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21 May 2012 Section e off Two One Volume e 31 Number r 20

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds Virginia Agroterrorism Conference prepares audience for the worst ~ Page A3

Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly A14

FEATURES Auctions Classifieds Dairy & DHIA Markets

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By keeping it simple Smitherman brothers keep on dairying ~ Page 2 They are like trees planted by streams of water, bearing fruit in due season, with leaves that do not wither; everything they do shall prosper. Psalm 1:3


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 2

By keeping it simple, Smitherman brothers keep on dairying by Karl H. Kazaks EAST BEND, NC — Charles and James Smitherman represent a disappearing part of the dairy industry — smallerscale farmers who do all of the farmwork, including the milking, themselves. The Smithermans used to both milk and raise about 50 acres of tobacco. When they decided to take the buyout some years back and stop raising the golden leaf, they appraised their operation to decide where they wanted to go in agriculture. “We decided to stick with what we can do by ourselves,” Charles said. That meant milking about 90 cows twice a day and raising a couple hundred acres of crops. At one point, they had a part-time milker, but today they do all of the work themselves. The decision to be selfreliant also led the Smithermans to build their own milking parlor in 2003. Charles explained, “We decided if we were going to keep milking we would build the parlor ourselves.” Total, the building cost about 40 percent of what it would have if it had been contracted out, with the Smithermans supplying 90 percent of the labor. The design of the doublenine was inspired by a number of parlors the Smithermans had encountered over the years. It is open-air, with a gate on one end and curtains on the other. The milking components are BouMatic.

Youngsters from the East Bend Elementary preschool class of 2012 watches a group of cows during a later-than-usual milking at the Smitherman Brothers Dairy. A few things the brothers would do differently if they were to build the parlor themselves — they would put drain holes exactly in the corner of the milking lanes (rather than slightly offset from the corner) and they would make the well another foot or two wider. “We thought it would be good to have a narrow space when going from side to side,” Smitherman said. The herd at the Smithermans dairy — which is mostly Holstein, with a few

Brown Swiss — spends much of its time on some of the 100plus acres of pasture at the farm. The barn is used primarily in the winter. The pasture, which fronts the road running next to the farm the brothers use as their maternity ward, for close-up cows. “Neighbors stop and tell us when one of them is calving,” Smitherman said. The brothers grow about 150 acres of corn. Once their silage bunk is full, they let the remaining acre stand for shell

Charles Smitherman and his brother, James, built this milking parlor themselves in 2003. They milk about 90 cows twice a day in the double-nine. Photos by Karl Kazaks

corn. They grow about 100 acres of barley — both for grain and hay — and then follow with soybeans. Soybeans are the only crop they sell for cash — and last year they had a nice harvest, with good yields and prices.

Until recently, the Smithermans did their own planting, but now hire a neighbor with a double-row planter. They still combine their grain themselves. Breeding is done natural service at the dairy. “One nailed me the other year,” Smitherman said. “He pushed me through a fence, busted three or four ribs. Needless to say a week later he was hamburger.” The Smithermans have considered going larger, expanding their herd and hiring help. But they are content to remain where they are, with the advantages they have “We don’t have the overhead these larger dairies do.” Every year, the Smithermans invite the preschool class at East Bend Elementary, where Charles’s wife Denise is a preschool teacher, to visit the dairy for a field trip. “We enjoy it,” Charles said. Those children get to experience, for a few hours, what the Smithermans have known all their life. “This is what I’ve been doing since about the third or fourth grade,” Smitherman recalled. “Dad told me to get the cows up and go feed silage, and I’ve been doing it ever since.”

Charles Smitherman and his wife, Denise, a longtime preschool teacher at East Bend Elementary, enjoy the annual field trip the school’s preschool class makes to the dairy.


by Jennifer Showalter BLACKSBURG, VA — The idea of an attack on U.S. agriculture from either domestic or international terrorists is nothing to take lightly. Such an event could be devastating to the industry and the country as a whole. Terrorists targeting both pre- and/or post-harvest agricultural products not only want to disrupt the U.S. food chain, but they also have full intentions of hindering our economy. If human lives are put in danger or lost during the process, these terrorists will feel even more accomplished. With this in mind, it only makes sense to prepare for the worst and to continue to hope for the best. A full house of around 110 state, local, and federal officials, along with farmers, veterinarians, agribusiness owners and others recently joined for the Fourth Annual Virginia Agroterrorism Conference in the Skelton Conference Center at Virginia Tech. This one-day conference was designed to inform individuals from the private sector involved in agriculture how the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS), the Virginia Department of Health, and the Federal Government would respond to an Agroterrorism incident within the Commonwealth of Virginia. The group learned that such an event could affect many different people and how important it is for everyone to be aware of the threat and have a plan to work together in such an event. From livestock and poultry producers, veterinarians, livestock market managers, food and dairy processors and retailers, to local and state government officials, the

speakers stressed that all involved in agriculture need to be prepared and have a plan. Throughout the day the audience was reminded to be observant, practice good biosecurity at the farm level and limit access to farm or processing plants. In short, the speakers encouraged the group to detect, deter, and defeat! With many diseases having similar symptoms, proper initial tests are needed to determine the severity of the threat. If in fact the initial tests show suspicion of a terrorist attack, proper actions must quickly be taken to deter the spread even before final laboratory confirmation is presented. If diagnosed, methods to defeat the disease and the terrorists must rapidly come into play. With Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) being very contagious, second only to small pox, most response activities that were reviewed throughout the day dealt with FMD. According to Dr. Charles Broadduss, VDACS, FMD has not been seen in the U.S. since 1929, but the threat for it to be introduced into the U.S. as an act of terrorism is real. “If the U.S. is hit with FMD, our door to export markets will slam shut and will slam shut fast for a long time,” said Broadduss. He went on to explain that FMD in the U.S. would shut down the U.S. livestock industry, but for how long is the question. With restrictions on movement of such things as milk, producers would lose big money. New to the conference this year was a mock exercise where a veterinarian is suspicious of FMD in a group of cattle he evaluated that had been brought into Virginia from

VDACS Emergency Services Manager Megan Samford encouraged the audience to secure the U.S. supply chain by trying to become more independent, rather than relying on outside sources that could potentially be cut off and leave the U.S. in a bind.

Dr. Charles Broaddus, VDACS, touches on a voluntary Secure Milk Supply Initiative in the states of Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. another state. As the case progressed, it was revealed that the son-in-law of the farmer was home between deployments with the U.S. Army in the Middle East and was at odds with the family, not in good standing with the military and had made threatening remarks to this father-in-law. Panelists from VDACS, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) reported what their initial

role would be in this case and worked the audience through the steps they would take as the case unfolded more. They explained how they would quarantine the farm and how they would take precautionary measures to prevent the spread of FMD should laboratory results confirm the initial diagnosis. By lunch time, the FBI had found a discarded rag on the farm that matched the soldier’s DNA and proved that the virus was not only FMD,

but the strain of FMD present in the Middle East. The soldier entered a no-contest plea to the charges against him and was sentenced to jail for a long period of time. Throughout this exercise the audience was encouraged to ask questions and make comments, giving them a much better feel for how to act if such an event should happen in Virginia. Megan Samford, the Emergency Services Manager at VDACS, encouraged the audience to support domestic supplies rather than relying on others by doing such things as joining the move to buy local. She assured the crowd that America wants to be in the position it can feed itself, in case trade is shut down or severely hampered. Looking back, Samford feels the conference gave everyone in attendance a better understanding of the vulnerability of Virginia’s agriculture industry to a domestic or international terrorist attack. “I think a healthy perspective on the risks and education about our response is strategically important if we are to prevent terrorist acts or to respond quickly and appropriately should they occur,” said Samford. She later added, “The conference brought the people together who would work side-by-side in an emergency — state, local, and federal officials; farmers; veterinarians; agribusinesses. Getting to know each other beforehand could save a lot of time and duplication of effort when responding to an actual crisis.” The Fourth Annual Virginia Agroterrorism Conference was sponsored by the VDACS, the FBI Richmond office, and Virginia Tech.

About 110 state, local, and federal officials along with farmers, veterinarians, agribusiness owners and others recently joined for the Fourth Annual Virginia Agroterrorism Conference in the Skelton Conference Center at Virginia Tech. Photos by Jennifer Showalter

Page 3 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

Agroterrorism Conference prepares audience for the worst


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 4

Give her a rest ~ cows need lots of time for lying down by Sally Colby “Cows are busy girls … they have lots of things to do.” That’s what Dr. Nigel Cook, who manages the Cow Comfort and WellBeing program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, says about cows. Cook is interested in how cows spend their time because that time budget is directly related to lameness, which impacts production. Cook compares the pastured cow to the cow that’s in a freestall or tie stall barn. “The grazing cow’s time budget involves mostly resting — about 10 hours or less per day,” he said. “The rest is eating — a grazing cow will typically spend eight hours a day chomping away at foliage. That’s a lot of time.” In a freestall barn, when the cow isn’t lying down, she’s standing in a stall. However, the cow is exposed to concrete in alleys and transfer lanes. “Standing on concrete is hard on cows,” said Cook. “Their feet weren’t designed for that. As a consequence, we see lameness.” The freestall cow’s

time budget involves a big chunk of lying time, but eating is greatly reduced; from eight hours to about four hours. Cook says that the cow should be able to ‘use’ that extra time for rest, but that isn’t always the case. “When the cow isn’t lying down, she’s often standing on concrete,” he said. “I think we need to reduce that.” Cook referenced a study conducted on dairies in British Columbia, California, New York and Pennsylvania that examined the relationship between housing and lameness. “Lameness problems (cows walking with a noticeable limp) are in the range of 28 to 55 percent of cows,” he said, “with lying times between 10.5 and 11 hours/day in freestall or drylot facilities. This leads to hock abrasions and other problems.” A more ideal situation is for cows to have 12 hours of resting (lying) time. “They need additional resting time to compensate for the increased exposure to concrete in alleyways and other barn areas,” said Cook. “In a grazing situation, 10 hours of rest a day for a graz-

Cover photo by Karl Kazaks Members of the East Bend Elementary preschool class of 2012 help bottle-feed at calf at the dairy of Charles (pictured) and James Smitherman. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

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Cows in freestall housing have improved hock scores, less lameness and higher production when stalls are comfortable. Photo by Sally Colby

ing cow is acceptable. Do they choose to rest less because they don’t need to, or is it because they’re so busy eating that they don’t have time?” Cook says that he doesn’t know the answer to that question, but says that it doesn’t look good if cows in freestall systems average only 10 hours of rest per day. Research done in Minnesota showed that the amount of time out of the pen for milking was associated with increased lameness. “Herds managing cows with smaller parlors and larger groups and haven’t invested in parlor through-put efficiency see more lameness,” said Cook. “For the non-lame cow, we have to get it done in three hours — one hour per milking. When there’s more than three hours out of the pen, we lose lying time. The cow has to eat, socialize and drink — that’s where we lose time.” Stocking density also plays a role in resting time. “Cows can’t get 12 hours of rest in a situation where there aren’t enough stalls,” said Cook. “With more cows than stalls, cows are battling for stalls — trying to enter a stall that’s occupied, then leaving for a while, taking a drink, then returning to try again. In crowded situations, subordinate cows can only get into stalls when dominant cows give up the stall.”

The bottom line is that stall comfort — from the cow’s perspective — must be improved. “If we’re going to improve stall comfort to persuade cows to go in and rest for 12 hours a day,” said Cook, “the most important thing we need to do is fix stall comfort and surface.” Cook referred to a study done at the university that measured resting behavior. “Resting behavior is different on sand and mattresses,” he said. “On a softer surface, cows lie down for longer. It’s the wooden chair/La-Z-Boy effect. You’re going to fidget less in a La-Z-Boy than on the kitchen chair.” Cook says that cows are the same — they have a longer resting ‘bout’ before they have to change position. “If we want about 12 hours of rest per day, we’re shooting for about a dozen of these bouts a day. What we see in sand herds is fewer bouts because each bout is longer. In mattress herds, the bouts are shorter and cows have more of them. There’s a difference in the way animals are getting those hours of rest. Does it matter? If you’re a young, fit heifer, getting up and down is pretty easy. I think it matters if you’re older and stiffer.” Cook added that when cows must get up additional times in a day, the consequence is loss of total resting time.

Soybean researcher recognized UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — A researcher in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences has been honored for his contributions in developing an online tool to forecast the emergence of threats to soybean crops. Scott Isard, professor of aerobiology, received the International Integrated Pest Management Award of Excellence. The award recognizes Isard’s collaboration with international agencies, land grant universities and the soybean industry in developing the Soybean Rust Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education. Incorporating weather data and knowledge of pest biology, the website provides the latest information on soybean rust and soybean aphid, including

observations and recommendations for management and scouting. Producers, crop consultants, Extension specialists, and government and industry personnel in the United States, Canada and Mexico utilize the program. The tool is credited with reducing the amount of fungicide used to manage soybean rust and saving growers millions of dollars they would have spent on fungicide applications. The award was shared by more than 20 of the main contributors to the soybean rust program and was presented at the recent 2012 International Integrated Pest Management Symposium in Memphis, TN. The soybean rust tool can be found at http://sbr.ipmpipe.org.


Newsletter of Penn Dutch Cow Care Hi Folks, As spring happens, life unfolds in its many forms. And with plants this is especially true. While it hasn’t been terribly warm in the northeast, everything is green at this point and growing. Crops are being planted and harvested already. These are the crops that we intend to feed to the cattle as their primary source of nutrition for the time of year when green plants are no longer growing. But during the mid-spring through early-autumn we should be thinking of pasture as the main feed. Why? For one, it is a cheap feed. But probably more importantly it provides a diverse diet which the cows appreciate — wouldn’t you?

Pasture is cheap feed because it is harvested by the cows themselves. They also fertilize the land. Matching what is standing there to what you desire your cows to take in from it will often result in spare acreage for you to mechanically harvest feed for later use — less purchased feed! I went over this last month, here it is a nut shell: dry matter desired for the cows divided by what is standing there = square footage needed. Even if sizing paddocks for 100 percent dry matter intake from pasture (like for growing heifers) I find most groups of animals are in way too much area. That wasted area could become hay or baleage! Pasture is the healthiest

feed because of the bovine digestive enzymes present in the gut and it makes the cows exercise and move around to harvest it. Probably the best aspect to pasturing cows is that they can pick and choose from among a variety of live, growing plants — rather than only consume a constant supply of stored, fermented feeds. The variety of plants that they will consume no doubt includes what people commonly call “weeds”. Yet I am no longer sure what the definition of a weed really is. The conventional definition is a plant growing where we don’t want it to. But if animals eat it, then couldn’t such a plant be considered a feed source? And what if the plant that is readily eaten also con-

tains nutrients that rival or exceed those found in alfalfa, ryegrass or clover? Then the “weed” might even be considered beneficial to their overall diet, providing both essential nutrients in addition to possible medicinal components. While not many projects are funded to study the nutritional content of “weeds” for herbivores like cows, sheep, goats and horses, there are some available. In a 2006 study, pasture “weeds” analyzed on New Zealand’s Massey University organic and conventional dairy farms showed most “weeds” being the same or better feed quality (in terms of ADF) and higher macroand micro-nutrients than their perennial rye-

grass and white clover stands. In terms of macro and micro nutrients: chicory had significantly higher levels of P, S, Mg, Na, Cu, Zn, B; narrow leaf plantain had higher levels of P, S, Ca, Na, Cu, Zn, Co; and dandelion had significantly higher amounts of P, Mg, Na, Cu, Zn, B. In a study done by Jerry Brunetti (see www.agridynamics.com), common “weeds” were compared to alfalfa. In terms of macroand micro-nutrients: nettle leaf showed better results than alfalfa in 13 measurements: protein, N:S, ADF, TDN, NEL, Ca, P, K, S, Fe, Zn, Mn, and B; dandelion was better in 12 measurements, comfrey in 10, with chicory and plantain better in 8 measurements compared to alfalfa. In an old study from 1933 done in Oklahoma, all the “weeds” were higher in N, P and Ca than the native grasses

and they found that young plants are higher in mineral nutrients and nitrogen than older plants. Their overall conclusion is that “the presence of these weeds in the hay would increase the total mineral content of the forage and under many conditions this effect would improve rather than injure its feeding value.” Secondary plant metabolites in fresh plants (pasture) can provide medicinal qualities and animals instinctively search out plants that are high in condensed tannins which help repel internal worms. Plants high in condensed tannins include the chicory mentioned above. Then there are the non-bloating legumes with high tannins such as birdsfoot trefoil, lespedeza, and sanfoin. All have shown in live animal studies (not test tubes)

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Page 5 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

The Moo News


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 6

Feeding wet calves for optimal growth This Tip of the Week comes from DCHA member Hugh Chester-Jones, PhD. Professor in Dairy and Beef Production Systems at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Chester-Jones, offered some useful tips on feeding wet calves for optimal growth. Holstein calf growth standards According to the DCHA Gold Standards, newborn calves should double their birth weight by 60 days of age and a frame growth goal of 4 inches. A goal of 1 pound per day daily gain within the first 2 weeks is also recommended. Calf and heifer growers are urged to keep track of the calf’s growth using devices such as scales, tape measure and stick measuring. There are many variables to consider when rearing calves, and there are sev-

eral that the grower needs to emphasize. According to Dr. Chester-Jones, there are five C’s of successful calf rearing: • Colostrum • Cleanliness • Consistency • Calories • Comfort Dr. Chester-Jones further discussed the liquid feeding source option, which consists of whole milk and milk replacers. For growers who prefer the whole milk option, it is essential to make sure there is no contamination after the pasteurization process. When using milk replacer, which is considered conventional, intensive or moderately intensive, there are a few factors for the grower to consider. The nutrient

content for milk replacers should range between 20-28 percent of crude protein and 15-22 percent of fat. If milk replacers are being used for feeding, it is important to limit the use of medicated milk replacers to a 1:1 neoterramycin for 14 days if medication is being used. Last but not least, it is vital to make alternative nutrient additives available. Feeding recommendations The volume of liquid feed source should range between 8 to 14 percent of birth weight with 12.5 to 17 percent solids. The feeding frequency for individual calves should be 2x daily; multiple meals with group feeding. It is also advised to make any necessary adjustments for cold or hot environmental conditions. Dr.

Chester -Jones recommended increasing milk solids and volume during cold weather. However, in hot weather conditions, emphasis should be placed on water intake. Starter Feed - complete, texturized or pellet Example of nutrient content - 18-22 percent crude protein, 7-9 percent ADF, 14-17 precent NDF, 3-4 percent fat, 0.8-1 percent Ca, 0.5-0.6 percent P, other vitamins and minerals. Availability — offer on day 3 with 1/4-1/2 pound in a bucket; increase as needed (not much intake for first 2 weeks). Tips for promoting consumption — it is important to keep feed fresh and encourage intake.

Moo from A5 to decrease internal worm burdens that are so common in weaned groups of heifers placed on the same pasture year after year — areas where parasites are just waiting for them time and time again. I have observed that cows, heifers and steers will readily eat true forages and weeds — if they are in a young stage of life. Once a plant starts going to seed, most animals won’t eat them unless forced to (by starvation or simply nothing

else to eat). From the old Oklahoma study that concluded young plants have more nutrients and the New Zealand and Jerry Brunetti’s study that showed which and how much of each nutrient is present, it is reasonable to state that having a true variety of plants in the pasture is quite beneficial for cattle. Do keep in mind, however, that there do exist truly toxic plants. These include bracken fern, wild cherry leaves that are wilted, ergot growing

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Unless starving, herbivores normally avoid such plants. If seen these plants really should be removed. In pastures that are un-even in growth with normal plants (forages and common “weeds”) that might have plants older than others, consider pre-clippping a field and letting the

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1. Keep cows clean and dry at all times. This assures clean teat surfaces and prevents bacteria from entering the teat end. 2. Seek assistance from a qualified dairy professional (veterinarian, milk plant field rep, milk equipment dealer, Extension educator). 3. Do individual cow SCC tests monthly to help identify herd trends and pinpoint the infected cows. 4. Run a monthly bulk tank culture through a reliable laboratory to find out what kinds of bacteria are causing intramammary infections. 5. If bulk tank culture results show a high level of contagious mastitis pathogens (Staph aureus, Strep ag, or mycoplasma), identify infected cows by individual cow culturing. Reduce cowto-cow spread and remove the high SCC quarters from the milk supply. 6. If bulk tank culture results show high levels of environmental pathogens (nonag streps, coliforms, or Staph species), improve bedding management and premilking cow prep. Replace all organic bedding in every stall weekly with clean bedding. Every day, replace the bedding in the back half of the stall with fresh, clean bedding. If you use sand bedding, add fresh, clean sand at least once per week. Keep stalls leveled and remove soiled sand daily. 7. Improve consistency in milking procedures. Include a pre- and post-

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milking teat dip, 10 to 20 seconds of cleaning, at least 30 seconds of contact time for the teat dip, and a thorough teat end wiping before attaching the milking unit. Plan routine to achieve 60-120 second prep-lag time. 8. Include forestrip during cow prep to identify high SCC quarters and keep milk from those quarters out of the bulk tank. 9. Cull chronically high SCC cows that do not respond to therapy. 10. Treat all quarters of all cows at dry off with an approved dry cow intramammary tube. 11. Consider using a dry cow teat sealer. 12. Provide dry cows with adequate space, ventilation and clean bedding. (Minnesota DHIA records indicate that an average of 35 percent of cows and heifers calve with high SCCs.) 13. Keep cows as cool and comfortable as possible during hot weather. 14. Control flies. 15. Maintain milking equipment in good working order. Develop a routine performance check and maintenance program. Replace rubber parts at recommended intervals. Be sure system cleaning is done consistently and properly. Source: University of Minnesota Extension Factsheet F-MP-1 (December 2011), as reprinted from Udder Topics Vol. 35, No. 1 & 2 (in April 2012)

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Page 7 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

Fifteen ways to reduce Somatic Cell Counts


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 8

The Peoples’ Department: 150 years of USDA On May 15, we will recognize the 150th anniversary of the founding of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. On that date in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed into law an act of Congress establishing USDA. Two and a half years after he established the Department, in what would be his final annual message to Congress, Lincoln called USDA “The People’s Department.” President Lincoln knew the importance of agriculture to our prosperity — particularly at a time when about half of all Americans lived on the farm. And while that number today stands at about 2 percent, our values are still rooted in rural America. As the United States has changed and evolved over the years, at USDA we have not lost sight of Lincoln’s vision. Through our work on food, agriculture, economic development, science, natural resource conservation and a host of other issues, USDA has impacted the lives of generations of Americans. And over the past three years, we have furthered that commitment to this nation. USDA has supported producers — making a record number of farm loans, maintaining a strong safety net, and expanding markets to drive record exports. We’ve stood by rural communities — supporting more than 6,000 community facilities projects, providing more than 50,000 loans to help rural businesses create jobs, and investing in thousands of infrastructure projects that have delivered modern broadband, water and electric services to millions. We’ve enrolled a record number of acres in conservation programs, and laid out a sensible new planning rule for 193 million acres of National Forests to promote job growth while conserving the environment. USDA has continued its history of groundbreaking research. For example, we’ve invested about $320 million to accelerate research on the next generation of renewable energy — so we can create jobs and ensure

America’s energy security for years to come. And we’re helping families lead healthy lives. USDA provides nutrition assistance for one in four Americans, enabling them to put healthy meals on the table, even when times are tough, and we’re serving healthier school breakfast and lunch to 32 million kids a day. Today, USDA truly remains a “Peoples’ Department” that touches the life of every American. Folks depend on us. That’s why I’m committed to leveraging the efforts of our Department and more than 100,000 hardworking USDA employees to continue creating jobs, supporting rural communities and helping our country prosper. As we commemorate 150 years of accomplishments, USDA is looking forward to addressing the changing needs of agriculture and rural America. For our small towns and communities looking to compete in a globalizing world, we’ll be there with access to broadband, critical infrastructure and support for new businesses. USDA will continue its support for the next generation of renewable fuels and help promote advanced, bio-based products. And we’ll keep working closely with America’s agricultural producers to maintain a dependable safety net for their work — which ultimately is connected to 1 in 12 American jobs — and ensure the food supply we need to feed a growing world population. I hope Americans will join us in our commemoration of 150 years of USDA. This is a great time to learn about this Department’s contributions to the strength of our nation, and to see how we can continue to partner with Americans working to provide a better life for their families. I invite everyone to visit www.usda.gov/ usda150 to learn more about USDA’s history and our plans for the future — as the “Peoples’ Department” continues serving all Americans, every day and every way.

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HARRISBURG, PA — The Center for Dairy Excellence and the Penn State Extension Dairy Team will host the next series of Dairy PROS meetings in July, offering dairy industry professionals the opportunity to gather new ideas and shared insight to benefit their dairy farm customers. The July Dairy PROS Series will address a “Milkshed Makeover.” “New products like Greek-style yogurt and dairy-based beverages are adding processing capacity to the Northeast dairy region. Higher milk quality requirements are also changing

dairy customers’ expectations in the Northeast,” said John Frey, executive director of the Center for Dairy Excellence. “July’s Dairy PROS series will review this change and highlight how it will affect individual dairy farm operations in the next five to 10 years.” Representatives from milk cooperatives and milk buyers will participate in the meetings to share their perspective on the evolution of the Northeast milkshed. The roundtable format at the meetings will also give other participants the opportunity to share

what they are seeing in their respective regions and to gather information from each other that they can take back to benefit their dairy farm customers and clients. The “Take It to the Farm” section, a 30minute segment of Dairy PROS when the Penn State Extension Dairy Team highlights strategies the dairy professionals can offer to their dairy clients, will address “Topping Off the Tank by Improving Cow Comfort.” Dan McFarland, ag engineer, and Greg Strait, extension educator, will discuss the correlation between cow comfort and

improved milk production from a dairy facility standpoint. Meeting dates and locations are listed below. All meetings will be from 89:30 a.m., with breakfast at 7:30 a.m. • Tuesday, July 10, at the Farm and Home Center, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster, Lancaster County; • Thursday, July 12, at the AgChoice Farm Credit office, 109 Farm Credit Drive, Chambersburg, Franklin County; • Tuesday, July 17, at Celebration Hall, 2280 Commercial Blvd., State College, Centre County; and

• Thursday, July 19, at King’s Restaurant, 1920 Leesburg Road, Grove City, Mercer County. The cost of Dairy PROS meetings is partially offset by a grant from the Department of Labor & Industry’s Workforce Investment Board. A new approach to registering for Dairy PROS offers an incentive to companies that support the center’s Allies for Advancement Program. If an organization is a supporter of the Allies for Advancement Program at any level above $250, any member of the organization can attend the Dairy PROS meetings at no charge. If the organization is not an Ally for Advancement, each

member from that organization who attends the Dairy PROS meetings will be charged a $20 registration fee. For more information or to register for the July series of Dairy PROS meetings, visit www.centerfordairyexcellence.org and click on the “Dairy PROS” icon in the middle of the page. Questions about the Dairy PROS meeting series can be referred to Penn State Extension Dairy Team at 888-3737232 or askdairyalliance@psu.edu, or to the Center for Dairy Excellence at 717-346-0849 or info@centerfordairyexcellence.org.

