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11 JULY 2011 Section e off One One Volume e 30 Number r 27

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

Precision feeding for beef feedlots ~ Page 27 Virginia hosts 126th Annual National Holstein Convention ~ Page 2

Columnist Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly 7

FEATURES Beef Producers Classifieds Farmer to Farmer Markets

25 22 8 9

In that day you will say: “Give praise to the LORD, proclaim his name; make known among the nations what he has done, and proclaim that his name is exalted.” ~ Isaiah 12:4


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 2

Virginia hosts 126th Annual National Holstein Convention by Jon M. Casey With “Dairy Month” ending, hundreds of National Holstein Association members converged upon Richmond, VA, June 22-25, for a week of farm tours, meetings and special activities to celebrate the 126th year of their organization’s efforts promoting the Holstein breed. Culminating with the election of a new association President, Chuck Wordon of Cassville, NY. Wordon, who previously served as the organization’s vice president, said that during his term as leader, he would ask the board members to consider market research and product development for all dairy producers, both domestically and internationally. He believes the Holstein Association has proven that it can speak for the industry because of their success as an organization and because of the strength of the breed throughout the industry. With nearly 90 percent of the milking cattle in the U.S. being Holstein cattle, the success speaks for itself. Meeting items Larry Tande, retiring current President, recalled his 10-year association with the organization at the nation-

al level, reminding members that there continues to be a need for leadership. With the ongoing problems that face the industry every day, Tande encouraged support from the membership for a renewed effort to face these issues. Zoning issues, animal welfare questions, the decline in research and Country of Origin Labeling were a few of his concerns. He called for board members to be respectful of other’s values, to follow through on their commitments and to always remember the membership when they make their decisions. Tande reminded the attendees that today, many cooperatives have forgotten why they exist. He asked that the Holstein Association not forget whom they represent. During the two days of meeting sessions, “Gwendelyn,” owned by Scarlet Summer Holsteins, Muncy, PA, was recognized as the 2011 Star of the Breed. Scarlet-Summer RB Gwendelyn EX-94 2E (EEEEE), placed 5th as a 5-year old at the Eastern Fall National Holstein Show. Her 58,270 pounds milk, 5.2 percent (3,004 pounds) fat, 2.9 percent (1,677 pounds) protein, helped propel her to the Star of the Breed honor.

Additionally, nine farms were honored with the 2011 Herd of Excellence Award. They are: Star-Summit Holsteins, Timothy Baker, Byron Center, MI; Hilrose Holsteins, Joseph A. Brantmeier, Sherwood, WI; Jafral Holsteins, Allen Dent Johnson, Hamptonville, NC; Ever-Green-View Farm, Thomas J. Kestell, Waldo, WI; Dirt-Road Holsteins, Steve and Amanda Killian, Blair, WI; K-Lane Farms, Rodger a. Koehn, Peotone, IL; B-Long Holsteins, Bruce and Brenda Long, New London, WI; See-More-View Holsteins, Merlin A. Rohm, Seymour, WI and Ideal Holsteins, Jake and Sallianne Tanis, Center Hall, PA. In a presentation entitled, “Forging a New Path for Dairy Producers,” Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of the National Milk Producers Federation, outlined his organizations progress to help change the way dairy producers are paid for their milk. Outlining the “Foundation for the Future” guidelines as a way to revise the Federal Milk Marketing Order program and to establish a new Dairy Market Stabilization Program to help prevent the extreme margin and price volatility, Kozak said

this new program is a key element of fostering transition to a new way of milk pricing. Kozak said because MILC has been inadequate in not being able to help dairy farmers when and how they really needed it, this new program is predicated on margins and triggers in and out as needed. He said all of the research and study that has been done has been transparent and that a foundational draft of the new legislation should be forthcoming sometime in mid-July. He said while this is a “discussion draft,” only, nevertheless, it is a giant step toward meaningful legislation. These new laws can help smooth out the big swings in milk prices and will work as a way to help stabilize the future for the next generation of dairy producers. Tours During the course of the week, tours to Virginia dairy farms and other points of interest had been organized by James Cook and Barbara Clary CoChairs for the convention. Destinations included Mount Vernon,

Virginia hosts cont. on A4

The Smith Family of Edgewood Farms, opened their operation to association members during the convention. Shown left to right: Garnett Jr. and Debbie Smith, granddaughter Madison, son Walter with wife Lisa hidden behind him, daughter Kensley, and Walter's sister Emion.

John M. Meyer, CEO/Executive Secretary, Holstein Assn. USA, Inc. welcomes members to the 2011 Annual Meeting. Photos by Jon M. Casey

The Smiths milk their cattle in this stanchion barn, a beautiful compliment to their plantation home which dates back to 1796.

One of the week's farm tours was to Eastview Farm, home to the Nuckols family. Welcoming nearly 300 visitors, Taylor, Matt, Elsie, Wayne and F.C. Nuckols stand atop a flatbed truck to greet them.


Part 1: Ruedinger Farms background by Sally Colby “Farming by nature is a risky business,” said Wisconsin dairy producer John Ruedinger. “We need to take some of that risk out and allow profitability. The best thing to do is manage risk and position yourself to capitalize on opportunities — that’s what we’re in business for.” About 10 years ago, Ruedinger had an idea — to broker his own milk. He incorporated a team approach and accomplished what he set out to do. Ruedinger shared his story, beginning with the background of his farm, at a Professional Dairy Managers of Pennsylvania issues forum held recently in Harrisburg, PA. Ruedinger and his wife Karen began working with his parents’ 50-cow traditional-style dairy in 1976. “In 1996, our dairy was drastically changed after a barn fire,” he said. “That’s what really started our progression toward a new, modern dairy facility.” The first new building was a 200-cow freestall facility with a double-8 parlor. The Ruedingers continued to add cows and buildings, and converted the double-8 parlor to a double-11, which keeps cows moving through for 3x milking. Today, the herd includes about 970 milking and dry cows. The dairy is set up with DeLaval’s ALPRO™ system with parlor ID and meters. Ruedinger also uses Dairy Comp 305, which estimates the value of each cow in a dairy herd relative to an average fresh heifer and calculates the current value of a pregnancy for each adult animal. This tool helps managers make decisions about whether or not an open animal should be bred. Ruedinger watches production closely, and uses numbers to manage the business. He tracks statistics, and knows that milking takes about 4.1 minutes/cow, with 130 cows moved /hour. The herd average is 30,216, with an average of 92 pounds/cow. Fat is 3.7, protein is 3.02, and cheese yield is 2,956. Milk is strained twice, then goes into a plate cooler before it is piped directly into trailers. About a trailer and a half of milk is shipped each day. One management aspect that Ruedinger believes is critical to the success of the operation is the fresh cow pen. Fresh cows go to parlor in the morning, then return to a dedicated area where they receive fresh feed. By the third day, cows are expected to be eating well compared to herd mates. This indicates that appetites are normal and metabolic issues are minimal. Each cow is observed for appetite, attitude and appearance — if she fails in

any of these areas, she’ll be checked for DA, ketosis and fatty liver. At five days in milk, every cow is assessed once more before she enters the regular herd — regardless of how well she is eating. Her uterus must be clean, she must be eating well, have a normal temperature and have no feet or leg issues. The herd manager continues to watch fresh cows closely, and he says that this rigorous fresh pen protocol has nearly eliminated DAs in the herd; with a herd average of less than one percent. The individual production average has increased from around 86 pounds to the mid-90s due to the fresh cow program, which means more profit. Calves are started on the farm and are fed pasteurized milk with nipple bottles. Ruedinger says calves have excellent early growth and gain what they need for future production. At the age of 4 1/2 months, calves are finished by a custom heifer raiser, then return to the farm at about 23 months. As the dairy grew, Ruedinger focused on employee training and management. “Employees are your best asset on the dairy,” he said. “As we grew our business, we found out that employees can add value and make money. We have an excellent dairy manager and an excellent crops and maintenance manager. We’re trying to create an atmosphere of self-motivation that creates employee competence. Teaching fundamentals and consistency in our procedures has allowed us to gain milk production, parlor through-put and efficiency.” Ruedinger has numerous conservation practices in place including minimal tillage for the 4-year alfalfa/2-year corn rotation. Grain is purchased, and forage crops are grown on 1350 acres. “We try to put up as high quality forage as we can,” said Ruedinger. “It’s the key ingredient to balancing the ration and getting the production we like to obtain.” There is also emphasis on reproduction and genetics. “You can do all you want with cow comfort and milk quality and employee development, but you need to key in on the genetic value of the herd. We’ve been working with top-end bulls, concentrating on feet, legs, udders and longevity.” At this point, none of Ruedinger’s children plan to return to the farm. “What we’re trying to do with our dairy is set it up to be a profitable business so that someone can come in and partner with us, or maybe sell it directly to another producer,” said Ruedinger. “We’re trying to create high milk pro-

John Ruedinger, of Ruedinger Farms in Van Dyne, Wisconsin, talks about how his family farm is using an integrated profit team to broker milk. Photo by Sally Colby

duction, good quality facilities and maintain them and create value in the business.”

Part 2 will discuss Ruedinger Farms’ business plan and team approach to risk management.

Pennsylvania Farm Bureau Earns Four National Public Relations Awards VIRGINIA BEACH, VA — Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) won four national public relations awards during the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) Public Relations Conference in Virginia Beach, VA. PFB was recognized for the categories of Best Public Relations Campaign, Best Editorial or Commentary, Best Graphic Design and Best Promotional or Education Video or Documentary. In the category of Best Public Relations Campaign, PFB was honored

for its work informing the public about new transportation regulations that placed significant burdens on farm families. Due to public relations and governmental relations efforts, and a strong commitment from Farm Bureau leaders and farmer volunteers across the Commonwealth, PFB achieved a major victory when exemptions from excessive regulations on farmers and farm truck drivers were reinstated by Pennsylvania’s General Assembly. The President’s Column “Standing Up and Speaking Out,” which appeared in

PFB’s monthly publication Country Focus, won for Best Print Editorial or Commentary. The editorial focused on how important it is for farmers to speak up for themselves by providing factual information to consumers about farming practices in order to combat attacks on agriculture and the food industry. “There’s a What in My Burger?” won the Best Graphic Design award. Farm Bureau created three, two-foot by three-foot displays that explained what goes into making a cheeseburger. The purpose of the display was to inform

children (and adults) how the food they eat is linked to farming. Pennsylvania Farm Bureau’s television program “Agritourism: Growing Fun and Making Friends on the Farm” won in the category of Best Promotional or Education Video or Documentary. The program related how farm families are diversifying their operations through agritourism enterprises, while generating new income that helps farm families prosper and preserve their agricultural heritage. The program was broadcast nationally on RFD-TV.

Page 3 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Protecting dairy profitability through risk management


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 4

North American Breeders plays vital role in beef industry by Jennifer Showalter BERRYVILLE, VA — From crop production to animal health and genetics, the industry has come a long way in a relatively short period of time. Producers across the country are becoming as efficient and productive as they possibly can. Artificial insemination is one of the many technological advancements a number of producers have adopted to better the productivity of their operation. Tim Schofield, owner of North American Breeders in Berryville, VA, has played a vital role in this process. Tim and his wife, Jean, have a long history in the cattle industry. Tim was born and raised in New Zealand. In his early 20s, Tim was hired by a New York firm to bring high priced bulls from Scotland to the U.S. While working at Black Watch Farms in New York, Tim met his wife, Jean. In 1970, Tim and Jean moved to southwest Virginia, where Tim was a partner in Tartan Angus Farms. About the same time, North American Breeders was established in Berryville, VA as a custom semen collection center for bulls. Tim became very interested in

Virginia hosts Monticello and the newly restored Virginia State Capital Building. More importantly, the farm tours helped members and their families to experi-

the business and decided to move to Berryville in 1973 and go to work for North American Breeders. In 1976, Tim decided to purchase part of the business. He took advantage of the opportunity to buy the remainder of the business in 1980. Today, North American Breeders is a niche business that collects, freezes, stores and distributes bovine semen. The process of collecting and freezing semen takes a tremendous amount of team work. From collecting the semen to all the paper work, each person along the way takes pride in what they do at North American Breeders. Tim and Jean rely heavily on their staff. Jay Douglas has been with North American Breeders for 27 years, while David Darsie has been there 29 years. Tim and Jean’s son, Todd Schofield, has been helping out for 23 years, and Brooks Staples has been a part of the business for the past eight years. The number of straws per collection varies from bull to bull. Most clients want between 750 to 1,000 units collected to sell or to store as a form of insurance in case of an injury or death. “Semen can be stored indefinitely. We

numbers of straws that are handled and stored in the main headquarters. “Our storage capacity is only limited by the number of tanks we have. At the moment, we can store over a million straws, amps, or embryos,” said Schofield. Tim Schofield, along with his wife and other employees, have built a favorable reputation by striving to provide the best quality semen along with the best care possible for the bulls they have on hand. In March of 2010, Tim was named the 2009 Cattlemen of the Year by the Virginia Angus Association for his important contributions to the industry. “It was not only a surprise, but also a great honor to be recognized by fellow breeders in Virginia. I have and still do enjoy meeting the many different people in the agriculture business, reflecting on the many changes that have occurred over the years, and without saying working with some of the greatest bulls in the United States,” said Schofield. For more information on North American Breeders contact them at 540955-3647 or e-mail northamericanbreeders@verizon.net

general members and guests, several hundred participants enjoyed many of the planned activities. On Thursday for example, five busloads of visitors spent the morning touring the Eastview and Edgewood Farms, near Beaverdam, VA. Hosting approximately 260 guests during the morning activities, the Nuckols and Smith families extended the warmest of welcomes to their fellow producers and friends, sharing experiences as the group had an opportunity to see how Virginia dairy producer milk their cattle. Earlier in the week, tour goers had the opportunity to visit farms in the Shenandoah Valley, stopping at Janney Holsteins, Mar-Bil Farms and Gloryland Holsteins on Tuesday, and at Harvue Farm, Cows-N-Corn and Moo-Thru on the return trip to Richmond on Wednesday. At the same time, other members visited the James River Correctional Center where the State Farm milks 283 Registered Holstein cattle and farms more than

6300 acres. From there they went on to visit the 800-head milking herd at Alvis Farm in Manakin-Sabot, VA. Elections In association elections, Glen Brown, Coalville, UT, was elected as vice-president over John Kalmey a Kentucky dairyman. Jim Burdette, Mercersburg, PA and was reelected as a National Director for a second term. Burdett is also chair of the Show Committee. Boyd Schaufelberger, Greenville, IL was re-elected to another term as director-at-large, with Mike Jones, Marshall, IN serving as the new director from region 3, defeating Thomas Atherton for the post, and Roy Bussing, Axtell, KS, being elected as director from region 7, having no opposition. To conclude events Holstein Association members were reminded to make plans for the 2012 National Convention to be held in Springfield, MO, June 27-30. For more information contact the association at 800-9525200 or online at www.holsteinuse.com.

from A2 ence a taste of life from the Virginia dairyman’s perspective. With 109 of the associations delegates in attendance, plus families,

Cover photo by Sally Colby Frank Stolzfus, ag production supervisor at Masonic Village Homes, feeds and manages cattle in the feedlot to minimize phosphorus, with zero phosphorus as the farm's goal. Mid-Atlantic Country Folks

FARM CHRONICLE

A Member of the Country Folks Farm Weekly Newspaper Group Waynesboro, Virginia

have semen that has been stored in our tanks for 45 years and is still viable.” said Schofield. He added, “Our semen is a bit more concentrated than some of the larger studs. We freeze at 40 million cells per cc; whereas, the big commercial studs will go as low as 25 million cells per cc.” The Schofields do not have the means to sex semen at their operation, but recognize the use and are working out the logistics of sending semen to a sexing company in Texas where it can be sexed for those who may wish to have that service. The optimal time to collect quality semen is from October to June when it is not as hot and there is less humidity. During this time, North American Breeders is typically at capacity with 75 bulls in stud. While the bulls are at stud, they are under the upmost care. They are fed twice a day a custom 13 percent grain mix along with orchard grass or timothy hay for roughage. Schofield has the crop analyzed annually to make sure the rations are balanced with the grain. Organization is critical to the success of the business because of the large

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Chuck Worden, Cassville, NY was elected Association President on Saturday June 25. Photo courtesy of Sherry Bunting


by Lynne Finnerty Most of the programs in the farm bill will expire next year and the debate over a new farm bill has begun. Spending cuts will be

needed. Congress must bring down the federal debt. With no prospect for more spending, competition for the remaining dollars is intense. Some would like to eliminate

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farm payments and redirect that funding — less than one-half of 1 percent of total federal spending — to other areas. The debate about farm payments brings to mind the term “Pyrrhic victory.” King Pyrrhus ruled the Greek state of Epirus in the third century B.C. When the Greek city of Tarentum in southern Italy feared invasion by Rome, the Tarentines asked Pyrrhus, who had a

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strong army, for help. Pyrrhus, seeing a chance to expand his rule, agreed. After two bloody battles, Pyrrhus defeated the Romans. However, Pyrrhus lost so many of his best soldiers that he is said to have remarked, “With another such victory, we will be finished!” He battled the Romans again five years later and lost. His legacy is the lesson that some victories are not worth what it costs to win them. Similar to Pyrrhus’ seeing an opportunity to gain control of part of Italy, special interests outside of agriculture see an opportunity to expand their grasp of farm bill funding. But, the portion of the farm bill that actually goes to farmers has already shrunk. Farm programs in 2010 accounted for just 7 percent of farm bill funding, compared with 33 percent in 2002. Nutrition programs, on the other hand, have grown, accounting for a whopping 80 percent of the farm bill in 2010,

compared to 52 percent in 2002. Conservation programs take up about 5 percent of the funding authorized by the farm bill. Most crop prices in recent years have been high enough to not trigger price support payments. Meanwhile, restrictive payment and income limits have made some of the most productive farmers ineligible to participate in farm programs. As a result, farm programs are already a shrinking piece of the farm-bill pie. That piece of pie, however, remains important to our agricultural productivity and food security. That mere 7 percent does a lot to keep our pantries full. Like Pyrrhus’ battles, the battle for farm program funding could be costly. America could lose growth in an industry that feeds, fuels and clothes us, and much of the world, and provides U.S. jobs. We would lose an important safety net for a sector of our economy that is actually growing, and the only one that has a positive

trade balance. The United Nations predicts that farmers need to produce 70 percent more food by 2050 to keep up with population increase. That makes keeping farmers in production more important than ever. Sure, crop prices are high now, but the only constant in agriculture is volatility, something that farm programs help farmers and food consumers ride out. Farmers know that change is in the air and are willing to do their part to cut government spending. Congress should consider changes to save money and make farm programs work better. Many ideas will be put on the table, but it is reckless to redirect funds from farmers’ tiny sliver of the pie to other areas. With a victory like that, American food security may be finished. Lynne Finnerty is the editor of FBNews, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s official newspaper.

