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12 DECEMBER 2011 Section One of One Volume 29 Number 38

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Aldermere Achievers shine at national Belted Galloway show ~ Page 4 Featured Columnist: Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly 21 Black Ink 17 Crop Comments 6 Focus on Ag 18 Auctions Beef Classifieds Farm Safety Farmer to Farmer Truck VT DHIA

23 8 36 11 12 13 14

Changing g perceptions s and connecting g with h customers att Sherman n Farm ~ Page 2 For as the earth brings forth its shoots, and as a garden causes what is sown in it to spring up, so the Lord GOD will cause righteousness and praise to spring up before all the nations. ~ Isaiah 61:11


Page 2 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Changing perceptions and connecting with customers at Sherman Farm by Sally Colby Shortly after Al and Phyllis Sherman started their dairy farm in East Conway, NH, farm in the mid-1960s, they realized that diversity was the key to growing their operation. They added fruits and vegetables in the ’70s and ’80s, and continually sought to produce what customers wanted. Today, daughter Kathy Sherman heads up the family team continuing that legacy; providing a variety of farm-fresh products for customers. Each year, Sherman Farm produces about 40 finished beef animals that are marketed at the family’s own farm stand. “We try to buy as locally as we can,” said Sherman, describing the young Angus and Angus cross calves they raise. “They’re usually from Maine or New Hampshire. We grow them to about 1,300 to 1,500 pounds.” Beef animals are raised in a spacious freestall barn and receive corn silage, grass haylage and supplemental grain. When customers ask the inevitable question — whether or not the animals

are grass fed — Sherman explains the animals’ diet: feeds that are grown on the farm. “That seems to satisfy people,” she said. “Some people are adamant that the animals have to be out on pasture walking around, but we explain that the animals get feeds that are raised here and that the animals are raised in a respectful manner.” Because the region lacks a smallscale butcher, Sherman takes animals to a USDA-inspected facility in Windham, ME, for slaughter, dry-aging and packaging. “We sell strictly retail at the farm stand,” she said. “We’ve been selling 25-and 50-pound meat packages, and last year, for the first time, we sold sides.” Customers can pre-order Christmas roasts, which are usually specialty high-end items such as tenderloin and rib roasts. In addition to cattle, Sherman Farm also raises pigs. Young pigs are purchased from local farms twice a year in groups of 10 to 15 at a time, for a total of about 40 each year.

In keeping with its goal of providing what customers want, Sherman Farm offers hand-made wreaths and locally-grown Christmas trees.

Hurricane Irene caused significant damage to vegetable crops and hoop houses at Sherman Farm, but the animals and main buildings were unharmed. Photos courtesy of Sherman Farm Milk and milk products sold at the farm store are from Sherman Farm cows, which are owned by the Hussey family, who purchased the cattle and rent the barn, storage facilities and excess land. “The cows are here, but the Husseys do all of the work,” said Sherman. “They’re milking about 100 to 110 cows.” The milk is processed at Smiling Hill Farm in Westbrook, ME, and sold at the Sherman Farm store. About 60 acres of the farm is devoted to growing a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, all of which are sold directly from the farm. “We try to keep up with trends and grow what people want,” said Sherman. “Once in a while we’ll try something that just doesn’t work out, but if it’s something we can grow and it works with the rest of our system, we try it.” Crops such as tomatoes are started in hoop houses in late February and moved to a greenhouse in March. Sherman says that they grow about 400 of just one tomato variety — Ultrasweet — because that’s what customers ask for. Although the average harvest is about 20,00 pounds of tomatoes, this year was different due to flooding from Hurricane Irene. “We had a flash flood that came through in less than eight hours,” said Sherman.

“Normally we would see flooding 12 hours after the town of Conway (10 miles away) floods, but there was no warning whatsoever. We lost nearly all the produce. The only thing we were able to sell after the flooding was sweet corn that was above the water line. Pumpkins, winter squash and some thick-skinned root crops were ok.” Although the hoop houses were under water, the family was especially grateful that the corn maze, as well as their animals and buildings, were not damaged. Sherman Farm is finishing up the season by offering hand-made wreaths and Christmas trees grown on a nearby farm. Sherman realizes that many consumers are getting information from extreme media sources, and has found it’s worth the time spent educating people about how animals are raised. “Once we tell them that there’s a happy medium and that the animals are content in a freestall barn with access to feed and water and can walk around, they respect that,” she said. “We invite anyone to go out and see where the animals are living, and most people are happy with that. Consumers are always curious about where their food comes from, and if you can honestly tell them, they’re good with that.”

Congressman works for Rhode Island priorities in new Farm Bill by Sanne Kure-Jensen The U.S. Congress is considering the 2012 Farm Bill, which sets national farm and food policy. To hear Rhode Island farmers’ priorities and concerns for the new Farm Bill, Rep. Jim Langevin (D-RI) hosted a Farmer Forum at the Warwick Public Library on Nov. 28. Langevin outlined past agricultural initiatives he has supported to strengthen Rhode Island’s Farms and Food System and heard from a panel of 18 farmers and agricultural agency representatives. Afterwards a dozen of the 60 audience members shared their concerns and suggestions on ways to benefit the farming and nursery industries, as well as the local food system. Tom Sandham of the RI

Agricultural Partnership and Ken Ayars, chief of the Division of Agriculture at the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, helped organize the event. Moderating the discussion, Ayers said “The public wants to know where their food comes from and works to support local farms.” Regarding potential farm project subsidies, Ayars continued, “Farmers are not looking for a handout, just support for what they do every day.” Clarifications Recommended Katherine Brown, executive director at Southside Community Land Trust and Rhode Island Food Policy Council member shared her story of young, small, urban

Congressman

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U.S. Rep. James Langevin with legislative assistant Kirtley Fisher; Katherine Brown, S o u t h s i d e Community Land Trust and Rhode Island Food Policy Council; Jim Hines of Rhody Fresh Milk; and Dick Went, Rhode Island Association of Conservation Districts.


The Fiber Festival of New England

The animals that are the source of the fiber, like this llama, were the stars of the Fiber Festival of New England. Photo by George Looby long life continues to grow amid increasing demand . As one travels the region visiting exhibits, shows and conferences reporting on the entire spectrum of agricultural activities the key words regularly heard are locally grown, green and organic. Certainly these facets of the industry were all in evidence at the festival. Attendance and participation at exhibits such as this is a must for anyone who is engaged in any phase of fiber production and also for the hobbyist or professional who is engaged in any of the many crafts that produce the products displayed. There were ongoing demonstrations by the varied,

skilled craftspeople with spinning wheels, rug hookers engaged in producing beautiful hooked rugs as well as loom operators making blankets. Much of the exhibit space was occupied by booths offering skeins of yarn of the whole spectrum of colors for sale. Other booths featured articles of clothing including caps, mittens and scarves many of which came directly from animals raised on the farm the entire operation conducted at one site. The imagination and ingenuity of the craftspeople was remarkable. There were Christmas ornaments, brooches, pins and pet toys all made from animal fiber. Not only were products made of fiber

on display but there were a variety of other products available for sale derived in whole or in part from the animals on the farm. These included soaps, balms and lotions, many of organic origin, each touted to bring health and beauty to the user. Edible products were also offered for sale which included sheep and goat cheeses. One of the problems that fiber producers have dealt with over the years is getting their products processed in order that the freshly shaved, cut, plucked or combed raw product from a particular animal can be turned into a form that the craftsperson can use in making it into a finished product. During the height of the textile industry in New England plants devoted to this sort of activity were commonplace but with the decline of the industry such enterprises faded from the scene. Now it appears that there is a modest resurgence of operations that are filling that void. One such operation is the Still River Mill located in Eastford, CT, owned and operated by Greg Driscoll and Deirdre Bushnell. They provide a full range of services to accommodate the grower to insure that the product returned meets the needs of all of their customers. Others also offer the same sort of services and sheep and wool growers association can provide the names of other processors. This show was one that everyone could enjoy and learn much about good basic craftsmanship emphasizing that good locally produced goods will beat mass produced items in terms of quality, dependability and longevity. The Fiber Festival of New England has met a growing and vital need for those engaged in fiber production at any level.

State/national partnership key to new beef marketing program State beef councils are joining with the national Beef Checkoff Program in support of a new retail beef marketing program that has the potential to significantly increase U.S. beef sales. The checkoff-funded program, called Beef Alternative Marketing (BAM), has identified innovative cutting techniques and marketing strategies for securing beef purchases from shoppers who previously looked elsewhere for nutritious, high-quality, size-appropriate proteins. BAM creates smaller filets and roasts out of beef ribeyes, top loins and top sirloins. These new cuts are thicker than many being sold by retailers, which have been sliced thinner because of larger beef carcass sizes and a retail desire to control package weights. By increasing cut thickness, final product quality is protected. At the same time, smaller portions give consumers the sizes and nutritional profiles they seek. Many retailers are embracing the program because it capitalizes on the popularity and profitability of middle meats. BAM includes a complete cutting and marketing program, including retailer training materials, point-of-sale materials, recipes, cooking instructions, charts, photos and instructional cutting posters. According to Jim Henger, executive director of channel marketing for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

(NCBA), a checkoff contractor, BAM is a perfect product for the times because it allows retailers to offer a product that has a new nutritional selling point, is sized to increase sales and retains the cooking quality of larger steaks. Furthermore, focus groups have shown that consumers not only like the new shapes and thicknesses of the cuts, they are not concerned about higher per-pound costs because there is a lower price per package. Also important for the beef industry is that research shows new sales of BAM cuts take nothing away from the sales of larger beef items. That’s because many consumers who might have shied away from larger cuts, such as women purchasing meat for themselves or their children, appreciate the new sizes and nutritional profiles, and recognized the usefulness of the cuts for both weekdays and weekends. State support Because they are actively involved in state-level beef demand-building programs, producers who sit on state beef council boards see the value of this program and have come out to assist in its introduction. For example, the South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) helped fund a nutrient analysis of BAM cuts that demonstrated that seven of the eight BAM cuts meet government guidelines for lean, with less fat and waste thanks to extra trim-

ming. Consumers, in turn, perceive a greater value from the product’s leaner fat profile. The research will be used by USDA to update its National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, which is the gold standard of databases for nutrient composition. The National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference is used by researchers and dietitians around the world. Involving state beef councils is a benefit for national programs, according to David Dick, a beef producer from Sedalia, MO, and chairman of the Federation of State Beef Councils. “Sometimes they know where to look better than we do (at the national level),” said Dick. “The local focus will get you into those markets that you don’t think about or can’t focus as deeply on. With state dollars you can be more pin-point.” The flip side is also crucial. “We really need that expertise that comes in from the national,” according to OBC’s Heather Buckmaster. “They create the program, then we are able to execute them on a state level. So really having that partnership is invaluable. We’re not all re-creating the wheel. We’re all spokes in that same wheel.” “It’s the extension of that state/national partnership,” said Dick. “We all pay that dollar, and 50 cents stays under the control of the state beef

council boards. But where the Federation becomes important is where you can do those things that a national program can’t. It’s that reach into the local store, into the local mindset to get that real connect with the consumer to find out why they buy your product. The state program gives you that connection.” Value added program sets example The highly successful Value Added Cuts program for chuck cuts, which introduced such cuts as the Flat Iron Steak and the Denver Cut, increased the value of each carcass by $50 - $70, according to Cattle-Fax, and a Value Added Cuts program for round cuts is expected to add another $20 - $30. Value Cuts helped set the stage for BAM by showing retailers how changes in beef marketing supported by the Beef Checkoff Program could benefit their operations. BAM takes change one step further, helping show retailers how to enhance beef sales and customer loyalty by modifying cutting and marketing within the stores. Retailers are always looking for additional sales opportunities, so the BAM program caught their attention, even though “change is not something that’s readily accepted in channel marketing,” said Henger. Part of the acceptance, Henger says, is the beef checkoff’s track record for successfully moving the industry forward.

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 3

by Dr. George Looby, DVM The Mallary Complex located on the grounds of the Eastern States Exposition in West Springfield, MA, continued it’s busy fall season the weekend of Nov. 5 and 6 presenting the second annual Fiber Festival of New England. The week before southern New England was hit by a classic nor’easter, the sort natives anticipate in the dead of winter, but not before Halloween. Power outages were widespread and prolonged causing major disruptions to activities of all sorts throughout the region but this show went on, bringing a welcomed diversion to the general misery that gripped the region especially in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Again this year the Eastern States Exposition and the New England Sheep and Wool Growers Association teamed up to produce the show that was educational, entertaining and diverse. If there is any animal that produces fur, hair, fleece or coat that can be processed and crafted to make a covering or garment for its human keepers it was represented at this exhibit. Although much of the emphasis of the exhibits on the floor of the exhibition hall was devoted to spinning and weaving it was the animal that was the source of the raw material that was the foundation for the entire show. Everything used in the production of the finished product had an animal origin be it a sheep, goat, llama, alpaca or rabbit. In this era of increasing diversification on farms in the Northeast the production of fiber makes for a perfect fit for those who are making an effort to find that special niche market. The enthusiasm and dedication of this group is especially gratifying to observe as the markets for products with high quality and


Page 4 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Aldermere Achievers shine at national Belted Galloway show Anticipation, anxiety, excitement, then pride, may well best describe the series of emotions Maine Coast Heritage Trust’s Aldermere Achievers 4-H Club members experienced on Nov. 15 during the National Belted Galloway Society's National Youth Show. They also described the feelings of staff and parents in attendance. The National Belted Galloway Society’s National Youth Show was one of many competitions presented in Louisville, KY, at this year’s North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE), the world's largest allbreed, purebred livestock exposition. Attending and competing at the National Show had been a goal of the Aldermere Achievers 4H club throughout the year, a beef club associated with Aldermere Farm in Rockport,

Aldermere Achievers 4-H Club members (L-R) Alice Flint, Frances Pendleton, Lucy Heal, Ellie Pendleton, Samantha Leighton, Tyler Leighton, Erin Rollins, and Addie Bragg. Maine. Through persistent fundraising initiatives, generous community involvement, and supportive families, the first part of the dream was realized in midNovember, as eight Aldermere Achievers 4H Club members and 10 head of cattle arrived in the Blue Grass State. By mid-week of the Show, the group of young

farmers had risen to the occasion to not only proudly represent MCHT Aldermere Farm Preserve, but to take home numerous awards as well. The day of the competition began early and required a lot of preparation. After breakfast, the crew headed over to the Expo site for feeding, shampooing, dry-

ing, clipping, accentuating positive traits, and hiding negative ones of their Belties — all critical components to an award-winning presentation. The competition, when it began, was divided into two categories: showmanship

and breed classes. Through showmanship, the judge determined how well the young trainers had worked with their animal’s hair, how well they lead them, and how knowledgeable they were about their breed. Through the breed class evaluations, the competition involved judging animals of similar age followed by a Grand Champion among all the age group winners. There are two key awards in the competition and Aldermere Achievers received both: Erin Rollins won for National Grand Champion Steer and Addie Bragg took home the National Grand Champion Heifer. Following them was Frances Pendleton. She won National Reserve Grand Champion with her heifer. In total, three

of the top four awards were achieved by Aldermere Achievers. Fellow Achievers Tyler Leighton, Sam Leighton, Ellie Pendleton, Lucy Heal and Alice Flint all finished strong by using the best showmanship skills of their lives at this National Show. With hundreds of eyes on them, each Achiever prepared their animal and presented it to the judge with calmness and focus while exhibiting the greatest respect for their fellow competitors from around the United States. 4-H member Frances Pendelton commented that “fundraising this year has been difficult, but well worth it. Thanks to the help of friends, family, and the community the trip to Louisville, Kentucky is one that I will not forget.”

Cover photo courtesy of Sherman Farm The dairy herd at Sherman Farm is owned by the Hussey family and produces milk that is sold at the farm stand.

Country Folks New England Farm Weekly U.S.P.S. 708-470 Country Folks New England Farm Weekly (ISSN 1536-0784) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge Post Office, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and at an additional mailing office. Subscription Price: $45 per year, $75 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks New England Farm Weekly, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager.....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor...........................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor.............................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145...................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition..........................Alison Swartz, 518-673-0139...................... aswartz@leepub.com Comptroller.....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148....................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com AD SALES REPRESENTATIVES Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0104 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ...............................................802-484-7240 Sue Thomas ................................................Albany, NY ................................................518-456-0603 Ian Hitchener ..............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Jan Andrews..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary............................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

Aldermere Achievers Lucy Heal, Addie Bragg, Samantha Leighton, Alice Flint, and Tyler Leighton. Photos by Martha Flint

National Grand Champion heifer Aldermere Xanderlee with the Aldermere Achievers 4-H club, judges, and some Aldermere Farm staff.


NMPF chairman, president cite successes at annual meeting

Congressman

MN), with support from co-sponsor Congressman Mike Simpson (R-ID). Mooney thanked both congressmen for their hard work on the bill and urged all producers to rally behind it. Although dairy reform was the most visible initiative in 2011, NMPF was busy throughout the year working on other priority issues, which Mooney and Kozak also discussed in their presentation. The organization worked on several regulatory efforts in 2011, including advocating for a reduction in somatic cell count levels to 400,000 and grappling with the Food and Drug Administration on drug residue violations in dairy animals. A significant regulatory victory came from the Environmental Protection Agency’s final exemption of milk storage from its Spill, Prevention, Control and Countermeasure regulation. “Reforming immigration policies to address the labor needs of farmers remains a paramount concern for NMPF,” Mooney continued. Although there had not been any significant progress made on immigration in 2011, the issue was getting the attention of Congress through a Senate hearing, the H-2A visa pro-

gram, and E-Verify. Mooney and Kozak noted various successes on Capitol Hill, such as minimizing the impact of the estate tax, overturning the proposed tax reporting requirement known as the IRS form 1099, passing three Free Trade Agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea, and resolving the trucking dispute that was negatively impacting U.S. cheese exports to Mexico. NMPF also was pleased to see the final implementation of the promotion checkoff on imported dairy products. “Ultimately, the outcome of this issue is not about equity, but justice for America’s farmers,” Kozak explained. Annual Meeting attendees learned that Cooperatives Working Together will continue in 2012 and 2013 after the program reached its 70 percent membership goal this year. The joint presentation concluded with Mooney and Kozak affirming that NMPF will continue to work on the issues important to its membership. “We won’t settle for mediocrity…We will never settle on anything less than what our members expect,” they said.

Continued from A2

and suburban farmers starting successful farms selling through CSAs, farmers markets and cooperatives. Viable operations are working properties as small as 2 acres or less. Brown urged the USDA and Rural Development to revise their minimum acreage requirements defining a farm. Brown also recommended continued support for the UDSA’s Community Food Project grant program. Several people brought up a loophole in land conservation regulations whereby turf farms and nurseries raising ball-and-burlap plants are not eligible for federal conservation grants. Many land trust and state conservation easement efforts rely on federal grants to help preserve farmland. The speakers said it is important to keep these farms viable through reduced property tax assessments, which reflect the true costs of town services. Conservation easements also help farmers and heirs by reducing inheritance tax property values. Dick Went, Rhode Island Association of Conservation Districts, said “Farmers (farm) because they love it, not to make a lot of money.” He proposed that USDA and Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) grant allocations to Rhode Island have fewer restrictions and national definitions attached. Since the state’s farms are different, selections and payouts should be allowed to better fit local farmers’ needs. Kyle Stewart of Stewart Nurseries noted that 55 to 60 percent of agricultural sales in Rhode Island were from greenhouse and nursery operations. That prime land should be used for agriculture rather than growing houses. Went and Ayers also urged changing grant eligibility rules to include turf and nursery operations. Resource Conservation Pat McNiff of Pat’s Pastured at

Boesch Farm stressed the importance of the fencing subsidies that have helped farmers keep their animals in and keep deer and predators out as well as protect sensitive wetland areas. “We are a suburban state and we need this crucial program restored.” Estate Taxation Al Bettencourt of the RI Farm Bureau noted that assessing farms at their highest and best use put many farms at risk during generational transitions. He urged assessments as farms not house lots and recommended higher exemptions when the estate tax laws are renewed in 2013. Stephen Anderson of Maplewood Farms shared this concern. “If tragedy strikes and the tax man comes saying I owe x dollars, I see a For Sale sign.” Small Business Burdens Sandie Barden of Barden Orchards spoke of the challenges her farm faced trying to sell apples to local schools. The high cost of Rhode Island real estate means that her apples cost $16 per box. Government purchasing programs begun as a collection tool for surplus farm produce now subsidize large farmers (who can meet the large contract quantities) allowing their apples to sell for as little as $8 per box. McNiff’s comments paralleled Barden’s regarding new Food Safety Regulations; the new standards are set up for big business and place a disproportionate burden on small family farms in terms of cost, equipment and time. “Let’s make the regulations proportional to the risks.” Jim Hines of Rhody Fresh milk explained that a Federal Marketing Order sets the wholesale price dairy farmers receive for their milk. Since Jan 2000, changes in that order resulted in wild swings in farm prices. In 2009, the average dairy farmer in the U.S. lost $100 per cow per month. Langevin supported the Milk Income

Stephen Anderson of Maplewood Farms expresses his concen over inheritance taxes and the high cost of land in Rhode Island threatening his ability to continue farming. Loss Contract (MILC) program which helps reduce the burden of low prices on small dairy farms. Product Labeling Max Hence of Hillandale Farm Organics agreed with the need to match regulations to risk and urged Congress to allow consumers to make informed choices by requiring labeling of genetically modified foods as Europeans do. Hence praised the nation’s effective organic certification process to ensure sustainable farming well into the future. Langevin’s Take In fighting for the Ocean State’s priorities, Langevin emphasized that unlike other farming regions in the country, Rhode Island produces few commodities like cotton, corn and wheat. Rhode Island’s small, family farms mainly produce specialty crops including fruits and vegetables for New

England markets. “Our farms contribute a great deal to the local economy and provide Rhode Islanders with healthier and fresher food options,” said Langevin. “However, they have historically been disadvantaged by federal policies that concentrate on bigger farms that receive more help than they need. We made great strides in the last Farm Bill to address this inequity, but we have an opportunity this coming year to do much more and I want to ensure our farmers’ voices are heard.” “I am pleased to see an increase in the number of farms in Rhode Island and their success is integral to revitalizing our economy,” said Langevin. “Particularly in a time of great fiscal constraints, we must have more efficient policies to most effectively provide safe and healthy food in our state and throughout the nation.”

