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www.cfmanestream.com

Your Connection to the Northeast Equine Market

All Breeds • All Disciplines

March 2012

Volume 2 Number 13

Moon blindness, leptospirosis and Appaloosas ~Page 2

NYS Quarter Horse Association ~ page 25

Judy Van Put

Horse Tales

9

Lynn Palm

Palm Partnership

14

Bob Jefferys & Suzanne Sheppard

Two As One Horsmanship

6

Mitzi Summers

4

Pull Out Supplement: Horse Owners Buyers Guide

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COLUMNISTS


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Moon blindness, leptospirosis and Appaloosas by Sally Colby When Dr. Gary Kubala is called to a farm to examine a horse showing signs of eye inflammation or early blindness, he can usually predict the breed of horse he’ll be seeing: Appaloosa. In many cases, the problem is diagnosed as equine recurrent uveitis, or ERU. This eye disease was referred to as moon blindness for many years because people thought that the temporary blindness associated with a flare-up was related to phases of the moon. Moon blindness was eventually referred to as periodic ophthalmia, and is now known primarily as ERU. Uveitis means inflammation of the uveal tract, which includes the vascular, pigmented tissue in the eye including the iris, ciliary body and choriod. ERU affects a significant percentage of horses, and seems to be prevalent in Appaloosas. ERU is a chronic, inflammatory and painful eye disease, and one of the most common causes of blindness in horses. It can be the result of injury, bacteria, viruses or parasites. Many ERU cases diagnosed today are the result of the horse having contracted leptospirosis or ‘lepto’. Although there are several strains of lepto, the strain that is most often found in equine cases is L interrogans Pomona. Unfortunately, the horse can be infected by leptospirosis and show no clinical signs. By the time the eye is affected, which can be as long as a year after the initial infection, the owner might notice red and/or watery eyes, squinting and reluctance to go outside on sunny days. The horse might try to rub its eyes on solid objects to relieve the pain, which may lead to further damage. The early stages of ERU are often missed in pastured horses simply because those horses are not handled as frequently. It can also be overlooked when the horse’s right eye is affected, because the handler usually leads and mounts on the horse’s left side. “There are multiple places where blindness can occur — not just in the eye itself,” said Dr. Gary Kubala, a veterinarian who sees numerous cases of ERU every year.

“Vision is the eyes, but it’s also a pathway through the back of the eye, to the brain and back to the response of the muscles and nerves. What happens with repeated bouts of uveitis is that the iris will adhere to the lens.” Kubala says that ERU can also damage the retina, but retinal damage is difficult to evaluate. Kubala added that to diagnose retinal damage, the horse must be anesthetized, so a thorough exam along with history from the owner is usually the best means of on-farm diagnosis. The veterinarian’s goal in treating ERU is to reduce any current inflammation and to preserve vision. Because the lepto organism responds to doxycycline, some equine practitioners choose to treat horses showing clinical signs of EUR with doxycycline. “We have no idea when or where the horse picked it up,” said Kubala. “Doxycycline is cheap, and if there’s a chance of stopping something from developing further, I’ll do it.” After the exam, including staining to rule out corneal abrasions or ulcers, the horse owner is instructed to apply eye ointment provided by the veterinarian. Horses in the throes of a painful ERU episode are also given pain relief as prescribed by the veterinarian. The lepto organism is present in the eye, but Kubala says that horse owners who are squirted with the horse’s tears during application of eye medication aren’t at risk. “The lepto bugs seem to localize on the inside of the eye and not in the tears,” he said. Recent findings show that ERU is immune-mediated, which means that after the initial infection clears, the horse is subject to future episodes of severe inflammation. “An immune-mediated reaction means that antibodies bind with antigens and deposit them in different places in the animals body,” said Kubala. “My guess is that the antigen/antibody complexes are going to the eye of the horse.” Ongoing research indicates that the higher rate of ERU in Appaloosas is due to this immune response. In addition to causing ERU, there is significant evidence that leptospirosis is often the culprit in

A stain helps the veterinarian find any corneal ulcers or abrasions so that the appropriate treatment can be used. This horse has significant opaqueness in the eye, and is blind on that side. Photo by Sally Colby abortions in mares. Leptospirosis is transmitted to domestic livestock through the urine of infected wild animals. The organism thrives in warm, wet weather, especially when puddles form. Although research is still underway, some equine veterinarians are using the cattle vaccine for leptospirosis to prevent abortion due to lepto in mares. Such action should be undertaken only under the guidance of a veterinarian. Once a horse has been diagnosed with ERU and treated for the initial flare, Kubala says it’s up to the owner to watch for recurring episodes. “Watch for the eye to become cloudy and increased squinting,” he said, adding that some horse owners opt for using cyclosporine eye drops to inhibit the immune reaction. Ongoing veterinary research is aimed at discovering more about the link between leptospirosis and ERU. For now, Kubala says that the best thing a horse owner can do is to be aware of the signs of ERU, and treat what’s treatable.

Percheron twins turn 3-years old by Elizabeth A. Tomlin Mane Stream enthusiasts may recall photos published in March ‘09 of black Percheron twins that had been born on Feb. 20, 2009. Some readers have requested an update on the fate and whereabouts of those twins, realizing that equine twins rarely live beyond a few days or weeks, and those that do may have long lasting disabilities. That is definitely not the case with ‘FAF’s Valadaisey’ and ‘FAF’s Frankntine.’ Born at Fritz Ann Farm from the black Percheron mare, ‘Ryan’s Susan’, and sired by the 18.2 hand, award winning Percheron stallion, ‘My Home Acres Beau’s Cruiser’, the colt and filly who were separated and sold as yearlings, have happily been reunited. They are celebrating their third birthday together with owners Bill and Terri Clark of Duanesburg, NY. “I bought the filly at the Country Folks sale in Fonda,” said first time draft horse owner Bill Clark. “We knew there was a twin, but another fellow bought the gelding.” Then later, someone asked Clark if this was the same Percheron filly that was in the article in Mane Stream. “At the time we didn’t know about the story, but we asked around and found out the name was the same.” By then the Clarks had the filly going well in her training — and were training her themselves with some help from their son, Todd. The Clarks went on a campaign to find the twin and once they located him they were determined to buy him and bring him home to reunite him with his sister, and that is exactly what they did. The Clarks agree that the filly, nicknamed Gabby, is the more dominant of the twins, even winning in a ‘cow penning’ event last fall while in competition with Quarter horses and other breeds recognized for team penning ability. “It’s almost unheard of to have a draft horse beat out the competition in a cow penning event!” attests Dave

Eglin, owner of the facility who ran the event. “This is the first time I’ve ever seen it!” Eglin says that there are usually 30-35 horses competing, and the filly had only been there five or six times before winning the cow-penning event. “She had never seen cattle before and she was pretty nervous at first, but she catches on very quickly!” Both twins are going well under saddle and participated in several trail rides last summer. Trail ride organizer Martha Suwara has ridden with the Clarks and the Percheron twins, “They have done a great job training those Percherons!” Suwara said. The Clarks claim that a lot of horse knowledge they have obtained came from trainer Bobby Hoyt. “Whatever Bobby says, you do it, because he knows!” Bill affirmed. The Clarks also say they got much of their information about the Percherons from draft horse people and they attend draft horse events where they can mingle with folks who own draft breeds. “What I like about the draft horse people is they’re not competitive. They’re laid back and they don’t mind if you ask questions — and that’s how we are!” Terri laughed. Bill was excited to receive a forecart as a Christmas present from Terri, and both anticipate doing a lot more with the twins this year. The Clarks say although they’ve had a harness on Gabby, they haven’t had the gelding, “Gunner”, under harness yet, and they take the twins out riding every chance they get, regardless of the temperature. “We’re going to have to buy draft horse saddles soon,” Terri laughed. “They’re getting too big for the saddles we’ve been using.” So what is the plan for the twins now that they’ve come this far? “We just want to have fun with them — and that’s what we’re doing.” Bill said.

Bill and Terri Clark show off their 3-year-old Percheron twins, 'FAF's Frankntine and FAF's Valadaisey', who were separated as yearlings and have now been reunited. Photo by Elizabeth A. Tomlin


The importance of water in winter An adult horse’s body is made up of about 70 percent water; in younger immature horses the percentage is even higher. Water is required for most all bodily processes, from digestion to respiration and circulation. The production of urine and sweat is dependent almost entirely on water; the horse’s body can only function normally as long as he consumes an adequate amount of water. Don’t rely on your horse being able to ‘find’ water by having to break the icy surface of a watering trough or tank in order to drink. Frozen water sources are a major cause of colic in horses that are pastured or kept in turnout paddocks during the winter. It’s important to check your pastured horse’s water sources every day. In addition to the threat of a frozen surface that renders the water in an untended tank or trough unavailable, some horses won’t bother making their way to that watering place if the approach is icy, rutted, or is excessively muddy. In addition, for horses that are turned out in a group, there is the hierarchy of the “alpha” or more dominant horse that might chase a lower-ranking horse away from the water source. Most horses will prefer to drink water that is warmed a bit during the cold winter weather. There are plenty of products on the market, from individual water buckets that have a false bottom with hidden coils that will keep the water from freezing in the stall, to whole tank warmers. You can also manually offer your horse water that is slightly warm, making sure that he is consuming about 12 gallons a day. If you are concerned that your horse is not consuming an adequate amount of water, you can try to encourage him to drink more by giving him water in which you’ve soaked sugar beet pulp; or try an oatmeal gruel; or adding a natural sweetener such as apple juice to his water. Another alternative that we have found to be helpful in encouraging our elder mares to consume more water is soaked beet pulp. You can feed a bucket of soaked beet pulp or other ‘warm mash’ in winter in addition to their ration of hay and feed. We only feed a handful of grain/supplements that we top-dress the

A wealth of information by George Looby, DVM The 2011 Equine Affaire held on the Eastern States Exposition Grounds in West Springfield, MA, provided ample opportunities to listen to a wide variety of well known speakers. An overview of the event and two speaker presentations were covered in the Jan./Feb. edition of Country Folks Mane Stream. Additional speakers are discussed here. John Lyons gave a most entertaining and informative demonstration of how to create a calm, willing and happy trail horse. It is John’s long held view that there are only a few things that the owner/trainer has to teach the horse — one being to go forward and the another is to back. An object on the ground is a distraction and should not interfere with the horses response to the command to go forward. No matter how great the distraction may be it should not cause the horse to react in an inappropriate manner. Forward, back, right, left — those are to be the horse’s only focus. Two loose horses that were part of the demonstration got down and rolled on the ground. This activity had absolutely no effect on the horse John was riding. It is John’s further contention that there is no need to scold, if you lose control you lose the horse’s trust. An even-tempered approach to responses works to the advantage of both the horse and the trainer. It’s not always an easy thing to do but one that should be employed regardless of the owner’s disposition. In late morning Jonathan Field presented a program entitled “Developing a great riding horse from the ground: warming up your horse’s mind and body on preparation for what you will ask of him under saddle.” Jonathan is a working cowboy from British Columbia who now works with students to pass on to them the lessons he has learned from his years of working with horses. The speaker, addressing the crowd on horseback, emphasized that the horse has no regard for space and that it is important to allow a comfort zone in

which the animal can stand and relax. Once the horse appears to be relaxed it is ready to ride and further if there are disturbing stimuli nearby the horse will come closer to the handler for protection. Much of the information Jonathan had to share is based on the world as the horse sees it and not the handler. Patrica Morris, Esq. an attorney from Barnstead, NH presented an overview of the law as it pertains to the horse and horse owners. Among the states the horse is viewed in several different ways oftentimes with little consistency among them. When dealing with equine issues one should engage local council. In her own state of New Hampshire horses are regarded as livestock whereas in others they may be regarded as commercial. Many towns become too closely regulated when it involves the number of horses that can be maintained on a given parcel without regard to all of the possible factors that may interact. In matters of litigation involving horses reasonable care seems to be the key in resolving such issues. Morris serves as President of the NH Horse Council and teaches animal law at UNH Law in Concord, NH. The newly appointed Chair of the Dept. of Clinical Sciences at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, Dr. Nicholas Frank, gave his audience an update on the causes on laminitis, an extremely serious condition of horses and ponies. Obesity is very often the underlying cause of this debilitating condition of the hoof. As the horse’s body attempts to adjust to this weight problem it does so by elaborating more insulin in an effort to”burn” the fat that has been deposited insidiously over time. The owner is often unaware that this is happening to his or hers “easy keeper” as it comes on rather incidiously. Very often it shows itself in the spring when animals are first turned out to pasture. Early grass is high in naturally occurring sugar and this additional intake is often enough to trigger the classic signs associated with founder, moving with

In order to encourage your horse to drink enough water in winter, about 12 gallons a day, you can purchase heated water buckets that fit in the stall. This is a safe and simple solution to providing plenty of ice-free water no matter how cold it is outside. Photos courtesy of Judy Van Put bucket of soaked beet pulp with, and our horses seem to enjoy the beet pulp along with their grain, while getting extra water in the process. In addition to monitoring how much water your horse is consuming, you can check his condition by performing a simple dehydration test each day. Simply pinch up a fold of skin on your horse’s neck or shoulder and watch to see how long it takes for that fold to fall back down after you release it. It should return to normal almost immediately. If you are concerned that your horse is not drinking enough, or if he fails the dehydration test, contact your veterinarian. It might be necessary to provide a supplement of electrolytes if your horse is suspected of being dehydrated; as these body salts are needed for the normal enzyme activity required in all your horse’s bodily processes.

a painful deliberate gait that, once seen, is hard to miss. As most horse owners are aware the inner structure of the hoof wall is made up of very delicate lamina that interdigitate with lamina from the underlying surface and when the horse has very high levels of insulin circulating in the blood stream it tends to settle there literally destroying the lamina. Recovery with appropriate treatment is very slow at best and is often unsuccessful. The horse that is predisposed to laminitis will often show fat deposits in predictable locations especially the neck, the tailhead, above the eye and above the mammary gland in mares. Avoid lush pasture for those predisposed, restrict grain intake and limit hay intake to about 1.5 percent of body weight. During the run of the 4-day event many outstanding speakers provided those in attendance with a wealth of take-home information.

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by Judy Van Put Heading into the last months of winter, it is especially important to monitor your horse’s body condition and overall health. Especially with older horses (those in their 20s and above) the sudden cold temperature swings can have an effect more quickly than you realize. Those long and shaggy winter coats can hide a drop in weight, and coupled with a few days of frigid temperatures and wet weather, your older horse can quickly lose condition. One of the most vital requirements for keeping horses healthy in winter is an adequate supply of fresh water. Water is even more important than food; as a horse can live for weeks without eating, but only for a few days without drinking water. And while we can understand how horses can become dehydrated in summertime, especially in the hot sun or after heavy work, we should remember that horses could also become dehydrated in wintertime. As one would imagine, horses will tend not to drink as much water during the winter as they will in warmer weather; however drinking too little water in the cold weather can result in a number of problems for your horse. And despite a commonly-held belief that horses will make up for a lack of fresh water by eating snow, the amount of water they will actually consume by doing so is woefully inadequate and can result in loss of weight, hypothermia, or even colic. Horses need to drink an average of 12 gallons of water per day; a horse would have to consume 50 to 70 GALLONS of snow in order to obtain his daily water requirements! It is highly unlikely that a horse would eat that much snow; and if he did, he would become severely chilled in the process. In order to keep warm and maintain their weight during the winter, a horse needs to consume enough roughage (hay.) It is important that your horse has access to plenty of fresh ice-free water, as horses will not eat hay without having water to drink. And by not eating enough roughage, they will become cold or hypothermic and will lose body condition.


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Help your horse with balance, suppleness, and obedience: double lungeing techniques by Mitzi Summers One of the most useful groundwork techniques that I use is something that I call “Double Lungeing”. It is a mix of long lining and lungeing. It can help almost any horse with control, gaining a quiet disposition, suppleness and strength. Steps involved in training I go through the same steps no matter what horse I am training. I definitely believe that it is worth the extra time to be assured that the horse will be desensitized to the soft lunge lines used and also will have a solid foundation so that the experience will be positive for him. Equipment needed: • Soft lunge lines - I like to use a braided cotton, or web lines. Do not use nylon as the outside line against the horse’s body may burn his skin a bit if he pulls. • Halter, either a leather, nylon, or nylon “breakaway” with a leather strap behind the crown piece. You may also use a lunge cavesson. Do not attach the line to a bit, nor use one of the now widely used thin nylon or rope halters with big knots in them. These are possibly suitable for an aggressive or very green horse in regular handling, but not for lungeing. You will want your horse to have even contact

with the lines…not to avoid contact and move away from it because of discomfort. • I like to put splint boots on all four legs or to wrap them in polo wraps. This serves as protection in case the horse does become a bit frightened or steps over one of the lines. • A regular lunge whip, not one that has a short stock and a whip lash of the same length. You will need two handlers for the first steps in training. If the horse has been correctly long lined or lunged in the past, it will progress rapidly if he has not been mistreated. If the horse is green or nervous it may take longer. The amount of time spent is not important — the horse and the skill of the trainer will determine your progress. One thing that needs to be determined before you begin is that your horse is not afraid of a whip, and that he will accept a tap from the whip as a signal to go forward. He should accept this as a reflex and should not be afraid of it. Take a dressage whip and stroke him with it. Use your “soft eyes” and reassure him verbally if this is needed. Some horses are whip shy, and nothing further should be done until you have determined that

Cover photo by Sally Colby A veterinarian examines an Appaloosa’s eye to diagnose equine recurrent uvetis, or ERU Country Folks

Manestream is published every month by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Standard postage paid at Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Publisher, President .........................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager........................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104.....................bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production...................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132..........................mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor..............................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor...................................Lorna Quinn, 518-673-0142.........................lquinn@leepub.com Page Composition...........................Michelle Gressler, 518-673-0138..................mmykel@leepub.com Comptroller.........................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148.....................bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator....................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137...................jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager.......................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111....................classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ..................................................................................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160 ........................Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office .......................518-673-0149 ..................................amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .......................subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com • Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com Ad Sales Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr ........Palatine Bridge, NY.........................................518-673-0104 Tina Krieger, Mane Stream Sales Mgr....Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0108 Territory Managers Patrick Burk ..................................................Batavia, NY ................................................585-343-9721 Tim Cushen ..............................................Schenectady, NY ...........................................518-346-3028 Ian Hitchener ...............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Rick Salmon ..................................................Cicero, NY .................315-452-9722 • Fax 315-452-9723 Scott Duffy ..................................................Reading, VT ................................................802-484-7240 Ad Sales Representatives Jan Andrews .........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ...........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary ...........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ...........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ...................................Palatine Bridge, NY ...........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser .........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ...........................................518-673-0107 Sue Thomas .........................................suethomas@cox.net ...........................................949-305-7447 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

he is not afraid. Now you will teach him the “Second Leading Position.” Remember that this is practiced on both sides of the horse. 1. Face his haunches. Stroke him softly on his back twice and then “tap-tap” twice on the top of his haunches as you say “walk on”. You may need to pull on the lead rope to give him the idea. 2. You will be walking opposite his shoulder. Have the dressage whip BETWEEN you and him. You can use it like a windshield wiper to emphasize that he does not need to walk right next to you. 3. When you want to stop him, take a few long steps so that you are facing him….your toes pointing to his toes and say “whoa”, and stop him with your body language and a pull on the rope. Then return to asking him to walk on by tapping him with the whip. The object of this exercise is to get the horse starting to realize that he can walk at a distance from you. You will start to be in the driving position that you need to be in to lunge him. I have seen too many people think that somehow by putting a long lunge rope on a horse and waving a whip at him that he will realize that NOW he can go in a circle around you, even though for most of his life he has been led close to you. This method is also used to start a horse with regular lungeing, but now we will progress to two lines. Put a surcingle or a saddle on the horse. The handler will have a lead rope on the horse and will stand on the same side of the horse. Take the soft lunge line and rub it all over the horse. If he is calm, carefully thread it all around his legs. Have the assistant keep the horse’s head slightly toward you; it will be harder for him to connect with a cow kick. If he does get upset, just go back to where you have already rubbed him. He is not allowed to kick AT you of course. Now have your assistant lead him from the left and you will be on the right side of him with one of the lunge lines. You will both coordinate your verbal and body cues. You will ask the horse to walk, and if the horse does not understand, the

assistant will merely lead him. Then together ask him to “whoa”. Do this until the horse readily walks forward and then stops by mostly your cues. Now the objective is to desensitize your horse to the feel of the line against his body. If the horse gets nervous, he will move AWAY from the pressure of the line. Move as quickly as possible to the outside so the line no longer touches him, and your assistant needs to move toward the front, out of any danger. As you walk and whoa you are gradually getting him accustomed to the feel of the line. Then move to the inside. This is the important step in this exercise — when the horse accepts the line around his haunches. Then ask him to “whoa”. You will now be exerting pressure around his haunches. When he is quiet, place the outside line through a stirrup or a ring on the surcingle so that it is more difficult for the line to get too high or too low. You have waited until the horse is accepting everything, as now the line will be more “fixed”. If you are using a saddle, change the height of the stirrup so that it does not hit his shoulder. Repeat the exercise as before, and if the horse is quiet attach the other lunge line to the left side of the halter and you take over. Have your assistant move well out of the way. You now have a lunge line in your left hand, one in your right hand, and the whip in your right hand. It does get easy, but in the beginning you may feel a bit uncoordinated. You will progress to walk, trot, and canter. The two lines will enable you to control your entire horse in an effective yet kind way. You are able to do half halts to help him to travel correctly. The second line helps him to engage his haunches and round his back. You will be able to get him to lengthen and collect so that when you ask him to do this under saddle, it will be more familiar to him. Ground work is correct if it prepares the horse for what his future work will be, and accomplishes this in a kind and caring way.


Frost Valley YMCA Horse Camps The goal of Frost Valley Horse Camp programs is to teach participants the fundamentals of riding while developing skills,

coordination, and confidence. Our staff is comprised of experienced horse lovers from all over the world, eager to share

Frost Valley trails take campers through woods and a across streams.

trails. They offer 2- and 4-week sessions to build improvement and learn leadership over time. Often campers will go for more than one session to improve skills as counselors will work on each campers skills individual-

ly to ensure they progress as they are ready. The horse camps serve girls ages 8-16. Frost Vallley programs are accredited by the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) and uphold the highest safety

standards. Frost Valley YMCA is located in the New York Catskill Mountains, just 2.5 hours from New York City. For more information please e-mail info@frostvalley.org or call 845-985-2291, extension 240.

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their knowledge. They are selected for their exceptional skills working with campers and horses. The main camp facility has over 50 horses, three arenas, a large barn and acres of open fields leading to miles of wooded


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Full throttle on the trail by Bob Jeffreys We do a lot of trail riding here at Two as One Ranch, and still think it’s the most fun you can have with your horse. No rules, regulations, or requirements, just you and your horse, and maybe a good friend or two with their horses. We’re lucky enough here to have a 3,800 acre undeveloped state park right at the end of our driveway, so we don’t even have to trailer out to enjoy a great ride. The key here is to truly enjoy your ride. Forget about work, or paying the bills, or the latest crisis in your life, and when you’re on your favorite mount, just relax, listen to the birds, catch a glimpse or the deer running, or maybe even a fleeting coyote. Take in the scenery of the lakes, streams, open fields, or wooded areas, and just let yourself be totally absorbed in the moment. This is a pretty easy thing to do when you’re on a well-trained, safe and willing horse. Most of them will enjoy being out on the trail as much as you do. If, on the other hand, your horse is not so nice, willing, or well-trained, then your trail riding experience might be anything but relaxing. Personally, I’ve

never met a single (or married!) person who purchased their horse in order to increase the stress in their life. However, my partner Suzanne and I, quite often meet people who tell us how their horses either bolted off and ran up the hill, bucked when asked to lope, galloped uncontrollably toward a road, “jigged” the whole ride, or who “spooked at everything” and threw a complete hissy fit when they tried to correct it to regain control. You don’t have to put up with this type of behavior unless, of course, you enjoy it. I’m convinced some people actually do like the adrenalin rush of such emergency situations because they do nothing about it, until that one time that they are seriously injured. Please take the time to train your horse, and even more importantly, educate yourself so that both of you can experience that fantastic bond between horse and rider that can be achieved in a relatively short period of time. If you need help… seek it. Don’t be afraid to get some professional advice; it could make your rides much safer, and a whole lot more fun. By the way, if you are a adrenalin

Bob and Suzanne enjoying the trail.

junkie, just know that there’s nothing more exciting than a full throttle gallop down the trail on a horse, but it’s nice to know that he’ll slow down or stop when you ask him too.

