie-stalls; Patz barn cleaner in covered manure room; 14x70 concrete stave silo; three-bay garage with overhead doors; additional bldgs. for storage, all in excellent condition; one pond and year round creek runs through property. Asking $395,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED TO $350,000

Real Estate For Sale ALPACA SHEARING TABLE excellent condition makes shearing Alpacas easy, $990.00. Monroe, CT. Westview Farm. 203-880-6814

Real Estate Wanted

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2332 2 - Oneidaa Countyy Gentleman'ss Farm 65 acres, flat to gently rolling land, 15 acres tillable, sandy loam soils, excellent for growing vegetables, year round pond for irrigation, balance of farm and woods. Great hunting. Lots of firewood. Good set of buildings. 2 story 30x70 barn for hay storage and livestock, box stalls for a few horses. Nice pole barn with shop 32x80 with power. Awesome building for machinery storage. Nice for working on machinery or vehicles. Good 2 story 4 bdrm home. Full block-layed basement. Updated power and windows. Nice eat in kitchen with sun room. Stone layed fire place. This will make a great farm to have a road side vegetable stand or business. Close to shopping, hospitals, schools. Mins to Oneida Lake or Sylvan Beach . . . . . . . .Askingg $179,900 2336 6 - Otsego o Countyy Farm - 86 acres. Year round trout stream. Excellent Hunting. 45 tillable acres, very productive well drained soils. Balance is woods and stream. Older 2 story 3 bedroom home with a lot of remodeling. New windows, insulation, sheetrock, electric. New septic, new well. Property is within minutes of Cooperstown and is in the Cooperstown School District. This would make a nice place to raise beef,

2256 6 - Madison n Countyy Freee stalll Operation. 210 acres 150 acres of very productive tillable land. 2 barns with 280 free stalls. Double 10 rapid exit parlor. Large concrete pad for feed storage. Good 2 story 5 bedroom home with 2 baths. Several custom operators in the area for harvesting and planting feed. This farm is turnkey, ready to milk. Good farming area, agricultural and machinery businesses all close by . . . . Askingg $550,000. Owners would like to sell this spring yet, they are entertaining all reasonable offers. 2302 2 - Otsego o Countyy Freee stalll Operation. Buildings for 300 head. Double 8 milking parlor, large concrete pad for feed storage. Good 2 story 4 bdrm home. All situated on 70 acres of land w/40+/- acres tillable, gravel loem soils w/lots of additional land to rent reasonable. Great location. Mins from Cooperstown or Oneonta. Farm would work well for dairy although buildings are conducive for horses and beef. Farm has 2 trout streams. Excellent deer and turkey hunting. Nice area to live and farm. Priced to sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . d from m $245,000 0 to o $225,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Reduced

May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 21

Berkshires from our American Berkshire Registered & Certified Herd. All vegetarian diet, no antibiotics, chemicals nor hormones. Straw bedded & pasture access. Feeder Pigs<10-$110 each; 10 or more $100 each; Butcher Hogs$1.10/lb 4 or more-$1.00/lb liveweight. Breeding Stockboars & gilts. 717-488-8090. Lancaster County, PA 17555

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY

www.myerspoultry.com

Hogs

Real Estate For Sale


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

St. Lawrence Silo Service

Tractors 1985 2950 JD MFD Open Station Serial No. 551299 7000 Hrs. 30 Day Powertrain Warranty $18,500. Wayne County, NY. Phone 315-7296708

• New Stave Silos • Stave Replacement • Silo Retensioning • Shotcrete Relining • Footer Repairs • Fill Systems • Silo Parts • Chute Repairs CALL FOR ESTIMATE

Page 22 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • May 21, 2012

(315) 393-3399 Lisbon, NY 13658 www.slsilo.com

Tractor Parts

Trailers TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

Calendar of Events NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

MAY 19 2012 Animal Science Day Grafton County Farm, 3855 Dartmouth College Hwy., N. Haverhill, NH. 9 am - 3 pm. Register by May 11. Contact Grafton County Extension Office, 603-787-6944, or email becky.colpitts@ unh.edu.

Trucks

Trucks

1994 Freightliner 3406 Cat, 10 speed, 16’ body with coal doors, lift axle $18,500

1988 Peterbilt 379 Rolloff, 350 Big Cam Cummins, 13 Spd, Air Ride, Aluminum Wheels $17,500

2001 Mack RD 350HP, 8LL, 44K rears with lift axle $25,500

1998 Custom Flatbed Trailer, 5th wheel, tandem axle, 30’ deck, 5’ beavertail $3,750

1997 Ford 6 Wheeler Auto, 210HP Cummins, sander $5,500

1979 Mack Ladder Truck, 237 Mack Motor, Auto Trans., Boom Works Great $7,500 OBO

1992 International 2574 N14 Cummins, 9 Spd, 19’ of Frame $7,750

1980 Chevy C70 Water Truck 454 big block, 5+4 transmission, has pump on it $4,250

Many New and Used Feed and Gravel Bodies

Call Us With Your Used Parts Needs - Many Hydraulic Parts in Stock

DERBY Y TRUCK K PARTS 802-673-8525 Days • 802-895-2961 Eves www.derbytruckparts.com

