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16 January 2012 Section One of One Volume 29 Number 43

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

$1.99

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Goat hoof care and foot rot prevention ~ Page 4 Nonnewaug’s agriscience program tops in statewide assessments ~ Page 3

Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly 18 Crop Comments 6 Auctions Classifieds Farmer to Farmer Vermont DHIA

22 34 12 14

KUHN NORTH AMERICA

“Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.” Matthew 7:7


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Manage your farm enjoyably, profitably and ecologically by Sanne Kure-Jensen Have you reached the end of the “busy season” exhausted and at odds with your family and business partners; do you dread tax season? Every day producers juggle life and farming — social relationships, financial success and environmental stewardship. “There is a better way,” says Seth Wilner, farmer and University of New Hampshire Extension Educator specializing in Whole Farm Planning. On Dec. 9, Wilner led the first of four Holistic Management workshops at the University of Rhode Island. These handson, interactive sessions help farmers accomplish more and enjoy their chosen work. Two sessions address Problem Solving and Strategic Decision Making and two focus on Financial Planning using the Holistic Management process. Quality of Life and Farm Goals It is easier to manage life and your farm if everyone on your farm is on the same page and is clear what the farm is managing towards. All potential changes in farm management or new ventures should be weighed against the overall Farm Goal and Future Farm Plan. Elements in a Whole Farm Goal are based on the values of the farmers. You can define what you want your life to be like on the farm and manage your farm towards this life. To develop a farm goal and whole farm plan, consider the resources you already have and who the key decision makers are. Things to consider are: • Decision Makers: Family members, staff and business partners are often involved in decision making and farm planning. • Resource Base: This includes land, livestock, farm buildings, home, vehicles, tractors, equipment and other assets. • People who influence or are influenced by our decisions: Your network offers great resources for information and marketing potential. This can include Extension Agents, NRCS staff, veterinarians, fertilizer and seed sales staff, neighbors (farmers and nonfarmers), friends, associations, customers and parents. • Skills: Your family and staff have many skills beyond what they are currently utilizing or were hired for. • Assets: Consider all inventory and streams of income, loans, bank accounts, credit cards and credit lines. This includes off-farm income,

Seth Wilner, farmer and University of New Hampshire Extension Educator specializing in whole farm planning, recently led the first of four Holistic Management workshops at the University of Rhode Island. Photo by Sanne Kure-Jensen checking and savings accounts and income from sale of farm products. Wilner recommends several ways to get the Whole Farm Goal and Farm Plan conversation started. While doing a tedious chore ask, “What else s t i n k s a r o u n d here?” and while doing a fun chore ask, “What else do we love about this job?” When you g a t h e r around a holiday table with the whole family ask, “Where do you see the farm in five years, in 20?” You can ask children, “Do you want to come back to the farm after college? Do you want to be active in major decisions or daily choices on the farm?” Discuss what happens if one child wants the farm and others do not; what role, obligations or privileges should other siblings have if they do not want to actively run the

farm? You can ask your parents how long they want to work and manage the farm, and have they thought about other adventures or travel they might desire? Think of all the things that deplete you and make the opposite your goal. For example: chaos, conflict, anger wasted time, financial stress and being tired all pull you d o w n ; proactive goals can include respect, working well together, efficien~ Seth Wilner cy, making a decent profit and having family leisure time. Are you making any money? When Wilner asks farmers, “What does it cost you to raise a dozen ears of corn?” he is amazed that most cannot answer. How can farmers decide whether to add or shrink the acreage in a crop

While doing a tedious chore ask, “What else stinks around here?” and while doing a fun chore ask, “What else do we love about this job?”

without knowing if it is a profitable crop in the first place? Farm data collection should provide enough information to determine if each current crop, herd or project actually makes any money. Wilner recommends “The Organic Farmer’s Business Handbook: A Complete Guide to Managing Finances, Crops, and Staff — and Making a Profit” by Richard Wiswall as a step by step guide to creating a business plan with data collection templates. Wiswall’s 27 years at Cate Farm guides his advice on efficient, profitable vegetable production as well as better employee and financial management. Once appropriate data collection is in place, each crop or herd or project (farm enterprise) can be evaluated against the Farm Goal. Is this crop or project helping us work towards our goal? Is this crop or project profitable? Shall we grow, shrink or change to achieve our goals? Promotion versus Production We could run ads and a clever marketing campaign to sell more products. We could increase production and use more land, resources and time to fulfill that demand. Would this get us closer or further

from our Whole Farm Goal and improve the quality of our farm and environment? Many farmers decide to down side or shift their crop mix after careful analysis of their Return on Investment (ROI) in effort, time and money as well as the impact on their family and environment. “We drive the farm business, it shouldn’t drive us,” urged Wilner. Whole Farm Goal Your family, staff and business partners can all benefit from a simple Management Plan covering everything under your control. This internal document will not be shared with customers or the public. The Whole Farm Goal should include the Quality of Life values that you and your fellow decision makers strive for. Describe “What” rather than “How” you will achieve those values and include your infrastructure needs as well as relevant policies and procedures. You may also describe the future farm landscape you are managing towards. Wilner recommends learning about the biodynamic Roxbury Farm in Kinderhook, NY. Their website at www.roxburyfarm.com describes their communication practices, harvesting techniques and includes some theory of holistic management documents. Business Plan If you have ever tried to seek outside funding, you know better results come with a well developed Business Plan and/or Farm Plan. Future sessions will guide farmers through development of this valuable tool. Seth Wilner teaches beginning farmers, consults with established farmers, grows non-certified organic vegetables for nearby restaurants and has worked with the UNH Cooperative Extension since 2000. For more information, contact Wilner via e-mail at Seth.Wilner@unh.edu, at 24 Main Street, Newport, NH 03773-1515 or call 603-8639200. The next three sessions are: Problem Solving with Holistic Management on Jan. 20, and Financial Planning with Holistic Management on Feb. 3 and March 2. Each session will run 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and include lunch at URI’s East Farm, Building No. 75, Kingston, RI 02881. The cost is $20 per person per workshop payable to URI. Mail checks to, URI Cooperative Extension, 3 East Alumni Avenue, Kingston, RI 02881. For questions or more information, call 401-874-2967.


Farmers need to fight hyper regulation with involvement Farmers need to commit their time, energy, money and best thinking if they want to stop the proliferation of federal regulations that threaten their businesses, a U.S. Chamber of Commerce official said at the American Farm Bureau Federation 93rd Annual Meeting. “This isn’t academic folks,” said Reed Rubinstein, senior counsel for the Chamber of Commerce. “When the federal government exercises its authority, it can send you to jail. We are all one regulation away from being out of business.” Most of the “hyper regulation” currently affecting farm-

ers stems from expansion of environmental law, he said, but new health care regulations and financial reform will add to their regulatory burden in the next five to 10 years. Increasingly, the Environmental Protection Agency is emphasizing ecological sustainability of agriculture in its regulatory programs, based on what it says are public concerns, Rubinstein said. “Translation: ‘You need somebody to tell you how to run your business because you’re not doing it in the right way,” he said. “But who’s going to decide what ‘sustainable’ means?” EPA also is having internal

discussions about moving away from place-based regulations supported by science to a holistic approach, which includes concern for social issues in writing regulations, he said. Farmers need to get engaged in these issues, Rubinstein said, and comment on proposed regulations at every level of government. Hyper regulation is also a state and local issue, he emphasized. Farmers need to be willing to serve on federal and local advisory panels that draft and review regulations, and file lawsuits if necessary. “If you’re not in there punching, you don’t have a

chance,” he said. In addition to responding, farmers and ranchers need to be proactive in addressing issues, he said. “We all want clean water, clean air,” he said. “We need to ask, ‘how do we work together to achieve it’” in a way that doesn’t handicap farmers’ ability to grow food. Rubinstein also encouraged farmers and ranchers to support legislation that would regulate how EPA settles lawsuits filed against it. Often environmental groups sue the agency to advance their agenda and EPA settles the lawsuits in a manner that establishes the regulatory control

the groups wanted. Farmers can find coalition partners in other groups that feel as strongly as they do about private property rights, he suggested. There also is value in publicizing excessive regulations, Rubinstein said, such as EPA’s plan to regulate spilled milk under the Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures program. The agency backed off the chage when the plan was brought to the attention of the general public. “Sunshine is a great disinfectant when it comes to government actions,” he said.

Streamlined, modernized department central to 21st Century USDA The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) must be built to meet the evolving needs of a 21st century agricultural economy, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Jan. 9 in presenting USDA’s Blueprint for Stronger Service, a plan that helps producers continue to drive America’s economy by streamlining operations and cutting costs. “The USDA, like families and businesses across the country, cannot continue to operate like we did 50 years ago,” said Vilsack. “We must innovate, modernize, and be better stewards of the taxpayers’ dollars. We must build on the record accomplishments of farm communities in 2011 with a stronger, more effective USDA in 2012 and beyond.” The Blueprint for Stronger Service is based on a Department-wide review of operations conducted as part of the Administration’s Campaign to Cut Waste, launched by President Obama and Vice President Biden to make government work better and more efficiently for the American people. The agency took a hard look at all USDA operations, from headquarters to field offices. The end result is a plan that will create optimal use of USDA’s employees, better results for USDA customers, and greater efficiencies for American taxpayers. The USDA will close 259 domestic offices, facilities and labs across the country, as well as seven foreign offices. In some cases, offices are no longer staffed or have a very small staff of one or two people; many are within 20 miles of other USDA offices. In other cases, technology improvements, advanced service centers, and broadband service have reduced some need for brick and mortar facilities. When fully implemented, these actions along with other recommended changes will provide efficiencies valued at about $150 million annually — and eventually more based on future

realignment of the workforce — and will ensure that USDA continues to provide optimal service to the American people within available funding levels. These actions and plans to close or consolidate facility, office and lab operations will impact USDA headquarters in Washington and in 46 states and 1 U.S. territory. • Farm Service Agency (FSA): Consolidate 131 county offices in 32 states; more than 2,100 FSA offices remain throughout the United States • Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS): Close 2 country offices; more than 95 FAS offices remain throughout the world • Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS): Close 15 APHIS offices in 11 states and 5 APHIS offices in 5 foreign countries; more than 560 APHIS offices remain throughout the United States and 55 remain throughout the world • Rural Development (RD): Close 43 area and sub offices in 17 states and U.S. territories; approximately 450 RD offices remain throughout the United States. • Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS): Close 24 soil survey offices in 21 states; more than 2,800 NRCS offices remain throughout the United States • Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS): Close 5 district offices in 5 states; 10 district offices remain throughout the United States • Agricultural Research Service (ARS): Close 12 programs at 10 locations; more than 240 programs remain throughout the United States • Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services (FNCS): Close 31 field offices in 28 states; 32 FNCS offices will remain throughout the United States The Blueprint for Stronger Service details 133 recommendations that affirm processes already in place, as well as 27 initial improvements, and other, longer-term improvements. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/strongerservice.

Nonnewaug High School’s Ellis Clark Regional Agriscience and Technology Program was recently recognized for outstanding results for student performance on the 2011 Connecticut Statewide CTE Assessments taken last spring. Pictured, from left to right, are NHS Principal Andrew O’Brien, Woodbury FFA Chapter President Becca Espitee, and Agriscience Program Director and Animal Science Teacher William Davenport.

Nonnewaug’s agriscience tops in statewide assessments Nonnewaug High School’s Ellis Clark Regional Agriscience and Technology Program was recently recognized for outstanding results for student performance on the 2011 Connecticut Statewide CTE (Career and Technical Education) Assessments taken last spring by all senior agriscience students in the 19 regional agriscience programs throughout the state. At the annual Career and Technical Education Conference held recently in Farmington, Nonnewaug High School was recognized for being ranked first place in the state in three different concentration areas, including Animal Science, Agriculture Mechanics and Natural Resources. During the awards

program, over 50 different high schools were honored in several areas of state-wide testing in all CTE areas including business, family and consumer sciences, video production and several other CTE course areas. Nonnewaug High school was the only high school in the state to be honored for earning first place rankings in three different areas, all of which were in the agriscience and technology program subject areas. These state-wide assessments are annually given to senior students and they measure the level of competence and knowledge base gained by the CTE classes offered in high schools over the four year period.

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

Vilsack announces blueprint to increase USDA efficiency


Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Goat hoof care and foot rot prevention Hoof care is a vital part of goat production. Hooves require regular trimming. Depending on the environment and nutrition, some animals need it more often than others, For example, animals in a rocky environment may need trimming less than those not exposed to rocks, and goats can sometimes experience excess hoof growth — called founder — when given too much grain. They can also get hoof diseases like foot rot or foot scald. Regular hoof trimming is necessary to prevent hooves from over-growing and to keep animals walking properly. The overall goal of hoof trimming is for the bottom of the hoof to be flat and parallel to the hair line at the top of the hoof. To keep trimmers sharp and for ease of trimming, excessive dirt should be removed from the hoof before trimming, using a hoof pick or the tips of the trimmers. Recommended types of hoof trimmers The walls, or hard sides, and heels should be trimmed flat with the sole, which may also be trimmed if needed, including between the two parts of the hoof. The toe may need to be trimmed. Both halves of the hoof should be a

similar length. Dirt within the hard wall of the hoof or pockets of dirt or infection should be cut out. To avoid bleeding, the hoof should be trimmed a little at a time and stopped if pink appears. Bleeding can be treated with a “blood stop” powder. A disinfectant or antiseptic can also be used. A proper hoof trimming video is also available. Some conformation, or structure, problems can be addressed with corrective trimming. For example, if an animal walks more on the outside half of the hoof than the inside half, the inside half could be trimmed shorter than the outside half to discourage rolling to the outside. Similarly, improper hoof trimming — especially infrequent trimming — can result in an animal walking as if structural issues exist when perhaps they do not. Hoof Care Issues Laminitis is the swelling of the sensitive tissue beneath the hard walls of the hoof, causing pain, lameness and eventually founder. Founder results when the hoof wall gets thick and overgrown, often with the toes turning up. In some cases, permanent hoof damage could occur. Possible causes of

laminitis include sudden or extreme changes in the diet — for example, too much grain — trauma, or severe bacterial infections. There may be no symptoms of mild laminitis other than the resulting overgrown hooves, often with separation of the hoof wall from underlying tissue as the hoof grows out. In severe cases, the animals may grind teeth in pain and walk on their knees. Hooves hot to the touch could also indicate a current case of laminitis. Prevention includes changing diets slowly, avoiding excessive grain feeding, and preventing or treating acidosis. Hoof abscesses are caused most often by an injury to one hoof that allows the introduction of infective bacteria. The symptoms of abscesses are lameness from pain and swelling at the hairline just above the hoof that might leak pus as the abscess works

out of the hoof. Treatment includes trimming and treating the infected area and using antibiotics if necessary. Proper hoof trimming can prevent abscesses. Granuloma is also caused by injury to the hoof, granulomas are round, red swellings of “proud flesh” that grow at the injury site and keep the hard part of the hoof wall from growing normally. They bleed easily. Lameness from pain and misshapen hooves/hoof walls are symptoms. In Shelly hoof, the white line — where the soft and hard part of the hoof meet — of the hoof can degenerate due to poor hoof maintenance, and a pocket can form that may fill with dirt. Under certain conditions, infections can result, but usually no lameness or pain is associated with shelly hoof. Source: Extension.org

Cover photo by Lorna Quinn Regular hoof trimming is necessary to prevent hooves from over-growing and to keep animals walking properly.

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470 Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas ................................................Albany, NY ................................................518-456-0603 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

Ag Literature Program launches March 8 Children to Learn about Sheep & Wool Concord, NH — New Hampshire Agriculture in the Classroom (NHAITC) is gearing up for its annual Agriculture Literacy Program, which will be launched on National Agriculture Day, March 8. Each year volunteers visit New Hampshire elementary schools during the month of March to help children learn about the importance of agriculture. Storybooks with farm related themes are read to the students and associated programs enable them to meet farmers and learn about the production of food and fiber. This year’s book, “Charlie Needs a Cloak” by New Hampshire author Tomie dePaola, will provide a window into the world of sheep farming and fiber production and use. In 2011, over 4,000 children were reached with the Agriculture Literacy Program. Donations of books to school libraries and lesson plans for teachers enable children to continue to learn about these topics long after the vol-

unteers have gone home. Anyone interested in volunteering or scheduling a reader/farmer team to visit a school should contact NHAITC at 603-224-1934 or nhaitc@nhfarmbureau.org. New Hampshire Agriculture in the Classroom is a private, non-profit organization, dedicated to helping New Hampshire youth understand and appreciate the important role that agriculture plays in their daily lives. Support is provided by the New Hampshire Farm Bureau, the NH Department of Agriculture, Markets and Food and donations from businesses, organizations and individuals. The program offers resources for educators, professional development workshops, in-school presentation, school to farm events, Ag Literacy Day, and curriculum consultation. For more information contact Coordinator Ruth Smith at nhaitc@nhfarmbureau.org, 603-224-1934, or visit the website: www.nhagintheclass.org


Weed management and crop rotation seedbeds are all means of horticultur- impact on disease and insect presal control. Most important is preven- sure. Weed impact is less obvious. A tion of new seed formation by pre- regularly plowed and tilled field will venting weeds from setting a new crop eventually exhaust the seed bank of winter annuals of seeds. that bloom • Chemical and set seed in Control: While this is the eas- “Field weed management is late spring. Crop rotaiest control crucial for the first four weeks tion can help from some perspectives, of growth for most crops, six control diffiit can have weeks for corn plants and cult weeds like Canada thistle significant yellow impacts on eight weeks for other late or farming prac- canopy crops, including many n u t s e d g e . Certain crop tices. Often combinations this choice vegetables.” allow targeted offers more ~ Bradley Majek weeds to be complete weed sprayed multicontrol at a ple times. lower cost than with other techniques, but Other crops can be planted to shade should not be used instead of good or smother weeds during bloom and horticultural practices such as crop seed set, reducing weed pressure over rotations and the use of cover crops. time. To control Canada thistle with its Herbicides should be carefully chosen for weed control without impacting deep wide roots, use tillage, a future crops or the environment. glyphosate product, Stinger or There are pre and post emergent Basagran to prevent the weed from treatments as well as residual, non- emergence in the spring, during selective or growth regulator prod- bloom in early summer and through ucts. Glyphosate is a non-selective the fall on the second growth spurt. herbicide, generally applied with For example, till and plant early seawarm temperatures when weed son snap beans treated with plants are in full bloom to the green Basagran followed by fall broccoli treated with Stinger in year 1; the fruit stage of growth. next year plant sweet corn treated Crop rotations Crop rotations can reduce disease with Stinger, followed by a glyphosate and insect pressure and improve soil product in early fall. In year three fertility and tilth. Horticultural, soil plant matted row strawberries treated and pest control benefits include uti- with Stinger. Yellow nutsedge with its tuber formlizing nutrients and soil moisture. Legume crops in the rotation can ing spreading rhizomes and vigorous increase soil fertility through nitrogen growth is the most prolific weed of fixation. Alfalfa’s deep tap roots pene- horticultural crops worldwide. To trate and loosen compacted soils and control yellow nutsedge, late summer hard pan. Through root renewal and tuber formation must be prevented tilling perennial grass and hay crops for several years. Effective crop rotaincrease organic matter and improve tion with early summer harvest allows tillage to keep the field nutsedge free soil structure. Crop rotation can offer a welcome during the late summer tuber forma-

tion period. The herbicides Dual Magnum, Basagran and Sandea are the most effective on yellow nutsedge. One example of crop rotation is effective: plant early cucumbers treated with Sandea, followed by late summer snap beans treated with Dual Magnum and Basagran in year one; the next year plant tomatoes treated with Sandea. In year three, plant early sweet corn treated with Dual Magnum and Basagran followed by tillage and pumpkins treated with Sandea in year four. This plan prevents yellow nutsedge tuber production and can reduce this weed population to minimal levels that can be managed by cultivation or hand weeding. Be sure to follow all label schedules for elapsed time before replanting with residual herbicides. Refer to the Commercial Vegetable Production Recommendation guide for plant back restrictions to plan crop rotations and weed control programs before applying herbicides. Consider herbicides without plant-back restrictions (or very short periods) or herbicides labeled for used on planned succession crops. When using an early cucumber crop treated with Command and Sandea you should get excellent weed control; late summer crops would be limited to snap beans that year. Using Prefar instead on the cucumbers would yield less weed control, but more late summer crop options would be available. Lettuce, onion, cole, parsley and summer squash or a second cucumber crop (not recommended) are acceptable options shown on the Prefar label. Local Cooperative Extension agents are available to help plan crop rotations. For more information, contact Majek via e-mail at majek@aesop.rutgers.edu or call 856-455-3100.

Look who’s talking now by Julie Murphree Someone has convinced farmers and ranchers to start talking. That’s kind of a crazy proposition, especially since sometimes they really don’t care to get into the communication thing too much. Warning: Once they do start talking, you really can’t get farmers and ranchers to shut up. They have lots to say. Maybe they’ve kept it bottled up for so long and now that they have popped the cork, they’re just bubbling over. The trouble is, new research shows “a different approach may be needed for farmers and ranchers to more effectively communicate with consumers.” Remember…most of them really don’t like to talk in the first place. They are good listeners, but they really just want to farm and ranch. Maslansky Luntz & Partners studied the messages we use in agriculture

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation and concluded what we say and what consumers hear are often two different things. The study, which was funded by the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance, revealed that agriculture’s (farming and ranching’s) standard go-to messages about sound science aren’t providing peace of mind for consumers. To put it another way, countering emotion with facts does not convey all that’s good about today’s farms and ranches. Today’s food producers have used science and research to improve the way they farm and ranch and they get excited about explaining that to others. But based on what Maslansky Luntz & Partners discovered, farmers

and ranchers are using too many technical terms, too much science talk and too many big, sterile words. One good thing: research shows farmers and ranchers are trusted, although consumers still have lots of questions about farming and everyday practices. And words like mass production, pesticides, big business, subsidies, ag chemicals and “best management practices” just make nonfarmers scratch their heads. So is the answer for farmers and ranchers to adopt a “touchy, feely” style of communicating? Let’s hope not. That would be kind of tough for most of them. They’ve seen a lot, gone through a lot and their mammas raised them not to complain or cry,

and certainly not in public. But, farmers and ranchers get it. Many have committed to being more succinct and understandable in response to consumer questions. Further, farmers and ranchers across the nation share common interests with consumers. Food, health and their futures — especially their families’ futures — are subjects farmers and consumers care about. Most farmers and ranchers hope to continually improve the way they grow food for America. But they’re already doing a lot right and they want consumers to know about it. So, if you’re not a farmer or rancher, keep asking questions. Keep talking to farmers and ranchers. They’re enjoying the conversation, and have lots of good stuff to share in addition to the great food we all eat every day. Julie Murphree is the public relation director for the Arizona Farm Bureau, and previously farmed cotton, wheat and alfalfa with her parents.