Until next time, ride safe! For more information call 845-6927478 or visit www.TwoasOneHorsemanship.com

Improperly heated barns may cause horse health problems by Donald Stotts Horse owners who use heated barns to keep water from freezing and to protect horses from cold temperatures during winter should remember supplemental heat can cause problems if used incorrectly. Ventilation is important when horses are kept inside a barn, said Dave Freeman, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension equine specialist. “Closing up a barn to maintain heat may increase respiratory diseases because of high ammonia content and bacterial growth in stalls,” Freeman said. Closed barns usually have increased humidity. High humidity combined with warm temperature can cause enough nitrogen smell or bacteria growth to irritate the horse’s respiratory system. These frequently result in chronic, minor respiratory problems that interfere with animal performance. Freeman said controlled research to define acceptable humidity and temperature levels to lessen the chance of respiratory illnesses is difficult because of the variability between barns, the horse’s daily routines in and out of the barn and lack of

controlling research conditions. However, many veterinarians attest to an increase in respiratory problems in heated barns with high humidity. Solution to closed barn problems “The solution is to turn down the heat and get rid of the humidity by increasing air flow,” Freeman said. Some farm operators have reported beneficial results by installing exhaust fans that move air when the humidity rises. There are methods to make these systems automatic by installing reostats that respond to humidity levels. Another problem is that while the ideal temperature for horses is around 45 degrees to 65 degrees Fahrenheit, this “ideal range” may be neither cost effective nor a way to promote equine health. “Increasing the heat of a barn above 55 degrees Fahrenheit not only can be expensive, it also may have negative effects when

moving horses out of the barn into colder temperatures,” Freeman said. Equine managers also need to remember that horses under artificial lighting programs for reproductive or show reasons will shed hair. Therefore, special considerations must be given to protect these animals from cold, windy and wet weather. Even though hair growth is largely a photoperiodic response, warm environments assist in keeping hair short. Adequate hair cover is extremely important during cold conditions, providing the horse with needed insulation to combat the cold stress of near freezing or freezing temperatures. Frequent movement into and out of heated barns from cold outside environments may in itself be a significant source of stress that can be avoided. Freeman said one alternative is to maintain barn temperatures at

around 45 degrees to 55 degrees Fahrenheit and use blankets to keep horses with short hair coats protected from cold temperatures in and outside of the barn. “Part of the problem with maintaining proper barn temperature is that people working in the barn often like it a bit warmer than is recommended for the horses,” he said. “Horse managers should maintain barn temperatures at a level that will help promote healthy horses and not at a level dictated by a worker’s personal comfort.” This might require periodic checks by the barn manager to ensure temperatures are set at the proper level.

“It’s often just a case of human nature. If you’re cold, you don’t think twice about turning up the heat a bit,” Freeman said. “But that oversight can cause

health-related problems for horses, which in turn can mean money lost to the horse owner.” Source: www.extension.org

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From the Ranch to You tions) and can stop and back readily and easily. It is also very helpful for the horse to do a 180-degree turn over the hocks. Horses, not somewhat proficient at these basics, may not be ready for cattle work. These basics they are easily attainable with a little time and work. In my experience, this “dry work”, needs to be good to get the “cattle work” good. Starting the cattle work too soon can lead to issues in the future, so work on these basics before you venture the cattle world. “So they’re started so they go.” Track a cow Tracking is the basic maneuver and the best place to start working with cattle. Tracking, in its simplest terms, is following the cow at a short distance with little or no pressure from the horse and rider. It is common for even the future champion horse to be somewhat timid or even afraid of the cattle at this point. If your horse is nervous, simply work your way toward the cattle, nice and slow, until his (and your) confidence grows! If the horse is watching the cow, keeping its eyes, ears, and therefore brain, on the cows every move, then you have a great start. This horse will become more aggressive once it learns that as he and you get closer the cow

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George Peters

moves away. When this happens, it’s the time to begin the “true” tracking. True tracking is when the horse keeps its footprints in the exact same tracks of the cow or staying exactly behind the cow. Then as the cow trots, the horse trots, as the cow lopes, the horse lopes. If the cow runs at this stage just do your best to follow. The cow will eventually tire and you can go back to tracking. Running the cow is too much for the beginning horse, too much for the cow, and sometimes too much for the arena fences. A little common sense (cow sense and horse

* Lessons * Team Roping * Cattle Drives * Team Penning * Horse Training * Ranch Riding Events

Win$um Ranch

1392 Route 32, Schuylerville, NY 12871

518-695-5510

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sense!) is sometimes needed at this point. Having a more experienced rider watch and help is also a good idea. As this first ride is going on, notice any skills that the horse and rider are weak in, and go back to “dry work” to practice. This will develop those weaknesses into strengths. Tracking cattle is a cow working fundamental, even for a finished cow horse, and if done correctly will keep the finished cow horse finished. Until next time, always remember, nothing will show the weaknesses of a horse and rider like a cow!

Page 7 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

by George Peters I’ve been asked to write a series of articles that pertain to the ranch horse western horsemanship skills, as well as some other closely related events, including barrel racing, roping, ranch sorting, team, penning and others. The basic skills and maneuvers necessary to compete in all these events have common fundamentals. These fundamentals are stressed in every clinic I have attended, and are used in every lesson I give. Future articles will pinpoint these fundamentals, explain how to perform them, and show where they are helpful in a variety of events or classes. Imagine a horse and rider team that can cut a cow, do a running pattern, rope cattle, perform on a trail course, show in a pleasure class and look good in a halter class, all in the same show! Welcome to the Ranch Horse competition, events that showcase all of these skills. In the early 2000s the American Quarter Horse Association, AQHA, began Ranch Horse Shows to showcase these skills for horses and riders all over the country. Where to start You first must have a horse that rides at the walk, jog, lope (both direc-


Page 8 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Double deck trailer ban in Highway Safety Bill by Cindy Schonholtz, Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association Unfortunately, the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation recently included the double deck trailer ban in S. 1950, the Commercial Motor Vehicle Enhancement Act of 2011. Section 905 of S. 1950 prohibits the transportation of all horses in double deck trailers, not just those bound for slaughter. This measure is currently waiting for further consideration on the Senate floor. The U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure will likely mark up its version of the Highway Bill in early February. You may be curious as to why Congress is trying to expand this provision. This issue has been a strong interest of Senator Kirk (R-IL). While Senator Kirk was serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, he stated he introduced this legislation after an accident in Wadsworth, IL, in October 2007, involving the overturning of a double deck trailer carrying 59 Belgian draft horses. According to accident reports the driver ran a red light causing the accident. Several other

accidents cited in background information supporting the ban were caused by driver error. Unfortunate accidents such as this remind those transporting livestock that continued education on transportation safety is vital. The welfare of the livestock we are transporting is our top priority and we must communicate this fact and not allow special interest groups to destroy our industries. The U.S. Department of Agriculture currently regulates the transport of horses to slaughter and recently strengthened those regulations, but there are currently no other federal regulations on horse transportation. Passage of this provision would possibly lead to further restrictions on livestock transportation. Rodeo stock contractors stand to suffer adverse effects if a ban on transporting in double deck trailers is imposed. The rodeo industry actively opposes the ban with the following facts: • While transporting horses and all livestock, the main goal should always be the safety of the trailer (i.e. headroom, road worthiness, etc.). As with any form of transportation, accidents

may happen and the focus of any potential legislation should be on safe transport, rather than the banning one specialized form of transportation. • Stock contractors transport rodeo horses in double deck trailers which are specially ordered or specially modified in order to safely transport horses. These modifications may include changes made to ramps and doorways to safely accommodate horses. • Rodeo horses must be fit and able to perform when they arrive at their destination. Thousands of horses are successfully hauled each year in specially modified double deck trucks. • Many stock contractors have one level created with a higher clearance (up to 84 inches). The level with the lower floor to ceiling clearance is used to haul timed event cattle or bulls. • The average height of a horse is approximately 60 inches. Floor to ceiling clearance in most double level trailers used to haul bucking horses range from 71 to 75 inches. This leaves from 11 to 15 inches of headroom for the average horse in these modified trailers, more than adequate. • Taller rodeo horses are transport-

ed in the single level areas at the front and back of the modified trailers which may have up to 9 feet of floor to ceiling clearance. • The majority of bucking horses used in professional rodeos today come from breeding programs where they are specifically bred to buck. These horses are conditioned to riding in specially modified double level trailers from a young age. We must stand together and educate our representatives in Congress on the negative consequences of this legislation. Please start today by contacting your elected officials in Congress and urging them to oppose provisions in the Highway Bill that prohibit the transport of horses in double deck trailers.

the Heart’s Delight prefix “HD”, there is always a variety of horses ranging in age and ability for use in the teaching program. Our Summer Experience in Equine Management is an intense 13 week paid internship for college students pursuing a career in the horse industry. During their time on the farm, students will not only work at the basic chores, but enhance their training skills with young stock and also gain experience with broodmares, foals and stallions. Other educational activities happen at Miner on a regular basis. We publish a free newsletter for horse enthusiasts. Our annual EquiDay program is on March 17, the Reproduction Workshop in conjunction with the UVM Morgan Horse Farm is March 3031, Youth EquiDay will be Saturday, Nov. 3. In addition, we offer periodic clinics and workshops. New for 2012 is a 3-day Horsemanship Retreat for adults that will be June 28-30. We’re proud to feature Dr. Stephen McKenzie, author and profes-

sor at SUNY Cobleskill will be a key part of the retreat. Comfortable accommodations, tasty meals, hands-on time with Morgan Horses and Miner faculty should make for a fun and memorable

event! For information on any of the above, please check the website www.whminer.com or contact Karen Lassell at lassell@whminer.com or 518-846-7121 x120.

Best kept secret! We’ve been told that’s what we are for a long time and we’re more than ready to shed that image! The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute is located in the fertile Champlain Valley in Chazy, NY. As a private, notfor-profit institution, our mission of integrated and useful research and education in the realms of the dairy and equine industries centers around the beautiful, historic farm built by Mr. Miner in the early 1900s. Today using the dairy herd, horse herd, fields, forests and streams along with the faculty, staff, and collaborators that are specialists in each area, Miner has the unique position of taking real science to those that use it. Numerous studies and surveys have shown that the equine industry in New York is a major contributor to the agricultural economy as well as an important part of the aesthetics of the state. The herd of approximately 25 Morgan horses is the keystone of the equine program at Miner Institute. With a few foals born each year under

Horsemanship Retreat- June 28-30th, 2012 3 full days of horse knowledge, fun and skills. Work with the Morgans and faculty to improve your abilities. Comfortable accommodations, good food, beautiful horses and setting on a historic farm. Featured clinic with Dr. Stephen McKenzie of SUNY Cobleskill. Miner Institute Karen Lassell, Equine Manager 1034 Miner Farm Road Chazy, NY 12921 518-816-7121 x120 lassell@whminer.com www.whminer.org


HORSE TALES By Judy Van Put Hay! What’s in it for your horse? As we work our way through the last months of winter, it remains of great importance to take stock of your hay supply and make sure you have enough on hand to last until your horses are able to graze again on summer pastures. Despite the common belief that horses need extra grain or concentrated feed in winter, it is the hay that is fed which keeps your horse warm and provides the best source of heat during the long cold winter months; during the cold weather it is best to increase the amount of

hay you feed your horse rather than grain or concentrated feeds. The reason for this is that hay is digested in the cecum and colon by bacterial fermentation over a long period of time, which results in heat production. On the other hand, concentrated feed is digested primarily in the small intestine over a short amount of time and therefore does not produce much heat. Horses that require more energy, such as thin or older horses, or those which are having difficulty maintaining body condition during the cold winter months, may require supple-

may have a copy of an equine nutritional chart available; you can also access this information online or in reference books. Monitor your horse’s body condition, especially during the cold weather. You may need to increase or decrease the amount of hay you’re feeding accordingly. In order to determine how much to feed your horse, you’ll need to know how much your horse weighs; this figure is of great importance in monitoring your horse’s overall health and performance. To calculate your horse’s weight, you can use a ‘weight tape’ that is especially made for horses and ponies, and is calculated in inch-long increments. Weight tapes are easy to use and are found in most feed and tack stores. Have your horse standing squarely with its head upright. Position the tape around the horse’s body about four inches behind its front legs and gently pull it snugly to depress the skin slightly. Record the measurement and repeat a few more times, taking the average weight for the best results. You can also measure the horse’s heart girth (the distance around your horse’s body about four inches behind its front legs) and length (the length of your

horse’s body in a straight line from the point of his shoulder to the buttocks) and enter those numbers in a weight estimator — a number of these are available online. Most adult horses can maintain their body condition on a diet of good quality hay with access to free-choice trace mineralized salt. The average adult horse used for light work should consume between 1.5 percent and 2 percent of their body weight in hay; this translates to 15 to 20 pounds of hay per day for a 1,000 pound horse. Remember that older horses will need extra calories during the cold weather in order to maintain body condition. Especially for those older horses of 20 years or above, it’s important to monitor their body condition and feed a higher percentage of calories than the average adult horse’s daily intake, from 1.5 percent to 3.0 percent of the horse’s body weight. Keep in mind that higher protein legume hays are also higher in energy and nutrients, and the extra energy provided will be a bonus in the colder temperatures. Supplementing hay with grain should only be necessary if horses are having difficulty in maintaining their body condition. Horses kept in extremely

cold conditions for an extended period; those with minimal shelter, or horses used for heavier work and pregnant or lactating mares will need grain supplementation to meet their energy demands. If your horse will require a combination of hay and grain to meet his nutritional needs, it will cost less to feed more hay and less grain. Check to make sure that your horse’s vitamin and mineral requirements are met as well. When feeding more than one horse in a paddock or turnout area, be sure to space the hay in separate feeders or piles, putting out one or two more piles than the number of horses you’re feeding — as there will be a fair amount of competition from the alpha horse, and you want to be sure that the low horse in the herd receives an adequate share. Horses tend to waste a fair amount of hay; you should figure on about 25 percent of your hay as wasted when calculating your hay requirements. Check your hay supply on a regular basis, and feed only clean hay. Discard any hay that shows signs of moldiness, smells musty, or emits clouds of dust when dropped to the floor from a height of a few feet.

Heritage Farm Offers Something For Every Rider, & Their Horse! *March 4 - Fundamentals of Dressage Clinic with Cathy Drumm - Open to English and Western Riders as we work towards introducing Western Dressage to Western MA! THE HUDSON RIVER TRACTOR CO. 2173 Route 203 Chatham, NY 12037 518-392-2505 1917 Route 9 Clifton Park, NY 12065 518-877-5059 3021 Route 5S Fultonville, NY 12072 518-853-3405 Fax 518-853-8694 PO Box 668 6 1/2 Station Road Box 27 Goshen, NY 10924 845-294-2500 11853 State Route 40 Schaghticoke, NY 12154 518-692-2676

STANTON EQUIPMENT INC. 2A Gandolfo Drive, Canaan, CT 860-824-1161 www.stantoneq.com 105 S. Main Street East Windsor, CT 06088 860-623-8296 www.stantoneq.com 1376 Norwich Road Plainfield, CT 860-230-0130 www.stantoneq.com PADULA BROS., INC. 133 Leominster Shirley Rd. Lunenburg, MA 01462 978-537-3356 www.padulabrothers.com 184 Broadway (Route 138) Raynham, MA 02767 508-824-4494 www.padulabrothers.com

*March 18 - Ranch Sorting *April 15 - Cattle Drive *April 22 - Spring Consignment Auction

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Page 9 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

menting their hay intake with grain or concentrates; however it is the amount of hay your horse eats that will do the best job in keeping him warm. It is important to know the nutritional value of your hay, as it is becoming a pricey commodity these days. Knowing that each horse will require about a bale of hay per day during the cold weather months, you’ll want to be sure you’re providing the best nutrition you can for your horse, and that you’re getting good quality hay for the price you’re paying. If you haven’t had your hay tested, a good place to start is by contacting your local County Extension office. They may ask you to bring in a sample, or they may come out and take a sample of hay for you. Be aware that the sample will have to be sent out to a laboratory, and test results can take from a few weeks to up to several weeks to come back. In any event, it’s a good idea to check the nutritional requirements for your horse, based on his age, size and amount of work he’s being used for. Pregnant or nursing mares will require a higher level of nutrition. Your Extension office or local feed store


EQUINE SERVICES DIRECTORY CONSTRUCTION-BARN BUILDINGS & ARENAS

BOARDING

EQUINE - ASSISTED THERAPY

EQUINE VETERINARY SERVICE

Contact:

H.G. (Bill) Barnes, DVM, MS Sandra Tasse, DVM Julie Cornell White, DVM

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Page 10 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

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CB Structures, with offices in New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia offer over 20 years design-build experience. Our post frame techniques provide affordable quality buildings suited for various applications such as back-yard barns, custom equine facilities, run-in sheds, and riding arenas.

Alice Root or Kim Senn 6000 Rock Road Verona, NY 13478

(315) 363-6124 Fax 315-363-6124 office@rootfarm.org www.rootfarm.org The Root Farm believes that horses are a source of physical and psychological benefit to persons with disabilities or challenging life situations. We maintain a dynamic arena for therapeutic and recreational engagement with the horse, with particular emphasis on equestrian vaulting for all ages and abilities.

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Complete line of farrier supplies, horseshoes, tools, etc. Over 200 new and used anvils, forges, post vises, available/bought, sold, and traded daily. Kerckhaert, St. Croix Forge, Capewell, Bellota, BloomForge, Vector, Delta, Mustad, GE Forge & Tool. Direct Distributor for All Brands of Shoes and Farrier Equipment.

Tack Shop and Gift Shop on Premises

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Scales Roping Chute, Accessories Full Line of 3 Pt Hitch Equipment Roping Arenas Sweep Systems Squeeze Chutes

(518) 392-7364 Fax (518) 392-2640 Todd & Skip Dyer 10 Pach Road, Chatham, NY 12037 www.skyview.biz • Email: Todd@skyview.biz

Equine Fencing of All Types: Q post & board Q electrobraid Q coated hi tensile Q split rail We also sell Priefert equipment (stalls, corral panels, dog kennels), Miraco heated waterers, treated round posts, split rail. All for retail do-it-yourselfers Contact: Melissa or Deb 2033 Brothertown Rd. Deansboro, NY 13328 (315) 841-4910 (315) 841-4649 Fax williamsfence@frontiernet.net www.williamsfarmfence.com

63 Henning Road, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 Clinic/Office: (518) 583-7273 Fax: (518) 583-4388 saratoga@saratogaequine.com www.saratogaequine.com Saratoga Equine Veterinary Service, P.C. is a full service ambulatory and surgical facility specializing in: Arthroscopy, Colic Surgery, Fracture Repairs, Shockwave, Reproductive Medicine, Digital Radiography & Ultrasound, Dentistry, Wellness Programs, Lameness Evaluations, Geriatric Medicine, Prepurchase Evaluation, IRAP, Stem Cell Therapy, Laceration Repairs, Castrations & 24 Hour Emergency Care.

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Afton Farrier Supply carries quality, competitively priced farrier supplies. We feature all major brands of steel and aluminum horseshoes, and stock the foremost brands of nails, rasps and other hoof care products. Daily Shipping via UPS!

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30 Florence Rd., Easthampton, MA 01027 413-527-1612 FAX: 413-527-7599 farmheritage@yahoo.com www.farmheritage.com 3 generations of horsemen and women. Horses available for sale suitable for every sport, lesson or family use. Several auctions each year feature new and used tack, equipment and trailers, followed by horses and ponies from local consignors as well as out west. Heritage Farm is also home to the New England Stock Horse Series, has a lesson program and both Hunt Seat and Western IEA teams.

30 Sakrison Rd., Granby, CT 06035 860-653-3275 FAX: 860-653-5256 www.strainfamilyhorsefarm.com New England’s largest quality sales stable. 41 years same location supplying the East Coast with family trail and show horses. We buy horses and take trade-ins. 3 week exchange guarantee on all horses and ponies.

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Meader Supply Corp. 23 Meaderboro Road Rochester, NH 03867 Ph. (603) 332-3032 Fax: (603) 332-2775 meader@meadersupply.com www.meadersupply.com Carrying a complete selection of draft and horse size harnesses in leather, biothane and nylon. Draft horse tack and supplies, books & videos, and horse care products. Also carrying a complete line of farrier supplies. Shoes, nails, tools and much more.

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To Be Included In This Directory, Please Contact Tina Krieger Phone: 518-673-0108 • Toll Free: 800-218-5586 Email: tkrieger@leepub.com • Fax: 518-673-2381

Page 11 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

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Finding the best harness for your horse

Page 12 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

by Emily Kunelius, Meader Supply Corp. If you are new to the experience of driving with horses, harnesses can seem like a confusing world of parts and pieces. How do you determine if you are getting the harness that will meet the needs of you and your horse? The first question you need to ask yourself is how you will be using your horse in harness. As a single or a team? For light driving or heavy farm work? With a light cart or with a wagon or farm implement? The single horse If you have a single horse and want to hook it up to a cart for light pleasure driving, a cart style harness is perfect for you. Cart harnesses come in both collar- and breast-styles. The choice between both of these will be determined by how much weight you are looking to pull. A breast-style harness would work well with light carts such as two-wheeled carts carrying one to two people. If you are carrying up to 4 people in a larger cart, the collar-style harness would be better suit-

ed to that load. For farm work or pulling significant loads, a traditional work harness would work well. This harness can be used for ground driving with the use of a singletree attached to the chains on the traces. A work harness can easily be adapted for use in shafts with the addition of a shaft loop set and holdbacks. A work harness is not limited to use with heavy jobs, however. It has the benefit of being suitable for both heavy jobs as well as light pleasure driving. It is a good, all-around harness. The team For a team, you will want a workstyle harness. Just as with the single work harness, this harness is perfect not only for farm work, but for pulling wagons, sleighs, and other implements. The most common work harness is the traditional belly-backer style, also called the western style harness. This is a good all-around harness, as it is relatively easy to adjust and use. Another harness that is becoming increasingly popular is the New England

D-Ring. The D-Ring harness requires finer adjustments and fitting than the belly-backer, because of the two-part trace and the front and rear sidebackers. One feature that distinguishes the D-Ring harness from the belly-backer is the distribution of weight. The DRing harness distributes the weight of the tongue and load to the side “dee” and the back pad rather than to the top of the neck. Those that work their horses heavily in hilly and rough areas, especially those that log with their horses, would find the D-Ring harness to be a great choice. For those using their

horses less frequently, the benefits that the D-Ring harness provides may not be necessary. Material Once you choose the style of harness that would best fit your needs, you must determine the material it will be made of. The three common options are nylon, biothane, and leather. Two factors that will play into the material that you choose are price and care. Nylon is the least expensive material. It is relatively light in weight, therefore easy to lift onto

Harness 13

Three abreast with Belly Backer Harness Photo courtesy of Meader Supply Corp.

JP’s NORTH TACK AUCTION AND CONSIGNMENT SALE March 18, 2012 • Old Florida Town Hall 214 Fort Hunter Rd., just south of Amsterdam

Back by Popular Demand!!! Consignment tables available @ $15.00!!! From Mini Tack to Large Horse Items!! 9:00 a.m. Consignment Sale Begins 11:00 a.m. Preview of Auction 12:00 Noon Auction Begins Food Provided Something for everyone!!! Any special requests or questions please call: 518-993-3525 Auction to Benefit the Youth of Adirondack Miniature Horse Club!!

