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18 June 2012 Section e off Two One Volume e 31 Number r 24

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

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Giant Sundae in Harrisburg Commemorates 75th June Dairy Month Page A3

Working with the land to produce dairy products for a niche market ~ Page A2

Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly A14

FEATURES Auctions Classifieds DHIA & Dairy June is Dairy Month Markets

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The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands. ~ Psalm 19:1


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 2

Working with the land to produce niche market dairy products by Sally Colby Lamar Wadel had been operating the Franklin County, Pennsylvania dairy he was raised on for about the past 10 years, always pushing his cows and striving for higher production. When a friend suggested that grazing might be a viable option for his dairy herd, Wadel decided to give it a try. The first year, he planted six acres of rye for his 45 cows. Although the herd was still receiving grain, Wadel says the cows weren’t interested in it once they were on grass. Wadel eventually added more grazing species including orchardgrass, alfalfa, brome, perennial ryegrass, timothy and clover; and sorghum or sorghum sudangrass in summer. While on pasture, cows are offered a selection of free choice minerals including salt, kelp, selenium, iodine, copper and potassium. “The cows will come up and lick whatever they need,” said Wadel. “In winter, I feed a 2:1 mineral mix with the haylage.” As he was establishing a grass-based herd, Wadel also concentrated on soil fertility and experimented successfully with remedies that organic producers use for treating sick cows and calves. “I’ve found that I have healthier cattle than I have ever had,” said Wadel. “I also pay more attention to the soil. I’ve been doing foliar feeding and paying more attention to soil health - I can see it reflected in improved cow health.” Since Pennsylvania is a state that allows raw milk sales directly from the farm, Wadel applied for and passed

the state inspection for raw milk sales about four years ago and starting selling raw milk directly from the farm and in several stores. Wadel has a small bottling plant on the farm for raw milk sold off the farm, although milk for on-farm sales can come directly from the tank. He has also been making and selling raw milk cheese for the past four months, which requires a separate permit. Cheese making begins with fresh raw milk from the morning milking. “As we’re milking, we take it over to the cheese vat in 100 gallon batches,” said Wadel. “It has to be at 88 degrees, and that’s about what it is by the time it’s there. Then I add the culture, let it sit for 45 minutes, then add rennet and let it sit for another 45 minutes.” Next, the mixture is stirred and heated slowly to the temperature required for the cheese he’s making. He drains the whey, and curds go to the bottom to become cheese. After aging for 60 days, the cheese is ready to sell. Wadel has been making three varieties of cheddar: plain, smoked and chipped beef. Wadel sells the cheese both directly from the farm, at retail stores and through someone who markets it at a farmers’ market. Wadel has an informative brochure for customers, and says that a lot of sales of both raw milk and cheese are by word of mouth. Since Wadel already has a grass-fed herd and customers who appreciate a source of inspected raw milk, he started the process of becoming certified organic. “It takes three

A simple right-angle motor runs the pulsators in Wadel's swing 18 parlor.

years to become organic,” said Wadel. “The fields are certified organic now, and the cows will be certified in January.” Once certified, Wadel will sell to Horizon, and will also continue raw milk and raw milk cheese sales on the farm. The state inspects Wadel’s raw milk operation as well as his cheese plant. “They come every two weeks,” he said, adding that the inspector comes unannounced. “Since I’m already doing raw milk, I surpass the cheese standard.” They take samples from the tank, and do a water test twice a year.” The state requires regular TB and brucellosis testing, and keeps a close watch on somatic cell count.

Despite the rain, a group dedicated to grazing their herds visited the Lamar Wadel dairy farm in Shippensburg, PA, to learn how this dairyman is grazing cows, producing raw milk and cheese, and transitioning to organic production. Photos by Sally Colby

Cows are milked twice a day in a swing 18 parlor that Wadel purchased and moved to his farm in September 2011. He excavated a section of his old barn for a pit, reinforced the old barn ceiling with new I-beams and sold some of the parts he didn’t need. In the parlor, a right angle motor runs a shaft that moves the pulsators. Wadel says it takes two people about 45 minutes to milk the 60 cows twice a day. Prior to adding the new parlor, Wadel had been milking 120 cows. He sold 80 cows; partly to help finance the milking parlor, and also so he wouldn’t have to purchase organic hay to feed during the transition period. “I opted to sell cows and make a little less milk this year,” said Wadel, “but I didn’t have to buy feed.” Although cow numbers are

down now, Wadel expects to be back up to between 80 to 100 cows within a few years. The cow herd is bred A.I. which Wadel does himself, and a Jersey bull runs with heifers. Wadel collects blood samples for pregnancy testing through BioPRYN®, which can verify pregnancy at 28 days. NRCS is helping Wadel plan and construct a manure handling system that will incorporate poultry litter from a turkey poult house and a turkey finishing house along with cow manure. After blending, the manure will be composted on a stacking pad. Wadel says that his raw milk customers are drawn to the product because the cows are on grass. “They know that I’m raising them all-natural and 100 percent grass,” he said. “That’s what they want as much as they want organic.”

Raw milk and raw milk cheese are sold on the farm through the honor system. These products are also sold at several area retail locations.


Pennsylvania’s dairy promotion organizations celebrated June Dairy Month with the creation of a colossal ice cream sundae on the steps of the Capitol Building in Harrisburg at noon on June 6. The annual salute to dairy farmers is sponsored by MidAtlantic Dairy Association and Pennsylvania Dairy Promotion Program on behalf of commonwealth dairy farmers, who work together to promote milk

and dairy products. Dairy is the largest segment of Pennsylvania’s agriculture industry, generating more than $7 billion in economic activity annually. Each year, Pennsylvania’s 538,000 dairy cows produce 10.7 billion pounds, or 5.6 percent, of the nation’s total supply of milk annually.(Information provided by USDA-NASS, Pennsylvania Field Office) “Is there anything better

Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture, George Greig, PA State Dairy Princess Gabrielle Murphy and Berks County dairy farmer Lolly Lesher celebrate June Dairy Month by topping the 2012 ice cream sundae with a giant cherry. Photos courtesy of Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association

than simple, wholesome milk? It’s a food that I feel good giving to my children, and I’m proud to provide it for your family, too,” said Lolly Lesher, a Berks County dairy farmer who spoke on behalf of the state’s dairy farmers. “The milk at your local grocery store is simply produced and delivered to you fresh, packed with nutrients vital to good health.” Joining Lesher with opening remarks, Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture George Greig read Governor Corbett’s proclamation declaring June is Dairy Month in the Commonwealth. Pennsylvania Dairy Princess Gabrielle Murphy and other dairy princesses from across the state helped with the day’s festivities. Following the opening remarks, volunteers created the giant sundae using 90 gallons of Turkey Hill vanilla ice cream. The mountain of ice cream was covered with 10 gallons of chocolate fudge, 10 gallons of cherries and 30 pounds of chopped pecans. The sundae was topped off with real whipped cream and a giant, 12-inch ball of cherries. “June’s 30 days are a wonderful opportunity to salute the 7,400 Pennsylvania families who produce 5.6 percent

Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association Board of Directors chair and Franklin county dairy farmer, Vernon Horst; PA State Dairy Princess, Gabrielle Murphy and Berks county dairy farmer, Lolly Lesher enjoy ice cream from the giant ice cream sundae built today on the Capitol Steps in Harrisburg in celebration of June Dairy Month.

of the nation’s total milk supply,” said Patty Purcell, CEO of Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association. “Dairy farmers take great pride in caring for their animals. The public can be assured that dairy farmers are dedicated and committed to providing your family with a delicious and nutritious food. Your milk comes from a good place!” Mid-Atlantic Dairy

Association and Pennsylvania Dairy Promotion Program are the local planning and management organizations funded by dairy farmer checkoff dollars. They work closely with Dairy Management Inc.™ and are responsible for increasing demand for U.S.-produced dairy products on behalf of Pennsylvania’s dairy farmers. For more information, visit www.dairyspot.com.

Oppose cuts to farm safety programs Editor’s Note: The following is a guest column by the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health. ——— by Dr. John May Recently the farm community expressed strong concern regarding proposed Department of Labor regulations regarding youth participation in a variety of types of farm work. This was predictable — few things raise the hackles of a farmer like governmental regulation. Yet farming remains an excessively dangerous business. By consulting closely with members of the farm community, by offering a variety of programs that provide safety services to farmers and by tracking their impact, the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) has pursued a non-regulatory safety approach on New York farms. Much of this has been possible because of support from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Currently NIOSH’s program in Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing is threatened with closure. The 136.9 million Americans working in safer occupations than farming are deemed to be a more “significant group”. Why should the farm community care? Farmers have on-the-job death rates that are over seven times higher than

the average American. Farmers’ death rates are twice as high as those for mining. The proposed budget cuts would obliterate the single most important national effort to improve this situation. In New York, the NIOSH cut translates into crippling of the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health. For nearly 25 y e a r s , NYCAMH has Dr. John May been working with New York farmers to address worksite hazards, prevent costly injuries, reduce workers compensation costs and decrease the number of farmers killed on the job — in 70 percent of cases such deaths result in loss of the farm over the next year. One of NYCAMH’s best known programs is the ROPS rebate program. In the past three years, tractors accounted for over 40 percent of New York farm fatalities. By assisting farmers in arranging for and paying for installation of rollbars on their tractors, NYCAMH has provided highly effective protection for over 1,000 tractors in

recent years. These protected tractors have since been involved in over 80 serious incidents, some of which would certainly have been fatal. According to insurance data, one such fatality would cost insurers at least $750,000. Thus this program has already paid for itself many times over by reducing costs to insurers and limiting premiums to the New York farm community. In New York orchards and “black dirt” regions, NYCAMH staff is working with farmers to develop new tools and new ways of working that reduce muscle strains and sprains to workers. Whether it is bags of onions in a packing house or buckets of apples being placed in bins, awkward positions plus heavy weights add up to musculoskeletal injury. These in turn result in workforce reductions and risk of medical and workers compensation costs. By partnering with farmers and workers to develop new ways to do these jobs, NYCAMH is heightening efficiency and reducing costs for New York agricultural producers. Trainings on New York farms (provided at no charge) by NYCAMH safety educators have enabled hundreds of New York producers to pass food safety audits and to comply with OSHA safety standards for forklift and tractor operation, chemical handling, hazard

communication, field sanitation, etc. Few would argue the economic benefit of avoiding OSHA fines. One farmer recently learned of a $6 device developed by NYCAMH for field sanitation stations that would have saved him a $3,000 fine. The NIOSH funding in the federal budget provides important (and nonregulatory) health and safety education, resources and research for our farmers. This has been a most important tool in New York to decrease farm fatalities and injuries. Right now is a key time to oppose cuts within the Centers for Disease Control budget that would eliminate the NIOSH Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing program in the final Fiscal Year 2013 federal budget. Please go to www.nycamh.com/news/ for contact information for your congressional representatives or call us at 800- 3437527 for assistance in locating your congressman. Tell them to assure appropriation of level funding for CDC/NIOSH Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing. Phone calls from farmers do count in Washington! Thank you for taking the time to consider this serious matter. Dr. John May is director of the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health

Page 3 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Giant Sundae in Harrisburg Commemorates 75th June Dairy Month


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 4

Quality minerals, proper vaccines important to herd success by Jennifer Showalter FAIRFIELD, VA — For the most part, cattle are fairly hardy creatures. With today’s beef cows being pushed and bred to be more and more productive, producers must realize their input needs have changed and are higher than before. A quality mineral plan and vaccine program are a must in productive herds. There are still some producers who feel like the added costs of keeping proper minerals in front of cattle and the costs of vaccinating cattle is too much for their pocket book to handle. Not realizing the benefits they receive in return for keeping up with their mineral and vaccination programs, these farmers unfortunately are not doing their cattle any favors and in return are giving up production. To stress the importance of following a proper mineral and vaccine schedule in cow herds and to showcase different products that are on the market, Augusta Cooperative Farm Bureau along with Novartis Animal Health teamed up and hosted a dinner meeting for 65 Rockbridge and Augusta County beef producers.

Novartis Animal Health and Augusta Cooperative Farm Bureau treated a group of 65 beef cattle producers from Rockbridge and Augusta Counties to dinner and an educational seminar on the importance of minerals and vaccines to success with their beef cow herds. Minerals Lynwood Ondrusek, with Tennessee Farmers Cooperative, spent some time explaining the importance of developing a year round mineral feeding strat-

Cover photo by Sally Colby Lamar Wadel explains how he established pastures for grazing at a recent pasture walk at his farm in Shippensburg, PA. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

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egy. Cows are profit centers that must have the proper inputs to be efficient. “You get out what you put in,” said Ondrusek. Ondrusek made sure the audience clearly understood that trace mineral salt is not equivalent to a free choice mineral supplement. Typically trace mineral salt mixes consist of only 2 percent trace minerals with the other 98 percent being salt. These mixes also normally lack calcium, phosphorus, vitamins, selenium, and magnesium. He warned the audience that if they are guilty of only feeding trace minerals and want to switch to providing free choice minerals to their cows, to expect the cows to suck down the free choice mineral at first until they build up their nutritional levels. With liver, lung, brain, and kidney development starting at day 25 of gestation, it is obvious that proper nutrition is important throughout the entire pregnancy. Heifers born from mineral supplemented cows have higher weaning weights, higher breeding weights, higher conception rates, and increased longevity compared to calves born to cows who were deprived of free choice minerals. Steer calves from supplemented cows tend to have higher average daily gains and more muscle fibers than those steers from cows that did not receive free choice minerals. Ondrusek explained that at least 17 minerals are required by beef cattle, and of the 17, 10 are trace minerals. Deficiency of different minerals results in a variety of side effects. Grass tetany is a magnesium deficiency that often pops up when cool soil is followed by fast growth. The problem is even more of an issue in soils that are high in potassium. The potassium binds to the magnesium and makes it unavailable to the cows. Ondrusek pointed out that grass tetany most often occurs in mature, lactating cows in the spring versus the fall. Grass tetany is a serious and possibly fatal metabolic disorder. Ondrusek warned the group that feeding a mineral mix high in magnesium right before calving is not going to do the trick. “It takes about 30 days for cows to get enough

magnesium to raise their blood levels.” Quality mineral supplementation is an additional expense for producers, but Ondrusek pointed out that in return producers can expect improved forage digestion and microbial health, improved body maintenance and growth, higher reproductive rates, healthier fetal development, improved milk production, better immune response and overall health, and better synthesis of B-Complex vitamins. “Minerals are part of the equation! Don’t let minerals be your ‘rate limiting factor’. If any are deficient, overall production can be reduced,” said Ondrusek. Vaccines Dr. Michael Moore, Senior Professional Services Veterinarian with Novartis Animal Health, shared a number of reasons and ways to keep cattle healthy. “If we can produce a healthy calf and keep it healthy, it will produce a more productive cow when it enters the cow herd or a better carcass at slaughter,” said Moore. According to Moore, producing a healthy calf starts before the cow is bred. She must be in the proper condition and properly immunized to produce a healthy calf. The baby calf is born with no protection from the dam. The protection must come from the colostrum the calf receives shortly after birth. Calves with inadequate passive immunity are 5.4 times more likely to die prior to weaning, 6.4 times more likely of being sick during the first 28 days of life, and 3.2 times more likely of being sick any time prior to weaning than calves who received the needed colostrum. Those calves that receive adequate passive immunity typically weigh about 30 pounds more at weaning than calves that don’t get the colostrum they need. Ninety-five percent of these calves will not get sick, and 94 percent of them will grade select or higher at harvest. In order to build colostrum, the momma cow must develop the immunity in her body and then pass it on to her calf after birth. The cow must be able to produce the antibodies for the diseases that cause problems. “If we can develop good antibody titers in the female, we have a very good chance of developing high IgG levels in the colostrum,” said Moore. Quality colostrum is the most vital factor for controlling diseases in baby calves. The maternal antibodies in the colostrum protect the calf until its’ immune system has a chance to develop. Moore explained that within 24 hours of birth, the bowel can no longer absorb colostrum and that calves really need the colostrum within the first six to eight hours of life. Moore went over a number of scour and respiratory vaccines on the market for cows that are beneficial in improving colostrum quality. He stressed that these vaccines must be administered to cows at the proper time. For additional information on ordering minerals and vaccines call Augusta Cooperative Farm Bureau at 540-3776798 or 540-348-1159 or visit www.augustacoop.com.


Newsletter of Penn Dutch Cow Care by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, How many of us really register what we are looking at? In terms of cattle, what do you first notice? What do you see, hear, feel and smell? Do you use all your senses? Are you simply going through the motions and set in your routine that everything always seems fine just the way it is? I spent an actionpacked week in Holland in late May as part of a

training course called Cow Signals, which is organized by a group of very practical Dutch dairy veterinarians. Their main focus is to create management systems which yield the healthiest possible cows, since healthy, happy cows produce the best milk — whether a pasture-based system, a free-stall system, a bedded pack system, or a tie-stall system. In any housing system,

the six freedoms of pasture should be the standard to achieve when cows are inside. The six freedoms of pasture are feed, water, light, air, rest, and space. These factors create (or hinder) true health. To put this into action, we first need to be aware of how cows behave in a pasture system — their natural motions when grazing and how they position themselves when lying down to rest or as

they get up, as well as the space, water, air and light to let cows do the things cows do when out on pasture. For instance, watch a cow rest while on pasture — often times they will have a front leg stretched in front of them. When they graze, they also eat with one foot forward. Can they do these things in the barn? These same sorts of abilities need to be provided with indoor stalls and at feed areas. Allowing good

traction on walkways to allow her body to turn (instead of shuffle in short straight movements), allowing normal intake of water at drinking facilities, and having good air to allow deep breathing and proper lighting to see things should closely mimic life on pasture. This is because pasture is the most natural situation for a cow — and the Cow Signals team fully realizes this. I must say I haven’t previously heard people relate the need so clearly for indoor facilities to reflect the freedoms of pasture life — a refreshing perspective. With proper pasture and barns the best possible

milk production can occur because the cows are at their healthiest. I initially became interested in this veterinary team by reading a book called “Cow Signals: The practical guide for dairy cow management” by Dr. Jan Hulsen, available through Hoard’s Dairyman. The book and course (taught by Dr. Joep Driessen) are based on some simple questions: What do I see? How does this happen? What does this mean? Then, real solutions can be planned and action can be taken. The course allowed me to see many details of cows which I haven’t looked for while treating individual sick animals with specialized organic medicines. For instance, seeing a bump on the front of both the shoulder blades, or a bump on the last rib or backbone, or a sore at the top of the neck, or missing fur at the hock, or a lack of fur along the rear leg muscle — what might this mean? Whatever we can see and take note of can help us start to think about what the cause might be. This will identify risk areas which will need improvement for the

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Page 5 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

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June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 6

Moo from A5 at their healthiest. I initially became interested in this veterinary team by reading a book called “Cow Signals: The practical guide for dairy cow management” by Dr. Jan Hulsen, available through Hoard’s Dairyman. The book and course (taught by Dr. Joep Driessen) are based on some simple questions: What do I see? How does this happen? What does this mean? Then, real solutions can be planned and action can be taken. The course allowed me to see many details of cows which I haven’t looked for while treating individual sick animals with specialized organic medicines. For instance, seeing a bump on the front of both the shoulder blades, or a bump on the last rib or backbone, or a sore at the top of the neck, or missing fur at the hock, or a lack of fur along the rear leg muscle — what might this

mean? Whatever we can see and take note of can help us start to think about what the cause might be. This will identify risk areas which will need improvement for the herd to perform better. In the examples given above, the problem (and solution) has to do with size of stalls and/or amount of dry bedding. Once we become attuned to why something is happening, we can take action. The goal is that your cows will pay you back with more milk in the tank, show better signs of fertility, have stress free calving and much better starts to lactation. Here is a real issue. When cows rise after lying down on pasture, they stretch, arch their back, drop manure, and then walk on. In all indoor systems, if the stalls are designed correctly, they should have the freedom to do the same.

Electric trainers completely stop the natural motions of cows rising freely from a resting position. In free stall systems there are no trainers and in bedded pack systems there are also no trainers. And I have seen many tiestall barns in various regions having no trainers either. I think part of the reason trainers are needed is due to pit manure systems and the mattresses that were created to accommodate such set ups — so that little to no bedding is used and therefore the cows must always be made to urinate and drop manure into the gutter itself. In free-stall systems and non-trainer systems, farmers regularly pull

back wet bedding as needed. I certainly understand why trainers are needed, but then they should be used only as training devices and not turned on all the time. If they are off and the cow just feels the metal ridges it will make them move back (and save on electricity cost also). I’ve never understood why trainers are turned on during milking time — I am near certain that having them on during milking time reduces milk production due to the added stress of electro-magnetic fields. As many of you know, when beginning to work on a cow my first question always is “are the trainers off?” Why? One time when checking a sick

cow, I must have been touching against a metal pole while using my stethoscope on the cow. At some point, I guess my head must have touched the trainer, for next thing I know I instantly dropped to the ground after feeling a gunshot-like jolt to my head. I don’t like to be shocked like that, plain and simple. Same for cows, I’d bet. Do animals always need to have something like that hovering inches above them? Keeping in mind the freedom of movement on pasture and that freestalls and bedded packs don’t ever use trainers (nor do any tie-stall farms in Quebec), use them as little as possible. What would milk customers

think of such things? There have been calls to eliminate tie-stalls in U.S. certified organic production (it’s already been done in Europe). Personally I will defend tie-stalls until the day I die, since personalized care and attention to cows can be maximized. I believe eliminating trainers from tie-stall systems will help fend off further calls to eliminate tiestalls since every cow will still need a place to rest and lie down anyway. Keep in mind that the more freedom there is to lie down normally, stand up normally and stretch normally — like out on pasture — the better a cow’s milk production will be.

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ation of State Veterinary Boards – RACE Program* (RACE). Additionally, all seminars will be available for viewing after they are presented at www.worlddairyexpo.com. Seminars will be showcased each day, Tuesday through Saturday, in the Mendota 2 meeting room, in the Exhibition Hall. A&L Labs, Arm & Hammer, Badgerland Financial, Neogen Corporation, Zurex PharmAgra are sponsors of this year’s seminars. Following is a brief synopsis of each Expo Seminar. Tuesday, Oct. 2, 1 p.m. “Building a Strong Management Team” Dr. Bernard Erven, Professor Emeritus, The Ohio State University Sponsored by: Zurex PharmAgra Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1) Dr. Bernard Erven will outline the three critical steps in forming an effective management team. Dairies have to identify what a management’s team role will be, who will make best candidates including family and non-family team members and, finally, provide the right training and leadership to accomplish goals. The seminar will conclude with take home tips that any manager can use almost immediately on any size operation. Wednesday, Oct. 3, 11 a.m. “Avoiding Drug Residues in the Dairy Industry” Dr. Geof Smith, Associate Professor, North Carolina State University – College of Veterinary Medicine Sponsored by: Neogen Corporation

Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1) The use of pharmaceuticals is an important part of animal health. Proper administration and usage of drugs is important for everyone on the dairy. Record keeping and utilizing protocols are a vital part of avoiding the consequences that can ensue with drug residue. Dr. Geof Smith will discuss these critical points and give an overview of how drug residue testing in milk and meat is implemented in the U.S. Wednesday, Oct. 3, 1 p.m. “Building U.S. Agricultural Exports: One BRIC at a Time” Jason Henderson, Vice President and Omaha Branch Executive, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City – Omaha Branch Sponsored by: Badgerland Finacial Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1) Brazil, Russia, India and China, also known as BRIC, have huge buying power, accounting for more than 40 percent of the world’s consumers. As economic conditions improve in these countries, a growing middle class has emerged. Jason Henderson will discuss this growing market and how it will affect agricultural exports and global food production. Thursday, Oct. 4, 11 a.m. “Planning for Change: Transitioning the Family Farm” Elizabeth Rumley, J.D, LL. M, Staff Attorney, The National Agricultural Law Center

Thank You Dairymen For Your Support & Business. Best Wishes For Your Success!

Expo A8

Page 7 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Expo seminars showcase latest research


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 8

Expo from A7 Sponsored by: EW Nutrition Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1) You’ve decided to sell the farm to the next generation, and now what? Family farm transition is a process that takes time and open communication. Assets, management and decision making must all be transferred in order to make the transfer a successful one. Elizabeth Rumley will discuss how to make the transition while keeping the farm financially viable for all parties involved. She will also outline ideas on creating a structured plan for making a smoother transition to the next generation. Thursday, Oct. 4, 1 p.m. “How to Many Replacement Heifers Does Your Dairy Need” Dr. John Currin, Clinical Associate Professor, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine Sponsored by: Nutrition Physiology Co. LLC

Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1) In the past, producers have struggled to have enough quality replacements. With the advent of sexed semen and having better reproductive management, the number of replacement heifers has been on the rise in recent years. Feed costs have also been on the rise and the price of bred heifers is on the decline. Dr. John Currin will discuss how to manage your replacement herd in terms of size and quality. Friday, Oct. 5, 11 a.m. “Making Sense of the Global Dairy Markets” Alan Levitt, Vice President of Communications, U.S. Dairy Export Council Sponsored by: Zurex PharmAgra Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1) As global markets become more integrated, the need to understand the supply and demand of dairy products becomes more critical. Alan Levitt

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will be discussing just how large the global marketplace is and where the market is headed. He will outline the current U.S. export situation, key markets and what factors are driving the global price. Friday, Oct. 5, 1 p.m. “The Effect of Risk on Dairy Farm Management” Dr. Christopher Wolf, Professor, Michigan State University Sponsored by: Arm & Hammer Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1),

RACE (1) Dairy farming involves more financial risk than ever. Market volatility and variability in crop yields have led to fluctuating milk and feed prices. Dr. Christopher Wolf will examine the risk that different sized dairies face, how risk has changed over time and what the management implications are for dairy farmers. He will also discuss the large range of risk management tools and strategies that are available.

Saturday, Oct. 6, 11 a.m. “Should You Treat Them or Should You Eat Them? How to Improve Your Mastitis Treatments and Maintain Healthy Cows” Pamela Ruegg, DVM, MPVM, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison Sponsored by: A&L Labs Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1) Mastitis remains the most frequent and costly disease of dairy cows and

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is one of the top reasons for culling. Dr. Pamela Ruegg will discuss the changing presence of mastitis pathogens on modern dairy farms and will demonstrate how and when antibiotic treatments should be used. Differences in the types of pathogens, differences in cow characteristics and a better understanding of how bacteria behave in the udder will be covered using practical case studies.

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COLUMBUS, Ohio — Increasing the reproductive efficiency of dairy cattle — getting the highest possible number of cows pregnant in the same period of time — has always been a challenge for this industry. Ohio State University specialists are working to reverse this trend through the development of new reproduction techniques and training that emphasizes proper management. Currently, the national pregnancy rate for dairy cows is only 16 percent, while the benchmark rate set by industry experts is 10 points higher, said Gustavo Schuenemann, Ohio State University Extension’s state dairy veterinarian. Ohio’s rate is about the national average, he pointed out, so there’s room for improvement. Lower pregnancy rates are an issue for the dairy industry because they translate into reduced

herd growth and potential loss of profits, said Mike Day, an animal scientist with the university’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). “Dairy cows work hard every day,” he said. “That makes it more difficult for farmers to increase reproduction rates.” One way dairy farms can boost their reproduction efforts is the use of artificial insemination (A.I.) and estrus (heat) synchronization techniques. Working with industry partners, Day and his research team have pioneered a new fixedtime A.I. protocol — known as “5-day COSynch + CIDR” — that better synchronizes a cow’s estrus cycle so that A.I. can be administered when cows are more fertile. A recommended practice within the beef cattle

industry nationwide, this protocol has been successfully tested on beef cows, resulting in 60 to 70 percent of animals getting pregnant within one day — a 17.5-percent increase compared to industry standards. Day and colleagues calculated that if 5-day CO-Synch + CIDR were implemented with just 10 percent of Ohio’s roughly 500,000 beef and dairy cows, the total economic benefit would easily surpass $5 million in savings and increased production. This protocol is now being studied in dairy heifers and cows by researchers at various locations across the country, Day said. The hope is that this approach will increase fertility in dairy cattle compared to current protocols, giving farmers another tool to inch closer to their reproductive goals.

While technology is an important factor in boosting reproductive efficiency of dairy cattle, it’s not the solution by itself, according to OSU Extension’s Schuenemann. “There’s no magic bullet,” said Schuenemann, who develops and coordinates research-based, practical training workshops for dairy producers, personnel and veterinarians throughout Ohio. “There are many tools out there — from synchronization protocols to heat detection to measuring cow activity — but regardless of the tool a farmer may use, proactive management practices at the farm level matter when it comes to reproduction.” One of the things Schuenemann emphasizes in his training programs is proper management during the transi-

tion period, which is three to four weeks prior to calving and approximately one month post-calving. This, he said, is “key to reproductive success.” Some of the issues that dairy farmers need to address during this crucial period include avoiding overstocking of animals and commingling (mixing together) of mature cows with heifers; making sure cows get balanced food rations; and having a reliable and well-trained group of workers who can properly handle calving and identify and assist cows that experience difficult births as well as sick cows after calving. Proactive nmanagement also involves choosing the right tool or set of tools to maximize reproductive success. “The choice of reproduction protocol needs to match the particular conditions of each farm, its resources, its objectives and the skill of its workers,” Schuenemann explained. “All dairy farmers are unique, even if

they are only a mile apart from each other. So it’s very important to assess human resources on the farm. Some may adopt techniques that are more time-sensitive and cost more in synchronization hormones, but which have the potential for higher pregnancy rates. Others may do better with heat detection and trying to take advantage of normal estrus. “You don’t want a farmer to fail because he picked a technique that doesn’t work for his conditions. Every farm is an integrated system; decisions made on one area of the farm will have an impact on other areas of the farm.” Ohio State resources for dairy farmers are available at http://dairy. osu.edu and http://vet. osu.edu/extension/dairy -resources. OARDC and OSU Extension are the research and outreach arms, respectively, of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.

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Page 9 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Boosting dairy cattle fertility: new technologies, outreach go hand in hand


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 10

Farmers are reminded to sign up for the 2012 Census of Agriculture Sign-up period for the census ends July 1 The U.S. Department of Agriculture is preparing to mail the 2012 Census of Agriculture to millions of U.S. farmers and ranchers in late December. Producers are reminded not to miss their opportunity to be counted by signing up for the Census before July 1. The Census of Agriculture is a complete count of U.S. farms and ranches and the people who operate them. A farm is defined as any place that produced and sold, or normally would have sold, $1,000 or more of agricultural products during the Census year (2012). “The Census is the leading source of facts about American agriculture,” said Renee Picanso, Census and Survey Division Director at USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. “The wealth of data available from the Census includes statistics on small, family farms to large, cor-

porate farms; information on young, beginning farmers to older, experienced farmers; and insight into traditional, rural farming versus trends in areas such as lifestyle and urban farming.” The sign-up period for the 2012 Census of Agriculture ends in a few weeks and is especially important for those individuals involved in agriculture who did not realize they qualify as a farm or have not previously participated in a Census. All farmers and ranchers

are reminded to sign up and be counted. “The Census provides the only source of uniform, comprehensive and impartial agricultural data for every county in the nation,” said Picanso. “Through the Census, producers can show the nation the value and importance of agriculture, and they can help influence the decisions that will shape the future of American agriculture for years to come. By signing up and then responding to the Census, producers

are helping themselves, their communities and all of U.S. agriculture.” To learn more and sign up for the Census of Agri-

culture, visit www.agcensus.usda.gov. All individual information will be kept confidential guaranteed by law (Title 7, U.S.

Code, and CIPSEA, Public Law 107-347). The 2012 Census of Agriculture is your voice, your future, your responsibility.