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

by Sanne Kure-Jensen Weeds were a big problem for producers this year. At the 2011 New England Vegetable & Fruit Conference, Bradley Majek of Rutgers University shared his experience with weed management in a low-till program. “Field weed management is crucial for the first four weeks of growth for most crops, six weeks for corn plants and eight weeks for other late canopy crops, including many vegetables.” If farmers cannot manage weeds for these time periods, harvest yields will be impacted. Weed Control Majek discussed four main types of weed control. • Biological Control: Typically this means one insect species works to control, not eliminate, one weed species. This type of weed control makes the least sense on cropland and rangeland. Extreme caution must be used with releasing biological control insects. The target weed must be a weed in all forms in all places. One potential risk might be a dandelion which many treat as weeds while others seed special dandelion varieties as part of mesclun salad green blends yielding $10 million in farm revenue in New Jersey. • Mechanical Control: Plows, disks, hoes and other tools can help remove weeds in fields. Soil profiles are disturbed and new weed seeds are exposed. Repeated tillage at seven- to 10-day intervals removes foliage, encourages regrowth and depletes root carbohydrate stores, weakening plants. Risks include damage to soil structure, increased compaction or erosion risk, organic matter oxidation and loss as well as the decreased nutrient-holding capacity and water penetration. Other considerations are the high cost of labor and fuel. • Horticultural Control: Mulches, cover crops, crop rotation and stale


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

Wandering waste oil My son Peter lives and works in an New York City suburb in Connecticut, and he receives the New York Times, either hard copy, on-line, or both. He is very of aware of my involvement with alternative fuels, particularly biodiesel. So he forwarded to me an article titled: “Thieves Seek Restaurants’ Used Fryer Oil”, written by Steven Yaccino, and printed in the Jan. 7 edition of NYT. This is particularly timely, because just yesterday I was visiting a customer, with whom I was discussing alternative fuels. To be more specific, I was talking about modified fuel systems, ones which handle vegetable oil, without first making it into biodiesel. Normally how this works is that the vehicle in question has a separate fuel tank with heating elements. The raw vegetable oil, or filtered waste veg oil, goes into the extra tank. The diesel engine in the car, or truck, is started with regular petroleum diesel. After the diesel engine is running, the heating elements automatically turn on in the second tank. When the veg oil gets up to a certain temperature (I believe, 90 degrees Fahrenheit usually), the fuel intake is switched from the petroleum diesel tank to the now-heated veg oil tank. Just before the operator shuts the engine down, the fuel intake is switched back to petroleum diesel, so that the conventional fuel is what is used whenever the engine is started. Veg oils,

and even biodiesel, tend to gel at higher temperatures than does petroleum diesel. I have worked with folks who are thinking outside the box with alternative fuel management. One fellow I have advised, who already was growing soybeans, began pressing them (some people use the term “crushing”), and feeds the meal to his milk cows; he then cuts the soybean oil with a little gasoline, then blends that mix with diesel for his tractors. Another man presses homegrown canola (which yields about twice as much oil per ton as soybeans), and blends fairly modest amounts of that veg oil with regular diesel for his tractors). He feeds the canola meal to his dairy cows. Still another man I’ve contacted blends highly filtered waste veg oil (WVO) one-to-one with petroleum diesel; that he does only in non-winter conditions. But the vast amount of fuel is consumed during the cropping season anyway. And the customer I talked to yesterday said he has a neighbor who fuels his tractors, during warm weather, with filtered waste veg oil, using the existing fuel system, without the aid of heating elements. Probably the best arrangement… and I don’t personally know anyone doing this… is to install a second fuel tank on a tractor, one with heating elements. Also grow oilseed, if such is compatible with your crop program, so you end up

with a protein supplement, plus your own home-grown oil; for this you need to own, or have access to, an oilseed press. Then supplement your own oil with what you can pick up at restaurants. But this last arrangement would maximize, year-round, the use of alternative fuel. Meanwhile, back to the article Peter sent me. I’ll try to hit the high points of what Mr. Yaccino wrote. He said that companies that collect used cooking oil from restaurants across the country have turned to all forms of sleuthing in recent years. They use private investigators, surveillance cameras, and rigged alarms. Nonetheless, containers full of WVO are vanishing. For years, restaurants had to pay companies to haul away the WVO and grease (which is an animal-

based product, like lard), which was used mostly in animal feed. Some restaurants gave it away to local biodiesel buffs. But with a demand for biofuel rising, along with conventional energy prices, WVO now trades on a commodities market, commanding around 40 cents per pound, about four-fold its value a decade ago, which makes it a tempting target for thieves, especially in a down economy. Some states, like California and Virginia have enacted special statutes to regulate grease collection from commercial kitchens. Few WVO theft cases go to trial, and when they do, the offenders often get off with no more than a small fine and hit the streets again to siphon off some more, according to Yaccino. For years, law enforce-

ment authorities seemed unaware that fryer oil was being stolen by unlicensed haulers, causing millions of dollars worth of losses each year for the rendering industry that collects and processes the grease. One Houston, Texas, lawyer who represents people accused of stealing WVO and grease, said that in the early 1990s he had won more than a dozen cases by arguing that grease should be considered free to take as abandoned property. Thus, pickups usually take place in the middle of the night. But the rendering industry has been trying to lock down the growing market, driven by demand for biodiesel, from freeloaders. California has a taken a lead in the crackdown on WVO and grease theft. In October, the state’s Department of

Food and Agriculture (CDFA) began a program with local police departments, targeting areas most often hit. As of early December, the police had caught and cited five people suspected of WVO or grease theft, and they will probably pay fines. CDFA will announce full results from the pilot program soon and expand it to other parts of the state. According to Yaccino, turning arrests into convictions with punishments large enough to deter future theft is rare; its hard to determine not just the value of the stolen WVO and grease, but also how much was stolen and from where. Thieves typically strike at multiple restaurants on one night, carting away the grease in tanker trucks or barrels

Crop 7

2001 JD 7710 MFWD, cab, air, power shift, 4298 hrs., 3 remotes, dual pto, front fenders, 20.8x42 and 16.9x30 radials, very clean, original, runs ex. . . . . . . . .$57,500

2002 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed, power quad LHR, 2485 hrs, ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radials on R+P axles, dual remotes and pto with JD 640 SL loader, real sharp, ex tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,500

JD 5085 M MFWD, 16x16 trans LHR only 92 hrs, EPTO, 3 remotes 16.9x30 and 11.2x24 radials with JD 563 SL loader, brand new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,000

2006 JD 6320 2WD, cab, air, power quad, left hand reverser 2419 hrs, ex 16.9x38 radials, 540+1000 pto buddy seat, very clean, sharp, original, ex . .$35,000 2006 JD 6320 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed PQ LHR, 1100 hrs, buddy seat, dual pto, 460/85R/38 and 420/85R/24 front fenders with JD 563 SL loader, electronic joystick 3rd valve to front, mint cond, like new . . . . . .$52,500 2005 JD 5225 468 hrs, 9 speed sync shuttle trans, 2 remotes, has E-pto3 point hitch, 14.9x28 tires, like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,500 2004 JD 6320 2WD, cab, air, power quad, LHR, ex 16.9x38 radials, 540+1000 pto buddy seat, 3079 hrs, very clean, sharp, original . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 1998 JD 5510 narrow orchard tractor, 75hp, cab, air, 5621 hrs, syncro reverser, 2 remotes outback plus joystick, loader brackets, 380/85/28 rears, 280/80R/18 fronts, ex running clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,000 1998 JD 5410 MFWD, 12x12 trans, left hand reverser, 3391 hrs, 16.9x30 rears 11.2x24 fronts, 540 loader with joystick, folding roll bar, 73 inch bucket, very clean, sharp, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1997 JD 7210 MFWD, cab, air, power quad LHR, 4800 hrs, ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radials, JD 740 SL loader, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,000 1986 JD 2550 cab, air, 3552 hrs, 18.4x30 tires, dual remotes with like new JD 620 loader joystick and 7' bucket, real clean, runs ex, only used on a bale spear before . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,500 1985 JD 1030 roll bar and canopy, same as JD 2040, 2900 hrs, diesel, very very clean, tight, sharp, one owner, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 1983 JD 2950 with laurin cab, 4732 hrs, ex 18.4x38 radials, 16 speed trans, dual pto and remotes, sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 1979 JD 4240 cab, air, 18.4x38 rears, dual remotes and pto, 5653 hrs, real clean, runs ex . . . . . . . . .$19,500 1994 Ford 7840 MFWD, 90hp, cab, air, SLE, 4995 hrs, ex 18.4x38 radials, ex 14.9x28 radials, ex Ford 7413 loader, very clean, original, runs ex . . . . . . . .$25,500 1989 Ford TW 15 MFWD, cab, air, series 2, 20.8x38s and 16.9x28s, 10 front weights and rear weights, 6180 hrs, 3 remotes, very clean, runs ex . . . . . . . .$20,000 1987 Ford TW15 series 2 MFWD, cab, air, only 3821 hrs, like new, 18.4x38 rears, 3 remotes, dual pto, original, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$24,500 1982 Ford 3610 42 hp, 3347 hrs, 8 speed trans, single remote, 540 pto, 14.9x28s, runs ex . . . . . . . . .$6,000 1979 Ford 5600 with Hiniker 1300 cab, 62 hp, 4094 hrs, ex 16.9x30 tires, dual remotes, 540 pto, sharp, very clean, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500

1977 Ford 9700 2WD cab, air, 5417 hrs, new 460/85R/38 rears, dual power, dual remotes and pto, clean, original, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 2005 CIH JX95 MFWD, cab, air, 80 hp, 841 hrs, 18.4x30 and 12.4x24 Goodyear super traction radials, front fenders, dual remotes, like new . . . . . . . . . . .$27,500 1995 CIH 7220 Magnum MFWD, cab, air, 5657 hrs, ex 20.8x42 radials, rear ex 16.9x30 radials, front fenders and weights, dual pto, 3 remotes, very clean, original, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$46,500 1984 IH 684D only 2317 original hrs, ex 18.4x30 rears, roll bar and canopy with ex CIH 2250 quick tatch loader, joystick, very clean, original one owner hobby farmer, ex tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1984 IH 3088 2WD, 4 post ROPS, ex 18.4x38s, 81 hp, dual pto and remotes, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1983 Case 2290 cab, air, 129 hp, 20.8x38s, 540+1000 pto, 5400 hrs, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 1977 IH 986 factory cab, 5717 hrs, dual pto and remotes, like new 20.8x38 firestone 7000 radials, very clean, original, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 1977 IH 1086 cab, air, 6100 hrs, 18.4x38 radials, dual pto and remotes, clean original Illinios tractor .$12,500 1975 IH Hydro 100 cab, 18.4x38s, dual remotes and pto, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1981 White 2-105 MFWD, cab, air, 4307 hrs, dual pto and remotes, 20.8x38 and 16.9x26 tires, real clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 Montana LG 2740 MFWD, ROPS only 79 hrs, R4 tires, LHR with loader, joystick control, just like new .$8,500 1976 Massey Ferguson 245 diesel 5114 hrs, 13.6x28 rears, 3ph, 1 set of remotes, very clean, original, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 2007 NH 1412 discbine, impeller conditioner, 540 pto, very low usage, real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 2006 NH 1411 discbine, rubber rolls, 540 pto, very low usage, real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,000 2005 JD 530 impeller discbine, hydra angle on head, real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 Kuhn FC300G impelller discbine, 540 pto, off small farm, real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 New Holland 310 baler with NH 75 hydraulic pan type kicker, real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 1994 New Holland 575 wire tie baler, hydraulic bale tension pickup head and hitch, NH model 77 pan type kicker, real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000 1990 New Holland 575 baler, hydraulic drive bale thrower and tension, super nice, clean, original low use baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 2004 JD 467 4x6 silage special round baler, mega wide pickup, dual twine, 11000 bales, gauge wheels, push bar, ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500

2005 Claas 260 variant with net wrap and twine, 4ft by 5ft, super sharp, like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 2002 Claas 250 Rollant rotocut net wrap 4x4 round baler, ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 2005 CIH RBX 453 4x4 round baler, dual electric tie bale ramps, baled less than 2000 bales, like new mint baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 2003 New Holland BR750 4x6 round baler, wide pickup head, bale ramps, net wrap, endless belts, very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 2000 JD 446 4x4 round baler, baleage kit, like new belts, ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1999 New Holland 648 silage special round baler, wide pickup head bale, ramps, very nice 4x5 baler .$8,500 1996 JD 335 4x4 round baler, silage special, real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 1998 JD 456 4x5 silage special round baler, wide pickup, real sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 CIH 3440 4x4 round baler, nice little baler . . . . .$3,500 1996 New Holland 644 4x5 round baler, silage special, wide pickup head, bale ramps, net wrap, very nice baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 CIH 3450 4x5 round baler, very clean, nice baler .$3,500 Gallignani 3200 4x4 round baler, rolls and chains, very clean, ex bale age baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 CIH No 10 flail chopper, nice one . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Kverneland Taarup 17 ft hydraulic fold tedder, ex cond 2 years old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Massey Ferguson model 72, manual fold up hay tedder, big tire, very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 2010 Anderson RB 500 trailer type bale wrapper, 30 in plastic, auto start and cut with electric start Honda gas engine, just like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 Late model Kuhn KC 4000G center pivot discbine, rubber rolls, ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 NH 144 windrow inverter, nice one . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 IH manure spreader, model 500, ground drive, good chain, 75 bushel, nice little spreader . . . . . . . . .$800 IH 450 3 bottom 3ph auto reset plow, very nice .$2,500 CIH 7500 4BT variable width, auto rest plow, 16-20 inches, like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 20.8x38, 18.4x46 clamp on duals, 18.4x38, 20.8x38, 10 bolt axle, duals and hubs 8ft front mounted snow pusher with mounting bracket for farm tractor with cylinder and hoses . . . . . . . .$1,000 8ft 6 in hi volume 3ph box blade for snow . . . . .$1,000 JD 840 self leveling loader and mouting brackets for JD 7010 series tractor, real nice, high volume bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500

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for sending me the NYT article, I told him that our tiny co-op with which I am involved is not immune to such theft. I e-mailed him as follows: “Good article. The demand for waste veg oil was even greater (I think) in 2008, since fuel prices that spring had spiked even worse. The fellow in our little co-op (Mohawk Biofuels Co-op, Inc), who picks

up most of the WVO, set out a 55-gallon plastic barrel behind a Chinese restaurant in Utica. The owners, who spoke little English, said they would put their WVO (it’s really not grease) in our barrel, which he had magicmarked MBCI. Bill said when he got to the restaurant in question, not only was the oil not there, the barrel had been stolen also.”

Crop from 6 in the back of a van. To illustrate the type of thefts that occur, the Times author cited the case where, one night in late November, a Sacramento rendering company employee, driving his monthly route, stopping at fast food joints, opened the lids of 22 grease containers. Only two had grease for him to collect. When I thanked Peter

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 7

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Page 8 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Angus cattlemen to meet for 2012 Cattle Industry Annual Convention Nashville, TN, will host hundreds of Angus producers during the upcoming Cattle Industry Annual Convention and NCBA Trade Show Feb. 1-4. Many of those producers will be setting the policy and priorities of the livestock industry while participating in the joint and individual meetings of five of the industry’s leading organizations: National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board (CBB), American National CattleWomen Inc. (ANCW), Cattle-Fax and the National Cattlemen’s Foundation (NCF). Participants from across the country will enjoy top-notch general session speakers, including author Marcus Luttrell, whose best-selling book Lone Survivor tells

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January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

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Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

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cal manuals, guides and references. There are two types of eligibility for CIG — applicant eligibility and project eligibility. For applicant eligibility, an applicant must be located in one of the following areas: the 50 States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Also, an applicant must be one of the following: a federally recognized Indian Tribe; a State or local government; a non-governmental organization; or a private individual. For project eligibility, the proposed project or activity must encompass the development and assessment, evaluation and implementation of either of the following: conservation adoption approaches or incentive systems, including market-based systems; or promising conservation technologies, practices, systems, procedures or activities. Landowners must meet Environmental Quality Incentives Program eligibility requirements defined in 16 U.S.C. Section 3839aa-1. CIG funds will be awarded through a competitive grants process. At least 50 percent of the total cost of CIG projects must come from non-Federal matching funds, including cash and in-kind contributions provided by the grant recipient. To apply electronically, visit www.grants.gov/ or contact a local NRCS office. To view the complete Announcement of Program Funding, visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/tech nical/cig/. For more information about NRCS conservation programs, visit www.nrcs.usda.gov or visit your local USDA service center.

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

ment. NRCS is especially interested in projects that demonstrate: • Optimal combinations of nutrient source, application rate, placement and timing that improve nutrient recovery by crops. • Procedures for refining the usefulness of the phosphorous index in reducing phosphorous losses. • Suites of conservation practices that protect water quality. • Renewable energy systems that reduce the use of fossil fuels and increase energy efficiency on farms. • The impacts of cover crops, crop rotations, tillage and other conservation practices on soil health. • Conservation practices that increase the water-holding capacity of soils. • Decision tools that help producers assess their operations and conservation needs in order to improve wildlife habitat. • Assess the technology transfer potential of completed CIG projects. Results of successful projects will be included in NRCS policy, techni-


FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE (2) USED SILO unloaders, $1,200 for both or will separate. Jonas Hershberger, 2845 Co. Rt. 2, Pulaski, NY 13142 FOR SALE: John Deere 450 Hydro push spreader, $3,500. 716-337-2543.(NY) FOR SALE: John Deere skid steer model 170 asking $3,000; Leave message. 607264-9056.(NY) 782 NEW HOLLAND forage harvester with hay head, $2,200. 9 lightly used cow mats, $40. 585-554-6292.(NY) LHASA APSO/BEAGLE pups, very small, adorable, colorful, vet checked, shots, crate trained, 11/25/11, pictures available, senior discount, $200. Mary. 315-8230512.(NY)

WANTED: Lime spreader, 5 ton or bigger, belt conveyor, 6” wide or more, to move dirt, crushed stone, into basement. 518279-3241.(NY)

ROUND BALES, 1st cut, dry, wrapped and processed, very good quality. Approx. 245 bales. Please call for price and availability. 802-285-6694.(VT)

JD 18.4 38 axle duals with hubs, $1,250; (2) 6 row cultivator $900; JD 335 lawn mower, 800 hours, $2,000. 585-5544506.(NY)

HINIKER CAB off JD 20 series, complete, good condition, $500; Older JD rake, good condition, works, needs some teeth, $200. 607-863-4422.(NY)

WOODS LS172 loader 48” bucket Joystick control. No Sunday Calls. 315-5366107.(NY) REGISTERED BELGIAN philly and stallion, 20 months old, Red with white stripe and socks. Sired by Stylemaster Ace. $2,000 each. 716-542-2938.(NY)

FOR SALE: 7 close up Holstein heifers, bred to Jersey Bull, size and type, vac. and dehorned. 413-743-1990.(MA)

WANTED: Ten foot transport disc, field ready; For sale, eight foot transport disc, filed ready, $750. 585-526-5442.(NY)

ALLIS CHALMERS 5050 4x4, bucket loader, near new tires, good shape, around 5,000 hours, near Syracuse, $9,200/offer. 315-672-5674.(NY)

WANTED: ROUND BALE unroller, self propelled “feed cart size” to fit in tie stall barn, working or needing repair. 802-862-0915, 802-335-1387.(VT)

JOHN DEERE 4200 4WD tractor, equipped with 3 range Hydro-trans, rear SCV, rear and mid PTO, 420 Q/A loader 716-735-3272.(NY)

WANTED: Locust fence posts, gates, high tensile wire, and Miscellaneous fencing supplies. 607-674-4597.(NY)

6 SURGE Mini orbit claws with shells, 30”: vent-o-matic barn fan. 315-344-2300.(NY)

SNOW BLOWER, 6’ 3 pt hitch, DeLaval 2” receiver jar, dump station, wood trailer, 5’x10’ skid steer chains, barn cleaner chute. 315-337-1499.(NY)

7 YR. OLD Standard bred gelding, 16H Valley Victory Dam, $900. Martin Byler, 5353 Co. Hwy. 18, New Berlin, NY 13411

SNAP ON duals, 18 4 34 & bar type, $700 or best offer. 585-506-7300.(NY) REEL AUGIE mixer wagon, #3025, $6,500; AC 190 xt diesel, runs, many new and used parts with it. Extra rims. 518-6865675.(NY)

MORTY GOOSE NECK trailer, 24’ 6” long, JOHN DEERE petal tractor model, 7600, hand turned corn chopper, 30 Farmall & IH 716-912-6109.(NY)

WANTED: Beef cattle, Dairy cattle, bulls, steers, veal, sheep, and goats, strong market, leave message. 413-441-3085.(MA)

FARMALL 560 diesel, excellent condition, NH 462 disc mower, excellent condition, NH 68 baler, excellent condition, $7,000 bo, will separate. 508-802-1369.(MA)

TWO 235 70R16 trail mark tires, tread wall 500, traction A, $100 or BO. 315-4838137.(NY)

HORSE DRAWN grain drill, nice, kept inside, odd lots of floor tile and contents of tile business. Craftsman table saw. 570642-1298.(PA)

WANTED: Buying Burrall cast iron floor model corn shellers, Mfg’rd in PA. Lebanon, Bernville, Tatamy, York, Wyanokie, others. Name your price. 717-7920278.(PA)