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Ask the Vet by Sandy Tasse, DVM Q: If a horse or cow were to swallow a metal 1 1/2” long bolt or a metal washer with the same diameter as a half dollar, would the metal pass through the animal’s system and be expelled with the manure? We have searched the area where we suspect the metal may have dropped out of the mineral feeder, by using a rake and a long magnet on wheels, but have found nothing. We are worried and thought we’d run the question by you. Thank you for your help. Worried A: There are a lot of different ways this scenario could play out. The first problem is we don’t even know if the metal was actually ingested. Even if

the missing metal cannot be located, it doesn’t mean it hasn’t fallen between the cracks in the floor boards or have been “nosed” around by the cow/horse into a different area you would not be searching in. But lets assume that the metal was actually ingested. Pica is the term given to ingestion of non-food items. This is very common in cattle, but not very common in horses. Horses are much more picky and have a sensitive, prehensile mouth that weeds out unpalatable objects, whereas a cow will ingest anything that fits into its mouth. Once in the mouth, it will then travel down the esophagus. Depending on size, there is the possibility it can cause choke (esophageal ob-

struction) in a horse. Next it would enter the stomach in horses or the 1st part of the 4 chambered stomach in cattle, the rumen. From the rumen, the metal would pass, along with the feed, into the reticulum. The most severe problems from metal ingestion are caused by sharp metal objects penetrating through the gastro-intestinal tract and into surrounding tissues. A bolt or washer would generally not have any sharp ends that would make it more likely to penetrate through the gut wall. If the metal pieces are sharp, they can be driven through the reticular wall by the strong contractions of this organ. This is known as hardware disease in cattle. As a preventative measure, some

farmers will administer an oral magnet to cows before they are 1 year old, that passes into the rumen and then into the reticulum. Any metal pieces ingested will become stuck to the magnet and be immobilized so that they do not penetrate through the reticulum and into surrounding tissues. When a metal object penetrates into surrounding tissues, the surrounding organs can be damaged. Both the liver and heart are in danger of being damaged by a penetrating object from the reticulum. In one case where a horse had unknowingly ingested a 3 centimeter piece of wire, the horse showed signs of severe colic, and the referable hospital found a severe peritonitis (large

Leather is the traditional harness material. However, because of the benefits of nylon and biothane, it is not as prevalent in new harnesses today. Leather is extremely heavy, and can be difficult to lift up onto horses’ backs. Leather requires diligent care and maintenance in order to keep it supple and in good condition. Leather is also the most expensive of the three choices. However, some people prefer leather because it is a natural material and will break when put under high stress which can be a benefit in the case of an emergency. Fitting the harness It is important to purchase a har-

ness that will fit your horse correctly. You do not want it to be too small or too large; otherwise it will be hard for your horse to work efficiently. A standard horse size harness will fit most horses weighing between 900 and 1,200 pounds. A standard draft size harness will fit most horses weighing at least 1,500 pounds. If your horse is between these two sizes, a special order harness may be necessary. In this case, you can take specific measurements of your horse, and a harness can be custom made. Even if you are purchasing a harness for a standard size animal, it can be beneficial to take these measurements to verify that they will match up with the standard harness. A complete sizing chart showing all of these measurements can be found

at www.meadersupply.com. Learning from others Once you have your harness, you will probably still have questions about how to put it on the horse as well as how to adjust it properly. This is when a knowledgeable friend is extremely beneficial. If you do not know anyone, contact local Draft Horse Associations to get in touch with people who drive with horses. Books and videos are also a great way to learn. There are many knowledgeable teamsters who have produced excellent resources for beginners. Don’t allow yourself to be intimidated by the seeming complexity of harness. Once you get the hang of it, though, you will be well on your way to the wonderfully fulfilling experience of driving horses.

Vet 15

Harness from 12

H.G. (Bill) Barnes, DVM, MS • Sandra Tasse, DVM • Julie Cornell White, DVM 63 Henning Road • Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 Clinic/Office (518) 583-7273 • Fax (518) 583-4388 www.saratogaequine.com

Spring Vaccine and Wellness Package Prices held from 2011! Your horse needs to be protected from very real diseases in our area and needs a wellness evaluation to allow for top performance and optimal health. SEVS is offering a vaccination package, which consists of 3 injections.

I/M Flu/Rhino

PHF/ Rabies

FACTORY DIRECT POLE BARN AND PRE-ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS ROOFING AND SIDING PANEL STEEL ROOF, WALL & LINER PANEL 17 COLORS AVAILABLE

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Contact our office for local vaccine clinics that are being scheduled in your area. We feel that this combination will provide better protection for your horse as opposed to a 5 to 7 way multi-valent vaccine and will significantly reduce the chance of a reaction at the vaccine injection site. The vaccines will be administered at one visit. SEVS is also available for Rabies only vaccination. New York State law requires that a rabies vaccination must be administered by a licensed veterinarian. In addition to the vaccination appointment, we will perform a physical exam, (recording temperature, pulse & respiration), dental exam, and free fecal exam and offer nutritional counseling. This total package is $90.00 per horse (no call charge for 5 or more horses at same location). Coggins are $25.00 per horse. Payment is required at time of appointment. Quality Care and Service 24/7/365. We look forward to getting to know your horse. Please call our office to schedule an appointment 518-583-7273. www.saratogaequine.com Special pricing for vaccines will expire 4/30/12.

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Page 13 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

the horse’s back. It is highly flexible and very strong. Nylon can be cleaned with mild soap and water, but care should be taken to dry it thoroughly as nylon can be prone to mold and mildew. Biothane is a nylon webbing coated in polyurethane. It costs a little more than nylon, but is still very reasonably priced. It has the benefit of being light in weight like the nylon, and once again is very strong. It can be cleaned easily with mild soap and water. Biothane is available in both shiny and dull styles. Biothane is increasingly popular because of its cost, weight, and ease of care.


Developing the young horse

Page 14 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Rider position, part 1 by Lynn Palm Are you ready for the challenge of using dressage principles to become a thinking, feeling rider? This task requires that we go back to the basics, whether you are an experienced rider or a novice. Many of the issues riders have with either themselves or their horses trace back to a problem or inadequacy with the basics, so it makes sense that this is where we should start. Before we mount up, we need to discuss the importance of the rider’s position, what I refer to as “respecting the rider’s form.” It is important for the rider to learn proper form and balance, and the proper function of form, which relates to how the rider positions her body to follow the horse’s movement at all times without interfering with the horse. Proper form enables the rider to: 1. Achieve a state of balance that allows her to feel relaxed and in command of her body; 2. Use the parts of her body to communicate at will with her horse. This is critical to riding because without the ability to clearly communicate to the horse, the rider cannot transmit her commands to him, and the horse cannot understand these requests in order to properly respond. Without proper form, there can be no unity with the horse and little can be accomplished! To achieve proper form, we must understand the proper positioning and function of each part of the rider’s body. This may seem elementary to those of you who are experienced riders, but as I mentioned before, I see many problems that are due to incorrect rider form. Even experienced riders will benefit from revisiting these basics. The importance of the rider’s upper body position The fact is that the position of your head, eyes, what you are thinking, and even the expressions on your face are all important to how well you function as a rider. When you are mounted on your horse, your head should be relaxed and coming straight out of your neck. Your chin should be level and

not tipped up or dropped to the chest. Where your eyes are focused is one of the most important elements of riding. Your eyes should be looking straight ahead at least 10 to 12 feet in front of the horse. This helps keep your head aligned, and more importantly, it opens up your peripheral vision to 180 degrees, letting you see from the front of your horse to his sides. Because you are looking up, you see where you are going. You can react and properly time the application of your aids to ask the horse to do something. We may learn first by sight, but with the precision that riding requires, the rider must learn to feel her form, balance, and relaxation to achieve good coordination. Look ahead! The number one key to improving your riding form is keeping your eyes up and looking ahead of the horse. Look ahead with a confident expression and relaxed face, and align your back straight while keeping your shoulders down and square (both shoulders even with each other). This enables your back to stay straight and better absorb the horse’s movement. In turn, the horse will move more freely and responsively because you can move with him. Contrast this proper position to the rider who looks down, causing her back to round and shoulders to hunch up. Her upper and lower arms and hands tighten. She has lost flexibility and relaxation in her back and shoulders, which in turn limits the independence of her hands on the reins. The horse feels this. He may stiffen his back and his gait in reaction to the rider whose body position and hands are inflexible and do not move with him. Try this while you are sitting in a chair reading this article: Look up and ahead. Notice how this simple action changes your back and shoulder position, and how it affects your balance and flexibility. Now look down and see how this changes your body position. Eye contact, concentration, and facial relaxation are important for the rider’s confidence. Of all of these, rider’s eye contact, or focus, may be one of the most difficult things to improve.

The number one key to improving your riding form is keeping your eyes up and looking ahead of the horse.

I have found that the hardest thing to teach a rider is not to look down! The next time you ride, pay attention to where you focus. Are you looking down without thinking about it? Starting today, make it a point to

ride with your eyes looking in front of your horse! For more information please visit the website at www.lynnpalm.com or call 800-503-2824.


Brookfield Riding and Driving Association News

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The First Annual Stable Directory Will Deadline on Friday, March 30th Listings Will Appear in the May Issue!

2012

Stable Directory

The May 2012 issue of Mane Stream will feature a Stable Directory. Please check as many categories below as apply to your company for the $25.00 listing. If you wish to have your companies logo appear in black & white above your listing, an additional fee of $50 will be charged. Your logo can be e-mailed to tkrieger@leepub.com. This form must be completed and returned by 3/30/12. Questions? Call Tina Krieger at 800-218-5586, ext. 262.

Your logo will appear with your listing in black and white (print) & color with the online version.

Check If Using Logo Company Name: Contact Person: Address:

Phone:

Fax:

Website: E-Mail: Description (40 words or less):

• CATEGORIES •

Ì Boarding Farms Ì Breeding Farms Ì Dressage Ì Driving Ì English Ì Foaling Centers Ì Fun With Horses (Travel/Trail Riding/Carriage Rides, etc.) Ì Horse Camps Ì Hunter Ì Instructions Ì Overnight Stabling

Ì Ranch Horse Events Ì Reining Ì Sales/Leasing-Horses (Equids) Ì Show / Events / Clinics Ì Showing Ì Stallion Service Ì Summer Programs Ì Timed Events Ì Trail Riding Ì Training Ì Transportation/Trailers/Trucks Ì Western

Return by Fax to 518-673-2381 or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 If you do not wish to receive any faxes from us, check here

Ì and fax back to 518-673-3245

Published by Lee Publications P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • 518-673-3237 • Fax 518-673-2381

three entries. A high point ribbon, prize and $100 purse will be provided for the Overall High Point Award. TB eligibility requirements may be found here at www.tjctip.com/owners.asp and more information on The Jockey Club’s program may be found at www.tjctip.com If you own a TB that has been registered with The Jockey Club, mark your calendars for July 15 and come join the FUN at the Madison County Fair Horse Show, 1968 Fairground Road, Brookfield, NY 13314 For more information about our club, shows and events, go to our website: http://brda.us

Vet from 13 amount of fluid in the abdomen). This wire that had penetrated through the stomach also involved the liver, spleen, and heart in this horse. Horses are more likely to ingest foreign bodies such as rope, bailing twine, shavings, paper/plastic feed bags, thorn branches, or twigs than a metal object. Ingestion of any of the above can cause an enterolith or fecalith to form in the horse’s digestive tract which can lead to a surgical colic. The foreign object will continue to pass slowly through the horse’s gastro-intestinal tract unless is reaches a narrowed area in the intestine where it can become stuck. Then over time, as the object sits there, minerals (for formation of an enterolith) or fecal material (for formation of a fecalith) will accumulate around it, forming a hard, stone like object. As this gets bigger and bigger, it will cause more and more of a blockage until not much manure is passing through and the horse becomes painful and distended. Only surgery to open the abdomen and intestine and remove the enterolith or fecalith will remedy the situation. Enteroliths can take years to form and it may be 10 years or more from ingestion of the foreign object until the horse shows signs of colic.

Treatment of hardware disease in cattle involves administering antibiotics to treat the infection, as well as insertion of a magnet to hopefully attract the metal piece back into the stomach (even if the cow had a magnet placed before the age of 1, insertion of a 2nd magnet will not be harmful and is often recommended if hardware disease is suspected). The magnet can be administered via stomach tube or balling gun (similar to giving the cow a large pill). These large, cylindrical shaped magnets cost around $50 each. Although ingestion of a foreign object in horses and cattle can sometimes be harmless, it is on occasion associated with illness, surgery, and a poor prognosis. The best option is to try to prevent ingestion of foreign objects. Once ingestion has occurred, there are a few preventative measures that can be taken in horses to limit enterolith formation. Feeding a diet that does not contain much alfalfa will decrease mineral deposition. Also adding vinegar to the feed is under investigation for causing less mineral deposition occur by changing the pH of the intestine. If your horse is exhibiting any signs of foreign object ingestion, you should contact your veterinarian for further instructions.

Page 15 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Don’t Miss Out!

We are very pleased to announce that the Madison County Fair Open Horse Show has been approved by The Jockey Club’s Thoroughbred Incentive Program (TJC T.I.P.). The following classes and awards have been approved: • Other Award - The Jockey Club T.I.P. Overall High Point Thoroughbred • The Jockey Club T.I.P. Thoroughbred English Pleasure W/T • The Jockey Club T.I.P. Thoroughbred English Pleasure W/T/C Ribbons for 1st - 6th place and a $50 purse will be provided for each class. In order to be eligible for the purse, a class must have a minimum of


Page 16 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

A day in the life of a licensed veterinary technician by Kathy Topps Hahn, LVT The day begins at 7:45 a.m. in the hospital barn. This particular morning we have a colic patient that has been on fluids over night. The horse remained comfortable overnight and began passing manure around 2 a.m. This patient is due for treatments and a “TPR”, short for Temperature, Pulse and Respiration, and consists of a complete physical exam. Medications are drawn up for the horse and we begin the exam. We start by feeling the pulse under the chin. Next we move to the horse’s gums (mucous membranes) to examine the color. Then we feel the patient’s feet for any heat and also for digital pulses. We listen to the gut sounds with a stethoscope and also get a heart rate, respiration rate and a rectal temperature. Medications prescribed by the veterinarians are administered and the amount of fluids that the horse received in the previous hour are noted. All of the information obtained in the examination is recorded on the treatment sheet and we initial off the medications that were given. We communicate all of this information to the doctor on the case. This horse will be monitored at least once per hour throughout the day to ensure that everything continues to improve. We move on to the other patients in the hospital to begin the same proce-

dure with each of them. On this day none of the other patients are seriously ill but all receive a TPR and any medications indicated on their treatment sheets. The clinical status of each case and treatment plan is discussed with the veterinarian and treatment sheets made up accordingly. We have one surgery scheduled for the day, so we begin preparation of the patient. A TPR is performed and then we prepare to place an intravenous catheter in the jugular vein of the patient. Pre-operative medications are administered to the patient, usually consisting of antibiotics, pain medication and a tetanus shot. The surgery is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. so next we need to get the surgery room ready. The surgery table needs to be set up according to the type of surgery being performed. Usually, horses will lie on their back, but sometimes will be on their side. Each surgery requires specific instruments and those surgery packs will be set out. Any additional instruments required, along with drapes, gowns and gloves will all be set up as well. Before each surgery the anesthesia machine is assembled, pressure checked, and filled with anesthetic gas (isoflourane) and carbolyme. Carbolyme is a granular substance that absorbs carbon dioxide exhaled by the patient. The oxygen to the anesthesia machine is turned on, as is the

LVTs Kathy Hahn and Amanda Blond administer IV medication through a catheter to a horse. Photos courtesy of Sandy Tasse

waste exchange canister that draws the exhaled isoflourane gas to the outside of the building. The patient is brought into the exam room where the mouth is rinsed out and tranquilizing agents administered. The horse is then brought into the induction stall where ropes are tied to the halter and the tail. Induction drugs are administered and three or four of us push the horse up against the padded wall and lower him or her to the ground. The doctor who will run anesthesia inserts an endotracheal tube into the horse’s mouth while we put slings on the front and hind feet.

The slings are hooked to a hydraulic hoist that picks the horse up and runs on a track into the surgery room. The horse is then lowered onto the surgery table and tied on. The horse is hooked up to the anesthesia machine and we begin scrubbing the surgical site. Depending upon the type of surgery one of us may scrub in to assist the surgeon or we may just provide non-sterile support, which involves bringing in additional supplies as needed. When surgery is complete, the horse is again hooked up to the hoist and transport-

Life 17


The Equine Clinic at OakenCroft Basic Horse Owner's Seminar Offered March 17th

Fun Facts: * In the last 25 years The Equine Clinic at OakenCroft has serviced 45,721 horses for 11,051 owners. * In 2011 we saw 5090 horses for 2029 owners. * Our eight veterinarians cared for routine clients in 14 counties in two states, driving 312,486 miles in 2011. That's the equivalent of driving 12.5 times around the equator! * In the last three years there has been an average of 52 broodmares on the farm every day. * In 2011 there were 2.2 horses in the hospital overnight each day. * In 2011 ten stallions were collected for breeding. * In the last 5 years there have been 257 foals born on the farm. * The clinic has flushed mares for embryo transfer 248 times. * Spinal Adjustments have been performed by our certified veterinarians 6,391 times since 1999.

If you own a horse, or a horse-related business (or work at one), chances are you’ve traveled to attend a conference/trade show that is aimed at the “professional.” It’s a great way to learn about what’s new, and network with other people with interests and businesses similar to your own. On March 16, the first Regional Horseman’s Day will bring all the excitement close to home, and with special emphasis on our regional needs and issues. “Orange County’s equine industry ranks third in total number of horses in New York State,” commented Audrey Reith, Equine/Livestock Educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County, “Regional Horseman’s Day is an opportunity to unite equine professionals, farm owners, stable managers, and University Educators from around the Northeast for the purpose of presenting the most up-to-date research initiatives and work in advancing horse industry issues and challenges.” The Harness Racing Museum, in Goshen, NY, will be the site for this full day of presentations, resources and equi-business vendors for the equine professional and discerning horse owner. Presentations include: The Horse is a Magnet for Children by Jean Griffiths, Extension Horse Specialist, Cornell University; The Genomics of Laminitis: Next-Generation Tools to Benefit Horse Health by Dr. Samantha A. Brooks, Assistant Pro-

fessor, Department of Animal Science, Cornell University; Genetic Studies of Gait: Why do horses pace? by Ann Staiger, Graduate Student, Department of Animal Science, Cornell University; Feeding the Performance Horse by Dr. Ann Swinker, Assoc. Prof. in Equine Sciences, Horse Extension Specialist, Penn State University; Choosing the Right Hay for Your Horse by Donna L. Foulk, Extension Educator - Equine, Forages, and 4-H, Penn State Cooperative Extension, Northampton County; and Reducing the Risks: Horse Farm Safety by Elizabeth (Betsy) Greene, Ph.D., Professor/Extension Equine Specialist. “Regional Horseman’s Day promises to be an outstanding event,” said Reith, “We combined a compelling mix of important topics, essential resources, a great conference setting, and fun things like door prizes. Spring is just around the corner, and this is a great way to get motivated and prepared for the new season ahead.” The $40 per person admission fee includes all presentations, admittance to the Harness Racing Museum, continental breakfast, full lunch and break refreshments. For questions or to register (credit cards accepted), contact Cathy at 845-3441234 or cah94@cornell.edu — a brochure is available for download at www.cce.cornell.edu/orange

Life from 16 ed to the recovery stall. The horse is placed on a mat, hooked up to oxygen via a nasotracheal tube and monitored until awake. Depending upon the type of surgery, the horse may be able to get up on its own or ropes may be attached again to the tail and halter to assist in recovery. Now comes the clean up. The surgery room is hosed down, sanitized and scrubbed. Instruments are rinsed and scrubbed, placed in an ultrasonic cleaner, dried, re-packed and autoclaved. It is now noon and treatments are again due in the barn. Patients are fed lunch, stalls are cleaned again and the barn is swept. Next, an inventory of supplies needs to be taken to prepare an order to our distributor. The list of required items is written down in the order book and is called in to the supplier. A lameness exam is scheduled to 2 p.m. so we begin set up. The x-ray machine is brought out and started up. We also make sure that other equipment that may be required is handy as well. Hoof testers are sometimes utilized, as is the ultrasound machine when a tendon injury is suspected. When the horse arrives, we assist by jogging the horse for the veterinarian to make a determination of the problem. Sometimes different joints are

flexed and the horse is jogged again. In this particular case, the veterinarian determines that joint injections in the hocks would help the patient. We get out the required medications, needles, syringes, and sterile gloves. We then begin the process of scrubbing the hocks. It is basically the same as a surgical scrub and is done to prevent infection of the joint. With the appointment completed, it is now 4 p.m. Treatments are again due in the barn. Patients are fed dinner, stalls cleaned and the barn swept again. The exam room needs to be hosed and scrubbed after the lameness exam, and the rest of the clinic needs to be swept, mopped and garbage emptied. The ICU person who will watch the colic on fluids has arrived, been updated on the horse’s condition and is set to go. Once this is all done, it is now 5 p.m. and time to go home. The professional life of a Licensed Veterinary Technician can be very busy and hectic at times, but I personally love every minute of it. Being part of a team dedicated to the health and well being of our equine patients is extremely rewarding. I would encourage anyone with a love of animals and an interest in medicine to look into becoming a technician.

Page 17 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

This popular seminar is offered at the clinic this year on Saturday March 17, 2012 from 8:00 am until 4:30 pm. The clinic will include lectures and demonstrations on: • Colic, The Glass Horse • Strategic Parasite Control • Vaccines • Nutrition - Kentucky Equine Research • Dentistry • Handling and Environment • Physical Exam and First Aid • Foaling and Breeding In addition, clients are invited to tour our expanded clinic and stallion facility and see our latest foals. A nominal fee of $15 per person will be charged to cover food and materials, and we ask that you register beforehand so we can plan accordingly. You may do so by calling the clinic at (518) 767-2906 or through email at equineclinic@oakencroft.org. Youth, 4-H and rescue groups are offered special pricing.

Inaugural Regional Horseman’s Day to offer education, information and inspiration in “everything equine”


VanDemark named 2012 New Jersey Equestrian of the Year who represented the Gladstone Equestrian Association, was chosen based on her ability to communicate and her knowledge of horses, as well as being well-versed in many phases of the horse industry.

VanDemark was the 2011 winner of the New Jersey State Equine Team Presentation Competition and a 2011 member of the NJ state team at the Eastern National 4-H Horse Round

Up for Equine Presentations. She is a current member and served as president of the Mavericks Equine Science 4-H Club last year and regularly competes in 4-H horse shows.

Right — Rachel VanDemark with NJ Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H. Fisher, who crowned her NJ Equestrian of the Year. Photo courtesy of NJ Dept. of Agriculture

Page 18 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Rachel VanDemark, a 16-year-old from South Brunswick, was named 2012 New Jersey Equestrian of the Year on Jan. 15 by the New Jersey Equine Advisory Board. The sophomore at South Brunswick High School,

Mail or Fax to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax 518-673-2381


Adirondack Foothills Equine events Adirondack Foothills Equine is pleased to announce March clinic dates with trainer Rene Gagnon! ADK will be hosting Rene for an open clinic that focuses on building a solid foundation for you and your horse. When your horse is soft, supple, and flexible through their whole body you have the basis for success in any discipline. This clinic will take place March 10 and 11, and will have groupings for Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced riders. Openings are limited, so be sure to contact us quickly to reserve your spot! You may attend one or both days at $175/day. We will also be having our second RSNC Sanctioned Sorting Competition of a series of 10 on March 17. Fifty per-

Ask the Farrier

But what about the perfect angle, 52 degrees in front and 56 degrees for the hind? Enter the all important angle of the pastern. We all know the pastern is made up of the two pastern bones, the short pastern and long pastern, commonly known as P2 and P1 with the coffin bone being P3 or the third phalanx. The alignment of the hoof with the pastern is critical to the soundness and longevity of the riding horse. This alignment, which can also be seen on the side view, will dictate what will be a suitable angle for your particular horse. Chances are this could be anywhere from 52 degrees to 56 degrees depending on how much or how little slope the pastern has. For example, we just picked up a Quarter horse mare for our son to show. She was barefoot and was presented to me at 49 degrees with a three and an eighth inch toe. She was positive to the testers on all four and quite uncomfortable, hardly rideable. There was nothing to trim so I was going to

have to wait it out. I selected an aluminum shoe to start her back. Pads weren’t an option as we were in mud season and I couldn’t take the chance and risk sole pressure. The shoes helped but she was feeling every little something that touch her sole. I had the opportunity to talk with her long time farrier up in Canada and he remembered her well. He said he liked her at 55 degrees for the fronts and at 49 I was way off but not by choice. The Spring clinic was coming up fast where they ride double sessions for two days and my son was really looking forward to that. So, knowing I needed a steeper angle I added a small degree pad and put soft gel underneath for added support. She had three days to get use to those and got through the clinic which was mostly canter work in good style. Since then, her wall has grown in and I am able to set the shoe back for ease of break over. But, she still wears the pads as I could not get her that steep without them and she is really

moving well now. The farrier can take an active role in maintaining this alignment by selectively trimming the hoof wall. Removing toe and saving heel will increase the angle. Sometimes just removing toe is not enough to restore this fragile alignment. Fragile because the heels and quarters of the hoof wall are thin and receive a lot of lateral movement, expansion and contraction if you will. This can wear them down even with a shoe in place. Or, because of conformation flaws no matter how much toe you remove you cannot get the hoof to align with the pastern. Today’s farrier has a whole host of products to help rectify this problem. Special pads with frog supports or a slight wedge built into a full pad can help quite a bit. Also, soft gel materials can be injected under the pads for further support. Remember, Mother Nature’s factory is imperfect and many times you’re dealing with defects.

