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19 March 2012 Section e off Two One Volume e 31 Number r 11

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

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Virginia Cattlemen and Dairymen find power in working together ~ Page A3 Brown Swiss breeders honored, awards presented Page A3 Columnist Lee Mielke

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Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good, and his mercy endures for ever. ~ Psalm 107:1


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 2

Virginia cattlemen, dairymen find power in working together by Jennifer Showalter ROANOKE, VA — It is often said that two heads are better than one. With this in mind, close to 400 Virginia cattlemen and dairymen recently came together for the 2012 Virginia Beef Industry and State Dairymen’s Convention and Trade Show at The Hotel Roanoke. Even though cattlemen and dairymen bring different products to the table, they deal with many of the same issues and have found they carry a bigger stick working together rather than as individuals when it comes to protecting their interests. This year’s Virginia Beef Industry and State Dairymen’s Convention provided an excellent opportunity for these two groups of producers to come together and learn where their industries stand and how they need to deal with current and future issues. In addition to all the meetings and presentations, guests were able to visit with industry officials as they strolled through the trade show. Being able to see and learn about many of the latest products and services available to the beef and dairy industries under one roof was a real treat for many producers. Dr. Dave McClary with Elanco got the morning’s educational program rolling at the 2012 Beef Industry and State Dairymen’s Convention and Trade Show with a discussion on making safe, affordable and abundant food a global reality. According to McClary, a growing wave of food insecurity is affecting more than 1 billion people and the number is like to increase significantly as the population pushes toward 9 billion by 2050. With many not realizing just how big an issue hunger is and is likely to become, McClary pointed out that hunger kills more than war, AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. “Hunger is a global issue and is the number one health problem in developing countries,” said McClary. “Here in the U.S., we live in a bubble. Three million people live on less than $2 per day throughout the world, less than one third of the world’s population lives on less than $1 per day, and the poorest nations spend 50-95 percent of their income on food.” Even though hunger is not as big of an issue in the U.S. as it is in many other countries, still one in five kids suffer from hunger in the U.S. With hunger already being an issue, the population rapidly on the rise, and the change in food preferences among

Steve Hopkins, at right, presents James Kean of Louisa County with the 2011 VCA Cattlemen of the Year Award. Also pictured are, from left, Kean's sons John and Brian and his wife, Kate. Photos by Jennifer Showalter striving countries, the world will need to produce 100 percent more food by 2050. Of this, 70 percent will have to come from efficiency-enhancing technologies because of the restraint on resources. “We are going to have to learn to produce more with less to make the food supply more affordable and to meet food and hunger demands,” said McClary. Technology contributes to a safe, affordable, and abundant food supply by ensuring three rights: food, choice, and sustainability. Food is a basic human right, choice is a consumer right, and sustainability is an environmental right. McClary shared how a research review of nearly 100,000 people in 26 countries showed that contrary to common believe, most people are not opposed to technology in food production. Dr. Richard Crowder at Virginia Tech reinforced much of what McClary went over and then went into the importance of exports to agriculture. Crowder stressed that trade is becoming more and more important and in order for U.S. agriculture to grow and be profitable, there has to be an increase in agricultural exports. “Exports alone are adding at least $200 per head to beef cattle right now. We wouldn’t see the prices we are seeing if it wasn’t for exports,” explained Crowder. Crowder made clear with the way things are unfolding and projected to unfold, there are huge opportunities for agriculture. Referring to such things as animal identification and traceability, Crowder reminded the audience, “If you are in a business were customers want something and competitors have it, you can’t try to get by without it.” McClary chimed in and agreed, “Customers are

always right! Instead of kicking and screaming, get on board and get it done.” Crowder reminded producers as they make changes to become more efficient and increase production to meet the world’s demand, they must not forget that volatility is not going away. “Risk management is going to be even more important,” said Crowder. The afternoon educational program gave producers hope that the strong cattle market is here to stay for at least a little while. Dr. Ron Plain of the University of Missouri provided some beef cattle industry updates to help cattlemen with future their plans. Charlie Garrison with South East Dairy Farmers provided an update on activities in Washington that are currently impacting agriculture. Record high cattle prices coupled with a positive outlook for future prices most certainly pumped spirits amongst the crowd. “Higher cattle prices always help everyone’s attitude and I probably saw more smiles on our folks’ faces than I ever have. Folks attending the educational programs should have gotten the message that cattle supplies in the U.S. will be short for the next four to seven years, while at the same time, the world’s population continues to desire more U.S. beef,” said Bill McKinnon, Executive Secretary of the Virginia Cattlemen’s Association. In addition to an impressive lineup of educational speakers, those who attended the Beef Industry Awards Banquet were treated with a visit from Congressman Bob Goodlatte. From the Farm bill, ethanol policy, national animal identification, to estate taxes, Goodlatte touched on a wide array of things that are relevant to today’s cattlemen. Dr.

Henry Poore, musician and story teller also entertained those at dinner. Several beef seedstock breeders put up $500 to $1,000 discount coupons on their bulls for auction along with a few nice cattle prints. This year’s sale grossed $15,125 with proceeds set aside to help kick off the VCA Public Policy and Advocacy Fund and support the Virginia Cattlemen’s Foundation. Awards Molly Elgin, an 18 year old senior at Orange County High School, was crowned the 2012 Dairy Princess. Elgin lives on her family’s dairy farm in Orange, VA, where they milk 185 cows three times a day. She is the fifth generation dairy farmer in her family. “I milk cows after school, feed calves, and Dad often calls me the ‘slack adjuster’, so I do whatever is needed,” said Elgin. When not in school or busy on the farm, Elgin is also involved with both the Orange Country 4-H Livestock and Dairy Clubs. She will be traveling to Australia this summer through the International 4-H Youth Exchange Program. “Being crowned the 2012 Virginia Dairy Princess is so exciting. I can represent not only my family, but many families across Virginia and our industry. I love knowing that our industry provides a nutritious and wholesome product for the world. I want the general public to understand that farmers work hard for our consumers. We want to provide the highest quality products possible,” said Elgin. The official ceremony for this year’s inductees into the Virginia Livestock Hall of Fame will be held this fall at the State Fair of Virginia, but both the dairy and beef industries were honored to recognize the 2012 inductees at their 2012 Virginia Beef Industry and

State Dairymen’s Convention and Trade Show. Reggie Reynolds; Ike Eller; Joe Fontenot; Bill McClure, J.E. Poore; the Brubaker Brothers, Galen, Emory, Dan, and Cine; and Fred Crittenden were thanked for their contributions to the Virginia livestock industries and congratulated for their induction into the Virginia Livestock Hall of Fame. Each year the Beef Cattle Improvement Association (BCIA) recognizes a few individuals and farms at the Virginia Beef Industry and State Dairymen’s Convention. This year Hounshell Farms in Wythe County was name the Virginia BCIA Seedstock Producer of the year, while Glenmary Farm, Tom and Kim Nixon in Orange County, was named Virginia BCIA’s Commercial Producer of the Year. Mike Henry proudly accepted the BCIA Service Award. The Virginia Cattlemen’s Association (VCA) presented the 2011 Martin F. Strate Industry Service Award to Gary Vance of Shenandoah County and the 2011 Allan K. Randolph Cattleman of the Year Award to James Kean of Louisa County. “I was very pleased with how the convention went. We had great crowds and the speakers did a great job educating our members about challenges and opportunities in our industry. The comment I heard the most was that people really enjoyed conversing with other producers from around the state. It’s a great opportunity for fellowship and to share ideas. We had great support from our industry sponsors and vendors which goes a long way to putting on a great convention,” said Eric Paulson, Executive Director of the Virginia State Dairymen’s Association.

Brittney Aker with the Dairy Herd Improvement Association talks with Ed Clar during the 2012 Virginia Beef Industry and State Dairymen’s Convention and Trade Show.


by Rebecca Long Chaney JEFFERSON, MD — Maryland Brown Swiss breeders recently gathered to celebrate special honors, leaders and youth. The breed’s annual banquet brought more than 80 Brown Swiss breeders and guests together to conduct business and honor Swiss breeders. Highlighting the evening was the tribute to the group’s president, Cindy Warner of Frederick, MD, and Vice President Dennis Smith of Woodsboro, MD, who retired from these positions after serving 19 years. Association member Bonnie Remsberg of Middletown, MD, who co-chaired the 2011 National Brown Swiss Convention with Warner praised both Smith and Warner for their commitment to the organization for nearly two decades. “It is indeed my pleasure and privilege to pay tribute to Cynthia Long Warner and Dennis Smith for their devotion and dedicated service to the Maryland Brown Swiss Association for 19 years,” Remsberg said. Remsberg said both Warner and Smith had a significant influence with the Brown Swiss breed in the show and sale ring on a state, national and international level. Cindy’s, and her late husband Bill’s breeding, Round Hill Acres, bred several All-American and Reserve AllAmerican Swiss and they also hold the record for highest selling Brown Swiss bred heifer at auction, commanding $40,000, according to Remsberg. Dennis and his family, Dublin-Hills, has bred numerous All-Americans and most recently Dublin-Hills Treats captured grand champion at

Maryland Brown Swiss President Cindy Warner, left, and Vice President Dennie Smith, were honored with a special tribute as the duo retired after 19 years of service. At right, Bonnie Remsberg, presents their retirment awards. Photos by Rebecca Long Chaney the 2011 International Brown Swiss Show at World Dairy Expo. Treats went on to be Grand Champion at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, Ontario. In her retiring message Warner reflected on 19 years of working with great cattle and great people in Maryland and around the country. She also paid tribute to her late husband Bill and her family for supporting her many endeavors with the Brown Swiss breed. “I truly enjoyed the time, energy and passion I gave to the association because it came back to me in many ways,” she said. “As Martha Stewart says, ‘It’s a good thing,’ And it was! Life is full of twists and turns — ever changing. And remember, time does not change us — it just unfolds us

and be not simply good, but be good for something. Thanks for all the memories.” Following the slideshow tribute to Warner and Smith, special awards were presented to members. Outgoing Maryland Swiss Miss Nicole Hood crowned the new 2012-13 Swiss Miss Cassidy Schirmer of Galena, MD. Hood, also the 2011-12 National Brown Swiss ambassador, gave a retiring message of her experiences the past year. Maryland Brown Swiss breeders were then presented with milk production awards. Winning the top production award for 20 cows or more went to Cletus and Janice Frey, Smithsburg, MD, with 23,576 Energy Corrected Milk (EMC) on 24 cows. Eric and Faith Burall, New Windsor, MD, were

Milk production awards were presented to, from left, seated, Erin Burall Mongold and Ed Fry. Standing are Heather Frey, Dennie Smith and Nichelle Upton. President Cindy Warner congratulates the winners.

second, and Dublin Hills, Woodsboro, MD, was third. Breeders with 19 cows or less cows — the production award went to Bob and Emmy Covell, Knoxville, MD, with 24,141 ECM on three cows. Fair Hill, Chestertown, MD, was second, and Shafton Swiss, Jefferson, MD, was third. The following were the winners in the individual awards: The Junior 2-year-old winner was Royal Colors Denver Taffy with 25,868 ECM pounds of milk owned by the Freys. The Senior 2-year-old topper was Dublin Hills Trixie with 29,168 ECM pounds of milk owned by Nichelle Upton, Woodsboro, MD. Ed Fry of Chestertown owns the Junior 3-year-old winner. She was Fair Hill PD Snowflake Twin with 27,676 ECM pounds of milk. Erin Burrall Mongold of New Windsor, MD, owned the Senior 3-year-old winner. She was Burlin Barton Wally with 27,087 ECM pounds of milk. The Freys also owned the 4year-old,Windy Springs Dyn Squirt, 29,164 ECM pounds of milk. The 5-year-old winner was Fair Hill Payoff Pride with 30,236 ECM pounds of milk and owned by Ed Fry. Upton owned the 6-year-old and over top producer, Dublin Hill Sasha, with 33,524 ECM pounds of milk. And Allen Smith of Woodsboro, MD, had the Lifetime winner (over 200,000 pounds of milk). She was Dublin Hills SJ Bambi with a lifetime record of 246,590 pounds of milk, 10,317 pounds of fat and 8,550 pounds of protein. Another highlight of the meeting were youth awards. Joseph Hubbard of Thurmont,

MD, was the junior record book winner and Josh Noffsinger of Frederick was second. In the intermediate division Riley Hoffman of Woodsboro was first; Grant Zimmerman of Walkersville was second and Joshua Hubbard, Jonathan Hubbard, and Kayla Lenhart, all of Thurmont, tied for third. The senior record book topper was Daniel Myers of Thurmont and Nicole Hood of Middletown came in second. Matthew Lenhart of Thurmont was third. Maryland Brown Swiss scholarships were presented to Daniel Myers, Jeffrey Hubbard, and Nicole Hood. Concluding the program was the election of officers. Scott Hood of Middletown was elected president while Jennifer Keilholtz Hill of Thurmont went in as vice president. Emmy Covell will continue as secretary as will treasurer Kathy Whitman of Mechanicsville. New directors selected included Dennis Smith, Cindy Warner, Brad Garst of New Windsor and Mrs. Mongold. Maryland once again posted another successful year throughout the state, but also had much success on the National level. According to outgoing president Warner, Maryland continues to make an impact and presence in the AllAmerican contest, the Bell Ringer contest, and the sales arena on a national level. Wrapping up the evening was a sales report on the upcoming Mid-Atlantic Brown Swiss Calf Sale on Saturday, April 21 at the Frederick Fairgrounds in Frederick, MD. For more information, contact, Cindy Warner at 301-6396887, or Dennis Smith at 301471-3215.

Maryland 4-H Brown Swiss record book winners, from left, seated, are, Joseph Hubbard, first junior; Riley Hoffman, first intermediate; Grant Zimmerman, second intermediate; and Kayla Lenhart, third intermediate. Standing are Matthew Lenhart, third senior; Nicole Hood, second senior; Daniel Myers, first senior; and Joshua and Jonathan Hubbard, tied for third, intermediate division.

Page 3 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Brown Swiss breeders honored, awards presented


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 4

Communicating about ag with the non-ag public by Sally Colby Farmers are becoming more and more aware of the importance of bridging the gap between those who grow, process and handle food and those who consume it. To address these concerns and encourage an open dialogue between farmers and consumers, the United States Farmers and Ranchers Alliance (USFRA) was formed. Rodger Wasson, president of his own agricultural consulting firm, represented USFRA and moderated a session on connecting with consumers at the Professional Crop Producers’ Conference held recently in Lancaster, PA. “I’ve never been as

concerned about what we’re facing in agriculture as I am now,” said Wasson, referring to consumers who are raising tough but legitimate questions. “We have to play this game differently, and that’s what U.S. Farmers and Ranchers is about. The point is to have all producers — organic, conventional, whatever — work together and move from a war on words to a conversation led by farmers and ranchers.” Wasson says that part of the problem is that most people don’t know or haven’t met a farmer other than perhaps at a farmers’ market. “They don’t have a grandma or grandpa back on the farm,” he said, “so

they’re drawn to stories about farming through what they read.” Wasson says that today, the image of a farmer is often that of someone who is industrialized, heartless, and out to make money. He also noted that a lot of consumer mistrust comes from disconnects in communication. “When we say our products are ‘safe’, what they (consumers) hear is that we aren’t really sure what the long-term effects are,” he said. But we don’t go after them (for thinking that). We need to say ‘I hear your concern’ and engage them without becoming defensive. What people doubt is when you claim to be farming perfectly

Cover photo by Jennifer Showalter From left, 2011 Virginia Dairy Princess Kendra Lester, 2012 Virginia Dairy Princess Molly Elgin, and 2011 Virginia Alternate Dairy Princess Esther Smith enjoy serving the dairy industry and being at the 2012 Virginia Beef Industry and State Dairymen’s Convention and Trade Show. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

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— nobody does it perfectly.” Through extensive research to determine perceptions about farming, USFRA found that many consumers think that farmers are tampering with nature. “People also think that although we say we’re a family farm, we’re being strung along by a processor who controls what we do, and that we take shortcuts when and if we can,” said Wasson. “If you’re more and more like a big business as they (the consumer) envision, it’s a big business they can’t trust. Big businesses try to make money, and if farmers can round the corners, they (consumers) suspect that you will. When we say that we’re trying to feed the world, consumers think ‘yeah, right’ — you’re trying to sell more to the world. They make that conversion.” Consumers also often believe that farmers are only looking for subsidies, lax regulations, and that farmers don’t know for sure what the long-term effects of pesticides, antibiotics and hormones. Wasson says research showed that while many people have favorable opinions about individual farmers and ranchers, those perceptions vary by state. And while consumers were generally positive about farmers, they aren’t as positive about farming itself, and there’s a general mistrust of modern agriculture. Wasson mentioned that the Iowa Corn Growers are considering taking down seed corn signs at the edges of fields because the non-ag public believes that those signs indicate who owns the farm. Although farmers know what the signs are for, consumers don’t, and that’s a misperception that should be addressed. When talking with consumers, Wasson says that instead of saying ‘we are producing more’, use terms such as ‘smarter use of resources’. “Our old arguments are falling flat,” he said. “We can’t communicate as if everything is perfect — we

Rodger Wasson explains some of the talking points that farmers and ranchers can use to communicate effectively with producers. Photo by Sally Colby

have to acknowledge that there’s always room for improvement. When you focus on improvements, you have to adjust what you say to who you’re visiting with and address the real concern.” Farmers should be aware that when they do make a connection with a consumer, anything that’s said can end up in someone’s blog or on a Facebook page. Wasson suggests farmers use the EASE approach when talking with people about ag: engage, acknowledge the concern, share, and earn trust. When asked a tough question, a good response might be, ‘I can see how that might worry you.’ “We’re creating confusion at all levels,” said Wasson. “Be authentic, give specific examples and talk about your own situation so people believe you as a farmer.” Wasson suggests that farmers talk about their own operation rather than the industry a whole, and noted that consumers

can tell if they’re being fed sound bites by farmers who have been media-trained. The infighting within agriculture must be stopped if farmers are to have an effective and positive message to consumers. Wasson suggests that farmers acknowledge various production methods for what they’re doing without denigrating others’ methods. “We can’t get defensive,” he said. “People turn off and stop listening. Many consumers have seen the ‘Learn About Your Food’ video series produced by USFRA and aired on Discovery Communications’ networks. These short clips feature farmers sitting down with consumers, discussing the agricultural community’s commitment to providing safe, healthy food choices. Farmers can learn more about USFRA and download videos from the ‘share’ section of the USFRA website at www.usfraonline.org/


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by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, Last month I talked about freshening problems, so this month I’d like to talk about preventing and treating calf problems. Good prevention for a calf starts when it is still inside the cow by feeding the cow correctly to help her immune system put antibodies into the developing colostrum. The colostrum will normally contain antibodies to germs that are found right on the farm. That is why you should NOT move cattle to your farm to give birth less than 2 weeks before calving since that’s about the time they need to create antibodies to the environment they are in. If you’ve had serious problems with young calf scours, you can help to boost antibodies in the colostrum to things like rota/corona virus, E.coli and Clostridium perfringens by vaccinating the dry cow with ScourGuard4KC® (two doses if it’s the first time ever, then once yearly thereafter). This has helped a lot of farmers in my experience. If white muscle disease has been a problem (weak calves that die in a day or two of birth), consider giving a dose of MuSe® to deliver high levels of vitamin and selenium. This should be done at about 2-3 weeks prior to calving. This will help against retained placentas and early lactation elevated somatic cell count. Once born, making sure the calf has gotten towards a gallon of colostrum

within the first few hours is critical (the sooner the better, always). This is the only source of antibodies that the calf will receive until it starts making its own which takes many weeks, so it is the most critical factor in ensuring normal response to challenges the calf will encounter in its environment. If for some reason the calf didn’t get any colostrum, another cow’s will do (though its own mom’s is the best) or even something like First Defense® boluses with measured amounts of antibody. Any source of colostrum must be given within the first 12-24 hours at the very latest as the gut will rapidly close in order to not allow germs into circulation. If a calf does get scours within the first 12 days of life, it is almost always due to rota/corona virus or E.coli bacteria. The first thing to do is to feed calves fluids more than twice a day since they will have bouts of diarrhea definitely more than just twice a day. Use about 2/3 the volume of a normal feeding, but feed 4 times a day, alternating between milk and electrolytes each time. A quick and handy homemade electrolyte mix consists of 1 gallon of water, 2 tsp. baking soda, 2 tsp. salt, and 8 tbsp. honey. If calves typically get scours by a certain day, try vaccinating the dry cows as discussed above and/or give the proven immune stimulant, Immunoboost®, 1cc under

Moo A6

Page 5 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

The Moo News


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 6

Moo from A5 the skin a day or two prior to “usual” outbreak time. If scours is still a problem, give a treatment dose of about 5075 cc PolySerum® or BoviSera® or Plasma Gold — all sources of antibodies against typical scours and pneumonia causing bugs that cattle commonly encounter. You can repeat the next day — these antibodies will slowly decline over 7-10 days. The best way to prevent baby calf problems is to run them at their mom’s side or other nurse cows, and preferably outside. If that’s not possible or desirable, keeping a calf with its mom for a week will at least allow for a healthy bonding to occur, yet not as strong and hard to break as keeping a calf with a cow until weaning. Keeping a calf with its mom allows vigorous nursing many times a day — this is good for both calf and mom. Why? The calf will take in many small meals instead of two large slugs which may cause digestive upset. This will also satisfy the calf’s urge to suck and therefore not potentially suck on pen mates. The cow will release natural oxytocin each time the calf bumps up to the udder to suck. This natural oxytocin release will help a first calf heifer to enjoy milk let down — and oxytocin release will help the uterus shrink down to normal size more quickly. Therefore, if you have a first calf heifer that won’t let her milk down, put a calf on her and it should help. If this is not possible, vigorously stimulate the cow’s teats and udder, even bumping up against it with your fist, just as a

calf does when it is searching for the teat (like those calves that bump up against you whenever they get a chance). That kind of physical interaction will give the brain a stronger signal to release oxytocin than just quickly washing the four teats and stripping out a few shots of milk. For the cow that hasn’t passed her placenta in the normal six hours, put her calf (or another calf) with her and let it suck as often as it wants. This will help the uterus to contract and push out the placenta instead of it sitting in there and putrefying like they tend to do. Dairy farmers that raise calves on cows often observe that there aren’t retained placenta problems anymore. I’m not certain how often beef cattle have retained placentas, but I doubt there is much due to beef calves running with their moms. By having calves with cows it’s allowing Mother Nature to take its course in a very positive way. Perhaps you’ll decide to try a small group of nurse cows and calves and see how it goes — I would guess that you will find that those calves will be pictures of health. If running calves with cows start with 3 calves per cow, but at about a month to a month and a half, drop back to 2 calves per cow as they do drink a lot. You still need to feed the cows well. Perhaps a good trial would be to keep a few calves with their moms for the first week and see how things go — again I will guess that the calves will get out of the starting gate wonderfully and retained placenta incidence will go

to near zero. One reminder: regardless of how you want to raise calves (hutches, indoor box stalls or on cows), never feed calves Johnes positive milk whether directly from a cow or in a bottle. Also, once calves are put outside (individual hutches, group hutches or with cows) do not bring them back inside until they’re ready to freshen. Why? Stale barn air is very difficult on an animal’s system, especially if they have internal parasites weakening them or their immune system is weak-

ened simply due to the natural stress of calving. The intranasal vaccines (TSV-2®, Nasalgen®, and Inforce 3®) are all excellent at preventing respiratory disease/shipping fever and should be given about 3-4 days prior to mixing animals or in conditions without the freshest air. It is with calves raised as Mother Nature would that it’s truly easiest to see robust health — put some calves on cows this coming season and observe this for yourself.

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Dairy farmers need improved safety net sooner, not later, says NMPF The National Milk Producers Federation’s (NMPF) Board of Directors supported a resolution March 13 urging Congress to pass a Farm Bill in 2012, one that contains an improved safety net for farmers in the form of the Dairy Security Act. The resolution, passed unanimously by the NMPF Board at its spring meeting, made it clear that the organization does not support any approach in Congress that would extend current farm programs by another year, and delay the creation of a better dairy program.

“Kicking the can down the road into 2013, where the farm bill is concerned, is neither good politics, nor good policy,” said Randy Mooney, Chairman of NMPF and a dairy farmer from Rogersville, MO. “The tough choices about budget priorities won’t be any easier next year. But more to the point, dairy farmers need a better program than what we have right now. A farm bill extension in 2012 doesn’t do us any good.” Mooney said he was encouraged that leaders in both the Senate and House Agriculture Committees have recently expressed hope that each chamber can complete work on a bill prior to the summer. NMPF has worked since 2009 to formulate a comprehensive economic safety net that is based on margins, rather than just the farm level price of milk. After developing its own proposal, Foundation for the Future, NMPF worked with Reps. Collin Peterson (D-MN) and Mike Simpson (R-ID) to encapsulate those concepts into H.R. 3062, the Dairy Security Act. “At some point, we have to hold Congress accountable for providing a stable safety net

going forward,” Mooney said. “We’ve seen prices drop significantly in the first quarter of 2012, and margins are again compressed, even as farmers are struggling to recover from the severe losses in 2009.” The full text of the NMPF Farm Bill resolution reads: WHEREAS, the NMPF Board of Directors recognizes that lower milk prices and higher feed costs are likely to result in significantly reduced operating margins for dairy producers across the country in 2012, and WHEREAS, the NMPF Board of Directors also recognizes the ineffectiveness of current federal programs designed to help protect the livelihood of dairy producers, as witnessed during the catastrophic margins of 2009, it is: RESOLVED, that the United States Congress be urged to pass a new Farm Bill as soon as possible that includes the provisions of the Dairy Security Act, and it is further RESOLVED, that the NMPF Board of Directors does not support an extension of the current Farm Bill and urges Congress to enact the Dairy Security Act if a Farm Bill is not enacted in 2012.

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Showcase your farm’s dedication to demonstrating the industry’s ethical principles as it relates to the environment by applying to be a 2012 Environmental Steward. The Pork Checkoff and National Hog Farmer magazine annually recognize up to four U.S. pork production operations of all types and sizes that demonstrate a positive commitment to environmental stewardship. Nominations should focus on one single production site or farm. Applications and nominations are welcome from pork producers, operation managers and other industry-related professionals. The application form is available on pork.org. A national selection committee selects the award winners following a review of: • General production information • Manure/nutrient management • Soil conservation management • Water conservation management • Air quality management • Wildlife habitat management • Neighbor and community relations efforts • An essay on the meaning of environmental stewardship For more information, contact Allan Stokes at AStokes@pork.org or 515-223-3447 or Mike King at MKing@pork.org or 515-223-3532. Source: Pork Leader Feb. 23

Page 7 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

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NMPF Board of Directors backs resolution urging passage of Farm Bill in 2012


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 8

U.S. Ayrshire winter news The Ayrshire Breeders’ Association ended the 2011 calendar year on a positive note. Registrations were up 8 percent, transfers were up nearly 3 percent and net assets for the year were positive. A budget for 2012 was approved allowing for new projects while projecting a positive year -end balance. Increased travel throughout the year by staff and directors will be done to target areas where field service will be beneficial. Breeders are encouraged to contact the ABA if assistance with registration and transfer work would be helpful. An update was made for animal identification. Animals born after June 1, 2012, that are identified with American ID tags must have two forms of identification: ie two tags or one tag with an official tattoo. Animals that are 75 percent Ayrshire or less will be registered at the rate of $7.50. This change in registration fees was done to encourage greater participation in registry. The Board of Directors has worked to stress the importance of increasing production and greater profitability over the past several years. The first step was the implementation of an improved cow performance index and production type index. The next focus has been to increase education and awareness of young sires available

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through A.I. The ABA is also working to assist A.I., as much as possible, to find a variety of pedigrees with increased production potential. The Directors recently approved a program to offer a registration incentive for young sire daughters. For every in-tact, readable unit of semen turned into the ABA for bulls born before 1990, the ABA will provide a $3 credit for registrations submitted from March 1, 2012 through March 1, 2013 on current A.I. young sire daughters. Another action was taken to increase the focus on increased production for the breed. Beginning in 2013, the unfresh fall yearling class will be eliminated from ABA national shows and the All-American contest. The discussion for this change was focused on profitability and increased production. Animals in this class are two years old by the time they show in national shows and many are often not bred. The Board of Directors approved the following slate of candidates for the 2012 elections: Region 1 – Richard Caverly, Benton, ME and Dale Maulfair, Jonestown, PA Region 2 – Neal Smith, Smyrna, TN and Mark Valentine, Thurmont, MD Region 3 – Jessica Gatton Dixon, Conway, MO and Darryl Keehner, Guttenberg, Iowa At Large - Pamella Jeffrey, Wakefield, RI

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for Dairy Excellence along with other partners in agriculture. Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, Alltech, Land O’Lakes Inc. and the Pennsylvania Beef Council will join the center to host the forums in Chambersburg, Franklin County, and Brickerville, Lancaster County. “Animal care and handling is critical to the quality of our products and the well-being of our dairy operations,” said John Frey, executive director of the center. “These forums train dairy employees on proper care and handling techniques on the farm.” The forums will feature two components: a classroom session beginning at 8:30 a.m. and handson instruction from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at a nearby farm. During the opening session, Drs. Ernest Hovingh and David Wolfgang from the Penn State Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences will review the fundamentals of animal care, the correlation between animal care and profitability and tools needed to provide proper animal care on the farm. Upon arriving at the farm, local veterinarians will lead the group through a physical examination of the dairy herd. In Brickerville, the examination will be led by Dr. Terri Coon from Agricultural Veterinary

Associations. Dr. Cory Myers from Mid-Maryland Veterinary Clinic will lead the Chambersburg session. Following lunch, forum participants will join in breakout sessions on downed cow care and management, euthanasia and necropsy, animal movement techniques and body condition, locomotion and hygiene scores, conducted by Hovingh and Wolfgang and Justin Potts of Land O’Lakes. Forum locations are: Monday, March 26 — Classroom session at the Church of God, 2230 Grand Point Road, Chambersburg, PA; hands-on instruction at Burk-lea Farms, owned and operated by the Burkholder family, 3099 Grand Point Road, Chambersburg, PA. Wednesday, March 28 — Classroom session at Brickerville House Restaurant, 2 East 28th Division Highway, Lititz, PA; hands-on instruction at Old Pike Dairy, owned by Dale Wine and Elvin Risser, 125 Sleepy Hollow Road, Lititz, PA. To register, visit www.centerfordairyexcellence.org and click on “Cow-Side Forums” under “News and Events” on the homepage. The advance registration deadline is March 21. For more information, contact the center at 717-346-0849 or info@centerfordairyexcellence.org.