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Page 5 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Cutting farm programs would be a Pyrrhic victory


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 6

Pennsylvania Farm Bureau troubled by major cuts to agriculture programs in state budget CAMP HILL, PA — Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) is troubled by deep cuts to several key agricultural programs, especially reductions to Cooperative Extension and agriculture research, which are included in the new state budget approved by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. Tom Corbett. PFB has learned that cuts totaling nearly $10.5 million to Penn State’s Agriculture Extension and Agriculture Research programs will result in the elimination of nearly 200 of the 814 permanent jobs within Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. “Agriculture research and Cooperative Extension are vital components of farming and our food industry. Pennsylvania farmers rely on timely assistance provided by agriculture extension agents and valuable developments in research to stay viable in a

constantly changing industry. Innovations in research and new information about agricultural practices have not only helped farmers throughout the years, but have also helped keep food prices down for consumers and resulted in conservation improvements on farms to protect the environment,” said PFB President Carl T. Shaffer. “Pennsylvania's farm families support the efforts of Governor Corbett and the General Assembly to restore fiscal discipline in our state, but the budget cuts in Cooperative Extension and agriculture research are excessive.” Farm Bureau is also concerned that lawmakers have eliminated the state crop insurance incentive program, which over the past five years has been chipped away to nothing from a $3 million appropriation. More than a decade ago, the

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General Assembly agreed to provide a modest commitment of funds to help farmers obtain crop insurance. As part of the agreement, the agriculture community encouraged farmers to self-insure, rather than rely on public funds to financially recover from weather-related losses, such as in 1999, when the state provided $65 million to farmers who were decimated by drought conditions. “The decision to eliminate crop insurance assistance is unfortunate,

because it eliminates what has been a successful program, which typically returned $4 for every dollar spent. Because the program was zeroed out, we also lose the ability to ask the federal government to match state funding. Last year, Pennsylvania farmers received $455,000 in matching funds from the federal government for the crop insurance incentive program. We are concerned that farmers will have to pay more for crop insurance or decide to insure

fewer acres of crops, leaving them vulnerable to losses from uncontrollable acts of nature,” added Shaffer. Meanwhile, PFB credited the General Assembly for doubling REAP (Resource Enhancement and Protection Act of Pennsylvania) program funding to $10 million and for restoring funding to the state budget for the Department of Agriculture in the areas of Agriculture Excellence (such as the Center for Dairy Excellence), Agriculture Research (within PDA) and

funding for livestock and dairy shows. “REAP has helped farmers and businesses invest in agricultural conservation measures, such as forested stream buffers, fencing projects, barnyard improvements and no-till practices by providing state tax incentives as part of the cost-share program. The practices implemented through REAP benefit the environment and local communities,” concluded Shaffer.

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late Friday morning as follows: July $20.50, August $18.79, September $18.18, October $17.75, November $17.06, and December $16.60. These prices would result in a 2011 average of $17.61, up from $14.41 in 2010, $11.36 in 2009, and $17.44 in 2008. The June Class IV price is $21.05, up 76 cents from May, and $5.60 above a year ago. California’s comparable 4a and 4b prices were announced after our deadline. I’ll report them here next week. The 4-week NASS-sur-

surveyed U.S. average block price hit $1.9861, up 3 1/2-cents, and the barrels averaged $2.0478, up 5 1/2-cents. FC Stone dairy broker Dave Kurzawski looks for cheese to slip after the 4th. In a Wednesday DairyLine interview Kurzawski said he has heard of discounted cheese being sold. Cheese sold at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange is no more than 30 days old, he said, so the steady current price is a “symptom of some tightness in fresh cheese,” but he believes that’s about to change. Eyes are on butter which slipped the second week in a row, though it did rally a penny on Wednesday and Thursday. It has been at or above $2 since the first of the year. The cash price closed Friday at $2.04, down 2 cents on the week, following the previous week’s 8-cent drop, but is still 29 cents above a year ago. Ten cars traded hands on the week. The NASS price hit $2.1272, up 0.8 cent. Kurzawski doesn’t believe we’re out of the woods yet on the tightness in butter as demand still appears to be good but the real issue in his mind is what will demand look like on August 1. By then

a lot of commercial buyers will have sourced their needs almost for the balance of the year, he said, and we could see prices slip at that point but, “as of today, we still have a pretty decent support underpinning the market.” Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk held all week at $1.6250 while Extra Grade remained at $1.61. NASS powder averaged $1.6629, up 0.9 cent, and dry whey averaged 53.06 cents per pound, up a half-cent. Powder has been pretty quiet, Kurzawski said, and he cited an old adage, “Don’t sell a sleeping market.” He’s not calling it a sleeping market, he said, as it is quiet most of the time and right now buyers have been quiet and international pressure has come on prices but we’ll know more from Fonterra’s auction on July 5. “The demand picture has been quiet,” he concluded, “I really wouldn’t think that this market is going to be very well supported as we roll into the middle of third quarter.” Looking “back to the futures;” the Federal order Class III contract’s average for the last half of 2011 was $17.64 per hundredweight on May 6, $17.49 on May 13,

Monday Cattle & Goat Sale 12:30

Friday Cattle & Goat Sale 10:30

Horse Sale 3rd Tuesday of Month

Graded Feeder Sales (Call for Dates)

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$18.22 on May 20, $18.39 on May 27, $18.72 on June 3, $18.34 on both June 10 and June 17, and $18.21 on June 24. The University of Wisconsin’s Dr. Brian Gould pointed out in Tuesday’s DairyLine that the high butter price has increased butter’s contribution to the Federal order Class III milk price. Butter typically represents about 40 percent of the Class III value, he said. That jumped to 48 percent in May but the big player is whey. The strong protein market has meant a strong nonfat dry milk and dry whey price, according to Gould, and whey’s contribution to the Class III price has doubled since the first of the year in terms of its relative value. Now it’s about 10 percent of the Class III value, he said, something not seen since late 2007. He attributed that to the strong export market for protein and said domestic users of dry whey are competing for whey with the export market. Last month’s calculation of the Class III price showed dry whey averaged about 49 cents per pound, Gould reported, and whey typically averages 25-30 cents. (The June whey price was 52.33 cents as reported earlier.) Export markets tend to be more volatile than domestic markets, Gould said, and that was evidenced in 2008 and 2009 when we lost a significant amount of exports resulting in a dramatic downturn in prices. It’s something to be aware of, he warned, “when we start relying on the export market to be a major source of our dairy product demand.” Speaking of exports; more U.S. cheese will be taking a cruise. The Cooperatives Working Together program announced the acceptance this week of four requests for export assistance from Dairy Farmers of America and Darigold to sell 1.4 million pounds of Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese to customers in Asia and Europe. The product will be delivered July through September and raises 2011 CWT cheese exports to 44.7 million pounds after adjusting for a cancellation. Milk receipts are generally past the annual peak throughout the country, according to USDA’s weekly update, with appreciable declines prevalent in the Southeast, Arizona, and New Mexico. California temperatures

Mielke 15

Page 7 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

The June Federal order benchmark farm milk price took a much needed jump. The Agriculture Department announced the Class III manufacturing grade milk price on July 1 at $19.11 per hundredweight, up $2.59 from May, $5.49 above June 2010, the highest it has been since June 2008, and equates to about $1.64 per gallon. The 2011 average now stands at $17.06, up from $13.58 at this time a year ago, and compares to an anemic $10.19 in 2009. Looking ahead, Class III futures were trading

veyed cheese price averaged $1.8999 per pound, up 24.7 cents from May. Butter averaged $2.1287, up 10 cents. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.6520, up 4 cents, and dry whey averaged 52.33 cents, up 3 cents from May. California’s June 4b cheese milk price is $18.79 per hundredweight, up $4.05 from May, $6.56 above June 2010, 32 cents below the comparable Federal order Class III price though the gap continues to narrow, and equates to about $1.62 per gallon. Its 2011 average now stands at $15.67, up from 12.29 a year ago. The 4a butter powder price is $20.79, up 85 cents from May, and $5.53 above a year ago. Its 2010 average is now $18.94, up from $13.69 a year ago. Cash dairy prices saw little change in the week entering the 4th of July holiday. Block cheese closed that Friday on a down note at $2.1250 per pound, down a half-cent on the day and the week, but 67 cents above that week a year ago. Barrel closed at $2.0975, up 2 cents on the week, and 69 3/4-cents above a year ago. Only two cars of block traded hands on the week and none of barrel. The lagging NASS-


ARKETPLACE

NEW HOLLAND 1069 bale wagons; gas, $22,500; reconditioned; 1998 driveline w/ 5.9 cummings, $33,000; H&S High capacity 16-wheel rake, $4,500. 315-3647936.(NY) GOOD QUALITY EAR CORN, inquire for details. 607-546-4055.(NY) BERK/DUROC cross, 13 piglets left. Wormed and iron shots. $65.00 each. Kirkville. 315-420-4682.(NY) WANTED: Hay grain elevator on wheels. 315-837-4980.(NY) SPRINGING HEIFER, due soon, very nice, $1,375. JD 12 row, 7200 planter, $12,500; WANTED: 6 row 1750 planter. Newark. 315-331-0902.(NY) 24 FT Elevator, new 9x18 steel rack wagon, 8 ton gear, NH 273 baler, NH 477 haybine, NH 467 haybine. 518-8756093.(NY)

16 MONTH OLD Standard Bred stud colt, can be registered, blind in one eye. $300 No Sunday Calls! 607-243-7142.(NY) NEW HOLLAND 460 haybine, works, $500 or BO. 518-234-4907, Leave message if no answer.(NY) 4 YR. OLD. REG. Saddle Bred, upheaded, fast trotter, not a beginner’s horse, $2,100. 607-243-9147.(NY) FORD 8700 tractor, 1987 model, open station, dual power, 540-1000 shaft, $7,000. 315-536-4783.(NY) IH 2-ROW pull type corn picker, wide row, shed stored, and in good working condition. 585-547-9573.(WNY) (5) NICE, white, full grown silkies, $4.00 each; IH Grain Head, 15 ft., good condition, $1,500; YAtes Co. 315-536-7978.(NY) COMMERCIAL MIXER “Globe” 20 quart, great for farm market, bakery, excellent condition, $1,200. 607-334-9961.(NY)

VICON tedder, $2,900; NH 56 rake, $900; Hesston baler, $7,900; 9’ haybine, $4,900; 4 row cultivator, $400; IH 700. 315-3486149.(NY)

FARMALL Model “c” restored, new tires, paint, battery, decals, hydraulic pulley, power take off, runs good, $2,200 OBO. 716-942-3994.(NY)

TWO Aluminum FEED truck boxes with hoists. One in good condition, one fair, $1,000 each. Not for junk. 315-7370421.(NY)

FOR SALE: Combine, International 403 12 ft. cut, field ready, excellent condition, $3,500 or b/o. 716-731-4021.(NY)

WANTED: Complete front loader for Allis Chalmers model B tractor. 315-8436055.(NY)

NEW HOLLAND 1044 stacker wagon, 120 bale, field ready, $3,200. 518-6325600.(NY)

WANTED: Dorset or Dorset-Cross ram for August breeding. 585-786-2451.(NY)

Ford 2000(mint), Case VAS w/cultivators(mint), VAH(HighCrop), 430, Farmall 300, Super H, Ford 2N, MH Pony(mint), Large Moline collection (rare and restored) 518-922-6301(NY)

NH 1465 haybine, new, $11,000; 10 ton and 6 ton running gears, $600/400; 600 gal. fuel tank with new pump, $475. 585567-2526.(NY)

FOR SALE: HAYBINE, NH 461 8’ 9” cut, covered off season, running. $500. 860485-1452.(CT)

WANTED: JOHN DEERE 175 loader bucket, 72 inch, good condition, need bucket only but will consider complete loader. 315697-5348.(NY) JOHN DEERE 3970, 2 row, green corn head, 7 1/2’ grass head, $7,500. 607-2438151.(NY)

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WANTED: Complete milking system, 1000 gallon bulk tank, 2” pipeline for 50-60 cow dairy; Also, 200-300 cu. ft. stationary mixer. 585-554-3674.(NY) 851 NEW HOLLAND bailer, 6x6 bale, ready to bale, $1,200 firm, works good, we just needed smaller bales. Call 607-2796745.(NY)

JD 720 standard, DWBR frame, bar, $100; S103 Eddy Plowworks, rollover moldboard, $50. WANTED: JD 15A, 16A flail chopper, consider N.H. 603-787-2396.(NH) TWO HORSE Covered wagon, brand new wooden spoked wheels on hard rubber. 10729 Anstee Road, Clyde, NY 14433 JAMESWAY HEAVY DUTY BARN cleaner, 4 yr old, with chain, $1,000; Lester Byler, State Route 274, Holland Patent, NY 13354

JD 1064 running gear, MVE semen tank, Bradco bale spear, River Road Holding Pen, Assorted gates and panels. 518-8835160.(NY)

570 NEW HOLLAND kicker baler, excellent condition. 585-593-5685.(NY) NEW HOLLAND 275 baler, $2,400; Grimm hay tedder, $350; 12 ft drag, $375. 2 old hay rakes, round, $100 ea. 315-5318510.(NY)

JD Combine 4400 with heads, $3,500; 585-519-6340.(NY) WANTED: Scour cleaner for AC 66 combine. 315-536-2012.(NY) ROUND BALE 3 pt hitch wrapper, $1,200; Arcade 585-492-1692.(NY)

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DRAFT HORSE SADDLE, almost new, $300; Yearling Angus Bull, $900.00; Angus Belted Galloway Bull Calf, $400.00; Other beef available, Westernville. 315-8274336.(NY)

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FEEDER CATTLE

HAGERSTOWN, MD FEEDER CATTLE: 87 Feeder Steers: 1 lot 466# @ 109; few 900-950# 111115. Feeder Heifers: M&L 250-350# 140-150; 400600# 110-124; 600-700# 100-114; 2 hd 895# @ 106 Feeder Bulls: M&L 230350# 130-160; 360-500# 125-150; 1 lt 516# @ 130; few 700-900# to 92. Stock Cows w/Calves: 950-1500; L Bred Cows to 1075; Short Bred Hfrs. to 750. *Promised for next Weds., 1 registered Hols. Bull. MT. AIRY NC FEEDER CATTLE: No report. SILER CITY, NC FEEDER CATTLE: No report. BLACKSTONE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 214. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 134; 108.50125.50; 700-800# 109-120; 800-900# 113; 900-1000# 110; M&L 2 400-500# 134; 500-600# 130-134.50; 600-

700# 126; M&L 3 400-500# 126; 500-600# 127; 600700# 118; S 1 400-500# 113-126; 500-600# 122.50. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 129.50; 500-600# 122; 600-700# 114; M&L 2 300-400# 133; 400-500# 108-129.75; 500-600# 117123; 600-700# 110-114; M&L 3 300-400# 115-118; 400-500# 91-124, mostly 124; 500-600# 121; S 1 400500# 122; 500-600# 118. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 113; 400-500# 130-146; 500-600# 118.50; 600-700# 112; M&L 2 300400# 125; 400-500# 111124.50; 500-600# 118.50; 600-700# 108. N VA FEEDER CATTLE: 579 Feeder Steers: M&L 1-2 300-400# 129-163.50; 400500# 134.50-145; 500-600# 125-133.75; 600-700# 116.50-128.50; 700-800# 116-119.25; 800-900# 116117.50; 900-1000# 96; M&L 2 300-400# 93; 400-500# 108-133; 500-600# 98-111; 600-700# 120. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 200-300# 119-131; 300400# 115-136.50; 400-500# 123-134; 500-600# 105-125;

600-700# 100-121; 700800# 98-111; M&L 2 300400# 116-133.50; 400-500# 119-128; 500-600# 112119.50; 600-700# 108-116; 700-800# 76. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 111; 300-400# 130-158; 400-500# 128149.50; 500-600# 111-124; 600-700# 103-119.50; 700800# 96-100; M&L 2 300400# 121-139; 400-500# 102-125; 500-600# 103-116; 700-800# 100; 800-900# 82; S 1 600-700# 94-102; 700800# 86-89. SW VA FEEDER CATTLE: 241. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 126-144; 500600# 130-135.50; 600-700# 118-131.50; 700-800# 119124; M&L 2 400-500# 131.50-134; 500-600# 132136; 600-700# 118-127. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 121-131; 500600# 116-126.50; 600-700# 115.75-118.50; 700-800# 110-111; M&L 2 300-400# 125; 400-500# 125-131; 500-600# 117-123; 600700# 104-114.50; M&L 3 300-400# 131; 400-500# 124. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 133-155; 400-

500# 119.50-143; 500-600# 114-121.50; 600-700# 107112; M&L 2 200-300# 155; 300-400# 135-157; 400500# 121-135; 500-600# 114-120; 600-700# 107.50108; M&L 3 300-400# 145. FREDERICKSBURG, VA FEEDER CATTLE: July 1, 2011 Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 155; 400-500# 134.50; 500-600# 133.75. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 127-128; 400500# 125; 600-700# 100107; M&L 2 300-400# 125. FRONT ROYAL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. LYNCHBURG, VA FEEDWER CATTLE: 220. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 137.50-144; 500600# 127.50-140.25; 600700# 133; 700-800# 125; M&L 2 300-400# 137.50147; 400-500# 128.50-148; 500-600# 143.25; 600-700# 133; 700-800# 112.50; M&L 3 400-500# 120-130.50; 500-600# 118-120; S 1 300400# 130; 400-500# 120; 500-600# 115; 600-700# 118. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 127; 400-500# 127-136; 500-600# 130; 600-700# 119; 700-800# 106-109; M&L 2 300-400# 133; 400-500# 126-136; 500-600# 129; 600-700# 115; M&L 3 300-400# 126129; 400-500# 123-127; 500-600# 125-128.25; 600700# 109; S 1 300-400# 109; 400-500# 116; 500600# 104-111; 600-700# 105. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 400-500# 120-143; 500600# 133; 600-700# 125127; M&L 2 300-400# 141150; 400-500# 127.50141.50; 500-600# 136.25; 600-700# 128.50; S 400500# 127; 500-600# 120. MARSHALL, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. NARROWS, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. RADIANT, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report.