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Herds Ranked by Daily Milk Lbs UNITED DHI Compiled by: NORTH CAROLINA TOTALS DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 MAY

(919) 661-3100

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

TOWN (3X)

GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON

CROUSE NC (3X)

JOHNNY, KAREN, & BRIAN MOORE MCCAINS DAIRY JAFRAL HOLSTEINS BEN SHELTON MYERS FARMS INC JERRY W. CRAWFORD CROSS CREEK DAIRY M&M'S DAIRY SHUMAKER DAIRY, INC. MARK JOHNSON GRAYHOUSE FARMS FOGLEMAN DAIRY BUTTKE DAIRY STEPSTONE HOLSTEINS INC GEORGE SMITH A D & CARLTON WILLIARD MIKE DUCKETT SCOTT AND BANKS DAVIS DAVID A SMITH DARRELL WRIGHT CARL & CLAYTON SMITH GREEN VALLEY FARM, LLC COLTRANE FARM SAM GALPHIN LYNCHS DAIRY INC ENGLISH DAIRY FARM, LLC WRIGHT DAIRY JOHN HAMPTON NELSON RIDDLE T C WILLIAMS S & L RIVERSIDE DAIRY LLC TED AND ALAN MOORE GLADDEN'S DAIRY ALLENS DAIRY STEVE AND ALLEN JOINES OAKMERE FARM MACGIBBON FARMS BOBBY & ALVIN EVANS WILLIAM H DAY JR TALLEY-HO FARM CHARLES CURRIN DAIRY JEFF CORNWELL DONALD PAYNE LOFLIN DAIRY ANDERS FARM

MOUNT ULLA NC (3X) SOPHIA NC (3X) HAMPTONVILLE NC OLIN NC (3X) UNION GROVE NC (3X) CHAPEL HILL NC (3X) HURDLE MILLS NC STATESVILLE NC (3X) BLANCH NC STATESVILLE NC STONY POINT NC (3X) LIBERTY NC (3X) RANDLEMAN NC BLANCH NC LEXINGTON NC (3X) GRAHAM NC LEICESTER NC MOORESVILLE NC LEXINGTON NC (3X) FRANKLINVILLE NC (3X) ENNICE NC RANDLEMAN NC (3X) PLEASANT GARDEN NC (3X) DURHAM NC MAIDEN NC MARION NC REIDSVILLE NC SPARTA NC STATESVILLE NC UNION GROVE NC VALE NC HURDLE MILLS NC VALE NC ASHEBORO NC SPARTA NC BROWNS SUMMIT NC STATESVILLE NC SPARTA NC OXFORD NC OLIN NC OXFORD NC LAWNDALE NC TAYLORSVILLE NC SOPHIA NC ENNICE NC

ROBERT NUTTER & MICHAEL STROWD HILLSBOROUGH NC (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

5 5 4 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

90.3 88.7 88.6 87.5 87.4 85.3 83.0 82.6 81.3 81.0 79.8 79.4 79.4 78.3 78.3 77.9 77.7 77.2 76.0 75.8 74.7 74.2 73.8 73.6 73.5 73.1 72.8 72.6 72.4 72.3 72.3 72.2 71.7 71.6 69.8 67.1 66.7 66.6 66.4 66.0 65.5 65.2 64.9 64.8 63.9 63.3 63.2

207 179 193 248 206 156 160 214 202 196 185 205 207 197 158 205 237 198 182 196 204 201 248 172 221 232 202 205 188 140 159 199 182 206 222 222 215 208 174 173 167 182 199 176 216 232 160

22526 25921 24258 24197 30809 26028 28532 23826 24398 27712 23372 23484 22901 27068 25908 23568 24469 22596 22242 25497 25558 19507 21256 23061 19943 . 20493 22395 20449 19201 16732 19890 22361 22150 21639 19724 21731 19395 19620 20123 19351 21149 19303 21209 20286 20558 19029

3.7 3.7 3.4 3.6 4.1 4.0 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.9 3.4 3.5 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.5 3.7 3.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 3.8 . 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.3 3.6 3.5 3.9 4.2 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.7 . 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.5 3.7 3.5

830 948 830 869 1271 1045 1032 858 856 1056 902 806 798 1005 981 895 924 894 788 951 885 716 731 969 752 . 753 824 767 638 603 697 863 923 797 766 811 732 719 . 727 829 732 812 718 763 667

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

3.1 2.9 2.8 3.0 3.1 2.9 2.7 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 . 0.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 . 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1

696 764 688 717 948 758 783 734 755 812 704 704 686 795 767 722 758 717 690 801 773 584 642 724 590 . 24 674 639 587 514 617 707 681 682 610 665 600 585 . 587 663 590 655 595 643 584

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

MANCO FARM INC. KATHY SHAMBLEY NEAL GROSE BEVILLE BROTHERS DAIRY STAMEY FARMS RANDY DOUGLAS WAYNE P STOUT LARRY D GALLIHER PROCTOR DAIRY WAYNE SMITHERMAN MACK BEAVER JR. LINDLEY DAIRY INC BOWMAN DAIRY INC WAYNE ROBERTSON SHELLY J SMITH JY-RO HOLSTEINS HILLCREST DAIRY GARY SCHLABACH COVINGTONS DAIRY FARM TEER FARMS INC

PITTSBORO NC HILLSBOROUGH NC HARMONY NC REIDSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC HAMPTONVILLE NC STONY POINT NC HARMONY NC (3X) BESSEMER CITY NC EAST BEND NC STATESVILLE NC SNOW CAMP NC JULIAN NC STATESVILLE NC NORWOOD NC ELKIN NC OXFORD NC UNION GROVE NC MEBANE NC CHAPEL HILL NC

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

63.0 62.5 62.1 61.2 61.1 60.4 60.3 60.3 60.1 60.1 59.6 59.5 59.3 59.2 59.2 59.0 58.8 58.6 57.3 57.2

168 236 289 248 103 227 222 224 233 169 185 233 229 179 178 248 224 189 208 271

18858 19318 18736 20303 19481 19505 22330 19955 19249 17056 15037 17874 16901 15244 18995 18026 18123 19562 17954 17185

4.0 3.9 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.5 3.7 4.1 3.3 3.5 3.9 3.9 4.2 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.4 3.9 3.9 4.0

751 759 708 696 704 673 821 822 630 598 585 700 709 560 681 698 624 766 701 685

3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.3 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.2

609 613 608 640 593 607 694 613 545 509 473 587 541 477 598 568 561 610 580 558

GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON GREEN VALLEY FARM, LLC T C WILLIAMS LUCKY L JERSEY TALLEY-HO FARM JEFF CORNWELL BRIAN MOORE JERSEYS SHADY BROOK FARM COREY LUTZ BRUSH CREEK SWISS FARMS TREASURE CHEST JERSEYS BILTMORE DAIRY FARMS INC COY + WANDA REESE SHADY BROOK FARM WAYNE AND KAREN LUTZ G W BELL SHADY BROOK FARM RIVERSIDE DAIRY FARM TREASURE CHEST JERSEYS CHAPMAN DAIRY RAY & LINDA ELMORE CHAPEL HILL CREAMERY KARRIMONT FARM CALDWELL OVERCASH ATT. ANNA G. AMORIELLO JERSEY

CROUSE NC (3X) RANDLEMAN NC (3X) UNION GROVE NC STATESVILLE NC OLIN NC LAWNDALE NC MT. ULLA NC (3X) STATESVILLE NC LINCOLNTON NC SILER CITY NC (3X) LINCOLNTON NC FLETCHER NC TAYLORSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC MOCKSVILLE NC KINGS MOUNTAIN NC (3X) STATESVILLE NC GIBSONVILLE NC LINCOLNTON NC TAYLORSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC CHAPEL HILL NC MOCKSVILLE NC KANNAPOLIS NC GIBSONVILLE NC AYDEN NC

5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

90.3 73.6 72.2 67.5 65.2 64.8 64.0 59.9 58.7 57.8 56.4 55.7 55.4 55.1 55.0 53.3 53.0 52.5 52.3 49.0 48.9 46.9 44.3 44.0 41.1 39.1

207 172 199 172 182 176 189 130 191 237 223 168 224 142 150 266 202 204 144 216 219 132 177 212 223 201

22526 23061 19890 19603 21149 21209 19054 15050 17962 22390 19923 15933 17773 13516 17303 15592 16805 16454 15640 15516 14491 12232 15751 15925 13828 .

3.7 4.2 3.5 4.3 3.9 3.8 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.0 3.9 4.8 4.3 4.4 4.8 4.7 4.0 3.9 4.4 4.4 4.6 4.7 4.9 3.6 4.1 .

830 969 697 848 829 812 846 682 832 902 778 761 759 594 838 739 667 642 688 684 670 571 769 578 564 .

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.3 3.2 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.1 3.3 .

696 724 617 663 663 655 648 528 646 736 631 578 640 467 625 492 557 517 542 551 527 441 551 490 453 .

NORTH CAROLINA COLOR BREEDS

X X X J X X J J J B X J J J J X X X J J J J J X X J


HARRISBURG, PA — The Center for Dairy Excellence will host its first “Open House and Dairy Tour” at Windy Lane Jerseys, a 160-cow operation managed by Ryan and Jen Clark in Tyrone,

Blair County. The Clarks started leasing the facilities in 2007 from Todd Lewis and have a longterm lease agreement on the 170-acre property. “The Clarks represent the next generation of

dairy entrepreneurs interested in production agriculture who are looking to build equity in their dairy herd before taking on land ownership,” said John Frey, executive director of the

Center for Dairy Excellence. “With the average age of Pennsylvania’s dairy farm owners approaching 60 years old, the Clarks’ relationship with Lewis is a model of how a non-family part-

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1332 Garbers Church Rd. Harrisonburg, VA 22801

Bus: 540-434-4457 • 800-900-8970

Ryan and Jen Clark of Tyrone, PA, are first generation dairy producers leasing facilities. The Center for Dairy Excellence will host its first of two “Open House and Dairy Tour” at the Clarks’ Windy Lane Jerseys on Thursday, June 28, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. nership can work in the dairy business.” Tour the facility and learn more about this unique partnership at the center’s “Open House and Dairy Tour” on Thursday, June 28, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The open house will feature a tour of the facilities and a short program, which includes a look at the Clark’s management style and best

management practices. A picnic-style lunch is also part of the event, which is offered at no cost to neighboring dairy farm families and other members of the dairy community. The Clark’s dairy operation includes a doublesix milking parlor and two sand-bedded freestall barns. The new-

Windy Lane A15

Page 11 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Windy Lane open house showcase of entrepreneurship


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 12

Dairy industry support key in USDA’s 150-year history On behalf of Dairy Farmers of America, Inc.’s (DFA) nearly 15,000 dairy farmer members, DFA’s Board of Directors and management team commend the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for its 150 years of service to the nation’s agriculture industries. In recent years, support from USDA has been critical to the dairy sector. As dairy producers have faced extreme volatility in milk price and input costs, numerous agencies and programs administered by USDA have benefited dairy farmers. Most notably, USDA used funds for additional dairy product purchases, reactivated export incentive programs and quickly disbursed emergency economic loss funds passed by Congress during the 2009-2010 low margin cycle. These initiatives, combined with

others, provided momentum in the recovery of the dairy industry. Our members also rely on USDA every day to administer conservation, marketing and market development programs, all which go toward strengthening the industry and providing opportunities for growth. USDA officials also have voiced ongoing support of the Capper-Volstead Act, which allows farmers to come together to market, handle and process agriculture products through cooperatives such as DFA. USDA’s ties to and support of this nation’s farmers are critical to ensure a safe, abundant and affordable food supply. Their advocacy of rural America and focus on fighting hunger and obesity are commendable.

Windy Lane from A11 er barn was built in 2011 to accommodate the Clarks’ growing herd. About 180 replacement heifers are housed in sand-bedded portable freestall buildings. The facility is located at 318 Crawford Road in Tyrone, about 18 miles north of Altoona. The Blair County event is the first of two “Open House and Dairy Tours” hosted by the center this summer. The second will be held on Thursday, July 6, at Brook-Corner Holsteins, owned by Reid and Diane Hoover, 400 Mount Wilson Road, Lebanon, Lebanon Coun-

ty. Although both events are free, preregistration is requested. Both events are open to anyone within the local dairy community, and sponsorship opportunities are available. To pre-register for either event, call the Center for Dairy Excellence at 717-346-0849 or e-mail rshaw@centerfordairyexcellence.org. For more information about the events, visit www.centerfordairyexcellence.org and look under “Upcoming Events.”

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — Dairy farmers need Congress to pass a new Farm Bill now to help provide certainty for making future business decisions, according to Sarah Leonard, a fourthgeneration dairy producer from Midland, VA, who spoke June 6 at a Senate news conference about the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 (the 2012 Farm Bill). Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), chair-

woman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, and Senator Pat Roberts (R-KS), the Committee’s ranking member, hosted the news conference in the Capitol. They were joined by several young farmers to discuss the importance of the farm bill for the next generation of ag producers. Leonard, who operates a 325-cow dairy along with her parents, spoke about her experiences as a young farmer on a multi-

generational farm. “On our farm, we don’t focus on the latest polls, or whose campaign is raising the most money,” she explained. “We focus instead on how much rain we received last night, how much milk the cows are generating today, and what the market price of corn and soybeans are. That’s our daily reality. But part of that reality is, we need a new farm bill.” Leonard said she was excited to see that the

Farm Bill legislation contained a variety of provisions to help beginning farmers like her continue to make a living from family farms, including access to capital, crop insurance and mentoring programs. “I can rely on my parents for their wisdom and perspective, but it would be great to know that the farm bill also has tools that I can use to keep our family business going. I would like to sell milk, not sell our land to devel-

Sarah Leonard opers,” she said. The Farm Bill legislation is not just about the next five years, but the next generation of farmers in America, Leonard concluded. “Dairy producers appreciate the work that senators Stabenow and Roberts and their colleagues have done so far. Now it is up to all 100 senators to take it from here,” she said. The National Milk Producers Federation,

based in Arlington, VA, develops and carries out policies that advance the well-being of dairy producers and the cooperatives they own. The members of NMPF’s 30 cooperatives produce the majority of the U.S. milk supply, making NMPF the voice of more than 32,000 dairy producers on Capitol Hill and with government agencies. Visit www.nmpf.org for more information.

Page 13 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Virginia dairy farmer urges Congress to pass new farm bill


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 14

1/4 below the blocks. Seven cars of block traded hands on the week and five of barrel. The AMS-surveyed U.S. block price slipped a half-cent to $1.5163. The barrels averaged Dairy Prices and Policy Keep Our Attention Issued June 8, 2012 All eyes remain on milk prices. California’s May Class 4a butter/powder milk price is $13.45 per hundredweight (cwt.), down $1.27 from April and $6.49 less than May 2011. The 4b cheese milk price is $13.56, up 13 cents from April, $1.18 less than a year ago, and $1.67 below the comparable Federal order Class III price. The 4b price 2012 average now stands at $13.66, down from $15.05 at this time a year ago and compares to $12.30 in 2010. The 4a price average is now at $15.04, down from $18.56 a year ago and compares to $13.37 in 2010. Looking “back to the futures;” after factoring in the announced Federal order Class III milk prices and the remaining futures, the average

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Class III milk price for the first six months of 2012 stood at $15.65 on March 2, $15.70 on May 10, and $15.94 on May 25. The last half of 2012 was averaging $15.61 on April 27, $15.08 on May 4, $15.44 on May 11, $15.69 on May 18, $16.13 on May 25, $15.96 on June 1, and was trading around $16.33 late morning June 8. The old saying goes; “What goes up must come down,” then go back up and then come down again. Cash block cheese, after hitting a 2012 high of $1.65 per pound on June 1, reversed gears and plunged, then rallied, then slipped again and closed the following Friday at $1.6150, down 3 1/2-cents on the week and 49 1/2-cents below a year ago. The barrels closed at $1.5225, down a penny, 54 1/2-cents below a year ago, and 9

$1.4995, up 0.6 cent. Increased milk production is mainly gong to the churn and the dryer. April butter production totaled 170 million pounds, according to USDA’s latest Dairy

Products report, down 3.3 percent from March but 7.2 percent above April 2011. Nonfat dry milk output hit 192 million pounds, up 2 percent from March and a whopping 31.1 percent

from a year ago. American type cheese, at 372 million pounds, was down 2.7 percent from March but 3.5 percent above a year ago.

Mielke A15


Total cheese output hit 903 million pounds, down 4.7 percent from March but 2.1 percent above a year ago. Cheese plants were busy over the Memorial Day weekend as surplus milk was available, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. Produc-

tion of cheese is increased over last year and supplies are described as manageable. The Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) program continues to assist with export sales, USDA reported, and another earthquake in Northern Italy may further affect

Thank you dairymen for your hard work & dedication! We appreciate your support and wish you all the best!

supplies of ParmigianoReggiano cheese which ages for two years. CWT accepted eight requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 1.938 million pounds of Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese to customers in Asia, North Africa and the Middle

East. The product will be delivered through November and raised CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 56.6 million pounds plus 44.3 million pounds of butter and anhydrous milkfat to 27 countries. Cash butter continued to creep higher for the fifth week in a row, closing Friday at $1.4175, up 1 3/4-cents from the previous week but still 71 1/4-cents below a year ago. Only two cars were sold. AMS butter averaged $1.3652, up 3.6 cents. Churning activity the last week of May increased as surplus cream volumes, especially over the holiday weekend, were heavier, USDA said. Many butter producers did indicate that weekend cream offerings were not as heavy as anticipated. Some ice cream manufacturers maintained steady production during the holiday period, which is often not the case during a holiday weekend. Surplus cream offers further declined early in

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the week as Class II operations, which reduced production schedules during the holiday period, resumed production. In most instances, current churning schedules are keeping pace with demand although butter continues to clear to inventory. Butter demand is seasonally fair to good. Retail buyers continue to report features which are clearing good volumes of print butter. Nationally, advertised butter prices from the National Dairy Retail Report showed a weighted average price of $2.49 per pound compared to $2.57 two weeks prior. Featured prices ranged from $1.49 in the Midwest to $3.49 in the Northeast. Food service orders are increasing as resort and vacation areas across the country prepare for the summer vacation season, USDA said. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed at $1.21, up 2 1/2-cents on the week. Four cars were sold. Extra Grade closed at $1.12, up 3 cents on the week on a bid. AMSsurveyed powder averaged $1.0957, down 3.6 cents, and dry whey averaged 51.66 cents, down 0.7 cent. Advertising or not, fluid milk sales continue to slide. The June 1 California Milk Producers Council (MPC) newsletter pointed out that bottling

plants used “less than their share of the milk supply simply because, once again, fluid milk sales fell by far more than had been the normal case for oh so many years.” Preliminary figures from federal order areas show class 1 usage in April was down 4.4 percent from April 2011, according to the MPC, and California class 1 sales were down 2.9 percent. MPC adds that “Only two out of the last 30 months have U.S. class 1 sales been higher than the year before, and one of those was February, helped by an extra day of sales.” Checking the international dairy scene; the June 5 Global Dairy Trade-weighted index for all dairy products soared 13.5 percent from the index on the May 15 auction, according to FC Stone’s eDairy Insider Closing Bell (ICB). Anhydrous milkfat led the GDT price increase, with August up 43.6 percent and the average across all contracts from August through December up 24.4 percent from May 15 prices. The average anhydrous milkfat price on the May 15 event had plunged 11.6 percent from May 1. Most other products on the GDT gained. The increases across all contract periods were 21.3 percent for skim milk powder, 19.6 percent for

Mielke A17

Page 15 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Mielke from A14


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 16

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

ADAMS

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PENNSYLVANIA

SPUNGOLD HOLSTEINS KEHOLTZ DAIRY KEHOLTZ DAIRY HILCREST DAIRY CIRCLE CREEK HOL. LADD S. MUMMERT STEVE & CHRISTINE WOOD APPLE VALLEY CREAMERY FARVIEW HOLSTEINS KENNETH WENGER

DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

104.6 40.3 396.3 282.8 155.9 181.3 53.4 63.2 62.1 241.1

24895 1000 4.0 784 3.1 23584 894 3.8 731 3.1 3X 22771 881 3.9 704 3.1 3X 22907 833 3.6 703 3.1 22213 768 3.5 680 3.1 21658 752 3.5 656 3.0 20096 810 4.0 649 3.2 19846 740 3.7 627 3.2 19925 744 3.7 623 3.1 17760 762 4.3 552 3.1

SCOTT BOWSER RON & BETH RUFFANER SHIREY FARM SHANMAR JERSEYS R.FREEHLING SILVER BROOK FARM LARA WILSON SHIELDS

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X J H H H

85.6 40.7 250.4 352.7 94.5 44.1 32.5

23619 22957 22064 17038 17943 16722 16393

BONZO ONEOONE BREEZE RIDGE CRAIG FARMS BREEZE RIDGE NYE FARMS FISCHERS WINDY RIDGE DIANE BURRY FRED SCHEEL

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI

H H H B H J J H

39.1 31.4 106.6 55.5 131.2 41.1 19.8 46.8

27367 1030 3.8 831 3.0 22239 763 3.4 685 3.1 21414 832 3.9 668 3.1 19916 766 3.8 660 3.3 21786 816 3.7 643 3.0 17306 812 4.7 622 3.6 14930 697 4.7 538 3.6 16718 624 3.7 531 3.2

DEVON MARTIN RAY D MOWRY & SONS

DHI-AP H 59.0 DHIR-AP X 39.4

ARMSTRONG

BEAVER

BEDFORD BERKS

22360 16970

839 774 809 832 593 675 614

3.6 3.4 3.7 4.9 3.3 4.0 3.7

724 689 667 614 552 516 504

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.1 3.1 3.1

821 3.7 701 3.1 639 3.8 541 3.2

MELVIN M OBERHOLTZER DHI-AP H 122.3 DON & AMY RICE DHI-AP H 106.3 CARL Z GOOD DHI-AP H 85.4 EARL R HAFER & SONS DHI-APCS H 227.6 TULPACANAL FARM DHI-AP H 131.4 ROCKYCREST HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 38.7 MIL JOY FARMS DHI-AP H 236.4 LARRY GRUMBINE DHI-AP H 63.7 ALLEN P+MARY J GRUBE DHI H 64.5 SKYLINE ACRES INC. DHI-APCS H 583.4 DAVIEW FARM DHIRAPCS H 65.6 MICHAEL FORRY DHI-AP H 100.8 GARY & KATHY HEFFNER DHI-AP H 80.9 SHOW TOP FARMS DHI H 174.6 UNITED HEARTS HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 116.2 E&N SHAYNAH KEE DHI-AP H 72.1 GLEN HARNISH DHI-AP H 157.6 SCATTERED ACRES INC DHI-APCS H 328.3 MARTIN & MISSY MOYER DHI-AP H 44.3 SUNRISE FARM DHI-AP H 39.4 WHISTLING ACRES DHI-AP H 46.3 DANA & DEBBIE STOUDT DHI-AP H 76.1 MISTY MOOR HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 77.7 MICHAEL HAAG DHI-AP H 86.5 LLEWELLYN MOYER DHI-AP H 110.6 ARDOUNIE FARM INC. DHI-AP H 133.3 RODGER WAGNER DHI-AP H 207.1 LUKE & LORI TROUTMAN DHI-AP H 69.5 JAMES P. & JAN M. ADAM DHI-APCS H 183.0 KIRBYVILLE HOLSTEINS DHIR H 98.2 GLENN A DAVIS DHI-AP H 73.9 WALNUTRIDGE HOLSTEIN DHI-AP H 57.4 CEDAR CREEK DAIRY LLC. DHI-AP H 107.9 SUNNYSIDE DAIRY FARM DHI-AP H 202.5 ONE HILL FARM MOYER DHIR-AP B 28.5 BARRY+BARBARA GOOD DHI-AP H 87.1 MARK A KIEFFER DHI-AP H 69.0 NORTHKILL CREEK FARM DHI-AP X 126.9 LEROY NOLT DHI-AP H 42.5 DAVID WOLFSKILL DHI-AP H 324.3

29763 1016 3.4 898 3.0 3X 29791 1046 3.5 886 3.0 3X 27998 1053 3.8 879 3.1 27653 906 3.3 841 3.0 27624 992 3.6 832 3.0 3X 26430 977 3.7 809 3.1 25352 872 3.4 784 3.1 3X 25474 828 3.3 783 3.1 25293 951 3.8 773 3.1 24717 898 3.6 770 3.1 3X 24709 800 3.2 769 3.1 24696 960 3.9 769 3.1 24919 858 3.4 766 3.1 23608 910 3.9 757 3.2 25003 926 3.7 754 3.0 25355 894 3.5 753 3.0 25003 893 3.6 750 3.0 25244 912 3.6 749 3.0 3X 25166 853 3.4 748 3.0 24372 945 3.9 747 3.1 24202 889 3.7 746 3.1 24807 904 3.6 744 3.0 25153 950 3.8 739 2.9 3X 24584 879 3.6 738 3.0 24562 859 3.5 734 3.0 24105 823 3.4 731 3.0 23472 904 3.9 728 3.1 23710 845 3.6 723 3.0 22954 800 3.5 722 3.1 22427 858 3.8 717 3.2 22560 911 4.0 714 3.2 23017 876 3.8 712 3.1 23311 828 3.6 705 3.0 23431 820 3.5 705 3.0 3X 22237 853 3.8 705 3.2 22708 900 4.0 705 3.1 22071 873 4.0 696 3.2 22843 765 3.3 695 3.0 22407 824 3.7 681 3.0 22771 834 3.7 677 3.0

CLOVER WILL FARMS RYAN JEN CLARK

DHI-AP H 191.5 DHI-AP J 141.2

22697 18070

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP

H H H H H

85.2 59.1 68.0 209.8 95.6

30240 1042 3.4 942 3.1 25069 848 3.4 775 3.1 22229 860 3.9 673 3.0 21163 836 4.0 667 3.2 18382 722 3.9 566 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H J H H H H H H

280.2 166.9 208.6 125.6 17.3 215.7 101.0 244.1 117.3 73.7 120.0

26646 25832 26296 22520 19752 23015 22749 22505 21434 17930 17455

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H

802.5 187.6 80.8 87.6 159.6 51.7

28061 967 3.4 850 3.0 27664 953 3.4 848 3.1 28942 1098 3.8 840 2.9 28601 990 3.5 815 2.8 26031 1054 4.0 786 3.0 24330 873 3.6 768 3.2

BLAIR

BUCKS

DEB & RAY DETWEILER BRENDA & JIMMY HARRIS MARWELL DAIRY FARM ROY + ART SHULL TOM + SUE HALDEMAN

CAMBRIA

DAVID MYERS BRENT LOWMASTER RALPH J LIEB BILL HOOVER DAVID MYERS VALEWOOD DAIRY MARTIN SHERRY STRITTMATTER DAIRY RON HOOVER RONALD HOGUE BORLIE'S DAIRY

CHESTER

WALMOORE HOLSTEINS ROBERT + BETTY PEIFER ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER NOLAN&NORI KING DAVID F KING FARM #2

900 4.0 717 3.2 3X 889 4.9 681 3.8

927 947 863 819 880 881 829 853 763 662 611

3.5 3.7 3.3 3.6 4.5 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.5

843 795 789 713 706 696 692 680 664 554 530

3X 3X 3X 3X

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

NEAL & LOU KING DHI-AP H 152.3 MARSHAK DAIRY -NBCDHI-APCS H 203.9 MARK & MELODY STOLTZFUS DHI-AP H 74.7 AMOS LAPP DHI-AP H 52.8 HERBETH FARMS DHI-AP H 62.3 CENTURY OAK FARM DHIRAPCS H 79.7 AMOS J STOLTZFUS DHI-AP H 58.1 EVERGREEN FARM DHI-AP H 131.7 RIDGE STAR FARM DHIR-AP H 49.5 HOLLY SOLLENBERGER DHI-AP X 37.9

25602 23651 22675 22328 22596 22675 19871 19708 16563 15800

887 890 832 849 845 894 780 779 598 612

3.5 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.9 4.0 3.6 3.9

BRYMESSER FARMS NEALAND FARMS SMITHDALE FARMS JETRAE FARM MARLIN & ADAMAE ZIMMERMAN STOVER FARMS CURTIS WEAVER TRIPLE L FARM SILVER HILL FARM MARCUS GOOD JOHN STAMY DORELL & BEV AGAR WESTYLE HOLSTEINS BERKHEIMER FARMS HENSEL HILL FARM J&S DAIRY HARRY & PAUL HOCH DAVE AND DOUG LEHMAN LIGHTNING BOLT FARM K HALE & L WENGER TIM WITTER HARPER HERSEY + SONS HARRY E THOMPSON DAVID R WALTON

HERD OWNER

CUMBERLAND

TYPE TEST

749 743 703 686 685 678 624 621 523 516

LANCASTER

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H X H H H H H

258.8 388.6 65.5 92.7 56.7 176.1 151.3 152.1 65.1 91.7 362.5 29.8 122.7 155.2 81.8 67.6 275.0 94.7 35.8 29.1 125.9 188.9 51.7 62.3

29651 1016 3.4 920 3.1 30606 1046 3.4 908 3.0 3X 26506 987 3.7 818 3.1 24317 948 3.9 779 3.2 24200 915 3.8 778 3.2 24763 888 3.6 775 3.1 24493 895 3.7 749 3.1 25157 913 3.6 742 2.9 3X 23072 859 3.7 728 3.2 23582 833 3.5 723 3.1 21897 769 3.5 689 3.1 22326 824 3.7 675 3.0 21485 797 3.7 664 3.1 21435 788 3.7 656 3.1 20868 807 3.9 652 3.1 19971 745 3.7 647 3.2 19892 754 3.8 624 3.1 3X 20348 728 3.6 622 3.1 17853 753 4.2 617 3.5 20093 742 3.7 598 3.0 18707 667 3.6 595 3.2 18719 659 3.5 592 3.2 18211 600 3.3 564 3.1 16207 564 3.5 517 3.2

TY & TRACY LONG LEHMANSTEAD FARMS BOB KESSLER PLEASANT HILL FARMS STONEY LAWN FARMS J MELVIN BRANDT

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI

H H H H H H

113.9 170.3 51.1 51.8 136.5 69.6

24431 864 3.5 742 3.0 23390 836 3.6 737 3.2 22995 1039 4.5 702 3.1 22009 761 3.5 676 3.1 20944 668 3.2 649 3.1 18992 684 3.6 585 3.1

ORR FARMS ORR FARMS ALLEN HILL DAIRY JACKSON FARMS STARLIGHT HILL FARM FERENS FARM LLC GARY THOMAS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H H H

107.6 70.1 125.2 142.9 39.6 101.5 91.8

25318 22635 21688 21594 20536 20674 17659

DAUPHIN

FAYETTE

FULTON

CREEK VALLEY FARMS

HUNTINGTON

DHI-AP H 496.4

MOWRER FARMS BILL & KAROL WINGERT LOCUST LANE FARMS EVERGREEN FARMS INC WILLOW BEHRER FARMS LITTLE J RANCH WILLOW BEHRER FARMS TIMOTHY R PEACHEY BILL & KAREN DAVIS LOST HOLLOW FARM DIAMOND VALLEY FARM IRVIN G MARTIN TOM & GLORIA COFFMAN LUZERNE FARM LAKEVALE AYRE FARM TERRY ALLISON HERON RUN FARMS HAWN CREST FARMS N&N FARMS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

BLOSSOM HOLLOW FARM LARRY H MARSHALL JERRY NESBIT PLEASANT VIEW FARMS DAN L. HANCOCK NEHRIG FARM JEWART DAIRY BERKEYS DAIRY FARM

INDIANA

DARYL&DEL BRUBAKER MYRON+MARY GEHMAN GLEN HENRY AND SONS TUSCARORA RUN HLSTNS J.SCOTT LANDIS GRAYBILL, DAVID JOEL & SARA MILLS MARCUS J ZOOK RUSSELL ADAMIRE JR CHARLES & TAMMY KLINE RUSSELL J DRESSLER MICHAEL W BEAVER BARRY E+BARB A LUCAS B. C. + E. BRUBAKER ANTHONY HEIMBACH KENT MABEN MARLIN CHARLTON TIMOTHY E LAUVER ANDREW B.SWARTZ GLEN & BEVERLY PEACHEY COCOLAMUS FARM G V FARMS