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Page 9 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

July Dairy PROS Series to Focus on a Milkshed Makeover


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 10

NMPF urges Senate to act on Farm Bill as soon as possible

Top 40 Herds For April For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

communities, other stakeholders, and all Americans. We very much appreciate your recognition of the need for timely action on the farm bill.” The Senate leadership received a similar letter from farm groups last week, when NMPF joined more than 125 other agricultural organizations in pointing out how important it is to act on the farm bill quickly. That letter pointed out to Reid and McConnell that the farm bill “is one piece of legislation upon which all Americans depend, urban as well as rural. With limited time remaining before expiration of current program authorities, time is of the essence. While each of our respective organizations will continue to work to accomplish our key priorities, the farm bill must move forward.” NMPF President and CEO Jerry Kozak said that “the clock is ticking on our opportunity to get a farm bill done in 2012. We appreciate the display of bipartisan effort by senators from across the country to move this legislation forward.”

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) is working with a bipartisan group of senators, as well as with other farm and agriculture organizations, to urge the Senate’s leaders to bring the pending 2012 Farm Bill legislation to a vote this spring. In a letter sent May 15 to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, 44 Senators urged that the farm bill be brought to a vote as soon as possible. If Senate action is delayed, it greatly diminishes the chance that the House of Representatives will make time to act on the Farm Bill yet in 2012 — meaning that important changes in dairy policy will not come to fruition this year. In the letter circulated by Agriculture Committee members Max Baucus (D-MT) and Mike Johanns (R-NE), along with Sens. Maria Cantwell (DWA) and Roy Blunt (RMO), the Senate leadership is told: “We need to act soon to complete a farm bill in 2012 and provide certainty for farmers, ranchers, rural

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

NMPF working with ag committee leaders to expedite vote in Senate

BALTIMORE

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

HERD OWNER JD & GE MILLER ROBERT KNOX JAMES ARCHER HARKINS HILL DAIRY CHRIS DIXON

MARYLAND

STEVE WILSON

DHI-AP H 172.6

CAROLINE

HARMONY FARM RICHARD EDWARDS HOLLINGSWORTH DANIEL 3 FAITHLAND FARM ARTIE FOSTER LONGDAY FARM

16138

606 3.8 523 3.2

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

H H H H H H

133.5 677.6 43.4 235.0 278.1 51.1

25783 24651 21376 21164 19259 16422

940 851 770 733 698 655

3.6 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.6 4.0

800 735 646 637 597 524

3.1 3.0 3X 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2

RICHARD &DIANE FLICKINGER DHIR R.A.BELL&SONS LLC DHI-AP COLDSPRINGS FARM DHIR R.A.BELL&SONS LLC DHIR-AP DONNA & JASON MYERS DHIR-AP GARY R BRAUNING DHIR-AP PANORA ACRES DHI-AP FRITZ FARM LLC DHIR-AP QUEEN ACRES JERSEYS DHIR-AP PEACE AND PLENTY FARMS DHIR-AP BAR NONE JERSEYS DHIR-AP BYRON D. STAMBAUGH DHIR-AP CEDAR KNOLL FARMS DHI-AP MARYLAND DELIGHT FARM DHIR-AP LEASE BROS. DHIR-AP CHARLES L. LETHBRIDGE DHIR ARBAUGH S FLOWING SPRINGS DHI-APCS

H H H B H H H H J H J H H H H H H

164.4 136.9 882.8 15.8 64.0 34.4 274.5 70.1 38.4 210.6 47.9 129.1 125.4 98.0 113.6 93.3 310.0

26968 24033 24261 21957 22921 22798 23063 22060 18442 21474 17773 21369 21303 19582 20534 20092 20200

989 917 884 903 886 849 865 833 891 801 893 777 814 743 786 740 740

3.7 3.8 3.6 4.1 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.8 4.8 3.7 5.0 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.7

857 760 737 734 722 720 717 701 700 669 669 658 655 637 631 628 626

3.2 3.2 3X 3.0 3X 3.3 3X 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.8 3.1 3.8 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.1 3.1

H 469.4 X 74.0 H 114.6 J 44.1 H 129.3

23266 19595 21368 15673 16932

791 827 767 790 694

3.4 4.2 3.6 5.0 4.1

691 644 638 565 515

3.0 3X 3.3 3X 3.0 3.6 3X 3.0

DHI-AP H 177.4

17354

755 4.4 574 3.3

1136.2 545.8 102.8 239.9 185.2 71.4 92.6 80.1 46.3 185.2 50.7 98.9

24281 23879 22493 21353 22059 21002 19720 19827 18538 17633 17260 17350

937 900 865 822 839 834 673 743 704 697 590 598

DHIR-AP H 150.3

20519

766 3.7 637 3.1

DHIRAPCS H 339.1 DHI-AP H 146.7

23050 22356

896 3.9 715 3.1 889 4.0 701 3.1

CARROLL

CECIL

KILBY INC. KILBY INC. WIL-O-MAR FARM KILBY INC. LONG GREEN FARMS INC.

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

WICOMICO W. BLAN HARCUM

FREDERICK

TEABOW INCORP. PAUL COBLENTZ & SONS BULLDOG HOLSTEINS MATTHEW TOMS DAVE & CAROLE DOODY JEREMY & JULIE THOMPSON PLAIN FOUR FARMS VENTURE LUCK FARM MERCURO FARM LLC ROCKY POINT FARMS, INC. JOHN STONE NEW DESIGN ACRES

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

GARRETT

KENTON B

HARFORD

MY-LADYS-MANOR FARM STRAWBERRY HILL FARM

H H H H H H H H H H H H

3.9 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.4 3.7 3.8 4.0 3.4 3.4

761 741 728 680 662 657 610 597 588 568 526 524

3.1 3X 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.0

HOWARD

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BOWLING GREEN FARM INC.

KENT

FAIR HILL FARM INC. CENTERDEL FARM INC. BRICK HOUSE FARM, INC. ROBERT FRY & JUDY GIFFORD FAIR HILL FARM INC. P. THOMAS MASON P. THOMAS MASON

WORCESTER

CHESAPEAKE BAY DAIRY ARTIE JAY FARM

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H 70.4 H 127.1 H 198.4 H 171.1 X 73.1

21969 23341 22786 20878 18053

837 853 810 730 659

3.8 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.7

DHI-APCS H 72.8 DHIR-AP H 114.1

23457 19162

880 3.8 733 3.1 731 3.8 633 3.3

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP

25849 23405 22799 19860 22229 22698 16642

885 893 893 901 827 882 840

78.3 68.4

18373 20366

700 3.8 589 3.2 689 3.4 633 3.1

1310.0 172.3 294.9 147.2 128.5 83.9 167.1 55.0

27411 23082 22652 21234 19968 18483 18858 17113

950 928 850 825 734 756 665 582

DHI-AP H 23.6 DHI-AP H 147.6

21396 19431

779 3.6 646 3.0 788 4.1 596 3.1

H 329.8 H 201.3 H 54.7 J 71.3 B 14.1 H 71.0 J 180.4

DHI-AP H DHI-AP H

QUEEN ANNE

LESTER C. JONES, INC. W. EDWARD PALMATARY PATTERSON FARMS INC. WINTERSTEIN FARMS LLC FRANKLIN & JEFF MOORE KEVIN LEAVERTON BOONE BROTHERS BENJAMIN STANTON

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

TALBOT

HENRY SNOW 111 WM. BRINSFIELD

WASHINGTON

TRANS OVA GENETICS CLETUS & JANICE FREY ISAAC AND DIANE MARTIN CLETUS & JANICE FREY RALPH W SHANK SHENANDOAH JERSEYS BRENT HORST PRYOR BROTHERS MICHAEL FORSYTHE CLETUS & JANICE FREY DAVID HERBST MARSH-HAVEN FARM RALPH W SHANK EARL GROVE, JR. JAMES A. CAMPBELL JR. COOL BROOK FARM DEBAUGH FARMS MARSH-HAVEN FARM MICHAEL FORSYTHE S.J. WINTERS JR. & FAMILY

For Records Processed through DHI Provo 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

TYPE TEST

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H

H H H B H J H H H G H H A H H X H J J H

16.0 103.3 59.7 21.9 69.1 119.9 137.4 106.3 23.8 13.1 178.9 42.1 112.5 109.1 103.0 103.9 129.5 12.2 34.7 128.6

3.4 3.8 3.9 4.5 3.7 3.9 5.0

3.5 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.7 4.1 3.5 3.4

699 698 685 638 562

763 743 714 714 710 708 597

786 712 682 656 616 604 559 513

3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1

3.0 3X 3.2 3.1 3.6 3.2 3X 3.1 3.6

2.9 3X 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.0

25404 1010 4.0 856 3.4 3X 26056 955 3.7 815 3.1 23048 843 3.7 722 3.1 20888 824 3.9 713 3.4 22644 885 3.9 712 3.1 18946 926 4.9 705 3.7 22473 813 3.6 698 3.1 21912 815 3.7 682 3.1 21021 730 3.5 655 3.1 19000 830 4.4 638 3.4 20527 735 3.6 637 3.1 19741 788 4.0 634 3.2 19345 796 4.1 632 3.3 19349 689 3.6 623 3.2 20419 723 3.5 615 3.0 19856 704 3.5 606 3.1 19844 724 3.6 600 3.0 15527 792 5.1 588 3.8 13804 683 4.9 519 3.8 16583 629 3.8 502 3.0

Top 40 Herds For April

RECORDS RECOGNIZE ENERGY CORRECTED MILK (ECM) BASIS - Over the years, totals have recognized milk, fat, and protein production. Since 1989, high herds on a county and state basis, along with all individual production awards, have been made on an (ECM) basis. The ECM formula (7.2 x lbs protein) + (12.95 x lbs fat) + (.327 x lbs milk) has helped identify cows that not only produce high volumes of milk, but also of milk solids. Maryland dairy producers are using the ECM formula and no longer mention lbs of fat or lbs of 3.5% fat corrected milk, since fat has become a negative word in promoting dairy and other food products.

HERD NAME DAIRY CATTLE RESEARCH SAVAGE-LEIGH FARM PAUL YODER MAR-K FARMS PAUL F. HARRISON JR. GLEN-TOCTIN FARM ORION-VIEW HOLSTEINS BENEVA FARMS DAVID & JAMES PATRICK GLENN BEARD LAVON YODER CALVIN SCHROCK JAMES & JOHN MYERS O. CLAYTON SMITH PHILIP BEACHY MD.-CARROLLTON PAUL & HENRY KINSINGER WILLOW SPRINGS PARTNERS CESSNA BROS. FARM ERIC & FAITH BURALL HARA VALE FARMS SHAFDON FARMS BRAD & CATHY WILES ANDREW W. SCHROCK THOMAS H. MULLER VALES - PRIDE HOLSTEIN MIKE & ANITA HAINES TOBIE KINSINGER DOOL-LEIGH FARM JEFF ENGEL

TYP BRD TEST H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

22 23 00 00 23 20 31 23 23 31 00 20 23 00 20 23 20 31 20 23 00 22 20 23 31 23 23 20 23 31

ECM 27,711 26,506 25,601 25,241 25,206 24,535 24,131 24,041 23,837 23,353 23,333 22,970 22,856 22,832 22,819 22,780 22,573 22,513 22,433 22,150 22,110 22,056 22,032 21,948 21,843 21,795 21,602 21,554 21,484 21,086

3X

44

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF

26520 1013 24595 998 25041 908 24225 923 22336 978 22738 921 23194 880 23204 870 22905 864 21795 863 23199 821 22706 806 22467 816 21435 828 22322 809 22252 820 21590 833 20684 829 21626 809 21244 804 21691 798 20728 817 20247 809 21464 784 21015 790 21859 755 21822 741 21769 747 19146 820 20566 754

3.82 4.06 3.63 3.81 4.38 4.05 3.79 3.75 3.77 3.96 3.54 3.55 3.63 3.86 3.63 3.69 3.86 4.01 3.74 3.78 3.68 3.94 4.00 3.65 3.76 3.45 3.39 3.43 4.28 3.67

823 770 786 746 728 719 716 721 717 702 711 710 687 709 701 679 657 697 679 666 651 653 686 664 659 677 677 662 640 639

3.10 3.13 3.14 3.08 3.26 3.16 3.09 3.11 3.13 3.22 3.06 3.13 3.06 3.31 3.14 3.05 3.04 3.37 3.14 3.13 3.00 3.15 3.39 3.09 3.13 3.10 3.10 3.04 3.34 3.11

79.7 68.7 64.0 67.6 69.2 67.8 66.5 58.6 66.9 71.6 60.3 56.2 65.1 65.5 65.9 61.9 46.2 56.1 59.7 68.4 64.7 66.3 58.2 58.2 46.9 62.3 62.6 45.2 58.0 50.4

3.0 2.8 2.3 2.6 3.0 2.8 2.5 2.2 2.6 2.6 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.7 2.4 2.2 1.8 2.2 2.2 2.6 2.4 2.6 2.3 2.2 1.8 2.3 2.2 1.6 2.4 1.8

2.4 2.1 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.1 2.0 1.8 2.1 2.3 1.9 1.8 2.0 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.4 1.9 1.9 2.1 1.9 2.1 1.9 1.8 1.5 1.9 1.9 1.4 1.9 1.5

HERD NAME

TYP BRD TEST

ECM

3X

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF

MAPLE LAWN FARM INC. EHRHARDT FARM INC EZRA SCHROCK WAYNE BURDETTE ASH & BEAR DAVID E. YODER RANDAL BEITZEL

H H H H H H H

23 31 23 20 31 31 20

21,007 20,895 20,731 20,671 20,537 20,046 20,042

20160 19390 18776 18772 19033 19669 19027

767 775 789 780 772 728 730

3.80 4.00 4.20 4.16 4.06 3.70 3.84

623 628 608 616 600 582 607

3.09 3.24 3.24 3.28 3.15 2.96 3.19

50.4 56.1 61.0 35.5 55.2 49.1 43.9

1.9 2.2 2.4 1.5 2.2 1.9 1.7

1.5 1.8 1.9 1.2 1.7 1.5 1.4

PATRICK, DAVID & JAMES VALES - PRIDE AYRSHIRE WHISPERING AYRSHIRE ROOM-TO-GROW

A A A A

23 23 00 20

20,086 18,959 14,196 1,312

18932 17492 13276 1434

743 709 531 44

3.93 4.06 4.00 3.05

594 564 414 38

3.14 3.22 3.12 2.65

53.8 50.5 38.1 9.1

2.1 2.1 1.6 .3

1.7 1.6 1.2 .2

ERIC F-FAITH M. BURALL VALES - PRIDE BROWN SWISS DUBLIN HILLS SWISS DWAYNE BELL

B B B B

23 23 31 20

20,132 20,089 19,212 14,676

18187 18413 17484 13299

747 743 711 543

4.11 4.04 4.07 4.09

627 618 596 458

3.45 3.36 3.41 3.44

51.7 45.4 41.8 37.6

2.1 1.9 1.7 1.6

1.8 1.5 1.4 1.3

WALNUT RIDGE GUERNSEY MAR SHIRL GUERNSEY

G G

31 31

21,878 19,175

17124 17714

922 719

5.38 4.06

603 566

3.52 3.19

50.7 43.7

2.7 1.8

1.7 1.4

O. CLAYTON SMITH GLENN BEARD JOHN & JULIE MAYER MIKE & ANITA HAINES 2 WILLOW SPRING FARM SPRING VALLEY JERSEYS ASH & BEAR ELI SWARTZENTRUBER GLADE VIEW DAIRY

J J J J J J J J J

20 31 31 23 31 31 23 23 20

30,307 26,106 18,739 18,248 17,222 15,223 13,669 11,027 8,055

21929 1356 22076 1029 15063 755 14599 726 14151 672 12113 608 11272 537 8905 445 6661 321

6.18 4.66 5.01 4.97 4.75 5.02 4.77 5.00 4.82

775 773 561 566 541 471 421 327 239

3.53 3.50 3.72 3.88 3.83 3.89 3.73 3.67 3.59

70.9 51.9 39.6 41.7 43.1 30.3 35.6 33.3 21.0

4.4 2.5 2.0 2.1 2.1 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.0

2.5 1.8 1.4 1.6 1.6 1.2 1.3 1.2 .7


FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE

by Bob Stallman Farm Bureau’s brand of advocacy has been a key part of my entire adult life. I first got involved with the organization when I was relatively young and was having problems with the state of Texas over water rights on my farm. I traveled to a committee hearing in Austin — the first time I’d been to a hearing and the first time I’d been to the state capitol — and met Farm Bureau representatives

American Farm Bureau Federation

testifying on behalf of landowners’ water rights. I realized then and there that they were advocating for me and my rights. When I got home, I took a deliberate step to become involved in my home county Farm Bureau in Colorado County, Texas. I saw first-hand that farmers and ranchers have to be the ones to stand up for agriculture to influence decisions that affect us, otherwise plen-

ty of other people would be more than happy to make those decisions for us. Now, I can’t imagine my life if that hearing in Austin had never happened. Since those early days at the Colorado County Farm Bureau, I’ve been blessed to travel our great nation, and the world on behalf of Farm Bureau members. From the formality of congressional hearings on Capitol Hill, to the internation-

al flavor of world trade negotiations, I still feel most comfortable and at home when I’m headed down a country highway to a friendly, local school cafeteria for a county Farm Bureau meeting. The grassroots level is where all true agricultural advocacy begins. As I hear the voices and soak in the energy from these grassroots Farm Bureau meetings, it gives me a personal connection to the issues I

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deal with. Most of the time what they have to say is good, some of the time it’s not. That’s the beauty of Farm Bureau, there’s always room for healthy debate. But in all of my travels, I have never met a farmer without something to say, or more importantly, not willing to get involved to help further our grassroots process. It’s this commitment of our grassroots members who play an active role in U.S. agriculture policymaking that makes Farm Bureau one of the most successful advocacy organizations in this nation. As Farm Bureau members, it is ingrained in us to be actively involved and to fight for what we believe in and for what we think will better our profession and our country. We are not ones to rest on our laurels while others do the work. We are also not the types to make a lot of noise about an issue and stop there. Farm Bureau members roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty when it comes to matters that are close to our hearts. They talk to their neighbors and other members of their community. And they share their personal stories through many platforms, traditional and new. This, to me, is what advocacy is all about. But, it doesn’t stop there. The future of upholding agriculture lies in farmers and ranchers being able to communicate in an even deeper and more meaningful way with consumers. We are being asked to fully take in the consumer point of view. We are being asked to answer questions in a meaningful and responsive way.

Times are changing. Consumers have not only grown more interested — but have greater influence — in the type of food they consume and how it is produced. Unfortunately, without the cultivation of deeper connections with consumers, many are apt to view farmers as the unfortunate puppets of Big Ag, because that is pretty much the scope of the emotionally charged messages they read and hear from those planting seeds of doubt about today’s agriculture. It truly is time for a consumer intervention, but one that makes significant and meaningful connections through the qualities of shared values, mutual respect and common ground. The two-way conversation needs to become a connection built on a foundation of understanding and ideals. I’ve learned many things in my agriculture career. For instance, it never rains when you need it to and there will always be more taxes. More importantly, I’ve learned that farmers and ranchers are the best advocates for their land, their animals and the food they produce. But to be our best advocates, we have to stop preaching to the choir and engage the congregation. It may not be easy and it may not always be comfortable, but it is the best way to ensure the future of those who follow in our chosen profession of agriculture. Bob Stallman, a rice and cattle producer from Columbus, Texas, is president of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Page 11 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

Advocacy must engage the congregation


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 12

All-American Dairy Show announces 2012 judges The 2012 All-American Dairy Show will welcome 11 judges to place classes in 14 youth and open shows Sept. 15-20, at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center in Harrisburg. The judges are: Tom Agnew of Hartland, WI, will judge the Premier National Junior Ayrshire and Milking Shorthorn shows on Monday, Sept. 17. Jeff Brown of Jackson Center, Ohio, will place the Premier Junior Jersey Show on Monday, Sept. 17. Stanley Chupp of Inola, OK, will judge the All-American National Guernsey Show on Wednesday, Sept. 19. Kelli Cull of Lomira, WI, will make her All-American Dairy Show judging debut by placing the Premier National Junior Holstein Show on Monday, Sept. 17. Ted DeMent of Kenney, IL, will return to the All-American Dairy Show to judge the All-American Jersey Show at Harrisburg on Wednesday, Sept. 19, and Thursday, Sept. 20. Chris Lahmers of Marysville, Ohio, will pull double duty by placing the Premier National Junior Guernsey Show on Monday, Sept. 17, and the All-American Milking Shorthorn Show on Tuesday, Sept. 18, and Wednesday, Sept. 19. Norm Magnussen of Lake Mills, WI, will judge the All-American Brown Swiss Show on Tuesday, Sept. 18, and

Wednesday, Sept. 19. Mark Rueth of Oxford, WI, returns to Harrisburg and will judge the AllAmerican Holstein Show on Wednesday, Sept. 19 and Thursday, Sept. 20. Chad Ryan of Fond du Lac, WI, will make his first judging appearance at the All-American with the Red & White Show on Wednesday, Sept. 19. Jeffrey Zeigler of Plain City, Ohio, will place the Premier National Junior Brown Swiss Show on Monday, Sept. 17, and the All-American Ayrshire Show on Tuesday, Sept. 18, and Wednesday, Sept. 19. Kelly Zepp of New Windsor, MD, will judge at the All-American for the first time at the Premier National Junior Red & White Show on Monday, Sept. 17. The All-American Dairy Show features 23 shows in six days in addition to the nation’s only all-dairy antiques show. Last year’s show featured more than 2,400 animals and 935 exhibitors from 26 states and Canada. For more information, visit www.allamerican.com, or call 717-787-2905.

