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19 DECEMBER 2011 Section One of Two Volume 29 Number 39

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Ogonowski Award for distinguished service to agriculture presented ~ Page 5

Merryy Christmass from alll off uss att Countryy Folks

Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly A18 Crop Comments A6 Moo News A14 Auctions B1 Classifieds B11 Farmer to Farmer A29

DHIA/Dairy

“I am the Lord’s servant,” Mary answered. “May your word to me be fulfilled.” Then the angel left her. ~ Luke 1:38


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

Pete’s Greens celebrates new barn by Bethany M. Dunbar CRAFTSBURY, VT — Pete’s Greens celebrated the completion of its new barn on Dec. 3 with an open house and tours. Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders and U.S. Rep. Peter Welch were among those attending and congratulating Pete Johnson and his crew. “This is pretty much Thanksgiving for us,” said Johnson. “Thanks so much. It’s really been a major ride.” On Jan. 12, 2011, fire destroyed the former dairy barn at Pete’s Greens. With the barn went lots of equipment and lots of vegetables. What didn’t get destroyed was Johnson’s customer base and all those who wanted to make sure Pete’s Greens would be up and running again as soon as possible. Friends started a fund-raising effort called Bid for the Barn that generated enough donations to get the rebuilding process rolling right away. With the Center for an Agricultural Economy, Johnson created the Vermont Farm Fund and gave back $40,000 of that money to be available for other farmers as emergency loans. Pete Johnson, left, visits with Gov. Peter Shumlin at the grand opening of the new The money was made available to help barn on Dec. 3. Photos by Bethany M. Dunbar farmers hurt by Tropical Storm Irene. “This has been a group effort,” said Shumlin. “A renaissance in Vermont goats, and everything else you can gratulations, and hope for the future think of. They told him, “I’m making was heard from the representatives agriculture.” from the U.S. Senate and Congress. He said he remembers the fund-rais- money growing food in Vermont.” Shumlin said “Working in Washington, I am more er at Higher “As Americans and more appreciative and grateful to Ground, a care more and be representing this state,” said dance hot spot more where Sanders. “This small state of Vermont in Burlington, their food is leading America in a new and after the fire comes from,” healthy direction. It’s not just Pete’s because there Vermont farm- Greens. This state is going to lead the were about 400 ers are showing country in a new direction.” people in attenthe rest of the “You’re back in the fight,” said dance. Many of country how to Welch. “You’re growing all the food and them — probably 60 or 70 ~ Gov. Peter Shumlin grow their own creating a local economy.” food. Welch said Vermont is a model for young people — “You are the food, energy and health care. came up to the reason for that “Where do I sign up for my CSA?” he governor in the course of the evening to tell him about movement,” he said. “Fires and storms added. Pete’s Greens has 400 members of their farms. These young people are don’t take us out.” A similar message of thanks, conits year-round CSA. raising beef, pork, vegetables, cheese, “I’m proud to be a Vermonter,”

“This has been a group effort. A renaissance in Vermont agriculture.”

Isaac Jacobs was the main builder of the new barn. He and his wife, Melissa, had a daughter, Iris, in October.

Johnson said. “I’m proud of the guys who represent us in D.C.” Pete’s Greens has 12 year-round employees and 20 in the summer. Isaac Jacobs, one of the employees, was in charge of building the barn. Johnson said thanks to Jacobs and the rest of the crew and all those who helped. In five months they went from digging a foundation to having a space to work inside. “There’s still a bunch of work to be done, but we feel pretty good about where we are at today.” Pete’s Greens employees (and one friend) of the business who helped make it all happen are portrayed on a huge mural on the side of the wall, painted by Tara Goreau, a recent graduate of Johnson State College. The friend is Greg Williams, an 82year-old neighbor who Johnson said kept everyone on track. “He was here the first day we started cleaning up the barn. He would set a goal every day for the clean up.” Johnson said sometimes those goals were somewhat hard to meet, and the crew would be working until well after dark to accomplish them. He said Williams kept on after that, setting goals for what should get done each day and staying until it was done as they built the new barn. Williams is depicted sprinting across the fields in the mural. That part of the mural was covered until the festivities, and as a small curtain was pulled off, Williams ran into a back room to avoid the extra attention. He came back out a few minutes later, though, and he and Deb Rosewolf, who works for Pete’s Greens, talked about what a hard worker Johnson is and how generous he is. “I started working for Pete seven years ago,” Rosewolf said. “We believe in him. You’ve got to believe in him.” Johnson is working on a plan to expand Pete’s Greens to add eight more acres of greenhouses in Coventry, using waste heat from the landfill to heat them.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders visits with Maggie Sherman during the barn open house.


Poultry processing at Tufts ent there were others in the agricultural community who were underserved, one such group being the small poultry producer. One question was how best to develop a program to allow them to sell their dressed poultry at retail. This question had been addressed in other parts of the country with some success. One such program was developed by a Bruce Dunlop in Washington State who lives on a rather remote island with a modest poultry industry. Producers there had no easy way in which to get their poultry processed so Bill designed and built a mobile poultry processing unit which could be towed around the island to locations to which local farmers could bring their birds for processing. Within Massachusetts one unit existed at the New England Small Farm Institute in Belchertown, MA. This unit was designed primarily to meet the needs of producers in the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts. This unit is an open air trailer mounted facility which somewhat limits its use in inclement weather -understanding of course that such weather events are rare in New England. It did however provide a model on which an enclosed processing plant could be built. As is the case with many innovative ideas there was only one major stumbling block - funding. The Director of New Entry Farming Program, Jennifer Hashley, took the ball and

Volunteers prepare for the first processing day. Photos by George Looby, DVM

ran with it. When the final tabulations were completed it was a USDA Rural Development grant that provided over half of the funding, some $55,000, with the remaining $45,000 coming from gifts and donations. Most of this was raised through the efforts of the Tufts Development Office. Once funding was secured, the plans for the enclosed processing plant were presented to a fabricating operation located in Ohio. Plans were developed using the models already in service with necessary modifications to meet the needs of the New Entry Program. As is the case in so many programs nothing progresses to the finished product without Murphy’s

Sam Anderson, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project livestock and outreach coordinator, helps with registration. All birds processed needed to be identified for delivery back to the rightful owner.

Law intervening. Specifications included the provision that this unit must be constructed so that a Ford 250 or equivalent could haul it over the road. The end product’s weight was such that it was in the range of a Sherman Tank so that no readily available farm truck could easily move it necessitating the hiring of an outside trucker to move it from place to place. Having secured funding and having a manufacturer identified, there remained another hurdle to confront and that was the various regulatory agencies who had a role in the approval process. The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources raised the issue of having a processing facility on the same premises as an existing flock. Since processing day was to be on the Grafton Campus of the Veterinary School which maintains a small flock, this issue needed resolution and indeed a compromise was reached. The Department of Environmental Protection has control of the manner in which industrial wastes are managed including disposal and composting issues. The Department of Public Health maintains control over all food processing facilities and they too were required to insure that the processing plant met their standards. Further, the Town of Grafton Board of Health officer needed to put her stamp of approval granting a one day permit for the operation. Once all of the details were arranged, a date was set for the first day of processing which was scheduled for Nov. 19 on the Grafton Campus of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University adjacent to the Wildlife Clinic. The New Entry Sustainable Farming Program has a website through which they transmit

information about various happenings within the organization to interested individuals. It was through this outlet that word was sent out regarding the processing day. For the first time through about 60 chickens and an equal number of turkeys were processed at a cost to the owner of $4.50 a bird for chickens and $8 per bird for turkeys. For the start up run all of the help were volunteers, veterinary students who agreed to help with words of encouragement from fourth year student Laura Kielbasa who recruited fellow students for the project. Jennifer Hashley’s husband, Peter Lowy, volunteered to do the slaughtering. Both Jennifer and Sam Anderson, another New Entry person, were actively engaged in every phase of the operation. Sam’s assigned role in the New Entry program is that of livestock and outreach coordinator but everyone in this group wears many hats. All birds processed had to be identified in order that it be returned to the rightful owner. Each bird was killed, plucked by machine, eviscerated, pinfeathers removed, washed, and cooled in ice water prior to being delivered back to the owner. When fully operational it is probable that any farm visited will supply their own labor for as many steps of the operation as possible. Once all regulations currently in place are modified it will be possible for the poultry producer to sell retail under conditions that guarantee the quality of the finished product. The unit will serve eastern Massachusetts and as the program matures it is likely that the fee schedule will be modified to insure that a break even point can be achieved. For more information concerning this program, e-mail Jennifer.Hashley@tufts.edu.

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

by George Looby, DVM For many years small poultry operations in Massachusetts have been restricted from offering for sale dressed poultry to retail customers. These restrictions have been imposed by regulatory agencies concerned about sale of dressed poultry that might be harboring infectious agents that potentially might put the consumer at risk. As well meaning as these restrictions may be, they have poised rather severe limitations on the small producer who offers a widely sought after product in today’s marketplace. In an effort to address and modify these long standing barriers, the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project at Tufts University has developed a program that hopefully will allow the consumer the opportunity to purchase locally grown poultry products in keeping with marketing trends of recent years of buying local. The New Entry Program exists within the framework of the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Freidman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. This program provides advice, counseling, direction and instruction to individuals who want to become involved. Particular emphasis is given to the business side of agriculture whereby those who are interested are brought face to face with economic reality. With this program now underway, it became appar-


Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

LEDC pledges $140,000 to protect Lamoille farmers MORRISVILLE, VT — Lamoille County hopes to become the first county in the country where every farmer has protection from tractor rollovers, the leading cause of serious injury and death on farms. Thanks to the Lamoille Economic Development Corp. (LEDC), this goal may be achieved in the near future. LEDC has pledged $140,000 over the next four years to University of Vermont (UVM) Extension’s Vermont Rebates for Roll Bars Program. The statewide program provides a 70 percent rebate, up to $765, to any Vermont farmer who wants to retrofit an old tractor with a rollover protection kit, which includes a roll bar and seatbelt. This life-saving measure provides 99 percent protection from fatal rollovers. The contribution from LEDC is earmarked for rebates for the more than 200 Lamoille County farmers eligible to register for the program. LEDC, a private, not-for-profit corporation sponsored by Lamoille County businesses and municipalities as well as the State of Vermont, strengthens the county’s economy through the creation and expansion of jobs and businesses with a focus on agricultural, tourism and web-based businesses. “Agriculture is the dominant industry in Lamoille County with a total of 357 farms, more than half of which do not have rollover protection structures on their tractors,” says Matt Myers, pro-

gram coordinator. “Seven out of 10 farms where a fatal rollover occurs are out of business in one year. UVM Extension and LEDC hope to sustain the viability of these farms by making sure every farm in the county has the opportunity to install a roll bar and seatbelt kit on at least one tractor to use on the more dangerous projects.” Chuck Hogan, LEDC board member, adds, “If you can provide, on average, a $660 rebate to a farmer, and that investment prevents a fatal rollover that costs the family and society at least $910,000, it’s a no-brainer.” LEDC has decided to prioritize this important safety investment for the sake of any tractor owner in Lamoille County. Although the program is targeted to farmers, any tractor owner in Vermont is eligible for the rebate. To find out what roll bar kits are available for their particular tractor, where to purchase and the cost before and after the 70 percent rebate, tractor owners can call the toll-free hotline at 877-767-7748. To date, more than 200 individuals statewide have registered for the rebate program, and more than 70 already have installed rollover protection on their tractors. LEDC’s support will accelerate this process greatly in Lamoille County. For more information, contact Myers at 802-888-4972, ext. 404, or 866-2605603 (Vermont calls only) or by e-mail at matthew.myers@uvm.edu.

Cover photo by Sally Colby

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470 Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $45 per year, $75 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas ................................................Albany, NY ................................................518-456-0603 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

Dave Hallquist, center, Lamoille Economic Development Corp. (LEMDC) board president and CEO of Vermont Electric Co-op, presents a check for $140,000 to Matt Myers, program coordinator, University of Vermont Extension Vermont Rebates for Roll Bars Program, as John Mandeville, LEDC executive director, looks on. The money will be used for rebates for rollover protection for Lamoille County farmers. Photo courtesy of UVM Extension

NOFA/Mass conference to be held at Worcester State University WORCESTER, MA — Worcester State University is the new 2012 host of the Northeast Organic Farming Association/Massachusetts Chapter Inc. (NOFA/Mass) Annual Winter Conference on Saturday, Jan. 14. The use of a new venue is the result of an expansion in conference registration over the past five years to over 900 participants. The conference features workshops, a keynote speech, exhibits, vendors and a catered organic lunch provided by Worcester State. The community event is designed for farmers, gardeners, consumers, landscapers, homesteaders and policy advocates. “Anyone who eats will be interested in attending the NOFA conference,” said Conference Coordinator Cathleen O’Keefe, “... there are workshops for teens, children and adults. Workshop topics range from farm management to ensuring a fair, equitable, regional food system, to food preservation and healthy living. There are also great practical skills workshops like knot tying and chainsaw safety.” This year, the 2012 NOFA/Mass Winter Conference will feature keynote speaker John Jeavons of Ecology Action in Northern California. Jeavons is known internationally as the leading researcher and method developer, teacher and consultant for the small-scale, sustainable agricultural method known as GROW BIOINTENSIVE ™ mini-farming. Jeavons' food-raising methods are being used in 141 countries and by such organizations as UNICEF, Save the Children, and the Peace Corps. Jeavons will also be teaching an allday seminar on Designing and Planning Your Garden/Mini-Farm for the Future. For gardeners there are workshops on Practical Seed-Saving Skills, Basic Organic Gardening, or Low Tunnels for Vegetables. Consumers might enjoy the sessions on Foraging for

Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms or Maple Syrup 101. Livestock workshops include Pigs and Pork Products on the Small Farm, So You Want to Raise Grass-fed Beef, or Raising Chickens in an Urban Backyard. Foodies can whet their appetites by attending Making Fresh Mozzarella, Curing Ham, and Using a Pressure Canner. Dennis Irish, vice president of Marketing, Government and Community Relations at Vanguard Health Systems offered a perspective on the importance of the NOFA/Mass conference. “We in the health care field feel that the opposite of hungry is not full. It’s healthy,” Irish said. To the extent that we can improve the quality of nutrition — the consumption of fruits, vegetables and organic food, our patient-base will benefit from it both physically and mentally. We’re looking forward to presenting at the conference.” Conference registration is $65 per person with discounts available for NOFA members, certified farmers, students, teens and children. Seminar registration is $120. Earlybird registration discounts are available before Jan. 1. Beginning Farmer Scholarships are available for anyone who has been farming for less than 10 years. Complete conference information is available at www.nofamass.org. The conference is sponsored by Whole Foods Markets, Stonyfield Farm, Farm Family, Greenfield Farmers Cooperative Exchange, Farm Family, Clements Law Office LLC, Greenleaf Foundation, Franklin Community Cooperative, Vermont Compost, Frontier Natural Products, Neighboring Food Coop, Boston Organics, Groton Wellness, RMA, Groundscapes Express, Lancaster Ag, Albert’s Organics, Chelsea Green Publishing, Fertrell, Harris Seeds, and The Weston A. Price Foundation.


Ogonowski distinguished service award presented established the award in 2001 as a memorial to John Ogonowski, longtime MFBF board member, county leader and victim of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack. John was the pilot of American Airlines Flight 11 that crashed into the World Trade Center. John was actively involved in the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project, renting land to immigrant farmers from Cambodia and then serving as a mentor to them as they learned how to farm in this region. John loved farming and was also very active with the Dracut Land Trust, working to preserve open space for future generations. Cook has had a lifelong love of farming. He began his career in agriculture while still in high school, co-managing a farm in Hamilton. He went on to receive a degree in horticulture, specializing in the cultivation of fruit. Over the years he worked at a number of nurseries and orchards, and also taught at Essex Agricultural Institute. Glenn and his wife, Karen,

purchased farm property in Amesbury and later merged their business with his parents’, forming Cider Hill Farm. Some 30 years later, the farm produces over 70 varieties of apples along with an assortment of peaches, pears, plums, small fruit, vegetables and chickens. Following in John Ogonowski’s footsteps, Cook has shared his passion for agriculture by mentoring over 85 international agricultural exchange students from 20 different countries. By sharing his knowledge and expertise of sustainable farming, this agricultural ambassador has an ever widening impact. Cook is also devoted to being green and this year has reached his goal of providing 100 percent of the energy needs for the farm through renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power. He continues to pursue innovative farming techniques and remains deeply committed to this way of life and the community in which he lives.

Glenn Cook of Amesbury, MA, was the recipient of the Massachusetts Farm Bureau’s Ogonowski Award.

Super Committee’s failure was a lucky break for dairy farmers In the Nov. 22nd failure of the Congressional “Super Committee” U.S. dairy farmers dodged a bullet. Had the Super Committee not broken up in the confusion of Babel, the nation’s dairy farmers might already be saddled with a 2012 Farm Bill dairy initiative that would have been largely against their interest. In the run-up to the Super Committee deadline powerful Washington lobbying forces in concert with a select member of Congress were confidently moving to impose a dairy proposal of greater utility and advantage to the management of the nation’s largest dairy cooperatives and dairy processors than to the nation’s dairy farmers. None of the numerous 2012 Farm Bill dairy proposals currently before the House and Senate Ag. Committees take note of, or proposes a remedy for what should be seen as the obvious elephant in the room: the market failure that is the USDA Farm Milk Price Formula. This formula is based on what is dubiously referred to as cheese trading, as practiced on the cheese floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME). This traded cheese comprises less than 1 percent of total U.S. milk production. It is offered in 50,000 pound “carload” lots; often at low-ball prices, seemingly against the offering trader’s immediate financial interest. This practice is termed: “trading against one’s interest.” In this

Letter to the Editor Opinions of the letters printed are not necessarily those of the staff or management at Country Folks. E-mail letters of opinion to jkarkwren@leepub.com or fax to 518673-2699, or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428.

instance, it represents collusion. Collusion amongst these cheese traders, who front for multinational dairy corporations, is done to deliberately down-skew the CME sale data which will be collected by USDA in the knowledge the data will become the formula basis for future U.S. farm price calculations. In this fashion these dairy corporations “game” the system; subverting this CME market mechanism to deliberately down-value the remaining 99+ percent of U.S. farm milk output. Short-selling one or two carloads of cheese can lower the future USDA Farm Milk Price and reduce these conspiring corporations’ overall monthly milk assembly costs by tens of millions of dollars. This scam translates to a systematic, continual financial short-changing of the nation’s dairy farmers. This CME system gaming has not gone unnoticed in the halls of Congress. Currently at point on the issue is New York’s junior Senator, Kirsten Gillibrand. At an August agricultural listening session in Westfield, NY, the Senator stated: “There is no transparency or honesty in the pricing mechanism at all, I

want to push the envelope that there is a disconnect between the (farm) price of milk and how we come up with it through the price of cheese in Chicago. I think there is a lot of corruption and anti-trust behavior that is there to keep the (farm) price down.” Until the collapse of the Super Committee negotiations there was a very real danger that the best interests of the nation’s dairy farmers were going to be sacrificed to political expediency. Post-collapse, the 2012 Farm Bill process now has an opportunity to revert to a slower, more thoughtful, deliberate and measured pace. U.S. dairy farmers must take advantage this precious opportunity and bend it to answer their purpose. Senator Gillibrand, a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee and Chairman of the Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, Poultry, Marketing and Agriculture Security is urging Senate Ag. Committee Chairman Debbie Stabenow, (D-MI) to hold hearings to explore the limitations and short-comings of the current USDA Milk Price Formula. Senator Gillibrand is

on record as wanting to craft a fair, transparent price formula based on reliable price discovery factors to counter the chicanery routinely generated on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange cheese floor. All parties interested in a bright future for the American dairy industry should close ranks behind the Senator and aid her in any way possible in this pursuit. Reworking the USDA Milk Price Formula will not be an end-all solution for our nation’s dairy farmers. However, without a remaking of the basic price formula all other proposed measures currently before Congress, either on their own, or in concert, are doomed to fail in curing the ongoing and seemingly unending crisis on the nation’s dairy farms. Seldom in life are there second chances, yet this is exactly what has been bequeathed to U.S. dairymen. It would be the height of folly for dairymen and their allies to ignore the resulting opportunity to enlighten their Senators and House members of what is needed to correct the U.S. dairy industry in the upcoming drafting of the dairy portion of the 2012 Farm Bill. Regardless of what other solutions are adopted, for ultimate success, a total retooling of the USDA Milk Price Formula must be at the head of the 2012 Farm Bill dairy initiative “to do list.” Failure to address the inadequacy of the current USDA

Price Formula and the CME price discovery system that feeds it bogus price information portends the eventual decline of the U.S. dairy industry itself. This is an American industry truly too vital, too strategic and too big to be allowed to fail. U.S. dairymen must come to the realization that no one, regardless of their high flown rhetoric — not their milk cooperative management, the American Farm Bureau, the National Milk Producers Federation nor its Congressional waterboy, Rep. Collin Peterson, (D-MN) has the U.S. dairy farmer’s back or any right to speak for them in the 2012 Farm Bill dairy fight. If U.S. dairy farmers want an honest, successful conclusion for their ongoing milk price difficulties, they are going to have to make it happen themselves, on their own initiative. Regardless of whatever pet Congressional dairy reform proposal each individual U.S. dairy farmer favors, dairymen need to unite and get behind Senator Gillibrand and her allies in Congress, now, in force and with a will. The USDA Farm Milk Price Formula must be reformed: the future of U.S. dairy farming depends on it, absolutely. Nate Wilson, Sinclairville, NY Nate Wilson, 64, has retired from a 40-year career as a dairy farmer on a small grassland dairy farm in Chautauqua County, NY

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

DANVERS, MA — Local farmer Glenn Cook is the 2011 winner of the John Ogonowski Award. The award was presented at the Massachusetts Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) Annual Meeting, held Dec. 1-2 in Fitchburg, MA. MFBF President Dr. A. Richard Bonanno made the announcement at the annual awards banquet, and presented Glenn with a plaque and engraved award. Cook offered a humble and heartfelt acceptance speech, thanking those who nominated and voted for him, and acknowledging the esteemed company of the other nominees. “I’m truly honored just to be nominated along with this group of incredibly dedicated people, some of whom served as my mentors,” Cook said. The annual award is given to a Farm Bureau member who has shown distinguished service to the organization and to the agricultural community as a whole. The Massachusetts Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF)


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

Ones that got away Earlier this month my son Peter, who works and lives in one of New York City’s Connecticut suburbs, forwarded me an Internet headline which read: “Town tries ‘bait cow’ to lure wayward heifer.” I will try to summarize the small Reuters News Service article which followed the headline: This past mid-September, a wayward heifer, weighing about 1,500 pounds (presumably a beefer), fell off the back of a truck and had been wandering loose in Plattsmouth, NE, ever since (as of Dec. 1). Animal control officers in that city, on that date, corralled a “bait cow” in a community tennis court to help lure the elusive heifer in from the cold. “We know that she’s back in the area because we found where she beds down during the day,” said Sue Baker, the animal control officer for the city, located 20 miles south of Omaha. “We hope she sees the other cow and joins her in the tennis courts when she walks by next time.” Plattsmouth’s loose woman (bovine, of course) fell onto a city street when the truck was detoured into the community. The driver was unaware that he had lost a passenger. The Plattsmouth heifer had been hiding in woods on the north edge of town during the day and coming out at night to graze on grass lawns. The 1,500-pound heifer appeared healthy, Baker said. “Now that there’s nothing to graze in the

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countryside, she’s coming into town for food,” she said. On Nov. 30, Baker almost led the heifer into the tennis court to join the “bait cow”, but a small barking dog spooked the heifer away. On the subject of escaping life forms, the one most commonly in the news these days is methicillin-resistant Staphyllococcus aureus (abbreviated MRSA). According to a British Web site (http://treatingstaphsuperbugmrsa.c om/allicin), over one million metric tons of antibiotics have been dispersed into the biosphere in the past 50 years to cure countless bacterial infections, half for hu-

man use and half for animal use. The problem with this shotgun approach, as with any method which attacks a population of what we consider pests, is that the weaker individuals die, but the ones with natural immunity to the pesticide survive to fight … and reproduce prolifically… another day. In this sense, antibiotics are pesticides just like herbicides and fungicides (-cide comes from a Latin word meaning “kill”). Cases of antibiotic-resistance have been documented since the 1950s, but science drowned the fear of unconquerable bacteria with a steady stream of new, more powerful antibiotics. Monsters, called “Antibiotic-resistant Super Bugs” have destroyed any illusion that we have won the war against infectious diseases. Medical doctors, by their own admission, are frustrated

and frightened. Fortunately Mother Nature, in the face of this pharmaceutical stalemate, is making a countermove against MRSA and other virulent pathogens. Many hospitals in the UK, and to a lesser extent, the U.S., have accepted her weapon of choice, namely allicin, the biochemical produced by garlic. Garlic, the prominent member of genus Allium (which also includes onion and leeks) produces a natural chemical called alliin in its cloves (and scapes, the vegetative portion)… no, I didn’t leave out a letter. When a garlic clove is cracked, oxygen hits the alliin, and chemically changes it to allicin, which now yields a lot more odor, as well as medicinal properties. Currently, there are several National Health Service hospitals in the UK that use allicin to treat MRSA, because it

kills this pathogen which has, to date, escaped human attempts to control, or kill it, with synthetic drugs. This contribution from garlic is proving to be a God-send to human (and animal) wellness. According to the UK Web site mentioned earlier, today infectious disease is ranked, world-wide, as the #1 people killer. Medical authorities are well aware that they are barely “one step ahead of catastrophe,” unable to defend patients against an onslaught of diseases for which there remains little, if any, effective medical treatment. Physicians agree that they are losing the battle for our health. Infectious diseases have returned to their former pre-antibiotic prominence. Many of these same scientists now admit they are looking at natural alternatives to help bail us out. Enter allicin. Great physicians, herbalists and healers have long

suggested that garlic is good for human health. Garlic has been used around the world, dating back over 5,000 years. Egyptian slaves building the pyramids were provided rations of garlic, not only to improve the quality of their daily rations, but also to keep them free of disease. More recently, longevity studies conducted by Dr. Narain at the Public Health Department in Delhi, India, revealed that 98 percent of all people over 100 years old consumed at least one clove of garlic every day. According to a recent U.S., study conducted by the National Cancer Institute, garlic and similar vegetables may be the reason why Chinese men have so little prostate cancer. These and other recent developments indicate that garlic’s primary active ingredient, allicin,

Crop A9


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Crop from A6 may become a much bigger player on the health scene. Allicin contains the same reactive sulfur group that sulfa drugs, the very first antibiotics, contained back in the 1930s. In their more natural form these sulfur compounds appear more effective against MRSA than synthetic sulfur-based antibiotics. A closing comment on the UK Web site ran: “Garlic’s health benefits are truly legendary, but only now, in the 21st century, has its potential to conquer modern-day health challenges been revealed. At long last, after 80 years of trying to release the ‘mother substance’, the allicin molecule is now available to assist mankind, where modern medicine is fail-

ing us.” Some time ago, in my involvement with organic agriculture, I learned that garlic has medicinal properties. Garlic fed to chicks substitutes for one on the -cycline drugs, I believe, Aureomycin. Armed with that knowledge, I began feeding very young calves a garlic clove to supplement their new-born colostrum feeding. I would bite a clove to activate the allicin, stick it between my two longest fingers, and poke it down past the calf’s tongue. This practice apparently worked quite well. Within organic circles, garlic has been shown to counter round worms. In one situation where I recommended garlic as a dewormer in

dry cows, the farmer observed that when the cows freshened, the calves had much fewer respiratory problems. Garlic-eaters get bitten by mosquitoes less often than non-garlic eaters. Garlic eaters are less prone to blood clots than non-garlic-eaters, which means people on blood thinners should avoid garlic. Garlic appears to be telling MRSA. “you can run, but you cannot hide”. If the Plattsmouth heifer is still on the loose, Ms. Baker should not try to lure her with garlic. It takes a while for most animals to get used to it. Myself, I find that when I crack a garlic clove with my teeth, prior to feeding it to a calf, I get a serious hankering for Italian food.

COLCHESTER, VT — Robert Paquin, state executive director for USDA’s Farm Service Agency in Vermont, reminds Vermont maple producers that the application closing date for 2012 Noninsurable Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) maple sap coverage is Jan. 1, 2012. NAP is the only option because a crop insurance policy is not available in Vermont to cover maple sap losses. If more than a 50 percent loss in total maple sap production is suffered, assistance could be available under NAP. Paquin also reminded maple producers that crop insurance or NAP coverage is required for all crops on a farm for that farm to be eligible for the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Program (SURE) for potential 2012 losses.

