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2 July 2012 Section One e off Two Volume e 41 r 28 Number

$1.99

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds True armyworms and their hoodlum friends ~ A3

Columnists Paris Reidhead

Crop Comments

A6

Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly

Auctions Alternative Fuel Classifieds Farmer to Farmer Manure Handling

A14

B1 A16 B15 A26 A12

INSERTS: (in some areas) Small Farm Quarterly

Saratoga County Sundae on the Farm ~ Page A2 This I call to mind, and therefore I have hope: The steadfast love of the LORD never ceases, his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness. ~ Lamentations 3:21-23


Section A - Page 2 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Eildon Tweed Farm hosts Saratoga County Sundae on the Farm by Steven E. Smith Father’s Day in Saratoga County means Sundae on the Farm. This annual commitment to community outreach for agriculture again drew more than 1,000 visitors from the capital region including Albany, Schenectady, Troy, Saratoga and the Mohawk Valley as families toured the 800 cow dairy at Eildon Tweed Farm in Charlton, NY. Wood recognized for promoting agriculture community Before the public arrived, a large group of Saratoga County farmers and other volunteers assembled to acknowledge leaders in their community. One of the highlights of the gathering was the naming of this year’s Saratoga County Agriculture Promoter of the Year. Connie Wood of Eildon Tweed was recognized for 2012. Wood was honored for her dedication to agriculture having been a founding member with 40 years of service to the Saratoga County Agricultural Promotion Committee which organizes among a number of functions, the Sundae on the Farm event. Wood is known for her leadership and service at local and regional events such as the NY State Dairy Days at the Well in Albany. While many of her efforts have been impactful due to their high visibility, Wood has also been a person of action who has helped with dairy princess functions in a supporting role. Wood graciously accepted the recognition. U.S. Representative Paul Tonko of the NY 21st congressional district was in attendance and thanked the agricultural community for all they do. Tonko praised the Saratoga County Agricultural Promotion Committee’s event for showcasing what New York agriculture is all about. As the public started to arrive, Dave Wood recognized his farm staff and the large group of volunteers for making the event a possibility. Public learns about a neighborhood farm Eildon Tweed Farm derives its name from Connie Wood’s ancestors who came to America in 1794 from the

Eildon Hills and Tweed River in the region of Melrose, Scotland. Dave and Connie, who married in 1964 have both been highly involved in agriculture and shared a love for farming. While both pursuing off-farm careers, the couple started raising heifers at their homestead on Connie’s grandparents’ farm. In 1985, the Woods purchased Eildon Tweed from family members lock, stock and barrel. Since Dave’s retirement in 1998, the Woods have focused on dairy farming fulltime and have grown the operation from 50 cows to 1,010 cows. Along with the 300 acres that the Woods own, they work with more than 40 land owners in three counties in order to harvest the 1,400 acres of corn and 800 acres of hay crop for their herd. From a hobby of two replacement heifers, the operation now employs 24 people to accomplish the day-to-day operation of this modern dairy. In order to meet their goals for development of their herd, Eildon Tweed Farm has engaged in the use of genomic testing to enhance their development of high quality registered Holstein cattle. As part of the day’s events, professional hoof trimmer Charles Biche explained his role in hoof health and maintenance. Biche complimented Eildon Tweed Farm for building a dedicated hoof trimming wing at the dairy. Biche indicated the specialized facility designed with concepts from Dr. Temple Grandin’s cattle handling elements enables him to effectively handle an extra three cows per hour. Other aspects of dairy production which were not accessible during the touring of the farm were demonstrated by video to the farm visitors. Hayride tour gives great perspective of farm activities While participating in the Sundae on the Farm event, visitors gained a perspective on the farm operation by taking a descriptive hayride tour past the phases of the farmstead. First, visitors were taken through the calf hutch and super hutch area followed by the bunk silage storage area. The guests rode through the dairy barns to learn more

Hayride tours of the modern facilities at Eildon Tweed Farm was one of the highlights of the event for the more than 1,000 guests of the farm. While touring the farm by wagon, the visitors clearly heard in depth descriptions of the farm operation and interacted with their tour guides.

David and Connie Wood, owners of Eildon Tweed Farm were recognized for their commitment to agriculture outreach as Connie was named Saratoga County Ag Promoter of the Year. David accepted the appreciation signage given to the farm for hosting their second Sundae on the Farm event. Photos by Steven E. Smith about the operation. Displays explain- popular draw for young families.” To ing veterinary science, agronomy and conclude the tour, Saratoga County animal nutrition were available to visit Dairy Princess Molly Pokrzywka and after the hayride. Jon Conover and her court served Stewart’s Ice Cream Rawson Gamage from Renaissance Sundaes as a part June’s Dairy month Nutrition explained the byproduct celebration. As a result of again holding the feeds used to make up the grain porSundae on the Farm event, the agrition of the farm’s total mixed ration. cultural community has stepped up Guests see scope of agriculture and done an excellent job of demonand get their just dessert too The Sundae on the Farm, often host- strating their many outstanding qualied by a dairy farm, also demonstrates ties to the general public. Elidon many other aspects of New York agri- Tweed Farm and the Wood family gave cultural industry. Visitors learned special thanks to Stewarts, the about beef and equine farming as well Saratoga County Camber and the as sheep, alpacas and bees. According Chamber of Southern Saratoga along to Neil Peck of Welcome Stock Farm with the core 150 volunteers who also who is one of the many faithful veteran donated their time. Next year’s event volunteers of the event, “Each year we will be held McMahon’s Thoroughbred are able to welcome new families to the Farm. More information is available at educational event because it is such a www.saratogafarms.com.

Joined by her mother Cathy (left) and sister Janet (right), Laura Hanehan was recognized as the first recipient of the 1st Annual Ag Promotion committee scholarship. Hanehan was recognized with this $500 award for her pursuit of an agricultural business studies degree at Morrisville State. Hanehan is career in her senior year with the plan of working in agricultural lending.


Page 3 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

True armyworms and their hoodlum friends by Stephen Wagner Penn State Extension Entomologist Dr. John Tooker, youthful, agile and funny, greeted a wagon load of people seated in pew-style benches who were interested in picking up new lore about Farming for Success, 2012. His associate, an equally humorous Dr. Katie Ellis, helped move their display table to the now stopped wagon so that passengers wouldn’t have to climb down to them. This event was held at the Penn State Research Station in Landisville, Lancaster County, PA. After Ellis briefly discussed pollinators, Tooker launched into an Insect Update. “The same treatments are all over your corn and soybeans that are under attack these days,” he said, “and the USDA is going to have to make a decision soon on whether they are siding with farmers or beekeepers. Beekeepers want neonicotinoid treatments banned in the United States.” This is a relevant issue for growers and there are people on both sides of the fence who feel quite strongly about it. Moving on to some pests of relevance, Tooker asked “Has anyone seen any armyworms this spring? They have been out of control. If you haven’t heard, I can share videos with you of roads just crawling with armyworms that are living up to their name. Essentially, they are defoliating corn or hayfields, then moving into whatever is nearby.” Thousands of acres have been decimated by what Tooker calls true armyworms. True armyworms act like black cutworms, and are sometimes confused with gypsy moths. They do not over-winter in Pennyslvania. They are blown up from storm fronts in southern states, where they do overwinter. Typically, in most years, the true armyworm is a mere curiosity with a couple plants chewed up here and there, but not a lot of damage is rendered. As to the extent of this year’s

Dr. Katie Ellis talks about pollinators.

widespread damage, some people are chalking it up to an odd spring, but Tooker says “we have had armyworm outbreaks like this in the past 30 years where we haven’t had odd springs.” In Tooker’s mind, it is “an alignment of variables.” A true armyworm has three generations per year. The simple rule of thumb is that the first generation is the only economically important one. “The other rule of thumb,” he says is that “we don’t ever see populations like this. I would say that the second population bears watching. You can put pheromone traps out and trap their numbers. However, if you get 22 armyworms in your trap, and you want to know what to do with that number, good luck.” Hardly anyone has experience with trapping the second generation and making inferences from those catches to know what should be done. One way people are alerted to armyworms is that blackbirds flock to the swarms, or armies. Slugs “This has been the perfect slug spring,” Tooker says. “It was so warm in March, most of the slugs hatched awfully early. One of the tactics you can use to avoid slugs is to plant early and try to outrun them.” But not everybody planted during that warm March, and by the time they did plant, the slugs were already active and feeding. “Most of the fields I’ve seen,” Tooker recounted, “are armyworm and slug damaged and it’s hard to discern the two at times. The best way to tackle slugs is not with a single management tactic; it is with a number of things,” mechanical, biological, cultural, and chemical. With an associate, Sjoerd Duiker, Tooker “did some light disking in the spring. This is no-till ground. We did a very non-aggressive three-inch disking (straight vertical) meant to approximate a vertical tillage event.” By so doing that, they were able to

Penn State Extension Entomologist Dr. John Tooker gives an Insect Update to attendees at Farming for Success 2012. Photos by Stephen Wagner knock back the slug population by about 80 percent. Metaldehyde baits like Deadline are best for small portions of fields that are infested but you need to get good coverage. Such as four to six pieces of bait per square foot. The downside is that the product is expensive, which translates into $22 to $25 per acre. And even after adopting that course of action, people have to replant occasionally. Nitrogen solutions are also an option. Lannate is available but with the caveat that efficiency data is questionable. “We are researching the way that cover crops can control slugs and the way that natural enemies can help control slugs, but we’re not to the point where we can recommend a whole lot. The one thing I will say is crimson clover seems awfully promising. In my mind, it’s a preliminary thing but if you can put crimson clover in the ground before your corn, you’re going to have less slug trouble than if you don’t.” Stink Bugs “You probably remember 2010 when stink bugs were everywhere,” Tooker said, easing into the last step of his update. The situation, however, did not worsen in 2011. “If you are in the orchard business, brown marmorated stink bugs are already beginning to show up. They don’t typically show in field crops until corn ears are there, and once those ears harden up, they move into soybeans.” Right now overwintered adults are dying; nymphs are feeding where

eggs were laid. Caveats about stinkbugs include: • Watch the edge of your cornfields in July, particularly next to woods; • Expect stinkbugs to move into soybeans when pods form; • Preventative sprays will not be effective due to poor residual activity; • Start scouting soybeans when pods appear; watch corn when kernels form; and • Focus scouting on edge of fields first. Mid-Atlantic Brown Marmorated Stinkbug Scouting Protocol in Soybeans: • Begin scouting fields by mid-July to catch first occurrence; • Use a 15-inch sweep net; • 180 degree sweeps — dipping in the canopy; • Begin sampling on field edges especially near woodlots and overwintering areas; • Take 15 sweeps in 10 locations, concentrating on the field edge first and then moving toward inner portions of the field. Keep good records to track population changes over time; record numbers of bugs and life stage (adults or nymphs) captured for each bout of 15 sweeps. Adults have fully formed wings, nymphs do not; and • Be sure to count all species — green, brown and BMSB — adults and nymphs. More information can be found at http://ento.psu.edu/extension/fieldcrops-new


Section A - Page 4 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

A big family keeps Brabant Farm humming along smoothly for 44 years by Pat Malin VERONA, NY — Lory van Lieshout wore at least three hats during the day of the Oneida County Farm Fest at the family-owned Brabant Farm. Of course, she was one of the hosts, giving tours to hundreds of guests, young and old during the day-long event. She was among a large group of volunteers helping out at the Cornell Cooperative Extension-sponsored event, yet she barely had time to sit down and relax between the morning, early afternoon and evening sessions. She also welcomed her students from Holy Cross Academy in Oneida, where she is a part-time teacher. And she also donned the role of historian and storyteller on the farm where she has lived with her husband, Pat, and his extended family since 1969. The 14th annual Oneida County Farm Fest drew more than 1,000 schoolchildren during the morning and approximately 2,000 people in the evening from communities in three surrounding counties. The roots of the Brabant Farm were first planted in Ellicott City, MD, Lory explained. In 1954, Henry and Johanna van Lieshout immigrated to the U.S. from the province of Brabant in the Netherlands, and decided to set

up a dairy farm in Maryland. Within 20 years, though, as their farm was getting encroached upon by suburban and more affluent residences in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area, they began looking for a new home. At some point — the family isn’t clear how it happened — the van Lieshouts discovered plenty of fertile farmland in upstate New York. In 1968, they moved lock, stock and barrel, including their herd of cows, to Happy Valley Road in Verona, on the site of the former Anken Farm, which is still operating in the city of Rome. Verona is near the geographic middle of central New York. To this day, the area around Brabant Farm is still rural, isolated in spots, and perhaps less populated than it was in the 1960s. “I think they found the land was cheap,” suggested Steve van Lieshout, one of seven children of Henry and Johanna. “I know they liked the schools and churches here.” Lory noted that her in-laws started this farm with 300 head, but under their sons’ oversight, Brabant Farm has grown to 1,200 head, including 620 milking cows on 1,300 acres. The van Lieshouts rent 300 acres from neighbors.

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Country Folks (ISSN0191-8907) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and additional entry offices. Subscription Price: $47 per year, $78 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA, N.Y. State FFA, N.Y. Corn Growers Association and the N.Y. Beef Producers. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., Production.................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com V.P., General Manager......................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com Managing Editor.............................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor..................................Gary Elliott, 518-673-0143......................... cfeditor@leepub.com Page Composition.........................Michelle Gressler, 518-673-0138 ...................mmykel@leepub.com Comptroller.......................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148...................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator..................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager.....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ..................................................................................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160 .......................Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office .......................518-673-0149 ..................................amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .......................subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com Ad Sales Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0104 Territory Managers Patrick Burk ...................................................Batavia, NY ................................................585-343-9721 Tim Cushen ...............................................Schenectady, NY ...........................................518-346-3028 Ian Hitchener ...............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................518-210-2066 Mark Whitbread..........................................Skaneateles, NY................................... ..........315-317-0905 Ad Sales Representatives Jan Andrews .........................................Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary ............................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ...........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0108 Kathy LaScala...................................katelascala@gmail.com...........................................913-486-7184 Sue Thomas ........................................suethomas1@cox.net ..........................................949-305-7447 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

Paul van Lieshout, talks with a group of home schooled Children on a tour of the Milking Parlor during Farm fest in Verona, NY, at the Brabant Farm. Photo by Jerry Waskiewicz The herd is overwhelmingly made up outfitted with individual milk metering of traditional Holsteins, with a sprin- and cow ID. Herd information is mankling of red and white Holsteins and a aged via DairyComp 305 software. few Jerseys used for breeding. Joe is involved in planting corn, hay Brothers Steve, Joe, Paul, Phil and and other crops on 1,100 acres which Pat are partners in the current are used for forage for the herd. The Brabant Farm, with each having his tractors are outfitted with GPS equipown area of expertise. “The family ment to aid in precision planting, regdivides up the work,” Lory pointed out. ulating the dosage of fertilizer and “Pat manages the schedules so that spreading manure. each of us gets one week’s vacation.” Brabant Farm has been a Dairy of During Lory’s tour, Steve was work- Distinction for 25 years and in 2000, it ing in the transition barn with his own received the Milk Quality Award from son filling the calves’ feeding pails with Dairy Today magazine. pelletized nuggets. The calves stay in a The eldest son of the founders, John, tunnel-ventilated nursery from four to 58, has his own farm in Lee Center, six weeks after birth before getting north of Rome in Oneida County. moved to the heifer barn. A few piglets The only daughter in the van and baby goats (managed by younger Lieshout family, Mary Lou, lives on a members of the family) also run farm in the village of Chittenango in around a pen inside the calf barn. Madison County. The free-stall barn also houses Brabant Farm depends for the most heifers from three months old to calv- part on family, nephews and nieces, to ing, and the barn is used for dry cows help keep the vast farm running too. Lory also took a guest to the smoothly. There are seven fulltime and maternity barn, which was not a part seven part-time employees. Lory and of the routine tour. Pat raised three children, Mark, now “We try to do as much as possible for 20; Meg, a junior at Holy Cross cow comfort,” said Lory. Academy, and Jessica, a ninth-grader. Meanwhile, Pat (the youngest brothEven if her children have interests er) was out in the field making unex- off the farm, Lory nevertheless predicts pected repairs on equipment. Paul a bright future for Brabant Farm. The was giving tours of the milking parlor, generation now in charge has 25 chilwhich is close to the calf barn and the dren among them. There are also four four-row free-stall barn for the milking great-grandchildren of Henry and herd. Cows are milked three times a Johanna, a fourth generation of van day in a double-12 Herringbone parlor Lieshouts.

Cover photo by Steven E. Smith Alternate Dairy Princess Hannah Curtiss (left) joined the 2012 Saratoga County Dairy Molly Pokrzywka to scooped hundreds of sundaes from Stewart’s Ice Cream as a part of the Sundae on the Farm event at Eildon Tweed Farm, Charlton NY.


by Elizabeth A. Tomlin “Mike Settle is a class act, true gentleman and consummate agriculture

Retiring Advisor Mike Settle received a plaque thanking him for his many years of leadership and dedication to the students of the Mohawk Valley FFA.

educator,” said New York State Association of Agriculture Educators President Keith Schiebel. Schiebel, who is also the Advisor for VernonVerona-Sherrill FFA, was speaking to attendees at the Mohawk Valley FFA annual Award Banquet, which took place on June 8, at the OppenheimEphratah CSD. Settle served in his position from 1997-2012. The Mohawk Valley FFA President, Robert Christman, presented Settle with a plaque from the Chapter thanking him for the leadership and dedication he had shown over the years. Awards were distributed at the Banquet, with the yearly, prestigious, ‘Most Outstanding Work in the FFA’ award going to Kaitlyn Isaac. Numerous other awards were distributed. Advisor Kristy Shafer of O-ECSD and Settle announced the committee’s elected officers for the 2012-2013 term. Kaitlyn Isaac was named as President. This year the Vice President position was combined with the Treasurer position for each separate school. Stephanie Arndt was elected as Vice President/Treasurer for St. Johnsville and Adam Rogers as Vice President/Treasurer for OppenheimEphratah. Serenna Lambert will fill the position of Secretary; Aryn Feagles was elected as Reporter and Robert Christman will fill the position of Sentinel. The ‘Stand In Officer’ position will be filled by Kyle Hayes. The meeting ended with the new officers working together, blindfolded, to assemble a 40-foot rope into a square. Advisor Shafer said this challenge was to demonstrate the officer’s ability to work together successfully.

Letter to the Editor Opinions of the letters printed are not necessarily those of the staff or management at Country Folks. Submit letters of opinion to Editor, Country Folks, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Fax 518-673-2699; E-mail cfeditor@leepub.com.

Dear Editor: As a dairy farmer in Pennsylvania over the past 30 years, I’ve lived through the ups and downs of this extremely volatile industry. Over the past decade, dairy farmers have experienced the highs of 2008 and 2010 and the extreme lows of 2003, 2006 and 2009, which was the worst year in the lifetime of most dairy farmers, because the price we received for milk plummeted, while production costs reached all-time high levels. The low times have been especially challenging, since it typically takes three good years to recover from one down year. Each year, June is recognized as National Dairy Month and is celebrated here in Pennsylvania. Throughout the month, you will likely hear about

how dairy farmers contribute significantly to the state’s economy and how they support thousands of jobs and rural communities — all of this information is true. It’s equally important to note that regardless of the economic picture on the farm, the top priority of dairy farmers is to produce high-quality, safe milk for consumers. We take the trust you put in us very seriously. As Vice President of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) and Chairman of PFB’s State Dairy Committee, I am involved in many meetings and discussions about the future of dairy farming, including proposals to reduce volatility and create a better future for dairy producers. I firmly believe that the U.S. needs to be a global dairy supplier, not a balancing

Members of the Mohawk Valley FFA met for their annual meeting and Award Banquet. Seen here are (from left, front) Gus Shaut, Ashley Chapman, Donna Boyer, Lindsey Boyer, Donavan Boyer, (second row) Caitlyn Handy, Aryn Feagles, Kait Isaac, Stephanie Arndt, (back) Austin Valleau, Adam Rogers, Robbie Christman, Kyle Hayes, Morgan Rockefeller and Serenna Lambert. Photos by Elizabeth A. Tomlin

Kait Isaac (left) was voted as the 2012-2013 President of the Mohawk Valley Chapter of the FFA and Stephanie Arndt (right) was re-elected as Vice-President and, additionally, Treasurer. Kait was the recipient of the esteemed, Most Outstanding Work in the FFA Award at the 2012 Banquet.

nation.We can’t afford to keep making products for our own government to purchase and then store products that no one wants. We also need to make sure that dairymen have equal access to reliable and workable safety net programs, like a margin protection program or a risk management insurance product. As lawmakers consider the next Farm Bill, I encourage milk producers to work together to identify positive changes to dairy policy. A perfect solution may be difficult to attain, but if we work together we can achieve a legislative outcome that will improve the long-term outlook for milk producers. Pennsylvania ranks fifth in the nation in milk production thanks to more than 7,000 farm families. We appreciate the support we receive from Pennsylvanians who purchase our products and look forward to continuing to providing consumers with a wide variety of high quality and good tasting items in the future.

Sincerely, Richard Ebert, Vice President, Pennsylvania Farm Bureau Richard Ebert is a full-time dairy farmer from Blairsville, Westmoreland County.

Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB) Vice President Rick Ebert

Page 5 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Mohawk Valley FFA annual Award Banquet honors retiring Advisor Mike Settle


Section A - Page 6 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant Tiny Orchids From June 10-18 my son Will and his wife and their toddler daughter visited us from Switzerland, and stayed with Sue and me. I didn’t get much work done during that time: made and received a bunch of phone calls, and, of course, did some writing, and that was about it. Will works for the World Wildlife Fund, which is headquartered near Geneva, Switzerland. He gets to travel literally around the world, to some countries I’d just as soon he didn’t visit… countries where Americans aren’t welcomed by everybody. Throughout his travels (the frequent flier miles of which help Sue and me go places), my son has acquired a love for, and understanding of, orchids. My knowledge of orchids was pretty much limited to what a young man buys for his junior prom date. That knowledge increased greatly when Will gave me a copy of Orchid Fever, a book which deals with the science, rabid passion, global politics, and floriculture of these mostly beautiful plants. It’s a fabulous book which I lent to a science teacher and never got back. (She likely lent it to a student.) Probably the most relevant fact regarding these flowers, that I learned from this book, is that vanilla beans are tropical orchids. Vanilla beans are clearly tropical, but not all orchids are. And Will wanted to locate some orchids which he believed grew near his boyhood home outside Cooperstown, NY. On an earlier visit, he and I had hiked around the old Cooperstown airport, which has not seen a plane land in over a quarter century. The former airport property,

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runway and all, now belongs to a rod and gun club. Will felt that the abandoned airstrip, surrounded by swamps and marshes, might be a good habitat for a certain variety of orchid. So on the Saturday of their visit, he and I drove up to the abandoned runway, looking for orchids. In their day the runway was nothing more than packed shale, hauled from nearby quarries. The runway was slightly raised, compared to adjacent terrain, meaning that the runway shoulders would tend to collect water. During our visit to the abandoned runway, nobody was hunting anything, or shooting skeet any stationary targets. The loudest noises came from turkeys gobbling at each other (turkey season was over), and the explosive sound of a partridge taking flight… something I haven’t heard in decades. I’ve hunted partridge, also called ruffed grouse (and nicknamed thunderbirds). I’ve eaten grouse, but only after they bounced off my windshield. As we walked along the abandoned runway, some of it overgrown with poplar, aspen, and birch, Will studied the periphery of the packed shale. He concentrated on the gently sloping area between the runway and long puddles. From his loud YES, I’d thought he’d discovered gold. What he did find was a colony of orchids, most of whose individuals were five or six inches tall. At first glance, these plants resembled lilies of the valley, but the lilies have white blossoms connected by short stems to a raceme (basically a column to which flowers and grain kernels adhere). These particular orchids had

their white flowers snugly attached to their raceme in spiral fashion, like the stripes on a barber pole. That’s why their genus name is Spiranthes. Will was sure of the genus name, but he wasn’t sure of the species. My computer search pointed me to species alticola. Will told me that this orchid was somewhat different from orchids which he pointed out to me a year ago in a nature preserve in Switzerland. Not to be outdone, I showed him examples of smooth vetch, birdsfoot trefoil, and common white clover, which were exactly the same as specimens which I had shown him in that same overseas preserve, 12 plus months earlier. This past Sunday (yesterday as I write), Will called us, having pretty well recovered from 6-hour jet lag. Sue said that the pictures of S. alticola were beautiful, and that it would be nice to transplant some of these orchids into our yard. Will said that perhaps the plants are protected by some environmental regulation, but he really didn’t know. He said a more valid concern was disrupting the orchids’ mycorrhizae. Now he was speaking my language. In the wonderful kingdom of soil microbiology, separating plant roots from their mycorrhizae has a success rate similar to the survival rate of turtles removed from their shells. Dr. Harold Willis, in his book The Rest of the Story about Agriculture Today (1984, A-R Editions) addresses this term. I’ll hit the high spots of his discussion. He said that the word “mycorrhiza” literally means root fungus; in fact, they are special symbiotic fun-

gi that live on or in the roots of most plants. Mycorrhizae perform services for their host plant. They increase the plant’s absorption of nutrients, many of which may be otherwise insoluble. They can produce hormones stimulating the growth of the host plant. Mycorrhizae can increase water absorption of plants, as they tolerate lower moisture levels than what the plant alone can. Mycorrhizae protect roots from disease by forming protective barriers or producing antibiotics. In return, these fungi receive carbohydrates and other nutrients from the host plant. Oh, Willis also said that mycorrhizae benefit plants growing in poor, particularly phosphorus-deficient soils. Abandoned runway shoulders fit that category. Symbiosis is a pretty wonderful two-way street. So we’ll probably leave the Spiranthes where they seem quite happy. Part of the reason that the Cooperstown airport was retired happened in 1974. That year on Hall-of-Fame Game day, some baseball nuts flew a light aircraft (it looked like a Cessna 172) and fell a couple hundred yards short of the runway. I don’t remember if the plane ran out of gas or stalled. Well, it landed in some treetops barely off New York State routes 80&28. I guess no one was hurt, so the passengers climbed out of the aircraft, shinnied down the tree, and hitch-hiked to Doubleday Field. An airplane crash was certainly no reason to miss Fame Game. Those tickets were hard to come by.

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Trip to PA For the first time in two years we were able to make a trip down to see our grandchildren in Lancaster and Bucks Counties, Pennsylvania. Being diehard farmers, we’re always observing the crops as we make this 900-mile round-trip venture. Everywhere we looked there were variations, from shoulder high to just planted, from poor germination to flooded out spots. We did come to the conclusion on this trip… farmers work very hard for their living. I hope that someday those who produce our food, will be appreciated. Down in Lancaster County we visited a 60,000 hen laying operation that had solar panels mounted on the roof of the 500-foot laying house. They told us that their electric bill went from $3,000 per month down to $200 per month. But… it cost $700,000 to install the solar panels, minus the 30 percent government credits. They also told us that when the government programs expired the company lowered the price 30 percent. He also mentioned that a 50-acre track of farmland sells for around one million dollars. Getting back to our main reason for

this trip; our grandkids are getting taller and stronger every time we visit them, just the way we like them. The littlest one at almost three years old didn’t know my husband and gave him the shy look and wiggled and squirmed when he held her. We’ll just have to visit them more! In talking to a local corn grower, he stated that he’s wondering if we’ll see the huge production that the USDA is predicting. He said that it would take near perfect weather all over the country to attain it. We asked him what the break-even point is, He replied, “90bushel corn at $5 per bushel, not including labor.” You can do the math. Our oldest son and family made a quick trip out to Western Colorado to see their grandson and gave us their take on what the crops looked like where they traveled. They said that you could sure tell where it had been irrigated. Otherwise, there are major variations. We’d better pray for our farmers! Let the heavens be glad, the earth rejoice; Praise Him for the growing fields, for they display His greatness. (Psalms 96:11a & 12a) TLB

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Page 7 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

A Few Words


Section A - Page 8 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

What to look for when buying a planter “The planter is the most important piece of equipment on your farm, hands down,” said Bill Hoeg, Case IH planter sales and marketing manager in North America. “If planting isn’t optimized — if the seed isn’t planted in a way that maximizes yield potential — that immediately impacts your profitability and should be the No. 1 consideration when purchasing a new planter. No. 2 is planter reliability: You can’t afford to have your planter slow you down during your limited planting window.” Hoeg cites six agronomic principles of optimized planting growers should consider when buying a new planter: proper seed depth; uniform seed depth across the planter and throughout the field; good soil-to-seed contact; uniform soil pressure all around the seed; accurate seed population; and accurate in-row seed spacing. He says a lot of planter manufacturers focus only on in-row seed spacing and accurate populations, “because

quite honestly, accurate population and in-row seed spacing are the easiest to impact. But those are only two factors. A planter should be able to deliver on all six agronomic principles right out of the box. It shouldn’t require hundreds of dollars of additional equipment on each row to improve planter performance,” Hoeg advises. “Don’t get caught up in the hype.” Planter agronomics “Agronomically, it’s not complicated. If you plant at the right depth, seed will emerge faster. Plant at a uniform depth, and it’ll all come up together. That gives you the best opportunity to maximize yields. Good soil-to-seed contact provides the best environment for seed to germinate. Uniform seed pressure is the hardest to affect, but you want to influence soil pressure on all sides of the seed to maximize moisture conductivity to the seed,” he adds. When it comes to seed population and accurate seed spacing, Hoeg says

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The planter is the most important piece of equipment on your farm, hands down.

every planter has operating rules. “As long as you stay within those rules, you can get respectable results. I suggest the Early Riser® planter does a better job, because we have a wider working range within each of those rules. We have a pull-gauge wheel, which allows the row unit to operate

TRACTORS 2000 NH TS100 4wd, Cab, 32x32 Shuttle, 2 Remotes, 2135 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,995 2007 NH TL100A 4wd, Cab, w/NH 830TL Loader, 2068 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,795 2010 NH T6030 4WD, Cab, 95HP, w/NH 840TL Loader, 1100 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $67,500 2005 Kubota L3130 4wd, HST w/Loader, 1023 Hrs.. . . . . $13,900 2009 NH TD5050 4wd, ROPS w/NH 820TL Loader/Canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,375 1990 Ford 8830 4wd, Cab, Rear Duals, Power Shift, 6650 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,250 Ford 821 2wd Industrial Tractor w/Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 2006 Case IH JX109OU 4wd, Cab, Like New, 200 Hrs.. . . $39,995 2011 Kioti DK45SE 45HP, 4wd Tractor/Loader, Cab w/AC-191 hrs Like new. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,625 AGRICULTURE EQUIPMENT 2009 NH 74CSRA 3 Point Snowblower - Like New . . . . . . $3,450 2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 WIC Cart Mounted bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . $1,450 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Round Bale Carrier/Feeder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . your choice $4,995 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head for a NH 900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 Gehl 970 14’ Forage Box on Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,950 Gehl 940 16' Forage Box on Tandem 12 Ton Gehl Gear . . . $2,995 Krause 2204A 14' Disc Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,780 Knight 3300 Mixer Wagon - Good Cond.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 1995 Kuhn FC400RG Hyd. Swing Discbine - Good Cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,200 2003 Challenger RB46 Silage Special Round Baler. . . . . $17,500 2011 H&S CR10 10 Wheel Hyd. Fold Rake - Like New . . . . $5,295 1998 John Deere 3 Row Corn Head from JD 3970 . . . . . . $3,200 1988 NH 900 Forage Harvester, Metalert, 900W Pick-up Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,720 2010 Hay Rite 32” Skeleton Elevator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,150 Wood Hay Racks on Gears - 2 Available. . . . . . . . . . . . Each $950 2009 NH BR7060 4x5 Bale, Twine/Net, Silage Special . . . $25,200 2010 H&S BW1000 Inline Bale Wrapper - Like New . . . . . $24,500 Case IH 415 Cultimulcher 12’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,700 Jaylor 2350 Vertical Cutter/Mixer/Feeder Wagon. . . . . . . . . $6,300 2007 Krause 7400-24WR 24’ Rock Flex Disc . . . . . . . . . . $27,500

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much more smoothly in rough fields. We also have the largest diameter seed disk. A bigger disk doesn’t have to turn as fast, so we can remain its optimum operating range even in adverse conditions. Therefore, we can plant a wider

Planter A9 2003 Gehl 2580 Round Baler, Silage Special, 4x5 Bale . . . $7,500 1990 NH 144 Merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $975 York 5’ 3Pt Landscape Rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $450 1999 Case IH 8435 Round Baler, 4x5 Bale, Silage Special, Good Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 New Idea Box Spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 2005 FFC 72” SSL Snow Plow, Hyd. Angle . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,680 Woods RM59 3pt. Finish Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $700 2011 WIFO 3pt. Pallet Forks - 3000 lb. Capacity, Like New. . . $795 Woods RM372 3pt Finish Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $980 1999 NH 824 2 Row Corn Head to fit NH 900 . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 2003 NH 27P Windrow Pickup head to fit NH 900. . . . . . . . $1,800 Gehl 970 14’ Forage Box w/Roof on Gehl 10T Gear . . . . . . $2,800 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2010 NH B95B TLB, CAB w/heat and AC, Pilot Control, Extendhoe, 418 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $65,000 2008 NH M459 Telehandler 45’ reach, 420 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . $60,000 2011 NH W190C Wheel Loader, 4.5 Cu.Yd. Buckets, Like New. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Choice $172,500 2007 NH E70SR Excavator w/Blade, Steel Tracks, Cab w/heat /AC 1613 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,000 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket, 1600 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,500 2011 NH D85B Crawler/Dozer, LGP Trucks, OROPS, 300 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $68,750 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, Cab w/Heat, Pilot Controls, Hyd. Q-Attach Plate, 72" Bucket, 100 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,875 2007 NH W110 Wheel Loader, 1025 Hrs, Excellent Cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $87,500 2007 NH W170B Wheel loader 2743 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . $76,250 2007 Kubota RS205 Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/Heat, 49 HP, 1080 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,900 2008 NH C185 Track Skidsteer, Cab, Heat A/C, Pilot, Hi-Flow Hyd., 84” Bucket, 984 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40,000 2008 NH L160 Skidsteer w/Cab & Heat, 72’ Bucket, 3,476 Hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,500 2011 NH L218 Skidsteer w/Cab and Heat, Hyd. Mount plate, 535 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,500 ATTACHMENTS 2008 NH /FFC 66" Skidsteer Tiller - Like New . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2011 NH/McMillon Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/9" Auger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950


range of populations and seed size more accurately at faster speeds.” Maximum field time, minimum maintenance According to Hoeg, a planter should also be designed to maximize time spent in the field. “The more time you’re forced to spend han-

dling daily maintenance and making adjustments, the less time you’ll have to plant. “And once you’re in the field, how many adjustments will you have to make every day to keep your planter operating at its best? Are the seed meter and vacuum/air

systems sensitive to humidity changes, adverse ground conditions or different seed sizes? If there are four different seed plates you have to change just to handle corn hybrids, that’s going to slow you down,” he notes. Operation, location

and farming practices Hoeg says the size and type of operation are also key factors. “If you have livestock to care for in addition to cash crops, you may need to size the planter differently, because there are fewer hours in the day available for

planting. A lot also depends on the type of crop being planted. With some crops, you can’t use a 90-foot planter, like with cotton, so you’ll need to cover more acres with a smaller planter. Transport width may also be a determining factor for growers who have multiple farms and different locations – or for those who simply have to deal with a narrow bridge nearby.” Other considerations are based on individual farming practices. “What inputs do you want to use, how do you want to apply them and in what types of soil? How much time do you have to get it all done? What system do you want to use to fill the planter so you can minimize non-planting time? Are there going to be multiple operators running the planter? If so, ease of use becomes even more important. “Even if you have big square fields, and there aren’t any waterways or other obstructions that cause you to plant in ir-

regular rows, you will want to take advantage of the advanced systems that bigger planters offer,” Hoeg continues. “You’ll likely want AFS (Case IH Advanced Farming Systems®), row shut-offs, driving guides and mapping capabilities to help you utilize every square inch of ground. Irregularly shaped fields with waterways and terraces only enhance the need for these advanced systems. There are all kinds of nuances that factor into which planter model and options you need. That’s why Case IH offers different models, configurations, options and capabilities, from 15-foot to 90-foot Early Riser planters,” he concludes. For more information about Early Riser planters, including demonstrations on how to create an ideal seed trench, how to achieve early, even emergence, and the benefits of pullvs. push-gauge wheels, call your local Case IH dealer or visit www.CaseIH.com.

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Page 9 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Planter from A8


Section A - Page 10 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

2012 Farm Bill passes U.S. Senate — What are the farm organizations saying? The U.S. Senate passed the 2012 Farm Bill on June 21, meaning the measure is a big step closer to enactment. The Farm Bill, renewed every five years, is the largest source of funding for conservation on America’s working farmland, ranchland and private forestland. The legislation was agreed to by a vote of 64-35. With Senate passage of a 2012 Farm Bill, the focus now shifts to the House of Representatives, where the House Agriculture Committee is expected to begin marking up its own version July 11. National Farmers Union (NFU) National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson issued the following statement: “We are pleased that the Senate was able to come together in a bipartisan manner to pass the 2012 Farm Bill, which is such a vital piece of legislation for family farmers and ranchers across the country. We appreciate the hard work of the

leadership of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, as well as the hard work of everyone in the full Senate. We look forward to working with members of the U.S. House of Representatives to get a farm bill passed, and then working with both chambers of Congress through a conference committee to complete a bill by the time the current farm bill expires on Sept. 30.” American Farm Bureau Federation Bob Stallman, President, American Farm Bureau Federation, made the following statement: “The bipartisan farm bill approved today by the Senate (S.3240) provides farmers improved risk management tools consistent with Farm Bureau’s core principles. While no farm bill is perfect, this is a solid bill that was worthy of Senate approval. The bill includes important reforms and is fiscally responsible, while including important provisions

to enhance crop insurance, maintain a viable marketing loan program and minimize the potential for farm program provisions to drive producer decisions. National Milk Producers Federation The National Milk Producers Federation hailed the bill’s passage as a “huge and historic step toward making a oncein-a-generation improvement in the safety net for America’s dairy farmers,” according to Jerry Kozak, President and CEO of NMPF. “Despite a variety of political, economic and institutional challenges, the leaders of the Senate, and in particular, the leaders of the Senate Agriculture Committee, Senators Stabenow and Roberts, have delivered on their promise to produce better farm and

food policy. We appreciate their hard work in the past months, and will work in turn to ensure the House produces a similar bill in the coming months,” Kozak said. National Corn Growers Association The National Corn Growers Association congratulates the Senate on passage of Agriculture Reform, Food and Jobs Act (2012 farm bill). NCGA also urges the House of Representatives to take action quickly. “America’s farmers greatly appreciate the leadership and cooperative work by the Senate to pass the 2012 farm bill in a timely manner,” NCGA President Garry Niemeyer said. “We would also like to thank Senators Stabenow and Roberts for their bipartisan efforts throughout the process. We have

1997 MF 8140 MFWD, cab, air, 32 speed dyna shift, 20.8x38 radials, 16.9x28 radials front, 5300 hrs, 145hp, 3 remotes, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000

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2009 JD 5085 M MFWD, 16x16 trans LHR only 92 hrs, EPTO 3 remotes 16.9x30 and 11.2x24 radials with JD 563 SL loader like brand new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,000 2009 JD 6430 premium IVT cab, air, 1725 hrs, 3 remotes Epto 18.4x38 and 16.9x24 radials front fenders warranty till 2014 like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$61,500 2008 JD 6430 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed auto quad LHR, 2802 hrs, HMS 18.4x38s and 16.9x24s with JD 673 SL loader 92 inch bucket electronic joystick real sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . .$60,000 2007 JD 6430 premium MFWD cab, air, IVT 2100 hrs, ex 18.4x38 and 16.9x24 radials 3 remotes very sharp runs ex . . . .$55,000 2007 JD 3420 telehandler cab, air, 5600 hrs, 6600lb lift bucket and forks real nice runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,000 2005 JD 8220 MFWD, cab, air, 1809 hrs, 3 ptos 4 remotes ex 20.8x42 radial axle duals ex 480/70R/30 fronts 18 front weights quick hitch ex one owner tractor very very sharp . . . . .$125,000 2004 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed PQ LHR, 5946 hrs, ex 18.4x38 radials on R+P axles very clean runs ex . . . . .$36,500 2004 JD 6420 2WD cab, air, power quad 1418 hrs, 18.4x38 radials on R+P axles just like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,000 2004 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, IVT trans ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radial tires buddy seat 3824 hrs, with JD 640 SL loader electronic joystick real sharp clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$52,500 2004 JD 6320 2WD, cab, air, power quad, LHR, ex 16.9x38 radials, 540+1000 pto buddy seat 3079 hrs, very clean sharp original . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 2002 JD 6420 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed power quad LHR, 2485 hrs, R+P axles ex 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 radials dual remotes and PTO with JD 640 SL loader real sharp ex cond . . . . . . .$55,000 1999 JD 6410 MFWD, cab, air, 24 speed PQ LHR, 3300 hrs, 18.4x38s 13.6x28s clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$31,500 1998 JD 6410 MFWD, cab, 16 speed PQ LHR 18.4x38s 13.6x28 clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,500 1998 JD 5410 MFWD, 12x12 trans left hand reverser 3391 hrs 16.9x30 rears 11.2x24 fronts 540 loader with joystick folding roll bar 73 inch bucket very clean sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . .$22,500 1994 JD 6300 2WD power quad 4983 hrs, 18.4x34s with JD 620 loader with joystick runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 1989 JD 2355 2WD add on cab left hand hydraulic reverser dual remotes 3748 hrs, 18.4x30s clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . .$8,000 1988 JD 2955 MFWD, cab, air, 4776 hrs, 18.4x38 13.6x28s front fenders very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,000 1980 JD 4240 cab, air, has turbo inline injector pump and after cooler 6020 hrs, quad range like new 20.8x38 radials dual pto and remotes very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$18,000 1980 JD 4240 cab, air, power shift 18.4x38 dual remotes and pto 7820 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1964 JD 3020 diesel wide front 3ph syncro range ex 15.5x38s rear wheel weights real clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 2008 Challenger MT475B MFWD, cab, air, 120 hp, 16x16 trans LHR, 4 remotes 1980 hrs, 18.4x38 and 16.9x28 radials ML 97B SL loader very very sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$60,000

been calling on Congress to pass the new legislation before the current law expires on Sept. 30. NCGA is pleased to see this significant hurdle has been overcome.” “Our focus now turns to the House Agriculture Committee with hopes that they will schedule a markup of their version of the farm bill for immediately following the July 4th recess,” Niemeyer said. “We look forward to continuing our work with

agriculture advocates to pass a new common sense, reformed 2012 farm bill before Congress recesses in August. Environmental Defense Fund “The Farm Bill is the United States’ primary means for engaging farmers, ranchers and foresters in stewardship of America’s natural resources,” said Sara Hopper, agricultural policy director of Environmental Defense Fund.

1982 JD 3140 MFWD, sound guard cab, recent new engine, dual remotes and pto, 18.4x38s, 13.6x38s, very clean, runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,750

1998 New Holland 644 silage special crop slicer, netwrap, wide hydraulic lift pickup head, bale ramp, real clean, just finished baling hay in field, ex . . . . . . .$8,750

2006 NH TS100A deluxe cab, air, MFWD, 16x16 trans LHR, 2667 hrs, ex 18.4x38 radials 14.9x28 fronts buddy seat 4 remotes NH 56LB SL loader very clean sharp runs ex . . . . . . . . . . .$45,000 1998 New Holland TS100 cab, air MFWD, 80 hp, 4083 hrs, 16 speed power shift 540+1000 PTO 4 remotes 90% 18.4x34 and 14.9x24 Goodyear super traction radials very clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$25,000 1998 New Holland TN90F MFWD, cab, air, 5947 hrs narrow orchard tractor 420/70R/28 rears 280/70R/20 fronts creeper super steer dual remotes runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 1997 New Holland 7635 MFWD, 2700 hrs cab, air, 86 hp, 540 + 1000 PTO 24 speed Quicke 310 loader clean runs ex . .$24,500 1995 New Holland 8970 MFWD, 210 hp, super steer 20.8x42 radial axle duals 18.4x30 radials front, 22 front weights 4 remotes 7597 hrs, clean original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,500 1993 Ford New Holland 7840 cab, air, SLE power shift 7487 hrs, like new 20.8x38 Goodyear super traction radials 800 hrs on new engine with turbo very very sharp and clean runs ex . .$16,000 1989 Ford TW 15 MFWD, cab, air, series 2 20.8x38s and 16.9x28s 10 front weights and rear weights, 6180 hrs 3 remotes very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,000 1987 Ford 7710 series 2 MFWD cab, air, ex 18.4x38 radials 16.9x24 fronts 3 remotes 4800 hrs, clean runs ex . . . . .$15,500 1987 Ford TW15 series 2 MFWD, cab, air, only 3821 hrs, like new 18.4x38 rears 3 remotes dual pto original runs ex . . . . .$24,500 1984 Ford TW15 MFWD cab, like new 20.8x38 and 16.9x28 radials 5100 hrs, dual power dual pto and remotes runs ex $16,000 1977 Ford 9700 2WD cab, air, 5417 hrs, new 460/85R/38 rears dual power dual remotes and pto clean original runs ex $12,500 1998 MF 6180 110 hp, MFWD, cab, air, 32 speed dynashift only 1225 hrs, 4 remotes 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials Quicke Alo 6755 SL loader one owner sharp ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,500 1980 MF 275D new style steering 8 speed ex 18.4x30s dual remotes laurin cab extra clean original . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,000 1967 MF 135 diesel 14.9x28 tires power steering multi power very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 2008 McCormick MTX120 MFWD, cab, air, 118 hp, 16 speed power quad LHR, 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 radials 2591 hrs with L165 SL loader very clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$47,500 2007 CIH Maxxum 110 MFWD, cab, air, 16x16 power shift LHR, like new 18.4x38 and 14.9x28 Michelin radials 1160 hrs, front weights and fenders very very sharp like new . . . . . . . .$47,500 1981 Case 1490 2WD 75hp, cab, air, power shift ex 18.4x34s dual pto and remotes 5600 hrs, clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,500 1977 IH hydro 86 diesel new 18.4x34s dual remotes ex running good hydro clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,500 1981 White 4-175 4x4 5641 hrs. 2002 cat 3208 engine 210 HP, 3ph pto quick coupler ex 20.8x38s runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 White 2-105 MFWD, cab, new 20.8x38 and 16.9x26 radials with self leveling loader clean runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 1977 White 2-105 cab, 4985 hrs, 3 remotes ex 20.8x38 radials front weights original runs ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500

2001 NH BB940 3x3 square baler last bale ejector, roller bale chute applicator knotter fans real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 New Holland 570 baler with model 72 hydraulic drive bale thrower real nice has been through NH dealership field ready . . .$9,000 2 New Holland 575 wire tie balers hydraulic bale tension pickup heads and hitch with NH 77 pan type kicker real sharp ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7,000 each 2003 New Holland BR750 4x6 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps net wrap endless belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,000 2003 CIH RBX 452 4x5 round baler same as NH BR740 wide pickup head bale ramps real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 2000 New Holland 648 silage special 4x5 round baler wide pickup head bale ramps ex belts very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,000 2009 JD 582 silage special 4x5 round baler crop cutter edge to edge mesh wrap or dual twine wide pickup 6700 bales very sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500 2004 JD 467 4x6 silage special round baler mega wide pickup dual twine 11000 bales gauge wheels push bar ex cond . . .$12,500 2001 JD 467 4x6 silage special round baler mega wide pickup dual twine gauge wheels and push bar ex cond . . . . . . . . . .$10,500 1999 JD 446 4x4 round baler ex belts bale age kit real nice $8,500 1996 JD 466 round baler 4x6 net wrap or twine wide pickup head bale ramps ex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,000 2007 New Holland 1412 discbine impeller conditioner very clean ex low usage discbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 2006 JD 530 discbine impeller conditioner super sharp like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,000 2005 JD 530 impeller discbine hydra angle on head real clean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 Late model Kuhn KC 4000G center pivot discbine rubber rolls ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 NH 38 flail chopper real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,750 New Idea 325 2 row corn picker and super sheller with 12 roll husking bed on picker real nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 each Fransguard SR4200p tandem axle hydraulic lift 13 ft 6 in width rotary hay rake very little use like new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 New Holland 258 hay rake rubber mounted teeth in ex cond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,000 Kverneland Taarup 17 ft hydraulic fold tedder ex cond 2 years old . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,000 Fella TH540T 17 ft hydraulic fold hydraulic tilt hay tedder just like new hardly used at all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Kuhn GF5001 TH hydraulic fold 17 ft hay tedder ex cond low usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500 Fanex 500 17 ft manual fold up hay tedder ex cond . . . . . .$2,000 NH 144 windrow inverter very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,500 20.8x42 T-rail clamp on duals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000 20.8x38, 18.4x38 and 18.4x34 clamp on duals JD 840 self leveling loader mounting brackets for JD 7000 series tractor high volume bucket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$,7,500 Brand new NH 62lb loader fits TM NHS's or MXM case IH never used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,000 JD 158 loader with bucket and joystick off JD 4430 . . . . . .$1,500

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ments to effectively process a variety of bales. The BPX9000 is built to maximize bale processing and minimize operator stress. “When developing the BPX9000, we started by listening to producers and then designing the machine to fit their needs. They told us they wanted a simple, durable and versatile machine, and that is what Vermeer built,” says Phil Egging, Vermeer Product Manager. “From the T-style frame to the slat and chain bale rotation system and offset rotor, the components of this machine provide producers a machine that’s easy to operate, easy to maintain and built to last.” The BPX9000’s slat and chain bed and positive bale feeding improve bale rotation, feeding bales more consistently into the rotor, while reducing the need for operators to reverse rotation of the bale when feeding. The split shaft in the bed allows for easier maintenance without removing the entire bed, and long-lasting bushings in the bed are resistant to net and twine wrapping.

