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14 NOVEMBER 2011 Section One e off One Volume e 30 Number r 45

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Importance e off cover cropss stressed d at a Field d Day Pennsylvania ~ Page 3 Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly

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FEATURES Auctions Beef Producers Classifieds Markets

27 14 36 25

Observations s from m a careerr in n livestock ~ Page e 2 Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Philippians 4:4-5


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 2

Observations from a career in livestock my mind is that over the by Chris Bickers Bruce Shankle, the last 34 years we have well-respected livestock children of children of who have marketing director for the children North Carolina shown animals in our Department of shows.” The ongoing Agriculture and the direcquestion of ethics tor of the livestock program at the North “I think that in the last Carolina State Fair, several years our leaders retired after the 2011 in what you might call North Carolina State Fair. political agriculture have Here are some of his realized that we need to educate observathe general tions from public that 30-plus livestock y e a r s producers watching “Showing livestock treat their young people bring is one of the integral animals in an ethical their ani- parts of keeping the manner mals to the livestock industry and that it fair. going.” is imporShows tant that “Showing livelivestock is ~ Bruce Shankle the s t o c k one of the industry to integral continue to parts of do what its keeping doing.” the live“There is so much negstock industry going. When these kids get into ative publicity toward it when they are young, the livestock industry. it stays with them, and But I think animal agrithose are the kids that culture may be the reason that the United stay in the business.” “I like to think that the States is the nation it is kids who are out here today. We have a well-fed showing livestock, who general public with a are out here feeding and balanced diet and that’s watering and caring for part of it. We certainly the animals, understand need to pay attention to the value of doing a good why we are a healthy job. And they under- nation. We are a strong stand the consequences nation because we eat of not doing a good job. good.” “As a livestock proThey learn responsibility from a very young age, ducer I am concerned and that responsibility about freedom of proand that work ethic duction. I will get down carry through all their on the ground and fight for my right to raise my life.” “What really sticks in cows and feed them and

Youths await the start of the Boer goat show. Photos by Chris Bickers

care for them the best way that I know how. A lot of times we have people that want to legislate rules for the industry that are not in the best interest of the animals we are working with. I wish the public would understand that the people that know how to run the business should have the free-

Young people show Jersey cattle at the North Carolina State Fair.

dom to do it. “Don’t misunderstand me: I am certainly not going to support any animal abuse, malnutrition or anything like that. But a lot of times the best interest of animals is not what is being looked at. A sow in a farrowing crate may seem inhumane to some individuals. But they have

never seen a sow in a pasture lay on her baby pigs and kill them. Or ever seen a rainstorm drown them in a rain. Or seen a frosty night freeze them to death. So maybe that hoghouse doesn’t look too bad.” Well rounded individuals “The young people who are involved in these livestock projects care for their animals. It’s in their heart and soul to keep them in as healthy a mental state as they can because they know a satisfied animal is a good animal to show. That carries through all the way to dogs and cats. And people. They understand that these animals aren’t pets, they are production animals. It makes for a well rounded individual who can say ‘We love them’ until it is time to eat them.” A Tar Heel champion “At this fair, we had a grand champion market steer that was born and bred in North Carolina. The belief is that you have to go to the Midwest for genetics that are capable of winning. But this year we had a steer show that would be competitive anywhere in the U.S.” By that I mean the dam actually became

pregnant in the state of North Carolina, and then the calf was born in North Carolina, and now it has been sold in North Carolina, to Harris Teeter, which paid $25,000, a very good price. They are going to get a well-educated consumer because the young man — Derrick Jones of Barnardsville, NC — is going to N.C. State University later this year. By the way, I am really proud that we as an industry have been able to help so many young people through our youth programs get an education.” What the future holds “I am by no means leaving the industry. Right now, I have a 125mama-cow herd in Ansonville that I have been working on for the last 30 years. Also, I work with several purebred producers in marketing their cattle plus I will be marketing my own. And there are a lot of people I consult with and work with. So I am just changing where I go every morning. I just want to feed my cows in the daylight hours for a few years. I told Commissioner Troxler I will still be working, just not for him.”


by Jennifer Showalter STAUNTON, VA — Around 80 farmers and land owners from the central Shenandoah Valley recently spent the best part of the day attending a soil and water conservation workshop designed to highlight both the latest soil and water conservation practices and cost-share programs available to help install these practices. As the group traveled around Carolyn Ford’s farm, different representatives shared information on such things as stream fencing options, livestock watering systems, forestry practices, wildlife practices, grazing systems, stream bank stabilization, and financing options. Ford’s farm was an ideal location for the workshop, as it showed many of the practices discussed in action. “It seemed that the event went very well overall and Carolyn Ford’s farm certainly showcased a number of environmental conservation practices as well as efforts to improve water quality. I’m sure quite a few people left with greater knowledge of both the types of environmental and wildlife habitat management programs that various entities from the federal to the local level subsidize as well as the flexibility many programs allow,” said Jason Carter with Virginia Cooperative Extension. At the first stop on the farm tour, Carter stressed to the audience that farmers need to be as interested in the environment as they are in making money. He explained that livestock do most of their urinating, defecating, and laying down within 70 yards of their water source. By implementing rotational grazing systems,

Matt Yancey, with Virginia Cooperative Extension, encourages a group of landowners and farmers to learn to identify and know the characteristics of weeds in their pastures before trying to decide on the most effective herbicide.

Jason Carter and Matt Yancey, both with Virginia Cooperative Extension, show a group of interested farmers and land owners different watering system that are available rather than allowing livestock to drink from natural waterways. farmers can force livestock to better utilize land and spread out waste. Cattle prefer to drink out of water tubes rather than natural waterways, but to maximize the benefits of a system Carter suggested fencing off waterways and practicing good rotational grazing management. “Fencing livestock from streams has become increasingly popular and essentially mandated as crucial for meeting the Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL) goals. However there are a number of fencing programs offering subsidies to implement fencing right up to the stream bank instead of many feet away. I hope folks left the extension talks realizing that increased management of water and forages is essential to allow existing livestock operations to remain productive and profitable,” said Carter. Matt Yancey, also with Virginia Cooperative Extension, encouraged the audience to learn to identify weeds in their pastures and become familiar with the characteristics of each. He suggested that good grazing management most certainly helps with weed control, but does not eliminate the need for herbicidal treatment from time to time. When herbicides are needed to address weed issues, Yancey emphasized that farmers and land owners must know what they are using and if the product has a residual effect. With water quality in mind, many people were interested in the use of buffers. Pattie Nylander and Jeff Brower, with the Virginia Department of Forestry and Conservation Services, discussed and showed various forestry techniques to enhance tree vigor in buffer areas. Brower made clear that seedlings need to be dormant when they are planted and that there is a four week span in November and then again from mid February to the first of May that is best

suited for planting. Brower also stressed that it is important to plant trees that are suitable for the area. He made note that it is critical to get a grip on invasive plants like multiflora rose, johnson grass, and autumn olives before planting trees in a buffer area. Once the trees are planted, he suggested putting tree shelters around each tree to decrease mole and mice damage. Brower emphasized that planting trees as a buffer takes time, patience, and upkeep. He finished by reminding the audience that the wider a buffer is, the more nutrient uptake occurs. Wildlife enthusiasts in the audience were excited to hear Debbie Wright, with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, discuss various habitat needs for the Northern Bobwhite Quail. Wright shared how native warm season grasses make an excellent habitat for quail. These grasses attract insects that birds like. They also seed out later in the fall than most grasses. The seeds from native warm season grasses provide food for the birds when they really need it during the winter. The grasses grow in clumps allowing chicks just enough bare ground surface to feed on seeds. Another advantage is the manner in which the grasses fall over and form cover for the birds and protection for nesting. Wright admitted that native warm season grasses do not come without their limitations. She stressed that fescue out competes native warm season grasses so it must be eliminated prior to planting and kept in control after the grass is established, which normally takes two to three years. Wright also made the audience aware that native warm season grasses cannot be grazed or cut shorter than nine inches in height. The fisherman in the audience where treated with a discussion by Paul Bugas, with

the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, on trout habitat and a stream bank stabilization project that he was involved with on Ford’s farm. Bugas shared that the more diversity there is in a stream the healthier it is. He pointed out that he likes to see rocks in the bottom of creeks. Brook trout nest in the rocks, and creeks with little sediment typically have lower E coli counts. Water samples were taken on the Ford farm before cattle were fenced out with E. coli counts of 3,850 colony forming units (CFU) per 100 ml. After the cattle were fenced out another sample showed an E.coli count down to 25 CFU per 100 ml. Representatives from the Natural Resource Conservation Service and Headwaters Soil and Water Conservation District took the opportunity to share various options for stream fencing and livestock watering systems. Bobby Drumheller showed the audience how much healthier fescue roots are and how much more moisture is held in the soil under a rotational

grazing system versus the shallow roots in a continuous grazing system. Along the same lines, John Keyler added, “Pasture is a crop just like anything else. It needs to be managed and treated like a crop especially with the cost of land and the price of cattle.” Throughout the day, the landowners and farmers learned of ways to be better stewards of the land. All water flows downstream and minor changes in practices at the farm level can have major effects on the quality of the water that eventually reaches the Chesapeake Bay. Libby Norris, with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, stressed the importance of voluntary Best Management Practices (BMP) to improve local waters along with the Chesapeake Bay. “The quality of the Bay is only as good as the water that feeds it,” said Norris. Following the tour around Ford’s farm, Nesha McRae, with the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, presented Virginia’s Watershed Improvement Plan and discussed various paths forward for cleaning up streams. Brad Hewitt, with Farm Credit of the Virginia’s, wrapped the day up by sharing different options for funding various BMP installation projects with the audience and suggesting to them how to go about getting the funding they need. “The proactive steps that agriculture takes in the coming years will be critical to both meeting the TMDL goals as well as avoiding costly legislation and regulation of on farm environmental management practices that remove land and resources from production. Education about designing grazing systems centered around off stream water and targeted use of herbicides will be very important in the future,” said Carter.

Mike Pillips (left) visits with Dave Horn about the possibilities and limitations of warm season grasses during a soil and water conservation workshop.

Page 3 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Soil and water conservation workshop draws crowd


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 4

Importance of cover crops stressed at Pennsylvania Field Day by J.C. Remsberg LANCASTER COUNTY, PA — Beautiful and sunny weather set the stage for Steve Groff’s Cover Crop Field days held Nov. 1 and 2 in Holtwood, PA. Several hundred producers were in attendance along with many government officials, seed company representatives, and other agronomists. People traveled from as far away as North Carolina, Ohio and New York to tour one of the best examples of sustainable agriculture in the East. The field day tour was self-guided with several stops where speakers could discuss what was important at the station. Twelve speakers came from as far away as France, and included industry experts, producers and educators. Highlights included test plot evaluations, equipment demos, and visits with vendors. Starting off was Steve Groff speaking about his farm and what he does to improve his operation. Steve Groff and his family farm 215 acres of vegetables and row crops in the rolling hills of southern Lancaster County, PA. He has pioneered cover cropping systems that include no-tillage, strategic planting of cover crops, and effective crop rotations as a way to increase profits, save soil and reduce pesticide use. The farm has received numerous

Steve Groff talks about the equipment used in his operation at a recent Cover Crop Field Day.

national, state, and local awards for soil conservation and sustainable farming practices. He speaks nationally and internationally about his cropping strategies. He proudly told visitors how the farms soil started at a 2 percent organic matter content and now the entire farm averages 5 percent organic matter. This is a huge increase

Cover photo by Chris Bickers Bruce Shankle, livestock marketing director for the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and director of the livestock program at the North Carolina State Fair, retired after the 2011 North Carolina State Fair in October. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

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Country Folks Farm Chronicle is published weekly for the agricultural community by Lee Publications PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Subscription Price: $45 (52 issues) $75 (104 issues), (Allow 3-5 weeks for delivery) Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge, NY. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks West, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager .....................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104 .................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production ................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132 ......................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor............................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141............... jkarkwren@leepub.com Editorial Assistant ..........................Richard Petrillo, 518-673-0145 ................... rpetrillo@leepub.com Page Composition........................Michelle Gressler, 518-673-0138 ................. mmykel@leepub.com Comptroller .....................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148 ..................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator.................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137 .................. jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager ....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111 .................. classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ...................................................... ..........................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160...................... Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office ........................518-673-0149 ............................... amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .................... subscriptions@leepub.com

and took many years. He spoke in depth about “working with nature” when using multiple species for cover crops. The farm is constantly experimenting with different cover crops and mixes to help show visitors what is possible. Steve noted, “Ask yourself what you’re trying to accomplish with your cover crop,” “It’s like buying a car, determine what you will need first.” Groff is also an innovator in the use of Tillage Radish™ which is deep taprooted radish species. It helps with soil compaction, holds nutrients, and suppresses weed growth. They were mixed in the plots at different rates. “The Tillage Radish is a cover crop with training wheels, it works well with other cover crops,” Groff said. “Our goal is to keep cover crop seed cost under $30 per acre.” Frederic Thomas, a French farmer and leader in cover cropping strategies in Europe, also spoke on his experiences with different species. “A cover crop is for your soil and system,” Thomas said. “It is a tool to improve the fertility for the next crop.” He went into detail why farmers need to use cover crops blends in order to achieve greater profit and productivity, not just in Europe, but in the United States as well. Kaitlin Dye, a full time employee at the farm, fielded questions from an

interested group in front of the cover crop plots she had planted. She spoke about cover crops in high tunnels and also how the soil temperatures were significantly higher than neighboring farms at spring planting time. She noted the 190 bushel corn the farm had raised in one field where no fertilizer was applied. Charlie White, a sustainable farming extension associate with Penn State, explained the benefits of different cover crops and how they work with soil microbes, worms and beneficial insects. Dr. Greg Roth of Penn State spoke about residual herbicides and making sure they don’t hurt fall cover crops. Another stop was in a field of Tillage Radish. A trench was dug showing the deep taproots they make. Chad Cherefko with NRCS got down in the trench to see for himself. “Pretty amazing,” he remarked. He later used a soil probe to measure compaction. He was impressed how deep he could get it in the soil and commented about lack of compaction. Ending each day was an energetic talk and demonstration from Ray Archuleta, Conservation Agronomist with NRCS. He is a self-proclaimed “former soil destroyer” who now works with improving soil quality. He stressed the importance of soil health, not soil management. “Always remember, we want grain for man, and residue for the land,” he noted. He performed an eye opening soil demonstration. Archuleta gathered different soils from different cropping systems and did a “Slake Test,” which measures the ability of the soil to hold together in water. The over worked conventional tillage soils quickly dissolved in water whereas the soils that were covered, no tilled, and cared for more, simply floated and did not dissolve away. He continued on about how important soil health is going to be for the next generations of farmers who will be working. He urged everyone there to remember, “that people in Indian and China want to eat steak and drive Cadillacs like we do in America.” “Our soils will need to compete to keep up in the future.” For more information on cover crops or to attend a future event, contact Steve Groff at 800-767-9441.

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The Tillage Radish™ is deep tap-rooted radish species. It helps with soil compaction, holds nutrients and suppresses weed growth. Photos by J.C. Remsberg


by Tamara Scully Martin Dally, renowned expert on sheep-breeding and laparoscopic artificial insemination, recently addressed the Garden State Sheep Breeders. Dally discussed flock management techniques for lamb optimization, as a part of the group’s annual Sheep and Fiber festival at the Hunterdon County Fairgrounds in Flemington, NJ. Dally also served as a judge for the show, and gave pointers on the proper

way to show the animals in another preshow seminar. Dally identified three phases of management needed for successful breeding: post-wean, prebreed, and herd management. He cautioned participants that “the most powerful word” in lamb production is “cull,” and encouraged breeders to keep very accurate lambing records. Large teats and entropian eye — an inverted eyelid — are reasons to cull, Dally said. “You can’t afford to have a ewe on your farm who

has not lambed for two years in a row,” he said. For the next phase, Dally suggests that special attention be paid to “select out ewes who need a little bit of help.” These ewes, he said, may have a poor conditioning score due to such factors as having had twins or large lambs, or having done a very good job lactating. Though they may be thin, these ewes are ones that a breeder would want to keep healthy, and may need assistance in gaining back their weight.