BLUE MINI REX doe with five bunnies. Red Golden Pheasants, Yellow Golden Pheasants, Miniature Horse, red and white philly. 585-509-0471.(NY)

OPEN CENTER steel wheels, excellent condition, 18x60 & 8x30. 315-5367875.(NY)

5 HP single phase cap enclose 220V motor, asking $250 OBO. 315-9424169l.(NY)

SPRINGING Holstein heifer, out of BlitzJintz, due Jan. 19th to Zoro, $1,400. 315497-2292.(NY)

FORD 9N, excellent tin, good tires, best offer. 315-536-3053.(NY)

FOR SALE: IH 234 compact 2wd 3 pt. pto, 80% tires. 315-536-4834.(NY)

WANTED: to trade, a six month old Polled Hereford bull, for the same for breeding. Yates Co., NY 607-243-7854

WANTED: Used 305 or 307 New Holland manure spreader. 802-476-4423.(VT)

1963 FORD 2000 runs but needs attention, power steering, wheel weights, chains, $2,800 OBO. 518-332-4171.(NY)

2240 IH 2WD 3100 original hours, new injection pump, new paint, new tires, good 55 hp tractor for sale, $10,500. 413-2385380.(MA)

NH 326 baler, low wear, MF 560 round baler, NH 492 haybine, new rolls, NH 56 rake, Kuhn GA300 rake. 315-5368183.(NY)

WANTED: Looking to buy used cattle chute or head gate Meadow Brook Farm. 518-943-2046.(NY)

HEAVY DUTY drill press, MT3; oil furnace, 68,000 BTU; Air pot paint sprayers. 585526-5954.(NY)

HAY for sale, 1st cutting, small bales, never wet, Rupert, VT 05776. 802-394-7729

245 JOHN DEERE self leveling loader, $3,750. OBO; 1923 Fordson model F cosmetic restoration, new paint, $2,850. OBO. 607-243-5810.(NY)

FOR SALE: 520 Rissler mixer engine and chain, one year old. Pump worn out. $1,000 with engine, $800 without engine, obo. 315-536-4285.(NY)

WANTED: 5 ft. rotary mower 3 pt. hitch or tow behind any cond. heavy duty A plus. 315-246-7162.(NY)

NORBCO Automatic power curtain controller w/ thermostat, 1/2 hp, 115 volt motor, $600. 603-443-1355.(NH)

HAFLINGER PONIES for sale, priced to sell!! Fat! Many to choose from, all colors and sizes, some broke, some not. 315678-2237.(NY)

5 TUNNEL VENTilation fans, Galv. 48” 1 hp with shutters, $525 each. Heavy duty shop carts, 1 @ $175. 585-554-3574.(NY)

WANTED: Young registered boar billy goat, breeding age, might consider grade if priced right. Also, young registered nannies, due spring. 585-786-2828.(NY)

OWEN NATURAL GAS generator, 30 amp, 120-140 volt, complete with ele. connections, $6,500. 716-665-3338.(NY)

FOR SALE: Holstein heifer calves, 2 to 4 weeks old, nice. Feagles Farm. 518-5682483.(NY)

FEED BIN 7 ft. dia. 4 rings high, $950; Also, Cat. 257B skid steer, enclosed cab, rubber tracks, $17,500. 315-2461154.(NY)

JD 7800 4WD duals, 740 loader, NH 230 chopper processor heads, Wester star dump truck with Houle 4250 tank, offload kit. 802-279-4567.(VT)

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MEAT GOATS: Four, three boar, all doelings, two hundred each, all for $1,300. Must sell very soon. 315-567-6631.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 3020 side console, good condition 16.9x38 tires, fair, 6,700 original hours, $8,000. 315-272-6267.(NY) F1500 hubs off a John Deere 60 with wedges, $150 a piece. 315-225-9882.(NY)

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HONEY BEES, 3 lb package, w/ queen; Also, hive bodies, frames, parts, etc., early April delivery. 845-427-2809.(NY)

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DOVER GAS PELLET stove/fireplace, hearth and roof kit, complete, new condition, $600. 607-434-5520.(NY)

2008 NH tl90A, 2wd tractor w/ quick attach 52LA forks & bucket, dual remotes, 280 hours, canopy top, LBN $32,500 BO. 315247-5616.(NY)

WANTED: PUREBRED red and white Holstein bull, large enough for service. For freestall barn. 315-852-3370.(NY)

SURGE HEAT exchanger pan type model 82080, very good condition; Also, various kinds of Banty’s nice wheat straw, $4 a bale. 315-595-2875.(NY)

THREE HOLSTEIN heifers, due in March, $1,500 obo; 23.1-26 tires on ten bolt rims off of IH Combine. 585-526-6922.(NY)

NH 411 discbine mower, $2,600; Zimmerman 7 ft. hay tedder, $780. FAHR deutz KH 500 4 star tedder for parts, $490. 315-5368522.(NY)

1986 CHEVY C70 diesel truck with 16’ dump body, removable sides, $6,500. 8x60 transport auger, pto driven, good condition, $3,000. 315-789-0882.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 2150 4wd tractor with JD 175 loader. Very good condition. $8,750. 518-441-0289.(NY)

Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

SIMS after market cab off IH 766, good condition, $300 OBO. 18.4-30 rear tractor tires like new $500 OBO. 607-2435912.(NY)

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$475,000 in environmental enhancement grants awarded to 35 Massachusetts farms BOSTON — Officials from the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (DAR) awarded 35 farm projects across the Commonwealth with grants for projects designed to increase compatibility between agricultural practices and protection of the state’s natural resources. Awarded through DAR’s Agricultural Environmental Enhancement Program (AEEP), grants totaling $475,000 were given to farms in Carver, Cheshire, Cummington, Dracut, East Bridgewater, Granville, Hadley, Hanson, Haverhill, Lakeville, Mattapoisett, Middleboro, North Harwich, Paxton, Plymouth, Plympton, Rehoboth, Shelburne, South Hadley, Sudbury, Sunder-

land, Taunton, West Brookfield, Ware, Westport and Williamstown. “These grants will help protect the state’s natural resources and improve conditions for our farming families,” said Gov. Deval Patrick. “We are committed to helping our local farmers create jobs to support agricultural economies across Massachusetts.” The funding will support projects such as automated irrigation systems for cranberry operations, manure storage areas, compost pads, fencing, milkhouse wastewater treatment areas, and zone tillage equipment for a vegetable operation. “I want to applaud the efforts of this year’s recipients and all those who have participated in the

program since its inception,” said Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray. “Through this program, our administration continues to work with local farmers to not only provide industry resources, but also additional aid to protect the Commonwealth’s land, air and water for years to come.” “This grant program helps farmers protect the state’s environment and encourages sustainable agricultural practices,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Richard K. Sullivan Jr., whose office includes DAR. “These investments reflect the commitment of the Patrick-Murray administration and our state’s farmers to reducing impacts on our natu-

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Commissioner Scott J. Soares. “We are delighted to support our local farmers in their efforts to ensure a sustainable future for their farms and I congratulate all of this year’s award recipients.” The program is one of several within DAR’s Division of Agricultural Conservation and Technical Assistance, whose mission is to enhance the viability of agricultural enterprises and safeguard natural resources through preservation, environmental stewardship, technology, technical assistance and education. “I am encouraged that so many of the state’s farmers are working toward implementing best practices that will enhance environmental

TRACTORS 2011 NH TD5030 4WD, ROPS - Rental Return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,250 2011 NH T5050 4WD, ROPS - Rental Return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,995 2001 NH TN70 w/32LA Loader, 4WD, ROPS, 2018 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . $22,600 1997 NH 8770 4WD, Supersteer, Mega Flow Hydraulics, Rear Duals, 7,164 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $53,750 2009 NH TD5050 4WD, Cab, 90 HP, 2683 Hrs., Excellent Cond. . . . . . $29,750 2000 NH TS100 4WD, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes, 2,135 Hrs. . . . . . $39,995 1995 White 6215 Cab, Tractor, 4WD, Duals, 215 HP, w/Degelman Blade. $53,750 2007 NH TL100A 4WD, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,795 2011 Mahindra 3616 4WD, Cab w/Heat & AC, HST Trans, Loader, 4 Hrs. $24,375 2010 NH T6030 4WD, Cab, w/NH 840TL Loader, 400 Hrs., Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $78,750 2010 NH TD5050 4WD, ROPS, w/Warranty, 480 Hrs. - Excellent . . . . . $31,875 2010 NH TD5030 4WD, ROPS w/New 825TL Loader - 495 Hrs. - Excellent Condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,800 Kubota L2850 4WD, GST Trans. w/Loader, Backhoe, Front Snowblower . . $,8,495 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT 2001 Gehl 1075 Forage Harvester, 2 Row Corn Head, Hay Pickup, Metal Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 2009 NH 74CSRA 3Pt Snowblower, Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 2000 Gehl 1287 Tandem Manure Spreader, 287 Bushel, Slurry Sides, Hyd. Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,495 1987 NH 790 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 790W Hay Pickup . . . . . . . . . $4,995 2003 Challenger SB34 Inline Square Baler w/Thrower, Hyd. Tension - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,375 2000 LP RCR 2584 7’ Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,540 2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 WIC Cart Mounted Bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . . . . . . . . $1,450 2008 Cole 1 Row 3pt. Planter with multiple Seed Plates. . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195 Gehl Forage Box, on Dion D1200 Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,895 JD 336 Baler w/Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2010 NH H7230 10’4” Discbine, Roll Conditioner, Like New, Demo . . . . . $24,900 1987 NH 326 Baler w/70 Thrower, Hydra Formatic Tension, Hyd. Pickup . $7,700 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Rd Bale Carrier/Feeder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 1989 NH 570 Baler w/72 Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,300 2003 NH 1411 Discbine, 10’4” Cut w/Rubber Rolls, Field Ready . . . . . $15,950 Deutz-Fahr K500 Tedder, 4 Star, 17’ Working Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,260 Pequea HR930 Rotary Rake, Excellent Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,400 2002 NH FP240 Forage Harvester, w/ met alert, Crop Processor, 29P P/U Head, 3PN Corn Head, New Knives & Sheerbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,995 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head for a NH 900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,250 2008 Taarup 8011T 8 Star 32’Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995 2008 H&S RT5200 HYD Hydraulic Fold Tedder, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 Smoker Solid Bottom Elevator 20’ on Chassis w/Elec. Motor. . . . . . . . . . . $995 2009 NH BR7060 Twine Only Round Baler, Wide Pickup, Like New . . . . . $24,500 JD 127 5’ Pull type Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $725 1995 Vicon H1050 9 Wheel Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195 Kverneland 2 Bottom Spring Reset Mold Board Plow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,795

Capital Tractor Carries All The Parts, Equipment & Service That You Will Need www.capitaltractorinc.com

practices,” said Sen. Marc R. Pacheco, senate chair of the Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture. “I am pleased to see the Patrick administration allocating these resources to ensure farmers have incentives to make these projects environmentally and economically viable.” “Our farmers strive to prevent any negative environmental impact their operations may have,” said Rep. Anne Gobi, house chair of the Joint Committee on the Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture. “This partnership with DAR to make grants available for mitigation keeps our farms viable and our air and water clean.”

Gehl 940 16’ Forage Box on Tandem 12 ton on Gehl Gear . . . . . . . . . . . $2,995 Wooden Flatbed on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350 2008 Agway Accumul8 AC800 Bale Accumulator & AC8006G SSL Grabber, Like New Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,700 Krause 2204A 14’ Disc Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,780 1998 Unverferth 13’ Perfecta II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,800 Brillian 16’ Drag Harrow w/Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,695 2002 NH 570 Baler w/72 Thrower - Excellent Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,600 2001 NH 163 Tedder, Hyd. Fold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 NH 716 Forage Wagon on NH Gear w/roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,250 NH 273 Baler w/54A Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,995 2008 Knight 8118 Pro Twin Slinger Spreader, Tandems w/Flotation Tires . $16,250 1998 JD 3970 Forage Harvester w/7’ PU Head, 3 Row Corn Head, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 1993 Wil-Rich 3 Point 10 Shank Chisel Plow w/Gauge Wheels . . . . . . . $2,600 1995 Kuhn FC400RC Hyd. Swing Discbine, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . $10,200 NH 415 Discbine, Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 NH 315 Baler w/70 Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 2009 Erskin 72” Front Mount Snowblower for Class III Compact Tractor . . $4,760 2008 Krause 7300/18WR 18’ Cushion gang disc, Demo Unit, Like New . $25,625 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2007 NH M428 Telehandler 42’ Reach - 1050 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $66,250 2008 NH M459 Telehandler 45’ Reach - 420 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,500 2008 NH W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/Heat/Air, Bucket/Forks, 375 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2007 NH E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Car w/Heat/AC - 400 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36” Bucket, 1,600 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $118,750 2009 NH E50B Cab w/Heat & Air, Blade, Rubber Track, Hyd. Thumb, 725 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,250 2010 NH E35B Excavator w/Blade, Rubber Tracks, Cab w/Heat/Air . . . . . $33,750 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate 72” Bucket - 100 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2007 NH C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, 84” Bucket, 1088 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,500 2008 NH C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, Hi-Flow Hyd., 84” Bucket, 932 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,750 Mustang MS60P 60” SSL Pickup Broom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 2005 NH LS180B Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Hyd. Mount Plate, New Tires, 4601 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,750 ATTACHMENTS 1999 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Good Cond. . . . . . $3,150 2008 NH/FFC 66” Skidsteer Tiller - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2008 NH 96” Hyd. Angle Dozer Blade, Demo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,875 2010 NH/Bradco 6” x 4’ Trencher, Skidsteer Mount, Like New . . . . $3,995 2011 NH/McMillon Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9” Auger . . . . . $2,950

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

CAPITAL TRACTOR, INC.

ral resources.” AEEP fund practices that improve water quality, promote water conservation and improve air quality. Farmers selected to participate are reimbursed for the approved costs of materials up to $30,000. Since 1999, AEEP has funded 387 projects statewide, providing growers and producers approximately $4.5 million to address environmental concerns on their farms. This program also helps advance several of the strategies outlined in the recent Climate Change Adaptation report. “AEEP has been a proven tool in helping us safeguard the environment, while ensuring that our local food supply remains viable,” said DAR


VERMONT DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER

1909 - 2012 OVER 100 YEARS OF SERVICE

Country Folks

Official Publication of Vermont DHIA

Visit Us At the Vermont Farm Show Come stop by and see us at our booth during the 2012 Vermont Farm Show! This year the farm show will be held from Tuesday, January 24th through Thursday, January 26th at the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex, VT.

The Vermont Farm Show is great opportunity to find out what services are offered by organizations in the local ag community, visit with friends and neighbors, and attend organization meetings and banquets. While you're at the

show, it's also a great time to visit our booth and find out what we can do for you! Meet some of our staff and technicians and ask about our numerous testing options. Whether you are looking for in-depth whole-herd management records

with health history and to-do lists, if you just want to know the somatic cell count of a few cows, or something in between, we can provide you the tools to do it. Testing plans range from technician-assisted programs to lower cost own-

er-sample options, with a choice of processed and non-processed records, and a variety of lab services to meet your needs. At the booth, you can also see demo of PCDART herd-management software from DRMS and

find out whether it can help you get more out of your records. Also ask us about handheld devices for running PocketDairy. Before you leave, don't forget to sign up for our door-prizes too! Hope to see you there!

Subgrouping in PCDART

Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Brett Denny, Vermont DHIA

sub-divided. The minor subgroup is really just a group-within-a-group. You can enter many of the same database items in the major and minor [ ] white boxes that you use to control a report. In the picture, the major subgroup is lactation number (database item # 8) and the minor subgroup is days in milk (database item # 7). This particular report will group all of the first lactation number animals together (with a "1" in both the Lower and Upper columns), all of the second lactation animals

major subgroups. For instance, within the first major subgroup (lactation 1), all animals will be further sub-divided by days-in milk. Animals with 1-45, 46-100, 101-200, and 201-999 DIM will be grouped together. The same thing will happen for each of the other major subgroups. When you preview the report, after each minor subgroup there will be two lines indicating the total number of animals in that minor subgroup along with the averages for most of the database

While you could create multiple reports that control on each of these different subsets, PC-

together, and all of the third-and-greater lactation animals together (with a 3 in the Lower

items that are displayed on the report. After all of the minor subgroups are shown, an average

DART has a built-in feature that provides the same functionality and a few extras. In the PCDART report editor (click on the "Edit" button above your list of reports) the "subgrouping" tab in the center of the window is designed just for this purpose. While the the tab is called subgrouping, it's not limited to just group-number; you can control on lactation, days in milk, production, or any number of other things. The tab is divided into two sections, Major [ ] and Minor [ ]. The major subgroup is the first means by which report is

column and a large number in the Upper

for the major group is displayed. Minor sub-

jor subgroups are indicated by (*****) at both the beginning and end of the line. Each subgroup lists the number of animals in the group along with the number of the subgroup control and what is being controlled. For instance, in the example, "36 cow average for minor group 04 (201, 999) Days in milk-ref" indicates there are 36 cows in the 4th minor subgroup, which represents cows from 201-999 days in milk. Be careful, this is not showing that there are 36 cows in group number 4 in the barn. When entering subgroups, be careful that your numbers are arranged in order, from low to high and left to right, and that numbers in your controls do not overlap. For instance, if you there are rows with larger numbers above rows with smaller numbers, if you have a number in the Lower column that is larger than the Upper column on the same row, or if you have different rows with number ranges that overlap, the report won't run (see the highlighted rows in the example). In addition to providing the added flexibility of major and minor sub-

column). The minor subgroup acts within each of those

group averages have (*****) only at the beginning of the line and ma-

groups, the "subgrouping" feature of PCDART is also useful because it

A simple report in PCDART is great for showing all of the animals in your herd, or a particular subset of those animals. Occasionally, depending on how you manage your herd, it can also be useful to see a bunch of subsets of animals together on the same report along with the totals (number of animals) and averages (production, DIM, etc.) for each of those subsets.

Record It… Manage It… Improve It…

provides access to the Crosstabs feature, which I will discuss in a different article. As always, if you have any questions about how to use PCDART for subgrouping, building re-

ports, entering information, or just how to make it work better for you overall, please feel free to contact any of us or call our main office at 1-800639-8067 or e-mail vtdhia@vtdhia.org.

General Manager Brett Denny 1-800-639-8067 (main) 802-233-8662 (cell) bdenny@vtdhia.org Education Development Specialist Sarah Stebbins 802-356-2841 (cell) sstebbins@vtdhia.org

MAIN OFFICE/LAB: 1-800-639-8067 FAX: 802-295-5964 E-MAIL: VTDHIA@VTDHIA.ORG WEBSITE: WWW.VTDHIA.ORG

VERMONT DHIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

REGION 1 Counties: Franklin/Grand Isle, VT; Lamoille, VT (W); Chittenden, VT (N) Daren Sizen, Vice-President ..........(802) 524-4412...................dsizen@vtdhia.org REGION 2 Counties: Orleans, VT; Essex, VT (N); Coos, NH (N) Mark Rodgers, President ...............(802) 525-3001 ................mrodgers@vtdhia.org REGION 5 Counties: Caledonia, VT; Essex, VT (S); Orange, VT (N); Washington, VT (N); Lamoille, VT (E); Grafton, NH (N); Coos, NH (S) Suzi Pike.........................................(802) 253-4304....................spike@vtdhia.org REGION 6 Counties: Addison, VT; Chittenden, VT (S) Melanie Carmichael .......................(802) 759-2089 .............mcarmichael@vtdhia.org John Roberts..................................(802) 462-2252..................jroberts@vtdhia.org REGION 7 Counties: Windsor, VT (N); Orange, VT (S); Washington, VT (S); Grafton, NH (S); Sullivan, NH (N) Kelly Meacham, Secretary .............(802) 295-8563...............kmeacham@vtdhia.org REGION 8 Counties: Bennington/Rutland, VT; Washington/Saratoga, NY Brian Hollister, Treasurer ................(518) 361-4526.................bhollister@vtdhia.org REGION 9 Counties: Windsor, VT (S); Windham, VT; Cheshire/Hillsboro/Rockingham, NH; Sullivan, NH (S); Franklin/Essex, MA; Worcester, MA (N); Middlesex, MA (N) Susan Rushton...............................(802) 843-2719.................srushton@vtdhia.org REGION 10 Counties: Berkshire/Hampshire/Hampden/Norfolk/Suffolk/Plymouth/Bristol/Barnstable, MA; Worcester, MA (S); Middlesex, MA (S); CT (All); RI (All) David Schillawski............................(860) 303-2866 ..............dschillawski@vtdhia.org REGION 11 Counties: Albany/Delaware/Montgomery/Otsego/Schoharie, NY Ray Steidle .....................................(518) 234-4659.................rsteidle@vtdhia.org


Top 10 sheep stories of 2011 Iowa, Minnesota, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee and California. The www.growour flock.org website contains the program details. 2. Federal Spending Package Includes Wild Sheep Language - The omnibus spending package included ASI-supported language regarding sheep grazing and wild sheep. The language prohibits the U.S. Forest Service from using funds to reduce domestic sheep grazing because of conflicts with bighorn sheep, unless the management is consistent with a state wildlife plan. This inclusion gives the industry and researchers the necessary time to finalize the implementation of promising vaccines to address disease issues, as well as strategies to implement best management practices to promote the coexistence of both species of sheep. 3. Industry Defeats Anti-Wildlife Services’ Amendment - An ani-

mal-rights led amendment by the Humane Society of the United States and Natural Resources Defense Council to cut funding to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Wildlife Services (WS) Agency by $11 million was soundly rejected by the U.S. House of Representatives. Fully twothirds of the House rejected an amendment to reduce funding for WS. 4. Generation Setting Wool, Lamb and Pelt Markets - Wool and lamb prices hit all-time highs this year and sheep producers agree that this is a great time to be in the sheep business. A high demand for both products resulted in rising prices. 5. Superwash Line Begins Production - The superwash equipment that was reintroduced into the United States by the Sheep Venture Co., in association with ASI, began production this year. Machine usage has ex-

ceeded industry projections and, according to wool warehousemen, more than $1.5 million in premium prices were paid to producers this year due to the superwash equipment. Additional commercial textile firms in the United States have entered the market because they could buy domestic wool and have the entire process done in America, thereby creating more competition. 6. Wal-Mart and Kroger’s Announce American Lamb Programs - Two major announcements to carry American lamb in our nation’s grocery stores occurred: Kroger, one of the nation’s largest grocery store chains, launched an American lamb branded campaign and Super Wal-Mart announced that all 40 distribution centers would exclusively carry domestic lamb. 7. Rocky Mountain Gray Wolf Delisted - Legislation passed to delist the gray wolves in Montana and Idaho, as well as portions of eastern Oregon and Washington and

north-central Utah, from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife. The language prevents courts from again intervening in the issue. 8. Drought Hits Texas Moving Record Number of Sheep Out of State In 2011, the sheep industry experienced the most dramatic shift in breeding sheep numbers seen in the past 15 years. Because of the drought in Texas, projections indicate that hundreds of thousands of breeding sheep from the nation’s largest sheepproducing state were exported to farms as far east as Tennessee, north to Idaho and Wisconsin and west to California. 9. NASS Sheep Report Off and Then On Again - In October, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistical Service

