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9 April 2012 Section e off Two One Volume e 31 Number r 14

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For hay producer John Geil, weather is an annual challenge ~ Page A4 PCA Annual Cattleman’s Banquet honors industry leaders ~ Page A3 Columnist Lee Mielke

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...fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart. ~ Hebrews 12: 2-3


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 2

Feed Association ‘Cow’ College: An educational event for all by Jennifer Showalter ROANOKE, VA — Roughly 115 people involved with the feed industry traveled to the Hotel Roanoke for the 66th Annual Virginia State Feed Association Convention and Nutritional Management “Cow” College. This three-day event was packed full of a broad range of educational topics effecting both the feed industry and production animal industries. For the first time in the history of the Convention, time was set aside specifically for the interests of mill managers. Dave Newman, with J.D. Newman Inc. in Elkwood, VA, gave an excellent overview of his family’s agricultural commodity trucking business. Dave clearly described the challenges and changes the trucking industry has undergone while his family has been in business. With rising fuel costs, new restrictions on hours of service, tighter EPA emission regulations, to other Department of Transportation regulations, Newman touched on many complications and how his family’s company has had to evolve over the years. Henry Graves with BungeNorth America in St. Louis, MO, shared his insight on the national and global outlook for grain supplies and production issues. He assured the crowd that, with the growing population, there most certainly are more mouths to feed. According to Graves, the U.S. population increased by 2.2 million people over the last year to 313 million people, while the world population increased by 91.4 million to 6.99 billion. Brett S. Lumpkins, with Southern Poultry Research Inc. in Athens, GA, told the audience today’s ever increasing economic climate is caus-

Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture Matt Lohr goes over challenges for Virginia Agriculture with those in attendance at the 66th Annual Virginia State Feed Association and Nutritional Management “Cow” College. Photos by Jennifer Showalter ing commercial poultry companies to work extra hard at finding ways to alleviate high costs. “It can be accepted that the feed manufacturing aspect of the broiler industry is ever changing and new products will constantly be introduced into diets. Each with a goal to aid in rising feed costs and adaptation of poultry products that will give what the consumers perception is at the given time,” said Lumpkins. The feed industry historically has been conservative when it comes to adopting new automation technology because of low margins, but Tom Shoen with Comco Controls in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, gave the audience a brief overview of some of the new features and technologies available. From tablets and smart phones, wireless technology, complex lot tracking systems, comprehensive audit systems, SQL databases, analytical tools, to maintenance software, Shoen

Angela Mills with Southern Sates Co-op in Richmond, VA, goes over purchasing and maintaining quality in feed ingredients with the audience at the convention.

highlighted what is out there to help with the advancement of feed mill automation. Joe Moritz, associate professor of Poultry Science and State Extension Specialist at West Virginia University, touched on the importance of maintaining feed quality. According to Moritz, the production of high quality pellets significantly improves animal performance and impacts customer perceptions of the quality of feed being purchased. With this in mind, it is essential that both independent and integrated mills utilize manufacturing techniques that produce high quality pellets without affecting heat sensitive nutrients. After sharing results of a few studies and going over possible strategies to create high quality pellets, Moritz suggested that if feed manufacturers’ strategies translate to improved bird weight gain, and less feed and time are required for grow-out, then the added investment required to create pellets of high quality may be well justified. Following an evening full of discussion regarding feed mills, Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture Matt Lohr and Virginia Farm Bureau President Wayne Pryor bought the audience up to speed on different agricultural issues involving the state and federal governments the next morning. With agriculture and forestry having nearly an $80 billion impact on the economy annually, Lohr pointed out that they are the commonwealth’s largest two industries. Lohr went on to touch on exports and stressed that they are key to success. “Every $1 from exports creates anther $1.40 in support activ-

ities such as processing, packing, financing, and shipping,” said Lohr. Switching gears to nutritional concerns in the livestock industry, Ralph Ward with Cumberland Valley Analytical Services in Maugansville, MD, updated the audience on current changes and adjustments to information available from forage analysis. Dr. Bennett Cassell with the Department of Dairy Science at Virginia Tech shared his view of the impact of genomics on the dairy industry. “I’m excited about the opportunities genomic technologies offer to dairy cattle breeding and dairy herd management. The story is just beginning to unfold. We should keep our eyes and minds open to the possibilities,” said Cassell. Pulling the second day of the convention to a closure, a panel discussion on feeding management, featuring three innovative dairy producers from North Carolina, Virginia and Wisconsin was a hit. The discussion provided an opportunity to get first hand feedback on how the producers use computers to evaluate the precision and accuracy of their feeding programs. Another lineup of informative speakers made up the final day of the Convention. Angela Mills with Southern States Co-op in Richmond, VA, started the morning off with a discussion on the proper protocols for purchasing feed along with quality control measures and tests needed for feed ingredients and finished feeds. Environmental issues and regulations are nothing new but are playing a bigger role in decision making procedures than ever before. With this in mind, John Welsh with

Virginia Cooperative Extension in Harrisonburg, VA, took the stage and touch on some of the environmental issues Virginia dairymen are facing today and are likely to face in the near future. Along the same lines, Erin Ling, from Virginia Tech, spent some time going over water quality and the importance in dairy herds. According to Ling, water intake is affected by such things as the mineral and iron content of feeds and rations. Ling also pointed out that at 90 degrees cattle drink two to four times more water than when the temperature is between 36 degrees and 50 degrees. Seventy percent of cows prefer warm water around 80 degrees over cold water even when it’s warm outside Ling warned that producers need to keep in mind that competition getting water occurs when there is inadequate supply and in turn affects water intake. Ling explained that water is an important nutrient for all stages of production. Lactating cows need around four pounds of water for every pound of dry matter intake (at least 21-26 gallons of water per day). Dry cows typically need at least 12-19 gallons of water per day. Weaned heifers require around 1 to 1.5 gallons of water per 100 pounds of body weight per day, and calves that are one to five weeks of age need 2.5 gallons of water per day. Ling stressed numerous times that water supply affects production. The convention was pulled to a closure with a discussion led by Dr. Bob James with the Department of Dairy Sciences at Virginia Tech on issues in managing automatic milk feeders for calves.

Randy Gordon with the National Grain and feed Association in Washington, DC, speaks to the audience about issues facing the feed industry.


by Jon M. Casey Following a message of encouragement from J.D. Alexander, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), the Pennsylvania Cattlemen’s Association (PCA) named five new Board of Directors members and honored several industry leaders at its annual Cattlemen’s Banquet in State College, PA, on March 29. Alexander, a Nebraska cattleman, was on hand as the evening’s keynote speaker. He began by telling PCA members that sensationalism and misinformation from the national media has given lean finely textured beef (inappropriately known as “pink slime”) a bad name. That coverage has resulted in more than 650 people losing their jobs in Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska, Alexander said. More recently, a company in Pennsylvania has filed for bankruptcy after a severe decline in ground beef sales that have resulted from this recent media exposure. Alexander said that on the day of the PCA meeting, top elected leaders from Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, Texas and South Dakota joined forces with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and Under Secretary for Food Safety Elisabeth Hagen to tour a beef facility in the Midwest to support the safety of this product and all U.S. beef. “Irresponsible attacks have resulted in a domino effect from farm to fork. The wave of chaos has calmed a bit and now is the time to help dissect fact from fiction with our consumers here in the United States and abroad,” Alexander said. “I am honored to be a part of the beef community.” He reminded members that their beef checkoff dollars are working to promote beef consumption across the nation. “If you are not at the table, you are on the menu,” he noted as a way to emphasize the importance of having lobbyists on hand at the state capital and in Washington, D.C., working to defend the Beef Industry’s interests. “You need to be represented.” Honors and Scholarships At the annual shareholder’s meeting, part of the evening celebration, five new

Larry and Barb Weaver received PCA’s Industry Service Award from Cheryl Fairbairn for Larry’s service to the industry as a cattle producer and as retiring PA Farm Show Executive Director, who will be leaving his post later this year. Photos by Jon M. Casey board members were chosen. Elected by secret ballot were Dustin Heeter, James Jones of Swank Farms, Wade Vonada, Andy Fabin, and Frank “Butch” Otto. They will serve three-year terms starting this year. Board member John-Scott Port announced that the “Top Hand Award” winners were Tom Gilliland and Steve Reichard for their efforts in promoting the Beef Industry in Pennsylvania. George McQuiston, scholarship committee chair and Vickie Baker of Pfizer, presented this year’s Legacy Scholarship and Pfizer Scholarships respectively. The Legacy Scholarship, formerly presented as the PCA and Lowell Wilson scholarships, were merged so that future funding would be available to honor students adequately on Wilson’s and the association’s behalf. This year’s Legacy Scholarship was presented to Courtney Love of Berks County, PA. Baker announced Lyndsay Upperman, Chambersburg, PA, as the 2012 recipient of the Pfizer Scholarship. Cheryl Fairbairn accepted

Courtney Love receives this year’s PCA Legacy Scholarship from George McQuiston, PCA Director.

the award on behalf of Upperman who is away at college and was not able to attend. PA Beef Council Executive Director Bridget Bingham, announced this year’s winners of the BQA Awards, recognition of producers in the beef and dairy beef industries. This year’s recipients are brothers Bernard and Darwin Nissely of Mt. Joy, PA, and Jennifer and Andrew Heltzel, dairy beef producers from Blair County, PA. Neither of the winners was present to receive their awards. However, Bingham noted that they would represent Pennsylvania at the national level. The past three dairy beef winners have come from Pennsylvania. The most recent winner, Logan Bower, was honored earlier this year at the national convention. Nichole Hockenberry, director of Industry Relations for the PA Beef Council, announced two Beef Ambassadors for 2012. Serving as this year’s Senior Beef Ambassador is Zachary Frazier, a high school senior

from Butler County. Tanner Rager, a 15-year old student from Mifflin County will serve as this year’s Junior Beef Ambassador. Cattleman’s Awards Fairbairn hosted the PCA Award recognition segment of the evening’s events. The 2012 Special Appreciation Award went to Jim and Billie Cowell, owners of Frosty Springs Farm, Greene County, PA. The Environmental Stewardship Award was presented to Tom and Karen Gilliland of Bradford County, PA. Larry and Barb Weaver were recognized for their years of service to Pennsylvania’s Beef Industry with the Industry Service Award and this year’s Seed Stock Breeder Award was given to the Penn State University Department of Dairy Animal Science, recognizing the university’s 100 years of service to agriculture and, more specifically, the school’s farm system Angus herd. Pete Levan and Wendell Landis, farm managers, accepted the award on behalf of the farm management faculty and staff. No Commercial Beef Producer Award was given this year. Dr. Dan Kniffen, Penn State Assistant Professor of Dairy and Animal Science, who heads up the school’s Beef Cattle Extension program, recognized the university’s Beef Quiz Bowl team, which recently won the National Collegiate Beef Quiz Bowl at the 2012 Cattle Industry Conference in Nashville, TN. Team members included Steve Bond, an agribusiness management major from Jim Thorpe, PA; Sarah Doyle, an animal sciences major from York, PA; Dustin Dreyfus, an agribusiness management major from Hampstead, MD; and Brianna Isenberg, an animal sciences major from Indiana, PA. This year marks the 17th time Penn State has represented the Northeast Region in the national championship event. Kniffen and dairy and animal science instructor Dale Olver advise the team. Penn State teams have won the contest 10 times and have placed second six times since the contest’s inception in 1993.

Junior Beef Ambassador Tanner Rager, at left, and Senior Beef Ambassador Zachary Frazier, at right, receive their honor from PA Beef Council Director of Industry Relations, Nichole Hockenberry.

Page 3 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

PCA Annual Cattleman’s Banquet honors industry leaders


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 4

For hay producer John Geil, weather is an annual challenge by Karl H. Kazaks BROADWAY, VA — “Consistency is everything,” John Geil said, describing his recipe for success as a hay producer. Yet some of the ingredients in the recipe for making hay — most notably, weather — are not only beyond his control, but here in the Shenandoah Valley are also wildly unpredictable. Last year Geil put up over 3,000 large 3-by-3-by-7 feet square bales. The year before, due to hot, dry weather, he put up only 1,800. Managing weather conditions — sometimes too much moisture, sometimes not enough — is just part of the juggling act Geil does on the 400 or so acres of hay he makes, all within two miles of his home farm. Keeping ahead of six or seven different types of fields — and juggling both organic and conventional production — adds up to, in Geil’s words, “a real logistical challenge.” Geil has been a full-time hay producer since 2003, when the last of his broiler houses collapsed under snow. (The house had finally been paid off with the previous flock.) “There is life after chickens,” said Geil, who had already been transitioning from chick-

en and crop farming to hay. Because much of the land he farms is sloped, when he was raising crops — corn, wheat, and soybeans — he was using filter strips and waterways to control erosion and runoff. Because he was already used to farming grass in those buffers, he decided to put everything into hay. Today, Geil grows stands of alfalfaorchard grass, orchard grass, timothy, orchard grass-timothy, what he calls native mixed grass fescue, and sometimes alternative species like matua grass. While in the past he has made hay on more than 500 acres, today he has 240 acres of certified organic hay and 170 acres of conventional hay. He grows 100 acres of alfalfa-orchard grass — 50 organic and 50 conventional. Though Geil has sold tractor-trailer loads of hay as far away as Florida, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina, the bulk of his hay is sold locally. Most of that is sold directly, though Geil does buy and sell at the hay auctions outside Harrisonburg. “A lot of my customers want five to six ton loads, not tractor-trailer loads,” said Geil. Many of his customers are

Cover photo by Karl H. Kazaks John Geil makes hay on 400 or so acres, all within two miles of his farm in Broadway, VA. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

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Old Order Mennonite dairymen who use the hay for dry cows and horses. Because those customers often have a limited amount of farmland, and the soils in those fields are often highnutrient soils, they need to buy in lowpotassium hay for their dry cows. Geil also puts an emphasis on keeping hay clean. “There again quality and consistency is everything,” he said. “I learned quickly that if you put down hay on dirt or concrete it can lead to mold,” which can lead to abortions in cows. Today, when stacking hay on concrete or dirt, Geil will put down a layer of plastic and use pallets to lift the hay from the plastic. Any condensation that may result from the cooling of the hay finds its way to the air space created by the pallets. He also keeps hay clean by using hydraulic drive rakes rather than wheel rakes, thus avoiding any dirt or moisture that might be kicked up by a wheel rake. “Bar rakes keep hay really clean,” Geil said. For several years after he went to farming just hay, Geil used breeder litter and lime as soil amendments. After the calcium and pH levels got up to where he wanted them, he switched to broiler litter. Today, Geil spreads about a ton of broiler litter per acre of hay ground. “I don’t fertilize too much,” he said. “Everyone wants the hay that’s leafy with fine stems. If you fertilize more you can get coarser stems.” Geil also uses a fish spray on his organic ground. “I think it helps in palatability,” Geil said. “It also helps build the biologics in soil.” Geil is so convinced that the fish makes his hay “softer and more palatable” that he also uses it on his conventional acreage. The conventional hay ground gets — in addition to the ton of broiler litter — ammonium sulfate — for a little more nitrogen and a little more sulphur — and boron. Building soil fertility is a key part of Geil’s management strategy. “I’ve learned that the green color of your hay comes from the vitality of your soil,” he said. “The better balance your soil has, the better performance you’ll have.” What’s more, he said, “If you keep soil fertility at the proper levels, plants don’t get as stressed.” For example, Geil usually doesn’t spray for leaf hoppers in his alfalfa-orchard grass stands — if it seem like the bugs might be a problem, he cuts earlier. The grass in the stand, too, helps keep the pests away, Geil said. “Of course, that doesn’t do anything for the deer,” he added. As far as weed control in his conventional fields Geil’s goal is to spray no more than once every three years. He sprays Banvel + 2,4-D. “If you don’t use it all the time it works very well,” he said. Last year Geil sprayed much of his conventional acreage, because of the “halfway crop failure” of 2010. With such hot dry weather in that year, many of his stands withered and bare spots appeared. “The last thing you want to do is follow up a halfway crop

Quality and consistency are the keys to success as a hay producer, according to John Geil. Photo by Karl H. Kazaks failure with weeds,” he said. Geil also went in and drilled winter oats in some places where the stands had withered. Though Geil typically focuses on putting up dry hay, because of the wet weather last year he wrapped about one-third of his crop. “We have some heavy dews around here,” he said. “Sometimes it’s like a light rain.” When it comes time to rotate a field — his alfalfa-grass stands last five to seven years — he likes to plant millet after killing the previous crop. He lets the millet grow up and cuts it dry, then drills his new crop. By allowing the millet to grow up he helps minimize the weeds he doesn’t want. The first cutting typically works in this order: alfalfa (in some case high moisture), orchard grass, timothyorchard grass, timothy, then the native mixed grass fescue — and then second cut alfalfa. Typically Geil gets about five cuttings of alfalfa, two or three of which, depending on the weather, will be wrapped. “I’ll do all the mowing and baling,” Geil said. His wife Melody, son Jared, and daughter Lexi help with the tedding, raking, and stacking. “It’s definitely a family procedure,” Geil said. “It’s a stressful life,” Geil said. “A lot of blessings, a lot of challenges. “Some days when the rain’s coming I just don’t go to sleep.” Forecasting is key to maintaining consistency in his hay production. If the forecast is good, Geil mows every morning in season. Having a smartphone in the field allows him to watch the weather radar full-time. Customer satisfaction is a key part of Geil’s philosophy. “I’d rather give hay away than have a disappointed customer,” he said. “The cost of a load of hay is immaterial compared to the cost of your reputation.” Being a full-time hay producer is, Geil said, “stressful. There’s weather pressures, there’s lots of decisions. Every season is different. I learn a little bit more each year, get a little more humble each year.” To contact Geil, call 540-820-3575 or e-mail thehayfarmer@gmail.com.


by Stephen Wagner There are some people who have a knack for imparting information to

people in an entertaining or educational manner. That was the case at the 43rd Cattle Feeders Day

at Lancaster’s Farm & Home Center. Though the day-long event hosted a variety of speakers, two of

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them encapsulated the basic crux of information sought by attendees. Both men are economists. Lou Moore, the first speaker, a retired Penn State Extension ag regular at these particular events, has a way of couching his information in current events laced with humor. Jim Robb is a senior ag economist at the Livestock Marketing Info Center in Denver, CO. Robb is a man who doesn’t waste a word. He cuts to the chase. “I’m always amazed,” Moore said, beginning the seminar, “that agriculture makes up less than 2 percent of our population in this country, but boy, do we get our share of publicity. Here are a few newspaper items I’ve clipped since Christmas. “Ethanol in winter! Our Congress does so many good things, and then there’s that $6 billion subsidy. Congress couldn’t come to an agreement on what they had to do. So they just

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better. Did you know that California is importing Brazilian ethanol to use in their cars because it meets their efficiency standards? Our ethanol doesn’t. “Drought prods cattle prices to highs!

Feeders A6

Page 5 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Some thoughts on the 43rd Cattle Feeders Day in Lancaster


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 6

Feeders from A5 “Soybeans take a back seat to corn! “Beef prices headed higher! Boy, we never suspected that was going to happen, did we? But food and fuel prices went up sharply last year. Very low interest rates continue, though it’s a little harder to qualify for the loan, isn’t it? Consumers are not as fearful. Actually, consumers feel a little bit better about the future. They are not as fearful that they’re going to lose their jobs. "We’re measuring our exports in billions of pounds. Record farm income. One hundred billion dollars last year. That’s a record. In 2009, 65 percent of all the corn that’s exported to markets around the world comes from the United States. Why wouldn’t we increase our corn acreage with what the price of corn is?” Moore noted a cattle report released in January putting the total cattle inventory at “90.8 million head, down 2 percent from last year, the lowest since 1952. Our total cattle herd at times in the ’80s was as high as 126 million head, so we’ve had a really sharp decline in number of cattle on farms.” Moore says it’s going to be a good year for sellers of feeder animals, but only so-so for feedlot operators because of high beef prices that he thinks will stay high at

Jim Robb told attendees that income growth is a more important driver of beef demand than population growth. least until mid-year. “To an economist, a recession is really an economic attraction; that is, an attraction in the shrinkage of the U.S. economy,” according to Jim Robb. “That’s why the economy is growing at a rather lackluster rate. Consequently, there’s a pushback in the meat system as we now have record high beef prices at the consumer level, and we continue to set record highs. Consumers are actually poorer than they were a few years ago, which actually has an impact on beef demand.” There are two parts to the market structure — the supply side and the demand side. This has two dimensions. One is the quantity which the consumer is willing to buy and, simultaneously, the price they are willing to pay. If the econo-

my doesn’t grow in the U.S. and the rest of the world, we are not going to get higher cattle prices, Robb opines. What is the major risk to this outlook? The major risk is Europe. If Europe goes into recession and it spills over into another U.S. recession, beef demand is going down. Cattle prices will run into a bigger headwind. “By the year 2050, the U.S. is projected to have

Attendees at the 43rd Cattle Feeders Day at the Lancaster Farm & Home Center listen to a presentation. 100 million more people, which will definitely qualify as a mature beef market,” Robb says. “Insofar as beef exports, they are currently an irrelevant factor. If we think about how population growth is the more important driver, in the world perspective, it is income growth. As incomes go higher, what do people want? They want more animal-based protein in their diet. Dairy products, beef products,

pork products, chicken products, etcetera. So if production and consumption then must double, we are going to have to produce it. And if we’re going to have to produce it, what is that going to take? It’s going to take more dairying, a much more efficient system in the world, more fertilizers, more grain and more beef. And this is why we’re more optimistic in this industry, especially a forage-based

industry, because these income drivers are critical, and income growth is what is driving the international marketplace. “We don’t have the largest cowherds in the world, but we are the largest beef production country. Way larger than anybody else. We have a great production and cattle-feeding system, and we’re the best at it. Some of the beef we import in this country will

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Jim Wilkins of Baker, West Virginia has owned his 1552 NDE mixer for only 4 months but has already formed his opinion. "I wouldn't take a million dollars for my NDE, if I couldn't buy another one! Beef farmers don't realize their waste until they start using a mixer." In a nutshell, Jim's feed costs this winter were much cheaper by using home grown forages while purchasing only cornmeal. His 300 head of fall cows wintered over the best ever. Weight gains on weaned calves in 45 days tested at 3.5 pounds. The waste from feeding hay all winter "would fit into the back of one pickup truck, and it wouldn't be full at that!" With the NDE scales, Jim feeds only what his livestock needs, to produce a marketable product, while significantly increasing cash flow. Jim sums it up "Anybody in the beef cattle business without a mixer, is NOT doing something right."