Page 9 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Cow-side forums offer hands on learning for dairy herd managers, employees


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 10

New report on New Zealand’s dairy export monopoly highlights U.S. concerns about expanding U.S.-New Zealand dairy trade The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) said that a new report on the anti-competitive practices pervasive in the New Zealand dairy industry highlights why the U.S. dairy farmer sector is so concerned with including U.S.-New Zealand dairy trade in a potential Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade agreement (FTA). The issue is one that NMPF has addressed through its comments to the Obama Administration on TPP, including in its 2010 testimony to the U.S. International Trade Commission. NMPF applauded the new report’s effort to shed more light on this critical concern. The report in question was prepared by the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) and provided confidentially to the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office and the U.S. Department of Agriculture

(a summary of the report is available online). The accompanying letter notes that New Zealand’s largest company has been provided special privileges by the government that enable it to maintain a roughly 90 percent market share of the milk produced in New Zealand. This advantageous position has given this single dairy company direct control of more than one third of world dairy trade, without even accounting for the additional sales controlled through its many production and distributor relationships around the world. NMPF has been strongly supportive of the overall TPP negotiations, working to pursue favorable opportunities where they exist for U.S. dairy producers. NMPF has identified the possible future inclusion of dairy negotiations with Japan and Canada as

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being among the most significant new openings TPP could ultimately offer, although it is not yet clear if or when those countries will join TPP and under what terms. However, NMPF has been equally clear about dairy producers’ continued vehement opposition to any expansion of U.S.New Zealand dairy trade as part of that effort, given New Zealand’s dairy market concentration and its dominating firm’s tremendous global market power. NMPF has estimated that U.S. dairy farmers could face $20 billion in losses during the first decade of the FTA if U.S. dairy tariffs are fully eliminated for New Zealand’s benefit. “New Zealand’s gov-

ernment and dairy industry have been teaming up to spend considerable resources in courting members of the U.S. Congress on the TPP, but our representatives need to keep in mind the harsh realities of the global dairy industry, where trade is dominated by one company,” said Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. “And that dominion has been facilitated by New Zealand’s policy of granting a market concentration exemption to a single company, allowing it to sway both internal and external dairy markets.” Kozak said that in addition to NMPF’s support for TPP talks, the organization has also been

supportive of the vast majority of past U.S. trade agreements, which have led to important gains that benefit U.S. dairy producers. NMPF’s position with respect to U.S.-New Zealand dairy trade is in keeping with a commitment to address not only tariff barriers to U.S. dairy sales, but also major non-tariff measures that negatively impact the U.S.’s ability to fairly compete both at home and abroad. NMPF will continue to

work with USDEC in asking Trade Representative Ron Kirk, other trade officials in the Obama Administration, and members of Congress, to insist on the importance of expanding U.S. exports and facilitating trade. It will continue to oppose any expansion of U.S.-New Zealand dairy trade under TPP, given the very troubling dynamics that persist in that country’s dairy industry.


by Kevin McCray Some 44 percent of the U.S. population depends on groundwater, the water that fills cracks and other openings in beds of rock and sand, for its drinking water supply — be it from either a public source or private well. In rural areas, the number is about 96 percent. That

fact alone justifies the need for National Groundwater Awareness Week which was held March 11-17. But groundwater is important to us in many other ways, as well. Groundwater provides much of the flow of many streams; often lakes and streams are

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serves to be at least 33,000 trillion gallons — equal to the amount discharged into the Gulf of Mexico by the Mississippi River in the past 200 years. The U.S. uses 79.6 billion gallons per day of fresh groundwater for public supply, private supply, irrigation, livestock, manufacturing, mining, thermoelectric power and other purposes. Groundwater is tapped through wells placed in water-bearing soils and rocks beneath the surface of the Earth. There are nearly 15.9 million of these wells serving households, cities, business and agriculture every day. Wells are constructed by the 8,100 contracting firms employing nearly 45,000 people dedicated to providing and protecting our nation’s groundwater supplies. Irrigation accounts for

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation the largest use of groundwater in the United States, about 67.2 percent of all the groundwater pumped each day. Some 53.5 billion gallons of groundwater are used daily for agricultural irrigation from more than 407,913 wells. Irrigation is a major reason for the abundance of fresh produce and grains that we all enjoy. One ton of groundwater used by industry generates an estimated $14,000 worth of output. These facts help us connect with the important role we each play as stewards, or protectors, of groundwater. Fortunately, there are simple steps that will help protect groundwater and the well systems that distribute it. Always use licensed or certified water well

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drillers and pump installers when a well is constructed or serviced, or when the pump is installed or serviced. Keep hazardous materials away from any well. Never dump such materials, motor oil, or anything else that could impact water quality onto the land surface, into a hole or pit, or into a surface water supply. These tips and more are available from state groundwater or water well associations, NGWA, county agricultural Extension agents or state government agencies with responsibility for groundwater. Visit www.wellowner.org to learn more. Kevin McCray is the executive director of the National Ground Water Association.

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Page 11 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Groundwater: out of sight, but not out of mind


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 12

Top-performing bulls to sell at PA Livestock Evaluation Center PENNSYLVANIA FURNACE, PA — Beef producers have an opportunity to buy some of the best genetics in the northeast during a cattle sale at Pennsylvania’s Livestock Evaluation Center in Pennsylvania Furnace, Centre County, Friday, March 30 at noon. Top-gaining performance-tested bulls will be sold at the annual Performance-Tested Bull Sale. Bulls enrolled in the program will have completed a 112-day test evaluating average daily gain, weight per day of age, feed efficiency, loin muscle size and fat deposition. All bulls will be given a breeding soundness exam and be selected for sale based on their performance in both components. There are currently 138 bulls on test representing six beef breeds including Angus, Hereford, Limousin, Red Angus, Simmental and Angus-Simmental crossbred, consigned by producers from Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York and New Jersey. The fastest gaining bull at 84 days on test is an Angus, consigned by Monte Nisewander of Greencastle, Franklin County. This GAR EGL Protege son has gained 6.29 pounds per day on test. The second fastest gaining bull on test is a Connealy Final Product Angus consignment by Corne Vogelaar, Far Hills, NJ, gaining 6.02 pounds per day on test. The Angus bulls on test averaged 4.72 pounds per

day of gain at 84 days. Leading the 33 Simmental bulls on test is a GW Lucky Dice son consigned by Caitlin Wolfgang of Middletown, Dauphin County, gaining 5.68 pounds per day. Following this bull, with 5.4 pounds per day of gain, is a Triple C Majic Man son consigned by Woodview Simmentals of Blairsville, Indiana County. The Simmentals on test are averaging 4.59 pounds per day of gain. Eight Red Angus bulls are currently on test, led by a Country Acres Glance son consigned by Gabe Zepp of New Windsor, MD, that is gaining 4.77 pounds per day. Second-fastest gaining is a PIE Advantage son consigned by Ryan Colteryahn of Prospect, Butler County, gaining 4.48 pounds per day. A Hereford consigned by Roy and Susan Smith of East Greenville, Montgomery County, leads the nine Herefords on test. The SHF RibEye son is gaining 5.38 pounds per day. The Limousin bull consigned by Jonah Broughton of Attica, NY, a RUNL Wrojo son, is gaining 3.95 pounds per day and two Angus-Simmental crossbred bulls from Tom Hamm of Allenwood, Union County, are averaging 4.66 pounds per day of gain. The bull sale is part of the Pennsylvania Beef Expo. Other expo events at the center will include a Simmental breeding cattle sale and a trade show organized by the Pennsylvania Cattle-

men’s Association. For more information about Pennsylvania’s performance testing programs and sales or facilities for hosting livestock events, contact Greg Hubbard at

814-238-2527 or ghubbard@pa.gov or visit www.livestockevaluationcenter.com. For information about the beef expo, visit http://pacattle.org.

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Page 13 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 14

County dairy promotion programs are accepting dairy princess and promoter applications STEWAR TSTOWN, PA — Dairy promotion committees throughout Pennsylvania are seeking dairy princess candidates to participate in county pageants held April 15 through June 15. Any single woman between 16-24 years of age by July 1, whose parents or guardians are engaged in dairy farming, or are employed in a dairy related industry is eligible to compete for the county dairy princess title. A young woman is also eligible if she, herself, is employed in a dairy related industry or is the owner or leaser of at least one head of dairy cattle of the seven major dairy breeds in a bona fide 4-H or FFA project. Contestants must reside in Pennsylvania, have no children and not marry or become pregnant during her reign. Each dairy princess will serve the dairy industry of their county/region for one year. She will make many appearances at schools, fairs, and grocery stores and have the opportunity to speak to civic clubs, senior citizen groups, farm and nonfarm audiences and to appear on television and

radio. Those young ladies selected as dairy princess will represent their county/region at the PDPPS Training Seminar held in July and at the State Pageant held in September. Young women and men interested in dairy promotion can participate in the program by becoming involved as a junior representative. The junior representative program is a complimentary program that functions within a county to assist the dairy princess in carrying out her duties and to educate and train future princess candidates and promoters. Or, it is a program which functions in its own right when there is no princess serving within a county. There will be no competition for junior representatives at the state level. Anyone interested in entering in their local dairy princess contest or serving as a junior representative can find county committee contacts online at www.padairy.org. or contact Jessica Armacost to receive information regarding their local promotion program. Jessica can be contacted at 717-599-4363 or Jessica@padairy.org.

Above are the contestants who participated in the 2011 State Dairy Princess Pageant.


HARRISBURG, PA — The Center for Dairy Excellence and the Penn State Extension Dairy Team will host the next series of Dairy PROS meetings in April, offering dairy industry professionals the opportunity to gather new ideas and shared insight to benefit their dairy farm customers. With milk prices falling nearly $4 per hundredweight since their high in the fall, the April Dairy PROS meetings will address “Dairy Markets and Risk Management.” Katie Krupa from Rice Dairy LLC, Tim Beck from Penn State Extension Dairy Team and Alan Zepp from the Center for Dairy Excellence will of-

fer a look at what has happened in the dairy commodity markets and strategies dairy farm families can use to protect their profits in the next 12 months. “Historically, dairy price markets have functioned on a three-year cycle, and 2012 is the final year in that cycle,” said Zepp, who is the risk management program coordinator of the Center for Dairy Excellence. “As cow numbers grow and exports wane, the milk price has become more volatile, forcing all dairy farm families to consider risk management as an option for protecting their profits.”

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Held in a roundtable setting, the meetings will give participants the opportunity to share what they are seeing in their respective regions and to gather information from each other that they can take back to benefit their dairy farm customers and clients. Also part of the meeting, the “Take It to the Farm” section will include a look at Penn State’s “Managing Milk Margins” spreadsheet. A complement to “Take It to the Farm,” which is a 30-minute segment of Dairy PROS when the Penn State Extension Dairy Team highlights tools the dairy professionals can offer to their dairy clients, the “Top 10 in Dairy” segment presented by the Center for Dairy Excellence will highlight the 10 key issues affecting dairy farms right at that very moment. Meeting dates and locations are listed below. All meetings will be from 89:30 a.m., with breakfast at 7:30 a.m. • Friday, April 20, at the Farm and Home Center, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster, Lancaster County; • Tuesday, April 24, at the AgChoice Farm Credit office, 109 Farm Credit Drive, Chambersburg, Franklin County; • Wednesday, April 25, at Celebration Hall, 2280 Commercial Boulevard, State College, Centre County; and • Thursday, April 26, at King’s Restaurant, 1920 Leesburg Road, Grove City, Mercer County. The cost of Dairy PROS meetings is partially offset by a grant from the De-

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partment of Labor & Industry’s Workforce Investment Board. A new approach to registering for Dairy PROS offers an incentive to companies that support the center’s Allies for Advancement Program. If an organization is a supporter of the Allies for Advancement Program at any level above $250, any member of the organization can attend the Dairy PROS meetings at no charge. If the organization is not an Ally for Advancement, each member from that organization who attends the Dairy PROS meetings will be charged a $20 registration fee. For more information or to register for the April series of Dairy PROS meetings, visit www.centerfordairyexcellence.org and click on the “Dairy PROS” icon in the middle of the page. Questions about the Dairy PROS meeting series can be referred to Penn State Extension Dairy Team at 888373-7232 or askdairyalliance@ psu.edu, or to the Center for Dairy Excellence at 717-346-0849 or info@centerfordairyexcellence.org.

Page 15 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

April Dairy PROS addresses price risk strategies on the farm


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 16

The Milk Isn’t As “Green” on the “Udder” Side of the Fence Issued Mar. 10, 2012 California milk producers are not happy with the prices they’re receiving for their milk especially when compared with their Federal order (FO) neighbors. For the second time in three months, California producers asked the California Department of Food & Agriculture (CDFA) to amend the state milk marketing order’s Class 4b milk price formula. A petition requesting a hearing was filed March 2, by Western United Dairymen (WUD) but several producer groups representing nearly 80 percent of California’s milk supply support the action. At the heart of the issue is the disparity in how whey is valued in federal market orders and California’s State market order formulas. That whey value factors into the price paid to farmers for milk used in cheese production. In the FO, that’s considered Class III milk and in California, it’s Class 4b milk. Dairy Profit Weekly

(DPR) reports that FO order formulas attempt to capture the full value of whey in determining the milk price paid to producers. As the result of a hearing held last summer, CDFA modified the Class 4b whey factor, from a permanent 25 cents per cwt. to an adjustable rate between 25 and 65 cents. However, demand for whey has driven values above the 65 cent cap, resulting in a growing disparity in FO and California cheese milk prices, which I have regularly reported here. Case in point; the February 2012 FO Class III price was $16.06 per cwt. The California 4b price was $13.42, $2.64 below the FO price. Since September 2011, the FO Class III averaged $18.01 per cwt. while California’s 4b price averaged just $15.35, according to DPW. The Milk Producers Council’s Rob Vandenheuvel wrote in his March 2 newsletter; “This is just the latest evidence of a disturbing and outrageous trend.” He said California’s 4b price has trailed the FO Class III price by an average $2.66 per cwt.

since the new formula was put in place in September 2011. California dairy farmers have sold more than 1.4 billion pounds of milk per month in that time period to cheese plants and those plants have “enjoyed a discount, courtesy of CDFA, of more than $37 million per month on milk they’ve bought the past six months and more than $220 million since September.” That, he said, is “di-

rectly at the expense of the roughly 1,700 dairy farmers who desperately need all the revenue available in order to operate in this high-cost environment of dairy farming.” He added; “This is about a government-mandated discounting of milk that could be the difference between individual dairies surviving or having to close down.” “It’s about a fleecing of the California dairy families that appears to be in di-

rect conflict with the California law that states that our prices need to be in a “reasonable and sound economic relationship with the national value of manufactured milk products.” Meanwhile; milk continues to run into the churn and the dryer across the U.S. January butter production hit a whopping 181 million pounds, up 14.9 million pounds or 9 percent from December and 14.2 million or 8 1/2 percent

above January 2011, according to USDA’s latest Dairy Products report. Nonfat dry milk output totaled 152.9 million pounds, up 1.8 percent from December and 30.6 percent more than a year ago. American type cheese, at 370.6 million pounds, was up slightly from December and 3.1 percent above a year ago. Total cheese output hit 912.3 million, down 1.9 percent

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from December but 2.9 percent above a year ago. Cash cheese prices saw another week of strength the week of March 5, with the blocks closing that Friday at $1.4925 per pound, up 1 1/4-cents on the week but 52 1/4-cents below a year ago. The barrels closed at $1.5025, up 2 1/4-cents on the week and 46 1/4-cents below a year ago. Nine cars of block traded hands on the week and seven of barrel. The NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price fell to $1.4873, down 0.7 cent, while the barrels averaged $1.5066, down 0.8 cent. Plentiful milk supplies

are resulting in increased manufacturing of cheese, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. Seasonal cheese plants in the Southeast are being utilized to assist in handling of milk supplies that would typically have ended up in the Midwest. Butter closed March 9 at $1.45, unchanged on the week but 67 cents below a year ago. No butter was sold. NASS butter averaged $1.4242, up a half cent. Churning schedules remain heavy in all regions with cream supplies available and clearing to churns. There has been an uptick in cream

utilization in higherclass products such as cream cheese, sour cream, dips, and similar items, as orders are prepared for upcoming retail and foodservice needs for the Easter and Passover holidays. Trade sources indicate that the current butter price is working better for featuring print butter at retail versus the price ($2.02) a year ago. Manufacturers are making and clearing 82 percent butter for export needs and cream demand is appearing from ice cream manufacturers on a limited scale. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk dropped 2 cents

on the week, closing at $1.2675. Extra Grade was also down 2 and closed at $1.2575. NASS powder averaged $1.3647, down 0.3 cent, and dry whey averaged 60.59 cents, down a half-cent. The Agriculture Department raised its 2012 milk production estimate again in this month’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report. Milk cow numbers were raised as herds are increasing more rapidly than expected, USDA said, and while herds are expected to decline from 2011 in the second half of the year, the rate will be less than

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previously expected. Mild weather in the early part of the year is also supporting higher levels of milk production. USDA now projects 2012 output to hit 199.7 billion pounds, up 700 million from last month’s estimate, and compares to 196.2 billion in 2011. Price forecasts for cheese, butter, nonfat dry milk, and whey were lowered, based on increased milk output and milk price forecasts were reduced. Look for the 2012 Class III price to average $16.35-$16.95 per cwt., down from $16.70$17.40 predicted a month ago, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. The Class IV will average $15.85-$16.55, down from the $16.25-$17.05 expected last month, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. Checking demand; 2011 dairy product commercial disappearance totaled 198.4 billion pounds, 1.5 percent above the same period in 2010. Butter was up 10.9 percent; American cheese, up 0.6 percent; other cheese, up 4.2 percent; nonfat dry milk was down 3.4 percent; and fluid milk products were off 1.8 percent. The January 2012 Consumer Price Index for all food is 232.7, up 4.4 percent from January 2011. The dairy products index is 220.5, up 9 percent. Fresh whole milk was up 10 percent; cheese, up 10.3 percent; and butter was up 2.2 percent. Speaking of dairy demand; the growing Greek yogurt industry in the Northeast may lead to a shortage of milk, according to leaders of New York-based Dairylea Coop. DPW’s Dave Natzke reported in his Friday DairyLine program that

the growing yogurt phenomenon could use up to 6 percent of the raw milk production in New England and surrounding states in 2012, according to Dairylea CEO Greg Wickham. He adds that milk production growth in the region has largely been stagnant, and with construction and growth of both yogurt and some cheese plants, more milk is needed. Long-term prospects for increased global dairy demand, especially in China, India and other emerging economies, are also promising. “Current price trends indicate a tough year for dairy farmers in 2012,” Natzke concluded, “But yogurt and global demand point to a more bullish outlook in the years ahead.” The March 6 CME Daily Dairy Report (DDR) points out that: “Since July 2008, the New Zealand-based Global Dairy Trade (GDT) auction has become an indicator of global spot prices for dairy products, much like the CME spot trading sessions are used to gauge spot prices for domestic products. The latest GDT auction shows declines in many protein based products (skim milk powder, milk protein concentrate and Casein) while fat based product, anhydrous milkfat, was up 3.7 percent and whole milk powder came in near unchanged at 0.3 percent. FC Stone’s March 7 eDairy Insider Opening Bell echoes some of that sentiment and reports that dairy commodity prices out of the Netherlands were also lower, compared to the previous week: butter fell 7 Euros, skim milk powder was down 5 Euros, and

Mielke A18

Page 17 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Mielke from A16


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 18

Mielke from A17 whey fell 2 Euros. “There continues to be an erosion of dairy commodity prices across the world,” says FC Stone dairy economist Bill Brooks. On a brighter note; Jerry Dryer wrote in his March 3 Dairy and Food Market Analyst, “While the (US) dairy category has grown significantly in recent years, it is nowhere near its full potential.” “The US market for dairy is growing, but remains largely untapped,” a spokesperson for PepsiCo told FoodNavigator-USA recently. As reported earlier, PepsiCo and Theo Müller, a major European yogurt maker, have formed a joint venture and are building a USA facility in Batavia, NY. The PepsiCO spokesman predicted that Greek yogurt will be the key volume driver for the next two or three years, but other products that com-

bine dairy with fruits and grains offer huge potential and products will be introduced into the USA market before the plant is completed in 2013. Meanwhile; a Rabobank report, “Global Beverage Outlook 2012”, said “strong global consumer demand for health and wellness beverages is leading to a greater convergence of soft drinks and dairy beverages.” Speaking of exports; Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted 24 requests for export assistance this week to sell 1.8 million pounds of cheese and 5 million pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Central America, the Middle East and North Africa. The product will be delivered through July and put 2012 CWT cheese exports to 28.7 million pounds plus 28 million of butter to 17 countries.

Back at home; milk production is strong and processors in many areas are focusing on clearing intakes from traditional suppliers and turning away requests for processing outside milk, according to USDA. Cream supplies are still heavy due to strong milk production but with increasing production of dips, whipping cream, ice cream mix and hard ice cream, the pressure is easing on churns and fewer loads of cream are migrating to other regions to find processing. Milk production in New Zealand

and Australia continues to outpace year ago levels and processing plants are working to handle it. New Zealand production trends continue to remain at high levels seasonally; yet at volumes below recent peak output. Weather has been and remains favorable for milk output. Ditto for Australia. The recent trends of milk production being higher than year ago levels and the total year output ranging from 2-4 percent higher for the season continues to take shape, according to USDA.

47


by Nancy Glazier Johne’s disease can affect any ruminant, though most prevalent in dairy cows. Jackson Wright, dairy specialist with the team, wrote in May’s issue about controlling Johne’s on the dairy. From his article, the disease is an intestinal infection caused by Mycobacterium avium sub-

species paratuberculosis, or MAP. MAP is a bacterium that primarily affects the latter portion of the small intestine (known as the ileum) of ruminants. Once ingested, intestinal mucosal cells absorb the bacteria initiating an immune response. This results in inflammation and thickening of the intestinal

Series 5 Silage Cart

lining and decreased nutrient absorption. Symptoms of Johne’s disease include weight loss despite good appetite, decreased milk production, diarrhea, and death. The real danger of Johne’s disease is due to the “iceberg” effect. For every clinical case of Johne’s in a herd, there can be 15 to 25 animals subclinically infected. Onset of clinical signs may be as early as two years of age if a massive exposure occurs close to birth. Digestive tract insults from clostridium

laden silages, mycotoxins, chronic acidosis and Salmonella infections may act to potentiate MAP infections creating more and younger clinical cases than the level of infection would predict. The “iceberg” of Johne’s steals profits through reduced production, increased secondary diseases, culled animals, and increased feed costs. MAP is shed in manure and can survive (but not multiply) in the environment for many years. Manure spread on pasture

land appears to be more of a concern than cow patties from carrier animals. Plant contamination is topical, not systemic. For the organism to reproduce and multiply, it needs a live host. Another means of transmission is through milk. A third route is in utero: a fetus may acquire the infection from its infected dam even before it hits the ground. In both modes of transmission, youngstock are the most susceptible to infection. Since there is no cure, prevention is critical. It

is present in about 68 percent of dairies, 8 percent in beef herds; however, the monitoring of Johne’s in beef herds is much more casual than in dairy. I am aware of three beef herds that have had it. The first step is to assess whether your flock or herd is at risk. The National Johne’s Education Initiative website (www.johnesdisease.org) has lots of information for all species of livestock. Source: Ag Focus, February 2012

Dairy producers reminded of MILC program

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The Delaware Farm Service Agency would like to remind dairy producers of some important program eligibility requirements for payment under the Milk Income Loss Contract program (MILC). FSA State Executive Director Bob Walls says dairy prices may authorize potential MILC payments, but all

dairy producers need to be aware of the program requirements should those conditions arise. Dairy operators currently enrolled in MILC, need to notify the local county office if there have been any changes to their dairy operation. If a payment rate is announced, dairy producers enrolled in the MILC

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program will need to provide the local county office with documentation showing the eligible milk production and commercial milk marketing for the months with a MILC payment rate in effect. When producers enroll in MILC, a payment start month is selected. This month remains the same through all program years, unless a change is requested by the dairy. Dairy producers are allowed to change their start month an unlimited number of times

throughout their enrollment in MILC, provided that the changes are requested timely. MILC program participants are also required to comply with FSA’s Adjusted Gross Income requirements each fiscal year. This certification, on a CCC-931, must be completed prior to a payment being disbursed. New dairies that have not previously participated in the MILC program will need to fill out the CCC-580, Milk Income Loss Contract.

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Page 19 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Johne’s Disease – not just a dairy problem


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 20

Calf-Tel expands innovative calf-housing product line Three new products complement existing line-up of products Hampel Animal Care announces the addition of three new innovative products. AirMax, a new Maternity pen and a new calf hutch front door join the growing list of quality products provided by Hampel Animal Care. For decades, Calf-Tel has set the standard for superior durability and efficiency, making your investment in calf housing systems one that grows with each generation of calves it protects, says Joe Weber, marketing manager, Hampel Corporation. These three new innovative products continue to deliver on our promise of providing quality calf housing to todays’ dairymen. AirMax The new AirMax by Calf-Tel features a nearly full-open back, which provides more ventilation than any other modular plastic pen system. This industry first will enhance calf comfort and long-term health. The innovative, new AirMax features a molded-in, sturdy wire screen that significantly increases ventilation. A cover that slides easily into place for added warmth in extreme cold weather conditions comes standard. • Benefits of the new system include: • Provides more ventilation than any

other pen system • Increases calf comfort and longterm health • Fits on existing Calf-Tel pen system • Rugged steel wire screen durable and long lasting • Cover included for extreme cold conditions New Calf-Tel front door The new Calf-Tel Front Door allows you to easily close off the front of your hutches. This new feature is great for extreme cold, heavy snow or any other time you want to secure the front of your hutches to protect your calves. • Rugged same high density polyethylene plastic used on all Calf-Tel products. • Easy to use simply slide the l-rods to open or close the door. • Fits Calf-Tel Pro, Deluxe, Pro II and Deluxe II hutches. • Secures to fence for greater flexibility. Maternity pen Calf-Tel introduces the new 4’x4’ Maternity Pen. This brand new pen provides added flexibility for short-term calf housing. The Maternity Pen takes up less space than full size pens making it a space- and cost saving solution for your maternity housing needs. • Compatible with the existing Calf-

Tel Pen front. • Durable and long lasting — same rugged design and construction. • Modular construction and assembly. • Easy to set up, configure, expand and sanitize. • Lightweight and simple to move requires only one person.

Hampel Animal Care, a division of Hampel Corporation, began serving the agriculture industry in 1981 with the introduction of Calf-Tel housing systems. Today it is the number one choice for calf housing, worldwide. For more information, visit www.Calf-Tel.com.