AGRIBUSINESS SERVICE INC. “Quality Farm Tools” Route 1, South, Ashland, VA

(804) 798-4020 • (800) 552-3428 www.agribusinesssvc@verizon.net

ROCKINGHAM, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 77 Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 115-130; 400500# 130; 500-600# 117; 600-700# 115; 700-800# 110. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 130-136; M&L 2 300-400# 121; 500-600# 113.50-116. STAUNTON, VA FEEDER

CATTLE: No report. TRI-STATE, VA FEEDER CATTLE: No report. WINCHESTER, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 312. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-400# 150; 400-500# 148; 500-600# 125.50-138; 700-800# 118; 900-1000# 106; M&L 2 300-400# 82110; 400-500# 113-121; 500-600# 114-119.50; 600700# 102-115; 700-800# 93108. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-400# 105-121; 400500# 110-117; 500-600# 108-118; 600-700# 107.50113; 700-800# 94-112; 800900# 97-105; M&L 2 400500# 102-109; 500-600# 100-105. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 200-300# 127-160; 300400# 140-170; 400-500# 121-138.50; 500-600# 117119; 600-700# 114-120; 700-800# 108; 800-900# 103; M&L 2 300-400# 110134; 400-500# 115-119.50. WYTHE COUNTY, VA FEEDER CATTLE: 129. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 400-500# 126-131.50; 500600# 130-133.50; 600-700# 131.50; 700-800# 120.50; M&L 2 400-500# 131.50; 500-600# 132-134; 600700# 127. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 121-131; 500600# 116-117; 600-700# 116.50-118.50; 700-800# 110; M&L 2 300-400# 125; 400-500# 125-131; 500600# 123; 600-700# 113. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300-400# 133; 400-500# 119.50-120; 500-600# 114115; 600-700# 107; M&L 2 300-400# 135; 400-500# 121-125; 500-600# 114; 600-700# 107.50-108. SLAUGHTER CATTLE SILER CITY, NC SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. MT. AIRY SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. SW VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 87. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 8080.50; 1200-1600# 75.5085; HY 1200-1600# 81.5093.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 72-82; 12002000# 74-80; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 61-68.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 90-94.50. HAGERSTOWN, MD SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 113. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 68-75.50, 1 @ 77.50; Boners 66-72; Lean 60-66; Thin/light 60 & dn. Slaughter Bulls: 6. YG 1

1400-1975# 87-96.50; 1 212# @ 93.50; 1 1488# @ 103; YG 2 75-82. Fed Steers/Heifers: 15. Hi Ch 2-3 1225-1500# to 113.50; Ret. to feed 12001300# to 104. Fed Heifers: Ch 2-3 1100-1225# 111-112; 1 1004# @ 115. Calves Ret. to Farm: 128. Hols. Bulls No. 1 95120# 90-102; No. 2 95-120# 70-90; No. 2 90-94# 60-72; No. 2 80-88# 45-52; Hols. Hfrs No. 1 100-120# to 215; No. 2 88# @ 130; Beef X Bulls No. 1 115-130# 140162; No. 2 100# to 80; Slaughter Calves 40 & dn.. N VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 238 Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 68.50-87; 1200-1600# 6983; HY 1200-1600# 7587.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 57-85.50; 12002000# 65-77.50; HY 12002000# 71-80.50; Lean 8590% lean 750-850# 50.5059.50; 850-1200# 56.50-67. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 68-88; 15002500# 86.50-88; HY 10001500# 92.75-95; 15002500# 91-93. Cows Ret. to Farm: 31. M&L 1, few 2, 3-10 yrs. old few aged bred 3-8 mos. 9751570# 650-1010/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 12. M 1-2, 3-12 yrs. old few aged w/calves 75-300# 710-1305# 750-1320/pr. Calves Ret. to Farm: 87. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 2072.50/hd; 100-130# 106107.50/cwt. BLACKSTONE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 60. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 6573; 1200-1600# 68-75; HY 1200-1600# 75-79.50; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 59-68; 1200-2000# 60-67; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 42-49; 850-1200# 42-52. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 66-82.50; 15002500# 82; HY 1000-1500# 94. DUBLIN, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: July 1, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 6168. FRONT ROYAL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. HOLLINS, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. LYNCHBURG, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE:

Markets 11

Page 9 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

MARKET REPORTS


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 10

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You Eating healthy at summer picnics by Dianne Lamb, Extension Nutrition and Food Specialist, University of Vermont To me, picnics are one of the best parts of summer although traditional picnic fare rarely fits the bill for what experts consider good nutrition. With some updating, you can turn these foods into examples of nutrition at its most delicious. When you plan a picnic, consider just how many different vegetable and fruit dishes are on the menu compared to starchy dishes like potatoes, breads, rice and pasta. You may be surprised to find that there aren’t that many. Although grain products are nutritious, especially if they are whole grain, many picnics include too many starchy foods and too little produce. I like to pass around trays of cut-up raw fruit or vegetables before the main course. Or you can add them to the picnic spread for nibbling throughout the meal. And don’t be afraid to experiment with different types of vegetable salads for variety and good nutrition. You also can slim down potato and pasta salad, two picnic favorites. Just a half-cup serving of either is packed with 180 to 260 calories and seven to 16 grams of fat. Have a serving of one, or take a taste of each, and you are consuming almost a meal’s worth of fat and calories from these two dishes alone. Substitute a variety of chopped vegetables for some of the starchy ingredients, which will reduce calories and boost nutrients. The American Institute for Cancer Research emphasizes eating a wide variety of vegetables for their antioxidant nutrients and health-promoting phytochemicals, a crucial part of a cancer-prevention diet. You don’t have to give up your potato or pasta salad. Just add more vegetables and less starch to make it healthier. Another option is to limit the amount of fat in the dressing or mayonnaise by using reduced-fat prod-

ucts. You may need to sample a few brands before you find one that you like. Or change the proportions of oil and vinegar in a homemade dressing to lower the fat content. Are bread and rolls on the menu? Unless you have extremely high calorie needs, choose either one small serving of pasta or potato salad or a roll or bread, and pass on the rest. A hamburger or veggie burger is just as delicious without the bun, and you can use those “saved” calories to sample something else. Gelatin dishes are another traditional picnic dish, but they may not be the best choice for healthy eating. A small half-cup serving has 80 calories, almost all of it sugar. Add whipped cream and the calorie intake is even higher. Instead, serve whatever fruits are in season. The calorie load will be the same or lower with the added benefit of fiber, vitamins and those good phytochemicals. Serve one type of fruit plain or combine several favorites to make a fruit salad, sweetened only with natural fruit juices. Typically, picnics include red meat or poultry, either grilled or in sandwiches. If you are the cook, choose lean meats. Even if you are a guest and have no control over what is served, you can save calories and limit fat intake by keeping your portion of meat small. Two to three ounces is a serving, which is the size of your palm or a deck of cards. A picnic without dessert? Unthinkable. If you eat healthy, you can splurge on foods like desserts that aren’t high in nutrition. However, remember that dessert is meant to be a tidbit that ends the meal on a sweet note, not something that fills a whole plate. Many desserts are often “overkill.” Pie with ice cream and whipped cream? That’s really three desserts, not one. Instead, have plain pie with one small dollop of whipped cream or

Vampire appliances Consume electricity even when switched off, costing consumers $1 billion a year Most homes have almost two dozen vampire appliances that consume energy even when they are turned off. These appliances cost consumers more than one billion dollars a year in energy costs. “These appliances aren’t really off but function in a stand-by mode,” says Joe Laquatra, a housing and energy expert at Cornell University. “They continuously use power so their features will continue to work when they are switched off, such as a digital video recorder (DVR) recording programs when no one is home.” An energythirsty TV, for example, may cost more than $14 a year for energy consumed when it’s off. “With many vampire appliances in a typical home, the cost

to feed energy-slurping vampires adds up quickly,” Laquatra adds. To minimize energy consumption by vampire appliances in your home, plug appliances into smart power strips that turn off appliances when they enter stand-by mode. Also, look for appliances with the ENERGY STAR® label; these appliances are guaranteed to use far less energy than standard appliances. Saving energy not only means saving money, but by saving electricity it also helps to prevent air pollution. For more energy saving ideas, visit www.GetEnergySmart.org, or contact Nancy Reigelsperger at Steuben County Cornell Cooperative Extension at 607664-2304.

a dish of fruit with ice cream. Brownies are so irresistible that it’s usually hard to stop at just one or just eat half a large brownie. The standard serving size is a two-inch square, which has 100 to 150 calories, so cut your pan of brownies into portions this size. You’ll be doing your caloriecounting guests a favor, and anyone who wants seconds can always go back for another piece. As you plan your picnic, keep nutrition and portion size in mind. You can serve all the traditional picnic foods, but be sure to look for ways to reduce fat and calories and take advantage of all the seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables available in season. Here’s a healthier, updated version of the layered salad that was popular back in the 1970s and ‘80s. This salad feeds a crowd and includes so many different vegetables that it can suffice as the only side dish at your picnic. If possible, use a clear bowl to show off its many colorful layers.

Seven-layer salad with ranch dressing 1 c. fat-free (or reduced-fat) buttermilk 1/4 c. reduced-fat mayonnaise 1 tsp. finely minced garlic 1 tsp. dried oregano (or 1 Tbsp. fresh) 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce Pinch cayenne pepper Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 1 can (19 oz.) kidney beans, rinsed

and drained 6 romaine lettuce leaves, halved lengthwise and cut crosswise in 1/2inch strips 2 large tomatoes, sliced 6 thin slices red onion, chopped 1 package (10 oz.) frozen green peas, defrosted 2 c. jicama, cut in 1/2?inch cubes 1 c. (4 oz.) reduced-fat cheddar cheese, shredded To make the dressing, place buttermilk, mayonnaise, garlic, oregano, Worcestershire sauce and cayenne in a small bowl. Add salt and pepper to taste. Whisk together until well blended. Cover and refrigerate dressing at least 30 minutes. To make the salad, place a layer of kidney beans in a deep, 8-inch glass serving bowl. On top of the beans, add, in succeeding layers, lettuce, tomatoes, onion, peas and jicama. Sprinkle cheese over top. Pour dressing evenly over salad. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate 1 to 3 hours. Just before serving, toss well and serve. Makes 12 servings. Nutrition information per serving: 120 calories, 3 grams (g) total fat (1 g saturated fat), 177 g carbohydrate, 7 g protein, 5 g dietary fiber, 280 milligrams sodium. Summers are made for picnics. So plan one today and remember to Eat fresh! Eat local! Eat well!

Campside treat gets revamped S’mores is one of the most popular desserts enjoyed around the campfire and at cookouts. Now you can enjoy the flavor of this delectable dessert without the fuss of toasting marshmallows over an open flame. S’mores history dates back to the early 20th century. While the actual recipe origin is unknown — considering most camping recipes were passed down from generation to generation — the first printed recipe for s’mores appeared in 1927 in the Girl Scout Handbook. S’mores were popular campside treats because of the portability of ingredients. It was easy to pack a bag of marshmallows, a box of graham crackers and a few bars of chocolate. The combination of sticky marshmallow, smooth, rich chocolate and crunchy graham crackers provides a perfect melding of flavors. However, s’mores weren’t the first pairing of these ingredients. Mallomar cookies and Moonpies also featured these ideal components. To make a delicious dessert that builds upon the s’mores flavors and theme at your next summertime event, try this recipe for Frozen S’mores Cake.

Frozen S’mores Cake 1 quart vanilla ice cream 1 quart chocolate ice cream 10 or 12 graham cracker squares 1/4 cup melted butter 1/2 tablespoon sugar 1 jar of hot fudge

1 bag mini-marshmallows 2 tablespoons water Vegetable shortening Crush graham crackers in a zipperlock bag or pulse in a food processor until made into crumbs. Add sugar and melted butter to the crumbs, mix and press into the bottom of a springform pan. Bake at 350 F for 10 minutes, or until the crust browns a bit. Soften ice cream by letting it sit out of the freezer for a few minutes. Use a spatula or spoon to spread the chocolate ice cream over the cooled graham cracker crust. Spread desired amount of fudge topping over the chocolate ice cream. Then spread the softened vanilla ice cream over the fudge layer. Coat a microwave-safe bowl with a thin layer of shortening. Add most of the marshmallows, reserving a few for garnish, and the water to the bowl. Microwave for about a minute to a minute and a half until the marshmallows are melted. Top the vanilla ice cream with the melted marshmallows. Place the cake in the freezer overnight to harden. When ready to serve, place the garnish marshmallows on top and drizzle with a little melted hot fudge. You can use a kitchen torch or a barbecue lighter to add a little browning to the garnish marshmallows to make them look like they were toasted over a fire. Slice and enjoy quickly before it melts. This cake also makes a great alternative to a store-bought ice cream birthday cake.


Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 7076; 1200-1600# 77-78; HY 1200-1600# 79-85; Boner 80-85% lean 800-1200# 6168.50; 1200-2000# 6067.50; HY 1200-2000# 6972; Lean 85-90% lean 750850# 45-58; 850-1200# 4860. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 83-88; 15002500# 80-89; HY 10001500# 88-90; 1500-2500# 90-92. MARSHALL, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. RADIANT, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. ROCKINGHAM, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 109. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 1200-1600# 71-74; HY 1200-1600# 75; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 66; 1200-2000# 6573.50; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 58.50-65. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 86-88. Calves Ret. to Farm: 84. Hols. Bulls 70-100# 2060/hd; 100-130# 106/cwt. STAUNTON, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report. TRI-STATE, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: No report.

Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 80; 1200-1600# 75.50-80.50; HY 1200-1600# 85.50-90; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 72-78.50; 12002000# 77-80; Lean 85-90% lean 850-1200# 61-68.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1500-2500# 92-93.50. HOG REPORT HAGERSTOWN, MD PIGS Pigs & Shoats: None offered. Butcher Hogs: 10. US 13 210-250# 71-75; No. 2-3 276# @ 70. Sows: 7. 550-675# 49-55. Boars: 1 300# @ 43.

80# 151-174; Sel 3 20-40# 81. Bucks: Sel 1-2 70-110# 159-169; 100-150# 114-144. Does: Sel 1-2 70-100# 90.

CASH GRAIN MARKET

MT. AIRY SHEEP: No report. MT. AIRY GOATS: No report. FREDERICKSBURG, VA SHEEP: no report FREDERICKSBURG, VA GOATS: No report.

FREDERICKSBURG, VA HOGS: No report.

MARSHALL, VA GOATS: No report.

HOLLINS, VA HOGS: 3. No report.

ROCKINGHAM, VA GOATS: No report.

MARSHALL, VA HOGS: No report.

ROCKINGHAM, VA SHEEP: No report.

WINCHESTER, VA SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 270. Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1100-1300# 104-113.25; 1300-1500# 109.75-114; Hols. Ch 2-3 1300-1500# 95-107; Sel 2-3 1300-1500# 86-93.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 23 1000-1200# 106.50112.50; 1200-1300# 104113.50; 1300-1500# 102.50114. Slaughter Cows: Breaker 75-80% lean 850-1200# 72.50-77; 1200-1600# 7581; HY 1200-1600# 82.50; Boner 80-85% lean 8001200# 66-76; 1200-2000# 68.50-77.50; HY 12002000# 79.50-81.25; Lean 85-90% lean 750-850# 59.50-64.50; 850-1200# 5867. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1-2 1000-1500# 84.50-87; 15002500# 88-93.75. Cows Ret. to Farm: 40. M&L 1, few M 2, bred 2-8 mos. 1075-1340# 9101450/hd; M 2, few M 1, bred 2-8 mos. 760-970# 575900/hd. Cows w/Calves at Side: 11 M 1, few M 2 w/calves 810-1265# 700-1125/pr.

HAGERSTOWN, MD GOATS: 19. L Nannies 95-130; Sel 1 Kids 50-70# 95-105; Sel 2 40-50# 60-90.

WYTHE CO SLAUGHTER CATTLE: 58.

N VA GOATS: 45. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 130170; 40-60# 170-175; 60-

S VA HOGS: No report. STAUNTON, VA HOGS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA HOGS: No report. WYTHE CO, VA HOGS: No report. LAMB & GOAT MARKET N VA SHEEP: 89. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 150-174.50; 80-110# 170-180; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 120-150; 60-90# 151-173. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 55-70; Gd 2-4 74. Slaughter Rams: all grades 73. HAGERSTOWN, MD SHEEP: Ewes 125-200# 65-75. HAGERSTOWN, MD LAMBS: No report.

WYTHE CO GOATS: No report.

S VA GOATS: No report.

MARSHALL, VA SHEEP: No report.

ROCKINGHAM, VA HOGS: No report.

WYTHE CO SHEEP: No report.

S VA SHEEP: No report.

NC SOWS: 300-399# 49.67-59; 400-449# 50.6860; 450-499# Prices not reported due to confidentiality; 500-549# Prices not reported due to confidentiality; 550# & up Prices not reported due to confidentiality.

N VA HOGS: 1. Barrows & Gilts: US 1-3 210-230# 70.

150# 85-90.

HOLLINS, VA SHEEP: No report. HOLLINS, VA GOATS: No report.

SHENANDOAH SHEEP: 35. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 60-80# 173-174.50; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 120; 60-90# 151-173. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 55. SILER CITY, NC GOATS: No report. SILER CITY, NC SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA SHEEP: No report. STAUNTON, VA GOATS: No report.

NC GRAIN US 2 Yellow Corn was 832¢ lower. Prices were 6.937.43, mostly 7.03-7.04 at the feed mills and 6.34-7.08, mostly 6.74 at the elevators. US 1 Yellow Soybeans were steady to 1¢ lower. Prices were 13.92 at the processors, 13.72 at the feed mills and 12.73-13.57, mostly 12.73 at the elevators. US 2 Soft Red Winter Wheat was 9¢ lower. Prices were 5.467.23, mostly 5.62 at the elevators. Soybean Meal (f.o.b.) at the processing plants was 371.70/ton for 48% protein. Feed Mills: Bladenboro 7.03, -----, ----; Candor 7.24, -----, 6.25; Cofield 7.04, 13.72, ----; Laurinburg 7.03, -----, ----; Monroe 7.18, -----, ----; Nashville 7.13, -----, ----; Roaring River 7.43, ----, ----; Rose Hill 7.03, -----, ----; Statesville 6.93, -----, 5.96; Warsaw 7.03, -----, ----; Pantego #2 7.03, -----, ----. Elevators: Cleveland ----, -----, ----; Belhaven ----, -----, ----; Chadbourn ----, -----, ---; Clement 6.34, 12.78, 6.89; Creswell 6.73, 12.96, 5.46; Elizabeth City ----, 13.57, 5.62; Greenville ----, -----, ---; Lumberton ----, -----, ----; Monroe ----, -----, 6.11; Norwood 6.74, 12.73, 6.05; Pantego ----, -----, ----; Register ----, -----, 7.23; Warsaw #2 7.08, -----, 7.18. Soybean Processors Fayetteville, 13.92; Raleigh, 13.92. RUSHVILLE SEMIMONTHLY HAY AUCTION Prices/ton FOB unless otherwise noted. Delivery beyond 10 miles mostly 2.50 /mile. No report. POULTRY REPORT

TRI-STATE, VA GOATS: No report. WINCHESTER, VA SHEEP: 88. Slaughter Lambs: Spring, Wooled Ch & Pr 1-2 80-110# 178.50-190; 110125# 175-199; Spring, Wooled Gd & Ch 1-3 30-60# 150-174; 60-90# 170-190. Slaughter Ewes: Ch 2-4 64; Gd 2-4 72; Util 1-3 65. WINCHESTER, VA GOATS: 78. Kids: Sel 1-2 20-40# 130156; 40-60# 150-170; 6080# 127-140; Sel 3 40-60# 176-181; 60-80# 128. Bucks: Sel 1-2 100-150# 90; 150-250# 97. Does: Sel 1-2 50-70# 103; 70-100# 71-112; 100-

NC BROILERS & FRYERS The market is steady and the live supply is adequate to meet the moderate demand. Average weights are desirable. The estimated slaughter for Wednesday in NC is 2,815,000 head compared to 2,573,000 head last Wednesday. NC EGGS The market is steady on all sizes. Supplies are moderate. Retail demand is moderate. Weighted average prices for small lot sales of grade A eggs delivered to nearby retail outlets: XL 122.32, L 113.79, M 88.86 & S 87.