Dally said condition scoring is very important, as the process helps to identify nutritional or other issues that need to be addressed prior to beginning to breed the animals. The scoring reflects the weight of the animal, which in turn impacts the ability to successfully lamb and wean, as well as the weight of the weaned lambs. A selenium deficiency is not uncommon in most parts of the country, and can result in fetal mortality during the

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first three months of gestation and should be discussed with a veterinarian, as the tolerance to selenium is low, and toxicity can occur rapidly if too much is provided. Vaccination programs for common disease issues should begin pre-breeding, Dally said, and proper nutrition for successful fertilization and fetal growth begins now. Flushing of ewes by increasing the nutritional content of their diet just prior to breeding, and for a very short time during breeding, can increase the ovulation rate, Dally said, resulting in a 15 to 20 percent increase in lambs being born. Flushing is performed by increasing the carbohydrates, either by moving to a more lush pasture on a rotational grazing system, or by gradually increasing the amount of grain being fed. However, this same increase in carbohydrates will cause embryo loss once the implantation phase is reached, so should only occur briefly during the breeding phase, Dally cautioned. “Mature ewes benefit more from flushing than young ewes,” he said. The role of the ram For those not choosing artificial insemination, the sterility of the ram can be affected by an increase in temperature or

humidity. Hot and humid weather, with no cool down, will cause spermatozoa to die off, and the recovery period for regaining vitality in the ram is six weeks, Dally said. Rams should be sheared one month prior to breeding, and should be kept in a cool pasture. It is important to palpitate the testicles and to check for scrotal circumference. Thirty-two centimeters is the size which indicates maturity to breed. A diet with 12 percent protein is optimal before breeding, Dally said, and too much protein causes problems. The use of a marking harness can help to determine if there are libido or fertility issues. The harness should be changed to a different color after 17 days, and checked periodically for snugness, as breeding rams lose weight. If too many ewes are marked with two colors, the conception rate was low. Dally recommends breeding females at 12 months, which gives a higher lifetime productivity than breeding younger — by about 20 lambs per lifetime, a significant difference. Young ewes should be bred three weeks after mature ewes, but wean-

Managiing 6

Page 5 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Managing the flock for lamb optimization: sheep breeders learn from expert


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 6

Managing from 5 ing should occur at the same time, which helps with recovery. Mature ewes will seek out a ram, while young ewes do not. The ewes ideally would be no less than 65 percent of their mature body size at breeding. Lambing “The last six weeks of gestation are the most important,” Dally said. There is less room in the rumen for food, so its important to provide a high nutritional content from a small amount of food. The quality of feed needs to increase, and larger operators typically separate ewes carrying twins from those with singles to help with proper feed management at this stage. Breeding overweight ewes, or having ewes that do not get enough exercise, or are being fed improperly, increases the chances of ketosis, Dally said. Ear flicking is one sign of ketosis, and a Vitamin B shot is needed if this is observed. Dally emphasizes that “if one

has it, the probability the others have it is high,” and need to be treated quickly. Do not hesitate to call the veterinarian at the first signs of ketosis, he urged. The key to successful lambing is to “maximize observation and minimize interference,” said Dally, who has lambed over 70,000 ewes. Hypothermia is a manageable problem, requiring constant checking of the jugs, and a quick response if necessary. Immediately taking the temperature of any questionable lamb is the first step. If the head is down and the lamb is unable to swallow, a glucose injection directly into the stomach is the only chance of saving the animal, Dally said, and must occur before warming or using a feeding tube. The rumen is not developed yet, so the injection is uncomplicated. For those lambs who can swallow, but have low temperature, drying

with a towel, warming back up and feeding by stomach tube is the proper response. Cleaning any equipment between animals is extremely important. Dally also emphasized that colostrum from heavy milkers can be frozen for up to one year, but should not be heated in the microwave, which will damage the beneficial microbes. Colostrum is only beneficial for the first 24 hours of life, he added. Other herd management issues Worming is recommended pre-breeding and post-weaning, Dally said. Rams should be wormed every 28 days. Prior to worming, take the animals off feed the night before, to increase the medication’s contact with the gut. Keep animals inside, so the worms are dropped in the bedding and not in the pasture, then move the animals to pasture. Drug resistance can become a real problem,

and Dally recommends rotating drugs from year to year — no more often — to best avoid resistance in the flock. Proper pasture management is also vital, and pastures should be replanted each year to help curtail worm problems. Some breeds are more prone to

worms. Humidity increases the worm population, and having too large of a pasture allows the sheep to select the best-tasting plants and to eat them to the ground, while avoiding less tasty ones, increasing the exposure to worms. Pasture grasses

should be kept at about three inches, no less, and pastures should be small enough that the flock will graze evenly, not selectively, and rotated before the grass is shorn down too low, Dally said.

TRADE SHOW OPPORTUNITIES • KEYSTONE FARM SHOW •

January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

• VIRGINIA FARM SHOW • Jan. 19, 20 & 21, 2012 • Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-3 Augusta Expoland • Fishersville, VA

• BIG IRON EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• EMPIRE STATE FRUIT & VEG EXPO • Jan. 24, 25 & 26 2012 Oncenter Convention Center • Syracuse, NY

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• HARD HAT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

www.facebook.com/countryfolks Get mid-week updates and online classifieds, plus links to other agricultural organizations.

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by Stewart Truelsen “Made in USA” are three words you won’t see very often on items sold by major retailers. It’s so true of consumer goods that a store in upstate New York is making a name for itself by selling only items made in the United States. The Made in America store has been so popular that buses on the way to Niagara Falls are stopping at Elma, NY, so tourists can visit. The owner proudly tells shoppers that he has carefully researched everything

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE

he sells and all items are 100 percent made-inAmerica products. The fact of the matter is that if you want to buy products made in this country you don’t have to drive to New York. Your best bet is to shop at a supermarket or farmers’ market. According to a report by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Americans spend 91 percent of their food dollars on food produced here. The report doesn’t itemize, but it’s a good bet that coffee, tea, tropical fruit

and seafood account for a large measure of imported food. If you shop at one of the major discount retailers for consumer goods, the numbers tell a much different story. Nearly 36 percent of personal expenditures for clothing and shoes are for products labeled “Made in China.” American-made clothing and shoes account for just 25 percent of all purchases. A separate report by the Toy Industry Association found that 90 percent of children’s toys are made

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Call or visit us on our Web site at

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519-765-4230 BERKELMANS’ WELDING & MFG. AYLMER ONTARIO, CANADA

in China. On a recent trip to a major discount retailer, we found clothing made in China, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Bangladesh and a country we weren’t familiar with at all — Lesotho. It turns out that Lesotho is an impoverished African nation where several major clothing companies have set up assembly operations because labor is so cheap. Globalization and technology have caused the loss of many factory jobs in the United States. Things we used to buy that were made with American hands are now made by foreign hands or aren’t made with human hands at

American Farm Bureau Federation all, but robots. Some call this progress, others call it unfair and few think it will change. As Americans we sometimes take food for granted. We’ve never had a major food shortage, and we can choose from an infinite variety of safe, affordable food. But, it is not just that we take food for granted. It’s that we take American food for granted. We may accept buying a pair of jeans stitched in Lesotho, but would we feel the same about purchasing food from there? It’s doubtful we would. The locavores who insist on locally produced food would have an even big-

Nominations open for leadership positions on the National Pork Board The National Pork Board is accepting nominations through Dec. 1 to fill five, three-year terms as directors of the board. Candidates also are being sought for two open seats on the board’s Nominating Committee to serve twoyear terms starting in

2012. Nominees may be submitted by state pork producer associations, farm organizations or anyone who pays the Pork Checkoff. Any person who is a pork producer or importer and has paid all Checkoff assessments due, or is a representa-

Monday Cattle & Goat Sale 12:30

Friday Cattle & Goat Sale 10:30

Horse Sale 3rd Tuesday of Month

Graded Feeder Sales (Call for Dates)

Siler City, North Carolina

Phone (919) 742-5665 Fax (919) 742-2584 PO BOX 345 Siler City, NC 27344 Livestock Auction Sales Dealers in Livestock Handling and Feeding Equipment We carry a full line of Feed by Performance Livestock and Feed Co.

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ger problem accepting it. At a time when so many consumer goods are imported and some Americans are even leaving the country to save money on dental work, surgery or prescription drugs, we need to be thankful for American agriculture and support the efforts of farmers and ranchers. Our homegrown food supply is an important economic strength and an envy of the rest of the world. Stewart Truelsen is a regular contributor to the Focus on Agriculture series and is the author of a book marking the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 90th anniversary

Selling Truck Load Lots of Farm Cattle by Video Tel-Auction Sale Every 2nd & 4th Wednesday of the Month

Stoll Trailers

tive of a producer/company that produces hogs/pigs, is eligible to serve on the National Pork Board. The 15 positions on the board are held by pork producers or importers who volunteer their time. USDA sees the pursuit of diversity in board membership as an opportunity for embracing new ideas that will enable the board to better serve its customers. The goal is to increase diversity through greater participation of persons with a variety of knowledge, skills and abilities; diverse size and type of operation; diversity of perspectives and opinions; diversity of marketing strategies; diversity of methods of production and distribution; diversity of gender, ethnicity and other distinguishing factors. The Pork Checkoff Nominating Committee will solicit, interview, evaluate and recommend candidates to the Pork Act Delegate Body at the annual meeting March 1-3, 2012, in Denver, CO. A slate of eight producers will be elected and submitted to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, who will appoint five producers to serve 3year terms on the National Pork Board. Please send application requests and questions to: National Pork Board, 1776 NW 114th St, Clive, IA 50325. Or contact Teresa Wadsworth at 515-223-2612 or at TWadsworth@pork.org. Source: Pork Leader, Oct. 14

Page 7 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Made in USA


IH 1066, lots power, $8000; NH 1465 9.3’ haybine, $10,300; 600 gallon gas tank, skid, $475; 585-567-2526.(NY) BEAGLE puppies, AKC $150, Lab puppies, $200; 1989 Ford F350 dump, $2,000. 518-993-4720.(NY) FIVE Steers 400-500#, one dairy nanny goat and one Billy goat. Samuel Schwartz, 2157 Hugh Sayer Road, Oriskany Falls, 13425 NEW HOLLAND MODEL 254 tedder rake, snow plow frame fits most IH tractors, homemade. 315-923-7789.(NY) SIX milkmaster milkers, good condition pipeline for 90 cows receiving jar & pump, 20 ft. patz silo unloader, wheel drive, $1,500. 518-673-2431.(NY) WANTED: N.H. 488 haybine, or similar model, in good condition. 315-5363506.(NY)

NH Super 77 baler, works & ties 100%, $1,400; Pequea 110 spreader, like new, $3,500. Gingerich, 9036 Stryker Road, Avoca,NY 14809 REG. Black and white Holstein service bull, 2 years old, sired by primer red. Fabius, 20 minutes south of Syracuse. 315-677-4013.(NY) ORGANIC Holstein Jersey Cross, cows and springing heifers, $1,500-$1,800; Also, small heifer calves, 493 Sickler Road, Jordanville, NY 13361. 315-858-3006.(NY) FAT HAFLINGER ponies for sale, 10+, make offer. Tennessee Walker rides great. Black Quarterhorse mare, green. Two miniature horses. 315-678-2237.(NY)

COMPLETE herd, Reg. Jerseys, 40 milkers, 13 bred heifers, 10 yearlings, $15,000; 16. avg., 4.9 bf test conventions. 207-4099453.(ME)

ROUND BALES, 4x5, 1000 lbs., first cutting, $22 and second $30; Square bales, 45-50 lbs., $2.75. Hobart. 607-3263407.(NY)

WANTED: Bottle washer for large milk bottles to be reused in dairy store. 508-8778700.(MA)

HAY FEEDER for horses, small bales. 315662-3440.(NY)

SUPER H, new paint, tires, tubes, rims, runs great, $2,200; 14’ lowboy tandem trailer, $850, 8 ft. box & leveler. 607-8634422.(NY)

WANTED: Someone to clip cows, my clippers and knives, 50 cows. 315-8458263.(NY)

1999 CHEVY 3500 4WD, Auto, 64K, on 2006 Engine. Needs flatbed and front brakes, cab frame and drive train good. 607-659-5904.(NY)

FOR SALE: Feeder pigs, approx. 100 lbs. each; WANTED: Good used tires13’6 on 38” rim. Gouvenour, 315-408-0471.(NY)

CASE IH 1420 combine with two heads, good working condition, always Shedded. 585-315-8127.(NY)

HEREFORD Angus bull, 3 yrs. old, $1,100; Lexington forge gas stove with pipe, like new, $1,200; Brillion 10’ transport harrow, $300. 315-684-3783.(NY)

AC A330 corn head, $1,200; Speed king, 41’ PTO drive hay grain elevator, $900. 1969 3020 diesel PS $8,200. 585-7863364.(NY)

NIGERIAN DWARF GOAT, kids for sale. 2 Wethiers, $50. each, 2 does, $100 each, all about 6 months old. 716-492-4351.(NY)

POLYDOME calf hutches, pail holder, 2 pails, bottle holder, very good shape. Chenango Co. 607-674-6211.(NY)

3x4 ROUND BALES hay, quality mixed grass, never wet, stored inside, 18 dollars. 607-225-4516.(NY)

MINIATURE DONKEYS herd reduction, Jacks and Jennies. All tame and friendly. $200 and up. 717-687-3761.(PA)

WANTED: INTERNATIONAL model #46 baler, working or for parts. Wayne Co. area. 315-923-4730.(NY)

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WANTED: Deutz-Fahr round baler, for use, repair, or parts. call 315-536-0235.(NY) WANTED: Beef cattle, halter broke or tie stall trained, young stock, Hereford preferred, please leave message. 315-8582508.(NY)

WANTED: 18.4x30 rear tractor tire, 75% OB; Patz barn cleaner chain, 450’ ccw; For Sale, one service bull, 15 months. 315823-2375.(NY)

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REG. Hereford cows, top bloodlines, open to reasonable offers, snow blower for tractor, $1,000; 315-363-8966.(NY)

JD Diesel motor from 4230, needs overhaul, $1,500; Also, JD Roll-O-Matic front axle with wheels and tires, $800. 607-6276240.(NY)

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WANTED: John Deere rear wheel weights for 4020; Also, Canopy and ROPS. 518568-7230.(NY) BOARDING HEIFERS: Up to 70 head. Little Falls. Plenty of feed. Call Dave or Tom, 315-723-4801 or 315-868-7012.(NY)

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November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 8

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Discuss vaccine choices with your herd veterinarian to help ensure complete protection

KELLY’S GARAGE 2868 Rt. 246 Perry, NY 14530 585-237-2504 SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 518-284-2346 6799 State Rt. 23 • Oneonta, NY 607-432-8411

B. EQUIPMENT, INC. 8422 Wayne Hwy. Waynesboro, PA 717-762-3193 BINKLEY & HURST, LP 133 Rothsville Station Rd. Lititz, PA 17543 717-626-4705 Fax 717-626-0996 ELDER SALES & SERVICE, INC. 4488 Greenville-Sandy Lake Rd. Stoneboro, PA 724-376-3740

GRUMELLI FARM SERVICES, INC. 929 Robert Fulton Hwy. Quarryville, PA 717-786-7318 STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE RD#1, Box 46 Klingerstown, PA 717-648-2088

Not all vaccines are created equal, and the myriad of choices can be confusing. Your veterinarian is the best resource to help you sort through product information and make science-based vaccine recommendations to provide complete protection for your herd. If your cattle aren’t fully protected against respiratory and reproductive diseases, your herd’s health, productivity and profitability could be at risk. “Vaccines need to be carefully assessed and chosen to ensure your dairy operation isn’t in danger of a disease outbreak,” says Greg Edwards, DVM, Cattle Technical Services, Pfizer Animal Health. “The investment you make in selecting the right disease prevention products also can help reduce the significant costs and labor associated with disease treatment.” Dr. Edwards suggests sitting down with your veterinarian to evaluate vaccines based on eight

areas of product differentiation and pick vaccines that best fit your management needs and vaccination program goals. 1. Label indications and levels of protection: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grants label claims based on demonstrated efficacy for each disease organism in the vaccine. These levels of protection include: Prevention of Infection, Prevention of Disease, Aids in Disease Prevention, Aids in Disease Control and Other Claims. 2. Duration of immunity: Duration of immunity (DOI) is the minimum amount of time you can expect a vaccine to help protect your cattle, based on manufacturer efficacy and disease challenge studies. A vaccine’s DOI should help protect during the critical risk period for disease risk. Your veterinarian can help schedule revaccination protocols according to your vaccines’ DOI. 3. Immune response time: Some types of vac-

cines stimulate protective immunity more rapidly than others. For example, intranasal vaccines can help provide a quick immune response. 4. Modified-live virus vs. killed virus vaccines: Modified-live virus (MLV) vaccines contain live organisms that can undergo limited replication within the body. MLV vaccines can have benefits including rapid immune response, comprehensive immune response and duration of immunity, and few postvaccination reactions. 5. Route of administration: Follow the route of administration indicated on the label to help achieve the expected efficacy of the vaccine. Your vaccine choice and preferred route of administration may depend on your management capabilities, and training your employees on administration may be necessary. 6. Safe for use in pregnant cows and calves nursing cows: Choose vaccines that are safe for use during pregnancy to help bolster immunity of the cow and enhance colostrum quality. Having flexibility to revaccinate cows during gestation provides protection against viral shedding and supports herd immunity. 7. Convenience: Vaccines come in a variety of combinations that can be tailored to fit your disease challenges and management needs. Your veterinarian can help you identify disease risks based on herd history or geographic challenges. When choosing combination vaccines, remember that DOI and levels of protection may be different for each antigen in the vaccine. 8. Cost-effectiveness: Profitability on the operation is important, and cost-effectiveness is always a factor in product selection. Work with your veterinarian to discuss factors that impact a cost-effective vaccine, including management time and labor for administration, vaccine combinations, levels of protection, duration of immunity, cost of a potential disease outbreak, and price. Partner with your veterinarian to select vaccines that provide complete protection for your cattle and optimal results for your operation.

