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19 March 2012 Section One of Two Volume 29 Number 52

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Dairy club members compete in regional 4-H quiz bowl ~ Page A5

Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly A17 Crop Comments A6 Focus on Ag A13 Moo News A8 Auctions B1 Classifieds B19 Farmer to Farmer A20 Truck B17 DHIA / DAIRY

Building a Dairy Farm Team ~ Page A4 Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good, and his mercy endures for ever. ~ Psalm 107:1


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

30th Annual Meeting of CT NOFA covers a lot of ground by George Looby, DVM For 30 years, the Connecticut Chapter of the Northeast Organic Farming Association has met annually to promote the goals of the association and update members and interested individuals on current trends, concerns and advances in the field of organic farming. This year’s meeting was held on March 3, at Manchester Community College in Manchester, CT. More than 400 people were on hand to bring themselves up to speed on a wide range of topics presented by over 40 speakers. As always, there was a topic of interest for everyone in attendance, which made selecting which session to attend a difficult one. In addition to the speakers, there were vendors of every stripe promoting a wide array of services and merchandise related in some way to the overall theme of the meeting. The conference was structured so that the morning session had a lecture period from 9:30 to 10:45, followed by a period devoted to announcements, a short business meeting for election of officers, followed by the Keynote Address by Jeffery M. Smith. Following the pot luck lunch there were two additional lecture periods starting at 1:45 and finishing at 4:30. With 45 workshops to choose from the attendees had to make some difficult decisions. The officers elected are James Roby, president; Bettylou Sandy, vice president; and Janet Hiller, treasurer. Directors elected are Elizabeth Fleming, Jane Maher, Ron Capozzi, John Turenne, Sven Pihl, Gary Hazelton, Steve Munno and John Putari. The focus of this year’s meet-

Keynote speaker Jeffrey M. Smith, founder of the Institute for Responsible Technology has author of two books gave aq presentation on the threat posed by GMOs. Photos by George Looby ing was the potential impact of GMOs on public health and organic farming and how those concerns should be addressed. GMOs are Genetically Modified Organisms are plants or animals whose genetic material has been changed to make the organism perform in a manner that meets certain commercial needs outside of that which might be considered normal for that particular species or variety. Perhaps the best known example of plant material that has been altered in such a way is field corn that has been modified so that it tolerates the application of Roundup, a product that most readers will recognize as a widely used herbicide. It is use to kill weeds that compete with crops such as corn, soybeans and cotton for water, sunlight

Joan Nichols of the CT Farm Bureau gave her audience an overview of Public Act 490, an act of the CT State Legislature that relates to the manner in which land is taxed in the state.

and fertilizer. Corn seed produced in the traditional manner will be killed or seriously impacted by Roundup if the timing or rates of application is wrong, but corn that has been genetically modified has a growth pattern that appears to be normal. At first there would appear to be distinct advantages to such technology but there have been issues identified since this technology was first introduced many of which are subtle, ill defined and oftentimes difficult to pinpoint. One problem is the emergence of “super weeds” — weeds that can withstand applications of Roundup. Keynote speaker Jeffrey M. Smith, founder of the Institute for Responsible Technology has published two books, “Seeds of Deception” and “Genetic Roulette” both of which spell out concerns that the author has identified as dangers in the food chain that need to be addressed. There is legislation pending in this session of the Connecticut Legislature designed to limit or greatly restrict the sale of food that has been produced using this technology. In visits to markets in the very recent past, it is almost impossible to identify produce that has been genetically modified. Conversely, foodstuffs produced organically are well identified. GMOs are not allowed for sale in the European Union. The FDA has a policy developed in 1992 stating that there is no difference in foods derived using this technology and those produced using more conventional methods. Smith’s presentation makes it is apparent that he takes a

rather strong contrary view. During his talk he cited instances where animals being fed GMO modified feed exhibited a variety of symptoms that resolved when it was replaced with conventional feed. He went on to suggest that there may be some relationship between autism and children fed GMO foods. The wide reach of the primary source of GMO modified seed is the Monsanto Corp., which is the manufacturer of Roundup. Over the years Monsato has become the largest seed company in the world and, in Smith’s opinion, if allowed to continue to grow unrestrained the potential dangers are ominous indeed. CT NOFA recently filed a lawsuit against Monsanto to restrain its activities, but the presiding judge threw the case out. CT NOFA is prepared to reinstitute proceedings. In an afternoon session Ed Stockman an organic farmer for 40 years offered some of his views on the possible threats of GMOs to organic agriculture. Traditional farmers have few restrictions as to how they manage their cropping programs, whereas organic farmers must adhere to well defined guidelines in the management of their crops that have been developed by the USDA. An example cited by Stockman was that of an organic farmer operating next to a conventional operation. The conventional operator has no restrictions regarding buffers between his fields and those of his next door neighbor, whereas the organic operator does. It is possible for drift from the conventional operator using GMOs to contaminate the crops of his neighbor who is a certified organic operator. This drift could be mist from a

herbicide spray or pollen from GMO plants. In either instance, a definite risk is posed to the plants growing in an organic operation. Bacillus theringiensis (BT) has long been used as an insecticide in greenhouse operations and field crops. It has been advocated because it is a naturally occurring organism that can be used without some of the concerns that chemical insecticides might give rise to. When used in a GMO program, risks can develop that would not be present when used in low concentrations as a spray. When genetically introduced into plant material it can pose a threat to livestock health when used as feed. Another threat may come from plants that have been modified so that they produce pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. These plants when planted close to organic operations can contaminate them though pollen drift. The plants are indistinguishable from plants that have not been modified. Alfalfa is the number one forage crop in the U.S. When genetically modified it is no longer an approved feed for organically grown livestock. If the supply of alfalfa grown in the traditional way is diminished that in turn will likely drive up the price making it more difficult for organic livestock producers to compete. There are many questions to be resolved that relate to GMOs and organic agriculture, few of them simple, but all worthy of careful review and consideration. In another afternoon session, Joan Nichols of the CT Farm Bureau gave her audience an overview of Public Act

CT NOFA

Page 5

James Roby was elected president of CT NOFA at the organization’s annual meeting.


Financial Planning with Holistic Management considered. Equipment replacement or depreciation funds should come from farm income; these are generally considered overhead or wealth generating expenses. Monitor Farm Business and Grow Income Wilner described three legs to the “sustainable farm stool:” social, environmental and economic. The social aspect of farming describes relationships with family members, farm staff, vendors, neighbors and customers. Great stress and inefficiency arise when the social leg of farming is ignored or poorly handled. In the worst cases this can, and has, caused farms to go out of business. The environmental aspect covers the health of the farm’s ecosystem. The economic aspect covers the checkbook, savings account, equipment replacement fund, college fund and retirement options. To effectively reinvest in a farm, it pays to look back on last year and assess what major problems or factors limited the farm’s economic, environmental and quality of life potential. These weak links could be labor turnover, weeds, repeated conflicts or insufficient data to make decisions. Brainstorm some potential solutions like mulches, irrigation systems, netting, new tractors, time on a family vacation or advertising. Determine the potential cost of these solutions and what time of year the money would need to be spent. Identify any potential time bottlenecks or cash flow issues. Solving these problems will move the farm closer to the whole farm goal and is not only a worthy investment, but important to prevent these problems from reoccurring. Wealth generating expenses are investments that address these problems and generate wealth. These expenditures should be a priority, even if it means cutting other expenses. Investigate the potential income these solutions may generate and test potential solutions or new enterprises using customer surveys, research new trends and emerging practices, and analyze potential value added products or new market outlets. There is a learning curve for farmers, staff and customers;

This chart illustrates the steps that should be followed to successfully implement Holistic Financial Planning.

Seth Wilner, farmer and UNH Extension Educator, led part three in a four-part Holistic Management series at the University of Rhode Island on Feb. 10. The workshop focused on Financial Analysis and Planning. Seated, from left, are Linda Del Buono and her father, Vincent, of Greenview Farm in Wakefield, RI; Martha Neale of Windmist Farm in Jamestown, RI; and Kathy Black, life coach, of Cranston, RI. Photos by Sanne Kure-Jensen successful businesses stay three to five years in a new venture before giving up. Longer payback periods just do not make sense. New farmers should have sufficient funds, savings, credit lines or off-farm income to keep their operation going for at least three years; this is typically the minimum time it takes before farmers can start drawing money out of new farm enterprises. In the early years, any farm profits need to be reinvested in equipment and supplies to keep the operation going. Many farmers don’t get to pay themselves a living wage, but rely on off-farm income during the start-up years. Many farmers look for ways to make money on unsold crops. Some cut and package non-blemished melon halves for a high markup; number two tomatoes or cucumbers can become salsa or pickles. Be sure each enterprise or project makes money. Review farmers market income versus time and expenses. Many farmers can make more money through a CSA, veggie shares, buying clubs or direct restaurant sales. Monitor and Shrink Expenses Many expenses are necessary, like equipment maintenance, fuel, labor, fertilizer or animal feed. Still other expenses are inescapable fixed costs like taxes, loans, staff salaries and insurance. Get creative to find ways to barter or cut your expenses. Create Wealth Generating Expenses and Potential Income spreadsheets with prioritized expenses and their expected month (for cash flow planning). These simple exercises help in selecting the projects with the highest return and in seeing potential cash flow bottlenecks and project when debts can be paid down. Wilner also recommends “The Organic Farmer’s Business Handbook: A Complete Guide to Managing Finances, Crops, and Staff — and

Making a Profit” by Richard Wiswall as a step by step guide to creating a business plan. Product Pricing Some farmers price their crops at prevailing levels never knowing if they are making any money. Some work from markets down and reduce costs until they achieve their desired profits. Others work from costs up. Variable expenses change with the crop or value added product mix. Overhead expenses are fixed costs like taxes, equipment loan payments and farm mortgages. The markup is the ratio of total overhead to total farm expenses. Add one to this percentage and multiply the result by the variable cost for the minimum sales price. Then add in your expected profit percentage or number to calculate the minimum sales price. If the market won’t support this price, there are two choices, reduce expenses or drop this crop or product. Know and Monitor Your Net Worth Farm evaluation should begin with a solid baseline. Calculate net worth by adding up assets using current market or Blue Book value and subtracting liabilities. Creating a balance sheet and cash flow statement will highlight the short and long term health of a farm business. Work with your farm accountant or extension staff to help compare per hour, per animal, per machine or per acre ratios with similar operations. Review financial statements monthly or quarterly. Net worth should increase over time. Net worth can be raised by adding animals, equipment, land, supplies and inventory, as long as liabilities and debts are managed. If net worth does not generally increase, then farmers should be realizing other benefits like increased quality of life or improved environmental or farm health. “If none of these values are increasing, you need to find a better way to farm,” said Wilner.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

by Sanne Kure-Jensen “With input costs rising 10 to 35 percent a year, farm management training is critical,” said Seth Wilner, farmer and University of New Hampshire Extension educator specializing in Holistic Management training. The third workshop in a four-part holistic management series, Financial Planning with Holistic Management, was presented at the University of Rhode Island’s East Farm in Kingston, RI. According to Wilner, many farms are going deeper in debt and capital is hard to access without thorough management plans. He said up to 85 percent of new farmers go bankrupt in the first five years of operation. Plan for Profitability The best ways to ensure a profitable operation are to plan and regularly monitor progress towards that plan. Wilner advised farmers to delegate someone to serve as Chief Financial Officer (CFO), like for-profit businesses. That CFO would be responsible for bookkeeping, analyzing the financial health of the business, human resources and marketing, including assessing new markets to grow the farm. Traditional business models use income minus expenses equals profit. Holistic Financial Planning turns this around. Wilner told attendees not to be satisfied with passively taking whatever is left after expenses; he urged attendees to actively plan for the profit needed to achieve their family’s financial needs and to achieve their farm and life goals. In order to achieve these goals expenses should be capped. Expenses that reinvest in the farm are given the highest priority under this cap. Farm and Family Budget Family budgets help determine what a farm needs to contribute to a family. Subtract off-farm income and the remainder is the minimum amount the farm needs to contribute to the family. Expenses for life events, such as children’s braces, vacations, college tuition, weddings and retirement funds should be included. Major farm equipment and capital reinvestments should also be


Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Building a Dairy Farm Team by Bernie Erven Ohio State University Extension Would anyone doubt that a successful dairy farm requires a team effort? Silly question? Not at all. Most dairy farms have groups of people or collections of individuals rather than teams. Success does not demand a team approach. A farm manager who prefers a team approach faces a tough test of patience, people skills, and communication. Team Basics A dairy farm can have a team of people, a group, or just a collection of individuals. The differences among the three are important: Team-Several people who work together as a cohesive unit to achieve specific, shared goals. Group-Several people who have common goals but work independently without depending on each other for their success. Individuals-Several individuals who work independently to accomplish their individual goals without depending on each other for their success. There are good reasons for dairy

farm managers to form teams. Successful teams are likely to help managers accomplish the following: 1. Efficiency in use of farm resources 2. Complementarity of skills brought to the team by its members 3. Reinforcement of goals, standards, procedures, and rules 4. Mentoring of newer and less skilled team members by other team members 5. Esprit de corps from team members personally enjoying each others’ company and the team’s accomplishments 6. Peer pressure to help meet team goals and to correct performance deficiencies 7. Monitoring of performance at both the individual and team level. However, people sometimes have understandable reasons for resisting teamwork: 1. Previous negative experiences with attempts at teamwork 2. Fear of the risk that goes with commitment to a team effort 3. Management's failure to develop an atmosphere of trust in a team's

Cover photo by Karl Kazaks A dairy farm manager who prefers to use a team approach faces a tough test of patience, people skills, and communication.

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470 Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas........................................suethomas1@cox.net. .......................................949-599-6800 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

ability to be good for both the farm and individuals 4. Some people not fitting well into a team environment, e.g., perfectionists, scorekeepers, grudge carriers, loners, and procrastinators. Stages of Team Development A dairy farm group goes through several stages before becoming a highly efficient and effective team. The stages are: 1. Forming 2. Storming 3. Initial Integration (norming) 4. Total Integration 5. Dissolution Teams go through these stages at different rates and in different ways. Most will go through all five stages provided they don't stall at an early stage and cease to function. Note carefully! We are describing a process uncommon in group work. Teamwork is easy rhetoric. The practice of teamwork challenges even the most experienced dairy farm managers. Some farm managers look for "top down" shortcuts. Some scoff at the time necessary to turn a group of people into a team. However, for those who understand the principles and then work hard at implementation, the payoffs can justify the effort. We turn now to the characteristics typically associated with each of the five stages in the team development process. 1. Forming 1. Members become acquainted 2. Members learn about goals and tasks of the team 3. Members evaluate work associated with and benefits of the team relative to career and personal needs 4. Almost everyone exhibits good behavior and courtesy 5. Leader is identified 6. Preliminary plans are made for the next steps 7. Members enjoy a good and seemingly easy start 2. Storming 1. High emotion 2. Conflict may occur during long meeting that seem to be inefficient 3. There is a lot of “behind the bosses’ back” and “behind the leaders’ back” kind of grumbling 4. High emotion characterizes some of the interaction among team members 5. Doubts based on previous negative experiences cause people to be cautious 6. Doubts emerge about ability to deliver all that is expected 7. Writing a mission statement and/or goals is stressful and leads to additional statements about differences of opinion 8. Outcome finally is to push ahead with a sense that some important progress has been made but that there is much still to be accomplished 3. Initial Integration (norming) 1. Team begins to function cooperatively 2. Rules of acceptable con-

duct, or norms, are established 3. Team needs begin to take precedence over individual needs 4. Hostility ceases 5. Mission statement and detailed goals are completed 6. Individuals begin to experience benefits of close cooperation with others on the team 7. Sense of closeness and group purpose emerges 8. Team has some major successes 4. Total Integration 1. Major successes continue 2. Conflict is rational 3. Creative tension regularly reappears 4. "What next?" is a compulsive question 5. Team struggles with how to handle changing membership 6. Successes are widely recognized 7. Members are concerned more about the team than their own successes 8. Team is well organized; meetings are short and efficient 5. Dissolution 1. No team goes on indefinitely 2. Teams that have functioned well sense when change, new members, and “mission accomplished” have taken members back to the forming stage. Cultivating Team Performance Neither the farm manager nor outside cooperators, e.g., veterinarians, can accept responsibility for team performance. Each team is responsible for its own performance. However, the following guidelines for team members, managers, and cooperators can help cultivate team performance: 1. Establish urgency. Have a driving cause, issue, or need. 2. Pay particular attention to early planning meetings and actions. Remember that most groups never reach the norming stage of team development. 3. Set some clear rules of behavior. Those rules will vary from team to team. Examples include holding all scheduled team meetings, starting meetings on time, volunteering to help each other with disagreeable jobs, saying thank you, and not talking about problems with neighbors and friends. 4. Set and seize upon a few performance-oriented tasks and goals. Make them SMART: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Rewarding, and Timed. 5. Challenge each other with fresh facts and information. 6. Spend lots of time together. There is no substitute for a team caring about its members and each team member caring about the welfare of the team. Celebrate birthdays, go to a baseball game together, have frequent team meetings, and have a daily "coffee break" together. 7. Exploit the power of positive feedback, recognition, and reward. Celebrating successes is time well spent. Source: www.extension.org


Communicating about ag with the non-ag public

Rodger Wasson explains some of the talking points that farmers and ranchers can use to communicate effectively with producers. Photo by Sally Colby

said. But we don’t go after them (for thinking that). We need to say ‘I hear your concern’ and engage them without becoming defensive. What people doubt is when you claim to be farming perfectly — nobody does it perfectly.” Through extensive research to determine perceptions about farming, USFRA found that many consumers think that farmers are tampering with nature. “People also think that although we say we’re a family farm,

we’re being strung along by a processor who controls what we do, and that we take shortcuts when and if we can,” said Wasson. “If you’re more and more like a big business as they (the consumer) envision, it’s a big business they can’t trust. Big businesses try to make money, and if farmers can round the corners, they (consumers) suspect that you will. When we say that we’re trying to feed the world, consumers think ‘yeah, right’ — you’re trying to sell more to the world. They make that conversion.” Consumers also often believe that farmers are only looking for subsidies, lax regulations, and that farmers don’t know for sure what the long-term effects of pesticides, antibiotics and hormones. Wasson says research showed that while many people have favorable opinions about individual farmers and ranchers, those perceptions vary by state. And while consumers were generally positive about farmers, they aren’t as positive about farming itself, and there’s a general mistrust of modern agriculture. Wasson mentioned that the Iowa Corn Growers are considering taking down seed corn signs at the edges of fields because the non-ag public believes that those signs indicate who owns the farm. Although farmers know what the signs are for, consumers don’t, and that’s a misperception that should be addressed. When talking with consumers, Wasson says that instead of saying ‘we are producing more’, use terms such as ‘smarter use of resources’. “Our old arguments are falling flat,” he said. “We can’t communicate as if everything is perfect — we have to acknowledge that there’s always room for improvement. When you focus on improvements, you

Dairy club members compete in 4-H quiz bowl ORLEANS, VT — Twenty-one youths from 4-H dairy clubs in Essex, Lamoille and Orleans counties participated on Feb. 29 in the regional dairy quiz bowl at the Orleans Elementary School in Orleans. University of Vermont Extension 4-H sponsored the event, which consisted of a written test and three rounds of 20 oral questions. Participants competed by age group for ribbons. For many, the regional quiz bowl also provided competition experience to get them ready for the State 4-H Dairy Quiz Bowl, March 17, at Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center. Although the focus of the day was on answering questions about dairy, including breeds, history, anatomy, animal health and nutrition, among other topics, the 4-H’ers also had the

Central Vermont 4-H’ers show off their ribbons after competing in the Northeast Vermont regional 4-H dairy quiz bowl competition. From left to right are Shelby Biasini, Morrisville; Ellie Moriarty, Stowe; Hattie Moriarty, Stowe, and Adele Biasini, Morrisville. Photo courtesy of UVM Extension 4-H opportunity to participate in a poultry quiz bowl just for fun. Dairy quiz bowl winners, by age group, ranked first through last place, are:

Cloverbuds (5 through 7 years old): Sadie Ellner, Morrisville; Emma Fortin, Derby; and Hailey Delabruere, Derby. Eight- and 9-year-olds: Caroline Kirby, East

Montpelier; Emma Nadeau, Holland; Ryanne Nadeau, Derby Line; Ellie Moriarty, Stowe; Meaghan O’Meara, Irasburg. Ten- and 11-year-olds: Isabel Hall, East Montpelier; Maddie Nadeau, Holland; Adele Biasini, Morrisville; Hattie Moriarty, Stowe; Olyvia Fortin, Derby; Makayla Kinney, Derby; Mackayla O’Meara, Irasburg. Twelve- and 13-yearolds: Maggie Kirby, East Montpelier; Owen Nadeau, Holland; Chris Girard, Lunenburg; Cole Stewart, Lunenburg. Fourteen years old and up: Shelby Biasini, Morrisville; Adam Pothier, Newport Center. For more information about 4-H in Caledonia and Lamoille counties, contact Lindsay Jones at 802-751-8310, ext. 357. For Essex and Orleans counties, contact Lindy Birch at 802-334-7235, ext. 481.

have to adjust what you say to who you’re visiting with and address the real concern.” Farmers should be aware that when they do make a connection with a consumer, anything that’s said can end up in someone’s blog or on a Facebook page. Wasson suggests farmers use the EASE approach when talking with people about ag: engage, acknowledge the concern, share, and earn trust. When asked a tough question, a good response might be, ‘I can see how that might worry you’. “We’re creating confusion at all levels,” said Wasson. “Be authentic, give specific examples and talk about your own situation so people believe you as a farmer.” Wasson suggests that farmers talk about their own operation rather than the industry a whole, and noted that consumers can tell if they’re being fed sound bites by farmers who have been media-trained. The infighting within agriculture must be stopped if farmers are to have an effective and positive message to consumers. Wasson suggests that farmers acknowledge various production methods for what they’re doing without denigrating others’ methods. “We can’t get defensive,” he said. “People turn off and stop listening. Many consumers have seen the ‘Learn About Your Food’ video series produced by USFRA and aired on Discovery Communications’ networks. These short clips feature farmers sitting down with consumers, discussing the agricultural community’s commitment to providing safe, healthy food choices. Farmers can learn more about USFRA and download videos from the ‘share’ section of the USFRA website at www.usfraonline.org/

CT NOFA Continued from Page 2 490, an act of the CT State Legislature that relates to the manner in which land is taxed in the state. The basis for the act is to tax land based on its current use, rather than on its highest value. The review included the steps a landowner must follow to enable him or her to take advantage of the benefits of the act. The cost savings realized from participating can be considerable. If the landowner qualifies under the provisions of the act the town or municipal assessor is authorized to make adjustments in the tax rate that reflects the current use of the land. There are certain restrictions built into the act that lessen the chances that it be misused. An example is

that there is a penalty for sale of the land for other uses within a 10 year period. Connecticut landowners who have not explored the provisions of this act are encouraged to do so. The wide range of topics presented was a tribute to the CT NOFA program committee’s wide range of interests and insights as to what is at the cutting edge of things organic. Many sponsors contributed to the success of the conference, including Stonyfield Organic, Farm Family, Manchester Community College Team Green, Hood Co-op, The Farmer’s Cow, Farm Credit East, Nationwide Insurance, CT Farm Energy Program and Common Good Market.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

by Sally Colby Farmers are becoming more and more aware of the importance of bridging the gap between those who grow, process and handle food and those who consume it. To address these concerns and encourage an open dialogue between farmers and consumers, the United States Farmers and Ranchers Alliance (USFRA) was formed. Rodger Wasson, president of his own agricultural consulting firm, represented USFRA and moderated a session on connecting with consumers at the Professional Crop Producers’ Conference held recently in Lancaster, PA. “I’ve never been as concerned about what we’re facing in agriculture as I am now,” said Wasson, referring to consumers who are raising tough but legitimate questions. “We have to play this game differently, and that’s what U.S. Farmers and Ranchers is about. The point is to have all producers — organic, conventional, whatever — work together and move from a war on words to a conversation led by farmers and ranchers.” Wasson says part of the problem is that most people don’t know a farmer other than perhaps at a farmers’ market. “They don’t have a grandma or grandpa back on the farm,” he said, “so they’re drawn to stories about farming through what they read.” Wasson says that today, the image of a farmer is often that of someone who is industrialized, heartless, and out to make money. He also noted that a lot of consumer mistrust comes from disconnects in communication. “When we say our products are ‘safe’, what they (consumers) hear is that we aren’t really sure what the long-term effects are,” he


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

Putting perennials to work Last Wednesday, as I write, I attended a seminar in the Mohawk Valley, with Jerry Brunetti as keynote speaker. In 1979, Jerry founded Agri-Dynamics, “a private, ecological, agricultural membership association”. Those are the words headlining the group’s sales catalog. Jerry’s motivation behind founding Agri-Dynamics was his vision to provide ecologically sound agronomic and nutritional consulting services, as well as creating a line of holistic animal remedies for farm livestock and pets. Fully familiar with the devastating results of conventional, chemically dependent, grainbased monocultural farming practices, he initiated a systems approach to educate and consult with farmers. These farmers, as well as communities, have decided to transition to ecologically responsible and sustainable farming, in pursuit of healthy, regenerative, and profitable solutions. Jerry is the managing consultant and advisor to Agri-Dynamics. Early in his presentation, he stressed the ecological tragedy taking place in the Gulf of Mexico, one commonly referred to as the “Dead Zone”. This underwater chunk of real estate consists of roughly 10,500 square miles, an area approximating that of Massachusetts. The Dead Zone is caused by soils eroding in the Mississippi basin, then washing all the way down the river bearing that name, then settling out southeast of New Orleans in the Gulf of Mexico. These mobile soils, consisting primarily of silts and clays, are laden with pesticides and soil nutrients. All this imported nutrition forces intense algal blooms, which scarf up the available oxygen. The animal life forms basically suffocate in this hypoxic (low oxygen) marine environment. Tiny animals (with

big long scientific names) give up the ghost, no longer expiring carbon dioxide for the marine plants to breathe. So it’s a lose-lose situation. The only winners would be the persons (including corporations) selling inputs to support the monoculture responsible for the soil losses. Brunetti stresses that perennial crops are needed to build up the soil so that it doesn’t wash away during flooding… and even during heavy rains that don’t cause visible flooding. Whenever a

creek, stream, or river turns brown, orange, or anything but clear, some soil is being lost. Healthy soils are characterized by high populations of earthworms, as well as much smaller life forms, which also breathe oxygen and kick loose carbon dioxide… which in turn feeds the crop plants we’re trying to grow. Jerry said that a healthy worm population can generate as much as 30 tons per acre of castings, the common term for worm manure. Some of our recommended crop practices are pretty hard on earthworms. When soil organic matter depletes due to nonstop planting of annual crops... particularly corn, and even soybeans... the worms feel uninvited. So do count-

less species of tiny organisms, which aren’t as easy to see as the much bigger spineless, slimy, creatures we’ve learned to love. Jerry says that while earthworms don’t appear to suffer much from herbicide applications, insecticides are a different story. Chemical insecticides depopulate earthworm civilizations quite thoroughly. Unfortunately, the Bt trait of genetically modified crops proves just as harmful as the more conventional insecticides. Brunetti didn’t mention this, but I already knew that when anhydrous ammonia, upon injection into soil... and contacting earthworm... dehydrates them fatally, immediately. In the short run, perennial crops, ones

that form sods, often don’t seem to make as much money as annuals. But in the long run, if we don’t hang on to our soils, in the wording of professional salesmen, not only have we given away the store to get the business, we gave away the factory. Jerry stressed that every civilization which collapsed, hastened that process by first destroying its soils. It some situations, a culture actually destroyed its forests first, then the soils became collateral damage. In the popular press the spotlight shines more on global warming than destruction of soils. Jerry tied the two issues together by stating that soil destruction, due to lost organic matter and different types of erosion,

pumps more carbon dioxide into Earth’s atmosphere each year than all the fossil fuels consumed by the planet’s industrial and automotive machinery. To better illustrate how much life is in the soil under our feet, he said to consider that most plants have as much rooting material under ground, in terms of biomass, as they do foliage, stems, and trunks above ground. Then he extended that comparison to animal life: it’s generally accepted that a healthy acre of above-ground pasture can support one animal unit (i.e., 1,000 pounds of cow, pig, poultry, or combination thereof); simultaneously, underground there will 1,000

Crop A7


U.S. Ayrshire youth challenge The National Ayrshire Youth Committee is challenging Ayrshire youth to sell calf raffle tickets with

the raffle to be held in June at the National Ayrshire Convention in Wisconsin. The youth mem-

ber selling the most tickets will receive a $100 cash prize. The second place prize is $75 and

third place is $50. Prices for the tickets are $2 each, or 3 for $5. The winner has the choice of the calf or $500. If the winner chooses the money, the calf will then be sold in the National Convention Sale with the proceeds going to the National Ayrshire Youth Fund. Tickets are available from the Ayrshire Breeders’ Association or a

youth committee member. The National Ayrshire Youth Fund is extremely vital to our organization. Through the youth fund, the National Ayrshire Youth Committee sponsors Ayrshire junior programs such as quiz bowl, record book, outstanding youth, and princess contests; scholarships, junior production awards, jun-

ior type classification awards, national junior shows and much more. In addition, they support industry-wide events with recognitions and awards such as dairy judging contests, national 4-H achievement luncheons and other requests that come before them. To support these activities, fund-raising is essential. You can help!

didn’t miss by much. Taking proper care of soils was mandated within months of Moses receiving the “Big Ten”. In the Old Testament Book of Leviticus (Chapter 25), God’s people are told to work their fields for six years, then “But in the seventh year shall be a sabbath of rest unto the land… thou shalt neither sow they field, nor prune thy vineyard… for it is a year of rest unto the land” (From the King James Version of the Bible, slightly abbreviated… not edited… by Paris.) With these last few thoughts in mind (and heart), I asked Jerry

Brunetti to “please comment on the wisdom of the Old Testament mandate regarding seventh year fallow.” I was grateful, but not surprised, that he knew exactly what I was talking about. He said that in New Zealand research is being conducted to document the total productivity of farmland working six years, then taking a year off... those practices being compared to conventional non-stop cropping. He said initially results are quite flattering to the 3500 year-old directive. You can bet I will keep track of that New Zealand research... and share with readers what I find.

Crop from A6

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March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 7

pounds of bacterial biomass, helping tie the whole picture together. I had never thought of comparing above-ground livestock to those underground (other than earthworms). But the concept was easy for me to accept, as I am aware of how much a mushroom’s rooting system sprawls through topsoil. (I actual wrote a column about truffles recently.) Soil health is not a new concept. Civilizations that abuse their soils fail sooner or later. Within the Judeo-Christian framework, the idea of taking care of soils didn’t quite make it into the Ten Commandments. But it


Page 8 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, Last month I talked about freshening problems, so this month I’d like to talk about preventing and treating calf problems. Good prevention for a calf starts when it is still inside the cow by feeding the cow correctly to help her immune system put antibodies into the developing colostrum. The colostrum will normally contain antibodies to germs that are found right on the farm. That is why you should NOT move cattle to your farm to give birth less than 2 weeks before calving since that’s about the time they need to create antibodies to the environment they are in. If you’ve had serious problems with young calf scours, you can help to boost antibodies in the colostrum to things like rota/corona virus, E.coli and Clostridium perfringens by vaccinating the dry cow with ScourGuard4KC® (two doses if it’s the first time ever, then once yearly thereafter). This has helped a lot of farmers in my experience. If white muscle disease has been a problem (weak calves that die in a day or two of birth), consider giving a dose of MuSe® to deliver high levels of vitamin and selenium. This should be done at about 2-3 weeks prior to calving. This will help against retained placentas and early lactation elevated somatic cell count. Once born, making sure the calf has gotten towards a gallon of colostrum within the first few hours is critical (the sooner the better, always). This is the only source of antibodies that the calf will receive until it starts making its own which takes many weeks, so it is the most critical factor in ensuring normal response to challenges the calf will encounter in its environment. If for some reason the calf didn’t get any colostrum, another cow’s will do (though its own mom’s is the best) or even something like First Defense® boluses with measured amounts of antibody. Any source of colostrum must be given within the first 12-24 hours at the very latest as the gut will rapidly close in order to not allow

germs into circulation. If a calf does get scours within the first 12 days of life, it is almost always due to rota/corona virus or E.coli bacteria. The first thing to do is to feed calves fluids more than twice a day since they will have bouts of diarrhea definitely more than just twice a day. Use about 2/3 the volume of a normal feeding, but feed 4 times a day, alternating between milk and electrolytes each time. A quick and handy homemade electrolyte mix consists of 1 gallon of water, 2 tsp. baking soda, 2 tsp. salt, and 8 tbsp. honey. If calves typically get scours by a certain day, try vaccinating the dry cows as discussed above and/or give the proven immune stimulant, Immunoboost®, 1cc under the skin a day or two prior to “usual” outbreak time. If scours is still a problem, give a treatment dose of about 50-75 cc PolySerum® or BoviSera® or Plasma Gold — all sources of antibodies against typical scours and pneumonia causing bugs that cattle commonly encounter. You can repeat the next day — these antibodies will slowly decline over 710 days. The best way to prevent baby calf problems is to run them at their mom’s side or other nurse cows, and preferably outside. If that’s not possible or desirable, keeping a calf with its mom for a week will at least allow for a healthy bonding to occur, yet not as strong and hard to break as keeping a calf with a cow until weaning. Keeping a calf with its mom allows vigorous nursing many times a day — this is good for both calf and mom. Why? The calf will take in many small meals instead of two large slugs which may cause digestive upset. This will also satisfy the calf’s urge to suck and therefore not potentially suck on pen mates. The cow will release natural oxytocin each time the calf bumps up to the udder to suck. This natural oxytocin release will help a first calf heifer to enjoy milk let down — and oxytocin release will help the uterus shrink down to normal size more quickly. Therefore,

if you have a first calf heifer that won’t let her milk down, put a calf on her and it should help. If this is not possible, vigorously stimulate the cow’s teats and udder, even bumping up against it with your fist, just as a calf does when it is searching for the teat (like those calves that bump up against you whenever they get a chance). That kind of physical interaction will give the brain a stronger signal to release oxytocin than just quickly washing the four teats and stripping out a few shots of milk. For the cow that hasn’t passed her placenta in the normal six hours, put her calf (or another calf) with

Moo News a Newsletter of

her and let it suck as often as it wants. This will help the uterus to contract and push out the placenta instead of it sitting in there and putrefying like they tend to do. Dairy farmers that raise calves on cows often observe that there aren’t retained placenta problems anymore. I’m

not certain how often beef cattle have retained placentas, but I doubt there is much due to beef calves running with their moms. By having calves with cows it’s allowing Mother Nature to take its course in a very positive way. Perhaps you’ll decide to try a small group of

nurse cows and calves and see how it goes — I would guess that you will find that those calves will be pictures of health. If running calves with cows start with 3 calves per cow, but at about a month to a month and a half, drop

Moo A9

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NASS asks farmers to sign up for census, share their story Census helps tell the story of American agriculture

In recognition of National Ag Day which was March 8, the United

States Department of Agriculture (USDA) called on America’s farmers and

ranchers to sign up for the 2012 Census of Agriculture and to share sto-

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of Agriculture. The same law requires NASS to keep all information confidential. In the Census, and in all related surveys, NASS safeguards the privacy of all respondents, ensuring that no individual operation or producer can be identified. The Census of Agriculture data benefits farmers and communities considerably, and NASS invites producers to share their Census stories in their own words. On National Ag Day, NASS will launch the “Share your Census Story” web page, where producers can tell how local, state and national farm services, programs and policies were shaped by Census of Agriculture data. They can also convey that by just answering a few simple questions, the Census data significantly affected their lives, operations and communities. “Sharing information about how agricultural and rural programs enhance their quality of life will help others understand the importance of Census information and encourage them to sign up and be counted,” said Picanso. For more information about NACS and the Census of Agriculture, or to add your name to the Census mailing list, or share your Census story, visit www.agcensus. usda.gov. NASS will mail Census forms on Dec. 29, 2012, to collect data for the 2012 calendar year.

