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21 NOVEMBER 2011 Section One e off Two Volume e 30 Number r 46

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

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Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

The e Goatt Lady y Dairy puts s a face e on n food~ Page A3 Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly

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FEATURES Auctions Classifieds Dairy & DHIA Markets

B14 B19 A9 B9

Melanie e Jackson n receives 2011 1 Michaell Everline Memoriall 4-H H Leadership Award ~ Page e A2 Enter his gates with thanksgiving; go into his courts with praise; give thanks to him and call upon his Name. ~ Psalm 100:3


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 2

Penn State students do well at Northeast Dairy Challenge While much of the Northeast was battling the first snow of the season, the weather was cool and sunny in Watertown, NY, for the Ninth Annual Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge. Hosted by Morrisville State College, the event drew 111 students from 12 colleges in the Northeast and two universities in Canada. The three day event, held on Oct. 27-29, allowed students to work in teams of four or five with teammates being other students from various universities attending the event. Along with meeting their new team members, students received information about their host farms on Thursday evening, and then boarded buses early Friday morning to complete their whole farm evaluations. Teams were ranked as platinum, gold or silver based on how well their evaluations matched the judges’ evaluations of the dairy operation. Penn State students who were members of platinum teams were Melissa Boess, Warrington, PA, and Christy Hindman, Brockway, PA. Penn State students ranked as gold level teams included Sara Bechtel, Martinsburg, PA; Nicole Irizarry, Malvern, PA; Wes Miller, Northeast, MD; and Nathan Oleniacz, Montrose, PA. Students on silver level teams included Daniel Hartzell, Slippery Rock, PA; Nicole Kusko, Hopewell Junction, NY; and Sarah Weimer, Clarion, PA. Students were coached by Dr. Lisa Holden, associate professor of Dairy and Animal Science, and Dr. Gabriella Varga, University Distinguished Professor of Animal Science. This year’s host farms included Beller Farms LLC in Carthage, NY, Deer Run Dairy LLC in Adams, NY, and Murcrest Farms LLC in Copenhagen, NY. Teams were

asked to prepare a presentation for Saturday that included strengths, weaknesses and key recommendations or opportunities for successes across all areas of the farm including nutrition, facilities, reproduction, animal health, crop and feed management, and financial management. All teams gave a 20 minute presentation to a panel of judges. The students had the opportunity to participate in educational workshops at Wood Farms in Clayton, NY, as well as attend an industry career fair. Team-building and fun activities were held throughout the weekend to encourage networking among students and sponsors. The regional event is part of the North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge (NAIDC) which was established as a management contest to incorporate all phases of a specific dairy business. It strives to incorporate a higherlearning atmosphere with practical application to help prepare students for careers in the dairy industry. The mission of NAIDC is to facilitate education, communication and an exchange of ideas among students, agribusiness, dairy producers and universities that enhances the development of the dairy industry and its leaders. Next year’s Northeast Regional event will be hosted by the University of Maine. For more information about next year’s contest, contact David Marcinkowski of University of Maine at davidm@umext.maine.edu. You may also contact industry chair Brett Denny of Vermont DHIA at bdenny@vtdhia.org. To become a sponsor, contact Jan Bitter of Farm Credit East at 800-3923276 or jan.bitter@farmcrediteast.com. You can connect to Dairy Challenge on Facebook or find more information on the website at www.dairychallenge.org.

Team members achieving platinum honors at 2011 Northeast Dairy Challenge included (from the left), front row: Lauren Williams, Cornell University; Christy Hindman, Penn State University; Melissa Boess, Penn State University; Audrey Ervin, University of Maryland; Lindsey Peterson, University of New Hampshire; back row: Randy Miller, Cornell University; Megan Hathaway, University of Guelph; Larry Bardoff, Cornell University; Matthew Grab, SUNY Cobleskill; Kyle Sudhoff, The Ohio State University – ATI; Hillary Knight, University of Maine; Chelsea Hargrave, Cornell University; Kenneth Nearhoof, Morrisville State College; Eric Winsor, Cornell University; Aubrey Swanson, Delaware Valley College; Andrew Whitney, Vermont Technical College; Seth Ripley, Morrisville State College; Wade Deaken, University of Guelph; and Katie Hanehan, Cornell University.

Participants, sponsors and planning committee members of the 2011 Northeast Regional Dairy Challenge.

Larry Bardoff of Cornell University and Melissa Boess of Penn State University review farm information.

Penn State students who competed in the Northeast Dairy Challenge are, from left, seated, Daniel Hartzel, Nathan Oleniacz and Wes Miller. Standing are Nicole Irizarry, Sarah Weimer, Nicole Kusko, Melissa Boess, Sara Bechtel and Christy Hindman.


Page 3 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

The Goat Lady Dairy puts a face on food by Tina L. LaVallee A line forms out the door at the Goat Lady Dairy open house as people eagerly anticipate a taste of nationally famous cheese. Central North Carolina is not what comes to mind when one envisions cheese making, but the Goat Lady Dairy has been quietly producing award winning goat cheeses there since 1996. Located on 75 acres near Climax, NC, the dairy works on the philosophy that less is more. In an age of expansion, owners Steve and Lee Tate set out to prove that success is not always governed by quantity. The dairy intentionally limits the size of its operation to assure quality, but that does not stop the Tates from seeking loftier goals. “We did not start Goat Lady Dairy to

make an easy living,” says Steve. “It was a calling. We want to support sustainable agriculture and prove that a business can ‘do good’ while still doing good.” All this sounded far-fetched in 1986, when Ginnie Tate, Steve Tate’s sister, first began restoring the 200 year old farm that was to become Goat Lady Dairy. Ginnie Tate had raised goats as a hobby farmer and had earned the nickname “Goat Lady” from her friends, so the farm name came naturally. As the property and its buildings began to take shape, Ginnie began the first of many experiments making cheese with the milk produced by her goats. Her brother Steve, his wife Lee, and their sons Nathan and Mills soon joined her on the farm to help launch

Goat Lady Dairy is located in a building constructed from timber harvested on the farm. Organic vegetables provide a beautiful, edible landscape.

the new business. When the dairy received its license from the North Carolina Department of Agriculture in 1996, it was one of only a handful of goat milking operations in the state. Even fewer produced farmstead cheese. Together as a family, the Tates set sail into uncharted waters. Starting small and concentrating on local sales, the Tates gained experience as their cheeses garnered appreciation from regional chefs. Awards began to come as well, with the plain Formage winning first place from the American Cheese Society National Competition in 1999. The positive recognition helped build a reputation that grew with each new restaurant and satisfied customer. All this translated into years of slow but steady growth, with yearly cheese production climbing from 7500 pounds in 2000 to 35,000 pounds in 2011. Today, Goat Lady Dairy works with area partner farms to produce the goat milk needed for the cheese making operation. Three breeds are used in the milking parlor, the Saanen, the Nubian, and the Alpine. Each breed contributes its own distinctive flavor and character to the cheeses. In addition to goat cheese, Goat Lady makes a small amount of aged cheese from cow milk, which comes from the nearby Lindale Organic Dairy. Both fresh and ripened goat cheeses are offered in a variety of flavors, along with goat milk yogurt and delicious goat cheese truffles. The cheeses are sold off the farm and through a variety of local stores and farmers markets. Dozens of area restaurants boast Goat Lady products on their menus and the cheeses have even been featured on the Emeril Live cooking show. Educating local customers to the many uses of goat cheese was an important part of the Tate’s work from the beginning and it lead to the creation of “Dinner at the Dairy”, a twice monthly gourmet dining experience. This very popular event begins with

Visitors line up for samples in Goat Lady Dairy's dinning room. The room is the site for the "Dinner at the Dairy" events and weddings. a tour of the dairy and proceeds into a “guided” fivecourse dining experience featuring all locally grown vegetables and meats prepared with Goat Lady cheeses. The menus are strictly seasonal to take advantage of the freshest ingredients. Steve Tate tells the story of each course, explaining where it came from and its journey from farm to plate. “I want to put a face on food,” he explains. “One of the principals of the slow food movement is knowing the origin of your food, including the farm and farmer who brings it to you.” Most of the vegetables featured in the dinners are grown at Goat Lady Dairy and this has provided an inspiration for yet another venture. The Tates recently launched the Goat Lady Community Supported Agriculture Project,

growing organic vegetables on a 15 acre farm near the dairy. Project members receive weekly boxes of in-season vegetables along with sustainably produced meats, eggs, and honey. Though still in its infancy, the Community Supported Agriculture Project sold out all its memberships for 2011. The relationship between the farmer and the consumer continues to be an integral part of operations at Goat Lady Dairy and it is certain that the Tate family will keep looking for new ways to connect with their customers. “When you change a person’s relationship to their food, you change the world forever,” says Steve Tate. “I may not be able to save the world, but I can save one farm.” For more information visit www.goatladydairy.com.

Everline 4-H Leadership Award presented to MidState 4-H’er Melanie Jackson of the MidState 4-H Club was chosen as the recipient of the 2011 Michael Everline Memorial 4-H Leadership Award. Melanie was selected for this award from applications submitted to the Kent County 4-H Office. The award is presented for outstanding leadership participation, activities and accomplishments at the local, county and state 4-H levels. The award is presented in memory of Michael Everline, an active

4-H’er in Kent County who displayed outstanding leadership qualities in his 4-H project work at all levels of the Delaware 4-H program. Melanie Jackson, of Felton, is 16 years old and a 6-year member of the MidState 4-H Club. She has been active in several 4-H project areas with an emphasis on goats, swine, clothing, foods, photography, citizenship and leadership. She recently served as president of the Kent County 4-H

Junior Council and also served in other officer capacities for this group. She served in all offices of her local 4-H club including president, and currently is serving as president for the State 4-H Teen Council. On the county level, Melanie has been involved with the 4-H Exchange Group, 4-H National Issues Action Team, served as a counselor for 4-H Day Camps and Younger Member Weekends and has provided leadership to county commit-

tees and events. Melanie was selected as a delegate to the 2010 National 4-H Congress and 2010 National 4-H Conference. If you would like to be part of the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension 4-H youth educational program as a member or adult volunteer, call the Kent County Extension Office at 302-730-4000.

For more Kent County 4-H awards see page 5

Melanie Jackson


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 4

Stay safe in and around grain bins by Sally Colby In June of 2011, three workers (in Iowa, Michigan and North Dakota) were killed by engulfment in grain. A worker in Texas was also buried, but was rescued and survived. Although workers who will be handling grain receive thorough on-thejob-training and many youth-oriented farm safety programs include demonstrations on the dangers of grain bins, it’s still frighteningly easy to become engulfed in a grain bin. OSHA clearly outlines regulations for grain bins, but accidents still occur. Suffocation from engulfment is the leading cause of death in grain bins, and numbers are rising. Between 2006 and 2010, deaths due to suffocation in grain more than doubled. In response, OSHA has issued a hazard alert on the dangers of engulfment and suffocation in grain bins. Those who work in and around grain handling and storage can prevent the tragedy of permanent injury or suffocation by following OSHA’s Grain Handling Facilities standard 29CFR 1910.272, which states that “suffocation occurs when a worker enters a bin and is engulfed by grain, or when bins develop hazardous atmospheres or do not have enough oxygen.” To understand the danger of contained grain (whether in large storage bins or gravity wagons), it helps to

think about grain having the same qualities as quicksand. As the auger unloads the bin, grain flows to the outlet and is released, which causes the grain above it to move in and take its place. When a worker stands on moving or flowing grain, the grain becomes like quicksand and buries the worker within seconds. The weight of a worker standing on flowing grain increases the rate of flow and causes the worker to sink rapidly into the grain. One source reports that a 6-feet tall worker would be unable to free himself within five seconds, and would become covered with grain in just 11 seconds. Pulling a person from grain is extremely difficult due to the friction created when a person’s body is in direct contact with grain. To avoid joint dislocation, paralysis or other serious injury, grain must be removed from around the person who is in grain more than knee-deep. A cofferdam, either purchased or made on site, should be constructed around the person so that grain can be removed. Instructions for a homemade cofferdam can be found at http://msucares.com/pubs/publications/p2598.pdf. The issue of “bridging,” which occurs when grain clumps together due to moisture or mold, is also hazardous. Bridging creates an empty space beneath the grain as it is

Cover photo courtesy of Kent County 4-H 4-H Volunteer, Connie Louder (right) presents the 2011 Michael Everline Memorial 4-H Leadership Award to Melanie Jackson of the MidState 4-H Club.

released. The bridged grain resists the downward pull toward the outlet, and if a worker steps onto that bridge, it can easily cave in and bury the worker in the empty space. As the grain continues to flow downward after the initial release, the worker is covered and quickly suffocates. Standing under bridged grain is also dangerous because the grain can cave in unexpectedly. Another dangerous practice is when a worker attempts to loosen a pile of grain, or stands next to a pile of grain on the side of the bin. In this case, even though the wall of grain may appear to be safe, the removal of just one scoop of grain may cause a collapse and rapid flow of grain that engulfs the worker. To avoid this kind of incident, grain should be loosened, or bumped, from outside the bin with a pole. In addition to engulfment and suffocation potential, another danger in grain bins is from hazardous gases. Oxygen levels in grain bins can be low, and grain dust often contains harmful mold spores. Long-term exposure to dust and spores can result in “farmers’ lung,” which can lead to irreversible lung damage and even death. Grain handlers should protect their lungs by using NIOSH-approved respirators that filter dust. “Suffocation Hazards in Grain Bins,” a publication of the University of Arkansas, outlines six steps that help reduce the risk of working in and around grain bins. First, workers entering a grain bin should wear a body harness that is tethered to a lifeline manned by two workers outside the bin. At least one of the outside workers should be able to see the worker who is inside the bin. Using

prearranged hand signals helps all workers communicate, especially when grain handling or drying equipment is in use. Rule two is simple — never enter a bin of flowing grain. To retrieve a dropped shovel or probe, stop the flow of grain, then proceed using precautions in rule one. Remember that no tool is worth a human life. Rule three is be aware of the history of a grain bin prior to entering. If the grain surface is moldy, damp or caked, make sure at least two helpers are present, along with a safety harness and tether. Probe through the grain from the top to check for crusted surface, and remain in constant communication with co-workers. Rule four is to always lock out/tag out power equipment before entering a grain bin. It’s a good idea to post a sign on the control box if there’s a possibility that others may arrive after the control levers are padlocked. In the case of gravity-flow bins, padlock the gate to keep it closed. Rule five is to ensure that rescue attempts should not endanger a second person. Always have the appropriate breathing apparatus and adequate dust protection ready, and make sure that the rescue crew can work without endangering anyone else. Prior to entering a bin, make sure ample help is present to pull rescuers out with a tether and safety harness. Rule six is that whenever possible, workers should solve problems without entering the bin. If it is necessary to enter the bin, prepare preventive safety measures such as ladders, scaffolds, body harnesses, tethers, breathing equipment and at least two other trained crew members prior to entering a bin.

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Livestock for Landscapes’ Kathy Voth to speak at Winter Forage conferences Integrated Weed Management: Putting Science into Practice is the theme for the Virginia Forage and Grassland Council (VFGC) and Virginia Cooperative Extension winter forage conferences. This is an ideal opportunity for all livestock producers to gain an understanding of how to profitably integrate science and practice to manage weeds in pastures and hay land by smartly managing livestock, soil fertility, and herbicides. This year’s keynote speaker is Kathy Voth of Livestock for Landscapes a national known expert on using livestock as a land management tool. Using decades of university research and practical hands-on experience, she invented a process for teaching cows to eat weeds and other non-traditional forages. Voth makes use of livestock’s natural behavior as an inexpensive alternative for managing weeds and other vegetation in pastures and other landscapes. Participants will also hear from Dr. Scott Hagood, professor and extension specialist, Weed Science, Virginia Tech, and Dr. Chris Teutsch, associate professor and extension specialist Forage Management, Virginia Tech. Hagood will provide farmers with knowledge of the practical science behind developing a weed management. Teutsch will help farmers

understand the relationships between soils and weeds, with insights on how to use fertility to shift the balance to favor of quality forages. This year, VFGC will have a local producer at each workshop to discuss how they balance grazing, re-establishment, mowing and spraying to provide a quality forage for grazing and/or hay. The daylong conference will be repeated at three locations: • Tuesday, Jan. 17, in Wytheville at the Wytheville Meeting Center; • Wednesday, Jan 18, in Weyers Cave at the Weyers Cave Community Center; • Thursday, Jan. 19, in Gordonsville, at the Gordonsville Volunteer Fire Company Hall; and • Friday, Jan. 20, in Chatham, at the Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex. The conferences will run from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The $35 early registration fee must be postmarked by Jan. 3, 2012. After that date, the registration fee is $50 per person. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service is also sponsoring the conference. Visit the VFGC website, http://vaforages.org, for additional details and registration information.


The 4-H program offers 10 different areas in which 4-H’ers can participate in a judging contest. This is an educational opportunity for our young people to learn to compare. A lesson they can use in their future adult lives in making purchases, selecting menus or other decisions that depend on comparison. The top contestant in each area at the state contests is selected as the Kent County winner. The winners are presented a trophy at the Annual Kent County 4-H Achievement program. The trophies are sponsored by concerned citizens, organizations and businesses in Kent County. This years winners are — Clothing — Lena Berry, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club Sponsor — Wilson Reed, Delaware Sewing Center Dairy — Jordan Gallagher, Westville 4-H Club Sponsor — Charmayne Busker and Jen-Amy Farms Environmental Awareness — Greg Grimminger, Chestnut Grove 4-H Club Sponsor — Cathy Martin, Delaware Council of Wildlife Rehabilitators and Educators Food and Nutrition — Melanie Jackson, Midstate 4-H Club Sponsor — Cliff and Judy Hudson Horses — Jacob Blacksten, Westville 4-H Club Sponsor — Harrington Raceway Inc. Horticulture — Drew Harris, Peach Blossom 4-H Club Sponsor — Sprig and Twig Garden Club Livestock — McKenzie Ivory, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club

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Sponsor — T. A. Farms Wood Science — Nile Bunce, Chestnut Grove 4-H Club Sponsor — The Chris Grampp Family Photography — Haley Gerardi, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club Sponsor — Willow Run Ruritanettes Poultry — Colleen Carter, Midstate 4-H Club Sponsor — Mr. and Mrs. Carl Melvin, BC Farms Team trophies were also presented this year for 4-H judging contests. This award consists of a revolving perpetual cup trophy presented to the 4-H club with the top team score for each of ten different judging areas. Team trophies were presented to the following — Clothing — Peach Blossom 4-H Club; team members Leslie Webb, Kristen Hedstrom and Mary Beth Robbins. Dairy — Westville 4-H Club; team members Caitlin Walton, Kayla Kemp and Jordan Gallagher. Environmental Awareness — Chestnut Grove 4-H Club; team members Nile Bunce, Justin Grimminger and Greg Grimminger. Foods and Nutrition — Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club; team members Haley Gerardi, Jessica Sullivan and Trevor Maloney. Horticulture and Field Crops — Peach Blossom 4-H Club; team members Drew Harris, Kristen Hedstrom and Maci Carter. Horses — Holler-N-Hooves 4-H Club; team members Lexi Willard, Claudia Little and Hayley Halloran. Livestock — Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club; team members McKenzie

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Kent County 4-H Judging Trophy Winners are, left to right, front row, Colleen Carter, Drew Harris, McKenzie Ivory and Melanie Jackson. Back row, Haley Gerardi, Jacob Blacksten, Greg Grimminger, and Justin Grimminger (accepting for Nile Bunce). Missing from photo is Lena Berry and Jordan Gallagher. Ivory and Lena Berry. Wood Science — Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club; team members Stephen Fox, Chris Fox, and Drew Fox. Photography — New Beginnings 4-H

Club; team members Kellie Ford, Kassie Keenan and Claire Benson. Poultry — Peach Blossom 4-H Club; team members Drew Harris, Mary Beth Robbins and JT Robbins.

Kent County 4-H’ers receive state awards Five Kent County 4-H’ers recently were recipients of 2011 Delaware 4-H State Awards. Two individuals have been selected to attend the 2011 National 4-H Club Congress in Atlanta. They were selected based on their project work, leadership and citizenship activities. These members are Trevor Maloney, age 16, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club,

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daughter of Tim and Kelly Maloney of Houston, DE, and McKenzie Ivory, age 16, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, daughter of Matt and Stephanie Ivory of Harrington, DE. In addition, three Kent County 4-H members recently represented Delaware 4-H at the 2011 National 4H Conference. Participating in this

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Page 5 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Kent County 4-H judging winners announced


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 6

Kent from A5 event were Haley Gerardi, age 16, Harrington Sunshine 4-H Club, daughter of Donald Gerardi of Harrington, DE, and Janene Gerardi of Felton, DE, and Melanie Jackson, age 16, MidState 4-H Club, daughter of Ed and Jackie Jackson of Felton, DE., and Bree Wilkins, age 16, Houston Cardinals 4-H Club,

daughter of John and Lynn Wilkins of Milford, DE. This event was held in Washington where over 300 4-H youths convened to participate in working sessions on important 4-H topics. These youth also spent a day on Capitol Hill visiting our Delaware senators and representatives.

Recipient of the 4-H State Awards for the National 4-H Conference, left to right, are Haley Gerardi, Melanie Jackson and Bree Wilkins. Recipients of the 4-H State Awards for the National 4-H Congress are Trevor Maloney and McKenzie Ivory.

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*Offer available October 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. Cannot be combined wih any other offer. Rebates and/or financing based on the purchase of eligible equipment defined in promotional program. Pricing and rebates in US dollars. Customers must take delivery prior to the end of the program period. Some customers will not qualify. Some restrictions apply. Offers available on new equipment only. Prior purchases are not eligible. Offer valid only at participating Dealers. See your dealer for details.

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Newsletter of Penn Dutch Cow Care by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks,

As many of us just weathered a very rare snow storm at the end of October

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FALL

and are still feeling some of its effects, it brings to mind to continue the conversation about issues associated with indoor housing during the winter. This month I want to focus on udder health since milk quality is always of concern anytime with dairy animals — especially those indoors. Looking back a couple years at a presentation given by Dr. Linda Tikofsky to the National Organic Standards Board during the Pasture Symposium in State College, PA, one study showed that the percentage of cows freshening with SCC of more than 300,000 is highest from December through April while the percent of cows freshening with SCC more than 300,000 being lowest during the pasture season. In a 4-year study of pasture and confinement systems, authored by Dr. Steve Washburn from NC State, confined cows had more clinical mastitis than pastured cows (Washburn et al. 2002. J Dairy Sci.). Back in 1992, a study in Vermont of 15 Vermont dairies that had monthly bulk tank cultures and whose records were monitored over a year showed that grazed herds had lower total bacteria counts than confined herds during grazing season (Goldberg et al. 1992. J Dairy Sci.). And in a study from Norway, of 4,256 first lactation heifers with mastitis compared to 67,072 without mastitis — it was found that heifers on pasture were at lower risk for clinical mastitis than confined heifers. None of these studies looked at certified organic herds specifically, just herds that were grazing or not. These studies showed

that when cows are out on pasture, milk quality tends to be improved in general. But now we are going to off pasture and inside. How best can we keep udder health and milk quality good and achieve quality premiums? There are a couple basic rules of milking cows that apply whether organic or conventional. These may sound very familiar but sometimes a reminder can help when factors beyond our control change — like the seasons and associated weather. As any dairy farmer knows, milking clean and dry teats is critical. Clean not just on the length of the teat you can easily see, but especially right at the teat end where the sphincter opens and closes to the outside world. This is the first port of entry for any unwanted dirt and bacteria. Bacteria love moisture, so it is truly critical to not have damp or wet teats when the milking machine or hand milking begins, as bugs will invisibly move about, with some gaining entrance into the teat canal where a reaction with the animal’s immune defenses will take place. This will cause higher somatic cell count and possibly clinical mastitis, depending how strongly the cow’s immune system reacts to the invader. It goes without saying that good lighting is needed at udder level. If area lights are somewhat distant or dim, it can be difficult to make sure the teats and teat ends are truly clean and dry. Bright lighting especially at the udder level is essential. Consider

Moo A10

FREPETION

Friday, December 2, 2011

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Page 9 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

The Moo News


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 10

Moo from A9 wearing one of those battery powered LED lights that can be worn on the head if needed. Wearing gloves is not well liked by everyone but the smooth surface of gloves don’t allow bacteria to find a hiding spot and will help minimize germ transfer from cow to cow. Gloves can be washed easily between cows if they become dirty. Skin of the hands, however, offer excellent landing areas for bacteria to stay until the next cow is prepared for milking, when they can be rubbed off onto the next cow’s teats. In a study that I did with Penn State Extension in Lancaster County in 2006, DHIA data and farm responses to a survey showed that wearing gloves was associated with significantly less somatic cell counts compared to herds not wearing gloves. In the same study, pre-dipping was also associated with significantly less somatic cell counts compared to herds that did not pre-dip. Wearing gloves, by the way, will reduce those painful fingertip cracks that are so common during the winter time. And those painful fingertip cracks happen to be a great areas for bacteria to lodge — especially Staph aureus. And it’s those same fingertips which are prepping the next cow to milk, right? Don’t forget the milking machines and the liners themselves. If many cows have teat ends that have little rings at the ends of each teat, then the cows are either being milked too long or there is too much vacuum fluctuation during milking time. Those rings harbor bugs. By making sure cows start milking within 60 seconds of preparation, 95 percent of your cows will be finished milking in about 3-4 minutes. Machine milking can be very irritating to cows if the machines aren’t functioning properly, regardless of make or model. Many factors go into udder health —

clean and dry teats, clean and dry hands, pre-and post dipping, milk out time, and the machines themselves.

Thinking back to the pasture studies mentioned earlier, the common theme is that cows being grazed had essen-

tially better milk quality. Then what was it about those cows housed continually indoors? While I’m not

certain, I would probably include damp bedding as a main culprit leading to decreased udder health. And as

those of you who know my writings by now, dry bedding is once again a

Moo A12

DON’T MISS OUT!! The First Annual Mane Stream Stallion Directory Will Deadline on Friday, December 2nd. Promote your stallion and breeding program! Fill out your form and return it today!

2 012 Stallion Directory The January/February Issue of Mane Stream will feature a Stallion Directory. For $25.00 you can list your stallion. You can add a photo to your listing for an additional $25.00. You can list additional stallions for $20.00 per stallion, add a photo for an additional $20.00 per stallion. Or, you can choose a Premium Listing to promote your Stallion or Stallions. Your information can be e-mailed to tkrieger@leepub.com. This form must be completed and returned by 12/2/11. Questions? Call Tina Krieger at 518-673-0108. CHECK WHICH APPLIES: ________ Listing Only $25.00

_______ Check If Adding Photo to Listing $50.00

How Many_______ Additional Stallion Listings Only $20.00 per stallion, (attach separate form for each stallion) How Many_______ Additional Stallion Listings Adding Photo $40.00 per stallion, (attach separate form for each stallion) How Many_______ Premium Listings $100.00 with enlarged photo (3 1/4” x 3 1/2”), add your Farm Logo, and Press Release of up to 250 words. (Per Stallion) Photos will be 4-Color; Listings will be online at www.cfmanestream.com Farm Name ____________________________________ Contact Person ______________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ________________________________________ Fax ______________________________________________ Website

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Description (40 words or less) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Return by Fax to 518-673-2381 or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 If you do not wish to receive any faxes from us, check here

Ì and fax back to 518-673-3245

Published by Lee Publications P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • 518-673-3237 • Fax 518-673-3245


Page 11 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

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November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 12

Focus is on the future at Alltech’s Global Dairy 500 For the fourth year in a row, leaders in the dairy industry will gather in Lexington, KY, from Dec. 6-8, for Alltech’s Global Dairy 500. In 2011, the Global 500 will move into uncharted territory, venturing into a world of opportunities and challenges, and exploring the dairy industries’ future landscape. “Our world is changing. Global demand for fuel, food and other commodities will only continue to spike as the world’s population and wealth increases. The adoption of new technologies is not optional anymore, but necessary if you want to stay competitive. It’s a world of transparency in which

people develop strong personal impressions of companies and producers — and communicate their feelings through social media as well as with their neighbors. To succeed in this new environment, the dairy industry must be prepared and must be able to engage the minds of future generations,” said Dr. Pearse Lyons, president and founder of Alltech. The agenda this year packs in everything the progressive dairy producer needs to know about the future of the dairy industry, from communicating the message to consumers, to engaging the next generation of dairy farmers.

Highlights from the Global Dairy 500 programme are as follows: • 32,000 Liters of Milk: A reality or an unachievable target? — Karl Dawson, Alltech, USA • No Recovery: The critical aspects of calf rearing — Sam Leadley, Attica Veterinary Associates • What Can a Multinational Expect from Dairy Farmers to Secure Future Needs? — Paul Gartner, Milk Upstream/Groupe Danone • From Farm to Spoon — Why I could not wait to start my ice cream business — Carl Chaney, Chaney’s Dairy Barn, USA

• Discovering the Power of Influence — Interacting with your marketplace through Social Media — Troy and Stacy Hadrick, Advocates of Agriculture, USA There will also be a special roundtable discussion between delegates following the seminars entitled “Roadmaps to the Future of the Dairy Industry.” To be a part in planning for the future of the dairy industry, join us Dec. 6-8, in Lexington, KY. For more information, or to register, visit www.alltech.com/global500.

Moo from A10 key ingredient in maintaining good health — in this instance for udder health. If SCC is becoming a problem, as it always is if it gets above 400,000 (the cut off limit by most organic milk processors), then it’s time to get to the bottom of the problem. The usual method I recommend is to look at your DHIA sheets and identify all cows that have a linear SCC (LSCC) of 5 or higher, then use a CMT paddle to identify the quarter(s) that are positive to the CMT fluid, then take a milk sample and have it cultured to see which bug/germ might be responsible. If not on DHIA, then you should be running a CMT on

your herd every month to stay on top of which animals may be contributing to any SCC problems. You simply cannot effectively deal with udder health issues without knowing what bug(s) may be involved. Sure, you may have a favorite remedy to treat cows with, but little by little, especially if there is a contagious bug like Staph aureus or Strep ag, your herd udder health will continually be a battle, resulting in more clinical mastitis flare-ups. Once you eventually do look into the problem, those bugs might have set up shop in the udder to such an extent that really drastic measures may be your only hope. Using fore-

sight, remaining aware and employing a careful milking technique will always lead to better outcomes than simply doing things the same old way and hoping they’ll miraculously get

better. Sure miracles do happen, but you’ll probably enjoy milking your cows more even if it means you’ve got to make some changes to your current routine. I’ve heard some folks say in

the past “But they don’t prep the cows at all in New Zealand — they just stick on the milker.” If everything is fine — great, don’t make any changes! But if you are having milk quality

problems, remember to get back to basics. When it comes to milking routines and milking hygiene, conventional wisdom really has its place, even on organic dairies.