MAY 21 Humane and Sustainable Livestock Farming Workshop Footsteps Farm, 55 Laurence Eleanor St., Stonington, CT. 4-7 pm. Contact CT NOFA, 203-888-5146 or email ctnofa@ctnofa.org. MAY 23 Introduction to Food Safety in Meat Processing Mad River Food Hub, 151-1 Mad River Canoe Rd., Waitsfield, VT. 8:30 am - noon. The cost is $25, which includes all course materials and lunch following the session. The course is funded in part by the Beef Checkoff Program. In addition, participants will tour the Mad River Food Hub. This US Dept. of Agriculture inspected meat processing facility produces raw, ground value added and smoked processed meats. To register go to http:// meatsafety.eventbrite.com. On Internet at www. uvm.edu/extension/food/?P age=food safety.html. Rotational Grazing: Invasive Species Walpole Valley Farms, 663 Wentworth Rd., Walpole NH. 10 am - noon. Come prepared to walk the grassy hillside!. Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext. 115, e-mail sharlene@ cheshireconservation.org. On Internet at www. cheshireconservation.org. MAY 26-27 38th Annual Massachusetts Sheep & Woolcraft Fair Cummington Fairgrounds, Cummington, MA. 9 am - 4 pm both days. On Internet at www.masheepwool.org. MAY 29 Farming for Life Webinar: Using Body Mechanics & Other Tools to do What You Love Longer Webinars are free and do not require preregistration. To join simply click “webinars” at www.uvm.edu/newfarmer. To request a disability related accommodation to participate, contact Jessie Schmidt at 802-223-2389, ext. 203 or 866-860-1382 by May 22. Contact Jessie Schmidt, 802-223-2389, ext. 203 or e-mail newfarmer@uvm.edu. JUN 1 Full Day Grazing School Knoll Farm, Fayston, VT. 9 am - 4 pm. Hands on workshop with essential information to start up or improve your grazing system. We will also take a walk around Knoll Farm to see their systems and grazing plan in action with their sheep flock. Bring your lunch, clean footwear, gloves and an empty thermos (you’ll learn why). Cost is $20. Contact Jenn Colby, 802-656-0858 or e-mail jcolby@uvm.edu. On Internet at www. uvm.edu/pasture. JUN 2-3 ASI Wool Handling School Norfolk County Agricultural School, Walpole, MA. The registration fee is only $20 (includes lunch), payable to Worcester County Sheep Breeders and mailed to Nancy Miniter, PO Box 729, Sherborn, MA 01770, together with your name, address, telephone and email address. Nancy can be contacted at jnen@aol.com

or 508-740-3839. A block of rooms has been reserved under the name “Worcester County Sheep Breeders” at the Holiday Inn Express, 395 Old Post Rd., Sharon, MA (781-784-1000) for $90/night plus tax. The Norfolk County Agricultural School is located a few miles away on Route 1A in Walpole, MA. JUN 7 Agroforestry Workshop Wichland Woods, Nelson, NH. 10 am - noon. Learn about fungi inoculation, habitat and harvest! Take home knowledge on how you can better manage your own woodland as well. Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext. 115, e-mail sharlene@ cheshireconservation.org. On Internet at www. cheshireconservation.org. Portable Skidder Bridge Building Granite Gorge, Route 9, Roxbury NH. 9 am - 4 pm. This hands on workshop will focus on the construction of a three panel portable skidder bridge. Bring work gloves and dress for the weather. Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext. 115, e-mail sharlene@ cheshireconservation.org. On Internet at www. cheshireconservation.org. JUN 8 15th Annual FFA Golf Tournament Windham Country Club, Windham, NH. 1:30 pm. Golfers and sponsors may register online at nhffa.org. Contact James McConaha, 603-491-5574, or e-mail jmcconaha@aol.com. JUN 14 Agroforestry Workshop Wichland Woods, Nelson, NH. 10 am - noon. Learn about fungi inoculation, habitat and harvest! Take home knowledge on how you can better manage your own woodland as well. Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext.115, e-mail sharlene@ cheshireconservation.org. On Internet at www. cheshireconservation.org Nitrogen Management Windyhurst Farm, Rt. 63, Westmoreland NH. 10 am noon. Learn how the tools of the trade can assist you in meeting the nitrogen needs of your crops and the benefits of having a nutrient management plan. Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext. 115, e-mail sharlene@ cheshireconservation.org. On Internet at www. cheshireconservation.org. JUN 16 NOFT-VT Presents Bovine Social Club Tupelo Music Hall, White River Junction, VT. 8 pm. NY area Americana band Bovine Social Club & special guest Patrick Fitzsimmons in concert. Tickets are $25 in advance. Concert to benefit the Vermont Farm Share Program which provides subsidized CSA shares to limited income Vermont families. Contact Tupelo Music Hall, 603-437-5100. On Internet at http:// tickets.tupelohallvermont.com JUL 12 Early Successional Habitat Duck Hole, Marlow NH. 10 am - noon. Directions upon request. Join us for a site walk & discussion at a successful location & learn more about

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1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week young woodland wildlife habitat. Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext. 115, e-mail sharlene@ cheshireconservation.org. On Internet at www. cheshireconservation.org. AUG 9 No-Till Demo & Performance Edgefield Farm, 123 Coyote

Canyon Rd., West Chesterfield, NH. 10 am - noon. A hands on demonstration of the Haybuster 77 No-Till Drill and a look at an earlier seeding with the implement. Contact Conservation District, 603-756-2988 ext. 115, e-mail sharlene@ cheshireconservation.org. On Internet at www. cheshireconservation.org.


May 21, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 23


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Country Folks New England 5.21.12  

Country Folks New England May 21, 2012