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TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

COREY FOSTER RIDGE FARM DAVID A SMITH M&M'S DAIRY JERRY W. CRAWFORD FOGLEMAN DAIRY ROBERT NUTTER & MICHAEL STROWD JAFRAL HOLSTEINS GEORGE SMITH BEN SHELTON MYERS FARMS INC NATHAN SOUTHER MCCAINS DAIRY MARK JOHNSON STEPSTONE HOLSTEINS INC GRAYHOUSE FARMS SHUMAKER DAIRY, INC. BUTTKE DAIRY CROSS CREEK DAIRY A D & CARLTON WILLIARD ENGLISH DAIRY FARM, LLC HOLLAND FARMS OF OLIN,LLC MAPLE RIDGE FARM INC. GLADDEN'S DAIRY GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON GREEN VALLEY FARM, LLC SAM GALPHIN BLAN BOTTOMLEY TED AND ALAN MOORE TALLEY-HO FARM WAYNE P STOUT DAVIS CASHATT EAKER DAIRY AUBREY N WELLS CARL & CLAYTON SMITH COLTRANE FARM WRIGHT DAIRY MACGIBBON FARMS JEFF CORNWELL ALLENS DAIRY SAMUEL J. FLOWE LYNCHS DAIRY INC BEVILLE BROTHERS DAIRY DARRELL WRIGHT J NORMAN RIDDLE DONALD PAYNE S & L RIVERSIDE DAIRY LLC PENDRYS DAIRY FARM

TOWN (3X)

CLEVELAND NC RANDLEMAN NC LEXINGTON NC (3X) STATESVILLE NC (3X) CHAPEL HILL NC (3X) LIBERTY NC (3X) HILLSBOROUGH NC (3X) HAMPTONVILLE NC LEXINGTON NC (3X) OLIN NC (3X) UNION GROVE NC (3X) UNION GROVE NC (3X) SOPHIA NC (3X) STATESVILLE NC BLANCH NC STONY POINT NC (3X) BLANCH NC RANDLEMAN NC HURDLE MILLS NC GRAHAM NC MARION NC OLIN NC MT. AIRY NC (3X) VALE NC CROUSE NC (3X) RANDLEMAN NC (3X) DURHAM NC ENNICE NC (3X) HURDLE MILLS NC OLIN NC STONY POINT NC RANDLEMAN NC CHERRYVILLE NC LEICESTER NC ENNICE NC PLEASANT GARDEN NC (3X) REIDSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC LAWNDALE NC ASHEBORO NC MIDLAND NC MAIDEN NC REIDSVILLE NC FRANKLINVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC TAYLORSVILLE NC VALE NC BOONVILLE NC

R TEST A MTH N K

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

94.1 90.0 89.1 88.8 88.0 87.6 87.3 86.6 86.5 85.9 85.5 85.4 84.1 82.9 81.0 80.1 79.8 79.8 79.6 79.5 79.4 79.1 78.5 77.4 76.9 76.6 75.9 75.3 75.3 74.8 74.4 73.7 73.4 73.3 72.5 72.5 72.5 71.8 71.7 71.4 69.8 69.4 69.2 69.1 69.0 68.9 68.8 68.8

155 174 181 170 162 173 156 212 200 146 147 162 182 162 148 179 150 148 200 166 146 120 209 205 165 159 171 241 205 159 172 152 164 186 226 198 173 136 154 188 153 207 228 164 138 199 157 163

26527 23448 25236 27568 21502 26341 25709 31424 23600 25716 28548 24684 23832 22789 22659 22452 23034 25706 24419 22293 22488 26866 . 20742 20333 22593 . 25085 21863 21818 21623 . 21668 22605 21151 19436 20610 19596 20489 20140 21324 20567 20476 18041 15767 20110 21921 20970

3.3 3.4 3.5 3.9 3.6 3.8 3.7 4.1 3.8 4.0 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.8 3.6 4.0 3.7 3.3 . 3.8 3.8 4.2 . 3.9 4.2 3.9 3.7 . 3.6 3.3 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.4 3.7 3.5 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.6

880 802 882 1071 774 1000 951 1302 897 1028 1014 922 860 806 872 827 898 980 870 890 826 878 . 785 764 949 . 973 915 849 800 . 773 740 720 741 777 717 775 771 723 758 707 705 584 717 850 758

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 2.9 2.8 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.2 3.0 2.9 . 3.2 3.1 3.1 . 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 . 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 0.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.0

817 724 767 804 668 789 763 971 735 751 787 717 708 N 687 699 678 701 758 751 706 684 787 . 654 626 709 . 753 672 680 676 . 678 705 639 578 649 582 626 616 630 47 646 556 484 585 699 632

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

STEVE AND ALLEN JOINES MANCO FARM INC. CARLAND DAIRY CHARLES CURRIN DAIRY GEORGE L PLESS AND SONS WILLIAM H DAY JR SHELLY J SMITH BOBBY & ALVIN EVANS CALDWELL OVERCASH PROCTOR DAIRY RANDY DOUGLAS COVINGTONS DAIRY FARM LINDLEY DAIRY INC T C WILLIAMS JOHN HAMPTON OAKMERE FARM STAMEY FARMS ANDERS FARM KATHY SHAMBLEY

SPARTA NC PITTSBORO NC MILLS RIVER NC OXFORD NC ROCKWELL NC OXFORD NC NORWOOD NC SPARTA NC KANNAPOLIS NC BESSEMER CITY NC HAMPTONVILLE NC MEBANE NC SNOW CAMP NC UNION GROVE NC SPARTA NC BROWNS SUMMIT NC STATESVILLE NC ENNICE NC HILLSBOROUGH NC

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

68.1 67.8 66.8 66.0 65.8 65.8 65.8 64.8 64.1 63.8 63.8 63.7 63.6 63.6 63.5 63.5 62.8 62.5 61.8

194 172 175 188 191 163 189 212 179 192 163 145 186 173 125 184 102 179 191

22272 18458 20424 19289 20495 19582 19138 19407 15269 19837 19182 17671 17383 19398 19276 19411 19307 18929 18890

3.7 4.0 3.8 3.8 3.5 3.7 3.6 . 3.5 3.2 3.4 3.8 4.0 3.5 3.4 3.8 3.6 3.4 3.9

815 740 782 729 712 729 694 . 538 627 647 668 688 685 653 737 694 637 739

3.0 3.3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 . 3.1 2.8 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2

678 600 624 591 630 593 603 . 466 563 590 568 574 605 594 605 592 580 600

GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON GREEN VALLEY FARM, LLC TALLEY-HO FARM BRUSH CREEK SWISS FARMS AUBREY N WELLS TREASURE CHEST JERSEYS CARLAND DAIRY LUCKY L JERSEY COREY LUTZ CALDWELL OVERCASH T C WILLIAMS SHADY BROOK FARM COY + WANDA REESE ATT. LENNIE BREEZE TREASURE CHEST JERSEYS RIVERSIDE DAIRY FARM WAYNE AND KAREN LUTZ SHADY BROOK FARM CHAPMAN DAIRY SHADY BROOK FARM SHADY BROOK FARM KARRIMONT FARM RAY & LINDA ELMORE G W BELL GRANT WALTERS ATT. ANNA G. AMORIELLO HARRY WELLS CHAPEL HILL CREAMERY

CROUSE NC (3X) RANDLEMAN NC (3X) OLIN NC SILER CITY NC (3X) LEICESTER NC LINCOLNTON NC MILLS RIVER NC STATESVILLE NC LINCOLNTON NC KANNAPOLIS NC UNION GROVE NC STATESVILLE NC TAYLORSVILLE NC GREENSBORO NC LINCOLNTON NC GIBSONVILLE NC MOCKSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC TAYLORSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC MOCKSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC KINGS MOUNTAIN NC CHINA GROVE NC GIBSONVILLE NC CLOVER NC CHAPEL HILL NC

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

76.9 76.6 74.8 73.9 73.3 68.2 66.8 64.5 64.3 64.1 63.6 62.9 60.7 59.1 56.2 56.0 53.4 52.7 52.0 51.3 51.3 49.6 49.3 48.8 46.9 41.7 40.9 35.0

165 159 159 190 186 168 175 168 152 179 173 164 177 237 150 147 192 180 188 149 130 146 159 218 166 193 160 204

20333 22593 21818 21860 22605 20439 20424 19414 17136 15269 19398 17082 17138 16703 15913 16146 17364 13662 15347 14662 13889 16643 14112 15300 13976 13504 12434 12202

3.8 4.2 3.9 4.1 3.3 3.8 3.8 4.3 4.7 3.5 3.5 4.0 4.4 3.9 4.3 3.9 4.8 4.4 4.4 4.6 4.8 4.8 4.5 4.8 4.4 4.1 4.8 4.7

764 949 849 899 740 783 782 828 809 538 685 690 750 646 682 635 840 604 678 668 663 797 640 727 617 551 593 573

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.4 3.6 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.6 3.3 3.5 3.1 3.6 3.4 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.2 3.5 3.3 3.6 3.6

626 709 680 722 705 645 624 656 619 466 605 565 619 546 551 507 619 471 543 512 506 586 510 487 490 440 453 438

NORTH CAROLINA COLOR BREEDS

X X X B X X X J J X X X J X J X J J J J J J J X J X J J


UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — Natural-gas development appears to be associated with falling dairy production in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale region, but the exact reasons for the decline are unclear, according to researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. In recent years, anecdotal evidence has suggested that natural-gas development is benefiting

many Pennsylvania farmers, with money from gas leases and royalties allowing producers to pay off debt, invest in new equipment and remain active in a business often characterized by razorthin profit margins. Still other reports have indicated that some farmers are using gasrelated income to make major changes to their operations or to leave agriculture altogether.

However, very little data exists to measure the true impact of naturalgas development on agriculture in the state. To get a better picture of how the natural-gas boom is affecting Pennsylvania’s top agricultural sector, dairy farming, researchers led by Timothy Kelsey, professor of agricultural economics, examined county-level changes in dairy cattle numbers and milk pro-

duction between 2007 and 2010, as reported by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Those data were analyzed in connection to the level of natural-gas drilling activity in each county, as indicated by Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection statistics on the number of wells drilled during the same three-year period. “Changes in dairy cow

numbers seem to be associated with the level of drilling activity,” said Kelsey. “For instance, counties with 150 or more Marcellus Shale wells on average experienced a nearly 19 percent decrease in dairy cows, compared to only a 1.2 percent average decrease in counties with no Marcellus wells.” Milk production followed a similar trend, according to Kelsey. “Production in counties with at least 150 Marcellus wells fell by an average of 18.5 percent,” he said. “In contrast, milk production in counties with no Marcellus wells increased by about 1 percent.” For example, in Bradford County — which had more than 500 drilled Marcellus wells and ranked sixth in the state in dairy production — cow numbers and milk production both fell more than 18 percent during the period. On the other hand, Chester County, the fifth-ranked

county in dairy production, had no Marcellus activity and saw cow numbers and milk production rise by 7.4 and 9.3 percent, respectively. Overall, the report states, only two of the 19 counties with 10 or more Marcellus wells had an increase in cow numbers or milk production between 2007 and 2010. Meanwhile, 15 of the 33 counties with no Marcellus activity experienced an increase in cattle numbers or milk production. Kelsey pointed out that county-level declines did not necessarily have a major effect on statewide production numbers, since much of Pennsylvania’s agricultural activity takes place in the ridgeand-valley regions of the state, rather than in the Marcellus Shale region on the Allegheny Plateau. “Only two of the top 10 agricultural counties as measured by sales have Marcellus Shale beneath

Marcellus A23

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ELDER SALES & SERVICE INC. 4488 Greenville-Sandy Lake Rd. Stoneboro, PA 724-376-3740

ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT 3662 Buffalo St., Box 215 Alexander, NY 585-591-2955

MAINE KRAMERS INC. 2400 W River Rd. Sidney, ME 207-547-3345

CATSKILL TRACTOR INC. 384 Center St. Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

JD 6320 80 PTO HP, 5683 Hrs., Power Quad, L.H. Reverser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,900

JD 6410 4x4, Loader, Cab, Power Quad, JD 5045E 4x4, Loader, 298 Hrs., 45HP $23,900 Also: 5065E 377 Hrs., 4x4, Ldr . . . . .$26,900 L.H. Reverser, 2700 Hrs. . . . . . . .$42,500

SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 Sharon Springs, NY 518-284-2346 CNY FARM SUPPLY 3865 US Route 11 Cortland, NY 13045 607-218-0200 www.cnyfarmsupply.com

JD 6200 Power quad, 5,000 hrs, JD 620 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,900

JD 5525, 4x4, Loader, 1300 Hrs., L.H. Reverser, Power Quad . . . . . . . .$36,900

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540-896-7148

Page 21 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Marcellus Shale activity affecting county-level dairy production


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 22

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

ADAMS

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PENNSYLVANIA

SPUNGOLD HOLSTEINS KEHOLTZ DAIRY KEHOLTZ DAIRY HILCREST DAIRY CIRCLE CREEK HOL. STEVE & CHRISTINE WOOD LADD S. MUMMERT APPLE VALLEY CREAMERY FARVIEW HOLSTEINS KENNETH WENGER

DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

103.9 40.0 397.9 279.2 153.9 53.3 181.7 63.6 61.7 239.6

24635 1001 4.1 780 3.2 23739 912 3.8 729 3.1 3X 22999 891 3.9 708 3.1 3X 22964 845 3.7 703 3.1 21954 781 3.6 675 3.1 20654 845 4.1 665 3.2 21056 764 3.6 641 3.0 20118 759 3.8 633 3.1 20477 759 3.7 628 3.1 17961 748 4.2 558 3.1

SCOTT BOWSER SHIREY FARM RON & BETH RUFFANER SHANMAR JERSEYS R.FREEHLING SILVER BROOK FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H J H H

84.0 247.0 40.7 350.5 95.1 43.2

23439 22605 22497 16600 18021 16311

BONZO ONEOONE BREEZE RIDGE CRAIG FARMS BREEZE RIDGE NYE FARMS FISCHERS WINDY RIDGE DIANE BURRY

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H B H J J

39.1 31.6 106.8 54.7 131.4 40.9 18.9

27903 1055 3.8 852 3.1 21639 763 3.5 668 3.1 21229 828 3.9 665 3.1 19593 767 3.9 650 3.3 21597 807 3.7 641 3.0 17704 831 4.7 639 3.6 14508 676 4.7 526 3.6

DEVON MARTIN RAY D MOWRY & SONS

DHI-AP H 61.2 DHIR-AP X 40.4

21894 17108

CARL Z GOOD DHI-AP H 85.5 DON & AMY RICE DHI-AP H 106.2 MELVIN M OBERHOLTZER DHI-AP H 121.7 TULPACANAL FARM DHI-AP H 130.7 EARL R HAFER & SONS DHI-APCS H 225.1 ALLEN P+MARY J GRUBE DHI H 62.4 LARRY GRUMBINE DHI-AP H 64.1 ROCKYCREST HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 38.7 E&N SHAYNAH KEE DHI-AP H 71.9 GARY & KATHY HEFFNER DHI-AP H 79.7 MICHAEL FORRY DHI-AP H 103.2 MIL JOY FARMS DHI-AP H 241.7 UNITED HEARTS HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 117.9 CURVIN MARTIN DHI-AP H 81.8 SKYLINE ACRES INC. DHI-APCS H 580.1 SCATTERED ACRES INC DHI-APCS H 332.8 DAVIEW FARM DHIRAPCS H 66.6 SUNRISE FARM DHI-AP H 39.1 LLEWELLYN MOYER DHI-AP H 111.9 SHOW TOP FARMS DHI H 173.7 LUKE & LORI TROUTMAN DHI-AP H 63.3 MARTIN & MISSY MOYER DHI-AP H 44.3 MISTY MOOR HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 78.3 DANA & DEBBIE STOUDT DHI-AP H 62.7 RODGER WAGNER DHI-AP H 206.4 ARDOUNIE FARM INC. DHI-AP H 132.7 MICHAEL HAAG DHI-AP H 86.5 CURVIN MARTIN DHI-AP H 76.1 WHISTLING ACRES DHI-AP H 48.8 GLENN A DAVIS DHI-AP H 74.6 NORTHKILL CREEK FARM DHI-AP X 125.6 KIRBYVILLE HOLSTEINS DHIR H 97.9 SUNNYSIDE DAIRY FARM DHI-AP H 203.2 JAMES P. & JAN M. ADAM DHI-APCS H 186.0 CEDAR CREEK DAIRY LLC. DHI-AP H 109.3 BARRY+BARBARA GOOD DHI-AP H 87.6 WALNUTRIDGE HOLSTEIN DHI-AP H 57.6 ONE HILL FARM MOYER DHIR-AP B 29.5 WAY HAR FARMS DHI-AP H 88.8 MARK A KIEFFER DHI-AP H 67.7

29329 30166 29537 27987 27636 26805 26154 26339 25872 25110 24819 24741 25592 24904 24537 25654 24296 24653 25175 23524 24377 25018 25084 24185 23706 23877 24020 24209 23442 22914 23604 22414 23695 22680 23416 22673 22498 22020 21909 21904

CLOVER WILL FARMS

DHI-AP H 192.7

24238

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H

85.0 57.2 67.8 210.1 73.2 95.4

30079 1038 3.5 936 3.1 24134 828 3.4 747 3.1 23278 898 3.9 701 3.0 21588 852 3.9 683 3.2 3X 18969 683 3.6 582 3.1 18558 733 3.9 569 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H J H H H

278.9 211.4 164.9 121.5 101.5 216.2 243.3 17.0 116.6 73.6 118.0

26398 26084 25232 22240 23025 22676 22577 18682 21066 18283 17031

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS

H H H H H H H H

191.9 80.9 802.2 87.2 158.7 148.5 50.0 204.4

28215 997 3.5 860 3.0 29547 1108 3.7 857 2.9 28190 973 3.5 848 3.0 28948 1017 3.5 817 2.8 26525 1071 4.0 806 3.0 26323 918 3.5 776 2.9 24725 878 3.6 773 3.1 23717 902 3.8 745 3.1

ARMSTRONG

BEAVER

BEDFORD BERKS

BLAIR

BUCKS

DEB & RAY DETWEILER BRENDA & JIMMY HARRIS MARWELL DAIRY FARM ROY + ART SHULL WO BO FARMS TOM + SUE HALDEMAN

CAMBRIA

DAVID MYERS RALPH J LIEB BRENT LOWMASTER BILL HOOVER MARTIN SHERRY VALEWOOD DAIRY STRITTMATTER DAIRY DAVID MYERS RON HOOVER RONALD HOGUE BORLIE'S DAIRY

CHESTER

ROBERT + BETTY PEIFER ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER WALMOORE HOLSTEINS ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER NOLAN&NORI KING NEAL & LOU KING DAVID F KING FARM #2 MARSHAK DAIRY -NBC-

847 816 774 807 609 659

3.6 3.6 3.4 4.9 3.4 4.0

721 682 668 598 557 502

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.1 3.1

806 3.7 681 3.1 638 3.7 545 3.2 1087 1055 1011 1013 934 990 857 934 889 877 928 869 919 893 895 922 804 959 890 914 868 865 951 906 915 821 880 878 887 918 784 852 822 797 840 888 862 858 782 851

3.7 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.4 3.7 3.3 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.3 3.9 3.5 3.9 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.8 4.0 3.3 3.8 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.9

920 900 891 844 842 817 809 802 772 770 769 768 767 762 762 760 759 757 754 753 743 740 736 734 730 729 725 724 724 723 719 717 711 711 706 699 697 696 690 686

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1

3X 3X 3X

3.5 3.3 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.9 3.7 4.5 3.6 3.7 3.7

836 784 772 700 699 688 684 672 653 569 515

MARK &MELODY STOLTZFUS AMOS LAPP CENTURY OAK FARM HERBETH FARMS EVERGREEN FARM AMOS J STOLTZFUS RIDGE STAR FARM HOLLY SOLLENBERGER

3X 3X 3X 3X

3X 3X 3X 3X

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

840 857 918 832 776 773 604 615

3.6 3.8 4.0 3.7 3.9 3.9 3.7 3.9

NEALAND FARMS DHI-AP BRYMESSER FARMS DHI-APCS SMITHDALE FARMS DHI-AP JETRAE FARM DHI-AP MARLIN & ADAMAE ZIMMERMAN DHI-AP CURTIS WEAVER DHI-APCS STOVER FARMS DHI-APCS TRIPLE L FARM DHI-APCS MARCUS GOOD DHI-AP SILVER HILL FARM DHI-AP DORELL & BEV AGAR DHI-AP JOHN STAMY DHI-AP WESTYLE HOLSTEINS DHI-AP BERKHEIMER FARMS DHI-AP J&S DAIRY DHI-AP HARRY & PAUL HOCH DHI-APCS LIGHTNING BOLT FARM DHI-AP HENSEL HILL FARM DHI-AP DAVE AND DOUG LEHMAN DHI-AP TIM WITTER DHI-AP K HALE & L WENGER DHI-AP HARRY E THOMPSON DHIR-AP HARPER HERSEY + SONS DHI-AP DAVID R WALTON DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H X H H H H H H H

387.7 257.9 64.6 93.1 55.7 150.6 176.7 152.2 92.3 69.7 29.9 358.1 125.1 156.7 65.0 273.7 35.3 81.9 94.3 135.1 29.5 51.8 190.1 68.7

30511 1041 3.4 903 3.0 3X 28628 1033 3.6 897 3.1 26089 975 3.7 808 3.1 24370 967 4.0 785 3.2 24579 911 3.7 782 3.2 24849 931 3.7 765 3.1 24223 894 3.7 760 3.1 25533 941 3.7 747 2.9 3X 24029 873 3.6 739 3.1 21841 831 3.8 689 3.2 22936 846 3.7 688 3.0 21574 770 3.6 679 3.1 21436 812 3.8 666 3.1 21075 792 3.8 646 3.1 19803 736 3.7 632 3.2 19982 755 3.8 625 3.1 3X 17840 766 4.3 617 3.5 19624 783 4.0 613 3.1 20028 725 3.6 609 3.0 18922 682 3.6 604 3.2 19591 751 3.8 586 3.0 18846 622 3.3 580 3.1 18073 663 3.7 577 3.2 17226 608 3.5 548 3.2

TY & TRACY LONG LEHMANSTEAD FARMS BOB KESSLER PLEASANT HILL FARMS STONEY LAWN FARMS J MELVIN BRANDT

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI

H H H H H H

114.4 169.7 50.2 52.2 132.2 68.5

24183 872 3.6 736 3.0 22735 837 3.7 724 3.2 23748 1032 4.3 720 3.0 21384 764 3.6 658 3.1 20270 660 3.3 632 3.1 18653 676 3.6 580 3.1

ORR FARMS ORR FARMS ALLEN HILL DAIRY JACKSON FARMS STARLIGHT HILL FARM FERENS FARM LLC GARY THOMAS FERENS FARM LLC

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H H H A

108.0 66.4 123.5 145.5 39.7 101.2 95.6 20.4

23894 21437 21544 21666 20389 20308 17941 17559

CUMBERLAND

DAUPHIN

FULTON

DHI-AP H 497.1

MOWRER FARMS BILL & KAROL WINGERT LOCUST LANE FARMS GLOBE RUN FARMS EVERGREEN FARMS INC WILLOW BEHRER FARMS TIMOTHY R PEACHEY WILLOW BEHRER FARMS LITTLE J RANCH BILL & KAREN DAVIS LOST HOLLOW FARM DIAMOND VALLEY FARM IRVIN G MARTIN LUZERNE FARM TERRY ALLISON LAKEVALE AYRE FARM TOM & GLORIA COFFMAN HERON RUN FARMS HAWN CREST FARMS N&N FARMS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

BLOSSOM HOLLOW FARM LARRY H MARSHALL JERRY NESBIT PLEASANT VIEW FARMS DAN L. HANCOCK NEHRIG FARM JEWART DAIRY BERKEYS DAIRY FARM GLEN HENRY AND SONS DARYL&DEL BRUBAKER TUSCARORA RUN HLSTNS MYRON+MARY GEHMAN GRAYBILL, DAVID J.SCOTT LANDIS RUSSELL ADAMIRE JR MICHAEL W BEAVER JOEL & SARA MILLS MARCUS J ZOOK CHARLES & TAMMY KLINE BARRY E+BARB A LUCAS B. C. + E. BRUBAKER RUSSELL J DRESSLER ANTHONY HEIMBACH KENT MABEN COCOLAMUS FARM MARLIN CHARLTON TIMOTHY E LAUVER CENTERVIEW FARM ANDREW B.SWARTZ G V FARMS

JUNIATA

889 849 793 801 806 776 643 708

3.7 4.0 3.7 3.7 4.0 3.8 3.6 4.0

713 697 690 690 632 623 519 516

758 709 693 688 653 610 552 528

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.3

LANCASTER

3.2 3X 3.3 3X 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0

30175 1218 4.0 929 3.1 3X

H 361.9 H 754.0 H 466.1 H 112.4 H 2786.5 H 698.7 H 91.3 H 112.9 H 87.9 H 166.9 H 117.6 H 90.4 H 84.0 H 447.2 H 85.6 H 62.3 H 179.9 H 174.2 H 77.5 H 42.3

28461 27379 27059 25912 26842 25927 24383 24846 23937 23046 22294 22481 22197 22349 20053 21325 20920 19366 17934 16080

1046 1096 1002 1021 1009 1045 957 977 858 980 809 829 760 840 772 797 792 672 712 638

3.7 4.0 3.7 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.9 3.6 4.3 3.6 3.7 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.5 4.0 4.0

863 846 842 817 803 792 758 757 752 728 714 699 661 658 658 657 655 582 577 507

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.3 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X H

62.0 48.2 103.4 234.2 114.1 101.0 229.6 48.6

25737 23173 22207 22464 21577 21018 19831 19312

945 967 969 771 743 749 768 705

3.7 4.2 4.4 3.4 3.4 3.6 3.9 3.7

797 700 697 682 670 646 625 580

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0

DHIR DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

52.5 98.1 101.6 342.0 65.1 64.5 87.2 22.9 110.4 76.7 80.2 134.0 70.3 84.6 68.7 60.7 42.1 75.0 40.4 118.0 57.4 119.4

26653 26423 25834 25123 24664 24736 23311 24027 23961 24044 24268 23049 23134 23599 23034 21968 21338 21643 20629 21172 20715 19712

996 972 989 882 912 866 908 902 895 898 831 861 793 855 868 792 755 798 806 793 759 740

3.7 3.7 3.8 3.5 3.7 3.5 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.4 3.7 3.4 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.5 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.8

821 807 777 763 758 755 748 742 742 737 731 730 718 707 704 676 666 666 657 651 650 629

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER ROBERT A MILLER BRIAN & KAREN DIFFENDERFER E MARLENE PEOPLES GLENN D. LAUVER DARRON SHEARER# ZIMMERMAN BROS TUSCVU FARMS

23068 22571 22836 22713 20007 20014 16534 15856

INDIANA

3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.1 3.1 3.0

RHA MILK

77.0 52.8 79.6 62.0 133.8 60.7 49.0 37.2

HUNTINGTON

3X

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H X

CREEK VALLEY FARMS

3X

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

FAYETTE

950 3.9 763 3.1 3X

925 864 946 778 828 877 844 838 758 677 622

HERD OWNER

Top 40 Herds For February

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H

55.3 49.9 109.0 31.3 71.6 89.0 26.0

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

19838 19432 19497 17706 17523 16682 16553

763 735 728 623 679 677 654

3.8 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.9 4.1 4.0

614 601 598 556 551 544 511

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1

STAR ROCK FARMS DHIRAPCS LLOYD M REIFF DHI-AP SCATTERED ACRES REINHOLDS DHI-APCS RAYMOND H GOOD DHI-APCS TRUDALE FARM DHI-AP JAY & ANNETTE STOLTZFUS DHI-AP HERMAN COOK DHI-APCS MEGASTAR HOLSTEINS DHI-APCS HERMAN COOK DHI-APCS

H 1399.4 H 58.0 H 629.3 H 275.7 X 31.7 H 133.5 H 80.0 H 56.3 J 26.5

28545 1063 3.7 875 3.1 3X 25076 898 3.6 742 3.0 24500 889 3.6 741 3.0 3X 23241 821 3.5 706 3.0 3X 21195 812 3.8 696 3.3 19873 706 3.6 606 3.0 18774 646 3.4 566 3.0 17723 644 3.6 538 3.0 15290 710 4.6 537 3.5

BRANDT VIEW FARM EARL RAY & CAROL MARTIN LITTLE HILL FARM LEON E. MARTIN LITTLE HILL FARM DALE+PATTIE MAULFAIR RUPLAND HOLSTEINS GARY LENTZ KEVIN & ALLISON SELLERS ADAM LIGHT KENDRA MASE DEW MIST HOLSTEINS PHILHAVEN FARM MILE EE FARM KIRBY L HORST B & L HOSTETTER MARTIN RIDGE FARM CURVIN+DAWN GOOD DALE HOSTETTER & SON LEROY WISE BRUCE BOLLINGER&FAMILY JAY W GOOD BARRY HOSTETTER CARISTONE FARM, LLC K & M SELLERS MARK M. HOOVER WHITE BIRCH FARM JERE BRUBAKER ZIM LEA HOLSTEINS DONALD C KRALL RUPLAND HOLSTEINS RICREY HOLSTEINS DALE BURKHOLDER MUSSER RIDGE FARM REID K HOOVER ROBERT & SHERRY BASHORE BRUCE R HEILINGER JOHN + SHARON KLINE HARLAN GOOD CLIFFORD+FAY BERGER#

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H

115.9 92.8 55.4 66.5 37.1 59.6 118.8 82.1 66.9 118.0 59.4 106.8 91.7 203.4 46.7 115.7 106.1 118.8 85.2 136.4 78.6 127.9 64.2 268.1 64.4 45.6 138.8 132.9 85.4 67.3 109.5 124.1 61.6 143.1 218.1 33.8 81.4 123.9 75.8 68.0

32845 30733 30737 27587 25822 26977 27165 26371 25373 25589 25750 25730 25425 25401 25071 26066 24279 24861 24004 24627 24485 24499 24009 23486 23838 24363 24537 24099 23570 23101 24129 23394 23819 23955 23324 23008 23383 23398 23052 23348

MELVIN&JUDY PEACHEY LOWELL J PEACHEY KISH VIEW FARM DAVID C YODER DAVID T HOSTETLER RAMOND & ROSE KAUFFMAN DAVID J & RUTH PEACHEY AMMON FARMS ROBERT & LISA PEACHEY FORGY DAIRY RODERICK KAUFFMAN ROBERT L KAUFFMAN LEE AND JOANNE YODER STEPHEN P KANAGY RAYMOND S HOSTETLER VERNAN HOLSTEINS SHAWN & EMILY YODER FROG MEADOW FARM MICHAEL P YODER JESSE L SPICHER JOHN SPICHER G SHELDON PEACHEY MARK & VERNA PEACHEY PAUL NEER LOREN K. YODER JOHN & SALOMA BYLER VALLEY VIEW FARM SAM K KAUFFMAN PEACHVIEW FARM DALE I KING TITUS R PEACHEY A FRED KING ELWOOD H STITT CAS STEAD FARMS DARVIN RENNINGER JAMES L HOSTETTER CLARK N. PEACHEY CAS STEAD FARM2 REED GAP FARMS NATHAN & EUNICE YODER

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H

55.2 60.6 406.8 78.8 55.9 86.7 54.1 92.8 86.5 150.6 114.2 48.8 59.6 56.9 61.8 68.1 99.1 64.4 143.4 39.8 77.9 118.4 100.1 27.2 112.0 84.9 75.9 81.6 120.7 47.8 96.3 67.0 37.7 197.0 63.4 31.9 70.2 17.9 69.8 72.0

29436 1109 3.8 896 3.0 3X 27635 982 3.6 846 3.1 3X 27662 960 3.5 828 3.0 3X 25913 979 3.8 827 3.2 25605 948 3.7 801 3.1 25502 949 3.7 783 3.1 24335 870 3.6 766 3.1 24408 921 3.8 757 3.1 24699 904 3.7 756 3.1 23838 927 3.9 754 3.2 24284 890 3.7 748 3.1 24138 846 3.5 745 3.1 23058 903 3.9 743 3.2 24563 881 3.6 735 3.0 23746 898 3.8 731 3.1 23966 885 3.7 729 3.0 23839 870 3.6 726 3.0 23234 878 3.8 716 3.1 23496 871 3.7 712 3.0 22733 883 3.9 712 3.1 22758 877 3.9 709 3.1 22781 911 4.0 705 3.1 23041 861 3.7 705 3.1 23043 879 3.8 704 3.1 23103 838 3.6 694 3.0 22504 849 3.8 694 3.1 21490 787 3.7 693 3.2 22353 837 3.7 686 3.1 21730 818 3.8 680 3.1 22474 801 3.6 678 3.0 22270 841 3.8 676 3.0 22033 792 3.6 669 3.0 21475 744 3.5 665 3.1 21522 776 3.6 664 3.1 21474 871 4.1 663 3.1 21109 812 3.8 661 3.1 21779 796 3.7 654 3.0 21114 635 3.0 641 3.0 19764 734 3.7 625 3.2 19809 743 3.8 623 3.1

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

99.4 38.3 110.5 60.4 33.5

28969 1004 3.5 869 3.0 22868 886 3.9 708 3.1 22577 820 3.6 693 3.1 19724 773 3.9 599 3.0 18696 730 3.9 597 3.2

LEBANON

MIFFLIN

MONTGOMERY MERRYMEAD FARM RUSSELL GUNTZ ROY S KOLB & SONS MARK SCHMIDT MERRILL MEST

1173 1135 1105 970 1031 956 934 928 980 1014 891 934 870 916 933 974 911 920 891 883 857 880 903 852 893 862 894 821 875 842 857 790 867 808 829 819 800 826 778 788

3.6 3.7 3.6 3.5 4.0 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.9 4.0 3.5 3.6 3.4 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.4 3.6 3.4 3.6 3.6 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.4

997 923 919 848 838 827 825 808 806 796 795 788 785 783 779 779 772 757 754 754 754 752 749 744 743 739 738 735 734 726 726 721 721 720 718 709 708 707 702 698

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

3X 3X 3X

3X

3X

3X

3X


them,” he said. “The six counties with the most Marcellus wells together account for about 5 per-

cent of all agricultural production, while the 33 counties with no wells account for 79

LANCASTER COUNTY, PA TOP 40 HERDS FOR FEBRUARY BRD

MILK 3X

FURNACE HILL HOLSTEINS DELAWARE VAL COLLEGE SPRING VALLEY DAIRY LLC ROARING CREEK FARM BRIAN K MULL JOBO HOLSTEIN FARM MARTIN PEILA DEWDROP-MEDO HOLSTIENS ABNER L STOLTZFUS FREDERICK FARMS SCOTT & APRIL COOPER CHRISTIAN L PETERSHEIM K WAYNE &MIKE BURKET WILLOW RUN FARM KEVIN L OBERHOLTZER SKY VIEW DAIRY OLD PIKE DAIRY DAVID & JOSHUA BISHOP CLIFF & ANDREA SENSENIG JOBO HOLSTEIN FARM GERALD SMITH HAROLD S ZIMMERMAN MIFFLIN HILLS FARM BRAUND VALLEY FARMS PEILA JOHN III MILL HILL FARMS DOUG-GREG MC CULLOH JOHN M. BURKHOLDER JEFF SENSENIG BRENT L. GEHMAN BRUVALLEY FARM RODRICK&TRUDY HINISH GLENVILLE FARMS CLAIR N OBERHOLTZER ERIC JEN FREDERICK GORRELL, GLENN & ROBIN WILLOW SPRINGS FARM

H B H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H H

YES NO YES YES YES YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES YES NO YES YES NO NO NO NO NO YES YES NO NO YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES

JOHN P LAPP DIVIDING RIDGE FARM JAY & FAYE GOOD & BEN & KARLA M

H H H

NO 27349 3.9 1067 3.1 YES 27187 3.4 918 3.1 YES 27200 3.6 982 3.1

NAME

RHA FAT RHA PROT RHA MILK PCT FAT PCT PRO 33203 30364 31945 31548 29382 28398 29304 29848 28595 27759 29434 28201 28273 28321 27794 28944 28121 27027 27708 28137 26219 28360 28038 27338 25075 27553 27951 27007 29046 27047 28556 26509 26806 26701 26326 26524 28041

3.3 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.2 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.3 3.3 3.7 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.3 3.9 3.3 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.6 3.5 3.9 3.5 3.9 3.2 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.2

TOP HERDS FOR RHI PROTEIN

1096 1196 1111 1166 1015 1010 937 1103 1037 1068 1123 970 1026 941 922 1081 990 1008 1026 921 1023 940 933 984 971 982 978 1041 1025 1046 902 943 964 950 1004 948 902

3.0 1003 3.3 997 3.0 953 3.0 951 3.1 917 3.2 916 3.1 908 3.0 903 3.1 893 3.2 891 3.0 891 3.1 886 3.1 881 3.1 871 3.1 865 3.0 864 3.1 861 3.2 857 3.1 856 3.0 854 3.3 854 3.0 851 3.0 850 3.1 849 3.4 849 3.1 847 3.0 847 3.1 847 2.9 846 3.1 845 3.0 843 3.2 842 3.1 842 3.1 838 3.2 836 3.2 836 3.0 835 835 835 833

percent of the state’s agricultural activity. “But regardless of how a county ranks in statewide production, agriculture plays important local economic, environmental and social roles, so it’s important to understand the implications of Marcellus Shale development on farming.” Kelsey maintains that additional research is

NDE

needed to understand the dynamics of what is occurring. He said the available data can’t pinpoint whether these declines resulted from existing farms simply downsizing their herds, whether some farms ended dairy production but shifted to other agricultural enterprises, or if they exited farming altogether.