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Page 13 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

New Kuhn fertilizer spreader


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 14

Is the ‘Darkest Hour’ Just Before Dawn? Issued May 11, 2012 The Agriculture Department raised its 2012 milk production forecast for the fourth month in a row in its World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report (WASDE). The report also stated that “High feed prices and weakening milk prices during 2012 are expected to pressure producer returns, leading to declines in 2013 cow numbers. However, improvements in returns during 2013 will moderate the rate of decline,” USDA said, but cautioned; “Milk per cow is expected to continue to grow supporting increased milk production.” The 2012 production estimate, at 201.9 billion pounds, was up 800 million pounds from last month’s estimate and “reflects a slower decline in cow numbers and slightly faster growth in milk per cow,” says USDA. The 2012 estimate is 202.6 billion. 2011 output totaled 196.2 billion, up from 192.8 billion in 2010. Commercial exports were forecast to increase as the global economy improves and milk production increases. Imports will be slightly lower as domestic supplies increase. With improving demand and only modest increases in production, 2013 cheese, butter, and nonfat dry milk (NDM) prices were forecast higher but whey is expected to average near 2012 levels. Class III and Class IV prices for 2013 were thus forecast higher. In the meantime; cheese, butter, and NDM prices were reduced from last month on weakerthan-expected demand but whey demand is stronger than expected so the price forecast was raised while 2012 milk price forecasts were reduced. The benchmark Class III milk price was projected to average $15.80-$16.30 per hundredweight (cwt.), according to USDA, down from the $16.10-$16.60 projected a month ago, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in

2010. The 2013 range was put at $16.20$17.20. The 2013 Class IV price was projected at $14.50-$15.10, down from $15.35-$15.95 expected last month, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. The 2013 average was projected at $15.40$16.50 per cwt. FC Stone’s May 10 eDairy Insider Opening Bell adds that the WASDE showed 2011-12 corn ending stocks were raised by an unexpected 50 million bushels to 851 million, well above the average estimate of 758 million. Corn ending stocks for the 2012-13 crop year also came in higher than expected at 1.881 billion bushels, compared with an average estimate of 1.704 billion bushels. Soybean stocks were lower than anticipated with old-crop ending stocks at 210 million bushels, compared with an average estimate of 221 million. New-crop bean stocks of 145 million bushels were lower than the expected 170 million. The Mamas and the Papas in 1967 sang “the darkest hour is just before dawn in Dedicated to the One I Love. FC Stone dairy economist Dave Kurzawski reported in Tuesday’s DairyLine that we might have seen the low for cheese this year.” Buying interest is out there, he said, and he believes the low might have been hit “as long as we can maintain the $1.45-$1.55 price through May,” but he admitted it’s a “big request this early on as the butter and powder markets remain weak.” “There is still room to go to the downside for cheese and Class III,” he warned. “I’m not saying that is not going to happen,” but warned that dairy producers may have to “make some drastic farm level decisions sooner rather than later as the profit margin on the farm is akin to the second quarter of 2009.” “There are good times to put hedges on and not so good times, right now

we are in that no so good time to be putting a hedge on,” he said. Even with $14-$15 prices out there, “The market has just taken a severe decline over the past three to four weeks and markets don’t typically go straight down.” He advised listeners; “If you are looking to put some hedges in place, monitor the grain and feed costs, which also could show some weakness moving forward.” “The market is making it real easy for you,” he said. “As a producer it’s real difficult to put any hedges of any worth on at this point and time.” He advised producers to “sit back and be concerned with other aspects of the business rather than hedging. Hopefully, a Class III rally in May will change the tune and producers can start to look at places to mitigate some risk.” For more details, call Kurzawski at 1-800-231-3089. Looking “back to the futures;” after factoring in the announced Class III milk prices and the remaining futures, the average Class III milk price for the first six months of 2012 stood at $15.65 on March 2 and $15.70 on May 10. The last half of 2012 was averaging $16.52 on April 5, $16.26 on April 13, $15.95 on April 20, $15.61 on April 27, $15.08 on May 4, and was trading around $15.37 late morning May 11.

of milk Speaking prices, California’s June Class I price for the north is $16.81 per cwt. The southern price is $17.08. Both are down for the sixth month in a row, down 13 cents from May and $4.60 below June 2011. The northern price average now stands at $17.83, down from $19.42 at this time a year ago and $16.09 in 2010. The southern average is $18.10, down from $19.69 a year ago and $16.36 in 2010. The June Federal order Class I base is announced by USDA on May 23. Meanwhile; cash cheese prices saw some slippage the week of May 9 but inched a little higher in Friday’s trading. The blocks closed at $1.50 per pound, still down 3 1/2-cents on the week and 12 1/4-cents below a year ago. The

barrels closed at $1.45, down 2 cents on the week and 19 1/4-cents below a year ago. Three cars of block found new homes on the week and 14 of barrel. The lagging AMS-surveyed block average gained 1.4 cents, hitting $1.5169, while the barrels averaged $1.4835, down 0.7 cent. Cheese plants are being offered surplus milk as butter/powder plants are operating at near capacity, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. Cheese manufacturers are cautious about building excess inventories as overall production is up. Cheese demand is less than hoped for as retailers are not featuring cheese as heavily as a few weeks ago. Export demand is being assisted through the CWT program. Cash butter ended the

week higher, closing Friday at $1.32, up a penny on the week but 63 cents below a year ago when the price crashed 14 1/2cents, to $1.95. It then rebounded 23 cents the following two weeks and stayed above $2 until early September. The latest AMS butter averaged $1.4133, down 1.4 cents. Churning schedules across the country remain very active as cream supplies are readily available. As has been the case for past weeks, churning continues to outpace demand, thus inventories are building. Overall butter demand is fair. Buyers are hesitant and cautious with their orders, USDA says, as the cash price declines. Retail butter feature activity has slowed following the recent holiday but butter continues to be

Mielke A15

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advertised in print ads. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.1225 and Extra Grade closed at $1.0825, both down 2 1/2cents. AMS-surveyed nonfat averaged $1.2169, down 0.1 cent, and dry whey averaged 56.97 cents, up 0.1 cent. Fluid milk supplies across the U.S. remain heavy. The Southernmost milk producing states are moving past peak yearly production. Heat and humidity is increasing and slowing production. The Northern states are still approaching peak production with pastures greening and planting on the minds of many

dairy farmers. Western states are dealing with excess supplies in many cases and milk is being moved to find production facilities. Class I demand is mostly flat as the end of the school year approaches. Interest from ice cream manufacturers is increasing and helping to clear some cream volumes from butter churns. USDA data shows commercial disappearance of dairy products for December 2011 to February 2012 totaled 48 billion pounds, down 6.1 percent from a year earlier. Butter was down 22.2 percent; American cheese, down

3.5 percent; other cheese, down 5.3 percent; Nonfat dry milk was up 17.7 percent, and fluid milk products were off 3.1 percent. Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted 10 requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 749,572 pounds of cheese and 518,086 pounds of butter to customers in North Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The product will be delivered through July 2012 and raised CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 47.6 million pounds and 41.3 million of butter to 26 countries. The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) reports that global dairy prices are off 20-30 percent from their spring 2011 peaks as “swelling milk production worldwide has turned supply deficits into surpluses.” As a result, rising inventories are expected to keep downward pressure on international dairy markets in the second half of 2012 according to presenters at USDEC’s spring Board of Directors and Membership Meeting May 2 in Chicago. Current soft conditions are “a painful re-affirmation that market cycles will continue even as demand, over time, outstrips supply,” said USDEC president Tom Suber. “In fact, it’s this period of temporary retrenchment that many of our work programs are intended to address.” USDEC marketing, technical and research activities are supported by U.S. dairy producers through their checkoff. Suber urged U.S. suppliers to protect volume and market share gains accrued in 2010-11. “We can’t take the

hit and balance the world market through our own inventories every time supply and demand run into an imbalance,” he said. Speakers emphasized that although challenges to U.S. global dairy growth remain “USDEC trade policy and market access efforts continue to bear fruit.” In another important front; Dairy Profit Weekly (DPW) reports that corn and soybean planting is running well ahead of last year and the 5-year average, according to USDA’s weekly Crop Progress report. About 71 percent of U.S. intended corn acreage in 18 major states was planted as of May 6, compared to 32 percent on the same date last year and 47 percent for the five-year average. More than 90 percent of the corn acreage in Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, and Tennessee is already planted. About 32 percent of the planted corn had emerged by May 6, compared to 6 percent a year ago and the five-year average of 13 percent. The 18 surveyed states represent about 92 percent of U.S. corn acreage. About 24 percent of U.S. intended soybean acreage in 18 major states (representing 95 percent of the U.S. total) was planted as of May 6, compared to 6 percent on the same date last year and 11percent for the five-year average. More than 50 percent of the soybean acreage in Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi is already planted this year, according to DPW.

Page 15 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

Mielke from A14


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 16

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

ADAMS

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PENNSYLVANIA

SPUNGOLD HOLSTEINS KEHOLTZ DAIRY KEHOLTZ DAIRY HILCREST DAIRY CIRCLE CREEK HOL. STEVE & CHRISTINE WOOD LADD S. MUMMERT APPLE VALLEY CREAMERY FARVIEW HOLSTEINS KENNETH WENGER

DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

104.4 40.2 396.8 281.6 155.2 53.2 181.1 63.4 62.1 240.9

24829 1001 4.0 782 3.1 23597 904 3.8 730 3.1 3X 22872 892 3.9 705 3.1 3X 22979 840 3.7 705 3.1 22155 769 3.5 680 3.1 20717 841 4.1 667 3.2 21405 751 3.5 649 3.0 20086 753 3.7 632 3.1 20287 754 3.7 625 3.1 17844 755 4.2 554 3.1

SCOTT BOWSER RON & BETH RUFFANER SHIREY FARM SHANMAR JERSEYS SILVER BROOK FARM LARA WILSON SHIELDS

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X J H H

84.8 40.8 247.4 352.1 44.1 32.5

23494 22755 22540 16762 16722 16393

BONZO ONEOONE BREEZE RIDGE CRAIG FARMS BREEZE RIDGE NYE FARMS FISCHERS WINDY RIDGE DIANE BURRY FRED SCHEEL

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI

H H H B H J J H

39.1 31.4 106.6 55.5 131.2 41.1 19.3 46.6

27631 1041 3.8 840 3.0 22239 763 3.4 685 3.1 21414 832 3.9 668 3.1 19916 766 3.8 660 3.3 21786 816 3.7 643 3.0 17306 812 4.7 622 3.6 14695 687 4.7 531 3.6 16020 599 3.7 513 3.2

DEVON MARTIN RAY D MOWRY & SONS

DHI-AP H 58.5 DHIR-AP X 39.6

22180 16927

DON & AMY RICE DHI-AP H 106.4 CARL Z GOOD DHI-AP H 85.4 MELVIN M OBERHOLTZER DHI-AP H 122.0 EARL R HAFER & SONS DHI-APCS H 226.3 TULPACANAL FARM DHI-AP H 131.0 ROCKYCREST HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 38.8 LARRY GRUMBINE DHI-AP H 63.7 ALLEN P+MARY J GRUBE DHI H 63.8 MIL JOY FARMS DHI-AP H 237.9 GARY & KATHY HEFFNER DHI-AP H 80.7 GLEN HARNISH DHI-AP H 81.5 DAVIEW FARM DHIRAPCS H 65.6 MICHAEL FORRY DHI-AP H 101.9 SKYLINE ACRES INC. DHI-APCS H 582.4 UNITED HEARTS HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 116.7 E&N SHAYNAH KEE DHI-AP H 71.9 SCATTERED ACRES INC DHI-APCS H 329.5 SUNRISE FARM DHI-AP H 39.1 SHOW TOP FARMS DHI H 174.3 GLEN HARNISH DHI-AP H 159.3 MARTIN & MISSY MOYER DHI-AP H 44.3 DANA & DEBBIE STOUDT DHI-AP H 71.6 LLEWELLYN MOYER DHI-AP H 111.5 WHISTLING ACRES DHI-AP H 47.4 MISTY MOOR HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 77.9 RODGER WAGNER DHI-AP H 206.6 ARDOUNIE FARM INC. DHI-AP H 133.2 LUKE & LORI TROUTMAN DHI-AP H 67.3 MICHAEL HAAG DHI-AP H 86.4 GLEN HARNISH DHI-AP H 77.2 JAMES P. & JAN M. ADAM DHI-APCS H 184.1 GLENN A DAVIS DHI-AP H 74.3 KIRBYVILLE HOLSTEINS DHIR H 98.3 SUNNYSIDE DAIRY FARM DHI-AP H 203.0 NORTHKILL CREEK FARM DHI-AP X 126.4 WALNUTRIDGE HOLSTEIN DHI-AP H 57.7 ONE HILL FARM MOYER DHIR-AP B 29.0 BARRY+BARBARA GOOD DHI-AP H 87.6 CEDAR CREEK DAIRY LLC. DHI-AP H 109.3 MARK A KIEFFER DHI-AP H 68.6

30021 28472 29543 27653 27831 26438 25769 25770 25057 25082 25253 24709 24712 24598 25397 25664 25417 24530 23511 24936 25107 24731 24787 24059 25164 23652 24012 23928 24181 24322 22844 22688 22272 23651 23156 22753 22109 22508 22959 22016

CLOVER WILL FARMS RYAN JEN CLARK

DHI-AP H 191.6 DHI-AP J 140.8

23374 18390

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

85.4 59.1 210.3 68.0 95.6

30159 1039 3.4 938 3.1 25069 848 3.4 775 3.1 21538 852 4.0 682 3.2 3X 22229 860 3.9 673 3.0 18382 722 3.9 566 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H J H H H H H H

279.7 166.4 209.6 123.8 17.1 215.5 101.1 244.1 117.2 73.4 119.1

26681 25681 26314 22487 19617 22978 22730 22505 21350 17936 17238

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H

188.5 80.8 802.5 87.1 159.8 51.4 150.8

28014 964 3.4 856 3.1 29466 1106 3.8 854 2.9 28092 966 3.4 848 3.0 28956 1013 3.5 819 2.8 26108 1057 4.0 789 3.0 24347 875 3.6 767 3.2 26039 903 3.5 764 2.9

ARMSTRONG

BEAVER

BEDFORD BERKS

BLAIR

BUCKS

DEB & RAY DETWEILER BRENDA & JIMMY HARRIS ROY + ART SHULL MARWELL DAIRY FARM TOM + SUE HALDEMAN

CAMBRIA

DAVID MYERS BRENT LOWMASTER RALPH J LIEB BILL HOOVER DAVID MYERS VALEWOOD DAIRY MARTIN SHERRY STRITTMATTER DAIRY RON HOOVER RONALD HOGUE BORLIE'S DAIRY

CHESTER

ROBERT +BETTY PEIFER ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER WALMOORE HOLSTEINS ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER NOLAN&NORI KING DAVID F KING FARM #2 NEAL & LOU KING

843 771 818 819 675 614

3.6 3.4 3.6 4.9 4.0 3.7

722 681 680 603 516 504

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.1 3.1

813 3.7 694 3.1 634 3.7 540 3.2 1054 1064 1015 917 1002 965 839 962 868 862 900 800 947 895 930 895 917 951 914 890 858 901 872 889 952 911 824 851 874 879 796 921 850 826 775 867 854 892 828 862

3.5 3.7 3.4 3.3 3.6 3.7 3.3 3.7 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.2 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.6 3.4 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.4 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.5 4.1 3.8 3.5 3.3 3.8 3.9 4.0 3.6 3.9

894 893 892 843 838 808 793 786 776 770 770 769 768 765 764 763 755 753 752 750 744 744 742 742 739 731 730 730 728 726 718 715 713 711 706 703 699 698 694 693

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1

3X 3X 3X

3X

3X 3X 3X

3.5 3.7 3.3 3.6 4.5 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.6

844 789 789 712 702 696 692 680 662 556 522

MARSHAK DAIRY -NBCMARK &MELODY STOLTZFUS HERBETH FARMS AMOS LAPP CENTURY OAK FARM EVERGREEN FARM AMOS J STOLTZFUS RIDGE STAR FARM HOLLY SOLLENBERGER

3X

3X 3X 3X 3X

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

898 831 846 854 907 783 788 605 612

3.8 3.7 3.7 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.9 3.6 3.9

204.0 75.3 62.0 52.7 80.0 133.3 59.2 49.1 37.9

23771 22754 22839 22354 22650 19983 20111 16686 15800

BRYMESSER FARMS DHI-APCS NEALAND FARMS DHI-AP SMITHDALE FARMS DHI-AP JETRAE FARM DHI-AP MARLIN & ADAMAE ZIMMERMAN DHI-AP STOVER FARMS DHI-APCS CURTIS WEAVER DHI-APCS TRIPLE L FARM DHI-APCS MARCUS GOOD DHI-AP SILVER HILL FARM DHI-AP JOHN STAMY DHI-AP DORELL & BEV AGAR DHI-AP WESTYLE HOLSTEINS DHI-AP BERKHEIMER FARMS DHI-AP HENSEL HILL FARM DHI-AP J&S DAIRY DHI-AP HARRY & PAUL HOCH DHI-APCS DAVE AND DOUG LEHMAN DHI-AP LIGHTNING BOLT FARM DHI-AP TIM WITTER DHI-AP K HALE & L WENGER DHI-AP HARPER HERSEY + SONS DHI-AP HARRY E THOMPSON DHIR-AP DAVID R WALTON DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H X H H H H H

258.4 388.4 65.2 92.7 56.5 176.0 150.8 153.4 91.8 66.3 360.9 29.9 123.5 155.8 81.8 66.9 275.2 94.5 35.7 128.8 29.0 189.3 51.9 63.5

29284 1015 3.5 911 3.1 30612 1043 3.4 906 3.0 3X 26315 981 3.7 815 3.1 24317 948 3.9 779 3.2 24315 915 3.8 779 3.2 24558 889 3.6 769 3.1 24578 902 3.7 753 3.1 25230 926 3.7 743 2.9 3X 23754 850 3.6 731 3.1 22966 858 3.7 724 3.2 21765 769 3.5 686 3.2 22431 829 3.7 676 3.0 21441 800 3.7 663 3.1 21380 791 3.7 654 3.1 20692 807 3.9 647 3.1 19950 741 3.7 644 3.2 19905 752 3.8 624 3.1 3X 20184 726 3.6 617 3.1 17790 755 4.2 615 3.5 18867 670 3.6 600 3.2 19868 743 3.7 592 3.0 18450 661 3.6 587 3.2 18345 603 3.3 566 3.1 16432 570 3.5 522 3.2

TY & TRACY LONG LEHMANSTEAD FARMS BOB KESSLER PLEASANT HILL FARMS STONEY LAWN FARMS J MELVIN BRANDT

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI

H H H H H H

113.9 170.0 50.4 52.3 135.3 69.1

24347 870 3.6 741 3.0 23292 837 3.6 735 3.2 23706 1051 4.4 720 3.0 21786 758 3.5 670 3.1 20759 665 3.2 644 3.1 18769 678 3.6 580 3.1

ORR FARMS ORR FARMS ALLEN HILL DAIRY JACKSON FARMS STARLIGHT HILL FARM FERENS FARM LLC GARY THOMAS FERENS FARM LLC

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H H H A

107.1 68.9 124.2 142.9 39.6 101.5 94.7 20.5

25031 22481 21565 21594 20536 20682 17669 16819

CUMBERLAND

DAUPHIN

FAYETTE

FULTON

DHI-AP H 496.4

MOWRER FARMS BILL & KAROL WINGERT LOCUST LANE FARMS EVERGREEN FARMS INC WILLOW BEHRER FARMS TIMOTHY R PEACHEY WILLOW BEHRER FARMS BILL & KAREN DAVIS LOST HOLLOW FARM DIAMOND VALLEY FARM IRVIN G MARTIN TOM & GLORIA COFFMAN LAKEVALE AYRE FARM TERRY ALLISON LUZERNE FARM HAWN CREST FARMS HERON RUN FARMS N&N FARMS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

BLOSSOM HOLLOW FARM LARRY H MARSHALL JERRY NESBIT PLEASANT VIEW FARMS DAN L. HANCOCK NEHRIG FARM JEWART DAIRY BERKEYS DAIRY FARM DARYL&DEL BRUBAKER GLEN HENRY AND SONS MYRON+MARY GEHMAN TUSCARORA RUN HLSTNS J.SCOTT LANDIS GRAYBILL, DAVID JOEL & SARA MILLS MARCUS J ZOOK CHARLES&TAMMY KLINE RUSSELL ADAMIRE JR MICHAEL W BEAVER BARRY E+BARB A LUCAS RUSSELL J DRESSLER B. C. + E. BRUBAKER ANTHONY HEIMBACH KENT MABEN MARLIN CHARLTON TIMOTHY E LAUVER COCOLAMUS FARM ANDREW B.SWARTZ CENTERVIEW FARM G V FARMS ROBERT A MILLER

INDIANA

3.2 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.6 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H H X

HUNTINGTON

3X

TYPE TEST

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

CREEK VALLEY FARMS

924 4.0 736 3.1 3X 903 4.9 691 3.8

930 948 867 806 874 881 829 853 762 665 622

HERD OWNER

Top 40 Herds For April

JUNIATA

919 886 794 793 832 786 636 678

3.7 3.9 3.7 3.7 4.1 3.8 3.6 4.0

746 704 692 688 679 631 628 526 516

795 746 692 683 657 617 544 506

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.3

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

29998 1206 4.0 923 3.1 3X

H 363.1 H 765.0 H 470.7 H 2778.1 H 702.1 H 91.8 H 111.1 H 170.9 H 118.0 H 92.0 H 83.5 H 180.5 H 61.0 H 86.2 H 442.2 H 79.5 H 175.6 H 42.8

28624 26983 26854 27214 25999 24367 24560 22553 22088 22017 22457 20789 21156 19717 21954 18176 19379 16334

1068 1095 990 1024 1064 955 984 957 801 816 749 783 783 763 820 714 670 637

3.7 4.1 3.7 3.8 4.1 3.9 4.0 4.2 3.6 3.7 3.3 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.5 3.9

869 843 836 810 792 753 747 713 707 690 666 650 649 646 644 583 582 513

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.3 2.9 3.2 3.0 3.1

3X

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X H

63.8 48.4 103.3 235.8 113.1 101.0 229.6 48.2

25878 23684 22552 22228 21131 21062 19645 19213

933 968 984 768 727 745 770 698

3.6 4.1 4.4 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.9 3.6

802 714 708 673 656 646 622 578

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

97.8 52.7 341.0 103.1 65.2 64.9 110.2 77.0 79.9 86.9 22.6 135.3 84.3 70.0 72.5 61.1 74.0 40.9 42.4 59.1 110.4 118.1 55.6

27464 1010 3.7 841 3.1 26160 978 3.7 807 3.1 26117 916 3.5 793 3.0 3X 25335 968 3.8 762 3.0 24788 856 3.5 759 3.1 24451 914 3.7 753 3.1 24273 892 3.7 748 3.1 24174 905 3.7 740 3.1 24378 834 3.4 736 3.0 22908 900 3.9 734 3.2 23466 874 3.7 729 3.1 22746 852 3.7 726 3.2 23878 849 3.6 718 3.0 22932 767 3.3 708 3.1 22661 857 3.8 695 3.1 22187 791 3.6 681 3.1 21816 803 3.7 673 3.1 20675 806 3.9 657 3.2 20978 754 3.6 656 3.1 20583 761 3.7 651 3.2 20703 772 3.7 634 3.1 19800 740 3.7 630 3.2 19818 759 3.8 613 3.1

3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

19702 19302 17033 17355 15970

737 731 666 688 648

3.7 3.8 3.9 4.0 4.1

H H H H H

STAR ROCK FARMS DHIRAPCS SCATTERED ACRES REINHOLDSDHI-APCS LLOYD M REIFF DHI-AP RAYMOND H GOOD DHI-APCS JAY & ANNETTE STOLTZFUS DHI-AP HERMAN COOK DHI-APCS MEGASTAR HOLSTEINS DHI-APCS HERMAN COOK DHI-APCS MEGASTAR HOLSTEINS DHI-APCS

H 1405.9 H 630.2 H 58.8 H 275.7 H 134.5 H 79.6 H 55.2 J 27.2 X 14.6

28583 1068 3.7 876 3.1 3X 24940 896 3.6 752 3.0 3X 25105 889 3.5 738 2.9 23117 813 3.5 702 3.0 3X 19712 693 3.5 600 3.0 18471 619 3.4 557 3.0 18088 661 3.7 553 3.1 15560 712 4.6 546 3.5 16421 637 3.9 517 3.1

BRANDT VIEW FARM EARL RAY & CAROL MARTIN LITTLE HILL FARM LEON E. MARTIN LITTLE HILL FARM DALE+PATTIE MAULFAIR RUPLAND HOLSTEINS GARY LENTZ KEVIN & ALLISON SELLERS KIRBY L HORST PHILHAVEN FARM MILE EE FARM ADAM LIGHT MARTIN RIDGE FARM DALE HOSTETTER & SON KENDRA MASE DEW MIST HOLSTEINS B & L HOSTETTER CURVIN+DAWN GOOD JAY W GOOD MARK M. HOOVER LEROY WISE BRUCE BOLLINGER&FAMILY K & M SELLERS JERE BRUBAKER BARRY HOSTETTER CARISTONE FARM, LLC ROBERT & SHERRY BASHORE ZIM LEA HOLSTEINS WHITE BIRCH FARM MUSSER RIDGE FARM RUPLAND HOLSTEINS REID K HOOVER RICREY HOLSTEINS BRUCE R HEILINGER DALE BURKHOLDER CLIFFORD+FAY BERGER# BAER BROTHER FARMS MALCOLM SONNEN MARK & STEPH PATCHES

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H

117.1 92.1 55.1 66.0 37.5 59.8 117.2 81.8 67.0 47.0 91.6 205.4 118.8 105.7 85.2 60.3 106.7 115.9 118.7 129.4 46.0 136.2 79.2 65.2 133.1 64.4 265.9 34.7 86.3 139.1 144.3 107.6 240.6 124.2 80.7 61.7 68.0 109.3 49.6 86.0

32548 31030 30377 27606 25942 27190 27580 26047 24591 25082 25389 25325 25168 24774 24801 25200 25311 25841 24932 24738 24791 24197 24002 23869 24141 23617 23167 23828 23764 24162 24252 23997 23467 23531 23579 23518 23327 21012 21517 22637

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H

55.7 63.6 78.8 409.4 55.9 85.4 86.3 152.2 53.7 62.0 92.3 61.6 114.2 49.0 69.2 29.8 99.5 64.4 39.5 144.2 84.9 75.5 99.4 80.2 119.5 117.5 48.1 110.3 81.8 33.0 66.2 95.0 67.1 199.4 70.3 33.3 68.8 17.6 72.1 82.4

29788 1119 3.8 907 3.0 3X 27527 971 3.5 843 3.1 3X 25879 970 3.7 826 3.2 27032 964 3.6 809 3.0 3X 25610 959 3.7 804 3.1 25213 911 3.6 772 3.1 25016 937 3.7 767 3.1 23929 933 3.9 757 3.2 23983 845 3.5 756 3.2 23310 888 3.8 755 3.2 24168 912 3.8 750 3.1 23881 897 3.8 734 3.1 23682 874 3.7 726 3.1 23644 855 3.6 725 3.1 23911 866 3.6 724 3.0 23453 890 3.8 722 3.1 23555 862 3.7 718 3.0 22920 860 3.8 705 3.1 22607 882 3.9 703 3.1 23170 861 3.7 699 3.0 22677 853 3.8 697 3.1 21700 776 3.6 696 3.2 22599 848 3.8 695 3.1 22141 853 3.9 694 3.1 22227 834 3.8 693 3.1 22405 892 4.0 692 3.1 22915 811 3.5 690 3.0 22669 816 3.6 683 3.0 22137 828 3.7 683 3.1 21653 836 3.9 677 3.1 21949 900 4.1 676 3.1 22245 845 3.8 671 3.0 22039 791 3.6 670 3.0 21341 776 3.6 661 3.1 21596 788 3.6 650 3.0 21089 710 3.4 649 3.1 20410 754 3.7 645 3.2 20556 603 2.9 626 3.0 19884 748 3.8 625 3.1 20172 783 3.9 622 3.1

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

101.2 39.4 111.1 60.3 35.3

29594 23238 22273 19900 18142

LEBANON

MIFFLIN

MELVIN&JUDY PEACHEY LOWELL J PEACHEY DAVID C YODER KISH VIEW FARM DAVID T HOSTETLER ROBERT & LISA PEACHEY RAMOND&ROSE KAUFFMAN FORGY DAIRY DAVID J&RUTH PEACHEY LEE AND JOANNE YODER AMMON FARMS RAYMOND S HOSTETLER RODERICK KAUFFMAN ROBERT L KAUFFMAN VERNAN HOLSTEINS PAUL NEER SHAWN & EMILY YODER FROG MEADOW FARM JESSE L SPICHER MICHAEL P YODER JOHN & SALOMA BYLER VALLEY VIEW FARM MARK & VERNA PEACHEY JOHN SPICHER PEACHVIEW FARM G SHELDON PEACHEY DALE I KING LOREN K. YODER SAM K KAUFFMAN JAMES L HOSTETTER DARVIN RENNINGER TITUS R PEACHEY A FRED KING CAS STEAD FARMS CLARK N. PEACHEY ELWOOD H STITT REED GAP FARMS CAS STEAD FARM2 NATHAN&EUNICE YODER NATHAN PEACHEY

