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19 SEPTEMBER 2011 Section One e off Three Volume e 39 r 44 Number

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Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

Farm News • Equipment for Sale • Auctions • Classifieds

‘Winning the Game’ with risk management and a post harvesting grain marketing plan Page A3

Columnists Paris Reidhead

Crop Comments

A6

Lee Mielke

Mielke Market Weekly B1

Auctions Classifieds Dairy & DHIA Farmer to Farmer

C1 B19 A6 A12

Youth h benefitt from m sale e of Clovers s in n Columbia a County A Page e A23 FFA I will ponder the glorious splendor of your majesty and all your marvelous works. Psalm 145: 5


Section A - Page 2 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Orange County farmers emergency flood meeting by Judy Van Put With little time for advance notice, in an effort to provide timely assistance to farmers who suffered great losses in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene, Maire Ullrich, Acting Program Leader and her staff at Orange County’s Cornell Cooperative Extension pulled together a well-attended Emergency Farmer Meeting at the Emergency Service Center, Goshen, NY. On hand to talk about what programs and assistance might be available were a whole slate of officials, including federal, state and local agencies, with representatives from Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture FSA (Farm Services Agency), Soil & Water Conservation Districts, Crop Insurance Cornell Cooperative Extension, Farm Credit East, NY Center for Agricultural Medicine & Health (NYCAMH) NY FarmNet, NY FarmLink, Department of Ag and Markets, Department of Labor, Department of Social Services and several councilmen and women and legislative representatives. In Orange County alone, it was estimated that the extent of the damage for agricultural production loss from Hurricane Irene is $40 to $45 million. That damage was severe for some, and completely wiped out others. Dominick Green, Director of Emergency Management in Orange County spoke about individual assistance that was available to help tenants, renters on small businesses recover from disaster. His agency will help with finding residences for those who are displaced, and replacing residences if they are declared destroyed. In addition, if someone’s propane or oil tanks were carried away, FEMA will help replace them and clean up any oil spilled. However, he cautioned, FEMA only provides help for your personal vehicle, not any farm vehicles. Their assistance is limited to a farmer’s residence, clothing, fuel oil tank, driveway, personal vehicles, etc. Historically, he said that FEMA has provided 12 1/2 percent in assistance as they have done in the past. However,

they are seeking to provide 25 percent coverage for this disaster. He instructed farmers to let the village or town know if their road has been damaged so that those repairs can be made. Under public assistance, if a culvert was washed out or destroyed the Federal government can be requested to replace it with a larger culvert. The number to call in order to register for FEMA assistance is 800-621-FEMA (3362). In addition, they can be reached online at FEMA.gov. Applications may be filled out online or on the telephone with an operator. The process takes about 5- 15 minutes, and if a home inspection is required, FEMA will contact the farmer. It was suggested that people should document their losses with photographs, and that they contact their insurance company to see whether they have national flood insurance. A question was asked whether FEMA would change the rules so that farms may be covered in some way by having crops designated as inventory, and it was answered that this is being considered by the operations people but no word yet has gotten back. Another farmer despaired that he has horses and cows floating down the Wallkill River, as well as 200 acres of sweet corn that was ruined, and who is going to help him? The FEMA representative deferred the livestock question to the U.S. Department of Agriculture representative, but mentioned NAP as being helpful for his corn crop. USDA’s Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) provides financial help to a farmer who has non-insurable crops when a low yield, loss of acreage or prevented planting occurs because of a natural disaster. Funding is already set aside by the federal government; however NAP insurance needs to have been applied for a year in advance. Farmers can check the USDA Web site, or stop into the local office in Middletown. Next on the agenda was a discussion of USDA’s ELAP program — which provides emergency assistance to producers of livestock, honey bees, and farm-raised

Kevin Sumner, of the Orange County Soil and Water Conservation Office and Phil Giltner, of the U.S. Department of Ag and Markets addressed some of the issues facing farmers with losses due to the hurricane.

fish. It covers losses from disaster such as adverse weather or other conditions, such as blizzards and wildfires not adequately covered by any other disaster program. The representative said that ELAP coverage was for livestock and feeds. “If you lost any animals in the disaster, feed, Ag bags, roof or silo bins, we have assistance. With feeds, the key distinction is, if it is feed you grew yourself you need RMA insurance or NAP insurance. If you buy in all your feed that’s slightly different and we can address that.” For livestock losses, farmers are requested to report in as quickly as possible, within 60 days. Another program pushing for funding from the government is the ECP, or Emergency Conservation Program. The representative stated “We (Orange County) have received ECP funding for leveling fields, cleaning out ditches,

Blaine Allen, from Farm Credit East, asked the crowd not to rule out loans, stating “There are things we can do to relieve stress. We can do interest-only payments, or restructure loans. The terms and rates are favorable; don’t block out what’s available.” Photos by Judy Van Put

certain other conservations practices. New York State has already requested funding; we’re doing that ASAP. It takes an act of Congress to get that money appropriated to our county. We’ve put in the request, and hope that Congress is sensitive to our issues.” Bob Merrill, of the Natural Resources Conservation Service asked those who suffered losses to “get in touch with me.” He said that the NRCS, upon reviewing letters describing damages, sends engineers to the area, where they create a damage report and enter a cooperative agreement with the town. NRCS can be reached locally by calling 845-343-1873. Many dairy farmers had to dump their milk after the hurricane; a representative of State Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s office said she’s requested federal reimbursement for the market value of that milk. Even so, some farmers were frustrated, and called the meeting a washout. Jody Moraski, a horse farm owner, asked “What can I do today to get (assistance)? I’ve got horses stuck in a paddock to stay ahead of water. What can we do today? You’re meeting prematurely. I have a lot of work to do to because the water is coming in my barn.” Another farmer said “We only have 15 days to apply for this. I know you’re doing what you can do, but for us on this side of the fence it’s completely different. We’re relying on our state to get us Ag assistance for the loss we have. We can’t wait the 15 days or we’re going deeper into a hole. We need the state to help us.” Kevin Sumner, of the Orange County Soil and Water Conservation Office provided his contact number as 845-3431873. He mentioned state money coming to local districts to assist on the local disaster program. For more information, including emergency telephone numbers and important information for flood assistance, please visit http://counties.cce.cornell.edu/orange/orange.htm or paste “Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County” in your browser.


by Elizabeth A. Tomlin “Look to the market at harvest,” advises Penn State Cooperative Extension Ag Marketing Educator John Berry. “It will suggest what post-harvest marketing methods are appropriate.” Berry was speaking at a ‘Winning the Game’ Risk Management presentation at the Richfield Springs Tally-Ho restaurant, where he discussed options of grain marketing and presented several marketing methods for attendees using a power point presentation, workbooks, and a simulated marketing game using actual daily marketing prices. Although some grain farmers may not initially be inclined to use a marketing plan, Berry pointed out that by writing down a basic, one-page plan you are able to formulate a proactive strategy to increase your profits. Your plan will be affected by whether or not you have storage for your crop. If not, you are probably selling your crop off of the combine. This simplifies things, however, Berry points out, “At harvest, typically the price is the lowest. As we go through the cooler seasons prices tend to rise until we get to May.” If you are fortunate enough to have storage space for your crops, you possibly store the entire crop until May, and then sell it all at once for the local cash price. Not a bad idea, as 20 years worth of data shows that historically, the seasoned price patterns of grain top out during May and then prices either stagnate or drop off. However, there is also the option of “selling the carry.” “Step one is to calculate the carry cost,” Berry explains, noting that the carry cost is simply the difference be-

tween any two future delivery months. Carrying charges speak directly to storable commodities and reflect price differences, suggesting potential storage return even when crops are not lockedin with a contract. Is the carry strong, weak, or negative? “When the market is inverted, we don’t sell to carry,” Berry states. “Step two is to figure out the per bushel cost,” Berry says. To do this take into consideration the cash grain price, the interest rate, and the number of months the grain is being stored. “Be aware of the costs to store grains,” reminds Berry. Comparing the carry charge to the interest cost will help to decide whether to store the crop or sell off the combine. Generally a carrying charge of greater than 140 percent will be large enough to cover all costs of storage. Armed with worksheets, calculators, and basic crop information, seminar attendees set about deciding what method they would choose to sell their crops. Choices included selling right off of the combine, storing with a set price, storing with no set price, or a combination of these. On the worksheets decisions were made as to how much grain would be sold and how much would be stored. Target dates were set concerning how many bushels would be sold during the winter and spring months, and exit strategies were chosen by a drop in crop prices or a late date with grain still stored. “Know what price and time driven exit strategy works for you,” Berry said, adding that everyone has their own idea of what their individual expectations are.

William Vetter, dairy and grain farmer from Sharon Springs, calculates the ‘carry cost’ in a simulated marketing plan. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Tomlin

“Be realistic about price expectations. What price is big enough and what price is too big?” Be flexible, yet disciplined when following your marketing plan.” Perceived risk may play a big part in the decision making. “I’m risk adverse,” Berry admitted with a smile. “I like to sleep at night!” Berry advocates dealing with local cash buyers but using the Chicago Board of Trade for reference to trends and driving prices. Berry also watches the market for weekly prices, which enables him to use a “viable strategy.” “Many factors influence grain marketing,” says Berry. “Good decisions to-

day may be poor tomorrow. Bad decisions today may be good for tomorrow.” Berry says his goal is to send attendees home “learning one thing about more efficient grain marketing.” “Look to the next year for pre-harvest marketing opportunities for the next crop,” Berry advises. Winning the Game grain marketing series was developed by the º of Minnesota Center for Farm Financial Management. The series consists of two workshops, pre-harvest offered in late winter, and post-harvest offered in late summer. The programs are made possible through Cornell Cooperative Extension and New York Ag & Markets and funded by a competitive government grant. Penn State Cooperative Extension Ag Marketing Educator John Berry, Presenter of Winning the Game and Managing the Margin, may be contacted at johnberry@psu.edu.

Ag Marketing Specialist John Berry explains his strategy of being “flexible, yet disciplined” in his grain marketing decisions.

(From left) John Berry Ag Marketing Specialist & Educator from Penn State Cooperative Extension, Kevin Ganoe, CCA Central NY Field Crop Specialist, and Charles Koines, NY Crop Insurance Educator joined forces to present the Risk Management educational program, Winning the Game ~ Grain Marketing seminar.

Page 3 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

‘Winning the Game’ with risk management and a post harvesting grain marketing plan


Section A - Page 4 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Worden brings perspective as National Holstein President by Steven E. Smith These are challenging times with the potential for exciting advancement. From his position as National President of Holstein USA Chuck Worden of Cassville, NY cites opportunities that will require focus and commitment from the dairy sector in New York as well as on the national level. U.S. dairy policy “Significant change to U.S. dairy policy has been considered ever since the precipitous fall of U.S. milk prices in 2009. Holstein Association USA has assisted with the development of the proposed Dairy Market Stabilization Act. “While this act has not been made into law, the current draft proposal known as the Foundations for the Future (FFTF) plan has elements of the Dairy Market Stabilization,” stated Worden. The FFTF proposal has been promoted by the National Milk Producers Federation and Worden indicated that the Holstein Association USA has been influencing this policy development. Worden explained that until this proposal is in the form of a bill, the Holstein Association will continue to influence the most aggressively pursued plan that is in the current pipeline. “What was the Dairy Market Stabilization Act is now more of a shell compared to what it was as a stand alone program.” That is among the reasons Worden believes that “as an industry we need to energize the base and make our voices heard relative to these proposed changed. Although the National Holstein Association exceeds 28,000 members

that has influence from the top down, it is important to have momentum from the grassroots up.” “The Holstein Association has met with U.S. Representative Collin Peterson to lobby for changing the proposed trigger from $6 to $7 so that the program would provide a more responsive but less dramatic shift in milk price during changes in the milk supply/ milk demand market event. We have requested hearings to discuss and evaluate the federal milk marketing orders.” From Worden’s vantage point, other concepts of other groups regarding price stabilization, price discovery and future production should be considered as well. Opportunities While the dairy sector is addressing change, Worden is quick to speak of the industry’s future including advancements such as genomics in dairy cattle. “It’s an exciting time for the Holstein Association right now. Genomics gives the industry a measure of the quality of genetics and allows breeders to determine the best new animals in the breed while they are young calves. Besides speeding up genetic progress, genomics provides so much more information to be obtained about cattle than ever before.” In order for this technology to continue to be advanced, Worden indicated that the industry needs to embrace verification through avenues such as DHI testing and animal classification. By testing and classifying, the association is measuring the phenotype. “This information is how genomic measures are

Country Folks Eastern Edition U.S.P.S. 482-190

Country Folks (ISSN0191-8907) is published every week on Monday by Lee Publications, PO Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. Periodical postage paid at Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 and additional entry offices. Subscription Price: $45 per year, $75 for 2 years. POSTMASTER: Send address change to Country Folks, P.O. Box 121, 6113 St. Hwy. 5, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428. 518-673-2448. Country Folks is the official publication of the Northeast DHIA, N.Y. State FFA, N.Y. Corn Growers Association and the N.Y. Beef Producers. Publisher, President .....................Frederick W. Lee, 518-673-0134 V.P., General Manager......................Bruce Button, 518-673-0104...................... bbutton@leepub.com V.P., Production.................................Mark W. Lee, 518-673-0132........................... mlee@leepub.com Managing Editor.............................Joan Kark-Wren, 518-673-0141................. jkarkwren@leepub.com Assistant Editor..................................Gary Elliott, 518-673-0143......................... cfeditor@leepub.com Page Composition.........................Michelle Gressler, 518-673-0138 ...................mmykel@leepub.com Comptroller.......................................Robert Moyer, 518-673-0148...................... bmoyer@leepub.com Production Coordinator..................Jessica Mackay, 518-673-0137.................... jmackay@leepub.com Classified Ad Manager.....................Peggy Patrei, 518-673-0111..................... classified@leepub.com Shop Foreman ..................................................................................................................Harry Delong Palatine Bridge, Front desk ....................518-673-0160 .......................Web site: www.leepub.com Accounting/Billing Office .......................518-673-0149 ..................................amoyer@leepub.com Subscriptions ..........................................888-596-5329 .......................subscriptions@leepub.com Send all correspondence to: PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428 • Fax (518) 673-2699 Editorial email: jkarkwren@leepub.com Advertising email: jmackay@leepub.com Ad Sales Bruce Button, Corporate Sales Mgr .......Palatine Bridge, NY..........................................518-673-0104 Territory Managers Patrick Burk ...................................................Batavia, NY ................................................585-343-9721 Tim Cushen ...............................................Schenectady, NY ...........................................518-346-3028 Ian Hitchener ...............................................Bradford, VT ...............................................802-222-5726 Rick Salmon ..................................................Cicero, NY .................315-452-9722 • Fax 315-452-9723 Ad Sales Representatives Jan Andrews .........................................Palatine Bridge, NY .........................................518-673-0110 Laura Clary ............................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0118 Dave Dornburgh ....................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0109 Steve Heiser ..........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0107 Tina Krieger ...........................................Palatine Bridge, NY ..........................................518-673-0108 Sue Thomas ..........................................suethomas@cox.net ..........................................949-305-7447 We cannot GUARANTEE the return of photographs. Publisher not responsible for typographical errors. Size, style of type and locations of advertisements are left to the discretion of the publisher. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. We will not knowingly accept or publish advertising which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The publisher reserves the sole right to edit, revise or reject any and all advertising with or without cause being assigned which in his judgement is unwholesome or contrary to the interest of this publication. We assume no financial responsibility for typographical errors in advertisement, but if at fault, will reprint that portion of the ad in which the error appears.

Chuck Worden is the National President of the Holstein Association USA. While the U.S. dairy industry is facing challenges due to rising production costs and the need for national and regional milk marketing policy changes, Worden also cites advancements which will allow the industry to be responsive in the future. Chuck and his wife Vanessa operate Wormont Dairy with their sons in Cassville, NY. Photo by Steven E. Smith

recalibrated. We need to do this to continue to improve the system. We need to collect this data efficiently and cost effectively to get more data. One of my goals is to see Holstein go forward, streamline the process so we can include more cows and more dairyman so that we are of service to all dairyman.” New information Worden gave a recent example of how genomics is advancing opportunities for the dairy industry. “A previously unknown lethal recessive that can result from certain matings was present in three breeds until it was measured through genomics. A haplotype or groups of genetic markers within the DNA of cattle have been determined to cause the failed conception or early embryonic losses when a pregnancy inherits the same haplotype from both sire and dam. There are three haplotypes in Holsteins, one in Jerseys and one in Brown Swiss that have this effect on reproduction. While there will be no need to cull animals with the given haplotypes, genomics information can be used to avoid low probability conception matings of animals with the same haplotype. “This type of information which will help dairyman understand health trait data as well as other aspects of performance such as feed efficiency measures will become a great tool for purebred and commercial breeders alike.” Advancement Worden conveyed that the cattle breeders should recognize that genomics increased the generation interval and doubled the net merit of the bulls in A.I. stud. “As we continue with the process, we will be advancing genetics very fast. With genomics, an A.I. sire

could have sons being born before sire is even two years of age. As a result, instead of evaluating first crop daughters when the sire is five years old, we could already be using grandsons. I can see this industry potentially collecting and slaughtering bulls in the future due to the technology of genomics. Perspective Worden’s perspective on the path that lies ahead for dairy at the state and national level as leader of the Holstein breed association is backed by years of farming and agriculture organization involvement. Chuck and his wife Vanessa farm with their sons Wayne, Mark and Eric joined by their daughter Lindsay and daughter-in-law Kate in Cassville, NY. The Wordens who started farming in New York, moved to New Mexico in 1994 and developed a large dairy there. Worden’s interest and commitment to purebred cattle never waned and in 2004, they returned to New York to operate a smaller farm. “One of the reasons we decided to return to New York was so that we could involve our children in the operation.” Worden credit his family and especially his father for his involvement in purebred cattle. Chuck’s father was a registered breeder of both beef and dairy cattle. He served on the National board of the Shorthorn, showing all Americans which resulted in supreme champion shorthorn bull over all breeds when shorthorn was not among the premier beef breeds. “My message to the industry is the same as the one for my family, ‘Actively embrace change as it will be a constant for the rest of your life. If you aren’t involved in how things are changed, it will be someone else decisions affecting you.’”