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by Virginia Ishler, nutrient management specialist, and Rebecca White, senior project associate, Penn State Extension Dairy Team UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — The definition of a cash cow is — after the initial capital outlay has been paid off — the animal continues to produce milk for many years to come and requires low maintenance costs. This does not necessarily happen in the real world on a dairy farm. However, there are

some basics related to producing a cash cow that continuously get overlooked. These relate to managing purchased feed costs for the mature animals and the young-stock as well as knowing the forage and feed inventory for the entire farming operation. Home-raised feed inventory is the nutritional foundation from which everything else builds to maintain ration consistency, animal performance and profitability. The old saying that

knowledge is power, or you can’t improve what you don’t measure or track, is very true. Knowing the farm’s inventory and recognizing the limitations in the cropping or ration program helps a producer make more informed decisions and have a higher success rate for achieving profitability. The Penn State Extension Dairy Team has been working with dairy producers across the state to study their ration programs for all

animal groups as well as their forage and feed inventories. There have been some common themes across farms. Many operations do not receive an itemized listing of purchased grain mixes. The loose or bagged feed prices are lumped together so it makes it very difficult to know what each feed costs. The other challenge is the uncertainty as to what the dry cows and young-stock are actually consuming, especially for

home raised forages. The end result is producers don’t know the purchased feed costs for the year on each animal group and the impact to forage inventories. Both items can put a producer at a distinct disadvantage when feed and forage prices are at record levels. When examining farms that have completed their ration and crops program, it is not unusual to have the annual milk cow purchased feed cost per cow come to $1,600-$1,800 per cow, per year or more, not including the value of home raised feeds. Historically we would want producers to achieve a benchmark of at least $4,000 milk income per cow, but with purchased feed at these levels, farms can get into cash flow problems very quickly even if they are reaching this income target. However, when purchased feed cost is unknown, how will decisions be made to correct the problem? Add to the scenario not knowing the purchased feed costs for dry cows and heifers and feed costs for the farm can get out of control very quickly. The price volatility the dairy industry has experienced with feed, fuel and fertilizer has forced many producers to reexamine the way they do business. Not only is it just grain prices that are high, but forage prices as well. Some farms are

seeing daily milk cow feed costs per cow between $7 and $8. This may be tolerable when milk price is $24/cwt. but it will not be when milk price drops to $17$19/cwt. Ultimately it comes down to knowing your margin (breakeven income over feed costs). Even though producers have been blessed with high milk prices in 2011, many farms are no better off financially than they were in 2009. Feed costs are so high for their level of milk production these farms are not close to the Net Margin needed to pay all other expenses. There have been a lot of missed opportunities in 2011 to maximize margin that may come back to haunt folks as we move into 2012. The Penn State Extension Dairy Team helps dairy producers track IOFC, makes recommendations to improve margins and develops cash flow plans to determine other areas of production that are inhibiting positive cash flow. The first step is to determine where the dairy is currently and where it needs to go in order to reach profitability and future goals. Working with a Profit Team can help producers track changes and explore different solutions to reaching their goals.

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Page 13 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Cash Cow 101: Ration and Cropping Strategies


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 14

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

AUGUSTA

NORTH POINT FARM INC. MEADOW RUN DAIRY INC KEVIN PHILLIPS

DHI-AP H 576.2 DHIR-AP H 307.8 DHI-APCS H 217.5

RIGGS & STILES INC YANCEY'S DAIRY

RHA MILK

DHIR H 608.3

24489 22390 22230

891 3.6 729 3.0 3X 813 3.6 679 3.0 832 3.7 676 3.0 3X

27273 1040 3.8 823 3.0 3X

ROBERT & STEPHANIE WHIPPLE DHI-AP H 98.5

23075

886 3.8 700 3.0

SHENANDOAH

WILKINS BROTHERS DAIRY

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP H 146.8

21157

786 3.7 643 3.0

DHI-AP H 135.8

20271

737 3.6 599 3.0

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

WEST VIRGINIA

LINTON BROTHERS INC.

734 3.8 611 3.1

WEST BRANCH DAIRY

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

BERKELEY

19434

ROCKINGHAM

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

% 3 % FAT FAT PRO PRO X

DHI-AP H 194.7

ROCKBRIDGE

For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh HERD OWNER

VIRGINIA

CLARK PAGE

B R COW E YEARS E D

17109

651 3.8 520 3.0

DHIR X 126.3 DHI-AP H 132.8

19639 20704

763 3.9 649 3.3 769 3.7 632 3.1

HOUGH, CLARENCE E. & T.TODD DHIRAPCS H 220.2 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP H 95.5 SNYDER, NICHOLAS DHI-AP H 91.3 RZ BANE INC. DHI-APCS H 250.0 VICKERS, L. ELMER DHI-AP J 54.2

23073 21200 20253 19324 15743

961 800 741 701 725

DHIRAPCS H 47.6

18287

680 3.7 577 3.2

DHI-APCS H 85.2

24618

975 4.0 756 3.1

DHI H 78.6

20610

810 3.9 676 3.3

DHIR-AP H 213.0

20092

709 3.5 617 3.1 3X

GREENBRIER BEN BUCK FARM EMORY & JEAN HANNA

JEFFERSON

MONONGALIA

WEST VIRGINIA DAIRY DEPT

MONROE

BEILER DAIRY FARM, LLC

PRESTON RANDOLPH LINGER FARMS INC.

4.2 3.8 3.7 3.6 4.6

703 645 620 581 559

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.6

UNITED DHI VIRGINIA TOTALS

CRESTHAVEN FARMS DAVID HOOLEY LUKE & ROBERTA HEATWOLE ROBERT D STOOTS GARY W MCDONALD DONALD BOWMAN CONNER DAIRY FARM INC HOME PLACE DAIRY INC WHISPERING OAKS FARM AMEVA FARM INC BRANDON BEERY RIVERBEND DAIRY FARM BROWN BARNY BAY DAIRY INC LEWIS E WENGER CHAD & REBECCA MCMURRAY HAMMOCK DAIRY INC. WHITAKER FARM INC. RANDALL INMAN M B & MARK B GOODE JOHN O HARDESTY & SON CLAUDIA PAULSON DOUGLAS & MELISSA HARRISON MICHAEL COUNTISS E H SPURLIN & SONS JORDAN ROHRER ALFRED STEPHENS MOUNTAIN MEADOWS DAIRY LLC. STEVE RAINEY GARY RUSSELL HARMAN BECKNER HEATWOLE FAMILY DAIRY RIDGE VIEW DAIRY LLC TRIPLE R DAIRY HILLSIDE FARM INC. CLARMAY FARM SPRING CREEK FARM KYLE LEONARD EASTVIEW FARM INC J & B FARMS INC. CLIFFORD BOWMAN R.JEFFERSON ROHRER BROTHERS WALTER MCCLURE ALLEN L SHANK JENNINGS GAP DAIRY BACK RUN DAIRY ERIC SIMMONS FORKLAND FARMS CORP BRANKLEY FARMS RICHARD L SHOWALTER DONALD & WAYNE COX MT. VIEW DAIRY INC. WILLOW BEND DAIRY CHARLES F MOYER AND SONS HOMESTEAD DAIRY

TOWN (3X)

MILK DAYS IN LBS MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

GALAX VA (3X) AMELIA VA (3X) MT. CRAWFORD VA MAX MEADOWS VA STEPHENS CITY VA ROCKY MOUNT VA FLOYD VA DAYTON VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA AMELIA VA MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) ROCKY MOUNT VA MARTINSVILLE VA ROCKY MOUNT VA DAYTON VA HARRISONBURG VA (3X) CHATHAM VA (3X) AMELIA CT HSE VA MT. CRAWFORD VA (3X) HUDDLESTON VA BERRYVILLE VA PORT REPUBLIC VA (3X) BROADWAY VA ABINGDON VA (3X) GALAX VA GROTTOES VA (3X) WYTHEVILLE VA MEADOWS OF DAN VA (3X) DILLWYN VA (3X) WOODLAWN VA WIRTZ VA HARRISONBURG VA (3X) QUICKSBURG VA (3X) CREWE VA (3X) DUBLIN VA FISHERSVILLE VA BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) SPOTTSWOOD VA BEAVERDAM VA MAX MEADOWS VA CALLAWAY VA CHATHAM VA (3X) DAYTON VA ROCKY MOUNT VA (3X) BRIDGEWATER VA CHURCHVILLE VA ROCKY MOUNT VA BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) FARMVILLE VA SKIPWITH VA DAYTON VA RADFORD VA JETERSVILLE VA BRIDGEWATER VA AMELIA VA BRIDGEWATER VA

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

92.1 84.0 83.2 83.2 82.8 82.6 82.4 80.4 78.6 78.2 78.2 77.8 77.6 77.4 77.4 77.1 76.9 76.7 76.4 75.9 75.9 75.7 75.7 75.5 75.2 75.1 75.1 74.8 74.7 74.4 74.3 74.3 74.1 74.0 73.8 73.4 73.3 73.2 73.1 72.9 72.8 72.8 72.8 72.7 72.7 72.6 72.4 72.2 72.2 72.1 71.8 71.5 71.5 71.3 71.2 71.2

30569 24327 26482 24951 27054 25786 23320 25484 25964 25653 26839 25048 22248 24900 24903 24861 25225 24525 26899 20605 24943 27162 23902 23433 24826 23634 24531 24288 25505 24918 22342 26693 24976 25555 24312 23451 23714 23520 23420 23388 23156 25581 24958 22123 22530 21286 25308 20435 21459 23282 25054 21160 21527 22872 22836 24905

3.3 3.6 3.3 4.0 3.5 3.9 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.3 3.8 3.6 4.0 4.1 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.6 3.2 3.3 3.3 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.3 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.8 2.8 3.6 3.7 4.1 3.8 3.5 3.6 4.1 3.6 3.7 3.4 3.9 4.3 3.3

997 871 882 993 944 993 707 849 936 968 1054 920 814 922 823 934 913 979 1104 781 919 1046 871 752 826 786 895 922 945 919 836 1006 835 876 896 844 933 879 882 843 881 973 693 804 834 882 969 711 782 956 890 792 738 895 991 814

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56

178 224 148 132 214 144 150 171 203 184 171 165 154 168 178 201 183 153 184 190 184 180 189 171 163 157 189 167 164 223 134 187 201 171 170 184 183 140 145 186 183 161 181 189 187 140 164 170 154 216 191 157 180 177 161 217

B % LBS R PRO PRO EE D

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.4 2.9 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.0 2.8 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 0.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.2 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0

926 760 782 752 924 760 695 747 757 788 794 689 684 751 756 753 759 753 813 636 767 820 734 693 18 687 760 752 766 763 688 812 744 753 739 730 733 705 717 707 687 784 727 686 717 664 737 614 663 724 769 671 651 698 721 752

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DELAWARE

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE VARI, V. JOSEPH EMERSON, ROBERT L. COOK, H. WALLACE & SON

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H X

102.3 106.2 158.4 72.8

25910 1057 4.1 811 3.1 20895 720 3.4 644 3.1 18927 721 3.8 609 3.2 17697 748 4.2 575 3.2

DEMPSEY FARM DHI-APCS DULIN BROS. DHI-APCS GREGG & STEPHANIE KNUTSEN DHIR-AP JENAMY FARMS DHI-AP MOOR JR, ALFRED M. DHI-APCS GREGG & STEPHANIE KNUTSEN DHIR-AP WHITE OAK FARMS DHI-AP VOGL, ANTHONY & ERNEST DHI-AP

H H H H H J H H

221.2 157.2 40.7 172.9 316.8 24.4 178.5 142.9

27941 1068 3.8 839 3.0 25287 920 3.6 797 3.2 22812 869 3.8 735 3.2 23764 849 3.6 732 3.1 22293 890 4.0 719 3.2 16411 786 4.8 619 3.8 17777 704 4.0 566 3.2 18476 696 3.8 559 3.0

H X H H H J H

104.2 38.5 567.4 83.8 25.6 114.5 255.4

25857 22823 23486 22184 21875 19522 21672

KENT

SUSSEX

LOYAL JAKE BENDER LOYAL JAKE BENDER GREEN ACRES FARM HEATWOLE, JERREL & ALMA JOHN A. MILLS JOHN A. MILLS BAILEY, J. E. & SONS INC.

ANNUAL AVERAGES

R TEST A MTH N K

B R COW E YEARS E D

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

947 890 847 866 890 967 783

3.7 3.9 3.6 3.9 4.1 5.0 3.6

799 742 700 699 681 679 662

3.1 3.3 3.0 3X 3.2 3.1 3.5 3.1

Herds Ranked by Daily Milk Lbs Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh The United Federation DHIA's, Va Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (540) 552-2541

OCTOBER

TEST DAY AVG (COW)

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

NEW CASTLE

DHI H 181.2

GREG GIBSON

OWNER

Top 40 Herds For October

Top 40 Herds For October

Top 40 Herds For October

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

KENDRA & JULIA HORST M J ATKINS RICHLANDS DAIRY FARM INC REGGIE DUNCAN STONEYBROOK DAIRY RAYMOND L BURKHOLDER CUB RUN DAIRY JAMES L WILL M.D.& LEE SIMMONS FRANKLIN CLEAR VIEW DAIRY MEL-PAULA HOLSTEIN'S JIM ELGIN JARECO FARMS CARTER S ELLIOTT JR LW COLE FARM JAMES AND LAVAUN JANNEY THOMAS E STANLEY & SONS INC MOTLEY DAIRY INC. RIVER HAVEN FARMS INC DAVID TERRY LITTLE RIVER DAIRY ROBERT RUTROUGH MONTA VISTA, INC. COOL LAWN HOLSTEINS LAIRD FARM J HOLLACE BOWMAN & SONS CEDAR RIDGE DAIRY INC ALLEN LAYMAN WOLF RIDGE HOLSTEINS SLATE HILL FARMS, LLC BIRCH LANE DAIRY GEO ALVIS & SONS DANIEL LAYMAN STAN AND WES SHOWALTER SHOMO FARMS INC C H BEAM & SON BURMAN WHITE & SON MELVIN R WENGER RHODES DRIVER DAIRY STEVEN KOOGLER LONG-ACRE FARM MT AIRY DAIRY FARM LLC CAVE VIEW FARMS INC OAK SPRING FARMS LLC

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

HARRISONBURG VA 10 57 CHARLOTTE C H VA 10 58 BLACKSTONE VA (3X) 10 59 CHRISTIANSBURG VA 9 60 WIRTZ VA 10 61 DAYTON VA 10 62 MC GAHEYSVILLE VA (3X) 10 63 BRIDGEWATER VA 10 64 MOUNT SOLON VA 10 65 ROCKY MOUNT VA 10 66 ROANOKE VA 10 67 CULPEPER VA (3X) 10 68 PENHOOK VA 10 69 RUSTBURG VA (3X) 10 70 CHILHOWIE VA 10 71 STAUNTON VA 10 72 ASHLAND VA 10 73 CHATHAM VA 10 74 RADFORD VA 10 75 RURAL RETREAT VA (3X) 10 76 FLOYD VA 10 77 ROCKY MOUNT VA 10 78 HARRISONBURG VA 10 79 REMINGTON VA (3X) 10 80 KEEZLETOWN VA 10 81 ROCKY MOUNT VA 10 82 ELKTON VA 10 83 WIRTZ VA 10 84 BRIDGEWATER VA (3X) 10 85 HARRISONBURG VA 10 86 HARRISONBURG VA 10 87 MANAKIN SABOT VA (3X) 10 88 WIRTZ VA 10 89 BRIDGEWATER VA 10 90 KEEZLETOWN VA 10 91 MOUNT CRAWFORD VA 10 92 RADFORD VA 10 93 DAYTON VA 10 94 DAYTON VA 10 95 BRIDGEWATER VA 10 96 MT JACKSON VA 10 97 MT JACKSON VA 10 98 WEYERS CAVE VA 10 99 UPPERVILLE VA 10 100 VIRGINIA COLOR BREEDS OAK SPRING FARMS LLC UPPERVILLE VA 10 1 DAN ABE SLEMP AND SON SUGAR GROVE VA 10 2 JACOB SHENK CATLETT VA 10 3 JOE BLANKENSHIP SUGAR GROVE VA 10 4 DAVID G & DARLENE F HOFFMAN CULPEPER VA 10 5 R Y STILES & SONS CLEAR BROOK VA 10 6 E CLINE BRUBAKER ROCKY MOUNT VA 10 7 HEDGEBROOK FARM WINCHESTER VA 10 8 NELSON & BEVERLY SINE & FAMILY WOODSTOCK VA 10 9 MICHAEL AND LORI WEBB CONCORD VA 10 10

ANNUAL AVERAGES

MILK DAYS IN LBS MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

B % LBS R PRO PRO EE D

71.1 70.8 70.8 70.8 70.5 70.5 70.4 70.3 70.2 70.0 70.0 70.0 69.8 69.7 69.7 69.5 69.5 69.4 69.2 69.1 68.8 68.8 68.6 68.5 68.5 68.4 68.4 68.3 68.3 68.1 67.9 67.8 67.5 67.4 67.2 67.1 67.0 67.0 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.9 66.8 66.7

166 164 159 155 190 182 167 159 188 177 202 185 183 193 210 163 182 161 165 180 205 189 152 165 159 162 199 146 183 155 159 166 189 170 197 169 191 169 189 154 168 177 166 87

22258 22291 24229 22387 22941 23640 25918 22242 24763 21139 23725 26770 23167 24420 21774 20870 22586 20285 21937 21895 21489 24474 22511 23266 24822 23075 23640 22185 24087 19412 21882 22872 22708 22504 22287 22295 21546 21841 23740 21935 20747 21478 23884 14164

3.6 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.6 3.5 3.3 3.5 3.7 3.6 4.0 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.5 4.0 3.8 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.7 3.6 2.6 3.1 3.6 . 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.9 4.8

796 800 909 832 873 889 926 773 822 734 872 953 931 892 809 744 868 770 835 789 808 959 815 860 931 819 941 838 817 731 839 891 851 800 576 697 781 . 878 808 745 782 934 678

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.1 2.9 3.2 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 . 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.6

674 688 725 675 694 719 777 662 748 621 726 815 730 738 684 646 689 629 666 668 664 743 699 706 762 682 679 649 743 571 691 659 682 674 682 662 662 . 726 694 617 643 725 506

66.7 56.9 53.4 50.3 49.1 48.3 37.6 36.9 35.1 34.6

87 215 168 178 163 142 204 145 180 211

14164 17526 15253 14428 16682 13773 13709 11623 11929 .

4.8 4.3 4.7 4.7 4.7 4.7 4.9 4.1 4.6 .

678 761 711 684 776 651 665 482 543 .

3.6 3.3 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.4 3.5 3.4 .

506 571 543 510 593 503 466 406 401 .

B J J J J J G J J J


Claessic Fields Vindicat Genie, exhibited by Ben Sauder, Tremont, IL, was Grand Champion of The 59th All American Junior Jersey Show on Nov. 5 in Louisville, KY. His brother, Andy, is at the halter of the Reserve Grand Champion, South Mountain Voltage Spice-ET. Also pictured, from left, are Seth Woods with the Caff-E-Hill Farms Trophy for Senior Champion; judge Ted DeMent, Kenney, IL; Lucy Woods; Dean Dohle, Half Way, MO, consultant judge; Lynda and Steve Bachelor with the Steve and Lynda Bachelor & Family Trophy; Amanda Lutz, presenting the $500 HerMan Jerseys bonus check for the Grand Champion; AJCA-NAJ Executive Secretary Neal Smith; 2010 National Jersey Queen Lena Sweeney; AJCA President Robert Bignami; Christy Ratliff; Pennsylvania Jersey Queen Michelle Morian; Sue Luchsinger, chair of the All American Junior Activities Committee; and Ron Ratliff with the Ratliff Jerseys Trophy for Reserve Grand Champion. Seventeen young people between the ages of 9 and 20 from 11 states have been recognized by the American Jersey Cattle Association as the owners of the Junior All American winners for 2011. The awards were announced Nov. 5 during the 59th All American Junior Jersey Show at Freedom Hall in Louisville, KY. Imprinted certificates were presented

to the owner of each winner before a large ringside audience by AJCA President Robert Bignami and association Executive Secretary Neal Smith. The presentations were also broadcast worldwide on live streaming Internet video provided by the North American International Livestock Exposition.

Jersey A16

Page 15 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Junior All Americans announced for Jersey breed


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 16

Jersey from A15 The Junior All American Four-Year-Old, Claessic Fields Vindicat Genie, was selected by judge Ted DeMent, Kenney, IL, as Grand Champion of the 207-head show. “Genie” was exhibited by Ben Sauder of Tremont, IL. Sauder’s All American Junior Three-Year-Old, South Mountain Voltage Spice-ET, was named Reserve Grand Champion. In all, Ben exhibited four All Americans and three Reserve All Americans. He was the show’s

Cash from A13 Penn State is offering workshops in 2012 to help producers determine their feed inventory; costs of producing home-raised feeds, breakeven IOFC and breakeven class III milk price. Each workshop has several specialists present to work one-onone with producers to get their cash flows completed within three hours. Contact Virginia Ishler, vishler@psu.edu 814-863-3912 or Rebecca White, rebeccawhite30@gmail.com 814-863-3917 for more information about the workshops. Workshop dates and locations include: January 2012 24 — Lancaster County: Penn State Cooperative Extension Office — Closed; 25 — Bradford County: Edgewood Restaurant, Troy; 27 — Berks County: Blue Mountain Family R e s t a u r a n t , Shartlesville; and 31 — Centre County: Visitor’s Center, State College. February 2012 2 — Cambria County: Keystone Restaurant, Munster; 3 — Lebanon County: Penn State Cooperative Extension Office; 14 — Huntington County: Penn State Cooperative Extension Office; 16 — Cumberland County: Penn State Cooperative Extension Office; 22 — Crawford County: Holiday Inn Express, Meadville; 23 — Fayette County: Farm Credit Office, New Stanton; and 28 — Somerset County: Penn State Cooperative Extension Office. March 2012 7 — Blair County: Penn State Cooperative Extension Office; and 13 — Franklin County: Hoss’s Steak and Sea House, Chambersburg.

Premier Exhibitor. The Junior All American Summer Junior Yearling, Sunset Canyon Governor FP Belle-ET, was Junior Champion for Valery Silva, Beaver, OR. Crestbrooke Socrates Madeline-ET, the Junior All American Junior Yearling, was Reserve Junior Champion for Kyle Natzke, Fond du Lac, WI. Premier Breeder honors went to George Colpetzer, Greenville, PA, who exhibited a Junior All American and

Reserve Junior All American during the show. Other exhibitors receiving multiple awards were Allison Massey of Wartrace, TN, and Megan Hill, Bristol, VT. The winners in each age division are: Milking Senior Yearling — BRJ Jade Bomber Eilene H-74-ET, R.J. Doran, Newberry, SC, Junior All American winner Milk-NMore-WJM Conct Vacation-ET, Colin Wussow, Cecil, WI, Reserve Junior All American winner.

Junior Two-Year-Old Cow — LC Suspect Miss America, Taylor Leach, Linwood, KS, Junior All American winner Budjon-Vail Jade Gracie-ET, Ben Sauder, Tremont, IL, Reserve Junior All American winner. Senior Two-Year-Old Cow — Diamond S Governor Joya, Ben Sauder, Junior All American winner Kellogg-Bay Amedeo Gladys-ET, Megan Hill, Bristol, VT, Reserve Junior All American winner. Junior Three-Year-Old

Cow — South Mountain Voltage Spice-ET, Ben Sauder, Junior All American winner Kilgus Comerica Ruby, Trent Kilgus, Fairbury, IL, Reserve Junior All American winner. Senior Three-Year-Old Cow — Willdina Jade Bee, Ben Sauder, Junior All American winner TC Vindication 1251 Becky, Krista Lutz, Lincolnton, NC, Reserve Junior All American winner. Four-Year-Old Cow — Claessic Fields Vindicat

Genie, Ben Sauder, Junior All American winner Millers Brazo Fascination, Kelsay Schilling, Boggstown, IN, Reserve Junior All American winner. Five-Year-Old Cow — Tallys Centurion Tilly, Tabb French, Newberry, SC, Junior All American winner Belfontaine Remake Oshgosh, Ben Sauder, Reserve Junior All American winner. Aged Cow — FCF Prize Ella, Jordan Stookey,

Jersey A19


On Nov. 2, the National Dairy Producers’ board of directors released a statement expressing their opposition to S. 1682, the Dairy Advancement Act of 2011. The esteemed “Contract with Producers” states that the board is committed to influencing changes that “maximize producer profits, minimize government involvement, remove government assistance and provide for the smooth and easy market management of the industry.” S. 1682 does not support these notions on a national scope, and therefore cannot earn support of the National Dairy Producers Organi-

zation, Inc. Upholding their pledge to “thoroughly and immediately review and study each of the issues that impact the price of milk paid to producers,” the board has pointed out four specific reasons for their position. 1. The bill repeals Dairy Product Price Support without providing an alternative for milk pricing. Absence of a milk pricing agenda directly contrasts the commitments of the board to producers. 2. It places limits on producers with Gross Margin Insurance, an alternative to the existing MILC program.

“Since a three million pound milk limitation appears in both alternatives, neither provide an effective safety net for a large number of producers,” says the board in their statements. 3. Ambiguous language evades definitive formulas for determining a minimum price for milk. The board adamantly declares a commitment to “secure a permanent and improved change in how milk is priced.” Producers deserve clarity and forthright language, particularly as it pertains to milk prices. 4. Finally, the bill offers unnecessary incentives for processors, without of-

fering attention to the capital improvement needs of dairy producers. The board aims to remove government assistance, particularly to those facets of the industry who aren’t in need of it. In their statements, the National Dairy Producers Organization, Inc. maintains their position that the “Dairy Industry Stabilization and Sustainability Act of 2011 (DISSA) represents the best path to dairy producer profitability which is predictable, manageable and effective and does not require government money or assessment on producers.”

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VIRGINIA DAIRYMEN SPECIALTY INC. 2098 John Wayland Hwy. Harrisonburg, VA 22801 540-433-9117 www.dairymen.net

Page 17 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

National Dairy Producers’ board of directors release statements on S.1682


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 18

Cleaning cows from inside out by Rosalie Marion Bliss U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their collaborators have conducted a series of studies that explore non-antibiotic methods to reduce foodborne pathogens that are found in the gut of food animals. The team consists of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) microbiologist Todd R. Callaway, with the agency’s Food and Feed Safety Research Unit in College Station, Texas; ARS animal scientist and project leader Jeffery Carroll with the agency’s Live-

stock Issues Research Unit in Lubbock, Texas; and John Arthington at the University of Florida in Ona. ARS is USDA’s principal intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports the USDA priorities of promoting international food security and ensuring food safety. Early studies showed that citrus products provide cows with good roughage and vitamins, and the essential oils in such products provide a natural antibiotic effect. Callaway’s early data showed the feasibility of

using orange pulp as a feed source to provide anti-pathogenic activity in cattle. He also showed that consumption of citrus byproducts (orange peel and pulp) by cattle is compatible with current production practices, and the byproducts are palatable to the animals. Callaway then shed light on how to exploit the essential oils inside the

peel and pulp that are natural antimicrobials. Collaborations with researchers Steven Ricke and Philip Crandall at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville also have identified specific essential oils that kill the pathogenic bacteria. From the time Callaway began studying citrus as an animal gut cleanser, he recognized that citrus

peel can be heavy and expensive to ship long distances, so his latest studies have investigated the use of processed orange peel pellets. For one study, the team fed dried orange peel pellets to sheep as a model for cows for eight days. They found a tenfold reduction in Salmonella populations in the animals’ intestinal con-

tents. Callaway received a grant from the National Cattleman’s Beef Association (Beef Checkoff funds) to help fund the study. Results from the 2011 study were published in Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. Read more about this research in the November/December 2011 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

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ARS microbiologist Todd Callaway has found that feeding orange peels and pulp to cattle can reduce the level of Salmonella and E. coli in the animals' intestines. Photo by Peggy Greb

1332 Garbers Church Rd. Harrisonburg, VA 22801

Bus: 540-434-4457 • 800-900-8970


Milford, IN, Junior All American winner Lyon Duke Dutchy, Ben Sauder, Reserve Junior All American winner. Junior Heifer Calf — Xanadu MG Wild Thing, George Colpetzer, Greenville, PA, Junior All American winner DKG Motion Nancy, Trevor Greiwe, Sidney, Ohio, Reserve Junior All American winner. Intermediate Heifer Calf — WC Madman Suzie, Allison Massey, Wartrace,

TN, Junior All American winner Xanadu MG Bombshell Betty, George Colpetzer, Reserve Junior All American winner Senior Heifer Calf — Vivatars Beauty Belle, Alissa Kay Ann White, New Castle, IN, Junior All American winner Four -Hills 1st Blue 3241-ET, Megan Hill, Reserve Junior All American winner. Summer Junior Yearling — Sunset Canyon Governor FP Belle-ET, Valery

Silva, Beaver, OR, Junior All American winner Milk-N-More Vindication NoraET, Abby Tauchen, Bonduel, WI, Reserve Junior All American winner. Junior Yearling Heifer — Crestbrooke Socrates Madeline-ET, Kyle Natzke, Fond du Lac, WI, Junior All American winner DKG Jade Showme, Trevor Greiwe, Sidney, Ohio, Reserve Junior All American winner Winter Yearling Heifer — WC Madman Lynn, Allison Massey, Junior All American winner Yellow Briar CarlynET, Kyle Natzke Reserve Junior All American winner.

Complete results from The 59th All American Junior Jersey Show are posted on the USJersey website at www.usjersey.com/AllAmericanResults/11_Results_index.html#Junior Show. The All American Junior Jersey Show is an annual production of the American Jersey Cattle Association. For information on sponsorship opportunities or to make a contribution to the Maurice E. Core Jersey Youth Fund in support of Jersey junior exhibitors, contact the AJCA Development Department at 614-322-4456.