MONTGOMERY MERRYMEAD FARM RUSSELL GUNTZ ROY S KOLB & SONS MARK SCHMIDT MERRILL MEST

48.9 108.9 70.0 25.4 90.7

RHA MILK

BRIAN&KAREN DIFFENDERFER DHI-AP E MARLENE PEOPLES DHI-AP DARRON SHEARER# DHI-AP TUSCVU FARMS DHI-AP ZIMMERMAN BROS DHIR-AP

LANCASTER

3.2 3X 3.3 3X 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0

B R COW E E YEARS D

1170 1144 1098 967 1030 976 940 917 957 922 873 914 1010 902 947 875 922 959 928 884 878 869 840 884 826 900 840 857 877 882 803 852 823 791 813 859 783 909 802 826

996 903 818 781 706

3.6 3.7 3.6 3.5 4.0 3.6 3.4 3.5 3.9 3.7 3.4 3.6 4.0 3.6 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.4 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.3 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.4 3.7 3.4 4.3 3.7 3.6

3.4 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.9

610 595 537 534 521

990 930 909 846 838 836 834 800 783 782 782 781 781 779 777 777 770 769 760 755 755 740 739 737 735 734 733 733 732 727 725 722 720 719 717 712 697 692 690 688

890 715 683 602 582

3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.3

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.3 3.2 3.0

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2

3X 3X 3X

3X 3X


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration

(FDA) Center for Veterinary Medicine has be-

LANCASTER COUNTY, PA TOP 40 HERDS FOR APRIL BRD

MILK 3X

RHA FAT RHA PROT RHA MILK PCT FAT PCT PRO

DELAWARE VAL COLLEGE FURNACE HILL HOLSTEINS GARY LEE & PATRICIA MASE SPRING VALLEY DAIRY LLC BRIAN K MULL SCOTT & APRIL COOPER ABNER L STOLTZFUS DEWDROP-MEDO HOLSTIENS DEEP RUN CRK HOLSTEINS SHALE RIDGE FARMS LLC WILLOW RUN FARM SKY VIEW DAIRY KEVIN L OBERHOLTZER OLD PIKE DAIRY JEFF SENSENIG DAVID & JOSHUA BISHOP GLENVILLE FARMS JOHN M. BURKHOLDER IRA M HEISTAND JR WILLOW SPRINGS FARM CLIFF & ANDREA SENSENIG JOHN P LAPP PAUL & MARK MILLER PEILA JOHN III CLAIR N OBERHOLTZER MATTHEW BENNETCH BRENT L. GEHMAN MEADOW VISTA FARM WEAVER HOMSTEAD FARM WALNUT RUN FARM DELAWARE VAL COLLEGE ELVIN & DORCAS REIFF S & A KREIDER- FARM NO 2 ARLIN BENNER JERE SENSENIG LEON N SENSENIG FREY DAIRY FARMS INC

B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H X H

NO YES NO YES YES NO NO NO NO YES NO YES NO NO NO NO YES NO NO YES YES NO YES NO YES YES NO YES YES YES NO NO YES YES NO NO YES

31961 33566 32152 31948 29251 29342 28404 28917 29416 28708 28200 28890 27575 27988 29347 26945 26873 26806 26940 28178 27079 27261 27325 24465 26653 26018 26778 28480 27279 26453 27013 27540 26283 27576 26268 27333 27255

LARRY BRUBAKER IVAN LEE KING CLAY FARM

H H H

NO NO NO

27034 3.5 938 26742 3.3 876 26613 3.7 984

NAME

3.9 3.3 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.3 3.8 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.4 3.3 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.2 3.3 3.5 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.3 3.7 3.6 3.6

TOP HERDS FOR RHI PROTEIN

1246 1105 1090 1087 1017 1123 1014 1076 1035 1031 933 1090 917 981 1043 1000 966 1033 916 916 1007 1058 1009 943 963 991 1027 925 905 918 1017 991 961 898 967 991 981

3.3 1062 3.0 1017 3.1 1008 3.0 956 3.1 917 3.0 889 3.1 880 3.0 877 3.0 874 3.0 870 3.1 870 3.0 867 3.1 859 3.1 858 2.9 856 3.2 851 3.1 844 3.1 838 3.1 837 3.0 836 3.1 836 3.1 835 3.0 832 3.4 832 3.1 831 3.2 830 3.1 828 2.9 824 3.0 822 3.1 820 3.0 819 3.0 816 3.1 814 2.9 813 3.1 813 3.0 811 3.0 810 3 3 3

809 809 809

Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 • (919) 661-3100

come aware that the term, “nonlactating dairy cattle,” may be confusing and that users could mistakenly interpret it to mean that drugs approved for use in nonlactating dairy cattle are safe when used in dry dairy cows. The term “non-lactating dairy cattle” in-

cludes replacement dairy heifers, replacement dairy bulls, and dairy calves. The term non-lactating dairy cattle does not include dry dairy cows. FDA says this is an important human food safety issue because of the potential for residues of drugs labeled for use

Hartman Farm Machinery

‘09 New Holland T6030 118HP, 2000 Hrs, 16 Spd, LH Reverser, Dual Outlets, Cummins Diesel! . . .$52,900

in nonlactating dairy cattle to be present in milk of the treated cows, as well as in the tissue of the calves born to the treated cows. FDA is working with sponsors of products approved for use in nonlactating dairy cattle to revise labeling to clarify that dry dairy cows are not non-lactating dairy

Farmall Super M-TA Recent New RA, New Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,950

JD 6410 4x4, Loader, Cab, Power Quad, JD 430 Round Baler, Monitor, Field Ready, L.H. Reverser, 2700 Hrs. . . . . . . .$42,500 Good Shape! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,950

Serving you Since 1940 See the Entire Line of New Holland Equipment at

New Holland 1412 Discbine, Very Nice! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,900

New Holland 316 Square Baler w/Bale Chute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,950

To view entire inventory go to

www.hartmanfarmmachinery.com Rt. 42 - 7 miles north of Harrisonburg, VA

540-896-7148

767 Penn Drive, Tamaqua PA, 18252 Phone (570) 386-5945 Fax (570) 386-4080 Email-cssnyder@ptd.net www.cssnyder.com

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

NORTHUMBERLAND JOHN RISHEL SPRING LAKE DAIRY STROUSE DAIRY FARM SHULTZ HILLSIDE DAIRY ZIMMERMAN FARMS INC. DRY RUN DAIRY, LLC WOLFE'S POWER LINE DAIRY J DANIEL FAUS WAYNE KLOCK PAUL SCHMIDT KEVIN BROSIOUS

PERRY

CARL & BRENT MC MILLEN LOY ACRES L.L.C. CINDY & JOE COMP JESSE+BARB SINGLETON M W SMITH FARMS O'TOOLE ACRES MELVIN S WEAVER NEVIN G RICE WELLER'S DAIRY LENARD & AMY KRESGE OL MAPLES FARM ROBRT & BONITA RODGERS LYONS BROTHERS SYLVIN M WENGER EDWARD C BROFEE PHILLIP WENGER INNERST FARM ED + WILMA MCMILLEN KRETZH FARMS INC. ROBT &JENNIFER GABEL SAMUEL L. HURST KENDALL BYERS BRIAN FLEISHER

SCHUYLKILL CARL A FARMS INC BRIAN RUCH JAMES D. DUNN

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI DHI-APCS DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H

48.3 106.9 67.8 79.9 316.6 97.0 387.1 126.7 40.9 122.3 42.4

RHA MILK

FAT

32029 29109 28516 27148 26665 24519 23973 22309 21174 16918 17969

1145 1023 1010 1027 949 1005 837 806 765 690 693

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

3.6 3.5 3.5 3.8 3.6 4.1 3.5 3.6 3.6 4.1 3.9

966 868 868 827 806 765 710 679 657 549 546

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X

96.7 90.7 103.3 52.9 505.5 71.9 90.3 123.1 67.3 157.4 99.6 36.7 68.5 75.2 254.7 73.0 192.4 47.6 321.8 33.5 57.7 66.2 50.0

27218 966 3.5 855 3.1 26928 968 3.6 833 3.1 27032 991 3.7 821 3.0 24912 909 3.6 794 3.2 26117 954 3.7 794 3.0 3X 24518 973 4.0 779 3.2 25676 1003 3.9 775 3.0 23974 863 3.6 754 3.1 24529 923 3.8 751 3.1 23813 848 3.6 743 3.1 22953 818 3.6 727 3.2 21762 877 4.0 709 3.3 22825 844 3.7 704 3.1 22693 788 3.5 694 3.1 22702 867 3.8 682 3.0 21605 767 3.6 671 3.1 21515 759 3.5 656 3.0 21509 784 3.6 654 3.0 20599 770 3.7 650 3.2 20770 700 3.4 642 3.1 20034 791 3.9 638 3.2 20449 736 3.6 626 3.1 18972 729 3.8 593 3.1

DHI-AP H 91.1 DHIR-AP H 61.9 DHI-AP H 96.7

33192 1232 3.7 993 3.0 3X 26789 1025 3.8 845 3.2 23592 845 3.6 734 3.1

cattle and therefore should not be treated with drugs labeled for use in non-lactating dairy cattle. S o u r c e : www.fda.gov/AnimalVe t e r i n a r y / N e w s E v ents/CVMUpdates/ucm 292761.htm, as reprinted from Udder Topics Vol. 35, No. 1 & 2

HERD OWNER MILLER & REX SNYDERLANDFARMS LARRY HEPLER WIND MILL FARM ELBERT FARMS MAR K FARMS MARK & AMY WOLFE RYAN KAHLER DONNON-S DAIRY FARM JERSEY ACRES FMS INC DAWN F RHEIN DONNON-S DAIRY FARM

SNYDER

CHRISS+TRISH NIPPLE DARE E LAND JACOB GRAYBILL KEITH MCCOOL WARREN FAUS JOHN M KURTZ ROBERT + KATHY WAITE BO ANN HOLSTEINS JL & CL SHAFFER DAVID APPLE AND SON RICHARD+BETTY WELLER LEIRE FRY & SONS SEVEN OAKS WAITE N CE FARM SAUDERDALE FARM MABARBIL FARMS JAY HOLLENBACH JUSTAMERE FARM DAN WHITMER DUANE & KAREN EWING NELALE FARM

SOMERSET

DAVID CRISSINGER VERNON D. MARTIN MERVIN AND JENELL YODER

TYPE TEST

Top 40 Herds For April B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

841 863 812 880 835 765 746 776 681 734 693 636

3.4 3.8 3.7 4.3 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.6 4.7 4.5 3.6

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H B H H H H H J J X

36.7 51.6 60.7 178.1 91.0 84.6 59.9 95.8 135.3 189.5 228.3 41.9

24765 22946 21858 20366 22245 21092 20304 20632 18825 15619 15533 17588

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

52.9 94.1 50.7 150.0 55.1 66.8 47.8 44.0 39.6 67.5 45.6 143.7 60.4 74.0 50.4 97.5 48.5 39.6 35.0 52.7 54.4

28240 1143 4.0 918 3.3 23319 976 4.2 752 3.2 23770 894 3.8 723 3.0 23243 813 3.5 711 3.1 21997 845 3.8 673 3.1 21315 810 3.8 659 3.1 20147 783 3.9 643 3.2 20210 753 3.7 620 3.1 19961 770 3.9 619 3.1 20903 752 3.6 610 2.9 18819 783 4.2 607 3.2 19583 745 3.8 603 3.1 19335 754 3.9 588 3.0 19368 741 3.8 586 3.0 18532 682 3.7 586 3.2 18864 817 4.3 573 3.0 17591 742 4.2 559 3.2 17919 764 4.3 545 3.0 17387 648 3.7 522 3.0 16682 684 4.1 515 3.1 16186 638 3.9 510 3.2

DHI-AP H 45.9 DHI-APCS H 202.4 DHI H 81.1

23288 22653 21090

730 701 697 677 666 643 643 637 580 569 566 543

2.9 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.6 3.1

820 3.5 702 3.0 825 3.6 688 3.0 789 3.7 678 3.2

HERD OWNER

WASHINGTON

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

867 882 901 646 734 802 717 634 661

3.4 3.6 3.8 3.2 3.6 4.8 3.6 3.7 4.0

HAMILTON BROS HAMILTON BROS JOHN E MARCHEZAK GREEN HAVEN FARM FOLLY HOLLOW FM INC JOHN E MARCHEZAK WINDSON DAIRY FARM WILLIAM A SCOTT MARION PYLE STONE

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H J H H W

256.0 55.0 67.7 126.6 154.0 18.5 87.3 69.6 13.4

25309 24548 23999 20447 20210 16751 19826 17227 16509

BILL & RICK EBERT SLICKHILL HOLSTEINS ALVIN VANCE JR -HALVIN VANCE JR -HSELEMBO DAIRY FARM YURIS' DAIRY FARM JAMES HOUGH ALVIN VANCE JR. -J-

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X J

76.7 78.0 42.5 24.4 165.3 48.0 33.1 73.7

23707 920 3.9 737 3.1 23553 1022 4.3 726 3.1 22417 885 3.9 690 3.1 19912 804 4.0 618 3.1 19320 736 3.8 600 3.1 18142 685 3.8 563 3.1 16456 633 3.8 522 3.2 14500 672 4.6 508 3.5

WESTMORELAND

YORK

SMYSERS RICHLAWN FMS DHIR-AP H 75.3 TAYACRES FARM DHI-AP H 189.1 WALK LE HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 280.9 ROBT. BAUMGARDNER JR DHI-AP H 164.6 MEADOW VALLEY DAIRY FARM DHI-AP H 176.9 THOMAS BOYER DHI-AP H 44.2 KATEANN FARM DHI-AP H 46.8 BARRENS VIEW FARM DHI-AP X 73.0 JESSE & BARB DRUCK DHI-AP H 104.7 JESSE & BARB DRUCK 2 DHI-AP H 25.0 DALE & DARLA DOLL DHI-AP H 103.1 GUM TREE FARM DHI-APCS H 70.4 JOHN KRONE DHI-APCS H 27.2 #PERRYDELL FARM DHI-AP H 140.0 STUMP ACRES DHI-AP H 121.4 LEROY BUPP DHI-AP H 173.3 GARY THOMAN DHIR-AP H 52.2 LARRY ROBINSON DHI-AP H 24.2 SYDOR BROS. FARM DHI-AP H 66.6

767 767 741 629 621 596 576 553 501

3.0 3X 3.1 3X 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.6 2.9 3.2 3.0

30277 1145 3.8 927 3.1 25859 1044 4.0 804 3.1 25452 908 3.6 781 3.1 3X 23948 904 3.8 737 3.1 23979 1027 4.3 728 3.0 24012 921 3.8 725 3.0 22422 747 3.3 684 3.1 20839 759 3.6 673 3.2 21626 780 3.6 661 3.1 3X 21401 794 3.7 651 3.0 3X 20417 716 3.5 641 3.1 19727 727 3.7 597 3.0 18084 667 3.7 586 3.2 18766 722 3.8 579 3.1 17331 640 3.7 548 3.2 18466 668 3.6 548 3.0 17466 661 3.8 547 3.1 18096 617 3.4 540 3.0 16564 632 3.8 521 3.1

Page 17 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

FDA clarifies use of the term “non-lactating dairy cattle”


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 18

Get new employees started right The first few days on the job are important for long-term employee success From cattle handling to overall management, staffing is a key factor for any feedlot and has a direct impact on the bottom line. “All too often, we are seeing that people jump into a new position at a feedlot without the knowledge or confidence to do their best,” said Nicolas Buttars, labor management specialist, Pfizer Animal Health. “This type of hiring and lack of training is not good for the new employee, the cattle and certainly not for the feedlot owners.” Rather than jump directly into the day-to-day workload, a more structured “onboarding” or training plan for new employees can help build confidence, prepare them to do the job correctly and set new hires up for longterm success. By definition, onboarding is the complete integration or immersion of new employees to your operation. Properly onboarding new employees requires an added time commitment from managers, but it can translate to dollars in the long run. Research has shown that offering complete training increases bottom-line returns by improving productivity and minimizing employee turnover, which can cost an operation

1.5 to 2 times the person’s annual salary, according the American Management Association. “The onboarding process begins before the employee is interviewed and will typically last throughout the first 60 to 90 days of employment at the feedlot,” Buttars says. “The process is inclusive of not only the initial interview, but orientation, training and performance reviews as well.” When evaluating how to improve the current onboarding process at your feedlot, consider the following: • Interview process: Develop and train managers to extensively interview potential employees. Personality traits and previous experience can help you determine what role they might best fit. One key is to understand what your best employees value about working for your organization and find other employees with similar goals. • New employee orientation: Familiarize new employees with practices and procedures on the feedlot. Take the time to discuss important factors for success and the specific role they will play. • Job training: Encourage managers and supervisors to work alongside new

employees during a typical day at the feedlot while thoroughly explaining each task. This also is a great time to extensively cover the basics and expectations for the position. • Training review: After initial training, managers and supervisors should check in regularly to rate employee performance and to keep them engaged. Regular reviews give employees an opportunity to correct any mistakes and/or provide positive reinforcement to keep up the good work. Unfortunately, when asked about performance related feedback, many employees say they receive no feedback on how they are doing. • Setting milestones: Whether in conjunction with reviews or on separate occasions, setting milestones for new employees — and the feedlot as a whole — will give them motivation to continue the good work. Try incorporating incentives such as a raise or other benefits into milestones. “Not only is it important to have a solid onboarding program in place when hiring a new employee, but it is also important to designate these responsibilities to someone on the feedlot,” Buttars said. “Having an

existing employee responsible for training new employees is the key to having a consistent and successful onboarding process.” After hearing about and seeing challenges from customers who work for large operations, Pfizer Animal Health developed the PeopleFirst™ program. Certified PeopleFirst consultants can assist operations of all sizes to implement and improve existing hiring and training protocols. Visit www.GrowPeopleFirst.com to learn more about what PeopleFirst can offer.

Herds Ranked by Daily Milk Lbs UNITED DHI Compiled by: NORTH CAROLINA TOTALS DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 APRIL

(919) 661-3100

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

COREY FOSTER JERRY W. CRAWFORD ROBERT NUTTER & MICHAEL STROWD RIDGE FARM M&M'S DAIRY JOHNNY, KAREN, & BRIAN MOORE GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON MCCAINS DAIRY NATHAN SOUTHER SCOTT AND BANKS DAVIS MYERS FARMS INC GEORGE SMITH NEAL P JOHNSON BUTTKE DAIRY SHUMAKER DAIRY, INC. GRAYHOUSE FARMS SAM GALPHIN A D & CARLTON WILLIARD DAVID A SMITH GLADDEN'S DAIRY CROSS CREEK DAIRY STEPSTONE HOLSTEINS INC BLAN BOTTOMLEY J NORMAN RIDDLE EAKER DAIRY MIKE DUCKETT WAYNE P STOUT CARL & CLAYTON SMITH COLTRANE FARM DARRELL WRIGHT AUBREY N WELLS PENDRYS DAIRY FARM ALLENS DAIRY T C WILLIAMS WRIGHT DAIRY HOLLAND FARMS OF OLIN,LLC JOHN HAMPTON TED AND ALAN MOORE JEFF CORNWELL ENGLISH DAIRY FARM, LLC CARLAND DAIRY TALLEY-HO FARM BEVILLE BROTHERS DAIRY OAKMERE FARM WILLIAM H DAY JR CHARLES CURRIN DAIRY

TOWN (3X)

CLEVELAND NC CHAPEL HILL NC (3X) HILLSBOROUGH NC (3X) RANDLEMAN NC STATESVILLE NC (3X) MOUNT ULLA NC (3X) CROUSE NC (3X) SOPHIA NC (3X) UNION GROVE NC (3X) MOORESVILLE NC UNION GROVE NC (3X) LEXINGTON NC (3X) STATESVILLE NC RANDLEMAN NC BLANCH NC STONY POINT NC (3X) DURHAM NC GRAHAM NC LEXINGTON NC (3X) VALE NC HURDLE MILLS NC BLANCH NC ENNICE NC (3X) STATESVILLE NC CHERRYVILLE NC LEICESTER NC STONY POINT NC ENNICE NC PLEASANT GARDEN NC (3X) FRANKLINVILLE NC (3X) LEICESTER NC BOONVILLE NC ASHEBORO NC UNION GROVE NC REIDSVILLE NC OLIN NC SPARTA NC HURDLE MILLS NC LAWNDALE NC MARION NC MILLS RIVER NC (3X) OLIN NC REIDSVILLE NC BROWNS SUMMIT NC OXFORD NC OXFORD NC

R TEST A MTH N K

4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

99.9 88.9 88.4 87.4 86.8 86.6 85.9 85.3 85.1 84.7 83.6 82.9 82.4 82.0 81.8 80.4 79.8 79.5 79.4 79.1 78.5 77.8 77.5 77.5 77.2 77.1 76.9 75.9 75.1 74.6 74.4 74.3 73.8 73.5 73.2 73.0 72.8 71.8 70.6 69.0 68.8 68.0 66.8 66.7 66.2 66.2

144 200 163 190 188 197 192 215 183 138 155 214 179 162 174 205 221 176 201 218 199 184 235 156 196 188 193 234 216 184 205 211 231 178 179 144 125 209 185 190 184 182 251 196 172 196

26112 23190 25787 23568 27682 24007 21641 23945 24678 25717 28591 24244 24226 25965 23279 22802 . 22435 25584 21388 24480 23297 24748 16388 22196 22125 22186 21136 19653 19079 23276 20957 19925 19577 20535 26569 19081 22070 20974 22346 20474 21426 20432 19349 19409 19376

3.3 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.8 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.5 . 4.0 3.5 3.7 3.5 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.5 3.8 3.3 3.4 4.2 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.9 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.8

864 831 946 820 1063 814 806 863 918 933 1029 918 895 984 900 807 . 893 887 793 862 885 960 596 782 784 817 727 743 716 770 763 770 691 771 887 641 920 797 826 791 838 697 730 728 734

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 2.8 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 2.7 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 . 3.2 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1

802 716 763 728 810 681 668 709 708 801 785 754 735 767 702 683 . 713 775 674 755 714 744 504 697 688 690 638 583 577 728 634 614 610 644 780 585 679 645 675 629 670 644 600 589 592

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

GARY SCHLABACH GEORGE L PLESS AND SONS SAMUEL J. FLOWE LARRY D GALLIHER ANDERS FARM MATTHEW CODY MAPLE RIDGE FARM INC. BOBBY & ALVIN EVANS LINDLEY DAIRY INC BOWMAN DAIRY INC COVINGTONS DAIRY FARM PROCTOR DAIRY MANCO FARM INC. KATHY SHAMBLEY ATT. LENNIE BREEZE G W BELL CARSON AND CLAYTON LLOYD TEER FARMS INC JY-RO HOLSTEINS WAYNE ROBERTSON CARTNER FARM, INC

UNION GROVE NC ROCKWELL NC MIDLAND NC HARMONY NC (3X) ENNICE NC MARS HILL NC MT. AIRY NC (3X) SPARTA NC SNOW CAMP NC JULIAN NC MEBANE NC BESSEMER CITY NC PITTSBORO NC HILLSBOROUGH NC GREENSBORO NC KINGS MOUNTAIN NC (3X) MEBANE NC CHAPEL HILL NC ELKIN NC STATESVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

65.3 64.2 64.0 63.7 63.0 62.5 62.5 62.3 62.2 62.1 61.6 61.6 61.0 61.0 60.9 60.7 60.6 59.6 59.6 59.4 58.7

192 198 179 223 166 171 215 185 206 210 186 218 173 236 181 232 243 267 245 207 160

19976 20229 20893 20025 19009 19424 . 19895 17787 16548 17899 19421 18735 19243 15030 15454 18067 17288 17805 15465 15470

3.9 3.5 3.4 4.1 3.4 3.5 . . 3.9 4.2 3.8 3.2 4.0 3.9 3.9 4.7 3.9 4.0 3.9 3.7 3.7

778 716 716 822 655 686 . . 697 698 683 629 750 754 586 730 708 691 691 571 573

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 . . 3.3 3.2 3.2 2.8 3.2 3.2 3.3 3.2 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.1 3.2

620 625 623 614 583 615 . . 585 528 576 550 607 611 491 489 597 565 561 485 492

GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON AUBREY N WELLS T C WILLIAMS BRUSH CREEK SWISS FARMS CARLAND DAIRY BRIAN MOORE JERSEYS TALLEY-HO FARM LUCKY L JERSEY MATTHEW CODY COREY LUTZ SHADY BROOK FARM ATT. LENNIE BREEZE G W BELL SHADY BROOK FARM RIVERSIDE DAIRY FARM COY + WANDA REESE CHARLES FISHER WARD BILTMORE DAIRY FARMS INC CHAPMAN DAIRY SHADY BROOK FARM GRANT WALTERS CALDWELL OVERCASH RAY & LINDA ELMORE ATT. ANNA G. AMORIELLO CHAPEL HILL CREAMERY HARRY WELLS

CROUSE NC (3X) LEICESTER NC UNION GROVE NC SILER CITY NC (3X) MILLS RIVER NC (3X) MT. ULLA NC (3X) OLIN NC STATESVILLE NC MARS HILL NC LINCOLNTON NC STATESVILLE NC GREENSBORO NC KINGS MOUNTAIN NC (3X) STATESVILLE NC GIBSONVILLE NC TAYLORSVILLE NC LEXINGTON NC FLETCHER NC TAYLORSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC CHINA GROVE NC KANNAPOLIS NC STATESVILLE NC GIBSONVILLE NC CHAPEL HILL NC CLOVER NC

4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

85.9 74.4 73.5 70.2 68.8 68.3 68.0 66.7 62.5 62.2 61.2 60.9 60.7 58.3 55.7 53.6 52.8 52.6 51.8 50.7 50.6 50.3 48.3 45.6 44.0 38.1

192 205 178 218 184 192 182 166 171 184 180 181 232 133 185 213 207 172 205 143 179 208 185 213 141 192

21641 23276 19577 22252 20474 19277 21426 19448 19424 17719 16886 15030 15454 14806 16351 17542 15561 15826 15467 13523 14183 15765 14221 13893 12415 12138

3.7 3.3 3.5 4.0 3.9 4.4 3.9 4.3 3.5 4.6 4.0 3.9 4.7 4.6 3.9 4.3 3.7 4.8 4.4 4.4 4.4 3.6 4.6 4.1 4.7 4.7

806 770 691 898 791 845 838 837 686 823 677 586 730 675 640 751 568 755 683 595 619 565 651 567 580 570

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.4 3.2 3.6 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.5 3.1 3.6 3.1 3.6 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.1 3.6 3.3 3.6 3.6

668 728 610 731 629 652 670 658 615 638 560 491 489 520 513 631 480 573 548 466 497 484 516 455 446 440

NORTH CAROLINA COLOR BREEDS

X X X B X J X J X J X X X J X J X J J J J X J X J J


MT. AIRY EQUIPMENT 1431 W. Pine St. Mt. Airy, NC 27030 336-786-6240

DAIRYMEN SPECIALTY CO. INC. 2098 John Wayland Hwy. Harrisonburg, VA 22801 540-433-9117 800-572-2123

WOODSTOCK EQUIPMENT CO. 22192 Old Valley Pike Woodstock, VA 22664 540-459-3233

TERRITORY REPRESENTATIVES VIC LEININGER Pennsylvania 417-872-5715 DREW DENMAN Virginia 417-872-5053

The judges have been selected for The 60th All American Jersey Shows, sponsored by the American Jersey Cattle Association of Reynoldsburg, Ohio. The largest exhibition of Registered Jersey™ cattle in the world, the three shows of The All American will be held Nov. 3, 4 and 5 in conjunction with the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, KY. Kevin Lutz, Lincolnton, NC, will officiate in The All American Jersey Show on Monday, Nov. 5. This will be his third time in the open show ring, having previously served as judge in 2003 and consultant judge in 2008. Lutz also officiated at the National Jersey Jug Futurity in 1999 and The All American Junior Jersey Show in 1998. He judged the 2011 Royal Melbourne (Australia) Show, and over the years numerous state fairs across the United States. His consultant will be Kevin Williams of McConnelsville, Ohio, who was the judge of the 2004 National Jersey Jug Futurity. Dean Dohle, Half Way, MO, will judge the 59th National Jersey Jug Futurity on Nov. 4. He has twice been an associate judge at the national level, for the Brown Swiss show at World Dairy Expo in 2005 and at the 2011 All American Junior Jersey Show. Dohle has judged at the state fairs of Ohio, North and South Carolina, Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. His consultant will be Tom “Moss” McCauley, Lowell, MI.

