Issuu on Google+

20 February 2012 Section One of Three Volume 29 Number 48

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

$1.99

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Vermont 4-H event tests knowledge of all things equine ~ Page 5

Featured Columnist:

Achieve the life and profit you want ~ Page 2

Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly C1 Crop Comments A9 Focus on Ag A7 Moo News A13 Auctions B1 Classifieds B18 Farmer to Farmer A28 Trucks A6 DHIA / Dairy

“This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins.” 1 John 4:10


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Achieve the life and profit you want by Sanne Kure-Jensen “Achieve the life you want, and be profitable.” This is the mantra of Holistic Management. “It’s all about goal setting and then measuring all decisions against whether the outcome will move you closer or further from that goal,” said Seth Wilner, farmer and University of New Hampshire Extension Educator specializing in Whole Farm Planning. According to Wilner, there is plenty of training out there for sustainable practices, farm economics and business planning but very little training available that combines these topics and adds a focus on the quality of farmers’ lives. In January Wilner led the second workshop in a four-part Holistic Management (HM) series at the University of Rhode Island. These hands-on, interactive workshops help farmers accomplish more and enjoy their chosen work. “There are at least 30,000 ways to lose money in farming and at least 500 ways to make money; this process will help you select profitable ways to yield you the life you want,” said Wilner. Set Goals How do you want to live your life on your farm? Sometimes it is easier to figure out what depletes you — like feeling tired, achy or making low (or no) profits. Consider what makes you happy or energized — like time with family or taking a vacation. Think about what photographs are on your refrigerator, decorating your walls or in your wallet. These people or places are important or inspire you. If you were to describe your farm or business to a potential visitor or customer, what would you be proud to tell them? These are the strengths of your farm or business. Wilner suggests you and your farm or business partners and family members, develop a Values or Quality of Life Statement for your farm, business and family. This list of values might include: being my own boss, working outside, caring for animals, teaching others (family and staff), contributing to the community/volunteer work, etc. Describe your ideal economic situation such as: having enough for family needs, being debt free, retiring at a comfortable level, travel at least two weeks each year, making donations to charity, etc. List desired relationships with family, staff, friends, community and reputation. Describe physical, mental and/or spiritual health goals, being pain free, teaching or learning new things or valuing your religious community. This process helps you make decisions that move you towards your goal and target life with increased happiness, higher productivity, pride in your work, profitability and a sense of accomplishment. Not all decisions can move you forward, directly towards your goal; life is not so perfect. Holistic Management will help people recognize when a decision they are making will take them away from their goal. Every farm or business decision affects others: farm partners, staff, family, vendors and customers as well as the animals, crops, land and environment. Consider efficient capital and resource uses in your production cycle. Make

Farmer and University of New Hampshire Extension Educator Seth Wilner, who specializes in Whole Farm Planning, presented the second class in a four-part series on holistic management. Photo by Sanne Kure-Jansen choices based on the best Return on Investment (ROI) of time and money. Factor in the impact on your farm, soils, landscape and even your view. Consider the sustainable use of your farm, the environment and your energy resources. And, don’t forget to listen to your gut feelings. Aim for Goals Using the Quality of Life or Values Statement, identify the behaviors, policies, practices, and infrastructure your farm needs to achieve or implement each of these. Typical examples can include: effective time management, conflict resolution, organizational and recordkeeping systems, disaster/risk management system, effective leadership and an effective outreach /marketing system. Implement policies, practices and behaviors and create infrastructure that bring you towards your life goals. Think about implementing a weekly farm meeting if you want to improve communications. If you value teaching others, you might establish a regular day each week or month where you get together with staff, children or students. If you value good health, you might get better tractor seats or ergonomic tools. If you value more profit from your farm, you might hire a bookkeeper to help you keep more thorough records so you can better evaluate each enterprise. If you value a connection to the land and environment, you might schedule a regular walk around the farm with a camera and field guide. Confront Barriers to Reaching Your Goals Not having enough money or time are the standard excuses for not implementing these policies and practices. The reality is farmers do everything. We plant, grow, fix equipment, invent, build, paint, bake/cook, market/sell, keep our records, make deliveries, etc. Sometimes we resist hiring others because we think we can do it ourselves. Step back and think about whether someone else who specializes

in that type of work might do a better or faster job allowing you to do other tasks you enjoy more or can do better. This might apply to hiring a mechanic, serviceman, painter, bookkeeper or delivery driver. Consider All Available Resources Look at all the resources at your disposal now and potential resources you will need to achieve your life goals. This can include how you wish to be seen by others (honest, reputable, progressive, etc.) Consider every available resource including: 1. People (who influence or are influenced by your decisions): farm staff, neighbors, ag professionals, bankers, customers, vendors, etc. 2. Natural: tillable acreage, forests, ponds, streams, etc. 3. Material: equipment, buildings, livestock, computers, electronics, etc. 4. Marketing/networks: Chamber of Commerce, FSA, PTAs, trade associations, etc. 5. Skills: mechanical, carpentry, marketing, web/computer, etc. 6. Financial streams: available funds for farm management: farm income, offfarm income, lines of credit, savings accounts, etc. 7. Community: ag-support systems like equipment dealers/repair, ag-friendly zoning, large animal vets, feed stores, farmers markets/sales venues, etc. Imagine you inherited the farm or think about a future landscape/farmscape and potential changes to your land with annual or permanent crops, rotations and natural habitat such as hedgerows, meadows, woods or wetlands. These factors all help guide Action Plans which lead you towards your goal. Wilner acknowledges that agricultural practices Do and WILL disturb land. ”By knowing how you want your land to look well into the future, you can assess whether your disturbances (clearing woodland, plowing, planting perennial crops, etc) are moving your farm in your desired direction.” Consider how to manage and fund

efforts toward this ideal farm over time. Make Decisions There are many familiar ways to gather data and make choices including: 1. Research and solicit opinions. 2. Assess pros and cons with paper or spreadsheet and assign points to each item. 3. Crunch numbers 4. Explore alternatives 5. Listen to gut feelings. Holistic Management uses seven test questions to increase the probability that your decision will move you toward your whole farm goal and be socially, environmentally and economically sustainable. 1. If there is a problem, will this action address the root cause of the problem? To assess the root cause, state the problem and ask “why”? Keep asking ‘why’ until you know the answer. 2. What is the weakest link? a. Social weak link — will the action you are considering adversely affect other people? b. Biological weak link - what is the weakest link in the lifecycle of the organism to be controlled or protected. c. Chain of production - prioritize your investments in the weakest link in that production chain. 3. What is the marginal reaction? What action will make the greatest impact or have the highest ROI in terms of time and/or money? 4. What is the projected Gross Profit? Subtract the Direct or Variable Costs from the Projected Revenue (per acre or other consistent unit). This is the Contribution or Return Toward Overhead. 5. Is this a sustainable action? Will it aim your farm or business toward your future goal(s) for the land, environment, family and financial resources? 6. Where will the money and energy come from, and is everyone comfortable about tapping these resources? Will the project be using farm equity loans, lines of credit, off-farm income or savings? Does it solve a ‘want’ or a ‘need’? Only continue the project or action if all family members and partners are comfortable. 7. What does your gut tell you? If the proposed project passes all the other tests but fails here, don’t go ahead. You may discover missing information and need to gather more data. If a project or action passes these seven tests, it is very likely to move you towards your whole farm goal. Often this process points out areas where you need more information. If the action doesn’t pass some or all tests, you can proactively mitigate potential problems. Wilner notes, “In the end all we should ask of ourselves is to make the best decisions we can with the information we have at that time. Recognize that situations change, and sometimes goals and objectives have to be adjusted to what life offers us. If we are aware of our decision making process, even if external pressures or circumstances force us to make decisions that we know will move us away from our Holistic or Whole Farm Goal, we will be aware that we are taking an action moving us in a direction away from our life goal and we can try to mitigate this in the future.”


Vermont 4-H event tests knowledge of all things equine

Top finishers in the senior division of the horse hippology contest held Feb. 4 in Lyndonville, VT, show off their rosette ribbons. From left to right are Brianna Bergh, Morgan; Miranda Wright, St. Johnsbury; Sarah Croteau, Newport; Kaila Stewart, Waterford; Sarah Garcia, Littleton, N.H.; Madison Wood, Concord; and India Braun, West Glover. Photo courtesy of UVM Extension 4-H Johnsbury; Madeleine Desrochers, St. Johnsbury; Jaime Wood, Waterford; and Myra Boulanger, St. Johnsbury. Alexandra Remington, St. Johnsbury, and Hannah Wagner, Sutton, also participated. Fourteen years old and up: Giovi Mier, St. Johnsbury; Kaila Stewart, Waterford; Madison Wood, Concord;

USDA awards Massachusetts $400K for specialty crop grants BOSTON — Officials from the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR) announced Feb. 13 that $400,000 will be made available to specialty crop producers through funding from the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Specialty Crop Block Grant Program. The grants will help strengthen the market for Massachusetts specialty crops such as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops. With the awarding of these grants, DAR is beginning the Request for Response (RFR) process. “Massachusetts agriculture plays an important role through access to nutrition and improved quality of life in both the physical and mental wellbeing of our residents as well as the strength of our economy,” said DAR Commissioner Scott J. Soares. “This funding will strengthen the Massachusetts agricultural economy by jump starting new markets, creating job opportunities and promoting greater access to safe, locally grown food.” The Specialty Crop Block Grant Program supports initiatives that: • Increase specialty crop nutritional knowledge and consumption; • Improvements to distribution system efficiency and reduced operating costs;

• Promote the development of good agricultural handling and manufacturing practices; • Support research through standard and green initiatives; • Enhance food safety; • Develop new or improved seed varieties and specialty crops; • Control pests and diseases; • Create organic and sustainable production practices; • Establish local and regional fresh food systems; and • Expand food access in underserved communities. DAR solicits proposals through a competitive RFR process. All agricultural organizations, including beginning farmers, commodity groups, individuals, agricultural organizations, colleges and universities, producers, municipalities, state agencies and agricultural nonprofits are all eligible for this grant program, provided their proposals meet all the specifications in the Department’s RFR and the USDA’s Notice of Federal Assistance. The RFR and all necessary documents, proposal submission requirements and deadlines can be found at www.mass.gov/agr/markets/specialty_crop_block_grant_program.htm and on the Commonwealth’s E-procurement website Comm-pass at www.comm-pass.com.

Brianna Bergh, Morgan; Sarah Garcia, Littleton, N.H.; and Miranda Wright, St. Johnsbury. India Braun, West Glover, and Sarah Croteau, Newport, also competed in the senior division. Horse Quiz Bowl winners, by age group, ranked first through last place, are: Eight and 9 years old: James Wood,

Concord; Molly Young, St. Johnsbury; Dairus Kapoukranidis, St. Johnsbury; and Allie Cloutier, Barton. Ten and 11 years old: Jada Rosemark, Sheffield; Abby Bliss, St. Johnsbury; Chelsea Carcoba, Danville; Katie Stone, St. Johnsbury; and Bridget Webber, West Burke. Twelve and 13 years old: Lindsay Wood, Concord; Pauleena Kapoukranidis, St. Johnsbury; Grace Miller, Glover; Madeleine Desrochers, St. Johnsbury; Jaime Wood, Waterford; and Myra Boulanger, St. Johnsbury. Other participants in this age group included Alexandra Remington, St. Johnsbury, and Hannah Wagner, Sutton. Fourteen years old and up: India Braun, West Glover; Madison Wood, Concord; Sarah Garcia, Littleton, N.H.; Kaila Stewart, St. Johnsbury; Sarah Croteau, Newport; and Miranda Wright, St. Johnsbury. Brianna Bergh, Morgan, also competed in this division. Britanny Webber of West Glover, a 4H Cloverbud from the Horsefeathers 4H Club in Barton, also participated but was not age-eligible to compete for ribbons in the horse hippology contest or quiz bowl. For more information about 4-H in Caledonia and Lamoille counties, contact Lindsay Jones at 802-751-8310, ext. 357. For Essex and Orleans counties, contact Lindy Birch at 802-3347235, ext. 481.

Sign-up for monetary assistance for conservation programs TOLLAND, CT — Want to do your part to make our world a little better? You can help protect animals, soil, water, plants, and the air by working with your local USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) office. If you own or rent land, you may qualify to apply for our programs. Jay T. Mar, NRCS State Conservationist for Connecticut, reminds potential applicants that these federal programs provide financial and technical assistance to farmers and forest land owners. Programs include the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP), and Agricultural Management Assistance Program (AMA). Landowners may submit applications any time throughout the year; however this year NRCS offers ranking periods with closing dates of March 30, and June 1. All completed applications will be batched and ranked for funding. For an application to be considered complete, the following criteria apply: All land and producer eligibility requirements must have been met; A conservation plan identifying conservation practices to be included for proposed funding must be finalized for the enrolled land. Incomplete applications will be deferred to the next ranking period. “We strongly encourage landowners

to work with their local NRCS field office to be sure that they don’t miss any opportunities, and ensure application’s are complete,” said Mar. Three national initiatives will also be available through EQIP including organic production, seasonal high tunnels for crop production and onfarm energy conservation. Applicants compete only among other farmers in the same funding pools. The New England/New York Forestry Initiative will be offered to non-industrial, private forest landowners to implement forest management plans on their land. Funds for this will be available through EQIP and WHIP. The 2008 Farm Bill provides additional incentives for farmers who are just beginning, have limited resources, or are socially disadvantaged because they belong to racial or ethnic groups that have historically been subjected to prejudice. Such farmers can receive up to 90 percent of the costs associated with planning and implementing conservation measures; up to 30 percent of expected costs may be provided in advance. For more information, visit www.ct.nrcs.usda.gov/programs or contact your nearest USDA Field Office: Danielson — 860-779-0557; Hamden — 203-287-8038; Norwich — 860-887-3604; Torrington — 860626-8258; Windsor — 860-688-7725.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

LNYDONVILLE, VT — Twenty-seven youth from 4-H equine clubs in Caledonia, Essex and Orleans counties recently participated in regional horse hippology and quiz bowl competitions. The University of Vermont Extension-sponsored event was held Feb. 4 at Lyndon Town School in Lyndonville. In addition to competing for ribbons, the 4-H youths also gained valuable practice for the State Horse Quiz Bowl on March 10 and the State Horse Hippology Contest on April 14. During the morning, the 4-H’ers participated in hippology contests, which included a written test, slide show quiz and completion of tasks related to equine projects. Horse Quiz Bowl rounds took place in the afternoon. Hippology winners, by age group, listed first through last place, included: Eight and 9 years old: James Wood, Concord; Allie Cloutier, Barton; Dairus Kapoukranidis, St. Johnsbury; and Lily Wagner, West Burke. Ten and 11 years old: Jada Rosemark, Sheffield; Katie Stone, St. Johnsbury; Chelsea Carcoba, Danville; Abby Bliss, St. Johnsbury; Bridget Webber, West Burke; and Devin Brown, Sutton. Twelve and 13 years old: Lindsay Wood, Concord; Grace Miller, Glover; Pauleena Kapoukranidis, St.


Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

A floor price is needed under falling milk prices Several National and multi-state organizations have sent a letter to all members of the United States Congress urging them to place a floor price of $20 per cwt (hundredweight) under all milk used for manufacturing dairy products. The $20 price will be a temporary price until a permanent dairy bill is written that will give dairy farmers the real price they deserve. The National Family Farm Coalition, the National Farmers Union, the National Dairy Producers Organization, and the food and water organizations are some of the National organizations that are spear-heading the efforts to achieve the $20 price. The National Farmers Organization supports the $20 price, but they feel we need a supply management program to go with the $20 price. I whole-heartedly agree with NFO, and the milk supply management program in S-1640 (The Federal Milk Marketing Improvement Act of 2011

Letter to the Editor Opinions of the letters printed are not necessarily those of the staff or management at Country Folks. E-mail letters of opinion to jkarkwren@leepub.com or fax to 518-673-2699, or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428.

would be something to work for). However, for the present time let’s go for the $20 floor price. Several multi-state organizations like Pro-Ag, Family Farm Defenders, ARMPA, several local Granges in Pennsylvania, and many others have signed onto the letter. In my opinion we can’t sit around and watch prices paid to dairymen drop anywhere near the level of 2009. Remember the average price paid to dairy farmers in Federal Order #1 was $13.01 per cwt (hundred weight) in 2009. According to USDA figures the all milk price in 2009 was $12.80 per hundred-weight. Again, according to

Cover photo The mantra of Holistic Management is it’s all about goal setting and then measuring all decisions against whether the outcome will move you closer or further from that goal

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470 Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas ................................................Albany, NY ................................................518-456-0603 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

the USDA’s figures the average cost of producing milk in 2009 was $22.28 per hundred weight. When you subtract the all milk price of $12.80 from the average cost of production, then the figures are very clear. The loss to the average dairy farm was $9.40 per hundred weight. The USDA figures indicate the total amount of milk produced and marketed in 2009 was 189.3 Billion pounds which illustrated a total loss to dairy farmers of 17.8 Billion dollars. (This only indicated the losses and not anything towards a profit). These are astronomical losses. I hope all dairy farmers and organiza-

tions will support the efforts of all these fine organizations that want to prevent the losses that dairy farmers will be experiencing in 2012. To further illustrate the potential losses to the American dairy farmer; the Chicago Mercantile Exchange’s (CME) latest estimates for the future prices for cheese are: February $16.10 per hundred weight March $15.54 April $15.70 Of course these figures are subject to change. However, there certainly is the possibility of the all milk price (across the United States) going under $16 per hundred weight (cwt). Everyone should join in and help to prevent the bloodbath that is on its way. I can be reached at 570-833-5776. Arden Tewksbury, Progressive Agriculture Organization, Meshoppen, PA

New app for smartphones provides access to soil survey information TOLLAND, CT — A new smartphone app to access soil survey information is now available as a free download for both iPhone and Android users. Called SoilWeb, the app combines online soil survey information with the GPS capabilities of smartphones. SoilWeb is a portable version of the UC Davis California Soil Resource Lab’s web-based interface to digital soil survey data from USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Because the app provides soil survey information in a mobile form, it is particularly useful for those working in the field. NRCS introduced the Web Soil Survey (WSS), an online tool for accessing soils information, a few years ago. It is great for users of soils information — engineers, developers, farmers and many others — because it provides quick access to the most current data produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. Until recently, a disadvantage of Web-based soil survey formats was that user access was limited to desktop computers with an Internet connection. That reason is why soil scientist Dr. Dylan Beaudette, while still an undergraduate with UC Davis

California Soil Resource Lab, collaborated with NRCS to develop the app. SoilWeb can retrieve a graphic summary of soil types in response to a user inquiry in the form of soil profile sketches. Each profile sketch shows soil horizons (often compared to a vertical ice cream sandwich) made up of layers of soil. Soil names, locations and taxonomic categories are also shown. Clicking on soil sketches sends the user to the corresponding Official Series Description, a user-friendly narrative of commonly used soil properties such as horizon depths, colors, texture, and rock fragment content. Clicking on a soil name, listed above each sketch, provides the user with a more detailed description including physical and chemical properties, definitions and links to a variety of environmental databases. This means that a farmer, rancher or even a backyard gardener could use a smartphone to gain an understanding of the soil type in the surrounding landscape. Soil health is a key factor in the success of plants — the type of soil determines what nutrients are needed, as well as how much water should be applied.

No warning required for raw milk PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Dairy farmers won’t be required to warn consumers about the health risks of raw milk they sell at Portland’s farmers markets. The city council voted Feb. 6 not to amend city ordinances governing the markets, essentially allowing the sale of unpasteurized milk without displaying a placard or providing handouts to consumers detailing the risks. Councilor John Anton said amending the law would be “unfair and

arbitrary.” The city’s health department had recommended the warnings, citing information on the health risks of raw milk from federal officials. Dairy farmer Heather Donahue says people seeking raw milk are already well-informed about the product. The Portland Press Herald reports that the council also approved the sales of malt liquor, hard cider and wine at farmers markets.


Cheshire County 4-H’ers compete in state Horse Quiz Bowl

Cheshire County 4-H members who participated in the Horse Quiz Bowl are Connor Greenwood, Leah Varney, Elizabeth Morris, Nicholas Shepard, and coach Dorothy Crosby. Seniors who participated in the contest included Elizabeth Morris, Connor Greenwood and Leah Varney from Minis Too! 4-H club; along with Nicholas Shepard of Ultimate

Equestrians. Patrick Roberts, Kaitlin Roberts and Megan Hebert from SMS Green Eggs club also competed; with a 4H’er from Coos County as a member of their team. The

senior teams placed fourth and seventh. In the individual division, Leah Varney placed first and Elizabeth Morris placed sixth. Leah and Elizabeth both qual-

ified as a finalist for a position on the New Hampshire Horse Quiz Bowl Team which will compete in the National contest in the fall. Juniors competing in the contest included Deanna Maxfield and Hannah Stanley from Ultimate Equestrians, Anna Cook, from Swanzey Saddles, and Emily Perry from SMS Green Eggs. This team placed second in the contest. Hannah Stanley was third in the individual portion while Deanna Maxfield was sixth. The team of Emma Kelley from Ultimate Equestrians and Veronica Parker from SMS Green Eggs placed fifth. Coaches for this event included Dorothy Crosby from Stoddard, NH, and Clara Lane from Surry, NH. Other Cheshire County volunteers assisting at the event included Karen Nass-Swanzey, scoring; Susan Lawson-KelleherChesterfield, judge; Rebecca and Sarah Vogel-Acworth were also judges for the event. This event is made possible with support from the 4-H Foundation of New Hampshire.

Vermont legislature considers Business skills retreat scheduled Interested in improving your farm’s Motor Inn, or $50 for those making ID cards for farm workers production record keeping? Want to other lodging arrangements. Lunch MONTPELIER, VT (AP) — As some states crack down on illegal immigrants, Vermont lawmakers are discussing creating a guest worker program that would include state IDs for the estimated 1,500 to 2,000 immigrants who work on Vermont dairy farms and who officials say have become critical to the struggling industry. There’s already a federal guest worker program for seasonal farm workers and for ski resort employees, said state Sen. Jeanette White, D-Windham, sponsor of the bill, on Thursday. The University of Vermont has visiting professors that don’t seem to have problems, she said. “So it just seemed a little bit unfair to me,” she told the Senate Agriculture Committee on Thursday. Because their business is yearround, dairy farms aren’t eligible for workers under the temporary visa worker programs used by farmers raising apples and other crops. Immigration is a federal issue, “But I think that in Vermont doing something against the federal (government) has never stopped us before. We seem to be willing to do it if it’s the right thing to do,” she said. Immigrant farm workers now face discrimination, fears of deportation and a lack of services, advocates say. Migrant Justice, formerly called the VT Migrant Farmworker Solidarity Project, has shared the proposal with the farm worker community, who is

thankful for it and sees it as a positive step, said Danilo Lopez, a member of the organization, through a translator. “What we see in this law in terms of the concrete benefits to be recognized as residents with the same rights and access to the different services as anyone without having fear of discrimination,” said Lopez, a former farm worker from Mexico, who was detained by state police during a traffic stop. The stop led Vermont’s governor to change the state police policy on dealing with suspected illegal immigrants, clarifying that troopers will not ask an individual about his or her immigration status when investigating a civil violation — mainly a traffic stop — but can ask about it in investigations of criminal offenses or suspicious activity in certain cases. The bill would create a state identification card for the workers and a registry of those workers that would allow them to be eligible for state services. White suggested that a cap could be set on the number of workers allowed based on the number needed by dairy farms. Concerns were raised about what state agency would keep the registry of workers and issue the identifications. White, who said she had talked to a member of the state police who supported the idea, suggested the Department of Public Safety. Others suggested the secretary of state’s office.

connect with your customers on Facebook? Lacking the time and expertise to learn these skills? Then participate in a Farm Business Skills Weekend Retreat Friday evening, March 9, through noon, Sunday, March 11, hosted by the Maine Sustainable Agricultural Society and Knowledge Transfer Alliance. The retreat will be held in the Gazebo Room of the Bangor Motor Inn, Hogan Road, Bangor. The goal of the Weekend Retreat is to teach farmers — individuals and partners — how to use business management tools for budgeting, record keeping and creating on-line networking, as well as learning from each other. The cost of the Weekend Retreat is $190 for those lodging at the Bangor

and dinner on Saturday, as well as snacks and refreshments throughout the weekend, will be provided. Those attending are asked to bring a wireless laptop with their version of Quickbooks or any other relevant software. Other material such as Excel files will be provided to download and update for each farm. If you do not have a laptop, one can be provided for your use during the workshops. To register, or for more information, contact Andrew Files of the Maine Sustainable Agricultural Society at 207-843-7581 or afiles@meas.org. It is requested that no children or pets be brought to the retreat. For questions concerning workshop materials, contact Aaron Hoshide at 207-945-6830 or aaron.hoshide@umit.maine.edu.

Beginning farmer series planned AUGUSTA, ME — Interested in starting a farm? Getting information at the outset can put you on the road to success by saving you time, money, and energy. University of Maine Cooperative Extension will offer a five-session Beginning Farmer Series in Waldo starting March 13. Classes will be held on Thursdays from 6:30 to 9 p.m. UMaine Extension Educators Rick Kersbergen and Caragh Fitzgerald will collaborate with farmers and other experts from around the region to present this series. Novice farmers will be given the tools to evaluate and choose enterprises, develop a business

plan, and market their products. Cost is $60 per farm and includes course books and other program materials. Registration ends March 7. For more information, contact Caragh Fitzgerald at 207-622-7546, 800-287-1481 (toll free in Maine), TDD 800-287-8957, or cfitzgerald@maine.edu. UMaine Extension programs are open and accessible to all in accordance with program goals. Any person with a disability who needs accommodations for this program should contact Caragh Fitzgerald at 800-2871481 to discuss their needs at least seven days in advance.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

4-H members from Cheshire County recently participated in the New Hampshire State 4H Horse Quiz Bowl held in Belmont, NH. Quiz Bowl is similar to the game show Jeopardy except all the questions relate to animals. Questions can relate to breeds, history, health and diseases, genetics, reproduction, showing and conformation, anatomy and physiology, equipment, and the animal industry and its products. Teams are made up of three or four 4-H members. Points are given or lost by accuracy of responses and the speed at which answers are given. Quiz Bowl provides 4-H’ers with a positive opportunity to build their knowledge of various subjects related to their animal and demonstrate their skill related to this 4-H project. Quiz Bowl offers a competitive setting where sportsmanship, friendliness and fairness are the goals. It also allows 4-H’ers to develop critical thinking skills, self-confidence, self-discipline, teamwork, and public speaking skills.


U.S. Department of Transportation’s proposed budget invests $74 billion in safe, efficient, and innovative transportation programs

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Investments support President Obama’s plan to boost economic development and create an America ‘Built to Last’ U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood on Feb. 13 praised President Obama’s $74 billion budget for the U.S. Department of Transportation. These funds will lay a new foundation for economic growth and competitiveness by investing in our national infrastructure network, building on recent safety achievements, and modernizing our transportation systems through research and innovation.

“President Obama’s budget for the Department of Transportation reflects our commitment to investing in an America that is built to last,” said Secretary LaHood. “A strong American economy depends on the roadways, runways, and railways that move people and goods from coast to coast and around the globe. President Obama’s plan will enable us to build the American infrastructure we need for tomorrow while putting people back to work today.” The centerpiece of the President’s FY 2013 budget for the Department is a six-year $476

billion surface transportation reauthorization proposal that will improve America’s highways and transit networks, continue to ensure that these systems are safe, and give travelers new options new options by enhancing and expanding passenger rail service. This proposed budget would be fully paid for using half the six-year savings achieved from ramping down the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with the other half used to pay down the national debt. In order to strengthen the backbone of America’s transportation net-

work, the 6-year budget includes $305 billion to rebuild America’s roads and bridges, a 34 percent increase over the previous authorization. The new budget also reaffirms Secretary LaHood’s strong commitment to maintaining the highest safety standards for Americans traveling by any mode of transportation. While road, transit, and air travel are currently the safest they have ever been in America, the Department will build on previous successes to make them even safer. To accomplish that goal, the budget provides nearly $30 billion over the

sued this statement: “We are disappointed by the committee’s vote today to remove the truck weight reform language from the highway bill under consideration in the House Transportation Committee. As dairy farmers and members of dairy cooperatives, we are affected every day by transportation policies that do not reflect the

needs and demands of today’s commercial environment. Building on the overwhelming success of pilot programs in Maine and Vermont, which Congress recently extended for an additional 20 years, truck weight reform has proven to be a responsible approach to raising truck weight limits. This allows American businesses to meet con-

grams, and technological solutions to address our transportation challenges and ensure that America remains competitive in the global marketplace. A budget summary document is available at www.dot.gov/budget/2013/dot_budget_high lights_fy_2013.pdf.

SPECIAL OF THE WEEK

Used 2011 PJ Tilt

NMPF statement on the markup of the American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act ARLINGTON, VA – The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee voted on Feb. 2 to remove truck weight reform language from the American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act, also known as the highway bill. Following the vote, National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) President and CEO Jerry Kozak is-

next six years for surface transportation safety programs, an increase of 137 percent over the previous authorization. This includes $330 million over six years for the Department’s ongoing campaign against distracted driving. The Administration’s budget also prioritizes research, innovative pro-

Trucks

sumer demand with fewer trucks, removing unnecessary congestion from the roads, lessening our dependence on fossil fuels, reducing our carbon footprint and improving shipping productivity. We need reform now, not after a three year study.”

102” x 26’ (22’ tilt + 4’ stationary deck), power up/down with self contained hydraulics, 17000lb GVW, electric brakes, LED lights, locking toolbox, 2 jacks, very little use

$

7,200

Prices valid till 2/27/12 Cash Only

Midlakes Trailer Sales “We’ll hook you up” 1595 Yale Farm Rd., Romulus, NY 14541

Toll Free 888-585-3580 ~ 315-585-6411

TRADE SHOW OPPORTUNITIES • KEYSTONE FARM SHOW • January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

• VIRGINIA FARM SHOW • Jan. 19, 20 & 21, 2012 • Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-3 Augusta Expoland • Fishersville, VA

• BIG IRON EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• EMPIRE STATE FRUIT & VEG EXPO • Jan. 24, 25 & 26 2012 Oncenter Convention Center • Syracuse, NY

• HARD HAT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO EXHIBIT AT OR ATTEND ANY OF THESE SHOWS

CALL 800-218-5586 www.leetradeshows.com • mwhite@leepub.com


Farmers reach out to consumers during Food Check-Out Week by Cyndie Sirekis As they have done for the past decade and a half, farmer and rancher members of many local Farm Bureaus will reach out to consumers in their communities during Food Check-Out Week (Feb. 19-25 this year). The official theme of the week is “Stretching Your Grocery Dollar With Healthy, Nutritious Food.” The theme reflects the continuing reality that many Americans are feeling an economic squeeze and as a result, eat out less often and prepare more meals at home. Offering practical infor-

mation and tips on how to put nutritious meals on the table with fewer dollars is just one aspect of Food Check-Out Week. Many participating farmers and ranchers also are committed to responding to broader questions consumers may have about food — how it is grown or raised and long-term effects on people’s health and the planet. For many farmers and ranchers, this steppedup interest in conversations about food, whether through in-person conversations or social media interaction with consumers, was

sparked by The Food Dialogues, a new effort to bring together different viewpoints on farming and ranching, and the future of food. The Food Dialogues is an initiative of the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance, a coalition of farmers, ranchers and their industry partners, committed to continuously improving how they grow and raise food that provides healthy choices for people everywhere. USFRA strives to bring together different viewpoints on farming and ranching and the future of food to solve today’s most

challenging problems. “For too long, farmers and ranchers have not had a voice in conversations about where food in America comes from,” said Terry Gilbert, a Kentucky farmer and chair of the AFB Women’s Leadership Committee. “Now more than ever before, both during special observances such as Food Check-Out Week and as they go about their dayto-day routines, farmers are committed to participating in conversations with consumers, to answer the questions they have

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation about food,” she said. Although the way farmers talk about food with consumers is evolving, the Farm Bureau — Ronald McDonald House Charities connection that was initiated when Food Check-Out Week first began remains strong. Recognizing the need everyone has to find solutions to feeding families healthful foods on a tight budget, many county and state Farm Bureaus will make food donations to Ronald McDonald Houses or other charities during Food Check-Out Week. Ronald

McDonald Houses provide a “home-away-fromhome” for families of seriously ill children receiving medical treatment. On the national level, the AFB Women’s Leadership Committee will make cash and food donations to the Ronald McDonald House of Central Indiana this year. The third week of February was selected for Food Check-Out Week as a bridge to National Nutrition Month in March. Cyndie Sirekis is director of news services with the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Vermont farmers can ask for more disaster relief funds Disaster Relief Fund. Agriculture Secretary Chuck Ross says feed has become an urgent need for some Vermont farmers. He says many farmers are discovering that their hay and corn was dam-

aged by the flooding and they are faced with the unexpected cost of buying feed. To date, the Vermont Farm Disaster Relief Fund has awarded $1.5 million to 177 farmers affected by Tropical

Storm Irene. As of January 25, the fund had received or been pledged to

receive more than $2.4 million. The state is also look-

ing for farmers with surplus feed for sale or that they are willing to donate.

www.leepub.com

*MARSHALL MACHINERY INC.