Page 19 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Jersey from A16


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 20

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

ADAMS

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PENNSYLVANIA

KEHOLTZ DAIRY SPUNGOLD HOLSTEINS KEHOLTZ DAIRY HILCREST DAIRY APPLE VALLEY CREAMERY CIRCLE CREEK HOL. STEVE & CHRISTINE WOOD LADD S. MUMMERT FARVIEW HOLSTEINS KENNETH WENGER

DHIRAPCS DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

39.7 105.2 400.3 272.7 63.7 150.2 54.6 180.2 60.9 233.9

25079 23957 23332 23026 21451 21596 20302 21398 21276 18287

965 992 906 862 812 800 852 819 771 779

3.8 4.1 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.7 4.2 3.8 3.6 4.3

770 765 715 700 668 662 655 653 647 565

3.1 3X 3.2 3.1 3X 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1

SCOTT BOWSER SHIREY FARM RON + BETH RUFFANER SHANMAR JERSEYS R.FREEHLING LARA WILSON SHIELDS

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H J H H

81.3 251.5 41.0 341.7 94.7 32.9

23346 22500 21792 16312 18267 16470

866 822 777 789 635 638

3.7 3.7 3.6 4.8 3.5 3.9

721 677 652 586 567 504

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.1 3.1

BONZO ONEOONE BREEZE RIDGE CRAIG FARMS BREEZE RIDGE NYE FARMS FISCHERS WINDY RIDGE DIANE BURRY

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H B H J J

39.1 30.8 107.8 54.7 131.7 40.2 17.3

28083 1055 3.8 857 3.1 21938 772 3.5 682 3.1 20884 815 3.9 662 3.2 19796 771 3.9 656 3.3 21349 805 3.8 635 3.0 17648 831 4.7 634 3.6 14006 647 4.6 508 3.6

DEVON MARTIN RAY D MOWRY & SONS

DHI-AP H 118.8 DHIR-AP X 40.7

ARMSTRONG

BEAVER

BEDFORD BERKS

22148 17396

847 3.8 684 3.1 648 3.7 550 3.2

CARL Z GOOD DHI-AP H 86.5 MELVIN M OBERHOLTZER DHI-AP H 121.4 DON & AMY RICE DHI-AP H 107.1 ALLEN P+MARY J GRUBE DHI H 60.2 EARL R HAFER & SONS DHI-APCS H 225.7 LARRY GRUMBINE DHI-AP H 64.4 TULPACANAL FARM DHI-AP H 130.0 E&N SHAYNAH KEE DHI-AP H 70.7 MIL JOY FARMS DHI-AP H 247.0 SKYLINE ACRES INC. DHI-APCS H 572.5 MICHAEL FORRY DHI-AP H 107.7 SCATTERED ACRES INC DHI-APCS H 335.8 GARY & KATHY HEFFNER DHI-AP H 77.5 SUNRISE FARM DHI-AP H 39.4 UNITED HEARTS HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 119.2 GLENN A DAVIS DHI-AP H 74.4 SHOW TOP FARMS DHI H 170.1 MISTY MOOR HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 77.9 LLEWELLYN MOYER DHI-AP H 113.5 LUKE & LORI TROUTMAN DHI-AP H 54.5 ROCKYCREST HOLSTEINS DHI-AP H 38.5 NORTHKILL CREEK FARM DHI-AP X 125.9 RODGER WAGNER DHI-AP H 206.5 MARTIN & MISSY MOYER DHI-AP H 43.8 CURVIN MARTIN DHI-AP H 91.8 CEDAR CREEK DAIRY LLC. DHI-AP H 108.5 DAVIEW FARM DHIRAPCS H 68.6 KIRBYVILLE HOLSTEINS DHIR H 97.4 MICHAEL HAAG DHI-AP H 87.1 ARDOUNIE FARM INC. DHI-AP H 131.0 WAY HAR FARMS DHI-AP H 90.5 BARRY+BARBARA GOOD DHI-AP H 89.0 CURVIN MARTIN DHI-AP H 71.1 JAMES P. & JAN M. ADAM DHI-APCS H 187.7 ONE HILL FARM MOYER DHIR-AP B 31.7 SUNNYSIDE DAIRY FARM DHI-AP H 202.0 DANA & DEBBIE STOUDT DHI-AP H 49.7 WALNUTRIDGE HOLSTEIN DHI-AP H 56.3 ALLEN A DAVIS DHI-AP H 56.4 WILLIAM&KAREN BOYD DHI-AP H 45.4

29535 1089 3.7 922 3.1 30136 1008 3.3 911 3.0 3X 29856 1051 3.5 894 3.0 3X 28195 986 3.5 862 3.1 27419 922 3.4 834 3.0 26597 873 3.3 831 3.1 26830 985 3.7 814 3.0 3X 26716 907 3.4 806 3.0 24923 912 3.7 777 3.1 3X 24756 915 3.7 767 3.1 3X 24940 932 3.7 766 3.1 25959 941 3.6 764 2.9 3X 24800 874 3.5 759 3.1 24717 940 3.8 755 3.1 25060 907 3.6 755 3.0 23682 921 3.9 752 3.2 23512 910 3.9 750 3.2 25287 967 3.8 748 3.0 3X 24751 884 3.6 746 3.0 24430 867 3.5 739 3.0 24348 866 3.6 732 3.0 23999 800 3.3 731 3.0 23767 907 3.8 728 3.1 24708 903 3.7 728 2.9 23716 865 3.6 728 3.1 24142 855 3.5 724 3.0 23264 802 3.4 723 3.1 22677 852 3.8 721 3.2 23879 895 3.7 718 3.0 23405 822 3.5 716 3.1 22680 805 3.5 716 3.2 23233 886 3.8 713 3.1 23901 872 3.6 712 3.0 22646 822 3.6 709 3.1 22105 912 4.1 707 3.2 23526 819 3.5 706 3.0 3X 23360 885 3.8 703 3.0 22761 863 3.8 702 3.1 21547 831 3.9 689 3.2 21722 725 3.3 684 3.1

CLOVER WILL FARMS

DHI-AP H 194.8

24932

DEB & RAY DETWEILER MARWELL DAIRY FARM ROY + ART SHULL WO BO FARMS TOM + SUE HALDEMAN

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

85.2 67.3 209.7 72.0 94.4

30070 1042 3.5 941 3.1 23820 931 3.9 720 3.0 22463 891 4.0 709 3.2 19220 684 3.6 593 3.1 18902 764 4.0 580 3.1

DAVID MYERS RALPH J LIEB BRENT LOWMASTER BILL HOOVER MARTIN SHERRY STRITTMATTER DAIRY DAVID MYERS VALEWOOD DAIRY RON HOOVER RONALD HOGUE BORLIE'S DAIRY

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H J H H H H

280.5 209.8 162.7 115.9 101.7 246.4 16.9 218.0 117.0 74.4 117.3

26181 25821 24865 22694 22879 22644 18668 22305 20925 19266 17127

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

80.4 795.0 156.8 193.3 87.6 144.3 48.4 60.7 200.2 79.7

30988 1153 3.7 903 2.9 3X 28931 996 3.4 870 3.0 3X 28297 1151 4.1 859 3.0 28125 996 3.5 850 3.0 3X 29812 1079 3.6 845 2.8 3X 26877 937 3.5 793 3.0 24744 873 3.5 768 3.1 25108 896 3.6 755 3.0 23854 900 3.8 748 3.1 22806 830 3.6 711 3.1

BLAIR

BUCKS

CAMBRIA

CHESTER

ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER WALMOORE HOLSTEINS NOLAN&NORI KING ROBERT +BETTY PEIFER ROY & RUTH ANN BENDER NEAL & LOU KING DAVID F KING FARM #2 CRYSTALRAY FARM MARSHAK DAIRY -NBCMARK &MELODY STOLTZFUS

964 3.9 783 3.1 3X

925 877 931 740 792 844 857 863 748 717 630

3.5 3.4 3.7 3.3 3.5 3.7 4.6 3.9 3.6 3.7 3.7

828 774 754 707 692 684 678 677 644 597 518

3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.6 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0

HERD OWNER CENTURY OAK FARM AMOS LAPP HERBETH FARMS EVERGREEN FARM AMOS J STOLTZFUS RIDGE STAR FARM HOLLY SOLLENBERGER

TYPE TEST

Top 40 Herds For October B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

962 867 824 794 741 634 604

4.1 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.9

E MARLENE PEOPLES DARRON SHEARER# ZIMMERMAN BROS GLENN D. LAUVER

DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X

76.9 53.5 61.9 130.4 60.9 50.3 35.6

23496 22788 22490 20717 19994 16891 15631

BRYMESSER FARMS DHI-APCS NEALAND FARMS DHI-AP SMITHDALE FARMS DHI-AP CURTIS WEAVER DHI-APCS MARLIN & ADAMAE ZIMMERMAN DHI-AP TRIPLE L FARM DHI-APCS JETRAE FARM DHI-AP STOVER FARMS DHI-APCS MARCUS GOOD DHI-AP DORELL & BEV AGAR DHI-AP WESTYLE HOLSTEINS DHI-AP SILVER HILL FARM DHI-AP JOHN STAMY DHI-AP BERKHEIMER FARMS DHI-AP DAVE AND DOUG LEHMAN DHI-AP J&S DAIRY DHI-AP LIGHTNING BOLT FARM DHI-AP TIM WITTER DHI-AP HARRY & PAUL HOCH DHI-AP HENSEL HILL FARM DHI-AP K HALE & L WENGER DHI-AP HARRY E THOMPSON DHIR-AP HARPER HERSEY + SONS DHI-AP DAVID R WALTON DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H X X H H H H H H H

255.7 385.6 62.5 148.3 54.0 147.0 93.5 176.0 93.1 29.9 128.6 73.3 351.0 158.0 94.6 61.0 34.9 146.2 272.4 82.2 30.0 51.7 195.4 74.7

28604 1065 3.7 903 3.2 30175 1016 3.4 892 3.0 3X 26255 995 3.8 809 3.1 25546 970 3.8 788 3.1 24653 916 3.7 786 3.2 26549 950 3.6 769 2.9 3X 23708 955 4.0 766 3.2 23613 888 3.8 741 3.1 24151 873 3.6 735 3.0 23772 877 3.7 706 3.0 21963 839 3.8 685 3.1 21012 813 3.9 657 3.1 20616 734 3.6 652 3.2 20916 805 3.8 648 3.1 20611 753 3.7 629 3.1 19976 738 3.7 628 3.1 18104 768 4.2 626 3.5 19191 694 3.6 618 3.2 19705 747 3.8 613 3.1 19647 787 4.0 606 3.1 19664 754 3.8 598 3.0 19162 654 3.4 592 3.1 17794 667 3.7 577 3.2 17233 627 3.6 555 3.2

TY & TRACY LONG LEHMANSTEAD FARMS BOB KESSLER PLEASANT HILL FARMS STONEY LAWN FARMS J MELVIN BRANDT

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI

H H H H H H

114.3 168.8 49.9 53.0 122.4 67.5

24128 863 3.6 728 3.0 22334 848 3.8 717 3.2 23700 1033 4.4 716 3.0 20351 755 3.7 624 3.1 19969 670 3.4 623 3.1 18843 693 3.7 590 3.1

ORR FARMS ALLEN HILL DAIRY ORR FARMS JACKSON FARMS DAVID HAY FERENS FARM LLC TESLOVICH DAIRY FERENS FARM LLC

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X H H H H A

110.8 122.7 63.8 147.0 40.5 100.0 67.0 20.9

23868 21672 21180 20472 20358 19836 16284 16877

CREEK VALLEY FARMS

DHI-AP H 494.1

CUMBERLAND

DAUPHIN

FAYETTE

FULTON

HUNTINGTON

MOWRER FARMS LOCUST LANE FARMS BILL & KAROL WINGERT GLOBE RUN FARMS WILLOW BEHRER FARMS WILLOW BEHRER FARMS EVERGREEN FARMS INC TIMOTHY R PEACHEY LOST HOLLOW FARM BILL & KAREN DAVIS DIAMOND VALLEY FARM TERRY ALLISON IRVIN G MARTIN LAKEVALE AYRE FARM TOM & GLORIA COFFMAN HERON RUN FARMS HAWN CREST FARMS

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

BLOSSOM HOLLOW FARM PLEASANT VIEW FARMS LARRY H MARSHALL DAN L. HANCOCK JERRY NESBIT NEHRIG FARM JEWART DAIRY CRAIG A ANDRIE BERKEYS DAIRY FARM

902 825 849 766 794 773 574 687

3.8 3.8 4.0 3.7 3.9 3.9 3.5 4.1

709 706 679 658 612 525 509

749 703 691 660 651 598 507 506

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.3

30594 1228 4.0 942 3.1 3X 27996 27239 27672 26399 26553 26456 26129 24884 22532 22961 22935 20675 22169 21386 20995 19620 17774

1010 1001 1086 1046 1034 1003 976 983 824 971 835 762 777 782 799 697 709

3.6 3.7 3.9 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 4.0 3.7 4.2 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.7 3.8 3.6 4.0

842 842 834 827 809 799 779 767 722 722 711 672 662 660 655 592 573

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X X H

60.0 229.4 46.9 116.6 100.4 102.8 227.8 63.4 48.5

25216 23143 22280 21097 20745 20717 19908 19791 19005

991 874 978 770 894 753 765 809 719

3.9 3.8 4.4 3.6 4.3 3.6 3.8 4.1 3.8

780 703 672 658 647 635 624 612 569

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0

GLEN HENRY AND SONS DHIR RUSSELL ADAMIRE JR DHI-AP DARYL&DEL BRUBAKER DHI-AP GRAYBILL, DAVID DHI-AP TUSCARORA RUN HLSTNS DHIRAPCS MYRON+MARY GEHMAN DHI-AP BARRY E+BARB A LUCAS DHI-AP MICHAEL W BEAVER DHI-AP JOEL & SARA MILLS DHI-AP B. C. + E. BRUBAKER DHI-AP J.SCOTT LANDIS DHI-AP ANTHONY HEIMBACH DHI-AP CHARLES & TAMMY KLINE DHI-AP MARCUS J ZOOK DHIR-AP RUSSELL J DRESSLER DHI-AP KENT MABEN DHI-AP CENTERVIEW FARM DHI-AP MARLIN CHARLTON DHI-AP COCOLAMUS FARM DHI-AP TIMOTHY E LAUVER DHI-AP ANDREW B. SWARTZ DHI-AP G V FARMS DHI-AP ROBERT A MILLER DHI-AP BRIAN & KAREN DIFFENDERFER DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

51.9 87.6 99.1 65.4 101.2 339.9 130.8 24.5 108.6 69.7 64.1 56.3 80.0 76.8 85.4 56.7 123.7 75.3 41.5 39.9 55.3 121.2 55.3 53.3

29053 1080 3.7 896 3.1 24303 926 3.8 784 3.2 25742 955 3.7 780 3.0 24473 912 3.7 755 3.1 25113 962 3.8 755 3.0 24910 868 3.5 752 3.0 23829 902 3.8 747 3.1 23946 911 3.8 746 3.1 23750 885 3.7 740 3.1 23749 829 3.5 739 3.1 24135 853 3.5 731 3.0 24031 885 3.7 729 3.0 24090 843 3.5 724 3.0 23363 867 3.7 717 3.1 23791 873 3.7 711 3.0 22258 807 3.6 682 3.1 21618 812 3.8 667 3.1 21658 809 3.7 667 3.1 21342 756 3.5 665 3.1 20530 801 3.9 657 3.2 20932 756 3.6 654 3.1 19734 747 3.8 633 3.2 19955 760 3.8 621 3.1 19711 753 3.8 608 3.1

INDIANA

JUNIATA

LANCASTER

3.1 3X 3.2 3.3 3X 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0

H 358.9 H 468.2 H 736.4 H 116.3 H 690.6 H 114.3 H 2797.1 H 91.6 H 120.0 H 159.4 H 87.9 H 86.3 H 84.4 H 65.9 H 174.1 H 171.5 H 75.1

HERD OWNER

3X 3X

3X 3X 3X

STAR ROCK FARMS TRUDALE FARM LLOYD M REIFF RAYMOND H GOOD SCATTERED ACRES REINHOLDS JAY & ANNETTE STOLTZFUS HERMAN COOK ELI S. STOLTZFUS MEGASTAR HOLSTEINS

LEBANON

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS

B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H

105.8 71.6 87.4 31.1

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

19790 18818 17749 17438

740 708 720 623

3.7 3.8 4.1 3.6

601 590 578 556

3.0 3.1 3.3 3.2

H 1377.5 X 26.6 H 57.8 H 277.1 H 648.2 H 130.2 H 79.3 H 57.0 H 56.7

28635 1070 3.7 875 3.1 3X 23301 935 4.0 773 3.3 25462 921 3.6 756 3.0 24218 848 3.5 734 3.0 3X 23114 873 3.8 702 3.0 3X 20411 734 3.6 624 3.1 19502 705 3.6 590 3.0 19061 750 3.9 584 3.1 18298 649 3.5 555 3.0

BRANDT VIEW FARM LITTLE HILL FARM EARL RAY & CAROL MARTIN LEON E. MARTIN LITTLE HILL FARM DALE+PATTIE MAULFAIR KENDRA MASE GARY LENTZ KEVIN & ALLISON SELLERS B & L HOSTETTER DEW MIST HOLSTEINS PHILHAVEN FARM ADAM LIGHT RUPLAND HOLSTEINS KIRBY L HORST MILE EE FARM MARTIN RIDGE FARM HAROLD CASE LEROY WISE BARRY HOSTETTER JAY W GOOD CURVIN+DAWN GOOD ZIM LEA HOLSTEINS JERE BRUBAKER WHITE BIRCH FARM CARISTONE FARM, LLC BRUCE BOLLINGER &FAMILY DALE HOSTETTER & SON K & M SELLERS MUSSER RIDGE FARM MARK M. HOOVER DONALD C KRALL RICREY HOLSTEINS REID K HOOVER RUPLAND HOLSTEINS HARLAN GOOD CLIFFORD+FAY BERGER# JOHN + SHARON KLINE BRUCE R HEILINGER DAVID+CHRIS WILLIAMS

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H

115.6 55.8 93.2 67.5 37.2 58.9 59.7 82.9 67.1 116.2 111.1 90.6 117.5 119.7 45.3 205.7 106.4 57.5 136.0 64.5 125.5 118.8 84.1 132.1 137.2 268.0 79.9 85.2 63.5 144.8 46.0 65.6 122.7 207.4 111.8 75.2 67.6 126.4 80.5 58.3

32454 31184 30230 27348 25643 26992 26249 26362 25482 26651 26011 25701 25556 26093 25624 25644 24369 25773 24895 24277 24740 24977 24184 24496 24742 23688 24352 23724 23441 24097 23847 23149 23343 23442 23773 23337 23285 23315 23477 22038

MELVIN&JUDY PEACHEY KISH VIEW FARM DAVID T HOSTETLER LOWELL J PEACHEY RODERICK KAUFFMAN DAVID C YODER RAMOND & ROSE KAUFFMAN AMMON FARMS DAVID J & RUTH PEACHEY RAYMOND S HOSTETLER FORGY DAIRY FROG MEADOW FARM MARK & VERNA PEACHEY VERNAN HOLSTEINS MICHAEL P YODER ROBERT L KAUFFMAN JOHN SPICHER LEE AND JOANNE YODER SHAWN & EMILY YODER JESSE L SPICHER ROBERT & LISA PEACHEY G SHELDON PEACHEY JOHN & SALOMA BYLER LOREN K. YODER ELWOOD H STITT SAM K KAUFFMAN TITUS R PEACHEY PAUL NEER VALLEY VIEW FARM PEACHVIEW FARM DARVIN RENNINGER DALE I KING CAS STEAD FARMS CLARK N. PEACHEY A FRED KING REED GAP FARMS MARLIN HARTZLER NATHAN PEACHEY CAS STEAD FARM2 CALVIN & ELVA YODER

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

55.0 407.8 55.6 59.6 115.6 78.5 87.8 93.2 54.5 62.0 146.5 65.5 99.4 67.2 141.6 47.7 74.8 57.1 99.4 39.7 88.5 118.5 85.2 114.7 43.0 80.0 99.4 22.4 75.8 120.8 58.0 46.7 195.3 70.1 66.1 68.7 50.2 86.6 18.6 104.6

29231 1110 3.8 884 3.0 3X 27886 944 3.4 834 3.0 3X 26031 965 3.7 809 3.1 26301 939 3.6 795 3.0 3X 25715 934 3.6 794 3.1 25057 954 3.8 790 3.2 25921 969 3.7 790 3.0 24920 937 3.8 771 3.1 24137 873 3.6 759 3.1 24777 912 3.7 754 3.0 23878 923 3.9 745 3.1 24519 916 3.7 745 3.0 24412 883 3.6 736 3.0 24190 896 3.7 733 3.0 24045 893 3.7 733 3.0 23746 855 3.6 733 3.1 23489 891 3.8 728 3.1 22799 874 3.8 723 3.2 23918 869 3.6 721 3.0 23048 898 3.9 720 3.1 23770 883 3.7 719 3.0 22965 916 4.0 709 3.1 22557 865 3.8 704 3.1 23337 856 3.7 702 3.0 22144 799 3.6 699 3.2 22688 856 3.8 694 3.1 22632 859 3.8 693 3.1 22655 880 3.9 693 3.1 21380 810 3.8 689 3.2 21598 834 3.9 684 3.2 22120 873 3.9 678 3.1 22251 797 3.6 672 3.0 21676 787 3.6 669 3.1 22124 818 3.7 667 3.0 21715 781 3.6 655 3.0 20112 742 3.7 638 3.2 21076 747 3.5 636 3.0 20051 781 3.9 626 3.1 20440 652 3.2 626 3.1 19916 741 3.7 621 3.1

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

96.8 37.5 110.4 174.5

29043 1013 3.5 863 3.0 22829 893 3.9 712 3.1 21992 815 3.7 672 3.1 19564 803 4.1 612 3.1

MIFFLIN

MONTGOMERY MERRYMEAD FARM RUSSELL GUNTZ ROY S KOLB & SONS EDWIN A POLLOCK

1163 1108 1113 971 1024 957 914 904 989 1001 925 910 1006 918 981 909 930 880 898 905 891 910 904 821 921 849 836 867 881 832 849 847 817 837 840 807 799 829 822 902

3.6 3.6 3.7 3.6 4.0 3.5 3.5 3.4 3.9 3.8 3.6 3.5 3.9 3.5 3.8 3.5 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.4 3.7 3.6 3.4 3.7 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.5 4.1

984 933 910 842 837 822 811 806 806 801 798 793 793 792 790 787 776 766 765 763 762 757 754 750 749 749 747 744 740 729 725 723 723 723 715 710 707 706 705 702

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2

3X 3X

3X

3X 3X

3X

3X


HARRISBURG, PA — Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) urged the Pennsylvania Milk Mar-

keting Board (PMMB) to keep the Class I over-order premium price for milk at $2.15 per hun-

LANCASTER COUNTY, PA TOP 40 HERDS FOR OCTOBER

NAME

BRD

MILK 3X

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H B H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

YES YES NO YES NO YES NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO YES NO NO YES NO YES NO YES YES YES YES YES NO YES NO NO NO YES NO NO NO YES YES

FURNACE HILL HOLSTEINS SPRING VALLEY DAIRY LLC MARTIN PEILA BRIAN K MULL SCOTT & APRIL COOPER ROARING CREEK FARM DEWDROP-MEDO HOLSTIENS ABNER L STOLTZFUS DEEP RUN CRK HOLSTEINS MIFFLIN HILLS FARM WEA-LAND FARM DAVID & JOSHUA BISHOP KEVIN L OBERHOLTZER FREDERICK FARMS CLIFF & ANDREA SENSENIG K WAYNE &MIKE BURKET BRAUND VALLEY FARMS CLAIR N OBERHOLTZER OLD PIKE DAIRY LAMAR GOCKLEY JEFF SENSENIG JOBO HOLSTEIN FARM MATTHEW BENNETCH DOUG-GREG MC CULLOH SKY VIEW DAIRY TROUT BROS DAIRY GERALD SMITH BRENT L. GEHMAN JEFF NEWSWANGER WILLOW RUN FARM ALVIN STOLTZFUS MILL HILL FARMS BEN AKERS JOHN M. BURKHOLDER MELODY LAWN FARMS BRUVALLEY FARM JOBO HOLSTEIN FARM

RHA FAT RHA PROT RHA MILK PCT FAT PCT PRO

33066 31867 29624 29935 30956 30747 30144 28694 30688 29910 27671 28137 28299 27562 27910 27917 27861 27261 27879 27795 29357 26300 26727 27931 28885 27043 26165 26960 28571 27703 28214 27291 27145 27116 27235 28706 27599

3.3 3.6 3.2 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.4 3.4 3.9 3.7 3.3 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.9 3.5 3.5 3.7 3.6 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.9 3.3 3.4 3.8 3.5 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.1 3.3

1081 1137 955 1040 1162 1135 1106 1060 1050 1015 1086 1041 941 1059 1028 1019 1015 948 987 1074 1033 926 1000 997 1071 982 1018 1058 932 934 1067 951 1026 1041 1055 903 906

3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2 2.9 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.2 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9 3.0

997 943 936 930 930 921 911 904 901 898 889 885 878 870 867 865 861 859 858 856 854 853 849 849 849 849 848 847 847 846 845 843 843 842 841 841 840

TOP HERDS FOR RHI PROTEIN

MAINS DAIRY INC. KING-RIDGE FARM HAROLD S ZIMMERMAN

X H H

YES 26834 3.6 975 3.1 836 NO 25982 3.7 949 3.2 836 NO 27913 3.3 929 3.0 835

Compiled by: DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 • (919) 661-3100

dredweight for the sixmonth period beginning Jan. 1, 2012. During testimony before the PMMB, PFB presented its concerns over how severe weather conditions, especially extremely wet weather, has had a negative impact on crops grown to feed dairy cows. “From an incredibly wet spring to an extremely hot July and August to a September filled with rain and flooding, nearly all Pennsylvania farmers are dealing with some sort of repercussion from Mother Nature’s onslaught,” said PFB Vice President Richard

Ebert, who is chairman of PFB’s State Dairy Committee. “On my farm, thanks to the wet weather, not only are we still chopping hay, but we’re also facing feed quality issues. In times of tight margins, feed quality is vitality important, as it allows us to attain optimum milk production.” The Westmoreland County dairy farmer, who milks 80 Holstein cows and grows corn, alfalfa hay and soybeans, says this year’s harvest of hay and corn is down and that the overall quality of crops used to feed his cows on the farm is not at the premi-

TYPE TEST

MARK SCHMIDT MERRILL MEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

DHI-AP H 61.1 DHI-AP H 32.0

NORTHUMBERLAND

RHA MILK

19528 18173

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

Economically priced and more feed value for your money.

New Products Now Available! • Commodity Pellet - a new pelleted 13% protein feed with added calcium • Performance Plus - a new complete 14% pelleted feed with extra corn • Performance Extra - a new pelleted 16% high energy feed with distillers

Call toll free 888-777-5912 Family owned and operated Mark Pendleton Jason Pendleton

JOHN RISHEL STROUSE DAIRY FARM SPRING LAKE DAIRY SHULTZ HILLSIDE DAIRY ZIMMERMAN FARMS INC. DRY RUN DAIRY, LLC NORTH RUSH HOLSTEINS WOLFE'S POWER LINE DAIRY WAYNE KLOCK J DANIEL FAUS JUDY BROSIOUS

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H

50.2 68.0 111.4 81.2 320.4 92.8 96.9 401.2 40.7 131.2 45.7

33801 29375 28908 27610 27718 24508 23313 24181 21707 21079 18142

CARL & BRENT MC MILLEN LOY ACRES L.L.C. M W SMITH FARMS JESSE+BARB SINGLETON CINDY & JOE COMP MELVIN S WEAVER O'TOOLE ACRES WELLER'S DAIRY NEVIN G RICE ROBRT & BONITA RODGERS OL MAPLES FARM LOGAN M BOWER LENARD & AMY KRESGE LYONS BROTHERS SYLVIN M WENGER PHILLIP WENGER ED + WILMA MCMILLEN KRETZH FARMS INC. EDWARD C BROFEE INNERST FARM KENDALL BYERS SAMUEL L. HURST ROBT & JENNIFER GABEL BRIAN FLEISHER LARRY BRAJKOVICH

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X

95.0 92.0 485.5 52.4 103.7 92.6 72.0 64.8 120.7 37.3 96.4 549.4 159.3 67.4 74.4 75.5 48.6 326.9 244.6 188.1 63.0 59.1 34.5 52.8 80.5

28092 960 3.4 874 3.1 27036 967 3.6 834 3.1 26837 1015 3.8 822 3.1 3X 25608 972 3.8 810 3.2 26419 992 3.8 807 3.1 26347 1005 3.8 793 3.0 24645 953 3.9 776 3.1 25105 937 3.7 770 3.1 24086 861 3.6 754 3.1 23317 932 4.0 753 3.2 23338 825 3.5 747 3.2 24308 890 3.7 742 3.1 3X 23841 867 3.6 737 3.1 23460 881 3.8 726 3.1 23195 824 3.6 710 3.1 21871 785 3.6 685 3.1 22496 830 3.7 679 3.0 21702 808 3.7 672 3.1 22203 842 3.8 658 3.0 21537 757 3.5 652 3.0 21065 769 3.7 646 3.1 20264 777 3.8 642 3.2 21038 735 3.5 630 3.0 18494 712 3.8 586 3.2 15602 669 4.3 522 3.3

PERRY

1149 1031 1087 1059 1043 969 1020 858 834 770 708

3.41026 3.5 895 3.8 863 3.8 850 3.8 830 4.0 768 4.4 731 3.5 725 3.8 671 3.7 635 3.9 563

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1

HERD OWNER

SCHUYLKILL

787 4.0 602 3.1 711 3.9 586 3.2 3X 3X 3X 3X

challenged in turning reasonable profit margins,” concluded Ebert. Farm Bureau also asked the PMMB to maintain its current premium price add-on for fuel costs. Dairy farmers whose milk is produced, processed and sold in Pennsylvania for Class I (fluid milk) use, receive an additional premium based on the cost of fuel. Pennsylvania Farm Bureau is the state’s largest farm organization with a volunteer membership of more than 53,000 farm and rural families, representing farms of every size and commodity across Pennsylvania.

