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10 OCTOBER 2011 Section One e off One Volume e 30 Number r 40

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

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Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Tractorr Safety Demonstration ~ Page e A2 Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly

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FEATURES Auctions Beef Producers Classifieds Markets

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Carolina cattleman looks to improve beef industry one farm at a time ~ page 4 As water reflects the face, so one’s life reflects the heart. ~ Proverbs 27:19


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 2

First responders give tractor safety demonstration Car versus tractor ~ never an equal match by Sally Colby A sobering headline: Police say a car trying to pass a slow-moving tractor on a rural road in Yates County, New York, collided with a van full of Amish farmers from Steuben County, killing five people and injuring nine others. “This is a scene we see all too often,” said Dave Hill, senior extension associate and agricultural emergency management program director at Penn State. “There are developments where farms used to be, and those developments are residences for non-farm people who are driving on the roads. We find ourselves sharing the roads with people who don’t understand farm equipment. A lot of these people have less patience — they’re in a hurry and just want to go down the road. They don’t want to be bothered by a tractor that’s pulling an implement from field to field.” Hill manages a program aimed at training first responders who help at farm-related accidents. “We teach fire fighters how to respond to agricultural accidents,” he said. “Tractor turn-overs, machinery entanglements, silo entrapments.” Hill also oversees a farm-family program that teaches farm families what to do while waiting for emergency personnel to arrive. “The peak time for farm vehicle accidents is late afternoon — from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,” said Hill, “and June and October are the peak months for

accidents. The majority of accidents occur when the tractor driver turns left. That person behind you has been putting up with your speed for long enough, so he tries to pass. He can’t see you, and he tries to pass just as you’re turning left.” Hill says that before making a left turn, tractor drivers should pull into the right lane so that they can see everyone behind them prior to turning. He added that the second most common accident is rear-end collisions, many of which are the result of someone is talking on a cell phone, texting or distracted in some other way. “They’re driving at 55 mph, become distracted, and all of the sudden there’s a tractor and implement in front of them going 15 mph.” That type of accident, a rear-ender, is what a team of first responders demonstrated to a huge crowd at Penn State during Ag Progress Days. Hill explained the process for accident response, noting that police are usually first to arrive on the scene. “Next, the fire chief and the rest of the company arrive to stabilize the scene,” he said. “The tractor and car are stabilized so that they don’t roll. The EMS will focus on stabilizing victims and preparing them for transport to the hospital.” The team worked carefully and seamlessly; first stabilizing the woman (a volunteer) who had fallen from the tractor and then working to extricate the driver (a dummy) from the car.

In some cases, parts of the vehicle must be removed to gain access to additional victims.

“We have a ‘golden hour’ rule,” said Hill. “The victim has a much better chance of surviving their injuries if we can get them to a surgeon at a trauma center within an hour.” Hill noted the accident in New York brought numerous rescue workers to the scene, including several helicopters. “The farm vehicle was a field sprayer loaded with chemicals,” he said. “It wasn’t leaking, but it would’ve been a more serious incident if the tank had been breached.” Throughout the demonstration, Hill discussed some of the most important safety measures for those who drive farm equipment on pub-

The stabilized victim is placed on a board and moved away from the accident scene so rescue workers can work on the automobile and tractor as well as the victim in the vehicle.

lic roads. “As farm equipment gets bigger, it also gets faster,” he said. “If you’re driving farm equipment on the highway, make sure you’re driving at the appropriate speed for the equipment. Some of the new tractors are designed to be operated in excess of 25 mph — that’s fine if you’re pulling implements that are also designed to go 25 mph. High-speed tractors with low speed implements are not a good combination.” Hill also noted that all equipment operators should be properly

trained, and that equipment should be wellmaintained and roadworthy with hitch pins, steering, tires, bearings and brakes in good condition. The slow moving vehicle (SMV) sign should be in good condition and properly mounted. “It’s designed to be mounted on the back of equipment for equipment traveling at 25 mph or slower,” said Hill. “The inside triangle is visible during daylight hours and the outside triangle is visible at night. Consider an escort vehicle on busy

rural roads so that people behind know what’s going on. Use proper lighting and take every opportunity to let nonfarm neighbors understand the issues of moving farm equipment on the highway.” Hill says accidents involving automobiles and farm vehicles are becoming more frequent. “Tractors are getting bigger and there are more non-farm people in rural communities,” he said. “It’s our obligation to inform people at every opportunity about farm equipment on the road.”

After the victim is removed from the scene, fire personnel carefully stabilize the automobile and tractor with a series of supporting blocks and jacks. Photos by Sally Colby


by Tina L. LaVallee The 2011 Red Angus National Convention kicked off with a commercial cattle symposium in Durham, NC on Sept. 14. The symposium was hosted by the Red Angus Association of the Carolinas and was free of charge to give local cattlemen an opportunity to hear some of the distinguished speakers who had traveled to the state as part of the national convention. More than 160 attendees from as far away as Montana and Colorado came to Durham to experience the southern hospitality. The president and executive secretary of the Canadian Angus Association were also in attendance to hear the latest news on America’s fourth largest beef breed. This was the first time the Red Angus National Convention was held in North Carolina, but Greenville, SC was the site of the 2005 event. The Red Angus Association of the Carolinas, which encompasses both states, was established in 2004 to serve the growing popularity of the breed in the southeast. “We’re excited to have the Red Angus National Convention here,” said Mark Morgan, national board representative for the Northeastern Region. “Preparations have been under way for a whole year.” The Carolinas may not the first place that comes to mind when one thinks of beef cattle production, but the entire southeast is experiencing steady growth and Red Angus are playing a significant role. “We can see by our national membership that the breed is moving east,” said Morgan. “We see excellent growth potential throughout the eastern United States because of the Red Angus’s excellent disposition combined with the heterosis (crossbreeding) benefits for the commercial cattleman.” The activity in the Carolinas has not gone unnoticed. “The Red Angus

Dr. Tonya Amen, genetics expert for Pfizer, discussed the importance of genomically enhanced EPDs. Photos by Tina L. LaVallee

Association of the Carolinas is one of the fastest growing in the United States,” said Greg Comstock, Chief Executive Officer of the Red Angus Association. “Southeastern cattlemen have different needs from those west of the Mississippi and Red Angus are increasing in all areas, especially where heat tolerance is an issue. Redhided cattle offer better adaptive qualities in many situations.” The Commercial Cattlemen’s Symposium featured a stellar group of speakers on the topic of adding profitability to the commercial cowherd. Dr. Tonya Amen, genetics expert for Pfizer, began with an explanation of genomic enhanced EPDs and their importance to commercial breeders. “GE-EPDs can help track the most efficient sires, identify bulls with low fertility, and those that produce the highest value at the feedlot,” she explained. Cows also benefit from genetic evaluation. “Genomic data adds accuracy to the standard EPD, which is strictly an estimate. A single genomic test can add as much information as data collected on eight natural calves, a lifetime’s produce for a cow.” This data available at an early age can identify the potential worth of female even before her first breeding, thus allowing better informed decisions regarding sire selection and a heifer’s retention in the herd. Dr. Gordon Jones, Professor at Western Kentucky University, addressed essential cow herd traits. He stated that females must have adaptability to the local environment and forages, good disposition, calving ease, fertility, and longevity. Of these, Jones considered the most important trait to be longevity. “A heifer does not turn a profit until her third or fourth calf. She must be physically able to stay in a producer’s herd long enough to earn her keep.” As for achieving longevity, Jones recommended judicious crossbreeding with British cattle such as the Red Angus and Continental breeds. Next, Dr. Joseph Cassidy, Associate Professor at North Carolina State University, gave an interesting report on a joint study being conducted with Mississippi State University on the rate of hair coat shedding and its effect on cow performance. Data is being gathered on 5,000 cows in an effort to learn the effects of a heavier, slow shedding hair coat on heat stress and calf weight gain. Heat stress is a major factor in the south and southeast where high humidity slows a cow’s natural system of evaporative cooling. The session concluded with Larry Keenan, director of Beef Improvement for the Red Angus Association of America. He emphasized the importance of the whole herd reporting that has been implemented within the Red Angus breed since its inception and how the information gained can help select and retain cattle for the cow/ calf producer. Red Angus CEO Greg Comstock summarized the symposium by stating that the Red Angus Association’s full herd reporting system provides very clean data sets which make predicting certain traits easier and that the organization is focused on making this information more meaningful to the rancher’s profitability. “We cannot

Convention visitors from across the U.S. mingle among the many vendor displays.

become disconnected from the commercial customer. Our goal must be to produce seedstock that fulfills these needs. We want to add value through

superior Red Angus genetics and we help accomplish this by providing accurate genetic predictions to our members.”

Brooke Harward of Richfield, NC, earned the National Junior Angus Association’s (NJAA) Bronze and Silver Awards at the 2011. Photo by David Gazda, American Angus Association

Bronze and silver angus awards presented Brooke Harward, Richfield, NC, earned the National Junior Angus Association’s (NJAA) Bronze and Silver Awards at the 2011 North Carolina Angus Field Day, Sept. 17 in Lawsonville, NC. The Bronze and Silver Awards

are the first two levels of the NJAA Recognition Program. Juniors must apply for the awards and then meet point requirements in many areas of participation before receiving them.

Page 3 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Red Angus convention opens with commercial symposium


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 4

Cattleman looks to improve beef industry one farm at a time by Jon M. Casey With his recent retirement from public service, North Carolina cattleman Robert Caudill has returned to his first love, working to improve the beef industry. With more than 20 years in the beef industry and more than 30 years working with cattle, Caudill said that there is plenty of room for improvement at the farm level when it comes to producing beef cattle that are the kind that packing companies are looking for. “Those cattle have got to fit ‘The Box!’” he says. His successes along the way seem to prove this point. Caudill recalls that when he left his family’s dairy farming operation in the late 1980s to pursue a career outside the dairy industry, he went to work for J-Bob Farms, a renowned cattle operation that featured registered Gelbvieh cattle. During that time he

worked with the herd, turning it from “red to black” through breeding selection and relying upon embryo transplants for herd quality improvement. They were devoted to incorporating the Angus “Black” genetics into the red Gelbvieh herd stock. Within a couple of years, the cattle at J-Bob Farm became a standard for excellence on an international level with respect to the Angus breed. He worked there for 13 1/2 years until the farm’s dispersal sale. In 2002, Kerry Collins, then quarterback for the New York Giants, purchased much of the JBob assets from Bob Myrick, and realized the need for someone to manage the operation while he was still playing professional football. Caudill was the ideal choice. “We got the three best Angus cows we could find,” says Caudill in a recent interview. “We

Pasture and facilities management are components of Robert Caudill's consultation services. Photo by Jon Casey mated them with six premium bulls and transplanted those embryos into the Blue Q herd of Angus cows that were there at the time. That

Cover photo by Jon Casey With more than 30 years dealing with cattle, Robert Caudill is looking forward to working with cattle producers both large and small. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

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gave us a crop of high quality calves for sale and for breeding. We used a Simmental bull for herd cleanup so that it would be easy to tell which calves were going to market, and we relied on the Simmental cross because we knew that those calves would grow quickly and were very desirable among cattle finishers.” In 2004, Collins went west to play for the Oakland Raiders, which limited his available time at the farm. During those years, Caudill oversaw the farm’s operations, while remaining in daily contact with Collins, especially on decisions regarding sire selection and cattle buying and selling. Then, in 2006, Collins wanted to play a major role in the cattle operation. It was then that Caudill parted company with Collins and Caudill went to work for the North Carolina Department of Transportation. This year, Caudill officially retired and returned to working in the cattle industry once again, as a consultant. That was in July. Today, Caudill works with local and regional cattlemen to help them with day-to-day decisions that will help them do a better job. He works with them to improve their breeding plan, their feeding plan and with their overall cattle maintenance and production plans. Currently, Caudill is working with McNeill

Farms, near Seagrove, NC. There, he advises Gene and Charlon McNeill about their herd of registered Gelbvieh cattle. He is also a feed dealer for Union Grove Feeds and works with Bud Eanes, on ration formulation. The McNeill herd is cattle that were previously purchased from the JBob dispersal. Currently, they are breeding the herd with Angus and Gelbvieh bulls for the best genetics possible. With Caudill’s experience and abilities in making sound cattle decisions, his contribution will prove itself later this fall when McNeill Farms will offer a “Pick of the Pen” Sale on Oct. 29 that will feature 25 yearling bulls and about 10 or 12 cowcalf pairs. “When I first talked with Gene, we discussed what he wanted to do long-term, with the cattle operation,” he said. “He determined that he wanted to improve the herd and sell quality cattle to his neighbors as breeding stock. He said that he would like to sell registered bulls and registered females. With that in mind, we began working toward this upcoming sale. That was two years ago. We used selected Gelbvieh bulls and cows and planned the mating selections before we started breeding the cows the year before last. “Now that I’m retired, I believe that there is a need among smaller cattle producers who are

looking to do a better job,” Caudill said. “There are a lot of very good, small, cattle producers who have excellent cattle, but are not able to make the best use of those cattle. If they could take advantage of sound advice about genetic selection and which cattle to market and which to breed, they could realize more income and improve the cattle industry overall, at the same time. “For example, instead of a high quality bull going to market as a slaughter steer, he could be used as breeding stock on a regional or national scale and the producer realize more in the way of income from that animal,” he adds. “I believe that when you can talk one-on-one with them and help them to see the advantage of using artificial breeding in place of using a gradequality bull, you can be a big help to these producers. “While the local extension service and the semen suppliers are doing a great job, there are a lot of producers who are looking for someone to come along side them and help them with all sorts of decisions. They are looking for someone to help with pasture management planning, herd health concerns, housing needs and that sort of thing. I’m here to help them with those challenges.” For more information on Robert Caudill, contact him at 910-2202835.


The USDA on Sept. 30 announced $18 million in grants to beginning farmers and ranchers at a press conference held in Washington, D.C. USDA Deputy Secretary Kathleen Merrigan highlighted these recent awards that were funded through the 2011 Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP), a competitive grants program administered by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). BFRDP was first authorized in the 2008 Farm Bill, and over the past three years, has awarded over 100 grants to organizations that provide training and technical assistance to beginning farmers and ranchers. Merrigan stressed the importance of BFRDP in supporting our nation’s beginning farmers, and spoke about the major challenges the country faces in transitioning our workforce to the next generation of people who will work the land. Merrigan cited that the average age of farmers in the U.S. is between 57 and 59, and that the forthcoming census of agriculture being conducted next year, will likely show an increase from the 2007 Census. “BFRDP is just the type of program we need to help beginning farmers succeed so they can create jobs and economic development in our rural communities,” said Adam Warthesen, a policy organizer with the Land Stewardship Project — a non-profit organization based in Minnesota and an NSAC member group — adding that the next slate of beginning

farmer and rancher policies and initiatives are in the works, with the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Opportunity Act of 2011 set for introduction in Congress next month. “As we’ve seen with BFRDP, the demand is strong and the need is there for community based programs that support the next generation of farmers,” said Warthesen. 2011 BFRDP Awards For Fiscal Year 2011, BFRDP projects were awarded in Arizona, California, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming. Eight of the 36 grants announced were awarded to NSAC member organizations, totaling $4.8 million, and representing over a quarter of total program funding for 2011 includes: Northeast Organic Farming Association of New Jersey (NJ) — There are currently no beginning farmer programs in the Garden State, yet there is an ever-increasing demand for local, organic produce and an ample amount of preserved farmland. This program will empower New Jersey's new small scale farmers through technical training courses, internship and apprenticeship programs, an incubator farm, and the development of land leases and contracts that can be used by beginning farmers to gain access to land. Northeast Organic Farming Associa-

tion of New York (NY) — The “Cultivating the Next Crop of Organic Farmers” project will support the next cadre of beginning farmers in every Northeast state by strengthening the support they receive from seven regional organic and sustainable farming organizations. The project's goals include providing a formal apprenticeship and mentoring program, as well as shared learning opportunities such as onfarm workshops, webinars, and conferences to build a strong and supportive generation of new farmers. Stone Barns Center for Food And Agriculture (NY) — Stone Barns is a working farm and education center that addresses the critical need to train young farmers in the Northeast. This award will be used to grow and improve their program that provides workshops, conferences, apprenticeships, on-line resources and mentoring services geared towards the needs of beginning farmers. The project will provide intensive hands-on training for more than 1,200 farmers by 2014 to ensure a better-equipped corps of regional farmers that will be able to supply the region with healthful food. 2012 Request for Applications Earlier this month, the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) also released the Request for Applications (RFA) for the next round of BFRDP funding for Fiscal Year 2012. Approximately $19 million will be made available for projects next year. This will be the last round of mandatory funding for BFRDP au-

thorized under the 2008 Farm Bill, and the program will require reauthorization and a dedication of funding in the next Farm Bill. NSAC will be pushing hard to reauthorize this program in the coming Farm Bill, and will advocate for increased mandatory funding in order to meet the incredible demand for the program. BFRDP grant projects address five major priority areas that provide technical and financial assistance to beginning farmers and ranchers, and include: • Production and management strategies to enhance land stewardship by beginning farmers and ranchers; • Business management and decision support strategies that enhance the financial viability of beginning farmers and ranchers; • Marketing strategies that enhance the competitiveness of beginning farmers and ranchers; • Legal strategies that assist beginning farmers with farm or land acquisition and transfer; and • Other Priority Topics to enhance competitiveness and sustainability of beginning farmers and ranchers for the next generation. Additionally, grants may be awarded for educational enhancement team projects that assemble a team of experts to review beginning farmer and rancher curriculum and programs, identify gaps, and develop and disseminate recommendations and materials to address these gaps.

Page 5 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

USDA awards $18 million to support beginning farmers


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 6

A walk on the wild side of ag advocacy by Cyndie Sirekis Steering clear of “producer” and “industry” when talking about food grown or raised by America’s farm and ranch families was one of the tidbits of advice offered at a recent gathering of Farm Bureau members and staff from around the country involved in agricultural promotion and education. The solution? Just use farmer. J. Scott Vernon Ph.D., a featured speaker at Farm Bureau’s national Promotion & Education Conference, is the founder of I Love Farmers… They Feed My Soul and a professor of agricultural education and communication at California Polytechnic State University. He is not alone in urging food producers to call themselves farmers. Vernon and the board of directors of I Love Farmers, none of whom are older than 25, do stand out in the growing field of those dubbed “agricultural advocates” due to their chosen methods of engaging with the non-farming public. Provocative is an apt description for some of the strategies used by

the young agricultural enthusiasts (ages 15-25) who make up I Love Farmers, the 501(c)(3) charitable organization founded by Vernon to “create a conversation among peers about our food, our farmers and our future.” The slogan “Where’s the Food, Without the Farmer?” is one example. Tee shirts, ball caps and temporary rub-on tattoos emblazoned with the slogan are wildly popular as conversation starters when worn by supporters. Hosting rap and reggae concerts and using social media are other fun ways to get points about today’s farming across to young people, according to Vernon. Going even further afield from the traditional venues ag advocates often frequent to reach the public, such as farmers’ markets and community fairs, supporters have placed “I Love Farmers” artwork in tattoo parlors. Spreading the word about today’s agriculture in tattoo parlors may have some merit. According to the Web

October 15TH 2011, 9:00 A.M. Loudoun Co. Fairgrounds 17558 Dry Mill Road Leesburg, VA

Farm Equipment - Light Industrial Lawn & Garden - Tools

After having our largest annual equipment auction in April, Bill Tillett & Craig Damewood, Auctioneers are preparing to deliver another popular sale. Even with two inches of rain over several hours, more than 600 people came ready to buy last spring. We are currently accepting consignments on the types of equipment and tools listed above. This is a great opportunity for farmers, contractors and homeowners to buy and sell their equipment and tools. Please - no household items or furnishings. We will sell the following at public auction: 1988 Ford L9000 Tandem Axle Dump Truck, EW 23k GW 52k, 350hp Cummins Engine w/ 9 speed Transmission, 325,000 miles; 2006 John Deere 310SG Backhoe 4x4, 750 hrs, Extend-a-hoe, cab w/heat & AC; New Holland 70 TNDA 4x4 tractor, loader, quick attach 32LC; 5210 John Deere, loader; 986 International w/cab, W.F., 6,416 hrs; Minneapolis Moline U-302; John Deere 830, new paint, blade; CubCadet Loboy w/belly mower; 1495 New Holland haybine; 845 New Holland round baler; John Deere 926 MoCo; Gehl 1465 round baler, twine; Frontier WB1008 wheel rake; Salte Dog spreader box; Brillion cultipacker, 16'; Mill Creek manure spreader; Aluminium Gooseneck trailer - 4 horse cust. fab; 1988 Jayco motor home, gas; 1999 Chev. 3500 diesel - 60K; 1995 Ford F250 4x4 - 180K, inspected; 1993 Jeep Grand Cherokee - 114K 4x4; 1983 Ford F250; 1994 Oldsmobile CutlassSupreme conv. -100K+ 2005 Eager Beaver 25 Ton Tagalong Trailer Tri axle w/ lift axle; ZD21 Kubota zero turn; Woods front cut zeroturn, 60", diesel; 595 John Deere, mower, front blade; 325 John Deere rider, complete recon, hydro static, 48" cut - 700 hrs; LX277 John Deere mower, hydro static, 48"; LA135 59 hrs; Troybilt tillers; Stihl Chainsaw; Trafcom arrow board; Snow blower - 7' 3"; M.B. quick attach street broom; Floor fan; 3 pt. Bushhog 7' Bushog; Lawn cart; Huskee 20 HP mower, 46" deck; 10' Pasture drag; Chain harrow, 8'; Bale spear; New Holland bale wagon, #1044; Pug utility car; Water tank, 100 gal.; and many more items still coming in! If you are interested in auctioning your equipment and/or tools, please call (703) 303-4760 or (540) 454-2326 Delivery dates for equipment and tools will be: Thurs. October 13th & Fri. October 14th from 7:30A to 6:00P Three-percent buyer's premium on all purchases; Payment by cash or check with ID; Not responsible for accidents; Food served. Bill Tillett and Craig Damewood, Auctioneers Ike Swart, Auctioneer Brian Damewood, Auctioneer Virginia License 141, 680 and 2246, 3881 540-668-6179 and 703-303-4760 www.tillettanddamewoodauctioneers.com

site VanishingTattoo.com, which features facts and statistics about inked body art, 14 percent of Americans now have one or more tattoos. That’s up from 6 percent in 1936. Looking at age breakdowns is even more revealing. A 2006 a study done by the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that 36 percent of Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 have at least one tattoo. Expanding the age bracket studied up to 50 reveals that 40 percent sport some ink. Despite the growing prevalence and in-

creased acceptance of tattoos, does Vernon really think people will ask for “I Love Farming… it Feeds My Soul” tattoos? Not at all, he says.

