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28 May 2012 Section e off One One Volume e 31 Number r 21

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds Louis Wood - building partnerships between horses and humans ~ Page 2 Choosing which dragon to kill first ~ Page 3 Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly

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FEATURES Auctions Classifieds Horse Markets

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INSERTS: (in some areas) Country Folks Real Estate & Auctioneers Guide

Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit. ~ Galatians 5:25


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 2

Louis Wood ~ Building partnerships between horses and humans by Jennifer Showalter WAYNESBORO, VA — Growing up on his family’s ranch, Louis Wood had no idea all the hard knocks he took helping his grandfather break colts would lead him to where he is today. Like many kids, Louis wanted a pony from day one, but his grandfather just smiled. Instead, his grandfather pulled out an old ranch horse, what he referred to as a “proper horse,” and set Louis free at age 5. Louis’s grandfather broke a number of colts for use on their ranch, and a large part of the income on the ranch came from breaking horses for other people. They also ran a substantial sized cow-calf operation on the land that Louis owns and operates today, which is the remainder of an original land-grant to his family 262 years ago. Spending every chance he could helping his grandfather with the horses, Louis realized that his grandfather had a deep and abiding love for all of the animals. The methods used were the mentality of the time and essentially consisted of trying to break the horse’s spirit into submission so that the human could gain control of it for their own uses. Not knowing any other means at the time, Louis continued to follow the guidance of his grandfather, and at the age of 8 when his grandfather fell out of a hay mow and broke his leg, Louis had no choice but to step up and start helping out with the colt breaking operation. Louis’s grandfather expected a lot of him, but looking back the lessons he learned at an early age are invaluable to him. “As I experienced life, I realized my grandfather had taught me at an early point in time that there are a lot of things in life that are going to slam you to the ground, and when that happens you have two options

— you can get up and continue to try again or you can sit around and feel sorry for yourself. Nobody will make that significant change for your situation to improve but you. Learning this at an early age has had a huge and significant impact on the outcome of my life. I have had some pretty major things slam me to the ground, and failure has just never been an option.” Forced to change his ways As Louis’s grandfather got older, Louis rode more and more colts and was living the cowboy dream. “A couple of things you tend to bring into the equation when you are a young man doing something so exciting as cowboying and breaking horses is testosterone and ego. As you get a little older you find out those two things don’t work out too good for you.” Being told by doctors he should never ride again following a serious horse related accident was devastating to Louis. “For me that was the hugest turning point of my entire life because I realized there was just no picture of me in my heart without a horse beneath me. At that point, I knew if I was to continue at all that my relationship with the horse would have to change. That was the first time I ever really looked at what I did with the horse as a relationship. I began to think about how a successful relationship might go, and if it was truly to be successful both the horse and the human would have to have needs met and things answered within that relationship.” Determined to continue riding, Louis began to explore some different ideas that he had had for a number of year and later learned about some other people who were offering clinics on better ways to work with horses. He began to gain a better understanding of how to form that human-to-horse

Louis Wood works with some clinic participants on groundwork with a horse during a clinic at Mountainview Ranch. Photo by Sharon Wood

Louis Wood and Moonpie pony another horse he is working with. Photo by Margarete Stephens bond that every horse owner dreams of. Learning how to recognize and respect his horses’ needs instead of conquering them, he came to the realization that what he really wanted was a willing partnership based on trust and understanding rather than submission and control. Utilizing this thought process has helped Louis to have continuing success throughout his career. New ways attract following Finding much success in Louis’s new way of training, people were eager to learn for themselves and pushed him to hold his first horsemanship clinic about 16 years ago. With one clinic under his belt, his name rapidly spread and he picked up more and more clinics and work. Being on the road more often than not, Louis made the difficult decision to go out of the cattle business. “There is not much worse than being in an airport thousands of miles away and getting a phone call that you have cows out,” said Wood. At the time, he was running a large cow/calf operation and contract grazing calves for some cattlemen in the Midwest. Louis’s love of cattle lingers on and, he truly cherishes the fact that his family was one of the last in the Shenandoah Valley to drive cattle horseback to and from summer pastures. Due to numerous complaints, the state police put a stop to the Wood family driving cattle in 1963. At one time, Louis was up to doing over 100 clinics a year,

but has gradually cut back and is working more with private clients. Louis finds that when he first starts working with riders they often are experiencing problems because they do not understand their horse’s needs. By going over the biomechanical aspects of both the horse and the rider and how the slightest movement can mean big things to a horse, Louis is typically able to get things moving in the right direction for both the horse and rider in a short period of time regardless of the discipline involved. In 1999, Louis’s Horsemanship was first used as a model for human leadership development and relationship building by the Leadership Development Center at the University of Virginia. Since that time, he and co-facilitator John Lord have continued to offer a program called Horsense For Leaders to public venues, colleges, universities and private industry. During these clinics, Louis focuses on listening skills, being receptive to others needs, and how to utilize these skills to be more effective leaders. For a number of years now, Louis has had the unique opportunity to spend the winter living and working in Wellington, Florida, home of the “A Circuit Finals”, where he helps resolve problems and enhance performance for riders of many disciplines. His clients include a number of Olympic athletes, and for a number of years now his focus has been

mainly on the sport of Dressage, however he continues to work with riders in all disciplines. Stemming from his opportunities in Florida, Louis has been invited to work in several European countries, primarily in Germany, where he exhibited his horsemanship. In 2006, he was presented the opportunity of a lifetime when he was asked by a client in Virginia to travel to Vienna Austria and work with a horse they owned who was being trained by the renowned trainer Arthur Kottas, who for many years was the chief rider for the Spanish School of Riding in Vienna. The opportunity to work with such a talented and respected horseman has truly been the highlight of Louis’s career and he left that experience with a wealth of knowledge and respect for the mentorship of such a talented horseman. Winding down at home Louis is not ready to hang up his saddle by any means, but is at a point in his life where what he wants is to spend more time at Mountainview Ranch doing private lessons rather than always being on the go traveling. He will continue to start a limited number of colts each year and spend increasingly more time devoted to his Retirement Horse Program. A number of retired performance horses now reside at the ranch, peacefully living out their later years in compatible social groups on lush pastures and hay produced right on the ranch. Realizing that these horses have been valued family members of their owners for many years, Louis takes great pains to keep the owners up to date on the welfare and daily lives of these cherished equine companions, treating them as if they were his own. When Louis lay on the ground as a kid time after time with the air knocked out of him from being bucked off, he only knew one thing and that was to get up, dust himself off and get back on. The drive and determination that Louis’s grandfather taught him at an early age certainly has pushed Louis forward in life, but Louis’s openness to change his ways is what has made him into the horseman he is today. “If you are open and receptive to what the good Lord presents, it’s pretty amazing what the outcome is,” said Wood. To view a clinic schedule and/or get more information on Louis Wood and Mountainveiw Ranch, visit www.mountainviewranch.net or contact Louis by phone at 540-471-1743 or by e-mail at mtnvwranch@earthlink.net.


by Sally Colby Agronomist John McGillicuddy says that farmers are their own best agronomic support system. “You’re there every day, and it’s your money on the line,” he said. “That makes you much more dedicated.” McGillicuddy’s Iowa-based agronomy consulting business is built on the premise that interacting with clients and helping them understand what’s going on in their fields bring them back. The dilemma for corn growers, according to McGillicuddy, is this: “You have a certain amount of time, and a certain amount of money. You also have a resource that you might not be thinking about, and that’s brain time. Your most valuable asset is your brain, and it has to make a lot of decisions.” McGillicuddy referenced an actuary who compiled a spreadsheet to help sort the factors involved in crop planting decisions. The printed version of that spreadsheet is 30 feet long, in small print, with nearly 3,000 critical input factors that have an impact on the outcome. “His position is that crop production is the most complex industry in the world,” said McGillicuddy. “Decisions have to be made well, and those decisions have an impact on success or failure.” McGillicuddy says many planting decisions are made instinctively, but most stem from areas where time and

Today farmers are thinking more about N, P, K and micronutrients, however those factors should be analyzed before making amendments. Photo by Sally Colby

money are invested. “You have to be selective about critical resources like your time and what your brain is doing,” he said. “Good agronomy is about identifying where time and money should go.” According to McGillicuddy, one steadfast rule of crop production is that ‘almost anything will work somewhere, but absolutely nothing works everywhere’. “If you’re going to

spend time and money on anything, two things have to be true or it won’t improve yields,” he said. “The problem you’re solving has to actually exist in your field. Products or treatments are purchased to solve a problem, so if the problem isn’t in that field, or if the problem isn’t the critical thing that puts a ceiling on yield, it probably won’t change the outcome.”

Kathy La Scala joins Lee Publications PALATINE BRIDGE, NY — Lee Publications announces the addition of Kathy LaScala to its sales and marketing team. In her role as Digital Media Manager, Kathy will focus on digital product development for the family of Country Folks publications, which serve a variety of agriculture markets. In addition, Kathy will be a part of the sales team, providing agriculture focused companies a platform of regional and national opportunities to extend multi-channel communication and marketing efforts. Prior to joining Lee Publications, Kathy was a national accounts manager at Vance Publishing. She brings extensive experience in sales, strategic positioning, marketing and project development to the team. A native New Yorker, Kathy earned her bachelor’s degree in animal science, with a focus on dairy, from Cornell University. Please join Lee Publications in welcoming Kathy to the Country Folks team! Lee Publications produces Country

Kathy LaScala joins Lee Publications.

Folks, Country Folks Grower, Country Folks Mane Stream, Wine & Grape Grower and Small Farm Quarterly, along with a line of publications reaching the construction and quarry market.

How should the farmer look for problems? “When you look at a field and have 2,500 decisions to make, it’s the same as running with 2,500 dragons,” said McGillicuddy. “Which dragon do you kill first? You kill the one that’s the most immediate threat. In a cornfield, what is the most likely thing that’s robbing yield?” When he started as an agronomist in the late 70s, McGillicuddy says an International Cyclo 400 Air Planter was considered stateof-the art. Yield limiting factors and concerns at that time included ear count, stand quality, hybrids, root mass and compaction. Today’s concerns are more about N, P, K and micronutrients. However, those factors must be carefully analyzed before amendments are made. “If you throw a jug full of a mixture of manganese, copper and boron on a field and assume your problem is solved,” said McGillicuddy, “you probably wasted material and didn’t solve your problem.” McGillicuddy says since we can’t control water and sunlight, good agronomy is about solving the things that can be solved. “If you want to achieve yields you’ve never had, you’re going to have to manage details you’ve never managed,” he said. “We didn’t always manage sulfur, boron and zinc, and now we manage them actively. That doesn’t mean we’re always putting those on — it means we’re always verifying whether we’re

getting enough.” According to McGillicuddy, corn has a unique characteristic that doesn’t apply to other agronomic crops. “It starts with extremely high yield potential, and over the season, gives it up,” he said. “Once those bushels are lost, they cannot be regained. Good agronomy is about stopping the decline in the early season.” Under ideal conditions, most commercial corn varieties would surpass 350 to 400 bu/acre. “The day it germinates, that’s the number you’re starting with,” he said. “If I harvest 200 bushels of corn, it’s a safe assumption that some time earlier in that growing season we were at 220 bushels. What I’m looking for is the event that dropped the yield — how did that field give up its last 20 bushels? The last 20 are the easiest to get back, so we want to identify how and when did the corn plant give up. If we can identify that, we can focus on figuring out the three most likely causes, and manage those.” Since growers are paid for weight, and the smallest unit of corn is a single kernel, the focus should be on maximizing both the number of kernels and kernel weight. “The number of kernels produced per acre times what each of those kernels weighs is what you’re going to be paid for,” said McGillicuddy. “We’ve been challenging this concept for 33 years and it hasn’t let us down yet.”

MD ag secretary releases statement on signing of estate tax reform bill ANNAPOLIS, MD — Maryland Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance released the following statement May 22 on the signing of estate tax reform legislation that would protect the generational transfer of farmland. The legislation (SB294/HB444) Family Farm Preservation Act of 2012, better known as the “estate tax” bill, was proposed by Gov. Martin O’Malley and Sen. President Thomas V. Mike Miller. It allows farms valued under $5 million to be passed down from generation to generation without incurring estate taxes, provided that the land stays in agricultural use for at least 10 years. The legislation also reduces the Maryland estate tax rate to 5 percent for qualified agricultural property values over $5 million, down from the current 16 percent. “This new law, long sought after by the agriculture community, will make it easier for farmers to pass down farmland through generations by decreasing the estate tax burden on

“This new law ... will make it easier for farmers to pass down farmland through generations.” ~ Buddy Hance Maryland Agriculture Secretary the owner’s death. No Marylander should be forced to sell a farm that has been in their family for generations because they cannot afford the tax bill. We thank Gov. O’Malley, Senate President Miller, Maryland legislators and all who were involved in the passage of this important legislation that protects our heritage and strengthens our agricultural economy. When our farm businesses are sustainable, the next generation will see farming as a viable career opportunity and Maryland will preserve its open space and locally-grown food industry.”