ROUTE 652, HONESDALE, PA 18431 • 570-729-7117 PHONE • 570-729-8455 FAX • WWW.MARSHALL-MACHINERY.COM

2000 Kubota KX008 excavator, rubber tracks, good condition, 611 hrs. $10,900

Kubota B3200 4WD tractor, hydro, turf tires, good condition, 313 hrs. $11,500

Kubota MX5100 2WD with loader, ag tires, very clean, 127 hrs. $17,450

2002 Bobcat 328 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, runs and operates good. $15,900

TRACTORS International 504 2WD tractor WFE very nice tractor ‘07 Kubota M108 4WD, C/A/H, cast centers, 1 remote, 793 hrs ‘08 Kubota M108XDTC 4WD, C/A/H w/loader, PS, 3 remotes ‘10 Kubota M110XDTC 4WD, w/loader, C/A/H, p shift, 2 remotes, 868 hrs. ‘06 Kubota M125XDTC 4WD, C/A/H, ldr., PS, 2 remotes, sharp tractor ‘06 Kubota M5040 2WD, low hrs., clean tractor, 363 hrs. ‘11 Kubota M5140 4WD, C/A/H, ag tires, 8x8 trans, 1 remote, like new ‘09 Kubota M5640 4WD tractor w/canopy ‘06 Kubota M6040 4WD, C/A/H, R4 tires, 1 remote, hyd. shuttle, 290 hrs. ‘07 Kubota M8540 4WD w/canopy and new tires, 1166 hrs. ‘08 Kubota M9540 4WD, C/A/H, hyd. shuttle, 12 spd., creeper kit ‘07 Kubota MX500 4WD, R4 tires, 1 remote, 108 hrs. ‘09 Kubota MX4700DT 4WD tractor w/loader, ag tires, like new, 59 hrs. ‘07 Kubota MX5000 2WD tractor w/ag tires, low hrs. ‘10 Kubota MX5100 2WD w/ldr., SS QT, ag tires, very clean, 127 hrs. ‘09 Kubota MX5100 4WD w/ldr., 8x8 trans, R-4 tires, SS QT, 229 hrs. COMPACT TRACTORS & LAWN TRACTORS ’07 Cub Cadet 7284 TLB 4WD Hydro mid mower 264 hrs. Ford 1510 4WD w/loader, really clean ‘86 John Deere 1050 tractor w/ldr., 4WD, ag tires, 2105 hrs. ‘09 Kubota B2320 4WD with mid mower, 6 speed, R-4 tires, good condition 126 hrs. ‘00 Kubota B2710 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, hydro, very clean, 310 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B2920 4WD tractor hydro, R-4 tires, 24 hrs. ‘09 Kubota B2920 4WD TLB hydro, R-4 tires, thumb, like new, 78 hrs. ‘11 Kubota B3200 4WD TLB hydro R-4 tires mid pto good cond.186 hrs. ‘10 Kubota B3200 4WD tractor, hydro turf tires, good condition 313 hrs ‘10 Kubota BX25 4WD TLB like new, 45 hrs ‘08 Kubota BX2350 4WD w/loader, ag tires, 318 hrs ‘08 Kubota GR2010 20hp, AWD 48” cut w/ catcher, clean 151 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L2800 2WD tractor, ag tires, low hours clean 85 hrs ‘08 Kubota L2800 4WD, TLB, R-4 tires, canopy ,274 hrs ‘09 Kubota L4240 HST 4WD w/loader, hydro, R-4 tires, SS QT, 299 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L440DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, 8x4 trans, 538 hrs. ‘11 Kubota L2800 4WD TLB ag tires, 8x4 trans 161 hrs ‘07 Kubota L2800 4WD TLB, good cond., ag tires, thumb, 249 hrs. Kubota L2850 tractor w/ ldr., 4WD, good cond., 1 owner ‘94 Kubota L2950 4WD tractor w/ ldr., SS QT, new rear tires, good cond. ‘07 Kubota L3130 4WD tractor w/ ldr., hydro R4 tires, good cond., 347 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L3240 4WD tractor, R-4 tires, good cond., 590 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3240 2WD tractor w/ ldr., good cond., 332 hrs. ‘10 Kubota L3240DT 4WD w/ldr., R4 tires, SS QT, like new, 101 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor with loader, R-4 tires, 43 hrs ‘08 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor w/ ldr., ag tires, 104 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3400 4WD TLB, hydro, ag tires, as new, 29 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L3400 4WD tractor w/ canopy, ag tires ‘08 Kubota L3540 4WD TLB hydro R-4 tires, 303 hrs ‘08 Kubota L3540 4WD tractor w/ ldr., hydro SS QT, clean machine, 264 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor w/loader, 8x8 trans., R-4 tires, SSQT, clean,

352 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L3940 4WD, w/ loader, R-4 tires, GST trans, 408 hrs. ‘08 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor w/ ldr., 445 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L3940 4WD tractor, hydro, canopy, R4 tires, clean, 149 hrs. ‘07 Kubota L4240 HST 4WD w/loader, hydro, R4 tires, SS Qt sharp, 168 hrs. ‘06 Kubota L4400DT 4WD w/loader, ag tires, 254 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L4400HST 4WD TLB, hydro SS QT, 1 owner, 181 hrs. ‘04 Kubota L4630 4WD tractor, C/A/H, creeper good cond., choice of tires ‘10 Kubota T2080 20 HP, hydro, 42” cut lawn tractor ‘08 Kubota T2380 48” cut, good condition ‘08 Kubota ZD321 zero turn, 21 HP diesel, 54” cut, very good cond., 71 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZD323-60 23 HP diesel 60” cut good condition 770 hrs ‘01 Kubota ZD326 60” rear discharge, like new, 28 hrs. ‘08 Kubota ZD326 26 HP dsl 60” pro deck ‘07 Kubota ZD331P-60 zero turn, 31 HP diesel, 60” cut, very good cond., 195 hrs. ‘08 Kubota ZG222-48, 22 HP, hyd lift, canopy, 167 hrs. ‘08 Kubota ZG222 48” cut, just like new, 36 hrs. ‘10 Kubota ZG227 54” cut, like new, 27 hrs. ‘09 Kubota ZG227 27 HP, 54” cut, good condition, 181 hrs. SKID STEERS ‘07 Cat 256C skid steer, cab with heat, 6’ bucket, 1 owner, clean with grouser tracks, 310 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat MT55 skid steer, good cond. w/ bkt., 634 hrs. ‘06 Bobcat S300 good condition with bucket, 586 hrs. ‘03 Bobcat S300 C/A/H, hi flow ptach, very good cond., 288 hrs. ‘08 Bobcat T190 skid steer, new tracks, good cond., 808 hrs. ‘08 Bobcat T300 C/A/H, SJC controls, 80” bucket, good cond. ‘10 Kubota SVL75HW wide tracks, hyd, coupler, low hrs. 108 hrs. PLOWS W/ SPRING RESET 7 shank high clearance chisel plow Asst. 1, 2, 3, or 4 x 3 pt. plows Ford 101 3x plow Ford 309 2x plow SIDE RAKES & TEDDERS New First Choice 2 star tedder New First Choice 4 star tedder, hyd. fold New First Choice 4 star tedder, spring assist First Choice 6 star hyd fold First Choice 10 wheel converge rake JD 660 hay rake w/dolly wheels and rubber teeth NH 55, 256, 258, 259 side rakes - priced from $500 NH 256, 258 side rakes, some w/ dolly wheels Tonutti RCS8 hay rake, good condition INDUSTRIAL Cat 307B excavator, C/A/H, 2 buckets, thumb, steel tracks, good condition, aux hyd ‘02 Bobcat 328 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, runs & operates, good cond., 1634 hrs. ‘04 Bobcat 331G ROPS, rubber tracks, 18” bucket, 645 hrs. ‘05 Bobcat 334 excavator, C/A/H, with thumb 627 hrs.

‘07 Bobcat 337 excavator, 24” bkt., hyd. thumb, good cond., 499 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat 341G excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb, good condition 577 hrs. ‘07 Bobcat 430H excavator, C/A/H, hyd thumb good condition 603 hrs. ‘06 Bomag BW211D 84” smooth drum roller, very good cond. Case 550E dozer, 6 way blade, rubber tracks, runs & works well Cat D3GXL dozer, C/A/H, 6 way blade, hy state, sharp ‘09 Dynapac CA134D roller, 54” smooth drum, w/shell kit, very clean Gehl 153 excavator, adj. tracks, low hours ‘07 Hamm 3205 54” vibratory roller, clean Hamm BW172D 66” smooth drum w/vibratory Hyundai Rolex 110D-7 excavator C/A/H manual thumb, good condition Ingersoll Rand SD77DX vibratory roller, 66’ drum, very nice Ingersoll Rand 706H fork lift, 4WD, 15’ see thru mast 6,000 lb Cummins dsl. International TD20 dozer, runs and works good undercarriage ‘96 JCB 506B telehandler, 6000# lift capacity, good cond., 3800 hrs. JD 450G dozer 6 way blade, runs and works ‘07 JLG 450A lift ‘08 Kubota B26 4WD TLB, 4WD, hydro, R4 tires, 207 hrs. ‘07 Kubota K008 excavator, 10” bucket, good cond., aux hyd. ‘11 Kubota KX41 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 92 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX41 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 12” bkt, 933 hrs. ‘07 Kubota KX71 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, 18” bucket aux hyd 1339 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX71 excavator ,rubber tracks, hyd thumb,, very good condition, 483 hrs ‘09 Kubota KX91 excavator, ROPS, hyd thumb 16’ QT bucket clean 360 hrs. ‘10 Kubota KX080 C/A/H, super double boom, hyd thumb, rubber tracks, good condition, 580 hrs. ‘07 Kubota KX080 C/A/H, hyd. thumb, rubber tracks, straight blade, clean, 1 owner, 799 hrs. ‘10 Kubota KX121 excavator, C/A/H, angle blade, hyd thumb, rubber tracks, 127 hrs ‘09 Kubota KX121 ROPS, hyd thumb, angle blade, 24’ bucket, 368 hrs. ‘09 Kubota KX121 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, angle blade, 133 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX121 excavator, rubber tracks, hyd. thumb, angle blade, 237 hrs. ‘07 Kubota KX121 excavator, C/A/H, straight blade, good cond., 1852 hrs. ‘08 Kubota KX121-3 excavator, ROPS, angle blade, hyd. thumb, rubber tracks, 343 hrs. ‘05 Kubota L39 4WD TLB, front aux hyd, 1 owner, sharp, 542 hrs. ‘09 Kubota L45 4WD, TL, hydro w/ HD box scraper & aux. hyd., like new, 73 hrs. ‘07 Kubota U35 rops, rubber tracks, 24” qt bucket 594 hrs. ‘07 Kubota U45 excavator, ROPS, rubber tracks, hyd. thumb, sharp, 198 hrs. ‘04 Morbark 2050 25 HP, gas, 5” capacity, clean machine Rayco C87D crawler dozer, C/A/H, pilot controls, winch and forestry pkg., very clean Rayco RG1625A stump grinder, 25hp, fair condition BALERS Haybuster 256DS bale chopper, good cond., dairyman special

NH 570 square baler, good cond., w/#72 thrower NH 575 square baler, good cond. w/thrower Tanco 580S new, 30” wrap, cable controls, standup CULTIPACKERS & SEEDERS 8-10-12 cultipackers Bobcat 72 seeder, 3pt. or SS mount, 6’ cultipacker seeder, good cond. MANURE SPREADERS Bodco LAGU-42” manure pump lagoon type Kuhn SD4000 3 pt seeder, nice NH 1038 stack liner wagon, good cond. Pequea MS80P manure spreader, PTO drive, same as new HAYBINES/DISCBINES McKee 16’ 3pt. danish tines w/ rolling baskets, good cond. NH 488 mower conditioner used 1 season on 25 acres, same as new DISCS IHC leveling disk, 14’ MISCELLANEOUS Allied 70 hydraulic tamper Asst used 3 pt. finish mowers & rotary mowers Befco 20’ batwing finish mower Bobcat 48 fence installer, SS mount, unused stakes & fence included Brillion 3pt. 5 shank reset ripper Bush Wacker 8410P rotary mower, 7’, pull type w/ hyd. cylinder Erksine 1812 snowblower 6 foot skid steer mount standard flow Ferri TD42RSFM boom mower, unused Ford 309 3pt 2 row corn planter, very good cond. Ford 3000 sprayer, dsl., custom spray rig tractor Genset D337F 6 cyl. generator Hardi 170 gallon 3pt sprayer, 30’ boom, very clean H&S BRT4D hay wagon, 8 ton gear, 8x18 steel, running good cond. JD 1240 4 row corn planter ‘10 Kubota RTV900 4WD w/cab heat and snowplow, 208 hrs. ‘08 Kubota RTV900 4WD w/canopy and hyd dump, 606 hrs. ‘08 Kubota RTV900 4WD, hyd. dump. canopy & windshield, same as new Kubota RTV900 utility vehicle ‘11 Kubota RTV1100 4WD utility vehicle C/A/H hyd dump & commercial snow plow 27 hrs. ‘07 Kubota RTV1100 Kuhn GMD33N unused 4 foot cut LuckNow 87 snow blower, 7’ 3 pt., 2 stage, good cond. Monosem 4 row corn planter NH 185 single manure spreader Orsi River L549 3pt boom mower, 4’ 3pt, good cond. Schulte RS320 rock picker, hid drive Skinner 1 row 3pt tree planter, very good cond. Stanley MB950 hammer Sweepster RHFAM6 rotary broom 3 pt., 6’ Timberjack T40 winch for skidders

We are your source for a wide range of used parts with free nationwide parts locator. Parts are dismantled, cleaned and ready for shipment.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 7

MONTPELIER, VT (AP) — There’s more grant money available for Vermont farmers hurt by flooding from Tropical Storm Irene. Farmers who need help can apply for assistance from the Vermont Farm


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You A toast to pot roast a perfect one-dish dinner (NAPSA) — Whether it’s for the nostalgia, the convenience or the reasonable cost, flavorful pot roast is making a comeback. Home cooks in the know are seeking out cost-effective cuts like boneless beef chuck, bottom round roast or rump roast and tossing them in a crock pot with simple pantry staples for melt-in-your-mouth dishes. Pot roast is easier to prepare than you might think, and it’s simple to customize by using different beef cuts, seasonings, liquids and vegetables. Plus, sandwiches, soups, tacos and hardy salads are among the possibilities for leftovers. When you’re busy and want a deliciously affordable meal, this recipe from Whole Foods Market makes it easy: Page 8 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Beef pot roast

1 1/2 teaspoons dried parsley 1 teaspoon sea salt 1/2 teaspoon minced onion 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 (2 1/2 to 3 pounds) boneless beef chuck roast 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 sliced onions 1 3/4 cups reduced-sodium beef broth 1 cup tomato juice 1 1/2 pounds potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks 1 pound carrots, cut into 1-inch chunks Preheat oven to 350° F. In a small bowl, combine seasonings, salt and pepper. Pat roast dry with paper towels and rub all over with seasoning mixture. In a large Dutch oven or ovenproof heavy

saucepot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add roast and brown on all sides. Remove to a plate and set aside. Add onions and 1/4 cup water and cook about 8 minutes or until tender and golden, stirring occasionally. Stir in broth and juice and bring to a boil. Add roast back to pot, cover and transfer to oven. Roast 2 hours. Stir in potatoes and carrots, cover and continue roasting 45 minutes longer or until vegetables and meat are tender. Transfer roast and vegetables to a large serving platter and drizzle with pan juices. For additional recipes, tips and a how-to video, visit www.wholefoodsmarket.com.

Whether you're cooking for a crowd or a crowded schedule, pot roast can be the answer.

Donna’s Day: creative family fun

by Donna Erickson

Warm up with white chili

Find winter’s warmth in a big bowl of easy-to-prepare white chicken chili. This irresistible recipe is a hearty meal, and I can assure you that it will warm up tummies after an afternoon spent outdoors. Prepare it in a big pot in less than an hour on your stove, or better yet, let it cook for a few hours in a slow cooker, so it’s conveniently piping hot whenever you’re ready to eat. Let kids get involved in the prep work appropriate to their age and skills. If the older junior chefs in the family have never peeled and chopped fresh garlic, show them how to mince it properly with a sharp knife. They also can take care of chopping the bell peppers and shredding the cheese for the garnish.

Younger kids can shred chunks of chicken or turkey with their hands and pour the beans in a colander to drain. Get out your measuring spoons and let them accurately measure the herbs and spices, too. Here’s what you’ll need for 6 servings: 2 (15 ounce) cans of great northern or pinto beans, drained 3 1/2 cups chicken broth 3 cups of cooked, shredded chicken or turkey (Save time and pick up ready-to-eat rotisserie chicken at your local market) 1 1/2 cups sweet bell peppers (red, yellow and green) seeded and chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 teaspoons ground cumin (substitute with 1 1/2 teaspoons taco seasoning if you prefer) 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano Salt to taste Shredded cheddar or Monterey jack cheese for garnish 1. Combine all ingredients except cheese in a standard slow cooker. Cover and cook on low for 8 hours or on high for 4 to 5 hours. 2. If you don’t have a slow cooker, bring the broth, peppers, garlic and seasonings to a simmer in a saucepan on your stove. Cook until peppers are tender, about 5 minutes. Add beans and meat. Simmer 10-20 minutes. 3. Ladle in bowls and garnish with the cheese. For variation, add crushed tortilla chips, if you wish. Serve with slices of French bread. (c) 2012 Donna Erickson Distributed by King Features Synd.

This week’s Sudoku solution


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant (Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

Paved with good intentions Between Christmas and New Years’ Day each

year I pursue the ritual of purchasing a calendar book for the following year. At the shopping

mall nearest us a calendar company sets up a temporary kiosk right after Thanksgiving, hoping to sell desk calendars and wall calendars at full price. The day after Christmas, when hordes are returning gifts for exchange or cash, Paris can be seen looking for a desk calendar, possibly one carefully examined a

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks

almost as cool (or cooler, depending who you ask). According to an Internet farm newsletter titled Ag Professional (check them out at www.agprofessional.com/news/An alysis), crop growers are playing a type of Russian roulette with their upcoming spring fertilizer purchases. Their writer, Tom Polansek, just headlined his Feb. 12 article with “U.S. farmers may fail in fertilizer faceoff”. It’s a very good and timely article, the high spots of which I will try to present, then follow with my own comments. Polansek writes that many Indiana crop growers are “playing chicken with the world’s biggest fertilizer makers”. Many Indiana corn growers are postponing buying the fertilizer needed, a last minute move rarely employed by serious Hoosier farmers. But

this year the common sentiment of these is anger that prices for key nutrients surged more than one-third in the fourth quarter of 2011. “I haven’t bought anything yet, prices are so high it’s ridiculous,” said Steve Georgi, an Indiana corn grower who normally purchases fertilizer around the beginning of the year. Fertilizer prices jumped last fall on global demand and expectations for a large increase in corn plantings in the United States. While those expectations have not changed, the price spike has triggered a buying boycott by farmers across the Midwest, pushing sales volumes of key products to their lowest levels since the financial crisis crushed demand in 2008. But farmers may lose in the face-off unless they place their orders soon. Fertilizer distributors, many of whom were burned when demand evaporated in the 2008 price crash, no longer maintain large local stockpiles. That leaves some unable to accommodate a last-minute buying spree, meaning farmers who wait to buy may have to delay plantings or grow something besides corn. The buying boycott is the latest sign of a broader trend in which farmers, most of them grain belt producers now flush with cash, seize more control over their operations to exert more market power. Net farm income jumped 27.5 percent last year to a record $100.9 billion, giving many Midwest farmers

Crop A10

FOR ROUND BALE HAYLAGE OR DRY HAY

CUT THROUGH BALE LIKE AMERICAN CHEESE

Distributor

BECHARD’S FARM EQUIPMENT

Champlain, NY (518) 298-5381 Dealerships Available

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

Gett mid-week k updatess and d onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations.

week earlier during last minute shopping. The big difference after Dec. 25: the calendars are all half price. Sometimes, if I know I will be back in the area after New Years’… and if there are lots of unsold calendars��� I will wait to see if the price is halved again. Occasionally, I have lucked out and gotten a good calendar for 75 percent off. I like Ansel Adams calendars, as well as those from Sierra Club and the Far Side cartoonist Gary Larson. One year, I waited till after New Years’ Day and was lucky to get a plain calendar with no pictures at all, for half price; it was the kiosk’s last desk calendar… period. This year I did much better and got a desk calendar featuring Pug dogs. Brittany spaniels would have been better, but Pugs are


Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Crop from A9 (not so much Northeast dairy farmers) the flexibility to break free of traditional practices. Many have installed their own storage bins, achieving more leeway in timing the sale of their crops so as to exact higher prices from grain companies. Farmers cashed in after Chicago Board of Trade corn prices reached a record high near $8 a bushel last July as strong demand drained supplies. Strong margins for producers of nitrogen-based fertilizers do not make high prices easier for farmers to swallow. Costs for natural gas, used to make nitrogen (N) fertilizer, are hovering near a 10-year low. But N fertilizer manufacturers haven’t passed these savings on to growers. At Potash Corp, the world’s top fertilizer producer, N fertilizer sales volumes fell by 15 percent in the last quarter of 2011 to 1.2 million tons, the low-

est for that quarter since 2008. The Saskatchewan-based company has slowed production of another key nutrient, potash, at its mines due to weak demand. Potash Corp predicts sales will rebound this spring as long as corn prices support an expansion of plantings. Will there be a lastminute rush? Logistical problems could prevent farmers from acquiring the fertilizer they want if they wait until the last minute to buy. For example, Hintzsche Fertilizer in Illinois is one company that most likely will not have enough on hand unless orders come in soon. The general feeling among fertilizer distributors and manufacturers is, in the words of Hintzsche’s general manager Jeff Eggleston, “I’m not buying it if you guys aren’t committing. I’m not going to get stuck with it.” Absent that

commitment, some farmers may need to delay planting because a flood of late orders can’t be filled as needed. Fertilizer dealers, as a group, don’t feel obliged to keep enough fertilizer on hand to fulfill all the built-up demand from farmers. “If the season breaks early, then we could see this jump in purchases at the retail level,” said David Asbridge, president of NPK Fertilizer Advisory Service. “We could see a price spike.” That could derail intentions for large corn plantings. If they cannot get their hands on fertilizer, or decide prices are still too high, farmers can plant soybeans, requiring less fertilizer than corn and planted later in the spring. Analysts predict corn plantings will reach a 68-year high of 94.2 million acres, up 2.5 percent from 2011, according to a Reuters survey. They

project soybean plantings will rise 0.4 percent to 75.3 million acres. Georgi, the Indiana farmer, is in no rush to lock in his fertilizer. He is confident he will be able to buy the supplies he needs and has already seen nitrogen prices in his area fall about 7 percent since November. The only other time Georgi waited so long to buy his fertilizer was during the price spike of 2008-09. His patience saved him money that year and he

will not finalize purchases this year for at least a few weeks in case prices continue to weaken. “There’s room for them to come down,” he said confidently. How does this mostly cornbelt scenario apply to Northeast crop growers? First the fertilizer availability situation is a national (if not global) arena. Crop growers further south of the cornbelt will soon start demanding their fertilizer… even the last-minute committers. I recommend that,

even in the face of overpriced NPK crop inputs, growers should use what soil test info they already have to make a fertilizer choice… and order… ASAP. If you don’t have current soil tests, take some as soon as the ground is thawed enough, even though February may not be the ideal time. Soil test time turn-around at most labs is better than it used to be, particularly if you avoid the spring rush. If seed corn varieties are in

Crop A11

Cornwall Coal Sales LLC We Have COAL In Stock Bag or Bulk - Low Ash/Long Burning Anthracite Coal Call for our tractor trailer pricing DEALERS WANTED

845-534-3808 www.cornwallcoal.com All Orders to be placed on phone BEST BUYS IN USED EQUIPMENT

EQUIPMENT BARGAINS

KEEP TRACK OF OUR WEB SITE FOR SPECIAL PRICING & PROGRAMS “Your Satisfaction Is Our Pleasure”

FACTORY DIRECT POLE BARN AND PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS

ROOFING AND SIDING PANEL STEEL ROOF, WALL & LINER PANEL 17 COLORS AVAILABLE

WINTER BLITZ 29 Ga. Galvalume $1.80 / Lin. Ft. Complete Wood Packages from 24' x 24' to 106' x 400' Penn State Style Complete All Steel Pkg. up to 200' clear span

29 Ga. Painted $2.55 / Lin. Ft.

Hurry while suppies last

We Are Now Manufacturing Mini-Self Storage Systems Call for Information

TRACTORS CASE-IH 7130 MAGNUM MFD - DUAL SPEED PTO CASE-IH 5240 MFD CAB P/S W/ 520 S/L LOADER - SHARP CASE-IH 1896 2WD ROPS - RECONDITIONED IH 3088 2WD RECONDITIONED IH CUB LOBOY FH W/ ATTACHMENTS KUBOTA L3430HST TRACTOR LOADER KUBOTA L2900GST TRACTOR/MWR KUBOTA M6800HDC TRACTOR W/ LA1162 LDR KUBOTA L3430HSTF TRACTOR LOADER KUBOTA L3710HSTF TRACTOR LOADER KUBOTA L3830DTF TRACTOR LOADER KUBOTA M9540HD-F TRACTOR LOADER NH TC30 MFD W/7308 LOADER 60 HRS NH TC40DHST TRACTOR LOADER NH TL90A MFD CAB TRACTOR JOHN DEERE 4200 W/ LOADER JOHN DEERE 5403 TRACTOR 11.5 HOURS - LIKE NEW JOHN DEERE 830 W/ 143 LOADER JOHN DEERE 301A INDUSTRIAL W/ LOADER 3PT PTO CAB JOHN DEERE 110 T/L/B 985 HRS FORD 9600 CAB - CHEAP FORD 1710 MFD W/ 770B LOADER FORD 2000 TRACTOR W/ FORD 7' SNOW PLOW SKID STEER LOADERS GEHL SL7800 SKID STEER GEHL SL6640SXT SKID STEER GEHL SL6635SXT SKID STEER GEHL SL4840 SKID STEER - HI FLOW GEHL SL3825 SKID STEER CASE 1845C SKID STEER BOBCAT 553 UNILOADER MUSTANG 2070 UNILOADER GEHL CTL85 TRACK LOADER RENTAL CAB/AIR HI-FLOW 145 HRS

NH L170 SKID STEER W/ CAB ENCLOSURE 517 HOURS CAT 303C CR EXCAVATOR CAB- TWIST BUCKET 1100 HRS NICE HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT CASE-IH WDX 1701 SP WINDROWER W/ RD162 15' DISC HEADER CASE-IH 8312 DISC MOWER CONDITIONER - EXCELLENT CASE-IH 8575 BIG SQUARE BALER W/ APPLICATOR NH 570 BALER W/ 72 BALE THROWER NH 310 BALER W/ 70 BALE THROWER KUHN FC353GC DISC MOWER CONDITIONER - EXCELLENT CLAAS 255 UNI WRAP ROUND BALER - NEW DEMO NEW MILLER (OXBO) 918 MERGER - GREAT PRICE NEW MILLER 5300 18' FORAGE BOX ON 16 TON TANDEM TRAILER - GREAT PRICE TEAGLE 808SCD BALE PROCESSOR - ROUND OR BIG SQUARE DEERE 7200 6/30 VACUUM PLANTER - LIQUID - CLEAN CASE-IH 900 6/30 PLANTER - LIQUID PLANTERS KINZE 3000 6/30 DRY FERT W/ DAWNS- SHARP UNIT CASE 900 6/30 LIQUID JD 7200 6/30 LIQUID JD 7000 6/30 MISCELLANEOUS JD 3800 TELEHANDLER PATU DC65 PTO CHIPPER HYD FEED BEARCAT CH5540H PTO CHIPPER HYD FEED ALO Q65 LOADER - FITS CASE IH MAXXUM & NH TS SERIES TRACTORS

SPECIALS - HUGE SAVINGS ON EARLY ORDER PARTS CALL FOR DETAILS BRING OR SEND YOUR KINZE OR JD SEED METERS IN FOR RESTING AND REPAIR AS NEEDED

COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC. Claverack, NY 12513 (approx. 40 miles south of Albany)

518-828-1781 • 800-352-3621

1-800-323-7739 (607) 753-9384 607 Rte. 13, Cortland, NY 13045 • A Division of Essex Structural Steel Co. Inc.

www.columbiatractor.com • skinne@columbiatractor.com Keep Track of Our Web Site For Special Pricing, Programs & Low Rate Financing © 2010 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLc. www.caseih.com


Winter calf management; 2011 forage analysis recap and comparison to 2010 ing to ensure continuous dry, deep bedded straw that allows “nesting” so legs are not visible. For other housing options provide the same, and review ventilation as well. Recent UW DairyLand Initiative recommendations call for forced-air tube ventilation to provide a constant and consistent supply of fresh air at the calf resting level. This reduces pathogen load and can reduce respiratory stress. Consider the use of calf blankets. Ensure the calf is dry and the blanket doesn’t encourage sweating. Various types are available including a “dual” blanket Renaissance offers. This allows you to remove the outer coat and keep the liner on as the calf ages or weather warms. Put blankets on at birth and for several weeks thereafter. Wash blankets between animals. A common and effec-

tive recommendation is to add an additional feeding of milk or replacer during cold weather. The Calf Notes website provides access to detailed calculations on extra feeding in Note #121 and #139 at www.calfnotes.com/CNli quid.htm. The calf has a greater need for energy to combat cold stress. Adding a high fat supplement to the milk or replacer will supply the needed energy without the added cost of the protein. Typically these supplements are at least 60 percent fat, can be added at 2 to 6 ounces/hd/d, go into suspension when mixed and are well consumed with the milk. Additional cold weather tips are at http://savacaf.com/assets/frontlines/74/front line.pdf Providing warm drinking water allows the calf to warm up. Greater water intake will encourage

more grain intake. The process of digesting grain produces body heat which is beneficial and reduces cold stress. Is the ability to stay warm or added energy intake more important? A 2007 comparison of bedding and level of milk replacer fed in cold weather in Ohio, showed that using straw bedding vs shavings resulted in 5-12 percent better growth. An added milk replacer feeding improved growth 4 percent, but not if the extra milk lowered starter intake. The researchers concluded “Choice of bedding material was as or more effective than MR feeding rate in improving ADG of calves in cold temperatures.” (PAS 23: 656). Combining both practices can result in positive calf health and growth in cold weather. 2011 Forage Recap A wet spring delayed planting and first crop

MAINE KRAMER’S INC. 2400 West River Road Rte. 104 Sidney, ME 04330 207-547-3345 www.kramersinc.com NEW HAMPSHIRE HICKS SALES, LLC 1400 Bowen Rd. East Corinth, VT 05040 877-585-5167 www.hicksales.com VERMONT BAILEY EQUIPMENT 181 Collinsville Rd. Craftsbury, VT 05826 802-586-9675 HICKS SALES, LLC 1400 Bowen Rd. East Corinth, VT 05040 877-585-5167 www.hicksales.com REAL DESROCHER FARM SUPPLIES & EQUIP., INC. Located on the Derby Rd. Derby, VT 05829 802-766-4732

harvest. This was followed by dry weather, then more than usual rain, including flooding. A challenging forage management year resulted in widely variable forage analysis results. This year in particular it is essential to test your forages frequently and make needed adjustments. Early season 2011 haylage results tended to be drier, higher in lignin and lower in fiber digestibility than 2010. This fits the scenario of larger plant stems, more structural fiber and later harvest due to a wet spring. These forages will likely result in more gut fill and lower feeding value. A UW Focus on Forage factsheet describes the reduced quality as maturity increases (www.uwex.edu/ces/cro ps/uwforage/MaturityNDF-FOF.htm). With increasing maturity, plants increase in complex carbohydrates bound to indigestible lignin, and digestibility decreases. As usual, 2011 corn silage quality depended on where it was grown, when it was planted and when the rains came. If weather is dry during the vegetative stage (before silking), the stalk will be shorter and less lignified. The result is usually higher fiber digestibility. Warm nights can limit that however. Rain after pollination helps ear fill and kernel development, increasing

starch. The mid Atlantic 2011 samples from Cumberland Valley illustrate this. The opposite is common if the rainfall pattern is the reverse. Cumberland Valley samples from another region showed that effect. The New York samples from DairyOne illustrate a pattern where there may have been more rain, taller plants, more fiber, but cooler nights improved digestibility. Lower late season rain may have limited ear fill. Van Soest and others described the effect of growing season on forage quality years ago. The Sept. 25, 2011 issue of Hoards Dairyman has additional discussion on the effect topic. Snyder (Progressive Dairyman 2011, http://bit.ly/s1K4Fr ) discussed the importance of testing fiber digestibility and the value of comparing relative forage quality (RFQ) of forages instead of Relative Feed Value (RFV). That article illustrated the potential economic loss when adjusting rations to compensate for lower RFQ. Lower digestibility and RFQ reduces intake potential (which is hard to make up) and results in higher supplementation to try and maintain production. Test and know your forage quality to be able to make the best decisions to optimize profitability.

Crop from A10 really tight supply, consider some open-pollinated (which may sound like heresy to some). Waiting till the last minute to line up crop

inputs in the spring is much riskier than the chance taken by some cheapskate trying to buy a desk calendar for quarter price.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

by Dr. Tim Snyder, Nutrition Manager, Renaissance Nutrition, Inc. Winter calf management To stay comfortable in winter do you put on more clothes, stay inside more, eat more or all three? When outside you probably dress more warmly and may eat more when coming in for dinner. Your calves should be given that consideration also. Persistent cold, especially with windy or wet conditions, can lower calf average daily gain to zero. If that is prolonged without protection and/or extra energy, calves can die. Calves grow best in cool, dry weather. Cool, variable and wet weather in fall and spring increases the chance of respiratory illness. Hot and humid weather reduces gains and can increase illness also. Recheck hutch hous-


Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Teat dipping vs spraying: is one method better than the other? Applying teat disinfectant to the teats immediately after removing the milking unit is an important part of a mastitis control program. The primary purpose of teat disinfection is to reduce the number of bacteria on teats and control the spread of mastitis. Teat disinfectants can be applied by dipping or spraying. Either method is acceptable if done in a manner that covers the entire area of the teat that had contact with the milking unit. The most common failure in most teat dipping/spraying programs is not adequately covering the teat: • When using dip cups, often the coverage is only half-way up the teat. This can happen if the whole cup is not filled with teat dip prior to application or overzealousness in

avoiding dip wastage. • When using a spray system, the spray should be applied from below the teat to ensure complete coverage. Spraying from the side results in the far side of the teat not being covered. Spray nozzles should be checked at the beginning of each shift to ensure proper distribution of the spray. A good way to test for proper teat disinfectant coverage is the “white towel test.” Immediately after the teats have been dipped or sprayed, wrap a clean towel around the base of the teat while blotting the teat dip from the entire teat. Open the towel to display the areas of the teat which were covered by the teat dip. If the pattern shows incomplete coverage, training should be implemented

to show the milkers the proper procedures which will result in the bottom two-thirds of the teat completely covered with disinfectant. It is critical to prevent the teat disinfectant from becoming contaminated: • For spray systems, keep sprayers clean, and do not let sprayers come in contact with the floor. • If using dip cups, empty and clean cups every time you fill the dip cup reservoir, or if they become contaminated during milking. Never pour used disinfectant back into the original container. Keep containers closed to prevent contamination. Regardless of the system used, the reservoir of teat disinfectant should be checked before each shift to make sure there is enough for the entire shift or pen. Consistent and com-

plete application of a teat disinfectant after every milking is a key to good udder health. When applied properly, teat disin-

fection will reduce bacteria counts in milk, reduce the number of mastitis cases and improve teat skin condition, which

makes cows easier to keep clean and milk out. Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34, No. 3 and 5, 2011

www.countryfolks.com

MAINE R.S. OSGOOD & SONS EAST DIXFIELD, ME 207-645-4934 • 800-287-4934 www.rsosgood.com

MASSACHUSETTS SIRUM EQUIPMENT MONTAGUE, MA 413-367-2481P CHAMPLAIN DAIRY SERVICE INC. Swanton, VT 802-868-3144

DYKEMAN FARMS Fultonville, NY 518-922-5496

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Seneca Falls, NY 315-568-0955

FISHER FARMS Canastota, NY 315-697-7039

DON'S DAIRY SUPPLY, INC. South Kortright, NY 607-538-9464

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Lowville, NY 315-376-2991

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Warsaw, NY 585-786-0177

R&M FARM & PRO HARDWARE Marathon, NY 607-849-3291

SOUTHERN TIER DAIRY SERVICE Java Center, NY 585-457-4350

ORCHARD HILL FARM BELCHERTOWN, MA 413-253-5456


by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, I’d like to talk about fresh cow problems as we come towards a lot of freshening cows in the next few months. If you don’t have any fresh cow problems, count yourself very fortunate and you probably don’t have U.S./Canadian Holsteins. This is especially true in regards to digestive disturbances after obstetric problems and not enough

effective fiber is eaten to rapidly create a healthy rumen. I personally like Holsteins a whole lot as my family is from Holland. I also like to easily see black and white animals on green pastures. The only other breed that has a well known problem is Jerseys when they are older and are famous for getting milk fever. Let’s first talk about preventing problems. Proper exercise is as criti-

NO BULL TOO BIG OR NASTY Semen Freezing Since 1983 Semen Fertility Evaluations A Value Adding Company

ZIMMERMAN’S CUSTOM FREEZING www.semenfreezing.com

131 Red Well Road New Holland PA

Cell 717-940-1430 717-355-2048

cal as a high forage diet for health for all cows, and especially dry cows so the uterine muscles have good tone. If feeding only baleage to dry cows, watch out for too high a soluble protein as that can upset a cow’s system. Metabolic energy will be required of the cow to process the excessive protein and this can lead to loss of body condition. Always be feeding some sort of DRY hay to DRY cows. Also with dry cows, feed relatively more negative ions (S-2, SO4-2, Cl-1, HCO32 ), while with “wet”/milking cows feed relatively more positive ions (Ca+2, Mg+2 and K+1 ). If you have a bred cow that is showing a red discharge you MUST check her to see what is going on. A red discharge in a pregnant animal is a red flag! A red discharge later

4 Models To Choose From

• Portable • Stationary • Skid Steer Mount • 3Pt Hitch • 20 Years Experience in the tables design • Right or left layover chutes • We deliver to your door • All chutes now have a self catching head gate • All chutes have a hydraulic belly lift • We also have an optional hydraulic lift for our portable tables for work height adjustments. • Galvanized cattle hoof trim chutes • Rubber mat on table and headboard

Call or visit us on our Web site at

www.berkelmanswelding.on.ca

519-765-4230 BERKELMANS’ WELDING & MFG. AYLMER ONTARIO, CANADA

in pregnancy may mean that she’s calving early, which is common with twins. Restrain the cow, tie the tail out of the way, wash up the vulva area really well, put on a sleeve, apply lube and then reach into the birth canal and feel what is going on. Most likely a calf will be nearby and you might need to help rearrange its limbs. Always have a cow standing when rearranging limbs. Cup your hand over a hoof and bring the hoof towards center midline of the calf while bending the leg the way it naturally wants to. Then straighten the leg and bring forward. Always

keep calving fluids away from other cows! In an A.I. bred cow that freshens on time but doesn’t pass the placenta, this is a problem and you’ll have to deal with it. But if it happens to a few animals, look to dry cow nutrition. If seen in a bunch of younger animals, you need to start feeding organically bound selenium for a few weeks or one injection of MuSe® 2-3 weeks prior to due date. If it’s in older cows, think calcium — especially if there are some muscles occasionally quivering over the shoulder blades, upper belly and leg muscles. Use apple

cider vinegar 2 ounces twice daily for two weeks prior to freshening to keep blood calcium levels up. Be careful of low calcium since the muscles that control the teat sphincters at the very bottom of the teat may be weak and not close tightly between milking times. This is how environmental bugs get in and cause horrible problems (especially coliforms). Springing heifers with a lot of fluid under their belly (edema) is almost always due to getting too much salt. Remember: where salt goes, water goes. Too much salt in the system will retain water, creating edema. Don’t let springers have free choice salt if edema is a problem. In older cows, udder edema can be due to so much protein going to the udder to make colostrum and vessels become leaky. Cows and heifers with udder edema can be treated by using four capsules of regular coffee right out of the container (not decaf) twice daily as needed. They’ll reduce fluid build up by urinating more.