Page 11 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Eight factors for confident vaccine selection


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 12

Hennessy finishes big to win the NAL Adult Jumper Finals HARRISBURG, PA — Patricia Hennessy of Kintnersville, PA, finished big to win the $10,000 North American League (NAL) Adult Jumper Finals riding Little Tom at the 66th Annual Pennsylvania National Horse Show on Oct. 22. “It was exciting because I had never done that well before and it was like, finally! I did it!” said Hennessy. “I knew I was able to do it I just had to execute it.” The course designed by Steve Stephens proved to be a challenge for many of the 30 riders in the class, with 13 returning for the jump-off. There were five double clear rounds in all with Murray Kessler and All That taking the lead just before Hennessy, who was second to last in the jump off. Hennessy and Little Tom laid down an impressive round in what would be the winning time of 28.143 seconds. Kaley Pratt and her mount, Shane, were the last to go, but finished a mere two seconds behind Hennessy to take the second place ribbon in a time of 30.107 seconds. “I saw Murray go right before me. I

knew he was pretty fast and his horse was really careful so I knew that I had to be clean,” said Hennessy. “It was anybody’s game though. Anyone that was in the jump-off could have won. I just happened to get lucky.” Hennessy had a lot of help getting to the winner’s circle. Her trainer, Olympic veteran Chris Kappler, came to Harrisburg just to help Hennessy for the class. Her husband Kevin was acting as the groom and many of her family members were on hand to provide support in the cheering section. “They try to come and watch me as much as possible, especially my mother, she loves horses and she really enjoys it when we win.” said Hennessy. “It meant a lot to win here.” The NAL offers a year-long series in six divisions — Children’s Hunter, Adult Hunter presented by Practical Horseman, Children’s Jumper, Adult Jumper, Pony Jumper, and the Low Junior/Amateur-Owner Jumper. The series includes classes held at hundreds of horse show across the United States and Canada.

Having A Horse Auction?

Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream. January/February 2012 March 2012

email to NAL@Ryegate.com or visit www.ryegate.com . The Pennsylvania National Horse Show is proud of its tradition of supporting equine and youth programs. The show benefits the Harrisburg Kiwanis Youth Foundation and the Pennsylvania National Horse Show Foundation, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation. Details are available at the horse show’s website at www.panational.org or by calling the horse show office at 717-770-0222.

at’s h W k Loo ew! N m trea S e Man Now is ne! Onli

Yourr connectionn too thee Northeast Equinee Market

ur ut O n o b A io Ask e Auct ing s t r i o H dar L s n e l Ca

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Riders need not be members of the NAL to compete in the qualifying classes, but only members earn points toward the year-end finals. With the annual membership fee only $35, most riders join in hopes of earning a trip to Harrisburg for the East Coast riders and Las Vegas for the West Coast competitors. The 2011-12 NAL qualifying period began on Sept. 1 and runs through Aug. 31, 2012. For more information regarding the NAL series, including series specifications, current standings and a list of upcoming events, call 717-867-5643,

Deadline Date December 9 February 17

Call Your Account Representative or 1-800-218-5586

The January/ February Issues of Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market www.cfmanestream.com

2012 1 stst Annual Stallion Directory nd *Listing Deadline Friday, December 2 nd

Will Feature:

Breeding & Foaling, Barn & Trailer Safety, Barn Building and Colleges Focus Deadline: Friday, December 9th

For advertising contact your sales representative today...

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The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) is hosting a series of workshops and listening sessions on conservation easements this year and in 2012.

The next session will take place Dec. 13 at the Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex in Chatham, VA. The workshop runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Virginia Secretary of

Agriculture and Forestry Todd P. Haymore and VDACS Commissioner Matt Lohr will host the event with speakers and workshop leaders from other state agencies, the legal profession, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. VDACS encourages farmers to attend who may be interested in the

idea of permanently preserving their farm or forest land with a conservation easement but are unsure of where to go for more information. Presenters will discuss all aspects of conservation easements, including the implications of easements on the farming operation; the use, sale and/or transfer of the land; and tax and finan-

FOR SALE 1998 International Towmaster on a 4700 Air Ride Chassis with a DT466, 275HP Engine, 6 Spd. Allison Automatic Transmission, Good Paint with a Perfect Interior and Air Seats, Nearly New Michelin Tires, Air Brakes, 25,000 Lb. 5th Wheel Hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. Phone Fort Plain, NY 518-993-2618

cial considerations. “With all of the pressing issues facing farmers today — high prices, unusual weather patterns, increased environmental regulation — few things rank higher than preserving their farmland,” said Lohr. “The land is our farmers’ greatest asset, and often they have an emotional as well as an economic tie to the old home place. The tradition of passing down the land from generation to generation is getting harder and harder to maintain,” he said. “We want to bring farmers together to better understand their options for preserving the land they love and the business, financial and estate planning implications that result from making this decision.” The one-day workshops can help producers learn more about conservation easements and how this tool may help them meet the longterm goals they have for their farming operations. Morning sessions in Chatham will include an overview of conservation easement mechanics and an update on Work-

ing Lands Discussion Group efforts. The lunch speaker will address starting the easement process and finding good partners. Afternoon sessions include the landowner’s perspective on easement donations and landowner thoughts on increasing the role of working lands as part of Gov. Bob McDonnell’s 400,000 acre preservation goal. Lohr will wrap up the day’s discussion. More information is available at www.vdacs. virginia.gov/preservation/workshop.shtml . The early registration fee is $5. After Dec. 5, it goes up to $10, and space will be limited at that time. Farmers may register electronically at www.vdacs.virginia.gov/preservation/wo rkshopform.shtml or by contacting Christie Young at 804-516-2396 or emailing her at christie 11000@yahoo.com. A third workshop will be held in Dinwiddie County on Jan. 5, 2012, at the Eastside Community Enhancement Center in Petersburg. The first session was held March 2011 in Lexington.

Page 13 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

State hosts workshops on preserving Virginia’s working farm and forest land


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 14

Building the beef industry with composite cattle by Sally Colby Composite cattle, the planned mating of two pure breeds that have desirable traits to create a new breed, might be part of the answer to revitalizing the beef industry. Dr. Jerry Lipsey, executive vice president of the American Simmental Association, says that the concept of planned crossbreeding isn’t new. “Animals such as chickens, pigs, turkeys have been bred as composites for quite a while, as have crops such as corn, soybeans and wheat,” he said. “We don’t plant purebred corn or wheat, we plant crossbreds.” Lipsey noted that the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) in Clay Center, Nebraska began testing the science of composite seedstock around 1980. “We’ve become comfortable with the term ‘purebred’, regardless of how that term is defined,” said Lipsey. “Open herd book breeds — such as Charolais, Simmental, Chianina, Gelbvieh and Maine Anjou — typically consider 7/8 blood animals as purebreds. Closed herd book breeds such as Hereford and Angus don’t accept other breeds, which keeps a

Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) president Ben Eggers, left, presents the 2011 BIF Pioneer Award to Jerry Lipsey, American Simmental Association.The award was presented to Lipsey at the organization’s 43rd annual meeting and research symposium in Bozeman, MT. The Pioneer Award recognizes individuals who have made lasting contributions to the improvement of beef cattle, honoring those who have had a major role in acceptance of performance reporting and documentation as the primary means to make genetic change in beef cattle. Photo by Troy Smith, provided courtesy of www.BIFconference.com

certain level of predictability in cattle relative to certain traits.” Lipsey, who has a lifetime of experience in the cattle industry, says when the American Simmental Association recognized that purebred seedstock will perhaps become less popular, and composite, or crossbred seedstock may become more popular in the future, they created a divi-

sion called SimSolutions so that Simmental owners could breed to other breeds. However, the association found that almost all the composite Simmental cattle are Simmental x Angus. “We realized that it really was-

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Producer News example, Charolais x Angus steers or Simmental x Angus steers are extremely popular. They have the best traits of Angus, and the best traits of Charolais or Simmental.” Lipsey says that although any animal that is 7/8 or higher Simmental can be registered as a purebred Simmental, more members are breeding SimAngus™ to

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SimAngus™ and stopping there. “Breeders often refer to ‘stabilized’ SimAngus™ which means multigenerational SimAngus™ (half to half),” he said. “The semen companies know that the data on such crosses is solid, and they know they can sell the product. The downstream industries — feedyards and packing

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n’t going to be Simmental x Hereford, or Simmental x Shorthorn,” said Lipsey. “It was going to be Simmental x Angus (both black and red). When we recognized that, we trademarked the SimAngus™ name. The overwhelming proportion of all composite crossbred seedstock are SimAngus™ — it is wildly popular across this nation.” The growing popularity of composite cattle such as SimAngus™ is the result of cattle breeders recognizing the value of hybrid vigor. “We get two things with cross-breeding,” said Lipsey. “We get hybrid vigor, or heterosis, which is crucial — it keeps us alive. Heterosis gives us fertility and longevity on the maternal side. The other thing we get with crossbreeding is when two breeds are combined in a smart and wise way, we get the best of both worlds. For

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Martin Morgan of Leicester, NC, received the John V. Robbins Distinguished Service Award from the Red Angus Association of America (RAAA) at the Red Angus National Convention in Durham, NC, Sept. 15-16. Johnny Rogers of Roxboro, NC, presented the award. “When I think of Red Angus in the Carolinas,” said Rogers, “Martin is one of the first people I think of. He lead the resurgence of the breed in the mid-Atlantic area.” Morgan was a founding member of the Red Angus in the Carolinas Association and was the driving force behind the area’s first affiliate sale, The Stocking Stuffer Sale, held each December.

Morgan was elected to the RAAA Board of Directors in 2007 and the next year was named chairman of the Constitution and By-Laws Committee. The governing documents of the RAAA had not been revised for the past 30 years and under the Morgan’s careful watch, the committee reviewed and revised the by-laws. They offered their first set of revisions at the 2009 convention and the final revisions in 2010. “This revisions task certainly took a tremendous amount of time and dedication working with the staff, the Constitutions and By-Laws Committee and at-

Morgan 17

Johnny Rogers (left) presented fellow breeder Martin Morgan with the John V. Robbins Distinguished Service Award at the 2011 Red Angus National Convention.

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Building from 14 plants — love to process cattle that have less waste fat and still have marketable characteristics.” Cross-bred composite seedstock are perfect for small beef herds in states such as New York and Pennsylvania, says Lipsey. “The reason the cross is so popular for small herds is that you can go back with a half-bred bull on halfbred heifers, and pretty soon your entire herd is half-half, which is just what the feedyards, sale barns and packing plants love to buy,” he said. “It really adds value to the herd.” Using A.I. helps spread the diversity even more because breeders can use elite bulls

that have high accuracy. “These bulls have so many progeny, and even though many of them are long dead, there’s a lot of semen stored. They can add huge value to herds.” Composite cattle will benefit farmers and ranchers, and in the end, consumers. “We can keep heterosis in the cow herd and blend the breeds properly,” said Lipsey. “We can build cattle that grow fast, use feed efficiently and produce carcasses that are relatively lean and have great marbling. It’s a win for the beef business, a win for the farmers and ranchers across the nation, and a win for consumers.”s

Page 15 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Morgan honored with John V. Robbins Distinguished Service Award


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 16

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support their grazing. If you’re watching a couple of bred heifers for a month, you might as well be watching 20 or 30. These examples relate to what I like to call “critical mass,” or enough to make a difference. I don’t use the term in a precise

way, just kind of adapted from two fields. In nuclear physics, that tipping point is the divide between sustaining a chain reaction and fizzling out. In sociodynamics, it’s the thresh-

Mass 18

Morgan from 15 torneys to make sure the wording was accurate,” said Rogers. “Martin’s dedication and attention to detail really put our association on solid ground going in to the future.” “When I started in this breed, my sole goal was to forward the knowledge and recognition of Red Angus, especially in the eastern U.S.,” said Mor-

gan. “As the breed continues to grow and expand in the East, so does our need to continue the education process with our commercial producers.” The John V. Robbins Distinguished Service Award recognizes RAAA members who show outstanding dedication and service to the Red Angus breed.

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Page 17 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Critical mass


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 18

Mass from 17 old number of people in a group that can make something happen by their exchange of ideas. There’s always water vapor in the air, but you don’t notice it unless it is either practically devoid and uncomfortably dry, or getting closer to moderately abundant and rain. A few people may not be able to create a movement or a brand, and their efforts could fizzle out. But with just the right dynamics, they can spark an exchange of ideas that leads to something with sustained power. Back to the farm or ranch, with a given stocking rate and climate, a certain amount of land supports a cowherd large enough to justify facilities, lead you

to try new marketing alternative and care about profitability. If you try to do too much with poor planning or management, your enterprise can go “supercritical.” Or that could refer to what folks are saying down at the feed store. Once you arrive at a threshold or realized goal that brings the change you were hoping for, good things should keep happening as long as you can manage the dynamics. The beef industry pursued a quest for critical mass in the area of adding value to underutilized cuts. When meat scientists pulled the teres major muscle out of the chuck and realized how good it was, that alone

would not bring about the cascade of added value to end meats that we have today. It took a producerfunded and sustained effort in locating other cuts worth fabricating from the chuck. That made it profitable for packers to change the way they process beef and pass some of that back to the ranch. Maybe you picked up on the unusual terminology I used to discuss humidity, a comparison to marbling in beef. Above the Choice/Select border, you find just

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November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 20

BENCHMARK MILK PRICE DROPS $1.04 Could Selling Dead Corn Stalks Help? Issued Nov. 4, 2011 The Agriculture Department announced the October Federal order Class III benchmark milk price Friday at $18.03 per hundredweight, down $1.04 from September, $1.09 above October 2010, and equates to about $1.55 per gallon. The decline pulled the 2011 Class III average to $18.25, up from $14.36 at this time a year ago and an anemic $10.72 in 2009. The Class IV price is $18.41, down $1.12 from September, but $1.26 above a year ago. The NASS cheese price averaged $1.7471 per pound, down 11.2 cents from September. Butter averaged $1.7893, down 19.9 cents. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.5109, down 3.3 cents, and dry whey averaged 61.52 cents, up 2.3 cents. The November Class III futures contract was trading late Friday morning at $18.89 and December at $18.40, which would result in a 2011 average of $18.32, up from $14.41 in 2010 and $11.36 in 2009. California’s October 4b cheese milk price was $15.78 per cwt., down 55 cents from September, but 12 cents above October 2010, and $2.25 below the comparable Federal order Class III price. The 4b price has trailed the Federal order Class for 13 months, ranging this year from a low of 8 cents in February to a high of $3.07 in August. The Golden State’s 4b price average now stands at $16.41 but is still $3.15 above the level at this time a year ago. The 4a butter-powder price is $18.29, down a dollar from September but $1.64 above a year ago. Its 2011 average now stands at $19.15, up $4.48 from 2010. Cash cheese saw some holiday strength for the third week in a row. The blocks closed the first Friday in November at $1.88 per pound, up 10 3/4-cents on the week, and 40 cents above that week a year ago. Good demand for barrel pushed the price above

the blocks, to $1.92, up 15 1/4-cents on the week, and 41 cents above a year ago. Only five cars of block traded hands on the week and six of barrel. The NASSsurveyed U.S. average block price slipped a half-cent to $1.7226 and barrel averaged $1.7411, down 0.1 cent. Cash butter headed down Friday, reversing four weeks of gains, and closed the week at $1.8325, down 4 3/4cents, and strangely 4 3/4-cents below a year ago when it plunged 30 1/2-cents on the week for no real clear discernable reason. Sales for Halloween week amounted to eight carloads. NASS butter averaged $1.8290, up 2 1/2cents. NASS nonfat dry milk averaged $1.4872, down a penny, and dry whey averaged 62.38 cents, up 0.3 cent. Milk is being channeled to the churn and the dryer. September butter production was reported at 138 million pounds, up 3.5 percent from August, and a whopping 21 percent above October 2010, according to USDA’s latest Dairy Products report. Nonfat dry milk and skim milk powder output totaled 139.5 million pounds, up 10 percent from a year ago. American type cheese output, at 337 million pounds, was down 3.2 percent from August, and 4.2 percent below a year ago. Total cheese production hit 867 million pounds, down 0.2 percent from August, and 0.6 percent below a year ago. I wrote about declining fluid milk sales last week but this week we learned that June to August sales were off 1.5 percent from a year ago, according to USDA and California data. August sales were up 0.9 percent but it’s only the second positive month in the last 21, according to the CME’s Daily Dairy Report (DDR). Year-todate sales were down 1.5 percent from last year and down 2.9 percent from two years ago. Switching to the export picture; the DDR reported that China only imported 15.4 million pounds of whole milk

powder (WMP) in September, the smallest figure in almost three years. June to September imports were down 43 percent from the prior year. From January 2010 to May 2011, China imported 69.7 million pounds of WMP per month, but that pace dropped significantly this summer, leaving New Zealand suppliers to find other markets for their products, the DDR said. Speaking of the world market; Global Dairy