Page 3 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Choosing which dragon to kill first


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 4

Letter to the Editor: Hysteria wins and consumers lose It was like the old horror movie when a black blob descended from the sky causing people to flee in the city streets. There are at least two things in common between the movie of the 1950s and the recent national episode about a food product now known as “pink slime.” Neither is based on truth and both caused pointless panic. The tale about this misunderstood meat product began in late March when ABC News broadcast a report about the use of lean finely textured beef (LFTB) in retail beef products. The report referred to LFTB as “pink slime,” a description coined by a USDA employee and mentioned by the New York Times. The Internet universe exploded with chatter about a product that was suddenly viewed as unappetizing, unhealthy and unsafe. When it was noted that our nation’s school lunch program permits schools to use ground beef that includes LFTB, some moms and dads freaked out. On top of all that, more alarm was raised when it became known that ammoni-

Letter to the Editor Opinions of the letters printed are not necessarily those of the staff or management at Country Folks. E-mail letters of opinion to jkarkwren@leepub.com or fax to 518-6732699, or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Letters must be kept to 500 words or less. um hydroxide is often used as part of the meat preparation process. Many supermarket chains rushed forward to exclaim that they will never again sell any ground beef product that includes LFTB. Restaurants and other fast food places quickly joined the choir. School districts across the country suddenly vowed to go LFTB-free. On and on the hysteria grew and it’s still reverberating today. So now, let’s stop, catch our breath and reflect upon some facts and realities. Let’s first be clear about LFTB. “Lean Finely Textured Beef” was

Cover photo courtesy of Moonstar Films Louis Wood enjoys his time at home working on his Mountainview Ranch more than anything. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

FARM CHRONICLE

developed to provide more domestic lean beef. The processor purchases beef trimmings (mostly 50 percent lean or less, from USDA-inspected food processing plants) heats the trimmings, and sends them through a centrifuge process that separates the fat and the meat. The resulting LFTB product is 94 percent to 97 percent lean beef. Ground beef containing LFTB has nearly identical nutritional value compared to other ground beef. The meat is exposed to one puff of ammonium hydroxide (which is already naturally present in beef) to provide extra protection for food safety. The treatment is an antimicrobial intervention directed primarily at E.coli but also is effective on Salmonella. The process has been thoroughly reviewed by scientists and has long been approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration. Now, let’s look at the costs and consequences of the rush to hysteria. Even before the LFTB controversy began, U.S. beef prices were heading higher because of a short supply caused by factors such as the disastrous draught in Texas last year. It has been estimated that it would take an additional 1.5 million head of cattle to produce the beef necessary to replace the use of LFTB. That could be welcome news for the nation’s farmers and ranchers, but certainly not for the many families who struggle to put food on the table, particularly in these tough economic times. Moreover, if school districts ultimately decide not to purchase ground beef with LFTB, it will likely raise their

costs at a time when many already have trouble providing adequate school lunch programs, despite federal assistance. Then there are the jobs. Hundreds have already lost their employment after processing plants were forced to close because of the LFTB frenzy. Another 650 will be out of work when the nation’s largest LFTB producer permanently closes three plants on May 25. Unfortunately, more paychecks will disappear; one processing company based in Pennsylvania and operating in five states with 850 employees has filed for bankruptcy. There are lessons to be learned from this incident. The food industry needs to be proactive with efforts to accurately inform the public about food production and not back away when topics such as “pink slime” surface. Meanwhile, consumers are encouraged to ask questions and critically evaluate what they hear and read in the media and on the Internet. Farmers are naturally concerned that consumers have trust and confidence that the food we produce is healthy and safe. It may make sense that regulations should enable processors to note on package labels if the ground beef has been processed with LFTB. But, it doesn’t make sense for a healthy, safe and affordable food product to be banished from production because of rampant misinformation and inaccurate perceptions. It is imperative that consumers base their decisions on facts rather than fear. Carl T. Shaffer President, PA Farm Bureau

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Center for Dairy Excellence offers team approach to improving dairy quality HARRISBURG, PA — The Center for Dairy Excellence has made its “Target Profit Team” Program available to use in addressing milk quality, animal care or drug residue compliance issues on the farm. The program, offered by the center with support from the Penn State Extension Dairy Team, provides up to $1,000 in funding for individual farms to establish “Target Profit Teams” to address these bottleneck areas on the farm. “With market expectations becoming increasingly more restrictive, all farms must have best management practices in place to address milk quality, animal care and drug residue compliance issues on the farm,” said John Frey, executive director of the Center for Dairy Excellence. “As a result, we are hearing many producers express interest in improved planning, execution and documentation of their standard operating procedures.” A target profit team is a team of trusted advisors that can be assembled to evaluate a problem, identify solutions and track results. The Center for Dairy Excellence will provide up to $1,000 to cover the cost of paid team members and discoveryrelated costs. The center will also offer additional support and

resources to the team effort. The center will help the farm identify team members, who will meet at least twice during the duration of the team to provide insight into potential bottlenecks contributing to the issue at hand. A facilitator designated by the farm, with assistance from the center, coordinates the meetings and keeps the team on tasks. “Bringing together your trusted advisors in a team setting and seeking advice from outside experts can often lead to better decisions and a more defined approach to improving specific areas of emphasis on the farm,” Frey said. “Ultimately, this leads to greater profits for the farm and better products for its customers.” Farms must complete a 2012 application to be enrolled in the program and receive funding. Copies of the 2012 On-Farm Dairy Resource Team Program Application, with updated guidelines, are available online at or by contacting the center at 717-3460849 or e-mail info@centerfordairyexcellence.org. More details can be found on the center’s website at www.center fordairyexcellence.org. Click on “Producer,” then on “Learn About Profit Teams.”


year milk and dairy product prices continue a downward glide as milk production continues to expand despite lower producer returns in the face of high feed

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then slip to $4.20-$5.00 next year. Higher corn plantings and higher expected yield could lead to a recordhigh supply in 2012/13 despite tight carryin stocks. The recent Crop Progress report showed a crop well ahead of average development for this time of year. While USDA admits this is no guarantee of above-average yields, it “minimizes the risk of yield loss due to late planting.” Soybean meal continues to inch upward. This month’s forecast calls for prices to average $360 a ton for the current crop year, up from April’s forecast. For 2012/13, prices are forecast at $335-$360 a ton. The April Agricultural Prices reported the preliminary estimate of alfalfa hay at $207 per ton. Hay could move downward with the 2012/13 crop. The benchmark 16-percent protein dairy ration was calculated at $11.20 per cwt. for January-March 2012. Given crop price forecasts, the ration value will likely head down

later this year and could fall further in 2013, according to USDA. “For dairy producers, the welcome relief from high feed prices will likely be countered by lower milk prices for the balance of 2012,” USDA said, “With some recovery likely in 2013.” On balance, the milk-feed price ratio is not expected to signal expansion until later in 2013, according to the report. The total number of milk cows for 2012 was raised slightly from April to 9.23 million head. The Milk Production report indicated higher than expected cow numbers and, despite weakening returns, producers were not reducing herds as quickly as expected. The dairy herd in 2013 is expected to decline to 9.17 million head, reflecting 2012’s high feed prices and lower milk prices. Milk per cow for 2012 was boosted to 21,880 pounds from the April projection. Production per cow is forecast at 22,100 pounds for 2013. The rise in milk

per cow this year is due to nearly ideal production conditions in much of the U.S. Next year’s projected increase in production per cow reflects the moderating feed price outlook. Looking “back to the futures;” after factoring in the announced Class III milk prices and the remaining futures, the average Class III milk price for the first six months of 2012 stood at $15.65 on March 2 and $15.70 on May 10. The last half of 2012 was averaging $15.95 on April 20, $15.61 on April 27, $15.08 on May 4, $15.44 on May 11, and was trading around $15.68 late morning May 18. Lower futures prices for feedstuffs could reduce Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) payments, according to the University of Wisconsin’s Dr. Bryan Gould and reported by Dairy Profit Weekly (DPW). USDA has already announced MILC payments of 38.9 cents per cwt. for February and

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Page 5 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Will Falling Feed Prices Help? Issued May 18, 2012 The Agriculture Department’s latest Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry Outlook says “Current

prices. Next year’s milk production increase is expected to be slight as the cow herd contracts and demand becomes somewhat stronger, lifting prices.” On a brighter note, the Outlook reported that corn prices are moderating for the current crop year and for 2012/13. Corn was projected at $5.95-$6.25 a bushel in 2011/12, a decline from April’s projection, and


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 6

Mielke from 5 82.6 cents for March. Using May 14 settlement futures prices for MILC-related contracts, Gould revised his estimates for the remainder of 2012 and early 2013. He looks for MILC payments to peak in spring and summer and top $1.00 per cwt. in April and July. For April, Gould projects an MILC payment of $1.18; May, 75 cents; June, 91 cents; July, $1.03; August, 81 cents; September, 38 cents; and October, 11 cents. Updates are posted at his “Understanding Dairy Markets” website. Meanwhile, cash dairy prices saw a little strength the week of May 14, especially on butter as the markets awaited Friday afternoon’s April Milk Production report which I will detail next week. Cash block cheese closed Friday at $1.50 per pound, unchanged on the week but 20 3/4-cents below a year ago. The barrels closed at $1.46, up a penny on the week and 25 cents below a year ago. Only one car of each traded hands all week. The AMS-surveyed block price slipped a penny to $1.5269, while the barrels averaged $1.4938, also down a penny. USDA’s Dairy Market News reports that cheese production remains high as milk looks to find a home away from Class IV production. Discounts are being offered to prompt cheese plants to take extra milk but are cautious to build inventory. Domestic sales are moderate as some buyers are waiting to see if prices will go lower before committing to added purchases. Export sales remain above year ago aided in part by CWT assistance, which was Friday’s DairyLine topic. DPW editor Dave Natzke reported that global dairy product sales are a “bright spot,” because USDA’s March dairy trade report indicates exports were valued at a record $484 million, topping $400 million for the 13th consecutive month. Paced by record-high cheese sales and continued strong sales of high-value whey products, export values were up 11 percent from February and 15 percent more

than March 2011. Monthly butterfat volumes also improved to a nine-month high, Natzke said. In contrast, March 2012 imports, at $258 million were up just 5 percent from February, and down about 7 percent from a year ago. “When we look at trade balance,” Natzke said, “March exports were equivalent to 13.6 percent of U.S. milk solids production for the month, while imports equaled about 2.8 percent of production. So far in this fiscal year, exports are estimated at more than $2.6 billion, up 24 percent from the same period a year ago. Imports, at $1.6 billion, are up 9 percent, resulting in a dairy trade surplus of more than $1 billion through the first half of the fiscal year. Natzke also pointed to National Milk’s CWT program. So far in 2012, CWT has assisted its members to export about 50 million pounds of cheese and 43 million of butter and anhydrous milk fat (AMF). The milk equivalent of those exports is about 1.4 billion pounds, or the annual production of more than 66,000 cows. Another 28 requests for export assistance were announced this week to sell 2.617 million pounds of cheese and 1.461 million pounds of butter and AMF to customers in Asia, Central America, North Africa and the Middle East. Back to the cash markets butter gained another 3 1/2-cents on the week adding to the penny it gained in the previous week’s reversal of six weeks of losses. It is now trading at $1.3550, but is still 71 1/2-cents below a year ago when it jumped 12 cents and then picked up another 11 cents the following week, to peak at $2.18 for the year. Seven cars were sold the week of May 14. The AMS butter price dropped 3.9 cents, averaging $1.3750. Butter producers and handlers indicate that churning schedules are seasonally strong, according to USDA. Cream offerings to the churn remain plentiful. Many

Mielke 17


DOVER, DE — With hurricane season about to begin, Delaware agricultural authorities are urging farmers and pet owners to plan ahead and prepare for weather emergencies. Hurricane Preparedness Week runs through June 2. “The time to be ready is now, before storms create disaster conditions,” said Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee. “We have been relatively lucky in recent years, but preparedness is bet-

ter than relying on luck.” The Department of Agriculture’s Delaware Animal Response staff coordinates and directs animal emergency response and evacuation activities in the state. “In the past, we have seen animals injured and even killed during storm situations,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Heather Hirst, whose Poultry and Animal Health Section includes the DAR program. “Buildings can collapse in high winds and

trap livestock, and flooding can contaminate feed with moisture and mold.” The Department of Agriculture recommends that animal owners take the following precautions: Livestock • Check and secure all buildings and enclosures. Repair or secure loose boards, doors, window covers, metal sheeting, wire and equipment that could blow around in high winds. • Provide water and food. Make sure your ani-

mals have alternate water sources in case power is lost and pumps and automatic waterers are not working. Have enough food and water on hand for seven days. Move feed to higher ground to prevent mold contamination from flooding. • Mark animals. Identifiers for returning lost animals could include ear tags with farm name and phone numbers, brands, paint markings on hooves or coats, or clipped initials in hair coats. Leg

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NH 1431 Swivel Hitch Discbine .$18,900 NH 1431 Standard Hitch Discbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In 1431 Swivel Hitch Discbine, Exc. Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,500 1034 Bale Wagon . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 4 Hay Wagons . . . . . . . . .Choice $2,500 TRACTORS & SKID STEERS AC 185 Low Hrs, 2800 hrs . . . . . .$8,500 9N Thru Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 MF 65 with rotary cutter . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 NH L150 New Skid Loader . . . . .$28,989 NH L170 Deluxe Heated Cab . . .$15,900 NH L185 Cab & AC, 700 hrs, Excellent Cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,900 JD 317 Skid Loader . . . . . . . . . .$13,900 JD 620 Tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,900 Ford 4000 Tractor w/ Loader . . . .$4,900 Ford 4610 712 Hrs., Power Steering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,900 MF 2680 4x4, Cab, 130 HP . . . .$15,900 NH 775 Skid Steer . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 NH GT22 Garden Tractor . . . . . . .$3,500 Ford 1000 Tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 IH 806 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,900 MISC. EQUIPMENT Rhino SE10A 10’ pull type rotary cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,750 Woods D80 Pull Type Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 NH Elevator, 36’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,950 Edsel 1958 4 Dr., Hardtop . . . . . .$1,200 Argosy 1975 23’ Camper . . . . . .$1,500 Good Selection of Aftermarket Buckets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Starting at $650 NH MC22 Front Cut Mower w/60” Deck, Low Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 Dixie Chopper X2000-50 . . . . . . .$3,500 4 in 1 Bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,900 JD 717A Zero turn mower, like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,900

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bands can be used for backyard poultry. • Stock up on supplies. Make sure you have basic veterinary supplies on hand and that your livestock are current on vaccinations. • Study evacuation options. If you decide to evacuate your livestock, determine several locations that the animals could be taken and map out several routes to each location. Make arrangements in advance with owners to accept your animals, and be sure to contact them before taking the animals there. Options could include private stables, race tracks, fairgrounds, equestrian centers, private farms and humane societies. • Choose indoor sheltering or outdoor enclosed areas. If you decide to confine or shelter indoors, consider the structure strength and how it will hold up during high winds and torrential rain. If you give your animals the option of moving outside of their barn during the storm, survey your property to find the best location, do not let animals become trapped in low-lying pens, give them enough space to move around to avoid blowing debris and make sure the areas have no overhead power lines or poles. Poultry The Delmarva Poultry Industry Inc. recommends that commercial poultry growers take steps that include the following: • Check your back-up generator. Make sure you have fuel for several days, and that automatic starting systems are ready to go. • Check propane gas. Make sure you have enough gas, and arrange an early delivery if necessary.

• Check feed inventory. Arrange for an early delivery if necessary. • Have a back-up communications plan. Make sure cell phones are fully charged in case land-line telephone service is lost. • Think long-term. Be prepared to keep birds for longer than normal if processing plants are unable to operate. Make plans for larger-thannormal carcass disposal if necessary. Pets • Make a disaster kit. Just like you have a kit for your family, your pets should have waterproof kits as well. Include medical records, vaccination history and medications, current photographs, veterinarian contact information, documentation of any behavior problems, alternate contact information, first-aid kit, leashes, collars, harnesses or muzzles with identification tags, a pet carrier, food and water bowls, litter pans, toys, blankets and food and water for at least seven days, with a can opener. • Update vaccinations. Make sure your pet is up-to-date before a storm event occurs. • Have an evacuation plan. Delaware emergency shelters now offer housing for pets at or near human shelters. Owners should bring a pet disaster kit along, including food and water, and they are encouraged to visit regularly and oversee day-to-day care for their pets. Pet owners should also have a list of other locations where they can evacuate with their pets, such as relatives, pet shelters or petfriendly motels or hotels. Determine several routes to your local shelters before you leave.