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December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

2012 NAP deadline for maple sap


Put the pieces in place for pneumonia management

Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

Set up your youngstock for a lifetime of success Replacement heifers are the future of every dairy operation. Your calf and heifer management program needs the right pieces to ensure the future wellness of your herd and your business. A key piece of that puzzle is pneumonia management. Pneumonia causes the second highest number of cases of illness and death in young dairy calves, behind only scours. Calves that do survive pneumonia are likely to face a lifetime of diminished performance. According to Lance Fox, DVM, Cattle Technical Services with Pfizer Animal Health, research shows that replacement heifers experiencing bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in the first three months of life are more likely to experience significantly increased mortality, have reduced average daily gain, calve later than healthy herdmates and produce less

milk in at least their first lactation. “It is important that producers work with their veterinarians to look at their calf and heifer management program and make sure they are properly managing BRD,” says Dr. Fox. “There are several steps for pneumonia management and all are interconnected — having one without the other can cause health issues.” • Set the stage with proper nutrition. Bolstering a calf’s immune system is important for pneumonia resistance and starts with feeding at least 4 quarts of highquality colostrum within 2 hours of birth. An excellent colostrum feeding program is the cornerstone of healthy calf rearing and helps jumpstart the immune system, better preparing it for vaccination. • Vaccinate to help prevent BRD. Work with

your veterinarian to set up a vaccination program for your young calves. Ask him or her about introducing an intranasal vaccine that helps protect against the three major viral pathogens that cause pneumonia in dairy calves — bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis

(IBR) virus and parainfluenza 3 (PI3) virus. Vaccines are an important part of helping the immune system fight off BRD. • Use strategic antibiotic control. Implementing a calf respiratory identification protocol can help you initiate treatment earlier in disease progression. Your veterinarian can help set

up an antibiotic control protocol to minimize the effects of pneumonia during high risk situations, such as seasonal weather changes, overcrowding or moving to group housing. • Manage the environment. Utilize an all-in and all-out approach and sanitize hutches and pens between calves to limit pathogen exposure

to incoming animals. Also, be sure to provide enough clean, dry bedding, especially as the weather gets colder. Work with your herd veterinarian and nutritionist to evaluate your calf and heifer management program to ensure you are doing everything to improve the health and future productivity of your youngstock.

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Essentials of feed program management by Bob James, Extension Dairy Scientist, Dairy Nutrition The coming year promises to be exciting! Milk prices are near record highs, but unfortunately so are feed prices. With corn prices nearly $8/bushel, the successful dairy manager must squeeze every bit of energy, protein and

carbohydrates from the forages on the farm to maintain margins on income over feed costs. Your feed management plan should focus on knowledge of inventories, feed nutrient content and controlling shrink. Successful feed program management demands knowledge of inventories of forages and

feed grains as well as their quality. Determine as closely as possible the amount of all silages and hay crops on hand and project utilization through the next harvest period. The silocap program, an Excel spreadsheet developed by VT faculty and available at www.vtdairy.dasc.vt.edu, can help estimate forage

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eat more. If herd average has increased this past year, expect greater demand for forages. Recognize deficiencies in forage supply early and purchase feed before it becomes more expensive in the spring. Don’t totally rely on what was needed in the previous year. Determine forage and feed nutrient content routinely. Ohio State studies suggest corn silage should be tested at least monthly. Routine testing of commodity feeds during our five year phosphorus field study demonstrated that every load of commodity feeds arriving on the farm should be tested. This enables timely adjustment of rations and in some cases, deficiency payments can be expected from suppliers if feeds don’t meet guaranteed nutrient specifications for DM percent, CP percent or other nutrients. What’s your shrink? How much harvested forage or purchased

grains and commodities are wasted? A trailer load of corn grain costs in excess of $8,000. Reducing shrink from 10 to 5 percent is worth over $400. Focus on the following in reducing shrink: • Dry storage; • Insect and animal damage; • Spillage during loading of mixer wagons; and • Overloading mixer wagon. Average daily feed cost for a cow producing 70 pounds of milk is close to $8 which represents a daily cost approaching $1,500 for the typical lactating herd in Virginia. Incentives are especially attractive for managers to optimize nutrient balance through timely ration formulation and knowledge of nutrient content and quality of all feeds. Further improvements can be expected through reductions in losses during storage and feeding. Source: Dairy Pipeline, November-December 2011

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December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

WINTER BLITZ 29 Ga. Galvalume

inventories in various silos. The program also has the ability to consider storage losses in determining how much is available to feed. Project utilization of each forage by considering how much is fed daily and project needs until the next harvest. Remember to consider the following in projections: • Herd expansion. What about those extra heifers freshening over the next year? Twentyfive extra heifers consuming 60 pounds of silage per day will mean an extra 1,500 pounds of silage daily and 275 tons more silage required annually. • Forage quality. Some producers have planted acreage to BMR varieties of corn silage. Rations with BMR varieties will contain more silage due to its higher digestibility. This means less corn to purchase, but it increases silage consumption by as much as 10 percent. • Higher production. As cow’s milk more they


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You

Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

Mysterious mistletoe • Scandanavians associated Mistletoe with Frigga, their goddess of love, and it may be from this that we derive the custom of kissing under the mistletoe. Those who kissed under the mistletoe had the promise of happiness and good luck in the following year. • The practice of kissing under the mistletoe was described in 1820 by American author Washington Irving in his “The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon”: “The mistletoe is still hung up in farm-houses and kitchens at Christmas, and the young men have the privilege of kissing the girls under it, plucking each time a berry from the bush. When the berries are all plucked the privilege ceases. • Mistletoe was used by Druid priests 200 years before the birth of Christ in their winter celebrations. They revered the plant since it had no roots yet remained green during the cold months of winter. • Mistletoe is intriguing botanically because it is a partial parasite (a “hemiparasite”). As a parasitic plant, it grows on the branches or trunk of a tree and sends out roots that penetrate into the tree and take up nutrients. But it also

can grow on its own and produce food by photosynthesis. • The mistletoe that is commonly used as a Christmas decoration (Phoradendron flavescens) is native to North America and grows as a parasite on trees in the West and also along a line down the East Coast from New Jersey to Florida. • European mistletoe (Viscum album) figured prominently in Greek mythology, and is believed to be The Golden Bough of Aeneas, ancestor of the Romans. • It is said that among Romans, enemies who met under mistletoe would lay down their weapons and embrace. • Mistletoe is rarely found growing on oak trees, and as such was especially sacred to the ancient Celtic Druids. On the sixth night of the moon, whiterobed Druid priests would cut the oak mistletoe with a golden sickle. Two white bulls would be sacrificed amid prayers that the recipients of the mistletoe would prosper. • The sticky juice of mistletoe berries was used as adhesive to trap small animals or birds. In South Africa, it is called “Bird lime” in English.

Comfort foods made fast and healthy!

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Holiday Rice Pudding You can never get too much of a good thing. Take a taste of this luscious rum raisin rice pudding made with sour cream, and see if you don’t agree. 1 (4-serving) package sugar-free instant vanilla pudding mix 2/3 cup nonfat dry milk powder 1 1/2 cups water 1/3 cup fat-free sour cream 1 teaspoon rum extract 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 3/4 cup raisins

2 cups cold cooked rice 6 tablespoons reduced-calorie whipped topping 1. In large bowl, combine dry pudding mix, dry milk powder and water. Mix well using a wire whisk. Blend in sour cream, rum extract and nutmeg. Add raisins and rice. Mix well to combine. 2. Evenly spoon rice mixture into 6 dessert dishes. Top each with 1 tablespoon whipped topping. Lightly sprinkle additional nutmeg over the top of each, if desired. Refrigerate at least 15 minutes. Makes 6 servings. • Each serving equals: 168 calories, 0g fat, 5g protein, 37g carb., 282mg sodium, 1g fiber; Diabetic Exchanges: 1 1/2 Starch, 1 Fruit. (c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

• According to custom in the Englishspeaking world, the mistletoe must not touch the ground between its cutting and its removal as the last of Christmas greens at Candlemas; it may remain hanging through the year, often to preserve the house from lightning or fire, until it was replaced the following Christmas Eve. • In the Middle Ages and later, branches of mistletoe were hung from ceilings to ward off evil spirits. In Europe they were placed over house and stable doors to prevent the entrance of witches. • In some parts of England, the Christmas mistletoe is burned on the 12th night lest all the boys and girls who have kissed under it never marry. (c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

Ham and Chutney Mini Biscuits Paula Deen created this perfect holiday party food by sandwiching ham and chutney in homemade mini biscuits. 2 cups self-rising cake flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 6 tablespoons cold butter, cut up 1/3 cup whole milk, plus additional if necessary 3 tablespoons mango chutney 16 slices (about 8 ounces) deli ham 1. Preheat oven to 400 F. 2. In large bowl, whisk flour and baking powder. With pastry blender or two knives used scissors-fashion, cut in 3 tablespoons butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs; set aside remaining butter to soften at room temperature. 3. Into flour mixture, stir milk and buttermilk, just until mixture forms dough that leaves side of bowl. Add additional milk, 1 tablespoon at a time, if needed to help form dough. 4. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead 2 or 3 times to smooth dough. Pat into 12 by 5-inch rectangle. With long side facing you, cut rectangle in half to form 2 rectangles, each 12 by 2-1/2 inches. Cut each rectangle at

3/4-inch intervals to form 2-1/2 by 3/4-inch pieces. (You should end up with 32 biscuits.) 5. On large ungreased cookie sheet, place biscuits 1/2 inch apart. Bake biscuits 20 minutes or until tops are golden brown. Transfer biscuits to wire rack to cool completely. 6. In small bowl, mix reserved softened butter and chutney until wellcombined. On cutting board, cut ham slices crosswise in half to form 32 pieces. 7. With serrated knife, split each biscuit. Spread chutney butter on both cut sides of each biscuit. Fold one ham slice to fit onto each biscuit bottom; replace biscuit top to make sandwich. Makes 32 sandwiches. • Each serving: About 70 calories, 3g total fat (2g saturated), 10mg cholesterol, 250mg sodium, 8g carbohydrate, 0g dietary fiber, 3g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefin der/. (c) 2011 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

Hot spiced cider 6 cups apple cider 1/2 teaspoon whole cloves 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 3 sticks cinnamon 1. Heat all ingredients to boiling in 3-quart saucepan over mediumhigh heat; reduce heat to low. Simmer uncovered 10 minutes. 2. Strain cider mixture to remove cloves and cinnamon if desired. Serve hot. Serves six. (c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

Last week’s Sudoku solution

This week’s Sodoku solution


December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

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Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, I sometimes take heat in the organic world due to really enjoying treating animals rather than focusing on prevention and nutrition. Yet let’s be real — even with excellent prevention and nutrition, the fact is there’ll still be illness at times — that’s part of life. Truth is that by the time I’m called to see a case, the situation is already beyond simple prevention and/or nutrition. Interestingly, some people seem to dislike that I use therapy via needles and injection to help animals regain health, instead of relying on orally administered remedies. Why is that? All I can say is that while I might use fairly intensive natural methods, I’ll also use all routes of administration to help get the best outcome for the patient. Interestingly, it seems that more and more dairy farmers considering organic certification want solutions with near equal “punch” that they have come to expect with conventional medicine. Thus it seems logical to know which quick acting, effective natural treatments to use when orally administered remedies have not succeeded. Truth be told, when giving talks to groups, I usually spend nearly half the time talking about prevention and foundational health strategies, with the rest of the time talking about various modes of alternative treatments and

then actual case studies. There are many types of alternative treatments that can be used as stand alone treatments or in combination with each other. As a group, the AVMA calls them Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine (CAVM). My opinion is that we should use whichever mode of treatment that we feel intuitively drawn to. Or if there are certain CAVM therapies that make no sense to you whatsoever, don’t seem “real enough”, or make you uncomfortable, simply don’t use them. A short listing of CAVM groupings with specific examples follow: food therapy - preventive nutrition, therapeutic nutrition, glandular therapy and orthomolecular medicine; manual therapy - massage, acupressure, acupuncture, osteopathy, chiropractic, and physical therapy; biological therapy - hyperimmune plasma, hyperimmune eggs, serum therapy, bee sting therapy, and pharmaceutically reared leeches and maggots; botanical therapy - western herbal medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, essential oils and aromatherapy; energy medicine - Christian layingon of hands, classical homeopathy, homotoxicology, Bach flower remedies and non-traditional homeopathy. This is not a complete list of course and there are combinations of treatment, like injecting

homeopathic remedies at acupuncture points. If you are drawn to a particular CAVM, consider learning more about it to use it well. Or, if a CAVM therapy makes no sense whatsoever, doesn’t seem “real” enough, or makes you uncomfortable, simply don’t use it. Just please don’t blindly “grasp at straws” in attempts to avoid standard, conventional therapy. Knowing a little about each may help you understand their potential role. Acupuncture is a form of treatment which utilizes energy routes (meridians) that naturally course throughout the body, with certain points (acupuncture points) of the channel on the skin surface connecting nerves to organs in the

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body interior. By stimulating these points with dry needles, injectible solutions, electricity or heat, we can influence the functioning of circulation and internal organs to help return a patient to health. Homeopathy is a form of treatment that uses very highly diluted substances of plant, mineral or animal origin to gently stimulate the body to return to nor-

mal equilibrium. The materials that are used would, if given in their raw form, create the illness condition that the dilute remedy is being used to treat. In-depth knowledge of the remedies’ properties and specific symptoms are needed to use homeopathy effectively. Homeopathic remedies higher than 12C (such as a 30C or 200C) actually have no original materi-

al, only the essence or energy of the original material remains. Botanical therapy is a form of treatment which has been used by humans and animals forever. The Bible mentions many plants that were used as medicine. Plants are food, herbs, nutraceuticals and medicine. Real medicine is tucked away within plant

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with good reason — because they contain active compounds. Like homeopathy, there are energetics associated with botanicals (bitter, cooling, sweet, pungent, sweet, and salty), but moreover, there are a multitude of real medicinal compounds in plants. Biological therapy is a form of treatment that uses natural substances derived from living organisms to stimulate, augment, or modify the immune system. Prior to the antibiotic era, serum therapy was used to deliver antibodies from

critical. I love what biodynamic herb grower Andrea Reisen said, “As soon as you put your intention upon anything, it changes everything.” This is so very true. Animals can sense with an uncanny ability whether we as individuals truly want to help them or if we are just going through mechanical motions. Yes, animals can resist your attempts to treat them. But if we come to them from a calm heart rather than a busy head, we may better understand what ails them — and then we’ll choose better therapies from the natural kingdom which God allows us all to partake in. Please realize that antibiotics do have a place in therapy. For example, if pneumonia hasn’t responded quickly to natural treatments, switch to antibiotics. You’re going to cull a few animals a year, so using antibiotics shouldn’t be automatically be viewed as an impossibility. Most people agree it’s better to have a live cow than a dead organic one. There’s a reason God placed the animals you have in your life — do what’s right and take good care of them. Rewards abound. Hey, I plan to start up again in part-time practice in the new year — to treat medical and repro problems with natural therapy (but not for emergencies or scheduled monthly reproduction). Hopefully I’ll get to see you sometime! Until then, count your blessings and the biggest blessing of all, the meaning of Lord Jesus born among the farm animals. Merry Christmas!

CWT export assistance program extended Dairy cooperatives and individual farmers representing 70.1 percent of the nation’s milk have committed 2 cents per hundred pounds of milk to Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) for 2012 and 2013. As a result of reaching the minimum participation level that the CWT Committee established, the Export Assistance program will carry on with assisting member cooperatives in selling U.S. cheese to key markets around the world. The 2-cent investment will begin with milk marketed in January 2012, and continue on member milk marketings through December 2013. Meanwhile, CWT members continued to aggressively sell American cheeses to key markets in November. A total of 9.5 million pounds of cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese, scheduled for shipment through April 2012, will receive assistance from CWT. This brings the total export sales assisted so far in 2011 to 88.3 million pounds going to 25 countries on four continents. CWT requires extensive documentation from cooperative members showing that the product was delivered in order for assistance payments to be made. Source: News for Dairy Coops, Dec. 2, 2011

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15

donors to recipients. Hyper-immune plasma, much purer than serum therapy, is the modern equivalent. For example, rabies anti-toxin, snake venom anti-toxin and botulism anti-toxin and gram-negative coliform and salmonella anti-toxins are derived from horses and cows. Using bees to sting certain points can reduce arthritic pains, using leeches to draw off excess blood accumulation, and carefully placing maggots to temporarily eat away gangrenous, dead tissue is known and practiced by some regular medical doctors. In approaching cases and coming up with possible solutions, I like to use hands-on touch to sense where problems may be, careful observation, heightened sense of smell, listen for subtle sounds (with a stethoscope) and intuition to pin point problems. Then I choose from whichever CAVM treatment seems best for each case. Anyone can do this. And while it’s satisfying to be part of a successful outcome, I don’t feel it’s actually me that gets the patient better — that is up to Holy Spirit. I am just a channel for healing to hopefully occur. You can be, too. Using natural therapies honors God’s creation. But if there isn’t success, then hopefully we learn from the situation to prevent it from happening again. That’s the way I handled situations as a herdsman and still do as a veterinarian. One last thing, and it’s mighty important, the intention with which we approach our animals is


Farm Credit East donates $37,150 to Northeast Charities ENFIELD, CT — Farm Credit East has donated $37,150 to local charities throughout the Northeast as part of the Farm Credit East Cares initiative. The donations were raised as part of 19 customer appreciation meetings held in October and November. The funds

raised went toward a local charity selected by the branch office. “We are pleased to support the local communities that Farm Credit East serves by providing donations to organizations that serve local communities” said Bill Lipinski, CEO of

Farm Credit East. Farm Credit East’s 19 branch offices donated a total of $37,150 to 20 organizations throughout the Northeast, including Connecticut Food Share, Amish Relief Fund, Daily Bread Food Pantry, Friends of Assisi Food Pantry, Massachusetts

Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture, Southern Regional Food Distribution Center and Schoharie Recovery Fund. In addition, several branches donated to their state, regional or local food bank; our Riverhead office helped a local family whose child

is battling cancer. Farm Credit East is a farmer-owned cooperative lender which extends more than $4.3 billion in loans in its sixstate service area. In addition to loans and leases, the organization also offers a full range of agriculturally specific finan-

cial services for businesses related to farming, horticulture, forestry and commercial fishing. Farm Credit East is governed by a 17person board of directors from across the Northeast. For more information, go to FarmCreditEast.com.

Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

USDA announces ranking dates for conservation initiatives TOLLAND, CT — Connecticut State Conservationist for the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Jay Mar recently announced three closing dates for ranking OnFarm Energy, Organic, and Seasonal High Tunnel Conservation Initiatives applications. All offer technical and financial assistance through the agency’s Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). “Producers tell us they want to apply for these initiatives, but many want more time to make sure they choose the one that’s right for their operation,” Mar said. “Moving to multiple ranking dates will make it easier for them to apply and begin implementing the practices they need to benefit natural resources.” NRCS accepts applications for financial assistance on a continuous basis; however, there will be three ranking periods for the Organic, OnFarm Energy, and Seasonal High Tunnel Initiatives. Applications for the first must be received by Feb. 3, the second by March 30, and the third by June 1. At the end of a period, NRCS ranks all proposals that have been submitted for funding consideration. NRCS will notify applicants of the results and begin developing contracts with those selected. Initiative Overview • On-Farm Energy Initiative: NRCS and producers develop farm energy audits that assess energy consumption on an operation. NRCS then uses audit data to develop energy conservation recommendations. • Organic Initiative: NRCS helps certified organic growers and producers working to achieve organic certification install conservation practices for organic production. • Seasonal High Tunnel Pilot Initiative: NRCS helps producers plan

and implement high tunnels that extend growing seasons in an environ-

mentally safe manner. For more information, visit the website at

www.ct.nrcs.usda.gov/p rograms, or contact your nearest USDA Field Of-

fice: Danielson, 860779-0557; Hamden, 203-287-8038; Norwich,

860-887-3604; Torrington, 860-626-8258; Windsor, 860-688-7725.

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Improve gain potential for suckling calves by Gary Sides, Ph.D., Cattle Nutritionist, Technical Services, Pfizer Animal Health Before calving season starts, you should have a plan ready to maximize weight gains for suckling calves and increase dollars on sale day. For calves at just 45 days old, multiple technologies are available to help increase the productivity of your calf crop. Along with early vaccinations, you can

help increase pounds of gain by collaborating with your veterinarian to select a low-dose implant best suited for your herd. For cow/calf producers in particular, the extra pounds at weaning that can be achieved by implanting sucking calves far outweighs the actual cost of the implant. When properly used, implants can help to wean an extra 19 pounds, giving you at least $25 more per im-

planted calf when sold. The long-standing philosophy behind using implants is to match the dose to the cattle based on their nutritional status. For instance, suckling calves on the cow are going to have a lower rate of gain potential and reduced feed intake compared with a heavier animal. In any case, this is an excellent time to utilize a low-dose implant. As the calves grow larger and feed continues to get

more expensive, looking to a higher-dose implant will be the most practical option. Proper nutritional programs, parasite control (both internal and external) and implant strategies are all additive and continue to improve health and weaning weights of suckling calves. Best of all, gains during the suckling phase will not adversely affect future performance in the feedlot.

The benefits of implanting suckling calves improve rate of gain, help produce more beef with fewer cattle and rarely affect the price paid per pound at the sale barn. Based on 2009 data, very few producers received a premium when they did not implant their calves. In fact, on average, there was no difference in prices paid per pound for nonimplanted vs. implanted calves.

When looking at weight gains of implanted vs. nonimplanted cattle — implants produce a heavier animal. Cattle grow bigger and more efficiently, leaving less of a carbon footprint and making them able to use nutrients more economically. Combining implants with other technologies helps us to maintain beef supply with a lower number of cattle due to drought and other factors. MAINE KRAMER’S INC. 2400 West River Road Rte. 104 Sidney, ME 04330 207-547-3345 www.kramersinc.com

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December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

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Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

“DAIRY” CHRISTMAS EVERYONE Issued Dec. 9, 2011 The Agriculture Department’s latest milk production estimate for 2011 and 2012 was unchanged from last month’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report. Commercial exports were forecast higher for 2011. Look for 2011 milk output to hit 195.9 billion pounds, up from 192.8 billion in 2010 and 189.3 billion in 2009. The 2012 projection is 198.4 billion pounds. Cheese, butter, and whey prices were forecast higher for 2011 and 2012, but the nonfat dry milk (NDM) forecast was reduced for 2011 and unchanged for 2012. Class III milk prices were raised for 2011 and 2012 on the increased price forecast for cheese and whey. The Class III is expected to average $18.30-$18.40 per hundredweight, up 15 cents from last month’s estimate, and compares to $14.41 in 2010 and $11.36 in 2009. The average takes a drop in 2012 however to $16.70$17.60, down 40 cents from last month’s projection. The Class IV price was unchanged for 2011 as the higher butter price is mostly offset by a lower NDM price forecast. That range is $19.05-$19.25, up from $15.09 in 2010 and $10.89 in 2009. However, for 2012 with an unchanged NDM price forecast, the Class IV price forecast was raised from last month due to higher butter prices. The 2012 average is now projected at $16.40-$17.40, which is a dime higher than what bean counters projected last month. Meanwhile; cash cheese prices fell for the fourth consecutive week at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. The cash block price closed the second Friday of December at $1.6550 per pound, down 8 1/2cents on the week but still 26 1/2- cents above that week a year ago when they plunged 11 3/4-cents. The blocks have lost 29 1/2-cents in the last four weeks and you’ll recall that a penny movement on the cheese

price approximates to a dime on the milk price. The barrel price closed Friday at $1.5725, down 14 cents on the week, 22 1/2- cents above a year ago when the barrels rolled 11 1/4 cents lower, and is now 8 1/4 below the blocks so, either the barrels will have to move higher or the blocks head lower to reestablish the more typical 3 cent spread. There were only four cars of block that were sold this week but 39 of barrel. The NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price slipped to $1.8807, down 0.8 cent, while the barrels averaged $1.9127, down 6.2 cents. FC Stone dairy broker Boris Maslovsky warned in his December 5 eDairy Insider Opening Bell that “Cheese buyers are still out there but the holiday buying season is winding down.” eDairy economist Bill Brooks added that “dwindling margins for butter and powder plants have probably shifted some milk into cheese vats.” “Butter demand is likely filling pipelines following holiday buying,” he said. “Butter has to be in distribution centers by now or on its way to stores.” USDA’s Dairy Market News said that “Cheese interest is light though lower prices may stimulate extra late year promotions.” It reported that a number of packagers needed overtime, to make up for the Thanksgiving holiday reduced schedules. Process interest is about steady at lighter seasonal levels. Cheese production was heavier over the Thanksgiving weekend and back to regular schedules following. Cheese yields remain at solid seasonal levels, according to USDA. Butter ended the week at $1.64, up a penny and 2 cents above a year ago. Volume was half that of the previous week with 25 cars trading hands. NASS butter averaged $1.6284, down 1.8 cents. NASS nonfat dry milk averaged $1.4422, up 3.2 cents, and dry whey averaged 64.7 cents, up 0.4 cent. Dairy analyst Jerry Dryer gave some insight into the butter situation in his December 2 Dairy

and Food Market Analyst, stating; “Tis the season for the butter price to plunge; however, one or more manufacturers and/or marketers aren’t ready to let it plunge. They want to protect inventory values, selling prices or both until all holiday orders are filled.” Dryer added that “two manufacturers reportedly had a supply agreement or have a supply agreement that is about to expire, so the buyer or the seller or both needed to come to the market and thirdly cream supplies may be just tight enough to put the squeeze on the available butter supply and force some to scramble for enough last minute butter to fill holiday orders.” He warned however, that “the butter price is about to correct lower. Holiday orders will be shipped within the next week to 10 days,” but added a couple other thoughts. One, October butter production was at a record 146 million pounds or 20 percent more than any previous October in recent history. He also points out that October 31 butter Inventories stood at 130 million pounds versus a five year average of 160 million and said international buyers are “kicking tires and will likely place orders once the U.S butter price gets to $1.50 or less.” Commercial disappearance of butter has been very strong, he said. USDA confirms that, reporting that dairy

product commercial disappearance in the first nine months of 2011 totaled 147.4 billion pounds, up 1.1 percent from the same period in 2010. Butter was up an impressive 9.9 percent; American cheese, up 0.6 percent; other cheese

was up 4 1/2 percent; nonfat dry milk, down 3.4 percent; and fluid milk products, were off 1 1/2 percent. FC Stone dairy economist Bill Brooks said in Tuesday’s DairyLine that October butter output was the highest since

records were kept and he’s a bit surprised that the price hasn’t fallen much considering the huge volume that was traded the week of November 28. He warned however that, if the price

Mielke

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Mielke from A18 index was up 2.6 percent from the November 15 auction. The weighted average price for skim milk powder was $1.55 per pound, up 2.6 percent; whole milk powder was $1.65 per pound, up 2 percent; anhydrous milkfat was $1.82 per pound, up 12 percent and the highest since early September. The Cheddar cheese price was up 2.1 percent, to $1.62 per pound. “International prices are still much weaker than domestic prices,” according to FC Stone dairy broker Derek Nelson, and “World prices are still playing catch-up with U.S. prices.” Broker Boris Maslovsky adds that “International dairy markets appear to have stabilized but U.S. prices are still at a premium to world prices. Typically international prices are

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higher,” he said, and warned “We could see the traditional spread between world and U.S. dairy prices slowly reestablish itself.” Bill Van Dam, of California’s Alliance of Western Milk Producers, says he has followed this auction since its inception, particularly skim milk powder, and for the past two months the sale of it by DairyAmerica. He wrote in his weekly newsletter that “It is becoming clear that the whole range of products sold at those auctions have become a critical piece of information in establishing the value of the various products in the world market.” He also reported that Murray Goulburn, a cooperative that handles about 32 percent of the Australian milk supply, will be the first to offer

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lactose products at the auction. Lactose has become a valuable product in which there is a great deal of interest, Van Dam said. “The U.S. exports over 50 percent of the lactose made in this country and interestingly New Zealand is our most important customer.” Murray Goulburn will offer products for the first time in April 2012 and that is the only products they will offer, according to Van Dam. National Milk’s Third Quarter Import Watch shows dairy product imports continue a downward trend. NMPF’s Jim Tillison said in Thursday’s DairyLine that the imports they monitor have dropped 49 percent since 2005 and he pointed out that it’s the high value products that are dropping off the most. Cheese imports are down significantly, according to Tilison, but “reflects the strong demand for cheese outside the U.S.” “The world middle class is growing,” he said, “And as a result, there’s a growing demand for dairy products offshore so the U.S. is no longer the place to dump dairy products. Butter imports are

mixed but Tillison said there was a big drop in butter substitutes, such as anhydrous milkfat, most of which was coming from Canada. Almost none was imported in the Third Quarter, he said. “We’re seeing a contiuing shift away from imports toward products that are produced domestically and toward the world export market.” On the other hand imports of casine are up from a year ago and appear to jump when the milk price risies. When the nonfat dry milk price goes up imports of casine go up as well and Tillison believes that’s tied to the fact that casine can be a substitute in certain uses for nonfat dry milk powder. Milk protein concentrate imports are down and isn’t the “bug-aboo” that some think it is, according to Tillison. MPC imports are running about average to what they’ve been running, he concluded. The farmer-funded CWT program accepted 13 requests for export assistance this week from Dairy Farmers of America and Darigold to sell a total of 3.2 million pounds of Cheddar and