Farrier 20

Upcoming g Eventss Att Adirondack k Foothillss Equine March h 10th h & 11th h • 9am m - 5pm m Both h Days Open Clinic With

Renee Gagnon Build a solid foundation for you and your horse! Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced Sessions Openings Are Limited...Call To Reserve Your Spot

March h 17th h • 9am m - 4pm RSNC Sanctioned Sorting Competition - 50% payback!

March h 24th h • 9am m - 3pm Tack Swap and Horse Sale - View our sales horses, and part with some of your old tack! Call to Reserve Your Table Many Working Ranch-Type Horses Available

View w ourr websitee forr completee details,

www.adkfoothillsequine.com Calll Forr Information 518-642-3755 5 orr 518-538-0202 116 County Route 17A, Comstock, NY www.adkfoothillsequine.com Email: adkfoothillsequine@roadrunner.com

Rt. 20, Sharon Springs, NY • (800) 887-1872 or (518) 284-2346 1175 Hoosick St. Troy, NY • (518) 279-9709

Page 19 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

by Frank Gringeri Q: Tracy R. writes in: What is the perfect hoof angle? A: An angle is formed or created by two straight intersecting lines. The point of contact of these lines is the vertex of the angle. There are many angles found in the horse; the angle or slope of the shoulder, the angle of the croup, the angle from hip to stifle to name a few. Our focus is on the angle or slope of the hoof. It can be seen from the true side view of the horse. One straight, sloping line is from the coronet band down to the end of the toe where it meets the ground. This line can be seen on the frontal view as a vertical line bisecting the hoof. It is also used to measure the length of the toe, expressed in inches and fractions. The other straight line is the ground surface of the hoof itself. These two lines form the hoof angle and barring any rotation or other damage we can assume the coffin bone within will be of the same angle also.

cent payback! Lastly, we are excited to announce our first Tack Swap and Horse Sale on March 24 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Come out to sell some tack you’ve been holding onto for too long, buy some equipment you’ve been looking for, and check out our sales horses. We have several very nice working ranch-type horses that will be exhibited. Contact us to reserve a table to sell tack, or for information on our sale horses. For more information contact Adirondack Foothills Equine, 116 County Route 17A, Comstock, NY, www.adkfoothillsequine.com, 518796-1818, adkfoothillsequine@roadrunner.com


Brookfield is back

Page 20 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

For many years the Eastern Competitive Trail Riding Association (ECTRA) sanctioned a very popular ride known as the NY 100 which was based at the Madison County Fairgrounds utilizing the Brookfield State Horse Trails. A loyal team led by manager, Anne Filley, gathered every fourth of July weekend to mark trails, put out water for horses, plan meals, provide prizes and make sure experienced riders and riders new to the sport had a safe and enjoyable time. Following the 2010 ride, this team decided to retire. After a year hiatus, a new team has stepped in to provide leadership

and make sure that the opportunity to compete on these beautiful trails is not lost. This year’s Brookfield rides are sponsored by the NYS Horse Council at the Madison County Fairgrounds on June 29, 30 and July 1. They will again be sanctioned by ECTRA. While there is a cadre of riders who are looking forward to coming back to the Brookfield ride, the new team is hoping to reorganize the ride to encourage more newcomers to the sport. There will be three colocated rides. The longest will a 2-day 50 mile ride, the next will be a 1-day 30 mile ride and the third will be a

15 mile Conditioning Distance Ride. Facilities at the Madison County Fairgrounds include stabling for all horses, plenty of parking for trailers, showers and a dining room for meals. The ride is primarily on trails with a short section on dirt roads and the shoulder of a lightly traveled paved road. Trails are varied including hills, woods, high ridges with beautiful views and inviting cantering areas. Competitive Trail Rides are judged rides over a set course done at an average speed of about 6 miles per hour. All riders are expected to take almost the same time to complete the

ride. These are not races nor are they obstacle courses. The horses are examined from nose to tail at both the start and the finish of the course. The horse who completes the course and has the least deductions for wear and tear or condition will be the winner. For more information regarding rules and suggestions for conditioning see www.ECTRA.org. For information about the ride as well as entry forms contact: Dan Gruen, Ride Manager, dangruen@roadrunner.com , 315-7498086 or Joanna Lasher, Ride Secretary, duniry@aol.com , 518882-1515.

March 17 and 18

Farrier from 19 The perfect angle will be a range of degrees but they should all contribute to the alignment of the pastern. Do both fronts always have to be the same angle? Never say always around horses. There are some horses with pasterns of different slope and it will show in the angle of the hoof as well. Sometimes these horses are better off with two different angles. The difference could be as little as two degrees and that might be just what he needs. Whatever the number of degrees that is perfect for your horse, it all boils down to striving for alignment and this can be an ongoing process. Have a question? Send it to lquinn@leepub.com and we’ll answer as many as we can.

$75 each Sunday - Michael Stewart DVM & Kristen Kuzmickas-Guadagnino, Full Circle Farm • Part 1: Biomechanics of Performance Horses • Part 2: A Rider’s or Instructor’s Understanding Riders $60 (limited to

4); Auditors $20 • Demonstrations between clinics by UConn Teams • Vendor Fair All at UCONN’s Horsebarn Hill Arena Please go online to register! Vendors and sponsors welcome!

HORSE AUCTION CALENDAR To have your auction listed in this calendar, contact your Country Folks Sales Representative, or Tina Krieger at 518673-0108 or e-mail: tkrieger@ leepub.com. Sunday, March 18 • 9:00 AM: Old Florida Town Hall, 214 Fort Hunter Rd., Amsterdam, NY. JP’s North Tack Auction & Consignment Sale. Consignment tables available for $15. From mini tack to large horse items. 9 am Consignment, 11 am preview of auction, 12 noon auction begins. Food provided. Auction to benefit Youth of Adirondack Mini Horse Club. JP’s North, 518-993-3525 jpsnorth@hotmail.com

Saturday, April 7 • 10:00 AM: Crowley’s Sale Barn & Stables, 32 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam, MA. Huge All Day Tack Sale. Saddles, blankets, buckets, lounge whips, pitch forks, bridles, halters, lead lines, stuffed animals, brushes, fly paper, sunscreen and the list goes on. Get ready for riding season! Bring items you don’t use to sell. Crowley’s Sales Barn & Stables, 413-786-1744 asmithjoya@aol.com www.crowleyshorses.com

Saturday, April 14 • 1:00 PM: Crowley’s Sale Barn & Stables, 32 Shoemaker Lane, Agawam, MA. Registered Horse Auction, Dennis & Alice will be bringing back the best horses they can find for you. Information is due 2 weeks prior to the sale to be in the catalog. (4-14 Sale Due 3-31 by 2 pm) Registered Horses will run first followed by grades. All horses will run in catalog order. Consignment forms can be found on our events page. Crowley’s Sales Barn & Stables, 413-786-1744 asmithjoya@aol.com www.crowleyshorses.com

Tack * Trailers * Equipment Tack Liquidation from Fischers Stables in PA Large Selection of Used Saddles & Tack Horses will Follow at 1PM This will be a Catalog Sale. All Consignments Must Be In Our Office By April 10th Saddle Horses, Ponies, Minis & Donkeys $35.00 Consignment Fee plus 10% Commission. Call for Consignment Forms 518-883-5748 Sale Held At Adirondack Animal Land 3554 St. Hwy. 30, Gloversville, NY 12078 Call for Information

Dave 518-848-7040, Tye 518-774-8594 Check Auction Zip for Photos and Daily Updates

Boarding

Connecticut Horse Symposium Featuring: Saturday Morning T.R. Potts, Potts Performance Horses - Western Pleasure/Trail Clinic • Clinic 1: Improving Your Horsemanship Skills for Better Western Pleasure • Clinic 2: Improving Your Trail Performance Riders $60 (limited to 10); Auditors $20 Saturday Afternoon – Jessica Chickering, Barefoot Hoof Practitioner • Two horses will be accepted for trim for

Largest Horse & Tack Auction in Upstate New York Saturday, April 28th, 11 AM

Visit: http://animalscience.uconn.edu/h orseSymp/HorseSymposium.php for updates or e-mail jenifer.nadeau@ uconn.edu with questions

45’x120’ Indoor Arena 100’x200’ Outdoor Arena 10’x10’ Box Stalls Trails James Gasner 592 Snooks Corners Rd., Amsterdam, NY 12010


MassQHA MassQHA Annual Banquet of Champions MassQHA held its annual Banquet of Champions Saturday, Jan. 20 at the Bull Run Restaurant in Shirley. Thank you to Jim “Jimbo” Craven, Debra Ann Mayer and Paul Valencourt for providing the entertainment. Our 2012 Royal Court Princess, Sarah Messing and Queen, Emily Messing presented great prizes and ribbons. Thank you once again to Jackie Hughes, for coordinating the awards. Lisa Rosner our Points Chair, was honored with the President’s Award. Marge Tanner, MassQHYA Youth Advisor, presented recognition awards to Youth for special acknowledgement of their contributions to the Club. Congratulations all! Youth held their Silent Auction at the Banquet and raised about $500. Youth are now planning the 2012 MassQHYA Ad Booklet. Last year’s booklet was seen by many people so get seen this year! See a youth member to get your ad in. 2012 MassQHYA Officers include President, Alyssa Freitas; 1st Vice President, Jessica Stepanek; 2nd Vice President, Amanda Putney; Secretary, Olivia Cundari; Treasurer, Rylee Desmarais; Reporter, Marykate Mahassel; Board of Directors: Morgan Stevens; Macy Sauliner; Kelsey Brooks; Katie O’Connell. Last but not least, congratulations to Cathy and Toby Tyler, winners of the Banquet Basket Raffle. Other news MassQHA’s next General Membership Meeting and Pot Luck Supper will be held Saturday, March 10 at Fasolo’s Pine Hill Farm, Taunton, MA. Remem-

Association News

Congratulations to Robert Lowell on his purchase of Honest Answer, a beautiful AQHA mare. Rob and his wife Bonnie, are planning to breed “Ava” to Congress Champion Only Blue Sky this Spring for a 2013 foal. Best of luck to the Lowells with their new addition and future, new addition!

MassQHYA Youth making Christmas Cards for Soldiers Home.

MassQHA Member, Beth Oveka and her horse Merlot love to lope. Beth often says, “have a told you I love this horse?”

ber you must attend two General Membership meetings between Nov. 2011 and Oct. 2012 to qualify for Year End Awards. Pot Luck dinner 6-7 p.m. meeting to follow. Please let Jackie Hughes or Donna Fasolo know what food you will be bringing to share. Hostess: Donna Fasolo 508-823-1640. Jackie Hughes jaclhughes@aol.com 508-823-7458 Next General Meeting after the March Meeting will be April 7 at Cheoy Lee’s II West Boylston. Enjoy a buffet at 6 p.m., $17, to be paid at the meeting. Meeting will follow. Make sure to save the dates, April 13 through 15, for the MassQHA Novice and Open Show at Three County Fairgrounds in Northampton, MA. Friday, MassQHA will host a free clinic late afternoon. Reining Classes will begin after

the clinic. This show counts towards MassQHA year end points. For class list and show information go to MassQHA.com, or contact, Cindi Adams via e-mail busboss310@aol.com Later in April on the 29th, come trail riding with MassQHA at the North Brookfield Sportsman’s Club. A delicious chicken barbeque will be served after a ride through gorgeous trails along a lake. For further information, please contact Don Gillespie at 508523-3913. MassQHA AQHA Spring Shows will also be held at Three County Fairgrounds in Northampton, May 3-6. Four sets of point count towards MassQHA year end points. A new all

MassQHA 23

Page 21 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Mass Quarter Horse Youth community service Mass Quarter Horse Youth community service and charitable giving have not gone unnoticed. The club recently received a letter from Paul Barabani, Superintendent of the Soldiers’ Home in Holyoke. He acknowledged and thanked MassQHYA Youth for sending over 230 Christmas cards to the Soldier’s Home. These cards were hand made at the December Youth Meeting. Additionally, more than 250 cards from the Youth members, family and friends were sent to the “Holiday Cards for Heroes” Program. To top it all off the club sponsored two children from Quincy Crisis Center for Christmas. Great job kids! MassQHA scholarship recipients announced MassQHA is proud to announce the recipients of our three merit scholarships. MassQHA Merit Scholarship: Jocelyn Tanner; MassQHA Presidential Scholarship: Garrett Wasylak; and MassQHA Past-President Book Award: Justine Anderson. These newly created scholarships, recognize and reward the hard work and dedication MassQHA members give to the club, by helping to support their academic pursuits. We encourage all MassQHA and MQHYA members to apply. The Silent Auction at our Annual Spring Show in May will once again be a fundraiser for our scholarships, so please help support this great cause. Please contact Scholarship Chairperson Samantha Palmer at massqhatreasurer@gmail.com for more information on scholarships or to donate an item to the silent auction.


Associations Directory Eastern Connecticut Draft Horse Association Exchange Street Arena PO Box 58, Attica, NY 14011-0058 Tickets Sales: Tickets@AtticaRodeo.Com All other inquires: AtticaRodeo@AtticaRodeo.Com

Page 22 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Eastern Regional Draft Horse Association Individual $14. Family $20. Youth $7. Roberta Healy 3418 St. Hwy. 29, Johnstown, NY 12095

Green Mountain Draft Horse Association Jean Cross - GMDHA VP 271 Plank Road, Vergennes, VT 05491 www.greenmountaindraft.org 802-877-6802

$15 member $20 family Send your check payable to GMDHA to Karen Myers, 1233 Satterly Rd., Ferrisburgh, VT 05456

www.easternCTdrafthorse.com Mary Washburn ECDHA Treasurer 281 Parish Hill Road, Chaplin, CT 06235

Equine Addiction Horse Club, Inc. PO Box 115, West Stockholm, NY 13696 Attn: Jen Bruno 315-212-0381 • www.equineaddiction.org

The Hudson Valley Draft Horse Association John Ingram, President - 845-657-2032 Matt Smith, Vice-President - 845-883-4007 To promote draft animals in the Hudson Valley, communicate with other draft animal enthusiasts, including horses, mules, oxen. Our events are festivals, plows, fairs, etc.

E-mail Robin at dmjure33@frontiernet.net Ask about our up & coming events New Members always welcome!

Mid State Riding Club Randolph, VT Nancy Moos Membership Coordinator 1245 Ferry St. Marshfield, MA 02050-1802 781-536-4119 (phone calls 8 am-8pm) nmoos@yahoo.com

Tri-County Pony Club, Inc. This organization is dedicated to fostering a positive, affordable, and safe environment for the promotion and enjoyment of equines. Bringing youth and equines together since 1959.

Get the latest news, events and membership information on our web site: www.tricountyponyclub.com Lynne Baldauf at 518-872-9320

Friend us on Facebook!

Washington County Draft Animal Association Membership is $30/year. Send dues to Jan Skelly, 3375 County Route 30 Salem, NY 12865. For more information call Karin Vollkommer @ 518-584-6933 Check Washington County Draft Animal Association out on facebook.

www.midstateridingclubvt.org Contact: Jyl Emerson, President jyl.emerson@hughes.net 802-522-2156

NEW ENGLAND WALKING HORSE Richard Lashoones, Treasurer NEWHA - PO Box 225, Marshfield, VT 05658 802-426-3781

The New York State Plantation Walking Horse Club Walking comfortably into the future.

www.nyspwhc.org

Eastern Mountain Ranch Horse Association www.emrha.com

Jane Moulton, President 232 Eldridge Lane, Fort Ann, NY 12827 518-632-9227 jmoulton@dishmail.net

Grafton Trail Riders 16 Trail Riders Way Grafton, NY 12082 www.graftontrailriders.com President ~ Rob Bink Vice President ~ Jeff Harrison Secretary ~ Tacey Shannon Treasurer ~ Linda Delisle B.O.D. ~ Mark Samu ~ Jeanette Larmon ~ Wendy Bink ~ Tracy Bartick-Sedrish Youth Advisor ~ Wendy Bink Charter Rep ~ Linda Delisle P.O. Box 31 Argyle, N.Y. 12809 www.hvrha.com ~ info@hvrha.com

NATIONAL BARREL HORSE ASSOCIATION For more information and a downloadable membership form visit www.nbha.com or call 706-722-7223

New York Percheron Association Linda Tangen - 518-673-5921 tangenspercherons@frontiernet.net www.nypercheron.org

New York State Draft Horse Club Gordon Howard, V.P. 315-436-5982 ghoward1951@yahoo.com For more information visit ny-state-draft-horse-club.org


MassQHA from 21 day fee structure will allow entry into other divisions for one low fee per judge. Contact show secretary, Alice Andrews at bgcandrews@yahoo.com or 607-2261289 for further information. A second trail ride is being planned for Sept. 16 at Waters Farm in Sutton, MA. We are planning a little something for a lucky horse and rider that attends both trail rides, more to come on this. Please check out MassQHA.com for further details on these upcoming events. We are looking to change up MassQHA Meetings and make them fun, informative and really involve our membership. We want to know what you want from your club. MassQHA members, do you have a picture of you and your horse that you would like to share? We love to show off our members. Please e-mail to cindyan-

derson43@gmail.com along with your names, what your interests are, and anything else you’d like to share about your equine/ human partnership. 2011 High Point Winners MassQHA would like to congratulate its 2011 high point winners. Amateur High Point Champion Jacquelyne Hughes, Skycz The Limit Amateur Select High Point Champion - Toni Gregoire, Fancy Huh Amateur Select High Point Reserve Champion - Jacquelyne Hughes, Skycz The Limit Novice Amateur High Point Champion - Cynthia Hidell, IE Formal Novice Amateur High Point Reserve Champion - Celeste Lagonick, Absolute Heirloom Adult Walk Trot High Point Champion - Don Gillespie, Jacs Hollywood Rose

Adult Walk Trot High Point Reserve Champion - Dannie Skog, Impulsive Rita Youth 14-18 High Point Champion Caitlyn Ackerman, Ziptown Doc Youth 13 and under High Point Champion - Kelsey Brooks, Just Right Invite Youth 13 and under High Point Reserve Champion - Morgan Stevens, Moscati Novice Youth High Point Champion Caitlyn Ackerman, Ziptown Doc Novice Youth High Point Reserve Champion - Kelsey Brooks, Just Right Invite Youth Walk Trot 10 and under High Point Champion - Carly Liquori, FCF Don’t Skip Julie Youth Walk Trot 10 and under High Point Champion - Sydney Letendre, A Passing Extra Youth Walk Trot 11-18 High Point

Champion - Lyndsey Ouimet, Huntin For Daybreak Youth Walk Trot 11-18 High Point Reserve Champion - Valerie Slimskey, Pass The Zippo High Point Leadline Winners - Reese Minckler, Samantha Wasylak, Shaely Alicea, Brett Beaudoin Thanks to Jackie Hughes and Donna Fasolo for the fantastic awards. Best of luck to everyone in the 2012 show season. See you in the show pen!

New York State High School Rodeo Association

Betsy Christensen 300 Rockland Rd. Guilford, CT 06437 203-457-9112 ngnurs@aol.com State Secretary

New York State Quarter Horse Association, Inc. www.nysqha.com

New York State Horse Council, Inc. Stephen Ropel 221 New Road, Nassau, NY 12123 sropel@nyc ap.rr.com or 518-366-8998

Renesselaer County Draft Animal Association New York State Saddle Horse Association Web site www.NYSSHA.org

Vermont Farriers Association c/o Diane Saunders, Treasurer 1292 South Rte. 116, Bristol, VT 05443 802-453-3750

Diane Crandall 107 Breese Hollow Rd Hoosick Falls, NY 12090 E-mail: rcdaa@rcdaa.com Web site: www.rcdaa.com

THE VERMONT HORSE COUNCIL www.vthorsecouncil.org Roger Morin, President 802-899-4030 Rogerm49@aol.com

5 Weekends of 16 AQHA Shows 1 NYSSHA open Show $9000 added to Futurities Contact: Kim LaFlair 48 Lake Road Ballston Lake, NY 12019 518-399-3414 luvqhrses@nycap.rr.com

Woodstock Riding Club PO Box 726, Woodstock, NY 12498 President - Hannah Moskowitz Vice Pres - Dawn Clayton Sec - Roberta Jackson Treas - Jane Booth www.woodstockridingclub.us www.woodstockridingclub.com woodstockridingclub@yahoo.com

VERMONT QUARTER HORSE ASSOCIATION

www.vtqha.com Lucille Evarts - President 802-545-2547 EVARTSL@YAHOO.COM

Make Country Folks Mane Stream Your Association’s Official Newspaper!

Promoting and encouraging perpetuation of the miniature horse breed through the World Class Miniature Horse Registry, with shows and educational demonstrations. $13. Single membership, $33. Family

Contact Laura Hayner at 518-848-4858

As the official publication Country Folks Mane Stream: • Offers associations the opportunity to get association news out to its members 12 times a year. • Will send that issue to all your members at no cost. • Will publish news throughout the year that pertains to your association. • Offer free calendar of events listings. • Will publish your association’s membership contact information each month at no cost. Please contact Tina Krieger at 1-800-218-5586, Ext #108, or email tkrieger@leepub.com

Page 23 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Associations Directory


Page 24 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

2012 Vermont Horse Council Happenings Coming events March 3 and 4: 2012 R6 AQHA 2nd Annual HORSEMAN’S CONFERENCE at the Holiday Inn, Boxboro, MA - The Region 6 AQHA Affiliates is once again PROUD to present this educational series offering a weekend of informative presentations and demonstrations interest to all Quarter Horse owners, exhibitors, and enthusiasts alike!! There will be sessions for adults and youth!! For more information please contact, R6 President Donna Rosciti at donna@rosciti.com or for the youth, Marge Tanner at pedlr70r@aol.com or visit www.r6aqha.com March 31: Whispering Pines 4-H Club Consignment Tack Sale and Tony’s Tack Shop Relocation Celebration! At the Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, VT. If you have items you would like to tag ahead of time, please contact Mary Fay at 802878-1215 or e-mail joelmary4h@ aol.com to get the form and tags sent to you in advance. May 5: Green Mountain Draft Horse Association Horse, Tack & Equipment Sale. Rain or Shine. 9 a.m. Equipment and Tack. Horses to follow (approx. 1:30 pm) At Addison County Field Days, Route 17, New Haven, VT. For more information contact Rose Ann Lombard 802-425-2824, rlombard@gmavt.net or visit www.greenmountaindraft.org Center for Equestrian Growth & Awareness CEGA Clinic Series 2012 Session 3: Soul: Communication & Listening, March 25 - 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Session 4: Stress-free Showing, April 22 - 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Session 5: Putting It All Together, May 20 - 10 a.m.-1 p.m. COST: $60 per session Email Info@CEGA.com to pre-register All workshops and the mounted clinic will be held at: The Equestry, 829 South St, New Haven, VT. Phone 802453-4424, Web: www.CEGAVT.com Northwest Riding & Driving 2012 Extreme Cowboy Race Contact Secretary: Barbara Rousseau, 802796-3440, rousseau@fairpoint.net • June 30 - Youth Introduction to Extreme Cowboy • July 29 - Exteme Cowboy Race • Aug. 26 - Extreme Cowboy Race • Sept. 8 - Partner Game Day • Sept. 30 - Raindate • Oct. 6 - Extreme Cowboy Race Irene Disaster Relief by Cindy Cross-Greenia, Vemont Horse Council Large Animal Technical Rescue Chair On Aug. 28, 2011 Vermonters woke to a state that had been ravaged and torn apart by a Hurricane named Irene. The days following were a flurry of activity with the state’s humane societies and rescues preparing to house displaced animals and feed for those remaining in homes. As part of the Vermont Humane Federation VHC took the lead in both identifying affected horse owners and meeting their needs. Some had lost hay and fencing and some had lost their barns and homes but all had the determination to keep their beloved horses no matter how it had to be done.