Page 7 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Agriculture officials urge preparedness for storm season


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 8

Vilsack: Ag research and education key to prosperity, security Investment in agricultural research doesn’t benefit just the 2 percent of the population involved in farming. It’s a matter of national security, job creation, energy independence and human health. That’s according to U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, who visited Penn State May 16 to tour College of Agricultural Sciences research facilities and commemorate this year’s 150th anniversaries of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Morrill Act of 1862, which created the land-grant university system. Vilsack spoke to a capacity crowd of more than 200 in the Life Sciences Building’s Berg Auditorium, where he acknowledged current economic challenges while citing a need for continued research funding. “We will be a government that spends less money, but one that must increase investment in education and research,” he said. “Why? Because that is the vehicle through which this country gets back into the business that it’s always been great at: innovating and creating.” Vilsack cited statistics showing that every $1 invested in ag research brings a $20 return. “As a result of agricultural research, since 1980 agriculture has been the second most productive aspect of our economy,” he said. “The research that’s been done over the last 30 years is nothing short of remarkable. It’s happening here, and it’s a result of partnerships between Penn

State and government entities like USDA.” Bruce McPheron, dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences, said maintaining that university research enterprise and the extension system that translates the science for use in the field is becoming increasingly difficult due to the erosion in public funding in recent years. “When state and federal appropriations are cut or remain flat — and costs continue to rise — we lose capacity to address these critical issues and support a vibrant food and fiber sector.” After visiting a greenhouse where biofuels research is taking place, Vilsack touted plant-genetics work aimed at finding ways to break down cellulose so that plant sugars can be extracted for fuel. He credited biofuels with helping to reduce U.S. oil imports from 62 percent to 45 percent in the last three years. Vilsack noted that scientists also are developing methods for turning plant and livestock waste into useful and valuable materials — such as chemicals, polymers and fibers — and in turn reducing reliance on petroleum-based products. “The biobased economy is beginning to take hold, which falls right into the vision of a country that creates and innovates,” he said. “And research is at the center of this.” Research also is the most important component of maintaining food safety, Vilsack contended, because of pathogens’ ability to evolve quickly and get

ahead of the science. He cited new research-based standards in beef and poultry production that could reduce foodborne illnesses due to E. coli, Salmonella and campylobacter by 25,000 cases a year, likely saving hundreds of lives. “You’re doing research here that will allow us to better understand (pathogens),” he said, referring to his earlier tour of labs and pilot

plants in Penn State’s Food Science Building. “You’re doing research that will ensure that the HACCP [Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points] plans we put together in processing facilities are what they need to be to stay ahead of the pathogens.” Food scientists also have a role to play in improving nutrition and addressing obesity and related health care issues,

such as diabetes. But the challenge, Vilsack explained, is to make healthy choices more palatable for consumers. “How are you going to reformulate the food so you can reduce the sodium, sugar and fat, and still make it the choice?” he said. “You’re doing research here at Penn State that’s going to allow us to understand all the complexities of food choices, from how our

brains work to genetics to the taste of food.” Vilsack emphasized that the United States is a food-secure nation, but warned the audience not to take that for granted. He said 85 percent of the food consumed in the United States is grown here, and what is imported is merely for convenience. “We like to have avocados 12 months out of the year

Vilsack 9

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On May 10, Representative Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE), Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight, and Credit held a public hearing to learn more about how credit programs are working for farmers and how they should continue in the 2012 Farm Bill. Two of the witnesses, a beginning farmer from Nebraska and an urban farmer from Ohio, explained how important it

is for agricultural producers to have access to credit to both start and support their operations because of the risks inherently involved with farming. While other witnesses representing the Farm Credit System and commercial lenders described the important role they play for economic growth in rural communities. A number of institutions provide credit to our nation’s farmers, ranchers, and rural constituents. Congress established the Farm

Credit System (FCS) in the Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916 to provide a reliable source of credit to agricultural producers, certain agriculturerelated businesses, and rural homeowners. The Federal Agriculture Mortgage Corporation (“Farmer Mac”) provides credit for agricultural real estate, rural housing, and rural utility loans on the secondary loan market. Both FCS and Farmer Mac are regulated by the Farm Credit Administration

(FCA), which is an independent federal agency. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides direct and guaranteed loans to producers who cannot obtain credit from commercial lenders. Much of the loan dollars from FSA are reserved for beginning farmers and ranchers who do not have the required resources to obtain financing from FCS or commercial lenders. Additionally, local banks provide an important

source of credit for rural constituents. “Today we heard that ensuring a stable food supply is directly connected to farmers and ranchers having access to steady sources of credit. It is especially important for our nation’s beginning farmers and ranchers, who are just starting their operations. As we prepare to write the next Farm Bill, it is critical that we continue to provide a credit system that meets the needs of our agricultural producers and rural communities,” said Chairman Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE). “I was particularly pleased to have an urban farmer and entrepreneur, Mr. Michael Walton from Cleveland, provide my colleages a different perspective. Urban farm-

ers are legitimate agricultural producers who happen to live and farm outside of the traditional rural environment. They are filling an increasingly important role in the economic well being of urban areas, and provide healthy nutrition for many who would otherwise not have access to it. They are doing this without the same resources afforded to traditional farmers such as credit. As we update the Farm Bill, I am urging my colleagues to give serious consideration to the needs of urban farmers. Access to credit can make or break rural farm operations, and urban farm operations are no different,” said Ranking Member Marcia L. Fudge (D-OH).

Vilsack from 8 instead of six months out of the year,” he said. “We start with a national security advantage because we have the capacity to feed ourselves. That’s directly related to the science that has led to this productivity.” Many countries are not so fortunate. And in light of rising world population and increasing demand for food, USDA has launched its Feed the Future initiative. Land-grant universities have an important role to play, according to Vilsack. “We’ll have to increase agricultural production by 70 percent globally in the next 40 years just to meet the needs of the rising human population,” he said. “That’s going to require research and technology transfer in countries and locations that may not have the sophisticated universities like

the one we’re at today.” In the end, Vilsack told the audience, agricultural research is about maintaining and enhancing a way of life. “So when you go back to those labs, back to the farm, back to your office, back to school, understand what’s at stake here,” he said. “It’s not just a research project, it’s not just getting money for the university, it’s not just the whiz-bang science and the excitement of discovery. “It’s about saving lives, creating jobs, improving incomes, feeding hungry people, making a nation secure, making the world a better place, preserving the planet and preserving a value system. That’s why research is important.” Secretary Vilsack’s entire speech can be viewed online at http://psu.ag/JHII2U.

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Page 9 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Subcommittee hearing takeaway: access to credit critical for farmers


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JOHN DEERE corn planter parts model # 1240. Call Paul 716-741-2654.(NY)

JD CORN HEAD 2 Row narrow, new condition, S.N. 000RCX916742 $3,200. Four Row Lilliston Cultivator $1,100. 802-2654496.(VT)

3 YEAR OLD Painted Clydesdale gelding broke to drive $1,500. 585-554-5357.(NY)

NH 664 ROUND baler, net or twine, always under roof 5’x6’. One owner 2100 bales, good cond. $5,500. Lanc. PA. 717-3672567 1PR. IH rear wheel weights $150. 8ft. JD finish mower $1,200. NH model 165 vertical mow conveyor with curve $500. 570557-1140.(PA)

WANTED: Flat bottomed grain bin 14’16’W. 8’H. FOR SALE: Farmall M on steel wheels G.C. Penn Yan, NY. 315-536-3182 GEHL CB-700 Forage Harvester, 550 PTO Hay head $600. New Holland Forage Harvester 782, 1,000 PTO, electric controls, hay head $900. 518-829-7194.(NY) 4 WEEK OLD BUNNIES, some are colorful others are a solid color $5. a piece. No Sunday calls. Lloyd Nolt. 607-2437556.(NY)

GEHL 250 BU manure spreader, needs work $450. New Idea model 512 Haybine $875. older unit. 802-442-5105.(VT) OATS FOR FEED Rodeo approximately 400 BU. test weight 33 lbs. 585-3463577.(NY) 2004 WILDERNESS 5TH wheel 28’ one power slide, front power leveling jacks, Dlx. cabinets, queen bed, Dbl. refrigerator, 17’ awning. 845-877-3132.(NY) WORK SHOES mens size 12 new, one pair 6” Rocky’s $75., one pair Rhino Work Oxfords $40. 518-725-6309.(NY)

TEAM OF BELGIAN Geldings, (smooth) dependable workers on all farm machinery. Schwartz 2157 Huth Sayer Rd., Oriskany Falls, NY 13425.

WANTED: John Deere number 3 mowing machine useable or for parts, no Sunday calls please. 315-843-6055.(NY)

JD 2630 80HP, good condition $7,500; JD 46A loader with brackets $800. 6 Row Noble cultivator $1,500. No Sunday calls. 315-536-7841.(NY)

FORD 6000 FARM tractor, 6 cylinder turbo diesel, 80hp., runs good, 540 and 1,000 speed PTO, good 3pt., $6,100. obo. 860614-5066.(CT)

WINPOWER GENERATOR on trailer 50/80 kw. 540 PTO with plug-in and heavy duty cables, excellent condition. 518-9932795.(NY)

EXCELLENT CONDITION Hesston small square baler $7,900., Vicon 4 Star tedder $2,900., IH 700 5 bottom auto reset plow $2,500. 315-348-6149.(NY)

WANTED: Polled Hereford Yearling service bull to lease or buy, need by June 30th, 8ft. Skeleton elevator section. T-burg, NY. 607387-6908 N.H. 316 BALER; N.H. 492 Haybine; Kuhn Tedder; N.H. 258 Rake; N.I. 3615 Manure Spreader, all in excellent condition. 585786-5505.(NY) WANTED: Looking for younger breeding age Red Angus bull or possibly Black, call 315-527-4731 or 315-829-4684.(CNY) 5’x10’ WELDING TABLE 3/4” top $900. Oliver 3 bottom trailer plow, cylinder, rubber tires, $450. Magnetic drill $350. 315699-4157.(NY) 42FT. SKINNER bale elevator, double chain with paddles, G.C. $2,000. obo. Lester Byler 8811 St. Rt. 274 Holland Patient, NY 13354. NH 258 hay rake, roller bar, nice shape, $1,950; JD Gator, 4x6 dsl., w/roof, good shape, $3,200. 315-374-2788(NY)

JOHN DEERE bale thrower, model 40 came off Deere 348 baler. Call Darrell $650. 804-514-9845.(VA)

WANTED: 1969 VW Camp mobile, running or repairable. 518-654-6620.(NY)

32’ MULKEY ELEVATOR with electric motor $2,000. John Deere 10’ fertilizer and lime spreader $500. 315-331-1184.(NY)

SAME EXPLORER 90 4X4 w/cab loader, Massey 253 diesel w/turbo both low hrs., good condition, kicker hay wagon wood 8x16. 607-865-5678.(NY)

AYR. HF. due Sept. to Percy $1,400.; 14’ Brillion Spring Tooth drags on wheels $1,400. 518-269-9590.(NY)

15K- PTO GENERATOR, antique hay rake, 12ft. hyd. dump, 6- produce wagons, scales, 1/2 bu. baskets, Oliver 77 manual, Allis cultivator + plow manuals, B.O. 315853-5889.(NY)

PERCHERON GELDING 17yr. old, does full days work, kids horse $750. Red Heeler pups $50. 35029 Elm Ridge Rd. Philadelphia,NY 13673.

BELGIAN MARES 9-10yrs. old, broke to all farm equipment, good pulling, logging team, fancy. Enos Schmucker 1061 Whiskey Rd. Waterloo, NY 13165.

782 CHOPPER, good condition hay corn heads $1,500.; Gehl 99 blower parts condition $100. 518-848-1822.(NY) 4 HORSE TRAILER needs work $700. Windham, NY area. 518-734-3198

CHICKENS READY to start laying. All Pullets are golden reds. $12.50 per bird. Call for more information 315-858-0088 or 315313-3534.(NY)

FORD 501 sickle bar mower 7ft. 3pt. hitch $1,000. 315-845-8341.(NY)

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Good Housekeeping Mixed grill 1/2 cups orange marmalade 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, or 1 teaspoon dried rosemary leaves, chopped, crushed 3/4 teaspoon salt 6 fully cooked bratwurst, knockwurst or frankfurters 1 (3 1/2-pound) chicken, cut into quarters Tomato wedges, for garnish 1. In small bowl, mix orange marmalade, lemon juice, rosemary and salt. 2. Cut a few slashes in each bratwurst to prevent them from bursting while cooking. 3. Place chicken quarters on grill over medium heat; cook until golden on both sides, about 10 minutes. Then to avoid charring, stand chicken pieces upright, leaning one against the other. Rearrange pieces from time to time and cook until fork-tender and juices run clear when pierced with knife, about 25 minutes longer. During last 10 minutes of cooking, place bratwurst on same grill. Brush chicken quarters and bratwurst frequently with orange-marmalade mixture. 4. Garnish with tomato wedges to serve. Serves 6. • Each serving without tomatoes: About 613 calories, 39g total fat (13g saturated), 162mg cholesterol, 875mg sodium, 30g carbohydrate, 41g protein.

German potato-salad packet Grill spuds with bacon pieces, then toss with a cider-vinegar dressing.

2 1/2 pounds (medium) red potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks 2 slices uncooked bacon, chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper 2 green onions, chopped 3 tablespoons cider vinegar 2 teaspoons sugar 1. In large bowl, toss potatoes with bacon, salt and pepper until potatoes are evenly coated. 2. Using 18-inch-wide heavy-duty foil, layer two 20-by-18-inch sheets to make a double thickness. Spray with nonstick cooking spray. Place potato mixture on center of stacked foil. Bring long sides of foil up and over potato mixture and fold over several times to seal well. Fold ends to seal in juices, making sure not to fold in too far in order to leave room for heat circulation inside. 3. Place packet on grill over medium heat and cook 30 minutes or until potatoes are fork-tender, turning packet over once halfway through grilling. 4. Remove packet from grill and carefully open; add green onions, vinegar and sugar to potato mixture, tossing gently to combine. Makes 8 (3/4 cup) servings. • Each serving: About 140 calories, 3g total fat (1g saturated), 4mg cholesterol, 180mg sodium, 25g carbohydrate, 2g dietary fiber, 4g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/ recipefinder/. (c) 2012 Hearst Communications, Inc.

Dairy Princess events Hi! this is Courtney Luskin, The Rensselaer County Dairy Princess. Looking forward to June we will be stepping off the month with a Rodeo at the Schaghticoke Fairgrounds hosted by the Painted Pony Rodeo on Saturday, June 2. The dairy princess will be at the Rodeo to give away coloring books for children and award prizes to the rodeo's youngest participants. Please be sure to stop by the information table and say "Hi". On Sunday, June 3 Hender'Son's Bar and Grill in Schaghticoke will be the site for our Annual Grill Cheese Eating Contest. The Contest will kick off at 2:30 with registration and at 3 p.m. the fun will begin when contestants will eat as many grill cheese as possible in a set amount of time. This is a fun time for all, no professional eaters allowed. We hope everyone will show their patriotic spirit by displaying the red, white and blue this Memorial Day. The Rensselaer County Dairy Princess program is made possible through the support of American Dairy Association and Dairy Council, the local planning and management organization funded by dairy farmer checkoff dollars. Dairy Farmers work hard to provide us with dairy products. One way to incorporate your 3 dairy products per day is this fun recipe, it would be great with a tall glass of milk. Drinking milk and eating other dairy foods makes it easy for kids to get the bone-building calcium and other nutrients their growing bodies need.