(NASS) announced it would be discontinuing the annual Sheep Inventory Report, eliminating the only annual report provided to the sheep industry. The report has been conducted since the 1860s. In December, NASS confirmed that it reinstated the sheep report and would begin collecting data. The report provides critical inventory and production information. 10. Superior Farms Closes Iowa Processing Plant - In May, Superior Farms closed its lambslaughter plant in Hawarden, Iowa, after acquiring the facility from Iowa Lamb Corporation in October 2010 stating reduced volume as a contributing factor. Source: American Sheep Industry Weekly Jan. 6

TRADE SHOW OPPORTUNITIES • KEYSTONE FARM SHOW • January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

• VIRGINIA FARM SHOW • Jan. 19, 20 & 21, 2012 • Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-3 Augusta Expoland • Fishersville, VA

• BIG IRON EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• EMPIRE STATE FRUIT & VEG EXPO • Jan. 24, 25 & 26 2012 Oncenter Convention Center • Syracuse, NY

• HARD HAT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO EXHIBIT AT OR ATTEND ANY OF THESE SHOWS

CALL 800-218-5586 www.leetradeshows.com • mwhite@leepub.com

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15

From record prices to drought and wild sheep to wolves, there was no room for the minor story when recapping the events of the sheep industry in 2011. The American Sheep Industry Association (ASI) selected the following top 10 sheep stories as a recap of 2011. 1. Let’s Grow Campaign Rolled Out - Producers from across the United States are participating in the Let’s Grow with twoPLUS initiative to strengthen the lamb and wool industry’s infrastructure for the longterm sustainability of the industry by increasing the number of sheep in production. With three goals in mind, the primary objective of this campaign is to encourage current producers to expand their sheep numbers by 2014. This initiative will result in 315,000 more lambs and 2 million more pounds of wool for the industry to market. To get the word out, media events were held in


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You

Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Wake up to Eggs: the gold standard for a healthy breakfast What’s low in calories, easy to fix, very economical and satisfying enough to keep you full for hours? That’s a no brainer — it’s the incredible egg. At only 70 calories for one large egg (let’s not even begin the packed with top quality protein, loads of vitamins and minerals talk), it’s a super way to start your day. The easy to fix part (a lot of folks don’t believe that) haven’t realized that cooking eggs in a microwave is a total cinch and even children can spray a cup, crack in an egg, swoosh it around a bit, toss in a handful a cheese and nuke it for 60 seconds. It slides out onto whole wheat toast and the cup goes into the dishwasher — done! No time to eat? Just wrap it up in foil and head out the door. And cost wise, we’re talking about a dime an egg. What kind of breakfast cereal costs a dime a serving? None I want to eat. In fact, a simple omelet, taking little more than two minutes to fix will make a really cost effective breakfast, plus you get to recycle whatever leftovers you have in the fridge for the filling. When you think of satiety, that’s where eggs really shine. The combination of nutrients in that egg, combined with uber-protein is what you want when you can’t stop for a mid-morning snack. In fact, research shows that folks that enjoy eggs for breakfast, compared to a high carb entrée, end up consuming 300 to 500 fewer calories throughout the rest of the day since they just aren’t that hungry. These are all good reasons eggs have been crowned the gold standard for breakfast, but the nutrition itself (sorry, we just have to mention it) is reason

enough to get your day started with an egg. Eggs contain 14 percent less cholesterol than previously thought, Vitamin D, choline (for memory health), every vitamin in some amount except Vitamin C, lutein (for eye health), loads of minerals, and the list goes on — in fact, if you could eat the shell, you’d even have some calcium! And after a night’s fast, filling up with top quality protein gets everything moving and working the way it’s supposed to. So in this new year, when you Wake up to Eggs and send yourself and the kids off with the perfect breakfast food — one that’s low in calories, easy to fix, economical, satisfying and infinitely nutritious — you know you are starting the day off to a good beat.

Quick and easy breakfast ideas ~ for one or two Easy Egg Breakfast Quesadillas 1/2 cup shredded Mexican cheese blend (2 oz.) 2 whole wheat OR flour tortillas (7”) 4 slices Canadian-style bacon (2.5 oz.) 4 eggs, beaten Salsa Sprinkle 1/4 cup cheese on one side of each tortilla. Top each with 2 bacon slices. Coat large nonstick skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium heat until hot. Pour in eggs. As eggs begin to set, gently pull the eggs across the pan with an inverted turner, forming large soft curds. Continue cooking, moving eggs around until thickened and no visible liquid egg remains. Do not stir constantly. Spoon eggs on top of bacon, dividing evenly. Fold tortillas over filling to cover, pressing gently.

Photo from www.incredibleegg.org Clean skillet. Coat with cooking spray; heat over medium-low heat until hot. Toast quesadillas just until cheese is melted, about 1 - 2 minutes per side. Cut into wedges; serve with salsa. Makes 2 servings Per serving: 449 calories; 24g total fat; 2g fiber; 30g protein; 415 mg cholesterol; 24g carbohydrate

Microwave Denver Scramble Slider 2 Tbsp. chopped red or green bell peppers 1 tbsp. chopped onion 1 egg 1 thin slice deli ham, chopped (1 oz.) 1 Tbsp. water 1 slider-size bun or whole wheat English muffin, split, toasted Ketchup (opt.) Place veggies in 8-oz. ramekin or custard cup. Microwave on high, 30 seconds; stir. Add egg, ham and water, beat until egg is blended. Microwave on high 30 seconds; stir. Microwave until egg is almost set, 30 to 45 seconds longer. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Serve in bun with ketchup, if desired. Makes 1 serving Per serving: 204 calories; 7g total fat; 197 mg cholesterol; 22g carbohydrate; 2g fiber; 14g protein

Microwave 1-Minute Ham & Egg Breakfast Bowl 1 thin slice deli ham (1 oz.) 1 egg, beaten Shredded Cheddar cheese Line the bottom of 8-oz. ramekin or custard cup with ham slice. Fold ham in half, if necessary. Pour egg over ham. Microwave on HIGH 30 seconds; stir. Microwave until egg is almost set, 15 to 30 seconds longer. Top with cheese. Serve immediately. Makes 1 serving Per serving: 133 calories; 8g total fat; 204 mg cholesterol; 2g carbohydrate; 0g fiber; 12g protein Source: Virginia Egg Council

This week’s Sudoku Solution


January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

MAINE CROWN EQUIPMENT, INC. 419 Sweden St. Caribou, ME 1-800-498-3196

KRAMERS TRACTOR SALES Rt. 104, RD #3 Sidney, ME 207-547-3345

LIONEL THERIAULT, INC. #10 Davis St. Presque Isle, ME 207-764-4405

VERMONT DESMARAIS EQUIPMENT, INC. RR 2, Box 14 Orleans, VT 802-754-6629


Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

2011 Looked Pretty Good Issued Jan. 6, 2012 With Auld Lang Sine playing in the background, the December 29 CME Daily Dairy Report (DDR) said 2011 saw record-high milk production, record high exports, and record prices. Milk production is expected to come in around 196.1 billion pounds, up 1.7 percent from 2010, with most of the growth in the West. Butter production was up 17 percent in the first 10 months of the year, while nonfat dry milk and skim milk powder was up 7 percent. Cheese production was up just 1.6 percent, a smaller increase than in recent years, according to the DDR, but still on pace for a new all-time high. In the first 10 months

of 2011, U.S. dairy exports totaled $3.96 billion worth, up 29 percent from 2010. Overall export volumes were about 9 percent ahead of 2010, led by gains in shipments of NDM/SMP, up 15 percent; cheese, up 31 percent; and butterfat, up 17 percent from a year ago. Switching to “Happy Days Are Here Again,” the All-Milk price average exceeded $20 for the entire year for the first time ever. The 2011 average will be about $20.10 per hundredweight (cwt.), up 24 percent from 2010. The Class III milk price averaged $18.36, up 27 percent from 2010; and the Class IV price averaged $19.06, up 26 percent. Exports, dairy policy and legal battles dominated dairy news in

2011but, like the rest of the country, the economy had the biggest impact on farmers, according to Dairy Profit Weekly’s Dave Natzke. It’s also the biggest question mark for farmers in 2012, according to Natzke in Friday’s DairyLine. He said that, “Like the rest of the U.S. and global economy, the news was mixed for dairy, with farmers receiving higher prices, but seeing higher costs to produce that milk, too.” Natzke echoed the positive milk price news but said higher feed costs offset some of that. USDA’s monthly index, the milkfeed price ratio, which compares the milk price relative to average feed costs, showed that, with December’s preliminary report, last year’s index will average just 1.89 for all of 2011, the second lowest ratio in about 25 years and rivals the record low set in 2009. A second USDA report detailing average costs to produce milk indicates 2011 will surpass the previous annual high set in 2008. Costs to pro-

duce homegrown feed or purchase feed are the

primary factors, with total feed and operating

Mielke 19

The March Issue of Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market www.cfmanestream.com

Follow us on Facebook

2012 Annual Horse Owners Buyers Guide & Equine Directory & Events Calendar *Listing Deadline Friday, February 3 rdrd March Focus is: Draft Horse Equipment

Will Feature:

DEADLINE: Friday, February 17th For advertising contact your sales representative today... or call 1-800-218-5586

2012 FOCUSES & DEADLINES PUBLICATION DATE

AD COPY DEADLINE

EDITORIAL DEADLINE

EDITORIAL FOCUS

MARCH 1

FEBRUARY 17

FEBRUARY 10

*Equine Events/Buyers Guide Insert, Draft Horse Equipment *Listing submission deadline: February 3

APRIL 1

MARCH 23

MARCH 16

Showing, Horse Care, Fencing, Pest Control

MAY 1

APRIL 20

APRIL 13

Trail Riding, Summer Camps, *Stable Directory *Listing Submission March 30 Recreational or Competitive Driving

www.cfmanestream.com

Country Folks Mane Stream 2012 Equine Directory and Events Calendar Will Be Inserted in the March Issue of Mane Stream Deadline for Listing Submissions and Ads will be Friday, February 3, 2012

JUNE 1

MAY 18

MAY 11

Timed Events and Rodeo Pasture Maintenance & Rotation

Full Page ..............................................$550.00 1/2 Page ................................................$336.00 1/4 Page ................................................$189.00 1/8 Page ..................................................$95.00

JULY 1

JUNE 22

JUNE 15

Farms & Stables, Light Horse, Pony & Draft Breeds

25% Off your ad in the March Mane Stream issue when you run in the Equine Directory & Events Calendar.

AUGUST 1

JULY 20

JULY 13

Alternative Therapies & Medicine Horse Farm & Stable Equipment

Color Process Add $95.00 Spot Color Add $25.00 Per Color

SEPT. 1

AUGUST 24

AUGUST 17

Fall Riding, Fun with Horses, Pet Section

Non-Affiliated Associations and Stable Events Calendar Listings

OCT. 1

SEPTEMBER 21

SEPTEMBER 14

Holiday Gift Guide

NOV. & DEC. 1

OCTOBER 19

OCTOBER 12

Winter Care and Feeding Tack and Equipment Care

JAN./FEB. 1, 2013

DECEMBER 20

DECEMBER 13

Breeding and Foaling, Barn and Trailer Safety, Barn Building, Colleges, Stallion Directory

EARLY DEADLINE

1-4 Listings $25.00 5 or More $35.00

Contact Your Sales Representative or Call 800-218-5586 P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Mielke from 18 costs estimated to average about $1.50 per cwt. more than 2010, according to Natzke. “The bottom line,” he said, “Is that U.S. dairy farmers saw vastly improved milk prices in 2011, but higher feed prices ate into their profit potential,” and he warned that the trend “looks to continue in 2012.” Speaking of milk prices; California’s December 4b cheese milk price is $15.14 per cwt., down $2.05 from November 2011, $2.92 above December 2010, but $3.63 below the compa-

rable Federal order Class III price; the largest gap in nine years. That put the 2011 4b average at $16.37, up from $13.17 in 2010. The December 4a butter powder price is $16.59, down $1.11 from November, but $1.92 above December 2010. The 2011 4a average is $18.82, up from $14.81 in 2010. The Golden State’s February Class I price will be announced January 10, with the Federal order Class I base announced January 20. The California Department of Food

and Agriculture also announced that no new quota will be allotted to the state’s dairy producers on January 1. Looking “back to the futures;” the Federal order Class III milk price average for the first six months of 2012 stood at $16.63 on November 4, $16.72 on November 11, $16.78 on November 18, $17.16 on December 2, $16.84 on December 9, $17.07 on December 16, $17.04 on December 23 and was around $17.53 on January 7. Checking the cash dairy markets; there

www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-week k updatess and d onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations.

USDA’s weekly butter stocks data this week showed inventory levels rose 22.5 percent from the previous week but are still 55.5 percent below a year ago, according to FC Stone’s January 5 Insider Opening Bell. FC Stone dairy economist Bill Brooks said “The rise in stock levels was only about 300,000 pounds so while the percentage change looks big, it was not a lot of butter.” Meanwhile; feed costs were lower in December but so were milk prices, leaving farm profitability down slightly from November. The All-Milk price was estimated at $19.80 per cwt., down 60 cents from November, while feed costs decreased about 3.5 percent, according to USDA’s latest Ag Prices report. The corn price declined 40 cents, to $5.44 per bushel, and soybeans dropped 60 cents, to $11.10, while alfalfa hay increased $1 per ton, to $199.00. Feed costs compute out to $10.53 per cwt., leaving “Income over feed costs” of $9.27 per cwt., according to the DDR, down from $9.49 in November. This is slightly above the 10-year aver-

age IOFC of $9.09 per cwt, the DDR said. Checking supplies; milk continues to flow into butter and powder production as November butter and milk powder output moved higher but cheese production was fairly steady, according to USDA’s latest Dairy Products report. Butter production totaled 153 million pounds, up 4.4 percent from October and14.2 percent above November 2010. Nonfat dry milk/skim milk powder was estimated at 159.7 million pounds, up 17.5 percent. Total cheese output slipped to 886.5 million pounds, down 1.2 percent from October but 0.3 percent more than November 2010. Italiantype cheese totaled 383 million pounds, up 0.1 percent from October but 0.6 percent less than a year ago. American-type cheese production totaled 348 million, down 1.3 percent from November but 0.7 percent more than a year ago. In regional news; Dairy Profit Weekly reports that a Northeast antitrust lawsuit cannot continue as a proposed

Mielke 23

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

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were no New Year hangovers as 2012 started on an up note for cheese and butter. The 40pound blocks closed the first Friday of 2012 at $1.61 per pound, up 4 3/4-cents on the week and 24 1/2-cents above a year ago. The 500pound barrels finished at $1.59, up a penny on the week and 24 3/4cents above a year ago. 21 cars of block traded hands on the week, 14 on Friday, and only one of barrel. Demand appears to remain good as Super Bowl entertaining approaches. The lagging NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price slipped to $1.6380, down 6 cents, while the barrels averaged $1.6094, down 2 1/2-cents. Cash butter closed at $1.6050, also up a penny on the week, but a whopping 49 1/2-cents below a year ago when butter jumped 43 cents that week. Three cars were sold the first week of 2012. NASS butter averaged $1.5873, down 0.3 cent. NASS nonfat dry milk averaged $1.4006, up 2.4 cents, and dry whey continued to strengthen, averaging 67.1 cents, up 1.1 cent on the week.


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Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

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Eastern States Exposition 1305 Memorial Ave • West Springfield, MA 01089 Phone: 413-737-2443 • Fax: 413-787-0127 FROM SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT Take Rte. 10/202 North to Southwick, Mass., turning right onto Rte. 57 East (4.7 mi.) to center of Feeding Hills. Continue straight on Springfield Street to Rte. 147 East, about 2 1/2 mi. to ESE grounds. Continue to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot.

FROM CONNECTICUT AND POINTS SOUTH Take I-91 North from Rte. 2, I-84, I-95 or the Merritt Parkway -Follow I-91 North to Mass. Exit 3 to Route 5 North to Rte. 147 West, Memorial Avenue approximately 3/4 mi. to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot. ALTERNATE ROUTES FROM CONNECTICUT AND POINTS SOUTH Take I-91 North to Conn. Exit 38 (Poquonock) to Rte. 75 North to Rte. 147 East. Continue approximately 1/2 mile to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot. Take I-91 North to Conn. Exit 40 (Bradley Int'l. Airport) to Rte. 20 West to Rte. 75 North to Rte. 147 East. Continue approximately 1/2 mile to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot.

FROM THE BERKSHIRES AND POINTS WEST Take the Massachusetts Turnpike East to Exit 4, to Rte. 5 South, to Rte. 147 West. Continue approximately 3/4 mi. to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot. FROM VERMONT AND POINTS NORTH Take I-91 South to Mass. Exit 13B, to Rte. 5 South, to Rte. 147 West. Continue approximately 3/4 mi. to ESE's Gate 9 public parking lot. FROM NEW YORK CITY From New York City, take I-95 North to New Haven, Conn., travel North on I-91 and follow above directions from Connecticut and Points South. Or, follow Merritt Parkway or I-84 to I-91 North. FROM LONG ISLAND Take the Orient Point Ferry to New London, Conn. or the Port Jefferson Ferry to Bridgeport. (See following)

FROM NEW LONDON Take I-91 North to Conn. Exit 42 to Rte. 159 North to Rte. 147 East. Continue approximately 1/2 mile to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot. Follow I-95 South and from Bridgeport, follow I-95 North to New Haven and follow above directions from Connecticut and Points South. Take I-91 North to Conn. Exit 47 West to Rte. 190 West to Rte. 159 North to Rte. 147 East. Continue approximately 1/2 mile to ESE's GPS INFO Gate 9 parking lot. If you are attending a show/event at Eastern States Exposition (The Big E or non-Fair), use 875 Memorial Avenue, West FROM BRADLEY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Springfield, Mass., as your destination address (coordinates: 42 °05'38.88"N - 72 °36'42.36"W - Elev. 52') to enter Gate 9. Take Rte. 75 North to Rte. 147 East. Continue approximately 1/2 For Gate 1, use 1761 Memorial Avenue as your destination mile to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot. address (coordinates: 42 °05'29.21"N - 72°37'28.35"W - Elev. 53')

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

FROM BOSTON AND POINTS EAST Take the Massachusetts Turnpike West to Exit 6 (Springfield). Go left at the light, following I-291 South to I-91 South (right lane) to Exit 3 and follow signs. OR, take the Massachusetts Turnpike West to Exit 4, to Rte. 5 South to Rte. 147 West. Continue approximately 3/4 mi. to ESE's Gate 9 parking lot.