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation “This is just one more place where we can reach people and get them talking about food and farming,” he suggests.

Cyndie Sirekis is director of news services with the American Farm Bureau Federation.

‘Ginger Day’ workshop in King and Queen County Cooperative Extension at Virginia State University is sponsoring a Ginger Day Workshop on Friday, Oct. 21 from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Dayspring Farm located in Cologne. On this 18-acre farm owned by Charlie and Miriam Maloney, workshop participants will learn about high tunnel production, harvesting and cleaning of fresh ginger.

Registration is limited to 60 participants and will only be accepted via mail or e-mail. Registration fee is $10 per person. To register or for directions to the workshop site, contact Mark Klingman at 804-524-5960 or e-mail mjklingman@vsu.edu . Anyone desiring special services or accommodations should call in advance to discuss their needs.

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III milk price at $19.07 per hundredweight (cwt.), down $2.60 from August, but still $2.81 above September 2010, and equates to about

$1.64 per gallon. That pulls the 2011 Class III average to $18.28, up from $14.07 at this time a year ago and $10.49 in 2009.

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814-793-4293 Day or Evening or 814-793-9797 • Fax: 814-793-2431

Financing & Leasing Available JD 6410 cab & air, 4x4 JD 6400 4x4, open station JD 4650 4x4, 4 post JD 4555 cab & air, powershift JD 4455 cab & air, 4WD JD 4450 cab & air, powershift, 4x4 JD 4440 cab & air, powershift JD 4430 cab & air, powershift JD 4430 cab & air, quad range JD 4320 fender JD 4240 cab & air, powershift JD 4055 cab & air, 4x4, powershift JD 4055 cab & air, 2WD, quad range JD 3255 4 post 4x4 JD 3155 cab & air, 4x4 JD 2955 fender, 2WD JD 2955 4x4, cab & air JD 2955 cab, air, 2WD JD 2950 cab, air, 4x4

JD 2755 cab, air, 4x4 JD 2755 fender, 4x4 JD 2755 fender, 2WD JD 2750 cab & air, 4x4 JD 2750 fender, 4x4 JD 2640 82 model JD 2640 JD 2555 fender, 4x4 JD 2555 cab & air, 4x4 JD 2355 cab & air, 4x4 JD 2355 fender, 4x4 JD 2355 cab & air, 2WD JD 2355 2WD, no cab JD 2155 4x4, fender JD 2155 2WD JD 4020 powershift, ‘72 JD 4020 powershift, ‘70 JD 2520 excellent condition JD 455D dozer 6-way blade JD 2030 IH 1086 cab & air IH 1066 cab

MF 165 diesel MF 175 diesel MF 255 w/ loader MF 265 MF 275 MF 399 cab & air White 2-88 cab & air, 2WD White 2-105 fender White 2-105 cab & air, 4x4 White 2-135 Series 3, cab & air, 2WD White 2-135 Series 3, cab, 4x4 Bobcat 843 skid steer, low hours Bobcat 175 skid loader JD 280 loader JD 265 loader JD 260 loader JD 245 loader JD 148 loader JD 158 loader JD 175 loader NH 2100 chopper JD 5830 chopper

Class III futures settled Friday as follows: October $17.44, November $16.41, and December at $16.35. Looking “back to the futures” now combined with the announced Class III prices, the Federal order Class III contract’s average for the last half of 2011 was at $19.63 on September 2, $19.36 on September 9, $19.49 on September 16, $19.21 on September 23, and $18.72 on September 29. The September Class IV price is $19.53, down 61 cents from August, but $2.77 above a year ago. California’s comparable September 4a and 4b prices are scheduled to be announced October 3. The four week NASSsurveyed cheese price averaged $1.8592 per pound, down 28.1 cents from August. Butter averaged $1.9886, down 8.1 cents. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.5439, down 3 cents, and dry whey averaged 59.26 cents, up 2.4 cents. Cash cheese lost a little more ground the last week in September though some positive movement occurred in the week. The 40-pound Cheddar blocks closed Friday at $1.72 per pound, down three quar-

ter-cents on the week, and 4 cents below that week a year ago. The 500-pound barrels closed at $1.64, down 6 3/4-cents on the week, and 9 1/2-cents below a year ago. Ten cars of block traded hands on the week in the spot market and 18 of barrel. The NASS U.S. average block price fell to $1.8005, down a penny and a half from the previous week, and the barrels averaged $1.7694, down 1.2 cents. FC Stone dairy broker Dave Kurzawski wrote in his September 26 Insider Opening Bell that, “As long as domestic spot cheese prices stay in the $1.70 range with international prices about a dime higher, export demand isn’t likely to change enough to lift domestic prices.” The CME’s Daily Dairy Report says USDA confirmed the slowdown in cheese usage this summer, reporting that disappearance of American

Monday Cattle & Goat Sale 12:30

Friday Cattle & Goat Sale 10:30

Horse Sale 3rd Tuesday of Month

Graded Feeder Sales (Call for Dates)

Siler City, North Carolina

Phone (919) 742-5665 Fax (919) 742-2584 PO BOX 345 Siler City, NC 27344 Livestock Auction Sales Dealers in Livestock Handling and Feeding Equipment We carry a full line of Feed by Performance Livestock and Feed Co.

Performance Livestock and Feed Company

“FEED FOR CATTLE, GOATS, AND HORSES”

Selling Truck Load Lots of Farm Cattle by Video Tel-Auction Sale Every 2nd & 4th Wednesday of the Month

Stoll Trailers

cheese was down 1.9 percent from 2010 in the May-July period and down 9.6 percent in July alone. Growth in butter movement slowed as well, due to a decline in exports. Overall butter disappearance was up 2.7 percent in May-July; domestic use was up 4.1 percent, while exports were down 8.7 percent, according to USDA numbers. The cash butter market closed September 30 at $1.76, down a penny on the week, and 47 1/2cents below a year ago when it peaked for 2010 at $2.2350. Only four cars were sold this week. NASS butter averaged $1.8911, down 4.8 cents. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk held all week at $1.49, while the Extra Grade remained at $1.58. NASS powder closed at $1.5413, up a half-cent, and dry whey averaged 60.04 cents, up a penny. In other milk price news, looking “back to the futures” combined with the announced Class III prices for July and August, the Federal order Class III contract’s average for the last half of 2011 was at $19.75 on August 5, $19.42 on August 12, $19.18 on August 19, $19.36 on August 26, $19.63 on September 2, $19.36 on September 9, $19.49 on September 16, $19.21 on September 23, and was close to $18.80 at our deadline on September 29. Milk production across the country is settling into fall trends, according to USDA’s weekly update. Weather patterns and temperatures are basically conducive to late season milk output, although milk volumes are declining to the point that balancing plants and surplus operations are greatly reducing processing schedules. Schools are now back in session, thus the school bottling pipeline is full and milk volumes are less stressed to maintain capacities. The fall harvest is well underway in many regions of the country for corn silage, although many corn and soybean

Mielke 15

Page 7 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Issued Sept 30, 2011 Farm gate milk prices are heading down. The Agriculture Department announced the September Federal order Class


5 MONTH OLD pigs, one female, 2 males, left males are neutered, $65.00 each. Hubbardsville. Call anytime, nice pigs. 315725-2965.(NY)

18’ steel flatbed truck body with subframe & omaha standard double 3 stage hyd. pistons & Hyd. pump, complete setup 860774-5437.(CT)

JOHN DEERE L, engine overhauled, rears 90%, fronts new paint land plow, cultivator , belt pulley. Let’s talk! $3,000. 585-5907383.(NY)

FEED CART, Bodco, Honda engine, N.H. baler, M282, two row international planter; WANTED: 6VDC tractor battery, 16.9x28 tractor tires. 315-926-5689.(NY)

E70B excavator with 24”-28” buckets, 4,000 hours showing, $15,500; JD 455G, track loader, 3,300 hours, good UC. Dundee 607-243-5388.(NY)

GREENHOUSE 30x70, used, currently housing calves. You take down. $2,000 OBO. 518-993-4014.(NY)

WANTED: Badger barn cleaner, complete unit or parts, corner wheels. FOR SALE: NH 1495 self propelled haybine, $1,500 or B/O. 315-717-4464.(NY)

1600 OLIVER Gas Tractor, all new tires, new clutch, with loader and 6 ft. bucket, $3,800 firm. 585-591-1350.(NY)

COMBINATION oil/wood forced hot air indoor furnace, used 2 seasons. Can deliver. Cost new, $6,000. Selling for $2,995 obo. 845-246-1377.(NY)

MINIATURE HORSE foals, two fillies, two colts, friendly, make an offer. 585-5264736.(NY)

GEHL 865 chopper, two row corn and hay head, $3,500; Schulte WR5 rock rake, $8,500. 315-339-4147.(NY)

FOR SALE: Brown egg lay pullets, just started laying. $5.75. 315-536-8967.(NY)

GOATS, Alpine, Female, $70; Metal Detector, new, $30; Pressure canner, Mirro, used once, $50; Hydraulic winch, new, water trough, $110; 315-531-8670.(NY)

IH 203 combine, gas engine, two row corn head, engine runs fine. $600. 315-6266265.(NY)

McCormick horse drawn mower, reaper, grain drill, IH 2 row corn planter, Papec silage blower, cultivator, 2 bottom, 3 bottom, 518-643-2526.(NY) TWO YOUNG BULLS, certified organic, 17 month Holstein and 16 month Holstein Jersey Cross, AI Sired, Pasured, $700 OBO. 802-254-6982.(VT) IHC TD6 pto box 540 rpm, GC; Also, IHC corn bundler, pto on rubber, good condition. 518-686-5418.(NY) JD Green corn head, fits 3940; WANTED: Direct cut head, 3940. 716-257-5129.(NY)

30.5.32 Firestone super All traction tires on 10 bolt rims, 85% tread, $3,500/pair. 14.9.24 Super All Traction $400. 315-4203396.(NY) WANTED: Good quality milk goats, preferably Saanen. Waterloo 315-694-8747.(NY) ALPACAS, two males, cream/white, healthy, excellent fleece! Good bloodlines, $500 each or both for $800, in upstate New York. 607-538-1799.(NY) JOHN DEERE LA No Tag, motor struck, $900. John Deere 140 with deck, $650. Rochester, NY 585-227-1864.(NY)

IH 764 diesel with or without 3 pt h blade and tire chains, $4,600 complete or will sell separate. 802-933-4501.(VT) 7’ DISK, $400; Homemade 3 pt. wood splitter, $400; Reasonable offers will be accepted. 716-680-2456.(NY) FEEDER PIGS, 8 weeks old, $40. Yorkshire 30 hp 3ph electric motor. 315-2723706.(NY) FEEDER PIGS, 7 weeks old, grain fed, all natural cross, Yorkshire, Tamworth, $50 each or 6 for $45 each. 607-647-5775.(NY)

THREE YEAR OLD laying hens, 15 to 20 of them, $1.00 each! 315-655-2283.(NY) CASE IH 1020 20’ flex head and head cart, 3” cut field tracker, extra knife bar and plastic, excellent cond. 585-721-4962.(NY) FOR SALE: Dexter cattle. Call 585-9282725 evenings.(NY) JOHN DEERE Model 25 3 point hitch corn chopper, one row head, used 1 year, like new, shed kept, $3,800 518-8480995.(NY)

WANTED: Used head lock section for cows. WANTED: Belted Galloway bull, 12 months. For Sale: First cut hay grass mix. 518-894-8111.(NY)

DAVID BRADLY tractor with land plow, snow plow, cultivator, wheel weights, tire chains, no motor, good hood, transmission, clutch work. 315-376-6386.(NNY)

SMALL PORTABLE David Bradley corn sheller on JD gear. Set up for PTO with home built cob stacker, $200. 315-5368206.(NY)

CULTIVATOR for Farmall A or Cub, good condition, make offer; Also, Gehl hammer mill - blower for hi moisture corn. 315-5360512.(NY)

400 GALLON milk tank, in running condition, with Comp., $1,200 or B.O. 413-5622981.(MA)

2-21L 24 12 ply industrial tires, good tread; 1991 Chevy 2500 4WD pickup, good shape. 2001 dodge intrepid, new tires, 315-462-9027.(NY)

WANTED: Combine with 4RN corn head, Gleaner or JD preferred. Also, Batch dryer, pto drive, Troy. 518-279-3241.(NY)

FOR SALE: A Mueller matic automatic washing system. Would work the best on the flattop sunset bulk tanks. Asking $175. 315-942-4069.(NY)

FOR SALE: Jamesway stanchions, good condition, leave message if no answer. 315-776-4197.(NY)

WANTED: Organic Hay for Bedding. 315536-3506.(NY)

JD Chopper 3970 Iron guard electric controls, 48 knives, long tongue, 7’ hay pickup, 3 row corn head, $8,900. 315-9862314.(NY)

MPK Compactor for trachoe, was on 30U Cat. May fit other models. WANTED: 80” bucket for 785 M.H. Skid Loader. 585-3947041.(NY)

2003 ISUZU NPR box truck, 151K, lift gate, 14’; Runs great, needs radiator, windshield, $7,500; 1998 F-150 extended 2wd, 171K, $2,500. 607-437-4243.(NY)

BLACK ANGUS BULL, 2 years old, $1,500; Offers; Alternator by DeLaval PTO 104 amps, 120 240 volts, no longer needed 607-829-2837.(NY)

HOBART Titan 8 AC-DC welder, 250 amps, 8000 whatts 18 hp, Briggs and Stratten Vanguard engine. Good condition, $1,400 OBO. 585-554-5406.(NY)

NEW HOLLAND 411 9 ft., needs idler tower, rolls and cutter bar good, $3,200. 315-985-0584.(NY)

WANTED: Straw or corn fodder for bedding. Yates Co. 585-526-5964.(NY)

OLIVER corn picker, picks & husks okay, elevator needs work, $250. Farmall H with loader, runs, looks good, $1,300. Evenings. 315-524-4007.(NY)

BLUE HEELER puppies, friendly, good cattle dogs, also make great pets. Males and females available. $100 OBO. 607532-9582.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 336 baler, good working condition, asking $2,800; Call 315-5271220 or 315-823-1419.(NY)

WANTED: Two Row Corn Planter. 315699-5349.(NY)

WANTED: Snapper head or adapter to fit FX45 harvester. Large quantity first cut large square bales, processed $170/ton FoB. 716-864-1562.(NY)

ALLIS CHALMERS 180 diesel tractor, $4,500 OBO 585-322-8831.(NY)

WANTED: Apple butter kettle and apple parer and related items. 716-3370449.(NY)

RED Simmental breeding bull approx. 20 months old, $1,500 firm. 607-8956624.(NY)

RYE seed, $20 per 100 lbs., 3 ph post hole auger, 6” auger, $250; Hay preservative system, extra motors, pumps, $250. 413584-3291.(MA)

WANTED: Ear corn, also decent 2nd or 3rd cutting alfalfa. Yates Co. 315-5363834.(NY)

FORD 2000, FORD 2N, Farmall 300U ($3,600.00), Massey Pony, Mint ($3,200.00) Fordson Major diesel, ($4,300.00), VAH High Crop, Case 430. 518-922-6301.(NY)

BROWN SWISS SEMEN, Old Mill WDE supreme ET. 518-993-4981.(NY)

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NH Tractor TS-100 ROPS, 4WD, loaded 16/16 powershift, 85 hp, $22,500; 1985 GMC 10 wheeler, 16 ft., flat bed, $3,500. 315-730-1067.(NY)

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The beef checkoff’s nutrition communications program helps motivate health professionals to recommend beef because they recognize that Americans need to eat beef and can eat beef every day to live strong and be strong. The program provides nutrition leaders with the reasons to believe in beef’s contribution to improving health since

nearly half of Americans say they are trying to consume more protein, and more than three-quarters of Americans reportedly change the types of food and/or food components to improve the healthfulness of their diet. That’s why each fall, your beef checkoff attends the American Dietetic Association’s (ADA) annual meeting — the

The November/ December Issues of Your connection to the Northeast Equine Market www.cfmanestream.com

Will Feature: Barn Building, Winter Horse Care &

Feeding, Tack & Equipment Care DEADLINE: Friday, October 14th For advertising contact your sales representative today... or call 1-800-218-5586

Myers Hereford Farm

321 Elmwood Road, Statesville, NC 28625 Phone: 704/872-7155 PH: 704-872-7155 FAX: 704-871-9997 CELL 704-450-1598 Email: hmastecc@I-america.net Web site: www.cattletoday.com/myers

world’s largest meeting of food and nutrition experts — where more than 6,000 registered dietitians, nutrition science researchers, policy makers, healthcare providers and industry leaders address key issues affecting the health of all Americans. This year’s annual Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo (FNCE) featured more than 100 research and educational presentations, lectures, debates, panel discussions and culinary demonstrations. More than 350 exhibitors, including your beef checkoff, showcased healthy foods and nutrition education materials. “When I started doing beef promotion in 1994, I gave out beef samples in a grocery store, and consumers refused to take them because their doctors told them they can’t eat red meat. Now, I see the American Heart Association logo or seal on packages of lean beef. That is a huge step in educating nutritionists and dietitians,” said Jeanne Harland, a beef producer from Illinois and vice chairman of the beef checkoff’s Joint Nutrition and Health Committee. “That mindset is changed by attending shows like ADA and the work that our state and national partners do with influencers,” she added. “It’s all about education and showing these nutrition leaders sound checkoff research to base their decisions on. It’s exciting to see actual results.” This year, the beef checkoff also supported a session titled, “Interpreting Epidemiology: Another New Study…

Now What Do I Say?” Sixty-four percent of consumers cite too much conflicting information about which foods are healthy as a roadblock to healthful eating. Registered dietitians need to be able to interpret the most current research for their clients, organizations and the media succinctly and clearly. This session provided concrete examples of how to review epidemiological research and create one or two sentences that puts the research in perspective. “Most of the questions we received centered around how the lean cuts of beef fit into a weight-loss program,” said Bill Brandenberg, a beef producer from California who met with conference participants at the beef checkoff booth. “As a cattle feeder from the Imperial Valley, it was good for attendees to see a producer face sharing the message about how beef is high in protein, low in fat, and a low-calorie option at mealtime. The younger generation has a lot more concerns about the safety of food and antibiotic use, but they were openminded and asked great questions.” In addition, the checkoff’s presence at the trade show included recipe demonstrations and samples, a resource CD, educational materials, “Beef Nutrition IQ and You” challenge and giveaways of the checkoff-funded Healthy Beef Cookbook. For more information about checkoff-funded activities, visit MyBeefCheckoff.com.