Trade auction prices were down on most products in the November 1 auction, while skim milk prices were flat, according to the DDR. The weighted average price was $1.49 per pound, up 0.2 percent from the October 18 auction. SMP from the U.S. (Dairy America) averaged $1.44 per pound for December delivery and $1.43 for January delivery. Anhydrous milk fat dropped 9.3 percent, to $1.50 per pound, and

Cheddar cheese for industrial use fell 3.2 percent, to $1.54. The weighted average price for whole milk powder was $1.58 per pound, down 0.8 percent. Back home, USDA reports that milk production continues to be at the seasonal low point in the Northeast and MidAtlantic. Milk volumes in the mid to upper Midwest are steady to slightly lower. Milk components are rebounding to near annual peaks. Cali-

fornia is mostly steady to slightly higher and at levels above a year ago. Milk production in New Mexico is tending to flatten out at current levels. Most of the growth in production is in the western states, according to University of Wisconsin Emeritus Professor Bob Cropp in Tuesday’s DairyLine. Texas was up substantially, he said, while California slowed some due to out-

Mielke 23


(L-R) Secretary of Agriculture Ed Kee, Jonathan R. Hastings Jr., Rosalie A. Hastings, Kenneth W. Rogers Sr., Barbara Rogers, and Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Austin Short. Two Delaware farms, each owned by the same family for 100 years or more, were honored as Century Farms recently by the Delaware Department of Agriculture (DDA). The two farms are the Rogers family farm, Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, and the Hastings family farm, North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County. The 24th annual Century Farms Awards ceremony was held at the Delaware Department of Agriculture, in Dover, DE. The DDA Planning Section presents Century Farm awards to landowners who can document that their land has been farmed by the same family for at least 100 years. Farms must include at least 10 acres of the

original parcel, or gross over $10,000 annually from the sale of agricultural products in order to qualify for the program. To date, including the latest honorees, Delaware has 116 farms enrolled in the Century Farms Program, which began in 1987. Ed Kee, Delaware Secretary of Agriculture, was the featured speaker during the ceremony. Kee said, “When I think about Century Farm families and the agricultural industry in Delaware, what comes to my mind is hard work and everything they have accomplished through the years. Everything we accomplish today is on the shoulders of those who went before us.”

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Page 21 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Two families inducted into Delaware Century Farm Program


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 22

Let’s keep restrictions on Sunday hunting by Carl T. Shaffer, President, Pennsylvania Farm Bureau Farmers across the commonwealth and a mounting number of other Pennsylvanians have been sending a clear message to members of the state General Assembly: “Don’t expand Sunday hunting.” Most farmers feel strongly about it because we want a day of peace and quiet on Sunday, when we may work less and enjoy more time with our family and friends around the farm. Posting “No Sunday Hunting” on our lands won’t prevent the intrusions. Hunters frequently wander from one property onto another, and while responsible hunters respect private property, landowners know that trespass and poor enforcement is a serious problem that would become even worse. Farmers also hunt and provide sportsmen access to vast amounts of land. While we feed the wildlife, hunters help us control the devastation of crops and the loss of farm income. It has been a good balance of mutual interests. It’s also noteworthy that many hunters do not want the law changed for a variety of reasons. But this is not only about farmers and hunters. More than 12 million other Pennsylvanians, including those living in cities and the suburbs, should be involved with the discussion and decision. Many take to the outdoors of the commonwealth to hike, bike, ride horses or just go there for a family picnic. Right now they aren’t startled or troubled by gunfire on Sundays and they don’t feel a need to wear blaze orange outfits worn by hunters. If the current law changes, so will the nature of Sundays in Pennsylvania. Legislation before the General Assembly in Harrisburg would not only repeal current restrictions on Sunday hunting, but also turn future decision-making about it over to the Pennsylvania Game Commission. The Game Commission’s job is to properly manage wildlife populations, not to deal with potential conflicts between segments of our human population. Some advocates of Sunday hunting argue that it is not fair for them to be prevented from hunting on their own land, implying that somehow everyone has the

right to do whatever they wish, whenever they want, on their property. The argument ignores the fact that many restrictions or limitations are common on private property and are established for the greater public interest. Many of us likely believe that some of those restrictions are unwarranted or excessive. Most farmers just don’t happen to feel that limits on Sunday hunting are among them, especially since our land borders the property of others.

Proponents of a change in the law claim Pennsylvania’s economy will get a boost if it expands Sunday hunting, citing a study commissioned by a committee of the General Assembly. Pennsylvania Farm Bureau and many others, however, believe the statistics are greatly exaggerated and fail to take into account other considerations. For example, how much revenue and how many jobs will be lost if fewer Pennsylvanians and out-ofstate visitors participate

in recreational activities (other than hunting) on Sundays? And, the study apparently assumes that resident hunters won’t be contributing to the state’s economy if they are not hunting on Sundays. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pennsylvania hunters already spend more “days afield” than those of any other state. Among those are 103 days to hunt deer, including 18 Saturdays. Meanwhile, the Game Commission

already has the authority to respond to hunters’ requests for more deer hunting opportunities by adding two more days to the rifled deer season and by allowing hunting on the Friday and Saturday following Thanksgiving, or further extending hunting seasons. The bottom line is that the current law restricting Sunday hunting provides a reasonable balance for farmers, hunters and the millions of other people who enjoy the outdoors of Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania Farm Bureau President, Carl Shaffer. Carl Shaffer is a fulltime farmer, who grows corn, wheat and green beans on his farm in Columbia County.

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put per cow being down as high feed and hay prices and lower milk prices took their toll. He also believes the growth in cow numbers has slowed so, if milk production gains stay around 1.5 percent or less, milk prices might be a little stronger than the futures are portending, the high $16s, maybe the low $17s, he said. Cropp admits prices could be stronger as some predict but the market is “very sensitive.” He listed some positive developments; the new free trade agreements with South Korea, Panama, and Columbia; South Korea particularly. The truck dispute with Mexico has been resolved and cheese tariffs were removed. Stronger exports and holding production in check prices could mean stronger milk prices than we’re now forecasting, Cropp concluded. Offshore the New Zealand season continues strong, with milk deliveries still running about 4-5 percent above year ago levels and Australian milk receipts are around peak levels, and if not now, within the next few weeks. The forecast continues for increased milk production for the current season but not nearly as optimistic as New Zealand. The September U.S. Consumer Price Index for all food is 230.6, up 4.7 percent from September 2010, according to the latest data. The dairy products index is 219.4, up 10.2 percent from a year ago. Fresh whole milk is was up 13 percent; cheese, up 10.2 percent; and butter, up 9.2 percent. Commercial disappearance of dairy products in the first eight months of 2011 totaled 131.2 billion pounds, 1.2 percent above the same period in

2010. Butter was up 10.9 percent; American cheese, up 0.8 percent; other cheese, up 4.7 percent; NDM, down 3.1 percent, and fluid milk products, were off 1.5 percent. Meanwhile, the bottom line isn’t improving on the farm. Profitability declined for the third month in a row as milk prices fell faster than feed costs. The Agriculture Department’s latest Ag Prices report pegged the October AllMilk price at an estimated at $19.90 per cwt., down $1.20 from September. The cost of feed to produce 100 pounds of milk was $11.12, down just 35 cents from September. Corn dropped 45 cents, to $5.92 per bushel, and soybeans lost 30 cents, slipping to $11.90. Alfalfa hay jumped $7, to $203 per ton, and that left income over feed costs of $8.78 per cwt., down 85 cents from September. The DDR points out that, over the last 10 years, the IOFC averaged $9.09 per cwt. Bill Van Dam, of California’s Alliance of Western Milk Producers, gave some perspective on whey in his recent newsletter, writing that “In a very interesting switch, dry whey prices in the U.S. are higher than prices in the export trade. However, marketers of dry whey understand that it is important to maintain market share and, for now, are willing to sell to the export market at prices below what they can get from domestic markets. This imbalance cannot last very long, he said, and prices will equalize at some point. Prices in Europe have in the past two weeks already increased 4.5 cents. It is also interesting to note that lactose prices are very strong and are now 8 to 9 cents higher than dry whey,” he wrote.

In dairy politics; we learned of a new study from two dairy economists, reported in Wednesday’s DairyLine by Jerry Slomionski, Senior Vice President, Legislative and Economics at the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA). Slominiski reported that the study was conducted by Charles Nicholson of Cal Poly and Mark Stephenson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who did the economic modeling for National Milk’s original Foundation for the Future plan. “Nicholson and Stephenson have looked at the latest proposal, introduced in Congress by Representative Collin Peterson as the Dairy Security Act (DSA), and found that it will have some very eye opening results,” Slominski said. “The economists say one of their original findings remains consistent: milk price volatility would be substantially reduced under the proposed plan,” Slominski admitted, “But that reduced volatility comes at a price for dairy farmers: significantly lower farm milk prices and lower net farm income across all sizes of dairy farms.” He said this new look suggests the reforms could lower the U.S. all-milk price by 92 cents per hundredweight and lower cumulative net farm operating income 32 percent to 48 percent. He also quoted a press release from the Professional Dairy Business Association in Wisconsin, where one of the authors concluded that “the proposal would cause small farms to leave the dairy industry at a faster pace than without the program.” For more details, log on to www.dairy.wisc.edu. A National Milk press release questioned the “selective and simplistic inter-

pretation of new dairy legislation by organizations opposed to the Dairy Security Act.” At issue are government costs of the program and speculation as to how many dairy producers would participate in DSA’s safety net provisions. National Milk CEO Jerry Kozak said “these contrary findings clearly illustrate the challenges associated with simplistic attempts to communicate results from complex economic modeling,” adding that “assumptions about how producers will respond to the program is highly uncertain.” See www.nmpf.org for more details. Top executives of six of the country’s biggest dairy exporters have written members of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction expressing opposition to the DSA. They outlined what they consider to be the “negative effects the act would have on domestic and global dairy markets,” according to an IDFA press release, and said it has no place in deficit-reduction talks. The bill is expected to be part of the recommendations submitted by House and Senate Agriculture Committee leaders to the supercommittee for inclusion in the debt-reduction bill. In another news item this week the IDFA and Organic Trade Association (OTA) declared victory after the state of Ohio agreed to drop its regulations for so-called “absence claims” on dairy product labels. Dairy Profit Weekly editor Dave Natzke reported in Friday’s DairyLine that the action comes more than three years after those organizations filed a lawsuit against a 2008 regulation covering milk and dairy products labeled as rbST-or bovine growth

Mielke 24

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Page 23 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Mielke from 20


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 24

Dairy Leadership Council to effect change by George Greig, Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture Pennsylvania is the most productive agricultural state in the Northeast, and agriculture is the foundation of the state’s economy. If agriculture is the foundation, then the dairy industry is the cornerstone, with farmers producing 10.7 billion pounds of milk valued at $1.96 billion each year. Just as other business sectors have struggled to stay profitable over the past few years, dairy producers have been hit with high input costs and low milk prices. To strengthen the industry and ensure our farmers have the tools they need to keep their farms viable, Gov. Tom Corbett established the Pennsylvania Dairy Leadership Council last month. Made up of producers and industry leaders representing key dairy sectors, the council will help shape the direction of our dairy industry and ensure the state is supporting its growth.

Mielke from 23 hormone-free. A lower court initially upheld Ohio’s labeling requirements but a three-judge panel in the Sixth Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals ruled in favor of IDFA and OTA in 2010. The organizations claimed the labeling rule requirements violated dairy processors’ First Amendment rights and consumers’ rights to know regarding food production. Proponents of the rule said the labels implied product quality or safety differences which did not exist. I have often read about and even written about the gap between “city slickers” and “country folk” but that gap was greatly evidenced to me this week as I visited a local nursery in town that was selling dead corn stalks for $4.95 each! Sure hope they were “organic.” Now if city slickers can be convinced to buy water in a bottle and dead corn stalks, there just has to be a way for the dairy industry can get them to consume more milk and dairy products. PT Barnum said “There’s a sucker born every minute” or words to that effect. We just have to find a way to satisfy the sucker, I mean the slicker.

The department will also continue to work closely with the Center for Dairy Excellence to enhance producer profitability. Growing up on, and later operating a family dairy farm for more than 30 years, I remember well layering up to go out to work in the cold Crawford County mornings, the hours spent balancing farm accounts and the nights spent praying for good weather. I’ve stretched the check book and the milk check. Farming isn’t easy, but I love it. This experience isn’t unique to me, and the dairy leadership council is part of the Corbett administration’s commitment to make it easier to be in the business of agriculture. The 25-member council will make recommendations to Governor Corbett on policies, pro-

cedures, regulations and legislation that may aid in the development of the dairy industry. It will also serve as a resource to all departments, commissions and agencies under the governor’s jurisdiction to ensure that they are aware of the issues surrounding the dairy industry and accessible, accountable and responsive to dairy farm families and businesses. The council, which met for the first time on Nov. 1, is charged with identifying key variables and short- and long-term critical issues for the dairy industry such as: • Dairy farm business profitability; • Environmental compliance for dairy operations; • Dairy cattle welfare; • Family and next generation dairy producer opportunities;

• U.S. Farm Bill and federal dairy policy; and • Pennsylvania dairy policy and legislation. During the meeting, the council identified strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats the dairy industry will face over the next 10 years, including milk production growth opportunities, obstacles to growth, environmental compliance regulations, innovation, financing, milk safety and animal health. The council will make major recommendations to Governor Corbett on what state government can do to help the industry. The council is just part of our efforts to support the state’s dairy industry. The department is seeking ways to spur the growth of Pennsylvania’s dairy industry through international investments and creating new

markets for milk. Over the past few months, the department has been engaged in 2012 Farm Bill discussions across the state and stands ready to address the needs of Pennsylvania’s dairy industry. Demand for milk exceeds supply, so the opportunity to expand production to meet this demand is essential. To do that, we need to enhance risk management options for farmers, provide a stronger safety net against market volatility,

leverage financial management tools and simplify milk pricing. The administration is committed to the state’s dairy farmers and to keeping dairy farm businesses profitable and growing. We’re going to look at every aspect of milk production from cow to glass. This is a challenge, but it is one we remain focused on, because we know what our efforts mean for our dairy industry, for our consumers and for our commonwealth.


FEEDER CATTLE HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: No report.

MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: No report. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 879 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 240-245# 134-162; 250295# 130-164; 300-345# 125-150; 320-345# brahman x 82-86; 350-395# 117-145; 400-445# 115-147; 450496# 126-138; 500-545# 120-128; 575-590# 119-133; 605-620# 115-127; 710735# 104-111.50; 838-845# 104-110; S 1-2 270-285# 104-113; 300-345# 100120; 365-395# 91-114; 400440# 95-110. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 160-175# 135-150; 260285# 120-137; 300-345# 115-130; 355-390# 115132; 400-435# 110-130; 450-495# 109-129; 500545# 110-126; 550-595# 108-120; 600-635# 108123; 675-695# 95-102; 730745# 96-103; 755-790# 103104; 800-820# 94-96; 855-

876# 92-96; S 1-2 310-340# 105-110; 355-395# 90-112; 400-445# 95-105; 451-496# 90-106; 500-545# 102-109; 552-595# 90-105; 600-645# 91-105. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-495# 110-130; 500545# 110-126; 550-592# 106-126; 600-645# 110-125; 615# brahman x 65; 660690# 107-115; 705-740# 95103; 750-780# 90-104; 1000-1020# 81-85; S 1-2 460-485# 96-107; 500-545# 91-109; 550-595# 90-99; 605-645# 90-105; 670-695# 90-102. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 308. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 130; 400-500# 124-133; 500-600# 126.50134; 600-700# 110-132, mostly 130.75; 800-900# 107; M&L 2 300-400# 135; 400-500# 137; 500-600# 130-133; 600-700# 122.50125; M&L 3 300-400# 111118; 500-600# 125; 600700# 112; S 1 400-500# 91; 600-700# 115. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 110; 400-500# 118; 500-600# 108.50-

AUCTIONS 115.50; 600-700# 106-109; M&L 2 300-400# 112; 400500# 122-125.75; 500-600# 113-117.50; 600-700# 106108; M&L 3 300-400# 115; 400-500# 114.50; 500-600# 112; 600-700# 95; S 1 300400# 105; 400-500# 92-105; 500-600# 96.50-98; 600700# 91. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 115-130; 400500# 100-133, mostly 133; 500-600# 122-125.25; 600700# 106-112; 700-800# 90; M&L 2 300-400# 130; 400500# 121.50-136; 500-600# 108-121; 600-700# 103; S 1 300-400# 125; 400-500# 112-117; 500-600# 111; 600-700# 79. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1107 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 300-400# 123.50-143.50; 400-500# 128-142; 500600# 124-139.75; 600-700#

119-134.50; 700-800# 109125; 800-900# 104-114.50; M&L 2 400-500# 110-125; 500-600# 106-117; 600700# 106-119; 700-800# 109.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 106-136; 400500# 113-137, few 100108.50; 500-600# 106-122; 600-700# 107-117.50; 700800# 105-107; M&L 2 200300# 100-108; 300-400# 108.50-117; 400-500# 104114; 500-600# 100-106; 600-700# 95-102; M&L 3 400-500# 100; S 1 300-400# 90-109; 600-700# 92. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 147; 300-400# 117-137; 400-500# 113-136; 500-600# 107-129.50; 600700# 105-114.50; 700-800# 91-102.50; M&L 2 300-400# 115-130; 400-500# 111-122; 500-600# 104-118; 600700# 95-100; 700-800# 93; S 1 300-400# 121. SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1609. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 124-142; 300400# 121-148; 400-500# 127-152; 500-600# 125139.50; 600-700# 115-134; 700-800# 118.50-127.50; 800-900# 108-127; 9001000# 96-119; 1000-1100# 96; M&L 2 200-300# 123157; 300-400# 110-140; 400-500# 135-157; 500600# 113-137; 600-700# 119-128; 700-800# 120; 800-900# 95-102; 9001000# 89-12. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 110; 300400# 110; 400-500# 105; 500-600# 90-105; 600-700# 79-90; 700-800# 75-86; 800900# 78-95; 900-1000# 70.50-91; 1000-1100# 7079; 1100# & up 79.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 97-115, few 121; 300-400# 110-137; 400500# 115-131; 500-600# 106-123; 600-700# 110119.50; 700-800# 105.50112; 800-900# 89-104; M&L 2 200-300# 110-124; 300-400# 110-135; 400500# 111-136.50; 500-600# 92-122; 600-700# 103-115; 700-800# 97-109.50; 800900# 81-98. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 120-140; 300400# 124-151.50; 400-500# 127-146; 500-600# 114-140; 600-700# 100-129.50; 700800# 95-105; 800-900# 8095; 900-1000# 78-92; M&L 2 200-300# 124-151; 300400# 124-151; 400-500# 121-143.50; 500-600# 119127; 600-700# 105-116.50; 700-800# 80-92; 800-900# 78-85; 900-1000# 70-79. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 47. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 108-112; 400-

500# 100-108.50; 500-600# 106; M&L 2 300-400# 109; 400-500# 104-105; M&L 3 400-500# 100; S 1 300-400# 90-95. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 300-400# 117; 400-500# 114. FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report.

300-400# 149.50; 400-500# 123-141.75, mostly 139141.75; 500-600# 115124.50; 600-700# 116.25; M&L 2 300-400# 137149.75; 400-500# 128141.75; 500-600# 119128.75; 600-700# 117.25; S 1 300-400# 119-130; 400500# 110-126.50; 500-600# 115-121.

HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 413. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 144.50-146.50; 500-600# 136.50-141; 600700# 130.50-132.50; 700800# 125.25; M&L 2 400500# 146.50; 500-600# 131139.50, few 120-124; 600700# 120-124.50; 700-800# 124. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 500-600# 87-89; 600700# 89; 700-800# 76-84; 900-1000# 90.50; 1100# & up 83.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 121-129; 400500# 121-126; 500-600# 114-121.50; 600-700# 120.50-123.25, few 111114; 700-800# 94; M&L 2 300-400# 122; 400-500# 113-125.75; 500-600# 116118; 700-800# 92-103. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 138-141; 400500# 125-136.50; 500-600# 119-122; 600-700# 110.50116; 700-800# 84; M&L 2 400-500# 132.50; 500-600# 115-127; 600-700# 105.

MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 64. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 106-118; 400500# 107-123; 500-600# 106-100; M&L 2 200-300# 100-108. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 120-126; 400500# 113-121; 500-600# 107-115. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 533. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 156-160; 400500# 141.50-156; 500-600# 132.50-135.25; 600-700# 120-132.50; 700-800# 118125; M&L 2 300-400# 155; 400-500# 135-155, mostly 145.25; 500-600# 136; 600700# 120-132.50; 700-800# 124; M 1 500-600# 133. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 130-134; 400500# 127-133; 500-600# 116.50-119; 600-700# 110115; 700-800# 109; M&L 2 300-400# 128-135; 400500# 120-126; 500-600# 111-116.25; 600-700# 109112.50; 700-800# 106. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 143-144; 400500# 136-140; 500-600# 121-124; 600-700# 118; M&L 2 400-500# 130-145; 500-600# 120-130; 600700# 114.

LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1499. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 146; 400-500# 140-147.75; 500-600# 127128.50; 600-700# 122123.25; 700-800# 114116.75; M&L 2 300-400# 145.50; 400-500# 139.50149; 500-600# 128.50-136; 600-700# 120.50-124.25; 700-800# 116.50-118; M&L 3 300-400# 138; 400-500# 135.50; 500-600# 117123.25; 600-700# 113-118; S 1 300-400# 130; 400-500# 120-121; 500-600# 114.50; 600-700# 113; 700-800# 113. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 132.50; 400-500# 123.75-125.50; 500-600# 121-121.50; 600-700# 116.50-119; 700-800# 105109; M&L 2 300-400# 129.50-132.50; 400-500# 122-124.50; 500-600# 120120.75; 600-700# 114115.50; 700-800# 109.75; M&L 3 300-400# 121128.75; 400-500# 112120.50; 500-600# 110115.50; 600-700# 115.75; 700-800# 101-102.50; S 1 300-400# 110-123.50; 400500# 98-115.75, mostly 115.75; 500-600# 104-105; 600-700# 109; 700-800# 107. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1

ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 110. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 132-136; 400500# 135-142; 500-600# 125-133; 600-700# 121-130; 700-800# 109-114. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 115-123; 500600# 116-120; 600-700# 110-116.75; S 1 300-400# 109. STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 855. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 130-142; 300400# 136-148; 400-500# 127-149; 500-600# 125139.50; 600-700# 115132.50; 700-800# 119; 800900# 120-127; 900-1000# 119; M&L 2 200-300# 130; 300-400# 137-140; 400500# 138; 500-600# 125; 600-700# 119; 700-800# 120; 800-900# 102; 9001000# 102. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 500-600# 90; 600-

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November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 26

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, November 14 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Heifer Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. Tuesday, November 15 • Houston, TX. Late Model Construction Equip., Aerials, Forklifts, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Wednesday, November 16 • The Pines Farm, Barton, VT. 150th Top of Vermont Invitational Dairy Sale. Free turkey for every buyer! Sales Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 neks@together.net • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104. • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105

• 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585738-2104 Thursday, November 17 • Bow, NH. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-776-2000 or 315-4277845. • 5:00 PM: Fillmore Fire Hall, 20 S. Genesee St., Fillmore, NY. Toys, tools, electronics, collectibles, closeouts, household goods & more. R.G. Mason Auctions, 585-567-8844 www.rgmasonauctions.com Friday, November 18 • 11:30 AM: Spencer Farm. Complete Holstein Dispersal for Arvo Rautine. 130 head of AI sired freestall cattle. 65 milking age, ave. 70#/cow. DHI RHA 22,484. 65 head of youngstock from newborn to springers. SCC 163,000. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, November 19 • Ledyard, CT (Foxwood Casino). Earthmoving Construction Equip., Aerial Lifts, Forklifts, Support, Dump Trucks, Truck Tractors, Equip. & Dump Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Monday, November 21 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, November 23 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, November 25

• 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 Saturday, November 26 • 10:00 AM: Galeton, PA. Jackson Stables Retirement Dispersal. 2 tractors, farm machinery, butcher items, mechanical & woodworking tools, dozer, backhoe, horse, feeder cattle, lots of tack, Trail King 1200 bandsaw & lots more. Fraley Auction Co., 570-546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com Wednesday, November 30 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, December 2 • 11:00 AM: 3144 Dalton Rd., Cato, NY. Andrew Dennison Equipment Dispersal. Having sold the cows selling complete line of late model equipment. Hilltop Auction Co., Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 Saturday, December 3 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland, NY. Special Winter Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Monday, December 5 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, December 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 10 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Horse Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-3941515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:15 AM: Ulysses, PA (Potter Co.). Hoopes Turf Farm, Inc. (Preston Hoopes)

Sod Farm Dispersal in conjunction with Fox Hill Farms Retirement Auction at 11 am. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-7282520 www.pirrunginc.com Monday, December 12 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Monthly Heifer Sale. Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, December 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, December 15 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Wednesday, December 21 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 28 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 31 • 8:30 AM: Hoover Tractor, Mifflinburg, PA. 5th Annual New Years Sale. Accepting consignments. Fraley Auction Co., 570546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com Saturday, January 7 • 10:00 AM: 3517 Railroad Ave., Alexander, NY. Z&M Ag & Turf Auction. Public Auction Sale of Farm Tractors, Machinery, Land-scape, Tools and Lawn Tractor-Mowers. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com Friday, January 20 • 12:00 Noon: 73 West First Ave., Windsor, PA. Public Auction of Windsor Meat Market. Operating business wit retail meat sales & custom slaughtering. Leaman Auctions, 717-464-1128 or 610-662-8149 www.leamanauctions.com Monday, February 6 • Kissimmee, FL. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com

Brought to You by These Participating Auctioneers COLEMAN SALES INC. Scottsville, VA 24590 434-286-2743 VA. A.F. #197 Your Complete Auction Service! Certified Personal Property Appraiser “Let our 34 years of experience work for you!” All types of auctions. Specializing in Real Estate, Farm, Livestock & Construction Equipment

GODLEY AUCTION COMPANY 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC 28216 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 NCAL #305 4th Friday each month. 100% Since 1935

OWNBY AUCTION & REALTY CO., INC. Mechanicsville, VA 804-730-0500 VA A.F. 86 www.ownbyco.com EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE since 1946 Real Estate • Livestock Machinery • Business Liquidations “Satisfied customers are our top priority”

TERRELL AUCTION & REALTY CO., INC. Richmond, VA 804-883-5201 • 804-677-3492 www.terrellauction.com VA AF 386 - Since 1961 Farm Equipment • Livestock • Dispersals. Nationally recognized for High Dollar Real Estate Auctions including Farms and Land. Promptly Paid Seller Proceeds. “Call us for a free consultation at your place before you decide”

UNITED COUNTRY AUCTION & REAL ESTATE GROUP 5455 Main St. Stephens City, VA 22655 540-877-7182 auctionzip.com ID #7424 & virginiaauctions.com

ROGERS AUCTIONEERS 2148 Henderson Tanyard Rd. Pittsboro, NC 27312 919-545-0412 www.rogersauction.com


700# 90; 700-800# 85; 9001000# 70.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 97-115; 300-400# 110-131; 400-500# 115-131; 500-600# 106-122; 600700# 110-118.50; 700-800# 112; 800-900# 89; M&L 2 200-300# 110-124; 300400# 110-125; 400-500# 111-127; 500-600# 92-122; 600-700# 111-115; 700800# 100; 800-900# 81. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 120; 300-400# 124-150; 400-500# 127-146; 500-600# 124-140; 600700# 100-129.50; 700-800# 95-105; 800-900# 85; 9001000# 78-92; M&L 2 200300# 124; 300-400# 124143; 400-500# 121-143.50; 500-600# 119-127; 600700# 105-106; 700-800# 91; 800-900# 81-85; 900-1000# 78. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1278. No prices available. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 442. Feeder Steers: M&L 1

200-300# 124-134; 300400# 121-130; 400-500# 152; 500-600# 134.50136.25; 600-700# 124-128; 700-800# 118.50-124.50; 800-900# 108; 900-1000# 96; 1000-1100# 96; M&L 2 200-300# 123-157; 300400# 110-140; 400-500# 141-157; 500-600# 113-137; 600-700# 127; 700-800# 120; 800-900# 95; 9001000# 89. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 110; 300400# 110; 400-500# 105; 500-600# 93-105; 600-700# 79-83; 700-800# 75-86; 800900# 78-95; 900-1000# 91; 1000-1100# 70-79; 1100# & up 79.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 101-121; 300400# 131-137; 400-500# 127-129; 500-600# 118.50120; 600-700# 118.50119.50; 700-800# 105.50; 800-900# 104; M&L 2 200300# 110; 300-400# 135; 400-500# 128-136.50; 500600# 110-120.25; 600-700# 110-113; 700-800# 105.50109.50; 800-900# 98. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1

200-300# 137.50-140; 300400# 143-151.50; 400-500# 130-138; 500-600# 114121.50; 600-700# 106-113; 700-800# 99-100; 800-900# 91; 900-1000# 91; M&L 2 200-300# 151; 300-400# 151; 400-500# 132-139; 500-600# 120.50-121.50; 600-700# 105-112; 700800# 80-92; 800-900# 78; 900-1000# 70-79. SLAUGHTER CATTLE SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1415-1740# 61.50-69; 1430-1830# lo dress 50-60.50; Boner 8085% lean 930-1385# 6169.50; 940-1335# hi dress 70-86; 900-1390# lo dress 50-60.50; Lean 85-90% lean 860-970# 53.50-56; 805-1165# lo dress 3149.50. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 640-645# 61-65. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1785-2060# 75.50-79; 16601900# lo dress 65.50-71. Cows/Calf Pairs: 1. M 1-2

1050# middle age cows w/275# calves 920/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 25-35. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 462. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 58.50-69.50; 1200-1600# 56-68.50; HY 1200-1600# 67-89.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 58-65; 1200-2000# 55-68; HY 1200-2000# 66-73; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 45-62; 850-1200# 47-63.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 74.50-82, few 63-66.50; 1500-2500# 7685.50, few 66-71.50; HY 1000-1500# 82-89; 15002500# 87-93.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 12. M 1, 4 yrs. old 1000# 875/hd; M 1, 5-10 yrs. old, 11451875# 780-1230/hd; L 1, 510 yrs. old, 1090-1385# 640910/hd; S 1, 8 yrs. old, 975# 610/hd.

Cows w/Calves at side: 2. M 1, 8 yrs. old w/calf 200# 1000# 950/pr; L 1, 8 yrs. old w/calf 1200# 1200/pr. HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 446 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 60.50-67; 1200-1600# 59.50-74; HY 1200-1600# 68.50-77; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 60-70, few 53-59; 1200-2000# 56.5068.50; HY 1200-2000# 63.50-74, few 81; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 56.5062.50; 850-1200# 51-61.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 64-79.50; 15002500# 68-79.50; HY 15002500# 83.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 26. M 1, few M 2, 4 yrs. old to aged bred 2-8 mos. 10051420# 700-985/hd. Cows w/Calves at side: 10. M 2, w/calves 100-125# 895-1000# 760-875/pr; M 1, w/calves 1515# 1185/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 72. Hols. Steers Bulls 70-100# 5-120/hd; 100-130# 129/cwt. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 88. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 58-

67.50; 1200-1600# 60-69; HY 1200-1600# 70-76; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 50-58; 1200-2000# 55-65; HY 1200-2000# 66-73; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 3545; 850-1200# 40-48. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 50-63.50; 15002500# 65-70. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 29. Slaughter Cows: Breaker HY 850-1200# 60.50; 12001600# 59.50-65.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 5359.50; 1200-2000# 57-61; HY 1200-2000# 63.5065.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 64-70.50; 15002500# 74.75. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 46. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 58; 1200-1600# 58-65.50; HY 1200-1600# 66.50-71; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 58-66; 1200-2000# 65-67; Lean 85-90% lean 8501200# 56-58.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 71.50; 15002500# 68.50-71.50, 1 at 60. LYNCHBURG, VA

UPCOMING AUCTIONS CATTLE AUCTION - BACK CREEK ANGUS SAT. 26 TH NOV. - 11:00 AM - TURNERSBURG, NC Location: 2207 Turnersburg Hwy. - Turnersburg, NC 28688 Back Creek Angus - Hamptonville, NC - (10) stout coming 2 & (35) yearling Angus bulls, (68) females - (15) Reg. Angus - 5 are Pathfinder status, (53) commercial cows most will have calf @ side, (23) Angus yearling open heifers, (5) Simmental bred cows.