922 891 794 793 832 784 651

3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7 4.1 3.8 3.7

803 751 695 683 657 617 547

HERD OWNER CENTERVIEW FARM ROBERT A MILLER E MARLENE PEOPLES TUSCVU FARMS DARRON SHEARER# ZIMMERMAN BROS

2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.3

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP

JUNIATA

3.2 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.6 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0

Top 40 Herds For May

3.2 3X 3.3 3X 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1

29998 1206 4.0 923 3.1 3X

H 363.6 H 768.5 H 470.7 H 2775.0 H 701.9 H 88.1 H 110.0 H 92.1 H 172.9 H 118.0 H 93.0 H 83.3 H 180.3 H 442.2 H 60.4 H 86.3 H 176.3 H 80.5 H 42.6

28733 26832 26854 27455 26115 23824 24446 24003 22393 22088 21780 22752 20826 21954 20766 19424 19579 18183 16456

1075 1091 990 1032 1069 854 982 943 940 801 807 755 785 820 766 758 674 711 638

3.7 4.1 3.7 3.8 4.1 3.6 4.0 3.9 4.2 3.6 3.7 3.3 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.4 3.9 3.9

871 840 836 816 795 748 744 741 709 707 683 673 652 644 636 635 592 584 516

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.2 3.1

3X

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X H

64.9 48.5 103.1 236.7 113.2 100.8 229.6 48.2

25615 23946 22569 22004 20952 21025 19645 19205

927 977 991 764 726 746 770 698

3.6 4.1 4.4 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.9 3.6

795 721 708 663 650 646 622 578

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

97.8 340.6 52.2 103.6 65.4 64.8 109.9 76.9 85.8 79.9 84.1 22.3 136.0 69.9 71.5 61.1 73.5 41.1 60.1 32.8 42.5 116.6

28024 1028 3.7 857 3.1 26424 926 3.5 801 3.0 3X 25457 946 3.7 784 3.1 25296 963 3.8 760 3.0 24728 848 3.4 757 3.1 24326 911 3.7 749 3.1 24316 892 3.7 748 3.1 24206 905 3.7 741 3.1 22891 896 3.9 733 3.2 24202 827 3.4 730 3.0 24022 853 3.6 722 3.0 23107 858 3.7 721 3.1 22476 839 3.7 718 3.2 22895 759 3.3 706 3.1 22258 840 3.8 682 3.1 22194 788 3.6 679 3.1 21688 798 3.7 671 3.1 20907 807 3.9 665 3.2 20746 767 3.7 655 3.2 21353 828 3.9 654 3.1 3X 20898 753 3.6 653 3.1 19964 744 3.7 629 3.2

3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

STAR ROCK FARMS SCATTERED ACRES REINHOLDS LLOYD M REIFF RAYMOND H GOOD JAY & ANNETTE STOLTZFUS MEGASTAR HOLSTEINS MEGASTAR HOLSTEINS HERMAN COOK HERMAN COOK

DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS

BRANDT VIEW FARM EARL RAY & CAROL MARTIN LITTLE HILL FARM LEON E. MARTIN DALE+PATTIE MAULFAIR LITTLE HILL FARM RUPLAND HOLSTEINS GARY LENTZ KIRBY L HORST DALE HOSTETTER & SON MILE EE FARM PHILHAVEN FARM MARTIN RIDGE FARM KENDRA MASE ADAM LIGHT B & L HOSTETTER KEVIN & ALLISON SELLERS DEW MIST HOLSTEINS CURVIN+DAWN GOOD MARK M. HOOVER JAY W GOOD JERE BRUBAKER ROBERT & SHERRY BASHORE ZIM LEA HOLSTEINS BARRY HOSTETTER K & M SELLERS LEROY WISE BRUCE R HEILINGER MUSSER RIDGE FARM REID K HOOVER CARISTONE FARM, LLC BRUCE BOLLINGER & FAMILY WHITE BIRCH FARM RUPLAND HOLSTEINS RICREY HOLSTEINS DALE BURKHOLDER MARK BALMER CLIFFORD+FAY BERGER# MALCOLM SONNEN MARK & STEPH PATCHES MELVIN&JUDY PEACHEY LOWELL J PEACHEY DAVID C YODER KISH VIEW FARM DAVID T HOSTETLER ROBERT & LISA PEACHEY RAMOND & ROSE KAUFFMAN LEE AND JOANNE YODER DAVID J & RUTH PEACHEY FORGY DAIRY AMMON FARMS RAYMOND S HOSTETLER PAUL NEER RODERICK KAUFFMAN VERNAN HOLSTEINS ROBERT L KAUFFMAN SHAWN & EMILY YODER FROG MEADOW FARM VALLEY VIEW FARM DALE I KING JESSE L SPICHER MICHAEL P YODER JOHN & SALOMA BYLER PEACHVIEW FARM MARK & VERNA PEACHEY JOHN SPICHER G SHELDON PEACHEY JAMES L HOSTETTER SAM K KAUFFMAN LOREN K. YODER DARVIN RENNINGER TITUS R PEACHEY A FRED KING CAS STEAD FARMS REED GAP FARMS CLARK N. PEACHEY ELWOOD H STITT NATHAN PEACHEY NATHAN & EUNICE YODER CAS STEAD FARM2

LEBANON

MIFFLIN

MONTGOMERY MERRYMEAD FARM RUSSELL GUNTZ ROY S KOLB & SONS MARK SCHMIDT

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H

107.2 55.4 109.1 24.8 68.4 91.8

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

20471 19872 19078 18080 16905 15631

762 759 726 715 665 636

3.7 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.9 4.1

626 615 588 555 533 511

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3

H 1408.2 H 630.5 H 59.1 H 275.7 H 133.5 H 54.1 X 14.1 J 28.2 H 78.7

28785 1079 3.7 883 3.1 3X 25065 902 3.6 755 3.0 3X 25216 888 3.5 744 3.0 23059 818 3.5 700 3.0 3X 19738 690 3.5 599 3.0 19089 697 3.7 586 3.1 17569 684 3.9 554 3.2 15884 710 4.5 551 3.5 18045 587 3.3 544 3.0

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H

117.3 91.9 55.0 65.8 59.8 37.5 116.7 81.5 47.0 86.5 206.6 91.5 105.6 60.8 119.0 116.3 67.0 104.5 118.3 46.3 130.0 133.3 35.3 85.8 64.3 65.5 136.2 79.9 145.4 251.8 266.6 79.7 139.2 107.2 123.9 61.6 40.6 67.9 47.4 86.0

32380 30833 30350 27545 27154 25835 27373 25872 25109 24934 25293 25319 24762 25293 25085 25865 24181 25035 25077 24997 24649 24311 24137 23935 23687 23819 23861 23862 24389 23694 22956 23469 24032 23865 23468 23538 22682 23293 21597 22637

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H

56.0 64.6 79.4 409.4 56.2 84.5 85.9 63.3 53.5 153.1 92.3 61.5 30.9 114.2 69.6 49.2 99.6 64.6 74.8 48.0 39.2 144.9 84.6 118.9 98.4 81.3 117.2 33.4 82.1 109.4 66.8 94.4 67.1 200.9 68.1 70.2 31.1 81.8 72.0 17.3

30025 1127 3.8 914 3.0 3X 27467 964 3.5 840 3.1 3X 25705 960 3.7 818 3.2 27032 964 3.6 809 3.0 3X 25164 943 3.7 789 3.1 25326 910 3.6 777 3.1 24905 934 3.8 763 3.1 23565 890 3.8 762 3.2 23820 835 3.5 753 3.2 23756 916 3.9 751 3.2 24058 906 3.8 746 3.1 23749 889 3.7 730 3.1 23552 890 3.8 727 3.1 23637 870 3.7 724 3.1 23920 859 3.6 723 3.0 23665 866 3.7 723 3.1 23328 857 3.7 712 3.1 22917 857 3.7 704 3.1 21844 772 3.5 699 3.2 23189 811 3.5 696 3.0 22477 879 3.9 696 3.1 23069 853 3.7 695 3.0 22642 844 3.7 695 3.1 22248 832 3.7 694 3.1 22448 844 3.8 690 3.1 21959 842 3.8 690 3.1 22216 881 4.0 686 3.1 21836 830 3.8 684 3.1 22035 818 3.7 682 3.1 22488 808 3.6 680 3.0 21926 894 4.1 676 3.1 22387 849 3.8 674 3.0 21842 781 3.6 666 3.0 21214 772 3.6 657 3.1 20612 762 3.7 653 3.2 21337 777 3.6 644 3.0 20908 701 3.4 644 3.1 20333 792 3.9 626 3.1 19925 750 3.8 626 3.1 20518 594 2.9 626 3.1

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

101.2 39.8 111.2 60.1

29594 23316 22091 20106

1166 1139 1095 963 973 1022 937 917 917 952 913 873 888 887 1005 953 938 894 939 884 881 836 871 883 907 880 856 823 805 819 833 825 876 842 791 859 821 780 808 826

996 902 813 788

3.6 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.6 4.0 3.4 3.5 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.4 3.6 3.5 4.0 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.4 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.4 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.6 3.3 3.7 3.6

3.4 3.9 3.7 3.9

986 923 908 843 836 835 828 796 783 781 779 777 777 776 775 769 767 766 765 762 751 740 739 735 735 733 730 728 728 727 726 724 723 719 716 714 702 696 695 688

890 715 678 608

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0

3X 3X 3X

3X 3X


rennet casein, 10.9 percent for milk protein concentrate, 9.4 percent for cheddar cheese, and

8.5 percent for whole milk powder. The only decline was for lactose, down 1.3 percent, ac-

LANCASTER COUNTY, PA TOP 40 HERDS FOR MAY BRD

MILK 3X

RHA FAT RHA PROT RHA MILK PCT FAT PCT PRO

DELAWARE VAL COLLEGE SPRING VALLEY DAIRY LLC BRIAN K MULL CHRISTIAN L PETERSHEIM LAMAR GOCKLEY SCOTT & APRIL COOPER MARTIN PEILA SHALE RIDGE FARMS LLC SKY VIEW DAIRY WILLOW RUN FARM ABNER L STOLTZFUS DEEP RUN CRK HOLSTEINS DEWDROP-MEDO HOLSTIENS KEVIN L OBERHOLTZER JEFF SENSENIG OLD PIKE DAIRY GLENVILLE FARMS DAVID & JOSHUA BISHOP IRA M HEISTAND JR PAUL & MARK MILLER JOHN M. BURKHOLDER WILLOW SPRINGS FARM CLIFF & ANDREA SENSENIG CLAIR N OBERHOLTZER MEADOW VISTA FARM JOHN P LAPP DELAWARE VAL COLLEGE PEILA JOHN III WEAVER HOMSTEAD FARM MATTHEW BENNETCH WALNUT RUN FARM S & A KREIDER- FARM NO 2 IVAN LEE KING SANDY HOLLOW FARM BRENT L. GEHMAN ELVIN & DORCAS REIFF JERE SENSENIG

B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H B H H H H H H H H H

NO YES YES NO YES NO NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO YES NO YES YES YES YES NO NO NO YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO

31130 31963 29189 28935 28583 29342 28896 28585 28927 28052 27977 28903 28334 27463 29371 27912 26982 26826 27214 27713 26713 28167 26996 26743 28653 27102 27091 24195 27310 25904 26550 26500 26887 26857 26557 27473 26365

PEILA JOHN III ARLIN BENNER TRI-WILLOW FARMS

H H H

NO 25822 3.4 876 3.2 YES 27635 3.2 898 2.9 NO 27551 3.3 919 3.0

NAME

3.9 3.3 3.5 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.2 3.6 3.8 3.3 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.3 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.4 3.7 3.8 3.3 3.7 3.6 3.3 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.3 3.8 3.5 3.7 3.3 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.7

TOP HERDS FOR RHI PROTEIN

1217 1067 1022 979 1093 1119 926 1020 1094 926 989 1020 1055 909 1044 979 974 993 927 1018 1028 917 1002 968 941 1048 1018 934 901 987 918 970 879 1004 1013 984 967

cording to the ICB. Meanwhile; the “Policy Wars” continue as 90 Senators voted in favor of bringing the Farm Bill to the Floor for further consideration while the

House Ag Committee has yet to begin its markup. A press release this week from the National Family Farm Coalition (NFFC) pointed out that, “Dairy farmers across the coun-

try struggle both financially and emotionally,” and charged that “the dairy pricing system is clearly broken.” They report that the first five months of 2012

3.4 1054 3.0 957 3.1 916 3.1 909 3.1 890 3.0 890 3.1 885 3.0 871 3.0 869 3.1 867 3.1 865 3.0 863 3.0 861 3.1 858 2.9 856 3.1 856 3.1 847 3.2 846 3.1 844 3.0 842 3.1 835 3.0 834 3.1 834 3.1 831 2.9 830 3.1 830 3.0 825 3.4 825 3.0 824 3.2 823 3.1 821 3.1 820 3.0 819 3.0 818 3.1 818 3.0 816 3.1 816 816 815 814

Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 • (919) 661-3100

Thank you Dairymen for all your support! We appreciate all you do and value your business! Best wishes from all of us at Valley Implement!

BOBCAT OF AUGUSTA, LC 123 Tinkling Springs Rd., Suite 113, Fishersville, VA 22939 Phone: 540-942-9961 or 888-829-4350

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER MERRILL MEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

DHI-AP H 36.1

NORTHUMBERLAND

RHA MILK

17836

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

695 3.9 573 3.2

JOHN RISHEL STROUSE DAIRY FARM SPRING LAKE DAIRY SHULTZ HILLSIDE DAIRY DRY RUN DAIRY, LLC WOLFE'S POWER LINE DAIRY J DANIEL FAUS WAYNE KLOCK PAUL SCHMIDT KEVIN BROSIOUS

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-APCS DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

48.0 67.8 106.1 80.2 97.1 382.8 126.0 40.9 120.7 42.4

31900 28516 29063 26722 24478 23938 22542 21360 16772 17816

1144 1010 1021 1015 1004 842 813 766 682 679

3.6 3.5 3.5 3.8 4.1 3.5 3.6 3.6 4.1 3.8

960 868 867 814 763 707 686 663 542 540

3.0 3X 3.0 3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0

CARL & BRENT MC MILLEN LOY ACRES L.L.C. CINDY & JOE COMP JESSE+BARB SINGLETON M W SMITH FARMS MELVIN S WEAVER NEVIN G RICE LENARD & AMY KRESGE OL MAPLES FARM ROBRT & BONITA RODGERS LYONS BROTHERS SYLVIN M WENGER EDWARD C BROFEE INNERST FARM PHILLIP WENGER ED + WILMA MCMILLEN ROBT & JENNIFER GABEL KRETZH FARMS INC. SAMUEL L. HURST KENDALL BYERS BRIAN FLEISHER LARRY BRAJKOVICH

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H X

96.9 90.1 103.3 53.0 504.3 90.7 123.2 157.1 100.1 36.7 68.7 75.2 255.7 192.5 72.6 47.6 33.0 319.7 57.3 66.5 49.3 89.8

27355 26987 27138 24681 25908 25374 24139 23810 22806 21730 22772 22693 22726 21931 21313 21625 20971 20452 19904 20292 19074 15334

974 966 990 896 945 992 859 843 812 880 834 788 866 773 759 783 699 765 790 730 731 652

3.6 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.6 3.5 3.6 4.0 3.7 3.5 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.3 3.7 4.0 3.6 3.8 4.3

860 836 822 786 785 765 759 744 721 706 701 694 684 668 661 655 650 648 633 621 596 527

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.4

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

90.8 62.0 36.5 96.5

PERRY

SCHUYLKILL CARL A FARMS INC BRIAN RUCH MILLER & REX JAMES D. DUNN

33337 1228 3.7 995 3.0 3X 26738 1026 3.8 844 3.2 24549 838 3.4 723 2.9 23186 834 3.6 723 3.1

HERD OWNER SNYDERLANDFARMS LARRY HEPLER WIND MILL FARM ELBERT FARMS RYAN KAHLER MARK & AMY WOLFE MAR K FARMS DONNON-S DAIRY FARM JERSEY ACRES FMS INC DAWN F RHEIN DONNON-S DAIRY FARM

SNYDER

CHRISS+TRISH NIPPLE DARE E LAND JACOB GRAYBILL KEITH MCCOOL WARREN FAUS JOHN M KURTZ ROBERT + KATHY WAITE BO ANN HOLSTEINS JL & CL SHAFFER DAVID APPLE AND SON LEIRE FRY & SONS RICHARD+BETTY WELLER SEVEN OAKS MABARBIL FARMS WAITE N CE FARM SAUDERDALE FARM JAY HOLLENBACH JUSTAMERE FARM DAN WHITMER NELALE FARM DUANE & KAREN EWING

SOMERSET

DAVID CRISSINGER VERNON D. MARTIN MERVIN AND JENELL YODER

TYPE TEST

resulted in declining farm milk prices, putting thousands of dairy farmers out of business and many more on the brink of economic collapse, adding that the losses hurt not just dairy farmers and their families but thousands of farm-related businesses. “Flawed trading practices at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange further diminish the value of struggling dairy farmers’ product,” according to the NFFC. “Ultimately, we rely more and more on dairy imports, leaving consumers with fewer safe and local choices, undermining our nation’s food security.” The NFFC continues to support S. 1640, the Federal Milk Marketing Improvement Act of 2011, introduced by Senator Bob Casey (DPA), and NFFC leaders met with President Obama in August 2011 as part of the White House Rural Council meetings. “We continue to call for restructuring the nation’s dairy policy to save the family dairy farm,” the NFFC concluded. On the other side of the battle, lawmakers were told by a Virginia dairy producer that “Dairy farmers need

Mielke A18

Top 40 Herds For May B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

863 813 886 831 775 744 760 676 732 693 636

3.8 3.7 4.3 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.6 4.7 4.5 3.6

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H B H H H H H J J X

51.6 61.0 177.7 90.8 97.2 60.1 91.9 136.0 189.6 226.7 42.0

22946 21969 20575 22095 20752 20093 20749 18692 15469 15374 17597

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

53.0 95.6 51.6 149.7 50.5 66.8 48.4 44.1 39.4 67.5 144.3 45.5 60.5 98.3 74.4 49.7 48.4 39.2 35.4 53.0 52.1

28760 1160 4.0 933 3.2 23232 972 4.2 748 3.2 23555 887 3.8 716 3.0 23218 812 3.5 710 3.1 22514 865 3.8 689 3.1 21315 810 3.8 659 3.1 20273 787 3.9 646 3.2 20472 758 3.7 628 3.1 20018 774 3.9 623 3.1 20837 743 3.6 608 2.9 19695 746 3.8 607 3.1 18669 768 4.1 601 3.2 19582 753 3.8 601 3.1 19319 814 4.2 591 3.1 19193 730 3.8 582 3.0 18382 680 3.7 582 3.2 17508 728 4.2 559 3.2 17972 769 4.3 546 3.0 17482 648 3.7 524 3.0 16283 639 3.9 518 3.2 16626 679 4.1 517 3.1

DHI-AP H 45.9 DHI-APCS H 202.8 DHI H 81.1

23288 22731 21090

701 698 684 661 641 636 635 577 563 554 545

3.1 3.2 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.6 3.1

820 3.5 702 3.0 829 3.6 691 3.0 789 3.7 678 3.2

HERD OWNER

WASHINGTON HAMILTON BROS HAMILTON BROS JOHN E MARCHEZAK FOLLY HOLLOW FM INC GREEN HAVEN FARM JOHN E MARCHEZAK WINDSON DAIRY FARM WILLIAM A SCOTT MARION PYLE STONE

WESTMORELAND BILL & RICK EBERT SLICKHILL HOLSTEINS ALVIN VANCE JR -HALVIN VANCE JR -HSELEMBO DAIRY FARM YURIS' DAIRY FARM JAMES HOUGH

YORK

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

867 882 899 739 638 789 715 624 661

3.4 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.2 4.8 3.6 3.7 4.0

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H J H H W

256.0 55.0 67.6 154.5 111.1 18.9 87.1 70.0 13.4

25309 24548 23860 20356 20205 16483 19708 17015 16509

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X

76.6 78.1 42.3 26.1 164.6 48.0 33.2

23570 901 3.8 735 3.1 23281 1020 4.4 719 3.1 21633 873 4.0 671 3.1 19921 819 4.1 618 3.1 19370 735 3.8 601 3.1 18142 685 3.8 563 3.1 16391 630 3.8 523 3.2

SMYSERS RICHLAWN FMS DHIR-AP H 75.1 TAYACRES FARM DHI-AP H 188.8 WALK LE HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 283.6 ROBT. BAUMGARDNER JR DHI-AP H 165.6 MEADOW VALLEY DAIRY FARM DHI-AP H 177.1 THOMAS BOYER DHI-AP H 44.3 KATEANN FARM DHI-AP H 46.4 JESSE & BARB DRUCK DHI-AP H 106.7 BARRENS VIEW FARM DHI-AP X 73.4 DALE & DARLA DOLL DHI-AP H 103.0 JESSE & BARB DRUCK 2 DHI-AP H 25.0 GUM TREE FARM DHI-APCS H 70.6 JOHN KRONE DHI-APCS H 26.7 #PERRYDELL FARM DHI-AP H 139.1 STUMP ACRES DHI-AP H 121.4 LEROY BUPP DHI-AP H 170.9 GARY THOMAN DHIR-AP H 52.2 LARRY ROBINSON DHI-AP H 24.2 SYDOR BROS. FARM DHI-AP H 66.6

767 767 736 625 620 585 573 550 501

3.0 3X 3.1 3X 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.5 2.9 3.2 3.0

30255 1144 3.8 927 3.1 25965 1049 4.0 807 3.1 25480 909 3.6 781 3.1 3X 24007 898 3.7 736 3.1 23877 1022 4.3 727 3.0 24009 924 3.8 725 3.0 22280 758 3.4 681 3.1 22159 784 3.5 673 3.0 3X 20753 754 3.6 669 3.2 20206 714 3.5 635 3.1 20720 753 3.6 631 3.0 3X 19641 719 3.7 593 3.0 18093 671 3.7 587 3.2 18948 730 3.9 583 3.1 17331 640 3.7 548 3.2 18397 663 3.6 548 3.0 17423 660 3.8 546 3.1 17630 605 3.4 527 3.0 16564 632 3.8 521 3.1

Page 17 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Mielke from A15


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 18

Mielke from A17 Congress to pass a new Farm Bill now to help provide certainty for making future business decisions.” Those were the words of Sarah Leonard, a fourth-generation dairy producer from Midland, Virginia, who spoke on behalf of National Milk at a Senate news conference this week about the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012 (the 2012 Farm Bill). “On our farm, we don’t focus on the latest polls, or whose campaign is raising the most money,” Leonard explained. “We focus instead on how much rain we received last night, how much milk the cows are generating today, and what the market price of corn and soybeans are. That’s our daily reality. But, part of that reality is, we need a new farm bill.” Processors, represented by the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), remain opposed to any kind of supply management feature for dairy. Speaking in Wednesday’s DairyLine radio program, IDFA’s Jerry Slominski began; “It’s a standard joke for a politician when asked to take a position to say I’ve got friends who are against it and friends who are for it and I’m with my friends.” He said he didn’t blame farmers if they are starting to feel the same way about economic studies of the proposed Dairy

Security Act (DSA). He criticized a recent study of the DSA conducted by Dr. Scott Brown, charging that Brown “used stochastic modeling to predict that the new milk supply management program would seldom be in effect and that exports and milk prices would be nearly unchanged.” “Stochastic” literally means “involving guesswork or conjecture,” Slominski explained. “Instead of conjecture about what will happen, Drs. Andy Novakavic and Mark Stephenson looked at data from the past five years to see what actually would have happened,” Slominski said. “They found the supply management program would have been in effect nearly 20 percent of the time.” “They also found that farmers of nearly every size would have had more money withheld under the stabilization program than payments received under the margin protection plan. Only if cows are culled and feed savings accounted for did farmers end up in the black under the program,” he said. He added that “Farmers can cull cows, dry cows off earlier or reduce feed in order to reduce production and save costs. Yet, every one of those options have long term implications for a farm’s milk production,

and it’s very possible that many farmers won’t reduce production at all. In those cases, the Dairy Security Act directly results in lower net income to a farm, not more.”

“Producers would be better off if Congress dropped the supply management plan and offered a stand-alone margin protection plan, Slominski concluded.

“Premiums would be slightly higher, but producers would not have money withheld from their milk checks due to the stabilization program, nor would produc-

ers have to decide whether or not to adjust milk production in the short run and how. This can easily be done by Congress without busting the budget.”

Top 40 Herds For May For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

BALTIMORE

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MARYLAND

STEVE WILSON

DHI-AP H 170.8

CAROLINE

HARMONY FARM RICHARD EDWARDS HOLLINGSWORTH DANIEL 3 FAITHLAND FARM HARMONY FARM ARTIE FOSTER LONGDAY FARM

3.8 519 3.2

H H H H J H H

131.8 678.1 43.7 238.3 10.1 275.9 51.8

25825 24822 21320 20885 16093 19236 15874

947 845 776 725 794 697 634

3.7 3.4 3.6 3.5 4.9 3.6 4.0

807 737 646 629 601 594 505

3.1 3.0 3X 3.0 3.0 3.7 3.1 3.2

DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHIR

H H B H H H H J H H J H H H H H H

164.8 137.2 15.5 880.0 62.0 33.9 276.6 38.9 70.1 210.7 49.2 129.9 126.1 113.0 99.0 304.3 94.4

27034 23941 22017 24151 23089 22954 22934 18477 21852 21529 17907 21383 21464 20629 19572 20409 20329

988 905 904 878 890 860 862 889 824 802 895 774 812 790 735 749 741

3.7 3.8 4.1 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.8 4.8 3.8 3.7 5.0 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.6

860 758 740 734 728 723 715 699 694 672 670 657 654 636 635 634 633

3.2 3.2 3X 3.4 3X 3.0 3X 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.8 3.2 3.1 3.7 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1

DHI-APCS H 469.6 DHI-AP H 115.1 DHI-APCS X 73.9 DHI-APCS J 45.0 DHI-AP H 128.3

23203 21654 19415 15779 16832

788 769 824 799 691

3.4 3.6 4.2 5.1 4.1

689 647 640 570 512

3.0 3X 3.0 3.3 3X 3.6 3X 3.0

DHI-AP H 176.0

18164

794

4.4 606 3.3

1136.2 549.2 99.4 238.5 185.2 71.6 92.2 84.4 46.2 184.8 91.9 51.1 98.7

24281 23799 22530 21176 22102 20946 19788 20034 18304 17746 17055 17293 17206

937 893 868 816 841 823 675 752 691 695 694 595 602

3.9 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.9 4.1 3.4 3.5

DHIR-AP H 150.3

20519

766

3.7 637 3.1

DHIRAPCS H 341.5

22855

895

3.9 709 3.1

RICHARD & DIANE FLICKINGER R.A.BELL & SONS LLC R.A.BELL & SONS LLC COLDSPRINGS FARM DONNA & JASON MYERS GARY R BRAUNING PANORA ACRES QUEEN ACRES JERSEYS FRITZ FARM LLC PEACE AND PLENTY FARMS BAR NONE JERSEYS BYRON D. STAMBAUGH CEDAR KNOLL FARMS LEASE BROS. MARYLAND DELIGHT FARM ARBAUGH S FLOWING SPRINGS CHARLES L. LETHBRIDGE

CECIL

KILBY INC. WIL-O-MAR FARM KILBY INC. KILBY INC. LONG GREEN FARMS INC.

WICOMICO W. BLAN HARCUM

FREDERICK

TEABOW INCORP. PAUL COBLENTZ & SONS BULLDOG HOLSTEINS MATTHEW TOMS DAVE & CAROLE DOODY JEREMY & JULIE THOMPSON PLAIN FOUR FARMS VENTURE LUCK FARM MERCURO FARM LLC ROCKY POINT FARMS, INC. ANDREW TOMS JOHN STONE NEW DESIGN ACRES

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

GARRETT KENTON B

MY-LADYS-MANOR FARM

600

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

CARROLL

HARFORD

15992

H H H H H H H H H H X H H

761 735 732 677 668 654 613 610 579 573 567 529 522

3.1 3X 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.0

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

H H H H H X

147.4 70.6 127.2 198.9 170.8 74.5

22429 21980 23325 22889 20810 17917

893 834 854 813 735 653

4.0 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.6

DHI-APCS H 72.6 DHIR-AP H 113.9

23776 19063

883 724

3.7 742 3.1 3.8 630 3.3

25842 23405 19868 22717 22289 22730 16589

882 893 903 891 828 883 840

3.4 3.8 4.5 3.9 3.7 3.9 5.1

79.3 69.9

18987 20304

696 681

3.7 599 3.2 3.4 634 3.1

1305.6 172.9 293.7 147.2 128.5 84.0 168.5 55.0

27043 23085 22528 21423 19968 18678 18728 17323

937 924 844 821 734 759 655 585

3.5 4.0 3.7 3.8 3.7 4.1 3.5 3.4

DHI-AP H 23.8 DHI-AP H 149.4

21472 19391

782 779

3.6 648 3.0 4.0 596 3.1

25587 25847 22959 20820 22527 18765 22480 22010 19197 20676 20529 19884 19239 19414 20446 20037 15788 19712 13892 16705

1024 950 833 822 874 916 811 817 836 738 696 791 787 689 720 709 805 709 687 627

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

STRAWBERRY HILL FARM JD & GE MILLER ROBERT KNOX JAMES ARCHER HARKINS HILL DAIRY CHRIS DIXON

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

HOWARD

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BOWLING GREEN FARM INC.

KENT

FAIR HILL FARM INC. CENTERDEL FARM INC. ROBERT FRY & JUDY GIFFORD BRICK HOUSE FARM, INC. FAIR HILL FARM INC. P. THOMAS MASON P. THOMAS MASON

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS

WORCESTER

CHESAPEAKE BAY DAIRY ARTIE JAY FARM

DHI-AP H DHI-AP H

QUEEN ANNE

LESTER C. JONES, INC. W. EDWARD PALMATARY PATTERSON FARMS INC. WINTERSTEIN FARMS LLC FRANKLIN & JEFF MOORE KEVIN LEAVERTON BOONE BROTHERS BENJAMIN STANTON

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

TALBOT

HENRY SNOW 111 WM. BRINSFIELD

WASHINGTON

TRANS OVA GENETICS CLETUS & JANICE FREY ISAAC AND DIANE MARTIN CLETUS & JANICE FREY RALPH W SHANK SHENANDOAH JERSEYS BRENT HORST PRYOR BROTHERS CLETUS & JANICE FREY DAVID HERBST MICHAEL FORSYTHE MARSH-HAVEN FARM RALPH W SHANK EARL GROVE, JR. JAMES A. CAMPBELL JR. COOL BROOK FARM MARSH-HAVEN FARM DEBAUGH FARMS MICHAEL FORSYTHE S.J. WINTERS JR. & FAMILY

For Records Processed through DHI Provo 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

H 333.3 H 201.3 J 71.5 H 54.2 B 13.2 H 72.1 J 185.6

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H

H H H B H J H H G H H H A H H X J H J H

16.1 103.3 59.5 21.9 70.2 119.1 137.6 106.9 13.4 179.0 23.6 41.3 112.6 108.2 102.9 102.6 12.1 130.3 34.9 127.4

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

4.0 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.9 4.9 3.6 3.7 4.4 3.6 3.4 4.0 4.1 3.5 3.5 3.5 5.1 3.6 4.9 3.8

703 700 697 689 638 558

764 743 720 715 715 712 599

776 711 678 658 616 609 553 521

862 808 719 708 708 700 698 684 644 643 642 637 631 626 616 613 599 597 523 504

3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1

3.0 3X 3.2 3.6 3.1 3.2 3X 3.1 3.6

2.9 3X 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.0

3.4 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.7 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.8 3.0 3.8 3.0

Top 40 Herds For May

RECORDS RECOGNIZE ENERGY CORRECTED MILK (ECM) BASIS - Over the years, totals have recognized milk, fat, and protein production. Since 1989, high herds on a county and state basis, along with all individual production awards, have been made on an (ECM) basis. The ECM formula (7.2 x lbs protein) + (12.95 x lbs fat) + (.327 x lbs milk) has helped identify cows that not only produce high volumes of milk, but also of milk solids. Maryland dairy producers are using the ECM formula and no longer mention lbs of fat or lbs of 3.5% fat corrected milk, since fat has become a negative word in promoting dairy and other food products.