Cover photo courtesy of Columbia County CCE Members of the Wilderness Workers 4-H Club, Matthew Bryan and Ruth Kress, show fairgoers how to milk a goat.


by Stephen Wagner If Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary George Greig should ever take a notion to run for President of the United States, he has several points in his favor. First of all, he is a farmer. So were Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Polk, Truman and Carter. Second, he has a hard work ethic. Third, he has been politically active for much of his life. And last, he looks presidential, almost embodying the visages of the great past presidents with silver hair and presidential smiles. Greig is a double-edged sword. With his strong looks and purposeful intent, he is also soft-spoken and able to see both sides of an equation. He needs no coffee to jolt his start to the day. Along with his brother, Greig started a farming business with a dairy operation purchased from their parents. That was in 1976. “We were in a buying and building mode,” he remembers. “That was when interest rates hovered at around 11 percent. We grew and expanded, buying three or four farms, different farms. We started milking three times a day before anyone else thought about doing it, almost on a whim. We were just young and ambitious.” When I asked Greig how Governor Corbett found him, he said they had worked together before. Both are from western Pennsylvania. And “I was on the Farm Service Agency state committee for eight years, a Bush appointee. We administered all the federal farm

by Jay Girvin, Esq., Girvin & Ferlazzo. P.C., Albany, NY, September 2011 Q. My farm sustained significant flood damage as a result of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. What disaster assistance programs are available through the USDA Farm Service Agency? A. The heavy rainfall associated with Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee resulted in unprecedented flood damage to homes, businesses, and farms across the eastern portion of New York State, particularly for properties located near rivers, creeks, and other bodies of water. Flood damage to farming operations was particularly widespread, resulting in the destruction or contamination of crops and feed, losses to livestock, and damage to equipment and structures. While this column generally addresses questions of a legal nature, we thought it appropriate under the circumstances to highlight some of the federal relief programs available to help New York farmers recover

programs in the state of Pennsylvania. I’ve always been politically active in my home county [Crawford]. I’ve been on the State Board of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, as well as the Executive Board for six years.” While at the Farm Bureau, Greig worked with then Attorney General Tom Corbett on the new ACRE law. While Vice Chairman of the Crawford County Republican party he worked hard on behalf of other candidates. “The Governor wanted a production agriculture person. We had 300 acres of soybeans and 125 acres of hay this year. We sold the cows in 2006 after milking them since 1976.” Now that he has been Ag Secretary for two-thirds of a year, either as the nominee or confirmed, what has been his top priority? “I had said that I wanted to work on marketing, and we have made some strides in exporting dairy cattle to Turkey. We helped a fellow in Butler County export some hides to Poland. One of the first things I did was to write letters to some companies in China. They came in and bought some Pennsylvania hardwood. And we have two South Korean companies that are hooking up with Pennsylvania companies to purchase United States beef.” But why exports rather than the Chesapeake Bay, as two of his predecessors touted? “With Governor Corbett’s position of no new taxes,” Greig said, “the only way you can raise state income is by increasing business. It’s

from the damage and financial losses resulting from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offers a number of disaster assistance programs to help farmers recover from production and physical losses suffered as a result of natural disasters, including flooding. Access to these programs generally requires that the property be located in an area that has been designated as a federal disaster area. As of Sept. 11, 2011, the following counties in New York State have been designated as federal disaster areas: Albany, Bronx, Clinton, Columbia, Delaware, Dutchess, Essex, Greene, Kings, Montgomery, Nassau, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens, Rensselaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan, Ulster, Warren, Washington, and Westchester. The FSA offers an Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) that provides funding for farmers to rehabilitate farmland damaged by floods or other

natural disasters. For land to be eligible, the natural disaster must create new conservation problems, which, if not treated, would: impair or endanger the land; materially affect the productive capacity of the land; represent unusual damage that, except for wind erosion, is not the type likely to recur frequently in the same area; and be so costly to repair that federal assistance is or will be required to return the land to productive agricultural use. ECP is administered by state and county FSA committees. The FSA also administers the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments (SURE) program, which authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to provide agricultural disaster assistance to producers who suffered qualifying crop production losses, crop quality losses, or both due to disaster(s), adverse weather, or other environmental conditions. The SURE program is intended to help mitigate the threats of lower-than-expected yields and prices by providing a revenue guarantee (SURE guarantee) for producers’ total farming interest. The Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) is available through the FSA to pro-

vide financial assistance to eligible producers affected by floods or other natural disasters, and covers non-insurable crop losses and planting prevented by disasters. Eligible crops generally include commercial crops and other agricultural commodities produced for food, including livestock feed or fiber, for which the catastrophic level of crop insurance is unavailable. FSA also offers the Emergency Assistance for Livestock Program (ELAP), which provides emergency assistance to eligible producers of livestock, honeybees, and farm-raised fish that have feed losses due to adverse weather that result in disaster declaration. Similarly, the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) offers benefits to livestock producers for livestock deaths in excess of normal mortality caused by adverse weather, including flooding. The FSA also provides emergency loans to help producers recover from production and physical losses due to natural disasters. Emergency loan funds may be used to restore or replace essential property, pay all or a part of production costs associated with the disaster year, pay essential family living expenses, reorgan-

farmers will, of course, go out. There are some 70 year old farmers who are still milking cows, and suddenly they now have a retirement plan. I think Marcellus Shale will be a good thing for farmers and landowners across the state where there is Marcellus.” Crop Insurance is another farming tool that farmers have not taken advantage of in the hoped for numbers. Critics put forth the argument that many farmers don’t understand crop insurance, that it isn’t being explained well enough if at all, the onus of which seems to be on the shoulders of agents who sell it. “Farmers have always been independent people as well as optimists,” notes Greig. “In the spring it’s hard to have the outlook that you’re going to fail. Crop insurance is a tool that if you’re in an area where you’ve had crop losses in the past, you really need to think about it. It seems like we have more and more disasters, more and more events — weather events, droughts, we had an earthquake this year — if you feel you can’t afford to have a loss, then you better have crop insurance.” Does Greig have a working philosophy for his farming success that he’s willing to share? Yes! “Always work hard. Keep an open mind. Don’t try to keep up with your neighbor; don’t go into debt trying to keep up. Do what’s best for your own situation.” Finally, does Secretary Greig find it exponentially easier to deal with his constituency, the media, and people at public events? “It gets easier every time you do it.”

ize the farming operation, and refinance certain debts. Emergency loans are subject to certain eligibility requirements, including that the applicant has suffered a least a 30 percent loss in crop production or a physical loss to livestock, livestock products, or property, has collateral to secure the loan, and has repayment ability. Eligible producers can borrow an amount up to 100 percent of their losses, up to a maximum of $500,000, and loan repayment periods can range from one year to 40 years, depending on the type of loan and other factors. Loans currently carry an annu-

al interest rate of 3.75 percent. Applications for emergency loans must be submitted within eight months of the federal disaster declaration issued for the county where the property is located. All of these programs are subject to specific eligibility and qualification requirements.Farmers interested in learning more about the availability of these programs to help address flood-related damage and losses should contact their local FSA office. Additional information regarding these programs is also available at the USDA FSA Web site at www.fsa.usda.gov.

Don’t move firewood When clearing storm debris from your neighborhood, take care to comply with any federal, state or local restrictions on the movement of wood materials. If you live in a quarantined zone, make sure to use a licensed contractor with a compliance agreement. If you don’t live in an area under quarantine, be on the

safe side and dispose of downed branches, trees, or resulting firewood at the nearest available facility. Remember, moving storm debris could accidentally spread invasive tree killing insects and create new infestations. Keep trees safe by complying with your state or local disposal regulations.

Page 5 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Double Duty

very important for the economy, the state, and the nation. We export our products. Over 90 percent of the mouths to feed are outside of Pennsylvania and outside of the US. It’s a very important market we can’t ignore.” Dairy policy is Greig’s second priority. “Internally,” he explained, “we have a Dairy Policy Committee that has been working on setting up policy for the 2012 Farm Bill. Dairy is the number 1 component of the number 1 industry in Pennsylvania. We want to make sure that we get that right.” Transportation is Greig’s third issue. A lot of transportation issues need to be addressed. A former Ag Secretary, in discussing farmland in Pennsylvania, said “The good news is that we saved 300 acres this week. The bad news is we lost 600 acres.” Country Folks had two questions for the current Secretary. With economic, political, and real estate pressures affecting today’s farmers, what does this say about Farmland Preservation? Another factor is Marcellus Shale money. Is the Marcellus a positive or a negative factor? Greig was reassuring. “We are the number one state in Farmland Preservation. Within the past two weeks, we signed up another six or seven farms. Under the Corbett administration we hope to go over 500,000 acres.” And Marcellus Shale: “I’ve talked to some farmers who already have [gas] wells on their farms. Some of them are building new barns and expanding; bringing in families who couldn’t afford to farm before. So I think it’s six of one and half a dozen of the other. Some


Section A - Page 6 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Crop Comments by Paris Reidhead Field Crops Consultant Bacterial boomerang According to studies recently published by the University of Maryland’s (U. of M.) School of Public Health, poultry farms that have adopted organic practices and ceased using antibiotics have significantly lower levels of drug-resistant enterococci bacteria that can potentially spread to humans. The study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives (online Aug. 10, 2011), is the first to demonstrate lower levels of drug-resistant bacteria on newly organic farms in the United States and suggests that removing antibiotic use from large-scale U.S. poultry farms can result in immediate and significant reductions in antibiotic resistance for some bacteria. “We initially thought we would see some differences in on-farm levels of antibiotic-resistant enterococci when poultry farms transitioned to organic practices. But we were surprised to see that the differences were so significant across several different classes of antibiotics even in the very first flock of birds that was produced after the transition to organic standards,” explained Amy R. Sapkota, assistant professor at U. of M. “It is very encouraging.” (Enterococci are bacteria originating in gastro-intestines.) Sapkota and her multi-university team investigated the impact of removing antibiotics from U.S. poultry farms by studying 10 conventional and 10 newly organic large-scale poultry houses in the mid-Atlantic region. They tested for the presence of enterococci bacteria in poultry litter, feed, and water, and tested its resistance to 17 common antibiotics. Quoting Sapotka, “We chose to study enterococci because these microorganisms are found in all poultry, including poultry on both organic and conventional farms. The enterococci also cause infections in human patients staying in hospitals. In addition, many of the antibiotics given in feed to farm animals are used to fight Gram-positive bacteria

(Contact: renrock46@hotmail.com)

such as enterococci. These features, along with their reputation of easily exchanging resistance genes with other bacteria, make enterococci a good model for studying the impact of changes in antibiotic use on farms”. Not recalling the meaning of Gram-positive, I looked it up on Wikipedia’s online encyclopedia. There I found that Gram-positive bacteria are those that are stained dark blue or violet by Gram staining. I believe Gram was a wellknown PhD researcher. The Gram-positive trait makes the mcrobe in question much easier to examine under the microscope. The rest of Wikipedia’s definition

gets really complicated for someone who never took microbiology and only got a C in college biochemistry. While all farms tested positive for the presence of enterococci in poultry litter, feed, and water as expected, the newly organic farms were characterized by a significantly lower prevalence of antibioticresistant enterococci. For example, 67 percent of Enterococcus faecalis recovered from conventional poultry farms were resistant to erythromycin, while 18 percent of Enterococcus faecalis from newly organic poultry farms were resistant to this antibiotic. Dramatic changes were also observed in the levels of multi-drug re-

sistant bacteria (organisms resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes) on the newly organic farms. Multi-drug resistant bacteria are of particular public health concern because they can be resistant to all available antibiotics, and are, therefore, very difficult to treat if contracted by an animal or human. Forty-two percent of Enterococcus faecalis from conventional farms were multi-drug resistant, compared to only 10 percent from newly organic farms, and 84 percent of Enterococcus faecium from conventional farms were multi-drug resistant compared to 17 percent of those from newly organic farms. “While we know that the dynamics of antibiotic resistance differ by bacterium and antibiotic, these findings show that, at least in the case of enterococci, we begin to reverse resistance on farms even among the

first group of animals that are grown without antibiotics”, said Sapkota. She said she expects that reductions in drugresistant bacteria on U.S. farms that “go organic” are likely to be more dramatic over time as reservoirs of resistant bacteria in the farm environment diminish. These antibiotic-resistant bacteria concerns were mostly theoretical to me until late last summer, when I was hospitalized for three days. Then these concerns became more emotional in mid-March of this year, when I spent another six days in the hospital. While in recovery I thought about MRSA (methicillin-r esistant Staphyllococcus aureus), which is the most common drug-resistant pathogen hitting medical facilities in the U.S. The U. of M. research actually parallels excellent broadcast journalism anchored Feb. 9 and

10, 2010, by CBS’ Katy Couric. In those CBS Evening News reports, Couric shared a concern of public health officials that widespread use of antibiotics on healthy farm animals may be putting people at risk. The microbial menace (my term) that Couric addressed was, in fact, MRSA, which plagues both the poultry and hog industries. In 2009, a University of Iowa study found a new strain of MRSA — in 70 percent of hogs, as well as 64 percent of hog farm workers — on several farms in Iowa and western Illinois. All those farms used antibiotics routinely. The same study found zero MRSA on antibioticfree poultry and hog operations; these latter weren’t organic… they were just antibiotic-free. With American farmers’ excessive use of growth-promoting antibiotics in livestock,

Crop A7


“U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack’s decision to take action that will pay dairy farmers for milk they were forced to dump or which spoiled due to Hurricane Irene is welcome news for New York farmers,” said New York Agriculture Commissioner Darrel J. Aubertine. “The damage from the storm made it impossible for some farmers to have their milk picked up. In other cases power outages caused the milk to spoil. The Secretary’s decision to include this milk as part of the Federal milk mar-

keting order pool for August and September means these farmers will not lose their income on this milk. I commend the Secretary’s action.”

Crop from A6

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Katy Couric reported on a possible alternative in Denmark, where preventive antibiotic use in livestock is banned. That country’s 17,000 farmers pridefully call it the “Danish Experiment”. Unlike industrial farms in the U.S., Danish farmers use antibiotics sparingly, only when animals are sick. This experiment to stop widespread use of antibiotics was launched in 1998.

At that time, European studies had proven there was a link between animals consuming antibiotics every day and people developing antibioticresistant infections from handling or eating that meat. Since the ban took effect, the incidence of these infections has plummeted significantly. One group of researchers in the Danish project has shown that if antibiotics are no longer used in a given livestock environment, that location will be free of drug-resistant bacteria within three years. In response to this and other related research, the Food and Drug Administration has gotten

Congress to introduce and pass legislation banning some types of antibiotics used to treat humans from being given to healthy farm animals. In Europe (beyond Denmark) this issue has caused organic certifiers to prohibit the use of conventional farm manure on organic farms. This is because, in their minds, there is no doubt that liquid manure, anaerobically managed, is a hotbed of microbial danger. This sentiment has “jumped the big pond” to convince our (USDA) National Organic Program to prohibit the use of conventional farm manure as a crop input on organic farms.

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Page 7 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Agriculture Commissioner commends USDA action on dumped milk


Section A - Page 8 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

The Moo News Newsletter of Penn Dutch Cow Care by Hubert J. Karreman Hi Folks, This month is back to basics and discussion of parasites in calves as I like to do this time of year. I really think that parasitism, whether internal (stomach worms and coccidia) and external (flies and mange) are truly a weak link in the chain of organic livestock health and growth. I say this coming from being in the trenches for many years now. I see crummy looking calves out on pasture at this time of year — “natural raised”, certified organic or conventional. It must be remembered that if pasturing animals in the same areas year after year, there will be parasites waiting for each group as they arrive. Pastures look really nice early on but those stomach worm larva are invisible to our eye and are out there rapidly multiplying and loading the animals that are out there eating the forages. That’s because the stomach worm larva crawl to the tips of the grass blades to be taken in again by the animal to start their life cycle all over again (to feed and reproduce themselves within the animal’s digestive system). This is why I am in favor of clipping pastures or at least dragging pastures with a set of chains: it smears out the manure paddy and those larva will dry out in the sun and wind and not live to climb up the grass blades to be eaten and taken in again. But here we are in September and the best pasture season is already behind. And during this particular pasture season it seems like

flies have been merciless as well. What do your calves on pasture look like right now? Are they sleek and in good body condition just like when you weaned them or set them out to pasture? Or do they look a bit more ragged now — perhaps a bit pot-bellied, their hair being dry looking and reddish black (not shiny black as it should be), with thin back leg muscles and some dried diarrhea up high on their legs and tail? If so, these are classic signs of internal stomach worm infestation. It would be wise to catch a few up and look in their eye sockets to see how pink or pale white the sockets are. In sheep and goats, it is common to use the FAMACHA test which basically looks at their eye sockets and, depending on how white (indicating anemia), this will indicate when to treat them with a conventional wormer. While the FAMACHA test is technically not valid for calves, looking at their eye sockets will still reveal the degree of blood loss as well. Calves just hide it until later in the disease. In organic agriculture, with the requirement of animals 6 months and older to get a minimum of 30 percent dry matter from pasture over the grazing season, it is only a matter of time before the young stock, which are not immunologically mature against stomach worms, will become infested if pasture management is not top notch. A big part of it all is proper feeding to ensure excellent energy intake while on pasture. This can be from high energy forages or giving some grain. The immune system depends

heavily on proper daily energy intake. It should be noted that adult animals do NOT need to be wormed as they can live in balance with a stomach worm challenge in their environment — unfortunately young stock can’t because they haven’t experienced worms previously. Note: lung worms can, and do, infect adult cattle especially in wet years. I think a good goal is to raise calves that do have some challenge with stomach worm larva in the pasture, yet are managed and fed well enough that instead of becoming infested, they instead build immunity due to a low level exposure. This is a kind of a natural vaccine effect. Unfortunately not many farms seem to be able to achieve this. The result is somewhat stunted calves that likely will freshen a month or two later since they won’t reach breeding size as quickly. However, calves that do make it through this tough period of life — usually between 4-11 months of age — start looking really nice again by a year old and go on to do fine. Even if they did look crummy due to a significant stomach worm infestation, they will now be really strong against pasture stomach worm challenges the rest of their lives. So how do we treat internal parasite infestations on certified organic farms? Well, as of this writing, only ivermectin is allowed to be used — and only for an emergency need when methods acceptable to organic have not succeeded in restoring an animal to health. However, earlier this summer, the USDA

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released an official statement that fenbendazole and moxidectin, on recommendation from the NOSB, will soon be allowed (still only for emergency situations, with a 90 day milk withhold). Typically in the past I have recommended ivermectin as a single treatment — essentially to reset the individual animals which are infested

— and then get the management in place to keep things in prevention mode rather than reaction (treatment) mode. Fortunately, there are many plant based medicines being used around the world against internal parasites. In the chapter I wrote called “Phytotherapy for Dairy Cows” in the book Veterinary Herbal Medicine (by

Wynn and Fougere, Mosby, 2007), I reported on a study that showed birdsfoot trefoil or chickory interplanted into pasture decreased stomach worm larva burden significantly compared to straight white clover and rye pasture. This is because of tannins contained in the birdsfoot trefoil and chickory.

Moo A10

Stop Milk Wetting the Teats! Check out the teats as soon as the machine is removed and note the amount of milk washed all over them. This presents two facts: 1) bacteria has been driven back up into the teats while milking and 2) any contamination left on the teat has been washed into the milk reducing milk quality. An individual from Japan recently traveled to see CoPulsationTM working on a large US herd. Comments from that visitor afterwards were: "I saw how does Mark milk in Madison. It was fantastic. All teats are dry, after milking. Milking speed is very high. I have never seen that kind of NON return flow milking...." You cannot get that result or performance from Boumatic, Delaval, GEA or Dairymaster. They offer only the conventional "washing machine" milking system that will soak the teats in milk every milking contaminating them causing mastitis.