Red White and Blue Dessert 2 packages (8 ounces each) cream cheese, softened 1/2 cup sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups heavy whipping cream, whipped 2 quarts strawberries, halved, divided 2 quarts blueberries, divided In a large bowl, beat cream cheese, sugar and extract until fluffy. Fold in whipped cream. Place a third of the mixture in a 4-qt. bowl. Reserve 20 strawberry halves and 1/2 cup blueberries for garnish. Layer half of the remaining strawberries and blueberries over cream mixture. Top with another third of the cream mixture and the remaining berries. Spread the remaining cream mixture on top. Use the reserved strawberries and blueberries to make a "flag" on top.

This week’s Sudoku Solution

Page 11 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 12

New cases of neurological EHV1 put horse owners on alert by Sally Colby News travels fast, and the reports of a Colorado horse diagnosed with the neurological version of EHV1 is no exception. Another recent incident involves horses on a group trail ride in Tennesee. But those horses are far away — could the virus affect horses in the east? The answer isn’t easy. One of the veterinarians dealing with the Colorado case is Dr. Kate Anderson of the Colorado Department of Agriculture, who says that because EHV is a herpes virus, it acts like herpes virus in other species — including people. “You can be exposed to a herpes virus through nasal discharge or a cough,” said Anderson. “Horses can be exposed and get the virus in their body, but the virus may or may not cause disease at that time. This particular herpes virus, EHV1, most commonly causes a mild respiratory virus in young horses, and they get better without any lasting effects. It’s when the virus has a propensity for the nervous system that we have a problem.” Anderson admits that the EHV virus is somewhat of a mystery. “At some points in research we think we understand it, then something new comes up and we’re back to the beginning,” she said. “Stress is absolutely a factor, as is the case with any herpes virus. The virus remains latent in the body, waiting for a good reason to show up again. Stress is one of those good reasons.” Herpes is relatively common among young horses — they pass it around, sometimes show signs of respiratory disease, then recover and do fine. If the virus become established in the body, it can remain latent in that horses’ body. Even with a good immune response, the virus doesn’t go away completely, so nearly every horse has the potential to develop clinical signs of herpes at some point. Penn State University Extension veterinarian Dr. David Wolfgang says that although we don’t know a lot about how the EHV virus works, it’s important for horse own-

Horse Section but may be the only sign and go undetected. The more obvious respiratory signs are coughing and nasal discharge. For the best chance of protection against EHV, Wolfgang recommends that horse owners work with their veterinarian to develop a sound immunization schedule. “There are vaccines that have EHV1 and EHV4 in them,” he said. “Even though the current EHV1 vaccine doesn’t provide ‘great’ pro-

tection against the neurologic form, it provides some protection.” The other way in which horse owners can reduce the risk of EHV is strict biosecurity measures both at the horse’s home barn and while away from home. Wolfgang says that bucket-sharing and failing to quarantine animals that have commingled after horse shows or group trail rides

EHV1 13

Whenever possible, horses affected by EHV 1 should be lifted to, and supported in, a standing position using an appropriately fitted sling. Slings work best for moderately affected horses that are too weak to rise but are able to maintain a standing position with minimal assistance. Source: Alan Weldon, DVM Dipl.ACVIM, http://thehorsedoctor.blo gspot.com/ ers to understand that the virus manifests in three forms: respiratory (pneumonia), abortive and neurological. “The problem with herpes viruses in general is that stress can make the virus pop up,” said Wolfgang. You can have a horse that’s perfectly normal, but was exposed years ago as a foal. Then that horse is put on a truck, doesn’t like being transported, is with horses it doesn’t like and maybe the diet is changed. That stress can trigger the carrier animal to shed the virus. In most cases, it’s in the upper respiratory tract, so it’s coming out in normal secretions. Some horses may act normal, but a stressor makes it release more of the virus. Then the horse can go back to normal two weeks later and not have a problem.” And that means the potential for infection in any horse that comes in contact with the horse that is actively shedding the virus, whether or not that horse shows clinical signs. Signs of the respiratory form of EHV include fever, which usually precedes other signs,

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by Craig Wood, University of Kentucky During anaerobic exercise, lactate production is the most limiting factor of performance. Low oxidative muscle fibers do not contain a great concentration of lactate dehydrogenase, the enzyme that converts lactate to a usable form. Muscle is unable to continue working in the presence of a high level of lactic acid and, therefore, fatigue occurs. Lactate decreases the pH of the muscle (acidosis), resulting in a decreased ability to use carbohydrates for ATP production. It has been postulated that the decrease in muscle pH due to lactate accumulation also decreases the muscle’s ability to uptake calcium for contraction. Heat is a by-product of the metabolism of fuels and is also a cause of fatigue in the equine athlete. As muscle temperature rises, certain enzymes that are used in the metabolism of fuels are unable to function correctly. High muscle temperature, along with decreased muscle pH, has also been related to the decreased ability of the muscle to uptake calcium for contraction. Environmental conditions play an important role in the performance of a horse. It has a large effect on the ability of a horse to dissipate heat

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Fatigue is the inability of a horse to continue exercise at the intensity required. Some factors that are associated with muscular fatigue in the horse include: • lactate accumulation in the muscles • increases in muscle temperature due to heat production • high environmental temperature and humidity • depletion of substrates for production of ATP (for muscle contraction) • impairment of muscle fiber function by alterations in calcium uptake or release produced during exercise. Loss of heat by convection and radiation depend on a temperature difference between the skin and the air. When environmental temperature is low (10ºC), convection and radiation are able to dissipate a large amount of heat produced; however, when environmental temperature increases (36ºC), convection and radiation are ineffective, and the horse must rely on sweat as its primary method of heat loss. Humidity also limits the amount of heat that can be dissipated from the body. High humidity decreases the ability of a horse to sweat because the water vapor content in the air is high. In con-

ditions of high heat and humidity, horses are severely limited in their ability to dissipate heat, and precautions must be taken to prevent dangerous elevations in body temperature. Muscle glycogen depletion is not a factor in fatigue of horses working at high intensities, but it can affect horses working at prolonged, low intensities. During submaximal exercise, free fatty acids and glycogen are the major fuels for energy. When glycogen is depleted from the liver and working muscles, ATP production decreases and fatigue sets in. Although fat stores are not depleted, they cannot be metabolized without carbohydrates.

EHV1 from 12 are the biggest problem. “The issue is that people need to be more careful about biosecurity in general,” said Wolfgang. “It’s a classic contact virus. In most cases, it’s transmitted nose to nose or nose to bucket. It isn’t being blown in from two miles away, and probably isn’t in the stall for months. On a dirt floor, it will dry up and be dead in 24 to 36 hours.” Wolfgang says that disinfectants such as Nolvasan, chlorine plus iodine or quaternary ammonia compounds are good disinfectants for hard surfaces such as buckets and bits. Isolation for horses returning from group events could be, at minimum, an emp-

ty stall between horses or an individual lot away from other horses for at least 10 to 14 days. Why are we seeing more cases of the neurologic form of EHV? Wolfgang says it’s because we’re moving horses around a lot more. “We truck our horses hundreds of miles,” he said. “Fifty years ago, very few horses went across the country. But now people put 4 or 5 horses on a trailer and go to a horse show. There’s a lot more transport than there used to be. But considering all horses throughout the country, most have been exposed to EHV and most don’t get sick.”

Page 13 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Equine limitations of performance


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 14

Delaware racing commissioner to head international organization DOVER, DE — Delaware Thoroughbred Racing Commission Secretary W. Duncan Patterson has been named next in line to head the Association of Racing Commissioners International. Patterson was recently selected to serve as chairman-elect/secretary of the organization, whose members regulate horse racing in five countries. He will become chairman at the 2013 annual meeting, succeeding Chairman John Sabini, chair of the New York State Racing and Wagering Board. Patterson served as RCI treasurer during the 2011-12 term and also heads RCI’s drug testing standards and practices committee. Patterson is a former thoroughbred trainer, amateur Steeplechase rider and former board member of the National Steeplechase Association. A commercial real estate broker, he was appointed to the Delaware Thoroughbred Racing Commission by Gov. Michael N. Castle in 1988.

“I look forward to serving during a time of great challenges and opportunity in racing,” Patterson said. “Delaware has a world-class racing industry, and I am proud to represent it on an international level.” Hugh Gallagher, executive director of the Delaware Harness Racing Commission, was also elected to the RCI board of directors for the 2012-13 term. Gallagher has served as executive director of the Harness Racing Commission since 2005. He previously served on the RCI’s board from 2009 to 2011, and served as chair of RCI’s continuing education and training committee, vice-chair of the model rules committee and a member of the drug testing standards and practices and standardbred racing committees. Gallagher also was recently elected as chairman of the board of the Racing Officials Accreditation Program at its annual meeting in Oklahoma City. He will serve as chairman through 2014.

Are red maple trees poisonous to horses? The wilted or dry leaves of the red maple (Acer rubrum) are toxic to horses — an unidentified toxin with oxidant properties is present in wilted or dried leaves. Only the red maple, and possibly closely related hybrids, are known to be toxic. The toxin in red maples oxidizes hemoglobin with the formation of Heinz bodies, methemoglobinemia, and subsequent hemolytic anemia. Poisoning is especially likely in the fall or following a storm when leaves of fallen branches become accessible to horses. The fresh green leaves apparently are not toxic, but once dried, they may remain toxic for up to 30 days. The bark

“RCI plays a valuable role in ensuring the integrity of horse racing,” Gallagher said. “The training and educational efforts help spread best practices internationally.” Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee con-

gratulated Patterson and Gallagher. “I am proud of the leadership Delaware racing is showing at the highest levels,” Kee said. “They will do an excellent job in their new roles, and we are lucky to have them serve here in Delaware.”

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from red maple trees is also toxic. Fatal poisoning of ponies that were fed 3.0 kilograms of dried red maple leaves occurred in one to five days. Doses of half this amount will induce formation of Heinz bodies. For more plants that are toxic to horses, you can visit our eXtension Pasture Management Learning Lesson at http://campus.extension.org/mod/book/view.php?i d=131, or for an even more complete list, visit Cornell’s poisonous plant website at www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/php/plant s.php?action=indiv&byname=common&k eynum=1 Source: www.extension.org

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by Sandra Avant In a search to find better ways to control viral enteric diseases in birds, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have unearthed a treasure trove of previously known and unknown viruses in poultry by using a powerful new molecular tool called metagenomics. Each year, disorders like poult enteritis mortality syndrome, poult enteritis complex, and runting-stunting syndrome cause diarrhea in turkeys and chickens, resulting in decreased weight, mortality and increased production costs. Several viruses have been associated with enteric or intes-

tinal diseases, but no single causative agent has been found. Unlike traditional sequencing that characterizes genes in a single organism, metagenomics detects the nucleic acid of thousands of organisms in an entire community. Using this technique, Laszlo Zsak, researcher leader of the Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases Research Unit at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory in Athens, GA, discovered a new virus that might have future antimicrobial applications. ARS is the chief intramural scientific research agency of USDA. Zsak and ARS microbiologist

Michael Day, also at Athens, found a short DNA sequence of the newly discovered virus and designed a technique to sequence its entire genome. The virus, called “phiCA82,� is the type of virus that naturally kills bacteria and belongs to a group known as “microphages� or phages, which can potentially be used as alternatives to antibiotics and as tools to fight multidrug-resistant pathogens. In the study, the scientists extracted and analyzed nucleic acid from poultry intestine samples gathered from U.S. commercial poultry flocks infected with enteric diseases. In addition to the novel phage, common avian viruses like astrovirus, reovirus and rotavirus, and RNA viruses belonging to the Picornaviridae family were detected. However, the scientists were surprised to discover previously unknown turkey viruses like picobirnavirus, a virus implicated in enteric disease in other agricultural animals, and a calicivirus, a type of virus often associated with human enteric diseases. In earlier studies, Zsak and Day used metagenomics to identify and an-

ARS researchers have discovered a new virus called "phiCA82" in turkeys that potentially could be used as an alternative to antibiotics to fight multi-drug-resistant pathogens in poultry. Photo by Scott Bauer alyze for the first time the complete genome of a novel chicken parvovirus. They also developed a PCR-polymerase chain reaction-assay that is highly sensitive and specific in detecting viruses in birds. Read more about this research in the April 2012 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

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Country Folks has partnered with the New York State Corn and Soybean Growers Association to publish the summer edition of the Association's newsletter, The NY Crop Grower. This will be a special insert to the JULY 9th edition of Country Folks East and West, with details about the 2012 Summer Crop Tour. It will also be mailed to all of the members of the association and to prospective members. Additional copies will be available at Empire Farm Days in the New York Corn and Soybean Association booth.

2&# "#"*',# 2- "4#02'1# ', 2&'1 '113# '1 (3,#2& If you sell harvesting equipment, grain drying equipment, grain storage, seed or provide custom harvesting you need to be in this issue!

2I JF;=? ;H ;> IL NI CHKOCL? ;<ION ;>P?LNCMCHA IJJILNOHCNC?M CH NBCM IL @ONOL? CMMO?M JF?;M? =IHN;=N SIOL !IOHNLS $IFEM M;F?M L?J IL =IHN;=N G? ;N D;H>L?QMF??JO<=IG IL ;N  ?RN 

Page 15 â&#x20AC;˘ MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE â&#x20AC;˘ May 28, 2012

New technique used to discover new viruses in poultry


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 16

Phil McMahon joins the Center for Beef Excellence board HARRISBURG, PA — New Center for Beef Excellence board member Phil McMahon is living his agricultural dream as the livestock manager of the famous Erdenheim Farm located in historic Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Erdenheim translates to earthly home in German. McMahon’s interest in beef cattle began in childhood as a 4-H member who raised club calves and market lambs. After high school, he attended Delaware Valley College to further his education in the animal sciences and from there left to work at a biological research company.

Ultimately, he was presented with the opportunity to become the herdsman at Erdenheim Farm, a 400- acre estate with roots tracing to the William Penn era. Since his initial hire 24 years ago, McMahon has taken the helm of all livestock operations, which include 100 head of Angus cows, 150 Cheviot sheep, 150 laying hens, and most recently, 11 Morgan horses. McMahon markets the Erdenheim cattle in a number of ways. He direct markets hamburger patties and other cuts at a farm stand which is open two

McMahon 18

Phil McMahon, who recently became a Center for Beef Excellence board member, has a long history of working with beef cattle that dates back to his time as a 4-H’er.