Gouda cheese to customers in Asia, Central America, the Middle East, and North Africa. The product will be delivered through May and raised CWT’s 2011 cheese exports to 91.5 million pounds. The International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) has issued its annual Dairy Facts book. Vivian Godfrey talked about it in Wednesday’s DairyLine and pointed out that the Milk Processor Education Program (MilkPEP) relies a great deal on research about dairy trends and Americans eating and drinking habits. She reported that U.S. milk production reached a record 192.8 billion pounds in 2010 but U.S. dairy exports increased 38.9 percent in volume with a 65 percent increase in value over 2009. She added that per person consumption of natural cheese achieved a record 33.29 pounds, surpassing t he previous 2007 record. On a less positive note the long-term trend of declining sales of packaged fluid milk products continued but MilkPEP still sees good opportuni-

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December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

breaks below $1.60, “it could be the straw that breaks the camel’s back.” He sees cheese prices dipping to $1.60 or so as well and reminds us that we started 2011 in the $1.30s but saw the $2 level maintained for some time. He pointed to the growing milk supply across the Southern Hemisphere and said “That’s not real positive given our economic situation we have out there across the world that we’re going to be able to use up all that at these current price levels and it could very well be that we’ll have to push those prices down a little bit further to move the product.” The global dairy auction was held on December 6 and prices were up, according to the CME’s Daily Dairy Report. The trade weighted


Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

USDA revises national nutrient management standard to achieve maximum agricultural, environmental benefits Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has revised its national conservation practice standard on nutrient management to help producers better manage the application of nutrients on agricultural land. Proper application of nitrogen and phosphorus offers tremendous benefits to producers and the public, including cost savings to the producer and the protection or improvement of ground and surface water, air quality, soil quality and agricultural sustainability. “Protecting America’s supply of clean and abundant water is an important objective for USDA,” Vilsack said. “This precious resource is the foundation for healthy ecosystems and

sustainable agricultural production. USDA provides voluntary technical and financial assistance to help producers manage their nutrients to ensure a clean and abundant water supply while maintaining viable farm and ranch operations.” The nutrient management conservation practice is an important tool in the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) conservation toolbox. The agency’s staff uses this conservation practice to help farmers and ranchers apply their nutrients more efficiently. Proper management of nitrogen and phosphorus, including the use of organic sources of nitrogen such as animal manure, legumes and cover crops, can save producers money. The nutrient management standard

provides a roadmap for NRCS’s staff and others to help producers apply available nutrient sources in the right amount, from the right source, in the right place, at the right time for maximum agricultural and environmental benefits. NRCS’s nutrient management experts worked with universities, nongovernment organizations, industry and others to revise the standard to ensure it is scientifically sound. Key changes in the standard include expanding the use of technology to streamline the nutrient management process and allowing states more flexibility in providing site-specific nutrient

management planning using local information when working with producers. NRCS staff offices will have until Jan. 1, 2013 to comply with erosion, nitrogen and phosphorus criteria for their state nutrient management standard. The revised national standard is being released at a time when the agency is working with various partners to address nutrient management concerns identified in three recently released Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) cropland studies. These CEAP studies assessed the effectiveness of conservation practices in the Upper Mississippi Basin, the Chesapeake Bay Wa-

tershed and the Great Lakes Basin. One significant resource concern identified in all three studies is the loss of nitrogen and phosphorus from cropland. Most nitrogen losses are attributed to nitrate leaching through the soil to groundwater. Most phosphorus is lost due to erosion because phosphorus attaches itself to displaced soil particles that are transported by runoff to nearby waterways. Improved nutrient management and effective erosion control work together to reduce the loss of nutrients from agricultural land, resulting in improved water quality in downstream rural and urban communities. The revised stan-

dard will provide tools and strategies to help producers address the natural resource concerns relating to excess nutrients on agricultural land. NRCS offers voluntary technical and financial assistance to producers nationwide for planning and implementing onfarm nutrient management plans. Producers can use this assistance to help meet federal, state, tribal and local environmental regulations. For more information about how nutrient management fits into NRCS’s conservation work, visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps /portal/nrcs/main/national/landuse/crops/n pm.

Mielke from A19 ties ahead and is using research to fight aggressively to increase fluid milk consumption. MilkPEP’s independent research shows that from breakfast to dinner, milk consumption at home represents close to 70 percent of all domestic milk consumption, with 2.7 billion gallons of milk being consumed at breakfast alone. Our data also shows that milk added to foods and beverages makes up about 40 percent of total fluid milk volume. Another revelation

from the study is that many Americans stop drinking milk in their teenage years. “We have discovered through research a great opportunity to bring lapsed adults back to drinking milk by suggesting that they drink chocolate milk as a refuel beverage after exercise,” Godfrey concluded. “There is strong scientific evidence from research with athletes that chocolate milk is the ideal recovery beverage if consumed within two hours of vigorous exercise.”

*Offer available October 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. Cannot be combined wih any other offer. Rebates and/or financing based on the purchase of eligible equipment defined in promotional program. Pricing and rebates in US dollars. Customers must take delivery prior to the end of the program period. Some customers will not qualify. Some restrictions apply. Offers available on new equipment only. Prior purchases are not eligible. Offer valid only at participating Dealers. See your dealer for details.

NEW YORK JIM’S EQUIPMENT REPAIR, INC. 4072 Lewis Rd. Campbell, NY 14821 607-527-8872 • 800-450-8872 www.jimsequipment.com TRI-COUNTY SUPPLY, INC. 12069 Ocean Rd. (Rt. 16) Chaffee, NY 14039 716-496-8859

TEAM DIXIE CHOPPER 1182 State Route 7 Richmondville, NY 518-294-2081 • fax 518-294-2083 team.dixiechopper@dixiechopp per.com NEW ENGLAND NORTHEAST FARM SERVICE, INC. 4497 Route 5 Irasburg, VT 05845 802-754-8863


Tax credit recalculation will yield $3 Million for Massachusetts Dairy Farmers BOSTON, MA — Officials from the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources

announced Dec. 6 that dairy tax credits — totaling $3 million dollars — will be available for the

2010 tax year for distribution to all Massachusetts dairy farmers who were eligible to receive a

the updated tax credit announcement. Nearly 227 million pounds of milk (or more than 26 million gallons) were produced by eligible dairy farmers in 2010. The independent analysis ordered by DAR determined that a rate of $1.323 should be distributed per hundred pounds of milk produced, which amounts to an average tax credit of $12,766. Two hundred thirty-five taxpayers are eligible to receive the credit. “Our ability to revisit the dairy tax credit program demonstrates Governor Patrick’s ongoing commitment to Massachusetts agriculture,” said DAR Commissioner Scott J. Soares. “And, while we recognize our program provides a safety net for Massachusetts dairy farmers, there is still more work to be done.” Soares will forward the recertified tax credit to the Massachusetts Department of Revenue (DOR) and send out recalculated credit statements to all who qualify to receive a credit for tax year 2010. “Since 2006, I have

been working to ensure that dairy farms, and agriculture as a whole, continue to be a part of the Massachusetts economy,” said Sen. Stephen M. Brewer, chairman of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. “This recalculation will allow dairy farmers to receive a tax credit for 2010. The Legislature recognizes the vital role these local businesses play in the Massachusetts economy and the Dairy Farmer Tax Credit is one of the tools we provided the Department of Agricultural Resources with to assist these farmers.” “I am extremely pleased that the hard working dairy farmers of Massachusetts will receive this tax credit and I appreciate the cooperation with DAR,” said Rep. Anne Gobi, House chair of the Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture. “This credit will assist in sustaining dairy farms that everyone in Massachusetts relies on.” The DOR will contact eligible dairy farmers with more information about receiving the credit.

HAGERTY FARM COOLING EQUIPMENT P.O. Box 63 Hinchley, ME 04944 207-453-6727 TARRYK’S FARM SUPPLY, LLC. 387 Canterbury Turnpike Norwich, CT 06360 860-822-6013 TERRITORY REPRESENTATIVES ROBIN SHIRLEY New York & New England 417-872-7094 VIC LEININGER New York & Pennsylvania 417-872-5715

CHAMPLAIN DAIRY SERVICE INC. Swanton, VT 802-868-3144

DYKEMAN FARMS Fultonville, NY 518-922-5496

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Seneca Falls, NY 315-568-0955

FISHER FARMS Canastota, NY 315-697-7039

DON'S DAIRY SUPPLY, INC. South Kortright, NY 607-538-9464

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Lowville, NY 315-376-2991

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Warsaw, NY 585-786-0177

R&M FARM & PRO HARDWARE Marathon, NY 607-849-3291

SOUTHERN TIER DAIRY SERVICE Java Center, NY 585-457-4350

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

DICK SOULE, INC. 3598 Vermont Route 105 Enosburg Falls, VT 05450 802-933-6167

tax credit that year. In 2008, Gov. Deval Patrick signed into law the Dairy Farm Preservation Act. One of the provisions of the Act was the creation of the Dairy Farm Tax Credit, meant to offset federally-imposed milk price constraints. Under this provision, farmers can obtain an income tax credit for production in any month when the farm price for milk falls below a “trigger” price, established by DAR, to reflect the cost of production. Farms receive the credit after they file their state tax returns. On Nov. 21, the state’s Board of Food and Agriculture determined that an error had been made in the 2010 Dairy Farmer Tax Credit Program. Using an independent agricultural economist, DAR officials recalculated the tax credit employing econometric data from 2006 through 2009. This recalculation resulted in


DHI TOP 40 FOR NOVEMBER NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

M. CHARLES EVANS

Following is the November 2011 VT DHIA Top 40 herds of 10 or more animals based on protein pounds in each County serviced by VT DHIA and processed through the Dairy Records Management Processing Center, Raleigh, NC during the calendar month. Rolling herd averages will appear on this list for herds which have chosen the option to have their herd average published and the herd has 12 consecutive tests including components for each test.

CONNECTICUT NEW LONDON H H H H H H H H J

369 104 140 115 27 34 46 29 45

27102 1042 3.8 25004 863 3.5 25601 841 3.3 24044 1040 4.3 23159 801 3.5 17735 726 4.1 18921 693 3.7 17674 664 3.8 12991 585 4.5

886 780 769 737 712 572 557 547 470

3.3 * 3.1 3 3.1 3.1 3.2 2.9 3.1 3.6

19009

590 3.1

TOLLAND HILLSIDE FARM

H

59

767

4

Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

H H H H H H J J X A X

84 35 210 211 358 23 107 54 18 96 70

24583 977 4 22237 892 4 22437 830 3.7 22445 798 3.6 22026 1000 4.5 21911 783 3.6 16837 833 4.9 16748 757 4.5 16605 697 4.2 17295 699 4 14829 635 4.3

754 731 718 698 670 651 629 584 558 545 505

3.1 3.3 3.2 3.1 3 3 3.7 3.5 3.4 3.2 3.4

MASSACHUSETTS BERKSHIRE CRICKET CREEK FARM

B

29

9569

404 4.2

335 3.5

26626 22754 20727 21080 21454 18392 19329 12890

969 905 829 808 856 756 685 676

3.6 4 4 3.8 4 4.1 3.5 5.2

786 727 657 654 643 591 578 501

3 3.2 3.2 3.1 3 3.2 3 3.9

24175 25562 25120 22235 21627 21566 20528

898 905 847 889 838 894 889

3.7 3.5 3.4 4 3.9 4.1 4.3

783 753 751 692 676 660 641

3.2 2.9 * 3 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1

FRANKLIN DARRIDGE FARM HERBERT & ROBERT PURINGTON GUNN STEVE DAVID DUPREY KAREN HERZIG PAUL L WILLIS HUNT FARM CRAIG W. AVERY

H 32 X 36 H 86 H 61 H 45 H 64 H 114 J 49

WORCESTER CV & MARY L SMITH JR JORDANS DAIRY FARM INC. OTTER RIVER FARM LLC JIM & KRISANNE KOEBKE WHITTIER FARMS INC. TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR TEMPLETON DEVELOPMENTAL CR

H 32 H 321 H 194 H 80 H 147 H 30 X 28

NEW HAMPSHIRE CHESHIRE VINCENT & CAROL MALNATI ECHO FARM INC. ECHO FARM INC. ECHO FARM INC.

H J M G

82 24 81 11

18499 15165 15711 13424

727 3.9 720 4.7 632 4 735 5.5

562 537 509 469

3 3.5 3.2 3.5

25691 24910 23919 23018 22557 20075 19757 18737 19659 13124

993 991 969 903 869 769 781 814 756 634

802 767 743 721 702 638 629 617 609 466

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.6

GRAFTON TULLANDO FARM INC. PATCH FAMILY DOUGLAS & DEBORA ERB GRAFTON COUNTY FARM RICH & DOREEN MORRIS JOHN C. PERKINS WILLIAM & DIANNE MINOT PUTNAM WILLIAM & CYNTHIA SCOTT & COLLEEN JOHNSTON RUSSELL & MARY HICKS

H H H H H H H H H J

456 121 85 82 147 136 33 12 28 51

3.9 4 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.8 4 4.3 3.8 4.8

MERRMK-BELKNP BOHANAN FARM TOPLINE JERSEYS YEATON DAIRY FARM TOPLINE JERSEYS

H 217 H 13 H 94 J 58

29574 1042 3.5 28052 1121 4 21142 908 4.3 19224 908 4.7

883 849 686 668

3 * 3 * 3.2 3.5 *

ROCKINGHAM STUART FARM LLC

H 240

24245

947 3.9

743 3.1

STRAFFORD-CARROLL ATHMOR HOLSTEINS

H 184

30088 1102 3.7

923 3.1 *

24204 23422 22466 20370 19804 18601 17185 18117 17006

SULLIVAN PUTNAM FARMS INC. TAYLOR FARM INC. JOHN W. LUTHER EDWARD MACGLAFLIN GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK ASCUTNEY VIEW FMS.LLC GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK TAYLOR FARM INC. GREGORY & MARCIA CLARK

H 482 H 54 H 33 H 471 X 12 H 32 B 17 M 13 M 35

892 840 798 911 882 714 835 615 716

3.7 3.6 3.6 4.5 4.5 3.8 4.9 3.4 4.2

737 698 680 620 607 575 561 545 530

3 3 3 3 3.1 3.1 3.3 3 3.1

944 862 917 806 750

3.9 3.9 5.4 3.9 4.8

771 731 665 632 566

3.2 3.3 3.9 3 3.7

NEW YORK MONTGOMERY SKIFF-S DAIRY FARM LLC HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD JOHN & CHRIS NELLIS PHILLIPS & SUSAN FERRY

H H J H J

81 35 15 98 64

24209 22350 16893 20781 15469

H

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

24345

911 3.7

742 3

17990

736 4.1

587 3.3

20091 21107 19753 14610 15615 14032 13687

796 817 737 678 605 586 589

4 3.9 3.7 4.6 3.9 4.2 4.3

673 658 599 537 495 456 440

3.3 3.1 3 3.7 3.2 3.2 3.2

29175 1117 3.8 23796 938 3.9 23478 873 3.7 23103 934 4 19345 784 4.1 17642 663 3.8 14513 606 4.2 14346 292 2

898 732 724 703 627 533 495 239

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3 3.2 3 3.4 1.7

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

58

RENSSELAER TERRANCE & MICHAEL H0AG

H

99

SCHOHARIE SEVEN VIEW FARM SLATEHILL FARM MIKE SWART GEORGE B. WILSON GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT DEB-RAY DAIRY GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT

H 116 H 137 H 69 J 104 X 22 X 47 G 32 H H H H H H B H

942 138 152 104 139 73 15 107

27 20 11

19639 14746 6795

738 3.8 622 4.2 319 4.7

603 3.1 503 3.4 229 3.4

17475

735 4.2

601 3.4

29512 27658 27566 27622 27346 27441 25695 26464 27241 24883 25539 25170 24069 24680 24319 23621 20323 23441 22277 22547 22132 21637 20790 23168 21770 20598 19650 20426 19839 19401 17291 19124 19787 19634 16337 15555 17208 15938 16154 12513

1102 922 1017 1012 995 1028 1002 991 997 903 1064 971 953 921 978 865 843 859 845 876 860 806 816 811 729 826 797 814 789 776 734 754 760 768 734 660 611 613 572 603

3.7 3.3 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.6 4.2 3.9 4 3.7 4 3.7 4.1 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.5 3.3 4 4.1 4 4 4 4.2 3.9 3.8 3.9 4.5 4.2 3.6 3.8 3.5 4.8

925 890 879 869 835 832 829 818 817 798 776 762 760 750 746 727 710 710 698 683 663 662 653 652 650 639 637 632 622 607 603 593 583 579 559 524 512 502 494 435

3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3 3.2 3.1 3 3.2 3 3 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3.5 3 3.1 3 3 3.1 3.1 2.8 3 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.1 2.9 2.9 3.4 3.4 3 3.1 3.1 3.5

23369 22454 22569 19266

987 4.2 893 4 987 4.4 797 4.1

739 733 694 587

3.2 * 3.3 3.1 3

24322 24066 24039 22752 22847 22580 19343 20660 16975 18808 18183 18239 14971 18953 17257 14623 15119 15504 17020 11302

908 925 909 875 902 780 806 809 789 769 745 722 764 735 767 765 713 728 655 520

771 759 756 727 713 682 661 642 598 597 574 572 567 558 554 528 522 517 495 393

3.2 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.1 3 * 3.4 3.1 3.5 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.8 2.9 3.2 3.6 3.5 3.3 2.9 3.5

22745 17701 21740

979 4.3 934 5.3 881 4.1

WASHINGTON THE LAPRISE FAMILY

J

41

VERMONT ADDISON VORSTEVELD FARM FARR ASHLEY LORENZO & AMY QUESNEL HERD 1 WAYNE & JEANNINE PARTRIDGE DAVID RUSSELL KAYHART BROTHERS LLC WOODNOTCH FARMS INC. GOSLIGA FARM INC. B DANYOW FARM LLC TIM & JULIE HOWLETT CHIMNEY POINT FARM L.P FOSTER BROTHERS FARM INC. CHARLES & BRENDA CHARRON HATCH FARM INC. BRACE ALEX & MICHELE MARC & NORRIS BRISSON LORENZO & AMY QUESNEL HERD 1 TERRIER LEE BRIAN & CINDY KAYHART WILCON FARM JEFF & BRIAN TREADWAY ROBERT & SUZANNE HUNT JOHN E. & BILLIE JO C. FORGUES KAYHART FARM INC. HANSON STEPHEN & SYLVIA ANTHONY & BARBARA CORREIA HAROLD & ANJE DEGRAAF ARTHUR & JOAN HUESTIS PAT & MELANIE HARRISON MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE MILES & CHERYL TUDHOPE FIFIELD JEFF & LISE JEFFREY & OLIVE PHILLIPS LESLIE RUBLEE PAT & MELANIE HARRISON JOHN & LISA ROBERTS SCOTT & MARY PURINTON MARTHA SEIFERT JOHN BUZEMAN DAVID & MELANIE CARMICHAEL

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H B H H H H X H H H H H H H H B H H H X B H H H J

759 27 875 109 179 605 295 604 744 511 131 449 57 563 148 815 133 37 87 424 354 308 233 188 56 467 137 303 43 46 35 139 61 68 68 165 59 11 71 44

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* * *

*

BENNINGTON RUPERT VALLEY HOLSTEINS WILHELM & KARL STROHMAIER DAVID TOOLEY KEN LEACH

H 312 X 109 H 88 H 58

CALEDONIA WAYSIDE MEADOW FARM LLC PHILIP BROWN ROGER & JOY WOOD DOROTHY & ANGELA WILLSON SCOTCH BURN FARM DON-SIM FARM JAMES W. SEYMOUR ROY & BRENDA PATTERSON LAGGIS BROS. HOWARD & JACQUELINE BENNETT PLYN N BEATTIE BILL & JENNIFER NELSON LUCKY HILL FARM MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD BILL & JENNIFER NELSON DWAYNE & DEBORAH MARCEAU WILLIAM & GWEN PEARL MARY KAY & DENNIS WOOD ROLAND & SHONNA HEATH JR. ERIC BEAN

H H H H H H H H J H H H J H X J J X H J

203 57 59 115 113 173 63 55 436 72 78 185 159 59 11 49 65 14 53 38

3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.5 4.2 3.9 4.6 4.1 4.1 4 5.1 3.9 4.4 5.2 4.7 4.7 3.8 4.6

CHITTENDEN MURRAY THOMPSON BRUCE & MARY TAFT CREAM

H 17 J 241 H 24

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

PAT FITZGERALD NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC PAT FITZGERALD SHELBURNE FARMS CREAM NORDIC HOLSTEINS LLC MURRAY THOMPSON WAYNE BARR

H 40 H 145 B 18 B 117 J 17 H 142 G 36 H 24

21984 20243 18400 17047 17588 19505 16508 18912

744 718 722 736 809 704 852 660

3.4 3.5 3.9 4.3 4.6 3.6 5.2 3.5

654 610 607 601 592 589 585 564

24947 21314 21861

918 3.7 814 3.8 796 3.6

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

3 3 * 3.3 3.5 3.4 * 3 * 3.5 3

H 310 H 24 H 217

773 3.1 672 3.2 672 3.1

FRANKLIN

KENT H X G

Brd Cows

ESSEX

RHODE ISLAND KEVIN BREENE KEVIN BREENE THE WOLOOHOJIAN FAMILY

NAME

ROUTHIER & SONS STEPHEN & CARLA RUSSO TANGUAY MIKE

WASHINGTON IDEAL DAIRY FARMS TAYLOR & ALAN HENDERSON WILLIAM LUNDY HOLLISTER BROTHERS CRYSTAL DEW FARM SKIFF FARMS INC. SKIFF FARMS INC. MICHAEL & LOUISE WOODDELL

WINDHAM HIBBARD HILL FARM COATNEY HILL FARM 2 FAIRHOLM FARM INC. VALLEYSIDE FARM LLC WOODHILL FARM ROCK MAPLE FARM 1 COATNEY HILL FARM 1 ROCK MAPLE FARM 1 ROCK MAPLE FARM 1 KINGSWOOD FARM SELBUORT VALLEY FARM

Brd Cows

OTSEGO

Vermont DHIA Country Folks List for the Month Ending November 2011

BERIAH LEWIS FARM INC. JOHN OSGA STEVE SNURKOWSKI CLARK WOODMANSEE III DAVID HYDE GARY PISZCZEK GERALD & DEBORAH GRABAREK REW FARM CATO CORNER FARM

NAME

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067

752 3.3 669 3.8 666 3.1 *

HOWRIGAN HOME FARM DAN & SHAWN GINGUE MIKE BENJAMIN WYNN PARADEE ANDREW & SUSAN BROUILLETTE BALLARD ACRES BERKSON DAIRY TOM & MARY MACHIA LTD. CARPSDALE FARMS SIMON DEPATIE WARREN HULL & SONS DANIEL & KAREN FORTIN HAROLD J. & LAWRENCE HOWRIGAN M. D. HOWRIGAN INC. & SON HOWRIGAN HJ & A & LAWRENCE J. & MACCAUSLAND S. WOLCOTT GARY & CRAIG TINKER BEN WILLIAMS BEN WILLIAMS PAUL-LIN DAIRY PARADEE DORA & BRAD CALLAN DENIS RAINVILLE NEWTON FARMS INC. LONGE LLOYD & MARIE GARRY & EILEEN TRUDELL KIRT WESTCOM FLEURYS MAPLE HILL FARM NEIL H. & JOANNE W. DOANE WALTER & DIANE BERTHIAUME

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H J J H X J H H H X H H J J X

251 541 543 37 80 226 105 191 84 125 92 85 276 242 247 25 123 47 35 31 81 117 83 77 121 126 34 88 39

25716 934 3.6 26151 1070 4.1 24761 1017 4.1 24473 851 3.5 24537 929 3.8 23509 892 3.8 23302 880 3.8 22611 875 3.9 21678 822 3.8 22904 859 3.8 21697 838 3.9 21334 804 3.8 21007 838 4 21397 957 4.5 19913 754 3.8 16580 766 4.6 17541 853 4.9 19343 745 3.9 17580 734 4.2 15169 722 4.8 16680 662 4 16965 645 3.8 19917 632 3.2 14894 585 3.9 14682 562 3.8 12433 484 3.9 10561 469 4.4 9720 453 4.7 10645 432 4.1

818 800 761 751 739 735 733 700 700 683 664 656 647 629 617 617 614 592 583 549 526 517 491 470 422 377 369 352 340

3.2 3.1 * 3.1 * 3.1 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.7 3.5 3.1 3.3 3.6 3.2 3 2.5 3.2 2.9 3 3.5 3.6 3.2

18762

627 3.3

553 2.9

21603 14745 17717 9972

877 721 680 410

4.1 4.9 3.8 4.1

657 548 530 307

3 3.7 3 3.1

26333 1020 3.9 25733 958 3.7 24732 937 3.8 22762 895 3.9 24293 904 3.7 23093 866 3.8 21194 888 4.2 19969 766 3.8 20172 760 3.8 19247 714 3.7 16334 747 4.6 18263 756 4.1 19271 772 4 15145 801 5.3 16094 757 4.7 16874 756 4.5 15270 754 4.9 17940 692 3.9 18604 713 3.8 15596 740 4.7 14594 718 4.9 14994 722 4.8 16240 676 4.2 14416 655 4.5 16187 606 3.7 14430 693 4.8 13717 646 4.7 14073 691 4.9 13272 659 5 16705 605 3.6 15982 622 3.9 14673 589 4 13476 626 4.6 14552 578 4 12484 561 4.5 12892 585 4.5 11528 534 4.6 11392 526 4.6 12087 531 4.4 12896 500 3.9

825 820 769 731 729 711 698 643 621 598 588 586 585 571 569 559 558 556 550 541 537 534 518 517 512 504 504 499 494 485 483 462 458 456 433 429 400 393 391 390

3.1 * 3.2 3.1 3.2 3 3.1 3.3 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.2 3 3.8 3.5 3.3 3.7 3.1 3 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.2 3.6 3.2 3.5 3.7 3.5 3.7 2.9 3 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.5 3.3 3.5 3.4 3.2 3

25215 23430 23181 22438 22579 21560 20350 20486 20691 19131 18471 17350 18093 16931 17277 17433

779 739 715 698 692 677 648 639 618 585 556 547 537 523 519 511

3.1 * 3.2 3.1 3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3 3.1 3 3.2 3 3.1 3 2.9

GRAND ISLE J & M LADD FAMILIES FARM

H

75

LAMOILLE ARTHUR & LARRY MORRILL LES & CLAIRE PIKE DEBORA WICKART WARREN RANKIN

H J H G

35 88 25 40

ORANGE WALTER & MARGARET GLADSTONE WHITE FARM PINELLO FARM ZACHARY FEURY SILLOWAY FARMS RANDY & AMY FERRIS HARKDALE FARM INC. DAVID P. DAVOLL THYGESEN KYLE & JENNIFER PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE RANDY & AMY FERRIS THYGESEN KYLE & JENNIFER ROBERT J HOWE HARKDALE FARM INC. DERRICK & BEVERLY WRIGHT OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP GRAY - WHITE JEFFREY & BETH BAILEY ALLENVILLE FARM ANTHONY & CHRISTINE BROWN ROBERT J HOWE JOSEPH O. ANGELL L.JR. & GORDON HUNTINGTON THOMAS & REBECCA LOFTUS WARREN PRESTON FARM 1 OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP DAVID CHILDS PEASE FAMILY FARM & SHIRLEY PEASE LLOYD & JASON BAKER DUANE & DALE WILLIAMS A. & K. BURGESS HERD 1 M. GARY MULLEN CHESTER & SCHEINDEL ABBOT JAMES WILLIAMS BRANDON BUCOSSI A. & K. BURGESS HERD 1 STEVEN & LINDA SMALL M. GARY MULLEN ROCK BOTTOM FARM THEODORE & LINDA HOYT

H 1193 H 119 H 243 H 85 H 67 H 16 H 62 H 37 H 41 H 77 J 58 X 11 H 29 J 79 J 50 J 17 J 29 H 48 H 85 J 43 J 12 J 43 A 61 J 48 H 84 J 45 J 48 G 10 J 67 H 40 H 13 X 24 X 54 X 34 J 63 G 28 J 48 J 40 G 55 A 54