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Page 9 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

NEW YORK ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT 3662 Buffalo St., Box 215 • Alexander, NY 585-591-2955 CATSKILL TRACTOR INC. 384 Center St. • Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

CNY POWER SPORTS Cortland, NY 13045 607-756-6578

MABIE BROTHERS, INC. 8571 Kinderhook Rd. • Kirkville, NY 315-687-7891

CORYN FARM SUPPLIES INC. 3186 Freshour Rd. • Canandaigua, NY 585-394-4691

SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 • Sharon Springs, NY 518-284-2346

PENNSYLVANIA ALLEN HOOVER REPAIR RR 1, Box 227 • Mifflinburg, PA 570-966-3821 ELDER SALES & SERVICE INC. 4488 Greenville-Sandy Lake Rd. • Stoneboro, PA 724-376-3740

SANDY LAKE IMPLEMENT INC. 3675 Sandy Lake Rd. • Sandy Lake, PA 724-376-2489


Section A - Page 10 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Enter the ‘Show Your Pride’ photo contest and win an NFL player visit PHILADELPHIA — Football season is here, and Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association and Pennsylvania Dairy Promotion Program invite dairy farmers to show their pride of the dairy industry and their favorite National Football League (NFL) team through the “Show Your Pride” producer photo contest. The lucky winner will receive a visit from an NFL player. Entries are due Sept. 23. The Show Your Pride photo contest is part of the NFL’s “Back to Football Friday” program in which sponsors and partners, including America’s dairy farmers, help to build excitement for

the current football season. Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association is seeking photos that show farmers’ enthusiasm for the NFL, the dairy industry and Fuel Up to Play 60, the school program that encourages students to “fuel up” on nutrient-rich foods, including lowfat and fat-free dairy, and get 60 minutes of physical activity each day. “The Show Your Pride contest gives dairy farmers an opportunity to get involved with the dairy checkoff’s NFL partnership,” said Laura England, executive vice president of communications for Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association. “It’s a great way for farmers to

show their passion for both the dairy industry and their favorite NFL team, while supporting Fuel Up to Play 60 and the dairy checkoff. And if you are the lucky winner, an NFL player will visit your farm!” The rules are easy and the creativity is up to you. We are looking for ways that you — and even your cows — support your favorite NFL team or player. All entries will be posted on a public Web site for national voting, which will take place from Sept. 28 to Oct. 10. Information on the Web site link will be shared at a later date. In additional to the national contest,

Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association will draw four random winners locally. The winners will be contacted shortly after the drawing and will receive four tickets each to a football game hosted by one of the four NFL teams in the MidAtlantic region: Baltimore Ravens, Philadelphia Eagles, Pittsburgh Steelers or the Washington Redskins. E-mail your photo entries, along with your name, address and phone number, to Amberleigh Packard at apackard@milk4u.org. All photos must be submitted no later than Sept. 23. For more information, contact Amberleigh Packard at 717-991-2483.

Moo from A8 However, we are later in the grazing season, so what should we treat with right now if our young stock look crummy? One treatment is to give 10cc of the high tannin, iron and mineral “Ferro” once daily for 5 days in a row — this is highly effective but requires individual animal dosing which most farmers do not like to do when it comes to a group of heifers outside (understandable). Perhaps trying Dr. Paul’s “Eliminate” would be worthwhile. It has ginger root, diatomaceous earth, neembark, garlic and yucca root — good ingre-

dients to battle internal parasites in the digestive tract. It is a simple dosing: 1 capsule / 500 lbs one time and repeat in 3 weeks. Another would be to try Agri-Dynamics Neema Tox or Vermi Tox as both have some positive benefits as shown by clinical trials at Chico State University. Weaned cattle are dosed at 1 oz/300-400 lbs for 3 days in a row. Remember, you can use ivermectin if your animals are in really bad shape — and you probably should at that point. Remember, now is the time to really check your young stock on pasture

for signs of internal worm infestation. If they are infested and nothing

is done about it, the first batch of damp cold weather will likely bring

on pneumonia — and that is not at all desirable. So be mindful: stop

and observe your animals and take action as needed now, not later.

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FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICES, INC. 175 Ovid St. • Seneca Falls, NY 13148 315-568-0955

DECHANTS REFRIGERATION SERVICE 20453 Rte. 322 • Corsica, PA 15829 814-764-5283

CORTLAND VALLEY DAIRY SERVICE, INC 1791 E. Homer Rd. Rte. 13 • Cortland, NY 607-753-6744

GARDINIER DAIRY SUPPLY 6111 St. Rte. 5 • Little Falls, NY 13365 315-823-0150

ENDLESS MOUNTAIN DAIRY SERVICE INC RR 1, Box 81E • Leraysville, PA 18829 570-744-2167

DELAVAL DIRECT 5249 Rt. 39 • Castile, NY 14427 585-493-2235

LAISDELL DAIRY SYSTEMS 11 North Main St. • Adams, NY 13605 315-232-2217

DELAVAL DIRECT 8631 East Main St. • Clymer, NY 14724 716-355-4326

DELAVAL DIRECT 1048 St. Rte. 197 • Argyle, NY 12809 518-638-8382

DELAVAL DIRECT 850 Main Rd. • Corfu, NY 14036 585-599-4696

SMITH BROTHERS ELECTRIC Rte. 2 Box 290 • Lisbon, NY 13658 315-393-2988

DELAVAL DIRECT 1486 US Hwy. 11 • Gouverneur, NY 13642 315-287-2581

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DELAVAL DIRECT 112 Creek Rd. • Middlebury, VT 802-388-0043 TERRITORY REPRESENTATIVES ROBIN SHIRLEY New York & New England 417-872-7094 VIC LEININGER New York & Pennsylvania 417-872-5715


Organic Dairy: What does the future hold? NODPA’s 11th Annual Field Days and Producers’ Meeting takes place at the height of the autumn color on Sept. 29 and 30, in Cooperstown, NY and will address some of the key questions that affect the future profitability of organic dairy, including: • The role of private label milk: does it harm producers pay price? • Should there be an Organic exemption from conventional milk supply management? • What is the threat to certification and the environment from Natural Gas Exploration and GMO’s? • In the year of the Farm Bill, do advocacy groups do more harm than good? • How can the ‘thinking-man’ plan for profit and success from grazing? The NODPA Field Days is a two-day event that will be held at the Cooper-

stown Beaver Valley Cabins and Campsites, 138 Towers Road, Milford, NY 13807, www.beavervalleycampground.com. “This year’s program at the NODPA Field Days tackles the most pressing issues for organic dairy farmers no matter who you sell your milk to,” said NODPA President Rick Segalla. The event starts in the morning on the 29th with a tour of Siobhan Griffin’s Raindance Farm, Schenevus, NY in the foothills of the Catskills where she milks 90 cows that graze on 200 acres. Participants will learn about incorporating cheese production into their dairy operation and the process of developing markets, creating products and on-farm cheese processing. Troy Bishopp will be at the farm to show producers how to ‘Read the

CATSKILL TRACTOR, INC. 384 Center St. Franklin, NY 607-829-2600

SALEM FARM SUPPLY, INC. Rt. 22 Salem, NY 12865 518-854-7424

COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC. Box 660 Claverack, NY 12513 518-828-1781

SHARON SPRINGS GARAGE, INC. Rt. 20 Sharon Springs, NY 13459 518-284-2346

CORYN FARM SUPPLIES, INC. Freshour Rd. Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-394-4691

COLUMBIA CROSS ROADS RR 2 Box 62, Rt. 14 Columbia Cross Roads, PA 16914 570-297-2991

Landscape.’ Troy is a regional grazing specialist from the Madison Co. NY, SWCD/Upper Susquehanna Coalition. Participants in the workshop will learn how to assess whether their pastures are moving forward or backward in productivity and profitability by monitoring (assessing) percentage forage ground cover, biological activity, plant species diversity, earthworm and dung beetle populations, and much more. Following lunch and registration at noon on Thursday, we will kick off the Field Days program with a panel discussion entitled, “Facts and Fiction: Demystifying Private Label Milk” at which Peter Miller, CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Northeast Regional Pool Manager, Kelly Shea, WhiteWave Foods, Vice President-Industry Relations & Organic Stewardship, and other invited industry professionals will discuss what we need to know about private label milk and whether it impacts pay price. Next, and new this year, we will experiment with a different format by holding an open producer and participant meeting on Thursday afternoon where we will explore the future of organic dairy and how producers can ensure their voice is heard on regulatory, policy and marketplace issues. After Thursday’s education program, attendees will have time to catch up with both new and old friends, and visit the Trade Show during the Social Hour. We will host an Organic Pig Roast for our banquet and afterward will hear from Francis Thicke, our Keynote Speaker. Francis is an organ-

ic dairy farmer and soil scientist who has been a leader in the organic community for many years and is very innovative in his farming and marketing practices. He is a leading advocate for sustainable and organic agriculture and recently ran unsuccessfully for the the position of Secretary of Agriculture for Iowa. Francis will challenge us to take more control of our future as organic dairy producers by sharing his own farming experience and vision for the future. Francis Thicke published his book, “A New Vision of Iowa Food and Agriculture” in June, 2010. NODPA’s Annual Meeting will follow the keynote presentation. A producer-only meeting will be held early Friday morning, where producers can speak about their concerns, challenges and successes without fear of their views hindering their relationship with their processors. Beginning at 9 a.m., workshops will include “Natural Gas Exploration: What impact will it have on Organic Certification?” with Lisa Engelbert, NOFA-NY organic certifier, James Northrup, energy expert, and Paul Allen, PA organic dairy farmer addressing the group. After a milk break there will be a panel discussion entitled “Advocacy Groups in the Organic Dairy Marketplace: Why they are important and necessary.” Panel members for this session include Liana Hoodes, National Organic Coalition’s director; organic dairy farmer, Cornucopia Board member and past NOSB member, Kevin Engelbert; OTA

NODPA A13

Page 11 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

NODPA’s 11th Annual Field Days in Cooperstown, NY


ARKETPLACE

NH 890W grass head, ex. cond., $650 Berg 20 ft. auger, $200; 315-2192894.(NY) IH 1066 GC, lots of power, $8,550; NH 1465 9.3 haybine, new, done 50 acres, $11,000; 585-567-2526.(NY) WANTED: 12 ft. and 14 ft. silo unloader in good condition. 315-536-7875.(NY) 707 NEW HOLLAND chopper, 12 in. Patz belt feeder; 10 in. Van Dale conveyor. 607627-6677.(NY) PARTING OUT TR 70 combine, NH 6 row corn head, hydro trans, 3208 CAT engine, good condition, many good parts. 315-5363259.(NY) WANTED: Good used feed mixer, 150 bushel preferred; Also 16 - 20 ft. feed conveyor. 315-536-2051.(NY) MASSEY HARRIS 44 diesel motor, $700; GM 3-53, $800; WANTED: Oliver super 99 or similar. 315-368-5274.(NY) FEEDER PIGS, eight weeks old, $50. each. 315-539-3621.(NY) JD 3970 chopper, 7’ grass, 3 row corn, Horning kernel processor, new 110 acres through it, $18,500. 518-332-0364.(NY) SOONER 1997 goose neck four horse slant dressing room, rear tack. No miles, like new, $8,000; 716-652-6024.(NY) 1923 FORDSON Model F, new paint, runs, drives, $2,900; JD 110 with beck engine oh new paint, $900. 607-243-5810.(NY)

REGISTERED Jersey heifer, born Jan. 2011; Grass fed, $700; San Clemente Island goat, buck, ready for fall breeding, $250; 603-242-6495.(NH)

WANTED: Round corn crib in fair condition. FOR SALE: Dusk to dawn lamps, like new, 4, $25/ea. CIH 385 on steel. 315-5952875.(NY)

WANTED: Hay tool collector buying haymow forks, hay carriers, grappling hooks, hay carriers, for wood, steel, cable, rod tracks. Mfg.’rs catalogs.

IH 330 utility, gas, lpt, 3 pt. loader, back blade, bear claw chains, runs good, straight metal, $3,500 or BO. 518-8423303.(NY)

IH 35 manure spreader, JD N manure spreader, both PTO regular size, good condition, ready to work, Lima. 585-6247551.(NY)

17 HOLSTEIN heifers bred to sexed semen. Due to start calving Oc. 1st, three R&W advents. All are artificially sired. 802881-9780.(VT)

KEMPER one row corn chopper, 3 point hitch, model M. 315-343-9687.(NY) 1941 FARMALL H with old IH loader, runs, looks good; 4 IH rear weights, 65# 06-86 series, $50.00 each. 315-524-4007 eves. WANTED: International 110 side mounted mower for Farmall H or M. FOR SALE: 3x4 round bales of hay, stored inside, $18.00; 607-225-4516.(NY) NEW IDEA model 329 2 row super sheller, good condition, stored inside, $4,000 or B.O. 716-244-1577.(NY) WANTED: Metal fence posts, 6’ to 7’ in good shape. 203-520-5690.(CT)

GLEANER F2 combine, 4wd, hydro, hyd. auger, 15’ flex, 13’ grain, 4 row narrow and 4 row wide corn heads. 315-5283785.(NY) JOHN DEERE 60 3 pth, new Firestone 14.9x38 tires, $3,000; Oliver 77 W7E, $2,200; Allis Chalmers backblade, snap coupler, $500. 315-427-2273.(NY) IH 470 disc, 14’, 20” blades, 70 acres on new blades and bearings. Excellent condition, $4,000; 315-749-4431.(NY) WANTED: Wind mill water pumping type. 315-536-5860.(NY)

WANTED: John Deere 3 row snapper head to fit John Deere Forage harvester. 315-536-3677.(NY) IH 544 diesel hydro row crop, strong hydro 4,600 hours, engine needs work, coolant in oil, good condition, $3,800; 315-7500481.(NY) WANTED: 1,500 to 2,000 bushel hopper bottom grain bin. 518-483-2576.(NY) WANTED: SUFFOLK/FINN ram, 5 mos. old, would like to trade for ram of like quality and disposition. 315-923-4730.(NY) WANTED: 6 x 40 grain auger. 607-2439018.(NY)

WANTED: PAIR Of Used 14.9x38 or 15.5x38 rear tractor tires. 585-7323376.(NY)

FOR SALE: Texas long horn herd, 4 cows, 1 bull, 3 calves, no longer can take care of them, nice. 585-786-8597.(NY)

WANTED: Roller mill with cob crusher or grinder blower in good working condition. 716-337-3278.(NY)

SINGLE OR DOUBLE bottom plow, steel wheel wagon running gear. Iddo Brenneman 1810 Augusta Solsville Road, Oriskany Falls, NY 13425

EXCELLENT Hesston small square straight thru baler, $7,900; Hesston 9’ 3” haybine, $4,900; Vicon 4 star tedder, $2,900; IH 700; 315-348-6149.(NY)

JOHN DEERE 1940 H, 1940 L & LA, all not running, not stuck; 1945 H runs, looks good, $2,500; 401-662-9131.(RI)

COMPLETE MILKING system, 6 milk master milkers, 2” ss pipeline for 90 cows receiver jar and pump electric pulsation system. 518-673-2431.(NY)

RICHARDTON 700 dump wagon, $4,000; GEHL 1540 blower, $500; Trailer sprayer, 200 gal. 30’ booms; NH 3 pt. sickle bar. 585-658-3788.(NY)

1948 LEADER Tractor, n/r, V/r parts or restore $500; Cockshutt 30 n/r to restore $750. NF wheel weights. 607-8634214.(NY)

SILO distributor, NH silage blower; JD chopper control box off 3940; Red giant stir-rator unit. 15.5x38 tire chains. All excellent. 585-747-7577.(NY)

FOR SALE: Rye seed, cleaned and bagged, #8 bushel; Nice Angus cross heifers shots and ivomec pour on backs. 607-346-4256.(NY)

FOR SALE: Allis chalmers 3 ph 2 row corn planter with extra plates, good condition. 716-640-5550.(NY) 200 Gallon vat pasteurizer, currently in use in our NYS inspected plant. Doesn’t include chart recorder or airspace heater. 315-689-0034.(NY)

500 GALLON propane tank converted for use as water storage tank for wood fired hot water heating system, $900. 413-5489404.(MA)

BLACK ANGUS 3 yr. old bull, $1,400; Gentle disposition from both bull and his offspring. Lewis County. 315-346-6457.(NY)

SLEIGH - Beautiful antique sleigh with Vermont metal plate. Black and Red. Excellent condition, $750. Standardbred driving horse also available. 607-263-2339.(NY)

PATZ cw gutter cleaner, 270’ chain, 16” flights, 18’ chute good. 814-642-2157.(PA)

IHC 2 PR 2 row corn picker pull type, wide row, shed keep and in good working condition. 585-547-9573.(WNY)

BEEF Cow/Calf pairs, herefords and crosses. Some registered, some certified organic. Will also consider trading for certified organic milkers. 315-626-6770.(NY)

FOR SALE: 8455 case rd baler, 4x5, like new, $3,000; H S 16W rake, ec, $1,600l TLF 646-399-2045.(NY)

SURGE Vacuum pump, ready to go, $1,250; 2 12.4-24, 2 18.4-R30 tire and rims, $1,500; 2 LB gas engines, $450 ea. 315-536-4818.(NY)

MILKING SHORTHORN x Hereford cow, 3 rs. old, has had 1 calf, $650; Other hereford cows, registered for sale also. 315-3638966.(NY)

JD two row corn head, green, $2,000; JD 82 snow plow, fits 3020 narrow front tractor, $750; 845-778-1916.(NY)

89 FORD L8000 grain hay truck, removable sides, tarp, 18 ft, 22 ft. with tail gate down, 10 sp 607-387-6671.(NY)

JOHN DEERE L early styled model with land plow, cultivator, belt pulley, $3,000 owner will negotiate. 585-765-2606.(WNY)

FARMALL 200, 20 ft., 6” auger, NH 451 mower, fly 2x 420 plow, NI corn drag elevator, Farmall S.M 518-731-8663.(NY)

1st & 3rd cut wrapped 4x4 silage bales for sale or trade, for quality beef steers or feeders, delivery available. 978-3377879.(MA)

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by Dr. Tim Snyder, Nutrition Manager, Renaissance Nutrition, Inc. Are you maximizing milk production from forage? Do you know what your feed shrink is costing with higher priced grain and forage? Could you use $320 / cow / year more income from forage management improvements? Forage Quality Value A complete listing of feed prices and relative values for use in replacement purchase of shrinklost forage or grain is updated monthly at www.das.psu.edu/research-extension/ dairy/pdf/feedprices.pdf /view. Corn Silage is listed at $36 /ton in the August

Penn State survey. An often used rule of thumb for corn silage is 8 times the corn bushel price; at $7.50 that would be $60 /ton. A more thorough Penn State price estimator puts the negotiation range for 2011 standing corn for corn silage at $55 to $65/ton using 150 bu/acre grain (20 ton/acre silage) at $7.50/bu corn. We've heard numerous locations reporting $60+ /ton for corn silage this season. CS with low grain content is worth less, however Digestibility of forage fiber and starch (in corn silage) drives milk production. Using the University of Wisconsin (UW) Milk 2006 software, a

BMR corn silage with a 70% 30 hour NDFD and 30% starch yields 90 lbs more milk per ton and 650 more lbs more milk per acre (at a 20 ton yield) than a conventional corn silage with 60% NDFD and 35% starch. The Professional Dairy Managers of PA (PDMP) provide yearly summaries, including Milk 2006 valuations, of 100+ varieties of corn silage every November after harvest at www.pdmp.org/10corn_s ilage_data.htm. Compare and select varieties that meet your nutritional and agronomic needs for maximum income. Storage and feedout losses Bolsen (KS 1993) reported bunker silo losses

of 10-15% in the top foot, 4-6% in the next 2 feet from the top of bunkers and 9% overall, after 6 months storage if immediately covered with plastic. Losses increased to 22% and 10% if covering was delayed 7 days; and to 62% and 35% in the top and 2nd foot from the top if left uncovered. Bolton and Holmes (UW 2009) summarized numerous studies and noted that nothing compares to plastic and touching tires to minimize silage losses. More recently introduced oxygen-barrierplastic silo covers have dropped surface and top spoilage dramatically. These require an additional plastic cover and a weighting method for

complete protection. A reusable, automated liquid-filled-bladder cover system has been in use in Europe for several years and has recently been introduced in the U.S. Silage packing density greatly influences storage losses, and lower density results in greater losses found near the top of bunkers. Griswold (PA 2009) determined density and dry matter were related to losses. He reported 13 to 15 lb / cu ft of DM density with DM of 31 to 39% kept loss under 4% in their trial. They reported silage densities

(and loss) of 17.8 # (lost 5.4%), 16.8# (lost 4.1%) and 13.5 #/cu ft. (loss 10.3%) at 2, 5 and 7 ft from the floor of a bunker silo. Craig (PA 2009) sampled 113 bunkers at 57 PA farms over 5 years and found average density of the forage was 15.5 lbs/cu ft in the bottomcenter and 11.2 in the top-center. Sides were lower than the center. Average bunker densities ranged from 8.2 to 16.8 lbs DM / cu ft. Only 29% of bunkers sampled had an average density over

Economics A14

NODPA from A11 Board member, WhiteWave Foods Vice President-Industry Relations & Organic Stewardship Kelly Shea, organic farmer and past candidate for Iowa Secretary of Agriculture, Francis Thicke, and additional organic leaders. Afterward, we will have lunch, during which time the Trade Show will be open, and there will be the ever-popular door prize drawings for products generously donated by NODPA sponsors and trade show participants. We have devoted the whole afternoon to a production based workshop entitled “Thinking-Man’s Grazing: Learning How to Plan your Grazing for Profit, Production and Success.” This workshop offers practical, handson learning experience on grazing plan strategies and will include examples of farms that have applied these strategies. Attendees will learn how to plan their grazing ahead of time to meet their personal production goals. Troy Bishopp, who will lead the

presentation, is a grazing consultant, a Holistic Management Educator from the Madison Co. NY SWCD/Upper Susquehanna Coalition, and a project leader for a NESARE funded professional development grazing training project through the CNY RC&D Council in Norwich, NY. For farmers that want to attend there are scholarship funds available. For more information and to register for the Field Days, please go to www.nodpa.com or email ednodpa@comcast.net or call 413772-0444 to speak with Nora Owens, Field Days Coordinator. Field Days is sponsored by Horizon Organic, Lakeview Organic Grain, Organic Valley/CROPP Cooperative, American Organic Seed, Organic Dairy Farmers Cooperative, Fertrell, MOSA, NOFANY, PA Certified Organic. Please visit www.nodpa.com for a full list of Field Days Supporters and Tradeshow participants.