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 5

The leaders of the National Milk with a better, more innovative way of Producers Federation (NMPF) stood preventing an economic crisis down before their members during NMPF’s on the farm,” Mooney stated. 2011 Annual Meeting as they report- “Ultimately, success in dairy policy ed on the organization’s progress reform is working together to get something better than before.” during the past year. The initial FFTF provisions were NMPF Chairman Randy Mooney, along with President & CEO Jerry refined after NMPF staff went on the road during the Kozak, started summer of the joint pres2011 and preentation by “Success is coming up with a sented the prodiscussing to dairy NMPF’s most better, more innovative way of posal farmers in 12 prominent initiative to preventing an economic crisis cities and 11 states across reform U.S. down on the farm.” the country. dairy policy K o z a k t h r o u g h ~ Randy Mooney explained that Foundation for Chairman NMPF although the the Future primary pur(FFTF), which pose of the tour this fall was to speak evolved into the Dairy Security Act (DSA) of 2011 directly to farmers about the need (HR 3062). FFTF began in June 2009 for dairy reform, it also allowed with the creation of a Strategic Task NMPF staff to listen to farmers’ perForce instructed to come up with a spectives. “This gave us an unfiltered insight into the producer communibetter safety net for dairy farmers. Mooney and Kozak stressed that ty’s view of FFTF,” Kozak said. although NMPF has come a long way The changes that resulted from the toward achieving its goal of better summer tour were incorporated into dairy policy, there is still more work the DSA under the leadership of to be done. “Success is coming up Congressman Collin Peterson (D-


Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant

Page 6 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

Genes without borders On Dec. 2 I received an e-mail from the most northern of my two Madison County Internet spies. The spy forwarded to me a news release sent to him by Ann Clark, an agronomy professor emeritus from Guelph University in Ontario, Canada. The article was titled “GMO Canola Everywhere”. Either my spy or the professor preceded the title with the comment (which I take to be sarcastic): “Now here’s a surprise: GM canola is becoming common on the Canadian prairies, and swapping manmade genes in the wild.” I remember, back dur-

ing my childhood, watching a grade B western movie on TV. In it the posse was chasing bad guys, everyone, of course on horseback. The bandidos rode into and through the shallow Rio Grande River. One deputy yelled, “Sheriff, we can’t follow them into Mexico.” The sheriff replied, “We can’t, but our bullets can.” Normally borders are pretty sacred lines on a map. I also remember, when I was stationed in Texas and trying to learn to fly in the U.S. Air Force, that I nearly flew into Mexican air space. My instructor pilot made sure that didn’t happen. Borders are less than sacred with medical hu-

manitarian missions. Most of us have heard about Doctors without Borders. I had the privilege of meeting one such doctor when I was first hospitalized some 15 months ago. This lady physician had seen on my medical records that I was born in the Sudan. She said that she had served there during the 1980s as a Doctor without Borders. I asked her about her experience. She enjoyed the six months or so she served there. I asked if she would like to go back there. She said she was too old… that was 25 years ago. She appeared to be about my age. Speaking of doctors, I have always been impressed by the Hippocratic Oath they swear to. It’s an oath historically taken by physicians and other healthcare professionals swearing to practice medicine ethically. It is widely believed to have been writ-

ten by Hippocrates, often regarded as the father of western medicine. The most commonly quoted high spot of that oath reads, “I will prescribe regimens for the good of my patients according to my ability and my judgment and never do harm to anyone.” When it comes to borders, be it someone else’s fields, or even another country, some pollens, particularly those transported by honeybees, are no more confined than the grade B movie sheriff’s bullets. Forgive my round-about introduction as I attempt to hit the high spots of Professor Clark’s e-mail, which technically was also fired across a border. High spots coming up. Genetically modified canola has escaped from the farm and is thriving in the wild across North Dakota. Studies indicate there are plenty of novel man-made genes crossing the Canada-U.S. bor-

der. GM canola was found growing everywhere from ditches to parking lots, scientists reported, with some of the highest densities along a trucking route into Canada. “That’s where the most intense canola production is and it’s also the road that goes to the canola processing plants across the border,” said ecologist Cynthia Sagers of the University of Arkansas. Her study stopped at the border, but Canadian research has also found “escaped” GM canola is becoming common on the Canadian prairies, and swapping manmade genes in the wild. For the study, Sagers and her colleagues drove across North Dakota and stopped every 8 kilometers (5 miles south of the border) to see what was growing. At almost half of the 634 stops they found genetically modified canola, with thousands of GM plants

growing at some locations. “That was a shock to us,” Sagers said. “In some places along the road where department of transportation had sprayed for weeds, the canola was blooming brilliantly”. At other spots GM canola was the only thing growing. Of 288 canola plants the researchers tested, 231 were genetically modified. Perhaps most significant was the fact that two of the plants had combinations of herbicide resistance that had not been developed commercially. “That suggests to us there is breeding going on, either in the field or in these roadside populations, to create new combinations of traits,” said Sagers. “In terms of evolutionary biology it’s pretty amazing.” She says the findings raise questions about whether the escaped or “feral” GM

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TRACTORS 2001 NH TN70 w/32LA Loader, 4WD, ROPS, 2018 Hrs. . . . . . . . . $22,600 1997 NH 8770 4WD, Supersteer, Mega Flow Hydraulics, Rear Duals, 7,164 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,750 2009 NH TD5050 4WD, Cab, 90 HP, 2683 Hrs., Excellent Cond. . $29,750 2000 NH TS100 4WD, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes, 2,135 Hrs. $39,995 1995 White 6215 Cab, Tractor, 4WD, Duals, 215 HP, w/Degelman Blade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P.O.R. 2007 NH TL100A 4WD, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,795 1988 Ford 1720 4WD, ROPS w/Loader, 12x12 Shuttle Transmission, 3,140 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995 2011 Mahindra 1816 4WD, ROPS, HST, Loader, 52” Mid Mower - 90 Hrs., Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,750 2011 Mahindra 3616 4WD, Cab w/Heat & AC, HST Trans, Loader, 4 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,375 2010 NH TD5050 4WD, ROPS, w/Warranty, 480 Hrs. - Excellent. . $31,875 2010 NH TD5030 4WD, ROPS w/New 825TL Loader - 495 Hrs. - Excellent Condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,800 Yamaha Rhino UTV, 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT Alamo Rear Mount Boom Mower w/60” Rotary Head . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 2001 Gehl 1075 Forage Harvester, 2 Row Corn Head, Hay Pickup, Metal Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 2009 NH 74CSRA 3Pt Snowblower, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 2000 Gehl 1287 Tandem Manure Spreader, 287 Bushel, Slurry Sides, Hyd. Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,495 1987 NH 790 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 790W Hay Pickup . . . . . $4,995 2003 Challenger SB34 Inline Square Baler w/Thrower, Hyd. Tension Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,375 2000 LP RCR 2584 7’ Rotary Cutter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,540 2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 WIC Cart Mounted Bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . . . . $1,450 2008 Cole 1 Row 3pt. Planter with multiple Seed Plates . . . . . . . . . $1,195 1981 NH 320 Baler w/70 Thrower Hyd. Bale Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 Gehl Forage Box, on Dion D1200 Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,895 JD 336 Baler w/Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2010 NH H7230 10’4” Discbine, Roll Conditioner, Like New, Demo. . $24,900 1987 NH 326 Baler w/70 Thrower, Hydra Formatic Tension, Hyd. Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Rd Bale Carrier/Feeder, 4 Available . . . . . . . $4,995 1989 NH 570 Baler w/72 Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,300 2003 NH 1411 Discbine, 10’4” Cut w/Rubber Rolls, Field Ready. . $15,950 Woods B60C 60” Brush Bull Rotary Cutter w/New Blades . . . . . . . $1,195 Deutz-Fahr K500 Tedder, 4 Star, 17’ Working Width . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,260 Pequea HR930 Rotary Rake, Excellent Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,400 2002 NH FP240 Forage Harvester, w/ met alert, Crop Processor, 29 P/U Head, 3PN Corn Head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,995 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head for a NH 900. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,250 2008 Taarup 8011T 8 Star 32’Tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995 2008 H&S RT5200 HYD Hydraulic Fold Tedder, Like New. . . . . . . . $4,995 Smoker Solid Bottom Elevator 20’ on Chassis w/Elec. Motor . . . . . . . $995 Kuhn GF5001TH 4 Star Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 2009 NH BR7060 Twine Only Round Baler, Wide Pickup, Like New. . $24,500 2001 LP PD15 3Pt. Post Hole Digger w/12” Auger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $695

JD 127 5’ Pull type Rotary Cutter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $725 1995 Vicon H1050 9 Wheel Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,195 Kverneland 2 Bottom Spring Reset Mold Board Plow. . . . . . . . . . . $1,795 NH 519 Manure Spreader, T Bar Chain, Hyd Gate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $950 Gehl 940 16’ Forage Box on Tandem 12 ton on Gehl Gear . . . . . . . $2,995 Wooden Hay Rack on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $595 Wooden Flatbed on Gear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350 2008 Agway Accumul8 AC800 Bale Accumulator & AC8006G SSL Grabber, Like New Package. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,700 1994 NH 575 Baler w/72 Thrower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,600 2002 NH 570 Baler w/72 Thrower - Excellent Condition. . . . . . . . . $19,600 2001 NH 163 Tedder, Hard Fold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Valvec Steel Hay Wagon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 NH 716 Forage Wagon on NH Gear w/roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,250 NH 273 Baler w/54A Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,995 2008 Knight 8118 Pro Twin Slinger Spreader, Tandems w/Flotation Tires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,250 1998 JD 3970 Forage Harvester w/7’ PU Head, 3 Row Corn Head, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon, Good Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 1993 Wil-Rich 3 Point 10 Shank Chisel Plow w/Gauge Wheels. . . . $2,600 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2007 NH M428 Telehandler 42’ Reach - 1050 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . $66,250 2008 NH M459 Telehandler 45’ Reach - 420 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,500 2008 NH W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/Heat/Air, Bucket/Forks, 375 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2007 NH E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Car w/Heat/AC - 400 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36” Bucket, 1,600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $128,500 2009 NH E50B Cab w/Heat & Air, Blade, Rubber Track, Hyd. Thumb, 621 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,500 2010 NH E35B Excavator w/Rubber Tracks, Cab w/Heat/Air . . . . . $33,750 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate 72” Bucket - 100 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,750 2007/08 (2) NH C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, 84” Bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Choice $46,250 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, OROPS, 72” Bucket. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 Mustang MS60P 60” SSL Pickup Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 1999 NH LX865 Skidsteer, OROPS, Bucket, Hi Flow Hyd., 1,202 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,625 2008 NH L160 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Hyd. Quick Attach Plate, 72” Bucket 3476 Hrs, New Tires. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,250 2005 NH LS180.B Skidsteer, OROPS, Hyd. Q-Attach, 84” Bucket - New Tires - 4601 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,650 1998 Scat Trak 1300C Skidsteer OROPS, Bucket Grouser Tracks, Boom Hyd’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,250 ATTACHMENTS 1999 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Good Cond.. $3,150 2002 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Like New . . $3,640 1999 Coneqtec APX400 Adjustable Cold Planer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 2008 NH 96” Hyd. Angle Dozer Blade, Demo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,875 2010 NH/Bradco 6” x 4’ Trencher, Skidsteer Mount, Like New . $3,995 2009 Virnig HD Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/ 9” Auger .$2,195


Dairy Cattle Antibiotic Residue Prevention Manual updated National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) has released an updated Milk and Dairy Beef

Drug Residue Prevention Manual. The manual is a concise review of appropriate antibiotic use in

dairy animals. Additions to the 2012 version include a section on meat drug residue testing, an

expanded list of products and risk factors for residues, as well as an updated drug and test

kit list. For more information, visit www.nationaldairyfarm.com. Source: Friday Facts

Dec. 2

edge was, granted, anecdotal, but Canadian canola farmers were observing that mustardlike weeds had developed glyphosate tolerance, not a real surprise because Canola and mustard both belong to the Brassica genus.

Maybe the research scientists should officially name this hybrid mustola. Sagers and her colleagues raise questions about whether “adequate oversight and monitoring protocols” are in place to track the environmental impact of

biotech products. “It is conceivably a very large problem,” she said. Crop and forage species now cover more than a quarter of the earth’s land surface and “yet we know relatively little about how domesticated plants influence wild ones,” said Sagers. When contacted regarding these runaway (or fly-away) genes, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said that it is satisfied that the GM crops escaping farms pose no risk. “GM crops have been safely grown in Canada for the past 20 years.” CFIA’s

media office said assessments, done by CFIA before the GM crops were approved for use, “concluded that herbicidetolerant canola varieties authorized for cultivation in Canada are neither more invasive nor more persistent than unmodified commercial counterparts.” To that either my spy, or the professor, asked if CFIA was missing the point (deliberately?), as usual. When CFIA said that GM crops escaping farms pose no risk, the very real threat of these man-made genes to the genetic purity of non-

GMO crops can sensibly be considered a type of harm, both economically and environmentally. Let me refer back to the ancient oath taken by medical professionals. It has been suggested that a similar oath should be undertaken by scientists, a Hippocratic Oath for Scientists. There is general sentiment among sustainable farming advocates that when it comes to the part “never do harm to anyone”, many plant genetic engineering scientists would solemnly swear with fingers crossed behind their backs.

Crop from 6 canola might pass on man-made genes to wild species like field mustard, which is an agricultural pest. What I myself learned about canola and mustard cross-breeding I stumbled into in the late 1990s. This new knowl-

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December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 7

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Deworming: the most important management tool for beef producers by Sally Colby Dr. Gary Sides doesn’t mince words: deworming is a critical aspect of overall beef cattle care. “When we control parasites, cattle are healthier,” said Sides, a nutritionist at Pfizer Animal Health. “Of all the technology we use from birth to slaughter, nothing is as good as killing parasites when we look at

overall performance. Parasites suppress feed intake, and they also suppress utilization of feed. Cattle that are parasitized have a depressed immune system — they can’t respond to vaccines, they can’t respond to disease challenges.” A parasitized pregnant cow that is trying to maintain weight through a rough winter

has a limited immune response, poor feed utilization and her growing calf will likely suffer as well. Sides says that when it comes to deworming cattle, it’s helpful to understand the life cycle of the parasite. “The most important thing to remember is that parasites have to go through the cattle’s system to complete their life cycle,” he

Page 8 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Deadline extended — producers reminded to participate in cattle survey Please help us assure that we continue to get widespread response from cattle producers across the United States to provide a strong production sector voice in the results and strategy of the checkoff-funded National Beef Quality Audit (NBQA). To assure full opportunity for producers to participate the survey will remain open until Feb. 6, 2012. The survey can be taken online at www.cattlesurvey.com and requires less than 10 minutes to complete. The checkoff needs

producer input for the following reasons: 1. The results of the survey will help drive the recommendation from the National Beef Quality Audit and assure that the strategies are developed based on a strong grassroots message. 2. Results of the NBQA will be used to enhance the beef industry’s message to supply chain partners, opinion influencers, and consumers. The survey provides an avenue for U.S. cattle producers to tell their collective story

about on-ranch commitment to quality. 3. NBQA results will be used to demonstrate value to international customers. Historically, the NBQA has yielded significant value to our industry by driving continuous improvement initiatives, providing strategic focus, and demonstrating opportunities for increased demand and profitability. For more information about your beef checkoff investment, visit MyBeefCheckoff.com.

said. “There’s an adult worm living in the gut of the cow. Those adults shed eggs, the eggs go out in the feces. Multiple eggs are shed per adult worm. Adult worms are the only ones that shed eggs — juveniles developing inside the animal do not shed eggs. The infective larvae crawl in a blade of grass, are consumed by cattle, go through several larval stages and become adults that shed eggs and start the cycle again.” It’s important to remember that parasite larvae can overwinter in an inhibited stage within the gut and emerge in spring. They can also overwinter by burrowing into the ground for hibernation and reemerge to infect cattle. Doing fecal egg counts (FEC) to monitor parasite burdens or identify parasites is not a reliable tool. “If I take a sample from an animal that has

ever been on grass, I can find fecal parasite eggs,” said Sides. “I can’t tell what’s what by microscopic exam.” Sides added that only parasitologists who hatch out parasite eggs can accurately identify them. FECs are also inaccurate for some parasite species due to those species’ ability to inhibit growth of some larval stages or encyst in the gut. Parasites in these stages can still cause significant gut damage. In the case of Ostertagia ostertagi, or brown stomach worms, a fecal sample might not show the true population of the L4 stage. “This state of this parasite doesn’t shed eggs,” said Sides. “We have to be very careful about evaluating fecal samples because they don’t always show a true picture of the level parasitism.” Sides cited a study in which animals were slaughtered and gut par-

BEEF asites were counted. In an animal that had 52,000 Ostertagia ostertagi in the gut, the majority were L4 larvae adult-shed eggs. Sides says that treatment with injectable Ivomec (ivermectin) will kill 98 to 99 percent of the parasites, but a drench such as Valbazen (which is labeled for ostertagia), only kills about 75 percent. “The strength of the injectable ivermectin is that it kills both adults and inhibited larval stage,” he said. Timing is everything in deworming strategy. “If I treat too early,” said Sides, “the drug isn’t in heavy enough concentration in the animal to be effective against parasites that have overwintered. Time treatments to correspond with green grass growth to get the most use of the products.” Sides advises de-

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Deworming 9


Taiwan beef promotions bring results While the marketing environment for beef products in Taiwan has been more challenging this year since the government there began testing for growth promotant residues, the beef checkoff, through its contractor the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) Taiwan has continued to work to regain the confidence of retailers and consumers. Recent promotions with hypermarket chain RT-Mart and

supermarket chain Taiwan Fresh show those efforts are paying off. A top-three chain in Taiwan, RT-Mart with its 26 outlets has been a longterm partner with the beef checkoff, so it recently agreed to a twoweek joint promotion on U.S. beef. Under the theme of “U.S. Beef Festival,” the promotion featured boneless short ribs, top blade muscle, chuck short ribs and short plate. As an incentive

for shoppers, a sea salt gift was added for each purchase over 699 Taiwan dollars (about $23). The promotion provided desired short-term results: a 17 percent increase over pre-promotion sales levels, reaching 136,400 pounds. “This is a very positive result given the fluctuating level of imports and consumer cautions regarding imported beef,” says Alex Sun, USMEF-Taiwan market-

ing manager. The checkoff coordinated a second promotion with a longtime U.S. beef merchant, Taiwan Fresh, which has 40 supermarket outlets in central Taiwan. A loyal partner that has continued to stock U.S. beef despite some negative consumer reactions, Taiwan Fresh conducted its own monthlong promotion, featuring chuck flap, top blade muscle, chuck tender, chuck roll, bone-in and

boneless short ribs, rib fingers, ribeye, pastrami, heel muscle and eye of round. While not all retailers share their postpromotion sales levels, Taiwan Fresh disclosed that its joint promotion is generating lasting sales benefits. Prior to the promotion, U.S. beef sales levels for the period were roughly 5,580 pounds. During the promotion, they more than doubled to 11,440 pounds. In a sign of growing consumer confidence, Taiwan’s sales of U.S. beef only declined slightly in the following month, holding at 10,780 pounds. During the promotion, consumers were provided with information on wet-aging techniques as well as information on how to prepare the variety of beef cuts.

BEEF “Supporting retailers strategically contributes to maintaining the level of chilled beef imports among importers and allows for more frequent purchases by retailers,” says USMEF-Taiwan Director Davis Wu. “This helps enhance buyer loyalty and helps us in the long run.” Through the first nine months of 2011, U.S. beef exports stand at 57.1 million pounds valued at $142.4 million – decreases of 6 percent and 5 percent respectively when compared to last year, but showing signs of rebounding in September. For more information about your beef checkoff investment in foreign marketing programs, visitMyBeefCheckoff.com

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The Maine Farm Bureau will conduct a workshop entitled How to Influence Legislation on Wednesday, Dec. 14, from 1-3:30 p.m. The agenda includes: • Welcome and Introduction — Jon Olson, executive secretary, Maine Farm Bureau; • How to Testify — Jon Olson — Learn how to give successful testimony from a lobbyist’s perspective. Find out the power of your own voice in advocating for issues important to you. • Legislative Insight — Rep. Jeff Timberlake (RTurner), member of the Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry Committee. Rep. Jim Dill (DOld Town), member of the Agriculture, Conserva-

tion, and Forestry Committee. Knowing how the legislative process works will help you to be successful in getting your point of view heard. Learn how the legislative process works and “do’s” and “don’ts.” Our panel will give you very important insight into a day in the life at the Legislature, which is beneficial to know when trying to influence legislation. Learning how to best communicate with legislators in order to help them understand your concerns will help them and you. Reservations suggested. Call 800-639-2126 or e-mail jjennings@mainefarmbureau.com to RSVP.

Deworming from 9 worming cows in fall so they go through the winter clean and in spring when grass starts to grow to kill the parasites that have overwintered and re-emerged. “In a true strategic deworming program, I deworm in fall and in spring, and use an injectable as often as I can,” he said. “For cows, I would inject in spring when I have the highest parasite cows, and use pour-on in fall to get best of both, and inject calves both spring and fall.” In the case of grubicides, it’s important for beef producers to be aware of regional cut-off dates for

such products. Sides says that so far, cattle in the U.S. haven’t had any major problems with resistance, and that the best way to avoid resistance is to use a full dose. He reminds producers to deworm animals at the appropriate time, and to follow BQA procedures. “Deworming is the most valuable player of any cattle technology,” said Sides. “It’s more valuable than implants, ionophores, antibiotics. It’s the most profitable management we can employ, whether we’re talking about cow-calf or feedlot.”

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 9

How to Influence Legislation workshop offered


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Page 10 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

ANGUS

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Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® Program reaches one millionth participant what we couldn’t do alone at a local level.” 2011 marks Davidson’s fifth Safety Day, which started with 75 kids and has now grown to over 200 at each event. Today, Safety Days are made possible by the Progressive Agriculture Foundation® (PAF), an independent 501(c)3 nonprofit with a board of directors from within the agriculture industry and an operating budget of $2.6 million. The program’s curriculum has grown from basic farm safety to also include a focus on rural issues like hunting, ATV usage and even childhood obesity. While the Foundation’s leadership is proud to hit the millionth participant mark, they stress there is still much to be done. PAF hopes to reach its secondmillionth participant within the next 10 years. “The number of children injured each year on farms has declined 59 percent since 1998, but there were still 15,012 farm injuries to children reported in 2009,” says Bob Marshall, of Bunge North America and PAF board president. “We view even one injury as one too many. The educational outreach of the Safety Day program is one of the efforts that has made this decline possible. We plan to work hard to do even more in the coming 10 years with the generous support of our many new and long-term sponsors who donate both financially and with employee

resources.” In addition to loyal sponsors, the program is largely made possible by a volunteer base that contributes time and skills to help run individual Safety Day events. “We can’t thank our volunteers enough,” says Susan Reynolds, executive director — programs for PAF. “We would not be able to reach as many children as we do without their gifts of time and resources.” In 2011 alone, approximately 18,000 volunteers have helped with PAF efforts. As many as 230,000 volunteers have helped throughout the last 17 years. The core mission of the Safety Day program is simple: to keep children safe and healthy. By focusing on topics that are relevant to children in rural areas, the Safety Day program has successfully reached over 1 million children and volunteers, and averages 400 Safety Day events a year, all over North America and the U.S. territories. Davidson continued, “I can’t say enough good things about PAF. This is a program I truly believe in. Reaching 1 million participants is a milestone, and I look forward to helping PAF continue to reduce farm incidents and death among children and in our communities.” For more information about PAF and to support the cause, go to www.progressiveag.org.

Power take-off safety is important for parents and children Power take-off devices (PTOs), though incredibly useful on farms and ranches, can be extremely dangerous to people, rotating at 540 to 1,000 revolutions per minute (RPM), or nine to 16 revolutions per second. These energy-transferring machines that generally work to move energy from a tractor to a smaller device such as a grain auger, hay baler or pump can present extremely hazardous situations to humans, especially children. One of the most common injuries that occurs with PTOs is PTO entanglement. Due to the rapid rotation, people often get caught by the fast-moving PTO shaft and injured before they have time to react to the situation. “The demonstrations we often do during Safety Days show what happens to a straw-filled dummy

when it comes into contact with a rotating PTO shaft. This is a great opportunity for kids to really see firsthand just what these machines are capable of. If even one life is saved from these dangerous devices, our work is well worth it,” says Bernard Geschke, program specialist with the Progressive Agriculture Foundation® (PAF), an organization that helps rural communities provide safety and health education to children ages 8 to 13. As a parent, there are several things you can teach your child to reduce the likelihood of a PTO-related injury or death. Educate your children on the importance of doing the following: 1. Always remove the keys to the engine before leaving the tractor seat to make sure the PTO will not accidently start run-

ning. 2. Make sure all equipment safety shields and guards are in place and properly working before working near a PTO device. 3. Wear tight-fitting clothes and keep hair out of the way. A baggy sleeve or hair can easily get caught in a PTO device. 4. Never step over a PTO device even when it is shut off. Stepping or reaching across a PTO can lead to entanglement. 5. Children should stay away from PTOs that are operating, and children under 18 should never operate a PTO device. Safety tips such as these are examples of the things children learn when they attend Progressive Agriculture Safety Days®, which are held each year in approximately 400 local communities throughout North America.