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butter producers report that cream offerings are surpassing their capacity. Current churning is generating butter stocks that are outpacing demand, thus clearances to inventory are occurring. Butter demand is “fair at best.” Analyst Jerry Dryer wrote in his May 11 Dairy & Food Market Analyst; “Don’t hold your breath waiting for butter prices to continue to

march higher. Domestic inventories are heavy; ditto for inventories in other parts of the world.” But he also warned, “If you prefer lower prices don’t get over confident.” Typical seasonal factors are coming into play, he said. With schools closing, less cream flows from bottlers to churns. As Mother Nature turns up the thermostat, there is less cream produced, and ice cream demand is

picking up. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk inched a quartercent higher this week, hitting $1.1250. Three cars were sold on the week. Extra Grade remained at $1.0825. AMS powder averaged $1.1467, down 7 cents, and dry whey averaged 53.4 cents per pound, down 3.7 cents on the week. Meanwhile; milk production in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions

has leveled off and indications are the two regions are at or near the seasonal peak. Manufacturing milk supplies remain heavy. Class I demand is steady. Various Midwest handlers report their milk intakes are steady to dropping slightly. Component values are also on a slow, seasonal decline. Milk availability in the region declined while sales into ice cream and ice cream

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mix facilities increased. Milk production in California remains uneven. Areas in northern California are seeing production move higher, while others are flat to occasionally lower. Temperatures are warming up, but not impacting cows yet. Arizona production is trending lower, moving away from the recent seasonal peak. Processing plants continue to work on extended schedules to handle the milk supply. Milk production in the Pacific Northwest is still heavy, although showing some relief from excess production. Utah and Idaho production is following expected levels. The Oceania milk production season continues to run stronger than previously projected. New Zealand output continues to run 9 to10 percent higher than last year at this time and is 4 to 5 percent higher in Australia. Market analyst Mary Ledman, who now co-edits the Daily Dairy Report, writes in her May 14 edition that New Zealand is the world’s largest exporter of dairy products but produces less than 5 percent of the global milk supply. The country’s dairy herd increased 259,000 head versus the prior year to 6.17 million as of June 2011, according to Statistics New Zealand. The milking herd was estimated at 4.82 million head, up 136,000 from the prior year. Given strong milk prices during the 201112 production season, there is no doubt that the New Zealand dairy herd continued its expansion mode this past

year, according to Ledman. The New Zealand production season runs June through May. To subscribe to Ledman’s all new Daily Dairy Report, log on to www.dailydairyreport.com. DPW also reported this week that March 2012 U.S. female dairy cattle exports dipped to 3,007 head, the lowest monthly total since February 2011. For the fifth time in six months, Russia was the leading destination, according to USDA. March exports brought the year-to-date (Y-T-D) total to 13,954 head, compared to 17,766 head for the same period in record-setting 2011. Last March, more than 9,600 head were exported, including nearly 7,400 head to Turkey alone. Russia imported 1,158 U.S. dairy replacement females in March 2012, bringing its Y-T-D total to 8,196 head, or about 59 percent of U.S. exports so far this year. Last year’s female dairy cattle export market leader, Turkey, imported 988 head in March, for a three-month total of 2,942, according to DPW. And; FC Stone’s May 15 Insider Closing Bell reported that traders saw a steep drop in prices on GlobalDairyTrade (GDT) this week. The tradeweighted price index on GDT fell 6.4 percent from the May 1 auction. Average prices across contract periods from June through November fell 11.9 percent for anhydrous milk fat, 8.9 percent for whole milk powder, 5.4 percent for skim milk powder, 1.3 percent for milk protein concentrate, and 0.2 percent for cheddar cheese.

Page 17 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

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May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 18

Ag Subcommittee highlights the importance of a fair and effective safety net WASHINGTON, D.C. — On May 17, Rep. K. Michael Conaway, Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management, continued the third hearing series on agricultural policy in advance of writing the 2012 Farm Bill. Commodity programs and crop insurance were the focus of the two-day hearing. Title I programs and crop insurance form the backbone of the farm safety net that ensures farmers are able to manage a few seasons of volatile prices or devastating weather patterns. This effort ultimately ensures that consumers have a stable food and fiber supply. The four panels of witnesses included economists and leaders from various commodity and agricultural groups highlighting the diversity of agriculture across the country. Witnesses described how programs are working under current law and how reforms can be made

while stressing the need for a fair and effective safety net and a strong crop insurance program. “The clear message from the hearing is that farmers need price protection. If prices collapse, we can’t have policy that collapses right along with them creating a crisis in farm country and calls for expensive, unbudgeted bailouts in Washington. Calls that cannot be answered because the government is broke. I have concerns that the Senate bill fails to provide that kind of protection. The Senate bill also creates a complicated new program that is so lopsided it actually locks in profits for some while denying any safety net at all to others. In a few weeks, the House Agriculture Committee will begin crafting a farm bill that is both fair and fiscally responsible to all producers across all regions of the country. Our efforts will save money for the taxpayer while providing policy that farmers can depend on when they truly need

it,” said Chairman K. Michael Conaway (R-TX). “Yesterday and today we were reminded that the details are critical when designing programs to provide farmers with assurance and a safety net. I am pleased that over the course of our two day hearing we heard from commodity groups, economists, and insurance agents that we must preserve crop insurance and other farm safety mechanisms that allow producers to feed America and the world. To

no surprise, our farmers and ranchers have stepped up to the plate and are ready and willing to dig through the weeds with us to craft policy that will benefit all producers. We must continue to work together to move forward on a House Farm Bill so that we can go to conference and negotiate a final bill that will assist our farmers and feed our communities before further budget cuts place these important programs in jeopardy,” said Ranking Member Leonard L. Boswell (D-IA).

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McMahon from 16 evenings a week. The market also features the farm’s eggs and produce. From those connections, he takes custom orders for freezer beef and has raised specialty beef, such as grass-fed for special orders. Seed stock is also sold directly to producers looking to use Erdenheim genetics although he has consigned the cattle at breed sales. McMahon looks forward to the opportunity to serve the industry on the Center for Beef Excellence and offers some advice. As the Center focuses on an age and source identification program, new export markets will be open to Pennsylvania beef producers. When asked if he has suggestions for best management practices to share with readers, he suggested selecting for birth weights. He states that after making low birth weight a primary selection criterion, he has not had to pull one calf this season. You can follow McMahon at the Erdenheim blog at www.blog .erdenheimfarm.com. History will repeat itself this fall as McMahon’s son, who already owns a small herd of cattle, will begin his freshman year at Delaware Valley College. He has his father’s passion for raising cattle and will major in animal science. You can find the McMahons exhibiting at the Pennsylvania Farm Show. To find out more about the Center for Beef Excellence visit www.beefexcellence.com.

The Center for Beef Excellence was established in 2007 to promote the beef industry through education, production efficiency, government and community relations and economic development. Represent-

ing 28,000 beef producers in Pennsylvania with 1.61 million head of cattle, the industry generates over $2 billion in economic impact yearly in the commonwealth.

www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-weekk updatess andd onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss too otherr agriculturall organizations.


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FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: Feeder Steers: 250-300# 165-187; 400-650# 140-160; 800-1000# 110-124; Hols. 850-1150# 84-94. Feeder Heifers: 300550# 130-157; 550-750# 130-140. Feeder Bulls: 150-300# 150-210; 300-400# 150-180; 400-500# 135-169; Red 550-600# to 125; 700-900# 98-119; 1000-1300# 98-113. Beef Stock Cows: Cow & Sm. Calf at 1225. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: 483. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 170-185# 200-227; 252285# 202-226; 310-330# 190-208; 350-380# 186-196; 461-475# 169-174; 516530# 168-173.50; 615-633# 144-160; S 1-2 320-345# 162-178; 350-395# 157-180; 462-475# 131-167. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 250-265# 162-170; 300343# 153-165; 358-380# 163-165; 432-445# 155165.50; 455-461# 161-164; 518-542# 151.50-154.50; 600-645# 136-140; 660675# 137-138; S 1-2 163# 162; 600-625# 100-121. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2

405-429# 173.50-182; 450477# 155-179; 505-548# 151-165.50; 553-555# 153.50-154.50; 605-645# 137.50-144; 650#136-141. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 1100-1180# 9991275/hd 4-6 mos bred; M&L 1-2 Young 1090-1155# 9991400/hd 7-9 mos bred; 9101130# 925-1475/head 7-9 mos bred; 1335-1405# 9991400/hd 7-9 mos bred. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 1078 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 210-245# 200-223; 250295# 170-219; 300-345# 165-220; 350-398# 165200; 400-446# 150-196; 455-480# 170-186.50; 505532# 161-175; 550-580# 140-174; 600-640# 145154; 660-695# 133-145; 700-730# 128-137; 750780# 116-128; 810-825# 115-117; S 1-2 255-275# 118-157; 305-340# 100-176; 355-380# 115-154; 405440#) 100-139. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 210-245# 160-206; 255290# 160-198; 300-347# 150-185; 350-395# 131-194; 400-445# 140-182; 450495# 134-174; 500-547# 130-161; 550-590# 130-160; 600-645# 128-146; 650690# 126-138; 815-840# 106-119; 855-895# 100-

113; 990# 107; 1030-1036# 90-103; 1060-1090# 90-104; S 1-2 455-490# 111-138; 505-530# 110-130; 550595# 117-125; 613# 118. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-495# 150-181; 500545# 140-170; 550-595# 120-159; 603-645# 130-147; 650-690# 120-142; 700742# 111-125; S 1-2 450490# 114-140; 500-535# 113-135; 550-575# 108117; 635-645# 105-124. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 136. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 500-600# 155-158; 600700# 147.50; 700-800# 141; M&L 2 300-400# 178; 500600# 154; 600-700# 148; M&L 3 400-500# 145-162; 500-600# 133-146; 600700# 132. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 150; 500-600# 146.50; 600-700# 130; M&L 2 300-400# 163; 400-500# 150-159; 500-600# 138; 600-700# 127.50; M&L 3 300-400# 156; 400-500# 130-151, mostly 146-151; 500-600# 139; 600-700# 133; S 1 300-400# 130-140. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 165; 500-600# 150.50; 600-700# 129137.50; 700-800# 118; M&L 2 400-500# 152-174, mostly 162-174; 500-600# 145-

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150.50; 600-700# 131137.50; 700-800# 117; S 1 400-500# 147-164. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1292 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 195-211; 400500# 185-196; 500-600# 151-189; 600-700# 145-161; 700-800# 125.50-140.10; 800-900# 120-138; 9001000# 134.60; 1000-1100# 125.25; M&L 2 300-400# 170-200; 400-500# 155-189; 500-600# 131-162.50; 600700# 139.50-157; 700-800# 134; 800-900# 120; 9001000# 102-105; M&L 3 400500# 154-156. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 600-700# 116; 700800# 108.50; 800-900# 100.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 165-183; 400500# 143.50-174; 500-600# 131-159.50; 600-700# 136147; 700-800# 129-139; 800-900# 117; M&L 2 300400# 145-180; 400-500# 110-167.50; 500-600# 110157.50; 600-700# 126138.50; 700-800# 120; M&L 3 1 400-500# 135. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 191-225; 300400# 191-199; 400-500# 150-190; 500-600# 137.50163; 600-700# 139-148; 700-800# 110-129; 800900# 113; 900-1000# 113; M&L 2 200-300# 179-199; 300-400# 184; 400-500# 153-174; 500-600# 127.50158; 600-700# 120-128; 700-800# 111-123.50; 800-

900# 98; 900-1000# 97.50. SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 784. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 221; 300-400# 1184.50-221; 400-500# 175.50-187; 500-600# 150174; 600-700# 152-165.50; 700-800# 142-152; 800900# 125-135; 900-1000# 108-125; 1000-1100# 109; M&L 2 200-300# 190-194; 300-400# 162-191; 400500# 155-192.50; 500-600# 156-173.50; 600-700# 140164; 700-800# 124-142; 800-900# 110-135; 9001000# 100-112; 1000-1100# 102. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 123.50; 300400# 119; 400-500# 90; 600-700# 75-108; 700-800# 96; 800-900# 104. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 168; 300-400# 165-177; 400-500# 150.50166; 500-600# 139-152; 600-700# 134-155; 700800# 117-130; 800-900# 109; M&L 2 200-300# 151; 300-400# 151-187; 400500# 148-173.50; 500-600# 120-163; 600-700# 110-143; 700-800# 102-104; 800900# 91-115. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 169; 300-400# 184-191; 400-500# 160-191; 500-600# 138-172; 600700# 127-145; 700-800# 120-128.50; 800-900# 94110; 900-1000# 97.50; M&L 2 200-300# 169; 300-400# 169-192; 400-500# 156-186; 500-600# 128-175; 600-

700# 120-145; 700-800# 113-126; 800-900# 94-105. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 91. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 500-600# 151-152; 600700# 145; M&L 2 400-500# 155-175; M&L 3 400-500# 154-156. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 165; 400-500# 155-165; 500-600# 131-145; M&L 2 300-400# 145-146; 400-500# 142; M&L 3 400500# 135. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 191-197; 300400# 191-195; 400-500# 175-183; 500-600# 148-160; 700-800# 110-115; M&L 2 500-600# 129-131; 600700# 120-125. FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 189. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 169-183; 300400# 178; 400-500# 178179; 500-600# 171.50; 600700# 150; 700-800# 145149; 800-900# 130; M&L 2 200-300# 178; 300-400# 169; 400-500# 171; 500600# 153-170; 600-700# 145; 700-800# 130; 800900# 130. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 115; 300400# 115; 400-500# 109114; 500-600# 102; 600700# 89-96; 700-800# 89; 800-900# 90.