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Page 13 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Forage Harvest, Preservation and Feedout Economics


their target 14 lbs DM / cu ft. They cited 1995 research by Ruppel showing losses that approached 20% when silage density was less than 14 lbs DM/ cu ft. The University of Wisconsin (UW) has numerous articles and spreadsheets that cover topics related to forage storage available at www.uwex.edu/ces/crop s/uwforage/storage.htm. Holmes (UW 2005) in the Average Density of Silage in Storage spreadsheet allows you to safely determine your feed out rate and density, by noting feedout disappearance from various size storages. To improve results next season, Holmes's (UW 2011) Bunk Density Calculator spreadsheet provides information on how thick packing layers should be, and what tractor weight is needed depending on the rate of bunker filling and time spent packing to achieve their recommended density of greater than 15# DM/cu ft. Changing from a 10 in. to a 5 in. packing layer can increase packing density by 3 - 5 lbs/cu ft. Bolton and Holmes (UW 2009) graphed silage feedout losses showing a 3 inch removal rate at 15 lb/cu ft. packing density resulted in a 3.5% loss, but at a 10 lb. density, loss increased to 7%. At a 9 inch removal rate and 15 lb. density loss was

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Section A - Page 14 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Economics from A13 1.5%, but at the 10 lb. density loss was 3%. They recommend never removing less than 6 inches per day. Summary Good management can limit combined harvest, storage and feedout losses to 10-15%. Poor management can result in combined losses up to 60 to 75%. Be aware that the losses are the most digestible nutrients. Less digestible nutrients remain, resulting in poorer quality forage. Muck (2009) stresses the best use of inoculants is in combination with good silage management. Keeping the feedout face tight and smooth and only removing as much silage as will be fed in 12 hours will minimize heating & spoilage. Bolton and Homes (UW 2009) recommend use of several smaller silos to fill, pack and cover each more quickly. If forage is coming in rapidly, by filling and packing 2 bunkers simultaneously you can use more packing tractors, with less interference. They note benefits of north-south bunker orientation (to minimize snow accumulation) and open end bunkers to increase management flexi-

bility. Also, a deeper pile (8 ft or more) reduces surface area to volume with a 12 x 50 x 365 bunker at 10% loss losing about 20 tons less than an 8 x 75 x 365 ft bunker. It's important to calculate forage and feed inventory in the fall and make any purchases when supplies are available and generally lower priced. Using the UW density and sizing calculators or worksheets from the Crop Storage Institute (www.cropstorage. com) will allow you to plan ahead for this year's needs. Holmes's (UW 2011) newest spreadsheet on Determining Value of Improved Silage Management brings together the numerous factors to estimate the money that could be saved on your operation. Using his example values for a 100 cow dairy (with heifers),

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ing, storage, feedout and in the trough could net a dairy farm up to $320 / cow / year.

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Freshmen and transfer students from Penn State’s departments of Dairy and Animal Science (DAS) and Poultry Science viewed first hand the diversity of Pennsylvania agriculture on the New Student Industry Tour during the first week of classes in

August. The tour was an opportunity to meet farm managers, learn about career opportunities and get to know fellow students and professors in an informal setting. Dr. Terry Etherton, Head of the Department of Dairy and Animal Science, said, “The annual

Students and faculty who participated in the agricultural industry tour for students Campus are shown here outside the headquarters of Center County PAWS. tour has become an important part of welcoming students new to the University Park Campus, helping them interact with each other and faculty members while learning about student activities and potential careers. The tour offers them an outstanding overview of Pennsylvania agriculture, and it has proven to be a great way for them to begin the first week of classes.” Morgan Heller, Lebanon, said, “The tour was beneficial — it was nice to be in a more relaxed environment to get to know professors and advisors and learn about student clubs. I appreciated seeing ag-related businesses and farms in the area. And I met many students who I’ll see in classes and clubs. It was well-rounded, and we saw many aspects of agriculture.” Heller’s primary interest is in the equine industry, but she

new to the University Park appreciated seeing other areas of agriculture. Lindsay Royer, Elizabethtown, said, “It definitely opened my eyes to different aspects of the ag industry. It was so fascinating to hear how the horses are trained, what they eat and how they are handled. To actually see them work and practice their show skills was amazing — definitely something I am not used to.” Her first love is dairy, so, not surprisingly, she found the dairy farm the most interesting part of the tour. “I miss my cows so much! It was so comforting to see some cows when I was feeling homesick!” Royer concluded, “It was such a great welcome to the college, and made me even more excited to join as many clubs as possible just so I can be as

Students A16

Page 15 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Students gain perspective on Pennsylvania agriculture


Section A - Page 16 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Students from A15 much a part of the College of Ag as possible.” Tour organizer Jana Peters, Animal Sciences Advising Coordinator, said, “The tour is especially valuable because more and more students are coming to DAS with non-farm backgrounds. This gives them the chance to see the diversity of Pennsylvania agriculture, and they learn so much from the successful professionals who give their time and allow us to visit their facilities. Students also benefit from meeting their classmates and faculty. It is really an outstanding day of education and fellowship.” Tour hosts included: Dairy: Mercer Vu Farms Inc., Mercersburg Rick and Rod Hissong are the owners of Mercer Vu Farms. The farm has 1,750 mature cows, milking 1,500 through a double 28 herringbone parlor four times/day. They raise over 1,600 replacements, and haul 45 million pounds of milk annually to Land O’Lakes. Cows are housed in three four-row freestall bedded with recycled sand and flushed with recycled water. Production average is 28,500 lbs. with 3.6 percent fat and 3.1 percent protein. The Hissongs raise crops on over 2,000 acres of owned and rented land. Rick, the dairy manger, graduated from Penn State in 1993 and is the operations manager, overseeing the cropping enterprise, nutrient management and mechanical issues on the farm. Rod graduated in 1998 and is dairy manager, responsible for dairy herd, replacement program and employee management. Beef: Gene Wingert Farm, St. Thomas The Wingerts operate a diversified 450-acre livestock and crop farm with help from son Jere and grandson Nicholas. They maintain a herd of 80 crossbred brood cows and finish 650 market hogs on a contract basis. Using very little grain in feeding the beef herd, they use a forage-based program of excellent pasture and hay. The breeding program is based on the production of “Club Calves” utilizing the best sires available through the artificial insemination industry.

Equine: Chapman Reining Horses, Millerstown Owned by Dutch Chapman, the farm is in a friendly agricultural community. Chapman has ridden to and coached his clients and assistant trainers to more than 60 NRHA topten finishes and 45 world and reserve world championships. Chapman Ranch has 42 fully matted stalls, a heated observation room look-

ing out on the 80 feet by 170 feet indoor sand arena, a 150 feet by 300 feet sand outdoor riding track and five turnout paddocks. They offer training, boarding and coaching services at a variety of levels. Companion Animal Industry: Centre County PAWS, State College Centre County PAWS is a local, volunteer-based organization and animal shelter, committed to finding homes for cats

and dogs, educating citizens on responsible pet ownership, providing spay/neuter assistance, and ending pet overpopulation. They are a noneuthanasia, membersupported, volunteer-enabled organization dedicated to the Promotion of Animal Welfare and Safety. Shelter Supervisor Lisa Bahr gave students a tour of the modern dog and cat kennels, visiting areas, and low-cost spayneuter surgical suite.

Lunch was sponsored for the group by AgChoice Farm Credit. Loan Officer Doug Koontz of the Cumberland Valley AgChoice office gave students an overview of career opportunities within AgChoice. Dr. Cory Meyers, DVM of Mid-Maryland Dairy Veterinary Associates, and Penn State graduate, talked with the students about potential careers in veterinary medicine.


UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — Robert Roberts, associate professor of food science in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, recently assumed the role of president of the American Dairy Science Association. Roberts began a one-year term during the organization's annual meeting this summer in New Orleans. He had served as vice president during the previous year. According to the association's Web site, the international group consists of “educators, scientists and industry representatives who are committed to advancing the dairy industry with a

keen awareness of the vital role the dairy sciences play in fulfilling the economic, nutritive and health requirements of the world's population.” The organization publishes the Journal of Dairy Science, the topranked peer-reviewed dairy science journal in the world. Roberts — who teaches a number of courses, including “Introduction to Food Science,” “Chemical Methods of Food Analysis,” and “Science and Technology of Dairy Products Processing” to seniors in the Food Science major — is responsible for dairyfoods-processing outreach efforts at

Penn State. In this role, he organizes and directs the 118-year-old Penn State Ice Cream Short Course, Ice Cream 101 and the Penn State Cultured Dairy Products Short Course. With a research program focused on the microbiology and technology of fermented dairy products, Roberts has authored or co-authored 40 refereed manuscripts and has advised 12 master's and seven doctoral students. He has spoken at International Dairy Foods Association Ice Cream Technology and Cultured Dairy Products Technology meetings and is a regular

speaker at the annual meeting of the National Ice Cream Mix Association. A recipient of awards for teaching and student advising, he also has presented internationally on dairy products processing and dairy microbiology in Australia, China, Germany, Mexico and Ukraine. Roberts received his bachelor's degree in dairy technology from the University of Vermont, his master's degree in dairy science from South Dakota State University and his doctorate in food science from the University of Minnesota. He joined the Food Science Department at Penn State in 1991. MAINE

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Page 17 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Penn State professor takes reins of international dairy group


Section A - Page 18 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Cumberland County couple named All-American Dairy Show ‘Image Award’ winners HARRISBURG, PA — Duane and Donna Duncan of Carlisle, Cumberland County, have been named the winners of the 2011 All-American Dairy Show Image Award. Agriculture Secretary George Greig will present the award at the show’s “got milk?”® banquet on Tuesday, Sept. 20, at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center. The Image Award is presented annually to an individual who has enhanced the image of the All-American Dairy Show with significant contributions to its reputation, prestige and welfare. “Duane and Donna have been avid supporters of the youth programs at the All-American Dairy Show for more than 50 years,” said Greig. “It’s because of their long-term dedication that this show continues to support meaningful events and contests that draw hundreds of young dairy enthusiasts year after year.” With wife Donna by his side, Duane served 45 years as a Penn State Agricultural Extension Educator in Adams and Cumberland counties, with 36 years spent as extension director in Cumberland County. He worked with local farm families, developed youth farm safety and therapeutic horseback riding programs, and educated the non-farm public about agriculture. Along with a local dairyman, Duane was instrumental in starting the 4-H and FFA Dairy Judging Forum at the All-American Dairy Show. For 37 years, the

contest annually hosts more than 250 students who evaluate seven classes of dairy cattle and compete in a management quiz. Donna has been a key partner in coordinating the contest and serving as a scorekeeper since the contest began. Duane served as the secretary for the Pennsylvania Junior Dairy Show from 1972-1991, and continued to assist with the annual show that boasts between 700 and 1,000 entries each year. Since 1980, he has served as treasurer of the Pennsylvania 4-H Horse Development Committee. “Duane and Donna are a major part of the legacy of the Pennsylvania Junior Dairy Show,” said show president Dale Olver. “Their dedication to youth achievement and participation is evident through their gifts of time and leadership to these events.” “This show and the judging contest are important for young people to understand the dairy industry and learn how milk gets put on the table,” said Duane. Donna added, “It’s rewarding to see the kids’ confidence grow, and to see those who win be so happy and proud.” Most recently, Duane and Donna have supported the All-American Dairy Show Youth Showmanship Contest, coordinated by fellow Cumberland County resident and former Image Award winner Kathy Walton. “Duane and Donna work as a team to enhance the activities of the All-American,” said Wal-

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ton. “Their unselfish commitment to the youth shows, including the state Junior Dairy Show, 4-H and FFA Judging Contest and Youth Showmanship Contest is what the Image Award acknowledges.” “One of the nicest things about this award is that it is for both Donna and me, showing our partnership,” said Duane. Established in 1993, the Image Award is the dairy show’s way of recognizing one of its own dedicated leaders. The winner is chosen through the Image Award Committee of the Pennsylvania Dairy and Allied Industries Associ-

ation and nominations are solicited from within the organization, the volunteers of the All-American Dairy Show and past awards winners. Show week, Sept. 1722, also boasts 23 dairy shows with nearly 3,000 animals in six days with premiums for all exhibitors. The week caps off with the 55th Pennsylvania Dairy Princess Pageant, Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Camp Hill Radisson Hotel. For more information about the All-American Dairy Show and the Premier National Junior Events, visit www.allamerican.state.pa.us.

Duane and Donna Duncan of Carlisle, Cumberland County, were named the winners of the 2011 All-American Dairy Show Image Award.


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grams and supplementing with mastitis prevention steps, such as teat sealants and environmental management, you can help reduce coliform mastitis severity and provide your cows with a better chance for successful treatment and recovery. Funke offers three steps for equipping your herd with tools to help prevent severe coliform mastitis. 1. Investigate the enemy: Knowledge is power and with a little reconnaissance, you can better prepare a defense strategy. Culture mastitis cases and review records with your veterinarian to identify common pathogens on your dairy operation. E. coli is the most common cause of coliform mastitis, but other pathogens can be to blame. Tailor your vaccination and treatment protocols to the causative pathogen. 2. Devise a defense strategy: With culture records in hand, work with your veterinarian to develop a vaccination program that protects against E. colimastitis. Review product labels, dosing and administration information, and efficacy and research to select the best vaccine for you and your dairy operation. Also, consider vaccines with lower endotoxin levels to limit negative reactions to vaccination. 3. Watch your flanks: Even with the best defense in place, including dry cow treatment, teat sealants and vaccination, don’t forget the basics of good management. Vaccines and pharmaceutical products are never a substitute for good management. Work with your nutritionist to ensure your dry cow ration is optimal. Cow and facility hygiene also is necessary to limit exposure to environmental pathogens. Be sure to set your cows up for success in their next lactation by providing them with an arsenal to fight off coliform mastitis. Talk to your herd veterinarian to confirm your herd is protected, and visit www.milkqualityfocus.co m to get additional insight on dry cow management and E. coli mastitis vaccination.

Page 19 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Strong, Durable and #1 Choice Among Farmers Worldwide


Section A - Page 20 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Foundation for the future offers affordable risk management tools to dairy farmers of all sizes Dairy farmers of all sizes will benefit from the risk management opportunities featured in the Foundation for the Future (FFTF) dairy policy program, designed by the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), and drafted into legislative form by Representative Collin Peterson (D-MN). In particular, the Dairy Margin Protection Program (DMPP) presents farmers with the opportunity to insure up to 90 percent of their milk production against catastrophically low margins, due either to low milk prices, high feed costs, or the combination. Because the financial stability of dairy operations increasingly depends on margins, rather than milk prices, giving farmers a way to protect their operation’s equity when margins are tight is a huge improvement over the status quo government safety net programs, which are solely focused on milk prices, according to NMPF. “It’s always being said that farmers are price takers, not price makers, but under this new safety net, dairy producers will have the option of making a smart investment to prepare for the type of worst-case sce-

nario like what we experienced in 2009,” said Doug Nuttelman, a dairy farmer from Stromsburg, NE, and a member of the NMPF task force that developed the DMPP. Nuttelman explained that the DMPP offers a Basic level of margin insurance at no cost to producers; all they will have to do is sign up for it, once the Foundation for the Future program is implemented. Under the congressional draft, 75 percent of a farm’s milk production history will automatically be eligible for protection at $4 per hundredweight margin (defined as the gap between the all-milk price, and a national average of feed costs). But the real opportunity for farmers comes under the Supplemental option of the DMPP, according to Nuttelman, because up to 90 percent of a farm’s production history can be insured in increments up to an additional $4/cwt. The cost of any optional, additional insurance will be shared between the USDA, and producers who elect for Supplemental coverage. “This gives farms of all sizes the chance to indemnify themselves at a level up to eight dollars per hundred-

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weight, meaning that if the milk price is $14, and feed costs are above $6 per hundred, the insurance program will pay them on all their production that particular month. Or, if milk prices are $20, and feed costs are above $12, they’ll get paid,” Nuttelman said. If producers don’t want that level of protection, the Supplemental program offers a sliding scale of options, in 50 cent per hundredweight increments.

And the real attractiveness of this program to smaller-scale operators is that “the margin insurance program allows for risk management regardless of whether you produce 100,000 pounds of milk per month, or one million,” he said. “Many other types of private risk management tools require a minimum volume of milk in order to

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will be held Oct. 4-8 in Madison, WI. Dairy cattle owners and their staff of bovine beauticians will be bringing their best cattle to World Dairy Expo to compete for honors and to network with fellow dairy producers. The owners and caretakers of these top-notch animals will be treated to a tasty Exhibitor Welcome Barbecue early in the week as they pack bedding, feed and settle their cattle in for their week-long stay in Madison. The Exhibitor Welcome Barbecue, for dairy cattle exhibitors only, is planned for Sunday, Oct. 2 at 6:30 p.m. in the Estrumate® Sale Pavilion. Merck Animal Health has committed to sponsoring this Dairy Cattle Exhibitor event and the Estrumate® Sale Pavilion through 2013. Merck’s support of Expo’s Dairy Cattle Show and Exhibitors is part of their overall support of Expo as a Five Star Sponsor. “We are proud to be a five-star sponsor at World Dairy Expo, where some of the best dairy producers showcase the best dairy cattle in the world,” said Rick Cozzitorto, dairy marketing manager for Merck Animal Health. “Dairy producers work hard breeding cattle and developing cow families all yearlong, and it’s exciting to support them at this signature industry event.” Select Sires, Inc., longtime supporter of World Dairy Expo has also shown their support by increasing to become a Four Star Sponsor in 2011. Their support now includes sponsorship of additional Dairy Cattle Show awards including the Junior Champion, Reserve Junior Champion, Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion of the Junior and Open Shows.