Moo from A8 back to 2 calves per cow as they do drink a lot. You still need to feed the cows well. Perhaps a good trial would be to keep a few calves with their moms for the first week and see how things go — again I will guess that the calves will get out of the starting gate wonderfully and retained placenta incidence will go to near zero. One reminder: regardless of how you want to raise calves (hutches, indoor box stalls or on cows), never feed calves Johnes positive milk whether directly from a cow or in a bottle. Also, once calves are put outside (individual hutches, group hutches or with cows) do not bring them back inside

until they’re ready to freshen. Why? Stale barn air is very difficult on an animal’s system, especially if they have internal parasites weakening them or their immune system is weakened simply due to the natural stress of calving. The intranasal vaccines (TSV2®, Nasalgen®, and Inforce 3®) are all excellent at preventing respiratory disease/shipping fever and should be given about 3-4 days prior to mixing animals or in conditions without the freshest air. It is with calves raised as Mother Nature would that it’s truly easiest to see robust health — put some calves on cows this coming season and observe this for yourself.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

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ries about how Census data benefits them. Recognizing the central role of agriculture in Americans’ lives, USDA wants to make sure it counts all farmers and ranchers in the upcoming Census. USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) conducts the Census of Agriculture every five years and is currently preparing to send the Census form to all agricultural producers in December. “National Ag Day is an opportunity to celebrate the important contributions of America’s farmers and ranchers,” said Renee Picanso, director of NASS’ Census and Survey Division. “Census data can help us to better tell the amazing story of American agriculture, but that story will be incomplete if farmers aren’t all counted.” To put together a complete list of agricultural producers, NASS sent out the National Agricultural Classification Survey (NACS) early in 2012. This initial survey helps identify all potential agricultural activities in the United States and who should receive the Census form later this year. Producers who did not fill out the NACS can still sign up for the Census by visiting www.agcensus. usda.gov and clicking “Be Counted – Make Your Voice Heard.” Federal law requires all agricultural producers to participate in the Census


Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Farm Credit awards $30,500 to Northeast Farm Programs ENFIELD, CT — The Northeast Farm Credit associations and CoBank recently awarded $30,500 to 12 organizations as part of the Farm Credit Northeast AgEnhancement Program. The grants help recipients promote northeast agriculture, support young and beginning farmer initiatives, encourage agricultural youth programs and generate a greater understanding of the Northeast’s vital agricultural, commercial fishing and forest products industries among the nonfarm public. The associations include Farm Credit East; Yankee Farm Credit; and Farm Credit of Maine. In partnership with CoBank (Denver, CO), these Farm Credit cooperatives have a long history of supporting farm programs through their Farm Credit Northeast AgEnhancement Program. Since its inception in 1996, Farm Credit AgEnhancement has awarded more than $1.26 million through 480 grants. Recent grant recipients Individual awards are considered in April, August and December each year. The most recent grants highlight Farm Credit’s ongoing partner-

ship with organizations that make a significant difference in the lives of people involved in all aspects of agriculture. • A $5,000 grant will be used to support Cornell Dairy Fellows, a comprehensive undergraduate program for students considering careers in the dairy industry. This highly regarded program exposes college students to the challenges and opportunities involved in dairy farm production. • A $5,000 grant to New York Farm Bureau to support the New York Farm Bureau’s Annual Leadership Conference, which provides educational and motivational sessions for young farmers. This grant is part of Farm Credit’s on-going commitment to support young and beginning farmers. • Cornell Cooperative Extension will use its $3,000 grant to support an educational program on workforce productivity at the 2012 Fruit & Vegetable Expo. The purpose of the talk is to help both fruit and vegetable growers improve their labor management and organizational skills. • A $3,000 grant to the Holstein Foundation will be used to support their Young Dairy Leaders In-

CropCare rolls out 1000 gallon sprayer CropCare’s Ag Sprayers have been known for their quality and longevity for decades. An exciting addition to their 2012 equipment line is a 1000 gallon model, the TR1000, that enhances productivity by reducing refill trips for farmers that spray mid- to- larger size acreages. Features include a 1000 gallon “total drain” tank, Big Wheel Axle assembly for less compaction, and either a PTO or Hydraulic-driven pump. The TR1000 has an adjustable wheel base from 62”-120”. CropCare uniquely offers a “Built to Order” capability to tailor a sprayer for an individual farmer’s specific needs, increasing comfort and efficiency in usage — but staying within or below prices charged by other

sprayer manufacturers. Just a portion of options include automatic rate control, freshwater rinse with power wash system, chemical induction, quick fill, safety lighting, hydraulic boom height adjustment, and precision GPS guidance systems that will keep you on the cutting edge of application technology. CropCare’s careful engineering and high-quality American manufacturing produces a highperforming machine that’s easy on the pocketbook, and backed by our strong customer service standards and full-service sprayer parts division locally based in Pennsylvania.

stitute which helps develop leadership for the dairy industry. YDLI consists of three phases ensuring development of essential skills for individual leadership, applying the skills in real-life scenarios, and focusing on leadership as influence to benefit the dairy industry. • A $3,000 grant to the New Jersey Agricultural Society will support the New Jersey Ag in the Classroom Program, entitled Learning Through Gardening, which gives New Jersey students a better understanding of agriculture by helping them establish a school garden. • New England Jersey Breeders will use a $2,500 grant to support the national Jersey Cattle Association Convention which offers adult

and youth educational programs. • Rutgers University will use a $2,500 grant to support a new initiative of Annie’s Project New Jersey, an educational program dedicated to strengthening women’s roles in modern farm enterprises across the state. This new project will use social media to expand the educational programming of Annie’s Project. • The Vermont Holstein Association will use their $2,000 grant to support their Northeast Youth Show Calf Summit in April. This event brings together over 150 youth from New England and New York to educate them on calf selection, nutrition, care and showing. • A $1,500 grant to the New York Holstein Asso-

ciation will be used to support their annual New York Spring Dairy Carousel which offers judging contests to develop leadership skills and increases knowledge of cattle. • A $1,000 grant to Chefs Consortium of Cummington, MA, will be used to support efforts to raise awareness of local foods through various events, market and cooking demonstrations, culinary education and farm to school programming. • A $1,000 grant to the Horse Park of New Jersey will support the Educational Equine Expo to promote agriculture to children and young adults in a fun, yet educational environment. • Wolfe’s Neck Farm Foundation in Freeport, ME, will use its $1,000 grant to help establish a

series of farm and agriculture-based youth education and work experience programs. Farm Credit Northeast AgEnhancement Program • Created: 1996 • Total grant dollars since 1996: $1,271,866 • Total projects supported: 480 • Proposal submission dates: April 1, Aug. 1, Dec. 1 • Contact: Robert A. Smith, Farm Credit East, 2668 State Route 7, Suite 21, Cobleskill, NY 12043 • Phone: 518-296-8188 • Send funding proposals to: AgEnhancement@FarmCreditEast.c om • For more informat i o n : FarmCreditEast.com/Industry-Support.aspx

1990 Ford 8630 121 hp, MFWD, 18x9 power shift trans 4850 hrs, 3 remotes 20.8x38 rears 16.9x28 fronts clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000

2000 New Holland 648 silage special 4x5 round baler, wide pickup head, bale ramps, ex belts, very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000

1998 New Holland TS100 MFWD, 80 hp, 4083 hrs, 16 speed power shift 540+1000 PTO, 4 remotes, 90% 18.4x34 and 14.9x24 Goodyear super traction radials, very clean, original, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000

2009 JD 5085 M MFWD, 16x16 trans LHR only 92 hrs, EPTO 3 remotes 16.9x30 and 11.2x24 radials with JD 563 SL loader brand new . . . . . . .$40,000 2008 JD 6430 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed auto quad LHR, 2802 hrs, HMS 18.4x38s and 16.9x24s with JD 673 SL loader 92 inch bucket electronic joystick real sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$60,000 2007 JD 7830 MFWD, cab, air, 165 hp, 1844 hrs, 2 doors, buddy seat 20 speed auto quad 4 remotes 540 and big + small 1000 pto front and rear weights front fenders 20.8x42 radials super sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$110,000 2005 JD 5225 468 hrs, 9 speed sync shuttle trans, 2 remotes has E-PTO3 point hitch 14.9x28 tires like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,500 2004 JD 5420 MFWD, 12x12 trans with LHR 16.9x30 radials rear 11.2x24 fronts dual remotes 3800 hrs with JD 541 loader very clean runs ex . . .$24,000 2004 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, IVT trans ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radial tires buddy seat 3824 hrs, with JD 640 SL loader electronic joystick real sharp clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,500 2004 JD 6320 2WD, cab, air, power quad, LHR, ex 16.9x38 radials, 540+1000 PTO buddy seat 3079 hrs, very clean sharp original . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 2002 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed power quad LHR, 2485 hrs, R+P axles ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radials dual remotes and PTO with JD 640 SL loader real sharp ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,000 1998 JD 5410 MFWD, 12x12 trans left hand reverser 3391 hrs 16.9x30 rears 11.2x24 fronts 540 loader with joystick folding roll bar 73 inch bucket very clean sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1986 JD 2550 cab, air, 3552 hrs, 18.4x30 tires dual remotes with like new JD 620 loader joystick and 7' bucket real clean runs ex only used on a bale spear before . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,500 1980 JD 4240 cab, air, with turbo and after cooler 6021 hrs quad range like new 20.8x38 radials dual PTO and remotes very clean runs ex . . . .$18,000 1980 JD 4240 cab, air, power shift 18.4x38 dual remotes and PTO 7820 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1979 JD 4240 cab, air, 18.4x38 rears dual remotes and PTO 5653 hrs real clean runs ex . . . .$19,500 1989 Ford TW 15 MFWD, cab, air, series 2 20.8x38s and 16.9x28s 10 front weights and rear weights, 6180 hrs 3 remotes very clean runs ex . . .$20,000

1987 Ford TW15 series 2 MFWD, cab, air, only 3821 hrs, like new 18.4x38 rears 3 remotes dual PTO original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,500 1979 Ford 5600 with Hiniker 1300 cab 62 hp 4094 hrs, ex 16.9x30 tires dual remotes 540 PTO sharp very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 1979 Ford 9700 cab, 5180 hrs, real good 18.4x38 rears dual PTO and remotes runs ex . . . . .$9,000 1977 Ford 9700 2WD cab, air, 5417 hrs, new 460/85R/38 rears dual power dual remotes and pto clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 2008 CIH Maxxum 125 PRO MFWD, cab, air, 517 hrs, 3 remotes power shift LHR, buddy seat 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials front fenders factory loader brackets and joystick loader prep package very sharp like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$62,500 2005 CIH JX95 MFWD, cab, air, 80 hp, 841 hrs, 18.4x30 and 12.4x24 Goodyear super traction radials front fenders dual remotes like new . . .$27,500 1984 IH 684D only 2317 original hrs ex 18.4x30 rears roll bar and canopy with ex CIH 2250 quick tatch loader joystick very clean original one owner hobby farmer ex tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1984 IH 3088 2WD 4 post ROPS ex 18.4x38s 81 hp, dual PTO and remotes runs ex . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1983 Case 2290 cab, air, 129 hp 20.8x38s 540+1000 PTO 5400 hrs, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 2001 NH BB940 3x3 square baler last bale ejector, roller bale chute applicator knotter fans real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 1994 New Holland 575 wire tie baler hydraulic bale tension pickup head and hitch NH model 77 pan type kicker real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000 1990 New Holland 575 baler hydraulic drive bale thrower and tension super nice clean original low use baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 New Holland 310 baler with NH 75 hydraulic pan type kicker real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 New Holland 565 baler with bale chute and hitch very little use off small horse farm very sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 2007 CIH RBX 443 round baler 4x4 baled less than 500 bales like brand new . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 2005 CIH RBX 452 4x5 silage special round baler net wrap and twine tie hydraulic wide pickup bale ramp only 3820 bales real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 2003 New Holland BR750 4x6 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps netwrap endless belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500

1996 New Holland 644 4x5 round baler silage special wide pickup head bale ramps net wrap very nice baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 CIH 3450 4x5 round baler very clean nice baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 2004 JD 467 4x6 silage special round baler mega wide pickup dual twine 11000 bales gauge wheels push bar ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 2000 JD 446 4x4 round baler baleage kit like new belts ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1999 JD 446 round baler baleage kit super sharp ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1996 JD 335 4x4 round baler silage special dual twine real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 2007 NH 1412 discbine impeller conditioner 540 PTO very low usage real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 2006 NH 1411 discbine rubber rolls 540 PTO very low usage real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,000 2005 JD 530 impeller discbine hydra angle on head real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 Late model Kuhn KC 4000G center pivot discbine rubber rolls ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 NH 38 flail chopper real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,750 CIH No 10 flail chopper nice one . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Fransguard SR4200p tandem axle hydraulic lift 13 ft 6 in width rotary hay rake very little use like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 Deutz Fahr KS2.42 rotary rake hydraulic lift .$4,000 New Holland 258 hayrake rubber mounted teeth in ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000 Kvernland taarup 17 ft hydraulic fold tedder ex cond 2 years old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Fella TH540T 17 ft hydraulic fold hydraulic tilt hay tedder just like new hardly used at all . . . . . .$4,500 NH 144 windrow inverter nice one . . . . . . . . .$1,500 JD 840 self leveling loader and mouting brackets for JD 7010 series tractor real nice high volume bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Dual prong forged bale spear quick tatch for JD 640 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$500 20.8x42 T-rail clamp on duals . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 18.4x46 T-rail clamp on duals . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 20.8x38, 18.4x38 and 18.4x34 clamp on duals Coming In Soon JD 7200 grow narrow dry corn planter 2005 JD 8220 MFWD 1700 hrs 3 PTOs duals

Financing Available Delivery Available

Bures Bros. Equipment

23 Kings Highway Ext., Shelton, CT 06484

1-203-924-1492


Farm Credit East pays borrowers $35.5 million in patronage dividends ENFIELD, CT — Farm Credit East, ACA, the Northeast’s largest agricultural lending cooperative announced recently that it has paid a record $35.5 million in patronage dividends to more than 9,900 farm, fishing and forestry business owners and operators across Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island. Paid entirely in cash, this patronage payment is equivalent to 23.1 percent of the interest that Farm Credit East customers paid in 2011.

As owners of their financial cooperative, Farm Credit East’s customers have the opportunity to share in the financial success of the cooperative through patronage dividends. Since the patronage program was first adopted, customer-owners of Farm Credit East (and predecessor cooperatives) have earned more than $370 million in dividends from ownership of their cooperative. This is the 17th consecutive annual patronage payment paid by Farm Credit East. Board Chairman Ab-

bott Lee, of Chatsworth, NJ, noted “The board of directors is committed to maintaining a financially strong cooperative that combines in-depth agricultural expertise with strong customervalue. Being able to consistently pay a healthy patronage dividend to our customer -owners reflects the strength of our cooperative.” William J. Lipinski, Farm Credit East CEO, added, “Paying patronage dividends, while also building capital levels to allow us to serve future generations of farm businesses, is a key part

of the value-proposition of the Farm Credit East cooperative. By focusing on strong earnings and sound lending practices and capital levels we continue to grow as the leading financial partner to Northeast agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industry and do our part to maintain investor confidence.” Farm Credit East extends more than $4.3 billion in loans and has 19 local offices in its sixstate service area. In addition to loans and leases, the organization also offers a full range of

agriculturally specific financial services for businesses related to farming, horticulture, forestry and commercial

fishing. Farm Credit East is governed by a 17-person board of directors from across the Northeast.

Krause 2204A 14' Disc Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,780 2002 N.H. 570 Baler w/72 Thrower- Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,600

2011 N.H.T5050 4wd, ROPS - Rental Return - 212 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . $29,995

Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600

2001 N.H.TN70 w/32LA Loader, 4wd, ROPS - 2018 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . $22,600

Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200

1997N.H. 8770 4wd, Supersteer, Mega Flow Hydraulics, Rear Duals - 7164 Hrs. 1993 Wil-Rich 3 Point 10 Shank Chisel Plow w/Gauge Wheels . . . . . . . $2,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $47,500 1995 Kuhn FC400RG Hyd. Swing Discbine - Good Condition . . . . . . . $10,200 2009 N.H.TD5050 4wd, w/New 825TL Loader, Cab, 90 HP - 2683 Hrs. -Excellent 2003 Challenger RB46 Silage Special Round Baler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,750 2011 . . N.H. BR7060 4x5 Silage Special Round Baler w/Crop Cutter- Like New 2000 NH TS100 4wd, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes - 2135 Hr. . . . . $39,995 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,250 2007 NH TL100A 4wd, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader - 2068 Hrs. . . . . . . . $43,795

2011 H & S CR10 10 Wheel Hyd. Fold Rake - Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,295

2011 Mahindra 3616 4wd, Cab w/Heat & AC, HST Trans, Loader - 4 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,375

N.H. 258LH, N.H. 260 RH Rakes w/double Hitch & Dollies-Complete Set$5,800 1998 John Deere 3 Row Corn Head from JD3970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200

1985 Ford 445 Industrial Tractor, 2wd, ROPS, Loader, Torque Converter$7,995

2008 Krause 7300/18WR 18' Cushion gang disc - Demo unit - Like New$25,625

2005 Kubota L3130 4wd, HST w/Loader - 1023 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT

2008 N.H. M459 Telehandler 45' Reach - 420 Hrs. - REDUCED. . . . . . $62,500

2009 NH 74CSRA 3 Point Snowblower - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 1987 NH 790 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 790W Hay Pickup . . . . . . . . . $4,995

2008 N.H.W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader ,Cab w/Heat/Air, Bucket/Forks-375 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $61,250

2003 Challenger SB34 Inline Square Baler w/Thrower, Hyd. Tension - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,375

2007 N.H. E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Cab w/Heat /AC - 400 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $65,000

2000 LP RCR 2584 7' Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,540

2009 N.H. E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket - 1600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $118,750

2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2008 Cole 1 Row 3pt. Planter with multiple Seed Plates. . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195

2010 N.H. L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate 72" Bucket - 100 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875

Gehl Forage Box on Dion D1200 Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,895

2007 NH W110 Wheel Loader- 1025 Hrs. - Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . $87,500

JD 336 Baler w/Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200

2006 Ingersoll Rand 185 Trailer Compressor w/JD Diesel Engine-61 Hrs - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,500

WIC Cart Mounted bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,450

2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Round Bale Carrier/Feeder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 1989 N.H. 570 Baler w/72 Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,300

2005 NH LW170B.TC Tool Carrier - 1415 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $87,500

2003 N.H. 1411 Discbine 10'4" Cut w/Rubber Rolls - Field Ready . . . . $15,950

2007 . . N.H. C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, 84" Bucket - 1088 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,500

Woods BB60 Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,185 N.H. 824 2 Row Corn Head for a N.H. 900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,250

2008 N.H. C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, Hi-Flow Hyd, 84" Bucket, 932 Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,750

Gehl 970 14ft. Forage Box on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,950

Mustang MS60P 60" SSL Pickup Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650

Smoker Solid Bottom Elevator 20' on chassis w/Elec. Motor . . . . . . . . . . . $795

2008 N.H. L160 Skidsteer w/Cab and Heat, 72" Bucket-3476 Hrs.. . . . $15,250

2009 N.H. BR7060 Twine Only Round Baler, Wide pickup - Like New . $24,500

2009 N.H. L170 Skidsteer OROPS - 66" Bucket - 1050 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . $19,250

Pequea HR930 Rotary Rake, Excellent Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,400

CAPITAL TRACTOR, INC. 1135 State Rte. 29 Greenwich, NY 12834

Since 1966 www.capitaltractorinc.com

(518) 692-9611 FAX (518) 692-2210

New Idea 5209 Disc Mower/Conditioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700

2010 NH TD5050 4wd, ROPS, w/Warranty, 480 Hrs. - Excellent . . . . . . $31,875

JD 127 5' Pull type Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $725

ATTACHMENTS

Gehl 940 16' Forage Box on Tandem 12 Ton Gehl Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,995

2008 N.H. /FFC 66" Skidsteer Tiller-Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900

Wooden Flat bed on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350

1994 Locke 8x18 Tandem axle Goose Neck Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750

2008Agway Accumul8 AC800 Bale Accumulator & AC8006G SSL Grabber, Like 2008 NH 96" Hyd. Angle Dozer Blade - Demo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,875 New Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,700 2011 N.H./McMillon Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9" Auger. . . . . $2,950

Capital Tractor Carries All The Parts, Equipment & Service That You Will Need www.capitaltractorinc.com

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

TRACTORS 2011 N.H.TD5030 4wd, ROPS - Rental Return. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,250


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You The Kitchen Diva by Angela Shelf Medearis

Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Cabbage has the right stuff Nutrition experts recommend that you eat cabbage or other cruciferous vegetables — meaning “cross-bearing” from the shape of their flowers, whose four petals resemble a cross — as part of a healthy diet. They suggest you eat at least 2 cups, 3 to 4 times per week. Cruciferous vegetables include cauliflower, cress, bok choy, broccoli and similar green leaf vegetables. I love cruciferous vegetables, but I’ve found cabbage to be the most versatile of the group. Cabbage is a good source of vitamins C and A. When choosing cabbage heads, select those that are firm and dense with shiny, crisp, colorful leaves. Examine the leaves to make sure that they’re free of cracks, bruises and blemishes. Severe damage to the outer leaves means there is probably worm damage or decay in the inner core as well. We enjoy stuffing cabbage leaves with a variety of interesting ingredients. This recipe for Cabbage and Potato Cups makes a great weekday side dish, or a unique appetizer when topped with thin slices of crispy Prosciutto or Parma ham, or bacon crumbles. Remember, eat more cabbage (or other cruciferous vegetables) and improve your health!

Cabbage and potato cups 1 medium onion, diced 2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil, plus more for drizzling 1 (3 pound) head leafy green cabbage; discolored, damaged or tough outer leaves discarded 1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 1/2 teaspoons black pepper 2/3 cup chicken broth or water 2 pounds large boiling potatoes 1 cup buttermilk, shaken 1 cup, coarsely grated, extra-sharp white Cheddar or Pepper Jack cheese 1 tablespoon drained, bottled horseradish 8 tablespoons unsalted butter 3/4 cup Panko or fresh bread crumbs 1. Cook onion in oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until soft and golden, about 6 to 8 minutes. 2. Bring a 6- to 8-quart pot of salted water to a boil. Remove and discard the core of the cabbage and carefully lower the cabbage leaves into the boiling water using a slotted spoon. 3. Boil cabbage about 5 minutes, or until softened. Transfer the largest leaves (at least 6) to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. Transfer remaining cabbage to a colander to drain. Transfer large leaves to paper towels to drain, then pat dry. 4. Using a nonstick muffin tin with 6 (1-cup) muffin cups, lightly spray each muffin cup or oil with 2 tablespoons of butter. Cut parchment or wax paper into 12 (10- by 2-inch) strips. Put 2 strips in a crisscross pattern in each cup to help with removing cabbage. (You will have a 2-inch overhang.) Line each cup with a large cabbage leaf. Coarsely chop enough remaining cabbage to measure 3 cups, then add to onion along with garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper, and water, and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is tender and browned, about 10 minutes.

stock.xchg photo

5. Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 350°F. 6. Peel raw potatoes and cut into 1-inch cubes, then cover with cold salted water by 1 inch in a 2- to 3-quart saucepan and bring to a boil. Cook potatoes until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain in a colander, then set potatoes in colander over saucepan to steam-dry, uncovered, 5 minutes. Using a large bowl and a slotted spoon or potato masher, mix the potatoes with the buttermilk, cheese, horseradish, remaining 6 tablespoons butter and remaining 1 teaspoon salt and pepper until combined well. 7. Fill each cabbage leaf with 2 to 3 tablespoons of mashed potato mixture. Then, place a layer of the sauteed cabbage mixture on the potatoes. Top with remaining potato mixture, and sprinkle evenly with breadcrumbs. Drizzle crumbs with olive oil. Fold edges of cabbage in toward filling (do not completely cover). At this point, you can cover and refrigerate the Cabbage and Potato Cups for 24 hours. Bring to room temperature (about 30 to 45 minutes) before baking. 8. Bake until heated through and edges of cabbage are well browned, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer stuffed leaves to plates using wax or parchment overhangs. Makes 6 servings. SHORTCUT TIP: If you have at least 2 cups of leftover mashed potatoes, or leftover baked or micro-cooked potatoes, mix them with the rest of the stuffing ingredients to save time. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

This week’s Sudoku Solution


Groundwater: out of sight, but not out of mind by Kevin McCray Some 44 percent of the U.S. population depends on groundwater, the water that fills cracks and other openings in beds of rock and sand, for its drinking water supply —

be it from either a public source or private well. In rural areas, the number is about 96 percent. That fact alone justifies the need for National Groundwater Awareness Week which was held

March 11-17. But groundwater is important to us in many other ways, as well. Groundwater provides much of the flow of many streams; often lakes and streams are “windows” to

the water table. Groundwater adds 492 billion gallons per day to U.S. surface water bodies. In large part, the flow in a stream represents water that has flowed from the ground into the stream channel.

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation all enjoy. One ton of groundwater used by industry generates an estimated $14,000 worth of output. These facts help us connect with the important role we each play as stewards, or protectors, of groundwater. Fortunately, there are simple steps that will help protect groundwater and the well systems that distribute it. Always use licensed or certified water well drillers and pump installers when a well is constructed or serviced, or when the pump is installed or serviced. Keep hazardous materials away from any well. Never dump such materials, motor oil, or anything else that could impact water quality onto the land surface, into a hole or pit, or into a surface water supply. These tips and more are available from state groundwater or water well associations, NGWA, county agricultural Extension agents or state government agencies with responsibility for groundwater. Visit www.wellowner.org to learn more. Kevin McCray is the executive director of the National Ground Water Association.

Apply by March 31 to be a 2012 Environmental Steward

Frost Farm Service, Inc. PO Box 546 Greenville, NH 03048-0546 603-878-1542

Townline Equipment 1474 Rte. 12A Plainfield, NH 03781 603-675-6347

Salem Farm Supply 5109 Rte. 22 Salem, NY 12865 518-854-7424

Showcase your farm’s dedication to demonstrating the industry’s ethical principles as it relates to the environment by applying to be a 2012 Environmental Steward. The Pork Checkoff and National Hog Farmer magazine annually recognize up to four U.S. pork production operations of all types and sizes that demonstrate a positive commitment to environmental stewardship. Nominations should focus on one single production site or farm. Applications and nominations are welcome from pork producers, operation managers and other industryrelated professionals. The application form is available on pork.org. A national selection committee

selects the award winners following a review of: • General production information • Manure/nutrient management • Soil conservation management • Water conservation management • Air quality management • Wildlife habitat management • Neighbor and community relations efforts • An essay on the meaning of environmental stewardship For more information, contact Allan Stokes at AStokes@pork.org or 515223-3447 or Mike King at MKing@pork.org or 515223-3532. Source: Pork Leader Feb. 23

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

Scientists estimate U.S. groundwater reserves to be at least 33,000 trillion gallons — equal to the amount discharged into the Gulf of Mexico by the Mississippi River in the past 200 years. The U.S. uses 79.6 billion gallons per day of fresh groundwater for public supply, private supply, irrigation, livestock, manufacturing, mining, thermoelectric power and other purposes. Groundwater is tapped through wells placed in water-bearing soils and rocks beneath the surface of the Earth. There are nearly 15.9 million of these wells serving households, cities, business and agriculture every day. Wells are constructed by the 8,100 contracting firms employing nearly 45,000 people dedicated to providing and protecting our nation’s groundwater supplies. Irrigation accounts for the largest use of groundwater in the United States, about 67.2 percent of all the groundwater pumped each day. Some 53.5 billion gallons of groundwater are used daily for agricultural irrigation from more than 407,913 wells. Irrigation is a major reason for the abundance of fresh produce and grains that we


Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Cleaning needles and syringes This week’s T ip is brought to you by the Beef Checkoff. For treating animals, Dairy Animal Care Quality Assurance (DACQA) guidelines for proper injections recommend the use of disposable equipment, including single-use needles, whenever possible. However, if you administer your injections with reusable syringes and needles, this equipment should be heatsterilized by boiling prior to use. If any disinfectants are used — including alcohol — they must be thoroughly rinsed from equipment because they neutralize vaccine and can chemically react with some antibiotics. If a disinfectant is used, syringes should be thoroughly rinsed with sterile water before use. Sterile water can be purchased. Note, distilled water is not

sterile water. Consult your veterinarian before sterilizing equipment to ensure proper sanitation techniques. Improper sterilization can reduce the effectiveness of future injections and result in infection at the injection site. And, remember, do not contaminate modified live virus products with disinfectants as effectiveness will be decreased or even eliminated. To learn about sterilizing equipment, watch this BQA education module featuring Dr. Dee Griffin of the Great Plains Veterinary Center in Clay Center, NE, or visit BQA.org for more information. DCHA’s Gold Standards III vaccination recommendations • Work with a veterinarian to develop vaccine protocols to address local disease con-

ditions and promote best management practices. • Immunity should support the standards for mortality, morbidity and growth defined in the Gold Standards I and II. • Store, process and administer vaccines according to manufacturer’s label and best management practices. • Avoid vaccinating during times of stress, in extreme ambient heat or with more than two Gram-negative vaccines concurrently. • Keep epinephrine and flunixin readily available to treat adverse reactions. • Dispose of vaccine containers, needles and syringes properly. • Keep handwritten and/or computerized records of all vaccinations. Source: Dairy Calf & Heifer Association

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March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15


Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Dairy farmers call on Congress to act Twenty-six local, state, and national organizations sent a letter to each Member of Congress on Feb. 9, calling on them to take immediate action in response to the crisis affecting our dairy farmers. Paul Rozwadowski, Wisconsin dairy farmer and chair of the NFFC Dairy Subcommittee, stated, “We are asking Congress to administer a temporary floor price of $20 because it is so badly needed to keep the remaining 49,000 dairy farmers in business. As Congress writes the new farm bill, we implore them to take into consideration the farmers’ costs of producing raw milk and establish a pricing system that will reflect it, along with a supply management system based on the proposals in S. 1640, the Federal Milk Marketing Improvement Act of 2011.” The price collapse is not a regional issue; it is currently affecting dairy farmers across the country. Loren Lopes, a California dairy farmer, spoke on behalf of the California Dairy Campaign stating, “We have not recovered from the devastating 2009 milk prices when producers lost over $17 billion nationally and in California we lost nearly $4 billion (an average of $1,000 dollars per cow) and borrowed against equity of cows, land, and savings. Farm machinery is on its last legs with no means to repair or replace it reducing our efficiency.” While we appreciate the support of the Vermont Members of Congress on dairy farmer issues, we are very concerned that a simple extension of the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) payments does not address the needs of the dairy farmer. Gretchen Maine operates a dairy farm in New York. She emphasized that, “Since September 2011, the price that we receive for our milk has dropped $4 per hundredweight (100 pounds of milk, or roughly 12 gallons). The projected February MILC payment is a little

over 27 cents per hundredweight, or 2 cents per gallon. Does anyone think that 27 cents is going to make up for the $3.72 loss? Milk prices are going in the gutter once again, while none of our input prices have gone down.” As the Senate holds their farm bill hearings, we urge them to consider the proposals supported by dairy farmers (especially S. 1640), not the proposals being pushed by the buyers and processors of our milk. The core of running a profitable farm of any size is the ability to recover input costs such as feed, fertilizer, and fuel. Our next farm bill should place an emphasis on creating a dairy pricing system that allows all farmers to recoup their costs and sustain their farms. Ben Burkett, NFFC President and Mississippi farmer, commented, “All farmers — whether they

raise livestock, dairy, wheat, or corn — need and deserve a fair price for what they produce.

What we need are programs that return the control over the pricing of our products to fami-

ly farmers. This farm bill is a chance for farmers and consumers to join together and de-

mand these changes to benefit farmers in the United States and across the globe.”


The Milk Isn’t As “Green” on the “Udder” Side of the Fence Issued Mar. 10, 2012 California milk producers are not happy with the prices they’re receiving for their milk especially when compared with their Federal order (FO) neighbors. For the second time in three months, California

producers asked the California Department of Food & Agriculture (CDFA) to amend the state milk marketing order’s Class 4b milk price formula. A petition requesting a hearing was filed March 2, by Western United Dairymen (WUD) but several producer groups representing nearly 80 percent of California’s milk supply

support the action. At the heart of the issue is the disparity in how whey is valued in federal market orders and California’s State market order formulas. That whey value factors into the price paid to farmers for milk used in cheese production. In the FO, that’s considered Class III milk and in California, it’s Class 4b milk. Dairy Profit Weekly (DPR) reports that FO order formulas attempt to capture the full value of whey in determining the milk price paid to producers. As the result of a hearing held last sum-

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milk per month in that time period to cheese plants and those plants have “enjoyed a discount, courtesy of CDFA, of more than $37 million per month on milk they’ve bought the past six months and more than $220 million since September.” That, he said, is “directly at the expense of the roughly 1,700 dairy farmers who desperately need all the revenue available in order to operate in this high-cost environment of dairy farming.” He added; “This is about a government-mandated discounting of milk that could be the difference between individual dairies surviving or having to close down.” “It’s about a fleecing of the California dairy families that appears to be in direct conflict with the California law that states that our prices need to be in a “reasonable and sound economic relationship with the national value of manufactured milk products.” Meanwhile; milk continues to run into the churn and the dryer across the U.S. January

butter production hit a whopping 181 million pounds, up 14.9 million pounds or 9 percent from December and 14.2 million or 8 1/2 percent above January 2011, according to USDA’s latest Dairy Products report. Nonfat dry milk output totaled 152.9 million pounds, up 1.8 percent from December and 30.6 percent more than a year ago. American type cheese, at 370.6 million pounds, was up slightly from December and 3.1 percent above a year ago. Total cheese output hit 912.3 million, down 1.9 percent from December but 2.9 percent above a year ago. Cash cheese prices saw another week of strength the week of March 5, with the blocks closing that Friday at $1.4925 per pound, up 1 1/4-cents on the week but 52 1/4-cents below a year ago. The barrels closed at $1.5025, up 2 1/4-cents on the week and 46 1/4-cents below a year ago. Nine cars of block traded hands on the week and seven of barrel. The NASS-sur-

Mielke A18

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

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mer, CDFA modified the Class 4b whey factor, from a permanent 25 cents per cwt. to an adjustable rate between 25 and 65 cents. However, demand for whey has driven values above the 65 cent cap, resulting in a growing disparity in FO and California cheese milk prices, which I have regularly reported here. Case in point; the February 2012 FO Class III price was $16.06 per cwt. The California 4b price was $13.42, $2.64 below the FO price. Since September 2011, the FO Class III averaged $18.01 per cwt. while California’s 4b price averaged just $15.35, according to DPW. The Milk Producers Council’s Rob Vandenheuvel wrote in his March 2 newsletter; “This is just the latest evidence of a disturbing and outrageous trend.” He said California’s 4b price has trailed the FO Class III price by an average $2.66 per cwt. since the new formula was put in place in September 2011. California dairy farmers have sold more than 1.4 billion pounds of


Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Mielke from A17 veyed U.S. average block price fell to $1.4873, down 0.7 cent, while the barrels averaged $1.5066, down 0.8 cent. Plentiful milk supplies are resulting in increased manufacturing of cheese, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. Seasonal cheese plants in the Southeast are being utilized to assist in handling of milk supplies that would typically have ended up in the Midwest. Butter closed March 9 at $1.45, unchanged on the week but 67 cents below a year ago. No butter was sold. NASS butter averaged $1.4242, up a half cent. Churning schedules remain heavy in all regions with cream supplies available and clearing to churns. There has been an uptick in cream utilization in higherclass products such as cream cheese, sour cream, dips, and similar items, as orders are prepared for upcoming retail and foodservice needs for the Easter and Passover holidays. Trade sources indicate that the current butter price is working better for featuring print butter at retail versus the price ($2.02) a year ago. Manufacturers are making and clearing 82 percent butter for export needs and cream demand is appearing from ice cream manufacturers on a limited scale. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk dropped 2 cents on the week, closing at $1.2675. Extra Grade was also down 2 and closed at $1.2575. NASS powder averaged $1.3647, down 0.3 cent, and dry whey averaged 60.59 cents, down a half-cent. The Agriculture Department raised its 2012 milk production estimate again in this month’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report. Milk cow numbers were raised as herds are increasing more rapidly than expected, USDA said, and while herds are expected to decline from 2011 in the second half of the year, the rate will be less than previously expected. Mild weather in the early part of the year is also supporting higher

levels of milk production. USDA now projects 2012 output to hit 199.7 billion pounds, up 700 million from last month’s estimate, and compares to 196.2 billion in 2011. Price forecasts for cheese, butter, nonfat dry milk, and whey were lowered, based on increased milk output and milk price forecasts were reduced. Look for the 2012 Class III price to average $16.35-$16.95 per cwt., down from $16.70$17.40 predicted a month ago, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. The Class IV will average $15.85-$16.55, down from the $16.25-$17.05 expected last month, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. Checking demand; 2011 dairy product commercial disappearance totaled 198.4 billion pounds, 1.5 percent above the same period in 2010. Butter was up 10.9 percent; American cheese, up 0.6 percent; other cheese, up 4.2 percent; nonfat dry milk was down 3.4 percent; and fluid milk products were off 1.8 percent. The January 2012 Consumer Price Index for all food is 232.7, up 4.4 percent from January 2011. The dairy products index is 220.5, up 9 percent. Fresh whole milk was up 10 percent; cheese, up 10.3 percent; and butter was up 2.2 percent. Speaking of dairy demand; the growing Greek yogurt industry in the Northeast may lead to a shortage of milk, according to leaders of New York-based Dairylea Coop. DPW’s Dave Natzke reported in his Friday DairyLine program that the growing yogurt phenomenon could use up to 6 percent of the raw milk production in New England and surrounding states in 2012, according to Dairylea CEO Greg Wickham. He adds that milk production growth in the region has largely been stagnant, and with construction and growth of both yogurt and some cheese plants, more milk is needed. Long-term prospects for increased global dairy demand, especially in China, India and other emerging economies, are

also promising. “Current price trends indicate a tough year for dairy farmers in 2012,” Natzke concluded, “But yogurt

and global demand point to a more bullish outlook in the years ahead.” The March 6 CME Daily Dairy Report (DDR)

points out that: “Since July 2008, the New Zealand-based Global Dairy Trade (GDT) auction has become an indi-

cator of global spot prices for dairy products, much like the CME spot

Mielke A19


Mielke from A18 trading sessions are used to gauge spot prices for domestic products. The latest GDT auction shows declines in many protein based products (skim milk powder, milk protein concentrate and Casein) while fat based product, anhydrous milkfat, was up 3.7 percent and whole milk powder came in near unchanged at 0.3 percent. FC Stone’s March 7 eDairy Insider Opening Bell echoes some of that

sentiment and reports that dairy commodity prices out of the Netherlands were also lower, compared to the previous week: butter fell 7 Euros, skim milk powder was down 5 Euros, and whey fell 2 Euros. “There continues to be an erosion of dairy commodity prices across the world,” says FC Stone dairy economist Bill Brooks. On a brighter note; Jerry Dryer wrote in his March 3 Dairy and Food Market Analyst, “While

the (US) dairy category has grown significantly in recent years, it is nowhere near its full potential.” “The US market for dairy is growing, but remains largely untapped,” a spokesperson for PepsiCo told FoodNavigator-USA recently. As reported earlier, PepsiCo and Theo Müller, a major European yogurt maker, have formed a joint venture and are building a USA facility in Batavia, NY. The PepsiCO

spokesman predicted that Greek yogurt will be the key volume driver for the next two or three years, but other products that combine dairy with fruits and grains offer huge potential and products will be introduced into the USA market before the plant is completed in 2013. Meanwhile; a Rabobank report, “Global Beverage Outlook 2012”, said “strong global consumer demand for health and wellness beverages is

leading to a greater convergence of soft drinks and dairy beverages.” Speaking of exports; Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted 24 requests for export assistance this week to sell 1.8 million pounds of cheese and 5 million pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Central America, the Middle East and North Africa. The product will be delivered through July and put 2012 CWT cheese exports to 28.7 million pounds plus 28 million of butter to 17 countries. Back at home; milk production is strong and processors in many ar-

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March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

eas are focusing on clearing intakes from traditional suppliers and turning away requests for processing outside milk, according to USDA. Cream supplies are still heavy due to strong milk production but with increasing production of dips, whipping cream, ice cream mix and hard ice cream, the pressure is easing on churns and fewer loads of cream are migrating to other regions to find processing. Milk production in New Zealand and Australia continues to outpace year ago levels and processing plants are working to handle it. New Zealand production trends continue to remain at high levels seasonally; yet at volumes below recent peak output. Weather has been and remains favorable for milk output. Ditto for Australia. The recent trends of milk production being higher than year ago levels and the total year output ranging from 2-4 percent higher for the season continues to take shape, according to USDA.


FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE TWO HEREFORD YEARLY HEIFERS, 600-700lb, one Hereford steer 800lb, grain fed from birth, must sell, excellent condition. Owego, N.Y. 607-687-4679.(NY) SCHERMER ELECTRIC HOG STUNNER, older model, works well, used in slaughterhouse, commercial grade, good condition $1,500. 585-659-2936.(NY) SILAGE WAGONS: Badger 1050 tandem axles $3500. (2) Badger 950 tandem axles for parts, good running gears $500. each. 540-399-1735.(VA) JD 945 MOCO, needs fixing or parts, best offer; Hesston 1160 Hydroswing haybine good shape $3500 leave message. 518965-7682.(NY)

Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

LEAF AND GRASS CATCHER fits most John Deere riding mowers, like new, new $340.00 asking $150.42” deck. 540-5781010.(VA) SHULTE 12’ PTO POWERED ROCK RAKE $4,300. one pair 20.8x38 snap on duals with hardware $1,350. 315-3355707.(NY) ALLIS 185 RADIATOR 190XT Allis engine block 301. N.H. Wrapper; BP37 801 Ford 3pt wood splitter Ford 8N horse-drawn disk. 607-538-1654.(NY) WHEAT STRAW, clean, easy shake out, 40 pound string bales, delivery Canandaigua and surrounding towns to North of Penn Yan. 585-747-7567.(NY) FOR SALE: Steel wheels for JD 40 combine $300. 315-781-2571.(NY) WANTED: FACTORY 2 POST R.O.P.S. with canopy for IH 766. 802-345-8272.(VT)

HAY FIRST CUTTING, 35 40lb bale fence post will cut to size and order. 518-3584832.(NY)

2 JOHN DEERE 2840 TRACTORS, one is in very good condition, and one is in good condition. 315-729-8018.(NY)

6 JOHN DEERE soybean meters used on 162 acres $900. 585-526-6755.(NY)

NATURALLY RAISED, antibiotic - hormone free, feeder pigs for sale $75.ea or 6 or more $65.ea, quality containerized nursery stock. 315-536-6406.(NY)

JD 260 LOADER; JD 524 front mount blade; JD 46A loader; 55 gallon drums w/lids; Case IH 885 2WD cab; 518-3760244.(NY)

3-HORSE DUNHAM BUSH COMPRESSOR, 3-horse Tecumsel compressor, 5horse Copeland compressor removed last week professionally, runs excellent $800. $1,000. 518-852-1137.(NY)

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER MODEL 460, 4 row corn planter, lots of plates, owners manual, good condition ready for work, bug boxes. 315-436-4058.(NY)

CROSSBRED BULL CALVES, Normande Holstein Jersey crosses, also some heifer calves, Dayton 5-horsepower farm duty motor, good condition $150. 315-6554395.(NY)

HAY FOR SALE, 1st cut - $3.00, 2nd cut $3.50, 35-45lb bales. 518-638-8074.(NY) JOHN DEERE 343 3RN corn head, with adapter for snaplage fits 3000 or 5000 JD harvester, stored inside $2,900. 315-4203396.(NY)

ONTARIO GRAIN DRILL, always kept inside $500. Kools Big Brother silage blower with pipe $450. 607-753-8485.(NY)

MINIATURE HORSES, 1 year old fillies, tiny black with papers $300. Bay $200. both are very friendly. OBO 585-5264736.(NY)

5 BOTTOM WHITE automatic reset plows, works excellent. 518-638-8724.(NY) ONE VACUUM PUMP $350. 400Gal. bulk milk tank w/compress $1,200. Aluminum conveyor 20ft long use for sawdust, grain, and cleaning. 413-562-2981.(MA)

WANTED: Work horses buy or borrow need for field work, also grain binder. Hershberger, 365 Steuben Rd. Poland, NY 13431-1829.

LOCUST FENCE POSTS, two to three dollars each. 518-234-7870.(NY)

BLUE HEELER PUPPIES very cute and playful, both parents are good cattle dogs $100. OBO. 607-532-9582.(NY)

LOCUST FENCE POSTS, 4”x7’ $4.50, 5”x6”x8’ $10.00, 6”x8”x8’ $12.50; 7-21 hole nest boxes $50.00, circular sawmill, trade for maple equipment? 585-554-6188.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 40 dozer New Holland 315 wire baler, John Deere wheel rake ear corn by the ton, leave message. 716-7513917.(NY)

WANTED: Egg washer. Do you have one sitting in the corner of your old hen house? Please call! 518-872-2375.(NY)

THREE NOVA certified Holstein heifers average weight 700lbs open. $2,500. OBO Schwartz Farm 6332 Co. Rte. 8 Avoca, NY 14809.

500 GALLON POT “O” GOLD aluminum tank $800. 716-592-2108.(NY)

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BALEAGE 4x4 2nd, 3rd certified organic small squares 1st, 2nd horse quality, stainless steel vacuum tank, Firestone Winter Force 225/60R16. 315-796-0099.(NY)

SMALL HEIFER RAISER, wants to raise you’re heifers from newborn to 2 years old reference’s March to November please call 518-817-0336.(NY)

JD 950 CULTIMULCHER, 16’, like new, $4,800; Hay, 1st & 2nd, small squares; Cedar fence posts, 6’, 7’; 518-7744928.(NY)

5 TRELLEBORG TIRES $4,500. 710-4022.5, 1 at 90%, 2 at 80%, 2 at 50%. 607343-1682.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 2240 with 3200 hours, new paint, plow, counter weight bucket, chains, new hydraulic pump, excellent condition asking $10,500. 413-238-5380.(MA)

2012 JD 348 BALER #42 ejector with electric controls, always kept under cover $24,500. 603-736-4549.(NH) 6 PURE BRED Black Angus heifers 10-15 months and a 3 yr. old cow, some AI bred, great stock. 585-538-4219.(NY) FORD 501 3-point sickelbar mower 7ft cut ,extra cutter bar $175. Naples, NY. 585396-2198

BERTOUD TOWER, 3 row grape sprayer $4,200. 8 row Rawson strip tiller $46. NH116 haybine 14 ft cut $4,200. 585-3015041.(NY) NEW IDEA, ground driven 2 wheel rubber tired ,12A manure spreader shed kept, good condition $1,800. Jeff Co. N.Y. 315783-9788.

GEHL CHOPPER 865 hay corn head $3,500. Schulte WRS rock rake $8,500. Leon 10’ bunk blade $1,500. Continental engine $400. 315-339-4147.(NY) WANTED: Sunset tank washer in very good condition: LP bird control cannon: 1 big round calf hutch, in central NY area. 315-839-9938.(NY) FOR SALE: 24” Planer $450. Belt or a PTO up to 6” thickness. Reg Schweitzer 14014 Case Rd. Chaumont, NY 13622. 315-6495758. WANTED: Wood fired arch 4x14 evaporator any condition considered. FOR SALE Hesston T010 haybine $1,000. Jerry Schalabach 5537 Nelson Canastota. 315-6558884.(NY)

I.H.C. 800 4 row liquid plate type corn planter with monitor, asking $1,600. 585786-3364. (NY)

15 BRED HEIFERS due April $950. each bred to Jersey, also dairy goats, milkers kids, bucks, Alpine and Saanen. 315-8582847.(NY)

12 ROW KINZE 2600 dry fertilizer asking $22,000. O.B.O. Steel tracks for skidloader $2,000. post pounder for skidloader $2,000. 585-704-2664.(NY)

2000 F-450 DUMP TRUCK 7.3L power stroke 6-speed, 88,000 miles, original owner, great shape, many new parts, asking $11,800. 315-219-1336.(NY)

NEW 8X16 and 9X16 Kicker rack wagons, 5 Holstein steers 400 to 550 lbs. 607-8476665.(NY)

Bale Squeeze for skidsteer, $750; exc cond; Gehl 1060 2RN & 7’ hay head, tandem, metal stop, VG condition, $3,200. 518-332-8116(NY)

40 COW JERSEY HERD, conventional cows and heifers for sale. Call for more info. 207-409-9453.(ME)

2 IH BLOWERS #56 and 600, good condition. 716-481-0740.(NY)

14X32 STEEL SILO with roof, also Ideal barn cleaner, no chain good motor $500. each, can deliver call 315-783-7618.(NY)

PATZ SILO UNLOADER 18’-20’ 7.5HP unloaded silo twice $1,200. 2in surge pipeline jar $350. 7ft Brush Hog twin blades $1,200. 518-797-5161.(NY)

TWO YEAR OLD service bull HolsteinHereford-cross $950. Also barn lightning rods $25. with copper cable $50. Otego, N.Y. 607-988-6348.

ARCTIC CAT 90 CC four wheeler, excellent condition, best offer. Stone carrier for IH 966, 1066, best offer. 315-5363053.(NY)

IH 1066 BLACK STRIPE OPEN STATION $7,200. 20.8-38 Goodyear tire 75% tread, on double bevel rim $950. 315-9424069.(NY)

DOLLY WHEEL HAY RAKE, works great, NH 268 baler stored indoors field ready, will demo, delivery available. 607-8296817.(NY)

WRAPPED SILAGE round bales, 1st cut 6/10, 50 bales alfalfa mix, 150 bales grass 4ft solid core bales. 603-747-2199.(NH) BOER GOAT BUCK, 4 years old, unregistered but excellent blood lines, mild tempered, excellent for herd breeding. 716628-9956.(NY) NEW HOLLAND 1038 bale wagon, good condition $7,500. Case IH 8370 haybine 14’ hydro swing stub guards vg condition $2,900. 585-703-5988.(NY)

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New report on New Zealand’s dairy export monopoly highlights U.S. concerns about expanding U.S.-New Zealand dairy trade The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) said that a new report on the anti-competitive practices pervasive in the New Zealand dairy industry highlights why the U.S. dairy farmer sector is so concerned with including U.S.-New Zealand dairy trade in a potential TransPacific Partnership (TPP)

free trade agreement (FTA). The issue is one that NMPF has addressed through its comments to the Obama Administration on TPP, including in its 2010 testimony to the U.S. International Trade Commission. NMPF applauded the new report’s effort to shed more light on this critical concern.

The report in question was prepared by the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) and provided confidentially to the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (a summary of the report is available online). The accompanying letter notes that New Zealand’s largest

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ued vehement opposition to any expansion of U.S.New Zealand dairy trade as part of that effort, given New Zealand’s dairy market concentration and its dominating firm’s tremendous global market power. NMPF has estimated that U.S. dairy farmers could face $20 billion in losses during the first decade of the FTA if U.S. dairy tariffs are fully eliminated for New Zealand’s benefit. “New Zealand’s government and dairy industry have been teaming up to spend considerable resources in courting members of the U.S. Congress on the TPP, but our representatives need to keep in mind the harsh realities of the global dairy industry, where trade is dominated by one company,” said Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. “And that dominion has been facilitated by New Zealand’s policy of granting a market concentration exemption to a single company, allowing it to sway both internal and external dairy markets.”

Kozak said that in addition to NMPF’s support for TPP talks, the organization has also been supportive of the vast majority of past U.S. trade agreements, which have led to important gains that benefit U.S. dairy producers. NMPF’s position with respect to U.S.New Zealand dairy trade is in keeping with a commitment to address not only tariff barriers to U.S. dairy sales, but also major non-tariff measures that negatively impact the U.S.’s ability to fairly compete both at home and abroad. NMPF will continue to work with USDEC in asking Trade Representative Ron Kirk, other trade officials in the Obama Administration, and members of Congress, to insist on the importance of expanding U.S. exports and facilitating trade. It will continue to oppose any expansion of U.S.-New Zealand dairy trade under TPP, given the very troubling dynamics that persist in that country’s dairy industry.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

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company has been provided special privileges by the government that enable it to maintain a roughly 90 percent market share of the milk produced in New Zealand. This advantageous position has given this single dairy company direct control of more than one third of world dairy trade, without even accounting for the additional sales controlled through its many production and distributor relationships around the world. NMPF has been strongly supportive of the overall TPP negotiations, working to pursue favorable opportunities where they exist for U.S. dairy producers. NMPF has identified the possible future inclusion of dairy negotiations with Japan and Canada as being among the most significant new openings TPP could ultimately offer, although it is not yet clear if or when those countries will join TPP and under what terms. However, NMPF has been equally clear about dairy producers’ contin-


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Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

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New wildlife conservation efforts unveiled TOLLAND, CT — Following the statement issued by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, Connecticut State Conservationist for the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Jay T. Mar has announced the new, nationwide $33 million partnership with farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners to use innovative approaches to restore and protect habi-

tats for wildlife, including seven at-risk species and other vulnerable game species. The announcement of the Working Lands for Wildlife partnership follows the recent White House Conference on Conservation that spotlighted community-driven conservation efforts as part of President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors Initiative. “Connecticut’s natural resources play a signifi-

cant role in building a strong and vibrant economy,” said Mar. “Agricultural lands with healthy and abundant wildlife habitat support strong incomes for our farmers and provides great opportunities for enhancing hunting and fishing, outdoor recreation, and wildlife viewing.” “This innovative partnership aligns our goals of empowering the state’s farmers to continue working their lands while

NEW YORK CORYN FARM SUPPLIES INC. 3186 Freshour Rd. Canandaigua, NY 585-394-4691

ELDER SALES & SERVICE INC. 4488 Greenville-Sandy Lake Rd. Stoneboro, PA 724-376-3740

ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT 3662 Buffalo St., Box 215 Alexander, NY 585-591-2955

MAINE KRAMERS INC. 2400 W River Rd. Sidney, ME 207-547-3345

CATSKILL TRACTOR INC. 384 Center St. Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 Sharon Springs, NY 518-284-2346 CNY FARM SUPPLY 3865 US Route 11 Cortland, NY 13045 607-218-0200 www.cnyfarmsupply.com

identify at-risk species that would benefit from targeted habitat restoration investments on private lands. Using the best available science, partners will prioritize restoration actions on a large regional scale to most cost effectively focus assistance. In return for voluntarily making habitat improvements on their lands, the federal government will provide landowners with regulatory certainty that they will not be asked to take additional conservation actions. NRCS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will jointly prepare species recovery tools such as informal or safe harbor agreements, and habitat conservation plans to provide regulatory certainty to landowners. The goal is to have these tools in place for all priority species by the end of the year. Seven species were initially selected for this expanded campaign; however the two affecting Connecticut are the

New England cottontail and the bog turtle. Landowners can signup now to manage and restore high-priority habitats. Applications within the priority habitat areas will receive highest consideration. Closing date for applications for this year’s funding is April 30; however applications will be accepted on a continuous basis. For 14 years, WHIP has worked to protect, restore, or develop fish and wildlife habitat for many species including those considered at-risk. Since 2003, about $310 million has been committed to 23,000 farmers, ranchers, and landowners to provide wildlife treatments on four million acres of private working lands. For more information, contact your nearest USDA Field Office: Danielson, 860-7790557; Hamden, 203287-8038; Norwich, 860-887-3604; Torrington, 860-626-8258; Windsor, 860-688-7725.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

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furthering conservation of imperiled species,” Mar said. “The Working Lands for Wildlife initiative will allow us to focus our resources where we can do the most good and will serve as a model for a more efficient, effective, and cooperative way to improve the health and diversity of working landscapes and strengthen local economies.” Under this strategy, federal, state, and local wildlife experts jointly


Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Land availability, government regs concern young farmers The latest survey of participants in the American Farm Bureau Federation’s Young Farmers & Ranchers program shows an even split when it comes to concerns about top challenges they face today. A total of 21 percent of young farmers surveyed ranked burdensome government regulations and “red tape” as a top concern; an additional 21 percent cited securing adequate land to grow crops and raise livestock as their top challenge today. “Most young farmers and ranchers would like to stay on the farm or ranch their entire lives,” said Glen Cope, AFBF’s national YF&R committee chair and a beef cattle producer from Missouri. “One of the biggest challenges many of us have faced is getting enough capital to start farming. And then, once we are established, regulatory costs can be the wildcard that determines whether we can be successful enough to stay on the land,” he said. Other issues ranked as

top concerns included economic challenges, particularly profitability, 11 percent; availability of farm labor and related regulations, 8 percent; and willingness of parents to turn over the reins of the farm or ranch, 7 percent. When asked to name the top three steps the federal government should take to help young farmers and ranchers, cutting government spending was the number one response, with 20 percent listing this as most important. Sixteen percent of those surveyed said the government should provide financial help to beginning farmers, while 12 percent indicated reforming environmental regulations should be first on the list. “Cutting government spending will help reduce the nation’s mammoth government debt,” said Cope. “However, providing assistance to help beginning farmers get started in food production would be money well spent. And reform-

ing burdensome environmental regulations will be good for all of agriculture and America.” The 20th annual YF&R survey revealed that 94 percent of those surveyed are more optimistic about farming and ranching than they were five years ago. Last year, 87 percent of those surveyed said they were more optimistic about farming than they were five years ago. The 2012 survey also shows 94 percent of the nation’s young farmers and ranchers say they are better off than they were five years ago. Last year, 90 percent reported being better off. More than 96 percent considered themselves lifetime farmers, while 98 percent would like to see their children follow in their footsteps. The informal survey reveals that 92 percent believe their children will be able to follow in their footsteps. The survey shows that America’s young farmers and ranchers are committed environmental stewards, with 61

percent using conservation tillage to protect soil and reduce erosion on their farms. In addition, computers and the Internet are vital tools for the nation’s young farmers and ranchers, with 93 percent surveyed reporting using a computer in their farming operation. Nearly all of those surveyed, 99 percent, have access to the Internet. High-speed Internet is used by 79 percent of those surveyed, with 20 percent relying on a satellite connection and just over 1 percent turning to dialup. The popular social media site, Facebook, is used by 79 percent of those surveyed who use the Internet. The most popular use of the Internet in the survey is to gather news and agricul-

tural information, with 82 percent turning to it for that use. Finally, the survey points out that 71 percent of YF&R members consider communicating with consumers a formal part of their jobs. “Young farmers and ranchers are becoming more comfortable when it comes to reaching out to consumers to participate in conversations they are having about food,” Cope said. “It’s important that we as farmers continue to explore and use all available tools to connect with consumers, whether that means social media platforms, personal outreach through farm tours, agri-tourism, farmers’ markets, or some combination,” he said. AFBF President Bob

SALEM FARM SUPPLY, INC. Rt. 22 Salem, NY 12865 518-854-7424

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DYKEMAN FARMS Fultonville, NY 518-922-5496

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DON'S DAIRY SUPPLY, INC. South Kortright, NY 607-538-9464

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Lowville, NY 315-376-2991

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Stallman said the annual YF&R survey points out that the future of U.S. agriculture is in good hands. “Our young farmers and ranchers have the know-how and tenacity to ensure that the best days are ahead for our country and agriculture,” Stallman said. “They are the future of American agriculture.” The informal survey of young farmers and ranchers, ages 18-35, was conducted at AFBF’s 2012 YF&R Leadership Conference in Grand Rapids, MI, in February. The purpose of Farm Bureau’s YF&R program is to help younger Farm Bureau members learn more about agriculture, network with other farmers and become future leaders in agriculture and Farm Bureau.

DESMARAIS EQUIPMENT, INC. 303 Willoughby Ave. Orleans, VT 05860 802-754-6629

YOUNGS FARM EQUIP. Rt. 4A Fair Haven, VT 05743 802-265-4943


U.S. Ayrshire winter news The Ayrshire Breeders’ Association ended the 2011 calendar year on a positive note. Registrations were up 8 percent, transfers were up nearly 3 percent and net assets for the year were positive. A budget for 2012 was approved allowing for

new projects while projecting a positive yearend balance. Increased travel throughout the year by staff and directors will be done to target areas where field service will be beneficial. Breeders are encouraged to contact

the ABA if assistance with registration and transfer work would be helpful. An update was made for animal identification. Animals born after June 1, 2012, that are identified with American ID tags must have two forms

Humane Milking - More Milk We offer the only humane way to milk a cow with a machine, consider the following comment from a recent customer in Germany: "what they claim is true, cows are noticeably quieter / relaxed during milking, milking speed about 10 - 20% faster, the teats feel dry after milking. It is fairly simple to install." And he has noted that the cows are no longer leaking milk in the free stalls "I noticed that there's way less milk in the free stalls, before there where many free stalls with lots of milk in it."

of identification: ie two tags or one tag with an official tattoo. Animals that are 75 percent Ayrshire or less will be registered at the rate of $7.50. This change in registration fees was done to encourage greater participation in registry. The Board of Directors has worked to stress the importance of increasing production and greater profitability over the past several years. The first step was the implementation of an improved cow performance index and production type index. The next focus has been

to increase education and awareness of young sires available through A.I. The ABA is also working to assist A.I., as much as possible, to find a variety of pedigrees with increased production potential. The Directors recently approved a program to offer a registration incentive for young sire daughters. For every in-tact, readable unit of semen turned into the ABA for bulls born before 1990, the ABA will provide a $3 credit for registrations submitted from March 1, 2012 through March 1, 2013 on current A.I.

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Kubota B2910 4WD tractor with 60” mid mower $9,950

TRACTORS International 504 2WD tractor WFE very nice tractor ‘07 Kubota M108 4WD, C/A/H, cast centers, 1 remote, 793 hrs ‘08 Kubota M108XDTC 4WD, C/A/H w/loader, PS, 3 remotes ‘10 Kubota M110XDTC 4WD, w/loader, C/A/H, p shift, 2 remotes, 868 hrs. ‘06 Kubota M125XDTC 4WD, C/A/H, ldr., PS, 2 remotes, sharp tractor ‘06 Kubota M5040 2WD, low hrs., clean tractor, 363 hrs ‘06 Kubota M5040DT 4WD w/ldr., 1053 hrs ‘07 Kubota M5040HD 4WD w/ldr., hyd shuttle, R-4 tires, 1 remote, 976 hrs ‘11 Kubota M5140 4WD, C/A/H, ag tires, 8x8 trans, 1 remote, like new ‘09 Kubota M5640 4WD tractor w/canopy ‘08 Kubota M9540 4WD, C/A/H, hyd. shuttle, 12 spd., creeper kit ‘07 Kubota MX500 4WD, R4 tires, 1 remote, 108 hrs. ‘09 Kubota MX4700DT 4WD tractor w/loader, ag tires, like new, 59 hrs. ‘07 Kubota MX5000 2WD tractor w/ag tires, low hrs. ‘10 Kubota MX5100 2WD w/ldr., SS QT, ag tires, very clean, 127 hrs. ‘09 Kubota MX5100 4WD w/ldr., 8x8 trans, R-4 tires, SS QT, 229 hrs. COMPACT TRACTORS & LAWN TRACTORS ’07 Cub Cadet 7284 TLB 4WD Hydro mid mower 264 hrs. Ford 1510 4WD w/loader, really clean ‘09 Kubota B2320 4WD with mid mower, 6 speed, R-4 tires, good condition 126 hrs. ‘00 Kubota B2710 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, hydro, very clean, 310 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B2920 4WD tractor hydro, R-4 tires, 24 hrs. ‘09 Kubota B2920 4WD TLB hydro, R-4 tires, thumb, like new, 78 hrs. ‘11 Kubota B3200 4WD TLB hydro R-4 tires mid pto good cond.186 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B3200 4WD tractor, hydro turf tires, good condition 313 hrs ‘10 Kubota BX25 4WD TLB like new, 45 hrs ‘08 Kubota BX2350 4WD w/loader, ag tires, 318 hrs ‘10 Kubota BX2660 4WD hydro, 26 HP, 60” mower w/hyd valve, 59 hrs ‘08 Kubota GR2010 20hp, AWD 48” cut w/ catcher, clean 151 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L2800 2WD tractor, ag tires, low hours clean 85 hrs ‘08 Kubota L2800 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, canopy ,274 hrs ‘09 Kubota L4240 HST 4WD w/loader, hydro, R-4 tires, SS QT, 299 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L440DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, 8x4 trans, 538 hrs. ‘11 Kubota L2800 4WD TLB ag tires, 8x4 trans 161 hrs ‘07 Kubota L2800 4WD TLB, good cond., ag tires, thumb, 249 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L2800 4WD tractor w/ldr., ag tires, 8x4 trans ‘94 Kubota L2950 4WD tractor w/ ldr., SS QT, new rear tires, good cond. ‘07 Kubota L3130 4WD tractor w/ ldr., hydro R4 tires, good cond., 347 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L3240 4WD tractor, R-4 tires, good cond., 590 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3240 2WD tractor w/ ldr., good cond., 332 hrs. ‘10 Kubota L3240DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, SS QT, like new, 101 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor with loader, R-4 tires, 43 hrs ‘08 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor w/ ldr., ag tires, 104 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3400 4WD TLB, hydro, ag tires, as new, 29 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor w/ canopy, ag tires ‘05 Kubota L3430HSTC 4WD, C/A/H w/ldr., hydro, ag tires, clean, 280 hrs ‘08 Kubota L3540 4WD TLB hydro R-4 tires, 303 hrs ‘08 Kubota L3540 4WD tractor w/ ldr., hydro SS QT, clean machine, 264 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor w/loader, 8x8 trans., R-4 tires, SSQT, clean, 352 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD, w/ loader, R-4 tires, GST trans, 408 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor w/ ldr., 445 hrs.

‘07 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor, hydro, canopy, R4 tires, clean, 149 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L4240 HST 4WD w/loader, hydro, R4 tires, SS Qt sharp, 168 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L4400DT 4WD w/loader, ag tires, 254 hrs. ‘05 Kubota L4400DT 4WD w/ldr., R-4 tires, good cond., 523 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L4400HST 4WD w/ldr, hydro, ag tires, 238 hrs. ‘04 Kubota L4630 4WD tractor, C/A/H, creeper good cond., choice of tires ‘09 Kubota L5740HSTC 4WD, C/A/H, w/ldr, aux front hydr R-4 tires, 477 hrs. ‘10 Kubota T2080 20 HP, hydro, 42” cut lawn tractor ‘08 Kubota T2380 48” cut, good condition ‘08 Kubota ZD321 zero turn, 21 HP diesel, 54” cut, very good cond., 71 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZD323-60 23 HP diesel 60” cut good condition 770 hrs ‘01 Kubota ZD326 60” rear discharge, like new, 28 hrs. ‘08 Kubota ZD326 26 HP dsl 60” pro deck ‘07 Kubota ZD331P-60 zero turn, 31 HP diesel, 60” cut, very good cond., 195 hrs. ‘08 Kubota ZG222-48, 22 HP, hyd lift, canopy, 167 hrs. ‘08 Kubota ZG222 48” cut, just like new, 36 hrs. ‘10 Kubota ZG227 54” cut, like new, 27 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZG227 27 HP, 54” cut, good condition, 181 hrs. SKID STEERS ‘07 Cat 256C skid steer, cab with heat, 6’ bucket, 1 owner, clean with grouser tracks, 310 hrs. ‘08 Bobcat MT52 Skid Steer, clean, low hrs, good tracks, 142 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat MT55 skid steer, good cond. w/ bkt., 634 hrs. ‘09 Bobcat S250 C/A/H, power tach, 72” bucket, very clean, like new tires, 160 hrs. ‘06 Bobcat S300 good condition with bucket, 586 hrs. ‘03 Bobcat S300 C/A/H, hi flow ptach, very good cond., 288 hrs. ‘11 Kubota SVL75 OROPS, pilot controls, very clean ‘11 Kubota SVL90 OROPS, hi flow, like new ‘08 Bobcat T190 skid steer, new tracks, good cond., 808 hrs. ‘08 Bobcat T300 C/A/H, SJC controls, 80” bucket, good cond. PLOWS W/ SPRING RESET Asst. 1, 2, 3, or 4 x 3 pt. plows Ford 101 3x plow Ford 309 2x plow SIDE RAKES & TEDDERS New First Choice 2 star tedder New First Choice 4 star tedder, hyd. fold New First Choice 4 star tedder, spring assist First Choice 6 star hyd fold First Choice 10 wheel converge rake NH 55, 256, 258, 259 side rakes - priced from $500 NH 256, 258 side rakes, some w/ dolly wheels Pequea HR-15 Tonutti RCS8 hay rake, good condition INDUSTRIAL Cat 307B excavator, C/A/H, 2 buckets, thumb, steel tracks, good condition, aux hyd ‘02 Bobcat 328 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, runs & operates, good cond., 1634 hrs. ‘04 Bobcat 331G ROPS, rubber tracks, 18” bucket, 645 hrs. ‘05 Bobcat 334 excavator, C/A/H, with thumb 627 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat 337 excavator, 24” bkt., hyd. thumb, good cond., 499 hrs.

‘08 Bobcat 341 excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, 24” bucket,, rubber tracks ‘07 Bobcat 341G excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, good condition 577 hrs. ‘06 Bobcat 430 excavator, C/A/H, 24” bucket, good cond., 649 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat 430H excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb good condition 603 hrs. ‘06 Bobcat 442 excavator, C/A/H, thumb, rubber tracks, very nice, ready to work, 327 hrs. ‘06 Bomag BW211D 84” smooth drum roller, very good cond. Case 550E dozer, 6 way blade, rubber tracks, runs & works well Cat D3GXL dozer, C/A/H, 6 way blade, hy state, sharp ‘09 Dynapac CA134D roller, 54” smooth drum, w/shell kit, very clean Gehl 153 excavator, adj. tracks, low hours ‘07 Hamm 3205 54” vibratory roller, clean Hamm BW172D 66” smooth drum w/vibratory Hyundai Rolex 110D-7 excavator C/A/H manual thumb, good condition Ingersoll Rand SD77DX vibratory roller, 66’ drum, very nice Ingersoll Rand 706H fork lift, 4WD, 15’ see thru mast 6,000 lb Cummins dsl. International TD20 dozer, runs and works good undercarriage ‘96 JCB 506B telehandler, 6000# lift capacity, good cond., 3800 hrs. ‘07 JLG 450A lift ‘08 Kubota B26 4WD TLB, 4WD, hydro, R4 tires, 207 hrs. ‘07 Kubota K008 excavator, 10” bucket, good cond., aux hyd. ‘11 Kubota KX41 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 92 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX41 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 12” bkt, 933 hrs. ‘07 Kubota KX71 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 18” bucket aux hyd 1339 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX71 excavator ,rubber tracks, hyd thumb,, very good condition, 483 hrs ‘10 Kubota KX080 C/A/H, super double boom, hyd thumb, rubber tracks, good condition, 580 hrs. ‘07 Kubota KX080 C/A/H, hyd. thumb, rubber tracks, straight blade, clean, 1 owner, 799 hrs. ‘10 Kubota KX121 excavator, C/A/H, angle blade, hyd thumb, rubber tracks, 127 hrs ‘09 Kubota KX121 ROPS, hyd thumb, angle blade, 24’ bucket, 368 hrs. ‘09 Kubota KX121 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, angle blade, 133 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX121 excavator, rubber tracks, hyd. thumb, angle blade, 237 hrs. ‘07 Kubota KX121 excavator, C/A/H, straight blade, good cond., 1852 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX121-3 excavator, ROPS, angle blade, hyd. thumb, rubber tracks, 343 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L39 4WD TLB, 1 owner, 18” bucket, like new, 157 hrs. ‘05 Kubota L39 4WD TLB, front aux hyd, 1 owner, sharp, 542 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L45 4WD, TL, hydro w/ HD box scraper & aux. hyd., like new, 73 hrs. ‘11 Kubota M59 4WD TLB, front aux hyd, good cond., 870 hrs. ‘07 Kubota U35 rops, rubber tracks, 24” qt bucket 594 hrs. ‘07 Kubota U45 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, hyd. thumb, sharp, 198 hrs. ‘04 Morbark 2050 25 HP, gas, 5” capacity, clean machine Rayco C87D crawler dozer, C/A/H, pilot controls, winch and forestry pkg., very clean Rayco RG1625A stump grinder, 25hp, fair condition Reinco TMJRH20 mulcher Stone SD54 roller, 54” smooth drum, diesel

BALERS Haybuster 256DS bale chopper, good cond., dairyman special NH 570 square baler, good cond., w/#72 thrower Tanco 580S new, 30” wrap, cable controls, standup CULTIPACKERS & SEEDERS 8-10-12 cultipackers Bobcat 72 seeder, 3pt. or SS mount, 6’ cultipacker seeder, good cond. MANURE SPREADERS Bodco LAGU-42” manure pump lagoon type Kuhn SD4000 3 pt seeder, nice Millcreek 75 manure spreader, low usage, fair condition NH 1038 stack liner wagon, good cond. Pequea MS80P manure spreader, PTO drive, same as new HAYBINES/DISCBINES Kuhn GMD33N disc mower, unused, 4’ cut McKee 16’ 3pt. danish tines w/ rolling baskets, good cond. NH 488 mower conditioner used 1 season on 25 acres, same as new DISCS IHC leveling disk, 14’ MISCELLANEOUS Allied 70 hydraulic tamper Asst used 3 pt. finish mowers & rotary mowers Befco 20’ batwing finish mower Bobcat 48 fence installer, SS mount, unused stakes & fence included Brillion 3pt. 5 shank reset ripper Bush Wacker 8410P rotary mower, 7’, pull type w/ hyd. cylinder Erksine 1812 snowblower 6 foot skid steer mount standard flow Ferri TD42RSFM boom mower, unused Ford 309 3pt 2 row corn planter, very good cond. Ford 3000 sprayer, dsl., custom spray rig tractor Gehl 970 tandem axle forage wagon with roof Genset D337F 6 cyl. generator Hardi 170 gallon 3pt sprayer, 30’ boom, very clean JD 1240 4 row corn planter Kubota RTV900 utility vehicle ‘11 Kubota RTV900 4WD, hyd dump, same as new, 61 hrs. ‘10 Kubota RTV900 4WD w/cab heat and snowplow, 208 hrs. ‘08 Kubota RTV900 4WD w/canopy and hyd dump, 606 hrs. ‘08 Kubota RTV900 4WD, hyd. dump. canopy & windshield, same as new ‘11 Kubota RTV1100 4WD utility vehicle C/A/H hyd dump & commercial snow plow 27 hrs. ‘07 Kubota RTV1100 ‘10 Kubota RTV1140 4WD, 4 seater w/hyd dump, like new, 215 hrs. Kuhn GMD33N unused 4 foot cut LuckNow 87 snow blower, 7’ 3 pt., 2 stage, good cond. Monosem 4 row corn planter NH 185 single manure spreader Orsi River L549 3pt boom mower, 4’ 3pt, good cond. Schulte RS320 rock picker, hid drive Skinner 1 row 3pt tree planter, very good cond. Stanley MB950 hammer Sweepster RHFAM6 rotary broom 3 pt., 6’ Timberjack T40 winch for skidders

We are your source for a wide range of used parts with free nationwide parts locator. Parts are dismantled, cleaned and ready for shipment.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 25

Consider the results of another recent Dutch customer with 500 cows: "The number of mastitis cases is still coming down to just 1 case last week from Sun - Sat"

young sire daughters. Another action was taken to increase the focus on increased production for the breed. Beginning in 2013, the unfresh fall yearling class will be eliminated from ABA national shows and the AllAmerican contest. The discussion for this change was focused on profitability and increased production. Animals in this class are two years old by the time they show in national shows and many are often not bred. The Board of Directors approved the following slate of candidates for the 2012 elections: Region 1 – Richard Caverly, Benton, ME and Dale Maulfair, Jonestown, PA Region 2 – Neal Smith, Smyrna, TN and Mark Valentine, Thurmont, MD Region 3 – Jessica Gatton Dixon, Conway, MO and Darryl Keehner, Guttenberg, Iowa At Large - Pamella Jeffrey, Wakefield, RI


DHI TOP 40 FOR FEBRUARY NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

Following is the February 2012 VT DHIA Top 40 herds of 10 or more animals based on protein pounds in each County serviced by VT DHIA and processed through the Dairy Records Management Processing Center, Raleigh, NC during the calendar month. Rolling herd averages will appear on this list for herds which have chosen the option to have their herd average published and the herd has 12 consecutive tests including components for each test.

CONNECTICUT NEW LONDON H H H H H H H H H J J J

351 101 138 114 80 30 47 58 10 12 48 10

27284 25180 25832 24482 23914 17933 18792 17384 15505 12591 13035 13643

1021 871 830 1056 949 670 670 660 611 593 577 618

3.7 3.5 3.2 4.3 4 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.9 4.7 4.4 4.5

889 783 767 761 757 562 562 545 503 469 467 463

3.3 * 3.1 3 3.1 3.2 3.1 3 3.1 3.2 3.7 3.6 3.4

TOLLAND HILLSIDE FARM

H

61

19325

775

4

24648 22279 22381 22929 22156 21482 22262 16663 16830 16752 14896

978 910 824 856 790 888 993 828 677 772 629

4 4.1 3.7 3.7 3.6 4.1 4.5 5 4 4.6 4.2

593 3.1

Page 26 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

WINDHAM HIBBARD HILL FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 2 FAIRHOLM FARM INC. ELM FARM VALLEYSIDE FARM LLC ELM FARM WOODHILL FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 1 KINGSWOOD FARM MOLODICH FARMS INC. SELBUORT VALLEY FARM

H H H H H X H J A H X

77 33 216 87 208 53 352 107 95 291 65

754 733 707 702 693 692 684 622 531 525 504

3.1 3.3 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.7 3.2 3.1 3.4

MASSACHUSETTS FRANKLIN DARRIDGE FARM HERBERT & ROBERT PURINGTON GUNN STEVE DAVID DUPREY KAREN HERZIG HUNT FARM PAUL L WILLIS CRAIG W. AVERY MAPLEDGE JERSEYS

H X H H H H H J J

31 35 90 62 46 119 63 49 41

26113 22772 21983 20948 21367 20320 17948 12151 11439

1017 904 855 855 861 705 760 660 539

3.9 4 3.9 4.1 4 3.5 4.2 5.4 4.7

775 727 693 651 641 612 571 468 417

3 3.2 3.2 3.1 3 3 3.2 3.9 3.6

25269 25284 21778 21312 20182 20628

924 924 840 846 915 886

3.7 3.7 3.9 4 4.5 4.3

805 747 680 660 630 629

3.2 3 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3

WORCESTER CV & MARY L SMITH JR JORDANS DAIRY FARM INC. WHITTIER FARMS INC. JIM & KRISANNE KOEBKE TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR

H H H H X H

31 329 146 73 30 32

NEW HAMPSHIRE CHESHIRE ECHO FARM INC. ECHO FARM INC. ECHO FARM INC.