Moo A14

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

CATTLE HOOF TRIMMING TILT TABLES

Moo News a Newsletter of


Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Moo from A13 If for any reason a cow has anything other than a normal start to lactation, always feed DRY hay (not only baleage) for the first week of lactation. Make sure she gets extra dry hay as this will create the fiber mat she needs from which to chew cud. If a heifer has a hard calving and she is all of a sudden eating a radically different ration than she was when happily running freely outdoors, she will be in for a difficult first couple weeks. An almost certain recipe for a twisted stomach (especially a heifer) is a hard calving with a retained placenta fed lots of high moisture corn, corn silage and grain, with little dry hay or long stem baleage. I’ve done hundreds of DA surgeries on such cows. Feed dry hay!! If a cow doesn’t pass the placenta (usually due to twinning, a large calf or if calving early), what should be done? After about 4-5 days of a festering uterine infection, this is where “the solution to pollution is dilution” for sure. You need to manually lavage

(cleanse) the uterus. You’re kidding yourself if you think working on her one time will mean she’ll be just fine. It’s exactly those cows that will have a pus discharge over the next months. You need to cleanse the uterine environment every single day before the cervix closes down and traps bad stuff in the uterus to linger and fester into pus. Using 300 cc of aloe everyday is good. But sometimes it’s good to place 1 gram of iodine pills or mix in 1 gram of liquid iodine with the aloe to infuse into the uterus daily. Old and cold cows that have some muscle quivers need calcium — even if they are standing. I prefer IV treatment because I have seen way too many cows drowned when oral fluids were given wrong. To give an IV, have the cow’s head tied downward with her face tied real snug against something. The jugular vein will bulge and show itself. Hold the calcium bottle no higher than the backbone. AVOID giving any IV in the milk vein of a first calf heifer, as their

milk veins are not big like in older cows. If an animal starts getting kicky, she is telling you that the needle is not in the vein and an abscess will develop, keeping her painful and slow for about 3 weeks (very counter-productive). Cows with hot coliform mastitis show a hot hard quarter with a watery secretion are usually off-feed and have a fever of about 104. DO NOT delay treatment! Give the well known organic IV treatment (Plasma Gold anti-toxin, 500cc vitamin C antioxidant and 60-90cc of goldenseal, garlic, ginseng Phyto-Biotic antibacterial). This also happens to be the same treatment for those first calf heifers with signs of pneumonia or any animal that is systemically ill with a fever. In this article are examples of problems I’ve successfully treated hundreds of times over the years. Until grazing season is here, dry bedding, fresh air, high forage diets and the tips above will keep animals healthy and help you treat those that need to be.

• Since 1964 • Specializing in Trade Publications, Trade Shows, Commercial Printing & Mailing Services

LEE PUBLICATIONS

Serving the agricultural, heavy construction, aggregates, solid waste, commercial horticulture and equine industries.

MARKET TO ANY OR ALL OF THESE INDUSTRIES WITH ONE CALL! Country Folks

Farm Weekly Newspapers - since 1972, serving fulltime farmers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic market areas. The number one agricultural publication in this market! Target your audience with 4 regional editions. Monthly Equine Publication covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations. Since 1979, serving heavy construction contractors, landscaping, aggregate producers and recyclers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Markets every month. Qualified readership is guaranteed to get you results. Country Folks

Since 1990, serving the commercial greenhouses, vegetable

GROWER W and fruit growers, and nurseries in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Northwest market areas. Reach your target audience with this monthly publication that is by far the number one media for these industries.

FREIPETION

SUBSCR R OFFE

Follow Us On

Published by the Lee Publications, Inc. PO Box 121, 6113 State Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Mail this form back or Fax to 518-673-2381

Is our newest publication. Started in 2011 to serve an important and growing segment of horticulture, this newspaper is targeted at businesses active in commercial scale growing and winemaking in the United States. In addition to a six times a year mailing, a searchable version is available to our online readers. WASTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT NEWS, since 1992, serving asphalt/concrete recyclers, composting facilities, construction demolition companies, wood waste recyclers and scrap metal recyclers with 2 monthly editions that cover the entire United States.

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN HORSES? SIGN UP NOW TO RECEIVE COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM AT NO CHARGE!

NORTH AMERICAN QUARRY NEWS since 1998, serving the quarry, sand & gravel, hot mix asphalt and ready mix concrete industries with one national edition. This is the fastest growing publication for these markets.

Name ___________________________________________ Farm/Company Name _______________________________ Address _________________________________________ City ____________________________________________ State ___________________________ Zip _____________ Signature _______________________ Date _____________ Phone ( )______________________________________ Fax ( )________________________________________ Email ___________________________________________ How Many Horses Do You Have?_______________________

TRADE SHOWS

www.cfmanestream.com

Lee Publications produces trade shows, both regionally and nationally for each of the markets listed above. Go to our website at www.leepub.com for more information or call 800-218-5586.

COMMERCIAL PRINTING

We specialize in short run (5,000-100,000) copies) web offset printing. Tabloid style print jobs like this publication are available in increments of 4 pages in black & white or full color. Complete mailing sources are available as well as insertions in any of our publications

LEE PUBLICATIONS PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Phone 518-673-3237 Fax 518-673-3245

info@leepub.com


February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15


Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Introducing Vermeer™ Net and Rebel™ Net from Vermeer Corporation The Vermeer Corporation has introduced the newest partner in its forage product line with Vermeer brand netwrap — Vermeer™ Net, available for 4’ and 5’ balers, and Rebel™ net, designed for Vermeer Rebel® Series Balers. Featuring superior net strength for ultimate bale protection, Vermeer brand netwrap is produced in a unique green, black and white color scheme for easy identification of the Vermeer quality. “Vermeer balers are one of the toughest in their class, and we are excited to offer a Vermeer brand netwrap that matches that durability,” says Joe Michaels, Vermeer Director of Forage Solutions. “Vermeer strives to help producers make the best looking bale in the least amount

of time, and the strength and reliability of Vermeer brand netwrap offers another valuable tool in making that possible.” Vermeer brand netwrap is produced with heavy-duty HDPE for a stronger tape than standard netwrap, and both Vermeer Net and Rebel Net offer optimum net spread to cover square shouldered bales with little net stretch, improving bale appearance. “In addition to enhancing the bale quality, Vermeer Net and Rebel Net

offer convenient features to help producers improve efficiency,” says Russell Beyer, Vermeer Project Lead. “Handgrips on the Vermeer Net packaging provide for easier handling, and the smaller roll length and weight of the Rebel Net makes loading and unloading easier.” Vermeer Net is offered in a variety of lengths and is suitable for most round balers in today’s marketplace. Visit your local Vermeer dealer for more details.

Introducing Vermeer Net and Rebel Net from Vermeer Corporation

SALEM FARM SUPPLY, INC. Rt. 22, Salem, NY 12865 518-854-7424

DESMARAIS EQUIPMENT, INC. 303 Willoughby Ave. Orleans, VT 05860 802-754-6629

YOUNGS FARM EQUIP. Rt. 4A Fair Haven, VT 05743 802-265-4943


February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17


New brand and product identity for Kuhn Krause Kuhn Krause, Inc. is proud to introduce its new brand and product identity. Beginning in April, 2012, Kuhn Krause will change the paint color of Kuhn Krause-brand products to Kuhn Red. This move is intended to strengthen and unify the Kuhn and Kuhn Krause brands through

the Kuhn color and graphics. Several of these new machines were on display at the National Farm Machinery Show in Louisville, KY. This change is an example of Kuhn Krause’s continued commitment to provide high-quality, innovative products and services by continuously improving our products,

Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Lucas makes statement on Obama’s Budget Plan WASHINGTON, D.C. — On Feb. 13, Chairman Frank Lucas released the following statement regarding President Obama’s fiscal year 2013 budget proposal. “The President’s budget demonstrates that neither rural America nor fiscal discipline is a priority for this administration. Raising taxes on small businesses and ignoring the real drivers of trillion dollar deficits is a failure of leadership. “The agriculture community remains committed to doing its part in deficit reduction. However, this proposal shows a lack of perspective and understanding in how agriculture can realistically contribute. “For example, President Obama’s proposal to cut crop insurance threatens the integrity of the program itself. And, he ignores other areas for savings such as streamlining or eliminating duplicative programs in conservation, or closing loopholes in nutrition spending. Nutrition spending comprises 80 percent of the agriculture baseline and there is bipartisan support in Congress to save billions by eliminating loopholes, but not one penny is cut in the President’s budget. “Not only does it fail to address our serious fiscal problems, but it undermines our investment in providing a stable food supply,” said Chairman Frank Lucas.

Count on Northeast Agri Systems For All Your Housing Needs

New facilities and renovations for: • Egg production - caged or cage free • Broiler, Turkey and Duck Production • Hog Production, traditional or open housing Lititz, PA • (800) 673-2580 Laurel, DE • (800) 735-6361 www.neagri.com Authorized

Distributor since 1982

services, facilities and methods of doing business to better serve our dealers and customers. We invite you to learn more about us and our new unified brand strategy by visiting our website. As a producer of high quality agricultural equipment since 1916, Kuhn Krause, Inc. is a recognized leader in the

development and manufacturing of innovative tillage and grain drill equipment. KUHN Group acquired Krause Corporation and created Kuhn Krause, Inc. in May 2011. For more information, contact Kuhn Krause, Inc., 305 S. Monroe, Hutchinson, KS 67501; 8 0 0 - 9 5 7 - 2 8 7 3 , www.kuhnkrause.com


What is overmilking and what can be done to avoid it? Overmilking occurs when the milking unit remains on the cow after milk flow has dropped below a predetermined amount, usually in the range of about 0.5 - 1.0 pounds per minute. Overmilking is something to be concerned about because it may have an adverse affect on teat condition and udder health. Milking units are often left on cows for longer than necessary because it is assumed that all milk should be removed from the udder in order to maximize the milk yield. How-

ever, there is no benefit from overmilking since overmilking increases teat irritation, increases the amount of time the machine is on the cow, and decreases the number of cows milked per hour. Signs that overmilking is occurring in a herd may include a combination of some of the following conditions: • restless, stepping, kicking cows at the end of milking • cows kicking off the milking unit • discolored teats after the unit is detached

• ringing at the base of the teat after the milking unit is detached • teats that are firm or hard to the touch • cows reluctant to allow hand stripping after the milking unit is detached • high numbers of teats with excessive hyperkeratosis (thickening of the skin that lines the teat canal and surrounds the external teat orifice) • nervous first lactation cows • cows reluctant to enter the parlor • long milk hoses or

claws without milk To reduce the incidence of overmilking, dairy operators should work with their equipment dealer to adjust the automatic milker detacher settings to increase the threshold value for activating the detachers, and/or decrease the delay time from when the threshold value is reached until the unit is removed. Milking procedures also influence overmilking. Proper premilking teat preparation will ensure that cows are stimulated and the milk ejection re-

sponse is fully evoked so that milk flows continuously shortly after the milking unit is attached. Immediately after attachment, the milking unit should be adjusted to assure the milking unit has an equal weight distribution and is balanced on the cow’s udder. Observation of the milking units for two minutes after attachment and finding periods of no milk flow is indicative of poor udder preparation.

Dairy operators should evaluate their milking equipment and milking procedures, and make the changes needed to minimize or eliminate overmilking. Cows will respond with short machine-on times, calmer behavior in the parlor or barn, better teat condition, and proper milkouts that require fewer adjustments by the milker. Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34, NO. 4 and 5, 2011

Rhode Island women in agriculture conference set for March 13 family and business activities. USDA is committed to reaching women and offering support with education, technical assistance and networking opportunities. Our vision for women in agriculture is to work with USDA’s partner organizations to increase the number of women owning/operating profitable farms and ag-related businesses and to augment the number of women in leadership positions throughout the agriculture sector, within government and our communities. For more info, see www.regonline.com/build er/site/Default.aspx?Eve ntID=1048819.

HOS-COT BUILDERS, INC. Box 12, South Street Hoosick, New York 12089

Phone: (518) 686-4422 Toll Free 1-800-685-6385 We Salute Our Farmers During June is Dairy Month

# Free Stall Barns # Milking Parlors # Machine Sheds # Farm Shops # Tie Stall Barns # Milkhouses # Horse Barns # Heifer Barns

= CUSTOM DESIGN SERVICE = A SPECIALTY

Visit These New York-New England Dealers

KRAMER'S INC. RFD #3 Box 245 Augusta, ME 04330 207-547-3345

CLINTON TRACTOR & IMPLEMENT CO. Meadow Street, PO Box 262 Clinton, NY 13323-0262 315-853-6151

FOSTERDALE EQUIPMENT CORP. 3137 Route 17B Cochecton, NY 12726 845-932-8611

WHITE'S FARM SUPPLY, INC. RD 4, Box 11 Jct. Rtes. 31 & 316 Canastota, NY 13032 315-697-2214

LAMB & WEBSTER INC. 601 West Main Springville, NY 14141 716-592-4924

Concrete Forming and Flat Work Quality Construction At Reasonable Cost Excellent References

Where One Call Brings It All! Celebrating Our 39th Year in Business

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

The second annual Rhode Island women in agriculture conference has been scheduled for 8 a.m. ot 4 p.m., Tuesday, March 13. The program will feature information sharing, industry assistance and resource guidance. The agenda is focused to present women farmers with tips for the trade, strategies for how to make it work and enlightening stories. Women are a key component to the development of rural areas and sustainable agriculture. Most female farmers and ranchers in the U.S. are “small farmers,” while at the same time involved in a myriad of other farm,


Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Enter Our Country Folks Sweepstakes For A Chance

John Deere Gator 825: 4x4 Gator provided by Z&M Ag and Turf

3 Ways To Enter!

1. Buy a subscription to Country Folks (see page 4 of this pullout) 2. Place a classified ad in Country

Folks Per zone, Reader ads cost $9.25 for 1st 14 words and 30¢ per additional word. - Phone it in: Call Peggy at 800-836-2888 - Fax it in: Fax attn: Peggy @ 518-673-2381 - Mail it in: Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 - Email it in: classified@leepub.com

3. No purchase necessary. Send a post card with your name, farm or company name, complete mailing address, phone number, email address and date of birth to CF/Gator Sweepstakes, Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Contest closes June 1st, 2012, mailed entries must be postmarked May 31st, 2012 or before. Employees and relatives of Lee Publications, John Deere and Z&M Ag and Turf are not eligible. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. All taxes are the responsibility of the winning entry. Contest open to readers of Country Folks, Country Folks Grower, Wine & Grape Grower, Country Folks Mane Stream, Hard Hat News, WHEN & NAQN.

Come See Us at The New York Farm Show in Booth HT-0316 NYS Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY February 23-24-25, 2012


Advice for problem breeders Virgin heifers should be the easiest animals to get pregnant on your farm. Apply tail chalk, watch for it to rub off and then breed ... right? But what about the ones that never seem to come into heat? Out of 100 heifers we always seem to have one or two that do not come into heat within the first

22 days of entering the breeding pen,” said DCHA South Central Director Vance Kells of Circle Bar Heifer Ranch in Satanta, KS. There are a number of reasons why a heifer just doesn’t seem to come into heat, Kells explains. The heifer might be sick or was sick in the past, her reproduc-

tive organs may not be fully developed or she is a freemartin. And if there are any bulls on the farm, you will also want to rule out that she is pregnant by a bull that got out a couple months back. Fortunately, there are also a number of great synchronization programs available to help

And Now - Camels Also! CoPulsation™ has solved yet another problem in milking animals. We have now successfully milked camels, yet again proving that conventional milking machines simply are not up to the job of properly milking animals in a humane manner. Camels are very sensitive and have a very short time period for milk let down. CoPulsation™ was recently recommended to a camel farmer in the US by one of our dairy cow customers as the solution to his problems and we have indeed proven the difference.

The 400K SCC limit will drive many farmers out of business. Ensure your success with the performance of CoPulsationTM.

See us at the New York Farm Show - HT-0320. www.CoPulsation.com www.Facebook.com/CoPulsation

CoPulsation™ Milking System 607-849-3880

prostaglandin on day 14. 4. Insert a CIDR (a progesterone-releasing insert) in conjunction with GnRH on day 1 and then give a shot of prostaglandin on day 7. Watch for heat. Breed if you see a heat or use timed-AI at 72 hours after the prostaglandin shot. Make sure your herd veterinarian is involved in the decisions regarding your reproduction program and for help with pregnancy detection following estrus syn-

chronization and AI. For guidelines covering breeding and pregnant heifers, review DCHA’s Gold Standards II, DCHA’s production and performance standards established for Holstein heifers, from 6 months of age to freshening. “We do a vet check every Monday and our veterinarian ultrasounds the ovaries looking for follicles or a developing corpus luteum,” Kells said. Source: Dairy Calf & Heifer Association Tip of the Week

E-Z COWLIFT

E-Z CATTLE OILER

Indispensable on every farm!

Cows love to use it! • Complete 2-yr. Warranty • Patented “stem” dispenser allows use of any liquid insecticide • Long-lasting bristles on brushes • Galvanized • Uses mineral oil too

• Nylon padding prevents bruising • Allows you to assist the cow quicker, more frequently, and in any location. • Adjusts easily to fit any size cow • Affordable

VINK CALF PULLER • Cannot slip out of position. • Single handed calving aid • Stainless steel for long trouble free service

Easy to Handle

A&A EZ-BRUSH & OILER

1-800-482-6495 Fax: 519-245-3800 www.aaezbrush.com

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

Whether you milk camels, goats or cows the situation is the same. You need to stop pinching the teats and stop inflicting pain if you want to properly milk an animal, achieve quality milk and have healthy udders.

heifers come into heat. “We use all of these on our heifer ranch,” Kells said. “It just depends on how much help the heifer needs.” Here is his advice: 1. Give a prostaglandin shot. If it has been at least 7 days after a heifer’s last cycle, she should come into heat within 72 hours. 2. Give a shot of GnRH and follow that with a shot of prostaglandin 7 days later. 3. Give a GnRH shot on day 1, another GnRH shot on day 7 and


For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MAINE

ANDROSCOGGIN-SAGADAHOC HEMOND HILL FARM STEPHEN BRIGGS TWIN BROOK DAIRY LLC R.E.HEMOND FARM INC. ALDEN FISHER EAST LEDGE FARM WATERMAN FARM INC. CHRIS & JEANIE LEWIS JOHN & SANDY NUTTING ALDEN FISHER BOTMA FARM LOWELL FAMILY FARM JOSEPH&VIRGINIA ROSEBERRY BARKER FARMS INC GOODNOW JERSEY FARM INC

DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H H M H J H H J

67.0 486.7 104.9 302.6 43.9 53.7 61.0 113.0 23.1 26.6 88.7 65.9 74.0 101.5 30.2

KAYBEN HOLSTEINS HALL C.W. PINELAND FARMS, INC BAKER BROOK FARM GARY WINSHIP AND FAMILY YOUNG C.E.

DHIR DHIR DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H X H H

77.8 51.5 74.5 58.5 49.1 58.2

24566 23054 21040 19757 18109 17351

922 881 824 757 681 649

3.8 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.7

738 705 649 609 543 523

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0

DAVIS, JIM & RICK BAILEY HILL FARM FARRINGTON, THAYDEN JOHN DONALD RICHARD COREY MARC BAILEY SHADY LANE FARM TURNER, MALCOLM HERD 1

DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X H

57.2 29.4 55.1 76.6 39.1 58.7 38.4 38.0

20953 20148 19553 19991 18574 18760 15124 17237

819 705 781 740 732 647 678 607

3.9 3.5 4.0 3.7 3.9 3.4 4.5 3.5

670 630 601 581 572 556 515 510

3.2 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.4 3.0

SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 CLEMEDOW FARM SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 PEARSON RICHARD NICK MICHAUD PEARSON RICHARD GAIL QUIMBY PLOURDE, ARTHUR E. JASON & JOY RAY

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP

H H J H H X X H J

120.8 97.2 84.4 97.9 135.8 18.5 76.1 63.0 62.4

26757 23613 19941 21785 20755 16962 19106 18192 14619

974 769 948 931 802 851 794 659 652

3.6 3.3 4.8 4.3 3.9 5.0 4.2 3.6 4.5

808 736 711 698 629 619 575 533 518

3.0 3.1 3.6 3.2 3.0 3.6 3.0 2.9 3.5

CUMBERLAND

Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

FRANKLIN

KENNEBEC

KNOX-LINCOLN

RALPH PEARSE & SONS HAWES LINCOLN J NEWBERT, GARY & ANDREA TIBBETTS, BARRY & ELAINE

26647 1032 3.9 817 3.1 26745 939 3.5 803 3.0 3X 25385 972 3.8 798 3.1 3X 25358 915 3.6 769 3.0 22296 803 3.6 657 2.9 20598 788 3.8 631 3.1 20970 763 3.6 627 3.0 19718 742 3.8 601 3.0 19966 712 3.6 599 3.0 19469 676 3.5 588 3.0 19246 735 3.8 586 3.0 15966 749 4.7 579 3.6 18319 688 3.8 549 3.0 17482 648 3.7 538 3.1 14787 706 4.8 518 3.5

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

33.6 37.5 57.6 50.9

24044 19125 18386 17938

866 754 687 661

3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7

716 596 553 540

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H J H

75.0 102.1 36.4 20.0 21.8

25232 22158 20266 16630 18343

847 848 741 702 692

3.4 3.8 3.7 4.2 3.8

745 677 629 578 548

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.0

DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

51.3 370.7 632.1 998.4 47.7 199.9 204.2 167.8 127.4 38.6

24524 23576 24670 23199 23031 20398 20183 19085 19828 15490

925 872 894 815 892 775 731 762 738 654

3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.9 3.8 3.6 4.0 3.7 4.2

744 728 725 705 699 638 637 622 611 508

3.0 3.1 2.9 3X 3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.3

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H X H H X H H H H H J X H

121.1 72.6 262.3 269.4 128.7 404.7 88.4 60.7 372.7 52.5 56.0 46.8 39.2 44.1 45.6

26288 24608 23527 20311 21216 21337 19161 20233 20043 19025 19498 19180 15611 16790 16127

920 855 916 867 895 805 804 722 779 772 726 743 737 647 598

3.5 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.2 3.8 4.2 3.6 3.9 4.1 3.7 3.9 4.7 3.9 3.7

794 744 710 683 671 658 622 600 598 585 581 559 545 517 507

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.5 3.1 3.1

THE THOMPSON FARM DHI-AP H 76.7 LARRABEE HAROLD & GALEN DHI-APCS H 477.5 INGRAHAM JOHN W & SONS DHI-APCS H 438.4 KEENE DAIRY DHI-AP H 99.4 SCHOFIELD, WAYNE DHI-AP H 25.4 CLEMENTS WALTER DHI-AP H 36.6 SIMON STOLL DHI-AP X 50.2

23252 24009 21515 20311 19906 19113 15823

896 894 874 783 761 685 662

3.9 3.7 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.6 4.2

728 700 670 623 610 568 533

3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.4

JOHNSON FARM INC. GIRARD,RYAN HIGHLAND FARMS INC ALDERWOOD FARM, INC. DUNN, FRED HARRISON FARM LEARY FARM INC.

23027 21721 17766 20222 20133 17439 17672

862 738 883 755 752 709 653

3.7 3.4 5.0 3.7 3.7 4.1 3.7

741 663 631 630 610 557 515

3.2 3.1 3.6 3.1 3.0 3.2 2.9

OXFORD

BISSELL JOHN & CINDY CONANT ACRES INC. KUVAJA FARMS INC KUVAJA FARMS INC LONE MOUNTAIN FARM

PENOBSCOT-PISCATAQUIS SCOTT KEITH VEAZLAND FARMS SIMPSON RON,BETH STONYVALE INC. UNIVERSITY OF MAINE HOWARD BROS LIBBY LAND SAWYER WILLIAM & SONS VELGOUSE FARM,LLC EATON FARM

SOMERSET

DANIEL HARRIMAN DICKINSON FRANK CHARTRAND FARMS INC. CAMBRIDGE FARMS MARK OUELLETTE JR. SOMERSET FARMS L.P SEVEY LAROY L FARRAND CHARLES BOSWORTH FARMS INC. SMITH ROGER DEAN PAINE CONNOLLY JAMES D & MARY JOSHUA CLARK GRASSLAND JAMES STROUT

WALDO

YORK

DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H J H H H H

79.8 27.2 249.8 81.0 51.6 42.8 51.4

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

CHESHIRE

Top 40 Herds For January B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

NEW HAMPSHIRE

HAMPDEN

WINDYHURST FM PARTNERSHIP DHIR-AP STONEHOLM FARM DHI-APCS SAWYER SHELDON S DHIRAPCS STONEWALL FARM DHI-AP

H 184.0 H 789.4 J 317.2 H 26.4

26156 24040 16711 18961

988 820 835 704

3.8 3.4 5.0 3.7

775 719 615 577

3.0 3.0 3X 3.7 3.0

RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD2 KEITH DAVID RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD3 RITCHIE GEORGE F HD 1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X A

15.2 215.1 26.2 74.0

22314 19852 15642 15780

723 805 687 583

3.2 4.1 4.4 3.7

709 623 573 516

3.2 3.1 3.7 3.3

KNOXLAND FARM INC FITCH FARM, LLC POMEROY, KEITH E. ALVIRNE SCHOOL FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

334.2 101.2 75.3 19.1

24742 1000 4.0 792 3.2 26314 936 3.6 790 3.0 22763 823 3.6 709 3.1 21983 1043 4.7 679 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X

216.9 59.1 62.3 157.4 79.6 78.7 14.7

25635 24779 24334 23341 20312 21729 16674

946 960 942 864 739 802 737

BODWELL, H & SONS FERNALD FARM DAIRY, LLC GREAT BAY FARM

DHI-APCS H 241.7 DHI-AP H 188.1 DHI-APCS H 105.5

25089 23735 20353

945 3.8 768 3.1 990 4.2 697 2.9 804 4.0 606 3.0

UNH CREAM UNH RESEARCH HERD SCRUTON'S DAIRY FARM NAUGHTAVEEL FARM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

24.0 76.8 244.9 106.1

26676 1024 3.8 813 3.0 25398 973 3.8 775 3.1 24327 895 3.7 737 3.0 23672 856 3.6 717 3.0

LECLAIR GARY D. KEITH KIMBALL JOHNSON, JOLYON MC NAMARA, PATRICK ECCARDT FARM, INC. HOLMES, JEFF AND STEVE

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H J

173.1 560.3 36.9 182.1 110.8 62.8

26454 22282 23709 21676 21784 16532

GRAFTON

HILLSBORO

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP HIGHWAY VIEW FARM BACHELDER, KEITH JONES, MARION & GORDON MORRILL FARM DAIRY GLINES,GEORGE HERD BARTLETT,A.S.&S.A. GLINES,GEORGE HERD

ROCKINGHAM

STRAFFORD-CARROLL

SULLIVAN

997 855 898 865 791 753

3.7 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.7 4.4

3.8 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.6 4.6

787 760 749 706 635 632 576

836 703 703 677 650 582

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.5

3.2 3.2 3X 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.5

VERMONT

ADDISON

BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC DEER VALLEY FARM M AND J DAIRY FOUR HILL FARMS BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC BINGHAM, WILLIAM AND KIM SABOURIN, GERARD & JUDY THOMAS, BRAD AND JILL MIDDLEBROOK FARM INC.

24631 25238 23619 23075 22056 21803 20721 20537 20861

898 928 858 869 839 833 778 758 803

DHI-AP H 64.8

27965

943 3.4 851 3.0

BURT, JASON AND CHRISTINA DHI-AP H 261.2 FOURNIER INC, RENE & SON DHI-AP X 75.3 GORT0N,GRANT JOHN DHI-APCS H 104.9

21888 19718 18857

810 3.7 644 2.9 768 3.9 612 3.1 770 4.1 592 3.1

DHI-AP H 378.9

26747

940 3.5 799 3.0 3X

DHI-AP H 865.5

25432

991 3.9 803 3.2

TWIN OAKS DAIRY FARM LLC

FRANKLIN

GRAND ISLE QUINTIN, ANDRE

ORANGE

KNOXLAND FARM

RUTLAND

MACH FARM, INC. BOOK BROTHERS GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD

WINDSOR

BILLINGS FARM MUSEUM WADE MAXIM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS

3.6 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8

3.8 3.7 4.0 4.5

762 756 725 701 691 671 629 628 626

657 652 638 614

3.1 3.0 3X 3.1 3X 3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0

H H H B

151.9 119.4 89.0 12.9

21056 21606 20838 18288

795 800 828 815

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.4

DHIR J DHI-AP J

40.6 74.4

15855 15680

794 5.0 594 3.7 741 4.7 567 3.6

MASSACHUSETTS

BERKSHIRE

MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP FAIRFIELDS DAIRY FARM,LLC DHI-AP MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP HIGH LAWN FARM DHIRAPCS TURNER FARMS, INC. DHI ZIEMBA, MICHAEL,MARK&TIM DHI-AP LEGEYT, RICHARD &BETTY DHI-AP

H H J J H H H

104.1 234.1 20.5 209.3 117.0 177.6 67.1

22452 21439 16659 16773 19856 18603 18008

WHOLEY COW FARM WHOLEY COW FARM BOYDEN BROS. DAIRY ROBERTSON,CHRIS & BOB MT.TOBY FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

X X H H H

42.3 18.7 88.9 88.4 104.1

27266 1024 3.8 855 3.1 23037 1055 4.6 814 3.5 24157 917 3.8 750 3.1 22589 931 4.1 699 3.1 21429 837 3.9 663 3.1

DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP

H H B H H J J H

57.9 112.2 129.4 189.2 105.4 99.0 11.1 89.8

23059 22535 19054 20419 19685 15511 14863 16730

FRANKLIN

HAMPSHIRE

COOK,GORDON,JR. & HANK BELDEN,LUTHER A.INC ALLARDS FARM INC. DEVINE FARM,INC. PARSONS,HENRY & EDWARD KOKOSKI, JOHN HD1 COOK,GORDON,JR. & HANK HARTSBROOK FARM

903 844 808 816 736 693 727

926 863 751 808 814 797 763 652

4.0 3.9 4.9 4.9 3.7 3.7 4.0

4.0 3.8 3.9 4.0 4.1 5.1 5.1 3.9

705 654 615 601 568 562 557

750 689 638 630 628 592 565 518

3.1 3.1 3.7 3.6 2.9 3.0 3.1

3.3 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.2 3.8 3.8 3.1

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

POMEROY & SONS PALMER,TERRY

DHI-AP H 71.6 DHI-AP H 155.3

20258 20745

788 3.9 646 3.2 781 3.8 633 3.1

TULLY FARMS, INC. PICKARD, JAMES & ELEANOR

DHI-AP H 125.7 DHI-AP H 87.0

19884 18150

801 4.0 640 3.2 703 3.9 560 3.1

HERRICK,DAVID SAM RICHARDSON'S DAIRY, INC.

DHI-AP H 91.4 DHI-AP H 155.3

25101 22656

892 3.6 769 3.1 768 3.4 677 3.0

BRISTOL COUNTY

DHI-AP H 19.2

20807

756 3.6 632 3.0

MIDDLESEX ESSEX

BRISTOL

RHODE ISLAND

WASHINGTON KENYON, FRANCIS COTTRELL HOMESTEAD

HARTFORD

DHI-AP X 63.0 DHI-AP H 14.7

19375 18534

741 3.8 591 3.1 692 3.7 581 3.1

CONNECTICUT

MILLBORNE FARM SMYTHS TRINITY FARM FUSIEK,D,& COULTER FUSIEK HASTINGS FARM H0USE OF HAYES COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. MILLBORNE FARM HASTINGS FARM PERRY, SCOTT

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X G J H

22.0 27.7 47.5 120.0 76.1 44.3 47.7 25.6 13.3 29.7

22991 21812 21112 20327 19425 18977 17096 17013 15694 17862

820 809 769 781 728 706 713 731 732 733

3.6 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.7 4.2 4.3 4.7 4.1

708 676 628 623 585 581 572 553 539 526

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.3 3.3 3.4 2.9

CHRIS & TODD HANNAN WEIGOLD FARMS LLP FREUND'S FARM, INC. ARETHUSA FARM LLC TANNER T. MEADOW RIDGE FARM LLC. THORN, CLINTON JACQUIER, DAVID & MELODY ARETHUSA FARM LLC WHITETAIL FARM 1 CARLSON,DOUGLAS J. NUTMEG ACRES

DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H J H H X

39.0 88.8 275.1 75.9 141.1 69.5 31.3 398.1 25.8 32.1 60.6 50.0

23247 23455 22828 22386 20389 20050 18201 17752 15662 17604 16396 15490

911 881 817 911 767 796 769 665 798 707 638 581

3.9 3.8 3.6 4.1 3.8 4.0 4.2 3.7 5.1 4.0 3.9 3.8

724 713 692 657 640 596 589 573 559 527 512 504

3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.6 3.0 3.1 3.3

DHIR-AP H 144.0 DHIR-AP X 44.4 DHI-AP H 55.6

21865 15330 16092

760 3.5 649 3.0 661 4.3 507 3.3 619 3.8 501 3.1

SPIELMAN FARM RIVER PLAIN DAIRY BLUESLOPE FARM, INC

DHI-AP H 375.2 DHI-AP H 52.7 DHI-APCS H 119.9

21772 20194 17652

862 4.0 689 3.2 754 3.7 618 3.1 670 3.8 517 2.9

BAHLER FARMS INC. UNIV OF CONNECTICUT BAHLER FARMS INC. HYTONE FARM MAPLELEAF FARM, INC SHADOW VALLEY FARM SHADOW VALLEY FARM UNIV OF CONNECTICUT SHADOW VALLEY FARM FISH FAMILY FARM

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

974.0 82.4 965.6 256.1 227.9 50.5 104.5 24.1 26.0 28.4

25725 26284 24075 23253 22493 17871 19263 16313 14518 14527

923 903 881 923 896 756 696 785 693 704

DHIR-AP H 114.8 DHI-AP H 127.9 DHIR-AP J 150.0

22349 20283 16098

891 4.0 694 3.1 729 3.6 633 3.1 799 5.0 581 3.6

LITCHFIELD

NEW HAVEN/MIDDLESEX

H 1356.1 H 451.2 H 303.0 H 1489.7 A 59.5 H 66.6 H 97.1 H 172.4 H 178.2

CHITTENDEN

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

GREENBACKER, C & SNS FM 2 GREENBACKER, C & SNS FM 2 TRIANGLE A

NEW LONDON TOLLAND

WINDHAM

TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2 MAY HILL FARM TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2

H H H H H X H J J J

3.6 3.4 3.7 4.0 4.0 4.2 3.6 4.8 4.8 4.8

781 740 737 726 690 608 595 573 520 513

3.0 2.8 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.5

3X 3X 3X

3X


MAINE CROWN EQUIPMENT, INC. 419 Sweden St. Caribou, ME 1-800-498-3196

LIONEL THERIAULT, INC. #10 Davis St. Presque Isle, ME 207-764-4405

VERMONT DESMARAIS EQUIPMENT, INC. RR 2, Box 14 Orleans, VT 802-754-6629

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

KRAMERS TRACTOR SALES Rt. 104, RD #3 Sidney, ME 207-547-3345


DHI TOP 40 FOR JANUARY NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

Vermont DHIA Country Folks List for the Month Ending January 2012 Following is the January 2012 VT DHIA Top 40 herds of 10 or more animals based on protein pounds in each County serviced by VT DHIA and processed through the Dairy Records Management Processing Center, Raleigh, NC during the calendar month. Rolling herd averages will appear on this list for herds which have chosen the option to have their herd average published and the herd has 12 consecutive tests including components for each test.