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT WED. 30 TH NOV. 11:00 AM - ROCKY MOUNT, NC Location: 9035 Hwy. 43 North - Rocky Mount, NC 27801 Trio Crushking, Simplicity screening machine, JD 644D wheel loader, 4x4, (3) Hitachi excavators, Mdl. EX200LC3, EX200LC, EX200-3, JD 650 LGP bulldozer, needs engine., Reynolds 14 yd. hydraulic dirt pan, NH LB75 backhoe, 4x4, Bobcat 763, Dynapac CA 15 drum roller, JD 4555 -4x4, MF 383 SALE HELD RAIN OR SHINE E.B. HARRIS (252) 257-2140 6:15 AM-9:59 PM (252) 430-9595 Mobile E.B.’s 9-10 PM only 445-5856 Fate’s (252) 985-8340 Mobile Fate’s Fax No. (252) 257-1035

E.

B. H arri

s

Inc. / Au ucttioneeers

3200 NC Hwy. 58 Warrenton, NC 27580 “THE COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICE” NCAL 1468 NC#C 4264 VAL 146 SCAL 3895 SALE DAY PAGER 252-407-4228

WYTHEVILLE, VIRGINIA TH

Sat., DECEMBER 10 , 2011 • 11:00 AM Complete COW HERD DISPERSAL

Directions: Exit 77 I-81 & I-77, at the BCIA Test Station Sale Facility

150 Fall & Winter Calving cows 100+ with calves at side - All black and BWF - All coming 3rd and 4th calves - Bred to Hereford and Angus bulls. Good young sound cows with calves at side or heavy springer’s. The absolute Right Kind!! Sale for: Roxie Jones For more info contact: EDWIN WAGONER & ASSOCIATES P.O. Box 1333, Wytheville, VA 24382 (276) 768-8539 VAAR #3035 FOR PICTURES AND INFO VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWW.WAGONERAUCTIONS.COM

Page 27 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

MARKET REPORTS


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 28

MARKET REPORTS SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 312 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 6368; 1200-1600# 63.50-69; HY 1200-1600# 69.50-72; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 57-63; 1200-2000# 56.50-64; HY 1200-2000# 65-68; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 38-46; 850-1200# 40-52. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 69-76; 15002500# 63-77.50; HY 10001500# 77-80; 1500-2500# 78-82. MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 62. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 66.50-68.50; HY 12001600# 68.50-70.25; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 6370; 1200-2000# 58-67; HY 1200-2000# 72.50-81; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 51. Calves Ret. to Farm: 10. Hols. Steers Bulls 70-100# 35-120/hd; 100-130# 129/cwt. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 219 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 60-67; HY 1200-1600# 6972; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 59-63; 1200-2000# 60-66.50; HY 1200-2000# 68-69; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 54-61.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 68-72. Calves Ret. to Farm: 10. Hols. Steers Bulls 70-100# 5-22.50/hd. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No prices available. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 215. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 6569.50; 1200-1600# 6366.50; HY 1200-1600# 7072.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 58-62; 12002000# 55-63.50; HY 12002000# 67.50-70; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 45-62; 850-1200# 55-63.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 79.50-80; 15002500# 76-85.50; HY 10001500# 82-89; 1500-2500# 87.50-93.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 3. M 1, 4 yrs. old 1000# 875/hd; S 1 8 yrs. old, 975# 610/hd. Cows w/Calves at side: 2. M 1, 8 yrs. old w/calf 200# 1000# 950/pr; L 1, 8 yrs. old w/calf 350# 1200# 1200/pr. WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 148. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 117-123; 13001500# 122.50-124.75; 1500# & up 119.75-123.25; Jersey X Ch 2-3 1200-

1400# 95-111.50; Sel 2-3 1000-1200# 89.50-101.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1000-1200# 113-123; 1200-1300# 118-122.25; 1300-1500# 112.50-125.25; Sel 2-3 1000-1200# 106; Hols. X Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 105-115.50; 1300-1500# 104-113.50 Cows Ret. to Farm: 71. M 1, few M 2, 5 yrs. old to aged bred 2-7 mos. 10051575# 785-1300/hd; M 2, few M 1, 4 yrs. old to aged bred 3-7 mos. 750-985# 500-910/hd. Cows w/Calves at side: 18. Mostly M 1, few M 2, w/calves 150-300# 10751465# 1030-1140/pr. Heifers: 2. Bred M 1, bred 6-7 mos. 975# 910/hd. Calves Ret. to Farm: 8. Hols. Bulls 130-200# 115135/hd. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 179. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 58.50-62.50; 1200-1600# 56-68.50; HY 1200-1600# 81.50-89.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 58.50-65; 1200-2000# 61-68.50; HY 1200-2000# 72-73; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 4755; 850-1200# 48-62.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 74.50-82; 15002500# 75-80; HY 10001500# 88.50; 1500-2500# 87-88.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 9. M 1, 5-10 yrs. old 1145-1875# 780-1230/hd; L 1, 5-10 yrs. old 1090-1385# 640-910/hd. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats: No report. NC SOWS: 300-399# 59.36-63.50; 400-449# 6063.50; 450-499# 55-64.63; 500-549# 55-65; 550# & up 64-65.96 FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No report. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: 3. No report. MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No report. N VA HOGS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report. S VA HOGS: No report. STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report.

LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 232. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 192-215; 80-110# 184-204; 110-125# 189-199; Spring, Wooled, Gd & Ch 13 30-60# 187; 60-90# 162213. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 60-88; Gd 2-4 72-100; Util 13 75-83; Cull 1-2 91. Slaughter Rams: all grades 127. HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: No report. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: No report. N VA GOATS: 47. Kids: Sel 1-2 40-60# 6975; 60-80# 85-97.50; Sel 3 20-40# 35. Does: Sel 1-2 50-70# 77; 70-100# 50-67. S VA SHEEP: No report. S VA GOATS: No report. MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report. MT. AIRY GOATS: No report FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report. HOLLINS, VA SHEEP: No report. HOLLINS, VA GOATS: No report. MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No report. MARSHALL, VA GOATS: 12. Kids: Sel 1-2 60-80# 8597.50. Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 50. ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: 35. Kids: Sel 1-2 40-60# 6975; Sel 3 20-40# 35. Does: Sel 1-2 50-70# 77; 70-100# 67. ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: 130. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 192-215; 80-110# 184-194; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 60-90# 162-190. Slaughter Ewes: 5. Ch 24 88; Gd 2-4 90-100. SHENANDOAH SHEEP: 112. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 80110# 200-204; 110-125# 189-199; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 187; 6090# 190-213. Slaughter Ewes: 21. Ch

2-4 60; Gd 2-4 72; Util 1-3 75-83; Cull 1-2 91. SILER CITY, NC GOATS: 265 Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 25-37.50; 20-40# 45-55; 40-60# 65-77.50; 6080# 80-90; Sel 2 under 20# 15-20; 20-40# 35-40; 40-60# 50-55; 60-80# 75; Sel 3 under 20# 5-10; 20-40# 30; 4060# 35; 60-80# 50-60. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80# 105-120; 80-100# 130157.50; Sel 2 60-80# 90100. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 5070# 90; 70-100# 100-115; Sel 2 50-70# 65. Wethers: Sel 1 100-150# 115-155. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 150-160; 150-250# 170-200. Sheep, per head: 35. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 100200# 120-175; Util 80-100# 80-110; Cull 60-120# 60-70. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report. TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 80. Slaughter Lambs: Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 90110# 180-205; 110-130# 180; Wooled, Gd & few Ch 1-2 30-60# 130-135; 60-90# 184-204. Slaughter Rams/Ewes: 16. Ewes Ch 2-4 80-86; Rams all grades 82. WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 63. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 150; 40-60# 175-197; 6080# 170-176; Sel 3 20-40# 160; 40-60# 175-180; 6080# 175. Does: Sel 1-2 100-150# 80-86. Bucks: Sel 1-2 100-150# 115-142.50. WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report. WYTHE CO GOATS: No report.

able trend. Prices were -, mostly - at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 332.60/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 7.25, -----, ----; Candor 7.36, -----, ----; Cofield 7.01, 11.90, ----; Laurinburg 7.25, -----, ----; Monroe 7.25, -----, ----; Nashville 7.10, -----, ----; Roaring River 7.30, -----, ---; Rose Hill 7.25, -----, ----; Statesville 7.10, -----, 7.07; Warsaw 7.25, -----, ----; Pantego #2 ----, -----, ----. Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement 6.92, 11.66, ----; Creswell 6.40, 11.50, ----; Elizabeth City 6.81, 11.80, ---; Greenville ----, -----, ----; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, 11.75, ----; Norwood 7.06, 11.40, ----; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ---, -----, ----; Warsaw #2 7.05, -----, ----. Soybean Processors Fayetteville, 12; Raleigh, 12. RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. Hay 65 tons. Alfalfa/Orchardgrass Mix: Sm Sq. 45-55# Gd 3.75-4.50/bale. Mixed Grass: Lg. Sq. 650-750# Gd 55-75/bale; S. Sq. Prem. 35-45# 5.40/bale; Gd 3.60-4.10/bale; Sm Rd. under 1000# Gd 30; Fair 15-30/bale. Orchard Grass: Sm. Sq. 35-45# Gd 5/bale; Sm Rd. inder 1000# Gd 92.50. Straw: Lg. Sq. Bright Barley 21/bale. Timothy: Lg. Rd. 650750# Gd 55/bale; Sm. Sq. 35-45# Prem. 5/bale; Gd 3.50/bale; Sm Rd. under 1000# Gd 27/bale. Sm. Rd. Wet Wrap Alfalfa: 20/bale.

POULTRY REPORT NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly heavy. The estimated slaughter for Tuesday in NC is 2,665,000 head compared to 2,552,000 head last Tuesday.

CASH GRAIN MARKET NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn: was 8¢ higher. Prices were 7.017.36, mostly 7.01 at the feed mills and 6.40-7.06, mostly 7.06 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 3-8¢ higher. Prices were 12 at the processors, 11.90 at the feed mills and 11.40-11.80, mostly 11.80 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was without an avail-

NC EGGS The market is higher on small, steady on the balance. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is good. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 137.57, L 135.24, M 120.86 & S99. NY EGGS Prices are steady. Current supplies are moderate

to heavy on all sizes. Demand into all channels is light to moderate. Market activity is moderate to slow. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered store door, cents per dz. XL 125129, L 123-127, M 109-113. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beans (Green) 25# bx 30; Beets (25# bg) 17.65; Cabbage (50# crate) Point-ed Head & Round 12; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 12-13.25, Spinach (25# bx) 18; Peas, Crowder (bu bg) 12-20, (bu shelled) 24; Peanuts (35# bag) Green 35; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 14-21.75; Red Potatoes (40# crate) 18-20. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn 100 count) WA Red Delicious (traypack ctn) 33-34.95, WA Golden Delicious (traypack ctn) 3334.50, Granny Smith WA (traypack ctn) 34-36.50, Gala WA 29-41.50, WA Fuji (traypack ctn) 34.50-38, WA Pink Lady (traypack ctn) 3841.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 26.55-32; Bananas (40# ctn) 21.50-22.80; Beans, Rd. Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 2328.65, Pole (1-1/9 bu) 3032.50; Beets (25# sack) 11.55-14.35; Blueberries (flat 12 1-pt cups) 24-34; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 20.50-22; Cabbage (50# ctn) 16.1518; Cantaloupe (case 12 count) 23.15-27.95; Carrots (50# sack) 22.95-27.15; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 20.5023.65; Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 26.5029.55; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 20.65-21.65; Oranges, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 24-34.85, FL (4/5 Bu ctn) 21-22; Pink Grapefruit, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 22-25.05; Tangelos, FL (80 count bx) 25-26.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 29-30; Limes (40# ctn) 25-26; Oranges, CA Naval (4/5 bu ctn) 30.6531.25, FL Naval (64 count) 19.50-21.50, Tangerines (120 count) 24; Corn (ctn 4 5 dz) Yellow 20-24, White (ctn 4 -5 dz) 22.55-24, (4 dz bags) Bi-Color 20-24; Cranberries (24 12 oz pkg) 24.50; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Long Green 26-29.35, Pickles (ctn 40#) 27.65-30.75; Eggplant (25# ctn) 20-21; Grapes, Red Seed-less (18# ctn) 24-34.75, White Seedless 28.50-32, Black Seedless 28, Red Globe 34; Greens, Collard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 18.75; Turnips (topped) 11.8514.65; Honeydews (ctn 5s) 17; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 13.65; Lettuce (ctn 24s) Iceberg (wrapped) 27.15-28, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 24-26, Romaine (ctn 24s) 24.50-28;


Page 29 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

It’s time to pay attention As the quality spread widens, prepared cattlemen profit Boxed beef climbed 15 percent in value to start the year, but with the passing of summer into fall value trends began a dramatic differentiation. “At these prices, buyers wanted better quality,” said Larry Corah, vice president of Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB). The spread between USDA Choice beef and lower quality Select, moderate since 2008, shot up $15 per hundredweight in a matter of weeks. It was partly attributed to a major retailer switching to higher quality beef, but others had set the stage. “Two of the largest retailers in the United States had added a premiumChoice program to their marketing plans in the past couple of years,” Corah noted. They were winning more satisfied customers, and the competition was quietly building demand at the high end. The latest retail shift signaled a sudden need for more Choice and better beef, he said, but more importantly an excess of the low-Select product formerly in those cases. “Combine the retail factors with an improving middle-meat market in our upscale, fine dining restaurants and a whole new demand profile for highquality beef has been created,” Corah explained. What does it mean at the feedlot and ranch? More money for informed marketers. “There’s no reason not to sell highquality cattle on a grid,” said Paul Dykstra, beef cattle specialist for the Certified Angus Beef ® brand, com-

menting on prices for CAB Prime. “When you’re looking at nearly $250 per head in premiums, that makes a guy pay attention.” Those figures are based on mid-October calculations of an 850-pound

Myers Hereford Farm

321 Elmwood Road, Statesville, NC 28625 Phone: 704/872-7155 PH: 704-872-7155 FAX: 704-871-9997 CELL 704-450-1598 Email: hmastecc@I-america.net Web site: www.cattletoday.com/myers

(lb.) carcass, sold on a popular Nebraska grid (Table 1). The difference is much larger when compared to Select, which brought $187-per-head less than CAB on the grid. The premiums for quality represent a significant jump from recent annual averages. Before anybody tallies potential premiums, Dykstra warned that it’s important to understand how areaweighted averages work (Table 2). “Many people believe they’ll get the full Choice/Select spread over and above the carcass price for Choice,” he said. “Not true. It all depends on the plant location and grid structure.” If a plant averages 65 percent Choice, the packer will likely pay 35 percent of that Choice/Select spread

on every Choice carcass. Southern plants with historically lower grading may pay up to 50 percent of the spread, Dykstra noted. Even in Nebraska, where quality competition is fierce, there’s plenty of reward for those who have focused on carcass quality. “Select is always a discount by the full Choice/Select spread below the base, and Choice is that area-average premium over the base,” Dykstra said. “The spread covers the up- and the down-direction from the base.” Regardless of whether you think about quality, it affects your price, he added: “Cattle with a track record for quality are the ones now bringing higher bids as calves and feeders.”

MARKET REPORTS

BULL & HEIFER SALE December 10, 2011 @ 1:00 pm 2 year old Horned Hereford Bulls Bred yearling Hereford Heifers, Open 2011 Hereford Heifers & Black Baldie Heifers THESE BULLS ARE FROM A LONG LINE OF LINE 1 HORNED HEREFORD BREEDING USING BREEDING STOCK FROM JAMISON HEREFORDS IN QUINTER, KANSAS, HOLDEN HEREFORDS AND COOPER HEREFORDS IN MONTANA. THIS IS THE ULTIMATE IN LINE BREEDING TO REALIZE MAXIMUM HETEROSIS IN A CROSS BREEDING PROGRAM FOR FARMERS.