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Rt. 12A, Plainfield, NH 603/675-5409 603/675-6347 www.townlineequipment.com • e-mail: info@townlineequipment.com

1990 Caterpillar IT28B Wheel Loader 110 HP, Hydraulic Coupler, Cab w/Heat, 2005 Kubota KX161-3 Excavator 1879 Hrs, Angle Dozer Blade, 24” Trenching Third Function Hyds, Powershift Trans, Bridgestone Radials, Quick Attach 2.5 Yd. Bkt, 48” Drainage Bkt, Quick Coupler, Wide Steel Tracks, Cab w/AC & Heat, Hyd. Thumb Kit, 47 HP, 12,000 Lbs. Operating Weight Bucket & Forks

2003 New Holland BR740 Round Baler 46.5”x60” Bale Size, Hyd PU Lift, XtraSweep, Bale Cmnd & Slicer, SS Baler

2004 Kubota L3400DT Tractor 550 Hrs, 34 HP Diesel, 4WD, Gearshift Trans, 2005 Kubota RTV900 Utility Vehicle 22 HP Diesel, 4WD, Power Dump & Steering, Hard Cab 1999 John Deere 80 Excavator 7835 Hrs., 55 HP, 16,600 lb. weight, WB Hyd. w/Heat, Front & Rear Worklights, Winch, 72” Power Angle Plow, Bedliner, Hydrostatic Trans Thumb, Wain Roy Wrist & Bucket, 3 Bkts, Cab w/Heat, Steel Tracks in Good Shape ROPS, Industrial Tires, Loader, 3 Pt. Hitch & PTO

2004 New Holland TC40DA Tractor/Loader/Backhoe 760 Hrs., Hydrostatic Trans., Loader w/ Quick Attach Bkt., 8’ Backhoe w/ Subframe, 3 Pt. Hitch, Diesel, PTO, 40 HP, R4 Industirial Tires CONSTRUCTION • 1986 Case 1150E dozer w/6 way blade & canopy • 1999 Case 1845C skid steer w/cab, heat, 73” bkt • 1980 JD 301A 3pt & PTO • 1990 Cat IT28B loader w/2.5 yd. bkt & 48” forks • 2005 Kubota KX161 w/cab, air, heat, QA 24” bkt, steel wide tracks w/thumb, 24” bkt & 48” clean mt bkt • 2005 Cat 304CR w/cab, heat, blade, new rubber tracks, thumb QA 18” & 24” bkts • Kobelco 80CS • 1952 Austin Westin Model 88 grader • 1999 JD 80 clean, nice w/cab, heat, blade,

steel tracks, Wain Roy wrist w/3 bkts • 1997 NH 675E cab, heat, TLB, reg hoe, hyd thumb • 2006 Case 450CT tracked skid steer, 819 hrs • Cat D3 dozer, 6 way blade, winch w/arch & canopy • Cat 426 series II, 4WD, TLB, Erops, extenda hoe, Balderson wrist, 2 bkts • Ford 555C 4WD, Erops, extenda hoe, 4 in 1 bkt, 3 dig bkts TRACTORS • 1999 Kubota L4310 w/ldr • 1984 Ford 1910 w/ldr • 1955 Farmall 300 w/ldr • 2002 Kubota B2910 w/TLB • 2002 Kubota B2710 w/ldr & mower

1998 Case 1845C Skid Steer 1707 Hrs., 56 HP Cummins Diesel, Cab, Hand Controls, Aux Hyd., 1750 lb. Operating Load • 1997 Kubot B2400 w/ldr & snowblower • 2004 Kubota B7610 w/ldr & blade • 1990 JD 855 TLB • JD 180LT tractor w/mower deck • 2001 Kubota M120DTC w/ldr • 1976 IH 986 w/cab • 1972 Ford 7000 • 2004 NH TC40A TLB • 1999 Kubota L3010HST w/ldr • 1988 Kubota L2850GST w/ldr • 2004 Kubota L3400DT w/ldr • 1997 Kubota L245DT w/ldr & new ROPS • 1998 Kubota B2400 w/ldr • 2004 Kubota B7610HSD w/ldr • 1992 Ford 1320 w/ldr • 1997 Kubota B2100 w/ldr & front snowblower

• 1986 Ford 2110 w/ldr • Massey Ferguson 20 w/ldr UTILITY VEHICLES • 2005 Kubota RTV900 • 2005 Kubota RTV900 w/cab, winch, power angle, snowplow LAWN MOWERS • 2005 Kubota GR2000 w/mower & bagger • 1998 Kubota G1800 w/mower & grass catcher • 2001 Simplicity Legacy w/mower & blower • Kubota GR2100 w/mower & blower • 2009 Kubota ZG327 mower MISCELLANEOUS • BR740 silage special baler, edge wrap, net wrap, bale slicer

1997 Ford/New Holland 675E 3324 Hrs., 90 HP, 4WD, Cab w/Heat, Powershift Trans. Standard hoe w/ hyd. thumb • SQ72R 72” rotary mower • 84” Lorenz rear mt PTO blower • CH 160 6” w/hyd feed chipper • Patu DC65 w/hyd feed chipper • Roadrunner grader blades • SQ142 42” rotary mower • 62CC 62” flail mower • Bradco 511 11ft backhoe fits New Cub Tractor • Troy-Built walk behind sickle mower • Troy-Built chipper/shredder • Echo Bear Cat walk behind vacuum, tow behind gang mowers • Harper Goosen SB5400 3pt straw blower w/hose • Bartell reversible plate compactor

• 2006 Vermeer BC600XL auto feed chipper, 300 hrs • New set of ice chains (19.5x24) • Super cutter clamp on asphalt cutting wheel • 2002 JLG 1932 elec scissor lift, 304 hrs • New Gentec hyd thumb (10-12K) • New Gentec manual thumb (20-30K) • New Versatech hyd brush grapple bkt • New Versatech solid bottom grapple bkt • 2004 Ammann AVH6030 diesel, reversible plate compactor • 6’ Harley rake, skid steer mount, power angle • New Cat Q/A pallet forks • New 72” high volume snow bucket • New 60” high volume snow bucket • Versatech Q/A bale spear


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class-action suit involving all dairy farmers in the region, based on a ruling, December 9, by U.S. District Judge Christina Reiss. The judge’s denial means the plaintiffs can pursue another course toward class certification, press individual claims, or drop the action. Last October, plaintiffs in the case formally filed a request that all dairy farmers producing and pooling raw Grade A milk in Federal Order Milk Marketing Order #1 be certified as a “class” in the lawsuit against Dairy Farmers of America, Incorporated. (DFA) and Dairy Marketing Services LLC (DMS). Federal milk market order number 1 covers Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Delaware, and parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. In her latest decision, Reiss denied class certification to all dairy farm-

ers in the affected region, determining all would not be affected equally in any potential ruling. According to Reiss, current DFA and DMS members could suffer harm which would not be shared by other Northeast farmers who were not DFA/DMS members. Log on www.nedairysettlement.com/Courtdocuments.htm for details. Looking abroad; FC Stones January 3 eDairy’s Insider Opening Bell reports that dozens of dairy producers in New Zealand’s flood-ravaged Bay of Plenty were forced to dump thousands of liters of milk due to damaged roads that have prevented milk trucks from reaching farms. And; results from this week’s GlobalDairyTrade (GDT) auction were mixed, according to the DDR. The weighted averages for the various products were released as follows: anhydrous milk fat fell 5.1 percent to $1.8062 per pound or

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$1.4479 per pound when adjusted to 80 percent butterfat butter. Milk powder gained 9.3 percent, climbing to $1.6261 per pound; cheddar cheese increased 0.2 percent, to $1.6320. Milk protein concentrate 70 gained 2.3 cent, hitting $2.7152 per pound. Rennet casein fell 4 percent, to $3.5362 per pound. Skim milk powder dropped 0.6 percent, to $1.4828 per pound; and whole milk powder was off 0.8 percent, at $1.6121 per pound. The weighted average for all products fell 0.7 percent, according to the DDR. Back on the home front; the Agriculture Department reports that milk production trends across the country are basically unchanged from previous weeks. Output in most areas of the country is stable while increasing in Florida. Milk logistics over the past holiday were challenging but for the most part, no major problems developed outside of a minor powder plant breakdown in the Pacific Northwest. Milk in the affected area was shuffled to operating plants with minimal difficulties. The lack of major winter storms combined with the holiday falling on the weekend provided for a smooth holiday period for most manufacturing plants. The biggest concern for milk processors was to get through the yearend holidays in as orderly of a fashion as possible. Sur-

Mielke 29

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January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

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Mielke from 19


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381

Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Monday, January 16 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Lamb, Sheep, Goat & Pig Sale. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-5843033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Happy New Year to all! Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs,

Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-2870220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-3923321.

Tuesday, January 17 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211.

Wednesday, January 18 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842 • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-8449104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105

B RO U G HT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

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BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

• 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842

Thursday, January 19 • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Fat Cattle & Feeder Sale. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-2870220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211.

Friday, January 20 • 12:00 Noon: 73 West First Ave., Windsor, PA. Public Auction of Windsor Meat Market. Operating business with retail meat sales & custom slaughtering. Leaman Auctions, 717-464-1128 or 610662-8149 www.leamanauctions.com

YO U

BY

Saturday, January 21 • 10:00 AM: Gray’s Connecticut Valley Indoor Auction, White River Junction, VT. Townline Equipment Sales Used Equipment Auction. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., 802-7852161 • 10:30 AM: 2725 Lime Lake/Elton Rd., Delevan, NY. Estate Auction for the estate of Michael J. Sargent. Semi Tractor, Trailers, Trucks, ATV’s, Snowmobiles, Dirt Bike. R.G. Mason Auctions, 585567-8844 www.rgmasonauctions.com

Wednesday, January 25 • 9:00 AM: Rt. 11 Cortland, NY (off exit 10). CNY Farm Supply of Recreational Equipment, Farm Machinery, Heavy Equipment, Cars & Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Calf Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842

Thursday, January 26 • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. January Heifer Consignment Sale. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105

Tuesday, January 31 • 3:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Beef Replacement & Feeder Sale. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-3213211.

Friday, February 3

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-7298030 • 3:30 PM: Erie Co. Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY. WNY Farm Show Virtual Auction! Farm machinery, tractors, ATV’s. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

Monday, February 6

Saturday, February 11 • 9:30 AM: Penn Yan, NY. Farm Machinery & farm smalls plus a few household goods for Ivan & Verna Zimmerman. L.W. Horst Auctioneer, 315-536-0954

Monday, February 13 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking

Saturday, February 18 • 9:30 AM: Newark Valley, NY. Large auction of farm & construction equipment. Goodrich Auction Service, Inc., 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com • 10:30 AM: Owens Farm, Smithfield, VA. Another Absolute Auction by Ownby. Farm Equipment Dispersal. No Buyer’s Premium!. Ownby Auction & Realty Co., Inc., 804-730-0500

Friday, March 2 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-7298030

Saturday, March 3 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com

Saturday, March 17 • 1138 Rte. 318, Waterloo, NY. Third Annual Spring Equipment Auction. Large public auction selling for farmers, dealers, bank repo & construction equipment. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 8:00 AM: Mendon, NY. Saxby Implement Corp. Public Auction. 200 Lawn Mowers, Vehicles, New Trailers & Much

More . Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Nathan Mason, Callaway, VA (near Rocky Mount). Another Absolute Auction by Ownby. Farm Equipment Dispersal. No Buyer’s Premium. Ownby Auction & Realty Co., Inc., 804730-0500

Wednesday, March 21 • 9:00 AM: 3186 Freshour Rd., Canandaigua, NY. Coryn Farm Supplies, Inc. Public Auction of Farm Equip. & Tools. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

Friday, March 23 • 10:00 AM: Batavia, NY. Jeff & Kathy Thompson Farm Machinery Auction. Selling a full line of farm machinery including Case IH Maxxum 115, Case IH MX110, Case IH 7220, Case IH CX70 plus hay, tillage, barn equipment and much more. William Kent, Inc., 585343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com

Saturday, March 24 • Atglen, PA. The Gala at Glen Valley II. Hosted by Glen Valley Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Clymer, NY. Z&M Ag and Turf Farm Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com

Saturday, March 31 • Cobleskill, NY. 31st Annual Cobleskill

Dairy Fashion Sale. Hosted by SUNY Cobleskill Dairy Cattle Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery, Lawn & Garden Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. Auctioneers, 585243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

Saturday, April 7 • Champlain, NY. Betty & Nelson LeDuc Farm Machinery Auction. Full line of machinery: Case MX120 w/ldr., Case IH 8920, Case 5130, NH TB110 w/ldr., Ford 6610. Northern New York Dairy Sales, Harry Neverett, 518-481-6666 www.nnyds.com • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Spring Premier All Breed Sale. Selections are underway. Accepting reg. high quality cattle. Give us a call! 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Saturday, April 14 • Syracuse, NY. New York Spring Holstein Sale. Held in conjunction with the New York Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

L. W. HORST AUCTIONEER 1445 Voak Rd., Penn Yan, NY 14527 315-536-0954 • Fax: 315-536-6189 KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE R.D. 1, Little Falls, NY 315-823-0089 We Buy or Sell Your Cattle or Equipment on Commission or Outright In Business Since 1948!

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung

NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 25

• Kissimmee, FL. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com


Page 26 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT January 9, 2012 Calves: 45-60# .24-.35; 6175# .4250-.45; 76-90# .55.60; 91-105# .65-.70; 106# & up .75-.80. Farm Calves: .8250-.1.15 Started Calves: .38-.42 Veal Calves: .55-.9750 Open Heifers: .60-.90 Beef Heifers: .73-.80 Feeder Steers: .75-.85 Beef Steers: .57-.83 Stock Bull: .65-1 Beef Bull: .74-.95 Sows: 1 at .31 Feeder Pigs (ea): 20-100 Goats (ea): 125-155 Kid Goats (ea): 37.50-175 Canners: up to 71.50 Cutters: 72-75 Utility: 76-80.25 Rabbits: 5-25 Chickens: 5-24 Ducks: 8-36 * Open Jan. 16 - Martin Luther King Day. On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT January 9, 2012 Cattle: 142 Calves: 178 Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 82-86; Breakers 75-80% lean 7282; Boners 80-85% lean 6878; Lean 85-90% lean 45-72. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls 92-125# 70-145; 80-92# 7082. Vealers: 100-120# 70-82; 90-100# 55-75; 80-90# 5575; 70-80# 52-70; 60-70# 20-46. COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA January 11, 2012 Cows: Canners 38-70; Cutters 70.50-79; Util 80-85.50. Bulls: 60-93.50 Steers: Ch 119.50-130.50; Sel 100.50-125.50; Hols. 76.50-85.50. Heifers: Ch 126-131; Sel 104-122.50; Hols. 71-88.50. Calves: 5-124 ea. Feedes: 55-109 Goats: 111-154 ea; Kids 78 ea. Hog: 68-72.25 Chickens: 3.50-15 Rabbits: 2-16 Ducks: 5.50-17

Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 15-31; 61-75# 33-62; 76-95# 4267; 96-105# 36-66; 106# & up 56-66. Farm Calves: 70-130/cwt Feeders: 52-90/cwt Heifers: 64/cwt Steers: 64/cwt Bulls: 82/cwt Canners: 20-67.50/cwt Cutters: 69-78/cwt Utility: 79-87.50/cwt Hogs: 77-83/cwt Boars: 18.50/cwt Shoats: 73-84 ea. Feeder Pigs: 36 ea. Lambs (new crop): 135280/cwt Sheep: 67.50-110/cwt Goats: 125-265 ea. Rabbits: 4-8 ea. Poultry: 2-10 ea. Hay: 10 lots, 2.90-5/bale northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ January 10, 2012 Livestock Report: 33 Calves .05-1.28, Avg .83; 41 Cows .36-.89, Avg .73; 6 Easy Cows .43.25-.66.5, Avg .55; 10 Feeders 300-500# .64-1.20, Avg .90; 16 Heifers .46-.86.5, Avg .74; 7 Bulls .59-.88, Avg .77; 10 Steers .64.5-1.22, Avg 1.04; 1 Hog .51; 4 Roasting Pigs (ea) 143; 1 Boar .28; 1 Sow .38; 8 Sheep .78-1.40, Avg 1.13; 36 Lambs (/#) 1.85-2.88, Avg 2.41; 10 Goats (ea) 84162.50, Avg 117.55; 7 Kids (ea) 30-170, Avg 66.31; 9 Hides (ea) 3.60-30, Avg 8.56. Total 211. Poultry & Egg Report: Heavy Fowl (/#) .70-2.50; Roosters (/#) 1.25; Pullets (ea) 7; Roosters (ea) 3.509.50; Bunnies (ea) 2.50; Ducks (ea) 6; Rabbits (/#) 1.40-2.90; Pigeons (ea) 1-4. Grade A Eggs: White Jum XL 1.40; Brown Jum XL 1.42-1.55; L 1.45; M 1.151.20. Hay, Straw & Grain Report: 4 Alfalfa 3.20-3.30; 18 Mixed 2.70-4.10; 2 Timothy 3.80-5; 15 Grass 2-5.30; 1 Mulch 2.30; 1 Rye Straw 3.40; 1 Shelled Corn 9; 1 Oats 5.80; 3 Firewood 20-40. Total 46. CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report

* Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA No report NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA January 10, 2012

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY January 5, 2012 Calves (/#): Hfrs. .50-1; Grower Bulls over 92# 11.75; 80-92# .70-1.20. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .64-.84;

Lean .45-.63; Hvy. Beef Bulls .66-.83. Dairy Replacements (/hd): Fresh Cows 850-1300; Springing Cows 1000-1400; Springing Hfrs. 950-1500; Bred Hfrs. 800-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 850-1350; Open Hfrs. 500-900; Started Hfrs. 100400; Service Bulls 500-900. Beef (/#): Feeders .50-1; Hols Sel .85-.99. Goats (/hd): Billies 75-170; Nannies 65-120; Kids 20-80.

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Central Bridge

CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No report CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY January 9, 2012 Calves (/#): Grower over 92# .90-1.15; 80-92# .70.85; Bob Veal .57-.64. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .77-.84; Lean .62-.7050; Hvy. Beef Bulls .79-.81. Beef (/price): Feeders 90115; Steer 80; Hols 7375.50; Hols. Hfrs. 61-84.50. Lamb/Sheep (/#): Feeder 1.90-2.05; Market 1.90; Slaughter Sheep .65-.70. Goats (/hd): Nannies 135. Hogs (/#): .62-.68; Sow .36; Boar .20. *Buyers always looking for pigs. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY No report DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY No report GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY January 5, 2012 Calves (/#): Hfrs. .48-1.10; Grower Bulls over 92# .901.875; 80-92# .70-1.15; Bob Veal .30-.54. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .76-.83; Lean .56-.72; Hvy. Beef Bulls .73-.85. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY January 5, 2012 Calves (/#): Grower over 92# 1.20-1.60; 80-92# .50.95; Bob Veal .30-.50. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .665.805; Lean .63-.73; Hvy. Beef Bulls .67-.71. BATH MARKET Bath, NY January 4, 2012 Calves (/#): Grower Bulls over 92# 1.20-1.45; 80-92# .75-.90; Bob Veal .15-.40. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .66-.76; Lean .55-.65; Hvy. Beef Bulls .75-.83. Beef (/#): Feeders .75-.92. FINGER LAKES

Cambridge

Chatham

LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY January 11, 2012 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 58-83.50; Canners/Cutters 43-76; HY Util 76-89. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95110# 40-70; 80-95# 3567.50; 60-80# 30-65; Vealers (grassers) 250# & up 50-89. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 80-115; 80-95# 75-110; 70-80# 70-85; Hfr calves 85-145; Beef Calves bull over 95# 75-115. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed 116-128; Sel 90-112; Hols. Ch grain fed 88-110; Sel 7884. Hogs: Sows US 1-3 65. Feeder Lambs: Ch 50-80# 197.50-250. Slaughter Sheep: M 46-56. FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY January 7, 2012 Beef Steers: 301-500# 75140; 501-700# 74-144; 701# & up 67-129. Beef Heifers: 301-500# 70132; 501-700# 501-700# 75-139; 701# & up 52-122. Beef Bulls: 301-500# 67141; 501-700# 70-124; 701# & up 72-105. Holsteins: 301-500# 64-84; 501-700# 58-83; 701# & up 49-78. Bred Replacements: 3601110. Families: 760-1010. Produce Mon. @ 10 am, Wed-Fri. @ 9 am sharp! FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY January 3 & 6, 2012 Hay: 65-190, 1st cut; 125330, 2nd cut; 110-360, 3rd cut. Straw: 200-255 Firewood: 52

* Hay Tuesdays & Fridays @ 11:15 am. Produce Friday @ 9 am sharp! HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY January 9, 2012 Cattle: Dairy Cows for Slaughter Bone Util .60-.89; Canners/Cutters .58-.65; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls/Steers .70-.99. Calves: Bull Calves 96-120# .80-1.30; up to 95# .10-.95; Hols. under 100# 1. Dairy: Top Milking age 1800; Top Bred Hfr. 1500; Top Open Hfr. 1050. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA January 4, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Sel 1-2 1166-1282# 111.50-116. Slaughter Heifers: Sel 1-2 1266# 109. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75# lean 81; Breakers 75-80% lean 75.50-78; Boners 80-85% lean 71.50-75, lo dress 67.50-69; Lean 85-90% lean 65-69.50, hi dress 70-73.50, lo dress 61.50-64.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1550-1980# 76.50-82.50. Feeder Cattle: Hfrs. M&L 1 400-500# 112-121; 500600# 113-115; M&L 2 500600# 90-95; Bulls M&L 1 400-500# 125-133; M&L 2 500-600# 89-107. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 95-120# 107.50117.50; No. 2 90-130# 72.50-92.50; No. 3 90-120# 52.50-70. Vealers: Util 65-120# 10-35. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 242-284# 77-79; Sows US 1-3 500600# 53-63. Feeder Pigs: 40-45# 56/hd. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 1-2 73-82# 182.50-196; Ewes

Util 1-2 152-162# 86-89. Slaughter Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 1 55# 115; 60-70# 140142.50; Sel 2 50-60# 85-95; Nannies Sel 1 100-115# 120-140; Sel 2 90-110# 87.50-110; Billies Sel 1 140# 195. BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA January 4, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 70.75-75.25; Boners 66-72.75, lo dress 59-61.50; Lean 60-66, hi dress 69.25-71.50, lo dress 51.50-58. Bulls: YG 1 1375-1800# 7275; YG 2 792-1042# 5064.75. Feeder Cattle: Steers M 1 508-542# 100-114; L 3 Hols. 272-494# 73-95; 612# 73. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 96-124# 118-136; 9092# 106-108; No. 2 94-110# 94-110; 86-92# 85-98; No. 3 78-106# 60-84; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 80-95# 75-100/hd; Vealers 64-94# 5-66. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 250-280# 180-185/hd; Sows US 1-3 550# 165/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 20-55# 5-25. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 40-46# 130-195; 7882# 175-217.50; Ewes Gd 23 130-134# 75-92.50. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 2 20-50# 20-65; 60-75# 90122.50; Nannies Sel 1 140# 100; Sel 2 120-130# 90-95; Billies Sel 2 130-140# 100155. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA January 10, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Hfrs. Hols. 1540# full 107. Slaughter Cows: Prem.