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BULL & HEIFER SALE December 10, 2011 @ 1:00 pm 2 year old Horned Hereford Bulls Bred yearling Hereford Heifers, Open 2011 Hereford Heifers & Black Baldie Heifers THESE BULLS ARE FROM A LONG LINE OF LINE 1 HORNED HEREFORD BREEDING USING BREEDING STOCK FROM JAMISON HEREFORDS IN QUINTER, KANSAS, HOLDEN HEREFORDS AND COOPER HEREFORDS IN MONTANA. THIS IS THE ULTIMATE IN LINE BREEDING TO REALIZE MAXIMUM HETEROSIS IN A CROSS BREEDING PROGRAM FOR FARMERS.

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Beef Checkoff helping to motivate health professionals


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 12

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You World Egg Day Recipes The entire globe celebrates World Egg Day on the second Friday in October. This year’s celebration, on Oct. 14, means countless countries pay homage to all the attributes of The incredible edible egg™ in activities ranging from festivals to celebrity chef cook-offs to recipe promotions, egg hunts and beyond. And there is a lot to celebrate — 70 calories, varying amounts of 13 essential vitamins and minerals, high-quality protein-at only 15¢ per serving! America’s egg farmers also celebrate the eggscellent benefits of eggs all year long and help those in need by donating eggs to food banks across the country throughout the year. Through the Good Egg Project, America’s egg farmers donate more than 12 million eggs a year to food banks. Eggs’ high-quality protein, which contains all the essential amino acids, goes a long way in feeding the hungry. Studies suggest eating a protein rich meal, like that in eggs, helps keep you feeling full longer. Couple that with being versatile and convenient, this high quality protein source has food banks around the world applauding farmers and The incredible edible egg™ for their efforts to feed the hungry. The versatility of eggs also helps translate mundane meals into flavorful can’t-get-enough-of dishes for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Need another reason to celebrate World Egg Day? Recent studies by the USDA have determined that eggs are a good source of vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, which bodies need to stay healthy. One egg provides 10 percent of the Daily Recommended Value (DRV) of vitamin D and 23 percent of the DRV of choline. Choline, another essential nutrient important for normal brain function, is found mostly in the egg yolk. This is why it’s important to eat the whole egg, yolk and all!

Greek Omelet 2 eggs 2 tablespoons water and 1/4 tsp. Oregano Feta cheese Baby spinach leaves

Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped Heat a 10” skillet with a quick release finish on medium high heat. Spray with cooking spray or coat surface with a teaspoon olive oil. Blend eggs, water and oregano and pour into hot skillet. Swirl egg around pan so entire pan is coated. With an inverted spatula, bring some of egg mixture towards center as you tip the pan, allowing the liquid egg to fill that space. Do this all around the pan until the egg mixture is no longer runny. Fill the left portion of the omelet with cheese, spinach and olives. Fold unfilled portion over filled part; let sit for 15 seconds; then flip out onto a plate. Serves 1

Chinese Egg Foo Yung 8 eggs, beaten 1 cup thinly sliced celery 1 cup finely chopped onion 1 cup bean sprouts 1/2 cup diced, fresh mushrooms 1/3 cup each: chopped, cooked chicken; crumbled, cooked ground beef; chopped, cooked pork 1 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. pepper Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Heat oil in a medium skillet and brown 1/2 cup portions of mixture. Flip and brown other side. Serve with Foo Yung Sauce. Serves 5

Foo Yung Sauce 2 cubes low sodium chicken bouillon 1 1/2 cups hot water 1 1/2 tsp. sugar 2 T. low sodium soy sauce 6 tablespoons cold water 1 1/2 T. cornstarch Dissolve bouillon in hot water in a small saucepan; add sugar and soy sauce and blend over medium heat. Add cold water and cornstarch and stir until thick and smooth.

Australian Poached Egg and Green Vegetable Pasta 8 eggs, poached and left in warm water 1 lb. penne or short pasta, boiled until al-dente 1 T olive oil and 2 tsp. margarine or butter 1/4 pound baby spinach, washed 1 bunch asparagus, cut into bite size pieces

1 cup frozen peas, thawed 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated Heat olive oil and butter in a large skillet; add veggies and sauté until spinach is wilted. With slotted spoon, lift pasta into skillet; stir to coat; sprinkle with cheese. Season to taste. Serve in individual bowls, each portion topped with a poached egg. Serves 8

Good Housekeeping Crustless tomato-ricotta pie This delicious cross between a frittata and a quiche makes a great vegetarian dinner or brunch option. Try this simple cheese-and-tomato pie with 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano or 1/4 cup chopped fresh dill in place of basil. 1 container part-skim ricotta cheese 4 large eggs 1/4 cup freshly grated Pecorino Romano cheese 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 1/4 cup low-fat (1 percent) milk 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1/2 cup (loosely packed) fresh basil leaves, chopped 1/2 cup (loosely packed) fresh mint leaves, chopped 1 pound ripe tomatoes, thinly sliced 1. Preheat oven to 375°F. In large bowl, whisk ricotta, eggs, Romano, salt and pepper until blended. 2. In measuring cup, stir milk and cornstarch until smooth; whisk into cheese mixture. Stir in basil and mint. 3. Pour mixture into nonstick 10-inch skillet with oven-safe handle. Arrange tomatoes on top, overlapping slices if necessary. Bake pie 35 to 40 minutes or until lightly browned and set around edge and center is puffed. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Makes 6 main-dish servings. • Each serving: About 190 calories, 10g total fat (5g saturated), 165mg cholesterol, 380mg sodium, 10g total carbs, 2g dietary fiber, 15g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our Web site at www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefinder/. (c) 2011 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

Answer to last week’s puzzle


Broadcast will also be live to all mobile phones In a significant technological move forward for agriculture, the National FFA Organization will stream its 2011 National Convention in Indianapolis Oct. 19-22 live online via the newly launched Alltech Ag Network on iHigh.com. The televised convention will be accessible real time via computers, iPads and all iPhone, Android and BlackBerry mobile devices. As FFA membership stands at more than a half-million students throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, iHigh.com expects this to be their largest telecast ever. Yet the significance of the convention broadcast goes beyond recordbreaking metrics. “Agriculture is taking the lead in communications, moving high tech to engage the world in its story,” said Billy Frey, general manager of the Alltech Ag Network. “iHigh.com’s unique platform enables it to, for example, on a recent Friday night, broadcast more than 170 high

school football games simultaneously and live to mobile devices free of charge. This is a capability far beyond many major sports organizations and applications. FFA is now harnessing this power, broadening its reach at a time when our growing population is moving increasingly far away from the stories of the farm and the origins of their food.” iHigh.com, the Global Youth Network, is designed to provide free feature-rich Web services to schools, students and youth organizations, and enables live streaming of events, mobile broadcasting, unlimited photo uploads and more. Using iHigh.com’s unique feature-rich Web and broadcast platform, high schools and organizations such as the National High School Rodeo Association, U.S. Pony Club, USA Swimming, the Bass Federation, BMX tracks, AAU and many others are able to share their events in real time with a global audience that can access the

streaming video on any computer or mobile device. Currently, iHigh receives 1.3 million unique visitors per month with a growth of 30 percent just within the last 30 days. “iHigh.com is a true supporter of FFA and exemplifies this by providing the means to take our convention message to tens of thousands of FFA members throughout the country and beyond who aren’t able to attend the event,” said National FFA Organization CEO Dwight Armstrong. “This is a major opportunity for FFA and we are extremely grateful for iHigh.com’s expertise, resources and abilities to reach our mem-

bership in a new and meaningful way.” “I am so pleased that one of the premier youth organizations in the United States, the FFA, has chosen to use the Alltech Ag Channel on iHigh.com to reach their audience in this everchanging world of technology,” said Jim Host, CEO of iHigh.com. The broadcast schedule for the 2011 FFA National Convention is as follows (times are listed in EST): • I Believe – Opening Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 19, 7:15 p.m. • I Believe in Action – Second Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct.

20, 2 p.m. • I Believe in... – Third Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m. • I Believe in Service – Fourth Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 21, 8 a.m. • I Believe in Leadership – Fifth Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 21, 12 p.m. • I Believe in Excellence – Sixth Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 21, 3 p.m. • I Believe in Possibilities – Seventh Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 21, 7 p.m. • I Believe in Passion – Eighth Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 22, 7:45 a.m.

• I Believe in the Future – Ninth Session at Conseco Fieldhouse – Oct. 22, 1:30 p.m. View the broadcasts live on the Internet or an iPad at ffa.ihigh.com. For mobile phone, including iPhones, Androids and some BlackBerrys, the broadcasts may be accessed at m.ihigh.com/ffa by clicking on the Media button and selecting your smartphone type to view the broadcast. Broadcasts will be viewable live and on-demand at no cost to the users. If there are any issues viewing a broadcast, please contact 859514-3886 for technical support.

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Page 13 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

2011 National FFA Convention to be televised live on internet


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 14

North Carolina MarketReady awards 2011 equipment cost share The North Carolina Value-Added Cost Share (NCVACS) program, administered by NC MarketReady, recently

selected eight agricultural producers and four agricultural processors to receive supplemental funding for value-

added equipment purchases. “This cycle of funding was highly competitive,” according to Brittany Whitmire, program coordinator for NCVACS. The total amount awarded was $167,774, with grants ranging from $475 to $50,000. Recipients are located across the state and are involved in a wide range of value-added agricultural enterprises. A few examples include cost share funds to support expansion of cheese-making facilities, adding a smoker to a meat processing business and expanding a forest products operation. The NCVACS program, funded by the North Carolina Tobacco Trust Fund Commission, directly supports the development of North Carolina valueadded agricultural operations. A valueadded agricultural product is a raw, agricultural commodity that has been changed in some manner so that it no longer can be returned to its original state. This change results in increased market value, allowing the producer to receive a higher price for these valueadded products compared to the original commodity. The program’s investment of $167,774 will result in equipment purchases valued at more than $500,000. The value-added operations receiving cost share funds will be able to improve efficiencies and increase production with the addition of specialized equipment. The cost share program, which launched in 2009, has provided more than $749,460 in direct cost share assistance to value-added producers and processors throughout North Carolina. Another cost share cycle will open in spring 2012. Updated guidelines and applications will be available online at http://plantsforhumanhealth.ncsu.ed u/extension/cost-share in January. The 2011 NCVACS award recipients are listed below. See profiles of previous award recipients. NCVACS is coordinated by NC MarketReady, the Cooperative Extension

outreach of the NC State University Plants for Human Health Institute, located at the NC Research Campus. Value-Added Processors • Richard Huettman, Acre Station Meat Farm, Pinetown, NC — Scale and camera to provide feedback on hog carcasses to producers in order to improve consistency and quality in production; • Jennifer Perkins, Looking Glass Creamery, Fairview, NC — Small batch candy making equipment for a shelfstable milk product called Carmelita; • John & Joni Wavra, Ty-Lyn Plantation, Cullowhee, NC — Pneumatic shearer for wreath making; and • Jody Thompson, Wells, Jenkins, Wells Fresh Meats, Forest City, NC — Smoker for meats and meat products; sausage stuffing machine. Value-Added Producers • Roger Ball, Ball Berries & Produce, Raleigh, NC — Pecan cracker, sheller, cleaner; • Portia McKnight, Chapel Hill Creamery, Chapel Hill, NC — Updated components for pasteurizer, Camembert system and refrigerator cube for handling and delivery of cheeses; • Darrell Wright, Franklinville, NC — Pasteurizer, butter machine and ice cream maker; • Ann and Casey Campbell, Janice Lindley; Lindley Farms, Snow Camp, NC — Vat pasteurizer for dairy to make cheesecakes; • Carl Evans, Mountain Harvest Organics, Hot Springs, NC — Sawmill and tools for timber framing; • Sally Eason, Sunburst Trout Company, Canton, NC — Expanded smoker capacity for trout products and sausage stuffer for jerky; • Bobby Tucker, Tucker Family Farm/Okfuskee Farm, Siler City, NC — Pea/bean sheller; and • Bruce DeGroot, Yellow Branch Cheese, Robbinsville, NC — Curd knives and walk-in aging space for expanded cheese production.

TRADE SHOW OPPORTUNITIES • KEYSTONE FARM SHOW •

January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

• VIRGINIA FARM SHOW • Jan. 19, 20 & 21, 2012 • Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-3 Augusta Expoland • Fishersville, VA

• BIG IRON EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• EMPIRE STATE FRUIT & VEG EXPO • Jan. 24, 25 & 26 2012 Oncenter Convention Center • Syracuse, NY

• HARD HAT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO EXHIBIT AT OR ATTEND ANY OF THESE SHOWS

CALL 800-218-5586 www.leetradeshows.com • mwhite@leepub.com


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Page 15 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Are You Involved In More Than One Industry? We Are Here to Help You.


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 16

Mielke from 7 fields still need drying time before combining. In some northern areas, a killing frost recently occurred which came earlier than crops in the region were ready for. Speculation is that the frost will reduce yields and crop maturity will be challenged. Cream markets are unsettled as cream volumes build and buyers are hesitant to purchase. The sharp drops in daily pricing and falling weekly price averages of CME

butter, are affecting the basing points used for most cream sales. Cream buyers are negotiating for the lowest basing point. As pricing multiples and basing prices continue to fluctuate, butter producers are very cautious with their additional cream purchases and churning schedules. Butter producers are often limiting their cream purchases to contractual commitments. Class II cream demand has eased

as ice cream production declines seasonally, although other cream based product production (cream cheese, sour cream, and bottled cream) is seasonally active, according to USDA. Farm profitability declined in September, according to the USDA’s latest Ag Prices report issued September 29. The September All-Milk price was estimated at $20.90 per cwt., down $1.10 from the August record high.

The cost of feed to produce 100 pounds of milk was $11.88, up 24 cents from last month, according to the DDR. Corn decreased 19 cents, to $6.69 per bushel, alfalfa hay was up $5, to $196 per ton, and soybeans were down 30 cents, to $13.10 per bushel. The DDR reports the “Income over feed cost” came to $9.03 per cwt., down $1.33 from August. Over the last 10 years, it has averaged $9.09. In politics, National

Milk CEO and president Jerry Kozak reported in a September 26 teleconference that additional sponsors in the House are signing on to its Foundation for the Future (FFTF) dairy policy reform proposal. The Dairy Security Act of 2011 (HR 3062) was introduced by Reps. Collin Peterson (D-Minn.) and Mike Simpson (R-Idaho). Other sponsors included Democrats Jim Costa, California; Joe Courtney, Connecticut; Rick Larsen,

Washington; Kurt Schrader, Oregon; and Peter Welch, Vermont. Rep. Billy Long, Missouri, was the only Republican to join Simpson. Additional cosponsors are being sought, according to Kozak, who added that the list of co-sponsors represented bipartisan, regionally diverse support for the bill, including representatives from several major dairy states and he urged dairy farmers to contact their elected officials to encourage their support. Kozak said the Congressional budget Office has scored the legislation and stated the measure would reduce government expenditures by $167 billion over the next five years and $131 billion over 10 years, based on a 60 percent enrollment of U.S. milk in FFTF’s supply management program. The bill has been referred to the House Ag Committee. Meanwhile, National Milk’s Cooperatives Working Together program (CWT.) accepted 12 requests for export assistance this week from Darigold, Dairy Farmers of America, and United Dairymen of Arizona to sell a total of 6.78 million pounds of Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese to customers in Asia, North Africa, and the Middle East. The product will be delivered October through March and raised CWT’s 2011 cheese exports to 72.3 million pounds to 20 countries, the equivalent of 723 million pounds of milk. Speaking of the CWT; Dairy Profit Weekly (DPW) reports that a law firm representing two consumers, a school and an animal advocacy group, filed a lawsuit against several dairy organizations, alleging the dairy groups used the CWT program to “fix” milk prices. Hagens Berman, on behalf of consumers, including Compassion Over Killing (COK) members, filed a class-action lawsuit that various dairy companies and trade groups, including National Milk, Dairy Farmers of America (DFA), Land O’Lakes, Inc. and Agri-Mark, Inc. formed CWT in order to fix the price of milk in the U.S. The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on Septem-

Mielke 19


UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — Managing for success is the theme of the Dairy Middle Managers Conference offered Nov. 8 in Harrisburg, PA, by the Penn State Extension Dairy Team. The conference is designed specifically for dairy middle managers. “Middle managers are critical to the success of dairies. They put dairy owners’ decisions into practice and deal with the day-to-day challenges of managing people and cows,” explained conference coordinator Dr. Lisa Holden, associate professor of Penn State Dairy and Animal Science. “The Middle Manager’s Conference was created to help middle managers develop the management and leadership skills they need to make positive changes in their operation while keeping front-line employees happy and productive,” she added. The conference focuses on building management skills in a highly interactive format that encourages discussion and net-

working with peers. Keynote speaker is Bret Bossard, co-owner, Barbland Dairy LLC, Fabius, NY, who will present “Intern to Partner: An Open Mind has Opened Doors.” Bossard grew up on a 60-cow registered dairy in Western New York. While earning a bachelor's degree from Cornell University, he worked as an intern on Barbland Dairy. Upon graduating, he was hired by Barbland full-time as an assistant herdsman and managed a start-up 200cow satellite dairy. In 2008, Barbland Dairy reorganized and Bossard now co-owns the dairy with two partners. Barbland Dairy has a milking herd of 1,300 cows at multiple sites. The dairy grows all its own forages on 2,600 acres, half of which is owned by the partners. All heifers are raised on site. The dairy has 28 full-time and six part-time employees. “Bret’s experience in managing people and cows as both a dairy manager and co-owner gives him a unique per-

spective on what it takes to build and manage a successful dairy team. His keynote will address how he progressed from the bottom of the dairy to the top over a five-year period. He'll share some of the successes and failures of his own transition from a tie-stall upbringing to managing a 1,300-cow dairy,” explained Holden. Other conference speakers and their topics include: Managing Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Employees: Communicating in a Chain of Command. Presented by Santiago Ledwith, dairy coach/consultant of Action Dairy of Canandaigua, NY. Calving, Calf Care and Fresh Pen Management: Presented by Andrew Holloway, DVM, PAS, technical consultant, Elanco Animal Health Profitable Parlor Operation — A panel of middle managers talks about how their parlors and workers operate to keep milk quality and profits high. Panel participants

Speedy Spread Truck Spreaders • 11’ & 13’ Hoppers • 18” Or 24” Wide SS Conveyor Chain • Optional 24” Belt Over Chain • GPS Speed Sensor • In Cab Spinner Speed Control • Spinner RPM Monitoring • Mid-Tech or Raven Controls with Variable Rate Options • Rates From 80 LB/A to 4500 LB/A

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include Dave Stanton, manager, Hillcrest Saylor Dairy, Rockwood, PA. Panel facilitator will be Jeff Harding, senior sales representative, Elanco Animal Health. Managing Work Relationships: Good Communication is Key. Presented by Dr. Charlie Gardner of Cargill Animal Nutrition Consulting. The conference will conclude with a general session titled “What do Dairy Owners Expect from Their Managers?” The session will feature a panel of owners talking about their wants, needs, and work expectations. Dr. Lisa Holden, associate professor of dairy science at Penn State, will facilitate the panel. Conference participants will also have ample time to network with other middle managers over lunch and during breaks. “This conference was the motivator I needed as a middle manager,” notes Kimberley Bunting, assistant herd manager at Mains Dairy in Newville, PA, and a past conference attendee. “It focused on my needs as a middle manager and the issues I am faced with daily. I feel that I now know how to better manage my time, better communicate, and better meet the needs of the people I work with.” The Dairy Middle Manager’s Conference will be held at the Best Western Premier: The Central Hotel and Conference Center, 800 East Park Drive, Harrisburg, PA. Hours are 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Program partners include Elanco and the Center for Dairy Excellence. The registration fee is $97. The Centre for Dairy Excellence is offering scholarships to the first 20 Pennsylvania dairy employees who register for this program. This scholarship reduces the registration fee to $47. Scholarships are available on a first-come, first-served basis to the first 20 Pennsylvania dairy employees who call the Penn State Extension Dairy Team office at: 888-373-7232. Registration with scholarship will be accepted by phone only. For more information, visit www.das.psu.edu/dairyalliance/education/middle-managers .