J M G

25 85 13

14551 15585 14482

690 4.7 625 4 770 5.3

516 3.5 504 3.2 504 3.5

25664 25222 24006 22711 22241 20074 19020 14780 12797

987 987 972 891 844 773 724 579 622

801 772 743 710 689 640 587 480 459

GRAFTON TULLANDO FARM INC. PATCH FAMILY DOUGLAS & DEBORA ERB GRAFTON COUNTY FARM RICH & DOREEN MORRIS JOHN C. PERKINS SCOTT & COLLEEN JOHNSTON PUTNAM GLEN RUSSELL & MARY HICKS

H H H H H H H X J

458 113 78 89 148 132 26 28 50

3.8 3.9 4 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.9 4.9

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.6

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP PINELANE FARM BOHANAN FARM YEATON DAIRY FARM

H H H

237 208 95

29954 28686 21470

1001 3.3 1019 3.6 912 4.2

923 3.1 * 854 3 * 695 3.2

24017

926 3.9

735 3.1

1099 3.7

904

ROCKINGHAM STUART FARM LLC

H

237

STRAFFORD-CARROLL ATHMOR HOLSTEINS

H

186

29909

3

SULLIVAN PUTNAM FARMS INC. JOHN W. LUTHER EDWARD MACGLAFLIN GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK ASCUTNEY VIEW FMS.LLC GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK

H H H X H B M

478 39 467 10 31 15 33

24142 21051 20380 19884 18845 16751 16179

882 758 906 888 705 799 681

3.7 3.6 4.4 4.5 3.7 4.8 4.2

732 644 630 607 579 552 509

3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1

21850 17139 20982 21188 15400 8332 5784

846 932 811 775 748 329 265

3.9 5.4 3.9 3.7 4.9 3.9 4.6

707 669 637 628 567 271 212

3.2 3.9 3 3 3.7 3.3 3.7

24100

903 3.7

NEW YORK H J H H J H J

35 14 100 88 67 30 24

OTSEGO M. CHARLES EVANS

H

53

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

19613 20923 19845 14465 15217 13954

768 803 744 672 593 597

3.9 3.8 3.7 4.6 3.9 4.3

650 649 603 528 482 445

3.3 3.1 3 3.7 3.2 3.2

28815 23525 23300 23057 20139 16336 14773

1099 859 911 923 855 686 346

3.8 3.7 3.9 4 4.2 4.2 2.3

894 721 716 700 611 504 280

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3 3 3.1 1.9

24375

951

3.9

747 3.1

29356 26853 26843 27017 25677 27345 25549 26044 24629 25211 25268 24528 24177 24714 23055 22408 23281 23177 19379 22489 21855 20694 22852 19888 21670 21018 20471 20393 19041 19332 18715 16812 19414 19192 16806 16931 17287 15918 14033 14943

1100 977 991 1010 1000 1012 922 972 973 1030 966 914 976 948 842 860 845 833 793 865 843 795 808 807 725 793 818 813 770 756 738 740 743 749 630 604 610 612 645 620

3.7 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.7 4 4.1 3.8 3.7 4 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.6 4.1 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.5 4.1 3.3 3.8 4 4 4 3.9 3.9 4.4 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.8 4.6 4.1

923 854 839 828 822 817 816 811 770 766 765 746 745 729 709 709 697 694 680 676 649 648 646 645 644 643 637 632 615 605 580 571 570 568 528 502 501 500 496 494

22922 23210 22813

902 976 976

3.9 4.2 4.3

750 3.3 733 3.2 * 702 3.1

24809 24676 24392 22917 22589 23129 21438 19223 20199 20340 17167 16294 19459 18326 15135 18110 17844 17779 15165 16225 15335 16143 12437 11014

891 938 927 903 867 805 879 795 757 785 799 752 749 728 775 725 725 650 720 736 713 616 564 508

3.6 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.5 4.1 4.1 3.7 3.9 4.7 4.6 3.8 4 5.1 4 4.1 3.7 4.7 4.5 4.6 3.8 4.5 4.6

777 771 765 715 713 697 659 654 645 622 604 584 577 576 575 568 565 542 525 523 521 471 452 386

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3 * 3.1 3.4 3.2 3.1 3.5 3.6 3 3.1 3.8 3.1 3.2 3 3.5 3.2 3.4 2.9 3.6 3.5

22773 22515 21813 19287 20292 16789 19476 16039 18983

976 882 749 755 711 740 700 835 660

4.3 3.9 3.4 3.9 3.5 4.4 3.6 5.2 3.5

753 680 651 630 605 595 585 574 565

3.3 3 * 3 3.3 3 * 3.5 3 * 3.6 3

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

*

SEVEN VIEW FARM SLATEHILL FARM MIKE SWART GEORGE B. WILSON GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT

H H H J X G

117 143 74 110 23 39

H H H H H X H

938 151 137 103 80 33 102

159

VERMONT ADDISON VORSTEVELD FARM LORENZO & AMY QUESNEL HERD 1 WAYNE & JEANNINE PARTRIDGE JONATHAN LUCAS WOODNOTCH FARMS INC. B DANYOW FARM LLC TIM & JULIE HOWLETT GOSLIGA FARM INC. CHARLES & BRENDA CHARRON CHIMNEY POINT FARM L.P FOSTER BROTHERS FARM INC. HATCH FARM INC. BRACE ALEX & MICHELE PHIL & DIANE LIVINGSTON MARC & NORRIS BRISSON BRIAN & CINDY KAYHART TERRIER LEE MILLBORNE FARM LORENZO & AMY QUESNEL HERD 1 WILCON FARM JEFF & BRIAN TREADWAY JOHN E. & BILLIE JO C. FORGUES KAYHART FARM INC. HAROLD & ANJE DEGRAAF HANSON STEPHEN & SYLVIA ROBERT & SUZANNE HUNT ANTHONY & BARBARA CORREIA ARTHUR & JOAN HUESTIS KATE INGWERSEN ORR ACRES FIFIELD JEFF & LISE KATE INGWERSEN JEFFREY & OLIVE PHILLIPS LESLIE RUBLEE JOHN BUZEMAN SCOTT & MARY PURINTON KETTLE TOP FARM MARTHA SEIFERT KATE INGWERSEN JOHN & LISA ROBERTS

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H B H H H H H X X H H H H H X H H H H H H X B

747 860 113 179 297 755 517 596 54 131 459 563 151 377 790 86 35 179 132 405 369 251 187 131 57 256 460 291 86 96 143 29 62 69 63 58 21 12 37 161

3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3 3.2 3.1 3.1 3 3 3 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.2 3 3 3.5 3 3 3.1 2.8 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.4 2.9 3 3.1 3 2.9 3.1 3.5 3.3

* * * * * * * * * * * *

* * *

*

*

BENNINGTON WILHELM & KARL STROHMAIER RUPERT VALLEY HOLSTEINS DAVID TOOLEY

X H H

106 327 82

CALEDONIA WAYSIDE MEADOW FARM LLC PHILIP BROWN ROGER & JOY WOOD SCOTCH BURN FARM DOROTHY & ANGELA WILLSON DON-SIM FARM KEITH DAY JAMES W. SEYMOUR SCOTT LANGMAID ROY & BRENDA PATTERSON LAGGIS BROS. BRIAN NICHOLS MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD BILL & JENNIFER NELSON LUCKY HILL FARM PLYN N BEATTIE HOWARD & JACQUELINE BENNETT DON LANGMAID WILLIAM & GWEN PEARL BILL & JENNIFER NELSON MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD ROLAND & SHONNA HEATH JR. BRIAN & KATHLEEN SOMERS ERIC BEAN

H H H H H H H H H H J X H H J H H H J X X H J J

213 59 60 111 115 173 66 69 53 52 431 15 59 182 170 74 70 48 68 12 14 52 42 37

736 3.1

MURRAY THOMPSON CREAM PAT FITZGERALD PAT FITZGERALD NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC SHELBURNE FARMS NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC MURRAY THOMPSON WAYNE BARR

H H H B H B H G H

17 24 41 20 137 109 146 31 26

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

18

15990

782 4.9

565 3.5 *

304 231 24

25343 23953 20802

937 3.7 979 4.1 793 3.8

787 3.1 741 3.1 660 3.2

25830 25508 23851 24031 23711 23317 22964 22659 22147 21485 23128 21988 21581 21826 21822 20205 15932 18961 15862 17093 20642 16574 16767 14061 14354 14860 12227 10299 10461 8840

937 1046 901 971 818 890 883 881 857 801 861 1102 818 831 840 763 750 722 742 713 660 654 637 589 558 567 475 457 424 421

821 785 750 743 728 727 700 699 694 692 690 664 663 661 658 625 593 575 571 564 524 521 515 470 448 421 370 359 330 320

18880

624 3.3

553 2.9

40 85 25

21659 14485 17166

870 4 713 4.9 645 3.8

652 3 540 3.7 509 3

H 1211 H 45 H 236 H 98 H 86 H 68 H 65 H 19 H 38 J 58 H 37 X 11 J 20 H 26 H 78 J 42 J 52 H 52 J 86 H 64 H 45 J 16 J 41 J 44 H 77 J 14 J 49 J 47 H 40 H 81 J 61 H 12 X 32 X 23 A 60 X 53 G 11 G 23 J 46 X 31

26452 25454 24374 23279 22711 24241 21030 22271 19573 16745 19335 18323 15993 19175 18862 15947 16254 17524 15053 18536 18096 16152 15515 15055 18180 14037 13695 14233 16581 15241 12879 14908 14483 13989 14620 13084 12435 12999 11649 12767

1022 992 930 944 895 901 880 828 747 788 720 741 733 766 703 711 765 606 796 719 686 726 731 725 697 693 635 679 596 579 627 598 573 567 596 596 623 599 533 520

3.9 3.9 3.8 4.1 3.9 3.7 4.2 3.7 3.8 4.7 3.7 4 4.6 4 3.7 4.5 4.7 3.5 5.3 3.9 3.8 4.5 4.7 4.8 3.8 4.9 4.6 4.8 3.6 3.8 4.9 4 4 4.1 4.1 4.6 5 4.6 4.6 4.1

828 775 759 746 731 728 689 685 633 598 592 584 584 581 581 577 575 571 569 561 555 542 541 538 536 517 501 499 479 479 476 461 452 449 448 442 439 437 403 402

3.1 * 3 3.1 3.2 3.2 3 3.3 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.1 3.2 3.7 3 3.1 3.6 3.5 3.3 3.8 3 3.1 3.4 3.5 3.6 2.9 3.7 3.7 3.5 2.9 3.1 3.7 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.1

25046 23567 22733 24332 22261 22167 21127 20522 19883 20771 18709 18168 18059 17224 17139 17834 16609 15281 14196 17214

947 942 891 879 883 844 881 780 726 784 725 656 662 689 640 657 637 667 672 646

3.8 4 3.9 3.6 4 3.8 4.2 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.7 4 3.7 3.7 3.8 4.4 4.7 3.8

767 740 731 704 689 681 663 631 627 614 568 544 540 540 536 535 510 507 505 503

3.1 3.1 3.2 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3 3 3 3 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.3 3.6 2.9

H H H

FRANKLIN

PROVIDENCE H

J

ROUTHIER & SONS AUBURN STAR FARM STEPHEN & CARLA RUSSO

RHODE ISLAND WRIGHT'S DAIRY FARM

Brd Cows

ESSEX

WASHINGTON IDEAL DAIRY FARMS WILLIAM LUNDY TAYLOR & ALAN HENDERSON HOLLISTER BROTHERS DON DURKEE ALAIN ETHIER MICHAEL & LOUISE WOODDELL

NAME CREAM

CHITTENDEN

MONTGOMERY HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD JOHN & CHRIS NELLIS PETERSHEIM SAMUEL & SADIE PHILLIPS & SUSAN FERRY DELLAVALE FARM DELLAVALE FARM

Brd Cows

SCHOHARIE

Vermont DHIA Country Folks List for the Month Ending February 2012

BERIAH LEWIS FARM INC. JOHN OSGA STEVE SNURKOWSKI CLARK WOODMANSEE III JACK TIFFANY REW FARM GERALD & DEBORAH GRABAREK GIGLIO LEONARD GIGLIO LEONARD SANKOW BEAVER BROOK FARM LLC. CATO CORNER FARM GIGLIO LEONARD

NAME

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

HOWRIGAN HOME FARM DAN & SHAWN GINGUE BERKSON DAIRY MIKE BENJAMIN WYNN PARADEE BALLARD ACRES LLOYD DIANE & BRADLEY LUMBRA TOM & MARY MACHIA WRIGHT FAMILY FARM LTD. CARPSDALE FARMS SIMON DEPATIE SIZEN DAIRY FARM DANIEL & KAREN FORTIN WARREN HULL & SONS PAUL & RAMONE & DANIEL COUTURE HOWRIGAN HJ & A & LAWRENCE J. & MACCAUSLAND S. WOLCOTT BEN WILLIAMS PAUL-LIN DAIRY BEN WILLIAMS NEWTON FARMS INC. PARADEE DORA & BRAD CALLAN DENIS RAINVILLE MARC & CAROL JONES LONGE LLOYD & MARIE GARRY & EILEEN TRUDELL KIRT WESTCOM FLEURYS MAPLE HILL FARM WALTER & DIANE BERTHIAUME GARY HANNA

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H J H J X H H H X X H H J X J

249 546 106 541 39 221 133 184 504 80 123 136 87 92 133 240 25 44 30 34 80 81 106 50 76 123 121 36 38 99

3.6 4.1 3.8 4 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.7 5 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.7 3.8 4.7 4.2 3.2 3.9 3.8 4.2 3.9 3.8 3.9 4.4 4.1 4.8

3.2 3.1 * 3.1 3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.1 * 3.2 3 3 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.7 3 3.6 3.3 2.5 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 2.8 3 3.5 3.2 3.6

GRAND ISLE J & M LADD FAMILIES FARM

H

68

LAMOILLE ARTHUR & LARRY MORRILL LES & CLAIRE PIKE DEBORA WICKART

H J H

ORANGE WALTER & MARGARET GLADSTONE ROBERT & MELANIE SWENSON PINELLO FAMILY FARM VERMONT TECH COLLEGE ZACHARY FEURY SILLOWAY FARMS HARKDALE FARM INC. RANDY & AMY FERRIS DAVID P. DAVOLL TIM & JANET ANGELL CHAPMAN COREY & ANN CHAPMAN COREY & ANN RAY E. CHURCHILL ROBERT J HOWE PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE RANDY & AMY FERRIS DERRICK & BEVERLY WRIGHT KENNETH & LISA PRESTON HARKDALE FARM INC. ROBERT & LINDA DIMMICK JEFFREY & BETH BAILEY OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP ANTHONY & CHRISTINE BROWN JOSEPH O. ANGELL ALLENVILLE FARM ROBERT J HOWE DAVID CHILDS OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP DUANE & DALE WILLIAMS WARREN PRESTON FARM 1 LLOYD & JASON BAKER A. & K. BURGESS HERD 1 JAMES WILLIAMS M. GARY MULLEN DEAN & TERRI CONANT CHESTER & SCHEINDEL ABBOT PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE A. & K. BURGESS HERD 1 STEVEN & LINDA SMALL DANIEL J CILLEY

ORLEANS FAIRMONT DAIRY LLC VERNON & MARY JUDITH HURD POULIN-ROYER J DENIS & CLAIRE MICHAUD NEIGHBORHOOD FARM AARON & CHANTALE NADEAU ANDERSONVILLE DAIRY LLC WEBSTER DANIEL & MEGAN DOUG NELSON BRUCE & LAURIE PERRON PADDLEBRIDGE HOLSTEINS JAMES & SHARLYN JORDAN JOHN & DEANNA BROE ADAM & JOANNA LIDBACK BRIAN & CYNTHIA DANE ANDY ANDREWS RANDALL DEXTER & ALICE JOHN & DEANNA BROE PAMELA HELENEK MICHAEL LACROSS

H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H X J H

384 49 112 448 856 169 210 77 122 62 52 261 21 34 93 88 97 33 28 89

* * * *


World Dairy Expo New Holland Trade Center unveiled World Dairy Expo promises even more for dairy producers to experience in 2012. A new major sponsor has stepped up to the plate for naming of the newly expanded indoor exhibit space. The New Holland Trade Center will feature a mix of new and returning exhibitors from across the dairy industry. Dairy enthusiasts attending the event will have the opportunity to view the very

latest cutting-edge equipment, research and services that might be incorporated into their operations. “We are very pleased about this new opportunity at World Dairy Expo,” said John Elliott, Director of Brand Marketing North America for New Holland. “New Holland has long been committed to the development and production of equipment that helps

dairy producers put up high quality hay and forage, and our support of World Dairy Expo is just one way that we are demonstrating and growing that commitment.” World Dairy Expo General Manager, Mark Clarke shared, “We are very excited to add New Holland as a new FiveStar Sponsor partner. The New Holland Trade Center addition will enhance our dairy producer

experience by adding indoor space to unveil the most progressive innovations, products and services in the industry. We are constantly searching for new companies with cutting-edge offerings to feature at World Dairy Expo.” The 26,000 square foot New Holland Trade Center will be the largest new exhibit area at Expo since the Exhibition Hall was opened in 1995. The new

space will offer 130 booths to meet a portion of the increasing demand for exhibit space from existing exhibitors as well as many new exhibitors that wish to be featured at World Dairy Expo. World Dairy Expo is recognized as the largest dairy-focused event in the world. Dairy producers from around the globe are invited to attend the event that includes elite dairy cattle shows, Expo

DHI TOP 40 FOR FEBRUARY NAME

J X X J J J X A J

51 123 215 69 19 64 24 49 49

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

13249 13868 12970 13556 12297 11341 13518 12859 9556

658 646 655 608 588 544 531 512 428

5 4.7 5.1 4.5 4.8 4.8 3.9 4 4.5

478 473 454 452 438 419 419 416 334

3.6 3.4 3.5 3.3 3.6 3.7 3.1 3.2 3.5

24475 16729 20821 19708 17825 15618 18317 15297 15624 12031 13324 14288 12712

907 867 736 784 658 660 591 639 574 591 512 557 525

3.7 5.2 3.5 4 3.7 4.2 3.2 4.2 3.7 4.9 3.8 3.9 4.1

726 629 628 600 554 528 518 486 464 454 414 407 396

3 * 3.8 3 3 3.1 3.4 2.8 * 3.2 3 3.8 3.1 2.8 3.1

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

RUTLAND RICHARD SHELDON CALEB P SMITH CASH & KAREN RUANE BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 HARVEY FARMS CASH & KAREN RUANE PAUL & KARI LUSSIER BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 JOESPH & OR UNA MORRISSETTE GERRY & DIANE COLVIN MCCULLOUGH BURTON & SON SHAUN YOUNG SHAUN YOUNG

H J H H H X H A H J H H X

190 55 70 97 125 11 135 29 26 31 34 40 29

NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

WASHINGTON FAIRMONT FARM DAVID PULLMAN WALTER C'O RAYMON BO BOTHFELD DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER FARM LLC. NEILL DAVID PULLMAN STANLEY & CATHERINE SCRIBNER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON MOLLY BROOK FARMS MORGAN & JENNIFER CHURCHILL STEPHEN & AMY BOTHFELD HARVEST HILL FARM WALT & JOSEPH MAHR MORSE JR. WOODARD FARM HARVEST HILL FARM JOHN ARMSTRONG GEORGE CARPENTER JR. VONTRAPP FARMSTEAD VERN-MONT FARM LLC MARK RUSHTON MARK RUSHTON

H H H H H X H H J X H A J X A J H X

823 185 69 44 71 31 282 66 115 91 58 13 26 24 18 22 49 43

WINDHAM H H J

566 36 25

26275 24050 22131 23171 20866 19369 19143 20098 15033 16458 17142 16132 14383 14993 15416 12759 13897 10216

1027 3.9 915 3.8 827 3.7 705 3 786 3.8 878 4.5 737 3.8 705 3.5 724 4.8 690 4.2 663 3.9 622 3.9 801 5.6 650 4.3 579 3.8 554 4.3 493 3.5 488 4.8

799 752 711 708 671 670 623 593 570 533 521 495 481 475 474 452 405 334

26307 23967 17246

1026 966 845

806 3.1 * 769 3.2 650 3.8

3.9 4 4.9

3 * 3.1 * 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.5 * 3.3 3 3.8 3.2 3 3.1 3.3 3.2 3.1 3.5 2.9 3.3

NAME

Brd Cows

KEVIN HAMILTON PETER MILLER CLARK FARM LLC WESTMINSTER FARM LILAC RIDGE FARM MALCOLM SUMNER THE CORSE FARM

H H H H H J H

44 162 81 642 39 37 57

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

20249 19697 18977 19048 17873 14315 16260

801 823 784 737 724 693 648

4 4.2 4.1 3.9 4.1 4.8 4

632 595 583 575 551 508 484

3.1 3 3.1 3 3.1 3.5 3

23783 23863 17846 22217 18050 21319 18960 15347 14381 14765 12690 13137 10315 8763

935 884 1047 906 920 765 709 714 600 528 535 486 495 376

3.9 3.7 5.9 4.1 5.1 3.6 3.7 4.7 4.2 3.6 4.2 3.7 4.8 4.3

750 731 708 686 664 658 607 543 463 453 435 406 354 285

3.2 3.1 * 4 3.1 3.7 3.1 3.2 3.5 3.2 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.4 3.3

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

WINDSOR LEMAX FARM RHOMAN WAI FARMS RICHARDSON FAMILY FARM MICHAEL & HEIDI DOLLOFF BASSETT ROBERT P GEORGE MILLER JEFFREY & DAVID TOWNSEND SPRING BROOK FARM MIKE L CLARK GREEN ACRES MILKING SHORTHORNS JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. ROYAL TERRACE GUERNSEYS LONE OAK FARM

H H J H J H H J X M J A G X

96 455 58 84 89 64 128 48 32 36 14 27 20 32

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 27

JACK & ANNE LAZOR JONATHAN & JAYNE CHASE RYAN BROS LEATHER JEREMY & JENNIFER JOHN & DEANNA BROE ERIC DAGGETT LEATHER JEREMY & JENNIFER ANDREW KEHLER WAYNE SR. DONCASTER

Brd Cows

Seminars, Virtual Farm Tours, youth competition, contests and over 800 exhibiting trade show companies featuring the latest products, research and service. The 2012 World Dairy Expo theme will be “Market Fresh” and the event will be held Oct. 2-6 at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, WI. Visit www.worlddairyexpo.com or call 608-224-6455 for further details.


For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MAINE

ANDROSCOGGIN-SAGADAHOC HEMOND HILL FARM DHI STEPHEN BRIGGS DHIR-AP TWIN BROOK DAIRY LLC DHI-AP R.E.HEMOND FARM INC. DHI-AP ALDEN FISHER DHIR-AP EAST LEDGE FARM DHIR WATERMAN FARM INC. DHIR-AP JOHN & SANDY NUTTING DHIR CHRIS & JEANIE LEWIS DHI-AP ALDEN FISHER DHIR-AP LOWELL FAMILY FARM DHIR BOTMA FARM DHI-AP JOSEPH & VIRGINIA ROSEBERRY DHI-AP BARKER FARMS INC DHI-AP GOODNOW JERSEY FARM INC DHIR

H H H H H H H H H M J H H H J

67.0 484.4 106.5 303.0 43.9 53.5 61.0 25.7 114.3 26.6 66.5 90.3 75.0 101.7 29.8

KAYBEN HOLSTEINS HALL C.W. PINELAND FARMS, INC BAKER BROOK FARM GARY WINSHIP AND FAMILY YOUNG C.E.

DHIR DHIR DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H X H H

77.4 51.5 74.5 58.0 49.0 57.8

24722 23054 20643 19791 18431 17478

930 881 813 754 691 655

3.8 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7

742 705 637 616 553 527

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0

DAVIS, JIM & RICK BAILEY HILL FARM THOMAS BAILEY FARRINGTON, THAYDEN JOHN DONALD RICHARD COREY MARC BAILEY TURNER, MALCOLM HERD 1 SHADY LANE FARM

DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H X

57.2 29.4 14.1 55.1 76.6 39.7 59.1 38.2 37.7

20695 20148 20423 19459 20010 18589 18869 17081 14839

809 705 682 776 737 735 649 601 668

3.9 3.5 3.3 4.0 3.7 4.0 3.4 3.5 4.5

660 630 601 599 578 573 558 507 506

3.2 3.1 2.9 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.4

SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 CLEMEDOW FARM SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 PEARSON RICHARD NICK MICHAUD PEARSON RICHARD GAIL QUIMBY PLOURDE, ARTHUR E. JASON & JOY RAY

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP

H H J H H X X H J

120.6 97.1 85.5 97.6 135.2 18.2 76.4 63.0 62.6

26824 23610 20112 21977 20692 16923 19052 18192 14297

978 769 954 933 795 844 791 659 638

3.6 3.3 4.7 4.2 3.8 5.0 4.2 3.6 4.5

808 737 713 705 628 616 572 533 508

3.0 3.1 3.5 3.2 3.0 3.6 3.0 2.9 3.6

RALPH PEARSE & SONS HAWES LINCOLN J NEWBERT, GARY & ANDREA TIBBETTS, BARRY & ELAINE

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

33.2 36.6 57.7 50.9

23983 19266 18138 17938

861 755 673 661

3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7

714 600 545 540

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H X H H

75.3 102.3 36.0 19.9 21.7 30.6

25386 22164 20065 16507 18508 16949

840 851 733 702 696 633

3.3 3.8 3.7 4.3 3.8 3.7

749 678 623 575 554 508

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.0 3.0

CUMBERLAND

Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

FRANKLIN

KENNEBEC

KNOX-LINCOLN

OXFORD

BISSELL JOHN & CINDY CONANT ACRES INC. KUVAJA FARMS INC KUVAJA FARMS INC LONE MOUNTAIN FARM BRIAN M. BAILEY

PENOBSCOT-PISCATAQUIS SCOTT KEITH VEAZLAND FARMS SIMPSON RON, BETH STONYVALE INC. UNIVERSITY OF MAINE HOWARD BROS LIBBY LAND SAWYER WILLIAM & SONS VELGOUSE FARM,LLC EATON FARM

26647 1032 3.9 817 3.1 26833 936 3.5 803 3.0 3X 25078 966 3.9 788 3.1 3X 25690 921 3.6 779 3.0 22296 803 3.6 657 2.9 20531 785 3.8 629 3.1 20756 757 3.6 622 3.0 19492 709 3.6 592 3.0 19357 727 3.8 591 3.1 19469 676 3.5 588 3.0 16009 749 4.7 583 3.6 19005 723 3.8 580 3.1 18244 679 3.7 545 3.0 17597 647 3.7 539 3.1 14763 703 4.8 518 3.5

DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

50.7 374.0 632.1 998.2 47.5 200.1 204.2 167.8 127.4 38.5

24213 23697 24670 23466 22919 20419 20183 19085 19828 15424

915 873 894 812 888 773 731 762 738 650

3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.9 3.8 3.6 4.0 3.7 4.2

738 733 725 712 694 637 637 622 611 506

3.0 3.1 2.9 3X 3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.3

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H X H H X H H H H H J X H

121.1 72.6 262.2 268.4 135.5 404.7 88.3 60.4 372.7 52.2 55.7 46.8 39.2 44.6 45.6

26288 24608 23506 20196 21066 21303 19273 20126 20043 18705 19412 19180 15611 17018 16127

920 855 921 862 885 799 818 721 779 762 711 743 737 650 598

3.5 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.2 3.8 4.2 3.6 3.9 4.1 3.7 3.9 4.7 3.8 3.7

794 744 709 679 668 655 627 599 598 577 577 559 545 520 507

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.2 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.5 3.1 3.1

THE THOMPSON FARM DHI-AP H 75.6 LARRABEE HAROLD & GALEN DHI-APCS H 476.6 INGRAHAM JOHN W & SONS DHI-APCS H 442.1 KEENE DAIRY DHI-AP H 100.7 SCHOFIELD, WAYNE DHI-AP H 25.0 CLEMENTS WALTER DHI-AP H 36.6 SIMON STOLL DHI-AP X 50.2

23352 23963 21548 20138 19968 18992 15823

904 901 871 776 757 683 662

3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.6 4.2

730 698 672 617 609 563 533

3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.4

JOHNSON FARM INC. GIRARD,RYAN ALDERWOOD FARM, INC. HIGHLAND FARMS INC DUNN, FRED HARRISON FARM LEARY FARM INC.

23290 21144 20259 17766 19838 17439 17541

864 718 749 883 741 709 647

3.7 3.4 3.7 5.0 3.7 4.1 3.7

750 649 632 631 603 557 511

3.2 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.0 3.2 2.9

SOMERSET

DANIEL HARRIMAN DICKINSON FRANK CHARTRAND FARMS INC. CAMBRIDGE FARMS MARK OUELLETTE JR. SOMERSET FARMS L.P SEVEY LAROY L FARRAND CHARLES BOSWORTH FARMS INC. SMITH ROGER DEAN PAINE CONNOLLY JAMES D & MARY JOSHUA CLARK GRASSLAND JAMES STROUT

WALDO

YORK

DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H J H H H

80.1 26.8 83.8 249.8 51.4 42.8 51.5

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

CHESHIRE

Top 40 Herds For February B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

NEW HAMPSHIRE

HAMPDEN

WINDYHURST FM PARTNERSHIP DHIR-AP STONEHOLM FARM DHI-APCS SAWYER SHELDON S DHIRAPCS STONEWALL FARM DHI-AP

H 183.5 H 789.4 J 318.2 H 26.4

26259 24040 16788 18961

998 820 834 704

3.8 3.4 5.0 3.7

780 719 619 577

3.0 3.0 3X 3.7 3.0

RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD2 KEITH DAVID RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD3 RITCHIE GEORGE F HD 1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X A

15.1 215.2 25.8 74.0

22340 19775 15533 15945

726 797 683 583

3.2 4.0 4.4 3.7

707 622 567 518

3.2 3.1 3.7 3.2

FITCH FARM, LLC KNOXLAND FARM INC POMEROY, KEITH E. ALVIRNE SCHOOL FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

100.8 334.6 74.6 19.0

26311 921 24733 998 22987 831 21955 1029

3.5 4.0 3.6 4.7

791 791 716 679

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X

218.3 58.9 62.3 156.8 78.9 80.4 14.3

25417 24999 24370 23417 21696 20057 16360

940 968 945 865 801 714 717

3.7 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.6 4.4

779 765 748 708 634 623 563

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.4

BODWELL, H & SONS FERNALD FARM DAIRY, LLC GREAT BAY FARM

DHI-APCS H 240.6 DHI-AP H 189.2 DHI-APCS H 103.3

25062 23632 20503

941 3.8 767 3.1 982 4.2 697 2.9 808 3.9 611 3.0

UNH CREAM UNH RESEARCH HERD SCRUTON'S DAIRY FARM NAUGHTAVEEL FARM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

24.0 76.8 242.4 107.0

26676 1024 3.8 813 3.0 25398 973 3.8 775 3.1 24372 887 3.6 730 3.0 23612 857 3.6 713 3.0

LECLAIR GARY D. JOHNSON, JOLYON KEITH KIMBALL MC NAMARA, PATRICK ECCARDT FARM, INC. HOLMES, JEFF AND STEVE

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H J

173.1 37.1 560.3 182.6 110.9 62.8

26454 23798 22282 21668 21723 16599

GRAFTON

HILLSBORO

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP HIGHWAY VIEW FARM BACHELDER, KEITH JONES, MARION & GORDON MORRILL FARM DAIRY BARTLETT, A.S. & S.A. GLINES,GEORGE HERD GLINES,GEORGE HERD

ROCKINGHAM

STRAFFORD-CARROLL

SULLIVAN

997 907 855 857 789 754

3.8 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.6 4.5

836 704 703 674 647 584

3.2 3.0 3.2 3X 3.1 3.0 3.5

3.6 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.6

762 754 733 696 691 671 634 624 623 564

3.1 3.0 3X 3.1 3X 3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

VERMONT

ADDISON

BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC DEER VALLEY FARM M AND J DAIRY FOUR HILL FARMS BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC BINGHAM, WILLIAM AND KIM SABOURIN, GERARD & JUDY MIDDLEBROOK FARM INC. THOMAS, BRAD AND JILL PLOUFFE HILL FARM

H 1356.1 H 455.2 H 301.5 H 1482.7 A 59.5 H 66.6 H 98.0 H 178.8 H 173.7 H 37.3

24631 25177 23869 22883 22056 21803 20909 20840 20486 18746

898 926 869 863 839 833 782 800 754 668

DHI-AP H 65.0

27873

944 3.4 844 3.0

BURT, JASON AND CHRISTINA DHI-AP H 260.3 FOURNIER INC, RENE & SON DHI-AP X 74.7 GORT0N,GRANT JOHN DHI-APCS H 105.3

21895 19633 18863

808 3.7 645 2.9 765 3.9 609 3.1 772 4.1 592 3.1

DHI-AP H 379.3

26750

939 3.5 798 3.0 3X

DHI-AP H 867.8

25296

979 3.9 796 3.1

CHITTENDEN

TWIN OAKS DAIRY FARM LLC

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

FRANKLIN

GRAND ISLE QUINTIN, ANDRE

ORANGE

KNOXLAND FARM

RUTLAND

MACH FARM, INC. BOOK BROTHERS GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD

WINDSOR

BILLINGS FARM MUSEUM WADE MAXIM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

H H H B

151.9 119.2 89.0 12.9

21056 21796 20838 18288

795 804 828 815

3.8 3.7 4.0 4.5

657 655 638 614

DHIR J DHI-AP J

41.0 74.4

15996 15680

801 5.0 600 3.8 741 4.7 567 3.6

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PALMER,TERRY POMEROY & SONS

DHI-AP H 155.2 DHI-AP H 71.4

20906 19852

786 3.8 639 3.1 772 3.9 637 3.2

TULLY FARMS, INC. PICKARD, JAMES & ELEANOR

DHI-AP H 125.4 DHI-AP H 87.5

19943 17945

798 4.0 641 3.2 696 3.9 555 3.1

HERRICK,DAVID SAM RICHARDSON'S DAIRY, INC.

DHI-AP H 91.4 DHI-AP H 154.7

25101 22747

892 3.6 769 3.1 758 3.3 678 3.0

BRISTOL COUNTY

DHI-AP H 19.2

20958

760 3.6 632 3.0

MIDDLESEX ESSEX

BRISTOL

RHODE ISLAND

WASHINGTON COTTRELL HOMESTEAD KENYON, FRANCIS

DHI-AP H 14.6 DHI-AP X 63.1

18822 19314

706 3.8 590 3.1 739 3.8 589 3.0

CONNECTICUT

HARTFORD

MILLBORNE FARM SMYTHS TRINITY FARM FUSIEK,D,& COULTER FUSIEK HASTINGS FARM COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. H0USE OF HAYES COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. MILLBORNE FARM HASTINGS FARM PERRY, SCOTT

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X G J H

21.8 28.0 47.5 118.6 43.1 76.1 48.0 25.7 13.8 29.6

22882 21795 21112 20250 19559 19425 16989 17350 15642 17836

811 812 769 776 719 728 707 743 733 733

3.5 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.7 4.2 4.3 4.7 4.1

707 677 628 617 601 585 573 564 537 524

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.4 3.3 3.4 2.9

JACQUIER, ROBERT & PETER CHRIS & TODD HANNAN WEIGOLD FARMS LLP FREUND'S FARM, INC. ARETHUSA FARM LLC TANNER T. MEADOW RIDGE FARM LLC. THORN, CLINTON JACQUIER, DAVID & MELODY ARETHUSA FARM LLC WHITETAIL FARM 1 CARLSON,DOUGLAS J. NUTMEG ACRES

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H H J H H X

986.1 39.2 88.8 275.9 75.9 139.3 69.5 32.9 380.2 25.8 31.9 60.8 51.3

27789 22895 23293 22756 22386 20436 20050 18090 17481 15662 17632 16509 15731

931 907 870 815 911 771 796 758 655 798 706 643 591

3.4 4.0 3.7 3.6 4.1 3.8 4.0 4.2 3.7 5.1 4.0 3.9 3.8

825 714 706 687 657 642 596 582 566 559 527 516 511

3.0 3X 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.6 3.0 3.1 3.2

DHIR-AP H 140.7 DHI-AP H 58.4

21266 16652

736 3.5 629 3.0 632 3.8 517 3.1

SPIELMAN FARM RIVER PLAIN DAIRY BLUESLOPE FARM, INC

DHI-AP H 373.0 DHI-AP H 52.6 DHI-APCS H 119.7

21751 20113 17464

858 3.9 686 3.2 748 3.7 615 3.1 660 3.8 512 2.9

BAHLER FARMS INC. BAHLER FARMS INC. UNIV OF CONNECTICUT HYTONE FARM MAPLELEAF FARM, INC SHADOW VALLEY FARM SHADOW VALLEY FARM UNIV OF CONNECTICUT SHADOW VALLEY FARM FISH FAMILY FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

975.1 962.5 82.9 256.0 228.7 50.9 101.5 23.9 24.8 28.3

25676 24254 26277 23320 22635 18057 19613 16319 15029 14506

914 876 908 926 896 763 706 788 713 701

DHIR-AP H 115.2 DHI-AP H 124.6 DHIR-AP J 149.9

22351 20191 16131

893 4.0 689 3.1 729 3.6 628 3.1 800 5.0 579 3.6

LITCHFIELD

NEW HAVEN/MIDDLESEX GREENBACKER, C & SNS FM 2 TRIANGLE A

NEW LONDON TOLLAND

WINDHAM

TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2 MAY HILL FARM TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2

H H H H H X H J J J

3.6 3.6 3.5 4.0 4.0 4.2 3.6 4.8 4.7 4.8

780 740 740 724 694 617 607 574 539 512

3.0 3.1 2.8 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.5

3X 3X 3X

3X

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.4

MASSACHUSETTS

BERKSHIRE

MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP FAIRFIELDS DAIRY FARM,LLC DHI-AP MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP HIGH LAWN FARM DHIRAPCS TURNER FARMS, INC. DHI ZIEMBA, MICHAEL,MARK&TIM DHI-AP LEGEYT, RICHARD &BETTY DHI-AP

FRANKLIN

WHOLEY COW FARM WHOLEY COW FARM BOYDEN BROS. DAIRY ROBERTSON,CHRIS & BOB MT.TOBY FARM

HAMPSHIRE

COOK,GORDON,JR. & HANK BELDEN,LUTHER A.INC ALLARDS FARM INC. DEVINE FARM,INC. PARSONS,HENRY & EDWARD KOKOSKI, JOHN HD1 COOK,GORDON,JR. & HANK HARTSBROOK FARM

H H J J H H H

103.7 232.8 21.7 209.5 118.0 177.9 67.1

22287 21518 16728 16454 19839 18524 18008

895 849 817 801 738 688 727

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

X X H H H

41.9 18.9 88.9 88.3 104.2

27010 1014 3.8 846 3.1 23104 1051 4.5 814 3.5 24084 911 3.8 747 3.1 22456 925 4.1 695 3.1 21658 841 3.9 672 3.1

DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP

H H B H H J J H

57.2 112.2 129.1 189.2 105.8 99.0 11.0 90.0

23067 22535 18951 20419 19583 15511 14801 16893

928 863 744 808 804 797 764 649

4.0 3.9 4.9 4.9 3.7 3.7 4.0

4.0 3.8 3.9 4.0 4.1 5.1 5.2 3.8

699 660 620 589 569 560 557

749 689 633 630 624 592 563 522

3.1 3.1 3.7 3.6 2.9 3.0 3.1

3.2 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.2 3.8 3.8 3.1

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Open application period for Grants announced the benefit of the public. AEEP is a competitive, reimbursement grant program that funds materials and labor up to $25,000 or 90 percent of project costs. Practices funded include those that prevent direct impacts on water quality, ensure efficient use of water, and address agricultural impacts on air quality. All projects where the primary focus is renewable energy or energy conservation would need to apply to the Massachusetts Ag-Energy Grant Program. Reimbursement grants will be awarded on a competitive basis. Those submitting successful proposals will be required to sign a contract with Agricultural Resources. All projects must be completed by June 30, 2013, subject to department funding sources. Satisfactory receipts for costs of approved materials and labor must be submitted to Agricultural Resources. AEEP grant applica-

tions are available at www.mass.gov/agr/programs/aeep. Ag-Energy Grant The purpose of the MDAR’s Ag-Energy Grant is to assist agricultural operations in an effort to improve energy efficiency and to facilitate adoption of alternative clean energy technologies in order that they can become more sustainable and the commonwealth can maximize the environmental and economic benefits from these technologies. Reimbursement grants of up to $25,000 will be awarded on a competitive basis. All projects must be completed by June 30, 2013. Projects with a primary focus to improve air and water quality and to conserve water need to apply to AEEP. Though all farm related energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet Ag-Energy Program requirements will be considered, higher priority project proposals

should focus on either of two specified categories and respective technologies listed: Energy Efficiency: • Dairy — Plate/Coolers, Heat Recovery and VSD Vacuum Pumps; • Greenhouse/Nurseries — Thermal blankets, roof venting modifications to eliminate mechanical ventilation needs, efficient heating distribution modifications – e.g. bench/soil in combination with staged control, electronic controls; • Higher Efficiency Advanced Low Emissions Indoor Furnaces or Boilers — Condensing type, central or unit heater utilizing conventional fuels, maple sap evaporator wood furnaces; and • Other Technologies — High efficiency refrigeration, optimally with heat recovery, reverse osmosis equipment for maple sugaring operations, process heat recovery, energy efficient Technologies advancing urban food gardens.