ORLEANS FAIRMONT DAIRY LLC VERNON & MARY JUDITH HURD WILLARD & TED TAFT NEIGHBORHOOD FARM AARON & CHANTALE NADEAU MARK RODGERS DOUG NELSON WEBSTER DANIEL & MEGAN BRUCE & LAURIE PERRON PADDLEBRIDGE HOLSTEINS JAMES & SHARLYN JORDAN ADAM & JOANNA LIDBACK ANDY ANDREWS RANDALL DEXTER & ALICE JACQUES COUTURE MICHAEL LACROSS

H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H

386 49 397 811 161 217 102 75 61 47 263 31 87 97 69 91

927 936 909 886 858 910 738 792 806 752 680 703 664 646 658 658

3.7 4 3.9 3.9 3.8 4.2 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.9 3.7 4.1 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8


Record number of dairy and beef producers attend Alltech’s Global 500

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to study how nutrients switch genes on and off. We can then develop programmed nutrition plans for young animals to increase efficiency and performance for life. 8. Social Media: We have to tell our story. This was followed by two days of seminars, covering everything from nutrition, to branding and social media. Experts from all areas of the industry were on hand to give dairy and beef producers all the information they need to take on the challenges of a changing industry. Paul Gardner, responsible for all milk and dairy ingredient purchasing at Groupe Danone, a company that purchases 3 billion dollars of milk each year, spoke about dairy demand and one of the biggest challenges for the dairy industry, price volatility. “Volatility in the market is huge when you buy that much milk but volatility is a much bigger issue for farmers. One year you can think about investing and the next year you cannot buy Christmas presents for your kids. When farmers can invest they make short term investments because volatility

DHI TOP 40 FOR NOVEMBER NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

NAME

Brd Cows

PAMELA HELENEK LEATHER JEREMY & JENNIFER JACK & ANNE LAZOR LEATHER JEREMY & JENNIFER RYAN BROS ERIC DAGGETT ANDREW KEHLER LAURENCE LUMSDEN & FAMILY WAYNE SR. DONCASTER LAINI FONDILLER

J 27 J 76 J 47 X 18 X 226 J 64 A 49 H 56 J 49 A 41

14179 14068 13067 14243 12800 11615 13117 14259 10176 1967

671 631 649 549 646 562 519 512 462 78

4.7 4.5 5 3.9 5 4.8 4 3.6 4.5 4

504 475 470 447 446 431 424 421 356 57

3.6 3.4 3.6 3.1 3.5 3.7 3.2 3 3.5 2.9

GEORGE CARPENTER JR. VONTRAPP FARMSTEAD

H X

23090 23154 21019 20100 15494 18610 15508 16144 14367 16857 14578 11731 1725

908 901 734 792 797 691 644 606 596 626 553 580 58

3.9 3.9 3.5 3.9 5.1 3.7 4.2 3.8 4.1 3.7 3.8 4.9 3.4

736 686 629 613 584 581 492 483 482 481 456 443 46

3.2 3 * 3 3 3.8 3.1 3.2 3 3.4 2.9 3.1 3.8 2.7

WOOD LAWN FARMS INC. RICHARD SHELDON CASH & KAREN RUANE BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 CALEB P SMITH HARVEY FARMS BARTHOLOMEW BROS. HERD 1 JOESPH & OR UNA MORRISSETTE CASH & KAREN RUANE CLIFTON & D.R. CRESSY PARKER DAVID & MICHELE GERRY & DIANE COLVIN MILLER ANGELA

RUTLAND H H H H J H A H X H H J B

170 194 66 104 57 122 34 27 10 27 86 33 78

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

WASHINGTON FAIRMONT FARM DAVID PULLMAN LYLEHAVEN FARM DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER WALTER C'O RAYMON BOTHFELD BOTHFELD DAVID PULLMAN FARM LLC. NEILL STANLEY & CATHERINE SCRIBNER CHARLES P. CARRIER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON MOLLY BROOK FARMS MORGAN & JENNIFER CHURCHILL HARVEST HILL FARM HARVEST HILL FARM WOODARD FARM WALT MORSE JR. JOHN ARMSTRONG DEREK WILSON

H H H H H X H H H H J X A A X J J X

806 181 74 41 65 31 73 297 76 67 103 90 12 18 21 48 26 108

26287 1033 3.9 803 3.1 * 24632 915 3.7 776 3.2 * 24865 964 3.9 757 3 23176 702 3 717 3.1 21487 822 3.8 693 3.2 19644 887 4.5 685 3.5 * 20051 769 3.8 650 3.2 19398 747 3.9 633 3.3 19702 782 4 612 3.1 19655 701 3.6 588 3 15193 738 4.9 577 3.8 16506 687 4.2 533 3.2 16600 644 3.9 508 3.1 15638 594 3.8 485 3.1 15023 650 4.3 475 3.2 14238 800 5.6 470 3.3 12954 561 4.3 458 3.5 15424 610 4 458 3

48 49

Milk 13444 10170

FAT

%

PRO %

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

482 3.6 395 2.9 484 4.8 331 3.3

WINDHAM VERN-MONT FARM LLC MARK RUSHTON BAZIN FARM AMY & NICK STONE BAZIN FARM MARK RUSHTON KEVIN HAMILTON PETER MILLER AMY & NICK STONE CLARK FARM LLC WESTMINSTER FARM THE CORSE FARM THE PUTNEY SCHOOL JONATHAN WRIGHT

H 570 H 39 H 98 H 21 X 55 J 24 H 43 H 159 X 14 H 78 H 631 H 59 X 33 X 32

26373 1070 4.1 806 3.1 * 23873 963 4 763 3.2 22730 826 3.6 709 3.1 22378 893 4 700 3.1 20341 825 4.1 681 3.3 17267 851 4.9 647 3.7 20825 811 3.9 641 3.1 19769 788 4 596 3 16957 812 4.8 595 3.5 18861 755 4 578 3.1 18721 727 3.9 569 3 16409 668 4.1 494 3 14959 602 4 467 3.1 6311 244 3.9 186 2.9

WINDSOR LEMAX FARM RHOMAN WAI FARMS ROBETH HOLSTIENS LLC. MICHAEL & HEIDI DOLLOFF DAVID AINSWORTH RICHARDSON FAMILY FARM BASSETT ROBERT P GEORGE MILLER JEFFREY & DAVID TOWNSEND SPRING BROOK FARM JAMES S. LEWIS MIKE L CLARK GREEN ACRES MILKING SHORTHORNS JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. JAMES & TINA SPAULDING JR. ROYAL TERRACE GUERNSEYS LONE OAK FARM LLP

H 89 H 444 H 99 H 81 H 35 J 59 J 91 H 62 H 129 J 46 J 63 X 31 M 38 J 13 A 27 G 19 X 32

23588 937 4 750 3.2 24135 901 3.7 739 3.1 * 22966 942 4.1 714 3.1 22975 939 4.1 713 3.1 23629 848 3.6 712 3 18038 1049 5.8 711 3.9 18248 924 5.1 673 3.7 21561 789 3.7 663 3.1 18712 714 3.8 602 3.2 15678 726 4.6 561 3.6 13481 614 4.6 477 3.5 14727 613 4.2 471 3.2 14623 527 3.6 451 3.1 11603 493 4.2 398 3.4 12748 475 3.7 394 3.1 10802 522 4.8 372 3.4 8897 387 4.3 293 3.3

ADDISON

TACONIC END FARM

J

29

11804

578 4.9 420 3.6

19343

745 3.9

FRANKLIN BEN WILLIAMS

H

47

Vermont Dairy Herd Improvement Assn., Inc. 226 Holiday Drive Ste. 3 White River Jct, VT 05001-2089 Phone 1-800-639-8067 NAME BEN WILLIAMS GARRY & EILEEN TRUDELL KIRT WESTCOM WALTER & DIANE BERTHIAUME

592 3.1

Brd Cows

Milk

FAT

%

PRO %

X 35 H 121 H 126 X 39

17580 14682 12433 10645

734 562 484 432

4.2 3.8 3.9 4.1

583 422 377 340

3.3 2.9 3 3.2

20172 18263 19271 16874 18604 15596 14594 14416 14430 13717 14673 13476 11392 12087 12896 12985 12978

760 756 772 756 713 740 718 655 693 646 589 626 526 531 500 519 520

3.8 4.1 4 4.5 3.8 4.7 4.9 4.5 4.8 4.7 4 4.6 4.6 4.4 3.9 4 4

621 586 585 559 550 541 537 517 504 504 462 458 393 391 390 389 377

3.1 3.2 3 3.3 3 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.1 3.4 3.4 3.2 3 3 2.9

47 87 47

19131 18093 13067

752 3.9 664 3.7 649 5

585 3.1 537 3 470 3.6

H 41 H 76 H 67 X 90 X 21 J 48 X 108

23176 19702 19655 16506 15023 14238 15424

702 782 701 687 650 800 610

717 612 588 533 475 470 458

19769 16409

788 4 668 4.1

596 3 494 3

11603 12748 8897

493 4.2 475 3.7 387 4.3

398 3.4 394 3.1 293 3.3

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

ORANGE THYGESEN KYLE & JENNIFER THYGESEN KYLE & JENNIFER ROBERT J HOWE OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP ALLENVILLE FARM ANTHONY & CHRISTINE BROWN ROBERT J HOWE THOMAS & REBECCA LOFTUS OUGHTA-BE-FARM LLP DAVID CHILDS M. GARY MULLEN CHESTER & SCHEINDEL ABBOT M. GARY MULLEN ROCK BOTTOM FARM THEODORE & LINDA HOYT CRAIG RUSSELL JAMES T DOYLE

H X H J H J J J J J X X J G A X H

41 11 29 17 85 43 12 48 45 48 24 54 40 55 54 66 33

ORLEANS PADDLEBRIDGE HOLSTEINS ANDY ANDREWS JACK & ANNE LAZOR

H H J

WASHINGTON

DOUGLAS H & SHARON A TURNER CHARLES P. CARRIER FRANK & MARILYN JOHNSON MORGAN & JENNIFER CHURCHILL WOODARD FARM WALT MORSE JR. DEREK WILSON

3 4 3.6 4.2 4.3 5.6 4

3.1 3.1 3 3.2 3.2 3.3 3

WINDHAM PETER MILLER THE CORSE FARM

ORGANIC

prevents them from making long term investments,” said Gardner. During the beef discussion panel, John Butler of the Irish food board, Bord Bia, talked about the importance of educating consumers. “It is critical to understand your market and know what they want, but it is important to educate those consumers in a way that they will understand why they should want this product,” said Butler. “If nutrition is their concern we explain the nutritional value of the product, if it is safety then we explain the practices we use to make sure the meat through every phase is the best quality.” In addition to seminars on the future of the industry, the conference attendees had the chance to network with other producers and farmers, and participate in discussion dinners that focused on hotly debated topics. To watch footage of the conference, visit the Alltech Ag Network at www.ihigh.com/alltech. You can also view pictures, interviews and recaps of the Alltech Global 500 conference, on Alltech’s blog at www.alltech.com/blog.

H 159 H 59

WINDSOR JAMES JR. & TINA SPAULDING JAMES JR. & TINA SPAULDING LONE OAK FARM LLP

J A X

13 27 32

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

• HARD HAT EXPO •

Alltech’s biggest ever Global 500 conference concluded, after welcoming nearly 700 dairy and beef producers from 32 countries to Alltech’s home in Lexington, KY. President and founder of Alltech, Dr. Pearse Lyons opened the conference with his “Eight Big Ideas” for the dairy and beef industries: 1. Efficiency: the cow is a fermentor, it is designed for fiber, we can increase efficiency and feed fiber. 2. Green house gases: We cannot stick our head in the sand. Green house gases are a real problem and sooner or later we will be taxed. 3. Mineral wastage and pollution: .75 kilo of mineral waste per cow means that a ton of mineral waste per day on a 1,000 cow farm. 4. Creating more nutritious milk and beef. 5. Branding: Branding is essential. Why is soda $5 per gallon when milk is so much better for you? 6. Fiber: Grain is expensive or unavailable. Fiber is not only a cheaper alternative but the rumen is designed to use it. 7. Nutrigenomics: This is a nutrition revolution. Nutrigenomics allow us


NOFA Vermont plans Seventh Annual Direct Marketing Conference SOUTH ROYALTON, VT — Vermont farmers who sell their products directly to their local communities through farmers’ markets, farm stands, and CSA farms, will gather for a day of workshops and networking on Sunday, Jan. 8 at the Vermont Law School in South Royalton. The Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont’s Seventh Annual Direct Marketing Conference is designed

to bring together farmers and market experts to serve as an educational opportunity helping farmers build stronger marketing opportunities to serve the thriving Vermont market for local food. The conference will feature 19 workshops on a variety of marketing and market development topics including Leveraging Customer Relationships Into Year Round Sales, Marketing Toolkit:

Planning and Measurement Strategies, and Strategies for Grassroots Fundraising. The conference will also host the annual meeting of the Vermont Farmers’ Market Association. In addition to these opportunities, conference attendees will enjoy a keynote co-presentation from Ellen Kahler, executive director of the Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund and Jean Hamilton, who recently con-

Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

s hat’ W k Loo ew! N am Stre e n Ma ow is N e! n Onli

Yourr connectionn too thee Northeast Equinee Market

Go to www.cfmanestream.com we are just a Click Away!

cluded a four-year term as NOFA Vermont’s Market Development and Consumer Access Coordinator. Kahler and Hamilton will share their thoughts in a keynote titled, Markets in Transition: How Can Vermont’s Direct Markets Evolve with a Growing Local Foods Movement? NOFA Vermont strengthens farmers’ markets and CSAs in Vermont by providing technical assistance,

collecting annual economic data, serving as the umbrella organization for the Vermont Farmers’ Market Association, and offering a farmers’ market minigrants program. More information about the conference is available online at www.nofavt.org. Walk-in registrations are also welcome. Each farmers’ market is invited to send a representative to the conference and to at-

tend and vote at the annual meeting of the Vermont Farmers’ Market Association held at the conference. The market can invite anyone to be their representative and they will be admitted into the conference for free. Registration fees are $30 for NOFA Vermont members and $35 for non-members. A lunch made with local ingredients and refreshments is included with the conference fee.


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Agricultura by Greg Coffta If you visit one of New York’s mid- to large-size dairy herds, you would see many employees in the milking parlor who are immigrants of Hispanic descent. This isn’t a news flash — these employees have been working on some dairies for more than 10 years now. In recent years, the increase in immigrant labor from Mexico and Central America has become a hotbutton political issue achieving national attention.

People make many assumptions about this workforce: It’s uneducated, unskilled and suitable for only the most routine, tedious tasks such as milking. A closer look at our dairy farms proves those beliefs to be misconceptions. The Hispanic workforce on New York dairy farms is being promoted to higher positions and given more responsibilities. New tasks and responsibilities Responsibilities vary

from dairy to dairy, but in general Hispanic employees complete some of a herd manager’s responsibilities. Dairies’ reproduction programs have benefited greatly from Hispanic employees’ taking on additional responsibilities. Heat detection and the delivery of ovulation synchronization injections are now popular jobs for Hispanic employees. On some dairies, Hispanic employees are also performing A.I. And they’ve been trained to identify

lameness and often trim hooves. The calf barn has probably benefited the most from Hispanic employees being trained to work outside the milking parlor. Caring for heifers from their first day to their first service is an important job that many Hispanic employees now perform. There are many reasons why Hispanic employees are diversifying in their job duties, but two of the biggest reasons for this change are:

A. The quality of the Hispanic workforce. That is to say; the dedication, responsibility and effort that most exhibit. B. The decline in the number of trained herd managers. Dairy managers and owners are having more difficulty in finding trained herd managers, and vacancies can be empty for months. A dairy can’t stop operating, so many managers have decided to fill the gaps with current Hispanic employees who have a record of

competence and high performance. Dedicated, skilled employees are valuable not just in the milking parlor but everywhere on a dairy. Many dairy managers have learned that Hispanic employees aren’t an unskilled workforce but simply an untrained workforce. They have discovered that these employees are a valuable resource beyond their traditional role as milkers. Source: Dairy Pipeline, November-December 2011

World crop production records help ensure needs are met Growers Association President Garry Niemeyer. “When our production is reduced, we appreciate that other options are available for some of our end users. We live in a diverse and global marketplace and it’s important to support and expand trade, whether through pushing for beneficial trade agreements or improving outdated transportation infrastructure.” In its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates Report, USDA notes that global corn production this year is projected at a new

record high of 867.5 million tons. A 3.5-million-ton decline in the United States was more than offset by a 43.4-million-ton increase in foreign corn production. Global wheat production this year is projected at a record 689 million tons, up more than 37 million from last year, and rice production worldwide is projected at a record 460.8 million tons, up 11 million tons from 2010. Source: NCGA News of the Day: Monday, Dec. 12

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(518) 692-9611 FAX (518) 692-2210

TRACTORS 2001 NH TN70 w/32LA Loader, 4WD, ROPS, 2018 Hrs. . . . . . . . . $22,600 1997 NH 8770 4WD, Supersteer, Mega Flow Hydraulics, Rear Duals, 7,164 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,750 2009 NH TD5050 4WD, Cab, 90 HP, 2683 Hrs., Excellent Cond. . $29,750 2000 NH TS100 4WD, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes, 2,135 Hrs. $39,995 1995 White 6215 Cab, Tractor, 4WD, Duals, 215 HP, w/Degelman Blade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.O.R. 2007 NH TL100A 4WD, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,795 1988 Ford 1720 4WD, ROPS w/Loader, 12x12 Shuttle Transmission, 3,140 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995 2011 Mahindra 1816 4WD, ROPS, HST, Loader, 52” Mid Mower - 90 Hrs., Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,750 2011 Mahindra 3616 4WD, Cab w/Heat & AC, HST Trans, Loader, 4 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,375 2010 NH TD5050 4WD, ROPS, w/Warranty, 480 Hrs. - Excellent. . $31,875 2010 NH TD5030 4WD, ROPS w/New 825TL Loader - 495 Hrs. - Excellent Condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,800 Yamaha Rhino UTV, 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT Alamo Rear Mount Boom Mower w/60” Rotary Head . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 2001 Gehl 1075 Forage Harvester, 2 Row Corn Head, Hay Pickup, Metal Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 2009 NH 74CSRA 3Pt Snowblower, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 2000 Gehl 1287 Tandem Manure Spreader, 287 Bushel, Slurry Sides, Hyd. Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,495 1987 NH 790 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 790W Hay Pickup . . . . . $4,995 2003 Challenger SB34 Inline Square Baler w/Thrower, Hyd. Tension Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,375 2000 LP RCR 2584 7’ Rotary Cutter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,540 2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 WIC Cart Mounted Bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . . . . $1,450 2008 Cole 1 Row 3pt. Planter with multiple Seed Plates . . . . . . . . . $1,195 1981 NH 320 Baler w/70 Thrower Hyd. Bale Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 Gehl Forage Box, on Dion D1200 Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,895 JD 336 Baler w/Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2010 NH H7230 10’4” Discbine, Roll Conditioner, Like New, Demo. . $24,900 1987 NH 326 Baler w/70 Thrower, Hydra Formatic Tension, Hyd. Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Rd Bale Carrier/Feeder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 1989 NH 570 Baler w/72 Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,300 2003 NH 1411 Discbine, 10’4” Cut w/Rubber Rolls, Field Ready. . $15,950 Woods B60C 60” Brush Bull Rotary Cutter w/New Blades . . . . . . . $1,195 Deutz-Fahr K500 Tedder, 4 Star, 17’ Working Width . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,260 Pequea HR930 Rotary Rake, Excellent Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,400 2002 NH FP240 Forage Harvester, w/ met alert, Crop Processor, 29 P/U Head, 3PN Corn Head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,995 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head for a NH 900. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,250 2008 Taarup 8011T 8 Star 32’Tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995 2008 H&S RT5200 HYD Hydraulic Fold Tedder, Like New. . . . . . . . $4,995 Smoker Solid Bottom Elevator 20’ on Chassis w/Elec. Motor . . . . . . . $995 Kuhn GF5001TH 4 Star Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 2009 NH BR7060 Twine Only Round Baler, Wide Pickup, Like New. . $24,500 2001 LP PD15 3Pt. Post Hole Digger w/12” Auger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $695

JD 127 5’ Pull type Rotary Cutter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $725 1995 Vicon H1050 9 Wheel Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195 Kverneland 2 Bottom Spring Reset Mold Board Plow. . . . . . . . . . . $1,795 NH 519 Manure Spreader, T Bar Chain, Hyd Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $950 Gehl 940 16’ Forage Box on Tandem 12 ton on Gehl Gear . . . . . . . $2,995 Wooden Hay Rack on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $595 Wooden Flatbed on Gear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350 2008 Agway Accumul8 AC800 Bale Accumulator & AC8006G SSL Grabber, Like New Package. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,700 2002 NH 570 Baler w/72 Thrower - Excellent Condition. . . . . . . . . $19,600 2001 NH 163 Tedder, Hard Fold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Valvec Steel Hay Wagon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 NH 716 Forage Wagon on NH Gear w/roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,250 NH 273 Baler w/54A Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,995 2008 Knight 8118 Pro Twin Slinger Spreader, Tandems w/Flotation Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,250 1998 JD 3970 Forage Harvester w/7’ PU Head, 3 Row Corn Head, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon, Good Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 1993 Wil-Rich 3 Point 10 Shank Chisel Plow w/Gauge Wheels. . . . $2,600 NH 415 Discbine, Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 NH 315 Baler w/70 Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4950 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2007 NH M428 Telehandler 42’ Reach - 1050 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . $66,250 2008 NH M459 Telehandler 45’ Reach - 420 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,500 2008 NH W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/Heat/Air, Bucket/Forks, 375 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2007 NH E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Car w/Heat/AC - 400 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36” Bucket, 1,600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $128,500 2009 NH E50B Cab w/Heat & Air, Blade, Rubber Track, Hyd. Thumb, 725 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,250 2010 NH E35B Excavator w/Blade, Rubber Tracks, Cab w/Heat/Air. $33,750 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate 72” Bucket - 100 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2007/08 (2) NH C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, 84” Bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Choice $46,250 Mustang MS60P 60” SSL Pickup Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 1999 NH LX865 Skidsteer, OROPS, Bucket, Hi Flow Hyd., 1,202 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,250 2008 NH L160 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Hyd. Quick Attach Plate, 72” Bucket 3476 Hrs, New Tires. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,250 2005 NH LS180.B Skidsteer, OROPS, Hyd. Q-Attach, 84” Bucket - New Tires - 4601 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,650 1998 Scat Trak 1300C Skidsteer OROPS, Bucket Grouser Tracks, Boom Hyd’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,250 ATTACHMENTS 1999 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Good Cond.. $3,150 2002 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Like New . . $3,640 1999 Coneqtec APX400 Adjustable Cold Planer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 2008 NH 96” Hyd. Angle Dozer Blade, Demo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,875 2010 NH/Bradco 6” x 4’ Trencher, Skidsteer Mount, Like New . $3,995 2009 Virnig HD Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/ 9” Auger .$2,195

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 27

While U.S. corn production this past year was impacted by several major weather-related events that cut acres and yield, taking a broader look shows how grain demands can be met by taking into account overseas production. This year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is reporting record global corn, wheat and rice production. “We always hold that, no matter the challenge we face, the global marketplace will respond to make sure all needs are covered,” said National Corn


For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MAINE

ANDROSCOGGIN-SAGADAHOC DHI DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H H H M J H H J

68.3 100.1 489.2 302.8 45.2 53.8 60.6 109.8 86.5 21.8 25.9 65.0 72.6 100.8 30.1

KAYBEN HOLSTEINS HALL C.W. PINELAND FARMS, INC BAKER BROOK FARM GARY WINSHIP AND FAMILY YOUNG C.E. TRUDY GRAFFAM

DHIR DHIR DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP

H H H X H H A

77.9 50.5 74.6 59.2 48.8 59.3 27.7

25027 23306 21302 19653 18073 17619 16277

933 874 827 756 677 656 636

3.7 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.9

753 708 655 603 539 529 506

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1

DAVIS, JIM & RICK BAILEY HILL FARM FARRINGTON, THAYDEN JOHN DONALD RICHARD COREY MARC BAILEY SHADY LANE FARM TURNER, MALCOLM HERD 1

DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X H

57.5 28.2 55.0 76.6 37.6 58.0 39.5 37.2

21246 20212 19643 20404 18727 18715 15463 17562

829 708 785 759 736 646 692 626

3.9 3.5 4.0 3.7 3.9 3.5 4.5 3.6

683 635 604 599 579 556 527 519

3.2 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.4 3.0

SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 CLEMEDOW FARM SILVER MAPLE FARMS INC 1 PEARSON RICHARD PEARSON RICHARD NICK MICHAUD GAIL QUIMBY PLOURDE, ARTHUR E. JASON & JOY RAY WINDY ACRES

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H J H X H X H J H

121.2 97.2 82.0 99.7 18.9 137.0 76.0 64.2 62.4 150.2

26593 23408 19653 21273 16704 20367 18925 18381 15090 16528

970 760 938 920 853 800 790 671 675 663

3.6 3.2 4.8 4.3 5.1 3.9 4.2 3.7 4.5 4.0

808 727 706 683 615 615 572 538 532 502

3.0 3.1 3.6 3.2 3.7 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.5 3.0

FRANKLIN

Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

HARRISON FARM LEARY FARM INC.