Page 17 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Dairy managers can hone skills at Middle Managers Conference


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 18

New Kuhn bale processor The Kuhn Primor 5570 M bale processor is ideally suited for the distribution of bedding in bedded-pack barns, as well as direct feeding of hay, silage and baleage. This machine can process large square bales up to 8’ 10” long, as well as round bales that are 4’ wide and up to 6’ 7” in diameter, to meet the needs of producers with medium- to large-sized operations. This model comes as a heavy-duty, trailed machine designed for lower horsepower tractors. The top discharge blower allows the operator to easily direct and control the spread pattern of the material; distances of up to 60 feet can be reached without adding options. The Polydrive® belt

system drives the feed rotor, which pulls material from the bale without overcutting, resulting in uniform material length and consistency when bedding and feeding. The exclusive Unroll System makes it possible to load up to three round bales simultaneously, without the risk of jamming or uneven distribution. Kuhn North America, Inc., of Brodhead, WI, is a leading innovator in the field of agricultural and industrial equipment, specializing in spreaders, mixers, hay tools and tillage tools. Kuhn- and Kuhn Knight-brand products are sold by farm equipment dealers throughout the United States, Canada, and many other countries.

Women in Sustainable Agriculture Conference on tap Register now for the 2011 Women in Sustainable Agriculture Conference: “Tell your Story” happening in State College, PA, on Nov. 6-8. The conference will bring together farmers, growers, educators, agricultural professionals, and policy makers to share the knowledge, skills, and stories for building a dynamic sustainable agriculture. The theme of the conference, Tell Your Story, focuses on the benefit of networking to women in agriculture. Through networking, women share their stories and knowledge and gain inspiration and companionship needed to survive challenging economic times. Women in agriculture have amazing stories to tell, and this conference will capture the struggles, passions, and history of the incredible women that have chosen careers in agriculture. The conference will include authors and artists who tell stories of women farming through non-fiction, literature, art, and film. The conference keynote speaker is Karen Washington, an urban farmer, president of the New York City Community Garden Coalition, and founding member of Black Urban Growers (BUGs). With over 20 years of experience working in New York City, Washington has developed abandoned lots into successful community gardens and food initiatives. She is the driving force behind the revitalization of numerous impoverished Bronx neighborhoods through the establishment of community gardens.

She is a strong believer in the connection between food and greater social justice issues. The conference will offer more than 30 workshops on sustainable and holistic farm management, urban farming, organic vegetable production, livestock management, health and well-being, valueadded agriculture, marketing, sustainable communities, creating a local food system, and on writing your story.

The first day of the conference will feature four farm tours: a tour of value-added agriculture in Amish country; a tour of wineries and artisan cheesemakers; a collaborative marketing tour; and a communitysupported agriculture (CSA) farm tour. Registration deadline is Oct. 28. For a complete list of conference offerings and to register for the conference, visit: http://2011wisa. aers.psu.edu .

The Kuhn Primor 5570 M bale processor is ideally suited for the distribution of bedding in bedded-pack barns, as well as direct feeding of hay, silage and baleage.

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Even if you’ve never had mold or mycotoxin problems, and if the flood waters didn’t inundate your crops, your feed may still be affected. Get the information your farm needs from experts

in the field. A free phone in Q&A session will be held Thursday, Oct. 20, 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. or 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. The panel of experts includes:

• Dr. Everett D. Thomas, Oak Point Agronomics, Ltd. —Management Tips for Storm Effected Crops • Dr. Trevor Smith, University of Guelph — Mycotoxins, What to Ex-

Mount Airy Stockyard and Equipment

327 Locust Lane, Mount Airy, N.C Livestock Auction Every Tuesday Poultry Sale 9:30 AM Goats & Cattle 12:00 Noon

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•Feeder Wagons - Trip Hop Feeders • Full Line of Gates & Panels OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK • Treated Fence Posts Monday - Friday • CRYSTALYX DEALER 8:30 - 5 Saturday • STOLL TRAILER DEALER 8:30 - 12 • TNT CARPORTS T-N-T Carports, Buildings & Metal Roofing, Feed Wagons, Hud-Son Sawmills, Priefert Ranch Equip., Southwest Power-Fence & Livestock Equip., Ritchie Automatic Waters, T&S Trip Hopper Feeders, Treated Fence Post, WW Livestock Products Equipment Sales Call: Jimmy Chandler (336) 287-2966 or (336) 786-8129 Web site mtairystockyard.com

pect & How to Manage • Rebecca Csutora, FSA Program Chief for Disaster Programs — Disaster Assistance Call In details: Call 866-266-3378 on Oct. 20 at either 10:30

a.m. or 2:30 p.m. to join the call Conf. ID: 717-787-

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Mielke from 16 ber 26, 2011, alleges that between 2003 and 2010, more than 500,000 cows were slaughtered under CWT’s dairy herd retirement program. The complaint alleges the program was a concerted effort to reduce the supply of milk and inflate prices nationally. The increased price allowed CWT members to earn more than $9 billion in additional revenue, according to the complaint. DPW editor Dave Natzke reported in Friday’s DairyLine that, if the lawsuit moves forward, the suit seeks establishment of a class representing milk consumers, and seeks financial damages on their behalf for dairy products purchased since 2004. Jim Tillison, CWT chief operating officer, defended the program, saying it was a self-help initiative to assist family dairy farmers and dairy cooperatives who were losing money producing

milk, Natzke reported. Tillison said the program was designed and operated consistent with U.S. anti-trust laws, the lawsuit was without merit, and that National Milk would vigorously defend its actions. Finally, a salute to World Dairy Expo in Madison which I will be attending for the 26th or 27th time, but who is keeping track. It’s a great show, enjoyable and educational.

Page 19 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Storm damaged crops: what you need to know


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 20

Monsanto donates $25,000 to Flight 93 National Memorial We will never forget. On Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001, the U.S. came under attack when four commercial airliners were hijacked and

used to strike targets on the ground. Nearly 3,000 people tragically lost their lives. Because of the actions of the 40 passengers and crew

aboard one of the planes, Flight 93, the attack on the U.S. Capitol was thwarted. Monsanto has joined other companies to bring

recognition and honor to those who sacrificed their lives by donating $25,000 to the Flight 93 National Memorial. The National Park Service

Small Farm Family Conference in Danville begins Nov. 1 Virginia State University’s Small Farm Outreach, Training and Technical Assistance Program will conduct its ninth annual Small Farm Family Conference on Tuesday, Nov. 1 through Wednesday, Nov. 2 at the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research located at 150 Slayton Avenue in Danville, VA. The two-day educational conference will focus on ways small farmers can maximize profits with emphases on effective business planning, cost-saving production measures, proper resource management methods and efficient marketing strategies, said Fidelis Okpebhelo, VSU Small Farm program coordinator. Discussion topics will include: sustainable/diversified production systems, high tunnel specialty niche crops, livestock production grazing systems, pasture ecology, benefits from good agricultural practices, freshwater shrimp production/marketing, farm business planning/ recordkeeping, alternative agriculture, pastured beef, poultry and rabbits, forest resources, ethnic crop production, vermi-compost production, marketing to wholesale outlets/and relationship marketing, and receiving maximum benefits from USDA. The registration fee is $10 per person and the registration deadline is Oct. 26. To register, obtain lodging information or for directions, call Mark Klingman, VSU administrative assistant, at

804-524-5960 or e-mail mjklingman@vsu.edu Anyone needing special services or accommoda-

tions is asked to call in advance to discuss arrangements. For specific details about the

program, call Okpebholo at 804-524-5662 or email fopkpebholo@ vsu.edu.

dedicated Phase One of the project, and commemorated the 10th Anniversary of Sept. 11. However, this $62 million dollar project is still millions of dollars short of its goal. The Flight 93 National Memorial is the only 911 memorial Congress has designated as a national park. It’s also the only one on a rural site, hundreds of miles away from ground zero and

The Pentagon. Our rural communities are the heart of America and Monsanto and the Monsanto Fund are working hard to give back to organizations who reach out to help others, through programs like America’s Farmers Grow Communities and America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education. This is another rural America cause we are proud to support.

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For Registration Information go to https://nysvga.org/expo/register/ For Exhibitor Information go to www.leetradeshows.com The 2012 Empire State Fruit and Vegetable Expo is sponsored by:

• New York State Vegetable Growers Association • Empire State Potato Growers • New York State Berry Growers Association • New York State Farmers’ Direct Marketing Association • New York State Horticultural Society • Cornell University • Cornell Cooperative Extension • NYS Flower Industries


Whether you currently own sheep or goats, or are considering starting a small ruminant flock or herd, you should plan to attend the Pennsylvania Shepherd's Symposium and Beginning Shepherd's Workshop on Saturday, Oct. 22, and Sunday, Oct. 23. The symposium will be held at the Samuel E. Hayes Jr. PA Livestock Evaluation Center, Pennsylvania Furnace, PA on

Saturday, Oct. 22 and will focus on reproduction. Making sound reproduction management decisions can really make a significant impact to your flock, both economically and genetically. Join us as we explore the reproduction systems of the ram and ewe and learn how technology has come to play a vital role in the process. Topics covered will include everything

from ram collection to embryo transfers. Our featured speaker is Glen Erickson of New Frontier Genetics in Wellsville, Utah. Erickson is actively working with deer, goats, sheep, and some exotic species on semen collection and evaluation, artificial insemination, and embryo transfer. After spending over 20 years as the Shepherd at Utah State, Glen now travels the

country performing reproductive procedures for some of the most elite flocks and herds. The day will also include the opportunity to meet with our industry's youth. We will offer a youth program that will have a breakout session in the morning to discuss basic reproduction and then join the handson portion of the symposium in the afternoon. The youth portion will run simultaneously with

the symposium program. There will be a lamb luncheon, showcasing the contestants for the 2012 Pennsylvania Lamb & Wool Queen contest. Throughout the day, there will be a silent auction going on to benefit the PA Sheep & Wool Growers Association. The evening will feature a reception and door prizes, concluding with the PA Sheep & Wool Growers Annual Meeting. The Beginning Shep-

herd's Workshop will be held on Sunday morning, Oct. 23 at the Penn State Sheep Barns, University Park, PA. The goal of the workshop is to provide hands-on management information for both first-time and experienced shepherds. This year's focus will be all things wool Topics covered will include: basic wool handling, preparation, storage, evaluating your clip, marketing and sales, and how to improve your wool quality. Plan to attend this motivating and educational symposium and workshop with fellow sheep enthusiasts. For more information and to pre-register, contact Joanne Evans at 717-485-0532 or by email at genetic@innernet.net

Maryland Agricultural Commission public meeting slated ANNAPOLIS, MD — The Maryland Agricultural Commission will hold a public meeting after a fall agricultural tour of Garrett County on Oct. 12, and Allegany County on Oct. 13. The public meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Oct. 13 at the Wisp Resort, 290 Marsh Hill Road in McHenry, MD. Anyone interested in farming and rural topics is encouraged to attend the meeting. Attendees will have an opportunity to discuss issues and policy affecting agriculture and rural communities, exchange ideas, get better acquainted with the role of the Maryland Agricultural Commission, and meet the Commission members. The Maryland Agricultural Commission is presently made up of 24 active members who represent commodities and organizations across the state and serve as an advisory body to Maryland’s Secretary of Agriculture. As a group, the members address legislative and policy issues that affect Maryland agribusiness. For further information, call Florence Jordan at the Maryland Department of Agriculture at 410-841-5882.

Page 21 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Pennsylvania Shepherd's Symposium set for Oct. 22 and 23.


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 22

Hagerstown Valley Apian Society hosting guest speaker Mike Embrey, agriculture technician with the Department of Entomology at the University of Maryland, will be the guest speaker at a gath-

ering of the Hagerstown Valley Apian Society, the Beekeeping Club for Washington County. The talk will take place at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 11 at

the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD 21713 Embrey is based at the

Wye Institute on the Eastern Shore and conducts research on honey bees. An international consultant on apiculture, Embrey’s presenta-

tion will be on the Small Hive Beetle, which has become more prevalent as a pest in Maryland’s honey bee colonies in recent years. The presen-

tation is free and open to the public. For more information contact Fred Smith at 301-992-7197.

Internship opportunities available with Center for Dairy Excellence HARRISBURG, PA — College students with an interest in advancing Pennsylvania’s dairy industry can apply for a paid internship with the Center for Dairy Excellence, based in Harrisburg, PA for approximately nine weeks during the summer of 2012. The center is a nonprofit organization that

Chesapeake College hosting Lambing & Kidding School The University of Maryland 2011 Lambing & Kidding School will be held Saturday, Nov. 19 at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, MD. The featured speaker will be Dr. Susan Kerr, an Extension Educator and veterinarian from Washington State University. The Lambing & Kidding School is ideally suited to producers who have been raising sheep and/or goats for less than five years. This year’s school will include a separate educational tract for youth. The registration deadline for the Lambing & Kidding School is Nov. 9. The registration fee is $40 per person; $30 for additional family members; and $25 for young people. Full registration includes the program, morning refreshments, a hot lunch, and resource materials (notebook or jump drive). Additional resource materials are available for purchase. Checks payable to the University of Maryland should be sent to 2011 Lambing & Kidding School, 18330 Keedysville Road, Keedysville, MD 21756. For additional information, call Susan Schoenian at 301-4322767 ext. 343 or visit the program’s Web site at www.sheepandgoat.com /programs/11LKschool. html . A program brochure and registration form are available for download.

was launched in 2004 to enhance the profitability of the dairy industry in the commonwealth. The organization, initiative of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture,

provides coordination and leadership of programs supporting individual dairy farms and the larger dairy industry in Pennsylvania. Interns will provide as-

sistance and support for the Center for Dairy Excellence in meeting goals identified in its three-year strategic plan. Applicants should have strong communications and interper-

sonal skills and be proficient in Microsoft PowerPoint, Word and Excel software programs. Extensive knowledge and understanding of the dairy industry is preferred.

Interested applicants may send resumes and cover letters to Jayne Sebright, communications director, at 717-3460849 or jsebright@centerfordairyexcellence.org

Coming Soon - The newest publication in the Lee Publications, Inc. family of agricultural papers Sept/Oct

Section One

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Classifieds Equipment Marketing

Wine and Grape Grower will offer features, news and information on growing grapes, and making and selling wines. As readers of Country Folks and Country Folks Grower you know the value of our publications as you run and improve your business. If your current business or future plans include grapes or wine you can now have a publication with those same benefits for that branch of your business. Subscribe today and don’t miss a single issue. If you have friends or family who would be interested please feel free to share with them also.

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If your business provides products or services for the grape growers and wine makers, please contact us for information on marketing opportunities to this important segment of agriculture. You can reach us at 800-218-5586 or dwren@leepub.com


FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: 167. Steers: M&L 250-500# 101-115# 500-700# 102113; 1 680# @ 125. Heifers: M&L 250-500# 90-108; 500-700# 90-102; 700-900# 82-90. Bulls: M&L 250-350# 95130; few 170-250# 130-154; 375-500# 95-115; 500-700# 100-107; 700-950# 80-84. Stock Cows: 14. Sm or old short breds 550-725. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: 469. Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 2 235-245# 128-130; 300342# 120-140; 365-385# 119-142.50; 428-445# 127130.75; 460-480# 123-138; 500-533# 120-135; 565585# 127-133; 600-623# 124-128.50; 820# 104.50105; S 1-2 250-255# 105110; 315-325# yearlings 7992; 360# 90-116; 405-425# 108-110; 543# 114.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 325# 116; 368-392# 108.50-112; 410-446# 113.25-114.75; 463-485# 112-115; 500-548# 108112.50; 605-630# 105109.50; S 1-2 433-448# 105-108.50; 510-525# 90107.50; 505-545# fleshy 82105; 580-585# 108-109; 615# 90. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 400-434# 119-131; 455460# 119-127; 540-545# 115-121; 615-626# 110-111; S 1-2 400-425# 105-118; 560-570# 110; 615-635# 9698; 665-680# 90-100; 710730# 87-88; 765-795# 8586. Bred Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 835-885# 690-740/hd 4-6 mos bred; M&L 1-2 Middle Aged 1070-1165# 650740/hd 1-3 mos bred; 715-

875# 380-400/hd 4-6 mos bred; 1040-1120# 600660/hd 4-6 mos bred. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: 1271 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 210-245# 120-141; 255295# 110-139; 300-345# 110-137; 350-395# 110-141; 400-445# 108-141; 450497# 119-137; 505-545# 110-131; 550-585# 111128.50; 605-645# 110-125; 652-685# 115-123; 768# 116; 830-845# 95-108.50; S 1-2 205-230# 97-110; 305335# 93-108; 355-395# 91109; 403-445# 97-106; 490495# 100-105. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1-2 265-295# 111-115; 305345# 109-125; 355-395# 110-128; 400-445# 108-126; 450-495# 108-117; 500545# 100-118; 550-595# 100-120; 600-645# 106-113; 650-675# 100-108; 720745# 95-110; 865-895# 8096; S 1-2 285-295# 91-105; 300-348# 90-105; 355-395# 90-105; 400-435# 94-105; 450-480# 97-105; 505-540# 90-99; 585-595# 91-95; 600645# 94-103; 650-685# 80100. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1-2 450-495# 107-129; 500545# 100-121; 550-595# 100-117; 600-645# 95-109; 650-695# 94-10; 705-730# 90-99; 805-835# 80-88; S 12 450-495# 90-105; 510545# 91-99; 550-590# 9095. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 173. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 120; 500-600# 113-123.50; 600-700# 114.50-120.50; 700-800# 106; 800-900# 106.50; M&L 2 400-500# 122-123; 500600# 113.50; 600-700# 108119.50; M&L 3 400-500#

Short Notice Dairy Dispersal

106-112; 500-600# 113; 600-700# 114.50; 700-800# 80; S 1 400-500# 111; 500600# 98. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 107-110; 400500# 114; 500-600# 111.50; 600-700# 97-99; M&L 2 300-400# 100-108; 400500# 109.50; 500-600# 104109; 600-700# 99; M&L 3 300-400# 102; 400-500# 106.50; 500-600# 100; 600700# 90; S 1 300-400# 95100; 400-500# 80-99, mostly 99; 500-600# 87-100. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 121; 400-500# 110-122; 500-600# 109; 600-700# 98; M&L 2 300400# 113.50-117; 400-500# 100-123.50, mostly 119123.50; 600-700# 100; S 1 400-500# 96.50-114; 500600# 95-99; 600-700# 99. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1855 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 300-400# 120-147; 400500# 120-154; 500-600# 119-139; 600-700# 116-132; 700-800# 110-127; 800900# 110-131; 900-1000# 103; M&L 2 200-300# 123; 300-400# 117-132; 400500# 115-130; 500-600# 110-134; 600-700# 108-125; 700-800# 93-121; 800-900# 86; 1000-1100# 92; S 1 400500# 115-119; 600-700# 110-122; 700-800# 107-116. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 102; 700800# 79.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 98-126; 400-500# 105-128; 500-600# 102122.50; 600-700# 109.50119; 700-800# 99-111; M&L 2 300-400# 95-118; 400500# 94-120; 500-600# 92123.50; 600-700# 75-112; 700-800# 91-110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 124-142; 300-

300+ Head

Happy Hollow Dairy Dispersal Monday, October 10th, * 10:00AM * Mifflintown, PA 300+ Head

300+ Head

178 cows: 65% Holsteins 35% Holstein crosses w/Sweedish Reds or Jerseys. All AI bred! Sire ID, on test & headlock trained! Catalogs at ringside! * Many sell recently fresh and milking extremely well * 107 cows sell pregnant *

400# 121-136.25; 400-500# 120-144; 500-600# 115-141; 600-700# 98-121; 700-800# 96-105; 800-900# 89; M&L 2 200-300# 112-127; 300400# 116-125; 400-500# 116-122; 500-600# 92-112; 800-900# 83. SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1482. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 123-144; 300400# 130-151; 400-500# 115-147.50; 500-600# 120134.50; 600-700# 118131.50; 700-800# 106-123; 800-900# 109-121; 9001000# 99-103; 1000-1100# 96-98; M&L 2 200-300# 116-135; 300-400# 125-140; 400-500# 126-146; 500600# 117-131; 600-700# 115-121; 700-800# 106-116; 800-900# 107; 900-1000# 97. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 109; 300400# 83; 400-500# 83; 500600# 75-87; 600-700# 7184; 700-800# 78; 800-900# 78-87. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 106-122; 300400# 128-136; 400-500# 108-127.50; 500-600# 98.50-128.50; 600-700# 105-123; 700-800# 102-116; 800-900# 104; M&L 2 200300# 120; 300-400# 112125; 400-500# 110-127; 500-600# 106-117; 600700# 103-112; 700-800# 101-110; 800-900# 92. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 131-142; 300400# 126-147; 400-500# 113-136; 500-600# 100-133; 600-700# 90-120; 700-800# 85-103; 800-900# 82-92; 900-1000# 75-82; M&L 2 200-300# 138-138.50; 300400# 118-149; 400-500# 111-136; 500-600# 99-128; 600-700# 85-110; 700-800# 85-101; 800-900# 76; 9001000# 74. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 23. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 108; M&L 2 300400# 107-113. Feeder Bulls: M&L 2 200-300# 120-125.