We Feed What We Sell

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER

um level that he is normally able to achieve. “Unfortunately, the problems we’ve had harvesting means that our silos won’t be quite full this year and as a result, I’ll have to buy additional hay to feed the cows. We’ve also seen reductions of five-to-six pounds of milk per cow, per day,” added Ebert. Farm Bureau adds that historically high production costs are putting additional stress on a farmer’s ability to remain viable. “I know that current milk prices sound good, but between the continued high input costs and the impact of the weather, dairy farmers are still

TYPE TEST

Top 40 Herds For October B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

CARL A FARMS INC BRIAN RUCH JAMES D. DUNN LARRY HEPLER SNYDERLANDFARMS MILLER & REX WIND MILL FARM ELBERT FARMS MARK & AMY WOLFE RYAN KAHLER MAR K FARMS DALE HEISLER DONNON-S DAIRY FARM DAWN F RHEIN JERSEY ACRES FMS INC DONNON-S DAIRY FARM

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H B H H H H H H J J L

93.6 60.7 98.7 60.6 52.7 38.6 182.8 90.0 58.7 89.3 79.0 97.6 133.2 228.5 189.9 38.9

31967 1165 3.6 957 3.0 3X 26513 1000 3.8 840 3.2 24543 857 3.5 753 3.1 22976 841 3.7 730 3.2 23109 846 3.7 712 3.1 23948 797 3.3 705 2.9 21007 891 4.2 699 3.3 22838 840 3.7 684 3.0 21687 759 3.5 683 3.1 21564 808 3.7 659 3.1 21660 778 3.6 659 3.0 19939 774 3.9 634 3.2 19306 712 3.7 588 3.0 15635 695 4.4 581 3.7 15712 727 4.6 571 3.6 16962 620 3.7 522 3.1

CHRISS+TRISH NIPPLE DARE E LAND KEITH MCCOOL JACOB GRAYBILL ROBERT + KATHY WAITE JOHN M KURTZ JL & CL SHAFFER WARREN FAUS SAUDERDALE FARM BO ANN HOLSTEINS DAVID APPLE AND SON RICHARD+BETTY WELLER JAY HOLLENBACH LEIRE FRY & SONS WAITE N CE FARM DAN WHITMER SEVEN OAKS MABARBIL FARMS JUSTAMERE FARM DUANE & KAREN EWING BRANDON EWING

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H X H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

48.0 88.0 147.2 48.4 45.3 65.3 39.6 97.2 52.7 45.3 67.5 44.8 46.3 141.5 73.5 34.7 60.0 99.1 41.5 53.7 40.3

26359 1091 4.1 866 3.3 23658 1010 4.3 768 3.2 23169 832 3.6 713 3.1 23137 894 3.9 709 3.1 21127 844 4.0 680 3.2 21699 814 3.8 662 3.1 21115 776 3.7 647 3.1 21245 777 3.7 643 3.0 20236 742 3.7 634 3.1 20489 810 4.0 627 3.1 21077 861 4.1 620 2.9 19056 789 4.1 619 3.2 19826 874 4.4 619 3.1 19198 759 4.0 593 3.1 19579 737 3.8 593 3.0 18706 681 3.6 570 3.0 18583 730 3.9 558 3.0 18222 805 4.4 557 3.1 17643 746 4.2 538 3.0 17385 712 4.1 537 3.1 16130 685 4.2 528 3.3

SNYDER

SOMERSET DAVID CRISSINGER

DHI-AP H 45.9

23117

829 3.6 703 3.0

HERD OWNER VERNON D. MARTIN MERVIN AND JENELL YODER

WASHINGTON

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

DHI-APCS H 206.5 DHI H 80.8

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

22716 20703

853 3.8 686 3.0 780 3.8 662 3.2 839 866 837 696 827 710 727 671 684

HAMILTON BROS JOHN E MARCHEZAK HAMILTON BROS GREEN HAVEN FARM JOHN E MARCHEZAK FOLLY HOLLOW FM INC MARION PYLE STONE WILLIAM A SCOTT WINDSON DAIRY FARM

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X H J H W H H

251.4 69.1 52.7 166.7 15.9 151.3 14.6 68.8 86.7

24061 23445 23223 20692 17447 19257 18075 17740 18851

SLICKHILL HOLSTEINS BILL & RICK EBERT ALVIN VANCE JR -HHIXSON FARM SELEMBO DAIRY FARM YURIS' DAIRY FARM JAMES HOUGH POOLE & SONS DAIRY ALVIN VANCE JR. -J-

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H X X J

79.6 78.7 42.4 31.8 163.5 48.3 31.7 29.9 78.4

23537 1038 4.4 731 3.1 23401 928 4.0 722 3.1 23089 911 3.9 706 3.1 19801 838 4.2 611 3.1 18379 721 3.9 576 3.1 18383 746 4.1 567 3.1 17338 698 4.0 544 3.1 16414 678 4.1 521 3.2 14600 675 4.6 513 3.5

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H

74.6 186.6 261.8 175.0 161.3 44.0 48.0 72.9 104.4 68.5 28.0 23.0 100.4 154.1 68.3 173.9 55.8 25.5 135.7

30943 1169 3.8 938 3.0 25913 1051 4.1 812 3.1 25293 929 3.7 780 3.1 3X 24344 973 4.0 737 3.0 23446 896 3.8 725 3.1 23647 922 3.9 722 3.1 22081 707 3.2 680 3.1 20364 781 3.8 668 3.3 21121 718 3.4 666 3.2 20818 784 3.8 646 3.1 19703 730 3.7 631 3.2 20098 783 3.9 616 3.1 3X 19892 756 3.8 615 3.1 3X 19418 733 3.8 606 3.1 17855 692 3.9 563 3.2 18499 683 3.7 550 3.0 17128 654 3.8 539 3.1 17018 587 3.4 510 3.0 21423 822 3.8 666 3.1

WESTMORELAND

YORK

SMYSERS RICHLAWN FMS TAYACRES FARM WALK LE HOLSTEINS FUHRMAN ROBT. BAUMGARDNER JR THOMAS BOYER KATEANN FARM BARRENS VIEW FARM DALE & DARLA DOLL GUM TREE FARM JOHN KRONE JESSE & BARB DRUCK 2 JESSE & BARB DRUCK #PERRYDELL FARM SYDOR BROS. FARM LEROY BUPP GARY THOMAN LARRY ROBINSON SHADOW PRACTICE2 DAIRY

3.5 3.7 3.6 3.4 4.7 3.7 4.0 3.8 3.6

729 728 722 641 624 589 558 548 546

3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3X 3.1 3.6 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.9

Page 21 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

PA Farm Bureau urges PMMB to maintain dairy price


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 22

NMPF’s 2012 antibiotic residue prevention manual now available

Top 40 Herds For October For Records Processed through DRMS Raleigh

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

Updated manual, additional materials available online for free The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) announced that it is releasing an updated version of the Milk and Dairy Beef Drug Residue Prevention Manual for 2012. One of the areas of focus for the National Dairy FARM Program™, the residue prevention manual can be found online at www.nationaldairyfarm.com. The Milk and Dairy Beef Drug Residue Prevention Manual is a concise review of appropriate antibiotic use in dairy animals. The manual is a quick resource to review those antibiotics approved for dairy animals, and also can be used as an educational tool for farm managers as they develop their onfarm best management practices necessary to avoid milk and meat residues. Additions to the 2012 version include a section on meat drug residue testing, an expanded list of products and risk factors for residues, as well as an updated drug and test kit list. The 2012 manual includes a certificate of participation that can be signed by a producer and their veterinarian to demonstrate their commitment to proper use of

antibiotics on the dairy. “The use of antibiotics in livestock is undergoing increased scrutiny, and this manual will help ensure that veterinary treatments are used appropriately,” said Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. The dairy industry is committed to producing safe, abundant, and affordable milk and dairy beef of the highest quality. Healthy animals help make for safe food and disease prevention is the key to keeping cows healthy. The National Dairy FARM Program was created by NMPF to demonstrate and verify that U.S. milk producers are committed to providing the highest levels of quality assurance including animal care, residue prevention, and other on-farm practices. The Residue Prevention manual was sponsored by Charm Sciences, IDEXX, and Pfizer Animal Health. No check-off finds were used in the development and distribution of this manual. For more information on the National Dairy FARM Program, contact Betsy Flores at 703-2436111 or log on to www.nationaldairyfarm.com.

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MARYLAND

BALTIMORE STEVE WILSON

DHI-AP H 175.8

CAROLINE

HARMONY FARM RICHARD EDWARDS HOLLINGSWORTH DANIEL 3 FAITHLAND FARM ARTIE FOSTER LONGDAY FARM

137.3 688.0 43.7 198.2 273.7 53.3

25822 24616 21994 22145 18682 16326

DHIR DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

H H H J H H H H B H J H H H H H H H

161.6 890.6 134.3 40.2 266.9 38.6 64.7 71.1 17.0 122.1 45.5 127.9 89.0 92.1 213.1 114.6 339.2 136.2

26300 1006 3.8 836 3.2 24440 914 3.7 757 3.1 3X 24627 934 3.8 756 3.1 3X 18666 921 4.9 722 3.9 23370 871 3.7 717 3.1 22348 830 3.7 708 3.2 22264 861 3.9 705 3.2 22058 835 3.8 702 3.2 21635 873 4.0 701 3.2 3X 22195 801 3.6 692 3.1 17513 893 5.1 688 3.9 21169 832 3.9 664 3.1 20146 813 4.0 655 3.3 3X 20722 781 3.8 649 3.1 20648 780 3.8 629 3.0 20441 776 3.8 625 3.1 19768 707 3.6 602 3.0 16392 628 3.8 512 3.1

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H X H J H G

463.2 58.3 74.3 113.6 39.2 131.7 11.2

23863 21600 20015 21861 15764 18139 14149

830 832 832 824 777 756 695

DHI-AP H 181.5

16533

720 4.4 545 3.3

H 1128.2 H 538.0 H 104.0 H 227.5 H 52.2 X 83.6 H 75.3 H 94.8 H 178.3 H 44.5

25024 24408 22104 22457 19563 19675 19260 19426 16840 16466

972 920 861 861 754 739 753 668 688 581

DHIR-AP H 144.3

21185

793 3.7 658 3.1

DHIR H 96.1 DHIR B 21.3

24622 21201

994 4.0 813 3.3 880 4.2 735 3.5

WICOMICO W. BLAN HARCUM

FREDERICK

TEABOW INCORP. PAUL COBLENTZ & SONS BULLDOG HOLSTEINS MATTHEW TOMS MERCURO FARM LLC ANDREW TOMS JEREMY & JULIE THOMPSON PLAIN FOUR FARMS ROCKY POINT FARMS, INC. JOHN STONE

960 894 781 791 675 659

H H H H H H

RICHARD & DIANE FLICKINGER COLDSPRINGS FARM R.A.BELL&SONS LLC QUEEN ACRES JERSEYS PANORA ACRES GARY R BRAUNING DONNA & JASON MYERS FRITZ FARM LLC R.A.BELL&SONS LLC BYRON D. STAMBAUGH BAR NONE JERSEYS CEDAR KNOLL FARMS MARYLAND DELIGHT FARM CHARLES L. LETHBRIDGE PEACE AND PLENTY FARMS LEASE BROS. ARBAUGH S FLOWING SPRINGS PARKER SMITH KILBY INC. MT ARARAT FARMS KILBY INC. WIL-O-MAR FARM KILBY INC. LONG GREEN FARMS INC. MT ARARAT FARMS

619 3.8 534 3.3

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

CARROLL

CECIL

16403

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

GARRETT KENTON B

HARFORD

MATT & JULIE YARRINGTON MATT & JULIE YARRINGTON

3.7 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.6 4.0

3.5 3.9 4.2 3.8 4.9 4.2 4.9

3.9 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.4 4.1 3.5

806 737 672 666 583 519

714 701 660 660 565 560 522

775 768 707 705 625 622 608 600 538 504

3.1 3.0 3X 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2

3.0 3X 3.2 3.3 3X 3.0 3.6 3X 3.1 3.7

3.1 3X 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.1

For Records Processed through DHI Provo 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

H H H H H H X H

329.4 123.2 72.2 190.9 155.7 165.3 65.5 225.9

22974 23455 22245 22407 20885 20955 18885 17364

909 882 868 791 860 714 695 686

4.0 3.8 3.9 3.5 4.1 3.4 3.7 4.0

DHI-APCS H 74.4 DHIR-AP H 114.4

22013 19046

848 3.9 693 3.1 760 4.0 632 3.3

309.2 211.3 19.5 67.9 56.3 71.0 161.2 24.0

25706 23607 22404 22919 22492 18333 17122 16249

885 906 859 881 853 814 864 659

DHI-AP H 77.5

17462

670 3.8 579 3.3

H 1321.7 H 303.2 H 170.7 H 147.3 H 138.0 H 86.2 H 161.7 J 15.4 H 55.4

27082 24206 23262 21138 19842 18478 19786 15639 17993

968 900 926 843 739 770 674 777 623

DHI-AP H 145.2 DHIR-AP H 24.1

19884 19388

812 4.1 618 3.1 710 3.7 593 3.1

26583 23905 21822 23214 21133 19343 22789 22027 22042 18293 19347 19385 20289 18502 19424 19575 19948 14404 18046 13583

974 946 836 872 845 955 819 838 796 815 686 808 723 743 727 746 700 743 687 679

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER MY-LADYS-MANOR FARM ROBERT KNOX JD & GE MILLER JAMES ARCHER STRAWBERRY HILL FARM HARKINS HILL DAIRY CHRIS DIXON GARDEN FENCE FARM

DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

HOWARD

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BOWLING GREEN FARM INC.

KENT

FAIR HILL FARM INC. DHI-APCS CENTERDEL FARM INC. DHI-AP FAIR HILL FARM INC. DHI-APCS P. THOMAS MASON DHIRAPCS BRICK HOUSE FARM, INC. DHI-APCS ROBERT FRY & JUDY GIFFORD DHIR-AP P. THOMAS MASON DHIRAPCS P. THOMAS MASON DHIRAPCS

WORCESTER

CHESAPEAKE BAY DAIRY

QUEEN ANNE

LESTER C. JONES, INC. PATTERSON FARMS INC. W. EDWARD PALMATARY WINTERSTEIN FARMS LLC FRANKLIN & JEFF MOORE KEVIN LEAVERTON BOONE BROTHERS LESTER C. JONES, INC. BENJAMIN STANTON

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

TALBOT

WM. BRINSFIELD HENRY SNOW 111

WASHINGTON

CLETUS & JANICE FREY RALPH W SHANK TRANS OVA GENETICS ISAAC AND DIANE MARTIN CLETUS & JANICE FREY SHENANDOAH JERSEYS BRENT HORST PRYOR BROTHERS MICHAEL FORSYTHE CLETUS & JANICE FREY EARL GROVE, JR. RALPH W SHANK DAVID HERBST MARSH-HAVEN FARM COOL BROOK FARM DEBAUGH FARMS JAMES A. CAMPBELL JR. MARSH-HAVEN FARM S.J. WINTERS JR. & FAMILY MICHAEL FORSYTHE

DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H B H H J J A

H H H H B J H H H G H A H H X H H J H J

97.2 60.9 22.9 59.7 24.3 124.6 134.1 101.2 22.6 12.5 114.7 113.1 178.4 47.7 111.5 125.7 106.2 12.6 135.9 34.8

3.4 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 4.4 5.0 4.1

3.6 3.7 4.0 4.0 3.7 4.2 3.4 5.0 3.5

3.7 4.0 3.8 3.8 4.0 4.9 3.6 3.8 3.6 4.5 3.5 4.2 3.6 4.0 3.7 3.8 3.5 5.2 3.8 5.0

723 713 709 672 660 641 596 573

759 754 717 707 698 641 608 517

789 722 718 672 614 607 582 547 543

829 746 730 724 720 712 710 682 674 625 624 623 621 602 601 596 590 552 541 511

3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.3

3.0 3X 3.2 3.2 3X 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.2

2.9 3X 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.3 2.9 3.5 3X 3.0

3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.4 3.7 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.8 3.0 3.8

Top 40 Herds For October

RECORDS RECOGNIZE ENERGY CORRECTED MILK (ECM) BASIS - Over the years, totals have recognized milk, fat, and protein production. Since 1989, high herds on a county and state basis, along with all individual production awards, have been made on an (ECM) basis. The ECM formula (7.2 x lbs protein) + (12.95 x lbs fat) + (.327 x lbs milk) has helped identify cows that not only produce high volumes of milk, but also of milk solids. Maryland dairy producers are using the ECM formula and no longer mention lbs of fat or lbs of 3.5% fat corrected milk, since fat has become a negative word in promoting dairy and other food products.

HERD NAME DAIRY CATTLE RESEARCH SAVAGE-LEIGH FARM PAUL F. HARRISON JR. PAUL YODER BULLDOG HOLSTEINS GLEN-TOCTIN FARM O. CLAYTON SMITH CESSNA BROS. FARM DAVID & JAMES PATRICK PHILIP BEACHY ORION-VIEW HOLSTEINS MD.-CARROLLTON JAMES & JOHN MYERS CALVIN SCHROCK GLENN BEARD LAVON YODER DOOL-LEIGH FARM BENEVA FARMS DAVE & CAROLE DOODY PAUL & HENRY KINSINGER MAPLE LAWN FARM INC. BRAD & CATHY WILES VALES - PRIDE HOLSTEIN WILLOW SPRINGS PARTNERS HARA VALE FARMS ERIC & FAITH BURALL THOMAS H. MULLER SHAFDON FARMS ASH & BEAR ANDREW W. SCHROCK MIKE & ANITA HAINES ANDY MASON EHRHARDT FARM INC

TYP BRD TEST H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

22 23 23 00 23 20 00 20 23 20 31 23 23 20 31 00 23 31 22 20 23 20 23 31 00 23 31 22 31 23 23 31 31

ECM 27,378 27,081 26,455 25,419 24,401 24,314 24,031 23,950 23,868 23,754 23,567 23,328 23,188 23,130 23,105 23,050 22,919 22,837 22,609 22,242 22,229 22,181 22,070 22,043 22,013 21,988 21,849 21,717 21,273 21,245 21,148 21,043 20,947

3X

39

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

26586 979 24996 1024 23577 1012 24450 920 22923 896 22442 922 21498 924 22645 876 22542 880 23180 849 22324 869 22934 829 22474 842 21865 839 21953 846 21902 853 20287 887 22606 806 22113 827 21229 821 21226 815 20163 827 20864 823 20517 813 20973 817 20975 800 20834 795 20136 813 19405 815 20229 777 20959 740 19410 791 19313 786

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF 3.68 4.10 4.29 3.76 3.91 4.11 4.30 3.87 3.90 3.66 3.89 3.61 3.75 3.84 3.85 3.89 4.37 3.57 3.74 3.87 3.84 4.10 3.95 3.96 3.89 3.82 3.82 4.04 4.20 3.84 3.53 4.08 4.07

835 785 784 766 737 700 700 723 709 720 697 708 686 711 691 673 667 696 649 649 658 678 638 668 636 663 659 640 608 635 655 619 619

3.14 3.14 3.32 3.13 3.22 3.12 3.26 3.19 3.14 3.11 3.12 3.09 3.05 3.25 3.15 3.07 3.29 3.08 2.94 3.06 3.10 3.36 3.06 3.26 3.03 3.16 3.16 3.18 3.13 3.14 3.12 3.19 3.21

82.8 72.4 68.0 62.9 66.9 68.6 66.7 56.4 67.0 62.4 65.2 63.5 66.3 63.7 73.6 61.7 58.6 53.4 56.1 45.5 50.2 57.3 61.1 55.3 68.8 70.8 47.8 65.9 50.6 57.0 59.5 45.4 57.8

3.0 2.9 2.8 2.3 2.5 2.7 2.8 2.2 2.6 2.3 2.4 2.3 2.4 2.3 2.6 2.4 2.5 1.9 2.1 1.8 1.8 2.3 2.3 2.2 2.6 2.6 1.8 2.6 2.0 2.1 2.1 1.8 2.3

2.6 2.2 2.2 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 1.8 2.1 1.9 2.0 1.9 2.0 2.0 2.3 1.9 1.9 1.6 1.7 1.4 1.5 1.9 1.9 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.5 2.0 1.6 1.7 1.9 1.4 1.8

HERD NAME

TYP BRD TEST

ECM

3X

ANNUAL LIFETIME AVG AVG AVG PRD PRD PRB % FT PRO. % PRO. TOT MILK TOT FAT TOT SNF

AVG MILK

AVG FAT

19635 20316 19789 20706 18282 20178 19815 19130

765 741 757 719 777 712 710 722

3.89 3.65 3.82 3.47 4.25 3.53 3.58 3.78

619 630 612 626 582 606 617 613

3.15 3.10 3.09 3.02 3.18 3.00 3.12 3.20

43.0 55.2 41.6 44.5 54.7 51.6 55.5 47.6

1.7 2.0 1.6 1.5 2.1 1.9 1.9 1.8

1.3 1.7 1.3 1.3 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.5

RANDAL BEITZEL SUNRISE HOLSTEINS DALE M & SUSAN SMITH TOBIE KINSINGER EZRA SCHROCK DAVID & JENNIFER BUROW RUFUS PEACHEY WARNER BROS INC

H H H H H H H H

20 31 31 20 23 00 00 23

20,780 20,771 20,677 20,585 20,227 20,178 20,112 20,015

PATRICK, DAVID & JAMES VALES - PRIDE AYRSHIRE WHISPERING AYRSHIRE ROOM-TO-GROW

A A A A

23 23 00 20

19,563 19,501 14,056 1,386

18174 17334 12814 1536

729 761 538 46

4.01 4.39 4.20 2.98

581 553 403 40

3.20 3.19 3.15 2.58

56.5 43.8 40.1 7.5

2.2 1.9 1.6 .2

1.8 1.4 1.2 .2

SHAFDON SWISS VALES - PRIDE BROWN SWISS ERIC F-FAITH M. BURALL DUBLIN HILLS SWISS DWAYNE BELL

B B B B B

22 23 23 31 20

21,194 20,237 19,674 19,619 15,538

18471 17725 17712 17382 13846

813 784 732 740 573

4.40 4.42 4.13 4.26 4.14

643 596 612 605 499

3.48 3.36 3.46 3.48 3.60

49.1 46.0 49.1 43.1 35.7

2.1 2.0 2.0 1.8 1.5

1.6 1.5 1.7 1.5 1.3

WALNUT RIDGE GUERNSEY MAR SHIRL GUERNSEY

G G

31 31

22,110 18,798

17215 17334

936 705

5.44 4.07

606 556

3.52 3.21

50.2 45.6

2.6 1.8

1.7 1.4

GLENN BEARD O. CLAYTON SMITH MIKE & ANITA HAINES 2 JOHN & JULIE MAYER WILLOW SPRING FARM SPRING VALLEY JERSEYS WES KELLER ASH & BEAR ELI SWARTZENTRUBER GLADE VIEW DAIRY

J J J J J J J J J J

31 20 23 31 31 31 22 23 23 20

26,802 25,784 18,865 18,045 16,949 15,577 15,139 14,729 11,251 8,029

22636 1072 19446 1125 15055 756 14860 716 13958 663 12284 631 11310 639 12035 584 9034 459 6719 317

4.74 5.78 5.02 4.82 4.75 5.14 5.65 4.86 5.08 4.72

767 675 577 544 528 471 440 449 327 240

3.39 3.47 3.83 3.66 3.78 3.83 3.89 3.73 3.62 3.57

59.9 69.5 45.4 40.6 35.8 32.1 33.0 34.4 31.1 16.0

2.9 4.2 2.3 1.9 1.7 1.6 1.8 1.6 1.6 .7

2.0 2.4 1.7 1.5 1.4 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.1 .6

14


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The warm days of summer will soon be a distant memory when Old Man Winter rears his ugly head. But before he arrives, producers should take time to plan ahead for feeding and housing calves during cold weather, a time when they are extremely vulnerable to cold stress. There are two areas on which to focus for minimizing cold stress during cold weather months: 1) implement a feeding program that supports increased energy demands, and 2) protect calves from energy-draining, cold temperatures. Plan ahead for cold weather feeding During cold weather, newborn and young calves are particularly susceptible to cold stress, even at fairly moderate temperatures, making it necessary to be prepared for the sudden onset of colder temperatures. Cold stress in calves is caused by environmental factors including lower environmental temperatures and wind chill factors. At temperatures below 60 degrees F, calves must increase their energy consumption, just to maintain their core body temperature. By implementing a cold weather feeding program that meets these increased energy requirements, producers can

keep their calves healthy and growing. According to Dr. Tom Earleywine, director of nutritional services at Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products, meeting energy and nutritional requirements during cold weather should be a top priority for producers. “Young calves are the future of the lactating herd, and providing environmental protection in addition to proper feeding is paramount in helping them survive and thrive in cold weather,” says Earleywine. “During cold temperatures, reducing environmental stress factors and meeting higher energy demands with milk or quality milk replacer can be all the difference when it comes to growth potential.” Energy reserves used to maintain and regulate body temperature are extremely limited in the young calf, therefore during cold stress, energy for growth and developing immune function becomes short or nonexistent. What it means for producers is that the calf is not using energy to gain weight and build immunity against disease, but instead is at greater risk for coming down with conditions like pneumonia or scours.

Cold A24

Page 23 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Plan ahead of the cold front when raising calves


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 24

Cold from A23 “Producers should take a close look at calf milk replacers going into the colder weather months,” continues Earleywine. “Calves need a great deal of energy to thrive and grow in cold weather. The main sources of energy in milk replacer are lactose and fat, both are needed by the calf. Adequate levels of milk replacer dry matter should be fed to provide lactose for immediate

energy and fat to build a reserve for the calf. Oxidation of this reserve when that cold front hits can be the difference between a calf that thrives and one that doesn’t. Oxidation rate increases have been proven to increase the ability of calves to tolerate cold stress,” he says. Additionally, Earleywine suggests producers not currently feeding a third

feeding of milk replacer consider the benefits of adding an additional helping, especially during cold weather. Incorporating a third feeding of milk replacer, preferably late in the evening, provides extra energy for young calves. Earleywine also notes calves fed three times a day show improved growth, better feed efficiency, and consume more starter prior to weaning than

calves fed twice daily. Protect calves from the cold In addition to enhancing the nutrition fed to calves, producers should provide housing that allows a space for calves to have fresh air yet protects them from drafts. Additionally bedding should be clean, dry and deep enough to completely hide a calves’ legs when

Cold A27

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Herds Ranked by Daily Milk Lbs UNITED DHI Compiled by: NORTH CAROLINA TOTALS DRMS, Raleigh, NC 27603 OCTOBER

(919) 661-3100

TEST DAY AVG (COW) OWNER

BUTTKE DAIRY BEN SHELTON SCOTT AND BANKS DAVIS M&M'S DAIRY ROBERT NUTTER & MICHAEL STROWD CROSS CREEK DAIRY SHADY GROVE DAIRY DAVID A SMITH STEPSTONE HOLSTEINS INC GEORGE SMITH S & L RIVERSIDE DAIRY LLC GREEN VALLEY FARM, LLC SCOTT AND BANKS DAVIS NEAL P JOHNSON SHUMAKER DAIRY, INC. AUBREY N WELLS JERRY W. CRAWFORD MCCAINS DAIRY RIDGE FARM A D & CARLTON WILLIARD WILLIAM H DAY JR MIKE DUCKETT JEFF CORNWELL CARL & CLAYTON SMITH TED AND ALAN MOORE BREEZY RIDGE DAIRY WAYNE P STOUT GRAYHOUSE FARMS ENGLISH DAIRY FARM, LLC BOBBY & ALVIN EVANS MATTHEW CODY ALLENS DAIRY TALLEY-HO FARM W G CARUTHERS JR STEVE AND ALLEN JOINES GEORGE L PLESS AND SONS GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON CHARLES CURRIN DAIRY EAKER DAIRY PENDRYS DAIRY FARM ANDERS FARM CARLAND DAIRY LARRY D GALLIHER WRIGHT DAIRY GLADDEN'S DAIRY STAMEY FARMS BEVILLE BROTHERS DAIRY MACGIBBON FARMS

ANNUAL AVERAGES

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

LIBERTY NC (3X) OLIN NC (3X) MOORESVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC (3X) HILLSBOROUGH NC (3X) HURDLE MILLS NC EAST BEND NC (3X) LEXINGTON NC (3X) BLANCH NC LEXINGTON NC (3X) VALE NC RANDLEMAN NC (3X) MOORESVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC BLANCH NC LEICESTER NC CHAPEL HILL NC (3X) SOPHIA NC (3X) RANDLEMAN NC (3X) GRAHAM NC OXFORD NC LEICESTER NC LAWNDALE NC ENNICE NC HURDLE MILLS NC SPARTA NC STONY POINT NC STONY POINT NC (3X) MARION NC SPARTA NC MARS HILL NC ASHEBORO NC OLIN NC HILLSBOROUGH NC SPARTA NC ROCKWELL NC CROUSE NC (3X) OXFORD NC CHERRYVILLE NC BOONVILLE NC ENNICE NC MILLS RIVER NC (3X) HARMONY NC (3X) REIDSVILLE NC VALE NC STATESVILLE NC REIDSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 10 9 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

86.6 83.7 81.6 81.3 79.7 77.8 75.3 74.6 72.9 72.5 71.8 70.9 70.0 69.7 69.5 69.4 69.0 69.0 68.9 68.3 67.9 67.5 67.5 67.3 66.8 66.4 65.6 63.5 63.2 62.9 62.8 61.6 61.4 61.4 61.3 61.3 60.9 60.8 60.7 60.1 60.0 60.0 60.0 59.3 59.0 58.8 58.5 58.4

175 151 111 157 164 173 186 173 135 209 153 163 155 173 197 134 147 227 174 191 167 206 180 211 210 159 169 180 170 160 192 194 162 204 152 204 155 195 187 152 192 191 254 227 185 126 217 161

24877 25635 25766 27108 25733 23896 25053 25012 21971 23515 21104 21792 25762 23169 23363 21400 19920 24060 . 22105 19593 22102 20240 21358 21700 20876 20713 21665 22707 18600 21161 20415 22306 17957 21382 20830 19189 19337 21461 20907 18613 21059 19701 21013 20526 19285 20803 19555

3.9 4.0 3.5 4.1 3.7 3.6 3.3 3.5 3.9 3.8 4.0 4.2 3.5 3.9 3.9 3.2 3.6 3.7 . 4.1 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.3 4.3 2.9 3.8 3.8 3.6 . 3.3 3.8 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.3 3.7 4.1 3.8 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.7

959 1038 901 1106 964 872 821 866 860 893 838 921 896 903 908 692 719 882 . 901 731 798 772 715 928 612 786 834 817 . 692 778 857 705 766 712 721 726 771 744 619 786 815 792 782 684 748 721

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

3.0 2.9 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.1 2.8 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 . 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.0 3.0 . 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 2.9

739 752 794 783 764 737 699 764 684 730 676 685 793 709 725 671 635 713 . 705 592 692 611 647 670 607 654 652 684 . 658 621 695 573 658 642 586 588 665 630 572 637 588 661 648 591 653 572

TEST DAY AVG (COW)

ANNUAL AVERAGES

TOWN (3X)

R TEST A MTH N K

MILK LBS

DAYS IN MILK

LBS MILK

% FAT

LBS FAT

B % LBS R PRO PRO E E D

SHELLY J SMITH BOBBY JOE GAMBILL NEAL GROSE JOHN HAMPTON RANDY DOUGLAS JY-RO HOLSTEINS PROCTOR DAIRY GARY SCHLABACH SHELLY J SMITH HILLCREST DAIRY WAYNE SMITHERMAN SEARS DAY DAIRY J NORMAN RIDDLE LYNN BONHAM COLTRANE FARM DARRELL WRIGHT MANCO FARM INC. TEER FARMS INC WAYNE ROBERTSON

NORWOOD NC SPARTA NC HARMONY NC SPARTA NC HAMPTONVILLE NC ELKIN NC BESSEMER CITY NC UNION GROVE NC NORWOOD NC OXFORD NC EAST BEND NC OXFORD NC STATESVILLE NC ARDEN NC PLEASANT GARDEN NC (3X) FRANKLINVILLE NC PITTSBORO NC CHAPEL HILL NC STATESVILLE NC

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

58.3 57.7 57.6 57.5 57.5 57.4 56.6 56.6 56.5 56.3 55.6 55.4 55.4 55.2 55.2 54.7 54.3 54.3 52.4

200 203 228 190 165 200 216 200 195 185 178 139 191 177 208 215 195 272 189

18517 17498 17549 19402 19332 18305 20186 . 18426 17954 15419 15211 15528 16622 19327 17341 18216 18538 17242

3.7 3.4 3.6 3.4 3.2 3.8 3.1 . 3.7 3.6 3.5 4.1 3.7 4.3 3.8 4.1 4.1 3.9 3.8

681 590 631 655 619 701 623 . 676 647 547 617 570 720 739 703 742 729 653

3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 2.8 . 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.1

583 535 562 596 591 579 574 . 579 563 461 474 471 553 575 541 592 597 541

BRUSH CREEK SWISS FARMS GREEN VALLEY FARM, LLC AUBREY N WELLS MATTHEW CODY LUCKY L JERSEY TALLEY-HO FARM GARY & SHARON MACGIBBON COY + WANDA REESE CARLAND DAIRY COREY LUTZ TREASURE CHEST JERSEYS LYNN BONHAM SHADY BROOK FARM TREASURE CHEST JERSEYS KARRIMONT FARM RAY & LINDA ELMORE BILTMORE DAIRY FARMS INC WAYNE AND KAREN LUTZ CHAPMAN DAIRY RIVERSIDE DAIRY FARM SHADY BROOK FARM GRANT WALTERS ATT. LENNIE BREEZE SHADY BROOK FARM CALDWELL OVERCASH ATT. ANNA G. AMORIELLO HARRY WELLS CHAPEL HILL CREAMERY

SILER CITY NC (3X) RANDLEMAN NC (3X) LEICESTER NC MARS HILL NC STATESVILLE NC OLIN NC CROUSE NC (3X) TAYLORSVILLE NC MILLS RIVER NC (3X) LINCOLNTON NC LINCOLNTON NC ARDEN NC STATESVILLE NC LINCOLNTON NC MOCKSVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC FLETCHER NC MOCKSVILLE NC TAYLORSVILLE NC GIBSONVILLE NC STATESVILLE NC CHINA GROVE NC GREENSBORO NC STATESVILLE NC KANNAPOLIS NC GIBSONVILLE NC CLOVER NC CHAPEL HILL NC

10 10 10 10 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

77.1 70.9 69.4 62.8 61.8 61.4 60.9 60.1 60.0 58.0 57.8 55.2 52.1 52.1 50.4 50.1 49.7 49.3 47.1 46.9 45.9 45.3 44.3 44.0 43.8 41.4 40.3 39.0

176 163 134 192 168 162 155 148 191 137 89 177 137 156 170 156 172 151 184 159 151 187 389 182 208 158 222 181

20367 21792 21400 21161 19166 22306 19189 16702 21059 16616 19998 16622 17594 16105 17104 13666 15277 16636 15270 16332 14574 14288 16046 13895 15316 13140 13136 12373

4.1 4.2 3.2 3.3 4.3 3.8 3.8 4.6 3.7 4.8 3.8 4.3 4.1 4.3 4.7 4.5 4.8 4.9 4.4 4.0 4.6 4.3 4.0 4.4 3.5 4.1 4.8 4.8

840 921 692 692 821 857 721 769 786 799 760 720 721 688 809 618 733 810 677 653 664 614 635 616 532 541 637 591

3.3 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.0 3.6 3.2 3.3 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.1 3.5 3.5 3.3 3.5 3.1 3.3 3.6 3.7

679 685 671 658 646 695 586 608 637 600 642 553 577 561 609 492 553 585 539 508 505 495 526 481 472 428 477 452

OWNER

NORTH CAROLINA COLOR BREEDS

B X X X J X X J X J X X X J J J J J J X J J X J X X J J


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Page 25 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

GIVE COUNTRY FOLKS FOR CHRISTMAS!