401 NDE 350 cubic ft, shed kept, nice and ready to work . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In Agrimetal 5500 Tub Grinder, Shed Kept, HD Cutting Head, Power Spout . . .$11,500 Knight 4036 Bowtec Mixer, Stainless Liner, Nice Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Salsco Round Bale Wrapper, 3Pt Hitch, Good Cond., Ready to Work . . . . . . .$4,250 Anderson 680S Single Bale Wrapper, Big Round-Big Square, Ex. Cond. . . .$17,500 Penta 350 Cu. Ft. Vertical Mixer, 10 Yrs. Old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In! • Specialized in feeding livestock • Factory authorized sales and service • Trade-in equipment welcomed

Rental M&S Grain Crusher, Rollermill/Bagger, does 5’x200’ bags, approx. 2500 bu. High Moisture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call! Reel Auggie Model 2450 Nice Mixer, Ready to Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 Triolet Model 1200 Auger in good shape Available Mid January . . . . . . . . . .$15,900 Luck Now 285 Mixer, nice augers, ready to work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In-Call! Roto-Mix Horizontal Mixer, 7 Yrs.. Old, Good SOLD

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That all depends on whether the consumer is willing to pay. Of course if the American customer won’t shell out the dollars, there are more buyers overseas. They are cashing in on a weaker U.S. dollar. Perhaps the most telling article related to beef demand was posted by Oklahoma State’s Darrell Peel at the beginning of the year: “Beef Demand Is the Key to Cattle Prices In 2012.” He suggests, “Cattle and beef prices will be higher in 2012, but just how much higher depends on consumer demand.” Although many brilliant ag econo-

mists have devoted countless hours of study to it, beef demand will never be an exact science. There are too many factors at work, but one thing is for certain, true demand increases aren’t simply selling more product or even higher retail prices. Demand only moves up when volume times price moves up. So what can individual farmers and ranchers do to move that needle? Listen to consumer preferences. Work at Kansas State recently

Demand A9

Feeders from A6 go to 7-11. Beef jerky! Flip the bag over and it probably says this beef came from Brazil. That is likely the best use of that product. The amount of beef Brazil is exporting is declining even though their cowherd is up a little bit. That’s because their domestic economy is growing so fast and because of their middle class emergence; they’re keeping more of their beef at home. They’re selling it to their domestic consumer and not in the international marketplace. Argentina is down largely because they continue to take crop land, pasture land and forage land, and convert it to corn and soybean production. Their beef cow herd production is down about 10 percent this year. Australia has stagnated in recent years. Canada is declining, too, from 5 million head to about 4 million. That’s huge. A nearly 28 percent decline. The European cow herd is down. The Russian cow herd is down. Most South American cow herds are down.

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“The major reason the U.S. has had record high cattle prices is due to exports. That’s just the beef side of the equation. Why is per capita consumption going down? Because foreign consumers are paying more for the beef than the U.S. consumer is willing to pay, and that is the only reason why. The foreign market is bidding it away from the U.S. consumer. “Pre-BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy), we were getting about $2 billion a year net back into cattle prices,” Robb concluded. “There’s no data for 2011 yet, but estimates have that figure at about $3.7 billion. That’s new money in the industry we didn’t have, thanks to international trade. Projecting into 2013, beef production is going down, beef cattle prices are going up. Structural change in the industry is dramatic; it’s going on in front of our eyes. It explains a lot about what’s going on and how the feedlot industry is changing.”

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Page 7 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Demand more from the herd

by Miranda Reiman The headline reads, “Beef prices skyrocket.” A little more information comes with, “Wholesale beef prices at record levels.” Another adds, “Beef exports up 7 percent in two months.” The articles that follow those zingers all explain different facets of the supply and demand equation. Beef prices are up because of a shrinking cowherd, accelerated by drought. Cattle prices are 25 percent higher than this same time a year ago, but can they stay there?


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 8

THESE LIVESTOCK BUSINESSES ARE READY FOR YOUR MARKET NEEDS!!!

VIRGINIA J BUNKS AND CATTLE GUARDS

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — After weeks of misleading media reports about lean finely textured beef, which has ultimately resulted in more than 650 individuals losing jobs in Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska, top elected leaders from Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, Texas and South Dakota joined forces with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and Under Secretary for Food Safety Elisabeth Hagen to support the safety of this product and all U.S. beef. Na-

tional Cattlemen’s Beef Association President and Nebraska cattleman J.D. Alexander issued the following statement to praise the leaders for their efforts. “Cattlemen are delighted to see state leaders from Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota and Texas saying enough is enough by clarifying the importance of beef in diets and its role in providing jobs and economic growth. The outspoken and visible support from Secretary

Vilsack and Under Secretary Hagen represents a united effort to restore confidence in the beef I proudly produce and feed my own family. “We have the safest beef supply in the world, but that didn’t stop the race for ratings and the misinformation overload scaring consumers and throwing the country into absolute chaos. This started out as yet another careless and irresponsible distortion of the facts that spiraled into real jobs

and real families in already struggling economies being thrown aside. “Irresponsible attacks will ultimately result in a domino effect from farm to fork. The wave of chaos has calmed a bit and now is the time to help dissect fact from fiction with our consumers here in the United States and abroad. I am honored to be a part of the beef community providing safe and nutritious beef for families around the globe.”

people have been saying with their wallets all along. And it should be common sense. After all, what kind of beef do you like to eat? But eating experience isn’t the only factor.

As Peel notes, “Consumer decisions are driven by value, which is a combination of preferences and price of a product relative to other products that may be substitutes.” He was mainly talking about folks substituting cheaper pork and poultry options for beef purchases, but this substitution can work in the other direction, too. A dinner party might call for a little extra assurance that the center-of-theplate item will be just right. So consumers will trade up from Select to Choice beef or from Choice to premium Choice or Prime. Peel is spot-on when he says decisions are driven by value. If they’re going to pay more (overall beef prices rose 10 percent last year), then it’d better live up to the expectations. That’s your job. Increasing quality bolsters the entire market. Better beef

also gives the U.S. a competitive advantage in the export markets, allowing international beef sales to flourish, regardless of what happens in the U.S. Keeping customers is the name of the game. Whether you’re a feeder wanting repeat visits from packer-buyers or a cow-calf producer looking for competing bids at the sale barn, there’s a common thread: beef demand. Increasing it leads to more money at the farm level. Data from Montana State noted a 66 percent decline in U.S. beef demand from 1976 to 1999 correlated with a 40 percent reduction in fed-cattle price and a 48 percent decrease in feeder-calf prices. Nobody wants to go back to that. Being aware of recent history seems motivation enough to keep a steady focus on all the ways to improve demand for U.S. beef.

Demand from A7 showed demand for USDA Choice beef increased 20 percent from 2002 to 2010, but that was outpaced by a premium Choice brand. Consumers want quality. Taste panel after taste panel proves what

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Page 9 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Alexander makes statement regarding USDA, state leaders defending safety of U.S. beef


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 10

Sixth annual ‘Meat-In Day’ goes off without a hitch by Sarah Doyle, Block and Bridle Public Relations Chair The sixth annual Meat-In Day was held at the Penn State University Park campus on March 15. Originally designed as a response to the “Meat-Out Day” held in protest of eating animal agricultural products, Meat-In Day has become much more than that now. Meat-In Day is not only an excuse to indulge in nutritious meat and milk products, it is also an opportunity to educate the public on how much animal agriculture impacts their everyday lives and how nutritionally important animal products are for the human diet. This year’s theme was “From Farm to Consumer … Thank the Producer,” which was splashed on bright neonyellow shirts worn by the members of Block and Bridle and Collegiate Cattlewomen clubs who worked the event. They handed out cheese sticks, ham sticks, and beef jerky to passersby, along with informational pamphlets about how animals are raised for food. “The theme for this year was devel-

oped in hopes of trying to help people understand that we, representing the farmers, work hard to raise the best quality food possible for the consumers to eat,” said Christiana Graver, Lehighton, PA, Block and Bridle CoChair of the event. “Many people today are further and further removed from the farm so we are trying to help reconnect them to the farmers that provide the food they eat three times a day. Through that we put a strong emphasis on eating animal agricultural products everyday for not only the wonderful tastes, but also for the numerous health benefits of consuming these products.” Graver and her Collegiate Cattlewomen Co-Chair Amanda Mosier, Cochranton, PA, share the sentiment that this year’s event was one of the smoothest Meat-In Days in the event’s history in terms of integrating new products and also the handling of the public. Products distributed included over 1,500 packs of Palmyra Co. Lebanon Bologna, 720 Buffalo Bill Honey Ham Smokies Sticks donated

Participants in Meat-In Day are front row, from left, Melissa Boess, Colleen Stewart (as Patty) and Christi Graver. In the back row, from left, are Kristina Tillou, Luke Graver, Amanda Mosier, Kam Lynch, Katie Landis, Jenessa Deeter, and Kristen Stufft. by Penn Ag Industries, 25 Lamb Sticks donated by Maple Hollow Farm, 960 Cheese Sticks donated by Mid-Atlantic Dairy, and 1,500 Beef Sticks. While many people asked questions about the event, members received no negative backlash. Graver said that while she is excited to be graduating this year, she will be anxious to see

how next year’s group of students handle the event, since she has been part of the organizing efforts for four years. She believes that since there is such strong support and dedication from both Block and Bridle and Collegiate Cattlewomen, it will continue to be the outstanding success as it has been in years past.

Edwards Land & Cattle Co.

SPRING PRODUCTION SALE SATURDAY, April 14, 2012 • 12:30 p.m AT OUR NEW SALE FACILITY - ON THE FARM 314 WILLARD EDWARDS RD. • BEULAVILLE, NY

Selling 135 Head as 100 Lots Bulls • Breds • Pairs • Show Prospects • 60 Embryos

Offering Only Our Best & FEATURING MANY BREED FIRSTS! • Some of the breed’s first mature Winston calves to be offered. • Some of the first Undoing calves offered East of the Mississippi. • Some of the breed’s first Xyloid & Brickyard progeny & embryos.

ELCX Dianas Willow 131Y

ELCX Destiny 146Y

ELCX Edith Erica 128Y

1/25/11 • HB/HP • 78% DHVO Deuce 132R x EXLR Sugar 154R BW: 0.9 WW: 57 YW: 95 MA: 21 SC: 0.9 MS: .09 $MI: 48

3/17/11 • HB/DP • 75% Lim-Flex DHVO Deuce 132R x GPEX Blaque Destiny BW: -0.9 WW: 52 YW: 91 MA: 20 SC: 0.6 MS: .20 $MI: 52

1/24/11 • B/HP • Purebred MAGSWL Usual Suspect x DFLC HBHPC 16S BW: 2.1 WW: 46 YW: 91 MA: 22 SC: 0.3

ELCX Yesterday 04Y

ELCX Cezar 140Y

ELCX Salem 144Y

1/25/11 • DB/DP • 25% Llim-Flex Deer Valley Direction S6118 x DFLC 4U BW: -1.7 WW: 36 YW: 77 MA: 34

3/11/11 • HB/HP • 50% Lim-Flex MAGS Winston x DFLC HBPC 25L BW: -0.4 WW: 41 YW: 87 MA: 27 SC: -0.2 MS: .47 $MI: 56

3/17/11 • B/HP • 50% Lim-Flex MAGS Winston x DFLC HBPC 25L BW: -1.1 WW: 39 YW: 85 MA: 27 SC: -0.2 MS: .47 $MI: 55

ELCX Prom Night 200Y 10/1/11 • DB/HP • 75% Lim-Flex CALO Brickyard 902W x KRVN Prom Belle 130P BW: -1.7 WW: 39 YW: 86 MA: 24 SC: 0.4 MS: .29 $MI: 51

ELCX-

Building for the Future with Faith, Dedication & Commitment

These and more exceptional genetics like them sell April 14. Contact the farm or R&R Marketing for a catalog. Call/text for a catalog. R&R Marketing Co. Randy Ratliff 615/330-2735 (m) www.rrmktg.com

Dexter and Nicholas Edwards 290 Willard Edwards Rd. • Beulaville, NC 28518 • www.edwardslandandcattle.com • e-mail: edwardslimouosin@earthlink.net 910/298-3012 • Fax: 910/298-6155 • Nicholas, mobile: 910/290-1424 •Nicholas, e-mail: npedwards07@yahoo.com

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Page 11 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Enter Our Country Folks Sweepstakes For A Chance


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 12


Each year, Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) looks for a seedstock and a commercial cattle operation to honor for their exemplary role in using superior Angus genetics to build better beef. “These Commitment to Excellence Award winners do it right, and show the way for others,” said Larry Corah, CAB vice president. Everyone learns from good examples, and that’s why the company recognizes those who leave no stone unturned

as they move toward the ideal, from genetics to coordinated management and marketing. Eligible candidates must have a record of measuring genetic and management criteria, and then acting to better drive the supply of Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand product. There are extra points for being directly involved with CAB in its various programs and licensed feedlots over the years. “We’re encouraging

cattlemen to nominate those they work with, their genetic suppliers or bull-buying customers,” Corah said. Nominations, due May 1, should include details that make the farm or ranch a good award candidate, including the ability of their cattle to hit the CAB and CAB Prime targets. Please include name and contact information, type and size of operation, number of years feeding or working with customers

on postweaning data, and any linkage to other CAB projects. Winners will be contacted by June 1. CAB will produce features stories about the individuals, who will receive an expensepaid trip to the company’s Annual Conference in White Sulphur Springs, WV, Sept. 19 to 21. Email Marilyn Conley at mconley@certifiedangusbeef.com for a nomination form or call to discuss at 800-225-2333.

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Page 13 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Nominate your Angus partners


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 14

Responding to demand Charting a course in the beef industry means acting on market signals and being ready for the reactions to those actions. “The message of consumer demand is more complicated than it has ever been,” John Stika said at the Kansas State University Cattlemen’s Day. Regardless of position in the beef industry, “we must interpret and respond by balancing those needs and expectations of consumers with our need to make a profit.” The president of Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) said that response is critical at every step from the cow-calf to retail level. “Being the closest to the consumer, retailers are the first to detect

these changing preferences,” he said. Trend lines in 2011 clearly show a retail shift toward higher quality beef, with many of the largest companies making room for Choice product in their meat cases. “Wal-Mart didn’t create a quality demand move,” Stika said. “They responded to it.” Consumers today consider a price-value relationship rather than price alone. “We as an industry have experienced record sales of premium Choice beef during the worst economy in recent years,” he noted. “The only way to explain this is that folks were careful where their dollars were spent, and they didn’t gamble in the meat case.”

So consumers are willing to pay more for a product that they know is worth more, and they may be willing to pay still more. “But there is an end out there somewhere,” Stika said. “For consumers to accept higher prices, we as producers must continue to increase quality.” That way, retailers who have responded by offering more high-quality beef will be able to maintain that strategy and satisfy consumers who want their money’s worth. The response must come from an entire industry that focuses on taste, the top reason consumers buy beef, said Stika, who admitted it seems a distant goal for many producers.

“Eating satisfaction is a lower priority and a challenge to focus on,” he said. “That’s because there are so many other factors weighing into their decisions. But producers must hedge those factors against longterm beef demand.” Stika acknowledged the real need for increasing efficiency amid high input costs, but progress there would ring hollow if the source of demand walks away. “We must always consider the wants and expectations of the consumer, who brings the only sustainable flow of dollars into our businesses.”


American Farm Bureau Federation

The emergence of retail agriculture by Gary Matteson Consumer trends such as personal electronics technology, women’s fashion or even popular vegetable varieties start with a good product idea that is amplified by the buzz of media, advertising, and social networks. Trends that stick create reliable, mature markets that are engines of economic demand, stimu-

lating additional new products and market opportunities. Many farmers and ranchers have benefitted from the trend in local foods, finding ways to sell direct-to-retail and capture a higher profit margin. Young, beginning and small farmers in particular have been able to enter into farming at the smaller scale of direct-to-consumer

sales in the local foods marketplace, like farmers’ markets, roadside stands and through community supported agriculture (CSAs). If the evolution of this trend in consumer demand for farm products stopped at local farmers’ markets, it would be easy to dismiss. However, the impact of this trend — if recognized, described, and labeled properly — shows that it is economically significant, commonly practiced and geographically widespread. None would argue that $7 billion in sales of cotton and rice are insignif-

icant, yet in the same Ag Census year of 2007, organic, direct-to-retail and local foods sales conservatively added up to $8 billion. Perhaps those of us in agriculture missed that comparison because it is so difficult to extract such statistics from USDA data sources, which are based on counting commodity products rather than following marketing channels. If the directto-consumer marketing channel were counted as if it were a commodity product, then it would be the fifth most common farm activity by number of farms. As for geographic distribution,

CSA farms were present in nearly 2,100 counties according to the 2007 Ag Census. If you raise cattle, you are in good company with the ag sector that is most likely to sell direct-to-retail; three out of five cattle producers use that marketing channel. If you don’t see some kind of consumer demand-based agriculture, you’re not looking, or maybe you see it and don’t know it. That illustrates a big part of the problem — we don’t have a name to call this trend of interrelated agricultural marketing channels that centers on the emergence of retail consumer demand as a driving factor. More farmers and ranchers are getting closer to their customers, and finding that they can capture a higher margin when they grow vegetable or meat products with a specific consumer market segment in mind. Whether they sell direct-to-retail or through wholesale channels, if it is sold with special product attributes such as being local, organic or small farm-raised, then a significant portion of the value is based on retail consumer demand. Let’s name it “Retail Agriculture.”

Retail Agriculture is analogous to “Small Business,” which is also a term that describes a wide variety of very different businesses in order to allow effective policy discussion. We can talk about “the role of Small Business in new job formation” and nobody blinks an eye at the idea of lumping sole proprietors with corporations of 500 employees — both fitting into the generalized definition. Retail Agriculture is a shorthand way to talk about this subject in agricultural policy discussions. We need the term “Retail Agriculture” as we describe its modest yet growing economic significance, its capacity to provide opportunities for lower cost entry into agriculture and its relevance to the future. Gary Matteson is a guest contributor to Focus on Agriculture. He is vice present of Young, Beginning, Small Farmer Programs and Outreach at the Farm Credit Council, a trade association of the Farm Credit System. Read more on “The Emergence of Retail Agriculture: Its Outlook, Capital Needs, and Role in Supporting Young, Beginning, and Small Farmers,” by Alan R. Hunt and Gary Matteson at (http://fccouncil.com/ybs/).

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Page 15 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE


by George Greig, Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture Farmers are taking to the fields earlier than anyone can remember thanks to a mild winter. While we know the danger of frost has not passed, there is something about spring — from the new animal and plant life to the clean smell of soil — that makes me eager to get into the fields. My brother and I grow soybeans and corn in Crawford County and last year’s wet conditions were less than ideal. Hopefully this year will be better, and though you can’t control Mother Nature, you can control how you prepare and protect your land. April 22 is Earth Day and this is the perfect time to celebrate our rich

resources and the farm families who work hard each day to protect them. Farmers are the original stewards of the land and know good soil is the key to successful farming. I am proud of the work done by our producers and agribusinesses together with 66 local conservation districts to safeguard our soil and water supply. Farmers have been using effective conservation practices like nutrient management, cover crops, streamside buffers and no-till or low-till farming for several decades, and it is clear this commitment to conservation is paying off. Nitrogen and phosphorus loads going into the Chesapeake Bay have been reduced by an estimated 41 percent. More than 2,900 of our farm-

ers across the state have established nutrient management plans for 700,000 acres. Thanks to programs like Resource Enhancement and Protection, or REAP, farmers have implemented conservation practices on their operations like conservation and nutrient management plans, grassed waterways, notill planting and waste storage structures. While we’ve made progress, our work isn’t done. The agriculture industry must play a leading role in the efforts surrounding the Chesapeake Bay and other critical estuaries flowing into the Delaware, Genesee, Ohio, Potomac and Susquehanna rivers and Lake Erie. With 12.7 million citizens and more than 63,000 farms, our efforts across the state

and throughout the region are meaningful. On April 19, the state Department of Agriculture will partner with the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources to highlight the importance of another segment of agriculture to a healthy environment — trees. We’ll visit Rockelman’s Nursery in York County to teach elementary students about the land of “Penn’s Woods,” sustainable forestry and how nurseries are helping to keep Pennsylvania green. Pennsylvania is home to nearly 17 million acres of valuable, life-enhancing, renewable hardwood forests — twice as much forested land as 100 years ago thanks to sustainable forestry practices. Trees help reduce soil erosion and improve water quality.

With the good efforts of our wood products industry, for every one tree harvested, four more grow in its place, making wood building, remodeling, flooring and furniture, cabinetry and woodworking projects truly green. In fact, studies have shown the environmental cost of producing other materials, like glass, steel and plastic, is higher than wood products. Our tree nurseries are working with an emphasis on sustainability, too. They are managing water and nutrients efficiently and helping customers create landscapes that enhance the environment, like tree-lined streets to improve air quality and rain gardens and green roofs to better manage storm water. While I’ll be in York

County, there are a lot of other Earth Day activities planned across the state — from clean ups and festivals to hikes and other special events. Visit www.dcnr.state.pa.us and click on “What to Do” then “Calendar of Events” for ways to celebrate Earth Day. Another resource is a new interactive Earth Day website hosted by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Visit www.dep.state.pa.us and click the “Earth Day” button for the Earth Day proclamation from Gov. Tom Corbett; an interactive calendar searchable by county, where event planners can promote their activities; biographies of environmental professionals with information about environmental careers; and links to educational resources. Whether it’s farmers, the wood products industry, nurseries or other businesses, Pennsylvania’s agriculture industry is leading the way in improving the environment. This Earth Day, and every day, celebrate Pennsylvania’s important efforts to ensure we are meeting the needs of the present without compromising the needs of future generations.

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April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 16

Celebrating our environmental successes


The winning drive to beef quality by Laura Nelson Preventing a “draft bust” in quarterback selection is the first step to build a winning team, says Pfizer Animal Health veterinarian Jason Osterstock. But the genetic epidemiologist isn’t talking about football or the gridiron; he’s analyzing sire selections for beef cattle herds. With cattlemen as general managers of the ranch team, their No. 1 responsibility is to make personnel and roster decisions, like what sires and cows will drive genetic improvement. “The herd sire is there for the long term, and his ability really lays out the success of the operation,” Osterstock points out. “We each invest a lot of effort, attention and diligence in evaluating those herd sires before we draft them.” Whether you go with a

proven free agent with a lot of hits and high accuracy numbers or a young, unproven draft pick, that herd leader has to be surrounded by a line that stands up to his genetic ability, too. In Osterstock’s analogy, presented at a 2012 Cattlemen’s College seminar, that’s the cowherd. “They’re the ones really doing the work, and they have to match up with the QB’s potential. It doesn’t matter how good the quarterback is if the line, or in this case your cows, can’t keep him standing upright.” So how does an expert manager put together a team that’s Super Bowl ready? Systematic selection that utilizes the latest DNA-testing resources, Osterstock says. There are well-established methods for incorporating those predictions into the EPDs (expected progeny differ-

ences) for genomically tested registered bulls, but commercial females and their progeny represent a new opportunity. “When we look at the benefits of genomic technology, it’s really about avoiding the draft busts,” he says. That goes for the cow line, too. “We have to accumulate enough information so that we can make investments in younger animals with a fairly minimum amount of certainty in their long term potential. And we have to do it in a much more systematic, intelligent and strategic way.” The competitive advantage DNA technology has against other selection tools is its early predictive ability, like reading the other teams’ playbook, even before they get a peek. “We can really get a feel for those traits that we’re most interested in

for our operation’s profitability, and then make those decisions as soon as possible.” Osterstock says. “The early-in-life part is a terribly important issue here because that’s where the opportunity is.” He points to the cheering fans in the grandstands — steak-loving consumers — as the most critical piece of the game plan. After all, even a champion team isn’t worth much if it doesn’t have a fan base to fill the seats, pay the salaries and rave about the experience. “Ultimately,” Osterstock says, “we need to make sure we’re making those decisions based on consumer eating satisfaction. We can expend a lot of time and effort, but we are going to have a hard time ensuring a place at the table for beef and ensuring a competitive market for our product if they’re not happy.”