AUCTIONS FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 230. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 131-136; 400500# 128-134; 500-600# 122-122.50; 600-700# 122122.50; 700-800# 112.50; M&L 2 400-500# 126131.50; 500-600# 118-124; 600-700# 115-119; 800900# 110. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 118; 400-500# 113-119.50; 500-600# 106110; 600-700# 109-115.50; 800-900# 91; M&L 2 300400# 119.50-122; 400-500# 112-121.50; 500-600# 101107.50; 600-700# 98-114; 700-800# 97. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 120-134; 400500# 112-126; 500-600# 117; 600-700# 103-103.50; 700-800# 95-98; M&L 2 400-500# 119-124; 500600# 108; 600-700# 105; 700-800# 95. LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 917. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 132-137.50; 500600# 118-126.25; 600-700# 122.50-124.25; 700-800# 116-117; M&L 2 400-500# 130-135; 500-600# 117124.25; 600-700# 115.50119.25; 700-800# 110; M&L 3 300-400# 125; 400-500# 123-128.50; 500-600# 117.50-117.75; 600-700# 109; S 1 300-400# 123; 400500# 109-124.50; 500-600# 111.25; 600-700# 113. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 114.50-116.50; 500-600# 111-113.75; 600700# 109-112.50; 700-800# 95; M&L 2 300-400# 111117; 400-500# 116-121.75; 500-600# 113-114; 600700# 104.50-110.50; 700800# 84; M&L 3 300-400# 110-111; 400-500# 103-113; 500-600# 107-111.50; 600700# 95-100; S 1 300-400# 88-100; 400-500# 97111.75; 500-600# 93-101;

600-700# 98; 700-800# 87. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 129-133.50; 400500# 132; 500-600# 113.50123.75; 600-700# 111; M&L 2 300-400# 130.140.75; 400-500# 120.50-132; 500600# 110-114.75; 600-700# 112; S 1 300-400# 120.50; 400-500# 110-119.50; 500600# 107.50-116. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 70. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 116-123; 400500# 130-138. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 108-115; 400500# 114-122.25; 500-600# 109-115; M&L 2 300-400# 119.75-120. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 129; 700-800# 102.50; M&L 2 300-400# 116-122; 400-500# 111121.50; 500-600# 115.50. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 381. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 147; 400-500# 135-142.50; 500-600# 122128; 600-700# 116-126.75; 700-800# 115-127; M&L 2 300-400# 135-140; 400500# 141-148.50; 500-600# 110-121; 600-700# 116-125; 700-800# 115. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 120-128.50; 400500# 119-122; 500-600# 115.50-116.75; 600-700# 110-118.75; 700-800# 112.50; M&L 2 300-400# 120-132.50; 400-500# 118.50-125; 500-600# 110117.75; 600-700# 113-118; 700-800# 105. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 139; 400-500# 125-133.50; 500-600# 122123; 600-700# 110-121; M&L 2 300-400# 141141.50; 400-500# 125-134; 500-600# 120; 600-700# 113.50. ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 109 Feeder Heifers: M&L 3 300-400# 98; 400-500# 115-

* Blended RHA: 2X 19,000M 3.95F 3.29P * SCC 140,000 * 65lb avg. * Extremely young - All 1st, 2nd lactation except 5 that are 5 years of age! Parabone Parlor trained * No BST * Pasture, TMR & TLC Sale Managers Note: One of the finest foot & leg herds you will ever walk into & home of sensational udders! Buyers will be impressed with the quality as seldom seen! This is a dairy producer's dream herd! The farm is for sale or available for lease. Please contact the owners directly for more details. Excellent Herd health & vaccination program: All heifers are given 2 shots Bova Shield modified live then 30 days post fresh shot of Bova Shield again. Pre Fresh-2 shots of EndoVac Bovi. 125 Heifers selling are in excellent condition: There are 26 confirmed pregnant; 25 on service; yearlings & calves will be offered! Sire ID on all heifers! Quality from every angle! Directions: Follow Rt. 322 to the Mifflintown exit and go North on Rt. 35 for 1.5 miles. Turn right on Happy Hollow Road and follow to the farm. Owners: David & Tina Hunsberger, 559 Happy Hallow Rd., Mifflintown, PA 17059. Phone 814-880-5186

Sale Managed By/Catalogs

STONEHURST FARM, INC. 1541 LIME VALLEY ROAD • STRASBURG, PA 17579 DON: 717-575-4700 • HAROLD: 717-575-3555 FAX: 717-687-8824 • EMAIL: SALES@STONEHURSTFARM.NET WEB: WWW.STONEHURSTFARM.NET

4236 CTY HWY 18, • DELHI, NY 13753 DAVE M. & MERRY RAMA 607-746-2226 OR FAX 607-746-2911 EMAIL: DAVERAMASR@CATTLEXCHANGE.COM WEB:WWW.CATTLEXCHANGE.COM AU-204463-E

ur ut O n o b A io Ask e Auct ing s r st i o H ar L d n Cale

Having A Horse Auction?

Running your ad in the Country Folks Auction Section? Don’t forget to ask your Country Folks Representative about the Special Rates for Country Folks Mane Stream.

Issue Date

November/December January/February 2012

Deadline Date October 14 December 9

Call Your Account Representative or 1-800-218-5586

Page 23 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

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October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 24

AUCTIONS 116.50; 500-600# 114-116; M&L 2 400-500# 109. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 135-140; 500600# 125-134; 600-700# 117.50500-600# 86-96; 800900# 89. STAUNTON, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 1100 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 120-147; 400500# 120-154; 500-600# 119-139; 600-700# 121-132; 700-800# 110-124; 800900# 110-131, few 116.50; M&L 2 300-400# 117-132; 400-500# 115-130; 500600# 110-134; 600-700# 111-125; 700-800# 108-121; S 1 400-500# 115-119; 600700# 110-122; 700-800# 107-116. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 300-400# 102; 700800# 79.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 117-126; 400500# 117-128; 500-600# 112-122.50; 600-700# 110119; 700-800# 104-111; M&L 2 300-400# 95-118; 400-500# 105-120; 500600# 112-123.50; 600-700# 100-112; 700-800# 100-110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 120-144; 500600# 115-141; 600-700# 110-121.

TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 862. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 144-151; 400500# 134-138; 500-600# 126-134.50; 600-700# 120131.50; 700-800# 115-123; 800-900# 121; M&L 2 300400# 125-136; 400-500# 126-135; 500-600# 117-127; 600-700# 115-121 700800# 1129116. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 118-120; 300400# 128-133; 400-500# 116-127.50; 500-600# 117128.50; 600-700# 119-123; 700-800# 111-116; M&L 2 300-400# 112-118.50; 400500# 112-123; 500-600# 110-117; 600-700# 103-112; 700-800# 101-110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 142; 300-400# 126-147; 400-500# 127-136; 500-600# 126-133; 600700# 106-120; 700-800# 102-103; 800-900# 92; M&L 2 300-400# 118-129; 400500# 124-135; 500-600# 116-128; 600-700# 101-110. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 568. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 126-136; 400500# 111-131; 500-600# 110-130; 600-700# 113121.50; 700-800# 110-112; 900-1000# 100; 1000-1100#

98; M&L 2 200-300# 123127; 400-500# 95-126; 500600# 108-114; 600-700# 97120; 700-800# 105-117.25; 800-900# 85. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 400-500# 85; 500600# 80. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 105-114; 300400# 107-119.25; 400-500# 111-121; 500-600# 96-120; 600-700# 97-104.50; 700800# 101-102; 800-900# 95.50; M&L 2 300-400# 101112; 400-500# 102-114; 500-600# 94.50-106; 600700# 94-111.75; 700-800# 83-93. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 141-162; 300400# 115-137; 400-500# 115-125; 500-600# 105-123; 600-700# 96-110; 700-800# 89-97.50; 800-900# 90; M&L 2 200-300# 131-144; 300400# 99-122; 400-500# 107114.50; 500-600# 99-111; 600-700# 89-98.50; 800900# 79. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 393. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 200-300# 123-144; 300400# 130-145.50; 400-500# 127.50-147.50; 500-600# 125-130.50; 600-700# 123127.50; 700-800# 106-115; 800-900# 109-116; 900-

1000# 99-103; 1000-1100# 96-98; M&L 2 200-300# 116-135; 300-400# 140; 400-500# 133-146; 500600# 120-131; 600-700# 115-120; 700-800# 106-115; 800-900# 107; 900-1000# 97. Feeder Holstein Steers: L 2-3 200-300# 109; 300400# 83; 400-500# 83; 500600# 75-87; 600-700# 7184; 700-800# 78; 800-900# 78-87. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 106-122; 300400# 134-136; 400-500# 108-117; 500-600# 98.50113.50; 600-700# 106-117; 700-800# 102-104; 800900# 104; M&L 2 200-300# 120; 300-400# 120-125; 400-500# 114-127; 500600# 108.50-112.75; 600700# 104; 700-800# 104; 800-900# 92.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE

1135# lo dress 40-48. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Young 785-865# 58-66. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1215-1475# 70.50-79.50; 1130-1490# lo dress 6369.50; 1505-1910# 73.5078.50. Cows/Calf Pairs: 2. M&L 1-2 950-1000# young to middle age cows w/150200# calves 650-780/pr. Baby Calves, per head: Holsteins 30-70.

SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1445-1685# 60.50-68; 1400-1600# lo dress 56.50-59; Boner 8085% lean 915-1385# 5765.50; 955-1335# hi dress 67-80; 905-1335# lo dress 45.50-56; Lean 85-90% lean 815-940# 50-55.50; 830-

MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80% lean 1015-1305# 62-68; 1465-1730# 66-68; Boner 80-85% lean 670855# 57.50-61; 665-855# lo dress 50-54; 950-1345# 5568.50; 1105-1215# hi dress 70-70.50; 1430-1465# 62.50-64.50; Lean 85-90%

Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 131; 300-400# 133-143; 400-500# 126-136; 500-600# 100-122.50; 600700# 91-95; 700-800# 85; 800-900# 82; 900-1000# 7582; M&L 2 200-300# 138138.50; 300-400# 138-149; 400-500# 126-136; 500600# 99-122.50; 600-700# 85-87.50; 700-800# 85; 800900# 76; 900-1000# 74.


SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 283. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 53-64; 1200-1600# 55.5072; HY 1200-1600# 62.5069; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 53-63; 1200-2000# 52-72; HY 1200-2000# 5769.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 42-53; 850-1200# 50-56.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 65-74; 15002500# 65-77.50; HY 10001500# 71.50; 1500-2500# 76-77.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 31. M 1, 3-10 yrs. old 895-1480# 650-900/hd; L 1, 1-8 yrs. old 895-1265# 650-830/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 5. L 1, 1-4 yrs. old w/calf 200# 1000# 980/pr; M 1, 5 yrs. old w/calf 100-155# 1150-1200# 900-1070/pr.

Calves Ret. to Farm: 4. Hols. Bulls 100-130# 215/cwt. HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 89 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites to 71.50; Breakers 62-69; full 59-61; Boners 6065; Lean 54-59; Thin/Light 53 & dn. Bulls: YG 1 1200# @ 72; few 1050-1150# 73-74. Fed Steers/Heifers: 23. Hi Ch full 1200-1500# 115; Sel 1200-1350# 99-105; L Ch Hols. 1700-1950# 8588.50. Fed Heifers: Hi Ch 11001200# 112-114. Calves: 95. Hols. Ret. to Farm No. 1 94-120# 130142; 90-92# 100-115; No. 2 94-120# 110-125; 84-92# 75-95; purebred Jersey hfr. 75# @ 150; Angus hfr. 96# @ 162; Slaughter Gd 80110# 35-55. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 374 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 5764; 1200-1600# 56.50-67; HY 1200-1600# 68-74.50; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 49.25-63; 12002000# 52.50-65; HY 12002000# 64.25-73.25; Lean

ABSOLUTE

A U C T I O N

4th Annual Bred Heifer Sale - Black Lick Cattle Co., Rural Retreat, VA

Sat., Oct. 29th, 2011 @ 12 Noon

Directions: I-81 take exit 60 (Rural Retreat Exit) go North on Black Lick Rd for 4 miles to Farm.

260 Bred Heifers - 9 Registered Angus Bulls

85-90% lean 750-850# 3350; 850-1200# 42-60. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 68-77.50; 15002500# 54-78.50; HY 10001500# 80.50; 1500-2500# 83.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 34. M&L 1, few 2, 3 yrs. old to aged bred 2-8 mos. 6751440# 510-1130/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 7. M&L 1-2, 5-10 yrs. old w/calves 100-150# 9001100# 925-1025/pr; M 2, S 1, 3-6 yrs. old w/calves 240340# 660-1010# 8751150/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 107. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 20105/hd; 100-130# 40142/cwt. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 39. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 5760; 1200-1600# 55-60; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 56-60; HY 1200-2000# 6062; Lean 85-90% lean 750850# 38-45; 850-1200# 4048. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 74; 1500-2500# 62. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 34 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 59.50; 1200-1600# 57.2564.75; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 60.25-60.50; 1200-2000# 59-65; HY 1200-2000# 64.25-67.75; Lean 85-90% lean 8501200# 45-54.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2

Big Strong, Mountain bred heifers the Absolute right kind. Free Chuck wagon Lunch 10:30 to 12:00 Noon

EDWIN WAGONER & ASSOCIATES

FOR PICTURES AND INFO VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWW.WAGONERAUCTIONS.COM

1500-2500# 71-72.25. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 20. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean HY 850-1200# 59-60.50; 1200-1600# 5863.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 63-63.50; 12002000# 65.50-67; Lean 8590% lean 850-1200# 50-60. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 65. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 43. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 58-63.25; HY 1200-1600# 63.25-64; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 52.50-60; 1200-2000# 57.75-62.50; HY 1200-2000# 60-65.75; Lean 85-90% lean 8501200# 44.50-50.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 65-71; 15002500# 71-72. Cows Ret. to Farm: 20. L 2-3, Hols. bred hfrs. bred 4-7 mos. 900-1175# mostly 80105/cwt; 1 at 122/cwt. Calves Ret. to Farm: 5. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 10-

MOWREY AUCTION CO., INC. OCTOBER 19, 2011 • 8:00 A.M.

For more info contact:

Independence, VA Office 276-773-3623 • Fax 276-773-3079 Mobile 276-768-8539 • VAAR # 3035

AUCTIONS

NO PROXI BID FOR THIS SALE CHECK OUT THE WEBSITE FOR LISTING AND PICTURES: WWW.MOWREYAUCTION.COM

NEXT AUCTION: NOVEMBER 16, 2011

PUBLIC AUCTION ANNUAL FALL CONSIGNMENT & INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE CATSKILL TRACTOR, INC., FRANKLIN, NY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14TH, 10:30 AM Tractors & Industrial: IH 806, Ford 5000 w/cab, Ford 9N, IH 1086 w/cab, Satoh S550G w/front blade, IH 2404, IH 986, JD 4230 w/cab, Kubota L3430 w/cab & loader, CaseIH 585, Ford 7600, MF 285, MF 65 diesel, MF 283, Ford 1910, Case 680 TLB, MF 20 industrial w/loader, Ford 575D TLB, Case 480 Construction King TLB, Oliver OC-46-3D crawler loader, Gehl 3825 skid steer, 20 ft gooseneck trailer Implements: NH BR740 Silage Special round baler, CaseIH 8530 inline baler, IH 550 manure spreader, Goosen 3 pt bale chopper, (2) Kilbros 350 gravity boxes, NH 477 haybine, IH 6 ft 3 pt disc, Neidmeyer 3 pt fertilizer spreader, NI 1-row corn planter, 6 ft QT manure scraper, NH Super 717 chopper, MF 3 pt 3 btm plow, MF 3 pt 2 btm plow, 3 pt post pounder, Kuhn TB181 ditch bank mower, NH 316 baler, IH 310 3 pt 1 btm plow, JD 525 disc mower conditioner, Shaver QT post pounder, Brillion 3 pt 2-row cultivator, NH F62B blower, poly calf hutch, International Machinery 3-way dump trailer, Bush Hog 15 ft batwing mower, 6 ft finish mower, MF 41 3 pt sickle bar mower, MF 12 baler, Kewanee 3 pt 7-shank chisel plow, AC 8 ft transport disc, Shaver 3 pt post pounder, Woods 5 ft rotary mower, (2) Kory gravity boxes, Pequea HR10 rotary rake, JD 1360 disc mower conditioner (salvage), Bush Hog bale spear, JD 5 ft rotary mower, Fella SM165 3 pt disc mower, JD 3 pt 2 btm plow, Tufline GB4 8 ft back blade, 5 ft rotary mower, Feterl 85 grain cleaner (rotary screen), Gehl 2365 disc mower conditioner (salvage), IH 1150 grinder mixer, Land Pride 4 ft power seeder, 8 ft box blade, Brillion 12 ft cultipacker, NH 25 blower, Kuhn FC300 disc mower conditioner (salvage), Bean orchard sprayer, Gehl 55 Mix-All, NH 28 blower, Brillion 10-shank chisel plow, Dearborn 3 pt 2 btm plow, NI 4-spool tedder, MF 39 2-row corn planter, Gehl 1000 chopper, Bush Hog 8 ft plowing disc, Bush Hog 12 ft transport disc, NI wheel rake, JD 2940 chopper w/2 heads, Gehl 1310 round baler (salvage), NH 451 3 pt sickle bar mower, JD trailer-type sickle bar mower, JD 7000 4-row planter, White 508 4 btm semi-mount plow, IH 1300 3 pt sickle bar mower, Kuhn 4-star tedder, NH 268 baler, Gehl 99 blower, IH 420 3 pt 3 btm plow, JD 1207 haybine, NH 1430 disc mower conditioner, Kuhn 17 ft tedder, IH 510 3 btm semi-mount plow, IH 496 24 ft wing disc, Gehl 860 chopper w/2-row corn & hay head, Kverneland 5 btm spring-reset plow, IH 12 ft transport disc, CaseIH 3309 disc mower conditioner, MF grain drill w/seed box, Bush Hog post hole digger, Gehl 315 Scavenger spreader, Mayrath 30 ft hay & grain elevator, JD 5 btm semi-mount plow, AgriMetal bale chopper, Kverneland 3 pt 4 btm plow, Gehl 1312 Scavenger spreader, NH 352 grinder mixer, House 5 ft rotary mower, King Kutter 6 ft stone rake, King Kutter 7 ft back blade, Dion forage wagon, ground-drive spreader, 3 pt 2-row cultivator, King Kutter carryall, NH 256 rake w/dolley, NH 472 haybine, Gehl 1000 chopper w/2-row corn head, Sanford field cultivator, Knight 3025 Reel Augie spreader Lawn & Garden & UTV: Polaris Ranger 4x4 UTV, CubCadet 2185 garden tractor, JD GX75 riding mower, CubCadet 724WE snowblower Early Listing - Much More by Sale Day • Listing May Change Due to Daily Business Consignments Accepted Until Friday, October 13th, 5 PM Trucking Available Pre-Approved Financing Available Lunch by Franklin Rotary Club TERMS: Cash or Good Check. VISA and MasterCard Accepted. Positive ID Required. 4% Buyer’s Premium Waived if Paid in Full with Cash or Check. Nothing Removed Until Paid in Full. All Sales As Is Where Is. 20% Down Payment Required Sale Day - Balance Due Within 7 Days. DIRECTIONS: From I-88 Exit 11, take State Route 357 East approx. 7 miles to Franklin. Turn left onto Otego Street. One block to auction. AUCTIONEER: Frank Walker Catskill Tractor, Inc., 384 Center Street, Franklin, NY • 607-829-2600 • www.catskilltractor.com