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December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 11

Milestone reached in farm safety and health education effort We all hear the horror stories of losing a loved one to a farm-related incident. The families left behind ponder what would have happened “if only.” If only he had been more careful, if only she wasn’t in such a hurry, if only we had known. Moved by stories of farming-related tragedies, Jack Odle, editor of The Progressive Farmer, launched an effort in 1995 to help prevent unintentional death on the farm. This effort evolved to become the Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® Program. Now in its 17th year, the effort has reached its one-millionth participant and is continuing the mission of eliminating farm injury and death by providing education and training to make farm, ranch and rural life safer and healthier for children and their communities through its Safety Day program. Penn State Extension Children and Youth Development educator Jana Davidson hosted the one-millionth Safety Day participant on Sept. 14, in Clearfield, PA. “Hosting this event is probably my favorite day of the year,” said Davidson. “(The kids) are getting so much education, but they’re having so much fun! The impact is huge. From the staff to the national sponsors, they’re helping us do

FARM SAFETY


FARMER TO FARMER MARKETPLACE WANTED: 1930 or 1931 Ford Model A Coupe, restored or unrestored. If no answer, please leave message. 716-5729102.(NY)

REG. Hampshire ram born 01/2009 for sale, sound, proven, big and stout (Hope bloodlines); Leave message. 716-5490649.(NY)

WANTED: Nubian goats looking for one or more, registered does or doelings with strong milking qualities for family farm foundation herd. 607-522-5561.(NY)

WANTED: One to 2 week old holstein hereford cross calves. Must be within 100 miles of eastern CT. Call 860-5645908.(CT)

T H E F O L L OW I N G I T E M S F I T A J D MODEL LA dirt plow: sickle bar, cultivator, buzz saw, ring chains, fit 9.5-s4 tire. 845876-7437.(NY)

FARMALL 200, Farmall 230, Farmall S-M, L-G corn drag, 20’ 6” auger, IH 420 2x trip plow, belt driven corn sheller. 518-7318663.(NY)

FOR SALE: 1 Pair 18.4-34 Firestone tires on double bevel rims, $995 for both. An IH cab from 966, $295. 315-942-4858.(NY)

HOLSTEIN HEIFER for sale, due Mid Dec., $1,400 or best offer. 315-5313063.(NY)

PAIR Armstrong Radial 18.4-38, good tread; (1) BF Goodrich16.9x38 6 ply, good, $350 for all three. 603-638-4763.(NH)

WHITE 8900 combine, (2) 6 row narrow corn heads, $5,500 obo; 8800 parts, good perkins engine. 570-537-2501.(PA)

45 Foot mow elevator, excellent condition, $500. 585-690-0784.(NY)

FOR SALE: JD 4520 1,000 RPM pto dual Hyd. diesel turbo 125 hp, $6,500 or bo. No Sunday calls please! 585-554-3962.(NY)

Page 12 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

2005 NH BR740 silage special, net wrap, wide pickup applicator, $7,000. 585-2027768.(NY)

EIGHT WEEK old feeder pigs, $50 each. Reg. Berkshire boar, two years old, $150. 315-858-1568.(NY) WANTED: STAINLESS STEEL boumatic claws with glass on the sides. There’s two types, narrow and wide, need narrow. 518538-8042.(NY)

JAMESWAY stanchions, excellent condition, have 98 total units, for further information, call 315-636-7151.(NY)

SNOW BLOWER 7’ 3 pt hitch, round bale spear, AKC Husky pups, Farmall A w/ sickle mower, DeLaval, 2” receiver jar 315337-1499.(NY)

CULTIPACKER 8’ double packers, $600, good condition. 585-506-7300.(NY)

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H & S 235 single axle box spreader, tail gate, single beater, good web chain, $1,100 as is OBO. 315-536-2664.(NY)

REG. Holstein bull, 14 months, sebastian son from VG 87 contract shottle. Also, three big reg. holstein heifers due soon. 413-527-6274.(MA)

FOR SALE: Solid maple King colonial bedroom set, medium stain headboard, chest of drawers, dresser with twin mirrors, two nightstand. 585-554-4423.(NY)

BULL, 3 years and proven easy calving, small frame, beautiful, gentle, black Angus. $1,500. 607-687-1666.(NY)

IH 1066 tractor, everything works, $8,350; IH 706 tractor, diesel, $6,350 w/ 20000 ldr; 600 gallon fuel tank, $475 585-5672526.(NY)

SHEEP SHEARING clippers, Shearmaster with 3” combs and cutters, air operated, $150.00 extra blades. 585-394-5814.(NY)

WANTED: Dexter heifer calves and boar doelings, will pay market price. Also, kiko doelings wanted. 315-567-6631.(NY)

CIRCULAR SAWMILL, 48” blade, chevy 6 cyl. power, $2,200; Fodder chopper, $75; 310’ aluminum rollers, $75 ea obo; JD 350 585-554-6188.(NY)

06 NH TL80A cab, 4wd, pow’r reverser, dual power, air ride seat, dual remotes, low hours, exc. condition, $24,000. 315-5363176.(NY)

In time for Christmas? Children’s pet miniature horse, black and white tame, $275. 315-536-4834.(NY)

WANTED: Dairy, beef feeders, veal, sheep, and goats; Strong market. 413-4413085.(MA)

(1) DORSET polypay cross ewe lambs, born Sept., weaned, $200 each. Ervin Miller, 4948 Rt. 210 Hwy, Smicksburg, PA 16256.

TWO ICE SAWS, $125 each. John Deere baler, banner 32” 120” from 40-50s, four legged deer, $125. 315-339-0392.(NY)

FOR SALE or trade for beef cows, Massey Ferguson 2200 Ind, live PTO, 3 pt. loader, good shape, $4,200. 607-522-4952.(NY)

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Anti-truck groups seek to dismantle successful safety regulation said. “Since these rules went into effect, fatal crashes involving large trucks are down 32 percent, even as truck miles traveled have increased. These rules are working, so we have to ask: what part of success troubles these groups? “It is apparent to us that since these crusaders cannot win an argument on the merits, as shown in analysis after analysis of FMCSA’s proposal, they now are attempting to use our country’s weak economy as a wedge, arguing for this rule simply because it will reduce productivity and create driving jobs,” Graves said. “What this rule will do, if enacted as proposed, is force fleets to put even

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more trucks on the road, which elevates the risk of a crash. ATA will not support rules that create more exposure to crashes for professional drivers or for the motoring public.” ATA estimates that if enacted, these new rules will reduce productivity by a minimum of 5 percent, which artificially creates a need for at least 115,000 additional

trucks to haul the nation’s freight. These trucks will need to travel an estimated five billion miles to deliver their goods and, given the most recent crash rates, could lead to an additional 52 fatal crashes, and nearly 900 injury crashes. “By baselessly cutting the productivity of the industry, these alleged champions of safety will,

by forcing thousands of additional drivers and vehicles onto the highway, make our roads less safe,” Graves said. “The highway is our workplace, and we have a vested interest in making it safer for everyone. If compelling evidence existed that the changes these groups want would increase safety, we would embrace it. However, the FMCSA it-

self said in its proposal the safety benefits of this rule do not outweigh the costs. “Rules should be written based on sound data and research, not the theories of outside interest groups. We hope and trust the factual record, and not politics will guide policymakers as they complete their review of this rule,” Graves said.

ATA asks OMB to consider if ‘legitimate’ reasons exist for hours change American Trucking Associations President and CEO Bill Graves, in a letter to Cass Sunstein, administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget, questioned whether “legitimate reason” exists to change the current hours-of-service rules. In the letter, dated Nov. 15, Graves points to recently unearthed data about the trucking industry’s safety performance, as well as the underlying science used by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Adminis-

tration and Department of Transportation to alter the 34-hour restart provision of the rules. “This data, in terms of both numbers and rates, is overwhelmingly positive, is a clear indication how well trucking is performing while operating under the current HOS rules, and further demonstrates FMCSA has no evidence of a safety problem with the current rules,” Graves said of the recently discovered 2009 Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts, which showed historic low levels of truck crashes.

Graves asked OMB to review the data “as you decide whether FMCSA and DOT have any legitimate reason to issue a new rule with significant public policy changes.” The letter also draws Sunstein’s attention to the “findings” and “recommendations” used by FMCSA and DOT to craft their proposed changes to the 34-hour restart. Those findings come from a single study that the researchers themselves said was not enough to answer all the questions surrounding the rule’s

effect on safety. “An objective read makes clear that this single study is insufficient to justify a policy change,” Graves said, comparing the need for more research to the Obama administration’s recent decision to delay approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline in lieu of further study. “Critical highway safety policy decisions by our government deserve no less scrutiny and understanding by government policymakers and the public than environmental and energy decisions,” Graves said.

New FMCSA report shows continued, marked improvements in trucking safety American Trucking Associations President and CEO Bill Graves praised the efforts of the nation’s truck drivers, safety directors and law enforcement officers for their contribution to the

continued progress in the industry’s safety record. “Based on the latest report from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, fatal crashes involving a large truck have fallen 31 percent from 2007 to 2009 and crashes resulting in injury have fallen 30 percent,” Graves said following a review of FMCSA’s 2009 Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts, recently posted on FMCSA’s website. In addition, the report says the large truck fatal crash rate fell to 1.0 crashes per 100 million miles in 2009 from 1.1 crashes per 100 million miles traveled in 2008. Since 2000, the fatal

crash rate for large trucks has fallen 54.5 percent — more than twice as much as the passenger vehicle fatal crash rate, which dropped just 25 percent — in the same time period. “These safety gains,” Graves said, “are the result of many things, sensible regulation, improvements in technology, slower more fuel efficient driving, the dedication of professional drivers and safety directors as well as more effective enforcement techniques that look at all the factors involved in crashes, not just a select few.” Graves also chided FMCSA for not doing

more to share this good news about trucking’s safety progress. “These results deserve to be heralded as tremendous progress and very good news for American motorists, our industry and our industry’s regulators,” Graves said. “However, FMCSA has chosen not to highlight these important results. By not celebrating this success, the agency is doing itself a disservice. These results are as much an achievement for FMCSA as they are for the nation’s trucking industry. We are at a loss on why FMCSA chose not to communicate this final data indicating great safety progress.”

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 13

ARLINGTON, VA — In advance of the Nov. 30 hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee’s Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, American Trucking Associations President and CEO Bill Graves questioned the aims of groups pressing the federal government to dismantle a successful regulation. “Since the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration first revised the hours-of-service rules in 2004, a coalition of advocacy groups and organized labor, abetted by their political allies have tried through lobbying and litigation to undo what has proven to be a successful regulation,” Graves

TRUCK


VERMONT DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER

1909 - 2011 OVER 100 YEARS OF SERVICE

Country Folks

Official Publication of Vermont DHIA

Page 14 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Tracker Series Sarah Stebbins Education and Marketing Specialist OK PCDART users, how much information are you recording? Have you thought about possibly recording more information, but thought it was too hard, or cumbersome to get that information back out to analyze? Well I have the answer for you. Over the past few years, DRMS in Raleigh, NC has been developing what is known as the Tracker Series. The Tracker Series is made up of 4 different analytical tools including, Activity Tracker, Heifer Tracker, Conception Tracker and Maternity Tracker. Each program is developed to "track" different information. The objectives of the tracker series are to answer specific questions related to dairy herd performance, enhance and optimize user flexibility to answer questions, and to provide a simple and easy interaction with Excel and PowerPoint. Trackers are most informative when you are trying to answer a specific question. Below, I am going to go over the different type of information each Tracker evaluates and questions each one can answer, assuming the necessary information is being recorded. Activity Tracker Activity Tracker is designed to count. It simply counts recorded events relative to the date and DIM of the cow when they occurred. It counts status events (such as FRESH, BRED, PREG, etc.), user-defined health codes, chores, and protocols. By changing the date ranges and calving cohorts, users can monitor trends over time. By using Activity Tracker to assign cows with certain activities to a Temp Group, in conjunction with standard or usercreated PCDART reports, many more questions can be answered. Examples of Questions Activity Tracker can Answer: * What is cull rate (by lactation group for any time period)?

* What is early lactation cull rate (by lactation group for any time period)? * What is pregnancy hard count from January 15 to April 15? Are there sufficient cow pregnancies? Are there sufficient heifer pregnancies? * Are there enough cows freshening for my herd size? * What percent of fresh cows had DA's, RP's, and ketosis from May 22nd to August 23rd? * Are cows being vaccinated appropriately? * When is lameness occurring? Is it seasonal? Does it occur more in early lactation? * Is there a mastitis problem? Are too many fresh cows being treated for mastitis? Is the problem with heifers or cows? * Do the cows that have RP's leave the herd any faster than cows with no RP's? * Are mastitis treatments working? What

percentage of these cows are re-treated? How many of these cows leave the herd? Heifer Tracker Heifer Tracker is designed to analyze the replacement enterprise. A specific set of metrics can be produced for any group of heifers on the dairy. The metrics evaluate several key areas of heifer management: inventories, speed of getting semen into heifers, speed of getting heifers pregnant, breeder performance, hard counts of critical events, and survival. Heifer performance can be monitored to spot trends and focus efforts on areas that need improvement. Examples of questions Heifer Tracker can Answer: * Does the distribution of heifer inventory suggest a growing population? * Are heifer inventories adequate to maintain calving patterns or re-

placement needs? * Am I getting semen into heifers quickly enough following the voluntary waiting period? * Are heifers too old at first breeding? * Are breeders currently doing a good job of getting heifers pregnant so they will freshen at the desired age? * What is the age at first calving in recent months? * How quickly are heifers getting pregnant in the cycles following the voluntary wait period? * How many heifers are reproductive failures? * What percentage of heifer pregnancies are from bulls? * What is the heifer pregnancy hard count each month? * How many sexed semen heifer pregnancies are there? * What are heifer conception rates for sexed versus conventional semen?

Conception Tracker Conception Tracker is designed to answer extremely specific questions relative to AI breedings. It does not consider Bull breedings. Conception Tracker will only count eligible breedings; a breeding is deemed ineligible if the outcome is unknown, or if there were multiple breedings in a 17 day window. Numerous filters related to the breeding date,

service sire, technician, day of the week, semen type, etc allow the user to ask a multitude of good questions. Examples of Questions Conception Tracker can Answer: * Are overall conception rates trending up or down? * Are first service conception rates different for first lactation cows

Tracker on next page

General Manager Brett Denny 1-800-639-8067 (main) 802-233-8662 (cell) bdenny@vtdhia.org Field Services Manager Linda Crossman 1-800-639-8069 lcrossman@vtdhia.org Education Development Specialist Sarah Stebbins 802-356-2841 (cell) sstebbins@vtdhia.org

MAIN OFFICE/LAB: 1-800-639-8067 • FAX: 802-295-5964 E-MAIL: VTDHIA@VTDHIA.ORG WEBSITE: WWW.VTDHIA.ORG

VERMONT DHIA BOARD OF DIRECTORS REGION 1 Counties: Franklin/Grand Isle, VT; Lamoille, VT (W); Chittenden, VT (N) Daren Sizen, Vice-President ..........(802) 524-4412...................dsizen@vtdhia.org REGION 2 Counties: Orleans, VT; Essex, VT (N); Coos, NH (N) Mark Rodgers, President ...............(802) 525-3001................mrodgers@vtdhia.org REGION 5 Counties: Caledonia, VT; Essex, VT (S); Orange, VT (N); Washington, VT (N); Lamoille, VT (E); Grafton, NH (N); Coos, NH (S) Suzi Pike.........................................(802) 253-4304....................spike@vtdhia.org REGION 6 Counties: Addison, VT; Chittenden, VT (S) Melanie Carmichael .......................(802) 759-2089 .............mcarmichael@vtdhia.org John Roberts..................................(802) 462-2252..................jroberts@vtdhia.org REGION 7 Counties: Windsor, VT (N); Orange, VT (S); Washington, VT (S); Grafton, NH (S); Sullivan, NH (N) Kelly Meacham, Secretary .............(802) 295-8563...............kmeacham@vtdhia.org REGION 8 Counties: Bennington/Rutland, VT; Washington/Saratoga, NY Brian Hollister, Treasurer ................(518) 361-4526.................bhollister@vtdhia.org REGION 9 Counties: Windsor, VT (S); Windham, VT; Cheshire/Hillsboro/Rockingham, NH; Sullivan, NH (S); Franklin/Essex, MA; Worcester, MA (N); Middlesex, MA (N) Susan Rushton...............................(802) 843-2719.................srushton@vtdhia.org REGION 10 Counties: Berkshire/Hampshire/Hampden/Norfolk/Suffolk/Plymouth/Bristol/Barnstable, MA; Worcester, MA (S); Middlesex, MA (S); CT (All); RI (All) David Schillawski............................(860) 303-2866 ..............dschillawski@vtdhia.org REGION 11 Counties: Albany/Delaware/Montgomery/Otsego/Schoharie, NY Ray Steidle .....................................(518) 234-4659.................rsteidle@vtdhia.org


VERMONT DAIRY HERD IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER Tracker from previous page

days of age? * How much lower is conception for sexed semen breedings compared to conventional breedings? * Is the lag in conception with sexed semen more or less pronounced in heifers compared to cows? * Does heat stress impact heifer conception as much as cow conception? Do 1st lactation cows handle heat stress better than older cows? Maternity Tracker Maternity Tracker will be able to answer questions about maternity management, specifically focusing on DOA's (Dead On Arrival or stillborn calves). Only calves that are reported born dead are counted as a DOA in maternity tracker. Maternity Tracker can also provide a useful

report for the maternity team on a large dairy. Calvings in Maternity Tracker are categorized as follows: All Calvings (every calving regardless of sex or twinning), Female Calvings (one heifer calf born), Male Calvings (one bull calf born), Twin Calvings (2 or more calves of any sex), and Other Calvings (no sex reported). Example Questions that Maternity Tracker can Answer: * What are DOA rates for lact=1 calvings? * What are DOA rates for lact>1 calvings? * What is the twinning rate for lact=1 compared to lact>1 calvings? * Do cows with ME's above herd average have a higher twinning rate? * Are DOA's lower in calvings that resulted from sexed-semen

breedings? * Are DOA's different for purchased versus home-raised heifers? * Are DOA's higher in cows that had twins? * Are more calves born dead on weekends? * Are DOA's higher when calving ease score is above 3? * Do early-dry cows have higher DOA rates? * For cows that calve more than 10 days early

Country Folks

Official Publication of Vermont DHIA

(before expected due date), is DOA rate higher? * What % of sexed semen calvings are female? * What % of traditional semen calvings are female? * Do any sires have a high proportion of male calvings? Information about the tracker series was found on the DRMS website, and there is more infor-

mation available there. Keep in mind that these Tracker Series are only as good as what you record, so record as much as you can! If you have any question on how to record specific information, or how to use the tracker series please feel free to contact any of us at Vermont DHIA, we are always willing to help!! Happy Holidays!

Record It… Manage It… Improve It…

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 15

compared to older cows? * Is the conception rate from 1st service timed-AI breedings acceptable? * Is the conception rate from 1st service "standing heat" breedings acceptable? * Are weekend breeders getting as many cows pregnant as the breeders during the week? * Are transition cow issues impacting reproduction? Are conception rates lagging in early lactation? Are there different trends for lactation=1 compared to lactation>1? * Did first lactation cows that calved in January have better 2nd service conception rates compared to first lactation cows that calved in December? * Are conception rates lower for heifers that were bred less than 400

1909 - 2011 OVER 100 YEARS OF SERVICE


More choices, less Choice beef

Page 16 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Trying to please every beef customer takes more of the best A wider price gap between Select grade boxed beef and Choice or better — the Choice/Select spread — always comes back to supply and demand. Consumers vote with their dollars, and recent shifts in merchandising put much more high-quality beef on the ballot, just as those supplies began to fall off. Asked to comment on implications, JBS USA officers noted supplies of Choice beef had been on the rise, at prices not much above Select. That helped entice marketers to offer better beef to millions more shoppers by this fall, and now the wider price spread signals producers to boost supply. “The retail channel in particular is making more impact than it has in the past on the spread,” said Tyler Brown, JBS premium program manager. Historically, that’s driven by foodservice, he adds, but

retailers today want to offer more quality and consistency. “They’re looking at higher grading programs to do that.” As looking gave way to buying more of the restaurant-quality beef, cattlemen took greater care to optimize marbling. In November and December, high-quality middle meats are often scarce due to holiday buys, but Al Byers, JBS senior vice president of sales, says this fall could see one of the tightest supply situations ever, especially for premium Choice programs. “The signal being sent to us by the market and the spread is that we need more,” Byers said. “Part of that signal reflects the changing nature of the consumer.” Indeed, as the flagging economy met higher overall beef prices, consumers sent their own signal to the retail and foodservice sectors. They wanted more value for

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their dollars. Brown says JBS customers are responding. “If they’re going to sell beef, they’ve got to deliver a consistent product to their customers,” he said. “That’s more important now than ever due to pricing.” Opportunities for retailers to meet the demand continue to grow, apace with opportunities for cattlemen to respond in kind. “When you deliver something they’re looking for with exceptional value, which is defined in the price paid for quality, you’ll usually get rewarded for it,” Brown said. The Choice/Select spread is a measure of that, and the basis of grid marketing. After

jumping to near -term highs above $20 per hundredweight this fall, the packers say that spread could stabilize somewhere between there and $12. “Dollars drive everything in this industry,” Brown said. “I think the spread speaks for itself and the prevalence of black cattle and Angusinfluenced genetics continuing to increase.” Byers compares the evolving meat case to the variety consumers already expect in the wine aisle. “You’ve got a bottle of $6 wine and then a $60 bottle of wine,” he said. “You’ve got them all on the shelf, knowing there’s that spread.” Similarly, many retailers that used to carry

only Select beef have upgraded part of the meat case to a higher quality product, but they maintain variety with more choices in the case. “Both retailers and packers are beginning to understand that marketing is not an average of where a particular consumer walks in,” Byers said. “They have to provide a beef eating solution that meets the unique social demographics of each consumer who walks in.” That caters to the universal demand for satisfaction, whether it’s in a fine dining restaurant or in the comfort of home. “If we can deliver on those attributes every time, that’s a win for everyone, from the cowcalf guy all the way to

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the retailer and foodservice operator,” Brown said. As supplies of premium Choice beef tighten up through the holiday season, Byers says packers will be challenged to meet demand. “Certainly, we’re encouraging anybody from the feedlot to the stocker and rancher to keep sending us high-quality cattle,” he said. “We’ll find a home for it.”

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Happy people, happy cattle by Miranda Reiman “If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.” Surely you’ve heard that phrase and get what it means: If the household caregiver isn’t in a good mood, it trickles down to the rest of the family. At a recent seminar, a management consultant applied that same concept to animal caretakers. When they’re not happy, the herds aren’t happy. When ranchers or feedlot employees are unhappy or feeling stress, how much pride can they take in the job they’re doing?

Call it mammalian empathy or stress-related errors of management, but those bad feelings are contagious across species. And a growing body of research says cattle that never have a bad day do better all the way through to the packinghouse. From an animal’s perspective, what exactly does that mean, never having a bad day? There are variables that no caregiver can completely control, like weather or sickness. But that doesn’t mean a herdsman is helpless;

there is much you can do. Approaches like strategic windbreaks or bedding cattle can make them more comfortable in the winter months. Sprinklers and shade can ease the sweltering summer heat. Vaccinations, good nutrition, minimal stress — these can all aid in keeping critters healthy. Then there are all those details where the caregiver has much greater control: weaning, feeding, animal handling and so on down the list. Planning ahead and

doing everything possible to ease cattle from one transition phase to the next helps. Consistency is another key. Moving animals in a calm and collected manner (as much as is humanly possible), avoiding “hot shots” and hollering, and focusing on the natural tendencies of the animal can make even the most stressful days seem like good times to those cattle. You care. Those animals are your lifeblood.