HEMOND HILL FARM TWIN BROOK DAIRY LLC STEPHEN BRIGGS R.E.HEMOND FARM INC. ALDEN FISHER EAST LEDGE FARM WATERMAN FARM INC. CHRIS & JEANIE LEWIS BOTMA FARM JOHN & SANDY NUTTING ALDEN FISHER LOWELL FAMILY FARM JOSEPH&VIRGINIA ROSEBERRY BARKER FARMS INC GOODNOW JERSEY FARM INC

CUMBERLAND

KENNEBEC

KNOX-LINCOLN

RALPH PEARSE & SONS HAWES LINCOLN J NEWBERT, GARY & ANDREA TIBBETTS, BARRY & ELAINE

26931 1037 3.9 824 3.1 25708 989 3.8 809 3.1 3X 26782 954 3.6 808 3.0 3X 25188 911 3.6 763 3.0 22089 795 3.6 650 2.9 20994 810 3.9 644 3.1 21505 774 3.6 639 3.0 20310 766 3.8 614 3.0 20067 762 3.8 610 3.0 20159 718 3.6 594 2.9 19771 670 3.4 592 3.0 15911 750 4.7 574 3.6 18652 704 3.8 566 3.0 17320 647 3.7 536 3.1 14902 710 4.8 521 3.5

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

33.8 38.5 57.8 52.5

24377 18767 18843 18360

874 741 701 678

3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7

725 589 568 552

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H X H

74.2 101.7 37.5 19.6 22.0

24950 22336 20489 17245 18083

843 853 750 730 683

3.4 3.8 3.7 4.2 3.8

742 679 636 596 539

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.5 3.0

DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

52.3 366.6 625.3 999.5 47.7 206.9 200.2 129.3 168.6 38.7

24997 23519 24329 22653 22591 20383 20363 20029 18471 16008

940 879 887 815 885 742 772 739 740 674

3.8 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.6 3.8 3.7 4.0 4.2

757 725 716 691 688 647 639 616 606 524

3.0 3.1 2.9 3X 3.1 3X 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.3

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H X H H X H H H H H J X H

118.2 72.1 263.5 270.5 405.1 117.8 88.7 367.7 60.8 56.8 52.4 47.3 39.0 43.1 45.8

25729 24604 23357 20447 21554 21230 18771 20326 20449 19707 18744 19099 15711 16267 15984

911 856 909 883 817 892 779 792 732 742 760 733 744 637 605

3.5 3.5 3.9 4.3 3.8 4.2 4.2 3.9 3.6 3.8 4.1 3.8 4.7 3.9 3.8

771 746 705 691 665 665 608 608 608 588 574 558 549 505 502

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.5 3.1 3.1

THE THOMPSON FARM DHI-AP H 77.6 LARRABEE HAROLD & GALEN DHI-APCS H 478.5 INGRAHAM JOHN W & SONS DHI-APCS H 432.1 KEENE DAIRY DHI-AP H 97.4 SCHOFIELD, WAYNE DHI-AP H 26.2 CLEMENTS WALTER DHI-AP H 36.7 ALAN & SUE HUNTER DHI-AP H 79.8 SIMON STOLL DHI-AP X 47.8 ALAN & SUE HUNTER DHI-AP X 20.2 SCHOFIELD, WAYNE DHI-AP J 39.5

23137 24168 21450 20169 19306 19630 18630 16171 16489 13750

909 898 876 782 752 704 745 677 734 664

3.9 3.7 4.1 3.9 3.9 3.6 4.0 4.2 4.5 4.8

727 706 667 618 600 586 554 549 544 506

3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.3 3.7

JOHNSON FARM INC. GIRARD, RYAN HIGHLAND FARMS INC ALDERWOOD FARM, INC. DUNN, FRED

22358 21905 17748 20149 20055

856 741 886 768 758

3.8 3.4 5.0 3.8 3.8

722 662 628 628 609

3.2 3.0 3.5 3.1 3.0

OXFORD

BISSELL JOHN & CINDY CONANT ACRES INC. KUVAJA FARMS INC KUVAJA FARMS INC LONE MOUNTAIN FARM

PENOBSCOT-PISCATAQUIS SCOTT KEITH VEAZLAND FARMS SIMPSON RON,BETH STONYVALE INC. UNIVERSITY OF MAINE LIBBY LAND HOWARD BROS VELGOUSE FARM,LLC SAWYER WILLIAM & SONS EATON FARM

SOMERSET

DANIEL HARRIMAN DICKINSON FRANK CHARTRAND FARMS INC. CAMBRIDGE FARMS SOMERSET FARMS L.P MARK OUELLETTE JR. SEVEY LAROY L BOSWORTH FARMS INC. FARRAND CHARLES DEAN PAINE SMITH ROGER CONNOLLY JAMES D & MARY JOSHUA CLARK GRASSLAND JAMES STROUT

WALDO

YORK

DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI

H H J H H

79.1 27.7 248.7 74.8 52.0

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

CHESHIRE

Top 40 Herds For November B R COW E E YEARS D

DHIR-AP H 44.1 DHI-AP H 50.9

RHA MILK

17898 18025

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

743 4.2 569 3.2 668 3.7 525 2.9

NEW HAMPSHIRE

WINDYHURST FM PARTNERSHIP DHIR-AP STONEHOLM FARM DHI-APCS SAWYER SHELDON S DHIRAPCS STONEWALL FARM DHI-AP

H H J H

183.8 788.0 312.6 26.1

26027 23910 16629 19865

976 824 838 730

3.7 3.4 5.0 3.7

773 721 611 604

3.0 3.0 3X 3.7 3.0

RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD2 KEITH DAVID RITCHIE, GEORGE F. HD3 RITCHIE GEORGE F HD 1

H H X A

15.1 213.4 27.0 74.5

22813 19622 16047 15686

728 793 702 585

3.2 4.0 4.4 3.7

727 614 588 515

3.2 3.1 3.7 3.3

GRAFTON

HILLSBORO

FITCH FARM, LLC KNOXLAND FARM INC POMEROY, KEITH E. ALVIRNE SCHOOL FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

MERRIMACK-BELKNAP HIGHWAY VIEW FARM JONES, MARION & GORDON BACHELDER, KEITH MORRILL FARM DAIRY GLINES,GEORGE HERD BARTLETT, A.S.&S.A. GLINES,GEORGE HERD

26335 934 24541 995 22748 832 21895 1044

3.5 4.1 3.7 4.8

BODWELL, H & SONS FERNALD FARM DAIRY, LLC GREAT BAY FARM

DHI-APCS H 244.5 DHI-AP H 185.0 DHI-APCS H 107.8

25177 23598 20298

948 3.8 771 3.1 998 4.2 690 2.9 810 4.0 603 3.0

UNH CREAM UNH RESEARCH HERD SCRUTON'S DAIRY FARM NAUGHTAVEEL FARM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

26.8 81.7 248.4 106.0

27154 1046 3.9 828 3.0 25632 983 3.8 780 3.0 24351 902 3.7 741 3.0 23899 861 3.6 730 3.1

LECLAIR GARY D. KEITH KIMBALL JOHNSON, JOLYON BOB & SUE FOULKS MC NAMARA, PATRICK ECCARDT FARM, INC. HOLMES, JEFF AND STEVE

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H J

169.9 558.5 37.2 97.4 181.3 110.1 62.0

25882 22602 23855 22115 21577 22099 16581

995 878 891 812 870 805 760

3.8 3.9 3.7 3.7 4.0 3.6 4.6

792 751 746 705 644 642 592

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1

951 942 953 864 753 811 757

SULLIVAN

3.7 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.7 4.4

789 788 705 678

25776 24394 24289 23282 20546 22181 17055

STRAFFORD-CARROLL

H H H H H H X

101.5 334.6 76.9 19.3 217.3 62.2 60.0 158.9 79.1 77.9 14.8

ROCKINGHAM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

813 720 703 703 676 661 585

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.5

3.1 3.2 3X 2.9 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.5

VERMONT

ADDISON

DEER VALLEY FARM BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC M AND J DAIRY FOUR HILL FARMS BLUE-SPRUCE FARM INC MIDDLEBROOK FARM INC. THOMAS, BRAD AND JILL SABOURIN, GERARD & JUDY PLOUFFE HILL FARM PLOUFFE HILL FARM RANDALL MUNGER

H 443.4 H 1338.4 H 308.3 H 1494.3 A 56.0 H 176.5 H 171.1 H 95.6 H 39.0 X 17.8 X 70.2

25433 24447 22728 22679 21897 21380 20717 20259 19130 15469 15704

934 882 826 847 827 826 773 767 689 637 659

DHI-AP H 64.6

28099

944 3.4 860 3.1

262.8 77.0 103.9 48.3

21878 19983 19174 15469

814 779 778 623

QUINTIN, ANDRE

DHI-AP H 377.1

26572

937 3.5 799 3.0 3X

KNOXLAND FARM

DHI-AP H 862.7

25531 1000 3.9 809 3.2

CHITTENDEN

TWIN OAKS DAIRY FARM LLC

FRANKLIN

DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

BURT, JASON AND CHRISTINA DHI-AP H FOURNIER INC, RENE & SON DHI-AP X GORT0N,GRANT JOHN DHI-APCS H BERARD, RICHARD DHI-AP X

GRAND ISLE ORANGE

RUTLAND

BOOK BROTHERS MACH FARM, INC. GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD GLEN AND MARTHA HAYWARD

WINDSOR

BILLINGS FARM MUSEUM WADE MAXIM

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS

3.7 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.6 4.1 4.2

3.7 3.9 4.1 4.0

3.7 3.8 3.9 4.4

761 754 698 693 678 648 640 622 582 515 503

643 622 601 502

655 652 636 613

3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3X 3.1 3X 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.3 3.2

2.9 3.1 3.1 3.2

H H H B

118.4 151.1 90.3 13.4

21593 20641 20787 18414

803 791 819 819

DHIR J DHI-AP J

40.4 72.1

15856 14935

795 5.0 591 3.7 713 4.8 543 3.6

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

HAMPDEN

POMEROY & SONS PALMER,TERRY MURPHY, TOM

H H J J H H H

104.8 235.6 19.6 210.3 177.9 116.2 67.2

22494 21350 16684 16833 19062 19842 17988

WHOLEY COW FARM WHOLEY COW FARM BOYDEN BROS. DAIRY ROBERTSON, CHRIS & BOB MT. TOBY FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

X X H H H

42.2 18.3 90.0 89.2 103.2

26748 1007 3.8 836 3.1 22887 1067 4.7 812 3.5 24711 944 3.8 769 3.1 23078 951 4.1 713 3.1 21646 845 3.9 671 3.1

COOK,GORDON,JR. & HANK LONGVIEW FARM BELDEN, LUTHER A.INC ALLARDS FARM INC. PARSONS,HENRY & EDWARD DEVINE FARM, INC. KOKOSKI, JOHN HD1 COOK,GORDON, JR. & HANK HARTSBROOK FARM

DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP

H H H B H H J J H

60.1 231.8 112.2 130.1 104.5 190.8 95.5 11.4 88.9

22846 22775 22445 19257 19946 20376 15535 14988 16372

HAMPSHIRE

910 861 868 763 833 809 807 751 660

4.0 3.9 4.8 4.9 3.8 3.7 4.1

4.0 3.8 3.9 4.0 4.2 4.0 5.2 5.0 4.0

707 648 610 603 579 567 558

748 699 690 644 637 632 595 568 511

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

21089 20388 16786

820 3.9 667 3.2 778 3.8 622 3.1 612 3.6 506 3.0

TULLY FARMS, INC. PICKARD, JAMES & ELEANOR

DHI-AP H 127.0 DHI-AP H 86.2

20016 18453

809 4.0 643 3.2 716 3.9 567 3.1

HERRICK,DAVID SAM RICHARDSON'S DAIRY, INC.

DHI-AP H 92.5 DHI-AP H 158.0

23935 22568

850 3.6 739 3.1 781 3.5 680 3.0

BRISTOL COUNTY

DHI-AP H 19.1

20637

754 3.7 632 3.1

MIDDLESEX ESSEX

BRISTOL

RHODE ISLAND

WASHINGTON KENYON, FRANCIS COTTRELL HOMESTEAD

DHI-AP X 62.7 DHI-AP H 14.9

20143 18355

769 3.8 615 3.1 689 3.8 578 3.1

CONNECTICUT

HARTFORD

MILLBORNE FARM SMYTHS TRINITY FARM FUSIEK,D, & COULTER FUSIEK HASTINGS FARM H0USE OF HAYES COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. COLLINS POWDER HILL FM. PERRY, SCOTT MILLBORNE FARM HASTINGS FARM

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H X H H G J

22.4 27.2 48.2 123.4 76.4 46.9 43.3 29.6 25.8 12.0

23233 21930 21343 20521 19537 17329 18108 18459 16564 15522

839 809 789 794 740 731 689 779 717 729

3.6 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.8 4.2 3.8 4.2 4.3 4.7

714 674 639 636 590 572 551 545 541 541

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.3 3.0 3.0 3.3 3.5

JACQUIER, ROBERT & PETER CHRIS & TODD HANNAN WEIGOLD FARMS LLP FREUND'S FARM, INC. ARETHUSA FARM LLC TANNER T. MEADOW RIDGE FARM LLC. SUNSET HILL FARM 1,INC. JACQUIER, DAVID & MELODY ARETHUSA FARM LLC CARLSON,DOUGLAS J. WHITETAIL FARM 1

DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H H J H H

975.3 38.8 88.4 273.4 72.3 144.9 69.9 38.3 416.9 26.8 60.7 32.2

27904 23394 23746 22688 22812 20254 20208 19864 18704 15405 16431 17113

951 921 902 816 944 761 803 731 699 807 638 678

3.4 3.9 3.8 3.6 4.1 3.8 4.0 3.7 3.7 5.2 3.9 4.0

831 728 727 692 668 635 605 601 599 557 511 510

3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.6 3.1 3.0

DHIR-AP H 150.0 DHIR-AP X 42.6

22508 15861

788 3.5 672 3.0 3X 691 4.4 526 3.3 3X

SPIELMAN FARM RIVER PLAIN DAIRY BLUESLOPE FARM, INC

DHI-AP H 385.1 DHI-AP H 52.6 DHI-APCS H 120.0

21652 20354 17872

866 4.0 690 3.2 763 3.7 624 3.1 681 3.8 522 2.9

BAHLER FARMS INC. UNIV OF CONNECTICUT BAHLER FARMS INC. HYTONE FARM MAPLELEAF FARM, INC SHADOW VALLEY FARM UNIV OF CONNECTICUT SHADOW VALLEY FARM FISH FAMILY FARM

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

967.4 81.3 970.9 255.6 227.6 49.1 24.5 110.2 28.1

25955 25983 24051 22956 22234 17528 16405 19079 14745

942 899 889 907 893 744 793 700 713

DHIR-AP H 113.6 DHI-AP H 135.0 DHIR-AP J 150.5

22552 20050 16109

897 4.0 703 3.1 725 3.6 629 3.1 797 4.9 582 3.6

LITCHFIELD

NEW HAVEN/MIDDLESEX GREENBACKER, C & SNS FM 2 GREENBACKER, C & SNS FM 2

NEW LONDON

TOLLAND

WINDHAM

TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2 MAY HILL FARM TYLER BROTHERS HD. 2

H H H H H X J H J

3.6 3.5 3.7 4.0 4.0 4.2 4.8 3.7 4.8

788 740 739 721 685 589 584 584 526

3.0 2.8 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.6 3.1 3.6

3X 3X 3X

3X

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.3

MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP FAIRFIELDS DAIRY FARM,LLC DHI-AP MARTHA & ROBERT KILMER JR DHI-AP HIGH LAWN FARM DHIRAPCS ZIEMBA, MICHAEL, MARK & TIM DHI-AP TURNER FARMS, INC. DHI LEGEYT, RICHARD & BETTY DHI-AP

FRANKLIN

909 838 803 821 717 727 740

RHA MILK

DHI-AP H 71.7 DHI-AP H 154.5 DHIR-AP H 31.4

SOFT COLLOIDAL PHOSPHATE

MASSACHUSETTS

BERKSHIRE

B R COW E E YEARS D

3.1 3.0 3.7 3.6 3.0 2.9 3.1

3.3 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.2 3.1 3.8 3.8 3.1

CANTON MILLS, INC. P.O. Box 97 Minnesota City, MN 55959 www.cantonmills.com

1-800-328-5349

NO BULL TOO BIG OR NASTY Semen Freezing Since 1983 Semen Fertility Evaluations A Value Adding Company

ZIMMERMAN’S CUSTOM FREEZING www.semenfreezing.com

131 Red Well Road New Holland PA

Cell 717-940-1430 717-355-2048


FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE GHANDY dry chemical box and 40 foot long hay-grain elevator. WANTED: Shanandoah Stove. 585-593-5685.(NY) MILKING DEVON cattle and milking devon, beef devon crosses for sale. 413446-2004.(MA) FORD 8N tractor, 1950, rungs good, has good tires, PTO 3ph everything works great, new drawbar assy, $1,800 bo. 401662-9131.(RI)

IH 315 cultimulcher, 12 ft., $1,800; WANTED: 9 ft. discbine, mower in working condition. WANTED: Deer rifle, bolt action. 315536-8522.(NY)

18 FT Jamesway silo unloader, $1,000; Poclain hydraulic excavator, 30 ton, 200 hp motor, $6,000. 315-245-5275.(NY) REG. Angus bull, DOB 1/17/2008, proven calving ease, sired by MYTTY in focus, gentle. 518-885-6286.(NY)

1968 671 Ford tractor with ford loader. 315343-9687.(NY)

NEW HOLLAND 1069 bale wagon, vg; Mack silage-grain tandem truck, vg; 30’ skeleton elevator, $650; Snap-On duals, 20.8-38, $1,500. 315-364-7936.(NY)

SINGLE SEATER Mennonite buggy, $900; Hyd. pump for IH 800 planter, swing bearing for CAT E70B, 66’ skid loader bucket, $200. 315-536-1112.(NY)

FOR SALE: Bobcat 543, two buckets, good condition, Oneida County. 315-8293594.(NY)

DEBEAKER for chicken, 2 vacuum pump, 400 gallon bulk milk tank with compressor. John 413-562-2981.(MA)

ORGANIC Holstein heifers, for sale, yearlings to shortbred, springing cross heifers, also, must sell, need room. 518-6388357.(NY)

QUICK ATTACH bale spear, like new, $375., Land Pride York rake, excellent condition, $575; Brand new calf puller. 518883-5160.(NY)

FARMALL450 wide front end, power steering, good tires, excellent condition, INT. 800 air cyclo 6 row corn planter. 315-5367875.(NY)

FLAT TOP 300 gallon Girton bulk tank with working compressor, 200+ foot complete DeLaval pipeline, 200+ foot badger cleaner chain. 585-770-4145.(NY)

Many IH 1066s, 1466s, fender and cab tractors, $6,500-$12,000; 340 dual loader w/ bale spear, $1,500. 66’ series parts. 518-677-2854.(NY)

400 bales nice, first, $2, 400 bedding, good kicker wagons, $900; Farmall H was running, NH 277 baler, $2,000, offers, Devin 607-432-0171.(CNY)

BALE WAGONS for sale, 18 ft. steel, $2,000, (2) 16 ft. wood, $1,750 and $1,000, all gc. No Sunday Calls! 315-5367841.(NY) WANTED: MANURE SPREADER, small, 80 bushel, no junk sale Hobart Butcher Saw $1,650, new. JD 720 standard, straight, $7,800. 914-533-6529.(NY) A set 16.9-38 continental tires, 60% tread, $25/pair; (2) 38” double bevel rims, 16” wide, $200/pair. 315-225-9882.(NY)

1 And Fa F G M rme R e ar r T E t E ke o E ve tp Fa ry lac rm Mo e er nt Ad h!

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JOHN DEERE 48 loader, $750; NH 56 rake with dolly, work good, $750; IH corn planter, 4 row, nice, $750. 607-4359976.(NY) 1040 MASSEY quick hitch loader, fits 471, 481, $2,500; Case 580L 4x4 extender hoe, 2,800 hours, $27,000. 508-410-7996.(MA) FORD 2000, super H, Ford 9N, lots of Molines, show ready! Case 430 restored, Fordson Major diesel. Call for pics. 518922-6301.(NY) WANTED: Need a gear box for model 72 Gehl Flail mower. Call 315-245-1149.(NY) PUREBRED SAANEN bucks: 8 mos., 18 mos., excellent lines, CAE tested. yearling does, doelings, bred or open, closed herd, wlemcke1@rochester.rr.com. 585-6592936.(NY)

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FORD 602 2 row mounted corn picker with mounts for Ford 6000. Vegy good, $1,500 trade for Ford 6000 parts. 716-9413200.(NY)

CAST IRON HOT WATER radiators, $100 each. Call for sizes. Penn Yan. 315-5360235. No Sunday Calls.(NY) ONE ROW CAROUSEL, six cup transplanter, one row bare root rubber finger transplanter, $375. ea. 908-362-7478.(NJ)

1947 Farmall A not running, motor turns, been inside with 2 bottom LnR plows, cultivator, exhaust lift wheel wt. $795. 413738-5379.(MA) FOR SALE: DeLaval 76 Vacuum pump, 3 hp, runs great, good for small operation. $600. Call 518-772-8856.(NY) GOATS ALPINE purebred, 5 female, 1 male, $50 each; Dog houses, $19. Reminisce magazines, $0.25 each, Gerbils, Guinea pig cages. 315-531-8670.(NY) 21’ rock flex disk, needs work, $2,500; 2 heifers, due Feb. 585-526-5195.(NY) SHAVINGS, White Pine, Kiln dried, 3.25 cu. ft., good quality, 529 Klock Road, Fort Plain. 518-568-3203.(NY)

CASE IH combine, 8x60 PTO auger, 6x41 electric auger, CIH 5100 drill. International 475 disk. Chevy 16’ dump, removable sides. 315-789-0882.(NY) 2 inch stainless pipeline, 60 cow tie stall, best offer wanted. Lime/litter spreader and 15’ or 20’ batwing mower. 315-3485251.(NY)

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18” GSI grain bin fan, purchased new, very little used; Also, JD 100 forage blower, same as NH 28, $450. 315-781-2572.(NY)

TIRE CHAINS, 15.5x38, excellent, large number of various JD bean puller parts, can be sold as complete unit as well. 585747-7577.(NY)

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DOUBLE RING TRACTOR TIRE, chains for 18.4-38 tires. Heavy duty round bale, bucket spear, Badger three beater forage wagon. 607-962-1477.(NY)

3 Hackney pony mares, 53” tall, dark bay, ride and drive. 8:00-8:15 a.m. 607-5827248.(NY)

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December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 29

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RADIAL tires, 2 (14.9-24), 2 (14-38), Case IH 1660 combine rotor, Abbott Farms, Baldwinsville 315-727-8347.(NY)

18.4x38 95% $450, IK Member B-RB motor in a body, mopar, $125., snow shoes, mod. bearpaw, $45. leave message. 607-293-7303.(NY)

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SIX Surge mini orbit claws and shells, 30” vent-o-matic barn fan. 315-344-2300.(NY)


Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

The Cornell Soil Health Test Report: A new way to identify unhealthy soil by Janet Fallon, CCA - Dairy One Forage & Soils Lab

When we aren't feeling well we might go to the doctor to have our blood pressure checked, our cholesterol tested or a throat culture taken to see if we have strep throat. The doctor might suggest weight loss, exercise, an anti-acid for a sour stomach or an anti-biotic for strep throat to bring us back to good health. Now we can do the same thing for our soil when it isn't performing quite as expected.

Page 30 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

A group of Cornell scientists, growers, extension educators and crop consultants evaluated 39 potential physical, biological and chemical indicators for their use in rapidly assessing soil health. They were able to boil these down into 9 grower friendly measurements or "indicators. Farmers can now send soil samples to the Cornell Soil Health Lab to get the health of their soils “diagnosed”...much like a person going to the doctor to find out how healthy they are. These 9” indicators are shown below. Four soil physical health indicators including aggregate stability, available water capacity, surface and subsurface hardness are evaluated. Aggregate stability uses a rain simulation sprinkler to determine the fraction of a soil sample that remains on a sieve after a specific amount of time and rainfall. Soils with low aggregate stability tend to form surface crusts which can reduce water infiltration and air exchange and can even make it tough for germinating seeds to emerge from the soil. Available water capacity measures the amount of water in a disturbed sample that is actually available for plant use. Surface and subsurface hardness is a measure of penetration resistance at 0 to 6 inches and 6 to 18 inches respectively, using a field penetrometer, an instrument that measures the extent and depth of compaction that may restrict the growth of roots or movement of air and water through the soil. This measurement needs to be taken in the field. All other indicators are measured in the laboratory using a sample submitted by the customer.

The Dairy One Improver water infiltration and poor rooting depth in the affected soil. This may explain why a soil with an excellent soil test (pH, P, K, etc) is failing to meet expectations. These ratings are averaged to provide an overall quality score (out of 100) as shown in Figure 1. Soils play a key role on every farm. Dairy farmers and cash crop producers are familiar with standard soil testing to identify nutrient deficiencies or imbalances in their soils. But many farmers have learned, some the hard way, that the chemical "health" of a soil is just one part of the puzzle. This may explain why certain fields perform poorly despite having an adequate and well balanced soil fertility profile. Something else, like soil compaction, poor drainage or root pathogens may limit crop performance and profitability unless corrective measures are taken to address the problem(s). So, send your soil samples to the Cornell Soil Health lab for a full work up if you think your soils are “sick” or you just want to know what is needed to help your soil meet it's full potential. You can go to http://soilhealth.cals.cornell.edu/extension/test.htm for complete information on services, pricing, sample sheets, guidelines needed to collect a representative sample, shipping samples and interpreting results including the physical and biological evaluations done by Cornell and the chemical evaluation done by Agro-One.

Figure 1 - Sample of a Cornell Soil Health Test Report

The four biological soil health indicators tested include organic matter, active carbon, potentially mineralizable nitrogen and a root health rating as determined in the soil health lab. Organic matter contributes to overall soil tilth, soil water holding capacity, and nitrogen availability, among other things. Active carbon is a leading indicator of soil health by telling us how fast soil organic matter will become available for use by important soil microbes. Likewise, potentially mineralizable nitrogen tells us how much plant available N will be released by organic matter. The Root Health Rating is based on a soil bio-assay with bean plants to determine the incidence of root pathogens like Fusarium, Pythium, Rhizoctonia and Thielaviopsis - and no, I don't know how to pronounce that last disease. A standard soil test, conducted by Agro-One, is used to determine the chemical health of a soil. This includes pH, extractable phosphorus, extractable potassium and several other secondary and minor elements. Results are summarized in a “report card” of sorts (Figure 1) that identifies potential problem areas based on the evaluation of physical, biological and chemical characteristics as measured by Cornell and Agro-One. It also identifies limitations or constraints that may be seen in the test soils. The Cornell Soil Health Website provides additional information and suggested management practices to correct these soil health constraints including: • Reducing or modifying tillage. • Changes in the crop rotation to add organic matter and/or break up pest life cycles. • Growing cover crops to build organic matter. • Adding organic amendments (manure or compost). • Adding chemical amendments (limestone, gypsum, fertilizer, etc). The Cornell Soil Health Report (Figure 1) shows the actual measured value, i.e. % aggregate stability, hardness (psi), % organic matter, pH, ppm P, ppm K, and so on. Each indicator is then scored on a scale of 1 to 100. Scores less than 30 are considered low and receive a red color code on the report. A score of 30 - 70 is medium and earns a yellow color code. A score above 70 is considered to be high or good and earns a green. The report also identifies possible constraints or problems associated with a particular indicator if it receives a low (red) rating. For example, a poor aggregate stability rating may indicate poor aeration, poor

For further questions about Agro-One you can contact Janet Fallon at 315-696-0167 or by email: janet.fallon@dairyone.com You can also call 1-800-344-2697 ext. 2172 for the Forage Customer Service or the Soils Lab ext. 2179.


NEW YORK A R TIMMEL 3626 Brown St. Collins, NY 14034 716-532-2040 • 716-532-0881 (Fax) artimmel@aol.com CENTER STATE AG SERVICE 20 West Main St., PO Box 935 Morrisville, NY 13408 (315) 684-7807 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE INC 9618 Route 26 Lowville, NY (315) 376-2991 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE INC 3003 Noble Rd. Seneca Falls, NY 13148 (315) 568-0955 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE INC 6195 Route 20A Warsaw, NY 14569 (585) 786-0177 FISHER FARMS Hwy Rt 13 PO Box 126 Canastota, NY 13032 (315) 697-7039

JONES FARM SUPPLY 39 Clinton St. Gouverneur, NY 13642 (315) 287-3210 ORTEL SUPPLY INC 268 Liberty Arcade, NY 14009 (585) 496-5050 R&M FARM & PRO HDWE 480 RT 11 PO Box 429 Marathon, NY 13803 (607) 849-3291 Z & M AG & TURF 17 Railroad Ave. Alexander, NY 14005 (585) 591-1670 Z & M AG & TURF 56 Lindquist Rd. Falconer, NY 14733 (716) 665-3110 PENNSYLVANIA AG EQUIPMENT SPECIALTIES Mercersburg, PA (717) 328-4450 HISTAND'S FARM & HOME RD 1 Box 231 Church St. Rome, PA 18837 (570) 744-2371 PAUL JACKSON LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS Bailey Hill Rd., Rt. 1 Box 366 Troy, PA 16947 (570) 297-3872 MAINE HAMMOND TRACTOR CO 216 Center Rd. Fairfield, ME 04937 (207) 453-7131 VERMONT HICKS SALES LLC 1400 Bowen Rd. East Corinth, VT 05040 (877) 585-5167 (802) 439-5279 (Fax) info@hicksales.com www.hicksales.com NORTHEAST FARM SALES & SERVICE INC Rt. 5, Box 4497 Irasburg, VT 05845 (802) 754-8863

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 31

GIROUX BROTHERS INC 8092 Rt. 9 Plattsburg, NY 12901 (518) 561-3682


Page 32 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011


Country Folks

Section B

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS Maine Farm Bureau supports inspection of all milk producers AUGUSTA, MAINE — Maine Farm Bureau supports the efforts of the Maine Department

of Agriculture to ensure that all dairy farmers in the state are licensed and inspected.

the milk is inspected. “For us, it’s a food safety issue.” said Executive Director Jon Olson.

(2) JD 74 Rakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville Double Rake Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 385 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 714 Forage Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit . . . . . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 735 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 1470 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 166 inverter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pequea Fluffer 81⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Fahr KH500 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Vicon 4 Star Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200. . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kuhn 500 Disc Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham Krone 550 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 552 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE Brillion 18’ Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 220 disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Taylorway 16’ disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 12’ BWA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Brillion Seeder 10’. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,600 . . . . . Schaghticoke IH 710 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200 . . . . . Schaghticoke IH II Shank Chisel 5700. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,600 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS NH 326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 316 baler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen Hesston 560. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston Rounder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 1500 Rd baler, Knives. . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS HARDI 210 3pt Sprayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville POLARIS RAZOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 245 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 666R corn HD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . Fultonville H&S 125 spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Great Bend loader for JD 7000’s . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Bush Hog 4 ft. mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850. . . . . . . . . Chatham 7’Loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Landpride 7’ HD Blade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke Frontier 7’ HD back blade, hyd Angle . . . $1,850 . . . . . Schaghticoke Woods 1035 backhoe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,650. . . . . . . . . Chatham Woods RB72 rear blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425. . . . . . . . . Chatham

HUDSON RIVER TRACTOR COMPANY LLC FULTONVILLE 518-853-3405

GOSHEN 845-294-2500

CHATHAM 518-392-2505

SCHAGHTICOKE 518-692-2676

CLIFTON PARK 518-877-5059

“The Maine dairy industry is vibrant and growing with many new dairy goat, yogurt, cheese and ice cream makers,” says Olson. “Maine dairy farmers across the state can not afford having anyone getting sick from drinking unlicensed raw milk. The reaction by the public would be enormous and could devastate the

$500 million dairy industry. People might think that all milk is bad and stop drinking it.” “One only has to look at the outbreak of E. coli bacteria in spinach in California a couple of years ago. Though it was only found in California, sales to spinach growers in Maine plummeted.” says Olson.