Nectarines, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 22; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 18-20.05, White (25# sack) 14.50-15, Red (25# sack) 15, Green (ctn 24s) 27.65-32.35; Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 20-25.05; Peaches, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 18; Peanuts (35#) Green 51-53; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn) 27; Bell Peppers, Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 20.0521, Red (11# ctn) 32, Yellow (11# ctn) 32; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red Size A 18-23.25, Red Size B 25-28, White size A 14-15; Russett, ID 19.35-20.05; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) Red 15.5015.75; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 22; Squash, Yellow Crookedneck (3/4 bu ctn) 17.95-32, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 15-21; Strawberries, CA (flat 8 1-qt conts) 28; Sweet Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45,

White (40# ctn) 20-20.65, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45; Tomat-oes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 22-22.95; Tomatoes, Cherry (flat 12 1-pt conts) 24.35-28.05, Romas (25# ctn) 22-24, Grape (flat 12 1-pt conts) 22-26.50; Turnips (25# film bg) Topped 11.85-14.65. WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 25-34, Golden Delicious 25-34, Granny Smith 35; (bu loose pack) Red & Golden Delicious, Fuji, Stayman, Romes 14-20; Bananas (40# bx) 18.50-20; Beans (bu) Snaps 25-26; Broccoli (ctn) 17.50-18; Cabbage (50 bg) 10.25-12; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12 count) 20-24.50; Cauliflower (ctn) 17-20; Citrus: Grapefruit 15-18, Navels 16-20,

Oranges 15-20, Tangerines 16-20; Lemons (ctns 95 count) 28-29, (165 count) 24-25; Corn (crate) Bi-Color & White 14-16; Cucumbers (1-1/9 bu) Long Green 18.50-20, Picklers (1-1/9 bu crate) 33.50; Grapes (18# ctn) Red Globe 24-25, Red & White Seedless 24-28; Lettuce (ctn) Iceburg 22.5024; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 13.75-15; Bell Pepper (1-1/9 Bu ctn) L & XL 1517; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) 14-20; Squash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 22-23, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 12-14; Strawberries (flat 8 1#) CA 16-25; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 1216; Tomatoes (25# bx) XL & Larger 15-18.50, M 12; Turnips (25# sack) 12.75-15. MARKET


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 30

Soybean production workshops scheduled for December HARRISBURG, PA — The Penn State Extension Crop Management Team has scheduled four soybean Production Workshops the week of Dec. 11. Support for the workshops is provided in part by the Pennsylvania Soybean Board through the soybean checkoff. Each workshop will feature Penn State researchers, experienced soybean growers, and county Extension personnel presenting information covering all aspects of soybean production from planting to harvest. Topics include how to get started in soybean production, soybean growth and development, weed and insect pest diagnostics, and best practices for harvest and storage. CCA and pesticide credits are available at each location. “Over 400,000 acres of soybeans are produced in Pennsylvania,” says Del Voight, Lebanon County senior Extension educator. “While yields throughout the state are still hovering around the 45 bu./acre, many growers participating in soybean workshops are reporting yields of over 60 bu./acre, and we've even seen some growers topping out at 80 bu./acre and more. We encourage farmers growing soybeans, and those considering growing soybeans, to attend and learn how to increase yields on their farm.” The workshops will be held at the Franklin Ag Center in Chambersburg, PA, on Tuesday, Dec. 13; the Chester Romano 4-H Center in Honey Brook, PA, on Wednesday, Dec. 14; the Columbia Extension Office in Bloomsburg, PA, on Thursday, Dec. 15; and Giannilli's II

in Greensburg, PA, on Friday, Dec. 16. The Soybean Production Workshops run from

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at each location. There is a $10 fee to attend, which includes lunch.

Pre-registration is required one week prior to the workshop. Information on agendas, speakers and pre-

registration is available on the Penn State Extension website by selecting the “Events” tab at http://ex-

tension.psu.edu/lebanon or by contacting the Lebanon County Extension office at 717-270-4391.

DON’T MISS OUT!! The First Annual Mane Stream Stallion Directory Will Deadline on Friday, December 2nd. Promote your stallion and breeding program! Fill out your form and return it today!

2 012 Stallion Directory The January/February Issue of Mane Stream will feature a Stallion Directory. For $25.00 you can list your stallion. You can add a photo to your listing for an additional $25.00. You can list additional stallions for $20.00 per stallion, add a photo for an additional $20.00 per stallion. Or, you can choose a Premium Listing to promote your Stallion or Stallions. Your information can be e-mailed to tkrieger@leepub.com. This form must be completed and returned by 12/2/11. Questions? Call Tina Krieger at 518-673-0108. CHECK WHICH APPLIES: ________ Listing Only $25.00

_______ Check If Adding Photo to Listing $50.00

How Many_______ Additional Stallion Listings Only $20.00 per stallion, (attach separate form for each stallion) How Many_______ Additional Stallion Listings Adding Photo $40.00 per stallion, (attach separate form for each stallion) How Many_______ Premium Listings $100.00 with enlarged photo (3 1/4” x 3 1/2”), add your Farm Logo, and Press Release of up to 250 words. (Per Stallion) Photos will be 4-Color; Listings will be online at www.cfmanestream.com Farm Name ____________________________________ Contact Person ______________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ________________________________________ Fax ______________________________________________ Website

______________________________________ E-Mail ____________________________________________

Description (40 words or less) ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please list additional Stallion information on separate forms.

Return by Fax to 518-673-2381 or mail to Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 If you do not wish to receive any faxes from us, check here

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Published by Lee Publications P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • 518-673-3237 • Fax 518-673-3245


Share the country farm newspaper you love with friends and family members who share your appreciation for farm living. Buy them a gift subscription to Country Folks.

If you purchase a one-year gift subscription for a new subscriber, we’ll extend your subscription three additional months at no extra charge. To subscribe, remove this 4 page insert from your paper. Fill out and follow the instructions on the form on page 4 of this pullout.

Page 31 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

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November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 32

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2011 Country Folks Subscription Prices (good through 12/31/11): One Year (52 issues) . . . . . . By Mail $45 . . OR By Email $25 . . OR Both $60 Two Years (104 issues) . . . . By Mail $75 . . OR By Email $45. . OR Both $85 (Prices will increase approximately 10% after 1/1/2012) First, Give Us Your Info: Name________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address ____________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip ______________________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________________________________________________ Email ______________________________________________________________________________ 1) __ Yes, Please Extend My Subscription __ One Year

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RALEIGH, NC — The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Seed Laboratory has moved back to its permanent location in the Old Health Building following the completion of renovations. Effective immediately, laboratory users who have been shipping samples through FedEx or UPS to the lab’s temporary location in Cary should send samples to NCDA&CS Plant Industry Division Complex, 216 W. Jones St., Raleigh, NC, 27603. Users who have been sending samples through the U.S. Postal Service should continue to address them to NCDA&CS-N.C. Seed Laboratory, 1060 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1060. The phone number for the lab is 919-733-3930, and the fax number is 919-733-1041. “Full testing services have resumed, and our goal is to minimize the interruption of service to our customers,” said Gene Cross, director of the Plant

Industry Division. The lab had moved to Cary last year to accommodate the needed replacement of the heating and air-conditioning system and renovation of the lab space in the Old Health Building,

which is in downtown Raleigh. The N.C. Seed Laboratory provides support for both the regulatory and service work of the department’s seed and fertilizer field specialists, seed dealers, producers, consumers and

university researchers. Testing focuses on purity and germination rates for seeds, accelerated aging, Round-Up Ready tolerance, and sand and moisture content.

Scholarships for college ag students available As the deadline steadily approaches, NCGA reminds members that it, along with the BASF Corporation, will again award five $1,000 scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students pursuing a degree in an agriculture-related field during the 2012-13 school year. “As schedules become increasingly busy over the holidays and finals season, interested candidates should make time soon for NCGA scholarship applications to make sure that they meet the Dec. 9 deadline,” said Brandon Hunnicutt, NCGA’s Grower Services Action Team Chair. “This program is important for candidates as it helps fund their ongoing education,

but it is also important for the industry as a whole. By helping tomorrow’s leaders further their studies, we proactively create a generation ready to lead agriculture for decades to come.” Applicants for the NCGA Academic Excellence in Agriculture Scholarship Program must be entering at least their second undergraduate year or any year of graduate study, and they, or a parent or legal guardian, must be an NCGA member. Scholarship applications must be postmarked on or before Dec. 9. Scholarship recipients will be selected in early 2012. Recipients and a parent or guardian will enjoy travel and lodging to attend a portion of the 2012

Commodity Classic in Nashville, TN, to be recognized at the NCGA Awards Banquet and have the opportunity to learn more about modern agriculture. This marks the fifth year for the program partnership between BASF and NCGA. Source: NCGA News of the Day, Tuesday, Nov. 1

Allan Hart & Sons FARM MACHINERY * TRACTORS *

McCormick CX105 4x4, cab, loader, 85HP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,500 Kubota M9000 4x4, cab, loader, 85HP $33,500 JD 7600 4x4, cab, 110HP . . . . . . . . . .$36,000 JD 4955 4x4, cab, 200HP . . . . . . . . . .$41,500 JD 3150 4x4, cab, 96HP . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 JD 4450 4x4, cab, 3 hyd., 145HP . . . .$32,500 JD 2950 4x4, cab, 86HP . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 NH 8560 4x4, cab, duals, 140HP . . . .$39,750 Ford 7710 4x4, cab, 85HP . . . . . . . . .$16,500 Ford 9700 cab, dual power, 135HP . . .$12,500 MF 1080 2WD, new clutch, 81HP . . . . .$6,800 Cockshutt 1855 2WD, cab, 105HP . . . .$7,500 AC 6060 4x4, loader, 68HP . . . . . . . . .$12,000 AC 180 gas, 2WD, 65HP . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,750 AC 175 diesel, 2WD, 60HP . . . . . . . . . .$6,200 Zetor 6245 4x4, 60HP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Zetor 4340 4x4, loader, 62HP . . . . . . .$10,500 Zetor 3340 4x4, loader, 44HP . . . . . . .$13,500

* SKID LOADERS *

JD 570 gas, lifts 1200#, 31HP . . . . . . . .$4,800 JD 240 hand controls, lifts 1350#, 46HP $11,750 NH LX885 lifts 2200#, 67HP . . . . . . . . .$11,500 Bobcat 743, lifts 1250#, 40HP . . . . . . . .$7,500 Bobcat T200 (Tracks) lifts 2800#, 73HP $18,500

* MISCELLANEOUS *

450 bu. grain cart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 Grain cleaner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$400 61’x8” grain auger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 JD 7’ snowblower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500 Lundell (heavy) 8’ snowblower . . . . . . .$3,500 Dresser TD8E dozer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,800 Kubota L35 backhoe, 4x4, 35HP . . . . .$14,500 NH 555E backhoe, 4x4, 4-n-1 bucket, air, 3600 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,000 JD 310D backhoe, 4x4, ext-n-hoe . . . . .$26,000

Visit These Virginia & Maryland Dealers VIRGINIA RIDGEVIEW NEW HOLLAND 12521 James Madison Rd. Orange, VA

540-672-4900 888-917-5192 SPAULDING EQUIPMENT Clover, VA

434-735-8163

MARYLAND ANTIETAM TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT INC. 20927 Leitersburg Pike Hagerstown, MD 21742

301-791-1200 • 800-553-6731 CERESVILLE NEW HOLLAND, INC. 8102 Liberty Rd. Frederick, MD

301-662-4197

RATHELL FARM EQUIPMENT CO. Skipton, MD 800-333-6203 or 410-822-1772

Financing & Delivery Available (800) 425-7094 www.harttractor.com Exit 141 off I-79, right 3 1/2 miles on Rt. 285 Cochranton, PA

Page 33 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

NCDA&CS seed lab returns to permanent home


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 34

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You Get stuffed

Celebrate with flavorful fillings November is infamous for stuffing — whether we’re fluffing our nest in anticipation of winter or filling our bellies with a harvest of savory flavors. Beef isn’t typically associated with stuffing, but Certified Angus Beef ® brand Chef Michael Ollier has created several rich and tasty beef dishes that will have you stuffing steak — and yourself — in no time. Flank Steak Roulade features an economical cut spread with a mixture of walnuts, parmesan cheese, garlic and herbs, sun-dried tomatoes and arugula. It’s then rolled and tied with butcher twine before roasting in the oven. Roulade makes for an elegant presentation and the flavors of this roasted beef are sure to wow the taste buds of everyone at your table. Yes, they’ll stuff themselves with seconds! Add Italian flair to any autumn meal with Stuffed Manicotti and Red Pepper Sauce. A blend of parmesan, Asiago and mozzarella cheeses add just the right balance to this beefy, pepper- and tomatobased dish.

Flank steak roulade 2 to 2 1/2 pound Certified Angus Beef ® flank steak 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar 8 ounces chopped walnuts, about 1 3/4 cups 5 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon minced garlic (2 cloves) 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes 2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt 1/2 cup olive oil 2 cups loosely packed baby arugula 8 ounce jar sun-dried tomatoes, packed in olive oil 2 teaspoons dried rosemary, hand crushed 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper Butcher’s twine 1. Butterfly flank with the grain to 1/4-inch thick, yielding about an eleven by fourteen inch rectangle. Place in a shallow baking dish with balsamic vinegar. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. 2. In a food processor, pulse together walnuts, 3

tablespoons parmesan, garlic, red pepper flakes and one teaspoon salt to the consistency of coarse cornmeal. Add olive oil while blending to make a paste; set aside. 3. Preheat oven to 450° F. Remove flank, pat dry & lay flat on a cutting board. Layer with walnut paste, arugula and sun dried tomatoes. Roll and tie roast to the 11-inch length. Season the exterior evenly with remaining 2 tablespoons parmesan, 1 teaspoon salt, rosemary and pepper. Set in roasting pan with rack, uncovered. 4. Roast for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 325° F and roast an additional sixty minutes for medium rare. Allow to rest 10 minutes before slicing, two slices per person. Serves 4-6 Nutritional Information per Serving: 748 Calories; 54g Fat; 9g Saturated Fat; 110mg Cholesterol; 18g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 48g Protein; 926mg Sodium; 24% daily value Iron (based on 2,000 calorie diet).

Stuffed manicotti with red pepper sauce Prep Time 45 minutes Cook Time 45 minutes 1 1/2 pounds Certified Angus Beef ® 80/20 ground chuck 8-ounces manicotti (14 pieces), cooked 2 minutes less than package directions 3 red bell peppers 15-ounce can tomato sauce 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion, diced 3 banana peppers, seeded and diced 8 ounces (approximately 2 cups) shredded asiago & mozzarella cheese blend 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley 1/3 cup chopped calamata olives (optional) 1. Using tongs, charred peppers over open stove flame. Turn frequently to get a uniform blackened and blistered skin. Allow to cool, remove stem and seeds and place in a blender, leaving skins on. Add

Flank steak roulade

tomato sauce, puree and set aside. 2. Simmer onions in olive oil until soft, 2-3 minutes. Add ground beef and simmer until no pink remains, breaking to small pieces as it cooks, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a mixing bowl. Stir in banana peppers, 1 1/2 cups of cheese, salt, parsley and olives. 3. Preheat oven to 350° F. Spread a third of sauce in a large rectangular baking pan. Stuff each manicotti with beef mixture, line in pan and cover with remaining sauce. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for thirty minutes. Remove foil, top with remaining 1/2 cup cheese and bake an additional twenty minutes until bubbly. Allow to set for five minutes before serving. Roasted Pepper tip: Another way to roast peppers is to seed and quarter, place skin-side up under broiler until charred. Make ahead tip: Assemble up to two days before. Bake the day of, adding ten minutes to cook time. Serves 6 Nutritional Information per Serving: 575 Calories; 29g Fat; 12g Saturated Fat; 106mg Cholesterol; 42g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 38g Protein; 12396mg Sodium; 32% daily value Iron (based on 2,000 calorie diet). Recipes provided by the Certified Angus Beef ® brand

Fun Fact

In 1990, there were about 15,000 vacuum cleanerrelated accidents in the United States.

Last week’s solution


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Page 35 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

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November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 36

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

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BEEF COWS, mostly black, some have calves, others will calve later. 540-822-5743 RED ANGUS BULLS, yearlings, balance EPD’s. 540933-6293

Cars, Trucks, Trailers 1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

Bedding Concrete Products

USA Gypsum Bedding Reduce your bedding costs! And Improve Soil Naturally!

Gypsum Bedding • Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Reduce mastitis & cell counts. • Use in place of Hydrated Lime. • Improves your soil • Available in bulk.

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves. • Use less! More absorbent than lime products.