BouMatic has also provided increased support of the Dairy Cattle Show by providing the premium money for the International Junior Holstein Show portion of the competition. As a continuing Five Star Sponsor of World Dairy Expo, BouMatic has supported many facets of the five-day dairy event and the support of this youth show will assist those future dairy industry leaderrs. Laura Herschleb, Dairy Cattle Show Manager remarks, “We are extremely appreciative of the support we receive from our generous sponsors each year, especially the increased commitment Merck Animal Health, Select Sires Inc., and BouMatic have made to this year’s dairy cattle shows. We are looking forward to welcoming over 1,000 exhibitors expected from across 36 states and 7 Canadian provinces.” World Dairy Expo takes place at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, Wisconsin. “Around the World of Dairy in 5 Days” is the theme for the 2011 show scheduled for Oct. 4-8. For more information, contact World Dairy Expo at 608-224-6455 or visit www.worlddairyexpo.com.

Foundation from A20 enter into a contract. But the DMPP is open to everyone, large or small. This brings a new degree of protection to even the smallest dairies,” Nuttelman said. He also noted that the DMPP is compatible with other risk management programs already in use, such as forward contracts. That type of program allows farmers to lock in a future price that may be attractive and profitable to them, whereas the DMPP al-

lows producers to insure against an unattractive scenario where poor margins may bleed away their equity. For Nuttelman, whose multigenerational Nebraska farm involves two sons, having insurance against equity loss “would make it easier for us to sit down with the banker, because if he sees that we are protected against the downside, both he and I can invest more confidently in the future of our farm.”

Page 21 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

World Dairy Expo 2011 adds warm welcome for cattle exhibitors


Section A - Page 22 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Cayuga County 4-H Youth Fair 2011 There were 38 members (ages 8-18) and 20 Cloverbuds (ages 5–7) that entered over 450 items in the Youth Building exhibits division. Items in the Youth Building include foods, clothing & textiles, home environment, arts & crafts, communications & expressive arts, child care, horticulture, photography, engineering exhibits and miscellaneous other categories. These items were judged on Wednesday, July 13, at the Ward O’Hara Ag Museum by volunteers that are dedicated to 4-H and the Youth in Cayuga County. 4-H member ages are based on the individual’s age as of Jan. 1 of the current year. 4-H uses the Danish judging system. Under the Danish system, each exhibit, be it a dress, a flower, or a market steer, is compared to an ideal for that category. Evaluators consider the age, experience level and difficulty of the project. Youth and projects are not compared to each other or judged one against another. Exhibits receive either an excellent (blue), good (red), or worthy (white) award, based on

how closely the project meets the ideal. Members entered and received awards in any of the areas of Food and Nutrition, Clothing and Textiles, Home Environment, Arts and Crafts, Communications, Photography, Horticulture, Engineering and Miscellaneous: Cloverbuds that entered exhibits in the Youth Building include: Audrey Bartholomew, Gavin Bartholomew, Marissa Bartholomew, Emilia Bennett, Harry Brown, Jeffy Carmichael, Will Chappell, Alexis Fredette, Aric Hall, Tristan Lee, Trista Lunkenheimer, Cody Manitta, Chris Moscato, Taryn Langtry, Jeremy Moscato, Kylie Rejman, Dakota Pickreign, John Read, Madalaina Raymond, and Marissa Wiemann. Members: Juniors: Tyler Abbott 7 Blue 1 Red, Cara Carmichael 6 Blue 1 red, Amber Cassick 6 blue 1 red, Katie Chappell 16 blue, Tommy Chappell 14 blue 5 red, Ryan Bailey 3 blue, Kyle Bailey 3 blue, Ben Davis 9 blue, Juliann Hall 3 blue 2 red, Baylee Kennedy 6 Blue, Ben Langtry 6 blue, Brit-

FFA membership skyrockets to all-time high In the past year, more than 17,000 new students have joined FFA, setting a new all-time high in the organization’s membership since the FFA was founded in 1928. During the 2010-2011 school year, FFA membership grew to a record 540,379 students, up 17,070 students from 523,309 members in the 2009-2010 school year. The number of FFA chapters in the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands also grew with the creation of 106 new, chartered FFA chapters. Texas tops the list of states with the largest FFA membership with 81,694 students, followed by California with 70,555, Georgia with 31,616, Missouri with 25,096 and Oklahoma with 23,562. The 10 largest FFA chapters are all in California. Texas also tops all states for largest FFA membership growth during the 2010-2011 school year, followed by

California, North Carolina, Georgia and Utah. FFA chapters can now be found in 18 of the 20 largest U.S. cities, including New York City, Chicago and Philadelphia. “We are excited to see that agricultural education continues to grow and flourish in this country. Agriculture plays an important role in our everyday lives and it’s inspiring to experience this surge in FFA membership, which allows FFA to grow its impact on young lives,” said National FFA Organization CEO Dwight Armstrong. “With more than 300 careers in agriculture, it comes as no surprise that students from all walks of life are interested in pursuing agricultural education. FFA members are students interested in developing a diverse set of skills and experiences that will equip them for careers in such fields as aquaculture and food science to production agriculture, forestry, research and more.”

tney Lillie 4 blue, Kayla Rotondo 6 blue 4 red, Dillon Hunter 4 blue, Taylor Hunter 3 blue, Sophie Throop 7 blue 1 red, Morgan Steele 2 blue 1 red, Duncan Brickner 13 blue

1 red, Emma Thompson 5 blue, Niel Wiemann 9 blue 1 red, Collin Rejman 7 blue 3 red, Kelsey Lafave 14 blue 1 red, Ella Read 10 blue 3 red, and Ana Brickner 13 blue. Seniors: Zachary Abbott 4 blue 1 red, Emily Bates 22 blue 3 red, Taylor Brown 2 blue, Anna Carmichael

10 blue, Alexandra Cassick 2 blue, Vivian Chappell 16 blue 1 red, Emily Clark 6 blue, Azure D’Angelo 7 blue 3 red, Zachary Davis 7 blue 2 red, Dan Gordon 1 blue, Logan LaFave 15 blue 1 red, Evelyn Marks 4 blue 3 red, Carl Minde 7 blue 1 red, Brittany Somes 26 blue 5 red

Club displays that were represented at the Youth Fair: Little Rascals 4-H Club Pins and Needles 4-H Club Millard Fillmore 4-H Club Northwoods Coyotes 4H Club Pony Pals 4-H Club Trail Mixers 4-H Club

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National 4-H Council has announced the fall 4-H Paper Clover Campaign in partnership with Tractor Supply Company (TSC). The nationwide, in-store fundraiser will benefit state and local 4-H programming in each of the communities where a TSC store is located. “We are both honored and excited that our local Tractor Supply store has chosen to support 4-H in Columbia County through the ‘4-H Paper Clover Campaign’,” said Linda Tripp, 4-H Youth Development Issue Leader. “With their support and that of customers right here in our community, local 4-H will be able to continue making a difference in the lives of our youth.” The fall 2011 4-H Paper Clover Campaign will take place Wednesday, Sept. 21, through Sunday, Oct. 2, ending at the start of National 4-H Week. Shoppers at the Greenport store will have the opportunity to support 4-H in Columbia County by purchasing paper clovers for

just $1 at checkout. All funds raised will be donated to 4-H, and will support 4-H youth development program activities in Columbia County. “The 4-H Tractor Supply Paper Clover fundraiser continues to ban incredibly impactful local event, hosted on a national platform,” said Donald T. Floyd Jr., president and CEO of National 4-H Council. “We are honored to have a tremendous partnership that helps facilitate the support of 4-H clubs and programs in the communitieis of more than 1,000 Trator Supply Company and Del’s Feed and Farm Supply stores. Now entering its second year, the TSC 4-H Paper Clover Campaign has provided nearly $500,000 to local 4-H programs across the country. The effort has provided direct support for local camps, after-school programs and other activities, and has granted scholarships to these events that youth can explore their interests in everything from animal science to robotics.

Morrisville State College to hold 22nd Annual Yearling Sale Sept. 25 MORRISVILLE, NY — The Morrisville College Equine Institute will hold its 22nd annual Fall Yearling Sale on Sept. 25, at 11 a.m., at the college’s Nancy Sears Stowell Arena on Swamp Road. The preview day for the sale, the largest of its kind in New York state, is Sept. 24. A total of 202 yearlings are up for sale. Eighteen of them are being sold by the Morrisville Equine Institute: five yearlings of Conway Hall; four yearlings of Cash Hall; two yearlings of RC Royalty; four yearlings out of the first crop by Kenneth J; and three yearlings of American Ideal.

RC Royalty is #1 under leading sires average earnings per foal in 2011 for 2year-old trotters and Conway Hall is #3. Internationally known harness trotter, Conway Hall (13 total yearlings in the sale) is sire of the 2004 Hambletonian and trotting Triple Crown winner, Windsong’s Legacy. Conway Hall is sire of the winners of more than $47 million, more than $4.25 million in 2011. Cash Hall (14 total yearlings in the sale) is the world record holder for the half-mile track by virtue of a time trial of 1:51.1. His first crop of foals, now 3-year olds, has won more than $1.8 million.

What’s your 4-H story? 2012 will mark 100 years of 4-H Programming in Pennsylvania. The program has truly grown from its rural beginnings to its global success of today, and everyone involved has a story to tell. The PA 4-H Centennial Planning Committee would like to capture these stories and paint a historical picture through stories and photos of the last 100 years of the Pennsylvania 4-H program. 4-H members, leaders, 4-H alumni, former 4-H leaders, current and former extension educators, and/or family members are invited to submit a story and photos. Please remember stories and photos cannot be returned so participants are asked to send a high-quality copy of any photo submitted. The photo if possible should relate to the story. What to include: Name (please include your maiden name if applicable); physical address and e-mail address; what county(s) you were involved with in 4-H; years you were involved in 4-H; your connection to 4-H (club, leaders names, member, parent, leader, educator, family member, etc.); educators are asked to include what their area of expertise was; and if sending photos please make sure names of those in the photos are included, include dates and locations as well. Stories should describe or highlight a

special moment in one’s 4-H experience. One example was of a story told by a daughter of a 4-H alumnus. She remembers her mother telling stories of when the 4-H Agent would come to the 4-H club in the 1960s to teach members how to cook, working with the girls oneon-one. One of the recipes taught to the members was a dish the mother learned to make at a 4-H meeting and enjoyed so much she continued to make the dish for her family after she married. The daughter remembered how tasty the dish was and is something she too continues to make. The goal is to have 4-H stories and photos on exhibit around the state in 2012 starting with Farm Show. The state-wide planning committee will be publishing a collection of stories. The PA 4-H program has made a tremendous difference in the lives of millions! It’s certainly something to celebrate, and our centennial is a perfect time to show what impact has been made over the last 100 years! If you are interested in submitting a story please contact the office at 570278-1158 or submit it via e-mail, susquehannaext@psu.edu. Deadline for stories to be submitted is Nov. 1. Our office will then forward stories from Susquehanna County on to the planning committee.

Afghan for Warm-Up America! made at the Columbia County Fair

Members of the Buccaneers 4-H Club, Carol and Theresa Kirsamagi, sew blocks together to make an afghan for Warm-Up America! Photo courtesy of CCE of Columbia and Greene Counties RC Royalty (18 total yearlings in the risville State College. sale) became the fastest 2-year-old trotThe yearling sale, which features ting colt ever in the NYSS on a half-mile year-old Standardbred horses sold on track by virtue of his 1:58.2 score at consignment by the college, is organSaratoga Gaming and Raceway in 2005. ized and run by Morrisville State ColThat track record, along with the 1:59.4 lege Equine Department faculty, staff record he set at Monticello Raceway in and students. the same year, still stand today. RC Equine students will be working the Royalty also holds the Massachusetts event, participating in every aspect of it Sire Stake record for 3-year-old trotting from bedding stalls, grooming, leading colts of 1:59.4. and showing horses, to setting up the Kenneth J, who has $1.5 million in business office and assisting with earnings, is the fastest son of Bettor’s cleanup. Delight and has set records at five difLast year, the sale grossed $1.6 milferent raceways during his career. He lion. was a two time NYSS Champion, Empire Profits from the sale go toward generBreeders Classic Champion, and won al maintenance and enrichment of the Red Mile stakes at both 2 and 3. Ken- college’s equine programs. There is no neth J has 13 total yearlings in the sale. admission charge and the public is welAmerican Ideal will have a total of 16 come to attend. yearlings in the sale. For more information about the anConway Hall, Cash Hall, RC Royalty nual event, visit www.morrisvillesale. and Kenneth J all stand stud at Mor- com or call 315-684-6355.

World Dairy Expo offers continuing educational credits World Dairy Expo has become well respected as an elite dairy cattle show, and also as a source for tapping into the latest research and cutting-edge technologies for the dairy industry. Many of the Expo Seminars, as well as, the Dairy Forage Tool Box Seminars qualify attendees for continuing education credits. The American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists (ARPAS) and the American Association of Veterinary State Boards’ (AASVB) Registry of Approved Continuing Education (RACE) are issuing additional credits for their members who attend the seminars. All 15 of the Expo Seminars and the Dairy Forage Tool Box Seminars are qualified for one continuing education credit for ARPAS members. In addition, the Expo Seminar series is qualified for the RACE program credits. Members of ARPAS and AASVB will want to take advantage of these continuing education opportunities by attending World Dairy Expo. 2011 Expo Seminar topics include Livestock Gross Margin (LGM) for dairy, genomics testing, communicating with

consumers, robotic milking, calf nutrition, feed costs, somatic cell counts and carbon emissions. The Expo Seminars will be held each day, Tuesday through Saturday, in the Mendota 2 meeting room in the Exhibition Hall. The Dairy Forage Tool Box Seminars topics feature improving forage harvest; corn silage fermentation time and starch digestibility; forage feeding in top-producing herds; fall-grown oat option; minimizing bunker/bag silage losses; feed cost benefits of reducing greenhouse gases; and capitalizing on forages to reduce purchased corn and soybeans. These seminars will be presented on stage in the east end of the Arena Building where attendees may also view the winning forage samples on display. World Dairy Expo takes place at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, WI. “Around the World of Dairy in 5 Days” is the theme for the 2011 show scheduled for Oct. 4 through Oct. 8. For more information, contact World Dairy Expo at 608-224-6455 or visit www.worlddairyexpo.com.

Page 23 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Youth benefit from sale of Cloverbuds in Columbia County


Section A - Page 24 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

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CARBU FARMS, LLC DHIRAPCS HILL'S VALLEY FARM, LLC DHIR-AP WHITEHEAD, NATE DHI-AP WILEAN FARMS DHI-AP KARON FARMS, INC. DHI-AP JONES DAIRY, INC. DHI-AP DUROW,MICHAEL AND DAWN DHI-AP BOBERG,DANIEL F. DHI-AP CHARLES BARE DHI-AP RONALD, PENNY & TODD PARKER DHI-AP PIMM ADELIA DHI-AP ANDERA, CHRIS DHI-AP MARK HANSEN DHIR-AP JOHN MOSHER DHI-AP BOBERG ALAN F. DHI-AP HORTON, DAIRY DHI-AP POWELL FARMS DHI-AP BRUCE & LUCILLE KONINGISOR DHI-AP KRATTS RONALD L. DHI-AP PHILIP CLARK DHI-AP ANDERA, CHRIS DHI-AP MICHAEL KENT DHI-AP BROWN BROOK FARM DHI-AP

H 523.0 B 151.8 H 58.6 H 159.6 H 80.3 H 80.7 H 178.1 H 67.7 H1975.4 H 76.1 X 293.3 H 67.2 J 70.2 H 47.7 H 62.7 H 63.9 X 101.9 X 77.6 H 54.5 H 45.0 H 18.2 H 34.2 A 41.5

29576 1047 3.5 894 3.0 3X 23800 1016 4.3 801 3.4 24226 936 3.9 795 3.3 24938 934 3.7 763 3.1 24424 948 3.9 763 3.1 24425 911 3.7 737 3.0 23389 786 3.4 724 3.1 22888 767 3.4 698 3.0 22807 850 3.7 692 3.0 3X 21063 804 3.8 676 3.2 20926 772 3.7 669 3.2 3X 19981 753 3.8 636 3.2 17896 839 4.7 628 3.5 20649 780 3.8 616 3.0 19520 726 3.7 596 3.1 19823 753 3.8 589 3.0 17511 754 4.3 584 3.3 17371 687 4.0 578 3.3 19162 711 3.7 574 3.0 18509 665 3.6 556 3.0 16649 684 4.1 545 3.3 16976 586 3.5 519 3.1 16374 615 3.8 506 3.1

SCIPIO SPRINGS DAIRY DHI-APCS H 797.6 FESSENDEN DAIRY, L.L.C. DHI-APCS H 677.3 OAKWOOD DAIRY, INC. DHI-APCS H1862.8 PINE HOLLOW DAIRY DHI-AP H 733.8 AURORA RIDGE DAIRY DHIRAPCS H1898.3 PATCHEN, KENTON DHIR-AP H 481.4 ALLEN FARMS DHI-AP H1251.1 GREEN HILL DAIRY DHI-AP H 802.4 KEVIN & BARB ZIEMBA DHI-AP H 39.3 BLUMER, DAVID DHI-AP H 348.4 RIPLEY FARMS DHI-AP H 179.1 MILLS, GEORGE DHI H 61.9 RIPLEY FARMS DHI-AP X 53.8 LITTLEJOHN FARMS DHI-APCS H 272.0 NOLT, RAYMOND JR DHI-AP H 87.0 REDMOND BROS. DHI-AP H 48.8 ROMANO FARM LLC DHI-AP H 11.8 VITALE, PAUL DHI H 98.1 WHITE CLOVER FARMS DHI-AP H 73.9 BRUTUS HILL FARM DHI-AP H 148.3 DONLIN FARMS DHI-AP H 103.3 DONLIN FARMS DHI-AP H 114.9 HALF ACRE DAIRY DHI-AP H 206.5 RIPLEY FARMS DHI-AP G 133.3 ROMANO FARM LLC DHI-AP X 31.9 TWIN HILLS FARM 1 DHI-AP H 107.3 BURHANS, DONALD & KATHY DHI-AP H 59.5

30972 1098 3.5 968 3.1 3X 30886 1087 3.5 948 3.1 3X 28360 994 3.5 864 3.0 3X 27379 997 3.6 863 3.2 3X 27682 1021 3.7 854 3.1 3X 27471 969 3.5 849 3.1 3X 27069 976 3.6 842 3.1 3X 25334 900 3.6 787 3.1 23758 908 3.8 744 3.1 25239 847 3.4 741 2.9 3X 24835 898 3.6 738 3.0 3X 24262 892 3.7 732 3.0 22010 894 4.1 694 3.2 3X 24091 909 3.8 686 2.8 3X 23102 841 3.6 681 2.9 22359 833 3.7 672 3.0 20323 741 3.6 665 3.3 21237 808 3.8 656 3.1 20337 753 3.7 639 3.1 19902 720 3.6 626 3.1 21298 761 3.6 625 2.9 3X 20507 754 3.7 610 3.0 3X 19701 731 3.7 604 3.1 18321 829 4.5 598 3.3 3X 15397 738 4.8 560 3.6 19238 669 3.5 550 2.9 17846 658 3.7 522 2.9