In addition, the bale processor’s offset rotor feeds material with less slugging, for a consistent cut length and higher quality feed. With exclusive cut control bars in combination with the self-cleaning rotor, excessive build-up of net and twine on the drum is eliminated. The rotor can also be manually cleaned, with easy access through a side-access door. The BPX9000 has no welds or gussets at high stress points for enhanced durability. The optional large square bale kit gives producers the flexibility to process both round and square bales, with offset loader forks to position square bales to the right side of the processor and a sidewall that lowers to effectively process square bales. “Every component of the BPX9000 Bale Processor was designed with the producer in mind, and it’s built with the Vermeer quality and durability that they expect,” said Egging. For more information about the BPX9000 Bale Processor, visit www.vermeer.com.

Page 11 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Vermeer introduces BPX9000 Bale Processor


Section A - Page 12 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Kish View Farms hosts PDMP tour by Jon M. Casey For brothers Keith and Kent Spicher, hospitality was the order of the day on June 7, when Professional Dairy Managers of Pennsylvania (PDMP) members concluded the association’s daylong Dairy Issues Forum with a tour of Kish View Farms, near Belleview, PA. With approximately 50 visitors and guests touring the facility, the Spichers recounted the evolution of the family farming operation over the past 50-plus years. A highlight of the afternoon was a first-hand look at their new environmentally friendly methane digester and electrical power unit. “We just brought the generator online about a year ago,” said Keith Spicher, as half the visitors toured the digester and gen-set while the other half went off to observe the livestock side of the operation. “It took us about two years to get everything built and operational. Last year, we were able to bring the system on line.” Spicher explained that the system is large enough to provide electricity sufficient for five locations associated with the farm. He said that the oversight of the digester and the cows is his (Keith’s) responsibility, while Kent takes care of the crops and does the books. All totaled, they farm about 600 acres and milk close to 400 cows. Keith and Kent, along with their father Dave, Keith’s father-in-law Irvin Hartzler, Keith’s son Aaron, Mark Donahey their herdsman and four workers on the milking crew, all work together to create a successful operation. Aaron helps wherever there is a need. Irvin Hartzler drives the farm’s milk tanker truck, taking milk to the Land-O’-Lakes plant near Carlisle, PA, four days per week. Keith said that as their operation grew, they did a cost assessment of their milk hauling expenses. At that time, they were paying the going rate to ship their milk a very short distance to a local process-

ing plant. That amounted to an extraordinary expense for each haul. They decided that they could “pay themselves” to haul the milk, especially since Keith’s father-in-law had a CDL license and was interested in doing the driving, part-time. Spicher said that it proved to be a good decision because approximately one year after they had made that decision, the local milk plant, their former destination, closed permanently. The need for a new outlet for their milk was not a problem for them like it was other producers, because they had already begun tak-

Manure Handling ing their milk to LandO’-Lakes in Carlisle, PA. History of Kish View Farms “I started farming this land with my father Jonas in 1959,” said Dave Spicher, as visitors began arriving at the farm. “We milked 40 cows. Today, I am semi-retired.” “Keith, Kent and I formed a partnership in 1992. I sold my share to them in 1998,” he added. “I still stay busy feeding the calves and doing some fieldwork.” Since that time, the cow numbers have

Kish A13

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grown from 100 milking, to approximately 380 head. Once the calves have been started on feed at the main farm, the heifers are raised at four separate locations. The dry cows are housed

at yet another farm, which Keith agrees is not ideal in the overall scheme of cow management. They are hopeful that the day will come when they can have all of the cattle housed at the

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Aaron Spicher and Noah Hartzler, in the foreground, listen as Keith Spicher, fifth from right, welcomes visitors to Kish View Farms. same location to make parlor came on line. It herd management more has served them since. efficient and easier on Over time, they added the staff. two additional freestall Keith explained that barns and most recently, when they bought out the manure digester. their father, they in- Benefits of the digester stalled a double-5 walkKeith said their decithrough parlor in their sion to install the RCM old bank barn, and in digester and gen-set 1999, they built their from Martin Machinery first new, three-row, was based primarily free-stall barn. It accom- upon the incentives that modated approximately were available at the 180 head. time. These were in the In 2001, they suffered form of grants that funda parlor fire that de- ed the project. The projstroyed the barn. Within ect began in 2009, and a few months, the new in early 2011, they be-

A worker scrapes manure in one of the freestall barns. This twice-weekly chore keeps the manure digester filled and operating efficiently. When the Spichers changed the cow's bedding from sand to composted manure, they grooved all of the concrete flooring throughout the freestall barn areas. gan electrical power production. In addition to the ability to send electrical power to the grid, they are also producing hot water and heat for the parlor and one or two nearby homes. He said their layout currently operates at a “breakeven” with respect to the amount of electrical power they supply to the grid versus the amount that the farm and associated homes consume.

“We do have a surplus of heat that we could use more effectively,” he said. “We are looking for ways to use the additional heat that the power generation supplies. Today, we are burning excess gas, something that we routinely do not have to do. We took in some outside food waste in the past few days, which has added digestible material to the digester’s output.”

Kisher A14

Page 13 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Kish from A12


Section A - Page 14 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

U.S. Lawmakers Got a “Dairy Good” Treat Issued Jun 22, 2012 The 30th Annual Capitol Hill Ice Cream Party was held June 21for members of Congress, families and staffs. A press release stated that about 2,000 gallons of ice cream and frozen yogurt, 6,000 root beer floats and 44 cases of sundae toppings were expected to be served. The party is sponsored by the International Ice Cream Association, Milk Industry Foundation and the National Cheese Institute, constituent organizations of the International Dairy Foods As-

sociation. In the real world; U.S. milk production may be slowing. The Agriculture Department reported its May estimate for the top 23 producing states at 16.4 billion pounds, up just 2.1 percent from May 2011. The 50-state total, at 17.6 billion, was up 2 percent. Revisions added 38 million pounds to last month’s preliminary data, putting output at 16 billion pounds, up 3.5 percent from 2011. The big story in the data is cow numbers. The 23 state total, at 8.52 million head, while up 77,000 from a year

ago, was down 3,000 from April, the first decline in 20 months. Output per cow averaged 1,924 pounds, up 22 from a year ago. California was up 1.9 percent from a year ago on 16,000 more cows and 15 pounds more per cow. Wisconsin was up 2.4 percent, thanks to a 35 pound gain per cow and 5,000 more cows. Idaho was up 2.5 percent on a 50-pound gain per cow but cow numbers were unchanged. New York was also up 2.5 percent, on a 45 pound gain per cow. Cow numbers were also unchanged. Pennsylvania was down 2.1 percent on a 15 pound per cow decline and 7,000 fewer cows. Other states with large gains in cow numbers were Michigan, up 11,000 head; New Mexico and Texas, each up

Kisher from A13 Keith recalled that they previously bedded the dairy cattle with sand, but when the digester made manure solids more available, they began composting the dewatered solids and using the compost for freestall bedding. “We have not noticed a difference in the somatic cell count by switching from sand to compost,” he said. “We did find that we needed to grove the concrete because the switch made the floors slicker and the cows were having trouble with solid footing. So, we went ahead and grooved all the floors.” He said the manure is scraped from each barn

twice per week. Wash water from the milking parlor dumps into the sump system that gravity feeds from one barn to the next. From there, the manure waste goes to a collection pit where it is pumped to the anaerobic digester. Thus far, the system has worked exactly as designed. They also bed the stalls twice per week with freshly composted manure as is needed for cow comfort. One of the foremost benefits of the digester appears to be the virtual elimination of the familiar odors that go along with dairy farming. Since this farm is directly across the highway from the Valley View Retire-

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ment Community, a 31acre campus with 118 residential cottages and other retirement facilities, the elimination of much of the manure odor via the manure digester process, has helped to make Kish View Farms an excellent and conscientious neighbor. Additionally, the processed manure liquid makes for a quality, organic field applicant when spread on the surrounding cropland.

10,000; Arizona, up 8,000; Colorado, up 6,000; and Indiana, Washington and Wisconsin up 5,000 each. Sates with fewer cows than a year included Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Penn-

sylvania, and Vermont. Meanwhile; USDA estimated 251,300 culled dairy cows were slaughtered under federal inspection in May, up 11,500 from the 239,800 culled in April 2012, and

31,300 more than May 2011. Through the first five months of 2012, cull cow slaughter totaled 1.294 million, up 55,500 from the same period in

Mielke A18

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UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — Pennsylvania farmers and homeowners should remain aware of possible armyworm infestations that could continue to appear within the during June in hay pastures, grain fields and lawns near agricultural fields. John Tooker, assistant professor of entomology in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, said that it has been a long time since an armyworm outbreak has occurred. “Every 20 or 30 years, we’ll have a booming outbreak of some insect species,” he said. “This one doesn’t have a regular schedule. We get armyworms in Pennsylvania every year, but this year the population for some reason is huge.” The outbreak may be related to the unusual spring weather, according to Tooker, but it is hard to say with certainty. He has heard widespread reports of armyworm infestations in Ohio, New York and Ontario. Tooker explained that armyworms eat more as they grow older, so 80 percent of the damage they cause occurs when they are in their final two stages of growth before becoming moths. “It can seem that the damage comes out of nowhere,” he said. “But what happens is that the caterpillars have been feeding away inconspicuously, and then damage becomes noticeable in the last two stages when they really start feeding voraciously.”

The insect feeds at night on corn, wheat or other grasses, damaging different portions of the plants. In corn, they take large chunks out of the leaves, damaging large portions of the field. In wheat, leaves are eaten, but the most noticeable damage is clipping of wheat heads. In grass or hay fields, armyworms consume the leaves and seed heads, so all that is left are the round stems of the plants. Lawns can be overrun by armyworms once they move out of grain fields into adjacent residential areas. These caterpillars are called armyworms for their tendency to march en mass to the next source of food — crossing roads and anything else that is in their path. Tooker said that the main tactic to treat a field or lawn for armyworms is to use the appropriate insecticide. A list of recommended insecticides for grain crops can be found in the Penn State Agronomy Guide, found online at http://extension.psu.edu/agronomyguide. The Pest Management section contains further information on managing armyworm and other pests. Before using any pesticide product, always read the label and carefully follow all directions and safety precautions. More information also can be found at http://extension.psu.edu/greenindustry/news/2012/armyworms-invade-lawns.

Page 15 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Watch for armyworm in corn, wheat and grass


Section A - Page 16 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

F UEL Hudson Valley livestock farm gets a shade greener by Ellen Wren Doing things outside the norm is nothing new for Richard Biezynski, a livestock farmer in Tivoli, NY. A nature lover from an early age, he always knew he wanted to be a farmer. In 1981 he got his wish when he bought Northwind Farms and began raising poultry. Inspired by reading Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring as a young man, Biezynski has always wanted to be in harmony with nature. He set out to raise free range meat without antibiotics, just for his family. Since additive-free feed wasn’t commercially available at that time, he prepared his own. His logic is simple common sense. He explains, “I want antibiotics when I need them, but I don’t want them in my food.” In short order his meat became popular in the local community and he earned loyal customers. Now, he’s a well-respected livestock farmer with a thriving CSA program and several active farm market booths. After a time he expanded beyond poultry. When his (then) young son pleaded for a McDonald’s hamburger, he decided to do a little better. He began raising cattle so his boy could have a healthier burger. Foresight is something that Richard Biezynski has in abundance. He was far head of his time with his additive-free meat, and is thinking about the future again, this time with a two-fold plan. He recently agreed to a conservation easement for 84 of his 197 acres of land, working with Scenic Hudson Land Trust, a land conservation organization to protect the land forever. There are many limitations on the land now, such as only about 3 percent of the land can be covered by any building structures, including even his concrete well cover. In some ways, the

value of his land has decreased but he’s willing to accept this. Why? “I think that long after we’re all gone, generations from now, they’ll appreciate it, when they ride on this road and they see it like it was back in 2012,” he said. On West Kerley Corners Road, in the village of Tivoli, where the farm is located, many other land owners have worked with Scenic Hudson to preserve their land for future generations as well. Because of the foresight and generosity of Biezynski and these other land owners, this area of the Town of Red Hook will be rural forever. Proceeds from the agreement helped to fund his latest project, also done with future generations in mind. Biezynski had photovoltaic array consisting of 150 solar panels installed on about one acre of his land. The entire project cost about $182,000, $133,000 of which came out of his own pocket, with some federal and state grant money pending as well. The panels turn his roughly $15,000 yearly electric bill into a tiny bill — just $25 for the first month, for line use fees. At this rate, the project will be paid off in 10 years or less by way of substantial electric bill saving. Electricity prices are about 12-13 cents a kilowatt right now and are projected to rise. With the solar panels, Northwind Farms now pays about 1 cent per kilowatt, and will do so for a long time to come. The panels are guaranteed for 25 years. Maintenance is minimal. Adjustments to the angle of the panels must be done four times a year and can be done by Biezynski himself. The solar array will generate 20 percent more power than he uses. Inverters installed on a wall show the elec-

tric meter rolling back. Biezynski will be credited for the excess power. They also show how much carbon dioxide is not being emitted into

Hudson A17

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National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson issued the following statement in response to a new series of reports, “Promoting International Energy Security,” released by the RAND Corporation: “The reports issued today by the RAND Corporation fail to consider all

of the benefits offered by the utilization of biofuels. In 2011, the United States imported 1.85 million barrels of oil per day from the Middle East, costing approximately $70 billion. By increasing the military’s use of biofuels, our armed forces are not only increasing job opportunities and income opportunities in rural America, but also diver-

sifying our fuel sources. By using only one source for fuels, the military is putting itself at risk, either by a sudden increase in oil prices or a steep drop in oil production. Biofuels will help to mitigate both of these risk factors and must continue to be utilized by U.S. Armed Forces.

“Many critical breakthroughs, such as Global Positioning Systems, come directly from our armed forces. The military can and should play a critical role in creating breakthroughs in renewable energy as well. It not only creates jobs but also improves our national security.”

Hudson from A16 the atmosphere because of the solar power. In 20 years, Northwind Farms with have avoided producing more than 800 tons of CO2. Solar power

is helping to make the farm more sustainable over the long term while contributing to a cleaner planet. “I think it’s the way of the future. It

would make more sense to pay the farmer the 20 percent and we’re not causing any pollution with this source of electric. Imagine if every

farm just took an acre out and was able to just send back 20 percent how that would reduce our oil dependency.” advises Biezynski.

The solar panels are not Biezynski’s first experience with solar power. Northwind Farms has been using portable solar fencing units for at

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least 15 years and finds it to be effective and sufficiently powerful. Being able to set up a pasture without running a line is also very convenient. The feedback from customers and the community has been, as predicted, very positive. Biezynski is approached at markets with questions and interest in his farm. A press conference was held at the farm with local politicians and State Senator Steve Saland in attendance, resulting in some great publicity for Northwind Farm. But Biezynski sees the move as common sense with an eye towards future generations and a leg up for his son, Russell, who plans to eventually take over the farm. “It’s all part of what I’ve thought about all my life. It’s an extension of what I do anyway,” explains Biezynski. What’s next for Northwind Farms? Biezynski muses about how he’d love to figure out how to have a solar irrigation system. But jokes, “The only way I can get any greener is if I change my name to O’Reilly!” An inspiring slide show made by Jane Biezynski, Richard’s wife, displaying photographs of the solar project can be seen on the Northwind Farms website: northwindfarmsallnatural.com Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now sourcing the following material:

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Page 17 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Biofuels are a critical part of U.S. Energy Security


Section A - Page 18 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Mielke from A14 2011. Based on May’s Milk Production report indicating there were about 9.27 million cows in the U.S., the May culling rate represented about 2.7 percent of the nation’s herd. The cash dairy markets apparently liked what it saw in the milk production data. Block cheese closed the week at $1.6250 per pound, up a penny on the week but 50 1/2-cents below a year ago. The barrels closed at $1.6350, up 6 1/4-cents on the week, 44 1/4cents below a year ago, and a penny above the blocks. Three carloads of block found new homes on the week and one of barrel. The AMS-surveyed U.S. average block price climbed to $1.5879, up 3.6 cents, while the barrels averaged $1.5492, up 1.8 cents. Production schedules at cheese plants are slowing as milk supplies appear to have passed the peak spring flush, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. Plant managers are keeping an eye on inventories and have reduced production in some cases. Mozzarella producers are especially conscious of reduced orders. Export demand has been helpful in moving cheese out of the country, according to USDA, but the strong U.S. dollar is hindering some sales. The Foreign Agricultural Service reported April exports were up 31

percent from last year and up 12 percent for the year. However, exports of butter and milkfat for April totaled 13.2 million pounds, down 29 percent from April 2011. Cumulative exports for the first four months of the year are running 32 percent behind last year. Saudi Arabia, at 13.6 million pounds for the year, is the largest importer with a 15 percent increase from a year ago. Butter and milkfat exports accounted for 5.9 percent of total butter production during January to April. Speaking of exports; Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) accepted 11 requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 1.7 million pounds of cheese to customers in Asia, South America, the Middle East, North Africa and South Pacific. The product will be delivered

through November 2012 and raised CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 61.7 million pounds plus 45.2 million pounds of butter and Anhydrous milkfat to 32 countries. FC Stone’s June 19 eDairy Insider Closing Bell reported that the June 19 GlobalDairyTrade (GDT) auction showed a significant decline in the average prices of commodities traded following a sharp rise two weeks ago. Anhydrous milkfat dropped 0.8 percent to $1.4025 per pound, or $1.1242 adjusted to 80 percent butterfat equivalent; cheddar cheese prices fell 3.7 percent to $1.4139 per

pound; milk protein concentrate 70 dropped 2.7 percent to $1.9115 per pound; rennet casein declined 1.9 percent to $3.079 per pound; and skim milk powder fell 4.8 percent to $1.2855 per pound. Buttermilk powder prices rose 2.5 percent to $1.381 per pound, according to the Insider, and whole milk powder prices climbed 2.7 percent to $1.3091 per pound. In other trade news; Dairy Profit Weekly reports that both U.S. neighbors are joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade talks. The U.S. and eight other countries, Australia, New Zealand,

Peru, Chile, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam and Brunei, accepted Canadian and Mexican applications to become part of the TPP negotiations this week. The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) and the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) strongly supported Canada’s participation in the TPP negotiations. Both groups agree that since Mexico has been invited to join the talks, it only made sense for the third member of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to join as well. However, whereas Mexico and the U.S. already have removed all dairy

trade barriers between them, this is not the case with respect to trade between Canada and the U.S., a situation which TPP must remedy, say the two organizations. NMPF and USDEC trust that the approval by the U.S. government of Canada’s participation in the TPP talks has been accompanied by a clear understanding of U.S. expectations that all Canadian trade barriers against U.S. dairy products must be eliminated. Canadian officials said they would defend the country’s domestic dairy supply management program in TPP talks.

Mielke A19

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Cash butter started the week on a down note, rebounded and climbed to $1.5450, then revered gears Friday ending six weeks of gain, and closed at $1.52, down 2 cents on the week and 54 cents below a year ago. Twenty one cars were sold this week. AMS butter averaged $1.3877, up 2 cents. Churning schedules across the country are active, basically absorbing cream volumes from regular and ongoing suppliers, according to USDA. Surplus cream volumes of earlier this spring are gone and churning activity is often keeping pace with demand, thus inventory clearances are lighter. Class II cream demand is seasonally strong as ice cream and ice cream mix

needs increase. Overall butter demand is good as retail features continue to clear good volumes of print butter and restaurant and food service outlets, especially in resort and holiday areas of the country. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.2275, up a half-cent on the week. Extra Grade closed at $1.19, up 2 1/2. AMS powder averaged $1.0997, down 0.2 cent, and dry whey averaged 50.75 cents per pound, up a half-cent. USDA’s June 15 Dairy Market News stated ahead of Monday’s Milk Production report that farm milk production was slipping gradually in most areas and that bottled milk demand was head-

ing toward “the summer doldrums.” Crop progress is reported to be at or ahead of expected development to date. North Central region farmers’ activities center around second cuttings on alfalfa, while cool weather and intermittent rain had Utah and Idaho alfalfa harvesting temporarily on hold. Corn in Texas improved with recent precipitation. In milk pricing news; the July Federal order Class I base milk price was announced by USDA at $15.51 per hundredweight, up 27 cents from June but $5.52 below July 2011. That equates to about $1.33 per gallon and pushed the 2012 Class I average to $16.34, down from $18.55 at this time a year ago, and compares to $14.60 in 2010

and $11.08 in 2009. The University of Wisconsin’s Dr. Brian Gould predicts that the July Milk Income Loss Contract Payment will be about 86 cents per cwt. The AMS-surveyed butter price averaged $1.3766 per pound, up 2.6 cents from June. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.1008, down 4 1/2-cents. Cheese averaged $1.5703, up 4.6 cents, and dry whey averaged 50.52 cents, down 3 cents. Looking “back to the futures;” after factoring in the announced Federal order Class III prices and the remaining futures, the average Class III milk price for the first six months of 2012 stood at $15.70 on May 11 and $15.90

Mielke A20

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Page 19 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Mielke from A18


Section A - Page 20 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Pennsylvania farmers urged to report crop damage promptly HARRISBURG, PA — Pennsylvania farmers are reminded to report crop damage to their crop insurance agent and local Farm Service Agency office within 72 hours of discovery. “Farmers are already seeing widespread crop damage from armyworms and late blight,” said Agriculture Secretary George Greig. “Help ensure you get the most out of your crop insurance

policy by reporting damage to your crop insurance agent immediately.” To file a claim: • Contact your crop insurance agent within 72 hours of discovery of damage. Follow up in writing. • Do not destroy evidence that is needed to support your claim without clear direction, in writing, from the insurance adjuster.

Whenever there is damage due to insects and/or disease it is critical to show: • That it was uncontrollable; • That preventative measures were taken; and • The measures and timing of the action taken since crop damage was found. Last year insured Pennsylvania producers recovered $62.6 million from losses. Greig reminded farmers to follow good

farming practices to help support crop insurance claims filed due to insect and disease damage. For information, contact your local cooperative extension office at http://extension.psu.edu/counties. For more information or to learn if your operation is eligible for crop insurance policies, call 717-705-9511 or visit www.agriculture.state.pa.us and search “crop insurance.”

cedural reforms, as well as elimination of end-product pricing formulas, were approved. A third amendment, from Senator Jim DeMint (R-SC), which called for prohibiting mandatory producer-funded checkoff programs, including the national dairy checkoff, was rejected. An amendment by Sen. Mike Johanns (R-NE), which called for a ban on EPA use of aerial surveillance of large livestock operations for compliance with Clean Water Act requirements, was also rejected. Provisions having the biggest impact on dairy farmers will be the components of National Milk’s “Foundation for the Future” program and Rep. Collin Peterson’s (D-MN) “Dairy Security Act,” which of course brought praise from National Milk. House Ag Committee chair Frank Lucas, who said he wanted to formalize a House version of the Farm Bill soon after the July 4 recess, apparently has had a change of plans, according to Natzke. House Majority Leader

Eric Cantor recommended a delay in the House Farm Bill, in part to review the Senate’s final proposal, he said. In addition, the House is scheduled to take up the fiscal year 2013 USDA ap-

propriations bill next week, and Cantor wants House ag committee members on the floor for that debate, instead of working on a farm bill.

Mielke from A19 on June 15. The last half was averaging $16.13 on May 25, $15.96 on June 1, $16.53 on June 8, $16.59 on June 15, and was trading around $17.02 late morning June 22. In politics; the Senate, Thursday, passed by a 64 to 35 vote its version of the 2012 Farm Bill, but the timetable for a House version became less clear, according to Dairy Profit Weekly’s Dave Natzke in Friday’s DairyLine broadcast. Faced with more than 200 amendments to its Farm Bill proposal, the Senate agreed to cut that to 73, Natzke reported, spending much of the week voting on those amendments before tackling the entire bill. Two dairy-related amendments affecting federal milk market orders, one from Sen. Robert Casey (D-PA), calling for an increase in the frequency of dairy market reporting, and requiring a feasibility study of reducing the number of classes of milk from four to two; and a second amendment from Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME), requiring federal milk marketing pro-

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Page 21 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Hello I’m P eggy


Section A - Page 22 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Home,, Family,, Friendss & You A sweet, cool treat to try (NAPSA) — Americans, it seems, are really hot for ice cream. People in the United States indulge more than those in any other nation, averaging 48 pints of ice cream per person, per year. Ninety-eight percent of all U.S. households purchase ice cream, with more sold on Sunday than any other day of the week. Here are a few more Cool Facts: • The first ice cream parlor in America opened in New York City in 1776. • George Washington loved ice cream and had two ice cream machines at his home. • It takes 12 gallons of milk to make one gallon of ice cream. • The most popular flavors are Vanilla, Chocolate, Butter Pecan, Strawberry and Neapolitan, followed closely by Chocolate Chip, French Vanilla and Cookies & Cream. • Cherry is the No. 1 Popsicle flavor. • Twin Popsicles were invented during the Depression so that two children could share one treat. Now you can find special deals on ice cream and novelties at the grocery store as the National Frozen & Refrigerated Foods Association (NFRA) celebrates this love for cool treats with an annual June/July Summer Favorites Ice Cream & Novelties promotion. Those experts on cool foods remind you to make the ice cream aisle your last stop, keep frozen purchases together in a separate section of the cart, and pack ice cream in an additional brown paper bag for the ride home. Once you get home, you may care to try this tasty, favorite ice cream dessert:

Ice Cream with Hot Fudge Sauce 1/2 gallon vanilla ice cream or frozen yogurt 2 (1-ounce) squares semi-sweet chocolate 1 Tbsp. butter 2/3 cup sugar 1/2 tsp. vanilla 1/4 tsp. salt 1 cup evaporated milk Maraschino cherries (for garnish) For sauce, heat, melt and stir chocolate, butter, sugar, vanilla and salt together. Gradually add the evaporated milk, continuously stirring. Bring to a light boil over medium heat and cook until sauce is smooth and thickened (about 10 minutes). To serve, place large scoops of ice cream in each dish and top with Hot Fudge Sauce and cherries. Serves 6. For additional recipes and tips and a chance to win a coupon, visit www.EasyHomeMeals.com or www.facebook.com/EasyHome Meals.

The most popular ice cream topping is chocolate syrup.

Good Housekeeping Picnic Chicken This walnut-crusted baked chicken is delicious hot or cold. Olive oil nonstick cooking spray 1 3/4 cups (about 8 ounces) walnuts 1 cup plain dried bread crumbs 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/4 teaspoon up to 1/2 teaspoon of ground red pepper, also known as cayenne 2 large eggs 8 medium (4 pounds) bone-in chicken breast

halves, skin removed 8 medium (1 3/4 pounds) chicken drumsticks, skin removed 1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Grease two 15 1/2 by 10 1/2 inch jelly-roll pans with cooking spray. 2. In food processor with knife blade attached, process walnuts with 1/4 cup bread crumbs until walnuts are finely ground. In medium bowl, combine nut mixture, salt, ground red pepper and remaining 3/4 cup bread crumbs; stir until well-mixed. In pie plate, beat eggs. 3. Cut each chicken breast half crosswise into two pieces. One at a time, dip breast pieces and drumsticks in beaten egg, then into walnut mixture to coat evenly, pressing firmly so mixture adheres. Arrange chicken in jellyroll pans; lightly coat chicken with cooking spray. 4. Bake chicken until golden brown and juices run clear when thickest part of chicken is pierced with tip of knife, 30 to 35 minutes, rotating pans between upper and lower oven racks halfway through baking. 5. Serve chicken hot, or cool slightly, cover and refrigerate to serve cold later. Makes 12 main-dish servings. • Each serving: About 311 calories, 16g total fat (2g saturated), 113mg cholesterol, 468mg sodium, 10g total carbs, 32g protein. (c) 2012 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

This week’s Sudoku Solution


by Marcie Hauri As the summer of 2012 starts up most people are looking forward to going to the beach, sleeping in, and not being in school. That is not the case with these young adults. The newly installed New York State FFA Officers are looking forward to spending their time at Camp Oswegatchie teaching leadership classes, running the FFA building at state fair, and so much more! The new State FFA officers are as follows: State President: Amanda Rhodes (Belleville-Henderson), Vice President: Paige Levandowski (Albion), Secretary: Leann Green (Jasper-Troupsburg), Treasurer: Ryan Willits (Lowville), Reporter: Marcie Hauri (CattaraugusLittle Valley), Sentinel: Kaylin

Broadwell (Hamilton), District 2: Brady Rogers (Tri-Valley), District 3: Dan Truso (Granville), District 5: Heather Staelens (Madison), District 6: Ashley Willits (Lowville), District 8: Thomas Drake (Jasper-Troupsburg), District 9: Adam Eick (Medina), and District 10: Ivy Reynolds (Cuba-Rushford). Even though their year of service has just begun they have already completed a weeks’ worth of leadership training (Blast Off) and plus attended NLCSO (National Leadership Conference for State Officers) at Camp Oswegatchie, New York, on June 27, along with several other eastern states. There they learned more efficient ways to work together as a team to better serve the FFA and New York State. Stay tuned for more updates from the New York State FFA Association.

2012-2013 New York State FFA Officers at their first leadership training- Blast Off. (Left to right) Top Row: Brady Rogers, Ryan Willits, Adam Eick, Dan Truso, Thomas Drake. Middle Row: Heather Staelens, Amanda Rhodes, Paige Levandowski, Ivy Reynolds, Leann Green. Bottom row: Kaylin Broadwell, Marcie Hauri, and Ashley Willits. Photo courtesy of Marcie Hauri, 2012-2013 NYS FFA Reporter

Cornell Cooperative Extension Broome County leads the state in Eat4-Health project Cornell Cooperative Extension Broome County (CCE-BC) was selected as the New York State lead for a new nutrition education program, Eat4Health, sponsored by a collaboration between National 4-H Council and UnitedHealthcare. The Eat4-Health team, headed by Vicki Giarratano, CCE-BC Assistant Director and Nutrition Education Program Leader, recently joined faculty from Division of Nutritional Sciences (DNS) at Cornell University and partners from Extension offices in Madison, Oswego and Jefferson counties and ten funded states for three days of intensive training at the National 4-H Center

in Chevy Chase, MD. Cornell is not only a grant recipient of this national project, but Wendy Wolfe, Ph.D., (DNS) authored Cornell’s Choose Health Action Teens (CHAT) and Choose Health: Food, Fun, and Fitness (CHFFF) programs that will be used nationally for the Eat4-Health project. Dr. Wolfe has conducted research in the areas of childhood obesity, child nutrition and the elementary school environment, food insecurity, community-based nutrition monitoring, postpartum weight retention, and dietary methodology. Since 2003, she has focused on youth nutrition and childhood obesity prevention within Cornell Cooperative Extension, providing research-based technical assistance and training to local educators and others throughout the state, and par-

ticipating in related program evaluation research. CHAT is a program in which teens are trained to co-teach the CHFFF curriculum to younger youth. CHFFF is a 6-lesson, interactive curriculum focused on healthy eating and physical activities. “What is exciting about this program,” says Wolfe, “is that the teens themselves learn about healthy eating and active living by teaching younger youth, and often change their own behaviors as a result. Plus they learn leadership and presentation skills.” Using CHAT and CHFFF curricula, Teen Leaders from Broome County 4H’s CITIZEN U, a five-year project funded by Children, Youth and Families At Risk (CYFAR), National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), USDA and CCE-BC nutrition

educators will conduct programming in Binghamton and lead the Eat4Health team statewide. The CITIZEN U Eat4-Health team will train teen ambassadors, called “CHATs” to conduct the 6-lesson CHFFF program with elementary and middle school-age children during the school year and conduct summer camps at two public housing complexes in partnership with Binghamton Housing Authority and the City of Binghamton. Statewide, the team will work closely with UnitedHealthcare and the other CCE partners to carry out statewide trainings focused on childhood obesity prevention. For more information about Eat4Health, please contact Vicki Giarratano, CCE-BC, at 607-5845022.

North Jackson Ag 4-H Club Livestock Clinic was held on June 16 at the Harford Fair grounds. There were many 4-H members who attended to learn about the type of animal they plan to show at the fair, whether it is a pig, goat, lamb, or a cow. The good production practices that are required for anyone who’s showing any species of livestock, were offered in the afternoon. Many 4-H members who attended had fun learning how to properly handle their livestock, but that’s not all we learned! I’m sure every single 4-H member that attended learned many things. I say this because I know that I had fun and learned many things. So when you pass by someone CITIZEN U Teen Leader, Mia Bruner who helped at the 2012 presents CHFFF nutrition lesson during Livestock Clinic be sure to training at the National 4-H Conference thank them for their time Center, Chevy Chase, MD.

and knowledge they shared with us. Here follows the dates of some upcoming 4-H events: On July 11 at the Harford Fair grounds 4-H one day camp will be held. The 4-H Scholarship Horseshow will be held on July 14 at the Harford Fair grounds at 9 a.m. Also on July 28 the 4-H Horse and Pony roundup will be held on the Harford Fair grounds. This year’s 2012 Harford Fair theme is “A Century of Celebrating Fairs and Agriculture”!

Eric Gorick during a mock pig show at Livestock Clinic. Photo courtesy of Penn State Extension in Susquehanna County

Page 23 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

On the road again with the FFA!


Section A - Page 24 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Trucks Thruway Authority plan drives up costs for New York’s farmers and consumers New York Farm Bureau strongly opposes the Thruway Authority’s plan to spike tolls for larger commercial trucks by nearly 50 percent. At a time when New York farmers are struggling to contain rising costs in an already “high cost” state, an added “tax” on their daily routine of getting nutritious food to market will only add another heavy burden on to the price of doing business. “In many cases, farmers will be paying hundreds if not thousands of dollars more per year just to conduct normal business.” said Dean Norton, New York Farm Bureau President. “New York needs to keep making it easier to do busi-

ness in the state, and not throw the recent momentum into reverse.” Initially, all farmers will be forced to absorb the large jump in transportation costs. For a dairy farmer who has no control over the volatile prices set by the government, this will be an especially big blow. And the costs are dramatic. Upstate Niagara Cooperative which hauls milk throughout the state says its largest operation out of Cortland County would spend $16,000 more per month to send its 75 trucks down the Thruway. Another in Genesee County which operates 35 trucks could pay close to $7,000 more a month bringing fresh

NYFB President Dean Norton’s statement on the passage of the Senate Farm Bill “New York Farm Bureau is pleased the U.S. Senate passed the comprehensive Farm Bill in a timely manner in order to give our members some reassurance that important reforms will happen before the current Farm Bill expires. We have lobbied hard for the inclusion of some key initiatives that will help our members in many ways including when they suffer from losses and natural disasters. Most importantly, this will reform the safety net for New York’s dairy farmers who are currently at the mercy of a volatile pricing system. And it provides more research dollars for important New York specialty crops such as apples, grapes, maple, and a number of locally grown vegetables. It also would provide better crop insurance options including for diversified vegetable farms, many of which suffered big losses in last year’s flooding. We appreciate the support of Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten

Gillibrand on a number of issues that our members deeply care about in the Farm Bill. This also opens the door for our Representatives to continue their important work on the legislation in the House, and secure its passage by the Sept. 30 expiration date of the existing Farm Bill which passed in 2008.”

dairy to Albany and New York City. Upstate Niagara’s Mike Davis said, “The consensus is that this increase will be harmful to agribusiness in general, not just limited to milk haulers. Some of these operations also operate dump trucks and other vehicles to haul grains, commodities, and manure. All of these haulers will be forced to collect this increase somewhere.” That’s how consumers will feel the bite at the dinner table. The USDA has proven that eventually any rise in transporta-

tion costs ultimately gets passed on to the people who buy the food. So, New Yorkers can expect to pay more to feed their families a New York grown healthy, nutritious meal. Raising the cost of food prices is never acceptable when the current economy is struggling to regain balance. One other impact… NYFB members depend on the Thruway for safe, convenient access to large markets. But if rural roads will make the trip cheaper, some farmers will have no choice but to send large, com-

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The Thruway Authority is proposing the massive hike at a time when Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s have downgraded the authority’s bond outlook. NYFB would ask the Thruway Authority to get its own house in order first before asking New York’s farmers and consumers to hand over their hard earned dollars.

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mercial vehicles through small communities and neighborhoods. “It is going to result in safety problems. People are going to go off the Thruway because it is free,” said NYFB member Mark Henry of W.D. Henry and Sons Inc. in Eden, NY. “It’s a dangerous situation when you have more trucks mixing with cars on a two lane road.”

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Page 25 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Are You Involved In More Than One Industry? We Are Here to Help You.


ARKETPLACE

GRAY SLATE TURKEY CHICKS, White Chinese and African gosling, $6.00 each; colorful Bantam hen w/chicks, $13.00 a family. 585-526-4736.(NY)

477 NH HAYBINE, $4,800; MF rake, $1,200; Nicholson tedder, $700; Farmall A tractor, $1,500; Vicon 510 tedder, 4-Star, $2,400 ~ 845-482-4296.(NY)

JD 343 3 row corn head for picker or snaplage includes adapter plate for 30005000 series harvesters, $3,000 ~ 315-4203396.(NY)

NH #306 TANDEM axle, V-Spreader side slinger $3,100. Hay Macerator #6600, $6,500. 315-853-2837.(NY)

TYTAN NET WRAP, 48 inch by 9,840’, full pallet, 16 rolls, asking $3,125 for pallet or $200 per roll ~ 802-285-6694.(VT)

FARMALL H 1941, new clutch, 12 volt, runs great, Straight sheet metal, original owners manual $1,900. OBO. 860-5670270.(CT)

8 WEEK OLD PITBULL PUPPIES, 6 females, 3 males ~ 716-592-7815.(NY)

27 FOOT ONE piece 20 section Headlocks, used in Goat milking parlor, very heavy, price $800. Cash firm, Millerton, NY. 845-518-0552

NH-144 HAY INVERTER $1,500. 12kw PTO generator on 5x10 trailer $1,300. Rhino 6ft. finish mower $600. NH Super-66 baler w/engine $1,200. 315-744-4941(NY)

BERKSHIRE YORKSHIRE CHESTER white boars and gilts. Jim Parlett, York County, PA ~ 717-862-3610

20x58 REBAR COMBINE WHEELS with 10 rubber blocks; 15kw Generac generator on 3Pt.; 2 pair 18.4x26 with rims ~ 585526-6240.(NY)

WANTED: JD wide front end 3010, 3020, blue squeeze pump, cab to fit 3010 JD. 607-343-1082.(NY)

AFTER MARKET 3pt. hitch off John Deere 620, lower arms, link arms, lower arm brackets. Make offer, (A heavy one). 607532-8512.(NY)

20’x60’ SILO with UNLOADER, $2,500. WANTED: Sicklebar mower to fit International tractor ~ 315-865-5657.(NY)

SPORTZ TRUCK tent fits 8 foot bed, like new with carry bag $75. 518-9470454.(NY)

590 ALLIED LOADER $2,500. NH Super 717 Chopper with pickup head $1,500. JD 494 Corn Planter $2,000. 716-5726217.(NY)

INTERNATIONAL 656 ROW crop Dsl. $3,500. JD A new tires $1,500. Ford 641 with loader $2,600. 315-427-2273.(NY)

#9 INSILAGE CUTTER, $1,600; Rebuilt #9 mower, $1,250; Super 77 baler ties, 100%, $1,250. Gingerich, 9036 Stryker Rd., Avoca, NY 14809

1,800 + 2,000 New Martin sprockets # 2580 A, B, B.S., BTB and others, make offer or by pound. 716-337-2975.(NY)

CIDER PRESSES, stainless steel presses, grinder, water pressure operated, 4-1/2bu. to 14bu. capacity available. Amon Zimmerman 1077 Hall Rd. Lydonville,NY 14098.

JD 520 NF new rear tires, runs great $5,800. JD 420W many new parts, runs good $2,900. obo 315-942-2951(NY)

DONKEY MINIATURE Gelded 8 years old, quiet, halter broke, others available $400 and up. 315-717-3426.(NY)

FULLBLOOD BOER BUCK 3 years old disbudded proven sire $350, available 8/1/12. Orange County 845-355-2718.(NY)

LITTLE GIANT grain and hay elevator, 36’ PTO or motor driven $1,400. 585-3431322.(NY)

BEAGLE PUPS: Ready to go, boys and girls, $200 each ~ 315-363-0262.(NY) WANTED: USED PRODUCE WASHER in working condition. Call at 8:00AM Mondays and Thursdays ~ 607-869-5321.(NY) POLLED HEREFORD Bull, registered, born 5-25-11, dark red $1,800. or trade for Hereford Heifers. 315-371-5757.(NY) OX YORKS, never used, like new $200. Or best offer, cash only. 716-652-6024.(NY) 2 REGISTERED PERCHERON MARES, 6 and 7 years old, broke to all farm machinery, $1,800/obo ~ 518-993-5129.(NY)

WANTED: Tire 19.1-16 for manure tank, 50% or better. Yates Co, NY. 315-536-0235 DARK BAY ARABIAN FILLY, 1 year old, can be registered, $300 ~ 315-8655898.(NY) FREE!! Havanese Bichon Puppy, 3 months old. Call 585-694-4246.(NY)

WATER WHEEL planter, 3 wheels and plastic layer $1,200. 720 Corn Planter $400. Four Row cultivator S-tine $400. 585-733-8154.(NY) FOR SALE: New Holland 275 hay baler with kicker, good condition, one owner, always kept under cover $2,800. 315-8581566(NY)

WANTED: 10 INCH “H” BEAM 20 FEET long. Call 585-554-4506.(NY) HEREFORD HEIFERS bred to Hereford Bull, 18 months old, also Yearling Heifers $1,000. each. New Holland LX885 Skid steer $12,000. 315-926-3585.(NY) 1953 JOHN DEERE “60”, $2,900; 1949 Farmall “M”, nice, $3,600; 1940 John Deere “H”, not running, $1,500. Downsizing, need room 401-662-9131.(RI) NH 3102 SPREADER; NI 3626 spreader; 2 gravity wagons; NH 28 blower; NI 323 picker; Brillion 16’ drags; Running gears; 315219-9090.(NY)

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July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Section A - Page 26

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2007 New Holland BR740A - 4’x5’, Silage Special, RotoCut, Net and Twine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call For Pricing

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Pequea TT4000 - 17’ Working Width, 4 Star, Hydraulic Kuhn GF5001TH - 17’Working Width, 4 Star, Hydraulic Fold Fold Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,775 Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,275 Country Folk Special $4,775

Kuhn GA6002 Double Rotary Rake - 10’ - 19’ Working Width, Field Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,875

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New Holland 166 Inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,875

Used Harvest Tec Applicator Systems In Stock NH BR740 - 30 Gal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700 NH Small Square Baler - 25 Gal., w/moisture tester . .$750 NH Small Square Baler - 25 Gal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$650 NH Round Baler - 25 Gal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$700

Page 27 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

New Liberty Blue Hay Rack Wagons - 9’x18’, Front Gate 1995 Ford 7840 - 90 PTO HP, 4WD, Cab, 2 Rear Remotes 2011 Bri-Mar DT816-14 Dump Trailer - 16’ Long, 14,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,995 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$28,500 GVWR, Tarp Kit, Battery, Exc. Cond. . . . . . . . . . .$11,575 Running Gears: Kory 8 Ton Wide Track . . . . . . . .$2,650 EZ-Trail 8 Ton Wide track . . . . .$1,975


July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Section A - Page 28


Section B

Ath-Mor Registered Holsteins Complete Dispersal Tuesday,, July y 17,, 2012 2 • 10:00 0 AM M • Lee,, NH GPS address: 280 Lee Hook Rd, Lee, New Hampshire

350 head sell including 175 milk cows and 175 heifers and calves! June, 2012 RHA: 176 cow 29,757M 3.6% 1086F 3.0% 899P • 126,000SCC (no rBST) *Herd is certified & tested Johnes free! • Bulk tank sample negative for Mycoplasma A few hot ones that sell: -Buckeye that is the #5 milk cow of breed w/ daus. • -GP-84 Planet +2128GTPI w/ daus. • -VG Jammer w/ multiple AI sons. Sells w/ daus. • +2298GTPI Observer X GP-83 Jeeves • +2290GTPI Digger X VG- Marsh • +2266GTPI 3%CE Bookem X GP-83 Mac • +2209 Paul X VG-88 Alton • +2197 Bookem X VG Jet Stream • *30 head sell with AI contracts • *40+ embryos sell sired by Numero Uno, Supersire, Epic, CM etc. Sale Manager's Note: Size, substance, great udders & excellent feet & legs! The heifers are strong and deep! One of the finest herds we have sold in Sale Manager/Catalogs years! Virtually no dairies in the area & we expect buyers will be rewarded for being at the sale!