45/hd. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 122 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 56.50-62.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 55-63; 1200-2000# 55-63; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 48.50-59. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 72; 1500-2500# 67.25-73.25. Calves Ret. to Farm: 73. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 2573/hd; 100-142/cwt. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 30 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 5764; HY 1200-1600# 6874.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 42-57. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 54-67. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 144. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 5864; 1200-1600# 61-72; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 55-61; 1200-2000# 58-72; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 42-45; 850-1200# 50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 67.50-74; 15002500# 72-77.50. WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 218. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 109.50-116.75; 1300-1500# 109.50-117.75; 1515-1605# 110-117.25; Sel 2-3 1100-1300# 96.75-111; LonghornX Ch 2-3 12801490# 93.75-96.75; Hols. Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 95-102.50;

31st Keystone Autumn Klassic Registered Shorthorn Sale SAT., OCT. 15th, 2011 12:30PM Woodside Farm 379 Woodside Road Waynesburg, PA 15370

Selling • Spring Calves • Open Females • Bred Females • Cow Calf Pairs • 2 Bulls

724-627-7240 Bradley Eisiminger 379 Woodside Rd., Waynesburg, PA 15370 Email: bradleyshirley@windstream.net Web: www.woodsideshorthorns.com

1300-1500# 94.50-103.50; 1510-1545# 94-100; Sel 2-3 1300-1500# 93.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1270-1500# 91.50-99; Sel 2-3 1390-1445# 88.5091.75; Ch 2-3 900-1000# 115.50; 1000-1200# 105114.50; 1200-1300# 106114.75; 1300-1500# 104.50116.75; 1640# 107.50. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 6566.50; 1200-1600# 62.5069.50; HY 1200-1600# 71.50-74.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 53-66.50; 1200-2000# 52-67; HY 1200-2000# 68-70.50; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 2453.50; 850-1200# 53-55; Jersey X Ch 2-3 11601580# 89.50-102; Brown Swiss Ch 2-3 1305-1455# 89.50-97.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 71.50-73; 15002500# 64.50-70.50; HY 1500-2500# 73.50-78.75. WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 93. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 5359; 1200-1600# 55.50-61; HY 1200-1600# 62.50-69; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 53-54.50; 12002000# 52-61.50; HY 12002000# 57; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 44.50-52; 850-1200# 53-56.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 65-66.50; 15002500# 69-72.50; HY 10001500# 71.50; 1500-2500# 76-77.50. Cows Ret. to Farm: 31. M 1, 3-10 yrs. old 895-1480# 650-900/hd; L 1 1-8 yrs. old 895-1265# 650-830/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 5. L 1, 1-4 yrs. old w/calf 200# 1000# 980/pr; M 1, 5 yrs. old w/calf 100-155# 1150-1200# 900-1070/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 4. Hols. Bulls 100-130# 215/cwt.

HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats: (/hd) 72. 20-30# 14-23; 30-45# 20-25. Butcher Hogs: 22. 280325# 63-69.50. Sows: 450-650# 6263.25. Boars: 375-450# to 28.50 NC SOWS: 300-399# 5966; 400-449# 60-66; 450499# 61-68; 500-549# 6268.50; 550# & up 63-68.50. FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: 8. Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 210-230# 67; 230-250# 63. Sows: US 1-2 400-500# 40; US 1-3 500# & up 43. HOLLINS, VA HOGS: 3. No report.

Page 25 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

lean 835-1215# 55-58.50; 835-1165# lo dress 46-52. Other Cows: M&L 1-2 Middle Aged 940-1085# 61.50-64.50; S&M 1-2 Young 820-845# 64-68; S 1-2 Middle Aged 815# 64.50-66.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1140-1395# 66-75.50; 15652050# 66.50-78.50. Cows/Calf Pairs: 2. M 1-2 800-845# middle age cows w/300-385# calves 800820/pr.


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 26

MARKET REPORTS MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No report. N VA HOGS: 8. Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 210-230# 67; 230-250# 63. Sows: US 1-2 400-500# 40; US 1-3 500# & up 43. ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report. S VA HOGS: No report. STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report. LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 64. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 159.50-178; 80-110# 125-181; 110-125# 169; Spring, Wooled, Gd & Ch 13 30-60# 141-170; 60-90# 175-181.50. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 60; Gd 2-4 51-88. Slaughter Rams: all grades 35. HAGERSTOWN, MD SHEEP: Lambs: few Ch 140-190# 140-155. HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: (/hd) 16. L Billies/Wethers 130-167; 2 Kids Sel 40-60# to 70. N VA GOATS: Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 126170; 40-60# 150-175; 6080# 98-102; Sel 3 20-40# 60-73; 40-60# 94; 60-80# 64. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 145-148. Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 90-171. S VA SHEEP: No report. S VA GOATS: No report MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report MT. AIRY GOATS: 55 Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 20-40# 50; 40-60# 82.50120; Sel 2 under 20# 27.50; 20-40# 20-27.50; 40-60# 52.50-75; 60-80# 90; Sel 3 20-40# 15; 40-60# 45; 6080# 37.50. Yearlings: Sel 1 80-100# 160; Sel 2 60-80# 57.50. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 100-140# 87.50-95; Sel 2 50-70# 40-55; 70-100# 50; 100-140# 80. Wethers: Sel 1 70-100# 120-125. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 145; 150-250# 120; Sel 2 100-150# 85-110; 150250# 82.50; Sel 3 70-100# 25.

FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report.

129-135; 40-60# 150-175; 60-80# 123-150; Sel 3 2040# 100. Bucks: Sel 1-2 100-150# 129-141.

HOLLINS, VA SHEEP: No report.

WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report.

HOLLINS, VA GOATS: No report.

WYTHE CO GOATS: No report.

MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: 20. Feeder Lambs: Wooled, S&M 1-2 40-60# 187.50; 6090# 188-189. MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: 17. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 159.50; 80-110# 155; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 141. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 60; Gd 2-4 51. SHENANDOAH SHEEP: 28. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 178; 80-110# 176181; 110-125# 169; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 152; 60-90# 175-181.50. SILER CITY, NC GOATS: 102. Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Sel 1 under 20# 22.50-32.50; 20-40# 45-50; 40-60# 60-70; 60-80# 75-85; Sel 3 under 20# 10; 40-60# 50-55. Yearlings: Sel 1 60-80# 90-100; 80-100# 110-130. Does/Nannies: Sel 1 5070# 65-80; 70-100# 90-110; 100-140# 120-155; Sel 2 5070# 50-60. Wethers: Sel 1 70-100# 125-140. Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100150# 150; 150-250# 170. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report.

CASH GRAIN MARKET NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 17 33¢ higher. Prices were 6.36-6.70, mostly 6.36-6.70 at the feed mills and 5.856.45, mostly 6.35 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were 3¢ higher. Prices were 11.63 at the processors, - at the feed mills and 10.99, mostly - at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was without an available trend. Prices were -, mostly - at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 330.20/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 6.65, -----, ----; Candor 6.65, -----, ----; Cofield 6.36, -----, ---; Laurinburg 6.65, -----, ---; Monroe 6.55, -----, ----; Nashville 6.55, -----, ----; Roaring River 6.65, -----, ---; Rose Hill 6.65, -----, ----; Statesville 6.55, -----, 6.75; Warsaw 6.65, -----, ----; Pantego #2 6.70, -----, ----. Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement 6.37, -----, ----; Creswell 5.85, -----, ----; Elizabeth City 6.16, -----, ----; Greenville ----, -----, ----; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, -----, ----; Norwood 6.35, 10.99, ----; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register 6.45, -----, ----; Warsaw #2 6.45, -----, ----. Soybean Processors Fayetteville, 11.63; Raleigh, 11.63. RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. No report.

POULTRY REPORT STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report. TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 8. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 80-110# 170. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-4 100-103. Slaughter Rams: all grade 78. WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 23. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40#

NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are mostly heavy. The estimated slaughter for Wed-nesday in NC is 2,644,000 head compared to 2,622,000 head last Wednesday. NC EGGS The market is steady on all sizes. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is good. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of

grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 136.89, L 133.79, M 120.86 & S 96. NY EGGS Prices are unchanged. Current supplies are moderate to heavy on larger sizes, light on M. Retail demand is light. Distributive demand is usually light to moderate. Market activity is slow. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered store door, cents per dz. XL 124-128, L 122-126, M 109113. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beets (25# bg) 17.65; Cabbge, Pointed Head & Rd Green (50# crate) 12; Cantaloupes, Athena (each) 11.25; Cucumbers, Long Green (3/4 bu bx) 15-18, Pickling 15-20; Eggplant, Black Beauty (1-1/9 bu ctn) 10-12; Grapes, Scuppernong (20# bx) 20-28; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 13.25, Spinach (25# bx) 18; Peas, Crowder (bu bg) 12-20, (bu, shelled) 24; Okra (1/2 bu bx) 15-20; Peanuts, Green (35# bg) 35; Pepper,Bell Type Green (11/9 bu ctn) 15-20, Hot (1/2 bu bx) 10-13; Squash, Yellow (3/4 bu bx) 18-20, (1/2 bu bx) Zucchini 14-15; Potatoes, White (40# bx) 20-22; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 1421.75; Tomatoes, field grown (25# bx) large 15-20, small 10, Roma (25# bx) 20; Watermelons, seeded (ea) 13.50. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn) WA Red Delicious (traypack ctn) 36-43.45, WA Golden Delicious (traypack ctn) 34.50-36, Granny Smith WA (traypack ctn) 36.50-37, Gala WA 41.50-48, WA Fuji (traypack ctn) 34.50-42.50, WA Pink Lady (traypack ctn) 38-41.50; Asparagus (11#

ctn) 32.95-34; Bananas (40# ctn) 20-22.80; Beans, Rd Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 3242.95, Pole (1-1/9 bu) 3032.50; Beets (25# sack) 14.35-20; Blueberries (flat 12 1-pt cups 24-34; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 23.15-31; Cabbge (50# ctn) 17.55-19; Cantaloupe (12 count ctn) 21.5028.95; Carrots (50# sack) 22.95-27.15; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 20.55-22.50; Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 26.50-28.50; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 21.95-25.25; Citrus: Orang-es, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 24-34.85, FL (4/5 bu ctn) 21-22; Pink Grapefruit CA (4/5 bu ctn) 22-25.95; Tangelos FL (80 count bx) 25-26.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 32.15-39.65; Limes (40# ctn) 21-24; Oranges CA Navel (4/5 bu ctn) 31.2531.95, FL Navel (64 count) 19.50-21.50; Corn, Yellow (ctn 4 1/2-5 dz) 20-25.05, White (ctn 4 1/2-5 dz) 2025.05, Bi-Color (4 1/2 dz bgs) 19-20; Cranberries (24 12 oz pkgs) 24.50; Cucumbers, Long Green (40# ctn) 21-23, Pickles (ctn 40#) 3136; Eggplant (25# ctn) 2123; Grapes, Red Seedless (18# ctn) 25.50-36.85, White Seedless 27.50-28, Black Seedless 28, Red Globe 34; Greens, Collard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 19.45; Turnips, topped 11.8514.65; Honeydews (ctn 5s) 17; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 13.65; Lettuce (ctn 24s) Iceberg, wrapped 22.50-24, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 20-22.50, Romaine (ctn 24s) 24.5026.50; Nectarines, YellowWhite flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 22; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 16.85-20; White (25# sack) 13.50-14.50, Red (25# sack) 15.50, Green (ctn 24s) 21.25-27.65, Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 20-25.05; Peaches, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 18; Peanuts, Green (35# bg) 48-51; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn) 28; Peppers, Bell Type Green (1-1/9 bu ctn) 21.45-26.65, Red

(11# ctn) 32, Yellow (11# ctn) 32; Potatoes, Red (50# ctn) size A 21-23, size A 1516, Red Size B 25-28, Russet ID 21.15-25.50; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) 15.7516.25; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 22; Squash, Yellow Crookneck (3/4 bu ctn) 23.50-27, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 2226.50; Strawberries CA (flat 8 1-qt cont) 28; Sweet Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 1621.45, White (40# ctn) 2020.65; Tomatoes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 2227.15, Cherry (flat 12 1-pt cont) 20.65-26, Roma (25# ctn) 22-24, Grape (flat 12 1pt cont) 26-27. WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 30-37.50, Golden Delicious 30-35.50, Granny Smith 20-28; (bu loose pack) Red & Golden Delicious, Mutsu, Fuji, Stayman, Romes 14-16; Bananas (40# bx) 18.50-20; Beans (bu) Halfrunners 25; Broccoli (ctn) 18-20; Cabbage (50 bg) 12.50-14; Cantaloupes (ctn 9-12 count) 14-18.75; Cauliflower (ctn) 18.50-20; Grapefruit 18.50-20; Oranges 18-24; Lemons (ctns 95 count) 30, (165 count) 24-24.50; Corn (Crate) BiColor, & Yellow 18-20; Cucumbers (1-1/9 bu) Long Green 16.50-24, Picklers (11/9 bu crate) 28-30; Grapes (18# ctn) Red Globe 22.7524, Red & White Seedless 20-24.50; Lettuce (ctn) Iceburg 19.50-20.50; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 1416; Bell (1-1/9 bu ctn) L & XL 12-15; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) 15.75-26.50; Pumpkins (ea) 3-12, (bin) 120-140; Squash (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crook-neck 2029.50, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 24-24.50; Strawberries (flat 8 1#) CA 24.50; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 12-16; Tomatoes (25# bx) XL & Larger 14-19, M&L 12. MARKET

Stallman makes statement regarding President Obama’s submission of Trade Pact Legislation On Oct. 3, Bob Stallman, President, American Farm Bureau Federation made the following statement: “The American Farm Bureau Federation is pleased that President Obama has sent implementing legislation to Congress today to ratify three bilateral free-trade agreements between the United States and Korea, Colombia and Panama. America’s farmers and ranchers have much at stake and the fact these three agreements are moving forward is very good news for our economy. “Now that the administration has done its part, it’s up to Congress to expedite this matter. It is vital that this process move forward to ensure the agreements

will be put in place as soon as possible so we can restore a level playing field for U.S. exports to these three nations. Without these agreements, over the last four years, Korea, Colombia and Panama have opened their doors to our competitors. A further delay will provide more benefits to our competitors at the expense of our economy. “Combined, the three FTAs represent nearly $2.5 billion in new agriculture exports and would create the economic growth that could generate support for up to 22,500 U.S. jobs. These gains will only be realized if the three agreements are passed by Congress and implemented.”


To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, October 10 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Monthly Heifer sale. A group of reg. fresh young cows from Muranda Holsteins; Larkindale sends 10 -15 fancy Registered cows all stages of lactation. An exceptional group of cattle with deep pedigrees and a lot of quality & milk. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 10:00 AM: Mifflintown, PA. Happy Hollow Dairy Dispersal. 300+ head sell. David & Tina Hunsberger, owners. Co-managed by Stonehurst Farm & The Cattle Exchange. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Misc. & Small Animals. 1:00 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. . Tom & Brenda Hosking 607699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518392-3321.

Wednesday, October 12 • Lexington, KY. Late model Cat & Komatsu Construction Equip. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Francis Clancy, Alfred, NY. 12 organic cows & heifers. Holstein & Xbred cows. All organic paperwork is in order. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041, 585-738-2104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716296-5041, 585-738-2104

Thursday, October 13 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105

Friday, October 14 • Detroit, MI. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

• Intercourse, PA. Plankenhorn Farms Complete Dispersal. Co-managed with Stonehurst Farms. Dr. Sam & Gail Simon, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 10:30 AM: Catskill Tractor Co., 384 Center St., Franklin, NY. Fall Inventory Reduction and Machinery Auction. Consignments accepted. Frank Walker Auctioneers, 607-829-2600 • 5:30 PM: American Legion Hall, Main St., Wayland, NY. Auction of tools & equip., large private collections and guns. R.G. Mason Auctions, 585-567-8844 www.rgmasonauctions.com • 5:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-776-2000 or 315-427-7845.

Saturday, October 15 • Sweet Water Farm Auction, 26 Barker St., Three Rivers, MA. IH 5088 & 1086, JD 2020, Dozer, IH Silage Trucks, Equipment, Owner George Foskit. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413-569-6421 • 11298 State Route 149, Fort Ann, NY. Late model Construction Equip., Forestry Attachments, Support Equip., Tagalong & Equipment Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 8:00 AM: 6 Charmund Rd., Orangeville, PA. Complete Liquidation of Brewer Equipment LLC. Trucks, forklifts, equipment and pallet lots. Fraley Auction Co., Inc., 570-546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 9:00 AM: LaPlume Excavating, 119 Newton Rd., Plaistow, NH. Contractor Retirement Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, October 15 • 11:00 AM: Richfield Springs, NY. 63rd OHM Holstein Club Sale. 100 head of quality registered Holsteins sell. Hosted by Roedale Farm, the Pullis Family. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771, Brad Ainslie Sale Chairman 315-822-6087 www.hoskingsales.com • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Calf Sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Feeder Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-7382104.

Monday, October 17 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Lamb, Sheep, Goat & Pig Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Wednesday, October 19

• Manassas, VA. Cat Construction Equip., Support, Attachments, Forklifts, Dump Trucks, Pickups & Equipment Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • Allentown, PA. State Auction. Complete Liquidation of Automotive Dismantling Operation. MAC Car Crusher, Rubber Tired Loaders, Rollback & Dump Trucks, Vans. Over 100 Cars (40-50 running), UNBELIEVABLE Accumulation of Motors, Transmissions, Shocks, Glass & Much More.Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Early consignments include 32 open heifers & 12 bred heifers. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104 • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-7382104. • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Thursday, October 20 • 140 Manda Ct., Troy, MO. Complete Liquidation of Concrete Precast Plant plus Real Estate. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315633-2944, Site phone 262-903-6269 www.lyonauction.com • Gordonville, PA. Jo-Lan Farm Complete Dispersal. John & Rachel Lantz, owners. CoManaged by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: 423 Ashwood Rd., Darlington, PA. Construction Equip., Trucks & Trailers. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com

sand/sawdust shooter; Rissler 510 feed cart mixer. Please call to get into the following ads. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-8478800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Tuesday, October 25 • 10:00 AM: 12601 State Rd. 545, North Winter Garden, FL. Rental Returns of Late Model Construction, Support Equip., Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com

Wednesday, October 26 • 10:00 AM: 175 Wolf Run Rd., Cuba, NY. Estate of Steve Petzen. Excavating Equip. & Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. . Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Milking Herd Dispersal. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104

Thursday, October 27 • Moira, NY. Carl & Annabelle Bilow. 85 head of Quality Dairy Cattle. “Super Milk” every year since 1986. Delarm & Treadway, Sale Managers & Auctioneers, 518-483-4106 • Cleveland, OH. Complete Liquidation Cat Construction Equip. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com

Friday, October 28 • Bloomfield, NY. Bennett Farms Milking Herd & Bred Heifer Dispersal. Bennett Farms, Inc. owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-7462226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704399-6111, 704-399-9756 • Detroit, MI. Large Construction, Agricultural Equip., Attachments, Support Equip. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com

Friday, October 21

Saturday, October 29

• Ben K. Stolzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. VisionGen & Partners Elite Offering. Hosted by Vision Genetics. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

• Syracuse, NY. Construction, Support, Attachments, Aerials, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com • 20 McCormick Rd., Spencer, MA. Estate of George Adgalanis. 4 Ford tractors, Trucks & Tools, Hay & other equipment. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, Inc., 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com • 9:00 AM: 5563 East Main St., Batavia, NY. Empire Tractor Relocation Auction. Farm Tractors, Equipment, Agricultural Parts, Store Inventory, Store Pictures. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com

Saturday, October 22 • 9:00 AM: Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds). Onondaga County Area Municipal Equipment Auction of Municipal & Contractor Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Woodhull, NY (Steuben Co.). Levi Farmwald Retirement Auction. Horses, Dairy Herd & Farm Machinery. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 10:30 AM: Castile, NY. Ward Bros. Machinery & Cattle Dispersal. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585738-2104 • 11:00 AM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Fall Machinery Sale. We will be accepting Machinery on Thurs. 20th & Fri. 21st. Already consigned: Case 5220 tractor 4WD loader, cab; NH L150 Skid Loader; HLA

Tuesday, November 1 • Pell City, AL. Truck Tractor & Specialized Trailer Auction. Large quantity of specialized trailers of different configurations: 19 axles, Trail Kings, Liddell, Hobb & others. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com

Wednesday, November 2 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. . Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

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Page 27 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

AUC TION CALENDAR


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 28

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CAMPAIGN ROAD SIGNS: Awesome prices. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518673-0101 or email bsnyder@leepub.com YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering. CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111 NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call Lee Publications 518-673-0101 Beth bsnyder@leepub.com

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POLITICAL PROMOTIONAL PACKAGES available for reasonable prices. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or email bsnyder@leepub.com

Dairy Cattle

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

USA Gypsum Bedding Reduce your bedding costs! And Improve Soil - Naturally!