Those traits focus predominantly on marbling and tenderness. “If the consumer perceives that a certain type of beef has a more favorable eating profile, then they are certainly willing to pay for it,” he says. “Those with that kind of product will be rewarded.” Market volatility calls for strategic investment in technology that help produce sought-after beef more efficiently. But before taking genetic selection to the make-sure level of DNA testing, Osterstock suggests finding answers to three questions: 1) Can I make real improvements? Carcass traits carry heritability of 35 percent to 40 percent, so the veterinarian says, “Yes, we can make systematic, cumulative genetic progress and improve the herd’s genetic merit over time.” 2) Which ones should I test? “Focus on the

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young animals,” Osterstock says. “That’s where the most opportunity is.” Pay mind to the selection tools you currently use, such as EPDs, health information and eye appeal. Sort off the animals that don’t make the cut on those standards; then collect samples for DNA testing on the rest. 3) What test should I use? “Choose a test that provides information for the traits that you are going to put an emphasis on,” he says. Quarterbacks are usually the highest-cost member of a team, and for good reason. You want more information on him, so buy a bull with EPDs enhanced by an extensive DNA test that examines many traits. The female “linemen” may need a smaller, more focused test to evaluate their abilities and keep costs under control. “In that situation we might choose to use a test like GeneMax™ that would give us an opportunity to assess a replacement heifer’s genetic potential for specific traits like marbling and growth,” Osterstock says. That’s provided the heifers — or steers that could be evaluated for feeding and carcass potential — are 75 percent or more Angus, since GeneMax ties into the American Angus Association’s expansive genetic database, he adds. Once the DNA test of choice has been selected and put in play, the final drive is to rank the animals’ genetic potential from top to bottom. “Then, draw a line in the rank and say, ‘these animals do not fit what I had envisioned for my operation and therefore I choose not to select them, and these other animals do fit my goals,’” Osterstock says. As animals above the line gain influence over herd genetics and build year-over-year improvements in carcass traits, the odds improve for Team Beef winning the Super Bowl of long-term demand, he says. “It’s a plan that assures we deserve a place at the dinner table.”

Page 17 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Team building in the herd


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 18

Horse owners urged to vaccinate now for West Nile, EEE The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) urges all horse owners to check with their veterinarians for West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) vaccination recommendations for their animals. Virginia only had one confirmed case of WNV in 2011 and no cases of EEE, although the number of horses affected in previous years and in other states is much higher. State officials are concerned that horse owners may be lulled into inaction by the lack of diseases activity last year and neglect vaccination this year.

“Despite a low level of disease activity last year, we still urge horse owners to consider vaccination,” said Dr. Joseph Garvin, program manager for VDACS’ Office of Laboratory Services. “We never know what mosquito activity will be in any given year and the bottom line is these vaccines are very safe and effective. We believe that, in most cases, private veterinarians will recommend them for their clients. Horse-owners need to be aware that the vaccines require boosters every six to 12 months.” Vaccines are available to drastically reduce the incidence of these dis-

eases in horses. The vaccines are effective for six to twelve months, so horses should be re-vaccinated at least annually. In an area where the disease occurs frequently, such as southeast and Tidewater Virginia, most veterinarians recommend vaccination every six months. For the vaccine to be effective it must be handled and administered properly and be given at least two weeks before the horse is exposed to the

virus. Additionally, to stimulate full immunity, horses must be vaccinated twice, about 30 days apart, the first year that the horse is vaccinated. Other prevention methods include destroying standing water breeding sites for mosquitoes, using insect repellents and removing animals from mosquito-infested areas during peak biting times, usually dusk to dawn. Typical symptoms of encephalitis in equines include staggering, cir-

MN; Justin Siewert, Lake City, MN; Jacob Sjostrom, Lafayette, MN; Matthew Sweeney, Appleton, NY; Joe Uter, Waverly, MN; Megan Viland, Pipestone, MN; Hannah Voelz, Tilleda, WI (Joe Drexler winner); Nicholas Weber, Bernard, Iowa; Kaylee Wegner, Faribault, MN; and Clare Yeager, Manchester, MD. This year marks the fourth consecutive year for awarding a scholarship in memory of Joe Drexler, who worked for NorthStar Cooperative DHI Services. NorthStar members and employees, friends and family contributed nearly $10,000 to establish this scholarship fund. Money generated from the annual National DHIA Scholarship Auction primarily funds the organization’s scholarship program. Investments and donations also help build the fund. To make a donation to the fund, contact National DHIA Scholarship Committee Chair Barb Roth at 616-897-7435, or roth250@ix.netcom.com; or National DHIA Communications and Events Manager JoDee Sattler at 608848-6455, ext. 112, or jdsattler@dhia.org.

WNV are present and those insects pose a threat to both humans and horses. For more information, contact the Office of the State Veterinarian, Division of Animal Industry Services, VDACS, at 804-786-2483 or see www.vdacs.virginia.gov/ animals/diseases.shtml. Horse owners should contact their veterinarians for further advice on prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

CERESVILLE VALUES

National DHIA names 21 scholarship winners The National Dairy Herd Information Association (DHIA) Scholarship Committee selected 21 high school seniors and college students as recipients of $750 scholarships. Judges evaluated applicants on scholastic achievements, leadership in school and community activities, and responses to DHI- and career-related questions. To be eligible for a National DHIA scholarship, applicants must be a family member or employee of a herd on DHI test, a family member of a DHI employee, or an employee of a DHI affiliate. The DHI affiliate for the herd or affiliate employee must be a National DHIA member. This year’s National DHIA scholarship winners are: Hannah Renea Bachman, Ulysses, PA; Abigail Andrew Copenhaver, Corfu, NY; Nathan Daninger, Forest Lake, MN; Elizabeth Fullerton, Argyle, NY; Rebecca Groos, Howard Lake, MN; Thomas Harren, Eagle Bend, MN; Chelsey Johnson, Heron Lake, MN; Stephanie Luders, Bliss, NY; Aryn Martin, Gorham, Maine; Kathleen Miron, Hugo, MN; Sara Roerick, Swanville, MN; Alyson Schwartau, Red Wing,

cling, depression, loss of appetite and sometimes fever and blindness. There is no cure for these diseases, which can kill anywhere from 30 percent (WNV) to 90 percent (EEE) of the horses infected. Humans cannot become infected by handling an infected horse, nor can a horse acquire the virus from another infected horse; however, the presence of an infected horse in the area indicates that mosquitoes carrying EEE or

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BALERS NH 575 Baler w/Thrower, Hydroformatic Bale Tension & Hydraulic Swing Tongue, Very Nice, Very Little Use . . . . .$20,900 NH 575 Baler w/Thrower, Hydroformatic Bale Tension & Hydraulic Swing Tongue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,500 NH 575 Baler Quarter Turn Chute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,900 NH 315 Baler w/Thrower . . . . . . . .$5,500 NH BC5070 Hayliner, Knotter fans, 2011 Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,500 NH BR7070 Rotocut 2010 Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,500 JD 435 Round Baler . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 NH 648 Autowrap Round Baler . . .$9,500 NH BR740A Rotocut, 2007 . . . . .$22,900 NH 640 Silage Special, Net Wrap, Wide Pickup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 NH 650 Net Wrap Baler . . . . . . .$11,500 HAY & FORAGE Kuhn GA7822 Twin Rotar Rake .$16,500 Vicon Andex 493T Rotary Rake . . .$4,500 NH 163 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,400 (2) NH H6750 Disc Mower, 2011 Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 NH 1033 Automatic Bale Wagon . .$7,900 NH 1049 SP Automatic Bale Wagon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,500 NH 892 Forage Harvester, Windrow Pickup . . . . . .$4,200 Reduced $3,900 NI Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,600 H&S HM 2000 Merger . . . . . . . . .$6,900 NH 258 Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,100 Kuhn FC303 Center Pivot Discbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,900 NH 156 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,600 Kuhn GA6002 Rake, through shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 Vicon KAR3200 Discbine, through shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500

Hesston Disc Mower . . . . . . . . . .$3,900 JD 1508 Batwing Mower . . . . . . . .$5,900 JD 1518 Batwing Mower . . . . . . . .$7,900 9N Thru Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 NH 1412 Discbine . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 TRACTORS & SKID STEERS NH TN75 Loader, Canopy, 2000 hrs. $20,900 Allis Chalmers 185 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,900 MF 65 with rotary cutter . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 NH L150 New Skid Loader . . . . .$28,989 NH L170 Deluxe Heated Cab . . .$15,900 NH L185 Cab & AC, 700 hrs, Excellent Cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,900 JD 317 Skid Loader . . . . . . . . . .$13,900 JD 620 Tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,900 Ford 4000 Tractor w/ Loader . . . .$4,900 Ford 4610 712 Hrs., Power Steering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,900 Bobcat T190 Track Machine w/ Cab & AC, 4 in 1 Bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,500 MF 2680 4x4, Cab, 130 HP . . . .$15,900 NH 775 Skid Steer . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 NH GT22 Garden Tractor . . . . . . .$3,500 MISC. EQUIPMENT Rhino SE10A 10’ pull type rotary cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,750 Woods D80 Pull Type Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 NH Elevator, 36’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,950 Edsel 1958 4 Dr., Hardtop . . . . . .$1,500 Argosy 1975 23’ Camper . . . . . .$1,500 Good Selection of Aftermarket Buckets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Starting at $650 NH MC22 Front Cut Mower w/60” Deck, Low Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 Dixie Chopper X2000-50 . . . . . . .$3,500 4 in 1 Bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,900 JD 717A Zero turn mower, like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,900

Pictures @ www.ceresvillenh.com SEE YOUR CERESVILLE NEW HOLLAND SALESMAN TODAY!!!

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Your authorized NEW HOLLAND dealer


Page 19 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 20

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You Fresh and fun family recipes (Family Features) — To help families transform ordinary meals into fresher versions that the whole family will feel good about eating, Ziploc Brand has partnered with best-selling author and TV personality Rachael Ray to bring healthier food choices to tables with the Great American FreshOver Project, a fresh food makeover made easy. For more recipes from the Ziploc Brand and Rachael Ray, visit the Ziploc Brand Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/ziploc.

The Only Pizza You’ll Ever Want Again Yield: 4 servings Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes Crust 1 16-ounce package pizza dough, brought to room temperature 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons grated ParmigianoReggiano Toppings 1/3 pound broccoli from trimmed broccoli bin in produce section, 1/3 head 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, 1 turn of the pan 3 cloves cracked garlic 1/2 pound chicken breast cut for stir fry, or chicken tenders Salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 cup part skim ricotta cheese 10 sun dried tomatoes in oil, drained and sliced 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese, available on dairy aisle 12 to 15 leaves fresh basil, torn or stacked and thinly sliced Preheat oven to 500°F. On 12-inch nonstick pizza pan, stretch out dough and form pizza crust. Drizzle olive oil on crust and spread it

The Only Pizza You’ll Ever Want Again with a pastry brush over the dough to the edges. Sprinkle crust with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano. In a small covered saucepan, bring 2 inches water to a boil. Separate broccoli tops into florets, discarding lower stalks or reserving for soup. Salt water and add broccoli florets. Cook, covered, 3 to 5 minutes. Drain broccoli and set on cutting board. Chop broccoli florets into small pieces. Heat a small nonstick pan over medium high to high heat. Add oil, cracked garlic and chicken. Season with salt and pepper. Brown chicken until lightly golden all over, 3 to 5 minutes. Chop sautéed chicken and garlic on a cutting board into small pieces. To assemble pizza, dot crust with broccoli and chicken. Dot crust with spoonfuls of ricotta, spreading gently with the back of spoon. Add sliced sundried tomatoes, scattering around pizza to edges. Complete assembly with a thin layer of shredded mozzarella. Place pizza in oven on middle rack and lower heat to 450°F. Bake 12 minutes, until cheese is deep

golden in color and crust is brown and crisp at the edges. Remove from oven and let stand 5 minutes. Top with lots of torn or shredded basil. Cut pizza into 8 slices using pizza wheel and serve. Tip: Put an individual serving size of chicken in Ziploc Brand Perfect Portions Bags right after purchasing and freeze in a Ziploc Brand Freezer Bag. That way you don’t have to defrost more chicken than you need for a meal.

Stretch a Buck Turkey and Bean Burrito Burgers Yield: 4 servings Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 16 minutes 1 cup cold leftover white or brown rice 1 pound ground turkey 1 (15-ounce) can pinto beans, rinsed and drained Palmful chili powder 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin, half a palmful 1 1/2 teaspoons coriander, half a palmful 1 tablespoon grill seasoning, (recommended: Montreal Seasoning by McCormick) 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 ripe avocado 1 clove garlic, grated or finely chopped 1 lime, zested and juiced 1 jalapeño or serrano pepper, seeded and finely chopped 1/2 small red onion, finely chopped 1/2 cup sour cream 4 red leaf lettuce leaves 1 ripe tomato, sliced 4 crusty rolls, split Combine rice, meat and beans with spices and grill seasoning. Form 4 big patties, then heat 1 tablespoon oil (a turn of the pan) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook patties 7 to 8 minutes on each side. While burgers cook, combine avocado with garlic, lime zest and juice, jalapeño and red onion. Mash to roughly combine, then stir in the sour cream. Place burgers on buns with lettuce and tomato, and top with sour cream guacamole. Tip: To keep leftovers fresh,

This week’s Sudoku solution

Stretch a Buck Turkey and Bean Burrito Burgers store in reusable dishes like Ziploc Twist n’ Loc Containers.

Broccoli and Cauliflower Gratin Mac ‘n Cheese Yield: 6 servings Prep Time: 20 minutes Cook Time: 1 hour 1 small head or bundle broccoli, trimmed into florets 1 small head cauliflower or half a large head, trimmed and cut into florets 1 pound whole-wheat macaroni or penne or other short cut pasta 2 cups sour cream or reduced-fat sour cream 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1/3 cup finely chopped chives 2 cloves garlic, peeled and grated or crushed into paste A few drops hot sauce Salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 1/2 cups grated extra-sharp cheddar Bring large pot of water to a boil over medium heat. Salt water and add broccoli and cauliflower florets. Boil vegetables for 5 minutes, then remove with a spider or a strainer and drain. Add pasta to water and undercook by about 2 minutes, drain. Meanwhile, combine sour cream in large bowl along with mustard, chives, garlic, hot sauce, salt and pepper, to taste. Add pasta and cauliflower and 2/3 of the cheese. Stir to combine, then transfer to a casserole dish or Ziploc VersaGlass container and cover with remaining cheese. Cool and chill for a make-ahead meal. To heat and eat, put casserole on baking sheet and bake in the middle of a preheated 375°F oven until deeply golden and bubbly, about 40 to 45 minutes. Tip: Make a double batch and freeze for a later date.

Broccoli and Cauliflower Gratin Mac ‘n Cheese


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Lee Publications, Country Folks Classified, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Page 21 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Hello I’m P eggy


ARKETPLACE

ONE PAIR 12.4X34 tires, one Firestone new, one Coop. 70% $175. for both. 315839-5417.(NY) CIH 3309 DISCBINE, needs cutterhead work, Holstein semen roughly 200 straws, Judd Dreamy Lotto Spoiler Tres Matson with semen tank. 716-257-3667.(NY) EASTER CHICKS, Crested Polish and for something different Crested Polish x with Layers. No Sunday calls or pick-ups $3. 315-536-5035.(NY) WANTED: Horse drawn two row corn cultivator. Shetler 1941 State Route 26 Oriskany Falls, NY 13425. 16 HEREFORD COWS bred to reg. Black Angus bull, all coming 3rd calf due May, June. 585-797-4561.(NY) JD 620 runs good, WFE $4,000. Also 2 Beagle dogs, free to good home. 315-3630262.(NY) SMALL SQUARE BALERS JD 348 $3,500. 3 JD 347 $3,000. -$2,500. Greg, always stored inside. 585-746-5925.(NY) LILY FERTILIZER SPREADER 3 point hitch, Grimm hay rake/tedder, New Idea PTO manure spreader small single axle. All well oiled. 802-257-4832.(VT) BUTCHERING HOGS for sale. Gouverneur, NY 315-854-5729.

PICK 10 JERSEY Yearling Heifers, ready to breed in May, naturally polled, nice looking animals $850. each. 802-4642644.(VT) 362 NEW IDEA manure spreader with end gate, good condition also Gehl 2 row corn and 7’ hay heads. 607-243-8282.(NY) 2010 PREMIER UTILITY TRAILER 6x16’ 7,000 GVWR good tires, like new $2,000. firm. 610-754-7360.(PA) NH 1411 Discbine 540 PTO rubber rolls, good condition $12,000. obo 203-2667907 cell 203-228-9428.(CT) CHRISTMAS TREE planter, 3PH old but very heavy duty with two spacer wheels $500/obo. Steuben County, NY. 607-3296753 WANTED: DeLaval Milk Master, auto takeoffs, working condition. DeLaval part milker with vacuum operated pulsator. 802897-7484.(VT) GEHL MX. 135 grinder mixer, NI 3626 260 bushel spreader, NH 28 blower. WANTED: NI and JD corn pickers. 315-2199090.(NY) REBUILT MCCORMICK DEERING #9 mower 6 foot bar tongue truck excellent condition $1,100. Firm, Tioga Co. PA. 814367-5909

JOHN DEERE 550C dozer with 6 way blade $13,500. 315-536-3828.(NY) 1953 JOHN DEERE “60” several new parts $2,900. 1949 Farmall “M” nice $3,600. Both run good, have nice sheet metal. 401-6629131.(RI) INT. MODEL “1100” trailer mower misc. “I” Beams and 4-6 foot angle iron JD four bottom trailer plow. Bath, NY. 607-794-8380. 7 YEAR OLD DONKEY bred, 8 year old Jack Yearling Jack, $500. Jonathan Stoltzfus, 707 Thompson Rd., Little Falls,NY 13365. 315-429-9301 JOHN DEERE 7200 6 row narrow maxemerge corn planter, dry fertilizer, hydraulic fill auger, $9,500. Call Ray, Addison,VT 802-324-2771 JD 110 disc, 13’7” spacing, blades half wore, $1,800; NH Super 717 chopper, single row cornhead, 5’hay haed, VGC, $1,000. 413-229-8548(Mont.Co.NY)

NEW HOLLAND 8970 SS Mega Flow duals $42,500. Gehl 7285 mixer wagon scales, very good $4,500/obo. Free stalls $15. each. 802-393-2485.(VT) 11 SHORTBRED HOLSTEIN Heifers bred to Jersey bull, calfhood vaccinated and had Triangle Nine shots. 413-7431990.(MA) LIVESTOCK TRUCK; One ton; GMC; 4 speed; good box; 90% rubber V8, hitch on back. WANTED; Oliver 2-14” trailer plow. Central NY. 607-546-4055 2006 FORD F250 4X4 regular cab, gas, auto, air, cruise, 50,000 one owner miles very good farm truck $15,000. Offer. 315232-4326.(NY) WHITE 271 Rock Flex disc 21-foot hydraulic fold good condition extra new parts $2,900. 315-497-1712.(NY) 4 YEAR OLD standard bred mare, easy to handle $2,100. 585-526-6922.(NY)

WANTED: Heavy low bed trailer need not road worthy. 315-673-3995.(NY)

DUMP CHEIF SILAGE high dump wagon field ready $2,500. Cash only. MF345 plow w/add on kit and many extra parts $1,800. Cash only. Spotsylvania, Virginia 540-8955729.

1/4-TURN CHUTE for 320 $100. Pair 18.4x30 tires tubes no patches or breaks $250. NH 718 Chopper w/hay $1,000. RO. 607-776-3606.(NY)

TWO SOWS due in May, $500. each. 607324-6592.(NY)

WANTED: Seed Plates for MF39 corn planter also 2 row Gehl corn head. 518568-2182.(NY)

TWO SOUTHBOUND RAMS for sale $175. Breeders not registered or best offer. Call after 3p.m. 315-209-8472.(NY)

HONEY BEES, 3LB., with queen; hive bodies, honey supers, frames, gloves, bee suits etc. 845-427-2809.(NY)

BRILLION HARROW C-Shank Tines (older style), 40 Available. Make Offer. Red Creek, NY. 315-573-3037

HAY & STRAW trailer loads call J.E. Hitts Hay & Straw 607-334-2778.(NY)

NEW HOLLAND model 254 3PT. hitch 2Star rake tedder EC- Round 4x4, 1st cut grass hay stored under cover. 315-9237789.(NY)

CAT 955K Shovel dozer less than 2000 HRS, power shift electric start, 24V $15,000. 802-733-7639.(VT)

WANTED: Female llama of breeding age, nothing fancy. Please wright: Chris Schmucker 1190 Whiskey Hill Rd. Waterloo, NY 13165.