We worked closely with the VT Dept. of Agriculture who provided a list of individuals who were willing to donate hay, equipment and a helping hand, the vtresponse website was an excellent spot to find hay donations, and many kind individuals called and emailed directly after the call went out by facebook, e-mail and our website. Through VHC, victims of Irene have received donations of over 1,200 bales of hay, countless bags of grain, wormer, fencing and manual labor. We have also secured 350 bags of shavings from Millbrook Shavings that were sold and delivered at cost. We have raised $1,347 above the initial $1,000 start up fund set by VHC. VHC has given out over $1,100 in checks at $50 per person to help with immediate need. The next round will be done by application. We still need your help, each week brings at least another victim in need forward. The donations have all but stopped, there is no hay being offered for the person who lost the 500 bales that got soaked in the flood or a backhoe to remove the feet of gravel washed into the barn that can’t be used. The financial donations have ceased and soon there will be no money left to give. The tragedy and its victims have begun to fade from our immediate thoughts as the winter continues. If you can donate please do, go to www.vthorsecouncil.org to donate with credit or debit card or send a check to Vermont Horse Council, PO Box 392, Underhill, VT 05489 I personally wish to thank all that

have contributed financially, physically and emotionally to The Vermont Horse Councils Disaster Fund and relief effort. In the very first days I told the Dept of Ag. that horse people stick together and we have. Thank you to all those that have donated financially to our effort, we cannot list you due to privacy but you know who you are! For in-kind donations, hay collections and hauls, manual labor and so much more: Ilene Douglas Heidi Krantz Lizbeth Kox Claudia Tarlov and the New England Dressage Association Tamara Burke Beth and Mark Gilpin John, Randy and Mark - hay producers Sarah Miller Rodney Graham Gary Guerari The Menonites of Vermont Our corporate sponsors: Gallagher Fencing Millbrook Shavings Depot Home and Garden Tony’s Tack Shop Vermont Department of Agriculture www.vtresponse.com And a very special thank you to: Leslie Chadwell and Leslie Carlson who have coordinated the efforts to meet the needs of the horse owners in their perspective towns. For more information visit www.vthorsecouncil.org

as they are applicable to this clinic. The fee for riders at the clinic is $130 for NYSHC members and $140 for nonmembers. Audits (those who participate in the clinic but do not bring a horse) will participate in all phases of the clinic with the exception of riding the trails. Audits will learn how to apply knowledge learned at the clinic to benefit their horses and improve their riding and horse care skills. This is a valuable clinic to audit. Audit fees are $95 for NYSHC members and $105 for nonmembers. All fees include camping (water and electric hook-up extra), stabling, six catered meals, and all clinic activities. Deadline for entry registration is

May 23. It is possible this may be the last clinic offered of this caliber so register early to be sure to be included. We welcome the return of past participants. Applications can be downloaded from the NYSHC’s website at www.nyshc.org. Go to New York Trails and then to NYSHC Trail Rides. You may also request an entry by writing the clinic secretary, Eva Norris, 253 Allen Road, Port Crane, NY 138331307, e-mail Eva83919@aol.com or call 607-693-4024. For more information contact the clinic chairman, Nancy Hart, 315-6734326 or e-mail nala.hart@yahoo.com.

New York State Horse Council by Nancy Hart The 24th NYSHC (New York State Horse Council) Annual Competitive Trail Riding Clinic on June 1, 2, and 3 will be held at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Brookfield Horse Trails. Headquartering at the Madison County Fairgrounds (Brookfield, NY) allows us the luxuries of box stalls, hot showers, and water and electric hook-ups available for those who choose. Introducing the sport of competitive trail riding to experienced riders of all ages (junior riders are strongly encouraged) is the purpose of the clinic. In this sport you compete against yourself, test your riding skills, your ability to relate to your horse and your ability to care for your horse. To compete you need a sound, healthy, and conditioned horse so the 3-day clinic includes, in large and small group instruction, proper conditioning, shoeing knowledge, horse safety on the trail and at your trailer, rider technique under different riding conditions, good nutrition for active horses, how to take and evaluate pulse and respiration, pacing, selection and fitting of equipment, assessing lameness, and causes and “cures” for fatigue. Practical information learned at the clinic will be beneficial to riders of all disciplines. Registration, followed by a trail riding activity, will begin at 1 p.m. on Friday, June 1. Immediately following the evening meal an informative lecture will begin by Anne Filley of Trumansburg, NY, head instructor. Her presen-

tation will continue after Saturday’s hot buffet breakfast. She will talk about a wide variety of topics previously mentioned in addition to horse’s anatomy and physiology, gait analogy, judging, scoring, and horse camping safety. The format for Saturday afternoon activities will change to small groups rotating to presenters on saddle fitting, cooling horses and taking pulse and respiration, equitation for varied terrain and distance, pacing, and horse presentation to judges. All participants will meet with each presenter. The official farrier for the former NY50 and 100 Mile rides, Todd Gorton, W. Edmeston, NY, will discuss shoeing for long distance horses on Saturday evening. Sunday’s culminating activity is a 15-mile mock competitive tail ride following a carefully marked trail and run the same way as a real competitive trail ride. The wrap-up following the ride and all clinic activities will be completed by 3 p.m. Dr. Ann Chaffee, Trumansburg, NY, our veterinarian, will address nutrition, vaccinations and the veterinarian’s role at a competitive trail ride. Veteran ECTRA (Eastern Competitive Trail Ride Association) riders staff the clinic to share their knowledge and enthusiasm for the sport. They are Eva Norris, Port Crane, NY; Bonnie McDevitt, Fabius, NY; Heather Vecchio, Amsterdam, NY; and Nancy Hart, Marietta, NY. NYSHC sponsors the clinic and it is sanctioned by ECTRA. Rules and regulations of both organizations are followed

Hudson Valley Draft Horse Association The Hudson Valley Draft Horse Association is in the planning stages for our annual SPRING PLOW to be held on April 28, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at Saunderskill Farm, 5100 Rt. 209, Accord, NY 12404. We have several teams of horses and mules plowing the field, an ox, a wagon ride, many vendors, good food, children's activities and much more. This event is FREE to the public — donations graciously accepted. We are inviting other draft animal groups to join us to make this a bigger event. We are also inviting vendors, crafters, and folks who are willing to demonstrate a skill. The Hudson Valley Draft Horse Association is starting their 31st season.

We have driving classes, monthly meetings, a square dance, auction, dinners and a great social network for those interested in Draft Animals or just having fun. On Aug. 3 you will find us at the Ulster County Fair, New Paltz, NY, and on Aug. 26 we will be at the Dutchess County Fair, Rheinbeck, NY, showing our driving skills. Both are all day events. Members DO NOT have to own livestock, just have an interest in keeping the activity alive. For more information, vendor contracts (vendor space - $35 for 10 foot by 10 foot area) etc. please email Robin at dmjure33@frontiernet.net, or call 845-294-9016, or John, 845-657-2032.


New York State Quarter Horse Association

The New York State Quarter Horse Association is pleased to be offering 16 AQHA recognized shows that will be held at the Cobleskill Fair Grounds in 2012.

From left to right: Madison Frasier, Katie Dolen, Jessica Ross, Deanna Ross, Sandy Mietz Allen, MaryAnne Dronchi, Debbie Parker Front: Morgan Hipkins.

educational event. Sue Howe will be our clinician and the clinic will be on Hunt Seat Equitation. All are welcome to participate in this FREE clinic. Participants can expect to gain insight on strategies to ride patterns while maintaining correct equitation. On Sunday, May 13, NYSQHA is hosting an Open Show, in conjunction with NYSSHA, and will be offering a variety of Open Classes along

with AQHA Rookie and Novice Youth and Novice Amateur Classes. The purpose of the Rookie level class in particular is to reach AQHA members of all ages and riding levels. The Rookie Classes are true entrylevel classes for new and current AQHA members. Eligibility for a Rookielevel class depends on both the horse and the rider’s show records: For a horse to be eligible to compete in a Rook-

Eastern Connecticut Draft Horse Association News by Janice Telfer The first event of the season for the ECDHA will be the annual Plow Match and Obstacle Competition at the University of Connecticut on April 14. The following information is provided by the Plow Match Committee member Patty Naegeli. Plowing Classes: Walking - Men’s; Team Walking Lady’s; Team Sulky - Men’s; Team Sulky - Lady’s; Sulky Two-Sided; Two way Sulky - Lady’s; Two way Sulky Men’s; Junior Plow; Multiple Hitch Obstacle Classes: Men’s Team Log Skid; Lady’s Team Log Skid; Junior Team Log Skid; Men’s Single Log Skid; Lady’s Single Log Skid; Junior Single Log Skid; Men’s Obstacle Team; Lady’s Obstacle Team; Junior Obstacle Team; Men’s Obstacle, Single; Lady’s Obstacle, Single; Junior Obstacle, Single • Entry fee: $15 per teamster • Awards: Ribbons 1-6 will be awarded in each division and in obstacle class. • High Point Plowing ribbon will be awarded in the plowing division. • High Point Obstacle ribbon will be awarded in the Obstacle division. • Teamster of the Day will be awarded to the person who is most proficient in all aspects of the event • Plowing: competition will begin at 9 a.m. sharp.

• Registration: the day of the event • Class list: Available after March 1 by contacting Dale Naegeli • Valid coggins and rabies certificates (valid Certificate of Health for participants outside of CT) MUST be presented to event committee before a team can be unloaded or registered for the event as required by the State of Connecticut. No exceptions. • Cancellation in case of inclement weather will be posted on ECDHA website at www.easternctdrafthorse.com on the day prior to the event. • Judges: Plowing - Peg and Dan Dockham; Obstacles - Brad Downs Questions and information - Dale Naegeli 860-742-7117 ECDHA monthly meetings: Are held every third Tuesday of the month at Blue Slope Country Museum, 138 Blue Hill Road, Franklin, CT. The club welcomes and encourages visitors to join our meetings. You need not own draft horses to join! Food and beverages are always served. Guest speakers are often scheduled. For directions, visit www.easternctdrafthorse.com.

ie-level class, that horse must have earned fewer than 10 lifetime points in that class in any division. For an exhibitor to be eligible to compete in a Rookie-level class, that exhibitor must have earned fewer than 10 lifetime points in that class in any division. Thus, to compete in a Rookie level class, the horse and rider must each have earned fewer than 10 points in that particular class. Open, Amateur, Novice Amateur, Youth, Novice Youth and Rookie-level points all count toward Rookie-level eligibility. In 2012, AQHA is offering a FREE Trial Membership for individuals who have not participated or shown in AQHA approved shows in the previous 5 years. This membership is for all individuals who meet the requirements for Novice and Amateur eligibility. Applications will be available at our show. The Novice Amateur Division is another great way to show in AQHA Classes and is open to all individuals who have not obtained 25 AQHA points in Halter and Performance classes in Novice Amateur, Amateur, Novice Youth, Youth and Open Division. For more information, please visit, www.nysqha. com. We look forward to seeing you at our clinic and shows in 2012! 2011 Year End Awards New York State Quarter Horse Association held it’s 2011 Year End Awards Banquet on Feb. 11 at the Best Western in

Jerri and Jim Shupperd of Shupperd’s Tack with Heather DeLucia, President NYSQHA

Cobleskill, NY. Awards were given to the Champion, Reserve Champion and Third Place Winner of each class and the Top Three All Around Recipients for those who qualified. Awards presented by NYSQHA were Heavy Winter Blankets, Directors Chairs, Nylon Sheets, Leather Halters, Jackets, Hooded Sweat Shirts, Gift Certificates, Vouchers for the NYSQHA 2012 Show Season, Saddle Covers, Garment Bags and Trophies and Plaques from Cowboy Bronze. The All Around Winners were: • Sandy Allen with Smooth Playing Chip Champion All Around for Amateur Division • Madison Frasier with NYPD Blue - Champion All around for Novice Youth Division • Morgan Hipkens with I Be The Kats Meow Champion All Around Small Fry • Deanna Ross with Crusin Sonny Dee Champion All Around for Amateur 50 & Over,

Champion All Around in Novice Amateur Division • MaryAnn Dronchi with Stepahead Two Tango - Champion Open All-around • Kourtnie Clark with Good At Cruisin - Champion All Around in Youth Division The Banquet also had activities that included a NYSQHA Youth Auction with all proceeds going to support youth activities throughout the year and a raffle for an Amateur Basket of Cheer with all proceeds going to support an Amateur Event at the upcoming Liberty Circuit Show in July. The highlight of the evening was the drawing for a western saddle that was generously donated by Shupperd’s Tack Shop that was awarded to Bryan Meyerhoff of Pownal, VT. New York State Quarter Horse Association would like to congratulate all of the Year End Award Winners and would like to thank all of the exhibitors who participated in their 2011 Shows.

Page 25 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

New York State Quarter Horse Association has elected their Officers and Board Members for 2012 and the Election results are as follows: President Heather DeLucia, 1st Vice President - Diane Tetlak, 2nd Vice President - Ron Bubniak, Secretary - Amy Bubniak, Treasurer - Kim LaFlair. 2011–2012 Directors: Eric Dolen, Bruce Emanuel, Sandi Emanuel, Dee Hartmann. 2012–2013 Directors: Melissa Frasier, Skip Hartmann, Allison Kraszewski, and Robyn Stultz. The newly elected Officers and Board Members of the New York State Quarter Horse Association are pleased to be offering 16 AQHA recognized shows that will be held at the Cobleskill Fair Grounds in 2012. Their first recognized AQHA show in May will be the 11th and 12th, sponsored by the Youth of NYSQHA. This show will be split/combined/ double judged. On Saturday Evening, May 12, at 6 p.m., NYSQHA is offering a FREE clinic to any interested individuals who would like to audit or ride in this fun and


Page 26 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Green Mountain Horse Association by Jean Cross Green Mountain Draft Horse Association held their annual meeting in January. There were some changes in the officers. After 14 years as president, Rose-Ann Lombard has handed the lines over to someone new. Don’t worry; she is still in the wagon as the new Vice President and Secretary. I talked to Rose-Ann about her years in the hot seat of President. Rose-Ann joined the club in 1987. By the early 90’s she was the club secretary. She kept that position until 1997 when she resigned because she and her husband were planning to move to Tennessee. Tragically her husband suffered a fatal heart attack before they made the move. After that member Ted Russell contacted her to see if she would be interested in being President. I thought she was the first female president of the group, but as it turns out Dina Marcotte broke the ice as the first female President. Dina did experience some resistance, but by the time Rose-Ann stepped in people had accepted that a woman could be President and the group would not fall apart. I asked Rose-Ann for highlights of the years she was President. She said they were helping in establishing all the activities that the club does now,

such as the draft horse auction, driving clinics, plowing events, Draft Horse Field Days and our presence at Everything Equine. Rose-Ann thought the hardest part about the job was keeping everybody focused at the meetings and not let members go off track for too long. It was a bit of a juggling act, as she wanted to give all the types of draft horse people (show, farm, pulling) their fair share of time, but she also had to keep the meetings to a reasonable length. Another job was to control the amount of money members asked the club to spend. Sometimes they could have easily spent $75,000 in a matter of minutes, which of course the club did not have. When I asked her what advice she had for the group going forward she reminded me that the group has many different factions and to remember our mission statement: To establish friendly communication and encourage the exchange of ideas for the purpose of assisting its members in the areas of breeding, exhibiting, buying, selling, and promoting the varied uses of draft horses, mules, ponies, and oxen. She suggested that events should appeal to many kinds of people, and we should remember that not everybody has the same level of involvement.

As far as the future she said she would like to see the club continue on with the momentum that it has going now. If she had any big wish it would be that all members have a chance to vote, even if we had to use a proxy vote. If you see Rose-Ann out and about at draft horse events, be sure to thank her for her years of service to GMDHA and to all the draft horse groups of which she is a part. Green Mountain Horse Association’s Summer Riding Camp The Green Mountain Horse Association (GMHA) will host its renowned Junior Horsemanship Clinic (JHC) June 24-July 3. The summer camp, now in its 56th year, is designed for young riders ages 9-17 who have their own mounts. The program focuses on the fundamentals of eventing, but paricipants don’t have to be eventers to attend. Skills taught apply to dressage and hunter/jumper competitors seeking to diversify their training. Campers should have a secure postion and be comfortable riding all three gaits, jumping small obstacles, and riding in the open. A major focus of the JHC is to educate young equestrians in all areas of horsemanship. Participants take two mounted and unmounted lessons each day taught by some of the best trainers

in eventing, dressage and jumping. The JHC is considered the premier eventing camp for young equestrians, having educated many top riders throughout its history. GMHA is located in picturesque South Woodstock, VT, and provides an ideal location for the camp experience. Facilities include four all-weather riding rings, a newly upgraded crosscountry course, six permanent barns, an extensive trail system, a Youth Center facility, and snack bar. This year, all participants will have the opportunity to compete in GMHA’s Starter Horse Trials on July 1 with coaching from the JHC staff. Clinic codirectors are Jim and Suzi Gornall, both “A” Pony Club alumns who have evented through the Advanced level. Suzi is one of the leading riders and instuctors in the region, and Jim is a USEF “R” technical delegate and course designer. Enthusiastic and highly qualified instructors round out the JHC staff. Scholarships are available for highly motived young riders with financial need. Scholarship applications and entry forms are available on GMHA’s web site www.gmhainc.org. The deadline for camp applications is April 27. For further information, contact GMHA at 802-457-1509.

The New York State Draft Horse Club offers many opportunities to learn about draft horses in 2012 Every year, the NYSDHC hosts draft horse demonstrations to show what draft horses can do. The NYSDHC will demonstrate Horse Drawn plowing at the annual Plow Day in May, Wheat Harvesting at King Ferry in August and Corn Harvesting in September. Club members also participated in a trail drive in June. This year, the New York State Draft Horse Club will also sponsor a Novice and Youth Clinic on Saturday, April 14, at the Morrisville State College Nancy Stowell Memorial Arena on Swamp Road in Morrisville, NY. (Take Route 20 to Morrisville. At the traffic light turn north on to Cedar Street and go approximately 3 miles to the Morrisville College Arena on the right.) Although the clinic is intended for

novice and youth that work with drafts, it is open to anyone who has an interest in learning more about how to use and care for draft horses. Prospective owners, new owners, and experienced teamsters can all learn from topnotch instructors. The Clinic schedule will be as follows: AM Session : (9:30 a.m.-Noon) - Coffee and Do dughnuts Provided by the Club Welcome: David Johnson, President, NYS Draft Horse Club Classes on Showmanship and Decorating Your Horse. Lunch break (Noon-1 p.m.) - Participants should bring their own lunch and a dessert dish to pass. PM Session: (1-3:30 p.m.) - The Afternoon Session is intended to give all participants an opportunity to get super-

Mark Burley and his team of Belgians prepare to give spectators horse drawn sled ride from lake to ice house at Tully Ice Harvest. Photo by Jim McRoberts

NYSDHC at Harlow Smith’s Smithland Farm for annual Corn Harvest. Photo by Stacy Young

vised hands-on experience driving draft horses in a controlled environment. Classes on Harnessing, Line Adjustments, Hitching, Driving Demonstrations, and How to be Safe with your Horse

Head Table at Annual Dinner held at Stone Hedges Golf Course in Groton. Photo by Stacy Young

There is no charge for the clinic. The Club will have a variety of books related to learning about draft horses for sale. For further information contact Karen Mulligan at 315-750-0529.

www.cfmanestream.com


Hudson Valley Ranch Horse Association opens the New Year with plans for spring clinics and shows

Waiting and watching at the 2011 Hudson Valley Ranch Show at Win$um Ranch.

Wendy Bink will be giving us the inside scoop on competing in shows at the Horsemanship Clinic on April 21.

Shawn Quinn holds 10 Champion Titles in the American Professional Roping Association (APRA) and is Win$um's own Profession Rodeo Cowboy Association's 2011 Circuit Champion in Team Roping for the New Frontier Region. Shawn will be traveling to Oklahoma this spring to compete for the National Title. These two gentlemen have a wealth

Chautauqua County Trail Riders …Hoof Beats Announcing a new event This is 2012, an Olympic year and I wish I had plane tickets to London to see the equestrian events that will be held in Greenwich Park. I know that is not going to happen but The Trail Riders have an exciting new event planned that will be our substitute for a trip to London. The new event is a Supreme Horse Event and will be held Sept. 21. The event will consist of both English and Western events both on judged trail obstacles and ring work. Horses will be able to compete in both disciplines and can be ridden by different members of the family. The points will be for the horse that does well in the most events and will highlight the versatility of the horse. If you choose you can do only Western or English. To

keep current on details for The Supreme Horse Event contact hobhollow@windstsream.net to receive emails. Let us know if you need overnight camping. The Meet & Greet May 20 is shaping up once again to be an informative and fun filled day complete with a morning trail ride, some interesting presenters on topics of interest to trail riders. Our pot-luck dinners at the end of the day are always superb! Next month we will have more details to pass on. The Trail Riders are located with easy access from I-90 and I-87 near Jamestown, NY. This family oriented club is open to new members looking for an active saddle club that loves to trail ride.

Jen Barrett competes in the Ranch Horse Show in 2011.

of information to share. Anyone interested in learning the basics of roping, or wanting to brush up on their technique won’t want to miss this one. April 21st - Horsemanship Clinic Hudson Valley Ranch Horse Association (HVRHA) will be offering a Horsemanship Clinic on April 21 at Win$um Ranch in Schuylerville. Two sessions are offered; one from 8 a.m.-noon, and a second from 1-4 p.m. Although spots are limited and going fast, auditors are welcome for only $10, and when you pre-register you will receive a handsome pamphlet outlining everything you need to know to get off to the right start on show day! During this four-hour clinic, topics to be covered include all the basics needed to prepare and compete in a Ranch Horse Show. Material to be covered includes, proper attire for you and your horse, review of the entry forms and show bills, overview of various Ranch Horse Show classes, potential trail obstacles one may encounter, how to present yourself to a judge, how to read and ride patterns properly, what the judge is looking for when you work a cow, and much more. Wendy Bink will run the clinic. Wendy has plenty of experience in showing and judging. She has earned over 400 ARHA points since its introduction in the North East and has judged many open shows, Ranch Horse Shows, and cowboy races. Wendy brings to the arena her experi-

Congratulations to Kathy Urbanski and Sis for their great showing at the Equine Affair. Photos by Mark Samu

ence as competitor, trainer and a judge. You may also recognize Wendy as one of the Managers of Walker’s Farm Home and Tack. Attendance and participation in this clinic should give all participants an edge as the show season begins. The first Open HVRHA show will be on May 5 at Win$um Ranch, followed on June 2 by an ARHA Sanctioned Ranch Horse Show. Both shows will begin at 8:30 a.m. Other news Congratulations to HVRHA member, Kathy Urbanski, on her 2nd place win at the Most Versatile Horse & Rider Competition at the Equine Affaire in Massachusetts last November. Kathy and her horse, Colonels April Kid (aka Sis), are fierce competitors and in Kathy’s words, they “became one” during the competition at the Equine Affaire. We are fortunate to have Kathy among our membership, both as a competitor and as a mentor to our youth and novice riders. Be sure to watch us on facebook. Our Open House and Year End Awards Banquet will be on March 24. Keep checking in for details on this and other events. Membership forms and are available on hvrha.com. Remember to renew your membership for 2012!