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA Small Animal Sale January 10, 2012 Rabbits: 1-18 Chickens: 1.25-7 Pot Belly Pigs: 20 Pullets: 4-5 Banties: 4.25 All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report *Next Sale Fri., Jan 13 for Chinese New Year 28-42#, 100-130# in strong demand for this sale. DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC Dewart, PA January 9, 2012 Cattle: Steers Ch 1472# 121; Sel 1-2 1258# 113.50; Hols. Ch 1322-1625# 103109; Hfrs. 1124-1308# 115.50-118.50. Cows: Prem. White 73.5075; Breakers 70-74.50, lo dress 68.50-70; Boners 66.50-70.50, lo dress 63-65; Lean 61-65.50, lo dress 5559.50. Bulls: 1294-1388# 7576.50, hi dress 80.50. Feeder Bulls: 462-530# 114-123; 612-750# 80-112. Feeder Heifers: 496-506# 106-116. Calves: 181. Bull Calves No. 1 94-120# 130-147; 90-92# 110-130; 82-88# 100-127;

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four No. 2 94-126# 115-135; 9092# 90-115; 80-88# 77-107; No. 3 94-124# 75-110; 8092# 72-87; Hfrs. No. 1 86118# 125-150; No. 2 78106# 95-115; Util 70-90# 2560; 54-68# 22-37. Lambs: 98-102# 150-177; 134-138# 120-135. Goats (/hd): Kids 60-70# 120-122; 20-30# 30-37; Nannies 100# 87-112. Feeder Pigs: 57/hd. Hay: 34 lds, 100-400/ton. Straw: 5 lds, 155-245/ton. Earcorn: 5 lds, 180-215/ton. Rd. Bakes: 2 lds, 21-37/ld. Firewood: 11 lds, 37-162/ld. EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA January 9, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1185-1580# 121.50-123; Sel 1-2 1065-1270# 108-114. Slaughter Heifers: Sel 1-2 1160-1345# 107-115.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75# lean 83-90, hi dress 92; Breakers 75-80% lean 78.50-82.50; Boners 80-85% lean 73-77.50; Lean 85-90% lean 68-72, hi dress 74, lo dress 66-67. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9502015# 81-84; few hi dress 88-93; YG 2 1080-1910# 7179. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 500-700# 132.50-142; M&L 2 300-500# 135-138; L 3 300-400# 91-102.50; 500# 96.50; Heifers M&L 1 300500# 125-135; 500-700# 110-115; 800-900# 93-95; M&L 2 300-500# 108122.50; 500-700# 87-105; Bulls M&L 1 400-500# 135145; 500-600# 118-128; 700-800# 95-114; M&L 2 300-500# 110-127.50; 500700# 105-116. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-120# 130-155; No. 2 90-130# 107.50-127.50; No. 3 85-120# 45-87.50; Hols. Hfrs. No 1 90# 180; Beef 100-250# 100-130, few 152.50-155; Vealers Util 65-

120# 25-40. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 350-408# 60-62; Sows US 1-3 300500# 55-59; Boars 540# 25. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 1-3 60-80# 199-217.50; Ewes Util 1-2 105-140# 8193. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 2 35# 70; 65-75# 135-149; Nannies Sel 2 80# 110; Billies Sel 1 145# 130/cwt. GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA January 9, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1354-1506# 126.50-128.50; Ch 2-3 12701584# 122-126.50; 16161618# 121.50-123; full/YG 45 1340-1550# 119-122; Sel 1-3 1120-1556# 115-120; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 15721694# 106-109; Ch 2-3 1332-1590# 101-106; Sel 13 1296-1396# 97.50-101.50; Hfrs. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 12061466# 123-125; Ch 2-3 1274-1488# 116-121; Sel 13 1078-1406# 106-114. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 78.7580; Breakers 75-80% lean 73-77, hi dress 77-78.75, lo dress 66.50-73; Boners 8085% lean 68-74, hi dress 7476.50, lo dress 63.25-67.50; Lean 85-90% lean 62.5068.50, hi dress 69-72.50, lo dress 56-61.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1382-2040# 72-81, hi dress 1308-1906# 83.50-90, lo dress 1040-1486# 65-69. Feeder Cattle: Steers L 2 Hereford 718# 105; L 3 Hols. 240# 92; 763-984# 84.5091; Hfrs. M&L 1 246-280# 127.50-135; 406-436# 120125; 578-620# 120-125; M&L 2 350# 95; 638# 118; Hereford 598# 79; Bulls M&L 1 246# 145; 346# 150; M&L 2 448# 132; 576-626# 115117; 856-920# 92-94. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bull Calves No. 1 94-124# 120-

135; No. 2 95-128# 95-120; 82-923 80-100; No. 3 94112# 77.50-100; 76-80# 7080; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 84-92# 72.50-137.50; Vealers Util 66-108# 37.50-77.50. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 46-62# 180-225; 7596# 192.50-217.50; 124# 195; Ewes Gd 2-3 126-136# 87.50-97.50; Util 1-2 206# 82.50. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 110-155; 70-90# 152.50-175; Sel 2 25-40# 75-102.50; 45-55# 72.50-85; Nannies Sel 1 100# 127.50; Billies Sel 1 170# 202.50; Sel 2 120# 150; Wethers Sel 1 140# 215. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA January 5, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 2-3 1290-1430# 117-121; Sel 1-2 1206-1636# 105.50116; Hols. Steers Ch 2-3 1590-1730# 90.50-97.50; Sel 1-2 1140-1524# 86.5089.50; Hfrs. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1304# 124; Ch 2-3 12361532# 116-120; Sel 1-2 1004-1490# 112.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 82.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 7678.50; Boners 80-85% lean 74-75, lo dress 69-71; Lean 85-90% lean 65-70.50, hi dress 71, lo dress 63.5064.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1400# 77; YG 2 1080-1712# 72-74. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&l 1 300-400# 121-135; 500# 115; Hfrs. M&L 1 400# 107; M&L 2 300-500# 80-93. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 90-125# 112.50127.50; No. 2 90-125# 90110; No. 3 85-120# 5087.50; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 96# 150; Beef type calves 132250# 120-135; Vealers Util 70-120# 15-40. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 242-270#

66-69; 40-45% lean 196238# 63-64; Sows US 1-3 500# 56; Boars 400# 26. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 60-70# 30-35/hd. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 80# 180. KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA January 7, 2012 Alfalfa: 4 lds, 130-355 Mixed Hay: 21 lds, 160-300 Timothy: 6 lds, 155-260 Grass: 13 lds, 155-285 Straw: 8 lds, 175-230 Firewood: 13 lds, 55-95 Corn Fodder: 1 ld, 100 Wrapped Hay: 1 ld, 400 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA January 6, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1255-1630# 127.50133; Ch 2-3 1230-1570# 124-128; Sel 2-3 10851450# 118-123.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1335-1635# 111-116; Ch 2-3 1225-1530# 98-103; Sel 2-3 1305-1495# 94-98. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1085-1455# 123126.50; Ch 2-3 1200-1375# 124-127; Sel 2-3 11051435# 117-119. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 76-82, hi dress 82-87, lo dress 7176; Breakers 75-80% lean 70-77.50, hi dress 77.50-80, lo dress 64-70; Boners 8085% lean 68-73, hi dress 73.50-76.50, lo dress 61-67; Lean 85-90% lean 60-65, hi dress 66-70, lo dress 53-60. Slaughter Bulls: Thurs. YG 1 995-1640# 79-84, lo dress 965-1900# 71.50-76; 20102105# 73-78. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 106-128# 127-140; 94-104# 123-131; No. 2 94-128# 120135; 80-92# 85-87; No. 3 80130# 70-88; 72-78# 65; Util 80-110# 77-83; 60-78# 57; Hfrs. No. 1 95-110# 110-150; No. 2 80-125# 50-90. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA January 3, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 74-75.50, hi dress 72.50-74.50; Boners 80-85% lean 61-67; Lean 85-90% lean 59-64, lo dress 49-54. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 137-142; 8090# 80-120; No. 2 95-120# 110-130; No. 3 80-110# 6070; Util 70-105# 20-50. LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA January 4, 2012

Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-4 1610# 125.50; Ch 2-3 1530# 121; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1405-1460# 113-115; 1675# 101; Ch 2-3 12601455# 103-108; 1800-1925# 95.50-97.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1115-1150# 116-119.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 74-77; Breakers 75-80% lean 71.50-75, hi dress 75-77; Boners 80-85% lean 68-72, hi dress 71.50-74; Lean 8590% lean 62-67, hi dress 6870, lo dress 55-61. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9952020# 75-80; hi dress 1625# 83.50. Feeder Cattle: Bulls L 3 Hols. 228-252# 74-75; Vealers 70-115# 30-50; 60-65# 17.50-20. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 127.50137.50; 85-90# 105-127.50; No. 2 95-125# 110-130; 8090# 90-100; No. 3 95-120# 60-100; 80-90# 40-70; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 80-95# 40-75. Lambs: Ch 2-3 55# 237.50; 70-75# 197.50-207.50; Ewes Gd 1-2 160-165# 91-107. Goats: Kids Sel 1 30-40# 90-97; 70# 132.50; Nannies Sel 1 80-100# 94-122.50. Feeder Pigs (/cwt): US 1-3 50# 60; 55# 100; 70-75# 7595. MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA January 3, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1370-1555# 129133.50; 1600# 127; Ch 2-3 1190-1585# 123-128.50; 1590-1660# 118.50-123; full/YG 4-5 1305-1585# 120; Sel 1-3 1160-1440# 117122.50; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1340-1560# 107.50-113.50; Ch 2-3 1260-1520# 100105.50; Sel 1-3 1295-1500# 95-99. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1300-1450# 125-130; Ch 2-3 1125-1395# 119.50124.50; full/YG 4-5 11651255# 114.50-115.50; Sel 13 1175-1370# 113-118. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 70-75.50, hi dress 75-77, lo dress 65-69; Boners 80-85% lean 6772.50, hi dress 71-73.50, lo dress 60-65; Lean 85-90% lean 58.50-65, hi dress 67.50-70.50, lo dress 5258.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1240-2105# 74-84, hi dress 1730-1785# 90-92; YG 2 1265-1880# 70.50-75. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 626# 100; Hereford 595# 92; M&L 2 620-930# 90-110; Herefords 490-620# 87-90; L 3 Hols. 205-325# 71-87; 8951106# 69-78.

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 27

White/Hols. Hfr. types 81.5089; Breakers 75-80% lean 76.50-79; Boners 72-76.25; Lean 70-76; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 61.50-69.50; Shelly 59 & dn. Feeder Cattle: Steers Hols. 465-490# 82; Bulls Hols. 775-785# 74-79.50. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 120130; No. 2 95-120# 105-120; No. 3 75-130# 75-105; Util 70 & dn. Swine: Hogs 270-290# 7176; 300-320# 72-76; Sows 345-430# 62-70; 450-595# 60-68; Boars 395# 35.50. Goats (/hd): Fancy Kids 145-150; Sm. Fleshy 60-96. Lambs: Ch 70-80# 200-235; 105-120# 156-175; 125130# 142-159. Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. * Special Fed Cattle Sales Jan 17 & 31. Receiving 7:30 until 10 am. Sale 1 pm for Chinese New Year.


Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 545595# 105-110; Hereford 515# 86; M&L 2 355# 105; 595-600# 87-88. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 620# 119; M&L 2 360# 124; 500# 113; L 3 Hols. 260-325# 67. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-125# 130-147; 90# 115-127; No. 2 95-125# 105132; 80-90# 80-105; No. 3 95-125# 75-100; 75-90# 6787; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 90-110# 150-190; No. 2 80-100# 70110; Vealers Util 60-105# 1075. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 230-275# 66-69; 280-360# 64-69; 4550% lean 247-275# 6366.50; 290-375# 61-65; Sows US 1-3 370-455# 5362; Boars 580-695# 2929.50. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 35# 22. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 65# 240; 110-112# 127-152; Ewes Gd 2-3 120160# 77-90. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 70# 145; 100# 182; Sel 2 under 20# 25-30; 20# 42; 70# 107. Slaughter Nannies: Sel 1 170# 150; pygmies 80# 7080; Sel 2 140# 92; Sel 3 100110# 40-77; Billies Sel 1 pygmies 80# 100. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA January 9, 2012 Cattle: 107 Cows: Steers Ch 115-120; Gd 108-115; Hfrs. Ch 112118; Gd 102-110; Util & Comm. 72-80; Canner/lo Cutter 70 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 75-90 Bulls: YG 1 75-80 Feeder Cattle: Steers 105120; Bulls 90-110; Hfrs. 75110. Calves: 86. Ch 100-120; Gd 80-100; Std 15-80; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 80-130. Hogs: 28. US 1-2 70-75; US 1-3 65-68; Sows US 1-3 3758; Boars 22-45. Feeder Pigs: 7. US 1-3 2050# 25-30. Sheep: 12. SI Ewes 50-100. Goats: 20-140 MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA January 9, 2012 Alfalfa: 210-260 Alfalfa/Grass: 205-280 Grass: 175-195 Timothy: 150-190 Mixed Hay: 115-200 Round Bales: 85-140 Lg. Sq. Bales: 125-155 Straw: 150-210 Wood: 40-65 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE

LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA January 9, 2012 Roosters: 2.75-6 Hens: 1.50-3.25 Banties: 1.50-2 Ducks: 7 Bunnies: 4-9 Rabbits: 10-15.50 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA January 5, 2012 Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 12551535# 128-133; Ch 2-3 1230-1520# 124-127; Sel 23 1085-1450# 118-122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-4 1335-1635# 111-116; Ch 2-3 1385-1528# 98-102; Sel 2-3 1305-1495# 94-98. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1085-1421# 124-126; Sel 2-3 1105-1435# 117119. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 78-82, hi dress 82-87, lo dress 71-77; Breakers 75-80% lean 73.50-77.50, hi dress 78-80, lo dress 70-72; Boners 8085% lean 68-73, hi dress 73.50-76.50, lo dress 61-67; Lean 88-90% lean 61-65, hi dress 65.50-68, lo dress 5560. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9951640# 79-84, lo dress 9651900# 71.50-76; 2010-2105# 73-78. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 106-128# 127-140; 94-104# 123-131; No. 2 94-128# 120135; 80-92# 85-87; No. 3 80130# 70-88; 72-78# 65; Util 80-110# 77-83; 60-78# 57. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 95-110# 110-150; No. 2 80125# 50-90. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA January 4, 2012 US 1-2: 10-20# 150;20-30# 120-155; 30-45# 130-140; 80-90# 60. US 2: 20-30# 110-125; lot 160; 30-40# 135. *Next Feeder Pig Sale will be Wed., Jan. 18. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA January 9, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 240-260; 60-80# 220-243; 70-80# fancy 245; 80-90# 219-234; fancy 242-244; 90110# 218-232; 110-130# 196-211; 130-150# 198-210; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 4060# 194-214; 60-80# 184203; 80-90# 180-195; 110130# 177-193. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M

flesh 90-110# 118-135; 120160# 104-119; 160-200# 100-114; 200-300# 96-111; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120-160# 88-102; 160-200# 94-109. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 30-50# 95-118; 50-60# 112125; 60-80# 132-157; 80-90# 160-170; 90-100# 161-171; Sel 2 40-60# 76-107; 60-80# 108-132; 80-90# 125-140; Sel 3 30-40# 45-60; 40-60# 56-80; 60-80# 85-110; Nannies/Does Sel 1 80-130# 126-141; 130-180# 143-158; Sel 2 80-130# 110-125; 130180# 120-135; Sel 3 50-80# 85-100; 80-130# 96-111; Bucks/Billies Sel 1 100-150# 182-197; 150-200# 225-240; Sel 2 100-150# 148-163; 150-250# 190-205. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to two weeks ago corn sold steady, wheat sold steady to .05 higher, barley sold .20 to .30 higher, Oats sold steady to .10 higher & Soybeans sold steady to 1 higher. EarCorn sold 2-4 higher. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.05-7.58, Avg 7.30, Contracts 5.83-5.85; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.226.85, Avg 6.49, Contracts 6.50-6.56; Barley No. 3 Range 4.70-6.50, Avg 5.56, Contracts 4.50; Oats No. 2 Range 4.10-4.80, Avg 4.46; Soybeans No 2 Range 11.22-11.70, Avg 11.48, Contracts 11.25-11.30; EarCorn Range 207.50. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.50-7.15, Avg 7; Wheat 6.22; Barley No. 3 Range 4.75-6.25, Avg 5.51; Oats No. 2 Range 4-4.83, Avg 4.44; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.50-11.63, Avg 11.05; EarCorn Range 195220, Avg 207.50. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.80-7.25, Avg 7.04; Wheat No. 2 Range 67.15, Avg 6.45; Barley No. 3 Range 4-6.10, Avg 4.75; Oats No. 2 Range 3-5.20, Avg 3.89; Soybeans No. 2 Range 11-11.70, Avg 11.23; EarCorn Range 180-190, Avg 180. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 7.15-7.33, Avg 7.24; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.35; Barley No. 3 Range 5.70; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50;

Soybeans No. 2 Range 11.15-11.71, Avg 11.42; Gr. Sorghum Range 5.75. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.50-7.58, Avg 7.14, Month Ago 6.67, Year Ago 6.07; Wheat No. 2 Range 6-7.15, Avg 6.44, Month Ago 6.25, Year Ago 7.24; Barley No. 3 Range 46.50, Avg 5.15, Month Ago 5.01 Year Ago 4.23; Oats No. 2 Range 3-5.20, Avg 4.19, Month Ago 4.08, Year Ago 2.88; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.50-11.71, Avg 11.28, Month Ago 10.54, Year Ago 13; EarCorn Range 180-220; Avg 200, Month Ago 199.60, Year Ago 159.50. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 5.70-6.85, Avg 6.35; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.65; Oats No. 2 3.20-4, Avg 3.56; Soybeans No. 2 11.30. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary January 6, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 127.50-133; Ch 1-3 123-127; Sel 1-2 111.50122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 109.50-116; Ch 2-3 98-105; Sel 1-2 92-98. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 124-130; Ch 1-3 116122; Sel 1-2 107-117. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 69.50-76; Boners 80-85% lean 65.50-73; Lean 85-90% lean 60-67. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 86-92; Avg dress 74-84; lo dress 68-74. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 122.50-152; 500-700# 115-147; M&L 2 300-500# 112-135; 500-700# 95-115. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300500# 97-127; 500-700# 110122.50; M&L 2 300-500# 80115; 500-700# 80-102.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 122.50-137; 500-700# 115-125; M&L 2 300-500# 88-119; 500-700# 87-114. Vealers: Util 60-120# 20-75. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-125# 120-147.50; No. 2 95-125# 100-130; No. 3 80-120# 50-100; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 140-200; No. 2 80-105# 75-135. Hogs: Barrows & Glts 4954% lean 220-270# 62-68; 45-50% lean 220-270# 5862. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 4346; 500-700# 50.50-54. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 12 10-20# 150; 20-30# 120155; 30-45# 130-140; 80-90# 60; US 2 20-30# 110-125; 30-40# 135. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 260-280; 60-80# 218-275; 80-110# 188-206; 110-150# 150-192; Ch 1-3 40-60# 190-232; 60-

80# 179-200; 80-110# 174188; Ewes Gd 2-3 120-160# 115-130; 160-200# 102-118; Util 1-2 120-160# 64-84. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 125-140; 60-80# 128-160; 80-100# 150-165; Sel 2 40-60# 106-118; 6080# 118-140; 80-100# 126150; Sel 3 40-60# 70-90; 6080# 84-103; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 128-143; 130-180# 145-160; Sel 2 80-130# 120135; 130-180# 130-145; Sel 3 50-80# 85-100; 80-130# 103-118; Billies Sel 1 100150# 180-195; 150-250# 240-260; Sel 2 100-150# 152-167; 150-250# 188-203. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Compred to last week hay & straw sold steady to 10 higher. Alfalfa 175-335; Mixed Hay 170335; Timothy 150-240; Straw 120-170; Mulch 60-90. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 240 lds 510; Mixed Hay 100480; Timothy 195-330; Grass 125-335; Straw 130-240. Diffenbach Auct, January 2, 103 lds Hay, 13 lds Straw. Alfalfa 200-510; Mixed Hay 165-480; Timothy 195-330; Grass 165-335; Straw 165240. Green Dragon, Ephrata: January 6, 56 lds Hay, 9 Straw. Alfalfa 215-390; Mixed Hay 100-360; Timothy 192295; Grass Hay 195-300; Straw 160-210. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: January 5, 32 lds Hay, 8 Straw. Mixed Hay 210-320; Timothy 270; Grass 200-350; Straw 130-195. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola, PA: January 4, 49 lds Hay, 7 Straw. Alfalfa 195-280; Mixed Hay 110-370; Timothy 150-315; Grass 125-250; Straw 185-222. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 163 Loads Hay, 37 Straw. Alfalfa 130-375; Mixed Hay 100-390; Timothy 180-290; Grass 90-335; Straw 160270. Belleville Auct, Belleville: Janary 4, 31 lds Hay, 2 lds Straw. Alfalfa 205-225; Mixed 102.50-280; Straw 180-270. Dewart Auction, Dewart: January 2, 33 lds Hay, 5 Straw. Mixed Hay 135-390; Grass 90-310; Straw 190235. Greencastle Livestock: January 2 & 5, 19 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa 180-375; Mixed Hay 100-160; Straw 170. Kutztown Auction, Kutz-

town: January 7, 45 lds Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa 130-355; Mixed Hay 140-300; Timothy 155-260; Grass Hay 180230; Straw 175-230. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: January 3, 33 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Alfalfa 330-345; Mixed Hay 110-260; Timothy 175-290; Grass 110-335; Straw 180-225. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: December 31 & January 3, 69 lds Hay, 18 Straw. Alfalfa 145-300; Mixed Hay 100-350; Timothy 180-240; Grass 125-235; Straw 160210. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: January 6, 37 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa 230-270; Timothy 170-200; Grass 230; Straw 200-220. VINTAGE SALES STABLES Paradise, PA January 9, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1275-1640# 126-130; Ch 2-3 1220-1585# 121.50125.50; Sel 2-3 1050-1385# 118.50-122.50. Slaughter Holsteins: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 fw 1355-1430# 111-115.50; Ch 2-3 13251520# 104.50-109; Sel 2-3 12751350# 95.50-99. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1345-1555# 121.50123.50; Ch 2-3 1120-1310# 120-123; Sel 2-3 10001170# 115.50-119.25. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 73-77, hi dress 77-79.50, lo dress 69-70.50; Boners 80-85% lean 71.5074, hi dress 75.50-79; Lean 85-90% lean 62-67, hi dress 68-72.50, lo dress 59-61.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-120# 120-140; No. 2 95120# 105-120; 80-90# 80105; No. 3 95-115# 80-95; 80-90# 60-75; Util 70-105# 35-65. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA January 5, 2012 Timothy Hay: 1 ld, 270. Orchard Grass: 4 lds, 220280. Mixed Hay: 19 lds, 185-320 Grass: 8 lds, 185-350 Straw: 3 lds, 130-195 Firewood: 16 lds, 40-100 Clover: 1 ld, 190 Soybean Fodder: 1 ld, 140 Baleage: 1 ld, 95 WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA January 4, 2012 Alfalfa: 5 lds, 184-280 Mixed: 34 lds, 195-370 Timothy: 2 lds, 233-315 Grass: 12 lds, 188-250 Straw: 8 lds, 173-222 Baleage: 1 ld, 50 Fodder: 1 ld, 140 Stubble: 1 ld, 130


FDA issues final rule on cephalosporin drugs The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plans to restrict a family of antibiotics commonly used to treat livestock, citing concerns that overuse might promote the development of drug-resistant bacteria that can infect people. In the Jan. 6 Federal Register, the FDA said it would limit the use of cephalosporin in cattle, swine, chicken and turkey. The antibiotics can no longer be used to prevent diseases in livestock starting April 5, though they can still be

used to treat illnesses, the FDA said. A proposed order was published in 2008 prohibiting the extra-label use of cephalosporin drugs in food-producing animals, citing cephalosporin resistance in human medicine as risk to public health. The American Sheep Industry Association (ASI) registered comments in 2008 on this order stating, “We believe that the extra-label use of the cephalosporin class of products in

sheep would have a diminutive effect on any antimicrobial resistance in humans. We also believe that allowing the extra-label use of cephalosporins in sheep will reduce the pain, suffering and mortality in sheep from disease conditions for which there are no other available effective products.” In its Final Rule, the FDA agreed with ASI and several others who commented similarly by stating, “When considering the foodborne pathway,

the potential for human exposure to antimicrobialresistant pathogens is significantly less for food derived from minor species than it is for food derived from the food-producing major species. In addition, cephalosporins are approved for use in sheep and goats, thereby, reducing the potential for extra label use in these species.” As stated in ASI’s 2008 comments, “Naxcel (ceftiofur sodium), for example, has a very limited label approval for the treatment of respiratory disease by

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practices the judicious and responsible use of the few anti-microbial drugs available to us for the treatment of sheep diseases and we appreciate FDA’s revisions to the final rule on this matter.” Source: American Sheep Industry Weekly Jan. 6

NRCS accepting applications to protect Connecticut farmland TOLLAND, CT — Connecticut State Conservationist for the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Jay Mar recently announced the sign-up period for the agency’s Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program (FRPP). “Applications are currently being accepted,” said Mar. “However, the cutoff date for this year’s funding is Feb. 24. This program helps ensure that valuable, productive land is protected. Since 1996, NRCS has provided $32 million to protect over 100 farmers in Connecticut.” FRPP provides matching funds to help purchase development rights to keep farms in agricultural uses. Working through existing partner programs, USDA works with state, Tribal, or local governments and nongovernmental organizations to purchase conservation easements from landowners. USDA provides up to 50 percent of

the fair market easement value of the conservation easement. To qualify, farmland must be part of a pending offer from a qualified state, Tribe, or local farmland protection program; be privately owned; contain at least 50 percent prime, statewide, or local important farmland soils; and include at least onethird cropland, grassland, and pasture land of the total acreage. All funds will be awarded to the highest ranking eligible parcels through a statewide, competitive process. Applications submitted after Feb. 24, will be held for 2013 funding consideration. For more information, visit www.ct.nrcs.usda. gov/programs, or contact your nearest USDA Field Office: Danielson, 860-779-0557; Hamden, 203-287-8038; Norwich, 860-887-3604; Torrington, 860-626-8258; Windsor, 860-688-7725.