Renewable Energy: • Photovoltaics; • Wind; • Solar Thermal; • Geothermal; • Bio-fuel crops for those shown to be grown on marginal soils or used in crop rotation; • Bio-fuel production provided demonstration of all federal, state and local process permits and approvals are identified and will be provided as part of the project installation, including but not limited to product preand post- storage, hazardous materials, and process effluents; • High Efficiency Advanced Gasification Biomass thermal boilers or furnaces intended for indoor use only, utilizing wood pellets, wood chips or kernel corn, meeting all current federal, state and/or local construction, emission and efficiency standards, and regulations and certified for MA installation; • Advanced biomass

(gasification) Outdoor Wood Boilers (OWB), meeting all current federal, state and/or local construction, emission and efficiency standards, and regulations. Requirements that must be met include a demonstration that the OWB system shall: a. meet all local Board of Health requirements b. be installed and certified under MA Dept. of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) regulations 310 CMR 7.26 (50) through (54) found at www.mass.gov/dep/air/l aws/regulati.htm#owb c. comply with all certified equipment requirements; MassDEP certified OWB equipment is listed at: www.mass.gov/dep /air/ community/certohh.htm; and • Renewable Technologies advancing urban food gardens Ag-Energy Grant applications are available at www.mass.gov/agr/ programs/aegp.

Farm Bill, crop insurance, trade priorities highlight 2012-13 ASA policy direction Soybean producers from all U.S. soybean growing regions gathered in Nashville to review and

revise the policy direction of the American Soybean Association (ASA). One hundred thirty three pro-

ducers from ASA’s 26 state affiliates served as Voting Delegates in this annual process that

guides the ASA as it pursues future initiatives to improve U.S. soybean farmer profitability.

The voting delegates session was held on Saturday, March 3, following conclusion of the annual

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Commodity Classic Convention and Trade Show that drew a record 6,014 attendees. What follows are some of the most significant additions and modifications covering a variety of important soybean issues. Trade ASA supports legislation that would graduate Russia from the provisions of the JacksonVanik amendment in order to establish permanent normal trade relations with Russia. ASA opposes any proposal to merge the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) with other trade agencies. ASA believes that USTR should remain an independent agency within the Executive Office of the President, focusing on trade negotiations, trade agreements and trade enforcement. ASA strongly supports swift implementation of the Colombia, Panama and South Korea Free Trade Agreements. ASA opposes currency legislation or any action by Congress to unilaterally regulate the value of foreign currencies. ASA believes that currency legislation would create

Farm A31

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 29

Over the coming weeks, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources will be accepting applications from farmers who wish to participate in the department’s energy and environmental programs for fiscal year 2013. The deadline for both applications is April 30. Agricultural Environmental Enhancement Program (AEEP) The purpose of AEEP is to support agricultural operations that are looking to install conservation practices that prevent direct impacts on water quality, ensure efficient use of water, as well as address impacts on air quality. By providing reimbursement directly to agricultural operations that implement eligible projects that prevent, reduce or eliminate environmental impacts, the program achieves its purpose and goals of minimizing environmental impacts from these operations for


Where Information Creates Opportunity

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Page 30 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

The Empire State Milk Quality Council? (Oh, 'Super' Milk, I've heard of that!) Reprinted with permission from Eastern Dairy Business, January 2012 By Lisa Ford & Roberta Wolf

• For consumers, they can be assured of quality milk, thereby increasing confidence in and demand for dairy products.

This is the first of eight articles the Empire State Milk Quality Council (ESMQC) is supporting along with Quality Milk Production Services and Dairy One. We are excited to partner with these two organizations to provide two more articles focusing on milk quality in 2012.

The council is made up of volunteer dairy community members, including veterinarians, educators, dairy producers, state agency employees and employees of other dairy-related businesses. Funding is received from many contributors from all aspects of the dairy industry in New York and the Northeast. The majority of their donations support the “Super” Milk program. In addition, the council has a goal of education, utilizing seminars, materials, articles and speaker luncheons over the years. We are grateful for the contributors and their generous donations. The council would not exist without their support.

To start the year, we wanted to reintroduce everyone to the ESMQC, based in New York. Milk quality has been a focus of New York farms for many years with programs like Quality Milk Production Services at Cornell University and the development of initiatives like the ESMQC. In the mid-1970s, a group of dairy industry people started as the Empire State Mastitis Council, a notfor-profit organization modeled after the National Mastitis Council. The Council began with the goal of improving the quality of the milk produced on New York dairies. The council recognized achieving this goal benefits everyone in the milk production chain: • For producers, it increases cow productivity, health and farm profitability. It decreases the use of antibiotics and the risk of antibiotic residue. • For handlers, quality milk increases finished product yield, quality and shelf life.

The council is best known for the ‘Super’ Milk program and award signs. Many of us look for the simple blue signs signifying that a farm focuses on their milk quality and the impression their farmstead leaves in the minds of the consumers driving by. This program depends on milk inspectors nominating farms that have a bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) of 250,000 cells/ ml or less for 10 of 12 months, and an exemplary farmstead. In March, the nominations are due for farms that qualified the previous year. Kerry Case, a long-term council member employed at QMPS who has been implementing the “Super” Milk program for many years, collects the nominations. She inputs the data and orders the proper signs for each farm. In May, the signs are distributed and farms can update their displays. The first year a farm receives ‘Super’ Milk designation it get the big blue sign. Each consecutive year the farm receives a small year sign, until they reach the milestones of 5, 10, 15 or 20 consecutive years, which each have special signs. “Super” Milk celebrated the first consecutive 20-year winners in 2010. Thirty-eight farms qualified for this amazing accomplishment! We now have more than 1,600 farms which have received “Super” Milk, and the numbers are growing. Larry Bertram, a partner at Hi-Hope Farm LLC, which is a 21-year “Super” Milk winner, states, “It can be done.” We asked many of the 20-year winners last year, “What is your secret?” and many stated the secret to their success was to keep the cows clean.

The council’s education goal is achieved through seminars, materials, articles and speaker luncheons.

Another focus of the ESMQC is to support the lowering of the BTSCC for shipment to 400,000 cells/ml. This is in keeping with our mission and would benefit cows, producers and consumers. Supporting this proposal through education and recognition of farms producing milk of higher quality will continue to be important for the council. See our website to read our full statement on this initiative. The ESMQC hopes to be an example for other states to start their own milk quality promotion programs. More and more consumers are demanding information about the way we produce milk and the quality of that product. We are dedicated to the education, promotion and recognition of quality milk throughout all facets of the New York dairy industry. Partnering with QMPS and Dairy One for these articles is a step we are taking to further our goals.


Farm from A29 retaliatory actions that would negatively affect soybean trade. Instead, ASA supports an approach by the U.S. that engages the international community in its efforts to address global foreign exchange polices. Farm Bill ASA supports the following provisions in the 2012 Farm Bill: Commodities Title ASA continues to strongly support programs in the 2012 Farm Bill that provide the greatest possible planting flexibility. Allowing and encouraging

producers to respond to market signals rather than government programs has been a cornerstone of the last three farm bills, and enabled U.S. soybean plantings to increase by 15 million acres (nearly 25 percent) between 1995 and 2010. ASA recognizes that budget constraints are likely to require restructuring farm programs in the 2012 Farm Bill. Agriculture should accept its fair share of any required spending reductions, provided they are proportionate with other federal pro-

grams and they do not require restructuring of the federal crop insurance program, which is the core safety net for producers of soybeans and other commodities. ASA developed and supports risk management concepts for the 2012 Farm Bill as a means to partially offset revenue losses that exceed a specified threshold, while complementing crop insurance. Payments under a revenue-based program should be commodity-specific, and based on the difference between historical

and current-year revenue at the farm level. While based on current-year production, this approach will have less of an impact on planting decisions and production than a fixed target price program, since any payments would be based on actual revenue losses rather than a decline in prices from fixed support levels. Production agriculture has inherent risks, and properly designed farm policy must not remove all risks. ASA recognizes that a revenue-based program may not be appropriate for

promotion programs at $34.5 million and $200 million, respectively. Transportation ASA supports an infrastructure funding framework that allows for public and private investment in the U.S. commercial transportation system to ensure U.S. soybeans and soybean products will be delivered to domestic and international markets in a timely and cost effective manner. ASA supports legislation to require that all funds collected for the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund are used for the intended purposes of waterways dredging and port maintenance. ASA supports expanding the truck weight limits on federal interstate highways to a minimum of 97,000 pounds, provided that there is a 6th axle. Crop Insurance ASA supports the Federal Crop Insurance premiums due date to be returned to September 30 of each fiscal year. ASA strongly urges the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture to make sure that one of the appointments to the board of the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation have a major financial interest in the production of commodity soybeans. Biofuels ASA supports the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) that reflects the expansion of the renewable fuels industry for biodiesel and ethanol and opposes any changes that would reduce obligations or otherwise negatively impact the biodiesel industry. Sustainability ASA supports an aggregate approach to documenting the sustainability of U.S. soybean production. ASA believes U.S. federal and state conservation, environmental and labor laws, and existing U.S. farmer compliance with them, provide assurance that U.S. soybeans are sustainably produced. Telecommunications ASA opposes the use of adjacent bandwidth by any company that would compromise the effectiveness of GPS technology for farmers. Research ASA supports strategic increases in federal investment in USDA’s Agricultural Research Service National Institute of Food and Agriculture that will benefit soybean producers.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 31

all commodities. ASA is open to supporting an alternative program, provided it does not interfere with the ability of producers to respond to the market or distort planting decisions. Additionally, programs should be in compliance with the United States’ existing World Trade Organization commitments. Existing conservation compliance provisions should continue as a condition of eligibility for receiving farm program payments. Conservation Title ASA supports maintaining and funding programs that encourage effective conservation practices on working lands. ASA supports reducing the cap on acres in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) as part of any requirement to reduce spending under the 2012 Farm Bill and to allow U.S. producers to respond to increasing world demand for agricultural commodities. As CRP contracts expire, we believe the CRP should be targeted to the most environmentally sensitive land and to meet water quality goals. Lands that can be returned to production in an environmentally friendly manner should be returned to productive agricultural use. Energy Title ASA supports reauthorization and funding of the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program, the Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels, and the Biobased Market Program in the Energy Title of the 2012 Farm Bill. ASA recognizes that energy programs do not have baseline funding beyond 2012. However, the benefits provided by the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program and the Biobased Market Program have been worth their relatively low cost, and warrant their continuation with an increased level of mandatory funding. Research Title ASA supports reauthorization of the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) to expand competitive research at USDA, as well as reauthorization to maintain research capacity at our land-grant universities. Trade Title ASA supports reauthorization of the Foreign Market Development (Cooperator) Program and the Market Access Program and continued annual funding of these export


Page 32 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012


C ountry F olks

Section B

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS

MACFADDEN'S HUGE SPRING AUCTION SAT. MARCH 31ST - 8AM

TRACTORS - FARM & CONSTRUCTION EQUIP. - ANTIQUES - PARTS & MORE!! At our yard on US Rt. 20, 4 mi. east of Sharon Springs, NY Online bidding available at www.macfaddens.com • Our best line-up of clean ready to go equipment in years!

15TH ANNUAL LAWN & GARDEN AUCTION SATURDAY, APRIL 7TH - 10AM

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March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 1

TRACTORS: '07 NH TB120 4WD, 2000hrs; NH TD80D 4WD w/cab & ldr 1000hrs like new; NH TB110 4WD w/cab & ldr; JD 4050; '06 Landini Powerfarm 105 w/ldr, 100hrs; '05 McCormick C-Max 75 4WD 360 hrs!; JD 6200 2WD PowerQuad cab 4900hrs, nice!; JD 2940 4WD, Fresh eng OH; MF 2605 w/ldr, almost new!; '04 Landini Legend 125 4WD 2900hrs; CaseIH 584 w/ROPS & canopy, 310 orig. hrs absolutely like new: '97 Landini 85F 4WD orchard w/cab; Ford TW15; IH 1086 4WD; IH 3288; IH 3688, nice; IH 966, 1066, 1466, 886; JD 2440 w/new ldr; MF 255; MF 231 150 orig hrs; Case 1210 3000 hrs, one owner; Belarus 525M 4WD w/ldr, low hrs; AC D17-4; AC D14; Mahindra 575 400hrs; CaseIH C80 3800hrs; Kubota M5000 MF 231S 120hrs; Ford 2000 w/ ldr; Ford 800; MF 135, restored; MF 65; + more coming in! COMPACT TRACTORS: All are 4WD most have loaders!!! New McCormick X10.40 4WD w/ldr; NH TC55DA 4WD & ldr 1050 hrs; NH TC33DA w/ldr; Kubota B7510 w/ldr; NH T1510 w/ldr new; Kubota L3200 w/ldr; Kubota BX2200 w/ldr; Kubota B7200 w/ldr; Kubota L2900 w/ldr; NH L4330 w/ldr; Kubota BX2360 w/ldr, new; JD 1050 4WD w/ldr; Kubota B2150 4WD w/ldr; NH TZ22 4WD w/ldr; Kubota BX2750 w/snowblower; JD 650 4WD; (2) Kubota front snowblowers; several 3 pt backhoes plus many more not listed! SKID STEER LOADERS: Unbelievable selection!!!! NH L185 w/cab & AC 850hrs like new!; NH LS170; (2) Case 75XT; Case 40XT; Hydra-Mac 2650 w/JD diesel, low hrs; Bobcat 883 w/cab & AC; Bobcat S175; Bobcat T140 track SS; Bobcat MT55 track loader; Bobcat 743; Bobcat 975 w/JD diesel; Bobcat 632 w/hoe; Bobcat 48in snowblower; Bobcat 54in sweeper; Bobcat M06 backhoe; Valby chipper for SS; Bradco trencher, like new; More coming in daily! INDUSTRIAL: JD 3420 telehandler w/cab & AC, Bobcat 325 excavator; Ford 455 4WD TLB w/ ext hoe & twistowrist only 2000 hrs; IH TD8-C dozer; Case 580D TLB; NH LB620 dsl ldr backhoe; '92 Dodge Cummins DSL low miles; Kubota RTV 1100 camo like new!; Kawasaki Mule 3010 4WD 4 seats- Like new; Cub Cadet BigCountry- like new; BushHog 12ft batwing finish mwr; (2) 2005 Jacobsen dsl reel mowers; 8ft Harley rake; Arps 3pt vibratory cable plow, like new; New Bradco trencher for SS, grapples, bkts; 20 ton Talbert , 9 ton Interstate trailers, 20ft Hillsboro; & much more! TILLAGE & PLANTING: Case IH DMI 530B EcoloTiger 5 shank-like new!; CaseIH 900 9X18 reset plows; White 449 8X18 reset plows, very low acres; White 598 6X variable width; IH 720 5X reset; IH 720 5X reset completely rebuilt; White 508 4X reset completely rebuilt; Kverneland 4x; Many more plows all sizes; Haybuster Rock EZ 106 rock picker-very low acres; Sunflower 6430 31ft finisher; DMI 7 shank discripper; Brillion 15ft Land Commander; IH 6500 9 shank disc-chisel-like new; Krause 7550 27ft rockflex disc; White 272 30ft rockflex disc; White 273 23ft rockflex discs; Tuffline 16ft rockflex disc; JD 210 & 215 discs; JD220 20ft rockflex disc; (10) other discs 6-16ft; JD 7200 6R planter; Sharp JD7000 4R planter; CaseIH 900 Springfield Tractor Rts. 20 & 80, Springfield Ctr. NY 4R planter; Case IH 5100 21x7 press wheel drill w/seed; CaseIH 5300 21x7 drill w/seed; IH 5100 drill; Moore 200+ pcs like new garden tractors, compact tractors, toy collection & more! No till drill; Marliss 10ft drill-nice!; Excellent Brillion 21ft cultimulcher; Nice Brillion 13ft & 15ft cultimNew Brillion 6ft cultimulcher; 5 ton tandem fert. spreader; Many more plows, planters, discs; Plus The nicest tractors for sale anywhere, all will sell w/no minimums or reserves ulchers; more coming in daily!!! Nothing like it anywhere else!!!!!!! HAY& HARVEST EQUIP: Our best selection ever! JD5440 4WD forage harvester-new knives; NEW Kuhn 7922 double rotor 25ft rake; New Kuhn 6622 22' double rotor rake; NH H7330 discbine-nearly new; (2) 21 COMPACT TRACTORS & UTILITY VEHICLES: Kubota L5030 4WD w/ldr & backhoe, 500hrs; (2) Cub Cadet 8404 4WD w/ldr; (3) Cub Cadet - Yanmar EX 3200 4WD w/ldr; (2) Cub Cadet EX 2900 4WD w/ldr; (3) Cub Cadet EX NH1432 discbines; NH1441 discbine; (2) NH 1431 discbines; NH 1412 & 1411 discbines; JD946 discbine; 2400 4WD w/ldr; Cub Cadet 7254 4WD w/ldr; Cub Cadet 7265 4WD w/ldr; Cub Cadet 5234 4WD w/ldr; Kubota Gehl 2330 discbine; Nice NH575 baler w/ thrower; NH 326 baler w/ thrower; Claas 180 round baler; JD 446 B2400; (3) Cub Cadet Big Country 4X4 utility vehicles, all low hours; Kawasaki 2510 Mule 4X4 low hours; Case 1150 round baler; Case IH 5240 round baler-sharp!; Hesston 540 round baler; NI 484 round baler; Deutz-Allis 280 B dozer, very good cond; JD 450C crawler loader, very good cond; IH 656 tractor; Oliver 1550 w/ldr; Farmall M; More round baler; NH 570 baler; (2) NH 315 balers; Sharp NH 311 baler; JD 336 baler; NH273 w/ thrower; JD traded by auction! 946, 930, 1460 discbines; NI 5209 & 5212 discbines; JD 7ft disc mower; Krone 36ft tedder, like new; Kuhn 50+ CUB CADETS: (10) Cub Cadet 3000 series 16-25 hp w/mowers, power steering & some w/snowblowers; (4) Cub 8501 8 star tedder; (6) Claas, Fahr, & NH 4 star tedders; Kuhn GA4100 rotary rake; NH166 inverters; Gehl Cadet Super garden tractors; (27) Cub Cadet 2000 series 16-25 hp-many like new; (15) Cub Cadet 1000 series 10-18hp; 1075 FH w/2 heads & kernel processor; Agripac 9100 round bale tuber; NH 1499 SP haybine; NH489; Several older Cub Cadets including a 100; 107 & more traded in by auction day. Hesston BP25 bale processor; Schulte S150 15ft batwing; Bush Hog 3715 15ft HD batwing; Nice Little Giant COMMERCIAL MOWERS: (8) Late model Cub Cadet Zero-Turn mowers 44-48-54-60 inch; Toro 4500D commer32ft elevator; (4) skeleton elevators; (2) NH 256 rakes; (2) NH 258 rakes w/ NH tandem hitch-like new!; NH; cial mower; JD 525; NH LS45 & more coming in! 50+ TRACTORS OTHER BRANDS: (26) John Deeres 8 - 25hp including 425; 345; 312; 314; 316; 317; & many oth- NI; CaseIH hay rakes; sicklebar mowers; NI 2 row picker; plus MUCH more coming in!!!! OTHER FARM EQUIP: Brock 10 ton grain bin-like new; N-Tech 4000 gal manure tank w/ brakes; Husky ers; Plus at least 25 more tractors various brands! 200+ PCS MISC NEW & USED EQ.: tillers; dump carts; push mowers; chippers; baggers; generators; log splitter; 3pt 4000 gal manure tank; Kelley 70 10ft 3pt backhoe; Woods 3pt backhoe; Caretree 24" 3pt tree spade; JD 450 hitch implements including mowers, blades, York rakes, snowblowers; (10) pallet lots of misc. parts, owners manuals, HydraPush spreader; NI 3626 spreader; NI 213 spreader, mint! Several smaller manure spreaders; Stoltzfus parts equipment row & much more!!! & H&S feeder wagons; (4) Cultipackers 8-14ft; PTO irrigation pump; (10) rotary mowers 4ft-15ft; (3) 3pt Selling 10 AM Sharp!!! snowblowers; Keenan FP80 & 140 mixer wagons; (2) Gehl mixer wagons; (5) Used loaders; (20) Farm gates; Antique Cub Cadets - Pedal Tractors & Toys NI 5623 spreader; (20) New tractor tires 24-38 inch; Belsaw PTO sawmill - 48" blade; M&W dyno; lots of Iver is reducing his collection: 3pt equipt including tillers; snowblowers; backhoes; rakes; plows; rotary mowers + 100's more items all kinds (2) 1961 Original Cub Cadet tractors, one electric start, one recoil both restored. 1976 Cub Cadet Spirit of '76 LAWN & GARDEN: JD X475 w/ bagger; Kubota ZD28F-72P dsl Zero turn; Kubota ZD331 dsl Zero Turn; Cub restored. (7) Pedal Tractors: Original open grille Farmall H; IH 400 w/ cart, original, 1986 Kubota 8950, new, Cadet M72 & M60 Tank Zero Turn mowers; (2) Jacobsen LF3400 diesel commercial mowers; plus many more! (2) JD 4020 w/wide front; (2) IH 1066; plus approximately 50 farm toys all NIB ANTIQUE TRACTORS: (Selling after 2pm) Cockshutt Blackhawk 35, restored; Ford 8N restored S/N 167; Come early & have some fun!!! JD 435; JD 530; JD 430W w/PS, mower, super low hours, original!!!! Cockshutt 30 restored; JD GP; Wallis TERMS: Cash or good check only! All items sold "as is." List is subject to change. 12-20; Rare Ferguson 40 LP gas 1 of 6; AC CA w/widefront, low hours original; (2) JD L; JD unstyled B; NOTE: The best selection of clean Cub Cadets anywhere! Auction under big tent, rain or shine. This auction features MM G100LP-original; Rare MM Jetstar 3 diesel; Oliver 70 restored; Orig Ford 9N on steel; 1939 top quality equipment and you set the price!! These tractors are all reconditioned and ready to mow. Many have snowWorthington; 7hp Economy engine; Complete 3pt for Oliver 770, + much more! blowers, tillers, cabs, etc. Iver says business has been good and it is again time to clean house for a big spring season. Auctioneer's Note: Most of this clean ready to go equipment is here on a one way ticket with no reserves or minPlan to attend, a great opportunity!!! imums! Be ready to buy! Starting early with 2 auctioneers for the first 3 hours; Big equipment starting at 9 AM! TERMS: All items sold as is, where is. All sales final. List is subject to change. Consignments taken til Fri, Owner: Springfield Tractor (315) 858-2578 March 30th. Trucking available anywhere. All purchases must be paid for on day of sale. Within 72 hours for Auctioneers: MacFadden & Sons, Inc. online bidders. Buyer's premium for online purchases 10% for payment with credit card. 5% for cash, check Rt. 20 Sharon Springs, NY • (518) 284-2090 or wire transfer, $25.00 fee for all wire transfers. Buyer's premium capped at $750.00 per item. Onsite buyer's premium 5% for payment with credit card. Onsite premium is waived for payments by cash or good check. Pictures at www.macfaddens.com


U.S. Grains Council attends Commodity Classic Projections of recordsetting attendance numbers exceeded expectations as over 6,000 farmers, member associations, agribusinesses and media descended on the 2012 Commodity Classic in Nashville, TN, on March 1. Hosted by the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA),

American Soybean Association (ASA), National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) and National Sorghum Producers (NSP), the Commodity Classic is an annual convention and trade show where conference participants network with top industry leaders to discuss and develop

current policy challenges on a variety of issues. Among the presenters was U.S. Grains Council President and CEO, Thomas C. Dorr, who delivered an analysis of the fast growing Vietnamese market. “Vietnam illustrates the choices faced by many developing countries today,” Dorr

noted. “A fast growing economy and rising demand are colliding with production constraints. The prospects for increased trade are good, and the Council is working to ensure that U.S. producers are able to compete.” Also representing Council at the event are

Board Officers Wendell Shauman, Don Fast and Terry Vinduska, together with Tom Sleight, USGC Vice President of Operations and Membership, who will share insight and Council persective on key issues including value of trade, food security and export expansion.

“The Council is always looking for new markets in countries that are just achieving lift-off,” Shauman said. “Vietnam has come a long way, and we are eager to help meet their rapidly growing dietary needs.” Source: USGC Global Update for March 1

‘Red Cattle Sale’ to be held April 28

Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

The Vermont Ayrshire Club and the New England Milking Shorthorn Association will host the “The Red Cattle Sale” at noon on Saturday, April 28, at the Vermont State Fair Grounds in Rutland, VT. Those planning to attend should use the Dana Avenue entrance and proceed to the barn at the south end of the fairgrounds. Consignments of all ages will sold that afternoon. Animals that are ready to go home and pay the bills are your best consignments. There will be animals for

www.leepub.com WEEKLY SALES EVERY MONDAY HOSKING SALES - FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK Weekly Sales Every Monday 12:30 Produce, Misc. & small animals; 1:00 Dairy; **We will now sell lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves and cull beef approx. 5:00-5:30PM. Help us increase our volume - thus making a better market for everyone. **We are Independent Marketers - working 24/7 to increase your bottom line. Take advantage of our low commission rates. Competitive marketing is the way to go. Monday, Mar. 12th sale - cull ave. .68, Top cow .86 wt. 1842 $1584.12, Bulls/Steers top $1.05 wt. 1538 $1614.90, bull calves top $2.50, heifer calves top $1.50, Dairy milking age top $1675, Bred Heifer $1625, Open heifer $1025, Young heifer $400. Monday, March 19th - Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Monday, March 26th - Note we will start this sale at 10AM due to the amount of small animals. Special Holiday Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Note this date is the last week of March. Group of Boar cross goats from one farm; 2 Boar cross Billy Goats. 25 - 100% Boar kids from one farm. Group of sheep from one flock. Call for advertising your group - it makes a difference. Monday, April 2nd - Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Thursday, April 5th - From 5PM - 9PM Open house & viewing of cattle for the Spring Premier Sale. Friday, April 6th - 11:30AM Spring Premier All Breed Sale. 165 Head selling: 100 Holsteins, 30 Jerseys, 30 Brown Swiss, 5 Guernsey. Selections are complete the quality is the best ever. We have show calves of all breeds, outstanding bred heifers, fresh young cows that will please the most discriminating. Watch our website for complete catalog on line. (Join us the evening before for open house and cattle viewing) Monday, April 9th - Monthly Heifer Sale. Saturday, April 21st - Annual Spring Machinery Sale & Plant, Tree & Shrub Auction - accepting consignments groups or single items. Consignments already coming in call today to get into advertising it will make a difference. Expecting a field full of quality farm equipment. Monday, April 23rd - Sale held at the sale barn. Boardwalk Holsteins 50 Head of Registered Milking & Close bred heifer Dispersal. RHA 19837 3.8 760 3.0 592. SCC 126,000. No BST or TMR. Brad & Carol Ainslie & Family. 315-822-6087 Watch future ads for more details. Saturday, April 28th - Sale held on Farm. Otego, NY. 11:00 AM. Gretna Acres Registered Brown Swiss Complete Dispersal. 100 Head sell. This is a long established breeding herd (50 years) DHI tested, AI sired. Regular herd health program. LOOKING TO HAVE A FARM SALE OR JUST SELL A FEW - GIVE US A CALL.

**Help Wanted - Looking for a clerk for our Monday sales, serious inquiries only. **Trucking Assistance - Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on our Web-Site. Call to advertise in any of these sales it makes a difference. Directions: Former Welch Livestock 6096 NYS Rt. 8, 30 miles South of Utica & 6 miles North of New Berlin, NY. www.hoskingsales.com Call today with your consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 6096 NYS Rt. 8 New Berlin, NY 13411

607-699-3637 or 607-847-8800 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771

4-H youth projects of the correct ages to show. Pedigrees and information on animals to be printed in the sale catalog need to be sent to the sale manag-

er, Lin Huntington, 3661 Route 5, Newbury, VT 05051, or fax 802-866-5429. For more information, call 802-866-5438.

YOU ARE INVITED JOHN DEERE DAY Goshen Store Wednesday March 21st 9-4pm Chatham Store Friday March 23rd 9-4pm TRACTORS Case IH 9110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 416 WLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 8N w/blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 555B WLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 7930 IVT/loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4010 w/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5045D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5045D w/512 LDR only 105 hrs. . . . . . $17,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 5075 w/553 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5303 w/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 6430 Rental Returns (3) . . . . . . . . . . . $65,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JD 7130 Rental Return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $71,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville COMPACT TRACTORS MF 1220 w/mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,595 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 750 w/ldr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2305 w/ldr & deck . . .SOLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 850 w/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 375 backhoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 855 w/cab, & loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 1600 wam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2210. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,750. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 3720 w/blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 4010 w/loader, mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4410 w/420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 855 loader/blower/blade . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . Clifton Park Kioti DK455 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota L39 TLB, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 72” Sweepster broom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 . . . . . . . . . Chatham 78” skid steer blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 96’ pwr rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH LS 85 cab/AC/heat. . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH LS 180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 3935 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH L175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke NH LS180 cab/heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MOWERS CONDITIONERS Gehl DC2414 mo-co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham CIH 8880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 1411 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 530 mo-co/rolls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 925 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 946. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 4890 w/890 14’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kuhn 500 disc mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Kuhn FC 302 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville

HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/heads . . . . . . . . . . $169,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro rake . . SOLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 74 rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 446 w/mega wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 714 forage box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit . . . . . . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 166 inverter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pronovost wrapper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Pequea fluffer 81⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Fahr KH500 tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Vicon 4 Star tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Krone 550 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE JD 220 disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 12’ BWA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Glencoe 7 shank tillage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Brillion Seeder 10’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,600. . . . . . Schaghticoke IH 710 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200. . . . . . Schaghticoke IH 11 shank chisel 5700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,600. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7200 4 row. . . .SOLD JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS JD 458 R baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Krone 1500 w/knives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 335. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 457. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 316 baler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Gehl 1470 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston 560. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston rounder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS 300 HUSKER w/243 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville HARDI 210 3pt sprayer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville POLARIS RAZOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 245 loader . . .SOLD JD 390 flail mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Bush Hog 4 ft. mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham 7’ loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Landpride 7’ HD blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke Woods 1035 backhoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,650 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Woods RB72 rear blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425 . . . . . . . . . Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville H&S 235 spreader . . .SOLD Polaris Ranger 6x6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen

HUDSON RIVER TRACTOR COMPANY LLC FULTONVILLE 518-853-3405

GOSHEN 845-294-2500

CHATHAM 518-392-2505

SCHAGHTICOKE 518-692-2676

CLIFTON PARK 518-877-5059


Haylage production practices to reduce your grain bill by Daniel Hudson, UVM Extension If you are a dairy farmer, at some point you have probably had to endure long months of feeding haylage that your production records suggest was less than inspiring to your cows. Each time this happens, we are reminded that haylage with lousy forage quality is a very costly investment. Granted, New England can be a very difficult place to consistently harvest high quality haylage: variable spring weather, long rainy

spells, challenging soils, many small fields scattered around the countryside, etc. That being the case, the difference between high-quality and low-quality haylage is worth pursuing, given that the only way to compensate for poor quality haylage is with purchased feed (mainly grain), which is not cheap right now, and probably will not be in the near future. But can we really PURSUE high quality haylage? Isn’t it just one of those things that happens

mostly by chance? It is obvious that farmers cannot control the weather, but there are many things that we can influence. The first thing we can control is our target for being half done with harvest. To optimize milk production from forage, the target should be to be half finished with harvest by the time the forage reaches peak quality. For alfalfa, this means being half done by the time it is at 39 percent NDF, and for grasses this means being half done by the

time it reaches 50 percent NDF (i.e., by very early boot stage or slightly earlier). It is also important to remember that the difference between high- and low-quality haylage involves more than just the plant growth stage and whether it was rained on prior to harvest. Forage that is cut/wilted and ensiled on the same day will almost always have significantly higher quality than forage that is cut one day and ensiled one or two days later. That being the case,

LARGE UNRESERVED INVENTORY REDUCTION AUCTION

THURSDAY, MARCH 29TH @ 9:30AM

***Parkingg forr thee auction n willl bee availablee att thee Ancasterr fairground d located d 1/2 2 km h off High hwayy 403.. Shuttlee busess willl bee available*** south

!!!NO O PARKING G AT T DEALERSHIP P SITE!!! TRACTORS:: JD 6420, 2wd, 1450hrs, s/n L06420H41165; White 6175, c/w 4wd, 18 speed power shift, 4900hrs; New w Hollandd T-5050, 4wd, cab 2355hrs; JD D 6420 4wd, D 5320 c/w 4wd, Alo 720 ldr, p. reverser, 4000hrs; JD 5220 2wd; JD 52255 2wd; cab, air; 3 (three) JD 6410's, cabs & air, 4wd; JD 6400 c/w 4wd, p. quad, 640 ldr, 4700hrs; JD JD 4440 c/w cab, air, 20.8x42's, 6800hrs; JD 6210 c/w 4wd, cab, air; JD 2355 c/w 2wd, JD 146 ldr, hi-lo, rebuilt engine; Casee IH 1896 c/w 2wd, cab, air; Ford TW25 c/w H 656 gas; Casee IH 4210 c/w 4wd, 2wd, cab, air; Fordd 7700 & cab; MFF 1085 & cab; MF 1745, 4wd, open; Deutzz 7110 c/w 4wd, cab & ldr; Ford 4610, series II; MF 2335; IH cab, air, ldr; JD 4010 c/w 4wd & mower; JD 4500 c/w 4wd & mower; MF 1040, 4wd compact c/w ldr; CIH 885; JD 1010 r.s; JD 2140 & ldr. CONSTRUCTION N EQUIPMENT:: 2006 JD D 50D mini-ex, c/w cab, 1836hrs; 2009 JD D 27D mini-ex, c/w cab, 995hrs; 2006 JD 17D mini-ex, c/w cab, 1501hrs; 2008 Bobcat 232G mini-ex, 823hrs; 2006 Bobcat, 325G mini-ex, 1033hrs; Komatsu PC15R mini-ex, JD CT332 track machine, c/w cab, 1643hrs; 5 (five) JD CT322 track machines, c/w cabs & the hours range from 1600-1900hrs; 3 (three) JD 325 skid steers; c/w cabs & hours from 340-2075hrs; 3 (three) JD 317 skid steers, c/w cabs & hours from w Holland LX665 skid steer; JD D 310C backhoe, 4wd, 640-1600hrs; JD 270 skid steer, 2300hrs; JD 2500 skid steer, 2440hrs; Cat 252B skid steer; Case 1845C skid steer; New cab & e-hoe; Clark 80 diesel, 8000lb forklift. FARM M EQUIPMENT: JD D 467 silage special round baler w/ net wrap; JD D 466 silage special, c/w net wrap; JD 467 silage special; JD 335 round baler; Casee IH 8420 round baler; JD 336 square baler c/w ejector; JD 935 rotary mo-co; JD 530 mo-co; JD 1560, 15' no-till drill, s/n N01560X681314, markers & caster wheel hitch; JD 7000, 6 D 3600, 6 fur 18" trail row narrow corn planter; Casee IH 5100, 21 run seed drill; NH 1033 stak-liner bale wagon; Fransgard SR3200P rake; Hesstton 1150 haybine; JD H 679 tandem manure spreader; JD 145 ldr; JD D 24'' modell 960, "S" tyne hydraulic fold cult; JD "C" tyne, 181/2' cult; plow; JD 2600, 4 fur adjustable semi-mt plow; NH Mohawk, 10' chisel plow; CIH H modell 4500, 181/2' vibra shank cult; Stolll R335 rake; JD 4'' modell 205 mower; NH 254, 3pth tedder; White 6 row air planter, c/w Market cross auger; JD MX7 HD mower; Woodss 72" mower; 500 gallon, 3pth spray caddy; 7' & 6' Mott mowers; 20.8x42 T-rail duals; Horst 7' power angle blade to fit Alo ldr; Curtis 4 way power blade to fit compact; New 9" 3pth post hole digger; Horst bale grab attachment; 6' 3pth blade; JD 84" bucket; 3pth cult; bale spears; JD bumper guards; mini-ex backhoe buckets; buckets; tires; JD front fenders, etc. etc. etc. CONSUMER R PRODUCTS:: JD 6x44 gator, gas & hydraulic dump; Kubota RTV900 c/w 4wd, hydraulic dump; JD electric turf gator c/w charger; JD 455 diesel, AWS & 54" D X5400 & mower; JD X485, gas, AWS; JD GX345, ps; JD 345, ps; JD X300; 3 (three) JD LT1880's, one with bagger; JD LX255; 2 (two) mower; JD 455, ps & 60" mower; JD JD 185; JD LX288; JD LX186; JD L-110 & bagger; New w Holland MZ18H; Honda 4518 & bagger; JD 105; JD 180; JD GT262; JD F725 front mount, c/w bagger; JD F925 front mount; Snapper 1621; Ezgo golf cart; JD RX95; JD GS45 commercial, 48" walk behind; JD GS30, 36" walk behind; JD TC7H17 hydro walk behind; Walker 26hp, c/w grass catcher; Cubb Cadet 3184 & blower; Husqvarnna YTH2148; Mastercraft 14.5hp; Yardman 15.5hp; JD Sabre 14.5hp (parts); JD LT180 (parts); Murray 13.5hp; JD SXT 38 (parts); Craftsman 17hp; Snapper 1650; Berco 2 stage, front mount blower; Tooro 826 snow blower; Goosen tow behind vacuum; Kubota T2740, 2 stage front mt blower; Honda 8hp rear tyne tiller.