Page 27 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Hudson Valley Ranch Horse Association (HVRHA) begins the season with with a Roping Clinic on March 31, followed by a Horsemanship Clinic on April 21. Both Clinics will be held at Win$um Ranch in Schuylerville, NY. Rain or shine, clinic participants will be comfortable in Win$um’s huge indoor arena. March 31, 10 a.m. - Roping Clinic Shawn Quinn and George Peters from Win$um Ranch will be available to share their expertise and advice with participants, who will be given opportunities to practice roping on foot in the morning, followed by a chance to practice on horseback during the afternoon. The morning will be spent on foot learning some basics such as going over parts of the rope, how to build a loop, and roping a dummy. In the afternoon participants will be on horseback using these same skills to rope a dummy, rope the hot heels, and finally track a cow. Bring your questions, your rope, and your horse, but don’t worry if you don’t have much experience to bring... we hope to provide this for you! This clinic has something to offer for the beginner on up to the advanced roper. HVRHA is so pleased that we are able to offer this clinic with two topnotch horsemen. George Peters has spent his life training, competing, and managing all aspects of Ranch work. George is very generous with his advice, and has helped numerous riders get started on Ranch Horse Work over the years, many of whom have gone on to win in local, state, and national events under George’s mentorship.


Page 28 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Yo-Sco-Haro 2012 Initiatives by Bruce Emanuel Yo-Sco-Haro Riding Club held their annual Christmas party at Howes Caverns banquet hall, Howes Cave, NY, on Dec. 9. The Club represents Schoharie County and is an affiliate of the New York Saddle Horse Association (NYSSHA). The latter group consists of nine other clubs which are Silver Spurs, Sacandaga, Eastern New York Plantation Walker Association, Rugmakers Riding Club, New York State Quarter Horse Association, Eastern New York Morgan Club, Classic Country, Adirondack Miniature Horse Club and Montgomery County Riding Club. The 67-year old Yo-Sco-Haro club had a gala time with fun, entertainment and various highlights. The newly elected 2012 officers made their debut by hosting the large turnout with a Merry Christmas and a Super New Year. The club officers are President Steve Harris, Vice President Sandi Emanuel, Treasurer Doug Habers and Secretary Ellie Beauchea. The Board of Directors are Kathy Powers, Connie Sondergaard, Debra Rickard, Harrison Terk and Carol Russel. The club meets every third Wednesday at Sterling Insurance in Cobleskill, NY, at 7 p.m. during the winter.

One highlight was that the youth and adults were enamored with their peer rider, Katie Dolen, daughter of Eric and Karen Dolen, Howes Cave, NY, at her placing at the All American Quarter Horse Congress. Many factors are essential for the success of the Yo-Sco-Haro Riding Club: 1. Capable officers and Board of Directors 2. A challenging program of work 3. Knowledge and involvement in the club as they share the responsibility for club activities 4. Support by horse enthusiasts and the community 5. All around enhancement of the individual horse and the equine industry The Yo-Sco-Haro club members pride themselves with social events, trail rides, 4-H and FFA commitments, class sponsorships, fashion show and of course, the youth scholarships which consists of our most important resource. The intent of the scholarship is to award $1,000 to each approved applicant attending college. The other project is funding for class show sponsors. This initiative involves donations with much support and appreciation of community businesses, club members, and independent individuals.

Santa Claus visits the Yo-Sco-Haro Christmas party. Alexa Livingston is giving Santa her Christmas list. Yo-Sco-Haro youth showing their show fashions with club member Bruce Emanuel. Front row: Lilly Anderson, Zelda HowardMartin. Second row: Jessica Harris, Hannah Wetsell, Alexa Livingston and Tia Butler. Third row: Mikaela Harris, Katie Dolen, Heather Mayoka and Bruce Emanuel.

One of the most challenging club activities is the annual horse show, completely run by volunteers, which will be held on June 9 and 10. It has 130 classes, representing many breeds, concentrating on western, hunt seat, saddle seat, driving, miniature horse, walking horse and all-around classes.

Save the weekend of Sept. 21, 22 and 23 for the Grafton Trail Riders (GTR) Annual Over the Mountain Ride! On Sept. 24, 2011 over 75 riders participated in the Over the Mountain ride, hosted by the Grafton Trail Riders. About 50 riders started the ride at Petersburg Pass and were joined by the rest at the lunch stop, to complete the 26 mile ride on horseback. Riders came from far and wide for this annual event which began on Friday and ended on Sunday with lots of fun activities and great food throughout. The Club received great comments on the event, including NB of Watertown who Over the Mountain participant Lori Gibsaid, “What an amazing time I had at bons and Maverick enjoying the beautiful your ride. Your facility is fantastic, scenery during the ride. your ride well organized and your trails stunning. I found the ride to be an un- ence the joys of traveling through forforgettable experience and can’t wait est and stagecoach roads long forgotten. The first half of the ride is more until next year to do it again.” This year’s fun weekend begins Fri- challenging while the second half folday Sept. 21 with a trail ride and a piz- lows the old wagon trail from Berlin, za party, at the GTR Club House in NY to Grafton, NY. A buffet lunch is Grafton, NY. On Saturday, the Over provided with free apples for your the Mountain trail ride begins. This 25 horse. The ride ends at the GTR Club mile ride begins on along the pictur- House in Grafton where we can unesque Vermont, Massachusetts and tack, unwind, and await a fantastic New York border. Riders will experi- catered barbecue. Later there is a

Some of the ride participants checking out one of the lakes at Grafton State Park.

campfire, music, dancing, raffles and lots of story sharing. On Sunday, there is a breakfast buffet and a trail ride. Camping is available on club grounds. You can come for all or any of the events, and you don’t have to be a club member to participate. Reservations close at 100 participants, so register early. For more information, go to www.graftontrailriders. com or e-mail us at graftontrailriders@yahoo.com.

VT Farriers Association - committed to ongoing continuing education for farriers Our Annual Spring Clinic is scheduled for March 24, in Orwell, VT. This clinic will be held on Saturday from 9 to 5 at the Fire House and will have four exciting presentations with information that not only Farriers but local horse owners will find very informative. The cost is $35 and includes lunch. We will have four speakers presenting on various topics: • John Blombach, Vice President of American Farriers Association,

• Dr. Greg Dowd, Equine Veterinarian, • Rebecca Watts, Resident Farrier at the Myhre Equine Hospital in Rochester, NH • Leif Erickson from Gilmanton, NH who has over four decades of experience. The clinic will finish with a panel of the presenters for a question and answer period. For registration or further information e-mail vikmart24@aol.com

Katie Dolen excelled at the All-American Quarter Horse Congress, Columbus, Ohio. Riding her 8-year old gelding, Ready Set Win, the 14-year old placed in the top 10 competing against 60 other participants in youth trail. Showing against over 100 exhibitors, she was in the top 15 in youth horsemanship.For these accomplishments, Katie received a medallion and the All-American AQHA Congress jacket, which is given solely to the top 10 winners. Admiring the jacket and display with Katie is Heather Mayoka, Alexa Livingston and Mikeala Harris.

This will be the third year that the YoSco-Haro show will enjoy the 240 by 120 foot in door Superior Homes Riding Arena. For more information you can contact show chairman Sandi Emanuel at 518-231-7807 or bemanuel13@nycap.rr.com. The Christmas decorations and candy gifts were ably put together by matriarch Greta Rehberg and Kathy Powers. The photographer was Stephanie Livingston. Another highlight of this joyful evening was our Yo-Sco-Haro Santa Claus excitingly portrayed by Steve Harris. All the youth adults exchanged gifts, with Sandi Emanuel being Santa’s helper elf. Yo-Sco-Haro club members realize that 2011 has come gone and that the New Year is upon us. Incidentally, the name Yo-Sco-Haro comes from the Iroquois word for smooth wood or better known as driftwood. The club had a very good year with success of our major projects. We look forward to bringing in 2012 and reaching our priorities successfully with having another prosperous year.


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Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first months insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call Lee Publications 518-673-0101 Beth bsnyder@leepub.com

Custom Services

& BEDDING

Call today and join our family of satisfied customers!! Farm Machinery For Sale IN STOCK ROUND BALE feeder wagon, 8’x20’, $3,700; Stoltzfus & E-Z Trail round bale carriers, feeder & kicker wagons. Sunnyhill Farm, 518885-5106

Price On Request - Del. Avail.

888-339-2900 ext. 10 315-338-1020

Fencing

FA R M R A I S E D H O M E BUILDER, featuring Bill Lake Homes. Your plans or ours. www.kdhomesny.com Dave at KD HOMES 315-841-8700

ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Buildings For Sale

Buildings For Sale

Buildings For Sale

Professional Pole Barns by S&L Builders 35 years of experience Lifetime Warranty No Sub Crews Any Size Or Description of Building Most Structures Erected Within 30 Days Beat Our Price? I Don’t Think So!

BARNS, STEEL BUILDINGS, GARAGES. We repair them! From extensive renovations to minor repairs. 585-739-0263

Building Materials/Supplies 29 Gauge 26 Gauge

Custom Services

518-673-1073 or 518-774-7288 • Horse Barns • Riding Arenas • Garages • Pole Barns • Machinery Sheds

We build what we sell

Barn Repair

classified@leepub.com

Double O Builders LLC

APRIL ISSUE

ADVERTISERS

1-800-836-2888

570-398-5948 (o) 570-772-2352 (c)

#1 and #2 Steel Roofing & Siding Painted - Galvanized - Galvalume Overhead Doors - Sliding Door Track & Parts Laminated Posts - Roof Trusses - Insulation

“STRAW BASED” HORSE BEDDING (STRAW MANURE)

LOCUST POSTS, POLES, Split Rails, 6x6’s, 4x4’s. Other hardwood & softwood boards and planks, custom cut. Also lots, land cleared, woodlots wanted. 518-883-8284

R & R FENCING LLC • • • •

Equine Livestock Post Driving Pasture & Paddock Design BRIAN ROSS

585-599-3489

9479 Alleghany Rd Corfu NY 14036 15 Years of Professional Fencing Installations “Quality You Can Trust”

WANT TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD? CALL: 1-800836-2888 Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS 10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

Contacts: Dave Tranquillo 610-926-8811 ext. 5223 dtranquillo@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

Heating CENTRAL BOILER E-Classic OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES. Cleaner and Greener. 97% Efficient. EPA Qualified. Call today Halloran Farm 845-482-5208.

Horse Equipment Draft Horse Implements and Equipment. Having sold the Team of Drafts Offer the Following Equipment: Parade Wagon: Fifth Wheel, Metal, Seats 10 Adults. Built-in stairway for easy access, rubber tires, two poles, kept inside, excellent condition. Party or Ride Wagon: Wooden, stairs for easy access, holds 12 adults, kept inside, like new, two poles, attractive. White Horse Sulky Plow: Brand new, 12”, steel eveners, plow tongue with neck yoke, coulter, beautiful plow, kept inside. Syracuse 2-way Plow: New points, mold board, jointer, needs pole. Fore Cart: Seats two, heavy duty. Miscellaneous Equipment for Draft Horses: Neck Yokes, Eveners, Nylon Harnesses, Collard, etc. Call 585-542-9134 HAY HUTS FOR SALE: $825. Save Hay, Labor, Money. 413-822-1029 See HayHuts.com or contact PaulsHayHuts@gmail.com

BIG SQUARE BALES: Low potassium, processed or not, $130/ton, horse quality $140/ton. Small square bales horse quality, $4.00-$4.50/ bale. Plus delivery. 315-2643900

22+ Colors

Mohawk Metal Manufacturing and Sales

Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

Fencing

518-768-2344 Building Materials/Supplies

Hay - Straw Wanted

Fencing

Fencing

E & A FENCE

771 State Highway 163, Fort Plain, NY

Bringing Security For Them Peace of Mind For You

1-800-836-2888

Page 29 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

CODE 35 40 45 55 75 80 85 90 95 105 110 115 120 130 140 155 160 165 175 190 210 215 235 325 335 340 370 410 415 440 445 455 460 465 470 495 500 510 560

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Mane Stream Classifieds Horse Equipment

Horse Equipment

Horses

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! Saddles, Pads, Bridles, Horse Supplies, Animal Feeds, Draft Supplies, Gifts & More Now carrying DAC Products

HONEY HILL FARM STORE & HONEY HILL FIREARMS

198 Honey Hill Road, Fulton, NY (315) 598-7332 or (315) 952-3788 Web site honeyhillfarmstore.com

Page 30 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012

Gift Certificates and Layaways

WANTED Cash Paid for Quality Used Western Saddles any type Piland, LJ’s, McCall, etc.

Consider one ($1,500) or both ($3,000) of these spotted draft yearlings. Handled daily, currently walk/trot in hand and good for farrier. NASDHA registered Sire and Dams on site. Contact for more pictures or call for an appointment to spend some time with these sweet horses.

MINIATURE DONKEYS. Herd reduction. Jacks and Jennies, all colors. Very tame and gentle. 717-687-3761

Horses

RAYCLIFF FARM QUARTER HORSES It’s Time To Start Thinking About Breeding Your Mare To HOW BLUE ARE YOU A.Q.H.A. $750 L.F.C.

Welsh Gelding-5 yrs old Harry "AKA" Hidden Springs Alabama Grey Welsh Pony-12.3hh $5,000 includes cart, harness & some tack. 704-487-9666

travis@mangum-associates.com

HORSES FOR SALE AT ALL TIMES

RAY HULTEN • 315-823-4321 www.rhutenquarterhorses.com

Top Quality Guaranteed Horses and Ponies For Sale Horses hand selected arriving from the Mid West. Great Selection Always on Hand From Performance Horses to Trail Riding Every Horse Guaranteed to Work for You 58 Years in the Horse Business!

Lumber & Wood Products LOCUST 4x4’s, fence posts, split rails, lumber. Natural, chemical free non poisonous alternative to pressure treated that has strength and lasts a lifetime. 518-883-8284

1. 2.

FAX IT IN - For MasterCard,

3.

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN Number of YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES! months to

Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

Cost per month: run_______ $9.00 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word. (Phone #’s count as one word)

Visa, AMEX or Discover customers, fill out the form below completely and FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381

MAIL IT IN - Fill out the

attached form, calculate the cost, enclose your Name: (Print)________________________________________________________________ check or credit card information and mail to: Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________

Mane Stream Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________ Classifieds, PO Box 121, City: __________________________________________ State: ________ Zip: __________ Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Phone #_____________________Fax #________________Cell #_____________________

4.

E-MAIL

5.

ON-LINE - Go to

E-mail your ad to e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ classified@leepub.com Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard

Card # __________________________________________Exp. Date __________________ (MM/YY) www.cfmanestream.com and follow the Place a Name On Credit Card:(Print)____________________________________________________ Classified Ad button to Todays Date: ______________ place your ad 24/7! Signature: ________________________________________ (for credit card payment only)

Services Offered Passing Fancy Farm is a breeding and training facility of quality horses. We have had great successes with our own bred warmbloods including #1 filly Oldenburgs in 2011. Training & boarding guidance available to create your own champion. 518-860-4327 www.passingfancyhorses.com

Horse Related Events Held All Year! Horses for Lease by the Season!

Trailers

www.pondhillranch.com

B&G Trailer Sales Dryden, NY 13053

1683 Pond Hill Ranch Rd Castleton VT 05735

classified@leepub.com

PHONE IT IN

Call Butch Colbert 518-966-5549 Email - gehs@nyair.net Horses

1-800-836-2888

5 Easy Ways To Place A Mane Stream Classified Ad

518-872-2005 FOR SALE: Rocky Mountain Horses, Trail Safe/Rockfish Stables, Blue Ridge Mountains/VA. 804-943-3818

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

607-898-9558 COMPLETE LINE

15

16

$9.30 per month

$9.60 per month

17

18

19

20

$9.90 per month

$10.20 per month

$10.50 per month

$10.80 per month

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$11.10 per month

$11.40 per month

$11.70 per month

$12.00 per month


Page 31 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012


Page 32 • COUNTRY FOLKS MANE STREAM • March 2012


Country y Folks

HORSE OWNERS BUYERS GUIDE ART / PHOTOGRAPHY Greene County Horseshoe Supply ASSOCIATIONS AND CLUBS Winning Weekends

CLOTHING Mandak Tack & Horse Sales

CONSTRUCTION-BARN BUILDING Adirondack Foothills Equine CB Structures, Inc. North Creek Heat DISCIPLINES Bitless Bridle, Inc. County Line Stables EDUCATION / EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS / 4H / PONY CLUBS Winning Weekends

This form entitles you to a free classified ad in Country Folks Mane Stream for 1 issue. Offer good through December 2012

HORSE OWNERS BUYERS GUIDE INDEX EQUIPMENT / GENERAL (STABLE / JUMPS / DRIVING, ETC.) Adirondack Foothills Equine George & Swede Greene County Horseshoe Supply Mandak Tack & Horse Sales McConnellsville Sands & Materials, Inc. Pond Hill Ranch Tatamy Farm Bureau FARM SERVICES George & Swede McConnellsville Sands & Materials, Inc. North Creek Heat FEED / HAY / BEDDING Endicott Feed and Tack Honey Hill Farm Store Kast Hill Farm King’s Agriseeds McConnellsville Sands & Materials, Inc. Tatamy Farm Bureau

FENCING Greene County Horseshoe Supply Mandak Tack & Horse Sales Tatamy Farm Bureau Williams Fence of CNY, Inc. FUN WITH HORSES (TRAVEL / TRAIL RIDING / CARRIAGE RIDGES, ETC.) Adirondack Animal Land Adirondack Foothills Equine Mohawk View Stables, LLC Pond Hill Ranch GIFTS Greene County Horseshoe Supply Honey Hill Farm Store Kast Hill Farm Mandak Tack & Horse Sales Tatamy Farm Bureau Winning Weekends

HEALTHCARE Endicott Feed and Tack Greene County Horseshoe Supply King’s Agriseeds Mandak Tack & Horse Sales Saratoga Equine Veterinary Service, P.C. Tatamy Farm Bureau HEALTH / VETERINARY SERVICES / FARRIERS Afton Farrier Supply Greene County Horseshoe Supply Saratoga Equine Veterinary Service, P.C. HORSE CAMPS Adirondack Foothills Equine Pond Hill Ranch INSTRUCTIONS Adirondack Foothills Equine County Line Stables Heritage Farm, Inc. Pond Hill Ranch

The April Issue of

Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market www.cfmanestream.com Will Focus On: Showing, Horse Care,

Fencing & Pest Control

DEADLINE: Friday, March 23rd Mail or Fax to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax 518-673-2381

For advertising contact your sales representative today... or call 1-800-218-5586

Page 1 • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stram Supplement • March 2012

BOARDING FARMS Adirondack Foothills Equine County Line Stables Kast Hill Farm Mohawk View Stables, LLC Pond Hill Ranch

BUILDINGS / BARNS AND ARENAS ACR Metal Roofing & Siding Dist. Adirondack Foothills Equine CB Structures, Inc. County Line Stables George & Swede McConnellsville Sands & Materials, Inc. Mohawk View Stables, LLC North Creek Heat


HORSE OWNERS BUYERS GUIDE INDEX REAL ESTATE / REALTORS North Creek Heat Posson Realty, LLC SALES-HORSES (EQUIDS) Adirondack Foothills Equine County Line Stables Heritage Farm, Inc. Mandak Tack & Horse Sales Pond Hill Ranch

SERVICES / SPECIALIZED (LEGAL / INSURANCE / FARM SITTING / PERSONAL TRAINING) Afton Farrier Supply Horse and Farm Insurance, CCI King’s Agriseeds Winning Weekends

SHOW / EVENTS / CLINICS Adirondack Foothills Equine County Line Stables Heritage Farm, Inc. McConnellsville Sands & Materials, Inc. Pond Hill Ranch Winning Weekends SHOWING County Line Stables Pond Hill Ranch Winning Weekends

SUMMER PROGRAMS Adirondack Foothills Equine Heritage Farm, Inc. Pond Hill Ranch

Honey Hill Farm Store JP’s North, Inc. Mandak Tack & Horse Sales Pond Hill Ranch

TACK / SADDLERY / HARNESS/ SUPPLIES / CLOTHING Adirondack Animal Land Adirondack Foothills Equine Bitless Bridle, Inc. Endicott Feed and Tack Greene County Horseshoe Supply

THERAPEUTIC RIDING PROGRAMS The Root Farm TRAIL RIDING Adirondack Foothills Equine Mohawk View Stables, LLC Pond Hill Ranch

TRAINING Adirondack Foothills Equine County Line Stables TRANSPORTATION / TRAILERS / TRUCKS Adirondack Foothills Equine County Line Stables George & Swede Greene County Horseshoe Supply Mandak Tack & Horse Sales McConnellsville Sands & Materials, Inc.

Page 2 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stream Supplement • March 2012

HORSE OWNERS BUYERS GUIDE LISTING ACR METAL ROOFING & SIDING DIST. Contact: Lisa Drebushenko 5278 Rt. 419 Womelsdorf, PA 19567 800-325-1247 Fax: 610-670-6530 www.acrmetal.com acrmetal@comcast.net We are a complete building products distributor specializing in metal roofing and siding. We offer complete pole barn packages, sliding door track, Cupola’s, stall parts, insulation and all accessories for metal roofing and siding.

ADIRONDACK ANIMAL LAND Contact: Dave Eglin RD No. 1 Broadalbin, NY 12025 518-848-7040 Fax: 518-883-8908 www.adirondackanimalland.com animal land@frontiernet.net Riding, Reining and Roping horses for sale. Public auction will be held onsite April 28 with many horses and lots of tack. Check it out on auctionzip.com

ADIRONDACK FOOTHILLS EQUINE Contact: George Thomas 116 County Route 17A Comstock, NY 12821 518-642-3755 www.adkfoothillsequine.com gthomas1818@gmail.com Adirondack Foothills Equine has a 70x134 heated indoor arena, a heated and enclosed viewing area and tackroom. There are

two outdoor arenas with lights, a cross country course and miles of trails spread offer 270 beautiful and well kept acres. We have near weekly events, including but not limited to gymkhanas, cow sorting practices and competitions, cattle drive practices and competitions, barrel races, schooling shows and roping practices. We offer quality care for both horse and rider, whether you’re looking to retire your old equine friend, or just beginning to train a youngster. Contact us for more information on boarding, lessons, horse training or guided trail rides. We also specialize in buying, selling and trading horses. Give us a call - we might have what your’re looking for!

AFTON FARRIER SUPPLY Contact: Joyce Haak 417 Co. Rd. 39 Afton, NY 13730 607-206-3867 Fax: 607-639-1393 aftonfarriersupply.tripod.com aftonfarrier@tds.net Afton Farrier Supply carries quality, competitively priced farrier supplies. We feature all major brands of steel and aluminum horseshoes and stock the foremost brands of nails, rasp and other hoof care products. Daily shipping via UPS. Experienced farrier on call.

WANTED Cash Paid for Quality Used Western Saddles any type Piland, LJ’s, McCall, etc. Call Butch Colbert 518-966-5549 Email - gehs@nyair.net

BITLESS BRIDLE, INC. Contact: Carole Iverson 1200 Nursery Rd. Wrightsville, PA 17368 717-252-2058 Fax: 717-252-2059 www.bitlessbridle.com info@bitlessbridle.com Go Bitless - You have a better horse than you think! The Bitless Bridle, by Dr. Cook is the best tested and most trusted bitless bridle on the market. See for yourself with our 30 day money back guarantee.

New Holland, PA 17557 877-434-4561 Fax: 717-355-3170 www.cbequinebarns.com suplinger@cbstructuresinc.com With over 20 years of designbuild experience, our post frame techniques offer cost effective, quality buildings for various applications such as backyard barns, custom equine facilities, run-in sheds, riding arena’s and more. Offer complimentary onsite consultation to discuss your next project.