When I started talking about a new TMR mixer, "Dad was about to have a heart attack" thinking about the investment, stated Jay. I looked around at other vertical mixers, and NDE looked like the strongest, best built and easiest to maintain and do the job we needed. I had also gotten some good reports about Trissel Equipment from other owners. It was only a few days after we bought the NDE 1402 mixer, that we realized the purchase couldn't have been better. Our butterfat went from 3.7-3.8 to 4.2 almost immediately by feeding 10 pounds of hay per head, while milk rose several pounds on the same ration. We can now make the ration fit our homegrown hay we have available, even if it's less palatable. Sorting has been all but eliminated and our 90 cows now eat what is good for them and not just what they want. October will be a year, the whole family agrees the purchase was a wise investment!

Brothers Jay and Karl Krueger

401 NDE 350 cubic ft, shed kept, nice and ready to work . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In Agrimetal 5500 Tub Grinder, Shed Kept, HD Cutting Head, Power Spout . . .$11,500 Knight 4036 Bowtec Mixer, Stainless Liner, Nice Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Salsco Round Bale Wrapper, 3Pt Hitch, Good Cond., Ready to Work . . . . . . .$4,250 Anderson 680S Single Bale Wrapper, Big Round-Big Square, Ex. Cond. . . . . . .Call!

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NORTHUMBERLAND

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

1141 1039 1001 1031 998 994 835 792 796 714 690 657

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

JOHN RISHEL SPRING LAKE DAIRY STROUSE DAIRY FARM SHULTZ HILLSIDE DAIRY DRY RUN DAIRY, LLC NORTH RUSH HOLSTEINS WOLFE'S POWER LINE DAIRY WAYNE KLOCK J DANIEL FAUS JUDY BROSIOUS PAUL SCHMIDT H & B FARM

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H

48.8 107.8 68.5 80.3 96.4 82.1 393.9 41.0 127.6 42.8 123.4 40.1

32589 29216 28443 27503 24579 22764 23936 21439 21741 18264 16939 16711

CARL & BRENT MC MILLEN LOY ACRES L.L.C. CINDY & JOE COMP M W SMITH FARMS JESSE+BARB SINGLETON O'TOOLE ACRES MELVIN S WEAVER WELLER'S DAIRY LENARD & AMY KRESGE NEVIN G RICE OL MAPLES FARM ROBRT & BONITA RODGERS LYONS BROTHERS SYLVIN M WENGER PHILLIP WENGER EDWARD C BROFEE ED + WILMA MCMILLEN KRETZH FARMS INC. SAMUEL L. HURST INNERST FARM ROBT &JENNIFER GABEL KENDALL BYERS BRIAN FLEISHER LARRY BRAJKOVICH

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H X

96.0 91.5 102.9 500.3 52.8 71.8 90.6 66.8 158.9 124.1 98.4 37.0 68.3 74.7 73.3 252.4 47.2 326.1 57.7 191.6 34.1 65.6 51.3 87.0

27129 954 3.5 849 3.1 26893 970 3.6 835 3.1 26966 996 3.7 823 3.1 26525 983 3.7 809 3.0 3X 25017 924 3.7 797 3.2 24743 979 4.0 785 3.2 25814 1005 3.9 780 3.0 24592 925 3.8 754 3.1 23917 860 3.6 746 3.1 23434 850 3.6 739 3.2 23151 830 3.6 737 3.2 22086 886 4.0 717 3.2 23029 861 3.7 712 3.1 22815 804 3.5 698 3.1 21723 776 3.6 677 3.1 22329 843 3.8 669 3.0 21575 789 3.7 658 3.0 20890 774 3.7 656 3.1 20331 797 3.9 647 3.2 20932 743 3.5 640 3.1 20874 717 3.4 640 3.1 20673 746 3.6 633 3.1 18737 720 3.8 589 3.1 15717 669 4.3 534 3.4

DHI-AP H 92.2

32708 1204 3.7 983 3.0 3X

PERRY

SCHUYLKILL CARL A FARMS INC

3.5 3.6 3.5 3.7 4.1 4.4 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.9 4.1 3.9

987 872 866 840 768 715 711 662 658 559 550 502

3.0 3X 3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3X 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0

Rental M&S Grain Crusher, Rollermill/Bagger, does 5’x200’ bags, approx. 2500 bu. High Moisture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call! Reel Auggie Model 2450 Nice Mixer, Ready to Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 Triolet Model 1200 Auger in good shape Available Mid January . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call! Luck Now 285 Mixer, nice augers, ready to work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 Roto-Mix Horizontal Mixer, 7 Yrs.. Old, Good Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coming In-Call! • Avery Weigh-Tronix Service Dealer • Financing and cash discounts available • Used feed mixers available

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For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

negative effects on land, water or herd health, or consumer resistance to food originating near natural-gas wells?” The implications of lower cow numbers and milk production go beyond the farmers involved, Kelsey explained. “Declining cow numbers mean fewer dollars spent locally by farmers to maintain their herds,” he

The NDE mixer will cut and mix long stem fiber in an even, consistent ration. They are built with quality components, simple to maintain, while mixing fast and efficiently with NO dead spots. They really do work! Why buy any other mixer?

Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 • (919) 661-3100

HERD OWNER

He also noted the importance of knowing whether those farmers who are leaving agriculture due to Marcellus development are doing so voluntarily. “Are they taking the money, paying off farm debt and choosing a new vocation? Or are they being forced out of farming due to environmental or other concerns, such as

HERD OWNER BRIAN RUCH JAMES D. DUNN MILLER & REX LARRY HEPLER SNYDERLANDFARMS ELBERT FARMS WIND MILL FARM MARK & AMY WOLFE MAR K FARMS RYAN KAHLER DONNON-S DAIRY FARM DAWN F RHEIN JERSEY ACRES FMS INC DONNON-S DAIRY FARM

TYPE TEST

Top 40 Herds For February B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H B H H H H J J X

61.4 97.1 37.2 60.6 51.7 90.5 179.5 59.5 81.9 93.4 135.0 229.4 190.7 41.5

26843 1024 3.8 849 3.2 24063 853 3.5 745 3.1 24474 826 3.4 724 3.0 21985 811 3.7 702 3.2 22833 842 3.7 701 3.1 22454 835 3.7 673 3.0 20124 867 4.3 669 3.3 20596 745 3.6 655 3.2 21344 766 3.6 650 3.0 20647 780 3.8 637 3.1 18820 686 3.6 580 3.1 15686 695 4.4 575 3.7 15769 733 4.6 573 3.6 17235 625 3.6 533 3.1

CHRISS+TRISH NIPPLE DARE E LAND JACOB GRAYBILL KEITH MCCOOL JOHN M KURTZ WARREN FAUS ROBERT + KATHY WAITE JL & CL SHAFFER BO ANN HOLSTEINS RICHARD+BETTY WELLER DAVID APPLE AND SON SAUDERDALE FARM WAITE N CE FARM LEIRE FRY & SONS SEVEN OAKS MABARBIL FARMS JAY HOLLENBACH DAN WHITMER JUSTAMERE FARM DUANE & KAREN EWING

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H H

51.6 91.8 49.4 149.8 65.3 69.6 47.1 39.6 44.3 45.3 67.4 52.1 73.4 143.0 60.5 98.0 48.6 34.1 40.3 53.2

27262 1117 4.1 891 3.3 23416 998 4.3 756 3.2 23475 889 3.8 717 3.1 22932 814 3.5 704 3.1 21688 816 3.8 665 3.1 21433 812 3.8 653 3.0 20173 787 3.9 645 3.2 20232 769 3.8 626 3.1 20200 764 3.8 617 3.1 18991 791 4.2 614 3.2 20777 789 3.8 609 2.9 18984 694 3.7 600 3.2 19742 752 3.8 596 3.0 19100 732 3.8 587 3.1 19211 752 3.9 581 3.0 18902 838 4.4 574 3.0 17963 767 4.3 565 3.1 18039 664 3.7 545 3.0 17727 753 4.2 541 3.1 16705 684 4.1 514 3.1

DAVID CRISSINGER VERNON D. MARTIN MERVIN AND JENELL YODER

DHI-AP H 45.7 DHI-APCS H 204.1 DHI H 81.2

SNYDER

SOMERSET

23242 22659 21093

815 3.5 702 3.0 838 3.7 687 3.0 785 3.7 675 3.2

HERD OWNER

WASHINGTON

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

885 860 893 653 834 718 707 648 683

3.6 3.4 3.7 3.2 4.7 3.6 3.6 3.7 4.0

HAMILTON BROS HAMILTON BROS JOHN E MARCHEZAK GREEN HAVEN FARM JOHN E MARCHEZAK FOLLY HOLLOW FM INC WINDSON DAIRY FARM WILLIAM A SCOTT MARION PYLE STONE

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

X H H H J H H H W

53.5 253.3 67.8 136.7 17.4 152.4 87.7 69.2 13.8

24745 25104 23920 20586 17593 19737 19581 17395 17004

BILL & RICK EBERT SLICKHILL HOLSTEINS ALVIN VANCE JR -HALVIN VANCE JR -HHIXSON FARM SELEMBO DAIRY FARM YURIS' DAIRY FARM JAMES HOUGH ALVIN VANCE JR. -J-

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H X J

77.3 78.3 42.4 23.3 31.3 165.6 48.3 32.9 75.1

23816 924 3.9 737 3.1 23879 1039 4.4 736 3.1 22752 897 3.9 700 3.1 19913 806 4.0 618 3.1 19252 773 4.0 600 3.1 19185 732 3.8 598 3.1 18560 730 3.9 576 3.1 16676 646 3.9 525 3.1 14581 676 4.6 510 3.5

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H

75.1 188.4 275.4 163.6 176.7 44.1 47.7 72.9 24.3 102.8 103.5 69.3 142.3 27.8 175.2 52.9 24.5 66.7 119.5 133.9

30203 1141 3.8 924 3.1 25874 1048 4.1 808 3.1 25452 912 3.6 782 3.1 3X 23840 899 3.8 737 3.1 24242 1001 4.1 733 3.0 23851 922 3.9 723 3.0 22478 727 3.2 688 3.1 20594 764 3.7 669 3.2 21544 817 3.8 658 3.1 3X 21275 785 3.7 654 3.1 3X 20683 717 3.5 651 3.1 20229 754 3.7 620 3.1 19352 734 3.8 600 3.1 18502 664 3.6 595 3.2 18615 683 3.7 553 3.0 17378 661 3.8 546 3.1 18054 617 3.4 539 3.0 16696 635 3.8 528 3.2 16345 627 3.8 516 3.2 20714 802 3.9 652 3.1

WESTMORELAND

YORK

SMYSERS RICHLAWN FMS TAYACRES FARM WALK LE HOLSTEINS ROBT. BAUMGARDNER JR JUSTIN FUHRMAN THOMAS BOYER KATEANN FARM BARRENS VIEW FARM JESSE & BARB DRUCK 2 JESSE & BARB DRUCK DALE & DARLA DOLL GUM TREE FARM #PERRYDELL FARM JOHN KRONE LEROY BUPP GARY THOMAN LARRY ROBINSON SYDOR BROS. FARM STUMP ACRES SHADOW PRACTICE2 DAIRY

774 762 742 635 626 607 570 549 517

3.1 3X 3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.0

Page 23 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Marcellus from A21


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 24

Marcellus from A23 said. “At the same time, lower milk production means fewer dollars coming to the local economy from milk sales. “A variety of businesses depend on local farms for their success, including feed stores, veterinarians, machinery dealers, milk haulers and dairy processors,” Kelsey said. “If the number of farms and associated agricultural activity fall too low, essential supporting businesses will go away, making it difficult for remaining farmers to access the inputs and markets needed to remain in business.” Kelsey said future research should investigate whether farmers who receive lease and royalty payments and choose to stay in agriculture are using gas-related income to improve their farms. “Anecdotes from farmers, equipment dealers and bankers suggest that some farmers are using

proceeds from Marcellus activity to strengthen their operations, which has the potential to benefit the agricultural economy,” he said. The analysis, co-authored by Riley Adams, doctoral candidate in agricultural economics, is summarized in a fact sheet, “Pennsylvania Dairy Farms and Marcellus Shale, 2007-2010.” One free copy can be obtained by Pennsylvania residents from the Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences Publication Distribution Center, The Pennsylvania State University, 112 Agricultural Administration Building, University Park, PA 16802-2602; telephone: 814-8656713; e-mail: AgPubsDist@psu.edu. For out-of-state or bulk orders, contact the Publication Distribution Center. This publication also is available online at http://psu.ag/yu0qJj.

Top 40 Herds For February For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

BALTIMORE

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MARYLAND

STEVE WILSON

DHI-AP H 175.1

CAROLINE

HARMONY FARM RICHARD EDWARDS FAITHLAND FARM HOLLINGSWORTH DANIEL 3 ARTIE FOSTER LONGDAY FARM ERIC AND HOLLY FOSTER

16313

616 3.8 530 3.2 940 873 764 776 686 664 621

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H J

134.5 676.4 222.2 42.9 280.5 51.0 63.2

25700 24687 21858 21621 19106 16622 13991

RICHARD &DIANE FLICKINGER DHIR R.A.BELL&SONS LLC DHI-AP COLDSPRINGS FARM DHIR GARY R BRAUNING DHIR-AP R.A.BELL&SONS LLC DHIR-AP PANORA ACRES DHI-AP FRITZ FARM LLC DHIR-AP DONNA & JASON MYERS DHIR-AP QUEEN ACRES JERSEYS DHIR-AP BYRON D. STAMBAUGH DHIR-AP BAR NONE JERSEYS DHIR-AP PEACE AND PLENTY FARMS DHIR-AP CEDAR KNOLL FARMS DHI-AP CHARLES L. LETHBRIDGE DHIR MARYLAND DELIGHT FARM DHIR-AP LEASE BROS. DHIR-AP ARBAUGH S FLOWING SPRINGS DHI-APCS

H H H H B H H H J H J H H H H H H

163.7 135.7 887.1 35.9 16.5 270.9 70.4 65.0 38.5 127.5 46.8 210.6 125.0 92.1 95.6 115.1 323.1

26921 1003 3.7 855 3.2 24332 934 3.8 761 3.1 3X 24331 889 3.7 743 3.1 3X 22814 855 3.7 723 3.2 21697 890 4.1 717 3.3 3X 23067 860 3.7 714 3.1 22350 842 3.8 711 3.2 22447 866 3.9 705 3.1 18352 892 4.9 703 3.8 21499 784 3.6 667 3.1 17369 872 5.0 663 3.8 21303 798 3.7 659 3.1 21203 826 3.9 656 3.1 20269 764 3.8 635 3.1 19464 748 3.8 634 3.3 20291 776 3.8 623 3.1 20000 731 3.7 620 3.1

CARROLL

CECIL

KILBY INC. MT ARARAT FARMS KILBY INC. WIL-O-MAR FARM KILBY INC. LONG GREEN FARMS INC.

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

801 818 831 779 783 704

DHI-AP H 179.1

16925

730 4.3 557 3.3

1130.6 541.5 106.5 240.5 188.1 71.1 93.2 47.3 93.2 183.8 48.5 12.9

24599 23926 22395 21861 22157 20620 19662 18866 18074 17365 17178 13669

952 911 864 846 839 817 668 719 695 700 591 727

DHIR-AP H 146.2

21030

781 3.7 652 3.1

DHIRAPCS H 336.9

23148

904 3.9 721 3.1

FREDERICK

TEABOW INCORP. PAUL COBLENTZ & SONS BULLDOG HOLSTEINS MATTHEW TOMS DAVE & CAROLE DOODY JEREMY & JULIE THOMPSON PLAIN FOUR FARMS MERCURO FARM LLC ANDREW TOMS ROCKY POINT FARMS, INC. JOHN STONE JEREMY & JULIE THOMPSON Garrett KENTON B MY-LADYS-MANOR FARM

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H X H H J

3.9 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.4 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.4 5.3

693 692 647 641 560 525

3.1 3.0 3X 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6

23306 21466 19684 21384 15564 17149

W. BLAN HARCUM

3.4 3.8 4.2 3.6 5.0 4.1

799 740 659 656 594 531 504

H 468.5 H 57.3 X 74.2 H 113.6 J 43.0 H 131.2

WICOMICO

HARFORD

3.7 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.6 4.0 4.4

767 750 718 693 659 645 604 601 592 557 522 516

3.0 3X 3.2 3.3 3X 3.0 3.6 3X 3.1

3.1 3X 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.2 3.0 3.8

For Records Processed through DHI Provo 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

H H H H H X H

125.6 70.4 147.0 195.8 169.2 70.4 242.5

23683 22031 21820 22759 20779 18059 16645

867 852 879 794 713 660 665

3.7 3.9 4.0 3.5 3.4 3.7 4.0

DHI-APCS H 73.6 DHIR-AP H 114.1

22953 19287

887 3.9 718 3.1 746 3.9 637 3.3

FAIR HILL FARM INC. DHI-APCS H 321.8 CENTERDEL FARM INC. DHI-AP H 205.5 P. THOMAS MASON DHIRAPCS H 69.6 BRICK HOUSE FARM, INC. DHI-APCS H 55.7 FAIR HILL FARM INC. DHI-APCS B 16.2 ROBERT FRY & JUDY GIFFORD DHIR-AP J 71.5 P. THOMAS MASON DHIRAPCS J 172.7

25895 23594 22761 22621 21942 19453 16695

892 899 888 878 824 882 846

77.7 64.8

17739 20311

684 3.9 576 3.2 693 3.4 627 3.1

1306.7 171.2 297.1 147.1 132.4 84.0 13.0 164.6 55.1

27496 23083 23124 20898 19679 18335 16964 19140 16796

960 919 874 822 740 758 826 679 583

DHI-AP H 23.5 DHI-AP H 146.2

20802 19448

765 3.7 629 3.0 799 4.1 600 3.1

25123 26221 21298 22987 19384 23024 22579 21859 21816 19465 20406 19236 19107 18347 20216 19884 19444 15109 17018 13579

985 972 858 904 949 853 812 819 776 808 734 685 773 810 719 741 705 771 651 672

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

ROBERT KNOX JD & GE MILLER STRAWBERRY HILL FARM JAMES ARCHER HARKINS HILL DAIRY CHRIS DIXON GARDEN FENCE FARM

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

HOWARD

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BOWLING GREEN FARM INC.

KENT

WORCESTER

CHESAPEAKE BAY DAIRY ARTIE JAY FARM

DHI-AP H DHI-AP H

QUEEN ANNE

LESTER C. JONES, INC. W. EDWARD PALMATARY PATTERSON FARMS INC. WINTERSTEIN FARMS LLC FRANKLIN & JEFF MOORE KEVIN LEAVERTON LESTER C. JONES, INC. BOONE BROTHERS BENJAMIN STANTON

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

TALBOT

HENRY SNOW 111 WM. BRINSFIELD

WASHINGTON

TRANS OVA GENETICS CLETUS & JANICE FREY CLETUS & JANICE FREY RALPH W SHANK SHENANDOAH JERSEYS ISAAC AND DIANE MARTIN BRENT HORST PRYOR BROTHERS MICHAEL FORSYTHE RALPH W SHANK DAVID HERBST EARL GROVE, JR. MARSH-HAVEN FARM CLETUS & JANICE FREY JAMES A. CAMPBELL JR. DEBAUGH FARMS COOL BROOK FARM MARSH-HAVEN FARM S.J. WINTERS JR. & FAMILY MICHAEL FORSYTHE

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H J H H

H H B H J H H H H A H H H G H H X J H J

16.5 102.6 21.9 66.8 121.2 59.9 135.5 105.2 23.5 112.5 179.7 111.1 44.4 12.7 104.0 127.9 106.8 12.6 130.7 34.5

3.4 3.8 3.9 3.9 3.8 4.5 5.1

3.5 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.8 4.1 4.9 3.5 3.5

3.9 3.7 4.0 3.9 4.9 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.6 4.2 3.6 3.6 4.0 4.4 3.6 3.7 3.6 5.1 3.8 4.9

712 701 687 680 632 567 554

762 748 706 702 699 687 594

794 710 697 654 603 600 588 569 507

843 824 731 723 721 720 703 681 676 633 630 620 620 619 606 599 598 573 516 509

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.3

2.9 3X 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3X 3.5 3.6

2.9 3X 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.5 3X 3.0 3.0

3.4 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.7 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.4 3.0 3.0 3.1 3X 3.8 3.0 3.7

Top 40 Herds For February

RECORDS RECOGNIZE ENERGY CORRECTED MILK (ECM) BASIS - Over the years, totals have recognized milk, fat, and protein production. Since 1989, high herds on a county and state basis, along with all individual production awards, have been made on an (ECM) basis. The ECM formula (7.2 x lbs protein) + (12.95 x lbs fat) + (.327 x lbs milk) has helped identify cows that not only produce high volumes of milk, but also of milk solids. Maryland dairy producers are using the ECM formula and no longer mention lbs of fat or lbs of 3.5% fat corrected milk, since fat has become a negative word in promoting dairy and other food products.

HERD NAME DAIRY CATTLE RESEARCH SAVAGE-LEIGH FARM PAUL YODER MAR-K FARMS PAUL F. HARRISON JR. ORION-VIEW HOLSTEINS GLEN-TOCTIN FARM BENEVA FARMS DAVID & JAMES PATRICK O. CLAYTON SMITH LAVON YODER MD.-CARROLLTON GLENN BEARD PHILIP BEACHY JAMES & JOHN MYERS CESSNA BROS. FARM CALVIN SCHROCK DAVE & CAROLE DOODY WILLOW SPRINGS PARTNERS PAUL & HENRY KINSINGER VALES - PRIDE HOLSTEIN ERIC & FAITH BURALL BRAD & CATHY WILES DOOL-LEIGH FARM HARA VALE FARMS THOMAS H. MULLER SHAFDON FARMS ASH & BEAR MIKE & ANITA HAINES ANDREW W. SCHROCK MAPLE LAWN FARM INC. EZRA SCHROCK

TYP BRD TEST H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

22 23 00 00 23 31 20 23 23 00 00 23 31 20 23 20 20 22 31 20 23 23 20 23 00 31 22 31 23 23 23 23

ECM 27,686 26,752 25,725 25,577 25,422 24,199 24,191 23,977 23,904 23,856 23,221 23,142 23,086 23,000 22,868 22,776 22,768 22,609 22,477 22,453 22,375 22,150 21,943 21,916 21,856 21,813 21,806 21,594 21,439 21,398 21,138 21,019

3X

45

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

26421 1013 24764 1010 25014 916 24519 936 22367 990 23198 884 22353 912 23185 865 22839 872 21943 887 22494 843 22541 834 21525 857 22385 822 22283 826 21724 828 21867 816 22113 827 20767 828 21446 829 21666 808 21244 804 20140 807 19382 843 21309 793 20944 790 20493 807 19804 823 21475 740 20758 771 20276 772 19066 800

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF 3.83 4.08 3.66 3.82 4.43 3.81 4.08 3.73 3.82 4.04 3.75 3.70 3.98 3.67 3.71 3.81 3.73 3.74 3.99 3.87 3.73 3.78 4.01 4.35 3.72 3.77 3.94 4.15 3.45 3.72 3.81 4.20

824 775 790 756 735 718 705 722 715 722 688 691 688 700 679 688 702 649 690 654 671 666 682 648 642 658 647 620 672 643 627 615

3.12 3.13 3.16 3.08 3.29 3.10 3.15 3.11 3.13 3.29 3.06 3.07 3.20 3.13 3.05 3.17 3.21 2.94 3.32 3.05 3.10 3.13 3.39 3.34 3.01 3.14 3.16 3.13 3.13 3.10 3.09 3.23

79.2 74.3 66.2 69.1 66.9 68.2 69.2 56.2 65.4 64.4 60.0 59.7 68.7 63.5 66.7 56.9 62.5 56.1 53.3 46.6 65.0 68.4 56.4 59.1 66.3 44.8 66.6 50.3 57.6 53.9 48.5 52.4

2.9 3.0 2.4 2.6 2.9 2.5 2.8 2.1 2.5 2.7 2.2 2.2 2.5 2.3 2.5 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.1 1.8 2.5 2.6 2.3 2.5 2.5 1.7 2.6 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.8 2.1

2.4 2.3 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.1 2.2 1.8 2.0 2.0 1.8 1.8 2.2 2.0 2.0 1.8 2.0 1.7 1.8 1.4 2.0 2.1 1.8 1.9 2.0 1.4 2.1 1.6 1.8 1.7 1.5 1.6

HERD NAME

TYP BRD TEST

ECM

3X

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

19412 20060 19265 20540 18481 19290 19564 19435

781 737 763 712 772 745 725 733

4.02 3.67 3.96 3.47 4.18 3.86 3.71 3.77

630 619 607 625 605 613 634 604

3.25 3.09 3.15 3.04 3.28 3.18 3.24 3.11

56.2 56.8 49.1 43.4 33.7 46.0 48.4 53.9

2.2 2.1 1.9 1.5 1.4 1.8 1.8 2.0

1.8 1.8 1.5 1.3 1.1 1.4 1.5 1.7

EHRHARDT FARM INC SUNRISE HOLSTEINS ANDY MASON TOBIE KINSINGER WAYNE BURDETTE RANDAL BEITZEL WARNER BROS INC JEFF ENGEL

H H H H H H H H

31 31 31 20 20 20 23 31

20,994 20,557 20,547 20,433 20,393 20,365 20,347 20,193

PATRICK, DAVID & JAMES VALES - PRIDE AYRSHIRE WHISPERING AYRSHIRE ROOM-TO-GROW

A A A A

23 23 00 20

19,605 19,010 13,871 1,287

18351 17252 12921 1419

730 724 521 43

3.98 4.20 4.03 3.00

577 555 403 37

3.14 3.22 3.12 2.61

53.8 47.9 40.3 8.3

2.2 2.1 1.6 .3

1.7 1.5 1.3 .2

SHAFDON SWISS ERIC F-FAITH M. BURALL VALES - PRIDE BROWN SWISS DUBLIN HILLS SWISS DWAYNE BELL

B B B B B

22 23 23 31 20

20,463 20,165 19,906 19,325 15,163

17947 18194 17815 17462 13587

782 750 754 718 565

4.36 4.12 4.23 4.11 4.16

621 626 600 600 473

3.46 3.44 3.37 3.43 3.48

65.2 54.2 51.0 43.7 45.7

2.9 2.2 2.3 1.8 2.0

2.2 1.8 1.7 1.5 1.7

WALNUT RIDGE GUERNSEY MAR SHIRL GUERNSEY

G G

31 31

21,606 19,018

16852 17637

914 711

5.42 4.03

592 562

3.51 3.18

48.7 43.5

2.6 1.8

1.7 1.4

O. CLAYTON SMITH GLENN BEARD JOHN & JULIE MAYER MIKE & ANITA HAINES 2 WILLOW SPRING FARM SPRING VALLEY JERSEYS ASH & BEAR ELI SWARTZENTRUBER GLADE VIEW DAIRY

J J J J J J J J J

20 31 31 23 31 31 23 23 20

29,827 26,133 18,463 18,423 17,672 15,586 14,119 11,284 8,850

21764 1332 22214 1031 15025 738 14822 730 14498 693 12298 628 11553 558 9064 458 7315 352

6.12 4.64 4.91 4.92 4.78 5.11 4.83 5.05 4.81

759 767 555 573 550 477 433 332 264

3.49 3.45 3.69 3.87 3.80 3.88 3.74 3.66 3.60

67.8 60.2 42.1 38.9 38.2 32.5 34.6 37.0 14.2

4.2 2.8 2.1 2.0 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.9 .7

2.4 2.1 1.5 1.5 1.4 1.3 1.3 1.4 .5

14


Top 40 Herds For February

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

BERKELEY

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

WEST VIRGINIA

LINTON BROTHERS INC.

GREENBRIER BEN BUCK FARM EMORY & JEAN HANNA

DHI H 187.4 DHIR X 126.3 DHI-AP H 129.5

JEFFERSON

HOUGH, CLARENCE E. & T.TODD DHIRAPCS H 212.6 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP H 95.9 SNYDER, NICHOLAS DHI-AP H 92.6 RZ BANE INC. DHI-APCS H 248.5 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP J 55.2

MONONGALIA

WEST VIRGINIA DAIRY DEPT

MONROE

BEILER DAIRY FARM, LLC DOUG & TRACY DRANSFIELD TRISH & STEVE ECHOLS

PRESTON GREG GIBSON

RANDOLPH LINGER FARMS INC.