NY EGGS Prices are steady on Medium and larger sized eggs. Offerings are light to moderate on XL & L, moderate on lighter weights. Demand is light to moderate. Market activity is usually moderate. Prices to retailers, sales to volume buyers, USDA Grade A & Grade A white eggs in ctns, delivered to store door, cents/dz. XL 106-110; L 104-108; M 8286. FARMERS MARKET NC STATE FARMERS MARKET Beans, Pole (30# crate) 24, Green 28, Butter & Speckled (8# shelled) 21; Beets (25# bg) 17.65; Blackberries, Flat 22-24; Blueberries (12 pt flat) 20-24; Cabbage (50# crate) Pointed Head & Rd 12; Corn, Yellow/White/Bi-color (4 1/2 dz crate) 12-16; Cantaloupes (bin) Athena 100-125, Cantaloupes (ea) Athena 1-1.25; Cucumbers (3/4 bx) Long Green 12-15, Pickling 1620, Cucumbers (bx) Pickling 25; Eggplant (1-1/9bu ctn) Black Beauty 12-15; Greens (bu ctn) Collards 9, Turnips 13.25; Spinach (25# box) 18; Peas, Garden (30# crates) 25; Okra (1/2 bx) 16.50; Peac-hes (25# bx) Red Haven & Ruby Prince 13; Pepper (1-1/9 bu ctn) Green Bell 22-25; Squash (3/4 bx) Yellow Summer 15, (1/2 bx) Zucchini 15-16, (1/2 bx) Yellow Summer 12; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) 1421.75; Red Potatoes (40# crate) 18-20; Tomatoes (25# bx) Field Grown (L) 16-20, (S) 12, Romas (25# bx) 20; Watermelons, Seeded (ea) 2.50, Watermelons (bin) Seeded 140-150. Wholesale Dealer Price: Apples (traypack ctn 100 count) WA Red Delicious (traypack ctn) 34.95-35.45, WA Golden Delicious (traypack ctn) 2934.50, Granny Smith WA (traypack ctn) 31.50-36.50, Gala WA 34.50-41.50, WA Fuji (traypack ctn) 34.5042.50, WA Pink Lady (traypack ctn) 48-41.50; Asparagus (11# ctn) 26.95-31; Bananas (40# ctn) 20-22.80; Beans, Rd Green (1-1/9bu ctn) 37.15-50.05, Pole (1-1/9 bu) 32-35; Beets (25# sack) 14.35-20; Blueberries (flat 12 1-pt cups) 21-24; Broccoli (ctn 14s) 27.50-35.75; Cabbage (50# ctn) 1517.15; Cantaloupe (bin 140 count) 100-150; Cantaloupe (case 12 count) 20.05- Carrots (50# sack) 40.85-41.05; Cauliflower (ctn 12s) 20.05-26.45; Cherries (16# bx) 48; Celery (ctn 30s) 32.95-34.95; Cilantro (ctn 30s) 24.65-27.05; Oranges, CA (4/5 bu ctn) 2334.85, FL (4/5bu ctn) 21-22; Pink Grapefruit, CA (4/5bu

ctn) 23-29.95; Tangelos, FL (80 count bx) 25-26.95; Lemons (40# ctn) 40.0541.45; Limes (40# ctn) 21; Oranges, CA Naval (4/5bu ctn) 31.55-34.05, FL Naval (64 count) 19.50-21.50; Corn (ctn 4 1/2-5 dz) Yellow 14-15, White (ctn 4 1/2-5 dz) 14-15, (4 1/2 dozen bgs) BiColor 14-15; Cranberries (24 12 oz pkgs) 24.50; Cucumbers (40# ctn) Long Green 19-21, Pickles (ctn 40#) 2034; Eggplant (25# ctn) 16; Grapes, Red Seedless (18# ctn) 33-38.25, White Seedless 36, Black Seedless 36, Red Globe 36; Greens, Collard (bu ctn/loose 24s) 10, Kale (ctn/bunched 24s) 20.65, Turnips (bu ctn) 10; Honey-dews (ctn 5s) 17; Kiwi (ctn 117s) 12.85; Lettuce (ctn 24s) Iceberg (wrapped) 23.50-28.25, Greenleaf (ctn 24s) 2021.50, Romaine (ctn 24s) 20-23.50; Nectar-ines, Yellow/White Flesh (1/2 bu ctn) 22; Onions, Yellow (50# sack) Jumbo 20-23.65, White (25# sack) 13.50, Red (25# sack) 12.50, Green (ctn 24s) 19.15-20; Sweet Onions (40# ctn) 20-25.05; Peaches, Yellow/White flesh (1/2bu ctn) 15; Peanuts (35#) Green 48; Pears, Bartlett (16# ctn 28; Bell Peppers, Green (1-1/9bu ctn) 18.65-24, Red (11# ctn) 29-32.50, Yellow (11# ctn) 29; Potatoes (50# ctn) Red Size A 16-20.05, White Size A 15-20.05, Red Size B 18.65-25; Russett, ID 31.1533.45; Radishes (30 6-oz film bgs) Red 13.25-16.25; Plums, Red (28# ctn) 22; Squash, Yellow Crookedneck (3/4 bu ctn) 16.2519.15, Zucchini (1/2 bu ctn) 14-17; Strawberries, CA (flat 8 1-qt conts) 20; Sweet Potatoes, Orange (40# ctn) 16-21.45, White (40# ctn) 10.65-20; Tomatoes, vine ripened XL (25# ctn) 1521.15; Tomatoes, Cherry (flat 12 1-pt conts) 17.5518.05, Romas (25# ctn) 1826, Grape (flat 12 1-pt conts) 22-26; Turnips (topped) 11.85-14.50; Watermelon (bin) (45 count) Seeded 125, Seedless 175. WESTERN NC FARMERS’ MARKET Apples (traypack ctn) Red Delicious 30-32, Golden Delicious 30-32; Bananas (40# bx) 20-21; Beans (bu) Poles 28-35; Broccoli (ctn) 18-19; Cabbage (50 ctn/crate) 1212.50; Canta-loupes (ctn 912 count) 19.50, (ea) 1, (bin 120-150 count) 175-200; Cauliflower (ctn) 21.50-22; Citrus (4/5 bu) Grapefruit 24; Oranges 19.50-21; Lemons (ctns 95 count) 3032, (165 count) 32-32.50; Corn (crate) Bi-Color, Yellow & White 14-14.50; Cucum-

Markets 19

Page 11 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

MARKET REPORTS


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NORTH CAROLINA JOE’S TRACTOR SALES Joe Moore Road, off Hasty School Road Thomasville, NC 910-885-4582 LOUISBURG TRACTOR & TRUCK CO. 1931 Hwy. 401 S. Louisburg, NC 919-496-3594

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The Farm Bill and the budget negotiations by Bob Gray The saga continues over how large the cuts will be in Farm Bill programs as negotiations continue on the extent of budget cuts associated with the pending legislation to raise the U.S. debt ceiling from $14.3 trillion to $15 trillion. Many farm groups feel

that agriculture has been disproportionately singled out for deep cuts which, of course, will clearly effect the debate and development of the Farm Bill next year. Vice President Biden and the bipartisan group of House and Senate members will very likely recommend very deep

cuts to the commodity programs in their recommendations to tie reduced federal spending to an agreement to raise the debt ceiling. Cuts in commodity payments and crop insurance could be as much as $34 billion over the next 10 years — a very significant bite in

farm program spending. And speaking of budget cuts The recently passed FY2012 spending bill for USDA contained some very significant cuts in various programs. The conservation programs took the hardest hit with $1 billion in cuts for

EQIP, the Conservation Stewardship Program, farm and ranch land protection and other similar programs. It was a blood bath for conservation programs. Overall USDA programs took about a 15 percent hit in funding reductions on top of another 14 per-

cent in the Continuing Resolution that was passed back in April to fund USDA for the rest of this fiscal year. The Senate has not yet acted on any of the major 12 appropriations bills. Source: NDFC E-letter, June 30

SEEDWAY acquires Olds Garden Seed HALL, NY — SEEDWAY has purchased the business assets of Olds Garden Seed from Winfield Solutions, effective June 30. Founded in 1888 and located in Madison, WI, Olds Garden Seed supplies smallpackage vegetable and flower seed to retailers and gardeners throughout the Midwest and Great Lakes region. The longstanding and successful Olds Garden Seed brand will be maintained, with inventory, operations and customer service transitioning to SEEDWAY’s Elizabethtown, PA facility. Scott Morgan, Olds Garden Seed Brand Manager, will remain with the organization to lead the brand, as will Chris Coley as customer service lead. In-step with longrange strategic plans, the acquisition enhances SEEDWAY’s business diversity and broadens its position in the smallpackage seed industry while leveraging existing equipment and processing efficiencies.

Your Connection to the Northeast Equine Market

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broke 100 degrees, so handlers expect receipts may decline. Fluid demand remains at lower summer levels. Cream demand has improved as warmer temperatures stimulate ice cream sales. Also, production of dips, sour, and whipped cream were steady to stronger ahead of the 4th of July holiday. Cream was getting shipped from region to region to supplement local offerings. Milk production in the Oceania region is

nearing seasonal low levels. The end of the 2010-11 milk production season was positive in both New Zealand and Australia with herd health and conditioning also positive which, if that carries through the winter months, will provide a strong start to the new season. The new milk production season is underway in New Zealand. Milk handlers are reporting that output during the 2010-2011 fiscal sea-

son was up 2-3 percent from the previous year. The outlook for the 2011-2012 season remains strong with some estimates in the 5-6 percent range. The 2010-11 milk production season in Australia comes to a close at the end of June. At this point, milk handlers estimate that annual output will be up about 1 percent from a year ago and project the 2011-2012 year to be slightly higher. Back on the home

front; dairy farm profitability improved slightly in June as milk prices increased to cover a small hike in feed. The Agriculture Department’s latest Ag Prices report shows the All-Milk price for June estimated at $21.00 per hundredweight, up $1.40 from May, $5.60 above June 2010, and the highest since December 2007, according to the CME’s Daily Dairy Report (DDR). The cost of feed to produce 100 pounds of milk

was $11.48, up just 15 cents from May. Corn averaged a record $6.58 per bushel, up 28 cents from May and $3.17 above a year ago. Soybeans averaged $13.30 per bushel, up a dime from May and $3.85 above a year ago. One bright note, alfalfa hay averaged $180 per ton, down $6, but still $61 higher than a year ago. That left “Income over feed costs” of $9.52 per cwt., according to the DDR, $1.25 higher than May, and compares to a

10 year average of $9.09. There’s more good news on the feed front. USDA’s Acreage and Grain Stocks reports showed U.S. corn plantings at 92.3 million acres, substantially higher than what was forecast in the July 12 World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimates report, and compares to 88.2 million acres a year ago. Soybean acreage was also below expected levels and a year ago. USDA reported that corn stocks were estimated at 3.67 billion bushels, down 15 percent from a year ago, however is higher than expected, which sent prices tumbling from record high levels of the last few weeks. Soybean stocks, at 619 million bushels, were above forecast estimates and a year ago. The DDR also reported that sales of cheese and butter were very strong in the February-April period, according to USDA data. Total cheese usage was up 5.1 percent versus the prior year. American cheese use was up 4.2 percent and movement of other varieties was up 5.8 percent. Butter disappearance was up 19 percent but nonfat dry milk and skim milk powder was down 7 percent, with gains in exports offset by a steep decline in domestic use, according to the DDR. Dairy Profit Weekly recently reported highlights from the latest American Farm Bureau Federation’s quarterly Marketbasket Survey. It shows that shoppers in 30 states reported paying the following average prices for milk in half-gallon containers in the second quarter of 2011: regular milk: $2.31, up 6 cents from the prior quarter, and up 12 percent compared to the same quarter a year earlier. (The price for one gallon of regular milk was $3.62, up 16 cents from the prior quarter, and up about 18 percent from the second quarter of 2010.) “rbST-free” milk averaged $3.18, down a nickel from the previous quarter, but 6 percent more than second quarter 2010. It is about 40 percent higher than the reported price of a halfgallon of regular milk. The retail markup on “rbST -free” milk = 87 cents per half-gallon X 23.25 half-gallons/cwt. = $20.23/cwt. Organic milk averaged $3.77, up 7 cents compared to the first quarter of 2011, and up 3 percent compared to the second

Mielke 17

Page 15 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Mielke from 7


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 16

NC State FFA officers elected at Raleigh convention their potential for leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. Visit www.ncffa.org for more information. FFA is a dynamic youth organization within agricultural education that changes lives and prepares students for premier leadership, personal growth and career success. FFA was created in 1928 as the Future Farmers of America;

the name was changed in 1988 to the National FFA Organization to represent the growing diversity of agriculture. Today, nearly one half-million student members across the United States are engaged in a wide range of agricultural education activities, leading to more than 300 career opportunities in the agricultural science, food, fiber and natural resources industry.

State FFA officers elected recently are, from left, Beverly Hampton, Hannah Russell, John Stewart, Allyssa Ramsey (front), Caroline Tart and Katie Cauthen. Photo courtesy of Jason Davis RALEIGH, NC — Four FFA members were elected state officers at the 201112 State FFA Convention held at the Raleigh Convention Center June 21-23. New officers are State President John Stewart of Knightdale; State Vice President Caroline Tart of Goldsboro; State Vice President Beverly Hampton of Mount Ulla; State Vice President Katie Cauthen of Mount Pleasant; State Vice President Hannah Russell of Asheboro; and State Vice President Alyssa Ramsey of Marshall. More than 2,500 youth from across North Carolina participated the 83rd North Carolina State FFA Convention that included community service projects, the awarding of 368 state degrees, $25,000 in scholarships, numerous awards, competitions, talent shows and the election of the new state FFA officer team. The theme of this year’s convention was “Infinite Potential.” Members were

encouraged to tap into their own infinite potential and to “envision, discover and achieve” while in Raleigh. Wednesday morning, students volunteered at the North Raleigh Ministries Thrift Store and the Salvation Army. “Volunteering in the Raleigh area is a great way for FFA members to put into practice values that they learn during their North Carolina FFA membership,” said Jason Davis, state FFA coordinator. “While the overall goal of FFA is to explore future agricultural career opportunities, student and life success is the primary mission.” The North Carolina FFA is a youth organization of more than 15,550 student members preparing for leadership and careers in the science, business and technology of agriculture. With 217 local chapters across the state, FFA makes a positive difference in the lives of students by developing

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Van Beek Natural Science is excited to introduce Optimum UterFlush, an organic product for reproductive care in beef and dairy cattle. Optimum UterFlush is administered intrauterine post-calving to help restore the cow’s uterus back to normal as quickly as possible. It can be given immediately after calving or later on when problems arise. The flush not only assists with uterine problems post-calving, but also sustains the cow’s reproductive performance reducing the breed back timeframe. Optimum UterFlush contains essential oils with antimicrobial properties that maintain and restore normal uterine environment. A natural foaming agent, called yucca, helps the flush reach all areas of the uterus. Optimum Uter-

Flush is an all-natural, organic product that requires no milk withholding and leaves no drug residue. The Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) has reviewed and approved Optimum UterFlush as an OMRI Listed product as of June 6. Optimum UterFlush is the organic version of UterFlush, a product Van Beek introduced last year. Optimum UterFlush performs similarly to the capsule product, Royal Uterine Capsules, but is in a convenient and easy to use liquid form. The Optimum UterFlush syringe has a dial to ensure the accurate amount is expelled when mixing the product. Optimum UterFlush is available in a 30ml syringe and 5.08 fl oz container, providing 8 and 40 administrations, respectively. The product is sold through all major

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Mielke from 15 quarter a year earlier. It is about 60 percent higher than the reported price of a half-gallon of regular milk. And, in a separate report, the Minnesota Farmers Union reported the U.S. average retail price for fat-free milk at $4.09 per gallon in April. According to MFU calculations, dairy farmers received $1.67 per gallon, or about 38 percent. Meanwhile, as National Milk begins its grassroots effort to sell its future dairy policy proposal to

farmers, California Farmers Union and the California Dairy Campaign are joining the National Family Farm Coalition in supporting legislative reforms called for in the NFFCbacked “Federal Milk Marketing Improvement Act.” The legislation would pay dairy producers based on their cost of production, manage milk inventories to meet market demand, and address the impact of unregulated concentrated dairy imports.

Page 17 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Van Beek Natural Science introduces Optimum UterFlush, organic reproductive care for cattle


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 18

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CAMP HILL, PA — Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) praised the appointment of Cumberland County farmer Mathew Meals of Newville as the new Pennsylvania Deputy Secretary of Agriculture and Consumer Protection. “Matt Meals is a proven leader, who will bring practical experience, energy and enthusiasm to the position. I’ve seen firsthand Matt’s successful work to advance agriculture, especially among young farmers, while serving as state chairman of Pennsylvania Farm Bureau’s Young Farmer and Rancher (YF&R) Committee and national chair of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s YF&R Committee,” said PFB bers (1-1/9bu) Long Green 18-18.50, Picklers (1-1/9bu crate) 20-25; Grapes (18# ctn) Red Globe 30-32, Red & White Seedless 30-32; Lettuce (ctn) Iceburg 19-20; Onions (50# bg) Yellow Jumbo 17-19; Vidalia Onions (50# sack) Jumbo & Medium 28; Peaches (1/2 bu baskets) Freestone Yellow & White 12-16; Pepper, Bell (1-1/9bu ctn) L & XL 14-17; Potatoes, Irish (50# bg) 16.50-22; Squash, (3/4 bu) #1 Yellow Crookneck 12-15, (1/2 bu) Zucchini #1 12-15; Straw-berries (flat 8 1#) CA 15.50-21.50; Sweet Potatoes (40# bx) Red or Orange #2 12-14.50; Tomatoes (25#

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Page 19 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Former Young Farmer and Rancher Committee Chairman named a Deputy Secretary of Agriculture


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 20

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JULY 20, 2011 8:00 A.M.