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ions. Make sure they know that how well they do their job matters — not only for today, but in the long-run bigger picture. Do they realize that the way calves are handled affects performance, both in the feedlot and on the rail? Many hurdles to happiness for man and beast can be overcome with more communication, more planning. That may not come naturally to every “get your hands dirty” type of manager, but it’ll be worth it in the end. Especially if, by keeping those calves happily gaining and grading, you make life better for them, for your family and for millions of consumers. That’s sure to put a smile on momma’s face, along with all those others.

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December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 17

Hello, I’m Peggy

You’re entrusted with their wellbeing and they’re your profit center. But if you have employees, either family or outside hired help, do they feel the same way? Is that passion coursing through their veins? This management consultant suggested those folks keep their purpose top of mind. They’re not just feeding cows and processing calves. They’re helping to feed the world. Ask them for suggestions and input — an outside perspective never hurts and they might be happier if you show that you value their opin-


Page 18 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Values kids learn through farm work are at risk by Lynne Finnerty Every summer, rural teenagers get jobs on local farms to earn some cash while being outdoors. Some just enjoy helping a relative or neighbor on his farm or ranch — because it really is a great experience to drive a tractor. Across rural America, young people help cut and bale hay on other people’s land. In the Midwest, many a teen has worked as a corn detasseler, removing tassels from one variety of plants so they can be pollinated by another and create a high-yield hybrid. For others, their first job might have been picking fruit in an orchard. By working on farms, their own family’s or someone else’s, young people learn about agriculture, how to respect and care for animals and how to work safely with farm equipment. They also learn important values, such as a good work ethic and taking on responsibility. But under a Labor Department proposal, such work could be off-limits to minors. They would not be allowed to work on a farm that isn’t directly owned by their parents or operate any power-driven equipment — even something as simple as a battery-powered screwdriver. “Under this proposal, it sounds like youths would be allowed to push open the barn door, but whether they can flip the light switch inside is unclear,” explained American Farm Bureau labor specialist Paul Schlegel. “But they sure couldn’t use a flashlight or pick up a weed whacker. And they couldn’t go up in the barn loft because it’s greater than 6 feet above ground level.”

The real impacts aren’t fully understood. It could depend literally on how government regulators write the final rules and then interpret them. Most likely, young people couldn’t even work on their own family farm if, like many farms these days, it’s set up as a corporation or partnership, not wholly owned by the kid’s parents. The Labor Department says its proposal is needed to protect young peo-

ple from dangerous work. However, as is often the case when the feds deal with an issue, the proposal goes too far. It’s like trying to kill a gnat with a sledgehammer. Farm work can have its hazards, and no one wants kids working when and where they shouldn’t be. But ask any farmer how she learned to do farm work, correctly and safely, and you’re likely to hear that she grew up doing it on

either a family farm or through agricultural education programs, which also would be at risk if kids are not allowed to do many farm tasks. If we can’t train the next generation of farmers, then the implications go beyond whether a teenager can earn a little spending money. Parents, not the federal government, should decide what’s safe for their kids. For those jobs that are particularly haz-

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation ardous, the government has a role to play. But the government should at least write rules that won’t threaten the very structure of family farms and rural communities. The comment period on the proposal has closed. Now the government will continue with the rulemaking process. As it does, it is hoped that the rules will make

more sense for how farms work today, and for youngsters who want the experience of working on a farm. It will be important for farm families and agricultural educators to weigh in to ensure that outcome. Lynne Finnerty is the editor of FBNews, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s official newspaper.

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Cornell offers online marketing class for new farmers in the Northeast New farmers with 1-3 years of farm experience and serious aspiring new farmers who have already explored the basics of marketing and are ready for a more formal marketing strategy. Course Objectives This course will help farmers: • Link your farm’s mission and vision to your commercial goals and marketing strategy • Understand the key elements of a solid marketing plan • Understand and use effective marketing strategies • Understand and use various pricing strategies with your products • Create a multi-tiered marketing strategy incorporating traditional and guerrilla marketing tactics Qualifying for Loans Students who successfully complete the course are eligible for borrower training credits through the USDA New York State Farm Service Agency. Borrower training credits may help farmers improve eligibility for a low-interest be-

ginning farmer loan though the USDA Farm Service Agency. For more information, visit www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/ webapp?area=home&su bject=fmlp&topic=bfl Instructors Laura Biasillo is an Ag Educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County. Rebecca Schuelke Staehr is an agricultural consultant and owner-operator of Cayuga Pumpkin Barn in Cayuga, NY. Course Outline • Week 1: Navigating the online classroom, in-

troductions and welcome to course Topic(s) Covered: Introduction to Marketing; Mission Statement, Goals & Overview of Market Channels (retail, wholesale, etc... • Week 2: Marketing Strategy - Where Do I Fit in this “Buy Local” market? Topics Covered: Who are your customers? How Do They Get Their Information? How Do You Access Them? • Week 3: Expense Budgets - How Much Should I Charge (or How

Much Does It Really Cost Me to Produce This Product?) Topics Covered: Sales Tactics, Expenses (real & perceived), Promotions (incl. point of purchase), Pricing • Week 4: Marketing Tactics Topic(s) Covered: LowCost, No-Cost, Cooperation and More • Week 5: Tying it all Together: Implementation of Marketing Tactics, Pricing and Local/Global Economy • Week 6: Overview of Marketing Plan

Cost and Registration Course fee is $175. Students are not eligible for college credit. To register, go online: http://nebeginningfarmers.org/onlinecourses/register-for-upcoming-courses/.

Final webinar to recap year of topics covered in social media training program NCGA’s 2011 Social Media Training Program will feature a final webinar that will recap material covered throughout the year and link each social media tactic to the larger overall agricultural picture. The program is generously supported by Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont Business. “Throughout this year, the social media webinar series has offered grow-

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ers a variety of tools and tips that are helpful when using Facebook, Google+, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr,” said Grower Services Action Team Chair Brandon Hunnicutt. “If you have missed any one of these informative sessions, or simply would like a refresher course, I urge you to tune in (Dec. 15) and become a part of the ongoing conversation

about agriculture.” This webinar will offer a review of the main points from past presentations and provide expanded information on these topics. The session will also offer best practices and case studies for topics including Facebook, Twitter, blogs and more. Offering a big-picture look at the topics covered, attendees will have the chance to ask

questions on any of the social media webinar content presented this year. The webinar starts at 10:30 a.m. CST Thursday, Dec. 15. Registration prior to the event is strongly recommended. Visit www.ncga.com/socialmedia for more information. Source: NCGA News of the Day: Tuesday, Dec. 6

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December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 19

Pricing, marketing tactics online course for beginning farmers offered through Cornell this winter The Beginning Farmer Project at Cornell University is offering an online course series in marketing strategy for new and start-up farmers. The online course is designed to help farmers better understand how to price products, position yourself in the growing “buy local” marketplace, online and physical location sales, as well as guerrilla marketing tactics. Webinars The bulk of the course happens on students’ own time, with discussions, readings, and assignments in a virtual classroom. There will be weekly webinars to allow farmers to learn from outside presenters, ask questions, and collaborate with other participants and the instructors. Webinars will be from 7-8:30 p.m. EST on Wednesdays Jan. 4-Feb. 8. Webinars will be recorded. Target Audience


Page 20 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

National Ag Day Essay Contest announces Feb. 1 Deadline The Agriculture Council of America (ACA) calls on ninth- to 12th-grade students to submit an original, 450-word essay or a two-minute video essay about the importance of agriculture. This year’s theme is “American Agriculture: Feeding the Future, Filling the Gaps.” The deadline is Feb. 1, 2012. The ACA asks teachers and parents to encourage student participation. The theme “American Agriculture: Feeding the Future, Filling the Gaps” presents an opportunity for students to address how the agriculture industry continues to feed a growing population. Entrants may choose to either write an essay and/or create a video focusing on how today’s growers are overcoming challenges to provide a safe, stable food supply and sustain the significant role agriculture plays in everyday life. “CHS is proud to help support students through this year’s Ag Day essay and video contest,” said Annette Degnan, marketing communications director, CHS Inc. “We want

to recognize today’s youth and their ability to help communicate the importance of agriculture’s role in our society. We look forward to seeing the entries that students develop around the theme, “American Agriculture: Feeding the Future, Filling the Gaps.” The national written essay winner receives a $1,000 prize and roundtrip ticket to Washington, D.C. for recognition during the Celebration of Ag Dinner held March 8 at Whitten Patio at the USDA. During dinner, the winner will have the opportunity to read the winning essay as well as join with industry representatives, members of Congress, federal agency representatives, media and other friends in a festive ag celebration. The video essay winner wins a $1,000 prize, and the winning video will play during the Celebration of Ag Dinner. This is the 39th anniversary of National Ag Day. The goal of the ACA is to provide a spotlight on agriculture and the food and fiber industry. The ACA not only helps

consumers understand how food and fiber products are produced, but also brings people together to celebrate accomplishments in providing safe, abundant and affordable products. The Ag Day Essay Contest is sponsored by CHS Inc., The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal, National Association of Farm Broadcasting, National Agri-Marketing Association, Country Living Association and McCormick Co. All written entries should be sent to: 2012 Ag Day Essay Contest, Agriculture Council of America, 11020 King Street, Suite 205, Overland Park, KS 66210, or submitted by e-mail to essay@agday.org. Students may upload video essays at http://agday.leapfile. net and follow the directions on the page, or students may choose to mail video entries to the address above on a compact disc. Visit www.agday.org or www.hpj.com/agday essay to read official contest rules and for more details regarding entry applications.

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Issued Dec 2, 2011 Federal order milk prices took a temporary jump. The Agriculture Department announced the November benchmark Class III price at $19.07 per hundredweight, up $1.04 from October, $3.63 above No-

vember 2010, $1.88 above California’s 4b cheese milk price, and equates to about $1.64 per gallon. It’s the highest November price in four years and put the 2011 average at $18.33, up from $14.46 at this time a year

ago and a disastrous $11.03 in 2009. But Class III futures late Friday morning portended a decline in December, to $18.61. Looking to First Quarter 2012; the January contract was trading at $17.29, February $17.15, March $17.09, and April $16.95. The November Class IV price is $17.87 per hundredweight, down 54 cents from October but $4.62 above a year ago. The NASS-surveyed cheese price averaged $1.8415 per pound, up

9.4 cents from October. Butter averaged $1.7824, down fractionally. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.4522, down 5.9 cents, and dry whey averaged 63.8 cents, up 2.3 cents. California’s 4b cheese milk price is $17.19, up $1.41 from October, and $4.05 above a year ago. The 2011 4b average now stands at $16.48, up from $13.25 a year ago. The 4a butter-powder price is $17.70, down 59 cents from October, but $1.36 above a

year ago. The 2011 average is now $19.02, up from $14.82 in 2010. Sellers tried to “butter up” the Chicago Mercantile Exchange the week following Thanksgiving as a possible record high 56 carloads came and went. You might say “Black Friday” for butter came on Monday when the price jumped a nickel despite 11 carloads trading hands, followed by 14 more on Tuesday, and kept coming. The first Friday of December however saw the price close

Mielke 22

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 21

at $1.63 per pound, up 2 cents on the week and 2 cents above a year ago. The NASS-surveyed price plunged 12.6, to $1.6467. NASS powder averaged $1.4094, down 4.3 cents, and dry whey inched 0.1 cent higher, to 64.29 cents per pound. A more typical spread between block and barrel cheese was reestablished. Monday saw a small rebound in both but gave it all back with the blocks closing Friday at $1.74, down 4 3/4cents on the week but still 23 1/4-cents above a year ago. The barrels rolled 8 3/4-cents lower, to $1.7125, and 25 1/4 above a year ago. Only five cars of block traded hands on the week and eight of barrel. The NASS U.S. average block price jumped 6 1/2-cents, to $1.8886, and the barrels averaged $1.9754, up 6.8 cents. The Monday rally in the cash dairy prices following Thanksgiving Week caught the market by surprise, according to Stewart Peterson’s Matt Mattke in Tuesday’s DairyLine broadcast. Futures were factoring in anticipated further declines in cheese, he said, with some months expecting the low $1.50s. “Seasonally, this is still the time of the year where we should, if buyers are going to step in, this is the time of the year where they should still be looking to do so,” Mattke said, “As there’s still those end users looking to procure supplies for upcoming holidays.” But, he wasn’t convinced the rally would hold and warned that, in the past, “When October and November are strong for cheese prices, which is pretty rare, it hasn’t been a good omen for cheese prices in the month of December.” He added that he would not be surprised if the blockbarrel average fell below November lows and, worst case scenario, “We could see $1.60 cheese tested.” He said that $1.59 to $1.77 “looks like what the downside range of risk could be.” Mattke advised producers to “Stay defensive in nearby months. Look to the tools you’re most comfortable with whether it be futures, puts, or fences. Keep the protection nearby and in that First Quarter time frame,” he concluded, but “Going beyond that I think it’s a bit early until we see some indications that the


Page 22 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Mielke from 21 long term trend for the dairy market is turning to down. Right now we don’t see that yet.” FC Stone dairy broker, Boris Maslovsky, said in their November 28 eDairy Insider Opening Bell that consumer demand may support dairy prices. “Black Friday was a blockbuster,” Maslovsky said. “Sales were extremely strong, well above expectations and are driving equities up. Consumer spending for televisions and other goods may filter into food markets.” However, he cautions that China’s milk imports are down by as much as half so international markets may weigh on U.S. dairy prices. Dairy economist Bill Brooks disagrees and said heavy consumer spending on television sets doesn’t translate into higher food demand. “I don’t believe there will be a bump in dairy prices based on Black Friday,” he said, but adds that consumer spending “could cushion price declines.” The CME’s Daily Dairy Report (DDR) echoed the China concern reporting that, in the June to October period, China imported just 150 million pounds of whole milk powder, down 45 percent from a year ago. Purchases are expected to pick up ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year, which starts January 23, according to the DDR. Whole milk powder out of Oceania is priced at $1.54-$1.70 per pound, up about 7 cents since mid-October, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. FC Stone dairy economist Bill Brooks warned in the December 1 eDairy Morning Executive Edition that the global macro-economic picture looks weak, while milk production is up. He adds that China’s economy has slowed and Europe is in trouble. Broker Maslovsky wrote; “The more support Europe gets, the less chance of the dollar soaring and limiting U.S. exports,” Meanwhile; the DDR says third quarter cheese use was slowing, based on USDA data. Disappearance of American cheese was off 4.3 percent, the worst quarter in four years, according to Editor Alan Levitt. He adds that disappearance of other cheese was up just 1.8 percent. Combined, total cheese use was down 0.6 per-

cent from the prior year in third quarter after running nearly 5 percent higher in the first half of 2011. Butter movement, on the other hand, remained robust in third quarter, according to Levitt. Commercial use was up 12.2 percent, “helping to clear very heavy production volumes.” Disappearance was up almost 10 percent in the first three quarters of the year, according to USDA, and manufacturers were successful in moving powder in the third quarter: Nonfat dry milk and skim milk powder use in third quarter was up about 11 percent versus a year ago, according to USDA production and inventory figures. Fluid milk sales were down 1.3 percent. USDA’s Dairy Products report indicates milk is being channeled to the churn and the dryer. October butter production hit 146 million pounds, up 6.4 percent from September and 19.6 percent above October 2010. Nonfat dry milk and skim milk powder output, at 142.7 million pounds, was up 8 percent from 2010. Cheddar cheese output totaled 249.9 million pounds, virtually unchanged from September but 5.8 percent below a year ago. American cheese, at 352 million pounds, was up 4 percent from September and 1.2 percent below a year ago. In export news; the Cooperatives Working Together program accepted 12 requests for export assistance this week from Dairy Farmers of America, Darigold, and United Dairymen of Arizona to sell a total of 7.4 million pounds of Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese to customers in Asia, the Middle East, and Central America. CWT’s 2011 cheese exports now total 88.3 million pounds. CWT will have “a very robust future,” in 2012 according to National Milk’s Chris Galen in Thursday’s DairyLine, now that participation exceeds 70 percent of the U.S. milk supply. Created in 2003 to help dairy farmers, Galen said the decision was made two years ago to concentrate on export assistance. The 2012 budget will be $35 million, according to Galen, with the majority going to American

type cheese, a quarter to butter and butterfat products, and $5 million held in reserve for possible inclusion of milk powders if necessary. “CWT has had a big role the past couple years in helping augment our cheese exports,” Galen said. About two thirds of all Cheddar and American type cheese exported this year was facilitated by CWT, he said, 18 percent of all cheese

exported this year has been the result of the CWT and, “at 2 cents per hundredweight, it’s a very modest investment that farmers and cooperatives are making in a program that basically helps everyone with better prices.” The majority of Asian exports go to Japan, Galen reported, but he expects exports to Korea to continue to grow with the new free trade agree-

ment, plus a significant portion of product is going to the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia and Egypt. “They are important export markets for the U.S. overall,” he concluded, “And the more people participate, that will give a bigger budget to facilitate more exports.” Milk prices could average around $20 per hundredweight for 2011, more than $3.50 higher

than last year, according to Dairy Profit Weekly’s Dave Natzke in Friday’s DairyLine. “However, two government reports this week, recapping dairy financial factors for October and November, indicate profit margins will be shrinking in the final quarter of the year,” he said. USDA’s monthly report on milk production costs

Mielke 23


Still no free lunch? The disconnect between academic idea and cowherd application Common sense makes it clear: simplicity rules. However, ranching profitability is a model of

complexity. “Conventional wisdom says crossbreeding equals extra pounds and

more revenue at sale time, but those assumptions are often too simplistic,” says animal sci-

nomics and business.” More pounds, more dollars? “It’s just never that simple,” he says (see Graphic). Strategic marketing Historically, the “pounds equal profit” paradigm gained ground on its perceived operational efficiency. It took little effort to introduce a Continental bull into an English herd and increase output. However, the slight effort often led to a “problem solved” level of thought. “We started crossbreeding, but it wasn’t often well-designed or systematic,” Speer says. “It was just a haphazard approach, and that’s no good. There was this perception that crossbreeding would fix everything, regardless of the genetics we put into the system.” That approach became hazardous as beef consumers grew more discriminating in the 1990s. Commodity beef wasn’t delivering what they wanted, so the industry had to start looking for new ways to meet demand for consistently high-quality beef. “Industry economics began to change toward reflecting the entire value chain,” Speer explains. “That favored production systems that were increasingly responsive to end-user specifications.” As more research pointed to English breeds’ superior marbling and tenderness,

cattle with proven potential for carcass performance became more valuable. Speer says these changes laid the groundwork for a shift in conventional marketing, including more interest in retained ownership at the feeding stage and more emphasis on quality over quantity alone. Cost, capital management Consolidation continued, and larger operations “have a tendency to move from strictly a weigh-up focus to more specified marketing targets,” Speer says. The ability to fill a semi-trailer leads to more desire for uniformity, and interest in value-added marketing through retained ownership. “In those scenarios, weight and value are not mutually exclusive,” he adds. The cowherd represents primary income for only one quarter of beef operations. Labor efficiency is especially critical to those with 200 or more cows, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the inventory. “One of their most time-consuming tasks is managing the calving females,” Speer points out. “In an ideal world, they would be observed regularly, but time constraints often don’t allow such luxury.” That adds emphasis to predictable calving ease.

Still 24

Mielke from 22 showed higher October feed prices pushed total production costs to possibly the highest level on record, even surpassing totals seen during a previous high-cost period of 2008. Based on USDA estimates, total costs covering feed and other operating costs, as well as labor and overhead, will be up at least $2 per hundredweight from 2010. “So while 2011 milk prices will be up substantially from 2010, higher costs could eat up nearly two-thirds of that additional income,” Natzke said. USDA’s second report provides another measurement of dairy income. The monthly milk-feed price ratio, an index comparing the relationship between the average milk price and feed

costs, shrunk in November. While November milk prices held steady at $19.90 per hundredweight, higher corn prices offset small declines in prices for soybeans and alfalfa hay, tightening the milk-feed price ratio to the lowest level since May. “For dairy producers who buy feed, hay prices remain especially troublesome, more than $80 per ton higher than a year ago,” Natzke said. “Most market analysts suggest milk prices move in a three-year cycle, and the last low point was 2009. And while 2011-12 milk prices should average well above the devastating lows of 2009, when combined with anticipated feed prices, the corresponding milk-feed price ratio could rival that seen in 2009,” he concluded.

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 23

entist Nevil Speer. The Western Kentucky University professor recently authored a research paper titled “Crossbreeding: a free lunch, but at what cost?” Speer’s analysis points to incremental changes in marketing, capital and cost management, and increasingly accurate genetic tools to help explain why long-established research that supports crossbreeding has failed to make a case for profitability. Why have so many left the beef industry’s last “free lunch” on the table? No doubt, properly planned, well-executed crossbreeding can add maternal benefits and more weaning weight in most environments, but Speer says the qualifiers mean it’s no open-and-shut case. “If we avoid this topic in animal science, it’s because we don’t have enough training in eco-


Spider plot offers a useful visual tool for agricultural management and education Killing a weed isn’t as simple as spraying herbicide on it when you consider the unintended consequences in agricultural systems. While the herbicide may kill the weed as intended, it also may contaminate ground and surface waters or kill field edge vegetation that is beneficial in creating a barrier against invading plants. Considering multiple variables and effects of agricultural practices leads to better management decisions. The current issue of the journal Weed Technology introduces the

spider plot — a graphical approach for evaluating multiple variables and tradeoffs in agriculture. The authors of the article also discuss applying this tool in the case study exercise of an educational workshop. Unintended effects of an agricultural method — weed control, tillage, rotation of crops, or planting of cover crops, for example — can be difficult to measure. These effects might manifest at a later time or at another site. Multiple variables make a decision less straightforward than it might seem.