17205 19186 20652

NEW CASTLE 659 3.8 538 3.1 740 3.9 633 3.3 760 3.7 625 3.0

23038 21706 20930 19110 16088

929 760 760 687 729

4.0 3.5 3.6 3.6 4.5

706 662 637 583 579

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.6

DHIRAPCS H 47.1

18073

661 3.7 560 3.1

DHI-APCS H 87.0 DHI-AP H 73.5 DHI-APCS H 31.9

23657 17423 17353

918 3.9 726 3.1 655 3.8 522 3.0 584 3.4 517 3.0

DHI H 79.1

20735

805 3.9 677 3.3

DHIR-AP H 212.6

19515

692 3.5 596 3.1 3X

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

H H H X

106.7 106.5 167.3 72.3

25649 1029 4.0 805 3.1 20835 704 3.4 637 3.1 19002 716 3.8 624 3.3 17360 714 4.1 561 3.2

DEMPSEY FARM DHI-APCS DULIN BROS. DHI-APCS MOOR JR, ALFRED M. DHI-APCS GREGG & STEPHANIE KNUTSEN DHIR-AP JENAMY FARMS DHI-AP GREGG & STEPHANIE KNUTSEN DHIR-AP WHITE OAK FARMS DHI-AP VOGL, ANTHONY & ERNEST DHI-AP

H H H H H J H H

277.2 159.4 313.6 40.2 166.5 25.7 184.9 145.6

28044 1087 3.9 854 3.0 24217 902 3.7 765 3.2 22596 898 4.0 739 3.3 22273 825 3.7 705 3.2 22881 803 3.5 702 3.1 15641 734 4.7 587 3.8 18138 697 3.8 578 3.2 18845 719 3.8 573 3.0

H X H H H H J H

103.3 40.1 574.0 26.1 86.2 265.8 116.5 230.4

25435 22914 24708 23110 21814 22639 18845 20044

SUSSEX

LOYAL JAKE BENDER DHI-AP LOYAL JAKE BENDER DHI-AP GREEN ACRES FARM DHI-APCS JOHN A. MILLS DHIR-AP HEATWOLE, JERREL & ALMA DHI-AP BAILEY, J. E. & SONS INC. DHI-AP JOHN A. MILLS DHIR-AP VANDERWENDE, WILLIAM & SNS DHI-AP

904 873 912 922 838 805 922 683

3.6 3.8 3.7 4.0 3.8 3.6 4.9 3.4

783 742 735 715 696 692 655 603

3.1 3.2 3.0 3X 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.5 3.0

UNITED DHI VIRGINIA TOTALS OWNER

CRESTHAVEN FARMS LEWIS A LAMB SONS INC TRIPLE R DAIRY CLAUDIA PAULSON LUKE & ROBERTA HEATWOLE DAVID HOOLEY WOLF RIDGE HOLSTEINS HEATWOLE FAMILY DAIRY CEDAR RIDGE DAIRY INC RANDALL INMAN R.JEFFERSON GARY W MCDONALD M B & MARK B GOODE WHISPERING OAKS FARM SHEN-ROCK HOLSTEINS BACK RUN DAIRY ERIC & RACHEL SIMMONS M.D.& LEE SIMMONS WHITAKER FARM INC. LAKESIDE DAIRY FARM INC. AMEVA FARM INC WILLOW BEND DAIRY BROOKSTONE FARM JOHN O HARDESTY & SON FRF CROSS KEYS LLC HILLSIDE FARM INC. ROBERT D STOOTS MICHAEL WRIGHT PLEASANT PASTURE DAIRY CHERRY GROVE FARM INC RIVERBEND DAIRY FARM CLARMAY FARM HOME PLACE DAIRY INC WALTER MCCLURE ROLLING HILLS DAIRY BROWN OAK SPRING FARMS LLC GOLDENVIEW DAIRY INC BOWSTRING HOLSTEINS ALFRED STEPHENS GARY RUSSELL BELAIR DAIRY, LLC PENNCREST FARM COOL LAWN HOLSTEINS CHRIS MCADEN BARNY BAY DAIRY INC JIM ELGIN HAMMOCK DAIRY INC. M J ATKINS GRANDVIEW HOLSTEINS,INC NORMAN BOOTH CAVE VIEW FARMS INC ALLEN LAYMAN JAMES L WILL MEL-PAULA HOLSTEIN'S E H SPURLIN & SONS

TOWN (3X)

GALAX VA (3X) ROCHELLE VA (3X) CREWE VA (3X) PORT REPUBLIC VA (3X) MT. CRAWFORD VA AMELIA VA (3X) BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) HARRISONBURG VA (3X) ELKTON VA MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) CHATHAM VA (3X) STEPHENS CITY VA HUDDLESTON VA ROCKY MOUNT VA HARRISONBURG VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) MOUNT SOLON VA AMELIA CT HSE VA MINERAL VA AMELIA VA BRIDGEWATER VA HARRISONBURG VA (3X) BERRYVILLE VA HARRISONBURG VA DUBLIN VA MAX MEADOWS VA WEYERS CAVE VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA FAIRFIELD VA ROCKY MOUNT VA FISHERSVILLE VA DAYTON VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA ROCKY MOUNT VA MARTINSVILLE VA UPPERVILLE VA REDWOOD VA ROCKY MOUNT VA WYTHEVILLE VA WOODLAWN VA CULPEPER VA FARMVILLE VA REMINGTON VA (3X) BRODNAX VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA CULPEPER VA (3X) CHATHAM VA (3X) CHARLOTTE C H VA CHATHAM VA SPOUT SPRING VA WEYERS CAVE VA WIRTZ VA BRIDGEWATER VA ROANOKE VA GALAX VA

R TEST A MTH N K

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56

NORTH POINT FARM INC. MEADOW RUN DAIRY INC KEVIN PHILLIPS

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

97.1 94.3 89.9 89.8 89.4 86.6 85.9 85.5 84.1 84.0 83.9 83.5 83.4 83.4 83.1 83.0 82.8 82.5 82.2 82.1 81.7 81.2 81.1 80.9 80.4 80.1 80.1 79.9 79.9 79.8 79.7 79.5 79.4 79.3 79.1 79.1 79.0 78.9 78.9 78.8 78.5 78.4 78.3 78.3 78.2 78.2 78.0 78.0 77.9 77.9 77.7 77.6 77.6 77.6 77.3 77.3

31083 29210 26500 26706 26483 25827 24022 26461 24228 26534 25378 26542 20943 25909 25507 24561 22249 24361 24787 25556 25889 23421 21323 25015 22163 24404 25352 24174 20164 23133 25051 24130 25075 21390 22799 23005 14769 22318 26054 24717 25056 22299 19815 23359 21507 24933 25907 25588 23578 22932 22984 23595 22459 22427 23666 24992

3.2 4.0 3.3 3.8 3.3 3.5 3.4 3.8 4.0 4.1 3.8 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.4 3.5 4.0 3.6 3.7 3.9 3.9 3.6 3.9 3.7 4.0 . 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.4 3.6 3.6 3.7 4.8 4.0 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.3 3.5 3.9 4.0 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.3

985 1160 876 1026 885 910 811 999 960 1090 958 926 778 937 963 934 766 846 997 926 969 914 827 913 868 900 1006 . 773 845 938 868 859 774 828 840 704 896 995 922 894 855 720 870 776 915 921 938 789 809 896 933 843 770 848 829

B % LBS R PRO PRO EE D

3.0 3.1 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.3 3.1 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 . 3.0 3.0 2.8 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.5 3.2 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 0.1

941 896 775 801 775 800 735 799 702 794 774 884 646 758 765 713 671 733 762 743 790 708 661 772 667 740 769 . 599 693 706 741 734 664 680 711 518 705 766 765 766 691 625 703 666 739 783 771 720 702 711 711 658 662 725 25

RHA MILK

% 3 % FAT FAT PRO PRO X

24108 21670 21551

882 3.7 721 3.0 3X 763 3.5 657 3.0 795 3.7 654 3.0 3X

VIRGINIA DHI-AP H 571.3 DHIR-AP H 306.4 DHI-APCS H 237.8

CLARK

RIGGS & STILES INC

DHIR H 606.8

ROCKBRIDGE

ROBERT & STEPHANIE WHIPPLE DHI-AP H 101.8 ROBERT & STEPHANIE WHIPPLE DHI-AP X 11.7

ROCKINGHAM WEST BRANCH DAIRY

SHENANDOAH

WILKINS BROTHERS DAIRY

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK DAYS IN LBS MILK

190 210 167 187 163 180 201 179 172 183 168 180 182 148 162 142 193 183 159 187 180 187 174 184 146 157 187 150 160 172 138 185 166 169 167 167 182 164 172 185 215 163 152 189 173 179 179 202 217 167 203 162 138 185 180 182

AUGUSTA

B R COW E YEARS E D

26914 1021 3.8 817 3.0 3X 22856 16570

871 3.8 700 3.1 765 4.6 568 3.4

DHI-AP H 143.6

21636

795 3.7 662 3.1

DHI-AP H 136.8

20361

729 3.6 600 2.9

Herds Ranked by Daily Milk Lbs Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh The United Federation DHIA's, Va Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (540) 552-2541

FEBRUARY

TEST DAY AVG (COW)

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

KENT

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DELAWARE

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE VARI, V. JOSEPH EMERSON, ROBERT L. COOK, H. WALLACE & SON

Top 40 Herds For February

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

CLIFFORD BOWMAN RIVER HAVEN FARMS INC MT. VIEW DAIRY INC. HARMON BECKNER BRANDON BEERY CHARLES F MOYER AND SONS RICHLANDS DAIRY FARM INC DANIEL LAYMAN JARECO FARMS BACK CREEK DAIRY REGGIE DUNCAN DONALD & WAYNE COX ASHLAND FARMS ROBERT RUTROUGH DARRELL AND RALPH WHITE EASTVIEW FARM INC WHITE OAK SPRING DAIRY THOMAS E STANLEY & SONS INC CHAD & REBECCA MCMURRAY EMERY & CHERYL BOWMAN TURNER DAIRY WALKUP HOLSTEINS W W SANFORD DAVE JOHNSON CONNER DAIRY FARM INC NATHAN HORST RAYFAY HOLSTEINS BURNT CHIMNEY DAIRY ALLEN L SHANK CARLTON W BRUBAKER BURMAN WHITE & SON KENDRA & JULIA HORST EARLY DAWN DAIRY GEO ALVIS & SONS J HOLLACE BOWMAN & SONS MOTLEY DAIRY INC. MICHAEL COUNTISS KNICELY BROS. INC #1 CUB RUN DAIRY FLOWING SPRING FARM SLATE HILL FARMS, LLC LONG-ACRE FARM CARTER S ELLIOTT JR STAN AND WES SHOWALTER OAK SPRING FARMS LLC DAN ABE SLEMP AND SON DAVID G & DARLENE F HOFFMAN JOE BLANKENSHIP R Y STILES & SONS J S HUFFARD III JACOB SHENK MICHAEL AND LORI WEBB E CLINE BRUBAKER HEDGEBROOK FARM

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

CALLAWAY VA 2 57 RADFORD VA 2 58 JETERSVILLE VA 2 59 WIRTZ VA 2 60 MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) 2 61 AMELIA VA 2 62 BLACKSTONE VA (3X) 2 63 WIRTZ VA 2 64 PENHOOK VA 2 65 PULASKI VA 2 66 CHRISTIANSBURG VA 2 67 RADFORD VA 2 68 CULPEPER VA 2 69 ROCKY MOUNT VA 2 70 FOREST VA 2 71 BEAVERDAM VA 2 72 EVINGTON VA 2 73 ASHLAND VA 2 74 HARRISONBURG VA (3X) 2 75 ROCKY MOUNT VA 2 76 BEDFORD VA 2 77 HARRISONBURG VA 2 78 ORANGE VA 2 79 GLADE SPRING VA 2 80 FLOYD VA 2 81 WEYERS CAVE VA 2 82 BOONES MILL VA 2 83 WIRTZ VA (3X) 2 84 BRIDGEWATER VA 2 85 BOONES MILL VA (3X) 2 86 RADFORD VA 2 87 HARRISONBURG VA 2 88 CHARLOTTESVILLE VA 2 89 MANAKIN SABOT VA (3X) 2 90 ROCKY MOUNT VA 2 91 CHATHAM VA 2 92 ABINGDON VA (3X) 2 93 HARRISONBURG VA 2 94 MCGAHEYSVILLE VA (3X) 2 95 BUCHANAN VA 2 96 HARRISONBURG VA 2 97 MT JACKSON VA 2 98 RUSTBURG VA (3X) 2 99 BRIDGEWATER VA 2 100 VIRGINIA COLOR BREEDS UPPERVILLE VA 2 1 SUGAR GROVE VA 2 2 CULPEPER VA 2 3 SUGAR GROVE VA 2 4 CLEAR BROOK VA 2 5 CROCKETT VA 2 6 CATLETT VA 2 7 CONCORD VA 2 8 ROCKY MOUNT VA 2 9 WINCHESTER VA 2 10

ANNUAL AVERAGES B % LBS R PRO PRO EE D

MILK DAYS IN LBS MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

77.1 77.0 76.9 76.8 76.8 76.6 76.6 76.6 76.6 76.5 76.4 76.3 76.0 75.6 75.5 75.5 75.4 75.4 75.4 75.2 75.1 75.0 74.9 74.8 74.7 74.6 74.5 74.5 74.5 74.4 74.4 74.4 74.3 74.2 74.1 73.9 73.9 73.8 73.7 73.5 73.4 73.4 73.2 73.2

172 190 175 179 175 156 166 178 182 166 214 177 177 186 155 171 208 174 254 203 206 162 168 160 204 174 162 189 174 216 229 145 179 176 167 193 181 141 187 204 170 166 198 182

24105 22736 22392 23488 26121 23545 24580 22852 23068 22988 22886 21546 23452 24050 21302 23495 20897 22813 24583 21154 22157 23265 22187 21561 23971 23614 20880 21416 22380 24381 21450 22590 24077 22507 22679 21467 23709 22189 25388 23100 20751 21011 23601 22407

3.8 3.7 3.3 3.7 3.9 4.2 3.7 3.7 4.0 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.2 3.6 3.0 3.1 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.5 4.0 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.3 3.9 3.6 3.9 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.6

923 830 748 878 1025 1000 911 847 922 861 846 794 907 949 815 861 773 865 941 813 848 966 800 646 745 828 780 782 846 855 765 800 961 866 815 793 783 873 926 900 751 761 855 804

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0

723 688 680 715 775 739 729 686 723 697 687 671 739 741 663 715 648 697 748 676 695 686 685 656 710 704 647 650 715 717 662 682 730 646 664 666 703 676 758 727 599 629 705 671

79.0 61.9 51.7 51.6 51.1 50.7 44.8 44.2 42.4 37.6

182 184 206 176 169 154 171 144 192 137

14769 18056 16333 14410 14052 16234 15089 . 13565 11920

4.8 4.4 4.6 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.7 . 4.8 4.2

704 789 746 691 661 751 711 . 655 497

3.5 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.6 . 3.4 3.5

518 588 578 512 516 568 540 . 457 415

B J J J J J J J G J

Page 25 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Top 40 Herds For February


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 26

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

The Dairy One Improver

The Empire State Milk Quality Council? (Oh, 'Super' Milk, I've heard of that!) Reprinted with permission from Eastern Dairy Business, January 2012 By Lisa Ford & Roberta Wolf

• For consumers, they can be assured of quality milk, thereby increasing confidence in and demand for dairy products.

This is the first of eight articles the Empire State Milk Quality Council (ESMQC) is supporting along with Quality Milk Production Services and Dairy One. We are excited to partner with these two organizations to provide two more articles focusing on milk quality in 2012.

The council is made up of volunteer dairy community members, including veterinarians, educators, dairy producers, state agency employees and employees of other dairy-related businesses. Funding is received from many contributors from all aspects of the dairy industry in New York and the Northeast. The majority of their donations support the “Super” Milk program. In addition, the council has a goal of education, utilizing seminars, materials, articles and speaker luncheons over the years. We are grateful for the contributors and their generous donations. The council would not exist without their support.

To start the year, we wanted to reintroduce everyone to the ESMQC, based in New York. Milk quality has been a focus of New York farms for many years with programs like Quality Milk Production Services at Cornell University and the development of initiatives like the ESMQC. In the mid-1970s, a group of dairy industry people started as the Empire State Mastitis Council, a notfor-profit organization modeled after the National Mastitis Council. The Council began with the goal of improving the quality of the milk produced on New York dairies. The council recognized achieving this goal benefits everyone in the milk production chain: • For producers, it increases cow productivity, health and farm profitability. It decreases the use of antibiotics and the risk of antibiotic residue. • For handlers, quality milk increases finished product yield, quality and shelf life.

The council is best known for the ‘Super’ Milk program and award signs. Many of us look for the simple blue signs signifying that a farm focuses on their milk quality and the impression their farmstead leaves in the minds of the consumers driving by. This program depends on milk inspectors nominating farms that have a bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) of 250,000 cells/ ml or less for 10 of 12 months, and an exemplary farmstead. In March, the nominations are due for farms that qualified the previous year. Kerry Case, a long-term council member employed at QMPS who has been implementing the “Super” Milk program for many years, collects the nominations. She inputs the data and orders the proper signs for each farm. In May, the signs are distributed and farms can update their displays. The first year a farm receives ‘Super’ Milk designation it get the big blue sign. Each consecutive year the farm receives a small year sign, until they reach the milestones of 5, 10, 15 or 20 consecutive years, which each have special signs. “Super” Milk celebrated the first consecutive 20-year winners in 2010. Thirty-eight farms qualified for this amazing accomplishment! We now have more than 1,600 farms which have received “Super” Milk, and the numbers are growing. Larry Bertram, a partner at Hi-Hope Farm LLC, which is a 21-year “Super” Milk winner, states, “It can be done.” We asked many of the 20-year winners last year, “What is your secret?” and many stated the secret to their success was to keep the cows clean.

The council’s education goal is achieved through seminars, materials, articles and speaker luncheons.

Another focus of the ESMQC is to support the lowering of the BTSCC for shipment to 400,000 cells/ml. This is in keeping with our mission and would benefit cows, producers and consumers. Supporting this proposal through education and recognition of farms producing milk of higher quality will continue to be important for the council. See our website to read our full statement on this initiative. The ESMQC hopes to be an example for other states to start their own milk quality promotion programs. More and more consumers are demanding information about the way we produce milk and the quality of that product. We are dedicated to the education, promotion and recognition of quality milk throughout all facets of the New York dairy industry. Partnering with QMPS and Dairy One for these articles is a step we are taking to further our goals.


Twenty-six local, state, and national organizations sent a letter to each Member of Congress on Feb. 9, calling on them to take immediate action in response to the crisis affecting our dairy farmers. Paul Rozwadowski, Wis-

consin dairy farmer and chair of the NFFC Dairy Subcommittee, stated, “We are asking Congress to administer a temporary floor price of $20 because it is so badly needed to keep the remaining 49,000 dairy farmers in

business. As Congress writes the new farm bill, we implore them to take into consideration the farmers’ costs of producing raw milk and establish a pricing system that will reflect it, along with a supply management sys-

tem based on the proposals in S. 1640, the Federal Milk Marketing Improvement Act of 2011.” The price collapse is not a regional issue; it is currently affecting dairy farmers across the country. Loren Lopes, a Cali-

fornia dairy farmer, spoke on behalf of the California Dairy Campaign stating, “We have not recovered from the devastating 2009 milk prices when producers lost over $17 billion nationally and in California

we lost nearly $4 billion (an average of $1,000 dollars per cow) and borrowed against equity of cows, land, and savings. Farm machinery is on its last legs with no means to repair or replace it reducing our efficiency.” While we appreciate the support of the Vermont Members of Congress on dairy farmer issues, we are very concerned that a simple extension of the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) payments does not address the needs of the dairy farmer. Gretchen Maine operates a dairy farm in New York. She emphasized that, “Since September 2011, the price that we receive for our milk has dropped $4 per hundredweight (100 pounds of milk, or roughly 12 gallons). The projected February MILC payment is a little over 27 cents per hundredweight, or 2 cents per gallon. Does anyone think that 27 cents is going to make up for the $3.72 loss? Milk prices are going in the gutter once again, while none of our input prices have gone down.” As the Senate holds their farm bill hearings, we urge them to consider the proposals supported by dairy farmers (especially S. 1640), not the proposals being pushed by the buyers and processors of our milk. The core of running a profitable farm of any size is the ability to recover input costs such as feed, fertilizer, and fuel. Our next farm bill should place an emphasis on creating a dairy pricing system that allows all farmers to recoup their costs and sustain their farms. Ben Burkett, NFFC President and Mississippi farmer, commented, “All farmers — whether they raise livestock, dairy, wheat, or corn — need and deserve a fair price for what they produce. What we need are programs that return the control over the pricing of our products to family farmers. This farm bill is a chance for farmers and consumers to join together and demand these changes to benefit farmers in the United States and across the globe.”

Page 27 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19, 2012

Dairy farmers call on Congress to act


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 28


Midatlantic

Section B

CropCare rolls out 1000 gallon sprayer CropCare’s Ag Sprayers have been known for their quality and longevity for decades. An exciting addition to their 2012

equipment line is a 1000 gallon model, the TR1000, that enhances productivity by reducing refill trips for farmers that spray mid- to- larg-

er size acreages. Features include a 1000 gallon “total drain” tank, Big Wheel Axle assembly for less compaction, and either a PTO or Hy-

draulic-driven pump. The TR1000 has an adjustable wheel base from 62”-120”. CropCare uniquely offers a “Built to Order” ca-

pability to tailor a sprayer for an individual farmer’s specific needs, increasing comfort and efficiency in usage — but staying within or below prices charged by other sprayer manufacturers. Just a portion of options include automatic rate control, freshwater rinse with power wash system, chemical induction, quick fill, safety lighting, hydraulic boom height adjustment, and preci-

sion GPS guidance systems that will keep you on the cutting edge of application technology. CropCare’s careful engineering and high-quality American manufacturing produces a highperforming machine that’s easy on the pocketbook, and backed by our strong customer service standards and full-service sprayer parts division locally based in Pennsylvania.

World Dairy Expo announces complete slate of judges A slate of 16 official judges will evaluate over 2,500 head of the finest registered dairy cattle Oct. 2-6 during the 2012 World Dairy Expo. This premier dairy industry event attracts over 65,000 dairy cattle enthusiasts from around the globe. The following list of judges has been named: • International Ayrshire Show: Lynn Harbaugh, Marion, WI Associate Judge: Chad Ryan, Fond du Lac, WI • International Brown Swiss Show: Curtis Day, Burnsville, MN Associate Judge: Brian Schnebly, Hagerstown, MD • International Guernsey Show: Adam Liddle, Argyle, NY Associate Judge: William Peck III, Schuylerville, NY • International Holstein Show: Michael Heath, Westminster, MD Associate Judge: Dave Dyment, Dundas, ON • Central National Jersey Show: Mark Rueth, Oxford, WI Associate Judge: Cathy Yeoman, Dover, OK • International Milking Shorthorn Show: Steve White, New Castle, IN Associate Judge: Ken Empey, Dorchester, ON • Grand International Red & White Show: Justin Burdette, Mer-

cersburg, PA Associate Judge: Steve Shaw, Williamsburg, PA • International Junior Holstein Show: Chris Lahmers, Marysville, Ohio Associate Judge: Pat Conroy, Angola, IN World Dairy Expo is recognized as the largest dairy-focused event in the world. Dairy producers from across the globe are invited to attend the event that includes eight dairy cattle shows, Expo Seminars, Virtual Farm Tours, youth competition and over 800 exhibiting trade show companies featuring innovative products and services. The 2012 World Dairy Expo theme will be “Market Fresh” and the event will be held Oct. 2-6 at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, WI. Visit www.worlddairyexpo.co m or call 608-224-6455 for further details.

Page 1 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

Country y Folks


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 2

American Society of Safety Engineers urges farms to invest in safety programs/precautions Safety needs to be the main ingredient in helping keep farms and ranches safe for farmers, family members including children, and employees. American Society of Safety Engineers Agriculture Branch Chair and President of the Chesapeake Chapter Mike Wolf, CSP, said, “Agriculture is one of the most dangerous industries in the U.S. Farming is the only industry that regularly has young workers and children present and it is critical that everyone working in or around farms is aware of the risks, hazards and ways to avoid injury and illness in these types of settings. Installing rollover protection on tractors and ensuring all farm workers and children are educated on farm safety practices is critical to reducing farmrelated fatalities.” According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2009, approximately 1,783,000 full-time workers were employed in the agriculture industry in the U.S. During the same year, 440 farmers and farm workers died from work-related injuries, resulting in a fatality rate of 24.7 deaths per 100,000 workers. Each day, approximately 243 agricultural workers suffer lost-time injuries, with five percent of these resulting in permanent impairments, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The leading cause of fatal farm injuries was tractor overturns, which accounts for more than 90 deaths annually. Rollover protection structures (ROPS) are important to reducing risk when it comes to tractor fatalities, noted Wolf. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) supports the theory that ROPS and proper seatbelt use on tractors can help eliminate fatalities by reducing risk of being thrown from the tractor, or crushed in a rollover incident. ROPS can be retrofitted onto older tractors to increase safety of such machines. Many companies provide engineercertified ROPS for purchase and installation. Most farms do not fall under the auspices of

the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules and regulations. Hence, ASSE urges farmers to train workers, including young farmers, in all aspects of farming risks and safety. Machinery, motor vehicles and drowning were the causes of most of the fatal incidents involving children on U.S. farms and ranches. In 2009, an estimated 16,100 children and adolescents were injured on farms, with 3,400 of these injuries due to farm work. On average, 113 youth less than 20 years of age die annually from farm-related injuries, with most of these deaths occurring among youth 16-19 years of age. A major agriculture safety risk, according to OSHA, is grain handling.

Workers can be exposed to risks such as fires and explosions, suffocate from engulfment and entrapment in grain bins, falls from heights, and crushing or amputation injuries from grain handling equipment. In 2010, 51 workers were engulfed by grain storage in bins and 26 of those trapped lost their lives. This type of tragedy can occur when workers walk on moving grain, which acts like quicksand according to OSHA, or when they attempt to clear grain bins. Moving grain can bury a worker in seconds. Grain dust explosions are also a high-risk element of working with grain as it is combustible and will burn or explode if exposed to an ignition source. Electrical safety is another major hazard on farms, noted Wolf. Regu-

lar electrical inspections are necessary to prevent accidents due to malfunctioning or old electrical equipment. Harvest season is the best time to inspect all machinery and electrical equipment, including clearing outlets, lighting, electrical panels and

equipment from obstructions or debris. One should check to make sure wires have not been affected by mice or other animals and carefully examine all connections. To learn more about agricultural safety and health and to view ASSE’s farm safety facts

for rural areas, farm safety and health tips and farm safety tips for young workers, visit www.asse.org/newsroom. For more information about ASSE’s Practice Specialty Agricultural Branch, visit www.asse.org/practicespecialties/ag-safety.

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-week k updatess and d online e classifieds, pluss linkss to o otherr agriculturall organizations.


RALEIGH, NC — Strawberry fertilization has begun in the coastal and piedmont regions of North Carolina. Fruit quality and yield will depend on how well nutrients are managed from now until harvest. “Plant tissue analysis from the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services provides the most accurate way to monitor strawberry nutrition and adjust fertilizer rates,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler.

The department recommends that growers submit strawberry tissue samples every two weeks throughout the bloom and fruiting stages. The test costs $7 per sample for North Carolina growers and $27 for out-of-state growers. It normally takes two working days for the department’s Agronomic Services Division laboratory to measure nutrient levels in each sample and post test results and recommendations online at www.ncagr.gov/

agronomi/uyrplant.htm. Strawberry tissue samples should contain only most recently mature, trifoliate leaves (MRMLs). These leaves are full-sized and green and consist of one petiole (leaf stalk) with three leaflets. They are usually located three to five leaves back from the growing point. Avoid collecting leaves that are damaged or dull in color. When MRMLs are being collected, it is very important to detach the petiole from the leaflets immediately. This action halts nutrient transfer between the two plant parts, which will be analyzed separately for different purposes. Analysis of leaflets can reveal nutrient imbalances within the plant. Analysis of petioles indicates the amount of soil nitrogen currently available for crop growth and development, and serves as a basis for the nitrogen rate recommendation. Each sample should include MRMLs from 20 to 25 plants randomly selected within a uniform area. For example, all of the plant material in a single sample should be the same variety, growing on the same soil type, planted at the same time and having the same management history. This is known as a representative sample. To provide accurate recommendations, the Agronomic Services Division asks growers to provide specific information about each crop sample. Details about fertilization history, environmental conditions and the name of the variety being grown should be

written on the NCDA&CS “Plant Sample Information” form, which is available on the division’s website. On the form, it is especially important to indicate the appropriate growth-stage code (B1 through B12) based on the week of bloom. David Dycus, an NCDA&CS regional agronomist based in Sanford, said it is important that growers have an overall understanding of fertilization strategy to use tissue analysis effectively. Growers who want to initiate a sampling program are encouraged to contact their NCDA&CS regional agronomist for guidance. Information on collecting and submitting strawberry tissue samples is available online at www.ncagr.gov/agronomi/pictorial.htm. NCDA&CS regional agronomists can also provide advice on sampling and fertilization. To identify the agronomist for your area, visit www.ncagr.gov/agronomi/rahome.htm, or call Kent Messick at 919-733-2655.