TRACTORS '10 JD 9630 #16492 JD 9400T #900200, BB 24 SPD JD 8770 #H003129, 7.10R38 DUALS 24SPD 4257HRS JD 8760 #H005702, 24 SPD BB JD 8530 #17984 JD 8530 #028711, 1150 HRS ILS IVT 710-42 DUALS JD 8520 #P037083, 3300 HRS ILS 50" DUALS '08 JD 8430 #20166 JD 8430 #P017454, MFWD 2802HR 480/80R50R JD 8330 #13179 JD 8320 #15912, ILS MFWD 46" DUALS JD 8310 #P005535, PS 18.4-46 5000 HRS JD 8220 #P026743, 3850 HRS MFWD 18.4-46 JD 8110 #RW8110P016119, 3560 HRS 18.4R46 MFD '04 JD 7800 #7718, CAB AIR 2WD JD 7430 #10772, 1282HR MFWD PQUAD "VERY NICE" JD 7430 #014150, MFWD 290 HRS IVT 50" DUALS W/JD 741 SELF LEVEL LDR "LIKE NEW" JD 6300 #162313, 6459 HRS W/CANOPY JD 6200 #12112575, 2WD CAB W/LDR 2000 HRS "VERY NICE" JD 6110 #282642, 2914 HRS MFD JD 5310 #S131396, 2WD 1900 HRS JOYSTICK JD 5303 #PX53030000681, W/JD 510 LOADER JD 5103 #7136, 1860 HRS 13.6-28 JD 4960 #P008053, MFWD JD 4755 #P002912, MFWD 3HYD DUALS WTS 5400 HRS JD 4630 #007945, 18.4-38 W/DUALS QUAD '97 JD 4560 #P004534, 5900 HRS 2WD PS JD 4555 #P002309, 2WD PS DUALS 18.4-38 4045 HRS JD 4555 #4351, 5701 HRS PS 18.4-42 JD 4455 #P003357, MFWD 18.4-38 2770 HRS 1-OWNER JD 4440 #057841, 7403 HRS 18.4-38 QUAD '72 JD 4320, LOW HRS ROPS JD 4250 #5358, MFD 6700 HRS PS JD 4240 S #346616L, CAH QUAD MFD JD 4240 #004819R, CAH 8876 HRS QUAD JD 4050 #P003026, 5516 HRS 18.4R-38 MFD JD 4050 #6610, 2WD JD 4020 GAS '93 JD 3155 #U716204, MFD 5066HR 18.4R38 JD 3010 #44345, W/48 LDR 15.5-38 JD 2955 #735093, 4467 HRS 16.9-38 ROPS JD 2955 #12674324 JD 2755 W/CAB MFWD JD 2755 #730527 JD 1020 #048420T, GAS 13.6-28 JD 47 LDR JD 820 #8201325, DIESEL 3643 HRS 18.4-34 "V-NICE" PONY MOTOR CIH 9180 #2563, 24.5-32 DUALS 4HYD PS TRANS 6151 HRS "VERY NICE" CIH 7120 #12108, 2WD CIH 7110 2WD, 49XX HRS 18.4-38 DUALS CIH 7110 #0026003, 8000 HRS 18.4-42 PS CIH 5288 #466, MFD DUALS 6405 HRS 18.4-42 TL 3HYD 1000 PTO CIH 4586 #2675, 4011 HRS 20.8R-38 W/DUALS 3HYD '82 IH 1086 #U49976, 4945 HRS CASE 1070, OPEN STATION CASE 930 #270918 IH 856 #U32177, DIESEL 6323 HRS CIH 786 #10008, 5880 ENG HRS 18.4-34 NO CAB CASE 730 #2858841 OLIVER 1755 D #161931, WF NH 8970 MFD SUPERSTEER, 6XXX HRS NH TJ325 #RVS001158, 24 SPD 2500 HRS EXC MASSEY HARRIS 30 #9218A 11.2-38 MASSEY HARRIS 20 #4053, 11.2-28 KUBOTA L3600 #53736, LA680 LDR MFD ROPS HESSTON 160-90 #318820, MFD 4705 HRS FORD 4400 #360311 FORD TW35 #C702820, 3618 HRS 20.8-38 W/DUALS 2WD FENDT 916 #924243180, 710/7R-42 MFD FARMALL C #1816 DEUTZ 130-6 #5529073, 20.8-38 TL 1000 PTO '05 CAT MT 465 MFWD, CAH P-QUAD TRANS LEFT REV 565 ACT HRS W/WESTERNDORF LDR "LIKE NEW" MECHANICS SPECIALS JD 8430 #8430H002897, 4WD JD 8200 #N/A, 2WD 20.8R42 DUALS 5HYD PTO TL QH JD 7800 #P004138, BURNT SALVAGE JD 6420 #324241, MFD 18.4R34 2HYD 3PT "BURNT" JD 4440 #31694, 18.4-38 DUALS QUAD 3HYD JUMPS OUT OF C RANGE OLIVER 80 #813063 JD 310A BACKHOE #801954, AS IS BLOWN MOTOR '93 KENWORTH #2NKPH77X1PM702665, 122625 MILES 6 SPD TRANS 18' BED '97 JEEP, SPORT 4.0L 5SPD SOFT TOP

COMBINES JD 9770 #726582, 12.50-32 FLOATERS 4X4 28L26 AUTO STEER VALVE 1062/800HR '05 JD 9650W #710201, 1654/1258 HRS '02 JD 9650 #697221, 2565/1828 "VERY NICE" '01 JD 9650 #691749, 3100/2400 HRS CM '00 JD 9650W #685780, 30.5-32 2WD CHOP 20' UNLOAD '02 JD 9650W #695351 '98 JD 9610 #676423, 3480/2749 '99 JD 9610 #681836, 3381/2323 HRS '97 JD 9600 #671146, 3247/2158 HRS '94 JD 9600 #658635, 3995/2760 HRS '94 JD 9600 #657464, 3978/2629 HRS '92 JD 9600 #645978, 3388/2616 HRS JD 9600 #660973, 4230/2890HR '99 JD 9510 #680506 '93 JD 9500 #650417, 2975/2278 HRS '90 JD 9500 #638149, 1OWNER 4150/2626 HRS '96 JD 9500 #666965 '95 JD 9500 #661331 '95 JD 9500 #660711 '99 JD 9410 #680208 '82 JD 7720, 31XX HRS JD 7720 #507996 JD 7720 #360837 JD 6620 #553955 JD 6620 #504090 JD 6620 #357808, SH 23.1-26 '92 JD CTS #645681, 4383/3436 HRS 20.8-38 30.5-32 4WD BISH BIN EXT '04 CIH 2388 #JJC0273159, CHOP FIELD TRACKER 1800 HRS Y-M MON W/DISPLAY 2 SPD HYDRO '02 CIH 2388 2WD #271014, 30.5-32 AG LEADER SPEC ROTOR 3330/2789 '00 CIH 2388 #JJC0267851, 3937/2756 HRS '81 CIH 1460 #42360, 4338 HRS '80 CIH 1460 #8840, 4X4 ON STEEL TRACKS 2985 HRS CIH 1460 #024553, 3814 HRS R.T. '87 NH TR96 #528150, 3200 HRS '94 NH TR87 #556340, 1 OWNER '82 MF 850, 35XX HRS MF 550 #4117, 23.1-26 DIESEL '00 GLEANER R72 #MJ72155, 22XX /15XX HRS GLEANER R6, 35XX HRS 4X4 '83 GLEANER M3 HYDRO, 2300 HRS GLEANER M #MKS829HY GLEANER F3 #F-K49917V-83, 1738 HRS PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE FOR AVAILABILITY AND MORE INFO '08 JD 9770 STS #727337, 687HR '09 JD 9770 STS #732424 '08 JD 9770 STS #726952 '05 JD 9760 STS #712352, 1343HR '06 JD 9760 STS #716932, 1033HR '09 JD 9670 STS #730672, 355HR '09 JD 9670 STS #730118, 900/585HR '09 JD 9670 STS #731758 '09 JD 9670 STS #731083, 349HR '09 JD 9670 STS #730132 '09 JD 9670 STS #730113 '08 JD 9670 STS #725662 '07 JD 9670 STS #725470 '07 JD 9670 STS #725209 '05 JD 9660 STS #712381, 1839 HRS '01 JD 9550 #690787, 2782/1800 HRS SH 30.5-32 BIN EXT '00 JD 9550 #685741, 2317/1800 HRS SH 30.5-32 BIN EXT TILLAGE JD 2700 RIPPER, 7X JD 2700 5X AR PLOW JD 2500 5X PLOW JD 845 12 ROW CULT JD 550 MULCH MASTER SEVERAL JD 512 DISC RIPPERS, 9X '94 JD 510 #1435, 7X JD 400, 30' NEW WHEELS JD 230 DISC #015604, 28' 25' JD 100 CHISEL PLOW JD 85 12RN CULT IH 4450 SOIL FINISHER 36' CIH 4200 #JAG0398100, 20' 5BAR HARROW CIH 3950 DISC, 32' CIH 730B 7X DISC RIPPER CIH 690 7X RIPPER CIH 496 ULTRA TILL DISC, 32'

CIH 490 32' DISC CIH 415 MULCHER CIH 315 MULCHER 15' CIH 183 CULT, 8R CIH 181 MT HOE CASE DISC, 28' YELLOW OFFSET DISC, 8' WESTENDORF 10' HYD BOX SCRAPER SUNFLOWER 4410 #4497-042, 9X 24" SUNFLOWER 4311 D RIPPER 7X AR SUNFLOWER 1434 DISC 32' SUNFLOWER 29' DISC '10 SALFORD 24' SOIL CONDITIONER, RTS PHOENIX 42' HARROW KRAUSE 4921 DISC 2 - 'KRAUSE 4850-18 DOMINATOR KRAUSE 4850 DOMINATOR, 12' "SAME AS NEW" DMI 730-B DISC RIPPER DMI 730 DISC RIPPER, TIGERII BRILLION XL144 CROW FOOT ROLLER 36' PLANTER/DRILLS JD 8300 DRILL W/GRASS JD 7000 PLANTER 16R JD 7000 PLANTER #56734A, 8R W/DRY FERT '97 JD 1850 AIR DRILL #X670620, W/1900 CART W/SELFFILL AUGER 7.5" SPACING '06 JD 1790 #715306, 16-31 CCS PDP NT JD 1790 16-31 PLANTER '01 JD 1780 PLANTER #690183, 16-31 '96 JD 1780 #665109, HD SPRINGS 12/23 JD 1770 24R #710141, CCS PDP JD 1770 #725179, NT 24R30 W/PRO UNIT CCS JD 1720 #695498, 16-30 STACK PLANTER JD 1570 DRILL #H01570X685131, W/NO TILL CART JD 752 DRILL #X000702, 10' NT W/DRY FERT JD 750 PLANTER #X009793, 15' NT DRY FERT JD 750 GRAIN DRILL #15867, 20' JD 750 DRILL #28537, 20' JD 750 DRILL JD 750 DRILL JD 730 AIR DRILL #N00730X000109 JD 520 20' DRILL #346, 3PT 10" JD 515 3PT DRILL '01 JD 455 25' DRILL #690320, DRY FERT CIH 5400 DRILL, 20' 3 PT HITCH CIH 5100 DRILL CIH 955 12-23 SS PLANTER '04 WHITE 8531 PLANTER #HN53100104, 16-31 NT VERMEER 10' DRILL UFT 10' NT DRILL W/SEED GP 30' DRILL 3020 #D2010 GP 24' NO-TILL DRILL #GPC1323 GP 15' NT DRILL CORNHEADS 3 - '07 JD 1293 #720648, "VERY NICE" USED 1 SEASON '06 JD 1293 #715862 '95 JD 1293 #655889 '97 JD 1290 #670687, 12-20" '89 JD 1243 #625904 SEVERAL JD 893 & JD 843 SEVERAL JD 693 & 643 '81 JD 653A ROW CROP '88 JD 643, 800 ACRES ON REBUILD 2 - '09 JD 612 #730653 2 - '08 JD 612 #725719 2 - '07 JD 612 #720365 5 - '09 JD 608C #730851 '08 JD 608 #725489 '08 JD 608 #725128, STALKMASTER CHOPPING 3 - JD 444 CIH 2212 #N/A, 12R20" KNIFE ROLLS HYD DECK PLATES '92 CIH 1083 #144205 '92 CIH 1064 #143191 CIH 1063 #JJC0070431, "VERY NICE" '85 CIH 963 #10537 '97 NH 996 #607753, 8RN HYD DECK NH 996 #607675, 6R30 "EXC" NH 974 6R 30 #532389 NH 974 #585151 NH 98C, 12R30 GLEANER 12R-30 #123015564 GRAINHEADS SEVERAL JD 930, 925, 922, 920, 918, 915 HEADS SEVERAL JD 635, 630, 625 HEADS '04 JD 622R #705561

'04 JD 620F #705498 SEVERAL JD 224R, 222R, 220R, 218R, 216R HEADS SEVERAL JD 218F, 216F, 215F HEADS '09 CIH 2020 #CBJ02600, 35' FLEX CIH 1052 HEAD #CCC011121 DRAPER 25' '90 CIH 1015 #51417, 6 BELT P/U '89 CIH 1015 P/U #51827, 7 BELT '94 CIH 1010 #JJC0201623, 25' RIGID SHELBOURNE CX60 REYNOLDS #860153 SHELBOURNE REYNOLDS SR6000 SHELBOURNE REYNOLDS RX66 SHELBORN RX60 STRIPPER #960160 '95 NH 973 #586611, 20' 1 OWNER VERY NICE NH 971R #544284, 20' '09 NH 84C, 30' "VERY NICE" MF GRAINTABLE #N/A, 20' MF GRAINHEAD 13' '09 MACDON FD70-40 #192707-09 '99 GLEANER 800 30' GRAINTABLE GLEANER 320 GRAINHEAD #N/A GLEANER 316 GRAINHEAD GLEANER GRAIN PLATFORM #25476, 15' FORAGE JD 1219 MOCO #747957, 12' JD 568 RD BALER #357522, NET JD 568 BALER #347455, NET '03 JD 567 BALER #X195501, RD 18000 BALES JD 567 BALER JD 530 #12745560 JD 510 RD. BALER JD 375 RD BALER #985017 JD 346 SQ BALER JD 336 SQ. BALER JD 214W WIRE BALER '97 JD 100 BIG SQUARE BALER #110254, 24000 BALES CIH 8580 SQ. BALER #CFH0120150 CIH 8465 AUTO RD BALER CIH 440 SQ. BALER CIH 60 STALK CHOPPER VERMEER R9-A, HITCH VERMEER 605L BALER #1VRR141F3W100 VERMEER 505L BALER #465, "VERY NICE" RHINO 20' SHREDDER NH BB960A BALER #274580045, LARGE SQ NH 855 RD. BALER '03 NH BR780 RD BALER #26078 NH 570 SQ. BALER NH 355 GRINDER MIXER HYD NH 353 MILL NH 351 MIX MILL NH 316 SQ. BALER GEHL 1260 CHOPPER W/3R C.H. GEHL 1065 CHOPPER W/2X CORN HEAD & HAYHEAD WAGONS/GRAINCARTS UNVERFERTH 475 AUGER CART #475025 NH 1033 BALE WAGON #10113 KNIGHT 4063 FEED WAGON KILBROS 1810 GRAIN CART KILBROS 575 AUGER CART KILBROS 475 GRAINCART KEENAN 115 HORIZONTAL MIX WAGON, WITH SCALES '09 J&M 750 GRAINCART #4618, 30.5L-32 J&M 750 GRAINCART J&M 675 AUGER CART J&M 620 GRAIN CART 3 - EZ TRAIL BALE WAGON ON KILBROS 1010 GEARS DMI 320 BRENT 674 GRAINCART, RT 30.5-32 CENTER AUGER BRENT 672 GRAIN CART #B17140145 BRENT 670 GRAIN CART BRENT 640 WAGON #B1696141 BRENT GRAINCART #400158 SEVERAL GRAVITY WAGONS MOWERS/CUTTERS JD X485 LAWN MOWER #40650 JD 275 DISC MOWER 9' JD 260 DISC MOWER CIH 254 #8542, W/WOODS 60" DECK RHINO FN20 BATWING MOWER #10288, 20' NITRO FRONTIER 2072 6' MOWER, NEW BUSH HOG 3210 3PT OFFSET INDUSTRIAL JD 544B WHEEL LOADER #262892T, W/BOOM & BUCKET JD 420 U FORKLIFT JD 320 SKID LDR #161931, CAB A/C

JD 317 SKID LDR #175603, CAB A/C JD 317 SKID LDR #104316 JD 245 QT LOADER CASE 921 LOADER #JEE0093689, CAB W/AC CASE 850C DOZER #7402509, 10' BLADE 24" TRACKS CASE 680L #JJG0070364, 4967HR TLB '00 CASE 650H DOZER, LONG TRACK CAB W/AC 2074HR 6 WAY CASE 584 FORKLIFT #5310478, 2WD 5318 HRS '94 CASE 580 SUPER K #JJG0185514, 4X4 3954HR TLB CASE 580B #41484, TLB CASE 580 BACKHOE #4131686 TAKEUCHI MINI EXCAVATOR STOUT WALK-THROUGH PALLET 48" W/SKID STEER QATTACH 2 - STOUT SKID STEER PLATE STOUT ROCK BUCKET GRAPPLE W/SKID STEER Q-ATTACH STOUT GRAPPLE BUCKET W/SKID STEER Q-ATTACH STOUT BRUSH GRAPPLE W/SKID STEER Q-ATTACH LOWE HYD AUGER, 750 CH W/9" & 12" W/SKID STEER QATTACH NH LX865 TURBO SK LDR #870575, 2166HR '00 MUSTANG 2050 SK LDR #SH001002466, 2500HR KELLY 3PT BACKHOE FORD 4500 LOADER FORD 575D, TURBO 4X4 4IN1 BUCKET 4941HR CAB A/C TLB FORD 555, MFD 16.9-28 2HYD 3PT LDR ONLY FORD 555 #P644642, 2WD 2308 HRS 16.9-28 LDR ONLY DRESSER TD8E DOZER #05379 CAT 931B DOZER #78U1050 CAT 236 SKID LOADER #4YZ00490, CAB A/C CAT D6 DOZER #07643 CAT D5C #6PJ00193, DOZER CANOPY 6-WAY '99 ASV 4810 TRACK SK LDR #ANC00685, 3327HR MISCELLANEOUS JD 6500 SPRAYER, 4 WHEEL JD 740 SELF-LEVEL LOADER JD 350 SPREADER #11311715 JD 260 LOADER JD LO BOY TRAILER 8X28 JD FRT MT BLADE, 10' UNVERFERTH HT36 #A48530347, HEAD MOVER TREE PLANTER 3PT SUKUP GRAIN CLEANER ROGATOR 844 #8407955, 4400HR 60' BOOM NH 328 SPREADER MELROW 115 SPRAYER #1153254-81 IRRIGATION PUMP W/AC MOTOR INGERSOLL RAM TELEHANDLER HYTROL BULK SEED CONVEYOR BELT 20' 2 - HYTROL BAG SEED CONVEYOR BELT 20' HARDY TANDEM SPRAYER EZ TRAIL HEAD CARRIER 25' DU-ALL MODEL 275 QT LOADER #5017 DMC HI CAP 40 GRAIN CLEANER DIESEL FUEL TANK, 8000 GALLON 2 - DEGELMAN ROCK PICKER 2 - CASE CONCRETE EAGLE BULK SEED CONVEYOR BELT 8' AG CHEM 50' SPRAY BOOM 625 HEAD TRAILER TITLED EQUIPMENT '00 WILSON GRAIN TRLR #1W1SAFYA8YA231570 '97 WILSON GRAIN TRLR #224550 '94 WILSON GRAIN TRLR #1W1MAF1D1RA218965 '95 WILSON GRAIN TRLR #1W1MAF1W5SA221228 '94 WILSON GRAIN TRLR #1W1MAFYA6RA218648 '94 WHEELER GRAIN TRLR #011117 '06 NISSAN ALTIMA, BLACK LEATHER VERY GOOD CONDITION '88 GMC, TANDEM TENDER TRUCK STAINLESS STEEL FERT BOX '96 FORD L8000 TRUCK, 20' FRAME 8.9 DIESEL ENG '89 FORD F800 SERVICE TRUCK '04 CHEVY PICKUP, 2WD EXT CAB 2500 HD 6.5 DIESEL SEVERAL PJ TRAILERS SEVERAL LOAD TRAIL TRAILERS

Live Online Bidding through Proxibid. Please visit www.proxibid.com/mowrey to register for the auction. There will be 2.5% Buyers Premium charged on items purchased online, with a $750.00 cap per item. MOWREY AUCTION CO., INC. LICENSE #044000247, JON MOWREY LICENSE #041000416 EQ. MUST BE REMOVED IN 30 DAYS OF PURCHASE PLEASE BRING BANK LETTER OF CREDIT IF YOU HAVE NEVER BEEN HERE

NEXT AUCTION AUGUST 17, 2011

THERE WILL BE A $25.00 TITLE FEE FOR ALL PURCHASES OF TITLED EQUIPMENT TO BE PAID BY THE PURCHASER.