If the variables are considered beforehand, better decisions can be made or tradeoffs can be found that minimize potential impacts. Tools that facilitate the conceptualization, evaluation, and visualization of multiple variables can assist in learning. One such visual representation is the spider plot. A spider plot contains three or more axes, each representing a variable and sharing a common

origin. Data are plotted on the axes, and data points are connected with a line. The size and symmetry of the resulting spider web indicates the relative magnitude of each variable and the overall performance of the system. The spider plot was introduced at an educational field-day workshop attended by farmers, agriculture professionals, and students. The activity was de-

signed to illustrate the multifunctionality of cover crops planted to suppress weeds or improve soil quality, showing participants that further variables, such as the type of cover crop, might play a role. The authors suggest the spider plot as a useful tool for weed science education and extension programs. Full text of the article, “Assessing and Visualizing Agricultural Management Practices: A Multi-

variable Hands-On Approach for Education and Extension,” Weed Technology, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2011, is available at www.wssajournals.org/t oc/wete/25/4

Page 24 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Still from 23 Higher birth weights may be linked to higher weaning weights, but expected progeny differences (EPDs) can defeat those antagonisms. In any case, the risk of losing a calf-or even a cowat birth verses more weaning weight leans toward the live calf when time and labor are scarce. Other convenience traits also come into consideration: “I don’t care if you get an extra 50 pounds at weaning,” Speer says. “I think most would agree that nursing one cow through a difficult birth in a snow storm when you have 200 more to think about is just not worth it.” Genetic progress pays As the use of EPDs has flourished over the past 30 years, the desire for data builds. Angus registrations outnumber those for all other breeds, even the next seven breeds combined. To that point, Speer says it’s not about the breed, it’s about the precise decisions that come with it: “As long as our industry is hitting the end target and doing that more

efficiently, more productively, and it’s profitable, who cares if the animals are black or white or pink or purple? It just happens to be that Angus has the genetic base to meet consumer demands and the tools to help people drive that forward.” The Angus database shows progress in performance traits across the board, narrowing the gap that used to produce the prized hybrid vigor. In general, breed differences have diminished. “The Angus breed caught up with Continentals in terms of growth and performance, so you just couldn’t get the boost you were used to getting in crossbreeding-plus the premiums,” he notes. “As the business environment has shifted, the sole pursuit of heterosis is no more tenable than single-trait selection for any genetic trait.” That means holding on to theoretical advantages without discipline can eat your lunch in terms of lost profit. To read Speer’s full research paper, visit www.CABpartners.com

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Weed Science Society of America says flooding along our nation’s rivers worsened by invasive weeds (Polygonum cuspidatum), giant knotweed (P. sachalinense), Himalayan knotweed (P. polystachyum) and a Japanese and giant knotweed hybrid (P. X Bohemicum). Knotweeds have been spotted in 41 states and are becoming a real threat to riparian areas, particularly in the Pacific Northwest. Knotweed roots are far less dense than those of native plants and are unable to hold soil firmly in place. When knotweed invades a riparian zone, stream banks become unstable and soil is stripped away. This scouring effect can actually shift a stream channel, create a sloping bank and result in significantly more sediment in the water. It also reduces the ability of both the riparian zone and the stream to hold water — promoting flash floods during periods of heavy runoff. Why is knotweed so successful at taking over? Like many riparian invaders, it can spread vegetatively, as well as by seed. Each plant produces an extensive network of underground rhizomes that can spread up to 65 feet in all directions. Tens of thousands of dormant buds on these underground stems can sprout new bamboo-like shoots that have been known to break through asphalt. “I’ve even seen a picture showing Japanese knotweed that had grown through someone’s living room floor,” says Timothy Prather, associate professor of weed science at the University of Idaho and a specialist in knotweed. Even a small fragment of a root or stem can launch a new invasive weed colony. You need to proceed with care and use every tool in your weed control arsenal to control knotweed. Here are a few control tips and best management practices compiled by The Nature Conservancy. Some of these same techniques can be applied to other aggressive plant invaders: • Manual/mechanical

control methods such as mowing, trimming, digging and pulling may work if you are persistent over a period of years. Your objective is to starve the root system, and that means staying ahead of new shoots that are produced from latent buds as you disrupt the plant. Be prepared to cut down or pull new shoots twice a month or more from April to August — and then at least once a month until first frost. Repeat the process annually until the knotweed no longer regrows. Also, keep stems that you pull, cut or mow out of the compost pile and well away from any nearby body of water. You don’t want the plant to spread to a new location. • Foliar herbicide applications may be appropriate for large infestations. Use only an herbicide approved for riparian use and take precautions to minimize drift. As with mechanical control measures, timing and persistence are important. Multiple applications may be needed to do the job. • New stem-injected herbicide techniques are showing great promise. A special tool is used to inject concentrated chemicals directly into a hollow in the knotwood stem. It’s a labor intensive process, though, making it best suited for small patches that are easily accessible. “Reclaiming riparian areas and restoring native species can be vital to flood control, water quality and even wildlife habitat,” Prather said. “It is important that we focus on early identification of invasive weeds, understand their growth patterns and how they spread, and establish an effective management plan before it’s too late.”

www.countryfolks.com

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 25

This year, flooding has ravaged thousands of homes and businesses in communities across the U.S. and scientists say the prevalence of invasive weeds is one of the factors that may be contributing to the damage. These foreign invaders are overrunning many vital “riparian” lands — the ecologically diverse natural habitats that run along the millions of miles of our nation’s waterways and help to prevent or moderate flooding. “Healthy riparian areas populated by native plants can store thousands of gallons of water per acre,” says Linda Nelson, plant physiologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and former president of the Aquatic Plant Management Society. “They filter the water that flows into a stream after a storm or snow melt and can also mitigate the effects of river flooding. But, unfortunately, the protection capacity of many of our vital riparian areas is being degraded by invasive weeds.” The native plant species typical of a healthy riparian corridor prosper there and have dense root systems to hold soil in place and protect against erosion. As a result, the soil is highly permeable and can absorb water entering the river and overflowing the banks. Healthy riparian land can even improve water quality as dense, native vegetation absorbs potential contaminants and traps sediment. But weeds that overrun native riparian vegetation can change everything and seriously degrade our nation’s valuable water resources. Common invaders include reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea), saltcedar (Tamarix aphylla) and leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula). Another good example is knotweed, an aggressive species from Asia introduced here as an ornamental. The most common varieties of this troublemaker include Japanese knotweed


AUC TION CALENDAR

Page 26 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, December 12 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. Featuring Rolling Ridge Dairy Milking Herd Dispersal. 15 Head of Registered Cattle. Grazing herd with light grain & baleage. Misc. & Small Animals. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-5843033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. We will be open the day after Christmas - Business as usual. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon,

NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-3923321. Tuesday, December 13 • 10:00 AM: 12658 S. Winchester, Calumet Park, IL. Late Model Truck Tractors, Dump Trucks, Construction Equip., Attachments, Support Equip & Dump Trailers. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-8682006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, December 14 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 9:30 AM: Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY. NY Farm & Construction Consignment Auction. Goodrich Auction Service, 607-642-3293

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd., Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

www.goodrichauctionservice.com • 10:00 AM: 12601 State Rd. 545 North, Winter Garden, FL. Rental Fleet Construction Auction, Support Equip., Trucks & Trailers. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Calf Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-8449104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 Thursday, December 15 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 9:00 AM: Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 840 Fords Bush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Sale held for Curtis Lumber, Flooded Materials from Irene. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257

YO U

BY

• 10:00 AM: 2041 Goose Lake Rd., Sauget, IL. Late Model Cat Rental Fleet Auction. Construction Equip., Attachments, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-776-2000 or 315-427-7845. • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Friday, December 16 • 9:30 AM: 935 US 23 North, Delaware, OH (Delaware Co. Fairgrounds). Over 60 Plus Trailers Sell! One Owner Auction. Late Model Truck Tractors, various Equipment Trailers: Walking Floors, Dumps, Drop Decks, Hi-Flats & Expandables. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers


AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Monday, December 26 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). We will be open the day after Christmas - Business as usual! Happy Holiday wishes from The Hosking Family, the Sale Barn crew & Cafe Girls. We appreciate all the business & friends we have made along the way! Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, December 28 • 9:30 AM: Tuscaloosa, AL. Large Logging, Construction, Truck Tractors, Dump & Utility Trucks, Support Equipment Auction. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315633-9544 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, December 30

• 10:00 AM: 398 Old Schuylerville Rd., Greenwich, NY (Washington Co. Fairgrounds). Rental Returns of New Holland, Kobelco, Cat Construction Equipment, Support, Attachments, Trucks & Trailers. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 Saturday, December 31 • 8:30 AM: Hoover Tractor, Mifflinburg, PA. 5th Annual New Years Sale. Accepting consignments. Fraley Auction Co., 570-546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com • 9:00 AM: 5253 Rt. 364, corner of Upper Hill Rd., 1 mi. E of Middlesex, NY. Melvin & Joan Bodine Retirement Auction. Farm is sold, selling farm equipment and shop tools. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Monday, January 2 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. A group of Jersey & Jersey X steers.Misc. & Small Animals. 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, January 7

• 9:30 AM: Pittsburgh, PA. Very Large Job Completion Auction for Fleischner Excavation. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315633-9544 • 10:00 AM: 3517 Railroad Ave., Alexander, NY. Z&M Ag & Turf Auction. Public Auction Sale of Farm Tractors, Machinery, Landscape, Tools, Lawn Tractor & Mowers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com Thursday, January 12 • Portland, OR. Major Job Completion Auction. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-6339544 Friday, January 20 • 12:00 Noon: 73 West First Ave., Windsor, PA. Public Auction of Windsor Meat Market. Operating business with retail meat sales & custom slaughtering. Leaman Auctions, 717-464-1128 or 610-662-8149 www.leamanauctions.com Monday, February 6 • Kissimmee, FL. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com Saturday, February 11 • Penn Yan, NY. Farm Machinery & farm smalls plus a few household goods for Ivan & Verna Zimmerman. L.W. Horst Auctioneer, 315-536-0954

HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com

KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE R.D. 1, Little Falls, NY 315-823-0089 We Buy or Sell Your Cattle or Equipment on Commission or Outright In Business Since 1948!

NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com

TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung

LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com

NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

L. W. HORST AUCTIONEER 1445 Voak Rd., Penn Yan, NY 14527 315-536-0954 • Fax: 315-536-6189

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com

WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 27

Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315633-2944, 315-633-9544 • 10:00 AM: Canaan, VT. Complete Dairy Herd Dispersal of 500 Head for Bill & Ursula Johnson. Sales Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802525-4774, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 neks@together.net Saturday, December 17 • 9:30 AM: 4501 Leipzig Ave., Mays Landing, NJ. Rental Return Auction of Construction, Support Equipment, Attachments, Pickups, Dump Trucks, Truck Tractors, Trailers & More. Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc., 315-633-2944, 315-633-9544 Monday, December 19 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, December 21 • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-2965041 • 10:00 AM: 3277 Lexington Road Richmond, KY. Secured Creditors Auction: Construction Equipment, Drilling Equipment, Support, Trucks & Trailers.


Page 28 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT December 5, 2011 Calves: 45-60# 18-22; 6175# 35-45; 76-90# 55-60; 91-105# 65-65.50; 106# & up 70-75. Farm Calves: 77.50-82.50 Started Calves: 25-30 Veal Calves: 50-117.50 Open Heifers: .60-1.10 Beef Heifers: 65-80 Feeder Steers: 59-85 Beef Steers: 101-15 Stock Bull: 71-105 Beef Bull: 63-77 Feeder Pigs (ea): 30-75 Sheep (ea): 135-180 Lambs (ea): 60-200 Goats (ea): 60-170 Kid Goats (ea): 65-75 Canners: up to 63.75 Cutters: 64-67 Utility: 68.50-72 Rabbits: 5-16 Chickens: 4-12 Ducks: 3-12 On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt

1.06.5, Avg .80; 12 Bulls .59.5-.89.5, Avg .76; 7 Steers .65.5-1.02.5, Avg .86; 4 Hogs .63-.68, Avg .66; 16 Roasting Pigs 59-61, Avg 59.81; 5 Sows .46-.53.5, Avg .57; 108 Sheep .381.36, Avg .70; 7 Lambs (ea) 64-104, Avg 84.57, 91 (/#) .80-2.20, Avg 1.79; 6 Goats (ea) 85-170, Avg 110.83; 21 Kids (ea) 8-75, Avg 57.38; 38 Hides (ea) 3-28, Avg 4.74. Total 407. Poultry & Egg Report: Heavy Fowl (/#) .60; Mixed Fowl (ea) 1.50-3.75; Pullets (ea) 5; Roosters (/#) 1-1.15; Bunnies (ea) 2-4.75; Ducks (/#) .80-1.50; Rabbits (/#) 23.20; Pigeons (ea) 2.503.50. Grade A Eggs: White Jum XL 1.65; Brown Jum XL 1.90-1.95; L 1.89; M 1.15. Hay, Straw & Grain Report: 1 Mixed 4.20; 6 Grass 3.80-4.90; 1 Mulch 3.50; 1 Firewood 25. Total 9.

41. *Buyers always looking for pigs.

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT No report

CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report

PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY November 28, 2011 Calves (/#): Grower Calves over 92# 1-1.40; 8092# .825-1.20; Bob Veal .10.40. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .60.755; Lean .54-.625; Hvy. Beef Bulls .67-.745. Beef (/#): Beef Ch .90-1.13; Hols. Ch .80-.94.

COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA December 7, 2011 Cows: Canners 37-57; Cutters 58-66; Util 67-79.50. Bulls: 55-85.50. Calves: 4-145/ea. Feeders: 27-131 Sheep: 66 Goats: 55-246/ea. Kids: 41-127/ea. Sows: 48-51 Chickens: 3.50-11 Rabbits: 6-21 * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA December 6, 2011 Beef Cattle: Canners .45.58; Cutters .48-.62; Util .65.75; Bulls .60-.78; Steers .90-1.15; Hfrs. .60-.80. Calves: Growers .75-1.50; Hfrs. .70-1.10; Veal .70-.90. Hogs: Feeders 30-45; Sows 40-48; Roasters 50; Boars 25; Market 55-60. Sheep: 50-80 Goats: 75-120; Billies 125180; Kids 40-120. Lambs: 1-2 NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA No report northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ December 6, 2011 Livestock Report: 32 Calves .16-1.70, Avg .80; 38 Cows .40.5-.77, Avg .61; 3 Easy Cows .14-.29, Avg .21; 7 Feeders 300-500# .54.97, Avg .78; 12 Heifers .44-

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY December 1, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. .50-2; Grower Bulls over 92# 11.85; 80-92# .80-1.20. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .62-.75; Lean .45-.63; Hvy. Beef .60.80. Dairy Replacements (/hd): Fresh Cows 800-1400; Springing Cows 800-1250; Springing Hfrs. 750-1300; Bred Hfrs. 700-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 750-1400; Open Hfrs. 400-800; Started Hfrs. 100300; Service Bulls 6001000. Beef (/#): Feeders .50-1; Sel .80-.95. Lamb/Sheep (/#): Feeder .80-1.50; Market 1-1.80; Slaughter Sheep .30-.60. Goats (/hd): Billies 80-150; Nannies 70-100; Kids 20-80. Swine (/hd): Feeder Pig 1540. CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY No report CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY December 5, 2011 Calves (/#): Grower over 92# 1-1.40; 80-92# .80-1.05; Bob Veal .50-.60. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .69-.75; Lean .62-.66.50; Hvy. Beef Bulls .73-.80. Beef (/hd): Ch 109-111. Lamb/Sheep (/#): Feeder 1.90-2; Market 1.40-1.75; Slaughter Sheep .62-.70. Goats (/hd): Billies 160175; Nannies 110-130. Swine (/hd): Feeder Pig 38-

CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY November 30, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. 1.55; Grower Bulls over 92# 1.201.575; 80-92# .90-1.10; Bob Veal .15-.40. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .65.745; Lean .555-.65; Hvy. Beef Bulls .665-.765. Beef (/#): Ch 1.225; Hols. Ch .80-1.01. Goats (/#): Billies 1.101.425. Swine (/#): Hog .50-.59; Feeder Pig (/hd) 25-34.

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Bath

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge Chatham

DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY No report GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY No report

BATH MARKET Bath, NY December 1, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. 1.70-1.90; Grower Bulls over 92# 1.251.50; 80-92# .75-1.10; Bob Veal .10-.55. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .66-.75; Lean .58-.65; Hvy. Beef Bulls .70-.75. Beef (/#): Feedeers .75-.85; Beef Ch .99-1.06; Hols. Sel .80-.90. Goats (/hd): Billies 80-95. Swine (/#): Sow .52-.56. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY December 7, 2011 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 55-73; Canners/Cutters 39-68; HY Util 67-80. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95-110# 40-67.50; 80-95# 35-65; 60-80# 30-60. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 70-160; 8095# 65-155; 70-80# 60-90; Hfr calves 125-185. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed 113-126; Sel 94-105; Hols. Ch grain fed 88-104; Sel 7083.50. Hogs: Slgh. US 1-3 54-60; Sows US 1-3 50.50-52; Boars US 1-3 15; Feeders US 1-3 13-55 Market Lambs: Ch 80-100# 150-180. Goats (/hd): L Billies 110# & up 130-202.50; L Nannies 125-142.50.

FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No report Produce Mon. @ 10 am, Wed-Fri. @ 9 am sharp! FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY December 2, 2011 Hay: 1st cut 105-190; 2nd cut 160-220; 3rd cut 170250. Straw: 175-260 HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY December 5, 2011 Cattle: Bone Util .60-.7550; Canners/Cutters .58-.65; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls/Steers .68-.78. Calves: Bull Calves 96120# .80-1.58; up to 95# .10-.95; Hols. under 100# 1. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA November 30, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75# lean 74; Breakers 75-80% lean 65.25-66.75, hi dress 74.75, lo dress 64-64.75; Boners 80-85% lean 62-66, hi dress 67, lo dress 55-58.25; Lean 85-90% lean 56-61.75, lo dress 49.75-55.75. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1042-1776# 66-74. Feeder Cattle: Steers M 2 514# 79; L 3 Hols. 434-462# 72; 522# 72; Bulls M 2 410# 88. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 94-116# 130-157; 92# 125-130; No. 2 94-132# 95127; 90# 75-102; No. 3 94116# 62-75; 80-92# 55-67; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 90-100# 110-150/hd; No. 2 80-90# 70-85/hd; Vealers Util 7418# 22-69. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 230-260# 120-135/hd; Boars 380#

45/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 2055# 13-21; 60-70# 27-33. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 50-55# 110-120; Sel 2 4055# 60-95; 60-75# 72.50115; Nannies Sel 1 120140# 100-110; Sel 2 90130# 65-80; Sel 3 80-90# 20-50; Billies Sel 1 130# 147.50; Sel 2 120# 137.50147.50. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA December 6, 2011 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 2-3 1230-1625# 123129; Sel & Lo Ch 13001610# 117-122; 2 hd ret. to feed 109; Hols. Steers Ch 23 1375-1660# 105-112; Sel & Lo Ch cpl 1435-1810# 94.50-104; Std 2 hd 85; Hfrs. Ch 2-3 1370-1520# 124.50127; Sel & Lo Ch 11851350# 112-120. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White & Hols. Hfrs. 7890.50; Breakers 70-73.50; Boners 65.50-73; Lean 6570; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 54.50-64.50; Shelly 54 & dn. Bulls: YG 2 1185-1490# 6050-78. Feeder Cattle: Steers L No. 1 685-785# 111-126; Hols/Dairy types 680-700# 63-65, 1 hd 1165# 89.50; Hfrs. Hereford full 755# 86; Bulls Hols. 205-265# 77-95; 425-865# 46-85. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 140150; No. 2 90-130# 100-142; No. 3 80-130# 75-105; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 85-90# 75-110. Swine: Hogs 305-370# 58.50-66; Sows US 103 320-315# 56-61; thin 380490# 48-53; Boners 285505# 39-46.50; Boars 535590# 31.50. Goats (/hd): M&L Nannies & Billies 90-190; Fancy Kids 130-148; Fleshy Kids 75120; Small/thin/bottle 32-70. Lambs: Gd 90-110# 145165. Sheep: (all wts.) 60-80 Sale every Tuesday

* 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. * Special Goat, Lamb & Sheep Sale for Christmas. Tues., Dec. 13 @ 6 pm. * State Graded Feeder Pig Sale for Christmas & New Year Fri., Dec. 16. Receiving 7:30 am til 10 am. Sale 1 pm. * Special Fed Cattle Sales Dec. 6, 20 & 27. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA Small Animal Sale December 6, 2011 Rabbits: 3-8 Chickens: .75-7.50 Button Quail: 1-5 Guinea Pigs: .50-1 Bunnies: 1-10 Chicks: 1-1.75 Pigeons: 3.50-4.25 All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC Dewart, PA December 5, 2011 Cattle: 258. Steers 10321244# 109-113; Hols. Steers Ch 1322-1772# 101-104; Sel 1200-1610# 90-94.50. Cows: Prem. White 68.5071; Breakers 64-67.50; Boners 60-65.50; Lean 45-57. Bulls: G 1 1576-1810# 70.50-76; 1218-1456# 7882.50; G 2 1460-2264# 61.50-67.50; M&L 3 700900# 72-77.50. Feeder Steers: M&L 2 300500# 112.50-128; 500-700# 106-110; 700-900# 90-105. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 12250-125; M&L 2 300500# 110-121; 500-700# 100-110; 700-900# 81-110; M&L 3 500-700# 65-75. Feeder Bulls: 300-500# 119-130; 500-700# 118-


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT 125; M&L 2 300-500# 107121; M&L 3 300-500# 6580. Calves: 219. Bull Calves No. 1 94-130# 132-162; 9092# 90-130; No. 2 94-130# 105-130; 80-92# 70-100; No. 3 94-124# 80-105; 8092# 55-80; Hfr. Calves No. 1 86-112# 185-250; No. 2 74116# 75-160; Util 10-55. Feeder Pigs: 20-30# 2032.50/hd. Hogs: 300-360# 61-66. Lambs: Ch 2-3 60-80# 175195; 80-100# 155-185; Gd & Ch 1-3 80-100# 130-145. Nannie Goats: 80-130# 62.50-97.50/hd. Hay: 19 lds, 85-400/ton. Straw: 3 lds, 170-200/ton. Earcorn: 4 lds, 215-290/ton. Firewood: 5 lds, 65115/cord.

GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA December 5, 2001 Slaughter Cattle: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1322-1432# 127.50131; 1648# 129.50; Ch 2-3 1244-1488# 123-128.50; Sel 1-3 1196-1500# 115.50122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1430-1502# 110-114; Ch 23 1286-1522# 101.50-107; Sel 1-3 1396-1572# 95.50100. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & pr 2-3 1264-1518# 125.50128; Ch 2-3 1240-1404#

Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four 120-124.50; Sel 1-3 10961234# 110.50-115. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 66.50-71.25, lo dress 64.75-66.75; Boners 80-85% lean 61.75-66.50, hi dress 66.50-71, lo dress 5660.50; Lean 85-90% lean 56.50-62.50, hi dress 6365.50, lo dress 51-57. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1052-1698# 67-79, hi dress 1052-1440# 83-87.50; 1806# 88.50, lo dress 16022210# 59-62.50. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L No. 1 290-296# 135; 512580# 130-133; Herefords 788# 83; M&L 2 Hfrs. 405480# 120-122; L 3 Hols. 430# 89; 709-1008# 82.5088.50; Hfrs. M&L 1 348483# 117.50-127.50; 538580# 115-121; M&L 2 244# 110; 300-458# 90-120; 550# 94; 858-914# 88-91; Bulls M&L 1 634-750# 107.50112.50; M&L 2 346-406# 110-115. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bull Calves No. 1 94-120# 125162.50; No. 2 94-120# 90125; 84-92# 75-95; No. 3 94116# 67.50-87.50; 78-92# 65-77.50; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 104-112# 160-180; No. 2 78-100# 100. Beef X Calves: 98-102# 85135. Utility: 70-108# 25-70. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 288-337# 67-72; 40-45% lean 235320# 63. Sows: US 1-3 414# 55; 696# 56.50. Boars: 286-610# 25-30. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 55-65# 210-220; 73108# 155-210; 112-160# 147.50-170; Ewes Gd 2-3 216-252# 45-62.50; Rams 346# 60. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 55-70# 110-142.50; 7590# 130-157.50; Sel 2 3045# 50-100; 70# 125; Nannies Sel 1 90-150# 100157.50; Sel 2 90-140# 77.50-105; Billies Sel 1 160180# 182.50-195; Sel 2 150# 167.50; Wethers Sel 1 150# 147.50. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA

No report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA December 3, 2011 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 220-400 Mixed Hay: 12 lds, 205-360 Grass: 7 lds, 230-310 Straw: 8 lds, 165-210 Firewood: 7 lds, 35-65 Oats: 2 lds, 5.75-6 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA December 1, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1230-1595# 127-131; Ch 2-3 1220-1575# 125.50127; Sel 2-3 1120-1260# 110-114; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 23 1385-1615# 110-114; Ch 2-3 1355-1615# 98.50-104; Sel 2-3 1138-1455# 88-93. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 7073.50, hi dress 75-78, lo dress 68-70.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 66-69, lo dress 63-65; Boners 80-85% lean 62-65, hi dress 66.50-67, lo dress 58-60; Lean 85-90% lean 56-60, hi dress 62.5063.50, lo dress 52-55. Slaughter Bulls: Thurs. YG 1 920-1625# 73-76.50, lo dress 1250-1950# 67-70.50; Bullocks 915-1320# 73-77; hi dress 900-1440# 8385.50, lo dress 885-1350# 65-702090-2155# 69-69.50. Graded Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 94-128# 131-143; 8692# 70-100; No. 2 94-128# 121-149; 80-92# 70; No. 3 80-130# 60-90; 72-78# 25; Util 60-110# 25-30; Graded Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 95-110# 150-180; No. 2 pkg 85-100# 50-100. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA No report LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA November 30, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1530# 123.25; Sel 1-3 14301475# 114.50-116.50; Hols. Ch 2-3 1320-1535# 102.50105.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 3-4

1100-1260# 119.50-120.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 70.5072.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 66.50-69.50, hi dress 72-76; Boners 80-85% lean 62.50-66, lo dress 60-60.50; Lean 85-90% lean 57-60.50, hi dress 62.50-64.50, lo dress 50-56. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1240-1680# 71-73.50. Vealers: 70-120# 25-70; 5565# 15-25. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 142.50-160; 85-90# 80-100; No. 2 95130# 130-150; 80-90# 77.50-90; No. 3 80-120# 70120; Hols. Hfrs. No. 2 85100# 70-75. Lambs: Ch 2-3 65-95# 165167.50; Ewes Gd 1-2 135175# 70; Util 1-2 100-125# 65-72. Goats: Kids Sel 2 under 20# 20-35; 30-40# 70-80; Nannies Sel 3 40-50# 3043. Slaughter Hogs: 50-54% lean 210-225# 75-80; 242256# 66.50-68.50. MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA November 29, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1310-1545# 127-131; Ch 2-3 1220-1500# 120126.50; 1570-1595# 125125.50; Sel 1-3 1110-1395# 113-118; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 23 1340-1595# 104.50-110; Ch 2-3 1195-1600# 99-105; Sel 1-3 1295-1485# 9398.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1285-1290# 126128.50; Ch 2-3 1105-1320# 117-119; Sel 1-3 11051320# 117-119; Sel 1-3 1145-1215# 112-115. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 67.50-69, lo dress 63-65.50; Boners 8085% lean 60.50-66, hi dress 67.50-68.50, lo dress 55-60; Lean 85-90% lean 55.50-61, hi dress 61.50-64, lo dress 48-55. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1290-1705# 70.50-79, lo dress 1100-1550# 50-64. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 607870# 110-120; M 2 Herefords 720# 77; L 3 Hols.