The National Jersey Jug Futurity is the oldest and richest class for dairy cattle. The 2011 futurity paid $11,565 in premiums, with the winner receiving over $2,100. Judge for The All American Junior Jersey Show on Nov. 3 will be Chris Lahmers, Marysville, Ohio. In 2011, Lahmers judged the National Jersey Jug Futurity, the International Brown Swiss Show at World Dairy Expo, and New York Red & White Spring Show. Previously he judged the 2007 Mid-Atlantic Ayrshire Show and 2008 Eastern National Brown Swiss Show, both in Harrisburg, PA, Sean Johnson, Glenville, PA, will be the consultant. The first and second place winners in each class of these shows will become the All American and Reserve All American honorees for 2012 of the American Jersey Cattle Association.

Page 19 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

Judges named for the Diamond Jubilee All American Jersey Shows


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 20

New youth group to promote agricultural issues BLACKSBURG, VA — Virginia 4-H, Virginia FFA, and Virginia Farm Bureau Young Farmers have announced the creation of Virginia AGvocates: Youth Advocating for Agriculture. The new program unites youths as one positive voice to produce, promote, and take pride in Virginia’s agriculture through public relations activities. Virginia AGvocates plans to use its website as an online database for agricultural advocacy. It will supply members with a list of resources including speech templates, tips on writing editorials, pointers on radio and

television interviews and helpful hints on writing press releases. In addition, scholarship opportunities will be available for youths ages 9 to 19. Scholarship requirements include speeches and essays on topics relating to the future of agriculture in the commonwealth. A series of advocacy training workshops will be held throughout the state in conjunction with participating partners’ conferences and conventions. “Virginia AGvocates is an awesome opportunity for youth to be directly connected to the many parts of the agricultural industry,” said Brian

Walsh, Virginia FFA Association state president and Virginia AGvocates participant. “Youth are the future of our industry. This program will develop future agriculturalists and strong leaders, which is what we will

need to continue to feed the growing population in the years to come.” A grant from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, with matching funds from Virginia 4-H and Vir-

Top 40 Herds For April 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

VIRGINIA

AUGUSTA

NORTH POINT FARM INC. KEVIN PHILLIPS MEADOW RUN DAIRY INC

23622 22431 21625

873 3.7 712 3.0 3X 829 3.7 680 3.0 3X 748 3.5 654 3.0

DHIR H 605.3 DHI-AP H 892.0

26068 22015

992 3.8 794 3.0 3X 780 3.5 694 3.2

DHI H 32.7

16543

615 3.7 510 3.1

ROBERT & STEPHANIE WHIPPLE DHI-AP H 101.0 ROBERT & STEPHANIE WHIPPLE DHI-AP X 12.9

22586 15933

853 3.8 699 3.1 736 4.6 553 3.5

22035

801 3.6 679 3.1

RIGGS & STILES INC WHITE POST DAIRY LLC JERRY MICHAEL FARM 2

ROCKBRIDGE

ROCKINGHAM WEST BRANCH DAIRY

DHI-AP H 144.7

SHENANDOAH

WILKINS BROTHERS DAIRY

DHI-AP H 137.7

21149

748 3.5 623 2.9

UNITED DHI VIRGINIA TOTALS TEST DAY AVG (COW)

CRESTHAVEN FARMS CLAUDIA PAULSON LEWIS A LAMB SONS INC DAVID HOOLEY BACK RUN DAIRY RANDALL INMAN WOLF RIDGE HOLSTEINS LUKE & ROBERTA HEATWOLE CARLTON W BRUBAKER HEATWOLE FAMILY DAIRY WILLOW BEND DAIRY STEVE RAINEY HOME PLACE DAIRY INC WHISPERING OAKS FARM WHITAKER FARM INC. FRF CROSS KEYS LLC M B & MARK B GOODE R.JEFFERSON BOWSTRING HOLSTEINS MEL-PAULA HOLSTEIN'S CEDAR RIDGE DAIRY INC HAMMOCK DAIRY INC. JOHN O HARDESTY & SON HILLSIDE FARM INC. NORMAN BOOTH M.D.& LEE SIMMONS ROLLING HILLS DAIRY ALFRED STEPHENS ROBERT D STOOTS JIM ELGIN BRANDON BEERY JORDAN ROHRER AMEVA FARM INC HENRY L HOPKINS GARY W MCDONALD ALLEN L SHANK BARNY BAY DAIRY INC E H SPURLIN & SONS LONG-ACRE FARM SLATE HILL FARMS, LLC BROWN JAMES AND LAVAUN JANNEY CLIFFORD BOWMAN PENNCREST FARM ASHLAND FARMS CHAD & REBECCA MCMURRAY EARLY DAWN DAIRY CAVE VIEW FARMS INC GOLDENVIEW DAIRY INC ROBERT RUTROUGH CHRIS MCADEN MIKE WATSON DAIRY ROHRER BROTHERS RIVERBEND DAIRY FARM

TOWN (3X) GALAX VA (3X) PORT REPUBLIC VA (3X) ROCHELLE VA (3X) AMELIA VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) MT. CRAWFORD VA BOONES MILL VA (3X) HARRISONBURG VA (3X) BRIDGEWATER VA DILLWYN VA (3X) DAYTON VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA AMELIA CT HSE VA HARRISONBURG VA HUDDLESTON VA CHATHAM VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA ROANOKE VA ELKTON VA CHATHAM VA (3X) BERRYVILLE VA DUBLIN VA SPOUT SPRING VA MOUNT SOLON VA ROCKY MOUNT VA WYTHEVILLE VA MAX MEADOWS VA CULPEPER VA (3X) MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) GROTTOES VA (3X) AMELIA VA ROCKY MOUNT VA STEPHENS CITY VA BRIDGEWATER VA ROCKY MOUNT VA GALAX VA MT JACKSON VA HARRISONBURG VA MARTINSVILLE VA STAUNTON VA CALLAWAY VA FARMVILLE VA CULPEPER VA HARRISONBURG VA (3X) CHARLOTTESVILLE VA WEYERS CAVE VA REDWOOD VA ROCKY MOUNT VA BRODNAX VA (3X) ELK CREEK VA DAYTON VA ROCKY MOUNT VA

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

BERKELEY

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

101.5 94.4 90.0 89.7 88.8 88.6 88.2 87.6 86.7 85.8 85.7 85.3 85.3 85.2 84.6 83.9 83.7 83.5 83.3 83.3 82.9 82.7 82.2 81.6 81.4 81.4 81.3 81.3 80.5 80.3 80.2 80.1 79.9 79.8 79.6 79.6 79.5 79.3 79.3 79.2 78.6 78.3 78.2 77.9 77.8 77.8 77.6 77.5 77.5 77.5 77.2 77.1 77.1 76.8

207 188 205 195 180 201 237 182 189 164 188 168 167 166 184 172 209 178 205 187 168 207 198 170 223 197 202 208 200 220 174 179 205 188 194 209 205 208 172 181 183 177 163 187 203 212 197 190 150 207 213 188 202 161

31140 26844 29302 25723 24988 26439 24538 26289 24441 26392 23421 26135 25098 25850 24934 22682 21337 25425 25953 23601 24407 25768 25196 24367 23217 24183 23629 24604 25496 25498 25824 23813 25964 22198 26523 22607 24933 24832 21458 21182 23425 20683 23836 20774 23184 24145 23645 23620 22418 24111 22073 . 25418 25032

3.1 3.9 4.0 3.5 3.7 4.1 3.3 3.3 3.4 3.8 3.9 3.5 3.5 3.6 4.0 4.0 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.9 3.5 3.9 3.3 3.7 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.3 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.8 3.5 3.9 3.9 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.9 3.5 . 3.1 3.7

979 1042 1166 907 920 1075 822 865 841 991 908 921 877 924 998 897 798 948 999 844 949 941 914 893 896 872 851 919 1006 884 1016 786 970 860 919 835 908 830 779 746 847 737 917 729 899 931 951 933 897 943 779 . 779 935

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.2 2.9 0.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 . 2.9 2.8

939 801 901 797 725 788 747 767 716 797 706 770 734 755 766 681 657 774 765 726 706 778 780 738 720 725 702 761 778 762 772 690 793 684 876 718 733 27 643 607 725 649 718 646 734 737 717 708 713 745 679 . 748 708

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

WEST VIRGINIA

LINTON BROTHERS INC.

DHI H 188.2

17529

666 3.8 549 3.1

DHIR X 126.0 DHI-AP H 128.4

19797 20515

754 3.8 645 3.3 753 3.7 620 3.0

HOUGH, CLARENCE E. & T.TODD DHIRAPCS H 210.1 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP H 95.5 SNYDER, NICHOLAS DHI-AP H 93.7 DANIEL, FRANCIS DHIR-AP H 126.8 RZ BANE INC. DHI-APCS H 249.1 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP J 55.3 DANIEL, FRANCIS DHIR-AP J 34.2

22978 21817 21341 19694 19552 15486 14558

916 748 761 776 693 703 745

DHIRAPCS H 46.6

18115

639 3.5 556 3.1

DHI-APCS H 87.4 DHI-AP H 69.5 DHI-APCS H 32.4

23558 18336 17716

907 3.9 722 3.1 679 3.7 553 3.0 3X 597 3.4 528 3.0

DHI H 78.1

20834

811 3.9 679 3.3

DHIR-AP H 208.8

19316

677 3.5 585 3.0 3X

GREENBRIER BEN BUCK FARM EMORY & JEAN HANNA

MONONGALIA

WEST VIRGINIA DAIRY DEPT

MONROE

BEILER DAIRY FARM, LLC DOUG & TRACY DRANSFIELD TRISH & STEVE ECHOLS

PRESTON GREG GIBSON

RANDOLPH LINGER FARMS INC.

ANNUAL AVERAGES B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

4.0 3.4 3.6 3.9 3.5 4.5 5.1

704 669 645 613 598 563 531

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.6

Herds Ranked by Daily Milk Lbs Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh The United Federation DHIA's, Va Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (540) 552-2541

APRIL

OWNER

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

JEFFERSON

DHI-AP H 572.4 DHI-APCS H 246.8 DHIR-AP H 308.3

CLARK

activities is available on Virginia AGvocates www.virginiaagvocates.o rg website.

Top 40 Herds For April

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

LOUDOUN

R TEST A MTH N K

ginia FFA, is funding the program. More information, resources, and upcoming

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER M J ATKINS CONNER DAIRY FARM INC ROBERT JENKINS & SONS DAIRY SAM AREY AND LARRY MOORE COOL LAWN HOLSTEINS STANLEY KOOGLER BROOKSTONE FARM LW COLE FARM DANIEL LAYMAN BURKDALE FARM DONALD & WAYNE COX HARRY J AND RONALD L BENNETT JAMES L WILL JARECO FARMS RIVER HAVEN FARMS INC RIDGE VIEW DAIRY LLC GARY RUSSELL AND RUDOLPH RUSSELL BACK CREEK DAIRY R-GARNETT SMITH JR CHERRY GROVE FARM INC LESTER & CAROL COBB MOTLEY DAIRY INC. LAKESIDE DAIRY FARM INC. MEADOW LAKE FARM INC WALKUP HOLSTEINS K & K DAIRY, LLC. FLOWING SPRING FARM ALLEN LAYMAN HARMON BECKNER BELAIR DAIRY, LLC KENDRA & JULIA HORST WHITE OAK SPRING DAIRY LLOYD E PHILLIPS STAN AND WES SHOWALTER LANAHAVEN FARM,INC CHARLES F MOYER AND SONS SHEN-ROCK HOLSTEINS CLAUDE AND KAREN GREEN CARTER S ELLIOTT JR RICHARD L SHOWALTER TURNER DAIRY DL & JB MAYHUGH CLARMAY FARM KYLE LEONARD TIDEWATER-DAIRY FARM INC% DUSTIN AND SARAH WENGER DAN ABE SLEMP AND SON JOE BLANKENSHIP JACOB SHENK R Y STILES & SONS DAVID G & DARLENE F HOFFMAN MICHAEL AND LORI WEBB E CLINE BRUBAKER NELSON & BEVERLY SINE & FAMILY

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

CHARLOTTE C H VA 4 55 FLOYD VA 4 56 GREEN BAY VA 3 57 MOUNT SIDNEY VA 4 58 REMINGTON VA (3X) 4 59 HARRISONBURG VA 4 60 HARRISONBURG VA (3X) 4 61 CHILHOWIE VA 4 62 WIRTZ VA 4 63 HARRISONBURG VA 4 64 RADFORD VA 4 65 COVINGTON VA (3X) 4 66 BRIDGEWATER VA 4 67 PENHOOK VA 4 68 RADFORD VA 4 69 QUICKSBURG VA (3X) 4 70 WOODLAWN VA 4 71 PULASKI VA 4 72 BEAVERDAM VA 4 73 FAIRFIELD VA 3 74 DAYTON VA 4 75 CHATHAM VA 4 76 MINERAL VA 4 77 MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) 4 78 HARRISONBURG VA 4 79 MOUNT CRAWFORD VA 4 80 BUCHANAN VA 4 81 WIRTZ VA 4 82 WIRTZ VA 4 83 CULPEPER VA 4 84 HARRISONBURG VA 4 85 EVINGTON VA 4 86 RADFORD VA 4 87 BRIDGEWATER VA 4 88 FERRUM VA 4 89 AMELIA VA 4 90 HARRISONBURG VA (3X) 4 91 BOONES MILL VA 4 92 RUSTBURG VA (3X) 4 93 DAYTON VA 4 94 BEDFORD VA 4 95 BRANDY STATION VA 4 96 FISHERSVILLE VA 4 97 SPOTTSWOOD VA 4 98 WARSAW VA 3 99 BRIDGEWATER VA 4 100 VIRGINIA COLOR BREEDS SUGAR GROVE VA 4 1 SUGAR GROVE VA 4 2 CATLETT VA 4 3 CLEAR BROOK VA 4 4 CULPEPER VA 4 5 CONCORD VA 4 6 ROCKY MOUNT VA 4 7 WOODSTOCK VA 3 8

ANNUAL AVERAGES B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

76.6 76.4 76.4 76.2 76.1 76.0 75.8 75.8 75.7 75.5 75.3 75.2 75.2 75.1 75.0 75.0 74.9 74.9 74.8 74.8 74.8 74.7 74.6 74.5 74.5 74.0 73.8 73.7 73.5 73.4 73.4 73.3 73.2 73.1 73.0 72.9 72.9 72.7 72.6 72.6 72.4 72.4 72.1 72.1 72.1 72.1

266 156 186 131 205 180 192 224 200 183 209 251 201 191 196 225 226 196 199 189 168 213 199 157 180 178 207 165 193 194 162 217 204 191 164 185 167 175 217 242 209 221 220 179 189 183

23955 23692 21815 19764 23393 21210 21692 23003 22887 22715 22052 25523 22680 23012 22945 24470 25074 23105 21807 23289 21848 21713 24852 17412 23011 22095 23045 22562 23697 22742 22714 21272 21477 22108 20902 23678 24733 20304 23342 23702 22366 22037 24134 23551 19360 21710

3.3 3.1 3.8 3.5 3.7 3.5 3.9 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.4 4.0 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.6 4.1 4.1 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.5 3.6 4.0 3.6 3.8 4.2 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.8 4.4 3.9

779 724 839 689 865 752 844 825 852 847 806 914 768 925 825 850 890 862 856 848 771 786 896 715 947 790 898 833 879 852 806 775 854 792 802 993 905 712 843 870 836 839 868 896 849 842

3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0

727 696 682 585 702 643 672 719 685 699 684 741 666 721 690 745 763 700 667 696 678 674 724 532 676 676 725 659 716 704 688 659 672 661 657 738 738 597 696 736 698 670 740 697 608 644

64.9 51.9 51.5 51.5 48.4 47.1 45.4 40.7

162 169 196 192 213 128 188 154

18295 14564 15236 14211 16189 . 13436 12240

4.4 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.5 . 4.9 4.5

809 704 718 668 736 . 652 553

3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.5 . 3.4 3.3

597 J 517 J 546 J 524 J 572 J . J 452 G 407 J


HARRISBURG, PA — The Pennsylvania State Grange has asked the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board (PMMB) to extend the $2.15 over-order premium currently in place for milk produced, processed and sold in Pennsyl-

vania. The state Grange continues to advocate on behalf of agriculture and rural communities and for a milk price that is beneficial to the dairy farmer. Matt Espenshade, a seventh generation dairy farmer and president of Eliz-

abethtown Grange No. 2076, offered testimony on behalf of the Grange. He and his family milk 70 cows on a Lancaster County farm that has been operated by his family since 1897. Espenshade previously offered testimony before the PMMB on this same issue in May 2011. Espenshade testified that, since the fall of 2011, the price his farm is paid for milk through their coop has declined $4.27 per hundredweight. During this same period, they have seen an increase in feed and fuel costs. He shared with the PMMB that for many farms, something as simple as an extra delivery of feed or unexpected repair bill can mean the difference between just getting by and being in a serious financial crisis. In urging the PMMB to extend the current over-order premium, Espenshade reminded them of the extreme

weather conditions that also plagued area farmers throughout 2011. These weather conditions affected the amount and quality of feed crops farmers were able to plant and harvest in the spring and fall of last year. Espenshade noted, “Many farms across the state have faced shortages of feed as well as poor quality.” This family farm has decided that changes need to be made in order to remain viable in today’s dairy industry — changes that many family farms across Pennsylvania are facing. Espenshade testified to the importance of maintaining the over-order premium to the future of his family’s farm and the businesses that support the dairy industry, “The money you invest in the over-order premium is not just supporting the local farmer, but the businesses they depend on as well,” he said.

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

The Dairy One Improver

New EU Agreement Drives Milk Quality Focus Access to international markets is an important area of growth for U.S. dairy producers. Participating in this global market means meeting the recently adopted European Union-USDA marketing agreement (EC 853/2004 regulation) milk quality standards. Having a new regulatory requirement has naturally led the industry toward focusing on achieving and maintaining somatic cell counts below the 400k limit. In April, producers began seeing calculated values of their rolling 3 month SCC mean, which indicates whether or not they are below the required limit. PENNSYLVANIA MM WEAVER & SONS, INC. 169 North Groffdale Rd. Leola, PA 717-656-2321

NEW YORK CORYN FARM SUPPLIES INC. 3186 Freshour Rd. Canandaigua, NY 585-394-4691

ELDER SALES & SERVICE INC. 4488 Greenville-Sandy Lake Rd. Stoneboro, PA 724-376-3740

ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT 3662 Buffalo St., Box 215 Alexander, NY 585-591-2955

MAINE KRAMERS INC. 2400 W River Rd. Sidney, ME 207-547-3345

CATSKILL TRACTOR INC. 384 Center St. Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

NEW YORK SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 Sharon Springs, NY 518-284-2346

A simple way to think about the complicated system that the EU has put in place is to look at cows in a herd that are infected. They are either infected or not, based on their SCC. Cows with higher SCC than others that are over the infection threshold (200,000) simply contribute to the bulk tank at different rates, based on their production and SCC. They are not "more infected". That said, once a producer reaches a geometric mean over 400,000, they are out of compliance, and it doesn't matter by how much. To make the calculation a bit easier, simply take the product of the three months averages; if below 64 million, you are fine. For instance, a herd with 3 consecutive months at 400K average SCC would have a product of 64 million, since 400K x 400K x 400K= 64,000,000. Producers below the limit will benefit from evaluating their SCC maintenance and monitoring options, while those above need options to help reduce overall cell counts while maintaining compatibility with the management of their farm business.

Page 21 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

Grange urges PMMB to extend over-order premium


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 22

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

The Dairy One Improver

400K Beat It! Program Uses a Team Approach to Improve Milk Quality Dairy One and Quality Milk Production Services have created a service package that provides a short-term--but intensive--boost to your milk quality management. The program, 400K Beat It!, is short-term in the sense that we will work with farms individually each month over a 6-month timeframe, but is long-term since our intention is to build a process by which the farm can manage and monitor SCC into the future. Identifying the factors that are impacting milk quality involves evaluating several aspects of the dairy operation. It can be difficult to isolate these factors and to develop appropriate monitoring tools without information and the experience of people who are working across many farms. Milking procedure, milking equipment, cow housing, bedding, consistency of the herd staff, dry cow programs, and nutritional programs are just some of the areas that need to be investigated before a good, whole farm program can be developed. Forming a milk quality team that supports and works with you to reach your milk quality goals is a positive first step. The team members are those advisors you work with and trust. For example, you might invite your Dairy One market manager or technician, milk inspector (CMI), herd veterinarian, and/or regional QMPS veterinarian to participate. One member will work as a facilitator, keeping everyone informed as new data is available, while other members will participate in setting goals, management changes, and monitoring progress during the program. Below is a graph featuring a case study herd where a team approach was used to improve SCC. It shows the bulk tank SCC for each tank for a one-year period. The oldest data is on the left, and most recent data is on the right. The broken line is at the 400K level, and timing for each meeting is indicated.

How the 400K Beat It! program works: Step #1: Complete a “Management Survey” or short risk assessment of your farm situation. The team will review and discuss the information, and come up with a plan to work on the identified priorities. In many cases, it is most efficient and cost effective to conduct this team meeting by conference call. Step #2: Set up the testing program for your farm. The testing program will include a 6-month bulk milk monitoring program and 6 months of individual cow production and cellcount tests. Step #3: Collect and interpret all the data. Before the team can suggest improvements, it is key to measure precisely what is happening in the herd: if you don't measure it, you can't manage it. QMPS veterinarians will analyze each month’s collected data with bulk tank cultures. They will look at the major bacteria causing SCC problems, and they will review cow-level SCC to identify dynamics of infections in the herd. Reports and recommendations for strategies to lower bulk tank SCC will be sent back to the dairy and distributed to the team. Step #4: The final step consists of another team meeting. The team will review all the data and decide on the necessary steps to ensure continued production of high-quality milk. The combination of monthly test-day information combined with regular team reporting on the results may be a process that continues in your day-to-day management. Sharing information during the 6-month duration of the program can provide the foundation for a process used by the dairy going forward.

Figure 1: 400K Beat It! case study This bulk tank SCC case study indicates the following: 1. The cost of the 400 Beat It! program is an investment in udder health and milk quality. 2. The 400 Beat It! program is a process, not an event, and functions better as time goes on. 3. Using teams is a powerful management strategy. Significant improvements are evident when teams meet and work for a common cause. 4. We are seeing success in achieving our goal of improved bulk tank SCC.

Teams are an integral part of the program because reducing SCC takes teamwork. The path to progress is not always easy to find, particularly while steeped in day-to-day management of the farm. With the 400K Beat It! program, we help you by developing a short-term, very focused program. Through the program, you receive the guidance and support of your professional milk quality team, as well as the data and monitoring solutions necessary to maximize milk quality. The return on investment will be evident in a very short time because it is two-fold: increased milk quality premiums and increased milk production. For producers who are consistently below 400K, we can explore a similar approach through our 200K Get It! program. For more information about the program, contact Randy Perkins, Marketing and Sales Director by phone at 607-227-6528 or by e-mail at randy.perkins@dairyone.com.