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 26

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HARRISBURG, PA — More than 300 dairy farm families recently participated in a survey conducted by the Center for Dairy Excellence to evaluate the effect natural gas will have on the

future of the dairy industry in northern and southwestern Pennsylvania. The results of that survey will be highlighted during a conference call hosted by the center on Thursday,

Dec. 1, at noon. “What we found from the survey is that expected income from natural gas could create opportunity to grow dairy in mineral rich regions,” said John Frey, executive director of the center. “Helping dairy farm families prepare to take advantage of that opportunity could have a sig-

nificant impact on Pennsylvania’s dairy industry as a whole.” The survey included questions regarding individual dairy farm families’ future plans and whether income from the natural gas would encourage or discourage further dairy production. Eighty percent of all farms participating

in the survey plan to continue in the dairy industry. The majority of those expecting natural gas income and interested in continuing in dairy plan to reinvest some of the funds back into the dairy operation. Anyone interested in learning more about the survey can take part in the conference call, be-

ing offered at no cost to participants. However, pre-registration is required. To register, please call the center at 717-346-0849 or e-mail info@centerfordairyexcellence.org. Upon registration, call-in details appropriate materials will be distributed.

ing the feeding program, Earleywine offers these tips for keeping calves healthy and growing during cold weather months: • Always offer free choice water. • Provide warm water with morning and afternoon feedings, and consider adding a third wa-

tering as well. By feeding liquids at closer to the calf’s body temperature of 102 degrees F, you can reduce the additional drain on its energy reserve to warm it. • Keep water & grain buckets clean. • If scours hit, primary treatment should be geared toward restoring water balance by feeding electrolytes in a separate feeding at body temperature. Continue feeding calves normal milk replacer levels for energy for maintenance and growth. • Provide enough dry bedding for calves to nestle into and keep warm. Straw or chopped corn stalks offer optimal protection for the calf; sand and

sawdust are ideal for summer but not winter. • Feed calves a full potential ration; calves fed a “maintenance” diet (less than 1.8 pound milk replacer daily) are more likely to fall behind on weight gain and become sick. a “Producers face unique and different set of challenges when it comes to feeding calves during periods of cold weather,” notes Earleywine. “Being prepared before the cold front hits by planning ahead is important for providing young calves the proper nutrition to keep them growing to someday become a productive member of the milking string.”

Cold from A24 they’re lying down. Proper insulation will help calves stay warm without relying on energy reserves to regulate body temperature. Calf blankets can also be used to help keep them warm. Additional cold weather management tips In addition to manag-

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Page 27 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Conference call to highlight results of dairy survey


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 28

The Dairy One Improver

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

Soil Sampling 101 By Janet Fallon, CCA The United Nations projects that the world population will increase by more than 2 BILLION people in the next 40 years. This creates some rather obvious challenges when it comes to meeting the world's demand for safe and affordable food. Increased food production must be achieved by intensified crop production since our arable land base is not likely to expand Soil testing will play a critical role to ensure efficient utilization of crop nutrients needed to boost food production in the future while minimizing negative impacts on the environment. That process begins by collecting a representative soil sample.

How to take a soil sample A representative soil sample is needed to determine lime and fertilizer requirements and avoid costly over or under fertilization. It is perhaps the most important part of any soil testing program…whether it is for a commercial operation farming 1000 acres or for your home garden. Follow the guidelines below to help ensure the best results.

Order Your Soil Test Supplies There are 3 ways to order soil sample boxes and sample information sheets: • call 1-800-344-2697 ext. 2172. • email supply@dairyone.com. Be sure to include your account number and/or name, street address and daytime phone number plus items and quantity needed. Specify the type of sample information sheet needed. • Directly from our website: http://www.dairyone.com/Forage/OrderSupplies/

Establish a Sampling Schedule Most soils should be sampled every 2 - 3 years; more often for sandy soils, high value crops or problem areas. To avoid seasonal variation, try to sample at the same time every year for a given field or garden. Fall is generally considered to be the most reliable time to pull samples, especially when it comes to pH. Soil pH fluctuates and tends to be lower in the summer when temperatures are higher and soils are dryer. When soils dry out, salt concentrations increase allowing Ca++, Mg++, K+ to replace H+ and Al+++ on the soil surface. The extra H+ and Al+++ in the soil solution will temporarily decrease soil pH hence pH determination is more reliable in the Fall when soil moisture is a bit higher.

Use the Right Tool Use tools that are clean and free of rust. Avoid brass or galvanized tools or containers that can contaminate samples with zinc or copper. Stainless steel probes or augers are best because they collect a continuous core through the entire sampling depth with a minimum disturbance of the soil (see Figure 1.). Avoid shovels or trowels. A soil auger may work better in wet or rocky soils. Collect samples in a clean plastic bucket or plastic bag. Avoid collecting or shipping wet samples in plain commercial paper bags or boxes that are often treated with a product containing boron. Wet samples can leach boron out of the paper and contaminate the sample. If possible, send air dried samples in an Agro-One sample box.

Sample at the Proper Depth Based on Tillage • Moldboard plow - surface to tillage depth (usually 6-7 inches). • Chisel plow and offset disk - sample before tillage to fl of the tillage depth. • Reduced tillage systems - No Till, Ridge till, Zone Till etc. Two Samples may be required. Sample between rows to avoid disturbed soil or fertilizer band. • Sample to 6 inch depth for pH and nutrient content. • Take a second sample to a 1 inch depth to determine if surface applied N has resulted in an acid layer that can reduce the effectiveness of triazine herbicides.

Figure 1. Use a stainless steel probe or auger for best results.

Identify the Sampling Area Commercial Field Historically, a single composite soil sample has been used to generate one fertilizer and lime recommendation for each field. This is adequate in many cases but may result in inefficient use of fertilizer inputs and increased potential for environmental degradation due to over or under fertilization within a field if the field is quite variable. Technology such as digitized soil survey maps, electrical conductivity mapping, yield monitors and aerial photographs may help farms sample fields more precisely by dividing them into "management zones". Several cores can be taken from each management zone and submitted separately to generate a nutrient application plan that is customized for each management zone within the field. Up front analytical costs may be higher per field since you may submit multiple samples for each field but it allows for improved fertilizer efficiency and environmental protection. Follow the guidelines shown below for taking a single composite soil sample per field. Contact your crop adviser if you plan to implement site specific or "precision" sampling on your farm. • Take 15-20 plow depth core sub-samples using a zig-zag pattern in a management area representing < 20 acres (see Figure 2.). • Avoid unusual areas such as dead furrows, old hedge rows, fence lines, old manure piles, lime piles or burn piles. Avoid wet areas or severely eroded areas. • Take separate samples from areas within the field that vary widely from the rest of the field in color, slope, soil texture, drainage, productivity or crop history. • Sample each contour strip separately if it is > 5 acres. • Mix the 15-20 subsamples completely in a clean plastic bag or plastic bucket. • Avoid sampling under extremely wet soil conditions. Wet samples usually leak in transit and some nutrients in very wet soils may undergo rapid biological transformations.

Home Landscape Samples • Each sample should represent only one area - for example, a lawn, vegetable garden or perennial landscaped area (Figure 3). • For each unique area take at least 10 - 12 cores. • Submit samples from healthy and unhealthy areas separately. • Sample lawns to a depth of 4 inches.

Figure 2. Suggested Sampling Pattern in a Commercial Field


Highlights Activities and Opportunities When members of the Penn State Dairy Science Club were invited to create a video to enter in the Holstein World’s Collegiate Video Contest, they accepted the challenge with enthusiasm. Immediately setting out to produce a video highlighting the achievements of the club, they sought to make it both informative and fun. The result is an entertaining, fast-moving video showing the university and the activities of the club. The reward for the efforts of participating clubs from universities around the nation is the opportunity to have the video played throughout the month of December on Holstein World’s website. Club President Phil Bachman, Ulysses, Potter County, said, “Our goal was to make sure it was a student-run effort, and that it promoted a good face for the club and showed what the campus looks like. It is pretty straightforward, and I think we portrayed the campus and the club well.” The winning video will be selected based on popular voting at http://hol-

steinworldproductions.com/productions/contests/collegevideocontest/, as well as quality of footage, following the rules of content, interest level, entertainment level and presentation of cattle. Dr. Terry Etherton, Head of the Department of Dairy and Animal Science, said, “The video contest offers a tremendous opportunity for our club, and our students did an exceptional job of presenting our program in a way that appeals to new students. It was a great team effort and really highlights the rich traditions of the club and its activities as well as the university.” College of Agricultural Sciences Dean Dr. Bruce McPheron showed his enthusiasm for the project by donning a black and white cow costume as he led club members in a spirited chant of “We are … D Sci” in front of the famous Nittany Lion Statue on campus. Caine Mitchell, Venus, Venango County, appeared throughout the video wearing the cow costume, and did most of the editing, noting that it was extremely difficult to edit down all the footage they filmed in preparation. “We wanted to show how big and

beautiful the campus is and also how nice and friendly the faculty is,” Mitchell said. We also wanted to include some of the main sights of Penn State — Beaver Stadium, Nittany Lion and the Berkey Creamery, among others.” Mitchell said he views the video as a recruiting tool and hopes it will bring students to Penn State and encourage them to be part of the Dairy Science Club. Emma Green, Bristol, NY, said, “This is great exposure for Penn State and for the Dairy Club. I am so happy we did it. We wanted to give a good overview of PSU, not just the dairy club, but the whole campus, and show that it is a great place to get experience.” She served as a co-host of the video. Rebecca Shaw, Williamsburg, PA, Blair County, also a co-host, added, “We are very honored to be in the competition. I think the video is going to be a great booster for the club. The Dairy Science Club excels in everything we do, and we really help students prepare for the future.” She said she is “super proud” of the entire club for working together to make the video a reality. Having the video shown on Holstein World’s

website, she said, is a “huge deal” and will expose Penn State’s Club to lots of potential students and other leaders in the dairy industry. Heidi Musshafen, Middleton, Tioga County, added, “It was a great bonding experience to work together on the video. We were trying to promote the club and the overall dairy program at Penn State, and I think we succeeded.” The “producers” noted that script writing, video taping and editing was a new experience for almost everyone in the small group designated to make the concept a reality, but with enthusiastic input from members, they had fun while doing it. Others competing in the video contest include University of New Hampshire Dairy Club, Cal Poly Dairy Club, University of Wisconsin-Madison Dairy Club, Virginia Tech Department of Dairy Science, and University of Minnesota’s Gopher Dairy Club. To view the informative videos produced for the contest, visit http://holsteinworldproductions.com/productions/contests/collegevideocontest/ and check out the competition.

Soil Sampling 101 continued... • Sample shrubbery & perennial beds to a depth of 4 - 6 inches taking care to avoid zones where lime or fertilizer has been applied recently. • Sample annual vegetable and flower beds to the depth that you plan to incorporate lime or fertilizer, usually about 4 - 6 inches. • Place all cores for one unique area in a clean plastic bucket and mix well. Fill the soil sample box about 2/3rd full (about 2 cups).

Individual soil core samples

Vegetable Garden Sample 2 Back yard Sample 3

Prepare Samples for Shipment. If possible, spread wet samples in a thin layer on a clean surface and dry at room temperature. Do not use heat but a fan is acceptable to assist in drying. Remove large stones or sticks and break up large lumps or clods before mixing the sample thoroughly. Complete the required information on the sample box before assembling and make sure that it matches the information on the sample information sheet. Place about fl - 1 pint of the mixed sample in the sample box then close it securely.

Fill Out the Sample Information Sheet Completely. A completed sheet must accompany each sample. Required information includes; • Customer name, address and contact information. • Consultant/Extension Educator name, address and contact information • Method of reporting results - fax, email or US Mail. • Type of report required - with or without recommendations.

Front yard Sample 1

Trees & Shrubs Sample 4

Figure 3. Sample Each Unique Area in a Home Landscape

• All Commercial NY samples must include a valid soil name if recommendations are desired. • All NY Home, Garden and Landscape samples must include soil texture and soil drainage if recommendations are to be reported. • All VT samples require soil drainage class if recommendations are to be reported • Method of payment - Dairy One or Agro One account number, DHIA herd code, credit card information or a check. Results will not be released until payment or billing information has been received. Make checks payable to Dairy One. • Sample information - sample identification, soil name (NY commercial samples), soil drainage & soil texture (NY Home, garden and landscape samples, soil drainage class (VT samples), and other required information should be filled in completely. Recommendations may not be generated if the information sheet is incomplete. • KEEP A RECORD OF ALL SAMPLES SHIPPED including method and date of shipment. Dried ground samples will be stored at the lab for approximately 4 weeks to allow for additional test requests. • Maintain records of your soil test results to assist in monitoring changes in soil fertility over time. This may be useful to adjust soil management to meet crop demands without costly over or under application of nutrients.

Ship Your Samples to: Dairy One 730 Warren Road Ithaca NY 14850 Phone: 1-800-344-2697 ext. 2172

Samples can be shipped via U.S. Mail, UPS, Fed Ex, DHL, etc. Selecting these carriers will require additional packaging and will incur additional shipping and handling costs. If using the USPS, the flat rate boxes will be your most economical way to ship samples. In some areas, samples can be left at milk pick-up points by prior arrangement. Where available, samples will be picked up three times a week and delivered to the Dairy One facility in Ithaca the following morning.There is no shipping or handling charge for this service. Complete information on pick-up point locations, procedures and schedules can be found at: http://98.159.209.20/Truck_Stops.html Although the factors contributing to improved crop production are numerous, one thing is certain - the use of soil testing to determine crop nutrient requirements and enhance overall efficiency will be a key component of world food production and environmental protection in the future.

Page 29 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Penn State Dairy Science Club Produces Video


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 30

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You The Kitchen Diva by Angela Shelf Medearis

Talking Turkey Preparing a turkey for the first time can be a daunting task, unless you know a few tricks. No matter how many guests are expected — whether it’s dinner for four or 24, allow 1 pound of turkey per person. I never buy a turkey more than 14 pounds, as it’s easier to cook two turkeys than it is to wrestle a turkey weighing 25 plus pounds in and out of the oven. I cook one turkey the day before Thanksgiving. I let it rest and carve it ahead of time, cover it with basting juices and aluminum foil to keep it moist, and reheat it to serve during the meal. I also roast a turkey on Thanksgiving day. It’s my “show” bird — the one I display whole on a decorated platter. While my guests are serving themselves, I can carve the other turkey without feeling rushed. When selecting a turkey, it’s better to pick an unstuffed turkey for safety reasons, and then season and baste the bird yourself so that you can control the quality of the ingredients. The “pop-up” timer that you find in some brands of turkey usually only pops up when the turkey is overcooked! If you want to use a brand with a timer, leave it in place until the turkey is ready to carve, but use a conventional meat thermometer to check your bird for doneness. If buying a frozen turkey, forgetting to thaw it out is a common mistake that many cooks make during the holidays. Allow approximately 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds of turkey, approximately three to seven days before Thanksgiving. Thaw the turkey in the refrigerator on a rimmed pan to catch any drips or in a cooler kept at 38 F. If you’re preparing a turkey for the first time, my recipe for this Easy Holiday Turkey is a great way to begin. Read over the instructions a few days before the holidays, purchase and prep your ingredients ahead of time, and enjoy your Thanksgiving with a lot less stress!

Easy Holiday Turkey 1 (12 to 14 pound) turkey (not self-basting) 3/4 cup canola oil 3 tablespoons poultry seasoning 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 1 stick unsalted butter, melted Aromatics: 2 medium onions, peeled and chopped 3 large carrots, chopped 2 large apples, cored and chopped 2 to 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary, thyme, sage, parsley, in any combination 6 sage leaves 1/2 cup water or chicken broth 1. Adjust the oven racks to the lowest level of the oven. Preheat oven to 500°F. 2. Pull the package containing the neck and giblets out of the neck and interior rear cavity of the turkey (neck cavity may be covered with a flap of skin). Set the liver, heart and giblets aside to use for the gravy. Reserve the turkey neck to use with the aromatics for the basting broth. 3. Rinse the turkey with cold water inside and out. Dry the turkey skin with food-safe paper towels. The turkey will not brown if the skin is still wet. The turkey probably will have the legs trussed in a metal or plastic clamp. Release the legs from the clamp and discard the truss. This will allow the dark meat on the legs to cook faster. 4. Rub the turkey inside and out with the canola oil. Sprinkle turkey all over, inside and out with the poultry seasoning, salt and pepper. 5. Fill the turkey with half of the aromatics — chopped onions, carrots, apples and herbs. Place the turkey neck and the rest of the aromatics in the bottom of the roasting pan with the water or chicken broth. 6. Place a sheet of aluminum foil on a roasting rack and place it inside of a roasting pan. Using the tip of

Traditional desserts add a fitting finish to Thanksgiving feasts (NAPSA) — One thing most people are thankful for each Thanksgiving is a variety of desserts including pumpkin and pecan pies. Pumpkin pie dates back to at least 1621, when Native Americans introduced the crop to the early American settlers of Plymouth. Hollowed-out shells were probably mixed with milk, honey and spices and then baked in hot ashes, as the early colonists did not have ovens. Tradition says the French were introduced to pecans by Native Americans and invented pecan pie soon after settling in New Orleans, but no recipes have been found that date before 1925. Karo knows from its history that the popular corn syrup version of pecan pie was a 1930s “discovery.” Karo syrup has long been an essential ingredient in classic pecan and pumpkin pies. Typically, light corn syrup is used when a delicately sweet flavor is desired, such as in fruit sauces and jams. With its more robust flavor and color, dark Karo syrup is ideal for many baked goods. Karo corn syrups used in baking contain 0 grams of high-fructose corn syrup. Both varieties are gluten-free. Here are two crowd-pleasing recipes for your Thanksgiving feast:

Classic Karo Pumpkin Pie with Cinnamon and Spiced Whipped Cream Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 55 to 65 minutes Cool time: 2 hours Yield: 8 servings Classic Pumpkin Pie: 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

2 eggs 1/2 cup Karo Dark (preferred) or Light Corn Syrup 1 can (15 or 16 ounces) pumpkin 1 can (12 fluid ounces) evaporated milk 1 (9- to 9.5-inch) unbaked deep-dish piecrust Spiced Whipped Cream: 1 cup whipping cream 2 tablespoons brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon Dash ground nutmeg Preheat oven to 425° F. For pie: Mix sugar, salt, cinnamon, ginger and cloves together in a large bowl. Add eggs and beat slightly. Add corn syrup, pumpkin and evaporated milk; blend well. Pour filling carefully into piecrust. Do not overfill crust. The amount of filling prepared may exceed the capacity of a 9-inch piecrust. Bake for 15 minutes; reduce oven temperature to 350° F and continue baking for 40 to 50 minutes, or until knife inserted in center of pie comes out clean. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours before serving. For whipped cream: Pour cream into medium-sized bowl. Beat cream 3 to 4 minutes until soft peaks begin to form. Gradually add brown sugar, being careful not to overbeat. Fold in vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg.

stock.xchg photo a knife, poke 20 to 30 holes in the foil. Place the turkey, breast-side down, on the foil-covered rack. Roast for 30 minutes (set the timer on the oven to prevent overcooking). 7. Turn the temperature down to 325 F. Turn the turkey breast-side up and tuck wing tips underneath the bird. Baste, inside and out, with the melted butter and the juices that have collected in the bottom of the roasting pan. 8. Roast for 1 1/2 hours for a 12-pound turkey (a 14- to 16-pound bird will require 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add an extra 15 minutes per pound for larger birds). Roast the turkey until the meat at the thigh (when the thermometer is inserted without touching the bone), the thickest part of the wing and the meat at the breast registers 165°F. At this temperature, juices should be clear, not reddish pink, when thigh muscle is pierced deeply. 9. Cover the turkey breast loosely with a sheet of aluminum foil, creased in the middle to make a tent, to keep the turkey warm without steaming the crispy skin. Let the turkey rest for at least 30 minutes before carving. (c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc. 1 1/2 cups (6 ounces) pecans 1 (9-inch) unbaked or frozen* deep-dish piecrust Preheat oven to 350° F. Mix corn syrup, eggs, sugar, butter and vanilla using a spoon. Stir in pecans. Pour filling into piecrust. Bake on center rack of oven for 60 to 70 minutes (see tips for doneness, below). Cool for 2 hours on wire rack before serving. *To use prepared frozen piecrust: Place cookie sheet in oven and preheat oven as directed. Pour filling into frozen crust and bake on preheated cookie sheet. Recipe Tips: Pie is done when center reaches 200° F. Tap center surface of pie lightly-it should spring back when done. For easy cleanup, spray pie pan with cooking spray before placing piecrust in pan. If piecrust is overbrowning, cover edges with foil. For more recipes and information, visit www.karosyrup.com.

Last week’s Sudoku Solution

Classic Pecan Pie Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 60 to 70 minutes Chill time: 2 hours Yield: 8 servings 1 cup Karo Light or Dark Corn Syrup 3 eggs 1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Puzzles will be back next week.


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Page 31 - Section A • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

VIRGINIA


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section A - Page 32


Midatlantic

Country Folks has partnered with the New York State Corn and Soybean Growers Association to publish the winter edition of the Association's newsletter, The NY Crop Grower. This will be a special insert to the DECEMBER 26th edition of Country Folks East and West. It will also be mailed to all of the members of the association and to prospective members. Extra copies will be going to the Annual Corn & Soybean Expo in Syracuse, January 2012, and also to the New York Farm Show in February.

THE DEADLINE TO ADVERTISE IN THE WINTER EDITION OF THE NY CROP GROWER IS DECEMBER 9TH If you sell harvesting equipment, grain drying equipment, grain storage, seed or provide custom harvesting you need to be in this issue!

To place an ad or to inquire about advertising opportunities in this or future issues please contact your Country Folks sales rep or contact Jan Andrews at jandrews@leepub.com or at 1-800-218-5586 ext 110

got holidays? Issued Nov. 11, 2011 Cash dairy markets were the center of attention the second week of November as only two dairy industry-watched USDA reports were released. The spot block cheese price closed Friday, Veteran’s Day, at $1.95 per pound, up 7 cents on the week, and 54 cents above a year ago when they lost 7 cents. Barrel closed at $1.98, up 6 on the week, and 61 cents above a year ago. Seven cars of block traded hands on the week and none of barrel. The NASS-surveyed U.S. average block price hit $1.7255, up 0.3 cent. Barrel averaged $1.7588, up 1.8 cents. FC Stone’s November 4 Dairy Insider reports that cheese market participants “continue to question whether current price levels are fundamentally supported.” Broker Yanna Zalukina said; “We are not hearing that a substantial amount of cheese is mov-

Section B

ing for the holidays.” “And with Oceania cheddar prices 35 cents below CME spot prices, it doesn’t appear current price levels are sustainable.” Analyst Jerry Dryer wrote in his November 4 Dairy and Food Market Analyst; that “Much delayed (holiday) orders for items like pepper Jack and Colby-Jack cheese have shifted milk from barrels to blocks. He quickly adds, “Most observers remain convinced that this is a short-term price phenomenon. Class III futures are also very skeptical of the cheese prices’ staying power.” He pointed out that his “limited survey of cheese heads” found estimates ranging from $1.35-$1.55 per pound when asked what the cheese price would be by late December. Stewart Peterson dairy advisor, Matt Mattke said in Tuesday’s DairyLine broadcast that, “the seasonal potential that cheese prices will stay strong, bows well for November milk prices.” Seasonality and correcting for an oversold condition is affecting the market right now, according to Mattke. “The one good thing that has happened this year that is a bit out of the norm is that we had cheese prices finish up about 9 cents for the month of October and that’s pretty rare,” Mattke said. “When you look back over the past 14 years, there’s only been four times prior to that where October has been an up month for cheese.” October is one of the more consistent weaker months for cash prices, he said. Moving on from there, he points out that cheese prices this time of the year tend to be, on average, the strongest weeks of the year and credits end user buying for Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years and Super Bowl. Weekly cheese invento-

ries have fallen seven out of the last 10 weeks, Mattke reported, to where they’re about 2 percent lower than where they were a year ago “so it’s falling inventory and seasonality that’s taken over the market.” The cash butter price fell to $1.74, down 9 1/4-cents on the week and 25 cents below a year ago when it had recaptured 11 cents after plunging 30 1/2-cents the week before. Eight cars were sold on the Veteran’s Day week. NASS butter averaged $1.8393, up a penny. Holiday butter orders are also being filled but Jerry Dryer warns that “manufacturers are looking over their shoulders at expensive inventories and big production numbers.” Orders are good, he reports, and holiday promotions are building, but prices are well above a year-ago and “the big question is how much butter will actually cross the scanner at retail?” He speculates that the CWT program may assist in exporting butter next year but CWT’s own existence may be in question as to whether it has the required 70 percent participation of the nation’s milk supply. We may not have the answers until National Milk’s November 14 annual meeting. Bill Van Dam, of the Alliance of Western Milk Producers, cautioned in his member newsletter that the scary part of the butter equation is the falling value of anhydrous butter oil in Fonterra’s Global Dairy Auction. He warned that the butterfat corrected price works out to butter values of $1.21. “However, domestic and export sales have for quite some time now been robust enough to clear an ever growing output of butter but as we repeatedly learn there is always a price adjustment necessary to keep the volumes moving. This appears to be the case with butter and we can expect a continuing seasonal downward adjustment in prices. Holiday sales could sur-

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Page 1 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Country y Folks


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 2

Mielke from B1 prise us if special promotions provide a boost and can keep prices fairly high for now,” he said. Butter prices in Europe and Oceania are slipping downward, Van Dam reports, but not at a very rapid rate. Inventories are higher than the past year but are not at a level that will be a burden on the market. “It seems the butter market fundamentals are still OK but the proper clearing price will need to be found.” California butter production was up 15.5 percent in September (up 18.8 percent in August). “Our state produces more that 1.5 million pounds of butter every day. That’s 33 full truckloads of butter every day, he concluded, “The size of this business always amazes me.” Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk inched a halfcent higher, to $1.4350. Extra Grade dropped a dime, to $1.48. NASS powder averaged $1.4723, down a penny and a half, and dry whey averaged 63.22 cents, up 0.8 cent. National Milk’s Roger Cryan writes in his latest market report that milk production growth will slow through fall but will continue to grow faster than domestic consumption. He also said that higher dairy cow slaughter hasn’t stopped expansion in the dairy herd, pointing out that the increased use of sexsorted semen has meant an increase in the replacement heifer supply. A study at the University of Florida showed about 1.8 million straws of sexed semen were used in 2009, producing an additional 300,000 heifer calves. Two years later, nearly all of these have grown into additional replacement cows, the study showed. Meanwhile; the Agriculture Department did not change its 2011 0r 2012 milk production forecasts in this month’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report. Production for 2011 is expected to hit 195.9 billion pounds, up from 192.8 billion in 2010 and 2012 output remains projected at 198.4 billion. 2011 commercial exports were forecast higher. Fat and skimsolids ending stocks were lowered. Cheese, butter, and whey prices were forecast higher for both

2011 and 2012, but the nonfat dry milk (NDM) price forecast was reduced for 2011 and unchanged for 2012. Class III milk prices were raised for 2011 and 2012 on the increased price forecast for cheese and whey. Look for the 2011 Class III average to range $18.30-$18.40 per hundredweight, up 15 cents from last month’s projection. The 2012 range is now put at $16.70-$17.60, up 40 cents from last month’s

estimate. The Class III averaged $14.41 in 2010 and $11.36 in 2009. The Class IV price forecast was unchanged for 2011 as the higher butter price is mostly offset by a lower NDM price forecast. However, for 2012 with an unchanged NDM price forecast, the Class IV price forecast was raised due to higher butter prices. Look for the 2011 Class IV price to range $19.05-$19.25, up from $15.09 in 2010 and $10.89 in 2009. The 2012

range was put at $16.40$17.40, up a dime from last month’s estimate. The all milk price was forecast at $20.10-$20.20 for 2011, and $18.05$18.95 for 2012. USDA’s November Crop Production report lowered 2011 corn and soybean harvest expectations slightly, but the WASDE report forecast season-average soybean prices would be lower. Corn production was forecast at 12.3 billion bushels, down 1 percent

from the October forecast and down 1 percent from 2010. If realized, this will be the fourth-largest U.S. production total on record, according to Dairy Profit Weekly. Based on conditions as of November 1, yields are expected to average 146.7 bushels per acre, down 1.4 bushels from the October forecast and down 6.1 bushels from 2010. If realized, this will be the lowest average yield since 2003. Area harvested for corn grain

is forecast at 83.9 million acres, unchanged from the October forecast, but up 3 percent from the previous year. If realized, area harvested for grain will be the second highest on record since 1944, said DPW, behind only the 86.5 million acres harvested in 2007. The U.S. season-average farm price for corn is unchanged at $6.207.20 per bushel. Soybean production is fore-

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cast at 3.05 billion bushels, down slightly from the October forecast and down 9 percent from last year. Based on

November 1 conditions, yields are expected to average 41.3 bushels per acre, down 0.2 bushel from last month and

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down 2.2 bushels from last year. If realized, the average yield will be the second lowest since 2003. Area for harvest is forecast at 73.7 million acres, unchanged from October but down 4 percent from 2010. Harvested area, if realized, will be the sixth largest ever. The U.S. season-average soybean price range is projected at $11.60$13.60 per bushel, down 55 cents on both ends of the range. The soybean meal price is projected at $310-$340 per short ton, down $25 on both ends of the range. USDA lowered its cottonseed estimate by about 100,000 tons, to 5.47 million. That’s down about 628,000 tons from 2010. Drought conditions in many of the cotton growing areas

have negatively impacted this year’s crop. The November crop report did not update dry hay production estimates, according to DPW. USDA also reports that disruptions in processing and consumption were noted in the Northeast the week of October 31 as heavy snow caused branches and power lines to break, leaving many consumers without power for extended periods. Manufacturing in the region was heavier as a result. Milk intakes are near annual low levels in the Northeast, Upper Midwest, and Pacific Northwest. California intakes are both higher and lower and above year ago levels. Receipts are higher in Florida, Utah and Idaho. Bottlers were in-

creasing production of eggnog as well as specialties for holiday consumption such as sour cream, dips, and whipping cream, reducing manufacturing milk supplies in those areas. Cream interest was also improved from most non-ice cream manufacturers as a result. Looking “back to the futures,” the average for the first six months of 2012 stood at $16.63 on November 4 and was right around $16.67 at our deadline on November 11. California’s December Class I milk price is $20.67 per cwt. for the north and $20.94 for the south, up 41 cents and 40 cents respectively from November but $2.39 above December 2010. The Northern price averaged $20.68 in 2011, up from $16.97 a year ago. The southern price averaged $20.95, up from $17.24 in 2010. The Federal order Class I base price is announced November 18 by USDA.

The Cooperatives Working Together program accepted 12 requests for export assistance this week from Dairy Farmers of America, Darigold, Foremost Farms, and United Dairymen of Arizona to sell a total of 2.1 million pounds of cheese to customers in Asia and the Middle East. The product will be delivered through May 2012 and raises CWT 2011 cheese exports to 81 million pounds. The Risk Management Agency announced that the next sales date for the Livestock Gross Margin program is November 18, 2011. Approximately $7 million in underwriting capacity was allocated to support LGM for Dairy Cattle for the November 18 sales period. This will bring the total to approximately $13.2 million for fiscal year 2012. Sales will begin no earlier than 4:30p.m. CST. For complete information log on to http://future.aae.wisc.e du/lgm_dairy.html.