367 102 81 138 114 31 35 29 48 57 13 10 49

27167 25095 24315 25756 24337 23007 17659 17889 18747 17640 12989 13807 13012

1028 868 961 833 1050 786 714 673 675 672 613 628 578

3.8 3.5 4 3.2 4.3 3.4 4 3.8 3.6 3.8 4.7 4.5 4.4

887 781 769 767 752 707 566 559 555 553 483 473 469

3.3 * 3.1 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3 3.1 3.7 3.4 3.6

23350 19196

959 4.1 771 4

666 2.9 * 593 3.1

24606 22237 22419 23009 22327 21597 16662 20627 16580 17884 16434 16721 14903

979 904 825 869 794 897 828 729 745 673 672 769 632

753 730 711 710 697 697 622 610 574 568 545 521 504

TOLLAND Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

BRADWAY FARMS INC. HILLSIDE FARM

H H

415 61

WINDHAM HIBBARD HILL FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 2 FAIRHOLM FARM INC. ELM FARM VALLEYSIDE FARM LLC ELM FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 1 ROCK MAPLE FARM 1 ROCK MAPLE FARM 1 DESJARDINS DORIS ROCK MAPLE FARM 1 MOLODICH FARMS INC. SELBUORT VALLEY FARM

H H H H H X J H J H X H X

83 34 214 79 210 52 110 22 55 171 19 296 65

4 4.1 3.7 3.8 3.6 4.2 5 3.5 4.5 3.8 4.1 4.6 4.2

3.1 3.3 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.7 3 3.5 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.4

31

H H H H H J H J

32 132 90 62 45 16 63 47

H H H H X H J H

32 210 144 75 30 30 119 81

416 4.2

341 3.4

26440 24838 21635 20920 21219 16893 18143 12238

1000 1061 849 823 848 914 760 658

782 760 683 650 635 605 579 475

3.8 4.3 3.9 3.9 4 5.4 4.2 5.4

82 25 80 12

920 863 835 862 905 875 753 694

3.7 3.5 3.9 4 4.4 4.2 4.9 4

801 734 676 676 635 634 576 559

3.2 3 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3 3.7 3.2

18548 15081 15713 13927

713 3.8 715 4.7 634 4 754 5.4

558 3 535 3.5 509 3.2 486 3.5

25569 25233 24125 22883 20089 19188 19337 14626 12842

988 992 975 900 770 826 760 578 623

797 773 747 717 640 626 618 478 459

GRAFTON TULLANDO FARM INC. PATCH FAMILY DOUGLAS & DEBORA ERB GRAFTON COUNTY FARM JOHN C. PERKINS PUTNAM WILLIAM & CYNTHIA WILLIAM & DIANNE MINOT JAMES & ELLEN PUTNAM RUSSELL & MARY HICKS

H H H H H H H X J

447 115 81 84 137 13 32 27 52

3.9 3.9 4 3.9 3.8 4.3 3.9 4 4.9

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.2 3.3 3.6

MERRMK-BELKNP PINELANE FARM BOHANAN FARM TOPLINE JERSEYS TOPLINE JERSEYS

H H X J

238 209 15 67

H

242

H

185

H H H H X

482 54 38 473 13

SEVEN VIEW FARM SLATEHILL FARM MIKE SWART GEORGE B. WILSON GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT DEB-RAY DAIRY GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT

55

H H H H J X X G

686 670 634 629 589 563 230 198

24025

900 3.7

735 3.1

17709

717

4

577 3.3

19747 20935 19849 14414 15232 13989 13912

776 804 740 668 589 582 597

3.9 3.8 3.7 4.6 3.9 4.2 4.3

657 650 602 527 483 455 445

3.3 3.1 3 3.7 3.2 3.3 3.2

JAMES W. SEYMOUR KEITH DAY KEMPTON FARMS INC. SCOTT LANGMAID LAGGIS BROS. BRIAN NICHOLS HOWARD & JACQUELINE BENNETT PLYN N BEATTIE LUCKY HILL FARM MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD DWAYNE & DEBORAH MARCEAU MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD WILLIAM & GWEN PEARL ROLAND & SHONNA HEATH JR. BRIAN & KATHLEEN SOMERS ERIC BEAN

29068 23601 23421 23121 20881 20675 20194 18480 16402 17275 15014 16296 14559

1109 927 858 931 890 907 860 752 803 643 612 679 317

3.8 3.9 3.7 4 4.3 4.4 4.3 4.1 4.9 3.7 4.1 4.2 2.2

898 725 720 702 649 645 612 602 557 527 512 502 258

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.1 3 3.3 3.4 3.1 3.4 3.1 1.8

18650

737

4

589 3.2

18422 14460 4653

694 621 213

3.8 4.3 4.6

567 3.1 492 3.4 155 3.3

24151

938

3.9

740 3.1

16227 11916

723 525

4.5 4.4

578 3.6 382 3.

3.7 3.9 3 3 3.2 3.7 3.3 3.7

94 119 141 71 108 23 50 34

H H H H H H H H J H B X H

942 136 156 103 147 15 76 132 15 69 18 34 102

H

67

WRIGHT'S DAIRY FARM THE LAPRISEFAMILY GEORGE & DOROTHY REYNOLDS

156

J X

31 53

ADDISON VORSTEVELD FARM WAYNE & JEANNINE PARTRIDGE KAYHART BROTHERS LLC DAVID RUSSELL WOODNOTCH FARMS INC. GOSLIGA FARM INC. B DANYOW FARM LLC TIM & JULIE HOWLETT CHIMNEY POINT FARM L.P CHARLES & BRENDA CHARRON BRACE ALEX & MICHELE HATCH FARM INC. PHIL & DIANE LIVINGSTON MARC & NORRIS BRISSON BRIAN & CINDY KAYHART TERRIER LEE MILLBORNE FARM JEFF & BRIAN TREADWAY JOHN E. & BILLIE JO C. FORGUES KAYHART FARM INC. ROBERT & SUZANNE HUNT HANSON STEPHEN & SYLVIA HAROLD & ANJE DEGRAAF ANTHONY & BARBARA CORREIA ARTHUR & JOAN HUESTIS ORR ACRES MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE FIFIELD JEFF & LISE JEFFREY & OLIVE PHILLIPS LESLIE RUBLEE JOHN BUZEMAN JOHN & LISA ROBERTS KETTLE TOP FARM SCOTT & MARY PURINTON SCAPELAND FARM COTA BROTHERS FARM INC.

737 3.1

30107

1105 3.7

914

24273 23425 21184 20322 17487

889 839 765 906 599

737 3 697 3 646 3 625 3.1 525 3

WILHELM & KARL STROHMAIER DAVID TOOLEY LEON CLARK JR KEN LEACH

782 3.2 707 3.3

WAYSIDE MEADOW FARM LLC PHILIP BROWN ROGER & JOY WOOD DOROTHY & ANGELA WILLSON DON-SIM FARM

*

H

VERMONT

931 3.9

MIEDEMAS THE 3.7 3.6 3.6 4.5 3.4

32 26 11

WASHINGTON

24097

3

H X G

3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.2 3.1 3 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.2 3 3 3 3.1 2.8 3.1 3 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.1 2.9 3 3.1 3.3 2.9 3 3 3.1

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X X H H H H H B H H H H B H H A X

753 110 598 177 292 603 756 506 128 57 154 568 374 803 82 36 173 368 244 186 263 57 137 448 294 99 43 34 144 61 71 62 161 22 58 53 87

29401 27126 27628 27051 25696 26165 27251 25180 25437 24533 24203 24461 24965 23090 22357 23447 22898 22044 20756 23128 21137 21680 19840 20447 20439 19352 19226 17003 18808 19517 19117 16519 15207 17446 17020 16555 14246

1102 1001 1036 1000 1002 977 1002 911 1047 969 976 911 958 846 858 852 823 853 800 813 804 726 804 819 815 761 770 717 742 750 747 620 637 617 601 591 544

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.6 4.1 3.9 4 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.5 3.8 3.3 4.1 4 4 3.9 4 4.2 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.8 4.2 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.8

924 850 835 828 827 814 814 806 772 768 746 744 737 709 705 704 692 656 652 651 646 645 643 637 632 608 598 592 583 574 565 520 506 506 505 504 435

*

H

122

11452

452

3.9

353 3.1

22753 22726 20886 19140

896 983 806 815

3.9 4.3 3.9 4.3

743 698 651 586

3.3 3.1 3.1 3.1

24639 24494 24285 22633 22953

899 937 922 870 799

3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.5

775 767 762 716 692

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3 *

* * * * * * * * * * *

*

*

BENNINGTON X H H H

105 84 174 55

CALEDONIA

NEW YORK MONTGOMERY SKIFF-S DAIRY FARM LLC HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD

H H

86 35

24378 21718

964 4 840 3.9

H H H H H

207 58 60 113 171

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

19347 21409 22155 20348 17137 15980 18190 18192 15041 19159 15097 15457 14953 16363 12303 11181

802 872 965 762 796 773 741 736 770 736 795 721 707 626 557 514

4.1 4.1 4.4 3.7 4.6 4.8 4.1 4 5.1 3.8 5.3 4.7 4.7 3.8 4.5 4.6

660 657 655 652 603 582 577 571 571 566 547 522 518 477 447 391

3.4 3.1 3 3.2 3.5 3.6 3.2 3.1 3.8 3 3.6 3.4 3.5 2.9 3.6 3.5

19 24 246 41 20 141 113 145 31 18 26

22813 22477 17737 21706 18868 20245 16928 19435 16079 16591 18847

978 891 934 741 739 709 743 697 835 783 658

4.3 4 5.3 3.4 3.9 3.5 4.4 3.6 5.2 4.7 3.5

756 682 673 646 617 605 599 584 574 572 562

3.3 3 3.8 3 3.3 3 3.5 3 3.6 3.4 3

310 23 215 105

25265 20802 19876 18850

932 794 766 776

3.7 3.8 3.9 4.1

784 659 635 588

3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1

25924 25602 24813 23730 24165 23435 23792 23990 23144 22746 22225 21562 21769 21482 21927 21751 21049 20040 17391 16024 19158 17395 15485 16631 16983 20375 15723 14495 12321 10389 9589 10517

938 1048 934 897 980 893 819 873 889 882 857 806 833 814 1103 837 833 758 853 751 731 728 729 656 644 643 587 565 480 462 440 426

3.6 4.1 3.8 3.8 4.1 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.8 5 3.8 4 3.8 4.9 4.7 3.8 4.2 4.7 3.9 3.8 3.2 3.7 3.9 3.9 4.4 4.6 4.1

823 786 750 747 746 731 730 718 706 704 697 695 661 660 660 654 651 622 612 597 583 575 559 523 521 509 472 455 373 363 346 333

3.2 3.1 * 3 3.1 3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 * 3.2 3 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.7 3 3.3 3.6 3.1 3.1 2.5 3 3.1 3 3.5 3.6 3.2

24109 18776

1253 5.2 623 3.3

931 3.9 551 2.9

35 55 87 25 66 42

21406 17659 14603 17372 13343 10222

864 846 717 659 637 416

4 4.8 4.9 3.8 4.8 4.1

647 556 543 518 499 316

3 3.1 3.7 3 3.7 3.1

H 1213 H 118 H 99 H 68 H 65 J 59 H 77 H 53 H 26 J 19 J 81 J 53 H 65 H 47 J 16 J 43 H 77 J 43 J 13 J 49 A 56 J 47 H 82 H 40 H 37 G 11 X 33 A 60 J 65

26409 25576 23191 24328 20980 16868 18975 17930 19232 15809 15116 16142 18569 18017 16340 15705 18277 14999 14359 14323 15975 14216 15493 16648 15877 12982 14593 14836 13000

1020 939 944 903 879 793 710 613 767 723 798 759 722 686 736 743 701 722 709 646 662 681 587 602 544 647 579 603 577

3.9 3.7 4.1 3.7 4.2 4.7 3.7 3.4 4 4.6 5.3 4.7 3.9 3.8 4.5 4.7 3.8 4.8 4.9 4.5 4.1 4.8 3.8 3.6 3.4 5 4 4.1 4.4

828 816 742 730 689 603 587 583 582 577 571 571 561 555 546 546 540 535 528 512 507 498 488 482 475 460 457 454 449

3.1 * 3.2 3.2 3 3.3 3.6 3.1 3.3 3 3.6 3.8 3.5 3 3.1 3.3 3.5 3 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.2 3.5 3.1 2.9 3 3.5 3.1 3.1 3.5

H H H H J J H H J H J X J H J J

66 68 319 52 427 12 70 82 166 57 49 14 67 52 45 37

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

CHITTENDEN

WASHINGTON IDEAL DAIRY FARMS TAYLOR & ALAN HENDERSON WILLIAM LUNDY HOLLISTER BROTHERS WINDY LEA FARM GARY & DEBRA MOORE DON DURKEE CRYSTAL DEW FARM GARY & DEBRA MOORE SKIFF FARMS INC. SKIFF FARMS INC. ALAIN ETHIER MICHAEL & LOUISE WOODDELL

920 3.1 * 863 3 * 827 3 659 3.5

SULLIVAN PUTNAM FARMS INC. TAYLOR FARM INC. JOHN W. LUTHER EDWARD MACGLAFLIN TAYLOR FARM INC.

4.6 5.4 3.9 3.7 4 4.8 4 4.5

SCHOHARIE

995 3.3 1026 3.5 1091 4 903 4.8

STRAFFORD-CARROLL ATHMOR HOLSTEINS

TERRANCE & MICHAEL H0AG

29847 28984 27458 18947

ROCKINGHAM STUART FARM LLC

838 933 808 776 737 743 278 246

PROVIDENCE

3 3.1 * 3.2 3.1 3 3.6 * 3.2 3.9

CHESHIRE H J M G

H

KEVIN BREENE KEVIN BREENE THE WOLOOHOJIAN FAMILY

NEW HAMPSHIRE VINCENT & CAROL MALNATI ECHO FARM INC. ECHO FARM INC. ECHO FARM INC.

18341 17134 20831 21177 18650 15332 7021 5409

KENT

9901

25130 24500 21661 21730 20358 20796 15366 17210

NAME

RHODE ISLAND

WORCESTER CV & MARY L SMITH JR OTTER RIVER FARM LLC WHITTIER FARMS INC. JIM & KRISANNE KOEBKE TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR PETER HAWKES CHERRY HILL FARM

PRO %

OTSEGO

JOHN G. KELLETT JR.

FRANKLIN DARRIDGE FARM HAGER BROS. FARM LLC. GUNN STEVE DAVID DUPREY KAREN HERZIG HAGER BROS. FARM LLC. PAUL L WILLIS CRAIG W. AVERY

163 15 95 85 67 65 29 23

%

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

ORGANIC

BERKSHIRE B

J J H H H J H J

FAT

MONTGOMERY

MASSACHUSETTS CRICKET CREEK FARM

GLEN MEADOWS FARM HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD JOHN & CHRIS NELLIS PETERSHEIM SAMUEL & SADIE JOHN G. KELLETT JR. PHILLIPS & SUSAN FERRY DELLAVALE FARM DELLAVALE FARM

Milk

RENNSSELAER

NEW LONDON H H H H H H H H H H J J J

Brd Cows

M. CHARLES EVANS

CONNECTICUT BERIAH LEWIS FARM INC. JOHN OSGA JACK TIFFANY STEVE SNURKOWSKI CLARK WOODMANSEE III DAVID HYDE GARY PISZCZEK REW FARM GERALD & DEBORAH GRABAREK GIGLIO LEONARD SANKOW BEAVER BROOK FARM LLC. GIGLIO LEONARD CATO CORNER FARM

NAME

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

MURRAY THOMPSON CREAM BRUCE & MARY TAFT PAT FITZGERALD PAT FITZGERALD NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC SHELBURNE FARMS NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC MURRAY THOMPSON CREAM WAYNE BARR

H H J H B H B H G J H

*

* * *

ESSEX ROUTHIER & SONS STEPHEN & CARLA RUSSO RICHARD & MURIEL MARTIN K. DEAN & CLAUDETTE HOOK

H H H H

FRANKLIN HOWRIGAN HOME FARM DAN & SHAWN GINGUE ANDREW & SUSAN BROUILLETTE BERKSON DAIRY MIKE BENJAMIN BALLARD ACRES WYNN PARADEE REAL & MARY LAROCHE LLOYD DIANE & BRADLEY LUMBRA TOM & MARY MACHIA WRIGHT FAMILY FARM LTD. CARPSDALE FARMS WARREN HULL & SONS DANIEL & KAREN FORTIN SIZEN DAIRY FARM PAUL & RAMONE & DANIEL COUTURE HAROLD J. & LAWRENCE HOWRIGAN HOWRIGAN HJ & A & LAWRENCE GARY & CRAIG TINKER J. & MACCAUSLAND S. WOLCOTT BEN WILLIAMS BEN WILLIAMS PAUL-LIN DAIRY PARADEE DORA & BRAD CALLAN DENIS RAINVILLE NEWTON FARMS INC. PAUL & ANITA MACADAMS LONGE LLOYD & MARIE KIRT WESTCOM FLEURYS MAPLE HILL FARM NEIL H. & JOANNE W. DOANE WALTER & DIANE BERTHIAUME

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H J J H X J H H H H X H J J X

251 540 77 108 539 223 38 261 130 188 512 79 90 86 145 132 269 244 120 23 44 34 30 81 113 82 35 77 124 36 81 38

GRAND ISLE LAKESIDE JERSEY'S J & M LADD FAMILIES FARM

J H

48 71

LAMOILLE ARTHUR & LARRY MORRILL BEAUDOIN GREG & KATHY LES & CLAIRE PIKE DEBORA WICKART RANDY & SCOTT BIDWELL WARREN RANKIN

H X J H J G

ORANGE WALTER & MARGARET GLADSTONE WHITE FARM VERMONT TECH COLLEGE SILLOWAY FARMS HARKDALE FARM INC. TIM & JANET ANGELL PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE KENNETH & LISA PRESTON ROBERT J HOWE RAY E. CHURCHILL HARKDALE FARM INC. DERRICK & BEVERLY WRIGHT ROBERT & LINDA DIMMICK JEFFREY & BETH BAILEY OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP ANTHONY & CHRISTINE BROWN ALLENVILLE FARM JOSEPH O. ANGELL ROBERT J HOWE THOMAS & REBECCA LOFTUS L.JR. & GORDON HUNTINGTON OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP WARREN PRESTON FARM 1 DUANE & DALE WILLIAMS STEVEN SMITH PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE JAMES WILLIAMS DEAN & TERRI CONANT BRANDON BUCOSSI


Serratia species: a practical summary for controlling mastitis breaks of Serratia mastitis have occurred in herds where Serratia grew in bedding and/or teat dip. Poor udder cleanliness and damaged teat ends also appear to increase risk of spreading Serratia to uninfected cows. How do Serratia spp. infect the mammary gland? Serratia spp. infect uninfected cows through environmental contact. As with control of all environmental organisms, maintaining a clean and dry environment for cows is of utmost importance. Similarly, using inorganic bedding (sand) also reduces environmental contamination by these bacteria. However, it is important to remember that recycled sand can serve as a source of environmental contamination as organic matter accumulates in the bedding material. How can mastitis caused by Serratia spp. be prevented and controlled? Practices for controlling Serratia spp. include implementing proper milk-

ing procedures and maintaining a clean and dry housing environment containing appropriate bedding materials. At milking time, all quarters should be forestripped to begin the milk let-down process. Using an efficacious pre-milking teat disinfectant following forestripping is particularly important in controlling this mastitis-causing pathogen. Chlorhexidine is not an effective killing agent for Serratia spp.; therefore, producers with herds experiencing Serratia mastitis should choose a pre-milking teat disinfectant containing an alternative active ingredient. The pre-milking teat disinfectant should remain on the teats for 30 seconds and should be removed with either a paper towel or a single-use clean and dry cloth towel. When these guidelines are followed, the time from start of manual stimulation (forestripping or wiping) until unit attachment is in the range of 60-120 seconds, an appropriate period of time for milk let-down to oc-

cur. In addition, reducing teat end exposure between milkings by scraping the back of cow stalls and applying fresh bedding frequently, will be worth your time. When herd-wide infection occurs, quick identification of the Serratia source — cows, teat dip, or bedding — is essential to reduce the spread of the infection. How can teat dip be protected from Serratia contamination? Teat disinfectants can become contaminated with Serratia marcescens on the farm. Serratia spp. are commonly resistant to chlorhexidine-gluconate disinfectants; therefore, if a container of disinfectant containing one of these active ingredients becomes contaminated, the continued use of this disinfectant on the farm can pose a threat to the rest of the herd. Dairy producers should consider culturing their teat dip if Serratia spp. is found in more than one cow, and especially if a chlorhexidine-

gluconate disinfectant is used as germicide in the teat dip. It is important to remember that the product should only be removed from the original container. Leftover teat disinfectant from teat dipping cups should never be poured back into the original container or reused for a subsequent milking. When are Serratia mastitis infections most likely to occur? New infections can occur at any time during lactation and may also occur during the dry period. Cows in early lactation are at an increased risk for new infections due to the increased stress and immune suppression associated with the postpartum period. Cows with high milk production are not at greater risk than cows with low milk production. How likely to be cured are Serratia infections? Serratia is resistant to most antibiotics, and, therefore, cure rates are limited. Thus, intramammary antibiotic treatment is not recommended. Vet-

DHI TOP 40 FOR JANUARY NAME

Brd Cows

CHESTER & SCHEINDEL ABBOT STEVEN & LINDA SMALL JAMES T DOYLE ROCK BOTTOM FARM THEODORE & LINDA HOYT STANLEY & LAURENCE ARMSTRONG

X J H G A J

FAIRMONT DAIRY LLC VERNON & MARY JUDITH HURD POULIN-ROYER J DENIS & CLAIRE MICHAUD WILLARD & TED TAFT NEIGHBORHOOD FARM AARON & CHANTALE NADEAU DOUG NELSON WEBSTER DANIEL & MEGAN BRUCE & LAURIE PERRON GARY & GAIL LYMAN PADDLEBRIDGE HOLSTEINS MICHAUD BARN 2 JAMES & SHARLYN JORDAN ADAM & JOANNA LIDBACK ANDY ANDREWS JACQUES COUTURE RANDALL DEXTER & ALICE PAMELA HELENEK LEATHER JEREMY & JENNIFER RYAN BROS LEATHER JEREMY & JENNIFER ANDREW KEHLER LAURENCE LUMSDEN & FAMILY WAYNE SR. DONCASTER WOOD LAWN FARMS INC. RICHARD SHELDON CASH & KAREN RUANE CALEB P SMITH BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 CARABEAU LARRY HARVEY FARMS PAUL & KARI LUSSIER CASH & KAREN RUANE CLIFTON & D.R. CRESSY BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 GERRY & DIANE COLVIN PARKER DAVID & MICHELE MCCULLOUGH BURTON & SON

54 47 35 53 53 35

ORLEANS H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H J J X X A H J

375 49 110 458 398 814 168 114 79 62 76 52 89 266 33 87 69 96 27 73 227 20 48 54 50

RUTLAND H H H J H H H H X H A J H H

169 193 66 58 101 144 121 135 11 26 29 32 90 34

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

13203 11620 13343 11932 12479 8838

607 533 535 520 484 429

4.6 4.6 4 4.4 3.9 4.9

447 403 390 385 377 318

3.4 3.5 2.9 3.2 3 3.6

25202 23594 22447 24625 22909 22372 22273 20063 20416 20909 18537 18918 18841 18118 17134 17990 17431 16744 14216 13733 12752 13628 12881 13744 9791

943 945 884 889 900 885 850 730 783 792 708 736 713 656 688 662 636 640 670 616 643 528 513 491 441

3.7 4 3.9 3.6 3.9 4 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.6 4 3.7 3.6 3.8 4.7 4.5 5 3.9 4 3.6 4.5

776 741 723 714 709 694 683 635 631 618 576 576 565 543 539 538 516 515 506 461 445 425 416 407 342

3.1 3.1 3.2 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3 3.1 3 3 3 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.6 3.4 3.5 3.1 3.2 3 3.5

22910 24063 20997 16256 19872 19351 18341 18302 15116 17444 15436 11958 14098 13445

901 899 736 838 788 886 679 589 635 641 645 589 539 517

3.9 3.7 3.5 5.2 4 4.6 3.7 3.2 4.2 3.7 4.2 4.9 3.8 3.8

730 712 631 609 606 588 572 517 509 497 491 453 446 419

3.2 3 * 3 3.7 3 3 3.1 2.8 * 3.4 2.8 3.2 3.8 3.2 3.1

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

* * * *

NAME FAIRMONT FARM DAVID PULLMAN LYLEHAVEN FARM DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER DAVID PULLMAN FARM LLC. NEILL STANLEY & CATHERINE SCRIBNER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON CHARLES P. CARRIER MOLLY BROOK FARMS MORGAN & JENNIFER CHURCHILL SETH GARDNER JAMES ACKERMANN HARVEST HILL FARM HARVEST HILL FARM WOODARD FARM WALT MORSE JR. JOHN ARMSTRONG DEREK WILSON GEORGE CARPENTER JR. VONTRAPP FARMSTEAD SHARON PECK VERN-MONT FARM LLC KEVIN HAMILTON PETER MILLER LILAC RIDGE FARM MALCOLM SUMNER THE CORSE FARM THE PUTNEY SCHOOL

Brd Cows

WASHINGTON H H H H X H H H H J X H H A A X J J X H X D

823 187 78 45 30 73 289 67 82 108 93 232 61 13 18 24 25 23 103 49 43 36

WINDHAM H H H H J H X

577 41 160 41 37 57 34

WINDSOR

UPWEY FARM RHOMAN WAI FARMS DAVID AINSWORTH ROBETH HOLSTIENS LLC. RICHARDSON FAMILY FARM BASSETT ROBERT P JEFFREY & DAVID TOWNSEND KAIMAN LISA JAMES S. LEWIS MIKE L CLARK GREEN ACRES MILKING SHORTHORNS JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. ROYAL TERRACE GUERNSEYS LONE OAK FARM

H H H H J J H J J X M J A G X

62 460 35 100 57 91 131 19 61 33 36 14 27 21 31

erinary consultation is recommended prior to the start of any treatment protocol. Due to the limited cure rates with the previously discussed options, emphasis needs to be placed on prevention of these infections, rather than on treatment. Summary • Serratia spp. are environmental organisms found commonly in soil and plant matter. • It is imperative to keep bedding clean and dry. • Use of washed sand bedding helps reduce the environmental load of Serratia spp. • Chlorhexidine-gluconate teat disinfectants are not effective in killing Serratia spp. • Proper milking procedures are critical for preventing infections. • Serratia spp. are resistant to most antibiotics and cure rates are limited. From DAIReXNET, www.extension.org/pages /61743/serratiasppapractical-summary-forcontrolling-mastitis Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34 No. 4 and 5, 2011

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

26316 24344 24911 23017 19531 20807 19145 19853 18943 15052 16490 17553 16136 16251 15423 14961 14290 12791 14939 13585 10322 735

1031 920 961 690 884 789 737 702 753 726 690 672 662 628 581 645 802 556 587 485 490 45

3.9 3.8 3.9 3 4.5 3.8 3.8 3.5 4 4.8 4.2 3.8 4.1 3.9 3.8 4.3 5.6 4.3 3.9 3.6 4.7 6.1

803 764 758 707 678 670 625 589 588 571 534 521 506 497 477 473 473 452 445 399 337 29

3.1 * 3.1 * 3 3.1 3.5 * 3.2 3.3 3 3.1 3.8 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.5 3 2.9 3.3 3.9

26346 20615 19761 17830 14450 16259 15392

1047 812 801 720 675 649 638

4 3.9 4.1 4 4.7 4 4.1

806 641 596 549 514 484 482

3.1 * 3.1 3 3.1 3.6 3 3.1

26754 23903 23902 23168 17944 18192 18900 14719 13474 14526 14679 12435 13037 10365 8745

904 890 848 930 1052 926 711 663 618 606 525 522 481 499 378

3.4 3.7 3.5 4 5.9 5.1 3.8 4.5 4.6 4.2 3.6 4.2 3.7 4.8 4.3

823 733 719 717 710 670 606 508 478 467 451 426 402 356 285

3.1 3.1 * 3 3.1 4 3.7 3.2 3.5 3.5 3.2 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.4 3.3

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

11452

452

3.9

353 3.1

19158 17395 12321 10517

731 728 480 426

3.8 4.2 3.9 4.1

583 3 575 3.3 373 3 333 3.2

55

17659

846

4.8

556 3.1

26 65 16 43 77 13 49 47 60 54 35 53 53

19232 18569 16340 15705 18277 14359 14323 14216 14836 13203 13343 11932 12479

767 722 736 743 701 709 646 681 603 607 535 520 484

4 3.9 4.5 4.7 3.8 4.9 4.5 4.8 4.1 4.6 4 4.4 3.9

582 561 546 546 540 528 512 498 454 447 390 385 377

3 3 3.3 3.5 3 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.1 3.4 2.9 3.2 3

18918 17990

736 662

3.9 3.7

576 538

3 3

23017 19853 18943 16490 16136 14961 14290 14939

690 702 753 690 662 645 802 587

3 3.5 4 4.2 4.1 4.3 5.6 3.9

707 589 588 534 506 473 473 445

3.1 3 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.3 3

19761 14450 16259

801 675 649

4.1 4.7 4

596 3 514 3.6 484 3

12435 13037 8745

522 481 378

4.2 3.7 4.3

426 3.4 402 3.1 285 3.3

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

ORGANIC MIEDEMAS THE BEN WILLIAMS BEN WILLIAMS KIRT WESTCOM WALTER & DIANE BERTHIAUME

ADDISON H

122

FRANKLIN H X H X

44 34 124 38

LAMOILLE BEAUDOIN GREG & KATHY ROBERT J HOWE ROBERT & LINDA DIMMICK OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP ANTHONY & CHRISTINE BROWN ALLENVILLE FARM ROBERT J HOWE THOMAS & REBECCA LOFTUS OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP DEAN & TERRI CONANT CHESTER & SCHEINDEL ABBOT JAMES T DOYLE ROCK BOTTOM FARM THEODORE & LINDA HOYT PADDLEBRIDGE HOLSTEINS ANDY ANDREWS DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON CHARLES P. CARRIER MORGAN & JENNIFER CHURCHILL JAMES ACKERMANN WOODARD FARM WALT MORSE JR. DEREK WILSON PETER MILLER MALCOLM SUMNER THE CORSE FARM JAMES JR. & TINA SPAULDING JAMES JR. & TINA SPAULDING LONE OAK FARM

X

ORANGE H H J J H J J J A X H G A

ORLEANS H H

52 87

WASHINGTON H H H X H X J X

45 67 82 93 61 24 25 103

WINDHAM H J H

160 37 57

WINDSOR J A X

14 27 31

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 25

by Christina S. PeterssonWolfe, Sandy Costello, and John Currin, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA Introduction The implementation of control measures for contagious mastitis pathogens has successfully reduced the prevalence of these organisms in U.S. dairy herds. However, dairy producers continue to struggle with the control of environmental pathogens. Serratia spp. are Gramnegative bacteria, similar in structure to Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species. The most common mastitis-causing species is Serratia marcescens. However, the treatment and control of these organisms is similar across all species of Serratia. Where are these organisms found? Commonly, these organisms are found in soil and plant matter (including feed). Cows on pasture or cows housed on organic bedding material may be at an increased risk for mastitis caused by Serratia spp. Herd out-


FILL OUT THIS FORM TO: - GIVE A GIFT SUBSCRIPTION - EXTEND YOUR SUBSCRIPTION - SIGN UP FOR A DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION 2012 Country Folks Subscription Prices: One Year (52 issues) . . . . By Mail $47 . OR By Email $25. OR Both $60 Two Years (104 issues) . . . By Mail $78 . OR By Email $45. OR Both $85

Page 26 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

This purchase automatically enters you in the CF/Gator Sweepstakes OR Bring This to our booth at The New York Farm Show, Syracuse, NY First, Give Us Your Info: Name ______________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address __________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip ____________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________________________________________ Email ______________________________________________________________________ 1) __ Yes, Please Extend My Subscription __ One Year

__ Two Years

2) If Giving a Gift Subscription, Give Us the Name and Address of the Recipient: Recipient’s Name __________________________________________________________ Mailing Address __________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip ____________________________________________________________ __ Please send me an opportunity to give this gift again when this gift subscription lapses by sending me a notice/invoice. 3) __ I Would Prefer to Receive My Subscription to Country Folks Via Email. __ Email Me a Subscription to Country Folks in Addition to My Mailed Subscription. Send to (email address) ______________________________________________________ Payment Info: __ Payment Enclosed (Make Check out to: Country Folks) Amount Enclosed $ __ Charge my Credit Card (Mastercard/Visa/Discover/American Express) Card Number ________________________ Expiration Date____________________ Your Name as it Appears on the Card ____________________________________

Mail this form to: Country Folks Subscriptions, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 OR Fax this form to 518/673-2322


Calf-Tel introduces new XXL hutch Hampel Animal Care introduces the new CalfTel XXL, the largest XL calf hutch on the market. For decades, Calf-Tel has set the standard for superior durability and efficiency, making your investment in calf housing systems one that grows with each generation of calves it protects, says Joe Weber, marketing manager, Hampel Corporation. Now the hutches themselves have grown too.

Calf-Tel XXL provides the most interior usable space for calves. The XXL hutch is 49 percent larger than the existing Pro & Deluxe II hutches from Hampel and 21 percent larger than other XL hutches on the market. This means six more square feet on the interior of the hutch for calves. Calf-Tel has long set the standard for quality, durability and excellence in calf housing systems, says Weber. The Calf-Tel

XXL comes with all of the same benefits you’ve come to expect from Calf-Tel. Benefits of the new Calf-Tel XXL hutch include: • Most efficient bedding door available. • Superior ventilation — ridge top vents and adjustable rear vent door ideal for all climates. • Extremely durable and lightweight the longest lasting hutch on the market.

• Decreased labor and healthier calves easy to move and clean. • Six more square feet on the interior of the hutch. Extra interior space provides protection in cold and damp conditions. • Maximum ultra-violet protection available. The Calf-Tel XXL will be available as of March 2012. Hampel Animal Care, a division of Hampel Corporation, began serving

the agriculture industry in 1981 with the introduction of Calf-Tel housing systems. Today it is the number one choice

for calf housing, worldwide. For more information, visit www.CalfTel.com.

Massachusetts Agriculture Day slated for April 3 a reception featuring Massachusetts’ farm and specialty food products. Massachusetts’ 7,691 farms maintain some 517,879 acres of open space and generate $364,481,000 in crop sales and $125,338,000 in livestock sales. Show support for Massachusetts’ farmers, learn more about efforts to maintain the longterm viability of Massachusetts’ agriculture and celebrate Massachusetts agricultural products. For more information, contact Massachusetts Farm Bureau Federation at 508-481-4766 or info@mfbf.net.