JOHN DEERE 7200 4-row corn planter, dry fertilizer, monitor, insecticide, conventional, excellent condition, new openers $10,000. Firm, Central NY. 315-737-5929

NH 489 HAYBINE NH 55 Hayrake Farmall A w/sickle mower. WANTED: PTO Pump. 315-337-1499.(NY)

GOATS: African Pygmy and Nigerian dwarf cross, lots to pick from, females and wethers $50-$75 each or make offers. 607522-7498.(NY)

BALEAGE 2011 CROP, first cutting tubed wrapped, alfalfa grass mix, mostly grass! 900-1000lb. ave. $45. FOB. Dundee 1-60 bales. 607-243-8747.(NY)

KIKO BUCK quiet, two years old,no papers, calm disposition $200. WNY Also 50% Feb./March kids. 585-535-0038.(NY)

WANTED: Rops for 980 Hesston tractor. Amsterdam, NY. 518-848-7201

IH 2000 SERIES loader, good condition, nearly new 6’ bucket brackets for utility style tractor $1,750. 607-863-4214.(NY)

(1) 2 YEAR OLD Belted Galloway bull $800. (3) Belted Galloway Hereford cross bulls born 7/11 $500. each. Fabius, NY. 315-683-5532

720 CIH PLOW six bottom 18” moulboards auto reset price $2,500. 804-5149845.(VA)

3 PH POST hole auger 6” auger $250. Hay preservative system, extra motors and pumps 10 cal preservative included $250. 413-584-3291.(MA)

RE CLEANED OATS for seed, from certified seed. 315-858-0088.(NY)

WANTED: Horizontal shaft to run hydraulic pump for side PTO to run loader on model 400, 420 or 420A Belarus tractor. 315-3379390.(NY)

LIQUID FERTILIZER PUMP for 6 row corn planter with filler 11’ cord for battery hookup. 585-394-7041.(NY)

NEW PICKUP TEETH FOR New Holland Hayliner baler $50. New belt for New Holland 273 baler from Flywheel for kicker. 607-965-8810.(NY)

DEUTZ ALLIS 385 corn planter 6 row, no till coulters new seed opener disks dry fertilizer $1,500. 607-243-7039.(NY) 6 YEAR OLD reg. Morgan mare, broke to drive, lots of action! $1,200. Morgan Standardbred cross filly, halter broke $800. 607-869-2699.(NY)

AYRSHIRE HEIFERS all ages; 14ft. Brillion drags $1,400; 4 Bottom JD plows hydraulic resets; Amsterdam, NY. 518-269-9590

FORD 4500 DIESEL with loader, shuttle, engine stack, $2,500. Wisconsin V465D excellent runner $900. 2 Ton electric chain hoist $800. 315-699-4157.(NY)

56 CORNPLANTER 4-row fert. marker $1,200. Vanbrunt 7x13 $800. Gehl 1310 round baler $4,500. Gehl 99 blower $750. 607-865-5945.(NY)

1972 CASE 430 gas tractor $3,500., 110 dual front end loader with quick detach bucket, fits Ford 4000 $1,500. 315-6753753.(NY)

LOCUST FENCE POSTS, 6-1/2 feet, sharpened $2.50. WANTED: Used JD metal canopy for 3020. Ask for Devin (work) 607-432-0171.(CNY)

LOOKING FOR A NEW PET? Try a different kind of pet- cute bunny. Easy to care for, many colors. Answer machine. 315776-4590.(NY)

PIPELINE MILKER for 30 cow barn complete with rotary vacuum, 4 units washer, pulsators, SS tubs, all PVC vacuum line. 716-830-5506.(NY)

FOR SALE: A complete 1086 transmission, TA housing and axles $995. 315-9424069.(NY)

AUSTRALIAN CATTLE DOG 1 year old, all shots updated, ntr reg family raised $150. 315-836-6131.(NY)

ORGANIC CERTIFIED BALEAGE tubed 4x4 first $35. Second $40. round dry bales 4x5 $30. Trucker available. 315-3472456.(NY)

SQUARE BALES 1st cut $3.00 new variety reed canary grass 2nd cut $3.50, 50 miles north of Albany. 518-638-8074.(NY)

300 GALLON single axle hydraulic driven field sprayer, complete with 30ft. booms, field ready $1,000. 450-264-4245.(NY)

WANTED: Stihl chain saw MS270C for parts. FOR SALE: Longcrower (Tomaru) chickens $60. Trio or $6. chicks. 315-8437563.(NY)

SPRAY TRUCK F390 diesel 900x20 tires, 400-gal. tank 45’-hyd. booms, raven monitor, foamer $6,000. Fert. spreader GUM ground driven $3,000. 585-624-4697.(NY)

52” GREAT DANE walk behind mower, 18hp. Kohler Hydro, fully sav’d, works very good $1,400. offer. No Sunday calls. 315536-3994.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 4450 4X4 cab, new A/C, new front tires, powershift, 3 remotes, 6,800 hrs. $34,000. 607-293-6421.(NY)

BRILLION PULVI MULCHER M-124 11 $3,500. JD 567 Wheel Rake, new and used parts, JD 38 mower $500. 518-8297194.(NY)

ONE CHICKEN DEBEAKER with stand $250; Antique wagon wheels; Vacuum pump $350; Antique chicken crate. 413562-2981.(MA)

JOHN DEERE #4 horse drawn mower, used very little; One single horse drawn mower make unknown. 434-724-7421. Night. (VA)

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April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 22

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April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 24

Lawrence Equipment celebrates new location with customer appreciation event by Jennifer Showalter BRIDGEWATER, VA — Around 400 people from as far south as Botetourt to as far north as Woodstock and across the mountains in Nelson and Albemarle counties recently attended an Open House and Customer Appreciation Event at Lawrence Equipment’s new Bridgewater dealership. In appreciation, guests were treated to lunch and were able to visit with Case and other vendor representatives. Customers also had the opportunity to view numerous pieces of equipment on display and take advantage of discounts on a variety of parts. Lawrence Equipment is a division of Lawrence Transportation Systems, a business with over 75

years of history. Lawrence Equipment started in the Case construction business in 2001 when the territory became available with the closing of the former dealership. Then in 2006, the Case IH agriculture equipment territory became available and Lawrence Ag Equipment formed. Since its beginning, the construction dealerships have grown from locations in Roanoke and Waynesboro to additional dealerships in Ashland and Bridgewater, VA. The agriculture location started in Cloverdale, VA and was later added in Dayton & Waynesboro. Business outgrew the Dayton location, and the Bridgewater store was purchased in 2011. Lawrence Ag Equipment moved

David Hanger, at left, and Barry Holland proudly present Case’s RB 454 Silage Baler.

into the Bridgewater location in July of 2011, while the construction division recently moved in and joined the agricultural equipment dealership in January of this year. The Bridgewater location is a 30,000 square feet building that is still being modified to accommodate the full line of equipment Case Construction and Case IH Agriculture has to offer. From sales to parts to in-house and field services, Lawrence Equipment is a 100 percent employee owned Employee Stock Ownership Plan company that strives to serve its customers. For more information on Lawrence Equipment phone 877466-1131, toll free, or visit www.lawrenceequipment.net on the Internet.

Steve Korfanty, at left, with Cummins and Bricker Inc., visits with Jack Henshaw of Ruckersville.

About 400 guests enjoy lunch during Lawrence Equipment’s open house in Bridgewater, VA.

Artie Wohl and Josette Gustavus promote the Case 5V185 Skid Steer during Lawrence Equipment’s open house and customer appreciation event in Bridgewater, VA. Photos by Jennifer Showalter

Lee Simmons, at left, of Mount Solon and Tyler Rhodes, a mechanic and truck driver at Lawrence Equipment, take a look at a Case IH 115.

Cotton Coffey, at left, and John McDonald, both of Rockbridge County, check out some of the tractors on display.


Midatlantic

Milk Milk Everywhere And Way Too Much To Drink Issued Mar. 30, 2012 The March Federal order benchmark milk price dropped another 34 cents, to $15.72 per hundredweight, the fourth month in a row of decline, $3.68 below March 2011, and equates to about $1.35 per gallon. The 2012 average now stands at $16.28, down from $16.63 at this time a year ago, and compares to $13.85 in 2010 and $10.18 in 2009. Looking ahead, Class III futures were trading late Friday morning as follows: April, $15.83; May, $15.53; and June, $15.82; with a peak of $16.75 in October. The Class IV price is $15.35, down 57 cents

from February and $4.06 below a year ago. California’s comparable prices were scheduled to be announced April 2. The four-week, NASSsurveyed cheese price averaged $1.5248 per pound, down 1.6 cents from February. Butter averaged $1.4347, down 3.7 cents. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.3310, down 4.8 cents, and dry whey averaged 61.07 cents, down 2.9 cents. The Agriculture Department reported in its latest Dairy Market News that the market is “awash with milk as increased production is noted across the U.S. Typical spring flush for the southern tier of states continues, while mild winter/spring weather in the northern areas has increased milk supplies.” The good news is that

cream demand has increased due to higher ice cream demand combined with better cream based production for Easter/Passover features. But, several processors in the West are preparing to implement financial assessments on producers for milk marketed above established volumes. Discounts for milk above basis are reported to be “severe.” March ended with the block cheese price trading at $1.49 per pound at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, down a halfcent on the week and 10 1/2-cents below that week a year ago. Barrel closed at $1.46, unchanged on the week but 11 1/4-cents below a year ago. Five carloads of block traded hands on the week and three of barrel. The NASS-reported U.S. average block price climbed to $1.5135, up 1.8 cents, while the barrels averaged $1.5549, up 4.9 cents. Higher than expected milk supplies are driving

increased cheese manufacturing. Plants across the U.S. have access to all the milk they need and then some in many cases. Surplus production is leaning towards Cheddar production but the higher production has led to increased retail featuring of cheese, USDA reports. Jerry Dryer, editor of the Dairy and Food Market Analyst, warned in his March 23 edition that cheese could fall as low as $1.45 per pound and possibly lower. He says the milk supply is overwhelming dairy product demand and exports appear to have “taken a hiatus.” He believes product prices will be lower for the next several months, based on the latest Global Dairy trade auction. Speaking of global trade; Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted 13 requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 2.84 million pounds of Cheddar cheese and 1.884 million pounds of butter to cus-

Section B tomers in Asia, Central America, the Middle East, and Africa. The product will be delivered through September and raised CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 37 million pounds and butter exports to 32.2 million, to 19 countries on four continents. On a butterfat basis, CWT says the milk equivalent of these exports is 1.044 billion pounds, the equivalent of nearly 60 percent of the 1.780 billion pounds of increased milk production through February 2012. Butter closed March at $1.4625, down 6 cents on the week and 52 3/4-cents below a year ago when it fell below $2 for the first time in 2011, though it was a short-lived two weeks before climbing back above $2. No butter was sold the last week of March. The NASS butter average hit $1.4519, up 0.9 cent. NASS powder averaged $1.3043, down 2.2 cents, and dry whey averaged 61.13 cents, up a half-cent. Dairy Market News says many butter producers and handlers believed the cash price would ease once the Easter/Passover holidays passed. Churning remains seasonally active although some producers indicate that cream supplies are a little less available due to enhanced Class II demand cream cheese, sour cream, whipping cream, and other cream based products. Warmer temperatures are encouraging ice cream consumption, according to USDA, but for the most part ice cream production remains seasonally limited. Retail butter demand has eased now that most orders for the holiday have been shipped. Suppliers indicate that orders are still occurring for fill-in needs. Retail features across the country are occurring and food service orders have been stronger in anticipation

of the holidays, according to USDA. The CME’s Daily Dairy Report says commercial disappearance of American cheese and otherthan-American cheese was up in January versus the prior year, based on USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) data. At 371.6 million pounds, American cheese was up 17.6 million. Other-than-American cheese totaled 574.4 million, up 26 million pounds from January 2011. Butter and nonfat dry milk commercial disappearance was off. Butter, at 117.7 million pounds, was down 12.2 million pounds from a year ago, and nonfat dry milk, at 159.5 million, was off 4.4 million pounds. USDA also reports that basketball-themed party ads were featuring cheese and sour cream. Advertising plans centered on the St. Patrick’s Day holiday however did not include many tie-ins with dairy products. The number of butter ads was lower this period with pricing slightly higher at $2.71 for a 1 pound pack. The number of cheese ads was lower for most sizes, with the exception of 2 pound block packs. Ice cream features are most common for a single item and many stores are featuring both a national and store brand. This period’s pricing level is $3.25, down 6 cents from two weeks ago. Yogurt features and prices are lower this reporting period with pricing for 46 ounce Greek yogurt and yogurt down slightly. I’ve said it before, the dairy industry’s problem is not so much one of over production as it is under consumption and part of that issue continues to be fluid milk. Tom Gallagher, CEO of Dairy Management Incorporated, addressed that at the recent Dairy Farmers of America annual meeting. Dairy Profit Weekly ed-

Mielke B12

Page 1 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Country y Folks


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 2

AUCTIONS -

FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: Feeder Steers: 250-400# 120-145; 400-600# 125146; 600-800# 120-136; Hols. 400-500# 110-121; 600-700# 97-111; 700-850# 89-101; 900-1100# 91-94. Feeder Heifers: 250500# 125-154; 500-750# 110-131. Feeder Bulls: 250-450# 125-140; 475-600# 115126; 700-850# 104-116; Red Angus 1140# at 105; Purebred Blk Angus 1500# at 1725. Stock Cows: Cow/Calf prs. 1500-1700; Smaller 1000-1400; Springers 11001550; Smaller 800-1075. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: 624. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 240# 187-195; 265-295# 185-193; 300-345# 169188; 355-390# 174-197; 400-405# 153-160; 453460# 167-185; 505-546# 151-167.50; 570-595# 150170; 610-643# 156-164; 670-675# 138-139; 763785# 133-134.50; S 1-2 200-210# 139-140; 300335# 150-169; 375-395# 130-173. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 265-280# 136-140; 305310# 160-165; 360-390# 158-167; 400-449# 150160.75; 470-485# 150151.50; 515-549# 142147.50; 553-580# 136-150; 605-630# 133-138; 655-

669# 124-135; S 1-2 250285# 130-139; 400-445# 110-146; 560-580# 128130. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 400-449# 159-171; 450480# 159-163; 505-548# 156.50-169; 557-560# 153159; 600-640# 144-149; 653-675# 136-146; S 1-2 415-445# 151-159; 455460# 140-154; 520-535# 155-158; 550-590# 123132. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 995-1170# 890900/hd 4-6 mos bred; M&L 1-2 Young 920-1195# 9001150/hd 7-9 mos bred; M&L 1-2 Middle Aged 870-875# 725-760/hd 1-3 mos bred; 975-1180# 750-1050/hd 4-6 mos bred; 1065-1145# 800910/hd 7-9 mos bred; S 1-2 Young 620-745# 610660/hd 4-6 mos bred; 600675# 580-690/hd 7-9 mos bred. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 329 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 160# 167.50; 225-240# 194195; 250-295# 155-184; 310-345# 150-200; 355395# 140-195; 405-445# 140-187; 455-470# 176185; 505-538# 171-175; 565-595# 145-171; 610625# 151-164; 680# 134; 1060# 108; S 1-2 270# 110; 695# 131. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 150-190# 130-177.50; 220240# 153-170; 260-290# 135-169; 305-330# 163170; 365-395# 140-166;

403-446# 142-160; 450490# 130-158; 505-540# 131-156; 555-585# 133150; 600-640# 120-134; 650-650# 126; 710# 123; 775# 125; 887# 123; S 1-2 170# 110; 370-380# 121128; 440# 124; 530# 125; 595# 100. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-495# 146-160; 505540# 150-170; 560-599# 123-156; 620-640# 134135; 687-690# 128-139; 705-740# 114-123; 750775# 112-119; S 1-2 450485# 120-139; 525# 133; 570# 126; 630# 112. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 119. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 189; 400-500# 163; 500-600# 158-164.50; 600-700# 136-142; M&L 2 300-400# 181-185; 400500# 184; 500-600# 168168.50; M&L 3 500-600# 149; S 1 300-400# 170; 400500# 158; 500-600# 151. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 150; 500-600# 134-139; 600-700# 129; M&L 2 300-400# 130-146; 400-500# 165; 500-600# 156; M&L 3 300-400# 146151; 400-500# 135-144; 500-600# 130; S 1 300400# 128-149; 400-500# 132; 500-600# 134; 600700# 122. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 196; 400-500# 150-170; 600-700# 123; 700-800# 115; M&L 2 300400# 165-194; 400-500# 168-177; 600-700# 124;

700-800# 100; S 1 300400# 164; 400-500# 147154. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 2513. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 178-201; 400500# 180-202; 500-600# 171-189; 600-700# 146-

168; 700-800# 139.50-149; 800-900# 122.25-139; 9001000# 120-133; M&L 2 300400# 170-200; 400-500# 165-184; 500-600# 161180.50; 600-700# 140-156; 700-800# 121.50-138; 800900# 119.50-124; S 1 300400# 160-167; 400-500# 157; 500-600# 164.

Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 134-142; 400-500# 119.75. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 175-197.80; 300400# 158-182.50; 400-500# 147-162; 500-600# 143.50155.50; 600-700# 138-148; 700-800# 130; M&L 2 200300# 165-170; 300-400#

CONSIGNMENT AUCTION Agricultural and Industrial Equipment

April 28th 2012 10:00 AM Dayton Ag Complex - by Dry River Hay and Ag Auction We are accepting Quality Equipment, Implement and Tool consignments until April 27th

Call for Details! Partial Listings Tractors/Equipment White 8410 2WD w/enclosed cab (3238 hrs.) John Deere 4430 (7547 hrs.) Ford 4000 Diesel Ford 8N (3201 hrs.) Case Model 584 Forklift (7580 hrs.) Caterpillar 955 Crawler Loader

Implements John Deere 750 Grinder “HAYMIXER” Grinder/Mixer Gehl 8210 Mixer Wagon Vermeer 605H Round Baler Bush Hog Disc Model 1436 New Holland Model 70 Bale Kicker Badger BN542 Silage Blower Badger BN2054 Silage Blower MoTrim Tiller Skeleton Hay Elevator Clark Sprayer

Tools Misc. Tools

More Items to Come! Terms/Conditions: Cash/Certified Check

FOR CONSIGNMENTS

OR QUESTIONS CALL: BEN SVONAVEC (814) 279-8453 AUCTION LICENSE #2907003983 LEWIS DRIVER (540) 487-1034 • MATT PENNYBAKER (540) 820-8977


SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1269. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 153-206; 300400# 160-196; 400-500# 164.50-184.50; 500-600# 166-184.50; 600-700# 146164; 700-800# 141-149.50; 800-900# 112-126.50; 9001000# 110-121; 1000-

1100# 93-106; M&L 2 200300# 153-200; 300-400# 168-186; 400-500# 130182; 500-600# 158-184.50; 600-700# 143-166.50; 700800# 130-149.50; 800-90# 114. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 120-132; 300-400# 110-126; 400500# 84-130; 500-600# 117-122; 600-700# 85121.50; 700-800# 70-94; 800-900# 84-94; 900-1000# 90; 1000-1100# 88. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 149-162; 300400# 148-175; 400-500# 148-165; 500-600# 140160; 600-700# 120-144.50; 700-800# 109-117.50; 800900# 95-115; M&L 2 200300# 137-164; 300-400# 150-172.50; 400-500# 134169; 500-600# 121-159; 600-700# 115-139; 700-

800# 101-117; 800-900# 92-115. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 186-207; 300400# 160-186; 400-500# 158-185; 500-600# 126169.50; 600-700# 130-158; 700-800# 125-145; 800900# 104-107; 900-1000# 97-102; M&L 2 200-300# 174.50-180; 300-400# 161183; 400-500# 130-179; 500-600# 125-160; 600700# 125-156; 700-800# 120-130; 800-900# 95-116; 900-1000# 85-90. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA

PUBLIC AUCTION

ANNUAL SPRING INVENTORY REDUCTION & CONSIGNMENT SALE

Friday, APRIL 13TH, 10:30 AM CATSKILL TRACTOR, INC., FRANKLIN, NY Tractors & Industrial: Kubota M120 4WD w/cab & ldr, MF 4243 4WD w/canopy & ldr, Kioti CK25 4WD w/ldr (100 hrs), MF 135 diesel, IH 2404 industrial, Farmall H, Ford 5000 w/cab, IH 986, Case IH 385 4WD /ldr, IH 806, Mahindra 7010 4WD w/cab, JD 2755, Farmall 400 (wide front), MF 65 diesel, Ford 4600, MF 283, Ford 3400 w/loader, Coyote C26 articulating payloader, JD 440 dozer, Oliver 46-3 crawler loader, MF 2200 rough terrain forklift, Ford 575D TLB (3003 hrs), Case 480 Construction King TLB, Airflo tailgate sander, Econoline 12 ton 25 ft trailer, ARE contracter cap, gooseneck tri-axle trailer, 2001 Dodge Dakota 4WD pickup, 96’ Ford F250 4WD pickup, Tree Farmer C5D forwarder Implements: Case IH 8530 inline baler, Case IH DCX101 disc mower conditioner, Case IH DC92 disc mower conditioner, JD 825 disc mower conditioner, JD crop sprayer, NH 451 9 ft sickle bar mower, Kuhn TB181 ditch bank mower, AC 12 ft disc, NH 477 haybine, AC 10 ft transport disc, MF 41 sickle bar mower, Earfe 3 pt bale shredder, NH 790 chopper w/2-row corn & hay heads, NH 352 grinder mixer, King Kutter 8 ft back blade, Ford 3pt back blade, Danuser 3pt PHD (no auger), 6 ft 3pt box blade, 3pt transplanter, IH 12 ft transport disc, Kverneland BA5NR 5 btm auto-reset plow, Gehl 1000 chopper w/2-row corn & hay heads, Kasten running gear, Leinbach 3pt 6 ft disc (new), Fimco 3pt crop sprayer, 4 ft manure bucket, Land Pride 50” 3pt overseeder, IH 420 3 btm plow, Gehl 99 blower, NH 278 baler, IH 550 spreader, ground-drive spreader, bale spear, 3pt bale spear (new), Pequea HR10 rotary rake, Fella SM165 3pt disc mower, NH 258 rake, Oliver 3pt 3 btm plow, NH 166 hay inverter, Galfre 3pt disc mower, Sitrex H-90 V-rake, Unverferth 11 ft 3pt Perfecta, AC 10 ft plowing disc, MF 3pt sickle bar mower, Lowery 3pt PHD (new), Lowery 8 ft stone rake (new), King Kutter 5 ft finish mower (new), Hawkline 8 ft back blade, NH 310 baler, JD FBB grain drill, Oliver 546 4 btm side-hill hitch auto-reset mounted plow, NH 315 baler, Bush Hog 12 ft transport disc, MF 2-row corn planter (nice), Kelly Ryan 8 ft bagger, NH 1307 side-slinger spreader, Kuhn GA3200 rotary rake, Gehl 55 grinder mixer, NH 28 blower, Brillion 12 ft cultipacker, Claas 250 RotoCut round baler, JD 1327 disc bine, IH 496 21 ft wing disc, Kuhn 5001 tedder, Gehl 860 chopper w/2-row corn & hay heads, Anderson M-90 log loader, Tuffline 8 ft back blade, Taylor Pittsburgh 6 ft S-tine spring harrow (new), Taylor Pittsburgh 8 ft chain drag (new), Taylor Pittsburgh potato hiller (new), AgriMetal bedding chopper, Salford 450 field cultivator, JD 1600 12-shank chisel plow, poly bunk feeders (5 & 10 ft), 3pt boom pole (new), poly spin spreader (new), metal spin spreader (new), 16 ft farm gates (new), 10 ft corrale panels (new), IH 310 1 btm plow, JD 1327 disc bine, Nelson chipper (diesel), NH 478 haybine, NH running gear, Gehl 865 chopper w/2-row corn & hay heads, JD 12 ft cultimulcher, (2) basket tanks, JD 14T baler, Grimm tedder, Nicholson tedder, Kuhn GF5000 mounted hyd-fold tedder, 3pt cultivator, IH manure spreader, Pequea tedder, Kidd round bale processor, Gehl TMR mixer, Valmetal 5500 round bale chopper, skid steer QT snow pusher, zone tiller, bedding chopper, NI 484 round baler, head gate, NI 3615 spreader, Brillion 16 ft transport drag, NH 316 baler, NH 28 blower, NH 24 table blower, Yellow Devil sprayer, Bear Cat PTO chipper, Tufline 3 pt disc, Land Pride 3 pt rototiller, fuel tank w/pump, dump trailer, Farmall 460 hitch, bale unroller, spike harrow, (2) 5 ft rotary mowers, grain elevator, NH 256 rake, Kverneland 4 btm plow, JD 720 9 ft haybine, Sitrex 5-shank chisel plow, JD 926 disc bine (nice) Lawn & Garden: MF 1120 compact tractor w/mower & back blade, Husqvarna YTH20K46 lawn tractor w/deck & snowblower, Cub Cadet 2166, Cub Cadet 1170, Cub Cadet 2145, Wheel Horse 520H w/deck & tiller, Toro lawn tractor, sprayer, 16” & 20” Christmas tree balers, woodsplitter Salvage: Gehl 2340 disc mower conditioner, Gehl 1309 Scavenger spreader, NH 415 disc bine, Case 930 tractor w/cab, JD 2840 tractor Early Listing - Much More by Sale Day - Listing May Change Due to Daily Business Consignments Accepted Until Thursday, April 12th, 5PM Trucking Available Pre-Approved Financing Available Lunch Provided by Franklin Rotary Club Terms: Cash or Check. VISA and Mastercard accepted. Positive ID required. 4% Buyer’s Premium Waived if Paid in Full with Cash or Check. Nothing Removed Until Paid in Full. All Sales As Is Where Is. 20% Down payment required sale day balance due in 7 days. Directions: From I-88 Exit 11, take State Rte. 357 East approx. 7 miles to Franklin. Turn left onto Otego Street. One block to auction.