FLAME STOCKYARD BRIGHTON COMMISSION CO.

691 Great Road, Littleton, MA 01460 978-486-3698

SALE EVERY TUESDAY Goats, Lambs, Sheep, Pigs 12:30 Calves 3:00pm followed by Feeders & Beef Animals BUYERS FROM 3 NATIONAL SLAUGHTER HOUSES 15+ LOCAL BUYERS Same Day Payment

ADVANCE NOTICE

SATURDAY

JANUARY 21st, 10 AM

HUGE USED EQUIPMENT AUCTION Hosted by Gray’s Auction at the Connecticut Valley Auto Auction (Indoor Facility) Rt. 14, White River Junction, VT Full Details and Equipment List Coming Soon in Country Folks

TOWNLINE EQUIPMENT Plainfield, NH

603-675-6347

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 1

TRACTORS Case IH 9110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville CAT D4H LGP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen Ford 8N w/Blade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 555B WLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 2840 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 7930 Lease return . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4010 w/Loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5510 w/540 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NHTD 95 cab, MFWD, Loader . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH TL90 cab 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham AC 200 w/ cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 4230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,000 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5065M w/553. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen COMPACT TRACTORS MF 1220 w/mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,595. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 110 TLB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 750 w/ldr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2305 w/ldr & deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 850 w/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500. . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 855 w/cab, & loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800 . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1600 wam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 3720 w/blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,900. . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 4410 w/420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham Kioti DK455 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000. . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota L39 TLB, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,400. . . . . . . Clifton Park Kubota L5450 loader/backhoe . . . . . . . . $21,000. . . . . . . . . Chatham NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500. . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900. . . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 72” Sweepster Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200. . . . . . . . . Chatham 78” Skidsteer Blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH L160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,900 . . . . . Schaghticoke NH L170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville MOWERS CONDITIONERS Gehl DC2414 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500. . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900. . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 925 Moco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kuhn FC 302 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/Heads . . . . . . . . . $169,500 . . . . . Schaghticoke Miller 310 30’ merger. . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH Flail Chopper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900 . . . . . . . . Fultonville

Maine Farm Bureau does support the sale of raw milk as long as the producer is licensed and


Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION M SHARP S AT.. DEC.. 31 ST 11:00AM

349 COUNTY ROUTE 111 (JOHNSONVILLE RD.) VALLEY FALLS, NY 12185 HAVING SOLD THE FARM WE HAVE BEEN COMMISIONED TO SELL THE COMPLETE LINE OF MACHINERY FROM BIG OAK VIEW FARM. TRACTORS: IH 3588 2 + 2, 4WD; JD 6300 W/640 LOADER 2WD; JD 4240 4WD, CAB, QUAD SHIFT; JD 2640 2WD, ROPS; IH 856 4WD; NH LS160 SKID STEER 1300 HRS.; FORAGE & HAY EQUIP: JD 5440 SP HARVESTER 4WD, HAYHEAD, 3 ROW CORNHEAD (SOLD SEPARATELY); NH 648 ROUND BALER (LIKE NEW); NH 320 SQUARE BALER; NH H7330 DISCBINE (LIKE NEW) H & S HYD. BI-FOLD HAYRAKE; KUHN GF5001 HYD-FOLD TEDDER; 2 - RICHARDTON DUMP WAGONS; 3 - METAL HAY WAGONS; HAYRITE HAY ELEVATOR; JD FLAIL CHOPPER; IH S1600 SILAGE TRUCK; STOLTZFUS ROUND BALE WAGON; TILAGE & PLANTING EQUIP: IH 700 5 BOTTOM PLOWS; CASE WING FOLD DISC; IH 5500 9 SHANK CHIESEL PLOW; JD 12' ROLLER HARROW; BRILLION 12' SEEDER; IH GRAIN DRILL; JD 7200 6 ROW DRY CORN PLANTER; 2 - KILBROS 350 GRAVITY FLOW WAGONS ONE W/AUGER; KUKER BOOM SPRAYER MISC: KNIGHT 2450 MIXER WAGON; GEHL GRINDER MIXER; GEHL MS1315 SCAVENGER MANURE SPREADER; GEHL BOX SPREADER; MENSCH SKID STEER SAND SHOOTER; MENSCH SKID STEER RUBBER TIRE SCRAPER; SCHAVER POST POUNDER; 3 - SETS OF DUALS; 2 - ROUND BALE SPEARS 3PT HITCH; GRAIN BIN W/AUGER BARN EQUIP: WIC BEDDING CHOPPER (LIKE NEW); AGWAY BREEDING WHEEL; ZIMMERMAN FREESTALLS (30-35); FOOT BATH; COW STANCHIONS; 3 - PICKUP FIFTH WHEEL PLATES; NEW 18.4 X 34 TIRE; MILKING EQUIP: DOUBLE FOUR PARLOR 3" LOWLINE STAINLESS STEEL RECIEVER; 8 SUPER FLOW CLAWS; 9 DELTRON 2 PULSATORS; WASH UNIT; 7 HP VACUUM PUMP; SURGE 600 GALLON TANK; COMPRESSOR; TANK WASHER; 8 - WEIGH JARS DIRECTIONS: FROM TROY FOLLOW RT 7 TO CO. RT 111 TAKE LEFT FOLLOW FOR 2 MILES TO FARM; FROM HOOSICK FOLLOW RT 7 TO CO RT 111 TAKE RIGHT FOLLOW FOR 2 MILES TO FARM; FROM SALEM OR CAMBRIDGE FOLLOW ROUTE 22 SOUTH TO ROUTE 67 TURN RIGHT FOLLOW TO JOHNSONVILLE TURN LEFT ON CO RT 111 FOLLOW FOR 5 MILES TO FARM; FROM MECHANICVILLE TAKE ROUTE 67 EAST THROUGH SCHAGTICOKE CONTINUE TO JOHNSONVILLE TURN RIGHT ON CO RT 111 FOLLOW FOR 5 MILES TO FARM.

SALE HELD BY: K-HILL

AUCTION SERVICE

KYLE MCPHAIL • 518-573-0683

AND: CAMBRIDGE

VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET

GLEN MCLENITHAN • 518-677-3895

TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK DAY OF SALE / SALE HELD RAIN OR SHINE AUCTIONEERS NOTE: GLEN & KYLE SAY COME SPEND SOME OF THAT HARD EARNED MONEY BEFORE THE END OF THE YEAR RATHER THAN GIVING IT TO UNCLE SAM !!!!!!!!!!! PLEASE VISIT AUCTIONZIP.COM ENTER AUCTIONEER ID # 11699 FOR COMPLETE DETAILS AND PICTURES.


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Tuesday, December 20 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, December 21 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market-

B RO U G HT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

ing, 716-296-5041 • 10:00 AM: 3277 Lexington Road Richmond, KY. Secured Creditors Auction: Construction Equipment, Drilling Equipment, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 Thursday, December 22 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 11:00 AM: 38 Lake St., Chateaugay, NY. Short Notice Dispersal for Gary Matthews. 50 head quality dairy cattle sell, machinery, fee,

YO U

BY

barn & farm equip. Sale Manager, Delarm & Treadway, 315-659-2407, 518-483-4106 www.delarm-treadway.com • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-3213211. Monday, December 26 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). We will be open the day after Christmas Business as usual. Happy Holiday wishes from The Hosking Family, the Sale Barn crew & Cafe Girls. We appreciate all the business & friends we have made along the way! Tom & Brenda Hosk-

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 3

Monday, December 19 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 55:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. We will be open the day after Christmas - Business as usual. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771


AUC TION CALENDAR

Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 ing 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, December 28 • 9:30 AM: Tuscaloosa, AL. Large Logging, Construction, Truck Tractors, Dump & Utility Trucks, Support Equipment Auction. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, December 30 • 10:00 AM: 398 Old Schuylerville Rd., Greenwich, NY (Washington Co. Fairgrounds). Rental Returns of New Holland, Kobelco, Cat Construction Equipment, Support, Attachments, Trucks & Trailers. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 Saturday, December 31 • 8:30 AM: Hoover Tractor, Mifflinburg, PA. 5th Annual New Years Sale. Accepting consignments. Fraley Auction Co., 570-546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com • 9:00 AM: 5253 Rt. 364, corner of Upper Hill Rd., 1 mi. E of Middlesex, NY. Melvin & Joan Bodine Retire-

ment Auction. Farm is sold, selling farm equipment and shop tools. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Monday, January 2 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. A group of Jersey & Jersey X steers.Misc. & Small Animals. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, January 7 • 9:30 AM: Pittsburgh, PA. Very Large Job Completion Auction for Fleischner Excavation. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 10:00 AM: 3517 Railroad Ave., Alexander, NY. Z&M Ag & Turf Auction. Public Auction Sale of Farm Tractors, Machinery, Landscape, Tools, Lawn Tractor & Mowers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585243-1563. www.teitsworth.com Thursday, January 12

• Portland, OR. Major Job Completion Auction. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315633-2944, 315-633-9544 Friday, January 20 • 12:00 Noon: 73 West First Ave., Windsor, PA. Public Auction of Windsor Meat Market. Operating business wit retail meat sales & custom slaughtering. Leaman Auctions, 717-464-1128 or 610-6628149 www.leamanauctions.com Saturday, January 21 • 10:00 AM: Gray’s Connecticut Valley Indoor Auction, White River Junction, VT. Townline Equipment Sales Used Equipment Auction. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., 8027852161 Monday, February 6 • Kissimmee, FL. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com Saturday, February 11 • 9:30 AM: Penn Yan, NY. Farm Machinery & farm smalls plus a few household goods for Ivan & Verna Zimmerman. L.W. Horst Auctioneer, 315-536-0954 Saturday, March 24 • Atglen, PA. The Gala at Glen Valley II. Hosted by Glen Valley Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-

2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, March 31 • Cobleskill, NY. 31st Annual Cobleskill Dairy Fashion Sale. Hosted by SUNY Cobleskill Dairy Cattle Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, April 14 • Syracuse, NY. New York Spring Holstein Sale. Held in conjunction with the New York Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, April 21 • Quarryville, PA. Wea-Land Holsteins Complete Dispersal. Landis Weaver & Family, Owners. Co-managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, July 21 • Middleburgh, NY. Reflections of Maple Downs Sale. Hosted by Maple Downs Farm II. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com

KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE R.D. 1, Little Falls, NY 315-823-0089 We Buy or Sell Your Cattle or Equipment on Commission or Outright In Business Since 1948!

NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com

TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung

LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

L. W. HORST AUCTIONEER 1445 Voak Rd., Penn Yan, NY 14527 315-536-0954 • Fax: 315-536-6189

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com

WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT December 12, 2011 Cattle: 131 Calves: 178 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whits 65-75% lean 85.50-88; Breakers 75-80% lean 73.5081.50; Boners 80-85% lean 69-80; Lean 85-90% lean 4571.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bul.s 92-125# 70-135; 80-92# 7092.50; Vealers 100-120# 6075; 90-100# 60-76; 80-90# 50-75; 70-80# 45-73; 60-70# not well tested. COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA No report * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA December 13, 2011 Beef Cattle: Canners .45.60; Cutters .55-.70; Util .68.78; Bulls .65-.85; Steers 11.15; Hfrs. .70-.85. Calves: Growers .70-1.50; Hfrs. .70-1; Veal .60-.75. Hogs: Sows 35-42; Roasters 50-110; Boars 20; Market 5570. Sheep: 76-100 Goats (ea): 90-130; Billies 175-200; Kids 50-120. Lambs: 1.50-2.30 NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA December 13, 2011 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 5-2; 61-75# 10-56; 76-95# 5-75; 96-105# 50-64; 106# & up 35-66. Farm Calves: 70-125/cwt Feeders: 59-75/cwt Heifers: 51.50-72.50/cwt Steers: 53-80/cwt Canners: 20-57/cwt Cutters: 57.50-67.50/cwt Utility: 70-81.50/cwt

Sows: 26-52/cwt Hogs: 57-62/cwt Boars: 3-16/cwt Shoats: 90-126 ea. Pigs: 21-56 ea. Lambs: 80-285/cwt Sheep: 30-125/cwt Goats: 24-177.50 ea. Rabbits: 1-7.50 ea. Poultry: 2.50-22.50 ea. Hay: 14 lots, 3-4.90/bale northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ December 13, 2011 Livestock Report: 47 Calves .12-1.36, Avg .86; 76 Cows .40-.80, Avg .62; 6 Easy Cows .14.5-.52.5, Avg .31; 13 Feeders 300-500# .58-1.16, Avg .96; 9 Heifers .57-.97, Avg .70; 10 Bulls .481.02, Avg .71; 14 Steers .371.12, Avg .80; 6 Hogs .48.5.62, Avg .53; 8 Roasting Pigs (ea) 2-30, Avg 25.25; 1 Boar 26; 3 Sows .02-.53, Avg .41; 55 Sheep .03-1.65, Avg .89; 2 Lambs (ea) 64-72, Avg 68, 94 (/#) 1.14-2.46, Avg 1.74; 8 Goats (ea) 32-88, Avg 63; 9 Kids (ea) 40-66, Avg 52.67; 40 Hides (ea) 1-20, Avg 3.86. Total 401. Poultry & Egg Report: Heavy Fowl (/#) .40-.75; Leghorn Fowl (ea) 5.50-5.75; Mixed Fowl (ea) 1.50-6; Pullets (ea) 3-6.50; Geese (ea) 24-36; Ducks (/#) 1.05-1.05; Rabbits (/#) 2-2.80; Pigeons (ea) 3-5.50; Guineas (ea) 8.50-9. Grade A Eggs: White Jum XL 1.45-1.65; L 1.40; Brown Jum XL 1.90-1.95; L 1.89; M 1.15. Hay, Straw & Grain Report: 2 Alfalfa 3.90-4.40; 23 Mixed 3.10-7.50; 6 Timothy 3.704.30; 10 Grass 2.20-4; 2 Mulch 1.60-2.60; 1 Rye Straw 5; 3 Oats 6.50; 1 Firewood 32. Total 48. CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY No report CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No report CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY December 12, 2011 Calves (/#): Grower over 92# .90-1.20; 80-92# .65-.80; Bob Veal .47-.62. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .69-.75; Lean .63-.67; Hvy. Beef Bulls .73-.80. Beef (/price): Feeders 400750# 53-86; Hfr. 65-109; Steer 57-76; Oxen 35-45; Veal 75-87. Lamb/Sheep (/#): Feeder 1.90-2.60; Market 1.30-1.70; Slaughter Sheep .81. Goats (/hd): Billies 135-180;

Nannies 71-92.50; Kids 4090. Swine (/#): Sow .40; Boar.12; Feeder Pig (ea) 40. *Buyers always looking for pigs.

Gouverneur

CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY No report DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY No report GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY No report

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge Chatham

PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY No report BATH MARKET Bath, NY December 6, 2011 Calves (/#): Grower Bulls over 92# 1.05-1.35; 80-92# .70-.95; Bob Veal .20-.40. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .66-.74; Lean .58-.64 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY December 13, 2011 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 58-75; Canners/Cutters 40-68; HY Util 65-78. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95110# 50-67.50; 80-95# 4065; 60-80# 30-62.50. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 70-132.50; 8095# 65-125; 70-80# 60-85; Hfr calves 100-160. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed 112-124.50; Sel 97-110; Hols. Ch grain fed 89-104.50; Sel 75-85. Hogs: Slgh. US 1-3 50-70; Sows US 1-3 31-50; Feeders US 1-3 34-50. Lambs: Hot house Ch 4050# 180-225; Feeder Ch 5080# 120-160; Market Ch 80100# 80-150. Slaughter Sheep: M 5567.50; Rams Ch over 130# 105. Goats (/hd): L Billies 110# & up 80-170; L Nannies 70140. FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No report Produce Mon. @ 10 am, Wed-Fri. @ 9 am sharp! FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY December 9, 2011 Hay: 1st cut 110-210; 2nd cut 150-230; 3rd cut 145257.50. Straw: 220-260 Firewood: 50 Oats: 10.50 HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY December 12, 2011 Cattle: Dairy Cows for Slaughter Bone Util .64-.74; Canners/Cutters .58-.65; Easy Cows .60 & dn.

Bulls: Bulls/Steers .68-.82. Calves: Bull Calves 96-120# .80-1.15; up to 95# .10-.95; Hols. under 100# 1. Dairy Milking age top 2750; bred hfrs. top 2300; open hfrs. top 1000. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA December 7, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75# lean 73.5074; Breakers 75-80% lean 66.75-71.75, lo dress 60.7563; Boners 80-85% lean 62.50-67, hi dress 67-70; Lean 85-90% lean 57-62, lo dress 54-57. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 12562028# 60-69.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers L 3 Hols. 380# 95; 646-658# 67.50-72. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 94-110# 120-140; No. 2 94-116# 90-115; 84-90# 80102; No. 3 96-102# 70-80; 78-92# 70-76; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 95-105# 175-180/hd; No. 2 80-90# 85-100/hd; Beef X 104# 90;Vealers Util 58112# 11-69. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 200-220# 85-90/hd; 230-270# 135142/hd; Sows US 1-3 700# 285/hd; Boars 350-500# 90100/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 10-55# 8-28; 60-90# 28-48. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 24-38# 145-170; 4060# 170-205; 74-92# 130185; 114# 135. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 65-90# 110-162.50; Sel 2 2040# 42.50-82.50; 45-65# 57.50-90; Nannies Sel 1 100130# 95-115; Sel 2 90# 95. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA December 13, 2011 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Sel & Ch full 1330-1470# 114-121.

Slaughter Cows: Prem. White & Hols. Hfrs. 74.50-86; Breakers 70-74; Boners 6671; Lean 65-70; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 57.50-64.75; Shelly 55 & dn. Bulls: 1210-1640# 65-79.50. Feeder Cattle: Hfrs. one Black X 390# 98; Bulls Dairy types 530-700# 70-76. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 140-147; No. 2 90-130# 105-140; No. 3 75-135# 75-105; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 80-90# 70-150. Swine: Hogs 245-310# 5961; 325-350# 55-66; Sows 505# 53.50; Boars 455-690# 27.50-29.50. Goats (/hd): L Nannies 100132; Billies to 220; Fancy Kids 130-149; Fleshy Kids 87-125; Small/thin/bottle 1180. Lambs: Ch & Pr 55-80# 260300; Gd & Ch 50-75# 202236; 65-85# 185-210; Gd 75110# 170-172. Sheep: (all wts.) 55-135 Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. * Special Fed Cattle Sales Dec. 20 & 27. * Breeding School - Buying Open Cows Tues., Dec. 20. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA Small Animal Sale December 13, 2011 Rabbits/Bunnies: 1.50-17 Chickens/Chicks: .50-7.50 Quail: 2.50-4 Guinea Pigs: .50 Turkey: 25 Ducks: 3-8 Pigeons: 3-3.50 Ferrets: 22 All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC Dewart, PA

December 12, 2011 Cattle: 131. Steers 12441364# 114-116; Hols. Steers Ch 1380-1524# 106.75107.25; Hfrs. 1124-1244# 115-117. Cows: Prem. White 69.5073.50; Breakers 65.50-68.50; Boners 58-65; Lean 50-60. Bulls: 1540-1858# 71.5078.50; Feeder 360-452# 97.50-120. Calves: 219. Bull Calves No. 1 94-120# 142-165; 90-92# 117-137; 82-88# 95-170; No. 2 94-130# 120-147; 90-92# 100-117; 80-88# 80-92; No. 3 94-124# 75-115; 80-92# 6087; Hfr. Calves No. 1 94-98# 180-197; No. 2 76-88# 125165; Util 10-67. Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 4270# 190-215; 74-96# 155182; Ewes 104-162# 57-75; Gd & Ch 1-3 80-100# 130145. Kid Goats (/hd): Sel 1 3040# 70-90; 60-70# 90-120; Sel 2 30-40# 50-70; 50-70# 80-95; Sel 3 20-30# 1627.50. Hogs: 278-308# up to 70; 105-150# 77.50-85. Sows: up to 62 Boars: up to 29 Hay: 25 lds, 110-400/ton. Straw: 9 lds, 100-270/ton. Earcorn: 3 lds, 200-210/ton. Firewood: 7 lds, 50-92/ld. EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA December 12, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 77.5079, hi dress 89; Breakers 7580% lean 73-76.50, hi dress 77.50, lo dress 69-72; Boners 80-85% lean 69-72.50, lo dress 66; Lean 85-90% lean 64-68.50, hi dress 69-71.50, lo dress 60.50-63. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 11201635# 78-81.50; YG 2 10701400# 67-72. Steers: M&L 1 600-700# 122.50; 700-800# 102-118. Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 117.50-127.50, few fancy 132.50-134; 500-700# 116124, few fancy 127.50; 800900# 94-100; M&L 2 300500# 101-116.

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 5

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT December 12, 2011 Calves: 45-60# .22-.28; 6175# .47.5-.50; 76-90# .55.57.5; 91-105# .60-.65; 106# & up .67.5-.70. Farm Calves: .75-.80 Started Calves: .25-.32 Veal Calves: .00-1.47.5 Open Heifers: .60-1 Beef Heifers: .67-.70 Feeder Steers: .65-.85 Beef Steers: .85-1.04 Stock Bull: 7.2.5-.95 Beef Bull: .67-.75 Boars: 1 at .09 Sows: 1 at 34 Butcher Hogs: .70-.80 Feeder Pigs (ea): .30-.90 Sheep (ea): 110-115 Lambs (ea): 140-150 Goats (ea): 100-235 Kid Goats (ea): 70-105 Canners: up to 64.50 Cutters: 65-68.50 Utility: 69.50-73 Rabbits: 5-19 Chickens: 4-13 Ducks: 4-14 On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt


Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Bulls: M&L 1 300-500# 128146; 500-600# 127.50-140; 600-700# 117-120; M&L 2 300-400# 98; 700-900# 8186. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 90-120# 130-150; No. 2 90-130# 102.50-125; No. 3 85-120# 60-95; Beef 155250# 107.50-112.50; Vealers Util 65-120# 20-40. Slaughter Hogs: Sows US 1-3 300-400# 54-62; Boars 300-500# 24-40. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 30# 32.5/hd. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 1-3 60-80# 170-185; Gd & Ch 12 40-60# 140-152.50; Yearlings 95-140# 125-160; Ewes Util 1-2 105-205# 71-90. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 37-40# 72.50-77.50; 5155# 85-105; 75-95# 125-130; 112# 130/cwt; Sel 2 40-65# 52.50-67.50; Sel 3 35# 4042.50; Nannies Sel 1 105# 87.50/cwt; Sel 2 105-110# 62.50-65; Billies Sel 1 100# 135; Sel 2 145# 85/cwt; Wethers Sel 2 115# 131/cwt. GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA December 12, 2001 Slaughter Cattle: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1386-1540# 128-131.50; Ch 2-3 1328-1582# 123128.50; 1606-1674# 118120; full YG 4-5 1404-1570# 118.50-121.50; Sel 1-3 12621488# 115.50-120; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1380-1510# 109-115; Ch 2-3 1334-1536# 103-109; 1640-1714# 109.50; Sel 1-3 1244-1390# 95-100. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & pr 2-3 1392-1412# 125.50127.50; Ch 2-3 1174-1436# 119-123; full YG 4-5 12041304# 112.50-114.50; Sel 13 1160-1340# 112-116. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 67.50-73, lo dress 62.50-67.50; Boners 80-85% lean 62-67, hi dress 67-70, lo dress 57-62.50; Lean 85-90% lean 57-62, hi dress 63-66.50, lo dress 5057.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 10241862# 77.50-84.50, hi dress 1322# 88; lo dress 10301738# 63.50-78. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L No. 1 352-434# 127.50-154; 514-558# 133-134; M&L 2 290# 145; Herefords 406# 77.50; L 3 Hols. 406# 83; 562-1156# 70-86; Hfrs. M&L 1 300-405# 120-138.50; 520604# 107.50-130.50; 8371166# 98-106; M&L 2 306469# 100-122.50; 512-726# 85-115; Herefords 452-618# 77-89; Bulls M&L 1 305-440# 127.50-154; 575-776# 97125; 811-1020# 93-102; M&L 2 268-412# 120-125; 736# 93; L 3 Hols. 292-324# 62.50-70. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bull Calves No. 1 94-120# 135162.50; No. 2 94-120# 95135; 84-92# 70-95; No. 3 94116# 67.50-95; 78-92# 6575. Utility: 70-110# 25-70. Sows: US 1-3 506-582# 52-

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four 59. Boars: 552# 27. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 47-70# 167.50-245; 70-108# 145-210; 114-142# 172.50-187.50; Ewes Gd 2-3 172-216# 67.50-75; Rams 178-254# 60-85. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-65# 72.50-120; 70-90# 120-160; Sel 2 under 20# 1929; 20-40# 35-72.50; 45-65# 50-100; 70-80# 90-145;Nannies Sel 1 95-160# 90-120; Sel 2 80-100# 59-82.50; Billies Sel 1 130-185# 155-215. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA No report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA December 3, 2011 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 220-400 Mixed Hay: 12 lds, 205-360 Grass: 7 lds, 230-310 Straw: 8 lds, 165-210 Firewood: 7 lds, 35-65 Oats: 2 lds, 5.75-6 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA December 9, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1230-1595# 127-131; Ch 2-3 1220-1575# 125.50127; Sel 2-3 1120-1260# 110-114; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 23 1385-1615# 110-114; Ch 2-3 1355-1615# 98.50-104; Sel 2-3 1138-1455# 88-93. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 7073.50, hi dress 75-78, lo dress 68-70.50; Breakers 7580% lean 66-69, lo dress 6365; Boners 80-85% lean 6265, hi dress 66.50-67, lo dress 58-60; Lean 85-90% lean 56-60, hi dress 62.5063.50, lo dress 52-55. Slaughter Bulls: Thurs. YG 1 920-1625# 73-76.50, lo dress 1250-1950# 67-70.50; Bullocks 915-1320# 73-77; hi dress 900-1440# 83-85.50, lo dress 885-1350# 65702090-2155# 69-69.50. Graded Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 114-128# 142-150; 94112# 155-159; 90-92# 105; No. 2 94-118# 144-156; 8892# 119; 80-86# 70; No. 3 100-130# 105-118; 80-98# 67-70; 72-78# 90; Util 60-

110# 20-35; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 90-95# 185-210; No. 2 pkg 85-120# 50-100. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA December 10, 2011 Alfalfa: 270-340 Mixed Hay: 190-350 Timothy: 210-310 Grass: 190-295 Straw: 165-230 Corn: 70-120 Oats: 7 LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA December 7, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1240-1600# 128-132, few fancy 133-134.50; Ch 2-3 1135-1600# 124-128; 16101700# 1200-126.50; Sel 2-3 1040-1345# 118-122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1365-1645# 108-122, few 113-115; Ch 23 1270-1720# 101-107.50; Sel 2-3 1305-1615# 97-100. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1300-1500# 127129.50; Ch 2-3 990-1315# 123-125.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 74-76; Breakers 75-80% lean 72-74, hi dress 75-78, lo dress 6569; Boners 80-85% lean 6871, hi dress 71-74, lo dress 62-67; Lean 85-90% lean 61.50-65, hi dress 66.5068.50, lo dress 55-60. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 12751760# 75-78, lo dress 68.5073.50; Bullocks 970-1500# 73.50-78, hi dress 92-103. Feeder Cattle: Steers L 3 Hols. 510-700# 55-65. Vealers: 70-100# 30-67.50; 55-65# 17.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 130-145; 8590# 95-105; No. 2 95-130# 120-140; 80-90# 75-85; No. 3 95-120# 70-115; 80-90# 47.50-65. Lambs: Ch 2-3 75-90# 172.50-180. Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-50# 8590; Sel 2 20-30# 45-50;Nannies Sel 3 70-100# 52.5072.50. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 50-54% lean 225-230# 60-63. MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION

Middleburg, PA December 6, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1270-1565# 128-133; Ch 2-3 1320-1570# 123-128; 1605-1660# 116-122; full YG 4-5 1235-1555# 116-120; Sel 1-3 1110-1560# 115-122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 13651515# 108.50-115; Ch 2-3 1295-1520# 105-109; Sel 1-3 1420-1550# 95-102. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1295-1490# 127-131; Ch 2-3 1130-1460# 119-125; full YG 4-5 1055-1270# 114118; Sel 1-3 990-1210# 113118. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 74; Breakers 75-80% lean 67-70, hi dress 72.50, lo dress 6367; Boners 80-85% lean 6266, hi dress 68-68.50, lo dress 58-61; Lean 85-90% lean 58-61, hi dress 60-63, lo dress 52-55. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9651835# 73-83.50, hi dress 1385# 90, lo dress 8702325# 60-69; Bullocks 11201225# 83-88. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 340405# 127-140; 575-700# 103-122; M&L 2 290-435# 112-132; L 3 Hols. 230-282# 70-75; 415# 80; 535-775# 77-85. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 247265# 102-132; 370-495# 105-125; 530-640# 105-115; Herefords 415# 97; M&L 2 247-290# 100-112; 315-495# 87-109; 515-630# 80-105; Herefords 390-470# 70-85. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 295485# 118-140; 555-830# 92121; M&L 2 275# 90; 485# 97; 775# 85; Herefords 340# 65; L 3 Hols. 245-295# 7582; 522# 76. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 135-172; 90# 110-120; No. 2 95-120# 100137; 80-90# 85-107; No. 3 95-110# 70-95; 80-90# 6580; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 85# 85145; Beef X 95# 117; Vealers Util 65-125# 30-70. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 245-277# 68-73.50; 282-322# 68-72; 45-50% lean 245-270# 6669.50; 282-295# 68-69.50. Sows: US 1-3 420-485# 4757.50; 515-745# 52-59. Boars: 465-745# 28-30.50; Jr. Boars 270-365# 43-51. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 60-

105# 23-57. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 40-67# 187-265; 7095# 157-182; 117-162# 130145; Ewes Gd 2-3 140-195# 75-85; 248# 67; Rams 190215# 60-77. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 4550# 125-135; 60-80# 127.50165; Sel 2 25-40# 35-75; 4555# 75-120; 60-70# 95-115. Slaughter Nannies: Sel 1 110-160# 102-135; Sel 2 90130# 70-105; Sel 3 70-100# 60-75. Wethers: Sel 1 120-160# 145-170. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA December 12, 2011 Cattle: 120 Cows: Steers Ch 110-118; Gd 100-110; Hfrs. Ch 110115; Gd 95-105; Util & Comm. 60-70; Canner/lo Cutter 60 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 70-78 Bulls: YG 1 65-70 Feeder Cattle: Steers 110118; Bulls 90-105; Hfrs. 80110. Calves: 102. Ch 90-110; Gd 75-90; Std 15-70; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 70-150. Hogs: 38. US 1-2 75-78; US 1-3 70-75; Sows US 1-3 3560; Boars 24-42. Feeder Pigs: 30. US 1-3 2050# 5-30. Sheep: 36. Ch Lambs 160180; Gd 140-150; SI Ewes 50-70. Goats: 15-195 MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA December 12, 2011 Alfalfa: 285-305 Alfalfa/Grass: 250-330 Grass: 190-245 Timothy: 185-215 Mixed Hay: 150-190 Round Bales: 100-195 Lg. Sq. Bales: 215-260 Straw: 190-205 Wood: 50-70 Fodder: 85 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA December 12, 2011 Roosters: 3-5 Hens: 1.25-3.40 Pigeons: 2 Guineas: 5 Bunnies: 1.25-4 Rabbits: 5-10 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA December 8, 2011 Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 12401600# 128-132, few fancy 133-134.50; Ch 2-3 11351600# 124-128; 1610-1700# 120-126.50; Sel 2-3 10401345# 118-122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1365-1645# 108112, few 113-115; Ch 2-3 1270-1720# 101-107.50; Sel 2-3 1305-1615# 97-100.

Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1300-1500# 127129.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 74-76; Breakers 75-80% lean 72-74, hi dress 75-78, lo dress 6569; Boners 80-85% lean 6871, hi dress 71-74, lo dress 62-67; Lean 88-90% lean 61.50-65, hi dress 66.5068.50, lo dress 55-60. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 12751760# 75-78, lo dress 68.5073.50; 970-1500# 73.50-78, hi dress 92-103. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 114-128# 142-150; 94-112# 155-159; 90-92# 105; No. 2 94-118# 144-156; 88-92# 119; 80-86# 70; No. 3 100130# 105-118; 80-88# 67-70; 72-78# 90; Util 60-110# 2035. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 90-95# 185-210; No. 2 85120# 50-100. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA December 7, 2011 US 1-2: 4, 13# 170; 48, 2025# 170-190; 16, 25-30# 140-150; 77, 30-40# 120145; 67, 40-60# 110-120; 12, 80-90# 75-90. US 2: 11, 15-20# 180-210; 107, 20-30# 100-140; 31, 2030# 175-180, 45 30-40# 100150, mostly 100-130; 20, 5055# 105-115; 33, 60-90# 7585. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA December 12, 2011 Slaughter Lambs: Non-traditional markets: Wooled & Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 245-305, new crop 40-50# 358-390; 60-80# 180-250, new crop 60-70# 298-312; 80-90# 180-195; 90-110# 180-192, new crop 90-110# 212-134; 110-130# 179-194; 130-150# 170-185; 150-200# 155-170; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 40-60# 203-224; 60-80# 175-203; 90-110# 161-176; 110-130# 160-174; 130-150# 135-150; 150-200# 108-123. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 91-104; 160200# 87-103; 200-300# 7590; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120160# 78-84; 160-200# 72-84. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 3040# 92-100; 40-60# 90-119; 60-80# 116-134; 80-90# 131146; 90-100# 141-156; Sel 2 30-40# 69-84; 40-60# 73104; 60-80# 105-122; 80-90# 117-132; 100-110# 130-139; Sel 3 30-40# 64-80; 40-60# 62-83; 60-80# 83-94; 80-90# 94-103. Slaughter Nannies/Does: Sel 1 80-130# 121-136; 130180# 124-140; Sel 2 80-130# 108-124; 130-180# 116-131; Sel 3 50-80# 76-91; 80-130# 90-105. Slaughter Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 196-211; 150-200# 253-266; Sel 2 100-150# 160-175; 150-250# 190-205. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report

Month Ago 4.13, Year Ago 2.70; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.16-11.50, Avg 10.54, Month Ago 10.95, Year Ago 12.05; EarCorn Range 195220; Avg 199.60, Month Ago 196.66, Year Ago 144.83. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 5.64-6.50, Avg 6.10; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.36; Oats No. 2 3.75-4.90, Avg 4.38; Soybeans No. 2 10.42. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary December 9, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 128-134; Ch 1-3 123128; Sel 1-2 117-122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110-116; Ch 2-3 101-107.50; Sel 1-2 95.50-99.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 125-131; Ch 1-3 119125.50; Sel 1-2 113-118. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 67-71.50; Boners 80-85% lean 63-68; Lean 85-90% lean 58-62. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 83-90; Avg dress 74-79; lo dress 68.50-73.50. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 145-162; 500-700# 120-152; M&L 2 300-500# 125-140; 500-700# 110-126. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300500# 120-146; 500-700# 120-137; M&L 2 300-500# 100-125; 500-700# 100-120. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 130-165; 500-700# 118-134; M&L 2 300-500# 107-129; 500-700# 87-114. Vealers: Util 60-120# 10-65. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols.

bulls 95-125# 130-170; No. 2 95-125# 100-145; No. 3 80120# 60-110; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 185-250; No. 2 80-105# 85-185. Hogs: Barrows & Glts 4954% lean 220-270# 66-72; 45-50% lean 220-270# 6465. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 5863; 500-700# 58.50-62.50. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 12 20-25# 170-190; 25-30# 140-150; 30-40# 120-145; 40-60# 110-120; 80-90# 7590; US 2 15-20# 180-210; 20-30# 100-140; 20-30# 175180; 30-40# 100-150. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 250-275, new crop to 310; 60-80# 208235, new crop to 270; 80110# 168-203; 110-150# 162-178; Ch 1-3 40-60# 215255; 60-80# 180-200; 80110# 160-183; 110-150# 151-164; Ewes Gd 2-3 120160# 80-95; 160-200# 74-89; Util 1-2 120-160# 60-75; 160200# 58-73. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 84-110; 60-80# 120153; 80-100# 141-170; Sel 2 40-60# 75-92; 60-80# 81106; 80-100# 105-140; Sel 3 40-60# 61-79; 60-80# 79-95; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 112122; 130-180# 120-134; Sel 2 80-130# 94-108; 130-180# 107-115; Sel 3 80-130# 8398; Billies Sel 1 100-150# 171-186; 150-250# 209-224; Sel 2 100-150# 146-161; 150-250# 168-180. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary

Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Alfalfa 175-250; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 160-300; Timothy 150-200; Straw 100-160 clean; Mulch 60-80. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 192 lds Hay, 40 Straw. Alfalfa 155-510; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 155-500; Timothy 215-340; Grass Hay 135-400; Straw 165-260. Diffenbach Auct, December 5, 85 lds Hay, 11 lds Straw. Alfalfa 255-510; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 140-500; Timothy 200335; Grass 185-400; Straw 185-240. Green Dragon, Ephrata: December 9, 57 lds Hay, 16 Straw. Alfalfa 155-385; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 155-370; Timothy 220-340; Grass Hay 135-240; Straw 165-210. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: December 8, 35 lds Hay, 9 Straw. Alfalfa 350-390; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 190-275; Timothy 320-330; Grass 150350; Straw 170-235. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola, PA: December 7, 15 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa 240; Alfalfa/Grass Mix 205-350; Timothy 215-285; Grass 120-245; Straw 177-260. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 135 Loads Hay, 22 Straw. Alfalfa 250-400; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 100-400; Timothy 170325; Grass 140-410; Straw 165-220. Belleville Auct, Belleville:

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December 7, 22 lds Hay, 0 lds Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 125-320. Dewart Auction, Dewart: December 5, 19 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 100-400; Straw 170-200. Greencastle Livestock: December 5 & 8, 14 lds Hay, 0 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass 102.50-212.50. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: December 3, 22 lds Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa 310-400; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 205-360; Grass Hay 230-310; Straw 165-210 clean. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: December 7, 23 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Alfalfa 300; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 140-290; Grass 100-195; Straw 120245. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: December 3 & 6, 35 lds Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa 220275; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 100-335; Timothy 170-325; Grass 140-410; Straw 132.50-235 clean. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: December 2, 18 lds Hay, 0 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass 215-257.50. VINTAGE SALES STABLES Paradise, PA December 12, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1300-1560# 127-130; Ch 2-3 1050-1535# 124.50127.50; Sel 2-3 1155-1425# 115-118; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 23 few 1385-1505# 114-116; Ch 2-3 few 1290-1520# 109.50-112. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1150-1345# 121-122. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 73.25-75.75; Breakers 75-80% lean 65.50-69, hi dress70.50-73.50; Boners 80-85% lean 63-66; Lean 8590% lean 58-62.50, lo dress 52-56.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-125# 135-150; No. 2 95115# 115-130; 85-90# 75-85; No. 3 95-130# 100-110; 7595# 60-70; Util 70-115# 4565. Holstein Heifers: No. 2 80115# 70-100. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA December 8, 2011 Alfalfa: 2 lds, 350-390 Timothy Hay: 3 lds, 320330 Orchard Grass: 5 lds, 225300. Mixed Hay: 15 lds, 190-275 Grass: 10 lds, 150-350 Straw: 9 lds, 170-235 Firewood: 5 lds, 45-125 Corn Fodder: 4 lds, 90-145 Soybean Stalks: 1 ld, 110 WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA December 14, 2011 Alfalfa: 4 lds, 170-250 Mixed: 25 lds, 150-390 Timothy: 6 lds, 130-325 Grass: 20 lds, 170-290 Clover: 1 ld, 135 Straw: 12 lds, 145-225 Bean Stubble: 1 ld, 72 Fodder: 2 lds, 60-100 Firewood: 55/ld

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 7

PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to last week corn sold steady to .05 lower, wheat sold .05-.10 lower, barley sold steady to .05 lower, Oats sold steady to .05 lower & Soybeans sold .15-.20 lower. EarCorn sold steady. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.65-7.05, Avg 6.79, Contracts 5.45-5.46; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.537.06, Avg 6.27, Contracts 5.28-5.83; Barley No. 3 Range 4.70-6, Avg 5.40, Contracts 4.50; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50-5, Avg 4.66; Soybeans No 2 Range 10.32-10.57, Avg 10.46, Contracts 10.75; EarCorn Range 195-198, Avg 196.50. Central PA: Corn No. 2

Range 6.40-6.70, Avg 6.56; Wheat 5.73; Barley No. 3 Range 4.75-5.25, Avg 5; Oats No. 2 Range 3.60-4.30, Avg 3.95; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.30-11.50, Avg 10.66; EarCorn Range 195220, Avg 207.50. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.35-6.85, Avg 6.60; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.60-6.73, Avg 6.09; Barley No. 3 Range 4.25-5.30, Avg 4.80; Oats No. 2 Range 3-4, Avg 3.55; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.16-10.57, Avg 10.50; EarCorn Range 190. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 6.50-6.92, Avg 6.69; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.85; Barley No. 3 Range 4.95; Oats No. 2 Range 4.75; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.40-10.80, Avg 10.53; Gr. Sorghum Range 5.96. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.35-7.05, Avg 6.67, Month Ago 6.85, Year Ago 5.71; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.53-7.06, Avg 6.25, Month Ago 6.16, Year Ago 7.13; Barley No. 3 Range 4.25-6, Avg 5.01, Month Ago 4.96 Year Ago 3.63; Oats No. 2 Range 3-5, Avg 4.08,


NRCS now accepting applications to protect farmland in Connecticut TOLLAND, CT — Connecticut State Conservationist for the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCSJay Mar) has announced the sign-up period for the agency’s Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program (FRPP). “Applications are currently being accepted,” said Mar. “However, the cutoff date for this year’s funding is Feb. 24. This program helps ensure that valuable, productive land is protected. Since 1996, NRCS has provided $32 million to protect over 100 farmers in Con-

necticut,” he said. FRPP provides matching funds to help purchase development rights to keep farms in agricultural uses. Working through existing partner programs, USDA works with state, tribal, or local governments and nongovernmental organizations to purchase conservation easements from landowners. USDA provides up to 50 percent of the fair market easement value of the conservation easement. To qualify, farmland must be part of a pending offer from a qualified

state, tribe, or local farmland protection program; be privately owned; contain at least 50 percent prime, statewide, or local important farmland soils; and include at least onethird cropland, grassland, and pasture land of the total acreage. All funds will be awarded to the highest ranking eligible parcels through a statewide, competitive process. Applications submitted after Feb. 24 will be held for 2013 funding consideration. For more information, visit NRCS on the web at

www.ct.nrcs.usda.gov/p rograms, or contact your nearest USDA Field Of-

fice: Danielson, 860779-0557; Hamden, 203-287-8038; Norwich,

860-887-3604; Torrington, 860-626-8258; Windsor, 860-688-7725.

Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

Agriculture and Food Conference of Southeastern Massachusetts The Agriculture and Food Conference of Southeastern Massachusetts will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 25, at Bristol County Agricultural High School in Dighton, MA. Registration is now open for this fifth annual conference presented by SEMAP and Bristol County Conservation District. This all-day event will feature an informationpacked range of 18 workshops, plus a special se-

ries of workshops on organic practices and three youth sessions for children ages 9-12. Offerings will include: • Three workshops by Will Bonsall of the Scatterseed Project; • Sessions on the business of farming, including marketing, land leasing and institutional sales; • New organic track workshops developed in partnership with NOFA/ Massand made possible by a USDA Specialty Crop

Block Grant and Mass Grown & Fresher; • Resource fair where you can learn about organizations and businesses helping you to grow; • Locally-sourced lunch included in registration; • Seed swap and more. Registration for this day-long event is $50 for the public and $35 for farmers. Register online at http://semaponline .org/semap/classesevents/ or call 508-2952212, ext. 50.

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Building family business relations Part 1: The family business environment Understanding the family business environment starts the process of success with family labor. The family business environment typically has the following key characteristics: 1. The family and the business overlap. Family considerations affect many business decisions; for example, business expansion is

justified by a son’s interest in the business. On the other hand, business considerations affect many family decisions; for example, bathroom and kitchen remodeling must wait until an additional truck is paid for. 2. The small business way of life brings great satisfaction to family members. Many fami-

lies want to continue their attachment to the business and each other as long as possible. Children grow up wanting to raise their children the way their parents raised them. 3. Family pride, values, history, and willingness to sacrifice drive the business to success. The family business is much more

than a business. It is often a family’s identity in the community. Family members are willing to sacrifice much for the success of the business. 4. The family culture emphasizes self-employment. Most owners highly value self-employment. Not surprisingly, their children are often raised to prefer self-employment over

working for someone else, especially a neighboring business. The desire to be part of ownership and management often dominates career decisions. 5. The opportunities provided by a small business may not fit the strengths of family members. The strengths of younger siblings in the management of

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 9

crops, machinery, or sales often duplicate the strengths already in the business. An answer to the desperate need for strengths in financial management, marketing, or labor management may be nowhere to be found among family members in the business. 6. The family business often limits the opportunities for career growth. A capable young family member often joins a family business while his or her parents are in the middle of their careers. Grandparents may still play a dominant role. In this situation, reality is waiting 30 years for one’s first significant taste of top management decision making. 7. Chronic health problems, weather, marital problems, economic difficulties, and calamities impede progress of the business. Factors over which the family has little control continuously affect the outcomes of plans and expectations. 8. Family members often come into the business with vague job descriptions, compensation packages, and placement in the business hierarchy. Confidence that everything will work out substitutes for careful discussion of the pros and cons for joining the business. Growing up in the business or marrying into it leads to the conclusion that not much can or will change. Several of these family characteristics appear negative. In fact, many family businesses are unsuccessful in bringing in succeeding generations. The challenge is to take advantage of the significant strengths of family businesses while dealing with their inherent weaknesses. Many family businesses succeed and thrive generation after generation. Top managers and the rest of the family working hard at family relations explain the success. The following three sections suggest guidelines that can help bring about the success. Source: www.extension.org/pages/15587 /building-family-business-relations


Registration open for the NMC 51st Annual Meeting Join us in Beach, FL for 51st Annual scheduled for 24, 2012 TradeWinds Grand Resort. Please note

St. Pete the NMC Meeting, Jan. 22at the Island that the

meeting will follow a slightly revised format compared to previous years. Be sure to note the changes, particularly the time for the committee meetings, short courses, and featured

symposium: • Committee meetings will be held on all three days (Sunday afternoon, Monday & Tuesday mornings) rather than all day on Monday, as has been the tradition in

the past. • The featured symposium has been moved from Sunday afternoon to Tuesday afternoon. • The general sessions and poster session will be held Monday and Tuesday.

• Short courses will be held on Sunday afternoon/evening and Tuesday evening. Please note that online registration for the meeting is preferred. You may pay by check or credit card if you register on-

line. Register by Jan. 2 and receive the earlybird discount. It is also advisable to make your hotel reservations early. The deadline is Dec. 27, but the room block could fill up before that date.

Page 10 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

Jersey leaders honored with memorial gifts to Jersey Youth Academy Memorial gifts were received from 11 different donors through Dec. 10, for Jersey Youth Academy. The Jersey Youth Academy was created in 2008 by the Board of Directors of the American Jersey Cattle Association to attract, educate and retain talented young people for careers in the Jersey dairy business. The program is conducted every two years, with all program costs paid by the Academy fund. Calvin and Lorraine Covington, Clemmons, NC, made a contribution in memory of Norma “Duffy” L yon, Toledo, Iowa. Known the world over as “the Butter Cow Lady,” Duffy was named an AJCA Honorary Member in 2007 and was World Dairy Expo’s Dairywoman of the Year in 1990. Memorial gifts were also received honoring

Neal F. Schirm, Canal Winchester, Ohio. A lifelong Jersey breeder, Schirm served as Director of the American Jersey Cattle Club and received the AJCA Distinguished Service Award in 2004. He was one of the founders and original delegates to the Central Ohio Breeders Association. Making contributions were J. Lawrence and Barbara C. Benson, New Lebanon, NY; Frank and Diane Bordonaro, Mineral Ridge, Ohio; Arlene Chamberlain, Wyoming, NY; COBA/Select Sires, Inc., Columbus, Ohio; Mary S. Creek, Hagerstown, MD; D. Todd and Kelly J. Kranz, Dublin, Ohio; Lawrence E. and Betty E. Neel, Lancaster, Ohio; the Ohio Jersey Breeders Association Inc.; Jeanne and Harold Schacht, Canal Winchester, Ohio; and Wickstrom Jersey Farms, Inc., Hilmar, CA.

HOS-COT BUILDERS, INC. Box 12, South Street • Hoosick, NY 12089

Phone: (518) 686-4422

# Free Stall Barns # Milking Parlors # Machine Sheds # Farm Shops # Tie Stall Barns # Milkhouses # Horse Barns # Heifer Barns

= CUSTOM DESIGN SERVICE = A SPECIALTY Concrete Forming and Flat Work Quality Construction At Reasonable Cost Excellent References

Where One Call Brings It All!

Season’s Greetings And Best Wishes for A Prosperous New Year From All of Us at Hos-Cot Celebrating 38 Years In Business

Jersey Youth Academy is exempt from federal income taxes under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. For more information on contributing to the Academy endowment or any of the other permanent funds managed by the American Jersey Cattle Association, contact the Development Department at 614-322-4456.

1989 MF 3090 MFWD, cab, air, 95 hp, 32 speed trans ex 18.4x38 radials 13.6x28 radials front fenders 540+1000 PTO real clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000

2009 Degelman 40.7H Agriplus material handler 9000lb lift 1286 hrs, 4 speed power shift cab, air, drawbar, 94 inch bucket, forks and bale spear like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$55,000

1998 JD 5410 MFWD, 12x12 trans lift hand reverser 3391 hrs 16.9x30 rears 11.2x24 fronts 540 loader with joystick folding roll bar, 73 inch bucket, very clean, sharp, runs ex .$22,500

2006 JD 6320 2WD, cab, air, power quad, left hand reverser 2419 hrs, ex 16.9x38 radials, 540+1000 pto buddy seat very clean sharp original ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000 2006 JD 6320 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed PQ LHR, 1100 hrs, buddy seat dual pto 460/85R/38 and 420/85R/24 front fenders with JD 563 SL loader electronic joystick 3rd valve to front mint cond like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,500 2005 JD 5225 468 hrs, 9 speed sync shuttle trans, 2 remotes 540 and 1000 pto 3 point hitch 14.9x28 tires like new . . . . .$16,500 2004 JD 7220 MFWD, cab, air, IVT trans 2539 hrs, buddy seat 4 remotes 18.4x42 and 14.9x30 radials front fenders very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,500 2004 JD 6420 MFWD cab, air, 24 speed power quad LHR, 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 Michelin radials buddy seat only 48 original actual hrs just like brand new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,500 2004 JD 6320 2WD, cab, air, power quad, LHR, ex 16.9x38 radials, 540+1000 pto buddy seat 3079 hrs, very clean sharp original . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 1998 JD 6410 MFWD, cab, air, power quad LHR, 4936 hrs, new 18.4x38 rears 13.6x28 fronts with JD 640 SL loader runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 1998 5510 narrow orchard cab, air, 5621 hrs, syncro reverser 2 remotes outback plus joystick and loader brackets 380-85-28 rears 280x80R18 fronts ex running clean tractor . . . . .$20,000 1997 JD 7210 MFWD, cab, air, power quad LHR, 4800 hrs, ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radials JD 740 SL loader runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,000 1988 JD 4450 MFWD, cab, air, 15 speed power shift 12 front weights 14.9x46 radials rear 14.9x30 radials front 3ph quick coupler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30,000 1986 JD 2550 cab, air, 3552 hrs, 18.4x30 tires dual remotes with like new JD 620 loader joystick and new 7' bucket real clean runs ex only used on a bale spear before . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,500 1985 JD 1030 roll bar and canopy same as JD 1530 2900 hrs diesel very very clean tight sharp one owner runs ex . .$6,000 1983 JD 2950 with laurin cab 4732 hrs, ex 18.4x38 radials 16 speed trans dual pto and remotes sharp runs ex . . . . .$12,500 1979 JD 3130 (same as 2840) 18.4x34 rears 4734 hrs, 540 +1000 pto with hiniker cab good original tractor runs ex . . . . . .$6,500 1968 JD 4020D power shift with added on sound guard cab ex 18.4x38s dual remotes runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1998 White 6710 cab, air, 95hp, 4242 hrs, 8x4 power shift right hand reverser 3 remotes 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 with Quicke 465 loader new 7ft bucket clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,500 1980 White 2-105 MFWD, cab, 5100 hrs, brand new 20.8x38 RL 14 ply tires ex 16.9x26 fronts dual pto and remotes runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500

1994 Ford 7840 MFWD, 90hp, cab, air, SLE, 4995 hrs, ex 18.4x38 radials ex 14.9x28 radials ex Ford 7413 loader very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,500 1990 Ford 5610 Series 2, factory cab, air, 2587 hrs, 18.4x30 and 12.4x24 dual power 2 remotes real clean runs ex . . . .$14,500 1989 Ford TW 15 MFWD, cab, air, series 2 20.8x38s and 16.9x28s 10 front weights and rear weights, 6180 hrs 3 remotes very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,000 1988 Ford 7710 Series, 2WD cab, air, 3 remotes dual power 4430 hrs, very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 1987 Ford 4610 series 2 MFWD, 2300 original one owner hours ex 16.9x30 and 11.2x24 8 speed ex allied 594 quick tatch loader front mounted pump ex tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,000 1982 Ford 3610 42 hp, 3347 hrs, 8 speed trans single remote 540 pto 14.9x28s runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 1979 Ford 5600 with Hiniker 1300 cab 62 hp 4094 hrs, ex 16.9x30 tires dual remotes 540 pto sharp very clean runs ex . . .$7,500 2005 CIH JX95 MFWD, cab, air, 80 hp, 841 hrs, 18.4x30 and 12.4x24 Goodyear super traction radials front fenders dual remotes like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,500 2005 CIH JX 1075C, MFWD, 62 pto 75 engine HP, 16 speed trans LHR, 16.9x30 rears 11.2x24 fronts dual remotes 2025 hrs, with Stoll F8 self leveling loader very clean sharp one owner ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1999 CIH MX200 MFWD, cab, air, 6400 hrs, 540 + 1000 PTO 4 remotes 20.8x46 axle duals ex 16.9x34 radials front fenders and weights very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,000 1995 CIH 7220 Magnum MFWD, cab, air, 5657 hrs, ex 20.8x42 radials rear ex 16.9x30 radials front front fenders and weights dual pto 3 remotes very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . .$46,500 1984 IH 684D only 2317 original hrs ex 18.4x30 rears roll bar and canopy with ex CIH 2250 quick tatch loader joystick very clean original one owner hobby farmer ex tractor . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1983 Case 2290 cab, air, 129 hp 20.8x38s 540+1000 pto 5400 hrs, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 1980 Case 2090 cab, air, power shift 4561 hrs, 540+1000 pto dual remotes 20.8x38s real clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 1977 IH 986 factory cab 5717 hrs, dual pto and remotes like new 20.8x38 firestone 7000 radials very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 1977 IH 1086 cab, air, 6100 hrs, 18.4x38 radials dual pto and remotes clean original Illinios tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 1975 IH 666D with cab 5900 hrs, new 18.4x34s dual remotes good TA very clean sharp original must see runs ex . . . . . . . .$8,000 1976 Massey Ferguson 245 diesel 5114 hrs, 13.6x28 rears, 3ph, 1 set of remotes very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 New Holland 310 baler with NH 75 hydraulic pan type kicker real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500

1994 New Holland 575 wire tie baler hydraulic bale tension pickup head and hitch NH model 77 pan type kicker real nice .$7,000 JD 337 baler with kicker and hydraulic tension . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 2005 Claas 260 variant with netwrap and twine 4ft by 5ft super sharp like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 2004 Claas 260 variant rotocut with netwrap and twine 4ft by up to 5ft super sharp like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,500 2005 CIH RBX 453 4x4 round baler dual electric tie bale ramps baled less than 2000 bales like new mint baler . . . . . . .$9,500 2003 New Holland BR750 4x6 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps netwarp endless belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 2000 JD 446 4x4 round baler bale age kit like new belts ex$8,500 1999 New Holland 648 silage special round baler wide pickup head bale ramps very nice 4x5 baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 CIH 3440 4x4 round baler nice little baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 1996 New Holland 644 4x5 round baler silage special wide pickup head bale ramps net wrap very nice baler . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 CIH 3450 4x5 round baler very clean nice baler . . . . . . . . .$3,500 Gallignani 3200 4x4 round baler rolls and chains very clean ex baleage baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 CIH No 10 flail chopper nice one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 NH model 38 flail chopper like new flails hydraulic lift on head electric controls good clean chopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,750 Kverneland Taarup 17 ft hydraulic fold tedder ex cond 2 years old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Massey Ferguson model 72 manual fold up hay tedder big tire very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 2010 Anderson RB 500 trailer type bale wrapper 30 in plastic auto start and cut with electric start Honda gas engine just like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 Late model Kuhn KC 4000G center pivot discbine rubber rolls ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 NH 144 windrow inverter nice one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 IH manure spreader model 500 ground drive good chain 75 bushel nice little spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$800 Agrimetal 24 in front mounted PTO powered leaf blower ex .$2,000 IH 450 3 bottom 3ph auto reset plow very nice . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 CIH 7500 4BT variable width auto rest plow 16-20 inches like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 20.8x38, 20.8x42, 18.4x46 clamp on duals 18.4x38, 18.4x42s and 20.8x38 10 bolt axle duals and hubs 10ft power angle snowplow with mounting brackets cylinders and hoses off JD 6420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 8ft front mounted snow pusher with mounting bracket for farm tractor with cylinder and hoses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000 8ft 6 in hi volume 3ph box blade for snow . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,000

Financing Available Delivery Available

Bures Bros. Equipment

23 Kings Highway Ext., Shelton, CT 06484

1-203-924-1492


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Announcements

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, December 21st For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com Announcements

Bedding

    

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call Lee Publications 518-673-0101 Beth bsnyder@leepub.com YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering. CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

Concrete Products

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS®

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL

- WANTED -

At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

40 Years Experience

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

 WANTED 

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

HEIFERS

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

Seward Valley 518-234-4052

(ALL SIZES)

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. Call SAVE! 1-800-688-1187

We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Dairy Equipment Beef Cattle

BERG-BENNETT, INC.