VIRGINIA DAIRYMEN SPECIALTY CO. Harrisonburg, VA 540-433-9117

PENNSYLVANIA AG EQUIPMENT SPECIALTIES Mercersburg, PA (717) 328-4450 HISTAND’S FARM & HOME Rome, PA 570-744-2371 J&J SILO CO. Gordonville, PA 717-768-7456 ROVENDALE AG & BARN Watsontown, PA 570-538-9564 SYNERGY AG SERVICES, LLC Chambersburg, PA 717-709-9990

MARYLAND GLADHILL TRACTOR MART Frederick, MD 301-663-1658

Dr. Michael Ladisch, director of the Laboratory of Renewable Resources Engineering and Distinguished Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at Purdue University, will deliver the keynote address to participants at the grand opening of the National Corn Growers Association’s Corn Utilization and Technology Conference, June 4, in Indianapolis, IN. “Dr. Ladisch’s work focuses on bringing biotech products to large numbers of people,” said NCGA Research and Business Development Action Team Chair DeVonna Zeug. “We are excited to have him set the stage for three days of discussion among the corn industry’s leading researchers, processors and business representatives.” At Purdue University’s Laboratory of Renewable Resources Engineering, Ladisch and his colleagues address topics in bioprocess engineering as they apply to bioenergy, bioproducts, biorecovery and bionanotechnology. He has authored 150 journal and proceedings papers, issued and applied

for 14 patents and is the recipient of several scientific recognitions including the Paul Dana Biofuels Award of the Indy Racing League. Dr. Ladisch is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is Chief Technology Officer of Mascoma Corporation and serves on the scientific Advisory Board of Agrivida. This year, CUTC’s agenda features cutting-edge technologies and new uses positioned to dynamically change the corn industry. The conference will debut presentations complementing the work of the Aflatoxin Mitigation Center of Excellence, which emphasizes the importance of mycotoxin control in all phases of production and processing. The CUTC poster session and other scheduled activities will provide opportunities for attendees to interact with peers and business contacts. CUTC will be held at the Westin Indianapolis in downtown Indianapolis, IN, June 4-6. Visit www.corntechconf.org for more information and to register online.

Page 23 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 21, 2012

Corn Utilization and Technology Conference announces top bioengineer as keynote speaker


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 24

Soybean crop increases, but supply to dip to historic low There are going to be more soybeans grown across the United States this year, but that increase will be dwarfed by the amount of soybeans that will be used and exported. The scenario will mean U.S. soybean supplies will fall to a mere 16 days of inventory, according to American Farm Bureau Federation analysts. According to the Agriculture Department’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report for May 2012, this year’s soybean crop is projected at 3.205 billion bushels, an increase of 149 million bushels from 2011. That boost, however, is not projected to keep up with strong demand from exports, which are expected to increase by 190 million bushels and the crush use of soybeans, which will increase by 10 million bushels. “When all is said and done, our ending stocks of soybeans will drop to just 145 million

bushels,” said AFBF Senior Economist Todd Davis. “That equates to a 4.4 percent stocks-touse ratio, which is just over a two week supply of soybeans at the end of the year. That will tend to be a bullish factor and should keep soybeans positioned as the market driver.” Prices will reflect soybean stocks being projected at historically low levels. The 2012-2013 U.S. marketing year average prices is pegged at $13 per bushel, which would eclipse the 2012 record of $12.35 per bushel, Davis explained. Davis said there are several factors leading to this perfect storm for soybeans. South American soybean production continues to decline, with Argentina’s production reduced by 91.8 million bushels and Brazil’s production reduced 36.7 million bushels from April. According to Davis, as the harvest wraps up in South America, the market is now grasping a better understanding of how their drought cut into production. On the world level, ending stocks for soybeans will be the tightest they have been since the 2007-2008 marketing year, 53.24 million metric tons, or a stocks-touse ratio of 15.5 percent. This report also carried significant news on the corn side, Davis said. The 2012 U.S. corn crop

is now projected at 14.8 billion bushels, which would be a record if realized. That is 2.4 billion bushels more than what was harvested in 2011. USDA projected a record 2012 yield of 166 bushels per acre based on the rapid pace of planting and crop emergence, according to Davis. Demand for corn is also projected to increase due to increased feed use (up 900 million bushels) and exports that should increase by

200 million bushels. “Corn production will outpace stronger demand and that will likely result in lower prices, but those prices will help fuel the robust demand we see both domestically and abroad,” Davis explained. Davis said 2012-2013 ending stocks for the domestic corn supply will be at 1.88 billion bushels. That is an increase of more than 1 billion bushels. The stocks-to-use ratio is

projected to increase to 13.7 percent, which is the largest since 20092010. Davis said that because of the large increase in corn stocks, the U.S. marketingyear average price is projected to decline sharply to $4.60 per bushel, compared to the 2011-2012 price of $6.10 per bushel. But there was a little surprise in the latest report, according to Davis. “There was a curveball regarding old-crop corn,”

Davis said. “The May report actually increased ending stocks of last year’s crop by 50 million bushels. This came as a fairly significant surprise, as pre-report estimates projected a decline in stocks due to stronger demand. According to the report, that demand never materialized because the amount of corn used for feed was reduced by 50 million bushels to reflect a greater use of wheat in feed rations.”


Midatlantic

Section B ASA urges speedy Senate consideration of Farm Bill In a letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NE) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), the American Soybean Association (ASA) and stakeholder groups from across agriculture urged the Senate to bring the Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act of 2012, more commonly known as the Farm Bill, to the floor for consideration as quickly as possible. “The stakeholders we represent need to know details of the programs which will be in effect in 2013 as soon as possible,” the letter stated. “Timely action will also enhance prospects for completing new legislation this year rather than needing to extend current program authorities.” The groups noted that the proposed legislation’s impact will not be limited to farm communities. “This is one piece of legislation upon which all Americans depend, urban as well as rural,” said the groups. Additionally, the groups underscored their collective goal of passing a farm bill this year, expressing a balanced desire to achieve organizational goals while also succeeding as a larger agricultural community. “With limited time remaining before expiration of current program authorities, time is of the essence,” wrote the groups. “While each of our respective organizations will continue to work to accomplish our key priorities, the farm bill must move forward.” Source: ASA Weekly Leader Letter for Thursday, May 10

Page 1 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 2012

Country y Folks


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 2

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You National Egg Month more incredible than ever Beat the heat with salads with eggs May is National Egg Month, it’s an important time for your family to eat high-quality protein at meals. The all-natural protein in eggs can help your kids perform their best on big days, when it matters most. And, with recent USDA data showing that one large egg is now 14 percent lower in cholesterol (down from 215 mg to 185 mg) and 64 percent higher in vitamin D, there’s no excuse not to get cracking. “National Egg Month is a terrific time to take a closer look at eggs — they are a good source of high-quality protein and contain 13 essential vitamins and minerals, all for just 15 cents apiece,” said Dr. Mitch Kanter, executive director of the Egg Nutrition Center. “Choosing eggs for breakfast is an easy way to deliciously — and nutritiously — celebrate.” Once hard-boiled eggs are cooked and peeled, most recipes have prep times under 10 minutes. For tips on hard-cooking eggs, more incredible recipes and nutrition information, visit www.incredibleegg.org or www.facebook.com/incredibleedibleegg.

Zesty summer steak salad 1 beef top sirloin steak, cut 3/4” thick (about 1 lb.) 1 tbsp. Mrs. Dash Garlic & Herb Seasoning Blend 1 medium sweet onion, cut into 1/2” thick slices 6 cups chopped romaine lettuce 1 medium tomato, sliced 6 Hard-boiled eggs peeled and quartered New York Style Sea Salt Bagel Crisps Dressing: 1/3 cup red wine vinegar 2 tbsp. honey 1 tbsp. olive oil 2 tsp. dried basil leaves 1 tsp. Mrs. Dash Seasoning Blend

Combine dressing ingredients in small bowl. Reserve 1/3 cup for salad. Brush remaining dressing on onion slices. Press 1 tablespoon seasoning blend evenly onto beef steak. Place in center of grid over medium ash covered coals. Grill steak, covered, 7 to 11 minutes (on gas grill, 8-13 min over medium heat) for medium rare (145°). Grill onion 10-12 minutes or until tender, turning occasionally. Carve beef into slices. Arrange lettuce on serving platter. Top with beef and tomato slices, onions and eggs. Drizzle with reserved dressing. Serve with Bagel Crisps as desired. Makes 4 main dish servings

Pink potato salad 3 lbs. baby red potatoes, washed, skins on 1 small onion, diced 7 hardboiled eggs, sliced, 1 reserved 1/2 green bell pepper, diced 6 sliced radishes 1 cucumber, peeled and diced 1 cup frozen peas, thawed 3 Tbsp. fresh, chopped parsley Dressing: 1/2 cup chili sauce 2 cups mayonnaise 1/2 cup French dressing 2 tsp. salt 3 tsp. onion powder 1/2 tsp. pepper 1/4 tsp. garlic powder Paprika for garnish Prepare dressing. Boil potatoes until tender but firm. Cool slightly, cut in half and add dressing while still warm. Let sit while preparing other ingredients; then fold them in. Refrigerate. Garnish with sliced egg and paprika. Makes 8-10 servings

Mushroom and egg salad* 3 slices brown bread and olive oil

3-4 eggs, hard boiled and peeled, set aside 1 head frisée lettuce 1 bunch watercress 9 oz. chanterelle (or your choice) mushrooms 1 tablespoon butter 2 cloves garlic chopped For dressing: 1 Tablespoon capers 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 1/2 Tablespoons red wine vinegar 1/4 cup olive oil Tear bread into 1” chunks. Drizzle with light olive oil and a touch of salt. Bake in 350° oven for 20 minutes, moving chunks around halfway through. They should be golden. Wash and tear up lettuce and watercress and spin-dry. Trim soiled ends of mushrooms and wipe clean. Melt butter in skillet, add garlic; swirl in bubbling butter until they begin to turn brown; add mushrooms. Season with S&P, cover; toss again and fry on high heat, uncovered, until soft. Make dressing by whisking those ingredients together. To Serve: Coat salad greens with dressing; arrange on plates with croutons scattered. Toss on mushrooms and arrange sliced eggs on top. Add a grind of cracked pepper and a touch of Kosher salt on yolks. Makes three main dish or six appetizer salads *Recipe adapted from Coloring the Seasons, by Allegra McEvedy

Corn chip salad 1 large head iceberg lettuce, washed, spun and torn 6 hard boiled eggs, chopped large 1/2 lb. bacon, fried, drained and crumbled 3/4 lb. grated Cheddar (or your favorite) cheese 4-6 cups corn chips, crushed Dressing: 1/4 cup brown sugar 1 cup mayonnaise 2 Tbsp. vinegar 1/4 cup milk Mix lettuce, eggs, bacon, cheese and corn chips together in a large bowl. Mix Dressing ingredients together and pour over salad just before serving. Makes 6 entrée servings

Lettuce salad roll ups Whole lettuce leaves (Romaine or Iceberg), washed and dried Tuna, Chicken or Egg Salad Put a scoop of salad in each leaf. Roll up and enjoy or wrap each in plastic wrap for a carb-free sandwich to go. Alternately, you may place the rolls in wraps or pitas. Source: Virginia Egg Council

This week’s Sudoku Solution


-

FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: Feeder Steers: 300# to 185; 350-450# 145-162; Hols. 250-350# to 120; 500700# to 108. Feeder Heifers: 200-375# 140-157; 390-550# 130-148; 600-700# 128-142; 700-850# 108-1277; 1000-1100# 107112. Feeder Bulls: 200-350# 150-185; 375-450# 120-145; 500-700# 120-130; Jerseys 250-600# 89-100. Beef Stock Cows: Cow & Calf at 1285; L Short Breds to 1360.

MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: 300. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 230-240# 219-221; 250-270# 190-202; 468# 177.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 300-325# 185; 383# 173; 430# 160; 453-465# 165.50170; 510-541# 143-156; 600-631# 130.50-135.50; S 1-2 285# 130-164. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 445#170-177; 450-495# 152-173.50; 505-538# 158.50-162; 583# 150; 602620# 130-146; 760-790# 116-121; S 1-2 430-435# 121-143; 480-485# 130-149; 520-535# 118-144; 555-560# 140-144; 610-620# 119-120. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2

Young 1275-1450# 9991525/hd 7-9 mos bred; M&L 1-2 Middle Aged 940-1110# 999-1150/hd 4-6 mos bred; 1210-1310# 999-120/hd 4-6 mos bred. 935-1190# 9501350/hd 7-9 mos bred; 800855# 875-1100/hd 7-9 mos bred. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 1128 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 255-295# 185-210; 300-345# 150-205; 350-395# 161-194; 405-446# 150-192; 450497# 158-180; 500-547# 150-170; 550-598# 138-163; 605-635# 135-147; 655-690# 129-135; 833-833# 130; S 12 410-440# 116-143. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 200-245# 155-191; 250-297# 153-175; 300-345# 155-180; 350-395# 145-180; 400-448# 141-172; 450-495# 135-160; 500-548# 130-151; 550-598# 130-149; 600-645# 120-139; 650-697# 111-135; 700-745# 120-126; 750-790# 100-125; 800-830# 105-115; S 1-2 460-490# 112-122; 515-545# 109-123; 555-580# 110-120. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-496# 140-176; 500-545# 140-185; 550-590# 124-158; 600-643# 121-146; 655-695# 115-136; 700-730# 120-128;

750-795# 114-124; 813-825# 111-122; 860-870# 101-111; S 1-2 460-495# 126-147; 500-535# 114-130; 575-595# 110-125; 700-745# 94-101. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 110. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 170-178.50; 500600# 166.50-169.75; 600700# 146; M&L 2 400-500# 173.50; 500-600# 157167.50; 600-700# 159.50; M&L 3 400-500# 167. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 156.50; 500-600# 143; M&L 2 300-400# 155; 400-500# 133-154, mostly 154; 500-600# 141-142.50; 600-700# 137; M&L 3 300400# 161.50; 400-500# 151.50; 500-600# 141; S 1 500-600# 134. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 500-600# 153; M&L 2 300400# 170-175; 400-500# 171.50-172; 500-600# 154.50; 600-700# 102.50; 700-800# 110; S 1 400-500# 158.

137-145; 800-900# 130; 900-1000# 127-135; M&L 2 300-400# 184-188; 400-500# 152-171; 500-600# 144-160; 600-700# 133-147; 700800# 122.50-130; 800-900# 121-128; 900-1000# 116; S 1 600-700# 121. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 500-600# 116-120. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 170-182.50; 400500# 160-177; 500-600# 144-159.50; 600-700# 139152; 700-800# 110-134; 800900# 116-120; M&L 2 300400# 142.50-162.50; 400500# 145-163; 500-600# 140-154; 600-700# 129144.50; 700-800# 120; 800900# 97-107. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 170-215; 300-400# 195-198; 400-500# 165-183; 500-600# 144-165; 600-700# 129-148; 700-800# 129.50130; 800-900# 106-110; M&L 2 300-400# 164-179; 400500# 142.50-169; 500-600# 128-147; 600-700# 137-139; 700-800# 114-121.

800# 149; 800-900# 115137; 900-1000# 108.50-121; M&L 2 300-400# 168-186; 400-500# 160-176; 500-600# 160-171; 600-700# 143-160; 700-800# 146; 800-900# 117-135.50; 1000-1100# 94; S 1 400-500# 168. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 400-500# 127. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 156-187; 400-500# 143-173; 500-600# 142-157; 600-700# 133-144; 700-800# 124-134; 800-900# 110118.50; M&L 2 300-400# 159-175; 400-500# 152-169; 500-600# 136-157.50; 600700# 125-139; 700-800# 114-126; S 1 300-400# 157. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 168-187; 400-500# 160.50-190; 500-600# 145173; 600-700# 136.50-148; 700-800# 125; M&L 2 300400# 161-170; 400-500# 161-180; 500-600# 138-166; 600-700# 134-148; 700-800# 122-129; M&L 3 500-600# 144; S 1 400-500# 150; 50600# 151.

N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1215 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 180-199; 400-500# 176-193; 500-600# 160-189; 600-700# 148-153; 700-800#

SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 771. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 187-192; 400-500# 176-183; 500-600# 157-174; 600-700# 145-164.50; 700-

FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE:

Page 3 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 2012

MARKET REPORTS


BUSH HOG 6 foot rotary mower, $500. International 56 4-row corn planter, both good condition $500. 585-703-2001.(NY)

WANTED: Jersey Heifers, Springing and Short bred for grazing dairy farm. 585-5904948.(NY)

ANTIQUE CORN SHELLER, best offer, good condition. 315-696-5565.(NY)

IH 510 DOUBLE DISC drill grain only $1,000. Case IH 8312 discbine $15,000. 4 Row cultivator w/side dresser $1,500. 716941-5123.(NY)

WANTED: Used metal grain bin 6 ton or more and used rubber cow mats. 315-7615897.(NY)

NH SUPER 717 + 770 choppers, Gehl Hithrow blower, Dion unloading wagons. Also Craftmatic adjustable bed. 607-5663312.(NY)

LINEBACK BULL calves from good milk breed stock good grazers, longetivity, Central NY $300. 607-847-8438 EBY G.N. stock trailer in good shape. 518568-2901.(NY) WANTED: Dairy cattle beef, bull steers feeders, veal sheep and goats. 413-4413085.(MA) JD 918 FLEX HEAD for sale for $7,500. Niagara County. Hydro D50 spray pump 13.7 GPM $150. 716-297-4350.(NY)

SALE DION self unload wagon 16ft. 3BTR. roof $1,000. Little Giant 40ft. elevator $1,200. pair 18.4/30 tires worn sound $100. 585-535-7006.(NY)

FARM TRACTOR TIRES 12.4x28, 11.2x16 with tubes, 11.2x20 570-756-2764. Also contents of floor and wall tile business, $5. case obo. 570-442-1310.(PA)

1949 FARMALL “M” runs good, good tires, nice sheet metal $3,600. John Deere “H” 1940, not running, not stuck $1,800. 401662-9131.(RI)

2-5FT.ROTARY MOWERS, Ford 2 bottom plow, Ford 8ft. disc- Ford cycle mower 7ft., all 3 points. 315-923-5011.(NY)

LILLISTON ROLLING Cultivator with fertilizer attachment $2,000. 1040 Massey quick hitch loader fits 471 and 481, like new $2,500. 508-410-7996.(MA)

WANTED: 540 Hydraulic pump for IH 800 planter, also 3 point disc mower. 216-4011052.(NY)

PLASTIC MULCH layer lays 4ft. wide plastic mulch 3pt. hitch excellent condition $800. 716-945-5221.(NY)

CATTLE BELTED Galloways 22mo., old service bull, cows, calves, steers, all grass fed. Call anytime. 607-387-9383.(NY)

WHITE PINE SHAVINGS, kiln dried. 3.25 cubic foot paper bags excellent to absorb moisture. 529 Klock Rd. Fort Plain, NY. 518-568-3203

WANTED: Barrel spreader or smaller PTO spreader also 20.8 38 tire chains 1175 Case door. 315-855-4353.(NY)

SADDLE BRED MARE seven years old, come and drive her $1,000. 585-5543818.(NY)

1968 D-6 CATERPILLAR bulldozer, full cab, 75% undercarriage, battery start, 2 way blade $12,000. OBO. 607-8634928.(NY)

4x4 TRACTOR 90H same cab, loader, A/C, heat, PTO 540-1,000 low hrs., 2wd Massey 253 clean lance truck camper loaded. 607865-5678.(NY) JOHN DEERE 457 4X5 round baler net wrap or string, like new condition, always kept inside. 518-744-1703.(NY) FOR LEASE 15 acres, pasture, barn waterer, ele. 4 wire high tensile fence, 15 min. from Owego, NY. 607-687-4679. CASE IH TWIN hitch for 5100 grain drills $600. or best offer. John Deere 2840, good condition $7,000. or best offer. 315-7298018.(NY) 2 ROW 3PT JD Max Emerge corn planter with insecticide $2,500. 315-5313324.(NY) FOR SALE: Combine International 403 12ft. cut, field ready, excellent condition, always stored inside $3,500. obo. 716-7314021.(NY)

FOR SALE: Tires two 13.6-28 FWD 10 ply. 25% tread $150. each. John 315-6623861.(NY)

INT MODEL “1100” sickle bar mower. Ferguson “T035”. Farmall “M” with loader. Misc. Int. tractor parts. JD four bottom trailer plow. 607-794-8380.(NY)

DRY 4X4 500LB. round bales, grass mix, stored inside $25. each. Wayne County, NY. 315-923-2410

RICHERTON 16 foot blower dump table. Gehl 1540 blower. 518-895-2590.(NY)

CASE 430 loader backhoe, old but in good condition $4,500. 4 Horse tractor needs work $700. Windham, NY area. 518-7343198

CAB FOR JOHN DEERE 7410 Power Quad, all glass and parts $7,000. OBO. 607-434-5691.(NY) JOHN DEERE 4440, good tires, front tires new, runs well, looks good, has served us well $19,500. Call Dave Henry. 401-8220131.(RI)

12FT. CEDAR HILL Transport Harrow $800. 275 Gal. fuel tank $100. Joel King 392 Elwood Rd. Fort Plain, NY 13339. 518993-2118

820 LAWN MOWER transmission $40. Lawn mower trailer $25. 6 Bean cups for John Deere 7,000 planter $50. each. 315536-8919.(NY)

GENERATOR, 75K Katolight, like new $3,500. Inverter 166 NH with extension $1,200. 518-643-8052.(NY)

FOR SALE: Yearling Holstein and Ayrshire bulls, 98 4x4 Dodge truck. WANTED:Pull type AC 60, 66 or 72 Combine. 607-5465588.(NY)

HIGH QUALITY forage soybean baleage 25 4x4 triple wrapped at $20. obo. Conrad Cook. St. Law. County, NY. 315-265-6788 STOCK TANK 50 gallons $45., tarp 16x18 $15., dog houses medium $20., Goats Alpine Young $55., ATV winch, levels 7.00. 315-531-8670.(NY)

WANTED: 4-6ft. Woven or American wire, steel T-posts. 585-554-6219.(NY)

WANTED: Round bale chopper not shedder trailer type preferred, also 2RN pull type corn sheller, good condition Troy, NY. 518-279-3241

WANTED: Skipper Key male dog for breeding. Andrew D. Hershberger 392 County Route 30 Williamstown, NY 13493.

DUMP TRUCK, 1971 IH, roadable, single axle, pintle hitch $1,500. 607-8293183.(NY)

IH 1050 GRINDER mixer JD 7ft. Sickle mower Mel-Cam rock picker pair of 16.9-30 rear trac tires 75% tread. 518-8720651.(NY)

WANTED: Two 13.00/ 24 good condition loader tires. 401-374-0077.(RI)

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HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 141. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 193; 400-500# 177-178; 500-600# 171-173; 600-700# 165-165.50; 700800# 152; 900-1000# 108; M&L 2 200-300# 194; 300400# 189-191; 400-500# 173-183; 500-600# 162. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 600-700# 108. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 171-177; 400-500# 150.50-157; 500-600# 139144.50; 600-700# 134; 700800# 123; M&L 2 300-400# 170; 400-500# 148; 500600# 131-148.50; 600-700# 120-125. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300400# 185.50-190; 400-500# 165; 500-600# 147; 600700# 127-139; M&L 2 300400# 187-192; 400-500# 172.50; 500-600# 159; 600700# 120. LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 873. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 203; 400-500# 167.50-179.50; 500-600# 166-172.25; 600-700# 148.50-157; 700-800# 136137; M&L 2 300-400# 202208.50; 400-500# 170.50183.50; 500-600# 162.25174.75; 600-700# 144151.50; 700-800# 135.50136.50; M&L 3 300-400# 201; 400-500# 167-177.75; 500-600# 161.25; 600-700# 136.50; S 1 400-500# 180; 500-600# 142. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 181; 400-500# 149-162, mostly 162; 500600# 145-150.50; 600-700# 141-147; M&L 2 300-400# 183.25; 400-500# 158-160; 500-600# 145-151.75; 600700# 136-143; 700-800# 114.25; M&L 3 300-400# 180-182; 400-500# 155.50159.75; 500-600# 145.50149.75; 600-700# 123-126; 700-800# 113.50; S 1 300-

400# 179.50; 400-500# 139153, mostly 153; 500-600# 140-140.50; 600-700# 109. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 160-192, mostly 178.75-192; 500-600# 158.50; 600-700# 148; M&L 2 300-400# 205; 400-500# 174.25-195; 500-600# 148.50-158.50; 600-700# 144; S 1 300-400# 188; 400500# 173-178; 500-600# 141.50-148.50. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 33 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 143.50; M&L 2 500-600# 110-135.50 Feeder Heifers: M&L 2 500-600# 110-135.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 150; M&L 2 600700# 128; 700-800# 111123.50. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 575. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 180-189; 400-500# 180-193; 500-600# 169-189; 600-700# 148-153; 700-800# 145; 900-1000# 129.50-135; M&L 2 500-600# 144-160; 600-700# 133-145; 700800# 122.50-130; 900-1000# 116; S 1 600-700# 121. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 175-182.50; 400500# 160-177; 500-600# 144-157.50; 600-700# 140146; 700-800# 110-112.50; M&L 2 400-500# 146159.50; 600-700# 140-154; 600-700# 137-144.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400500# 169-181; 500-600# 144-154; 600-700# 143-148; M&L 2 400-500# 142.50146; 500-600# 137.50-144; 600-700# 137-139.

L COW W SALE SPECIAL S PECIAL FAUQUIER LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE, INC. 7404 John Marshall Hwy., Marshall, VA Office: 540-364-1566 or Toll Free 877-416-5653

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 55+ Bred Cows and Cow/Calf pairs from Shady Grove Farm 12 Fall Bred Heifers 8 Open Heifers from Cleremont Farm Plus 40+ Cow/Calf Pairs and Bred Cows from other consignors Fall Bred, Mostly Angus Regular Sale at 2:00 PM Bred Cows will be offered at 3:00 PM Cows will be preg-checked on 5/28/12 at the sale barn.