Mielke from 23 plus milk offerings were heavy in most regions and manufacturing facilities were located in close proximity of production without too many long hauls reported. Cream placement was probably the most challenging. Cream volumes moved from Eastern and Western regions of the country into the Midwest for processing. In most

areas of the country, churns were running at capacity and generating bulk butter versus print. Surplus milk offerings were expected to ease during the New Year’s holiday weekend as bottlers enhanced their schedules as many primary and secondary school students return to the classroom on Tuesday, January 3.

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January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 29

TRACTORS Case IH 9110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 8N w/Blade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 555B WLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 3010 w/Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 4010 w/Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5075 w/553 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5303 w/Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In. . . . . . . . . . Goshen (4) JD 6430 Rental Returns . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (4) JD 7130 Rental Returns . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5065M w/553. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TD95 Cab, MFWD, loader . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . Fultomville COMPACT TRACTORS MF 1220 w/mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,595. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 110 TLB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 750 w/ldr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 750 w/67 ldr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,900. . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 2305 w/ldr & deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 850 w/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500. . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 855 w/cab, & loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1600 wam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,750 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 3720 w/blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,900. . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 4410 w/420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham Kioti DK455 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000. . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota L39 TLB, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,900. . . . . . . Clifton Park Kubota L5450 loader/backhoe . . . . . . . . $21,000. . . . . . . . . Chatham NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900. . . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 72” Sweepster Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200. . . . . . . . . Chatham 78” Skidsteer Blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH L170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville MOWERS CONDITIONERS Gehl DC2414 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900. . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 925 Moco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kuhn FC 302 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/Heads . . . . . . . . . $169,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH Flail Chopper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville (2) JD 74 Rakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville Double Rake Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville

Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke CIH 8880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 385 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 446 w/mega wide . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 714 Forage Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 946 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 4890 w/890 14’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit . . . . . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 735 Moco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 1470 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 166 inverter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pequea Fluffer 81⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Fahr KH500 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Vicon 4 Star Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200. . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kuhn 500 Disc Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham Krone 550 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 552 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE JD 220 disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Taylorway 16’ disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 7000 Grow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 12’ BWA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Brillion Seeder 10’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,600 . . . . . Schaghticoke IH 710 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200 . . . . . Schaghticoke IH II Shank Chisel 5700. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,600 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS NH 326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 316 baler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen Hesston 560. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston Rounder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 1500 Rd baler, Knives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS HARDI 210 3pt Sprayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville POLARIS RAZOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 357 Grinder Mixer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 245 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 666R corn HD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kubota KX900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville H&S 125 spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Great Bend loader for JD 7000’s . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Bush Hog 4 ft. mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850. . . . . . . . . Chatham 7’Loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Landpride 7’ HD Blade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke Woods 1035 backhoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,650. . . . . . . . . Chatham Woods RB72 rear blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425. . . . . . . . . Chatham

intramuscular injection only in sheep. A prohibition on this drug would leave the U.S. sheep industry with nearly no tools to treat gram-negative bacterial infections.” According to ASI President Margaret Soulen Hinson, “The U.S. sheep industry believes in and


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Page 30 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

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January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 33

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CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Announcements

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Announcements

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ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, January 18th

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1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com Announcements     

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Bedding WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. Call SAVE! 1-800-688-1187

NEW ENGLAND ANGUS Annual and Educational Meeting 1/28/12, held at Salem Cross Inn, W. Brookfield, MA, RSVP contact JohnIovieno@gmail.com

BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Bedding

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING

Dairy Cattle 50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Herd Expansions

WANTED All Size Heifers

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

Barn Repair

CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

Beef Cattle

NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 bsnyder@leepub.com

CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Dick Meyer Co. Inc.

REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050

16 s Color

Agricultural Commercial Residential

24-29 G Pane a. ls

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822

We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Dairy Equipment

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159 Dairy Equipment

BERG-BENNETT, INC. RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866 Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

315-269-6600

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us

 WANTED 

(ALL SIZES)

Cut to the INCH

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

Metal Roofing

Dairy Equipment

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

HEIFERS

Building Materials/Supplies

Dairy Cattle

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Heifers & Herds

978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Seward Valley 518-234-4052

DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

• 4000 Gal. Surge (99) • 3000 Gal. Surge (95) • 3000 Gal. Storage • 2700 Gal. Mueller OH NY • 2000SOLD Gal. DeLaval • 2000 Gal. Mueller OE • 1600 Gal. Surge • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. Majonnier • 1250 Gal. DeLaval • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 1000 Gal. DeLaval

SOLDMueller PA M • 1000 Gal. • 1000 Gal. Mueller H • 900 Gal. Mueller OH • 800 Gal. Majonnier • 800 Gal. Mueller OH • 735 Gal. Sunset • 700 Gal. Mueller OH • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 545 Gal. Sunset • 500 Gal. Mueller M • 500 Gal. Mueller MW

• 500 Gal. Majonnier • 415 Gal. Sunset • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 400 Gal. Majonnier SOLDMilkeeper WV • 375 Gal. • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal Mueller M • 300 Gal. Sunset • 200 Gal. Mueller RS • 200 Gal. Sunset SC • 180 Gal. Milkeeper • 150 Gal. Majonnier • 150 Gal. Mueller RH • 100 Gal. Majonnier

HEAT EXCHANGERS S • TUBE E COOLER 300-6000 0 Gall Storage e Tanks

We e Do o Tank k Repair

SHENK’S

505 E. Woods Drive,

Sales 717-626-1151

Lititz, PA 17543

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Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Equipment

H O L I DAY

B A R GA I N S

MACFADDEN & SONS INC. 1457 Hwy. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 13459

518-284-2090 • email: info@macfaddens.com

www.macfaddens.com Lots More Equipment & Parts In Stock - Stop In Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

2004 2x4 JD 5520 Deluxe factory cab w/heat/air w/JD ldr, 75-80hp dsl., low hrs., dual outlets, power reverser, 12 speed, super clean inside & out, $27,500. Call 315-2454361. Lve msg, all calls returned.

FOR SALE OR TRADE: John Deere 2640, w/loader & rollbar, 3pt. hitch, clean; John Deere 2640, 3pt. hitch; Allis Chalmers D14; Farmall 460 diesel, WF, doesn’t run; Farmall M, completely rebuilt, WF; Int. 1066 hydro, needs paint; 856 tractor w/cab, 3pt. hitch.; Int. 1206, needs paint. For more information & pricing 802-758-2396 or email lawtonfamily@gmavt.net

Farm Machinery For Sale

HITACHI track dumper, 6 cyl. Isuzu made by MOROOKA, same size as 2200, needs tracks, $10,000. 603-4985835 Int. 766, Black Stripe, cab, 3100 hrs. orig., super nice! $14,950; Int’l 966, open, 115hp, nice machine! $9,500; 6’ rock bkt, SS mount, $1,100; Bale spears, 3ph & SS mount, $250/each. 603-477-2011 JD 444 loader w/clam bucket, good rubber, runs good, has hydraulic leak, reason for selling bigger loader needed. 802-758-2138 KNIGHT MIXER WAGON, model 3030, real good shape, good paint, $8,500. Gorham, ME 207-839-3170

• • • • •

Steiger PT310 IHC 1066 IHC 656 Diesel IHC 2350 Loader Double 8 Surge Parlor, Complete • Girton 3000 Gallon Bulk Tank

Farm Machinery For Sale

Fencing

WANTED

WELLSCROFT FENCE SYSTEMS

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

LANSING, NY 607-279-6232 Days 607-533-4850 Nights Farm Machinery For Sale

info@wellscroft.com

For Rent or Lease

WANTED:Duetz tractor, 110140hp; NH baler, 271 or 311; NH rake, 256 or 258; NH 402 krimper; NH 456 bar mower. All must be in good condition. 717-548-3214

FOR LEASE: Organic dairy farm in Central NY, 3 bedroom house with 40 stall barn with pens for calves, 32 acres of pasture. Please call for details. 315-893-7616

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

For Sale

CORN SILAGE, $50.00/ton, 500 ton. 603-469-3559

TINGLEY

• Hi-Top Work Rubbers* #1300 - $17.00/pr • 10” Closure Boots* #1400 - $22.00/pr • 17” Knee Boots #1500 - $26.00/pr Sizes S, M, L, XL, 2X, & 3X

CORN SILAGE: Processed, 38% dry matter. Delivered. Polinsky Farms, Jewett City, CT. 860-376-2227 ORGANIC FEED: hay silage & hay, VT based, delivery possible 888-212-6898

Farm Machinery For Sale

Franchises? Not exactly! Through our partnerships we want to be the largest importer of used FAST front PTO tractors Kverneland Plows & Claas balers in the US!

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348 Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS 10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

518-768-2344 1st & 2nd cutting alfalfa timothy & grass, small squares & large square bales, also round bales. Stored inside. 518-9293480, 518-329-1321 1st CUT Wrapped Round bales, $35.00/bale; 1st cut square bales, $3.75 each. Manchester,VT 802-362-3454 4X4 ROUND SILAGE BALES, 1st & 2nd cutting, FOB SE Mass. 508-648-3276

(888) 223-8608

AMARAL FARMS 1st & 2nd cutting good quality hay, round silage bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-4506536

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Naples Distributors

MAINE TO NORTH CAROLINA Farm Machinery For Sale

Great Prices/Fast Service Call For Brochures 603-827-3464 or

814-793-4293

315-521-2552

USED COMBINE PA R T S K & J SURPLUS

Hi Tensile & Portable Electric Fences Solidlock Woven Wire Pressure Treated Posts King Hitter Post Pounder

Generators

www.NaplesDistributors.com

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting Hay - Straw For Sale

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service Hay - Straw For Sale

Roll On, Roll Off-Cheaper than you think!

PleasantCreekHay.com Welsarth@Msn.com

Charles McCarthy Farm Machinery TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY • UTILITY TRAILERS

BUY ~ SELL ~ TRADE PH: 570-869-1551 Cell: 607-759-4646 4698 ST. RT. 3004

570-833-5214 MESHOPPEN, PA 18630

Looking for Long Term Customers Wheat Straw, Grass Hay, Mixes and Alfalfa available in large square bales. FULL TRAILER LOADS ONLY

Call Nick 845-901-1892 Miriam 800-747-3811 or visit adenbrook.com

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 35

1992 Like New Belarus 572 4WD w/Kelley loader, 400 eng. Hours, Last 572 Sold New by Us, Hobby Farm Tractor, Always Inside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 2011 McCormick X-10 40 4WD w/Loader, Nearly New! Only 15 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,500 JD 5440 4WD Forage Harvester w/P.U. Head, 4500 Hrs., New Dura Drum Cutterhead rebuilt in 2011, Priced Right!. .$12,500 NH 8560 4WD, Cab, 3500 Hrs, Powershift, 4 New Tires, Very Nice!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,500 JD 325 Skid Steer w/Cab & AC, Hi flow, 68 Hrs!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,900 Claas 46 Round Baler w/Netwrap, Very Nice . . . . . . . . . .$8,750 Krone RR280 5x6 Round Baler, Very Good . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,750 Case IH C80 2WD, 3500 Hrs, Bargain!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 ‘07 Krone KW1102 36 Ft. Tedder, Like New!! . . . . . . . . .$12,500 JD 4050 4 Post, Quad, 4500 Hrs, 3Pt, 2 Hyd, Future Collector Tractor, Factory Yellow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,500 15 Ft. Brillion Land Commander Very Good . . . . . . . . .$15,000 NH 2120 4WD Tractor w/Loader, 1500 Hrs . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 Case IH 9X, 800 Spring Reset Plows, Very Good!! . . . . . . .$9,500 2009 JD 582 Round Baler, Roto Cut, Cover Edge, Like New!! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,750 2005 JD 5325N 2WD Open Orchard Tractor, 1170 Hrs, Like New & Priced Right! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,750

A/C 5020, 25hp, $2,950; Kelly backhoe, 8’, 3ph, $1,900; Kub #4560 backhoe, 9’, $3,200; JD & NH tandem manure sprdrs, $2,000/each; JD 34 manure sprdr, 120 bu., $600; Henke chipper, 6”- hyd. feed, $2,200. Full line of farm equipment available! 802-885-4000

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Equipment


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

Help Wanted

Horse Equipment

DRY HAY: Several grades & quality levels available for horse, cow, sheep & goat. Large square, barn stored, no rained-on hay. Also, straw available. Pick up or deliver. Free loading. Fox Valley Vail Farms 518-872-1811

HAY & STRAW: Large or small square bales. Wood Shaving Bagged. René Normandin,Québec,Canada 450347-7714

TOO MUCH HAY?

Experienced Cheese Maker

PIONEER FORE CART with shafts, heavy sleigh - runners only. 315-778-7141

FOR SALE: 4x4 baleage, second cut. Halifax, Mass. 781293-1385

HAY FOR SALE: Dry round, wet round, second cutting small squares. Call Louis 860803-0675

Try Selling It In The

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

800-836-2888 or email

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

classified@leepub.com

Established, well equipped grass-based sheep dairy in Cazenovia, NY producing on-farm artisanal yogurts and award winning cheeses seeks experienced head cheese maker starting April 2012. Commercial acumen and marketing experience a plus. Send resume to resumes@meadowoodfarms.com

Horses FLYING ZEE HORSE DISPERSAL SALE, Delanson, NY, 1/21/12, 70 head sell, 5 1 8 - 8 9 3 - 1 5 7 2 , flyingzeesale@gmail.com, www.highcliff.com

Page 36 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

WILL DELIVER

ROBERT ROLLE (518) 234-4052

GOOD QUALITY hay & straw. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802-849-6266,

Help Wanted

Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers (7 Meat Varieties)

Extremely hearty & perfect for free range Layer Chicks, Turkeys Ducklings, Guineas, Much More

(814) 539-7026

www.myerspoultry.com

Poultry

FOR SALE All Grades Hay & Straw Horse & Dairy Quality Bagged Shavings & Sawdust

Poultry & Rabbits

Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

HERDSMAN WANTED ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141 Help Wanted

We are offering an excellent opportunity to join the service team of the most progressive milking equipment dealership in the East and an exciting career in the #1 industry in PA. Become a part of our professional, innovative milking equipment service team. We are looking for an individual who is self motivated, and technically skilled in milking equipment repair. Must have electrical and refrigeration experience. Excellent salary, company vehicle, paid vacations, holidays, and retirement plan. Please email resumes to fondar@lancasterdairy.com

WRITERS WANTED Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper. Knowledge of the industry a must. Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles. Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141

Hay - Straw Wanted

WANTED

Hay & Straw - All Types We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers Real Estate For Sale

For modern 350 cow dairy in northern Vermont. Slatted floors, double 10 parlor, sort gate, auto ID, computer. We’ve got it all except the right person. Minimum of 2 years recent experience on large dairy farm required as well as skills in hoof trimming, AI, Spanish and computer literacy; advanced education such as college is a plus. Competitive salary and housing. Livestock equity is a possibility. References required. Are you the person who can make things happen? Send resume and references to

farm1850s@yahoo.com

Real Estate For Sale

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

(607)) 334-97277 Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

Parts

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED

Clearview Hatchery PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

(717) 365-3234

PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

607-642-3293

RABBITS: MEAT. Fryers $15.00; Roasters $20-$30. Dutch $30.00; Lopps $30.00. 860-778-8766, Scottland,CT. Will grow to order.

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

22566 - Madisonn Countyy Freee stalll Operation. 210 acres 160 acres of very productive tillable land. With additional land to rent. 2 barns with 280 free stalls. Double 10 rapid exit parlor. Large concrete pad for feed storage. Good 2 story 5 bedroom home with 2 baths. Several custom operators in the area for harvesting and planting feed. This farm is turnkey, ready to milk. Good farming area, agricultural and machinery businesses all close by . . . . . . . 50,000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $55 Makee ann offer.

22799 - Madisonn County, Near Brookfield State Lands. Good little buy on a good little farm. 18 surveyed acres mostly tillable. Beautiful year round trout stream. 2 story barn with 50 stalls. Milking equipment still intact. Patz barn cleaner. Good 40x80 machinery building. Additional older 2 story barn with side addition for storage. Remodeled 2 story home. Good 2 car garage. Farm is close to the beautiful Brookfield State Forest and the Equine trail system with over 300 miles of trails for riding horses. Close to snow mobile and ATV trails, great hunting and fishing. Nice little farm to raise a few horses or beef. Farm is reasonably priced to sell . . . . .Askingg $140,000 Ownerr wouldd considerr fairr offer.

23022 - Otsegoo Countyy Freee stalll Operation. Buildings for 300 head. Double 8 milking parlor, 3,000 gallon bulk tank, large concrete pad for feed storage. Good 2 story 4 bdrm home. All situated on 70 acres of land w/40+/- acres tillable, gravel loem soils w/lots of additional land to rent reasonable. Great location. Mins from Cooperstown or Oneonta. Farm would work well for dairy although buildings are conducive for horses and beef. Farm has 2 trout streams. Excellent deer and turkey hunting. Nice area to live and farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pricedd too selll Askingg $245,000

22755 - Makee uss ann offer! Madison County Gentleman's Farm. 190+/- acres. 60 well drained high lime tillable acres. Balance woods and pasture. 2 large machinery buildings. 50x70 loose housing livestock barn. Also an older 72x175 Free stall barn. Good completely remodeled 2 story Victorian home. House is ready to go for two families but could easily be changed to one 5 bedroom home. Farm has a great location, 25 mins to Syracuse. Beef, horses, or gentleman farming. Farm has been reasonably priced to sell m $300,0000 too $275,000. . . . . . . . . . . . .Pricee Reducedd from

22911 - Drasticallyy Reducedd - Otsego County Gentleman's Farm New Home and Buildings. Spectacular views. Mins to Cooperstown, NY. 93 acres located on a quiet road w/30 tillable acres all in hay. 15 acres of pasture, balance woods. Lots of deer & turkey. Nice modern 2 story 4 bdrm home. 52x60 pole barn w/partial concrete floor would work well for horses, livestock, machinery storage. 20x40 horse barn. Home & buildings sit well off of quiet road . . . m $440,0000 too $395,0000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Reducedd from Ownerss aree lookingg forr a fairr offeer.