HERD NAME DAIRY CATTLE RESEARCH SAVAGE-LEIGH FARM PAUL YODER PAUL F. HARRISON JR. MAR-K FARMS GLEN-TOCTIN FARM ORION-VIEW HOLSTEINS BENEVA FARMS DAVID & JAMES PATRICK LAVON YODER GLENN BEARD CALVIN SCHROCK JAMES & JOHN MYERS O. CLAYTON SMITH PHILIP BEACHY MD.-CARROLLTON CESSNA BROS. FARM SHAFDON FARMS PAUL & HENRY KINSINGER ERIC & FAITH BURALL WILLOW SPRINGS PARTNERS ANDREW W. SCHROCK BRAD & CATHY WILES HARA VALE FARMS VALES - PRIDE HOLSTEIN THOMAS H. MULLER MIKE & ANITA HAINES TOBIE KINSINGER DOOL-LEIGH FARM JEFF ENGEL

TYP BRD TEST H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

22 23 00 23 00 20 31 23 23 00 31 20 23 00 20 23 20 22 23 23 31 23 20 00 23 31 23 20 23 31

ECM 27,539 26,870 25,601 25,206 24,978 24,427 24,143 24,041 23,769 23,606 23,353 22,970 22,953 22,832 22,819 22,628 22,384 22,228 22,227 22,154 22,110 22,088 22,067 22,028 21,680 21,677 21,602 21,554 21,484 21,086

3X

44

8

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF

26465 1005 24935 1012 25041 908 22336 978 24065 909 22696 916 23161 879 23204 870 22821 862 23477 829 21795 863 22706 806 22658 817 21435 828 22322 809 22136 814 21678 805 20907 823 21245 820 21305 800 20241 814 21625 788 20233 812 21648 795 22123 735 20968 780 21822 741 21769 747 19146 820 20566 754

3.80 4.06 3.63 4.38 3.78 4.03 3.80 3.75 3.78 3.53 3.96 3.55 3.61 3.86 3.63 3.68 3.71 3.94 3.86 3.75 4.02 3.64 4.01 3.67 3.32 3.72 3.39 3.43 4.28 3.67

816 780 786 728 742 715 721 721 715 722 702 710 690 709 701 674 677 658 648 671 688 669 686 647 685 656 677 662 640 639

3.08 3.13 3.14 3.26 3.09 3.15 3.11 3.11 3.13 3.07 3.22 3.13 3.05 3.31 3.14 3.04 3.12 3.15 3.05 3.15 3.40 3.09 3.39 2.99 3.10 3.13 3.10 3.04 3.34 3.11

83.2 69.5 64.0 69.2 70.6 68.4 68.2 58.6 69.3 63.1 71.6 56.2 68.9 65.5 65.9 63.8 59.5 68.5 49.2 68.6 55.7 57.5 57.9 66.5 61.6 49.4 62.6 45.2 58.0 50.4

3.1 2.8 2.3 3.0 2.7 2.8 2.6 2.2 2.7 2.3 2.6 2.0 2.5 2.7 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.7 1.9 2.6 2.2 2.1 2.3 2.5 2.2 1.8 2.2 1.6 2.4 1.8

2.5 2.2 2.0 2.3 2.2 2.1 2.1 1.8 2.1 1.9 2.3 1.8 2.1 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.8 2.1 1.5 2.1 1.9 1.8 1.9 2.0 1.9 1.5 1.9 1.4 1.9 1.5

HERD NAME

TYP BRD TEST

ECM

3X

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF

MAPLE LAWN FARM INC. WAYNE BURDETTE EZRA SCHROCK MENDELSSOHN TERRACE FARM EHRHARDT FARM INC ASH & BEAR RANDAL BEITZEL DAVID E. YODER

H H H H H H H H

23 20 23 23 31 31 20 31

21,007 20,983 20,826 20,586 20,552 20,537 20,042 20,005

20160 19044 18841 19403 19112 19033 19027 19738

767 790 793 767 760 772 730 722

3.80 4.15 4.21 3.96 3.97 4.06 3.84 3.66

623 629 611 599 620 600 607 584

3.09 3.30 3.25 3.09 3.24 3.15 3.19 2.96

50.4 35.1 61.2 44.7 55.9 55.2 43.9 47.9

1.9 1.4 2.5 1.7 2.2 2.2 1.7 1.8

1.5 1.2 1.9 1.4 1.8 1.7 1.4 1.4

PATRICK, DAVID & JAMES VALES - PRIDE AYRSHIRE WHISPERING AYRSHIRE ROOM-TO-GROW

A A A A

23 23 00 20

20,371 18,991 14,232 1,267

19238 17640 13401 1398

754 705 529 42

3.92 4.00 3.95 3.01

600 569 417 37

3.12 3.23 3.11 2.63

52.8 50.8 37.9 9.2

2.1 2.1 1.6 .3

1.7 1.6 1.2 .2

VALES - PRIDE BROWN SWISS ERIC F-FAITH M. BURALL DUBLIN HILLS SWISS DWAYNE BELL

B B B B

23 23 31 20

20,232 20,216 19,429 14,676

18718 18237 17672 13299

743 750 718 543

3.97 4.11 4.06 4.09

624 631 605 458

3.33 3.46 3.42 3.44

45.3 54.1 41.7 37.6

1.9 2.2 1.7 1.6

1.5 1.8 1.4 1.3

WALNUT RIDGE GUERNSEY MAR SHIRL GUERNSEY

G G

31 31

22,064 19,307

17231 17787

932 724

5.41 4.07

606 572

3.52 3.22

53.8 45.8

2.9 1.9

1.8 1.5

O. CLAYTON SMITH GLENN BEARD JOHN & JULIE MAYER MIKE & ANITA HAINES 2 WILLOW SPRING FARM SPRING VALLEY JERSEYS ASH & BEAR ELI SWARTZENTRUBER GLADE VIEW DAIRY

J J J J J J J J J

20 31 31 23 31 31 23 23 20

30,307 26,106 18,739 18,248 17,138 15,192 13,669 11,434 7,912

21929 1356 22076 1029 15063 755 14599 726 14034 669 12155 604 11272 537 9287 459 6499 318

6.18 4.66 5.01 4.97 4.77 4.97 4.77 4.94 4.90

775 773 561 566 540 472 421 341 232

3.53 3.50 3.72 3.88 3.84 3.88 3.73 3.67 3.57

70.9 51.9 39.6 41.7 39.6 31.5 35.6 33.0 20.8

4.4 2.5 2.0 2.1 1.9 1.6 1.7 1.6 .9

2.5 1.8 1.4 1.6 1.5 1.2 1.3 1.2 .7


by Bob James, VT Extension Dairy Scientist, Dairy Nutrition Current economic conditions are causing intense frustration throughout the dairy industry. There are many items over which you have no control, but there ARE things that you can control—both from an income and expense perspective. Our five year study of feed management illustrated many opportu-

nities which exist to improve income over feed cost. Too often dairy producers make the mistake of assuming that a good nutritionist will fix all of their problems to assure high milk production at a low cost per cwt. It’s up to the dairy manager to ensure that the recommendations are carried out. Focus on these three items to improve the accuracy of the feeding program.

WHITESEL BROTHERS, INC.

Providing dairy equipment, supplies, water treatment and outstanding service for Virginia and West Virginia dairymen since 1963.

Meet the Whitesel Team! L-R George Grim (Service), Mike Sechler (Manager), Bevan Driver (Route Truck), Mike Forbus (Sales), Debbie Reedy (Parts), Dennis Thomas (Service), Gary Clinedenst (Warehouse), & Tracy Horn (Service)

Thank k You Dairymen n for yourr support, dedication,, and d work. hard Wee valuee yourr business!

540-434-4457 • Harrisonburg, VA www.whiteselbrothers.com

PENNSYLVANIA B. EQUIP. INC. 8422 Wayne Highway Waynesboro, PA 17268 717-762-3193

NEW YORK BOURQUIN FARM EQUIPMENT 9071 Rt. 12E Chaumout, NY 13622 315-649-2415

LONGENECKERS INC. Rt. 866 South Williamburg, PA 16693 814-793-3731

CATSKILL TRACTOR INC. 379 Center St. Franklin, NY 13775 607-829-2600

MM WEAVER & SONS INC. 169 N. Groffdale Road Leola, PA 17510 717-856-2321

NORTH CAROLINA C&R IMPLEMENT 301 Jonesville Road Williamston, NC 252-792-1511

1. Test forages monthly regardless of the herd size. This costs between $32 and $150 depending on the sophistication of the analyses requested. This sounds expensive, but the alternative is far more costly. • For a typical 150 cow dairy in Virginia, $150 amounts to $.03/cow/month. Reducing soybean meal overfeeding by .13 lb. per cow or increasing milk yield by 0.16 lb. per cow would offset this expense. 2. Measure silage dry matters at least weekly or whenever one detects a change in feed quality. Dry matter can be determined on the farm with a Koster tester, microwave oven, or food dehydrator—all equipment with a minimal expense. The impact of moisture on ration balance can be large. If one assumes a herd is fed 70 lb. of corn silage/cow/day at 38 percent DM a reduction to 32 percent DM results in 3.2 Mcal less energy and 0.34 lb. less protein. For a 1400 lb. cow producing milk with 3.5 percent fat that’s about 6.5 lb. less milk or $1.17 less income per day. 3.Improve feeding accuracy. The phosphorous incentive program studied eight farms which implemented the use of feed management software and a new indicator for their mix wagons. This enabled managers to download feeding instructions and to monitor how accurately the feeder loaded ingredients and delivered the rations. Use of this technology resulted in the best managers achieving accuracy within 1 percent of that specified by the nutritionist. In contrast, we found that feeders and

managers who did not use the technology very well deviated from the specified rations by more than 8 percent. The challenge is that in some cases feeders underfed key ingredients and overfed other ingredients. The result is that cows are either underfed and produce less milk the next day or overfed key ingredients, thus wasting feed. This technology would cost between $4,000 and $6,000. Again, this sounds expensive until one considers that our example 150 cow dairy with 50 lb. of dry matter intake per cow costing $.16/lb. spends $1200 / day on feed alone. Reducing overfeeding by 1 lb. of dry matter would enable a payoff of the investment in less than seven months. Additional benefits of higher milk yield accrue with less daily variation in ration composition. These three items require a commitment by the manager to adopt routine practices of forage analyses and monitoring of dry matter. Feed management software and hardware with proven success on dairies includes: (in alphabetical order) EZ Feed, Feed Supervisor, Feed Watch and TMR Tracker. Source: Dairyline, June 2012

Page 19 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

High feed prices, low milk prices! What can you do?


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 20

The Dairy One Improver

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com DAIRY ONE RECOGNIZES OUTSTANDING QUALITY MILK AWARD WINNERS Each year, Dairy one is pleased to recognize those members whose herds have maintained a rolling herd average somatic cell count of 175,000 or less in the previous calendar year. Winners are presented with a Quality Milk barn sign and a year sticker for the first year that they win the award. Those who have won in previous years are given a year sticker to add to the barn sign, indicating another year of excellence. Award packets are currently being distributed through Dairy One Farm Service Technicians and Market staff. Herds with low somatic cell counts (SCC) tend to be more profitable than herds with high SCC. Increased profit comes from reduced mastitis treatmeat and veterinary costs, higher milk production per cow and milk quality premiums. Additionally, milk with lower somatic cell counts has a longer shelf life and results in a higher yield of cultured dairy products. Herds producing high quality milk with low SCC set a standard of excellence for the entire industry. Careful milking procedures, good milking equipment maintenance, and excellent herd management using individual cow SCC all contribute to a herd’s low SCC. Out of the approximately 4,000 members that process through DRMS Raleigh and get Record Services through Dairy One, 744 were honored with the Outstanding Quality Milk Award. Listed below are those who are on the published option. Dairy One congratulates all winners and wishes them continued success through 2012-2013. If you would like assistance improving your milk quality, talk to your Dairy One Farm Service Technician or call Dairy One at 800-496-3344.

2011 Quality Milk Winners

CONNECTICUT

• St. Brigid’s Farm

Hartford County • Smyth’s Trinity Farms • Scott Perry

Talbot County • Henry W Snow, III

Merrimack-Belknap County • Marion & Gordon Jones • Highway View Farm • Spooky View Farm

Litchfield County • Arethusa Farm, LLC • Laurelbrook Farm • Hudson Weigold • Meadow Ridge Farm • Carlwood Farm

Tidewater County • Harmony Farms, LLC

Hillsboro County • Paul Knox

Queen Anne County • L. J. Palmatary & Sons • Lester Jones & Sons, Inc.

Rockingham County • Great Bay Farm • Fernald Farm

New Haven/Middlesex County • Cedar Ridge Dairy

Washington County • Christine & Michael Forsythe • Long-Delite Farm

Strafford-Carroll County • Scruton’s Dairy, Inc. • UNH Cream Herd • UNH Dairy Ctr. - John Whitehouse

New London County • Blue Slope Farm, Inc. • River Plain Dairy Tolland County • Fish Family Farm • University of Conn. Dairy • Hytone Farm

DELAWARE Sussex County • Richfield Farms • Fair Hope Farm, Inc.

MASSACHUSETTS Berkshire County • Twin Rivers Farm • Fairfields Dairy Farm, LLC Essex County • Richardson’s Dairy, Inc. Franklin County • Robertson Bros. Farm • Boyden Bros. Dairy Hampshire County • Mayval Farm • Morning Dew Farm • Cook Farm Middlesex County • Tully Farms, Inc.

MARYLAND Carroll-Baltimore County • Ryan Bell • Barney Stambaugh • Windsor Manor Farm • R.A. Bell & Sons, LLC Cecil County • Kilby, Inc. • Mt. Ararat Farms Frederick-Montgomery County • Deerspring Dairy Farm • David & Carole Doody • Plain Four Farms • Bulldog Holsteins • Arti-Jay Farm

• Trans Ova Genetics

MAINE Androscoggin-Sagadahoc County • Fisher Farm • Twin Brook Dairy, LLC • Brigeen Farms, Inc. • Roland Hemond Cumberland County • Baker Brook Farm Franklin County • Shady Lane Farm • John & Marcia Donald • Richard Cory • M T Farm • Springside Farms Kennebec County • Silver Maple Farms, Inc. • Richard Pearson • Windy Acres Farm, LLC Knox-Lincoln County • Linita Farms Oxford County • Mountain View Farm • Granite Hill Farm Penobscot-Piscataquis County • Univ. of Maine - Whitter Farm • Twin Meadows Farm • Stephen & David Velgouse • Simpson View Farm • Veazland Farms • Stonyvale, Inc. Somerset County • Mt. View Homestead • Krebs Farm • Grassland Farms • Joshua Clark • Chartrand Farms Waldo County • Aghaloma Farms

Harford County • Harkins Hill Dairy • Strawberry Hill Farm

York County • Johnson Farm, Inc.

Howard County • Univ. of Maryland - Forage Research Farm

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Kent County • Fair Hill Farm

Coos County • Yawnoc Farm \1

Cheshire County • Stonewall Farm

Sullivan County • La Casa de Leche, LLC • Eccardt Farm, Inc.

NEW JERSEY Central Jersey Area/ Hunterdon County • George Wengryn, Jr. • Cedar Lane Farms, LLC • Windy Crest Holsteins

NEW YORK Albany County • Stanton Farm Allegany County • Nickdale Farms • Deer Creek Farms • Center-Vu Farm • Thomas & Nason Long • Bennett Brothers • Sara Hatch • Kel-Acres Dairy Farm • Jopo Farms Broome County • Whittaker Farm • Roseland Holsteins • Faigle Farm • HayDay Farm Cattaraugus County • Wilean Farm • Roger Horton • Brown Brook Farm Cayuga County • Little John Farms • White Clover Farms • Happiness Hill Farm • Green Hill Farm • Allen Farms • Fessenden Dairy, LLC • Romano Farms, LLC • Raymond Nolt Chautauqua County • Cline-Crest Farm • Minor Brothers Farm • Frontier Brook Farm • John & Laura Knight • Raymond Troyer • R&D Crowell Farm • Grape View Dairy, LLC • Norman Lundmark • Tim & Mary Rhinehart • Crump Farms • Halocrest Holsteins • Craig Harvey • McCray Farm

Chemung County • Grace Farms Chenango County • Twin Pond Farms • Angelrose Dairy • Greenview Farms • Underground Genetics • Eiholzer Farms • Balsam View Dairy • Alan & Debra Davis • Mattydale Farm • Hanehan Family Dairy, LLC • Westover Farm • Davis Farm • Edward Geier • McKenney Farm Clinton County • Donald Dimock • Don-Sher Farm • Hidden View Farm, LLC • Cha-Liz Farm, LLC Columbia County • Hillover Farm • The Davenport Family\1 • Jim Davenport • Ooms Adrian & Sons • Dutch Hollow Farm #1 • Hollyrock Farms Cortland County • Mockingbird Hill Farm • Dove-Tales Farm • Currie Valley Dairy, LLC Delaware County • Del Rose Farm • Keator Farm • Ackland Dairy Farm • Jeff & Lori Taggart • Cecil Davis • Schaefer Farm • Char-Marie Farm • Darling Holsteins • Pineyvale Farm • Humdinger Holsteins • Marick Farm, LLC • Paul & Gwen Deysenroth • Boardview Farm • Gregory Farm • Posthaven Holsteins • Eternale Flames Holsteins • Hosking Farm Dutchess County • Plankenhorn Farms • Sprout Creek Farm • Rebecca Osborne Erie County • Rolling Meadows Farm, LLC • Wideman Farms • Early View Farm • Jeffrey Simons • Richmond Farm • George Haier • James Emerling • R&D Janiga Enterprises • Keith & Ann Schmitz Franklin County • Blue Gene Farm • Glengarry Farms, LLC • Alan Lobdell • Ooms View Holsteins • Rolling Brook • Beaver Flats Holsteins • Glenn & Mary Blow Greene County • Valley View Farm Herkimer County • Valley High Farm • Foster’s Acres Jersey’s • Foster’s Acres Holsteins • Done-In-Farm • Marshy Acres Farm • Jordan Valley Farm • Kel-Vista Holsteins Jefferson County • Eastman Dairy Farm, LLC • Lyndale Farm • Young Farm • Mazy Acres • Lilac Lawns Farm, Inc. • Michael Northrop • Steve Eisel • TMT Farms • Cady-Lee • Big Dog Dairy

• • • •

Louis & Olive Peachy Hy-Light Farms, LLC Enos Kurtz Jon Freeman

Lewis County • Carl & Doris Hoppel • Sunny Slope Farm • Keith & Amy Roggie • Harmony Haven Farm • Norman Farney • Jeff Simpson • Paluck Farms • Windmill Crest • Christina Nortz • Wilfred & Lois Schrag • Gus & Mike Tabolt • South Keener Dairy • L&M Farms Livingston County • Kevetta Farm • Cadyville Farm • Maxwell Farms Madison County • T-Farm 1 • Perry Farms • Tuscarora Dairy, LLC • Timothy Head • Morgan Farm Montgomery County • Clyde Snyder • Handy Hills Farms • Maxine & Paul Shuster • Hu-Hill Farm • Robert & Mary MacVean • Canary Dairy, LLC • Debily-Dale • James Hudson • Brumer Farm Niagara County • Maverick Farm Oneida County • Flowing Spring Farm • Gypsy Dell • Collins Knoll Farm • Lucky Vale Farm • James Williams • Champion Farms, LLC • John & Lisa Roberts Onondaga County • Eastview Farms, LLC • Elmer Richards & Sons • Fabius-Greenwood Farms • Twin Farms • Maplehurst Farms, LLC • Carl & Craig Dennis • Burgett Farms Ontario County • Bennett Farms • FA-BA Farm • Charles & Shelley Walker • Phalen Farms • Reedland Farm • Lightland Farms, LLC Oswego County • Corjess Holsteins Otsego County • Lentsville Farm • Charles & Joyce Johnson • Rohring Falls Farm • Waterpoint Farms • Dulkis Farms • Maple Grove Farm • Day Dream Farms • Weinert Farm • Banta Brothers • Silver Spoon Farm • Trill-Acres • Woodlawn Dairy Farm • Rock-Spring Farm Rensselaer County • Mark & Alice Moody • Dothedale Farm • Evergreen Farm • Matt & Peggy Cannon • Lukeland Farm • Boilingbrook Farm Saratoga County • Smith Brothers • Hanehan Family Dairy, LLC • Clear Echo Farm, LLC • Welcome Stock Farm • C.B. Curtiss & Sons

Schoharie County • R-Key-Vale Farm • Eureka Farms • L-V-A Farms • High Hill Farm, LLC • Argus Acres • John & Debra Stanton • Gaige Farms Schuyler County • Seneca Valley Farm • Glenview Dairy, LLC • Lone Oak Farm • Nick & Erica Wood Seneca County • Muranda Holsteins • Daryl Martin • John Mehling • Roy Martin • Persoon Dairy Farm St. Lawrence County • Stauffer Farms, LLC • David Smith • Putney Dairy • C&M Dairy, LLC • Freoge Farms • Scott & Traci Laing • Lisbon Centre Farms, LLC Steuben County • Damin Farms • Karr Dairy Farms, LLC • Jackson Hill Farm Sullivan County • J&E Weissmann Farms Tioga County • Howland Acres • Yvette Francisco • R. Hidden Valley Farm • Crest Valley Farm • Maiden Blush Farm • Kwiatkowski Brothers • Merle & Margaret Lawton Tompkins County • Millbrook Farms • Snow Top Farm of Danby Washington County • Critter-Ridge • Twin Brooks Farm • Dewalt Farm • Parker’s Dairy • Kuster Farm • New Generation Farm • Main Drag Holsteins • John & Mary Tudor • Beech Hill Farms • Ruigview Farm • Reafield Farm • Liddleholme • Deep Roots Holsteins • HI Brow Farms, LLC • Kenyon Hill Farm • Walker Farms, LLC • Tamarack Farms • JLH Dairy • Cambric Holsteins • Shaker Hill Farm • Deer Flats Farm Wayne County • E. W. Koeberle & Sons • Drumlin View Farm, LLC • Schoe-Acres Wyoming County • Armson Farms • Silver Meadows Farm • Emerling Farms • Hyman-Crest Farm • West-Flats Dairy • Stoney Creek Dairy, LLC • Davis Valley Farm • Friendly Acres • New Dawn Farm

OHIO Columbiana County • Everson Jerseys Richland County • Ivan Burkholder

PENNSYLVANIA Adams County • Spungold Holsteins • Circle Creek Holsteins Armstrong County • Alta-View Farm • Shan-Mar Jerseys


by Dave Winston, VT Extension Dairy Scientist and Dairy Youth Program Coordinator The use of social media has grown tremendously over the past few years. Social networking sites like Facebook, MySpace

and LinkedIn have created ways for people to stay connected personally and professionally in an online format. Twitter, introduced in 2006, is considered a microblog, meaning that it is a blog containing very short en-

Top 40 Herds For May

tries. It is a means of sharing little tidbits of information, often with a link provided for ‘the rest of the story’. Twitter offers users a quick way to scan what is happening locally, nationally, and globally. Dairy producers and other members of the dairy

industry can effectively use Twitter to access dairy and other information as well as to share information with others. Twitter may be accessed through a computer with Internet access or through applications available on smart phones like the iPhone,

Top 40 Herds For May

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

BERKELEY

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHI H 188.5

GREENBRIER BEN BUCK FARM EMORY & JEAN HANNA

18098

680 3.8 568 3.1

DHIR X 126.9 DHI-AP H 126.7

20408 20578

771 3.8 658 3.2 751 3.6 620 3.0

HOUGH, CLARENCE E. & T.TODD DHIRAPCS H 209.0 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP H 94.8 SNYDER, NICHOLAS DHI-AP H 94.3 DANIEL, FRANCIS DHIR-AP H 125.0 RZ BANE INC. DHI-APCS H 250.2 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP J 55.4 DANIEL, FRANCIS DHIR-AP J 34.3

23025 21877 21470 20150 19770 15372 14858

913 743 763 790 698 696 755

DHIRAPCS H 46.3

18088

634 3.5 555 3.1

DHI-APCS H 87.7 DHI-AP H 69.5 DHI-APCS H 32.8

23237 18336 18006

888 3.8 714 3.1 679 3.7 553 3.0 3X 606 3.4 536 3.0

DHI H 77.3

20767

808 3.9 675 3.3

DHIR-AP H 208.8

19316

677 3.5 585 3.0 3X

JEFFERSON

MONONGALIA

WEST VIRGINIA DAIRY DEPT

MONROE

BEILER DAIRY FARM, LLC DOUG & TRACY DRANSFIELD TRISH & STEVE ECHOLS

PRESTON GREG GIBSON

RANDOLPH LINGER FARMS INC.

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

WEST VIRGINIA

LINTON BROTHERS INC.

4.0 3.4 3.6 3.9 3.5 4.5 5.1

707 671 648 627 606 560 543

Blackberry, and Android. To create a free Twitter account, one would first visit twitter.com. In order to effectively use Twitter, one should become familiar with the jargon associated with it. The following selected definitions are from the Twitter website. Others are provided in the Twitter Help Center on the website. • Tweeting is the act of posting a message, often called a “Tweet”, on Twitter. • A tweet (noun) is message posted via Twitter containing 140 characters or fewer. • A tweeter is an account holder on Twitter who posts and reads Tweets. Also known as Twitterers. • To follow someone on Twitter is to subscribe to their Tweets or updates on the site. • A follower is another Twitter user who has followed you. • A username is also known as a Twitter handle. It must be unique and contain fewer than 15 characters. It is used

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.7

NEW CASTLE

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DELAWARE

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE VARI, V. JOSEPH EMERSON, ROBERT L. COOK, H. WALLACE & SON

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H X

107.9 107.6 175.8 73.1

26055 1018 3.9 821 3.2 21844 698 3.2 664 3.0 18966 712 3.8 626 3.3 17958 723 4.0 571 3.2

DEMPSEY FARM DHI-APCS DULIN BROS. DHI-APCS MOOR JR, ALFRED M. DHI-APCS JENAMY FARMS DHI-AP GREGG & STEPHANIE KNUTSEN DHIR-AP WHITE OAK FARMS DHI-AP GREGG & STEPHANIE KNUTSEN DHIR-AP

H H H H H H J

311.3 163.1 310.9 161.9 39.7 184.8 26.9

28182 1108 3.9 870 3.1 24201 898 3.7 765 3.2 22908 909 4.0 750 3.3 22885 802 3.5 698 3.1 22230 790 3.6 693 3.1 18934 717 3.8 600 3.2 15020 691 4.6 560 3.7

H X H H H H J

103.9 41.3 575.4 26.3 271.5 87.3 118.0

25893 23013 24947 23113 22939 21506 18573

KENT

SUSSEX

LOYAL JAKE BENDER LOYAL JAKE BENDER GREEN ACRES FARM JOHN A. MILLS BAILEY, J. E. & SONS INC. HEATWOLE, JERREL & ALMA JOHN A. MILLS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

906 870 919 912 819 835 907

3.5 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.9 4.9

793 742 741 715 701 687 648

3.1 3.2 3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.5

The Dairy One Improver

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com Beaver County • Ronald & Diane Burry • Craig Farms • Nye Farms Berks County • Gary & Kathy Heffner • Oakenbound Holsteins • G & H Farms • Michael Forry • Arlan & Jane Krick • Knauer Brothers • One Hill Farm Moyer • Barry & Barbara Good • Miclin Farms • Carl Good • United Hearts Holsteins • Misty Moor Holsteins • Sunrise Farm Bradford County • County Path Holsteins • Davi Leray Dairy • Kevin & Sally Vanderpoel • Stewart’s Holsteins • John & Holly Allford Butler County • Michael & Annette Schiever • Under Grace Dairy • Chestnut Run Farm • Croft Brothers • Marburger Farm Dairy Cambria County • Ron Hoover • Vale Wood Dairy • Barr Ridge Farms • David Myers

Clearfield County • Carl Brink & Sons • Orner Farms, Inc.