For more information or to consign, please contact: Lindsay Eastham, Manager 540-272-7048 Randall Updike, Field Rep. 540-522-6885 Wes Ware, Field Rep. 304-270-0276

TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 408. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 190; 400-500# 180-183; 500-600# 166.50171.50; 600-700# 145155.50; 800-900# 115; 9001000# 108.50; M&L 2 300400# 184; 500-600# 161170; S 1 400-500# 168. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 187; 400-500# 162-173; 500-600# 149-157; 600-700# 138-144; 700-800# 134; M&L 2 300-400# 169; 400-500# 157-169; 500-600# 146-153.50; 600-700# 130138; S 1 300-400# 157. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 185; 400-500# 167-190; 500-600# 167.50173; 600-700# 142-145; M&L 2 400-500# 161-180; 500-600# 158-166; 700-800# 122-129; M&L 3 500-600# 144; S 1 400-500# 150; 500600# 151. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 429. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 195-211; 400-500# 189-190; 500-600# 159-168; 600-700# 147-153.50; 700800# 137-137.50; 800-900# 120-130; M&L 2 300-400# 172-197; 400-500# 170-88; 500-600# 131-162.50; 600700# 141-150; 700-800# 134; 900-1000# 102-105. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 165-183; 400-500# 159-174; 500-600# 139159.50; 600-700# 136-147; 700-800# 129-130.50; 800900# 117; M&L 2 400-500# 110-142.50; 500-600# 124146; 600-700# 126-137; 700800# 120. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 196-225; 300-400# 196-199; 400-500# 168-182; 500-600# 137.50-163; 600700# 139-141; 700-800# 113-129; 800-900# 113; 9001000# 113; M&L 2 200-300# 179-199; 300-400# 184; 400500# 153-174; 500-600# 127.50-158; 800-900# 98; 900-1000# 97.50. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 230. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 500-600# 165; 600-700# 164.50; 700-800# 149; 800900# 137; 900-1000# 116121; M&L 2 300-400# 168186; 400-500# 160-168; 500600# 160-164; 600-700# 160; 700-800# 146; 800900# 135.50. Feeder Holstein Steers:

AUCTIONS L 2-3 400-500# 127. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 156-161.50; 400500# 156; 500-600# 152154.50; 600-700# 138-140; 700-800# 127; 800-900# 110-118.50; M&L 2 300400# 159-169; 400-500# 152-163; 500-600# 157.50; 600-700# 128-135; 700-800# 118-126. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 168; 400-500# 160.50-169.50; 500-600# 145-159; 600-700# 145-148; 700-800# 125; M&L 2 300400# 161-170; 400-500# 169.50; 500-600# 156.50160; 600-700# 135-148. SLAUGHTER CATTLE HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 85-90, hi dress to 93.50; Boner 83-89, hi dress to 97; Lean 75-85; Thin & Light 64 & dn. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1700-2000# 108-114, hi dress at 119; YG 2 104-108. Fed Steers: Ch 2 1272# at 113; lo Ch Hols. 1500-1700# 98-102.50. Fed Heifers: Ch Hols. 1344# at 109; L Ch Hols. 99101; Culls 92-95. Dairy Replacements: L Springers to 1300; Jersey Cow to 725; Fresh Jersey X Cow 950-1275; Short Bred Hols. Hfrs. 775-1100; Breeding Size Hfrs. 650-935; Jersey Open Hfrs. 350-600. Calves: Hols. Bull Ret. to Farm No. 1 80-120# 215232; No. 2 80-120# 190-212; No. 3 80-120# 160-190; Beef X Bulls 85-125# 175-190; Beef X Hfrs. 112# at 135.

SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1415-1670# 8392.50; 1415-1600# hi dress 93-100; 1400-1475# lo dress 79-82; Boner 80-85% lean 680-890# 84-89; 850-895# hi dress 90-98; 900-1375# 85-91.50; 1010-1325# hi dress 92-100; 910-1375# lo dress 70-83; Lean 85-90% lean 855-1075# 73.50-80; 905-1260# lo dress 65-66.

AUCTION Saturday 2ND June - 9:30 AM - Roxboro, NC

Real Estate, Construction & Farm Equipment Directions: From Roxboro, Take Hwy. 158 East 6 miles, sale @ 972 Tigen Rd. JD 4240, JD 2640, JD 2040, MF 135, (3) Roanoke box barns, Taylor 2-row harvester, irrigation pipe, 6-ton ss fertilizer spreader, ‘94 KW road tractor, ‘88 Ford L8000 dump truck, ‘03 & ‘96 Ford service trucks, equipment trailers, Cat V51 forklift, JD 770 motor grader, Lee Boy tar kettle, smooth drum rollers, rolling vibrator packer, BlawKnow paving machine, lots & lots of tools. Real Estate @ 2:15 PM - 108 Acres +/- in 6 tracts - 50% woodland, - 50% open land. Visit www.ebharris.com for complete details. SALE HELD RAIN OR SHINE E.B. HARRIS (252) 257-2140 6:15 AM-9:59 PM (252) 430-9595 Mobile E.B.’s 9-10 PM only 445-5856 Fate’s (252) 985-8340 Mobile Fate’s Fax No. (252) 257-1035

E.

B. H arri

s

Inc. / Auctioneers

3200 NC Hwy. 58 Warrenton, NC 27580 “THE COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICE” NCAL 1468 NC#C 4264 VAL 146 SCAL 3895 SALE DAY PAGER 252-407-4228

Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1065-1395# 97-106; 15351925# 95-109. Cows/Calf Pairs: 6. S1-2 850# young cows w/250# calves 1125/pr; M&L 1-2 950-1050# middle age cows w/100-250# calves 10001400/pr; L 1-2 1250-1300# middle age cows w/175-350# calves 1400-2000/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 75-90. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1055-1380# 8594.50; 1475-1675# 88-94.50; 2055-2095# 89-94; Boner 80-85% lean 765-880# 85.50-94; 920-1360# 85-95; 975-1350# hi dress 95-99; 1470-1620# 85-93.50; Lean 85-90% lean 885-1105# 7787.50; 805-1125# lo dress 63-75. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1530-2360# 100-109.50; 1760-1890# hi dress 110.50115. Cows/Calf Pairs: 1. S 1 -2 720# middle age cows w/110# calves 1175/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 85-125. SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 303 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8794.50; 1200-1600# 84.50-98; HY 1200-1600# 93-105; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 83.50-94; 1200-2000# 89.50-96; HY 1200-2000# 97-104.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 71-83.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 104.50-114; 1500-2500# 102.50-121; HY 1500-2500# 114-119. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 438. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 112-112.75; 1300-1500# 114-119.75; 1500# & up 116.50-118; Hols. Ch 2-3 1300-1500# 109-113.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1000-1200# 111-118; 12001300# 113.50-117.50; 13001500# 108.50-118.50. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8088.50; 1200-1600# 80-93.50; HY 1200-1600# 95-100; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 74.50-87; 1200-2000# 74-89; HY 1200-2000# 8893.25; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 54-69; 850-1200# 65-81. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 95-104.50; 1500-2500# 95-107; HY 1000-1500# 107.50-111.50; 1500-2500# 104-114.50.

Cows Ret. to Farm: 36. M&L 1, few 2, 4 yrs. to aged, bred 2-8 mos. 1050-1560# 950-1365/hd; M&L 2, few 1, 4 yrs. to aged, bred 5-8 mos. 850-975# 760-1100/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 8. M&L 1, few 2, w/calves 100-200# 935-1300# 9001525/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 53. 130-200# 151-210; Hols. Bulls 70-100# 50-165/hd, 1 at 230; 100-130# 223. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 38. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8995.50; 1200-1600# 88-96.50; HY 1200-1600# 97-103; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 83-86; 1200-2000# 85-86.50; HY 1200-2000# 87-93; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 65-75; 850-1200# 78-88. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1000-1100# 105; 11001300# 103-110.75; 13001500# 110-115; 1500-1850# 115. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 900-1000# 99.50; 10001200# 105-112; 1200-1400# 95.50-113; Sel 2-3 9001000# 97-105; 1000-1200# 98; 1400-1600# 105.50. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 8093.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 75-87; 12002000# 77-86.50; HY 12002000# 89-91; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 64; 8501200# 71-81. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 97-99; HY 15002500# 104-109. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls 70-100# 50165/hd; 100-130# 223/cwt. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 19. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 8595; HY 1200-1600# 96.50100; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 85; 1200-2000# 89.50-93; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 69-82.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 103; 15002500# 107-108. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 205. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 86-

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May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 6

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, May 21 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. 1 pm dairy followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. . Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Wednesday, May 23 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves

followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Thursday, May 24 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 Friday, May 25 • Clark Bros. Farm, DeRuyter, NY. 158 Hi Grade cattle. Farming since 2967. Top dairy averaging 60# out of the tank. AI breeding. Closed herd. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 • D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Spring Round up. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com • 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com Saturday, May 26 • 10:00 AM: Middlefield, MA. Estate Auction. Case 580 backhoe, Ford & AC tractors, hay equip & tools, horse equip, furniture & antiques. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com Monday, May 28 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Memorial Monday we will be open for business for the farmers convenience. Special Plant Auction. Starting at 10 am. Selling hanging baskets, bedding plants, vegetable plants, shrubs, trees all you need for your gardening needs. We will then follow with misc. small animals, etc. followed by our normal schedule. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, May 30 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-

394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, June 1 • Gene Woods Auction Service, Cincinnatus, NY. Price Farm. 50 Head Dairy. 25 recently fresh. Over 1/2 the dairy are 1st & 2nd’s. Nice young herd with a lot of milk. SCC-75,000. 4.0F 3.2P. Also consigned 28 open heifers from 300# to breeding age. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315729-8030 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, June 2 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 9:30 AM: South Royalton, VT. Selling tractors, farm equip. & implements, lawn & garden. Inventory reduction for L.F. Trottier’s. Monday, June 4 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Feeder & Fat Cow Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, June 9 • North Bangor, NY. Craigmoor Farms Dispersal. Eric & Joel Craig. 140 head of reg. Guernseys, reg. Jerseys & reg. R&W Holsteins. Complete line of machinery. Delarm & Treadway, 518-4834106 • 9:00 AM: Don Rice Jr., 5761 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. 15 MM farm tractors & parts, 150 MM farm toys, MM & gas signs. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm • 10:00 AM: 1046 Cty. Rd 23, Sherburne, NY. Lok-N-Logs, Sawmill Consolidation Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Monday, June 11 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs &

Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Friday, June 15 • Gene Woods Auction Service, Cincinnatus, NY. Pedersen Farms 100 head Holstein Cattle & some machinery. Gene Woods Auction Service, 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com • 4:00 PM: Wayne & Roxanne Force, 7819 High Rd., off CR 75, 4 mi. NE of Prattsburg, NY. Kubota BX2230 4wd w/deck, excellent contractor shop tools, antiques, household. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm Saturday, June 16 • 9:00 AM: Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Watertown, NY. Jefferson County Area Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Selling Heavy Equipment, Trucks & Trailers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, June 20 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, June 21 • Sharon Springs, NY. High Hill Farm Complete Dispersal. 120 plus head will sell. C/O Greg Law, owners. Managed by The Cattle Exchange. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 6:30 PM: 210 Pottsville St., Port Carbon, PA. 4.92 Approx. Industrial Acreage w/Building. Leaman Auctions, 717-464-1128, cell 610-6628149 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip #3721 Tuesday, June 26 • At the Farm, Newport, VT. Poulin-Royer, Inc. Complete Dispersal of all cattle and most equipment. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 Wednesday, June 27 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

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98; 1200-1600# 81.50-99; HY 1200-1600# 100-108; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 87-94.50; 1200-2000# 85-98; HY 1200-2000# 96100.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 64-74; 850-1200# 65-81. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 99.50-107; 1500-2500# 99.50-109.50; HY 1000-1500# 108-118; 1500-2500# 110-116.50. MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 89-95; HY 1200-1600# 97100; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 87-95; 12002000# 91-95; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 65.50-76.25. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 97.50-110. Calves Ret. to Farm: 12. Hols. Bulls 130-200# 157.50. Holstein Bulls: YG 1-2 100-130# 185. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 8593.50; HY 1200-1600# 9596.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 75-87; 12002000# 74-89; HY 12002000# 89-92; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 54-59; 8501200# 65-68.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 95-104.50; 1500-2500# 102.25; HY

1000-1500# 110.50; 15002500# 106-110.50. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 113-119.75; 1300-1500# 112.50-118.25; 1500-1850# 113-116; Sel 2-3 1500-1850# 112.75. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1000-1200# 112.50; 12001400# 113.50; 1400-1600# 115; Sel 2-3 900-1000# 95; 1200-1400# 96. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 138. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8792.50; 1200-1600# 89-98; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 83.50-92; 1200-2000# 89.50-96; HY 1200-2000# 100-102; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 79.50-80.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 104.50-114; 1500-2500# 112-121. WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 110. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 104; 1200-1600# 85.50-90; HY 1200-1600# 90.50-91.50; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 73-93; 1200-2000# 80-91.50; HY 1200-2000# 93-96.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 58-79; 850-1200# 73.50-85.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 106.50-108.75, 1 at 88; 1500-2500# 103109.75; HY 1000-1500# 112.50; 1500-2500# 111117.75. Cows Ret. to Farm: 23.

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M&L 1, few 2, 2-7 yrs., bred 5-8 mos. 845-1455# 8501350/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 8. M&L 1, 5-12 yrs. old w/calves 110-275# 9801250# 1160-1610/p. Calves Ret. to Farm: 9. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 85-250; 130-200# 235-285. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 150 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8794.50; 1200-1600# 8995.50; HY 1200-1600# 96105; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 85-94; 12002000# 89.50-95.50; HY 1200-2000# 97-104.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 7483.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 112; 15002500# 102.50-115.50; HY 1500-2500# 114-119. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats (/hd): 69. 35-50# 37-54; 50-60# 48-58; 60-70# 59-69; 80-100# 78110. Butcher Hogs: No. 1-3 230-270# 61-63.75; 275300# 60-62; 1 lot 382# at 53. Sows: 300-425# 51-57. Boars: 428# at 29. Bred Sows: 190-240; (/#) 10 110# at 109; 3 137# at 91. Stock Boars: 240-350# 48-56. NC SOWS: 300-399# 43.54-48.75; 400-449# 4253.15; 450-499# 41-54.66; 500-549# 41-56; 550# & up 51.75-58. FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No report. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: No report.

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ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report. S VA HOGS: No report. STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report.

LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 15. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 60-80# 180; 80-110# 170; 110-125# 147.50-177. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 80; Gd 2-4 126; Util 1-3 83; Cull 1-2 97.50. HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: Gd Ch 70-90# 175-195; 8 Sheep 70-105. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: L Billies to 250; M 120-155; Sel 1 80-100# 140175; 35-50# 83-100; Sel 2 100# 125-140. N VA GOATS: No report. MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report. MT. AIRY GOATS: 45. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 40; 60-80# 100120; Sel 2 under 20# 32.50; 20-40# 30-45; 40-60# 40-50; 60-80# 75-97.50; Sel 3 under 20# 22.50; 20-40# 22.50. Yearlings: Sel 1 80-100# 135. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 100140# 160-200; Sel 2 50-70# 35-47.50; 70-100# 35-50; 100-140# 60-75. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 150250# 195-245. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: 9. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 60-80# 180; 110-125# 177. FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report. HOLLINS, VA SHEEP/GOATS: No report MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No report. MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: 14 Slaughter Lambs: Wooled Ch & Pr 90-110# 223. SHENANDOAH SHEEP: Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 80-110# 170; 110-125# 147.50. Slaughter Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 80; Gd 2-4 126; Util 13 83; Cull 1-2 97.50. SILER CITY, NC GOATS:

64. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 30-40; 20-40# 5060; 40-60# 65-70; 60-80# 8595; Sel 2 under 20# 27.50. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80# 100-120; 80-100# 140-200. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 70100# 100-105; 100-140# 130-145; Sel 3 50-70# 42.50. Wethers: Selection 1 100150# 172.50-180. Bucks/Billies: Selection 1 70-100# 110, 150-250# 182.50. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: 31. Slaughter Lambs: Gd 100-140# 150-200. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 100200# 110-120; Util 80-100# 85-95. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report. TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 49. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 6080# 175-180; 80-110# 170180; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-2 30-60# 150-175. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Gd 2-3 73-75. WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 24. Kids: Sel 1-2 40-60# 141235; 60-80# 135-230; Sel 3 40-60# 108-132. Slaughter Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 146; 100-150# 130175; 150-250# 145. Slaughter Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 120; 100-150# 119. WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report. WYTHE CO GOATS: No report. CASH GRAIN MARKET NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 23¢ higher. Prices were 6.647.15, mostly 6.70 at the feed mills and 6.20-6.85, mostly 6.85 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 9-14¢ higher. Prices were 14.62 at the processors, 14.42 at the feed mills and 13.92-14.22, mostly 14.22 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was 30¢ higher. Prices were 6.59, mostly 6.59 at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 455/ton for 48% protein.

Feed Mills: Bladenboro 6.64, -----, ----; Candor 7.15, ----, ----; Cofield 6.70, 14.42, ---; Laurinburg 6.64, -----, ----; Monroe 6.95, -----, ----; Nashville 6.80, -----, ----; Roaring River 7, -----, ----; Rose Hill 6.64, -----, ----; Selma ----, -----, ----; Statesville 6.70, -----, 7.38; Warsaw 6.64, -----, ----; Pantego #2 6.70, -----, 6.20. Elevators: Cleveland ----, ----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ---; Chadbourn ----, -----, ----; Clement ----, -----, ----; Creswell 6.20, 14.02, ----; Elizabeth City 6.50, 14.22, 6.59; Greenville ----, -----, ----; Lumberton ----, ----, ----; Monroe ----, 14.12, ----; Norwood 6.85, 13.92, ----; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ----, -----, ----; Warsaw #2 ---, -----, ---. Soybean Processors: Fayetteville, 14.62; Raleigh, 14.62. RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. No report

POULTRY REPORT NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly desirable. The estimated slau-ghter for Wednesday in NC is 2,682,000 head compared to 2,694,000 head last Wednesday. NC NY EGGS Prices are 4¢ higher on XL & L, unchanged on M’s. Supplies are light to moderate, lighter on heavier weight eggs. Demand is light to moderate. Market activity is usually moderate. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered to store door, cents per dz. XL 89-93, L 87-91, M 75-79. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beans, Round Green (25# bx) 30; Beets (25# bg) 12.95; Cabbage, Round Green & Pointed Head (50# crate) 12; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 11.55-12, Spin-ach (25# bx) 18; Peas, Crowder (bu bg) 12-20, Crowder (bu shelled) 24; Peanuts, Green

Page 7 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 2012

MARKET REPORTS


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 8

MARKET REPORTS (35# bg) 35; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 14-20.05; Strawberries (8 1# flats) 17.95-20.05. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn 100 count) WA Red Delicious 32.9533.65, WA Golden Delicious 33-34.50, Granny Smith WA 34-36.50, WA Gala 32-36, WA Fuji 34.50-38, WA Pink Lady 38-41.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 30.15-32; Ban-anas (40# ctn) 21-23.80; Beans, Round Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 20-21, Pole (1-1/9 bu) 25-27; Beets (25# sack) 11.5515.75; Blue-berries (flat 12 1 pt cups) 24-34; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 16.95-20; Cabbage (50# ctn) 12.15-12.95; Canta-loupe (case 12 count) 26.95-32.15; Carrots (50# sack) 19.65-21.25; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 21.50-23;

Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 29.50-31; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 17.95-18.95; Citrus: Oranges, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 26.15-30.65, FL (4/5 bu ctn) 21-22; Pink Grapefruit, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 25.75-28.65; Tangelos FL (80 count bx) 25-26.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 35-40.05; Limes (40# ctn) 27-32; Oranges CA Navel (4/5 bu ctn) 29.25-31.45, FL Navel (64 count) 23.5526.15, Tangerines (120 count) 24; Corn, Yellow & White (ctn 4 ?-5 dz) 1519.35; Cranberries (24 12-oz pkg) 24.50; Cucumbers, Long Green (40# ctn) 23-25, Pickle (ctn 40#) 26-30; Eggplant (25# ctn) 20-24; Grapes, Red Seedless (18# ctn) 33-36, White Seedless 29-31, Black Seedless 28,

Red Globe 28; Grapefruit (40# ctn) 28.65; Greens, Coll-ard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 11.55-14.15; Turnips, Topped 11.85-14.65; Honeydews (ctn 5s) 29; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 12.75; Lettuce, Iceberg (ctn 24s, wrapped) 22.45-26.25, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 24.5025, Romaine (ctn 24s) 25-26; Nectarines, Yellow/-White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 24; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 16.45-20, White (25# sack) 18-19, Red (25# sack) 15-22.50, Green (ctn 24s) 14.35-17.15, Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 24-25.75; Peaches, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 18; Peanuts, Green (35 bg) 53-69; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn) 27; Peppers, Bell Type Green (1-1/9 bu ctn)

20.05-24, Red (11# ctn) 32, Yellow (11# ctn) 32; Potatoes, Red (50# ctn) Size A 15-15.75, Red Size B 25-28, White Size A 19-23.95, Russet ID 20-26.15; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) 12.95-15; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 27; Squash, Yellow Crookneck (3/4 bu ctn) 10.75-20, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 14-16; Straw-berries CA (flat 8 1-qt conts) 20.15-26.45, NC (flat 8 1-qt conts) 17.95-20; Sweet Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45, White (40# ctn) 20-20.75; Tomatoes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 19-20, Cherry (flat 12 1 pt conts) 18.55-20.05, Roma (25# ctn) 16-19, Grape (flat 12 1 ptconts) 19-21; Turnips, Topped (25# film bg) 11.5517.15

WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 30-31.50, Golden Delicious 30-31.50, Granny Smith 34.50; Bananas (40# bx) 19.50-20; Beans, Halfrunner (bu) 30-35, Snaps 20; Broccoli (ctn) 15-17.25; Cabbage (50# bg) 10.50; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12 count) 18.50-20, (bin 120-140 count) 200; Cauli-flower (ctn) 18; Citrus: Grapefruit 25.50, Navel Oranges 20-25.50; Lemons (ctns 95 count) 29.50-30, (165 count) 28.5030; Corn (crate) Bi-Color & White 15-16; Cucumbers, Long Green (1-1/9 bu) 16-18, Pickle (1-1/9 bu crate) 2832.50; Grapes, Red & White Seedless (18# ctn) 28-38.75;

Lettuce, Iceberg (ctn) 1718.75, Green Leaf 16-19.25, Romaine 19-19.75; Okra (1/2 bu) 26-27.50; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 14-16, Vidalia 23-26 (25# bg) 15-16; Pepper, Bell Type (1- 1/9 bu ctn) L & XL 18-20; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) White 1523.50, Red 16.25-25, Russet 18-22.50; Squash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 18-20, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 12-15; Strawberries (8-1# conts) CA 12.50; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 12-15; Tomatoes, vine ripe (25# bx) XL & Larger 14-16, Green 15-16; Turnips (25# sack) 15; Watermel-ons (ea) 4-8, (bin 35/45 count) Seeded 140155, Seedless 165-190. MARKET

State veterinarian urges horse owners to observe strict biosecurity during the summer show season Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) State Veterinarian Dr. Richard Wilkes urges all horse owners to be mindful of biosecurity now that the summer show season is under way. “Any time and any place that horses from different farms gather together, there is always the possibility of transmission of disease,” said Wilkes. “While we have not had any recent equine disease outbreaks in Virginia, owners need to be aware that horses can pick up diseases while traveling and bring them home to their own stables.” Recently, multiple horses in Tennessee have shown clinical signs of the neurological form of Equine Herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) resulting in Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy

(EHM) and are being monitored by their private veterinarians and the Tennessee State Veterinarian’s office. The symptoms of EHM in horses may include a fever, nasal discharge, wobbly gait, hind-end weakness and dribbling of urine. The disease is often fatal. The virus is easily spread by airborne transmission, horse-to-horse contact and by contact with nasal secretions on equipment, tack, feed and other surfaces. Caretakers can spread the virus to other horses if their hands, clothing, shoes or vehicles are contaminated. EHV-1 poses no threat to human health. VDACS recommends the following biosecurity measures for all horses that will come into contact with other horses at shows, trail rides, meets and other events:

• Minimize direct contact, especially nose to nose, between assembled horses whenever possible; • Clean and disinfect equipment, feed, tack, stalls and other surfaces that are shared between horses; • Isolate and closely monitor horses that are returning from a show, trail ride or competition for a minimum of 14 days; • Clean and disinfect caretakers’ hands, clothing, shoes and vehicles that may be contaminated by other horses or equipment; and • Consult with your veterinarian about a vaccination schedule for diseases of concern such as Eastern Equine Encephalitis, West Nile Virus, Equine Rhinopneumonitis, and rabies. Your equine veterinarian can also provide you with biosecurity recommenda-

tions that are specifically tailored to your horses and your facility. Horse exhibitors and event goers can monitor their horses for early signs of infection by taking their temperature twice a day while at shows and reporting an elevated temperature to their veterinarian. Veterinarians should report suspected neurological cases of EHV-1 to the Virginia State Veterinarian’s office at 804-692-0601. More information on EHV-1 is available at vdacs.virginia.gov/animals/ehv.shtml. A downloadable brochure about horse biosecurity is available on the USDA website at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/animal_health/content/printable_version/HorseBioSecurity_final.pdf.

Living with arthritis on the farm Arthritis is an umbrella term for more than 100 diseases that can affect the joint and surrounding tissue. Common forms of arthritis include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, gout and fibromyalgia. Arthritis is considered one of the most disabling conditions a farmer can face and is the leading cause of disability of farmers in the Mid-Atlantic area. Arthritis affects approximately onethird of all adult farm operators. Farmers are an aging population and the average age today is above 57. As work tasks become more difficult, many farmers and agricultural workers may not even associate the pain with arthritis. Signs and symptoms of arthritis include the following: • Persistent pain; • Stiffness, swelling, redness or heat in the joint; • Difficulty in moving the joint; and • Possible fatigue, weight loss and nausea. Arthritis is especially detrimental to farmers and farm workers because of

the nature of their work. Many farm chores such as mounting tractors, baling hay, feeding livestock, harvesting vegetables, milking cows, operating equipment, cleaning out broiler houses require strength, dexterity and mobility, which are lessened by the effects of arthritis. According to medical professionals, there are benefits of exercise for farmers with arthritis. Exercise can help them manage arthritis pain and reduce the disability as well as increase energy levels, help with sleep and decrease depression and fatigue. Exercise is also considered very important for healthy joints. Moving your joints helps keeps them fully mobile and strengthens the surrounding muscles which help support the joints. Since there is no known cure for arthritis, education and awareness of pain management techniques are considered the best practice for treating the disease. This includes but is not limited to joint protection, work simplification and stress reduction. A few so-

lutions that can be implemented to help control joint stress and pain in farming include the following: • Wear quality, non-slip footwear; • Use appropriate assistive aids such as automatic couplers, mobility devices, hydraulic lift table, shop hoists, powered cordless caulk guns and more; • Adhere to proper posture when sitting for long periods of time in tractors; • Use large muscle groups to complete a task. For example use the legs instead of the back to lift; • Avoid gripping and grasping for long periods of time; • Simplify jobs and tasks; and • Pace yourself throughout the day. Arthritis is a debilitating disease, but it is manageable. You will be able to farm productively and safely. The MidAtlantic Agrability Project and the Arthritis Foundation are willing to help in any way that it can. The foundation promotes technologies and given your tenacity and willingness to try, you can preserve your livelihood on the farm.