545-870# 60-69. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 310-415# 110-114; 535563# 100-110; M&L 2 735830# 80-85. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 245287# 126-137; 427# 126; 566# 112; L 3 Hols. 585# 65. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 130-162; 90# 95-105; No. 2 95-110# 95135; 80-90# 75-95; No. 3 95110# 65-90; 75-90# 50-75; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 90-100# 140-175; Beef X 90# 75; Vealers Util 60-100# 10-70. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 252-276# 68-72.50; 280-305# 68-72; 320-355# 71-76; 45-50% lean 270-287# 68-69; 305# 65. Sows: US 1-3 460-500# 5055; 535-790# 59.50-62. Boars: 385-760# 29.50-40; Jr. Boars 330-340# 50-52. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 60-67# 185-225; 75100# 120-180; Ewes Gd 2-3 141-175# 55. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 5565# 115-135; 70-90# 130160; Sel 2 40-65# 60-90; 7075# 80-105. Slaughter Nannies: Sel 1 100-140# 90-115; Sel 2 90130# 70-90; Sel 3 70-110# 40-60. Billies: Sel 1 150# 190; Sel 2 130-160# 150-155. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA December 5, 2011 Cattle: 143 Cows: Steers Ch 110-115; Gd 80-100; Hfrs. Ch 108115; Gd 80-95; Util & Comm. 60-70; Canner/lo Cutter 58 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 75-82 Bulls: YG 1 55-75 Feeder Cattle: Steers 65110; Bulls 75-110; Hfrs. 70100. Calves: 109. Ch 90-105; Gd 70-85; Std 15-70; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 80-140; Hols. Hfrs. 90-130# 100-150. Hogs: 21. US 1-2 80-85; US 1-3 75-80; Sows US 1-3 5560; Boars 22-42. Feeder Pigs: 5. US 1-3 2050# 40-50. Sheep: 27. Ch Lambs 175190; Gd 170-180; SI Ewes 65-80. Goats: 20-160 MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA December 5, 2011 Alfalfa: 255-325 Alfalfa/Grass: 230-295 Grass: 270-365 Timothy: 205-320 Mixed Hay: 200-350 Round Bales: 135-190 Lg. Sq. Bales: 150-200 Straw: 190-225 Wood: 75-100 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY &

RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA December 5, 2011 Roosters: 2.50-6 Hens: .50-2 Banties: .10-2 Pigeons: 2-3 Geese: 15-16 Bunnies: 2-4 Rabbits: 4-10 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA December 1, 2011 Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1230-1595# 127-131; Ch 23 1220-1575# 125.50-127; Sel 2-3 1120-1260# 110114.; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1385-1615# 110-114; Ch 23 1355-1615# 98.50-104; Sel 2-3 1138-1455# 88-93. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 few 1275-1450# 127.50-131. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 7073.50, hi dress 75-78, lo dress 68-70.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 66-69, lo dress 63-65; Boners 80-85% lean 62-65, hi dress 66.50-67, lo dress 58-60; Lean 88-90% lean 56-60, hi dress 62.5063.50, lo dress 52-55. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 9201625# 73-76.50, lo dress 1250-1950# 67-70.50; 2090-2155# 69-69.50. Graded Bull Calves: No. 1 94-128# 131-143; 86-92# 70-100; No. 2 94-128# 121149; 80-92# 70; No. 3 80130# 60-90; 72-78# 25; Util 60-110# 25-30. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 95-110# 150-180; No. 2 85-100# 50-100. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA No report *Next Feeder Pig Sale Wed., Dec. 7. NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA November 28, 2011 Slaughter Lambs: Non-traditional markets: Wooled & Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 225-243; 60-80# 206-237; 80-90# 181-196; 90-110# 178-193; 110-130# 165182; 130-150# 156-171; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 6080# 168-181; 90-110# 153168; 110-130# 140-155; 130-150# 140-148. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 76-91; 200-300# 6681; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120160# 66-80. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 3040# 86-94; 40-60# 90-109; 60-80# 118-136; 80-90# 122-132; 90-100# 128-143; Sel 2 30-40# 68-83; 40-60# 69-87; 70-80# 88-103; 80100# 93-108; Sel 3 30-40# 38-53; 40-60# 42-74; 60-80# 70-88; 80-90# 81-94. Slaughter Nannies/Does:

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 29

EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA December 5, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 7677.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 72-75; Boners 80-85% lean 67.50-72, lo dress 64; Lean 85-90% lean 62-66, hi dress 65-67, lo dress 5961.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1420-1650# 75-80; YG 2 1390-2205# 70-72. Steers: M&L 1 500-600# 127.50-132.50. Heifers: M&L 1 300# 132.50; 500-700# 108122.50; M&L 2 300-500# 105-115; 500-700# 101108. Bulls: M&L 1 300-500# 125-137.50, few fancy 152.50; 500-700# 125-135; M&L 2 300-500# 107.50122.50, thin type 127.50; 500-700# 90-95. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 90-120# 110-140; No. 2 90-130# 80-102.50; No. 3 85-120# 40-70; Beef 90105# 100-135; Vealers Util 65-120# 25-40. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 1-3 60-80# 175-87.50; Gd & Ch 1-2 40-60# 120-127.50; Ewes Util 1-2 120-200# 6068. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 2 40-50# 47.50-60; Nannies Sel 1 97# 125; Sel 2 80100# 67.50-80; Billies Sel 3 60# 47.50; Wethers Sel 2 115# 92.50/cwt.

Pennsylvania Markets


WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Sel 1 80-130# 99-114; 130180# 114-129; Sel 2 80130# 88-102; 130-180# 94109; Sel 3 50-80# 58-66; 80130# 69-84. Slaughter Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 163-178; 150-200# 200-210; Sel 2 100-150# 122-137. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report

Page 30 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to last week corn sold .05-.10 lower, wheat sold mostly steady, barley sold .05-.10 higher, Oats sold steady & Soybeans sold .15-.20 lower. EarCorn sold steady. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.42-7.05, Avg 6.75, Contracts 5.40-5.43; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.256.83, Avg 5.94, Contracts 5.20-5.24; Barley No. 3 Range 4.70-4, Avg 540, Contracts 4.75; Oats No. 2 Range 4.40-5, Avg 4.63; Soybeans No 2 Range 10.55-10.71, Avg 10.58, Contracts 10.70-10.76; EarCorn Range 198-200, Avg 199.

Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.25-6.75, Avg 6.60; Wheat 6.83; Barley No. 3 Range 4.75-5.25, Avg 5; Oats No. 2 Range 3.604.30, Avg 3.95; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.50-11.50, Avg 10.74; EarCorn Range 195-220, Avg 207.50. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.42-7.10, Avg 6.77; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.60-6.60, Avg 6.10; Barley No. 3 Range 4-6, Avg 4.92; Oats No. 2 Range 3-5.20, Avg 3.86; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.51-11, Avg 10.73; EarCorn Range 180190, Avg 185. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 6.70-7.10, Avg 6.88; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.94-6.70, Avg 6.32; Barley No. 3 Range 4.95; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.70-10.95, Avg 10.78; Gr. Sorghum Range 5.95. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.427.10, Avg 6.72, Month Ago 7.10, Year Ago 5.30; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.25-6.83, Avg 6.14, Month Ago 6.38, Year Ago 6.02; Barley No. 3 Range 4-6, Avg 5.05, Month Ago 5.06 Year Ago 3.74; Oats No. 2 Range 35.20, Avg 4.12, Month Ago 4.22, Year Ago 2.63; Soybeans No. 2 Range 10.5011.50, Avg 10.71, Month Ago 11.47, Year Ago 11.30; EarCorn Range 180-220; Avg 197.16, Month Ago 195, Year Ago 133.75.

Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 5.53-6.50, Avg 6.06; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.15; Oats No. 2 3-4.85, Avg 4.07; Soybeans No. 2 10.42. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary December 2, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 126.50-131; Ch 1-3 123.25-126.50; Sel 1-2 114122; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110-114; Ch 2-3 99-105; Sel 1-2 93-98.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 125-131; Ch 1-3 117120.50; Sel 1-2 112-115. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 66-72; Boners 80-85% lean 62-67.50; Lean 85-90% lean 57-62. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 76.50-80; Avg dress 7376.50; lo dress 67-72. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 142.50-148; 500-700# 122-148; M&L 2 300-500# 120-123; 500-700# 114115. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 127-143; 500700# 108-131; M&L 2 300500# 105-130; 500-700# 100-117. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 135-162.50; 500-700# 123-141; M&L 2 300-500# 107-136; 500-700# 90-110. Vealers: Util 60-120# 10-70. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-125# 130-160; No. 2 95-125# 95-130; No. 3 80-

120# 40-80; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 150-220; No. 2 80105# 50-150. Hogs: Barrows & Glts 4954% lean 220-270# 68-74; 45-50% lean 220-270# 6266.50. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 5963; 500-700# 63-65. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 12 30-39# 126-131; 40-49# 111-127; 50-59# 100-118; 60-69# 100-106; 70-79# 9093; US 2 50-59# 101. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 225243; 60-80# 206-237; 80110# 178-196; 110-150# 156-182; Ch 1-3 60-80# 166-183; 80-110# 153-180; Ewes Gd 2-3 120-160# 8093; 160-200# 76-91; Util 1-2 120-160# 66-80. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 90-109; 60-80# 118-136; 80-100# 122-143; Sel 2 40-60# 69-87; 60-80# 86-103; Sel 3 40-60# 42-74; 60-80# 70-88; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 99-114; 130-180# 114-129; Sel 2 80-130# 88102; 130-180# 94-109; Sel 3 50-80# 58-66; 80-130# 6984; Billies Sel 1 100-150# 163-178; 150-250# 210; Sel 2 100-150# 122-137. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. Compared to last week hay sold sharply higher and straw sold steady. All hay and straw reported sold

/ton. Alfalfa 175-325; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 170-335; Timothy 150-250; Straw 100-170 clean; Mulch 60-80. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 159 lds Hay, 15 Straw. Alfalfa 200-370; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 120-460; Timothy 195-400; Grass Hay 100-400; Straw 170250. Diffenbach Auct, November 21, 66 lds Hay, 7 lds Straw. Alfalfa 225-370; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 170-450; Timothy 195-330; Grass 190-360; Straw 185-250. Green Dragon, Ephrata: November 25, 42 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa 200-350; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 150-460; Timothy 210-400; Grass Hay 100-400; Straw 235260. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: November 17, 22 lds Hay, 5 Straw. Alfalfa 540; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 155360; Grass 170.99-210; Straw 170-260. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola, PA: November 23, 29 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa 235; Alfalfa/Grass Mix 120-370; Timothy 155-245; Grass 125-235; Straw 170-215. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 120 Loads Hay, 28 Straw. Alfalfa 210-330; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 105390; Timothy 215-280; Grass 150-250; Straw 110210. Belleville Auct, Belleville: November 16, 18 lds Hay, 4

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lds Straw. Alfalfa 245-275; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 105220; Straw 135-190. Dewart Auction, Dewart: November 21, 21 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 105-315; Straw 200. Greencastle Livestock: November 14, 4 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass 137.50142.50; Straw 122.50. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: November 26, 39 lds Hay, 6 Straw. Alfalfa 210330; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 160-390; Timothy 215-280; Grass Hay 150-335; Straw 150-210 clean. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: November 22, 11 lds Hay, 9 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 90-250; Grass 145250; Straw 110-180. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: November 12 & 15, 27 lds Hay, 7 Straw. Alfa;fa 180; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 130-290; Timothy 152.50265; Grass 152-250; Straw 90-150 clean. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: November 25, 18 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass 200220; Straw 155. VINTAGE SALES STABLES Paradise, PA December 5, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1340-1600# 131.50134; Ch 2-3 1220-1580# 128.50-130.50; Sel 2-3 1225-1490# 124-127; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1380-1545# 115-117; Ch 2-3 13801615# 108.50-111.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1100-1345# 125.50-127. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 69.50-72; Breakers 75-80% lean 65-69.50; Boners 80-85% lean 63-66.50; Lean 85-90% lean 57-61, lo dress 50.50-56.50. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-120# 125-150; No. 2 95125# 100-125; 80-90# 7085; No. 3 95-120# 60-85; 8090# 55-65; Util 70-120# 4565. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA December 1, 2011 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 400 Timothy Hay: 1 ld, 320 Orchard Grass: 3 lds, 250290. Mixed Hay: 10 lds, 145400 Grass: 4 lds, 180-300 Straw: 6 lds, 160-250 Firewood: 4 lds, 60-120 Corn Fodder: 1 ld, 185 Big Bale Mixed: 2 lds, 580/bale. WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Leola, PA December 7, 2011 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 240 Mixed: 6 lds, 289-350 Timothy: 3 lds, 253-285 Grass: 5 lds, 200-245 Straw: 4 lds, 217-260 Baleage: 2 lds, 56-65 Fodder: 1 ld, 135


SCIP to the premiums in the South, where many herds were selected for adaptability with little emphasis on carcass traits. Brink had bought many calves and feeders from those states, and he knew a huge share of them hit a genetic roadblock to marbling. Gardiner had sold many bulls into those states and saw what a difference genetic improvement was making for his customers. Both men saw the USDA Choice percentage climb in Kansas packing plants while Texas plants lagged. “This is a major problem, yet there is no broad-scale effort to improve quality grades in Southern-origin cattle,” Brink noted at the Gardiner sale. “In fact, the industry problem is rarely even discussed, although its annual cost is more than $200 million, not counting the lost beef demand due to lack of sufficient highquality beef.” Three years earlier he and Gardiner wondered, what if a demonstration project could be set up in with a major university to show the added

value in breeding to an Angus alternative? They talked to Virginia Tech animal scientists Dave Notter and Bill Beal, geneticist and breeding systems experts, respectively. Gardiner would fund the research if a scientifically valid structure could be set up. As Beal recalled, “Tom proposed that we identify a group of cows typical of Southern herds and breed them either to typical Southern bulls or high-growth, high-carcass Angus bulls. The question was how to do it.” He liked the idea of “demonstration” as opposed to clinical study. “We could all sit back and go to the Journal of Animal Science, where there are published studies that used bulls with different marbling levels, and they show that what you see is, in fact, what you get in carcass merit. Okay,” Beal said, “but those were controlled studies that some meat scientist did at a university.” Such results still seemed theoretical to real-world ranchers. A demonstration project may not impress an-

imal scientists, but it had to pass their scrutiny. The target had to be commercial ranchers who had adapted their herds to challenging Southern environments, but who doubted whether Angus genetics could make a difference in their progeny. After ruling out multiple herds and locations for adding too many wild cards to the project design, Beal and Notter saw the Gardiner embryo transfer (ET) program as part of the solution: All that was needed were Southern donors. Simplicity may have allowed some elbow room, but skeptics are universal. “We couldn’t have either ranchers or animal scientists look at the study and say, ‘well obviously it worked because they picked those donors or those bulls.’ We really went to great lengths to be representative and then utilized random mating of bulls to the Southern donors,” Beal explained. Igentity® DNA profiling helped minimize concerns about selection of specific individuals, too, he added. “We

characterized those cattle, cows, bulls and calves, so you could see which ones had marbling potential.” Consulting with Notter, 22 representative cows were purchased and relocated to the Gardiner Ranch for the ET program; 12 of them produced calves from random mating to sires from eight bos indicus breeds or three Angus bulls. They were born in spring 2010, raised as contemporaries, weaned and fed together through harvest. Carcass data on 57 of those Angus — or “Southern” — sired calves shows big differences, although leanness was similar as measured by yield grades. Two-thirds of the Angus-sired group graded Choice, but none of the non-Angus graded above Select. On average, the Angus-sired group finished with higher marbling scores, larger ribeye areas, more backfat and heavier carcass weights compared to the Southern-sired group. The value of those differences added up to $134 gross and a net $92-

per-head economic advantage after accounting for feed costs. The Angus sire effects for the first-year calves included a 103-point marbling advantagemore than a full USDA quality grade-along with nearly another inch of ribeye area and 61 more pounds of carcass. Larry Corah, Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) vice president for supply, said demand for high-quality beef is running high, even as the supply tightens and quality premiums increase. CAB partners sold more than 807 million pounds in 2011, setting a fifth consecutive annual sales record, despite a stagnant to recession-affected economy. “This project and its results speak volumes about the opportunity just waiting for ranchers in an area not known for high quality to cash in on the millions of dollars in annual premiums paid for quality beef,” Corah said. And the project continues with 56 SCIP calves born in 2011 backgrounded at Gardiner Angus Ranch.

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December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 31

by Jen Gillespie and Steve Suther First results from ongoing research show an average carcass-value advantage of $134 per head for Angus-sired calves compared to those with bos indicus or Brahman influence. The Southern Carcass Improvement Project (SCIP) was initiated in 2009 as a collaboration between Kansas State University, Virginia Tech and Gardiner Angus Ranch. Its goal was to measure the impact that a single generation of high-quality Angus genetics can have on feedlot and carcass performance when mated to Brahman-crossed cattle commonly found in the Southern U.S. “It had to show the effect in one generation to have much impact and gain many believers,” said Mark Gardiner, the Ashland, KS, Angus breeder who shared SCIP progress at his family’s bull sale in September. The idea came up while talking with longtime friend Tom Brink, senior vice president of Five Rivers Cattle Feeding, about beef quality


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Page 32 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

DECEMBER 21, 2011 7:00 A.M. TRACTORS ABSOLUTE '99 JD 9400 #P020807, PS 9100 HRS B.B. 4HYD 710-38 W/DUALS 90% "VERY NICE" '05 JD 8420 #P031538, 18.4-46 W/DUALS FRT WTS FRT FENDERS 3PTO DELCAB 7090HRS "VERY NICE" '03 JD 8320 #P014101, 18.4-46 W/DUALS 4HYD DEL CAB FRT WTS 5961 HR "VERY NICE" '98 JD 8300 #22666, 4HYD 10 FRT WTS 1500LB 46" W/DUALS SHOWING 489 HRS "VERY NICE" JD 7820 #R030957, MFD PQ 18.4-42 W/DUALS 3HYD DEL CAB 3670 HRS LEFT REV "VERY NICE" '97 JD 7810 #6088, PS MFWD P QUAD LEFT REV '97 JD 7800 #P015034, PS 2WD 18.4-42 NO DUALS 3HYD "VERY NICE" '95 JD 7800 #P002617, DUALS MFD JD 7720 #31564, MFWD P QUAD P/S LH REV 18.4-42 W/DUALS WTS FENDERS DEL CAB 3HYD 3520 HRS "VERY NICE" JD 7200 #H001900, NO CAB 2WD W/JD 720 LDR JD 6300 #143445, MFWD W/LDR CAH P.QUAD JD 5510 #S152422, 2WD NO CAB JD 4850 MFD, REBUILT 1 YR AGO JD 4455 #H006124, QR 18.4-38 W/10 BOLT DUALS 3HYD 4030 HRS FRT WTS "VERY NICE" '85 JD 4450 #21278, PS 18.4-38 W/DUALS 2WD FRT WTS JD 4450, 18.4-38 W/DUALS 12 WTS 2HYD 9700 HRS '79 JD 4440 #014419, CAH QUAD '81 JD 4440 #61254, 20.8-38 PS TL 2HYD '77 JD 4430 #73084, WTS 5606 HRS 500 HRS ON O.H. "NICE '74 JD 4430 #25472, CAH QUAD 2HYD JD 4320 #009040R, 18.4-38 2HYD FACT CAB JD 4240 #10999, JD 720 LDR W/JOYSTICK 6' BKT BALE SPEAR 8700HR 18.4R38 QUAD '73 JD 4230 #11431, PS 18.4-34 3HYD 2 - JD 4230 #22976, CAH QUAD JD 4200, 1250 HRS W/JD 420 LDR HYDRO JD 4020 D, SYNCHRO JD 4010 #22859, DIESEL QH WF 2HYD JD 2640 #242261, W/JD 146 LDR CIH 5488 #877, 3HYD 18.4-38 W/DUALS 7338 HRS '76 CIH 1570 "SPIRIT OF "76 #8801723, DUALS QH 2772 HRS ORIGINAL CIH 1486 #17929, SHOWING 3026HRS 18.4R38 TL 3HYD 2PTO CIH 1486 NEW TA CIH 1086, CAH 18.4-38 2HYD 2PTO CIH 1030 COMFORT KING #8330328 CIH 666 #11764 '07 CIH 305 #Z6RZ02636, C/A MFD PS 18.4-50 DUALS WTS 4HYD 3900HR FRT DUALS "VERY NICE" CIH MX270 #JJA0110316, MFWD 4000HR 50" DUALS FRT DUALS WTS CIH 184 #U047480, W/BELLY MOWER CIH SUPER WD6 #7618J OLIVER 1955 #599-22337, CAB DUALS WTS "ORIGINAL" NH 8870 #D406626, MFWD 18.4-42 W/DUALS S.S. 8179HR "NICE" MM M602 #16906653, 1590 HRS PROPANE MM G705 #900080, 23.1-26 2HYD MASSEY HARRIS 30 #9218A, N.F. GAS KUBOTA L2800 #82208, 394HR HYDRO ROPS MFWD "SAME AS NEW" '91 FORD VERSATILE 946 #475333, 20.8-42 DUALS BB "VERY NICE" FORD 445A #C702309, W/LOADER AC 185 #S1853424, W/LOADER DIESEL "NICE" AC 185, 1799 HRS OPEN STATION FARMER CLOSEOUT, JIM KULT CIH 574, GAS 2250 LOADER 1069 ACTUAL HOURS 1-OWNER "VERY NICE" 3PT 2X PLOW 3PT 6' DISC 3PT HD 8' BLADE FARMER CLOSEOUT, TROY HOLMES (217) 304-0998 '97 JD 9600 #673764 '98 JD 893 CORNHEAD #675478 '98 JD 930F HEAD #676258, W/HOMEMADE HEAD CARRIER POLY 3" CUT FA SS FLOOR ABSOLUTE - ALL ITEMS SHEDDED "VERY NICE" CIH 1420 COMBINE #1747 CIH 943 4R30 CORNHEAD CIH 1020 15' GRAINHEAD #81099 '73 CIH 1070 #8715279, 5400 HRS ENG O.H. 800 HRS AGO '80 CIH 2290 #10236744, 5700 HRS BESTWAY 500 GAL SPRAYER ONE OF A KIND ABSOLUTE ITEMS '74 IH 1066 #27784, CAH 18.4-38 W/DUALS 2HYD 2PTO 1 OWNER 1937 HRS "WOW" IH 1066, 1 OWNER 4600 HRS "SUPER NICE" WHITE 2-155 #301114438, SERIES 3 FWA 18.4-38 W/DUALS 14.9-28 W/FRT DUALS 3HYD TL 2838 HRS 1 OWNER "WOW - ONE OF A KIND" WHITE 2-155 #301114-438, SERIES 3 FWA 18.4-38 W/DUALS 14.9-28 W/FRT DUALS 3HYD TL 2838 HRS 1 OWNER "WOW - ONE OF A KIND" TRACTORS REGULAR JD 9420 #031560, PS 710-42 W/DUALS 4HYD B.B. DIFF LOCK 5990