See Us at NY Farm show HT-E4

NEW W YORK JIM’SS EQUIPMENT T REPAIR,, INC. 4072 Lewis Rd. Campbell, NY 14821 607-527-8872 2 • 800-450-8872 www.jimsequipment.com

W YORK NEW TRI-COUNTY Y SUPPLY,, INC. 12069 Ocean Rd. (Rt. 16) Chaffee, NY 14039 716-496-8859

W ENGLAND NEW NORTHEAST T FARM M SERVICE,, INC. 4497 Route 5 Irasburg, VT 05845 802-754-8863

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 27

Massachusetts Agriculture Day at the State House will be held April 3. From the Berkshires to the Cape and islands, to the Farmers’ markets in Boston, each year this event draws hundreds of farmers, agriculture officials, legislators, and industry leaders from across the commonwealth. For one full day, participants gather at the State House to celebrate Massachusetts agriculture and discuss issues and legislation affecting their farms and communities. The event includes a speaking program, “Agriculture Day” awards, informational exhibits and


FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE THREE 20 ft steel feeder wagons, slant bar made by Schoessow, all in good condition with flotation tires. 315-398-9211.(NY) JD 7’ pull type Bush Hog, 525 woods RM 59, 3 pt mower, $300; WANTED: Seat for Int. W-4. Bucks. 215-431-6459.(PA) 6 trash wheels, 5 Dawn, 1 martin, off Kinze 2200, $100 each. 585-526-6755.(NY) NH 790 chopper w/ both heads. 2 Knight forage wagons, both tandem w/ roofs, all good condition. Sold cows. 315-7509164.(NY) FOR SALE: 12 in. wood master planer; Also, center belt; Cumberland nest boxes, 10 units. WANTED: 10 inch roller mill. 585554-4154.(NY)

REG. Boer goat, American purebred buck, Proven excellent breeding show stock, $450. Same tractor round bailer. 607-8655678.(NY) 85 FORD 250 ext. cab, auto, 6.9 diesel, 89K miles, EZ dump, 8’ fisher plow, aluminum rims, $4,500 OBO. 845-586-2870 , 607-262-0720.(NY) TAILGATE FOR M.I. 3632 manure spreader cylinder and hoses included. 585-3947041.(NY)

10 yr. black gelding, top driver, surrey or boys, $1,400. 12 Fancy Saanen Doelings. Gingerich, 9036 Stryker Road, Avoca, NY 14809

DORPER KATAHDIN 9 ewes, 1 ram, 10 lambs, $2,500. Call between 7 - 7:15 pm Tues. to Fri. 585-322-7168.(NY)

TIMOTHY SEED, $45 bu., round bales, stored inside, 1st cut Timothy, $40, bred angus cows, pure bred, 70hp loader tractor, 607-329-0301.(NY)

IH 756D on steel, runs great, very straight, will have a new TA, $8,000 OBO. 315-5367653.(NY) FOR SALE: Snap max grow tubes for grapes and other fruits, 30 cents each. Used once. Yates Co. 315-536-6747.(NY)

WANTED: AG TECH 5004 sprayer for parts, has to be the 1984 model or somewhere in that time period. Call Dave. 401822-0131.(RI) BOAR billy goat, 2 yrs old, $100, excellent shape. Call 518-686-9602.(NY)

17 YEAR OLD Arabian gelding. Sound. good health. loves to run. well mannered, great for the intermediate to experienced rider. $800. 570-605-0341.(PA)

20 ft. Patz silo unloader wheel drive, $1,500 obo. WANTED: Maytag washer. 518-673-2431.(NY)

ALLIS CHALMERS corn picker with manual, $450; Oak lumber, 5/4 rough cut wide planks. 518-731-1590.(NY)

FARMALL H tractor, good shape; Also, stock trailer, holds two horses with storage in front, ex. shape. 315-250-3248.(NY)

HAY ROUND BALE 800# to 900#, square bales, 40# to 45#, also ear corn. Corning Area, Landolf Farms, Call 607-9621741.(NY) WANTED: Pop up camber. Call Charles. 315-694-3580.(NY) BALEAGE 4x4, 1st, 2nd, 3rd cutting, NOFA certified, 1st cutting, small square bales. 315-865-8297.(NY)

ROUND BALES, fescue cattle hay, 4x5 approx. 20 bales available, $25 each, stored outside. Louisa. 804-513-4013.(VA)

JD 347 bale thrower $3,500; 56 IH corn planter, $1,000; Dutch dairy bull, 15 months, works good, tie stall, $800. 607435-9976.(NY)

12 Kw generator w/ 6x10 trailer, $1,300; Bobcat model 907 backhoe attachment, $3,500; Farmall cub lowboy, $1,500; 1940 Chevy truck, $8,500 315-744-4941.(NY)

GOOSENECK cattle trailer 18 ft., 92/94 w/ rust, $2,500 or BO. Knowles 25 ft. fold up drags, good condition, $2,500. 315-6965832.(NY)

1953 JOHN DEERE “60”, several new parts, $2,950; 1949 Farmall “M”, nice, $3,600; Both run good and look good! 401662-9131.(RI)

FORAGE WAGON, GEHL 970 tandem gear, metal sides w/ roof, 14’, good condition, $4,500. No Sunday Calls! 607-2439018.(NY)

14’ KEWANEE disk, rock flex, 18” disks, $3,000; 18” GSI bin fan w/ 3 hp motor and transition, new, $650. Geneva. 315-7812572.(NY) TWO Seal-o-matic 340 u cardboard former filler machines, $15,000 each; 1987 GMC top kick milk truck, 2,500 gallon, $8,000. 607-263-5340.(NY) ‘04 Pioneer Club Car, 4x4, gas, dump, hitch, $6,500 B/o. Dynmark lawn tractor with 18 hp, B/s, $500 bo. 315-4041752.(NY) CLUTCH pulley for 620-630 JD tractor, $500; JD M tractor, excellent, $3,000; Cleatrac B dozer, excellent, $2,200; 315737-8622.(NY) BACK BLADE, 3 point hitch; 325 gal. plastic water tank; 4x5 dry round bales, stored, nice. 585-593-5685.(NY) 1069 NEW HOLLAND bale wagons, vg; Mack tandem silage grain truck, vg; Ford, F-Series cab & parts. 315-364-7936.(NY)

FOR SALE: Case IH 781 chopper, two heads, $2,000 obo; 234 IH compact, 2wd, $2,500 OBO. 315-536-4834.(NY)

PARTING OUT Knight 3300 TMR Mixer; Also, John Deere 148 front end loader for sale $3,800 OBO. Leave Message 607432-3238.(NY)

FOR SALE: Cedar fence posts, 6 1/2’ round and split mixed, $3.00 each or $275 per hundred. Call after 6 pm. 315-8225492.(NY)

MASSEY HARRIS grain drill, with fert. and seeder boxes, 15 run mechanical lift, planted 15 a/c, 2011 good condition, $1,000 firm. 315-697-3812.(NY)

NH 1411 discbine, good condition, light, kit, $12,000, Bethlehem.CT 203-266-7907, 203-228-9428.(CT)

WOOD TRAILER with loader, 14’ reach, with own power, $5,400 or trades; JD dozer winch, $3,500. 603-869-5819.(NH)

ANGORA buck, three years old, registrable, from Champion stock. $200. 315-3737193.(NY)

2940 JOHN DEERE Tractor, 4WD, Steele radial tires, 2420 hours, $10,900 OBO. Please, No Sunday Calls. 717-6374887.(PA)

WANTED: Clean 45 lb. bales first and second cut hay, Eastern New York Area, min load 450. 203-263-5334.(CT) WANTED TO BUY: owners manual for STARLINE 70R silo unloader. 518-8422789.(NY) (2) Myers 620 wagons, 4 beater. Tandem roofs. New Floors. Good cond., $4,000 each. Gehl 1060 chopper, both heads, $7,000. 518-642-2305.(NY) (1) STARTED Holstein heifer; New 9x16 wood kicker rack, Golby running gear. 607847-6665 leave message.(NY) PIGS: 2 silts, 8 months old, (1) Boar/Duroc, 10 month, (1) sow, Berk/Duroc cross, and more. Call for info. 315-420-4682.(NY) AC 426 Turbo Diesel, complete, $1,100 OBO. GENERAC 15 Kw generator, $950, 20*58 rebar wheels BO 585-526-6240, No Sunday Calls.(NY) FEATHERLITE Aluminum stock trailer, 1997 Gooseneck, 20 foot, used for draft horses, few miles, excellent condition. 585542-9134.(NY) 2nd cutting grass or Alfalfa hay, small squares; Also, mulch hay, 3x3 or round bales. 610-273-7547.(PA) 5 HOLSTEIN HEIFERS, due in June. Jonas Hershberger, 201 Irish Settlement Road, Heuvelton, NY 13654 2008 KUHNS 103H hay accumulator, with grabber, $9,500. Call 585-526-4785.(NY)

JOHN DEERE L, not running, no tag, ready to restore, $850. 585-975-9435, Rochester, NY.

WANTED: 15’-16’ Grain truck body with hoist to fit Chevy C-70. Can Remove. 607343-1082.(NY)

BILLBOARD tarps, assorted size and weight. Chevy 263 engine with clutch, trans, $850; Various sizes, locust posts. After 5 pm weekdays, 585-554-6188.(NY)

ENGINE, International 262 6 cyc. gas for 656 etc. runs good, $1,800 complete. Troy. 518-663-7693.(NY)

IH 720 five bottom plow, 18”, $3,500, JD 8300 drill, seeder, $3,000. Bred registered heifers. 518-376-8409.(NY)

GOATS: Alpine & Saanen bred does & dry yearlings for show & milking stock, must sell. 607-838-8227 or 607-280-6617.(NY)

WANTED: Iie stall pipe and clamps with chain and hooks, bale spear, water buckets, 2 wheel wheel barrow. 315-8458618.(NY)

GEAR BOX for Steiner TMR Tumble mixer, $200; Digi Star 4 weight bars, EZ 210, 1 7/8 load, cell calibration. 315-2468707.(NY) CASE IH 2250 loader, complete with brackets for utility574-895, tractors, like new, $3,500; LX118 loader, fits DX55/TC55 tractor, new, $3,000. 607-6564568.(NY)

SWANS, GEESE, wild and domestic ducks, peacocks, pheasants, Nigerian Dwarf Goats, Miniature donkeys and more! North of Utica, 7pm - 9pm. 315-8962336.(NY)

FOR SALE: Semen tank, 49 units, Charolais semen from WCR Sir T, WCR Sir Impressive, WR Benefit. Potter Co. 814848-7401.(PA)

WANTED: Hydraulic drive fertilizer auger for Gravity Wagon; FOR SALE: Smucker barn lime spreader. 607-346-1067.(NY) WANTED: Patz 98B silo unloader, rotary hay rake, tine weeder, batch grain dryer. 315-496-2357.(NY)

4 row 3 point Spider cult., $500. Same Bu 7710 130, cab, 4 wheel, 6,800 hours, 80% rubber, vgc $9,500. 315-344-2232.(NY) 6 LUG steel wheels for skid loader, like new, $350; Chocolate lab puppy, $200. 607-243-7142.(NY)

FIVE FOOT TWO Gang disc with truck, $500; John Deere Three section nine foot tine harrow, both horse drawn, $800. 315729-2369.(NY)

BRILLION 12’ transport cultipacker, 18’ Brillion transport drags with Hydraulic cylinder, both in excellent condition. 315963-3826.(NY)

FEED CART: Bodco model C-30-1 5.5 hp Honda motor; New Holland 272 baler, Fahr tedder, four star. 315-926-5689.(NY)

SUBSCRIBE Country Folks The Weekly Voice of Agriculture

Your paid subscription to Country Folks earns you 1 FREE Farmer to Farmer Marketplace ad Each Month.

INCLUDE Your Mailing Information Found on the Front of Your Country Folks Paper!

E REAID ERS F 1 P IB TOSCR LY B N SU O

W02888 ***************CAR-RT Chec Are You E LOT**R002 k You leg r L1/01/11 YOUR NAME abel ible? For T he “A YOUR MAILING ADDRESS ” YOUR CITY & STATE, NY 13428

Your Label Looks Like This Gray SAMPLE Label

You Must Include The ( A ) That Is Found In This Area Of Your Label, It Signifies That You Are A A PAID SUBSCRIBER

YOUR Label Is Found On The Lower Right Hand Corner Of The Front Page Of Your Paper

YOU MUST MAIL THIS FORM & YOUR LABEL TO: Country Folks FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE PO Box 121 Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

 WANTED

_______________________________________________ 2ND word 3RD word 4TH word 1ST word _______________________________________________ 6TH word 7TH word 8TH word 5TH word _______________________________________________ 10TH word 11TH word 12TH word 9TH word _______________________________________________ 14TH word 15TH word 16TH word 13TH word _______________________________________________ 17TH word 18TH word 19TH word 20TH word

( ) _______________________________________________ Area Code & Phone Number (Counts as the 21ST word)

Please PRINT Clearly!

 FOR SALE

REQUIREMENTS: 1. P a i d S u b s c r i b e r s a r e allowed ONE Farmer to Farmer Marketplace ad Per Month. (Ads Will Appear For 1 Issue Only) 2. Must MAIL this form & your Current Label to us. (NO Phone Calls, NO Faxes, NO E-Mails, NO Photo Copies Accepted). 3. (21) Word Limit. Please Print Clearly.

(If we can’t read your writing we can’t enter it in the paper.) 4. Include your Phone Number with area code. (Phone #’s count as 1 word).

5. The following types of ads WILL NOT be accepted: BUSINESS, Personals, Help Wanted, For Lease, For Rent, Wanted To Rent, Wanted To Lease. The above types of ads WILL NOT be accepted. 6. Information not received

in our office by Noon on Wednesday will be held until the following issue.

Lee Publications staff has the right to reject and/or edit any Farmer To Farmer Marketplace ads.

An 1 d Far F G Ma me R et r E Ev rket To F E

TO

FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE

Please PRINT Clearly!

Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

2005 Toy hauler camper, R-wagon, Rvision, kept inside, 2 5/16 ball hitch, $12,900. 413-329-4112.(MA)

WANTED: GOOD BROKE work horse, good used set of work harness; Big chest freezer, does not have to work. 315-8589151.(NY)

CALL Toll Free

ery pla arm Mo ce er nth Ad !

888-596-5329

or FAX form with credit card information to (518) 673-2699 or e-mail your request to subscriptions@leepub.com

Rush This Subscription Form with Check or Credit Card Information To:

Country Folks

Country Folks is Published Weekly By Lee Publications, Inc.

P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428-0121 Name ______________________________________________ Farm/Company Name__________________________________ Address ____________________________________________ City

__________________________State ____Zip ________

Signature ______________________________Date ________ Phone (

) ____________________________________

E-mail ______________________________________________ Fax (

) ________________________________________

- Publication  Country Folks Eastern Edition  Country Folks Western Edition  Country Folks New England Farm Weekly  Country Folks MidAtlantic (Farm Chronicle)

 Print  Digital

- Subscription Price  1 Year (52 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$47.00  2 year (104 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$78.00  Canadian (52 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$140.00  Canadian 1st Class (52 issues) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$265.00  New  Renewal (include label from paper if possible)  Gift Subscription Signature __________________________________Date ________ Payment Method VISA MC AMEX DISC Exp. Date

____

Acct. # ________________________________________________

One Year (52 Issues) $47.00 Two Years (104 Issues) $78.00 Every Week

Country Folks

Brings You: • Award Winning Editorial • Feature Stories • Latest in National, Local, and State News • New and Used Equipment for Sale • Auctions

New Subscribers Please Allow 3-4 Weeks Delivery

NOW AVAILABLE DIGITALLY!!

Get your copy every Saturday from anywhere you have web access!! By getting your subscription digitally you also will have access to our archived issues since January of 2009 and have the ability to search your current issue or the past issues.


Country Folks

Section B

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS Evaluation of propane flaming of sand for reducing bacterial counts in bedding mastitis pathogens to mammary glands is due to the inorganic properties of sand. However, as organic content and moisture in sand bedding increases during the common practice of on-farm reclaiming sand from manure, the mastitis pathogen populations may also increase. The need exists for environmentally safe and effective procedures for altering physical properties and bacterial loads in recycled sand bedding. The use of propane flame for reducing pathogen populations in poultry litter has been reported as a practical means of sanitizing animal contact areas. However whether or not there could be similar applications for dairy herds was not known. Ohio State University researchers recently conducted a study to determine the effects of propane flaming on bacteriological populations of common environmental mastitis pathogens in recycled sand bedding. The experiment was conducted on a commercial 600-cow dairy farm. One row of free-stalls was flamed within 12 hours after recycled bedding was added to stalls, and then daily for the next six days. One row of free stalls was left as the untreated control. Stalls received the same treatment for three consecutive weeks. After three weeks, bedding treatments were changed between rows in a switch-back design. The flaming unit was mounted on 50 hp tractor. A tractor mounted rake with tines approximately 75 mm (3 inches) in length tilled bedding 150 mm (6 inches) preceding the flame. The daily movement of

Evaluation B2

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 1

A key to controlling mastitis is identifying sources of the bacteria causing infections and reducing exposure of cows to mastitis pathogens. The primary source of environmental mastitis pathogens in the cow’s habitat is the bedding or material used for cows to lie upon in stalls or corrals. The use of sand as bedding for dairy cows dramatically reduces the mastitis pathogen exposure to teat ends compared with common organic bedding materials. The effectiveness of sand for reducing exposure of


Sign-up under way for Emergency Conservation Program PITTSFIELD, MA — Berkshire County USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) County Executive Director Aimee Thayer announced that the official sign-up for costshare assistance under the Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) began on Jan. 23 and ends on March 23. Owners of farmland in Berkshire County who suffered severe damage from Hurricane Irene may be eligible to apply for assistance

under the ECP. While the USDA-FSA has already begun accepting applications from farmland owners; this announces an official sign-up period that is required by program regulations. A farmland owner qualifying for ECP assistance may receive financial assistance levels not to exceed 75 percent of the eligible cost of restoration measures which are aimed at restoring farm related resources. Types

of measures that may be eligible include removal of debris from farmland, grading, shaping and releveling, restoring permanent fencing, restoring conservation structures and installations and other conservation restoring activities. Farmland owners in Berkshire County who may have suffered a loss should contact the Berkshire County FSA office at 413-443-1776 ext. 2 for further information.

depths were less consistent. The effects of subsequent flaming of sand over a week also differed among pathogens. In general, mastitis pathogens were reduced greatest the day recycled sand was added to stalls and flaming was less effective as sand bedding was in stalls over a six day period. The use of propane flaming of recycled sand was shown to have potential as a practice to control mastitis

pathogen populations in bedding. The greatest advantage afforded by flaming was on the surface of bedding and was more effective in controlling bacterial populations of fresh recycled sand than in sand after several days use. From 3rd International Symposium on Mastitis and Milk Quality Proceedings, 2011, p. 52-55 (Hogan, Raubenolt, McCormick and Weiss) Source: Udder Topics, Vol. 34, No. 4 and 5

Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Evaluating from B1 the 760 degree C propane fueled flame at 3.2 kilometers per hour (2 miles per hour) over the surface of recycled sand bedding in stalls provided a positive effect by reducing mastitis pathogen loads in recycled sand at different depths of bedding in a pathogen specific manner. The greatest reduction of mastitis pathogen populations by flaming was on the surface 25 mm (1 inch) of recycled sand. Reductions in bacterial counts at deeper

MAINE HAMMOND TRACTOR CO 216 Center Rd. Fairfield, ME 04937 (207) 453-7131

VERMONT HICKS SALES LLC 1400 Bowen Road East Corinth, VT 05040 (877) 585-5167 (802) 439-5279 (Fax) info@hicksales.com www.hicksales.com NORTHEAST FARM SALES & SERVICE INC Rt. 5, Box 4497 Irasburg, VT 05845 (802) 754-8863


Statement from Agriculture Secretary Vilsack on record U.S. farm exports for calendar year 2011 Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack made the following statement regarding data released Feb. 10 showing U.S. farm exports reached a record $136.3 billion in calendar year 2011: “The data released today by USDA represents a record-breaking calendar year for farm exports, demonstrating — once again — that Amer-

ican agriculture remains a bright spot in our nation’s economy. We saw a rise in both the value and volume of U.S. agricultural exports worldwide in 2011, as international sales rose $20.5 billion over the previous record set in calendar year 2010. Total agricultural exports for calendar year 2011 were a robust $136.3 billion.

“These figures indicate how demand for the American brand of agriculture continues to soar worldwide, supporting good jobs for Americans across a variety of industries such as transportation, renewable energy, manufacturing, food services, and on-farm employment. During the past three years, the U.S. farm sector has

Landscaping & Snow Equipment Auction 500 River Rd, Shelton, CT

Saturday, Feb., 25, 2012 • 10:00AM Machinery • Trailers Mowers & Accessories Landscaping & Power Equipment Lawn & Garden • Misc. Equipment & Tools Snow Equipment Office Furniture & Equipment

of doubling all U.S. exports by the end of 2014. Grains were the biggest contributor to the overall record, reaching an alltime high of $37.7 billion, a $9.2 billion increase over 2010. Cotton experienced the biggest year-toyear increase, up 44 percent from 2010, reaching a record $8.5 billion. Dairy and pork exports also set records in 2011, reaching $4.8 billion and $6 billion respectively. “Another success story is U.S. beef exports. Last year, the United States exported an all-time high of $5.4 billion worth of beef and beef products, surpassing the previous record by more than $1.6 billion. The volume of shipments also surpassed the 2003 levels, the last year before a detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington

Directions from Waterbury: Rt. 8 South to Exit 14. Left at the bottom of the exit. Auction entrance approx. 2 miles on the left. Auction Signs will be posted. For more info. call 860-480-5606 or 860-567-7777. Go to auctionzip.com #13745 or visit www.rtandsonauctions.com for more info & pictures. SNOW DATE SAT., MARCH 3 10:00 am

State disrupted U.S. trade. The return to pre2003 levels marks an important milestone in USDA’s steadfast efforts to open and expand international markets. Despite this progress, restrictions continue to constrain exports to many of our key markets and we remain fully committed to breaking down those trade barriers. “There was more good news for U.S. beef exporters when United Arab Emirates (UAE) officials issued a decree on Jan. 24, liberalizing imports of U.S. beef by eliminating age restrictions. The expansion of U.S. beef access to UAE — one of the largest markets for U.S. beef in the Middle East — underscores the tenacity of the Obama Administration to improve our trade relationships, expand export opportunities and strengthen an American economy that’s built to last.” The latest export data is available via the Global Agricultural Trade System at www.fas. usda.gov/data.asp.

r Ou t u n o Ab uctio ng k A s ti A rse Lis o r a H nd e Cal

Having A Horse Auction? Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream.

Issue Date

Deadline Date

April 1 May 1 June 1 July 1 August 1 September 1 October 1 Nov. & Dec. 1 Jan. & Feb. 1, 2013 Early Deadline

March 23 April 20 May 18 June 22 July 20 August 24 September 21 October 19 December 20

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 3

Preview: 8:30 am Day of sale

continued to support and create jobs on a consistent basis, strengthening an American economy that’s built to last. Every $1 billion in agricultural exports supports 8,400 American jobs, meaning that U.S. farm exports helped support more than 1 million U.S. jobs in 2011. “And that gets to the innovation of our American farmers, ranchers and growers. American agriculture continues to apply the latest in technology and achieve a nearly unparalleled level of productivity. In fact, U.S. agriculture is the secondmost productive sector of our economy in the past few decades outside of information technology. “Exports of almost all major U.S. commodities rose in calendar year 201l, helping us to reach President Obama’s goal


AUC TION CALENDAR

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, February 20 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Special 16 Boer X kids from one farm. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire

Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 2:00 PM: Windsor Meat Market, 73 West First Ave., Windsor, PA. Public Auction Online and On Site. For updates go to auctionzip.com 3721. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-4641128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Tuesday, February 21 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, February 22 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752 • 10:00 AM: Doody Farms LLC, 4451 Large Rd., Auburn, NY. Large Public Retirement Auction. Hilltop Auction Com-

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

pany, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Calf Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716296-5041 or 585-447-3842 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716296-5041 or 585-447-3842 Thursday, February 23 • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. February Heifer Consignment Sale. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315829-3105 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire

YO U

BY

Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-8682006, 800-321-3211. Tuesday, February 28 • 10:00 AM: 97 Loop Rd., Quarryville, PA (Lancaster Co.). 53 Acre Dairy Farm. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 Friday, March 2 • 10:30 AM: Chesterfield (Burlington Co.) New Jersey. Katona Farms and Neighbors Farm Machinery Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Saturday, March 3 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Columbus (Burlington Co.)

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 public auction selling for farmers, dealers, bank repo & construction equipment. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 8:00 AM: Mendon, NY. Saxby Implement Corp. Public Auction. 200 Lawn Mowers, Vehicles, New Trailers & much more. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:30 AM: Nathan Mason, Callaway, VA (near Rocky Mount). Another Absolute Auction by Ownby. Farm Equipment Dispersal. No Buyer’s Premium!. Ownby Auction & Realty Co., Inc., 804-730-0500 Wednesday, March 21 • 8:55 AM: Rising, MD. 3 Day Retirement Auction. Business Liquidation. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-6628149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 9:00 AM: 3186 Freshour Rd., Canandaigua, NY. Coryn Farm Supplies, Inc. Public Auction of Farm Equip. & Tools. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire

Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842 Friday, March 23 • 10:00 AM: Batavia, NY. Jeff & Kathy Thompson Farm Machinery Auction. Selling a full line of farm machinery including Case IH Maxxum 115, Case IH MX110, Case IH 7220, Case IH CX70 plus hay, tillage, barn equipment and much more. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Saturday, March 24 • Atglen, PA. The Gala at Glen Valley II. Hosted by Glen Valley Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Clymer, NY. Z&M Ag and Turf Farm Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Monday, March 26 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Special Holiday Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, March 28

• 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Easter Lamb & Goat Sale approx. 5 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, March 30 • 10:00 AM: Warsaw, Wyoming Co. Estate of Ronald Milcarek Auction. Selling vehicles, farm machinery, tools, & household including ‘07 Chevy Silverado, NH TB100 tractor, MF 573 tractor and more! Watch our website for a complete list and photos. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Saturday, March 31 • Cobleskill, NY. 31st Annual Cobleskill Dairy Fashion Sale. Hosted by SUNY Cobleskill Dairy Cattle Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Windmill Farm Market, 3900 Rt. 14A, 5 mi. S. of Penn Yan, NY. Equipment Consignment Auction. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.h tm • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery, Lawn & Garden Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Thursday, April 5 • 11:00 AM: 2324 Ridge Rd., Penn Yan, NY. Marvin & Mildred Koek Excellent Farm

HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net

TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 5

New Jersey. IH Tractors and Haying Equipment for “Ralph” Dubell. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Monday, March 5 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, March 10 • 9:00 AM: Penn Y an, NY (Yates Co.). Finger Lakes Produce Auction Spring Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 9:00 AM: Penn Yan (Yates Co.) New York. Finger Lakes Produce Auction Spring Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 9:30 AM: 653 Youkers Bush Rd., St. Johnsville, NY. Public Auction. Farm Equip., Guns, Stoves, Tools & Household. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • 3:30 PM: Benton Fire Dept., 932 Rt. 14A, Benton Center, 3 mi. N. of Penn Yan, NY. Seneca Farm Toy Auction. Show 8:30 am - 2 pm. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.h tm Saturday, March 17 • 1138 Rte. 318, Waterloo, NY. Third Annual Spring Equipment Auction. Large


Auction Calendar, Continued

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

(cont. from prev. page)

Equipment Retirement Auction. IH 1420 4WD combine, ‘95 Ford 16’ grain truck, tillage, planting & harvest equip. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies, registered and grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-5213123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Friday, April 6 • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Spring Premier All Breed Sale. Selections are underway. Accepting registered high quality cattle. Give us a call. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, April 7 • Champlain, NY. Betty & Nelson LeDuc Farm Machinery Auction. Full line of machinery: Case MX120 w/ldr., Case IH 8920, Case 5130, NH TB110 w/ldr., Ford 6610. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • 10:30 AM: Independence Township (Allegany Co.) New York. Complete Line of Good Farm Machinery and Livestock Handling and Support Equipment for Lyon View Farm. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Monday, April 9 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Friday, April 13 • 10:30 AM: Catskill Tractor, Inc., 384 Center St., Franklin, NY. Farm Equipment Consignment and Inventory Reduction. Franklin Used Equipment Sales, Inc. Auction Service, 607-829-2600 Saturday, April 14 • B&R Dairy, West Chazy, NY. Livestock. Full line of JD farm machinery & tiling equip. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • Syracuse, NY. New York Spring Holstein Sale. Held in conjunction with the New York Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:00 AM: Farm of Don & Betty Duska, 1820 Co. Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman,

610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 8:00 AM: Beaver Mountain Farms, 1820 County Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. On the Farm of Don & Betty Duksa, 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-6628149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 Saturday, April 21 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Annual Spring Machinery Sale & Plant, Tree & Shrub Auction. Accepting consignments groups or single items. Consignments already coming in call today to get into advertising it will make a difference. Expecting a field full of quality farm equipment. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • Quarryville, PA. Wea-Land Holsteins Complete Dispersal. Landis Weaver & Family, Owners. Co-managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Gerry Rodeo Grounds, RT. 60 Gerry, NY. Chautauqua County Area, Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: Argyle Livestock Station, 8 McEachron Hill Rd., Argyle, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Franklin Used Equipment Sales Inc., Frank Walker Auctioneer 607-829-5172 • 10:30 AM: Dalton (Livingston Co.) New York. Dr. Lonnie and Donna Meeusen Retirement Auction. Clydesdale Horses, Show Wagon, Tack, new JD Tractors, haying line & general purpose line. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Friday, April 27 • Waddington, NY. Complete Dispersal for Gary Tiernan. 200 head of AI sired dairy cattle. Delarm & Treadway, 518-483-4106 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Machinery Consignment Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, April 28 • Heifer Haven, North Bangor, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 www.nnyds.com • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 42nd Annual New York’s Favorite Consignment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 8:00 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 9:00 AM: 796 No. Cream Hill Rd., Brid-

port, VT. Jim Ferguson Farm Machinery & Small Equipment Sale. All machinery like new. Wide selection of tractors, tools, hay & farm equip. Well maintained. Addison Co. Commission Sales E.G. Wisnowski & Sons, 800-339-COWS or 802-388-2661 • 10:30 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 11:00 AM: On the farm Otego, NY. Gretna Acres Registered Brown Swiss Complete Dispersal. 100 Head sell. This is a long established breeding herd (50 years) DHI tested, AI sired. Regular herd health program. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Tuesday, May 1 • 5:00 PM: Greenwood (Steuben Co.) New York. “Warrinerdale Homestead.” The estate of Wayne Warriner, Sr. Farm Equipment. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Saturday, May 5 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Also selling Trowbridge Angus Bulls. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, May 11 • Arcade, NY. Co-Vista 20th Anniversary Sale. Hosted by Co-Vista Holsteins. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, May 12 • 9:00 AM: 3080 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY. Estate of Tom Oliver. Excellent farm collectibles, signs, 2 Oliver 66 tractors. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, May 19 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, June 1 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, June 9 • 9:00 AM: Don Rice Jr., 5761 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 15 MM farm tractors & parts, 150 MM farm toys, MM & gas signs. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m Friday, July 13 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, July 21 • Middleburgh, NY. Reflections of Maple Downs Sale. Hosted by Maple Downs

Farm II. The Cattle Exchange, 607-7462226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, July 28 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, August 3 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 15 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, September 22 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 6 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, October 20 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, November 3 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, November 10 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 1 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. . Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, April 5 • Intercourse, PA. Past Present Future Sale hosted by C.K. Kerrick & Matt Kimball. Held at te Ben K. Stolzfus sale barn. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT February 13, 2012 Cattle: 125 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean not well tested; Breakers 75-80% lean 85-91; Boners 80-85% lean 73.50-89.50; Lean 8590% lean 58-81.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls 92-125# 82.50-145; 80-92# 85-125. Vealers: 100-120# 70-85; 90-100# 55-85; 80-90# 6085; 70-80# 72.50-82.50; 6070# 40-62.50. COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA February 15, 2012 Cows: Canners 50-79.50; Cutters 80-86.50; Util 8793.50. Bulls: 96.50 Steers: Ch 124; Sel 102104; Hols. 93. Heifers: Holstein 83.50 Calves: 54-141 ea. Feeders: 62-138 Lambs: 155 Goats: 118-202 Kids: 41-158 ea. Sows: 51 Hogs: 55-56 Feeder Pigs: 72 ea. Chickens: 3-13 Rabbits: 2-16.50 Ducks: 4.50-19.50 * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA February 14, 2012 Beef Cattle: Canners 40-70; Cutters 58-75; Util 75-85; Bulls 78-99; Steers 95-120; Hfrs. 65-85. Calves: Growers 120175;Hfrs. 80-120; Veal 90120. Sheep: 80-120; Lambs 2-

2.80. Goats: 140-170 ea; Billies 140-210 ea; Kids 80-140 ea. NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA February 14, 2012 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 23-42; 61-75# 20-62; 76-95# 38-70; 96-105# 30-75; 106# & up 60. Farm Calves: 85-160/cwt Start Calves: 115/cwt Feeders: 49-74/cwt Heifers: 70-93.50/cwt Steers: 60/cwt Bulls: 73-89/cwt Rep. Heifers: 1276 ea. Canners: 40-75/cwt Cutters: 76-87/cwt Utility: 88-94/cwt Lambs: 120-255/cwt Sheep: 42.50-120/cwt Goats: 55-190 ea. Rabbits: 2.50-18.50 ea. Poultry: 3.50-12 ea. Hay: 16 lots, 2.80-4.70/bale northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ February 14, 2012 Livestock Report: 43 Calves .05-1.40, Avg .75; 34 Cows .20-.84.5, Avg .73; 7 Easy Cows; 6 Feeders 300500# .62-1.22, Avg .91; 8 Heifers .56.5-.96, Avg .78; 5 Bulls .67-.98, Avg .85; 8 Steer .83-1.25, Avg 1.11; 8 Hogs .70-1, Avg .78; 5 Roasting Pigs (ea) 76-80, Avg 78.40; 1 Boar 55; 24 Lambs (/#) 1.80-2.62, Avg 2.29; 2 Goats (ea) 25-185, Avg 105; 9 Kids (ea) 20-115, Avg 78.87; 7 Hides (ea) 3-30, Avg 13.14. Total 167. Poultry & Egg Report: Mixed Fowl (/#) .50; Roosters (ea) 3; Bunnies (ea) 3.257.25; Rabbits (/#) 1.90-3; Pigeons (ea) 2-4.50; Guineas (ea) 7.50. Grade A Eggs: White Jum XL 1.15; Brown Jum XL 1.151.30; L 1.05-1.20; M .90-1. Hay, Straw & Grain Report: 1 Alfalfa 6.80; 22 Mixed 1.204; 8 Grass 1-3.90; 1 Mulch 1.40; 1 Oat Straw 1.60; 2 Wheat Straw 2-3.30; 2 Rye Straw 3.30-3.60; 1 Ground Corn 6.80; 1 Oat 5; 4 Firewood 25-65; 2 Cedar Posts 60-80. Total 45 . CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 50-150; Grower Bulls over 92# 100-170;

80-92# 70-130; Bob Veal 1050. Cull Cows: Gd 68-88; Lean 45-67; Hvy. Beef Bulls 74-93. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 800-1400; Springing Cows 800-1300; Springing Hfrs. 750-1450; Bred Hfrs. 700-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 7501550; Open Hfrs. 300-750; Started Hfrs. 100-300; Service Bulls 400-1000. Beef: Feeders 50-115; Hols Sel 75-108. Lamb/Sheep: Market 70180; Slaughter Sheep 20-60. Goats: Billies 75-175; Nannies 60-125; Kids 20-80. Swine: Sow 30-55. CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 40-150; Grower Bulls over 92# 100-175; 80-92# 70-135; Bob Veal 1045. Cull Cows: Gd 68-85; Lean 45-67; Hvy Beef Bulls 75-92. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 700-1400; Springing Cows 750-1250; Springing Hfrs. 800-1350; Bred Hfrs. 800-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 7501450; Open Hfrs. 400-800; Started Hfrs. 150-500; Service Bulls 600-1000. Beef: Feeders 50-110; Hols. Ch 82-104. Lambs: Market 75-180; Slaughter Sheep 25-60. Goats: Billies 80-175; Nannies 60-120; Kids 20-80. Swine: Sow 40-70. CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY February 13, 2012 Calves: Grower over 92# 100-130; 80-92# 90-135; Bob Veal 58-66. Cull Cows: Gd 79-86; Lean 68-77; Hvy. Beef Bulls 88-92. Beef: Feeders 85-115; Hfrs. 69-115; Steer 69-85. Lamb/Sheep: Market 160195; Slaughter Sheep 65-70. Goats: Nannies 130-165; Kids 65. Swine: Hog 35. *Buyers always looking for pigs. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY February 8, 2011 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# 120-142.50; 80-92# 115140; Bob Veal 25-55. Cull Cows: Gd 74-83.50; Lean 58-74.50; Hvy Beef Bulls 83-92. Beef: Ch 115-120; Sel 92100; Hols. Ch 100-110; Sel 82-88. Swine: Sow 55-68; Feeder Pig/hd 20. DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY February 13, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 70-130; Grower Bulls over 92# 110-170; 80-92# 100-150; Bob Veal 10-50.