To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact Dave Dornburgh at 800-218-5586, ext. 238 • Fax 518-673-2381 • e-mail: ddornburgh@leepub.com Monday, July 11

• 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 9:30 AM: Athens Stockyards, Athens, PA. Misc. sale starts @ 9:30 am, small animals approx. 12:30-1 pm, followed by livestock (pigs, calves, goats, sheep & beef cattle). All times are approximate. Tom & Brenda Hosking 570-882-8500 or 607-699-3637 www.athensstockyards.com • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY (Former Welch Livestock). Misc., Produce & Small Animals @ 12:30 pm. 1 pm Dairy, lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following the dairy. Calves & cull beef approx. 4:30-5:30 pm. Monthly Heifer Sale. All times are approximate. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-847-8800 or 607-699-3637 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518392-3321. • 5:45 PM: Dealer Liquidation - Crane & Dump Truck. 1960’s Pettibone 30 boom crane, ‘84 Volvo/White dual axle dump truck w/good motor & transmission. • 6:00 PM - Salmanca Board of Public Utilities Poles - (11) New & Unused Shakespeare Washington style fiberglass street light poles. 20” anchor base; 16” fixture mounting height. • 6:05 PM - City of Poughkeepsie Police - Vehicles - Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredos, ‘01 Chevy Malibu, Nissan Altimas, ‘99 Volvo S70, ‘99 Dodge Stratus, ‘98 Chrysler Sebring Lxi & more. • 7:05 PM - Union Springs CSD - Buses & Mower - ‘97 International 3800/Blue Bird handy bus, ‘95 Chevy Van G30 bus & Jacobsen HR15 tractor/mower. • 7:20 PM - Westchester Community College Books - Over 100 (approx. 160) widely assorted decommissioned library books. A complete inventory is provided. • 7:25 PM - Westchester Community College Equip. - Monroe salt spreader, Goossen Rake ‘n’ Vac vacuum and self-propelled hydro drive lawn mower. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Tuesday, July 12

• 6:00 PM: Town of Eastchester - Vehicle Auction . ‘98 Chevy K3500 dump truck, ‘91 Ford F700 dump truck, ‘97 Ford CF8000 sweeper, ‘98 Chevy K2500 pickup & more. 6:35 PM - Private Consignor - Excavator & Equip. - ‘89 Case 220B excavator, Joy D800QP Quiet Power compressor and Hobart G-261 gas welder. • 6:50 PM - Town of Stony Point Police Automobiles - ‘05 Ford Crown Vic 4 door Police Interceptor & ‘00 Chevy Lumina. Both regularly serviced by local fleet maintenance. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com • 7:00 PM: On the Farm, 1254 Blacks Creek Rd., Liberty, PA (Tioga Co.). Provident Farms Complete Milk Herd & Bred Heifers. Fraley Auction Co., Inc., 570-546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com

Wednesday, July 13

• 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager,

Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716296-5041, 585-738-2104 • 6:00 PM: Town of Cheektowaga - Vehicles & Equip. (2) ‘89 Peterbilt 320 packers, ‘95 Ford F350 stake truck, (2) ‘94 Ford F250 pickups, (2) Jacobsen T422D mowers & more. • 6:40 PM - Private Consignor - Ford Taurus SE ‘00 Ford Taurus SE 4 door sedan w/3.0L V6 EFI gas engine. Runs & drives well. Keyless entry. Keys & clean title. • 6:45 PM - Town of Nelson Highway - Tractor - 91 Ford 4630 tractor w/Alamo A boom 17’ reach grass flail mower w/16” cut. Good mechanical shape. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Thursday, July 14

• 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 6:00 PM: Town of Kinderhook Highway - Dump Truck. ‘91 International 4800 4X4 dump truck w/side wing plow, 10’ side dump/front discharge, (2) coal chutes. Auctions International, 800-5361401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Friday, July 15

• Enosburg Falls, VT. Carpenter’s Tools of the Trade Sale. Jim Carpenter & Family, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Fairfield, VT. St. Jacobs Celebration Sale. Tim & Sharyn Abbott, hosts. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:30 AM: Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY. Public Auction to be held in our yard. 2 & 4WD farm tractor, 20 & 150 hp. Large selection of haying, tilling, harvesting & construction equipment. Consignments welcome. Goodrich Auction Service, Inc., 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com, www.auctionzip.com • 6:00 PM: Village of Hudson Falls - Vehicles & Assets. (3) Chevy Impalas, ‘90 Ford F250 utility truck, ‘68 International Farmall 140 tractor, Kohler generator, motors, tires & more. • 6:50 PM - Western Suffolk BOCES - Surplus Assets - Pexto Shear, Kenmore refrigerator, cameras, (5) GBC laminators, TV & VCR, tables & chairs, (10) bookcases & more. • 7:05 PM - Valhalla Fire District - Surplus Assets - Motorola Minitors II & III, Metro gear rack, Accoweed single truck chains, (10) chairs & TV stand. • 7:15 PM - Heritage Centers - Shrink Wrapper ‘82 Shanklin A-22 Automatic L-Sealer shrink wrapper. Weighs approximately 350-400 lbs. Seals 25-30 packages per minute. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com • 7:30 PM: On the Farm, 8071 Rt. 414, Canton, PA. Leroy Dale Farms Complete Milking Herd Dispersal. The Blackman Family. Est. 1928. Fraley Auction Co., Inc., 570-546-6907 www.fraleyauction.com

Saturday, July 16

• 601 North Peterboro St., Canastota, NY. Lyon’s Annual Summer Hay Camp & Friday Night Barbecue. Late Model Construction, Support, Aerial Lifts, Trucks & Trailers. *Stop in for the Barbecue Fri., July 15 before the sale! Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

Sunday, July 17

• 6:00 PM: Onondaga County - Industrial Pumps. (3) Penn Valley Diaphragm/Positive Displacement pumps for use in food processing, dairy, paper mills & wastewater treatment. • 6:05 PM - Onondaga County - Surplus Equip. Cameras, car stereo equip. GPS navigation systems, Dell laptop, DeWalt router & saw, air conditioners & more. • 6:20 PM - Asset Recovery Svcs. - Vintage Electronics - Vintage audio, broadcast equipment, computers, TV’s, projectors, lighting, tools, restaurant equip. Too much to mention!. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Monday, July 18

• 9:30 AM: Athens Stockyards, Athens, PA. Misc. sale starts @ 9:30 am, small animals approx. 12:30-1 pm, followed by livestock (pigs, calves, goats, sheep & beef cattle). All times are approximate. Monthly Feeder Sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 570-882-8500 or 607-699-3637 www.athensstockyards.com • 9:30 AM: Norwich, VT. Selling equipment, trucks, trailers and scrap iron for the estate of Richard “June” Thompson. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY (Former Welch Livestock). Misc., Produce & Small Animals @ 12:30 pm. 1 pm Dairy, lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following the dairy. Calves & cull beef approx. 4:30-5:30 pm. All times are approximate. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607847-8800 or 607-699-3637 www.hoskingsales.com • 6:00 PM: Village of Monroe Public Works Pickup. ‘02 GMC Sonoma SL pickup. Starts, runs & drives, new tires this year. Sold with keys & clean title. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Tuesday, July 19

• 6:00 PM: Village of Brockport Police - Crown Vic. ‘06 Ford Crown Vic 4 door Police Interceptor. Starts, runs & drives. Good body & interior. Keys are available. • 6:05 PM - City of Stamford CT - Sutphen Fire Truck - ‘96 Sutphen TS-100 fire truck w/QSMG150-23-S, 1500 GPM Pump & 100’ ladder. Starts, runs & drives/operates. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Wednesday, July 20

• 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-7382104. • 10:00 AM: Haverling Central School Auditorium, Bath, NY (Steuben Co.). Steuben Co. Tax Title Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Thursday, July 21

• Prattsburgh, (Steuben Co.) NY . John Brezinski Farm Equipment, Farm Accessories, Household. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 5:00 PM: 7614 Chestnut Ridge Rd. (Rt. 77) 4 miles East of Lockport, NY. Real Estate selling at 5:30 pm will be Parcel No. 1 - circa 1834 4 bdrm 1-1/2 bath stone house w/2 garages situated on lovely 7.25 acre country lot. Newer roof, replacement windows & public water. Parcel No. 2 83.55 acres w/2 large attractive barns. 55 acres tillable & approx. 4 acres wooded. Property has 425’ frontage on Chestnut Ridge Rd. & 710’ frontage on Cottage Rd. Parcel No. 1 sells at $40,000 or above and Parcel No. 2 sells at

$100/acre or above. $5,000 deposit on each parcel. 3% to cooperating Brokers who register clients prior to viewing. Open Houses - July 14 from 3-5 pm, July 16 from 10 am - Noon & July 19 from 3-5 pm. Call Penne at 585-494-1880 for details. Also selling contents of farmhouse, attic, basement and barns (old farm machinery). List available next week on harriswilcox.com. Harris Wilcox Inc., Auctioneers, Realtors & Appraisers, 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com • 6:00 PM: Village of Mamaroneck - Vehicles & Assets. ‘00 C-Hawk boat, ‘98 Mack RD688S garbage truck, (3) GO-4 scooters, wood docks, tow bars, GM parts & repair manuals. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Friday, July 22 • 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC. General Consignment Auction. Godley Auction Co., 704399-6111, 704-399-9756 • 6:00 PM: Village of Depew DPW - Vehicles. ‘95 GMC C7H042 box truck, ‘99 Ford E350 XL Super Duty van & ‘84 Ford 4000 tractor w/776B loader. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Saturday, July 23 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Horse Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Monday, July 25 • 9:30 AM: Athens Stockyards, Athens, PA. Misc. sale starts @ 9:30 am, small animals approx. 12:30-1 pm, followed by livestock (pigs, calves, goats, sheep & beef cattle). All times are approximate. Tom & Brenda Hosking 570-882-8500 or 607-699-3637 www.athensstockyards.com • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, New Berlin, NY (Former Welch Livestock). Misc., Produce & Small Animals @ 12:30 pm. 1 pm Dairy, lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following the dairy. Calves & cull beef approx. 4:30-5:30 pm. All times are approximate. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607847-8800 or 607-699-3637 www.hoskingsales.com

Tuesday, July 26 • 6:00 PM: Livingston Co. Hwy. Shop Facility, Rte. 63, Geneseo, NY (Livingston Co.)`. Livingston Co. Tax Title Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Wednesday, July 27 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, July 30 • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161

Saturday, July 30 • 9:00 AM: 291 Maple Hollow Rd., New Hartford, Ct. Sunset Hollow Farmbr. Combined the contents of the Old Mill of Bakersville with the Nathan Estate Tractor collection for this spectacular auction. 19 JD antique tractors, IH, Case & other antique tractors, 1919 Ford Model T depot hack delivery sedan & 1956 IH R190 cab & chassis trucks, Hit & Miss engines & early walk behinds, horse drawn equip., quilt collection & antiques. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413-569-6421.

Brought to You by These Participating Auctioneers

COLEMAN SALES INC. Scottsville, VA 24590 434-286-2743 VA. A.F. #197 Your Complete Auction Service! Certified Personal Property Appraiser “Let our 34 years of experience work for you!” All types of auctions Specializing in Real Estate, Farm, Livestock & Construction Equipment

GODLEY AUCTION COMPANY 4918 Rozzells Ferry Rd., Charlotte, NC 28216 704-399-6111, 704-399-9756 NCAL #305 4th Friday each month. 100% Since 1935

TERRELL AUCTION & REALTY CO., INC. OWNBY AUCTION & REALTY CO., INC. Richmond, VA Mechanicsville, VA 804-883-5201 • 804-677-3492 804-730-0500 www.terrellauction.com VA A.F. 86 VA AF 386 - Since 1961 www.ownbyco.com Farm Equipment • Livestock • Dispersals. EXCELLENCE IN SERVICE since 1946 Nationally recognized for High Dollar Real Estate Auctions including Farms and Real Estate • Livestock Land. Promptly Paid Seller Proceeds. Machinery • Business Liquidations “Satisfied customers are our top priority” “Call us for a free consultation at your place before you decide”

UNITED COUNTRY AUCTION & REAL ESTATE GROUP 5455 Main St. Stephens City, VA 22655 540-877-7182 auctionzip.com ID #7424 & virginiaauctions.com

Page 21 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

AUC TION CALENDAR


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 22

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

CODE 35 40 45 55 75 80 85 90 95 105 115 120 130 140 155 160 165 175 190 210 215 235 325 335 340 370 410 415 440 445 455 460 465 470 495 500 510 560 580 585 590 595 610 620 630 640 645 650 655 670 675 680 700 705 730 735 740 760 780 790 805 810 815 860 885 900 910 915 950 955 960 1035 1040 1050 1060 1075 1080 1085 1100 1115 1120 1130 1135 1140 1160 1170 1180 1190 1195 1200 1205 1210 1220 1225

CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

Announcements

Announcements

Dairy Equipment SEVERAL USED Double 6 and 8 parlors w/ATO’s and 3” low lines complete. Several 2”: pipelines, used vacuum pumps, receiver groups, claws, ATO’s, washer boxes, etc. 585-732-1953

ADVERTISING DEADLINE Wednesday, July 13th For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Concrete Products

Pre Cast Concrete

CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-6733237 ext. 225 HEAR livestock market report. HEAR weather forecast. TOLL-FREE 800-465-8209

J BUNK FEED TROUGHS FOB Wytheville, VA $150.00 ~ 8’ sections CATTLE GUARDS (deliverable locally) Call for Details!

U BUNK $150.00

Dairy Cattle

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

Big Tractor Parts Steiger Tractor Specialist 1. 10-25% savings on new drive train parts 2. 50% savings on used parts 3. We buy used or damaged Steigers 4. We rebuild axles, drop boxes, transmissions with one year warranty.

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700

Farm Machinery For Sale

Bedding

USA Gypsum Bedding Reduce your bedding costs! And Improve Soil - Naturally!

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry

• Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? • Reduce mastitis & cell Gypsum dissolves. counts. • Use less! More • Use in place of absorbent than lime Hydrated Lime. products. • Improves your soil Try Grip X1 Today! •Available in bulk. www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Also Available at:

USED TRACTORS & EQUIP. FOR SALE

AC F2 COMBINE, diesel, hydraulic auger, 15’ flex head; 1970 4020 John Deere with 148 loader. 434-332-5673

Dairy Cattle

buycows@warwick.net

Gypsum Bedding

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768

7 CASE IH 2366 combines in stock. 4 Case IH 2166, 8 Case IH 1660-1640. All very nice combines. 3.9% Fin. Low trucking rates. Zeisloft Farm Eq. 800-919-3322

Wytheville, VA (276) 620-1821 Ask for Chris

Dealers wanted in select areas

Elam Miller, Fort Plain, NY, ph 518-993-3892 Himrod Farm Supply, Penn Yan, NY, ph 315-531-9497 Homestead Nutrition, New Holland, PA, ph 888-336-7878 Levi Fisher, Honey Grove, PA (Juniata County), ph 717-734-3145 Martin’s Ag, Shippensburg, PA, ph 717-532-7845 New Bedford Elevator, Baltic, OH, ph 330-897-6492 Norm’s Farm Store, Watsontown, PA, ph 570-649-6765 Robert Rohrer, Millmont, PA, ph 570-898-1967 Steve B. Stoltzfus, Lykens, PA, ph 717-365-3804 Walnut Hill Feeds, Shelby, OH, ph 419-342-2942

Beef Cattle

Dairy Cattle

QUALITY REG. HEREFORD BULLS, excellent EPD’s, www.stoneridgemanor.com 717-642-9199, 240-447-4600

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

$1,000 OFF most any corn head & grain heads. Huge election of later model heads, any size. Zeisloft Eq. 800-9193322 $1000 OFF any corn head or grain head in stock. Huge selection up to 30’. Zeisloft Farm Eq. 800-919-3322

Randolph, NY

Large Selection Available

(717) 776-6242

WEST END PRECAST

NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call Lee Publications 518-673-0101 Beth bsnyder@leepub.com

Bedding

MACK ENTERPRISES

403 Centerville Rd., Newville, PA 17241 off 81 Exit 11, 2 mi. N of 233

Concrete Products

Feed Bunks & Cattle Guards

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

DISMANTLED MF TRACTORS FOR PARTS

NOLT’S EQUIPMENT

or email classified@leepub.com

# # # # #

Farm Machinery For Sale

We Buy Tractors For Parts

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 Announcements

Farm Machinery For Sale

1-800-982-1769

US or Canada American made quality parts at big savings

HUGE SELECTION JD combines 9660, 9650, 9550, 9510 & 9550. Some 6620, 7720’s in stock. 1 year motor warranty. Zeisloft Farm Equipment, Bloomsburg, PA 800-9193322 IH DISGUSTED??? With your shifting? Now is the time to fix. Put a good tractor back to work. 800-808-7885, 402-374-2202 JOHN DEERE 245 SL loader, fits JD tractors 70’s-80’s, 73” bucket, w/mounting brackets, hydraulic valve, excellent condition, like new, $3,750 OBO. 804-337-2319

Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

ONE OF LARGEST Selections of JD & Case IH combines on East Coast. Most sell with 1 year warranty on motor & transmissions. (No one but us do this!) Low trucking rates. 3.9% finance rate. Zeisloft Farm Eq., Bloomsburg, PA 800-919-3322 zeisloftequip.com ONE OF LARGEST Selections of JD & Case IH combines in East. All backed by warranty. We specialize in later model combines. 3.9% 5 year or 4.9% (7) year. 1-800919-3322 zeisloftequip.com PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com Self-propelled new Holland 1069, 160 bale, wagon, $23,500. 1049, 160 bale, wagon, $10,100. 1068, gas, 108 bale, $10,800. 1047, 119 bale, $8,000. Pull type, 1044, 119 bale, $3,300. 1030, 70 bale, $1,600. 1002, 56 bale, $1,400. All checked out in shop. Can deliver. Roeder Impl. Seneca, KS 785-3366103

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 WE HAVE 7 CASE IH 2366 combines for sale today. All have super sharp appearance & quality. all sell with one year motor and transmission warranty. 3.9% fin. Zeisloft Farm Eq., Bloomsburg, PA 800919-3322

1954 JD 40 UTILITY, wide front, 3 point hitch. 518-2563169

JOHN DEERE 915 flex head, see-thru reel, exc. cond., low acres, shed kept, $6,900 OBO. 804-337-2319

(2) TAYLOR COTTON BOWL buggies, 1995 model, exc. condition, $7,000 ea. 757342-6981

L2 GLEANER COMBINE, 16’ flex & 16’ rigid head, good condition, $15,000 OBO. 585721-7684

WE SELL AFTERMARKET combine & tractor parts. We ship! Most parts 1/2 of OEM with 1 year warranty! Zeisloft Eq. parts #570-437-3440

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Maine To North Carolina PleasantCreekHay.com

Hiring For Fall?