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry

• Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? • Reduce mastitis & cell Gypsum dissolves. counts. • Use less! More • Use in place of absorbent than lime Hydrated Lime. products. • Improves your soil Try Grip X1 Today! • Available in bulk. www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Also Available at: Dealers wanted in select areas Central Dairy & Mechanical, Martinsburg, PA, ph 814-793-3721 Genesee Valley Nutrition, Piffard, NY, ph 585-243-9597 Himrod Farm Supply, Penn Yan, NY, ph 315-531-9497 Homestead Nutrition, New Holland, PA, ph 888-336-7878 Levi Fisher, Honey Grove, PA (Juniata County), ph 717-734-3145 Martin’s Ag, Shippensburg, PA, ph 717-532-7845 Elam Miller, Fort Plain, NY, ph 518-993-3892 New Bedford Elevator, Baltic, OH, ph 330-897-6492 Norm’s Farm Store, Watsontown, PA, ph 570-649-6765 Robert Rohrer, Millmont, PA, ph 570-898-1967 Steve B. Stoltzfus, Lykens, PA, ph 717-365-3804 Walnut Hill Feeds, Shelby, OH, ph 419-342-2942

585-732-1953

DOUBLE 8 HERRINGBONE Boumatic Parlor for sale, $25,000. Call for details. 607847-6809

Farm Equipment JD 5730 chopper, 4wd processor hay & 4 row chain heads. 585-746-5050 RICHARDTON 1400 dump wagon, no roof, $4,000. 585746-5050

Farm Machinery For Sale 1992 INT. LITTER SPREADER, cummins engine, tandem axle w/hyd. 20’ Chandler litter spreader, exc. cond., $20,000 OBO. Mount Jackson,VA 800541-7496

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS Large Selection Available

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE We Buy Tractors For Parts

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT 403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

(717) 776-6242

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

6000 Mueller 900 Mueller 4500 Mueller 850 Sunset 4000 Mueller 800 Universal 3500 Mueller 800 Sunset 3000 Girton 800 Mueller 3000 Mueller 800 Surge 2-3000 S.S. 735 Sunset Sugar Tanks 700 Mueller 2500 Mueller 625 Sunset 2-2000 Mueller 600 Mueller 1500 Mueller 545 Sunset 1500 Surge 500 Mueller 1350 Mueller 400 Mueller 1000 Zero 310 Sunset 3-1000 Mueller 300 Mueller 1000 Surge 250 Mueller New Sunset Tanks New & Used Compressors 200-4000 Gal. StorageTanks Used Freheaters

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

Bedding

Gypsum Bedding

U BUNK

Concrete Products

# # # # #

Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

FOB Wytheville, VA $150.00 ~ 8’ sections CATTLE GUARDS (deliverable locally) Call for Details!

Dairy Equipment

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist 1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

buycows@warwick.net

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us

• 3000 Gal.Girton D5 • 3000 Gal.Storage • 2000 Gal.DeLaval • 2000 Gal.Mueller OE • 2000 Gal.Mueller OH • 2000 Gal.Mueller O SOLD RI OH • 1500 Gal.Mueller • 1500 Gal.Mueller OHF • 1500 Gal.Mueller OH • 1250 Gal.DeLaval • 1250 Gal.Mueller OH SOLD PA • 1000 Gal.Mueller O • 1000 Gal.Mueller M • 1000 Gal.Mueller OH SOLD PA

• 1000 Gal.Sunset F.T. • 1000 Gal.Mueller OH • 1000 Gal.DeLaval • 900 Gal.Mueller OH SOLD NY OH • 800 Gal.Mueller • 800 Gal.Majonnier • 800 Gal.Mueller OH • 735 Gal.Sunset • 700 Gal.Mueller OH • 700 Gal.Mueller V • 700 Gal.Mueller M • 600 Gal.Mueller OH • 600 Gal.Mueller M • 600 Gal.DeLaval Rnd

• 545 Gal.Sunset • 500 Gal.Mueller MW • 500 Gal.Mueller M • 500 Gal.Majonnier • 415 Gal.Sunset • 400 Gal.Jamesway • 400 Gal.Majonnier • 375 Gal.Milkeeper • 300 Gal.Majonnier • 300 Gal Mueller M • 300 Gal.Sunset • 200 Gal.Sunset SC • 180 Gal.Milkeeper • 150 Gal.Mueller RH

HEAT EXCHANGERS • TUBE COOLER 300-6000 Gal Storage Tanks

We Do Tank Repair

SHENK’S

505 E. Woods Drive,

Sales 717-626-1151

BUSH HOG

USED EQUIPMENT

Westfield 8x51 Auger MF 1835 Baler Allied 8x50’ Grain Auger White 285 Tractor Miller 5300 Forage Box Miller 1150 Rake IH 37 Baler w/Thrower Westfield 8x56 Auger Hesston 4550 Square Baler Vicon 553 Tedder Farmall 460 Tractor MF 246 Loader White 5100 4R Planter White 6100 4R Corn Planter White 543 Corn Planter Case IH 8830 SP Mower Cond. MF 285 Tractor NI 290 Mower Conditioner White 549 SAR 5 Bottom Plow Int’l. 20x7 Grain Drill Miller Pro Forage Boxes In Stock

STANLEY’S FARM SERVICE RD Box 46 Klingerstown, PA

Lititz, PA 17543

570-648-2088 WE ALSO STOCK NEW VICON


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Ridgeview New Holland Orange, VA Schulerr 175BFF Silage Cart, Good Condition. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 Ford 8240SLE Cab 4WD Loader P/S Trans. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,500 Ford 3000 Gas Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,950 w Holland TC C 40 Hydro trans, New cab Only 125 Hrs. . . . . . .$27,500 D 2940 Open Station 2WD Super JD sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 H 640 Autowrap R/Baler Very NH clean low hrs . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 H BR770 Auto Wrap R/Baler . . . NH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 Hesstonn 4600 Square Baler .$3,900 H H6750 9 ft. Disc Mower Like NH New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,250 Woodss 3180 15 ft. Batwing cutter, 540 CV drive shields . . . . .$8,5000

Ridgeview New Holland

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

OCTOBER Equipment Inventory

MAINE TO N. CAROLINA We broker and manage Multi Farm Partnerships.

Check Out Our Outstanding Low Interest Financing On Used Equipment!

New Holland BR 740 twine tie, good condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 New Holland BR 780 5x6 bale . . . . . $16,500 New Holland 664 round baler, bale command monitor, twine. . . . . . . REDUCED TO $6,500 Ford 4000 diesel, 2wd, manual trans., 1 set remotes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 In Stock! New Holland 200 Series Skid Loaders

0% FINANCING AVAILABLE ON SELECT NEW HOLLAND TRACTORS & HAY TOOLS CALL TO INQUIRE! See/Call Us For Northern Ag Mist Sprayers, 55 & 110 Gal. 3 Pt. Hitch Models Available

Wet fields? Make land tile application a part of your crop rotation @ PleasantCreekHay.com Welsarth@Msn.com Compare our front PTO tractors speed, options, and prices.

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

JD Trs., 8420, 8110, 7930, 6115-D, 2555, 2550, 720 others coming! Case IH Trs. 305 Magnum, 275 Magnum 140 hrs., 125 Maxium w/500 hrs., NH TD 5050 c/a 4x4 w/ldr., 7740 2x. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 JD 9510 combine, 2900/2400 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $57,500 Just in: New McFarlane Vertical tillage tools, Demo - this Sat. 8th & Mon. 10th Call for Details.

ANDREWS FARM EQ., INC. Conneautville, PA 16406 See Lots More at www.andrewsfarm.com 814-587-2450 or 814-573-3344

Used Equipment For Sale CASE 685 2WD, w/CASE LOADER, JUST TRADED . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500.00 NH 1431 DISC BINE, SMUCKER ROLLS, GOOD COND . . . . . . . .$8,500.00 CASE IH 7220 4WD, CAB, EXCELLENT CONDITION . . . . . . . . .$45,000.00 NH 1412 FLAIL DISCBINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,000.00 DMI 3 SHANK NO-TIL RIPPER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500.00

D&H Tractor

CASE IH 4210 4X4 W/LOADER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$16,000.00

Chilhowie, VA • 276-646-3642

CASE IH C70 TRACTOR, 2WD, ROPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,000.00

dhtractorsales@comcast.net

LAWRENCE AG EQUIPMENT

Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802-2533 PH: 540-433-7070 Check out our e-bay store at stores.ebay.com/tractor-care-inc

877-466-1131

B EST N OW

Farm Machinery For Sale

JOHN DEERE BALER PARTS: 347, 346, 336, 224, 214, 24T, 14T. Nelson Horning 585-5266705

PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

New Holland 254

New Holland TT60A

Hay Rake Tedder Combo, PTO Driven

$950

56 HP, 4WD, New Holland Loader, 110 hrs, Like New!

$25,900

2035 Stuarts Draft Hwy., Stuarts Draft, VA 24477 540-337-1090 www.beveragetractor.com

IN IN

• Search All of our Auction and Used Equipment Ads at One Time! Auction and Used Equipment Ads from:

• Country Folks • Country Folks Grower • Hard Hat News • North American Quarry News and • Waste Handling Equipment News

are combined into our searchable database.

www.equipmentexplorer.com

Tractor Care, Inc. 1066-C Virginia Avenue,

N ORTHEAST THE S OUTH

BEST WARRANTY: 1 Year Parts on Motor & Transmission, most all combines BEST QUALITY: Selected Direct from Farm or OEM Dealers BEST SELECTION: Just visit website; We got em BEST TRUCKING: Lowest Rates Available BEST “TRUE” INTEREST: 3.8% 3 Years • 4.3% 5 Years • 5.0% 7 Years Over 25+ Years Selling Combines

WE WANT TO SELL YOU YOUR NEXT COMBINE Bloomsburg, PA • Route 44 (Jerseytown)

www.equipmentexplorer.com

Closeout Pricing On McCormick Compact Tractors 0%-60 month financing or Huge Cash Discounts Call Now! Round Bale Wagon 10 Position Mover, Like New! ....................................$1,900 Kuhn GF5001 THA, 4 Rotor Tedder, Hyd. Fold, Good ..................................$2,200 Kuhn GMO 77 HD, 3Pt. Disc Mower, Good...........................................$3,500 ’73 Ford 3000 8 Speed Manual, 1 Remote, Diesel, Good Rubber, No Rust! .......................................................Call! Ford 1200 4WD, Diesel, w/3Pt. 48” Finishing Mower, 600 hrs, Good Condition.........................Reduced To $4,000 New Holland 255 Tedder-Rake Combo, Good Condition..............................Call! ’01 NH 688 Round Baler, Auto Wrap, 5x6, Good Condition...........................$8,500 ’09 Vermeer 555XL w/Net Wrap, Good Condition...................................$13,900 2004 McCormick CX85 Cab, 4x4, 1,300 Hrs., Ex. Cond...........................$29,500 NEW! HayMag 4 Rotor Tedders w/Hyd. Fold & Tilt, 18’.............................$4,995 Vermeer 404 Pro Demo Baler, Only 2,500 Bales.........................................$27,500 Massey Ferguson 4225, 2WD, 1036 Massey Loader, Cab, Air, 2 Remotes, 1,500 Hours, Bale Spike...........$23,900 Pictures at www.tractorcare.com

540-672-4900

1-888-917-5192

USED EQUIPMENT

CASE IH 7110 2WD, CAB, 3,300 HRS., GOOD COND. . . . . . . . .$22,000.00

www.ridgeviewnh.com

TOLL FREE

Farm Machinery For Sale

328 Danville Rd. (Near I-80)

TOLL FREE 800-919-3322 www.zeisloftequip.com

Visit Us Online! Anytime!! www.countryfolks.com

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293 Fencing

BLACK LOCUST POSTS: Poles up to 30’. Authentic split rails 6x6, 4x4, 1” & 2” boards. Photos at www.blacklocustwood.com Call Tom 518-883-8284 ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Page 29 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 30

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Fresh Produce, Nursery

PUMPKINS, GOURDS, WINTER SQUASH etc. Pie, Jack-O-Lantern, White & Munchkin Pumpkins Butternut, Spaghetti, Buttercup, Acorn, Ambercup, Sweet Potato, Sweet Dumpling Squash

ANY SIZE LOTS AVAILABLE From Bushels to Tractor Trailer Loads

Hay - Straw For Sale 4x5 MIXED GRASS round bales, good quality, net wrapped, barn kept, $40. Pick up at farm. No delivery. Brookview Farm, 854 Dover Rd., Manakin Sabot,VA 23103 email bviewfarm@gmail.com 804-784-3131 FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

Hoeffner Farms

Hay - Straw For Sale

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

607-769-3404 607-324-0749 eves

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

Hay For Sale First Cut, Second Cut, Timothy and Alfalfa WE DELIVER

519-604-8683

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

HAY FOR SALE: 1st and 2nd cutting 4x5 round bales, w/ net wrap, delivery available. 804-3392500

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry

NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION Parts & Service New Installations

Round & Square Bales

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay

Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

800-836-2888 or email

classified@leepub.com Hay - Straw Wanted Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted.

Also Square Bales of

Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

CALL STEVE

Contacts: Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com

STRAW 519-482-5365

804-387-6462

MIXED GRASS HAY for sale. $35.00/Roll, 4x5. 540-8602145

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

ROOFING & SIDING

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

Try Selling It In The Generators

Classes cost $12/ea and the registration deadline is Oct. 10. On Internet at www. wchorsecouncil.org OCT 19 Food for Profit Seminar A Recipe for Success Maryland Agriculture Research Center, 1114 Shawan Rd., Cockeysville, MD. 9 am - 4 pm. A $40 registration fee covers class materials and lunch. Preregistration is required.To attend this session of Food for Profit, please registrar at www.cvent.com/d/mcq73k or call 877-489-1398. Young Farmers Advisory Board to Meet Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. 11 am. Contact Florence Jordan, 410-841-5882. OCT 20 SSCC Meeting Prince George’s Soil Conservation District, 5301 Marlboro Race Track Rd,, Upper Marlboro, MD. The meeting is open to the public and will focus on soil conservation and water quality programs. Contact Louise Lawrence, 410-841-5863. OCT 21 Ginger Day Workshop Dayspring Farm, Cologne, VA. 9-11 am. Registration is limited to 60 participants and will only be accepted via mail or e-mail. Registration fee is $10/person. Contact Mark Klingman, 804-5245960 or e-mail mjklingman@vsu.edu. OCT 22 Tree Farm Field Day Burnham Woodlot, East Finley, Washington County, PA. 12:30-6 pm. $10/person. Call 724-223-8781.

Roofing

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix

TOO MUCH HAY?

Hornell,NY

Roofing

Allen Hollenbach 610-926-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

WANTED

Hay & Straw - All Types We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

WANTED

Pre Cut Rye Straw 50 to 75 Lb. Bales

302-737-5117 302-545-1000 Heating

e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Real Estate For Sale 220 ACRE FARM IN CENTRAL NEW YORK With 70 Holstein milkers, 40 young stock, including one month old- up to 2 years old. Beautiful land with lots of opportunity. Buildings include renovated barn with spacious cow stalls, tiestalls w/mats, addition on barn houses heifers & dry cows. Big spacious 5 stall garage. Big 5 bedroom, 1½ bath farmhouse. Must see property. Tons of equipment in excellent shape and wellmaintained.

$650,000.00

315-489-0742

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY Southwestern Virginia Bland County

62+/- ACRES ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

$90,000 Several Purchase Options Available. Call

540-255-9112

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

OCT 10-11 DFA/Dairylea 2011 Annual Meeting Syracuse, NY. Call 888-5896455, ext. 5598. Joint Leadership Conference Syracuse, NY. Like usual, an Agri-Business Breakfast will be held the morning of Oct. 11 with a focus on growth of dairy in the Northeast. Call 888-589-6455, ext. 5598. OCT 15 Washington County Horse Council Dressage Horse Show 7303 Sharpsburg Pike in Boonsboro, MD. 9 am.

5 Easy Ways To Place A Country Folks Classified Ad

1. PHONE IT IN IT IN - For MasterCard, Visa, 2. FAX American Express or Discover customers, fill out the form below completely and

FOR BEST RESULTS, RUN YOUR AD FOR TWO ISSUES!

Just give Peggy a call at 1-800-836-2888

Cost per week per zone: $9.25 for the first 14 words, plus 30¢ for each additional word. (Phone #’s count as one word) If running your ad multiple weeks: Discount $1.00 per week, per zone.

FAX to Peggy at (518) 673-2381

MAIL IT IN - Fill out the attached form, 3. calculate the cost, enclose your check or credit card information and mail to:

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

4. E-MAIL E-mail your ad to classified@leepub.com ON-LINE - Go to 5. www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a Classified Ad button to place your ad 24/7!

West

East

New England

Mid-Atlantic

Place my ad in the following Zones:  Country Folks East  Country Folks West  Country Folks of New England  Country Folks Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle Number of weeks to run___________ Name(Print)________________________________________________________________ Farm/Company Name_________________________________________________________ Street___________________________________________County_____________________ City____________________________________________State______Zip______________

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Tractor Parts

Phone_______________

_______________

____________________________________

Fax_________________

_______________

____________________________________

Cell_________________

_______________

____________________________________

e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard Card # ______________________________________________Exp. Date ______________ (MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card(Print)____________________________________________________ Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for credit card payment only)

15

(MM/DD/YY)

16

1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

Miscellaneous C A M PA I G N P O S T E R S : Very reasonable prices. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or email bsnyder@leepub.com

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

17

18

1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week

19

20

1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

21

22

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week 1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week

23

24

1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week


We would be happy to send a digital copy of Country Folks every week to your email address. Call, fax, or email us to receive a sample issue. Digital editions cost $25 per year or $45 for 2 years. Give us your zip code and we’ll email you a link to the edition appropriate for your area.