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge Chatham

Cull Cows: Gd 75-89; Lean 60-74; Hvy. Beef Bulls 82-96. Beef: Feeders 75-85; Hols Sel 104-109. Goats: Billies 125. GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 80-135; Grower Bulls over 92# 90-172.50; 80-92# 80-137.50; Bob Veal 30-79. Cull Cows: Gd 75-88; Lean 68-78; Hvy. Beef Bulls 8290.50. Beef: Hols. Sel 99-108. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY February 13, 2012 Calves: Grower Bulls over 92# 120-145; 80-92# 80-140; Bob Veal 35-60. Cull Cows: Gd 74-82; Lean 65-77; Hvy Beef Bulls 91.Beef: Feeders 118-134. Lambs/Sheep: Slaughter Sheep 67.50. BATH MARKET Bath, NY February 9, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 90-130; Grower Bulls over 92# 110-155; 80-92# 90-140; Bob Veal 2060. Cull Cows Gd 73-85; Lean 58-70; Hvy Beef Bulls 82-94. Beef: Sel 100-104; Ch 101; Hols. Sel 92-98. Lamb/Sheep: Market 160180; Slaughter 40-50. Goats: Billies 45-85. Swine: Hog 70-77; Sow 4755; Feeder Pig/hd 27-45. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY No report FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No report Produce Mon. @ 10 am,

Wed-Fri. @ 9 am sharp! FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY February 7 & 10, 2012 Hay: 95-205, 1st cut; 110275, 2nd cut; 125-300. Straw: 155-255 Firewood: 42 EarCorn: 180 * Hay Tuesdays & Fridays @ 11:15 am. Produce Friday @ 9 am sharp! HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY February 13, 2012 Cattle: Dairy Cows for Slaughter Bone Util .70-.90; Canners/Cutters .58-.65; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls & Steers .80-.95. Feeders: Dairy .70-.89. Calves: Bull Calves 96-120# .80-1.5250; up to 95# .10.95; Hols. under 100# 1. Dairy: Milking age up to 1750; Bred Hfrs. up to 1150. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA February 8, 2012 Slaughter Heifers: 11861360# 116-120.50. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 79-83.50, hi ddress 84-84.50, lo dress 76.50-77; Boners 74-78, hi dress 80, lo dress 67.50; Lean 68-73, hi dress 74, lo dress 66-67.50. Bulls: YG 1 1244-2042# 88.50-90.50; YG 2 10881390# 82-84.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 3 400-500# 71-87; 950-1100# 76-83; Hfrs. M&L 1 600# 114; M&L 2 600# 94-96. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bullss 95-120# 115-132.50; No. 2 90-130# 92.50-110; No. 3 90-120# 57.50-85. Vealers: Util 65-120# 37.5047.50 Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 249280#

72.50-76; 40-45% lean 248286# 70-72; Boars 500# 22. Feeder Pigs: 40-50# 3547.50/hd. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 1-2 66-86# 183-202.50; Ewes Util 1-2 182-234# 7-86. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 70# 146; Sel 2 70# 132.50; Nannies Sel 1 110# 127.50; Billies Sel 1 90# 157.50; 180# 185. BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA February 8, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 76.50-80.25, hi dress 82, lo dress 70-73.50; Boners 71-75.50, hi dress 75-79, lo dress 64-68; Lean 85-90% lean 65-69.50, hi dress 75.50, lo dress 57.5064.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9901566# 79-81.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers S 3 Jersey 620# 72; L 3 Hols. 330-428# 76-87; 650# 82; L 3 Hols. 766# 81. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 94-118# 115-132; 8892# 115-132; No. 2 94-106# 102-120; 80-88# 100-120; No. 3 84-106# 72-100; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 80-86# 70-100; Vealers 72-102# 40-77. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 230# 195/hd; Sows US 1-3 350# 175/hd; Boars 280-350# 60120/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 15-40# 10-29; 60-90# 28-42; Roasting Pigs 150-170# 135140/cwt. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 46-68# 165-210; 70104# 120-195; 114# 177.50; Ewes Gd 1-2 196# 95; 270# 85; Rams 196-230# 100-110. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 70-80# 95-125; Sel 2 35-40# 35-75; 60# 80; Nannies Sel 1 90-130# 85-135; Billies Sel 1 170-180# 215.

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 7

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT February 13 , 2012 Calves: 45-60# .40-.50; 6175# .7750-.80; 76-90# .85.8750; 91-105# .90-.9750 106# & up 1-1.05. Farm Calves: 1.10-1.25 Started Calves: .50-.62 Veal Calves: 1.30-1.50 Open Heifers: .95-1.20 Beef Heifers: .73-.8850 Feeder Steers: .95-1.20 Beef Steers: 1.03-1.1250 Stock Bull: .90-1.20 Beef Bull: .95-.99 Butcher Hogs: 1.05-1.15 Feeder Pigs (ea): 50-55 Sheep (ea): 85-110 Goats (ea): 50-160; Kids ea. 120-135. Canners: up to 77.50 Cutters: 78-81 Utility: 82-85 Rabbits: 5-23 Chickens: 5-30 Ducks: 13-17 *Next Sale is Feb. 20. On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt


Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA February 14, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 1515# 126; Hols. lineback 1480# 117.50. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 87.50-91.50; Boners 81.5087; Lean 79-88.50; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 68-78.50; Shelly 66 & dn. Bulls: Hols. 1155# 89; Longhorn 1065# 59. Feeder Cattle: Hfrs. Hols 360-445# 97; Bulls L 1 605630# 104-116; Dairy types 895-1020# 78-86.50. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-125# 132-146; No. 2 80-120# 105-132; No. 3 75-115# 85-115; Util 85 & dn. Swine: Hogs 235-240# 6669; 255-285# 63-68; 385465# 52-59.50; Barrows 505615# 45-49.50; Gilts 505550# 5455.50. Goats (/hd): L Nanny 142; Fancy Kids 140-164. Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. * Special Fed Cattle Sales Feb 21 & March 6 & 20. Receiving 7:30 until 10 am. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA February 14, 2012 Rabbits: 5-24 Chickens: 2.50-7.50 Bunnies: 8.50 Guineas: 7.50 Guinea Pigs: .50-1.50 Ducks: 6.50 Eggs (/dz): Brown Jum 1.351.70; XL 1-1.20; L 1; Mixed .85. All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report *Next State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Fri., Feb. 17. Receiving from 7:30 until 10 am. Sale time 1 pm. DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC February 6, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 82-83.50, hi dress 91; Breakers 77-81; Boners 73.50-77, hi dress 76.50-78, lo dress 70-72; Lean 6972.50, lo dress 62-67.50. Bulls: 1424# 84.50. Feeder Steers: 500-776# 115-117. Feeder Heifers: 650-772# 99-114. Feeder Bulls: 462-500# 110-125. Calves: 172. Bull Calves No. 1 94-120# 127-145; 80-92# 137-147; No. 2 94-124# 120135; 80-92# 120-140; No. 3

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four 94-120# 85-120; 80-92# 90115; Hfrs. No. 1 82-114# 175197; No. 2 82-98# 100-172; Util 70-118# 42-82; 58-68# 15-30. Sows: 478-550# 61-65 Sheep: 118-182# 85-95 Goats: Kids 92-100; Billies 210. EarCorn: 6 lds, 185-210/ton Hay (/ton): 20 lds, Timothy Grass 175-300; Mixed 135250; Grass 100-330; Alfalfa/Grass 100-330. Straw: 9 lds, 155-200/ton. Firewood: 7 lds, 32-80/ld. Round Bales: 3 lds, 40-47 EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA February 13, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75# lean 91-94; Breakers 75-80% lean 8589.50; Boners 80-85% lean 79-84.50; Lean 85-90% lean 73-78, hi dress 79.50, lo dress 68-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 2 1460# 86. Feeder Cattle: Heifers M&L 1 400# 149; 500# 145 M&L 2 300-500# 117.50-130; Bulls M&L 1 600# 136; M&L 2 300500# 119-120; 800# 97.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-120# 140-165; No. 2 90-130# 115-135; No. 3 85120# 67.50-107.50; Vealers Util 65-120# 30-62.50. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 205-235# 78-79.50; 40-45% lean 210335# 70-73; Boars 400# 25. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 50-60# 205-235; 80# 217.50; Yearlings 120-125# 162-165; Ewes Util 1-2 125160# 69-96. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 55# 127.50; Nannies Sel 2 100-105# 90-137.50/cwt; Sel 3 50-70# 46-67.50. GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA February 13, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1374-1540# 128.50131.50; Ch 2-3 1226-1530# 123-128.50; Sel 1-3 1192-

1446# 116-121.50; Hols. Ch 2-3 1472-1512# 109.50-110; 1690# 109; Sel 1-3 13041594# 95-102. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1292-1420# 128.50132.50; Hols. 1384# 103; Ch 2-3 1108-1374# 122-127; 1350# 90.50-94; Sel 1-3 1084-1266# 114. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 81.75-86, hi dress 87.75-92.25, lo dress 77.75-81.50; Boners 80-85% lean 77-82.50, hi dress 81.25-86.25, lo dress 71.2576.50; Lean 85-90% lean 73.50-79.50, hi dress 79.5082.50, lo dress 66-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 10081938# 88-99.50, hi dress 1560-1920# 102-103, lo dress 1080-1465# 83-89. Feeder Calves: Steers M&L 1 553-626# 137.50-140; 8871018# 112-116; L 3 Hols. 700-1010# 89-99; Hfrs. M&L 1 510-624# 132.50-140; 780# 117.50; M&L 2 368422# 137.50-145; Bulls L 3 Hols. 438# 92.50; 888# 96 Hols. Bull calves No. 1 94124# 130-147.50; 86-92# 132.50-140; No. 2 94-124# 110-135; 76-92# 125-137.50; No. 3 76-110# 70-110; Hols. Hfr. calves No. 1 92-98# 157.50-200; No. 2 78-84# 95132.50. Vealers: Util 66-116# 52.5087.50. Slaughter Hogs: Boars 346# 38. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 76-108# 187.50192.50; 124# 175; Ewes Gd 2-3 178# 90-92.50; 218# 87.50. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 30-40# 100-132.50; 50-65# 132.50; Sel 2 under 20# 1015; 20-40# 42.50-112.50; 4555# 90-122.50; Nannies Sel 1 100-170# 140-180; Sel 2 90-140# 122.50-147.50; 130200# 132.50; Billies Sel 2 100-110# 145-152.50; Wethers Sel 1 180# 1225. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA February 9, 2012

Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 2-3 1410# 122.50; Sel 1-2 1370-1482# 117.50-118.50; Hols. Steers Sel 1-2 13061816# 90.50-95; Hfrs. Ch 2-3 1208-1326# 120-121.50; Sel 1-2 1174-1524# 116-117. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean hi dress 91; Breakers 75-80% lean 79.50-83.50; Boners 80-85% lean 75-79; Lean 85-90% lean 71.50-74.50, lo dress 64.50-68. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 2 400# 132.50; Hfrs. M&L 1 600# 120; M&L 2 300-400# 125-147.50; Bulls M&L 1 400# 152.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-125# 135-155; No. 2 90-125# 110-130; No. 3 85120# 90-110; Hfrs. No. 1 70135# 130-155; Vealers Util 70-120# 25-45. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 306# 79. Sows: US 1-3 600# 54. Boars: 300-500# 24-27. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3-45# 55/hd. Slaughter Sheep: Ewes Util 1-2 148# 70. Goats: Kids Sel 1 60# 100. KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA February 11, 2012 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 180 Mixed Hay: 12 lds, 165-290 Timothy: 6 lds, 220-270 Grass: 5 lds, 170-270 Straw: 6 lds, 175-180 Firewood: 8 lds, 50-105 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA February 10, 2011 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1265-1645# 126.50-130; Ch 2-3 11151575# 122-127; Sel 2-3 1085-1410# 116-124; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1425-1630# 108-114; Ch 2-3 1290-1640# 101-111; Sel 2-3 11501560# 94-105; Hfrs. Ch 2-3 1070-1575# 117-126; Sel 2-3 1065-1335# 111-116. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 80.50-

86, hi dress 86-91, lo dress 72-79; Breakers 75-80% lean 76-81, hi dress 81-86, lo dress 71-76; Boners 80-85% lean 74-78.50, hi dress 78.50-82, lo dress 68.50-74; Lean 85-90% lean 65-73, hi dress 73-77.50, lo dress 5965. Slaughter Bulls: Thurs. YG 1 1045-2085# 88-93. Holstein Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 114-128# 120-127; 90112# 135-148; 86-88# 125; No. 2 112-128# 120-129; 80110# 137-144, pkg 129; No. 3 100-130# 107-116; 72-98# 117-127, pkg 138; Util 90110# 40-88; 60-88# 17-25; Hfrs. No. 1 85-105# 160-210; No. 2 70-95# 125-150. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA February 7, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 82-87; Breakers 75-80% lean 7580.50; Boners 80-85% lean 68-74.50; Lean 85-90% lean 62.50-65.50, lo dress 50-55. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 120-145; 8090# 100-120; No. 2 95-120# 110-120; No. 3 80-110# 7085; Util 70-105# 20-70. LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA February 8, 2012 Slaughter Holstein Steers: Ch 2-3 1295-1560# 107.50110; Sel 1-3 1305-1660# 93.50-98.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1300# 120; Sel 1-3 10001360# 90-95.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 83-87.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 75.508050, hi dress 84-87.50; Boners 80-85% lean 71.5076, hi dress 77.50-81.50; Lean 85-90% lean 64-70, hi dress 71.50-73.50, lo dress 54-59. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 11052460# 87-92, hi dress 94. Feeder Cattle: Vealers 70110# 10-50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 127.50-140; 85-90# 100-140; No. 2 95130# 110-130; No. 3 80120# 80-120. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 140# 137.50; Yearlings Gd 2-3 90-140# 77.50110; Sheep Gd 2-3 180# 883. Goats: Kids Sel 1 30-60# 105-125; Nannies Sel 2 100130# 115-125; Billies Sel 1 150# 172. Slaughter Hogs: 45-50% lean 130-190# 61-65. MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA February 7, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1160-1535# 129-133;

Ch 2-3 1125-1480# 123-129; full/YG 4-5 1135-1460# 118123; Sel 1-3 1300-1485# 117.50-123; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1335-1565# 110-113; Ch 2-3 1280-1565# 104.50110.50; 1640-1680# 98-102; Sel 1-3 1175-1600# 96-102. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1250-1285# 127-129; Ch 2-3 1035-1390# 120126.50; full/YG 4-5 11901480# 119-120; Hols. 13851395# 94.50-95; Sel 1-3 1050-1395# 115-120. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 78.5080.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 74-79, lo dress 68.50-73.50; Boners 80-85% lean 69-75, hi dress 76.50-78, lo dress 65-70; Lean 85-90% lean 64.50-70, hi dress 73-74, lo dress 60.50-65. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 13651925# 87-95, hi dress 1745# 95.50; lo dress 990-1370# 72-85. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 600-730# 125-130; Hereford 835# 105; M&L 2 225# 160; 435-447# 137-165; L 3 Hols. 232# 115; 300-495# 85-102; 510-920# 78-97; Hfrs. M 1 470# 147; M&L 2 230-255# 127-135; 365-488# 115-147; 552-675# 115-137; 710-823# 88-95; Bulls M&L 1 457-465# 165-167; M&L 2 200-280# 125-147; 375-495# 150-158; 535# 149; 765-805# 90-97; L 3 Hols. 225# 100; 855-960# 79-80. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-115# 120-140; 8590# 125-137; No. 2 95-115# 105-127; 80-90# 100-127; No. 3 70-120# 72-107; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 95-110# 140-160; No. 2 80-85# 100-122; Vealers Util 85-100# 65-80. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 238-275# 75-80, late sale 69-71; 280295# 76-81, late sale 70-75; 300-340# 74-79, late sale 68-72; 45-50% lean 240275# 70-76, late sale 65-68; 280-330# 70-78, late sale 67-69; Sows US 1-3 310490# 58-67; 515-670# 55-57; Boars 345-420# 29-36. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 20-40# 16-36; 60-90# 38-51; Roasting Pigs 160-195# 50-65/cwt. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 25-50# 240-290; 7375# 182-202; 115-130# 132140; Ewes Gd 2-3 103-170# 95-110; Rams 170-180# 102-107. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 50-60# 117-137; 70-100# 147-170; Sel 2 20-40# 50-85; 45-65# 90-122; Sel 3 40-65# 45-65; Nannies Sel 1 90# 135; Sel 2 90-150# 117-125; Sel 3 70-80# 77-85; Wethers Sel 2 150# 167. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA February 13, 2012 Cattle: 77


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Cows: Steers Ch 112-117; Gd 106-112; Hfrs. Ch 110115; Gd 100-108; Util & Comm. 72-82; Canner/lo Cutter 72 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 82-92 Bulls: YG 1 72-85 Cattle: Steers 80-110; Bulls 75-125; Hfrs. 70-100. Calves: 82. Ch 100-120; Gd 80-95; Std 15-85; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 90-140. Hogs: 43. US 1-2 75-78; US 1-3 70-75; Sows US 1-3 5565; Boars 27-47. Feeder Pigs: 6. US 1-3 2050# 30-65. Sheep: 23. SI Ewes 60-80. Goats: 20-140

MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA February 13, 2012 Roosters: 3-5 Hens: 1.50-3.75 Banties: .05-2 Pigeons:-2-3.80 Bunnies: 3.25-7 Rabbits: 8-12.50 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA February 9, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1265-1625# 126.50130; Ch 2-3 1115-1565# 122-126; Sel 2-3 1085-1340# 116-121; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 24 1425-1630# 110-114; Ch 2-3 1300-1640# 101-106; Sel 2-3 1115-1560# 90-94. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1070-1320# 117-122; Sel 2-3 1065-1335# 111-116. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 79-83.50, hi dress 84-88; Breakers 7580% lean 76-80, hi dress 8085, lo dress 72-76; Boners 80-85% lean 72-76, hi dress 77-81, lo dress 67-71; Lean 88-90% lean 64-68.50, hi dress 70-72.50, lo dress 5762. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 10452085# 88-93. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 114-128# 120-127; 90-112# 135-148; 86-88# 125; No. 2 112-128# 120-129; 80-110# 137-144, pkg 129; No. 3 100130# 107-116; 72-98# 117127, pkg 138; Util 90-110# 40-50; 60-88# 17-25. Holstein Heifer Calves: No.

NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA February 1, 2012 US 1-2: 20-30# 140-145; 3040# 135-145; 40-50# 155; 60-90# 70-90. US 2: pkg 31# 150; pkg 42# 110; pkg 57# 140. *Next Feeder Pig Sale is Wed., Feb. 15. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA February 6, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: Non-Traditional, Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 50-60# 256-260; 6080# 235-258; 80-90# 215230; 90-110# 200-215; 110130# 206-220; 130-150# 185-200; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 60-80# 220-242; 80-90# 208-223; 90-110# 175-190; 110-130# 160-175; 130-150# 146-161. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 106-121; 160-200# 102-117; 200-300# 88-102; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120-160# 104-120. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 109-140; 60-80# 144160; 80-100# 152-171; 100110# 163-178; Sel 2 40-60# 90-118; 60-80# 112-134; 8090# 126-142; Sel 3 30-40# 50-61; 40-60# 64-82; 60-90# 74-89; Nannies/Does Sel 1 80-130# 140-155; 130-180# 152-167; Sel 2 80-130# 118133; Sel 3 50-80# 79-93; 80130# 95-110; Bucks/Billies Sel 1 100-150# 178-193; 150-250# 218-240; Sel 2 100-150# 145-165; 150-250# 165-181. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to last week corn sold .05 to .10 lower, wheat sold steady to .05 lower, barley sold .05 to .10 higher, Oats sold steady & Soybeans sold steady. EarCorn sold steady to 3 higher. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.92-7.28, Avg 7.10, Contracts 5.64-5.74; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.106.80, Avg 6.42, Contracts 6.26-6.28; Barley No. 3 Range 4.70-6, Avg 5.40, Contracts 4.50; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50-4.80, Avg 4.60; Soybeans No 2 Range 11.54-12.09, Avg 11.85,

Contracts 11.76-12.05; EarCorn Range 200-205, Avg 202.50. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.80-7.10, Avg 6.94; Wheat No. 2 6.29; Barley No. 3 Range 6.50; Oats No. 2 4-4.40, Avg 4.23; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11.4012.09, Avg 11.66; EarCorn Range 195-225. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.70-7.10, Avg 6.96; Wheat No. 2 Range 67.10, Avg 6.56; Barley No. 3 Range 4-6.20, Avg 4.97; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-5.10, Avg 4.27; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11-11.94, Avg 11.57; EarCorn Range 195-200, Avg 197.50. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 7-7.25, Avg 7.14; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.50-7.50, Avg 7; Barley No. 3 Range 6; Oats No. 2 Range 4.55; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11.20-11.80, Avg 11.60; Gr. Sorghum Range 5.90. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.70-7.25, Avg 7.02, Month Ago 6.82, Year Ago 7.07; Wheat No. 2 Range 6-7.50, Avg 6.56, Month Ago 6.27, Year Ago 8.15; Barley No. 3 Range 46.50, Avg 5.29, Month Ago 5.20 Year Ago 4.28; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-5.10, Avg 4.36, Month Ago 4.27, Year Ago 2.84; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11-12.09, Avg 11.67, Month Ago 11.03, Year Ago 13.59; EarCorn Range 195225; Avg 205.71, Month Ago 196, Year Ago 156.25. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.10-6.50, Avg 6.34; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.95; Oats No. 2 3.20-4.85, Avg 4.01; Soybeans No. 2 11.84. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary February 10, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 127-131.50; Ch 1-3 122-127; Sel 1-2 116-121; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110114; Ch 2-3 104-109; Sel 1-2 94-102. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 127-129; Ch 1-3 120126.50; Sel 1-2 112-118. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 76-81; Boners 80-85% lean 71-78; Lean 8590% lean 64-71.50. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 94-101; Avg dress 84-94; lo dress 77-83. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 150-212; 500-700# 125-165; M&L 2 300-500# 130-182.50; 500-700# 110142.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300500# 147-166; 500-700# 129-155; M&L 2 300-500# 115-145; 500-700# 115-137. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 165-217.50; 500-700#

132-161; M&L 2 300-500# 125-158; 500-700# 107.50127.50. Vealers: Util 60-120# 20-80. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-125# 120-150; No. 2 95-125# 105-130; No. 3 80120# 70-115; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 160-220; No. 2 80-105# 80-160. Hogs: Barrows & Glts 4954% lean 220-270# 6068.50; 45-50% lean 220270# 52-65.50. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 53.50-55; 500-700# 5558.50. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 12 20-30# 140-145; 30-40# 135-145; 40-50# 155-165; 60-90# 70-80; US 2 pkg 30# 150; pkg 40# 110; pkg 55# 140; 80-125# 60-70. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 265-310; 60-80# 220-250; 80-110# 175-219; 110-150# 146-188; Ch 1-3 40-60# 218-232; 6080# 197-217; 80-110# 155200; Ewes Gd 2-3 120-160# 103-116; 160-200# 96-111. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 115-138; 60-80# 126160; 80-100# 143-159; Sel 2 40-60# 90-105; 60-80# 105144; 80-100# 127-145; Sel 3 40-60# 56-79; 60-80# 85101; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 130-145; 130-180# 144-159; Sel 2 80-130# 120-134; Sel 3 50-80# 77-93; 80-130# 911104; Billies Sel 1 100-150# 154-200; 150-250# 202-217; Sel 2 100-150# 146-161; 150-250# 170-185. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Compred to last week hay & straw sold steady. Alfalfa 175-335; Mixed Hay 170-335; Timothy 150-240; Straw 120-180; Mulch 60-100. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 285 lds 52 Straw; Alfalfa 157-400; Mixed Hay 100460; Timothy 140-400; Grass 100-350; Straw 140-200, mostly 150-180. Diffenbach Auct, February 6, 119 lds Hay, 18 lds Straw. Alfalfa 175-350; Mixed Hay 150-460; Timothy 170-400; Grass 210-350; Straw 140200. Green Dragon, Ephrata: February 10, 79 lds Hay, 13 Straw. Alfalfa 157-400; Mixed Hay 100-335; Timothy 142300; Grass Hay 100-305; Straw 150-172. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: February 9, 30 lds Hay, 10 Straw. Alfalfa 210-270; Mixed Hay 150-400; Timothy 160-200; Grass 180-290; Straw 165-200. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola,

PA: February 8, 57 lds Hay, 11 Straw. Alfalfa 205-360; Mixed Hay 145-415; Timothy 175-210; Grass 185-260; Straw 140-200. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 170 Loads Hay, 51 Straw. Alfalfa 135-365; Mixed Hay 95-320; Timothy 115-275; Grass 80-270; Straw 120220, mostly 160-205. Belleville Auct, Belleville: February 8, 42 lds Hay, 3 lds Straw. Alfalfa 200-305; Mixed 120-312.50; Straw 135-220. Dewart Auction, Dewart: February 6, 33 lds Hay, 13 Straw. Alfalfa 310; Mixed Hay 100-320; Grass 100-250; Straw 160-205. Greencastle Livestock: February 6 & 9, 21 lds Hay, 5 Straw. Alfalfa 170-365; Mixed Hay 95-207.50; Timothy 147.50; Grass 82.50-270; Straw 110-137.50. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: February 11, 24 lds Hay, 6 Straw. Alfalfa 180; Mixed Hay 165-290; Timothy 220-270; Grass Hay 245270. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: February 7, 50 lds Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa 135-320; Mixed Hay 95-285; Timothy 115-275; Grass 80-235; Straw 120-175. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: January 7 & 10, 80 lds Hay, 23 Straw. Alfalfa 145320; Mixed Hay 85-295; Timothy 175-250; Grass 135285; Straw 150-210. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: February 10, 40 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Alfalfa 180-200; Timothy 160-200; Grass 160-180; Straw 75190. VINTAGE SALES STABLES February 13, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1315-1465# 125-

129.50; Ch 2-3 1235-1570# 122.50-126.50, mostly 119.50-122; Sel 2-3 12551460# 119.50-121.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1320-1730# 109-110.50; Ch 2-3 13001705# 102.50-106.50; Sel 23 94-100.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 75-80% lean 80.5085.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 77.50-82, hi dress 82-84, lo dress 70-73.50; Boners 8085% lean 75-80, hi dress 8185, lo dress 70-73; Lean 8890% lean 73-78, hi dress 7880.50, lo dress 68-72.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-120# 115-125; 80-90# 8595; No. 2 95-115# 85-90; 8090# 75-80; No. 3 80-100# 6080; Util 80-110# 30-60. Holstein Heifers: No. 1 90105# 120-130. *Next Feeder Cattle Sale is March 9. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA February 9, 2012 Alfalfa: 4 lds, 210-270 Timothy Hay: 2 lds, 160200 Orchard Grass: 1 ld 175 Mixed Hay: 17 lds, 150-400 Grass: 6 lds, 185-290 Straw: 10 lds, 165-200 EarCorn: 1 ld, 85 Firewood: 7 lds, 55-115 Wrapped Baleage: 1 ld, 50/bale. Baleage: 1 ld, 60/bale Baleage Mixed: 3 lds 5560/bale. WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA February 8, 2012 Alfalfa: 7 lds, 226-300 Mixed: 32 lds, 215-325 Timothy: 4 lds, 230-265 Grass: 13 lds, 184-240 Straw: 13 lds, 167-195 Fodder: 1 ld, 120 Baleage: 1 ld, 40 Firewood: 3 lds, 82-105

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 9

MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA February 13, 2012 Alfalfa: 170-315 Alfalfa/Grass: 275-355 Grass: 230-345 Timothy: 145-180 Mixed Hay: 180-330 Round Bales: 135-180 Lg. Sq. Bales: 128-260 Straw: 130-240 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm.

1 85-105# 160-210; No. 2 7095# 125-150.


Survey shows raw milk sales grossed $1 million for Vermont farms in 2011 MONTPELIER, VT — Rural Vermont has released its 2012 Report on raw milk production and sales. For the third year since the passage of Act 62, which enabled

the direct sale of raw milk by farmers to consumers, Rural Vermont has presented an overview of how the law is working for farmers and the economic impact

KENNLAND TRUCKING Scott Kennedy 518-857-7423 cell • 518-993-3902 home

• Dairy Cows & Heifers • Complete Moves

• Feeders/Feedlots • Sales

• Shows • Load Chute

Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Also Equipment/Corn

of raw milk sales. The report was presented to the House Committee on Agriculture on Jan. 24 and was presented to the Senate Committee on Agriculture on Feb. 3. The report is available on the Rural Vermont website www.ruralvermont.org or by calling 802-223-7222. The report is based on the results of surveys conducted by Rural Vermont, which reached 95 of the estimated 150 farms that are producing raw milk and selling it to consumers under the re-

Massachusetts Blue Ribbon Calf Sale March 24th

Eastern States Exposition - Mallary Building West Springfield, MA

FLAME STOCKYARD BRIGHTON COMMISSION CO.

691 Great Road, Littleton, MA 01460 978-486-3698

SALE EVERY TUESDAY Goats, Lambs, Sheep, Pigs 12:30 Calves 3:00pm followed by Feeders & Beef Animals

CLINICS START AT 10 AM • SALE STARTS AT NOON

50 CALVES OF ALL BREEDS For more information we can be found on Facebook and our website is

www.blueribboncalfsale.com YOUTH CAN RECEIVE A 5% DISCOUNT ON A PURCHASE OF ONE CALF

quirements of Act 62. The report provides an overview of how the law has been functioning, summarizes the data collected in the surveys and presents some recommendations for further adjustments to the law and the regulations. Lisa Kaiman of Jersey Girls Farm in Chester participated in the survey and commented; “Being able to sell raw milk has done a lot for my farm, not just financially, but community building and job appreciation — for both me and my

BUYERS FROM 3 NATIONAL SLAUGHTER HOUSES 15+ LOCAL BUYERS

All proceeds go to the Massachusetts 4-H dairy program

Same Day Payment

cows. Since Irene, these sales and community interaction have been even more of a support to my farm than ever before. I continue to feel restricted by the seemingly arbitrary 40 quart per day limit and the unreasonable labeling and testing regulations.” In general, the farmers who participated in the survey were enthusiastic about the benefits of being able to sell raw milk. Jonathan Falby, owner of Symphony Farm in Washington said, “Protecting the raw milk law ensures that citizens have the freedom to choose who makes the products that are put in their bodies, where the product is

Fiber festival and sheep forum events planned The 103rd Annual Connecticut Sheep, Wool and Fiber Festival will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, at Tolland Agricultural Center, 24 Hyde Avenue, Vernon, CT. The event

LETT USS DESIGN N ANDD PRINTT YOUR R OWN N BROCHUREE OR R FORMS 4 to 48 Page Tabloids on Newsprint or Offset Paper • Spot Color and Process 4 Color Available 8 1/2 x 11 or 11 x 17 Single Sheets Printed One or Two Sides, Spot Color, Variety of Paper Colors and Weights and Folding is Available In Quantities from 5,000 to 100,000 We can work from your layout or provide a custom designed piece for you.

Let Us Take Out The Headache . . .

Let Us Take Out The Red Tape . . .

Let our expert and professional graphic department create the image you are looking for in all of your business forms, brochures, handouts, newsletters, payroll stuffers, invoice stuffers etc.

No more jumping from the printers to the mail room. No more cutting checks to several out-sourcers to complete one job.

Fast Turn Around On All Your Commercial Print Jobs. Our fast and professional service will keep you on target. No more missed deadlines, no more coordination problems. Let our professionals get the job done...ON TIME!

made, and how the product’s production effects their land, community and economy.” Rural Vermont’s recommended changes are focused on improvements to the law and regulations that were identified by the farmers who responded to the survey. These changes would further enable farmers to respond to the skyrocketing consumer demand for raw milk and valueadded products made from raw milk such as cheese and yogurt. Being able to meet this consumer demand offers a significant economic benefit to Vermont’s growing community of small, diversified farms.

We offer complete mailing services and mail processing including labeling, inserting and folding!

And All Without Breaking Your Wallet . . . Call us for an estimate on your next job!!

PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 LeePublications PublicationsJobJobPrinting Printing Depart. 1-8001-800-218-5586 -218-5586 ext.. 1066 518-673-3237 • 1-800-218-5586 • Fax: 518-673-2699 Lee Depart.

PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 518-673-0106 • 1-800-218-5586 • Fax: 518-673-2381

will take place rain or shine. This agricultural learning experience features fiber art demonstrations and workshops, a fleece sale, sheep dog trials, sheep shearing and a wool fashion show. Premier fiber vendors offer a wide variety of handicrafts. Also featured will be live music, animals, great food and a kids’ wool craft corner. Admission is free, parking is $5 per vehicle. The festival is sponsored by the Connecticut Sheep Breeders Association. For program details, visit www.ctsheep.com. Annual Blue Ribbon Sheep Forum Held at the University of Connecticut College of Agriculture, the forum will take place Saturday, Feb. 25, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. The forum is sponsored by the Connecticut Sheep Breeders Association to educate and promote keeping sheep in Connecticut and New England. The event features seminars, workshops and a mentor/resource fair filled with valuable information in all aspects of sheep production, management and marketing. For program details, visit www.ctsheep.com.


A Fun and Easy Way To Read Country Folks...

Applying its knowledge of entering and aspiring farmers, the Southeastern Massachusetts Agricultural Partnership (SEMAP) is offering the “So, You Want to Be a Farmer?” workshop series in March and April. The workshops are designed to educate entering farmers on the essential building blocks of starting a new farm enterprise and to inform them

of the network of existing services. The series will be offered Wednesday evenings from 6-9 p.m. The five-session workshop series, “So, You Want to Be a Farmer?” comprises: 1.) So, You Want to Be a Farmer?: The Dirty Truth. March 21; 2.) What is a Business Plan and Why You Need One. March 28; 3.) The Dollars and Sense of Financing a Small Farm. April 4; 4.) News Flash! You Don't Need To Own The Land You Farm. April 11;

and 5.) Farm Tour: What A Real Farm Smells Like. April 28. All workshops will be held at The Cranberry Bog Station, One State Bog Road, East Wareham, MA 02538. SEMAP has been working with aspiring and entering farmers through its Farms Forever Program for the past four years. For more information, contact Sarah Cogswell, program director, by e m a i l i n g scogswell@semaponline.o rg or call 508-295-2212, ext. 50.

Farm Law

DOWNLOADABLE Read it on your computer anytime, anywhere

GET IT FASTER Arrives every Saturday morning

USER FRIENDLY Search and print ads and articles, even from past issues

THINK GREEN Save trees — no ink and paper necessary!

WHAT DOES YOUR LAWYER DRIVE? Farm raised lawyer who still farms can assist you with all types of cases including: Email subscriptions@leepub.com to start a new digital subscription or change your current print subscription to digital.

• Farm Accidents • Tractor Accidents • Insurance Lawsuits • Defective Equipment • Farm Losses Caused by the Fault of Another Hiring a lawyer who understands farming can make all the difference to your case. I’ve recovered millions for my clients.