Family owned stable offering boarding, training, lessons and sales. Enjoy our new large indoor and oversized sand outdoor arenas. A place where you can enjoy your horse in a drama free zone. Specializing in gently breaking young horses and dealing with problem issues such as trailer loading and more. Welcoming all disciplines.

GEORGE & SWEDE

COUNTY LINE STABLES

CB STRUCTURES, INC. Contact: Stephanie Uplinger 202 Orlan Rd.

Contact: Jean Marie Coppola 985 State Highway 67 Amsterdam, NY 12010 518-842-2978 www.countylinestables-ny.com countylinestables@nycap.rr.com

www.endicottfeedandtack.com jladdyost@yahoo.com Specialty equine and pet foods from Nutrena, Purina and Ward & Van Scoy. Animal health needs/aids. Quality tack and supplies.

ENDICOTT FEED AND TACK Contact: Ladd Yost 1320 Campville Rd., Rt. 17C Endicott, NY 13760 607-785-5333 Fax: 607-687-2713

Contact: Greg Newell 7155 Big Tree Rd. Pavilion, NY 14525 585-584-3425 Fax: 585-584-8853 www.georgeandswede.com gregn@georgeandswede.com McCormick tractors 23 hp to 230 hp.

ACR

Metal Roofing & Siding Distributors, LLC

Agricultural, Commercial & Residential Metal Roofing & Siding • We Carry All Major Manufacturers • Variety of Colors, Trims & Accessories in both Steel & Aluminum • Complete Pole Barn Packages • Lumber & Trusses

Authorized Dealer For

Sunset Horse Stalls Exterior Doors - Many Styles Available (Standard & Custom) Design your Custom Stalls with the many options available

Lisa Drebushenko • 1-800-325-1247 acrmetal@comcast.net • www.acrmetal.com 5278 Rt. 419 North Womelsdorf, PA 19567 717-933-7044 Fax 717-933-7045

130 Bran Road Sinking Spring, PA 19608 610-670-6523 Fax 610-670-6530


HERITAGE FARM, INC. GREENE COUNTY HORSESHOE SUPPLY

HONEY HILL FARM STORE Contact: Cheryl 198 Honey Hill Rd. Fulton, NY 13069 315-952-3788 Fax: 315-593-1670 www.honeyhillfarmstore.com We carry saddles, bridles, harness and DAC products. A little something for everyone. Most horse accessories, also some minor repair work. Can make bridles with bling!

equipment and apparel.

KAST HILL FARM

HORSE AND FARM INSURANCE, CCI Contact: Kevin T. Kosach P.O. Box 5060 Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 518-602-2020 Fax: 518-602-0236 www.horseandfarminscci.com info@horseandfarminscci.com Horse and Farm Insurance CCI, your independent source for insuring equine operations of all types and sizes. Contact us for a free review of your program. We offer farm packages, liability, workers compensation, mortality, auto and more with one call.

JP’S NORTH, INC. Contact: Arlene Curtis P.O. Box 11, 10251 Rte. 32 Greenville, NY 12083 518-966-4488 Fax: 518-966-4147 www.jpsnorth.net jpsnorth@hotmail.com Fine English and Western horse

Country Folks is pleased to be named as the Official Publication of the following associations: • Washington County Draft Animal Association • New York State Draft Horse Club • Vermont Horse Council • New York State Quarter Horse Association • Eastern Mountain Ranch Horse Association • New York State National Barrel Horse Association • New York State Horse Council • Grafton Trail Riders • Vermont Farriers Association • Massachusetts Quarter Horse Association • New York State Saddle Horse Association • Tri-County Pony Club, Inc. • Eastern Connecticut Draft Horse Association • New York Percheron Association • Brookfield Riding & Driving Association • Hudson Valley Ranch Horse Association • Equine Addiction Horse Club • New England Walking Horse Association • Rensselaer County Draft Animal Association • Chautauqua County Trail Riders • Woodstock Riding Club • New York State High School Rodeo Association • Eastern Regional Draft Horse Association • Green Mountain Draft Horse Association • Vermont Quarter Horse Association • Attica Rodeo & Show Association • Mid State Riding Club

The members of these associations all receive the monthly Country Folks Horse Issue. Contact Your Country Folks Sales Representative or Call 1-800-218-5586

Associations...be part of our Calendar of Events. Please forward your information to: Horse Focus Calendar of Events Lorna Quinn Phone 518-673-3237 • E-mail lquinn@leepub.com

Contact: Dorothy Perry 126 Kast Hill Rd. Herkimer, NY 13350 315-866-1188 Fax: 315-866-2514 Poulin Grain dealer. Small animal feed, stall mats, shavings, horse boarding, indoor arena. Now selling Adirondack Candles!

KING’S AGRISEEDS Contact: Tim Fritz 60 North Ronks Rd., Ste. K Ronks, PA 17572 866-687-6224 Horse owners and dairy and livestock producers look to King’s Agriseed for the seeds that provide their animals with the best nutrition available.

MANDAK TACK & HORSE SALES Contact: Joe Migdal 67 Middleline Rd. Ballston Spa, NY 12020 518-885-1158 Fax: 518-885-7772 www.mandaktackandhorsesales.com mandaktack@yahoo.com Offering western and english tack, stable supplies and equipment, barn/trailer security cameras, treats, supplements, gifts, barn boots and gloves, electro-braid fencing and installation, horse sales and transportation and dog blankets. Mobile unit available to come to your event. Mon. - Fri. 9-6, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 1-5 or by appointment.

MCCONNELLSVILLE SANDS & MATERIALS, INC. Contact: Gary Scott P.O. Box 70 Blossvale, NY 13308-0070 315-339-2900 ext. 10 Fax: 315-339-3900 AScott@Lynnhscott.com Screened sand for horse arenas and bedding. Delivered price on request.

Fax: 518-829-7679 wilpafarms@yahoo.com Have 100-foot x 200-foot outdoor arena, 45-foot x 120-foot indoor arena, 10-foot x 10-foot box stalls and trails.

NORTH CREEK HEAT Contact: Ron Aldrich 697 North Creek Rd. Little Falls, NY 13365 315-866-3698 Fax: 315-866-3698 We sell top of the line Central Boiler Outdoor Wood Furnaces and products.

Contact: Jamie Gasner 592 Snooks Corners Rd. Amsterdam, NY 12010 518-848-4517

TATAMY FARM BUREAU Contact: Jim Heck 300 Bushkill St. Tatamy, PA 18085 610-258-2871 Fax: 610-250-0838 www.tatamyfarmbureau.com bic22fbc@rcn.com Farm Co-op dealing with all products needed for horse owners. Blue Seal feed dealer.

THE ROOT FARM

POND HILL RANCH Contact: Harry O’Rourke 1683 Pond Hill Ranch Rd. Castleton, VT 05735 802-468-2449 Fax: 802-468-0578 www.pondhillranch.com horses@pondhillranch.com Horses bought, sold or leased. Largest selection of top quality horses in the East. English and western. Family, trail, performance and jumping. Horses and ponies leased for the season. All horses guaranteed. Full service tack shop, lessons and boarding.

POSSON REALTY, LLC Contact: David Posson 787 Bates-Wilson Rd. Norwich, NY 13815 607-334-9727 Fax: 607-336-6381 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net Over 40 years experience in selling farms throughout NY State! Farmer owned and operated!

SARATOGA EQUINE VETERINARY SERVICE, P.C.

MOHAWK VIEW STABLES, LLC

grams, Mare Reproductive medicine, Digital Radiography and Ultrasound, Video Gastroscopy/Endoscopy, Dentistry, Lameness evaluation, Pre-purchase evaluation, seasonal vaccines, Ambulatory care and more.

Contact: Kathy Van Pelt 63 Henning Rd. Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 518-583-7273 Fax: 518-583-4388 www.saratogaequine.com saratoga@saratogaequine.com Services include Arthroscopy, Fracture repair, Colic surgery, Shockwave Therapy, Wellness pro-

Contact: Kim Sen 6000 Rock Rd. Verona, NY 13478 315-363-6124 www.rootfarm.org rootfarmfoundation@gmail.com The Root Farm offers programs for handicapped and nonhandicapped children and adults including adaptive vaulting, a sibling program, Hippotherapy, Adult Dayhab programs and our award winning vaulting team.

WILLIAMS FENCE OF CNY, INC. Contact: Melissa or Deb 2033 Brothertown Rd. Deansboro, NY 13328 315-841-4910 Fax: 315-841-4649 www.williamsfarmfence.com williamsfence@gmail.net Installation of all types of horse fencing including: Post & Board, Electrobraid, Hot Kote/Horse Kote, Split Rail, Flex Rail, Mesh. Authorized dealer of Priefert, Gallagher, Miraco waterers, Bekaert wire, Fertrell and much more. We sell everything to build your own fence!

WINNING WEEKENDS Contact: Celeste O’Neill 518-466-2445 www.winningweekends.com winningweekends @empireone.net Annual Horse show series, riding clinics, show management / secretary services, custom embroidery, pattern practice kits, event planning, consultation services, AQHA certified show managers on staff.

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/cfmanestream

Page 3 • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stram Supplement • March 2012

Contact: Butch Colbert 10711 Rt. 32 Greenville, NY 12083 518-966-5549 Fax: 518-966-5130 gchs@nyair.net Complete line of farrier supplies, horseshoes, tools, etc. Over 200 new and used anvils, forges, post vises, available/bought, sold and traded daily. Kerckhaert, St. Croix Forge, Capewell, Bellota, BloomForge, Vector, Delta, Mustad, GE Forge and Tool. Over 400 saddles in stock at all times! Circle Y, McCall, Reinsman, Dakota, Big Horn, Simco, Billy Cook, Long Horn, Tex Tan, Cactus Saddlery, Colorado, Dale Chevez. Professional Choice ropes and accessories, horse tack and supplies, blankets and turnouts. Horse trailers. Used saddles wanted - Top prices paid! Check out our Gift Shop and Yankee Candles! We have many unique gifts in stock at all times! Custom gift baskets, porcelain, pitchers and bowls, Indian and Western figurines and more.

Contact: Diane Raucher Miller 30 Florence Rd. Easthampton, MA 01027 413-527-1612 Fax: 413-527-7599 www.farmheritage.com farmheritage@yahoo.com Three generations of horsemen and women. Lessons, auctions, hunt seat and stock horse shows. Always horses for sale.


HORSE CALENDAR

NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office 2 weeks prior to our publication date in order to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com MAR 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 Cattle Drive Practice

Jackpot Barrel Race

Adirondack Foothills Equine - 116 County Route 17A - Comstock, NY. Starts at 6 pm nearly every Friday night all year! $20. Check website for exclusions. Contact George, 518796-1818. On Internet at www.adkfoothillsequine.com

JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. 11 am. Contact JP’s North, 800-2374488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com.

MAR 4 Fundamentals of Dressage Clinic with Cathy Drumm Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. Open to rider in English or Western tack as we work to introduce Western Dressage to Western MA. Learn more about Cathy Drumm at www.cathydrumm.com. Call 413-527-1612 or e-mail farmheritage@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com MAR 11 Jackpot Barrel Race Page 4 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stream Supplement • March 2012

MAR 25

JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. 11 am. Contact JP’s North, 800-2374488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com. MAR 11 & APR 8 Barrel Race Circle “C” Arena, 5104 Purdy Creek Rd., Hornell, NY. 2nd Sunday of each month. Must ride in 2 of 5 shows to qualify for finals. Contact Circle “C”, 607-698-4373. MAR 15 CNY Horse Club Meeting JM McDonald Sports Complex, 4292 Fairgrounds Rd., Cortland, NY. 7:30 pm. Contact Marge Talutis, 607-863 4261 or e-mail mtalutis@a-znet.com. MAR 17, APR 14, MAY 19, JUNE 9, JUL 14, AUG 4, SEP 22, OCT 20 & NOV 3 Adirondack Foothills Equine RSNC Saddle Series Sorting Competition Adirondack Foothills Equine - 116 County Route 17A - Comstock, NY. 50% payback classes. Sign-ups at 9, show at 10. Contact George, 518-796-1818. On Internet at www.adkfoothillsequine.com MAR 18 Ranch Sorting Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. Contact David, 413-335-3468. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com Rensselaer County Draft Animal Association Pasture Management Seminar 4-H Center in Ballston Spa, NY. noon - 4 pm. Contact Diane Crandall, 518-686-4815 or newsletter@rcdaa.com.

Winning Weekends Get Ready for Spring Clinic Three Pines Stables, Guilderland, NY. Topics will include Western, Hunt seat, Trail & Pattern classes. Auditors welcome $15 pre paid/$20 at the door. Contact Celeste O’Neill, 518-466-2445 or e-mail WinningWeekends@empireone.net. On Internet at www.WinningWeekends.com MAR 31 HVRHA Ranch Roping Clinic Win$um Ranch 1392 Rte. 32N, Schuylerville, NY. Learn to build a loop, to roping dummy & live cattle. Contact Linda Delisle, 518744-0601, e-mail dbdranch@localnet.com or hudsonvalleyranch@gmail.com. On Internet at www.hvrha.com APR 1 Green Mountain Draft Horse Association Spring Meeting New Haven VT. Contact Jean Cross, 802877-6802 or e-mail jean@greenmountaindraft.org. Spring Meeting Pat & Cathy Palmer, New Haven VT. Contact Jean Cross, 802-877-6802 or e-mail jean@greenmountaindraft.org. APR 4, 11, 18 & 25 Jackpot Barrels Adirondack Foothills Equine - 116 County Route 17A - Comstock, NY. Every Wednesday night. Warm-ups at 7:15, race to follow. Contact George, 518-796-1818. On Internet at www.adkfoothillsequine.com

The Fire House, Rt. 73, Orwell, VT. 9 am - 5 pm. The cost is $35 and includes lunch. We will have 4 speakers presenting on various topics. Contact Vikki Fortier, 860-558-7397 or e-mail vikmart24@aol.com.

Spring Open House Adirondack Foothills Equine - 116 County Route 17A - Comstock, NY. Demonstrations, horse and tack auction and vendors to be announced. Contact George, 518-796-1818. On Internet at www.adkfoothillsequine.com APR 22 Jackpot Barrel Race JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. 11 am. Contact JP’s North, 800-2374488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com. Spring Consignment Auction Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA . 10 am. New & used tack followed at 2 pm by horses and ponies from out west as well as local consignors. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com APR 28 $5000 Added Barrel Race JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. Warm ups at 7 am, race at 9 am. Contact JP’s North, 800-237-4488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com. Jackpot Barrel Race JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. 11 am. Contact JP’s North, 800-2374488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com. APR 28-29 Everything Equine

APR 29 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Burnin Time Arena, Gansevoort, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am. Run at 11 am. Contact Cindy Kennedy 518-793-3513, Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com Working Cow Horse Day Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. Contact David, 413-335-3468. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com MAY 5 Annual Horse Auction Addison County Fair Grounds, New Haven, VT. Hosted by Green Mountain Draft Horse Association. Contact Jean Cross, 802-8776802 or e-mail jean@greenmountaindraft.org. Fun at the Farm Fundraiser The Root Farm, 6000 Rock Road, Verona. An open house style fundraiser right at the farm. Meet our equine staff, enjoy music and food, a vaulting exhibition and more. Contact Alice Root, 315-363-6124 or e-mail aliceroot@gmail.com. On Internet at www.rootfarm.org HVRHA Open Ranch Horse Show Win$um Ranch 1392 Rte. 32N, Schuylerville, NY. Numerous ranch classes/ Ranch Trail $100 added Open Cutting(sponsored by Sand Castle Farm) - Horsemanship - Command - Boxing - Ranch Riding - Ranch Reining - Ranch Cutting - Conformation - Day

APR 14 Draft Horse Demonstration Hebron Fair, Hebron, CT. Contact Karl Lado, 860-376-4808. Plow Match University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Plowing competition will begin at 9 am sharp. Contact Dale Naegeli, 860-742-7117. On Internet at www.easternctdrafthorse.com APR 15 Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. Teams of 3 riders maneuver cattle through a series of ranch related obstacles. Open and Drawpot Divisions. Contact David, 413-335-3468. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com

VT Farriers Association Annual Spring Clinic

Sandy Hill Quarter Horses 232 Eldridge Lane, Fort Ann, NY. Saturday - Clinics & Demos; Sunday - Intro Show. Come give ranch horse shows a try, open to all horses. Contact Jane Moulton, 518-632-9227 or jmoulton@dishmail.net. On Internet at www.EMRHA.com

Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. AQHA Novice Youth, Novice Amateur & Open/Green classes offered. Open & AQHA Equestrians with Disabilities classes offered. Contact Winning Weekends, 518-466-2445. On Internet at www.WinningWeekends.com

JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. 11 am. Contact JP’s North, 800-2374488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com.

MAR 24

Adirondack Foothills Equine - 116 County Route 17A - Comstock, NY. Sell some tack you don’t use and find something you need! Also see our sales horses. Contact George, 518-796-1818. On Internet at www.adkfoothillsequine.com

APR 21-22 EMRHA Intro to Ranch Horse Weekend

Winning Weekends

APR 7

HVRHA Open House & Awards Banquet

Tack Swap and Horse Sale

Hoosick Falls, NY. Contact Diane Crandall, 518-686-4815 or newsletter@rcdaa.com.

Champlain Valley Expo. Come see our booth and stock up on your summer t-shirts and caps.

Jackpot Barrel Race

Cattle Drive

Win$um Ranch 1392 Rte. 32N, Schuylerville, NY. Learn about ranch horse classes. Free instruction, small fee to cover cattle expenses. 2011 HVRHA Year End Awards Banquet. Please bring your favorite dish to pass. Contact Linda Delisle, 518-744-0601, e-mail dbdranch@localnet.com or hudsonvalleyranch@gmail.com. On Internet at www.hvrha.com

Rensselaer County Draft Animal Association Plow Day

APR 19

164TH Essex County Fair 2012 Annual Horse Pulling Contest Saturday, August 11th at 10AM August 8-12, 2012

2012 HORSE SHOW SCHEDULE Wednesday, August 8th 9AM

Saturday, August 11th 10AM

Open Pony, Light Horse & Draft Driving Show Showmanship, Halter, Hitch & Under Saddle Classes

Horse & Pony Pulling Contest Minis, 50" Ponies, Under 3200 lbs, Horse Free For All **Must Pre-Enter By August 1st, No Post Entries Accepted

Wednesday, August 8th 2PM Beginner Horse Show Leadline, W/T, W/T/C Classes, Includes Gymkhana Games

CNY Horse Club Meeting Homer Senior Center, 4 Water St., Homer, NY. 7:30 pm. Annual election of officers and dish to pass. Bring your own place setting. Contact Marge Talutis, 607-863 4261 or email mtalutis@a-znet.com. APR 21 Ranch Horsemanship Clinic Win$um Ranch 1392 Rte. 32N, Schuylerville, NY. 2 separate clinics: Clinic 1 from 8 am-12 noon and the Clinic 2 from 1-5 pm. Each cover the same topics and limited to 12 riders per clinic. Contact Linda Delisle, 518744-0601, e-mail dbdranch@localnet.com or hudsonvalleyranch@gmail.com. On Internet at www.hvrha.com

Friday, August 10th 8AM Open Horse Show English, Western, Trail, Driving & Costume Classes

Sunday, August 12th 9AM Gymkhana Show Age Divisions 9-13, 14-18, 19 & Over

Sunday, August 12th 10AM Oxen & Steer Pulling Contest Weigh Ins Between 8-10am, 2400lbs & Under, 2800lbs & Under, 3200lbs & Under, Over 3200lbs **Must Pre-Enter By August 1st, No Post Entries Accepted

For More Information: Contact Scott Christian 518-962-8650 E-mail countyfairfun@yahoo.com Website www.essexcountyfair.org Entry information & forms in the handbook are available on the Website.


End Awards- Open - Amateur - Novice Youth Divisions. Contact Linda Delisle, 518744-0601, e-mail dbdranch@localnet.com or hudsonvalleyranch@gmail.com. On Internet at www.hvrha.com MAY 6 NCBRA Benefit Barrel Race Burnin Time Arena, Gansevoort, NY. Contact Jennifer Romriell, 518-883-8957. On Internet at www.nbha.com MAY 11-13 Mothers’ Day Weekend Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd. New Berlin, NY. Mothers’ Camp free at our Campground. 30 pipe stalls, 30 hook up sites, Brookfield trail system. Pavilion, wi-fi, arena. Contact James Weidman, 607-8479265, or e-mail jimbo58@peoplepc.com. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com

on to Western IEA Nationals in June. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com MAY 12-13 Beginner Driving Clinic Shelburne Farms Breeding Barn. Learn how to drive a team or single draft horse in the beautiful setting of Shelburne Farms Breeding Barn. We provide the horses, you provide the excitement. Contact Jean Cross, 802877-6802 or e-mail jean@greenmountaindraft.org. MAY 13 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Ker-A-Mel Arena, Argyle, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am. Run at 11 am. Contact Kerrie Mcwhorter 518-638-8015, Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

www.tricountyponyclub.com

JUN 1-3

MAY 17 CNY Horse Club Meeting

24th NYSHC Competitive Trail Riding Clinic

JM McDonald Sports Complex, 4292 Fairgrounds Rd., Cortland, NY. 7:30 pm. Contact Marge Talutis, 607-863 4261 or e-mail mtalutis@a-znet.com.

Madison County Fairgrounds, Brookfield, NY. Info and entries can be downloaded from www.nyshc.org. Contact Eva Norris, 607693-4024.

MAY 19-20

JUN 2

NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05

AFA Certification

Double M Arena, Ballston Spa, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am. Run at 11 am. Contact 518-885-9543, Laura Derrick 518746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-4240972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

Ira Brook Farm, Ira VT. Contact Vikki Fortier, 860-558-7397 or e-mail vikmart24@aol.com.

PtHA Open, Amateur & Youth Classes (approval pending)

Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Contact Paulette Lindner, 518-668-5084.

Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill NY. On Internet at www.WinningWeekends.com

Gentle Dove Farm Demonstration: NYS 4-H Youth Development Horse Program Inservice Training

MAY 19-21

New York State Quarter Horse Association Open Horse Show

Buster McLaury 3 day Colt Starting ~ Problem Solving, Horsemanship Clinic

Wilbraham, MA. Contact Melissa Graves, 413-244-4934. On Internet at www.easternctdrafthorse.com

Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Contact Sandi Emanual, 518-231-7807.

Pre-Certification Clinic

Shelburne Farms. Bring your draft animal and plow with us. We will have students from the driving clinic watching you show your stuff. Contact Jean Cross, 802-877-6802 or e-mail jean@greenmountaindraft.org.

County Line Stables, 985 State Highway 67, Amsterdam, NY. $475 Colt Starting/Problem Solving, morning session & $400, Horsemanship, afternoon sessions each day. Contact Pasquale and Jean Marie Coppola, 518 842 2978, e-mail countylinestables@nycap.rr.com. On Internet at www.countylinestables-ny.com

MAY 12 Plowing the Community Garden

Ira Brook Farm, Ira VT. Contact Vikki Fortier, 860-558-7397 or e-mail vikmart24@aol.com. Rensselaer County Draft Animal Association Plow Day

Plowing Fun Day

MAY 13, JUN 10 & SEP 9 Tri-County Pony Club Show Series Announced

Western IEA Zone 1 Horse Show

Altamont Fairgrounds. Mother’s Day, TETWP Benefit & Fall show. Trophies, day end awards. Classes for all levels. All equines welcome. Reasonable prices. On Internet at

Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA . Classes from lead line to 3’ equitation medals. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com MAY 25-28 Jon Ensign General Horsemanship Clinic

w o N Is ! e n i l On

Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA . Morning sessions/ Working Cow Horse Clinic Evening sessions. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com MAY 26-27 NYSSHA Spring Fling Open Horse Show Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Contact Sandi Emanual, 518-231-7807. Pure Country Versatility Cowboy Race

Y ourr connectionn too thee Northeast Equinee Market

Go to www.cfmanestream.com we e are e justt a Clickk Away!

Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd. New Berlin, NY. Six classes, payback every class, awards end of year, 10 acre onsite obstacle course, dinner on Saturday. Contact James Weidman, 607-847-9265, or e-mail jimbo58@peoplepc.com. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com MAY 26-28 NYS NBHA Championships Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Contact Karen Rebello, 607-760-2942 or e-mail nynbha@gmail.com. On Internet at www.nbha.com

2012 SMALL ANIMAL & TACK AUCTION SCHEDULE

March 04 Small Animal Auction 18 Small Animal Auction

June 03 Small Animal Auction 17 Small Animal & Veg. Plant Auction 29-30 Store Summer Sale

April 01 Small Animal Auction Lamb & Goat Sale 15 Small Animal Auction

July 01-08 Store Summer Sale 08 Small Animal Auction

May 06 Small Animal Auction 12 Horse & Tack Auction @ 11am 20 Small Animal & Flower Auction

August 04 Horse & Tack Auction @ 6 PM 05 Small Animal Auction September 02 Small Animal Auction 23 Small Animal & Fall Harvest Auction 29 Horse & Tack Auction @ 6 PM

10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY 12083 800-237-4488

October 07 Small Animal Auction 12-21 Store Fall Sale November 04 Small Animal Auction December 02 Small Animal Auction

All Auctions Start at 10:30 AM Please Call If Inclement Weather Miscellaneous Merchandise taken every sale to be auctioned prior to animals

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Contact Joann, 585-738-7477 or e-mail JKLong@rochester.rr.com. On Internet at www.GentleDoveFarm.com HVRHA / ARHA Sanctioned Ranch Horse Show Win$um Ranch 1392 Rte. 32N, Schuylerville, NY. Classes offered: Barrels - Poles - Ranch Riding - Ranch Cutting - Ranch Boxing Ranch Reining - Ranch Trail - WCH - WRH Conformation - Divisions: All Age(open) Amateur - Youth - Novice - Walk Trot & Novice Youth. Day end awards. Contact Linda Delisle, 518-744-0601, e-mail dbdranch@localnet.com or hudsonvalleyranch@gmail.com. On Internet at www.hvrha.com JUN 2-3 Winning Weekends Show Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Open to all breeds of equines, with nine different divisions offered for all levels of riders. Contact Winning Weekends, 518-466-2445. On Internet at www.WinningWeekends.com JUN 3 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Hawthorn Farm, Gloversville, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am. Run at 11 am. Contact Robyn Valentine 518-725-5924, Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com JUN 7-10 NYSHC Spring Pleasure Ride Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd. New Berlin, NY. Four days of fun. Join the NYS Horse Council with scavenger hunts, dressage clinic, tack shop, pace, poker run and delicious dinners! Get your tickets now! Contact James Weidman, 607-847-9265, or e-mail jimbo58@peoplepc.com. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com

2012 BARREL RACE SCHEDULE Negative e Cogginss mustt be e shown n dayy off race.

March 11 Jackpot Barrel Race 25 Jackpot Barrel Race

September 15 Barrel Race $5000 added

April 07 Jackpot Barrel Race 22 Jackpot Barrel Race 28 Barrel Race $5000 added

October 20 Barrel Race $5000 added

All Races Start at 11:00 AM except $5000 Races Start at 9:00 AM

Page 5 • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stram Supplement • March 2012

Schaghticoke, NY. Contact Diane Crandall, 518-686-4815 or newsletter@rcdaa.com. Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. Determines which riders move

MAY 20 WNEPHA Affiliated Hunt Seat Show

Eastern NY Plantation Walking Horse Club Open Horse Show


JUN 9-10

JUN 23-24

JUL 28

AUG 10

Yoscoharo Riding Club Open Horse Show

Equine Valley Association AQHA/PHBA/NSBA Shows

Gentle Dove Farm’s Versatile Horse Obstacle Clinic: Mounted Police Style

Open Horse Show

Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Two judges - classes run once over the two days. One NSBA show. Starts at 8 am. Contact Sandi Emanuel, 518-294-2022, 518-2317807 or e-mail bemanuel3@nycap.rr.com.

Turk’s Southwind Stable 2179 Dean Rd, Lodi, NY. 12:30-5:30 pm. Riders will work with their mounts in creative sensory and obstacle situations, with the emphasis on versatility challenges. Spectators welcome. Discounts for pre-registration. Contact Joann, 585-738-7477 or e-mail JKLong@rochester.rr.com. On Internet at www.GentleDoveFarm.com

Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Contact Sandi Emanual, 518-231-7807. JUN 10 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Hurricane Hill Arena, Argyle, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am. Run at 11 am. Contact Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com JUN 15-17 NBHA Syracuse Super Show NYS Fairgrounds, Syracuse, NY. On Internet at www.nbha.com

Equine Valley Association AQHA Special Events Show Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Barrel Racing and Pole Bending Classes. Starts 1 pm or later. Contact Sandi Emanuel, 518294-2022, 518-231-7807 or e-mail bemanuel3@nycap.rr.com.

JUN 16-17

NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05

2012 ACTHA Trail Challenge

Painted Pony. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am, run at 11 am. Contact Shana Graham 518-696-2421, Laura Derrick 518-7460087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd., New Berlin, NY. Two days of separate ACTHA rides. Six obstacles each day with six different judges. Dinners each day. Bonfires at night. Awards. Contact Pure Country Campground, 607-847-9265. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com

Page 6 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stream Supplement • March 2012

JUN 24

JUN 30 Northwest Riding & Driving Youth Introduction to Extreme Cowboy

Shelburne Farms Draft Horse Field Day Shelburne Farms. 11 am - 2 pm. Come watch us while we show how we can use draft animals on today’s farms. Lunch will be served at the location. Contact Karen Myers, 802-316-1274 JUL 28-29 Cowboy Weekend Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd., New Berlin, NY. Saturday & Sunday events in and out of the arena. Barrels, obstacles, trail rides, breakfast, dinners. Camping, bonfires. Book now. Contact Pure Country Campground, 607-847-9265. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com

Equine Valley Association AQHA/PHBA/NSBA Shows

Contact Barbara Rousseau, 802-796-3440, e-mail rousseau@fairpoint.net.

Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Three judges - classes run once over the two days. One NSBA show. 8 am start time. Contact Sandi Emanuel, 518-294-2022, 518-2317807 or e-mail bemanuel3@nycap.rr.com.

JUL 1

NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05

EMRHA Cowboy Race

Cobleskill Fair, Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Entries open 11 am, close at 1 pm, run at 3 pm. Contact Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-4240972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

Montgomery County Equine Club Open Horse Show and Gymkhana Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Contact Chris St. Amour, 518-829-7366. JUN 17 Equine Valley Association AQHA Special Events Show Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Barrel Racing, Pole Bending & Trail classes. Starts 1 pm or later. Contact Sandi Emanuel, 518-294-2022, 518-231-7807 or e-mail bemanuel3@nycap.rr.com. New England Stock Horse Show Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. 5 individually judged classes for riders and their western horses: Ranch Handiness, Ranch Pleasure, Trail, Reining & Working Cow Horse. Day end and series end awards in Green, Youth, Non-Pro and Open Divisions. Series runs 3rd Sunday each month thru October. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com JUN 21 Equine Valley Association AQHA Special Events Show Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Trail and Western Pleasure Show. Starts at 9:30 am. Contact Sandi Emanuel, 518-294-2022, 518-231-7807 or e-mail bemanuel3@nycap.rr.com. JUNE 21 CNY Horse Club Meeting

Gelinas Farm, 471 4th Range Road Pembroke, NH. Open & Green Divisions, day end awards. Contact Jane Moulton, 518-6329227 or jmoulton@dishmail.net. On Internet at www.EMRHA.com JUL 1-13 & 15-27, JUL 29 - AUG 10 & AUG 12-24 Frost Valley Horse Camps Frost Valley YMCA, Claryville, NY. For all levels and skill of rider in the heart of the Catskill Mountains, just 2.5 hours from New York City. Contact Jenny Stover, 845-9852291 or e-mail horses@frostvalley.org. On Internet at www.frostvalley.org JUL 7-8 Pure Country Versatility Race Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd., New Berlin, NY. Six classes, all with payback, awards at end of year, enter them all! 10 acre obstacle course on site. Contact Pure Country Campground, 607-847-9265. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com The Ride Way Clinic: Cattle Working with Aaron Ralston 2012 & Jeff Veicht.

Carriage Rally Blue Slope Country Museum, Franklin, CT. Contact Ernie Staebner, 860-642-6413. On Internet at www.easternctdrafthorse.com

Silver Spur Riding Club Open Horse Show and Gymkhana Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Contact Deb Yacobucci, 518-673-5668. JUL 15

NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Adirondack Foothills. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am, run at 11 am. Contact Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

Draft Horse Show

New England Stock Horse Show Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. 5 individually judged classes for riders and their western horses: Ranch Handiness, Ranch Pleasure, Trail, Reining & Working Cow Horse. Day end and series end awards in Green, Youth, Non-Pro and Open Divisions. Series runs 3rd Sunday each month thru October. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com

AUG 11 Fair Horse & Pony Pulling Contest Essex County Fair, Westport, NY. 10 am Minis, 50-inch Ponies, Under 3200 lbs., Horse Free For All **Must pre-enter by August 1, no post entries accepted. Contact Scott Christian, 518-962-8650, e-mail countyfairfun@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.essexcountyfair.org AUG 11-12 Classic Country Horse Association Open Horse Show Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Contact Linda Voehringer, 518-227-4134. AUG 12 Gymkhana Show Essex County Fair, Westport, NY. 9 am Age divisions 9-13, 14-18, 19 & over. Contact Scott Christian, 518-962-8650, e-mail countyfairfun@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.essexcountyfair.org Oxen & Steer Pulling Contest Essex County Fair, Westport, NY. 10 am, Weigh ins between 8-10 am, 2400 lbs. & under, 2800 lbs. & under, 3200 lbs. & under, over 3200 lbs. **Must pre-enter by August 1, no post entries accepted. Contact Scott Christian, 518-962-8650, e-mail countyfairfun@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.essexcountyfair.org AUG 18 Gentle Dove Farm’s Versatile Horse Obstacle Clinic: Mounted Police Style

Sunshine Fair Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. ARHA classes as well as green rider classes. Day end awards. Contact Jane Moulton, 518-632-9227 or jmoulton@dishmail.net. On Internet at www.EMRHA.com

Old Broads Riding Club & held at Fisher Farm, 7269 Plainville Rd, Memphis, NY. 12:30-3:30 pm. Riders will work with their mounts in creative sensory and obstacle situations, with the emphasis on versatility challenges. Spectators welcome. Discounts for pre-registration!. Contact Joann, 585738-7477 or e-mail JKLong@rochester.rr.com. On Internet at www.GentleDoveFarm.com

Gentle Dove Farm’s On The Trail Obstacle Clinic: Mounted Police Style

Versatility Cowboy Races No. 3

EMRHA ARHA approved Ranch Horse Show

AUG 4-5

JUN 21-22

Sandy Hill Quarter Horses 232 Eldridge Lane, Fort Ann, NY. ARHA classes as well as green rider classes. Day end awards. Contact Jane Moulton, 518-632-9227 or jmoulton@dishmail.net. On Internet at www.EMRHA.com

AUG 4

JUL 14-15

Equine Valley Association AQHA/PHBA/NSBA Show

JUN 23

Contact Barbara Rousseau, 802-796-3440, e-mail rousseau@fairpoint.net.

County Line Stables, 985 State Highway 67, Amsterdam, NY. $500/rider for all day, both sessions. Contact Pasquale and Jean Marie Coppola, 518 842 2978, e-mail countylinestables@nycap.rr.com. On Internet at www.countylinestables-ny.com

North Stonington Fair, North Stonington, CT. Contact Nita Kincaid, 860-535-1416. On Internet at www.easternctdrafthorse.com

EMRHA ARHA approved Ranch Horse Show

Northwest Riding & Driving Extreme Cowboy Race

Emerald Hill Farm, 1707 Murray Rd, Victor, NY 14564. 10 am - 3:30 pm. A unique opportunity to learn obstacle strategies while enjoying a gorgeous trail ride on the rolling hills in Victor! Spectators welcome. Discounts for pre-registration. Contact Joann, 585-7387477 or e-mail JKLong@rochester.rr.com. On Internet at www.GentleDoveFarm.com

Homer Senior Center, 4 Water St., Homer, NY. 7:30 pm. Annual Chicken Barbecue. Bring a dish to pass and your own place setting. Contact Marge Talutis, 607-863 4261 or e-mail mtalutis@a-znet.com.

Cobleskill Fairgrounds, Cobleskill, NY. Starts at 4 pm on Thurs. and 8 am on Fri. Contact Sandi Emanuel, 518-294-2022, 518-2317807 or e-mail bemanuel3@nycap.rr.com.

JUL 29

Essex County Fair, Westport, NY. 8 am English, Western, Trail, Driving & Costume classes. Contact Scott Christian, 518-9628650, e-mail countyfairfun@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.essexcountyfair.org

AUG 18-19 Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd., New Berlin, NY. Contact Pure Country Campground, 607-847-9265. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com AUG 19 New England Stock Horse Show

Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd., New Berlin, NY. Two Separate days of events. Dinners, breakfast. Sign up for riding at actha.us. Contact Pure Country Campground, 607-847-9265. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com

Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. 5 individually judged classes for riders and their western horses: Ranch Handiness, Ranch Pleasure, Trail, Reining & Working Cow Horse. Day end and series end awards in Green, Youth, Non-Pro and Open Divisions. Series runs 3rd Sunday each month thru October. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com

NYS Eastern District Morgan Horse Society Open Horse Show

NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05

ACTHA Trail Challenge

Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Contact Jackie Ross, 607-432-8977. AUG 8 Beginner Horse Show Essex County Fair, Westport, NY. 2 pm Leadline, W/T, W/T/C Classes, Includes Gymkhana games. Contact Scott Christian, 518-962-8650, e-mail countyfairfun@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.essexcountyfair.org Open Pony, Light Horse & Draft Driving Show Essex County Fair, Westport, NY. 9 am Showmanship, Halter, Hitch & Draft Under Saddle Classes; Pony, Light Horse & Draft Driving Classes.. Contact Lacey Smith, 518572-1134, e-mail countyfairfun@yahoo.com. On Internet at www.essexcountyfair.org

AUG 22 Washington Co. Fair, Greenwich, NY. Entries open 2:15 pm, close at 3:30 pm, run at 5 pm. Contact Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com AUG 24-26 Leather & Lace Ladies Retreat Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd., New Berlin, NY. Don’t miss this special event, massages, special dinner, slushies, trail riding, only for woman. One ticket price. Contact Pure Country Campground, 607-8479265. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com


AUG 26

SEP 8

Northwest Riding & Driving Extreme Cowboy Race

EMRHA ARHA approved Ranch Horse Show Gelinas Farm, 471 4th Range Road Pembroke, NH. ARHA classes as well as green rider classes. Day end awards. Contact Jane Moulton, 518-632-9227 or jmoulton@dishmail.net. On Internet at www.EMRHA.com

Contact Barbara Rousseau, 802-796-3440, e-mail rousseau@fairpoint.net. Summer Wrap Up Auction Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. 10 am new and used tack, equipment and more. 1 pm Horses and ponies, featuring dozens back from their summer work at camps and lesson programs throughout New England. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-5271612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com

Northwest Riding & Driving Partner Game Day Contact Barbara Rousseau, 802-796-3440, e-mail rousseau@fairpoint.net. SEP 9 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05

AUG 30

Burnin Time Arena, Gansevoort, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am, run at 11 am. Contact Cindy Kennedy 518-793-3513, Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Fonda Fair, Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Entries open 2:15 pm, close at 4 pm, run at 5 pm. Contact Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-4240972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

SEP 15 $5000 Added Barrel Race

SEP 1 (TENTATIVE) Montgomery County Equine Club Gymkhana Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Contact Deb Yacobucci, 518-673-5668.

New England Stock Horse Show

Saratoga Horse & Tack Expo

Open Horse Show. Class list and entry blanks available at NYSSHA.ORG or call 518993-3525.

Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA . 5 individually judged classes for riders and their western horses: Ranch Handiness, Ranch Pleasure, Trail, Reining & Working Cow Horse. Day end and series end awards in Green, Youth, Non-Pro and Open Divisions. Series runs 3rd Sunday each month thru October. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com

Saratoga Race Course, Grandstand area, Union Avenue, Saratoga Springs, NY. 10 am - 6 pm Saturday and 10 am - 5 pm Sunday. New and used tack. Wide variety of equine related products. Demonstrations, presentations, silent auction and raffles. Be a vendor, donor or sell your used tack. Watch performances by Guy McLean, Master Horseman and Performer. Contact Dot Christiansen, 518-885-7817 or Dot@nyhorsepark.org or Mick Rodgers 518-338-8358 or Mick@saratogasaddlery. com On Internet at www.nyhorsepark.org

HVRHA Open Ranch Horse Show Adirondack Foothills Equine. Numerous ranch classes / Ranch Trail - $100 added Open Cutting(sponsored by Sand Castle Farm) Horsemanship - Command Boxing - Ranch Riding Ranch Reining - Ranch Cutting - Conformation - Day End Awards- Open - Amateur - Novice - Youth Divisions. Contact Linda Delisle, 518-744-0601, e-mail dbdranch@localnet.com or hudsonvalleyranch@gmail.c om. On Internet at www.hvrha.com SEP 16 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Ker-A-Mel Arena, Argyle, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am, run at 11 am. Contact Kerrie Mcwhorter 518-638-8015, Laura Derrick 518-746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-4240972. On Internet at www.nbha.com

Sacandaga Saddle Club Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Open Horse Show. Class list and entry blanks available at NYSSHA.ORG or call 518-848-4858. SEP 16-17 Sacandaga Saddle Club & Adirondack Miniature Horse Club Open Horse Shows & Gymkhana Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Contact Laura Hayner, 518-661-5871. SEP 22-23 NYSSHA Fall Round Up Open Horse Show Fonda Fairgrounds, Fonda, NY. Contact Laura Hayner, 518-661-5871.

Regional Horseman’s Day to provide important opportunity for vendors to reach the region’s equine community equine professionals, farm owners, stable managers, and University Educators from around the Northeast creating an ideal setting for individuals and businesses to showcase their services.” The Harness Racing Museum, in Goshen, NY, will be the site for this full day of presentations, resources and equi-business vendors for the equine professional and

“If you own a horse-related business or service, this conference aimed at the “equine professional is a don’t-miss opportunity,” commented Audrey Reith, Equine/Livestock Educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County, “Orange County’s equine industry ranks third in total number of horses in New York State. Regional Horseman’s Day, on March 16, will unite

discerning horse owner. “There are two ways for businesses to be a part of the Regional Horseman’s Day event,” said Reith, “Vendor Booths are available for $50, or you can increase your impact by becoming a Topic Sponsor for one of four topics - Nutrition, Youth/Education, Research and Farm Safety. Topic sponsorship is $200, and includes a complimentary Vendor

Booth, plus listings in our Sponsorship Banner and program.” Vendors and Sponsors also receive admittance to the Harness Racing Museum, continental breakfast and lunch. For questions or to register (credit cards accepted), contact Cathy at 845-344-1234 or cah94@cornell.edu — a brochure is available for download at www.cce.cornell.edu/orange

Versatility Cowboy Races No. 4 Finals Pure Country Campground, 176 Kelly Rd., New Berlin, NY. Contact Pure Country Campground, 607-8479265. On Internet at www.purecountrycampground.com SEP 23 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05 Hawthorn Farm, Gloversville, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am, run at 11 am. Contact Robyn Valentine 518-7255924, Laura Derrick 518746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com SEP 29 HVRHA / ARHA Sanctioned Ranch Horse Show Win$um Ranch 1392 Rte. 32N, Schuylerville, NY. Classes offered: Barrels Poles - Ranch Riding - Ranch Cutting - Ranch Boxing Ranch Reining - Ranch Trail - WCH - WRH - Conformation - Divisions: All Age (open) - Amateur - Youth Novice - Walk Trot & Novice Youth. Day end awards. Contact Linda Delisle, 518744-0601, e-mail dbdranch@localnet.com or hudsonvalleyranch@gmail.c om. On Internet at www.hvrha.com SEP 30 NBHA Districts NY 02 & NY 05

A COMPLETE LINE

FARRIER SUPPLIES IN-STOCK. OVER 200 NEW & USED ANVILS, FORGES, POST VISES AVAILABLE / BOUGHT, SOLD, TRADED DAILY

OF

• Kerckhaert • Bellota • BloomForge • Capewell • Vector • St. Croix Forge • Delta • Mustad • GE Forge & Tool ~Light Horse & Draft

Pleasure, Trail, Ranch, Roping and Barrel Racing SADDLES BY...

Circle Y • Dale Chevez • Reinsman • Dakota Big Horn • Simco • Billy Cook • Long Horn Tex Tan • Colorado • Cactus Saddlery • McCall

Horse Collars, Harness & Equipment ~ 4’6’ Stall Mats ~ Horse Tack & Supplies ~ Farmco Feeders ~ Round Pens

Circle Y Treeless Saddles Now Here!

WANTED... Winter Blankets

Many Sizes Still Available

Used Western Saddles $$ Top Prices Paid $$

Hurricane Hill Arena, Argyle, NY. Entries open 9 am, close at 10:15 am, run at 11 am. Contact Laura Derrick 518746-0087 or Samantha Eyster 518-424-0972. On Internet at www.nbha.com Northwest Riding & Driving Rain Date Contact Barbara Rousseau, 802-796-3440, e-mail rousseau@fairpoint.net. OCT 6 Northwest Riding & Driving Extreme Cowboy Race Contact Barbara Rousseau, 802-796-3440, e-mail rousseau@fairpoint.net. OCT 14

Check Out Our Gift Shop for That Unique Gift and Our Yankee Candles!

Toll Free 1-866-966-5549 • 518-966-5549

Fall Round Up Auction

We Welcome Trades!

Butch h Colbert gchs@nyair.net Route 32, PO Box 176, Greenville, NY 12083 (Opposite the Greenville Drive-In)

Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. 10 am new and used tack, 2 pm horses and ponies from

out west and local consignors, including some from late season camp and trail ride leases. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413-527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com Rensselaer County Draft Animal Association Wagon Ride Schaghticoke, NY. 11 am. Contact Diane Crandall, 518-686-4815 or newsletter@rcdaa.com. OCT 20 $5000 Added Barrel Race JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. Warm ups at 7 am, race at 9 am. Contact JP’s North, 800237-4488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com. OCT 21 : Final show in series New England Stock Horse Show Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. 5 individually judged classes for riders and their western horses: Ranch Handiness, Ranch Pleasure, Trail, Reining & Working Cow Horse. Day end and series end awards in Green, Youth, Non-Pro and Open Divisions. Series runs 3rd Sunday each month thru October. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com NOV 2-3 VTFA & AFA Tri Chapter Annual Contest & Clinic Ira Brook Farm, Ira VT. Contact Vikki Fortier, 860-5587397 or e-mail vikmart24@ aol.com. NOV 3 Fun Day Blue Slope Country Museum. Contact Terry Joseph, 860-376-8110. On Internet at www.easternctdrafthorse.com Rensselaer County Draft Animal Association Plow Day Halfmoon, NY. 11 am. Contact Diane Crandall, 518686-4815 or newsletter@rcdaa.com. NOV 25 WNEPHA affiliated hunt seat show Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. Classes from lead line to 3’ equitation medals. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com DEC 2 Pre-Holiday Auction Heritage Farm, Inc. 30 Florence Rd, Easthampton MA. 10 am new and used tack and many unique gift ideas for the horse person on your shopping list, 2 pm horses and ponies from out west and local consignors, including some from late season lesson programs. Contact Heritage Farm, Inc., 413527-1612. On Internet at www.farmheritage.com

Page 7 • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stram Supplement • March 2012

JP’s North, Inc., 10251 Rt. 32, Greenville, NY. Warm ups at 7 am, race at 9 am. Contact JP’s North, 800237-4488 or e-mail jpsnorth@hotmail.com.

Adirondack Miniature Horse Club


Page 8 - Section B • COUNTRY FOLKS Mane Stream Supplement • March 2012

Mane Stream 3.12  

Mane Stream March 2012

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