108@EFD’s

WelsArth@Msn.com

Partner Up Instead

Got a Facebook? SO DO WE!!! Swing by, and say ‘Hi’!!! www.Facebook.com/CountryFolks

25% Bank Financed @ $47,250 / Partner / The Works


1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Farm Machinery Wanted

WANTED

Hay - Straw For Sale MIXED GRASS HAY for sale. $35.00/Roll, 4x5. 540-8602145

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293 Fencing

ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

Financial Services

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES @ COLUMBIA TRACTOR INC. 841 Route 9H, Claverack, NY 12513

FARM EQUIPMENT MECHANIC: Qualifications Needed: 2 years + previous experience as farm equipment mechanic. Skills required - diagnosis of repairs needed and proper repair of farm tractors - hay and forage equipment, planting and seeding equipment - tillage equipment.

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

PARTS COUNTER PERSON: Qualifications Needed: 2 years experience as parts counter person or related experience. Familiarity w/looking up parts on computer w/customers on phone or at counter for farm. Familiarity w/farm - light construction - lawn & garden equipment will be a plus. Good people & communications skills w/customers & employees.

Financial Services

BENEFITS AVAILABLE: HEALTH INSURANCE - 401K & PROFIT SHARING - UNIFORMS - PAID VACATION & PERSONAL TIME

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices

519-529-1141

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment NEW JAMESWAY Unloaders In Stock. Sales, Parts and Service on Jamesway, VanDale, J-Star and Big Jim Unloaders. Converting Harvestore silos to top unloading. 717-768-7456

REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR 717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

Tractors

Tractors

Massey 5445 Very Good Condition! 4WD, 800 Hrs., One Owner

COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC.

$37,900

BOX 660, CLAVERACK, NY 12513

Poultry & Rabbits

INDIVIDUALS FOR CUSTOM HARVESTING OPERATION

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

PLEASE REPLY TO: Stu Kinne 518-828-1781, Ext. 115 or 113 - Email skinne@columbiatractor.com Julie Kinne 518-828-1781, Ext. 111 - Email jkinne@columbiatractor.com

Help Wanted

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

Mt. Airy Equipment Co., Inc. Call: 336-786-6240 www.mtairyequipmentco.com

Texas through Montana 2011 Season

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

VIRGINIA BIN SERVICE SPECIALIZING IN GRAIN BIN RELOCATION Parts & Service New Installations

804-387-6462 Hay - Straw For Sale FOR SALE: Quality first & second cut big & small square bales. Delivered. 315-264-3900

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

519-482-5365 Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw Wanted Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted. Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment Contacts: Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com Dave Tranquillo 610-926-8811 ext. 5223 dtranquillo@giorgimush.com Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

WANTED

Hay & Straw - All Types We Pick Up & Pay Cell 973-876-8222 Buyers & Sellers

Hay - Straw For Sale

The Best Method For Covering Hay Stacks

Must be honest, hard working with farm background.

402-364-2222 LARGE COMMERCIAL family dairy and heifer grower seeking working herdsman to join us in sunny North Carolina. AI and herd health, with some supervisory and outside responsibilities. Additional preferences include recent verifiable experience, Animal Science degree, or fluency in Dutch or Spanish. Serious applicants only reply in confidence to 704-450-7051 for additional details.

Horses 2 TARPAN COLTS, look alike yearlings, gentle, halter broke. dixiemeadows@erols.com 540-937-5186

Nursery Stock MUSCADINE GRAPEVINES, varieties include Carlos, Summit & Tara. Price $3.75 per vine. Bodenhamer Farms & Nursery 910-422-8118 office, 910-608-9823 Louie, 910-733-2760 Aaron

Parts & Repair

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS

PROTECT YOUR FEED FROM THE WEATHER Save money in prevented feed losses & up to 5 seasons of use Large Inventory • Next Day Shipping

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS!

ROCKY MEADOW FARM

Call the IH Parts Specialists:

1-866-887-2727 • 1-717-228-2727

Extremely hearty & perfect for free range Layer Chicks, Turkeys Ducklings, Guineas, Much More

(814) 539-7026

www.myerspoultry.com

Real Estate For Sale

CALL FOR INFORMATION Mt. Airy Equipment Co., Inc. Call: 336-786-6240 www.mtairyequipmentco.com

HUNTING/CAMPING PROPERTY

New Holland C175

Southwestern Virginia Bland County

Track Loader w/72” low profile bucket w/teeth, 1 owner, purchased new 200814 Original hours, New Cond.

ATV Trails, Springs Deer, Turkey, Grouse Adjoins National Forest

$

$90,000 Several Purchase Options Available. Call

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

1-800-248-2955

25,500

Original Cost $37,228

540-255-9112

Contact Ken

Roofing

Roofing

336-399-1073

ROOFING & SIDING e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

www.supertarp.com • rockymeadowfarm@evenlink.com

(7 Meat Varieties)

62+/- ACRES

BATES CORPORATION

810 South 14th Ave., Lebanon, PA 17042

Several Used Round & Square Balers to choose from

Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

Come visit us online at: www.LeePub.com And check out all our great publications!!!

Trucks GMC 1993 CAT 3116 diesel, 6 speed, air brakes, 32,000 gvw, 151” CA, 326,800 miles, $4,500 OBO. 804-457-4495

Page 23 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 24

Sell Your Your Items Reader Ads Ads Sell ItemsThrough Through Reader P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com classified@leepub.com

Trailers

Trailers 2011 Rollin-S 20’x7’, 7k torsion axles, wood floor, electric brakes, tube/plank solid sides, full escape door, dual sing cut gates, 2 cut gates spaced 4/8/8, canvas top, 16” radial Goodyear tires with spare. Call for Price

RILEY

I-77 & US #421

LIVESTOCK

336-477-5165 336-469-2117 2011 Rollin-S 24’x8’, Commercial Grade Livestock Trailer, 1x3 tube sides, heavy duty electric brakes, 235/75/R17.5 Goodyear Tires with spare, 2 cut gates spaced 4/10/10, cleated rubber floor, canvas top, dual swing cutgates, full escape door

Call for Price

RILEY

I-77 & US #421

LIVESTOCK

336-477-5165 336-469-2117 2006 Gooseneck Brand 28’x7’6”, rubber floor, 2 cut gates spaced 8/12/8, 235/75/R17.5 16 ply tires, 10K Dexter torsion axles, new canvas top, electric/hyd. brakes. Very good condition.

RILEY

I-777 & USS #421

LIVESTOCK

Reduced Price! Call fo Price

336-477-5165 336-469-2117

Calendar of Events MID-ATLANTIC REGION NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the Calendar of Events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

JUN 21-JUL 15 Sign up for the 2011-2012 Cover Crop Program Soil Conservation District Offices Statewide. Program details will be mailed in May to farmers who participated in last year’s program. Farmers are asked to mark their calendars and check with their soil conservation districts in upcoming weeks for this year’s program requirements and highlights. JUL 9-15 National Junior Limousin Show, All American Limousin Futurity Tri-State Expo Complex and the Ambassador Hotel in Amarillo, Texas. The NJLS&C will not accept entries after June 10. Contact North American Limousin Foundation (NALF), 303220-1693. On Internet at www.nalf.org JUL 10-16 National Junior Angus Show Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex, Harrisburg, PA. Contest entry deadlines and further information about the NJAS are available at www.njas.info Contact Junior Activities Dept., 816383-5100. On Internet at www.njas.info

JUL 12, 14, 21 & 26 Nutrient Management Farmer Training and Certification Workshop University of Maryland Extension Office, Ellicott City, MD. Training & certification program for operators of pasture based operations who are interested in becoming certified by MDA to write and update their own nutrient management plans. Call 410-841-5959. On Internet at www.mda.state.md.us JUL 13 Maryland Agricultural Commission to Meet Maryland Dept. of Agriculture (MDA) headquarters, 50 Harry S. Truman Pkwy., Annapolis, MD. 8:30 AM. Contact Maryland Department of Agriculture, 410841-5881. JUL 16 Western PA Championship Show & The Red and White Open Show Lawrence County Fairgrounds, Newcastle, PA. 9 am. Contact Tom Uber, 814777-3777. JUL 21 Horse Pasture Walk Series CMREC 4241 Folly Quarter Road, Ellicott City, MD. 6-8 pm. Contact Jennifer Reynolds, 301-405-1547. JUL 21-22 NC Goat & Sheep Producers Roundup IV Lenior CCE Center, 1791 Hwy. 11/55, Kinston, NC. Registration deadline July 11. The pre-registration cost is $40/day for adults and $10/day for youth (18 years and younger). The FAMACHA certification price is $12 extra. A $10 late fee will be charged after the July 11 deadline. For event information and for registration information, go to http:// franklin.ces.ncsu.edu Contact Martha Mobley, 919496-3344.

JUL 28 2011 Commodity Classic Queen Anne’s 4-H Park in Centreville. Contact MGPA Office, 410-956-5771. Grain Marketing for Women Chesapeake College, Wye Mills, MD. 8:30 am - noon. $10/person and includes breakfast and materials. Call 410-758-0166 or jrhodes @umd.edu AUG 3 2011 Field Day Program Shenandoah Valley Agricultural Research & Extension Center, 128 McCormick Farm Circle, Raphine VA. 12-1:15 pm. Register by Fri., July 29. Contact Shenandoah Valley AREC, 540-3772255. AUG 5 Maryland Nutrient Management Certification Exam Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. 911 am. Individuals who want to become certified to write nutrient management plans for farmers should attend. The cost is $50; however, government employees and farmers who have previously taken the exam are exempt from the exam fee. Contact Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, 410-841-5959. On Internet at www.mda .state.md.us AUG 10-12 31st Annual National Pike Steam, Gas & Horse Association Show National Pike Steam, Gas, & Horse Association Grounds, 222 Spring Rd, (4 miles west of Brownsville off US 40), Brownsville, PA. Antique farm, construction, mining equipment, trucks and more. Contact Louis McMaster, 724-356-2307.

SEP 7 Farm Estate Planning Workshop Chesapeake College, Wye Mills, MD. 8:30 am registration. 9 am - 1 pm. Call 410758-0166 or jrhodes @umd.edu SEP 15-18 State 4-H Championship Horse & Pony Show Virginia Horse Center, Lexington, VA. Contact Celeste Crisman, 540-231-9162, ccrisman@vt.edu or Joi Saville, 540-231-2257, joi.saville @vt.edu SEP 16 & 21 14th Annual All Dairy Antiques & Collectibles Show Dairy Activity Center, PA Farm Show Complex & Expo Center, Harrisburg, PA. Fri. noon - 5 pm. Sat. thru Wed. 8 am - 5 pm. Free parking, free exhibitor space & free admission. Featuring Holstein breed items, but all dairy related collectors and invited and encouraged to attend. Antique Consignment Auction Tues., Sept. 20. Contact Gary Gojsovich 717-635-5067 or Lolly Lesher 717-787-2905. SEP 22-24 3rd International Symposium on Mastitis and Milk Quality St. Louis, MO. Submission of abstracts for presentation at this fall symposium (either as a poster or orally) will be due by March 1. Watch the NMC Web site at nmconline.org for more details. SEP 30 - OCT 6 65th Robeson Regional Agricultural Fair Robeson Co. Fairgrounds, Hwy. 41 South, Lumberton, NC. Call 910-671-3276.

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The next load of cattle may carry more than just an opportunity for profit

Producers who regularly deal with high-risk cattle — those animals that may weigh a little

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coplasma bovis can do to cattle health. However, even the best-prepared operations can experience the disease. “If you are buying wellmanaged cattle, you don’t generally see M. bovis as a common theme, but every once in a while you get proof of the problem,” said Daniel Scruggs, DVM, Veterinary Operations, Pfizer Animal Health. “We don’t know how it happens, but all of a sudden we can see herds that are treating for M. bovis, but by far the most common manifestation is in cattle that are at high risk.” M. bovis is one of the most common infectious agents connected to clinical cases of bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which is estimated to cost the beef industry nearly $1 billion in economic losses

from death, reduced feed efficiency and increased treatment costs. Dr. Scruggs notes that producers should pay close attention to classes of cattle that are most likely to develop M. bovis-related disease, including cattle that have been commingled, lightweight cattle, and cattle that have been stressed. Knowing the level of risk is particularly important if producers are dealing with types of cattle they don’t normally handle as a response to higher feeder prices. “When cattle prices go up, some producers tend to handle riskier cattle,” Dr. Scruggs said. “Any time people dramatically change the quality of cattle they are buying,

they may be surprised by what they encounter disease wise.” Dr. Scruggs recommends producers work with their veterinarians to control M. bovis before it becomes a problem by treating cattle on arrival with an effective, proven antimicrobial and instituting management changes to help control spread of disease. “I advise producers to treat all respiratory disease in cattle as if Mycoplasma bovis were a component, because in many cattle it is M. bovis,” Dr. Scruggs says. “If you do it right, you may never identify if M. bovis was a component because the cattle are treated, get better and move on with their lives.”

Juniors give back to community Donate items at the 2011 NJAS to deployed troops. The National Junior Angus Association (NJAA) believes giving back builds responsibility and leadership skills. Juniors can further develop these skills at the 2011 National Junior Angus Show (NJAS) in Harrisburg, PA, by participating in the Support Our American Recruits (SOAR) community service project. “The community service project helps instill charitable qualities in junior Angus members,”

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said Jaclyn Upperman, junior board member and 2011 NJAS junior co-chairman. The SOAR program is for any American soldier who has served or will serve in the armed forces. The community service project accommodates the NJAS theme “Let Freedom Ring” and honors Pennsylvania history and military ties. “Through SOAR, juniors will better realize how important soldiers are and will hopefully continue to contribute once back in their own states,” Upperman says. The program began after Sept. 11, 2001, as a support group for military families. The program now sends 600 care packages per year to deployed troops throughout the world. SOAR provides more than items to soldiers, says Becky Bair, SOAR executive director. “It lets troops know they are not forgotten and are appre-

ciated while providing them a taste of home to keep their morale up.” NJAA members and families can donate items to deployed troops during the NJAS Opening Ceremonies on July 11 or throughout the week at the SOAR tradeshow booth. “It is hard for all of us back home to realize how much we take for granted,” Bair says. “Even the most basic items are appreciated when received.” The SOAR tradeshow booth also accepts full military addresses for specific soldiers to receive a care package. The SOAR program also serves as a support group twice a month for military family members. Visit www.supportouramericanrecruits.co m for more information. “As volunteers we feel that it is not what SOAR does, rather it is about the troops and what they do for us,” Bair said.

Page 25 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Unloading Mycoplasma bovis


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 26

‘Young Guns’ prepare to network and share innovative practices NASHVILLE, TN — The Red Angus Association of America (RAAA) and the American Simmental Association (ASA) are again teaming up to gather forward-thinking producers at the annual Young Guns Conference, July 24-26, in Nashville, TN. The conference offers a combination of speakers, interactive discussions, tours and relationshipbuilding activities between cattlemen and national staff. “Young Guns gives us enthusiasm that we bring back to our operation,” said Sarah Jones of Red Hill Farms, Lafayette, TN. “We have built many friendships with progressive breeders across the nation, which is valuable to the future of our own operation.” While the name of the conference implies an age limit for attendees, that is not the case. “Young Guns is open to any age and is designed for young-minded producers who want to learn more about the Red Angus and Simmental breeds, as well as the beef industry,” said Kenda Ponder, RAAA member services director and one of the event's planners. This is the seventh year for the Young Guns Conference, but only the third year Red Angus and Simmental breeds have joined forces to plan the interactive conference and provide networking opportunities

between the two breeds. “Young Guns creates a unique synergy between Red Angus and Simmental breeders that is unprecedented in the beef industry,” said Jones. She added that the networking she and husband, Bart, gain from learning about other producers’ operation is invaluable. Schedule Young Guns 2011 will kick off Sunday, July 24, at 5:30 CDT at the Holiday Inn. Attendees will enjoy a welcome dinner and visit with fellow producers and national staff. Later that evening, Young Guns can tour Nashville’s 2nd Avenue and Broadway clubs, where budding country artists perform. Monday morning, July 25, Young Guns will depart for CPC Commodities at Fountain Run, KY. CPC Commodities provides complete feed rations to producers across the United States. They have been in business over 30 years — perfecting feed rations for their own stockerbackgrounding operation that is one of the largest east of the Mississippi River. During lunch, Gini Chase of Buffalo Creek Red Angus, Leiter, WY, will open discuss the changes she has witnessed in the seedstock industry in her 38 years as a seedstock producer. Then, Young Guns will

split into teams for interactive discussions on the different segments of seedstock production and marketing, and predict how these components will change by the year 2020. The day will conclude with a tour, program and supper at Red Hill Farms, a diversified operation raising Red Angus, Simmental and SimAngus cattle, Duroc and Landrace hogs, and burley tobacco. Red Hill Farms also directly markets beef and pork products from their farm. Tuesday morning, July 26, attendees will explore practices to add

value to feeder cattle in the eastern U.S., where cowherds are smaller than in the west, but combined cattle numbers in Kentucky and Tennessee rank them second nationally. Seedstock producers will gain a general knowledge of the area’s commercial industry to help their bull customers overcome marketing obstacles. Dr. Wade Shafer, ASA director of performance programs, and Larry Keenan, RAAA director of breed improvement, will initiate interactive exercises and discussion on the next generation of selection tools.

Attendees will also have the opportunity to ask ASA Executive Vice President Jerry Lipsey and RAAA CEO Greg Comstock questions about the two breeds ongoing relationship and what to expect in the future. Paul Bennett of Knoll Crest Farms, Red House, VA, a past BIF president and BIF Seedstock Producer of the Year winner, will conclude the program. Bennett, who markets 150 bulls a year in Virginia, will address what attributes make a successful seedstock supplier. “Young Guns is one of the best programs I’ve

attended,” said Donnell Brown of R.A. Brown Ranch, Throckmorton, Texas. “It is a chance to learn vital information about our breed and the beef business from industry experts, while building excellent relationships with other leaders from around the country.” This year’s Young Gun conference will headquarter out of the Holiday Inn Nashville Opryland Airport hotel. For a complete agenda, registration form and hotel reservation information, visit redangus.org or www.simmental.org .