Attorney Arend R. Tensen www.countryfolks.com

1-800-371-3506

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 11

NOW AVAILABLE IN DIGITAL FORMAT

‘So, You Want to Be a Farmer?’ workshop series planned


XTRACTOR (patented automatic push-off system)

Clinton Tractor Clinton, NY 315-853-6151

James R. Rosencrantz & Sons Kensington, NH 603-772-4414

CNY Power Sports Cortland, NY 607-756-6578

L.W. Greenwood & Sons East Randolph, VT 802-728-5453

Crown Equipment Caribou, ME 207-498-3196

Hammond Tractor Fairfield, ME 207-453-7131

OPTIONAL AUTO PILOT

For inquiries contact: Stephenson Agri Sales (802) 287-9241

 

Page 12 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

SEE YOUR LOCAL DEALER TODAY

Mountain View Equipment, LLC Middlebury, VT 802-388-4482 Plattsburgh, NY 518-561-3682

Northeast Farm Service, Inc. Irasburg, VT 802-754-8863 Padula Bros., Inc. Lunenburg, MA 978-537-3356 R.N. Johnson, Inc. Walpole, NH 603-756-3321 Walldroff Farm Equipment Watertown, NY 315-788-1115

White’s Farm Supply Canastota 315-697-2214 Lowville 315-376-0300 Waterville 315-841-4181 Zahm & Matson Alexander, NY 585-591-1670 Falconer, NY 716-665-3110 N Collins, NY 716-337-2563

New Holland Binghamton Vestal, NY 888-347-6902

ONLY TELESCOPING HYDRAULIC PUSH OFF SYSTEM IN THE INDUSTRY!

Anderson Group co. (888) 833-2952 www.grpananderson.com

See the Anderson Booth at the New York Farm Show


Ag Committee advances legislation to bring balance to financial regulatory reform On Jan, 25, the House Agriculture Committee advanced, by voice vote, six bills that amend Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection

Act. The legislation is the culmination of the committee’s oversight efforts of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as it writes rules for Dodd-

Frank. In the past year, the committee has held seven hearings on Title VII that have included testimony from market participants. They have shared consistent con-

cerns that the CFTC is overreaching in its rulemaking and it will have a negative impact on businesses and on the economy. “I appreciate the bi-

partisan leadership of my colleagues on the bills that advanced today. Our effort is to ensure that America’s job creators — our farmers, ranchers, small busi-

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 13

nesses, community banks, energy companies and manufacturers — are not overburdened by financial regulations. Without these important changes, regulations could deter businesses from hedging against risk. That increases costs for consumers and reduces stability in the market place, which is contrary to the intent of the original Dodd-Frank legislation,” said Chairman Frank Lucas. All of the bills considered are listed below: • H.R. 1840 would require the CFTC to assess the costs and benefits of proposed actions. • H.R. 3336, the Small Business Credit Availability Act, ensures banks and farm credit institutions can continue providing interest rate swaps for customer loans without being classified as swap dealers. • H.R. 2682, the Business Risk Mitigation and Stabilization Act, ensures that end users can continue to use derivatives to manage business risks without being subject to costly margin requirements. • H.R. 2779 provides clarification that interaffiliate transactions, when the parties to the transaction are under common control, are not to be regulated as swaps. • H.R. 3527, Protecting Main Street EndUsers from Excessive Regulation, clarifies the definition of swap dealer to ensure energy and agriculture end-users are not misclassified and subject to costly new regulatory requirements. • H.R. 2586, the Swap Execution Facility (SEF) Clarification Act, prohibits the regulators from requiring a minimum number of participants to receive or respond to quote requests. It also prohibits regulators from limiting the means of interstate commerce that market participants can use to execute swaps and prohibits the agencies from requiring a SEF to delay quotes for any specific period of time.


USDA announces CRP general sign-up Landowners and producers will have 4-week window beginning in March to enroll WASHINGTON, D.C. — Acting Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services (FFAS) Michael Scuse announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will conduct a four-week Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)

general signup, beginning on March 12 and ending on April 6. CRP has a 25year legacy of successfully protecting the nation’s natural resources through voluntary participation, while providing significant economic and environmental benefits to

rural communities across the United States. “It is USDA’s goal to ensure that we use CRP to address our most critical resource issues,” said Scuse. “CRP is an important program for protecting our most environmentally sensitive lands from

erosion and sedimentation, and for ensuring the sustainability of our groundwater, lakes, rivers, ponds and streams. As always, we expect strong competition to enroll acres into CRP, and we urge interested producers to maximize

Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

See Us at Dairy Building Booth MD

their environmental benefits and to make cost-effective offers.” CRP is a voluntary program available to agricultural producers to help them use environmentally sensitive land for conservation benefits. Producers enrolled in CRP plant long-term, resource-conserving covers to improve the quality of water, control soil erosion and develop wildlife habitat. In return, USDA provides participants with rental payments and cost-share assistance. Contract duration is between 10 and 15 years. Producers with expiring contracts and producers with environmentally sensitive land are encouraged to evaluate their options under CRP. Producers also are encouraged to look into CRP’s other enrollment opportunities offered on a continuous, non-competitive, signup basis. Currently, about 30 million acres are enrolled in CRP; and contracts on an estimated 6.5 million acres will expire on Sept. 30, 2012. Offers for CRP contracts are ranked according to the Environmental Benefits Index (EBI). USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) collects data for each of the EBI factors based on the relative environmental benefits for the land offered. Each eligible offer is ranked in comparison to all other offers and selections made from that ranking. FSA uses the following EBI factors to assess the environmental benefits for the land offered: • Wildlife habitat benefits resulting from covers on contract acreage; • Water quality benefits from reduced erosion, runoff and leaching; • On-farm benefits from reduced erosion; • Benefits that will likely endure beyond the contract period; • Air quality benefits from reduced wind erosion; and • Cost. Over the past 25 years, farmers, ranchers, conservationists, hunters, fishermen and other outdoor enthusiasts have made CRP the largest and one of the most important in USDA’s conservation portfolio. CRP continues to make major contributions to national efforts to

improve water and air quality, prevent soil erosion by protecting the most sensitive areas including those prone to flash flooding and runoff. At the same time, CRP has helped increase populations of pheasants, quail, ducks, and other rare species, like the sage grouse, the lesser prairie chicken, and others. Highlights of CRP include: • CRP has restored more than two million acres of wetlands and two million acres of riparian buffers; • Each year, CRP keeps more than 600 million pounds of nitrogen and more than 100 million pounds of phosphorous from flowing into our nation’s streams, rivers, and lakes. • CRP provides $1.8 billion annually to landowners — dollars that make their way into local economies, supporting small businesses and creating jobs; and • CRP is the largest private lands carbon sequestration program in the country. By placing vulnerable cropland into conservation, CRP sequesters carbon in plants and soil, and reduces both fuel and fertilizer usage. In 2010, CRP resulted in carbon sequestration equal to taking almost 10 million cars off the road. In 2011, USDA enrolled a record number of acres of private working lands in conservation programs, working with more than 500,000 farmers and ranchers to implement conservation practices that clean the air we breathe, filter the water we drink, and prevent soil erosion. Moreover, the Obama Administration, with Agriculture Secretary Vilsack’s leadership, has worked tirelessly to strengthen rural America, implement the Farm Bill, maintain a strong farm safety net, and create opportunities for America’s farmers and ranchers. U.S. agriculture is currently experiencing one of its most productive periods in American history thanks to the productivity, resiliency, and resourcefulness of our producers. For more information on CRP and other FSA programs, visit a local FSA service center or www.fsa.usda.gov.


HARVEST EQUIPMENT 29 Industrial Drive Newport, VT 802-334-7300 www.harvequip.com MOUNTAIN VIEW EQUIPMENT, LLC Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4482

SIRUM EQUIPMENT CO. INC. Montague, MA 01351 413-367-2481

PADULA BROS, INC. 133 Leominster Shirley Road Lunenburg, MA 01462 978-537-3356 HAMMOND TRACTOR Auburn, ME 207-782-8921 Fairfield, ME 207-453-7131 Union, ME 207-785-4464 HALL IMPLEMENT CO. JCT. 202 & 302 Windham, ME 04062 207-892-6894

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 15

STANTON EQUIPMENT INC. 105 S. Main Street East Windsor, CT 06081 860-623-8296 860-627-9832 Fax


Egg legislation replaces science with politics The American Farm Bureau Federation strongly criticized a bill pushed by the Humane Society of the United States and the United Egg Producers to implement an agreement they reached to replace decades of sciencebased animal care practices with strict government control. The flawed legislation, H.R. 3798, introduced by Representative Kurt Schrader (D-OR), would set a dangerous prece-

dent by establishing federally mandated egg production practices and banning a number of other proven sciencebased egg production methods, according to AFBF President Bob Stallman. “This bill would result in mandated animal care standards based largely on the political goals of an animal rights group that seeks to eventually shut down animal agriculture by government mandate,”

Stallman said. “The bill ignores the science supporting the consensus among mainstream agricultural veterinarians, animal scientists and livestock producers. We see this legislation as an attempt by a radical animal rights group to legitimize a policy package that will undoubtedly be used to bully other livestock producers.” Other organizations joining AFBF in raising serious concerns about the bill include the Na-

tional Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the National Pork Producers Council, the National Chicken Council, the National Turkey Federation and the National Milk Producers Federation. “The top priority of America’s farm and ranch families is to raise healthy animals, which results in healthy food for our nation,” Stallman said. “Our food supply is simply too important for scientifically proven production stan-

Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

OPEN HOUSE DATES Fultonville - Saturday, March 10TH Goshen - Wednesday, March 21ST Chatham - Friday, March 23RD TRACTORS Case IH 9110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 416 WLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Case IH MXU125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Ford 8N w/blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 555B WLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 7930 IVT/loaded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4010 w/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5075 w/553 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5303 w/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 6430 Rental Return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $65,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2) JD 7130 Rental Returns . . . . . . . . . . . $71,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville COMPACT TRACTORS MF 1220 w/mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,595 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 750 w/ldr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2305 w/ldr & deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 850 w/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 375 backhoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 855 w/cab, & loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1600 wam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2210. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,750. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 3720 w/blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 4410 w/420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 855 loader/blower/blade . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . Clifton Park Kioti DK455 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota L39 TLB, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,900 . . . . . . . Clifton Park NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 72” Sweepster broom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 . . . . . . . . . Chatham 78” skid steer blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 96’ pwr rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH LS 85 cab/AC/heat. . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Gehl 3935 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH L175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH LS180 cab/heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MOWERS CONDITIONERS Gehl DC2414 mo-co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham CIH 8880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 1411 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 925 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 735 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 946. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 4890 w/890 14’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kuhn 500 disc mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Kuhn FC 302 mo-co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/heads . . . . . . . . . . $169,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville

JD 686 rotary head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,000. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 74 rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Double rake hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 446 w/mega wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 714 forage box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit . . . . . . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 166 inverter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pronovost wrapper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Pequea fluffer 81⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Fahr KH500 tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Vicon 4 Star tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Krone 550 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE JD 220 disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Taylorway 16’ disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 7000 6 row. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 12’ BWA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Glencoe 7 shank tillage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Brillion Seeder 10’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,600. . . . . . Schaghticoke IH 710 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200. . . . . . Schaghticoke IH 11 shank chisel 5700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,600. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS JD 458 R baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Krone 1500 w/knives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 335. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 457. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,000 . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 316 baler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Gehl 1470 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston 560. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston rounder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS HARDI 210 3pt sprayer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville POLARIS RAZOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 245 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500. . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 390 flail mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Bush Hog 4 ft. mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850 . . . . . . . . . Chatham 7’ loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Landpride 7’ HD blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900. . . . . . Schaghticoke Woods 1035 backhoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,650 . . . . . . . . . Chatham Woods RB72 rear blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425 . . . . . . . . . Chatham H&S 235 spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Polaris Ranger 6x6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . Goshen

HUDSON RIVER TRACTOR COMPANY LLC FULTONVILLE 518-853-3405

GOSHEN 845-294-2500

CHATHAM 518-392-2505

SCHAGHTICOKE 518-692-2676

CLIFTON PARK 518-877-5059

dards to be outlawed on any basis. We firmly believe that any approach to animal care that does not rely on the expertise of veterinarians and animal scientists collaborating with farmers, ranchers and other livestock producers — in short, the people who work with farm animals daily — is simply not justified.” According to Stallman, as science has provided improved animal care standards, techniques and tools over the years, farmers and ranchers have steadily and voluntarily adopted these improvements to enhance the welfare of their livestock and viability of their operations.

“Farmers and ranchers have a proven track record of improvement in animal care — their livelihood depends on it,” Stallman said. “We do not need heavyhanded government mandates based primarily on the extreme political whims of animal rights activists who clearly have no regard for science-based animal husbandry or for the hard-working families that provide all of us with wholesome foods from well-cared-for livestock. Legislation that attempts to selectively and arbitrarily label any proven, science-based, animal care practice as ‘bad’ is politics at its worst.”

PLAN AHEAD

MacFaddens Spring Auction

Sat., March 31st, 2012

Worldwide Advertising & Internet Bidding Call early to consign to this big event! MACFADDEN N & SONS,, INC. 1457 Hwy. Rt. 20, Sharon Springs, NY

(518) 284-2090 Email: info@macfaddens.com web site: www.macfaddens.com


Are You Involved In More Than One Industry? We Are Here to Help You. FREE E SUBSCRIPTIONS S BY Y REQUEST * Regional/National Solid Waste Recycling (monthly)

Regional Heavy Construction (monthly)

- Send me Ì YES Hard Hat News!

Handling Ì YES - Send me Waste Equipment News!

Hard Hat News focuses on heavy equipment construction including excavating, construction/demolition, paving, bridge building, and utility construction in the northeastern third of the United States.

TITLE 1 Ì President/CEO 2 Ì Manager/Supervisor 3 Ì Other NUMBER YOUR PRIMARY BUSINESS #1, SECONDARY #2, ETC. 1 Asphalt Paving _____________________ 7 Construction Demolition _________________ 2 Concrete Paving ___________________ 8 Landscaping __________________________ 3 Oil & Stone Paving__________________ 9 Land Clearing _________________________ 4 Bridge Construction ________________ 10 Logging _____________________________ 5 Excavating ________________________ 11 Other _______________________________ 6 Utility/Underground _________________

Ì

(bi-monthly)

J Owner/President/VP J J J J

TITLE J Operations Manager TYPE OF BUSINESS (Check all that apply)

J Other

J Asphalt/Concrete Recycling J Scrap Metals Recycling J Ferrous J Non-Ferrous

Construction Demolition Recycling Construction Demolition Landfill Woodwaste Recycling/Land Clearing Composting

Regional Horticulture

Paid Subscription

monthly

Folks Ì YES - Send me ) CountryGROWER!

YES - Send me North American Quarry News!

Country Folks Grower is the regional newspaper for all segments of commercial horticulture. Each issue is filled with important information for the Greenhouse, Nursery, Garden center, Landscaper, Fruit, Vegetable Grower and Marketers.

North American Quarry News covers quarries, sand and gravel pits, HMA and ready mix concrete operations in the United States. NAQN provides a combination of strong editorial and advertising for industry professionals.

*This publication costs $22 for one year. *This publication costs $38 for two years.

Your company produces these products or services: 1 2 3 4 5

Ì Ì Ì Ì Ì

(Check All That Apply) Crushed stone and sand & gravel 6 Ì Industrial minerals Crushed stone 7 Ì Machinery/equipment manufacturer Sand and gravel 8 Ì Equipment dealer/distributor Recycled materials, concrete/asphalt 9 Ì Drilling Lime 10 Ì Blasting

(

Regional Agriculture

Paid Subscription

weekly

Ì YES - Send me Country Folks!

Business Type: K Greenhouse K Tree Fruit K Nursery

)

Business Type: K Dairy K Sheep

K Beef K Alfalfa

K K K K

K Farmers Market K Direct Market K Vegetable

Northeast Equine Market

Small Fruit Christmas Garden Center Supplier

(monthly)

Mane Stream is a monthly horse publication reaching Maine to Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Not only does Mane Stream go to horse owners who request it, but it goes to all of our Affiliated Horse Association Members.....29 Associations Strong and Growing! In addition, issues of Mane Stream are shipped to tack shops, feed stores, stables, auction barns, and where horse people frequent.

Our premier weekly agricultural newspaper has four editions covering agriculture from Maine through North Carolina. Every issue is loaded with national, regional and local agricultural news, equipment, service advertising and auctions.

*This publication costs $47 for one year.

(Check All That Apply)

*This publication costs $78 for two years. (Check All That Apply)

K Poultry K Corn

National Vineyard

K Horse K Soybeans

K Goat

Subscription (Paidbi-monthly )

Wine & Grape Grower offers features, news and information on growing grapes, and making and selling wines. Learn tips on how to start or improve your business.

How Many Horses Do You Have?_____

LEE PUBLICATIONS, INC. PO Box 121, 6113 State Hwy., Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 800-218-5586 • FAX 518-673-2381

SUBSCRIPTIONS 888-596-5329 email: subscriptions@leepub.com Name _______________________________________________ Farm/Business Name ___________________________________ Address______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ City ________________________ State _____ Zip __________

Business Type: K Grape Grower K Vineyard

(Check All That Apply)

K Wines K Supplier

County ____________________Email _____________________ Phone (

) _______________Fax (

) _________________

Date ___________Signature______________________________

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 17

National Aggregate

Recycling professionals involved in the wood waste, C&D, scrap metal, asphalt & concrete, and compost recycling industries will find Waste Handling Equipment News a valuable source of new products, product innovation and site adaption.


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888

Page 18 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

classified@leepub.com

CODE 35 40 45 55 75 80 85 90 95 105 115 120 130 140 155 160 165 175 190 210 215 235 325 335 340 370 410 415 440 445 455 460 465 470 495 500 510 560 580 585 590 595 610 620 630 640 645 650 655 670 675 680 700 705 730 735 740 760 780 790 805 810 815 860 885 900 910 915 950 955 960 1035 1040 1050 1060 1075 1080 1085 1100 1115 1120 1130 1135 1140 1160 1170 1180 1190 1195 1200 1205 1210 1220 1225

CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Announcements

Announcements

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, February 22nd For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com Announcements

Barn Repair

    

BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 bsnyder@leepub.com

Bedding WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

Beef Cattle BRITISH WHITE HEIFERS, mostly July 2010. ready to breed, $1,500 OBO. 518-3292405 BULLS BULLS BULLS: 3 British White, 3 Murray Grey. Very nice! Call for prices 518-329-2405

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050

CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Building Materials/Supplies

Building Materials/Supplies

Metal Roofing

Concrete Products

Dairy Cattle

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS®

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL

CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete SAFE A T LA ST

• Free Stalls • Holding Areas • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250

Tarryk’s Farm Supply 860-822-6013

Dairy Cattle

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

Priced to Sell

1000’S OF PARTS FOR SALE 61 Years in Business

 WANTED 

Bred Jersey Had All Their Shots Will Deliver

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Mueller, Westfalia, Surge, Ritchie, Clay, Norbco, Condi & More!

See Us at The New York Farm Show - Booth HT0367

Holstein Heifers

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

Dairy Equipment

40 Years Experience

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

12 Fancy Fresh & Close AI Freestall

We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email

HEIFERS (ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

978-505-0380

Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE:

HEIFER BOARDING

Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Concentrate Your Efforts on Making Milk - Let Us Raise Your Heifers - Quality Care ~ References Available ~ SILAGE ALSO AVAILABLE Springfield, VT • 802-885-4000

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Herd Expansions

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location!

WANTED

DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC.

Cut to the INCH

All Size Heifers

Agricultural Commercial Residential

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

Dairy Equipment

16 s Color

24-29 G Pane a. ls

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822 978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

Building Materials/Supplies

Agricultural Buildings Metal Roofing Pressure Treated Posts

Dairy Equipment

OVERSTOCKED!

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866

REG. BROWN SWISS COWS & HEIFERS

Sunny Acres Farm

CENTER HILL BARNS P.O. BOX 262  EPSOM  NEW HAMPSHIRE 03234

607-286-7620

FAX 603.798.5088

buycows@warwick.net

BERG-BENNETT, INC.

Records to 30,000lbs.

RICHARD PITMAN, INC

Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700

315-269-6600

Over 50 Years of Breeding

TELEPHONE 603.798.5087

Dairy Cattle

Lester Tyler

RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

M ID - W INTER

B A R GA I N S

JOHN DEERE #64 hay rake w/dolly wheel, $2,300; John Deere #640 hay rake w/dolly wheel, $1,700; New Holland #474, 7’ haybine, $3,200; Kuhn 2 rotor tedder, like new, $1,100; Bush Hog 10’ transport harrow, exc. cond., $3,500; Case 3 bottom, 3pt. hitch spring reset plow, $1,800; Kuhn model GF440T hay tedder, 13’, $2,200; International Model 1100, 3pt. hitch sickle bar mower, $1,400; New Holland #450, 3pt. htich sickle bar mower, $1,200. 413-522-4040

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

MACK ENTERPRISES Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

Combine Salvage

60 Dublin Rd. Lansing, NY 14882 (607) 533-4850 • (607) 279-6232

Lower your feed cost!

Buy New Tractors?

GIVE ME A BREAK

518-284-2090 • email: info@macfaddens.com

• Salford Tillage • Amco Disks • Macerator by Agland Industries • Farmco Feeders & Bale Wagons 1 Used Available • MDS Loader Attachments • Corn Stoves and Furnaces • Vermeer Hay Equipment • Tanco Bale Wrappers - 1080 in Stock • Artsway & Miller Pro Equipment • Quick Attach 6 foot Rock Buckets in Stock $1,200 • Salford RTS for Conservation Tillage in Stock

(518) 488-2696

Sales@skottfarmandequipment.com www.skottfarmandequipment.com

Now Selling DeKalb Seed Corn

FULL LINE OF USED EQUIPMENT: 7000 JD corn planter, no till & dry fertilizer, $8,000; 93 JD 4960 w/Degelman blade, $45,000; Fan manure separator, $15,000. 802-2727009 or 802-223-3868 IH DISGUSTED??? With your shifting? Now is the time to fix. Put a good tractor back to work. 800-808-7885, 402-374-2202 Int. 766, Black Stripe, cab, 3100 hrs. orig., super nice! $14,950; Int’l 966, open, 115hp, nice machine! $9,500; 2 new 6’ grapple b uckets SS mnt, $1m950 ea.; 6’ rock bkt, SS mount, $1,100; Bale spears, 3ph & SS mount, $250 ea. 603-477-2011

JD 2940, 2WD, new motor! ROPS, nice! $10,500; A/C 5020, 25hp, $2,950; Kelly backhoe, 8’, 3ph, $1,900; Kub #4560 backhoe, 9’, $3,200; JD & NH tandem manure sprdrs, $2,000 each; JD 34 manure sprdr, 120 bu., $600; Henke chipper, 6”- hyd. feed, $2,200. Full line of farm equipment available! 802-885-4000

Farm Machinery For Sale JOHN DEERE TRACTOR PARTS

Many New Parts in Stock RECENT MODELS IN FOR SALVAGE:

•6420 burnt •6215 burnt •E4020 •L4020 PS •E3020 •4240 •3010 • 2950 4WD • 2840 • 2630 • 2550 4WD • 2010 • 830 We Rebuild Your Hydraulic Pumps, SCV Valves, Steering Valves, etc. All Units are Bench Tested Many Used Tractor Parts Already Dismantled CALL FOR YOUR NEEDS

SANDY DODGE

Orchard Hill Farm Equipment & Trailers Rte 9, Belchertown, MA. 01007 413-253-5456 413-478-9790 www.orchardhillsales.com

Equipment Sale John Deere 4100 HST, 4x4, Quick Attach Ldr 350 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9950.00 Cub Cadet 28hp 4x4 Dsl, mid mower 365 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,450.00 MF 65 High Crop, restored . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4795.00 Ford Dexta, restored, clean . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4295.00 MF 281X Tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,995.00 John Deere 1050, 4x4, Ldr . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,695.00 Kubota L3250, 4x4, Ldr, Canopy . . . . . . . .$12,500.00 Ford 1710, Open Cab, 4x4, Ldr . . . . . . . . . .$8,950.00 Mahindra 5530, 4x4, Ldr, 20 hrs . . . . . . .$21,200.00 Mahindra 4510, 4x4, Ldr, Cab, 265 hrs . .$19,950.00 Kioti LK 3054, 4x4, Ldr, 425 hrs . . . . . . . .$10,250.00 New Yanmar CBL40, Ldr hoe . . . . . . . . . .$35,500.00 Yanmar VIO35 excavator . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,900.00 Wallenstein Chippers/Splitters/Winches In-stock!

NELSON PARTS

Call us today for your Subscription to

800-730-4020 315-536-3737

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

MANURE SPREADER, 2011 H&S 5120 Top Shot, 2000 gallon capacity, just like new. 802-728-5135

As our readers say... “Monday just isn’t Monday without your Country Folks!”

Penn Yan, NY

JD BALER PARTS: Used, New Aftermarket and rebuilt. JD canopy new aftermarket, $750. Call for pictures. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705

PleasantCreekHay.com

Farm Equipment

NEW FARM EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

Farm Machinery For Sale

Mowing is the easiest Task it’ll ever perform!

GET A

SKOTT FARM & EQUIPMENT

Farm Machinery For Sale

Maine e To o North Carolina

Save an average of 3 to 4 lbs of grain per cow per day Going from non processing to a processor. $6.00 corn. . . .

1457 Hwy. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 13459

Buskirk, NY

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

K & J Surplus

MACFADDEN & SONS INC.

www.macfaddens.com Lots More Equipment & Parts In Stock - Stop In

Farm Machinery For Sale

Country Folks

888-596-5329

McCormick MCX140 Power shift, 4WD, cab, AC, quick-tach 810 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38,500 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ‘88 GMC 18’ Platform Dump, Cat Diesel, 53,000 GVW, Lots of Extras, Very Good . . . . . .$11,500 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ��� • • • New 8x18 Bale Wagon, Steel Sides & Oak Floor, 8 Ton Gear w/11Lx15 Implement Tires, Ready for Field $3,585 *With All Steel Construction .Add $300 •••••••••••••••••• New Running Gear - 3 Ton .$750 6 Ton $900; 8 Ton $1150; 10 Ton $1295 12 Ton Tandem . . . . . . . .$1,995 With 11L by 15 Implement Tubes & Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . .$90 Ea. •••••••••••••••••• Exchange 15” for 16” Wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Plus $15 Ea. Wide Track Gear . . . . . .Plus $60. •••••••••••••••••• Dry Hill Bale Grabbers Round Bale . . . . . . . . . . $1,150 Heavy Duty Round or Square Bale double piston . . . . . $1,795 •••••••••••••••••• 16’ & 20’ Aluminum Ladder Conveyor w/Belt for Hay or Bag Shavings, 120# w/Motor . .$1,450/$1,550 •••••••••••••••••• Morra Tedder 17’, Used .$4,350 New . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,950 Morra Rotary Rake, Tandem 9’ 3pt. Hitch, New . .$4,500 11’ Pull Type, New . .$7,200 Tandem Rake Hitch . . . .$1,850 CIH DCX101 Discbine (Same as NH 1411) . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 CIH SBX540 Baler w/Thrower (Same as NH 575) . . . .$15,500 J&L Hay Saver, Feeders Avail Call Other Sizes Wagons,Tedders, Rakes, Feeders & Gates Available Call SANDY DODGE 668 RT. 12, PLAINFIELD, CT 06374

860-564-2905

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 19

BARGAIN OF THE WEEK White 2-85 4WD w/Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 JD 450 Hydra-Push Spreader, No Tailgate, Good Working Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,900 NH 492 Haybine, Excellent, Last Year Made . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 NH 315 Baler w/Thrower, Hyd. Tension, Nice . . . . . . . . .$5,750 2011 McCormick X-10 40 4WD w/Loader, Nearly New! Only 15 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,500 JD 5440 4WD Forage Harvester w/P.U. Head, 4500 Hrs., New Dura Drum Cutterhead rebuilt in 2011, Priced Right!. .$12,500 JD 325 Skid Steer w/Cab & AC, Hi flow, 68 Hrs!! . . . . . .$28,900 Claas 46 Round Baler w/Netwrap, Very Nice . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Krone RR280 5x6 Round Baler, Very Good . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,750 Case IH C80 2WD, 3500 Hrs, Bargain!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 ‘07 Krone KW1102 36 Ft. Tedder, Like New!! . . . . . . . . .$12,500 JD 4050 4 Post, Quad, 4500 Hrs, 3Pt, 2 Hyd, Future Collector Tractor, Factory Yellow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,500 15 Ft. Brillion Land Commander Very Good . . . . . . . . .$15,000 NH 2120 4WD Tractor w/Loader, 1500 Hrs . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 Case IH 9X, 800 Spring Reset Plows, Very Good!! . . . . . . .$9,500 2006 Landini PowerFarm 105 4WD Open w/Alo Loader, 99HP, 2 Year Warranty, 0% for 48 Mos!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000

Farm Machinery For Sale


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

FOR SALE: 4x4 baleage, second cut. Halifax, Mass. 781293-1385 FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900 GOOD QUALITY HAY & STRAW. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802849-6266

For Sale

HAY: Wrapped round bales, 1st, 2nd & 3rd; 1st cutting small squares. Louis 860-8030675

TINGLEY

• Hi-Top Work Rubbers* #1300 - $17.00/pr • 10” Closure Boots* #1400 - $22.00/pr • 17” Knee Boots #1500 - $26.00/pr Sizes S, M, L, XL, 2X, & 3X

Naples Distributors (888) 223-8608

www.NaplesDistributors.com

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Heating

Help Wanted

Horses SMALL White Percheron gelding, broke for wedding carriage, also rides. Also, team of well broke, older Belgian geldings, sound, shod. Erin C. Lundy 315-493-1051

Help Wanted

PROGRESSIVE Dairy, located in Cooperstown, NY, position available immediately for the right individual. Duties include: all types of field work with some maintenance, year round work. Class A or B CDL. Flexible hours, a team player with a passion for Ag. Eric 607-547-2797, 607-4355345

DRY HAY: Several grades & quality levels available for horse, cow, sheep & goat. Large square, barn stored, no rained-on hay. Also, straw available. Pick up or deliver. Free loading. Fox Valley Vail Farms 518-872-1811

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293

Page 20 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Hay - Straw For Sale

Large Dairy Farm Located in Cayuga County, NY Is seeking a goal-oriented team player to join our crop crew. Ideal candidate will have a class A CDL, knowledge of dairy farming, and strong mechanical and operation skills. A positive attitude and willingness to learn are also a must.

Call

• BRAND NEW •

2-STAINLESS STEEL bulk milk tanks for storage: 1-1500 gallon round Girton ($2,500), 1-600 gallon rectangular Diplomat ($800). 978-5050380

wide track w/ rack,

5’x14’

315-963-3586 Call before 7 pm

Help Wanted

Great Opportunities!

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Mountain View Equipment, LLC

LOOKING FOR

Small Engine Technician DIESEL ENGINE, HYDRAULIC AND ELECTRICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIRED, CLEAN DRIVER’S LICENSE

Agricultural Equipment Sales Person EXPERIENCE PREFERRED

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

518-768-2344 150 ROUND BALES, 1st cut hay, approx. 4x6, net wrapped Will load. Call 802-352-4586

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

Call for Competitive Prices

BARTON VT: 350 big square bales, wrapped. Avg 1250lbs, Avg 57% dry matter, Avg 17.5% protein. $70/bale. $5 discount to ‘Irene’ victims. Call Bob 802-673-6629 or Dan 802-793-0844, email dan@farmandforest.com

Benefits • EOE

519-529-1141

LEADER 15 Quart Sap Buckets w/spout & lid, large quantity, $7.50 each; 2-275 gal. steel gathering tanks, $250.00 each. 413-522-4040

Parts

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED

Poultry Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Clearview Hatchery PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

(717) 365-3234

Day Old Chicks: Broilers, Layers Turkeys, Ducks

NEPPA Hatchery Jill & Ken Gies 660 Fordsbush Road Ft. Plain, NY 13339 email: giespasture@frontiernet.net Write or call for prices & availability

518-568-5322 RABBITS: MEAT. Fryers $15.00; Roasters $20-$30. Dutch $30.00; Lopps $30.00. 860-778-8766, Scottland,CT. Will grow to order.

PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

607-642-3293

WRITERS WANTED Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper. Knowledge of the industry a must.

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

4X4 ROUND SILAGE BALES, 1st & 2nd cutting, FOB SE Mass. 508-648-3276 AMARAL FARMS 1st & 2nd cutting good quality hay, round silage bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-4506536

Please Apply in Person 1137 Route 7 North Openings in Middlebury Location 802-388-4482

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

Maple Syrup Supplies

Help Wanted MADE IN AMERICA!!! Quality Hay = Healthier Animals! All hay is tested and meets production and nutrient needs... Dry Round, Square & Wrapped, 1st, 2nd, 3rd & 4th. Delivery available. 845-9857866

Lawn & Garden

Horses

real set of bobsleighs

315-729-0438

Poultry & Rabbits

Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles.

Parts & Repair

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS BATES CORPORATION 12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS!

1-800-836-2888

1-800-248-2955

To place a Classified Ad

Parts & Repair

Parts & Repair

Call the IH Parts Specialists:

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services

Hay - Straw Wanted

WANTED

Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141

“BELT T BUSTERS” $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Hay & Straw - All Types

Agricultural Belt Service

We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

185 ACRE CENTRAL Maine dairy farm, milking parlor, open stall, 600 gallon bulk tank, grain bin, ASCS manure pit, heifer barn, equipment shed, ready to milk, possible lease, purchase or rent. 207431-2348

Barton VT: 123A farm, 40% open, remainder mixed woods. Large post-n-beam barn, one-story steel frame dairy barn for 60+ cows. 5 BR farmhouse in good shape. $399,000. Call Dan 802-7930844, 800-273-5371. MLS 2799176

CENTRAL VERMONT DAIRY for sale, 394 acres, double 8 parlor, 200+ cow capacity, slurry store, harvestore, bunk silos. $750,000 firm. Cows, machinery, and feed available. Call 860-836-1524

Peacham VT: 158A farm with 45A meadow & pasture, balance mixed woods. Recently used as Organic Vegetable farm. Large 3-story post-nbeam barn. Farmhouse has 5+ BR, many renovations, new standing seam roof. $624,900. Call Dan 802-7930844, 800-273-5371. MLS 4128930

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

(607)) 334-97277 Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2223 3 - Madison n Countyy Freee Stalll Operation- 500 acres, 330 tillable well drained high lime very productive soils w/additional 200 acres rented with more land available. 2 Modern Barns w/305 free stalls 2 other barns for 100 head of young stock or dry cows. 36x80 machinery building with heated shop. Large pad for corn silage and haylage. Separate heifer facility for 200 head of heifers available for rent close by. Good remodeled 2 story 3 bdrm home. This is a great area of Central NY to farm in. Everything is close by. 5 million Long growing season, good milk markets Askingg $1.35 #2254 4 - Neat,, Clean,, & Turn-key.. 220 acre farm, 160 exceptional well drained tillable acres with additional 40+ acres to rent. Balance mostly pasture, some woods. Two story 68 stall dairy barn with attached 80 stall free stall for dry cow and young stock. 3 very nice Morton machinery buildings. Nice 2 story 5 bedroom 3 bath Modern Home. This is truly an exceptional farm that has everything. Great milking facility, room for heifers and dry cows, plenty of

Lowell VT: 372A Farm, Missisquoi River frontage, 2000+ tap sugarbush, addl 5000+ potential. Gambrel 40x160 barn, 4-bay garage/shop. Extensive renovations to 4 BR, 2 BA home. Miles of high tension fencing, ready for animals. $744,000. Bruno Marquis, 802-673-8101, 800-2735371. MLS 4081963

Roofing

Trucks

1995 Mack RD 350HP, 8LL, 18K-44K axles with pusher, bill of sale only $18,500

Fermec TLK 860 Backhoe Perkins diesel, Needs some TLC $9,500

2001 Mack RD 350HP, 8LL, 44K rears with lift axle $26,500

1989 Dresser TD-8G 6 way blade $13,500

1997 Ford 6 Wheeler Auto, 210HP Cummins, sander $7,000

1993 Custom Tiltbed new paint, fully rebuilt $13,500

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Trailers TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

Cat D3B Dozer 6 Way Blade $10,500

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING

1999 International 4900 10 Wheeler, Auto w/DT530 $10,500 Assortment of Trucks and Equipment Many New and Used Feed and Gravel Bodies

Call Us With Your Used Parts Needs - Many Hydraulic Parts in Stock e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

machinery storage, and enough supporting lands. Farm recently appraised by leading Ag Bank at close to $550,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $550,000,, cattle, machinery, and feed available 1 - Madison n Countyy Farm m - 240 acre Farm bordering large 2311 State Land and the Brookfield Equine Trail System. 60+ acre tillable mostly hay 70 acres in pasture, balance woods. Older 2 story barn for 70 head of cattle. 2 out buildings for machinery storage. Older 2 story 5 bedroom home. Excellent hunting. Sits on a very quiet road with lots of possibilities. Raise beef or horses. Excellent hay making farm. Road frontage on two roads. Farm could be easily sub-divided for investment. Gas and Mineral rights convey. Owners are relocating their dairy operation to another area this spring and have priced this farm very reasonable to move it. Priced to sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $310,000 2280 0 - Otsego o Coun ntyy Dairyy Farm.. 25 acres total, 10 tillable, balance pasture. Plenty of additional land close by to rent or purchase feed dealers in the area. Single story conventional barn with 55 ties set up to milk. 20x80 young stock barn. 2 upright silos 20x60 & 18x60. Older 2 story 4 bdrm 2 bth home in good condition. New windows, new septic. All located on a quiet road, mins to Cooperstown. Buy for Dairy or would make a nice farm for horses or beef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $175,000. 2315 5 - Nearr Cortland d NY.. 26 acres of land with road frontage on two roads. Power and telephone. Mineral rights intact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $55,000. Owner would consider financing for qualified buyer.