View catalog online at www.cattlexchange.com Sale Owners: Ath-Mor Holsteins 280 Lee Hook Rd., Lee, NH 03861 Tom Morrell 603-659-3836 and Russ Atherton 603-659-6128

Dave & Merry Rama

4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 Phone: 607-746-2226 • Fax: 607-746-2911 E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com Website: www.cattlexchange.com

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MARKET REPORTS A View from Hickory Heights by Ann Swanson Independence Day Today, Independence Day, or July 4, is simply a picnic or a celebration with fireworks, but I am sure the colonists had a much different view. They were fresh from a fight against fellow countrymen. Perhaps they met friends or relatives on the battle field. It was a bitter struggle. The colonists were the underdogs yet they persevered and won their independence. Picture the ill clad troops up against the well-healed British Red Coats. It certainly was a battle filled with emotion. I remember that the

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study of the American Revolution was in my day part of seventh grade social studies. I was really interested in what we learned. Since I lived in New York we focused on the role of the New York battles and generals. Mrs. Rotunda had taken time to write a story about the war with a generous number of blank spaces. After she lectured us about the information for the day we had time to look in our books for the information that was missing. This may be an old technique, but it proved to be one that allowed those facts to remain in my

mind. When the family plays Trivia or other information rich games I find that I have an enormous amount of extraneous information in this head of mine. I have no idea why I remember some of these things, but I do. I was in a third grade classroom as the country celebrated the bicentennial. History is fun if it is approached in the right manner. We looked at how the colonists lived at the time trying some of the early crafts and activities. All of my lessons worked together so the children would have a better understanding of what Independence Day really was. We made samplers. We cooked a traditional dinner of stew with vegetables grown in the early gardens. The parents were wonderful. They contributed food

Hickory B2

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Page 1 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Country y Folks AUCTION SECTION and


Section B - Page 2 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Hickory from B1 and materials. On the final day of study we dressed in colonial garb and enjoyed a feast as we reveled in the joy of earning independence from England. I look back on that unit fondly. I enjoyed teaching it and the students enjoyed learning about it. It was not in the third grade textbook, but I managed to fit it in because it was a current event. I am so glad that all of the planning and hard work paid off. When I meet former students they remind me of some of the units that we did. They always remember what I like to call the active way of studying. Once you do something you remember. It was a lot of work to do these active units, but they were well worth the effort. It was what made learning fun. The community that I grew up in did not have a 4th of July parade, but they did have a band con-

cert and fireworks. We usually had a family picnic at my aunt and uncle’s cottage, then, loaded up the car to go to the band concert. The band played familiar tunes that we could all sing to. Marches were also big. They played all of the John Phillip Sousa marches. We took lawn chairs and blankets and made ourselves at home. The concert lasted about an hour then it was time for the fireworks. The fireworks were set off from the dock so we could all see them. Even though we had just eaten we were always hungry. My neighbor’s family ran a hot dog stand just across from the park where the band concert was held. They also sold pop in glass bottles. They charged a deposit on the bottles but many people were just too lazy to return them. My cousins and I collected the bottles that were tossed

REGULAR LIVESTOCK SALE Wednesday July 4th • 1 PM Sale as usual. All buyers will be here.

For info call: 585-394-1515

FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK EX. 3 Miles East Of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20

Visit Our Web Site www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

D.R. CHAMBERS & SONS, INC. 76 Maple Ave. - Unadilla\\, NY 13849

607-369-8231 • Fax 607-369-2190

SALE DATE CHANGE Our July 4th Wednesday Cattle Sale will be on

Thursday,, Julyy 5th h starting @ 11:30am Please try to have stock here by 3pm DAIRY DAY THE 3RD WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH Special Feeder Sale Every Wednesday following the dairy @ 3pm. We have a Strong and Consistent Calf, Feeder and Beef Market

Next 2 Horse Sale Dates are: Friday, July 6th Friday, July 20th Tack @ 1pm - Horses @ 6pm Celebrating 74 years in business Check out our Website for market report, sale dates and more. www.drchambersauction.com Join us on Facebook at Chambers Livestock-Auction

away and returned them for the deposit. Often we earned enough to buy some chips or even enough for a hot dog. Now, they charge deposit on aluminum cans, but people do no return those either. We find all kinds of trash along the side of the road. As I became a farmer’s wife I realized that farm work did not stop for the 4th of July. Sometimes we had a picnic and sometimes we didn’t. It depended on how the haying was going. If there was hay to haul

the best we could hope for was a picnic supper after the work was done. Grandma’s birthday was two days later so often we had birthday cake for dessert. Usually grandma’s birthday celebration stretched over several days. One 4th of July we had a family reunion. Since the haying was finished we got to attend. It was a great way to celebrate our country’s independence. We saw relatives that we seldom saw. We played volley ball and ate a delicious meal that we

TRACTORS Case IH 9110 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 416 TLB, nice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 750 B Crawler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 2950 cab/MFWD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 3150 w/740 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4310 w/430 loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 4430 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5520 cab, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,000 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 5525 cab, loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 6430 Rental Return 2.5% Financing . . . . $65,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JD 7130 Rental Return 2.5% Financing . . . . $71,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville (3) JD 7930 IVT . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting at $123,000 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 4630 cab, 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville COMPACT TRACTORS JD 850 w/cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 1600 wam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 2210 w/Loader/Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2520 Loader/Mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 3320 w/300/448 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3720 w/blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,900 . . . . . . . . Clifton Park JD 3720 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham Kioti DK455 TLB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota L39 TLB, canopy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 78” skid steer blower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 96’ pwr rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH LS 180. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH L175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke NH LS180 cab/heat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen MOWERS CONDITIONERS JD 530 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 1217 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl DC 2412 MoCo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham NH 1411 MoCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . Chatham HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/heads . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 74 rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 552 3pt tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro rake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke (2) JD 2 Row Corn HD. . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 / $3,250 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3rn corn head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 676 corn head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 751 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit . . . . . . . . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 2 row corn head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $650 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville

all contributed to. When we first attended fireworks around here they were done in the school athletic field. Sometimes we parked at the high school and looked down from there. Gradually the celebration expanded to include a carnival. The fireworks moved. Now we take our lawn chairs and sit in one of the grassy areas to enjoy the fireworks display. The big thing was sparklers. We always had our own sparklers. The adults lit them and the children went around the

yard with them. We always made them bring the wire holders to the porch so that we did not have to worry about running over them with the lawn mower. With the 4th being in the middle of the week I am not sure what the family is doing. The parents will all have to go to work the next day so it is really just a day off. Ann Swanson writes from her home in Russell, PA. Contact at hickoryheights1@verizon.net

Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville HS HSM9 hydra-swing merger . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,950. . . . . . . Schaghticoke NH 166 inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,450 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Pequea fluffer 8 1/2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 550 tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE Amco 27’ disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,250 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Frontier RT 1280 Roto Tiller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 750 15’ No-till drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville IH 710 4 bottom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2500 5 bottom (nice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2800 6 btm trip plow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 8300 23 x7 drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,950 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 8300 23 x7 drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS Claas 46 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Krone 1500 w/knives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,000 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,000 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 335 RB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 328 w/1/4 turn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 328 w/chute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500. . . . . . . Schaghticoke JD 338 w/out chute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 348 w/ 1/4 Turn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 348 w/40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 446 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 446 w/mega tooth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 458 silage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 567 RB w/Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville NH 316 baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Goshen NH 740 round baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . . . . Chathm Hesston rounder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,250 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Tubeline Wrapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS New 10 bolt duals 480/80R 46 . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Dynaweld trailer w/hyd tail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville 300 HUSKER w/243 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 390 flail mower. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham JD 920 Flex HD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville (3) JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Kelly Ryan Blower Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Hardi Ranger 2200 (NEW) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville HS 125 spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000. . . . . . . Schaghticoke 7’ loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville 8N/9N loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Sweepster 6’ 3pt broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Sweepster S32C 6’ front broom . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Used 20.8-38 snap on duals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Woods 3100 loader (fits IH 66/86 series) . . . . . $4,900 . . . . . . . . . Fultonville Woods RB72 rear blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425 . . . . . . . . . . Chatham

HUDSON RIVER TRACTOR COMPANY LLC FULTONVILLE 518-853-3405

GOSHEN 845-294-2500

CHATHAM 518-392-2505

SCHAGHTICOKE 518-692-2676

CLIFTON PARK 518-877-5059


Page 3 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012


Section B - Page 4 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, July 2 • Hosking Sales . Monthly Fat Cow & Feeder Sale. Special - ROB-MICH Farm Registered & Grade Holstein Herd Dispersal. 40 Head (20 Reg.) 36 cows, 4 Bred Hfrs. Watch for the two Maternal sisters by Talent & Sept. Storm. Also a fancy VG 87 R&W due sale day to Sept. Storm. Cows are in all stages of lactation with a few exceptionally fancy young cows here! Other job interest prompts this short notice sale. Owners: Robert & Michele Franklin & Family. Dairy will start at 1 pm. Quality consignments welcome. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-6993637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • Town of Berne, NY. Vehicles and equipment. Online auction closing at 6 pm. Auctions, International, 800-536-1401 x 115 www.AUCTIONSINTERNATIONAL.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Misc. & Small Animals. 12:30 Produce, 1 pm Dairy. We now sell Lambs, Goats, Pigs & Feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves & Cull Beef approx. 5-5:30 pm. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-972-

1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Regular Monday schedule. . Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321.

Tuesday, July 3 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Consigned from Washing Co. Farmer. Overstocked sends 10 fresh hfrs., Hols. X. All have had 9 way & have been wormed. Real nice group of hfrs. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-3213211.

Wednesday, July 4 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 1:00 PM: Regular livestock sale. Sale as usual, all buyers will be here. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, Inc. 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rts 5 Y 20. 585-394-1515 • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 11167 Big Tree Rd.,East Aurora, NY 14052 800-536-1401 x 115 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

• 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-8293105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Thursday, July 5 • Private Consignor/ St Lawrence Co. Vehicles/1975 Trojan loader Online auction closing at 6:45pm, Toll free 800-536-1401 x115 www.AUCTIONSINTERNATIONAL.com • Town of Masonville. Tools & Equip Online auction closing at 7:15pm. Auctions International, Toll free 800-536-1401 x115 www.AUCTIONSINTERNATIONAL.com • Westchester County. Vehicles. Online auction closing at 6 PM. Auctions International 800-536-1401 x 115 www.AUCTIONSINTERNATIONAL.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, Sue Rudgers, Manager, 518-584-3033 • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Our usual run of dairy cows, heifers & service bulls. Tim Miller, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing,

YO U

BY

315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800321-3211. 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-3698231 (Date change due to July 4 holiday). www.drchambersauction.com

Friday, July 6 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 6:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Horse Sales every other Friday. Tack at 1 pm, horses at 6 pm. . D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-369-8231 www.drchambersauction.com

Saturday, July 7 • Garden Time LLC in Glens Falls, NY. 3rd Annual Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • 9:30 AM: Bow, NH. Construction Equipment Liquidation for Farnese Construction . Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

Monday, July 9 • 1:00 PM: Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S of Utica & 6 miles N of New Berlin. Monthly 1 PM heifer sale followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 PM. Tom & Brenda Hoskings, 607-699-3637, 607-847-

THESE

D.R. CHAMBERS & SONS 76 Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY 13849 607-369-8231 • Fax 607-369-2190 www.drchambersauction.com EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm

Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com


To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Wednesday, July 11 • Barton, Vermont. 153rd Top-Of-Vermont Invitation Dairy Sale, at the Pines Farm. Reg Lussier neks@together.net 802-525-4774 • 10:00 AM: Essex, NY. Complete dairy farm disperal of 186 head free stall cattle, farm and barn equip,ment for Windy Valley Farm. Wrights Auction Service, 802-334-6115

Thursday, July 12 • Phoenix, AZ. Complete Liquidation of Late Model Construction Equipment: (75) Forklifts, (80) Pickups, (25) Delivery Trucks (mostly with cranes), (30) Trailers (mostly with cranes). PLUS: Complete Wood Truss Manufacturing Plant including all types of machinery and enormous amount of tooling. In Conjunction with Bar None Auction. A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

Friday, July 13 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, July 14 • Canastota, NY. Lyon’s Annual Summer Hay Camp & Friday Night Barbecue! Late Model Construction Equipment, Support, Aerial Lifts, Trucks & Trailers. WATCH FOR DETAILS! HILITES: 2010-2009 Cat D8T, (2) 2009 Cat D7R (ripper), 2012 Cat D6NXL (unused), (6) Cat D6T & D6N, 2010 Cat 320D, 2011 Cat 980H, (2) 2012 Cat CD54, 2007 Cat XQ600, (2) 2012 JCB 3CX-14 (4x4). A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

• 9:00 AM: Canastota, NY. Annual Summer Auction. Late Model Construction Equipment. Alex Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

Saturday, July 14 • 9:00 AM: West Meetinghouse Rd., New Milford, CT. Estate of Chick Flynn. JD 4440D Powershift, 4000D, 5625D & 5525D 4x4 w/QT542 Loaders, 4400D 4x4 Compact w/430 Loader; JD 47 QT Backhoe; JD 950D 4x4, JD 440G Track Loader & Other Tractors, Hay & Tillage Equipment, Dairy Heifers, Bulls/Steers, Guns, Antiques & Furniture. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com

Monday, July 16 • 1:00 PM: Monthly sheep lamb goat & pig sale. 1 PM dairy followed by sheep, lamb, goats, pigs & feeders. Calves & cull beef approx. 5-5:30 PM. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607-847-8800, cell 607-9721770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Tuesday, July 17 • 10:00 AM: Lee, NH. Ath-Mor Registered Holsteins complete dispersal 350 head sale. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattleexchange.com www.cattleexchange.com

Wednesday, July 18 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558 • 3:00 PM: D.R. Chambers & Sons, 76

Maple Ave., Unadilla, NY. Dairy Day Special Feeder Sale. Every Wednesday following Dairy. D.R. Chambers & Sons, 607-3698231 www.drchambersauction.com

• 1815 Hicks Field Rd. East FORT WORTH TX 76179. Rental Fleet Construction, Support Equipment & Attachments. A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

Thursday, July 19

Thursday, July 26

• 7:00 PM: Batavia, NY. Genesee County 4H Meat Animal Sale - Come support the local 4H youth by bidding on their 4H animals! See our website for more information. William Kent, Inc., 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com

• Midland, Texas. Complete Liquidation Late Model Cat Construction Equipment, (20) Mack Truck Tractors and Dump Trucks, Large Quantity of Pickups, Support Equipment. HILITES: (6) Cat 140H, Cat 324DL, (8) Cat D6T, (2) Cat D6R, Cat 966H, (40) Pickups, (20) Belly Dumps & Equipment Trailers, Plus Much, Much More! A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 6:00 PM: County Highway Maintenance Facility, Geneseo, NY. Livingston County Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Saturday, July 21 • Middleburgh, NY. Reflections of Maple Downs Sale. Hosted by Maple Downs Farm II. Held in conjunction with the NY Holstein Summer Picnic. The Cattle Exchange, 607746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Leyden, MA. Selling trucks, trailers, shop tools & farm equip. including pay loader and farm tractor for Zimmerman Livestock Trucking. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Tuesday, July 24 • Syracuse, NY. Complete Liquidation: Asphalt Paver, Late Model Vibratory Rollers, Rough Terrain Crane, Skid Steers, Mini Excavators, Very Large Amount of Shop Equipment, Tooling & Accessories. VERY NICE!. A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com

Wednesday, July 25 • West Addison, VT. Bodette Farm Complete Equipment Dispersal. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892

Friday, July 27 • 10:00 AM: Haverling Central High School, Bath, NY. Steuben County Tax Title Auction. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Saturday, July 28 • 9:30 AM: Martins Country Market. 3rd Annual Large Summer Equipment Auction. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Sunday, July 29 • 10:00 AM: Washington Co. Fairgrounds,

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S

Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers HILLTOP AUCTION CO. 3856 Reed Rd., Savannah, NY 13146 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Elmer Zieset 315-729-8030 HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 Looking to have a farm sale or just sell a few? Give us a call. Trucking Assistance. Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on the Web site. 607-699-3637 • Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com

KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE 817 State Rt. 170 Little Falls, NY 13365 315-823-0089 • 315-868-6561 cell We buy or sell your cattle or equipment on commission or outright! In business since 1948 LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales

NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 • Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774 NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 • Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 • 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 www.wrightsauctions.com

Page 5 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

AUC TION CALENDAR


Section B - Page 6 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Auction Calendar, Continued (cont. from prev. page) Rt. 29 & 392 Old Schuylerville Rd., Greenwich, NY. Tri-State Antique Tractor Club Inc. antique Wheels and Iron Showw. 1st time consignment auction. Selling antique & modern farm, construction, gas engine, signs, toys, literature and related items. Show: Sat-Sun July 28-29. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm

Friday, August 3 • 11:00 AM: Lakeview Holsteins, 2456 Rt. 14, Penn Yan, NY. Selling complete dairies and registered & grade cattle. Hilltop Auction Company, Jay Martin 315-521-3123, Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 • 6:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, August 4 • 10:00 AM: 1507 Pre-Emption Rd., Penn Yan, NY (Yates Co.). Real Estate Absolute Auction. 103 acre DeWick farm w/100 acres tillable, farmhouse, shop 2 machine sheds. Thomas P. Wamp/Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com

Wednesday, August 8 • 2:00 PM: Gehan Rd., off Rts. 5-20, 5 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. NY Steam Engine Assoc. 4th Annual Consignment Auction. 1st day of pageant of Steam Show Aug. 8-11. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585-3961676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm

Thursday, August 9 • 1:00 PM: Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY. Farm & Equipment Auction. Next to Empire Farm Days Show. Farm Equipment, Tractors, Antique Equipment, Construction Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

Friday, August 10 • 10:00 AM: North Java, NY. Dairy Farm Machinery Auction - Selling a full line of farm machinery including Case IH 7140, IH 1566, IH 886, NH 1900 forage harvester, Kenworth W900B 10 wheeler, Claas 180 RotoCut baler, plus truck parts, tillage, planting, harvesting and more! See our website for more information. William Kent, Inc., 585343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com

Wednesday, August 15 • 12601 State Rd. 545 North WINTER GARDEN FL 34787. Late Model Rrental Fleet Construction Equipment, Aerials, Trucks & Trailers. A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • Pike, NY. Wyoming County 4H Meat Animal Sale - Come support the local 4H youth by bidding on their animals! See our website for more information. Jacquier Auctions, 413-569-6421 www.jacquierauctions.com

Wednesday, August 15 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Saturday, August 18 • 1755 S. E. Frontage Road STURTEVANT WI 53177. Complete Liquidation of Late Model Earthmoving Equipment, Truck Tractors, Equipment Trailers & Support. A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944

www.lyonauction.com

Wednesday, August 22 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Saturday, September 29 • Twister Valley, Fort Plain, NY. Power Sports Consignment Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257

Friday, August 24

Saturday, October 6

• Barton, VT. Important Holstein Dispersal. More info soon. Sale Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, neks@together.net, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802626-8892

• 9:00 AM: 145 Paul Rd., Exit 17, Rt. 390, Rochester, NY. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction. Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars & Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, August 25 • 9:00 AM: Penn Yan, NY. Finger Lakes Produce Auction Farm Machinery Consignment Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc., 585-7282520 www.pirrunginc.com

Thursday, September 6 • 1:00 PM: 10400 Gillette Rd., Alexander, NY. WNY Gas & Steam Engine Assoc. 2nd. Annual Consignment. 1st day of show Sept. 6-9. Dann Auctioneers, Delos Dann, 585396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com/dannauctioneers.htm

Saturday, September 8 • North Country Storage Barns. 2nd Annual Shed and Shrubbery Auction. Benuel Fisher Auctions, 518-568-2257 • Morrisville, NY. 30th Annual Morrisville Autumn Review Sale. Hosted by Morrisville State College Dairy Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Town of Lansing Highway Dept., Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing, NY. Municipal Surplus & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, September 15 • 8:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Fall Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment. Heavy & Light Trucks. Consignments welcome. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, September 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Saturday, September 22 • Scranton, PA. Complete Liquidation: Aggregate, Construction, Support Equipment, Truck Tractors, Dump Trucks & Trailers. A. Lyon & Son, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction. Farm Tractors & Machinery. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-2431563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, September 26 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder

Saturday, October 13 • Hosking Sales . OHM Holstein Club Sale. Brad Ainslie sale chairman 315-822-6087. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com • 9:00 AM: Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY, Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

Wednesday, October 17 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Saturday, October 20 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, October 27 • Ithaca, NY. NY Fall Harvest Sale. Hosted by Cornell University Dairy Science Club. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

Saturday, October 27 • 9:00 AM: Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds). Onondaga Co. area Municipal Equipment Auction. Municipal & Contractor Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Saturday, November 3 • Hosking Sales (former Welch Livestock), 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin) . Fall Premier All Breed Sale. Call early to consign to make catalog & advertising deadlines. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-699-3637, 607847-8800, cell 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com

Saturday, November 3 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, November 10 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, November 21 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular

Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Thursday, November 29 • Lampeter, PA. Destiny Road Holstein Dispersal. Jay Stolzfus, owner. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com

Saturday, December 1 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, 6502 Barber Hill Rd., Geneseo, NY. Special Winter Consignment Auction. Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Professional Auctioneers, 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Feeder Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, December 8 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Saturday Horse Sales. Tack at 9 am, sale at 10 am. Finger Lakes Livestock, 585-394-1515 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Wednesday, December 12 • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Feeder Sale. Empire Livestock Market, 716-2965041 or 585-447-3842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Wednesday, December 19 • 10:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041 or 585-4473842, Sue Rudgers, Manager 716-296-5041, Lonnie Kent, Auctioneer & Sales Manager 716-450-0558

Friday, April 5 • Intercourse, PA. Past Present Future Sale hosted by C.K. Kerrick & Matt Kimball. Held at te Ben K. Stolzfus sale barn. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farm. The Cattle Exchange, 607-746-2226, daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com


*MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT June 25, 2012 Calves: 45-60# 55-65; 6175# 85-1.15; 76-90# 1.251.30; 91-105# 1.45-1.50; 106# & up 1.55-1.60 Farm Calves: 165-170 Started Calves: 48-56 Veal Calves: 70-125 Open Heifers: 85-10750 Beef Heifers: 98-10350 Feeder Steers: 88-10750 Beef Steers: 90-111 Stock Bull: 90-102 Beef Bull: 92-104 Butcher Hogs: 1@ 50 Feeder Pigs (ea): 70-80 Sheep (ea): 85-125 Lambs (ea): 75-190 Goats (ea): 65-320; kids 45125. Canners: up to 79.50 Cutters: 80-83 Utility: 8450-86 Rabbits: 4-22 Chickens: 4-27 Ducks: 5-13 On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt *ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES East Middlebury, VT June 25, 2012 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 86-95.50; Boners 80-85% lean 79-88; Lean 85-90% lean 60-91.50. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls 92-125# 85-200; 80-92# 90165; Vealers 100-120# 8090; 90-100# 70-90; 80-90# 60-90; 70-80# 55-80; 60-70# 42.50-50; Hols. Heifers 69108# 100-150. COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA June 20, 2012 Cows: Canners 55-72; Cutters 73.50-78; Util 78.5085.50. Bulls: 78.50-109 Steers: Ch. 118; Sel 74-115; Hols. 72-88; Heifers: Ch 115-116; Sel 84-111; Hols. 72-95.50. Calves: 5-100ea. Feeders: 64-150 Sheep:64 Lambs: 160 Goats:100-224 ea.; Kids 48118 ea. Sows: 38-44 Chickens: 1.50-8.50 Rabbits: 2-16.50 Ducks: 1.50-18.50 Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. No sale July 4. Sale will be July1 @ 4 pm. *FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA June 26, 2012 Beef Cattle: Canners 50-72, bulls 90-108; Cutters 65-77; steers 100-115; Util 75-84; heifers 75-90. Calves: Growers 125-150; Veal 75-130; Heifers 150200; Other 75; Hogs: Sows 35-45; Feeders 40-75; Roasters 75-150; Boars 10-15; Market 55-60. Sheep: 55-70; Lambs 100-

150; Goats: 75-125 ea; Billies 110-190ea; Kids 35-105 ea. *NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA June 26, 2012 Calves (/cwt): 0-60# 70; 6175# 43-78; 76-95# 70-90; 96105# 20-80; 106# & up 7986. Farm Calves:100-160/cwt Start Calves: 71-130/cwt Feeders: 68-147.50/cwt Heifers: 116/cwt Canners:40-73/cwt Cutters: 74-87/cwt Utility: 95.50-111/cwt Sows: 48/cwt. Shoats: 126-131 Feeder Pigs: 34-77ea. Lambs: 80-135/cwt Sheep:40-125/cwt Goats: 36-210 ea. Rabbits: 2-29ea. Poultry: 1-16 ea. Hay: 10 lots.35-2.70/bale northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ No report CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report *EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET June 25, 2012 Calves: Hfr. Calves Grower over 92# 175-210; 80-92# 140-185; Bob Veal 75; Cull Cows: Gd. 81-87; Lean 73-85.50; Beef: Veal 85-110; Beef Hfrs. 88-92; Beef Steers 109-113; Lamb & Sheep: Feeder 190-220; Goats: Billies 240-270; Nannies 110-130; Kids 40-65; *BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY June 21, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. .70-1.80; Grower bull over 92# .802.35; 80-92# .65-2.25; Bob Veal .10-.70. Cull Cows: Gd 68-88; Lean .45-.76; Hvy. Beef 70-1.04. Dairy Replacements: Fresh Cows 900-1500; Springing cows 1000-1300; Springing Hfrs. 850-1200; Bred Hfrs. 850-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 9001450; Open Hfrs. 500-900; Started Hfrs. 150-400; Service Bulls 700-1000. Beef: Feeders 60-120. Lamb/Sheep: Market .80-2; Slaughter Sheep .20-.60. Goats: Billies .75-1.75; Nannies .65-1.25; Kids 10-.50. CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY June 7, 2012 Calves: Heifer 70-180; Grower bulls over 92#100-

230;80-92# 80-220; bob veal calves 10-75 Cull cows: Gd. 68-89; Lean 45-75; Heavy beef bulls 73102 Dairy Replacements: Fresh 900-1500; springing cows 1000-1300; springing heifers 1000-1450; bred heifers 8501200; fresh heifers 900-1450; open heifers 500-900; started heifers 150-400; service bulls 700-1000 Beef: feeders 60-120 Lamb & Sheep: market 100200; slaughter sheep 25-65 Goats: billies 80-180; Nannies 75-130; Kid 10-70 CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY June 18, 2012 Calves: Hef. 1.20; Grower over 92# 185-210; 80-92# 100-235; Bob Veal 77-82. Cull Cows: Gd 84-87.50; Lean 75-81.50; Hvy. Beef Bulls 95-.9650. Beef: Feeders 96-1.44; Veal 100-120; beef/hfrs. 93-100; Hols. steers 98-1.04. Lamb/Sheep: feeder 160185; Market 145-160; Slaughter Sheep 70-76. Goats: Billies small 110-110; Swine: feeder pig 75 *CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY June 20, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 125-220; Grower Bulls over 92# 1202025; 80-92# 100-210; Bob Veal .10-80 Cull Cows: Gd 77-89; Lean 66-82; Hvy. Beef 90-97. Dairy Replacements: Fresh 650-1350; handling Hfrs. 950-1400; Springing Hfrs 750-1425; Bred 600-1250; Fresh 525-1350; open 400950; Started 250-550; Service Bulls 650-1000; Beef: Ch 107-118; sel 98101; hol. ch.98-104.; Hols. Sel. 90-93; Lambs: Sheep 40-80; Goats: Nannies .75-1.30; Kids 1-1.25; Swine: No Report *DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY June 20, 2012 Calves Grower Bull over 92# 1.40-2.00; 80-92# 1-1.70; Bob Veal .10-.70. Cull Cows: Gd 78-87; Lean 65-77. Heavy Beef Bulls 8698. Goats: No Report Swine: No Report *GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY June 21, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 70-1.90; Grower Bulls over 92# 1.25-2.775; 80-92# 90-2.075; Bob Veal 25-80. Cull Cows: Gd 84-965; Lean 70-87; Hvy. Beef Bulls 881.04. *PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge

Bath

Chatham

June 18, 2012 Calves Grower Bulls over 92# 1.65-2.10; 80-92# 1.552.10; Bob Veal 30-85. Cull Cows: Gd 80-87; Lean 65-82; Hvy. Beef Bulls .91596. Beef: Ch 95-1.13; Hols. Ch 87-1.005. Lamb/Sheep:No Report Goats: No Report Swine:Hog 48-50. *BATH MARKET Bath, NY June 21, 2012 Calves: Hfrs. 170-230; Grower Bulls over 92# 190240; 80-92# 160-220; Bob Veal 10-60 Cull Cows: Gd 80-87; Lean 70-79 heavy beef bulls 90103 Dairy Replacements: 9001150 Beef: Ch 113-115; Sel 110113; Hol. Sel 95-106 Lamb & Sheep: market 140150; Slaughter Sheep 35-47 Goats: Billies 85-100; Nannies 90-110; kids 25-35. Swine: Hog .65-.71; sow 4048. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Penn Yan, NY June 20, 2012 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 68-87.50; Canners/Cutters 42-76. Dairy Bulls for Slaughter: HY Util 84-102. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95110# 60-70; 80-95# 5067.50; 60-80# 40-65; Vealers (grassers) 250# & up 78-104. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: bull over 95# 125-210; 8095# 100-212.50; 70-80# 75170; Hfr. Calves 140-180. Beef Calves Ret. to Feed: bull over 95# 125-175. Beef Steers: Ch grain fed 115-175; Sel 100-111; Hols. Ch grain fed 90-108. Hogs: Slgh. Hogs US 1-3 73; Sows US 1-3 35; Feeders US 1-3 5-55;

Slaughter Sheep: M 38; Goats: Nannies M 56-68. FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY June 27, 2012 Produce:Beans(1/2 bu) 626; Beets (Bunch) .50-1.20; Blueberries(pt) 2.85-3.50; Broccoli (hd) .55-.85; Cabbage (hd) .65-.70; Cucumbers (1/2bu) 5.50-20; Eggs (dz) 1.45-1.85; Lettuce (hd) .05-.60; Peas ( 1/2 bu) 10-20; Raspberries (pt) 2.40-4.60; Rhubarb 1.45-2; Salt Potatos (1/2 bu) 10-15.50; Sweet Corn (dozen) 3-4.25; Strawberries (qt) 3.80-4.65; Summer Squash (1/2bu) 4.50-13; Tomatoes (25#)12-38; Zucchini (1/2 bu) 2-12.50. Produce Mon. @ 10 am Wed. & Fri. at 9 am sharp, Hay Auctions Fridays@ 11:15. FINGER LAKES FEEDER SALE Penn Yan, NY June 1, 2012 Beef Steers: 301-500# 117166; 501-700# 98-159; 701# & up 88-148. Beef Heifers: 301-500# 118161; 501-700# 96-157; 701# & up 89-158. Beef Bulls: 301-500# 102.50-159; 501-700# 86129; 701# & up 90-126. Hols: 301-500# 88-105; 501700# 84-96; 701# & up 8286. Bred Replacements: 8101460. Families: 1270-1280. FINGER LAKES HAY AUCTION Penn Yan, NY No report Hay Tuesdays & Fridays @ 11:15 am. Produce Friday @ 9 am sharp! *HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY June 25, 2012

Cattle: Dairy Cows for Slaughter Bone Util .70-.84; Canners/Cutters .58-.70; Easy Cows .60 & dn. Bulls: Bulls & Steers ..62-.97 Calves: Bull Calves 96-120# 1.50-2.15; up to 95# .10-2; Hols. under 100# 1.80. BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA Slaughter Steers: Sel 1-2 1170-1502# 113.50-117.50 Slaughter Cows: Prem whites lean 65-75, hi dress 97.50; breakers lean 75-80, avg dress 86-89, lo dress 85; Boners lean 80-85% lean 81.50-85; lean lean 85-90, 75-79, lo dress 71-72. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 2100# 96; YG 2 908-996# 83-92. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 500-600# 143; M&L 3 400500# 139; M&L 3 300-500# 80-90; 500-700# 83. Heifers: M&L 1 400-500# 140. Bulls: M&L 1 300-500# 138151; 500-600# 138-150; M&L 2 300-500# 129-134. Return to Farm Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 85-120# 162.50-182.50; No. 2 80120# 122.50-150; No. 3 80120# 77.50-118 Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 247-274# 68.50-71; 40-45 per lean 207-268# 62-65; Sows US 13 400-600# 53.50-56.50; Feeder Pigs US 1-3 40-60# 75-87.50/hd Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch. 2-3 40# 297.50-305; 75# 300. Ewes Util 1-2 158-206# 54-57. Slaughter Goats: Sel 1 6070# 132.50-152.50; Sel 3 1020# 35-45; Nannies Sel 100110# 115-140; Billies Sel 2 100# 130. BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA June 6, 2012

Page 7 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT


Section B - Page 8 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75%; Breakers 75-80% lean, hi dress 88.50 lo dress 75-80; Boners 8085% lean 80-84, hi dress 87.50-88, lo dress 72-79; Lean 85-90% lean 73.5081.50, hi dress 81.50-86, lo dress 66-72.50;, very lo dress 50-64; Light Lean 8592% lean 62-67, lo dress 53.50, very lo dress 45-50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 8501862# 96-104; YG 2 11981234# 89.50-91.50 Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 1 374# 128; 672# 118; Hols. L 3 758# 85; Hfrs L 3 530# 70; Holstsein Bull Calves: No. 1 94-114# 175-202; 82-92# 182-205; No. 2 94-118# 157180; 86-92# 157-182; No. 3 82-104# 100-150; Util 66104# 50. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 2 75-100# 115-185per/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 30-60# 55-67. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 32-66# 135-165; 72104# 152.50-167.50; 110154# 155-172.50. Ewes Gd 2-3 134-166# 65-85; 212224# 50-70; Rams 224# 95. Slaughter Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 1 60# 120; Sel 2 under 20# 32.50; 20-40# 27.50-35; 45-60# 67.50-85; 70# 85; Nannies Sel 1 120-130# 122.50-125; Sel 3 90# 67. Fresh Cows: Supreme 1750-1825; App 1425-1750; Xbred 1525-1625; Jersey 1000; M 1125-1250; Jersey 875; Common 685; Short Bred Cows: 1-3 months, M 925. Springing Cows: 7-9 Months M 1025; Common 950. Short Bred Heifers: 1-3 months app 1010-1175; reg 1000-1210; Xbred 925; M 710-910; Common 600. Bred Heifers: 4-6 months app 1100-1310; Xbred 8851000; Jerseys 1110-1225; M 825-1085. Springing Heifers: 7-9 mos 1275-1475; Jersey 975; M 900-985 Open Heifers: 300-600# 635-660; Jersey 435-600; 600-900# 810-985; 9001200# 810-1050; Reg. 1085; Xbred 775; M 300-600# 485575; Xbred 485; jersey 310375; 600-900# 660-785; Xbred 450-485; Jersey 425; 900-1200# 685-735; Common 300-600# 235-500; 600900# 385-610; 900-1200# 600. Dairy Bulls: 300-600# 335; Jersey 310; 600-900# 550600; Jersey 600; 900-1200# 735-775; 1200-1500# 875985. *CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA June 26, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Cows: Beef type 92-98; Breakers 86.50-89; Lean 8490; Big Middle/lo dress/light 70-93.50; Shelly 69 & down Bulls: 1145-1880# 97.50115; Feeder Cattle: Bulls Hols. 820-860# 92-94 Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols.

Bulls No. 1 85-130# 140-170; No 2 60-130# 130-145; No 3 55-100# 90-128; Util. 87 & down Swine: Hogs 210# 74; Gilts 410-480# 46.50-50.50; 485570# 50-52.50; Barrows 360490# 45.540-52; 500-590# 44.50-47.25; Sows 300-360# 53-66; 435-480# 44-50; 485570# 45-52; Boars 740# 24; Goats (/hd): Nannies & Wethers 120-135; Fancy Kids 135-180; Fleshy Kids 97-125; Small thin bottle 2782; Lambs: Gd & Ch 60-80# 134-145; 80-100# 130-145; 110-130# 100-147; Sheep (all wts): No Report Sale every Tuesday 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs 6 pm for Livestock starting with calves. No Sale Tues., July 3. Receiving 7:30 until 10 am. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA June 19, 2012 Rabbits: 3-13.50 Bunnies: .50-6 Hens: 1.50-4.50 Roosters: 2-7 Pullets: .50-3 Peeps: .50-1.50 Ducks: 4.50-8 Ducklings: 1 Chickens: 2-3.50 Chicken Family: 11 Turkey: 24 Pheasant Peeps: .75 Guinea Family: 20 Guinea Pigs:1-4 Quail Peeps: 1 Eggs (/dz): Jumbo Brown 1.65; XL Brown 1.55; L Brown 1.55; M Brown 1.201.30; M White 1.05; Fertile Leghorn .95; Fertile Green 2.25. All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm. *CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA US 1-2: 31# 141; 40-48# 135-136; 56-59# 118-131; 60-69# 114-124; 68# with tails 108; 71-79# 107-111; 74# 85; 81-88# 87-90; 103109# 97; 130-149# 70-91; US 2: 38# 178; 43-49# 114125; 54-59# 115-122; 65-69# 106-113; 80# 97; As Is 1520# 90-100; 35-68# 80-100; 72-97# 66-87; *DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC June 25, 2012 Steers: Ch 2-3 1448# 114; Hfrs. Hi CH & Pr 3-4 12161250# 115.50-117.50; CH 23 1230-1298# 108-112; Sel 1-3 1176-1268# 100-102; Bulls G 1 1334-1892# 92-94; hi dress 1000-1282# 102103.50; Bullock 1384# 116.50; Holstein Steers: 750-850# 76-91; Bulls 500-650# 111121; Cows: prem white 85-87.50; Breakers 80-83; Boners 7582; Lean 67-79.50; Holstein Bull Calves: No 1 80-118# 172-192; No 2 80-

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four 128# 160-182; No 3 78-116# 110-155; Util. 70-108# 35-90; Util. 52-68# 10-25;Hfr. Calves No 1 90-96# 182-200; No 2 82-118# 145-177; Non tubing 58-64# 22-27; Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 270282# 71-73; Sows 300-500# 36-44; Boars 204# 44; 410# 17; Feeder Pigs 15-25# 5275/head, by weight 120-130# 75-84; Lambs: 30-40# 120-142; 4060# 127-145; 60-70# 130145; 70-90# 142-150; Ewes G 1-2 138-144# 47-50; Goats (/hd): Kids Sel 1 under 20# 35-42/head; 5060# 110-120/head; Sel 2 under 20# 30-37/head; 60# 100/head; Sel 3 40# 45/head; 50# 80/head; Nannied sel2 100-120# 105115/head; Sel 3 90-100# 5575/head. *EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA June 25, 2012 Slaughter Cows: prem whites 65-75% lean; Breakers 75-80% lean, 90-94, 96 hi dress, 88 lo dress; Boners 80-85% lean, 83-88, 89.50 hi dress, lo dress 81.50-82.50; lean 85-90% lean, 77-81, 7476 lo dress. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 13142175# 99-113; YG 2 10001645# 83-96; Steers: M&L 1 300400#167.50-175; 600-700# 139; 800-900# 125; Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300500# 132.50-142.50; 500700# 133-140; 700-800# 120-130; M&L 2 300-500# 118-120; 500-700# 110-116; Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 145-157.50; 500-700# 130-145; 700-800# 128-133; M&L 2 300-500# 120-130; 600-700# 90-96 Ret. to Farm Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 85-120# 160185; No 2 80-120# 130-160; No 3 80-120# 95-120; Utility 70-120# 30-75;Beef Type 110-250# 110+167.50; Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 240-305# 60-64; Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 60-80# 134-147.50, few 164.

Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 50# 100; sel 2 35-45# 41-50; 65-68# 89-120; Nannies sel 2 105# 108/cwt.; Billies Sel 1 135# 130/cwt. *GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA June 25, 2012 Slaughter Steers: hi ch & pr 2-3 1360-1458# 118122.50; Ch 2-3 1234-1508# 114-118, full/YG 4-5 111114.50; Sel 1-3 1276-1460# 110-114; Slaughter Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr. 2-3 1524-1560# 103.50-104.50; Ch 2-3 12081648# 99-103.50 Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1116-1296# 109-114.50 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75%, 90.50-95; Breakers 75-80% lean 8487.50, hi dress 87.50-89.75, lo dress 79-80; boners 8085% 76-81.50, hi dress 8285, lo dress 72-76; lean 8590% lean, very lo dress 5358; Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 11442090# 98-105, hi dress 111.50-114, lo dress 10241634# 92-95.50; Steers: M&L 1 500-700# 145; M&L 2 500-700# 107.50; Hfrs. M&L 1 300500# 145; 500-700# 129147.50; L Hols. 300-500# 7094; 500-700# 76-95; 700900# 85-95; Bulls: M&L 1 300-500# 137.50-150; 500-700# 135145; Ret. to Farm Calves: Hols. Bull No. 1 80-120# 175195; No 2 80-120# 155185.50; No 3 74-108# 90145; Utility 56-122# 20-90; Hfrs. No 1 92-94# 155-180; No 2 80-92# 95-145; Slaughter Hogs: Feeder Pigs US 1-3 pkg. 39# 80; 70130# 97.50-110; Slaughter Sheep: Lambs, Ch 2-3 40-60# 160-170; 6080# 140-160; 80-100# 140170; 100-120# 172.50-180; Slaughter Goats: kids Sel 1 10-20# 35-55; 40-60# 80-95; 60-80# 102.50-112.50; sel 2 10-20# 29-44; 20-40# 33-50; 40-60# 49-65; 80-100# 95100; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 95-122.50; Sel 2 80-130# 71-

85; Sel 3 80-130# 67.5072.50; *INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA June 21, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1246-1498# 118.50-119.25; Sel 1-2 1336# 111.50. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1226-1403# 115.50-119.25; Sel. 1-2 1056-1334# 106.50114.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem whites 65-75% lean; Breakers 75-80% lean 88.50-93; Boners 80-85% lean 82.5087.50, hi dress 90; lean 8590% lean 75.50-78.50, lo dress 73.50-74.50 Slaughter Bulls: YG 2 10661340# 89-96.25. Feeder Cattle: Steers M&L 2 700-800# 125; Hfrs. M&L 1 700-800# 102.50; Bulls M&L 1 300-400# 170; 500-700# 120-127.50; 700-900# 105122.50; M&L 2 400-500# 120. Ret. to Farm Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 85-120# 180-200; No. 2 80-120# 150-175; No. 3 80-120# 90-140; Utility 70120# 30-55; Beef Type 96296# 120-170; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 84-108# 150-190; Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 214-298# 6950-74; 40-45% lean 255310# 66-70; Sows US 1-3 300-500# 57.50-58.50; Lambs: No Report. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 3 20# 15-20; Nannies Sel 2 8090# 72.50-87.50; Whethers Sel 1 120# 137.50. KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA June 23, 2012 Alfalfa: 1ld 2200# 285; 2lds 2380# 210. Mixed Hay: 1 ld, 120# 120; 3 lds 3900# 115; 4 lds 2620# 280; 5 lds 4680# 80; 6 lds 4660# 200; 7 lds 4220# 115; 8 lds 2500# 175; 8 lds 2800# 100; Timothy: 1 ld, 2720# 215 Grass: 1 ld 2900# 245; 2 lds 4260# 85; 3 lds 5360# 110; 4 lds 9210# 90; 5 lds 1480# 155; 6 lds 6080# 85; 7 lds 2600# 190; 8 lds 5400# 215; 8 lds 5800# 95; 9 lds 2310#

85; 10lds 8220# 80 Straw: 1ld 2220# 190; 2lds 2200# 160; 3lds 1980# 150; 4lds 4640# 120; * LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA June 22, 2011 Slaughter Cattle: Steers High Ch & Pr 3-4, 12251640# 117-122; Ch 2-3 1125-1620# 113-119; Sel 2-3 1145-1405# 107-114; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1335-1650# 106-110; Ch 2-3 1280-1650# 100-106; sel 2-3 1255-1530# 94-99.50; Hfrs. Hi Ch & Pr 23 11230-1305# 114-117; Ch. 2-3 1150-1500# 109-112; Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 8485.50, lo dress 78-82; Breakers 75-80% lean 82-87.50, hi dress 89-94, lo dress 77-82; Boners 80-85% lean 79.5086.50, hi dress 86.50-88.50, lo dress 71-78.50; Lean 8590% lean 74-79, hi dress 7984.50 lo dress 65-74 Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 8101935# 103-109, hi dress 109.50-112, very hi dress 122-125, lo dress 90-100; Holstein Bull Calves: No Report Graded Holstein Heifers: No Report Graded Bull Calves: Thurs. No 1 114-128# 192-203; 94112# 212-223; 86-92# 175195; No 2 106-128# 190-200; 94-104# 211-220; 80-92# 175-187; No 3 80-130# 125150; 72-78# 80; utility 60110# 20-40; Holstein Heifer Calves:No 1 85-110# 190-220; No 2 70105# 80-120; JerseyX 85105# 80-130; *LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA Slaughter Cows: Prem. White Lean 65-75%; Breakers lean 75-80#; 77-82; boners lean 80-85#, 73-78.50; lean lean 88-90# 67-72; low dress 54-60 Holstein Bull Calves: No 1 85-120# 185-210; No 2 80120# 140-175; No 3 80-120# 100-140; utility 65-130# 2080; *LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA June 20, 2012 Slaughter Cattle: Steers Ch 2-4/Full 1175-1280# 116; Sel 1-3 1035-1565# 111-114.50 Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 8587.50, hi dress 89.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 82-85; Boners 80-85% lean 80-83, hi dress 84-87 low dress 73-76; Lean 85-90% lean 77.50-82, hi dress 82-85.50, lo dress 72-76. Bulls: YG 1 1170-1185# 99102 Ret. to Farm Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 80-115# 195-215; No 2 80-120# 175-195; No 3 70-110# 90-160; Utility 70-


110# 30-50; 60-65# 1532.50; Hfrs. No 1 100# 247.50; 85# 185; No 2 80120# 145-175; Barrows/Gilts: No Report Sows: No Report Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 30-45# 170-175; 5055# 167.50-185; 60-70# 162.50-190; Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 91117.50; sel 2 40# 75; Nannies Sel 3 80-120# 52.50-80. *MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA June 19, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1245# 121.50; Ch 2-3 1140-1530# 114.50-119.50, Full YG 4-5 111.50-114.50; 1600-1625# 115.50-116; Sel 1-3 1255-1435# 112-114. Slaughter Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1390-1530# 104-106; Ch 2-3 1310-1590# 97-102.50; 1640-1645# 99100.50; Sel 1-3 1310-1555# 94-97. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1120# 118.50; Hols. Hfrs. 1330# 100; Ch 2-3 1010-1360# 113.50-115.50, full/YG 4-5 108-112; Sel 1-3 1050-1340# 109-110 Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% Breakers 7580% lean 82-85, hi dress 8789, lo dress 75-80; Boners 80-85 lean, 75-80, 72-75.50 lo dress very lo dress 71.50; Lean 85-90% lean70-75 hi dress 76-78, lo dress 6571.50, very lo dress 60.5066.50; light lean 85-92% lean, 65-69.50, lo dress 6066.50, very lo dress 50-60; Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 12051895# 99-110, hi dress 114; YG 2 1270-1640# 87-91; Steers: M&L 2 Herefords 335# 130; 540-755# 102122. Holstein Steers: L 3 470# 115; 545# 100; Heifers: M 1 417# 160; Herefords 655# 99; M&L 2 440# 137; 550# 110; 790# 107; S 1 692# 109; M 1 Herefords 736# 106; 840# 110; M&L 2 490# 107; 630-655# 110119; Holstein Bulls: L 3 305360# 97-102; 880# 92; Holstein Bulls Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-115# 150-162; 80-90# 150-170; No 2 95125# 120-147; 75-90# 120150; No 3 70-115# 87-120; Utility 55-110# 10-92; Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 95-110# 160-170; Barrows & Gilts: 49-54% lean 235-276# 75-76; 280310# 75-75.75; 343# 69; 4550% lean 320-355# 7074.75; Sows: US.1-3 415-470# 4350; 5400-725# 50.75-53.50; Boars: 425-740# 20-25.50; Jr. Boars 382# 47; Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 10-50# 42-70; 60-70; 57-75; Lambs: Ch 2-3 32-67# 125160; 75-105# 120-145; 125# 100; Yearlings: No Report

Ewes: Gd 2-3 100-195# 4760 Kids: Sel 1 50# 110; 90# 135; Sel 2 under 20# 10-30; 20-40# 25-65; 45-60# 65-92; 70# 132; Nannies: Sel 1 130-160# 110; Sel 2 100-130# 80-105; Billies: Sel 2 130# 140 Slaughter Wethers: Sel 2 100-110# 155-160; Sel 3 110# 107; *MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA June 25, 2012 Steers: Gd 103-108. Heifers: Gd 102-108. Cows: Util & Comm. 78-89; Canner/lo Cutter 75 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 92-98 Bulls: YG 1 82-90 Cattle: Steers 90-140; Bulls 90-125; Hfrs. 80-130. Calves: Ch 120-140; Gd 100-115; Std 15-90; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 125-200. Hols, Heifers 90-130# 100-200. Hogs: US 1-2 72-76; US 1-3 68-70; Sows US 1-3 42-50; Boars 20-40. Sheep: Lambs Ch 140-160; Gd 125-135; Goats: 25-155. *MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA June 25, 2012 Alfalfa: 200-305 Mixed Hay: 120-135 Round Bales: 35-135; Lg. Bales 125 Straw:120-135 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. *MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA June 25, 2012 Roosters: 3.50-6.50 Hens: 1.75-5.25 Bantys: 50-3.25 Pigeons: 2.25-3 Ducks: 1.25-4 Geese: 8.50 Guineas: 7.50 Bunnies: 1.25-4.50 Rabbits: No Report Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. *NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA June 18, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1335-1540# 117-122; 1585-1760# 109-114; Ch 2-3 1125-1520# 114.50-119; Sel 2-3 1145-1395# 110-114; Hols. Hi Ch &Pr 2-3 13351540# 117-122; 1585-1760# 109-114; Ch 2-3 1325-1605# 100-104.50; sel 2-3 12901488# 94-98; Hfrs. Hi Ch &Pr 2-3 1230-1305# 114-117; Ch 2-3 1150-1500# 109-112; Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean; Breakers 75-80% lean, 84-87, hi dress 89-92, lo dress 79-82; Boners 80-85% lean, 82-86, hi dress 87-88, lo dress 71-79; Lean 88-90% Lean, 74-79, hi

dress 80-84.50, lo dress 6573; Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 13151935# 103-109, lo dress 94100; Holstein Bull Calves: No 1 114-128# 192-203; 94-112# 212-223; 86-92# 175-195; No 2 106-128# 190-200; 94104# 211-220; 80-92# 175187; No 3 80-130# 125-150; 72-78# 80; utiliy 60-110# 2040; Holstein Heifer: No 1 85110# 190-220; No 2 70-105# 80-120; JerseyX 85-105# 80130; NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA Feeder Pigs: US 1-2 75 head, 30-40# 140-16; 24 head 40-50# 90-110; 21 head 50-60# 95-105; 19 head 60-100# 70-90; US 2 198 head 15-30# 155-200; 71 head 30-40# 120-140; 29 head 40-60# 100-105; *NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA June 18, 2012 Slaughter Lambs: Non-Traditional, Wooled, Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 148-162; 6080# 134-156; 80-90# 120142; 90-110# 128-150; 110130# 130-154; Hair Sheep 60-80# 134-148; 90-110# 120-138; 110-130# 118-126; Fancy 40-60# 120-142; 90110# 120-129; 150-200# 132; Hair Sheep 60-80# 124142; 80-90# 120-128; 90110# 120-132; 130-150# 104; Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 74-95; 150200# 56-78; 200-300# 58; Utility 1-2; Thin Flesh 90110# 56-70; 120-160# 50-72; Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 30-40# 92-102; 40-60# 112131; 60-80# 134-163; 80100# 152-172; sel 2 20-40# 68-88; 40-60# 76-112; 6080# 110-136; sel 3 20-40# 30-57; 40-60# 58-81; 60-80# 79-107; Nannies/Does sel 1 80-130# 120-135; 130-180# 136-149; sel 2 80-130# 102121; sel 3 50-80# 61-81; 80130# 74-93; Bucks/Billies sel 1 100-150# 168-180; 150250# 192-210; Sel 2 100150# 205-215; 150-200# 227-252; NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF* AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to last week corn sold .05-.10 lower, wheat sold mostly steady, barley sold steady to .05 lhigher, Oats sold .05 to .10 lhigher & Soybeans sold .30-.35 lower. EarCorn sold steady

to 3 lower. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.36-7.12, Avg 6.63, Contracts 6-6.03; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.727.00, Avg 6.85, Contracts ; Barley No. 3 Range 3.703.90, Avg 3.80, Contracts; Oats No. 2 Range 3.80-4.50, Avg 4.15; Soybeans No 2 Range 13.68-14.53, Avg 14.06, Contracts 13.6013.90; EarCorn 180, Contracts 180. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.25-6.80, Avg 6.49; Wheat No. 2 6.72, Avg. 6.72; Barley No. 3 Range 3.704.75, Avg. 4.23; Oats No. 2 5, Avg 5; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13-13.85, Avg 13.61; EarCorn Range 195, Avg 195. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.40-6.61, Avg 6.52; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.30-7.27, Avg 6.64; Barley No. 3 Range 3.80-4.20, Avg 3.98; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-4.80, Avg 4.01; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.2014.02, Avg 13.65; EarCorn 180-190, Avg 185. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 6.65-6.80, Avg 6.72; Wheat No. 2 Range 7.10, Avg 7.10; Barley No. 3 3.70, Avg. 3.70; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.55-14.25 Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 6.25-7.12, Avg 6.57, Month Ago 6.80, Year Ago 7.67; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.30-7.27, Avg 6.79, Month Ago 6.54, Year Ago 5.86; Barley No. 3 Range 3.70-4.75, Avg 3.96, Month Ago 5.03, Year Ago 4.84; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25, Avg 4.22, Month Ago 4.31, Year Ago 4.31; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13-14.53, Avg 13.78, Month Ago 13.34, Year Ago 13.33; EarCorn Range 180220; Avg 193, Month Ago 194, Year Ago 207.60. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 5.80-6.85, Avg 6.14; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.58, Avg. 6.58; Oats No. 2 3.005.35, Avg 4.15; Soybeans No. 2 13.81, Avg. 13.81. *PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary June 22, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 118-123.50; Ch 1-3 113-118; Sel 1-2 111-114; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 103.50108; Ch 2-3 100-105.50; Sel 1-2 89-100. Slaughter Hols. Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 104-110.50; Ch 2-3 96-104; Sel 1-2 93-98. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 117-121; Ch 1-3 114.50-119; Sel 1-2 107-114. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 79.75-86; Boners 80-85% lean 75-83; Lean 85-90% lean 68-78.50. Slaughter Bulls: hi dress 109.50-112.50; Avg dress

PA DEPT OF* AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and/ton. All hay and straw reported sold/ton. Compared to last week hay sold steady to weak & straw sold mostly 20 lower. Alfalfa 140-165; Mixed Hay 125-160; Timothy 125-140; Straw 70-130; Mulch 65-70. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 52 lds, 10 Straw; Alfalfa 210215; Mixed Hay 295-400; Timothy 290; Grass 280-290; Straw 130-250. Diffenbach Auct, June 18, 41 lds Hay, 4 lds Straw. Alfalfa 210-215; Mixed Hay 295400; Timothy 290; Grass 280-290; Straw 130-250. Green Dragon, Ephrata: June 15, 15 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa 200-225; Mixed Hay 150-197; Timothy 215-232; Grass Hay 155-215; Straw 132-210. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: June 21, 11 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa 195; Mixed Hay

300; Timothy 150; Straw 195. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola, PA: June 13, 29 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa 200-255; Mixed Hay 120-265; Timothy 100-280; Grass 165-210; Straw 115-200. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 45 Loads Hay, 8 Straw. Alfalfa 285; Mixed Hay 210; Timothy 125-215; Grass 120-240; Straw 120-190. Belleville Auct, Belleville: June 20, 11 lds Hay, 0 lds Straw. Alfalfa 150; Mixed 295; Grass 75. Dewart Auction, Dewart: June 11, 10 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Mixed Hay 110-255; Grass 115; Straw 100-195. Greencastle Livestock: May 28 & 31, 4 lds Hay, 0 Straw. Mixed Hay 50-87.50; Timothy 135. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: June 23, 24 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa 285; Mixed Hay 280; Timothy 215; Grass Hay 155-240; Straw 120-190. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: June 19, 21 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Timothy 125-135. Mixed Hay 125-165; Grass 120. Straw 125-150. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: June 9 & 12, 11 lds Hay, 1 Straw. Mixed Hay 70205; Straw 130. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: June 22, 19 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa 150; Timothy 170; Grass 160. Straw 200. *VINTAGE SALES STABLES June 25, 2012 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1280-1590# YG 5 111-114.50; 1600-1710# 108.50-113; Ch. 2-3 12501570# 113-117; YG 4-5 107.50-111; sel 2-3 12501460# 108.50-112; Slaughter Holsteins: Ch 23 1210-1640# 101.50-106; Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1125-1425# 111-114; YG 4-5 107.50-110; Slaughter Cows: Prem white 75-80% lean; Breakers 75-80% lean, 79-83; Boners 80-85% lean 79-81.50, hi dress 84.50-85; Lean 8590% Lean, 73.50-78.50, hi dress 79-79.50, 70.50-73; Slaughter Bulls: Calves No 1 85-120# 160-190; No 2 80125# 120-150; No 3 100115# 100-120; 80-95# 70100; Utility 80-125# 50-80; *WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA June 21, 2012 Alfalfa: 1 ld, 195 Mixed Hay: 8 lds, 150-300 Straw: 1 ld., 195. Timothy Hay: 1 ld., 150 Grass: 2 lds., 170-290 Ear Corn: 1 ld., 200 New Grass: 4 lds., 160 *WOLGEMUTH AUCTION Alfalfa: 3lds 205 high, 185 Avg. Mixed: 10 Lds. 275 High, 169 Avg. Timothy: 1ld 180 high, 180 Avg. Grass:12 Lds. 290 High, 163 Avg. Straw: 2 Lds. 215 High, 200 Avg.

Page 9 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT

95-109; lo dress 85-97. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300500# 171-194; 500-700# 155-167; M&L 2 300-500# 140-167; 500-700# 117-133. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300500# 151-175; 500-700# 137-159; M&L 2 300-500# 137-143; 500-700# 120-143. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 155-196; 500-700# 150-162; M&L 2 300-500# 127-140; 500-700# 130-135. Vealers: Util 60-120# 20-80. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 80-120# 180-225; No. 2 80-120# 170-205; No. 3 80120# 80-150; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 190-275; No. 2 80-105# 80-175. Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 4954% lean 220-270# 74.5077; Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 4850; 500-700# 51-53.50. Graded Feeder Pigs: US 12 20-30# 180-180; 30-40# 110-110; 40-50# 130-140; 50-60# 130-140; 60-70# 100130; US 2 20-25# 220-230; 25-35# 160-180; 35-50# 140160; Slaughter Sheep Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 186-200; 6080# 180-200; 80-110# 172202; Ch 1-3 60-80# 163-172; 80-110# 152-172; Ewes Gd 2-3 120-160# 66-86; 160200# 68-86; Util 1-2 120160# 54-72. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 110-152; 60-80# 145175; 80-100# 160-177; Sel 2 20-40# 64-70; 40-60# 84112; 60-80# 120-144; Sel 3 20-40# 35-56; 40-60# 55-85; 60-80# 72-110; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 125-144; 130180# 141-160; Sel 2 80-130# 108-127; 130-180# 126-132; Sel 3 50-80# 56-72; 80-130# 85-103; Billies Sel 1 100150# 177-194; 150-250# 192-210; Sel 2 100-150# 158-172; 150-250# 171-190; Wethers Sel 1 100-150# 225240; 150-250# 245-266; Sel 2 100-150# 165-181;


Section B - Page 10 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Farmers try to ‘stop the flood of regulation’ by Erin Anthony Growing up, we all needed guidance at times. Don’t run with scissors. Don’t forget your jacket. Don’t eat yellow snow. If you make that face one more time, it might get stuck like that. But, as adults, not all guidance is helpful or benevolent. That is particularly true if the guidance is coming from a government regulatory agency. Take, for example, the Environmental Protection Agency’s effort to expand its regulatory reach under the Clean Water Act to nearly every drop of water, and some dry land, too. Through what’s officially known as a “guidance document,” EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers are seeking to remove the word “navigable” from the Clean Water Act. That action would allow them to regulate even a roadside ditch that holds water for only a few hours after a big rain. Both agencies have been upfront about their intent to use the guidance process to increase their regulation of water bodies and lands that have been under the states’ regulatory authority. Another issue is the way the agencies are going about it. They’re using a guidance document, rather than going through a proper rulemaking. Formal rulemaking allows input from farmers, ranchers and other landowners — the people who would be flooded with an expensive slew of new regula-

tions and permitting requirements should the guidance document be put in place. Along with farmers, ranchers and other landowners, there are another 544 people EPA and the Corps are ignoring: 535 U.S. senators and representatives and nine Supreme Court justices. The lawmakers who wrote the Clean Water Act never intended for the federal government to have the kind of control it is seeking over local bodies of water. Similarly, in two rulings, the Supreme Court affirmed important limitations of the federal government’s jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act. Having to get another permit doesn’t sound like that big of a deal, but at $30,000 to well over $100,000 for some permits, these requirements sometimes force growers to avoid farming otherwise productive acreage just so they don’t trigger federal permit and extremely costly mitigation requirements. But in most parts of the country, it would be just about impossible to farm around every wet spot that EPA and the Corps want to regulate. To dry up EPA’s effort, Farm Bureau has launched the “Stop the Flood of Regulation” campaign. As part of the campaign, farmers and ranchers are asking their senators and representatives to support the Preserve the Waters of the U.S. Act (S. 2245 and

MONDAY, JULY 2, 2012 1 PM

AT HOSKING SALES - NEW BERLIN, NY ROB-MICH HOLSTEINS REGISTERED & GRADE HERD DISPERSAL.

40 Head (20 Registered) 36 cows, 4 bred heifers. Cows are in all stages of lactation with a few exceptionally fancy young cows here!! Watch for these two maternal sisters: Toyful is a Super uddered Talent already scored VG she sells fresh in April. JJ is her 2yr. old Sept. Storm sister every bit as fancy & sells due in Sept. to Seeker-Red. Super is another Talent that is a sure bet to score VG she sells with her just fresh Mac 2yr. Dtr. Special VG 87 R&W due sale day to Sept. Storm. Other job interests prompts this extremely short notice sale, seize the opportunity to buy outstanding cows while your neighbors are making hay!! SALE WILL BE HELD AT OUR FACILITY DURING OUR REGULAR MONDAY SALE - HOSKING SALES 6096 STATE HIGHWAY 8, NEW BERLIN, NY. 30 miles south of Utica, 6 miles north of New Berlin, NY. Dairy will start at 1:00PM, quality consignments welcomed. Owners: ROB-MICH HOLSTEINS Bob & Michele Franklin & Family Newport, NY 13416 315-845-8009

Hosking Sales Tom & Brenda Hosking 6096 State Highway 8 New Berlin, NY 13411 607-699-3637 or 607-972-1770 or 1771

H.R. 4965), which would prevent EPA from taking action through this guidance document. They also will be sharing their stories of regulatory inundation through social media platforms. Look for the #stoptheflood hashtag

on Twitter. And a Facebook page will give farm and ranch families a platform for sharing how this guidance effort might affect them. There is no doubt; without action, a flood of federal regulations appears imminent. Many of

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE American Farm Bureau Federation our nation’s farms and ranches could find themselves awash in new, expensive and unwarranted regulations — even if the cause of those regulations is an inch-deep puddle following a down-

pour. Long after the puddle dries, the effect of the regulations could linger. Erin Anthony is assistant editor of FBNews, the official newspaper of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

DATE: WEDNESDAY, JULY 11TH, 2012. TIME: 10 a.m. LOCATION: WINDY VALLEY FARM, 49 VALLEY WAY, ESSEX, NY 12936 DIRECTIONS: Take Rte 22S. Take left at Lake Shore Rd, take first right onto Station St. Drive approximately 5 miles and turn left onto Whallons Bay Rd. Turn right onto Angier Hill Rd. Turn left on to Valley Way Rd., auction on right. Watch for auction signs. Due to Ralph & Cecile Evans and William & Sally Evans selling the farm, we have been commissioned to sell the equipment, cattle & barn equipment. 186 FREE STALL CATTLE This herd consists of: 120 milking cows, (3) Jerseys, (4) Jersey crosses, (3) Red & White, (2) Ayrshires and the balance Holsteins. (28) Fresh, (27) Springing & Dry, over 39 of these are 1st & 2nd calf heifers averaging 50+ lbs/cow and SCC 280,000. 66 heifers which consist of (19) bred heifers, (31) yearlings 6m - 1yr old and (16) started calves. EQUIPMENT 7410 JD 4wd tractor w/loader & cab, 4240 JD 2wd tractor w/canopy, 8950 Case International 4wd tractor w/cab & dual wheels, TW 35 Ford 4wd tractor w/cab, 1365 Oliver 2wd tractor, 4490 Case Articulate tractor w/ cab & dual wheels, 317 JD Skid Steer w/2 buckets & rubber tire scraper, International truck w/dump body, HPX JD 4x4 gator, 660 4wd Yamaha Grizzly 4-wheeler, 7914 Miller Pro merger, 920 JD MoCo disc mower, 935 JD MoCo mower (needs work), 266 NH rake, 11’ Kuhn rake, NH rake, 1065 Gehl chopper w/grass head & metal alert, 3950 JD chopper w/grass head & 2 row corn head & metal alert (needs work), 311 NH square baler w/kicker, 3450 Reel Auggie Knight mixer wagon, 16’ feed wagon, 8335 Gehl feeder wagon, 16’ pin hitch forage dump wagon, McConnell wide wheel base Hi-dump wagon, 22’ GMC dump box, 12’ Pronovost pintle hook tandem axle dump trailer, 335 JD round baler, Patz round bale grinder, 508 White 5-bottom spring loaded plow, Kverneland 5 bottom plow, 3pth 100 JD 11-shank chisel plow, (2) sets chisel plows, Krauss harrows, Bush hog harrows, centerfold 235 JD harrows, 3pth 16’ drag harrows, 5100 White 6 row air corn planter, 8200 JD drill seeder, Brillion 14’ seeder, Ford 4-row cultivator, 311 Gehl Scavenger side slinger manure spreader, 780 JD hydro push manure spreader, JD corn sprayer, hay wagon w/wooden rack, NH bale picker wagon, (8) hay wagon running gears, 3pth double bale spear, 40’ hay elevator on wheels & more. BARN EQUIPMENT & MISCELLANEOUS 2000 gal DeLaval round milk tank, double 10 Surge milking parlor, 10hp self contained vacuum pump, Mueller plate cooler, Argo parlor fans, 200+- free stalls to be sold in sections, large assortment of stainless steel pipe, 3pth cement mixer, nail bins w/nails & screws, nut & bolt bins w/nuts & bolts, (6) 10’ long sections of head lock gates, foot bath, watering tanks, cow foot trimming table, (5) calf hutches, 50’x100’ cement bunkers (to be sold in sections), (7) 8’ feeder bunks, assortment of gates, assortment of equipment tires & rims and more. Cash or good check w/ID. *** Purchases will not be released until paid in full. For buyers unknown to management, they must provide letter of credit issued to Wright’s Auction Service. ***

Sale managed by Wright’s Auction Service, Newport, VT & CC Miller Jr., Morrisville, VT. Lunch catered by Wright’s Catering Service. Email: info@wrightsauctions.com Website: www.wrightsauctions.com AUCTIONEER: Ron Wright TEL: (O) 802-334-6115 (C) 802-673-9840 CC Miller Jr. - TEL: (O) 802-888-3670 (C) 802-793-1583 Owner Bill Evans: 518-242-6619


3RD ANNUAL AMISH AUCTION & DEMONSTRATION DAY

July 7, 2012 - 9:30 AM

652 Quaker Road, Queensbury, NY 12804 1-888-793-8555 www.GardenTimeInc.com Trees and Shrubs: Assorted varieties and sizes. Flowers: Assorted annuals, perennials and veggies in packs and containers. Hanging baskets and combination planters. Garden Store Retail Products: Outdoor wooden furniture, patio furniture, wooden benches, gliders and rockers. Garden gift items, garden statuary, cement urns, and fountains. Umbrellas, hammocks, trellises, arbors and mailboxes. Pottery, bird feeders/houses and other bird accessories. Bagged mulch, potting mixes, garden soils and fertilizers. Outdoor Living Products: Sheds, gazebo's, play sets, swings, pergolas and animal shelters. Bridges, wishing wells, arbors, screens, mailboxes, lighthouses and patio furniture. Home Heating Products: Heating stoves, stove parts and accessories. Seasonal Items: Artificial Christmas trees, wreaths and roping. Miscellaneous Christmas items.

Come see the Amish Builders construct Sheds that will then be auctioned off!

See Photos on Auction Zip ID #18971 All Announcements Day of Sale Take Precedence Over Advertising

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Timely congressional approval of permanent normal trade relations status for Russia will benefit U.S. farmers and ranchers, the American Farm Bureau Federation told a House Committee on June 20. Wayne Wood, president of Michigan Farm Bureau, testified on behalf of AFBF before the House Committee on Ways and Means. “PNTR makes permanent the trade status the U.S. has extended to Russia on an annual basis since 1992,” Wood said. “It recognizes Russia’s joining the World Trade Organization, which will provide our farmers and ranchers with more certain and predictable market access.” Russia’s commitment to adhering to WTO provisions on sanitary and phytosanitary measures in particular will benefit U.S. farmers and ranchers because this will limit the country’s abil-

ity to impose arbitrary measures that have impeded trade in the past. In his testimony, Wood explained that exports of U.S. farm goods to Russia are likely to increase substantially follow ing congressional approval of PNTR and the country’s accession to the WTO. U.S. sales of beef, poultry, pork, apples, cheeses, soybeans and soybean products are all expected to grow due to improved market access.

LAKEVIEW HOLSTEINS Friday, July 6th, 2012 at 11:00 AM 2456 Route 14 Penn Yan, NY 14527 18 mi. south of Geneva, 18 mi. north of Watkins Glen right along Route 14

Great Market for High Quality Cattle at this Auction Specializing in registered and grade dairy cattle, Jerseys, complete dairy herds, heifers, and service bulls. Set up for interstate transportation. Reasonable commission rates. Great dairy location. Licensed and bonded. Auction held every first Friday of the month. Excellent ventilation, all cattle vaccinated upon arrival and vet checked by Keseca Vet. 1. 14 top notch open Holstein heifers from PINE HOLLOW DAIRY, all A.I sired and herd has a 27,000 lb. herd av. heifers are around 13 months old, pedigrees at ring side. (You will like them) 2. 2 purebred heifers from Bill Brown, one fresh one week, one fresh two weeks, starting out strong, one sired by Loren, pedigrees at ringside. 3. 8 A.I sired heifers from one farm bred from 3 months to 9 months 4. 8. Cross bred heifers from Harold Shirk, 3 springing, and 5 yearlings. Heifers are mixed with Montbeliarde or Swedish Red cross 5. 2 springing heifers from Bob Nipper 6. 5 Reg. fresh 1-2 calf heifers from Jason Glick (nice) 7. 5 5-month old heifers from northern dairy 8. 12 heifers bred average 6 months from one farm 9. Few fresh heifers from local farm that sells as they freshen 10. 12 nice 7 month old heifers from eastern dairy 11. One Reg. Ayrshire that is due 7-14-12 12. Group of open and springing heifers from one farm. 13. Purebred red and white service bull from George Farms, sire is Debonair-Red-ET 14. Plus lots more cows and heifers to the auction date 15. If you are thinking of selling one or a whole herd we would like to talk to you. (Specializing in agriculture is what we do.) AUCTIONEER'S NOTE: Last month we sold 175 head with the top coming to $2,100. Lots of demand for top quality animals.

Terms: Cash or honorable check. Nothing to be removed until settled for.

FOR TRUCKING AND CONSIGNMENT CALL: Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 Jay Martin 315-521-3123 Raymond Zimmerman 315-531-8521

Large Annual Summer Equipment Auction Saturday, July 28 at 9:30 AM At Martin’s Country Market, Waterloo, NY 13165 We will be selling Complete Farm Lines, Estates, Repo Eq., Light and Heavy Trucks, Excavating Eq., Dealer Eq., & Lawn and Garden. We will be offering great opportunity to buy and sell here. Reasonable commission rates, great location. Call Jay Martin 315-521-3123 or Elmer Zeiset 315-729-8030 to get in early advertising.

FEW FARMS LINES AND LOTS OF CONSIGNMENTS ALREADY CONSIGNED

Specializing in Agriculture & Construction Public Auctions Jay Martin Clyde, NY 14433 315-521-3123

Elmer Zeiset Savannah, NY 13146 315-729-8030

Page 11 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Increased trade with Russia will benefit U.S. farmers


Section B - Page 12 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Back by popular demand: The Pond Management Workshop GREENWICH, NY — The Washington County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) is partnering with Ag Stewardship Association (ASA) to host another Pond Management Workshop. The workshop this year will be held at the Lacroix Family pond located at 205 Old Cambridge Road off from State Route 372 in the town of Greenwich, NY. It will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on July 17. This event will be held rain or shine and light refreshments will be served. The Soil and Water Conservation Districts receives many requests for assistance regarding ponds over the course of a year, so to help further public knowledge about ponds and their maintenance we are partnering with ASA to provide educational materials and guidance to pond owners. Along with professionals from SWCD and ASA there will be a variety of experts from various agencies giving presentations about their area of expertise and they will be available to answer your individual questions. Olga Vargas, Soil Scientist with Natural Resources Conservation Service will discuss optimal soil types and will give a hands on demo of how to determine if

you have clay, silt, or sand. Kathy Donna is an NRCS Biologist who can give a better understanding of the types of plants and animals that like to inhabit ponds and surrounding areas. Jim Pinheiro is a Habitat Specialist with DEC and he will be discussing fish species and their requirements. Russ Lacroix who built the pond will be giving some insight into some of the management techniques they are utilizing at the pond site and some of the construction challenges they ran into when building the pond. Joe Driscoll District Manager for Soil and Water will give some insight into sighting and design challenges, as well permitting requirements, and rural fire hydrant design and installation. So bring your questions and join us for an enjoyable summer evening at the Lacroix Family Pond. Please keep checking on both the Ag Stewardship and Washington County Soil and Water Conservation District websites for updates on this upcoming workshop. The web addresses are: www.agstewardship.org and www.washingtonsountyswcd.org, or you can call SWCD at 518-692-9940 ext 3 and ASA at 518-692-7285.

Retirement Auction for Walters Farms

Fri., July 13th @ 10:30 AM Zimmerman Rd and Fly Rd (Mud Street), Beamsville, Ont. (farm is sold, owners retiring from farming) Sale to consist of Winery Equipment, Tractors, Vineyard Harvesting Equipment, Late Model 20 ton excavator, float and flat bed trailer, mini excavator/trencher. Collector vehicles plus some household and antique items.

Directions: From QEW exit Ontario St. Beamsville south to King St. E. to Mountain St. south (first lights east of Ontario St.), than south to Fly Road (Mud Street first stop), take Fly Road west to first road on right (Zimmerman Rd.) right to sale site. Watch for signs. Partial List to Include: Case CX 210 Excavator, 2004 model Q.A. 4 ft bucket 6500 hrs. one owner machine in good condition, Case D-H4 trencher/mini excavator with new engine, 20 ton goose neck float, 2-40 foot flat bed trailers (Fruehauf, Brantford) certified in good condition. Tractors and Vineyard Equipment: Ford 2600 gas 700 hours orig one owner, Ford 5600 dsl with front hydraulic remotes, Ford Super Dexta dsl. 1971 Chisolm Ryder 4 W.D. harvester (with many parts). Chisolm Ryder Sickle Bar Hedger Conversion, 2-hydraulic Tote Lift dump wagons (narrow) 38” and 28” tires, A.C. 4000 lb propane forklift/ 3 stage mast, Lansing Bagnall elec dual wheel tow motor with rotary head and side shift. Tufline vineyard disc, I-H vineyard disc, I-H 7ft 12 run grain drill with grass seed and fert. and press wheels (good shape) Ford 6 ft. finishing mower, 6 ft Bush Hog mower, Bush Hog 6’ to 9’ hydraulic adjust flail mower, Cosmag flail mower with hydraulic width adjust., Wifo double tooth 3 pth subsoiler, Massan mole subsoiler, Ford 6’ blade, 7’ 3 pth blade, Danhuser post hole auger with 9” auger, Thomas 3 pth rotary grape hoe, Clements rotary grape hoe, 3pth vine/tree planter, Ferguson 3 pth one way discs, Vicon 1400 kg 3 pth fert spreader, Slawson and Mead hedger, Ellis front mount brush rake, 2 row canopy vineyard sprayer, Triumph 5’ sickle bar mower, 5’ arena vator with rolling basket, 10 ft and 5 ft spring tooth cult., Ford 2 bottom plows. Large quantity steel “T” posts and press, treated grape posts, plastic yellow grape boxes. 14-4 ton steel grape bins with plastic lids, 10 plastic Macro 34 fruit bins, 8 1 ton steel bins. 5’ Land pride box scraper. New Trane 5XE 1000 5 ton A/C unit, 1965 Groh Mahogany 16 ft lapstrake boat with V4 OMC I/O motor sells with trailer. KNIGHT 12030 Spreader with narrow wheel base (ex condition). Agro Trend 6’x4’ tandem dump trailer (atv size). 8 ft front mount snow blade. Front mount hyd post pounder, Laurin tractor cab with A/C (fits Ford 5600) Winery equipment: 5 ton Vaslin grape press, High capacity destemmer with 15 hp elec motor, Titanus continuous twin screw press, Rossi 8’ elevator/dejuicer, Velo 15 plate juice filter, Pasteurizer 60 ft (15x4) 3” s.s., 2-3000 gal S.S. tanks, 14-1, 500 gal (US) plastic upright tanks, 8750 gal (US) plastic upright tanks, 500 agl transfer tanks, 300 gal transfer tanks, 4-1000 ltr totes etc. Note all tanks clean and used for grape juice only. Quantity of unused 12”x4” clay drainage tile. Classic vehicles: 1949 GMC 3 ton stake orig. running, 1965 T Bird/390, 1979 T Bird/302 1979 Fairmont, 1968 Ford Bronco chassis with new fiberglass body. 16 ft flat bed float trailer, 10 ft utility trailer, 20 ft heavy duty hyd cylinder rebuild table, unused 8’x7’ door, 3” Rupp pump with 1.5 hp (220 vl) with hose, 200 gal slip in fuel tank, 200 gal fuel tank with elec pump. Good selection modern and older household items, glassware, china etc.

Terms: Payment in full prior to removal of merchandise. All taxes apply. Cash Visa Mastercard or Debit. Washrooms and lunch booth on premises. Auctioneers: Nello Romagnoli and Jim McCartney For info and pictures www.nelloromagnoliauction.com

NELLO ROMAGNOLI AUCTION SALES, SMITHVILLE, ONT 905-957-7283

FARM & CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT AUCTION

SATURDAY, JULY 7TH @ 9:30 AM At Visscher Farm Rte. 282 (1400 S. Main St.) Nichols, NY 13812 use Exit 62 off Southern Tier Expressway (Rte. 17/I-86) 1 1/2 mile south on Rte. 282 to site. Or 20 miles north of Towanda/Wysox, Pa area via Pa Rte. 187 north (bridges are now open) TRACTORS: John Deere 6320 4x4 w/640 ldr. 2170 hrs. 38" rubber; Allis Chalmers 8010 4x4 w/cab; White 2-85 4x4 w/cab; Kubota M4700 4x4 w/LA 1001 ldr.; Mahindra 1815 4x4 w/ldr.; Lipetsk 4x4 diesel w/ldr.; Agco ST35X 4x4 w/SC46 loader & 3 pt bush hog 765H backhoe; Massey Ferg. GC 2300 4x4 w/ldr.; (2) Farmall Cubs w/attachments; Fordson Major diesel; MF 1085; Same Mini Taurus 4x4; Farmall 100; Ford 2000 "clean" Combine: J.D. 3300 self propelled w/12 1/2 ft. grain head CONSTRUCTION: John Deere 490D Excavator; Kanamoto AX30 mini excavator; CAT 931 Crawler/loader; Case 850 Dozer; Kubota HJ4540 Backhoe; Vermeer mdl. 935 chipper; service truck boom SKID STEERS: Bobcat 553; JD 240; Case 1845L & 1830; J.D. 250; plus many new attachments: forks, buckets, broom, grapple; Lowe post auger EQUIPMENT: Kverneland 7517 Wrapper; New Holland 648 round baler; Challenger RB 24 round baler; Gehl 1460 round baler; Case IH 8345; Case IH 8430 round baler; MF 146; Vermeer 504I silage; Claas 46 Net; NH 316 w/thrower (sharp); Oliver 585 4 btm spring reset semi mtd plow; 2 & 3 btm 3pt. plow plus other tillage tools; 3 point hitch Nugent engineering bale slicer; NH 315 & 276 balers; 4& 6 row cultivators; NH 451 sickle bar mower; finish mowers; rotary mowers: pull type & 3 pt.; Kverneland KD 825 & KD 806 and Patz bale shredders; Tedders & Rakes: SSI hydraulic fold 4 star tedder; Kuhn GA 6000 rake & CR320; Miller Pro 1150; NH 256 rolabar rake; Miller Pro 110 rotary rake; new Rossi rotary rake; Claas 309 rotary rake; Vicon Fanex 523T 4 star hydra fold tedder; Grimm, D & Pequea 4 star; fold up 4 star tedder; NH 144 hay inverter w/extension; NH 166 inverter; FS 500 fert. spreader; Vicon pull type fert sprd.; 10 ft lime sprd.; JD 1240 4 row corn planters; Roto Mix TMR; Gehl 125 grinder mixer & Gehl 95 (nice); Brady Hydro Mill feed grinder; NH 1033 bale wagon; Hay feeder; feeder wagon; N.I. 3626 box spreader w/hydraulic tail gate; Haybines & Discbines: JD 936, NI 5212 red; JD 1470 w/flails; Gehl 2350; JD 1470; NI 5209; NH 488; JD 34 manure sprd.; NH 306 scavenger sprd.; Danhauser F8 post hole digger; Pequea 8x16 metal hay wagon w/dump; Flex-bale self unld. round bale wagon; Cobey flat hay wagon 9'x14'; Vermeer V1150 ditch witch; 4 barn fans; NH 28 blower; Farmgo 24 ft feeder wagon; Peque double rake hitch; Manco 265cc power kart "like new"; toys; 3 pt finish mowers; lawn roller; lawn vacuum w/Honda motor TRUCKS: 1998 GMC diesel w/20' Morgan enclosed box; 1992 Ford diesel w/25 ft flat bed; 1987 Ford F350 ambulance; machinery trailers FROM AN ESTATE: Ford 2000 tractor; NH 488 haybine; skeleton elevator; 1975 VW Beetle; Cub Cadet 2146 Lawn Mower; Cub Cadet 826 snow blower; 2 yard carts; Lawn sweeper; Power Washer; Power Chipper; 2 Craftsman tool boxes; Precision tools; Mic's caliper, etc.; hand tools, etc. Some small items in AM in the building - construction items left from 5/25 sale - We'll be out in the field with machinery by afternoon TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK - NO BUYER'S PREMIUM - LUNCH

HOWARD W. VISSCHER AND SON SALES MANAGER AND AUCTIONEER NICHOLS, NY 607-699-7250


The true armyworm is center stage again for the fourth week. They are being found throughout New York State and mostly in grasses and mixed stands. There have been reports of armyworm over threshold in oats and corn. The majority of the

damage is still occurring in Western New York, but also as far as St. Lawrence County. There are reports of some fields over threshold in Eastern New York from Clinton County to Dutchess County and out to Oneida County. A light of hope is

LLAND SALES STABLES, IN W HO E N Located 12 Miles East of Lancaster, PA Just Off Rt. 23, New Holland C.

Dairy Cow & Heifer Sale Wed., July 4TH • 10:30 AM

Firecrac ker Sale

ker Firecrac Sale

Complete Dispersal of 80 Cow Upstate Herd AI Sired & AI Bred for Years Big, Strong Cows Milked in Tie Stalls All Consignments Welcome

Cows - Heifers - Bulls Thank You

SALE MANAGED BY: New Holland Sales Stables, Inc. David Kolb 61-L

717-354-4341 (Barn) 717-355-0706 (FAX)

Special Heifer Sale Next Wed. July 11th WEEKLY SALES EVERY MONDAY HOSKING SALES - FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK Weekly Sales Every Monday 12:30 Produce, Misc. & small animals; 1:00 Dairy; **We will now sell lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves and cull beef approx. 5:00-5:30PM. Help us increase our volume - thus making a better market for everyone. ** We are Independent Marketers - working 24/7 to increase your bottom line. Take advantage of our low commission rates. Competitive marketing is the way to go. Monday, June 25th sale - cull ave. .67, Top cow .84 wt. 1603 $1346.52 cows up to $1526.25 Bulls/Steers top $.97 wt. 1375 $1333.75, bull calves top $2.15, heifer calves top $1.30. Monday, July 2nd - Special: ROB-MICH Farm Registered & Grade Holstein Herd Dispersal. 40 Head (20 Registered) 36 cows, 4 Bred Heifers. Watch for the two Maternal sisters by Talent & Sept. Storm. Also a fancy VG 87 R&W due sale day to Sept. Storm. Cows are in all stages of lactation with a few exceptionally fancy young cows here!! Other job interest prompts this short notice sale. Owners: Robert & Michele Franklin & Family. Dairy will start at 1PM, quality consignments welcome. Monthly Fat Cow and Feeder Sale. Monday, July 9th - Monthly Heifer Sale. Special: 10 Head of Organic Cows - all stages of lactation. Monday, July 16th - Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. 20 Lambs, Ewes and 1 Ram from one flock. Monday, July 23rd - Normal Monday Sale. Monday, July 30th - Normal Monday Sale. Saturday, Oct. 13th - OHM Holstein Club Sale. Brad Ainslie Sale Chairmen 315-822-6087. Saturday, Nov. 3rd - Fall Premier All Breed Sale - Call early to consign to make catalog and advertising deadlines. Café is now open for breakfast and lunch - great food! LOOKING TO HAVE A FARM SALE OR JUST SELL A FEW GIVE US A CALL. **Trucking Assistance - Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on our Web site. Call to advertise in any of these sales it makes a difference. Directions: Former Welch Livestock 6096 NYS Rt. 8, 30 miles South of Utica & 6 miles North of New Berlin, NY. www.hoskingsales.com Call today with your consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 6096 NYS Rt. 8 New Berlin, NY 13411

607-699-3637 or 607-847-8800 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771

that in Eastern New York extension educators are reporting that some of the populations are showing signs of biological control. Both parasitoids and pathogens have been found in populations of armyworms. The pathogen can wipe out a population armyworms in a field. Parasitoids can hold a population in check so it does not build. Again as we have said you never know where and when this will happen. It might come to a field near you! A question was raised recently on whether the second generation of true armyworms would cause more damage to crops. Elson Shields (Cornell Field Crops Extension Entomologist) responded that there is no useful reason to monitor or worry about the sec-

ond generation of armyworm! The same behavior which makes this insect a long-distance migrant (the need to fly long distance before settling down to lay eggs) is in force in all generations. In addition, the dilution in the vast habitat in New York reduces any potential to a non problem. The reason we had a spring problem was that millions of moths were concentrated into a small zone due to weather issues and dumped on us in a wide swath from Michigan across Ontario to New York. Paul Cerosaletti and Dale Dewing are reporting black cutworm damage in corn. Paul stated that they have found damage in very clean fields (weed free) of corn. They also found a loose smut on the heads of bar-

AUCTION

BY Order of Secured Creditor & Owner

Real Estate, Rest. & Bar Equip. On-Site Regardless of Weather

Weds.,, July y 11,, 2012 2 - 10:00 0 AM Inspection & Registration: 8:30 AM Auction Day

Bull's Head Inn

105 Park Place, Cobleskill, New York Real Estate and Complete Contents of Restaurant, Bar, Kitchen and Additional Pub will be offered as an Entirety Package as Well as Individually and Whichever Method Generates The Highest Return Will Be Sold. PERSONAL PROPERTY TERMS: Full Payment Auction Day Within 30 Minutes of Auction By Cash, M/C, Visa, Discover, Debit Card or Check w/Bank Ltr of Guaranteed Payment. 16% BP, 3% BP Discount for Cash or Check w/Bank Ltr. See Web Site for Full Terms & Sample Bank Ltr. REAL ESTATE TERMS: $5,000 Down Payment plus 12% Buyer's Premium at "Knockdown" Auction Day in Cash, Bank Check Payable to Bidder. Closing must take place by 08/24/2012

See Web Site for Details, Photos, & Full Terms

www.collarcityauctions.com

(518) 895-8150 x 101

ley. I also found a lot of loose smut in organic wheat in Essex County last week. Gary Bergstrom reports finding several wheat diseases near Aurora. These include brown leaf rust, striped leaf rust, eye spot foot rot, and Fusarium foot rot. Rusts can dramatically reduce yields on wheat. Eye spot root rot and fusarium root rot can also affect yield. Potato leafhoppers (PLH) can be found readily on alfalfa throughout the state. In western New York, Mike Stanyard is reporting very high levels of PLH on alfalfa. He stated that they are even over threshold on PLH resistant alfalfa. The rest of the state is reporting finding PLH but not at threshold levels. An interesting thing is that Mike Stanyard reports that PLH are at high levels in soybeans. Elson Shields (Cornell Field Crops Extension Entomologist) responds that pubescent soybeans are not generally damaged by PLH. The plant hairs interfere with the adult’s egg laying ability. Eggs are inserted in the leaf and stem tissue and the plant hairs interfere with those activities. It is a mechanical resistance. Remove the plant hairs (glabrous) and soybeans are very susceptible to PLH. In pubescent soybeans, you will find

adults but rarely nymphs. It is the nymphs which cause the majority of the economic damage. Keith Severson reports an issue we should all be aware of “BEES”! This time of year with fields being sprayed with insecticides it is important to consider protection of bees. Always follow insecticide label instructions. If there are flowering plants in the fields you are spraying you have the potential to kill bees. Many times the bees will carry an insecticide back to the hive and kill many more. If you observe bees in a field you are going to spray you could consider a better time of the day to spray. Spraying in the evening after bees have returned to their hives is one option. Notify the bee keeper of your intentions to treat a field. Western Bean Cutworm (WBCW) trapping began statewide the week of June 10. Twenty-eight locations are now reporting WBC collection data. The first WBC moths were collected in Eden (Erie County) in a sweet corn field. The next week WBC moths (one each) were collected in Eden and Lockport (Niagara County). Both traps were adjacent to sweet corn fields. Source: NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report - June 21

Equipmentt & Tooll Auction

Farm Equipment Auction

Saturday, July 14, 2012 @ 10AM

Estate of Ed & MaryAnn Ahrens

511 Wrightstown Sykesville Rd, Wrightstown, NJ 08562 2001 PT Cruiser with 23,000 Original Miles & Garage Kept, John Deere 2320 Diesel Mini Hoe with 23 original Hours, Allis Chalmers 620 Lawn Tractor with Belly Mower and 3PtH, Dodge 2500 4x4 with V-10 Snow Plow and Dumping Bed, Dodge Ram Charger 4x4, 1964 Dodge 600 with 318 V-8 5-Speed Transmission and a 2 Speed Rear, Volksboat (German Speed Boat) with 25HP Johnson Out Board and Trailer, More Vehicles to be Added! New Metal Barn to be Dismantled and Moved, Electric Air Compressor, Gas Powered Tamper, Gas Powered Leaf Blower, Gas Powered Chipper Shredder, Gas Powered Pressure Washer, Front Tine Rototiller, Drill Press, Partner Cut Off/Demolition Saw, 5000 lb. 12v Winch, Air Tools, Air Powered Hydraulic Jacks, Tall Hydraulic Jacks, Power Tools, Hand Tools, Wrenches, Air Tight Wood Stove, Thick Cut Lumber for Scaffolding, Restaurant Dishes, Glasses, Skillets, and Cook Ware, Cast Iron Bath Tub, More Items to be added. Stay tuned! Terms: Everything is sold As Is-Where Is and must be paid in full the day of auction. We accept Cash, Visa or Mastercard only. No Checks. There is a 13% Buyers Premium with a 3% discount for cash.

www.auctionzip.com #1070 Directions: Take Route 537/Monmouth Rd to Wrightstown Sykesville Rd. Go South on Wrightstown Sykesville Rd. Make a Left onto Defense Access Rd/Rt 680 and follow signs to auction.