Internett biddingg availablee by:: www.proxibid.com m PLEASEE NOTE: This is a very large UNRESERVED AUCTION! Crossroads Equipment is reducing their inventory along with some additions from Premier Equipment & Podolinsky Equipment. An excellent offering, something for everyone. Plan to attend as this is THE auction of spring. Don't forget to park at the Ancaster Fairgrounds. Shuttle service will be provided! TERMS: Cash or good check day of sale. Pre-approved financing can be provided by FCC or JD Finance. Owners and auctioneers are not responsible for accidents. Any verbal announcements take precedence over any written matter. List is subject to additions & deletions. Visitt Proxibid'ss websitee forr photoss & too register:: www.proxibid.com

PROPRIETORS:: CROSSROADS EQUIPMENT LTD. FOR INFO CALL DON: 905-648-8001 AUCTIONEER:: TOM HAMULECKI Office: 519-424-9993 Cell: 519-421-6957

rior of a narrow windrow, plant tissue is a net USER of energy. Plant tissue cannot capture light energy when there is none to be had, yet the ‘cellular machinery’ still needs to be maintained, and this takes energy, which means that existing sugars and starches will be partly or mostly consumed, depending on how long the process continues. Each minute this process continues, your grain bill goes up. How can we get the plant to stop those processes that consume so much of the sugars and starches? Dry it down to harvest moisture and get it packed in the silo — AS FAST AS POSSIBLE! How dry does the plant need to be before the cellular activities stop? The numbers I have seen vary too much for me to have confidence in them; for practical purposes, the principle of ‘dry it down fast’ is what matters most, not a magical number at which the

Haylage B10

ADVANCE NOTICE:

FLOODS ANNUAL MACHINERY SALE ED FLOOD 518-638-8580

ON SAT., MARCH 31, 2012 AT 10:00 AM SHARP Rte. 22, Amenia, NY

Call With Your Consignments

AMERICAN LINEBACK DAIRY CATTLE ASSOCIATION

20th Anniversary Sale! Sat., March 24th at 12:00 Noon Hosted by Kish Valley Dairy Sales in Belleville, PA Selling 50 Head of Linebacks. Show Calves, Heifers, Springers, Fresh Cows and a few breeding Bulls. We have selected a NICE group, something for everyone! Semen also available. Please join us before the sale for a complimentary pig roast provided for all Lineback enthusiasts to celebrate 20 successful years!

For more info, contact: Park Myers, Jr. - 717-483-6736 Barnard Baily - 484-883-2819 Bob Bashore - 717-865-3161 Elden Woolf - 610-334-1238

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 3

T LTD. including additions from PREMIER R EQUIPMENT T LTD.. & PODOLINSKY Y FARM M EQUIPMENT For CROSSROADSS EQUIPMENT LTD.. featuring an excellent selection of approximately 35 tractors, 15 skid steers, 3 mini-excavators, backhoe, 40 lawn tractors, gators, Kubota RTV, farm equipment & miscellaneous. Auction held at Crossroad Equipment's location at Fire #66 Highway #52. South of Jerseyville, ON, just off Highway 403. Exit 55, 1/2km north.

once ensiled the two different products may look almost exactly the same, but the amount of ‘milk per ton’ will not be the same. How much of a difference can it make? Documents from and conversations with Tom Kilcer, retired Cornell University Extension Educator, are the sources for much of the information I am passing along here. Tom’s research shows that leaving the swath in the field overnight vs. cutting and chopping on the same day can reduce the potential milk per ton of haylage (on a dry matter basis) by 300 pounds. Why is it that these two different materials will feed so differently? To understand the difference, we must review what actually happens when forages are mowed. The act of cutting forage plants off near ground level does not instantaneously kill the plant. Cellular activities in the plant tissue can continue for quite a long time. In the dark of night or in the dark inte-


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Monday, March 19 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Dairy 1 pm followed by sheep, lamb, goat, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321.

Tuesday, March 20 • North Woodstock Rd, Southbridge, MA. Foreclosure Greenhouse Farm Auction. Jacquier Auc-

tions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211.

Wednesday, March 21 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 8:55 AM: Rising, MD. 3 Day Retirement Auction. Business Liquidation. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 9:00 AM: 3186 Freshour Rd., Canandaigua, NY. Coryn Farm Supplies, Inc. Public Auction of Farm Equip. & Tools. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

Thursday, March 22 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211.

Friday, March 23 • 10:00 AM: Batavia, NY. Jeff & Kathy Thompson Farm Machinery Auction. Selling a full line of farm machinery including Case IH Maxxum 115, Case IH MX110, Case IH 7220, Case IH CX70 plus hay, tillage, barn equipment and much more!. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 11:00 AM: Passumpsic, VT. Farm Equipment Liquidation. Wright’s Auction Service, 802-3346115

Saturday, March 24 • Atglen, PA. The Gala at Glen Valley II. Hosted by Glen Valley Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-7462226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Clymer, NY. Z&M Ag and Turf Farm Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

YO U

BY

• 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: Roger & Kathleen Willingham, 3773 Rt. 37 Constable, NY. 58 head of Jersey, Jersey cross cattle. Plus full line of machinery. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-4816666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com

Monday, March 26 • 10:00 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Special Holiday Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. We will start this sale at 10 am due to the amount of small animals. This date is the last week of March. Call for advertising your group - it makes a difference. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Wednesday, March 28 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 • 12:00 Noon: East Middlebury, VT. Annual Spring Dairy/Feeder & Consignment Sale. Addison Co. Commission Sales E.G. Wisnowski & Sons, 800339-COWS or 802-388-2661 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Easter Lamb & Goat Sale approx. 5 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Friday, March 30 • 10:00 AM: Warsaw, Wyoming Co. Estate of Ronald Milcarek Auction. Selling vehicles, farm machinery, tools, & household including ‘07 Chevy Silverado, NH TB100 tractor, MF 573 tractor and more! Watch our website for a complete

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 list and photos. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 11:00 AM: Rt. 5, Coventry, VT. Organic Farm Auction of 135 head organic Holsteins and B.C., Full line of equipment for Paul Lehoullier. Roberts Auction Service, 802-334-2638

Saturday, March 31

Sunday, April 1 • 9:00 AM: Middlesex Livestock Auction, 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefiled, CT. Lamb & Goat Sale. This sale will have over 250 lambs, goats, kid goats and sheep to choose from. Middlesex Livestock Auction, Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828, res. 860-346-8550, sale barn 860-349-3204 or e-mail sscirpo35@comcast.net

Monday, April 2 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: Eden, NY. Don Mammoser Farm Machinery Auction. Selling a complete line of farm machinery including John Deere and IH tractors, trucks, tillage, harvest, barn and more! Watch our website for more information. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com

Thursday, April 5 • 11:00 AM: 2324 Ridge Rd., Penn Yan, NY. Marvin & Mildred Koek Excellent Farm Equipment Retirement Auction. IH 1420 4WD combine, ‘95 Ford 16’ grain truck, tillage, planting & harvest equip. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies, registered and grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-

8030 • 5:00 PM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Open house & viewing of cattle for the Spring Premier Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Friday, April 6 • 10:00 AM: Alfred, NY. Alfred State College Spring Fling. All Breed Sale featuring choice cattle of all ages! Watch our website for more information. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Spring Premier All Breed Sale. 165 Head selling: 100 Holsteins, 30 Jerseys, 30 Brown Swiss, 5 Guernsey. Selections are complete the quality is the best ever. We have show calves of all breeds, outstanding bred heifers, fresh young cows that will please the most discriminating. Watch our website for complete catalog on line.(Join us the evening before for open house and cattle viewing). Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Spring Premier All Breed Sale. Selections are underway. Accepting registered high quality cattle give us a call, Join in the Excitement - Best lineup we’ve ever had, join the outstanding herds that are participating Merrilea, Rolling View, Oakfield Corners, Liddleholm, Lylehaven, Spruce-Haven, Muranda, Midas-Touch, Fantasy-Found, CoVista, Boanco, Sco-Li, Hills Valley, Dublin Hills, Osborns, Evans, Empire Farm, Wisner Farms, Lundy, Lincoln Hill, Lawton’s Jerseys, Pineyvale, Posthaven, Dairysmith, Elm Spring, Carpsdale, Woodmansee, Lismore Dairy, Marshman, LocustVale, Blue-Gene - the list is growing rapidly. We

will have it all - Great Individuals, many Generations of VG & EX, Red & White, Milk, Show type (Many will be entered in NY Spring show), Genomics and most importantly commercially sound cattle with great earning potential. Watch website for updated sale highlights. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Saturday, April 7 • 10:30 AM: Independence Township (Allegany Co.) New York. Complete Line of Good Farm Machinery and Livestock Handling and Support Equipment for Lyon View Farm. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 11:00 AM: Champlain, NY. Betty & Nelson LeDuc Farm Machinery Auction. Full line of machinery: Case MX120 w/ldr., Case IH 8920, Case 5130, NH TB110 w/ldr., Ford 6610. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com

Tuesday, April 10 • Westport, NY. Pat Bennett Equipment Dispersal. Full line of equipment including 2 2010 John Deere Tractors, NH BB 940 tandem large square baler w/crop processor. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Friday, April 13 • The Pines Farm. Barton, VT. 151st Top of Vermont Invitation Dairy Sale. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802626-8892 • B&R Dairy, West Chazy, NY. 2 Day Sale April 13-14. 13th: 300 top quality AI sired free stall heifers. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-5690503 www.nnyds.com • Batavia, NY. 2012 Spring Consignment Auction to benefit Agriculture Education. Sponsored by

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 5

• Cobleskill, NY. 31st Annual Cobleskill Dairy Fashion Sale. Hosted by SUNY Cobleskill Dairy Cattle Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 205 Hanley Rd, Nassua, NY. Estate Auction. Case-IH 685 4x4 Diesel w/loader, JD 4030, Oliver 1755 tractors, Befco C50 15’ Batwing finish mower, Wood Working & Mechanics tools, Horse equip. & Tack, Lumber, Cattle Show equip. & gates, Asst furniture & collectibles. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 9:00 AM: Windmill Farm Market, 3900 Rt. 14A, 5 mi. S. of Penn Yan, NY. Equipment Consignment Auction. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm • 9:00 AM: Middlesex Livestock Auction, 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefiled, CT. Lamb & Goat Sale. This sale will have over 250 lambs, goats, kid goats and sheep to choose from. Middlesex Livestock Auction, Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828, res. 860-346-8550, sale barn 860-349-3204 or e-mail sscirpo35@comcast.net • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery, Lawn & Garden Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Horse & Tack Sale. Starting with tack at 10 am. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558•

12:00 Noon: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Lamb, Sheep and Goat Easter Sale. All animals taken Fri., March 30 from 8 am - 5 pm. Also accepting until 10 am day of sale. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315287-0220


Auction Calendar, Continued (cont. from prev. page) the Farm Burewau. Now accepting quality consignments. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 10:30 AM: Catskill Tractor, Inc., 384 Center St., Franklin, NY. Farm Equipment Consignment and Inventory Reduction. Franklin Used Equipment Sales, Inc. Auction Service, 607-829-2600 • 6:00 PM: Syracuse, NY. NY Spring Color Breed Sale. Held in conjunction with the NY Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Saturday, April 14 • B&R Dairy, West Chazy, NY. Farm machinery & tiling equipment. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 8:00 AM: Farm of Don & Betty Duska, 1820 Co. Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 8:00 AM: Beaver Mountain Farms, 1820 County Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. On the Farm of Don & Betty Duksa, 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 4:00 PM: Syracuse, NY. New York Spring Holstein Sale. Held in conjunction with the New York Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

Friday, April 20 • Pennellville, NY. 2012 Twin Brook Farms Machinery & Equipment Auction to settle the estate of Eugene Blumer. Full line of farm machinery including John Deere & Case tractors, John Deere forage harvester plus harvest, tillage and barn equip. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 9:00 AM: Melvin Miller, 240 Phillip Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Farm Equipment & Tools. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257

Saturday, April 21 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Annual Spring Machinery Sale & Plant, Tree & Shrub Auction. Accepting consignments groups or single items. Consignments already coming in call today to get into advertising it will make a difference. Expecting a field full of quality farm equipment. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • Quarryville, PA. Wea-Land Holsteins Complete Dispersal. Landis Weaver & Family, Owners. Comanaged by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:25 AM: Newton, PA. Inventory Reduction. Farm tractors & equipment. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 9:00 AM: Allegany Fairground, 15 North Main St., Angelica, NY. 22nd Annual Spring Extravaganza Auction. Call now to consign for advertising. 585-567-8844 or 585-261-8844 • 9:00 AM: Gerry Rodeo Grounds, RT. 60 Gerry, NY. Chautauqua County Area, Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: Argyle Livestock Station, 8 McEachron Hill Rd., Argyle, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Franklin Used Equipment Sales Inc., Frank Walker Auctioneer 607-829-5172 • 10:30 AM: Dalton (Livingston Co.) New York. Dr. Lonnie and Donna Meeusen Retirement Auction. Clydesdale Horses, Show Wagon, Tack, new JD Tractors, haying line & general purpose line! Pir-

rung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Monday, April 23 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Boardwalk Holsteins 50 Head of Registered Milking & Close bred heifer Dispersal. RHA 19837 3.8 760 3.0 592. SCC 126,000. No BST or TMR. Brad & Carol Ainslie & Family. 315-822-6087 Watch future ads for more details. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Tuesday, April 24 • 11:00 AM: Paul & Darcy Graves Farm, Comstock Rd., Adams, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal. Watch future ads and our website for complete listing. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220

Wednesday, April 25 • The Pines Farm. Barton, VT. Annual Equipment Auction. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Friday, April 27 • Waddington, NY. Complete Dispersal for Gary Tiernan. 200 head of AI sired dairy cattle. Delarm & Treadway, 518-483-4106 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Machinery Consignment Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, April 28 • Rising Sun, MD. 40 plus tractors. Watch for future ads. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 172 Marsh Rd., Litchfield, CT. Farm Auction for Bill Butts. Hay & Tillage Equipment, Tools & Cattle Support Equipment. Jacquier Auctions, 413569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com • Heifer Haven, North Bangor, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • Twister Valley, Fort Plain, NY. Power Sports Consignment Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518568-2257 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 42nd Annual New York’s Favorite Consignment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 8:00 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Townline Equipment Annual Spring Used Equipment Sale. C. W. Gray & Sons, Inc., 802-785-2161 • 9:00 AM: 796 No. Cream Hill Rd., Bridport, VT. Jim Ferguson Farm Machinery & Small Equipment Sale. All machinery like new. Wide selection of tractors, tools, hay & farm equip. Well maintained. Addison Co. Commission Sales E.G. Wisnowski & Sons, 800-339-COWS or 802-388-2661 • 10:30 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315829-3105 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 • 11:00 AM: On the farm Otego, NY. Gretna Acres Registered Brown Swiss Complete Dispersal. 100 Head sell. This is a long established breeding herd (50 years) DHI tested, AI sired. Regular herd health program. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:00 Noon: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Spring Dairy Cattle, Feeder Cattle & Machinery Consignment Sale. Good listing f cattle & machinery already. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220

Tuesday, May 1 • 5:00 PM: Greenwood (Steuben Co.) New York. “Warrinerdale Homestead.” The estate of Wayne Warriner, Sr. Farm Equipment. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520

www.pirrunginc.com

Saturday, July 7

Friday, May 4

• Garden Time LLC in Glens Falls, NY. 3rd Annual Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257

• Ron Paro Farm, Heuvelton, NY. Complete Dairy Cattle & Machinery Dispersal. Watch papers for complete listing. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220

Saturday, May 5 • Rt. 125, East Middlebury, VT. Annual Spring Machinery Auction. Addison Co. Commission Sales E.G. Wisnowski & Sons, 800-339-COWS or 802388-2661 • Burke, NY. Complete Dispersal. 90 head AI sired, many red & whites plus equipment for Nate & Krista Beachy. H&L Auctions, Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787, 483-8576, cell 569-0460, Ed Legacy 518-483-7386, cell 832-0616, with Willis Shattuck 315-347-3003 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Also selling Trowbridge Angus Bulls. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Tuesday, May 8 • Mohawk Valley Produce Auction. Wholesale Flower Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-5682257

Friday, May 11 • Arcade, NY. Co-Vista 20th Anniversary Sale. Hosted by Co-Vista Holsteins, the George Family. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

Saturday, May 12 • Burke, NY. Miller Family Spring Consignment Auction. Contact Paul Miller 518-483-6804 (No Sunday Calls). Delarm & Treadway, 518-483-4106 • Mohawk Valley Produce Auction. Spring Consignment Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518568-2257 • 9:00 AM: 3080 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY. Estate of Tom Oliver. Excellent farm collectibles, signs, 2 Oliver 66 tractors. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm • 10:00 AM: University Dr, Torrington, CT. Estate Auction. Ford 2810 tractor w/loader, Hay & 3 ph equip., Farmie winch, storage trailers. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, May 19 • 10:00 AM: Langdonhurst Farm, 1601 Rt. 7A, Copake, NY. Buildings, Dairy, Cattle & Milking Equipment, Case/IH 5240 & Ford 7700, (2) Mack Trucks & Dump Trailer, Hay & Manure Equipment. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, May 23 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

Friday, June 1 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, June 9 • 9:00 AM: Don Rice Jr., 5761 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 15 MM farm tractors & parts, 150 MM farm toys, MM & gas signs. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm

Tuesday, June 26 • At the Farm, Newport, VT. Poulin-Royer, Inc. Complete Dispersal of all cattle and most equipment. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Wednesday, June 27 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

Friday, July 13 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, July 21 • Middleburgh, NY. Reflections of Maple Downs Sale. Hosted by Maple Downs Farm II. Held in conjunction with the NY Holstein Summer Picnic. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

Saturday, July 28 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Friday, August 3 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, August 22 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

Saturday, September 8 • North Country Storage Barns. 2nd Annual Shed and Shrubbery Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • Morrisville, NY. 30th Annual Morrisville Autumn Review Sale. Hosted by Morrisville State College Dairy Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, September 15 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, September 22 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, September 26 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

Saturday, September 29 • Twister Valley, Fort Plain, NY. Power Sports Consignment Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518568-2257

Saturday, October 6 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, October 20 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, October 27 • Ithaca, NY. NY Fall Harvest Sale. Hosted by Cornell University Dairy Science Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

Saturday, November 3 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT March 12, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites not well tested; Breakers 82-93; Boners 7792; Lean 60-82. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls 92-125# 89-205; 80-92# 88200; 70-80# 87.50-105; Vealers 100-120# 65-87.50; 90-100# 75-87.50; 80-90# 65-80; 70-80# 55-80; 6070# 50-70. COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA March 14, 2012 Cows: Canners 51-80; Cutters 81-86.50; Util 87-90. Bulls: 84-106 Steers: Ch 110-123.50; Sel 84-114; Hols. 95.50-102.50. Heifers: Ch 103.50-114; Sel 74-105; Hols. 93-102.50 Calves: 40-141 ea. Feeders: 69-110 Goats: 81-174 ea. Kids: 46-152 ea. Sows: 46.50-52 Hogs: 59-67 Roaster Pigs: 102 ea. Chickens: 6-16 Rabbits: 12-27.50 Ducks: 5-21.50 * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA March 13, 2012 Beef Cattle: Canners 6575; Cutters 70-80; Util 7585; Bulls 75-102; Steers 100-120; Hfrs. 80-102. Calves: Growers No. 1 100220; No. 2 80-210; Util 2090; Hfrs. 100-200; Veal 80120; Other 70-100. Hogs: Feeders (ea) 40-60; Sows 35-50; Boars 25.

Sheep: 85-110; Lambs 1.95-2.50. Goats: 100-142 ea; Billies 125-200 ea; Kids 30-60 ea. NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA March 13, 2012 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 20-48; 61-75# 34-80; 76-95# 2078; 96-105# 48; 106# & up 60-89. Farm Calves: 90-215/cwt Feeders: 79/cwt Heifers: 75-80/cwt Bulls: 89-98/cwt Canners: 55.50-76/cwt Cutters: 78-90/cwt Utility: 92.50-109/cwt Sows: 35-53/cwt Hogs: 60-72/cwt Shoats: 75-93 ea. Feeder Pigs: 49-83 ea. Lambs: 120-300/cwt Sheep: 52.50-132.50/cwt Goats: 44-210 ea. Rabbits: 3-21 ea. Poultry: 4-15.50 ea. Hay: 10 lots, 2.60-6/bale northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ March 13, 2012 Livestock Report: 36 Calves .22-2, Avg 1.31; 56 Cows .46-.87.5, Avg .74; 8 Easy Cows .54-.68.5, Avg .58; 12 Feeder 300-500# .62-1.30, Avg 1.09; 9 Heifers .46.5-.89.5 Avg .77; 10 Bulls .76-1.04.5, Avg .93; 11 Steers .87-1.22, Avg 1.03; 3 Hogs .80-.94, Avg .87; 2 Sheep 1.32-1.70, Avg 1.49; 1 Lamb (ea) 7, (/#) 2.10; 20 Goats (ea) 65-160, Avg 105.70, 7 Kids (ea) 2085, Avg 75.86; 1 Hide (ea) 13. Total 177. Poultry & Egg Report:Heavy Fowl (/#) 1.10-1.20; Mixed Fowl (ea) 5.50-7.50; Pullets (ea) 6-10; Bantams (ea) 2-6.75; Roosters (ea) 3-8.75; Bunnies (ea) 5.25-12;Ducks (/#) 2.20; Rabbits (/#) 2.20-7.30; Guineas (ea) 9-11.50. Grade A Eggs: White Eggs Jum XL 1.15; Brown Jum XL 1.20-1.25; L 1.05-1.15; M .90. Hay, Straw & Grain Report: 2 Alfalfa 4.30; 25 Mixed 2.90-5.90; 2 Timothy 3.60; 3 Grass 3.20-3.80; 1 Wheat Straw 4.50; 1 Ground Corn 7.50; 1 Firewood 50; 2 Cedar Posts 55120. Total 37. CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK

MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY March 8, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 50-200; Grower Bulls over 92# 100-265; 80-92# 70-245; Bob Veal 10-75. Cull Cows: Gd 68-87; Lean 45-72; Hvy Beef Bulls 75100. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 700-1700; Springing Cows 800-1600; Springing Hfrs. 850-1650; Bred Hfrs. 750-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 800-1650; Open Hfrs. 400-900; Started Hfrs. 200500; Service Bulls 6001100. Beef: Feeders 50-120; Veal Hols. Sel 84-104. Lamb/Sheep: Market 100200; Slaughter Sheep 3065. Goats: Billies 85-175; Nannies 65-125; Kids 20-80. CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No report CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY No report *Buyers always looking for pigs. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY March 7, 2011 Calves: Hfrs. 130-175; Grower Bulls over 92# 140210; 80-92# 150-230; Bob Veal 30-75. Cull Cows: Gd 74-89; Lean 52-82; Hvy Beef Bulls 84106. Beef:Veal 200-300# 111123; Ch 93-103; Sel 93-104; Hols. Ch 95-101. DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY March 7, 2012 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# 170-220; 80-92# 130210; Bob Veal 10-40. Cull Cows: Gd 80-91; Lean 65-79; Hvy. Beef Bulls 8692. Beef: Feeders 130-170. GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY March 8, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 75-165; Grower over 92# 100-262.50; 8092# 80-237.50; Bob Veal 40-80. Cull Cows: Gd 75-88.50; Lean 72-85; Hvy Beef Bulls 90-108. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY March 12, 2012 Calves: Grower over 92# 175-225; 80-92# 150-220; Bob Veal 35-70.

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge Chatham

Cull Cows: Gd 75-89; Lean 72-80; Hvy Beef Bulls 8795. Beef: Ch 120; Hols. Ch 95104.50. Lamb/Sheep: Slaughter Sheep 70. Goats: Billies 62.50; Nannies 107.50. BATH MARKET Bath, NY March 6, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 140; Grower Bulls over 92# 170-215; 8092# 130-190; Bob Veal 1050. Cull Cows Gd 77-88; Lean 61-78; Hvy Beef Bulls 8890. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY March 14, 2012 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 66-88; Canners/Cutters 52-76. Dairy Bulls for Slaughter: HY Util 79.50-102. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95-110# 70-90; 80-95# 6587.50; 60-80# 60-85. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 100220; 80-95# 95-227.50; 7080# 90-180; Hfrs. 87.50190. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed 110-128; Hols. Ch grain fed 92-110; Sel 85-88. Hogs: Sows US 1-3 51-58; Boars 18. Market Lambs: Ch 80100# 150. Slaughter Sheep: M 70120; Rams Ch over 130# 90. Nannies: L 97.50135. FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No report Produce Mon. @ 10 am, Wed-Fri. @ 9 am sharp!

FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY March 6 & 9, 2012 Hay: 65-210, 1st cut; 95300, 2nd cut. Straw: 175-220 * Hay Tuesdays & Fridays @ 11:15 am. Produce Friday @ 9 am sharp! HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY March 12, 2012 Cattle: Dairy Cows for Slaughter Bone Util .70-.86; Canners/Cutters .58-.65; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls & Steers .701.05. Calves: Bull Calves 96120# .80-2.50; up to 95# .10-2.40; Hols. under 100# 1.90. Dairy: Milking Age up to 1675; Bred Hfrs. up to 1625; Open Hfrs. up to 1025; Young Hfrs. up to 400. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA No report CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA March 13, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Sel & Ret. to Feed 11551575# 110.50-116.50; Hols. 1190-1390# Cowish 81-92; Hfrs. Hols. 1430# 120.50. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 87-92; Boners 83.50-86.50; Lean 76-85.50; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 6777.50; Shelly 66 & dn. Bulls: 1330-1865# 87.50104.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers Hols. 550-965# 75.50-105; Feed-

er Hfrs. L 2 895-1105# 98105. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 80-120# 230247; No. 2 80-135# 180225; No. 3 70-115# 115175; Util 70-100# 77-102; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 110# 180. Swine: Hogs US 1-3 245300# 62-68; US 2-4 235265# 50-60; Sow cpl Crampe 560-690# 21-52. Goats (/hd): Nannies/Billies 160-275; Fancy Kids 140-168; Fleshy Kids 107140; Small/thin/bottle 11-95. Sheep: Rams 71-72. Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. * Special Fed Cattle Sales Feb 21 & March 20 & Apr 317. * State Graded Feeder Pig Sales March 16 & 30. * Complete Easter Sale March 30. Receiving 7:30 until 10 am. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA March 13, 2012 Rabbits: 5-32 Bunnies: 3.50-14.50 Chickens: 2-6.50 Peeps: .50-1 Chucker: 12 Pullets: 4.50-5 Pigeons: 3-3.75 Quail: 2 Guineas: 8-11 Turkeys: 10-20 Ducks: 4.50-8 Parakeets: 22 Eggs (/dz): Jumbo Brown 1.50-1.90; XL Brown 1.201.40; Mixed Colors .80-1; Sm. Banty .40; Green 2.20 Guinea Pigs: 1-2 German Owls: 3-3.50 Pot Belly Pig: 12.50. All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm.

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 7

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT March 12, 2012 Calves: 45-60# .35-.45; 6175# 1.10-1.25; 76-90# 1.301.40; 91-105# 1.50-1.75; 106# & up 1.80-1.8750. Farm Calves: 1.95-2.10 Started Calves: .55-.70 Veal Calves: .75-1.50 Open Heifers: .75-1.25 Beef Heifers: 1.05-1.27 Feeder Steers: 1-1.2750 Beef Steers: .91-1.3750 Stock Bull: .95-1.2250 Beef Bull: .90-1.17 Sows: 2 at .47 Butcher Hogs: .95-1.05 Sheep (ea): 130-135 Lambs (ea): 145-155 Goats (ea): 75-250; Kids 50-160. Canners: up to 83.50 Cutters: 84-88 Utility: 89-1.05 Rabbits: 15-32 Chickens: 6-40 Ducks: 10-13 On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report Receiving from 7:30 until 10 am. Sale time 1 pm.

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

New Wilmington DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC March 12, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 48-86; Breakers 7789; Boners 72-85.50; Lean 68-80. Bulls: 1272-1790# 92.5096 Feeder Holstein Steers: 300-400# 90-115. Feeder Heifers: 350# 130; 400-600# 82.50-100. Feeder Bulls: M 1 300400# 155-167.50; M 2 300400# 117.50-140. Calves: 209. Bull Calves No. 1 94-122# 220-237; 8092# 232-255; No. 2 94122# 200-225; 76-92# 195220; No. 3 94-120# 125192; 80-92# 125-190; Hfrs. No. 1 88-106# 200-245; 82112# 125-190; Util 70-100# 50-90; 58-68# 10-30. Sheep: Ewes 106-132# 110-140. Goats: Kids 30-50# 82130/hd; Nannies 152170/hd. EarCorn: 7 lds, 200227/ton Oats: 3 lds, 4.50-7.75/bu. Hay (/ton): 35 lds, Timothy Grass 100-220; Mixed 130400; Grass 95-335; Alfalfa/Grass 200-295. Straw: 6 lds, 160-225/ton. Round Bales: 20-62/bale. EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA March 12, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 9295.50, lo dress 89; Breakers 75-80% lean 87.50-91, hi dress 93-94, lo dress 84-87; Boners 81-86.50, lo dress 79-80; Lean 85-90% lean 73.50-78.50, hi dress 79.5080, lo dress 68-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1352-1920# 96-102.50; few hi dress 104-107; YG 2 1635-1905# 85-92. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400500# 182.50-185; 600-700# 144-149; 700-800# 136140; M&L 2 300-500# 150172.50; M&L 3 700-900# 76--86; Hfrs. M&L 1 250300# 190; 300-400# 170172.50; 500-600# 140-150; 600-700# 135; 700-900# 114-120; 900-1000# 103113; M&L 2 300-500# 132.50-145, thin type 157.50-162.50; 500-700# 114-135; Bulls M&L 1 300400# 182.50; 500-600# 152.50-155; 600-700# 138142; 1000# 110; M&L 2 300-

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four 500# 135-150, thin type 157.50-168; 500-700# 127.50-136. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 85-120# 195-230; No. 2 80-120# 165-190; No. 3 80-120# 110-160; Util 70120# 30-72.50; Beef type 120-237# 140-190; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 100-105# 165170. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 185205# 59-65. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 2-3 60-75# 200; Gd & Ch 1-2 40-60# 180; Yearlings Ch 23 165# 97.50; Ewes Gd 1-2 110-280# 85-90. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 50# 127.50; 85# 165; Sel 2 50# 105; Nannies Sel 1 100-115# 110-117.50/cwt; Billies Sel 1 160-175# 110127.50/cwt. GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA March 12, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1306-1562# 129-132; full/YG 4-5 1128129.50; Ch 2-3 1217-1574# 123.50-128.50; full/YG 4405 120-123; Sel 1-3 12241512# 117-122.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1458-1540# 111-112; Ch 2-3 13661530# 107-110; Sel 1-3 1228-1554# 97-101; Hfrs. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1332# 130; Hols. 1528# 110; Ch 2-3 1204-1284# 123-126; full/YG 4-5 116.50; Hols. Hfrs. 1280# 102.50; Sel 1-3 1036-1158# 113-117. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 86.7590, hi dress 97.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 83.75-88, hi dress 89-93.50, lo dress 79.75-83.75; Boners 8085% lean 79-85.25, hi dress 85.25-89.50, lo dress 74.5079, very lo dress 71.50-74; Lean 85-90% lean 7480.50, hi dress 81-85, lo dress 66-73, very lo dress 57-65; Light Lean 85-92% lean 70-76, hi dress 78-

hi dress 85, lo dress 75-76; Lean 85-90% lean 72-77, hi dress 78.50-81, lo dress 69.50-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1348-1490# 88-93.50; 2362-2500# 89.50-90; YG 2 1490-1530# 79.50-85.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 700-800# 122.50-130; M&L 2 500-700# 132.50142.50; Hfrs. M&L 2 400500# 122.50-135; Bulls M&L 1 400# 160; 500# 152.50-160. Ret. to Farm Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-125# 185-200; No. 2 90125# 160-180; No. 3 85120# 110-150; Util 70-120# 30-75; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 90# 200. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 236280# 69-75; 40-45% 208272# 63-67.50; Sows US 13 500-600# 56-60.50. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40# 75; Sel 2 90# 130; Nannies Sel 1 100-120# 142.50-175; Sel 2 100-120# 130-145; Whethers Ssel 1 100-150# 165-185; Sel 2 110-150# 110-130.

79.50, lo dress 62-69.50, very lo dress 55-60.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1290-1912# 95-106.50; 2198-2502# 94.50-98; hi dress 107.50-114, lo dress 84.50-92; YG 2 1102# 93.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 2 300-500# 135-150; 550# 122.50; 700-800# 94117.50; L 3 Hols. 240# 110; Hfrs. M&L 1 380# 155; 240# 150; 300-500# 120-145; 500-700# 117.50-135; Herefords 95; Bulls M&L 1 260# 200; 300-500# 139150; 500-700# 127.50152.50; 700-900# 117.50120; M&L 2 300-500# 102.50-150; 630# 130; Hols. Bulls L 3 Hols. 330# 90. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 94-118# 215-240; 8692# 215-227.50; No. 2 94118# 180-220; 78-92# 180220; No. 3 78-106# 120180; Util 68-106# 20-90; Hfrs. No. 1 98# 180; Hols/Beef X 88-112# 140230. Slaughter Hogs: Boars 504# 25. Slaughter Sheep: Ch 2-3 30-60# 220-222.50; 70110# 230-235; Ewes Gd 2-3 199# 77.50. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 35-45# 52.50-112.50; 5070# 102.50-165; Sel 2 under 20# 13-24; 20-35# 30-52.50; Nannies Sel 1 140# 152.50; Sel 2 100110# 132.50-135; Wethers Sel 1 150# 230.

KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA March 10, 2012 Alfalfa: 7 lds, 165-250 Mixed Hay: 20 lds, 135-250 Timothy: 8 lds, 150-255 Grass: 8 lds, 140-325 Straw: 12 lds, 120-175 Firewood: 7 lds, 65-85

INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA March 8, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1390-1566# 126-127.50; Ch 2-3 12641402# 123-125.50; Sel 1-2 1038-1602# 114-118.50; Hols. Steers Ch 2-3 13301528# 97-97.50; Hfrs. Ch 23 1362# 122. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 85-88, lo dress 83.50; Boners 79.50-84.50,

LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA March 9, 2011 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1305-1615# 126-130; Ch 2-3 12651605# 122-128; Sel 2-3 1145-1430# 118-121.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 12051675# 109-116; Ch 2-3 1190-1635# 103-109.50; Sel 2-3 1150-1500# 96.50103; Hfrs. Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1230-1465# 127-130, late

week sales 121.50-124.50; Ch 2-3 1220-1540# 124127, late week sales 118122; Sel 2-3 1080-1380# 121-123. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 84-91, hi dress 91-92, lo dress 7884; Breakers 75-80% lean 80-86, hi dress 86-90, lo dress 75-80; Boners 8085% lean 78-85, hi dress 85-89.50, lo dress 72-78; Lean 85-90% lean 73-79, hi dress 79-85, lo dress 65-73. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1215-1925# 92-99; hi dress 103.50-107; Bullocks 9001335# 96-102; hi dress 1185-1410# 116-120, lo dress 830-1265# 90-95. Graded Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 114-128# 180199; 86-112# 213-224; No. 2 120-128# 172; 102-118# 198-208; 80-100# 215-230; No. 3 100-130# 155-185; 80-98# 195-208; 72-78# 130; Util 60-110# 27-50; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 80-105# 220-285; No. 2 80-105# 100-200; non-tubing 70-85# 50-110. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA March 6, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 80-82.50, hi dress 89; Boners 75-78.50; Lean 85-90% lean 65-70, lo dress 54-60. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 80-120# 180-230; No. 2 80-120# 160-200; No. 3 80-110# 130-160; Util 70105# 65-110. LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA March 7, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1515# 129; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1525-1565# 110-111; Ch 2-3 1375-1540# 104108; Sel 1-3 1220-1350# 97.50-102.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 4-5 1360# 126. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 87-90, hi dress 92; Breakers 7580% lean 82-86, hi dress 88-89; Boners 80-85% lean 77-81, hi dress 82-85; Lean 85-90% lean 74-79, hi dress 80-83, lo dress 69-73.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1300-2010# 86-89; hi dress 99.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 180-195; 8090# 180-200; No. 2 95-125# 170-195; 80-90# 120-155; No. 3 95-120# 100-170; 8090# 100-145. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 125# 151; Ewes Gd 1-2 135-200# 83-90. Goats: Sel 1 40# 75; Nannies Sel 1 pygmies 60# 85; Sel 2 135# 137.50.

MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA March 6, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1400-1555# 130134.50; Ch 2-3 1295-1585# 124-130; 1625-1630# 123.50-124; full/YG 4-5 1170-1540# 119.50-123.50; Sel 1-3 1130-1545# 118124; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1270-1470# 112.50-117; Ch 2-3 1250-1575# 104110.50; Sel 1-3 1220-1505# 99-104. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1280-1325# 127130; Ch 2-3 1155-1370# 123-126.50; full/YG 4-5 1140-1315# 118-122; Sel 13 1085-1450# 117.50-122. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 90, lo dress 88; Breakers 75-80% lean 82-86.50, lo dress 77.50-80.50; Boners 8085% lean 78-83, hi dress 83, lo dress 74.50-79.50, very lo dress 73.50; Lean 85-90% lean 72-78.50, hi dress 78.50-80.50, lo dress 65-71.50, very lo dress 6065. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1080-1800# 92-102, 2125# 95; hi dress 2030# 104.50; lo dress 1095-1760# 82.5092; 1885-2200# 81-85. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 410-495# 135-167; 505640# 142-165; 790# 135; Herefords 575# 137; 910# 127; M&L 2 427# 135-147; 1100# 117; Herefords 860# 109; L 3 Hols. 285-380# 95114 660-1140# 90-95; Hfrs. M&L 1 620-625# 130-135; 770-790# 100-119; Herefords 410# 127; 548-740# 102-120; M&L 2 340# 132; 670# 122; Herefords 385495# 112-127; Bulls M&L 1 605# 130; 885-920# 115117; Herefords 647-795# 110-129; M&L 2 545# 120; 840-1055# 89-115; L 3 Hols. 295-340# 112-117; 572# 97. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 190-222; 8090# 210-220; No. 2 95-115# 172-205; 75-90# 175-212; No. 3 70-115# 100-165; No. 2 Hols. Hfrs. 90-100# 155190; No. 2 75# 125; Vealers Util 55-110# 15-90. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 245265# 80-84, single 86; 285310# 86, late sales 262270# 74-79; 285-310# 7681; 45-50% lean 243-285# 75-80, late sales 247-270# 71-73; 290-365# 68-74; Sows US 1-3 315-445# 5560; 520-650# 60-62; Boars 360-475# 30-32.50; Jr. Boars 235-330# 59-67. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 2040# 31-47; 60-90# 50-51; Roasting Pigs 142-200# 6072/cwt.