FOR SALE 1998 International Towmaster on a 4700 Air Ride Chassis with a DT466, 275HP Engine, 6 Spd. Allison Automatic Transmission, Good Paint with a Perfect Interior and Air Seats, Nearly New Michelin Tires, Air Brakes, 25,000 Lb. 5th Wheel Hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. Phone Fort Plain, NY 518-993-2618

Cloverdale Stationary Vertical TMR Mixers Mixing hay into the ration with the least amount of moving parts is it’s specialty! Built in Curtiss, Wisconson, Heart of Dairy Country

More than a house, a wonderful way of life. 3.5 acres, Kitchen with built in Dishwasher, Stove, Refrigerator/Freezer, Ample Cupboards and Work Island. Dining Area - Living Room adjacent to Den, 3 Bedrooms with 3 Baths. Large, Glassed Sunroom, Outside Deck, Insulated Barn with concrete floor. Oil Hot Water Baseboard Heat. You owe it to yourself to come and take a look. Owner will carry mortgage for qualified buyer with down payment. Otsego Lake Privilege.

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Mixer includes Small footprint to replace 21 Inch Tungsten Knives for two 10HP motors any stationary mixer! fast hay processing • 175 to 395 Cubic Foot Models Available • Weightronix Weigh System • Tempered Steel Construction to endure heavy use • Quality, warranted planetary drive w/limited moving parts • Simple and easy to maintain • Specialized in feeding livestock • Factory authorized sales and service • Trade-in equipment welcomed

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Page 3 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

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GE Electrac E20, new batteries, paint, 42” mower, $1,200; Massey Harris Pony with field cultivator, new tires, wheel weights, $1,600. 518-587-1755.(NY)

MINIATURE HORSES, friendly, 6 to 8 months old. Black colts w/baldes, $200. Chocolate, filly, $300. Stanley,NY 585-5264736.

NEW IDEA 708 diesel, 4wd, 3,000 hr., 717 combine, 713s flex head, 844N 4 row corn head, field ready, nice 315-536-0798.(NY)

BOB SLEIGH, seats 18 adults, excellent condition, $1,600, Percheron gelding, 9 years old, rides, drives, kid broke, black, $1,500. 716-542-2314.(NY)

HAY FOR SALE: Small squares. Ph: 716640-5550.(NY) JOHN DEERE snow plow, #82, fits John Deere 3020 narrow front $700; John Deere 3 pt. back blade, #80, $400. 845-7781916.(NY) MISC. “I” beams, Farmall “M” with loader, misc. older Farmall & Allis Tractor parts, combine & plow parts, balers. 607-7948380, NY SHAVINGS, White pine kiln dried, 3.25 cu. ft., good quality, 529 Klock Road, Fort Plain, 13339. 518-568-3203.(NY) NEW Belting Skid loader wheels for sale, 11” by 34”, pad type, $2,100. 315-5360512.(NY)

BELGIAN Geld. 20 yrs old, broke the best, single, double, rides good for kids, $3,500. Call after 6 pm 607-692-7088.(NY)

NEW IDEA one row corn picker, $850 BO. Flat rack wagon and gear, 3 pt. hay rake, 4x4 round bales 716-652-9482.(NY)

(2) Black Percherons, Mare, gelding 5 & 15 years old, 17+ hands, 7 yr. old gelding, chestnut, 16 h, drives. 315-963-7103.(NY)

FOR SALE: Belgian Mare, broke to all farm machinery, $1,000. Levi Y Stoltzfus, 3749 O’Brien Road, Lowville, New York 13367

FIVE MONTH OLD Jersey heifer calf, call for more information. 518-239-6867.(NY)

9 yr old Percheron gelding, broke to drive double, $450. John U. Hershberger, 440 McIlwee Road, Heuvelton, NY 13654

ALPACA females, registered, good lines, excellent fiber, $500 each, males $200, selling out. 716-692-8828.(NY)

BOER GOAT does, $100 each, Buck doelings, also very tame and great pets; Also two boer Nubian cross. 585-721-6376.(NY)

FOR SALE: 2 Border Collie Mixed pups, ready to go, 2 moles. Sammy S Hershberger, 365 Steuben Road, Poland, NY, 13431

(4) HEREFORD steers, (1) Heifer, 600 700 pounds, feed grain and alfalfa hay summer and fall , people friendly, market price. 607687-4679.(NY)

(5) HEREFORD cows, bred for April, used to stanchen barn, for winter $650 each; Reduing her to new barn, evenings 607656-4568.(NY)

HAUL MARK enclosed trailer 10’x5’-10”, excellent shape, kept inside during winter, leave message, Albany Area. 518-6646632.(NY)

3 poultry layer cages, roll out front stackable, used 5 months, clean and complete, $180. 585-765-2606.(NY)

WOOD STOVE, Vermont Castings, Resolute with Warming Shelves, excellent condition, $500. 518-842-6875 after 5:00 pm.(NY)

FOR SALE: INT. snow blower, 3 pth 7 sect, good condition, $1,000 or best offer. 315865-8012.(NY) REG. RWDCA HFA spring and summer calves. Buy now, show next year! Sires include Durable, Lawn Boy, Caruso. $500 each. 413-624-3012.(MA) IH 600 Blower, $850; Single seat buggy, $2,500 OBO; Schuler CM 175 mixer for parts or repair, $1,000. 315-536-0094.(NY) IH 400 cyclo air, 4 row planter, good shape, field ready, $1,500 OBO; Surge 25 Kw generator, $2,200 OBO. 518-8487035.(NY)

1 TON livestock truck, older GMC, good condition, and good box, Rubber 90%, 4 speed, call for details. 607-546-4055.(NY)

ALLIS CHALMERS 7000 runs good, looks good, cab, good tires, 100 horsepower, good solid tractor, $8,000; Also, 16.9/30 tires, $100. 315-858-2847.(NY)

FOR SALE: Beagle puppies, tri colored, $200 each. 315-363-0262.(NY)

NYC Railroad wrenches and spike hammers and other railroad items; Plus, some farm related items. 315-376-6386.(NNY)

NEW IDEA 51’ hay grain conveyor, electric motor, good condition, $1,400; Badger barn cleaner unit, good, $225, please message.(NY)

WANTED: A couple of week old beef cross calves within 100 miles of eastern CT. Leave message. 860-564-5908.(CT)

HOLSTEIN JERSEY CROSS cow, dried off. Due January 2012 with second calf, $1,000 firm. 585-658-2897.(NY)

WANTED: Model A Ford Coupe, unrestored or restored, preferably unrestored original. If no answer, please leave message. 716-572-9102.(NY)

WANTED: Dog kennel on legs with wire caged run. 315-536-7964.(NY)

499 NH Haybine, 12’ center pivot, good condition, $3,400. NH 256 rakes with double rake hitch, $3,150 OBO. No Sunday Calls. 607-243-7951.(NY) WANTED: Feeder wagon in good condition. 518-762-1354(NY)

1996 Ford LTS 9000 road tractor, 3406E Cat 10 spd, 40,000 rears, new tires, runs great, very good condition. 585-7376116.(NY)

RARE Moline collection includes 5-star, u’s, Z’s, and more. Ford 2000, Case VAS with cultivators, Massey Harris Pony, full restored. 518-922-6301.(NY)

ALPINE buck, registered, born 2009, proven for breeding, $150. 607-6527973.(NY)

JOHN DEERE “M” estate tractor with original Hendersen loader, with bucket and 60” blade, ex. cond, always under cover, $3,995. 401-662-9131.(RI)

Snap-On Duals, 20.8-38; $1,500; New Holland 1069 bale wagon, Mack tandem silage grain truck, VG, 30’ skeleton elevator, $650. 315-364-7936.(NY)

TROJAN Model 134 Payloader with backhoe, $4,000; Two Farmall cubs $1,200 each; JD Model 60 3 pth, new rear tires, $3,000. 315-427-2273.(NY)

ROPS W/ Canopy off Ford Tractor, rear tires 14-9-24, 8 bolt, 2 front tires on rims 750-18LT 6 bolt, $300 315-585-6376.(NY)

1200 lbs. Red Limousin bulls for sale, delivery available, two available, one black Limousin bull, 800 lbs., $1,800 you choose. 315-796-4374.(NY)

NI 314 corn sheller unit for 324 or 325 picker, ex. cond., $2,000 OBO. 814-5462033.(PA)

GIVE THE Unique Christmas gift that keeps on giving all year long. Easy to care for male alpacas, $300 each. 315-8231605.(NY)

2 YEAR OLD Quarter horse/Paint colt brown and white, nice markings, $100. 10 year old Appaloosa Mare, $100. 315-6512265.(NY)

WANTED: RECUTTER screen with slots for New Holland 790 harvester. 518-8598085.(NY)

KUHN 6002 twin rotary rake, $8,500. 315536-8183.(NY)

GOLDEN RETRIEVER pups, AKC, vet checked; Also, Bush Hog small garden tractor, collectors item. 3 pt. tiller, plow, front mount 585-554-6219.(NY)

CERTIFIED ORGANIC Piglets for sale, Tamworth X Berkshire, well grown, $100. 20-30 available. Plainfield, VT. 802-4548614.(VT)

FEEDER PIGS, $50 or less. Also, 8” pipe, saw dust blower, $80. Reuben Hershberger, 2442 CR 2, Richland, NY 13144

FOR SALE: Plydome calf warmer. Surge Alamo 200+ vacuum pump. 413-5284150.(MA)

HARVESTORE Hercules high moisture shelled corn unloader, 20’ $750. 18’ x 6” shelled corn elevator, $200; Roller mill, needs TLC, $200. 603-787-2396.(NH)

72” 3 pth McKee Bros. Snowblower, dual auger, 2 stage, requires 1000 rpm pto. 518-734-3198.(NY)

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November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 4

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by Dr. Dan Eversole, Dept. of Animal and Poultry Sciences Despite the cold, inclement weather, the 2011 Livestock Merchandising Class at Virginia Tech entertained a standing-room-only crowd of over 600 supporters and friends in the Livestock Judging Pavilion at the 17th Annual Hokie Harvest Sale on Oct. 28. As many of you know, the Hokie Harvest Sale has developed a significant reputation for selling high quality, university-owned livestock. Since 1995, which was the inaugural year of the Hokie Harvest Sale, there have been 1,160 students enrolled in this merchandising class and a grand total of 362 horses, 46 pigs, and 728 head of beef cattle have been offered at public auction, totaling $1,921,042 in gross revenue. This year’s sale grossed $97,275 and featured 44 lots of purebred and commercial beef cattle and five bred gilts. Since the equine warm-blood program moved to the Middleburg Agricultural Research and Extension Center in December 2009, there were no horses offered in the 2011 student-run sale. There were 171 registered buyers from New York, Illinois, Tennessee, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia, who attended the sale which was broadcasted live over the Internet by Aaron Ray Tompkins, Cowbuyer LLC of Mt. Airy, NC. The beef cattle sale featured 13 head of commercial bred cows and 41 animals representing three different purebred breeds — Angus, Hereford, and Simmental.

There were 10 spring-calving pairs in the cow/calf division, which averaged $3,420. Lot 4 was the sale topper at $4,400. This 4-year-old Angus cow is a daughter of SAF Strategy and ranks in the top 10 percent among current dams for $B at $58.88. She has recorded progeny ratios of IMF @ 105, REA @ 103, and YWR @ 103. Both she and her phenomenal January heifer calf sired by GAR Progress sold to Mike and Tim Wells of Rocky Mount, VA for $2,200 each. In the Hereford division of four cow/calf pairs and two breeding-age bulls, Lot 26 commanded the highest bid at $3,100. This stout, yearling bull, sired by SHF Rib Eye M326 R117, ranks in the top 10 percent for BW and the elite 3 percent for CHB$. Both springcalving cow/calf pairs were maternal half-sisters sired by Gerber Watchfire 117F and each pair sold for $3,000. Lot 15 was the top-selling lot in the Simmental breed. Round Meadow Farm from Meadows of Dan, VA, purchased the SimAngus cow by G 13 Structure at $1,900 and her January Simmental bull calf sired by SVF/NJC Built Right N48 sold to ACE Livestock, Allison and Andrew Echols of Gap Mills, WV, for $1,550. The breeding-age bull division of 10 yearling bulls was topped by Lot 21 at $3,100. This Angus yearling bull is sired by SS Objective T510 0T26 and out of a daughter of TC Total 410 and our featured donor cow, HHF Alli Rita

Strong B8

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January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

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• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO EXHIBIT AT OR ATTEND ANY OF THESE SHOWS

CALL 800-218-5586 www.leetradeshows.com • mwhite@leepub.com

Page 5 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Strong support at the 2011 Hokie Harvest Sale


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November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 8

2011 harvest wraps up; many crops took a beating from Mother Nature As harvest winds down, many producers may want to examine the condition of their crops after a whirlwind of weather conditions across the United States. Hurricanes and drought have done the most damage with Irene leaving more than just floodwater standing in fields in the Northeast. Reports from Pennsylvania showed that as the plants bent over and touched the soil, plants and grains had a direct contamination with various molds and yeasts present in the soil. This is particularly true for no-till lands as there was an abundance of molds on the previousyear plant debris. Molds and yeasts can multiply at an alarming rate once

the corn silage is made, leading to aerobic instability in the bunk and the later effects of moldy silage syndrome. The North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture made a statement encouraging farmers to have their corn tested after the hurricane. Corn and forage yields are down and silage is lower quality due to the drought in the Southwest. Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and New Mexico were hit the hardest with high temperatures and extreme conditions. Quality issues, like mycotoxins in this fall’s crop, will mean a lot of testing and will require a close eye on toxin levels in order to prevent milk from being infected.

Strong from B5 704 317. This popular herd-sire prospect ranks in the elite 1 percent of non-parent sires for WW and YW EPD, top 2 percent for $F, and upper 4% for $B. Wilson Cattle Company of Abingdon, VA, is the new owner. The 13 lots of young, commercial cows, mostly Angus or SimAngus breeding, drew considerable interest among cattlemen and averaged $1,511. Moreover, five pregnant gilts were sold via live auction and grossed $2,075. The 69 students did a superb job of preparing for the sale. They gained hands-on experience in sale management, budgeting, cataloging, advertising, livestock photography, clerking, and health requirements. Special thanks are extended to Col. Ken Brubaker of Brubaker Sales and Marketing, Harrisonburg, VA, for serving as the sale consultant and auctioneer. Students Will Fiske, Greenville, VA; Haydon Garland, Callao, VA; Evan

Jeuck, Dublin, VA, served as bid-takers for the sale while Daniel Fleishman, Dayton, VA, worked the ring. Alyssa Elliott, Harrisonburg, VA, served as the student clerk in the block. The Food and Beverage Committee, with assistance from the Block and Bridle Club in the Department of Animal and Poultry Sciences, served a complimentary BBQ dinner to nearly 600 guests. Their support and cooperation are greatly appreciated. Interest in the Hokie Harvest Sale continues to be overwhelming in favor of hosting future student-run livestock sales. However, purebred animal inventory numbers have dwindled in recent years which make it difficult to continually offer quality livestock at public auction. We are hopeful to host the 18th Annual Hokie Harvest Sale on Friday, October 26, 2012. Source: Livestock Update, Novemeber 2011

Farmers in other parts of the U.S. also had their crops affected by dramatic changing weather patterns: • Hot, dry temperatures in the Plains states have affected crops with aflatox-

in. This year the fungus is being seen in concentration levels far above common acceptance in Kansas.

Harvest B9

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-

FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: 90. Feeder Steers: 450-700# 110-126; 1 800# @ 108; Hols. 1114# @ 74. Feeder Heifers: 300400# 92-115, 1 @ 125; 400600# 92-107. Feeder Bulls: 300-400# 120-145; 400-600# 110-126. Dairy Replacements: 64. Springing Hfrs. 1475-1525; Springing Cows 1175-1250; Fresh Hfrs. to 1625; Fancy 1800-1925; Fresh Cows few 900-1000; Short bred Hfrs. M 775-900. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER

CATTLE: 671. Feeder Steers: 200-235# 147-161; 315-347# 150-159; 355-395# 127-158; 463485# 140-147; 515-549# 137.50-140; 553# 136; 625640# 125.50-133; 655-673# 122.50-128; 705-725# 120121.75; 752-770# 116121.75; S 1-2 220-230# 121-130; 250-265# 118-133; 365-395# 95-120. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 255-290# 120-130; 341343# 125-137; 369-390# 129-136.50; 410-444# 122132.75; 454-485# 119127.25; 525-543# 113.75117.75; 556-565# 110-118; 615-648# 111-115.75; 653# 112; 700-730# 99-110; 820-

830# 99; S 1-2 235-245# 105-114; 300-330# 99-105; 365-390# 106-125; 505520# 107-113; 568-585# 105-109; 620-635# 95-107; 650#98-103. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 418-445# 122-134.75; 450465# 131-134.50; 525-543# 118-126.25; 556-563# 122125.50; 615-620# 113-121; 652-658# 112; 705-722# 98.50-99; S 1-2 425-445# 94-114; 468-493# 100117.50; 530-545# 100-110; 575-585# 110-114; 610625# 93-114; 670# 88-98. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 880-895# 450-720/hd 4-6 mos bred; 905-1030# 650-750/hd 4-6 mos bred;

925-1150# 570-730/hd 4-6 mos bred; 1030-1100# 690720/hd 7-9 mos bred; 12151275# 790-940/hd 7-9 mos bred; S&M 1-2 Middle Aged 820-865# 610-660/hd 4-6 mos bred; S 1-2 Young 660670# 470-540/hd 4-6 mos. bred. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 1348 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 150-190# 130-150; 205245# 129-160; 250-295# 114-153; 300-345# 115-149; 350-395# 114-149; 400448# 110-147; 450-495# 115-141.50; 508-545# 125137; 550-585# 124-131; 600-640# 121-128; 654-

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Lee Publications, Country Folks Classified, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

680# 115-123; Small 1-2 225-230# 100-114; 255265# 94-112; 300-345# 99111; 350-395# 95-110; 400445# 90-106. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 185-190# 143-144; 215240# 120-137; 255-295# 115-135; 300-345# 115-125; 350-395# 110-134; 400448# 110-132; 450-495# 110-132; 500-545# 110126; 550-595# 110-125; 600-640# 100-116; 650695# 100-108; 700-730# 95104; S 1-2 250-295# 104110; 300-345# 92-105; 355395# 94-107; 400-445# 90105; 460-485# 91-109; 500545# 95-108; 550-595# 95109; 600-645# 0-93. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-490# 115-140; 500546# 110-132; 550-595# 110-125; 600-640# 102125; 650-695# 101-113; 705-725# 100-108; 750790# 97-105; S 1-2 450490# 93-113; 500-540# 93108; 550-595# 90-106; 615630# 95-97; 665-685# 9097.

BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 165. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 135.50; 500-600# 111-128.50, mostly 116128.50; 600-700# 40132.50, mostly 132.50; 700800# 112; M&L 2 400-500# 107-139, mostly 139; 500600# 101-130, mostly 130; 700-800# 95; M&L 3 300400# 122; 400-500# 124.50; 500-600# 95-113; 600-700# 109; S 1 400-500# 117; 600700# 109. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 115-123.50; 500600# 115-116; 600-700# 95; M&L 2 300-400# 120-125; 400-500# 90-126, mostly 126; 500-600# 113; 600700# 104; 700-800# 99; M&L 3 400-500# 111; 500600# 114; S 1 300-400# 109; 400-500# 104; 500600# 105; 600-700# 86-90. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 90-125, mostly 125; 500-600# 102-125, mostly 123.50; 600-700# 94114, mostly 114; 700-800# 103; 800-900# 78-80; M&L 2 400-500# 111-136, mostly

Harvest from B8 • According to the Montana field office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Montana producers are finishing up this season’s spring wheat harvest, which has progressed to 94 percent complete with continued reports of drought and grasshopper damage. • Some North Dakota and Minnesota producers saw an early end to their corn growing season after a September frost. According to University of Minnesota Extension, corn is killed when temperatures are near 32 degrees Farenheit for a few hours and near 28 Farenheit for a few minutes. Frost damage to corn reduces grain and silage yields, grain test weight and silage quality. Corn that is severely damaged by frost often has kernels that are more susceptible to cracking, grain that is less digestible, and silage that has less energy and more fiber than normal. With variable crop conditions across the states, many livestock producers now must come up with a plan to safely feed their herds. Mycotoxins, harmful toxins produced by molds, can create a variety of health problems for animals depending on species and type of toxins identified. In swine and equine, there is a higher sensi-

tivity to contaminated feed and feed avoidance is a common symptom of mycotoxicoses in these animals. Ruminant animals are often resistant due to microorganisms in the rumen that can degrade toxins before they enter the bloodstream. Harmful effects are observed however, in high producing dairy cows. Reduced milk production, impaired reproduction and immune suppression in cows are possible effects of mycotoxicoses. Producers can either choose not to handle contaminated feed or use an effective mycotoxin adsorbent. There are two types of adsorbents: silicabased polymers and carbon-based organic polymers. Silica-type materials are readily available and many have shown to be effective against aflatoxins, but ineffective against other types. A modified yeast cell wall extract that is a natural fiber source can often be used at practical levels of inclusion. Mycotoxins are a leading area of study at Alltech. Through 31 years of research-driven product development, Alltech has created a range of natural solutions for the feed and food industries. For more information, please visit the websites at www.alltech.com or www. knowmycotoxins.com.

Page 9 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

MARKET REPORTS


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 10

MARKET REPORTS 136; 500-600# 100-126, mostly 121.50-126; 600700# 94-113, mostly 113; 700-800# 85; S 1 300-400# 116-120; 500-600# 93-100. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 2918 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 200-300# 151-165; 300400# 129-150; 400-500# 124-165; 500-600# 122-148; 600-700# 124-137; 700800# 115-139.75; 800-900# 125-137.75; 900-1000# 125134; 1000-1100# 129; M&L 2 200-300# 141; 300-400# 126-141; 400-500# 120-144; 500-600# 110-125; 600700# 108-127; 800-900# 120-127; 900-1000# 110119; M&L 3 500-600# 114; 600-700# 102-117; S 1 200300# 135-138; 300-400# 110-129; 500-600# 90-116; 600-700# 89-118; 700-800# 110-117. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 88; 400500# 81; 500-600# 7784.50; 600-700# 73-79; 700800# 71-76. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 125-132; 400500# 105-138; 500-600# 110-137.50; 600-700# 104119.50; 700-800# 105-110; 800-900# 105-118; M&L 2 300-400# 106-122; 400500# 107-115; 500-600# 103-112; 600-700# 98-112; 800-900# 99; S 1 200-300# 107; 300-400# 91-108; 400500# 96-111; 500-600# 97100; 600-700# 94. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 124-158; 400500# 114-140; 500-600# 105-126; 600-700# 95-106; M&L 2 300-400# 130-157; 400-500# 116-122; 500600# 100-118; M&L 3 500600# 91; S 1 400-500# 94110; 500-600# 98-104; 600700# 91-100. SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1890. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 135-146; 300400# 146-153; 400-500# 135-149; 500-600# 131143.50; 600-700# 116132.50; 700-800# 115126.50; 800-900# 115; 900-1000# 100; M&L 2 200300# 133-163; 300-400# 133-162; 400-500# 100-150; 500-600# 100-139.50; 600700# 110-27.75; 700-800# 115-124; 800-900# 115; 900-1000# 95. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 70-120; 300400# 80-120; 400-500# 68117; 500-600# 87-104; 600700# 71-89; 700-800# 7688; 800-900# 80-87; 9001000# 78-90.50; 10001100# 69-74.50; 1100# & up 70-83.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 100-139; 300400# 120-138; 400-500# 115-135; 500-600# 110-125; 600-700# 108.50-123.25; 700-800# 94-117.50; 800900# 85-90; M&L 2 200-

300# 112-125; 300-400# 122-142; 400-500# 113-130; 500-600# 99-121.50; 600700# 105-115; 700-800# 90109. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 150-163; 300400# 130-143; 400-500# 120-152; 500-600# 116-152; 600-700# 105-126; 700800# 80-94.50; 800-900# 79; 900-1000# 75-76; M&L 2 200-300# 136-154.50; 300-400# 126-139; 400500# 100-139; 500-600# 100-27; 600-700# 90-116; 700-800# 70-85; 800-900# 79; 900-1000# 74.50-76. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 329. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 146-148; 500600# 128-138; 600-700# 120.50-134; 700-800# 124.50; 800-900# 121; M&L 2 400-500# 147-148; 500600# 130. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 124-128; 400500# 120-128.75; 500-600# 116-120.75; 600-700# 119.25-119.75; 700-800# 105.50; M&L 2 300-400# 125; 400-500# 125; 500600# 113.50-118; 600-700# 108-116.50; 700-800# 108. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 142-153; 400500# 138; 500-600# 120122.50; 600-700# 112-114; 700-800# 105; M&L 2 300400# 131-142; 400-500# 135; 500-600# 123; 600700# 109.50. LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1272. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 141-152; 500600# 124.50-138.50; 600700# 124.50-125; 700-800# 122-126.25; M&L 2 300400# 146.25; 400-500# 146147; 500-600# 122-139.25; 600-700# 120-124.75; 700800# 125-126; M&L 3 300400# 137.50; 400-500# 134138.75; 500-600# 128.75; 600-700# 120; 700-800# 116.50; S 1 300-400# 142.50; 400-500# 128-129; 500-600# 125.50; 600-700# 123.25; 700-800# 107. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 130; 400-500# 126.50-128.50; 500-600# 120.25; 600-700# 115.50117; 700-800# 114.50; M&L 2 300-400# 121-131.50; 400-500# 124-128.75; 500600# 118-120.25; 600-700# 117; 700-800# 114.50115.75; M&L 3 300-400# 119-128.50; 400-500# 116124; 500-600# 111-118.50; 600-700# 116-118; 700800# 105.50; S 1 300-400# 105-126.25, mostly 126.25; 400-500# 101-119.25, most-

ly 119.25; 500-600# 108112.25; 600-700# 110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 145.50; 400-500# 129.50-149, mostly 136; 500-600# 122-124; 600700# 115.75; M&L 2 300400# 145-149; 400-500# 133-151.50, mostly 135; 500-600# 126; 600-700# 117; S 1 300-400# 135; 400500# 125-127.50; 500-600# 120-124. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 30. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 500-600# 85-100; M&L 2 600-700# 85-89. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 126-132. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 411. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 139-146.50; 400500# 134-146.50; 500-600# 129-135; 600-700# 130135.50; 700-800# 118124.50; M&L 2 300-400# 138-145.50; 400-500# 130138.50; 500-600# 120-135; 600-700# 119-132. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 128; 400-500# 124-130; 500-600# 120.50122.50; 600-700# 108118.25; 700-800# 103-110; M&L 2 300-400# 127130.25; 400-500# 115127.75; 500-600# 120.50122.25; 600-700# 105-110; 700-800# 102. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 144-156; 400500# 133-156, mostly 156; 500-600# 125-126; 600700# 122; M&L 2 300-400# 150; 400-500# 133-135; 500-600# 122; 600-700# 114.

• Since 1964 • Specializing in Trade Publications, Trade Shows, Commercial Printing & Mailing Services

LEE PUBLICATIONS

Serving the agricultural, heavy construction, aggregates, solid waste, commercial horticulture and equine industries.

MARKET TO ANY OR ALL OF THESE INDUSTRIES WITH ONE CALL! Country Folks

Farm Weekly Newspapers - since 1972, serving fulltime farmers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic market areas. The number one agricultural publication in this market! Target your audience with 4 regional editions. Monthly Equine Publication covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations. Since 1979, serving heavy construction contractors, landscaping, aggregate producers and recyclers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic Markets every month. Qualified readership is guaranteed to get you results. Country Folks

Since 1990, serving the commercial greenhouses, vegetable and fruit growers, and nurseries in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Northwest market areas. Reach your target audience with this monthly publication that is by far the number one media for these industries.

GROWER W

Is our newest publication. Started in 2011 to serve an important and growing segment of horticulture, this newspaper is targeted at businesses active in commercial scale growing and winemaking in the United States. In addition to a six times a year mailing, a searchable version is available to our online readers.

ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 155. Feeder Steers: No prices available. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 500-600# 78-84.50. Feeder Heifers: No prices available. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 127; 400-500# 114-140; 500-600# 118-126.

WASTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT NEWS, since 1992, serving asphalt/concrete recyclers, composting facilities, construction demolition companies, wood waste recyclers and scrap metal recyclers with 2 monthly editions that cover the entire United States.

STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 900. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 151-165; 300400# 129-150; 400-500# 124-165, few 170; 500-600# 122-148, few 155; 600-700# 124-137; 700-800# 155139.75; 800-900# 125137.75; 900-1000# 125-134; 1000-1100# 129; M&L 2 200-300# 141; 300-400# 126-141; 400-500# 120144; 500-600# 110-125; 600-700# 108-127; 800900# 120-127; 900-1000# 110-119; M&L 3 500-600# 114; 600-700# 102-117; S 1 200-300# 135-138; 300400# 110-129; 500-600# 90116; 600-700# 89-118; 700800# 110-117. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 88; 400-

TRADE SHOWS

NORTH AMERICAN QUARRY NEWS since 1998, serving the quarry, sand & gravel, hot mix asphalt and ready mix concrete industries with one national edition. This is the fastest growing publication for these markets.

Lee Publications produces trade shows, both regionally and nationally for each of the markets listed above. Go to our website at www.leepub.com for more information or call 800-218-5586.

COMMERCIAL PRINTING

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info@leepub.com


by Cyndie Sirekis No matter where you live in America — in a rural area, on a farm or ranch, in the city or suburbs, or anywhere in between — it’s a fair bet that traditions will be a major part in your Thanksgiving celebration. Watching the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade ranks high on the list of “can’t miss it” traditions for a lot of people. Although home cooks may hate to admit it, long

hours in the kitchen preparing a holiday meal, even one as delectable as Thanksgiving dinner, can be lonely. Watching the parade’s fantastic floats, marching bands and warbling singers helps pass the time. Football is a time-honored Thanksgiving tradition for many sports lovers, whether that means tossing a pigskin on the front lawn for an hour or two before dinner or settling in to watch a

big game on TV. Hunting remains a popular pastime around Thanksgiving and interest is growing. A recent National Shooting Sports Foundation report revealed that 21.8 million Americans (most hailing from small towns and rural areas) went hunting at least one time in the past five years. That’s up from about 14 million a few years ago. Another NSSF study found that 83 percent of those surveyed

consider deer as their top priority; hunting upland game birds such as turkeys, quail, pheasants, doves and grouse is also popular. In the week leading up to and including Thanksgiving, supporters of National Farm-City Week will host celebrations with the goal of increasing understanding and forging lasting connections between the farmers who grow our nation’s food and those who con-

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation sume it. That tradition was started in 1955 and is still going strong. Eating turkey would likely rank high on the list of food-centric traditions for the holiday. A whopping 46 million birds will be cooked and eaten on Thanksgiving Day. Most will be oven-roasted, although some will be smoked or fried. In the South, Cajun fried turkey is a particular favorite.