Auctioneer: Frank Walker For updated listing or to view photos, visit www.auctionzip.com Auctioneer ID 19065 Catskill Tractor, Inc., 384 Center Street, Franklin, NY • (607) 829-2600 • www.catskilltractor.com

FEEDER CATTLE: 519. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 181-184; 400500# 169-177; 500-600# 166-171.50; 600-700# 150160; 700-800# 146-152; 800-900# 121; M&L 2 400500# 175.50-184; 500-600# 173.50-174; 600-700# 151158; 700-800# 135.50. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 139; 400500# 123; 500-600# 118119; 700-800# 103.50; 9001000# 91. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 150-157; 500600# 140-150; 600-700# 123-138; 700-800# 124135.75; 800-900# 125; M&L 2 300-400# 159; 400-500# 145-154; 500-600# 139149.50; 600-700# 1289. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 184; 300-400# 174; 400-500# 149-161.50; 500-600# 147; 600-700# 118; 700-800# 118; 800900# 103; M&L 2 300-400# 174; 400-500# 162; 500600# 148; 600-700# 133; 700-800# 118. LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 370. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 187.50; 400-500# 172-174; 500-600# 157166.50; 600-700# 148-150; 700-800# 123-133; M&L 2 300-400# 187.50-197.50; 400-500# 176.50-178.50; 500-600# 164-168; 600700# 131-147; 700-800# 121-132; M&L 3 300-400# 181-188.50; 400-500# 169175.25; 500-600# 149-156; 600-700# 132-139.50; 700800# 114; S 1 300-400# 192; 400-500# 151-163.50; 500-600# 130-140; 600700# 120. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 158; 400-500# 150-163; 500-600# 140152.50; 600-700# 129.50129.75; 700-800# 121-123; M&L 2 300-400# 163176.50; 400-500# 160165.25; 500-600# 141.50156; 600-700# 128-134.75; 700-800# 116-124; M&L 3 300-400# 164.50-166; 400500# 145-160; 500-600# 144-148.50; 600-700# 131.50-133.50; 700-800# 104; S 1 300-400# 141; 400500# 140; 500-600# 120130; 600-700# 109; 700800# 104.25. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 194; 400-500# 157-180, mostly 160; 500600# 154.50-158; 600-700# 143; M&L 2 300-400# 181198.50; 400-500# 160190.25, mostly 167-190.25; 500-600# 164; 600-700# 144-151; S 1 300-400# 188; 400-500# 140-182, mostly 154.50-182; 500-600# 135138.50. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 14. Feeder Steers: M&L 2

800-900# 104. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 800-900# 102-103; M&L 2 400-500# 126-128. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 160-179, mostly 164.50; 500-600# 165-177; 600-700# 160.50; 700-800# 140.75; M&L 2 300-400# 174-180.50; 400-500# 170179; 500-600# 170.50-184; 600-700# 158.50; 700-800# 153. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 170; 400-500# 144.50-145; 500-600# 138147.50; 600-700# 144.75; 700-800# 115; M&L 2 100200# 138; 300-400# 169; 400-500# 141-172, mostly 145.50; 500-600# 143-158; 600-700# 137; 700-800# 115. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 150-169, mostly 169; 500-600# 142-165. mostly 160; 600-700# 157; M&L 2 300-400# 176-178; 400-500# 181; 500-600# 158-173. ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 47. Feeder Heifers: M&L 2 400-500# 150; M&L 2 200300# 165; 500-600# 150. STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1800. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 190-201; 400500# 180-202; 500-600# 171-189; 600-700# 146168; 700-800# 139.50-147; 800-900# 122.25-137; 9001000# 120-133; M&L 2 300400# 200; 400-500# 174184; 500-600# 167-180.50; 600-700# 140-156; 700800# 120-138; 800-900# 121. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 175; 300-400# 172-182.50; 400-500# 147156; 500-600# 146-153; 600-700# 138.50-148; M&L 2 200-300# 170; 300-400# 15.50-168; 400-500# 129149; 500-600# 139-160; S 1, 300-400# 152.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 195-199; 400500# 161-178.50; 500-600# 168-171.50; 600-700# 123134; M&L 2 300-400# 183; 500-600# 151. TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 673. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 192; 300-400# 160-196; 400-500# 166177; 500-600# 166-175; 600-700# 161-164; 700800# 141; 800-900# 114124; 900-1000# 120-121; M&L 2 200-300# 176; 300400# 177-186; 400-500# 130-182; 500-600# 158172.50; 600-700# 144-164; 700-800# 130; 800-900# 114.

Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 126.50; 300400# 110; 400-500# 84-126; 500-600# 122; 600-700# 85-117; 700-800# 94; 800900# 94; 900-1000# 90; 1000-1100# 88. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 149-162; 300400# 159-175; 400-500# 148-165; 500-600# 140160; 600-700# 120-140; 700-800# 114; 800-900# 112-114; M&L 2 200-300# 137-164; 300-400# 150167; 400-500# 134-165; 500-600# 121-159; 600700# 115; 700-800# 101; 800-900# 92. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 191; 300-400# 160-179; 400-500# 167177; 500-600# 158-169.50; 600-700# 145-158; 700800# 125-145; 800-900# 104; 900-1000# 102; M&L 2 200-300# 177.50; 300-400# 183; 400-500# 130-179; 500-600# 140-159; 600700# 156; 700-800# 120; 800-900# 116; 900-1000# 90. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 829. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 174-193; 400500# 164-186.50; 500-600# 166-184.50; 600-700# 147159.50; 700-800# 135-141; 900-1000# 113; 10001100# 107-113; M&L 2 300400# 163-176; 400-500# 159-178; 500-600# 153171; 600-700# 141-152; 700-800# 128-136; 800900# 118. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 143-173; 400500# 135-166; 500-600# 141-154; 600-700# 130141; M&L 2 300-400# 130137.50; 400-500# 115-140; 500-600# 138-141; 600700# 115-133.50; S 1 300400# 118. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 180-214; 300400# 172-185; 400-500# 160-184; 500-600# 137165; 600-700# 136-145; 700-800# 118-134; 800900# 116; 900-1000# 99; M&L 2 200-300# 169-194; 300-400# 144-168; 400500# 147.50-173; 500-600# 134-154; 600-700# 120130; 800-900# 98-114. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 413. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 202-206; 300400# 171-180; 400-500# 164.50-168; 500-600# 168169.50; 600-700# 146-161; 700-800# 141-145.50; 800900# 126.50; 900-1000# 110; 1000-1100# 106; M&L 2 200-300# 200; 300-400# 172-183.50; 400-500# 169.50-180.50; 500-600# 160-174.50; 600-700# 143166.50; 700-800# 139. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 132; 300-

Page 3 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

140-168; 400-500# 129150; 500-600# 139-160; 600-700# 119; S 1 300400# 128-152.50; 400-500# 126. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 183-199; 400500# 161-182.50; 500-600# 159-171.50; 600-700# 123144; 700-800# 117-120; 800-900# 117.50; M&L 2 300-400# 162-183; 400500# 150-165; 500-600# 132-151; 600-700# 129; 700-800# 106.


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 4

250# 902-1240# 10001575/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 78. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 50180/hd; 100-130# 157-200.

AUCTIONS 400# 112-126; 400-500# 118-130; 500-600# 117; 600-700# 110-117; 700800# 70; 800-900# 84. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 150; 300-400# 148-168; 400-500# 155164; 500-600# 150-151; 600-700# 135; 700-800# 117.50; 800-900# 95-115; M&L 2 200-300# 138; 300400# 168-172.50; 400-500# 150-169; 500-600# 147152; 600-700# 120-135; 700-800# 110-117; 800900# 115. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 207; 300-400# 181; 400-500# 158-170; 500-600# 146-165; 600700# 130-135.50; 700-800# 127; 800-900# 107; 9001000# 97; M&L 2 200-300# 180; 300-400# 161-180; 400-500# 173-174; 500600# 151-160; 600-700# 125-142.50; 700-800# 128.50-130; 800-90# 95; 900-1000# 85. SLAUGHTER CATTLE HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 85-92; Breaker 8088.50, hi dress to 966; Boner 77-84; Lean 72-78; Thin & Light 72 & dn. Slaughter Bulls: few 1100-1950# 90-96; Jersey 1082# at 94. Fed Steers: Sel 1250# at 114; Plain Hols. 87-92; L Ch Hols. 1380# at 99.50. Fed Heifers: L Ch Hols. 1250-1525# 95-105; Dairy Culls 950-1100# 87-91. Calves: Hols. Bull Ret. to Farm No. 1 80-120# 145160; No. 2 80-120# 150-145; No. 3 80-120# 110-130; Hols. Hfrs. 85-95# 140-197; Beef X bulls & Hfrs. 120175. SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1605-1870# 89-90.50; 1545-1655# hi dress 92.50-94.50; Boner 80-85% lean 850# 82; 9501355# 82-89; 950-1395# hi dress 90-97.50; 910# lo dress 72; Lean 85-90% lean 700-795# 71-78; 730-785# lo dress 57-69; 890-960# 71-73; 835-1005# lo dress 60-69. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 825# 97. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1235-1390# 96-98.50; 1435-1435# hi dress 108; 1275# lo dress 90; 1540# 100; 1700-2298# hi dress 103.50-114.50. Cows/Calf Pairs: 1. M 12 1000# middle age cows w/100# calves 730/pr. Baby

Calves, per head: Holsteins 100-120. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1105-1330# 80-92; 1180-1360# hi dress 91.50-95.50; 1485-1610# 86-90; 1610-1660# hi dress 92.50-94; Boner 80-85% lean 135-895# 80-92; 9001330# 80-91; 1050-1320# hi dress 92-97; 920-1145# lo dress 70.50-79.50; 14051770# 83.50-91.50; 14101660# hi dress 92.50-95; Lean 85-90% lean 565775# lo dressi 46-70; 8001295# lo dress 49-69.50. Other Cows: S 1-2 Young 650-710# 87. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1370-1415# 99.50-105; 1200-1385# lo dress 60; 1580-1855# 100.50-106.50; 1575-1845# hi dress 107114. Cows/Calf Pairs: 15. S 12 680-750# middle age cows w/40-345# calves 5001375/pr; M 1-2 800-1075# middle age cows w/75-300# calves 575-1300/pr; L 1-2 1100-1200# middle age cows w/80-235# calves 1050-1360/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 60-115. SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 282 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 70.50-88; 1200-1600# 8392; HY 1200-1600# 92-104; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 65-85; 1200-2000# 68.50-89.50; HY 12002000# 89-93; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 56-80; 8501200# 62.50-82. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 95-102; 15002500# 94-110; HY 10001500# 101-109.50; 15002500# 101-117.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 45. L 1, 2-10 yrs. old 8751280/hd; M 1, 5-6 yrs. old, 850-900# 850-890/hd; L 1, 5-12 yrs. old, 750-1000# 520-1000/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 30. M&L 1, 2-10 yrs. old w/calves 100-250# 8001380# 100-1590/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 13. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 4075/hd; 100-130# 70-72.50. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 316. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 74-86.75; 1200-1600# 7890; HY 1200-1600# 9198.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 71.50-85; 12002000# 75-85.50; HY 1200-

2000# 84.50-90; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 72.5078; 850-1200# 67-84.75. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 89-105; 15002500# 85-100; HY 10001500# 102.75; 1500-2500# 99.50-105.25. Cows Ret. to Farm: 35. M&L 1-2, 4 yrs. to aged, bred 2-8 mos. 800-1325# 785-1130/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 8. M 1, few M 2, calves 150-

BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 69. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 80-86; 1200-1600# 85-90; HY 1200-1600# 91-97; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 75-82; 1200-2000# 78-85; Lean 85-90% lean 8501200# 65-70. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 84-87; 15002500# 85-90; HY 1000-

1500# 88-97; 1500-2500# 91-94.50. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 80. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 87; 1200-1600# 85-88.50; HY 1200-1600# 90-98; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 81.50-88.50; 1200-2000#

82-85.50; HY 1200-2000# 89-90.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 64; 850-1200# 71-75.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 105-106.50; HY 1500-2500# 108. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 340. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 75.50-90; 1200-1600# 8095; HY 1200-1600# 96-100; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 78.50-83; 12002000# 77.50-84.50; HY 1200-2000# 85-89.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850#

COMPLETE FARM RETIREMENT AUCTION JD TRACTORS - HAYING LINE - CLYDESDALE HORSES SHOW WAGONS - SHOW AND WORK HARNESSES FOR DR. LONNIE AND DONNA MEEUSEN

SATURDAY, APRIL 21 @ 10:30 A.M. (Horse Preview Fri. Eve. April 20 @ 6:00 p.m.)

2416 CHAUTAUQUA HOLLOW ROAD DALTON (LIVINGSTON CO.) NEW YORK 14836

(Off State Route 70 over the railroad tracks across from Lawson’s Gravel Pit) From Dalton take Rte 70 south about 3.3 miles to right turn onto Chautauqua Hollow Road and come back north to the very end of the road. From Canaseraga/Swain follow Rte 70 north to the Allegany Co./Livingston Co. line (about 5 miles north of Swain) and about 1/10 mile into Livingston Co. turn left onto Chautauqua Hollow Road and follow to very end. Having sold the Veterinary Clinic a few years ago the time has come for Doc to retire from years of farming and dedicate more time to the luxury of travel and the pursuit of big game! Selling will be: (NOTE Sale Order: Machinery First at 10:30 a.m.; Horses app. 12:00 Noon followed by Horse Equipment and Tack) “NEW” MFWD TRACTORS—TRUCK—TRAILERS—SKID STEER—GATOR: JD 6430 Premium MFWD Tractor, cab, 2 remotes, 18.4x38 and 16.9x28 tires, selling complete with 673 quick attach (electric) loader with bucket, only 1064 hrs.! (bale spear sells separately); JD 6715 MFWD Tractor, cab, duals, 2 remotes, 18.4x38 rear tires, just 854 hrs.!; JD 6220 MFWD Tractor, open station, ROPS bar, (this open station allowed Donna to tan while working!) 2 remotes, 12.4x24 front tires and 18.4x30 rear, 650 light duty hrs.!; NH 150 diesel skid steer with only 279 hrs., with bucket (manure fork and bale spear selling separately); 2002 Ford F350 dually pickup, IH 7.3L diesel, 35,000 orig. owner miles!!; 1997 Barrett alum. gooseneck horse/livestock trailer, 28x8x8, real nice!; 2002 Car Mate Cargo Trailer with drop down door 24x8x9, bumper pull, nice shape!; 2004 “Quality” bumper pull 16 ft. flat deck (very low usage) car trailer; JD 620i “Gator” 4x4 with hyd. dump box; Firestone 18.4x38 hub duals; Goodyear 18.4x38 snap on duals; (14) JD suitcase weights; JD 500 “Multi-terrain” lawn mower, only 290 hrs.; NICE HAYING TOOLS: MF “Hesston Line” (Agco) model 1839 square baler with thrower like brand new used 1 1/2 seasons!; JD 457 round baler Silage Special, net wrap, “cover edge”; JD 946 MOCO diskbine (impellers), 3 yrs. old, 13 1/2 ft. cut; H&S 30 ft. 12 wheel rake; IH 5 bar hyd. rake; Kuhn GF5001 Gyrotedder 4-star with hyd. fold; Horst 27 ft. round bale wagon; Homemade 20 ft. round bale wagon; nice wooden rack kicker wagons; Two (2) H&S 18x8 steel rack kicker wagons; Several running gears; NH 33 ft. skeleton transport hay elevator; JD 1018 pull type 10 ft. offset rotary mower; TILLAGE LINE—SPREADER—DRILL: MF 18 in. 5-b on the land plow; Ford 151 18 in. 4-b plow; MF 25 ft. fold up disk; CIH trailer type 10 shank chisel plow; JD 12 ft. cultimulcher; NH 514 manure spreader with new slippery floor, hyd. end gate; IH 510 seed only 23 disc grain drill; 22 PUREBRED REGISTERED AND GRADE CLYDESDALES Coggins will be current! “The Gentle Giants” Selling App. 12:00 NOON after the farm machinery: Seven (7) Mares exposed to Clydesdale Stallion will be pregnancy examined! Nine (9) Geldings (2 to 9 yrs. old) 17.2 to 19 plus hands! (Note: Geldings will be shod!); One (1) Stallion from good breeding background; Four (4) Fillies (yearlings to 3 yrs.) PLUS one late fall foal;

HORSE EQUIPMENT—TACK—ACCESSORIES: (Sells right after the horse auction): Two (2) 5th wheel draft horse show wagons; Fancy draft horse show cart; 5th wheel rubber tire practice wagon; Antique restored “Doctors” buggy; Pioneer forecart; Poles for 4 and 6 hitch; Six (6) Fancy Bio Show Harnesses made in Ohio by N.&A. Harness makers, complete with show boxes; Four (4) sets of custom made Bio and some spotted work harnesses; Beta driving lines from cart to “8 Up”; Small 5th wheel practice wagon very smooth rider; Misc. tack items; Wheelbarrows; Seven (7) Nylon feed tubs 10x4; Four (4) Rubbermaid water troughs; 20x40 shade cover complete with poles; Four (4) rolls (640 ft. long) of 3 wire Nylon corral fence and hangers; Selection of (new) rough cut lumber (leftovers from new barn) 2x6; 2x4 and 1 in. x various widths to 10 inch; Jim’s NOTE: Doc has worked many long hours over many years for so many of us! He is deserving of a good sale and Many Happy Years of Retirement. Set aside Sat. April 21 from your busy calendar and just plain plan to attend this neat auction sale! Horse Preview is Fri. Eve. @ 6:00 P.M.! Terms: CASH. Checks in U.S. Funds will be accepted from known persons in good standing with the Auction Company or the Sellers. Unknown persons will need a currently dated bank letter addressed to this auction for immediate removal privilege! Otherwise plan to leave purchased items until check is cleared! Nothing is to be loaded or removed until properly settled for in full sale day. Lunch and comfort facilities on site! Information from Owners: Dr. Lonnie and Donna Meeusen 585-476-5688

Auction Conducted by James P. Pirrung and Associates

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. Wayland, New York Phone 585-728-2520 Fax 585-728-3378 Pictures: www.pirrunginc.com


MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean HY 12001600# 87.50-95; Boner 8085% lean 800-1200# 7580.50; 1200-2000# 79.5083.50; HY 1200-2000# 9194.50; Lean 85-90% lean

850-1200# 65-71. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 131. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 74; 1200-1600# 78-84; HY 1200-1600# 93; Boner 8085% lean 800-1200# 81-85; 1200-2000# 76-82; HY 1200-2000# 86-88.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 7584.75. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 103-105; 1500-

2500# 85-100. Calves Ret. to Farm: 74. Hols. Steers/Bulls 70-100# 50-132/hd; 100-130# 157/cwt. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 200. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 80-86.50; 1200-1600# 84-

92; HY 1200-1600# 94-95; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 75-80; 1200-2000# 72-84; HY 1200-2000# 8993; Lean 85-90% lean 750850# 74-80; 850-1200# 7581. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 95-102; 15002500# 96-110; HY 10001500# 104-109.50; 15002500# 113.50-116.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 14. M 1, 5-6 yrs. old, 850-900# 850-890/hd; L 1, 5-12 yrs. old 750-1000# 520-1000/hd.

Cows w/Calves at Side: 6. M 1, 5-6 yrs. old w/calves 100-250# 1000-1380# 1180-1430/pr. WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 393. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 118.50; 13001500# 117.75-123; 1500# & up 115-119.50; Sel 2-3 1100-1300# 97-109; 13001500# 108.75-114.50; Hols. Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 109.50116; 1300-1500# 99.50115; Sel 2-3 1100-1300# 87.50-99; 1300-1500# 95. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 900-1000# 108.50-112; 1000-1200# 114.50-121; 1200-1300# 115.50-124; 1300-1500# 115-126.75; Sel 2-3 1000-1200# 109118. Cows Ret. to Farm: 34. M&L 1, few 2, 3-12 yrs. old, bred 2-8 mos. 850-1370# 610-1250/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 18. M&L 1,4-10 yrs. old, calves baby to 240# 9501190# 700-1470/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 13. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 35180/hd; 100-130# 100-150. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 112. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 70.50-86; 1200-1600# 8392; HY 1200-1600# 95-104; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 65-83; 1200-2000#

68.50-89.50; HY 12002000# 90.50-91; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 56-68; 850-1200# 62.50-78.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 97-100; 15002500# 94-109; HY 10001500# 106.50; 1500-2500# 110-117.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 31. L 1, 2-10 yrs. old, 875-1100# 875-1280/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 22. M&L 1, 6 yrs. old w/calves 100# 900# 1525/pr; L 1, 3-10 yrs. old w/calves 100-150# 9501200# 1050-1590/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 11. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 4062.50/hd; 100-130# 7072.50.

HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats (/hd): 2838# 67-72; 40-55# 58-68; 1 lot 68# at 74; (/#) 125-175# 71-83; 180-210# 60-71. Stock Boars: 200-300# 53-55. Butcher Hogs: No. 1-2 245# at 71; No. 2-3 280325# 61-70; few 400-425# 61-67; Sows few 375-475# at 58; Boars 400-600# 3132. NC SOWS: 300-399# 5357; 400-449# 50-57; 450499# 50-58.98; 500-549# 56-62; 550# & up 57-62.07.

CATTLE AUCTION - 180 HEAD - CLINTON, NC

Saturday, 21st APRIL - 10:00 AM Location: George P. Upton Sales Arena - 2 mi. South of Clinton on Hwy. 421 @ 93 Agriculture Place. 180 Head consisting of cow/calf pairs, bred cows & heifers - breeds represented Angus, Angus X, Red - 2 complete dispersals (5) Herd Sires - Reg. Angus, all cattle screened for reproductive soundness by vet. Visit www.ebharris.com SALE HELD RAIN OR SHINE E.B. HARRIS (252) 257-2140 6:15 AM-9:59 PM (252) 430-9595 Mobile E.B.’s 9-10 PM only 445-5856 Fate’s (252) 985-8340 Mobile Fate’s Fax No. (252) 257-1035

E.