Dairy Cattle Certified Organic herd reduction - grass fed Belted Galloway cattle. Cow-calf pairs and champion bull. Young stock all certified organic. SW NH 508-5619107 REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050 REGISTERED Red Belted Galloway bull, US BGS# 9979R 6 yrs. Exc. bloodlines. Has been haltered, $1,800.00. N.H. 603-6482333 lv. message.

Barn Repair BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Building Materials/Supplies

Building Materials/Supplies

Metal Roofing

HEIFER BOARDING Concentrate Your Efforts on Making Milk - Let Us Raise Your Heifers - Quality Care ~ References Available ~ SILAGE ALSO AVAILABLE Springfield, VT • 802-885-4000

Herd Expansions

WANTED All Size Heifers

RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866 Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

315-269-6600

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

Cut to the INCH

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE:

Agricultural Commercial Residential

Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

16 s Color

24-29 G Pane a. ls

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822 978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

Building Materials/Supplies

Agricultural Buildings Metal Roofing Pressure Treated Posts

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

WANTED HEIFERS ~ ALL SIZES ~

CENTER HILL BARNS RICHARD PITMAN, INC

P.O. BOX 262  EPSOM  NEW HAMPSHIRE 03234

TELEPHONE 603.798.5087

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

FAX 603.798.5088

Dairy Equipment

HEIFER HAVEN 518-481-6666

Harry Neverett Joey St. Mary

518-651-1818 518-569-0503

“Heifers R Us”

Dairy Equipment USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

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December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 11

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Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Fencing

FORD 1710 diesel, 4 WD, w/ ldr., $4,800; White #252, 10’ transport/ disk harrows, $2,800; Kelly backhoe, 8’, 3 ph., $1,900; Kub #4560 backhoe, 9’, $3,200; JD & NH tandem manure sprdrs, $2,000 each; JD 34 manure sprdr, 120 bu., $600; Flail mowers, 5’ & 8’, $800 & $1,300; Henke chipper, 6”- hyd. feed, $2,200; 4’ 7’ bush hogs, $400 & up. Full line of farm equipment available! 802-885-4000

SANDY DODGE

WELLSCROFT FENCE SYSTEMS

MILKING PARLOR COMPONENTS FOR SALE: • Double 10 Herringbone with Germania Model B arm take offs • Double 10 Blue Diamond stalls and indexing neck rail. • 3” stainless steel line with receiver jar, variable speed pump (three phase), wash system and sink. • Updated Legend vacuum pump with variable speed drive, three phase • Model 70 Delaval vacuum pump, single phase (backup) • Almost new Delaval Delatron 100 pulsators with two control boxes • Plate Cooler • Ingersoll Rand Model 2475 air compressor, three phase. • 3000 gallon Surge Stainless Steel (white) tank – storage only • 29 ft Blue Diamond crowd gate, single phase with cord. 70 feet of track for both sides MUST GO - Building is Coming Down Will Accept Offers for All or Individual Pieces 585-526-5523 ext 10 or ryan@hemdalefarms.com

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS Page 12 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us

• 4000 Gal. Surge (99) • 3000 Gal. Storage • 2700 Gal. Mueller OH NY • 2000SOLD Gal. DeLaval • 2000 Gal. Mueller OE SOLD NJ Mueller OH • 2000 Gal. • 1600 Gal. Surge • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. DeLaval PA M • 1000 SOLD Gal. Mueller • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 1000 Gal. DeLaval

• 1000 Gal. Mueller M • 900 Gal. Mueller OH SOLD OH OH Mueller • 800 Gal. • 800 Gal. Majonnier • 800 Gal. Mueller OH • 735 Gal. Sunset • 700 Gal. Mueller OH • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 545 Gal. Sunset • 500 Gal. Mueller M • 500 Gal. Mueller MW

• 500 Gal. Majonnier • 415 Gal. Sunset • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 400 Gal. Majonnier SOLDMilkeeper WV • 375 Gal. • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal Mueller M • 300 Gal. Sunset • 200 Gal. Mueller RS • 200 Gal. Sunset SC • 180 Gal. Milkeeper • 150 Gal. Majonnier • 150 Gal. Mueller RH • 100 Gal. Mojonnier

HEAT EXCHANGERS • TUBE COOLER 300-6000 Gal Storage Tanks

We Do Tank Repair

SHENK’S

505 E. Woods Drive,

Sales 717-626-1151

Lititz, PA 17543

Dogs

Farm Machinery For Sale

REGISTERED Austrailian Shepherd puppies, all shots, dewormed, ready to go, $900.00. 603-332-7488 or 603-923-9656

1991 LOR-AL EZ Rider F350 Spray Truck, 60’ booms, 500Gal. tank, light-bar, chemical injection, Mattracks available. Jantzi Crop & Turf Spray. 315-523-2249

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Lower your feed cost! Save an average of 3 to 4 lbs of grain per cow per day Going from non processing to a processor. $6.00 corn. . . .

GET A

GRAPPLE Bucket, 6’, SS mount, new $1,600; Kuhn TB211, Ditch flail mower, $3,800; NH 162 tedder, $1,900; Vicon 17” tedder, $2,400. 603-477-2011 IH DISGUSTED??? With your shifting? Now is the time to fix. Put a good tractor back to work. 800-808-7885, 402-374-2202 JD 2940, new motor, ROPS, 2 WD, very nice! $9,500; Int. 766, Black Stripe, cab, 3100 hrs. orig., super nice! $14,950; MF 150, gas, nice, $4,500. 603-477-2011

Kennedy Tractor (315) 964-1161 Williamstown, NY “We Deliver” 3Pt 5’ Snowblowers complete/fully assembled $1,890; 3Pt 7’ & 7 1/2’ Snowblowers (several); PTO Generators; JD Hard Cab for Compact w/heater, lites, wiper $1,650; New Quicke 980 Ldr & 7’ Bkt w/mounts to fit Agco, MF & Challenger $4,150; 4x4 Ford 2120 w/Ford 7109 Ldr 40HP Dsl, 1100 hrs $8,950; 4x4 Kubota L3410 Heated Cab 30HP Dsl, “Ag” tires $7,950; Lots More Tractors & Machinery In Stock

Maine To North Carolina

Merry Christmas

1953 JOHN DEERE 60, several new parts, $2,950; 1949 Farmall M, $3,600. Both run and look good. 401-662-9131

Farm Machinery For Sale

GRAIN DRYER: GT545XL, 500 bushel - grain cleaner. Halifax, Mass. 781-293-1385

From All Of Us At PleasantCreekHay.com MUST SELL! 20’ Featherlite trailer, exc. condition, $9,000; NH 170 skid steer, 1300 hrs., $21,000; MF 1105, 7000 hrs., $7,000; Keenan 115FP, 400CF, new floor, $9,000; side shooter, $500.00; tire scraper, $300.00; 6 calf hutches, $150.00 each. Contact Andy at 860-534-0556 or jersey_cow_guy@yahoo.com pictures available RECONDITIONED 4-6-8R 7000 and 7200 planters. Also, one and two row sweetcorn, vegetable, pumpkin planters w/JD Max-Emerge. FrameMount no-till coulters. Custom b u i l d p l a n t e r s . Pe q u e a Planter, 717-442-4406

McCormick MCX140 Power shift, 4WD, cab, AC, quick-tach 810 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$38,500 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ‘88 GMC 18’ Platform Dump, Cat Diesel, 53,000 GVW, Lots of Extras, Very Good . . . . . .$11,500. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • New 8x18 Bale Wagon, Steel Sides & Oak Floor, 8 Ton Gear w/11Lx15 Implement Tires, Ready for Field $3,585. *With All Steel Construction .Add $300. •••••••••••••••••• New Running Gear - 3 Ton .$750. 6 Ton $900; 8 Ton $1150; 10 Ton $1295. 12 Ton Tandem . . . . . . . .$1,995. With 11L by 15 Implement Tubes & Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . .$90 Ea. •••••••••••••••••• Exchange 15” for 16” Wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Plus $15 Ea. Wide Track Gear . . . . . .Plus $60. •••••••••••••••••• Dry Hill Bale Grabbers Round Bale . . . . . . . . . . $1,150 Heavy Duty Round or Square Bale double piston . . . . . $1,795 •••••••••••••••••• 16’ & 20’ Aluminum Ladder Conveyor w/Belt for Hay or Bag Shavings, 120# w/Motor . .$1,450/$1,550. •••••••••••••••••• Morra Tedder 17’, Used .$4,350. New . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,950. Morra Rotary Rake, Tandem 9’ 3pt. Hitch, New .$4,500. 11’ Pull Type, New .$7,200. CIH DCX101 Discbine (Same as NH 1411) . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 CIH SBX540 Baler w/Thrower (Same as NH 575) . . . .$15,500 J&L Hay Saver, Feeders Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL Other Sizes Wagons,Tedders, Rakes, Feeders & Gates Available Call SANDY DODGE 668 RT. 12, PLAINFIELD, CT 06374

860-564-2905

USED COMBINE PA R T S K & J SURPLUS LANSING, NY 607-279-6232 Days 607-533-4850 Nights

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293 Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

300 4x4 dry wrapped round bales, $40/bale. 802-7484667 FOR SALE: #1 Roasted Corn. 518-537-6509

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hi Tensile & Portable Electric Fences Solidlock Woven Wire Pressure Treated Posts King Hitter Post Pounder

FOR SALE: 4x4 baleage, second cut. Halifax, Mass. 781293-1385 FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900 GOOD QUALITY hay & straw. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802-849-6266,

Great Prices/Fast Service Call For Brochures 603-827-3464 or info@wellscroft.com

HAY & STRAW: Large or small square bales. Wood Shaving Bagged. René Normandin,Québec,Canada 450347-7714

Hay - Straw For Sale

Generators

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

HAY FOR SALE: Dry round, wet round, second cutting small squares. Call Louis 860803-0675

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

HAY FOR SALE: First cutting round bales stored outside $25. Bennington,VT. Delivery available 802-688-3700

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

518-768-2344

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

1st CUT SMALL SQUARES, $3.00/bale; 2nd cut square, $4.00/bale. 1st cut round, $30.00/bale; 2nd cut round, $40.00/bale. Accessible to tractor trailers. Mike Quinn, Middlebury,VT 802-388-7828

Call for Competitive Prices

4X4 ROUND SILAGE BALES, 1st & 2nd cutting, FOB SE Mass. 508-648-3276 ALFALFA BALEAGE & dry round bales. Burgundy Brook Farm, Palmer, MA 413-283-4395, 413-374-9238 AMARAL FARMS 1st & 2nd cutting good quality hay, round silage bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-4506536

Low Potassium for Dry Cows

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

TOO MUCH HAY? Try Selling It In The

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Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

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Hay - Straw Wanted

Heating

Parts

WANTED

We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

Hay - Straw Wanted

TOP MARKET PRICES PAID

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

For Quality Hay in 2 String Bales Looking for Long Term Supply Paid for On Scale

Also Buying All Grades of Hay and Straw in 2 String or Large Square Bales

Nick Fitzpatrick 845-901-1892 or 845-609-7315

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

WRITERS WANTED Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper.

607-642-3293

Help Wanted

PATTERSON FARMS Is Looking for a Self Motivated Team Player to Join Our Team If you are a Jack or Jill of all things, we are looking for you. Repairs, crop, dairy animals and manure. Possitive attitude a must and Class A license helpful. Please Call Jon at

315-963-3586 Parts & Repair

Parts & Repair

315-729-0438 Horse Equipment THREE-SEATER Bob Sleigh, medium size, rebuilt runners, new bed. Can be used by single draft or pole for team. Erin C. Lundy 315-493-1051

BRAND NEW

Set Up Ideal for Sleigh Rides

BEFORE 7:00 PM

Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles.

NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

DEC 19 2 Webinars to Help Understand the 2012 Farm Bill Reauthorization Process Local & Regional Food Systems - 11 am - 12:30 pm. Contact American Farmland Trust, 202-331-7300. JAN 7 VA Sheep Producers Assoc. Annual Meeting Blacksburg, VA. Contact Scott Greiner, 540-231-9163 or e-mail sgreiner@vt.edu. JAN 8 NOFA Vermont’s 7th Annual Direct Marketing Conference Vermont Law School, South Royalton, VT. More informa-

BOB SLEIGHS

Knowledge of the industry a must.

Calendar of Events

JAN 11

“BELT T BUSTERS”

Special Farm Family Relationships Webinar 3 pm. EST. “Dealing with the complexity of family and business relationships that exist on family owned farms,” the webinar will cover these discussion points: • Estate Planning - active and non-active family members in the farm business; • Farm Transition - ownership and control; • Organization - multiple family members working together; and • Exit strategies for the retiring farmer without a successor. Question should be submitted to c.merry@agconsult ants.org at least 10 days prior to the event.

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Agricultural Belt Service Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

Help Wanted Alltech is currently looking for a Territory Sales Representative with a strong dairy background for Pennsylvania. Alltech sales people are highly motivated professionals who provide a natural link between marketing, research and the customer. Alltech ranks among the top 10 animal health companies in the world. The company has experienced consistent growth since it was founded in 1980. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has a presence in over 110 countries with distributors around the world. Today it employs 2,600 people and growth continues at a rate of 20 percent.

Keyy responsibilitiess include: Regularly visit our industry partners (feed companies, consulting nutritionists, veterinarians, producers, government agencies, etc) across the territory to manage existing relationships while cultivating new relationships Drive sales by identifying customer needs and finding solutions Attend industry events and tradeshows to showcase Alltech in a positive, professional manner

Thee ideall candidatee should d have: A strong technical background: BSc, MSc or higher Strong verbal and written communication skills Interest and experience in the animal health or nutrition industries Self-motivated and proactive A valid driver’s license E-mail resumé and cover letter to: mgast@alltech.com

CLOSING G DATE:: JAN.. 1,, 2012

Co., UConn Extension Center, 1066 Saybrook Rd., Haddam, CT • Mar 5 - 10 am - Noon. Litchfield Co., UConn Extension Center, 843 University Dr., Torrington CT • Mar 7 - 4-6 pm. New London Co., USDA Rural Development Office, 238 West Town St., Norwich, CT Register today. Call 860345-3977 or e-mail ctfarmenergy@aol.com. On Internet at www.CTFarm Energy.org

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com #1 - UNIQUE PROPERTY with much potential & lovely views of valley - 400 rolling acres, some lg. fields, nice woods & pasture land - restored & elegant Victorian home - 11 lg. rooms with victorian period decor is a step back in time - 130 yrs. old & in VG condition - 4 Bdrms., lg. LR, DR, Fam. rm. - nice library & 3.5 baths - lg. bay windows upstairs & downstairs - attached 2 car garage - patio area - also carriage house in entrance to 120x36 ft. dairy barn - 72x25 ft. mach. shed & attractive tree lined entrance to property - A MUST SEE FOR BUYERS LOOKING FOR SOMETHING OUT OF THE ORDINARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$898,000 #36 - Nice hunting & recreation property on very quiet road - 141 acres near Adirondack Park on south side - 5 rm. A-Frame home w/attached 10x18 ft. breezeway & 20x24 ft. work shop - lots of water - 125 ft. well - 3 ponds, 2 stocked w/bass & 3 creeks - INCLUDES TRACTOR AND LAWNMOWER - PRICED AT . . . .$268,000 #20 - Well-kept country property w/12.7 A. - 8 rm., 3 bdrm., 2.5 baths, brick ranch home in VG condition - 2 rec. rooms in basement - also central air - 30x36 ft. unattached garage & lg. paved driveway - tall pole barn is 54x96 ft. w/20x20 ft. heated, insulated office & half bath - 2 wells, spring & creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$249,000 #71 - Hobby farm w/8.2 A. in nice quiet location - 2 story post & beam 7 rm. home mostly remodeled - attached garage - also 40x80 ft. pole barn with 36x60 ft. addition & water - irrigation pond for veg. gardens is stocked w/bass . . . . . . . . . . . .$130,000 C-62A - 84 Acres farmland, mostly all tillable. Spring water supply centrally located in the parcel makes this an ideal acreage for a hobby farm. Could be purchased with homestead listing C-62 or separately, terms available. . . . . . . . . . .Asking $175,000 C-72 - Operating Sheep Farm located in southeast Montgomery County. 204A. Total with 104A. forest managed surveyed woodlot, (last harvested in 2007), 20A. pasture, remainder prime cropland. 36x80 two-story barn, set-up with pens for livestock, 9-crate heated and insulated farrowing room. Additional 30x40 wing off of main barn, 40x80 steel pole barn/large doors, 5 outbuildings; 2-16x21; 2-16x30; 1-12x41. Used for livestock all with water, completely remodeled 3200 sq. ft. 200+ yr old farmhouse. 8 Lg. rooms, 4BR, 2 full baths, jacuzzi, woodstove in kitchen/dining area, fireplace insert for wood in sitting room, additional wood or coal forced-air furnace. Drilled well and pond. Great hunting, woodlot, and cropland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $499,000

Alltech h | Pennsylvania 1860 0 Charterr Lane,, Suitee 203 Lancaster,, PA A 17601 Fax:: 717-393-9774 4 • mgast@allltech.com

tion about the conference is available online at www.nofavt.org. Registration fees are $30 for NOFA Vermont members, $35 for nonmembers. A lunch made with local ingredients and refreshments are included with the conference fee. JAN 9 & 11, FEB 6 & 8, MAR 5 & 7 Connecticut Farm Energy & Assistance Workshops Locations as follows: • Jan 9 - 10 am - Noon. Tolland Co., UConn Extension/Tolland Ag Center, 24 Hyde Ave., Vernon, CT • Jan 11 - 4-6 pm. New Haven Co., USDA Field Office, 51 Mill Pond Rd., Hamden, CT • Feb 6 - 2-4 pm. Hartford Co., USDA Rural Development Office, 100 Northfield Dr., 4th Floor, Windsor, CT • Feb 8 - 6-8 pm. Middlesex

JAN 12 Farm to School & Farm Based Education: Benefits of Kids Learning on Farms Call 978-318-7871. On Internet at www.farmbased education.org JAN 14 NOFA 25th Annual Winter Conference Worcester State University, 486 Chandler St., Worcester, MA. Contact Cathleen O’Keefe, e-mail wc@nofa mass.org. On Internet at www.nofamass.org/confer ences/winter/index.php

JAN 18 Southeast Agriculture Mediation Workshop: Conflict Resolution Skills The Carver Public Library, 2 Meadowbrook Way, Carver MA. 6-8 pm. Call 508-2952212 ext. 50 or e-mail balexander@semaponline.org On Internet at http:// semaponline.org. JAN 20-21 16th Annual VT Grazing & Livestock Conference Lake Morey Resort, Fairlee, VT. Featuring local, regional and national speakers on multiple species grazing management & production. Several workshops. Contact Jenn Colby, 802-656-0858 or e-mail jcolby@uvm.edu. On Internet at www.uvm. edu/pasture JAN 22-24 The National Mastitis Council (NMC) 51st Annual Meeting TradeWinds Island Grand Resort, 5500 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach, FL. For dairy professionals from around the world to exchange current information on udder health, mastitis control, milking management and milk quality. Call 727-3676461. On Internet at www.nmconline.org JAN 25 Vermont Sheep & Goat Association Annual Meeting Barre, VT. Contact Jane Woodhouse, 802-592-3062. JAN 27 & 28 4th Annual Winter Greenup Grazing Conferenc Century House Hotel & Conference Center, Route 9, Latham, NY. This year’s conference will feature speakers on Wye Angus genetics, grazing behavior, branding your farm’s products, leasing land to graze, extending the grazing season and more. Contact Gale, 518765-3500.

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 13

adenbrook.com

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED

Hay & Straw - All Types

Page 12

Real Estate For Sale


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

(607) 334-9727 Cell 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

Page 14 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

New - 2311 - Bordering large State Land and Brookfield Equine Trail System. Madison County Farm - 240 acre 60+ acre tillable mostly hay 70 acres in pasture, balance woods. Old 2 story barn for 70 head of cattle. 2 outbuildings for machinery storage. Older 2 story 5 bedroom home in fair condition. Excellent hunting. Sits on a very quiet road with lots of possibilities. Raise a nice beef or horse farm. Priced to sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Asking $310,000 2275 5 - Madison County Gentleman's Farm. 190+/- acres. 60 well drained high lime tillable acres. Balance woods and pasture. 2 large machinery buildings. 50x70 loose housing livestock barn. Also an older 72x175 Free stall barn. Good completely remodeled 2 story Victorian home. House is ready to go for two families but could easily be changed to one 5 bedroom home. Farm has a great location, 25 mins to Syracuse. Beef, horses, or gentleman farming. Farm has been reasonably priced to sell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Price Reduced from $300,000 to $280,000

Roofing

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING

Real Estate Wanted

Tractor Parts

nty Free stall Operation. 210 acres 160 2256 - Madison Coun acres of very productive tillable land. 2 barns with 280 free stalls. Double 10 rapid exit parlor. Large concrete pad for feed storage. Good 2 story 5 bedroom home with 2 baths. Several custom operators in the area for harvesting and planting feed. This farm is turnkey, ready to milk. Good farming area, agricultural and machinery businesses all close by. . . . . . . . . Asking $550,000. Make an offer.

NEEDED FOR THE SPRING of 2012: Dairy Farm to Rent or Lease for 60+cows with pasture. Current farm becoming too small. 518-321-0889. Best time to call 7-9pm

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

2304 - Oneida County Dairy Farm 140 acres, 80+ acres tillable well drained very productive soils right behind the barn, flat to gently rolling fields. An additional 86 acres tillable close by available to rent. Nice remodeled 2 story dairy barn with 86 stalls. Tunnel ventilation. Nice barn to work in. Attached 74 stall free stall barn w/large bedding pack and pens for calves. Barn has a manure pit for 3 month storage. 2 large machinery buildings. Good 2 story 5 bdrm home and 2 bdrm mobile home for hired help. This is a good turn-key operation. Owners are retiring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Askinng $450,000

YES WE HAVE SEED CORN Conventional, GT, 3000GT, CB/LL, GT/CB/LL, Viptera, Waxy 866-471-9465 request@gristmillinc.com

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

ABM & ABX Panel - Standing Seam - PBR Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Calendar of Events FEB 1-4 2012 Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show Nashville, TN. Advanced registration is open until Jan. 11, 2012. To register visit www.beefusa.org or contact Kristin Torres at ktorres@ beef.org. FEB 14-16 45th Annual World Ag Expo International Agri-Center, 4450 South Laspina St., Tulare, CA. The Expo is the largest annual agricultural show of its kind with 1,600 exhibitors displaying cutting edge agricultural technology and equipment on 2.6 million square feet of show grounds. On Internet at www.WorldAgExpo.com FEB 18-20 2nd Annual Beginning Farmer Conferenc Amway Grand Plaza Hotel & DeVos Place Convention Center, Grand Rapids, MI. Beginning farmers and ranchers interested in all types of agriculture are encouraged to attend. The

conference provides an opportunity for attendees to network with other farmers from around the country and learn from experts about how to start and maintain a thriving farm or ranch business. For more information, including online registration and hotel information, visit http://2012bfrconference.ev entbrite.com or e-mail questions to info@start2farm.gov. FEB 25 6th NH Grazing Conference Holiday Inn, Concord,NH. Featuring Kathy Voth on “Training Livestock to Eat Weeds” and Brett Chedzoz on “Benefits of Silvopasturing.” Contact Bill Fosher, 603-399-9975 or e-mail Bill@edgefieldsheep.com. Agriculture & Food Conference of Southeastern Massachusetts Bristol County Agricultural High School, Dighton, MA. 8:30 am - 5 pm. Registration is $35 for farmers; Register online or call 508-295-2212 ext. 50. MAR 9-12 ABCs of Farm Based Education: A Project Seasons Workshop for Farmers Shelburne Farms, VT. Call 978-318-7871. On Internet at www.farmbasededucation.org

Sheep BLUE-FACED Leicester ram & Blue-Faced crossbred ram, 7 months old. 518-283-5217

Trailers TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

2307- Herkimer County - 100+/- acres all wooded, good amount of road frontage. Power and telephone. Year round stream. Awesome deer & turkey hunting. Mins from the Adirondack Park. Mins from I90, hour to Albany. This is a very nice area of the Mohawk Valley region. Seller is a retiring dairy farmer from the area. Looking to downsize his land base. Would like to sell before spring. Reduced from $110,000 to $90,000 for this good property. Which is an AWESOME buy anywhere! Make an appointment to see this property soon. Near Cortland, NY. 26 acres of land with road frontage on two roads. Power and telephone. Mineral rights intact. . . . . .Askinng $55,000 Owner would consider financing for qualified buyer.

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Is our newest publication. Started in 2011 to serve an important and growing segment of horticulture, this newspaper is targeted at businesses active in commercial scale growing and winemaking in the United States. In addition to a six times a year mailing, a searchable version is available to our online readers. WASTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT NEWS, since 1992, serving asphalt/concrete recyclers, composting facilities, construction demolition companies, wood waste recyclers and scrap metal recyclers with 2 monthly editions that cover the entire United States. NORTH AMERICAN QUARRY NEWS since 1998, serving the quarry, sand & gravel, hot mix asphalt and ready mix concrete industries with one national edition. This is the fastest growing publication for these markets.

TRADE SHOWS Email subscriptions@leepub.com to start a new digital subscription or change your current print subscription to digital.

Lee Publications produces trade shows, both regionally and nationally for each of the markets listed above. Go to our website at www.leepub.com for more information or call 800-218-5586.

COMMERCIAL PRINTING

We specialize in short run (5,000-100,000) copies) web offset printing. Tabloid style print jobs like this publication are available in increments of 4 pages in black & white or full color. Complete mailing sources are available as well as insertions in any of our publications

LEE PUBLICATIONS

www.countryfolks.com

PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Phone 518-673-3237 Fax 518-673-3245

info@leepub.com

December 19, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section B - Page 15

NOW AVAILABLE IN DIGITAL FORMAT

Monthly Equine Publication covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations.


Coming Soon - The newest publication in the Lee Publications, Inc. family of agricultural papers

GROWER

Wine & Grape

The NEWSPAPER for the wine and grape industry December 2011

Volume 1 Number 1

Newport Vineyards: Record harvest, grand expansion plans

In this issue

Page 16 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 19, 2011

~ Page 2

Second generation returns to Shade Mountain Winery and Vineyards ~ Page 3

g n i m o C on So

Sustainable practices focus of grape annual convention ~ Page 5

New Publication for the wine and grape industry Page 4

Sustainable practices focus of grape annual convention Page 5

Calendar of events Page 7

Wine and Grape Grower will offer features, news and information on growing grapes, and making and selling wines. As readers of Country Folks and Country Folks Grower you know the value of our publications as you run and improve your business. If your current business or future plans include grapes or wine you can now have a publication with those same benefits for that branch of your business. Subscribe today and don’t miss a single issue. If you have friends or family who would be interested please feel free to share with them also.

Order Soon and get a Free Shirt. While Supplies Last

Classifieds Page 7

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If your business provides products or services for the grape growers and wine makers, please contact us for information on marketing opportunities to this important segment of agriculture. You can reach us at P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 or call 800-218-5586 • Fax 518-673-2381 • Email: dwren@leepub.com

CF New England 12.19.11  

Country Folks New England December 19, 2011

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