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JD 4000 open Int. 1066 cab/air Ford 7710 4x4, cab/air Ford 6610 open MF 399 cab/air MF 285 open MF 275 open MF 265 open MF 255 open MF 175 open MF 165 open White 2-135 cab/air White 2-110 4x4, cab/air White 2-88 cab/air White 2-105 open Bobcat 175 Bobcat 843 CAT 508 cable skidder JD 280 loader JD 265 loader JD 260 loader JD 245 loader JD 148 loader JD 158 loader JD 175 loader

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Page 19 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

MARKET REPORTS


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 20

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LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 842. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 201; 400-500# 170-182.75; 500-600# 154168; 600-700# 148-158.50; 700-800# 140; M&L 2 300400# 206.50; 400-500# 170186; 500-600# 161.50172.75; 600-700# 155.75; M&L 3 300-400# 195.50201; 400-500# 167.50-179; 500-600# 146-158.50; 600700# 143; S 1 300-400# 178-193; 400-500# 175.50; 500-600# 144.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 182; 400-500# 164; 500-600# 150-156.75; 600-700# 143; 700-800# 122.50; M&L 2 300-400# 183.25; 400-500# 167.50-

169; 500-600# 155-156; 600-700# 139-140.50; 700800# 123.50; M&L 3 300400# 182-182.75; 400-500# 168.75-169; 500-600# 153.50-157.25; 600-700# 129-133.50; S 1 300-400# 177; 400-500# 152.50; 500600# 149.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 205; 400-500# 160-189, mostly 165; 500600# 158.50; 600-700# 146.50; M&L 2 300-400# 210.50; 400-500# 176.75195.50, mostly 176.75; 500600# 149.50-160; 600-700# 150; S 1 300-400# 170190.50, mostly 189-190.50; 400-500# 145-164, mostly 164; 500-600# 144. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 79. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 600-700# 116; 700800# 108.50 800-900# 100.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 2 400-500# 154; 500-600# 143. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 500-600# 150-153; M&L 2 500-600# 138.50. STAUNTON, VA FEEDER

CATTLE: 660. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 199; 400-500# 185-196; 500-600# 174-189; 600-700# 160-161; 700800# 125.50-140.10; 800900# 132-138; 900-1000# 134.60; 1000-1100# 125.25; M&L 2 300-400# 170-200; 400-500# 171-189; 500600# 157-160; 600-700# 139.50-157; 800-900# 120. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 146.50-159; 500600# 138-150; 600-700# 138-140; 700-800# 134-139; M&L 2 300-400# 174-180; 400-500# 167.50; 500-600# 157.50; 600-700# 135138.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 190; 500-600# 159; 600-700# 147-148; M&L 2 500-600# 147-151. TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 368. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 221; 300-400# 189-221; 400-500# 179-187; 500-600# 150-174; 600700# 152-160; 700-800# 142; 800-900# 125; 9001000# 112-125; 1000-1100# 109; M&L 2 200-300# 190; 300-400# 162-190; 400500# 155-192.50; 500-600# 168-173.50; 600-700# 140164; 700-800# 124-136; 800-900# 110; 900-1000# 100-110; 1000-1100# 102. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 123.50; 300-

19TH ANNUAL PENNSYLVANIA'S FINEST ANGUS FEMALE SALE

Saturday • June 2, 2012 • Noon Held at the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture Livestock Evaluation Center (1494 W Pine Grove Road, Pennsylvania Furnace, PA 16865 - Near Ag Progress Days site)

Featuring the COMPLETE AND TOTAL DISPERSAL OF THE ELITE BEN & LINDA MERCER ANGUS HERD! SELLING 60 HAND-SELECTED LOTS! * Productive Cow/Calf Pairs * Powerful Bred Heifers * Elite Show Heifer Prospects Cattle sired by and bred to top A.I. Sires including SAV Final Answer 0035, Sitz Upward 307R, Coleman Regis 904 and many more. Sale sponsored by the Pennsylvania Angus Association For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Managers. TOM BURKE, KURT SCHAFF, JEREMY HAAG, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME, at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089-0660. Phone: (816) 532-0811. Fax: (816) 532-0851. www.angushall.com E-Mail angushall@earthlink.net.

AUCTIONS 400# 119; 400-500# 90; 600-700# 75; 700-800# 96. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 168; 300-400# 165-168; 400-500# 158-166; 500-600# 145.50-152; 600700# 135-155; 700-800# 117; 800-900# 109; M&L 2 200-300# 151; 300-400# 151-187; 400-500# 163173.50; 500-600# 120-163; 600-700# 110-143; 700800# 102-104; 800-900# 91115. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 169; 300-400# 184; 400-500# 162-191; 500-600# 153.50-172; 600700# 130-140; 700-800# 120-124; 800-900# 94; 9001000# 97.50; M&L 2 200300# 169; 300-400# 169; 400-500# 156-186; 500600# 128-175; 600-700# 121-135; 700-800# 113; 800-900# 94. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 479. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 192.50-193; 400500# 174-188; 500-600# 152-171; 600-700# 136-155; 700-800# 125-141.50; 800900# 130; 900-1000# 118121.75; 1000-1100# 114.50; M&L 2 300-400# 189; 400500# 165-179; 500-600# 127-150; 600-700# 130-155; 700-800# 113-116; 800900# 114-126.50; S 1 300400# 169; 400-500# 161. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 176-189; 400500# 155-184.50; 500-600# 140.50-159.50; 600-700# 142.50-147.75; 700-800# 128-136; 800-900# 115121.50; M&L 2 300-400# 170-184; 400-500# 145-156; 500-600# 133-142; 600700# 123-147; 700-800# 114-122; 800-900# 91-104; S 1 300-400# 135; 400-500# 133; 600-700# 128. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 214; 300-400# 180-198; 400-500# 168-184; 500-600# 139-173; 600700# 137-152; 700-800# 122-135.50; M&L 2 200300# 179; 300-400# 171192; 400-500# 141-150; 500-600# 124-144; 600700# 116-136.50; 700-800# 121-131; 800-900# 106-113; S 1 300-400#160-175; 400-

500# 131-142.50; 500-600# 128. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 275. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 184.50; 400-500# 175.50-176.50; 500-600# 159-163.50; 600-700# 162; 700-800# 146; 800-900# 135; 900-1000# 120; M&L 2 400-500# 180-181; 500600# 156-163; 600-700# 149-157; 700-800# 142; 800-900# 135; 900-1000# 112. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 800-900# 104.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 159-160; 500600# 148.50; 600-700# 141145; 700-800# 130; M&L 2 300-400# 157-176; 400500# 149-162.50; 500-600# 145-153; 600-700# 134-138. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 191; 400-500# 160-169; 500-600# 138-148; 600-700# 145; 700-800# 128.50; 800-900# 110; M&L 2 300-400# 182; 400-500# 165; 500-600# 147.50; 600700# 135-145; 700-800# 126; 800-900# 105. SLAUGHTER CATTLE HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 90-95; hi dress 98102; Breaker 87-94; Boner 80-90, hi dress to 98; Lean 76-82, hi dress to 89; Thin & Light 75 & dn. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 104-111; YG 2 88-96. Fed Steers: L Ch 1388# at 120; Sel Dairy X 108-111; Hols. 1700-1800# 94-106. Fed Heifers: Hi Ch 12501375# 120-123; L Ch Hols. 1388# at 102. Calves: Hols. Bull Ret. to Farm No. 1 80-115# 220242, few 120-136# 160-197; No. 2 80-115# 190-220; No. 3 80-115# 200-220; No. 3 80-115# 170-200; few 6878# 145-165; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1-2 70-90# 160-210. SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 405-1830# 8591; Boner 80-85% lean 965-

Construction Equipment Auction Billings & Garrett

SATURDAY 9TH JUNE – 9:30 AM - ZEBULON, NC Location: 424 Eatmon Rd. – Zebulon, NC 27597 Kobelco & Fiat Allis excavators, Volvo BM L90C wheel loader, JD 450G bulldozer, JD 410C, backhoe/front end loader, Ingersoll Rand DD-32 roller, LayMor Mdl. 8B Sweeper, Bomag Type BW142PD-2 rollers, Ditch Witch R100, Ditch Witch R65 trencher, Richmond Mdl. 20D boring machine, ‘94 KW T800, ‘95 Mack RD688S 10-wheeler dump, ‘92 KW T800 service truck, ‘94 Chevrolet Kodiak w/dump, 50-ton detach lowboy, 24-ton trailer equip. trls., sweeper tractors, generators, welders, lots or shop and construction tools. Visit www.ebharris.com for more details - Bid Online SALE HELD RAIN OR SHINE E.B. HARRIS (252) 257-2140 6:15 AM-9:59 PM (252) 430-9595 Mobile E.B.’s 9-10 PM only 445-5856 Fate’s (252) 985-8340 Mobile Fate’s Fax No. (252) 257-1035

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1380# 83.50-91.50; 9551390# hi dress 92-99; 9951390# lo dress 72-82; Lean 85-90% lean 750-780# hi dress 81-84. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1160-1495# 99-108; 10001235# lo dress 89-98; 16202475# 102.50-106; 15801995# hi dress 110-117. Cows/Calf Pairs: 5. S 1-2 900# middle age cows w/100# calves 600/pr; M 1-2 975-1075# middle age cows w/00-350# calves 12251400/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 140. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1145-1395# 90-98; 1155-1325# hi dress 101-103; 1420-1720# 94-97; Boner 80-85% lean 815870# 89-98; 920-1285# 8797.50; 995-1245# hi dress 100-108; 1415-1735# 8897.50; 1415-1585# hi dress 98-101; Lean 85-90% lean 620-795# lo dress 62-75; 910-1385# lo dress 60-79. Other Cows: S&M 1-2 Young 765-850# 102105/hd. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1035-1470# 97-113; 12451385# hi dress 115-125; 1560-2160# 110-114.52; 1505-2040# hi dress. Cows/Calf Pairs: 9. S 1-2 525-800# middle age cows w/100-160# calves 6001000/pr; M 1-2 915-1070# middle age cows w/85-135# calves 900-1450/pr; L 1-2 1200# middle age cows w/150# calves 1400/pr. SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 304 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1000-1100# 105. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 9096; 1200-1600# 85-100; HY 1200-1600# 92-108; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 7897; 1200-2000# 82-93.50; HY 1200-2000# 95.50107.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 60-76.50; 8501200# 69-92. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 103-116.50; 1500-2500# 100-120.50; HY 1000-1500# 120.50; 15002500# 113-125. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 378. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 75104; 1200-1600# 74.50-95; HY 1200-1600# 84.50-100; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 73-95; 1200-2000# 80-95; HY 1200-2000# 93100.25; Lean 85-90% lean

Page 21 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 169-174; 300400# 164-174; 400-500# 145-155; 500-600# 158; 600-700# 146; 700-800# 131; M&L 2 200-300# 164; 300-400# 155-164; 400500# 163; 500-600# 142; 600-700# 138; 700-800# 108. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 199; 300-400# 168; 400-500# 154-158; 500-600# 154; 600-700# 144; 700-800# 130-131; 800-900# 110; M&L 2 200300# 188; 300-400# 188194; 400-500# 148; 500600# 148; 600-700# 121; 700-800# 109.


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 22

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, May 28 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Memorial Monday we will be open for business for the farmers convenience. Special Plant Auction. Starting at 10 am. Selling hanging baskets, bedding plants, vegetable plants, shrubs, trees all you need for your gardening needs. We will then follow with misc. small animals, etc. followed by our normal schedule. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Wednesday, May 30 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

• 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, May 31 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 Friday, June 1 • Gene Woods Auction Service, Cincinnatus, NY. Price Farm. 50 Head Dairy. 25 recently fresh. Over 1/2 the dairy are 1st & 2nd’s. Nice young herd with a lot of milk. SCC75,000. 4.0F 3.2P. Also consigned 28 open heifers from 300# to breeding age. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, June 2 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 9:30 AM: South Royalton, VT. Inventory Reduction for L.F. Trottier’s. Selling tractors, farm equip., implements, lawn & garden. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., 802-785-2161 • 9:30 AM: South Royalton, VT. Selling tractors, farm equip. & implements, lawn & garden. Inventory reduction for L.F. Trottier’s. Monday, June 4 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Feeder & Fat Cow Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Friday, June 8 • 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Saturday, June 9 • North Bangor, NY. Craigmoor Farms Dispersal. Eric & Joel Craig. 140 head of reg. Guernseys, reg. Jerseys & reg. R&W Holsteins. Complete line of machinery. Delarm & Treadway, 518-483-4106 • 9:00 AM: Don Rice Jr., 5761 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 15 MM farm tractors & parts, 150 MM farm toys, MM & gas signs. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m • 10:00 AM: 1046 Cty. Rd 23, Sherburne, NY. Lok-N-Logs, Sawmill Consolidation Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Monday, June 11 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Friday, June 15 • Gene Woods Auction Service, Cincinnatus, NY. Pedersen Farms 100 head Holstein Cattle & some machinery. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com Friday, June 15 • 4:00 PM: Wayne & Roxanne Force, 7819 High Rd., off CR 75, 4 mi. NE of Prattsburg, NY. Kubota BX2230 4wd w/deck, excellent contractor shop tools, antiques, household. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.ht m Saturday, June 16 • 9:00 AM: Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Watertown, NY. Jefferson County Area Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Selling Heavy Equipment, Trucks & Trailers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Monday, June 18 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. 1 pm dairy followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, June 20 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular

Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Thursday, June 21 • Sharon Springs, NY. High Hill Farm Complete Dispersal. 120 plus head will sell. C/O Greg Law, owners. Managed by The Cattle Exchange. The Cattle Exchange, 607746-2226. daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 6:30 PM: 210 Pottsville St., Port Carbon, PA. 4.92 Approx. Industrial Acreage w/Building. Leaman Auctions, 717-4641128, cell 610-662-8149 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip #3721 Friday, June 22 • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 @Leader:Tuesday, June 26 • At the Farm, Newport, VT. Poulin-Royer, Inc. Complete Dispersal of all cattle and most equipment. . Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 Wednesday, June 27 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, July 6 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Friday, July 13 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, July 18 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

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750-850# 58-79; 850-1200# 65.50-100. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 105-108.75; 1500-2500# 100-109.75; HY 1000-1500# 112.50; 15002500# 103-117.75. Cows Ret. to Farm: 23. M&L 1, few 2, 2-7 yrs. to aged, bred 5-8 mos. 8451455# 850-1350/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 8. M&L 1, 5-12 yrs. old w/calves 110-275# 9801250# 1160-1610/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 99. 130-200# 157.50; Hols. Bulls 70-100# 55-250/hd; 100-130# 185-285. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 44. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8091; 1200-1600# 88-91.50; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 80-88; 1200-2000# 83-88.50; HY 1200-2000# 89-91.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 74-84. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 97-98; 15002500# 97-99.50. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7583; 1200-1600# 74.5083.50; HY 1200-1600# 84.50-86.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 66.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 105.50; 15002500# 100. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 33. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 109.75-121.50; 1300-1500# 107.50-129. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1000-1200# 92.50-127; 1200-1400# 108-127.50; 1400-1600# 116-127.50. HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 33. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 84.50-90; 1200-1600# 9091; HY 1200-1600# 93; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 85-88; 1200-2000# 88-89; HY 1200-2000# 91; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 6675; 850-1200# 73-87. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 89-101; 15002500# 101-105.50; HY 1000-1500# 107-109; 15002500# 107.50-109.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 4. S 1, 10 yrs. old 790# 525/hd; L 1, 2-3 yrs. old 830-860# 7251025/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 1. M 1, 6 yrs. old with

w/300# calf 1000# 1175/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 2. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 120130/hd. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 195. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 91.50-100.50; 1200-1600# 87-101.50; HY 1200-1600# 102-111; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 84-90; 1200-2000# 81-95; HY 1200-2000# 96-105; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 5565; 850-1200# 60-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 103-110; 15002500# 89-106; HY 15002500# 107-119.50. MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean HY 12001600# 91.75-94.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 7893.25; 1200-2000# 89-92; HY 1200-2000# 94-102.50; Lean 85-90% lean 8501200# 65-75. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 110. Calves Ret. to Farm: 19. 130-200# 125-140; Hols. Bulls 70-100# 90-110/hd; 100-130# 65-125.

ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 119. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 83.50-91; 1200-1600# 8993.50; HY 1200-1600# 9498; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 84-92; 1200-2000# 85-91.50; HY 1200-2000# 94-96; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 73-77; 850-1200# 81-89. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 106.50; HY 1500-2500# 103-115. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls 70-100# 55230/hd; 100-130# 236/cwt. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 70 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 82-93; HY 1200-1600# 92; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 77-92.15; 12002000# 81-94.50; HY 12002000# 97.50-100.25; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 92100. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 105-107.75; 1500-2500# 100-108.75. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 134. S l a u g h t e r

Steers/Heifers: Ch 2-3 1000-1100# 105. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 9096; 1200-1600# 88-100; HY 1200-1600# 103-108; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 7892; 1200-2000# 82-93.50; HY 1200-2000# 96-97; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 6076.50; 850-1200# 76.50-90. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 105-116.50; 1500-2500# 108-120.50; HY 1000-1500# 120.50; 15002500# 125.

600# 65-66. Stock Boars: 450# at 39

WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 116. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 94.50-107; 1200-1600# 84.50-95; HY 1200-1600# 99.25-101.50; Boner 8085% lean 800-1200# 78.50104.50; 1200-2000# 86-96; Lean 85-90% lean 8501200# 68-85.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 107-114.50; 1500-2500# 98.50-112.50; HY 1500-2500# 123.75. Cows Ret. to Farm: 14. M&L 1-22, 4-12 yrs. old to aged, bred 2-8 mos. 7951230# 575-885/hd, 1 at 1525. Cows w/Calves at Side: 14. M&L 1, few 2, 3-10 yrs. old w/calves 1255-1340# 1000-1470/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 23. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 27.50150/hd; 100-130# 107.50200.

MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No report.

WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 151. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 88-94.50; HY 1200-1600# 92-106; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 86-97; 12002000# 86-93.50; HY 12002000# 95.50-107.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 8192. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 100-112.50; HY 1500-2500# 113-117. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats (/hd): 164. 20-30# 25-36; 35-50# 40-52; 50-60# 52-64; 60-80# 60-74; 80-100# 75-102; (/#) 100120# 93-111; 140-175# 6781; 450# at 39. Butcher Hogs: 1-3 210280# 62-63.25; 280-300# 62.75-64.50; 300-325# at 68; 1 lot 309# at 68. Sows: 300-400# 54-59; 400-600# 48-55. Boars: 600-800# 24-26. Springing Sows: 500-

NC SOWS: 300-399# 4450.30; 400-449# 45-51.08; 450-499# 43-55.65; 500549# 52-56.51; 550# & up 53.50-59.10. FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: 5. Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 270-300# 50-55. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: No report.

N VA HOGS: 5. Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 270-300# 50-55. ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report. S VA HOGS: No report. STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report. LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 87. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 60-80# 175-180; 80-110# 170-180; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 150-175. Slaughter Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 38; Gd 2-4 53.50-75. HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: Hi Ch & Pr 60-95# 220230; Gd 50-80# 170-195. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: M Billies 110170/hd; Nannies 95-120/hd; Kids Sel 1 35-50# 70-90. N VA GOATS: 24 Kids: Sel 1-2 40-60# 141-235; 60-80# 135-230; Sel 3 40-60# 108-132. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 146; 100-150# 130-175; 150-250# 145. Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 120; 100-150# 119. MT. AIRY SHEEP: 15 Slaughter Lambs: Gd 20-60# 62.50; 60-100# 75100. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 100200# 120-180. MT. AIRY GOATS: 91 Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 0-80# 125-155; Sel 2 20-40# 30-55; 40-60# 50-67.50; 60-

80# 62.50-100. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 100-140# 125-205. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 120-220. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report. HOLLINS, VA SHEEP/GOATS: No report MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No report. MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: 37 Slaughter Lambs: Wooled Ch & Pr 80-110# 174. SHENANDOAH SHEEP: Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 38 Gd 2-4 53.50. SILER CITY, NC GOATS: 33. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 40; 20-40# 45-60; 40-60# 65-80. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80# 100-125; 80-100# 130-210. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 70100# 110-115; 100-140# 160; Sele 2 50-70# 55; Sel 3 50-70# 40. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 140. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: 13. Slaughter Lambs: Ch & Pr 60-100# 100-105; 100140# 115-135. Slaughter Ewes: Cull 60120# 80-95. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report. TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 38. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 6080# 175-181; 80-110# 175; Spring, Wooled Gd & few Ch 1-3 30-60# 172.50-187.50; 60-90# 145; Wooled, Ch & Pr 3-4 130-160# 150. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: 11. Ewes Ch 2-4 57.50; Gd 2-4 82.50-89; Util 1-3 50-73; Rams all grades 60-90.

WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 58. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 147.50-200; 40-60# 230234; 60-80# 200; Sel 3 2040# 140; 40-60# 135-165; 60-80# 122.50-135. Trios: no grade 100-120# 120. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 147.50-170; 100-150# 140172.50; 150-250# 122.50. Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 136-147; 100-150# 117122.50; 150-250# 92.50. WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report. WYTHE CO GOATS: No report. CASH GRAIN MARKET NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 6 7¢ higher. Prices were 6.336.99, mostly 6.33-6.54 at the feed mills and 6.03-6.73, mostly 6.69 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 20¢ lower. Prices were 14.02 at the processors, 13.82 at the feed mills and 13.33-13.62, mostly 13.62 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was 42¢ lower. Prices were 6.046.63, mostly 6.44 at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 440.80/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 6.46, -----, ----; Candor 6.99, -----, 6.24; Cofield 6.54, 13.82, ----; Laurinburg 6.46, -----, ----; Monroe 6.78, -----, ----; Nashville 6.63, -----, ----; Roaring River 6.83, -----, ---; Rose Hill 6.46, -----, ----; Selma ----, -----, ----; Statesville 6.53, -----, 7.65; Warsaw 6.46, -----, ----; Pantego #2 6.33, -----, 5.83. Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement ----, -----, ----; Creswell 6.03, 13.42, ----; Elizabeth City 6.34, 13.62, 6.44; Greenville ----, -----, ---; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, 13.53, ----; Norwood 6.69, 13.33, 6.04; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ----, -----, 6.58; Warsaw #2 6.73, -----, 6.63. Soybean Processors: Fayetteville, 14.02; Raleigh, 14.02. RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50

Page 23 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

MARKET REPORTS


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 24

MARKET REPORTS /mile. Hay 15 tons. Alfalfa: Lg. Sq. Prem. 213 1st cut. Mixed Grass: Lg. Sq. Gd 28/bale; Lg. Rd. Gd 61, 33/bale 1st cut. Orchardgrass: Lg. Sq. Gd 20-26/bale 1st cut; Lg. Rd. Prem. 63 3rd cut; Sm. Rd. Prem 48/bale 1st cut. Timothy: Sm. Sq. Gd 2.70-bale 1st cut. Timothy/Orchardgrass: Lg. Rd. Gd 31/bale. Wet Wrapped Rye: Sm. Rd. 15/bale POULTRY REPORT NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly heavy. The estimated slaughter for Wednesday in NC is 2,683,000 head compared to 2,680,000 head last Wednesday. NC EGGS The market is higher on XL & L, steady on the balance. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is good. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of grade A eggs delivered to

nearby retail outlets: XL 115.52, L 108.71, M 84.86 & S 78. NY EGGS Prices are steady on all sizes. Supplies range light to heavy on L&M, light on XL. The New York shell egg inventory is 1% less than a week ago. Retail demand is light to moderate. Distributive demand is moderate to good. Market activity is slow to mostly moderate. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered to store door, cents per dz. XL 83-87, L 81-85, M 75-79. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beans, Green (25# bx) 30; Beets (25# bg) 12.95; Cabbage (50# crate) Pointed Head & Round 12; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 11.55-12, Spinach (25# bx) 18; Peas, Crowder (bu bg) 12-20, Crowder (bu shelled) 24; Peanuts (35# bg) Green 35; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 14-20.05; Strawberries (8 1# flats)

17.95-20.05. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn 100 count) WA Red Delicious (traypack ctn) 32.95-34.55, WA Golden Delicious (traypack ctn) 3334.50, Granny Smith WA (traypack ctn) 34-36.50, Gala WA 32-36, WA Fuji (traypack ctn) 34.50-38, WA Pink Lady (traypack ctn) 3841.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 32.95-36; Bananas (40# ctn) 21.20-23.80; Beans, Round Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 22.1523, Pole (1-1/9 bu) 25-27; Beets (25# sack) 11.5515.75; Blueberries (flat 12 1pt cups) 24-34; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 19.15-20; Cabbage (50# ctn) 12.15-12.95; Cantaloupe (case 12 count) 26.95-32.15; Carrots (50# sack) 19.65-21.45; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 19.05-22; Cherries (16# box) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 29.50-35.65; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 17.9518.05; Citrus: Oran-ges, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 26.15-30.65, FL (4/5 bu ctn) 21-22; Pink Grapefruit CA (4/5 bu ctn) 28.65-33.15; Tangelos, FL (80 count bx) 25-26.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 34-44.35; Limes (40# ctn) 22-27; Oranges CA Naval (4/5 bu ctn) 31.45-33.95, FL Naval (64

count) 23.55-26.15, Tangerines (120 count) 24; Corn (ctn 4 ?-5 dz) Yellow 1521.45, White (ctn 4 ?-5 dz) 15-21.45; Cranberries (24 12 oz pkg) 24.50; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Long Green 23-25, Pickles (ctn 40#) 2630; Eggplant (25# ctn) 2024; Grapes, Red Seedless (18# ctn) 33-36, White Seedless 31-52, Black Seedless 28, Red Globe 28; Grapefruit (40# ctn) 28.65; Greens, Collard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 11.5514.15; Turnips (topped) 11.85-14.65; Honeydews (ctn 5s) 29; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 12.75; Lettuce (ctn 24s) Iceberg (wrapped) 26.5029.15, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 24.50-25, Romaine (ctn 24s) 24.50-26; Nectarines, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 24; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 16.45-20, White (25# sack) 18-19, Red (25# sack) 15-22.50, Green (ctn 24s) 14.35-17.15; Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 2425.75; Peaches, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 18; Peanuts (35# bg) Green 53-69; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn) 27; Bell Peppers, Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 22.95-

25, Red (11# ctn) 32, Yellow (11# ctn) 32; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red Size A 15-16, Red Size B 25-28, White Size A 18-26.15; Russet, ID 2026.15; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) Red 12.95-15; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 27; Squash, Yellow crooked neck (3/4 bu ctn) 10.7515.75, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 14-16; Strawberries CA (flat 8 1-qt conts) 20.15-26.45, NC (flat 8 1-qt conts) 17.9520; Sweet Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45, White (40# ctn) 20-20.75, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45; Tomatoes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 19.35-20; Tomatoes, Cherry (flat 12 1-pt conts) 18.55-20.05, Romas (25# ctn) 16-19, Grape (flat 12 1pt conts) 19-21; Turnips (25# film bg) Topped 11.55-17.15. WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 30-31.50, Golden Delicious 30-31.50, Granny Smith 30-34.50; Bananas (40# bx) 19.50-20; Beans (bu) Halfrunners 30-38; Broccoli (ctn) 16.75-18; Cabbage (50# bg) 10.50; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12 count) 18.75-20, Bin (120-

140 count) 125-150; Cauliflower (ctn) 18-20; Citrus: Grapefruit 20-24.50; Lemons (ctns 95 count) 31.5034, (165 count) 32.50-34; Corn (Crate) Bi-Color & White 15-16; Cucumbers (11/9 bu) Long Green 18, Picklers (1-1/9 bu crate) 2732; Grapes (18# ctn) Red & White Seedless 31-41; Lettuce (ctn) Iceburg 20-21.75, Green Leaf 16-18.75, Romaine 18-21; Okra (1/2 bu) 26-30; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 17-21, Vidalia 23-26, (25# bg) 15-16; Bell Pepper (1-1/9 bu ctn) L & XL 16-19.50; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) White 15-26, Red 17-24, Russet 18-21; Squash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 18-20, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 12-15.50; Strawberries (4 qt cont) NC & SC 11-13; (8-1#s cont) CA 18-22; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 1215; Tomatoes, vine ripe (25# bx) XL & Larger 14-16, Green 15-16; Turnips (25# sack) 15; Watermelons (ea) 4-8, bin 35/45 Count Seeded 130-170, Seedless 150190. MARKET

NFU: Climate change adaptation key for continued agricultural success National Farmers Union (NFU) submitted comments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on May 17 regarding the agency’s Draft National Water 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change. The agricultural organization emphasized the need for agriculture to adapt to changing environmental conditions, particularly as it relates to water. “Climate change adaption is critical

for the continued productivity of the agriculture sector, specifically as it relates to water quality and quantity,” said NFU President Roger Johnson. “Given the proper incentives, family farmers and ranchers will be valuable partners in addressing the challenges that result from a changing climate. Family farmers and ranchers have historically been our best soil and water conservationists when given the economic incentives and

flexibility to do so.” NFU agreed with the assessment of the Draft 2012 Strategy that agriculture, ranching, and natural lands will likely face further pressure from a limited water supply as temperatures rise. In the comments, NFU encouraged EPA to seek market-based solutions to further enhance climate adaptation strategies. NFU also encouraged EPA to coordinate efforts with federal part-

ners to address issues like risk management, nonpoint source pollution and water management. “The Draft 2012 Strategy identifies many stresses to agriculture from climate change,” said Johnson. “We encourage EPA to continue establishing partnerships to coordinate efforts and maximize resources in addressing climate adaptation.”

McDonnell signs bills that will benefit agriculture, forestry WEYERS CAVE, VA — Two agriculture-friendly bills were signed into state law during a May 9 ceremony. Both will provide opportunities for producers to grow their businesses. HB 766 and SB 128 created the Governor’s Agriculture and Forestry Industries Development Fund, an economic development grant program. Grants will support localities’ efforts to attract value-added or processing facilities that will use Virginia-grown products. “We are extremely thankful that Gov. (Bob) McDonnell, his administration and the General Assembly are actively looking for new opportunities for farmers in Virginia,” said Trey Davis, assistant director of governmental relations for Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. “The Agriculture and Forestry Industries Development Fund will allow our members to partner with localities and use funds to support facilities using Virginia-grown products. We’re excited

to see this mechanism moving forward and encouraging new ways that entrepreneurs can utilize products grown right here in the commonwealth.” Virginia’s current economic development incentive and assistance programs “are ill-suited for agriculture and forestry,” said Travis Hill, Virginia’s deputy secretary of agriculture and forestry. “The thresholds for investment and job creation are so high in these programs that they miss great opportunities in the agriculture and forestry industries. “Rather than focusing on the number of jobs created or the amount of money invested, this fund looks to the impact the project will have on the community and emphasizes the use of Virginia products in the project’s operations. Farm income should increase as demand for Virginia products increases as a result of the project. Ideally, what we will have are more projects in rural parts of the state provid-

ing jobs for local residents while at the same time using products that are also being grown in Virginia.” HB 292 and SB 405 make Virginia’s secretary of agriculture and forestry and secretary of technology voting members of the Virginia Economic Development Partnership Authority

Board of Directors. “This legislation continues the governor’s strategy to fully integrate agriculture and forestry, the two largest industries in Virginia, into the broader economic development and job creation efforts of Virginia,” Hill said.