B. H arri

s

Inc. / Auctioneers

3200 NC Hwy. 58 Warrenton, NC 27580 “THE COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICE” NCAL 1468 NC#C 4264 VAL 146 SCAL 3895 SALE DAY PAGER 252-407-4228

SPRING COW SALE

VIRGINIA LIVESTOCK, LLC FRONT ROYAL, VA TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2012 AT 7:30 PM

150 Cows from one farm (Herd Dispersal) 70 Cows from one farm Cows with first calves by side FOR MORE INFORMATION: VIRGINIA LIVESTOCK: 540-635-5511 540-635-6927 RICK MATHEWS: 540-622-4889 GARY VANCE:

Page 5 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

51.50-68; 850-1200# 61-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 92-100; 15002500# 99.50-104; HY 10001500# 101-108.50; 15002500# 105-111.50.


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 6

FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No report. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: No report. MARSHALL, VA HOGS: 18. Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 250-270# 71-85. N VA HOGS: No report ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report.

190. Slaughter Ewes: Cull 60120# 95. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report

HOLLINS, VA SHEEP/GOATS: No report MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No report. MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No report.

STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report.

ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: No report

WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report.

ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: No report

LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 78. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 60-80# 208-240; 80-110# 187-195; Wooled, Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 218-248; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 30-60# 180-196; 60-90# 185-187; 90-110# 150-181. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 66; Gd 2-4 6779. HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: Gd Ch 40-80# 220-250. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: L Billies/Nannies 120150; Sel 1 50-80# 105-130; Sel 2 50-80# 80-110; few 25-50# 45-70 N VA GOATS: 98 Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 220241; 40-60# 200-250; Sel 3 20-40# 201-228; 40-60# 230; 60-80# 200-230. Pairs/No Grade: 120160# 165-245. Slaughter Bucks: Sel 12 70-110# 130-190; 100150# 138-141. Slaughter Does: Sel 1-2 50-70# 120; 70-100# 110; 100-150# 111. MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report. MT. AIRY GOATS: 35. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 20-40# 52.50-67.50; Sel 2 40-60# 45-70. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 70100# 95-100. Wethers: Sel 1 100-150# 125-220. Bucks/Billies: Sel 2 70100# 50-60. Sheep, per head: 7. Slaughter Lambs: Ch & Pr 60-100# 120; 100-140#

OFFICE: 815-889-4191 FAX: 815-889-5365 www.mowreyauction.com

FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report.

S VA HOGS: No report.

WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report.

PO BOX 24 301 E. FREDERICK MILFORD, IL 60953

SHENANDOAH SHEEP: Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 210-215; 80-110# 187-195; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 60-90# 185-187; 90110# 179. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 66; Gd 2-4 67. SILER CITY, NC GOATS: 19. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 20-40# 45-50; 40-60# 6580; 60-80# 85-90. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80# 105-110. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 5070# 95; 100-140# 160-165; Sel 2 50-70# 7075. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 175; 150-250# 225. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report. TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 70. Slaughter Lambs: Wooled, Ch & Pr 1-2 90110# 180; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 30-60# 140-240; 60-90# 150-200. Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 24 69; Gd 2-4 80-89. WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 49. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 220; 40-60# 237.50-267.50; 6080# 152.50-222.50; Sel 3 40-60# 115-180; 60-80# 110-132.50. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 122.50-150; 100-150# 120160; 150-250# 98-112.50. Slaughter Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 132.50-172.50; 100-150# 87-122.

APRIL 18, 2012 8:00 A.M. TRACTORS '04 JD 9320 #E31176, 4899HR 620/70R42 '01 JD 9300 #H041036, 24SPD 3486HR JD 8970 #1202, 24SPD 7600HR 3PT 2 - JD 8640, 6942 HRS JD 8630 4WD '10 JD 8295R #013863, 18.4-50 1018HR WARRANTY JD 8295R #P013183, 888HR JD 7810 #015113, MFWD C/A 8097HR JD 6430 #604943, 657HR CAB MFWD JD 6310 #V284315, MFWD CAH PQ JD 4755 #H003877, QUAD 2WD '80 JD 4640 #016792R, QUAD 7758HR JD 4640 #15109, 9010 HRS JD 4555 #4352, 9539 HRS '74 JD 4430 #17780, JD 158 FRONT LDR 4519HR NO CAB JD 4320, CAB 3HYD JD 4230 #N/A, SELLS AS IS BAD TRANS JD 4230, CAH '92 JD 4055 #11103, 6751 HRS MFD JD 4050 #007764, 3707 HRS JD 3020 #52213, GAS NF 4428 HRS CIH 7120 #3725 CASE 3294 IH 1066 W/660 LDR IH 1066, CAB IH 986, CAH IH 706 IH 656 #2145, HYDRO 3802 HRS '10 CIH 535HD #117394, 3615HR CIH MX255, MFWD 1800 HRS 2 - IH 1066 #U054170 WHITE 2-105 #274027-406, AS IS DOES NOT RUN WHITE 8410 #F330003, 4WD 4873 HRS MFD WHITE 2105 #N/A WHITE 140 #402394, MFD 7019 HRS KUBOTA L2550 FARMALL 560 #14423, DIESEL COMBINES '11 JD 9870 #740656, 486/316HR '09 JD 9770 #733062 '09 JD 9770 #731777, 990/640 HR '11 JD 9670 #740443, 224/298 JD 9660 #711809, 2340/1787HR '00 JD 9650 #686089, 2315/1710 '95 JD 9600 #660650, 3566/2291 JD 9570 #725316, 4X4 '06 JD 9560 #715652, STS DUALS CM JD 9560 #710115, SH 1660/1116HR '05 JD 9560 #710102, SH 2035/1374HR '01 JD 9550 #690788, 30.5-32 2WD JD 9510 #677974 '98 JD 9510 #675688, SH 30.5-32 3100/2100 '98 JD 9510 #675632, CM '95 JD 9500 #S660552, SH JD 7720 #556372 '87 JD 6620 SH #620423, TITAN II 3434HR '89 JD 6620 #630426, SH '87 JD 6620 #620675, SH '86 JD 6620 #X615644, 3736HR '85 JD 6620 #615592, TITAN II SH '09 CIH 7088 #Y8G000272, 1469/1030 '08 CIH 2577 #303166 '06 CIH 2388 #293029, 2706/1913 '02 CIH 2388 #271617, 30.5-32 3220/3212 '99 CIH 2388 #266966, 18.4-38 DUALS 2800/1987HR CIH 2166 #180745 '96 CIH 2144 #172791, 3731/2882 HRS '93 CIH 1688 #1200042, 2WD 3757HR '90 CIH 1680 #048565, 4X4 CIH 1680 #18679 '90 CIH 1660 #041325, 3237HR '90 CIH 1640 #35595, 4435 HRS

'81 CIH 1420 #3168, 3993HR '96 NH TR87 #557135, 2WD 2790/2020HR '97 GLEANER R72 #R7277096, 3103/2218HR '98 GLEANER R62 #68407, 2WD 2630/1950 '95 GLEANER R52 #55040, 2093/1559 '84 GLEANER M3 HYDRO #26169, W/320 FLEX 6RN "ALL VERY NICE" TILLAGE JD 2700 DISC RIPPER #128, 7X 2 - JD 1010 F CULT, 24' '98 JD 980 F CULT #X012049, 44' "VERY NICE" '97 JD 980 F CULT #7078, 32' 5 BAR SPIKE JD 960 F CULT 40' 2 - JD 960, 30' JD 940 24' F CULT 2 - JD 845 CULT. 12R JD 726 #6058, 25' 3BAR SPIKE W/ROLLING BASKET "VERY NICE" JD 712 DISC CHISEL JD 550 MULCH MASTER 2 - '01 JD 512 DISC RIPPER #X001162, 9X JD 512 DISC CHISEL #3647, 7X FOLDING '04 JD 512 DISC RIPPER #3075, 5X JD 400 HOE 15' JD HOE 24', FLAT FOLD '08 CIH 5300 TOOLBAR, 13X SUPER COOLER CIH 3950 #752179, 32' ROCK FLEX 9" SPACING CIH 496 DISC 25' CIH 490 DISC #34683, 24' IH 480 DISC #11396 CIH RMX 340 DISC, 25' UNVERFERTH 130 5X ZONE BUILDER #400145 SUNFLOWER 6332 #6394-123, 32' SUNFLOWER DISC RIPPER SUNFLOWER 15' DISC PROGRESSIVE 1300 #354, PULL TYPE TOOLBAR MARKERS/COULTERS/SEALERS 6X NO MONITOR 2 - PHOENIX ROTARY HARROW, 42' KRAUSE 6331 SOIL FINISHER, 28' KEY 16R CULT 2 - KEWANEE 1010 DISC KEWANEE F. CULT, 21' DANISH TINE HARROGATOR 28' HYD FOLD "NICE" GLENCOE 4300 TILLAGE TOOL, 28' GLENCOE CULT. 12R30 S-TINE 2 - DMI F. CULT. 32' DMI 45' CRUMBLER DMI 36' CRUMBLER '09 BRILLION PACKER, 36' X-FOLD LESS THAN 100 ACRES 2 - BRILLION PACKER, 32' X-FOLD BRILLION 25' MULCHER BRILLION 21' CULTIMULCHER AC 2600 DISC PLANTERS/DRILLS 2 - '94 JD 7200 #D655291, 16R30 W/LIQ JD 7200, 16R JD 7200 #205614, 8R30 JD 7200 PLANTER 6R30 JD 1780 #680152, 16/31 '06 JD 1770 #M715109, 16-30 CCS 1.6 BOXES 2 - '95 JD 750 #H106417, NT 20' 7.5" '01 JD 455 #690344, 25' 7.5" DRY FERT JD 455 #3276, 30' 7.5" DRY FERT CIH 900 PLANTER 8R30 '09 KINZE 3800 PLANTER #755212, 36R30 '03 KINZE 3700 #750595, 24R30 KINZE 3700 #750554, 24-30" '02 KINZE 3700 #750354, 24R30 '07 KINZE 3600 #620602, 16-31 KINZE 3600, 16-31 KINZE 3600 #616550 '07 KINZE 3500 #903301, 8-15 NT 8-COMBOS LIQ FERT SING ARM OPENERS JOHN BLUE SQUEEZE PUMP

'00 KINZE 3000 8R PLANTER, LIQ FERT NT "VERY NICE" GP 2420 DRILL, 24' 3PT GP 2410 NT DRILL #387595X223 GP 12/24 TWIN ROW PLANTER GP 15' DRILL CORN HEADS 5 - JD 893 JD 643 #474035, OIL BATH JD 608C #726008 JD 444 #243478 '07 CIH 2206 #CBJ031304 CIH 1083, 144904 CIH 1064 #71109, HYD DECK PLATES CIH 1063 #000702 NH 6R30 #26777 MASSEY 1163 #113437 GRAIN HEADS SEVERAL JD 930, 925, 924, 922, 920, 915 HEADS SEVERAL JD 635, 630 HEADS JD 216F #542988 JD 213 HEAD JD 100 #172337, 15' 3" CUT STEEL DIVIDERS '09 CIH 2020F #044552 CIH 2020 #21666, 35' CIH 2020 #20353, 25' SEVERAL CIH 1020 HEADS - 20', 25' & 30' CIH 1020 #333935, 17.5' FA 3" CUT CIH 1010, RIGID 15' CIH 820F #30405, 20' IH 810R #33039, 17' NH 973F #520892, 20' NH 73C #669174 GLEANER 322 #28511 GLEANER 320 CAT LEXION F530 #4380-383, 30' 3" CUT FA POLY FF AUGER "NICE" CAT 525, 25' FORAGE JD 568 BALER #338154 JD 535 RD BALER #848496 JD 338 SQ BALER IH 440 WIRE BALER NH 355 MIXER NH 316 BALER NH 315 BALER NH 311 BALER NH 144 HAY INVERTER 2 - NH HAY RAKE MC 2408 #58558, 20' MC CHOPPER #47761 HINIKER 20' #17400017 HAY TETTER 520 #201308 GEHL 2880 BALER GEHL 100 MIXER FNH 144 INVERTER ALLOWAY SHREDDER #19190, 20' WAGONS/GRAIN CARTS JD 716A SILAGE WAGON UNVERFERTH 430 WAGON PARKER 4500 GRAIN CART PARKER 614 GRAIN CART PARKER 400B WAGON KINZE 1040 GRAIN CART, DUALS KINZE 1040 GRAIN CART, TRACKS 2 - KINZE 840 GRAIN CART KINZE 640 GRAIN CART KILBROS 1800 KILBROS 1150 #D46520139 KILBROS 490 GRAIN CART J&M 620 AUGER CART FRONTIER GC-1108 GRAIN CART #401004 EZ TRAIL 710 AUGER CART EZ TRAIL 510 AUGER CART

CALUMET HONEY WAGON BRENT 782 GRAIN CART #920157 BRENT 674 GRAIN CART #1627129 MOWERS/CUTTERS JD 1518 BATWING MOWER JD 1517 BATWING MOWER JD 609 MOWER JD 275 DISC MOWER 9' JD MX8 MOWER WOODS BATWING MOWER WOODS 20' SHREDDER RHINO 10' CUTTER BUSHOG GHM 800 3PT DISC MOWER INDUSTRIAL JD 8875 SKID STEER #040593 JD 401C #286539, 2403 HRS '08 CASE 430 #N8M493945 CASE 435 SKID STEER VERMEER 450, TRENCHER COMBO DIESEL TCM FORKLIFT #3130847 NH LM430 TELEHANDLER #41717933, 3600 HRS JCB 214 #FCSE043481010, TLB CANOPY FORD SKID LOADER #N/A FNH 655D #A432714, 4X4 TLB C/W A/C CAB FIAT ALLIS 545B WH LOADER, 4WD 17.5-25 HRS N/A EVERSMAN 650 DIRT SCRAPER 2 - EVERSMAN 600 DIRT SCRAPER EAGLE PITCHER RC60 CHAMPION 710A GRADER #157-237-2652-2, MOTOR BOBCAT 825 #14316, DIESEL BOBCAT 753 SK LOADER CAT 236 SKID LOADER #4YZ00490, CAB A/C CAT D4E DOZER, CAB 6WAY BLADE PS 5500HR "VERY NICE" MISCELLANEOUS CIH 2250 LDR '02 CIH SPX4260 YETTER 20' COLTER CART WILMAR 6200 SPRAYER 2283 HRS 60' BOOM RAVENS MON 9.5R36 WILMAR EAGLE SPRAYER, 2386HR 90' BOOM AG LDR W/DISPLAY ARC-6000 AIR SUSP 1000GAL SS TANK FOAM MARKERS 380/90R46 TOP AIR TA800 SPRAYER, 60' BOOM TOP AIR 550 SPRAYER RED BALL 570 SPRAYER #05-02623, 1200 GAL 80' BOOM NI 324 PICKER #270944 NH 795 SPREADER NH 514 SPREADER MILLER PRO SPRAYER J&M 30' HEADER CART #10260 HANDI HC 940M PT SPRAYER #3153 EZ TRAIL 31' HEAD HAULER DMI 5300 ANHYDROUS BAR, 24 KNIFE DUAL RAVEN SUPER COOLERS DMI 4100 ANHYDROUS APPLICATOR 13 KNIFE W/HINIKER 8100 MON BBI TANDEM LIME SPREADER, 32' CHAIN TITLED EQUIPMENT '10 TRAILER MAN GOOSENECK TRL #000707 TRAILER, BUMPER HITCH CARGO SEMI #1LH360TH7F1002326 TRAILER FLATBED PJ TRAILER #4P5U81212B2158455, 12'X83 CHANEL UTILITY STRAIT DECK 4' FOLD UP GATE SD MT ATV RAMPS PJ TRAILER #2173243, 83X14 '03 MAC CX613 #W014203 '03 MAC CX613 #W014199 FORD F800 #1FDPK84P6JVA38542, DUMP TRUCK PTO '73 CHEVY C60 GRAIN TRUCK, 53376MI 4/2SPD 14' MIDWEST BED "EXC SHAPE"

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WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report. WYTHE CO GOATS: No report. CASH GRAIN MARKET NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was mixed. Prices were 6.927.37, mostly 6.92-6.96 at the feed mills and 6.71-7.07, mostly 7.07 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 3¢ higher. Prices were 14.59 at the processors, 14.35 at the feed mills and 13.9014.19, mostly 14.15 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was 19¢ lower. Prices were 6.59, mostly 6.59 at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 411.20/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 7.21, -----, ----; Candor 7.37, -----, ----; Cofield 6.92, 14.35, ----; Laurinburg 7.21, -----, ----; Monroe 7.21, -----, ----; Nashville 7.16, -----, ---; Roaring River 7.26, ----, ----; Rose Hill 7.21, -----, ---; Selma ----, -----, ----; Statesville 7.06, -----, 7.39; Warsaw 7.21, -----, ----; Pantego #2 6.96, -----, 6.46.

Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement ----, -----, ----; Creswell 6.71, 14.19, ----; Elizabeth City 6.77, 14.15, 6.59; Greenville ----, -----, ---; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, 14.05, ----; Norwood 7.07, 13.90, ----; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ---, -----, ----; Warsaw #2 7.01, -----, ----. Soybean Processors: Fayetteville, 14.59; Raleigh, 14.59. RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. Hay 32 tons. Alfalfa: Lg. Sq. Gd 76/bale. Alfalfa/Orchard Grass: Sm. Sq. Gd 4.95/bale; Sm. Rd. Gd 30/bale, wet wrapped. Mixed Grass: Sm. Rd. Gd 21/bale, 2nd cut; 14/bale, wet wrapped. Orchard Grass: Sm. Sq. Gd 3.50-3.85/bale. Straw: Lg. Sq. 18/bale. Timothy: Lg. Sq. Gd 36/bale; Lg. Rd. Gd 36/bale.

NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly heavy. The estimated slaughter for Wed-nesday in NC is 2,346,000 head compared to 2,280,000 head last Wed-nesday. NC EGGS The market is steady on small, lower on the balance. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is good. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 140.25; L 138.70; M 108.17 & S 78. NY EGGS Prices are 5¢ lower on M’s, 4¢ less on larger sizes. Supplies are moderate to heavy. Demand into all channels ranges light to fairly good. Market activity is usually moderate. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered to store door, cents per dz. XL 123-127, L 121-125, M 95-99. FARMERS MARKET

POULTRY REPORT NC STATE FARMERS

MARKET Beans, Green (25# bx) 30; Beets (25# bg) 17.65; Cabbage (50# crate) Pointed Head & Round 12; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 12-13.25, Spinach (25# bx) 18; Peas, Crowder (bu bag) 12-20, Crowder (bu shelled) 24; Peanuts (35# bg) Green 35; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 14-21.75. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn 100 count) WA Red Delicious (traypack ctn) 32.75-33.35, WA Golden Delicious (traypack ctn) 33-34.50, Granny Smith WA (traypack ctn) 3436.50, Gala WA 32-41.50, WA Fuji (traypack ctn) 34.50-38, WA Pink Lady (traypack ctn) 38-41.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 24.5027.95; Bananas (40# ctn) 21-23.80; Beans, Round Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 19.3524, Pole (1 -/9 bu) 24-25; Beets (25# sack) 11.5515.75; Blueberries (flat 12 1pt cups) 24-34; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 18.15-24; Cabbage (50# ctn) 11.05-14.35; Cantaloupe (case 12 count) 23.95-29; Carrots (50# sack) 15.75-21.15; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 17.65-20; Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 25-28.55; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 16.45-17.95; Citrus: Oranges, CA (4/5 bu

ctn) 26.15-30.65, FL (4/5 bu ctn) 21-22; Pink Grapefruit, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 22-25.05; Tangelos, FL (80 count bx) 25-26.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 32-37.65; Limes (40# ctn) 30-32; Oranges, CA Naval (4/5 bu ctn) 23.45-27.65, FL Naval (64 count) 23.5526.15, Tangerines (120 count) 24; Corn (ctn 4 ?5dz) Yellow 20.05-27.15, White (ctn 4 ?-5 dz) 2226.45; Cranberries (24 12 oz pkg) 24.50; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Long Green 19-26, Pickles (ctn 40#) 22-32; Eggplant (25# ctn) 21-24; Grapes, Red Seedless (18# ctn) 29-31, White Seedless 29-31, Black Seedless 28, Red Globe 34; Greens, Collard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 11.55-14.15, Turnips (topped) 11.85-14.65; Hon-eydews (ctn 5s) 29; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 12.75; Lettuce (ctn 24s) Iceberg (wrapped) 2124, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 2224, Romaine (ctn 24s) 2224; Nectarines, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 24; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 13.65-20, White (25# sack) 16.50-18, Red (25# sack) 15, Green (ctn 24s) 13.65-16.55; Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 20-25.05; Peaches, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 18; Peanuts (35# bg)

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Green 53-69; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn) 27; Bell Peppers, Green (1 1/9 bu ctn) 20.0526, Red (11# ctn)32, Yellow (11# ctn) 32; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red Size A 18-21.45, Red Size B 25-28, White size A 14.50-20.75; Russett ID 21-27.55; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) Red 12.95-15; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 24; Squash, Yellow Crooked neck (3/4 bu ctn) 20.95-26, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 17-18; Strawberries, CA (flat 8 1-qt conts) 21.45-26.45, NC (flat 8 1-qt conts) 14-21.45; Sweet Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 16-20.05, White (40# ctn) 20-20.75; Tomatoes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 18-21; Tomatoes, Cherry (flat 12 1-pt conts)18.2521, Romas (25# ctn) 16-21, Grape (flat 12 1-pt conts) 19.50-21; Turnips (25# film bg) Topped 11.55-15. WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 25-30.75, Golden Delicious 25-30, Granny Smith 30, (bu loose pack) Red & Golden Delicious, Stayman, Romes, 16-20; Bananas (40# bx) 20-21; Beans (bu) Halfrunners 3740, Snaps 24-25; Broccoli (ctn) 15-18; Cabbage (50# bag) 7.50-9; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12 count) 19.75-21; Cauliflower (ctn) 16.75-18; Citrus: Grapefruit 15-16, Navels 18-21; Lemons (ctns 95 count) 26.50-28, (165 count) 26.75-28; Corn (crate) White, Yellow & BiColor 16-19.50; Cucumbers (1-1/9 bu) Long Green 16.50-18, Picklers (1-1/9 bu crate) 27-32; Grapes (18# ctn) Red & White Seedless 26-34.50; Lettuce (ctn) Iceburg 16-17.75, Green-Leaf 14-15.75, Romaine 15.7519; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 14-16; Onion Sets (32# bg) Yellow, White & Red 24-25; Bell Pepper (1 1/9 bu ctn) L & XL 14-15; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) White 16-24, Red 18.75-25, Russet 17-24; Seed Potatoes (50# bg) Kenne-bec, Yukon Gold & Red Pontiac 17.50-19.50; Squ-ash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 2226.50, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 15-16; Strawberries (flat 8 1#) FL & SC 10.75-16; Sweet Potat-oes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 12-14; Tomatoes (25# bx) XL & Larger 13-14; Turnips (25# sack) 13. MARKET