KNIGHT, JOHN & LAURA IVETT, HOWARD & LUCY TENPAS, ROGER CABHI FARM JHIGH ACRES MCCRAY FARM GRAPE VIEW DAIRY LLC. DENISE SAXTON TRIVAL FARM, INC. ORMOND, FARM CROWELL, ROBERT FAIRBANKS, DOUGLAS CRUMP FARMS MOSS, GLEN & S. DIANE RHINEHART, TIM & MARY

27726 977 3.5 876 3.2 3X 26423 991 3.8 819 3.1 3X 25196 886 3.5 808 3.2 3X 26154 1005 3.8 796 3.0 3X 26283 932 3.5 788 3.0 3X 25909 982 3.8 774 3.0 26076 915 3.5 760 2.9 3X 25251 1002 4.0 759 3.0 23785 936 3.9 736 3.1 23348 873 3.7 728 3.1 24216 913 3.8 724 3.0 3X 23174 867 3.7 710 3.1 22758 793 3.5 697 3.1 3X 22330 813 3.6 696 3.1 22503 827 3.7 696 3.1

BROOME

CATTARAUGUS

CAYUGA

CHAUTAUQUA

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H

75.6 55.5 468.2 185.2 220.5 132.8 253.1 25.2 138.5 220.7 530.7 167.2 126.7 170.3 99.3

970 973 946 870 787 866 773 769 788 754 784 732 677

3.7 3.7 3.9 3.9 3.6 4.1 3.7 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.8

793 742 741 675 661 659 651 639 629 629 623 591 519

3.0 3X 2.8 3X 3.0 3X 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

Top 40 Herds For August B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

CARLBERG FARM STARCESKI, PAUL AND ROBIN CRAIG HARVEY CHENEY, STEVEN & MORRIS ANDERSON, ALLEN CARL AND KRIS NECKERS CLINECREST FARM LUNDMARK, NORMAN E. BECKERINK, ROBERT NICKERSON FARMS DAN & AL MINOR BRAD & KIM WILTSIE WALL STREET DAIRY 1 KELLEY FAMILY FARM BEIGHTOL, JAMES, BRETT DWAYNE & CATHY EMKE BOOZEL, MARK SPINLER FARMS RAYMOND TROYER JAQUITH DOUGLAS TODD AND TERRI BAYLE CARL AND KRIS NECKERS

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H J

106.9 48.6 78.1 58.7 64.8 425.5 85.0 111.2 72.4 898.3 92.9 107.4 42.7 40.2 122.8 98.0 86.6 139.8 40.9 107.0 43.4 168.7

21318 21506 21397 21365 20966 21385 20391 20688 19926 20613 21118 19116 19153 18627 18540 18348 18074 17859 18055 17770 17876 14437

784 791 770 837 786 754 732 779 720 752 761 744 709 721 712 697 661 704 638 649 672 704

3.7 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.5 3.7 3.8 4.9

680 676 652 651 651 647 645 639 617 613 605 595 583 583 577 563 545 542 542 538 529 526

3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.6

LANTLAND FARMS LTD. BLAKEMORE, LANCE & GINA BOOR, DAVID TANNER FARMS LLC TURNER, DAVID

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H

212.7 91.5 107.8 88.6 82.4

24033 24113 22433 21169 19413

906 874 876 762 707

3.8 3.6 3.9 3.6 3.6

747 730 704 622 601

3.1 3.0 3X 3.1 2.9 3.1

NEWTON, HAROLD & BRIAN INDIAN CAMP FARM HANEHAN FAMILY FARM HOWARD, BOB & ROXY MARSHMAN FARMS ANGELROSE DAIRY HOFMANN, ROBERT & JOHN LATHROP, BARRY & PAULA HOWARD, BOB & ROXY LINCKVIEW FARMS DAVIS, ALAN & DEBRA MIKALUNAS FARM DAN FRIEDEL INGERTO, JAY & VIRGINIA GORRELL FAMILY SYLSTRA, J.C. ANGELROSE DAIRY MCKENNEY, DAVID MURPHY, THOMAS & CATHERINE COOK, MARTIN MATTYDALE FARM GREENVIEW FARMS OLIN, WILLIAM & LINDA BLANCHARD FARMS BARTLETT, ANDREW MAPLEDREAM FARM ROBINSON, OSCAR MAPLE SHADOW FARM WHITE, MASON & ALLEN CROTHERS, ANTHONY EIHOLZER FARM SCHWARTZ, CARL FRANK, ROBERT LATHROP, PETER & BRENDA MUDGE, STEVEN MIRY RUN FARM HAPPY VALLEY FARM ROWE CHARLE LEANING LOCUST DAIRY TYNERDALE

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H J H H H H H H H J H J H H H H H J H X H H X H H H H H H H H H H

201.6 406.4 696.4 23.4 393.6 57.8 63.5 82.3 58.2 153.9 53.5 108.3 72.0 106.3 98.4 67.2 19.5 83.4 35.1 103.5 57.7 84.6 127.8 167.7 147.7 121.1 82.9 112.5 64.0 82.4 63.5 86.1 191.8 91.6 60.3 98.4 237.9 104.9 57.6 32.4

27520 1057 3.8 858 3.1 3X 27048 1114 4.1 843 3.1 3X 26413 932 3.5 799 3.0 26258 959 3.7 790 3.0 25182 954 3.8 770 3.1 3X 25501 917 3.6 767 3.0 24305 882 3.6 737 3.0 24755 941 3.8 734 3.0 21006 921 4.4 717 3.4 23267 807 3.5 716 3.1 24007 919 3.8 708 2.9 22517 860 3.8 702 3.1 23338 872 3.7 702 3.0 23106 868 3.8 701 3.0 22842 817 3.6 688 3.0 22881 870 3.8 687 3.0 19914 860 4.3 686 3.4 22824 876 3.8 678 3.0 18345 870 4.7 666 3.6 21678 844 3.9 664 3.1 20886 821 3.9 659 3.2 21079 794 3.8 649 3.1 21519 806 3.7 648 3.0 20470 735 3.6 640 3.1 17273 809 4.7 640 3.7 20094 740 3.7 638 3.2 19968 702 3.5 637 3.2 21209 740 3.5 636 3.0 20937 732 3.5 634 3.0 18724 781 4.2 631 3.4 21204 775 3.7 629 3.0 20904 773 3.7 627 3.0 20073 739 3.7 613 3.1 20739 751 3.6 610 2.9 19583 815 4.2 600 3.1 20162 796 3.9 598 3.0 18789 687 3.7 595 3.2 18771 711 3.8 588 3.1 18993 719 3.8 588 3.1 18395 700 3.8 578 3.1

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H X H H

348.2 542.5 992.4 268.6 594.7 149.3 94.0 51.3 62.8 51.7

30025 1136 3.8 947 3.2 3X 29842 1123 3.8 902 3.0 27565 948 3.4 828 3.0 3X 24668 1005 4.1 779 3.2 24105 934 3.9 734 3.0 22759 841 3.7 689 3.0 22249 871 3.9 689 3.1 21051 728 3.5 643 3.1 19971 718 3.6 596 3.0 17987 712 4.0 537 3.0

CHEMUNG

CHENANGO

CLINTON

MINER INSTITUTE REMILLARD FARMS CHALIZ FARM LLC. DIMOCK FARMS, LLC. HIDDEN VIEW FARM ALLEN, JAMES W. G & M FARM MCNEIL, DON & SHERRY DAMOUR, DICK SMITH, HAROLD

COLUMBIA

3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 4.7 3.6 3.8 3.7 4.9 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.6 4.0 3.7 3.7 3.9 4.6

887 822 792 788 775 761 729 715 684 677 676 671 668 664 627 585 576 529

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.7 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.4 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.6

3X

3X 3X

LONAN FARM DHI-AP LYN F. MAIN, JR DHI-APCS OOMS ADRIAN & SONS DHI-AP KELLER R & SONS HD1 DHIR ELITE DAIRY DHI-AP DAVENPORT, JIM HERD 3 DHI KIERNAN, WILLIAM DHI-AP THE DAVENPORT FAMILY HD 2 DHIR DUTCH HOLLOW FARM DHIRAPCS RONNYBROOK FARMS DHI-AP MILLERHURST FARM DHI-AP TRIPPLE CREEK FARM DHI-AP BARRINGER, FRED DHIR-AP OOMS, ANTONIE & MICHAEL HD 1 DHI-AP G+H DAIRY DHI-AP B.B.T.T.FARM DHI-AP BURLINGAME, DOUG DHI-AP OOMS, ANTONIE & MICHAEL HD 2 DHIR-AP

H 538.0 H1099.4 H 461.3 H 249.5 B 46.5 H 19.1 H 147.1 H 51.2 J 538.9 H 75.0 H 127.5 H 176.6 H 85.5 X 106.0 H 156.6 H 171.9 H 24.6 J 65.2

29076 26461 25342 26047 20827 24886 24707 23373 19865 21154 22630 21871 21500 20735 19665 17464 18814 14784

TURNER, BENJAMIN &CAROLYN DHIR BECK FARMS DHI-APCS SPRUCE EDEN DAIRY LLC DHIR-AP DRAKE, RICHARD D. DHI-AP

H 113.6 H1179.4 H 431.3 H 191.3

29655 1182 4.0 986 3.3 28260 951 3.4 881 3.1 3X 26272 971 3.7 826 3.1 3X 25286 967 3.8 794 3.1 3X

CORTLAND

995 926 920 951 973 904 927 867 982 780 846 835 768 823 736 647 736 687

3X

3X 3X

3X

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

CURRIE VALLEY DAIRY LLC DHI-AP H 51.3 HALL, BRYAN DHI-AP H 68.7 RIVERSIDE DAIRY LLC DHI-AP H 581.1 CURRIE VALLEY DAIRY LLC DHI-AP H 781.7 DOVETALES FARM DHI-AP H 174.8 BROOKS, CLINTON S DHI H 75.3 ROBINSON, ROLAND DHI-AP H 73.3 SPRUCE EDEN DAIRY LLC DHIR-AP J 18.1 AUGUR, DAVID DHI H 80.1 FORBES FARM DHI-AP X 575.2 A & J GRINNELL DHI-AP H 97.2 SCHONCREST FARMS DHI-AP H 84.1 SUNSETYOUNG FARM DHI H 144.1 WESTAN FARMS DHI H 155.3 MCEVOY, CHARLES & KENNETH DHIR H 33.1 TWIN OAKS DAIRY LLC DHI-AP H 134.8 KNAPP, PETER DHI-AP H 59.5 MATT & KEVIN SHARPE DHI-AP H 102.9 MUGGLIN JEAN L HD I DHIR-AP J 41.3 CLOSSON, RANDY DHI-AP H 84.2 ROCKY BOTTOM FARM DHI-AP H 61.9 GLADTIME TOO DHIR-AP X 68.0

25023 25479 25447 24096 23023 23090 22825 19154 22415 21218 20171 19510 20215 20540 19304 19141 18113 18111 15393 17524 18213 15594

984 902 943 897 810 866 834 884 797 817 816 732 753 840 774 758 717 691 776 750 667 669

3.9 3.5 3.7 3.7 3.5 3.8 3.7 4.6 3.6 3.9 4.0 3.8 3.7 4.1 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.8 5.0 4.3 3.7 4.3

JOLEANNA HOLSTEINS PALMER, RONALD & LANDA HAGER FARMS MATTSON, H.L. & SONS ACKLAND DAIRY FARM ALBANO FARM INC. TAGGART, JEFF & LORI & BRAD HUMDINGER HOLSTEINS SCHAEFER, ADOLF & LARRY LAMPORT, FRANK JR DELROSE FARM HOLLEY, DAVE & ELAINE DEYSENROTH, PAUL & GWEN MARICK FARM, LLC BEEBE HILL FARM JASON, SANTOBUONO MARTIN, EDWIN & DUANE CHAR MARIE FARM LLC SCOTT' HILLSIDE FARM SKYMAC FARM BEDFORD FARMS TERRY, MATTHEW ETERNAL FLAME HOLSTEINS BRUCE&SUE GREGORY MUSHKODAY FARM DAIRY SMITH HOLSTEINS MAXWELL, RUSSELL HOSKING FARM RITZ FARMS PINEYVALE FARM SITTS CO. HOLSTEINS TERRY, MATTHEW MOUNTAIN CREST FARM 2 DAVID GOULD JOHNSON, CHRISTL & TIM GRANT, DAVID RICHNAN FARM SHAW, JAMES RASMUSSEN, BRUCE & SCOTT ANDY & BETTYANN POST

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H J H H H H H H H H

143.6 45.9 486.0 188.5 37.4 153.3 80.4 49.0 66.8 118.7 70.6 74.1 43.9 302.3 71.9 38.6 52.4 113.4 126.1 51.6 99.6 29.9 106.2 38.5 136.5 122.6 46.3 59.3 70.4 65.3 83.6 43.9 90.5 62.9 39.5 100.4 44.7 58.8 50.7 81.4

27220 953 3.5 854 3.1 3X 26859 944 3.5 844 3.1 26356 1055 4.0 810 3.1 25364 924 3.6 788 3.1 24943 933 3.7 770 3.1 25020 1133 4.5 767 3.1 24429 943 3.9 761 3.1 3X 24445 934 3.8 756 3.1 25004 905 3.6 756 3.0 24283 921 3.8 753 3.1 23771 916 3.9 735 3.1 23299 915 3.9 727 3.1 22884 872 3.8 725 3.2 23333 927 4.0 719 3.1 3X 23971 912 3.8 710 3.0 22946 882 3.8 706 3.1 22142 863 3.9 704 3.2 22682 868 3.8 700 3.1 22889 853 3.7 695 3.0 23088 850 3.7 688 3.0 22304 853 3.8 685 3.1 20221 880 4.4 684 3.4 22324 792 3.5 684 3.1 22457 810 3.6 676 3.0 21635 867 4.0 673 3.1 20791 837 4.0 669 3.2 22621 842 3.7 667 2.9 21948 795 3.6 666 3.0 20843 876 4.2 664 3.2 22184 859 3.9 663 3.0 20075 805 4.0 646 3.2 17090 874 5.1 641 3.8 21248 775 3.6 638 3.0 21377 806 3.8 635 3.0 20776 802 3.9 634 3.1 20826 818 3.9 629 3.0 20442 720 3.5 625 3.1 20570 664 3.2 622 3.0 20983 811 3.9 620 3.0 20996 812 3.9 620 3.0

COON BROTHERS HD 2 PLANKENHORN FARMS UPLANDS FARM HENRY BENEKE JACKSON BROS. BROOKCREST BRIAN DONOVAN PULVER, JOHN & JEFFREY STORM FIELD SWISS REBECCA OSBORNE COON BROTHERS HD 1 PEROTTI, FRANK FM 1

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR

H H H H H H H H X X G H

234.1 46.3 90.0 142.4 46.0 66.5 150.3 170.6 42.4 75.0 117.5 90.2

24215 23639 21847 20104 19706 19657 18536 18406 17885 17076 16759 16069

DELAWARE

DUTCHESS

ERIE

3X

TYPE TEST

914 886 920 806 722 743 706 680 686 707 768 619

3.8 3.7 4.2 4.0 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8 4.1 4.6 3.9

774 756 756 715 709 703 682 679 676 665 621 614 599 597 586 575 566 563 557 543 541 511

730 709 696 651 613 603 599 589 569 546 532 512

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.5 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.6 3.1 3.0 3.3

3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

3.0 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2

AMBERWOOD FARM DHI-AP H 56.9 RICHMOND, CHARLES & JOHN DHIR-AP H 219.5 ROLLING MEADOWS FARM LLC DHI-AP H 574.0 EARLY VIEW FARM DHI-AP H 116.1 PHILLIPS FAMILY FARM INC. DHI-AP H 844.8 WIDEMAN FARMS DHI-AP H 130.6 R&D JANIGA ENTERPRISES DHI-AP H 300.4 MUNN, RICHARD DHI-AP H 78.2 HAIER, GEORGE DHI-AP H 58.0 WITTMEYER, CLAYTON JR. DHI-AP H 183.7 NORBEL DAIRY DHI-AP H 116.5 JEFFERY SIMONS DHI-AP H 62.6 TRIPLE OAK FARMS DHI-AP H 153.7 HAIER FREDRICK DHI H 55.5 SCHMITZ, KEITH & ANN DHI-AP H 83.1

26748 1039 3.9 866 3.2 27709 990 3.6 844 3.0 3X 25734 982 3.8 786 3.1 3X 24794 938 3.8 783 3.2 25438 986 3.9 779 3.1 3X 24460 897 3.7 749 3.1 23491 852 3.6 733 3.1 24038 885 3.7 728 3.0 23775 866 3.6 728 3.1 22736 857 3.8 704 3.1 22247 867 3.9 668 3.0 3X 21926 801 3.7 655 3.0 21365 835 3.9 655 3.1 20573 833 4.0 649 3.2 21462 802 3.7 648 3.0

OOMSVIEW HOLSTEINS STARGO DAIRY FARM, LLC METCALF FARMS DANIEL & HELENE MEIER BEAVER FLATS HOLSTEINS POIRIER, EUGENE VINCENT FARM LLC. ARMSTRONG,THOMAS FRIEND,ALLAN AND MARY OTIS,RALPH & CINDY HAMILTON, SCOTT & JUDY

35133 1090 3.11020 2.9 3X 26064 945 3.6 808 3.1 3X 25533 973 3.8 807 3.2 3X 24754 897 3.6 788 3.2 25180 796 3.2 767 3.0 24149 943 3.9 747 3.1 24529 867 3.5 738 3.0 22593 854 3.8 713 3.2 21737 829 3.8 679 3.1 20839 765 3.7 644 3.1 20612 721 3.5 621 3.0

FRANKLIN 3X

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

HERD OWNER

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H

90.0 173.0 525.3 347.1 52.2 69.8 137.6 70.5 77.3 56.7 84.9


HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

VINCENT FARM LLC. WOOD, WILLIAM K. GEORGE MILLER THANKFUL HEARTS JERSEY'S CRAIGMOOR FARM ARTIC ROSE ARTIC ROSE ALAMANA FARM'S CRAIGMOOR FARM TUTTLE FARM LABARE, ROBERT WILLIAM JONES & SONS GLENGARRY FARM LLC

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHIR-AP

BLUMER DAIRY MOWACRES FARM KINGSLEY ,HOWARD & SONS JEFF & KATHY THOMPSON ZUBER FARMS 2 BERKEMEIER, H. C. & SONS ROBERT WOOD JOHN KUSZLYK

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP

GENESEE

GREENE

B R COW E E YEARS D

J H J J J H H H G X H H A

31.4 70.0 100.4 57.7 48.1 12.4 31.4 42.8 44.7 78.6 64.3 100.0 152.5

H 404.2 H1511.5 H 102.4 H 107.4 H1864.9 H 76.1 H 81.8 X 67.2

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

17612 18922 17124 17001 16116 19304 19561 19852 16796 17027 18108 17738 17256

821 713 743 745 768 666 663 694 777 689 681 650 648

4.7 3.8 4.3 4.4 4.8 3.5 3.4 3.5 4.6 4.0 3.8 3.7 3.8

613 602 602 596 585 584 576 566 557 552 546 539 527

3.5 3.2 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.0 2.9 2.9 3.3 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.1 3X

26095 969 3.7 817 3.1 3X 26727 1025 3.8 799 3.0 3X 23570 851 3.6 724 3.1 22529 862 3.8 698 3.1 22113 888 4.0 664 3.0 3X 19607 803 4.1 638 3.3 20551 648 3.2 628 3.1 19641 702 3.6 596 3.0

VALLEY VIEW FARM STORY, MATTHEW C. JR.