Alfred’s Auctions Inc.

Appraisals, Real Estate, Equipment, Antiques Your “AREA” Auctioneer • 609-448-SOLD (7653)

www.alfredsauctionsinc.com

Friday, July 6TH 2012 • 6pm Location: 134 Turn Hill Rd. Fort Plain, NY Directions: From Canajoharie take Rt10 North approx. 7 Miles to left on New Turnpike (just past blue water tower) 1/2 mile to right on Turn Hill Rd

A well kept line of farm equipment ready to go to work: Ford 9600, 4000, & 3400 tractors; JD 410 loader backhoe; Nice NH 310 baler w/ hyd drive thrower; Deutz-Fahr baler w/ thrower; NH 489 haybine; JD 640 & 660 rakes; NH 4 star tedder; (8) nice wooden kicker wagons; Oliver 4x plows; White 10ft disc; 6ft Bush Hog; 3pt snowblower; JD transport drags; NI manure spreader; 3pt blade; 10ft drags; 2x plow; nice '98 GMC pickup; '04 GMC Envoy; 800 bales 2nd cut hay; quantity of lumber; 2 wagon loads small tools & a few household items. See you there for a great evening auction! Terms: Cash or good check. All items sold as is.

MACFADDEN N & SONS,, INC.

1457 Hwy Rt 20 Sharon Springs NY 13459 (518) 284-2090 or www.macfaddens.com

Page 13 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

View From the Field


Section B - Page 14 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Manure-pond deaths reinforce need for safety awareness UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — The recent deaths of three Pennsylvania farm-family members in a manure-storage pond in Maryland is a stark reminder of the need for safety precautions when working around such facilities, according to a farm-safety specialist in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. Although circumstances surrounding the recent fatal incident are still under investigation, there are several common hazards associated with open-air manure pits and ponds, such as the one in which a Lancaster County man and his two teenage sons died, said Dennis Murphy, distinguished professor of agricultural safety and health. "These ponds typically contain a thick liquid and floating crust in which movement is very difficult," said Murphy. "They also often have steep and slippery slopes that make getting out difficult or impossible." He explained that localized layers of hazardous gases may exist above manure surfaces, especially on hot, humid days with little breeze. Release of these gases may be accelerated by movement, agitation, removal or addition of manure to the storage pond. Someone unable to get out and trying to tread in manure may not have enough oxygen to breathe, and emergency response might be slow to arrive because of remote or isolated farm locations, Murphy noted. Tragically, incidents related to manure storages often involve multiple fatalities. "When someone falls into a manure-storage facility or is overcome by gases, the first reaction of nearby family members or farm employees often is to go in and help, and the would-be rescuers quickly can become victims as well," Murphy said. Murphy recommends the following safety guidelines to minimize the risk of injury or death around an open-air manure-storage facility: • Make sure everyone who needs to be near manure-storage structures understand the

hazards, including how the various gases can affect them. • Make sure the openair manure storage is surrounded by a fence and that access gates are locked to keep unauthorized personnel from entering the area. • The facility should have manure drowning hazard signs and no trespassing signs on all sides of the storage. • If you must go into the fenced area of the open manure storage, enhance your chances of rescue by wearing a safety harness with a life line attached to a safely located solid object or anchor. • Never work alone. The second person's role is to summon help in an emergency and assist with rescue without entering the storage. • Rescue equipment, such as flotation devices and lifelines, should be attached to every manure pump. • Move slowly around the manure storage,

since the ground sometimes can be uneven, causing a person to trip or stumble. • Bystanders and nonessential workers should stay away from pump-out and other accessible areas. • There should be no horseplay near the open manure pit or pumping equipment. • Explosive gas may accumulate near where agitation or pumping is occurring. No smoking, open flames or sparks should be allowed. • If equipment malfunctions during agitation or pumping of the manure, shut off all equipment and remove it from the storage before servicing or repairing. • If you feel unsure about what you are preparing to do near the open manure pit, step back, contact someone and review the situation before proceeding. • Be prepared to call 91-1 if an emergency happens. Being prepared

means accurately describing the incident and number of victims and giving specific directions

to the site. A Penn State fact sheet on open-air manurestorage safety can be

found at http:// psu.ag/Kjq8Lp online.

ur tO n u o Ab uctio ng k s A rse A Listi Ho ndar e Cal

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or 518-673-0111 or email classified@leepub.com Ag Bags

~ Serving Agriculture Since 1985 ~

• Up North Silage Bags • Bunker Covers • Silo Shield • Net Wrap • Special Order Bunker Covers • Sunfilm Bale Wrap • Poly Twine • Bale Tubes, Elastic Tubes • Kelly Ryan Baggers

CUSTOM FORAGE BAGGING Serving Western NY & Surrounding Areas 9’ & 10’ Ag Bag Machines w/Truck Table Reasonable Rates ~ Responsible Service Brett (cell) 585-689-1857 William (cell) 585-689-1816 (Home) 585-495-6571

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YARD SIGNS: 16x24 full color with stakes, double sided. Stakes included. Only $15.00 each. Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or bsnyder@leepub.com. Please allow 7 to 10 business days when ordering.

GOT GAS: 315-729-3710 35¢ above spot. No contracts, membership or tank fees. www.propane4farms.com

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ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Bedding

USA Gypsum Bedding Low On Bedding? Add Gypsum! Stanchions - Free Stalls - Bed Packs

Gypsum Bedding

GRIP X 1 Barn Dry • Barn dry filling your gutters & tanks? Gypsum dissolves.

Barn Repair

NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($60.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call your sales representative or Beth at Lee Publications 518-6730101 or bsnyder@leepub.com

GREEN SAWDUST, 35 yard load, $400.00. Delivered free 30 miles. Fingerlakes Firewood 607-659-7718

Bale Covers

Bale Covers

Bedding

MAX TECH BALE WRAP 20”x6000’ or 30”x5000’ Also Net Wrap 48”x9840’ & 51”x9840’ Now Carrying - Stretch-O-Matic Fully Automatic Tubular Wrappers - All At Competitive Prices (1) Available in Stock Also Selling - Bale Thrower Racks 8-1/2’x20’, Creek Bank Bale Wagons & Barn Feeder NEW - CREEK BANK 25’ BALE WAGON w/12 Ton Tandem Running Gear & Tires 9000’ Brazilian Green • 20,000’ Poly Twine 9,600’ Poly Twine (same as 7200’Twine) • Others Available

315-823-1656 Barn Equipment

Bedding

• Cheaper than sawdust shavings or straw. • Reduce mastitis & cell counts. • Use in place of Hydrated Lime. • Improves your soil • Available in bulk or bag.

BARN REPAIR SPECIALISTS: Straightening, leveling, beam replacements. From foundation and sills to steel roofs. HERITAGE STRUCTURAL RENOVATION INC., 1-800-735-2580.

Ag Bags

Leray Sealed Storage 315-783-1856

Ag Chemicals

Announcements

Barn Equipment

• Use less! More absorbent than lime products.

Try Grip X1 Today! www.usagypsum.com • Phone 717-335-0379 Dealers wanted in select areas Also Available at: Central Dairy & Mech. Country View Ag Products Elam Miller Himrod Farm Supply Homestead Nutrition Levi Fisher Martin’s Ag New Bedford Elevator Norm’s Farm Store Robert Rohrer Steve B. Stoltzfus Walnut Hill Feeds

Martinsburg, PA Moravia, NY Ft. Plain, NY Penn Yan, NY New Holland, PA Honey Grove, PA Shippensburg, PA Baltic, OH Watsontown, PA Millmont, PA Lykens, PA Shelby, OH

ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph ph

814-793-3721 315-374-5457 518-993-3892 315-531-9497 888-336-7878 717-734-3145 717-532-7845 330-897-6492 570-649-6765 570-898-1967 717-365-3804 419-342-2942

PEANUT HULL BEDDING New York Prices Quoted • Call for Prices Elsewhere

Load Size

110 Cu. Yd. Trailer Loads

Ground Unground

$125.00 $115.00/Ton $165.00/Ton

Works Great in Both Freestall & Tiestall Barns

315-823-1656

“Specializing in Dairy Bedding” e Oak Farm Bedding, LLC W h it Announcements

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Page 15 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 16 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Bedding

Bedding

KILN DRIED BULK BEDDING

BEDDING SAND

Delivered all of NY & New England or you pick up at mill.

• Stones • Gravel • AgLime

for COW STALLS

Seward Valley 518-234-4052

WOOD SHAVINGS: Compressed bags, kiln dried, sold by tractor trailer loads. SAVE! www.pinebec.ca 1-800-6881187

Beef Cattle 2 HEREFORD Cows & 2 Calves, very friendly, $2,250/all. 518-598-3215 3 BLACK ANGUS STEERS, 8-9 months old and 2 heifers. Please call 845-758-3332 or 845-876-4111 ALL NATURAL grass fed Angus/ Baldies feeders 400600lbs. Other ages available. For more information. 845629-1000 FOR SALE: Nice Black Angus bull, ready to breed, 14 months old, $800.00. 315568-8066

Cattle

FASTRACK® DISTRIBUTOR’S WANTED for the #1 Dairy Probiotic. Call 585-773-0101

REG. TEXAS LONGHORNS: Cow/calf pairs, heifers, bulls, exhibition steers. See www.triplemlonghorns.com Tom/Julie (w)607-363-7814, 607-287-2430

Business Opportunities

Mark J. DuPont, Owner Cell 315-796-5084 Home 315-845-8471

PINE SHAVING: 3.5 cubic foot paper bags. Call Bobby 315-600-7507 SAWDUST FOR SALE: Sawdust, 50-100 yards. Delivery available. J&J Log & Lumber. 845-832-6535

Business Opportunities

Bedding

Beef Cattle

Building Materials/Supplies

REG. BELTED Galloway bull, 4 years old, calm temperament, $1,600. 845-676-4501

INSULATION 1/2” to 4” - 4x8 sheets foam insulation. 1x6, 2x6 tongue & groove, white pine siding. Large quantities available!! Beachy’s Lumber & Insulation. 585-765-2215

SERVICE BULLS: Angus, Hereford & Santa Gertrudis. Delivery available. Will lease bulls. 315-521-2552 SMALL HERD Black Angus, papers available, gentle. 5 cows, 4 calves, $12,000/all. 518-598-3215

Building Materials/Supplies #1-40YR painted steel, galvanized & galvalume, also #2 available w/all trim & accessories. Complete Building Packages. Before you buy call Mohawk Metal Sales, 315-853-ROOF(7663)

GRASS FED Dexter Cattle, Heritage breed, dual purpose, “raise your own beef”. Call for more info. 518-339-6030 or email tlippert@hughes.net

FACTORY SECONDS Foam Insulation, various thickness. 4x8 sheets of recycled blueboard. Adirondack Metal Sales, 315-429-3627

Building Materials/Supplies

Building Materials/Supplies

Do You Grow Grapes? Do You Make Wine? CHECK OUT www.wineandgrapegrower.com Or Call For a Sample Copy

800-218-5586

Buildings For Sale FA R M R A I S E D H O M E BUILDER, featuring Bill Lake Homes. Your plans or ours. www.kdhomesny.com Call Dave KD HOMES 315-841-8700 kdhomes@frontiernet.net

Buildings For Sale

No Sub Crews Any Size Or Description of Building Most Structures Erected Within 30 Days Beat Our Price? I Don’t Think So!

(Direct Shipments - Wholesale, Retail) ~ Quick Turn-Around, We Ship Anywhere ~ Located in the Heart of the Fingerlakes

607-869-9483

1/2”, 3/4” or 1 1/2” Wide Grooves Protect Your Cows From Injuries and Slippery Concrete • Free Stalls • Holding Areas SAFE A T LA ST • Feed Lots • Pens • Stalls • Walkways

Dick Meyer Co. Inc. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-228-5471

Call 888-596-5329 for Your Subscription

www.barnfloorgroovers.com

Cars, Trucks, Trailers

Cars, Trucks, Trailers

Call today and join our family of satisfied customers!!

We build what we sell

• Polebarn Packages - Any Size up to 80x600

CONCRETE SAFETY GROOVING IN

518-673-1073 or 518-774-7288 • Dairy Facilities • Machinery Sheds • Pole Barns • Free Stall Barns • Tie Stall Barns • Garages • Gravity Flow Manure Systems • Horse Barns • Riding Arenas

Lifetime Warranty

• Gluelam Poles, Lumber, Trusses

BARN FLOOR GROOVERS®

Double O Builders LLC

35 years of experience

24 ga, 26 ga, 28 ga, 29 ga, Plus Aluminum

Concrete Products

Buildings For Sale

by S&L Builders

• Metal Roofing and Siding in Many Colors

WANTED TO BUY: Old Grit newspapers (not the Grit magazine). 518-568-5115

R A R E & FA S T ‘06 Caddy CTS-V

Professional Pole Barns

Midlakes Metal Sales

Collectibles

570-398-5948 (o) 570-772-2352 (c)

6.0 liter V-8, 6spd std, all options, black w/tan leather interior, 48,000 miles.

Reduced to $21,000 518-221-4103 3 orr 518-673-0104 Cow Mats

Cow Mats


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Custom Butchering

Custom Butchering

Custom m Processingg Forr Alll Organic & Conventionall Animals USDA Certified for Beef, Pigs, Lambs, Goats, Chickens and Turkeys 56 Railroad Ave, Stamford, NY Cell 607-435-9375

Office 607-652-6321

www.eklundprocessing.intuitwebsites.com

New York Custom Processing, LLC Rt. 8, Bridgewater, NY

Now Open & Booking Animals

No Lines ~ No Waiting All Cuts Vacuum Packed and Bar-Coded for Tracking and a Complete Printed Inventory of Your Product Call For Appointment

315-204-4089 or 315-204-4084

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

BOSS LIVESTOCK: WANTED Holstein Jersey or Mixed Dairy Herds, immediate payment and removal. Also Dairy Cows For Sale: One or 100your choice, quality replacements. Call Chris Boss 315219-0590(cell), 315-8581651(home).

JERSEY HEIFERS for sale. Please call before 9pm, Canajoharie,NY 518-673-2267

USED COWS WANTED

FOR SALE - 2 registered cows with great pedigrees both milking now. Need to sell. 518-598-4237

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

Custom Services CUSTOM PLOWING & DISKING. Reasonable rates. Call 315-985-5415

Spr ing Lak e Far ms Quality Services You Can Count On Custom Farming “Since 1995” 50 Mile Radius

BIG SQUARE BALING

FOR SALE: 5 BEAUTIFUL Large Holstein Heifers, bred for Aug. & Sept. DAMs production date available. Call 315-845-8521

Clinton Zimmerman

315-729-1066

HOLSTEIN COWS: 28,000RHA, milked 2 times/ day, 3.5Fat 3.0Protein, excellent feet & legs, young herd, $1,800/each OBO. Pick 40 out of 45. L&M Farm, 315-3766884

Custom Services

Custom Services

w/3 Bale Accumulator Savannah, NY

B.K. Transfer 5324 County Rd 14 Odessa, NY 14869

“A Farmer Friendly Direct Marketing Service” Barb Kelley Owner/Operator Licensed & Bonded

1

12 oz

ORGANIC CATTLE: 25 Fresh & Springing Holsteins & crosses. Take one or all. 610273-2285 ORGANIC DAIRY COWS, $2,000 each. You pick. 315287-2835

APPROX. 120 HEAD TO PICK FROM

 WANTED 

HEIFERS

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

• Trucking Available

REGISTERED & GRADES

Monday 9am - 4pm Thursday 9am - 3pm

We Currently Have a Very Good Selection Reasonably Priced

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

610-273-2285

- WANTED -

Daniel Z. Stoltzfus SCC Over 100,000? Call Us. Only 13 cents/cow. 39 years easy use. Effective, no withholding, results. PH: 800-876-2500, 920-650-1631 www.alphageneticsinc.com

Dairy Cattle

(ALL SIZES)

Heifers & Herds Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101 Dairy Cattle

ATTENTION FARMERS

WA N T E D

Down - Disabled & Fresh Dead Cows

**Specialty Sausages: Apple/Maple Chipotle/Honey, Buffalo Wing

For Rendering - Courteous Service

315-793-0043

***Grillin’ Glaze: Black Bull BBQ, Mandarin Teriyaki Call To Place An Order Today Dairy Cattle 110 WELL-GROWN freestall trained Holstein heifers due August & September. Had all shots. 315-269-6600

www.countryfolks.com

AMERICAN RENDERING CO. BINGHAMTON, NY

• Competitive Pricing

Bar-B-Que

8 hot dogs 1 full rack

1-800-777-2088

Local 607.703.0052

ON SPECIAL

2 1

DEAD - DOWN - DISABLED CATTLE Call 607-722-5728 Anytime

QUALITY FRESH & SPRINGING HEIFERS

Hickory Smoking on Premises

4 patties 1#

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

• Accepting All Types of Livestock

USDA FACILITY RETAIL STORE OPEN!

3 3

Call Us with your information or email

Toll Free 1.877.208.0123

Cell 607.227.5282 Working With You, The Farmer

Ground Beef Patties Choice of Specialty Sausage** Pork Hot Dogs Pork Spare Ribs Choice of Grillin’ Glaze***

OPEN HEIFERS NEEDED

25 REGISTERED Jerseys tiestall & freestall trained $1,100 each. 203-263-3955 50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

Dairy Cattle

Herd Expansions

WANTED All Size Heifers

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

315-269-6600

A MESSAGE TO ALL DAIRY FARMERS We’re not the largest Livestock Dealers, we don’t have the largest advertisements, but we can promise to be honest, fair, and caring when it comes to purchasing and selling your complete dairy herd. You and your cows deserve that much. We also have a quality selection of Reg. and Grade cows at all times for you to choose from. So if you are thinking of buying or selling, from one cow to an entire herd, give us a call. You will be glad you did.

Bose Quality Dairy Sales

Tom 845-482-4380 • Sonny 845-482-4166

Page 17 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 18 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYSS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER R LIVESTOCK K SALES,, INC. Middletown, NY (845)) 344-71700 buycows@warwick.net

CLIP & SAVE

Dairy Equipment

Dogs

2” SS PIPELINE. 360’, receiver group, $1,900. Patz heavy Duty unit with 360’ 12”CCW HiFlites, $1,900. 2-Boumatic FR4 Vacuum pumps with 5 hp motors on tanks, $900 ea. 10’ hairpin precooler, $900. 6Complete DeLaval milking machines with hangers, noses, silicone inflations, pulsators, $125 ea. 3-36” barn fans, $125 ea. Bale spears, back blades, polywire, posts, reels. murphytc@frontiernet.net Tom, 315-691-6723

REGISTERED ENGLISH SHEPHERD PUPS. e-mail TandD_Kaschak@msn.com www.kaschak-kennels.tripod.com 814-796-4070

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

FREE REMOVAL

Down - Disabled - Dead Cattle Servicing: Delaware, Otsego, Schoharie, Chenango and Montgomery CALL ANYTIME Call by 8am for Guaranteed Same Day Removal

1-855-3CATTLE 1-855-322-8853 EMPIRE DOGFOOD

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159 FOR SALE: 60 cow waterbeds, $100.00 each. With brisket boards. Will sell one or all. 585-749-6557 Brian, 585749-6559 Bradley

Farm Equipment JD 5730 CHOPPER, 4WD processor hay & 4 row chain heads, $25,000. 585-7465050

Farm Machinery For Sale $1,000 OFF corn heads & grain heads. Huge selection 15’-30’, 4,6,8 row corn heads. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322 1-BOUMATIC plate cooler w/79 plates, $1,500; 2-16’ Dion self-unloading wagons w/roof 3 beaters & tandem running gears $1,500 each or $2,500 both. 1-16’ Dion selfunloading wagon w/2 beaters, $800. 518-441-0289

Down, Disabled & Fresh Dead Cows for Rendering

SURGE-WESTFALIA variable speed 10hp vacuum pump; 2 20 ton hopper bins; Universal Coldmine plate cooler. 585732-1953

1256 IH turbo w/cab, 18.4x38 radials, $8,500; IH 720 5 bottom plows, $2,800; Hesston 7155 chopper, $3,000; 1981 Chevy C60 w/silage dump body, $3,500; old JD rake, $500; Int. 400 gas tractor, $1,800; Harsh 303 mixer, $5,500; Harsh 290 mixer wagon, for parts, $1,000. 607286-9362

315-375-8459

Variable Speed Pump Controller. No stray voltage, stable vacuum 607-849-3880 www.CoPulsation.com

1978 FORD 8000 w/18ft Dump Box. Good for Farm silage or grain truck. Asking $3,500 Call 607-336-5151

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

ATTENTION FARMERS Operating 6 Days~Monday thru Saturday

WANTED

PINE TREE RENDERING Route 37, Brier Hill, NY

Dairy Equipment

Dairy Equipment

ATTENTION DAIRY FARMERS

We Need Good Used Tanks • 100-8,000 ga. - Call Us SOLD NJ • 500 Gal. • 1000 Gal. DeLaval • 6000 Gal. Storage Majonnier • 1000 Gal. Mueller M • 415 Gal. Sunset • 3000 Gal. Storage • 400 Gal. Jamesway • 2000 Gal. Mueller OH • 900 Gal. Mueller OH • 800 Gal. Majonnier SOLD NH OE Mueller • 400 Gal. Majonnier • 2000 Gal. • 2000 Gal. Mueller OE • 800 Gal. Mueller OH • 300 Gal. DeLaval SOLD NY • 735 Gal. Sunset • 2000 Gal. Surge • 300 Gal. Majonnier • 735 Gal. Sunset • 1600 Gal. Surge • 300 Gal Mueller M • 700 Gal. Mueller OH • 1500 Gal. Mueller OHF • 300 Gal. Sunset • 700 Gal. Mueller V • 1500 Gal. Mueller OH • 700 Gal. Mueller M SOLD PA • 200 Gal. DeLaval • 1250 Gal. Surge • 200 Gal. Mueller RS • 600 Gal. Mueller OH • 1250 Gal. Mueller OH • 600 Gal. Mueller M • 200 Gal. Sunset SOLD PA • 1250 Gal. Majonnier Majonnier • 600 Gal. DeLaval Rnd • 150 Gal. • 1250 Gal. DeLaval • 150 Gal. Mueller RH • 545 Gal. Sunset • 1000 Gal. Sunset F.T. • 500 Gal. Mueller MW • 100, 180, 250 Gal. Milkeeper Self-Cont. • 1000 Gal. Mueller OH • 500 Gal. Mueller M

HEAT EXCHANGERS S • TUBE E COOLER 300-6000 0 Gall Storage e Tanks

We e Do o Tank k Repair

SHENK’S

505 E. Woods Drive,

Sales 717-626-1151

Lititz, PA 17543

Do you have a digital subscription?

www.countryfolks.com

FOR SALE: Milkeeper 600 gallon bulk milk tank, $875.00. 518-673-3611

SUMMERS COMING! IH & WHITE PLOWS & PARTS

JD 4050 MFD PS, NEW TIRES $26,900 CIH 9170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 CIH 5140 MFD NICE . . . . . . .$26,500 IH 1486 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL IH 1086 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,250 IH 1066 CAB . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,750 IH 1066 MFD . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 IH 1066 FENDER & NEW TA .$10,900 IH 966 FENDER . . . . . . . . . . .$8,250 IH 856 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL IH 856 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,250 IH 806 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 IH 656 WEAK HYDRO . . . . . .$3,500 IH 424 W/LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 FD 4100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500 BOBCAT CT225 W/LDR NEW $14,900 JD 9510 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . .$69,900 JD 9510 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . .$53,000

JD FLEX HEADS . . . . . . . . . . .CALL JD CORN HEADS . . . . . . . . . .CALL KILLBROS 350 GRAVITY BOX NICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,750 CORN PLANTERS . . . . . . . . . .CALL ELWOOD 4WD UNIT . . . . . . . .$5,500 IH & WHITE PLOWS 4X-10X . .CALL FRONT END LOADERS NEW & USED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL CASE 8430 ROUND BALER . .$5,000 1ST CHOICE GS520-4 TEDDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,250 ROCK PICKER . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL CHISEL PLOWS 9-17 SHANK .CALL 33FT AL DUMP TRAILER . . . .CALL LOTS OF DUALS . . . . . . . . . . .CALL IH, JD, FD TRACTOR WEIGHTS .CALL

Alternative Parts Source Inc. Chittenango, NY •

315-687-0074

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

1987 LN8000 10 WHEEL DUMP TRUCK, 17’ body, $9,100. 978-544-6105

3PT. HITCH Bale Wrapper, Kverneland, Serial #UN7556, looks like new, $6,500. 607533-7527

1992 CASE IH 1680, 4WD combine, 3,500 engine hours, $49,500/obo; 1020 20’ flex head, always housed, $13,000/obo. Both Excellent Condition and Field Ready. 315-420-8328, 315-382-6334 2 JD 220 flex heads, poly skids, stainless bottoms, $2,500 & $3,200; JD 44 combine, very good rubber, $5,200; Killbros 375 gravity box, wrap-around on top on JD 12 ton gear, $3,250. Mike Franklin 607-749-3424 2 VANDALE surface drive unloaders, one new & one used. 315-404-6721, 315495-6506. 2006 JOHN DEERE 5425, 4WD, w/loader, power reverser transmission, excellent condition, $32,000. 585-3300014 2007 CORN PRO Cattle Trailer, 20’ gooseneck, heavy duty model, new paint, excellent, $4,750; JD 213 flex head with cart, very good, $4,500; JD 6 row cultivator, $1,500; Paul livestock scale, $650; square bale grabber, $650. 802-6445974 (25) 36” DIRECT DRIVE Schaeffer fans, excellent condition, $200.00 each. Sell together or separate. 585749-6557 or 585-749-6559

8312 CASE DISCBINE w/2pt. swivel hitch, used on small farm w/100 acres of hay. Call 607-423-0816 or 607-2276529 evenings ALL STEEL HAY WAGON; 1 wooden hay wagon; International 574, gas; International 2250 loader; Case IH 600 blower. 315-691-2927 ALLIS CHALMERS powered generator, 60kw, 2300 hrs., will separate, 426 cube engine from generator. $4,500 OBO for generator, or $3,500 OBO for engine. 315-9424475 B&E MANUFACTURING: Kicker racks, slant bar feeders, headlock feeders, round bale carriers, low profile bale carriers. 315-536-9513 CASE PUMA 195 CVT transmission, 210 hours, Michelin tires, loaded, owner downsizing, $130,000. 518872-1386 E-Z TRAIL WAGONS, all in excellent condition, 1 on JD gear, $2,500 each; 2 on Kory gear, $3,000 each. 315-7830595

3hp Electric Cooling System; Electric barn cleaner; oil hot water heater. 315-868-7425

FARMALL 340 pulling tractor, new tires, weight brackets, $5,800/obo; Farmall 560 pulling tractor, $6,400/obo; 1966 Mac R-600 single axle truck. 518-945-1715, 518567-1532

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

MABIE BROS., INC.

New MF/Hesston 1734

39"x 52 inch round baler with electric threader, bale ramp and gathering wheels 10% down, 0% For 60 Mo. •

$249/mo

New Krone SW42T Hay Rake New Krone 552T 4 star tedder New Krone KWT782 6 star tedder Used Class Liner 350 rake Excellent . . . . . .$5,500 Used Miller Pro 1100 rake . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,400

8571 1 Kinderhook k Rd.. Kirkville,, NY Y 13082

315-687-7891 1 • 315-510-2400

MabieBros.Com m


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

FARMKING

17’ 3Pt. Rotary Cutter

VanDusen Machinery 607-529-3294 570-888-5370

Zeisloft’s want to be your Combine Man

1 Year Motor & Trans. Warranty on Combines In Stock/Ready to Go 2005 JD 9560 Sidehill, 2000 Eng,1370 Sep hrs, New Rubber, Greenstar . $169,000 2000 9650 STS 1300 Eng, 1700 Sep hrs, Like New Rubber, 30.5, Greenstar, Sharp! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $97,500 2002 JD 9550 LL only 1,840 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $89,500 2000 JD 9550 Sidehill, only 2,092 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,500 2001 JD 9550 Sidehill, only 1.900 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call 1999 JD 9510 Super Sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call 1998 JD 9510 4x4, New Rubber. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call 1995 JD 9500 Sidehill, 4x4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,000 1996 JD 9500 Sidehill, 2WD, Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $57,500 1997 JD 9500 LL, only 2,700 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $58,000 1995 JD 9500 LL, only 2,200 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $53,500 1993 JD 9500 LL, very nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,500 (12) JD 6620 Mostly Sidehills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Varies (2) JD 7720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheap! 1998 Case/IH 2366 Hillco 4x4 only 1620 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $109,000 1998 Case/IH 2366 Hillco 2WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99,000 1998 Case/IH 2366 2WD, Sharp, 2,300 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $74,000 1998 Case/IH 2366 2WD, 2,510 hrs, Exc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75,900 1998 Case/IH 2366 4x4 1,966 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,900 1996 Case/IH 2166 2WD, AFS, 2,966 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,900 1995 Case/IH 2166 2WD, 3,357 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 1995 Case/IH 2144 2WD, nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,700 1994 Case/IH 1666 2WD, Very Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,500 14 1660-1640-1620 combines

Direct Ship Program Ships Direct from our Warehouse from Midwest Direct to you. Prices are Trucking Included. ‘11 JD 9870 #740656, 486/316HR, 20.8-42 Duals 28L26, 4WD, Chop, 24’ Unload, Contour Delcab Mauer Bin ext, “very Nice” 30.5 Avail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$299,000 ‘08 JD 9770 #727600, STS, 1480/983, 20.8-42 Duals, CM, Chop Bin ext, Custom Cutter Package, “Very Nice” . . . . . . . . .$189,000 ‘04 JD 9660 #707325, STS, 2WD, 30.5, Sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$119,000 ‘07 JD 9660 #721103, STS, 2WD, 30.5, Fancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$145,000 ‘05 JD 9560 #710704, STS, CM, 30.5L-32 2WD, 14.9-24 Chopper Mauer Bin ext, GS, Y&M, JD Universal Steering Kit, Auto Steer, 2038/1391, “Very Nice” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$139,000 ‘00 JD 9650W #685321, 3690/2601HR, 30.5-32F 18.4-30R, 4WD, Chaff Chopper Bin ext, GS ,w/Display CM w/Single Point Conversion Delcab w/Airseat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$98,000 ‘00 JD 9650W #686932, STS, CM, 3875/2642, AHC DAS, FA, GS . .$75,000 CIH 7088 #Y8G000272, 1469/1030, Tracker RT Chop 2spd Feeder House 4WD, Pro 600 Monitor, 900-32 Drive Tires, 540/30 Rear Elec Bin ext, Leather Seat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call ‘09 CIH 2366 #184744, Hillco Bin ext, RT 800/65R32 14.9-24R, Big Top Leveling System, CIH, AFS System w/Display 2WD, Spec Rotor, 3735/2733, 2SP, Hydro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$99,000 ‘01 CIH 2388 #269238, 18.4-42 Duals, 2WD, FT RT, Spec Rotor Chop Mauer Bin ext, AFS, Y&M, Monitor w/Display, 2700/2020 . .$94,500 ‘99 CIH 2388 #266467, 18.4-38 Duals, 2WD Mauer ext, FT, Spec, Rotor Chopper, 3574/4507, AG Leader 2000, Y&M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$74,500 ‘98 CIH 2388 #198537, FT RT, 30.5-32 2WD, Spec Rotor Chopper, Rear Weights, Mauer Bin ext, 20’ Unload, AG leader, PF, Y&M, Monitor, 3640/2795 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$76,000 Delivered Prices

FOR SALE: NEW HOLLAND 311 hay baler, like new. Call 518-497-6246 FORD 1720 4WD w/loader, 980 hrs., $12,500; JD 5303 turbo, 580 hrs., $17,500; Kubota 900 RTV diesel w/snowplow, $9,500. All mint condition. Can be seen at Raycliff Farm, 315-823-4321

Farm Machinery For Sale

www.zeisloftequip.com

Getting Out Of Farming CASE IH DCX 101 discbine, like new cond., around 600 acres through machine. . . . . $14,500 JOHN DEERE 960 field cultivator, 24’ wide w/7” JD perma lock sweep . . . Reduced $8,200 20’ Round Bale Wagon w/IH running gear . . . . . . . . . $3,500

585-356-2634 Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale HERCULES, CONTINENTAL WAUKESHA: Farm and Industrial Engine Parts, M&M Surplus Sales, P.O. Box 381, Chester, NY 10918. 845-4693597, Fax 845-469-0990. IH DISGUSTED??? With your shifting? Now is the time to fix. Put a good tractor back to work. 800-808-7885, 402-374-2202 JD 224 wire baler $1,200; JD 920 flex head, $5,500. 607279-6232, 607-533-4850 JD 4400 COMBINES, one gas, one diesel, 13’ flex head, pickup head. 607-592-1878 JD 4755 MFWD; JD 4255 MFWD; JD 4450 MFWD & 2WD; JD 4850, 4650. Used most of ‘em on our farms. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322 JD 8420, 4560, 4650, 7700, 7405, 7210, 2555. CIH 8920, 7140; Ford 5000, 6610 4WD. 585-732-1953 JD 9600 COMBINE, 2900 separator hours, w/18’ grain head, $28,000. 607-731-6284 JD BALER PARTS: Used, New Aftermarket and rebuilt. JD canopy new aftermarket, $750. Call for pictures. Nelson Horning 585-526-6705 JOHN DEERE 2555, 4WD w/loader, new rear tires, works & runs good, $17,500; (2) Killbros 350 gravity boxes, good condition, $2,100 each; (1) Killbros 350 gravity box w/14’ fertilizer auger, $2,600. 315-335-3020

TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY • UTILITY TRAILERS

BUY ~ SELL ~ TRADE 570-833-5214

PH:570-869-1551 Cell:607-759-4646 4698 ST. RT. 3004

MESHOPPEN, PA 18630

$15,500 OBO 845-866-9322

1999 NH 4835 60-65HP Dsl, Canopy 2000 hrs w/side mt sicklebar mower, 7’ cut, dual outlets, super clean! $9,750 Also: Ford 540 w/Canopy & Sd. Mt. Sicklebar Mower Approx. 50HP Dsl, 2000 hrs $8,950; Bush Hog 2610 Legend 10’ Rotary Mower 540 PTO w/batwing $6,450; Landpride RCR 2510 10’ rotary mower, demo, 540 PTO (New list over $7,400) Our Price $5,600 Brillion 8’ seeder, 380 acres, super nice $3,250; Brillion 10’ seeder, low acreage $2,750; 18’ Steel rack kicker wagon on good running gear $2,275; Liberty Wood Chipper like new, Professional Series WC-6, 3pt w/6” feed PTO driven $1,695; 4x4 Kubota 85-90HP Dsl, Full Factory Cab w/AC & heat, new tires, dual outlets, lots of weights $11,900; ‘04 2x4 JD 5520 Full Deluxe Cab w/AC, Heat, Stereo & JD Ldr 12 spd power reverser, 2500 hrs, 75-80HP Dsl $24,500; 4x4 Landini 75-80HP Dsl, 2500 hrs, w/full glass cab w/AC/heat, dual outlets, clean $15,900; Kuhn Knight 8110 Slinger Spreader (1) year old, single axle, 540 PTO, just like new $10,500; More Tractors & Machinery In Stock

KICKER BALE WAGONS $2,400; 8 & 10 Ton Running Gears, $1,450-$1,550; 20’ Bale Carriers, $2,850. Horst’s Welding, 585-526-5954

MADE BY HUD-SON Forest Equipment: Farm Boss Band Saw, on trailer, $3,000. 315789-6961

Lower your feed cost!

GET A

Kennedy Tractor of Williamstown, NY 315-964-1161 Delivery Available

LARGEST SELECTION of combines on East coast. Most all sell with 1 year motor & trans. warranty. 3.7% fin. Delivery. zeisloftequip.com Bloomsburg, PA 800-9193322

Round Bale Mover Like New!

Save an average of 3 to 4 lbs of grain per cow per day Going from non processing to a processor. $6.00 corn. . . .

Farm Machinery For Sale

LARGE SELECTION OF FARM TRACTORS available. Call for great pricing. BUYING good tractors too! Located just below LJ HANDS Farm Center, 518-922-6301

TECHNO BALE 960

Bloomsburg, PA • Route 44 (Jerseytown)

TOLL FREE 800-919-3322

FOUR CASE IH Tractors, MX 220 coming in. Maxxum 5220 loader; MX 110, 2 and 4wd.; JD 3010 6 row cultivator; Case 2670 duals, 12 foot silage blades, runs nice; 3 Whites, 2-110, 2-105, 4 wheel drive and parts tractor; Same 45 vineyard cab air 4wd loader 675 hours; MF 1529 4wd loader 25 hours; AgChem road gator, 80 foot sprayer, nice and field ready; Krone Big M 30 foot disk mower, low hours, field ready; Kuhn GA 6002 double spinner rake; NH 900 Harvester, grass and 824 corn; JD 347 Baler thrower, low wear, one owner $5,800; Knight Reel auger mixer wagon; Bush Hog 18 foot hydraulic fold disk $2,400; 4 and 6 row cultivator Danish Rolling and Will-rich; IH 1020 Grain head. Aarons Equipment 315-536-8718

Charles McCarthy Farm Machinery

Financing As Low As 3.5% 328 Danville Rd. (Near I-80)

Farm Machinery For Sale

1-800-836-2888

To place a Classified Ad JOHN DEERE 300 garden tractor, full cab w/removable doors, runs good, new paint, comes w/mower attachment, snowblower attachment, full power front blade, wheel weights & chains, $4,200 OBO. Will consider guns in trade. 518-283-4470 JOHN DEERE 3955 forage harvester, 2 row corn head & grass head, excellent condition, $17,000; Knight 3030 Reel Auggie mixer wagon, $2,900. 978-544-6105

MC 400 GRAIN DRYER with new 15hp motor; 36 Foot 6 inch transport auger; ONAN 20 generator. 315-337-5566 NEW HOLLAND 1037 automatic bale wagon/stacker. Call for details 518-284-2180 NEW HOLLAND 1409 discbine, 5 years old, like new condition, $11,000. 315-8995853 NEW IDEA 3615 spreader; Sitrex tedder, 4-Star hydraulic fold; Deutz 2-Star tedder; International 35 rake. 315691-2927

Page 19 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 20

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

NEW SKID LOADER ATTACHMENTS: Buckets, Manure Forks, Pallet Forks, Bale Spears, Round Bale Grabbers, Feed Pushers, Adapter Plates, Skid Steer Hitch, 3pt. Bale Spears. Tire Replacements for tire scrapers. Truck Freight Available. MARTIN’S WELDING, 315531-8672

Smiley’s Equipment

Wood kicker wagon, 22’ on JD 1275 tandem gear, like new $2,650; Ficklin 185 gravity wagon, $2,750; 18’ steel side kicker wagon, $2,550. 607533-4850, 607-279-6232

NEW STEEL BALE WAGONS, all steel, 2”pressure treated floor, 9x8x18 w/wide track 8T gear, $3,950. 10 bale round bale carrier, 6x12”box beam, $3,299. Feeder wagons all sizes. 570-446-3170 NH 489 haybine, $2,000; Deutz Fahr KH500 tedder, $2,000, sell both for $3,000. 5’ rototiller, 3pt. hitch, $1,100; Kennco plastic mulch layer, $1,100; Craftsman 12” tablesaw, $150.00; Karcher pressure washer, $150.00; Mig welder, $325.00; Winco PTO generator, $325.00; chemical applicator for forage, $125.00. Agway rear-tine rototiller, $150.00; antique power hacksaw, $150.00; electric bug zapper, $125.00. 518-8531454

800-836-2888 To Place Your Classified Ad

800-836-2888

800-836-2888

July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Just Ask For Peggy or send her an e-mail at:

classified@leepub.com

PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

Maine e To o North Carolina

HAYING EQUIPMENT NH hay rake, $1,500; tedder, $850; NH tedder, $1,250; JD hay rake, $1,200; like new JD round baler, all the bells & whistles, $17,500; Hesston round baler, $2,500; NH round baler, $2,000; JD square baler, $1,500; NH square baler, $1,250; York rake, $400; hay wagons, $850 up; JD discbine, $7,000; Kuhn discbine, $3,500. Post diggers & pounders, $350 up; 2-3-4 bottom land plows, $200 up; harrows, $150 up; 3pt. and tow behind disc’s, $450 up; brush hogs, $300 up; finishing mowers, 3pt., $350 up. JD dozer, 6 way blade, $9,000; 4x4 tractor with cab, $9,000; JD 4x4 ldr., $7,500; Ford 4x4 compact, $4,500; Hitachi excavator, $10,500; MM excavator, $12,500; Case backhoe, $5,000; MF backhoe, $3,000; Case 1150C dozer, 6-way, $18,500; scraper blades, $200 up; Int. dump, $5,500; skid steer, $7,000; landscape trailers, $850; new 5 ton trailer, $5,000.

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293

WANTED TO BUY: John Deere tractors running, parts, or need of repair. Cash paid. Also 2 row corn planter in working condition. 518-6956180 WANTED TO BUY: Used farm & construction equipment, all makes and models, running or not, 1980’s & newer. Will 315777-2357

Fencing

Empire Farm Fence & Supply

“Miles of Quality Start Here”

• High Tensile • Split Rail • Misc. Types of Fence • Energizers • Fencing Supplies 4097 Rt. 34B, Union Springs, NY 13160 RUSTIN WILSON (315) 364-5240

WEILER’S GRAIN ROASTING

(315) 549-7081 FOR SALE: 1500 tons corn silage, 1500 tons haylage. All in Ag Bags. 607-565-9677

2033 Brothertown Road Deansboro, NY 13328 Phone: (315) 841-4910 Fax: (314) 841-4649 Hrs: Mon-Fri 8am-4pm; Sat. 8am-Noon Spring/Summer www.williamsfarmfence.com

williamsfence@gmail.com

Priefert Dog Kennels In Stock

Now carrying Agri-Dymanic organic minerals

~ Available Now ~

Buying Equipment Dead or Alive

518-634-2310

POST T POUNDER R FOR R RENT

30 Acres of Equipment

SPRAYER SALE

YOUR SOURCE FOR:

Hardi 500 Gallon Sprayer 45’ booms, hyd. up & down, fair shape $

$

2,500 OBO

250 Demco Sprayer 3pt. hitch, fair shape $

• Livestock Feeds • Ration Balancing • SeedWay Seeds • Crystalyx Products

3,000 OBO

Century 500 Gallon Sprayer 40’ booms, manual fold, nice shape

1,500 OBO

518-848-4669 USED BATWING MOWERS. Woods, Bushog, JD. Also 20% Discount on new Rhino mowers. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322

USED COMBINE PA R T S K & J SURPLUS LANSING, NY 607-279-6232 Days 607-533-4850 Nights

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

PleasantCreekHay.com

WANTED

Custom Roasting and Cooling Your Soybeans,Corn, etc. At Your Farm or Mill Serving All of NY State

Fencing

~ reels ~ poliwire ~ step in posts etc. ~ hi tensile ~ wire mesh ~ gates ~ split rail fencing ~ hay feeders ~ posts of all sizes ~ tools ~ cattle handling equipment ~ water tubs & valves ~ mineral feeders

WANTED

We could have finished paying for a Tractor, Mower & Baler in the last dry laps!

Farm Machinery Wanted

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

814-793-4293 WHITE 2-85, 85hp tractor w/full cab, like new rear rubber, looks great, runs great, has 8’ snowplow & Banford ditch-bank mower, will separate, $18,000 OBO, will consider guns in trade. 518-2834470

Tired of Playing Cowboy? Before

Buying Corn, Feed Wheat & Oats

WANTED: Working Barrel spreader; Cab door for Case tractor; Cutditioner drive line; Short grain elevator or conveyor. 315-855-4353

(315)) 549-82266

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Romulus, NY 14541

After

Pat O’Brien & Sons For all your feed needs! • Steam Flaked Corn • Protein Mixes

• Corn Meal • Minerals

• Energy Mixes • Nutritional Services

Pick-up or Delivery from our Geneva Feed Mill

We Buy All Grains! Call Pat @ 716-992-1111

Grain Roasting On Your Far m

Soybeans • Corn Barley • Wheat

Waterville Grain Roasting Oneida Co., NY

315-534-8948

Call now, Don’t get caught in the Fall rush!

Fence Built Your Way E & A Fence, LLC 518-993-5177

WANT TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD? CALL: 800-836-2888


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Fencing

Fish

ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180 LOCUST POSTS, POLES, Split Rails, 6x6’s, 4x4’s. Other hardwood & softwood boards and planks, custom cut. Also lots, land cleared, woodlots wanted. 518-883-8284

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

AG LIME HI-MAG

3 0 To n M i n i mu m Spreader & Spreading Available Large Quantity Discount ALSO BEDDING SAND & CHICKEN MANURE

Call T J Allen 315-845-6777 315-868-2438

HI-MAG LIME

FISH HATCHERY

Goats

Hay - Straw For Sale

Hay - Straw For Sale

FULLBLOOD BOER BUCK: Three years old, disbudded, proven sire, $350.00. Available 8/1/2012. 845-355-2718

4x4 ROUND BALES, Grass Hay, baled prior to June 20th, not wet. Organic Certified. $35.00 each. 607-849-3798

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

EARLY CUT JUNE HAY, no rain, good quality. 518-2842180

HAY SAVER Plus Hay Preservative, 68% Propionic Acid. 87¢ per pound. Product available in Waterloo, NY. Delivery Available. Conoy Ag, Elizabethtown, PA 717-367-5078

Falconwood Farms

MC 400 GRAIN DRYER with new 15hp motor; 36 Foot 6 inch transport auger; ONAN 20 generator. 315-337-5566

845-832-6086

NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

Generators

Hay - Straw For Sale

Live Fish for Ponds & Restaurants

NOBODY beats our prices on Voltmaster PTO Alternators, Sizes 12kw-75kw. Engines Sets and Portables Available.

STANTON BROTHERS 10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

518-768-2344

MOELLER SALES 1-800-346-2348

2011 BALEAGE CHEAP 250 Bales; Also Dry Hay, 50 round bales. Albany,NY area. James Frueh, 518-436-1050

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Delivered by the Truckload Also BEDDING

SAND

for Horse Arenas or Cattle FOB McConnellsville, NY Delivery Available

888-339-2900 ext. 10 SCHAFER LIQUID FISH FERTILIZER, 100% Organic OMRI listed. For pricing call WIGFIELD FARMS, Clyde, NY 14433, 315-727-3910

Financial Services

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS 315-923-9118

Clyde, NY

WE SPECIALIZE IN • Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

Contacts: Allen Hollenbach 610-929-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com

Delivery Available by the Semi Trailer Load

FOR SALE All Grades Hay & Straw Horse & Dairy Quality Bagged Shavings & Sawdust

WILL DELIVER

ROBERT ROLLE (518) 234-4052

GOOD QUALITY HAY & STRAW. Large Square Bales. Will load or ship direct. 802849-6266 HAY: SECOND CUT, $3.00 per bale. Selkirk, NY 518-3223633

Hay - Straw For Sale

2012 Contracts Now Available

We are producing a large quantity of dry round bales.