Page 7 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

MARKET REPORTS


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 8

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, April 9 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. 3 started Jersey bulls sired by Alexander, Vete & TBone. 1 pm dairy followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-3923321. Tuesday, April 10 • Westport, NY. Pat Bennett Equipment Dispersal. Full line of equipment including 2 2010 John Deere Tractors. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 Wednesday, April 11 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Easter Lamb & Goat Sale approx. 5 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Thursday, April 12 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315287-0220 Friday, April 13 • The Pines Farm. Barton, VT. 151st Top of Vermont

Invitation Dairy Sale. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 • Batavia, NY. 2012 Spring Consignment Auction to benefit Agriculture Education. Sponsored by the Farm Burewau. Now accepting quality consignments. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 10:30 AM: Catskill Tractor, Inc., 384 Center St., Franklin, NY. Farm Equipment Consignment and Inventory Reduction. Franklin Used Equipment Sales, Inc. Auction Service, 607-829-2600 • 6:00 PM: Syracuse, NY. NY Spring Color Breed Sale. Held in conjunction with the NY Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, April 14 • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • Canton, NY. Machinery Dispersal for Mark Brown Farm. Case 1896 & Case JX80 (both 4WD) & full line. Willis Shattuck, Sales Manager & Auctioneer 315-347-3003 with H&L Auctions, Malone, NY. Ed Legacy 518-483-0800, Scott Hamilton 518-4838787 • 8:00 AM: Beaver Mountain Farms, 1820 County Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. On the Farm of Don & Betty Duksa, 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 4:00 PM: Syracuse, NY. New York Spring Holstein Sale. Held in conjunction with the New York Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-7462226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Monday, April 16 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 10:00 AM: East Derry, NH. Selling for the Estate of William Dearth. Tools, equipment, ‘66 Corvette & more. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc. 802-785-2161 Wednesday, April 18 • 9:00 AM: Charlotte, VT. Complete dispersal of 346 freestall Holsteins. Long line of farm & barn equip. for the Foote Family farm. Wright’s Auction Service, 802-334-6115 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 Friday, April 20 • Pennellville, NY. 2012 Twin Brook Farms Machinery & Equipment Auction to settle the estate of Eugene Blumer. Full line of farm machinery including John Deere & Case tractors, John Deere forage harvester plus harvest, tillage and barn equip. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Saturday, April 21 • Dekalb Junction, NY. 12th Annual Machinery & Equipment Consignment. Call for info or to consign. Willis Shattuck, Sales Manager & Auctioneer 315347-3005 with H&L Auctions, Malone, NY. Ed Legacy 518-483-0800, Scott Hamilton 518-483-

8787 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Annual Spring Machinery Sale & Plant, Tree & Shrub Auction. Accepting consignments groups or single items. Consignments already coming in call today to get into advertising it will make a difference. Expecting a field full of quality farm equipment. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • Union Springs, NY. Fleming Homestead Farms also Carl & Esther Filer - 2 late model auctions held at same location, same day. Selling 7 tractors plus lots of almost new hay equip. & tillage, planters. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • Randolph, VT. Selling top herd of Holsteins along with Heifers & Milking Equipment for David Davoll. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-5254774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 • Quarryville, PA. Wea-Land Holsteins Complete Dispersal. Landis Weaver & Family, Owners. Comanaged by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:25 AM: Newton, PA. Inventory Reduction. Farm tractors & equipment. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 9:00 AM: Allegany Fairground, 15 North Main St., Angelica, NY. 22nd Annual Spring Extravaganza Auction. Call now to consign for advertising. 585567-8844 or 585-261-8844 • 9:00 AM: Royalton, VT. Selling for Lucky’s Motorsports & Snowmobiles. Motocycle parts & clothing. Slling for Welch’s Hardware Store surplus rental equip., tools & hardware. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc. 802-785-2161 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: Argyle Livestock Station, 8 McEachron Hill Rd., Argyle, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Franklin Used Equipment Sales Inc., Frank Walker Auctioneer 607-829-5172 • 10:30 AM: Dalton (Livingston Co.) New York. Dr. Lonnie and Donna Meeusen Retirement Auction. Clydesdale Horses, Show Wagon, Tack, new JD Tractors, haying line & general purpose line! Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 11:00 AM: Middlesex Livestock Auction, 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT. Spring Feeder Cattle Sale. All sizes, breeds & gender of Beef Cattle accepted! Middlesex Livestock Auction, Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828, Sales Barn 860-349-3204, Res 860346-8550 Monday, April 23 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Boardwalk Holsteins - 50 Head of Registered Milking & Close bred heifer Dispersal. RHA 19837 3.8 760 3.0 592. SCC 126,000. No BST or TMR. Brad & Carol Ainslie & Family. 315-822-6087 Watch future ads for more details. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Tuesday, April 24 • 11:00 AM: Paul & Darcy Graves Farm, Comstock Rd., Adams, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal. Watch future ads and our website for complete listing. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock

Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 Wednesday, April 25 • The Pines Farm. Barton, VT. Annual Equipment Auction. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 • 9:30 AM: Our Auction Yard, corners of Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY. Large Public Auction. Farm & compact tractors, machinery, industrial. Loading dock, free loading, lunch onsite. Consignments welcome. Goodrich Auction Service, Inc., 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com, auctionzip.com #10071 Friday, April 27 • Waddington, NY. Complete Dispersal for Gary Tiernan. 200 head of AI sired dairy cattle. Delarm & Treadway, 518-483-4106 • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704-3996111, 704-399-9756 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Machinery Consignment Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, April 28 • Rising Sun, MD. 40 plus tractors. Watch for future ads. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-6628149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 172 Marsh Rd., Litchfield, CT. Farm Auction for Bill Butts. Hay & Tillage Equipment, Tools & Cattle Support Equipment. Jacquier Auctions, 413-5696421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 8:00 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 8:30 AM: Middlesex Livestock Auction, 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT. Rain or Shine. Farm and Landscape Equipment Auction. Middlesex Livestock Auction, Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828, Sales Barn 860349-3204, Res 860-346-8550 • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Townline Equipment Annual Spring Used Equipment Sale. C. W. Gray & Sons, Inc., 802-785-2161 • 9:00 AM: 796 No. Cream Hill Rd., Bridport, VT. Jim Ferguson Farm Machinery & Small Equipment Sale. All machinery like new. Wide selection of tractors, tools, hay & farm equip. Well maintained. Addison Co. Commission Sales E.G. Wisnowski & Sons, 800339-COWS or 802-388-2661 • 10:30 AM: Benedict Farms, Turin, NY. Complete Machinery Dispersal on the Farm. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 11:00 AM: On the farm Otego, NY. Gretna Acres Registered Brown Swiss Complete Dispersal. 100 Head sell. This is a long established breeding herd (50 years) DHI tested, AI sired. Regular herd health program. . Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:00 Noon: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Spring Dairy Cattle, Feeder Cattle & Machinery Consignment Sale. Good listing f cattle & machinery already. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220

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BLACKSBURG, VA — Virginia Cooperative Extension has announced the establishment of the Virginia Junior Livestock Expo to be held Oct. 11 through 14 at the Rockingham County Fairgrounds in Harrisonburg, VA. This event will serve as the culminating activity for youth livestock projects and will replace the junior livestock show activities that were previously held annually at the State Fair of Virginia in Doswell, VA. In 2011, 445 young people exhibited more than 940 animals during the fair. “Virginia has a long history of strong youth livestock programs and events. Having an event that allows youth from across the commonwealth to come together to benefit from the educational process that youth livestock programs offer is extremely important,” said Ed Jones, director of Virginia Cooperative Extension. “We look forward to the opportunity to provide leadership to this activity and work closely with youth, parents, leaders, volunteers and supporters.”

The Virginia Junior Livestock Expo will be open to all Virginia 4-H and FFA members and will offer market and breeding shows for beef cattle, swine, sheep, and meat goats, as well as a stockman’s contest. Show details and entry forms will be posted on the Virginia Cooperative Extension www.4-h.ext.vt.edu/programs/anscience/Livestock/Events/jr -livestock-expo/index.html) as they become available. For more information regarding the Virginia Junior Livestock Expo and sponsorship opportunities, contact Paige Pratt, youth livestock Extension specialist, at pjpratt@vt.edu or 540231-4732.

More than 500 FFA and 4-H members tested their knowledge of livestock production during last year's stockman's contest.

r Ou t u n o Ab uctio ng k A s ti A rse Lis o r a H nd e Cal

Having A Horse Auction?

Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream.

Issue Date

Deadline Date

May 1 June 1 July 1 August 1 September 1 October 1 Nov. & Dec. 1 Jan. & Feb. 1, 2013 Early Deadline

April 20 May 18 June 22 July 20 August 24 September 21 October 19 December 20

Page 9 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Virginia Cooperative Extension to host Virginia Junior Livestock Expo


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 10

2012 Mid-Atlantic Junor Angus Classic, Harrisonburg, VA

Senior Showmanship — Senior showmanship honors were awarded to Kayla Widerman, Good Hope, IL, champion; and Ethan Whiteside, Queenstown, MD, reserve champion.

Junior Angus exhibitors led 235 entries at the 2012 Mid-Atlantic Junior Angus Classic (MAJAC) Regional Preview Show, March 1011 in Harrisonburg, VA. Mark Johnson, Orlando, OK, evaluated the 110 owned females, 50 bredand-owned females, 50 steers, 10 bred-and-owned steers, 13 bredand-owned bulls, two cow-calf pairs and 102 Angus-based crossbred steers. Hannah Grim, Thomasville, PA, led the grand champion bred-andowned bull. B C A Flawless 119 is a February 2011 son of TC Aberdeen 759. He earlier won junior champion. Cherry Knoll Brilliant 1138 won the title of reserve grand champion bred-and-owned bull after first claiming reserve junior champion. Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, owns the April 2011 son of S A V Brilliance 8077. Kelsey Stabler, Gaithersburg, MD, led the grand champion bredand-owned female. PleasantValley Evergreen1104 is an April 2011 daughter of Connealy Final Product. She earlier won junior

champion. Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, showed the reserve grand champion bred-and-owned female. Cherry Knoll Lady Pippa 1111 is a February 2011 daughter of Connealy Final Solution. She first won reserve junior champion. Cherry Knoll Rosebud 1153 won grand champion owned female after claiming intermediate champion. Logan Wright, Philippi, WV, owns the May 2011 daughter of Exar Lutton 1831. William Harsh, Radnor, Ohio, showed the reserve grand champion owned female. Dameron SRF Pride 1144 is a May 2011 daughter of PVF ALL PAYDAY 729. She first won reserve intermediate champion. Cherry Knoll Fern 9072 won grand champion cow-calf pair. Bryce Fitzgerald owns the September 2009 daughter of MCATL Reachout 836. A December 2011 heifer calf sired by Connealy Final Solution completes the winning pair. Sarah Harris, Buchanan, Va., claimed reserve grand champion

cow-calf pair. M C Mina 6023 is a January 2006 daughter of Whitestone 511N of 216 LTD. A November 2011 bull calf sired by M C Final Answer 9035 is at side. Bryce Fitzgerald, led the grand champion bred-and-owned steer. Cherry Knoll Lou 1164 is an April 2011 son of Plainview Lutton E102. He earlier won junior champion. Ryan Nolt, New Holland, PA, showed the reserve grand champion bred-and-owned steer. Triple N Black Label 4081 is an April 2011 son of Plainview Lutton E102. He first won reserve junior champion. In the steer show, Brody Fitzgerald showed the grand champion entry. HC LA Mack 72 is a March 2011 son of Top Line Mackinaw 0825. He first won junior champion. Garrett Gardner, Cherry Tree, PA, led the reserve grand champion steer. Buchanan’s Pickles N198 is a March 2011 son of Champion Hill Fullback 380. He earlier won reserve junior champion.

Intermediate Showmanship — Intermediate showmanship honors went to Robert Nixon III, Rapidan, VA, champion; and Shannon Schneider, Bluemont, VA, reserve champion.

Grand Champion Bred-and-owned Bull — B C A Flawless 119 won grand champion bred-and-owned bull. Hannah Grim, Thomasville, PA, owns the February 2011 son of TC Aberdeen 759. He earlier won junior champion.

Grand Champion Bred-and-owned Steer — Cherry Knoll Lou 1164 won grand champion bred-and-owned steer. Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, owns the April 2011 son of Plainview Lutton E102. He also won junior champion.

Junior Showmanship — These Angus members won junior showmanship honors. Pictured from left are Daniel Rohrbaugh, Seven Valleys, PA, champion; and Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, reserve champion.

Premier Breeder — Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, was named premier breeder at the 2012 Mid-Atlantic Junior Angus Classic (MAJAC) Regional Preview Show, March 10-11 in Harrisonburg, VA. Presenting the award is Miss American Angus Brooke Harward.

Novice Showmanship — These young Angus enthusiasts won novice showmanship honors. At left, Jacob Bowen, Sunderland, MD, champion; and Jesse Earhart, Broadway, VA, reserve champion.


A complete list of winners follows: Owned Heifers Senior Heifer Calf Champion: Windy Ridge Shadoe 11. Exhibitor: Lauren Schur, Sabillasville, MD. Reserve Senior Heifer Calf Champion: Eastfield Blackbird 147Y. Exhibitor: Abbie Bartenslager, Lewisburg, WV. Intermediate Champion Heifer: Cherry Knoll Rosebud 1153. Exhibitor: Logan Wright, Philippi, WV. Reserve Intermediate Champion Heifer: Dameron SRF Pride 1144. Exhibitor: William Harsh, Radnor, Ohio. Late Junior Champion Heifer: Gambles Lady 4031. Exhibitor: James Moxley IV, West Friendship, MD. Reserve Late Junior Champion Heifer: Ayres Stardom Eline 401. Exhibitor: Catherine Knebel, Winamac, IN. Early Junior Champion Heifer: Dameron Princess 126. Exhibitor: Keegan Cassady, Mahomet, IL. Reserve Early Junior Champion Heifer: Dameron Lucy 102. Exhibitor: James Full, Mount Airy, MD. Senior Champion Female: Champion Hill Cheyenne 7796, Exhibitor: Caroline Cowles, Rockfield, KY. Reserve Senior Champion Female: L V A Ginger Spice 1003. Exhibitor: Ethan Whiteside, Queenstown, MD. Grand Champion Female: Cherry Knoll Rosebud 1153. Exhibitor: Logan Wright, Philippi, WV. Reserve Grand Champion Female: Dameron SRF Pride 1144. Exhibitor: William Harsh, Radnor, Ohio. Bred-and-Owned Heifers Senior Heifer Calf Champion: Windy Ridge Skymere 11. Exhibitor: Jessica Clarke, Rocky Ridge, MD. Reserve Senior Heifer Calf Champion: Windy Ridge Evergreen. Exhibitor: Jessica Clarke, Rocky Ridge, MD. Intermediate Champion Heifer: Cherry Knoll Richta 1159. Exhibitor: Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Reserve Intermediate Champion Heifer: Triple N Franny 512. Exhibitor: Ryan Nolt, New Holland, PA. Junior Champion Heifer: PleasantValley Evergreen1104. Exhibitor: Kelsey Stabler, Gaithersburg, MD. Reserve Junior Champion Heifer: Cherry Knoll Lady Pippa 1111. Exhibitor: Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Senior Champion Female: WF Eagle Eye’s Jada 1220. Exhibitor: Ethan Whiteside, Queenstown, MD. Reserve Senior Champion Female: SSC Rihanna X012. Exhibitor: Chet Stem Jr., Westminster, MD. Grand Champion Female: PleasantValley Evergreen1104. Exhibitor: Kelsey Stabler, Gaithersburg, MD.

Reserve Grand Champion Female: Cherry Knoll Lady Pippa 1111. Exhibitor: Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Cow-Calf Pairs Grand Champion Cow-Calf: Cherry Knoll Fern 9072. Exhibitor: Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Reserve Grand Champion Cow-Calf: M C Mina 6023. Exhibitor: Sarah Harris, Buchanan, VA. Virginia Futurity Heifer Champion Futurity Heifer: DCF Miss Rito Y114. Exhibitor: Sarah Harris, Buchanan, VA. Reserve Champion Futurity Heifer: Shen-Val Designer Rita 11S04. Exhibitor: Katherine Ashby, Berryville, VA. Bred-and-Owned Bulls Senior Bull Calf Champion: SSC Money Machine Y013. Exhibitor: Chet Stem Jr., Westminister, MD. Reserve Senior Bull Calf Champion: Ridgeview Rebel 11. Exhibitor: Sarah Harris, Buchanan, VA. Intermediate Champion Bull: Shale Ridge Sig 1103. Exhibitor: Jocelyn Duncan, Otego, NY. Reserve Intermediate Champion Bull: S A B 6200 George 174. Exhibitor: Savannah Brauning, Finksburg, MD. Junior Champion Bull: B C A Flawless 119. Exhibitor: Hannah Grim, Thomasville, PA. Reserve Junior Champion Bull: Cherry Knoll Brilliant 1138. Exhibitor: Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Grand Champion Bull: B C A Flawless 119. Exhibitor: Hannah Grim, Thomasville, PA. Reserve Grand Champion Bull: Cherry Knoll Brilliant 1138. Exhibitor: Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Angus Steers Intermediate Champion Steer: FDE BF Blindside. Exhibitor: Emily Velisek, Gaithersburg, MD. Reserve Intermediate Champion Angus Steer: B C A Roman H19. Exhibitor: Ethan Whiteside, Queenstown, MD. Junior Champion Steer: HC LA Mack 72. Exhibitor: Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Reserve Junior Champion Steer: Buchanan’s Pickles N198. Exhibitor: Garrett Gardner, Cherry Tree, PA. Grand Champion Steer: HC LA Mack 72. Exhibitor: Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Reserve Grand Champion Steer: Buchanan’s Pickles N198. Exhibitor: Garrett Gardner, Cherry Tree, PA. Bred-and-Owned Steers Intermediate Champion Steer: Windy Ridge Paco. Exhibitor: Taylor Clarke, Rocky Ridge, MD. Reserve Intermediate Champion Steer: B W F 0471 Buster. Exhibitor: Deedra Suchting, Reisterstown, MD.

Champion Angus-based Steer — James Moxley IV, West Friendship, MD, showed the champion Angusbased steer. The steer weighed 958 pounds. Mark Johnson, Orlando, OK, evaluated the 235 entries. Photos by Shelia Stannard American Angus Association

Junior Champion Steer: Cherry Knoll Lou 1164. Exhibitor: Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Reserve Junior Champion Steer: Triple N Black Label 4081. Exhibitor: Ryan Nolt, New Holland, PA. Grand Champion Steer: Cherry Knoll Lou 1164. Exhibitor: Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Reserve Grand Champion Steer: Triple N Black Label 4081. Exhibitor: Ryan Nolt, New Holland, PA. On-Stage Steers Grand Champion On-Stage Steer: Butler Farms Charlie H211. Exhibitor: Ben Jenkins, Luray, VA. Angus-Based Crossbred Steers Champion Light Weight Angus-Based Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: Andrea Foore, Seven Valley, PA. Reserve Champion Light Weight AngusBased Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Champion Middle Weight Angus-Based Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: James Moxley IV, West Friendship, MD. Reserve Champion Middle Weight Angus-Based Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: James Moxley IV, West Friendship, MD. Champion Heavy Weight Angus-Based Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: Nicole Kibler, Edinburg, VA. Reserve Champion Heavy Weight Angus-Based Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: Michael Orndoff, Stephenson, VA. Grand Champion Angus-Based Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: James Moxley IV, West Friendship, MD. Reserve Grand Champion Angus-Based Crossbred Steer. Exhibitor: James Moxley IV, West Friendship, MD. Showmanship Novice Showmanship: Champion: Jacob Bowen, Sunderland, MD. Reserve Champion: Jesse Earhart, Broadway, VA. Junior Showmanship: Champion: Daniel Rohrbaugh, Seven Valleys, PA. Reserve Champion: Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA. Intermediate Showmanship: Champion: Robert Nixon IL, Rapidan, VA. Reserve Champion: Shannon Schneider, Bluemont, VA. Senior Showmanship: Champion: Kayla Widerman, Good Hope, IL. Reserve Champion: Ethan Whiteside, Queenstown, MD. Premier Breeder Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA.

Grand Champion Owned Female — Cherry Knoll Rosebud 1153 won grand champion owned female. Logan Wright, Philippi, WV, owns the May 2011 daughter of Exar Lutton 1831. She first claimed intermediate champion.

Grand Champion Steer — HC LA Mack 72 won grand champion steer. Brody Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, owns the March 2011 son of Top Line Mackinaw 0825. He first claimed junior champion.

Grand Champion Cow-calf Pair — Cherry Knoll Fern 9072 won grand champion cow-calf pair. Bryce Fitzgerald, West Grove, PA, owns the September 2009 daughter of MCATL Reachout 836. A December 2011 heifer calf sired by Connealy Final Solution completes the winning pair.

Grand Champion Bred-and-owned Female — PleasantValley Evergreen1104 won grand champion bred-and-owned female at the 2012 Mid-Atlantic Junior Angus Classic (MAJAC) Regional Preview Show, March 10-11 in Harrisonburg, VA. Kelsey Stabler, Gaithersburg, MD, owns the April 2011 daughter of Connealy Final Product. She earlier won junior champion.