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 40-52# 230-260; 75100# 140-175; Yearlings 185# 120; Ewes Gd 2-3 105-190# 97-102; 310# 67; Rams 145# 200. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 65-75# 150-162; 90-100# 175-177; Sel 2 20-35# 70105; 40-50# 85-120; Nannies Sel 1 130-150# 132157; Sel 2 100-110# 87135; Sel 3 80# 75; Billies Sel 1 170# 245.

MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA March 12, 2012 Alfalfa: 150-330 Alfalfa/Grass: 315-335 Grass: 195-350 Timothy: 170-200 Mixed Hay: 175-290 Round Bales: 95-200 Lg. Sq. Bales: 140-230 Straw: 200 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA March 12, 2012 Roosters: 3-5.75 Hens: 2-3.25 Banties: 1.50-4.75 Ducks: 7-7.50 Bunnies: 3-10.50 Rabbits: 9-14 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA March 1, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1305-1640# 126130; full/YG 4-5 121.50-126; Ch 2-3 1285-1535# 122126; Sel 2-3 1145-1430# 118-121.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1205-1625# 109112.50; 1675-1885# 98103; Ch 2-3 1295-1610#

NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA March 7, 2012 US 1-2: 25 hd,, 30-40# 140175; 46 hd, 45-50# 130-150; 4 hd pkg 82# 95. US 2: 62 hd, 20-30# 160200; 85 hd, 30-40# 160-180; 4 hd, 60-70# 75-110. *Next Feeder Pig Sale is March 21. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA March 12, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: NonTraditional, Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 280295; 40-50# fancy 300; 5060# fancy 285-300; 60-80# 217-251, fancy 70-80# 250268; 80-90# 205-221; 90110# 194-214; 110-130# 170-188; 130-150# 161179; Wooled & Shorn Ch 23 40-60# 204-235; 60-80# 203-228; 80-90# 193-209; 90-110# 184-203; 110-130# 152-171. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 86-101; 160200# 84-100; 200-300# 6977; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120160# 85-100; 160-200# 8296. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 20-40# 82-125; 40-60# 115-158; 60-80# 152-171; 80-100# 162-182; 100-110# 177-191; Sel 2 30-40# 92101; 40-60# 110-137; 6070# 125-141; 70-80# 132147; Sel 3 20-40# 52-74; 40-60# 70-94; 60-70# 94101; Nannies/Does Sel 1 80-130# 160-176; 130-180# 178-188; Sel 2 80-130# 139-154; Sel 3 50-80# 93108; 80-130# 113-128;

Bucks/Billies Sel 1 100150# 195-218; 150-250# 245-267; Sel 2 100-150# 155-170. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to two weeks corn sold .05 to .07 lower, wheat sold .05 to .10 lower, barley sold steady to .05 lower, Oats sold steady to weak & Soybeans sold .15.20 higher. EarCorn sold 3-4 lower. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.95-7.27, Avg 7.13, Contracts 5.59-5.72; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.237.13, Avg 6.65, Contracts 6.22-6.33; Barley No. 3 Range 4.70-6.25, Avg 5.48, Contracts 4.50; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50-5.10, Avg 4.78; Soybeans No 2 Range 12.63-13.07, Avg 12.95, Contracts 12.33-12.55; EarCorn Range 200-205, Avg 202.50. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.95-7.35, Avg 7.07; Wheat No. 2 7.10; Barley No. 3 Range 5.70; Oats No. 2 4-5, Avg 4.53; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11.50-12.90, Avg 12.36; EarCorn Range 195-220, Avg. 207.50. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.70-6.95, Avg 6.88; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.50-7.03, Avg 6.74; Barley No. 3 Range 4.25-6.25, Avg 5.13; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-4.50, Avg 3.91; Soybeans No. 2 Range 12.5612.87, Avg 12.76; EarCorn Range 190. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 7.10-7.25, Avg 7.16; Wheat No. 2 Range 7.35; Barley No. 3 Range 6; Oats No. 2 Range 4.60; Soybeans No. 2 Range 12.25-13.11, Avg 12.68; Gr. Sorghum Range 6. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.707.35, Avg 7.07, Month Ago 7.02, Year Ago 6.86; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.23-7.35, Avg 6.79, Month Ago 6.56, Year Ago 7.20; Barley No. 3 Range 4.25-6.25, Avg 5.41, Month Ago 5.29, Year Ago 4.71; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-5.10, Avg 4.43, Month Ago 4.36, Year Ago 3.28; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11.50-13.11, Avg 12.66, Month Ago 11.67, Year Ago 12.79; EarCorn Range 195-

225; Avg 202, Month Ago 205.71, Year Ago 172.60. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.20-7, Avg 6.52; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.08; Oats No. 2 3-4.85, Avg 3.87; Soybeans No. 2 12.93.

165-180; Sel 2 80-130# 130145; Sel 3 50-80# 85-102; 80-130# 109-123; Billies Sel 1 100-150# 184-199; 150250# 242-265; Sel 2 100150# 148-155; 150-250# 176-185.

PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary March 9, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 126-134.50; Ch 1-3 123-129; Sel 1-2 118-124; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110116; Ch 2-3 103-109.50; Sel 1-2 97-101. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 124-50-132; Ch 1-3 121.50-126.50; Sel 1-2 117122. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 80-87; Boners 80-85% lean 78-84; Lean 85-90% lean 72-79. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 102-109.50; Avg dress 9198; lo dress 87.50-92. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 175-209; 500-700# 140-180; M&L 2 300-500# 140-180; 500-700# 120150. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 140-175; 500700# 125-160; M&L 2 300500# 120-170; 500-700# 110-140. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 145-215; 500-700# 140-155; M&L 2 300-500# 135-190; 500-700# 130150. Vealers: Util 60-120# 3055. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-120# 190-230; 8090# 180-220; No. 2 95-120# 160-210; 80-90# 160-220; No. 3 80-120# 100-180; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 190245; No. 2 80-105# 100200. Hogs: Barrows & Glts 4954% lean 220-270# 64-72; 45-50% lean 220-270# 6364. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 51.50-56; 500-700# 58-60. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 1-2 30-40# 140-175; 45-50# 130-150; US 2 20-30# 160200; 30-40# 160-180. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 250270; 60-80# 226-263; 80110# 217-238; 110-150# 188-204; Ch 1-3 50-60# 220-235; 60-80# 175-230; 80-110# 188-208; Ewes Gd 2-3 120-160# 95-110; 160200# 86-101; Util 1-2 120160# 86-96. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 118-145; 60-80# 138-166; 80-100# 160-177; Sel 2 40-60# 88-116; 6080# 117-147; Sel 3 20-40# 55-82; 40-60# 69-84; 6080# 82-102; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 160-175; 130-180#

PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Compared to last week hay & straw sold steady. Alfalfa 175-325; Mixed Hay 170325; Timothy 150-260; Straw 110-180; Mulch 60-90. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 265 lds 62 Straw; Alfalfa 150-405; Mixed Hay 110425; Timothy 175-325; Grass 102-325; Straw 130202. Diffenbach Auct, March 5, 104 lds Hay, 30 lds Straw. Alfalfa 150-405; Mixed Hay 160-370; Timothy 175-325; Grass 130-280; Straw 130185. Green Dragon, Ephrata: March 9, 61 lds Hay, 11 Straw. Alfalfa 190-330; Mixed Hay 150-340; Timothy 192-220; Grass Hay 170260; Straw 155-225. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: March 8, 35 lds Hay, 7 Straw. Alfalfa 255385; Mixed Hay 130-280; Timothy 180-220; Grass 130-325; Straw 165-185. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola, PA: March 7, 65 lds Hay, 14 Straw. Alfalfa 175-322; Mixed Hay 110-385; Timothy 200-235; Grass 102-325; Straw 157-202. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 286 Loads Hay, 51 Straw. Alfalfa 125-300; Mixed Hay 95-365; Timothy 130-270; Grass 100-325; Straw 100230. Belleville Auct, Belleville: March 7, 57 lds Hay, 0 lds Straw. Alfalfa 205-250; Mixed 105-240; Grass 260. Dewart Auction, Dewart: March 5, 48 lds Hay, 13 Straw. Alfalfa 140-280; Mixed Hay 110-330; Grass 100-320; Straw 145-200. Greencastle Livestock: March 5 & 8, 23 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa 125-190; Mixed Hay 105-152.50; Timothy 122.50-192.50; Grass 100-137.50; Straw 105137.50. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: March 10, 12 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa 165-250; Mixed Hay 135-270; Timothy 150-270; Grass Hay 140325; Straw 120-175. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: March 6, 50 lds Hay, 7 Straw. Alfalfa 205-300;

Mixed Hay 100-310; Timothy 130-240; Grass 100-195; Straw 150-230. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: March 3 & 6, 65 lds Hay, 17 Straw. Alfalfa 132300; Mixed Hay 95-365; Timothy 140-265; Grass 115280; Straw 100-190. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: March 9, 55 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa 175-200; Timothy 200-220; Grass 210; Straw 175. VINTAGE SALES STABLES March 12, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1290-1615# 125-129; Ch 2-3 1160-1590# 122125.50; Sel 2-3 1215-1475# 118.50-121. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1410-1580# 111.50114; Ch 2-3 1330-1695# 105-108.50; Sel 2-3 12901580# 99-102; Hi Ch & Pr 34 1340-1440# 123-125. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 75-80% lean 8586.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 81-85; Boners 80-85% lean 79.50-83.50, hi dress 85-89, lo dress 73-77; Lean 88-90% lean 73-79, hi dress 83-84.50, lo dress 68-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1215-1915# 92.50-98.50, hi dress 100-100.50, lo dress 86-90. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-115# 210-237; No. 2 95115# 170-180; 70-90# 185205; No. 3 85-110# 150-170; Util 80-115# 80-100; 65-75# 30-50. Holstein Heifers: No. 2 95105# 120-160; non-tubing 90-95# 85-120. *Next Feeder Cattle Sale is April 13. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA March 8, 2012 Alfalfa: 5 lds, 225-385 Timothy Hay: 2 lds, 180220 Orchard Grass: 2 lds, 235280 Mixed Hay: 22 lds, 130-425 Grass: 4 lds, 130-325 Straw: 7 lds, 165-185 EarCorn: 1 ld, 230 Firewood: 3 lds, 72-95 Corn Fodder: 5 lds 35-110. Alfalfa Baleage: 2 lds, 4055. Wrapped Alfalfa Baleage: 1 ld, 85 Wrapped Baleage: 1 ld 65 Mixed Baleage: 70 WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA March 14, 2012 Alfalfa: 16 lds, 90-310 Mixed: 42 lds, 185-260 Grass: 13 lds, 160-300 Straw: 10 lds, 140-167 Fodder: 3 lds, 70-125 Firewood: 2 lds, 35-50

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 9

MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA March 12, 2012 Cattle: 132 Steers: Ch 115-119; Gd 110-115. Heifers: Ch 112-118; Gd 105-112. Cows: Util & Comm. 75-85; Canner/lo Cutter 82 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 90-106 Bulls: YG 1 60-95 Cattle: Steers 120-160; Bulls 110-150; Hfrs. 100160. Calves: 72. Ch 100-120; Gd 85-100; Std 20-85; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 150-220. Hogs: 44. US 1-2 75-78; US 1-3 70-74; Sows US 1-3 3558; Boars 24-51. Sheep: 13. Lambs Gd 150180. Goats: 60-150

103-108; Sel 2-3 13901500# 97-101. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1230-1465# 121.50124.50; Ch 2-3 1040-1395# 118-122. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 84-88, hi dress 88-91.50, lo dress 78-82; Breakers 75-80% lean 81-84, hi dress 84.5087.50, lo dress 75-81; Boners 80-85% lean 78-84, hi dress 84-87, lo dress 76-79; Lean 88-90% lean 74-77, hi dress 78.50-82.50, lo dress 67-73. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1005-1855# 94-99. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 114-128# 180-199; 86-112# 213-224; No. 2 120-128# 172; 102-118# 198-208; 80100# 215-230; No. 3 100130# 155-185; 80-98# 195208; 72-78# 130; Util 60110# 27-50. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 80-105# 220-285; No. 2 80-105# 100-200; Nontubing 70-85# 50-110.


Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

Haylage from B3 plant is technically dead. To understand how management practices can influence the rate of the drying process we should consider what are known to be the primary drivers of the drying process in the field, from greatest to least. Some of these factors obviously relate to or interact with others: 1. swath exposure to sun 2. swath temperature 3. air temperature 4. vapor deficit (difference between vapor pressure inside and outside of the plant tissue) 5. crop moisture, tied for 5th place with relative humidity 6. swath density 7. soil moisture 8. wind velocity Consider the impact that swath width (as a percent of cutting width) would have on each of these factors: • A narrow windrow that is only 40-50 percent of the cutting width is not nearly as exposed to sunlight as a wide windrow that is 80-95 percent of

the cutting width. • The narrow windrow will also be denser than a wide windrow (assuming the same cutting width) which prevents the warm air during the daytime from penetrating the windrow as quickly. • Air will not move through a dense windrow as readily, and the humidity in the center will therefore generally be higher. One more detail: the living cells that are in the DARK interior of the narrow windrow are still using sugars and starches (respiration) to maintain the cells. At night, when it is REALLY dark, whatever heat the windrow picked up during the day is held more tightly in the narrow windrow, which increases the rate of dark respiration (it is temperaturedriven), burning off even more starches and sugars. Not to worry, though, because whatever starches and sugars that are lost in this process can be replaced with purchased grain... The wide windrow, on the other hand not only

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Annual Spring Feeder Cattle Sale

Fri. Eve., March 30th • 6PM Featuring

200 Holsteins & 50 Holstein Cross Steers from Oak Bluff Farms, Woodsboro, MD. These cattle are home raised & ready to go! Wormed, dehoved & double innoculated. Should weigh approx. 800-1100 Lbs. & will sell @ 7 PM All Farm Fresh Cattle are Welcome Any Size - Breed - Sex - or Color Thank You

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Next Special Feeder Cattle Sale Fri. Eve., April 27 • 6PM

dries faster, but early in the drying process while the cells are alive, it can actually continue capturing sunlight for a while. This allows the levels of non-structural carbohydrates (i.e., starches and sugars) to maintain levels similar to or even higher than freshly mowed forage. That means that the net energy for lactation (NEL) of the forage in a wide windrow can actually go UP after it is cut! ‘Great,’ you say, ‘my windrower will not lay the windrow out at 75 percent+ of the cutting width!’ There are at least

three options to help overcome this barrier: • Tedd the windrow soon after mowing and rake the material back into a windrow when it approaches 70 percent moisture. Tedding will allow rapid drying and raking it back into a windrow at about 70 percent moisture will help prevent ‘over-drying.’ • If you have a New Holland mower, ask your dealer about a ‘wide thin fin’ kit. These fins mount on the swath board of some of their mowers and angle the flying forage outward as it hits the swath

board, resulting in a wider swath. The kits cost about $200 and seem fairly simple to install. • Buy a new mower that either does or can be adjusted to deliver a swath that is 75 percent+ of the cutting width. While the old-style sicklebar mowers will obviously lay it down right at cutting width, there are quite a few disc mowers that will also do it just as wide and do so much faster. What is the optimal time to mow? We all remember the A.M. vs P.M. harvest conversation from several years ago. The argument

was that alfalfa harvested in the evening has higher sugar levels than alfalfa that was cut in the morning. This seems logical given that a day of sunshine ought to increase the levels of starches and sugars in the tissue. HOWEVER, that research was conducted in the arid West, where humidity is generally much lower than it is in the Northeast, and the afternooncut plant material probably dried sufficiently on the day of cutting to keep the sugars from being en-

Haylage B11

Photos available online at www.marshall-machinery.com

34th Annual Inventory Reduction Auction

New, Used & Consignment Farm, Industrial & Garden Equipment Located on Route 652, 5 miles East of Honesdale, PA Phone 570-729-7117 Fax: 570-729-8455

Saturday April 7, 2012 9:00 AM Sharp COMMERCIAL EQUIPMENT

Excavators 2009 Kubota KX080-3 C/A/H, hyd thumb, QT bckt 515 hrs. 2009 Kubota KX161-3 C/A/H, hyd. thumb, angle blade, QT, 24 & 36 bckts. 2007 Kubota KX121-3 C/A/H, 1852 hrs 2006 Kubota KX91-3 rops, hyd thumb, 16" qt bucket, 360 hrs 2004 Kubota KX91-3 rops, rubber tracks 18" qt bckt, thumb 2006 Bobcat 430 C/A/H, hyd thumb, 24" bucket, 649 hrs QT bckt 2006 Bobcat 335 rops, hyd thumb, 733 hrs QT bckt 2007 Bobcat 329, 5' blade, 20" bucket, 692 hrs QT bckt 2004 Bobcat 331G, rops, rubber tracks, 18" bucket 645 hrs QT bckt 1999 Bobcat 331 with manual thumb 2500 hrs 2005 Hyundai Robex 110D-7 C/A/H, thumb, good condition, 2939 hrs 1996 Cat 315L with cab and hyd thumb 1991 CAT 307B C/A/H, 2 buckets, thumb, steel tracks, blade, aux hyd (2) 2006 IHI 35NX,orops, front blade, swing boom, aux hyd, rubber tracks 2002 Kobelco SK35SR2E, open rops, 2500 hrs 1990 JD 892DLC with approx 2000 hrs new motor 2007 JCB 8035 ZTS with orops, hyd thumb, 630 hrs Crawlers & Dozers 2004 JD 650HLT 4400 hrs 85% undercarriage JD 550HLT cab, heat, 3200 hrs 85% undercarriage 1997 JD 550G, 6 way blade, long track 3300 hrs 1992 JD650G, open rops, 6 way blade, 8650 hrs 1993 JD 750BLT w/ 10.5ft blade gd. U/C 2004 Rayco C87D, C/A/H, 6-way, pilot controls, winch & forestry package 168 hrs Case 550E 6 way blade, rubber tracks 1988 Case 450C new steering clutches 3274 original hours International TD20E runs and works very good condition JD 555 track loader with forks and bucket, 4500 hrs Wheel Loaders 1999 Samsung 120 loader good rubber 5000 hrs 1997 Cat IT28F loader GP bucket, q coupler, 3rd valve, new rubber, 6722 hrs Cat IT28B loader rubber tire with bucket and forks 1200 hrs good rubber TLBS 2008 Kubota M59 4wd,TLB, hydro, front and rear qt, 24" bucket NH 75LB 4wd, TLB, cab with heater, 4651 hrs AC 715 TLB gd cond. Compaction 2009 Dynapac CA134D vibratory roller, 54" smooth drum, shell kit, very clean 309 hrs 2002 Ingersoll Rand SD77DX vibratory roller 66" drum, very nice 1631 hrs 1993 Bomag BW172D vibratory roller 66" smooth drum (2) Stone SD54 rhino, single drum, vib. roller Rayco 400A Roller vib roller JD VR73C skid steer mount vibratory roller Allied 1000 Vib compactor 5' skid steer mount very good condition Forklifts & Manlifts 2004 IR 706H forklift, 4wd, 15' see thru mast, 6000 lbs Cummins dsl 1996 Cat TH63 telescopic forklift 6k cap. 41 ft. 1996 JCB 506B telehandler 6k cap. 36ft. Terex SS836C telehandler cab with heat 8K cap. 36ft. JLG 450A bucket lift 4wd, max height 45', horizontal lift Forestry 2010 Morbark M20 chipper, 325hp Deere, tandem axle, infeed bed, remote control Morbark 2050 wood chipper, 25 hp, gas, 5' capacity, Woodchuck WC17 chipper

(2) Whisper Chippers Rayco RG1625 stump grinder with fold up ramp Timberjack 380 log skidder new tires Cat D30C end dump 2nd & 3rd transmission problems Omal MB125 hydraulic hammer pin mount with point Rockblaster RB-100G hydraulic hammer fits JD 160 and JD 892 excavator Bobcat HB980 hydraulic hammer good condition x change mount Orsi River L549 4' boom mower 3 pt mount (2) Ground heating blankets 11x23 120 v Torwel EGM-1200 sander with Honda 5.5 hp engine 12 cubic feet Reinco TWm5X VSg hay mulcher 489 hrs Wic blizzard hay mulcher 2 new pressure washers

Skid Steer

2011 Kubota SVL90, hi flow, pilot controls like new, 128 hrs 2011 Kubota SVL75, pilot controls, 156 hrs 2007 Bobcat T190 orops, 68" bucket, 734 hrs 2006 Bobcat T190 new tracks, 74" bucket, 808 hrs 2003 Bobcat T300 C/A/H 80" bckt 2004 Bobcat S250 with 72" bucket 2007 Bobcat MT55 with bucket, good condition, 634 hrs 2007 Cat 256C cab, heat, 6' bucket with grouser tracks 2002 Cat 242, GP bucket, aux hydro, cab with heat, high lift, VTS track system, 2200 hrs 2005 JD 320 on tires C/A/H, foam filled tires, weight package 2005 Mustang MTL16 rubber tracks 1999 Mustang 2060 dsl, 2468 hrs NH L150 with cab, diesel Many new & used skidsteer attachments including, brush hog, grapple buckets, forks, rock bckt, post hole digger, various buckets

Tractors

2008 Kubota M125XDTC 4wd, C/A/H P. shift, 2 remotes, clean 2008 Kubota M108XDTC 4wd C/A/H, w/ loader, p shift, 3 remotes 2007 Kubota M8540HDC 4wd, C/A/H, cast centers, 2 remotes, 640 hrs 2011 Kubota M5140DTC 4wd,C/A/H, ag tires, 8x8 trans, 1 remote 2009 Kubota M5040DT 4wd w/ loader ag tires, 255 hrs 2011 Kubota L5240HST 4wd,hydro w/loader 2009 Kubota L4400, 4wd, TLB, hydro, SS QT, 181 hrs, 2005 Kubota L3430HSTC 4wd, C/A/H with loader, hydro, ag tires, clean 2005 Kubota L39 TLB 4wd,front aux hyd, 1 owner 542 hrs 2007 Kubota L3130 4wd w/loader, hydro, R-4 tires, 347 hrs 2008 Kubota L3400 HST 4wd w/ loader, SS QT, R-4 tires 2008 Kubota L3400 HST 4wd w/ hydro, 206 hrs 2008 Kubota L2800 4wd, TLB, ag tires, thumb, 249 hrs 2008 Kubota L2800 2wd, ag tires 108 hrs 2004 Kubota B2910 4wd TLB, R-4 tires, 112 hrs 2007 Kubota BX24 TLB 4wd 194 hrs 2002 Kubota BX22 TLB, bar tires, 432 hrs 2010 Kubota BX2660 4wd, 26hp, hydro, 60" mower, 59 hrs 2008 Kubota BX2660 4wd,w/ 60" mower Kubota L2950 4wd w/ loader SS QT new rear tires Kubota B6200 HSD 4wd,hydro Kubota B8200 w/ dozer blade, snow blade, 5' mower 2009 Bobcat CT440 4wd w/ loader 68 hrs Bobcat CT122 4wd TLB -New New MF 1528HL 4wd w/ loader 2007 Cub Cadet 7284 4wd TLB, hydro, mid mower, 264 hrs 2010 JD 5055E 4wd with loader 60hrs- like new JD 1050 4wd w/loader, diesel, ag tires

JD 3020 dsl, JD 2010 gas, MF50, FM 504, AC B Ford 545 loader, Sims cab 3pt & pto Lawn and Garden 2010 Kubota ZD331 31 hp diesel, 72" cut 2007 Kubota ZD331 31 hp diesel 60" cut 200 hrs 2008 Kubota ZD21F 21 hp, 60" cut,284 hrs 2008 Kubota ZG327 27 hp gas 60" cut 248 hrs 2009 Kubota ZG227 27 hp gas 54" cut 234 hrs 2010 Bad Boy 6000 CZT 23 hp, 60" cut like new 2007 JD 757 zero turn mower 1285 hrs 2001 JD M665 zero turn mower 60" cut Toro Master 100-52 zero turn mower 675 hrs Cub Cadet R2T50 zero turn mower 412 hrs BCS W/B tractor with tiller, snowblower and broom IR 3018 tractor with mower and snowblower 337 hrs Many other trade in lawn mowers Utility Vehicles 2008 Kubota RTV1100, 4wd, C/A/H, hyd dump, power angle blade 433 hrs 2009 Kubota RTV1140 78 hrs 2008 Kubota RTV900 4wd, canopy, hyd dump bed, 606 hrs 2007 Kubota RTV900, 4wd, canopy 2010 Bobcat 3400G manual dump 69 hrs 2008 Kawasaki 3010 4wd, diesel, 4 seater, 1 owner 2001 Kawasaki 1500 motorcycle garage kept 4268 miles

Trucks and Trailers

Trucks 2001 IHC w/ 350hp cat c-10 engine with 10 speed 33,000 GVW Service body 1990 IHC 2554 fuel truck DT466 engine, manual transmission 1982 IHC 2554 single axle dump truck DT466 engine, automatic transmission 1997 Freightliner 20' flat bed truck, A/C, PS, air brakes, cruise controls, 3126 Cat engine 1993 Ford LTL9000, tri axle, cab & chassis, 46k lock rears, 8 LL trans, 20k lift axle, 18k steer axle 1981 IHC single axle flat bed truck, automatic transmission w.b. 162" 140,075 miles 1984 Ford L9000, single axle, 240 Cummins 9 speed transmission, 2500 gal vacuum tank 2003 Ford F450 w/service body, PTO powered air comp. & generator 1997 Chevy C3500 utility truck 6.5 turbo dsl, auto crane w/ 3k lift cap, air comp, 2002 Chevy bucket truck, diesel, auto transmission, A/C, fiberglass utility box 1998 Chevy C30 cab chassis 1992 Dodge 350 5.9 L Cummins with 5 speed, 11' platform dump 5 ton hoist 1988 GMC Vandura 3500 box truck contains pressure washer system 1979 GMC 3500 service truck Trailers & other (10+) new trailers- all sizes, including single axle, 2 axle, Deck over, Gooseneck, Dump (20+) used trailers- trade ins all sizes 2004 Eager Beever 20 ton trailer 1987 Southwest 16 foot trailer 6 ton BRI-MAR 6 X 12 DUMP TRAILER 10' Heavy Duty Baker Flat bed trailer 11' Reading enclosed service body 16' truck flat bed, 12' truck flat bed 12'flatbed with lift gate for 1 ton truck 9' 3-5 cubic yard dump body with hoist (2) 1991 Brenner stainless steel transport trailer 6,000 gallons with heated valves

FARM EQUIPMENT

Hay Equipment 2008 Claas 350RC Round baler silage with net wrap 2009 Tanco 580S round bale wrapper Elho silage wrapper JD 925 discbine, tine cond. JD 955 discbine center pivot, tine cond. NH 1411 discbine NI 5209 discbine, gray model Hesston 1160 haybine 14', center pivot NH 472 haybine, Hesston 1070 haybine, 2003 NH 570 square baler with thrower clean NH 575 baler w/ thrower NH 273 baler NH 1018 bale wagon Pequea HR-15 hay rake NH 258 & 260 rakes NH 144 hay inverter Sitrex RT5200 tedder-New 4star hyd fold Tonutti RCS8 V-rake good condition Gehl BU970 forage wagon tandem axle with roof Manure NH 185 manure spreader. 2 axle with tailgate, good condition NH 145 manure spreader no gate New-Massey Ferguson 3715 manure spreader Millcreek 75 manure spreader low usage, fair condition New- Pequea MS125 manure spreader

Implements and Miscellaneous Equipment

Normal run of 50 plus 3pt attachments including: brush hogs, tillers, disks, plows, rock rakes, box scrapers, post hole diggers, etc. Schulte RS320 jumbo rock picker, hydraulic drive, 52" head New- Woods BW15LHKW Batwing mower with 15' chain shielding Befco 7-420-SFL 20' batwing finish mower Timberwolf TW-5 Log splitter w/ 4-way & log lift Brillion 8FT 3pt. Seeder Danuser 3pt post hole digger Howse 10FT 3PT rotary mower- New JD 72" mid mount mower with mtg brackets fits 4500 to 4700 series JD HX10 rotary mower Kuhn SD4000 seeder drill, 3pt Old Forge post hole digger Woods RM990W finish mower with chain shielding -New Woods BH65000 Backhoe attachment 300 gallon vacuum skid tank with pump 3 cylinder Deutz diesel motor 1999 Presvac vacuum tank 3,800 gallon Rheintub (Hobbs) irrigation hose reel model VRTB125/400 td Lanco lime spreader, pull type, pto drive

Plus Much More


Haylage from B11 tirely consumed overnight. In Kimberly, Idaho, where some of the data was collected, daytime humidity regularly drops below 25 percent during the day and may be lower than 60 percent overnight. In much of the Northeast, many days will not see relative humidity below 75 percent on a given day. Experiments done by Cornell (a much more humid environment) have shown that forage cut around 9:30 a.m. (with the dew on and without conditioning) actually had

moisture levels at 3 p.m. that were not significantly different than forage that was conditioned (cut at the same time) or forage that was cut at 6 a.m. that same morning or 8 p.m. the night before. Aside from chores, the main reason to wait until 9:30 a.m. instead of mowing at 6 a.m. is that the sunlight the plants get during that intervening time can help the plant rebuild sugar and starch levels from the night, and do so without delaying the drying process. Mowing in the

evening can work well if night temperatures are expected to be quite low (probably below 45°F). Lower temperatures will slow ‘dark respiration.’ What about conditioning? One counter-intuitive fact is that conditioning is not helpful if you are only trying to get the forage dry enough to put in your bunker silo; in fact, it can be counterproductive. To understand why, consider that forages have three phases of drying. Assuming the stems of the plant have not been crushed via con-

ditioning, the first phase of drying is driven by the fact that the leaves are still alive. The pores on the leaf surface are open (trying to bring in more carbon dioxide for photosynthesis); at the same time, water vapor is escaping through the pores. Because the plant is no longer connected to the ground, that water is not being replaced in the plant. This allows the plants to wilt down to 6570 percent moisture more rapidly than if the forages had been conditioned. The second phase of dry-

your grain bill is just right, the ‘haylage in a day’ process has very little to offer over what you are currently doing. Finally, higher quality forages will not improve your bottom line as much if you do not account for it when balancing the rest of the ration. Be sure to test regularly and work with your nutritionist to adjust the ration accordingly. By definition, modern ‘high forage’ rations for dairy cattle depend on and account for excellent quality haylage. Any time I present an idea for a solution to a given problem, I understand that there are some for whom the process is simply not practical. You might have cash-flow issues that prevent you from purchasing any new equipment or hiring more labor during busy times. You might have logistical bottlenecks that cannot be overcome without building new infrastructure. Last, but not least, you may have a very influential family member who is not game to try it. If any of the former issues apply, my hope is that some of the principles outlined above will still be helpful as you pursue higher quality forages as a major way of controlling feed costs throughout the year. Links to many of the references used can be found at: http://agronomator.wordpress.com/au thor/agronomator/ Daniel Hudson is an agronomist for University of Vermont Extension and can be contacted by em a i l i n g daniel.hudson@uvm.edu or calling 802-751-8307.

Middlesex Livestock Auction

LAMB & GOAT SALE 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455

Sat. March 31 - 9 am to 2 pm & Sun. April 1 - 9 am to 12 Noon This sale will have over 250 lambs, goats, kid goats, and sheep to choose from. Come and pick out the goats or lambs of your choice. No need to wait for sale day! Avoid the hustle and bustle of a Monday sale and take your time in picking out one or more. These lambs and goats will be straight off the farm! Come pick out the highest quality lambs and goats for pets, breeding or the freezer! No buyer's premium! Cash or check Mastercard and Visa with a 3% surcharge.

For more information call Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Res. 860-346-8550 Sale Barn 860-349-3204 email sscirpo35@comcast.net

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 11

ing, when the plant moisture is dropping from 70 percent down to ~35 percent) happens more quickly if the stems are crushed with a mower equipped with a conditioner. The third phase (below 35 percent) is more regulated by weather and other factors. If you want a mower that will be useful for dry hay and haylage, it should have a conditioner, but you need not use it when you are mowing wide-swath haylage. One added benefit of not needing to use the conditioner for wide-swath haylage production is that less fuel will be consumed. Is the ‘haylage in a day’ process worthwhile on my farm? Setting up so that you can get haylage in the bunk on the same day it is cut may require some investment in equipment, and it can be more laborintensive and logistically rigorous. Whether it will be profitable for you depends on whether the improvement in lactation and/or reduction of grain costs outweigh the additional labor and equipment costs. If you are set up to move the crop to the silo on the same day it is cut, you will generally have more harvest intervals (especially for first cut) than you would if you require more than a day to get it done. This can allow the first cut to happen earlier (often resulting in higher forage quality), which can allow an earlier second cut and perhaps more cuttings overall. If your forage quality is almost always as high as it can be and


‘So, You Want to Be a Farmer?’

Don’t Miss Out! The First Annual Stable Directory Will Deadline on Friday, March 30th Listings Will Appear in the May Issue!

2012

Page 12 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

The five-session workshop series Applying its knowledge of entering and aspiring farmers, the Southeastern Massachusetts Agricultural Partnership (SEMAP) is offering the “So, You Want to Be a Farmer?” workshop. The series is designed to educate entering farmers on the essential building blocks of starting a new farm enterprise and to inform them of the network of existing services. The series will be offered Wednesday evenings from 6-9 p.m. from March 21 to April 28 at The Cranberry Bog Station, One State Bog Road, East Wareham, MA. The five-session workshop series, “So, You Want to Be a Farmer?” comprises: • So, You Want to Be a Farmer?: The Dirty Truth. March 21; • What is a Business Plan and Why You Need One. March 28; • The Dollars and Sense of Financing a Small Farm. April 4; • News Flash! You Don't Need To Own The Land You Farm. April 11; and • Farm Tour: What A Real Farm Smells Like. April 28. SEMAP has been working with aspiring and entering farmers through its Farms Forever Program for the past four years. New and aspiring farmers have communicated their need for support in the areas of business planning, locating farmland, financing, and other legal issues. SEMAP has received funding for 20 participants. For more information or to register visit http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e4z un73e9cd61967.

Stable Directory

The May 2012 issue of Mane Stream will feature a Stable Directory. Please check as many categories below as apply to your company for the $25.00 listing. If you wish to have your companies logo appear in black & white above your listing, an additional fee of $50 will be charged. Your logo can be e-mailed to tkrieger@leepub.com. This form must be completed and returned by 3/30/12. Questions? Call Tina Krieger at 800-218-5586, ext. 262.

Your logo will appear with your listing in black and white (print) & color with the online version.

Check If Using Logo Company Name: Contact Person: Address:

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Johne’s Disease – not just a dairy problem by Nancy Glazier Johne’s disease can affect any ruminant, though most prevalent in dairy cows. Jackson Wright, dairy specialist with the team, wrote in May’s issue about controlling Johne’s on the dairy.

From his article, the disease is an intestinal infection caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, or MAP. MAP is a bacterium that primarily affects the latter portion of the small intestine (known as the

ileum) of ruminants. Once ingested, intestinal mucosal cells absorb the bacteria initiating an immune response. This results in inflammation and thickening of the intestinal lining and decreased nutrient absorption. Symptoms

of Johne’s disease include weight loss despite good appetite, decreased milk production, diarrhea, and death. The real danger of Johne’s disease is due to the “iceberg” effect. For every clinical case of

Johne’s in a herd, there can be 15 to 25 animals subclinically infected. Onset of clinical signs may be as early as two years of age if a massive exposure occurs close to birth. Digestive tract insults from clostridium laden silages, mycotox-

ins, chronic acidosis and Salmonella infections may act to potentiate MAP infections creating more and younger clinical cases than the level of infection would predict. The “iceberg” of Johne’s steals profits through reduced production, increased secondary diseases, culled animals, and increased feed costs. MAP is shed in manure and can survive (but not multiply) in the environment for many years. Manure spread on pasture land appears to be more of a concern than cow patties from carrier animals.

Plant contamination is topical, not systemic. For the organism to reproduce and multiply, it needs a live host. Another means of transmission is through milk. A third route is in utero: a fetus may acquire the infection from its infected dam even before it hits the ground. In both modes of transmission, youngstock are the most susceptible to infection. Since there is no cure, prevention is critical. It is present in about 68 percent of dairies, 8 percent in beef herds; however, the monitoring of Johne’s in beef herds is much more casual than in dairy. I am aware of three beef herds that have had it. The first step is to assess whether your flock or herd is at risk. The National Johne’s Education Initiative website (www.johnesdisease.org) has lots of information for all species of livestock. Source: Ag Focus, February 2012

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 13

The real danger of Johne’s disease is due to the “iceberg” effect. For every clinical case of Johne’s in a herd, there can be 15 to 25 anmals subclinically infected.


Ninth Annual Massachusetts Blue Ribbon Calf Sale slated The Massachusetts 4H Dairy Program has announced that the Ninth Annual Massachusetts Blue Ribbon Calf Sale will be held on March 24 at the Eastern States Exposition Fairgrounds

in West Springfield, MA. The sale offers 60 heifers from the seven major dairy breeds. Youths ages 8-18 receive a 5 percent discount on the purchase of one heifer. Bidding is open to

adults, too. Sale proceeds go to the Massachusetts 4-H Dairy Program. Clinics begin at 10 a.m. and the sale starts at noon. A commercial display area will also be

Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

USDA issues mandatory electronic dairy product price reporting rule USDA issued, on Feb. 15, the final rule for the mandatory electronic dairy product price reporting, which appeared in the Federal Register. The rule was mostly unchanged from the proposed rule issued last July, and did several things that NMPF had supported: • It completed the move of dairy product price reporting from the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) to the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS). AMS staff are more familiar with the reporting plants and their operations, and so are better equipped to integrate data collection and

audit. • It makes reporting completely web-based, which would speed the data collection process. • It moves up the plant reporting deadline each week from noon (local time) on Wednesday to noon (local time) on Tuesday, with some adjustments for when Monday or Tuesday fell on a holiday. • It moves up USDA’s normal publication deadline each week from 8:30 a.m. ET on Friday to 3 p.m. ET on Wednesday, again with possible adjustment for holidays. • Beginning April 18, Federal order price announcements will also

move from Friday to 3 p.m. ET on Wednesday, allowing about 40 percent of Class price announcements to be based on more current data than they were before. The last Dairy Product Prices report will be issued by NASS for the last time on Friday, March 30. The following week, on Wednesday, April 4, it will be issued by AMS for the first time. New product price reporting and announcement schedules and information about the new data collection system were posted on the AMS website. Source: News for Dairy Co-Ops, March 2

available at the sale. Past sale cattle have gone on to become state and national show winners, leaders in production and excellently scored animals. This year, there will be heifers

selling out of multiple generations of EX scored dams, national show winners and high production cow families. Offspring sell from famous families such as, Atlee, Bliss, Elegance, Snicker-

doodle, Snow and Veronica to name a few. For further information, contact Moira Poitras at mpoitras@charter.net or 413-244-8969 or visit www.blueribboncalfsale.com.