• Lost Hollow Farm • Globe Run Farms • Wingert Farms

Columbia County • Jan Jurbala

Indiana County • Pleasant View Farm • Craig Andrie • Jewart Dairy • Stewart Hollow Farm

Crawford County • Fosters Family Farm Cumberland County • Marcus Good • We-Style Holsteins • Smithdale Farm • Jet-Rae Farm • Curtis & Janice Weaver • Hensel Hill Farm • Triple L Farm Dauphin County • Pleasant Hill Farms • Ty & Tracy Long Elk County • Paul Swanson • Pierre Pontzer Erie County • George Heintz • William & Bryan Loper • Mark Vogel • Roger & Debra Gilkinson Fayette County • Starlight Hill Farm

Chester County • David F King Farm • Century Oak Farm • Neal & Mary Lou King

Franklin County • Milking Time Holsteins • Beidel Brothers • Middour Farms, LLC • Steven Ruby • Locust Hill Dairy • Dennis & Janice Bricker • Eric Niswander • James & Nina Burdette • Curtis & Erma Knepper • Milton Rotz • Paul Zimmerman • Poverty Lane, LP • Dennis Sollenberger

Clarion County • Nexgen Dairy, Inc. • John Henry

Huntington County • Behrer Farms • Heron Run Farms

Centre County • Heather Brown • Jesse Stover • Tom & Loretta Hartle • Valleys-End Farm

Jefferson County • Highland H Farms Juniata County • J. Scott Landis • Joel & Sara Mills • Red Sunset Farms • Robert Miller • Andrew & Robin Swartz • Charles & Tammy Kline Lancaster County • K+Q Swiss • Tru-Dale Farms • Spatz Cattle Company • Star Rock Dairy, Inc. Lawrence County • Martinholm Farms Lebanon County • Pleasant Patches Dairy • Reid Hoover • Leroy & Grace Wise • Promise Lane Farm • Clifford & Fay Berger • Curvin & Dawn Good • Reeds Creek Farm • Bruce Heilinger • Kendra Mase • Miste Hollow Holsteins • Ric-Rey Holsteins • White Birch Farm • Kevin & Allison Sellers • Robert & Sherry Bashore • Gary Lentz • Calvin & Thelma Zimmerman • Philhaven Farm • Earl Ray & Carol Martin • Locust Ridge Holsteins • Smith Farm • Mark M Hoover • Zim Lea Holsteins

to identify you on Twitter for replies and mentions. • Mentioning another user in your Tweet by including the @ sign followed directly by their username is called a “mention”. This is also refers to Tweets in which your username was included. Therefore, the @ sign is used to ‘callout’ usernames in Tweets. • A hashtag (the # symbol) is used to mark keywords or topics in a Tweet. A dairy producer may find Twitter useful in a variety of ways including: • To receive news and updates from dairy publications, government agencies, and local and national media; • To follow the activities of dairy and other agricultural organizations; • To educate others about the dairy industry; • To search for information on trending topics; • To share photos, Tweets from other users, and web links through Tweets. Source: Dairy Pipeline, June 2012

• • • • •

Leon Martin Detweiler Farm Barry & Barbara Hostetter Little Hill Farm Harold Case

Lycoming County • Benjamin & Marjorie McCarty McKean County • Syn Tann Mercer County • Canon Dairy Farm Mifflin County • Elwood & Pauline Stitt • Ramond & Rose Kauffman • Robert & Diane Kauffman • Paul Neer • Nathan Yoder • Forgy’s Dairy • Michael Yoder • John & Saloma Byler • Willows Farm • G Sheldon Peachey • Kauffman Dairy Farm • Jesse Spicher • Calvin & Elva Yoder • Dale King • Clark N. Peachey • Ray & Tura Hostetler • Ammon Farms • Ver-Nan Hosteins Montgomery County • Merrymead Farm Northhampton County • Koehler Farm • Brewer Farms • Ralph Hahn • Red Mapl Spring Farm Northumberland County • Gla-Dan Holsteins • Shultz Hillside Dairy • H & B Farm • Spring Lake Dairy • Dry Run Dairy, LLC Perry County • Nikoda-View Farm

• • • • •

Provida Dairy Farm Phillip Wenger Laurel Grove Farm M W Smith Farms Sylvin Wenger

Potter County • Edko Farms • John & Carol Fowler Schuykill County • Miller & Rex, Inc. • Brian & Brenda Ruch • Snyderland Farms Snyder County • Mabarbil Farm • Warrencrest Holsteins • Ernest Weaver Somerset County • Pleasant Side Farm • First Love Holsteins Steuben County • Dunlea Dairy Susquehanna County • Kenneth Gesford • Walker Farms • RM Shipsky & Sons • Reuben & Elizabeth Everitt • Joe & Lisa Valentine Tioga County • Henry & Kelly Sherman Union County • Buff Run Farm Warren County • Donald Ekey • Martha Beardsley • Aggravation Acres • Matt Wilcox Washington County • John Marchezak • Plainfield Farm Part Wayne County • N. Gary Kravetsky • Highland Farms

• Jack & Ella Chyle • Kevin & Gerarda Burleigh Westmoreland County • Bill & Rick Ebert • Hixson Farm York County • Tayacres Farm • Robert & Sharon Baumgardner • Walk-Le Holsteins • Kate-Ann Farm • Gum Tree Farm

VERMONT Addison County • Middlebrook Farm, Inc. • Cary Family Farm • M & J Dairy • Deer Valley Farm • Four Hills Farm Chittenden County • Twin Oaks Dairy Farm, LLC Franklin County • Fournier Acres • Burland Farms • Grant John Gorton Grand Isle County • North Island Dairy Orange County • Knoxland Farm /2 Windsor County • Jason Johnson

VIRGINIA Clarke County • Riggs & Stiles Orange County • Rock Bottom Dairy, LLC

WEST VIRGINIA Greenbrier County • Lotus Hill Farm • Ben Buck Farm Monroe County • William Beiler

Page 21 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Tweets aren’t just for the birds: Using Twitter as a source of information


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 22

National Dairy Producers offer a unique proposal to supply management in the DISSA When producers recently met in Virginia, New York and Pennsylvania to discuss an array of industry-related issues, a certain detail outlined in the Dairy Industry Stabilization and Sustainability Act of 2012 (DISSA) took many of them by surprise. The DISSA, drafted by the board of the National Dairy Producers Organization, Inc., offers a unique approach to supply management, by regulating only the production of class III and class IV milk. “This is a radical departure from any other proposal currently being considered by the dairy industry or elected officials in Washington,” National Dairy Producers’ Director Tom Van Nortwick said. The plan will manage the overproduction of milk used to manufac-

ture cheese, butter and powder which have a major and direct impact on the prices of all milk. The National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), will be used to determine trigger mechanisms when an excess of maximum production levels occur. Such a proposal would balance the supply of milk with profitable demand. According to board member Bob Krucker, it “provides the producer with a potential for profitability by changing the method and the mechanism which values or prices the milk.” Today, the price of butter, powder and cheese is priced by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME), and based on these values the price for class III and IV milk is established. But should the DISSA be

enacted, a regional minimum price will be set at 80 percent of the total cost of production for class III and class IV milk. Classes I and II will continue to be priced under the current Federal Milk Marketing Order (FMMO) formula. As classes I and II will always be higher under this pricing structure, the value of milk should be greater than what it costs to make, Krucker said. When the program is activated, each licensed

producer will be assigned a “production history base,” determined by their last three years of production. The highest annual milk production between 2009 and 2011 will become that producer’s “production history base”. “Bases” will be be annually adjusted according to the percentage of change in domestic demand. If excess inventory levels exist, the money paid for that percentage of milk used to manufac-

CLAUDIA PAULSON CRESTHAVEN FARMS DAVID HOOLEY BACK RUN DAIRY HAMMOCK DAIRY INC. RANDALL INMAN WHISPERING OAKS FARM JOHN O HARDESTY & SON WHITAKER FARM INC. DAVID TERRY CARLTON W BRUBAKER CEDAR RIDGE DAIRY INC HEATWOLE FAMILY DAIRY MEL-PAULA HOLSTEIN'S TRIPLE R DAIRY HOME PLACE DAIRY INC M B & MARK B GOODE WEST FINT WOLF RIDGE HOLSTEINS RIVERBEND DAIRY FARM HILLSIDE FARM INC. R.JEFFERSON BOWSTRING HOLSTEINS ERIC & RACHEL SIMMONS BACK CREEK DAIRY LINDEN AND CHRISTIE RHODES DAVE JOHNSON JORDAN ROHRER E H SPURLIN & SONS ASHLAND FARMS FRF CROSS KEYS LLC ROBERT D STOOTS M.D.& LEE SIMMONS LUKE & ROBERTA HEATWOLE ALFRED STEPHENS KNICELY BROS. INC #1 GARY W MCDONALD CHAD & REBECCA MCMURRAY BARNY BAY DAIRY INC ROHRER BROTHERS CLIFFORD BOWMAN SLATE HILL FARMS, LLC HARRY J AND RONALD L BENNETT NORMAN BOOTH BROOKSTONE FARM AMEVA FARM INC CONNER DAIRY FARM INC WILLOW BEND DAIRY MAJESTIC VIEW DAIRY ROBERT RUTROUGH OAK SPRING FARMS LLC JASON AND KAREN HEWITT NATHAN HORST STEVE AND MARY MCCROSKEY KENDRA & JULIA HORST GOLDENVIEW DAIRY INC

TOWN (3X) PORT REPUBLIC VA (3X) GALAX VA (3X) AMELIA VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA CHATHAM VA (3X) MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA BERRYVILLE VA AMELIA CT HSE VA RURAL RETREAT VA (3X) BOONES MILL VA (3X) ELKTON VA HARRISONBURG VA (3X) ROANOKE VA CREWE VA (3X) DAYTON VA (3X) HUDDLESTON VA SALTVILLE VA (3X) BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA DUBLIN VA CHATHAM VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) PULASKI VA SINGERS GLEN VA GLADE SPRING VA GROTTOES VA (3X) GALAX VA CULPEPER VA HARRISONBURG VA MAX MEADOWS VA MOUNT SOLON VA MT. CRAWFORD VA WYTHEVILLE VA HARRISONBURG VA STEPHENS CITY VA HARRISONBURG VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA DAYTON VA CALLAWAY VA HARRISONBURG VA COVINGTON VA (3X) SPOUT SPRING VA HARRISONBURG VA AMELIA VA FLOYD VA BRIDGEWATER VA DAYTON VA ROCKY MOUNT VA UPPERVILLE VA MT. CRAWFORD VA WEYERS CAVE VA MENDOTA VA (3X) HARRISONBURG VA REDWOOD VA

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E YEARS E D

870 3.7 708 3.0 3X 858 3.7 701 3.0 3X 751 3.5 658 3.0

DHIR H 607.0 DHI-AP H 888.8

26042 22278

993 3.8 795 3.1 3X 778 3.5 703 3.2

DHI H 33.2

16900

627 3.7 519 3.1

ROBERT & STEPHANIE WHIPPLE DHI-AP H 100.4 ROBERT & STEPHANIE WHIPPLE DHI-AP X 13.6

22427 15703

846 3.8 697 3.1 723 4.6 546 3.5

DHI-AP H 145.1

22286

810 3.6 690 3.1

DHI-AP H 137.1

21274

752 3.5 627 2.9

JERRY MICHAEL FARM 2

ROCKBRIDGE

ROCKINGHAM WEST BRANCH DAIRY

SHENANDOAH

WILKINS BROTHERS DAIRY

Herds Ranked by Daily Milk Lbs Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh The United Federation DHIA's, Va Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (540) 552-2541

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK LBS

LBS MILK

% FAT

95.4 94.5 89.3 87.7 87.4 86.9 86.6 86.5 86.0 84.7 84.6 84.6 84.6 83.7 83.7 83.4 83.3 83.0 82.8 82.7 82.7 82.6 82.2 81.6 81.4 81.3 80.9 80.6 80.6 80.3 80.1 80.1 80.0 80.0 79.5 79.4 79.3 79.3 78.8 78.8 78.6 78.5 78.4 77.9 77.8 77.2 77.0 77.0 76.8 76.7 76.4 76.3 76.1 75.9 75.8 75.7

203 215 192 201 207 197 170 204 205 155 194 179 162 198 218 175 233 185 258 163 175 179 202 244 208 129 168 194 210 216 197 206 199 199 225 162 215 178 209 214 161 177 258 246 187 212 168 186 173 214 158 64 194 186 172 152

26996 31140 25511 25121 25917 26400 25964 25259 25152 21439 24865 24483 26268 23688 27533 25077 21653 23297 24708 24990 24356 25471 25985 23305 23224 18364 22249 23706 24776 23124 23149 25463 24106 26324 24559 22122 26497 23979 24951 25460 23723 21360 25433 23420 21764 25949 23763 23512 27327 24158 15770 . 23332 23859 22676 22452

3.9 1049 3.1 976 3.5 898 3.7 921 3.6 943 4.0 1064 3.6 926 3.6 914 4.0 997 3.5 752 3.4 839 3.9 948 3.8 989 3.6 843 3.4 925 3.5 881 3.8 817 3.7 853 3.3 826 3.7 924 3.7 889 3.7 946 3.8 999 3.4 785 3.7 865 3.6 668 3.2 704 3.3 779 3.4 833 3.9 901 4.0 916 3.9 998 3.7 890 3.3 862 3.8 922 3.9 857 3.5 915 3.9 925 3.6 903 3.1 791 3.8 911 3.5 744 3.6 922 3.9 902 3.9 845 3.7 972 3.0 720 3.9 910 3.5 950 3.9 940 4.7 740 . . 3.5 807 2.9 687 3.6 808 4.0 898

LBS FAT

3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.1 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.8 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 0.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.3 3.1 2.9 2.9 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.5 . 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.2

804 937 791 729 784 786 758 782 773 646 726 708 795 729 800 733 667 719 753 708 737 774 767 705 703 573 674 687 26 733 693 777 722 767 761 672 872 732 733 751 715 613 738 726 673 793 696 708 836 748 551 . 694 702 687 716

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

23516 23107 21757

LOUDOUN

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

FAT

DHI-APCS H 259.7 DHI-AP H 573.8 DHIR-AP H 309.4

RIGGS & STILES INC WHITE POST DAIRY LLC

DAYS IN MILK

RHA MILK

VIRGINIA

CLARK

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

KEVIN PHILLIPS NORTH POINT FARM INC. MEADOW RUN DAIRY INC

MAY

R A MTH N K

review board and will be used for the improvement of market conditions for dairy producers. To review a copy of the DISSA, visit www.nationaldairyproducers.org .

Top 40 Herds For May

AUGUSTA

UNITED DHI VIRGINIA TOTALS TEST

ture cheese, butter and powder beyond the producer’s licensed history base will be distributed into a producer controlled fund. These monies will be managed by a producer

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER TURNER DAIRY STANLEY KOOGLER WINDCREST HOLSTEINS LLOYD E PHILLIPS BURKDALE FARM MT AIRY DAIRY FARM LLC LAKESIDE DAIRY FARM INC. MICHAEL COUNTISS CHARLES F MOYER AND SONS CARTER S ELLIOTT JR PENNCREST FARM HENRY L HOPKINS WALKUP HOLSTEINS JARECO FARMS TIDEWATER-DAIRY FARM INC% RED-VALE DAIRY DONALD & WAYNE COX ALLEN L SHANK EARLY DAWN DAIRY LEWIS AND KEVIN WENGER BILL BLALOCK BELAIR DAIRY, LLC CUB RUN DAIRY ALLEN LAYMAN J HOLLACE BOWMAN & SONS GARY RUSSELL & RUDOLPH RUSSELL STONEYBROOK DAIRY LESTER & CAROL COBB GRANDVIEW HOLSTEINS,INC STAN AND WES SHOWALTER SPRING CREEK FARM COTTAGE FARM SAM AREY AND LARRY MOORE LANAHAVEN FARM,INC RIVER HAVEN FARMS INC MOTLEY DAIRY INC. WALL BROTHERS INC CHERRY GROVE FARM INC LONG-ACRE FARM OLE VA HOLSTEINS RIVERSIDE FARM ASSOCIATES LLC ELBE FARM, LLC BROWN EMERY & CHERYL BOWMAN OAK SPRING FARMS LLC DAN ABE SLEMP AND SON J S HUFFARD III JACOB SHENK JOE BLANKENSHIP R Y STILES & SONS DAVID G & DARLENE F HOFFMAN MICHAEL AND LORI WEBB NELSON & BEVERLY SINE & FAMILY E CLINE BRUBAKER HEDGEBROOK FARM

TOWN (3X)

R A MTH N K TEST

BEDFORD VA 5 57 HARRISONBURG VA 5 58 TIMBERVILLE VA (3X) 4 59 RADFORD VA 5 60 HARRISONBURG VA 5 61 MT JACKSON VA 5 62 MINERAL VA 5 63 ABINGDON VA (3X) 5 64 AMELIA VA 5 65 RUSTBURG VA (3X) 5 66 FARMVILLE VA 5 67 ROCKY MOUNT VA 4 68 HARRISONBURG VA 5 69 PENHOOK VA 5 70 WARSAW VA 5 71 BOONES MILL VA 5 72 RADFORD VA 5 73 BRIDGEWATER VA 5 74 CHARLOTTESVILLE VA 5 75 DAYTON VA 5 76 BASKERVILLE VA 5 77 CULPEPER VA 5 78 MCGAHEYSVILLE VA (3X) 5 79 WIRTZ VA 5 80 ROCKY MOUNT VA 5 81 WOODLAWN VA 5 82 WIRTZ VA 5 83 DAYTON VA 5 84 CHATHAM VA 5 85 BRIDGEWATER VA 5 86 BRIDGEWATER VA 5 87 COLONIAL BEACH VA 4 88 MOUNT SIDNEY VA 5 89 FERRUM VA 5 90 RADFORD VA 5 91 CHATHAM VA 5 92 BLACKSBURG VA 5 93 FAIRFIELD VA 5 94 MT JACKSON VA 5 95 FERRUM VA 5 96 MANQUIN VA 4 97 LINVILLE VA 5 98 MARTINSVILLE VA 5 99 ROCKY MOUNT VA 5 100 VIRGINIA COLOR BREEDS UPPERVILLE VA 5 1 SUGAR GROVE VA 5 2 CROCKETT VA 5 3 CATLETT VA 5 4 SUGAR GROVE VA 5 5 CLEAR BROOK VA 5 6 CULPEPER VA 5 7 CONCORD VA 5 8 WOODSTOCK VA 4 9 ROCKY MOUNT VA 5 10 WINCHESTER VA 5 11

ANNUAL AVERAGES B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

75.6 75.4 75.3 74.9 74.5 73.9 73.9 73.9 73.8 73.8 73.6 73.5 73.5 73.4 73.4 73.2 73.2 73.1 73.0 73.0 72.8 72.8 72.8 72.7 72.6 72.6 72.5 72.2 72.1 72.1 72.0 72.0 71.9 71.9 71.9 71.8 71.6 71.1 71.1 71.0 71.0 71.0 70.8 70.8

210 185 209 211 197 189 218 166 202 228 202 198 188 208 221 211 231 230 217 172 191 203 209 178 217 245 196 188 173 191 205 206 136 176 210 222 207 197 177 179 189 193 203 194

22493 21179 22420 21468 22683 20884 24514 23537 23641 23350 21181 22107 22917 23035 19725 22525 22231 22762 23286 . 22257 22912 24481 22579 22473 25099 22172 21940 22450 21926 23211 21829 19798 20987 23053 21701 21159 23274 21629 20418 19247 21063 23526 21443

3.7 3.5 3.7 4.0 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.4 4.2 3.6 3.4 3.9 4.1 4.0 4.3 3.3 3.6 3.7 4.0 . 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.6 . 3.9 3.5 3.8 3.6 3.6 4.0 3.6 3.6 3.8 3.5 3.8 3.6 3.7

824 747 837 855 849 756 883 803 990 838 730 854 941 925 847 741 811 831 942 . 780 855 900 828 818 890 839 774 797 780 . 855 686 801 821 782 848 849 787 771 676 805 848 798

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.2 3.0 . 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 . 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2

700 643 692 672 697 618 715 697 735 695 656 682 673 719 617 645 689 720 708 . 684 709 728 659 658 762 669 681 690 655 . 679 583 659 691 674 673 695 648 625 585 648 728 680

76.4 62.9 55.6 53.0 53.0 50.3 48.5 45.8 44.0 42.7 38.2

158 173 159 208 178 203 210 151 160 190 153

15770 18329 16122 15447 14662 14400 16141 . 12339 13350 12086

4.7 4.4 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.7 4.5 . 4.5 4.8 4.2

740 813 752 727 705 677 733 . 557 645 507

3.5 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.5 . 3.3 3.4 3.4

551 B 598 J 563 J 552 J 518 J 532 J 569 J . J 410 J 448 G 416 J


On June 4, Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) outlined its support for legislation that would change the way public schools are funded during testimony before the state House Finance Committee. Farm Bureau provided comments on House Bill 1776, which calls for the elimination of school property taxes and for schools to be funded through increases in the local income tax and state sales tax. Farm Bureau noted that the current system imposes substantial financial burdens on farm families. PFB acknowledged that some farmers in Pennsylvania do receive a measure of property tax relief through the state’s Clean and Green program, which allows farmers to

DAIRYMEN SPECIALTY CO. INC. 2098 John Wayland Hwy. Harrisonburg, VA 22801 540-433-9117 800-572-2123

TERRITORY REPRESENTATIVES VIC LEININGER Pennsylvania 417-872-5715 DREW DENMAN Virginia 417-872-5053

pay taxes based on the agriculture value of the land rather than its development value.

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-week k updatess and d onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations.

Page 23 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

PA Farm Bureau supports changing school funding method


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 24

2012 Atlantic National Super Point Roll of Victory Angus Show, Timonium, MD, May 27, 2012

Grand Champion Bull — Gambles Safe Bet won grand champion bull at the 2012 Atlantic National Super Point Roll of Victory Angus Show, May 27, in Timonium, MD. Holly Gamble, Clinton,TN, owns the April 2010 son of Northern Improvement 4480 GF. He first claimed junior champion. Scott Buchanan, Aldie,VA, evaluated the 179 entries.

Reserve Grand Champion Bull — Cherry Knoll Lutton 1133 won reserve grand champion bull. Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, owns the April 2011 son of Exar Lutton 1831. He first won late spring calf champion. Photos by Shelia Stannard, American Angus Association.

Grand Champion Cow-calf Pair — J K S Miss Cheyenne 4209 won grand champion cow-calf pair. Jamie Smith, Lebanon, TN, owns the April 2009 daughter of A A R New Design 6537. A March 2012 heifer calf sired by S A V Pioneer 7301 completes the winning pair.

Reserve Grand Champion Cow-calf Pair — JEA LF Erica 721 won reserve grand champion cow-calf pair. Just-Enuff Angus, Bethlehem, PA owns the August 2007 daughter of S A V 8180 Traveler 004. A September 2011 bull calf sired by S A V Bismarck 5682 is at side.

Grand Champion Female — Cherry Knoll Lady Pippa 1111 won supreme champion and grand champion female. Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, owns the February 2011 daughter of Connealy Final Solution. She first claimed early spring calf champion.

Reserve Grand Champion Female — Champion Hill Cheyenne 7796 won reserve grand champion female. Caroline Cowles, Rockfield, KY, owns the September 2010 daughter of S A V Free Spirit 8164. She first won senior calf champion.


Midatlantic Not your father’s farm bill by Tracy Taylor Grondine Farm bill legislation (S.3240) that’s working its way through the Senate is not your father’s typical farm bill. It’s about the future. The

Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act recognizes that U.S. farmers are aging and something needs to be done to ensure that the future of agriculture is vi-

able. S. 3240 includes significant measures to address this demographic predicament. According to the Agriculture Department’s most recent census, the

average age of the American farmer is 57 years old. Further, a quarter of American farmers are 65 or older. The future of American agriculture depends on the next gener-

Section B

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation ation of farmers and ranchers. More than any previous farm bill, this one takes direct aim at providing retiring farmers extra benefits for passing their farms on to beginning farmers. Probably most importantly, the bill provides nearly $200 million in new funding for expanded access for crop insurance for beginning farmers. These improvements will lower the cost of crop insurance for beginning farmers, allow the Risk Management Agency to consider a beginning farmer’s previous experience in calculating their production history, and it will provide additional assistance when beginning farmers face natural disasters. Farmers like Michigan fruit producer and Farm Bureau member Ben LaCross understand the importance of this provision first hand. In a normal year, his farm produces 4 million pounds of cherries. Due to extremely bad weather conditions, this year he’ll be lucky to harvest 40,000 pounds — only 1 percent of his normal production. This level of losses is tough on any producer, but especially catastrophic for a beginning farmer who is still trying to build up equity. If S. 3240 were in existence today, Ben and others like him would have the opportunity to cover more of their crops under crop insurance, using new programs that would provide better coverage at a lower cost. In other areas, the bill continues the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program, which offers education, training, outreach and mentoring programs to ensure the success of the next generation of farmers. It also increases access to capital and prioritizes the needs of be-

ginning farmers to ensure they have access to programs like the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, a program that is critical to farmers and ranchers striving to be good stewards of the land and trying to meet tough environmental mandates. The bill makes significant strides in increasing lending to beginning farmers by expanding eligibility, removing term limits on guaranteed lending and providing opportunities for beginning farmers to earn direct loan access. For the first time, USDA will have the ability to create pilot programs in the Farm Loan Programs exclusively targeted to beginning farmers. Finally, the farm bill legislation encourages older farmers to help beginning farmers get started by providing two extra years of Conservation Reserve Program participation to retiring farmers who transition their expiring CRP land to beginning farmers. Unlike past farm bills, this one is about the future. It’s about farmers like Ben LaCross and the many other young and beginning farmers and ranchers who want to one day pass their farms to their own children. Tracy Taylor Grondine is director of media relations for the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Page 1 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Country y Folks


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 2

Nomination schedule set for 2012 Virginia Junior Livestock Expo BLACKSBURG, VA — Virginia Cooperative Extension has set the nomination schedule for youth livestock projects at the 2012 Virginia Junior Livestock Expo. All 4-H and FFA members who wish to exhibit at the 2012 Virginia Junior Livestock Expo are required to first nominate their livestock projects in order to participate. The Virginia Junior Livestock Expo was created as the culminating activity for youth livestock projects. It will replace the annual junior livestock show activities that were previously held at the State Fair of Virginia. The expo will take place Oct. 11-14 at the Rockingham County Fairgrounds in Harrisonburg, VA. All youth who plan to exhibit market lambs, commercial ewe lambs, market goats, market hogs, market steers/heifers, and — new this year — commercial heifers, commercial does, and commercial gilts at the expo are required to bring their animals to one of the designated nomination sites for identification. Also new in 2012, nominations will be held during two time frames. • Nominations for all market lambs, commercial ewes, market goats, commercial does, market steers/heifers, and commercial heifers born Sept. 30, 2010, to Dec. 31, 2011, will occur during mid-to-late June. The animals must be nominated no later than June 26. Commercial heifers born after Jan. 1, 2012, may be nominated at the same time, but they are not required to

be tagged and nominated until late July/early August. • Nominations for all market hogs, commercial gilts, and commercial heifers (born Jan. 1, 2012, or later) will be held in late July/early August. The animals must be nominated no later than Aug. 13. A complete schedule of dates and locations for the nomination sites, as well as the rules and nomination procedures, are available on the Virginia Junior Livestock Expo website, www.ext.vt.edu/livestockexpo Exhibitors who are unable to attend a nomination site or do not see a time listed for a specific species should contact their local Extension agent at least two weeks prior to the district nomination date to arrange a time to have their animals nominated. Failure to nominate animals by the deadlines will result in ineligibility to show at the 2012 Virginia Junior Livestock Expo. Nominations at these sites do not constitute entry into the Virginia Junior Livestock Expo. Exhibitors will be required to enter each animal they wish to exhibit. All entries must be postmarked by Aug. 15, and will require the signature of the local Extension agent or FFA advisor. The Virginia Junior Livestock Expo will be open to all Virginia 4-H and FFA members and will offer market and breeding shows for beef cattle, swine, sheep, and meat goats, as well as a stockmen’s contest. Various other agricultural contests and events will in-

clude a crops contest, junior forester contest, horticulture demonstration, and agriscience demonstration. Virginia FFA will also host its state smallengines contest, tractor-troubleshooting contest, and forestry field day. In 2011, 445 young people exhibited more than 940 animals during the state fair. An additional 1,000 youth

competed in other agricultural contests held in conjunction with the fair. For more information regarding the Virginia Junior Livestock Expo and sponsorship opportunities, contact Paige Pratt, e-mail: pjpratt@vt.edu, youth livestock Extension specialist, at 540-231-4732.

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Country Folks has partnered with the New York State Corn and Soybean Growers Association to publish the summer edition of the Association's newsletter, The NY Crop Grower. This will be a special insert to the JULY 9th edition of Country Folks East and West, with details about the 2012 Summer Crop Tour. It will also be mailed to all of the members of the association and to prospective members. Additional copies will be available at Empire Farm Days in the New York Corn and Soybean Association booth.

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by George Greig, Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture This month we celebrate the work of Pennsylvania’s dairy farmers. Diligent, dedicated and determined, dairy farmers form the backbone of the state’s agriculture industry. The dairy industry leads the state, contributing 34 percent of all agricultural income and generating more than $1.9 billion in revenue. More than 7,400 dairy farmers manage 541,000 cows that produce 10.7 billion pounds, or 5.5 percent, of the nation’s milk supply each year, ranking Pennsylvania fifth nationally in milk production. We at the Department of Agriculture are working to ensure all Pennsylvanians can continue to enjoy quality milk and other dairy products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream. As June marks the end of the school year for most of our chil-

dren, and for some the end of daily access to milk, this month is the perfect time to remind Pennsylvanians of the importance of dairy. Approximately 10 percent of our population is at risk for hunger, and many children are not getting essential nutrients like calcium, potassium and magnesium. Milk and dairy products contain all three plus others that make dairy an important part of every diet. The department is committed to helping families get the dairy they need through programs like the State Food Purchase Program. As one of only a small number of states in the nation to provide state dollars for an emergency assistance food program, last year more than $17 million was provided to counties to purchase nutritious foods. In 2011, the program provided 1.6 million pounds of dairy products to house-

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holds in need. Part of our effort to make sure families can enjoy dairy products also includes bolstering the dairy industry and preparing it for the opportunities and challenges of the future. Gov. Tom Corbett created the Dairy Leadership Council to strengthen the industry and provide our farmers with the tools they need to keep their farms viable. Made up of producers and industry leaders representing key dairy sectors, the council has split into workgroups and is looking at four areas: regulatory structure; marketing strategies; producer and next generation education; and economic development, finance and infrastructure. Soon the council will convene to review workgroup reports, establish priorities and determine next steps. The Center for Dairy Excellence is busy working to keep our dairy farms profitable. Recently, center staff presented a professional development program for dairy industry consultants designed to enhance succession and transition facilitation skills. This “Building the Bridge to Dairy Transition” will help countless farm families break the communications barrier and navigate difficult decisions to help ensure there is a next generation of dairy leaders. The center is also working to reach children, especially those who don’t live on farms, with information about how milk and dairy foods are produced through Discover Dairy, an inter-

Wee Salutee thee Dairy Farmers

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active website and lesson series. Education about the industry will help children make informed purchase and consumption choices as adults, keeping the industry viable and encourage them to explore the many careers available in the dairy industry. Continuing its consumer outreach efforts, the department is helping families learn about which milk they find on their grocery store shelves was produced on local dairy farms only miles from their homes. Later this month, I’ll be in Pittsburgh to help promote our newest PA Preferred™ milk processor, Schneider’s Dairy, at the Hometown–Homegrown®: A Celebration of Food from the Best in the ’Burgh. The blue

and gold PA Preferred™ logo, representing the official branding program of commonwealth agricultural commodities, will appear on milk trucks and cartons throughout the western part of the state. As a former dairy farmer and now as a consumer, I’m proud of

our dairy industry and of the efforts we’re making to ensure its long-term viability. The steps we’re taking now to help more Pennsylvanians get milk and dairy products into their refrigerators and to keep the industry profitable are the building blocks to keeping Pennsylvania growing.

NMPF and IDFA oppose Senate Farm Bill amendment legalizing national sales of raw milk WASHINGTON, D.C. — The two organizations representing America’s dairy farmers and dairy foods companies jointly announced their opposition recently to a proposal in the Senate that would allow the interstate sales of raw milk. Senator Rand Paul (RKY) has introduced an amendment to the 2012 Farm Bill, No. 2180, that would allow the direct sale of raw milk and raw milk products across state lines, “greatly enhancing the chances that people will become sick because of increased consumption of unpasteurized milk,” the two groups said in a letter sent to members of the Senate. “Pasteurization is one of the greatest public health tools. To compromise or reduce its use

through this legislation is not just bad politics — it’s a huge, inhumane step backwards, and one that will cause sickness and death,” said Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. Federal law currently prohibits the interstate sale of raw milk, but allows states individual discretion to regulate raw milk sales within their borders. Several states in recent years have liberalized sale or distribution of raw milk, even as the product has been repeatedly linked to serious illnesses from coast to coast. “The link between raw milk and foodborne illness has been well-documented in the scientific literature, with evidence spanning nearly 100 years, said Connie Tipton, President and CEO

of IDFA. “Raw milk is a key vehicle in the transmission of human pathogens, which is why its consumption has been opposed by every major health organization in the United States, including the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics.” Kozak said that lawmakers have to keep in mind that “nearly twothirds of all outbreaks associated with raw milk or raw milk products involve children. It is the responsibility of our nation’s leaders to make decisions to protect the health of the American public, most especially, those who are minors and are unable to make fully informed decisions that could have profound consequences for the rest of their lives,” he said. Tipton said that “While consumer choice is an important value, it should not pre-empt public health and wellbeing. Legalizing the sale of raw milk and raw milk products to consumers, either through direct sale or through cowshare programs, represents an unnecessary risk to consumer safety. Therefore, we ask that you oppose Amendment No. 2180.”