Page 11 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Juniors lead Angus champions at 2012 MAJAC


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 12

Mielke from B1 itor Dave Natzke reported in Friday’s DairyLine that, for the week ending January 22, 2012, fluid milk sales were down 3.9 percent over the previous 12month period, according to Gallagher, but the retail price averaged $3.90 per gallon, up 11 percent from a year earlier. Commercial disappearance of overall fluid milk was down 1.7 percent, with an increase in consumption of milk in coffee drinks possibly offsetting some of the fluid milk sales decline. Gallagher said studies for four decades have revealed the “elasticity” in the relationship of the retail milk price and retail sales. Each 1 percent change in the price impacts sales by 0.35 percent in either direction. If the price goes up 1 percent, sales go down 0.35 percent. If the price goes down 1 percent, sales increase 0.35 percent. The trouble, said Gallagher, is that gallon jugs of milk are traditionally thought of as a commodity. Thus, it’s always marketed on price. “When we treat it as a commodity at retail, so do the consumers, and they buy milk on price,” he explained. “Margins shrink, leaving little room for innovation.” “Some of the strongest ‘brands’ in the world market something that comes out of your tap, water,” he continued, adding that cereal, soda, toothpaste and laundry detergent are all largely the same, but are not treated as commodities. “They have strong marketing programs by brand.” In dairy politics; the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) reports that 25 of their member dairy manu-

facturers, including some of the largest food companies in the U.S., have called on House and Senate Agriculture Committee members to oppose supply management proposals and adopt a compromise producer safety net in the new Farm Bill. The manufacturers would be directly regulated under the pending Dairy Security Act, H.R. 3062, which was proposed by National Milk and introduced by Representative Collin Peterson (D-MN). IDFA charged that “other commodities have moved to insurance and other risk management tools instead of government price intervention. Not only will dairy exports decline if Congress imposes supply management, but dairy imports will be encouraged, causing problems for future trade negotiations.” “Some groups want to completely eliminate government support for agriculture commodities while others are arguing that government needs to step in and control milk supply to assure high milk prices,” said Jerry Slominski, IDFA senior vice president of legislative affairs and economic policy. “We think there is a middle ground where government can help dairy farmers successfully manage their own businesses.” Three taxpayer organizations, Citizens Against Government Waste, Americans for Tax Reform, and the National Taxpayer’s Union, have also called on lawmakers to oppose the legislation, calling it “an egregious mistake.” In other legislative news; DPW reports that Florida U.S. Rep. Tom

Rooney, chair of the House Ag Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy and Poultry, cosponsored the bipartisan “Preserving America’s Family Farm Act,” HR 4157, which would prevent the Department of Labor (DOL) from enacting controversial new restrictions on youth working on family farms. HR 4157 would prevent the DOL from implementing its proposed rules to restrict family farm operations. The new mandates would prohibit youth under 18 from being near certain animals without adult supervision, participating in common livestock practices like vaccinating, handling most animals more than six months old, operating farm machinery over 20 PTO horsepower, completing tasks at elevations over six feet high, and working at stockyards, grain and feed facilities. And, National Milk has become the new manager of the licensing and use of the REAL® Seal, one of the food in-

dustry’s most recognizable product logos. The management was transferred from the United Dairy Industry Association as a result of an agreement between it and NMPF, according to a press release, as “the best opportunity to place a renewed emphasis on highlighting the importance and value of American-made dairy foods.” “The REAL® Seal was created more than 30 years ago to help consumers distinguish between real and artificial cheeses, as the pizza category was really taking off,” said Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. “Today, a generation later, we still see a need to differentiate American-made dairy products from imports, and real dairy foods from those made with soy or rice or even hemp. Our management of this labeling program will benefit consumers, as well as the farmers who have a direct stake in how their milk is marketed.”

TRADE SHOW OPPORTUNITIES • KEYSTONE FARM SHOW • January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

• VIRGINIA FARM SHOW • Jan. 19, 20 & 21, 2012 • Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-3 Augusta Expoland • Fishersville, VA

• BIG IRON EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• EMPIRE STATE FRUIT & VEG EXPO • Jan. 24, 25 & 26 2012 Oncenter Convention Center • Syracuse, NY

• HARD HAT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO EXHIBIT AT OR ATTEND ANY OF THESE SHOWS

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Are You Involved In More Than One Industry? We Are Here to Help You.


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 14

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

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Martinsburg, PA Kennedyville, MD Penn Yan, NY New Holland, PA Piffard, NY Honey Grove, PA Shippensburg, PA Baltic, OH Watsontown, PA Millmont, PA Lykens, PA Shelby, OH

Beef Cattle ANGUS SALE: Work Land & Cattle Co. 50 females, 25 bulls MAY 6, 2012, Smock PA. R e q u e s t c a t a l o g s n o w. Video preview at w w w. Wo r k C a t t l e. c o m kev i n r o o ke r @ ya h o o. c o m 724-322-1576

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Page 15 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 16

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

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$45,900

2035 Stuarts Draft Hwy., Stuarts Draft, VA 24477 540-337-1090 www.beveragetractor.com

3pt. Farm Drainage tile plow w/Spectra laser & receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,200 42' Krause field cultivator model 4237HR, 2 piece K-tine shank on 6" spacing w/spring levelers . . . . . .$12,500 40' Unverferth rolling harrow soil conditioner, model 1235 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 '96 WT Patriot sprayer, 6200hrs,175hp, 90ft, 750 gal. poly tank, GPS w/auto swath, Trimble EZ Guide & EZ Boom, tires 12.4x38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,000 NH 1069 bale wagon 2800hrs Cat3208 w/ turbo, Allison trany w/heavy truck rear end . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 '82 JD 410 backhoe, 2WD, 4985 hrs . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 JD 348 wire balers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 JD 347 wire balers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500-$3,000 All equipment stored inside except tile plow.

Contact Greg 585-746-5925 or Kim 585-330-5381

JD 8430 C/A MFD, 50” rear duals, 34” ft duals, all Firestones, Active-seat, 4 remotes, HD wt. package, Q-hitch, Very Fancy Tr. w/2,200 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,500 JD 8330 C/A MFD, 46” duals, 4 remotes, Q-hitch wts “ONLY” 1,200 hrs, Looks New w/Warranty!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $154,900 JD 8270-R C/A MFD, 50” duals, wts, G-Star ready, Q-hitch, 4 “ONLY” 1,700 hrs, Looks New!. $168,500 JD 7930 C/A MFD, 46” duals, wts, 20 speed PQ, LH Rev, with “Front PTO & 3ph” . . . . . . . . . . Call! JD 7930 C/A MFD, 46” duals, wts, IVT trans w/LH Rev, “ONLY” 336 hrs, Warranty! . . . . . . . . . Call! 2010 Case IH 275 Magnum, C/A, MFD, Fully Loaded, 3 PTO’s, 5-remotes, duals all around, wts, leather, Extended Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $158,500 2010 Case IH 245 Magnum, C/A, MFD, duals, wts, 4 remotes, “ONLY” 1,040 hrs, “Look at this Price” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $129,500 Firm! Case IH 245 Magnum, C/A MFD, duals, wts, 4 remotes, 3,100 hrs Sharp! . . . . . . . . . . . . $106,500

All these are in stock and ready to go!

See These Tractors and More At www.AndrewsFarm.com Financing & Trucking Available

ANDREWS FARM EQ. INC. Conneautville, PA 1-814-587-2450

www.equipmentexplorer.com • Search All of our Auction and Used Equipment Ads at One Time! Auction and Used Equipment Ads from:

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are combined into our searchable database.

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1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Fencing ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Generators

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

200 - 3x3x8 Squares Bales 175 - 4x5 Round Bales Really Early Cut & Timothy Hay. All Hay Stored Inside on Pallets. Approx. 50 Outside Round Bales, Good for Beef Cattle Picked Up or Delivered, Any Amount, Large Quantity

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

518-929-3480 518-329-1321

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

Try Selling It In The

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry

Round & Square Bales

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE

STRAW

SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION

519-482-5365

Parts & Service New Installations

CALL STEVE

Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted.

CLASSIFIEDS

Contacts: Allen Hollenbach 610-926-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com

WANTED

or email

Pre Cut Rye Straw

classified@leepub.com

50 to 75 Lb. Bales

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY & STRAW

302-737-5117 302-545-1000 Heating

For Sale All Types Delivered

804-387-6462

MIXED GRASS HAY for sale. $20.00/Roll, 4x5. 540-8602145

Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

Livestock Equipment

Livestock Equipment

South East Precast Concrete, LLC Feed Bunks, Water Troughs, Mineral Feeders, Cattle Guards, Silo Sides, Bunker Sides Dealer for: Giant Rubber Water Tanks and Best Livestock Equipment

Call to Order 276-620-1194 Wytheville, VA

Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

Call Peg At

800-836-2888

Lawn & Garden

Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

CALL TODAY FOR NEW “HIGHER” PRICING

TOO MUCH HAY?

H AY

Hay - Straw Wanted

Parts THOUSANDS OF AG PARTS available online at www.PaulBparts.com.Sprayer parts include Teejet & Hypro Nozzles/Tips, Nozzle Bodies, Pumps, GPS Guidance, Foam Markers, and much more. Weasler PTO Driveline Parts available for North American, Italian, and German series. Or call 717-738-7355 ex. 275. Shipping is FREE if picked up at the Lititz store.

Poultry & Rabbits

Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers (7 Meat Varieties)

Extremely hearty & perfect for free range Layer Chicks, Turkeys Ducklings, Guineas, Much More

(814) 539-7026

www.myerspoultry.com

Poultry

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Lancaster DHIA

Clearview Hatchery

Part Time Position

(717) 365-3234

Lancaster DHIA has an opening in Lycoming, Bradford and Sullivan Counties

JANSEN AUTOMATED nesting box & cleaning system: Candler, washer, dryer, grader & packer. Accommodates up to 10,000 birds. Asking $25,000 firm. Truly phenomenal. 315-415-7762

Field Technician

Ideal position for a retired dairyman Or Independent person who enjoys managing their own time

PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

This position has the potential to grow into full-time, with benefits For more information contact David Bigelow@ 814-330-5222 Lancaster DHIA Director of Field Services Please leave a message if no answer Horses

Real Estate For Sale

FOR SALE: Rocky Mountain Horses, Trail Safe/Rockfish Stables, Blue Ridge Mountains/VA. 804-943-3818

2.2-Acres 2 story house 28x80 shop barn 5200 Keith Rd. Conewango Valley, NY 14726. 6 ACRES, 2-story house 26x60 shop barn, fruit trees. 5499 Elm Creek Rd. Randolph, NY 14772.

Page 17 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 18

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Real Estate For Sale

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY

REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR

Southwestern Virginia Bland County

62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

$90,000 Several Purchase Options Available. Call

540-255-9112

Trailers

2008 Wilson

Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

24’ w/8’ Tack Room, Daylight Roof, Center & Rear Swing Gates w/Sliders, 7’ Height, 81” width, elec/hyd brakes. Like New

$19,900 Firm 717-927-9317 Trucks

7.3 Diesel, 4x4, 6 Speed 97K miles, New Cannonball Bale-Dump Bed,

Radial 240-R4TM Truck Tire 22.5 Available

Cannonball & Butler Bale Beds Sold & Installed

Can Be Used on Silage Trucks or Manure Trucks 402 State Hwy 163 Fort Plain, NY

(518)) 993-2235 www.hilltoptire.net

Tractor Parts

Yearling Tunis Ram for sale. 585-526-7103 or 585-2615389.

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Roofing

Roofing

Sheep

CALL! Other Similar Trucks Available for Sale Bonny View Farms - 540-460-3535

Hill Top Tire

Virginia (South Central): Custom-built 3BR rancher set on 20 open & wooded acres. LR w/FP, DR, Kitchen, 2 baths & utility room. Detached 40x40 garage/ shop, plus equipment shed. Nice pond. Home in excellent condition. Annual taxes $762. Priced at $284,900 (More acreage available). Vaughan Auction & Realty Co., PO Box 1, Keysville, VA 23947 434-736-8400 www.vaughanrealty.com

Trucks

‘99 Red Ford F350

Tires & Tire Repair Service

ORGANIC DAIRY FARM/ CREAMERY, 318 acres. 8 miles from Cooperstown,NY. Two 3 bedroom homes, 100 cow freestall, Double 6 milking parlor. Many outbuilding for young stock, hay & equipment. New cheese room, aging facility & solar electric system. 200 acres fenced for grazing. $998,500. 607-2869362

Trailers

ROOFING & SIDING e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

APR 11 Maryland Agricultural Commission Public Meeting and Tour Elks Lodge, 502 Dutchman’s Lane, Easton, MD. 7 pm. Citizens interested in farming and rural topics encouraged to attend. Contact Sally Terry, 410-8415881 or Sally.Terry@ maryland.gov. APR 11-12 Cage Aquaculture Forum VSU’s Cooperative Extension Pavilion, River Rd., Ettrick. Special program features include a site visit to a local farm where fish are being raised in cages, and a caged trout farm pond demonstration. Since space is limited, interested persons are strongly encouraged to register before or by April 2. Contact Debra B. Jones, 804-524-5496 or e-mail dbjones@vsu.edu. APR 27 MDA to Conduct Training Workshops for On Farm Poultry & Rabbit Processing Washington County Agricultural Education Center, Boonsboro, MD. 9 am - 4 pm. Registration check in begins at 8:30 am. The training fee is $20 which includes lunch and materials. To download a copy of the registration form, visit www.mda.state.md.us/pdf/ poultryrabbitwkshp.pdf. Workshop participants will learn to recognize diseases of

public health concern, take basic bio-security measures, write and implement basic Standard Sanitary Operating Procedures, develop Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point plans and properly dispose of offal and waste water. To become certified for off farm sales, producers must: • Complete the training; • Pass a brief test at the training; • Submit an application for certification along with a $75 annual fee; and • Be inspected by MDA. Note: MDA inspectors will conduct an inspection at least once per year to verify that producers are following food safety requirements. Space is limited, so register early. Contact Sherry Weygant, 410-841-5769 or em a i l w e y g a n s l @ mda.state.md.us. MAY 4-6 Halifax County Heritage & Antique Machinery Festival Halifax County Fairgrounds, Hwy 360-E, South Boston, VA. Call 434-572-6879 or e-mail bobconner@ t o u c h v a . n e t o r ccole@embarqmail.com. On Internet at www.halifax countyheritagefestival.org SEP 15-20 The 49th All American Dairy Show Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center, Harrisburg, PA. Featuring 23 shows in six days, including four full days dedicated to youth shows and more than 2,400 animals shown by nearly 1,000 exhibitors from across the nation. Call 717787-2905. On Internet at www.allamerican.state.pa.us OCT 24-27 National FFA Convention & Expo Indianapolis, IN. On Internet at www.ffa.org

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1. PHONE IT IN IT IN - For MasterCard, Visa, 2. FAXAmerican Express or Discover customers, fill out the form below completely and 3.

Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!

FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381 MAIL IT IN - Fill out the attached form, calculate the cost, enclose your check or credit card information and mail to:

Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word. (Phone #’s count as one word) If running your ad multiple weeks: Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

4. classified@leepub.com E-mail your ad to - Go to 5. ON-LINE www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a E-MAIL

West

New East England

Classified Ad button to Mid-Atlantic place your ad 24/7!

Place my ad in the following Zones:  Country Folks East  Country Folks West  Country Folks of New England  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle Number of weeks to run___________ Name(Print)________________________________________________________________ Farm/Company Name_________________________________________________________ Street___________________________________________County_____________________ City____________________________________________State______Zip______________ Phone_______________ _______________ ____________________________________ Fax_________________ _______________ ____________________________________ Cell_________________ _______________ ____________________________________ e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard Card # ______________________________________________Exp. Date ______________ (MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card(Print)____________________________________________________ Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for credit card payment only)

15

(MM/DD/YY)

16

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

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1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week

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1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

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1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week


Left — Maryland Hereford Association President Jay Stull of Libertytown, MD, at right, presents the Col. E. Brooke Lee Award to Thomas Bramble Sr., during the group’s annual meeting. The award is presented to a breeder for his or her dedication, leadersthip and support of the Maryland Hereford Association and the Hereford industry. Bramble is also a director for the Maryland Cattlemen’s Association. Photos by Rebecca Long Chaney

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-week k updatess and d onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations.

All Breed Horse Sale and Tack Sale April 27, 2012 Mount Airy Stockyard, Inc. Mt. Airy, N.C. Tack Sale @ 5:00 PM Horses @ 7:00 PM Registered Horses Sold Before Grade Horses Registered Horses 8% Plus $15.00 per head Grade horses 8% ($25.00 minimum) No Sale (in auction ring $25.00) No Sale before going through auction $50.00 Resales 1/2 Commission • Coggins $30.00 Tack Commission 15% Horses requiring EIA Testing must be in the barn before 5:00 PM

Consigners paid day of sale All transactions must go through the office ALL GUARANTEES ARE BETWEEN BUYER & SELLER WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR HEALTH, SOUNDNESS AND REGISTRATION OF ANY ANIMAL, WE ACT AS AGENTS ONLY!

NEXT HORSE & TACK SALE MAY 25TH 2012 For more information Call: (336)786-8129 Hotels: Quality Inn (336) 789-2000 Hampton Inn (336) 789-5999 Surry Inn (336) 366-3000 Best Western Inn (336) 352-3400

Terms: Cash, Approved Check (ID Required) or Visa (3% Service Charge added to all Credit & Debit Cards) $30,00 On all Return Checks

The Howes family of Taneytown, MD, was inducted into the Maryland Hereford Associaiton’s Hall of Fame at the group’s annual banquet and meeting held recently. The Howes are, from left, Ray, Carey, Cyndy and Katy. They were honored for their commitment and leadership in the organization as well as their decades of success with Hereford cattle. They were presented a beautiful Hereford end table.

Page 19 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • April 9, 2012

Maryland Hereford Association Banquet


GROWER

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of web. t Foodan even greater numberthe ing on the 2002 the Gourme In 2001 and and 29 the customers. Most of Gourmet On June 28 ip came togeth their last year will membersh its first the Maine SFP’s will stage Food vendors from and we exand completed ifying MG& again Gour met ucerand’sexhibit erstrate History of 2 Annual in- be back have many new Prod gic plan ident to includ- Festival. Last year 25 Food ty to- pect en to be Trade Show the three major goals ial at happ came posicts inec you a If ote members a susta to bers produ trip And Sp And to prom g the ing, Creating tent on ones. a s- trepid pro- mem

94 Bull Rd., Otisville, NY 10963 845-386-5681 FAX: 845-386-8752 sales@wesselsfarms.com www.wesselsfarms.com

nd

large aggre ol durin group of of foods of planning Maine on that gether in a State capit of Agricul- able organization, tive image In 1987 a small in front marssed in t Freeport, producers see and proce the green Departmen at the Legis- sively promote and member come by and specialty food ia- duced ization, its SFP’s samfirst assoc ’. weekend ture’s ‘Ag day ket the organ products MG& r’s lots of free Chocolates formed the ote Maine’s Maine. the organiza- lature’. and to us. With ‘Wilbu from you Since then MG&SFP’s members tion to prom try. lent exposure a ples to choose to over 60 ber ben’! In 1999 the food indus has grown Ejust expand mem nt em- With excel ‘free lunch specialty traffic and selves tion bers with a diverse launched WWW.MAIN et and 1 curre can get a them the Route serving for mem mark efits. With away from its They set ers will be cts. Their S.ORG to upgrading stones throw managed to Memb treats from musgoals: range of produ s have re- FOOD specialty phasis on imfour basic , cowe and of great ilities et up effort spirit LL Bean the web site capab , cheese to combined crowd of To foster a organi- gourm cts through of a regular attract a nice in sels to salsa stability and sulted in a strong food produ Since plementation year we are cookies and everything operation, being has developed World Wide Web. r for members buyers. This your well , zation that advertising ization has e-newslette ded ad cameconomic to maren. Just bring fun. more site organ bers, g betwe the web e mem addin expan more a uniqu and have pro- then the Uni- and an amongst its is steadily a larger banner and taste buds ered with a framework ket their products, to attract To provide sem- partn of Maine at Orono paign the group ess towards temporary signs and coopy shops and n beng for re- making progr for networking d- duce work the members. versit be the liaiso ties, inclu pursue fundi eting op- these goals. for will to activi e He e inars parMain erativ clariand adver- Each year members hing mark the Heart of y that will help De- searc analyzing ing marketing ies surve value - tween and the MG&SFP the Maine nities and needs of opportunit RC&D ticipate in project ulture portu tising, marketing cers fy the food producers in an advocacy partment of Agric carrying out as the food produ To provide added and for for Maine ature, . Part of his terms of marketing ties, such will activi Gritty Details of role in legisl and processors t in the tools that assis to oping “Nitty the be ar and job will web devel exposure al Selling” semin process of nt. generate greater Food Festiv cts. He will in- ongoing developme try and to nt for their produ to update Gour met taking place is food indus profitability of conte ermore, he will be be helping which is 29 in ct whose goal - Furth n of a also crease the Strategic Plan June 28 and ment proje strengthen small, farm-based value ing on the desig MG&SPF’s of Maine help a marketing Freeport. to cers and work The Heart added n. and design food produ Inc. and the Maine’s value organizatio pro- added project is RC&D Area, plan for the met and Spe- farm producers. The are processors. The a Federal Gour e Main Producers main goals t, being funded by ject’s two et Imcialty Food exten State Mark are working to survey the size, state’s and (MG&SFP) rtProgram (FSMaine Depa a and needs of the essed provement with the June 4 ulture in - added/proc MIP) grant. na, a gradment of Agric ing op- value mic devel Stefano Tijeri Spring Meet nic Web Listings Dejoint econo nt from the Orga uate stude ntation Adof Harvey Marof Public Feature Prese y - Managing Partner about how to ent partm n at the UniElizabeth Harve discuss the latest buzzengines. Techministratio h p will e, has come source keting Grou site noticed by the searc e an on line versity of Main the Heart e cases to dissome onlin maine becom ation relevant to to help your web view get www. board will on we SFP inform itting This year its of the MG& food indus nology perm undergoing of Maine and project. He the specialty of the site works best. 12 Bangor foods.org is what this When g de. out cover upgra June carry This part ils of Sellin first major ing as a Reprotectare try. Gritty Deta vements will be work be password be limThe Nitty Marketing and the impro de a will will Seminar it will provi search and June 13 Portl ons will focus on selland access completed bringing with processor locati of serv- ed alist, two food level in r ito Speci ct placement ar held iate much highe and ited years of exper , out and produ This semin and assoc restaucustomers him seven ct from roll , media alty stores, e members It will provide produ ice to our eting speci to your resum mark cts ing shows, corWe will produ ence in members. line gement. He members. Tijerina, Maine to marketing your tips for trade hly drawings members with on ing, alty and web mana Columbia. Stefano s etc. with offering mont and Speci of cuslicens , chain store g. ivate the to sites for is a native the Houston Gourmet cers’ new intern rants and and react sales and pricin 28 and 29 reg- links in al on InFood Produ letter with and porate June ess assistancerelatHe worked years prior tomer news of new prod- busin to assess met Food Festiv products will work area for three al Maine GourMaine. ’s farmsources of e. line Annu t ular features d On Maine Main to abou try. g ve Secon ort, impro articles to movin ed to the indus be avail-added food dependence Green, Freep be conductucts and based, value ssors. Stefano will Specialty food conferencing will market rethe Maine proce informaand other ing extensive ding on-line producers industry. g as able as deterinclu servin h, to needs searc l In addition marketing tiona bers. for d by the mem a showplace will mine products it member’s

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April 9, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 20

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Free Wholesale Buyers Guide

Wisconsin Christmas Trees www.christmastrees-wi.org e-mail: info@christmastrees-wi.org

Give us a ring at 804/786-3951. Visit www.vdacs.state.va.us for the Virginia Shippers Directory, the Virginia Christmas Tree Guide, and the Virginia Food and Beverage Directory. Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Also visit these Web sites: www.virginiagrown.com — Virginia Grown produce and nursery products • www.vctga.com — Virginia Christmas Tree Growers Association www.vnla.org — Virginia Nursery and Landscape Association • www.vafinest.com — Virginia’s Finest products

(608) 742-8663 Fax (608) 742-8667 Wisc. Christmas Tree Producers Assn. Dept. C, W9833 Hogan Rd, Portage, WI 53901

For More Information Contact Your Local Representative or Country Folks Grower, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • 800-218-5586 Advertising and Print Jobs: Dan Wren 517-673-0117 • Email dwren@leepub.com Editorial: Joan KarkWren 518-673-0141 • Email jkarkwren@leepub.com

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic 4.9.12  

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic April 9, 2012

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