The April Issue of

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NMPF Board of Directors backs resolution urging passage of Farm Bill in 2012 Dairy farmers need improved safety net sooner, not later, says NMPF The National Milk Producers Federation’s (NMPF) Board of Directors supported a resolution March 13 urging Congress to pass a

Farm Bill in 2012, one that contains an improved safety net for farmers in the form of the Dairy Security Act. The resolution,

passed unanimously by the NMPF Board at its spring meeting, made it clear that the organization does not support any approach in Con-

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since 2009 to formulate a comprehensive economic safety net that is based on margins, rather than just the farm level price of milk. After developing its own proposal, Foundation for the Future, NMPF worked with Reps. Collin Peterson (D-MN) and Mike Simpson (RID) to encapsulate those concepts into H.R. 3062, the Dairy Security Act. “At some point, we have to hold Congress accountable for providing a stable safety net going forward,” Mooney said. “We’ve seen prices drop significantly in the first quarter of 2012, and margins are again compressed, even as farmers are struggling to recover from the severe losses in 2009.” The full text of the NMPF Farm Bill resolution reads: WHEREAS, the NMPF Board of Directors recognizes that lower milk

TS ROBER

prices and higher feed costs are likely to result in significantly reduced operating margins for dairy producers across the country in 2012, and WHEREAS, the NMPF Board of Directors also recognizes the ineffectiveness of current federal programs designed to help protect the livelihood of dairy producers, as witnessed during the catastrophic margins of 2009, it is: RESOLVED, that the United States Congress be urged to pass a new Farm Bill as soon as possible that includes the provisions of the Dairy Security Act, and it is further RESOLVED, that the NMPF Board of Directors does not support an extension of the current Farm Bill and urges Congress to enact the Dairy Security Act if a Farm Bill is not enacted in 2012.

AUCTION SERVICE

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Friday, March 30, 2012 * 11 a.m.

Due to serious illness and Real Estate having been sold, we will sell all personal property at the farm located on Rt 5, between Coventry and Orleans, VT 1/2 mi. south of Northeast Farm Service.

135 Head of Organic Cattle Super Gold Certificate herd and many Gold Certificate year after year.

nic

rga

O 75 mature cows, 10 black Crosses, 1 Jersey, bal. Holsteins ley 32 cows dry & springing, 23 fresh, bal. Of diff. Lactations. Val Better than half herd of 1st & 2nd calf heifers, milking at 46-47 lb. 3.9+ fat, 3.2+ protein on purchased feed. Very young uddered herd. 34 heifers, running with bull 2 mo. 20 BC, 14 Holst. 23 2 mo. To 8 mo. Holst. Heifer, 2 stock bull, cattle bred to P.B. bull from Jenkins herd. Heifers raised loose housing, cows stall. All cattle to be preg checked & inoculated prior to sale.

FARM MACHINERY TRACTORS: 2004 MT 635 Challenger 160 h.p. 4 w/d w/L355 Loader & Cab (2700 hrs); MF3545 4 w/d 125 h.p. w/Cab-new tires; Int'l 1066 125 h.p. 4 w/d w/Cab; Int. 3388 2x2 w/dr 175 h.p. w/Cab; J.D. 250 skid steer (3100 hrs); J.D. 600 w/bucket; Ford 800 w/scraper. EQUIP: '08 Knight 1140 350 bu. Hydro-drive apron; 2- FC4000 Kuhn disc mowers; NH 900 chopper; Gallagher 3200 L round baler; Kuhn 7822 27 ft. rake; double Kuhn tedder; 12' water fill land roller; 2 Fargo hy-dump wagons; Richardson 700 hy-dump; '10 Anderson selfpropelled bale wrapper; J.D. 616 bush hog; Bodco 42' liq manure pump; WIC 2700 gal. liq. spreader; WIC 4350 gal. liq. spreader; Huskey 3500 gal. truck mount liq. tank; 2 Pequea 520 24' feeder wagons; 36' solid bottom elevator on wheels; foot trimming cage; R.B. picker; Agri metal stationary feed mixer; 5th wheel 24 ft. cattle trailer; Bodco feed cart; tandem axle 15' trailer; R.B. fork; 4 wheel hay wagon; 5th wheel 32 ft 3 axle trailer; 5000 gal. Fuel tank; also some shop tools. TRUCKS: '80 Mack w/16 ft dump body; '78 GMC Dump truck; '83 Chevy 1 ton-parts. TERMS: Cash/check settlement prior to removal. OWNERS: Paul Lehoullier

Lunch by Wrights

SALE MANAGED BY: ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE, NEWPORT, VT 802/334-2638 robertsauctions@together.net AUCTIONEERS: MARCEL ROBERTS 802/334-2638 RICHARD DEGRE, 802/744-2427 degreauction@comcast.net

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March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 15

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gress that would extend current farm programs by another year, and delay the creation of a better dairy program. “Kicking the can down the road into 2013, where the farm bill is concerned, is neither good politics, nor good policy,” said Randy Mooney, Chairman of NMPF and a dairy farmer from Rogersville, MO. “The tough choices about budget priorities won’t be any easier next year. But more to the point, dairy farmers need a better program than what we have right now. A farm bill extension in 2012 doesn’t do us any good.” Mooney said he was encouraged that leaders in both the Senate and House Agriculture Committees have recently expressed hope that each chamber can complete work on a bill prior to the summer. NMPF has worked


2012 Farm Bill comments being accepted online until May 20

Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

“The work of the Agriculture Committee, including reauthorizing the Farm Bill in 2012, affects every American; ensuring that our farmers and ranchers have the tools they need to produce an abundant and affordable food and fiber supply is as important to our country as national defense.” — Chairman Frank D. Lucas Farm Bill Field Hearings Chairman Frank Lucas announced a series of field hearings on the 2012 Farm Bill to take place throughout March

and April. The hearings will give Committee Members the opportunity to hear firsthand how U.S. farm policy is working for farmers and ranchers in advance of writing legislation. • New York — Held on March 9 • Illinois — March 23 • Arkansas — March 30 • Kansas — April 20 Farm Bill Feedback You may submit comments to be considered part of the Committee’s Farm Bill field hearing record by visiting http://agriculture.house

.gov/farmbill_feedback.h tml. and completing the feedback form at that online address. Your comments must be submitted using that link by May 20. Information about America’s Farm Bill 2012, as posted by the U.S. House of Representatives House Committee on Agriculture, can be found at http://agriculture.house .gov. Chairman Lucas began the Farm Bill process when the Committee held 11 audit hearings on agriculture programs to look for ways to im-

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Senate Highway Bill moves forward with agricultural exemptions WASHINGTON, D.C. — Although the Highway Bill (S.1813) has been a victim of partisan politics, according to National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Associate Director of Legislative Affairs Kent Bacus, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) and Senate Minority

Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reached an agreement on the consideration of a series of amendments to the Highway Bill. Two of those amendments, which passed March 13, are of particular importance for farm and ranch families. Specifically, an amend-

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Congressman Sam Graves (R-MO), which waives certain driving restrictions during planting and harvest seasons for producers who are transporting agricultural goods. Bacus said the amendment would allow farmers and ranchers to transport goods during harvest seasons when necessary instead of being subject to certain time requirements. The Farmers’ Freedom Act of 2011, H.R. 2414, sponsored by Congressman James Lankford (R-OK) is similar to the amendment sponsored by Senator Merkley. This legislation exempts certain farm vehicles, including the individual operating the vehicle, from certain federal requirement such as commercial driver’s licenses. According to the U.S. House of Representatives, it is not moving forward with its version of the Highway Bill. Instead, the House will take up the two-year Senate bill, sponsored by Sens. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and James Inhofe (R-OK), which was debated in the Senate March 13. Once

Trucks the Senate concludes consideration of the amendments, the bipartisan legislation will be

brought up for consideration. The bill will then move to the House for consideration.

The highway bill: possible change of committee leadership by Mike Oscar On Tuesday, March 6, House Speaker Boehner has sidelined Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Mica after his panel produced a reauthorization of highway programs that stirred strong objections from House conservatives and forced Republican leaders to regroup. Currently, Republican leaders are now relying upon Congressman Shuster (PA) who also serves on the transportation panel, and have given him a pivotal role in working with committee staff and leaders in an effort to write a new bill that bridges differences among House Republicans. Speaker Boehner’s effort to salvage the bill (HR 7), a measure he embraced as his signature legislation, is intended to quickly find the right policy prescriptions needed to secure a House majority in order to pass the reauthorization before a short-term extension (PL 112-30) of the funding for infrastructure programs expires March 31, 2012. The Speaker’s move shows uncharacteristic willingness to publicly rebuke a chairman and turn to other leaders on a panel when that chairman does not draft a bill that can gain the support of a majority of Republicans. Congressman Shuster ranks 10th in the party seniority on the panel and his father, Congressman Bud Shuster (PA), reigned as the committee’s powerful chairman from 1995 to 2000. Source: NDFC E-letter for March 9

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 17

2009 Better Built Gooseneck

ment brought forth by Senator Jeff Merkley (DOR) will exempt drivers of farm vehicles from having to acquire a commercial driver’s license. Another amendment, introduced by Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), will waive hours of service restrictions during harvest seasons. “Farmers and ranchers are not professional truck drivers and shouldn’t be treated as such. Hauling livestock to market two times a year is hardly the same as hauling goods across the country on a daily basis. Subjecting family farmers and ranchers to costly requirements is an unnecessary burden we cannot afford,” said Bacus. “NCBA and its members were pleased to see the U.S. Senate approve two commonsense amendments that differentiate agriculture from commercial transportation.” The amendment brought up by Senator Klobuchar is similar to H.R. 3265, sponsored by


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CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Announcements

Announcements

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, March 21st For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com Announcements

Announcements

    

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call your sales representive or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Announcements NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101 bsnyder@leepub.com

Dairy Cattle

WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Bedding

Barn Equipment (2) 24 ft. Big Ass fans. Only used one summer, with converter. $5,000. 315-250-0652

BRED HEIFERS, (2) Jersey, (2) Jersey cross breeds, due March Through May. $900/ea., or one money will take all. 207-654-2393

Bedding

DRY SAWDUST

Attention Vermont Dairy Farmers Dry Sawdust Delivered in Walking Floor Trailer Loads Reliable & Sustained Supply. Call For Details

802-228-8672

The Williams Contracting Co. Beef Cattle REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050

Metal Roofing Cut to the INCH Agricultural Commercial Residential

16 s Color

Barn Repair

24-29 G Pane a. ls

BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822

Bedding

20 quality AI sired ready to breed open Holstein heifers. 802-295-4998

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

Dairy Cattle

Building Materials/Supplies

HEIFER BOARDING Concentrate Your Efforts on Making Milk - Let Us Raise Your Heifers - Quality Care ~ References Available ~ SILAGE ALSO AVAILABLE Springfield, VT • 802-885-4000

Herd Expansions

Building Materials/Supplies

240 FT Patz barn cleaner chain. Clockwise, 16 in. gutter, $750.00. Can deliver 802-5869675

Seward Valley 518-234-4052 Bedding

Bedding

Building Materials/Supplies

WANTED All Size Heifers

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

315-269-6600 JERSEYS FOR SALE: Closed herd, beautiful udders, average B.F. 5.4%. Pro. 3.8. All lactating now. Last SCC 32,000. Most due to calve in early Fall, one due in May, service sires Eclipes, Riley, & Premier. 802-866-5001

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

40 Years Experience

Dependa-Bull Services

Agricultural Buildings Metal Roofing Pressure Treated Posts

315-829-2250

Bedding

CENTER HILL BARNS RICHARD PITMAN, INC

P.O. BOX 262  EPSOM  NEW HAMPSHIRE 03234

TELEPHONE 603.798.5087 Dairy Cattle

SERVICE AGE Registered Holstein Bulls, 6 over 1-year. Dams w/2 generations of 1,000 fat, excellent pedigree, $1,200/each. Delivery available. Robeth Holsteins, Rochester, VT 802-767-3926

FAX 603.798.5088

 WANTED 

Dairy Cattle

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

HEIFERS (ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 19

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Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Dairy Cattle

We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Dairy Equipment 400 Gallon bulk tank, all stainless, half round, self contained, all working. Asking $1,000/OBO. 207-654-2393

Page 20 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

Dairy Equipment

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

NEW PALTZ 2” pipeline, 4 units, milk up to 50 head, automatic washer, surge 3 hp vacuum pump, using every day. $3,000 OBO. 207-6542393

Degleman 46-57 12 ft. blade with mounts for CaseIH MX tractor. Nice shape. $10,000 315-250-0652

FORD, approx. 1960 w/snowplow & cab, no 3ph, $1,800; Ford 2N, excellent tin, engine overhauled, $1,600; Springtooth harrow, 3 pth, 11’; International fast hitch 2 row corn planter; Ford 5’ finish mower, 3ph. 978-948-2674.(MA)

Int. 766, Black Stripe, cab, 3100 hrs. orig., super nice! $14,950; Int’l 966, open, 115hp, nice machine! $9,500; JD 920 disk mower, flail cond., $5,500; NH 162, 17’ tedder, $2,100; Kuhn 13’ tedder, $1,850; 2 new 6’ Grapple buckets SS, mint, $19,50 ea.; 6’ rock bkt, SS mount, $1,100. 603-477-2011

MACK ENTERPRISES

Farm Machinery For Sale 2007 KRONE BIG X 650, 1156 cutter head hours, 1573 engine hours, 8 row corn head w/processor, 12½’ hay head, all upgrades are done, cab camera, inoculant sprayer, $229,000. 802-373-7215 BUSH HOG Model 2415 Batwing 15’ rotary mower. Like new. Stored under cover. Photos available. Pine Plains, NY. $7,250. 518-398-1404. follyfarm@fairpoint.net

Complete Double eight milking parlor, everything except the stalls. Boumatic Airstar variable-speed 10hp vacuum pump with converter, 16 Boumatic signature series corded take-offs, pulsators, pre-cooler 3” low-line, receiver with milk pump, washer. $25,000. 315-250-0652

CI 695, 4WD, w/2255 ldr., new motor/clutch, $13,500; JD 2940, 2WD, new motor! ROPS, nice! $10,500; JD 970, 4WD w/ldr., Really nice tractor! $9,500; A/C 5020, 25hp, $2,950; JD 680 manure sprdr w/end gate, $2,000; JD 450 hydra push, $950; White 252, 10’ disk harrows, $2,200; Kelly backhoe, 8’, 3ph, $1,900; Kub #4560 backhoe, 9’, $3,200; Henke chipper, 6”- hyd. feed, $2,200. Full line of farm equipment available! 802-885-4000 www.youngsmilkywayfarm.com

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

BERG-BENNETT, INC. RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866 Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

EXCELLENT CONDITION John Deere 3955 forage harvester, 2 row corn head & grass head, $18,000. 978544-6105 FARMALL A tractor, new rear tires, potato hoe & one row cultivator, $3,500; Ford 861, good shape, $3,500; 56 corn planter, w/new runners, good shape, ready to plant, $1,200; commercial meat saw & cube steak maker, $100/both. 413229-8554

FORD 5000 tractor, 772 loader, 4000 hours, 2WD, excellent condition, $6,500 OBO. 315-737-0820

Farm Machinery For Sale

Call 800-836-2888 to place your classified ad.

HEIL 30' tandem aluminum tank trailer . .$5,000 OBO KINZE 4 row corn planter, double frame, no till, fertilizer box, excellent condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 JD 3970 2 row corn chopper, new knives, shear bar, bearings, field ready . . .$6,500 JD Loader model 146, quick hitch . . . . . . .$2,000 CAT 922 wheel loader, diesel, new paint & glass, good tires, runs good . . .$8,000

860-537-1974 Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Equipment

New Hay Wagons-Cheap! COMPLETE WAGONS 18’ w/8 ton gear . . . . . . . .$3,500 20’ w/8 ton gear . . . . . . . .$3,700 24’ w/12 ton tandem gear .$4,400

Combine Salvage

K & J Surplus 60 Dublin Rd. Lansing, NY 14882 (607) 533-4850 • (607) 279-6232 John Deere 8200 grain drill, 18 X 7", grass seed boxes, packer wheels. . . . . . . . $4,000 DMI chisel plow, 11 shank, 3 point hitch, spring reset, spike points . . . . . . . . . . $1,950 Brady chisel plow, 11 shank, 3 point hitch, spring reset, new points. . . . . . . . . . $1,950 Kewanee chisel plow, 13 shank, pull type, spring reset and new points. . . . . . . .$2,250 Kuhn FC4000RG disc mower, 13', roll conditioner, gyro hitch, center pivot. . . . .$10,500 (3) Forage King bale baskets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 choice or $6,500 for 3 New Holland 308 side slinger spreader, 2,000 gallon, tandem, flotation tires. . . . $4,500 Tyler fertilizer spreader, 5 ton, stainless tub, tandem axle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,750 18.4 X 38 snap on duals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$750 3,000 gallon poly vertical tank, used for liquid fertilizer and irrigation water storage, 2" valve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,200 1,500 gallon poly vertical tank, used for liquid fertilizer and irrigation water storage, 2" valve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $800 John Deere 400 Rotary hoes 8' and 15'. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$65 and $1,100 (2) 4 row Danish tine cultivators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$950 each

Call - Sam Lincoln 802-793-1206 • sam@swlincoln.com

You can’t afford downtime! Use Dual-Cut Rolls For Peak Performance

Y QUALIT EED T N A GUAR

RACKS ONLY 18’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,100 20’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,200 24’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,700 Bale Grabbers . .$1,800 w/QA incl.

JOHN DEERE no-till 1750 6Row planter w/Unverferth zone till, dry fertilizer, insecticide hoppers, precision planter units completely updated. 518-882-6684

Many New Parts in Stock RECENT MODELS IN FOR SALVAGE:

•6215 burnt •3020 •4240 •L4020 • E3020 syncro • E3020 PS • 4030 • 3010 • 2955 4WD • 2840 • 2630 • 2550 4WD • 830 We Rebuild Your Hydraulic Pumps, SCV Valves, Steering Valves, etc. All Units are Bench Tested Many Used Tractor Parts Already Dismantled CALL FOR YOUR NEEDS

NELSON PARTS Penn Yan, NY

800-730-4020 315-536-3737 Kennedy Tractor (315) 964-1161 Williamstown, NY “We Deliver” ‘04 JD 5520 2x4 w/Deluxe Cab/ Heat/AC/Stereo w/JD LDR, Power Reverser 2500 Hrs, 12 Spd, Dual outlets, Super Clean Inside & out! $26,500; 4x4 Ford NH 555D TLB Factory Heated Cab (also (2) Bkts) Super Clean $17,900; Trojan Loader 1700m Good Tires/Well Maintained $12,900; 4x4 Kubota M8950 Heated Factory Cab 85-90 HP Dsl New Tires, Field Ready $12,900; Int 450 (3) Btm Plows $1,275; Int 451 3pt SB Mower $1,850; Landpride new RCR 2510 10’ Semi Mount Rotary Mower $5,650; 4x4 Landini 8560F Vineyard (Less than 60” wide) 75-80 HP Dsl, Dual Outlets $8,450; 4x4 JD 4200 Heated Cab & 72” JD Belly Mower 25 HP Dsl, Hydro $8,950; 4x4 Kubota B1750 w/ LDR & Belly Mower 20 HP, 800 Hrs., Hydro $7,950; 4x4 Kubota L3410 Heated Cab 34 HP Dsl “Ag” Tires, Hydro $8,900; Lots More

L

Buy 2 or More Any Size Complete Wagon or Just Rack, Take $100 Off the Price of Each! Free Delivery On 3 or More!

Feeders, Headlocks, Round Bale Wrappers, and more! Multiple purchase discs! “Farmer to Farmer” Sales that can’t be beat! Call Today! 802-875-2031

JD BALER PARTS: Used, New Aftermarket and rebuilt. JD canopy new aftermarket, $750. Call for pictures. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705

JOHN DEERE TRACTOR PARTS

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE Farm Equipment

JD 6310 4x4, 640 ldr., $26,000; JD 730 & 530; NH 575 baler w/thrower; NH 315 baler w/thrower; 311 baler; JD 336 baler w/kicker; new Morra 17’ hyd. fold tedder; new Pequea rotary rake; IH plow, 710 4 bottom, 720 4&5 btm reset plows; JD 1600 4 btm. 3pt. hitch plow. Augur Farms, 203-530-4953

Questions? Call us. PH#

K

For Sale: Val-Metal Bale Master(bale chopper), stationary unit, excellent condition, stored inside, 207-437-2554 dennis.mckeen@gmail.com

Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

LOADER, International 2350 w/84” bucket; Agri-Metal belt conveyor, 60’ long, 18” belt; Flyght manure pump, electric, 20hp. 802-864-5382, 802578-7352

Maine e To o North Carolina

Buy New Tractors?

GIVE ME A BREAK Mowing is the easiest Task it’ll ever perform!

PleasantCreekHay.com SANDY DODGE

McCormick MCX140 Power shift, 4WD, cab, AC, quick-tach 810 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38,500 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ‘88 GMC 18’ Platform Dump, Cat Diesel, 53,000 GVW, Lots of Extras, Very Good . . . . . .$11,500 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • New 8x18 Bale Wagon, Steel Sides & Oak Floor, 8 Ton Gear w/11Lx15 Implement Tires, Ready for Field $3,585 *With All Steel Construction .Add $300 •••••••••••••••••• New Running Gear - 3 Ton .$750 6 Ton $900; 8 Ton $1150; 10 Ton $1295 12 Ton Tandem . . . . . . . .$1,995 With 11L by 15 Implement Tubes & Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . .$90 Ea. •••••••••••••••••• Exchange 15” for 16” Wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Plus $15 Ea. Wide Track Gear . . . . . .Plus $60. •••••••••••••••••• Dry Hill Bale Grabbers Round Bale . . . . . . . . . . $1,150 Heavy Duty Round or Square Bale double piston . . . . . $1,795 •••••••••••••••••• 16’ & 20’ Aluminum Ladder Conveyor w/Belt for Hay or Bag Shavings, 120# w/Motor . .$1,450/$1,550 •••••••••••••••••• Morra Tedder 17’, Used .$4,350 New . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,950 Morra Rotary Rake, Tandem 9’ 3pt. Hitch, New . .$4,500 11’ Pull Type, New . .$7,200 Tandem Rake Hitch . . . .$1,850 CIH DCX101 Discbine (Same as NH 1411) . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 CIH SBX540 Baler w/Thrower (Same as NH 575) . . . .$15,500 J&L Hay Saver, Feeders Avail Call Other Sizes Wagons,Tedders, Rakes, Feeders & Gates Available Call SANDY DODGE 668 RT. 12, PLAINFIELD, CT 06374

860-564-2905


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293 Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay - Straw For Sale LARGE SQUARE BALES, processed first & second cut. Call 802-864-5382 or 802578-7352

DRY HAY: Several grades & quality levels available for horse, cow, sheep & goat. Large square, barn stored, no rained-on hay. Also, straw available. Pick up or deliver. Free loading. Fox Valley Vail Farms 518-872-1811

MADE IN AMERICA!!! Dry Round, Square & Wrapped, 1st, 2nd, 3rd & 4th. Delivery available. 845-9857866

DRY ROUND BALES 900 lbs., $20.00 & $25.00 each. 802-537-2435, 802-345-4752

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900 GOOD QUALITY HAY & STRAW. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802849-6266 HAY FOR SALE: First cutting round bales stored outside. Bennington,VT. Delivery available 802-688-3700

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

HAY: Wrapped round bales, 1st, 2nd & 3rd; 1st cutting small squares. Louis 860-8030675

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay - Straw Wanted

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

SECOND CUT Baleage, Alfalfa Grass, 4’ bales, real nice feed, 40 bales per load; First cut round bales, stored inside, cheap feed, not quite horse quality, 40 bale loads. 315737-0820

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

HAY & STRAW

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers Help Wanted

Hay - Straw For Sale

Sales Position Available

STANTON BROTHERS

Due to our sales rep retiring, Country Folks has an opening in Central NY. Applicants must have a basic knowledge of agriculture, reliable transportation, good driving record and be willing to learn. Sales calls to agribusinesses requires an average of 3 days on the road a week with no overnight travel required. If you are interested, contact Bruce Button at Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge NY 13428 or e-mail your resume to bbutton@leepub.com or fax to 518-673-2381

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

518-768-2344 1st cut, 4’x4’ round bales. Mixed grasses, dry hay, stored indoors, not dusty. Call Norm 413-768-8948. Davenport Farm, Shelburne MA 3x3x8 Squares bales. Also 4x5 round bales. Really early cut & timothy hay. All hay stored inside on pallets. Early cut 1st cutting square bales, approx. 58lbs. grass & timothy mix. Picked up or delivered, any amount, large quantity.

518-929-3480 518-329-1321 4’ 2nd cut round bales, $40.00/bale, stored under cover, can load tractor trailers. Mike Quinn, Middlebury,VT 802-388-7828 4X4 ROUND SILAGE BALES, 1st & 2nd cutting, FOB SE Mass. 508-648-3276

Great Opportunities!

Mountain View Equipment, LLC

LOOKING FOR

Agricultural Equipment Sales Person EXPERIENCE PREFERRED Please Apply in Person 1137 Route 7 North Openings in Middlebury Location 802-388-4482 Benefits • EOE

Heating

Lawn & Garden MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

FOR SALE: Corn Stove. 50,000BTU, can be used inside fireplace or by itself. 802-948-2765

Help Wanted

WANTED

Assistant Herd Person

with recent experience doctoring cows. Some assistance in AI breeding on sizeable modern dairy in northern VT. Salary based on experience, housing package possible.

Parts

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

607-642-3293

SEEKING EQUITY PARTNER (S) in New York Dairy Farm. Minority or Majority partner in midsize diary operation. Herd, equipment, or land, or all. Send inquiries to: HedgerowsDairy@gmail.com

STONEHOLM FARM A progressive 700 cow dairy with sites in Putney, VT and Walpole, NH is looking for a HERD MANAGER for our 400 cow dairy in Putney. Qualified applicants must have a strong reproduction background and excellent A.I. skills. They must be up to date in the most modern dairy practices. Duties will include repro, herd health, fresh cow and supply mgt. They must be able to interact and manage employees. Spanish a plus. Housing, health ins., retirement plan. Call Mike at 802-579-4739 or email at gotmilk_vt@yahoo.com

Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Clearview Hatchery PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

(717) 365-3234

Day Old Chicks: Broilers, Layers Turkeys, Ducks

NEPPA Hatchery Jill & Ken Gies 660 Fordsbush Road Ft. Plain, NY 13339 Write or call for prices & availability

518-568-5322 RABBITS: MEAT. Fryers $15.00; Roasters $20-$30. Dutch $30.00; Lopps $30.00. 860-778-8766, Scottland,CT. Will grow to order.

HERDSMAN

Email resume to: lodell364@aol.com

Poultry

email: giespasture@frontiernet.net

Call 802-782-9058 Large strong production dairy operation in central New York looking for experienced, hands on dairy cattle professionals. Demonstrated dairy nutrition, herd health skills, education, people skills and analytical ability. Responsible for improving herd performance by adjusting protocols’ along with setting, communicating and reaching goals with fellow herdsmen, milkers, feeders, nutritionist, and facility personnel. We are competitive on salary and benefits, along with offering a rewarding work environment, a stable schedule, while living in an area offering exceptional quality of life opportunity.

Poultry & Rabbits

THOUSANDS OF AG PARTS available online at www.PaulBparts.com.Sprayer parts include Teejet Nozzles/Tips, Nozzle Bodies, Pumps, GPS Guidance, Foam Markers, and much more. Weasler PTO Driveline Parts available for North American, Italian, and German series. Or call 717-738-7355 ex.275.

Parts & Repair

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS

1-800-836-2888

BATES CORPORATION

To place a Classified Ad

12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

Real Estate For Sale

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS!

1-800-248-2955

CENTRAL VERMONT DAIRY for sale, 394 acres, double 8 parlor, 200+ cow capacity, slurry store, Harvestore, bunk silos. $750,000 firm. Cows, machinery, and feed available. Call 860-836-1524

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

Call the IH Parts Specialists:

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

60 +/- ACRES Located in Central New York All tillable, certifiable farmland, approximately 550’ of frontage. Schools, shopping, medical & Amish less than 2 miles.

Owner financing, asking $99,900 More land available.

315-823-3221

March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 21

Green Haven Open Pollinated Corn Seed. ***Silage, Grain, Wild life plots ***Available Certified Organic ***Early Varieties ***Free Catalog ***Green Haven Open Pollinated Seed Group 607-566-9253 www.openpollinated.com

Hay - Straw For Sale AMARAL FARMS 1st & 2nd cutting good quality hay, round silage bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-4506536


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

Page 22 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com #720 - VERY NICE 250 ACRE DAIRY FARM - 4 miles south of Sangerfield, borders Rte. 12. 170 acres tillable, 50 pasture, 90 woods - 60 tie stall 2 story cow barn with wide fronts, large milk house 2 bulk tanks - 72 stall 2 story heifer/dry cow barn with wide fronts, two barns hooked together, concrete barn yard - 3 concrete silos with black top for unloading wagons. Big 20 room house built by a doctor 150 years ago - new wood/oil furnace - great water supply. Some of the best soils in NEW YORK STATE - . . . . . . . . . . .ASKING $698,000 REDUCED TO $650,000 BIG HOUSE HAS BEEN PAINTED, NEW ROOF, COMPLETELY REMODELED. #40 - DAIRY OF DISTINCTION - Very nice 395 acre river bottom dairy farm w/240 tillable, 70 pasture & 80 woods - 350 ft. stone barn w/108 tie stalls & room for 75 young stock - 1500 gal. B.T. & 2” pipeline - 6 stall garage & 100x25 ft. carriage barn - 4 concrete silos w/unloaders & 40x80 ft. bunk silo - 3 bdrm. brick home & 2 fam. tenant house - also 5 rm. mobile home - 1 lg. pond, 2 springs & 100 ft. well . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $1,500,000 - machinery available. #266 - Nice hobby farm w/35 acres - 10 tillable, 22 pasture & 2 woods - good 6 rm. 3 bdrm. home w/new roof & vinyl siding has oil hot air heat & full cellar - also 64x36 ft. 2 story barn w/high ceilings, new electric service & good upstairs storage area - year around creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$160,000 REDUCED TO $150,000 C-71 - Well-kept 50A. Hobby Farm, recently surveyed; 5A. woods, remainder tillable; 25x56 modular home on slab, 3BR, 2 full baths, central air, new steel roof; drilled well, 28x52 barn used for hay storage; 40x60 heated shop w/two 12’ overhead doors w/openers; 14x32 pole bldg. addition w/overhead doors; 28x38 open pole shed; 14x28 shed w/overhead door; 22x26 storage bldg. This property has a SPECIAL USE VARIANCE PERMIT (Agricultural or Commercial). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $299,000 C-72 - Operating Sheep Farm located in southeast Montgomery County. 204A. total with 104A. forest managed surveyed woodlot. (Last harvested in 2007), 20A. pasture, remainder prime cropland. 36x80 two-story barn, set-up with pens for livestock, 9-crate heated and insulated farrowing room. Additional 30x40 wing off of main barn, 40x80 steel pole barn/large doors, 5 outbuildings; 2-16x21; 2-16x30; 1-12x41. Used for livestock, all with water. Completely remodeled 3200 sq. ft. 200+ yr. old farmhouse. 8 Lg. rooms, 4BR, 2 full baths, jacuzzi, woodstove in kitchen/dining area, fireplace insert for wood in sitting room, additional wood or coal forced-air furnace. Drilled well and pond. Great hunting, woodlot, and cropland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $499,000 C-74 - Dairy farm with 320A. - 500 Jersey size free stalls; set up for a grazing operation, 40 paddocks including laneways and water system; 16 unit Swing Parlor w/4000 gal. tank; additional 2 story 100 tie-stall barn, lg. Morton bldg. w/lg. doors and shop area; 100+ yr. old 2 story farmhouse w/6BR, 2 full baths. Ideal heifer raising operation w/main road access - stream runs through property, one pond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $975,000

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2316 6 - 120 0 acree m/ll Hobbyy Farm situated on a quiet road. 30 acres of farm ground used for pasturing and making hay, two year round streams, balance woods, some timber, lots of firewood, excellent hunting. Good 2 story 4 bedroom farm house inside has been remodeled. New front porch. Good 2 story 30 stall dairy barn, would work well for beef or horses. Good 32x40 shop, concrete floor, and power. Nice building to work on equipment or vehicles. This farm has a great location close to Lake Delta for boating and fishing. Snow mobile and ATV trails close by. Mins to Rome or Utica, shopping and hospitals close by. Nice area to live and farm, handy to everything. d to o $215,000 Death in family forces sale. Price has been reduced This is a great buy on a nice little farm of this size. 2311 1 - Madison n Countyy Farm m - 240 0 acree Farm bordering large State Land and the Brookfield Equine Trail System. 60+ acre tillable mostly hay 70 acres in pasture, balance woods. Older 2 story barn for 70 head of cattle. 2 out buildings for machinery storage. Older 2 story 5 bedroom home. Excellent hunting. Sits on a very quiet road with lots of possibilities. Raise beef or horses. Excellent hay making

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MAR 19 2012 Winter Hops Conference Sheraton Hotel & Conference Center, Burlington, VT. On Internet at www.uvm.edu/ extension/agriculture/?Page =hopsconference.html

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Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

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Tractor Parts

Trucks

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

1987 LN8000 10 wheel dump truck, 17’ body, $9,500; 1985 LN8000, 6 wheel 18’ platform dump, $2,900. 978-544-6105

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Trailers

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TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

2004 FORD F350 Lariat, 4 door, AWD, dually pickup. Excellent shape, 66,000 one owner miles. Many options including leather seats, sunroof, V10 w/6spd. trans., setup for gooseneck, $25,000. 802-468-5166

Real Estate For Sale

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15 farm. Road frontage on two roads. Farm could be easily sub-divided for investment. Gas and Mineral rights convey. Owners are relocating their dairy operation to another area this spring and have priced this farm very reasonable to move it. Priced to sell . .Askingg $310,000

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week

16

8 - Otsego o County.. 135 5 acree farm & Treee nursery, 30 acres 2318 of planted nursery stock pine and deciduous trees, 50 acres in fields, balance woods and pasture. Good 2 story barn for hay storage stalls for about 50 head of cattle. 40x60 machinery shed. Good 2 story 5 bdrm home, interior has been completely remolded. This a beautiful farm 1/4 mile of frontage on a beautiful river, fishing and canoeing, lots of water fowl. Excellent deer and turkey hunting. Priced to sell . 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg 299,900 2321 1 - Oneida Countyy farm with Partially New home. Situated on a quiet road. 70 acres of land 35 tillable good well drained soils, 20 acres in fence, balance woods some timber lots of fire wood. Good 2 story 50 stall dairy barn. 30x100 machinery shed, 24x40 calf and heifer barn, 24x36 machinery shop building. New 2 story home with 5 bdrms just built needs some finishing touch. This farm would make a good little dairy or beef farm with lots of land close by to rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $225,000 9 - Northern n Schohariee Countyy Land. Close to the Town of 2309 Ames, NY. 170 acres +/- situated on a quiet road. 90+ acres tillable good soils and decent size fields. 40 acres of pasture balance woods. Lots of road frontage. Would make a nice property to build, run beef or horses, make hay. Reasonable taxes around $2,000 a year. Good investment property. Local farmers willing to rent this land which would more than pay the taxes. Good deer and turkey hunting. Easy to get to from Rt 90 or I88. 45 mins to downtown Albany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $250,000 MAR 20 Farm Pricing Strategy Clinic UVM Extension Offices. Free one day clinic to provide hands-on opportunities to learn about various cost based pricing techniques using your own production and financial data. Call 802223-2389 ext. 203 or e-mail newfarmer@uvm.edu. On

Internet at www.uvm.edu/ farmpricing/sign-2012pricing-clinics Massachusetts Farmers’ Market Managers Professional Development Seminar Hoagland-Pincus Conference Center, 222 Maple Ave, Shrewsbury, MA. Speakers, networking and plenty of discussion. Contact Martha

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1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week 1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week

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1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week 1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week

22

(607)) 334-97277

David C. Posson, Broker

Roofing

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1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week 1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

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1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week 1 Week $12.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.85 per zone per week 1 Week $13.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.15 per zone per week

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1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week 1 Week $13.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.75 per zone per week 1 Week $14.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $13.05 per zone per week

Sweet, 781-893-8222. MAR 22 Beginning Woman Farmer Conference; Exploring Whole Farm Planning University of Massacusetts, Amherst, Lincoln Campus Center. Two day conference with 28 sessions to learn about Holistic Management Whole Farm planning. Vermont farmers can contact Jessie Scmidt at newfarmer@uvm.edu for conference details, travel and lodging. On Internet at holisticmanagement.org/con ferencebwfne Vermont Food Safety Stakeholder Summit Lake Morey Resort, Fairlee, VT. Contact Elizabeth Wirsing, 802-951-0109 or e-mail Elizabeth.Wirsing@state.vt.us or Ginger.Nickerson@uvm.edu MAR 24 CT Agriculture Commission Conference EastConn, 376 Hartford Turnpike, Hampton, CT. 9 am - 3:30 pm. $15. Includes farm to table lunch & conference materials. Register before March 15, space is limited. Contact Jennifer Kaufman, 860-450-6007 or e-mail AGvocate@yahoo.com Growing Farms in Your Community Conference EastConn, 376 Hartford Turnpike, Hampton, CT. 9 am - 3:30 pm. $15. Includes

farm to table lunch conference & conference materials. Register prior to March 15. Space is limited. Jr. Iron Chef VT Champlain Valley Expo, 105 Pearl St., Essex Junction, VT. For middle & high school students from all across Vermont. Teams of 3-5 students will each have 90 minutes to create a dish using seasonal, local foods that is also delicious, nutritious and can be served in school cafeterias. Contact Libby McDonald, 802-434-4122 or e-mail info@jrironchefvt.org. On Internet at www. jrironchefvt.org MAR 24-25 New Hampshire Preservation Alliance Old House & Barn Expo Center of NH/Radisson Hotel, Manchester, NH. 9 am - 5 pm. Over 100 exhibitors, educational sessions and demonstrations. Contact NH Preservation Alliance, 603224-2281. MAR 31 3rd Annual Statewide Conference Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT. Registration before March 27 $50 members, $65 non-members. After March 27, $75 members, $90 nonmembers. Contact Joan Nichols, 860-768-1100 or email joan@cfba.org.


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March 19, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 23

NOW AVAILABLE IN DIGITAL FORMAT


Salem Farm Supply 5109 State Rte 22, Salem, NY 12865 1-800-999-3276 • (518) 854-7424 fax (518) 854-3057 Web www.SalemFarmSupply.com Email parts@salemfarmsupply.com

Lubricants 55 gallon drums • 5 gallon pails 2 1/2 gallon containers Oil prices have been on an upward rise for years. Now is the chance to save. Please call for pricing!

Page 24 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • March 19, 2012

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CF New England 3.19.12