DHIR-AP J 59.3 DHI-AP H 43.4

18680 20315

CASLER, JIM & PHIL MAYPAR FARM TIMMERMAN FARMS FOSTER'S ACRES HOLSTEINS WOLFE, HOWARD VALLEY HIGH FARM WINDEX FARMS KELVISTA HOLSTEINS BOEPPLE, RAYMOND & LISA DONALD & ERIN SHUTTS JR SCHWASNICK FARMS FREDERICK P HERRINGSHAW ATRASS FARM HAUGHTON FARM MEADOW BROOK FARM SPRING LAWN FARM LYON, JOSEPH & ANGELA BLACK IRON DAIRY LLC WINTERGREEN FARM MARSHY ACRES FARM FOSTER'S ACRES JERSEYS COLLINS PRIDE HOLSTEINS SALMSTEAD FARMS DITHMARSIA HOLSTEINS BRUCE TREADWELL DALE COVERT ELM TREE FARM DALE COVERT DONEINFARM HACKLEY, BRIAN ROB MICH FARM

DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H X H H H H X H H H H X J H H H H H H X H H H

275.2 136.9 203.8 137.4 91.7 74.9 101.2 91.7 63.5 64.4 116.6 204.2 76.4 94.7 68.7 84.0 70.9 176.1 65.0 60.2 17.3 111.1 97.7 106.5 75.4 49.5 74.0 15.5 29.5 52.3 46.2

26536 1146 4.3 817 3.1 25277 970 3.8 791 3.1 25497 834 3.3 770 3.0 3X 24387 779 3.2 757 3.1 23533 904 3.8 737 3.1 23929 932 3.9 735 3.1 22689 851 3.8 718 3.2 23416 873 3.7 717 3.1 22719 863 3.8 691 3.0 20711 771 3.7 663 3.2 3X 21499 842 3.9 662 3.1 20505 811 4.0 659 3.2 20900 791 3.8 637 3.0 19580 762 3.9 634 3.2 19931 759 3.8 627 3.1 19877 732 3.7 624 3.1 19532 729 3.7 605 3.1 19146 750 3.9 599 3.1 19956 745 3.7 597 3.0 19666 698 3.5 595 3.0 15756 736 4.7 586 3.7 19472 690 3.5 584 3.0 20070 682 3.4 578 2.9 18960 695 3.7 576 3.0 19529 750 3.8 576 2.9 19211 687 3.6 575 3.0 17989 667 3.7 531 3.0 15778 692 4.4 531 3.4 18423 681 3.7 530 2.9 16940 657 3.9 518 3.1 17657 627 3.6 512 2.9

NORTH HARBOR FARM MURCREST FARM HYLIGHT FARMS, LLC HYLIGHT FARMS, LLC NORTHROP, MICHAEL & SONS SHELAND FARMS BIG DOG DAIRY EISEL, STEVE LYNDALE FARM HORNING, STANLEY&SHARON BROWN, DOUGLAS E. MASON'S DAIRY FARM SOUTH SANDY DAIRY WOOD FARMS, LLC. PARISH, LOUANN LEE,STEPHEN & SALLY BOULTON BEACH FARMS, LLC LILAC LAWNS FARM INC. ZEHR, JASON EASTMAN DAIRY FARM LLC REFF FAMILY FARM HYLIGHT FARMS, LLC PEACHEY WILMER & VERA PEACH SPRING FARM REED HAVEN FARMS FORRESTER, DENNIS & CAROL MURROCK FARM TMT FARMS ZUMBACH, BRIAN & AMY KURTZ, JOSEPH E. JR. WATSON, STEPHEN BONNYLAND FARM MOSER, BRAD YODER, TIM & ARLENE HALDEMAN DAVID JEFF ZIMMER MOSER, JOSH JON FREEMAN HORTON, CARL J. & RANDY C.

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H X H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

764.8 687.8 234.2 99.1 85.4 721.2 113.1 135.8 72.0 55.7 306.5 112.2 87.4 546.5 45.0 62.5 135.1 147.2 55.2 409.5 95.8 28.8 77.7 58.9 168.3 124.9 230.7 50.8 91.4 58.2 88.7 67.6 50.9 78.8 53.5 79.8 52.3 86.0 93.3

29127 28344 28606 27673 27801 26772 26950 23970 24829 24137 24723 23903 23732 23918 24016 22807 22597 22903 22143 24224 21406 19669 22938 23151 22628 22793 21074 20118 20195 18968 18776 18695 18282 17150 17232 17401 16711 17144 16127

1033 1040 1143 1107 967 935 939 733 918 941 943 971 898 940 862 824 810 776 748 844 894 990 841 837 802 826 753 798 674 742 672 687 655 690 614 633 626 627 605

3.5 3.7 4.0 4.0 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.1 3.7 3.9 3.8 4.1 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.4 3.4 3.5 4.2 5.0 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.6 3.6 4.0 3.3 3.9 3.6 3.7 3.6 4.0 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.8

886 869 863 854 840 816 797 782 760 754 746 741 726 724 704 701 698 697 697 694 692 687 684 684 682 660 630 626 613 589 581 561 549 530 520 512 509 509 506

3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.3 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.5 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H

48.5 108.1 141.8 72.3 64.9 56.1

27610 26519 23791 22872 23166 23513

993 977 950 797 854 857

3.6 3.7 4.0 3.5 3.7 3.6

825 811 745 708 708 707

3.0 3.1 3X 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0

HERKIMER

JEFFERSON

LEWIS

L&M FARMS WALNUTHOF FARM WILLIAMS FARM ANDY SCHANTZ JEFF SIMPSON YORK, SCOTT E

924 4.9 654 3.5 773 3.8 629 3.1

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

3X

3X 3X

3X 3X

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

RIVEREDGE DAIRY SCHRAG, WILFRED & LOIS RIDLESIDE HERD #1 HOUSER, DWIGHT TERRY WALSEMAN LIMESTONE RIDGE FARM ROGGIE, KEITH SOUTH KEENER DAIRY JASDALE FARM HANCOCK, JIM & DARCIE GUS TABOLT ZEHR GLENN MAST, TITUS RODNEY CLINTSMAN SULLIVAN, MIKE C. ERNEST & AMY BEYER SHERMAN ERIC & LORELLE THUNDER LANE DAIRY FARNEY, NORMAN LEYDEN VIEW FARM YORK, MICHEAL & DYNALL HEBERT, RONALD MISTYKNOLL FARM TARA LYNDAKER PURPLE FEVER HOLSTEINS VALMONT DAIRY FARM WIDRICK, KYLE YANCEY, HASKELL A., JR NORTZ, CHRISTINA PALUCK, WILLAIM BAUER, JAMES ZEHR, MYRON D. HOPPEL, CARL & DORIS ROES, LOREN J.

DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

R. SCHRAMM ENT. MULLIGAN FARM, INC MULLIGAN FARM, INC KEVETTA FARMS DAIRYKNOLL FARMS COYNE FARMS, INC MAXWELL FARMS KEVETTA FARMS MROCZEK, JOSEPH & ANDY CADYVILLE FARM DONNAN FARMS, INC

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS

LIVINGSTON

Top 40 Herds For August B R COW E E YEARS D

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H

61.9 82.5 168.8 79.3 73.4 199.1 82.9 113.0 133.3 102.8 118.1 87.5 77.6 79.3 125.8 122.3 69.6 81.0 102.2 88.5 63.6 98.4 124.5 46.4 35.4 114.3 77.1 59.5 36.7 90.3 25.2 74.6 100.7 50.0

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

22220 22641 22775 22013 23013 22426 23131 22128 21979 22245 21273 21559 21007 21113 20185 21262 20948 21221 19919 20545 20456 20719 19725 19214 18719 19388 19566 19053 19261 18302 18710 18498 18574 17677

832 879 811 837 827 854 836 792 854 730 848 783 777 778 757 784 822 848 762 807 784 766 765 717 730 727 720 655 732 710 672 695 689 656

3.7 3.9 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.8 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.3 4.0 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.9 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.7 3.4 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.7

706 695 691 687 685 680 678 678 668 663 660 659 651 649 645 640 640 630 627 622 620 618 606 598 589 578 576 575 567 557 555 547 546 546

3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.0 3X 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1

H 194.3 H1094.0 H 135.1 H 22.7 H 899.2 H 943.7 H 92.2 J 15.6 H 93.0 H 152.6 H 3535.6

29391 1191 4.1 913 3.1 3X 29307 1104 3.8 898 3.1 3X 26817 1023 3.8 822 3.1 3X 26806 913 3.4 813 3.0 26674 945 3.5 811 3.0 3X 25588 969 3.8 751 2.9 3X 24869 914 3.7 736 3.0 20324 868 4.3 731 3.6 22824 871 3.8 715 3.1 21747 884 4.1 677 3.1 21432 734 3.4 638 3.0 3X

MORRISVILLE COLLEGE FOUND DHI-APCS H 255.5 CHRIS AND STEPH ANDERSON DHIR-AP H 54.2 CEDARKNOB FARMS ,LLC DHI-AP H 321.8 DURFEE, STEVEN DHI-AP H 477.1 HOLMES ACRE DHI-AP H 412.5 WHITE EAGLE FARMS DHI-AP H 909.5 SPRINGWATER FARMS LLC DHI-AP H 351.3 ROBERTS, CHARLES & SONS DHI-AP H 125.7 FERN HILL FARM, LLC DHIR H 253.7 EVANS, DOUG DHIR A 38.6 SWAMP BOTTOM FARM DHI-AP H 41.1 BIKOWSKY, PATTY & JOHN JR. DHI-AP H 76.5 MONANFRAN FARMS, INC DHIR-AP H 181.8 GATEHOUSE FARM DHI-AP H 251.0 WINTERCREST FARMS DHI-AP H 118.2 GRANNY ANNE DHIR-AP H 80.3 MANLEY, GWEN & JEFF DHI-AP H 41.8 KOBLER, GLENN DHIR-AP H 75.4 WRATTEN FARM DHI-AP H 37.2 JONES, DAVID & SCOTT DHI-AP H 75.1 WOOD, CALVIN & MATT DHI-AP H 235.5 TFARM DHIR H 90.1 RENDCACH FARMS DHI-AP H 158.9 FANNING, TERRY DHI-AP H 68.4 PUSHLAR, PAUL & FAMILY DHI-AP H 86.2 WESTFALL, FRED & STEVE DHI-AP H 89.0 PARSONS, DOUGLAS DHI-AP H 116.3 HENRY, JOSEPH O. & PETE DHI-AP H 73.3 BRIDGEDALE FARM DHI-AP H 114.3 MORGAN, FRED & JUDY DHI-AP H 148.5 DORRANCE, THOMAS A. DHIR-AP H 87.1 LYREKCREST HOLSTEINS DHIR-AP H 78.5 WEDGE FARM DHI-AP H 71.0 ELLIOTT, DOUGLAS DHI-AP H 72.5 SCHELL, JOHN E. DHI-AP H 64.5 MEEKER, ROY E. DHI-AP H 41.5 WRATTEN FARM DHI-AP X 30.0 WESTFALL, FRED & STEVE DHI-AP A 26.6 PERRY, DONALD L. & DONALD H DHI-AP H 81.1 WOODCOCK, LOUIS L. DHI H 94.6

30092 1093 3.6 942 3.1 3X 28352 849 3.0 873 3.1 3X 27173 941 3.5 829 3.1 3X 26259 882 3.4 817 3.1 3X 27144 941 3.5 813 3.0 3X 26340 930 3.5 783 3.0 3X 25543 921 3.6 757 3.0 3X 24050 916 3.8 745 3.1 23024 915 4.0 744 3.2 22776 910 4.0 732 3.2 22665 815 3.6 722 3.2 24394 863 3.5 720 3.0 23760 877 3.7 709 3.0 23755 872 3.7 702 3.0 3X 23051 822 3.6 688 3.0 22482 818 3.6 687 3.1 22080 844 3.8 683 3.1 21920 895 4.1 680 3.1 21302 781 3.7 674 3.2 21283 820 3.9 656 3.1 20713 819 4.0 653 3.2 20957 820 3.9 650 3.1 20631 764 3.7 645 3.1 21066 728 3.5 644 3.1 20625 717 3.5 641 3.1 20620 735 3.6 627 3.0 19528 734 3.8 613 3.1 20085 691 3.4 611 3.0 19687 723 3.7 602 3.1 18711 786 4.2 602 3.2 19894 710 3.6 601 3.0 19084 701 3.7 591 3.1 19347 764 3.9 589 3.0 19126 715 3.7 577 3.0 19321 700 3.6 572 3.0 19325 727 3.8 564 2.9 17814 652 3.7 557 3.1 17449 619 3.5 549 3.1 18593 737 4.0 546 2.9 17115 660 3.9 521 3.0

COLBY HOMESTEAD FARMS ELLSWORTH,ROCKY & PAT

DHI-APCS H 212.5 DHIR-AP X 62.8

20893 16302

KORONA, JEREMY DEVENDORF FARM CANARY, JAMES KORONA, JEREMY SHUSTER, PAUL & MAXINE HAYES THOMAS BRUMAR FARM STANLEY WICHOWSKY NARE FARMS HEISER, JASON MEAD, GARY KORONA, STANLEY ROBBIE DYGERT

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP

25709 1189 4.6 841 3.3 25834 988 3.8 814 3.2 24812 995 4.0 809 3.3 24223 1124 4.6 795 3.3 25628 928 3.6 768 3.0 25183 948 3.8 762 3.0 24378 1012 4.2 760 3.1 24816 948 3.8 758 3.1 23788 984 4.1 751 3.2 24579 926 3.8 745 3.0 22916 905 3.9 724 3.2 23623 852 3.6 722 3.1 23956 951 4.0 718 3.0

MADISON

MONROE

MONTGOMERY

X H H H H H H H H H H H H

37.1 41.3 58.3 60.1 55.0 64.6 223.5 68.5 200.5 88.7 204.6 42.6 57.6

813 3.9 634 3.0 658 4.0 551 3.4

HERD OWNER KORONA, JEREMY MAC VEAN, ROBERT INGHAMS HILL FARM HANDY HILLS FARM JAMES HUDSON CLAY HILL FARM FREDERICKS VELVET ACRES FEAGLES FARM MCCLUMPHA FARM RACANIELLO, WAYNE HILL, RONALD DAMIN FARM KORONA, STANLEY RANDY & DEBBIE FRASIER ADAM HAYES TRAHAVEN FRASIER, LYN AND WILLIAM KORONA, STANLEY CHAPMAN, RICHARD & FAMILY SNYDER, CLYDE DAMIN, GLEN

NIAGARA

LAKESHORE DAIRY LLC J J FARMS 1 MCCOLLUM FARMS GASPORT VIEW DAIRY, INC WILLS DAIRY FARM RANNEY FARMS RED CREEK FARM J J FARMS 1 MILLEVILLE FARMS, INC

ONEIDA

COLLINS, EDWARD & SONS TAYLWIND FARM CHAMPION FARMS LLC WILLSON, RODNEY ANGELL, KEVIN C. BIELBY, JAMES GAFNER, GEORGE WILLIAMS, JAMES PRITCHARD, HUBERT AND JIM GALLAGHER, CINDY & PAUL SMITH, WILLIAM & JOAN GYPSY DELL FARM LLC MELODYWOOD FARM SMITH, RONALD & HOWARD GREEN, PETER M. WORMONT DAIRY VAN HATTEN, B & C GROESLON FARM INC. HAROLD GLOUSE STOLARCZYK, BRIAN ROBERTS, JOHN & LISA RED LINE FARMS LLC SHERWOOD FARM JONES TERRANCE R. NOBIS, TONY & PETE BALDWIN, RICHARD & SHARON SPRING GROVE FARM LLC LARRY, DOUGLAS VALEHIGH FARM POOLE, BRIAN & TRACEY GAR LINN FARM SCHNEIBLE, BOB LWG DUTCH HAVEN FARM SMOTHERS, ANNETTE & AR WORMONT DAIRY LEE DAIRY FARM TOLBERT FRANK

ONONDAGA

TYPE TEST

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

J H H H H H H H H H H H J H H H H A H H H

12.4 117.0 80.9 115.9 40.7 141.4 139.4 72.1 30.1 30.0 80.5 72.6 29.4 46.6 56.5 49.7 60.2 37.1 85.2 74.1 61.5

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

18562 1090 5.9 717 3.9 22732 878 3.9 715 3.1 24066 853 3.5 696 2.9 21199 825 3.9 687 3.2 23006 934 4.1 685 3.0 22171 835 3.8 681 3.1 21938 774 3.5 681 3.1 22211 843 3.8 667 3.0 21483 758 3.5 665 3.1 20748 840 4.0 644 3.1 20914 924 4.4 629 3.0 20480 850 4.2 618 3.0 17265 835 4.8 617 3.6 19414 751 3.9 611 3.1 20220 777 3.8 608 3.0 20280 814 4.0 597 2.9 19303 713 3.7 573 3.0 17645 725 4.1 571 3.2 17814 710 4.0 569 3.2 19238 748 3.9 569 3.0 17812 667 3.7 523 2.9

H1765.3 H 319.4 H2185.1 H 692.6 H 314.5 H 118.9 H 141.8 H 123.5 H 79.1

25750 1003 3.9 781 3.0 3X 24378 882 3.6 737 3.0 3X 24165 908 3.8 716 3.0 22750 841 3.7 699 3.1 21420 697 3.3 649 3.0 20457 883 4.3 641 3.1 20264 805 4.0 631 3.1 18995 691 3.6 604 3.2 3X 18123 730 4.0 583 3.2

H H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H X H H H X H H H H H H J H H X H J H H

634.8 198.3 656.7 99.1 51.3 83.5 57.3 56.0 117.2 72.6 57.7 153.9 54.8 59.1 133.7 248.6 39.1 71.6 87.7 83.0 40.2 58.0 68.5 99.1 43.9 64.8 56.9 48.4 68.0 41.6 56.6 47.5 68.2 37.9 32.0 77.1 67.6

28119 27566 27128 25744 24447 24410 22662 22862 22194 21118 22046 21586 21947 21519 21820 20255 19761 19228 18937 19159 19500 18761 18345 18784 18660 17787 18737 18889 16993 15130 16726 17418 16232 15934 13943 17243 16372

992 988 895 933 950 865 896 844 831 857 829 794 785 844 811 726 779 702 717 710 698 766 736 610 734 676 691 658 647 709 676 578 601 728 678 601 612

3.5 3.6 3.3 3.6 3.9 3.5 4.0 3.7 3.7 4.1 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.6 4.1 4.0 3.2 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.8 4.7 4.0 3.3 3.7 4.6 4.9 3.5 3.7

863 807 804 786 782 768 740 696 693 686 684 656 649 643 638 625 601 600 594 592 592 591 588 585 569 555 551 544 529 527 523 522 516 513 512 511 506

3.1 2.9 3X 3.0 3X 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 2.9 3.1 3.5 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.7 3.0 3.1

1030 1060 1051 975 957 877 876 912 944 1006 836 892 819 860 866 813 799 761 817 830 762 754 665 630 651 722 673 725

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.5 3.5 3.4 3.4 3.9 4.0 4.0 3.6 4.0 3.5 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.6 4.8 4.1 3.6 4.7 3.7 3.5 3.8 3.9 4.1 5.0

890 888 854 850 834 777 765 756 739 737 707 700 699 696 680 672 663 656 642 640 635 568 560 555 538 535 519 514