Make Plans Now to Attend the EMPIRE STATE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE EXPO and DIRECT MARKETING CONFERENCE Oncenter • Syracuse, NY

January 24-25-26 2012 NEW FOR 2012 • Third Day Added • NYS Flower Industries

LIMITED BOOTH SPACE AVAILABLE CALL TODAY!! 800-218-5586 2012 SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE:

• Flower Production • Flower Marketing • Labor • Potatoes • Tree Fruit

• Tomatoes & Peppers • Cultural Controls • Direct Marketing • Pesticide Safety • Vine Crops • Leafy Greens • Cover Crops

• Soil Health • Reduce Tillage • Berry Crops • Cabbage • Cole Crops • Food Safety

• Onions • Garlic • Peas & Snap Beans • Greenhouse & Tunnels • Pesticide Safety • Sweet Corn

For trade show and exhibiting information, please contact Dan Wren, Lee Trade Shows, P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

800-218-5586 or e-mail dwren@leepub.com

For Registration Information go to https://nysvga.org/expo/register/ For Exhibitor Information go to www.leetradeshows.com The 2012 Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo is sponsored by:

• New York State Vegetable Growers Association • Empire State Potato Growers • New York State Berry Growers Association • New York State Farmers’ Direct Marketing Association • New York State Horticultural Society • Cornell University • Cornell Cooperative Extension • NYS Flower Industries

Enjoying other special foods that grace our tables only around the holidays (for the most part) is another highly anticipated tradition. Those of us looking forward to dishes such as cranberry salad with pecans, sweet potatoes with pecans or pecan pie, may have to pay a bit more for the nutty delights because a much smaller crop than usual was harvested. This year’s drought took a heavy toll in the top three pecan-producing states — Texas, New Mexico and Georgia. Finding out the average cost for a classic Thanksgiving dinner as calculated by the American Farm Bureau has been a tradition for many over the past 26 years. This year, our wallets will open a little wider to pay for the feast, as the average cost increased 13 percent to $49.20 for a meal for 10 that includes a 16-pound turkey and all the trimmings. Gathering with family and friends to celebrate and express thanks for blessings received is perhaps rightfully considered the most cherished tradition of Thanksgiving. Anything else is just icing on the cake. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours! Cyndie Sirekis is director of news services with the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Page 11 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Thanksgiving is all about traditions


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 12

Dairy farmers invited to tell their story PHILADELPHIA, PA — Dairy farmers and dairy advocates from the MidAtlantic region are invited to join the Telling Your Story program and attend a training workshop on Dec. 13 from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at The Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel in State College, PA. Telling Your Story is the dairy checkoff program to train and empower farmers to share the dairy story with consumers. Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association, Pennsylvania Dairy Promotion Program and Center for Dairy Excellence will jointly host the workshop to bring together dairy producers who share a common goal of

educating consumers about dairy farming and the commitment dairy farm families have to their animals, the land and their communities. Michele Payn-Knoper will open the program with an interactive discussion on “Championing Agriculture.” Payn-Knoper is a nationally known speaker and trainer who encourages her audience to have fun while developing skills in advocacy, social networking, leadership and community engagement. Known as a presenter who gets people out of their seats, she develops a recipe to hit the hot buttons of participants, providing the tools to implement what you learn.

Penn State student horseman headed for United Arab Emirates competition UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — During a time when most students are stressing over finals, Penn State junior Steven Hays will be heading to Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, for a once-ina-lifetime opportunity. On Dec. 10, Hays will have the honor of competing in the Young Rider World Endurance Championship as part of the United States team. “I’m so excited,” he said. “It’s definitely nerve-wracking, but it’s a big deal.” Riders, ages 14-21, were required to submit applications to compete. In choosing the team, a selection committee looked at the riders’ records, their horses’ records, how well and fast they’ve competed, and other criteria. The 21-year-old Port Matilda native is ranked second in the country among those who applied for the event in the Middle East. In addition to being a full-time student, the Environmental Resource Management major in the College of Agricultural Sciences has an impressive list of accomplishments, including two team gold medals as the 2010 and 2011 North American Champion and two individual bronze medals from the 2010 and 2011 North American Junior Young Riders Championships. He also placed eighth out of 79 riders in the Biltmore 50-mile event

in 2010, and fifth overall at the Biltmore 75-mile event in 2011. With the competition approaching, Hays is looking for sponsors and donations to cover the expenses of the trip while making sure his horse is in tip-top shape. “I’m just working on fine tuning now, preparing for the sandy conditions of Abu Dhabi. The climate difference will be the hardest part, especially in comparison to the December weather here.” Having competed at local and national levels for years, Hays hopes to keep pushing his boundaries. “It’s a cool way to step up into another level of competition,” he said. “My goal is to move up to international riding.” His passion for horses started at a young age. By the age of 6, Hays was riding and taking lessons. Over the next couple of years, he took part in local horse shows and events, but he became bored. When he was 12, Hays started to compete in trail riding and distance riding after hearing about it through a neighbor. His interest in trail riding eventually led to endurance riding on courses that are 50 to 75 miles long. “It’s pretty challenging, but I think it’s worth it,” he said. “Competing is my passion. To date, I have completed 2,850 miles of endurance riding.”

Following the keynote presentation will be a recognition luncheon and afternoon breakout sessions to focus on tools to better tell the dairy story to community groups and the news media and through social media. Reservations must be made by Nov. 28 by contacting Laurie Savage, dairy farmer speakers bureau scheduler, at 301349-0750 or dairyspeakerscheduler@gmail.com.

Follow Us On www.facebook.com/countryfolks Gett mid-weekk updatess andd onlinee classifieds, pluss linkss too otherr agriculturall organizations.


Representatives of BouMatic provide attendees with information on their products.

A view of the new loafing facility at the farm.

Advanced Composting’s Keith Warren, second from left, explains how the animal composting unit works.

A view of the milking parlor set up.

A picture perfect fall day greeted attendees to the Windcrest Holsteins Open House. The event was held Oct. 25 at the farm in Timberville, VA. There was a large contingent of interested folks there and they were treated to an informative day at the farm by Windcrest Holsteins’ owners and the many sponsors who helped put the event together. Windcrest Holsteins’ owners wish to express their gratitude to the sponsors of their successful open house and appreciation to all the attendees. The sponsors of the event were: Farmer Boy Ag, Farm Credit, C&C Farm Supply, BouMatic, New Wave Flooring, Alger Excavating, ESSRoc Redi Mix, Shank Doors, Ventec, Manada Construction, Red Barn Consulting, Fabral, Advanced Composting and Rob’s Hydraulics.

Farm owner David Yutzy, at right, speaks with two of the attendees.

Tanker trailers on the pad ready to be filled and shipped.

Rob’s Hydraulics of Greenville, NC, displayed a compost grinder, which is designed to speed up the decomposition process.

Mike Cline, owner of C&C Farm Supply, second from left, visits with attendees at the open house.

Bedding material is saved for reuse at the sand bedding reclamation area.

Page 13 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Windcrest Holsteins Open House, Timberville, VA, Oct. 25


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 14


TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1031. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 135; 300-400# 153; 400-500# 135-149; 500-600# 135-143.50; 600700# 116-132; 700-800# 125; M&L 2 200-300# 133; 300-400# 133; 400-500# 100-150; 500-600# 100-131; 600-700# 110-127.75. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 70; 300400# 106; 400-500# 68. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 100-126; 300-

400# 120-131; 400-500# 115-135; 500-600# 110-125; 600-700# 108.50-121; 700800# 117.50; 800-900# 85; M&L 2 200-300# 112-115; 300-400# 129; 400-500# 122-128; 500-600# 99-118; 600-700# 113-115; 700800# 90. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 151; 300-400# 130-143; 400-500# 120-152; 500-600# 120-152; 600700# 105-126; 700-800# 80; 800-900# 79; 900-1000# 7576; M&L 2 200-300# 136; 300-400# 136; 400-500# 100-125; 500-600# 100-125; 600-700# 90-101; 700-800# 70-72; 800-900# 79; 9001000# 74.50-76. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1334. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 131-153; 400500# 134.50-147.50; 500600# 119-147; 600-700# 114-128; 700-800# 119.50126.25; 800-900# 115120.50; 900-1000# 113.50; M&L 2 300-400# 129-135; 400-500# 114.50-138; 500600# 113-124; 600-700# 101-113; 700-800# 114-118; 800-900# 103-114.50; S 1 300-400# 110-122; 500600# 97-109; 600-700# 8491; 800-900# 91. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 1000-1100# 76.50; 1100# & up 70.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1

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Directions: Exit 77 I-81 & I-77, at the BCIA Test Station Sale Facility

150 Fall & Winter Calving cows 100+ with calves at side - All black and BWF - All coming 3rd and 4th calves - Bred to Hereford and Angus bulls. Good young sound cows with calves at side or heavy springer’s. The absolute Right Kind!! Sale for: Roxie Jones For more info contact: EDWIN WAGONER & ASSOCIATES P.O. Box 1333, Wytheville, VA 24382 (276) 768-8539 VAAR #3035 FOR PICTURES AND INFO VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWW.WAGONERAUCTIONS.COM

300-400# 110-128; 400500# 104-130; 500-600# 111-128; M&L 2 300-400# 110-118; 400-500# 91-108; S 1 300-400# 68-92. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 128-156; 300400# 142-158; 400-500# 120-153; 500-600# 120134.50; 600-700# 103-115; 700-800# 96.50-110; 800900# 97; M&L 2 200-300# 115-130; 300-400# 115-130; 400-500# 105-115; 500600# 109.50-118; 600-700# 92.50-106; 700-800# 88-97; 800-900# 82-90; S 1 200300# 108; 400-500# 99-114; 500-600# 105-111. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 446. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 146; 300-400# 146-151; 400-500# 137-147; 500-600# 131-135; 600700# 124.50-130; 700-800# 115-126.50; 800-900# 115; 900-1000# 100; M&L 2 200300# 150-162; 300-400# 150-162; 400-500# 137-142; 500-600# 135.50-138; 600700# 115-125.50; 700-800# 115; 800-900# 115; 9001000# 95. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 120; 300400# 80-120; 400-500# 110117; 500-600# 104; 600700# 71-88; 700-800# 88; 800-900# 80-87; 900-1000# 78-86; 1000-1100# 6974.50; 1100# & up 70. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 130-139; 300400# 137-138; 400-500# 120-130; 500-600# 113119.75; 600-700# 110-113; 700-800# 108.50; 800-900# 88-90; M&L 2 200-300# 125; 300-400# 138-142; 400500# 125-130; 500-600# 111-121.50; 600-700# 105113.25; 700-800# 109. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 150-163; 300400# 137.50-138; 400-500# 130-139; 500-600# 116120.50; 600-700# 108112.50; 700-800# 94.50; M&L 2 200-300# 153154.50; 300-400# 126-139; 400-500# 126-139; 500600# 110-121; 600-700# 116; 700-800# 85.

AUCTIONS SLAUGHTER CATTLE SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1435-1625# 62-68.50; 1510-1860# lo dress 54.50-60; Boner 8085% lean 920-1395# 61-69; 1135-1345# hi dress 71.5082.50; 920-1380# lo dress 50-60.50; Lean 85-90% lean 695-795# 51.50-57.50; 690-785# lo dress 35-44.50; 825-1130# 50.50-58; 8451240# lo dress 33-49.50. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 630-825# 56-64. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1065-1415# 74-82; 10351460# lo dress 60.50-70; 1545-2150# 73.50-82; 1505-1790# lo dress 64-68. Cows/Calf Pairs: 7. S 1-2 700-800# middle age cows w/100-200# calves 650750/pr; M 1-2 950-1100# middle age cows w/180200# calves 775-875/pr; L 12 1400-1450# middle age cows w/50-200# calves 825975/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 40-95. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: 9051385# 63-73; 915-1385# lo dress 55-62; 1400-1900# 65-72.50; Boner 80-85% lean 940-1370# 61-72; 1055-1375# lo dress 4659.50; 1405-1700# 64.5072.50; Lean 85-90% lean 655-790# lo dress 40-55; 815-1340# lo dress 4360.50. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 950-1100# 65-79; S&M 1-2 Young 835-870# 65.50-71; S 1-2 Young 645675# 77-80; S 1-2 Middle Aged 685-810# 53-65. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1155-1475# 70-78.50; 15852180# 75-82.50; 17051870# hi dress 84.50-87.50. Cows/Calf Pairs: 3. M 1-2 965-1187# middle age cows

w/185-250# 1100/pr.

calves

930-

SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 293. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 56.50-65; 1200-1600# 5865.50; HY 1200-1600# 66.50-75.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 56.50-66; 1200-2000# 57-67; HY 1200-2000# 65-68; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 4964.50; 850-1200# 54.50-64. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 71.50-82; 15002500# 68.50-91; HY 10001500# 82-86.50; 15002500# 95-96.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 22. M 1, 5-10 yrs. old, 915-1205# 600-760/hd; L 1, 5 yrs. old, 1200-1260# 860/hd; L 1, 310 yrs. old, 775-1285# 540910/hd. Cows w/Calves at side: 2. L 1, 5-12 yrs. old w/calves 250# 900-1090# 10901160/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 10. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 50/hd. HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 104. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 62-67.25, 1 @ 73; Boners 60-64, lo dress 57-60; Lean 55-60; thin/ligt 1900# @ 80.50. Fed Steers/Heifers: 33. Hi Ch & Pr 1250-1525# 121125; Ch 2-3 1150-1525# 118-120; L Ch 1500-1575# 112-114.50; L Ch Hols. 1500# @ 103. Holstein Bulls Ret. to Farm: No. 1 94-120# 140147; No. 2 94-120# 110-137; 90-92# 100-125; 80-88# 85100; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 94120# 150-170; Beef X Bulls No. 1 110-145; Bred Hfrs. No. 1 112# @ 105. Slaughter Calves: Gd 80-100# 40-50; L Ch 334#@ 94. N VA SLAUGHTER

SPECIAL SALE VIRGINIA LIVESTOCK, LLC FRONT ROYAL, VA TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2011 AT 7:30 PM

ur ut O n o b A io Ask e Auct ing s r st i o H ar L d n Cale

Having A Horse Auction?

Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream.

Issue Date

January/February 2012 March 2012

Deadline Date December 9 February 17

Call Your Account Representative or 1-800-218-5586

Sale Will Feature: Cow/Calf Pairs Bred Cows Bred Heifers (including 20 Bred heifers from Dave Foltz)

Breeding Age Bulls FOR

MORE INFORMATION:

VIRGINIA LIVESTOCK: 540-635-5511 RICK MATHEWS: 540-635-6927 GARY VANCE: 540-465-5175

CATTLE: 527 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 117-123; 13001500# 122.50-124.75; 1500# & up 119.75-123.25. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1000-1200# 113-123; 1200-1300# 118-122.25; 1300-1500# 112.50-125.25; Sel 2-3 1000-1200# 106. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 60-65.50; HY 1200-1600# 67-69; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 57-61.50; 12002000# 58-64.50; HY 12002000# 67-68; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 52.50-59. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 68-72. Cows Ret. to Farm: 71. M 1, few M 2, 5 yrs. old to aged bred 2-7 mos. 10051575# 785-1130/hd; M 2, few M 1, 4 yrs. old to aged bred 3-7 mos. 750-985# 500-910/hd. Cows w/Calves at side: 18. Mostly M 1, few M 2, w/calves 150-300# 10751465# 1030-1140/pr. Heifers: (Bred) 2. M 1, bred 6-7 mos. 975# 910/hd. Calves Ret. to Farm: 73. Hols. Steers Bulls 70-100# 30-120/hd; 100-130# 130/cwt; 130-200# 115135/cwt. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 67. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 55-68; HY 1200-1600# 6972; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 55-62; 1200-2000# 55-58; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 35-43; 850-1200# 38-45. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 80; 1500-2500# 54-68.50. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 38. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 115-121.25; 1300-1500# 117.50-122.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1000-1200# 91-117.50; 1200-1400# 82-124. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 38. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 66-68; HY 1200-1600# 7072.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 63.50-69; 12002000# 65.50-68; Lean 8590% lean 850-1200# 5256.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 75.50; 15002500# 71.50-79. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 227 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 60-

Page 15 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

500# 81; 500-600# 77; 600700# 73-79; 700-800# 7176. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 125-132; 400500# 105-138; 500-600# 110-137.50; 600-700# 104119.50; 700-800# 105-110; 800-900# 105-118; M&L 2 300-400# 106-122; 400500# 107-115; 500-600# 103-112; 600-700# 98-112; 800-900# 99; S 1 200-300# 107; 300-400# 91-108; 400500# 96-111; 500-600# 97100; 600-700# 94. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 124-158; 400500# 121-135; 500-600# 105-121; 600-700# 95-106; M&L 2 300-400# 130-157; 400-500# 116-122; 500600# 100-118; M&L 3 500600# 91; S 1 400-500# 94110; 500-600# 98-104; 600700# 911-100.


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 16

68; 1200-1600# 62-69.50; HY 1200-1600# 70-73; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 55-63; 1200-2000# 56-64; Lean 85-90% lean 750850# 38-47.50; 850-1200# 40-50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 70-75; 15002500# 65-77.50; HY 15002500# 78-80. MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 84. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 58-65; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 56-63.50; 12002000# 61.25-65.25; HY 1200-2000# 64-72; Lean 8590% lean 850-1200# 4247.25. Calves Ret. to Farm: 14. Hols. Steers Bulls 70-100# 10-45/hd; 100-130# 70120/cwt. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 138 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 60-65.50; HY 1200-1600# 67-69; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 57-61.50; 12002000# 58-64.50; HY 12002000# 67-68; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 52.50-59. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 68-72. Calves Ret. to Farm: 65. Hols. Steers Bulls 70-100# 30-120/hd; 100-130# 130/cwt. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No prices available. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 100. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 80-82; 15002500# 75.50-91; HY 10001500# 86.50; 1500-2500# 96. Cows Ret. to Farm: 4. M 1, 8-10 yrs. old 1000-1100# 600-760/hd; L 1, 5 yrs. old, 1200-1260# 860/hd. Cows w/Calves at side: 2. L 1, 5-12 yrs. old w/calves 250# 900# 1090# 1090-1160/pr.

59.50-64.50; HY 12001600# 74.50-75.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 56.50-63.50; 1200-2000# 57-64; HY 1200-2000# 6568; Lean 85-90% lean 750850# 49-64.50; 850-1200# 54.50-64. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 72-78; 15002500# 85-86.50; HY 10001500# 82; 1500-2500# 9596.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 18. M 1, 5-10 yrs. old 915-1205# 630-780/hd; L 1, 3-10 yrs. old 775-1285# 540-910/hd. Calves Ret. to Farm: 8. Hols. Steers Bulls 70-100# 50/hd. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats: 125. (/hd) 20-30# 23-33; 30-40# 40-50; Culls 60-95# 40-53; (/#) 100-150# 56-70; St. Boar 282# @ 46. Butcher Hogs: 46. US 13 230-300# 81-89; US 2-3 300-350# 79-87. Sows: 6. 500-625# 69-77; 1 Lean 366# @ 66. Boars: 3. 450-650# 2831.25. NC SOWS: 300-399# 5561.50; 400-449# 55-62; 450499# 54-63.30; 500-549# 55-65.50; 550# & up 6265.50. FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No report. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: 3. No report. MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No report. N VA HOGS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report. S VA HOGS: No report. STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report. LAMB & GOAT MARKET

WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 166. Slaughter Cows: Prices unavailable. Slaughter Bulls: Prices unavailable. Cows Ret. to Farm: 57. M&L 1, few 2, 3 yrs. old to aged bred 2-8 mos. 8301525# 540-975/hd. Cows w/Calves at side: 3. M 1, 3-6 yrs. old w/calves 160-240# 945-1340# 10251310/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 4. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 30160/hd; 100-130# 127.50/hd. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 96. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 56.50-65; 1200-1600#

N VA SHEEP: 155. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 194-198; Spring, Wooled, Gd & Ch 1-3 3060# 170-181; 60-90# 131182; Wooled, Ch & Pr 1-2 90-110# 180-205; 110-130# 180; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 30-60# 130-135; 60-90# 184-204. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 69-86; Gd 2-4 73. Slaughter Rams: all grades 82. HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: Ch 78-100# 172-177. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: 18. Few L Nannies 100-158; Sel 1 50-85# 105-145; Sel 2 50-85# 7595.

N VA GOATS: 63. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 150; 40-60# 175-197; 60-80# 170-176; Sel 3 20-40# 160; 40-60# 175-180; 60-80# 175. Bucks: Sel 1-2 100-150# 115-142.50. Does: Sel 1-2 100-150# 80-86. S VA SHEEP: No report. S VA GOATS: No report. MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report. MT. AIRY GOATS: 16. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 40-60# 52.50;

60-80# 75-80; Sel 2 20-40# 20-25; 40-60# 32.50. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 100-140# 97.50-117.50; Sel 2 50-70# 40; 100-140# 52.50. Wethers: Sel 1 70-100# 82.50. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 70100# 85; 150-250# 135. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report. HOLLINS, VA SHEEP: No report. HOLLINS, VA GOATS: No report. MARSHALL, VA SHEEP:

No report. MARSHALL, VA GOATS: 12. Kids: Sel 1-2 60-80# 8597.50. Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 50. ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: 35. Kids: Sel 1-2 40-60# 6975; Sel 3 20-40# 35. Does: Sel 1-2 50-70# 77; 70-100# 67. ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: 20. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 60-90# 131-140. SHENANDOAH SHEEP:

39. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 6080# 194-198; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 170-181; 60-90# 165-182. Slaughter Ewes: 3. Ch 24 69; Gd 2-4 73. SILER CITY, NC GOATS: 74 Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 30-40; 20-40# 5560; 40-60# 65-75; 60-80# 80-90; Sel 2 under 20# 17.50-25; 20-40# 42.5047.50. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80# 92.50-115; 80-100# 135. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 5070# 75-85; 100-140# 120130; Sel 2 50-70# 60.

ANNUAL DECEMBER CONSIGNMENT AUCTION TRACTORS, COMBINES, TILLAGE EQUIPMENT & LAWN & GARDEN EQUIPMENT

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2011 @ 9:00 A.M. Location: Taylor & Messick, Inc. • 325 Walt Messick Road • Harrington, DE 19952 302-398-3729 (Day) OR 302-398-4145 (Evening) • Ask for Jimmy Messick Sr. Pallets of Parts & Att. Parts, Antiques, & Many Odds & Ends - Something for Everyone! Tractors: JD 9230 w/ PTO & 3 PT, 857 hrs., JD 8295R 4WD w/ 561 hrs., JD 4960 4WD, JD 4850 4WD, JD 6200 4WD w/ Cab & 640 SL Loader, JD 2630 w/ 146 Loader, JD 6430 4WD w/ Cab & Warranty, JD 5400 4WD No Cab w/ 540 Loader, MF 165 Gas w/ Loader, MF 165 Diesel, JD 60 Tricycle Bare Back, JD 6430 4WD w/ Cab Lawn & Garden: JD Trail Buck 4-Wheeler (Like New), JD 1565 4WD w/ 72" Deck & 595 hrs., Cub Lo Boy 154 w/ Woods Belly Mower, JD Z820 w/ 60" Cut & only 97 hrs., JD 4x2 TX Gator w/ only 20 hrs., JD 120 w/ 48" Cut, JD X300 w/ 42" Cut, JD Z425 w/ 48" Cut (Like New), JD 425 w/ 60" Cut, JD 997 Diesel w/72" Cut, JD 2305 w/ 200 CX Loader & 62" Belly Mower, JD STX38, JD 757 w/ 60" Cut, JD LX176, JD L120, JD LT150, Many More Being Traded In! Tillage Equipment: 8R, 12R, 16R Cultivators, UN 6 Shank Zone Builder, 15 ft. Alloway Flail Chopper (Nice), JD 26x6 Drill (New), Rear Blades, Box Blades Combines & Heads: JD 9650 4WD Walker Machine, JD 9600 4WD, JD CTS 4WD, JD 843 Cornhead, JD 644 Cornhead, JD 915 Platform, JD 920 Platform Misc. Equipment: Weights, Many Attachments for L&G, Blades, Dual Wheels, Unverferth Seed Tender, Many Funnel Body Wagons, 7 ft. McKee Snow Blower, 1770 16R Planter Liquid Fertilizer (Field Ready) THIS IS ONLY A PARTIAL LISTING, MANY ITEMS ARRIVING DAILY

CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE - NOVEMBER 29th @ 12:00 P.M. SALE STARTS @ 9:00 A.M. 2ND AUCTION TRUCK WILL START SELLING MACHINERY @ 10:00 A.M. TRACTORS TO BE SOLD APPROXIMATELY @ 2:00 P.M. BE HERE EARLY - DO NOT BE LATE! ALL EQUIPMENT MUST BE REMOVED BY DECEMBER 17TH

Wilson’s Auction Sales, Inc. Dave Wilson, Auctioneer & Sales Manager K. Wade Wilson, Auctioneer & Customer Service Representative (302) 422-3454 FAX (302) 422-0462 For Photos & Detailed Listing Visit Our Website at www.wilsonsauction.com FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT JIMMY MESSICK SR. (302) 398-3729 (Day) OR (302) 398-4145 (Evening) Please Call If Interested In A Certain Item Terms: Cash, Certified Check, Cashiers Check, or Check with Current Letter of Credit from your Bank or Letter from Mid Atlantic Farm Credit ACA - Call 1-800-573-3028. ALL EQUIPMENT SOLD "AS IS - WHERE IS" with NO expressed or implied warranties unless announced otherwise by auctioneer the day of sale. ***Lunch Served By Burrsville Ruritan Club*** ***Only Authorized Handicapped Vehicles Will Be Allowed On Property*** ***T&M Reserves The Right To Reject Items Inappropriate For The Auction Or Those Deemed Unsellable *** NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS OR ITEMS AFTER THEY ARE SOLD!


To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, November 21 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. . Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Ren-wick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-3923321. Wednesday, November 23 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104 Thursday, November 24

• 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 Friday, November 25 • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 Saturday, November 26 • 10:00 AM: Galeton, PA. Jackson Stables Retirement Dispersal. 2 tractors, farm machinery, butcher items, mechanical & woodworking tools, dozer, backhoe, horse, feeder cattle, lots of tack, Trail King 1200 bandsaw & lots more. Fraley Auction Co., 570546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com Wednesday, November 30 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, December 2 • 11:00 AM: 3144 Dalton Rd., Cato, NY. Andrew Dennison Equipment Dispersal. Having sold the cows selling complete line of late model equipment. Hilltop Auction Co., Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zieset 315-7298030 Saturday, December 3 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland, NY. Special Winter Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Monday, December 5 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New

Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, December 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, December 8 • Lebanon Area Fairgrounds, Lebanon, PA. 2 Day Sale. Dec. 8 & 9! Holiday Holstein Sale. Over 400 head of Reg. & Sire ID’d Holsteins. Cows sell on the 8th, heifers on the 9th. Comanaged by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms, 315-837-9640, jpullis@frontiernet.net www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, December 10 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Horse Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:15 AM: Ulysses, PA (Potter Co.). Hoopes Turf Farm, Inc. (Preston Hoopes) Sod Farm Dispersal in conjunction with Fox Hill Farms Retirement Auction at 11 am. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Monday, December 12 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. Featuring Rolling Ridge Dairy Milking Herd Dispersal. 15 Head of Registered Cattle. Grazing herd with light grain & balage. Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, December 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday.

Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, December 15 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Market-ing, 607776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Wednesday, December 21 • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104. • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 28 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 31 • 8:30 AM: Hoover Tractor, Mifflinburg, PA. 5th Annual New Years Sale. Accepting consignments. Fraley Auction Co., 570-546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com Saturday, January 7 • 10:00 AM: 3517 Railroad Ave., Alexander, NY. Z&M Ag & Turf Auction. Public Auction Sale of Farm Tractors, Machinery, Landscape, Tools and Lawn Tractor-Mowers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-2431563. www.teitsworth.com Friday, January 20 • 12:00 Noon: 73 West First Ave., Windsor, PA. Public Auction of Windsor Meat Market. Operating business wit retail meat sales & custom slaughtering. Leaman Auctions, 717-464-1128 or 610-662-8149 www.leamanauctions.com Monday, February 6 • Kissimmee, FL. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com

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COLEMAN SALES INC. Scottsville, VA 24590 434-286-2743 VA. A.F. #197 Your Complete Auction Service! Certified Personal Property Appraiser “Let our 34 years of experience work for you!” All types of auctions. Specializing in Real Estate, Farm, Livestock & Construction Equipment

GODLEY AUCTION COMPANY 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC 28216 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 NCAL #305 4th Friday each month. 100% Since 1935

OWNBY AUCTION & REALTY CO., INC. Mechanicsville, VA 804-730-0500 VA A.F. 86 www.ownbyco.com EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE since 1946 Real Estate • Livestock Machinery • Business Liquidations “Satisfied customers are our top priority”

TERRELL AUCTION & REALTY CO., INC. Richmond, VA 804-883-5201 • 804-677-3492 www.terrellauction.com VA AF 386 - Since 1961 Farm Equipment • Livestock • Dispersals. Nationally recognized for High Dollar Real Estate Auctions including Farms and Land. Promptly Paid Seller Proceeds. “Call us for a free consultation at your place before you decide”

UNITED COUNTRY AUCTION & REAL ESTATE GROUP 5455 Main St. Stephens City, VA 22655 540-877-7182 auctionzip.com ID #7424 & virginiaauctions.com

ROGERS AUCTIONEERS 2148 Henderson Tanyard Rd. Pittsboro, NC 27312 919-545-0412 www.rogersauction.com

Page 17 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

AUC TION CALENDAR


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 18

MARKET REPORTS Wethers: Sel 1 100-150# 165-237.50. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 130-150; 150-250# 230. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report. TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 39. Slaughter Lambs: Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 90110# 175-199; Wooled, Ch & Pr 3-4 110-130# 189; 130160# 140; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 30-60# 190; 60-90# 188-212; 90-110# 118. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: 11. Ewes Gd 2-4 70; Util 1-3 45-65; Rams all grades 6383. WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 39. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 110-155; 40-60# 136-181; 60-80# 112-184; Sel 3 2040# 71. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 103-166; 100-150# 145; 150-250# 108. Does: Sel 1-2 100-150# 83-84. WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report. WYTHE CO GOATS: No report.