For more information, visit Mid-Atlantic Agrability on the web at www.mid-atlanticagrability.com or visit the Arthritis Foundation at www.arthritis-ag.org . You may also call Mid-Atlantic Agrability toll free at 877-204-FARM (3276).


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Part of his terms of marketing ties, such will activi Gritty Details of role in legisl and processors t in the tools that assis to oping “Nitty the be ar and job will web devel exposure al Selling” semin process of nt. generate greater Food Festiv cts. He will in- ongoing developme try and to nt for their produ to update Gour met taking place is food indus profitability of conte ermore, he will be be helping which is 29 in ct whose goal - Furth n of a also crease the Strategic Plan June 28 and ment proje strengthen small, farm-based value ing on the desig MG&SPF’s of Maine help a marketing Freeport. to cers and work The Heart added n. and design food produ Inc. and the Maine’s value organizatio pro- added project is RC&D Area, plan for the met and Spe- farm producers. The are processors. The a Federal Gour e Main Producers main goals t, being funded by ject’s two et Imcialty Food exten State Mark are working to survey the size, state’s and (MG&SFP) rtProgram (FSMaine Depa a and needs of the essed provement with the June 4 ulture in - added/proc MIP) grant. na, a gradment of Agric ing op- value mic devel Stefano Tijeri Spring Meet nic Web Listings Dejoint econo nt from the Orga uate stude ntation Adof Harvey Marof Public Feature Prese y - Managing Partner about how to ent partm n at the UniElizabeth Harve discuss the latest buzzengines. Techministratio h p will e, has come source keting Grou site noticed by the searc e an on line versity of Main the Heart e cases to dissome onlin maine becom ation relevant to to help your web view get www. board will on we SFP inform itting This year its of the MG& food indus nology perm undergoing of Maine and project. He the specialty of the site works best. 12 Bangor foods.org is what this When g de. out cover upgra June carry This part ils of Sellin first major ing as a Reprotectare try. Gritty Deta vements will be work be password be limThe Nitty Marketing and the impro de a will will Seminar it will provi search and June 13 Portl ons will focus on selland access completed bringing with processor locati of serv- ed alist, two food level in r ito Speci ct placement ar held iate much highe and ited years of exper , out and produ This semin and assoc restaucustomers him seven ct from roll , media alty stores, e members It will provide produ ice to our eting speci to your resum mark cts ing shows, corWe will produ ence in members. line gement. He members. Tijerina, Maine to marketing your tips for trade hly drawings members with on ing, alty and web mana Columbia. 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DOVER, DE — Delaware farmers can soon receive more assistance to move excess poultry manure off their farms to land that can benefit with the addition of manure or to alternative uses, reducing nutrient loading in certain areas and helping improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The Delaware Nutrient Management Commission recently voted unanimously to increase the cost-share funding for manure transport, which helps support the cost of moving manure from their farms to areas or projects that can use it, thus reducing nu-

trient loading in certain areas. “This is great news for farmers and the environment, allowing Delaware to move more manure out of sensitive areas,� said Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee, an ex officio member of the Commission. “The additional reimbursement will especially be of help to farmers dealing with the rising cost of fuel.� The decision to raise the funding level was possible thanks in part to $600,000 in funding for relocation work from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, via the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, and a continu-

ing reduction in the volume of poultry manure being moved through the program. The funding must be used over a four-year period, by 2016. “The environment gets a big boost through this, and farmers find it more attractive to move their manure out of nutrient-rich areas,� said Delaware Nutrient Management Program Administrator Larry Towle. “Moving this high-phosphorous manure from areas where there’s an excess into areas where it can be used spreads out the impact on waterways and the Chesapeake Bay.� Towle said the volume of manure transport being supported by the program has gradually been decreasing because of changes in farm management practices and farmers arranging independent farm-to-farm transport. The new rates will take effect June 1. For manure being moved from farm to farm, or from a farm to an alternative use project such as the Perdue AgriRecycle fertilizer plant, the rate

will increase to 16 cents per ton mile, with a cap of $18 per ton, from 10.8 cents per ton mile, with a cap of $13.50 per ton. That is an increase of 48 percent, and restores the reimbursement rate to the 2006 level. For manure being moved from an alternative use project off the Delmarva Peninsula, the rate will increase to 6 cents per ton mile, with a cap of $10 per ton, from 5.4 cents per ton mile, with a cap of $9 per ton. That is an increase of 11 percent, and restores the reimbursement rate to the 2008 level. The relocation program also receives funding from the state of Delaware General Fund and poultry companies. More than 58,000 tons of excess manure was moved out of high-nutrient areas through Delaware’s relocation program in fiscal year 2011, with more than a third of that tonnage going to alternative use projects such as Perdue AgriRecycle or mushroom growers in Pennsylvania. More than 660,000 tons have been relocated since 2006.

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Country Folks has partnered with the New York State Corn and Soybean Growers Association to publish the summer edition of the Association's newsletter, The NY Crop Grower. This will be a special insert to the JULY 9th edition of Country Folks East and West, with details about the 2012 Summer Crop Tour. It will also be mailed to all of the members of the association and to prospective members. Additional copies will be available at Empire Farm Days in the New York Corn and Soybean Association booth.

2&# "#"*',# 2- "4#02'1# ', 2&'1 '113# '1 (3,#2& If you sell harvesting equipment, grain drying equipment, grain storage, seed or provide custom harvesting you need to be in this issue!

2I JF;=? ;H ;> IL NI CHKOCL? ;<ION ;>P?LNCMCHA IJJILNOHCNC?M CH NBCM IL @ONOL? CMMO?M JF?;M? =IHN;=N SIOL !IOHNLS $IFEM M;F?M L?J IL =IHN;=N G? ;N D;H>L?QMF??JO<=IG IL ;N  ?RN 

Page 11 - Section B â&#x20AC;˘ MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE â&#x20AC;˘ May 2012

Additional financial assistance offered for poultry manure relocation


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 12


BLACKSBURG, VA — Ten seniors from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences presented their research projects on May 3 as part of the John Lee Pratt Animal Nutrition Senior Fellows program. The program promotes the study of animal nutrition across departments throughout the college. The funding is made available through a bequest of John Lee Pratt, a native Virginian, cattle owner, and, at one time, the CEO of General Motors. The Pratt endowment provides nearly $1 million a year to the college. Of that, about $150,000 is earmarked for scholarships and the senior research fellow program. The remainder is used for research equipment, bringing visiting scholars to Virginia Tech and for graduate students’ research and stipends. Saied Mostaghimi, director of the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, associate dean for research and graduate studies and the H.E. and Elizabeth F. Alphin professor,

congratulated the students on their work. “No research outcome is a bad outcome,” he said, adding that learning about the research process is more important than the outcome at this stage of their careers. He cited several reasons for being a strong proponent of undergraduate research. “Research is a huge confidence builder, particularly when you are challenged with questions you want to answer.” Virginia Lyman of Winchester, VA, a senior majoring in animal and poultry sciences, applied for the program because she wanted laboratory experience. She wanted an edge when she applied to veterinary schools and her strategy paid off — Lyman will be attending the VirginiaMaryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in the fall. Her research examined if leptin, a hormone produced by fatty tissues, had an effect on protein synthesis in the cows’ mammary glands. Her results did not show any statistically significant effects.

“Working on this project gave me a greater appreciation for research, which sometimes can be a long and challenging process,” said L yman. “I really learned a lot by working with graduate students and the professors.” The senior fellows program encourages intellectual partnerships between students and professors, said Susan Sumner, associate dean and director of academic programs. “This is a great opportunity for students to work side-by-side with professors to not only tackle some real-life issues, but also to investigate subjects students are passionate about,” Sumner said. Many students need the opportunity to do research, said Associate Professor Cindy Wood in animal and poultry sciences. When a project comes along that fits an undergraduate’s training and interests it’s good to encourage students to apply for the senior fellows program, she said. Wood worked with Karen Park of Fairfax, VA, a senior majoring

Susan Sumner, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences associate dean and director of academic programs, congratulates students who participated in the John Lee Pratt Animal Nutrition Senior Fellows program before they presented their research on May 3. in animal and poultry sciences. Park’s research attempted to find out if a subtle connection exists between iron supplementation and lameness in pigs. In their lives, pigs need supplementary iron to prevent them from becoming anemic. Because too much iron can lead to liver damage and joint problems in humans, the question was whether the same problems could occur in pigs. “We did not see any differences in growth rate or joint damage,” Wood said. “We have not

yet had a chance to look at whether the iron supplementation affects the way pigs walk.” Other students, including Miranda Ritzi of Virginia Beach, VA, a senior majoring in animal and poultry science, focused their research on chicks. Her mentor, Chasity Cox, a doctoral candidate in animal and poultry sciences, said Ritzi looked at the growth and immune response in chicks that were given probiotics before hatching. Probiotics may jump-start

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the growth and development of the chicks. The results showed that probiotics stimulated the chicks’ immune system in the gut. But the probiotics did not hinder the growth of the chicks and their ability to hatch. Between eight and 10 students this year have been accepted as senior fellows, which is nearly double the number from three years ago, Sumner said. Students can work with any faculty member within the college. Students receive a $3,000 stipend for the research and faculty members receive notifications that they get $2,000, which is spent on supplies, student travel, and other related research activities.

Funding offered The Center for Dairy Excellence is now offering up to $1,000 in funding, as well as support for identifying appropriate resources, to farm families assembling teams to improve milk quality, animal health and to meet drug residue standards. Visit www.centerfordairyexcellence.org and click on “Producer,” then “Profit Team” for an application. Source: Friday Facts: May 11

Page 13 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 2012

Virginia Tech Pratt senior fellows present research results


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 14

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• Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Reduce mastitis & cell counts. • Use in place of Hydrated Lime. • Improves your soil • Available in bulk or bag.

• Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves.

Dairy Cattle

Business Opportunities

CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

Dairy Equipment

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us

• 6000 Gal. Storage VA (99) • 4000SOLD Gal. Surge • 4000 Gal. Surge NY • 3000SOLD Gal. Storage • 3000 Gal. Storage • 2000 Gal. Mueller OH NH • 2000SOLD Gal. Mueller OE • 1600 Gal. Surge • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. Surge • 1250 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. Majonnier • 1250 Gal. DeLaval • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 1000 Gal. DeLaval

• 1000 Gal. Mueller M • 900 Gal. Mueller OH • 800 Gal. Majonnier • 800 Gal. Mueller OH SOLD NY • 735 Gal. Sunset • 735 Gal. Sunset • 700 Gal. Mueller OH SOLD MD V • 700 Gal. Mueller • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 545 Gal. Sunset • 500 Gal. Mueller MW • 500 Gal. Mueller M • 500 Gal. Majonnier

• 415 Gal. Sunset • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 400 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal. DeLaval • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal Mueller M • 300 Gal. Sunset • 200 Gal. DeLaval • 200 Gal. Mueller RS • 200 Gal. Sunset • 180 Gal. Milkeeper • 150 Gal. Majonnier • 150 Gal. Mueller RH • 100, 180, 250 Gal. Milkeeper Self-Cont.

HEAT EXCHANGERS S • TUBE E COOLER 300-6000 0 Gall Storage e Tanks

We e Do o Tank k Repair THE SCABBLER MAN: 2” & 1” wide scabbling. Dan Martin 434-454-7018 Home, 434579-0705 Cell

SHENK’S

505 E. Woods Drive,

Sales 717-626-1151

Lititz, PA 17543


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Farm Equipment JD 5730 chopper, 4wd processor hay & 4 row chain heads. 585-746-5050 RICHARDTON 1400 dump wagon, no roof, $4,000. 585746-5050

Farm Machinery For Sale 1987 NEW HOLLAND 1900SP forage harvester, 4WD, 2400 cutter head hours, 340W pickup head, 4 row corn head, auto sharpener, 3306 Cat, many new spare parts, machine works excellent! $32,500 OBO. 207-717-7000

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS Large Selection Available

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE We Buy Tractors For Parts

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT 403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

(717) 776-6242 Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

BUSH HOG

USED EQUIPMENT

NI 9800 4R Planter Agco 17’ Tedder Woods 121 Rotary Cutter Woods RM660 Finish Mower Case IH 8330 Windrower White 445 Disc Chisel NI 3715 Spreader Vicon Fertilizer Spreader 165 Bu. Gravity Box MF 245 Tractor Westfield 8x51 Auger White 285 Tractor Miller 5300 Forage Box Miller 1150 Rake IH 37 Baler w/Thrower Hesston 4550 Square Baler Farmall 460 Tractor MF 246 Loader Case IH 8830 SP Mower Cond. MF 285 Tractor White 549 SAR 5 Bottom Plow Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill Miller Pro Forage Boxes In Stock

STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE RD Box 46 Klingerstown, PA Farm Machinery 570-648-2088 Sale WE ALSOFor STOCK NEW VICON

PRICES REDUCED Bes t in Nor theas t No w in the South

BEST WARRANTY: 1 Year Parts on Motor & Transmission, most all combines BEST QUALITY: Selected Direct from Farm or OEM Dealers BEST SELECTION: Just visit website; We got em BEST TRUCKING: Lowest Rates Available BEST “TRUE” INTEREST: 3.7% 3 Years • 4.2% 5 Years • 4.9% 7 Years Over 25+ Years Selling Combines WE WANT TO SELL YOU YOUR NEXT COMBINE Bloomsburg, PA • Route 44 (Jerseytown) 328 Danville Rd. (Near I-80)

TOLL FREE 800-919-3322 www.zeisloftequip.com

Farm Machinery F S l

Farm Machinery For Sale

Massey Ferguson

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist

WANTED

165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293

Maine To N Carolina

Forget the Hay! Forget the Strawwwwwww?

We are only forming Shredder Partnerships. Join us! Let’s shred the competition before the competition shreds us!!!

1-800-982-1769

Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293

Check out OUR used Rotocut Claas Balers! WOW!

USED EQUIPMENT Close Out on McCormick CT Series Tractors! Call Now - 0 % - 60 mo or Huge Cash Discounts! ’94 Case IH 5210, 4WD, 2,900 Hrs., Cab, LDR, Field Ready!...........................$16,900 ’06 Vermeer TE170, 4 Rotor Tedder, Hyd. Fold and Tilt, Nice!....................................$4,995 JD 14T Square Baler, Fair Condition ......$600 Vermeer 605M, w/Net and Bale Ramp, Complete Rebuild (Belts, Chains, Sprockets) Wide Pickup....................................$19,900 1993 8200 International Truck, 400HP, 8 Speed, 60 Series, w/Water Tank and Pump...............................................$11,900 Fanex 833T by Vicon 6 Rotor Tedder, Field Ready, Pull Type................................$5,000 ’05 McCormick CX85 Tractor, 1,400 Hrs., w/New Loader, Cab, 4x4 Dual Remotes...... ........................................................$35,000 Kuhn GMO 77 HD, 3Pt. Disc Mower, Good.... ..........................................................$3,500 ’73 Ford 3000 8 Speed Manual, 1 Remote, Diesel, Good Rubber, No Rust! ........$5,500 New Holland 255 Tedder-Rake Combo, Good Condition...........................................$2,000 ’09 Vermeer 555XL w/Net Wrap, Good Condition.........................................$13,900 NEW! HayMag 4 Rotor Tedders w/Hyd. Fold & Tilt, 18’ ..............................................$4,995 Massey Ferguson 4225, 2WD, 1036 Massey Loader, Cab, Air, 2 Remotes, 1,500 Hours, Bale Spike.......................................$19,900 Pictures at www.tractorcare.com

Tractor Care, Inc. 1066-C Virginia Avenue, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802-2533 PH: 540-433-7070 Check out our e-bay store at stores.ebay.com/tractor-care-inc

Mahindra 4110 Mahindra 112 Loader, 475 Hrs, 4x4, ROPS, Exc. Cond.

$13,500 ROCKBRIDGE FARMER’S COOP

645 Waddell Street, Lexington, VA Phone: 540-463-7381 Propane: 540-464-5552 Toll Free: 800-868-7336

JD Tractors: 7930 C/A 4x4 IVT; 7530 P. C/A, 4x4, IVT; JD 6430 P. C/A 4x4 IVT, all low hours w/warranty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call For Great Price 2010 Case IH 245 Magnum C/A 4x4, 1050 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $128,500 Case IH MX120 C/A, 4x4, w/Loader, 3160 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,500 NH TS115 A C/A 4x4 w/Loader, 3500 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,500 White 6085 C/A 4x4 w/Loader, consigned. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,750 firm! NH 230 Forage Harvester, K.P., 3 row hay, tandem, 200 acres use . $45,000 NH BR740 Round Baler, silage, net, 2500 bales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 JD 1590 No Till Drill, 15 ft., dolly, no grass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,500 SEE THIS

AND MORE AT

www.andrewsfarm.com

ANDREWS FARM EQ., INC. Conneautville, PA 16406 814-587-2450

PleasantCreekHay.com Compare our Front PTO tractors, speed options and prices.

Farm Machinery For Sale

1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

ANNOUNCING IMMEDIATELY

Farm Machinery For Sale

For Rent or Lease Fencing ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

LARGE 500 COW freestall barn with 16 unit milking parlor 4,000 gallon refrigerator tank. Barn is also suitable for heifer rearing or beef production. (13339) 516-429-6409

Generators

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348 Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Page 17 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 18

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

Hay - Straw For Sale

TOO MUCH HAY? Try Selling It In The

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

Parts & Service New Installations

800-836-2888

804-387-6462

or email

Hay - Straw For Sale FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

519-482-5365 ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

REDUCED PRICES-NEED ROOM FOR NEW CROP 3x3x8 Squares Bales; 4x5 Round Bales Really Early Cut & Timothy Hay. All Hay Stored Inside on Pallets. Outside Round Bales, Good for Beef Cattle Picked Up or Delivered, Any Amount, Large Quantity

classified@leepub.com

Help Wanted

Poultry & Rabbits

Parts & Repair

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services Dairy Cattle Feeder position on a 700 cow dairy farm located in Southern Cayuga County. The eligible candidate will have experience in TMR feeding with a payloader and mixer truck. Knowledge of FEEDWATCH is preferred, but not necessary. Excellent compensation package provided. Please submit resume to: feedcowz@yahoo.com

“BELT T BUSTERS” $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers (7 Meat Varieties)

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Extremely hearty & perfect for free range Layer Chicks, Turkeys Ducklings, Guineas, Much More

Agricultural Belt Service

(814) 539-7026

Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT

www.myerspoultry.com

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY & STRAW

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW

Hogs Berkshires from our American Berkshire Registered & Certified Herd. All vegetarian diet, no antibiotics, chemicals nor hormones. Straw bedded & pasture access. Feeder Pigs<10-$110 each; 10 or more $100 each; Butcher Hogs$1.10/lb 4 or more-$1.00/lb liveweight. Breeding Stockboars & gilts. 717-488-8090. Lancaster County, PA 17555

Poultry Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Clearview Hatchery PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

(717) 365-3234

All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted. Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

2012 Contracts Now Available Contacts: Allen Hollenbach 610-929-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

Hoof Trimming

Affordable Hydraulic Hoof Trimming Tables • Heavy Duty Professional Quality • Increased Production With Less Effort • Models Available In Stationary & Portable • Limited Warranty

The Ultimate in Tilt Tables

1-800-370-8454

Pre Cut Rye Straw

Lawn & Garden

50 to 75 Lb. Bales

MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

302-737-5117 302-545-1000 Heating

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Southwestern Virginia Bland County

62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

$90,000 Several Purchase Options Available. Call

540-255-9112 ORGANIC DAIRY FARM/ CREAMERY, 318 acres. 8 miles from Cooperstown,NY. Two 3 bedroom homes, 100 cow freestall, Double 6 milking parlor. Many outbuilding for young stock, hay & equipment. New cheese room, aging facility & solar electric system. 200 acres fenced for grazing. $998,500. 607-2869362

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

SHEP’S WELDING, INC. PO Box 296, Chiefland, FL 32644 • www.shepswelding.net

WANTED

Real Estate For Sale

Hoof Trimming

WE HAVE OVER 20 FARMS FOR SALE THROUGHOUT PA. JOHN MATTILIO, BROKER

FARM AND LAND REALTY, INC. 717-464-8930

www.farmandlandrealtyinc.com

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR

518-929-3480-518-329-1321

Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

STRAW FOR SALE: 21 bale bundles, loaded on your truck, Madison County,VA. 540-9484043, 540-718-1567 cell

Hay - Straw For Sale

Parts & Repair

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

Hay - Straw For Sale

The Best Method For Covering Hay Stacks

PROTECT YOUR FEED FROM THE WEATHER Save money in prevented feed losses & up to 5 seasons of use Large Inventory • Next Day Shipping

ROCKY MEADOW FARM 810 South 14th Ave., Lebanon, PA 17042

1-866-887-2727 • 1-717-228-2727 www.supertarp.com • rockymeadowfarm@evenlink.com

Livestock Equipment

Livestock Equipment

South East Precast Concrete, LLC Feed Bunks, Water Troughs, Mineral Feeders, Cattle Guards, Silo Sides, Bunker Sides Dealer for: Giant Rubber Water Tanks and Best Livestock Equipment

Call to Order 276-620-1194 Wytheville, VA

Roofing

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – We manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Tractors 1985 2950 JD MFD Open Station Serial No. 551299 7000 Hrs. 30 Day Powertrain Warranty $18,500. Wayne County, NY. Phone 315-7296708

Trucks

1995 A35C Volvo Articulating Haul Truck 6 x 6 $37,000. (716) 433-3373

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

MAY 15 Field Day Piedmont Research Station, 8350 Sherrills Ford Rd., Salisbury, NC. Wheat farmers can learn about advances in research on the crop at the field days. Admission is free. Registration opens at 3:30 pm and field tours start at 4. Contact Dan Weathington, 910736-8258. Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting (third Tues. of each month) O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910671—3276.

MAY 21 What’s The Beef? How to Talk to Consumers About Beef Production O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm sponsored meal. Contact Michelle Shooter, 910-671-3276. MAY 24 Sorghum Growers Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 8-10 am. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-671-3276. MAY 30 Market Signage Workshop O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 10 am - 4 pm. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-671-3276. JUN 12 PA Forest Web Seminar Management Strategies for Eastern Forests Threatened by Hemlock Wooly Adelgid. Mary Ann Fajvan, Research Forester with the Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, will be the presenter. Seminars are scheduled for noon and again at 7 pm. To register & take part in the liv seminars or to view the upcoming seminar schedule visit http:// extension/psu.edu/ private-forests/toolsresources/webinars.

JUN 16 The Maryland Poultry Swap & Farmer’s Market Green Hill Farm, 5329 Mondell Rd., Sharpsburg, MD. 8 am - 2 pm. Admission is free. On Internet at www.Md PoultrySwap.blogspot.com. JUN 19 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. JUL 17 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. JUL 20 Sorghum Grower Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 8-10 am. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-671-3276.

JUL 24 Pesticide Re-certification Class, Private Category V&X O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 5-9 pm. Commercial class TBA. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-671-3276. AUG 21 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. SEP 6 Precondition Cattle Sale Stanley County Livestock market, 13215 Indian Mound Rd., Norwood, NC. 7 am - 3 pm cattle arrive. Sale at 7 pm. Contact Marcus Harward, 704-474-7681. SEP 15-20 The 49th All American Dairy Show Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center, Harrisburg, PA. Featuring 23 shows in six days, including four full days dedicated to youth shows and more than 2,400 animals shown by nearly 1,000 exhibitors from across the nation. Call 717-

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1.

2.

PHONE IT IN Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

FAX IT IN -

For MasterCard, Visa, American Express or Discover customers, fill out the form below completely and FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381

MAIL IT IN - Fill out the 3. attached form, calculate the cost, enclose your check or credit card information and mail to:

Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word. (Phone #’s count as one word) If running your ad multiple weeks: Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

Mid-Atlantic

Place my ad in the following zones:  Country Folks East  Country Folks West  Country Folks of New England  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle Number of weeks to run________

Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________ City: __________________________________________ State: ________ Zip: __________ Phone #_____________________Fax #________________Cell #_____________________

- Go to 5. ON-LINE www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a

e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard Card # __________________________________________Exp. Date __________________ (MM/YY)

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only)

15 1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week

17 21 1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week

25 1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week

New England

Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________

4. E-MAIL E-mail your ad to classified@leepub.com

1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week

West

East

Name: (Print)________________________________________________________________

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Classified Ad button to place your ad 24/7!

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!

787-2905. On Internet at www.allamerican.state.pa.us . SEP 18 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. SEP 20 Pesticide Recertification Class, Private Category V&X O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. Commercial class TB. Contact Mac Malloy, 910-6713276. OCT 16 Robeson Co. Area Beekeepers Assoc. Monthly Meeting O.P. Owens Ag. Center, 455 Canton Rd., Lumberton, NC. 6:30 pm meal, 7 pm educational meeting. Contact Nelson Brownlee, 910-6713276. OCT 24-27 National FFA Convention & Expo Indianapolis, IN. On Internet at www.ffa.org.

18 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week

22

19 1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week

16 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

20 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

23

24

1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week 1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week

1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

27

28

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1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week

26

Page 19 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • May 2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


May 21, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 20

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