FOR SALE: Horse quality first & second cut grassy hay, big & small square bales. Delivered.-315-264-3900

Hay - Straw For Sale

The Best Method For Covering Hay Stacks

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

519-482-5365 LARGE SQUARE BALES, processed first & second cut. Call 802-864-5382 or 802578-7352

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

Call for Competitive Prices NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

519-529-1141

TOO MUCH HAY? Try Selling It In The

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

PROTECT YOUR FEED FROM THE WEATHER Save money in prevented feed losses & up to 5 seasons of use Large Inventory • Next Day Shipping

ROCKY MEADOW FARM

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW

Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment

We are Looking for Farms Who are Using and Buying Dry Hay

315-497-0095

Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted.

FARMERS

CF FARM LLC

Hay - Straw Wanted

Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

WANTED

HAY & STRAW

Trailer Load Lots Janowski Bros. 315-829-3794 315-829-3771

WANTED

Pre Cut Rye Straw 50 to 75 Lb. Bales

302-737-5117 302-545-1000 WANTED: 1st & 2nd cut big & small squares. 315-363-9105

Heating CENTRAL BOILER EClassic OUTDOOR FURNACES. Cleaner and Greener. 97% Efficient. EPA Qualified. Call North Creek Heat 315-8663698

800-836-2888 or email

classified@leepub.com

810 South 14th Ave., Lebanon, PA 17042

1-866-887-2727 • 1-717-228-2727 www.supertarp.com • rockymeadowfarm@evenlink.com

Hay - Straw Wanted

HAY * HAY * HAY 100% Alfalfa or Grass Mix 100-240 RFV

ALWAYS WANTED

Western * Organic * Conventional BEST QUALITY / PRICES / SERVICE We’re #1 - Financing Available WE DELIVER! Certified Organic Growers Association $50 CASH for REFERRALS

Call 4M FARMS 315-684-7570 • 315-559-3378

CALL RICK (815) 979-7070

TIMOTHY MIXED HAY ALFALFA MIXED HAY 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cuttings Also Small Square Mulch

HAY & STRAW

For Sale All Types Delivered Cell 717-222-2304 Growers, Buyers & Sellers

CENTRAL BOILER E-Classic OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES. Cleaner and Greener. 97% Efficient. EPA Qualified. Call today Halloran Farm 845-482-5208. Maximum efficiency. Lower emissions. Central Boiler OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE. EPA Qualified. Instant rebates up to $1,600! Call today! Border Drive Heating 570-537-2447

Page 21 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 22

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Assistant Dairy and Livestock Manager

DAIRY TECHNICIAN (HERDSMAN)

FARMER WANTED

HEAD FEEDER POSITION

Help manage all aspects of organic, 50-cow, grassbased dairy, beef and poultry operation on publicly accessible, diversified farm owned by Massachusetts non profit organization. Competitive salary and benefits, including housing.

Assist with all aspects of organic, 50-cow, grassbased dairy, beef and poultry operation on publicly accessible, diversified farm owned by Massachusetts non profit organization. Competitive salary and benefits, including housing.

Full job posting at: www.thetrustees.org

Full job posting at: www.thetrustees.org

Progressive Hudson Valley, New York family farm seeks self motivated individual with livestock, crop & machinery experience for daily operation and new projects. Valid drivers license, non-smoker, spanish speaking a plus, nice housing included, pay commensurate with skills.

Call

845-399-7847

WANTED: Ag Service Tech

Cazenovia Equipment Company, a premier John Deere Dealer is looking for experienced service technicians to join our team in any of our eleven locations in New York. The right candidate has strong mechanical skills, understands the performance of farm equipment and implements applications. The job requires computer knowledge and good communication skills. John Deere equipment repair knowledge and experience is a plus. Technicians have access to state-of-the-art computer diagnostic information, John Deere education programs, as well as performance incentive programs. Cazenovia Equipment offers competitive compensation package, 401K retirement program, employee discount, personal leave days many group employee benefits.

Apply now... Fax Resume to (315) 655-8433 Email Resume: jobs@cazequip.com

www.cazenoviaequipment.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

AGRICULTURAL SALES/ SERVICE OPPORTUNITY

Available on an Expanding 1,000 Cow Dairy in CNY A successful candidate will be a motivated individual who will be responsible for mixing and delivering a total mixed ration to the dairy herd as well as overseeing bunk management and feed equipment preventative maintenance. Experience operating machinery, a valid driver’s license, a willingness to learn, and a positive attitude are a must. Experience as a feeder is helpful, but we are willing to train the right person. Contact Chris At 315-729-3186 after 7PM A job description is available upon request

Genex Cooperative, Inc. seeks team members with dairy or business experience for a Breeding Program Specialist position in Eastern New York.

Apply online at: crinet.com or call Jim Vitale at 315-730-6455, email jvitale2@crinet.com

Working knowledge of dairy genetic & reproductive programs required. Fast-paced, physically demanding on-farm work environment. Flexible work schedule, full benefits.

Apply online at: crinet.com or call Dan Cerretani at 607-423-5341, email dcerretani@crinet.com

EXPERIENCED D AGRICULTURE E TECHNICIAN N AND/OR R CONSTRUCTION N TECHNICIAN wanted to fill immediate opening at our St. Johnsville or Richfield Springs locations. Full time position with excellent pay and benefits. Please send resume to: sspringersinc@roadrunner.com Or apply within at either: Springer’s Inc, 55 West Main St. Richfield Springs or 7403 State Hwy 5, St. Johnsville

Logging Equipment

Herdsman Wanted:Jasper Hill Farm seeks a candidate to help grow our farmstead cheese business. Responsibilities include managing the herd health and breeding programs for our herd of 45 registered Ayrshire cows, milking and raw product quality oversight, management of farm operations including wheyfed pork production, field work and staff supervision. Dairy experience required. Competitive pay. Contact: Emily 802-533-2566 x106 or work@cellarsatjasperhill.com

FOR SALE: Valby CH260 3pt. hitch wood chipper, will handle 10” diameter log, over $20,000 new, sell for $8,800 OBO. 607-746-7708

Hoof Trimming DAN & JEN WILLIAMS HOOF TRIMMING • 28 Years Experience • VET RECOMMENDED • 607-591-0885 DON’S HOOF TRIMMING: Maintain herd health. Sore feet a specialty. Vet recommended. Quality, experience, will travel. 518-6732577 leave message.

Working knowledge of dairy genetic & reproductive programs required. Fast-paced, physically demanding on-farm work environment. Flexible work schedule, full benefits.

AGRICULTURAL SALES/ SERVICE OPPORTUNITY Genex Cooperative, Inc. seeks team members with dairy or business experience for Breeding Program Specialist positions in New York's Finger Lakes region.

Help Wanted

Herd Health

J&S LEONARD HOOF TRIMMING. 20 Years of Experience. Sore Feet - My Specialty. 607-264-8004

Herd Health

Herd Health

Every Cow Every Freshening DR. REGISTER Jump Start & Nia Plus Drenchs Remember that 1 cow that didn't eat after freshening? Remember that 1 cow that didn't take off well or had a DA? Remember that 1 cow that retained? ... and she cost you time, money and lost milk? Save yourself the time, money and get healthier cows Dr. Register Drench... Every fresh cow, every time. Avoid "that 1 cow".

June Dairy Month Special On Now • 1-866-737-6273

Help Wanted

Horses

Country Folks’

Based in Western NY. Experience Needed. Must have Ag background.

315-567-9308

MINI DONKEY BABIES: 3 spotted, 1 black woolly. All very friendly and gentle. 315-655-3990

Jewelers Beautiful Custom Designed Gold or Silver Masonic Rings. Made by a Brother for a Brother. Jonathan’s Jewelry, 417B East Main Street, North Wilksboro, NC 28659. Phone 336667-0144

Classifieds

800-836-2888

Full Time Position Available

Subcontractors and gain your financial independence! We are seeking Diesel Engine Mechanics, Herdsman, Milkers, Milker Helpers, Baler Operators, Equipment Operator 1’s, Equipment Operator II’s, Certified Pesticide Applicators, Picker’s Planter’s Pruners and weeder’s, Horseman, Grooms, Kennel Attendants and City-Farm Managers 720+ Part-time, Full time and Seasonal Positions in 60 Cities We hope by 9/1/2012 to be able to launch in time for Fall Harvest The first temp agency to specialize in providing Skilled sub-contractor’s specific to Agriculture Admin@PleasantCreekHayEmploymentServices.com

Horses 3 YEAR OLD Standard bred mare, boy’s horse, needs work. 315-823-3017

Actually across the nation! Sign up to become one of

PleasantCreekHayEmploymentServices.com’s CDL-A-Drivers

BAILLIE LUMBER CO. buys all species of hardwood veneer logs, sawlogs and standing timber year round. IMMEDIATE LOCAL PAYMENT AND TRUCKING AVAILABLE. Please call for an updated price and spec sheet today! Smyrna Sawmill 607-627-6547. Mark Mowrey 315-796-6644; Phil Day 315436-2766; Jonathan DeSantis 315-882-8174; Sean Karn 315-436-3588. Boonville Sawmill 315-942-5284. Dave Prezyna 315-436-5329; Paul Snider 315-827-4062 (home) or 315-436-0949 (cell); Tom King 315-436-0936; Lukas Myers 315-263-6909. LOCUST 4x4’s, fence posts, split rails, lumber. Natural, chemical free non poisonous alternative to pressure treated that has strength and lasts a lifetime. 518-883-8284

Maine to North Carolina It’s Independence Day For Feed Deliveries

Lumber & Wood Products

800-836-2888

July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Get Results

FOR YOU!


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

EARLY ADVERTISING DEADLINE Tuesday, July 3rd For as little as $8.25 - place a classified ad in

Country Folks

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888

or 518-673-0111

or email classified@leepub.com Parts

Poultry & Rabbits

Real Estate For Sale HUNTERS PARADISE: 130 acres, 45 tillable on New York Canadian border, 5 bedroom, 2-1/2 bath house. 518-4830577

Well Kept 100 Acre Horse Farm In Schoharie County, close to NYS Thruway. 3 BR., 2 ba. Farm house with recent updates. 30x160 barn, 8 stalls, tack room & hay storage. Paddocks with fencing. Gently rolling open and wooded farm land. $395,000

Call Debbie Stanton

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED

518-573-2693

Realty USA Cobleskill

PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

Cornish Cross Broilers & Colored Broilers (7 Meat Varieties)

Extremely hearty & perfect for free range Layer Chicks, Turkeys Ducklings, Guineas, Much More

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

(814) 539-7026

607-642-3293

www.myerspoultry.com

THANKSGIVING TURKEYS TIME TO ORDER BB/White Day Old $3.50 Broilers & Guineas Too

COOPERS ARK FARM

Parts & Repair

518-295-7662 6 AM to 7 PM

ZERO

Real Estate For Sale

BULK TANK REPAIR PARTS

315-364-8452

FA I R H AV E N V E R M O N T DAIRY FOR SALE. 200+ cow capacity, approx. 400 acres, Double 8 parlor, two houses & one trailer, $750,000 bare. Equipment & cattle available. Call 860-836-1524

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

For All Makes & Models

MARSHALL ELECTRIC Venice Center, NY

Van Billings Real Estate, LLC Van Billings, Broker/Owner

14 S. Main St., Dolgeville, NY 13329

315-429-0300

www.vanbillingsrealestate.com Exeter - 153 Acres - $489,600 Dairy Farm in need of New Owner. 153+ acres of tillable and pasture with small trout stream. 130 stanchion barn, with most milking equipment. 36x72 Machine pole barn. Older home needs additional work. Fences good. Barn holds 20,000 bales. Additional acres available. Adjacent acreage: 114 Ac, $285,000 & 184 Ac, $460,000

Oppenheim - 37.1 Acres - $110,000 Beautiful old multi-level barn would make an excellent home. A drilled well, 2 septics and electricity already on the property. 37.1 acres of nice farmland, great hayfields, beautiful and magnificent distant views all makes a perfect spot for a retreat.

Fairfield - 200+ Acres - $589,000 Amazing Victorian Farm - Restored 3000 sq. ft., 4 BR, 3.5 bath home on 200 mostly tillable acres. Huge Barn, Large Equipment Building. Home features oak & pine floors, high ceilings, large gracious rooms, impeccably maintained. Fields are worked by local farmers, views are wonderful. Additional 47 Acres available.

Real Estate For Sale

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

(607)) 334-97277 Celll 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.net possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2321 1 - Oneidaa Countyy farm m with Partially New home. Situated on a quiet road. 70 acres of land 35 tillable good well drained soils, 20 acres in fence, balance woods some timber lots of fire wood. Good 2 story 50 stall dairy barn. 30x100 machinery shed, 24x40 calf and heifer barn, 24x36 machinery shop building. New 2 story home with 5 bdrms just built needs some finishing touch. This farm would make a good little dairy or beef farm with lots of land close by to rent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $225,000 8 - Oneidaa Countyy - 258 8 acree dairyy farm,, 80 ac tillable, 2308 good well drained flat ground all in hay. Balance woods and pasture. Nice 56 stall 2 story dairy barn, enclosed manure room, 2" pipeline milking system. Big mangers, high ceilings, nice barn to work in. Good 2 story remodeled 6 bdrm, 3 bath, new kitchen and baths; a very well maintained home. 3 out buildings for machinery storage and young stock. Year round trout stream. Excellent deer and turkey hunting. Would make a nice farm to milk a small dairy or would be excellent for beef or horses. Lots of additional land to rent for little or nothing. Nice area to live, hiking, skiing, and snowmobile trails close by. Farm is priced to sell . . . . . . . Askingg $429,000.. That's $1,662 per acre with good buildings.

2330 0 - Chenango o Countyy Hobbyy Farm.. 45 acres located on a quiet road. 15 tillable acres all in hay, 10 in pasture, balance woods. Some timber, lots of firewood. Good 2 story 34x80 barn with drive in mow, lean to on the back for a run in shed. Lots of room for hay storage and box stalls. Good solid barn. New 30x40 pole barn for equipment. Partially remodeled 2 story 5 bdrm home. New windows and vinyl siding. Oil hot water baseboard heat. This would make a nice little farm to raise beef or horses. Pasture for grazing and hay fields for making hay. Woods offer plenty of firewood and some timber. Excellent hunting. Barn has plenty of room for young stock and hay storage. Nice location close to shopping, hospitals, schools. Owners are retiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Askingg $189,000 2323 3 - Chenango o Countyy Gentleman'ss Farm.. A neat and clean little farm of 8 acres of land consisting of 6 acres in fields. Balance woods. 2 story barn with a drive in mow. Stalls for 15 head of cattle and two box stalls for horses and chickens. 2 stall shop and garage building with power; side addition for additional storage. Good 3 bdrm farm house in great shape with decent sized rooms with hardwood flooring throughout. Wood and oil combination furnace. Spring dug well, excellent water and lots of it. Taxes $2,700 total per year. This farm would make a great little farm to have a large garden, raise a couple beef cows or a horse or two, have your own chickens. Farm Fresh food. Be selfsufficient, live off the land. Schools, shopping and hospitals all within minutes. Very nice area of Central NY. Owners are retiring. Farm reasonably priced to sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$89,000 2337 7 - 137 7 acree parcell off baree land.. Located mins south of Utica, NY. 30 acres in fields rented to local farmer. 20 acres of pasture balance woods. 2 man-made stocked fish ponds. Lots of deer and turkey. Property would make an excellent place to build or have for the weekend. Property is mins from the Brookfield Equine Trail System. Priced right . . . . . . . .Askingg $195,000. Note** Ownerr woulld considerr holdingg a largee mortgage h a qualified d buyer. with

Page 23 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 24

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com

Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes

Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes

CAMPER FOR SALE

Roofing

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

ROOFING & SIDING e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

Services Offered CANVAS PRINTS: All sizes. Mounted or Unmounted. Just bring in or send us your photo at Lee Publications. Call 518673-0101 bsnyder@leepub.com

WEDDING INVITATIONS printed and designed by Lee Publications: 100 (4.5x6) Invitations including envelopes with 100 RSVP postcards. Only $150.00 +tax. We can also do smaller and larger amounts. Call for pricing and designs 518-673-0101, or bsnyder@leepub.com Also Save the Dates • Shower Invitations • Baby Announcements and more.

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

New Stave Silos

• New Stave Silos

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

For All Your Automation and Filling Needs Call:

Center State Ag. Service Morrisville, New York

315-684-7807

JAMESWAY & VAN DALE

Equipment, Parts & Service Authorized Harvestore & Laidig Dealer Sales, Service-Repair

PATZ DEALER Parts-Sales-Service

VALMETAL DEALER Sales-Service-Parts

DAIRYMASTER DEALER

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

St. Lawrence Silo Service

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ## # # # # ## ## # #

#93-A - HUNTING CLUB SPECIAL!!! 716 ACRES IN ADIRONDACK PARK Great for recreation - all wooded with creeks & ponds throughout property - great hunting and fishing - hunting cabin - logging road thru middle of property 4-wheeler trails thru property - Town of Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Price $798,000 REDUCED TO $494,000 93-B - Great property for hunting & fishing is joined on its northern border by 93A, it’s mostly wooded, 475 acres with creek going thru - road goes by east end of property & log road thru west end - mostly level with hills on east end. Located in Town of Ohio, Herkimer Co., southern part of Adirondack Park, Poland School District - Priced to sell fast at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$327,750 93-C - Another great property for hunting & trout fishing is joined by 93-B on the east - mostly wooded, 157 acres, log road thru property, trout stream going thru center of property. Sale price . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$108,330 93-D - 574 ACRES OF LAND BORDERS 93-A - great for recreation and hunting - mostly wooded, creeks & ponds - trees marked for cutting with over ONE MILLION BOARD FEET OF LUMBER. Priced at . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$575,000 93-A + 93-B + 93-C + 93-D form a square of 1,922 acres. This great piece of property in the Adirondack Park joined together sells for . . . . . . . . . $1,504,080 C-83 - Cape Cod Style Home situated on 4.4 acres along East Canada Creek. This country nestled property consists of 8 rm., 3BR, 1 1/2 bath, first floor laundry room; lg. sunroom; forced air furnace, generous windows that provide natural lighting, and hardwood floors. 30x44 Steel barn in pasture area ideal for storage or small livestock housing. This home has not been updated. Basement has petitioned off rooms and walk-out outside entrance. . . . . . . . . .Asking $88,500 C-17 - Wood lot w/5.35 acres on the edge of the Adirondack Park located on paved road w/electricity - property has never been logged - very clear brook trout stream running thru property - small hunting cabin - great location for fishing & hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$33,000

Roofing

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ## # # # # # # #

• Stave Replacement • Silo Retensioning • Shotcrete Relining • Footer Repairs • Fill Systems • Silo Parts • Chute Repairs CALL FOR ESTIMATE

(315) 393-3399 Lisbon, NY 13658 www.slsilo.com

# # # # # # # # #Mixers, # # Stationary # # # & #Trailer # # #

FREE: 18x50 Concrete Silo. You tear down and remove. Call 607-336-5151

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

# # #

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

MID-STATE TECH INC. 6024 Greene Rd. Munnsville, NY

315-495-6506 315-404-6721 David Stanek

 Fan us on Facebook

facebook.com/countryfolks OR visit our website at www.countryfolks.com

Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

Pre-Owned Tanks & Silos NRCS Approved Slurry Storage Systems

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

New Conventional Silos

Silo Repair

Silo Unloaders Van Dale Jamesway Patz FULL LINES N-TECH NORBCO RISSLER Conveyors & Carts GRAETZ LAIDIG All Silo Repairs Conveyors & Mixers Utility Augers

Hammer Mills

Specializing In: • New Silos Available • Stave Replacement • Plaster • Chutes • Pipes • Distributors • Roofs • Takedowns & Rebuilds • Retightening Older Silos Over 35 Years Experience

Ed Rocker

607-334-5194 Norwich, NY

Hill Top Tire

402 State Hwy 163 Fort Plain, NY

(518)) 993-2235 www.hilltoptire.net

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Trailers

Tires & Tire Repair Service

COMPLETE LINE OF ADAM LIVESTOCK TRAILERS 12’ TO 24’ ADAM & COTNER HORSE TRAILERS Also

Flatbed Trailers

AIRPLANE TIRES 14”-50” used & recapped, 34ply, custom rims available. Hill Top Tire, State Hwy. 163, Fort Plain, NY 518-993-2235

LIKE NEW 20’ Featherlite aluminum gooseneck stock trailer, center gate. 315-826-3290

Tractors, Parts & Repair

Tractors, Parts & Repair

TRACTOR PARTS NEW & USED

• We Have Over 8000 Parted Tractors • Many Late Models • New & Used Parts • UPS Daily *Nationwide parts locating service*

Anderson Tractor Supply Inc. 20968 TR51 • Bluffton, OH 45817

800-391-5462

PARTS •

PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS

PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS

5th Wheel Camper, 33’ Challenger by Damon, awning, satellite TV, rear kitchen, microwave, range w/oven, bedroom w/queen size bed, couch folds out to queen size bed and table folds down to child’s size bed, air conditioning, kitchen & living room slide-out. Very clean. Asking $10,000 or Best Offer. Call 732-323-8223 or 732-606-7593 Camper is in Stamford, NY

NORTHEAST SILO DEMO: Need a cheap, quick & easy way to get your silo down? Will travel, give us a call. 518568-3560

REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR

TRACTION & FLOTATION

607-898-9558

# # # # # # # # # # #stalls # #& parlor # # # # #

#

Radial 240-R4TM Truck Tire 22.5 Available

Dryden, NY 13053

of # # # # # VENTILATION # # # # # # #We # carry # #a full # line # # # # All # Types # # of#Systems # # # milking # # # # # #for#tie# # equipment SILO REPAIRS - Blower Pipe, Vinyl & Steel, Distributors, Silo Hoppers, Poly Chute Hoppers, Chute Replacements, # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Chute Liner, Klean Chute Tubing, Wood Doors # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # WOOD CONVEYORS - Single & Double Chain, # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Taper Board Feeders

Tires & Tire Repair Service

B&G Trailer Sales

# # # # # # # # # #Sales-Service-Parts # # # # # # # #

PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS • PARTS

July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Trailers

Trailers

CIRCLE L TRAILER SALES

TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

All Aluminum Horse & Livestock Trailers Starting at

7,495

$

Trucks 2003 FREIGHT LINER FL50 18 foot aluminum bed. 315729-5347

Trucks

Trucks

1999 Freightliner FL106 300 Series 60 Detroit, 9 Speed, 54,000 GVW, Air Ride, No Rust, Cheap! Priced To Sell Or Trade

1996 Peterbilt 378 425 Cat, Jake, 9 Speed Transmission, Air Ride, Very Clean, Cheap!

1991 Kenworth W-900 460 Cummins, Jake, 18 Spd. Transmission, 18,000 Front, 46,000 Rears, Hendrickson Walking Beam, Double Frame, No Rust Priced To Sell Or Trade

2005 Kenworth T-800 Low Miles, 475 Cat, Jake, 14,600 Front, 46,000 Full Locking Rears, 18 Speed, Wet Line, Air Ride, Aluminum Wheels, Very Clean Priced To Sell Or Trade

Priced To Sell Or Trade

NEW Steel Livestock Trailers Bumper Pulls Starting at $4,095 Goosenecks at $5,800 ALSO Aluminum Skin & Steel Horse Trailers In Stock

ADVANTAGE TRUCKS (716) 685-6757

ALSO

UTILITY • CARGO MACHINERY • HYDRAULIC DUMP LANDSCAPE TRAILERS

www.advantagetrucks.com

Large Selection at All Times M-F 9-4 • Sat 9-3

3032 State Hwy 30 Gloversville, NY 12078

518-661-5038 FAX 661-6658

Wanted WANTED TO BUY: Old Grit newspapers (not the Grit magazine). 518-568-5115

Calendar of Events EAST

Trailers

Trailers

Horse • Livestock • Dump • Cargo Equipment • Landscape • Motorcycle Snowmobile • ATV • Car and More

Trailer Parts & Towing Accessories

Route 12, North Norwich, NY

Trucks

Trucks

1984 Polar 9,000 Gallon 1970 Custom 9,000 Gallon 1966 Fruehauf 8,250 Gallon Center fill, 8” booms, 22’ long, can field spread, unload in 4 min.

Chuck Hainsworth at 585-734-3264

Martin’s Farm Trucks, LLC

Trucks for All Your Needs - Specializing in Agri-Business Vehicles

2003 Mack RD688S Tractor, 2009 Mack Granite GU713 Cab and Chassis, Mack MP8 455hp, Jake, AI-350HP, Jake, 18 spd, Camelback, Dbl Frame, Wet Line, 14/48 Axles, 18 spd, 18/58 Axles, Camelback, WB170”, 225K Mi. $34,500 Double Frame, 141K Mi. $79,500

888-497-0310

NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

Apr 18 - Nov 14 Groundswell’s Sustainable Farming Certificate Program Now Accepting Applications For aspiring and beginning farmers and market gardeners, providing 124 hours of classroom training, hands on workshops, farm visits and supervised work experience on sustainable farms. Tuition is on a sliding scale and ranges from $125 to $800, with substantial support offered to people of color, new immigrant & limited resource trainees. Applications are now online. Visit www.groundswellcenter.org to learn more and apply today. Jul 5, Sep 6, Oct 4, Nov 1 & Dec 6 Maple Training Webinars 7-8 pm. Webinar connection details are available at http://maple.dnr.cornell.ed u/webinar.html A high speed internet connection is necessary to participate. Access is free of charge. No preregistration is required. Contact Stephen Childs, email slc18@cornell.edu. Jul 7 Cayuga County Fair Open Meat Goat Show Weedsport, NY. Contact Kay Kotwica, 315-889-5333 or email kotland@dreamscape.com Jul 7 Sullivan County CCE Golf Classic Swan Lake Golf and Country Club, Swan Lake, NY. 11 am. Rain date of July 8. All funds raised will benefit Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County. If you would like to become a sponsor, donate a raffle prize or play in our event please contact us at 845-292-6180 ext. 128, or go to our website at

Trucks

1986 Mack Superliner RW713 350 12 speed, 16/44k axles, 24.5 wheels. $8,000

Trucks

1988 Peterbilt 379 Rolloff, 350 Big Cam Cummins, 13 Spd, Air Ride, Aluminum Wheels. $16,500

1999 International 2554 DT466E, Allison 3560MD automatic, Pitman Pole Cat M-50 with auger and winch. Will separate. $9,500

1998 Custom Flatbed Trailer, 5th wheel, tandem axle, 30’ deck, 5’ beavertail. $3,750

1980 Mack RD686 285, 6 speed, 16’ farm body. Will separate. $8,500

2002 Ford F350 Super Duty 7.3I power stroke, auto, 71,000 miles, good tires, mechanics body. $7,500

1997 Ford L8000 Cummins motor, 8 speed, 15’ of frame

13’6” Polished Aluminum Dump Body comes with hoist. $5,000

WE DELIVER

“Exporters Welcome”

www.sullivan.cce.org for more information. Jul 8 ASA Barbeque & Bands Washington County Fairground, Greenwich, NY. 4-8 pm. Tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for children under 15 and children 5 and under are free. Tickets are available for purchase online at www.agstewardship.org and advance reservation is required by July 2. Jul 8 Brunswick Grange Tailgate Sale and Farmers Market Schaghticoke Fairgrounds, Rt. 67 & 40, Schaghticoke, NY. 7 am - 2 pm. Contact Alice Grimsley, 518-2799113. Jul 9 Retirement Celebration! The Ag Resource Center in the Upstairs Meeting Room, 9219 Route 487, Dushore, PA. Two long time Sullivan County Extension co-workers are retiring. Come celebrate the retirement of Rick Smith, County Extension Director and Peggy Molyneux, 4-H Secretary. They have a combined 63 years of service. Open house to honor them and to welcome the public to our new office space. Retirement Donations will be accepted for 4H Camp Scholarships (Checks made payable to S.C. Ext. Program Acct.) and for the 4-H/ Extension Memorial Scholarship (Checks Payable to the award) No gifts please. All are welcome. Call 570-9288941. Jul 12-13 Forest Pest Survey Project Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County. The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) and Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) are non-native invasive insects that were accidentally introduced and have subsequently killed millions of trees in the United States. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County in partnership with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets is conducting a volunteer training and survey project to help determine if these insects are in the

Many New and Used Feed and Gravel Bodies

Call Us With Your Used Parts Needs - Many Hydraulic Parts in Stock

DERBY Y TRUCK K PARTS 802-673-8525 Days • 802-895-2961 Eves www.derbytruckparts.com greater Binghamton area. A volunteer training will be held at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Broome County on Thursday, July 12, from 1-4 p.m. The following day, Friday, July 13, the trained volunteers will conduct ALB/EAB surveys in the Binghamton area. Call 607584-9966. On Internet at mailto: clf62@cornell.edu Jul 14 Renewable Energy workshop Morrisville State College’s Renewable Energy Training Center (RETC), Morrisville, NY. The workshop is $30. Participants will earn 7 professional development hours (PDH) and 7 continuing education units (CEU). Call 315684-6391 or e-mail retc@morrisville.edu. On Internet at http:// retc.morrisville.edu Jul 15 Ice Cream Social Millers Mills Grange. Visit their website for more information. On Internet at www.millersmillsny.com Jul 17 New York Weed Science Field Day • 8 am - 5 pm - H.C. Thompson Research Farm, Freeville, NY •12-5 pm - Musgrave Research Farm, Aurora, NY. Contact Maxine Welcome at 607-255-5439, mw45@ cornell.edu (Vegetables) or Mary McKellar at 607-2552177, mem40 @cornell.edu.

Jul 17 Pond Management Workshop Lacroix Family Pond, 205 Old Cambridge Rd., off from State Route 372, Greenwich, NY. 6-8 pm. Rain or shine. Light refreshments. Please visit Ag Stewardship and Washington County Soil and Water Conservation District websites for updates on this upcoming workshop at www.agstewardship.org and www.washingtonsountys wcd.org, or you can call SWCD at 518-692-9940 ext. 3 and ASA at 518-692-7285. Jul 18 Aurora Farm Field Day Musgrave Research Farm, Aurora, NY. 9 am - 3 pm. Contact Mary McKellar, email mem40@cornell.edu. Jul 20-21 2012 Summer Tree Farm Tour Empire Evergreens, 766 Addison Rd., Painted Post, NY. Registration begins at 8 am each day. On Friday night, there will be a cash bar with 20 plus vendors in the trade show area, and a chicken BBQ. Attendees can save money by registering by June 11. Registration includes admission to all sessions and the trade show area, workshop materials and morning refreshments. Lunch is available both days with advance ticket purchase or bring your own. A registration form can be downloaded from the Associ-

Page 25 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 26 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Trucks

Trucks

Trucks

CALEDONIA DIESEL, LLC TRUCK & EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE “The Diesel People!”

2905 Simpson Rd., Caledonia, NY

585-538-4395 • 1-800-311-2880 Since 1982

Just 1 mile south of Route 20 on 36 south

2006 Kenworth W900 Daycab - HEAVY SPECS! Cat C15 550hp, 18 speed, 29k front axle, 46k full locking rears, 245” wheelbase, polished aluminum wheels, 24.5 rubber at 95% $57,900

2005 Mack CL733 Daycab HEAVY SPECS! Cummins 500hp, 18 speed, 20k front, 46k full locking rears, double frame, 210” wheelbase, 338k miles $49,500

2001 Freightliner FL112 Flatbed, Cummins ISM 400hp, 10 speed, 297,800 miles, 26’ deck with ratchet straps and Moffet lift truck mounts $22,900 (Also 1999 IH w/22’ deck available)

2002 Kenworth T800 Daycab Cat C12 445hp, 10 speed, 179” wheelbase, 13,200# front axle, 46k rears, air ride, 456k miles $34,500

PRICE REDUCED! 1998 IH 2674 Cab and Chassis, Cat C10 320hp, 10 speed, aux. drive, double frame, 46k rears, 14k front, 176k miles. 21’8” of frame behind the cab, 193” C-T, rubber 75% $18,500

2009 Hyundai HL740-7A ONLY 729 HOURS! 2.7 CY GP Bucket, 20.5-25 Michelins at 75%, Cab with heat and AC $89,900

Please check our Web site @ www.caledoniadiesel.com

PRICE REDUCED! 1999 IH 9400 Daycab w/Wetline, Cummins N14 460hp, 10 speed, 14,000# front axle, 46k rears, 206” wheelbase, air ride, very good condition $24,500

2004 Cat 988G Cab with heat and AC, 9 CY spade nose rock bucket, rubber very good, 16,345 hours $199,000

Calendar of Events ation website at www. christmastreesny.org or call the CTFANY office at 607535-9790. Jul 21 Tree Farm Field Day Eagleville Gap, Blanchard, PA. 10 am - 3 pm. Questions? Program Details Contact: John Hoover, Tree Farmer 203-736-4385 or johnwhoover@msn.com. Registration information contact: Dave Jackson, Forest Resources Educator, Penn State Extension of Centre County at 814-3554897 or drj11@psu.edu. The registration page can be downloaded at http:// patreefarm.org/wpcontent/uploads/2012/01/ Hoover-Tree-Farm-FieldDay-Brochure-7-12.pdf. Jul 21 Summer Hopyard Tour & Picnic 4808 Davis Rd, Union Springs, NY. We’ll have virus indexed stock plants on site for sale! Cascade, Newport,

2008 Mac 34’ Aluminum Dump Trailer Good condition, 66” sides x 96 wide, air ride, aluminum wheels $31,900

HOPPER BOTTOM TRAILERS Many units in stock 1998 TO 2008, All with Shur-Lok tarp systems PRICES STARTING AT $19,500

Williamette, Perle, Fuggle & Liberty varieties at $5 per plant (trays of 12) $25 for NeHA members, $35 for non NeHA members. Register online at: http:// hopmeadowfarmes2.eventbri te.com/ On Internet at http://hopmeadow farmes2.eventbrite.com/ Jul 25-31 Managing the Biology of a Grazing System Marvin Moyer’s Farm, Lainhart Rd., Owego NY. 10 am - 3 pm. A view of what is going on beneath the sod of a grazing farm and how to maximize the biology potential for cycling nutrients which feed the plants. RSVP requested to help plan lunch. Contact Sharon VanDeuson, 607-7535078 or shv7@cornell.edu Jul 27 Farm On? Feast On! with Chef David Burke Copake Country Club, 44 Golf Course Rd., Copake, NY. 6 pm. A benefit for the Friends of the Farmer Farm On Scholarship Fund benefiting our programming for continued studies in Agricultural Sciences with Cornell Cooperative Extension, QuestarIII and 4-H. Tickets available online $150 for

2006 Volvo VHD Tri-Axle Dump, Volvo 395hp, 8LL, 200k miles, 16’ steel body with tarp, 20k front axle, 46k rears $62,500 (Also 2002 Available)

(Qty. 5) Osh Kosh 6x6 Cab and Chassis, Average 65K Miles, Cummins ISM 330HP, 10 Spd, 18’ 8” of Frame, 132” C-T, 20K Front Axle, 46K Full Locking Rears $39,000 Each

Dinner, Local Libations, Full Moon “Midnight” Local Poached Fruit Sundae Bar Bonfire, Music and Dancing! Can’t come? Sponsor an Agriculture Student in your name for $100. Questions: Contact info@friendsofthe farmer.com or call 518-3259437. Jul 28 CCE Open House Madison County Fairgrounds, Morrisville NY. 11 am - 4 pm. Watch our website for more events and details at www.madison countycce.org. Free family event.. Call 315-684-3001. Jul 28 Madison County 4-H Youth Fair Fairgrounds in Morrisville, NY. 11 am. Free Family Event.. On Internet at www.madisoncountycce.org Jul 28-29 NYS Boer Goat Show NYS fairgrounds, Syracuse, NY. Contact Kay Kotwica, 315-889-5333 or e-mail kotland@dreamscape.com. Aug 4 Down on the Farm Day 139 Callicoon Center Rd., Jeffersonville, NY. 10:30 am

- 3 pm. This year’s event will be hosted by the Moran Family of Stonewall Farms and the Likel Road Facility. Contact Elizabeth Higgins, 845-292-6180. Aug 14-16 Ag Progress Days 9 miles SW of State College, PA. Admission and parking are free. Call 814-865-2081. Aug 17 Grown on Long Island Day More information to come as the date gets closer. To receive email updates regarding events, visit www.lifb.com and click on “join our free e-mail list.” Vendors will be contacted in late April or early May. Contact Long Island Farm Bureau, 631-727-3777. Aug 18 Pre-Harvest Tour & Picnic Braunius Hop Farm, 140 Quinlog Rd. Mt. Vision, NY 13810. 2-6PM $25 for NeHA members, $35 for non NeHA members Register online at http://brauniushopfarm.eve ntbrite.com/ On Internet at http://brauniushopfarm.eve ntbrite.com/ Aug 20 & 22, Sep 17 & 19 Defensive Driving Courses Arkell Center, Canajoharie, NY. • Aug 20 & 22: 1-4 pm. • Sept. 17 & 19: 5:30-8:30 pm. $20/person. All classes will be held in the Community Room of Arkell Center. Upon completion, individuals qualify for a NY ate point & insurance reduction certificate which will be mailed to them. Payment required in the form of a check or money order made payable to The Shults Agency or cash - paid on the day of the first class. Bring your drivers license.. Contact Joam Cimino, 518673-4408, leave your name and phone number. Aug 25 Golf Tournament and Silent Auction Cronin’s Golf Course Warrensburg, NY. 9:30 am. $75/player, includes green fees, cart and BBQ. Contact Amy Sabattis, 518-623-3291 or e-mail als77@cornell.edu. Sep 2 New York State Fair Open Meat Goat Show NYS fairgrounds, Syracuse, NY. Contact Kay Kotwica, 315-889-5333 or e-mail kotland@dreamscape.com. On Internet at www. nysfair.org/competitions Sep 15-20 The 49th All American Dairy Show Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center, Harrisburg, PA. Featuring 23 shows in six days, including four full days dedicated to youth shows and more than 2,400 animals shown by nearly 1,000 exhibitors from across the nation. Call 717787-2905. On Internet at www.allamerican.state.pa.us Sep 29-30 NYS Jack Frost Classic Boer NYS fairgrounds, Syracuse, NY. Contact Kay Kotwica, 315-889-5333 or e-mail kotland@dreamscape.com. On Internet at www. esmgpa.org

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1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week 1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week Oct 2 Building a Strong Management Team Alliant Energy Center, 1919 Alliant Energy Center Way, Madison, WI (Mendota 2 meeting room). 1 pm. Dr. Bernard Erven will outline the three critical steps in forming an effective management team. Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1). On Internet at www.worlddairyexpo.com

Oct 3 Avoiding Drug Residues in the Dairy Industry Alliant Energy Center, 1919 Alliant Energy Center Way, Madison, WI (Mendota 2 meeting room). 11 am. Dr. Geof Smith will discuss these critical points and give an overview of how drug residue testing in milk and meat is implemented in the US. Continuing Education Credits: ARPAS (1), RACE (1). On Internet at www.worlddairyexpo.com


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Farm Weekly Newspapers - since 1972, serving fulltime farmers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic market areas. The number one agricultural publication in this market! Target your audience with 4 regional editions. Monthly Equine Publication Covering New York, New England, Northern Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Reaching the horseowners in this market area as the official publication of over 25 Associations. since 1979, serving heavy construction contractors, landscaping, aggregate producers and recyclers in the Northeast and MidAtlantic Markets every month. Qualified readership is guaranteed to get you results. Country Folks

since 1990, serving the commercial greenhouses, vegetable and fruit growers, and nurseries in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Northwest market areas. Reach your target audience with this monthly publication that is by far the number one media for these industries. Is our newest publication. Started in 2011 to serve an important and growing segment of horticulture, this newspaper is targeted at businesses active in commercial scale growing and winemaking in the United States. In addition to a six times a year mailing, a searchable version is available to our online readers. WASTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT NEWS, since 1992, serving asphalt/concrete recyclers, composting facilities, construction demolition companies, wood waste recyclers and scrap metal recyclers with 2 monthly editions that cover the entire United States.

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Page 27 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • July 2, 2012

• Since 1964 • Specializing in Trade Publications, Trade Shows, Commercial Printing & Mailing Services


Section B - Page 28 July 2, 2012 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

PH (585) 243-1563 FAX (585) 243-3311 6502 Barber Hill Road, Geneseo, New York 14454 WWW.TEITSWORTH.COM

ROY TEITSWORTH INC. SUCCESSFUL AUCTIONS FOR 42 YEARS

AUCTION NOTICE

Farm Days Equipment & Truck Auctions

Thursday, August 9, 2012

Next to Empire Farm Days Show 2973 Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY If you are new to the auction process or would like to know what your items might be worth please call for personal consultation or appraisal: RICHARD D @ 585-721-9554 4 • MILO O @ 585-739-6435 5 • JESSE E @ 585-738-2010 0 • ROY Y @ 585-721-9177

Special Announcement: due to customer request the auction will be starting two hours earlier than previous years... 1:00 P.M. Roy Teitsworth, Inc. ~ Successful Auctions for 42 Years Plain old-fashioned hard work, experience and market knowledge make this the team to choose for successful auctions. Now is the time to call for a no obligation consultation or appraisal. There are many options available to market your business assets. We would be pleased to discuss the auction methods with you. Give us a call today. If you are looking for clean, well-maintained municipal equipment and trucks, at absolute public auction, here are some tentative dates to keep in mind. Please also visit www.teitsworth.com

Thursday, August 9, 2012 Farm & Equipment Auction 1:00 P.M. Next to Empire Farm Days Show Farm Equipment, Tractors, Antique Equipment, Construction Equipment Route 414, Seneca Falls, NY Saturday, September 8, 2012 9:00 A.M. Municipal Surplus & Contractor Equipment Auction Town of Lansing Highway Dept. Rts. 34 & 34B, Lansing, NY Saturday, September 15, 2012 8:00 A.M. SPECIAL FALL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland Farm & Construction Equipment Heavy & Light Trucks Consignments Welcome Geneseo, NY

Saturday, September 22, 2012 9:00 A.M. LAMB & WEBSTER USED EQUIPMENT AUCTION FARM TRACTORS & MACHINERY Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY Saturday, October 6, 2012 9:00 A.M. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars &Trucks 145 Paul Rd. Exit 17, Rt. 390 Rochester, NY Saturday, October 13, 2012 9:00 A.M. Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY

Saturday, October 27, 2012 9:00 A.M. Onondaga County Area Municipal Equipment Auction Municipal & Contractor Equipment Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds) Tuesday November 6, 2012 Ending November 13, 6pm Monthly Online Auction Check it out at www.teitsworth.com Saturday, December 1, 2012 9:00 A.M. Special Winter Consignment Auction Teitsworth Auction Yard, Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks Liquidations & Consignments Geneseo, NY

July 10-17, 2012 August 14-21, 2012 September 11-18, 2012 October 9-16, 2012 November 6-13, 2012 December 4-11, 2012

RTI Online Auctions Keep in mind we also have a web based auction monthly! This is an efficient and convenient way to sell equipment of all kinds. Please contact Milo @ 585-739-6435, Richard @ 585-721-9554 or Cindy @ 585-738-3759 to consign to any of these auctions.

“WE SPECIALIZE IN LARGE AUCTIONS FOR DEALERS, FARMERS, MUNICIPALITIES AND CONTRACTORS”


SUMMER 2012

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY Good Living and Good Farming – Connecting People, Land, and Communities

Feature Articles • Working Oxen on the Farm Today….........................Page 9 • New Uses for Old Barns.......................................….Page 14 • Backyard Poultry …...............................................…Page 18 • Grow Berries for all Seasons…...........................….Page 20 Supplement to Country Folks


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Page 2

July 2, 2012

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY - SUMMER 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS SMALL FARM PROGRAM UPDATE Cornell Small Farms Program Update........................................................Page 3

BOOK NOOK Meat, by Jill Swenson.....................................................................................Page 4

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Is a Farm Loan Right for You?, by Noreen Atkins & John Flocke.............. Page 19

COMMUNITY AND WORLD

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY Good Farming and Good Living — Connecting People, Land, and Communities Small Farm Quarterly is for farmers and farm families — including spouses and children - who value the quality of life that smaller farms provide. OUR GOALS ARE TO: • Celebrate the Northeast region’s smaller farms; • Inspire and inform farm families and their supporters; • Help farmers share expertise and opinions with each other; • Increase awareness of the benefits that small farms contribute to society and the environment. • Share important research, extension, and other resources.

Growing Communities, by Mason Donovan ...................................................Page 5

FARM TECH

The Right Tool for the Job, by Brad Halm.....................................................Page 7 Coolbot Enables Small Farmers to Build Do-it-yourself Coolers, by Aaron Munzer ...........................................................................................Page 6

GRAZING I Love My Pasture, by Denise Timms..........................................................Page 12 Grazing Management in the New Normal, by Troy Bishopp .....................Page 13

HORTICULTURE Grow Berries for All Seasons, by Cathy Heiderreich & Laura McDermott.....................................................Page 20

LIVESTOCK & POULTRY Backyard Poultry, by Nancy Glazier.............................................................Page 18 Considerations for Pasture Lambing & Kidding, by tatiana Stanton........Page 17

LOCAL FOODS & MARKETING Faces of our Food System: Garden Gate Delivery,

Small Farm Quarterly is produced by Lee Publications, Inc., and is distributed four times a year as a special section of Country Folks. Volume 10 publication dates: January 9, April 2, July 2 and October 1, 2012. EDITORIAL TEAM: • Violet Stone, Cornell Small Farms Program Managing Editor • Anu Rangarajan, Cornell Small Farms Program Editor in Chief • Laura Biasillo, Broome County CCE New Farmers • Jamila Walida Simon, NYS 4-H Youth Development Program • Sam Anderson, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project Livestock • Gary Goff, Cornell Natural Resources Department • Martha Herbert Izzi, Vermont Farmer New England Correspondent • Betsy Lamb, CCE Integrated Pest Management Program Horticulture • John Thurgood, USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service-Vermont Stewardship and Nature • Nancy Glazier, Northwest NY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team Grazing • Jill Swenson, Swenson Book Development Community and World • Michelle Podolec, NE Beginning Farmer Project Coordinator Farm Technology

607-255-9227 607-255-1780 607-584-5007 607-255-0287 978-654-6745 607-255-2824 802-492-3346 607-254-8800 802-865-7895 315-536-5123 607-539-3278 607-255-9911

FOR SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION CONTACT Tracy Crouse, Lee Publications, Inc., PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 888-596-5329 subscriptions@leepub.com FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT: Jan Andrews, Lee Publications, Inc., 518-673-0110 or 800-218-5586, ext. 110 or jandrews@leepub.com

by Becca Jablonski .......................................................................................Page 14 Wanted: Infrastructure Real and Virtual, by Beth McKellips ....................Page 15 Home Grown Cow, by John Aikman............................................................Page 16

NEW FARMERS

SEND YOUR LETTERS AND STORIES TO: Cornell Small Farms Program 15A Plant Science Building, Cornell University , Ithaca, NY, 14853 607-255-9227 • vws7@cornell.edu About copyright: The material published in Small Farm Quarterly is not copyrighted unless otherwise noted. However, we ask that you please be sure to credit both the author and Small Farm Quarterly.