Page 3 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Celebrating dairy, not just in June


BLUE HEELER PUPS $50ea. 3 Males, 4 females. Ready to go in 2 weeks. Abner King. 2550 W.Wycoff Rd. Ovid, NY. HORSE DRAWN hay loaders, tedders, mowing machines, corn stalk binder. 603464-6067.(NH) ZERO 1000 gallon bulk tank with 5HP compressor, works $1,200. Cato, NY. 315626-3288. CROWN ROTARY rock picker 2 4x4 aluminum box beams, 24 foot long $125. each. 518-293-6298.(NY) 70 BY 14 SINGLE WIDE trailer, fully gutted, new sheetrock, new wiring with porch $2,500. 315-527-6203.(NY) KRONE KR-130 ROUND BALER, “twine mechanism”, new, $300 - 518-993-5426 ext. 2.(NY) 316 NEW HOLLAND baler with pan thrower, nice condition $6,500. 518-6388724.(NY) SHEEP/ PIG SCALE $400. Fitting stand $350. Goat Gopher $225. Sheep/ Goat chute $600. Will e-mail pictures, maxthecattledog@hotmail.com 315-9459006.(NY) CORN CRIB with 42 20’ poles, fence and metal roof, $2,000 or best offer - 315-7290828.(NY)

WANTED TO BUY: JD tractors running, parts, or need of repair. Cash paid. Also,2 row corn planter in working condition. 518695-6180(NY)

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN bull, 15 months, outcross to most current breeding. Dam EX Mammary Bolton, also Heifers due June and July. 413-527-6274.(MA)

TO CALLER, Both Papecs Model 35, Not 35A. NOS Galaxy 19L-16.1 12ply RibImplement tire, $150/bro - 603-7872396.(NH)

RESTORED 1941 LA with all equipment, also 1941H 1943A 1946B Terratrac GT25 dozer and New Idea ground driven spreader. 607-369-7656.(NY)

30FT. HAY AND Grain elevator with motor, super hutch calf.tel. New Holland 770 Field Chopper with pickup head, also big. 315398-9211.(NY)

REGISTERED AYRSHIRE BULL 15 months old, sired by Ramius, DAM has 3yr. record 280 days 22,899. Semen also for sale, 802-866-5438.(NY)

WD ALLIS CHALMERS with loader, runs good $1,900. Campbell, NY area. 607-3689629

NEW HOLLAND 477 haybine, excellent condition, $1,275; Case S.C. tractor, runs, $875; John Deere rake, $600 - 716-5927593.(NY)

FOR SALE: 4 Llamas 2 male, 2 female. Asking $1,000. 845-489-1874.(NY)

IH 915 COMBINE with 15’ 810 grain head, runs good, always inside, $4,500/obo; 1981 homemade livestock trailer, 12’, $500 - 585-554-6628.(NY)

EBY CATTLE trailer 24’x8’ $20,000. Sullivan show box 21”x24”x58” $275. 24” Fan half horsepower $150. 603-446-3324.(NH)

JD B; 30’ hay & grain elevator w/motor; 110 gallon tank w/front brackets for IH 706; 1977 Ford F700 dump truck. 315-7192149(NY)

FARMALL LOADER off M, but will fit many Farmall models. Comes with two buckets, great condition $500. ask for Austin. 607263-5120.(NY)

1034 KUHN BALE accumulator 9,250. 8360 Case IH haybine 2,800. Maxxum 125 4x4 cab power shift only 250hrs. $65,000. 585-526-4785.(NY)

HORSE FENCE, black vinyl, Hot Cote wire, brand new, .60 a foot, 6,000’ total. WANTED: 8-10’ Bush Hog. 315-8230812.(NY)

NH 271 BALER with steel wheels and 2 cylinder Wisconsin motor, field ready also 2x14 White Horse hydraulic trailer plow. 315-823-2053.(NY) WANTED: JD 350 or 450 Track loader, in good condition, 60% UC plus. Cell 908619-0462 or 908-362-7478.(NJ) MID- 1950’s UNIT shovel on tracks, in working condition. GM 271 diesel engine, cable operated, 1/2 yard bucket $4,000. 845-679-2864.(NY) PEQUEA 710 TEDDER $600; Ford 4400? with loader, backhoe, tractor partial burned, hoe good, $2,500 - 315-5361091.(NY) REGISTERED BLACK Angus bulls. World class genetics, easy going demeanor. Bred for calving ease. Only three left. Don’t miss out! 716-378-7151.(NY)

NEW HOLLAND 166 Inverter merger with extension table, excellent condition $3,500. 607-346-1067.(NY) IH 183 CULTIVATOR, 4 row, S-tine, excellent condition, $850. E. Fox 585-5266634.(NY) MANY JD 1360 discbine, will sell any parts off them. Farmall 340 fast hitch, power steering, new tires $2,600. 315-9424069.(NY) FOR SALE: NH round baler 846, good $2,500. 607-687-3028.(NY)

MASSEY FERGUSON 3 point sickle mower, stored inside, $500. Excellent shape - 585-548-2434.(NY)

500 GAL. pull behind side dresser setup for 6 rows. 315-776-4110.(NY)

FARMALL TRACTOR Super A cultivators, excellent condition $3,600. 704-5165340.(NC)

CASE IH 1660 COMBINE, Century 500gal. sprayer 45’ hydraulic folding booms. 8x60 Transport auger pto. IH 1086 tractor with duals. 315-789-0882.(NY)

ROUND BALER, New Holland 638, twine, 4x4, like new $8,000. Agco 3715 Manure spreader, b.new $6,500. Oliver 351SB mower $1,750. 607-656-4568.(NY)

WOODS BRUSH HOG-B8400 HD 3pt. mower dual tail, wheels VG condition $4,500. Ford-4000, gas, 3pt. hitch, p/s, no pto $2,500. 413-738-5379.(MA)

1986 GMC 7000 STEEL DUMP 14’x7’6”x4”, 17,000 original miles, excellent shape, good firewood or insilage truck, $4,500 - 413-458-8438.(MA)

WANTED: Rear wheel WTS Ford 7710 34” rubber, also stabilizer bars for 3PH arms for International 684. 315-823-2375.(NY)

JD 301A TRACTOR, side mount sickle bar mower, 2400HR $5,500. JD 440 Crawler loader $2,500, JD 46A loader $1,000. 716289-1472.(NY)

18 4X4 ROUND BALES stored outside from 2011 season, could be fed for beef cows, will sell cheap, you haul. 607-7613883.(NY)

JD 8300 GRAIN drill, 24 openers, 6” spacing, no grass seed, single disc openers $1,200. 315-529-9842.(NY)

GELDING ¼ BELGIAN ¾ HAFLINGER, 9, rides, drives; Also, Registered Haflinger mare, 6, rides, drives, $600/each - 585786-2828.(NY)

4 YEAR OLD Standard Morgan cross Green broke, need miles. Call for more information $1,000. OBO. 315-5364506.(NY)

LOG CABIN FARM HOUSE located on edge of farm in Windsor, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, new septic, roof, windows $229,900. 413-684-4665.(MA)

770 OLIVER 77 OLIVER VA Case 3 disks plows New Idea spreader horse drawn equipment running gear 801 Ford scavenger. 607-538-1654.(NY)

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UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — One source of income for Pennsylvania dairy farmers has hit its lowest point in three years, according to a dairy market expert in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. James Dunn, professor of agricultural economics, said that in May, milk margin per hundredweight — the income portion left to pay dairy producers’ bills for inputs other than feed, such as electricity, equipment and labor — hit its lowest point in Pennsylvania since September 2009. “This is starting to really eat up the farmers,” Dunn said. “The milk price is not historically low, but the feed price is so high that the amount that’s left is not good.” The 2012 Pennsylvania average milk price is estimated to be $2.14 per hundredweight lower than it was in 2011. Feed prices and difficulty with weather and crop harvests have contributed to dairy producers’ struggles. Last year’s wet seasons hindered farmers’ ability to produce feed for their dairy herds. Dunn said some producers are running out of corn silage. Exports and the strength of the American dollar also have played a role in the fluctuating milk prices. With the amount of milk produced per cow increasing — creating more milk than the U.S. population can consume — dairy-product exports must increase

or cow numbers must shrink to balance supply and demand. Increased exports in the last year have meant the dairy industry could grow. In 2011, 14 percent of domestic milk production was exported, and prices were favorable. The exports were boosted by bad weather in Australia and New Zealand, leading to low milk production in those countries. Foodsafety concerns related to Chinese products also were a factor, as well as a then-weak U.S. dollar. Dairy producers used the favorable dairy prices to make largely the same decisions. “The problem always in agriculture is everybody looks at the same information and reaches the same conclusions,” Dunn said. “And when producers saw really nice prices, everybody said, ‘I’m going to expand.’” With the expansions came 4 percent more milk production in January through March than the same months in 2011. However, sales of milk could not increase at the same rate. Now the industry is trying to figure out how to adjust surpluses. Dunn said that could happen in two ways: finding more customers for the milk, and encouraging the industry to expand more slowly. The latter is happening gradually, and the growth in milk production in April was lower than it was in March.

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Now, the dairy industry needs to increase its exports by 20 percent, an amount Dunn said is substantial. “It’s one thing to have your market grow by 3 or 4 percent, but where are you going to find 20 percent more customers than you had last year?” he asked. “The world population is growing, and you can have some bad weather, but that’s too much to expect.” Another factor hurting the dairy industry is the recent strengthening of the U.S. dollar against some other currencies, which Dunn said hurts American exports. For example, compared to the euro, the value of the dollar is high, having increased by more than 10 percent in the last few months. The

strong dollar negatively affects export sales because it drives up the prices for American goods. “If we have a strong dollar, we can buy other people’s stuff for a good price, and our stuff is expensive to them,” Dunn said, emphasizing that agriculture is driven largely by exports. He added that a number of farmers are thinking of concentrating on crops instead of dairy. “Ordinarily, land in Pennsylvania is not suitable to be really competitive in corn and soybeans — too many small fields — but when the prices of corn and soybeans are high enough, then that works.”

Nutrient management farmer training and certification workshop offered The Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA) and University of Maryland Extension will offer a training and certification program for operators of equine and pasture-based operations who want to become certified by MDA to write and update their own nutrient management plans. The workshop will take place over the course of four evenings on July 10, 11, 17 and 24 at the University of Maryland Extension office in Ellicott City. For more information, call 410-8415959 or visit www.mda.maryland.gov. Scroll down the Quick Links to Nutrient Management and click on Nutrient

Management Training Classes for a registration form.

Page 5 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Expansions in dairy industry lead to surplus, lows for milk prices


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 6

The Pork Checkoff introduces a new level of professionalism The Pork Checkoff is introducing a new Certified Swine Manager program this fall to take pork producers to the next level in professionalism. The program will promote the industry’s ideal of continuous improvement and further the We CareSM ethical principles. In conjunction with this, the new program will define a core body of knowledge needed to achieve standards in pork production, establish educational standards, provide resources to acquire knowledge and offer certification to validate knowledge gained and work accomplished. “This program, developed with the U.S. Pork Center of Excellence

(USPCE), is another tool to help develop the knowledgeable, skilled employees who are invaluable to the success of the pork industry,” said Jim Lummus, manager of producer learning and performance for the Checkoff. To become a Certified Swine Manager, producers will be required to pass assessments, including both a test and an on-the-job evaluation, to confirm the individual’s competence in all pork production phases. The program will not have specific educational requirements but resources and materials will be available to help producers prepare for certification exams.

The assessments will verify employee knowledge, skills and abilities in areas including farm and personnel management, breeding and gestation, farrowing and wean-to-finish. “We hope producers will realize the program’s importance and incorporate it into their leadership development programs,” added Lummus. While the Certified Swine Manager program outlined above will not have educational requirements, materials and resources will be offered to help producers prepare for the certification exams. The USPCE,

in collaboration with the Pork Checkoff, is leading an effort to develop a community college curriculum for pork production workers. The Professional Swine Manager (PSM) curriculum will include classroom sessions, delivered via Internet by community college instructors experienced in pork production. Hands-on learning at a farm site and facilitated by a senior production manager will be part of the program. The courses will qualify for credit toward an associate degree, with the first courses offered this

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fall. Courses include Introduction to Swine Production, Sow Farm Management, Wean/Finish Management, Employee Management, Facility Operations, Production Records, and Internship/Work Experience. The PSM curriculum provides the means to offer economical, reliable training to employees. It also targets community or technical college students interested in becoming involved in pork production after graduation. “Completing the curriculum will help participants find employment and advancement opportunities in pork produc-

tion, as well as aiding in passing the certification exams to become a Certified Swine Manager,” said Lummus. “And it’s a win for the pork industry, with more skilled, trained individuals in the workforce pool.” For more information on the program, call 800-456-7675.

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GLEN ARM, MD — A special delegation of the Maryland Horse Industry Board (MHIB) visited a Baltimore County equestrian school on June 5 to present its Touch of Class Award to Merlin, a national champion therapeutic riding mount, who has helped hundreds of special needs children and adults deal with emotional issues and traumas throughout his career. The 32-year-old gelding, who is still in active use at the Rose of Sharon Equestrian School in Glen Arm (Baltimore County), was honored earlier this year as the American Morgan Horse Association’s “National Therapy Horse of the Year” at its annual awards program in Florida. “It is a privilege to be

here today with this gifted and caring horse who has quietly gone about his business of helping people and making a real difference in the lives of people in need, especially special needs children and adults,” said MHIB Chairman Jim Steele. “Merlin represents not only the very best of the equine species, he is truly a role model for all of us to emulate.” Merlin is a former show horse who “retired” from his first career at age 18 and took up residence as a therapeutic riding mount at the Rose of Sharon School — the school’s first therapeutic horse. His owner Joan Marie Twining, who is also the founder and executive director of Rose

of Sharon, said the charismatic and gentle Merlin is still the lead horse in her stable. “In the stable, there is something about Merlin’s presence that helps people in emotional distress bring their pain to the surface and release it in a wash of tears,” said Twining. “Dozens of people over the years have commented on how much better they feel after just spending time with him. I am humbled by his continued willingness to choose to do the work we are doing despite the predictable routine and the ravages of age. He’s a horse with special needs himself now, but he still takes himself and his work pretty seriously.”

Because Merlin no longer leaves the farm, a delegation from the MHIB went to Rose of Sharon to present the Touch of Class award to him and Twining in a special ceremony. The MHIB conceived of the “Touch of Class Award” nearly a year ago to honor the many Maryland horses and people who achieve national and international prominence. The award celebrates the memory of “Touch of Class,” the gallant Maryland-bred mare who won two Olympic Gold Medals in Showing Jumping at the 1984 Games in Los Angeles. Winners since its inception include: • September, 2011: Graham Motion, Ken-

tucky Derby-winning trainer from Fair Hill; • October, 2011: Colleen Rutledge from Mt. Airy and her horse, Shiraz, third highestplaced Americans at the 2011 Four-Star Burghley Horse Trials in England; • November, 2011: John Crandell III from West River, and his Arabian horse, Heraldic, winner of two Silver Medals in Endurance Riding at the 2011 Pan American Games in Chile; • December, 2011: Tiffany McClure from Cheltenham and her horse Dink, World Champion Barrel Racers on the International Professional Rodeo Association circuit; • January, 2012: Multiple National Champion Pony Hunter Sire Blue Rain, who stands at Springdale Pony Farm in Frederick, owners Allyson Coluccio and Lisa Gordon Carr; • February, 2012: Thoroughbred racer, Rapid Redux, winner of U.S. record 22 straight races and Special Eclipse Award winner, owned by Robert Cole of Highland; and two champion Standardbred racers, Champion U.S. 3-year-old Pacer, Roll With Joe, from Joe Thomson’s Winbak Farm in Chesapeake City and world record holder Googoo Gaagaa from the Richard Hans Farm in Westminster; • March, 2012: National steeplechase champions, owner Irv Naylor, from Glyndon, trainer Tom Voss from Monkton, and Bon Caddo, timber horse champion from

Glyndon, owned by Merriefield Farm and trained by Dawn Williams; • April, 2012: National Arabian racing champions Golden Odyssey and Dixies Valentine from Sharon Clark’s Rigbie Farm in Darlington; and • May, 2012: Merlin, the American Morgan Horse Association’s “National Therapy Horse of the Year” from Joan Twining’s Rose of Sharon Equestrian School in Glen Arm. Touch of Class recipients so far include 15 people and 11 horses, all national or international champions, from eight different Maryland counties (Cecil, Howard, Anne Arundel, Prince George’s, Frederick, Carroll, Baltimore and Harford) who are involved in nine varieties of horse sports — Thoroughbred racing, Three-Day Eventing, Endurance Riding, Western barrel racing, show hunters, Standardbred racing, steeplechasing, Arabian horse racing and therapeutic riding. The non-profit Rose of Share Equestrian School (ROSES), founded in 1998, offers therapeutic horsemanship programs for people with disabilities, volunteer openings for retirees and others, internship and research opportunities for college students, service learning hours for middle and high school students, and remediation classes for students academically at risk, as well as workshops and projects for Scouts. For more information about ROSES, see www.roseofsharonschool.org.

Page 7 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Touch of Class Award presented to national champion therapeutic riding mount


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 8

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The Kitchen Diva

by Angela Shelf Medearis Create an Italian Grill After almost 40 years of living in Texas, I’ve grown a bit tired of the brisket, ribs, burgers, hot dogs and chicken menu typically served at most barbeques. Even the side dishes from coleslaw to potato salad to beans could use a makeover. If you’ve run out of ideas for a holiday barbeque menu, try grilling Italian style! The beauty of making Italian dishes on the grill is that your guests can enjoy familiar dishes with a twist, served in a unique outdoor setting. Eggplant is found often in Italian dishes. It’s easy to grill and can be used in a variety of ways to please meat lovers, vegetarians and children. Improperly prepared eggplant can be slimy or bitter. To avoid bitterness, select young, tender eggplants with shiny skins that give slightly under light pressure. Overly mature eggplants can develop a bitter flavor. If you prepare and cook eggplant correctly, it’s delicious, and grilling makes it even more flavorful. My recipe for Grilled Eggplant Caponata is the perfect appetizer when served with grilled slices of bread, or makes an excellent Panini sandwich. You also can grill flatbread or pizza dough, pile the Caponata on top and sprinkle it with grated cheeses. It’s a delicious main course when tossed with hot pasta, or an excellent side dish when served cold as a pasta salad or tossed with crisp salad greens. Any way you serve Grilled Eggplant Caponata, it’s delicious!

Grilled Eggplant Caponata 4 2 2 2

large portabella mushrooms tablespoons olive oil small red onions, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices small eggplants (about 1 1/4 pounds each), cut

into 3/4-inch-thick slices 3 red, yellow or green bell peppers (or a combination), stems, ribs and seeds removed, and cut in half 4 medium celery stalks 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 6 medium plum tomatoes (about 1 1/2 pounds), cut into 1/2-inch chunks 1 cup kalamata, Gaeta or green Sicilian olives, pitted and chopped 1/4 cup golden raisins 3 tablespoons drained capers 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh Italian parsley leaves or basil Dressing: 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon sugar or stevia 1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper 1. If using a charcoal grill, clean and lightly oil the grate where the food will be placed to prevent sticking. Open vents on bottom of grill, then light charcoal. Charcoal fire is medium-hot when you can hold your hand 5 inches above rack for 3 to 4 seconds. If using a gas grill, clean and lightly oil the grate where the food will be placed. Preheat burners on moderately high, cover for 10 minutes, and then reduce heat to moderate. 2. Wash portabella mushrooms in cold water. Gently rinse gills on underside of the mushroom. Cut off end of stem to remove any dried or hardened section. Let mushrooms drain, gill side down, for 1 minute. 3. Rub or brush olive oil onto the tops of the mushrooms (the round caps, not the gills), onions, eggplants, peppers and celery stalks, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. 4. Place mushrooms, onions, eggplants, peppers and celery on the hot grill rack. Cover grill and cook vegetables 8 to 10 minutes or until tender and lightly

stock.xchg photo browned, turning over once and transferring to plate as they are done. Cool slightly until easy to handle. 5. In large bowl, mix vinegar, oil, sugar and pepper until blended. Cut mushrooms, eggplants, peppers and celery into 3/4-inch chunks; coarsely chop onions. Place vegetables in bowl with the dressing. Add tomatoes, olives, raisins, capers and parsley or basil. Gently toss ingredients and dressing until wellcombined. Makes 8 servings. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis

Comfort foods made fast and healthy

by Healthy Exchanges

Graduation loose meat sandwiches Whether your graduate is receiving a diploma from high school or college, you’ll probably want to share the special occasion with family and friends. Here’s a recipe guaranteed to head the “honor roll” of party celebration foods. By the way, if you don’t have a graduate in your family, how about hosting a party anyway and celebrate the coming of summer. You may just receive a diploma from everyone as the “hostess with the mostest.” 2 pounds extra-lean ground sirloin beef or turkey breast 1 1/2 cups finely chopped onion 2 cups diet cola 2 teaspoons parsley flakes 1/8 teaspoon black pepper 12 small hamburger buns 1. In a large skilled sprayed with butter-flavored cooking spray, brown meat and onion. Add diet cola, parsley flakes and black pepper. Mix well to combine. Lower heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until most of the moisture evaporates, stirring occasionally. 2. For each sandwich, spoon about 1/3 cup meat mixture between a hamburger bun. Serves 12. • Each serving equals: 199 calories, 7g fat, 18g protein, 16g carb., 232mg sodium, 1g fiber; Diabetic Exchanges: 2 Meat, 1 Starch. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

This week’s Sudoku solution

Page 9 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 10

MARKET REPORTS -

FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: Feeder Steers: 400-550# at 170; Red 125-135; BW Face 660# to 130; 10001100# 103-116; Dairy X 350# to 145; Hols. 250-400# to 125. Feeder Heifers: 275500# 130-147; 500-700# 125-141; 2 Blacks 358# at 164. Feeder Bulls: 250-450# 130-155; 460-625# 120-137; 700-900# 91-110. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: 398. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 250-285# 196-216; 360385# 184-189; 405-425# 170-175; 452-490# 165.50178; 531-544# 170.50-171; 555-590# 154-160; 605645# 157.50-158; 725-730# 132-137; S 1-2 300-315# 130-176; 365-385# 154178; 455# 156; 555# 136149; 600-635# 125-146. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 185# 230; 350-370# 170179; 400-438# 155-169; 462-463# 164-165.50; 528538# 154-156.50; 562# 149.50; 608-620# 140-144; 750-770# 110.50-120; S 12 375-380# 153-163; 405445# 149-154; 450-485# 140-160; 533# 146.50; 613# 124. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 460-482# 167.50-169; 505543# 157-162.50; 555-572# 151-154.50; 600-640# 130.50-155; S 1-2 450490# 137-144; 510-520# 140-148; 645# 122. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2 Middle Aged 960-995# 720900/hd 4-6 mos bred. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 969. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 160# 189-207; 230-246# 202-230; 255-295# 180220; 300-345# 148-210; 355-395# 162-211; 400445# 160-208; 450-495# 175-188; 500-547# 154-174; 550-598# 150-167; 607640# 151-165; 650-695# 140-148; 730-745# 140; S 1-2 350-395# 140-150; 400445# 110-159; 540# 130145. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 275-298# 137-175; 300335# 150-180; 350-390# 150-184; 400-445# 140-176; 450-498# 142-168; 501547# 145-160; 550-595# 146-171; 600-645# 120-155; 655-690# 122-143; 714740# 125; 758-795# 108125; 950-980# 103-105; 1038# 109; 1155-1195# 100-106; S 1-2 350-390# 121-142; 455-495# 110-14; 505-545# 111-141; 560580# 114-138; 610-620#

105-112; 665-690# 100105. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-495# 142-188; 500546# 140-175; 550-595# 140-164; 600-640# 125154; 650-695# 130-145; 710-722# 110-135; 755795# 116-117; 810-840# 112-118; S 1-2 455-495# 117-138; 500-525# 116-138; 550-595# 116-130; 635640# 94-101. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 117. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 132; 500-600# 149-159; 600-700# 139.50; M&L 2 400-500# 159-161; 500-600# 162; 600-700# 142; 800-900# 124-134.50; M&L 3 500-600# 142. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 147; 500-600# 126-138; 600-700# 130.50; M&L 2 300-400# 153; 400500# 150-160.50; 500-600# 146; 600-700# 131.50; M&L 3 400-500# 145; 500-600# 127-137; 600-700# 127-133; S 1 400-500# 119. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 175; 400-500# 159; 500-600# 149; 600700# 129.50; 700-800# 120.50; M&L 2 300-400# 172-174; 400-500# 160-165; 500-600# 140-149.50; 600700# 132-134; 700-800# 120; S 1 400-500# 146-150; 500-600# 132-135; 600700# 133. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 756 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 191. 300-400# 166-191;400-500# 174-182; 500-600# 154-172; 600700# 145-160; 700-800# 133-143; 800-900# 122.50130; 900-1000# 110121.50; 1000-1100# 105. M&L 2 300-400# 160-167; 400-500# 157.50-175; 500600# 145-166; 600-700# 110-140; 700-800# 135145; 800-900# 112 9001000# 99-130 Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 133; 300400# 127-136; 400-500# 118-119.50; 500-600# 114.50-119.50; 600-700# 105-110. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 170-180; 400500# 157-165; 500-600# 146-156; 600-700# 126-147; 700-800# 118-135; 800900# 111-121; M&L 2 300400# 140-165; 400-500# 140-162; 500-600# 141-148; 600-700# 120-140; 700800# 122-130; Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 176-200; 300400# 181-197.50; 400-500# 161-180; 500-600# 142-158; 600-700# 135-148; 700800# 120-140; M&L 2 200300# 137.50-159; 400-500# 141; 500-600# 141-145;

600-700# 110-133; 700800# 103-128; 800-900# 85; 900-1000# 93; S 1 600-700# 137. Slaughter Steers & Heifers: Ch. 2&3 10001100#115.50-116; 11001300# 113-118; 1300-1500# 114-119; 1500#+ 116.75122.25. Slaughter Steers Sel. 2&3: 1100-1300# 108.50112.50; 1300-1500# 109115.50. Slaughter Holstein Steers Ch. 2-3: 1100-1300# 111; 1300-1500# 104.50110; Sel. 2-3 1100-1300# 94-98; 1300-1500#105106.50 Slaughter Heifers Ch. 2&3: 900-1000# 97; 10001200# 111-115.75;12001300# 113.50-119.25;13001500# 111.50-117.75; Sel. 2-3; 1000-1200#103.50111.50; Slaughter Heifers Sel. 23: 1000-1200# 103.50111.50 Slaughter Cows Breaker 75-80% Lean: 850-1200# 83-95; 1200-1600# 82-91; Boner 80-85% Lean 8001200# 76.50-93; 12002000# 74-90.50; Boner High Yielding 1200-2000# 88-99; Lean 85-90% Lean 750850# 61-84; 850-1200# 6585; Slaughter Bulls YG 1-2: 1000-1500# 89-108.50; 1500-2500# 97.50-111; Slaughter Bulls High Yielding: 1000-1500# 109113.50; 1500-2500# 109111.50; Cows Returned To Farm 19 Head: Med 1+2 3+8 yrs. old bred 2-8 months. 8701335# 900-1100.00 per head. Cows with Calves at Side: 5 Pair Med. 1+2, 1012yr. old with calves 155# 1010-1245# 910-1100 per pair. Calves Returned To Farm: 72 head, Holstein Bulls 70-100# 40-210 per head;100-130# 130-245; Lamb: 45 Head Slaughter Lambs, Spring, wooled Ch.+Pr. 60-80# 151-180; 80110# 146-170; Slaughter Lambs Spring wooled ch. + pr.: 60-180# 151-180; 80-110# 146-170; Good & Ch. 1-3 30-60# 130201; 60-90# 140-159; Slaughter Ewes: Ch. 2-4 53; Good 2-4 60-80 Slaughter Rams all Grades 82 Goats: 28 Head; Kid Sel. NO. 1-2, 20-40# 147; 40-60# 219-224; 60-80# 218. Kid Sel. No. 3 60-80# 101; Slaughter Bucks: 70110# 150; 100-150# 130; 150-250# 131-139; Slaughter Does Sel. No. 1-2: 70-100# 100; 100-150# 106;

SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 531. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 183-188; 400500# 165-180; 500-600# 145-168; 600-700# 150160.50; 700-800# 146150.50; 800-900# 138; 9001000# 125; M&L 2 300-400# 187-194; 400-500# 155-174; 500-600# 157.50-165; 600700# 140-158; 700-800# 86147.50; M&L 3 500-600# 140; S 1 400-500# 153. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 140; 700800# 86. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 166; 300-400# 160-184; 400-500# 150.50171; 500-600# 150.50-164; 600-700# 130-146; 700800# 120-142; M&L 2 300400# 160-180; 400-500# 150-163; 500-600# 148-160; 600-700# 135.50-142; 700800# 131-140.50; M&L 3 500-600# 143-148; 600700# 110-133; 700-800# 125; S 1 400-500# 141; 500600# 146. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 186; 400-500# 157-181.50; 500-600# 143.50-179; 600-700# 130149.50; 700-800# 110-121; 800-900# 117; 900-1000# 106.50-110.50; M&L 2 300400# 190; 400-500# 146157; 500-600# 143-156; 600-700# 130-139; S 1 400500# 115-130; 500-600# 130. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 28. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 500-600# 140-149. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 142; M&L 2 600700# 133-135. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 150-160; 500600# 150-154; M&L 2 500600# 150. FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 189. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 188; 400-500# 165; 500-600# 165; 600700# 154; M&L 2 300-400# 187; 400-500# 170; 500600# 165; 700-800# 86. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 700-800# 86. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 171; 500-600# 151; 600-700# 130; M&L 2 400-500# 162; 500-600# 148. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 500-600# 138. LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1164. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 174-183; 500600# 160-166; 600-700# 149.75-154.50; 700-800#

147.25; M&L 2 300-400# 195.50; 400-500# 171184.75; 500-600# 155.50171.25; 600-700# 151154.50; 700-800# 144; M&L 3 300-400# 189-194; 400500# 156-177.25; 500-600# 154-163.50; 600-700# 145; S 1 300-400# 193.50; 400500# 155; 500-600# 153.50; 600-700# 140; 700-800# 140. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 169; 400-500# 155-165; 500-600# 143146.75; 600-700# 144.50; 700-800# 122.50; M&L 2 300-400# 167-170; 400500# 161-169; 500-600# 151.25-152.75; 600-700# 143.75; 700-800# 119; M&L 3 300-400# 168-168.50; 400-500# 143.25-155.75; 500-600# 145.50-150.00; 600-700# 127-136.50; 700800# 118; S 1 300-400# 165.50; 400-500# 143150.75; 500-600# 141144.50; 600-700# 110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 191; 400-500# 166-183; 500-600# 148.50155.50; 600-700# 144.50; M&L 2 300-400# 191; 400500# 166-185.50, mostly 167; 500-600# 147.75-156; 600-700# 145.50; S 1 300400# 187.50; 400-500# 160184; 500-600# 141.50. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean 850-1200# 81-93; 1200-1600# 83-94; Breaker High Yielding, 12001600# 94.50-99; Boner 8085% Lean, 800-1200# 7989; 1200-2000# 81-90; Boner High Yielding, 12002000# 91-94; Lean 85-90% Lean, 750-850# 75-83; 8501200# 72-85; Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2, 1000-1500# 100-104; 15002500# 96-106; High Yielding, 1000-1500# 104-106; 1500-2500# 107-118. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 57. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 900-1000# 110; M&L 2 600700# 110-130. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 600-700# 126-133; M&L 2 400-500# 141-148; 600700# 120-125. Feeder Bulls: M&L 2 600-700# 110-115 NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 105. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 174; 500-600# 172; 600-700# 160; M&L 2 900-1000# 130. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 133; 300400# 127-136. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 500-600# 155; 600-700# 130.50.

STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 287. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 191; 300-400# 175-189; 400-500# 181; 500-600# 158.50-163; 600700# 149-160; 700-800# 143; 800-900# 127; M&L 2 300-400# 167; 400-500# 171-175; 500-600# 145-156; 700-800# 135. Feeder Holstein Steers: No Report. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 157-165; 500600# 146-149; 600-700# 140-147; 700-800# 118; 800-900# 111-115; M&L 2 400-500# 143-156; 500600# 141-148; Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 181-185; 400500# 175-180; 500-600# 144-153; 600-700# 135148;700-800# 120-138; M&L 2 700-800# 103; 800900# 85; S 1 600-700# 137; Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% Lean, 850-1200# 89; 1200-1600# 88-91. Breaker High Yielding, 12001600# 94.50; Boner High Yielding 1200-2000# 89-91; Breaker high yielding, 12001600# 94.50; Boner high yielding, 1200-2000# 89-91; Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 100.50-101; 1500-2500# 104; High yielding, 1000-1500# 109-112.50 TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 341. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 179-194; 400500# 170-179; 500-600# 165-171; 600-700# 140-153; M&L 2 300-400# 160; 400500# 162-172; 500-600# 160; 600-700# 152-162; 700-800# 120-125. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 163-170; 300400# 160-164; 400-500# 157-163; 500-600# 148-160; 600-700# 135-145; M&L 2 300-400# 150-159; 400500# 144-156; 500-600# 140-155; 600-700# 126-136; M&L 3 500-600# 123. S 1 400-500# 122-140. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 184-200; 300400# 173-181; 400-500@ 160-175; 500-600# 156-170; 600-700# 130-140; 700800# 120-124; M&L 2 400500# 155-164; 500-600# 145-154; 600-700# 120-124; 700-800# 118; Slaughter Cattle: Breaker 75-80% Lean 850-1200# 78.50-88; 1200-1600# 8592; Boner 80-85% Lean 800-1200# 76.50-87; 12002000# 85-94.50; Boner High yielding, 1200-2000# 95.5098; Lean 85-90% Lean 8501200# 70-76; Bulls YG 1-2 1000-1500# 103-108.50; 1500-2500# 112.50-120.50 WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 343. Feeder Steers: M&L 1


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large aggre ol durin group of of foods of planning Maine on that gether in a State capit of Agricul- able organization, tive image In 1987 a small in front marssed in t Freeport, producers see and proce the green Departmen at the Legis- sively promote and member come by and specialty food ia- duced ization, its SFP’s samfirst assoc ’. weekend ture’s ‘Ag day ket the organ products MG& r’s lots of free Chocolates formed the ote Maine’s Maine. the organiza- lature’. and to us. With ‘Wilbu from you Since then MG&SFP’s members tion to prom try. lent exposure a ples to choose to over 60 ber ben’! In 1999 the food indus has grown Ejust expand mem nt em- With excel ‘free lunch specialty traffic and selves tion bers with a diverse launched WWW.MAIN et and 1 curre can get a them the Route serving for mem mark efits. With away from its They set ers will be cts. Their S.ORG to upgrading stones throw managed to Memb treats from musgoals: range of produ s have re- FOOD specialty phasis on imfour basic , cowe and of great ilities et up effort spirit LL Bean the web site capab , cheese to combined crowd of To foster a organi- gourm cts through of a regular attract a nice in sels to salsa stability and sulted in a strong food produ Since plementation year we are cookies and everything operation, being has developed World Wide Web. r for members buyers. This your well , zation that advertising ization has e-newslette ded ad cameconomic to maren. Just bring fun. more site organ bers, g betwe the web e mem addin expan more a uniqu and have pro- then the Uni- and an amongst its is steadily a larger banner and taste buds ered with a framework ket their products, to attract To provide sem- partn of Maine at Orono paign the group ess towards temporary signs and coopy shops and n beng for re- making progr for networking d- duce work the members. versit be the liaiso ties, inclu pursue fundi eting op- these goals. for will to activi e He e inars parMain erativ clariand adver- Each year members hing mark the Heart of y that will help De- searc analyzing ing marketing ies surve value - tween and the MG&SFP the Maine nities and needs of opportunit RC&D ticipate in project ulture portu tising, marketing cers fy the food producers in an advocacy partment of Agric carrying out as the food produ To provide added and for for Maine ature, . Part of his terms of marketing ties, such will activi Gritty Details of role in legisl and processors t in the tools that assis to oping “Nitty the be ar and job will web devel exposure al Selling” semin process of nt. generate greater Food Festiv cts. He will in- ongoing developme try and to nt for their produ to update Gour met taking place is food indus profitability of conte ermore, he will be be helping which is 29 in ct whose goal - Furth n of a also crease the Strategic Plan June 28 and ment proje strengthen small, farm-based value ing on the desig MG&SPF’s of Maine help a marketing Freeport. to cers and work The Heart added n. and design food produ Inc. and the Maine’s value organizatio pro- added project is RC&D Area, plan for the met and Spe- farm producers. The are processors. The a Federal Gour e Main Producers main goals t, being funded by ject’s two et Imcialty Food exten State Mark are working to survey the size, state’s and (MG&SFP) rtProgram (FSMaine Depa a and needs of the essed provement with the June 4 ulture in - added/proc MIP) grant. na, a gradment of Agric ing op- value mic devel Stefano Tijeri Spring Meet nic Web Listings Dejoint econo nt from the Orga uate stude ntation Adof Harvey Marof Public Feature Prese y - Managing Partner about how to ent partm n at the UniElizabeth Harve discuss the latest buzzengines. Techministratio h p will e, has come source keting Grou site noticed by the searc e an on line versity of Main the Heart e cases to dissome onlin maine becom ation relevant to to help your web view get www. board will on we SFP inform itting This year its of the MG& food indus nology perm undergoing of Maine and project. He the specialty of the site works best. 12 Bangor foods.org is what this When g de. out cover upgra June carry This part ils of Sellin first major ing as a Reprotectare try. Gritty Deta vements will be work be password be limThe Nitty Marketing and the impro de a will will Seminar it will provi search and June 13 Portl ons will focus on selland access completed bringing with processor locati of serv- ed alist, two food level in r ito Speci ct placement ar held iate much highe and ited years of exper , out and produ This semin and assoc restaucustomers him seven ct from roll , media alty stores, e members It will provide produ ice to our eting speci to your resum mark cts ing shows, corWe will produ ence in members. line gement. He members. Tijerina, Maine to marketing your tips for trade hly drawings members with on ing, alty and web mana Columbia. 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Page 11 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

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June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 12

CBE offers opportunities for beef excellence HARRISBURG, PA — “The excellence of beef” is of high importance to producer and cattleman Curtis Koons of Mont Alto, PA. Koons says, beef quality is a factor that is important in his 350-head cattle operation. His recent connection with the PA Center for Beef Excellence (CBE) enabled him to process over 100 head of cattle with the use of its mobile handling equipment. He was pleased to be provided with this opportunity. The use of the equipment impacts beef quality, improves animal health and promotes the message that Pennsylvania producers are taking measures to improve the methods used to produce a quality, safe product. This equipment is available for Pennsylvania’s producers looking for a way to improve their handling practices. According to Koons, the use of CBE’s portable equipment was a significant benefit to him both in efficiency and economically. “It’s a valuable asset for producers,” he said. CBE strives to work with industry partners to develop marketing opportunities for the Pennsylvania Beef Industry. Recently the market has been driven by the strong influence of export markets, cattle supply and consumer demand. Darwin Nissley, CBE president and feedyard operator noted, “the need to educate producers on the value these

opportunities have created is readily apparent.” CBE is currently planning another program that will equip producers with the necessary tools to ensure they remain progressive in the industry. Look for more information to come. A major component of this program was recently featured during the Cumberland Valley High School A-Day. Partnering with the PA Beef Council, The PA Center for Beef Excellence was proud to be able to “beef” up the day for 400 fourth grade students. While at the booth, the students were given an RFID tag to hold while being scanned by the accompanying reader. They learned the importance of record keeping, proper nutrition and good herd health. They also learned about other products not typically associated with beef. The enthusiasm of the fourth grade participants matched the student leaders who were engaged in all aspects of the day. Cumberland Valley’s FFA chapter deserves congratulations for a job exceptionally well done. The group was well organized and their enthusiasm set the tone for a day of learning. The beef exhibit was happy to host not only the students, but also State Rep. Glen Grell. Working with industry partners to provide the safest, highest quality, most consumer friendly beef and beef products is the focus of CBE’s 15

board members. Together they have numerous

CBE B13 Right — Rep. Glen Grell joined elementary school students at the recent Cumberland Valley A-Day sponsored by the district’s FFA Chapter. Grell and the children are shown at the beef exhibit, which was presented by the Center for Beef Excellence in partnership with the PA Beef Council.

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Check Out These Great Prices HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT JD 330 Round Baler, 4x4, Single Twine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 (CH) JD 458 SS Round Baler, net hyd pkp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$23,900 (M) JD 467 Round Baler, 540 PTO, 4x6 Bales, No Surface Wrap . . . . . . . .$14,100 (M) JD 558 round baler, net wrap, ramps, megawide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..$22,200 (H) JD 5730 SPFH, 4WD, 7’ Pickup & 4RN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,000 (M) JD 6850 SPFH, 4WD, KP, Approx. 2400/1800 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$78,900 (M) JD 7350 SPFH, 4WD, KP, Approx. 1,000 Eng. Hrs., 750 Cutter Hrs. . . . . . Call For Details! (M) Various Corn Heads & Hay Pickup Heads Available FR DM1140 disk mower, 5’ cut, 3pt hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,400 (H) NH 1431 Discbine w/Rolls, Drawbar Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,900 (M) NI 483 round baler, twine tie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 (H) H&S B12 Folding Wheel Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000 (M) SEEDING EQUIPMENT JD 1750 6 Row Planter, Liquid, Insecticide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In (CA) JD 1760 12 row 30” folding, liquid, nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Just Arrived (CH) JD 1990 30ft air seeder w/central tank fill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In (M) JD 1590 15’ Drill, 2008 yr model, Grass, 2pt Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,900 (H) JD 1590 10’ No till drill, dolly hitch, grass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In (CA) SKID STEERS NH L185 SS Foot control, 6850 hrs, cab, heat, a/c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,500 (CH) JD 960 Backhoe for SS Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 (M) JD 260 SS Loader, Series 2, 2 Sp., Foot Control, 1400 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . .$17,900 (M)

COMBINES JD 9660 STS 2004 yr model, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In (H) TRACTORS CIH MX120 cab, 4WD, loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In (H) JD 4560 cab, 4WD, 5700 hrs., duals, powershift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$48,900 (H) JD 5075M 2WD, 12/4 trans, approx 600 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In (CH) JD 6430 4WD, cab, TLS, IVT, SHARP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Just Arrived (M) MF 165 Utility Tractor, Gas, 2WD, Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 (H) MISC. JD 521 NSL loader to fit 5000 Series tractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 (M) Kubota RTV900 utility vehicle, diesel, cab, 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,800 (CH) *NEW* Sno-Way 90” snowplow, JD 500 series loader mounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,950 (M) Polaris 6x6 utility vehicle, roof, 350 Hrs., sharp! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 (CH) 4-N-1 Bucket, As Is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800

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The Center for Beef Excellence hosted importers from the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) office of Singapore. USMEF wants to put U.S. meat on the world’s table. Phil McMahon (third from left), livestock manager at Erdenheim Farm and CBE board member, provided the tour of the Erdenheim operation to USMEF representatives from Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

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First FMD vaccine that can be manufactured on the U.S. mainland PLUM ISLAND, NY — The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced recently that the world’s first molecular foot-and-mouth (FMD) vaccine has been granted conditional license for use in cattle by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB). Developed at DHS’s Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Plum Island

Animal Disease Center (PIADC), this is the first licensed FMD vaccine that can be manufactured on the U.S. mainland. “The important capability of this vaccine compared with other foot-and-mouth disease vaccines that have been developed in the past is that it can be manufactured on the mainland in the United States because it does not contain live FMD virus,” said PIADC Director Dr. Larry Barrett. This molecular-based FMD vaccine was developed by scientists with the USDA Agricultural Research Service and DHS at PIADC and is the result of a seven-year collaboration with industry partners GenVec Inc., a biopharmaceutical company based in Gaithersburg, MD, and

Antelope Valley Biologics, a Benchmark Biolabs affiliate based in Lincoln, NE. “This vaccine represents one of the most significant developments in foot-and-mouth disease vaccines in the last 50 years,” said Dr. Luis Rodriguez, Research Leader, PIADC, Agricultural Research Service, USDA. “The new molecular vaccine provides important options to FMD control in the United States, including less dependence on foreign sources for vaccine manufacturing and a wider range of tests that can readily distinguish vaccinated animals from those that have been infected with the disease.” Additionally, the vaccine does not require expensive, high-containment facilities be-

cause it does not use the infectious materials of the live FMD virus. DHS PIADC is working with the animal health vaccine manufacturer Merial to evaluate the production process. The award-winning discovery research conducted by Dr. Marvin Grubman, USDA Agricultural Research Service at PIADC, led to this new vaccine that contains only virus coat particles, called empty viral capsids, which lack the infectious viral nucleic acids. “The absence of specific viral components provides multiple opportunities to develop better diagnostic tests that differentiate between vaccinated and infected animals,” said Grubman. “Having this capability is critical to demonstrating freedom of infection and

return to trade after a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak.” Dr. John Neilan, with the DHS Targeted Advanced Development Branch at PIADC, developed a way to address the immune response to the vaccine, achieving the efficacy required for a USDA license. With the licensing of this vaccine, it may be added to the North American Vaccine Bank at PIADC. While this vaccine protects against one strain of FMD, there are seven major serotypes and many sub-types of FMD. Vaccines for other strains of FMD and other transboundary animal diseases of livestock are being developed at PIADC using this and other molecular technologies. “Development of this vaccine technology took

several years, and everyone at Plum Island Animal Disease Center is proud to see result of the hard work that began with the initial discovery by Agricultural Research Service scientists followed later by the Department of Homeland Security scientists taking it through the licensing process,” said Barrett. “Effective FMD vaccines can help alleviate the burden that these diseases pose to animal health and human wellbeing particularly in parts of the world facing food insecurity and population increases over the next decades,” Rodriguez added.

CBE from B12 years of experience working in many segments of the industry. They are involved in many industry organizations and are instrumental in the success of many of the programs CBE is partnering in. CBE Board Director Phil McMahon, who also manages Erdenheim Farm in Lafayette Hill, PA, recently hosted a tour for CBE and a group of interested importers from the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) office in Singapore. USMEF’s interest is to put U.S. meat on the world’s table. They represented the countries of Singapore, Indonesia, Phillipines, Thailand and Vietnam. USMEF was very interested in the beef and sheep facility of Erdenheim. Looking for quality and the need for an economically suited product, they see the U.S. market as an opportunity for their respective companies. As importers they got a great view of the best management practices utilized by the Pennsylvania producers. Protecting and enhancing the freedom of producers to operate is also important to CBE. Working with state and national organizations to educate consumers and legislative representatives on the issues that affect cattlemen will not only preserve the future but will also allow for growth in the beef industry.

Page 13 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

New foot-and-mouth disease vaccine gets licensed for use on cattle


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 14

AUCTIONS 300-400# 170-180; 400500# 177-181; 500-600# 157-169; 600-700# 144-159; 700-800# 144; 800-900# 126; M&L 2 400-500# 160168; 500-600# 156-158; 600-700# 149-154; 700800# 121-130; 900-1000# 120; S 1 400-500# 141-147; 500-600# 151. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3, 400-500# 107-110; 700-800# 97; Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 147-155; 400500# 158.50-166.50; 500600# 134-156; 600-700# 133-155; 700-800# 126-137; M&L 2 400-500# 148-162; 500-600# 142-145; 600700# 132-141; 700-800# 104-110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 179-200; 300400# 171-180; 400-500# 158-168; 500-600# 138-161; 600-700# 137-151; 700800# 129; 800-900# 102; M&L 2 300-400# 151-162; 400-500# 140-146; 500600# 131-149; 600-700# 131-136; 700-800# 121-125; 800-900# 92; S 1 400-500# 153-155. Slaughter Cow Breaker 75-80% Lean: 850-1200# 91.50; 1200-1600# 80-93; Breaker High Yielding:

1200-1600# 93.50-96.50 Boner 80-85% Lean: 800-1200# 73.50-87; 12002000# 76-91.50; Lean 8590% Lean, 750-850# 70-81; 850-1200# 75-82 Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2, 1000-1500# 94.50-103.50; 1500-2500# 105-114; Cows Returned To Farm: M 1-2, 4-8 yrs. old, bred 2-8 months, 793-1391# 11001125 per pair. Holstein Bulls: 70-100# 45-240per head; 100-130# 135; Slaughter Lambs: Spring wooled Ch.+Pr. 60-80# 160168; 80-110# 150-175; Good+Ch. 1-3, 30-60# 145175; Slaughter Rams and Ewes: Ch. 2-4 74, Good 2-4 55-77, Utility 1-3 62.50, all grades 68. Goats: Kids Sel. No. 1-2 20-40# 125-160; 40-60# 212-214; 60-80# 200-221; Kid Sel No. 3, 40-60# 130; Slaughter Bucks: Sel No. 1-2, 70-110# 185; 100150# 137.50-147.50; Slaughter Does: Sel No. 1-2, 70-100# 137.50 WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 187. Feeder Steers: M&L 1

300-400# 171; 400-500# 158-180; 500-600# 155161.50; 600-700# 162-167; 700-800# 150-154.50; 800900# 145.50; M&L 2 400500# 170; 500-600# 152.50; 600-700# 164.50; 700-800# 152. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 159; 500-600# 150-151; 600-700# 135-142; 800-900# 126.50; M&L 2 300-400# 170; 400-500# 161-163; 500-600# 150159.50; 600-700# 141; 700800# 131-135.50; 800-900# 120. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 180; 400-500# 150; 500-600# 148.50150.50; 600-700# 135137.50; 700-800# 126-131; M&L 2 300-400# 160; 400500# 154; 500-600# 148150; 700-800# 133. SLAUGHTER CATTLE HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 81-86, hi dress to 88; Boner 80-88, hi dress 90-95, few at 98-103; Lean 74-80; Thin & Light 73 & dn. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1446# at 111, lo dress at 99; YG 2 1910# at 100.50.

Fed Steers: H Ch full 1250-1400# 118-120; L Ch Guernsey 1468# @ 101; L Ch Hols. 1900-2200# 95102. Fed Heifers: Ch No. 2 1146# at 117.50.

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Calves: Hols. Bull Ret. to Farm No. 1 82-100# 185202; 102-120# 175-190; No. 2 82-100# 160-180; 102120# 155-175; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 110# at 190; No. 2 8095# 145-180; Beef X Bulls

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1085# lo dress (1078) 81.00-89.00 (85.03); 15202055# (1707) 100.00112.50 (108.83); 15402270# hi dress (1839) 115.00-120.50 (116.50). Cows/Calf Pairs: (1) M &L 1-2 1000# middle age cows with 80# calves 1100.00 per pair. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 100.00-110.00 MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1050-1390# 88-95; 1050-1335# lo dress 75.50-84.50; 1525-1795# 87.50-96.50; Boner 80-85% lean 810-845# 87-91; 780855# lo dress 81-84; 9551370# 85-96.50; 985-1320#

hi dress 97.50-103.50; 1045-1340# lo dress 7984.50; 1405-1730# 85-92; 1410-1495# hi dress 99.50100.50; Lean 85-90% lean 575-785# lo dress 60-79.50; 945-1255# 80.50-87; 8101345# lo dress 60-76; 14301485# lo dress 78. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1140-1365# 99-109.50; 1575-2240# 101.50-112.50; 1760-2180# hi dress 114.50-118. Cows/Calf Pairs: 2. M 1-2 870-900# middle age cows w/120-300# calves 8251275/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 65-175. SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 237 Slaughter Cows: Breaker

75-80% lean 850-1200# 8297.50; 1200-1600# 8998.50; HY 1200-1600# 99.50-107.50; Boner 8085% lean 800-1200# 8293.50; 1200-2000# 84100.50; HY 1200-2000# 98105.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 61-70; 850-1200# 79-87. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 105-113.50; 1500-2500# 112-122.50; HY 1500-2500# 119.50-126. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 348. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7599.75; 1200-1600# 77-96; HY 1200-1600# 90-100; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 76-95.50; 12002000# 78-97.50; HY 12002000# 90-104; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 66-88; 8501200# 71-90. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 95-102; 15002500# 95.50-113; HY 15002500# 111.50-127.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 255. M 1, 3-8 yrs. old, bred 5-6 mos. 1200-1623# 12001550/hd; M 1, few 2, 3 yrs. to aged, bred 3-8 mos. 9001050# 880-1350/hd; M&L 12, 4-10 yrs. old 950-1300# mostly 1300-1500/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 127. M 1 w/150-400# calves 1078-1448# 1270-1800/pr; M 1, few 2, w/200-300# calves 860-997# 10001710/pr; M&L 1-2, 4-10 yrs. old w/calves newborn-250# 950-1300# 1250-1700/pr, mostly 1500-1700/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 81. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 50190/hd; 100-130# 130-235. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 39. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 92; 1200-1600# 85-96; Boner 80-85% lean 1200-2000# 93-98; HY 1200-2000# 99102; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 89. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 103; 15002500# 97.50-106. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8687; 1200-1600# 78; HY 1200-1600# 89.25. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 85.50-100.

FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 41. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 100; 13001500# 110-120; 1500-1850# 114.25-118.25. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1000-1200# 91-122.25, mostly 100-122.25; 12001400# 113.50-120.50; 14001600# 90-119.75, mostly 101-119.75; Sel 2-3 12001400# 96. HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 14. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8589; 1200-1600# 93-94.50; HY 1200-1600# 99.50; Boner 80-85% lean 1200-2000# 84-90; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 61-70; 850-1200# 79-84. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 169. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8099.50; 1200-1600# 85-105; HY 1200-1600# 106-118; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 78-86; 1200-2000# 75-87.50; HY 1200-2000# 88-99.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 72-80; 850-1200# 75-83.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 79.50-113.50; 1500-2500# 103-114; HY 1000-1500# 115.50; 15002500# 114.50-118. MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 85.50-89; HY 1200-1600# 91; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 80.50-91; 12002000# 78-88; HY 12002000# 91-95; Lean 85-90% Lean 750-850# 70; 8501200# 55.50-69.50 Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 15002500# 92.25-105.50 Calves Ret. to Farm: 7. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 95105/hd; 100-130# 130. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 20. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 82-85; HY 1200-1600# 88; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 81-85; 1200-2000# 74-85; HY 1200-2000# 9094; Lean 85-90% lean 750850# 74; 850-1200# 68.5085. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2

CATTLE & FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION SATURDAY 30TH JUNE – 10:00 AM – CLINTON, NC

Location: George P. Upton Sales Arena - 2 mi. south of Clinton on Hwy. 421 @ 93 Agriculture place. 130 head consisting of cow/calf pairs, bred cows & heifers - breeds represented: Angus, Angus X, Red, Sim Angus & Sim herd bull. Case IH MUX 125 - 1283 hrs., MF 255, ‘01 EBY 20’ alum. gooseneck, Case IH 5300 grain drill, Case IH 8435 round baler, disc cutter, hay tedders, Grain-O Vator grain cart, cattle feeder, rotary cutters. Visit www.ebharris.com SALE HELD RAIN OR SHINE E.B. HARRIS (252) 257-2140 6:15 AM-9:59 PM (252) 430-9595 Mobile E.B.’s 9-10 PM only 445-5856 Fate’s (252) 985-8340 Mobile Fate’s Fax No. (252) 257-1035

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3200 NC Hwy. 58 Warrenton, NC 27580 “THE COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICE” NCAL 1468 NC#C 4264 VAL 146 SCAL 3895 SALE DAY PAGER 252-407-4228

1000-1500# 89-98; 15002500# 102-111. Calves Ret. to Farm: 60. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 40175/hd; 100-130# 185. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 87 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7588; 1200-1600# 77-89; HY 1200-1600# 90-95; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 7689; 1200-2000# 78-91; HY 1200-2000# 92-96; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 66-79; 850-1200# 75-85. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 79. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8294; 1200-1600# 89-98.50; HY 1200-1600# 102-107.50; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 82-91.50; 12002000# 88.50-100.50; HY 1200-2000# 102-104.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 105-113.50; 1500-2500# 114-116; HY 1500-2500# 124-126. WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 84. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8894.75; 1200-1600# 88.5096; HY 1200-1600# 96.50100; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 79.50-91; 12002000# 82-88.25; HY 12002000# 92.50-96.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 73.50-75; 850-1200# 71-77. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 102; 15002500# 95.50-99.50; HY 1500-2500# 111.50-127.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 164. M 1, 3-8 yrs. old 5-6 mos. bred 1200-1623# 12001550/hd, M 1, few 2, 3 yrs. to aged, 3-8 mos. bred 9001050# 880-1350/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 76. M 1, w/150-400# calves 1078-1448# 1270-1800/pr; M 1, few 2 2/200-300# calves 860-997# 10001710/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 7. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 132.50190/hd; 100-130# 130-235. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 135. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 79.50-88; 1200-1600# 8592; HY 1200-1600# 9497.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 78-90; 12002000# 85-95; HY 12002000# 104; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 50-51; 8501200# 59.50-77.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 107; 15002500# 105-117. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS

Page 15 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

lean 1405-1665 # (1527) 85.00-90.00 (87.21); 15001540# lo dress (1523) 72.00-78.00 (75.01). Boner 80-85% lean 885-885# hi dress (885) 95.00 (95.00); 940-1395# (1184) 82.0089.00 (84.79); 925-1050# hi dress (1002) 94.00 101.00 (96.56); 1055-1320# lo dress (1212) 70.00-81.00 (76.06). Lean 85-90% lean 720-720# lo dress (720) 59.00 (59.00); 890-890# lo dress (890) 64.00 (64.00). Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 860-885# (875) 90.00-95.00 (91.68); 9901190# (1066) 85.00-96.00 (88.90). Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1120-1485# (1350) 97.00109.50 (105.99); 1070-


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 16

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, June 18 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. 1 pm dairy followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Tuesday, June 19 • 5:00 PM: 3660 Oatka Trail, Leroy, NY. Harmon Farms Machinery Auction selling all farm equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

Wednesday, June 20 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. east of Canandaigua, NY on Route 5 & 20. Regular Livestock sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com • 5:00 PM: Coleman’s, Rt. 17C, Barton, NY. Tractors, farm machinery & consignments. Goodrich Auction Service, 607-642-3293

Thursday, June 21 • Sharon Springs, NY. High Hill Farm Complete Dispersal. 120 plus head will sell. C/O Greg Law, owners. Managed by The Cattle Exchange. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 6:30 PM: 210 Pottsville St., Port Carbon, PA. 4.92 Approx. Industrial Acreage w/Building. Leaman Auctions, 717-4641128, cell 610-662-8149 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip #3721

Friday, June 22 • Bridgeport, VT. Farm and Barn Equipment for Paul Mariah Connor’s Red Gate Acres. Wrights Auction Service. 802334-6115 • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 • 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-

8231 www.drchambersauction.com

Saturday, June 23 • 9:30 AM: Manasse Auction Yard, 12 Henry St., Whitney Point, NY. 100 Seized and Repo vehicle auction. Plus Local Estate with Tractors, Firearms, Woodworkng Equipment & Tools; Group of top quality contractor tools - Selling for local financial institution. Also: Group of Commercial Restaurant Equipment Large Group of Tractors, Lawn & Garden, Farm Equipment & Trailers, Municipal & School Vehicles. Manasse Auctions, 607-6924540, 1-800-MANAASSE. www.manasseauctions.com 10:30 AM: R.G. Mason Auctions, Rt. 19 Fillmore, NY. 8th Annual Consignment & Automobile Auction. R.G. Mason Auctions, 585-567-8844, 585-261-8844, 585-7218844. www.rgmasonauctions.com

Tuesday, June 26 • At the Farm, Newport, VT. Poulin-Royer, Inc. Complete Dispersal of all cattle and most equipment. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Wednesday, June 27 West Charleston, VT. Complete Holstein Herd Dispersal for Brian Dane. Sale Managers Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier, 802-626-8892 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-4500558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. east of Canandaigua, NY on Route 5 & 20. Regular Livestock sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Friday, June 29 • 9:30 AM: Newark Valley, NY. Farm & Construction, Tractors and machinery. Consignments. Goodrich Auction Service, 607-642-3293

east of Canandaigua, NY on Route 5 & 20. Regular Livestock sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515

Thursday, July 5 • Cattle sale will run on Thursday July 5. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-3698231 www.drchambersauctions.com Friday, July 6 • 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-3698231 www.drchambersauction.com • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-5213123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030

Monday, July 9 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock) 6096 NYS Rt.8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles south of Utica & 6 miles north of New Berlin. Monthly Heifer Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 PM Produce, 1 PM Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders Immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 PM. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-880, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771. www.hoskingsales.com

Wednesday, July 11 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. east of Canandaigua, NY on Route 5 & 20. Regular Livestock sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515

Friday, July 13 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, July 18 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. east of Canandaigua, NY on Route 5 & 20. Regular Livestock sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515

• Leyden, MA. Selling trucks, trailers, shop tools & farm equip. including pay loader and farm tractor for Zimmerman Livestock Trucking. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Wednesday, July 25 • West Addison, VT. Bodette Farm Complete Equipment Dispersal. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Thursday, July 26 • 6:00 PM: County Highway Maintenance Facility, Geneseo, NY. Livingston County Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Friday, July 27 • 10:00 AM: Haverling Central High School, Bath, NY. Steuben County Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Saturday, July 28 • 9:30 AM: Martins Country Market. 3rd Annual Large Summer Equipment Auction. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Sunday, July 29 • 10:00 AM: Washington Co. Fairgrounds, Rt. 29 & 392 Old Schuylerville Rd., Greenwich, NY. Tri-State Antique Tractor Club Inc. antique Wheels and Iron Show. 1st time consignment auction. Selling antique & modern farm, construction, gas engine, signs, toys, literature and related items. Show: Sat-Sun July 28-29. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m

Friday, August 3

Monday, July 2

Saturday, July 21

• 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-5213123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

• Hosking Sales. Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

• Middleburgh, NY. Reflections of Maple Downs Sale. Hosted by Maple Downs Farm II. Held in conjunction with the NY Holstein Summer Picnic. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

• Lee, NH. Ath-Mor Farm dispersal of Holstein Herd and complete line of Equipment. Sale Managers Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier, 802-626-8892

Saturday, June 30 • 10:30 AM: Blanchard Farms, Smyrna, NY. Absolute Machinery Sale. David Unger & Gene Wood’s Auction Service, Inc. 607863-3821. www.genewoodautionserviceinc.com

Wednesday, July 4 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi.

Wednesday, August 15

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Pigs & Shoats (/hd): 35. 50-60# 55-68; 60-70# 6572; 1 lot 74# at 75; few 96# at 92; (/#) 100-160# 94-101; 180-190# 89-91. Butcher Hogs: 1-3 240300# 62-64.25; No. 2-3 215290# 58-61; 300-330# 61.50-63; few 200-210# 6768.25. Sows: 350-550# 53-56. Boars: 600#at 24.25. NC SOWS: 300-399# 39.10-51; 400-449# 39.1052; 450-499# Prices not reported due to confidentiality; 500-549# 42-58.34; 550# & up Prices not reported due to confidentiality. FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No report. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: No report. MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No report. N VA HOGS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report. S VA HOGS: 2. Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 190-210# 56; 210-230# 50. STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 190-210# 56; 210-230# 50.

N VA GOATS: 51 Kids: Sel 1-2 40-60# 200-220; Sel 3 40-60# 200. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 113-155; 150-250# 122. Does: Sel 1-2 50-70# 120-126; 70-100# 120-129; 100-150# 118-126. MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report MT. AIRY GOATS: 45 Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 32-37.50; 20-40# 55; 40-60# 80-87.50; 6080# 100-125; Sel 2 under 20# 22.50; 20-40# 32.50; 40-60# 52.50-55; Sel 3 under 20# 12.50. Yearlings: Sel 1 80-100# 165. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 100-140# 125-135; Sel 2 50-70# 77.50; 100-140# 5060; Sel 3 70-100# 50; 100140# 47.50-50. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 125; Sel 2 70-100# 50; 150-250# 100; Sel 3 70100# 20. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report. HOLLINS, VA SHEEP/GOATS: 22. Feeder Lambs: Wooled M&L 1-2 40-60# 168; 6090# 169; Wooled S&M 1-2 90-110# 105. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 70.

S VA SHEEP: 11. Feeder Lambs: Wooled, M&L 1-2 40-60# 168; 6090# 169; Wooled, S&M 1-2 90-110# 105. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 70 HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: Gd Ch 90-120# 167-170; 40-85# 175-185; Sheep Ewes 120-170# 72-80; 200# 62-70. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: No report.

SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report. TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 27. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 80110# 160-170; 110-125# 160-170; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 184; 60-90# 175. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: 3. Ewes Ch 2-4 72; Gd 2-4 82. WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 51. Kids: Sel 1-2 40-60# 200-220; Sel 3 40-60# 200. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 113-155; 150-250# 122. Does: Sel 1-2 50-70# 120-126; 70-100# 120-129; 100-150# 118-126. WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report.

MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No report.

WYTHE CO GOATS: No report.

MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No report.

CASH GRAIN MARKET

LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 46. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 60-80# 168.50; 80-110# 160-170; 110-125# 160170; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 184; 60-90# 175. Slaughter Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 65-72; Gd 2-4 77-82.

100-117.50; 80-100# 122.50-147.50; Sel 3 6080# 57.50. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 5070# 95-100; 70-100# 115130, 100-140# 220; Sel 2 50-70# 70-75. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 140; 150-250# 180185.

ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 13 30-60# 130; 60-90# 147.50. SHENANDOAH SHEEP: Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 6080# 153; 80-110# 146. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 13 60-90# 140-159. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 53; Gd 2-4 60. SILER CITY, NC GOATS: 74. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 30-37.50; 20-40# 45-55; 40-60# 65-75; 6080# 82.50-90; Sel 2 under 20# 20-27.50; 20-40# 40; 40-60# 60. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80#

NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 23¢ lower. Prices were 5.806.55, mostly 5.80-6.10 at the feed mills and 5.596.29, mostly 6.25 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 9-13¢ lower. Prices were 14.13 at the processors, 14.03 at the feed mills and 13.43-13.78, mostly 13.78 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was 3¢ lower. Prices were 5.60-6.19, mostly 6.14 at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 444.90/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 6.11, -----, ----; Candor 6.63, -----, 5.88; Cofield 6.18, ----, ----; Laurinburg 6.11, -----, ----; Monroe 6.38, -----, ----; Nashville 6.43, -----, ----; Roaring River 6.43, -----, ---; Rose Hill 6.11, -----, ----; Selma ----, -----, 5.88; Statesville 6.18, -----, 6.47; Warsaw 6.11, -----, ----; Pan-

tego #2 5.87, -----, 5.37. Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement ----, -----, ----; Creswell 5.59, 13.53, 6.03; Elizabeth City 5.90, 13.78, 6.14; Greenville ----, -----, ---; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, 13.77, 6.11; Norwood 6.25, 13.43, 5.60; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ----, -----, 6.14; Warsaw #2 6.29, -----, 6.19. Soybean Processors: Fayetteville, 14.13; Raleigh, 14.13 RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. Hay 40 tons. Alfalfa: Lg. Sq. Prem. 8891/bale; Gd 65/bale 2nd cut. Alfalfa/Orchardgrass Mix: Lg. Sq. Gd 46/bale, 1st cut. Mixed Grass: Lg. Sq. Gd 60-66; 20/bale; Lg. Rd. Gd 57; 16-18/bale; Fair 11/bale; Sm. Rd. Gd 16/bale. Orchardgrass: Lg. Rd. Gd 77/bale. Timothy/Orchardgrass: Lg. Rd. Gd 22/bale; Sm. Sq. Gd 2.10-3.30/bale. Straw: Lg. Sq. 24bale. Oat Hay: Lg. Rd. 21/bale.

POULTRY REPORT NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly heavy. The estimated slaughter for Wednesday in NC is 2,701,000 head compared to 2,667,000 head last Wednesday. NC EGGS: The market is steady on all sizes. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is good. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 120.79, L 116.14, M 84.86 & S 78. NY EGGS Prices are steady on all sizes. Supplies range light to heavy on L&M, light on XL. The New York shell egg inventory is 1% less than a week ago. Retail demand is light to moderate. Distributive demand is moderate to good. Market activity is slow to mostly moderate. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered to store door,

cents per dz. XL 105-109, L 103-107, M 75-79. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beans, Green (25# bx) 30; Beets (25# bg) 12.95; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 11.55-12, Spinach (25# bx) 18; Peas, Crowder (bu bg) 12-20, Crowder (bu shelled) 24; Peas, Garden (25# bx) 20; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 14-20.05; Squash, Yellow Crookneck (1/2 bu) 15; Tomatoes, Greenhouse (25# bx) 25. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn 100 count) WA Red Delicious 32.95-34.55, WA Golden Delicious 33-34.50, Granny Smith WA 34-36.50, Gala WA 32-36, WA Fuji 34.5038, WA Pink Lady 38-41.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 32.9534.35; Bananas (40# ctn) 21-23; Beans, Round Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 22.15-24, Pole (1-1/9 bu) 25-27; Beets (25# sack) 15.75-21.15; Blueberries (flat 12 1-pt cups) 24-34; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 19.15-20; Cabbage (50# ctn) 12.15-12.95; Cantaloupe (case 12 count) 22.15-32.15; Carrots (50# sack) 19.65-21.45; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 19.0523.45; Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 29.5035.65; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 17.95-18.65; Citrus: Oranges CA (4/5 bu ctn) 26.1530.65, FL (4/5 bu ctn) 2122; Pink Grapefruit CA (4/5 bu ctn) 28.65-33.15; Tangelos FL (80 count bx) 2526.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 34-44.35; Limes (40# ctn) 22-27; Oranges CA Navel (4/5 bu ctn) 31.45-33.95, FL Navel (64 count) 23.5526.15, Tangerines (120 count) 24; Corn, Yellow & White (ctn 4 ?-5 dz) 1521.45; Cran-berries (24 12oz pkg) 24.50; Cucumbers, Long Green (40# ctn) 2325, Pickles (ctn 40#) 26-30; Eggplant (25# ctn) 20-24; Grapes, Red Seedless (18# ctn) 33-36, White Seedless 31-52, Black Seedless 28, Red Globe 28; Grapefruit (40# ctn) 28.65; Greens, Collard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 11.55-14.15; Turnips, topped 11.85-14.65; Honeydews (ctn 5s) 29; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 12.75; Lettuce, Iceberg, wrapped (ctn 24s) 26.50-30.45, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 24.50-25, Romaine (ctn 24s) 24.50-26; Nectarines, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 24; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 16.45-20, White (25# sack) 18-19, Red (25# sack) 1522.50, Green (ctn 24s)

14.35-19.65; Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 24-25.75; Peaches, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 20; Peanuts, Green (35# bg) 53-69; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn) 34; Peppers, Bell Type Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 22.95-25, Red (11# ctn) 32, Yellow (11# ctn) 32; Potatoes, Red Size A (50# ctn) 15-17.95, Red Size B 25-28, White size A 1826.15; Russet ID 21.8523.85; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) 12.95-15; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 27; Squash, Yellow Crookneck (3/4 bu ctn) 15-18.45, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 14-16; Strawberries CA (flat 8 1-qt conts) 2026.45, NC (flat 8 1-qt conts) 17.95-20; Sweet Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45, White (40# ctn) 20-20.75; Tomatoes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 18.55-20, Cherry (flat 12 1-pt conts) 18.5522.95, Roma (25# ctn) 1619, Grape (flat 12 1-pt conts) 19-21; Turnips, topped (25# film bg) 11.55-17.15; Watermelon (bin) 175-200. WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 30-31.50, Golden Delicious 30-31.50, Granny Smith 30-34.50; Bananas (40# bx) 19.50-20; Beans (bu) Halfrunners 32-38, Snaps 18.50-24; Broccoli (ctn) 15-18.75; Cabbage (50# ctn/crate) 12-14; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12 count) 18.75-20; Cauliflower (ctn) 18-20; Citrus: Lemons (ctns 95 count) 31.50, (165 count) 32.50-34; Corn (crate) Bi-Color & White 1415; Cucumbers (1-1/9 bu) Long Green 15.75-22, Picklers (1-1/9 bu crate) 27.5030; Grapes (18# ctn) Red & White Seedless 35-49; Lettuce (ctn) Iceburg 21-22.75, Green Leaf 16-18.75, Romaine 18-21; Okra (1/2 bu) 24-26; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 16-16.50, Vidalia 23-26, (25# bg) 15-16; Peaches (1/2 bu basket) Clingstone 14-16; Bell Pepper (1-1/9 bu ctn) L & XL 16-19.50; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) White 15-26, Red 16-24, Russet 18-20; Squash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 16-18, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 12-14; Strawberries (4 qt cont) NC & SC 11-13; (8-1# conts) CA 21.50; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 1215; Tomatoes, vine ripe (25# bx) XL & Larger 15-18, Green 17.50; Turnips (25# sack) 15; Watermelons (ea) 5.50-8, (bin 35/45 count) Seeded 160, Seedless 200. MARKET

Page 17 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

MARKET REPORTS


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 18

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1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Announcements

Announcements

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, June 20th • 2:00 PM For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

Business Opportunities

Business Opportunities

Do You Grow Grapes? Do You Make Wine? CHECK OUT

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com

www.wineandgrapegrower.com Announcements

Announcements

# # # # #

CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101

Beef Cattle

YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call your sales representive or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

ANGUS/HEREFORD CROSS replacement heifers ready for breeding. Pelvic meas. & tract scores. 804-375-3297

Bedding

Bedding

REG. HEREFORD BULLS ex. EPD’s-carcass. 717-6429199, 240-447-4600.

USA Gypsum Bedding Low On Bedding? Add Gypsum! Stanchions - Free Stalls - Bed Packs

Or Call For a Sample Copy

800-218-5586

Concrete Products

Dairy Cattle

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS®

10 CERTIFIED Organic bred heifers for sale. $1,700/ea. Jersey, Ayrshire and crosses. 607-263-5774.

CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

SCC Over 100,000? Call Us. Only 13 cents/cow. 39 years easy use. Effective, no withholding, results. PH: 800-876-2500, 920-650-1631 www.alphageneticsinc.com

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

Dairy Equipment

THE SCABBLER MAN: 2” & 1” wide scabbling. Dan Martin 434-454-7018 Home, 434579-0705 Cell

Concrete Products

Concrete Products

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

Feed Bunks & Cattle Guards

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves. • Use less! More absorbent than lime products.

Try Grip X1 Today! www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Dealers wanted in select areas Also Available at: Central Dairy & Mech. Country View Ag Products Elam Miller Himrod Farm Supply Homestead Nutrition Levi Fisher Martin’s Ag New Bedford Elevator Norm’s Farm Store Robert Rohrer Steve B. Stoltzfus Walnut Hill Feeds

Martinsburg, PA Moravia, NY Ft. Plain, NY Penn Yan, NY New Holland, PA Honey Grove, PA Shippensburg, PA Baltic, OH Watsontown, PA Millmont, PA Lykens, PA Shelby, OH

ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph

814-793-3721 315-374-5457 518-993-3892 315-531-9497 888-336-7878 717-734-3145 717-532-7845 330-897-6492 570-649-6765 570-898-1967 717-365-3804 419-342-2942

We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 500 Gal. Majonnier • 6000 Gal. Storage VA (99) • 1000 Gal. DeLaval • 4000SOLD Gal. Surge • 415 Gal. Sunset • 1000 Gal. Mueller M • 4000 Gal. Surge • 400 Gal. Jamesway NY • 900 Gal. Mueller OH • 3000SOLD Gal. Storage • 400 Gal. Majonnier • 800 Gal. Majonnier • 3000 Gal. Storage • 300 Gal. DeLaval • 2000 Gal. Mueller OH • 800 Gal. Mueller OH SOLD PA • 300 Gal. Majonnier SOLD NY Sunset NH • 2000SOLD Gal. Mueller OE • 735 Gal. • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 2000 Gal. Mueller OE • 735 Gal. Sunset • 300 Gal Mueller M • 700 Gal. Mueller OH • 2000 Gal. Surge • 300 Gal. Sunset SOLD MD V • 700 Gal. Mueller • 1600 Gal. Surge • 200 Gal. DeLaval • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 200 Gal. Mueller RS • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 200 Gal. Sunset • 1250 Gal. Surge • 180 Gal. Milkeeper • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 1250 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 150 Gal. Majonnier • 1250 Gal. Majonnier • 150 Gal. Mueller RH • 545 Gal. Sunset • 1250 Gal. DeLaval • 500 Gal. Mueller MW • 100, 180, 250 Gal. • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 500 Gal. Mueller M Milkeeper Self-Cont.

HEAT EXCHANGERS S • TUBE E COOLER 300-6000 0 Gall Storage e Tanks

We e Do o Tank k Repair

SHENK’S

505 E. Woods Drive,

Sales 717-626-1151

Farm Machinery For Sale $1,000 OFF most all corn heads & grain heads. Huge selection. Lots of 20-22-25-30’ heads. Zeisloft Eq. 800-9193322, Bloomsburg, PA

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE We Buy Tractors For Parts

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT 403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

(717) 776-6242

Pre Cast Concrete J BUNK FEED TROUGHS FOB Wytheville, VA $150.00 ~ 8’ sections CATTLE GUARDS (deliverable locally) Call for Details!

U BUNK $150.00

Lititz, PA 17543

Farm Machinery For Sale

BUSH HOG

USED EQUIPMENT Sitrex 17’ Tedder MF 1835 Baler Woods 121 Rotary Cutter Woods RM660 Finish Mower Case IH 8330 Windrower White 445 Disc Chisel Vicon Fertilizer Spreader MF 245 Tractor White 285 Tractor Miller 1150 Rake Hesston 4550 Square Baler Farmall 460 Tractor MF 246 Loader Case IH 8830 SP Mower Cond. MF 285 Tractor Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill Miller Pro Forage Boxes In Stock STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE RD Box 46 Klingerstown, PA

WEST END PRECAST

570-648-2088 WE ALSO STOCK NEW VICON

Wytheville, VA (276) 620-1821 Ask for Chris Dairy Cattle

Dairy Equipment

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS

Large Selection Available

USED BOUMATIC double 12 parallel Grand Prix milking parlor with meters, claws, plate coolers, vacuum pump, sink, complete. Very nice, working condition. 315-3532075

Gypsum Bedding • Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Reduce mastitis & cell counts. • Use in place of Hydrated Lime. • Improves your soil • Available in bulk or bag.

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist 1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

NEW COMBINE PROGRAM! Direct ship combines. Save money and trucking. 1 year warranty on motor & transmission. Largest inventory of quality used combines on East Coast! 28 years in business. Zeisloft Farm Eq. LLC, Bloomsburg, PA, 800-9193322 www.zeisloftequip.com

Page 19 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 20

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Zeisloft’s want to be your Combine Man

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery Wanted

ONE OF LARGEST Selections of quality combines on East Coast! JD 9560, 9660 STS, lots of 9550, 9650 and 9500/9510. Also big selection Case IH 2366, 2166, 1666, 1660, 1640. 1 year warranty on motor & trans. 3.5% fin. Low trucking rates. Zeisloft Farm Eq., Bloomsburg, PA zeisloftequip.com 800-9193322

WANTED

WANTED

1 Year Motor & Trans. Warranty on Combines In Stock/Ready to Go 2005 JD 9560 Sidehill, 2000 Eng,1370 Sep hrs, New Rubber, Greenstar . $169,000 2000 9650 STS 1300 Eng, 1700 Sep hrs, Like New Rubber, 30.5, Greenstar, Sharp! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $97,500 2002 JD 9550 LL only 1,840 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $89,500 2000 JD 9550 Sidehill, only 2,092 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,500 2001 JD 9550 Sidehill, only 1.900 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call 1999 JD 9510 Super Sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call 1998 JD 9510 4x4, New Rubber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call 1995 JD 9500 Sidehill, 4x4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,000 1996 JD 9500 Sidehill, 2WD, Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $57,500 1997 JD 9500 LL, only 2,700 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $58,000 1995 JD 9500 LL, only 2,200 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $53,500 1993 JD 9500 LL, very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,500 (12) JD 6620 Mostly Sidehills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Varies (2) JD 7720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheap! 1998 Case/IH 2366 Hillco 4x4 only 1620 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $109,000 1998 Case/IH 2366 Hillco 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99,000 1998 Case/IH 2366 2WD, Sharp, 2,300 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $74,000 1998 Case/IH 2366 2WD, 2,510 hrs, Exc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75,900 1998 Case/IH 2366 4x4 1,966 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,900 1996 Case/IH 2166 2WD, AFS, 2,966 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,900 1995 Case/IH 2166 2WD, 3,357 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 1995 Case/IH 2144 2WD, nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,700 1994 Case/IH 1666 2WD, Very Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,500 14 1660-1640-1620 combines

Direct Ship Program Ships Direct from our Warehouse from Midwest Direct to you. Prices are Trucking Included. Was

Now

‘11 JD 9870 #740656, 486/316HR, 20.8-42 Duals 28L26, 4WD, Chop, 24’ Unload, Contour Delcab Mauer Bin ext, “very Nice” 30.5 Avail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $299,000..........$289,000 ‘08 JD 9770 #727600, STS, 1480/983, 20.8-42 Duals, CM, Chop Bin ext, Custom Cutter Package, “Very Nice”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $189,000..........$179,000 ‘04 JD 9660 #707325, STS, 2WD, 30.5, Sharp . . . . . . . $119,000..........$109,000 ‘07 JD 9660 #721103, STS, 2WD, 30.5, Fancy . . . . . . . $145,000..........$137,000 ‘05 JD 9560 #710704, STS, CM, 30.5L-32 2WD, 14.9-24 Chopper Mauer Bin ext, GS, Y&M, JD Universal Steering Kit, Auto Steer, 2038/1391, “Very Nice” . . . . $139,000..........$132,000 ‘00 JD 9650W #685321, 3690/2601HR, 30.5-32F 18.4-30R, 4WD, Chaff Chopper Bin ext, GS ,w/Display CM w/Single Point Conversion Delcab w/Airseat . . . . . $98,000............$89,000 ‘00 JD 9650W #686932, STS, CM, 3875/2642, AHC DAS, FA, GS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75,000............$69,000 CIH 7088 #Y8G000272, 1469/1030, Tracker RT Chop 2spd Feeder House 4WD, Pro 600 Monitor, 900-32 Drive Tires, 540/30 Rear Elec Bin ext, Leather Seat. . . . . . Call ..................Call ‘09 CIH 2366 #184744, Hillco Bin ext, RT 800/65R32 14.9-24R, Big Top Leveling System, CIH, AFS System w/Display 2WD, Spec Rotor, 3735/2733, 2SP, Hydro . . $99,000............$92,000 ‘01 CIH 2388 #269238, 18.4-42 Duals, 2WD, FT RT, Spec Rotor Chop Mauer Bin ext, AFS, Y&M, Monitor w/Display, 2700/2020. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $94,500............$88,000 ‘99 CIH 2388 #266467, 18.4-38 Duals, 2WD Mauer ext, FT, Spec, Rotor Chopper, 3574/4507, AG Leader 2000, Y&M . . $74,500............$68,500 ‘98 CIH 2388 #198537, FT RT, 30.5-32 2WD, Spec Rotor Chopper, Rear Weights, Mauer Bin ext, 20’ Unload, AG leader, PF, Y&M, Monitor, 3640/2795 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $76,000............$71,000 Delivered Prices

Financing As Low As 3.5% Bloomsburg, PA • Route 44 (Jerseytown) 328 Danville Rd. (Near I-80)

TOLL FREE 800-919-3322 www.zeisloftequip.com

MAINE TO NORTH CAROLINA

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293

Farm Machinery For Sale

“New” McHale Rd Bale Wrapper model 991 BC, self load & bale tip . . . $18,600 NH FP 230 Forage Harvester, 3 row & hay head, processor, tandem axle “Very Little Use” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,500 NH 575 sq Baler w/#72 thrower, good one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 NH 570 sq Baler, No Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,200 JD 7930 c/a MFD, IVT, duals, 360 hrs JD 7530 c/a MFD, P. Series, IVT, duals 700 hrs w/JD 741 SL loader! 2011 JD 6430 c/a MFD P. Series, IVT, w/loader, only 115 hrs JD 6405 c/a w/loader, new tires, Hyd, L.H. Rev. Case IH 245 Mag. c/a 4x4, duals, 1100 hrs SEE

US AT

www.andrewsfarm.com

ANDREWS FARM EQ., INC. Conneautville, PA 16406 814-587-2450

New Holland T4050 100 hrs, cab, AC, Power Shuttle, Loader, Like New!

Chopper eating dirt? Why R U Raking? Front PTO + Triple Mower + Collector = Dirt Free Windrows

PleasantCreekHay.com USED EQUIPMENT Further Price Reductions on McCormick CT Series Tractors! Call Now - 0 % - 60 mo or Huge Cash Discounts!

’08 Vermeer 5410 Round Baler, Net, 244 Bales, Exc. Cond. ............................Call! 1974 Ford 5000 w/Dual Power, Very Good Condition ......................................$8,000 ’06 Vermeer TE170, 4 Rotor Tedder, Hyd. Fold and Tilt, Nice!........................$4,995 JD 14T Square Baler, Fair Cond........$600 Vermeer 605M, w/Net and Bale Ramp, Complete Rebuild (Belts, Chains, Sprockets) Wide Pickup..............$19,900 Fanex 833T byVicon 6 Rotor Tedder, Field Ready, Pull Type ...........................$5,000 ’05 McCormick CX85 Tractor, 1,400 Hrs., w/New Loader, Cab, 4x4 Dual Remotes . ....................................................$35,000 Kuhn GMO 77 HD, 3Pt. Disc Mower, Good ......................................................$3,500 ’73 Ford 3000 8 Speed Manual, 1 Remote, Diesel, Good Rubber, No Rust!....$5,500 ’09 Vermeer 555XL w/Net Wrap, Good Condition ....................................$12,900 NEW! HayMag 4 Rotor Tedders w/Hyd. Fold & Tilt, 18’...............................$4,995 Massey Ferguson 4225, 2WD, 1036 Massey Loader, Cab, Air, 2 Remotes, 1,500 Hours, Bale Spike .......$19,900

Thank you area dairymen for your support! Best wishes and we appreciate your business!

Pictures at www.tractorcare.com

Tractor Care, Inc. 1066-C Virginia Avenue, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802-2533 PH: 540-433-7070 Check out our e-bay store at stores.ebay.com/tractor-care-inc

$45,900

Kioti DK45, cab, loader, Only 252 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . .$23,900 New Holland 3930 loader, 2,075 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,900 Kubota B7500 loader, mower, Only 58 hrs . . . . . . . .$12,900 Massey Ferguson 283 89hp, 2wd, 821 hrs . . . . . . . .$8,900 Kubota B2100 loader, mower, 1,059 hrs . . . . . . . . . . .$8,900 Kioti LK2554 25hp, 4wd, loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,490 2035 Stuarts Draft Hwy., Stuarts Draft, VA 24477 540-337-1090 www.beveragetractor.com Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293 Fencing

ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Generators

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348 Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers For Sale: 2 Steel 30-ton Grain Bins, cone bottom, $4,000/each. Contact Dave 845-701-2737 Sullivan Co.,NY NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION Parts & Service New Installations

804-387-6462 Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

Pre Cut Rye Straw

Try Selling It In The

302-737-5117 302-545-1000

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Hay - Straw Wanted

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers

Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

519-482-5365 ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

STRAW FOR SALE: 21 bale bundles, loaded on your truck, Madison County,VA. 540-9484043, 540-718-1567 cell

Hay - Straw For Sale

50 to 75 Lb. Bales

WANTED WHEAT STRAW: Virginia area. Combined/not moldy, big or small bales. Can pick up from field. 304-4972438

Help Wanted

Livestock Equipment

Herdsman Wanted:Jasper Hill Farm seeks a candidate to help grow our farmstead cheese business. Responsibilities include managing the herd health and breeding programs for our herd of 45 registered Ayrshire cows, milking and raw product quality oversight, management of farm operations including wheyfed pork production, field work and staff supervision. Dairy experience required. Competitive pay. Contact: Emily 802-533-2566 x106 or work@cellarsatjasperhill.com

Livestock Equipment

South East Precast Concrete, LLC Feed Bunks, Water Troughs, Mineral Feeders, Cattle Guards, Silo Sides, Bunker Sides Dealer for: Giant Rubber Water Tanks and Best Livestock Equipment

Call to Order 276-620-1194 Wytheville, VA

Heating

HAY & STRAW

Round & Square Bales

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay

WANTED

TOO MUCH HAY?

or email FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

Hay - Straw Wanted

Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW

Help Wanted

EQUIPMENT OPERATOR/ TRUCK DRIVER

All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted.

With Mechanical Skills

Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

Needed on CNY Dairy Farm

2012 Contracts Now Available Contacts: Allen Hollenbach 610-929-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

Hay - Straw For Sale

The Best Method For Covering Hay Stacks

315-379-3220 is available at OAKWOOD DAIRY

Involves feeding an 1800 cow dairy, managing bunk silos and feed deliveries. Good Salary with a 5-day work week, paid holidays & other benefits. Oakwood Dairy is a progressive, high production dairy with excellent facilities, equipment and management located near Auburn, NY.

315-252-0652 315-730-9046 (Bill) or

810 South 14th Ave., Lebanon, PA 17042

1-866-887-2727 • 1-717-228-2727 www.supertarp.com • rockymeadowfarm@evenlink.com

HAY * HAY * HAY

Western * Organic * Conventional BEST QUALITY / PRICES / SERVICE We’re #1 - Financing Available WE DELIVER! Certified Organic Growers Association $50 CASH for REFERRALS CALL RICK (815) 979-7070

Penta Feed Mixers Sales • Parts • Service

New Units 300, 410, 900 Cu. Ft. In Stock Financing Available Call For Pricing 315-545-2027 Daryl Hoover, Newark, NY

Poultry & Rabbits

315-729-0438

Hoof Trimming

Hoof Trimming

Affordable Hydraulic Hoof Trimming Tables • Heavy Duty Professional Quality • Increased Production With Less Effort • Models Available In Stationary & Portable • Limited Warranty

The Ultimate in Tilt Tables

For more information call

Help Wanted

ROCKY MEADOW FARM

Is seeking a goal-oriented team player to join our crop crew. Ideal candidate will have a class A CDL, knowledge of dairy farming, and strong mechanical and operation skills. A positive attitude and willingness to learn are also a must.

Call

FEEDING POSITION

oakwood@cnyemail.com

PROTECT YOUR FEED FROM THE WEATHER Save money in prevented feed losses & up to 5 seasons of use Large Inventory • Next Day Shipping

Large Dairy Farm Located in Cayuga County, NY

Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers (7 Meat Varieties)

Extremely hearty & perfect for free range Layer Chicks, Turkeys Ducklings, Guineas, Much More

(814) 539-7026

www.myerspoultry.com

SHEP’S WELDING, INC. PO Box 296, Chiefland, FL 32644 • www.shepswelding.net

1-800-370-8454 Help Wanted

SEED COMPANY DEALERSHIPS DOEBLER’S is searching for professional seed sales men and women in all of its Eastern regions from New York State into Ohio and as far south as North Carolina. Ideal candidates must demonstrate an ability to quickly learn new seed product information, a desire to not only grow Doebler’s business but also the businesses of his or her customers, and a thorough understanding of and ability to communicate Doebler’s reputation in agribusiness as “Your Regional Advantage”. If you would like to be considered for a dealership position with a company nearly eight decades in the industry, please call 1-800-853-2676. Thank you.

Parts & Repair

Parts & Repair

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services

“BELT T BUSTERS” $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Agricultural Belt Service Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

Page 21 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • June 18, 2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 22

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Poultry & Rabbits

Poultry Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Clearview Hatchery

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

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62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

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540-255-9112 ORGANIC DAIRY FARM/ CREAMERY, 318 acres. 8 miles from Cooperstown,NY. Two 3 bedroom homes, 100 cow freestall, Double 6 milking parlor. Many outbuilding for young stock, hay & equipment. New cheese room, aging facility & solar electric system. 200 acres fenced for grazing. $998,500. 607-2869362

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1995 A35C Volvo Articulating Haul Truck 6 x 6 $37,000. (716) 433-3373

Phone #_____________________Fax #________________Cell #_____________________ e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard Card # __________________________________________Exp. Date __________________ (MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card:(Print)____________________________________________________ Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for credit card payment only)

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week

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16 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

20

1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week 1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

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1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week 1 Week $12.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.85 per zone per week 1 Week $13.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.15 per zone per week 1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week

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Roofing

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NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

City: __________________________________________ State: ________ Zip: __________

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week 1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week 1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

717-464-8930

MID-ATLANTIC REGION

Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________

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FARM AND LAND REALTY, INC.

Calendar of Events

Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________

Trucks

WE HAVE OVER 20 FARMS FOR SALE THROUGHOUT PA. JOHN MATTILIO, BROKER

Roofing

New

 Country Folks West West East England Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word.  Country Folks Number of New England (Phone #’s count as one word) If running your ad multiple weeks:  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic of weeks to Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

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NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

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JUN 19 Breeding & Genetics: Considerations for Organic Dairy Farms Online. For more information or to register visit www.extension.org/pages/2 5242. Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276.

JUN 21 The Farming for Success 2012 Field Day PSU Southeast Agricultural Research & Extension Center 1446 Auction Rd., Manheim, PA. 9 am - 3 pm. Preregistration cost: $5 (if received by noon of June 20). Walk-in registration: $10. Registration includes a BBQ lunch. Contact Penn State Extension, 717-394-6851. On Internet at www. extension.psu.edu/lancaster JUN 28 Open House and Dairy Tour Ryan & Jen Clark’s Dairy Operation, 318 Crawford Rd., Tyrone, Blair County. 10 am - 1:30 pm. Picnic style lunch. Participation is free, but pre-registration is requested. Call 717-3460849. On Internet at www. centerfordairyexcellence.org JUN 30 National Lineback Show Centre Hall Fairgrounds, Centre Hall, PA. 10 am. Any boy or girl age 8-21 and a jr. member of ALDCR by June 1 is eligible to show in the junior show. This year an open show has also been added. For entry info check at

www.americanlinebacks.co m. Contact Luke Harrison, 814-490-7517 or roz_18@ hotmail.com. JUL 6 Open House and Dairy Tour Reed & Diane Hoover’s Dairy Operation, 400 Mount Wilson Rd., Lebanon, Lebanon County. 10 am - 1:30 pm. Picnic style lunch. Participation is free, but pre-registration is requested. Call 717346-0849. On Internet at www.centerfordairyexcel lence.org JUL 13-14 Wild Horse & Burro Adoption Shale Knoll Arena, 47 Crooked Rd., Annville, PA. Friday preview 2-7 pm. Saturday adoption 8 am - 5 pm. Adoption is first come, first serve. Call 866-468-7826. JUL 17 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276.

JUL 20 Sorghum Grower Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 8-10 am. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-671-3276. JUL 21 Tree Farm Field Day Eagleville Gap, Blanchard, PA. 10 am - 3 pm. Questions? Program Details Contact: John Hoover, Tree Farmer 203-736-4385 or johnwhoover@msn.com. Registration information contact: Dave Jackson, Forest Resources Educator, Penn State Extension of Centre County at 814-3554897 or drj11@psu.edu. The registration page can be downloaded at http:// patreefarm.org/wpcontent/uploads/2012/01/ Hoover-Tree-Farm-FieldDay-Brochure-7-12.pdf. JUL 24 Pesticide Recertification Class, Private Category V&X O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 5-9 pm. Commercial class TBA. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-671-3276.

AUG 2 The 2012 Virginia Ag Expo Grainfield Farm operated by Chuck McGhee in Mechanicsville, VA. 7:30 am. Field tours starting at 8 am will include the Virginia on farm corn and soybean variety plots; corn and soybean planting dates; weed, insect and nematodes control; population studied in both corn and soybeans; row width in full season soybeans and seed treatments in soybeans. Also on the tour will be a stop at the blackberry and raspberry operation and a stop at a pre-Civil War cemetery. There is no preregistration or registration fee for attendees. Lunch will be available from local civic organizations and vendors. Contact John Smith, e-mail vaagexpo@aol.com. AUG 21 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276.


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June 18, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 24

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic 6.18.12  

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic June 18, 2012

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