HRS 300 HR ON NEW PS LOCAL TRACTOR "VERY NICE" '98 JD 9400 #H010784, 710-38 W/DUALS 24SPD TRANS 3 HYD B.B. DIFF LOCK 3165 HRS LOCAL TRACTOR "VERY NICE" '79 JD 8440 #5008, 3PT PTO 3HYD 20.8-34 W/DUALS '95 JD 8300 #3213, 2357 HRS 18-46 DUALS 3HYD QH "NICE" JD 8100 #P024078, MFWD 7700 HRS 3HYD 18.4R46 W/DUALS WTS JD 6030 #33362, 8400 HRS 20.8-38 3PT TL 2HYD ROPS JD 4650 #6442, 20.8-38 DUALS 2WD 2HYD 5562 HRS JD 4230 #24754, CAH QUAD 2HYD 9 BOLT HUBS '69 JD 4020D #213263, 16.9-38 5900 HRS W/JD 725 LDR JD GRAPPLE "VERY NICE" JD 4020 #202807, CANOPY "PARADE READY" '72 JD 4000 #257013, DIESEL W/CAB JD 2150 #L02150R565032 JD 3020 #134056 "PARADE READY" '72 JD 2520 #22998, GAS CIH 3788 #10875, PTO 18.4R-38 DUALS 3HYD 4917 HRS CIH 685 UTILITY #B023584, 16.9-30 2300 HRS 2HYD TL ROPS '09 CIH 305 #Z9RZ04039, 480-80R50 DUALS 4HYD 861 HRS FRT DUALS FRT SUSP FRT WTS "SAME AS NEW" 2 - MF 536 #25051, W/LIQ MANURE TANK FORD 9600 #41270, 7500 HRS 20.8R38 2HYD FORD 6640 #005541B FARMALL F20 #37331, "GREY" COMBINES ABSOLUTE '04 JD 9860 #705854, STS 2090/1500 HRS 20.8-42 DUALS 2WD CM CHOP GS YM W/DISPLAY HI CAP UNLOAD "VERY NICE" '08 JD 9770 #726763, 1165/750HR 20.8-42 DUALS CM BIN EXT CHOPPER HI CAP UNLOAD "NICE COMBINE" '03 JD 9750 #701064, STS 2550/1900 HRS 20.8-42 DUALS CM CHOP 2WD GS Y&M W/DISPLAY SERVICED IN '11 '02 JD 9650 #697181, 2700/2020HR STS 20.8-42 BIN EXT CM GS '96 JD 9600 #667250, 30.5-32 2WD CHOP 4429/3352HR '95 JD 9600 #662257, 3285/2500 HR 18.4-38 DUALS '93 JD 9600 #650938, 3500/2400HR 18.4-38 DUALS 20' UNLOAD '91 JD 9600 #640630, 30.5-32 2WD CHOP 20' UNLD 3800/3000 APROX HOURS "VERY NICE" '91 JD 9600 #641847, 18.4-38 2WD CHOP 2 CHAFF 17' UNLOAD MAUER BIN EXT 3540/2377 HRS '01 JD 9550 #691148, 30.5-32 2468/1873HR BIN EXT CHAFF SPREADER 17' UNLOAD "VERY NICE" '93 JD 9500 #650388, 4100/2700 HR 30.5-32 AG LDR 2000 '93 JD 9500 #650290, 24.5-32 2WD CHOP 2-CHAFF 17' UNLOAD MAUER BIN EXT 3765/2489 '91 JD 9500 #642597, 30.5-32 2WD 1-CHAFF CHOP 20' UNLOAD BISH BIN EXT 4525/3167 '91 JD 9500 #640358, 4143/2771 HR 24.5-32 BIN EXT CHOP LOTS OF RECOND "NICE" '91 JD 9500 #642617, 2WD 30.5-32 2WD 1 CHAFF CHOP MB EXT AG LDR 2000 Y&M 4960/3480 HRS '90 JD 9500 #638180, 30.5-32 2WD CHOPPER '90 JD 9500 #635235, 30.5-32 2WD 1-CHAFF CHOP 17' UNLOAD '89 JD 9500 #631233, 5143/3286 HRS 24.5-32 F CHOP CHAFF '99 JD 9410 #680131, 2700/1800 24.5-32 CHOPPER BIN EXT "VERY NICE" '86 JD 7720 #621293, TITAN II 24.5-32 CHOP 4857HR '82 JD 7720 #509767, 4100HR CHOPPER BIN EXT '85 JD 7720 #615866, TITAN II 4WD 37XX HRS '84 JD 6620 #600477, SH 23.1-26 2WD CHOPPER CHAFF AG LEADER Y&M MONITOR '85 JD 6620 TITAN II #615108, 23.1-26 CHOP JUST RECONDITION "VERY NICE" 2 - '81 JD 6620 #454763, 2WD CHOPPER '03 CIH 8010 #105140, 4X4 1497/1050 HRS 18.4-42 DUALS PRO 600 MONITOR CHOPPER '02 CIH 2388 #269089, 20.8-38 DUALS CHOP SPEC ROTOR 1944/1485HR HYD REV BIN EXT 20' UNLOAD "VERY NICE" '96 CIH 2188 #192858, TRACKER CHOPPER DUALS 2WD 3690/2780 HRS BISH BIN EXT '96 CIH 2188 #192223, 3600/2500HR 30.5-32 LL RT CHOP BIN EXT STD ROTOR AFS MON '95 CIH 2188 #189230, RT MB EXT SP ROTOR CHOP AUGER AFS Y&M W/DISPLAY 3575/2575 30.5-32 '95 CIH 2166 #179357, 18.4-38 DUALS MB EXT SWING AWAY CHOPPER AG LDR PS 3000 Y&M W/DISPLAY 4100/3024 HRS CIH 2144 #72791, 24.5-32 3731/2882 '90 CIH 1680 #47593,30.5-32 FIELD TRACKER CHOP 3690HR '94 CIH 1666 #106306, 30.5-32 BISH BIN EXT CHAFF 3513 HRS '94 CIH 1666 #105701, 24.5-32 2WD MB EXT 3935 HRS F TRACKER 1 CHAFF CHOP "VERY NICE" '94 CIH 1666 #107064, 3600 HRS ROCK TRAP 30.5L32 CHAFF Y&M MONITOR '88 CIH 1660 #36096, 28L26 CHOP RT STD ROTOR LOTS OF MAINTENANCE 1 OWNER 3600 HRS "VERY NICE" '92 CIH 1660 #104122, 24.5-32 CHOP SPEC ROTOR '90 CIH 1660 #39102, CUM ENG 24.5-32 3985 HRS CIH 1640 #35531, 2600 HRS CHOPPER "VERY NICE" CIH 1460 #005986, 28.1-26 F 18.4-16 R CHAFF WHITE 8920 #5A-2059, 3940 HRS '00 NH TR99 #565220, 18.4-42 DUALS 4X4 CHOP MB EXT HYD REV ELEC STONE DOOR 2600/1900 HRS MECHANICS SPECIALS JD 8650, 20.8-38 3PT PTO 3HYD 1700 HRS ON ENG O.H. HAS INT WATER LEAK '95 CIH 2166 #JJC017959, 24.5-32 4X4

'04 JD 630F #707570, DAMAGED '97 JEEP, SPORT 4.0L 5SPD SOFT TOP 4X4 RUNS GOOD NEEDS WORK JD 5010 WHEATLAND, NEEDS ENG WORK COMBINES REGULAR '08 JD 9870 #725548, 1200/850 CM 20.8-42 DUALS HI CAP UNLOAD 5SPD F.H. BIN EXT POWER TAILBOARD '09 JD 9870 #730106, 4WD 620-42 DUALS 28L26 CHOPPER AUTO STEER BIN EXT GS LOADED APPROX 1200/900 HRS EXT WARE 1 OWNER "VERY NICE" '09 JD 9770 #731777, 990/640 HR BIN EXT CHOP CM HI CAP UNLOAD AUTO STEER EXT WARE "VERY NICE" '08 JD 9770 #727227, 837/744HR 480R42 DUALS BIN EXT CHOP CM LOADED 0 HRS ON ENG O.H. ENG HAS WARRANTY '02 JD 9650 #696956, STS 30.5-32 CHOP 22' UNLOAD CM 2960/2245 GS Y&M "VERY NICE" '01 JD 9650 #692504, STS 30.5-32 LL CHOP BIN EXT 2327/1516HR '01 JD 9650 #692443, STS 18.4-42 DUALS CM BIN EXT CHOP GS Y&M MONITOR W/NO DISPLAY 2795/2071HR '01 JD 9650 #691918, STS 20.8-42 DUALS CM CHOP BIN EXT 1625/1060HR GS Y&M MONITOR 1 OWNER VERY LOW HRS "NICE" '01 JD 9650 #690644, STS 2350/1700 HR LL BIN EXT 20.8-38 DUALS 20' UNLOAD '98 JD 9610 #678711, 18.4-38 DUALS 2WD 2-CHAFF CHOPPER 20' UNLD MAUER BIN EXT GS Y&M W/DISPLAY DELCAB AIR SEAT 3740/2518HR '97 JD 9600 #673522, GS MAUER EXT 28L26 4X4 FLOATERS 2-JD CHAFF CHOP 3815/2575 HILLCO FH '96 JD 9600 #668300, 18.4-38 2-CHAFF CHOP 3424/2679 '95 JD 9600 #662183, 3547/2431HR 18.4-38 DUALS AG LEADER BIN EXT 2-CHAFF CHOPPER '92 JD 9600 #646558, 30.5-32 CHOP 20' UNLOAD BISH BIN EXT 4400/3100 '96 JD 9600 #667409, 4WD W/DUALS 3900/2800 HRS 30.8R32 18.430 BIN EXT CHAFF CHOP '01 JD 9550 #691004, 24.5-32 CM CHOPPER 1-CHAFF 17' UNLD BIN EXT 2620/1900HR GS Y&M MONITOR '01 JD 9550 #690499, 2794/2110HR MAUER BIN EXT 30.5L-32 DUAL CHAFF SPREADER CM '00 JD 9550 #685723, 2465/1652 CM 30.5-32 GS Y&M CHOP 20' UNLD "VERY NICE" '95 JD 9500 #662505, 24.5-32 2WD CHOPPER MAUER BIN EXT 3491/2281 '93 CIH 1644 #97919, 24.5-32 2WD CHOPPER BIN EXT 3503 HR LOTS OF NEW PARTS "VERY GOOD CONDITION" TILLAGE ABSOLUTE 3 - JD 1100 F. CULT. JD 1010 F. CULT. W/5 BAR HARROW '98 JD 980 F CULT, 30.5' SPIKE HARROW X-WHEELS "SUPER NICE" '04 JD 726 SOIL FINISHER, 27' SPIKE HARROW "VERY NICE" JD 726 MULCH FINISHER #10139, 24' SPIKE HARROW "VERY NICE" JD 637 DISC #7332, 32' JD 630 DISC #6231, 25' 2 - JD 230 DISC, 22' JD 210 #025129 JD 30' HOE W/TRANSPORT CIH 4600 FIELD CULT. IH 4450 SOIL FINISHER 36' CIH 3900, 25' ROCK FLEX 9" SPACE W/HARROW CIH 496 DISC, 22' V-RIPPER, 4X 2 - SUNFLOWER 4311 DISC RIPPER, 7X 18' W/HARROW SUNFLOWER 29' DISC '98 SUNFLOWER 6332 26' LAND FINISHER #6378, 3 BAR COIL TINE HARROW W/ROLLING BASKET "VERY NICE" NH SG120 CRUMBLER, "LIKE NEW" M&W SOIL FINISHER 20' LANDALL 9X SOIL SAVER KRAUSE 1900 21' ROCK FLEX DISC KEWANEE 14' CULTIMULCHER GLENCOE 6000 #00108, SOIL FINISHER SPIKE HARROW "NICE" GLENCOE 9X SOIL SAVER DMI TIGER MATE II, 28.6 FIELD CULT W/SPIKE HARROW DMI F CULT, TIGERMATE II 32' DMI FIELD CULT #121547, TIGER MATE 42' 3 BAR COIL TINE HARROW BRENT CPC DISC RIPPER, 5X AR BLUJET 7X RIPPER W/DISC BLADES PLANTERS/DRILLS ABSOLUTE JD 8300 DRILL, GRASS SEED 21X7" JD 7000 PLANTER, 4RW JD 7000 PLANTER, 16RN '08 JD 1790 #725314, 16-31 CCF PNEUMATIC MARKERS "VERY NICE" '06 JD 1790 #715306, 16-31 CCS PDP NT "VERY NICE" '99 JD 1780 #680135, 16/31 VAC NO TILS JD 1780, 12/23 VAC "VERY GOOD" '05 JD 1770 24-30" #710141, CCS PDP '08 JD 1770 #725469, 12-30 TRASH WHIPPERS "VERY NICE" '07 JD 1770 #720105, 16R30 "VERY NICE" '99 JD 1560 DRILL #683057, 15' DOLLY WHEEL AUGER FILL '00 JD 1535 DRILL #685121, CADDY '00 JD 1530 DRILL #685144, CADDY JD 1500 DRILL 3PT HITCH WHITE 6186 #613144, 16R TRASH WHEELS "VERY NICE"

KINZIE 3800 #755228, 24-30 KINZIE 3650 #655047, 12R-23' NO TILL COMBOS REBUILT BULK FILL "VERY NICE" '99 KINZIE 2600 PLANTER #613595, 12-23 NT COULTERS CORN & BEAN UNITS KINZIE 2000 PLANTER #607708, 8RN KM 3000 MONITOR CORN BEAN CUPS YETTERS "VERY NICE" GP 2410 #GP-D1730-97, 24' NT "EXC COND" GP 30' DRILL 3020 #D2010, 10" SPACE GP 30' CONV DRILL, 3 SECTION 3000 TOTAL ACRES PLANTERS/DRILLS REGULAR '07 JD 1890 #720164, 42' 7.5" SPACE HAUKOS MARKERS SELF FILL AUGER W/1910 310BU COMMODITY CART #720124 '97 JD 1850 AIR SEEDER, 42' W/MARKERS W/JD 787 SEED CART W/MONITOR "VERY NICE" '02 JD 1780 #695237, 12R-23 '02 JD 1560 #695660, 15' DOLLY '02 JD 1560 #695654, 15' DOLLY JD 750 20' NT DRILL, 2PT '01 JD 455 #690344, 25' DRY FERT CIH 5500, 30' 7" SPACE "NICE" '09 KINZIE 3800 #755212, 36R-30 CCS-ADS SYSTEM MARKERS LIQ FERT TANK 5500ACRES "VERY NICE" KINZIE 6R CORN PLANTER NO TILL DBL FRAME DRY FERT CORNHEADS ABSOLUTE '06 JD 1293 #716075, PIXALL ROLLS HYD DECK PLATES CIH 963, 6R 2 - JD 893 2 - JD 693 JD 494 #660391 2 - CIH 1083, "VERY NICE" IH 984, IH 864 CIH 883, CIH 863, CIH 843 WHITE 706, 6R MF 1163, 6R CORNHEADS REGULAR '03 JD 893 #701293 '02 JD 893 #695816, STD ROLLS DECK PTO DRIVES JD 643 #621303 2 - '08 JD 612C, HYD PLATES KNIFE ROLLS 2 - CIH 1083 #71917 CIH 1063 #11337257 NH 996 #607675, 6R30 HYD DECK PLATES "EXC" GRAINHEADS ABSOLUTE 3 - JD 930 JD 920 FLEX 3 - JD 925F, 3" CUT JD 918 #625162 JD 912F P/U HEAD #635163 4 - JD 635F JD 220 CIH 2020 #21666, 35' '96 CIH 1020 #220997, FA 30' 3 - CIH 1020, 20' 4 - CIH 1020, 25' 2 - CIH 1020, 30' WHITE 916 GRAINHEADS REGULAR 6 - JD 930F 3 - JD 925F, FF POLY 3" CUT SS FLOOR FA 2 - JD 922F JD 920 #625706 JD 915 #665523, POLY 3" CUT SS FLOOR FA '10 JD 635F #738284 3 - JD 635F JD 215 #587507 JD 213F #369727H 2 - CIH 1020, 20' FA SS FLOOR 3" CUT '03 CIH 1020 #89402, 25' CIH 1020 #224074 CIH 1020 #333971 NH 973 #614196, 16' SS 3" CUT SHELLBORNE CX60 REYNOLDS #860153 FORAGE ABSOLUTE JD 930 MOCO 3 - JD 700 GRINDER MIXER #19526, HYD DRIVE JD 568 RD BALER #357522, NET WRAP MEGAWIDE NH 499 MOWER CONDITIONER NH 355 GRINDER MIXER HYD 17' AUGER HESSTON 565T RD BALER, NET WRAP WAGONS/GRAINCARTS ABSOLUTE KNOEDLER AUGER WAGON KINZIE 840 GRAINCART, RT 900-60R32 TIRES KINZIE 840 CART #2659, ROW CROP 18.4-38 DUALS ROLL TARP "NICE" 4 - KILBROS 350 GRAVITY WAGON 3 - EZ FLOW 220 WAGON BRENT 774 GRAIN CART, 30.5-32 TURF TIRES "GREEN" TARP & SCALES A&L 838 AUGER CART

WAGONS/GRAINCARTS REGULAR PARKER 710 GRAINCART PARKER 450 GRAINCART #11081629 KILBROS 1600 GRAINCART MOWERS/CUTTERS ABSOLUTE JD 425 LAWN MOWER; ALL WHEEL STEER JD 350 SICKLE MOWER JD 275 DISC MOWER 9' JD HX20 BATWING WOODS 3180 BATWING MOWER WOODS CADET 60 ROTARY MOWER WOODS 84" 3PT MOWER BIGFOOT 10' BRUSH HOG INDUSTRIAL ABSOLUTE NH LX865 TURBO SK LDR #870575, DIESEL 2166HR '00 MUSTANG 2050 SK LDR #SH001002466, DIESEL 2500HR MUSTANG 442D SKID LDR, 4-IN-1 BUCKET MASTERCRAFT FORKLIFT #3305 KUBOTA KH41 #11439, 3300HR CANOPY CASE 1845C #JAF0102046, CANOPY BOBCAT 825, CANOPY 2390HR INDUSTRIAL REGULAR CASE 921 LOADER #JEE0093689, CAB W/AC AUTO SHIFT 3495 HRS 26.5-25 TIRES MOFLET FORKLIFT #5340 INGERSOL RAM TELEHANDLER #N/A, 390 HRS 34' BOOM EXT WAREHOUSE CLEARANCE FROM DEALER - SELLS AT 8:00 AM JD 28' TRAILER W/WOOD DECK 2 SETS 18.4-46 10 BOLT DUALS 2 SETS 10 BOLT DUALS HUBS 4" 2 SETS 10 BOLT DUALS SPACERS 12" 4 - ENGINES 1 COMPLETELY REBUILT MISC PLANTER PARTS SET 24.5-32 KNOBBY TIRES SET 23.1-26 KNOBBY TIRES SET JD LIQUID FERT FOR 6R PLANTER MISCELLANEOUS ABSOLUTE JD 48 LOADER JD BIKE 5 - WITCH HAZEL TREES 5 - WHITE SPIRE BIRCH TREES UNVERFERTH HT30 HEAD HAULER UNVERFERTH 14' HYD SEED AUGER SMART BOX SYSTEM FOR JD 7200 W/WIRING HARNESS 16 ROW ROGATOR 854 #8525057, 90' BOOM 14.9-46 TIRES HYD ADJ FENDERS RADAR 750 GAL SS TANK ON BOARD AIR FOAMER SCF 460 MONITOR 4790 HRS VERY GOOD CONDITION 6.5' PICKUP BED W/TAILGATE FOR '04 CHEVY 2500 KUBOTA RTV 1100, CAB AIR HEAT DIESEL HERD F-160 3PT SEEDER DEGELMAN ROCK PICKER #10753, 4 BAT CHEM FARM 500 GAL SPRAYER W/40' BOOM BURR MILL BESTWAY 1000G SPRAYER, X-FOLD BOOMS ABI 126 IRRIGATION SYSTEM, 125' HOSE & SPRAY GUN MISCELLANEOUS REGULAR CIH 595 TANDEM AXLE SPREADER YAMAHA GOLF CART ELECTRIC UNVERFERTH HEAD CARRIER 96" H.D. SNOW BLOWER HESCO MOBEL POWER UNIT #73682 GRAIN CLEANER FC 2080 G6000 AG BAGGER COMPLETE "VERY NICE" 2 - EASY GO GOLF CARTS, ELECTRIC BALZER MANURE TANK 6000 GAL VAC TOP LOAD 30.5-32 REBUILT VACUUM PUMP IN '05 "EXC COND" TITLED EQUIPMENT ABSOLUTE VOLVO SEMI TRACTOR '98 VOLVO VNL 64T SEMI TRACTOR '02 WILSON COMMANDER GRAIN TRAILER, AG/STRAP TRAPS BLACK SS FRONT/REAR PULLED LESS THAN 20,000 MILES "EXC" '99 WILSON HOPPER BOTTOM TRAILER '87 TIMPTE HOPPER BOTTOM TRL '81 TRANSCRAFT COMBINE TRAILER SEVERAL PJ TRAILERS '98 FRUEHOLPH DRY VAN '86 FREIGHTLINER FLC 11242ST SEMI TRACTOR '05 DODGE PICKUP #3D3KS28C95G763528, CREW CAB SHORTBED 4X4 CUMMINGS ENG 207,898 MILES YELLOW

Live Online Bidding through Proxibid. Please visit www.proxibid.com/mowrey to register for the auction. There will be 2.5% Buyers Premium charged on items purchased online, with a $750.00 cap per item. Toy auction to start at 6:00 pm indoors...No online bidding for this portion of the auction. MOWREY AUCTION CO., INC. LICENSE #044000247, JON MOWREY LICENSE #041000416 EQ. MUST BE REMOVED IN 30 DAYS OF PURCHASE. PLEASE BRING BANK LETTER OF CREDIT IF YOU HAVE NEVER BEEN HERE

NEXT AUCTION JANUARY 18, 2012

THERE WILL BE A $25.00 TITLE FEE FOR ALL PURCHASES OF TITLED EQUIPMENT TO BE PAID BY THE PURCHASER.