Page 3 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

Manage strawberry fertilization with tissue testing


1 ROW 3PT YETTER STRIPTILL, with crumbler Cole MX12, no till planter, Cover crop roller crimper 3 acres 3 yrs. 585-9674620.(NY) TWO HEREFORD YEARLY HEIFERS, 600-700lb, one Hereford steer 800lb, grain fed from birth, must sell, excellent condition. Owego, N.Y. 607-687-4679.(NY) SCHERMER ELECTRIC HOG STUNNER, older model, works well, used in slaughterhouse, commercial grade, good condition $1,500. 585-659-2936.(NY) SILAGE WAGONS: Badger 1050 tandem axles $3500. (2) Badger 950 tandem axles for parts, good running gears $500. each. 540-399-1735.(VA) JD 945 MOCO, needs fixing or parts, best offer; Hesston 1160 Hydroswing haybine good shape $3500 leave message. 518965-7682.(NY) LEAF AND GRASS CATCHER fits most John Deere riding mowers, like new, new $340.00 asking $150.42” deck. 540-5781010.(VA) SHULTE 12’ PTO POWERED ROCK RAKE $4,300. one pair 20.8x38 snap on duals with hardware $1,350. 315-3355707.(NY) ALLIS 185 RADIATOR 190XT Allis engine block 301. N.H. Wrapper; BP37 801 Ford 3pt wood splitter Ford 8N horse-drawn disk. 607-538-1654.(NY) WHEAT STRAW, clean, easy shake out, 40 pound string bales, delivery Canandaigua and surrounding towns to North of Penn Yan. 585-747-7567.(NY) FOR SALE: Steel wheels for JD 40 combine $300. 315-781-2571.(NY) WANTED: FACTORY 2 POST R.O.P.S. with canopy for IH 766. 802-345-8272.(VT)

HAY FIRST CUTTING, 35 40lb bale fence post will cut to size and order. 518-3584832.(NY)

2 JOHN DEERE 2840 TRACTORS, one is in very good condition, and one is in good condition. 315-729-8018.(NY)

6 JOHN DEERE soybean meters used on 162 acres $900. 585-526-6755.(NY)

NATURALLY RAISED, antibiotic - hormone free, feeder pigs for sale $75.ea or 6 or more $65.ea, quality containerized nursery stock. 315-536-6406.(NY)

JD 260 LOADER; JD 524 front mount blade; JD 46A loader; 55 gallon drums w/lids; Case IH 885 2WD cab; 518-3760244.(NY)

3-HORSE DUNHAM BUSH COMPRESSOR, 3-horse Tecumsel compressor, 5horse Copeland compressor removed last week professionally, runs excellent $800. $1,000. 518-852-1137.(NY)

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER MODEL 460, 4 row corn planter, lots of plates, owners manual, good condition ready for work, bug boxes. 315-436-4058.(NY)

CROSSBRED BULL CALVES, Normande Holstein Jersey crosses, also some heifer calves, Dayton 5-horsepower farm duty motor, good condition $150. 315-6554395.(NY)

HAY FOR SALE, 1st cut - $3.00, 2nd cut $3.50, 35-45lb bales. 518-638-8074.(NY) JOHN DEERE 343 3RN corn head, with adapter for snaplage fits 3000 or 5000 JD harvester, stored inside $2,900. 315-4203396.(NY)

ONTARIO GRAIN DRILL, always kept inside $500. Kools Big Brother silage blower with pipe $450. 607-753-8485.(NY)

MINIATURE HORSES, 1 year old fillies, tiny black with papers $300. Bay $200. both are very friendly. OBO 585-5264736.(NY)

5 BOTTOM WHITE automatic reset plows, works excellent. 518-638-8724.(NY) ONE VACUUM PUMP $350. 400Gal. bulk milk tank w/compress $1,200. Aluminum conveyor 20ft long use for sawdust, grain, and cleaning. 413-562-2981.(MA)

WANTED: Work horses buy or borrow need for field work, also grain binder. Hershberger, 365 Steuben Rd. Poland, NY 13431-1829.

LOCUST FENCE POSTS, two to three dollars each. 518-234-7870.(NY)

BLUE HEELER PUPPIES very cute and playful, both parents are good cattle dogs $100. OBO. 607-532-9582.(NY)

LOCUST FENCE POSTS, 4”x7’ $4.50, 5”x6”x8’ $10.00, 6”x8”x8’ $12.50; 7-21 hole nest boxes $50.00, circular sawmill, trade for maple equipment? 585-554-6188.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 40 dozer New Holland 315 wire baler, John Deere wheel rake ear corn by the ton, leave message. 716-7513917.(NY)

WANTED: Egg washer. Do you have one sitting in the corner of your old hen house? Please call! 518-872-2375.(NY)

THREE NOVA certified Holstein heifers average weight 700lbs open. $2,500. OBO Schwartz Farm 6332 Co. Rte. 8 Avoca, NY 14809.

500 GALLON POT “O” GOLD aluminum tank $800. 716-592-2108.(NY)

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BALEAGE 4x4 2nd, 3rd certified organic small squares 1st, 2nd horse quality, stainless steel vacuum tank, Firestone Winter Force 225/60R16. 315-796-0099.(NY)

SMALL HEIFER RAISER, wants to raise you’re heifers from newborn to 2 years old reference’s March to November please call 518-817-0336.(NY)

JD 950 CULTIMULCHER, 16’, like new, $4,800; Hay, 1st & 2nd, small squares; Cedar fence posts, 6’, 7’; 518-7744928.(NY)

5 TRELLEBORG TIRES $4,500. 710-4022.5, 1 at 90%, 2 at 80%, 2 at 50%. 607343-1682.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 2240 with 3200 hours, new paint, plow, counter weight bucket, chains, new hydraulic pump, excellent condition asking $10,500. 413-238-5380.(MA)

2012 JD 348 BALER #42 ejector with electric controls, always kept under cover $24,500. 603-736-4549.(NH) 6 PURE BRED Black Angus heifers 10-15 months and a 3 yr. old cow, some AI bred, great stock. 585-538-4219.(NY) FORD 501 3-point sickelbar mower 7ft cut ,extra cutter bar $175. Naples, NY. 585396-2198

BERTOUD TOWER, 3 row grape sprayer $4,200. 8 row Rawson strip tiller $46. NH116 haybine 14 ft cut $4,200. 585-3015041.(NY) NEW IDEA, ground driven 2 wheel rubber tired ,12A manure spreader shed kept, good condition $1,800. Jeff Co. N.Y. 315783-9788.

GEHL CHOPPER 865 hay corn head $3,500. Schulte WRS rock rake $8,500. Leon 10’ bunk blade $1,500. Continental engine $400. 315-339-4147.(NY) WANTED: Sunset tank washer in very good condition: LP bird control cannon: 1 big round calf hutch, in central NY area. 315-839-9938.(NY) FOR SALE: 24” Planer $450. Belt or a PTO up to 6” thickness. Reg Schweitzer 14014 Case Rd. Chaumont, NY 13622. 315-6495758. WANTED: Wood fired arch 4x14 evaporator any condition considered. FOR SALE Hesston T010 haybine $1,000. Jerry Schalabach 5537 Nelson Canastota. 315-6558884.(NY)

I.H.C. 800 4 row liquid plate type corn planter with monitor, asking $1,600. 585786-3364. (NY)

15 BRED HEIFERS due April $950. each bred to Jersey, also dairy goats, milkers kids, bucks, Alpine and Saanen. 315-8582847.(NY)

12 ROW KINZE 2600 dry fertilizer asking $22,000. O.B.O. Steel tracks for skidloader $2,000. post pounder for skidloader $2,000. 585-704-2664.(NY)

2000 F-450 DUMP TRUCK 7.3L power stroke 6-speed, 88,000 miles, original owner, great shape, many new parts, asking $11,800. 315-219-1336.(NY)

NEW 8X16 and 9X16 Kicker rack wagons, 5 Holstein steers 400 to 550 lbs. 607-8476665.(NY)

Bale Squeeze for skidsteer, $750; exc cond; Gehl 1060 2RN & 7’ hay head, tandem, metal stop, VG condition, $3,200. 518-332-8116(NY)

40 COW JERSEY HERD, conventional cows and heifers for sale. Call for more info. 207-409-9453.(ME)

2 IH BLOWERS #56 and 600, good condition. 716-481-0740.(NY)

14X32 STEEL SILO with roof, also Ideal barn cleaner, no chain good motor $500. each, can deliver call 315-783-7618.(NY)

PATZ SILO UNLOADER 18’-20’ 7.5HP unloaded silo twice $1,200. 2in surge pipeline jar $350. 7ft Brush Hog twin blades $1,200. 518-797-5161.(NY)

TWO YEAR OLD service bull HolsteinHereford-cross $950. Also barn lightning rods $25. with copper cable $50. Otego, N.Y. 607-988-6348.

ARCTIC CAT 90 CC four wheeler, excellent condition, best offer. Stone carrier for IH 966, 1066, best offer. 315-5363053.(NY)

IH 1066 BLACK STRIPE OPEN STATION $7,200. 20.8-38 Goodyear tire 75% tread, on double bevel rim $950. 315-9424069.(NY)

DOLLY WHEEL HAY RAKE, works great, NH 268 baler stored indoors field ready, will demo, delivery available. 607-8296817.(NY)

WRAPPED SILAGE round bales, 1st cut 6/10, 50 bales alfalfa mix, 150 bales grass 4ft solid core bales. 603-747-2199.(NH) BOER GOAT BUCK, 4 years old, unregistered but excellent blood lines, mild tempered, excellent for herd breeding. 716628-9956.(NY) NEW HOLLAND 1038 bale wagon, good condition $7,500. Case IH 8370 haybine 14’ hydro swing stub guards vg condition $2,900. 585-703-5988.(NY)

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Page 5 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

Hello I’m P eggy


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 6

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You The Kitchen Diva by Angela Shelf Medearis

Cabbage has the right stuff Nutrition experts recommend that you eat cabbage or other cruciferous vegetables — meaning “cross-bearing” from the shape of their flowers, whose four petals resemble a cross — as part of a healthy diet. They suggest you eat at least 2 cups, 3 to 4 times per week. Cruciferous vegetables include cauliflower, cress, bok choy, broccoli and similar green leaf vegetables. I love cruciferous vegetables, but I’ve found cabbage to be the most versatile of the group. Cabbage is a good source of vitamins C and A. When choosing cabbage heads, select those that are firm and dense with shiny, crisp, colorful leaves. Examine the leaves to make sure that they’re free of cracks, bruises and blemishes. Severe damage to the outer leaves means there is probably worm damage or decay in the inner core as well. We enjoy stuffing cabbage leaves with a variety of interesting ingredients. This recipe for Cabbage and Potato Cups makes a great weekday side dish, or a unique appetizer when topped with thin slices of crispy Prosciutto or Parma ham, or bacon crumbles. Remember, eat more cabbage (or other cruciferous vegetables) and improve your health!

Cabbage and potato cups 1 medium onion, diced 2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil, plus more for drizzling 1 (3 pound) head leafy green cabbage; discolored, damaged or tough outer leaves discarded 1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 1/2 teaspoons black pepper 2/3 cup chicken broth or water 2 pounds large boiling potatoes 1 cup buttermilk, shaken 1 cup, coarsely grated, extra-sharp white Cheddar or Pepper Jack cheese 1 tablespoon drained, bottled horseradish 8 tablespoons unsalted butter 3/4 cup Panko or fresh bread crumbs 1. Cook onion in oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until soft and golden, about 6 to 8 minutes. 2. Bring a 6- to 8-quart pot of salted water to a boil. Remove and discard the core of the cabbage and carefully lower the cabbage leaves into the boiling water using a slotted spoon. 3. Boil cabbage about 5 minutes, or until softened. Transfer the largest leaves (at least 6) to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. Transfer remaining cabbage to a colander to drain. Transfer large leaves to paper towels to drain, then pat dry. 4. Using a nonstick muffin tin with 6 (1-cup) muffin cups, lightly spray each muffin cup or oil with 2 tablespoons of butter. Cut parchment or wax paper into 12 (10- by 2-inch) strips. Put 2 strips in a crisscross pattern in each cup to help with removing cabbage. (You will have a 2-inch overhang.) Line each cup with a large cabbage leaf. Coarsely chop enough remaining cabbage to measure 3 cups, then add to onion along with garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper, and water, and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is tender and browned, about 10 minutes.

stock.xchg photo

5. Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 350°F. 6. Peel raw potatoes and cut into 1-inch cubes, then cover with cold salted water by 1 inch in a 2- to 3-quart saucepan and bring to a boil. Cook potatoes until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain in a colander, then set potatoes in colander over saucepan to steam-dry, uncovered, 5 minutes. Using a large bowl and a slotted spoon or potato masher, mix the potatoes with the buttermilk, cheese, horseradish, remaining 6 tablespoons butter and remaining 1 teaspoon salt and pepper until combined well. 7. Fill each cabbage leaf with 2 to 3 tablespoons of mashed potato mixture. Then, place a layer of the sauteed cabbage mixture on the potatoes. Top with remaining potato mixture, and sprinkle evenly with breadcrumbs. Drizzle crumbs with olive oil. Fold edges of cabbage in toward filling (do not completely cover). At this point, you can cover and refrigerate the Cabbage and Potato Cups for 24 hours. Bring to room temperature (about 30 to 45 minutes) before baking. 8. Bake until heated through and edges of cabbage are well browned, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer stuffed leaves to plates using wax or parchment overhangs. Makes 6 servings. SHORTCUT TIP: If you have at least 2 cups of leftover mashed potatoes, or leftover baked or micro-cooked potatoes, mix them with the rest of the stuffing ingredients to save time. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

This week’s Sudoku Solution


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FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: 173. Feeder Steers: M&L 350450# 150-187; 450-650# 145-175; 650-750# 140-150; 750-825# 135-145; Hols. 200-300# 115-130; 400-600# 95-118. Feeder Heifers: M&L 280450# 135-160; 450-650# 130-157. Feeder Bulls: M&L 300400# 175-195; 400-500# 150-180; 500-650# 140-154; 650-725# 130-137; 750-850# 97-110. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: 663. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 170-195# 223-235; 270-275# 191-195; 308-345# 180-189; 350-385# 174-193.50; 415438# 171.50-186; 460-475# 158-182; 520-525# 174.50177.50; 605-630# 157-162; 900# 100; S 1-2 255-285# 108-175; 365-395# 148-154. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 220-240# 146-150; 275-285# 151-176; 310-348# 166-176; 355-365# 172-176; 400440# 58.50-169; 451-485# 152-160.50; 510-546# 144154; 565-588# 148-151; 600636# 141-143; 650-660# 133-134; 755-793# 116117.50; S 1-2 320-345# 120166; 355-370# 138-139; 405440# 143-148; 500-525# 120-136; 565-590# 112-146. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 415-447# 169-180; 450-465#

165-173.75; 505-546# 150168; 570-595# 140-151.50; 605-645# 131-132; 815830# 128-139; S 1-2 400425# 144-150; 450-495# 110-158; 555-563# 120-122; 605-640# 110-125; 655660# 110-114. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 1040-1160# 9701175/hd 4-6 mos bred; M&L 1-2 Young 845-873# 900925/hd 7-9 mos bred; M&L 1-2 Middle Aged 915-1065# 800-825/hd 1-3 mos bred; 1015-1170# 825-975/hd 4-6 mos bred; 1255-1260# 9251010/hd 4-6 mos bred; 9701190# 900-1000/hd 7-9 mos bred; S&M 1-2 Young 740760# 775-825/hd 7-9 mos bred. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 1111 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 200-240# 180-213; 250-295# 170-220; 300-345# 170-209; 350-395# 160-206; 400447# 150-216; 455-495# 180-193; 500-542# 174-187; 560-590# 166-181; 600620# 150-158; 708-735# 130-142; 830# 130; S 1-2 250-275# 123-165; 300-320# 101-150; 370-395# 111-150; 405-445# 126-150; 455-485# 145-156. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 205-245# 150-170; 255-295# 150-175; 310-348# 140-165; 350-398# 150-174; 400445# 140-164; 450-495# 144-166; 500-549# 130-166; 550-595# 130-158.50; 600645# 133-156; 655-693#

125-140; 700-737# 120-135; 760-775# 102-125; S 1-2 270-285# 140-148; 325345# 127-132.50; 405-445# 117-137; 460-495# 113-139; 520-545# 120-124; 565-595# 114-125; 610-640# 115-126. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-498# 144-187; 500-545# 140-178; 550-595# 130-169; 600-645# 125-152; 655-690# 120-135; 700-720# 120-131; 750-795# 104-118; 11151125# 96-106; S 1-2 450485# 110-138; 620-635# 116-124. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 147. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 500-600# 172; 600-700# 140; M&L 2 300-400# 206.50; 400-500# 195; 500600# 175; 600-700# 152; M&L 3 300-400# 190; 400500# 156-193, mostly 193; 500-600# 148-174; S 1 400500# 119-136. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 134; 500-600# 140.50; 600-700# 132; M&L 2 300-400# 169.50; 400500# 157.50; 500-600# 139141.50; 600-700# 124; M&L 3 300-400# 146; 400-500# 154; 500-600# 146; S 1 400500# 120; 500-600# 119.50120; 600-700# 118. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400500# 176.50-180; 500-600# 162.50; 600-700# 113; M&L 2 300-400# 180; 400-500# 160-184; 500-600# 160160.50; 600-700# 141; S 1 400-500# 152; 600-700# 100-126.

400-500# 127. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1530. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 191-206; 400-500# 185-202; 500-600# 169.50196; 600-700# 149-177; 700800# 136.50-160; 800-900# 139.50-140; 900-1000# 120.50-131; M&L 2 300-400# 204; 400-500# 162.50-189; 500-600# 180-185; 600-700# 145-170; 700-800# 121-143; 800-900# 126; S 1 400-500# 140-163; 500-600# 160; 600700# 132-140; 700-800# 133. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 127.50; 300400# 130; 500-600# 100118; 600-700# 117; 700800# 89-107; 800-900# 8186; 900-1000# 99; 10001100# 88. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 154-175; 400-500# 149-174; 500-600# 134-158; 600-700# 125-149; 700-800# 110-143; 800-900# 115-139; M&L 2 200-300# 160; 300400# 147-168; 400-500# 123-155; 500-600# 116-147; 600-700# 118-124; 700-800# 115-125; S 1 400-500# 110120.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 215-245; 300-400# 179-215; 400-500# 181-211; 500-600# 161-171; 600-700# 125-155; 700-800# 113-144; 800-900# 106-109; M&L 2 200-300# 180-202; 300-400# 136-191; 400-500# 155-197; 500-600# 140-162.50; 600700# 129-149; 700-800# 110; S 1 300-400# 130-169;

SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1032. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 170-202; 300-400# 190-210; 400-500# 188-201; 500-600# 166-199; 600-700# 140-181; 700-800# 130-145; 800-900# 129-140; 9001000# 124; 1000-1100# 95; M&L 2 200-300# 149-219; 300-400# 179-202; 400-500# 155-201; 500-600# 157195.50; 600-700# 150-172; 700-800# 128-133; 800-900# 118.50-125; 900-1000# 116; 1000-1100# 95. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 107-149; 300-400# 132.50-144; 400500# 121-135; 500-600# 116-132; 600-700# 100.50116; 700-800# 85-100.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 131-175; 300-400# 170-185.50; 400-500# 150172; 500-600# 135-163; 600700# 128-153; 700-800# 120-130.50; 800-900# 109122; M&L 2 200-300# 149165; 300-400# 162-183; 400500# 123-168.75; 500-600# 135-157; 600-700# 117-145; 700-800# 108-123; 800-900# 122. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 200; 300-400# 181-202; 400-500# 171-197; 500-600# 164.50-185; 600700# 136-191; 700-800# 124-156; 800-900# 100-124; 900-1000# 95; M&L 2 200300# 194-202; 300-400# 136-194; 400-500# 150-197; 500-600# 142-180; 600-700#

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138-167; 700-800# 96-135; 800-900# 96. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 352. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 182-191; 151162.12; 700-800# 139-142; M&L 2 400-500# 181186.50; 500-600# 161-180; 600-700# 164-167. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 170.50; 400-500# 163-164; 500-600# 155-159; 600-700# 134-137; 700-800# 117; M&L 2 300-400# 168169; 400-500# 160-166; 500600# 142-158; 600-700# 124-131. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300400# 187-202; 400-500# 175-181. LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1501. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 196; 400-500# 190-193; 500-600# 173186.50; 600-700# 151163.75; 700-800# 127129.50; M&L 2 300-400# 200-203.25; 400-500# 184199; 500-600# 168-182.50; 600-700# 149-158; 700-800# 123-135.50; M&L 3 300-400# 194-196; 400-500# 183-184; 500-600# 165.50-170.25; 600-700# 126-135.50; 700800# 123.50; S 1 300-400# 190; 400-500# 183; 500600# 159.50; 600-700# 130. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 170-171; 400-500# 156.50-164.75; 500-600# 143-158.50; 600-700# 139141; 700-800# 132.50; M&L 2 300-400# 175-176.50; 400-500# 160.75-165; 500600# 145-157.25; 600-700# 140.25-144.25; 700-800# 130.50-131; M&L 3 300-400# 174-180.50; 400-500# 161165.50; 500-600# 147156.50; 600-700# 125-138; 700-800# 105; S 1 300-400# 165-168; 400-500# 159.25; 500-600# 150; 600-700# 124.25; 700-800# 110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 199; 400-500# 189.50-192.75; 500-600# 163.50-181; 600-700# 152; M&L 2 300-400# 199; 400500# 179.50-198, mostly 190; 500-600# 153-168; 600700# 152.50; S 1 300-400# 195; 400-500# 178-190; 500600# 150. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 24. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 203.50; M&L 2 400-500# 173.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 600-700# 130; 800-900# 115; M&L 2 300-400# 161; 400-500# 155. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report

Page 7 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

MARKET REPORTS


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 8

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, March 19

Thursday, March 22

• Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Dairy 1 pm followed by sheep, lamb, goat, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518392-3321.

• 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220

Tuesday, March 20 • North Woodstock Rd, Southbridge, MA. Foreclosure Greenhouse Farm Auction. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com

Wednesday, March 21 • 8:55 AM: Rising, MD. 3 Day Retirement Auction. Business Liquidation. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-2965041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-3941515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558

Friday, March 23 • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704399-6111, 704-399-9756 • 11:00 AM: Passumpsic, VT. Farm Equipment Liquidation. Wright’s Auction Service, 802-3346115

Saturday, March 24 • Atglen, PA. The Gala at Glen Valley II. Hosted by Glen Valley Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-7462226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Monday, March 26 • 10:00 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Special Holiday Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. We will start this sale at 10 am due to the amount of small animals. This date is the last week of March. Call for advertising your group - it makes a difference. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Wednesday, March 28 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716450-0558 • 12:00 Noon: East Middlebury, VT. Annual Spring Dairy/Feeder & Consignment Sale. Addison Co. Commission Sales E.G. Wisnowski & Sons, 800339-COWS or 802-388-2661 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Regular Livestock Sale. Easter Lamb & Goat Sale approx. 5 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Friday, March 30 • 11:00 AM: Rt. 5, Coventry, VT. Organic Farm Auction of 135 head organic Holsteins and B.C., Full line of equipment for Paul Lehoullier. Roberts Auction Service, 802-334-2638

Saturday, March 31 • Cobleskill, NY. 31st Annual Cobleskill Dairy Fashion Sale. Hosted by SUNY Cobleskill Dairy Cattle Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 205 Hanley Rd, Nassua, NY. Estate Auction.

Case-IH 685 4x4 Diesel w/loader, JD 4030, Oliver 1755 tractors, Befco C50 15’ Batwing finish mower, Wood Working & Mechanics tools, Horse equip. & Tack, Lumber, Cattle Show equip. & gates, Asst furniture & collectibles. Jacquier Auctions, 413-5696421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 9:00 AM: Windmill Farm Market, 3900 Rt. 14A, 5 mi. S. of Penn Yan, NY. Equipment Consignment Auction. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm • 10:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Horse & Tack Sale. Starting with tack at 10 am. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 12:00 Noon: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Lamb, Sheep and Goat Easter Sale. All animals taken Fri., March 30 from 8 am - 5 pm.. Also accepting until 10 am day of sale. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220

Monday, April 2 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Thursday, April 5 • 11:00 AM: 2324 Ridge Rd., Penn Yan, NY. Marvin & Mildred Koek Excellent Farm Equipment Retirement Auction. IH 1420 4WD combine, ‘95 Ford 16’ grain truck, tillage, planting & harvest equip. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm • 5:00 PM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Open house & viewing of cattle for the Spring Premier Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Friday, April 6 • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Spring Premier All Breed Sale. 165 Head selling: 100 Holsteins, 30 Jerseys, 30 Brown Swiss, 5 Guernsey. Selections are complete the quality is the best ever. We have show calves of all breeds, outstanding bred heifers, fresh young cows that will please the most discriminating. Watch our website for complete catalog on line. (Join us the evening before for open house and cattle viewing). Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Spring Premier All Breed Sale. Selections are underway. Accepting registered high quality cattle

give us a call, Join in the Excitement - Best lineup we’ve ever had, join the outstanding herds that are participating Merrilea, Rolling View, Oakfield Corners, Liddleholm, Lylehaven, Spruce-Haven, Muranda, Midas-Touch, Fantasy-Found, CoVista, Boanco, Sco-Li, Hills Valley, Dublin Hills, Osborns, Evans, Empire Farm, Wisner Farms, Lundy, Lincoln Hill, Lawton’s Jerseys, Pineyvale, Posthaven, Dairysmith, Elm Spring, Carpsdale, Woodmansee, Lismore Dairy, Marshman, LocustVale, Blue-Gene- the list is growing rapidly. We will have it all - Great Individuals, many Generations of VG & EX, Red & White, Milk, Show type (Many will be entered in NY Spring show), Genomics and most importantly commercially sound cattle with great earning potential. Watch website for updated sale highlights. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Saturday, April 7 • 10:30 AM: Independence Township (Allegany Co.) New York. Complete Line of Good Farm Machinery and Livestock Handling and Support Equipment for Lyon View Farm. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Tuesday, April 10 • Westport, NY. Pat Bennett Equipment Dispersal. Full line of equipment including 2 2010 John Deere Tractors, NH BB 940 tandem large square baler w/crop processor.Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802626-8892

Friday, April 13 • The Pines Farm. Barton, VT. 151st Top of Vermont Invitation Dairy Sale. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802626-8892 • Batavia, NY. 2012 Spring Consignment Auction to benefit Agriculture Education. Sponsored by the Farm Burewau. Now accepting quality consignments. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 10:30 AM: Catskill Tractor, Inc., 384 Center St., Franklin, NY. Farm Equipment Consignment and Inventory Reduction. Franklin Used Equipment Sales, Inc. Auction Service, 607-829-2600 • 6:00 PM: Syracuse, NY. NY Spring Color Breed Sale. Held in conjunction with the NY Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

Saturday, April 14 • Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Machinery Consignment Sale. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 8:00 AM: Beaver Mountain Farms, 1820 County Rt. 7, Ancram, NY. On the Farm of Don & Betty Duksa, 22nd Annual Auction. Quality Consignments Accepted. Leaman Auctions, J. Edward Leaman, 610-662-8149, 717-464-1128 www.leamanauctions.com, auctionzip.com 3721 • 4:00 PM: Syracuse, NY. New York Spring Holstein Sale. Held in conjunction with the New York Spring Dairy Carousel. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

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STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 950. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 192-206; 400-500# 185-202; 500-600# 170-196; 600-700# 153-177; 700-800# 149-160; 800-900# 139.50140; 900-1000# 131; M&L 2 300-400# 204; 400-500# 175-189; 500-600# 180-185; 600-700# 161-170; 700-800# 141-143; S 1 400-500# 140163; 500-600# 160; 600700# 132-140; 700-800# 133. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 160-173; 400-500# 157-174; 500-600# 142153.50; 600-700# 130140.50; 700-800# 131.75143; 800-900# 139; M&L 2 300-400# 150-168; 400-500# 144-155; 500-600# 142-147; 600-700# 124; 700-800# 115-125; S 1 400-500# 110120.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 190-200; 400-500# 181-190; 500-600# 165-167; 600-700# 125-141; M&L 2 300-400# 175-191; 400-500# 177-185; 500-600# 140162.50; 600-700# 129-134.

TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 464. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 170-191; 300-400# 201-210; 400-500# 188-201; 500-600# 168-199; 600-700# 140-181; 700-800# 130-143; 800-900# 135-140; M&L 2 200-300# 219; 300-400# 189-202; 400-500# 174-187; 500-600# 157-195.50; 600700# 166-172; 700-800# 128; 800-900# 125. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 107; 300400# 132.50; 400-500# 121; 500-600# 116; 600-700# 100.50; 700-800# 85-100.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 175; 300-400# 173-174; 400-500# 150-172; 500-600# 135-163; 600-700# 140.50-153; 700-800# 120127; 800-900# 109; M&L 2 200-300# 165; 300-400# 162-165; 400-500# 123-160; 500-600# 135-155; 600-700# 117-145; 700-800# 108-109. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 200; 300-400# 181; 400-500# 171-187.50; 500-600# 165-185; 600-700# 162-191; 700-800# 124-156; 800-900# 124; M&L 2 200300# 202; 300-400# 136189; 400-500# 150-195; 500600# 142-180; 600-700# 159-167; 700-800# 96-135; 800-900# 96. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 584. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 204-210; 400-500# 180-200; 500-600# 167-188; 600-700# 149-161; 700-800# 141-149.50; 800-900# 124129; 900-1000# 126; 1000-

1100# 120; M&L 2 300-400# 175; 400-500# 175-191; 500600# 151-154; 600-700# 125; 800-900# 117; 9001000# 106; 1000-1100# 106. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 157-170; 400-500# 147-168; 500-600# 142160.50; 600-700# 128148.50; 700-800# 130-134; M&L 2 300-400# 150-155; 400-500# 149-163; 500-600# 135.50; 600-700# 114-126; 800-900# 97-108. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 180-212.50; 300400# 170-197.50; 400-500# 159-191; 500-600# 159-181; 600-700# 146-160; 700-800# 110-133; 800-900# 116; M&L 2 200-300# 169-185; 300400# 150-177; 400-500# 150-161; 500-600# 130-156; 800-900# 94; 900-1000# 92. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 323. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 190-202; 300-400# 190-198; 400-500# 197.50; 500-600# 166-179; 600-700# 160; 700-800# 141.50-142; 800-900# 135; 900-1000# 124; 1000-1100# 95; M&L 2 200-300# 149-198; 300-400# 190; 400-500# 169-201; 500600# 169; 600-700# 150164; 700-800# 133; 800900# 118.50; 900-1000# 116; 1000-1100# 95. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 149; 300400# 138-144; 400-500# 129-135; 500-600# 120-132; 600-700# 104-116. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 131-157; 300-400# 170-185.50; 400-500#

Page 9 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

r Ou t u n o Ab uctio ng k As rse A Listi Ho ndar e Cal

ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 115. Feeder Holstein Heifers: L 2-3 200-300# 127.50; 300400# 130; 500-600# 100118; 600-700# 117; 700800# 107; 900-1000# 99; 1000-1100# 88. Feeder Heifers: 41. 500600# 134-158; 600-700# 125-139.50; 700-800# 110122.


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 10

164.50-166.50; 500-600# 150-154.75; 600-700# 128145; 700-800# 130.50; 800900# 122; M&L 2 200-300# 149-159; 300-400# 175-183; 400-500# 168-168.75; 500600# 150-157; 600-700# 137-140; 700-800# 123; 800900# 122. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 200; 300-400# 194-200; 400-500# 193-197; 500-600# 167.50-170; 600700# 143.50-145; 700-800# 126; 800-900# 100; 9001000# 95; M&L 2 200-300# 194; 300-400# 194; 400500# 194-197; 500-600# 160-168.50; 600-700# 138139.50; 700-800# 122.50.