Call 888/596-5329 Fax 518/673-2381 Email: subscriptions@leepub.com

Page 31 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

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October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 32

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2011 Country Folks Subscription Prices (good through 12/31/11): One Year (52 issues) . . . . . . By Mail $45 . . OR By Email $25 . . OR Both $60 Two Years (104 issues) . . . . By Mail $75 . . OR By Email $45 . . OR Both $85 (Prices will increase approximately 10% after 1/1/2012) First, Give Us Your Info: Name________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address ____________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip ______________________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________________________________________________________ Email ______________________________________________________________________________ 1) __ Yes, Please Extend My Subscription __ One Year

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Seeking clarification on costly, burdensome uncertainties arising from Clean Water Act The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and the Public Lands Council (PLC) recently filed an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in the Sackett v. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) case, which will likely be argued in January 2012. Dustin Van Liew, PLC executive director and NCBA director of federal lands, said Sackett v. EPA could set a dangerous precedent allowing EPA and other federal agencies to make jurisdictional determinations that are not ju-

dicially or administratively reviewable. In 2005, Chantell and Michael Sackett purchased a plot of land, less than one acre in size, to build a home. However, in 2007, after filling in half the lot with gravel in preparation for construction, EPA issued the Sacketts an “Administrative Compliance Order” (ACO), alleging the land was a wetland subject to Clean Water Act (CWA) jurisdiction and ordered the Sacketts to restore the land to its original condition or face nearly $50,000 in fines per day.

The Sackett family appealed for a hearing on their alleged violation but was denied by EPA and the federal court. According to Van Liew, the court threw out the case because it determined that the CWA prevented judicial review ACOs until the enforcement actions have been issued by federal agencies. He said the Sacketts could not challenge the compliance order until they refused to do what it instructed and consequently were fined tens of thousands of dollars. “Like millions of Amer-

icans regularly do, the Sacketts rightfully purchased land to build their dream home. Unfortunately, instead of building that home, they have spent the past four years battling EPA and the courts,” Van Liew said. “The Sacketts weren’t trying to cut corners. They followed the rules and now they just want a fair shake in the courts. The uncertainty surrounding the CWA permitting process and the time and financial costs associated with it has left them with abysmal options of sub-

Producer News mitting to the regulator’s demands and the costs associated with those demands, risking catastrophic fines for noncompliance or investing significant time and resources pursuing a permit. In this process, the only winner is the federal government. Private landowners lose.” According to NCBA Deputy Environmental Counsel Ashley Lyon, this case could have farreaching impacts on farmers and ranchers and all private landowners. She said the CWA has morphed from a statute to protect our nation’s waters in to a tool for regulators to micromanage daily decisions of private landowners. She said the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether petitioners may seek pre-enforcement judicial review of ACOs and whether petitioners’ current inability to seek preenforcement judicial re-

view of the ACO violates their rights under the Due Process Clause. “The brief NCBA and PLC filed in this case pushes for a decision that affirms a landowner’s right to challenge a jurisdictional determination before they are required to either go through the costly and time-consuming permitting process or are fined thousands of dollars,” Lyon said. “Today it is private landowners, who followed the rules, attempting to build a home but private landowners, including farmers and ranchers, will no doubt face future challenges if EPA and other federal agencies’ decisions are not subject to judicial and administration review. We are hopeful the U.S. Supreme Court will consider the sweeping impact this case could have our all private landowners in this country.”

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Page 33 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

NCBA, PLC weigh in on precedent-setting Clean Water Act case


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 34

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by Sandra Avant A new test that detects a rare and deadly bone disorder in Red Angus is now available to cattle producers, thanks to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists. Marble bone disease, also known as osteopetrosis, had not been seen in the United States since the 1960s until it resurfaced in Red Angus cattle three years ago. The birth defect,

which affects humans, cattle and other animals, causes abnormal brain and bone marrow cavity development, leading to overly dense, brittle bones. Calves with the mutation usually are stillborn or die soon after birth. To stop the disease in cattle, scientists at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center

(USMARC) in Clay Center, NE, and the Henry A. Wallace Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC) in Beltsville, MD collaborated with several university and Red Angus Association of America partners to identify the gene mutation responsible for the disorder. They then developed a DNA diagnostic test that identifies osteopetrosis carriers. ARS is USDA’s chief

ARS researchers have developed a test that identifies Red Angus cattle that are carriers of the gene for marble bone disease, also known as osteopetrosis. Photo courtesy of the Red Angus Association of America

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intramural scientific research agency, and this research supports USDA’s priority of promoting international food security. Chemist Tim Smith and geneticist Tara McDaneld in the USMARC Genetics and Breeding Research Unit, BARC geneticist Tad Sonstegard and University of Illinois scientists compared DNA from affected Red Angus calves and their carrier parents to unaffected animals. A search of the entire genomes of all the calves for common and uncommon chromosomal segments revealed an abnormality. In osteopetrosis-affected calves, some of the genetic material of SLC4A2, a gene located

on a segment of chromosome 4, had been deleted. The discovery of the deletion was a first for cattle, according to McDaneld. SLC4A2 is necessary for proper osteoclast maintenance and function. Osteoclasts are cells that break down old bone during bone development and remodeling. Scientists were able to develop a polymerase chain reaction test in less than a year, according to Smith. The test is being used to help manage osteopetrosis and identify possible carriers. Findings from this research were published in Biomed Central Genomics. Read more about this research in the September 2011 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

Ranch, beef, sales education rolled into one You don’t hear of too many September graduations. But then again, there aren’t that many MBA programs that consist of ranch visits, meats labs and sales sessions. Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) launched its Master’s of Brand Advantages program in late 2010 and the first class will receive their degrees at the company’s annual conference in Sunriver, OR. The second class is in progress. “Meat experience in sales is not as in-depth as it used to be,” said Deanna Walenciak, CAB marketing director. “As our industry has changed, there are not as many people working their way up through the cut shop to sales.” The void makes people less prepared to face sales objections or confidently sell a premium product like the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand. The company set

out to change that through an intensive, hands-on course encompassing three sessions and covering everything from cattle production to beef sales. “They need to understand production agriculture and they need to have experienced it,” Walenciak said. The first two classes have taken a trip to southwest Kansas, where they break down into small groups and spend a half day with Angus ranchers, visit a CAB-licensed feedyard and tour CAB-licensed packing plants at Dodge City. Berry Bortz, who runs CB Farms near Preston, KS, with his wife Carla, hosted a handful of the students this summer. “We felt if they wanted to take the time to learn about our products, we owed it to the industry, and those people in particular, to tell them the truth,” he said. “We do

Ranch 36

Page 35 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Test identifies Red Angus carriers of bone disease


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 36

Ranch from 35 have a good story to tell.” The family narrated through a production calendar before driving out to the pastures where they keep their registered and commercial Angus cattle. “They were awestruck at how many decisions and how much hands-on stuff actually happens out here,” Bortz said. “One of the guys made a comment, ‘The next time somebody asks me why a steak costs so much I’ll tell them it’s cheap. It should be twice as much for all the work that goes into it.’” “All we’re doing is showcasing what we have every day as an industry, and that’s people committed to raising great beef,” Walenciak said. “There are so many misperceptions out there. The people in this class are the ones who are selling the ranchers’ products every day to the best chefs in the country. If they’ve never been to a ranch, they can’t tell the great story that we have with passion and enthusiasm.” Tom Chamot of New York-based Palmer Food Services says the experience taught him about the level of animal care from ranch to feedlot. “They are well-designed and managed facilities for the finishing phase,” he said with a note of confidence in answering questions about cattle feeding, including antibiotic and hormone use. Each session follows a similar cram-packed schedule. In the meatsfocused class, participants walk through the fabrication process. “You need time, not watching somebody else do it or watching a video, but time with your knife in hand, breaking down a carcass,” Walenciak said. The final part is all about application. “If we give them all this knowledge, we really have to help them connect the dots,” she said. That means role-playing and practice. The class tackles statements they might hear out in the field ranging from implant usage and factory farms to price and quality. “If we had a tagline,” Walenciak said, “it would be, ‘Product knowledge is the key to overcoming every sales objection.’” CAB licensees apply for a spot in the MBA training. At the end of each segment, they complete a test and then it wraps up with a morn-

ing-long final exam. “If you know the beef industry inside and out, you’ll be better at selling beef. If they feel they’re educated on the industry, they will become more valuable as a consultant to their customers,” Walenciak said. Chamot is just one example of how it’s supposed to work. “Producers have an unbelievable amount of care and integrity and pride in what they do and they do it for us,” he said. “I’m

empowered with knowledge and confidence-my gun is fully loaded to answer questions I normally wouldn’t have been able to answer.” The second class started in June, and Walenciak hopes the first alumni are just the beginning. “These classes are phenomenal, but we can’t change the world with 20 grads,” she said. “In the very near future we want to have many, many more classes rotating through.”


Efficient cattlemen and women are a boon for the environment. “I am absolutely not anti-grass-fed beef. There is a place for every single kind of system: grass-fed, grain-fed, local, organic and so on,” said Jude Capper, Washington State University animal scientist at the Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) Annual Conference. “What I am ‘anti’ is mismarketing and the perceptions that are passed on to the consumer about what is and isn’t environ-

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mentally friendly.” From farm publications and the Wall Street Journal to Cosmopolitan and mainstream women’s magazines, there is a constant stream of information about water, land and resource use. Beef is often held under the microscope, Capper told the crowd of more than 500 who gathered at the event in Sunriver, OR. “In every part of the world we’re going to face the issues of feeding more people on less land with fewer resources,” she

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said, citing estimates that by 2050 worldwide population will increase by 50 percent and we’ll need 70 percent more food to support that. “On a global basis people are going to have greater incomes,” Capper said. “As people have more money they want more meat, more milk, more eggs.” Today’s conversations about sustainability are well founded, she said, but some of the proposed solutions are not. Take “Meatless Mon-

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days” for example. “Even if we all went meatless every Monday, if we only ate lentils and tofu and magically didn’t give off any methane ourselves, it’s going to cut our national carbon footprint by less than half a percent,” Capper said. And then there are important considerations, like where would animal byproducts like leather, tallow and pharmaceuticals come from? Instead, Capper suggested one proven method for reducing resource use:

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increase efficiency. “If we can have our animals on the planet for fewer days before they’re harvested, in total we use less energy, less land and less water per unit of beef,” she said, pointing to examples over the years. In 1977 it took five animals to produce the same pounds beef that it takes four animals to produce today. “Beef yield over that time has gone up fairly consistently,” she said, noting carcasses can’t keep getting bigger because of consumer acceptance and processing challenges. “What we can do is improve productivity, improve growth rate.” The efficiency gains from 1977 to 2010 amount to a 19-percentage-point reduction in feed use, a 12-point decrease in water needed and a 33-point drop in land required per pound (lb.) of beef. “That’s not because ranchers and feedlot operators have implemented specific environmental technologies,” Capper said. “It’s because they’ve been doing what they do best, to improve productivity.” Yet that story hasn’t caught on. “The consumer often hears that grass-fed must be best,” she said. Capper and her research team analyzed and compared the environmental impact of three beef production systems: conventional, natural and grass-fed. Looking at conventional, with its growth-enhancing technologies like implants and ionophores, versus natural production, cattle in the latter system take more days to finish. “Animals that grow faster and weigh more cut the environmental impact,” she said. That’s magnified when comparing conventional to grassfed, as average days from birth to harvest increase by 226 and carcass weights drop by 185 lb. “To convert to an entirely grass-fed system, we’d need to more than double the number of the cows in the U.S. today just to maintain beef sup-

ply,” Capper said. Land use would increase by 131 million acres, equivalent to 75 percent of the area of Texas, and water use would skyrocket by 468 billion gallons. Capper showed several highly publicized studies containing suspect assumptions about the modern beef industry. “This is very dangerous because it’s put out there as fact in an international science magazine,” she said of one example. “Potentially, it turns consumers away from beef.” Ranchers, stockers and feeders need to keep getting better, and talking about it. Reducing mortality and morbidity is one step. “It’s important to keep having healthier animals. They’re going to gain better and grow faster,” she said. Reproduction is another. “Only about 86 percent of cows have a live calf every year. If that was 90 percent, 95 percent or 99 percent, that would make a huge improvement in productivity,” Capper said. “If we improve our land, better grasses, better feed, those animals are going to grow faster.” Good news is found in a recent study showing 94 percent of worldwide consumers either support or are neutral toward the use of technology in food production. “Most consumers just want affordable, safe, nutritious food that tastes good,” she said. To view Capper’s research visit http://wsu. academia.edu/JudeCapper/Papers. For more information on the Certified Angus Beef ® brand Annual Conference, go to www.certifiedangusbeef.c om.

Page 37 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Modern beef production is “green”


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 38

CHB LLC foodservice marketing experiences tremendous growth in 2011 Fiscal year 2011 was excellent for Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC, posting the second highest year in volume at 40.5 million pounds sold. Foodservice was the big winner with 47 percent growth and a total of 11 million pounds sold. “2011 proved to be a very successful year in both growth and exposure for the brand,” said Craig Huffhines, American Hereford Association (AHA) executive vice president. CHB LLC is a subsidiary of the AHA with its fiscal year ending Aug. 31. This year also proved to be a success in both growth and exposure for the brand. Volume increased this past fiscal year by 6.4 percent. Total tonnage reached 40.5 million pounds. According to the Food Marketing In-

stitute, 50 cents of the U.S. consumer dollar spent on food is spent at restaurant establishments. Even though the foodservice industry has seen a dip in consumer spending during the recession, CHB has witnessed tremendous growth across the U.S. in this category. This year, CHB® licensed processors sold 11.3 million pounds of CHB into the restaurant trade, up 3.6 million pounds from a year ago — a 47 percent increase. The most impressive growth came from three Sysco Food Distribution centers located in Baraboo, WI; Minneapolis, and Nashville, TN; and Kohls Foods located in Quincy, IL. The Minneapolis center was licensed at the beginning of the fiscal year and marketed 1.2 million pounds in its first year of selling the brand. The Baraboo and

Nashville divisions marketed a combined 1.35 million pounds this year. Another highlight of the program this year was the licensing of Sysco Food Distribution in Sacramento, CA. This new relationship in California has made CHB product available in Reno and Tahoe, NV, and a large area of northern California. Finally, in its second year of selling CHB, Kohls Food Service located in Illinois grew its business by nearly a million pounds. 215,000 total carcasses were certi-

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fied as CHB in 2011, and the pounds used from each carcass increased 11.4 percent to 190 pounds. Currently CHB is offered in 233 retail supermarkets in 35 states, as well as 37 foodservice distribution centers serving restaurants in 25 states. Since the inception of CHB, 3.9 million head of cattle have been identified through licensed packing plants as meeting the live animal specifications to carry the CHB name.

Besler & Hydra Bed Bale Beds In Stock Installation and Parts Available

‘05 Eby Roughneck GN, 24 ft, 8’ wide, 1 rolling cut gate, 1 standard gate, 8000# axles $16,950

‘97 Adams GN 12 ft Stock Trailer 1 cut gate, rubber mats $3,300

L I S K E Y T R U C K S A L E S, L L C

‘94 GMC Top Kick

3116 Cat, 6 Speed, 18ft. Dump, 215 HP

$9,500

Selection Of Over 10 Good Used Trucks In Stock

We are a BBI Stocking Dealer 2 Pull Types in Stock, Truck Mounts Available

View our Web site to see our entire inventory - New & Used

Honey Spreader Ground Speed Driven Manure Spreaders in Stock 25 and 50 cu ft Models.

VATRAILERSALES.COM Large Inventory of

and

Flatbed Truck Bodies In Stock

New Dealer for Rolling S Stock Trailers 20’ and 24’ Models In Stock. Flatbeds Also.

Call us for all your truck accessory needs! Now stocking tires for trailer and truck applications. 486 Maury River Rd. Lexington, VA 24450 (Across from the VA Horse Center) PH: 540-464-1006 FAX: 540-464-3244 New Store Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9-5

Email: vatrailersales@earthlink.net • Web: vatrailersales.com

Harrisonburg, VA • (540) 434-0495 * VA Only * 1 (800) 424-8232

TRACTOR HILL EQUIPMENT 1770 Mansfield Rd. Mineral, VA 23117 540-894-8770

BEVERAGE TRACTOR 2085 Stuarts Draft Hwy. Stuarts Draft, VA 540-337-1090

D & H TRACTOR P.O. Box 897 Chilhowie, VA 24319 276-646-3642 • 800-462-5264

LAWRENCE EQUIPMENT & LAWRENCE AG EQUIPMENT 359 South Oak Lane Waynesboro, VA 22980 540-942-2610 • 866-949-0101 357 Simmons Drive Cloverdale, VA 24077 540-966-0151 • 800-410-7330 4431 Honeyrun Road Dayton, VA 22821 540-879-3533 • 877-466-1131 105 Ashcake Road Ashland, VA 23005 804-752-8333 • 866-391-1550


Fair trade, not free trade, should be basis of food and agriculture system

15638 SPAR MINE ROAD* TIMBERVILLE, VA

OCTOBER 25, 25, 2011 2011 OCTOBER 11:00 AM-2:00 AM-2:00 PM PM 11:00 You are invited to visit the Yutzy family at their new dairy facility.

Theirs is the first “SMART DAIRY” in Virginia, Featuring: 600 Cow-6 Row-Free Stall Facility Flush, Sand Recovery Special Needs Barn Sort Area Double 12 Expandable Automated Parlor Direct Load, Chiller * From intersection of Rt. 42 and Rt. 259 in Broadway, VA, go 0.2 miles West on Rt. 259. Turn right onto Rt. 617, “Spar Mine Road”. Go 1.0 mile to Windcrest Holsteins on right.

Stay and enjoy a Pork BBQ lunch & Ice Cream from Moo Thru. Call C&C Farm Supply and Reserve Your Meal 540-433-8582.

C& FARM SUPPLY C

New Wave Flooring

Algar Excavating 6566 Crossroads Ln Timberville, VA 540-578-2753

The National Family Farm Coalition and 56 allied organizations representing family farmers, ranchers, fishermen and advocates signed a letter [http://nffc.net/Pressroom/Press%20 Releases/2011/finalsignon.tradeltr.Se pt2011.pdf] to Congress condemning the pending free trade agreements (FTAs) with South Korea, Colombia and Panama. As the letter states, more FTAs will only accelerate the economic disasters in agriculture: industrial farms dependent on massive amounts of petroleum-based inputs, low-paying exploitative jobs in processing and packing plants, and increased consolidation throughout the agricultural supply chain. Wisconsin farmer Joel Greeno, a participant in the Aug. 16 White House Rural Economic Forum in Peosta, Iowa, noted, “The way to get the country’s economy back on track is to strengthen rural communities, which means ensuring farmers a fair price, not exporting foods to people they may not want or that would destroy their own markets.” The Economic Policy Institute’s research revealed that 700,000 U.S. jobs have been lost or displaced since 1994 as a result of the trade deficit with Mexico. Additionally, EPI estimates that free trade agreements with Colombia and South Korea alone will likely increase the U.S. trade deficit by $16.8 billion and eliminate or displace another 214,000 U.S. jobs. Such trade agreements are an eco-

nomic disaster that will only deepen the current recession. When Mexico devalued the peso by 50 percent after NAFTA’s implementation, the projected benefits for thousands of Mexican producers were eliminated. NFFC president Ben Burkett added, “Many Korean, Colombian and Panamanian producers will lose their livelihoods and land, so we’ll hurt our allies, as well.” Furthermore, the Tax Information Exchange Agreement between the U.S. and Panama may not be enough to curb Panama’s position as one of the world’s major tax havens. This FTA could deprive the U.S. government of much-needed revenue and saddle other sectors of the economy, such as agriculture, with a disproportionate share of the cost-cutting burden. The ability of local producers both here and abroad to feed their families and their communities will be compromised by these misguided trade agreements. Potential labor abuses, trade deficits and displaced jobs will further destabilize rural communities and the food system. NFFC vice-president Dena Hoff, summarized, “The seven principles of food sovereignty, including food as nutrition first and a commodity second, should be the basis of our agricultural system, not the unbridled NAFTA-style commerce that destroys our communities and environment as gargantuan transnational corporations profit.”

DON’T MISS IT

FEBRUARY

8-9, 2012 Eastern States Exposition West Springfield, MA Wednesday 10am - 7pm Thursday 9am - 4pm

For Information on Exhibiting or Attending Call Ken Maring

800-218-5586 Fax 518-673-3245 Visit Our Web site: www.leetradeshows.com

Big Iron Expo is Produced by the Trade Show Division of Lee Newspapers, Inc. Publishers of Hard Hat News, Waste Handling Equipment News, North American Quarry News P.O. Box 121, 6113 St Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Page 39 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • October 10, 2011

Organizations oppose pending free trade agreements

WINDCREST HOLSTEINS OPEN HOUSE


October 10, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 40


CM 10.10.11