Working Oxen on the Farm Today, by Jake Czaja ................................................................................................Page 9

SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS:

RESOURCE SPOTLIGHTS Report Rare Nuts, Please, by John Wertis ................................................Page 19

Cornell Small Farms Program www.smallfarms.cornell.edu 607-255-9227

SMALL FARM SPOTLIGHT

www.cce.cornell.edu www.cals.cornell.edu

New Uses for Old Barns: Reframing the Venerable Red Vermont Landmark, NYS 4-H Teen Program www.cce.cornell.edu/4h 607-255-0886

by Martha Herbert Izzi ..................................................................................Page 14

PHOTO ESSAY

www.nrcs.usda.gov 802-865-7895

Marvin Looking Fine...................................................................................Page 11

YOUTH PAGES I Love NY Agriculture Art & Writing Contest...............................................Page 10

Cover photo credit: A summer medley: wild grape, seaberry, currents, blueberries, raspberries and cherries from Whole Systems Design Research Farm in Moretown, VT. Photo by Ben Falk

ABOUT OUR ADS...

All advertisements in Small Farm Quarterly are managed by Lee Publications. Cornell’s Small Farms Program, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and other Small Farm Quarterly sponsors and contributors do not endorse advertisers, their products or services. We receive no revenues from advertisers. To find out how your business or organization can advertise in Small Farm Quarterly, contact: Jan Andrews, Lee Publications, 518-673-0110 or jandrews@leepub.com


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

Page 3

Cornelll Smalll Farms s Program m Update Announcing the 2012 Summit Report The Cornell Small Farms Program is pleased to announce that the Report on the 2012 Small Farms Summit has arrived! The report includes the top ranked recommendations for investment in New York's small farm sector as reported to us by 572 survey respondents and 150 Summit meeting participants. The top ranked priorities include: Develop FOOD DISTRIBUTION STRATEGIES (e.g. collaborative marketing, product pooling and trucking, food hubs) to expand small farm access to local and regional markets; DOCUMENT ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SMALL FARMS on their communities to increase investment in and support of small farms; and Develop new and/or expand existing LIVESTOCK PROCESSING FACILITIES. It is our hope that the report will inform educators, researchers, policy makers and community organizations the major areas in which to invest support for small

farms over the next 5 years. To read the full report or to learn more about the statewide Summit meeting, visit www.smallfarms.cornell.edu New Resources for Small Dairy Farms! With funding from the Small Farms Program, the Cornell Small Dairy Team, a group of Cooperative Extension Educators and farmers, has released six new resources for small dairy farmers. The project aims to provide resources to dairy farmers in the constantly adapting market. The new tools and resources include: • Financial Bench Marks for Small Dairies: Helps dairies identify the strengths and weaknesses of their farms compared to other farms of similar size in New York State • Off-Farm Processing Start-Up Fact Sheet: Suggests first steps for dairy farmers considering adding direct sales of value-added dairy products to their business mix

Join the Conversation We would love to hear from you! Send us a question, submit a photo for the “Photo Essay”, connect us to your farm and food blog, or mail us an old fashioned letter. Leave a comment online or get in touch via email. You can read Small Farm Quarterly articles and find past issues at www.smallfarms.cornell.edu. We look forward to hearing from you! Write or email Violet Stone, Cornell Small Farms Program, 15A Plant Science Building, Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 vws7@cornell.edu

How can I get Small Farm Quarterly? Country Folks subscribers automatically receive SFQ four times a year at no extra cost. Country Folks is delivered weekly for $47 per year. SFQ-only subscribers receive just the 4 issues of Country Folks that contain the SFQ insert for only $5 a year. Cooperative Extension Associations and other organizations can offer their members a subscription to SFQ as a member benefit! Your organization collects the names, forwards them to Country Folks Subscriptions, and pays Country Folks just $2.50 for each subscriber. Country Folks mails out the copies. Bulk orders: You can order multiple copies of any issue for just 10¢ a copy! Minimum order is 50. Orders must be placed at least 4 weeks before the publication date To find out more, contact: Tracy Crouse Country Folks Subscriptions P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 1-888-596-5329 email: subscriptions@leepub.com

• Web based Geo-Map: Shows all the small dairy processing plants in New York state • Small Dairy Case Studies: Highlights unique solutions of how four small dairy operators made decisions to keep their farms profitable • Production Record-Keeping Book for Grazing Dairies: Formatted and distributed to Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) offices statewide by Cornell Small Farms Program Small Dairy Team; printing funded by New York Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative; books are available to grazing dairies at no cost through local CCE office. • Organic Dairy Forage and Grain Survey: Due to fluctuating precipitation in 2011, many farms were short of forage and grain. This is particularly stressful to organic dairies since they have limited options for buying replacement feed. To access these new resources visit the Small Farms Program site: http://smallfarms.cornell.edu/resources/small-dairy. Small Farms Program Website Restored! Many of you noticed that we were experiencing serious website problems earlier this Spring. We are happy to report that both our major websites, www.smallfarms.cornell.edu and www.nebeginningfarmers.org have

been restored. Did you know that the Small Farm Quarterly magazine is also available online? Search for your favorite articles in our “Search by Column” feature or by clicking through past issues! If you'd like to remark on anything in the magazine, feel welcome to leave a comment online! Small Dairy Field Day Series This summer, the Cornell Small Farms Program teamed up with educators around NY to host a series of small dairy field days. The field days highlighted creative strategies to improve profitability, sustainability, and quality of life on farms milking 35 to 75 head. If you are in the Groton, NY area on July 11, the final field day of the season showcases “On Farm Energy Production” (Oilseed Press/ Grass Pellet Demonstration). Ed & Eileen Scheffler will be demonstrating the oilseed press they purchased through Organic Valley. Also, John Stoker, an organic dairy farmer from Cazenovia NY, will talk about his business pressing oilseeds for human consumption. For more information about the previous field days, or to learn more about the July 11 field day, visit http://smallfarms.cornell.edu/ 2012/04/24/announcing-2012-small-dairyfield-days/

Message from the Managing Editor Happy Summer! I'm always surprised by the speed of lush growth this time of year, especially with the rain and bouts of early warm weather we had in the Northeast. Before I know it, I'll be humming the lyrics to my favorite song from the musical, Oklahoma: “The corn is as high as an elephant's eye, an' it looks like its climbin' clear up to the sky.” As I think back on the articles featured this summer, the theme of 'invention' stands out. As we are well aware, Violet Stone farmers are a resourceful bunch, and it is part of the job description to think creatively when it comes to craftsmanship. In the article “The Right Tool for the Job”, apprentice Brad Helm describes the quirky materials his farmer mentor sourced to make new tools: “My favorite chore is digging burdock roots using the ‘Kentifer’ weeding tool that Roy made for me in his shop from a piece of old truck spring steel.” In “New Uses for Old Barns”, Martha Herbert Izzi takes us on a tour of farmers that are reinventing the traditional dairy barn into spaces for nursery production, mushrooms, and even a hardware store! And finally, in “Working Oxen on the Farm Today”, Jake Czaja describes a modern vegetable farm re-using a traditional practice: Oxen. He writes “The truth is that oxen are an amazing asset to a farm and are as useful today as they were yesterday.” Each issue, I'm filled with gratitude for the farmers and educators that take time to share their stories and advice with our reading audience. Thank you to our contributors and thank you to our readers! By the time this issue arrives in your mailbox, I hope your corn, or whatever else is growing in your garden or field, is climbing clear up to the sky! Best wishes, Violet Stone

Join the Cornell Small Farms Program on Facebook! You can now receive small farm news, events and much more on Facebook! This venue will help us to continue providing great resources to the Northeast community without cluttering your email inbox! Visit Cornell Small Farms Program on Facebook and click the “Like” button to see our resources pop up in your newsfeed.


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Page 4

July 2, 2012

BOOK NOOK

Meat

Girl Hunter: Revolutionizing the Way We Eat, One Hunt at a Time by Georgia Pellegrini (December 2011, Da Capo) is another memoir from a chef, but one who acquired the passion for good food along a creek bed fishing for breakfast trout. Pellegrini describes the task of catching and killing her first turkeys and how she plucked, prepared, and served them. Her attempt to hunt venison is a near lethal disaster. She writes with self-deprecating humor about the old guys who take her out duck hunting and righteously make a fool of her. She gains respect for hunters who eat what they kill, respect the land, and preserve the wilderness. Tracking her career from underaged waitress and bar maid to the Catskills campground where the mess hall became her refuge from the city scene of catering life provides an entertaining read.

by Jill Swenson Sheepfolds, pigpens, chicken coops, and smoke houses: on a farm with animals, these places have meaning. Cynthia G. Falk writes about the agricultural and architectural diversity of historic farm buildings in her new book: Barns of New York: Rural Architecture of the Empire State (Cornell University Press, 2012). This is a beautiful book about the rich diversity of livestock practices with more than 200 photographs and line drawings. I haven’t seen anything quite like it since Eric Sloan’s An Age of Barns, now a collector’s item. Sustainable practices of small scale farming and hunting include a place for meat at the table and there are some wonderful new books about this subject. Passion for good, simple, healthy food is something farmers and hunters share with chefs, urban homesteaders and metropolitan diners in these new books about meat and so much more. Farmer and evangelist for the grass-fed movement, Joel Salatin’s new book, Folks This Ain’t Normal: A Farmer’s Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World (Hatchette 2011) points out how alienated most people are from the meat they eat. If you’ve never read one of Salatin’s books, you’re missing a distinctive voice with a provocative point of view. He’s got a wicked sense of humor and a storyteller’s knack. This is his first title with a big commercial publisher and it quickly became a best seller. Tamar Adler, An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace (Scribner, 2011), writes essays for the home cook. Inspired by the spirit of M.F.K. Fisher’s How to Cook a Wolf - written in 1942 during wartime shortages - this is a young woman’s account of how to make the most of everything you

In Girl Hunter, Pellegrini gains respect for hunters who eat what they kill, respect the land, and preserve the wilderness. have including the bones and peels and ends, demonstrating what great chefs don’t want you to know. Part philosophy, part cooking lessons, Tamar Adler writes about boiling water, cooking eggs, using meat and fish resourcefully, and pulling together full meals from empty cupboards. Roasts for every day of the week is the subject of the new book by the authority on soulful French cooking and author of the popular, Pork and Sons. Stephane Reynaud has a guide to roasting fish and meat titled, Rotis (Melville House, 2011). Reynaud grew up the grandson of a rural village butcher and today owns one of the best restaurants in Paris. Reynaud has appeared on The Martha Stewart Show and NPR’s The Splendid Table. Booksellers from Brooklyn to Maine tell me this is the one cookbook about meat people buy once they see it.

Tamar Adler's new book, An Everlasting Meal, is inspired by the spirit of this much older book, written in 1942 during wartime shortages.

Blood, Bones and Butter by Gabrielle Hamilton (Random House, 2011) is a bestselling memoir subtitled, “The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef.” An engaging account of her father’s spring lamb roast appeared as an excerpt in The New Yorker. The problem with this kind of memoir is that it’s more about her dysfunctional relationship with her family than it is about discovering down-to-earth food and how she puts meat on the plate at her much acclaimed restaurant, Prune, in New York City. Hamilton follows the foodie memoir formula: share a few recipes, intersperse with personal reflection, and structure around tight family narrative. It follows in the style of Ruth Reichl, Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table (Random House, 1998), who served as Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine for 10 years until it closed in 2009. Reichl set the bar for food memoir and Gabrielle Hamilton raised it.

with our own humanity. Thrilling stories woven together with expository information about the natural world and the history of hunting, this memoir offers a fresh examination of our relationship with nature and food. Each chapter concludes with “tasting notes,” for home cooks and those around a campfire. No matter what your preference - pork, beef, chicken, lamb, goat, turkey, rabbit, venison, fish - there’s a new book here on this list of recent releases to enhance your appreciation of meat and how it gets to our plates.

Jill Swenson is a former farmer and the president of Swenson Book Development, LLC, based in Brooktondale, NY. She may be reached at jill@swenbooks.com or 607539-3278.

Hank Shaw’s Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast (Rodale, 2011) is another new book of interest filled with personal stories and recipes. With this contemporary eat wild narrative, Hank Shaw offers a beginner’s guide to fishing, hunting, foraging, outdoors, and cooking wild meat. This is not, however, a book for hunters, but a book about eating wild.

Meat Eater: A Natural History of an American Hunter, by Steven Rinella (Spiegel &Grau, 2012) explores the disappearance of the hunter and the loss of Americans’ connection with the way their food finds its way to the table. Hunting, Rinella writes, is connected intimately

If you’ve never read one of Salatin’s books, you’re missing a distinctive voice with a provocative point of view.

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SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

COMMUNITY

AND

Page 5

WORLD

Growing Communities by Mason Donovan In the beginning of our humble American nation, we had strong communities tied around local family farms. As we grew in population, the farms decreased along with the community connection. There is a resurgence lately to not only source locally, but to once again re-establish our communal connections to farms and each other. A little over a hundred years ago, agriculture was the center of community, serving up sustenance and conversation at the dinner table as well as social interaction at the market and farm stand. It was also the major source of income. In the late 1800’s over 70% of the U.S. population was employed in agriculture. Today, it is less than 3%. The loss of local small farms has had a dramatic impact on the quality

of diets and society. One movement to reverse this trend is the Locavore movement. It has gained momentum in the last few years helping us understand the importance of locally sourced food. What has been over looked in this movement, is the correlation of the loss of local farms to the decline of a closely woven community. As social media connects us to our primary school classmates, old flings and even our next door neighbors, many are waking up to the fact that there is something really missing in our lives that cannot be fulfilled by status updates and virtually posting our realty. How do small farms fulfill this void? I brought this question to a couple of enterprising farmers, Ryan Ferdinand and Mike Hvizda. Ryan and Mike began the creation of Phoenix Hill Farm in Boscawen, NH in 2010. At the time of their purchase it was a 5 acre parcel on a wooded hillside with a house which showed its over two centuries of use. Phoenix Hill Farm was destined to become more than a farm. They wanted it to reach back in history to a time when social interaction between farmers and residents translated beyond a commercial transaction. It was a long and deliberate path to this goal. Ryan’s desire to connect with others and the earth led her through living on an organic farm in England to a potential chef career and a brief period as a founding art teacher at a charter school. Mike’s interest in agriculture was inspired by his tri-athlete father who was very conscious of his food intake. It was further cemented living in mid-west towns where healthy living, from food to exercise, was an encouraged way of life. Both Mike and Ryan eventually found themselves living on a permaculture farm in Tyngsboro, MA. It was on this property where they started to formulate the idea of Phoenix Hill Farm. Like a well seeded row, ideas grew quickly and started to bear fruit. Agricultural challenges such as clearing land led to even better solutions; free range pigs. Mike and Ryan led countless educational walks for visitors around the grounds to explain the benefits of sustainable permaculture. Each visitor helped to not only formulate the realization of the farm, but started to create a community of friends, customers and farm participants. It was this later fringe benefit, they both found to be the most fulfilling. A quick look at their Facebook page may have you think they already had a community before the farm. Although they were very active in social media with hundreds of likes and friends, Ryan said it can “give you an illusion of being connected because of the hyper-communication.” Mike saw the online connections as a valuable resource, but he believed “community was made in person.” What better way to start making the community, than to start from the ground up? The days of farmers networking to support each other is not gone, but can sometimes feel like a bygone era. Mike and Ryan started a network of like farmers to help each other. The work share and suppers became aptly named the “Wuppers Club.” There are those who believe Robert Putnam’s book, “Bowling Alone”, about the collapse of the American community has to be outdated because of our virtual connections. He details organization after organization whose membership has been on a rapid steady decline (Elks, BoyScouts, churches of every kind, PTA, Odd Fellow, etc. etc.). But our virtual communities are expanding exponentially for every generation. Over 80 million people have signed up to play the virtual farming game, Farmville. Think about that. The amount of people interested in spending their free time virtually farming is approximately equal to the same amount in the late 1800s who were actively involved in American agriculture. Although less than 1 million people in the US claim farming as an occupation today, the need to connect to agriculture has not diminished. In NH alone, winter farmers markets doubled from 2011 to 2012. New markets such as the Tilton farmers market are attracting over 1,000 visitors every Saturday. Like the fringe community benefit of Phoenix Hill Farm, these farmers markets are reconnecting us to our food source and our neighbors. It is a place to commune, be educated and share a connection. Unique community building ideas are exploding. As of the writing of this article, 7 local

A day of farm work ends with a homemade pizza party. Photo by Ryan Ferdinand artists in the NH lakes region have teamed up with 16 farms to create original works of art to support local agriculture. As Ryan and Mike look towards the future, they envision a pick-your-own CSA where the consumer can be part of the process. They also are working on plans to build an institute which provides apprenticeships and community rooted in agriculture and art. Mike adamantly believes, “one has to consciously make their community,” and not wait for the community to form around them. Studies have shown millions of Americans are becoming addicted to their texting and online posting communication. Their brain waves illustrate a starvation for interaction. Look around at the next farmers market and see how many people are not texting or deeply absorbed in their mobile devices. You may be pleasantly surprised to find what we are really starving for is good food and good company provided to us by our small farms.

Mason Donovan owns a hay farm in Boscawen, NH and founded The Yard Project. The Yard Project is an agriculturally based organization to promote healthy connected agrarian communities. Visit www.TheYardProject.com for more info. He can be reached by email at Mason@TheYardProject.com. Growing your own agricultural based community may seem as overwhelming as starting a farm. It is all about seeding, growing and harvesting. Seeding: Intended crops must be sown thoughtfully and with a plan. • Gather some like-minded friends over local food and discuss what you would like out of a community. • Write down the key points of this conversation and send it out to the group within the next few days. Ask them to share with their friends. • Search for existing organizations which may already be providing this service. Start first with your local Ag Extension: www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension Growing: Be your own farmer of community and support the growth. • If your community does not have small farms, seek out ways to create them. Beginning with community gardens is a great start. Petition your town to provide an acre of town land for a garden. • Create an online membership to aid in cross communication. Facebook is a great place to start for free. • Actively seek out small farmer opportunities by reaching out to your local small farm educators such as the Cornell Small Farm program: smallfarms.cornell.edu Harvesting: Reap the benefits of community by getting involved. • Community is all about being involved. Attend local Ag education workshops. Join your town or county Ag board. • Support your local farmers by shopping locally and helping out on the farm. Like a pumpkin patch, involved active agricultural based communities do not sprout up out of nowhere. If not seeded and cared for, all you will get is a field of weeds.


Page 6

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

Farm Tech

CoolBot Enables Small Farmers to Build Do-it-Yourself Coolers by Aaron Munzer Like many small-scale vegetable growers, Anton Burkett couldn’t afford a large, expensive walk-in cooler compressor to cool his produce before market. Then he found the CoolBot. When he started Early Morning Farm near Ithaca, NY. in 1999, he built a small, eight foot by ten foot walk-in cooler powered by a small refrigerator compressor. With the continued success of his vegetable CSA, two years ago he found it necessary to build a bigger cooler, but couldn’t afford the thousands of dollars it would have cost for a larger compressor. He had a dilemma - without the cooler he couldn’t grow and harvest more vegetables, but without larger harvests he couldn’t afford a bigger cooler. After doing some research, he decided to try the CoolBot, a thermostatic controller that turns an off-the-shelf air conditioner into a compressor for a homemade walk-in cooler, which would save him thousands of dollars and still keep his produce fresh and cool. Weeks later, Burkett built a larger eighteen by nineteen foot cooler around his original cooler, powered by the CoolBot, and started hauling in vegetables within hours. “Not only did it work, it worked great!” he said. “We now cool the big cooler with less electricity than we used to use on just the small cooler, plus it seems to get the veggies down to temp faster.” Since the device went on sale in 2006, thousands of small farmers - and florists, hunters, brewers and anyone else needing a walk-in cooler - have started using the CoolBot to keep their product fresh for a fraction of the installation and construction costs of the more traditional options. The CoolBot uses patent pending technology that allows a home window air conditioner to keep a well-insulated room as cold as 35 degrees consistently, while at the same time using about half the electricity of a comparably sized standard compressor. The setup is simple: aluminum foil attaches a heating element to the air conditioner’s temperature sensor to trick the compressor into running longer. The CoolBot has a second sensor that idles the air conditioner when its fins are about to freeze, and restarts it when they have thawed sufficiently. Inventor and small-scale vegetable farmer Ron Khosla created the CoolBot simply because he and his wife Kate couldn’t afford an expensive walk-in cooler compressor for the CSA they operated, Huguenot Street Farm. After lots of research and talking with friends, he thought that he might be able to use an air conditioner to accomplish much the same cooling effect with only an AC unit. Although he had to destroy more than a few air conditioners while trying to cre-

ate the controller, he was able to keep his vegetables cold, using a simple device made from a light bulb and a thermometer, but had to monitor the unit to keep it from freezing up. The final product doesn’t overwork the window air conditioners. Because of the small room, tight nature of walkin coolers, the compressors run less hard than when they are installed in someone’s living room. “We made it out of a desperate need for our small farm, but I never thought it would get this popular,” he said. Once he had figured out how to keep his produce consistently cold by manually cycling the compressor, he enlisted the help of an engineering friend from his college days at Cornell University, Timothy Weber, to build a micro controller “brain” for the CoolBot that would cool an insulated room down to well below its normal range automatically. Khosla said he’s been astonished by how successful the device has been. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) also provided technical assistance in the design of the frost sensor through their Space Alliance Technology Outreach Program. “This was one thing a small farmer couldn’t do well on his/her own, you were stuck paying thousands of dollars for a normal compressor, and now we’ve provided do-it-yourself folks a way to build their own coolers,” Khosla said.

CoolBot inventor and organic farmer Ron Khosla with his partner Kate in front of their CoolBot regulated cooler.

What Khosla said he’s been most excited by is the CoolBot’s popularity in the developing world, where farmers from Uzbekistan to India have been building small coolers to keep their produce fresh. It’s helping to solve one of the largest agricultural problems in those places, where up to 40 percent of fresh produce spoils before it gets to market.

“Small, poor farmers across the world are so happy to find something they can afford, that uses so much less electricity. That part has been much more fun than the thousands we’ve sold in the U.S,” he said.

we were really lucky to find an air conditioner still in stock.” For more information on the CoolBot, visit storeitcold.com.

Aaron Munzer is a freelance writer and farmer at Plowbreak Farm in Hector, NY. He may be reached at aaronmunzer@gmail.com.

Khosla said that in places where there’s no nearby Home Depot, coolers have been made from papyrus, brick, and even straw bales. “A lot of our customers hack together stuff and it usually works,” he said, laughing. After building his own cooler and installing a CoolBot, Burkett has some advice for those thinking about their own do-it-yourself cooler.

The CoolBot is a thermostatic controller that turns an off-the-shelf air conditioner into a compressor.

“Buy your air conditioner early - we found out that there is an air conditioner season at the retailers,” he said. “You would think that the season would be at its peak in say August, but that’s actually when the retailers are boxing air conditioners up and sending them back to the warehouses. We put the finishing touches on our cooler just about at that time and

Keep your produce cool and fresh for less New patent pending technology cools your walk-in or insulated room to 35 degrees with just a Window Air Conditioner • 10% of the up-front cost of a cooler compressor • Save up to 65% in electrical operating costs compared to same size cooler Order now and try CoolBot 30-Day * RISK-FREE TRIAL * 1-888-871-5723 • www.storeitcold.com

Alternative Refrigeration


July 2, 2012

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Page 7

FARM TECH

The Right Tool for the Job by Brad Halm Tools are now and have always been vital to farming: They’re how we interact with the land to get things done. Whether it’s a stirrup hoe or a cultivating tractor, our favorite tools become extensions of our bodies, as we use them again and again. We farmers have a very interesting relationship with our tools. Nowhere have I seen more random and unlikely materials become useful tools than on a farm. As a group, farmers seem to be driven by the ethics of rugged individualism, frugality, and independence, and there’s no way we’re going to pay $59.99 for something we can make for free from scavenged materials around the farm (even if it takes us two weeks).

We farmers have a very interesting relationship with our tools.

Small farmers are also caught in a void. “Gardening” tools sold at nurseries are largely overpriced, poorly designed, and way too dainty to get anything done on a farm. Conversely, most farm equipment is sized for huge producers with thousands of acres of commodity crops and is obviously unsuited for us smaller-scale folks. Thus, we’re forced to repurpose odd items found hidden in the recesses in the back of the barn, to buy antiquated equipment at auction, and to improvise our own tools. For me, there was no better introduction to this phenomenon than apprenticing for a few seasons with Roy Brubaker on his organic vegetable farm in central Pennsylvania. Roy had a fierce imagination and a steady hand with an arc welder, and he hated to buy anything. This combination led to a steady stream of inventions pouring from his shop, some absurd and some amazing. I remember harvesting greens with a tool made from a food-processor blade and an electric drill, “harvesting” pesky sparrows and invasive starlings in a human-size trap, and watering transplants using harvested rainwater from a reclaimed milk tank on a semi. We even had an old Dodge Colt that was converted for use as sort of a field-delivery wagon. We’d drive it down the farm lane, filled with sacks of fertilizer for the transplanting crew, and return to the packing shed overloaded with boxes of melons or bunches of beets from the harvest crew. Once, in a pinch, I picked up my mother from the hospital after a serious bacterial infection in our “Crop Car.” It was actually a pleasant ride. Mom napped in the front while a fresh breeze whipped through the missing window seals and wafted the scent of organic fertilizer through the car. Roy loved working in his shop and would do so as often as the constraints of farming would allow him. I remember him struggling through a chilly spring day of harvest with a serious cold, hacking and coughing all the while. Later that night, I found him in the shop, the temperature even colder, welding away. “I’m starving my cold,” he said. I think he figured if the conditions were tough on him, they had to be even worse for whatever virus had infected his lungs. Sure enough, the following day yielded a chipper

and smiling Roy, complete with a new creation from his shop in hand. He never passed up the chance to create his own solution for whatever problem arose on the farm, even if he could buy one relatively inexpensively. We had homemade opening devices for our greenhouse ventilation windows, a homemade spool to distribute our plastic packing bags, and a homemade barrel washer to clean our root crops. Were all these homemade tools worth the effort it took to make them? Did they really improve our efficiency? Did Roy get a proper return on all the time he spent in the shop? The answers are immaterial. I learned a lot from working with someone who was unafraid to exercise creativity to solve a problem rather than reach for an offthe-shelf solution. During my second winter in Pennsylvania, I was midway through building a set of harvest crates from a poplar harvested from the farm when I realized that, for me, the most valuable part of farming lies in the process, not in the number of pounds of produce harvested at the end of the season. That said, tools for small farmers are starting to become more available. New companies are springing up and old ones are expanding their product lines to supply high-quality equipment to farmers of all scales. It’s a welcome change, as there’s nothing more frustrating than struggling through a task with a poorly designed tool. Ultimately, I think tools are at their best when they’re well planned, properly made, and efficient to use but still carry some of our collective farmers’ soul. My favorite chore is digging burdock roots using the “Kentifer” weeding tool that Roy made for me in his shop from a piece of old truck spring steel (the original model was built as a wedding gift for two of his earliest apprentices, Kent and Jennifer). It’s a joy to use, and brings back a lot of good memories every time I pull it out of the tool shed.

Excerpted from Greenhorns: 50 Dispatches from the New Farmers’ Movement (c) Zoe Ida Bradbury, Paula Manalo, and Severine von Tscharner Fleming. Used with permission of Storey Publishing.


Page 8

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

SMALL FARM SPOTLIGHT

New Uses for Old Barns: Reframing the Venerable Red Vermont Landmark by Martha Herbert Izzi

before and Mrs. Lehouillier is still behind the cash register." George describes an old barn put to use as a seeding area for a nursery, and a couple others turned into apartment buildings. Others are being upgraded by the younger generation for a future in dairy farming. He describes the [name] family farm in [location]: "They have modern milking facilities, a totally new milking parlor and up to 200 cows".

Vermont's red barn, once the hallmark of the small family dairy farm, is now the centerpiece of a changing agricultural landscape. It is being reframed and reformed for new, often unusual enterprises. While dairy production still tops the agricultural economic scale in Vermont, the actual number of dairy farms is declining due to new technologies, improved genetics and larger dairies. But as new, young and older farmers move in or veteran dairy producers retool for new endeavors, the barn is taking on new life. Tweed Valley Farm - Pittsfield, Vermont Tweed Valley Farm began its latest incarnation in 2002 when a newly married couple named Nancy Cooper Wisner and Fred Simon fled from their New Jersey home. They could "see the smoke from the fall of the Twin Towers" on that fateful day. Not long after, Nancy and Fred found themselves signing a contract for a far-from-perfect property. The "big pink barn" had been the unlikely home of a successful furniture store. The house was “a nightmare”. But, Nancy says, “the farm had neighbors, a town, wood, and a river across the street for water” and they were motivated to become more self-reliant. Prior to moving to Vermont Nancy had spent years in sales and marketing in the garden industry and she clearly has an entrepreneurial spirit. With time and research she began to get an image of what they would produce. She wanted to do something that was different and that could provide a consistent income. "Everyone was doing eggs, beef, milk and veggies." She settled on mushrooms. Today, 120 shitake mushroom logs are thriving along with oyster bags in the 8x8 hoop-style greenhouses in the middle section of the 8,000 square foot barn that began life in the 1850s as a dairy farm on the Tweed River. Another section houses the quail hatching incubator, five brooder pens and 5 grow out pens for the hundreds of quail that are sold for meat and eggs. Still another section is the goat shelter for the Nigerian dwarfs that are raised for milk and breeding stock. After several years of selling Vermont Specialty Mushrooms, and quail year-round at the Farmer's Market in Rutland, Nancy has embarked on a new venture; marinated shitake mushrooms. She has test-marketed them at the Farmer's Market and other venues to great reviews. Nancy has vivid, often humorous memories of their early years recalling two seniors renovating the barn, lowering the floor to pasture level, lugging an old chicken barn in pieces up the street and attaching it to the barn. She speaks of the barn that became the setting for a life where they "have learned so much" and it has erased Nancy's fear of having

Shitake mushrooms growing inside a greenhouse, which are set up inside Tweed Valley’s barn. Photo by Fred Simon some beef, chicken, or eggs were important values. The Clarks had two sons who were invested in the farm but had their own ideas and interests. Oldest son, John converted the conventional stanchion barn to a streamlined parlor with a store so that visitors could see the entire milking, calving and processing operation and hopefully buy some of the end products. Son Jason is a chef and his vision was to open a catering business on the farm. The Clarks had already built a bunker silo which had evolved over time into a 'community hall' for various meetings and local gatherings. As Jason's reputation spread as a chef providing delicious local farm food (when it didn't have the cache it does today) the Clarks added a kitchen with freezers downstairs from the main hall so that Jason could sell frozen meals to the growing number of visitors. Jason now offers a monthly localvore dinner which has become very popular. Judy says, “We also rent the hall for retreats, workshops, family reunions and weddings”. But their interest in the educational aspect of the farm operation continues to grow and they are exploring a number of possibilities with other organizations as a means of sustaining the farm. "We want to renovate the bottom of the barn to include classrooms and rooms for overnight stays.

Despite the many times that we have heard over the years to expect an agricultural doomsday, the future looks reasonably healthy for Vermont farms, especially in light of the localvore movement, concerns over food security, food safety and most importantly the need to change our food habits for better health. To learn more about Tweed Valley Farm, visit www.tweedvalleyfarm.biz. To learn more about Applecheek Farm, visit www.applecheekfarm.com. To learn more about historic preservation in Vermont, visit accd.vermont.gov/ strong_communities/preservation

Martha Herbert Izzi is a writer and farmer at Bel Lana Farm in Shrewsbury, Vermont. She may be reached at mhizzi@yahoo.com.

Judy says, "We have converted the end of the dairy barn, now called Applecheek Localvore Farm Market." It is now the outlet for their extensive farm products from pork, poultry, beef and veal to vegetables, raw milk and products from other local farms. The Clarks are currently milking about 40 cows as the industry continues to constrict and prices fluctuate radically. It is likely that the barns will be reinvented yet again as they grow the meat business, expand their CSA and continue to frame the educational programs. They are moving with the times, retrofitting the barns and looking to the future. New Lives for Old Barns in the Morrisville region George Cook, a veteran UVM Extension Farm Safety Specialist, has seen many old dairy barns morph into unimagined uses lately. "The [Lehouillier] family dairy barn became a farm stand with fruits and veggies when the father died. Later, the family changed it again and it's now Johnson Hardware. That facility is making way more money than

Marinated mushrooms are Tweed Valley’s newest product. Photo by Fred Simon nothing to do. Applecheek Farm - Hyde Park Vermont John and Judy Clark started their farm in 1965 with ten cows. Over the years, they grew the dairy herd to a peak of 120 holsteins, added pigs, emus, beef, poultry, geese and incorporated agritourism events. Education was a big part of their philosophy. Bringing families and school children to the farm, letting them see the operation and perhaps buy

Vermont Division for Historic Preservation After twenty years of providing grants to repair and retain historic barns, the Vermont Division awarded "nearly a quarter million dollars" to sixteen recipients this year according to its administrator, Judith Ehrlich. These grants must be matched and the barns must be at least 50 years old to qualify. The top dollar award is $15,000. The awards are not necessarily contingent on a continued agricultural use, "but most are" according to Ehrlich. The categories of requests usually fall into three areas: young couples coming to Vermont to farm, families inheriting the farm, and new buyers who are resurrecting abandoned barns. In one case, the new buyer bought a farm that was out of use for twenty years. It had belonged to one family for over a century. The new buyer wanted to restore the farm to its agricultural 'roots.'

A portion of the dairy barn is now used for the ApplecheekFarm Store. Photo by Applecheek Farm

Once a bunker silo, this space now hosts a monthly localvore dinner. Photo by Applecheek Farm


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NEW FARMERS

Working Oxen on the Farm Today by Jake Czaja I never thought I would be learning to farm with oxen. I grew up in Chicago and I did not get to see the country all that often. The only “Bulls” I knew of were a professional basketball team. After high school, I chose to go to college out in Iowa. It is interesting how a new place can influence your ideas. Well that summer, I decided to work on a farm. I was curious, excited, and I felt free to explore my interests. But I had not gone so far as to think that I would want to become a farmer. That only came after I had worked on a few more farms. I make these statements today. But not too long ago, most people lived in the country, farmed the land, and had draft animals. If they heard me say this, they would probably look at me funny. Today, using oxen primarily for farming is uncommon in the United States. The only other oxen I have encountered reside on historical interpretation farms like the Howell Living History Farm or Sturbridge Village. The truth is that oxen are an amazing asset to a farm and are as useful today as they were yesterday. Historians of early America say that if it were not for the cow and the ox, then none of us would be here today. There is a farmer in Northern Pennsylvania, Millerton to be exact, who trains and utilizes oxen to make a living farming. He grows over 30 types of vegetables on about 1 acre, about another acre of various grains, and raises pastured chickens, pigs, and grass-fed cattle. He does not have a tractor to work the land. Instead, he has a Holstein team of oxen to plow, spread manure, haul stones, cart, cultivate, harrow, disc, skid logs, and pull you-name-it. He also has me. I am farmer Andy’s apprentice for this year. In order to be of any help to Andy, I have to learn to teach or “train” the oxen. According to Andy, oxen are never finished with their schooling. They respond to voice commands and negative reinforcements of the whip that are both built on their prey animal instincts. So if we give the oxen a command, such as, “Come here!” the oxen move forward, because they associate the sound and a crack of the whip on their rumps if they do not move fast enough. For all we know, oxen are not rational thinking animals like us. We have to be always thinking about where we want to pull the stoneboat, giving the oxen the right commands, making

sure the oxen respond with the right movements, and see if we have navigated the corner without any rocks falling off. Driving oxen is quite a skill! My first few practices driving Burt and Marvin were not what I had expected. I thought, “Ok, ok, I just tell them ‘Come here!’ then I tell them ‘Whoa!’ and we stop right where Andy wants the stoneboat. How hard can that be?” Well anybody who has played a game of golf can probably sympathize that trying to put an object in a certain spot while using another tool can be challenging. In the case of the oxen, I am developing a “sixth sense” of where exactly that hitched stoneboat is in relation to where the oxen are. A discussion of oxen would From Left to Right: Burt, Marvin, (the oxen) Andy, and Jake. not be complete without mentioning the benefits. Why would anybody want to use oxen over a tractor or horses for 4, Andy’s father was making his own yoke for his team of that matter? I am attracted to oxen because they are eco- oxen. By age 6, Andy’s father skidded all the firewood for the nomical when compared to tractors or horses. You can pick winter with his two year old team of oxen. At age 7, he was up a pair of calves from the local dairy for $20 a piece (that plowing up the wheat fields with the horses all by himself. is honestly what one farmer was going to sell his calves to The only thing that would slow this kid down was a lack of a me for), train them individually in your spare time, cut out a safety feature on the hay tedder. One day, the kid’s foot yoke and bows out of a log, chain your team to a wagon, slipped off the pedal that operated the hay tedder and went and are good to go! Maybe I left out a few details about how right into a gear. He left the horses hitched to the tedder and much time is involved in training a mature team or how feed- ran home crying with a cut foot. ing milk to your calves at an early age can make all the difference later on. The knowledge and skill required to use oxen will make you become a better farmer. Andy tells me stories from time to time about his father. His father grew up around oxen and horses on the farm. At age

I find that Andy’s stories tell a lot about farming and youth. Traditionally, the kids did a lot of the farm work. Sometimes they did all the farm work, especially when the father was drafted for the military or was working another job. I also think about Andy’s father and how young he was working with these animals that weighed 30 times his body weight. I tell Andy that his father was exceptional, some kind of prodigy farmer. Andy replies, “No, my dad always said with regret that he could not plow by himself till he was 7.” Apparently, there were some kids in the neighborhood that could plow by themselves when they were 6! Now, I will be turning 23 this year and I am looking at making my first yoke. I may be several years behind Andy’s father, but I plan to keep up the tradition of working animals. Who knows, I might even get to a point when I can plow all by myself.

Jake is an apprentice at Spring Meadows Farm in Millerton, PA. He may be reached at Springmeadowsfarm@gmail.com.

2012 Field Days at Spring Meadows Farm

Spreading compost on the garden where the roots - beets carrots, parsnips - will be planted. Photo by Jake Czaja

Spring Meadows Farm holds monthly Field Days on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Field Days end with a pot luck and are open to the public. A PASA special event: “Happy Animals Work For a Living” will take place on Oct. 11 at Spring Meadows Farm. • Fermenting Zucchini and Other Vegetables, July 21 • Potato Harvesting with Oxen, Aug. 11 • From Wheat to Breadmaking, Sept. 8 • Garlic Planting, October 6th • Happy Animals Work for a Living, Oct. 11 (10-4) • Fall Plowing with Oxen, Nov. 3. • Season Recap, Nov. 17 For more info, visit http://springmeadowsfarm.wordpress.com or call 570-537-2128.


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I Love New York Agriculture Art & Writing Contest Each year, NYAITC and New York Farm Bureau sponsor an opportunity for Pre-K through middle school students across the state to discover more about where food comes from and why agriculture is important. The contest is divided by grade level,

and each level has a specific topic to create a piece of art, poem, or narrative related to an aspect of agriculture. There were over 1,000 entries in the 2012 contest. All awardees receive a Certificate of Recognition, and the first place winners are awarded $25 to invest in their education or an agricultural product or experience. Congratulations to the all the award winners! We wish we could feature all of them!

Left - Maisyn Stanton, a Pre-K student at Downsville Central School painted a picture of her favorite New York farm animal - a pig in front of a red barn! Maisyn was the 1st place winner in her age division.

July 2, 2012

Small Farm Quarterly

Youth Page New York Agriculture Poem Students in 4th grade are asked to compose a poem. The poem can be general or specific, and it can focus on one of the over 200 agricultural commodities produced in New York, a specific farm or farmer, or an aspect of the food system. Jesse Fisher of Cattaraugus-Little Valley Intermediate won the division with her poem entitled “Farmers”. A section of her poem reads:

“Farmers collect sap, Out of a maple tap. A farmer ends their day By giving thanks to pray.”

Leah Pasqualetti of South Davis Elementary wrote the second place poem entitled “Three Cheers for Agriculture”. A section of her poem reads:

“We’re thankful for farmers who plant fruits and vegetables to eat, And others who raise livestock for poultry, pork, and beef meat. Agriculture is much more than just food, It’s also about fibers for clothing to fit every mood. In the Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring, Three cheers for the farmers who do their thing!”

New York Agriculture in the Classroom's (NYAITC) mission is to foster an awareness, understanding, and appreciation of how New York State and the United States produce food and fiber. NYAITC assists educators in teaching about our agricultural food systems, what we eat, and how we live by offering opportunities for students and communities to engage with agriculture. If you are interested in learning more about NYAITC, or volunteering for a variety of events, please visit www.nyaged.org/aitc.

Sara Burrowes of Tioga Central was the 1st place winner in the Kindergarten category, where the students were asked to color a drawing of themselves with their favorite food. As you can see in Sara's drawing, she pictured herself enjoying carrots with corn growing in the background.

The category for the 1st grade contestants celebrates New York’s dairy industry. The students were asked to paint or color a drawing showing where milk comes from and products made from milk. Tony Recio of Holy Name created this winning piece of art.

Right - In 2012 the 2nd grade competition proved to be the most competitive as it had the most entries of any other age group. Joshua Miller of Fonda-Fultonville came out in 1st place with his creative picture of an apple tree and pig. Along with the picture, Joshua was asked to write four sentences about his favorite New York food and where it comes from. He said, “My favorite New York food that is good for me is the apple. But I also love bacon which comes from a pig. Bacon is delicious with eggs! I love New York food!”

Left - Third grade students are asked to paint or color a drawing with a one sentence slogan about New York agriculture. The slogan can be general or specific to a particular agricultural process of commodity. Strawberries were the product of choice for Teara Tattro, a 3rd grader at Deleaven Elementary School. Her slogan states, “New York Strawberries are Berry Good”


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New York Agriculture Essay Liam Sayward, a homeschooled 5th grade student received 1st place in his category for his original narrative he wrote. The students were asked to write an informative narrative, real or imagined, that utilized research and information from a variety of sources to develop their topic or stories. Liam’s winning story is entitled, “The Lamb’s Amazing Recovery”, and a section of his story reads:

“I noticed the first lamb had droopy ear. Her mouth was cold. This meant she probably was suffering from hypothermia. Her

body temperature was lower than it was supposed to be. The book says 102-103 degrees F. I gave her an enema, very warm soapy water injected into her anus, to clear the meconium out of her body to warm her up. Then my mom helped me tube feed the little ewe lamb colostrum. But it did not warm her up. The lamb stayed cold and she started to go downhill. I gave her two more enemas. The second one failed, but the third one worked. Lots of black gooey meconium squirted out. I brought her inside the house and turned the oven on to 150 degrees F.”

People of New York Agriculture — Students in 6th grade were asked to create a poster that celebrates New York farms or farmers, using a media of their choice. Hunter Newland of Pioneer Middle School created the 1st place poster.

Photo Essay

Marvin Looking Fine Our summer photo features comes to us from “The Farmer's Husband”, a diversified farm in Schoharie County, NY, owned by Thomas McCurdy and Bailey Hale. The farm is currently raising chickens, ducks, turkeys, rabbits, goats, sheep and pigs. Thomas says, “We don't want to be big, just big enough to be self-sustaining, producing as much of our own food as possible while generating an income from the land, likely from a combination of meat, eggs, cheese, bread, fiber, produce, and whatever else we can sell or barter. We want to nourish ourselves and our loved ones while treating the land and the animals with respect, living honestly, simply, and sustainably.” To read more about the farm's adventures in raising livestock, visit www.thefarmershusband.com

Marvin, an East Friesian Ram


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July 2, 2012

GRAZING

I Love My Pasture! by Denise Timms

This article was one of four winning entries in a writing contest sponsored by the New York State Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative (GLCI). GLCI is led by a Steering Committee of farmers and agricultural professionals to promote the wise use of private grazing lands, and is funded by the USDANatural Resources Conservation Service. James and I moved our family to Madison County from Long Island in September of 2006, after leaving jobs that we had been at for over twenty years each. We were finally going to live our dream on 36 acres of pasture and woodland in a house we built a few years before. We were lucky enough to find jobs, but what were we to do with thirty-plus acres of pasture? In the past, we had some local folks that cut and took the hay as we had no use for it on Long Island. But, what to do now?

I have always loved them, and the thought of raising our own beef appealed to us. We got a bred cow and her seven month old heifer calf. It was a little rough going at first but that's another story! However, because of the “mishaps” with our first cow experience we met people that would introduce us to something we had never really heard of “grass-fed beef”! We no longer had to worry about what to do with thirty-plus acres of pasture. Soon after I was able to attend “Grasstravaganza” in Binghamton, NY and I was hooked! It was there that I met Madison County's own “Grass Whisperer”, Troy Bishopp. We've learned so much from him, from rotational grazing to installing a high tensile fence for our permanent/winter pasture. At this point we rotationally graze using temporary fencing, in the open pasture, usually attached to the permanent fence. We also section off the high tensile pasture so we can rotate them in there too. The pasture walks we have attended, organized by Troy Bishopp, have been invaluable. All of the plant species that we did not appreciate in our athletic fields (we did make sure we had some clover as we returned our clippings) have true nutritional value to the animals that we graze. Weeds in our pasture? Absolutely! Lots and lots of clover in our pasture? You bet! We wouldn't have it any other way.

I love my pasture! Photos by Denise Timms I had a bit of an agricultural background mostly with small livestock, a semester and a half of night time ag classes at SUNY Farmingdale and fourteen years of handson experience at two public education farms, both on Long Island. James had been on the grounds crew at the Shoreham Wading River School District for 18 years, 12 of which we worked together. One of the farms I had worked at was located at the Shoreham Wading River Middle School. I was there for 11 years. Unfortunately due to the loss of some of the district's tax revenue, the farm at the Middle School had to be closed. The district was kind enough to move me to the grounds department, and although I was grateful to still have a job, I wasn't quite sure that maintaining athletic fields was going to be my cup of tea. I gave myself six months. Twelve years passed. Being the people we are we weren't happy just cutting the grass - we had to do it all! We learned a lot about grass: growing, maintaining optimum cut height for healthy turf, etc. We went to seminars, got our Pesticide Tech certification (which we rarely had to use due to our management practices), and talked our supervisor into letting us do all the fertilization, over-seeding, etc. We already had all the equipment to do it, and we could save the district some money by not having to contract out those jobs. We found out that we could grow some pretty good grass! What we hadn't realized was how well the jobs we had on Long Island were preparing us for life in central New York State! So, we decided to get a couple of Herefords.