825-1325# lo dress 43.5067. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 940-1100# 85-88; S&M 1-2 Middle Aged 785880# 63-72; S 1-2 Young 680-750# 75-80. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1060-1465# 94.50-100; 1080-1245# lo dress 6981.50; 1500-1945# 93.50101. Cows/Calf Pairs: 7. S 1-2 570# young cows w/100# calves 1000/pr; M&L 1-2 885-1070# young to middle age cows w/60-200# calves 925-1175/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 75-130.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE

SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 266. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7488.50; 1200-1600# 75.5088.50; HY 1200-1600# 92.50-99; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 70-78; 12002000# 74-81.50; HY 12002000# 78.50-83; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 56-70; 850-1200# 60-79.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 90-103.50; 1500-2500# 98.50-110.50; HY 1000-1500# 105-110.50; 1500-2500# 106.50-111.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 17. M&L 1, 2-8 yrs. old, 8201590# 820-1220/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 5. M&L 1, 4-5 yrs. old w/calves 100-200# 10001350# 980-1430/pr.

SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1460-1775# 80.50-89.50; 1410-1665# hi dress 90-96; 1400-1725# lo dress 65-76.50; Boner 8085% lean 885-890# 86-87; 915-1390# 79-89.50; 9801390# hi dress 91-98; 9101385# lo dress 65-77; Lean 85-90% lean 800-895# 7078; 835-1205# lo dress 5769. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 680-805# 0.95-1.09 Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1340-1425# 93-99; 12401470# hi dress 109-115; 1510-2000# hi dress 101115. Cows/Calf Pairs: 5. M 1-2 1000-1100# middle age cows w/100-200# calves 975-1150/pr; L 1-2 12001250# middle age cows w/200-250# calves 9751300/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 95-120/pr. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1015-1325# 8189.50; 1530-1720# 85.5088.50; Boner 80-85% lean 355-890# 79.50-84; 9451390# 75-87.50; 980-1155# lo dress 72-76; 1465-1795# 81.50-87.50; Lean 85-90% lean 100-770# lo dress 5065; 800-1015# 70.50-72.50;

HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-83, hi dress to 87; Boners 76-85, hi dress 8893; Lean 70-76, hi dress to 80; Thin & Light 70 & dn. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1928# at 99.50; 1 1050# at 88.50. Fed Steers: Hi Ch 13001450# 128-129; 1500-1600# 124-127.50; Sel 1100-1375# 116-120. Fed Heifers: 1496# at 124.75. Calves: Hols. Bulls Ret. to Farm No. 1 80-110# 265290; No. 2 80-120# 250-265; No. 3 74-120# 180-235; Hols.

D SALES STABLES , IN HOLLAN W NELocated 12 Miles East of Lancaster, PA Just Off Rt. 23, New Holland C.

Annual Spring Feeder Cattle Sale

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200 Holsteins & 50 Holstein Cross Steers from Oak Bluff Farms, Woodsboro, MD. These cattle are home raised & ready to go! Wormed, dehoved & double innoculated. Should weigh approx. 800-1100 Lbs. & will sell @ 7 PM All Farm Fresh Cattle are Welcome Any Size - Breed - Sex - or Color Thank You

SALE MANAGED BY: New Holland Sales Stables, Inc. David Kolb 61-L

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Next Special Feeder Cattle Sale Fri. Eve., April 27 • 6PM

Hfrs. 1-2 74-110# 180-235; Beef X Bulls 70-100# 145170; 1 100# at 240. Slaughter Calves: Gd 70100# 65-95. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 489. S l a u g h t e r Steers/Heifers: Ch 2-3 1300-1500# 12675-135.50; 1500# & up 125.75; Sel 2-3 1100-1300# 119.50-125.50; 1300-1500# 114-126; Hols. Steers Sel 2-3 1100-1300# 96.50-98; 1300-1500# 107113; Hfrs. Ch 2-3 900-1000# 112.50-123.50; 1000-1200# 126.25-127.75; 1200-1300# 122.50-129; 1300-1500# 122-132.25; Sel 2-3 10001200# 123.50. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7886; 1200-1600# 75-88; HY 1200-1600# 85.50-96; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 6694.50; 1200-2000# 66-89; HY 1200-2000# 83.50-90.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 44-71; 850-1200# 62.50-86. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 78.50-95; 15002500# 84.50-103.50; HY 1000-1500# 100.50; 15002500# 100-106.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 123. M&L 1-2, 4-12 yrs. old, 9001500# 810-1400/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 28. M&L 1-2, 4-8 yrs. old w/calves 150-250# 11001500# 1100-1800/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 63. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 67.50202.50/hd; 100-130# 100193/cwt.

88-88.90. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 54. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1300-1500# 111.50-120; 1500-1850# 105.75-120; Sel 2-3 900-1000# 103; 11001300# 115-116.50; 13001500# 112.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3

1000-1200# 102-123; 12001400# 122-124.50; Sel 2-3 1000-1200# 107.50. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 43. Slaughter Cows: Breaker

75-80% lean 850-1200# 8084; 1200-1600# 78-85; HY 1200-1600# 86-90; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 7579; 1200-2000# 80-85; HY 1200-2000# 85-89.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 6874. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 87; 1500-2500# 89-98; HY 1000-1500# 107.

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BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 28. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7578; 1200-1600# 78; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 6675; 1200-2000# 70-75; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 5062. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 75; 1500-2500#

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MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8587.25; HY 1200-1600# 8997.50; Boner 80-85% lean

800-1200# 73-84; 12002000# 82-84.50; HY 12002000# 91-103. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 94-106.50; 1500-2500# 83.75-93.50; HY 1000-1500# 117; 15002500# 94-105. Cows Ret. to Farm: 94. M&L 1-2, 4-8 yrs. old 10001300# 1035-1400/hd; M&L 12 8-12 yrs. old 900-1200# 810-1175/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 24. M&L 1-2, 4-8 yrs. old w/calves 150-250# 10001500# 1000-1800, mostly 1325-1500/pr. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 155. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 78-

86; 1200-1600# 75-87; HY 1200-1600# 88-90; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 6882; 1200-2000# 66-82; HY 1200-2000# 83.50-88; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 4450; 850-1200# 64-78. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 78.50-80; 15002500# 84.50-94.50; HY 1000-1500# 100.50; 15002500# 100-104.50. Calves Ret. to Farm: 61. Hols. Steers/Bulls 70-100# 67.50-202.50/hd; 100-130# 193/cwt. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 40. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 84; 1200-1600# 83.50-86.75; HY 1200-1600# 87-89.50; Bon-

er 80-85% lean 800-1200# 78.25-83.25; 1200-2000# 75.25-86; HY 1200-2000# 89-90; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 75-86. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 93-103. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 109-124; 13001500# 132; 1500-1850# 125.50. Slaughter Heifers: 12001400# 119-127; 1400-1600# 126.25-133; Sel 2-3 9001000# 100. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 125. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7885.50; 1200-1600# 82-88.50; HY 1200-1600# 92.50-96; Boner 80-85% lean 800-

MID-ATLANTIC SPRING EQUIPMENT AUCTION Construction Equipment, Tractors, Trucks, Trailers, Planters, Tillage, Implements, Equipment, Lawn and Garden, Tools, ATV’s & More

SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2012 @ 9:00 A.M

Location: Delaware State Fairgrounds (Green Lot) - 18500 S. DuPont Hwy, Harrington, Delaware. Construction Equipment: JCB 508C Forklift w/40' Boom & 8' Bucket - 4WD; Kubota 4540 backhoe; JD 240 skid steer; 1996 Ditch Witch Trencher Model 3610 - 850 hrs. w/Backhoe attachments; Rhino 75 Backhoe 3ph w/18" bucket; NH 3ph backhoe; storage pods, 20 yd. & 15 yd. dumpsters and much more not listed. Tractors: 2008 Kubota M125 - 329 hrs. w/loader; 2008 NH TC 34 DA 4WD hydro - 200 hrs. w/15L 68" loader - 4WD; 1999 JD 790 - 588 hrs; New Holland TC30 4WD hydro w/110TL loader - 717 hrs; JD 4320; Oliver 1900 Checkerboard; Ford 640 w/ front blade; JD "B"; Ford 9N; MF 65, JD MT; Case 1070; 1954 & 1958 Farmall Super MTA and many more not listed. Tractors To Be Sold At Approximately 2:00 p.m. Trucks, 5th Wheel Camper & Trailers: 2004 GMC C7500 Duramax Diesel 4000 gal. double wall tank, top & bottom load oil truck; 1990 GMC 7000 Diesel Top Kick 2700 gal. three pocket oil truck w/recovery pump; 1987 International S1700 2900 gal. two pocket tank oil truck; 2000 GMC C7500 Diesel w/IMT 6425 boom & 18' bed; 1994 International 8200 Truck Tractor; 2006 Ford F-550 XL Super Duty Power Stroke V8 Diesel w/1000 gal waste & 300 gal. water tank; 2003 Ford F-350 Super Duty XL Power Stroke V8 Turbo Diesel w/Reading utilty & crane; 2006 Ford F-450 XL Super Duty Power Stroke V8 Turbo Diesel w/Omaha utility body & Thieman lift gate; 2004 Ford F-550 XL Super Duty Power Stroke V8 Turbo Diesel w/Reading utility & Tommy Gate lift gate; 1987 GMC 7000 w/1600 gal. elliptical tank; 2003 Ford E-350 Super Duty work van; 1998 Chevy 3500 - diesel; 2008 Chaparral Coachman 5th wheel Camper; 2006 DTOE flat bed car trailer; 2003 PAMR enclosed utility trailer; 2003 10' US cargo enclosed utility trailer; 16' Trailer w/ winch; storage trailers; 12'x54', 8'x32' & 8'x10' office trailers;The Frog Vacuum Recovery Tank; an assortment of single & double axle utility trailers and more not listed. Tillage, Implements & Equipment: JD 2800 four bottom V-width plow; JD 1600 14' chisel plow w/buster bar; Case IH 5400 - no till drill; John Blue 400 gal. sprayer, JD 7000 four row dry planter w/ splitter; JD 7000 six row liquid - no till: JD 7200 four row liquid planter - no till; JD 444 corn head; Hobbs hard hose irrigation reel; International 56 two row dry planter; International 800 four row dry planter; Hardi ditch bank mower; JD 346 square baler; Gehl 1475 round baler;Vermeer S04 round baler;JD 336 square baler;NH 144 hay inverter;Grain cleaner;several funnel body wagons;3ph post hole diggers;3ph 6', 7' & 8' scraper blades; box blades; 3ph dirt scoops; 3ph yard rakes; and much more. Lawn & Garden, ATVs: JD 757 Z Trak w/60" - 298 hrs; Cub Cadet Tank w/60" - 65 hrs; Hustler Super Z w/66" - 72 hrs; JD X465 w/54" - 415 hrs; JD LX176 w/48"; Cub Cadet HDS3205 w/48" - 1186 hrs; JD X540 w/28 hrs & warranty to 6-17-15; 1984 JD 420 w/60" - 1733 hrs; JD LX277 w/48"- 414 hrs; JD 345 w/54"-1244 hrs; JD GT275 w/48"; Kubota RTV900 w/front plow; JD HPX Gator w/4WD - 861 hrs. & fully enclosed cab; 2010 JD 4x2 TX Gator-195 hrs; 2009 JD 4x2 TS Gator - 624 hrs; JD 4x2 TS Gator fully loaded - 337 hrs; JD HPX diesel Gator; 2007 Can-Am mini DS90 four wheeler, Avanti 125 four wheeler 6.5 hp Yard Machine chipper; Toro Powerlite snow blower; JD J3816R chainsaw; Stihl weed wackers; Echo GT2000R weed wackers and more. Hit & Miss Engine,Tools & Miscellaneous: Stover "Type K" hit & miss engine w/pump; Monarch Model 75 lathe w/accessories; Southbend 14' metal lathe w/3 & 4 jaw chuck; Kohler 60kw generator; Apache 250 air compressor - New w/warranty; Apache WP30 3" water pump - New w/warranty; Puma 80 gal. air compressor; Snap-on tool box, Wards welder w/cart; transit w/measuring stick; scaffolding; alum. ramps; shop hoist; front & rear tine tillers; Case IH & Int. pedal tractors; trailer winches; welders & access.; generators; pressure washers; hand tools; shop rugs & towels and much more. Late Listing: Freisen 240 seed express; 2005 JD 4520; JD 14’ flatbed wagon; NH 18’ flatbed wagon; Hutchison 30’ grain elevator (like new); NH hay rake; NI 65 mixer & grinder; Int’l 8330 9’ hay bine; Int’l 550 spreader; 16’ crawfoot packer; MF 520 16’ disc; JD 8300 drill w/cultivator; 10’ chisel plow; JD 790 excavator w/ thumb; 1995 Kenworth W900L truck tractor w/ sleeper; Army 10 wheel deuce truck; JD 650 w/loader; Intl 244; NH 644 round baler w/autowrap; NH488 10’ hay conditioner; Befco 4 wheel hay rake; Valley 14’ livestock trailer; Case IH 1064 corn head 6 row. Items being sold for Nelson Warrington - JD 4020 w/48 loader; JD 672 hay rake; JD 630 MoCo haybine; JD 338 Baler w/42 kicker; (6) 18’ Farmco Model 88 kicker wagons (like new); Brillion 12’ field cultivator; Pittsburgh 16’ disc harrow. Terms & Conditions: Payment on the day of sale with Cash, Certified Check, Cashier's Check or approved check with a current letter of credit from your bank. Also accepting debit cards & major credit cards. 5% clerking fee on all sales which will be discounted entirely for customers paying with cash, approved check or debit card. NO BUYER'S PENALTY, NO SALES TAX & NO TITLE FEES. We accept pre-approval letters from major lenders. All items sold "AsIs and Where Is" with no expressed or implied warranties unless announced otherwise by auctioneer on the day of sale. All items are subject to being sold prior to day of sale. Announcements made day of sale supersede any and all advertisements. Wilson's Auction Sales is not responsible for accidents or items after they are sold. Accepting Consignments: Monday, March 19th thru Thursday, March 22nd from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wilson's Auction reserves the right to reject items inappropriate for this auction or items deemed not sellable. If in doubt, please call ahead for approval. Loader & Forklift service available. All items must be removed from the Delaware State Fairgrounds within 72 hours of the auction date, or owner will be responsible for any fees that may be incurred for removal.

Delaware's Largest Full Time Professional Auction Service - Serving Your Auction Needs Since 1966. Don't miss this opportunity to market your equipment with an auction company that gets positive results. Contact our office today to have your items included in future advertising!!! Auctioneer’s Note: This is only a partial listing as many items are coming in daily. Auction will start promptly at 9:00 a.m. This will be a full day of Auction Excitement with something for everyone. Plan to bring a friend as there are several wagons of small items, and four auctioneers selling throughout the day. There is Plenty of Convenient Parking. Visit our web site for updated listings and several color photos of items in this sale.

Food & Refreshments will be served by Burrsville Ruritan Club.

** Mark Your Calendar... Valuable Real Estate Auction scheduled for Saturday, March 17, 2012 Valuable Real Estate Auction scheduled for Saturday, March 31, 2012 Mid-Atlantic Fall Equipment Auction scheduled for Saturday, September 22, 2012 MID-ATLANTIC EQUIPMENT AUCTION - Message Line: (302) 422-8548

Wilson’s Auction Sales, Inc. Our Service Doesn't Cost...It Pays! Experience is the Difference. Dave Wilson, Auctioneer & Sales Manager K. Wade Wilson, Auctioneer & Customer Service Representative (302) 422-3454 Fax (302) 422-0462 Email: wilsonsauction@aol.com www.wilsonsauction.com

1200# 70-72; 1200-2000# 75-78.50; HY 1200-2000# 83; Lean 85-90% lean 750850# 65-70; 850-1200# 6973.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 90-100.50; 1500-2500# 103-110.50; HY 1000-1500# 110.50; 15002500# 111.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 4. M 1, 2-5 yrs. old, 900-1300# 1010-1130/hd; L 1, 2 yrs. old 1050# 1120/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 2. M 1, 5 yrs. old w/120# calves 1350# 1430/pr; L 1, 5 yrs. old w/200# calves 1300# 1370/pr. WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 129. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7994; 1200-1600# 76-85; HY 1200-1600# 86-89; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 71.50-89; 1200-2000# 69.5083.50; HY 1200-2000# 84.50-90; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 56.50-58; 8501200# 62-76. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 78-93; 15002500# 86-94.75; HY 10001500# 95-97; 1500-2500# 95-106. Cows Ret. to Farm: 63. M&L 1, few 2, 3 yrs. to aged, bred 2-8 mos. 775-1325# 850-1350/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 12. M&L 1, few 2, 3-12 yrs. old w/calves to 125# 7151095# 1000-1285/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 16. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 42.5080/hd; 100-130# 85102.50/cwt. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 108. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7483; 1200-1600# 75.50-87.50; HY 1200-1600# 98-99; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200#

71-75; 1200-2000# 74-75.50; HY 1200-2000# 78.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 5668; 850-1200# 60-79.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 99-103.50; 1500-2500# 98.50-101.50; HY 1000-1500# 105; 15002500# 106.50-111. Cows Ret. to Farm: 13. M 1, 5-8 yrs. old, 980-1590# 890-1210/hd; L 1, 5 yrs. old 820-1305# 820-1220/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 5. M 1, 5 yrs. old w/100# calves 1100# 1090/pr; L 1, 4 yrs. old w/150# calves 1000# 980/pr. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats (/hd): 71. 1 lot 50#at 65; 75-95# 70-85; (/#) 130-180# 84-86; 180220# 60-72. Butcher Hogs: 79. No. 1-2 270-300# 72-79; No. 1-3 235-270# 67-71; 300-350# 65-75. Sows: 9. 400-675# 59-61; 690-725# 57-59. Boars: 2. 306# at 46; 480# at 28.50. NC SOWS: 300-399# 5360.21; 400-449# 53-60.80; 450-499# 58-63.45; 500549# 61.29-64.75; 550# & up 62.26-65.63. FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No report. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: No report. MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No report. N VA HOGS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report. S VA HOGS: No report.

10th Annual Spring Berryville, VA Farm & Outdoor Equipment Auction Thurs. & Fri., March 29TH & 30TH, 2012 9:30 AM

Clarke County Ruritan Fairgrounds, Berryville, VA 22611

"Consign Today" Farm Tractors & Equipment Trucks & Vehicles • Lawn & Garden Trailers of any type • Tools & Building Materials Livestock Equipment • RV's, ATV's & Boats/Marina Hay, Straw & Feedstuffs • About Anything

Good Commission Rate Scott Strosnider @ (540) 877-7182 AuctionZip.com #7424 "A Mainline Auction Company"

VA Lic. #3449

P.O. Box 479 • Stephens City, VA 22655

“A Mainline Auction Company”

Office located @ 5455 Main St. • Stephens City, VA "One Block South of the light" Office & Cell 540-877-7182 Announcements on day of sale take precedence over printed matter

Page 11 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 310. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7985; 1200-1600# 80-87.50; HY 1200-1600# 88-94; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 70-80; 1200-2000# 73-79.50; HY 1200-2000# 81-89.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 45-52; 850-1200# 62.50-77. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 88-96; 15002500# 95-102.50; HY 10001500# 97-104; 1500-2500# 103-108.50.


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 12

STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report. LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 27. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled, Ch & Pr 1-2 90110# 180-186; Wooled, Ch & Pr 3-4 130-160# 124-140; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 6090# 170-193. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 75; Gd 2-4 7093; Rams all grades 60-80. HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: Few haired 50-80# 150165; Buck 262# at 63. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: 17. M Billies 140-185; Wethers to 190; Sel 1 kid 20-25# 5272; Sel 2 20-35# 45-55; 5070# 75-115. N VA GOATS: 17. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 150191; 40-60# 249; Sel 3 2040# 100-142. Slaughter Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 135-137; 100-150# 85-90. MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report MT. AIRY GOATS: 44. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 20-40# 60-75; 60-80# 100185; Sel 2 20-40# 40-55; 40-

60# 30-70; 60-80# 95; Sel 3 20-40# 20. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 100140# 110-130; Sel 2 100140# 85. Wethers: Sel 1 70-100# 110; 100-150# 155. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 70100# 85-105; 100-150# 150200; 150-250# 195; Sel 2 70100# 55; 150-250# 150. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report.

25. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80# 95-120; 80-100# 130-160. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 5070# 75; 70-100# 105-135; 100-140# 170; Sel 2 50-70# 70; Sel 3 50-70# 50. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 140-167.50; 150-250# 175-245. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report.

HOLLINS, VA SHEEP/GOATS: No report

TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report.

MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No report. MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No report.

ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: 8. Slaughter Lambs: Wooled, Gd & Ch 1-2 60-90# 190.

WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 29. Slaughter Lambs: Wooled, Ch & Pr 1-2 90110# 180; Wooled, Ch & Pr 3-4 130-160# 170; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 60-90# 150220. Rams/Ewes: Ewes Ch 2-4 79; Gd 2-4 106; Util 1-3 7297. Rams: all grades 75-104.

SHENANDOAH SHEEP: 49. Slaughter Lambs: Wooled, Ch & Pr 2-3 90110# 189-197. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 98 Gd 2-4 108.

WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 12. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 140170; 40-60# 110-123; 60-80# 114-220. Slaughter Does: Sel 1-2 100-150# 100.

ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: No report

SILER CITY, NC GOATS: 135. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 30-40; 20-40# 5065; 40-60# 70-77.50; 60-80# 82.50-90; Sele 2 under 20#

WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report. WYTHE CO GOATS: No report. CASH GRAIN MARKET

r Ou t u n o Ab uctio ng k A s ti A rse Lis o r a H nd e Cal

Having A Horse Auction?

Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream.

Issue Date

Deadline Date

May 1 June 1 July 1 August 1 September 1 October 1 Nov. & Dec. 1 Jan. & Feb. 1, 2013 Early Deadline

April 20 May 18 June 22 July 20 August 24 September 21 October 19 December 20

NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 38¢ lower. Prices were 6.997.39, mostly 6.99-7.22 at the feed mills and 6.84-7.14, mostly 7.09 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 1-8¢ higher. Prices were 13.91 at the processors, 12.36-13.60 at the feed mills and 13.20-13.46, mostly 13.40 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was 5¢ lower. Prices were 6.64 at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 393.20/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 7.08, -----, ----; Candor 7.39, ----, ----; Cofield 6.99, 13.60, ---; Laurinburg 7.08, -----, ---; Monroe 7.23, -----, ----; Nashville 7.33, -----, ----; Roaring River 7.28, -----, ----; Rose Hill 7.08, -----, ----; Selma ----, 12.36, ----; Statesville 7.19, -----, 7.51; Warsaw 7.08, -----, ----; Pantego #2 7.22, -----, ----. Elevators: Cleveland ----, ----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ---; Chadbourn ----, -----, ----; Clement ----, -----, ----;

Creswell 6.94, 13.46, ----; Elizabeth City 6.84, 13.40, 6.64; Greenville ----, -----, ---; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, 13.35, ----; Norwood 7.09, 13.20, ----; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ---, -----, ----; Warsaw #2 7.14, -----, ----.

36/bale; Sm. Sq. Gd 4/bale; Sm. Rd. Prem. 140 2nd cut; Gd 66. Wet Wrapped Rye: Sm. Rd. 27. Wet Wrapped Sorghum: Sm. Rd. 24/bale.

Soybean Processors: Fayetteville, 13.91; Raleigh, 13.91.

NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly heavy. The estimated slaughter for Wednesday in NC is 1,996,000 head compared to 2,253,000 head last Wednesday.

RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. Hay 125 tons. Alflafa: Lg. Sq. Gd 146; Sm. Sq. Prem 6/bale; Good 4.80/bale. Alfalfa/Orchard Grass: Lg. Sq. Gd 141, 60/bale; Sm. Sq. Prem. 5.95/bale. Mixed Grass: Lg. Sq. Gd 37-45/bale 2nd cut; Fair 20/bale; Sm. Sq. Gd 2.60/bale; Sm. Rd Gd 75; Fair 10-15/bale. Orchard Grass: Lg. Sq. Prem. 154-164; Sm. Sq. Prem. 5.90/bale 2nd cut; Fair 2.60/bale; Sm. Rd. Gd 74, 22-23/bale; Fair 20/bale. Timothy: Lg. Sq. Gd

POULTRY REPORT

NC EGGS The market is steady on small, higher on the balance. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is moderate. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 119.61, L 117.29, M 88.90 & S 78. NY EGGS Prices are 4¢ higher on XL & L, 2¢ more on M. Supplies range light to at


FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beans (25# bx) Green 30; Beets (25# bg) 17.65; Cabbage (50# crate) Point-ed Head & Round Green Type 12; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnip 12-13.25; Peanuts (35# bg) Green 35; Spinach

(25# bx) 18; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 14-21.75. Wholesale Dealer Price - Apples (traypack ctn 100s) WA Red Delicious 32.95-33.15, (traypack ctn) WA Golden Delicious 33-34.50, WA Granny Smith 34-36.50, WA Gala 3241.50, WA Fuji 34.50-38, WA Pink Lady 38-41.50, (traypack ctn 113s-125s-138s) Red & Golden Delicious 2831, (ctn 12 3# film bg) 25-29; Asparagus (11# ctn) 24.7532; Bananas (40# ctn) 2123.80; Beans (1-1/9 bu ctn) Round Green Type 25.7529.35, Pole Type 24-29; Beets (25# sack) 11.5513.65; Blueberries (flat 12 1pt cups) 24-31; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 17.65-18; Cabbage (50# ctn) Round Green Type 14.35-15; Cantaloupe (ctn

12s) 19.35-29; Carrots (50# sack) 17.15-23.65; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 17.85-25.05; Cel-ery (ctn 30s) 24.9525.85; Cherries (16# box) 48; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 16.4517.95; Citrus(4/5 bu ctn) CA Pink Grapefruit 22-25.05, CA Oranges 26.15-30.65, CA Navel Oranges 23.45-27.65, (40# ctn) Lemons 32-36.45, Limes 27-30, (ctn 64s) FL Navel Oranges 23.55-26.15, (ctn 100-125s) FL Oranges 21-23, (ctn 120s) Tangerines 24; Corn (ctn 4 1/2-5 dz) Yellow 23.95-26.15, White 23.95-27.15; Cranberries (24 12-oz pkgs) 24.50; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Long Green 16.35-23.51, Pickles 20.5522; Eggplant (25# ctn) 21-24; Grapes (18# ctn) Red Seedless 26.50-32.50, White

Seedless 26.50-32.50, Black Seedless 28, Red Globe 34; Greens (bu ctn/loose 24s) Collards 10, (ctn bunched 24s) Kale 11.55-14.35, (bu ctn) Turnip 10; Honeydews (ctn 5s)29; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 12.75; Lettuce (ctn 24s) Wrapped Iceberg 19.2521.50, Greenleaf 21.50-24, Romaine 21.50-24.50; Mangos (flat 9s) 13.50; Nectarines (1/2 bu ctn) Yellow/White Flesh 24; Onions (50# sack) Yellow Jumbo 13.65-20, (25# sack) White 15-16.50, Red 15, (ctn 24s) Green 16.85-20.05, (40# ctn) Sweet 20-25.50; Parsley (1-1/9 bu ctn) 26.50; Peaches (1/2 bu ctn) Yellow/White Flesh 18; Peanuts (35# bg) Green 53-53; Pears (16# ctn) Bartlett 27, (ctn

LARGE UNRESERVED INVENTORY REDUCTION AUCTION T LTD. including additions from PREMIER R EQUIPMENT T LTD.. & PODOLINSKY Y FARM M EQUIPMENT For CROSSROADSS EQUIPMENT LTD.. featuring an excellent selection of approximately 35 tractors, 15 skid steers, 3 mini-excavators, backhoe, 40 lawn tractors, gators, Kubota RTV, farm equipment & miscellaneous. Auction held at Crossroad Equipment's location at Fire #66 Highway #52. South of Jerseyville, ON, just off Highway 403. Exit 55, 1/2km north.

THURSDAY, MARCH 29TH @ 9:30AM

***Parkingg forr thee auction n willl bee availablee att thee Ancasterr fairground d located d 1/2 2 km h off High hwayy 403.. Shuttlee busess willl bee available*** south

!!!NO O PARKING G AT T DEALERSHIP P SITE!!! TRACTORS:: JD 6420, 2wd, 1450hrs, s/n L06420H41165; White 6175, c/w 4wd, 18 speed power shift, 4900hrs; New w Hollandd T-5050, 4wd, cab 2355hrs; JD 6420 4wd, cab, air; 3 (three) JD 6410's, cabs & air, 4wd; JD 6400 c/w 4wd, p. quad, 640 ldr, 4700hrs; JD 5320 c/w 4wd, Alo 720 ldr, p. reverser, 4000hrs; JD 5220 2wd; JD 52255 2wd; JD 4440 c/w cab, air, 20.8x42's, 6800hrs; JD 6210 c/w 4wd, cab, air; JD 2355 c/w 2wd, JD 146 ldr, hi-lo, rebuilt engine; Casee IH 1896 c/w 2wd, cab, air; Ford TW25 c/w 2wd, cab, air; Fordd 7700 & cab; MF 1085 & cab; MF 1745, 4wd, open; Deutzz 7110 c/w 4wd, cab & ldr; Ford 4610, series II; MF 2335; IH 656 gas; Casee IH 4210 c/w 4wd, cab, air, ldr; JD 4010 c/w 4wd & mower; JD 4500 c/w 4wd & mower; MF 1040, 4wd compact c/w ldr; CIH 885; JD 1010 r.s; JD 2140 & ldr. CONSTRUCTION N EQUIPMENT:: 2006 JD 50D mini-ex, c/w cab, 1836hrs; 2009 JD 27D mini-ex, c/w cab, 995hrs; 2006 JD 17D mini-ex, c/w cab, 1501hrs; 2008 Bobcat 232G mini-ex, 823hrs; 2006 Bobcat, 325G mini-ex, 1033hrs; Komatsu PC15R mini-ex, JD CT332 track machine, c/w cab, 1643hrs; 5 (five) JD CT322 track machines, c/w cabs & the hours range from 1600-1900hrs; 3 (three) JD 325 skid steers; c/w cabs & hours from 340-2075hrs; 3 (three) JD 317 skid steers, c/w cabs & hours from w Holland LX665 skid steer; JD 310C backhoe, 4wd, 640-1600hrs; JD 270 skid steer, 2300hrs; JD 2500 skid steer, 2440hrs; Cat 252B skid steer; Case 1845C skid steer; New cab & e-hoe; Clark 80 diesel, 8000lb forklift. FARM M EQUIPMENT: JD D 467 silage special round baler w/ net wrap; JD 466 silage special, c/w net wrap; JD 467 silage special; JD 335 round baler; Casee IH 8420 round baler; JD 336 square baler c/w ejector; JD 935 rotary mo-co; JD 530 mo-co; JD 1560, 15' no-till drill, s/n N01560X681314, markers & caster wheel hitch; JD 7000, 6 row narrow corn planter; Casee IH 5100, 21 run seed drill; NH 1033 stak-liner bale wagon; Fransgard SR3200P rake; Hesstton 1150 haybine; JD 3600, 6 fur 18" trail plow; JD 2600, 4 fur adjustable semi-mt plow; NH 679 tandem manure spreader; JD 145 ldr; JD 24'' modell 960, "S" tyne hydraulic fold cult; JD "C" tyne, 181/2' cult; Mohawk, 10' chisel plow; CIH H modell 4500, 181/2' vibra shank cult; Stolll R335 rake; JD 4'' modell 205 mower; NH 254, 3pth tedder; White 6 row air planter, c/w Market cross auger; JD MX7 HD mower; Woodss 72" mower;; 500 gallon, 3pth spray caddy; 7' & 6' Mott mowers; 20.8x42 T-rail duals; Horst 7' power angle blade to fit Alo ldr; Curtis 4 way power blade to fit compact; New 9" 3pth post hole digger; Horst bale grab attachment; 6' 3pth blade; JD 84" bucket; 3pth cult; bale spears; JD bumper guards; mini-ex backhoe buckets; buckets; tires; JD front fenders, etc. etc. etc. R PRODUCTS:: JD 6x44 gator, gas & hydraulic dump; Kubota RTV900 c/w 4wd, hydraulic dump; JD electric turf gator c/w charger; JD 455 diesel, AWS & 54" CONSUMER mower; JD 455, ps & 60" mower; JD X5400 & mower; JD X485, gas, AWS; JD GX345, ps; JD 345, ps; JD X300; 3 (three) JD LT1880's, one with bagger; JD LX255; 2 (two) w Holland MZ18H; Honda 4518 & bagger; JD 105; JD 180; JD GT262; JD F725 front mount, c/w bagger; JD F925 JD 185; JD LX288; JD LX186; JD L-110 & bagger; New front mount; Snapper 1621; Ezgo golf cart; JD RX95; JD GS45 commercial, 48" walk behind; JD GS30, 36" walk behind; JD TC7H17 hydro walk behind; Walker 26hp, c/w grass catcher; Cubb Cadet 3184 & blower; Husqvarnna YTH2148; Mastercraft 14.5hp; Yardman 15.5hp; JD Sabre 14.5hp (parts); JD LT180 (parts); Murray 13.5hp; JD SXT 38 (parts); Craftsman 17hp; Snapper 1650; Berco 2 stage, front mount blower; Toro 826 snow blower; Goosen tow behind vacuum; Kubota T2740, 2 stage front mt blower; Honda 8hp rear tyne tiller.