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• Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves. • Use less! More absorbent than lime products.

Try Grip X1 Today! www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Dealers wanted in select areas Also Available at: Central Dairy & Mech. Country View Ag Products Elam Miller Himrod Farm Supply Homestead Nutrition Levi Fisher Martin’s Ag New Bedford Elevator Norm’s Farm Store Robert Rohrer Steve B. Stoltzfus Walnut Hill Feeds

Concrete Products

REG. HEREFORD BULLS ex. EPD’s-carcass. 717-6429199, 240-447-4600.

Bedding

Martinsburg, PA Moravia, NY Ft. Plain, NY Penn Yan, NY New Holland, PA Honey Grove, PA Shippensburg, PA Baltic, OH Watsontown, PA Millmont, PA Lykens, PA Shelby, OH

ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph

814-793-3721 315-374-5457 518-993-3892 315-531-9497 888-336-7878 717-734-3145 717-532-7845 330-897-6492 570-649-6765 570-898-1967 717-365-3804 419-342-2942

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS Large Selection Available

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE We Buy Tractors For Parts

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com Announcements

Farm Machinery For Sale

403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

(717) 776-6242

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist 1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

BUSH HOG

USED EQUIPMENT

Bush Hog 17’ Tedder Woods 121 Rotary Cutter Woods RM660 Finish Mower Case IH 8330 Windrower White 445 Disc Chisel NI 3715 Spreader Vicon Fertilizer Spreader 165 Bu. Gravity Box MF 245 Tractor Westfield 8x51 Auger White 285 Tractor Miller 5300 Forage Box Miller 1150 Rake IH 37 Baler w/Thrower Hesston 4550 Square Baler Farmall 460 Tractor MF 246 Loader Case IH 8830 SP Mower Cond. MF 285 Tractor White 549 SAR 5 Bottom Plow Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill Miller Pro Forage Boxes In Stock

STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE RD Box 46 Klingerstown, PA

570-648-2088 WE ALSO STOCK NEW VICON

buycows@warwick.net

Dairy Cattle

Farm Equipment

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

RICHARDTON 1400 dump wagon, no roof, $4,000. 585746-5050

SCC Over 100,000? Call Us. Only 13 cents/cow. 39 years easy use. Effective, no withholding, results. PH: 800-876-2500, 920-650-1631 www.alphageneticsinc.com

DISCBINE: CAT Challenger PTD12, 12’ hydroswing, roller conditioner, 1000 rpm, new condition, same as Massey Ferguson & Hesston. 585392-7692, 585-424-0795

Page 27 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

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May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 28

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Used Equipment For Sale JD 5410 4WD, ROPS, JD LOADER, JUST TRADED! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,000.00 CASE IH MX110 CAB, HEAT, AIR, 4WD, LOADER, GRAPPLE BUCKET, GOOD COND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,000.00 NH 1431 DISC BINE, SMUCKER ROLLS, GOOD COND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500.00 DMI 3 SHANK NO-TIL RIPPER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500.00 VERMEER TE 170 TEDDER, 4 ROTOR, EXC. COND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000.00 JD 535 ROUND BALER, 5X6, JUST TRADED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,000.00 HESSTON 3983 12 WHEEL V RAKE, PULL TYPE, HYDRAULIC, JUST TRADED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,750.00 GEHL 100 GRINDER MIXER, SCALES, DOUBLE FOLDING AUGERS, JUST TRADED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000.00

Fencing ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

For Rent or Lease LARGE 500 COW freestall barn with 16 unit milking parlor 4,000 gallon refrigerator tank. Barn is also suitable for heifer rearing or beef production. (13339) 516-429-6409

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

LAWRENCE AG EQUIPMENT 877-466-1131

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

MAY Equipment Inventory

PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

D&H Tractor Chilhowie, VA • 276-646-3642

dhtractorsales@comcast.net

IH DISGUSTED??? With your shifting? Now is the time to fix. Put a good tractor back to work. 800-808-7885, 402-374-2202 JD BALER PARTS: Used, New Aftermarket and rebuilt. JD canopy new aftermarket, $750. Call for pictures. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705

MACK ENTERPRISES Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

New Holland 1012, 56 bale, $1,700; 1033, 104 bale wagon, $4,600; 1037, 104 bale, $6,000; 1044, 119 bale, $3,300. S1049, 160 bale, selfpropelled, cab, $17,900. 1047, no cab, 119 bale, $6,900. All through shop. Roeder Impl. Seneca, KS 785-336-6103

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

519-482-5365 ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

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SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION

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ROCKY MEADOW FARM 810 South 14th Ave., Lebanon, PA 17042

1-866-887-2727 • 1-717-228-2727 www.supertarp.com • rockymeadowfarm@evenlink.com

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NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

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REDUCED PRICES-NEED ROOM FOR NEW CROP 3x3x8 Squares Bales; 4x5 Round Bales Really Early Cut & Timothy Hay. All Hay Stored Inside on Pallets. Outside Round Bales, Good for Beef Cattle Picked Up or Delivered, Any Amount, Large Quantity

518-929-3480-518-329-1321 STRAW FOR SALE: 21 bale bundles, loaded on your truck, Madison County,VA. 540-9484043, 540-718-1567 cell

Hay - Straw For Sale FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY & STRAW

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers Hay - Straw Wanted Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted. Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

2012 Contracts Now Available

adenbrook.com

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Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

Call for Competitive Prices

Parts & Service New Installations

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Farmer to Farmer

Bright Clean WHEAT STRAW

Good selection of Kuhn Hay Equipment has arrived. Stop by or call!

0% FINANCING AVAILABLE ON SELECT NEW HOLLAND TRACTORS & HAY TOOLS CALL TO INQUIRE!

H AY

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE

Check Out Our Outstanding Low Interest Financing On Used Equipment! Case IH RBX 452 Round Baler, 4x5, net & twine wrap, Silage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,000 Ford 3000 Manual Trans, good cond. . . . . $6,000 Hesston 530 Round Baler, great shape for age! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,000 New Holland BR 740 twine tie, good condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,000 New Holland BR 780 5x6 bale . . . . . . . . $13,500 TN95 DA Cab, 4WD, Woods Loader, Low Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,000 TL100 4WD, Cab, NH Loader, Low Hrs. . $33,000 Northern Ag Mist Sprayers In Stock In Stock! New Holland 200 Series Skid Loaders

Hay - Straw For Sale

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Contacts: Allen Hollenbach 610-929-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com

We are taking orders for shredded 2012 CS from those with and those wanting their CS harvested

Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

Heating

PleasantCreekHay.com Compare our Claas Rotocut Baler, Triple Mowers, Roll Over Vrn’land Plows, Front PTO Tractors, Speed Options and Prices.

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293

Help Wanted

FEEDING MANAGER Position is available at OAKWOOD DAIRY

Involves feeding an 1800 cow dairy with 1700 heifers, managing bunk silos and feed deliveries, and working with the Herd Managers and nutritionist. Oakwood Dairy is a progressive, high production dairy with excellent facilities, equipment and management located near Auburn, NY.

For more information call

315-252-0652 315-730-9046 (Bill) or oakwood@cnyemail.com


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Help Wanted Herdsman Wanted:Jasper Hill Farm seeks a candidate to help grow our farmstead cheese business. Responsibilities include managing the herd health and breeding programs for our herd of 45 registered Ayrshire cows, milking and raw product quality oversight, management of farm operations including wheyfed pork production, field work and staff supervision. Dairy experience required. Competitive pay. Contact: Emily 802-533-2566 x106 or work@cellarsatjasperhill.com

Hogs Berkshires from our American Berkshire Registered & Certified Herd. All vegetarian diet, no antibiotics, chemicals nor hormones. Straw bedded & pasture access. Feeder Pigs<10-$110 each; 10 or more $100 each; Butcher Hogs$1.10/lb 4 or more-$1.00/lb liveweight. Breeding Stockboars & gilts. 717-488-8090. Lancaster County, PA 17555

Livestock Equipment

South East Precast Concrete, LLC Feed Bunks, Water Troughs, Mineral Feeders, Cattle Guards, Silo Sides, Bunker Sides Dealer for: Giant Rubber Water Tanks and Best Livestock Equipment

Call to Order 276-620-1194 Wytheville, VA

Lawn & Garden MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

Help Wanted

Livestock Equipment

Help Wanted

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Lumber & Wood Products

Parts & Repair

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

TOMATO STAKES, hardwood, with or without points, available 1”x1” to 1½”x1½” sq. and 36” to 72” long, one pallet or tractor trailer load picked up or delivered. Erle D. Anderson LUMBER PRODUCTS INC., www.woodstakesupplier.com Located in Virginia. 804-7480500

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS

REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR

BATES CORPORATION 12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS! Call the IH Parts Specialists:

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

1-800-248-2955 Help Wanted

Roofing

Poultry & Rabbits

Poultry Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Clearview Hatchery

Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

(717) 365-3234 Real Estate For Sale

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY Southwestern Virginia Bland County

62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

$90,000 Several Purchase Options Available. Call

540-255-9112

Tractors 1985 2950 JD MFD Open Station Serial No. 551299 7000 Hrs. 30 Day Powertrain Warranty $18,500. Wayne County, NY. Phone 315-7296708

Trucks

1995 A35C Volvo Articulating Haul Truck 6 x 6 $37,000. (716) 433-3373

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

MAY 29 Farming for Life Webinar: Using Body Mechanics & Other Tools to do What You Love Longer Online. Webinars are free and do not require preregistration. To join simply click “webinars” at www.uvm.edu/newfarmer. To request a disability related accommodation to participate, contact Jessie Schmidt at 802-223-2389, ext. 203 or 866-860-1382 by May 22. Contact Jessie Schmidt, 802-223-2389, ext. 203 or e-mail newfarmer@uvm.edu. Regional Hands-On Beef Cattle Workshop Farm of Don York in Julian, NC. 1-4:30 pm. Contact Ben Chase, 336-342-8235, 8006 6 6 - 3 6 2 5 , ben_chase@ncsu.edu or Adam Ross, 336-318-6000, adam_ross@ncsu.edu. MAY 30 Market Signage Workshop O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 10 am - 4 pm. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-671-3276. JUN 1 Cooperative Extension’s Meat Handling & Cutting Workshop Rockingham County Cooperative Extension Center, Reidsville, NC. 1-4 pm. Call 3366-342-8230. JUN 9 Invasive Plants and Pests Tour Pine Grove Furnace State Park, Gardners, PA. 1-4 pm. A walking tour to show how to identify and control invasive plants and pests that threaten our forests. The group will meet at 1 pm at the Laurel Lake day use parking lot by Cold Spring Road. Wear appropriate clothing for outdoors including hiking boots. The tour will take place rain or shine. You do not have to be a member of the Cumberland Woodland Owners Association and there is no cost to attend but registration is requested. Please register by June 7. Contact George Hurd, 717-263-9226 ext. 225 or e-mail grh5@psu.edu.

Page 29 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 28, 2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


May 28, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 30

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Calendar of Events JUN 12 PA Forest Web Seminar The title of June’s presentation is Management Strategies for Eastern Forests Threatened by Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. Mary Ann Fajvan, Research Forester with the Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service will be the presenter. Seminars are scheduled for noon and again at 7 pm. To register and take part in the live seminars or to view the upcoming seminars schedule, visit http://extension.psu.edu /private-forests/ tools-resources/webinars. JUN 16 The Maryland Poultry Swap & Farmer’s Market Green Hill Farm, 5329 Mondell Rd., Sharpsburg, MD. 8 am - 2 pm. Admission is free. On Internet at www.Md PoultrySwap.blogspot.com

JUN 19 Breeding & Genetics: Considerations for Organic Dairy Farms Online. For more information or to register visit www.extension.org/pages/2 5242. Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. JUN 28 Open House and Dairy Tour Ryan & Jen Clark’s Dairy Operation, 318 Crawford Rd., Tyrone, Blair County. 10 am - 1:30 pm. Picnic style lunch. Participation is free, but pre-registration is requested. Call 717-3460849. On Internet at www.centerfordairy excellence.org JUN 30 National Lineback Show Centre Hall Fairgrounds, Centre Hall, PA. 10 am. Any boy or girl age 8-21 and a jr. member of ALDCR by June 1 is eligible to show in the junior show. This year an open show has also been added.

For entry info check at www.americanlinebacks.co m. Contact Luke Harrison, 814-490-7517 or roz_18@hotmail.com. JUL 6 Open House and Dairy Tour Reed & Diane Hoover’s Dairy Operation, 400 Mount Wilson Rd., Lebanon, Lebanon County. 10 am 1:30 pm. Picnic style lunch. Participation is free, but preregistration is requested. Call 717-346-0849. On Internet at www.centerfordairyexcellence.org JUL 17 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. JUL 20 Sorghum Grower Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 8-10 am. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-671-3276. JUL 21 Tree Farm Field Day Eagleville Gap, Blanchard, PA. 10 am - 3 pm. Questions? Program Details Con-

tact: John Hoover, Tree Farmer 203-736-4385 or johnwhoover@msn.com. Registration information contact: Dave Jackson, Forest Resources Educator, Penn State Extension of Centre County at 814-3554897 or drj11@psu.edu. The registration page can be downloaded at http://patreefarm.org/ wp-content/uploads/2012 /01/Hoover-Tree-FarmField-Day-Brochure-712.pdf. JUL 24 Pesticide Recertification Class, Private Category V&X O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 5-9 pm. Commercial class TBA. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-671-3276. AUG 2 The 2012 Virginia Ag Expo Grainfield Farm operated by Chuck McGhee in Mechanicsville, VA. 7:30 am. Field tours starting at 8 am will include the Virginia on farm corn and soybean variety plots; corn and soybean planting dates; weed, insect and nematodes control; population studied in both corn and soybeans; row width in full season soybeans and

seed treatments in soybeans. Also on the tour will be a stop at the blackberry and raspberry operation and a stop at a pre-Civil War cemetery. There is no pre-registration or registration fee for attendees. Lunch will be available from local civic organizations and vendors. Contact John Smith, e-mail vaagexpo@aol.com. AUG 21 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. SEP 6 Precondition Cattle Sale Stanley County Livestock market, 13215 Indian Mound Rd., Norwood, NC. 7 am - 3 pm cattle arrive. Sale at 7 pm. Contact Marcus Harward, 704-474-7681. SEP 15-20 The 49th All American Dairy Show Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center, Harrisburg, PA. Featuring 23 shows in six days, including four full days dedicated to youth shows and more than

2,400 animals shown by nearly 1,000 exhibitors from across the nation. Call 717787-2905. On Internet at www.allamerican.state.pa.us SEP 18 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. SEP 20 Pesticide Recertification Class, Private Category V&X O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. Commercial class TBA. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-6713276. OCT 16 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276.

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Country Folks Mid-Atlantic 5.28.12