Try Grip X1 Today! www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Dealers wanted in select areas Also Available at: Central Dairy & Mech. Delmarva Farm Service Elam Miller Himrod Farm Supply Homestead Nutrition Genesee Valley Nutrition Levi Fisher Martin’s Ag New Bedford Elevator Norm’s Farm Store Robert Rohrer Steve B. Stoltzfus Walnut Hill Feeds

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The Scabbler Man

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Farm Machinery For Sale

2006 New Holland TC55DA Power Shuttle Transmission, 4x4, Loader, Canopy, 55HP, 538 Hours

Delivery Available

919-669-7964

JD 7930 C/A MFD, 260 Hrs., 46” Duals, P.Q. w/LH Rev, Same As New!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,500 JD 7410 C/A MFD, 20 Speed, P.Q. w/LH Rev., w/ JD 741 SL Loader, Bale Spear Only, Only 1670 Hrs., Very Nice Outfit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,900 JD 6115-D C/A MFD, Hyd. Rev., 1500 Hrs., Great Price At . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,500 JD 2555 & 2550 Both Nice. . . . . . . . . . . $12,700 & $10,500 JD 4020 w/ 148 Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,250 JD 720 wide ft., 3ph., remotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 Some 8000 Series Deere’s Coming In! CALL! 2010 Case IH 275 C/A MFD, 50” R. Duals, 38” Ft. Duals, 3 PTO’s, Loaded Luxury Cab, Only 200 Hrs. Absolutley Like New! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $159,500 Case IH 7150 C/A MFD, 20x42’s, Wts, Very Nice w/4800 Hrs., This is One of the Real Good Ones! . . . . . . $59,900 Case IH 125 Maximum C/A MFD, Only 500 Hrs. Same As New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,500 JD 9510 Combine w/ 643 Corn Head in the Field Here Now! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,500 Killbros 385 Gravity Wagons w/Side Boards on 12 Ton Gears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,800 New & Used Westfield Augers In Stock, CALL! www.andrewsfarm.com

ANDREWS FARM EQ., INC. Conneautville, PA 16406

814-587-2450 or 814-573-3344 Dairy Equipment

Dairy Cattle 50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Concrete Products

Concrete Products

SEVERAL USED Double 6 and 8 parlors w/ATO’s and 3” low lines complete. Several 2”: pipelines, used vacuum pumps, receiver groups, claws, ATO’s, washer boxes, etc. 585-732-1953

Feed Bunks & Cattle Guards

Pre Cast Concrete J BUNK FEED TROUGHS FOB Wytheville, VA $150.00 ~ 8’ sections CATTLE GUARDS (deliverable locally) Call for Details!

U BUNK $150.00

WEST END PRECAST

Wytheville, VA (276) 620-1821 Ask for Chris Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER LIVESTOCK SALES, INC. Middletown, NY (845) 344-7170 buycows@warwick.net

Farm Machinery For Sale 1992 INT. LITTER SPREADER, cummins engine, tandem axle w/hyd. 20’ Chandler litter spreader, exc. cond., $20,000 OBO. Mount Jackson,VA 800541-7496 1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS Large Selection Available

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE We Buy Tractors For Parts

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT 403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

(717) 776-6242

ANDERSON 780SB WRAPPER, will wrap large squares or round bales, new condition, $24,500. 704-202-3626

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist 1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

Farm Machinery For Sale

Maine To North Carolina Need to defer 2011 taxes? Through Partnership and Custom Work We can out compete any of the largest of the Mid-West’s Crop Farms Your neighbor will leave his mower in the shed! Wet Fields? Make land tile application a part of your crop rotation. Compare our front PTO tractors speed, options and prices @

PleasantCreekHay.com

MACK ENTERPRISES Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

BUSH HOG

Farm Machinery Wanted

STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE RD Box 46 Klingerstown, PA

570-648-2088

WE ALSO STOCK NEW VICON IH DISGUSTED??? With your shifting? Now is the time to fix. Put a good tractor back to work. 800-808-7885, 402-374-2202 JOHN DEERE 535 round baler, net wrap, gathering wheels, new belts, excellent condition, $9,995. 757-6172923 JOHN DEERE BALER PARTS: 347, 346, 336, 224, 214, 24T, 14T. Nelson Horning 585-5266705

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay - Straw Wanted Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW

814-793-4293

All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted.

Fencing

Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

BLACK LOCUST POSTS: Poles up to 30’. Authentic split rails 6x6, 4x4, 1” & 2” boards. Photos at www.blacklocustwood.com Call Tom 518-883-8284

Contacts: Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com

ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Allen Hollenbach 610-926-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

WANTED

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay & Straw - All Types We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION Parts & Service New Installations

804-387-6462 Hay - Straw For Sale

814-793-4293

1st and 2nd cutting, 4x4 round bales. 540-832-2487

Fencing

Fencing

USED EQUIPMENT

MF 245 Tractor Westfield 8x51 Auger MF 1835 Baler White 285 Tractor Miller 5300 Forage Box Miller 1150 Rake IH 37 Baler w/Thrower Westfield 8x56 Auger Hesston 4550 Square Baler Vicon 553 Tedder Farmall 460 Tractor MF 246 Loader White 5100 4R Planter White 6100 4R Corn Planter White 543 Corn Planter Case IH 8830 SP Mower Cond. MF 285 Tractor White 549 SAR 5 Bottom Plow Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill Miller Pro Forage Boxes In Stock

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

4x5 MIXED GRASS round bales, good quality, net wrapped, barn kept, $40. Pick up at farm. No delivery. Brookview Farm, 854 Dover Rd., Manakin Sabot,VA 23103 email bviewfarm@gmail.com 804-784-3131

MIXED GRASS HAY for sale. $30.00/Roll, 4x5. 540-8602145

Heating

FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

H AY

Help Wanted

Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry

Round & Square Bales Also Square Bales of

9 49-6 Fixknot

WOVENWIRE FENCE One Strand Barb Wire 5x6x7 post set at 18 ft. $2.55 per ft., 2000 ft. or more and $34.00 per H Brace

ASSISTANT HERDSPERSON

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

Needed on Progressive 450 Cow Registered Dairy

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay

Fall Special!

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

STRAW

Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices

Self-Motivated with Supervisory Skills

519-482-5365

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

CO-VALE HOLSTEINS

519-529-1141

315-729-3220

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

CALL STEVE

Alltech is currently looking for a Territory Sales Representative with a strong dairy background for Pennsylvania. Alltech sales people are highly motivated professionals who provide a natural link between marketing, research and the customer. Alltech ranks among the top 10 animal health companies in the world. The company has experienced consistent growth since it was founded in 1980. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has a presence in over 110 countries with distributors around the world. Today it employs 2,600 people and growth continues at a rate of 20 percent.

Key responsibilities include: Regularly visit our industry partners (feed companies, consulting nutritionists, veterinarians, producers, government agencies, etc) across the territory to manage existing relationships while cultivating new relationships Drive sales by identifying customer needs and finding solutions Attend industry events and tradeshows to showcase Alltech in a positive, professional manner

The ideal candidate should have: A strong technical background: BSc, MSc or higher Strong verbal and written communication skills Interest and experience in the animal health or nutrition industries Self-motivated and proactive A valid driver’s license E-mail resumé and cover letter to: mgast@alltech.com

CLOSING DATE: JAN. 1, 2012

Alltech | Pennsylvania 1860 Charter Lane, Suite 203 Lancaster, PA 17601 Fax: 717-393-9774 • mgast@allltech.com

Page 37 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 38

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Parts & Repair

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS BATES CORPORATION 12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS! Call the IH Parts Specialists:

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

1-800-248-2955 Real Estate For Sale

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY Southwestern Virginia Bland County

62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

$90,000 Several Purchase Options Available. Call

540-255-9112 Roofing

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING BUY DIRECT – We manufacture Metal Roofing & Siding.

ABM & ABX Panel - Standing Seam - PBR Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

NOV 11-18 North American International Livestock Exposition Sheep Show Louisville, KY. On Internet at www.livestockexpo.org NOV 15 Maryland Horse Industry Board to Meet Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. 2 pm. Contact Ross Peddicord, 410-841-5798. NOV 15, 16 & 17 UNH Cooperative Extension Risk Management Workshops • Nov. 15 - Westmoreland, NH • Nov. 16 - Concord, NH • Nov. 17 - Bath, NH. Call 603-862-3234. On Internet at http://extension.unh.edu NOV 16 Food Safety Training MDA’s headquarters, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. 9 am - 4 pm.

The registration fee is $20 and includes lunch and training materials. Contact Deanna Baldwin, 410 841 5769 or e-mail baldwiDL@ mda.state.md.us. On Internet at www.mda.state.md. us/pdf/GAP_Registration_ 111611.docx NOV 17 SSCC Meeting Set MDA, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. Contact Louise Lawrence, 410-841-5863. State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners to Meet Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Pkwy, Room 102, Annapolis, MD. 10:30 am. A portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Call 410-8415862. NOV 18 Kent County 4-H Hosts Open House University of Delaware, Kent County Extension Office, 69 Transportation Circle, Dover, DE. 6:30-8 pm. Call 302-730-4000 or e-mail Kristin@udel.edu. Online Nutrient Management Training 2:30 pm. The webcast qualifies for a one hour continuing education credit through MDA’s Nutrient Management Program. On Internet at www.anmp.umd.edu/Events

Trucks 1998 INTERNATIONAL TOWMASTER on 4700 air ride chassis with DT466, 275hp engine, 6 spd. Allison auto. trans., good paint w/perfect interior & air seats. Nearly new Michelin tires & brakes, 25,000 lb. 5th wheel hitch. Ready to take you on your next trip. 518-993-2618 Fort Plain,NY

NOV 19 ATV Safety Seminar Washington Co. Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, 6.5 miles south on MD Route 65, Boonsboro, MD. Registration at 8:30 am, programs runs from 9:30 am to 12:30 pm. Advance registration is requested by Nov. 16. Tp include class room and ‘hands-on’ training. ATV Safety Institute Instructor, Patrick Gregory, will be the featured speaker and educator. This ATV Safety Seminar will cover: ownership, maintenance, personal protective gear, riding basics, tips and techniques and safe riding practices. Demonstration rides on ATVs will be available at the end of the seminar. All riders must wear long pants, long sleeve shirt or jacket and sturdy over the ankle boots. Helmets will be provided but feel free to bring your won. Contact Leslie 301-432-4782 or Erin at 240-420-1714. On Internet at www.washcoagmarket.net University of Maryland 2011 Lambing & Kidding School Chesapeake College, Wye Mills, MD. Registration deadline is Nov. 9. The registration fee is $40/person; $30 for additional family members and $25 for youth. Checks payable to the University of Maryland should be sent to 2011 Lambing & Kidding School, 18330 Keedysville Rd., Keedysville, MD 21756. Contact Susan Schoenian, 301-432-2767 ext. 343. On Internet at www.sheepandgoat.com/pro grams/11LKschool.html NOV 21 York County Agriculture Business Council to Meet York County Annex Building Room 1, 118 Pleasant Acres Rd, York, PA. 7 pm. The Council invites any agricultural supporter to join us as we establish our goals and priorities for 2012. Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP by Nov. 18. Contact Michele Grove, 717246-3578 or e-mail ycabc@ comcast.net. DEC 1 Direct to Consumer Farm Marketing & Agri-Tourism Seminar Berks Co. Ag Center, 1238 County Welfare Rd., Leesport PA. 8:30 am - 4:30 pm. Contact John Berry, 610-391-9840. On Internet at extension.psu.edu DEC 3 Putting Small Acreage to Work 2011: The Business Side of Farming 112 W. Walker Ave., Asheboro, NC. 8:45 am - 3 pm. Pre-registration and a fee of $10 (lunch included) are due

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by Wed., Nov. 30. Checks, made out to NC Cooperative Extension - Randolph County, can be sent to 112 W. Walker Ave., Asheboro, NC, 27203. Contact Mary Helen Ferguson, 336-318-6000 or e-mail maryhelen_ferguson@ ncsu.edu. Tack Auction JP’s North The Old Florida Town Hall, 214 Fort Hunter Rd., Amsterdam, NY. Used Tack Tag Sale & Preview start at 11 am. Auction starts at noon. Presented by Adirondack Miniature Horse Club. Bring your used tack & apparel for our Tag sale. Call 518-4615039. DEC 6 York County Buy Fresh, Buy Local® Chapter’s 2012 Promotional Kick Off & Annual Meeting Adams Electric Building, 200 Trinity Rd, York, PA. 7 pm. The meeting will include a recap of 2011, new promotions & fundraisers for 2012, Why Buy Fresh Buy Local(r) (BFBL) matters & Why YOU matter, approval of By-laws & election of officers, volunteer opportunities and local, fresh refreshments. Seating is limited. Please RSVP by Nov. 28. Contact Kim Gross, 717-814-8141 or e-mail yorkbfbl@yahoo.com. DEC 8 Commodity Marketing Seminar Berks Co. Ag Center, 1238 County Welfare Rd., Leesport, PA. 8:30 am - 3:30 pm. Contact John Berry, 610-391-9840. On Internet at extension.psu.edu DEC 8-12 Acres USA Conference & Trade Show Hyatt Regency, Columbus,

OH. See Web site for details. Call 800-355-5313. On Internet at www. acresusa.com DEC 12, NOV 9, 15, 16 & 21, DEC 7, 12 & 15 Upcoming Nutrient Management Voucher Training & Renewal Courses Allegany Co. Free voucher training & renewal courses to farm operators who apply nutrients to 10 or more acres of cropland. The two hour nutrient applicator training course is required once every three years for these operators. For additional dates and locations, operators should contact their local Extension office or visit www.mda.state.md.us. Scroll down the Quick Links to Nutrient Management and click on Nutrient Management Training Classes for the complete 2011-2012 schedule. Locations as follows: • Anne Arundel Co. - Dec. 12. Call 410-222-6757. • Calvert Co. - Nove. 9. Call 410-535-3662. • Carroll Co. - Nov. 15 & Dec. 15. Call 410-386-2760. • Frederick Co. - Nov. 16. Call 301-600-1594 • Kent Co. - Dec. 14. Call 410-778-1661. • Montgomery Co. - Dec. 7. Call 301-590-9638. • Prince George’s Co. - Nov. 21. Call 301-868-8780. • Somerset Co. - Nov. 21. Call 410-651-1351. • Wicomico Co. - Dec. 12, 2011. Call 410-749-6141. NOV 11-14 National No Tillage Conference St. Louis, MO. Registration is $279/person, with a special $252 rate for additional

farm or family members. On Internet at www.NoTillCon ference.com JAN 22-24 The National Mastitis Council (NMC) 51st Annual Meeting TradeWinds Island Grand Resort, 5500 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach, FL. For dairy professionals from around the world to exchange current information on udder health, mastitis control, milking management and milk quality. Call 727-3676461. On Internet at www.nmconline.org JAN 27 & 28 4th Annual Winter Green-up Grazing Conference Century House, Latham, NY. Please contact Tom Gallagher at tjg3@cornell.edu, Lisa Cox at lkc29@ cornell.edu or Morgan Hartman at blackqueenangus@ yahoo.com for more information and to get on the mailing list for registrations. Contact Lisa Cox, 518-7653512. FEB 1-3 Southern Farm Show NC State Fairgrounds. Over 300 exhibiting companies make the Southern Farm Show the largest agricultural exposition in the Carolinas and Virginia. Free admission and free parking make the show a can’t miss for farmers, as well as allied professionals including landscapers and excavation contractors.Show Hours: Wednesday through Friday 9 am - 4 pm. Admission is free. Call 800-849-0248. On Internet at www.southernfarmshow. com


Sept/Oct

Section One

Servingg Thee Professionall • Growerr • Winemakerr • Seller

Classifieds Equipment Marketing

Wine and Grape Grower will offer features, news and information on growing grapes, and making and selling wines. As readers of Country Folks and Country Folks Grower you know the value of our publications as you run and improve your business. If your current business or future plans include grapes or wine you can now have a publication with those same benefits for that branch of your business. Subscribe today and don’t miss a single issue. If you have friends or family who would be interested please feel free to share with them also.

n

io

at

rm fo In 86 com g 5 . in -5 ub 1 tis 218 eep c. r ve 0- l De Ad 80 en@ ine r r l Fo dw ead r D o

Order Before November 30 and get a Free Shirt. * Paid Orders Only

Subscription Form Name ____________________________________________ Business/Farm Name__________________________________ Address __________________________________________ City ____________________ State______ Zip Code_______________ PHONE ( ) __________________ E-mail __________________  Free Trial

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Subscribe Online at: www.wineandgrapegrower.com/wggsub.asp

Mail to: PO Box 121, 6113 State Hwy., Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 Fax to: 518-673-2381 If your business provides products or services for the grape growers and wine makers, please contact us for information on marketing opportunities to this important segment of agriculture. You can reach us at 800-218-55866 orr dwren@leepub.com

Page 39 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • November 14, 2011

Coming Soon - The newest publication in the Lee Publications, Inc. family of agricultural papers


November 14, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 40

CF Mid-Atlantic 11.14.11  

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic November 14, 2011

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