Internett biddingg availablee by:: www.proxibid.com m PLEASEE NOTE: This is a very large UNRESERVED AUCTION! Crossroads Equipment is reducing their inventory along with some additions from Premier Equipment & Podolinsky Equipment. An excellent offering, something for everyone. Plan to attend as this is THE auction of spring. Don't forget to park at the Ancaster Fairgrounds. Shuttle service will be provided! TERMS: Cash or good check day of sale. Pre-approved financing can be provided by FCC or JD Finance. Owners and auctioneers are not responsible for accidents. Any verbal announcements take precedence over any written matter. List is subject to additions & deletions. Visitt Proxibid'ss websitee forr photoss & too register:: www.proxibid.com

PROPRIETORS:: CROSSROADS EQUIPMENT LTD. FOR INFO CALL DON: 905-648-8001 AUCTIONEER:: TOM HAMULECKI Office: 519-424-9993 Cell: 519-421-6957

90s) Bosc 27; Peppers (1-1/9 bu ctn) Green Bell Type 22.95-25.50, (11# ctn) Red Bell Type 25.50-32.50, Yellow Bell Type 28; Plums (28# ctn ) Red Type 24; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red Size A No. 1 17.9522.95, Red Size B No. 1 1519.50, White Size A 14.5020.75, ID Russet 20.5024.65; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) Red Type 12.85-12.95; Raspberries (flat 12 1/2-pints cups) 25.65; Rutabagas (40# ctn) 23; Squash (3/4 bu ctn) Yellow Crookneck 20.7522.95, (1/2 bu ctn) Zucchini 18-20; Strawberries (flat 8 1qt conts) CA 21.45-26.45; Sweet Potatoes (40# ctn) Oranges Type 16-20.05, White Type 20-20.75; Tomat-oes (25# ctn) vine ripened XL 1621; Plum Tomatoes (25# ctn) Roma 16-21; Cherry Tomatoes (flat 12 1-pt baskets) 18.25-21; Grape Tomatoes (flat 12 1-pt conts with lids) 16-19.50; Turnips (25# film bg) Topped 11.55-15. WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 20-32, Golden Delicious 20-30, Granny Smith 30, (bu/loose pack) Red & Golden Delicious 16-20, Stayman 16-20, Rome 1620, York 16-20, Fuji 16-20; Bananas (40# ctn) 20-20.50; Beans (bu ctn/crate) Snap 31.50-35, Halfrunner 31.5035; Beets (25# sack/loose) 14-14.50; Blue-berries (flat 12 1-pt conts) 26-28; Broccoli (ctn 12s) 15-15.25; Cabbage (50# sack) Round Green Type 8-10, (50# ctn/crate) Round Green Type 10-11.25; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12s) 18-20.50; Carrots (50# sack) 20-22.75; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 20-21; Celery (ctn 30s) 19.75-24; Citrus (4/5 bu ctn) Grapefruit 14.5018, Navel Oranges 17.50-20, Oranges 17.50-20, (ctn 95s) Lemons 26-26.50, (ctn 165s)

Lemons 26.50-32, (ctn 150200s) Limes 26.50; Corn (crate) Bi-Color 16-17.75; Cucumbers (1-1/9 bu ctn/crate) Long Green 16-18, Pickles 29.50-30; Egg-plant (bu ctn/crate) 18.50-24; Grapes (18# ctn) Red Seedless 28-34.50, White Seedless 28-32, Red Globe 2834.50; Honeydew (ctn 6-8s) 20-24; Kiwi (ctn 39s) 9-12; Lettuce (ctns 24s) Iceberg 15.25-17, Greenleaf 1617.50, Romaine 17.25-19; Mushrooms (10# ctn) Fancy 16.75-18.50; Nuts (50# sack) Mixed 60, Pecans 140; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 11-14, White Jumbo 39; Onion Sets (32# bg) Yellow No. 1 23-25, White No. 1 2325, Red No. 1 23-25; Peppers (1-1/9 bu ctn) XL & L Green Bell Type 14-17.75, XL & L Red Bell Type 22.7530, (1/2 bu ctn) Jalapeno 24; Pineapple (ctn 5-8s) 1112.75; Potatoes (50# bg) White 18-25, (50# box) Russet 15-19; Seed Potatoes (50# sack) Kennebec 15.5020.75, Yukon Gold 15.5020.75, Red Chiefton 15.5020.75; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) 12.50-14; Spinach (ctn 12 10-oz film bgs) 18-20; Squash (3/4 bu ctn/crate) Yellow Crookneck 21.50-25, (1/2 bu ctn/crate) Zucchini 16-18, (1-1/9 bu ctn/crate) Acorn 26.50, Butternut 28; Strawberries (flat 8 1# cont) FL 10.75-12, (flat 4 2# cont) FL 10.75-12; Sweet potatoes (40# ctn) Orange Type No. 1 23-24, Oranges Type No. 2 12-16, Red Type No. 1 23-24, Red Type No. 2 12-16; Tomatoes (25# ctn) vine ripened XL & Larger 16-20; Plum Tomatoes (25# ctn) Roma 16-19.50; Grape Tomatoes (flat 12 1-pt cont) 16-21.50; Turnips (25# sack/loose) Topped 12.50. MARKET

AMERICAN LINEBACK DAIRY CATTLE ASSOCIATION

20th Anniversary Sale! Sat., March 24th at 12:00 Noon Hosted by Kish Valley Dairy Sales in Belleville, PA Selling 50 Head of Linebacks. Show Calves, Heifers, Springers, Fresh Cows and a few breeding Bulls. We have selected a NICE group, something for everyone! Semen also available. Please join us before the sale for a complimentary pig roast provided for all Lineback enthusiasts to celebrate 20 successful years!

For more info, contact: Park Myers, Jr. - 717-483-6736 Barnard Baily - 484-883-2819 Bob Bashore - 717-865-3161 Elden Woolf - 610-334-1238

Page 13 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

times heavy, mostly moderate. Retail demand is currently light. Demand is moderate to good. Market activity is moderate to active. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in cartons, delivered to store door, cents per dozen. XL 109-113, L 107-111, M 8286.


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 14

Are You Involved In More Than One Industry? We Are Here to Help You. FREE E SUBSCRIPTIONS S BY Y REQUEST * Regional/National Solid Waste Recycling (monthly)

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CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

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Ag Chemicals

Generic RoundUp . . . . .$11.00 gal. Atrazine 4L . . . . . . . . .$11.90 gal. Simazine 4L . . . . . . . .$16.20 gal. Generic Bicep II Mag . .$29.00 gal. Lumax . . . . . . . . . . . .$45.00 gal. Sunfilm Silage Wrap Baler Twine & Net Wrap

Plus Complete Line of Spray Material

Beef Cattle

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Beef Cattle

CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Double “S” Dairy Harrisonburg, VA 540-867-9675 • 540-830-9675 Announcements

cell

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Barn Equipment (2) 24 ft. Big Ass fans. Only used one summer, with converter. $5,000. 315-250-0652

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Bedding

Beef Cattle

Announcements NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101 bsnyder@leepub.com YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call your sales representive or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

Bedding

RED ANGUS BULLS, yearlings, EPD’s for calving ease, growth and milk. 540-9336293 yesmar@shentel.net

Bedding

Bedding

USA Gypsum Bedding Low On Bedding? Add Gypsum! Stanchions - Free Stalls - Bed Packs

A is a Thousand

Gypsum Bedding • Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Reduce mastitis & cell counts. • Use in place of Hydrated Lime. • Improves your soil • Available in bulk or bag.

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves. • Use less! More absorbent than lime products.

Try Grip X1 Today! www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Dealers wanted in select areas Also Available at: Central Dairy & Mech. Delmarva Farm Service Elam Miller Himrod Farm Supply Homestead Nutrition Genesee Valley Nutrition Levi Fisher Martin’s Ag New Bedford Elevator Norm’s Farm Store Robert Rohrer Steve B. Stoltzfus Walnut Hill Feeds

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Page 15 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 16

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Concrete Products

Concrete Products

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Feed Bunks & Cattle Guards

Pre Cast Concrete J BUNK FEED TROUGHS FOB Wytheville, VA $150.00 ~ 8’ sections CATTLE GUARDS (deliverable locally) Call for Details!

U BUNK $150.00

WEST END PRECAST

Wytheville, VA (276) 620-1821 Ask for Chris Concrete Products

Dairy Equipment

The Scabbler Man “Solutions for Slick Concrete” • 2” & 1” Wide Scabbling

434-454-7018 Home 434-579-0705 Cell

Complete Double eight milking parlor, everything except the stalls. Boumatic Airstar variable-speed 10hp vacuum pump with converter, 16 Boumatic signature series corded take-offs, pulsators, pre-cooler 3” low-line, receiver with milk pump, washer. $25,000. 315-250-0652 SEVERAL USED Double 6 and 8 parlors w/ATO’s and 3” low lines complete. Several 2”: pipelines, used vacuum pumps, receiver groups, claws, ATO’s, washer boxes, etc. 585-732-1953

Dairy Cattle 50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Farm Machinery For Sale

JERSEYS FOR SALE: Closed herd, beautiful udders, average B.F. 5.4%. Pro. 3.8. All lactating now. Last SCC 32,000. Most due to calve in early Fall, one due in May, service sires Eclipes, Riley, & Premier. 802-866-5001

2007 KRONE BIG X 650, 1156 cutter head hours, 1573 engine hours, 8 row corn head w/processor, 12½’ hay head, all upgrades are done, cab camera, inoculant sprayer, $229,000. 802-373-7215

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

Dairy Products

Dairy Products

FOR SALE

VA A MILK K COMMISSION N BASE 150,000 LB WINTER BASE 143,000 LB SUMMER BASE

CALL

EDWIN WAGONER & ASSOCIATES

276-768-8539

JD 8430 C/A MFD, duals, all around H.D. wt. package, 4 remotes, Greenstar ready, active seat, like new appearance, 2200 hrs, at a great price. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $172,000 JD 8330 C/A MFD, 46” duals, wts, 4 remotes, G-Star ready, looks as new, 1200 hrs, warranty, look at the price! . . . . . . . . . $157,500 JD 8270-R C/A MFD, duals, wts, G-Star ready, Q-hitch, 4 remotes, 1762 hrs, compare anywhere at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,900 JD 8410 C/A MFD, duals, all around, wts, Q-hitch, 4 remotes, the 10 Series are hard to find, here is a nice one w/4300 hrs at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,000 JD 7230 C/A MFD, w/JD 673 SL loader, bucket & forks, P.Q. w/L.H. Rev., only 540 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,000 2010 Case IH 305 C/A MFD, “completely loaded”, 3 PTO’s too! w/Extended Warranty, compare anywhere!. . . . . . . . . . $178,500 2010 Case IH 245 C/A MFD, duals, wts, 4 remotes, looks new w/1043 hrs, look at the price . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $137,500 Case IH 255 C/A MFD, duals, no wts, 4 remotes, needs tires, look twice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $68,000 Case IH 7140 C/A MFD, good tires all around, wts, 3 remotes, I am using this right now! 4800 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $52,500 Case IH MX120 C/A MFD, 16x16 trans w/hyd. L.H. Rev., ONLY 1900 hrs, and fancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,500 NH 4630 Turbo, 4x4, loader, 3500 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,250 Ford 7740 2 wheel, canopy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,700 NH TS115-A 4x4 C/A, loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,500

Tillage Tools, Etc. Call Us or See Us At

www.AndrewsFarm.com

ANDREWS FARM EQ. INC. Conneautville, PA 814-587-2450

PRICES REDUCED Bes t No w

in in

Nor theas t the South

BEST WARRANTY: 1 Year Parts on Motor & Transmission, most all combines BEST QUALITY: Selected Direct from Farm or OEM Dealers BEST SELECTION: Just visit website; We got em BEST TRUCKING: Lowest Rates Available BEST “TRUE” INTEREST: 3.7% 3 Years • 4.2% 5 Years • 4.9% 7 Years Over 25+ Years Selling Combines WE WANT TO SELL YOU YOUR NEXT COMBINE Bloomsburg, PA • Route 44 (Jerseytown) 328 Danville Rd. (Near I-80)

TOLL FREE 800-919-3322 www.zeisloftequip.com

www.countryfolks.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS

Degleman 46-57 12 ft. blade with mounts for CaseIH MX tractor. Nice shape. $10,000 315-250-0652

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE

APRIL Equipment Inventory

Large Selection Available

We Buy Tractors For Parts

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT 403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

(717) 776-6242

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist 1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

Check Out Our Outstanding Low Interest Financing On Used Equipment!

Case IH RBX 452 Round Baler, 4x5, net & twine wrap, Silage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,000 New Holland BR 730 Round Baler, ex. cond. 4x4, twine tie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,000 New Holland BR 740 twine tie, good condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 New Holland BR 780 5x6 bale . . . . . $16,500 New Kuhn Manure Spreaders In Stock Northern Ag Mist Sprayers In Stock In Stock! New Holland 200 Series Skid Loaders

Good selection of Kuhn Hay Equipment has arrived. Stop by or call! 0% FINANCING AVAILABLE ON SELECT NEW HOLLAND TRACTORS & HAY TOOLS CALL TO INQUIRE!

D&H Tractor Chilhowie, VA • 276-646-3642

BUSH HOG

USED EQUIPMENT

White 543 4R Planter NI 3715 Spreader White 6100 4R Planter, dry fert. White 5100 6R Planter Vicon Fertilizer Spreader 165 Bu. Gravity Box Hardi 210 Gal. 3Pt. Sprayer MF 245 Tractor Westfield 8x51 Auger White 285 Tractor Miller 5300 Forage Box Miller 1150 Rake IH 37 Baler w/Thrower Hesston 4550 Square Baler Farmall 460 Tractor MF 246 Loader Case IH 8830 SP Mower Cond. MF 285 Tractor White 549 SAR 5 Bottom Plow Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill Miller Pro Forage Boxes In Stock

STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE

dhtractorsales@comcast.net IH DISGUSTED??? With your shifting? Now is the time to fix. Put a good tractor back to work. 800-808-7885, 402-374-2202 JD BALER PARTS: Used, New Aftermarket and rebuilt. JD canopy new aftermarket, $750. Call for pictures. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705 JOHN DEERE 750 late model grain drill, 15’, row markers, big tires, shed kept, $16,500; 1200 gallon stainless steel nurse tank, $2,500. 804-3474341

MACK ENTERPRISES Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

WE ALSO STOCK NEW VICON

PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

RD Box 46 Klingerstown, PA

570-648-2088

CLAAS 3050 TC 10ft Mower Conditioner, Excellent Condition

$14,000 Grandview Equipment LLC • Bridgewater, VA 540-828-0309


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Maine e To o North Carolina

Buy New Tractors?

GIVE ME A BREAK Mowing is the easiest Task it’ll ever perform!

PleasantCreekHay.com

USED EQUIPMENT Vermeer Winter Fix Program 10% Parts and Labor Going on Now! Fanex 833T by Vicon 6 Rotor Tedder, Field Ready, Pull Type................................$5,000 ’05 McCormick CX85 Tractor, 1,400 Hrs., w/New Loader, Cab, 4x4 Dual Remotes...... ........................................................$35,000 ’08 Vermeer TE 250, 25’, 6 Rotor Tedder, Ex. Cond................................................$13,900 Kuhn GMO 77 HD, 3Pt. Disc Mower, Good.... ..........................................................$3,500 ’73 Ford 3000 8 Speed Manual, 1 Remote, Diesel, Good Rubber, No Rust! ................... ..........................................................$5,500 New Holland 255 Tedder-Rake Combo, Good Condition...........................................$2,000 ’01 NH 688 Round Baler, Auto Wrap, 5x6, Good Condition.................................$8,500 ’09 Vermeer 555XL w/Net Wrap, Good Condition.........................................$13,900 NEW! HayMag 4 Rotor Tedders w/Hyd. Fold & Tilt, 18’ ..............................................$4,995 Massey Ferguson 4225, 2WD, 1036 Massey Loader, Cab, Air, 2 Remotes, 1,500 Hours, Bale Spike.......................................$23,900

Thanks to Everyone Who Made Our 25th Year Anniversary A Success!

Pictures at www.tractorcare.com

Tractor Care, Inc. 1066-C Virginia Avenue, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802-2533 PH: 540-433-7070 Check out our e-bay store at stores.ebay.com/tractor-care-inc

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

2006 John Deere 4720 E-Hydro, 4x4, Loader, 58HP, 471 Hours 919-669-7964 WWW.COUNTRYFOLKS.COM OR VISIT US ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK.COM/COUNTRYFOLKS

24/7/365 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293

Fencing ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading HAVE WET FIELDS? Have compaction issues? Low yields? Call D&D Farm Service/Agri-SC 1-888-401-4680

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Goats

Hay - Straw For Sale

FOR SALE: Champion bloodline boer goats, bucks, does & kids, $150.00 to $600.00. 540578-3822

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION Parts & Service New Installations

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

804-387-6462

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay

Hay - Straw For Sale

STRAW

3x3x8 Squares bales. Also 4x5 round bales. Really early cut & timothy hay. All hay stored inside on pallets. Early cut 1st cutting square bales, approx. 58lbs. grass & timothy mix. Picked up or delivered, any amount, large quantity.

518-929-3480 518-329-1321

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900 MIXED GRASS HAY for sale. $20.00/Roll, 4x5. 540-8602145

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Heating

Also Square Bales of

Help Wanted

CALL STEVE

WANTED

519-482-5365 Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY & STRAW

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted. Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

CALL TODAY FOR NEW “HIGHER” PRICING Contacts: Allen Hollenbach 610-926-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

Help Wanted

Assistant Herd Person

with recent experience doctoring cows. Some assistance in AI breeding on sizeable modern dairy in northern VT. Salary based on experience, housing package possible.

Call 802-782-9058 HERDSMAN

Large strong production dairy operation in central New York looking for experienced, hands on dairy cattle professionals. Demonstrated dairy nutrition, herd health skills, education, people skills and analytical ability. Responsible for improving herd performance by adjusting protocols’ along with setting, communicating and reaching goals with fellow herdsmen, milkers, feeders, nutritionist, and facility personnel. We are competitive on salary and benefits, along with offering a rewarding work environment, a stable schedule, while living in an area offering exceptional quality of life opportunity.

Email resume to: lodell364@aol.com

Help Wanted

Sales Position Available Due to our sales rep retiring, Country Folks has an opening in Central NY. Applicants must have a basic knowledge of agriculture, reliable transportation, good driving record and be willing to learn. Sales calls to agribusinesses requires an average of 3 days on the road a week with no overnight travel required. If you are interested, contact Bruce Button at Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge NY 13428 or e-mail your resume to bbutton@leepub.com or fax to 518-673-2381

Page 17 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 18

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Help Wanted

Real Estate For Sale

Poultry Processing Plant Supervisor. On-farm USDAinspected processing. 7500+ birds per week. Upstate New York location. Experience required. Spanish language helpful. Salary depends on experience. $52k Email resume to: MariaW@hvc.rr.com

Hoof Trimming

Tires & Tire Repair Service

Radial 240-R4 Truck Tire 22.5 Available

TM

Hoof Trimming

Affordable Hydraulic Hoof Trimming Tables • Heavy Duty Professional Quality • Increased Production With Less Effort • Models Available In Stationary & Portable • Limited Warranty

The Ultimate in Tilt Tables

Virginia (South Central): Custom-built 3BR rancher set on 20 open & wooded acres. LR w/FP, DR, Kitchen, 2 baths & utility room. Detached 40x40 garage/ shop, plus equipment shed. Nice pond. Home in excellent condition. Annual taxes $762. Priced at $284,900 (More acreage available). Vaughan Auction & Realty Co., PO Box 1, Keysville, VA 23947 434-736-8400 www.vaughanrealty.com

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1. PHONE IT IN IT IN - For MasterCard, Visa, 2. FAX American Express or Discover customers, fill out the form below completely and

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!

Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word. (Phone #’s count as one word) If running your ad multiple weeks: Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381

3. calculate the cost, enclose your check or MAIL IT IN - Fill out the attached form,

credit card information and mail to:

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

4. E-MAIL E-mail your ad to classified@leepub.com - Go to 5. ON-LINE www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a Can Be Used on Silage Trucks or Manure Trucks

Hill Top Tire

402 State Hwy 163 Fort Plain, NY

(518)) 993-2235 www.hilltoptire.net

Classified Ad button to place your ad 24/7!

West

East

New England

Mid-Atlantic

Place my ad in the following Zones:  Country Folks East  Country Folks West  Country Folks of New England  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle Number of weeks to run___________ Name(Print)________________________________________________________________ Farm/Company Name_________________________________________________________ Street___________________________________________County_____________________ City____________________________________________State______Zip______________

SHEP’S WELDING, INC. PO Box 296, Chiefland, FL 32644 • www.shepswelding.net

Tractor Parts

1-800-370-8454

Phone_______________ _______________ ____________________________________ Fax_________________ _______________ ____________________________________ Cell_________________ _______________ ____________________________________

Horses FOR SALE: Rocky Mountain Horses, Trail Safe/Rockfish Stables, Blue Ridge Mountains/VA. 804-943-3818

Lawn & Garden MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877439-6803

Parts & Repair

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS BATES CORPORATION 12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS!

WE HAVE OVER 20 FARMS FOR SALE THROUGHOUT PA. JOHN MATTILIO, BROKER

www.farmandlandrealtyinc.com

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Roofing

Roofing

FARM AND LAND REALTY, INC. 717-464-8930

1-800-248-2955

Poultry

Lumber & Wood Products TOMATO STAKES, hardwood, with or without points, available 1”x1” to 1½”x1½” sq. and 36” to 72” long, one pallet or tractor trailer load picked up or delivered. Erle D. Anderson LUMBER PRODUCTS INC., www.woodstakesupplier.com Located in Virginia. 804-7480500

Parts THOUSANDS OF AG PARTS available online at www.PaulBparts.com.Sprayer parts include Teejet Nozzles/Tips, Nozzle Bodies, Pumps, GPS Guidance, Foam Markers, and much more. Weasler PTO Driveline Parts available for North American, Italian, and German series. Or call 717-738-7355 ex.275.

Goslings, ducklings, chicks, turkeys, guineas, bantams, pheasants, chukars, books, medications.

Clearview Hatchery PO Box 399 Gratz, PA 17030

(717) 365-3234

e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

Real Estate For Sale

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY Southwestern Virginia Bland County

62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

$90,000 Several Purchase Options Available. Call

540-255-9112

(MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card(Print)____________________________________________________ Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for credit card payment only)

15 LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

Poultry & Rabbits

Card # ______________________________________________Exp. Date ______________

(MM/DD/YY)

ROOFING & SIDING

Call the IH Parts Specialists:

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

MAR 21 2012 Produce Food Safety Training Session University of Delaware, Carvel Research & Education Center, 16483 County Seat Highway, Georgetown, DE. 6-9 pm. Call Karen Adams at 302-856-2585 ext. 540 to register. Contact Tracy Wootten or Cory Whaley, 302-856-7303. MAR 22 State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners will Meet Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. The meeting will consist of general board business. A portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Call 410-841-5862.

16

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

17

18

1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week

19

20

1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

21

22

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week 1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week

23

24

1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

MAR 24 VA BCIA Southwest Bull Test Sale Wytheville, VA. Contact Scott Greiner, 540-2319159, or e-mail sgreiner@ vt.edu. MAR 28 Using Smart Phones and Tablet Computers in Direct Marketing Silk Hope,NC. 7 pm. On Internet at http://chatham .ces.ncsu.edu/growingsmallfarms/workshops.html MAR 28-29 National Manure Management Conference Holiday Inn Syracuse/Liverpool, NY. Optional farm system tours on March 27. The conference agenda is posted online at www.ansci.cornell.edu/prodairy/gotmanure/agenda.html Register online at www.epa.gov/ agstar/news-events/events /conference12_reg.html. APR 11-12 Cage Aquaculture Forum VSU’s Cooperative Extension Pavilion, River Rd., Ettrick. Special program features include a site visit to a local

farm where fish are being raised in cages, and a caged trout farm pond demonstration. Since space is limited, interested persons are strongly encouraged to register before or by April 2. Contact Debra B. Jones, 804524-5496 or e-mail dbjones @vsu.edu. MAY 4-6 Halifax County Heritage & Antique Machinery Festival Halifax County Fairgrounds, Hwy 360-E, South Boston, VA. Call 434-572-6879 or email bobconner@touchva .net or ccole@embarqmail .com. On Internet at www.halifaxcountyheritage festival.org OCT 24-27 National FFA Convention & Expo Indianapolis, IN. On Internet at www.ffa.org


The First Annual Stable Directory Will Deadline on Friday, March 30th Listings Will Appear in the May Issue!

2 012

Stable Directory

The May 2012 issue of Mane Stream will feature a Stable Directory. Please check as many categories below as apply to your company for the $25.00 listing. If you wish to have your companies logo appear in black & white above your listing, an additional fee of $50 will be charged. Your logo can be e-mailed to tkrieger@leepub.com. This form must be completed and returned by 3/30/12. Questions? Call Tina Krieger at 800-218-5586, ext. 262.

Your logo will appear with your listing in black and white (print) & color with the online version.

Check If Using Logo Company Name: Contact Person: Address:

Phone:

Fax:

Website: E-Mail: Description (40 words or less):

• CATEGORIES •

Ì Boarding Farms Ì Breeding Farms Ì Dressage Ì Driving Ì English Ì Foaling Centers Ì Fun With Horses (Travel/Trail Riding/Carriage Rides, etc.) Ì Horse Camps Ì Hunter Ì Instructions Ì Overnight Stabling

Ì Ranch Horse Events Ì Reining Ì Sales/Leasing-Horses (Equids) Ì Show / Events / Clinics Ì Showing Ì Stallion Service Ì Summer Programs Ì Timed Events Ì Trail Riding Ì Training Ì Transportation/Trailers/Trucks Ì Western

Return by Fax to 518-673-2381 or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 If you do not wish to receive any faxes from us, check here

Ì and fax back to 518-673-3245

Published by Lee Publications P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • 518-673-3237 • Fax 518-673-2381

Page 19 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • March 19,2012

Don’t Miss Out!


March 19, 2012 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 20

A Fun and Easy Way To Read Country Folks...

• Since 1964 • Specializing in Trade Publications, Trade Shows, Commercial Printing & Mailing Services

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Serving the agricultural, heavy construction, aggregates, solid waste, commercial horticulture and equine industries.

MARKET TO ANY OR ALL OF THESE INDUSTRIES WITH ONE CALL! Country Folks

Farm Weekly Newspapers - since 1972, serving fulltime farmers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic market areas. The number one agricultural publication in this market! Target your audience with 4 regional editions.

NOW AVAILABLE IN DIGITAL FORMAT DOWNLOADABLE Read it on your computer anytime, anywhere

Monthly Equine Publication covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations. Since 1979, serving heavy construction contractors, landscaping, aggregate producers and recyclers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Markets every month. Qualified readership is guaranteed to get you results. Country Folks

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Is our newest publication. Started in 2011 to serve an important and growing segment of horticulture, this newspaper is targeted at businesses active in commercial scale growing and winemaking in the United States. In addition to a six times a year mailing, a searchable version is available to our online readers. WASTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT NEWS, since 1992, serving asphalt/concrete recyclers, composting facilities, construction demolition companies, wood waste recyclers and scrap metal recyclers with 2 monthly editions that cover the entire United States. NORTH AMERICAN QUARRY NEWS since 1998, serving the quarry, sand & gravel, hot mix asphalt and ready mix concrete industries with one national edition. This is the fastest growing publication for these markets.

TRADE SHOWS Email subscriptions@leepub.com to start a new digital subscription or change your current print subscription to digital.

Lee Publications produces trade shows, both regionally and nationally for each of the markets listed above. Go to our website at www.leepub.com for more information or call 800-218-5586.

COMMERCIAL PRINTING

We specialize in short run (5,000-100,000) copies) web offset printing. Tabloid style print jobs like this publication are available in increments of 4 pages in black & white or full color. Complete mailing sources are available as well as insertions in any of our publications

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PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Phone 518-673-3237 Fax 518-673-3245

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CF Mid-Atlantic 3.19.12  

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic March 19, 2012