Beef Council offers matching grant program BEDFORD, PA — The Pennsylvania Beef Council is now accepting matching grant applications for beef promotions. Eligible projects strive to increase beef’s visibility at consumer events, while promoting good stewardship and nutritional messages. The application deadline is Friday, Aug. 12. With a completed application, county or regional groups can become eligible to receive matching funds up to $500 and materials, for local beef promotions. The Beef Council board of directors will review applications and fund promotions that

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by Sally Colby The ‘average’ mid-west feedlot is a easy to describe: it’s a relatively large outdoor facility with cattle in various stages of finishing. In contrast, beef feeding facilities in the northeast vary widely. Feedlots range from traditional bank barns and partially covered feedlots to repurposed dairy freestall barns and slatted floor facilities. The monoslope barn, which typically has a roof sloped to the north with southern exposure, is becoming popular for newly constructed feedlots. In some areas of the nation, beef and dairy operations are being held to increasingly stringent nutrient management requirements to manage the environmental effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Nebraska, a major cattle feedlot state, is encouraging producers to stop adding supplemental phosphorus to beef diets. And Pennsylvania, known throughout the northeast for precision dairy feeding, is now the first state in the nation to have a beef feed management program. The goal of certified feeding programs is to control nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), that build up in soil and/or leach into groundwater and runoff. Rebecca White, senior project associate at Penn State, says in working with Galen Erickson at the University of Nebraska, she learned that that state’s main goal is to get beef feeders to stop feeding supplemental phosphorus. “There’s too much phosphorus in grain,” said White, “exacerbated by byproducts such as dried distillers grains/solubles and corn gluten feed.” White says the 1996 NRC recommends .2 percent P, but that value is

considered outdated. Phosphorus availability is underestimated, with a value of .67 for all feedstuffs. And although P is necessary in the diet, the requirements for gain and maintenance are overestimated. “The industry is currently feeding .35 to .39 percent phosphorus,” said White. “The current recommendation is .15 or lower, and .12 is more accurate for what we want to consider standard.” Phosphorus is supplemented to avoid insufficiencies, but White says that is part of the archaic feeding management that was standard prior to the use of by-products in feed. “Dried distillers grains (DDG) are .8 percent phosphorus,” she said. “There is probably no need for supplementing P beyond feeding corn or by-product feeds.” When White was working in the Midwest, she found that nitrogen is overapplied and that crop ground has high nitrate levels. “There’s a huge disconnect between feedlots and crop growers in the Midwest,” said White. “If you’re a feedlot, you’re trying to get rid of that manure as quickly and as inexpensively as possible. If you’re a crop farmer, you’re looking for the cheapest source of fertilizer. They’re purchasing fertilizer rather than trying to utilize neighbors’ manure.” Educational efforts focus on helping feedlot operators to understand N and P requirements and metabolism in feedlot cattle, assistance in implementing feeding programs that maximize animal performance while minimizing total nutrient excretion. White says that DDG might be more closely monitored in the future. “When using DDG, in general, excreted nitro-

A settling basin for manure at this beef feedlot includes a picket fence dam that filters liquids. The liquid portion drains onto permanent grass so that nutrients are retained. Photo by Sally Colby

gen will increase by 50 percent with most loss through ammonia,” she said. “If air quality is brought into feed management, this might be an issue.” She adds that increasing the overall efficiency of the beef operation through management will influence beef feedlot nutrients. “Weighing animals before and after (the feeding period),” tracking average daily gain — how can we increase the whole efficiency of the system?” Phase feeding the beef herd will also be a factor as regulations are tightened. “Different stages of finishing require different levels of protein,” said White. “Protein deposition is higher in younger animals and as the animal gets older, fat deposition increases. This is where growth promotants come in — they help maintain that protein deposition for a longer period of time.” Although dairy farmers in the

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Chesapeake Bay watershed have already been managing potential nutrient pollution through precision feeding, beef cattle feedlots are now being encouraged to adopt similar programs. States in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed will be watching as precision feeding for beef cattle is implemented. Right now, any Pennsylvania NRCSqualified feed-management plan writer can become certified to write plans for beef operations through the American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists (ARPAS). “Pennsylvania is at the top of the list for dairy cow feeding, and when Pennsylvania does something, people notice,” said White. “The take-away message is that if you are feeding any kind of grain or by-product, phosphorus supplementation really isn’t needed.”

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Page 27 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Precision feeding for beef feedlots


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 28

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by Cari Rincker, Esq. All parties involved with embryo transfers should consider memorializing the terms of the agreement in writing. Contracts are important because it clearly defines the terms of the agreement and obligations of both parties. Each party in an embryo transfer transaction has specific interests to protect. Below are some suggested terms for the livestock industry that should be included in contracts dealing with embryo transfers. Recipient Agreement - Livestock producers who are selling embryo transfer recipient should make sure that the following terms are included in the written contract: (1) sale/rental price of recipient; (2) payment terms including penalties for late payments; (3) instructions for receipt of embryos; (4) embryo transfer fees; (5) dates/procedures/costs associated with pregnancy checks (e.g., palpation, ultrasound); (6) duration

that recipient will stay under the care of owner and any daily boarding/maintenance fees (e.g., feed, pasture); (7) if necessary, reimbursement for routine veterinary care and transportation; (8) limitation of liability for congenital birth defects or reasonable birthing difficulties; and, (9) if appropriate, security on the embryo transfer progeny and the assignment of necessary registration papers. Furthermore, the recipient owner may request additional fees for genetic testing or marketing services. Breeder Agreement - On the other hand, breeders should make sure that the recipient owner agrees to bear the burden that the recipient is (1) in good health and obtains necessary vaccinations; (2) within the appropriate age range; (3) has an acceptable body condition score; (4) if appropriate, a certain breed or color pattern (e.g., solid black/red hided); and, (5) is structurally sound. The breeder may want

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to hold the recipient owner liable for gross negligence or intentional misconduct relating to the care of the recipient and the progeny including birthing complications and require that the recipient owner use best management practices. If the recipient owner will be raising the progeny until weaning and retaining ownership of the recipient, the breeder may want to list special management terms (e.g., early weaning, creep feeding, DNA testing). Flush Agreement - If a livestock breeder is purchasing a flush from another owner, the breeder may want to memorialize a minimum number of transferable embryos from the flush (e.g., five embryos) and the date/procedures for the receipt of the flush. Additionally, this breeder would also want to make sure that that flush is guaranteed to be what was ordered (e.g., free of certain genetic defects, use of sexed semen) and note liquidated damages in case of an error. Conversely, the owner who will be flushing the embryos will want to enumerate the payment terms including shipping expenses and ensure that he/she is not responsible for the transfer of the embryos to the recipient or birthing problems that may occur. General Considerations - There are also some general considerations that the parties should consider such as

the name and contact information of the parties (including D/B/A or corporate business entity), choice of law, and attorneys’ fees for the prevailing party in a dispute. The contract should also be binding on the heirs, successors and assigns. Additionally, some parties wish to have an arbitration clause or alternatively a forum selection clause for a neutral courtroom. Some embryo transfer contracts also require credit card information to be used as security for late payment. Finally, each party of the contract should agree to comply with all federal, state, and local laws including livestock animal cruelty laws. It is highly suggested that all parties dealing with embryo transfers put their agreements in writing. The agriculture industry is notoriously trustworthy oftentimes doing business with a handshake. Having terms of an agreement in writing is not an indication of a lack of trust; instead, it is a sound business practice. Things go wrong outside of everyone’s control. Make sure everyone involved in the transaction is clear on the terms of the agreement in a legally enforceable contract and all parties’ interests are protected. Contract law is state specific so it is recommended that livestock producers seek counsel from an attorney licensed in their jurisdiction.

Page 29 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

More than a handshake: embryo transfer contracts for the livestock industry


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 30

AABP calls for applications for 2nd Annual AgriLabs Dr. Bruce Wren Continuing Education Awards AgriLabs $5,000 grants to a beef and a dairy veterinarian In collaboration with the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP), AgriLabs is offering an award to two veterinarians — one beef and one dairy — to encourage and fund recent graduates in their postgraduate continuing education efforts. Named as a tribute to Bruce Wren, D.V.M., each award will provide $5,000 for professional-development training so these practitioners may better serve their producer-clients. Completed applications are due July 15, and the presentations will be made at the annual AABP Awards Banquet. “The gap between the number of veterinarians available to serve dairy and beef producers, and the actual need is increasing at an alarming rate,” says Steve Schram, AgriLabs President and CEO. “The grants will encourage these veterinarians to remain in large animal medicine by providing a significant resource for self-directed professional development.” Developing the innovative award “We found that after graduation, there really weren’t many industrysponsored awards or professional-development opportunities for veterinarians until they had spent many years in practice,” says Dr. M. Gatz Riddell, AABP executive vice president and member of that planning committee. “Yet, the years after graduation are a key time when veterinarians not only gain experience, but also are likely to decide whether to continue in herd-side practice or move into other career

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New Holland BR 740 twine tie, good condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 New Holland BR 770 5x5, net wrap, BC plus monitor, good condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,500 New Holland BR 770 twine tie, 5x5, ex. condition, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 New Holland BR 740 Silage Special, net & twine tie, BC plus monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,500 New Holland BR780 5x5 w/ net . . . . . . . $18,500 New Holland 664 round baler, bale command monitor, twine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 Good Selection of Kuhn Hay Equipment in Stock

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paths. The AgriLabs $5,000 awards will be vital in helping veterinarians gain more experience in individual animal and herd production medicine, helping them bring value to their producerclients for years to come.” Create your award The grant process allows applicants to determine how best they want to use the $5,000 grant from AgriLabs and judging will be based on three primary criteria: 1) The applicants’ professional-development plan, which describes the skills/knowledge they would like to improve to become a more valuable resource for their producer-clients. 2) How the $5,000 will be

utilized to fulfill the professional-development plan. 3) Letters of reference from three individuals (including at least one producer and one veterinarian) who have first-hand knowledge of the applicant’s practice experience and educational interest. “What is especially exciting about the AgriLabs Dr. Wren awards are the variety of the plans, programs and educational goals that applicants have submitted as a means of improving their skills and becoming more effective in bovine medicine,” says Riddell. “The professional development plans funded by the $5,000 grants from AgriLabs have included par-

ticipation in technical and business-oriented short courses, advanced educational training, and mentoring opportunities with an exemplary veterinarian. While each applicant’s background, experience and future direction will differ, the AgriLabs awards will benefit participating veterinarians, their producers and

the industry at large.” To apply A full description of AgriLabs Dr. Bruce Wren Continuing Education Awards and a link to the application forms are available at www.AgriLabs.com/scholarships. The application may be completed online and all materials postmarked on or before July 15. The

awards are open to AABP members in good standing; are actively involved in practice; and who graduated with a DVM/VMD degree between June 1, 2001, and June 1, 2010. The professional-development opportunity described in the application

AABP 31 • WE TAKE TRADES

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The Angus Foundation was honored June 13, for excellence in producing publications and communication projects at the annual meeting of the National Agricultural Alumni and Development Association (NAA-

DA) in Lubbock, Texas. Among the 48 total entries submitted by 14 institutions, including agricultural colleges, alumni associations and other agricultural organizations from across the U.S., the Angus Founda-

tion received the following awards: • 1st place, print media category, annual report/strategic plan, for the 2010 Angus Foundation Annual Report — Their Story is Our Story • 2nd place,

events/program category, for BlackOnTrack! Angus Magic at Churchill Downs NAADA is a professional association that provides education and support for professionals, volunteers and student leaders who are dedicat-

Ridgeview New Holland, Inc. For pricing and a full list of new and used equipment Visit our Web site www.ridgeviewnh.com (Web site updated daily) Or Call toll Free 1-888-917-5192

ed to expanding the human resources and financial support for landgrant colleges of agricultural sciences and related programs. The awards competition was established to recognize outstanding publications and communication projects among the organization’s membership. “To be recognized by one’s peers for outstanding work is the utmost compliment an organization can receive,” said Milford Jenkins, Angus Foundation president. “I give all credit to our tal-

ented professional staff and the dedicated volunteers who contributed their countless hours of time, energies and creative skills to helping the Angus Foundation provide for the benefit of our supporters the caliber of projects, events and publications resulting in the achievement of these prestigious awards.” This is the seventh year the Angus Foundation has entered projects in the competition. The Angus Foundation has won awards in six of those seven years.

AABP from 30

Ford 8240

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NH 144 windrow inverter was $2,000 buy it now for

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$

1,800

John Deere 2760 4WD cab less loader 24,500 with loader, New Roman engine $

28,900

Additional Used Equipment Woods 3180 15 ft batwing cutter . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,650 JD 535 Round Baler, Twine wrap . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,000 Kubota BX1800 w/new loader low hrs . . . . . . . . .$8,500

Massey Ferguson 240 low hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 New Holland BR770 Round Baler Auto-Wrap . . .$11,500 New Holland 1411 Discbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500

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540-672-4900 • 1-888-917-5192 Visit our web site: www.ridgeviewnh.com

The NDE mixer will cut and mix long stem fiber in an even, consistent ration. They are built with quality components, simple to maintain, while mixing fast and efficiently with NO dead spots. They really do work! Why buy any other mixer?

Better Utilization & Improved Efficiency = More Turns Lost River, West Virginia beef producer, Tim Wilkins, is a believer after 3 years owning a NDE mixer. Tim says his NDE’s ability to utilize and uniformly mix rougher, lower cost fiber sources as a benefit. This allows him to better utilize and stretch out his more costly feed ingredients such as corn silage and distiller grains. This in turn enables him to feed out 1 more lead of cattle per year without sacrificing the desired ADG on the cattle hes feeding. Having demoed several competitive brands of mixers prior to his NDE purchase, Tim states that for his money, there was no comparison. Check out for yourself the NDE advantage! Knight 4036 Bowtec Mixer, Stainless Liner, Nice Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 Vermeer SW2500 3 Yr. Old, Bale Wraper, Ex. Shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900 Gehl 7190 Feed Wagon, Exc. Cond. .$4,750 Salsco Round Bale Wrapper, 3Pt Hitch, Good Cond., Ready to Work . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,250 Anderson 680S Single Bale Wrapper, Big Round-Big Square, Ex. Cond. . . . . . . .Call!

Rental M&S Grain Crusher, Rollermill/Bagger, does 5’x200’ bags, approx. 2500 bu. High Moisture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call! Jaylor 3425 s/n TB0402653D, Used 5 Years, Ready to Work! . . . . . .Reduced to $18,450 Anderson Hybrid Wrapper (Big Square & Big Round) Used 1 Season, Exc. Cond.$22,500

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can apply to either individual animal medicine (e.g., diagnosis, treatment, surgery, case management, pain management, patient welfare) or herd production medicine (e.g., records analysis, disease prevention, production enhancement, benchmarking, biosecurity, food safety). AgriLabs: sustaining the legacy of continuing education These AgriLabs -veterinary awards are named in honor of Bruce Wren, D.V.M., Ph.D., who is highly regarded for his commitment to both practical and formal con-

tinuing education. “Dr. Wren’s service to the profession as a practitioner, a teacher, a veterinary pathologist and a technical services veterinarian has been exemplary,” says Schram. “AgriLabs is so pleased to give back to the profession in his name with this significant award. Whether the veterinarians receiving these $5,000 continuing education grants come from single-veterinarian or multi-practitioner practices, or from areas with high or low beef and dairy concentrations, this investment will be good for bovine medicine.”

• ‘04 Vermeer 554XL, good Condition, 4x4 . . .$11,600(A) • Kubota M6800, 4WD, cab, air, heat, 1,140 hrs., loader, above average condition, manual shuttle . . . . . . .$26,000

‘08 Kubota M108S 545 hours, 4WD, cab ..............................................$35,500 (A)

(2) JD 6430’s cab, air, 4WD, low hours, clean units.............................$54,500 (A)

‘08 NH TL100 2,800 hrs., cab, 4WD, loader, new front tires . . . . $36,500 (M)

• ‘93 JD 6300 2WD, 3,480 hrs., local trade, well maintained, good condition, A/C, sharp! . . .Reduced to $19,500 (B) • 8’ finishing disk, 18”, ex. working cond., wheel & cylinder carrier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 (B) • ‘04 JD 6420 4WD, cab, JD 640 SL loader, 4,700 hrs, good cond., new tires all around . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,500 (A) • JD Gator XUV 4x4, gas, camo, windshield, canopy top, nice! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,950 (B) • ‘02 JD 6420 1,036 hrs., cab, PQ, 4WD . . . .$45,500 (B) • ‘05 JD 457 4x5, double elec. tie, monitor, ex cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 (G) • ‘88 NH 853 round baler, good cond. . . . . . . .$2,000 (B) • ‘94 JD 6300 open, ROPS, 4WD, 16:16 PQ, trans., good cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$26,900 (A) • Case International 784, cab, good cond. . . .$8,500 (A) • ‘07 JD 582 Round Baler, 4x5, Silage Special, Mega-Wide, Net Wrap, Ex. Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,000

We Are The Area’s New Headquarters for Gator Flatbed Trailers. ‘02 Kubota M6800 4WD, cab, air, heat, Call/See Us on 1,140 hrs., ldr., above av. cond., manual These Units! shuttle ..........................................$26,000

‘07 JD 5103 45HP, 250 hours, ex. condition .....................................................$12,900

‘98 Cat D5MXL Dozer, 3,400 hours, good condition.......................................$39,000

‘99 New Holland TL100 open, 4WD, Woods loader, 1 owner, new front tires, 90’s rear.. ..............................................$25,000 (M)

2000 JD 4600, 72” mid deck mower, 74” ‘90 JD 375 round baler, 5x4 bales, good snow blade, Frontier 1060 (60”) 3pt hitch condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,000 (A) cutter, 349 hrs, Like new! .............$17,500

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Page 31 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • July 11, 2011

Angus Foundation wins national communication awards


July 11, 2011 • MID-ATLANTIC COUNTRY FOLKS FARM CHRONICLE • Page 32

SEE ONE OF THESE AUTHORIZED KUBOTA DEALERS NEAR YOU! NORTH CAROLINA BROOKS SALES, INC. 3144 Hwy 74 E.• Monroe, NC 28112 704-233-4242 • fax 704-233-4244 CORRIHER TRACTOR INC. 555 Wilkesboro Blvd. • Lenoir, NC 28645 828-758-5506 • fax 828-758-3022 RIDDLE TRACTOR 3640 Glenn Ave. • PO Box 4021 Winston Salem, NC 27105 336-767-2001 • fax 336-767-0168 Email: info@riddletractor.com SINK FARM EQUIPMENT 1840 West Hwy 64 Lexington, NC 27295 336-243-5138

VIRGINIA BEVERAGE TRACTOR 2085 Stuarts Draft Hwy • Stuarts Draft, VA 24477 540-337-1090 • 800-296-3325 www.beveragetractor.com TAYLOR-FORBES EQUIP. CO, INC. 1102 East Third St. • Farmville, VA 23901 434-392-4139 • 800-626-7459 www.taylor-forbes.com CAVALIER INTERNATIONAL INC. 10450 Success St. • Ashland, VA 23005 804-798-1500 • fax 804-752-2164 COLLIE EQUIPMENT CO. 1101 Industrial Ave. • Danville, VA 24541 800-348-7486

VIRGINIA SPAULDING EQUIP. CO. Hwy. 360 • Clover, VA 24534 434-735-8161 • fax 434-735-8628 WOODSTOCK EQUIPMENT CO. Route 11 North Woodstock, VA 22664 540-459-3233 • fax 540-459-3286 VALLEY IMPLEMENT SALES 230 Charles Street Harrisonburg, VA 22803 540-434-9961 • fax 540-434-3779 ROCKBRIDGE FARMERS COOPERATIVE 645 Waddell Ave Lexington, VA 24450 540-463-7381 • 800-868-7336

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic, 7.11.11  

Country Folks Mid-Atlantic, July 11, 2011