After we got settled with the cows, we decided to add some turkeys that we would raise as gifts for family. They were quite happy eating not only their grain, but the pasture's offerings. Due to the ingenious invention of electric net, we raised our first small flock of turkeys on pasture with great success. We now raise about seventy-five turkeys and around one hundred Cornish Rock crosses on pasture that we rotate as well. Yes, they do need to get grain, but about thirty percent of their consumption is pasture. They are happy and healthy and grow extremely well, and you should see the grass they can grow! I'm not through just yet! What started out as a 4-H project has turned three sheep into a pastured flock of 13 sheep that we raise primarily for fiber. They are also the lucky recipients of new pasture every few days. Their fleece is so much cleaner than it would be if we fed them hay all year. The sheep as well as the cows give birth and raise very healthy, happy lambs and calves being fed our grass, our own hay and of course minerals. We love watching the “families” interact. It is really some of our best entertainment and my personal stressrelieving activity. We were told that turkeys (the commercial type that we raise) don't

Turkey poults enjoying the grass!

Multi-species interaction - I love that electric net! preen or take dust baths. We have found that out in the pasture they are given the opportunity to engage in natural behaviors and they do! We found out about the CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement) program through a Cooperative Extension seminar. We are now in our second year of a ten year contract through Madison County, now installing our riparian buffer. CREP is allowing us to improve our own program by installing practices that we probably wouldn't have known to do, and helping to attract and protect wildlife, the environment, and the Chesapeake Bay.

Well, I think that I have answered “But, what to do now” with thirty acres of pasture. Raise happy, healthy animals of several species while having them fertilize the fields, provide food for the family while providing us with a great way to meet new people. And, let's not forget all the entertainment! Life is good!

Denise Timms grazes beef, sheep, and turkeys in West Edmeston, NY. For more information on the Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative please contact Karen Hoffman at 607-334-4632 x116 or karen. hoffman2@ny.nrcs.gov. For assistance with planning or starting up a grazing system contact your local USDA-NRCS or county Soil and Water Conservation District.


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GRAZING

Grazing Management in the New Normal by Troy Bishopp As a veteran grazier, I’m concerned about the phrases, “The 300 year flood, Peak Soil, Peal Oil, Climate Change and The New Normal” frequently heard in the news. Should I discount them as just an anomaly or should I be planning on how this will affect my grazing operation? For me, it boils down to a simple concept; keep the soil covered with perennial, highly diverse, biologically active pastures. However it has taken me 48 years of farming to become a true believer and holistic planner in this. It’s rather embarrassing to admit I missed this mark as a “yute” while continually being stumped by a grazing system always headed in the path of what Andre Voisin termed; untoward acceleration, where each successive grazing period provides less forage and the rest period is shortened until the rotation collapses. Grazing Consultant, Jim Gerrish, says grazing too short is the biggest problem in production. With hairline receding and the prospect of a sixth generation farming here, I found the “ah ha” moment I needed 12 years ago in a hurricane and in the mirror. The forces came together after a long dry spell followed in

earnest by a 5 inch rain. As I flashed a picture of my swollen, muddy stream, I turned the lens to wipe off the rain and I caught my reflection, this was my fault. This single event of losing topsoil put me on the path to become a better grazier and in turn a better land manager. But I needed a better plan, more measuring and monitoring and long term goals. I am lucky to live in an era with access to knowledge from influential grazing notables; Andre Voisin to Newman Turner, Darrell Emmick to Jim Gerrish and Allan Savory to Greg Judy to name a few. This has led me to think about grazing in a more holistic, managementdriven style predicated on a triple bottom line mentality and stop blaming the animals for over-grazing. “Create the farm you want” is a quote I like in approaching the upcoming grazing season. Like any good game of chess, it starts with a tactical plan. I start by planning (hypothetically) on my 12 month grazing chart (in pencil) before I go into Mother Nature’s domain, around specific financial, production, environmental and family goals. I plan in recovery periods, certain grazing strategies for each field, expected dry matter intakes and plan back from major events such as my daughter’s wedding, droughty times, breeding, bluebird fledging, frost and stockpiling dates. This futuristic decisionmaking and constant monitoring allows me to think deeply about what’s ahead and works nicely with my experience and gut feelings to make management changes sooner and level out the new normals of weather. You’re probably thinking, easier to plan than to implement. But the impetus for the organic farmer is if you run out of grass you’re out of options. We’ve got to get in the mindset that it takes grass to grow grass and stop being scared of wasting a little grass if you want top performance for your animals and soil. I do agree that the forage should be trampled, harvested or clipped sixty days before the first frost to enable possible extended grazing of rested plants.

I’m wearing blinders to stay focused on grazing management.

My observations over 26 years of grazing on our farm are this; rain now comes down in buckets and we need to catch it all for the uncharacteristic dry periods that are happening. On our farm, the shorter always vegetative sward of plant species of yesteryear

has given way to a taller, more mature grazing style with a higher grazing residual (4”) and in turn longer rest periods, averaging 45 days for last season. This has changed my naturalized sward into having a more prairielike composition which have deeper, stronger roots and puts more litter on the ground to feed the soil microbes. Having stronger, more vibrant plants has also increased our grazeable days by two weeks in the spring and two months in the fall. This strategy in conjunction with stockpiling has raised our farm’s organic matter from 3.4% to 4.6% over the last three years which has essentially drought-proofed the farm while sequestering the big rain and adding resiliency to the whole farm system without buying expensive inputs.

Change in levels of organic matter on our farm map. Photos by Troy Bishopp

I’ve been monitoring Brix levels of plants and the cows that eat them and continue to see higher energy levels in more mature swards later in the day especially in young blossoms and leaf tips. To garner more of this production, I move animals 1/3 of an acre in the morning and 2/3 in the afternoon. The difference can be 7 brix in the early morning and double that by 3pm. Capturing this free energy just takes moving a fence. I’m also hearing many farmers having good success spraying raw milk on pastures to raise the energy. Grazing for energy and not towards Jerry Brunetti’s “funny proteins” has been a learning curve, but also good for the wallet as it takes less expensive grain and baleage to even out the animal’s diet and production. At the same time it allows the plant roots to rest and add mass in the soil which stimulates soil life and increases water holding capacity. Probably the most often overlooked questions of grazing management in the new normal are: What are you managing towards and why? Without tangible sustainable goals, you may fall prey to buying prescriptions that fix problems not address root causes. In my humble opinion, making money from grazing is absolutely about keeping the soil surface covered with diverse swards and soil life collecting solar energy while sequestering moisture and carbon. One only has to remember 2011 to see this is a great strategy for the future. How do you get it done? Create farm family

My grazing chart from 2011.

Five inches of rain seems to be the ‘new normal’. goals that incorporate the triple bottom line, plan out in detail how to make these goals happen, question everything, measure and monitor progress often, join a mentoring team, record your results and most of all have fun honing your grazier’s eye because the world needs more pasture-based systems.

Troy Bishopp aka “The Grass Whisperer” is an everyday practical steward, observer, teacher and 25 year veteran farmer and grazing professional in working with biologically active, financially viable and sensory pleasing, diverse, perennial pasture systems. Learn more at www.thegrasswhisperer.com/.


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July 2, 2012

LOCAL FOODS & MARKETING

Faces of our Food System: Garden Gate Delivery Get to know a local food distributor in our 2012 feature series by Becca Jablonski

CSA farms. Plus, it makes them look good, since they can expand offerings to their CSA members through increasing access to the other CSA share options.

This article is the third in a series highlighting distributors of New York State farm-grown products. For our third spotlight, I spoke to Marlo Capoccia, the Owner of Garden Gate Delivery, located in Ithaca, New York. I wanted to feature Garden Gate as they recently made the decision to shift their business model to focus on providing freight services for the growing Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farms throughout the Tompkins County region. Whereas many CSAs purchase their own vehicles, out sourcing this delivery function can be more cost effective and enable farmers to focus their attention on farming. Thus the service that Marlo and Garden Gate provide farms can be an important part of improved farm profitability.

Q: Is there demand from other CSAs to increase the availability of distribution services? A: Yes! We are trying to figure out how to grow our business to meet the demand. Q: What are the challenges you face working with the CSAs? A: Working with multiple CSAs is difficult in terms of timing - certain product has to get to businesses or specific places at certain times. For example, the bakery doesn't finish baking until 10:30am, but I want to start deliveries at 8:30am. So managing the timing issues is tough. Also, sometimes the CSAs have made commitments to deliver to certain businesses at certain times and managing those scheduling issues is a challenge. I also need to make sure that the delivery routes make sense for my business.

Q: When you started Garden Gate Delivery in 2008, what was your initial vision and model for the company? A: I wanted to bring as many local products to families as possible. It was a 'milkman model' that I had in mind. I thought that if I went out to various farms to get yogurt and meat for my own family, that I could also do it for Ryan Barrows, a driver for Garden Gate Delivery, arrives with a home delivery. other families too. So I bought a truck and got in touch with 10-15 local suppliers. I did my best to get an assortment of meat, bread, fruits, vegetables, and dairy. Next, I set deliveries. When we handled everything in-house there was up a website to ensure that everything was as convenient for more room for error and mistakes - packing, repacking, sort- Q: Are you looking for additional CSAs to work with? the would-be customers as possible. I was trying to reach ing, labeling, etc. Doing just the CSA deliveries cut down on A: Yes, but not immediately. We are still tweaking the model, people who were interested in local foods, but my real goal our costs, and particularly the need for labor, which meant and once we have it right we will certainly start looking for was to try to convert people who were buying at the grocery we could reduce our delivery fee. It has been really appeal- more CSAs. store to buying local. I knew that the key would be conven- ing to work with The Full Plate Farm Collective (see: ience. The website enabled customers to pay online (90% of http://fullplatefarms.webs.com for more information). The Q: If farmers are interested in working with Garden Gate our sales are credit card based), and thus not worry about Full Plate Farm Collective CSA started with some fruit and Delivery who should they contact? writing checks or leaving cash. The home delivery portion of vegetable CSAs working together to increase the diversity of A: I am happy to be a resource for anybody looking for ideas their offerings. But then they added 'spoke' farms so that about how to start a distribution company, but I am not capathe business was also really just to make it simple. As we went along, much of the function of the business they could offer expanded shares of other types of products ble of delivering outside of Tompkins County at this point. If became more about education. People do not just want to - meat, dairy, baked goods, etc. This kind of model works farms are looking for delivery within Tompkins County, they buy stuff. For example, as we started offering CSA shares, great with Garden Gate's new business strategy as we can should email me at: marlo@gardengatedelivery.com. Also, I we saw that people might drop off in the second season. help coordinate pick-ups and deliveries from the various encourage everyone to check out our website: www.gardenPeople would get broccoli rabe or kohlrabies as part of their farms and customers are happy because they have expand- gatedelivery.com share and not know what to do with it. So we implemented ed options. Becca Jablonski is a PhD student at Cornell University conan educational piece through the website and started writing ducting food systems research. She may be contacted at a weekly newsletter. We also did a series of cooking class- Q: How many growers or CSAs do you work with? es one summer a few years ago, and they were very well A: We have 10 CSAs we work with, and that includes two rb223@cornell.edu Thanks to the following funders for their attended, but it is a lot of work with just me running the busi- Community Supported Kitchens (for more information, see: support of local food distribution research: the Cornell Center for a Sustainable Future, NESARE, and the Cornell ness. I have received many requests to start the cooking http://crookedcarrotcsk.com. Small Farms Program. classes again. And, as much as I love the education piece, it isn't really what makes Garden Gate money. So I need to Q: What type of response do you get from the CSAs for figure out how to make the business successful so that I can whom you do deliveries? do the educational piece, which I love, or find a way for the A: Mostly they are relieved not to do the delivery themselves. It is my goal to take as much of the work off their educational piece to financially support itself. plate as possible. So at some point we may offer to take all Q: How has that vision and model changed over the of the CSA orders through our website and just give farms the total number of orders. Right now we do routing, and are years? A: Last year when I sat back to really look at the finances of starting to do some marketing - and of course the delivery. the business, I realized that we were much more efficient This takes about 10+ hours of work per week away from the when we were doing the CSA deliveries rather than our own

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July 2, 2012

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Page 15

LOCAL FOODS & MARKETING

Wanted: Infrastructure Real and Virtual by Beth McKellips When I first moved to Madison County in central NY, I was surprised to learn that very few farmers were selling products in the NYC market. In my fresh perspective, connecting upstate farmers to NYC seemed like a fairy tale waiting to happen. Madison County had rolling hills that were not being plowed under to create quarter acre lots, farmers who genuinely wanted to farm these hills as well as the lowlands in between, and plenty of businesses that sold things the farmers actually use. On the other end of a relatively short 4 and a half-hour trip was one of the most dynamic and demanding consumer markets for food. So, in my first few months of running a Cornell Cooperative Extension program aimed at expanding marketing channels for farmers, I focused on learning how to connect farmers to the NYC market, calling on Baldor, Red Jacket Orchards, GrowNYC/Greenmarket, the Park Slope Coop, Pampered Cow, and…..in fact, I called pretty much every person I knew that bought or sold local food in NYC. More than once, I filled my Subaru with Madison County-made Kriemhild Meadow Butter and headed to the city to disperse rack cards touting all kinds of Madison County products everywhere I could. In a matter of months, I had made a rather complete circuit of the local food scene in NYC. I told everyone I met that it just has to be easier to help upstate farmers sell food downstate. I naively assumed that if I built it, they would come. My whirlwind tour of the NYC local food market recently culminated with organizing a panel of wholesale buyers and distributors who have stated interest in purchasing food grown in New York State. Upon reflection of the dialogue that unfolded at this panel and my self-guided tour of the NYC local food sector, I was, in a word, wrong. There are significant structural changes needed that are much deeper and complex than creating marketing campaigns to connect the dots of upstate production to the downstate market. It is not impossible for farmers outside of the Catskills and Hudson Valley to burst the NYC bubble, but it is not easy. There are very real and tangible reasons why almost all the farmers I meet in Madison County and central NY ask for help with marketing and talk about how they need to sell more product, and on the flip side, there are concrete reasons that more stores, restaurants and institutions in NYC don't buy more food grown in New York State. Overcoming these obstacles is not going to happen quickly or without considerable effort and most likely will require some government intervention. The following is a brief description of where to start.

Step One: Physical Infrastructure The need for physical infrastructure in the form of a distribution hub where products could be aggregated, packed into marketable packages and stored to preserve freshness before making their journey to market in a re-fridgerated truck, quickly emerges as one significant missing link. Farmers are typically financially leveraged to their full capacity and tend to be asset rich but cash poor. Consequently, most farmers lack the ability to borrow capital to purchase these extremely expensive storage and transportation systems without taking a serious financial risk and going into deeper debt. A publicly funded distribution hub (or a public-private partnership) would open the door to markets of magnitude to upstate growers with one fell swoop. The buyers at the local food buyers panel mentioned purchase volumes along the lines of a quarter million dollars worth of produce. Each buyer at the table indicated a desire to purchase more product grown in New York. However, these food outlets need a consistent supply for logistical reasons and to meet consumer demand. Also, even though at first blush it might seem easy to assume that most A food distribution hub could allow farmers like Terry Mosher, stores in NYC want to buy pallet upon pallet of seen here talking to Greenmarket/GrowNYC Wholesale Market products, many specialty stores in NYC and Coordinator, Nathan Forster, to aggregate produce to meet the Brooklyn have limited storage and refrigeration volume demands of the NYC wholesale market. capacity due to small scale of the NYC urban fabric. Consequently, they need to order often and have products be delivered in small batches. The combina- robust databases that allow customers to purchase local tion of the need for consistency and to receive products in food. The lack of development of online technology is due to small doses compounds the need for physical infrastructure several complex factors beyond the scope of this discussion, upstate, where product can be consolidated from multiple but include the scarcity of capital not tied up in production, lack of technical knowledge, and the labor and time sources, stored and repacked without losing quality. demands of farming that don't allow for a plenitude of screen Lastly, while there are some shining examples of food dis- time. Farm websites in rural areas tend to be behind the tributors who work with food produced outside of the New times in both design and functionality. On the flipside, local York City market, such as Regional Access and FingerLakes food buyers in the city don't know where exactly to turn Farms, as the price of energy grows, their ability to pick up when they want to find a product produced in New York and products from multiple farmers, especially low-volume pro- usually depend on what their distributors can bring them. ducers, is going to be an uphill battle and they might Store and market managers, institutional buyers and local food distributors need to have viable options for finding local increasingly need product aggregation. products at their fingertips (literally) and this database needs a robust backend that can support real time inventoThe Other Step One: Technological Infrastructure One of my favorite moments from the recent local food panel ry changes. We need a business-to-business “facebook” for was when a Cornell Cooperative Extension colleague asked food. There have been several inroads in this realm, and the buyers, “I assume you all have farmers calling you all the many more are in development, but for now the non-comtime, right?” and the entire panel shook their head no. While modity farming industry remains a bit in the technological this baffled the agricultural professionals in the room who dark ages. tend to receive these calls daily, this exchange highlights another significant need in building a vital regional food sys- To Be Continued…. tem, technological infrastructure. While some farms have The story of upstate growers beyond the Hudson Valley and grabbed the internet and social networking bull by the horns the Catskills region providing products to the demanding and have done quite well, traditionally, the non-commodity downstate market does not appear to have a fairy tale endagricultural sector has come relatively late to the technology ing at the moment. While NYC is far from the only viable party, especially in terms of consumer-friendly websites with market for central NY farmers, the sheer volume of NYC demand highlights how a happier ending is within reach if policy makers, developers and/or the private sector could work together to create the physical and virtual infrastructure needed to connect upstate growers with the NYC market. Fulfilling these needs would allow farmers to focus on farming and producing the best food they can. At the local food buyers panel, the agricultural professionals in the room had potential to connecting over 1000 farmers with the local food buyers who spend over $150,000 annually on produce on the low end. Frankly, I would be surprised to learn if even one sale was initiated at this panel. It's time to quit putting out the fire one bucket at a time and bring on the hose, in the form of publicly-funded infrastructure that will bridge the gap for the farmers to the large, practically insatiable NYC market.

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This mixed lettuce pack is an example of how a packing house and storage facility could allow growers to package their products to make them more attractive to restaurant and other institutional buyers.

Beth McKellips is an Agricultural Economic Development Specialist with Cornell Cooperative Extension in Madison County, where she creates programs to connect farmers with marketing opportunities, diversify through value-added products and provides business and technical support. She can be reached at 315.684.3001 x 126 or at bam233@cornell.edu.


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SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

LOCAL FOODS & MARKETING

Home Grown Cow: An Easy Way to Get Into Online Sales for Meat, Poultry, and Cheese Producers by John Aikman

poultry and cheese to consumers all over the country at prices that are generally less expensive than more traditional sales channels even with the 15% service fee that is included in the retail prices. The fee covers transaction costs, marketing costs and operational costs associated with running the site. Of course the best part about Home Grown Cow is that it's free for farmers to use - so there's no risk involved in giving it try. Even farms that already have an online store can reach customers with Home Grown Cow that they wouldn't otherwise reach on their own, and farms with a web-site with no store can use Home Grown Cow as their store simply by linking to their farm profile at www.homegrowncow.com

“Where did you get these steaks? They're fantastic!” is the usual reaction from friends from out-of-town to eating beef at my dinner table in South Central Wisconsin. Some of these dinner guests have even asked me to mail meat to their homes in places as far away as Miami and Atlanta because they loved it so much. My family enjoys beef from local farms in South Central Wisconsin. It varies in type, but whether Angus, Scottish Highland, or Holstein, it is always tender, tasty and of course, most importantly, I know where it comes from and how it was raised. Though not a farmer myself, I grew up in a small market town in the UK where the sights and sounds of the livestock yard on market day were something that every kid was familiar with. I spent most summers in my mother's native Italy where grandparents raised cattle, pigs and rabbits for dairy and meat for family consumption. As a result I have a great understanding and love of farming culture and traditions. Sometime in 2010 I took a call from a friend asking if I wanted to buy a quarter beef from a farmer friend of hers. The person who had agreed to buy it had bailed on her and she needed to find a new buyer fast. That was the beginning of Home Grown Cow. Solving the Equation I suddenly realized that I was looking at two sides of an equation that was missing an “equals” sign. Friends with their craving for delicious, farm-direct meat; and busy farmers without an easy or lucrative way to reach a growing market of hungry online shoppers. My wife, Karen and I, met with farmers, and heard about the challenges of local bulk beef sales, people backing out, customers not paying, the importance of timing, processing, the dangers of listing your farm with unverified classified ad sites, and so on. It became clear that many farmers are being left behind by a digital world of online sales marching on into the future without them. Further research also taught us that smaller, more traditional farms are having an increasingly tough time due to the continuing vertical integration of the industry, which has forced most of them to become price-takers rather than price-makers, and that a small number of very big companies control more than 80% of the meat supply in the United States. It was time to act; I called my old high school friend Dom Lindars on the west coast, entrepreneur, programming wiz-

John Aikman, Home Grown Cow Co-Founder and an associate. Photo by James Blakeslee, Madison, WI

Hermione Grace Cow, Home Grown Cow’s logo drawn by John’s children. ard and rocket scientist among many other things. He was looking for advice on whom to hire to build the site and what sort of components it would need. By the end of the phone call, Dom, now my business partner, had agreed to create the site from the concept I had dreamed up which now serves farms and customers nationwide, and www.homegrowncow.com was born. Home Grown Cow serves two groups of people. First and foremost it serves farmers who, they have learned, can be held back from engaging in e-commerce because they lack time, money or the necessary skills to do so. Home Grown Cow ensures that they have an easy way of listing their farm and selling their products online at absolutely no cost to them. The second group of people of course is the customers - affectionately known as “Eaters”, and the goal for them is to offer choice and transparency in the meat, poultry and cheese that they put on their table. How it All Works From the farmers' perspective Home Grown Cow helps eliminate a number of headaches common to online sales. First, the farm profile is easy to set up and use and costs nothing, so no web designer or hosting fees are needed. It's as easy as setting up a Facebook or E-Bay account. No Internet access? No problem - you can fax the information and the team will set it up for you. Secondly, Home Grown Cow accepts credit card payments up-front, so farmers never have to worry that the customer will back out of the deal, or that they won't get paid. Thirdly, for farms that want to ship, we help with that too - calculating and collecting shipping fees from customers and producing packing slips and airbills that are e-mailed to the farmer after the sale is accepted. All the farmer has to do is package up the goods, stick on the label and get the package to the carrier's nearest location. We also provide guidance on how to do that, and shipping rates are 62% of the standard shipping rates advertised by the carrier which is welcomed by far-flung Eaters. Finally, Home Grown Cow accommodates all kinds of meat, poultry and cheese producers; farms can list everything from a whole beef to an emu fan steak. Products can be USDAinspected, state-inspected or custom-exempt inspected, and this is clearly communicated to the customer at the time of purchase along with what each of them means. Other advantages include the ability to list products well in advance of their availability dates and pre-sell them, a huge help with inventory and cost management, and the Home Grown Cow “Safety Net” which protects Farmers by collecting funds up front and Eaters by holding payment to farms until after the goods are satisfactorily received. Something for Everyone The variety of people shopping online for meat is enormous. There are people shopping for value - bulk “freezer meat”; those who want to know that their meat contains no added hormones or antibiotics; there are fancy folk who might want to serve “American Kobe Beef” at a special dinner; and gentle souls who take solace in knowing that their meat was raised especially humanely, to name just a few. Home Grown Cow, with its growing group of participating farms uses simple check boxes to identify customer preferences, and farm practices so they can be matched up. Home Grown Cow offers an ever-increasing variety of meat,

John Aikman is Co-Founder of Home Grown Cow, LLC, a national company based in South Central Wisconsin. He may be reached at john@homegrowncow.com.

Zorro the bull, from Thistle Hill Plantation in Eolia, MO. Photo by Bruce Denslow Home Grown Cow removes the constraints of time, skills and money that keep small farms from engaging in ecommerce. Home Grown Cow is a free, instant, easy-to-use online sales presence that: • Provides an online farm store • Takes credit card payments • Does your Internet marketing • Handles nationwide shipping And… • Customers pay up-front • Participation is free • Farms are paid quickly How does it work? Farms set up a Farm Profile and list their available products. Home Grown Cow markets and sells them to local and national markets. Farms identify themselves according their meat, poultry or cheese, and farm practices. Customers search based on these choices and find exactly what they're looking for. The goal for farmers is a no-cost entry into e-commerce, and for consumers it's choice and transparency of the meat, poultry and cheese that ends up on their table. Any meat, poultry or cheese producer can use Home Grown Cow; it's as simple as Facebook or E-bay to set up. Farms can ship, deliver or permit pick-up of their orders. For shipping, Home Grown Cow has deeply discounted rates that are calculated and charged to the customer up-front along with their order. Farms receive an airbill by e-mail or fax and products can be picked up or dropped off by the carrier. Consumers pay for the service in the form of a service fee that Home Grown Cow adds to each sale. Home Grown Cow is completely free for farms to use. Producers can learn more and sign up by visiting www.homegrowncow.com/farmers, calling 608-5155335 or writing to info@homegrowncow.com.


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

Page 17

LIVESTOCK & POULTRY

Considerations for Pasture Lambing and Kidding by tatiana Stanton We associate spring time with newborn lambs and kids frolicking on green pastures. However, Northeast sheep and goats often give birth indoors in winter. This makes sense for farms targeting the Easter market for suckling lambs and kids or providing show prospects for the summer show circuit. If you do not sell to these early markets, then delaying and birthing outside in the spring when the grass is up may be perfect for you. Approximately 30 Northeast sheep and goat farmers are participating in a Cornell project reviewing labor and feed costs for different birthing systems. To date, the project has uncovered some interesting results. Labor demands were substantially more for farms giving birth in Winter ’09 as compared to Spring or Fall (Figure 1). Furthermore, when comparing barn and pasture birthing in Spring ’09 (Figure 2), no pasture birthing farms lost dams at birth, although 3 of 4 barn birthing flocks had dams die. A huge benefit of pasture birthing is that dams can separate themselves and birth undisturbed leading to fewer dystocia or mothering issues. However, Goat Farm #3 experienced Floppy Kid Syndrome during birthing. If the same disease had occurred on pasture, kid losses might have increased because of difficulty treating collapsed kids.

Article Definitions Creep feeding — establishing a pen that offspring can get into but dams cannot so offspring can get extra feed to supplement dams' milk, useful for triplets or offspring from low milk producing dams. Dystocia — Labor difficulty due to malpresentation of the lambs/kids or large size in relationship to pelvic cage or dilation. Grannying — the hormone-driven stealing of newborns by another dam as she goes into labor. Jugs — small portable pens to temporarily put a dam and her litter in after birthing to facilitate bonding. Additionally, for Spring ’09 birthing farms, feed costs for pasture-birthing goat herds averaged $6.80 per dam as compared to $21.74 for barn-kidding herds (most on pasture after 1 month) and $8.14 for pasture-birthing sheep flocks as compared to $42.86 for barn-lambing sheep flocks (most in barn through weaning). Dams that are limited to the barn for birthing consume harvested forage that could be reserved for winter feeding. The success of pasture birthing is dependent on planning ahead for several factors. Choosing a Birthing Pasture Birthing checks can be done quickly (even with binoculars) if birthing pastures are close to the farm and dams are clearly marked ahead of time with spray paint. Thus, pastures bordering your barn or house are most convenient, especially if you anticipate returning triplet litters or “orphans” to the barn for more intensive rearing. Unfortunately these nearby pastures are often your winter loafing areas and by spring are heavily contaminated with manure and internal parasites. Many worms successfully overwinter outside (brown stomach worm, nemotodirus). Barber pole worm, our deadliest worm, does not survive outside in winter. It “hibernates” as immature larvae inside your sheep or goats. However, its dormancy breaks by early March and livestock then shed barber pole eggs in their feces. Therefore, you must plan ahead to insure that your livestock don’t access the proposed birthing paddocks over the winter.

Figure 1

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In contrast, some study participants move their animals with temporary fencing every 1 to 5 days and must disrupt dams shortly after/during birth when it’s time to shift to the next grazing paddock. This can result in poor bonding between dams and offspring - leading to rejected offspring. Some farms have adopted drift lambing procedures where ewes that lamb during the 1 to 5 day period are left behind to form their own grazing unit to eventually combine with other “left behind” units. However, many farmers only have a few dams giving birth during a paddock move. These dams may panic if left behind. One option for smaller flocks is to move the temporary fence forward but let the “back” fence remain in place for at least one extra shift. Thus, dams that have recently given birth can stay in the previous grazing strip without being separated from the flock. You need good grazing in the previous strip so that hunger does not cause dams

Plastic rain covers for lambs are not readily available in the U.S. but can be handmade using plastic bread bags.

A second decision you need to make is whether to “set stock” or “drift lamb” during your birthing season. Most farmers in our study practice set stocking. Two weeks prior to lambing, one very experienced study farmer runs his flock through a working chute and spray paints them starting with the number 1.The first 40 ewes go in his first 5 acre birthing paddock, the next 40 in the next 5 acres, until all 300 ewes have been assigned a paddock. When lambs are born they receive the same spray paint number as their dam. Thus, for every lamb he can identify its paddock and dam. His system

Figure 2

hinges on having plentiful grazing in each paddock to last the 6 week long birthing season. After lambing the flock is combined and rotationally grazed. Water should be centrally located in birthing pastures to discourage dams from having to travel far from their young to drink. Advantages of set stocking are that ewes pick out a nesting area and are undisturbed until they and their lambs decide to rejoin the flock.

to move forward prematurely from their nesting site. However, letting grass get excessively tall can cause problems especially for breeds that hide their young, because dams may lose track of where they have stowed their offspring. Planning for Inclement Weather, Mothering Issues and Predation Weather patterns can change radically in spring time. Have a contingency plan to get animals to shelter in case of sudden snow storms or freezing rains. Many farms utilize hedgerows, woodlots, or dead drops during the birthing season. However, keep in mind that dams may mob shelters during bad weather. Any artificial shelters should be very open with wide entrances to try to avoid trampling of newborns. Grannying (stealing of newborn by another dam near parturition) may also occur when animals crowd together in bad weather. Plastic rain covers for lambs are not readily available in the US but can be handmade using plastic bread bags. If your fence line is electrified, the metal corkscrew tie-out stakes for dogs are helpful to restrain dams with dystocia or hesitant to nurse young. Avoid setting up jugs in birthing pastures if possible because the whole flock may try to get to the feed in them and collapse the jugs onto newborns.

Birthing checks can be done quickly (even with binoculars) if birthing pastures are close to the farm and dams are clearly marked ahead of time with spray paint.

Several farms on our study experience no predation problems while others with similar fencing have problems with coyotes, foxes, or great

Lambing Page 18


Page 18

SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

LIVESTOCK & POULTRY

Backyard Poultry 101 by Nancy Glazier

Chickens are an easy way to raise your own meat and eggs. They don't require a lot of work or time and flocks are great for kids to care for, from collecting eggs to feeding and watering. Birds need to get off to a good start; healthy chicks, proper nutrition, water and shelter equates to the beginning of a healthy productive flock! The first thing is to find a reputable source for chicks. Buy from one hatchery to reduce the risk of bringing disease onto the farm. Most hatcheries will ship chicks within one day of hatching. Some will vaccinate if you request them. Many of the old-time diseases are making a comeback since chicks may not be vaccinated. Vaccines to consider include Marek's disease, Newcastle, and Infectious Bronchitis. It may not be necessary for broilers, but laying hens hang around for several years which increases their health risks. Have housing ready for chicks; they will need a heated brooder for a few weeks before they venture out. If you had a previous flock, the pens or house should be thoroughly cleaned and allowed to dry to reduce the risk of infecting the young birds with diseases. Disinfectants containing quaternary ammonium are good choices. Upon arrival, give each chick a drink of water; they have been without food and water since they left the hatchery, so they will be thirsty. Feed and water should always be avail-

able. Feed can be commercially purchased or mixed at home. If farm-mixed, make sure all essential vitamins, minerals and amino acids are provided or deficiencies will develop. Your local feed mill can mix a ration for you if you purchase a quantity. A dry and ventilated living area is important to keep the flock healthy. Bedding should be dry with shavings or straw added when needed. A closed-up coop can lead to respiratory diseases and build-up of ammonia from manure. Visitors to the farm that have their own flocks should wear clean shoes to prevent spreading diseases. Limiting exposure to wild birds can also reduce the risk of diseases. Rodents can be disease carriers, so keep them out of housing and feed. Parasites - both internal and external - can reduce pro- Some happy backyard chickens. ductivity. Chickens can become infested with mites and lice. Foxes, raccoons, weasels, hawks, owls and even the neighSigns are feather loss and reduced egg production; severe bor's dog can prey on the flock. Guard animals, like dogs infestations can cause death. Spraying or dusting with car- and geese may help protect them. Free-ranging flocks baryl will control the pests, and providing an area for dust should have a safe place to roost for the night. baths will help. Most common internal parasites are roundFor more information on poultry health, visit the National worms and tapeworms. Poultry Improvement Program at www.aphis.usda.gov/aniAnother parasite, cocci (protozoa) causes coccidiosis that mal_health/animal_dis_spec/poultry/ can cause high mortality in young birds. It can be more common in wet and humid conditions, and can be controlled with Nancy Glazier is Small Farms Support Specialist for the Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team medicated feeds containing coccidiostats. of Cornell Cooperative Extension/PRO-DAIRY, and has a Predators can be real problems in rural or suburban areas. small flock of egg layers.You can reach her at 585-315-7746 or nig3@cornell.edu.

Lambing from Page 17

dams toward this equipment prior to birthing.

horned owls. Dispose of stillbirths and uneaten afterbirths quickly so that local predators do not cultivate a taste for them. Some farmers prefer not to band tails for fear that discarded tails encourage predation. Most study farms with a history of predation successfully combat it with guardian dogs, llamas or donkeys and improved electric fencing. They still run into problems if dams are birthing in too large an area (i.e. 120 ewes on 25 acres) because one or two dogs are insufficient, especially if the terrain is hilly or forested. If predation challenges continue both night and day, some farms combine guardian species so that dogs patrol at night and llamas/donkeys take over during the day.

You’ll need a good tote to carry your equipment cross country. Favorites include 5-gallon pails (good to sit on), carpenter belts, small coolers, and carpet bags (good for stowing an extra lamb). Wooden crooks help to traverse electrified fences. Banding is the most commonly used method for tail docking and castration as farmers have no access to electricity and want to avoid open wounds. However, some farmers delay docking until birthing is done and animals can be brought to an electrified barn. If you have a good quiet herding dog or are working with goats, newborns can be processed as 2 day olds when hardier.

Handling Birthing Checks and Management Tasks How often a farmer checks a birthing pasture depends on how difficult it is to catch newborns. Most kids are awkward on their feet for a couple of days after birth. This is not true for many breeds of sheep. Most sheep farmers doing pasture lambing try to conduct all their birthing tasks (spray painting, ear-tagging, tail docking, etc.) when they first spot a new litter. Be sure to catch the entire litter to avoid the dam taking off with some of her offspring. You’ll get good at holding several newborns between your knees. Catching can be done using a leg crook or fish net. You must desensitize

Creep feeding to supplement dams’ milk is challenging on pastures because offspring want to follow their dams instead of congregating at a creep. Locate the creep near places where dams tend to lie down to chew their cud (near water, gates, or shade) to encourage offspring to explore it. Make sure the creep is well built so that the flock cannot collapse it. Internal Parasites Nursing dams and their suckling offspring are vulnerable to internal parasites especially when pasture

On left: Some farmers prefer not to band tails for fear that discarded tails encourage predation.

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conditions are warm and damp as in late spring and summer. Animals should be monitored frequently for anemia (FAMACHA scores and lethargy), diarrhea and poor body condition, and selectively dewormed as necessary. In temperate climates barber pole populations peak about 35 days after the egg laden manure is deposited on a pasture but drop substantially by 60 days. Highly susceptible animals should be moved out of a paddock within 5 days and not returned for greater than 60 days. The pasture may need to be brush hogged or grazed by a different species during the extended rest period to keep from getting too mature. Pasture birthing is not for farmers who feel they’ll have too little control of birthing at a time when their labor and attention needs to be focused instead on hay or field crops. However, with wise advance planning, pasture birthing is a successful alternative for many farms to explore.

Tatiana Stanton is a Small Ruminant Extension Specialist in the Dept. of Animal Science at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. She may be reached at 607-254-6024 or tls7@cornell.edu


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

July 2, 2012

Page 19

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Is a Farm Loan Right for You? by Noreen Atkins & John Flocke Nathaniel Thompson approached the Cortland NY FSA Credit Team in 2006 for loans to purchase a 5 acre parcel of land and build a barn in an attempt to expand his business. Nathaniel is an organic vegetable farmer, specializing in salad greens and root crops. He markets his produce as Remembrance Farm, to local restaurants, grocery stores, and through the Full Plate Collective CSA in the Ithaca NY area, and always is attempting to expand his customer base. At the time of his initial FSA loan application Nathaniel had been in business for 3 years and had recently moved his operation from the Hudson Valley to Tompkins County. At that point he was renting 10 acres of land South of Ithaca, NY. He had already established a solid customer base in the Ithaca, NY area and the business had a history of increasing sales. He planned to rent 15 acres of cropland and incorporate a sustainable cropping system to be the centerpiece

of a biodynamic organic farm. To ensure such a project worked Nathaniel decided to purchase land adjacent to the rented tract. Nathaniel soon realized he would have little equity to purchase the real estate after closing costs and sought financial help to boost his business. After he was unable to obtain commercial credit for the land purchase and to construct the barn, he turned his attention to the NY Farm Service Agency Farm Loan Programs available to him. FSA was able to approve his request to purchase the 5 acres of land and build the cleaning/processing barn along with loans to refinance his equipment debt, purchase additional equipment and provide annual operating expenses. Nathaniel's vision of a truly biodynamic farm was first initiated by adding a powerful ally, chickens. These birds play a crucial role on the farm by transforming the grain and pasture into fertilizer for the crops grown. The chickens are set out to pasture and rotate around the farm to consume the grasses, cover crops, bugs, and organic grains while leaving their special brand of organic fertilizer. The eggs are then sold locally and distributed through the farms CSA. The addition of chickens has allowed the farm to become not only a certified biodynamic farm but a model of sustainability.

Chickens are a very important aspect to the biodynamic nature of Remembrance Farm.

Since the first FSA loans were closed, Nathaniel's business has continued to grow, with gross income tripling since 2006. This boom has been assisted by additional FSA operating loans and a farm ownership loan. These loans and the overall success of the farm has allowed him to purchase an additional 35 adjacent acres, add high tunnels to his operation, expand his barn and build a machine shed. All of this expansion became a reality with the help of FSA and the dedication of a great New York State farmer.

The rows of greens are growing for Remembrance Farm’s CSA customers. Photos by Emily Thompson

For information on Remembrance Farm, visit remembrancefarm.org/. For more information on Farm Service Agency programs, visit your local (county) office. You can find their locations by visiting: www.fsa.usda.gov/ and search by state and then county.

Nathaniel & Emily Thompson of Remembrance Farm.

RESOURCE SPOTLIGHTS

Report Rare Nuts, Please! NY Nut Growers Association Seeks to Preserve Heirloom Nut Trees by John Wertis In the 1930’s, a lot of interest developed in growing English (Persian) Walnuts in New York State. The Canadian Minister, the Rev. Paul Crath, had collected seed nuts and seedling trees from his native Poland and was growing them successfully in Southern Ontario. He formed a partnership with S.H. Graham, a nurseryman in Ithaca, NY, and many Crath Carpathian strain trees were marketed and planted throughout NYS and in other parts of the country through the 1950’s. Many of these trees have survived freeze, drought, and the Walnut Blight and continue as producers of large, crackable, tasty nuts today.

wood”, and carrying out the grafting and callusing processes employed in asexually reproducing valuable nut trees of several species.

For more information on the internship, or to report a rare tree, visit www.NYNGA.org, or contact John Wertis, president, at 607-387-4331, or bwwfarmtoday@aol.com.

The NY Nut Growers Association is seeking out Crath Carpathian and perpetuating their germ plasm by grafting and growing them on member’s farms and at the John Gordon Demonstration Nut Grove in Trumansburg, NY. Readers are encouraged to report the location of such trees to the Nut Growers Association for our expanding data base and for possible use in the “Heirloom Program”. If you have a large “English” walnut tree growing on your property that is producing a crop of edible nuts with some regularity, chances are good that it is of the Crath Carpathian strain and the Nut Growers Association would like to hear from you about it. The NY Nut Growers Association also sponsors an annual internship in which individuals spend three full days gaining practical, hands-on experience in growing nut tree seedlings for “stock”, collecting and processing “scion

The “Stanley Carpathian” strain on the farm of the Roggan Family near Stanley, NY. NYNGA has made successful grafts from this tree.


SMALL FARM QUARTERLY

Page 20

July 2, 2012

HORTICULTURE

Grow Berries for All Seasons by Cathy Heidenreich and Laura McDermott There are many reasons that growers would choose to extend the cropping season for berries. The earliest berries notably capture the best market prices - which is what growers strive for. On the latter end of the season, there may be late season marketing opportunities, and certainly creating as long a time as possible for berry sales is a good thing. Season extension techniques may improve yield, fruit quality and shelf life, and possibly allow us to grow a wider variety of berries, all attributes that growers and consumers can be happy about. When season extension is discussed lately, it often includes plant manipulation techniques, like tipping raspberries or removing blossoms of strawberries, or it might refer to environmental manipulation like using row covers or high tunnels to temporarily provide protection from an unsuitable environment. The easiest thing a grower can do to extend the berry season is to choose to grow berry crops that compliment each other seasonally, and then choose varieties that provide plentiful, high quality berries throughout the harvest season. The following summaries are meant to be examples of the way a grower could choose overlapping varieties that would keep fresh, nutritious berries in front of his/ customers for the longest possible time - without doing any crop or environmental manipulation. As customers come to rely on local farms for their fruit needs, that will provide the incentive for more elaborate season extension efforts. These summaries are not inclusive. There are dozens of varieties that could be substituted for the ones mentioned below. Growers should always try different varieties as fruit characteristics may differ between locations. Additional information about these and other varieties as well as the nurseries where you can order them is located at www.fruit.cornell.edu/berry/index.htm The earliest berries in New York State are strawberries. Traditional June bearers and Day Neutral strawberries begin producing in May or June, depending on the microclimate. In cooler regions and with good variety selection, June bearers will continue into July, but day-neutrals will provide customers with fresh strawberries into October throughout most of New York - with just a bit of attention to frost protection.

Additionally, many other berry crops will start production in July including blackberries, blueberries, currants, gooseberries and raspberries. Many of these can continue into September and possibly longer if the correct varieties are chosen and with slight modifications to environment. Elderberries ripen in August and hardy Kiwifruit, soon to be very popular with consumers, is a great addition to the September market table. Choosing the best berry varieties is not an easy task. There are hundreds of options, all touted to be the most delicious and productive. Growers need to consider local customer preferences in addition to pest resistance, vigor and timing. The lists in Figure 1 may provide you with ideas for new varieties to try next season.

Figure 1: Blueberry, raspberry and strawberry varieties for an extended season. Many of the berries in Figure 1 are familiar to growers, but the key is to have some of all varieties so that you can prolong the optimum harvest window. The area where many growers may be surprised at the varieties listed is in the fall raspberries. Most folks are still relying on Heritage to pull them through the autumn, but this is a mistake as the new varieties offer significant advances in earliness and fruit quality. The overall yield of these newer varieties will not approach Heritage, but having some nice looking early fall raspberries may encourage late summer pickers to return. The chart also does not mention Day-Neutral strawberries. In New York, day neutral production relies largely on 4 varieties: Albion, Evie 2, Seascape and Tribute. Using these varieties in a number of different field or high tunnel production systems will add a great deal to berry season extension. The blueberry variety plan is the most reliable in season stretching mainly because blueberries last so well on the plant. Still, in a year like summer 2010, the sustained heat really shortened the season, so most growers did not harvest much of anything past the 2nd week of August.

Strawberries taste like spring! Photos by Cathy Heidenreich

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Cornell Releases Two New Raspberry Varieties Two new raspberry varieties produced by Cornell researchers, Double Gold and Crimson Night, offer smallscale growers and home gardeners showy, flavorful raspberries on vigorous, disease-resistant plants. Double Gold produces a deeply blushed, golden champagne-colored fruit with a distinctive conical shape, earning the "double" in its name for its two harvests per season. The first year of planting, the initial crop is produced in the fall on the tips of that year's canes, and a second crop is produced farther down the same canes the following summer.

Blueberries ready to pick Farmers in cold areas may get excited when they see the primocane blackberry varieties listed. Prime-Jim and PrimeJan have been around for several years and offer the cold climate berry grower the possibility of getting blackberries in normally un-hospitable zones. The problem is that these varieties still need a VERY long growing season before they can be harvested. In a 2008 Massachusetts study, both of these varieties started bearing by Sept. 15 and were finished by early October in the field. Compared to the same planting design under a high tunnel, which yielded 2.5 times more fruit that same season, it still suggest that some type of protection would really help fall bearing blackberries. Summer blackberries likewise may need some environmental or plant manipulation in many NY regions, but for growers in Zones 5 and warmer, these plants offer a product highly desired by health conscious consumers. Ribes, currants and gooseberries, are very popular with certain ethnic markets, but growers would profit by putting a bit of extra effort into marketing these fruit. Currants and gooseberries are featured in many cooking magazines and make great preserves. Black currants specifically have very high anti-oxidant levels and could be marketed to those folks that have home juicers.

Blackberry and ribes varieties for an extended season. *Susceptible to currant cane blight

The possibility for making the most of your berry season begins with your winter order. Take plenty of time to look at the fruit you offer over the entire season and try hard to avoid dead zones when no fruit is available. Northeast growers will have to work hard to meet the local demand, but the end result will be worth it.

Cathy Heidenreich is a Berry Extension Support Specialist with Cornell University and she can be reached at mcm4@cornell.edu. Laura McDermott is a Capital District Vegetable and Small Fruit Regional Specialist with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Washington County. She can be reached at lgm4@cornell.edu.

Crimson Night is more compact, making the dark purple canes a particularly attractive ornamental for container gardening or a backyard raspberry plot. Small quantities will be available late this summer, and North American Plants expects to have enough plants to meet the anticipated demand of each variety by the spring of 2013. Plant patents will be filed later this year. Interested growers can learn more about new Cornell berry varieties at open house events in July and September.

A mixed berry planting

Country Folks East 7.2.12  

Country Folks East July 7, 2012