DERBY Y TRUCK K PARTS 802-673-8525 Days • 802-895-2961 Eves www.derbytruckparts.com

Calendar of Events NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

FEB 25 6th NH Grazing Conference Holiday Inn, Concord,NH. Featuring Kathy Voth on “Training Livestock to Eat Weeds” and Brett Chedzoz on “Benefits of Silvopasturing.” Contact Bill Fosher, 603-399-9975 or e-mail Bill@edgefieldsheep.com. Agriculture & Food Conference of Southeastern Massachusetts Bristol County Agricultural High School, Dighton, MA. 8:30 am - 5 pm. Registration is $35 for farmers; Register online or call 508-295-2212 ext. 50. Annual Blue Ribbon Sheep Forum University of Connecticut College of Agriculture. 9 am 3 pm. Seminars, workshops and mentor/resource fair filled with valuable information in all aspects of sheep production, management and marketing. Visit the website for details. On Internet at www.ctsheep.com

FEB 27 Rutland Natural Resources Conservation Annual Meeting USDA Service Center, 170 S. Main St., Rutland, VT. 9:30 am. Pre-register by Feb. 20. Contact Nanci McGuire, 802-775-8034 or e-mail nanci.mcquire@vt.nacdnet.net MAR 5 & 7 Connecticut Farm Energy & Assistance Workshops Locations as follows: • Mar 5 - 10 am - Noon. Litchfield Co., UConn Extension Center, 843 University Dr., Torrington CT • Mar 7 - 4-6 pm. New London Co., USDA Rural Development Office, 238 West Town St., Norwich, CT Register today. Call 860345-3977 or e-mail ctfarmenergy@aol.com. On Internet at www.CTFarm Energy.org MAR 9-12 ABCs of Farm Based Education: A Project Seasons Workshop for Farmers Shelburne Farms, VT. Call 978-318-7871. On Internet at www.farmbasededuca tion.org MAR 13 Rhode Island Women in Agriculture Conference URI, CBLS Building, Flagg Rd., Chafee Lot Rd. (Parking), Kingston, Rhode Island. 8 am - 4 pm. The agenda is focused to present women farmers with tips for the trade, strategies for how to

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 21

#718 - Nice 210A. free stall dairy farm w/170 tillable flat to rolling acres w/sandy/loam soil - 120 cow free stall barn w/double 10 Beco parlor w/ATO’s, 3,000 gal bulk tank - also 160 ft. free stall heifer/dry cow barn, 20x41 ft. Sealstore grain silo & 170x100 ft. bunk silo w/concrete floor - good 9 rm. home w/5 bdrms & 2 baths corn & wood stoves - nice fireplace, also village water & Artisian spring. .$550,000 93-A - HUNTING CLUB SPECIAL!!! 716 ACRES IN ADIRONDACK PARK - Great for recreation - all wooded with creeks & ponds throughout property - great hunting and fishing - hunting cabin - logging road up thru middle of property - 4-wheeler trails thru property - Town of Ohio - Price $798,000 . . . . . . . . .REDUCED TO $494,000 93-B - Great property for hunting & fishing is joined on its northern border by 93-A, it’s mostly wooded, 475 acres with creek going thru - road goes by East end of property & log road thru west end - mostly level with hills on east end. Located in Town of Ohio, Herkimer Co., southern part of Adirondack Park, Poland School District priced to sell fast at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$327,750 93-C - Another great property for hunting & trout fishing is joined by 93-B on the east - mostly wooded, 157 acres, log road thru property, trout stream going thru center of property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sale Price $108,330 C-40 - Hobby/dairy farm on 70 A. of gravel soil, 40 A. pasture, 30 A. woods - 52 tie stalls, 3 lg. pens, 2” pipeline, 5 units, 800 gal. tank, tunnel ventilation, mow conveyor, 2 Patz barn cleaners, 8 ton grain bin, 16x40 & 16x60 silos w/unloaders, tiled mangers, concrete barnyard, 50x80 pole barn & outbuildings all w/concrete floors, water & electric - nice 7 room, 3BR, 1 bath home - new outside wood furnace, inside oil furnace, drilled wells & spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $260,000 C-52 - Certified Organic Dairy Farm Operation w/340 A. - 285 tillable, remainder woods & pasture - 50x75 two story dairy barn w/50 tie stalls, 2 box stalls & 22 calf ties - 2 inch pipeline, 3 units, 800 gal bulk tank, 20x30 & 20x60 ft. Harvestores w/unloaders - unrestored 8 rm. stone home; prime certified organic farm land; 1.8 mi. road frontage; drilled well; stream runs thru property - parcel could be divided into 185 A. with no bldgs & 149 A. or 149 A. w/homestead . . . . . . .Asking $1,350,000 CERTIFIED ORGANIC DAIRY ALSO AVAILABLE.

CHRISTMAS TREE FARM and split level house. Unique entrepreneurial opportunity, earn a second income, fourth bedroom off family room and office, large closets and pristine floors, open kitchen atmosphere, 2½ baths. Bloomfield,CT 860-989-2783

Trucks


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Page 22 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Calendar of Events make it work and enlightening stories. For more info, see www.regonline.com/ builder/site/Default.aspx? EventID=1048819. MAR 15 Vermont Grain Growers Conference The Essex Resort and Spa, Essex, VT. Registrations are due by March 7. The fee, which includes materials and lunch, is $45 per person and $40 for NGGA members. Registration forms and payment also may be mailed to Grain Conference, UVM Extension, 278 South Main St., Ste. 2, St. Albans, VT 05478. Checks should be made payable to University of Vermont Extension. Contact Erica Cummings or Heather Darby at 802-5246501 or 800-639-2130. On Internet at www.uvm.edu/ extension/grainconference MAR 24 CT Agriculture Commission Conference EastConn, 376 Hartford Turnpike, Hampton, CT. 9 am - 3:30 pm. $15. Includes

farm to table lunch & conference materials. Register before March 15, space is limited. Contact Jennifer Kaufman, 860-450-6007 or e-mail AGvocate@yahoo.com APR 28 103rd Annual Connecticut Sheep, Wool and Fiber Festival Tolland Agricultural Center, 24 Hyde Ave., Vernon, CT. 9 am - 5 pm. featuring fiber art demonstrations and workshops, a fleece sale, sheep dog trials, sheep shearing and a wool fashion show. Visit the website for details. On Internet at www. ctsheep.com MAY 26-27 38th Annual Massachusetts Sheep & Woolcraft Fair Cummington Fairgrounds, Cummington, MA. 9 am- 4 pm both days. On Internet at www.masheepwool.org OCT 24-27 National FFA Convention & Expo Indianapolis, IN. On Internet at www.ffa.org NOV 7-8 Northeast Greenhouse Conference and Expo DCU Center, Worcester MA. Call 802-865-5202 or e-mail nfo@negreenhouse.org.

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1.

PHONE IT IN Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

2. Visa,customers, AMEX or Discover fill out the form

FAX IT IN - For MasterCard,

3.

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN Place my ad in the following zones: YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES! Country Folks East

Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, below completely and FAX to plus 30¢ for each additional word. Peggy at (518) 673-2381 (Phone #’s count as one word) MAIL IT IN - Fill out the If running your ad multiple weeks: attached form, calculate the cost, enclose your check or Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

New England East

Country Folks West West Country Folks Number of New England Country Folks Mid-Atlantic of weeks to Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle run_______

credit card information and Name: (Print)________________________________________________________________ mail to:

Country Folks Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________ Classifieds, Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________ PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Do You Grow or Sell 4. E-MAIL Fruits, Vegetables, ON-LINE Greenhouse or 5. Nursery Crops?

City: __________________________________________ State: ________ Zip: __________

E-mail your ad to classified@leepub.com

Phone #_____________________Fax #________________Cell #_____________________ e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard

Go to www.countryfolks.com Card # __________________________________________Exp. Date __________________ and follow the Place a Name On Credit Card:(Print)____________________________________________________ Classified Ad button Todays Date: ______________ to place your ad 24/7! Signature: ________________________________________ (for credit card payment only) (MM/YY)

If You Answered Yes You May be Interested in Our

Country Folks Grower T M T P F C H HE

ONTHLY RADE APER OR

OMMERCIAL

ORTICULTURE

CALL

888-596-5329 For a Free Sample A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

15

16

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

17

18

19

20

1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week 1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

21

22

23

24

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week 1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week 1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week It’s easy & economical to add a picture to your ad!

For Information Call

1-800-836-2888

25

26

27

28

1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week 1 Week $12.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.85 per zone per week 1 Week $13.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.15 per zone per week 1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week


February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 23


Page 24 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012


Country Folks

Section C

barrel. The NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price fell to $1.5587, down 2 1/2-cents. The barrels averaged $1.5409, down 3.7 cents. Cash butter saw its fourth consecutive week of loss, losing another 6 cents and closing at $1.4325, 65 3/4-cents below a year ago. Four cars traded hands on the week. NASS butter averaged $1.5470, down 4.3 cents. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.3350, down 2 1/4-cents on the week, while Extra Grade held all week at $1.2975. NASS powder averaged

Mielke C3

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section C - Page 1

Where Is The Silver Lining? Issued Feb. 10, 2012 Dairy prices saw more weakness the first full week of February. The cash block cheese price closed that Friday at $1.4750 per pound, down a penny on the week and 44 cents below a year ago when they jumped 10 1/2 cents. The barrels saw some gains but still lost a penny on the week, closing at $1.4850, 41 1/2-cents below a year ago when they gained 12 1/2 cents, but they’re a penny above the blocks despite a fair amount of product being sold. Nine cars of block traded hands and 29 of


HOW CAN

? ?

Country Folks

GROWER

HELP YOUR ORGANIZATION?

Press Releases? Advertisements? Trade Shows? Signs? Banners? Direct Mail? Buyers Guide? Inserts? Some examples of what some other organizations have done to promote their Members, Association, and Industry... Call Today For A Free Catalog 800-538-1428

the value of

tis-

paid adver

Maine 2nd Annual Festival

Wessels Farm

1-800-538-1428

of web. t Foodan even greater numberthe ing on the 2002 the Gourme In 2001 and and 29 the customers. Most of Gourmet On June 28 ip came togeth their last year will membersh its first the Maine SFP’s will stage Food vendors from and we exand completed ifying MG& again Gour met ucerand’sexhibit erstrate History of 2 Annual in- be back have many new Prod gic plan ident to includ- Festival. Last year 25 Food ty to- pect en to be Trade Show the three major goals ial at happ came posicts inec you a If ote members a susta to bers produ trip And Sp And to prom g the ing, Creating tent on ones. a s- trepid pro- mem

94 Bull Rd., Otisville, NY 10963 845-386-5681 FAX: 845-386-8752 sales@wesselsfarms.com www.wesselsfarms.com

nd

large aggre ol durin group of of foods of planning Maine on that gether in a State capit of Agricul- able organization, tive image In 1987 a small in front marssed in t Freeport, producers see and proce the green Departmen at the Legis- sively promote and member come by and specialty food ia- duced ization, its SFP’s samfirst assoc ’. weekend ture’s ‘Ag day ket the organ products MG& r’s lots of free Chocolates formed the ote Maine’s Maine. the organiza- lature’. and to us. With ‘Wilbu from you Since then MG&SFP’s members tion to prom try. lent exposure a ples to choose to over 60 ber ben’! In 1999 the food indus has grown Ejust expand mem nt em- With excel ‘free lunch specialty traffic and selves tion bers with a diverse launched WWW.MAIN et and 1 curre can get a them the Route serving for mem mark efits. With away from its They set ers will be cts. Their S.ORG to upgrading stones throw managed to Memb treats from musgoals: range of produ s have re- FOOD specialty phasis on imfour basic , cowe and of great ilities et up effort spirit LL Bean the web site capab , cheese to combined crowd of To foster a organi- gourm cts through of a regular attract a nice in sels to salsa stability and sulted in a strong food produ Since plementation year we are cookies and everything operation, being has developed World Wide Web. r for members buyers. This your well , zation that advertising ization has e-newslette ded ad cameconomic to maren. Just bring fun. more site organ bers, g betwe the web e mem addin expan more a uniqu and have pro- then the Uni- and an amongst its is steadily a larger banner and taste buds ered with a framework ket their products, to attract To provide sem- partn of Maine at Orono paign the group ess towards temporary signs and coopy shops and n beng for re- making progr for networking d- duce work the members. versit be the liaiso ties, inclu pursue fundi eting op- these goals. for will to activi e He e inars parMain erativ clariand adver- Each year members hing mark the Heart of y that will help De- searc analyzing ing marketing ies surve value - tween and the MG&SFP the Maine nities and needs of opportunit RC&D ticipate in project ulture portu tising, marketing cers fy the food producers in an advocacy partment of Agric carrying out as the food produ To provide added and for for Maine ature, . Part of his terms of marketing ties, such will activi Gritty Details of role in legisl and processors t in the tools that assis to oping “Nitty the be ar and job will web devel exposure al Selling” semin process of nt. generate greater Food Festiv cts. He will in- ongoing developme try and to nt for their produ to update Gour met taking place is food indus profitability of conte ermore, he will be be helping which is 29 in ct whose goal - Furth n of a also crease the Strategic Plan June 28 and ment proje strengthen small, farm-based value ing on the desig MG&SPF’s of Maine help a marketing Freeport. to cers and work The Heart added n. and design food produ Inc. and the Maine’s value organizatio pro- added project is RC&D Area, plan for the met and Spe- farm producers. The are processors. The a Federal Gour e Main Producers main goals t, being funded by ject’s two et Imcialty Food exten State Mark are working to survey the size, state’s and (MG&SFP) rtProgram (FSMaine Depa a and needs of the essed provement with the June 4 ulture in - added/proc MIP) grant. na, a gradment of Agric ing op- value mic devel Stefano Tijeri Spring Meet nic Web Listings Dejoint econo nt from the Orga uate stude ntation Adof Harvey Marof Public Feature Prese y - Managing Partner about how to ent partm n at the UniElizabeth Harve discuss the latest buzzengines. Techministratio h p will e, has come source keting Grou site noticed by the searc e an on line versity of Main the Heart e cases to dissome onlin maine becom ation relevant to to help your web view get www. board will on we SFP inform itting This year its of the MG& food indus nology perm undergoing of Maine and project. He the specialty of the site works best. 12 Bangor foods.org is what this When g de. out cover upgra June carry This part ils of Sellin first major ing as a Reprotectare try. Gritty Deta vements will be work be password be limThe Nitty Marketing and the impro de a will will Seminar it will provi search and June 13 Portl ons will focus on selland access completed bringing with processor locati of serv- ed alist, two food level in r ito Speci ct placement ar held iate much highe and ited years of exper , out and produ This semin and assoc restaucustomers him seven ct from roll , media alty stores, e members It will provide produ ice to our eting speci to your resum mark cts ing shows, corWe will produ ence in members. line gement. He members. Tijerina, Maine to marketing your tips for trade hly drawings members with on ing, alty and web mana Columbia. Stefano s etc. with offering mont and Speci of cuslicens , chain store g. ivate the to sites for is a native the Houston Gourmet cers’ new intern rants and and react sales and pricin 28 and 29 reg- links in al on InFood Produ letter with and porate June ess assistancerelatHe worked years prior tomer news of new prod- busin to assess met Food Festiv products will work area for three al Maine GourMaine. ’s farmsources of e. line Annu t ular features d On Maine Main to abou try. g ve Secon ort, impro articles to movin ed to the indus be avail-added food dependence Green, Freep be conductucts and based, value ssors. Stefano will Specialty food conferencing will market rethe Maine proce informaand other ing extensive ding on-line producers industry. g as able as deterinclu servin h, to needs searc l In addition marketing tiona bers. for d by the mem a showplace will mine products it member’s

Private Label Available

ecialty met and Sp Maine Gour ers Welcomes Intern uc Food Prod

Calendar

p Food Grou b Site We Upgrades

stm

as Tree G ro

Ch ri

We Grow Spring

Annuals, Perennials , Wes-Select Premiu m Annuals, Hanging Baskets, Combo Planters, Veg etables

We Ship Anywhere in the USA

y! Fir Countrn are Vermont Is of the Associatio orThe members col

and you with lush ready to serve sizes and assortment of ful trees in an s, grown Fir and Fraser m lsa Ba es. typ the most untain air, are in our cool mo of trees available to es ieti var r ula ds. pop to meet your nee you in quantities your order with our ce pla you en Wh rmation get accurate info m the growers, you directly fro rs we ans est and hon custom cut as order will be will farmer. Your e as possible and dat ry ive del close to the k of condition. working with pea the in n locatio experienced in arrive at your sale growers are er you are a garden center, Vermont whole eth p e retailers. Wh zation, let us hel all Christmas tre lot or a fund raising organi trees. Orders as ner farm stand, cor high profit Vermont Christm ile. sm , and a you with quality l be handled with efficiency wil large and small bility

Products Priced For Your Profitability

Asso

Convenient Shippi ng, Volume Pricin g, Easy Pick-up

o Verm

ciation

nt Wholesale

for June

rs we

Page 2 - Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

Country Folks Grower is the only publication reaching the fruit, vegetable, greenhouse and nursery growers and sellers every month with just one publication!

d Availa For Prices an The Contact as Tree lesale Christm Vermont Who Association at s er ow Gr s.org tchristmastree www.vermon “PROFIT” You CAN Get There From by the VT Here Co-Sponsored ure Dept. of Agricult

For a Successful Holiday Season, Give Virginia a Ring. www.greenstarcoop.net

Click on catalog & enter guest@greenstarcoop.net in the email address, password 123456. This will allow you to access over 1,400 products!

All prices subject to change

Virginia has everything you need for sparkling sales and satisfied customers. Diverse selection of Christmas Trees, poinsettias, plants, Virginia’s Finest® food and beverage gifts. Excellent quality. Speedy shipping.

Free Wholesale Buyers Guide

Wisconsin Christmas Trees www.christmastrees-wi.org e-mail: info@christmastrees-wi.org

Give us a ring at 804/786-3951. Visit www.vdacs.state.va.us for the Virginia Shippers Directory, the Virginia Christmas Tree Guide, and the Virginia Food and Beverage Directory. Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Also visit these Web sites: www.virginiagrown.com — Virginia Grown produce and nursery products • www.vctga.com — Virginia Christmas Tree Growers Association www.vnla.org — Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association • www.vafinest.com — Virginia’s Finest products

(608) 742-8663 Fax (608) 742-8667 Wisc. Christmas Tree Producers Assn. Dept. C, W9833 Hogan Rd, Portage, WI 53901

For More Information Contact Your Local Representative or Country Folks Grower, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • 800-218-5586 Advertising and Print Jobs: Dan Wren 517-673-0117 • Email dwren@leepub.com Editorial: Joan KarkWren 518-673-0141 • Email jkarkwren@leepub.com


Mielke from C1 powder (NFDM and SMP) output neared the twobillion-pound threshold at 1.964 billion; up 8 percent (147 million lbs). Commercial disappearance was up even more, wrote Dryer, plus 8.8 percent (159 million lbs). He also touched on the growing milk supply and, based on plant operators he has talked to, warned that “the traditional spring peak in daily milk production is one to four months early across most of the U.S.” He speculated whether there would be even more to come “as warmer weather and longer days push their way north to the milksheds across the upper tier of states” and posed the question; “Will there be enough plant capacity for all of the milk by March, April, and May.” Several people he spoke with are concerned, he reported. Zeroing in on nonfat dry milk (NFDM), the CME’s Daily Dairy Report says U.S. NFDM prices have dropped steadily the last seven months, falling 25-30

cents from the July 2011 peak. Buyers are often waiting for prices to stabilize before ordering too far out, according to the DDR, and inventories are building. Meanwhile, Oceania skim milk powder prices have held mostly steady since October. “Traders and handlers indicate that powder stocks are sufficient to fulfill commitments with minimal volumes remaining as uncommitted,” DMN said. Mild winter weather across much of the country is helping to increase milk production and thus more milk is finding its way to cheese vats, according to Dairy Market News. Inventories are building as sales are reported as slow after the New Year. In most regions, the winter season has been much less stressful on the herd and increasing milk receipts at processing plants are being reported. Except for Florida, milk volumes coast to coast are building to the point that milk is not moving from one region to another to sup-

plement shortages. Milk volumes are increasing, but processing capacity is generally sufficient within close proximity of production at this time, according to USDA. Cream markets are weak and pricing multiples are easing. Cream volumes are heavy and often clearing from one region to another to find processing. Producers of higherclass cream product items are seeing declines in orders after a recent boost from football related interest, thus more cream is available to churns coast to coast. The Oceania milk production season continues to trend lower. New Zealand weather patterns are favorable for production at this time of the annual cycle and handlers continue to project a 3-4 percent annual increase over last season, with some handlers adjusting their estimates to a strong 4 percent plus increase. Fluctuating weather in Australia is not having an overall negative impact on milk output. Producers and handlers indicate volumes are lower but maintaining levels that are often higher than projected. Producers project a 2-3 percent annual increase when the current fiscal year ends in June. Back on the home front, the Agriculture Department raised its 2012 milk production forecast in this week’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report (WASDE) after lowering it slightly a month ago. Look for output to hit 199 billion pounds, up 500 million pounds from last month’s projection. Milk cow numbers were raised for much of the year as USDA’s Cattle report indicated 1 percent more dairy cows on January 1, 2012. However, producers are holding 1 percent fewer heifers for addition to the dairy herd, which is expected to push cow numbers lower later in the year. Milk per cow forecasts were raised as data for the last quarter of 2011 was higher than expected and mild weather in much of the country is

supporting increased early year yields. 2011 output was put at 196.2 billion, up 200 million pounds from last month’s projection and compares to 2010’s 192.8 billion. With higher forecast 2012 production, cheese and butter prices were lowered. The nonfat dry milk (NDM) price was lowered to reflect slightly weaker early year prices. With stronger forecast demand for whey, the whey price forecast was raised. The lower cheese price is expected to more than offset the higher whey price, resulting in a reduced forecast Class III price. Look for the 2012 Class III average to range $16.70-$17.40 per hundredweight (cwt.), down from the $17.10-$17.90 expected a month ago, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. Lower butter and NDM prices result in a lower Class IV price, now projected to average $16.25-$17.05, down from $16.45$17.35 expected in the last report, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. The WASDE report was the topic of Dairy Profit Weekly editor Dave Natzke in his Friday DairyLine update. He reported on the weakening cheese, butter and milk powder prices and the rising futures prices for corn and soybeans. He gave as an example, February 8 annual average 2012 Class III milk futures contracts traded 85 cents per cwt. below the average on January 5, with prices for February through March down nearly $2 per cwt. compared to a month ago. He reported that the WASDE indicates the trend could continue and cited the rising milk production data and lowered milk price projections detailed above and warned that; “If lower milk prices aren’t enough incentive for dairy farmers to reduce milk production, higher feed costs might be.” USDA forecasts the season-average corn price to be 60 cents to $1.40 per bushel higher than the year before, and soybean prices up to $1 per

bushel higher. Higher beef prices might be an incentive to more culling, Natzke said. Latest USDA projections raised beef prices by $6-$14 per cwt. compared to last year. Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted 35 requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 3.763 million pounds of Cheddar cheese and 3.411 million pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The product will be delivered through June 2012.The sales raised CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 17 million pounds plus 14.4 million pounds of butter to 14 countries. Looking “back to the futures;” the Class III milk price average for the first six months of 2012 stood at $17.60 on January 6, $17.28 on January 13, $16.81 on January 20, $16.85 on January 27, $16.35 on February 3, and was hovering around $16.15 late morning February 10. Meanwhile; the Livestock Gross Margin insurance program (LGM) has been a “very workable way for dairy producers to set some minimum floors on their revenue,” according to the University of Wisconsin’s Dr. Brian Gould in Tuesday’s DairyLine but is severely limited by a budget of just $20 million a year for all of the pilot livestock revenue programs, including the LGM. Gould said the Congressional Budget Office 10 year forecast of direct payments to agriculture is about $60 billion, with $22 billion going to corn producers and $11 billion to wheat. $443 million would go to dairy or less than 0 .3 percent. He predicted continued volatility in dairy but said the LGM program works however it may need to be removed from “pilot status,” so more funds could become available for the LGM. The LGM ran out of money after two months, Gould reported, but he speculated that about 2 1/2 percent of U.S. annual milk production was insured and was equivalent to what’s sold

Mielke C6

February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section C - Page 3

$1.3853, down 0.8 cent, and dry whey averaged 66.48 cents, down a penny. Commercial disappearance and the production of dairy products finished 2011 strong and rounded out a big year of output and usage, according to USDA data reported by Jerry Dryer in his February 3 Dairy and Food Market Analyst. Cheese production was up 1.7 percent (173 million lbs.) to a record high 10.609 billion pounds and commercial disappearance grew by 3 percent (317 million lbs). American cheese disappearance grew 1.2 percent (49 million lbs) and other cheese, by 4.2 percent (268 million lbs). Dry whey output fell about 1 percent (10 million lbs to 950.6 million) and commercial disappearance was down 0.9 percent (8 million lbs to 952 million lbs). Butter production increased 15.4 percent (241 million lbs) and commercial disappearance was up 10 percent (163 million lbs). Milk


USDEC and NMPF raise concerns about impact reorganization proposals on trade policy, food safety agencies NMPF has expressed concerns about the potential impact on U.S. dairy exports of a recent proposal to consolidate government agencies. President Obama recently announced his proposal to reinstate the Office of the President’s authority to reorganize the government. His first proposed use of that authority would be to consolidate six agencies dealing with trade and commerce into one. NMPF, and the U.S. Dairy Export Council (US-

DEC), praised the Administration’s effort to ensure that agencies involved in efforts related to trade are operating in the smoothest and most coordinated way possible. But they expressed deep concerns that including the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative in the process could detrimentally affect U.S. ability to effectively negotiate and enforce trade agreements. Both organizations indicated that they supported the overall effort, but would oppose the inclu-

sion of USTR in such a reorganization out of concern that it would damage the agency’s effectiveness. “NMPF’s members want to see an efficiently operated and cost-effective U.S. government,” said Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. “However, as we pursue the important goal of seeking greater government efficiencies, we need to ensure that this process does not undermine the ability of critical agencies to carry out their missions. In this in-

stance, NMPF is very concerned that USTR’s unique role in trade negotiations and its superb level of openness to input from the public would be greatly harmed by submerging this agency within a larger bureaucracy.” In a related issue, Office of Management and Budget Director for Management Jeff Zients stated that a subsequent effort would be to consolidate USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) with the food safety unit at the U.S. Food and Drug

Administration (FDA). NMPF and USDEC also noted with interest this proposal, which, as announced, would not directly impact dairy products, since only meat products are inspected by FSIS. However, the statement did not reference what impact such a food safety consolidation might have on the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service, which currently plays a key official role as a proxy for FDA on many export-related issues, given the lack of FDA mandate to

address export matters. The fact that FDA is not charged with a responsibility for supporting U.S. food exports has in the past created unnecessary hurdles to resolving U.S. dairy export challenges, given FDA’s oversight of dairy products. NMPF and USDEC support efforts to rationalize FDA’s role with respect to exported products in order to most effectively make use of government oversight responsibilities. Source: News for Dairy Co-Ops, 2-03-12

the lack of money, according to Gould. Gould encouraged listeners to be involved in

the hearing process as the Farm Bill process moves ahead and to contact lawmakers. He said

there are groups of dairy farmers that are examining changes that could be made to the LGM to

make it more workable and get it out of pilot status and now is the time to do it.

www.leepub.com

Mielke from C3

Page 6 - Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

on the Class III futures. The relative small amount of milk represented is only because of

Capital Tractor Carries All The Parts, Equipment & Service That You Will Need www.capitaltractorinc.com

CAPITAL TRACTOR, INC. 1135 State Rte. 29 Greenwich, NY 12834

Since 1966 www.capitaltractorinc.com

(518) 692-9611 FAX (518) 692-2210

TRACTORS 2010 NH T1530 HST Trans. w/NH 250 TL Loader, 72” Quick Attach, R1 Tires, 148 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 2011 N.H.TD5030 4wd, ROPS - Rental Return. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,250 2011 N.H.T5050 4wd, ROPS - Rental Return - 212 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,995 2001 N.H.TN70 w/32LA Loader, 4wd, ROPS - 2018 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,600 1997 N.H. 8770 4wd, Supersteer, Mega Flow Hydraulics, Rear Duals - 7164 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $47,500 2009 N.H. TD5050 4wd, w/New 825TL Loader, Cab, 90 HP - 2683 Hrs. - Excellent Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,750 2000 NH TS100 4wd, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes - 2135 Hr. . . . . . . . $39,995 2007 NH TL100A 4wd, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,795 2011 Mahindra 3616 4wd, Cab w/Heat & AC, HST Trans, Loader - 4 Hrs. $24,375 2010 NH TD5050 4wd, ROPS, w/Warranty, 480 Hrs. - Excellent . . . . . . . . $31,875 2010 NH TD5030 4wd, ROPS, w/New 825TL Loader - 495 Hrs. - Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,800 1985 Ford 445 Industrial Tractor, 2WD, ROPS, Loader, Conv. Trans. . . . . . $7,995 2005 Kubota L3130 4wd, HST w/Loader - 1023 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT 2009 NH 74CSRA 3 Point Snowblower - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 1987 NH 790 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 790W Hay Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 2003 Challenger SB34 Inline Square Baler w/Thrower, Hyd. Tension - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,375 2000 LP RCR 2584 7' Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,540 2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 WIC Cart Mounted bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,450 2008 Cole 1 Row 3pt. Planter with multiple Seed Plates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195 Gehl Forage Box on Dion D1200 Gear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,895 JD 336 Baler w/Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2010 NH H7230 10'4" Discbine, Roll Conditioner, Like New - Demo. . . . . $24,900 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Round Bale Carrier/Feeder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 1989 N.H. 570 Baler w/72 Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,300 2003 N.H. 1411 Discbine 10'4" Cut w/Rubber Rolls - Field Ready . . . . . . $15,950 Pequea HR930 Rotary Rake, Excellent Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,400 2002 N.H. FP240 Forage Harvester, w/metalert, Crop Processor, 29P P/U Head, 3PN Corn Head, New Knives and Sheerbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,995 N.H. 824 2 Row Corn Head for a N.H. 900. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,250 Gehl 970 14 ft. Forage Box on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,950 2008 Taarup 8011T 8 Star 32' Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995 Smoker Solid Bottom Elevator 20' on chassis w/Elec. Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . $795 2009 N.H. BR7060 Twine Only Round Baler, Wide pickup - Like New. . . . $24,500 JD 127 5' Pull type Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $725 Gehl 940 16' Forage Box on Tandem 12 Ton Gehl Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,995 Wooden Flat bed on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350 2008 Agway Accumul8 AC800 Bale Accumulator & AC8006G SSL Grabber, Like New Package. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,700 Krause 2204A 14' Disc Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,780 1998 Unverferth 13' Perfecta II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,800

2002 N.H. 570 Baler w/72 Thrower- Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,600 2001 NH 163 Tedder, Hyd. Fold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 1998 JD 3970 Forage Harvester w/7' P/U Head, 3 Row Corn Head - Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 1993 Wil-Rich 3 Point 10 Shank Chisel Plow w/Gauge Wheels . . . . . . . . . $2,600 1995 Kuhn FC400RC Hyd. Swing Discbine - Good Condition . . . . . . . . . $10,200 2009 Erskine 72" Front Mount snowblower for Class III Compact Tractor . $4,760 2003 Challenger PTD10 10' Disc Mower/Conditioner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 2003 Challenger RB46 Silage Special Round Baler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 2011 N.H. BR7060 4x5 Silage Special Round Baler w/Crop Cutter- Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,250 2011 H & S CR10 10 Wheel Hyd. Fold Rake - Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,295 1988 Hesston 530 Round Baler, w/Gathering Wheels, 39x54” Bales, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 NH 258LA, NH 260 RH Rakes w/double Hitch & Dollies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,800 2008 Krause 7300/18WR 18' Cushion gang disc - Demo unit - Like New . . $25,625 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2007 N.H. M428 Telehandler 42' Reach - 1050 Hrs. . . . . . . . REDUCED $41,250 2008 N.H. M459 Telehandler 45' Reach - 420 Hrs. . . . . . . . . REDUCED $62,500 2008 N.H.W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/Heat/Air, Bucket/Forks-375 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $61,250 2007 N.H. E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Cab w/Heat /AC - 400 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $65,000 2009 N.H. E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket - 1600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $118,750 2009 N.H. E50B Cab w/Heat & Air, Blade, Rubber Track, Hyd. Thumb - 725 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,250 2010 N.H. E35B Excavator w/Blade, Rubber Tracks, Cab w/Heat/Air. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REDUCED $30,625 2010 N.H. L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate 72" Bucket - 100 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2006 Ingersoll Rand 185 Trailer Compressor w/JD Diesel Engine, 61 Hrs, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,500 2007 N.H. C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, 84" Bucket - 1088 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,500 2008 N.H. C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, Hi-Flow Hyd, 84" Bucket, 932 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,750 Mustang MS60P 60" SSL Pickup Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 2005 N.H. LS180.B Skidsteer, Hyd. Mount Plate, New Tires - 4601 Hrs. . $14,750 2009 NH L170 Skidsteer OROPS - 66” Bucket - 1050 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . $14,950 ATTACHMENTS 2008 N.H. /FFC 66" Skidsteer Tiller-Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 1994 Locke 8x18 Tandem axle Goose Neck Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 2008 NH 96" Hyd. Angle Dozer Blade - Demo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,875 2010 N.H./Bradco 6" x 4' Trencher, Skidsteer Mount, Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . $3,995 2011 N.H./McMillon Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9" Auger . . . . . . . . . $2,950


February 20, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section C - Page 7


Page 8 - Section C • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • February 20, 2012

MAINE

MASSACHUSETTS

NEW YORK

EAST DIXFIELD, ME 04227

WILLIAMSBURG, MA 01096

R. S. OSGOOD & SONS

BACON’S EQUIPMENT

SALEM, NY 12865

U.S. Route 2 207-645-4934 • 800-287-4934 www.rsosgood.com

29 Goshen Road (Rte. 9) 413-268-3620

FAIRFIELD, ME 04937

HAMMOND TRACTOR COMPANY 216 Center Road 207-453-7131

SALEM FARM SUPPLY 5109 State Rte. 22 518-854-7424 • 800-999-3276 www.salemfarmsupply.com


CF New England 2.20.12