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Real Estate For Sale

Tractor Parts

CHRISTMAS TREE FARM and split level house. Unique entrepreneurial opportunity, earn a second income, fourth bedroom off family room and office, large closets and pristine floors, open kitchen atmosphere, 2½ baths. Bloomfield,CT 860-989-2783

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

SUMMIT, NY: Lakefront 5 acre farmette. Newly renovated home. Large garage and storage barn. Meadows and woods. Picturesque country setting. $149,000. Call BrokerAlton Makely, (518)-231-0304

TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

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DEMEREE REALTY www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com #501 Outstanding “dairy of distinction” farm w/500 acres, COULD BE A GREAT GRAIN, 360 tillable, 70 pasture & 68 woods - like-new 2 story barn w/130 tie stalls & gravity flow to manure pit - 3 yr. old free stall heifer barn w/113 stalls - also 14 stall dry cow barn - 2000 gal. B.T. & 2” pipeline - new 30x40 ft. heated workshop - 22x20 ft. grain dryer - 2 26x20 ft. metal grain bins - 2 25x70 & 2 12x90 ft. bunk silos, 20x70 & 20x60 ft. Harvestore silos - extra nice 2 story home with 9 rms. - also 2nd home w/6 six rms. & a small tenant house - 2 wells & 6 ponds - farm borders Rte. I-88 South of Albany priced to sell @ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,100,000. COWS & MACHINERY AVAIL. #72 - 241 ACRES on PARKHURST RD. Near MIDDLEVILLE, HERKIMER COUNTY, NY - 120 acres tillable - 30 acres of woods and 90 acres pasture - great views in all directions - not far from the WEST CANADA CREEK - A GREAT BUY FOR .$350,000 #16 - CERTIFIED ORGANIC - 175 ACRES NEAR LITTLE FALLS WITH ACREAGE ON BOTH SIDES OF ROUTE 5S - 90 acres tillable the rest woods and a pond - has great views of the MOHAWK VALLEY. It is located one mile from the AMISH SALE BARN THAT HAS AN AUCTION AT LEAST ONCE A WEEK. . . . . . Asking $350,000 #67 - Very quiet, private location 3 miles from Little Falls, NY with 46 A., 14 tillable, 30 pasture - great hobby farm - 9 room farmhouse in good condition has combination oil/wood hot water heat, a clean & comfortable home - also like-new double-wide with 6 rooms, 2 decks, 1 porch, above ground pool, work shop with electric, dependable year-round creek, drilled well & 2 springs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .all for $198,000 C-74 - Dairy farm with 320 A. - 500 Jersey size free stalls; set up for a grazing operation, 40 paddocks including laneways and water system; 16 unit Swing Parlor w/4000 gal. tank; additional 2 story 100 tie-stall barn, lg. Morton bldg. w/lg. doors and shop area; 100+ yr. old 2 story farmhouse w/6 BR, 2 full baths. Ideal heifer raising operation w/main road access - stream runs through property, one pond . . . .Asking $975,000 C-71 - Well-kept 50A. Hobby Farm, recently surveyed; 5A. woods, remainder tillable; 25x56 modular home on slab, 3BR, 2 full baths, central air, new steel roof; drilled well. 28x52 ban used for hay storage; 40x60 heated shop w/two 12’ overhead doors w/openers; 14x32 pole bldg. addition w/overhead doors; 28x38 open pole shed; 14x28 shed w/overhead door; 22x26 storage bldg. This property has A SPECIAL USE VARIANCE PERMIT (Agricultural or Commercial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $299,000

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Tractor Parts

Trucks

ARE YOU IN NEED of any small engine or Agriculture parts? Why not give us a try? Visit us on- line at www.nnyparts.com or call 315-347-1755 for more information and prices.

(2) 2000 & 2001 Int. 4900’s, single axle, heavy duty, automatic, $7,500 OBO. Also dump bodies from 10’ to 24’ & hyd. components. Call 802-758-2396 or email lawtonfamily@gmavt.net

NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

JAN 18 Energy Audit Workshop with CISA MDAR Amherst Office, 101 University Dr. Suite C4. 5:30-8 pm. This workshop will review energy audit options that can help assess energy saving and renewable energy options on your farm by looking at energy use, financial savings, recommendations and payback periods for equipment upgrades. Contact Devon Whitney-Deal, 413-6657100 ext. 22 or e-mail devon@buylocalfood.org. Southeast Agriculture Mediation Workshop: Conflict Resolution Skills The Carver Public Library, 2 Meadowbrook Way, Carver MA. 6-8 pm. Call 508-2952212 ext. 50 or e-mail balexander@semaponline.org On Internet at http:// semaponline.org. JAN 20-21 16th Annual VT Grazing & Livestock Conference Lake Morey Resort, Fairlee, VT. Featuring local, regional and national speakers on multiple species grazing management & production. Several workshops. Contact Jenn Colby, 802-656-0858 or e-mail jcolby@uvm.edu. On Internet at www. uvm.edu/pasture JAN 20-22 NOFA-NY Annual Conference: The Cooperative Economy Saratoga Hilton & City Center, Saratoga Springs, NY. Contact Katie NagleCaraluzzo, 585-271-1979 ext. 512 or e-mail register@ nofany.org. JAN 22-24 The National Mastitis Council (NMC) 51st Annual Meeting TradeWinds Island Grand Resort, 5500 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach, FL. For dairy professionals from around the world to exchange current information on udder health, mastitis control, milking management and milk quality. Call 727-3676461. On Internet at www.nmconline.org JAN 25 Vermont Sheep & Goat Association Annual Meeting Barre, VT. Contact Jane Woodhouse, 802-592-3062. JAN 25-26 Northeast Pasture Consortium (NEPC) Annual Meeting Century House Hotel & Conference Center, Latham, NY. Topics are nutrient management, silvopasture, results from grazing trials and more.. Contact Becky Casteel, 304-293-2565 or e-mail becky.casteel@mail.wvu.edu JAN 26 2012 Dairy Farmers’ Banquet

edge agricultural technology and equipment on 2.6 million square feet of show grounds. On Internet at www.WorldAgExpo.com FEB 18-20 2nd Annual Beginning Farmer Conference Amway Grand Plaza Hotel & DeVos Place Convention Center, Grand Rapids, MI. Beginning farmers and ranchers interested in all types of agriculture are

encouraged to attend. The conference provides an opportunity for attendees to network with other farmers from around the country and learn from experts about how to start and maintain a thriving farm or ranch business. For more information, including online registration and hotel information, visit http://2012bfrconference.ev entbrite.com or e-mail questions to info@start2farm.gov.

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January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 37

Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

Calendar of Events

Champlain Valley Exposition (Hamlin Room). Come celebrate with Vermont highest quality dairy farmers and those who support them! Vermont’s highest quality milk awards, Finley Award and Dairy Farm of the Year will be presented. Tickets $10 in advance or at the door. Seating is limited. Contact Nathan Miller, 802-5452320 or e-mail kettltop@ gmavt.net. JAN 27 & 28 4th Annual Winter Greenup Grazing Conference Century House Hotel & Conference Center, Route 9, Latham, NY. This year’s conference will feature speakers on Wye Angus genetics, grazing behavior, branding your farm’s products, leasing land to graze, extending the grazing season and more. Contact Lisa Cox, 518-765-3512. JAN 31 USDA Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Training Program Massachusetts Farm Bureau Federation Office, 249 Lakeside Dr., Marlboro, MA. 12:30-5 pm. Registration deadline Jan. 20. Contact Doreen, 413-545-2254 or email dyork@umext.umass. edu. FEB 1-4 2012 Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show Nashville, TN. Advanced registration is open until Jan. 11, 2012. To register visit www.beefusa.org or contact Kristin Torres at ktorres@beef.org. FEB 6 & 8, MAR 5 & 7 Connecticut Farm Energy & Assistance Workshops Locations as follows: • Feb 6 - 2-4 pm. Hartford Co., USDA Rural Development Office, 100 Northfield Dr., 4th Floor, Windsor, CT • Feb 8 - 6-8 pm. Middlesex Co., UConn Extension Center, 1066 Saybrook Rd., Haddam, CT • Mar 5 - 10 am - Noon. Litchfield Co., UConn Extension Center, 843 University Dr., Torrington CT • Mar 7 - 4-6 pm. New London Co., USDA Rural Development Office, 238 West Town St., Norwich, CT Register today! Call 860345-3977 or e-mail ctfarmenergy@aol.com. On Internet at www.CTFarm Energy.org FEB 9-11 Soil and Nutrition: An Education and Coalition Building Conference First Churches, 129 Main St, Northampton, MA. On Internet at www.nofamass.org/ seminars/winterseminar.php FEB 10-12 30th Annual NOFA-VT Winter Conference University of Vermont in Burlington, VT. The conference will feature over 70 workshops. Learn more, browse workshops and register at www.nofavt.org or call 802-434-4122. FEB 14-16 45th Annual World Ag Expo International Agri-Center, 4450 South Laspina St., Tulare, CA. The Expo is the largest annual agricultural show of its kind with 1,600 exhibitors displaying cutting


Page 38 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Now is the time to make your estate plans Attendees of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 93rd Annual Meeting picked up valuable advice from Christopher Hesse on how to protect their estates. Hesse is a CPA with LarsonAllen Firm-Wide Tax Resource Group and a partner in a family farm. According to Hesse, proper planning is critical to ensure an estate will be passed down to future generations, and not the government. The current death tax exemption for 2012 is $5 million. While Congress is expected to extend the current exemption to 2013, Hesse warns that if this is not the case, it will be reduced to $1 million. Any amount over the death tax exemption is subject to a taxable amount of 55 percent of the asset’s present value. “It’s important to start the estate planning process now, because no one has a crystal ball that can predict the future,” said Hesse. With the high price of farmland today, farmers and ranchers can easily find themselves having an estate worth more than $5 million. For these individuals, Hesse says there are several ways to transfer ownership of their estates. One option is to start reducing total net assets through annual gifting. The government currently allows gifts up to $13,000 to be given to one individual without being taxed. While Hesse encouraged members to begin setting up their estate plans, he offered some words of caution regarding estate trusts. “One of the things people sometimes don’t realize is that if you just change your will, if you have an estate trust, the changes you make in the will do not effectively change the estate trust.”

2012 Horse Owners Buyers Guide The March 2012 issue of Country Folks will feature a Horse Owners buyers guide section. Please check as many categories below as apply to your company for the $25.00 listing. If you wish to have your companies logo appear in black & white above your listing, an additional fee of $50 will be charged. Your logo can be e-mailed to tkrieger@leepub.com. This form must be completed and returned by 2/3/12. Questions? Call Tina Krieger at 800-218-5586, ext. 108.

Your logo will appear with your listing in black and white (print) & color with the online version.

Check If Using Logo Company Name: Contact Person: Address:

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Ì Abuse/Humane Organizations Ì Art/Photography Ì Associations and Clubs Ì Auctioneers Ì B&B Ì Boarding Farms Ì Breeding Farms Ì Buidings/Barns and Arenas Ì Catalogs Ì Clothing Ì Construction-Barn Building Ì Disciplines Ì Education/Educational Materials/4H/Pony Clubs Ì Equipment/General (Stable/Jumps/Driving, etc.) Ì Farm Services Ì Feed/Hay/Bedding Ì Fencing Ì Fun With Horses (Travel/Trail Riding/Carriage Rides, etc.)

Ì Gifts Ì Healthcare Ì Health/Veterinary Services/Farriers Ì Horse Camps Ì Instructions Ì Real Estate / Realtors Ì Sales-Horses (Equids) Ì Services/Specialized (Legal/Insurance/Farm Sitting/Personal Training Ì Show / Events / Clinics Ì Showing Ì Stable & Farm Equipment Ì Stallion Service Ì Summer Programs Ì Tack/Saddlery/Harness/Supplies/Clothing Ì Therapeutic Riding Programs Ì Trail Riding Ì Training Ì Transportation/Trailers/Trucks

Return by Fax to 518-673-2381 or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 If you do not wish to receive any faxes from us, check here

Ì and fax back to 518-673-3245

Published by Lee Publications P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • 518-673-3237 • Fax 518-673-3245


Tips for a successful breeding season by Dr. Scott P. Greiner, Extension Animal Scientist, VA Tech The start of the fall breeding season is just around the corner. Proper management of both rams and ewes prior to, during, and after the breeding season is critical for a successful sub-

optimize maturity). To prepare ram lambs for the breeding season, rams should be “hardened up” prior to introduction with ewes. This can be accomplished through limit feeding grain while on pasture. The amount of supplementation will vary ac-

sequent lambing season. Ram Management Most often, newly purchased ram lambs are coming off a high plane of nutrition heading into their first breeding season (completing a structured performance test, or managed on the farm for high growth rates to

cording to the ram’s body condition and pasture quality, but as a guideline 1-2 percent of body weight will suffice to achieve a moderate body condition at the start of the breeding season (not excessively fat or thin). Be certain that housing and facilities provides

adequate shade and ventilation so that rams can stay cool. These principles also apply to mature rams, which may be new to the flock or been in use for several years. Exposure to high temperatures can compromise the reproductive soundness of rams.

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If your business provides products or services for the grape growers and wine makers, please contact us for information on marketing opportunities to this important segment of agriculture. You can reach us at P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 or call 800-218-5586 • Fax 518-673-2381 • Email: dwren@leepub.com

Tips 40

January 16, 2012 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 39

Section One

Wine and Grape Grower will offer features, news and information on growing grapes, and making and selling wines. As readers of Country Folks and Country Folks Grower you know the value of our publications as you run and improve your business. If your current business or future plans include grapes or wine you can now have a publication with those same benefits for that branch of your business. Subscribe today and don’t miss a single issue. If you have friends or family who would be interested please feel free to share with them also.

Newly acquired ram lambs should not be commingled with older, mature rams either prior to or during the breeding season. Particular care should be taken if rams from different sources (of similar age) need to be commingled and all commingling should take place prior to the breeding season. Prior to the start of the breeding season, all rams should be subjected to a breeding soundness exam by a veterinarian. The breeding soundness exam assess the physical fitness of the ram, and most importantly the ram’s reproductive soundness and capability of settling ewes. Plan ahead to allow adequate time to find a replacement ram should an existing sire be found to be a non-breeder. Many factors influence the breeding capacity of rams, including age, breed, nutrition, management, and environment. As a general guideline, ram lambs are capable of breeding 15 to 25 ewes during their first breeding season, and most mature rams can service 50 or more ewes. All rams, and particularly ram lambs, should be observed closely to monitor their breeding behavior and libido to ensure they are servicing and settling ewes. The use of a marking harness, rotating colors every 17 days, is an excellent management tool for this purpose. The breeding season should be kept to a maximum of 60 days for young rams. This will prevent over-use, severe weight loss and reduced libido. Severe weight loss


Page 40 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • January 16, 2012

Tips from 39 may impair future growth and development of the young ram and reduce his lifetime usefulness. When practical, supplementing ram lambs with grain during the breeding season will reduce excessive weight loss (feeding rate of 2 percent bodyweight daily). Rams used together in multiple-sire breeding pastures should be of similar age and size. Ram lambs cannot compete with mature rams in the same breeding pasture. A sound management practice is to rotate rams among different breeding pastures every 17-34 days. This practice decreases the breeding pressure on a single ram. Ewe Management Some advance planning and simple management practices will assist in having a successful breeding season. Vaccination of the ewe flock for Campylobacter (vibrio) and Chlamydia are important for abortion disease control. For ewe lambs and ewes not previously vaccinated, these products typically require an initial injection prior to the breeding season followed by a second vaccination during gestation. In subsequent years, a single booster vaccination is required. Follow product label directions when administering any vaccine. A month prior to the breeding season is also an opportune time to trim and inspect feet on the ewe flock and perform preventative foot care. This is also a good time to make final culling decisions and sell poor producing and thin ewes. Flushing is the practice of increasing energy intake, and therefore body condition, during the 10-14 days prior to breeding. This practice has been shown to be effective in increasing ovulation rates, and thereby increasing lambing percentage by 10-20 percent. The response to flushing is affected by several factors, including the body condition of the ewe and time of the breeding season. Ewes that are in poor body condition will respond most favorably to the increase in energy, whereas fat ewes will show little if any response.

Flushing can be accomplished by moving ewes to high quality pastures or through providing .75 to 1.25 pounds of corn or barley per head per day from two weeks prebreeding through four weeks into the breeding season. Provide a highselenium, sheep mineral

free choice. Like rams, ewes are also prone to heat stress during the breeding seasons. Prolonged exposure to high temperatures can have an effect on ewe fertility and embryo survival. To help reduce these embryo losses and resulting decrease in

lamb crop, minimize handling during the heat of the day and allow the flock access to a cool, shaded area. Ram Management After the Breeding Season Young rams require a relatively high plane of nutrition following the

breeding season to replenish body condition and meet demands for continued growth. Body condition and projected mature size of the ram will determine his nutrient requirements during the months following the breeding season. Rams should be kept away

from ewes in an isolated facility or pasture after the breeding season. In the winter months, provide cover from extreme weather that may cause frostbite to the scrotum resulting in decreased fertility. Source: Livestock Update, August 2011

Make Plans Now to Attend the EMPIRE STATE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE EXPO and DIRECT MARKETING CONFERENCE Oncenter • Syracuse, NY

January 24-25-26 2012 LIMITED BOOTH SPACE AVAILABLE CALL TODAY!! 800-218-5586

NEW FOR 2012 • Third Day Added • NYS Flower Industries

Don’t Miss These Exhibitors . . .

2012 SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE:

• Flower Production • Flower Marketing • Labor • Potatoes • Tree Fruit • Tomatoes & Peppers • Cultural Controls • Direct Marketing • Pesticide Safety • Vine Crops • Leafy Greens • Cover Crops • Soil Health • Reduce Tillage • Berry Crops • Cabbage • Cole Crops • Food Safety • Onions • Garlic • Peas & Snap Beans • Greenhouse & Tunnels • Pesticide Safety • Sweet Corn

Acadian AgriTech • 910 Adams County Nursery, Inc • 115 Advanced Sprayer & Water Tech • 931, 932, 933, 934 Agraquest, Inc • 705 Agricultural Data Systems, Inc • 602 Agro One • 421 Amaizeingly Green Value Products, ULC • 108 American Takii, Inc • 709 Andre & Son, Inc / Nature Safe • 114 Applied Agricultural Technologies • 214 Arctic Refrigeration Co. • 518 BASF - The Chemical Company • 402 Bayer Crop Science • 201, 300 BCS Shop • 325, 424 BDI Machinery • 403, 405 Bejo Seeds, Inc • 320 Belle Terre Irrigation, LLC • 519, 521, 523 Biagro Western Sales • 700 Blackberry Patch • 106 Burgess Baskets • 107 Business Lease Consultants, Inc • 604 CAS Pack Corporation • 103 Clifton Seed Co • 303 Community Bank, NA • 924 Community Markets • 200 Compac Sorting Equipment • 423, 425, 522, 524 Conklin Agro Vantage • 806 Cornell Pesticide Management Education Program • 804 Cornell University-NYSAES • 100 CropCare Equipment by Paul B LLC • 719, 721, 816, 818 Crop Production Services • 600 Country Folks Grower • 1014 Dow Agro Sciences • 606 DuBois Agrinovation, Inc • 503 DuPont Crop Protection • 909, 911 Durand-Wayland • 205 Empire Tractor • 117, 119, 121, 216, 218, 220 Farm Family Life & Casualty Insurance Co • 101 Farmer’s Choice Foods • 915 FB Pease • 102 Fingerlakes Trellis Supply • 605, 607

Food Bank Assoc of NYS • 504 Frontlink, Inc • 941, 942 Gowan Company • 501 Grimes Horticulture • 304 Growers Mineral Solutions • 319 Growers Supply • 217 Growth Products • 210 GVM, Inc • 723, 725, 820, 822 Hansen-Rice, Inc • 904 Harris Seeds • 901 Haygrove Tunnels, Inc • 307 Hill & Markes, Inc • 808 Hillside Cultivator Co., LLC • 301 Hillside Orchard Farms • 419 InterCrate Inc • 603 IPM Laboratories, Inc • 112 J&M Industries, Inc • 703 Kepner Equipment, Inc • 1005, 1006 Koppert Biological Systems • 805 Kube Pak Corp • 706 Lambert Peat Moss, Inc • 938 Lansing Sales & Service, Inc • 929 Lee Shuknecht & Sons, Inc • 906 Lucas Greenhouses • 520 Maier Farms • 305 Mankar Ultra Low Volume Sprayers • 1000 Marrone Bio Innovations • 701 MAS Labor H-2A, LLC • 203 Mid-Lantic Labeling & Packaging • 903 Mike Weber Greenhouses, Inc • 809 Miller Chemical & Fertilizer Corp. • 316 Monte Package Company • 206 N. M. Bartlett, Inc • 801, 803, 900, 902 Natural Forces, LLC • 221 Natural Industries • 321 New York Center for Agricultural Medicine & HealthNYCAMH • 623 Nichino America, Inc • 506 Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York • 109 Nourse Farms, Inc • 707 NTI Global • 1001

NY DOL - Rural Employment • 122 NYS Department of Ag & Markets • 1013 NYS Department of Ag & Markets-Crop Insurance Education • 204 NYS Flower Industry • 111 NYS Vegetable Growers Association • 950 O. A. Newton • 819, 821, 920, 922 OESCO, Inc • 525, 624 Oro Agri Inc • 202 Paige Equipment Sales & Service, Inc • 711, 713, 810, 812 PCA - Supply Services • 418 Penn Scale Manufacturing Co • 116 Pennsylvania Service & Supply, Inc • 937 Phil Brown Weldin Corp. • 323 ProducePackaging.com® • 502 RE & HJ McQueen • 209, 211, 213, 215, 308, 310, 312, 314 Reed’s Seeds • 407 Rupp Seeds, Inc • 406 Rockford Package Supply • 302 Seedway, LLC • 318 Siegers Seed Company • 400 Sinknmore Div - Polyjojn Enterprises Corp • 618 Spectrum Technologies, Inc • 625 Stark Bro’s Nurseries & Orchards Co • 207 Stoke Seeds, Inc • 401 Stokes Blueberry Farms & Nursery • 212 Summit Tree Sales • 507 Suterra, LLC • 505 Syngenta • 702, 704 Targit Sales Associates, LLC • 807 Tew Manufacturing Corp • 935 The Horticultural Society • 907 Treen Box & Pallet • 919 Tuff Automation • 802 USDA NY Agricultural Statistics Service • 113 Valent U.S.A. Corp • 306 Van Ernst Refrigeration • 620 VirtualOne • 500 Wafler Nursery • 404 Wessels Farms • 601 White’s Farm Supply, Inc • 619, 621, 718, 720

For trade show and exhibiting information, please contact Dan Wren, Lee Trade Shows, P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

800-218-5586 or e-mail dwren@leepub.com

For Registration Information go to https://nysvga.org/expo/register/ For Exhibitor Information go to www.leetradeshows.com

The 2012 Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo is sponsored by: New York State Vegetable Growers Association Empire State Potato Growers New York State Berry Growers Association New York State Farmers’ Direct Marketing Association

New York State Horticultural Society Cornell University Cornell Cooperative Extension NYS Flower Industries


Country Folks New England 1.16.12