CASH GRAIN MARKET NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 3¢ lower. Prices were 6.837.22, mostly 6.83 at the feed mills and 6.22-6.88, mostly 6.88 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 1213¢ lower. Prices were 11.92 at the processors, 11.73 at the feed mills and 11.23-11.68, mostly 11.63 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was not available. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 321.40/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 7.07, -----, ----; Candor 7.18, -----, ----; Cofield 6.83, 11.73, ----; Laurinburg 7.07, -----, ----; Monroe 7.07, -----, ----; Nashville 7.22, -----, ----; Roaring River 7.17, -----, ---; Rose Hill 7.07, -----, ----; Statesville 6.92, -----, 6.66; Warsaw 7.07, -----, ----; Pantego #2 ----, -----, ----. Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement ----, -----, ----; Creswell 6.22, 11.42, ----; Elizabeth City 6.63, 11.63, ---; Greenville ----, -----, ----; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, 11.68, ----; Norwood 6.88, 11.23, ----; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ---, -----, ----; Warsaw #2 6.87, -----, ----. Soybean Processors Fayetteville, 11.92; Raleigh, 11.92. RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery

beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. Hay 65 tons. POULTRY REPORT NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are heavy. The estimated slaughter for Wednesday in NC is 1,798,000 head compared to 2,491,000 head last Wednesday. NC EGGS The market is higher on small, lower on medium, steady on the balance. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is good. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 137.57, L 135.24, M 118.43 & S 101. NY EGGS Prices are 2¢ lower on M’s, steady on XL & L. Supplies are moderate to heavy. The New York shell egg inventory is 6% higher than a week ago. Demand is mostly moderate to fairly good. Market activity moderate. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered store door, cents per dz. XL 125-129, L 123-127, M 107111. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET

Beans (25# bx) Green 30; Beets (25# bg) 17.65; Cabbage (50# crate) Point-ed Head & Round 12; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 12-13.25, Spinach (25# bx) 18; Peanuts (35# bg) Green 35; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 14-21.75; Round Red Potatoes (40# crate) 18-20. Wholesale Dealer Price Apples (traypack ctn 100s) Red Delicious WA 33-34.95, (traypack ctn) Golden Delicious WA 33-34.50, Granny Smith WA 34-36.50, Gala WA 29-41.50, Fuji WA 34.50-38, Pink Lady WA 3841.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 26.55-32; Bananas (40# ctn) 21.50-22.80; Beans (1-1/9 bu ctn) Round Green 2530.05, Pole 30-32.50; Beets (25# sack) 11.55-14.35; Blueberries (flat 12 1-pt cups) 24-34; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 20.50-24; Cabbage (50# ctn) Round Green 16.15-18; Cantaloupe (case 12s) 23.15-27.95; Carrots (50# sack) 15.75-22.95; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 20.5023.65; Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30) 26.50-29.55; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 20.6521.65; Citrus (4/5 bu ctn) Oranges CA 24-34.85, FL 2122, Navel Oranges CA 30.65-31.25, Pink Grapefruit CA 22-25.05, (ctn 80s) Tangelos FL 25-26.95, (40# ctn) Lemons 29-30, Limes 2526, (ctn 64s) Navel Oranges FL 19.50-21.50, (ctn 120s) Tangerines 24; Corn (ctn 4 1/2-5 dz) Yellow 16.8518.25, White 16.85-18.25; Cranberries (24 12-oz pkg) 24.50; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Long Green 26.50-32, Pick-

les 30.75-35.75; Eggplant (25# ctn) 20-21; Grapes (18# ctn) Red Seedless 2739.35, White Seedless 28.50-34, Black Seedless 28, Red Globe 34; Greens (bu ctn/loose 24s) Collards 10, (ctn/bunched 24s) Kale 18.75, (bu ctn) Turnip 11.8514.65; Honey-dews (ctn 5s) 17; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 13.65; Lettuce (ctn 24s) wrapped Iceberg 27.15-32, Greenleaf 24-26.50, Romaine 24.5031.50; Nectarines (1/2 bu ctn) Yellow/White Flesh 22; Onions (50# sack) Yellow jumbo 18-20.05, (25# sack) White 14.50-15, Red 15, (ctn 24s) Green 27.6532.35, (40# ctn) Sweet 2025.05; Peaches (1/2 bu ctn) Yellow/White Flesh 18; Peanuts (35#) Green 51-53; Pears (16# ctn) Bartlett 27; Peppers (1-1/9 bu ctn) Green Bell Type 20.0522.95, (11# ctn) Red Bell Type 32, Yellow Bell Type 32; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red size A 18-23.25, Red size B 2528, White size A 14-15, Russet ID 19.35-20.05; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) Red 15.50-15.75; Plums (28# ctn) Red 22; Squash (3/4 bu ctn) Yellow Crook-neck 17.95-32, (1/2 bu ctn) Zucchini 15-21; Straw-berries (flat 8 1-qt conts) CA 28; Sweet Potatoes (40# ctn) Orange Type 16-21.45, White Type 20-20.65; Tomatoes (25# ctn) vine ripened XL 22-22.95, Plum Type Roma 22-24, (flat 12 1-pt conts) Cherry Type 24.3528.05, Grape Type 22-26.50; Topped Turnips (25# film bg) 11.85-14.65.

WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 24-34, Golden Delicious 25-34, Granny Smith 35, (bu loose pack) Red & Golden Delicious, Fuji, Stayman, Pink Lady, Romes 1420; Bananas (40# bx) 18.5020; Beans (bu) Snap 23-24; Broccoli (ctn) 17.50-18; Cabbage (50# bg) 9.75-12; Canta-loupes (ctn 9-12s) 20-24.50; Cauliflower (ctn) 20-22.50; Citrus (4/5 bu ctn) Grapefruit 15-20, Lee Fruit 22-24, Navel Oranges 1620, Oran-ges 15-18, Tangerines 17-20, (ctn 95s) Lemons 28-29, (ctn 165s) Lemons 24-25, (ctn 150200s) Limes 17.50-20; Corn (crate) Bi-Color 13.50-14, White 13.50-14; Cucumbers (1-1/9 bu crate) Long Green 20-21, Pickles 33.50; Grapes (18# ctn) Red Globe 24-25, Red Seedless 24-32, White Seedless 24-32; Lettuce (ctn) Iceberg 27.75-29; Nuts (50# sack) Mixed 125, Pecans 160, Walnuts 130; Onions (50# bg) Yellow jumbo 12.75-15; Pepper (1-1/9 bu ctn) Bell Type L & XL 1218.50; Potatoes (50# bg) Irish 20-26, Russet 15.5020; Squash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 22-23, (1/2 bu) #1 Zucchini 12-14; Straw-berries (flat 8 1#) CA 16-25; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 1216; Tomatoes (25# bx) XL & larger 15-18.50, M 12; Topped Turnips (25# sack) 12.75-15. MARKET

Time to move on highway bill by Kent Bacus, NCBA manager of legislative affairs Over the years, U.S beef producers have been anxiously waiting for Congress to vote on legislation to address our concerns with antiquated and inconsistent transportation rules and regulations that hinder the flow of commerce for small businesses. Legislative solutions are typically consolidated into one piece of multi-year authorizing legislation commonly known as the highway bill. Instead of keeping our transit laws current and reflective of the needs of today’s economy, Congress has the unfortunate habit of kicking the can down the road by extending the existing highway bill to a time when political and fiscal forecasts seem brighter. In fact, the previous highway bill expired in October 2009 and has been extended several times. The current extension of transportation programs will expire at the end of March 2012. All signs from Capitol Hill suggested that no further action would happen on the highway bill until early 2012. Fortunately, we are finally starting to see movement on the transportation front. On Wednesday, Nov. 9, the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works voted unanimously in

support of S. 1813, “Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act,” commonly referred to as the highway bill. The bill is a two year bill that consolidates existing surface transportation programs and reallocates funding to other transportation programs. Unfortunately, the bill does not include language to address cattlemen’s immediate concerns with increasing truck weights with an additional axle or to allow agricultural permits for drivers to haul up to 100,000 pounds. While the bill does not include language critical to cattlemen, it is important to remember that this is just the beginning of a long process. The House has indicated it may move forward with a transportation bill by the end of this year. NCBA will continue meeting with members of Congress and the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee to help them understand why cattlemen’s concerns should be addressed in the highway bill. Specifically, cattlemen urge Congress to include the following provisions in the highway bill: • Give states the option to increase truck-weight limits to 97,000 pounds with inclusion of a sixth axle on trucks. Increasing hauling capacity will result

in fewer trucks on the roads. We greatly appreciate Congressman Michael Michaud (D-Maine) and Congresswoman Jean Schmidt (R-Ohio) for introducing the Safe and Efficient Transportation Act of 2011 (H.R. 763), and for Senator Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) for introducing the Senate version (S. 747). • Allow the purchase of permits for commercial vehicles to haul farm commodities up to 100,000 pounds. • Create a uniform mileage exemption for farm use vehicles exceeding 26,000 pounds. We need uniformity and reciprocity of farm exemptions across state lines for drivers licenses and we strongly oppose any federal requirement of commercial driver’s licenses for farmers and ranchers. We are grateful to Congressman Sam Graves (R-MO) for introducing H.R. 3265, which waives certain driving restrictions during planting and harvest seasons for producers who are transporting agricultural goods. We also commend Congressman James Lankford (R-OK) for introducing the Farmers’ Freedom Act of 2011(H.R. 2414). This legislation exempts certain farm vehicles (including the individual operating the vehicle) from certain federal requirements (for a commercial dri-

ver’s license, drug testing, medical certificates and hours of service) governing the operation of motor vehicles. To all of our producers and anyone engaged in agribusiness, we need your help. We need a commonsense highway bill that addresses the needs of rural America and we need it now. Contact your elected officials in the House and Senate and urge them to include these provisions in the highway bill to create a safer and more efficient transportation system in our nation.


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CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

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THE SCABBLER MAN: 2” & 1” wide scabbling. Dan Martin 434-454-7018 Home, 434579-0705 Cell

Beef Cattle BEEF COWS, mostly black, some have calves, others will calve later. 540-822-5743 LIVESTOCK BUYING STATION, Cody, Virginia. Slaughter cattle bought every Tuesday 9am-2pm. Load lots of feeder cattle and herds bought by appointment. Statewide service, Grey Puckett 434-610-6689

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1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

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50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

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USA Gypsum Bedding Reduce your bedding costs! And Improve Soil Naturally!

Gypsum Bedding • Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Reduce mastitis & cell counts. • Use in place of Hydrated Lime. • Improves your soil • Available in bulk.

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves. • Use less! More absorbent than lime products.

Try Grip X1 Today! www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Dealers wanted in select areas Also Available at: Central Dairy & Mech. Delmarva Farm Service Elam Miller Himrod Farm Supply Homestead Nutrition Genesee Valley Nutrition Levi Fisher Martin’s Ag New Bedford Elevator Norm’s Farm Store Robert Rohrer Steve B. Stoltzfus Walnut Hill Feeds

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Martinsburg, PA Kennedyville, MD Fort Plain, NY Penn Yan, NY New Holland, PA Piffard, NY Honey Grove, PA Shippensburg, PA Baltic, OH Watsontown, PA Millmont, PA Lykens, PA Shelby, OH

ph 814-793-3721 ph 888-348-1747 ph 518-993-3892 ph 315-531-9497 ph 888-336-7878 ph 585-243-9597 ph 717-734-3145 ph 717-532-7845 ph 330-897-6492 ph 570-649-6765 ph 570-898-1967 ph 717-365-3804 ph 419-342-2942

RED ANGUS BULLS, yearlings, balance EPD’s. 540933-6293

Cars, Trucks, Trailers 1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

Concrete Products

• 4000 Gal. Surge (99) • 3000 Gal. Storage • 2700 Gal. Mueller OH • 2000 Gal. DeLaval • 2000 Gal. Mueller OE • 2000 Gal. Mueller OH SOLD PA O Mueller • 2000 Gal. • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. DeLaval SOLD NY Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. PA M • 1000 Gal.SOLD Mueller • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH

• 1000 Gal. DeLaval • 1000 Gal. Mueller M • 900 Gal. Mueller OH OH OH Mueller • 800 Gal.SOLD • 800 Gal. Majonnier • 800 Gal. Mueller OH • 735 Gal. Sunset • 700 Gal. Mueller OH • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 700 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 545 Gal. Sunset • 500 Gal. Mueller M

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Feed Bunks & Cattle Guards

Pre Cast Concrete J BUNK FEED TROUGHS FOB Wytheville, VA $150.00 ~ 8’ sections CATTLE GUARDS (deliverable locally) Call for Details!

U BUNK $150.00

WEST END PRECAST

Wytheville, VA (276) 620-1821 Ask for Chris Dairy Cattle

• 500 Gal. Mueller MW SOLD WV M • 500 Gal. Mueller • 500 Gal. Majonnier • 415 Gal. Sunset • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 400 Gal. Majonnier • 375 Gal.SOLD Milkeeper WV • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 300 Gal Mueller M • 300 Gal. Sunset • 200 Gal. Sunset SC • 180 Gal. Milkeeper • 150 Gal. Majonnier • 150 Gal. Mueller RH

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Lititz, PA 17543

Dairy Equipment 6000 Mueller 900 Mueller 4500 Mueller 850 Sunset 4000 Mueller 800 Universal 3500 Mueller 800 Sunset 3000 Girton 800 Mueller 3000 Mueller 800 Surge 2-3000 S.S. 735 Sunset Sugar Tanks 700 Mueller 2500 Mueller 625 Sunset 2-2000 Mueller 600 Mueller 1500 Mueller 545 Sunset 1500 Surge 500 Mueller 1350 Mueller 400 Mueller 1000 Zero 310 Sunset 3-1000 Mueller 300 Mueller 1000 Surge 250 Mueller New Sunset Tanks New & Used Compressors 200-4000 Gal. StorageTanks Used Freheaters

585-732-1953 Farm Machinery For Sale

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER LIVESTOCK SALES, INC. Middletown, NY (845) 344-7170 buycows@warwick.net

1992 INT. LITTER SPREADER, cummins engine, tandem axle w/hyd. 20’ Chandler litter spreader, exc. cond., $20,000 OBO. Mount Jackson,VA 800541-7496

Page 19 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

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Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS Large Selection Available

1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE We Buy Tractors For Parts

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT 403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

(717) 776-6242

WANT TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD? CALL: 1-800836-2888

Farm Machinery For Sale

BUSH HOG

USED EQUIPMENT

MF 245 Tractor Westfield 8x51 Auger MF 1835 Baler White 285 Tractor Miller 5300 Forage Box Miller 1150 Rake IH 37 Baler w/Thrower Westfield 8x56 Auger Hesston 4550 Square Baler Vicon 553 Tedder Farmall 460 Tractor MF 246 Loader White 5100 4R Planter White 6100 4R Corn Planter White 543 Corn Planter Case IH 8830 SP Mower Cond. MF 285 Tractor White 549 SAR 5 Bottom Plow Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill Miller Pro Forage Boxes In Stock

STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE RD Box 46 Klingerstown, PA

570-648-2088

WE ALSO STOCK NEW VICON CASE INT. 1680 combine, 4x4, Cummins engine, w/ 1020 22.5’ flex bean head & 1054 corn head. $26,500 OBO. 252-435-9158

USED EQUIPMENT YEAR END PROGRAM Now Available On McCormick & Vermeer! Huge Savings! Round Bale Wagon 10 Position Mover, Like New!.............................Reduced To $1,500 Kuhn GMO 77 HD, 3Pt. Disc Mower, Good........................................$3,500 ’73 Ford 3000 8 Speed Manual, 1 Remote, Diesel, Good Rubber, No Rust! .................................................$5,500 Ford 1200 4WD, Diesel, w/3Pt. 48” Finishing Mower, 600 hrs, Good Condition..................Reduced To $3,900 New Holland 255 Tedder-Rake Combo, Good Condition...........................................$2,000 ’01 NH 688 Round Baler, Auto Wrap, 5x6, Good Condition.................................$8,500 ’09 Vermeer 555XL w/Net Wrap, Good Condition.........................................$13,900 2004 McCormick CX85 Cab, 4x4, 1,300 Hrs., Ex. Cond..........................................$29,500 NEW! HayMag 4 Rotor Tedders w/Hyd. Fold & Tilt, 18’ ..............................................$4,995 Massey Ferguson 4225, 2WD, 1036 Massey Loader, Cab, Air, 2 Remotes, 1,500 Hours, Bale Spike.......................................$23,900 ‘08 Vermeer Rebel 5410, net wrap, 1,500 bales, ex. cond ................................$12,900 ‘08 Arctic Cat Prowler, 650cc, RTV, 680 miles, manual dump bed, ex. cond. ..$7,000 Pictures at www.tractorcare.com

Tractor Care, Inc. 1066-C Virginia Avenue, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802-2533 PH: 540-433-7070 Check out our e-bay store at stores.ebay.com/tractor-care-inc

WANTED

Massey Ferguson

ANDERSON 780SB WRAPPER, will wrap large squares or round bales, new condition, $24,500. 704-202-3626

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery Wanted

PRICES REDUCED

WANTED

Bes t in Nor theas t No w in the South

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers JOHN DEERE BALER PARTS: 347, 346, 336, 224, 214, 24T, 14T. Nelson Horning 585-5266705

BEST WARRANTY: 1 Year Parts on Motor & Transmission, most all combines BEST QUALITY: Selected Direct from Farm or OEM Dealers BEST SELECTION: Just visit website; We got em BEST TRUCKING: Lowest Rates Available BEST “TRUE” INTEREST: 3.7% 3 Years • 4.2% 5 Years • 4.9% 7 Years

814-793-4293 Fencing

PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

BLACK LOCUST POSTS: Poles up to 30’. Authentic split rails 6x6, 4x4, 1” & 2” boards. Photos at www.blacklocustwood.com Call Tom 518-883-8284

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Used Equipment For Sale CASE 685 2WD, w/CASE LOADER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500.00 NH 1431 DISC BINE, SMUCKER ROLLS, GOOD COND . . . . . . . .$8,500.00 CASE IH 7220 4WD, CAB, EXCELLENT CONDITION . . . . . . . . .$45,000.00

Over 25+ Years Selling Combines

NH 1412 FLAIL DISCBINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,000.00 DMI 3 SHANK NO-TIL RIPPER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500.00

WE WANT TO SELL YOU YOUR NEXT COMBINE

CASE IH 4210 4X4 W/LOADER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,000.00

Bloomsburg, PA • Route 44 (Jerseytown)

CASE IH C70 TRACTOR, 2WD, ROPS . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED TO $8,500.00

328 Danville Rd. (Near I-80)

CASE IH 1896 CAB, HEAT, AIR, 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . .COMING IN - CALL!

TOLL FREE 800-919-3322 www.zeisloftequip.com

LAWRENCE AG EQUIPMENT 877-466-1131

Fencing

Hay - Straw For Sale

ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

4x5 MIXED GRASS round bales, good quality, net wrapped, barn kept, $40. Pick up at farm. No delivery. Brookview Farm, 854 Dover Rd., Manakin Sabot,VA 23103 email bviewfarm@gmail.com 804-784-3131

Generators

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

Hay For Sale First Cut, Second Cut, Timothy and Alfalfa WE DELIVER

519-604-8683

H AY Farmer to Farmer

Goats

Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

COMPLETELY EQUIPPED Goat Cheese Plant including 30 Gal. SS pasteurizer, cheese vat, 2 tables, refrigerators & 30 Reg. Saanen & Alpine goats. 315-867-7800

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

519-482-5365 MIXED GRASS HAY for sale. $30.00/Roll, 4x5. 540-8602145

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION Parts & Service New Installations

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

804-387-6462

519-529-1141

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw Wanted

TOO MUCH HAY?

Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW

Southwestern Virginia Bland County

Try Selling It In The

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

Heating

Real Estate For Sale

62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted.

800-836-2888

$90,000

classified@leepub.com

Contacts: Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com Allen Hollenbach 610-926-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

WANTED

Hay & Straw - All Types We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

WANTED

Pre Cut Rye Straw 50 to 75 Lb. Bales

1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

Several Purchase Options Available. Call

Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

or email

Trucks

540-255-9112 Help Wanted

Help Wanted

HELP WANTED

Dairy Nutrition & Feed Consultant Renaissance Nutrition, Inc. has an opening in Lancaster Co., PA, for a farm consultant. A dairy background and/or college ag degree preferred, but will train person with potential. Email resumes to djmahlandt@gmail.com Hoof Trimming

Hoof Trimming

Affordable Hydraulic Hoof Trimming Tables

302-737-5117 302-545-1000

• Heavy Duty Professional Quality • Increased Production With Less Effort • Models Available In Stationary & Portable

WE HAVE OVER 20 FARMS FOR SALE THROUGHOUT PA. JOHN MATTILIO, BROKER

FARM AND LAND REALTY, INC. 717-464-8930

www.farmandlandrealtyinc.com

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

FARM - 57 +/- acres, 2 ½ miles to Colgate University in the village of Hamilton, New York The farm is composed of 15 +/- acres of woodland with the remainder fields and pasture. Restored 4/3 bath house dated circa 1850 - 1880. Two barns circa 1850. Machine shed. Everything in very good condition. Beautiful views from property. Stream. Marketable timber. Potential building lots, great investment potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$395,000

Phone 315-292-1104 See details at www.hamiltonfarm.info

• Limited Warranty

Hay - Straw Wanted

Hay - Straw Wanted

TOP MARKET PRICES PAID For Quality Hay in 2 String Bales Looking for Long Term Supply Paid for On Scale

Also Buying All Grades of Hay and Straw in 2 String or Large Square Bales

Nick Fitzpatrick 845-901-1892 or 845-609-7315

The Ultimate in Tilt Tables SHEP’S WELDING, INC. PO Box 296, Chiefland, FL 32644 • www.shepswelding.net

Parts & Repair

Parts & Repair

Help Wanted

“BELT T BUSTERS” $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction

e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES

Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

Help Wanted

Alltech is currently looking for a Territory Sales Representative with a strong dairy background for Pennsylvania. Alltech sales people are highly motivated professionals who provide a natural link between marketing, research and the customer. Alltech ranks among the top 10 animal health companies in the world. The company has experienced consistent growth since it was founded in 1980. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has a presence in over 110 countries with distributors around the world. Today it employs 2,600 people and growth continues at a rate of 20 percent.

Keyy responsibilitiess include: Regularly visit our industry partners (feed companies, consulting nutritionists, veterinarians, producers, government agencies, etc) across the territory to manage existing relationships while cultivating new relationships Drive sales by identifying customer needs and finding solutions Attend industry events and tradeshows to showcase Alltech in a positive, professional manner

Thee ideall candidatee should d have: A strong technical background: BSc, MSc or higher Strong verbal and written communication skills Interest and experience in the animal health or nutrition industries Self-motivated and proactive A valid driver’s license E-mail resumé and cover letter to: mgast@alltech.com

CLOSING G DATE:: JAN.. 1,, 2012

ROOFING & SIDING ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services

Agricultural Belt Service

Help Wanted

Roofing

1-800-370-8454

Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

adenbrook.com

Roofing

Alltech h | Pennsylvania 1860 0 Charterr Lane,, Suitee 203 Lancaster,, PA A 17601 Fax:: 717-393-9774 4 • mgast@allltech.com

Real Estate For Sale

HOBBY FARM Fingerlakes, NY

Modern 3 bdr., 2-1/2 bath ranch on 62 acres overlooking the Genesee Valley. 2 barns, 8 horse stalls, 50 open acres mostly fenced now in horses, sheep, cattle & chickens.

$319,000 Reduced

299,999

$

585-335-7436

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Trucks 1998 Chevrolet 1500 4wd Ext Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,999 2005 Chevrolet 1500 Silverado 4wd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,390 2005 Chevrolet Colorado Z71 4wd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,475 1999 Ford F-250 4wd Super Duty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,999 1996 Ford F-150 Only 65k miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,900 2005 Ford F-150 4wd Super Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,999 2004 Ford F-150 4wd Reg Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,299 2005 Ford F-150 4wd Ext Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,999 2006 Ford F-250 4wd Lariat Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,490 2001 Toyota Tundra SR5 4wd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,999

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

2035 Stuarts Draft Hwy., Stuarts Draft, VA 24477 540-337-1090 www.beveragetractor.com

Page 21 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 22

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1.

PHONE IT IN

2.

FAX IT IN -

3.

4.

Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

Place my ad in the following zones: FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!  Country Folks East

For MasterCard, Visa, Cost per week per zone: American Express or Discover customers, $9.25 for the first 14 words, fill out the form below completely and plus 30¢ for each additional word. FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381 (Phone #’s count as one word) MAIL IT IN - Fill out the I F RUNNING YOUR AD MULTIPLE WEEKS: attached form, calculate

Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

the cost, enclose your check or credit card information and mail to:

 Country Folks West West  Country Folks of New England  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle Number of weeks Mid-Atlantic to run__________

East

New England

Name: (Print)________________________________________________________________

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________ Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________ City: __________________________________________ State: ________ Zip: __________

E-MAIL

Phone #_____________________Fax #________________Cell #_____________________

E-mail your ad to classified@leepub.com

e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard

5. ON-LINE -

Go to www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a Classified Ad button to place your ad 24/7!

Card # __________________________________________Exp. Date __________________ (MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card:(Print)____________________________________________________ Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for

credit

card

payment

only)

15 1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week

17 1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week

18 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week

16 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

19 1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week

20 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

21

22

23

24

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week

1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week

1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week

1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

25

26

27

28

1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week

1 Week $12.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.85 per zone per week

1 Week $13.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.15 per zone per week

1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

NOV 21 York County Agriculture Business Council to Meet York County Annex Building Room 1, 118 Pleasant Acres Rd, York, PA. 7 pm. The Council invites any agricultural supporter to join us as we establish our goals and priorities for 2012. Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP by Nov. 18. Contact Michele Grove, 717246-3578 or e-mail ycabc@comcast.net. NOV 22 Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation Board to Meet Maryland Dept. of Agriculture headquarters, 50 Harry S. Truman Pkwy., Annapolis, MD. 9 am. Contact MALPF Office, 410-841-5860. DEC 1 Direct to Consumer Farm Marketing & Agri-Tourism Seminar Berks Co. Ag Center, 1238 County Welfare Rd., Leesport PA`. 8:30 am - 4:30 pm. Contact John Berry, 610-391-9840. On Internet at extension.psu.edu. DEC 3

Livestock Judging and Stockman’s Coaches Workshop VA Tech. Blacksburg. Adults only. Contact Paige Pratt, 540-231-4732, or e-mail pjpratt@vt.edu. Putting Small Acreage to Work 2011: The Business Side of Farming 112 W. Walker Ave., Asheboro, NC. 8:45 am - 3 pm. Pre-registration and a fee of $10 (lunch included) are due by Wed., Nov. 30. Checks, made out to NC Cooperative Extension - Randolph County, can be sent to 112 W. Walker Ave., Asheboro, NC, 27203. Contact Mary Helen Ferguson, 336-318-6000 or e-mail maryhelen_ferguson@ncsu.edu. Tack Auction JP’s North The Old Florida Town Hall, 214 Fort Hunter Rd., Amsterdam, NY. Used Tack Tag Sale & Preview start at 11 am. Auction starts at noon. Presented by Adirondack Miniature Horse Club. Bring your used tack & apparel for our Tag sale. Call 518-4615039. Virginia Youth Livestock Leadership Forum VA Tech. Blacksburg. Contact Paige Pratt, 540-2314732, or e-mail pjpratt@vt.edu. VSPA Fall Bred Ewe Sale Rockingham County Fairgrounds. Harrisonburg. Contact Scott Greiner, 540231-9159, or e-mail sgreiner@vt.edu. DEC 6 VT Beef Webinar Contact Mark McCann, 540231-9153 or e-mail mark.mccann@vt.edu.

York County Buy Fresh, Buy Local(r) Chapter’s 2012 Promotional Kick Off & Annual Meeting Adams Electric Building, 200 Trinity Rd, York, PA. 7 pm. The meeting will include a recap of 2011, new promotions & fundraisers for 2012, Why Buy Fresh Buy Local(r) (BFBL) matters & Why YOU matter, approval of Bylaws & election of officers, volunteer opportunities and local, fresh refreshments. Seating is limited. Please RSVP by Nov. 28. Contact Kim Gross, 717-814-8141 or e-mail yorkbfbl@yahoo.com. DEC 8 Commodity Marketing Seminar Berks Co. Ag Center, 1238 County Welfare Rd., Leesport, PA. 8:30 am - 3:30 pm. Contact John Berry, 610-391-9840. On Internet at extension.psu.edu DEC 8-12 Acres USA Conference & Trade Show Hyatt Regency, Columbus, OH. See Web site for details. Call 800-355-5313. On Internet at www.acresusa.com DEC 12, NOV 9, 15, 16 & 21, DEC 7, 12 & 15 Upcoming Nutrient Management Voucher Training & Renewal Courses Allegany Co. Free voucher training & renewal courses to farm operators who apply nutrients to 10 or more acres of cropland. The two hour nutrient applicator training course is required once every three years for these operators. For additional dates and locations, operators

should contact their local Extension office or visit www.mda.state.md.us. Scroll down the Quick Links to Nutrient Management and click on Nutrient Management Training Classes for the complete 2011-2012 schedule. Locations as follows: • Anne Arundel Co. - Dec. 12. Call 410-222-6757. • Calvert Co. - Nove. 9. Call 410-535-3662. • Carroll Co. - Nov. 15 & Dec. 15. Call 410-386-2760. • Frederick Co. - Nov. 16. Call 301-600-1594 • Kent Co. - Dec. 14. Call 410-778-1661. • Montgomery Co. - Dec. 7. Call 301-590-9638. • Prince George’s Co. - Nov. 21. Call 301-868-8780. • Somerset Co. - Nov. 21. Call 410-651-1351. • Wicomico Co. - Dec. 12, 2011. Call 410-749-6141. DEC 20 Penn State Extension Workshop on Crop Load Management Adams County Agricultural & Natural Resources Center, Gettysburg, PA. 8:30 am 3:30 pm. Includes presentations on the carbon balance model and use of a new tool - the Equilifruit Disk - for assessing optimum apple crop load. During the afternoon, participants will move to Kuhn Orchards, Cashtown, PA for a discussion of “Pruning to Manage Crop Load.” The afternoon pruning demonstration is free and will be conducted in Spanish and English. Final date to register is Dec. 14. Call 877-489-1398. On Internet at

www.cvent.com/d/9cqjgg JAN 7 Sheep Symposium Alphin-Stuart Arena. Blacksburg, VA. Contact Scott Greiner, 540-2319159, or e-mail sgreiner@vt.edu. NOV 11-14 National No Tillage Conference St. Louis, MO. Registration is $279/person, with a special $252 rate for additional farm or family members. On Internet at www.NoTillConference.com JAN 22-24 The National Mastitis Council (NMC) 51st Annual Meeting TradeWinds Island Grand Resort, 5500 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach, FL. For dairy professionals from around the world to exchange current information on udder health, mastitis control, milking management and milk quality. Call 727-3676461. On Internet at www.nmconline.org JAN 27 & 28 4th Annual Winter Greenup Grazing Conference Century House, Latham, NY. Please contact Tom Gallagher at tjg3@cornell.edu, Lisa Cox at lkc29@cornell.edu or Morgan Hartman at blackqueenangus@yahoo.com for more information and to get on the mailing list for registrations. Contact Lisa Cox, 518-765-3512. FEB 1-3 Southern Farm Show NC State Fairgrounds. Over

300 exhibiting companies make the Southern Farm Show the largest agricultural exposition in the Carolinas and Virginia. Free admission and free parking make the show a can’t miss for farmers, as well as allied professionals including landscapers and excavation contractors.Show Hours: Wednesday through Friday 9 am - 4 pm. Admission is free. Call 800-849-0248. On Internet a t www.southernfarmshow.co m FEB 1-4 2012 Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show Nashville, TN. Advanced registration is open until Jan. 11, 2012. To register visit www.beefusa.org or contact Kristin Torres at ktorres@beef.org. FEB 8-9 2012 Pennsylvania Dairy Summit Lancaster Host Resort in Lancaster, PA. Call 877-3265993 or e-mail info@padiarysummit.org. MAR 18 VA BCIA Southwest Bull Test Open House Hillswinds Farm. Dublin, VA. Contact Scott Greiner, 540-231-9159, or e-mail sgreiner@vt.edu. MAR 24 VA BCIA Southwest Bull Test Sale Wytheville, VA. Contact Scott Greiner, 540-2319159, or e-mail sgreiner@vt.edu.


YOUR CHANCE TO WIN!! CRACK THE VAULT AND WIN GREAT PRIZES

AT THE

VIRGINIA FARM SHOW

JANUARY

19-20-21, 2012 Thurs. 9-4 • Fri. 9-4 • Sat. 9-3

AUGUSTA EXPOLAND • FISHERSVILLE, VIRGINIA

SPONSORS

Camping World of Roanoke 8198 Gander Way Roanoke, VA 24019 888-501-8405

888-853-7746 4445 Early Road Harrisonburg, VA 540-433-7881

Produced by the Trade Show Division of Lee Newspapers, Inc.; P.O. Box 121, 6113 State Hwy. 5; Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Publishers of Country Folks, Country Folks GROWER and Farm Chronicle

Show Manager: Ken Maring 1-800-218-5586 or 518-673-0103 • Fax 518-673-3245

The Virginia Farm Show is proud to announce the “Crack the Vault” giveaway. Enter the right 5-digit combination that unlocks the prize vault and win. One chance per attendee. The winner must be 18 years of age. Sponsors, exhibitors, show management or their employees are prohibited from participating.

Page 23 - Section B • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 21, 2011

DON’T MISS


November 21, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Section B - Page 24

CF Mid-Atlantic 11.21.11  

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic November 21, 2011

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