Home,, Family,, Friendss & You Christmas through the ages choir to guitar music. Later that night, the people in the little Austrian church sang “Stille Nacht” for the first time. • In 1834, Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert, brought the first Christmas tree to Windsor Castle for the Royal family. • In 1836, Alabama became the first state to declare Christmas a legal holiday. • The first commercial Christmas card, produced in 1846, featured a drawing of family members happily toasting each other with glasses of wine — a shockingly decadent portrait that was immediately condemned by temperance advocates. • In 1856, President Franklin Pierce decorates the first White House Christmas tree. • In 1907, Oklahoma became the last state to declare Christmas a legal holiday. • In 1937, the first postage stamp to commemorate Christmas was issued in Austria. • In 1945, a phonograph album containing Bing

Crosby’s signature song, “White Christmas,” is released. The recording would go on to become the best-selling single ever, with sales of more than 50 million copies worldwide. (c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

Chocolate cake with a hint of mint This fabulous cake won third place in the state finals, Everybody Loves Chocolate contest. Developed by Lynette Shenk, of Luray, VA, we thought this would make a sensational, centerpiece dessert for your holiday table. It’s huge, dense and layered with a hint of mint — perfect for the holidays. It’ll serve about 16. Cake: 3 cups flour 2 cups sugar 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 2 1.4 oz. pkg. sugar-free instant chocolate pudding 1 cup Cocoa powder 1/2 cup Canola oil 2 cups warm water 1 tablespoon Vanilla 8 egg yolks 8 egg whites 1/2 teaspoon Cream of Tartar Preheat oven to 325°. Use a clean 10” tube pan or three 9” round layer pans. Separate eggs. Place whites in a deep bottomed bowl with cream of tartar and beat until peaks form, but it isn’t dry. Combine

dry ingredients. Mix wet ingredients in a large bowl; then combine wet and dry. Once whites are done, fold whites into chocolate mixture, mixing until the stiff batter is smooth. Pour batter into pan(s) and place on lowest rack and bake for 45 to 50 minutes. Tube pan will take longer. Remove cake(s) from oven, but do not invert pan(s). Cake will be heavier than an angel food or chiffon, but lighter than a German chocolate. Filling: 2 cups Heavy whipping cream 1 teaspoon Mint extract 1/4 cup sugar Green food coloring (opt.) Cool cake completely. Whip cream; gradually add sugar while mixing then add mint flavor to taste and just a tiny bit of color, if desired. Slice tube cake into 3 layers. Spread between layers, then ice with Whipped Chocolate Ganache. Whipped Chocolate Ganache: 2 cups Heavy whipping cream 16-18 oz. dark or semi-sweet chocolate, chopped or chips Heat cream in heavy saucepan just until it starts to boil. Remove from heat; add chocolate all at once and stir until chocolate is melted. Cool in refrigerator (several hours - consistency should be like thick pudding). Whip until soft peaks form (over whipping may cause mixture to become lumpy). Frost the sides and top of cake. Using a hot spatula, warmed in hot water and dried well, offers smooth spreading. Garnish: Melt 1/4 cup white and 1/4 cup dark chocolate chips and drizzle each on top and sides of frosted cake. Source: Virginia Egg Council

Last week’s Sudoku Solution

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 33

• Telesphorus, the second Bishop of Rome, declared in the 2nd century AD that public Church services should be held to celebrate “The Nativity of our Lord and Savior.” • In 320 AD, Pope Julius I and other religious leaders specified Dec. 25 as the official date of the birth of Jesus Christ. • In the 13th century, St. Francis of Assisi introduced Christmas carols to formal church services. • In 1531, in Germany, the first printed reference to Christmas trees appeared. • The Christmas tree was first decorated with lights in the 16th century. It is believed that Martin Luther, the Protestant reformer, was so taken with the Christmas night sky that he added lighted candles to the tree to bring “the lights of the stars” into the home of his family. • A goose was customary Christmas fare until the early 1600s, when King Henry VIII of England took it upon himself to tuck into a turkey. • In 1643, the British Parliament officially abolished the celebration of Christmas. • The first American Christmas carol was written in 1649 by a minister named John de Brebeur. It is called “Jesus Is Born.” • Between 1649 and 1660, Oliver Cromwell banned Christmas carols in England. Cromwell thought Christmas should be a very solemn day, so the only celebration allowed was a sermon and prayer service. • A wreath with holly, red berries and other decorations began from at least the 17th century. Holly, with its sharply pointed leaves, symbolized the thorns in Christ’s crown-of-thorns. Red berries symbolized the drops of Christ’s blood. A wreath at Christmas signified a home that celebrated to birth of Christ. • In 1818, “Silent Night” was written by Austrian priest Joseph Mohr. Legend has it that his church’s organ broke on the day before Christmas. Mohr could not imagine Christmas without music, so he sat down to write a carol that could be sung by a


Page 34 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011


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Hard Hat News focuses on heavy equipment construction including excavating, construction/demolition, paving, bridge building, and utility construction in the northeastern third of the United States. HOW MANY OF THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF EQUIPMENT DO YOU OWN OR LEASE? 1 Excavators ________________________ 2 Dozers ___________________________ 3 Track/Wheel Loaders ________________ 4 Trucks____________________________ 5 Backhoes, TLB’s ___________________ 6 Other Heavy Equipment _____________

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December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 35

TITLE 1 Ì President/CEO 2 Ì Manager/Supervisor 3 Ì Other FULL TIME EMPLOYEES 1 Ì 1-5 2 Ì 6-25 3 Ì >25 NUMBER YOUR PRIMARY BUSINESS #1, SECONDARY #2, ETC. 1 Asphalt Paving _____________________ 2 Concrete Paving ___________________ 3 Oil & Stone Paving__________________ 4 Bridge Construction _________________ 5 Excavating ________________________ 6 Utility/Underground _________________ 7 Construction Demolition______________ 8 Landscaping ______________________ 9 Land Clearing _____________________ 10 Logging _________________________ 11 Other ___________________________

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Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888

Page 36 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

classified@leepub.com

CODE 35 40 45 55 75 80 85 90 95 105 115 120 130 140 155 160 165 175 190 210 215 235 325 335 340 370 410 415 440 445 455 460 465 470 495 500 510 560 580 585 590 595 610 620 630 640 645 650 655 670 675 680 700 705 730 735 740 760 780 790 805 810 815 860 885 900 910 915 950 955 960 1035 1040 1050 1060 1075 1080 1085 1100 1115 1120 1130 1135 1140 1160 1170 1180 1190 1195 1200 1205 1210 1220 1225

CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Announcements

Announcements

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, December 14th For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Equipment

HIGH QUALITY REG. Jerseys For Sale. 6 cows, 4 bred heifers, possibly more. Pictures & references available. 207-672-4892

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

 WANTED 

HEIFERS

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

or email classified@leepub.com

(ALL SIZES)

or 518-673-0111

Announcements

Beef Cattle

    

REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

REGISTERED Red Belted Galloway bull, US BGS# 9979R 6 yrs. Exc. bloodlines. Has been haltered, $1,800.00. N.H. 603-6482333 lv. message.

NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call Lee Publications 518-673-0101 Beth bsnyder@leepub.com

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Barn Repair BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Bedding

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

Seward Valley 518-234-4052 WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. Call SAVE! 1-800-688-1187

Beef Cattle 2 PURE BRED Devon Bulls: 6 year old Rotokawa for $1,500 and 3 year old Lakota for $1,200. Call 845-629-1462

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

- WANTED -

Dogs LITTER of Excellent Pedigree working Border Collies. Farm homes preferred. Goulds, 413-625-2638

Farm Machinery For Sale

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

1953 JOHN DEERE 60, several new parts, $2,950; 1949 Farmall M, $3,600. Both run and look good. 401-662-9131

At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

www.cattlesourcellc.com

1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

40 Years Experience We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email

Building Materials/Supplies

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

Metal Roofing

518-791-2876

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE:

Cut to the INCH 16 s Color

Agricultural Commercial Residential

Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

24-29 G Pane a. ls

Wiin Haven Farm 978-874-2822 978-790-3231 Cell Westminster, MA

Cars, Trucks, Trailers 1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

Dairy Cattle 50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Herd Expansions

WANTED All Size Heifers

FORD 1710 diesel, 4 WD, w/ ldr., $4,800; White #252, 10’ transport/ disk harrows, $2,800; Kelly backhoe, 8’, 3 ph., $1,900; Kub #4560 backhoe, 9’, $3,200; JD & NH tandem manure sprdrs, $2,000 each; JD 34 manure sprdr, 120 bu., $600; Flail mowers, 5’ & 8’, $800 & $1,300; Henke chipper, 6”- hyd. feed, $2,200; 4’ 7’ bush hogs, $400 & up. Full line of farm equipment available! 802-885-4000 GRAIN DRYER: GT545XL, 500 bushel - grain cleaner. Halifax, Mass. 781-293-1385 GRAPPLE Bucket, 6’, SS mount, new $1,600; Kuhn TB211, Ditch flail mower, $3,800; NH 162 tedder, $1,900; Vicon 17” tedder, $2,400. 603-477-2011 JD 2940, new motor, ROPS, 2 WD, very nice! $9,500; Int. 766, Black Stripe, cab, 3100 hrs. orig., super nice! $14,950; MF 150, gas, nice, $4,500. 603-477-2011

JOHN DEERE TRACTOR PARTS

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250

Farm Machinery For Sale

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

Dairy Equipment

Many New Parts in Stock RECENT MODELS IN FOR SALVAGE:

• 5215 burnt • E3020 • 4430 qd, cab • 6420 burnt • 5400 4WD burnt • E4020 •3010 •2630 •L4020 PS •2010 We Rebuild Your Hydraulic Pumps, SCV Valves, Steering Valves, etc. All Units are Bench Tested Many Used Tractor Parts Already Dismantled CALL FOR YOUR NEEDS

NELSON PARTS 800-730-4020 315-536-3737

Kennedy Tractor (315) 964-1161 Williamstown, NY “We Deliver” Ford NH 4630 Fully Heated Factory Cab 55-60HP Dsl, 1800 hrs, (2) sets outlets, exc. tires/tin & runner $11,500; 8’ Push Blade for Ldr $1,850; (Used) 7’ & 7 1/2’ Snowblowers 3pt (several); New 5’ Snowblowers 3pt; 4x4 Long 50HP Dsl 2900 hrs, canopy w/reverser $6,950; 4x4 Kubota L3410 30HP Dsl, fully heated cab, “ag” tires $7,950; New Quicke 980 Ldr & 7’ Bkt w/mounts for fit MF, Agco & Challenger $4,150; PTO Generators 70/30KW $2,450 & 50/25KW on cart $2,750; 4x4 Ford 2120 w/Ford 7109 Ldr 40HP Dsl, 1100 hrs $8,950; Lots more Tractors & Equip. Available

Dairy Equipment

BERG-BENNETT, INC.

Maine To North Carolina

Call Toll Free 1-800-724-4866

The End Is Near! Last chance to upgrade and defer 2011 taxes!

RD #2 Box 113C, Wysox, PA 18854

Hook & Eye Chain • Manure Augers & Pumps Replacement Gutter Cleaner Drive Units Free Stalls

Tumble Mixers

Tie Rail Stalls

Conveyors

Comfort Stalls

Feeders

Cow Comfort Pads

Ventilation

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

WE OFFER PARTS & COMPONENTS FOR EVERY CLEANER

315-269-6600

BETTER PRICES ~ BETTER SERVICE

PleasantCreekHay.com MUST SELL! 20’ Featherlite trailer, exc. condition, $9,000; NH 170 skid steer, 1300 hrs., $21,000; MF 1105, 7000 hrs., $7,000; Keenan 115FP, 400CF, new floor, $9,000; side shooter, $500.00; tire scraper, $300.00; 6 calf hutches, $150.00 each. Contact Andy at 860-534-0556 or jersey_cow_guy@yahoo.com pictures available


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

MACK ENTERPRISES

PARTING OUT 3 cyl. Ford 4000, loader w/large bucket, tires, rims, SOS parts, weights, fenders, 6’ snowblower. 585-437-2796

RECONDITIONED 4-6-8R 7000 and 7200 planters. Also, one and two row sweetcorn, vegetable, pumpkin planters w/JD Max-Emerge. FrameMount no-till coulters. Custom b u i l d p l a n t e r s . Pe q u e a Planter, 717-442-4406

AMARAL FARMS 1st & 2nd cutting good quality hay, round silage bales 4x5. Call 860-576-5188 or 860-4506536

Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

WANTED

Massey Ferguson Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Charles McCarthy Farm Machinery TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY • UTILITY TRAILERS

PH: 570-869-1551 Cell: 607-759-4646 4698 ST. RT. 3004

570-833-5214 MESHOPPEN, PA 18630

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293 Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

FOR SALE: #1 Roasted Corn. 518-537-6509

Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS

Combine Salvage

K & J Surplus 60 Dublin Rd. Lansing, NY 14882 (607) 533-4850 • (607) 279-6232

You can’t afford downtime! Use Dual-Cut Rolls For Peak Performance

Y QUALIT TEED N A R A GU

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

518-768-2344 1st & 2nd cutting alfalfa timothy & grass, small squares & large square bales, also round bales. Stored inside. 518-9293480, 518-329-1321 1st CUT SMALL SQUARES, $3.00/bale; 2nd cut square, $4.00/bale. 1st cut round, $30.00/bale; 2nd cut round, $40.00/bale. Accessible to tractor trailers. Mike Quinn, Middlebury,VT 802-388-7828

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

FOR SALE All Grades Hay & Straw Horse & Dairy Quality Bagged Shavings & Sawdust

WILL DELIVER

For Sale Bulk Feed Body with Auger Unload System

GOOD QUALITY hay & straw. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802-849-6266,

$4000 OBO

518-537-6509

Hay - Straw Wanted

TOP MARKET PRICES PAID For Quality Hay in 2 String Bales Looking for Long Term Supply Paid for On Scale

Also Buying All Grades of Hay and Straw in 2 String or Large Square Bales

Nick Fitzpatrick 845-901-1892 or 845-609-7315

adenbrook.com

Heating

Help Wanted

PATTERSON FARMS Is Looking for a Self Motivated Team Player to Join Our Team If you are a Jack or Jill of all things, we are looking for you. Repairs, crop, dairy animals and manure. Possitive attitude a must and Class A license helpful. Please Call Jon at

HAY FOR SALE: Dry round, wet round, second cutting small squares. Call Louis 860803-0675

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

315-729-0438

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Call for Competitive Prices

For Rent or Lease

For Rent or Lease

519-529-1141

Fully furnished 2BR unit during Daytona Bike Week, March 10-17, 2012 at The Cove, Ormond Beach. Oceanview - minutes from Daytona Main St. Looking to rent for $800. Please call 518-848-6469 if interested or 518-858-1130 after 6PM Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY & STRAW: Large or small square bales. Wood Shaving Bagged. René Normandin,Québec,Canada 450347-7714

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

315-923-9118

We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

(518) 234-4052

4X4 ROUND SILAGE BALES, 1st & 2nd cutting, FOB SE Mass. 508-648-3276

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay & Straw - All Types

ROBERT ROLLE

HARLEY-DAVIDSON LOVERS Questions? Call us. PH#

WANTED

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

WRITERS WANTED Country Folks is looking for self-motivated free-lance writers to contribute to their weekly agricultural paper. Knowledge of the industry a must. Articles could include educational topics as well as feature articles. Please send resume to Joan Kark-Wren jkarkwren@leepub.com or call 518-673-0141

December 12, 2011 • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • Section A - Page 37

BUY ~ SELL ~ TRADE

165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

FOR SALE: 4x4 baleage, second cut. Halifax, Mass. 781293-1385

Hay - Straw Wanted


Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Alltech is currently looking for a Territory Sales Representative with a strong dairy background for Pennsylvania. Alltech sales people are highly motivated professionals who provide a natural link between marketing, research and the customer. Alltech ranks among the top 10 animal health companies in the world. The company has experienced consistent growth since it was founded in 1980. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has a presence in over 110 countries with distributors around the world. Today it employs 2,600 people and growth continues at a rate of 20 percent.

Seeds YES WE HAVE SEED CORN Conventional, GT, 3000GT, CB/LL, GT/CB/LL, Viptera, Waxy 866-471-9465 request@gristmillinc.com

Key responsibilities include: Regularly visit our industry partners (feed companies, consulting nutritionists, veterinarians, producers, government agencies, etc) across the territory to manage existing relationships while cultivating new relationships Drive sales by identifying customer needs and finding solutions Attend industry events and tradeshows to showcase Alltech in a positive, professional manner

The ideal candidate should have: A strong technical background: BSc, MSc or higher Strong verbal and written communication skills Interest and experience in the animal health or nutrition industries Self-motivated and proactive A valid driver’s license E-mail resumé and cover letter to: mgast@alltech.com

CLOSING DATE: JAN. 1, 2012

Page 38 - Section A • COUNTRY FOLKS New England • December 12, 2011

Horses 8 YEAR OLD light grey 16-1 hand Percheron gelding; broke single, double and rides. Erin C. Lundy 315-4931051

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS BATES CORPORATION 12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS!

Parts

Call the IH Parts Specialists:

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

Trailers

NEEDED FOR THE SPRING of 2012: Dairy Farm to Rent or Lease for 60+cows with pasture. Current farm becoming too small. 518-321-0889. Best time to call 7-9pm

TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

Roofing

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING

1-800-248-2955 e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

Real Estate For Sale

607-642-3293

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

Real Estate Wanted

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

CHRISTMAS TREE FARM and split level house. Unique entrepreneurial opportunity, earn a second income, fourth bedroom off family room and office, large closets and pristine floors, open kitchen atmosphere, 2½ baths. Bloomfield,CT 860-989-2783

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

BLUE-FACED Leicester ram & Blue-Faced crossbred ram, 7 months old. 518-283-5217

Tractor Parts

Alltech | Pennsylvania 1860 Charter Lane, Suite 203 Lancaster, PA 17601 Fax: 717-393-9774 • mgast@allltech.com Parts & Repair

Sheep

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com #501 - Outstanding “Dairy of Distinction” farm w/500 acres, COULD BE A GREAT GRAIN, 360 tillable, 70 pasture & 68 woods, like-new 2 story barn w/130 stalls & gravity flow to manure pit - 3 yr. old free stall heifer barn w/113 stalls - also 14 stall dry cow barn - 2000 gal. B.T. & 2” pipeline - new 30x40 ft. heated workshop - 22x20 ft. grain dryer - 2 26x20 ft. metal grain bins - 2 25x70 & 2 12x90 ft. bunk silos, 20x70 & 20x60 ft. Harvestore silos - extra nice 2 story home with 9 rms. - also 2nd home w/6 rms. & a small tenant house - 2 wells & 6 ponds - farm borders Rte. I-88 South of Albany - priced to sell @ $1,100,000. COWS & MACHINERY AVAIL. #67 - Very quiet, private location 3 miles from Little Falls, NY with 46 A., 14 tillable, 30 pasture - great hobby farm - 9 room farmhouse in good condition has combination oil/wood hot water heat, a clean & comfortable home - also like-new double-wide with 6 rooms, 2 decks, 1 porch, above ground pool, work shop with electric, dependable year-around creek, drilled well & 2 springs - all for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$198,000 #16 - CERTIFIED ORGANIC - 175 ACRES NEAR LITTLE FALLS WITH ACREAGE ON BOTH SIDES OF ROUTE 5S - 90 acres tillable the rest woods and a pond - has great views of the Mohawk Valley. It is located one mile from the AMISH SALE BARN THAT HAS AN AUCTION AT LEAST ONCE A WEEK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $350,000 #70 - 178 ACRES IN STARK, HERKIMER COUNTY, NY - 60 acres tillable, 30 pasture - 80 nice woods, 2 story barn w/72 ties - 26x40 ft. heifer or horse section off main barn. V.G. 8 rm. home with H-W-HEAT - 3 car garage with nice work shop. Across rd. from #69. EX Buy at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$289,000 B-302 - This is a very nice private 2BR year round cottage that is on a secluded bay of Kayuta Lake with 128 feet of lakefront. The cottage has a wrap around deck with a hot tub for relaxing. There is a private dock also a small island where you could have a picnic. A storage shed (10x12) to hold the yard equipment and a detached 2 car garage (24x24) with a second story loft that could be used for living space, all on a wooded 1/2 acre lot. In a perfect area for year round recreation; near snowmobile trails, miles of XC ski trails 3 miles away at BREIA, and boating right out the door. Total taxes are $1,896. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $259,000 C-72 - Operating Sheep Farm located in southeast Montgomery County. 204A. total with 104A. forest managed surveyed woodlot, (last harvested in 2007), 20A pasture, remainder prime cropland. 36x80 two-story barn, set-up with pens for livestock, 9-crate heated and insulated farrowing room. Additional 30x40 wing off of main barn, 40x80 steel pole barn/large doors, 5 outbuildings: 2-16x21; 2-16x30; 1-12x41. Used for livestock, all with water. Completely remodeled 3200 sq. ft. 200+ yr old farmhouse. 8 lg. rooms, 4BR, 2 full baths, jacuzzi, woodstove in kitchen/dining area, fireplace insert for wood in sitting room, additional wood or coal forced-air furnace. Drilled well and pond. Great hunting, woodlot, and cropland. . . . .Asking $499,000 C-14 - 130 Farmland, 80A tillable, 29A pasture, 21A woods; large, level fields of prime farmland, pond located in pasture; can qualify for organic status. Priced at . . . . . . .$268,000

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

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Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Calendar of Events NEW ENGLAND NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

DEC 8-12 Acres USA Conference & Trade Show Hyatt Regency, Columbus, OH. See website for details. Call 800-355-5313. On Internet at www. acresusa.com DEC 16 & 19 2 Webinars to Help Understand the 2012 Farm Bill Reauthorization Process • Dec. 16 - Conservation - 11 am - 12:30 pm. • Dec. 19 - Local & Regional Food Systems - 11 am 12:30 pm. Contact American Farmland Trust, 202-3317300. JAN 7 VA Sheep Producers Assoc. Annual Meeting Blacksburg, VA. Contact Scott Greiner, 540-231-9163 or e-mail sgreiner@vt.edu. JAN 9 & 11, FEB 6 & 8, MAR 5 & 7 Connecticut Farm Energy & Assistance Workshops Locations as follows: . • Jan 9 - 10 am - Noon. Tolland Co., UConn Extension/Tolland Ag Center, 24 Hyde Ave., Vernon, CT

• Jan 11 - 4-6 pm. New Haven Co., USDA Field Office, 51 Mill Pond Rd., Hamden, CT • Feb 6 - 2-4 pm. Hartford Co., USDA Rural Development Office, 100 Northfield Dr., 4th Floor, Windsor, CT • Feb 8 - 6-8 pm. Middlesex Co., UConn Extension Center, 1066 Saybrook Rd., Haddam, CT • Mar 5 - 10 am - Noon. Litchfield Co., UConn Extension Center, 843 University Dr., Torrington CT • Mar 7 - 4-6 pm. New London Co., USDA Rural Development Office, 238 West Town St., Norwich, CT Register today. Call 860345-3977 or e-mail ctfarmenergy@aol.com. On Internet at www.CTFarm Energy.org JAN 11 Special Farm Family Relationships Webinar 3 pm. EST. “Dealing with the complexity of family and business relationships that exist on family owned farms,” the webinar will cover these discussion points: • Estate Planning - active and non-active family members in the farm business; • Farm Transition - ownership and control; • Organization - multiple family members working together; and • Exit strategies for the retiring farmer without a successor. Question should be submitted to c.merry@agconsult ants.org at least 10 days prior to the event.

Trucks 1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

JAN 12 Farm to School & Farm Based Education: Benefits of Kids Learning on Farms Call 978-318-7871. On Internet at www.farmbased education.org JAN 14 NOFA 25th Annual Winter Conference Worcester State University,

486 Chandler St., Worcester, MA. Contact Cathleen O’Keefe, e-mail wc@ nofamass.org. On Internet at www.nofamass.org/con ferences/winter/index.php JAN 18 Southeast Agriculture Mediation Workshop: Conflict Resolution Skills The Carver Public Library, 2 Meadowbrook Way, Carver MA. 6-8 pm. Call 508-2952212 ext. 50 or e-mail balexander@semaponline.org On Internet at http:// semaponline.org. JAN 20-21 16th Annual VT Grazing & Livestock Conference Lake Morey Resort, Fairlee, VT. Featuring local, regional and national speakers on multiple species grazing management & production. Several workshops. Contact Jenn Colby, 802-656-0858 or e-mail jcolby@uvm.edu. On Internet at www. uvm.edu/pasture

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CN 12.12.11  

Country Folks New England December 12, 2011

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