3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.8 3.2 3.0 3.5 3.1 3.1 3.2 2.9 3.2 3.5

COVALE HOLSTEINS SNAVLIN FARMS VENTURE FARMS LLC ANDREW STACK TWIN BIRCH DAIRY, LLC FABIUS GREENWOOD FARM AIRY RIDGE FARM MOUNTFIELD FARM COWLES, THURLOW, Y. MAPLEHURST FARMS LLC AMESLEA FARM 1 LOOMIS, JAMES W. DOODY, LARRY & SONS MARKHAM HOLLOW FARM OLIVER, FARM TREGFARMS LLC RICHARDS, ELMER & SONS DALE VANERDEN CARLSON, CHERYL BURGETT FARMS DENNIS, CARL & CRAIG TUCKER JOHN HAYNES SCOTT KARASEK, RUDY & SON TWIN FARMS COOK, PAUL WILDB DAIRY SILVER SPRINGS FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

H 459.0 H 148.2 H 818.5 H 97.8 H1142.4 H 849.0 H 384.6 H 160.8 H 264.7 H 408.8 H 124.8 H 190.5 H 363.4 H 293.2 H 79.5 H 185.1 H 1324.5 H 642.6 J 58.7 H 112.9 H 47.1 J 116.9 A 46.1 H 119.6 B 31.9 H 49.3 X 50.7 J 131.2

28048 29023 28085 27577 27125 25500 25500 23414 23373 24867 23085 22287 23176 22220 23069 21855 21453 21182 16885 20051 21245 16051 17945 17769 16976 18285 16390 14508

RAES,RONALD BLACK BROOK FARM MINNS JAMES HEMDALE FARMS, INC. FABA FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

H H H H H

33267 1153 3.5 988 3.0 3X 28668 1083 3.8 886 3.1 28604 985 3.4 865 3.0 3X 26866 884 3.3 822 3.1 3X 25961 964 3.7 811 3.1

ONTARIO

152.7 168.9 651.4 727.5 491.5

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

3X 3X

3X

Page 25 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com


Section A - Page 26 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

LIGHTLAND FARMS DHI-AP HILTON RICHARD N DHI-AP ELVI FARMS, INC. DHI-APCS REEDLAND FARMS DHI-AP LINHOLM DAIRY LLC DHI-AP J.DEBOOVER FARMS INC. DHI-AP ROGERS DAIRY FARM DHI-AP WILLOCREST DHI-APCS GREEN VIEW FARMS DHI-AP HAYTON FAMILY FARM DHI-AP BENNETT FARMS DHIR-AP PHALEN, KEVIN & ROBERT DHI-AP DAY BROTHERS DHI-AP LAMELLA FARMS DHI-AP COSH, ANDREW S. DHI-AP WALKER, CHARLES & SHELLEY DHI-AP CROUCH, GLENN AND JOHN DHI-AP

H 397.9 H 379.2 H 1003.5 H 340.7 H 175.5 H 983.8 H 158.3 H 1003.5 H 120.9 H 64.8 H 80.4 H 450.6 H 156.1 H 127.4 H 72.5 H 40.6 H 69.3

26748 26268 26248 25495 23358 23936 22996 24163 23458 22351 22658 22216 20690 20410 20218 16792 16463

958 997 927 918 913 916 879 831 886 853 846 855 793 769 749 728 664

3.6 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.9 3.8 3.8 3.4 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 4.3 4.0

SMILEY, RUSSELL W. STAP ROBERT & STACEY ECHO FARM BELLVALE FARMS THORNDALE FARM SPRUCEGATE HOLSTEINS GIBBS, GARY & SARA HOYT, MARK & KATIE EWANCIW, ED WISNER FARMS, INC. JOHNSON, C. F. & SON BALBACH, C.H. JOHSON, PHILIP FREEDOM HILL FARM

H H H H H H H H H H H H H J

27306 1111 4.1 849 3.1 22072 763 3.5 694 3.1 22983 802 3.5 692 3.0 21859 849 3.9 687 3.1 21057 840 4.0 653 3.1 20031 747 3.7 646 3.2 20758 807 3.9 641 3.1 20563 721 3.5 622 3.0 20228 770 3.8 574 2.8 18752 693 3.7 573 3.1 18524 780 4.2 573 3.1 18445 687 3.7 552 3.0 17824 767 4.3 546 3.1 16124 771 4.8 540 3.3

HERD OWNER

ORANGE

ORLEANS

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHIR DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

38.6 105.8 115.9 56.0 106.8 54.5 65.9 70.2 26.5 94.5 252.0 51.2 248.6 27.2

NEAL, EDWARD & JAMES AND JODY DHI-AP H 549.4 ZIMMERMAN CHRIS DHIR-AP H 39.7 SMITH, EDWIN & RICHARD DHIR-AP H 57.8

26125 22315 20284

CORJESS HOLSTEINS WILKINSON, LARRY MAPLE HELP STOCK FARMS NICHOLSON, DEAN WIMLER FARM NY BURR, BRUCE SUMMER VILLA HOLSTEINS

OSWEGO

803 803 801 768 747 730 722 721 719 697 692 684 655 629 626 511 503

3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1

3X 3X 3X 3X

83.2 77.0 53.4 95.7 161.7 30.6 60.2

28080 1045 3.7 878 3.1 23308 803 3.4 691 3.0 20969 780 3.7 677 3.2 20809 804 3.9 652 3.1 18054 699 3.9 527 2.9 16537 639 3.9 508 3.1 16830 616 3.7 501 3.0

TRIPLE J DAIRY DHI-AP WEBSTER, TERRY & COREY DHI-AP WOODLAWN DAIRY FARM LLC DHI-AP VAN ALSTINE, TOM & SANDY DHIR-AP ALDRICH KEITH DHI-AP ROHRING FALLS FARM DHI-AP WATERPOINT FARMS DHIR GALLEY, DAVID DHI TRACY, ROBERT DHI-AP BANTA BROTHERS DHI-AP COOPERSTOWN HOLSTEIN CORP DHI-AP JORDAN BROTHERS DHI-AP OSBORNE, CLAYTON, JOHN, BRUC DHIR WESTBROOK, WILLIAM & WENDY DHI-AP POWERS, JAMES & PAMELA DHI-AP TRIPLE J DAIRY DHI-AP ROCKSPRING FARM DHI-AP LICATA DAIRY DHI-AP BOUCHARD, RICKY DHI-AP DAN & MAE'S DAIRY DHI-AP DAYDREAM FARMS DHI-AP GANTNER, RICH DHI-AP BOB & KAREN MELLOTT DHI-AP TYLER, LESTER DHIR JAMES FERGUSON DHI-AP MATT AND DEAN UTTER DHI-AP BUTTS, DAN & JOHN DHI-AP GOD'S GRACE FARM DHI-AP JAKE REED DHI-AP ADAM & ANDREA ROBERTSON DHI-AP WEINERT,WILLY&BECKY DHI-AP TAUZEL, J & J DHI-AP MUMFORD, JAMES & MARCIA DHI-AP BUTTS, DAN & JOHN DHI-AP RIDGEVIEW FARM DHI-AP DULKIS, MARK DHI-AP GRETNA ACRES DHI-AP

X H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H X H X H H B H H H H H H H H H X H H B

12.2 147.7 163.1 75.1 33.8 76.8 375.1 79.6 81.3 74.7 281.4 95.1 52.8 82.4 50.6 17.9 90.2 30.8 32.6 79.3 47.2 39.2 63.1 139.3 82.3 124.0 38.0 50.1 61.5 117.3 41.9 53.1 109.7 49.8 66.7 68.8 60.7

25940 970 3.7 810 3.1 3X 26680 1038 3.9 799 3.0 25811 957 3.7 789 3.1 25271 920 3.6 771 3.1 3X 24570 895 3.6 741 3.0 23829 912 3.8 717 3.0 23804 937 3.9 712 3.0 3X 22850 862 3.8 710 3.1 22434 815 3.6 705 3.1 23310 934 4.0 699 3.0 23248 839 3.6 694 3.0 3X 21844 820 3.8 659 3.0 21950 817 3.7 649 3.0 21156 781 3.7 646 3.1 21082 802 3.8 643 3.0 20098 752 3.7 635 3.2 3X 20508 804 3.9 634 3.1 21329 783 3.7 627 2.9 18948 772 4.1 623 3.3 20291 734 3.6 618 3.0 19560 776 4.0 617 3.2 20380 749 3.7 615 3.0 19769 736 3.7 603 3.1 18451 747 4.0 597 3.2 19624 816 4.2 596 3.0 18711 717 3.8 593 3.2 19761 744 3.8 591 3.0 19008 742 3.9 582 3.1 18565 715 3.9 575 3.1 17737 685 3.9 574 3.2 19325 735 3.8 570 2.9 18133 725 4.0 558 3.1 18271 701 3.8 555 3.0 16290 745 4.6 548 3.4 17688 681 3.9 534 3.0 17630 656 3.7 525 3.0 15463 636 4.1 508 3.3

GREEN, DAVID CANNON MATT & PEGGY DAN REQUATE MCMAHON, JOHN & DAN MOODY, MARK & ALICE TARBOX FARMS 1 LEWCLIF FARMS LUKELAND FARMS

DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H

341.4 108.5 187.3 127.4 33.3 93.0 123.6 101.9

27928 1134 4.1 872 3.1 3X 21787 908 4.2 743 3.4 22490 863 3.8 695 3.1 3X 22659 850 3.8 692 3.1 21675 827 3.8 649 3.0 20944 757 3.6 634 3.0 19212 757 3.9 603 3.1 19315 758 3.9 598 3.1

GILBERT, ANDY & TONY RIVERBREEZE FARMS STAUFFER, FARMS WOODCREST DAIRY ,LLC C&M DAIRY LLC REED, MARION & FRED JR. CROSBY, FRANK, J. TWIN MILL FARMS, LLC LES & IRENE HARGRAVE HD2 FAUCHER, MICHAEL PUTNEY, LESLIE G.HD 2

DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H 1105.2 H 1067.7 H 1227.6 H 2723.1 H 555.5 H 65.2 H 32.2 H 157.7 B 23.4 H 104.2 H 190.7

RENSSELAER

ST. LAWRENCE

26863 26233 26002 25846 24036 21236 21880 21634 19067 21589 20734

850 878 848 897 918 825 796 831 810 742 710

3.2 3.3 3.3 3.5 3.8 3.9 3.6 3.8 4.2 3.4 3.4

824 790 780 772 737 676 672 669 660 644 626

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.5 3.0 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

772 775 758 764 667 666 693 635 622 713 728 627 637 583 634

3.9 3.9 3.8 4.0 3.5 3.5 3.8 3.4 3.6 4.0 5.0 3.6 3.6 3.4 3.8

53.7 60.4 78.5 121.2 121.1 135.9 168.0 127.5 70.2 45.1 35.1 160.2 85.3 31.7 88.7

20008 20048 19944 19201 19016 19036 18102 18888 17125 17760 14425 17637 17477 16923 16814

DHIRAPCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H

903.7 590.2 141.1 800.1 675.9 98.8 541.7 170.7 83.3 60.5 21.5

28125 1137 4.0 892 3.2 3X 28002 1052 3.8 872 3.1 3X 25536 928 3.6 780 3.1 3X 24873 908 3.7 765 3.1 3X 24362 931 3.8 755 3.1 24235 919 3.8 741 3.1 24847 927 3.7 739 3.0 3X 22683 863 3.8 710 3.1 22180 926 4.2 676 3.0 21231 846 4.0 674 3.2 17677 724 4.1 559 3.2

PROKOP, RICHARD, SANDY & JON DHI-AP H 327.5 SUNY AG & TECH COLLEGE DHIR H 168.4 ARGUS ACRES, LLC DHI-AP H 381.5 HIGH HILL FARM LLC DHI-AP H 122.3 PROKOP, RICHARD, SANDY & JON DHI-AP J 19.9 RUTHER, STEVEN & MARION DHI-AP H 77.7 SCHULTZ BROS. FARM INC. DHI-AP H 141.0 LLOYD, DAVID, DENISE, JASON DHIR-AP H 145.3 CACCIOLA GERRY & SHARON DHI-AP H 316.1 RKEYVALE DHI-AP H 69.3 BOULDER BROOK FARM DHI-AP H 136.5 EVERETT, TIM & PATTI DHI J 35.3 STANTON, JOHNDEBERIC DHI-AP H 140.0 LVA FARMS NO B.S.T. DHI-AP H 108.4 CHARLIE & WILLA REED DHI-AP H 52.3 LARKIN, PAUL E. DHI-AP H 55.1 BUCK, DANIEL & TAMMY DHI-AP H 67.8 GAIGE, DAVID & DONNA DHIR-AP H 52.2 STANTON, JOHNDEBERIC DHI-AP A 39.1 C.D.S. TILLAPAUGH DHI H 305.1

28750 1227 4.3 872 3.0 3X 28202 1163 4.1 840 3.0 3X 25545 994 3.9 826 3.2 26790 921 3.4 802 3.0 3X 21982 1192 5.4 788 3.6 3X 24711 898 3.6 728 2.9 22958 961 4.2 720 3.1 22854 907 4.0 715 3.1 23371 900 3.9 710 3.0 3X 22450 759 3.4 693 3.1 22198 792 3.6 671 3.0 18843 855 4.5 665 3.5 21899 828 3.8 665 3.0 3X 22303 805 3.6 663 3.0 20363 714 3.5 623 3.1 20155 742 3.7 592 2.9 18572 739 4.0 586 3.2 19255 725 3.8 583 3.0 18957 707 3.7 577 3.0 3X 17725 753 4.2 539 3.0

SENECA VALLEY FARM GAIGE FARMS BURR, CHARLES AND KEN GLENVIEW DAIRY LLC BERGEN FARMS HOSTETLER, MARK & MARYELE BURR, CHARLES AND KEN ALLEN, THOMAS R. LONE OAK FARM

H 743.5 H 398.8 H 124.4 H 706.3 H 2305.8 H 75.6 A 28.7 H 52.1 X 64.6

28077 26552 25153 25653 25293 23832 21309 18692 17956

1086 1012 1003 1011 970 863 918 720 646

3.9 3.8 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.6 4.3 3.9 3.6

851 843 793 772 765 723 700 565 549

3.0 3.2 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.3 3.0 3.1

24861 24839 24703 23825 23614 22954 23825 20488 21186 21413 19168

939 945 861 854 845 889 811 792 807 752 682

3.8 3.8 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.9 3.4 3.9 3.8 3.5 3.6

765 762 746 713 712 706 689 672 663 662 552

3.1 3X 3.1 3.0 3X 3.0 3X 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.3 3.1 3.1 2.9

SCHUYLER

SENECA

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.0 3.7 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X

GEORGE FARMS JOHN MEHLING DARYL G. MARTIN ROY MARTIN MURANDA HOLSTEINS CANOGASPRING FARMS HORNING, CURTIS VANILLEN DAIRY VANILLEN DAIRY ZIMMERMAN, GLENN EAGLETON FARM

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H B H H H

SMITH STOCK FARM SMITH, GERARD M. DAMIN FARMS, LLC BEACH, THOMAS JR. SCHUMACRES & ASSOCIATES ROGER DUNN JA WA FARMS BURNS FAMILY FARM LLC CLARK, EDWARD JR. DAMIN FARMS, LLC ARCHER, BRUCE KARR DAIRY FARMS, LLC DWI BET FARMS BARBR FARMS KIMBLEDALE PRICE, TOM NICHOLS DAIRY WADE, LYLE & JEAN BENTON HOLSTEINS FIDE FARMS ELLISON FARMS ATHERTON FAMILY KRAMER, DAVID & KIMBERLY CHARLES P. WATERS EDWARD SOPOROWSKI STEWART, DAVID & KATHY

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H 539.7 H 110.1 H1135.2 H 57.4 H 1045.0 H 578.1 H 167.2 H 394.8 H 83.6 J 54.5 H 55.6 H 531.2 H 333.2 H 149.4 H 71.8 H 39.3 H 65.3 H 58.7 H 55.7 H 87.0 H 175.7 A 85.9 H 38.0 H 123.5 H 48.9 X 105.0

28975 1064 3.7 876 3.0 3X 25473 1006 3.9 831 3.3 28080 941 3.4 806 2.9 3X 24239 944 3.9 777 3.2 25691 947 3.7 770 3.0 3X 25861 973 3.8 766 3.0 3X 23916 927 3.9 746 3.1 24635 872 3.5 734 3.0 3X 22558 889 3.9 715 3.2 21296 882 4.1 696 3.3 3X 21508 822 3.8 687 3.2 22402 818 3.7 677 3.0 3X 23025 822 3.6 676 2.9 3X 22606 812 3.6 673 3.0 21758 784 3.6 669 3.1 22042 757 3.4 667 3.0 19863 788 4.0 644 3.2 19961 717 3.6 636 3.2 20839 794 3.8 633 3.0 19737 726 3.7 615 3.1 20219 728 3.6 614 3.0 19376 705 3.6 609 3.1 18449 721 3.9 556 3.0 18244 638 3.5 551 3.0 17667 669 3.8 517 2.9 16576 629 3.8 503 3.0

BRANDON PETERS DAIRY J&E WEISSMANN FARMS WEISSMANN MSHORTHORNS THONY'S DAIRY HUGHSON, WILFRED

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H M H H

20913 20739 17626 17093 17111

STEUBEN

SULLIVAN

360.6 88.3 68.6 208.2 79.3 353.6 70.6 25.9 40.0 206.9 50.1

613 612 611 611 581 564 559 553 544 539 535 532 525 518 502

85.2 30.9 21.0 51.6 146.9

693 786 715 688 683

3.3 3.8 4.1 4.0 4.0

640 621 550 548 519

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.0

HERD OWNER

TIOGA

H H H H H H H H H H J H H H H

SCHOHARIE

H H H H H H H

B R COW E E YEARS D

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

WOOD, DAVID R. PECK, WILLIAM FLYHIGHER HOLSTEINS LLC KINGSRANSOM FARM HANEHAN FAMILY DAIRY PECK, JOSEPH KEVIN PECK SMITH BROS. SPEIDEL, RICHARD ARNOLDHAVEN CURTISS, C.E. & SON

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR

OTSEGO

NOWZ THE TIME FARM SCOTT & TRACI LAING MAPLE NOOK HOLSTEINS ROPUT FARMS PUTNEY, LESLIE G. HD1 BRESETT, HAROLD JR MCDONALD, DONALD & ROBERT FREGOE PATRICK, H. HOBKIRK, JOHN & RICHARD MATT REYNOLDS COW BELL ACRES DAVID SMITH LAVACK, FRED & FAMILY HD 1 NELSON, MARK DAVID MALOY

SARATOGA

936 3.6 765 2.9 3X 851 3.8 693 3.1 803 4.0 659 3.2

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

Top 40 Herds For August LYON, FRANK CAMPBELL, CHARLES B. KING, DAVE R. HIDDEN VALLEY FARM ZORN, TOM & JANET HOWLAND, ROBERT C. LAWTON, MERLE STRONGHAVEN FARM HUIZINGA, HENRY & LOIS FRISBIE BROTHERS MCNEIL, MARK KLOSSNER, JACK & LYNN KWIATKOWSKI BROTHERS HUIZINGA DAIRY RAUTINE, ARVO FRANCISCO, YVETTE TODD AND JOSIE SPENCER WALKER, DOUGLAS JR. ROBINSON FARM

TYPE TEST

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

27535 1030 3.7 842 3.1 26682 967 3.6 821 3.1 27688 995 3.6 818 3.0 25157 976 3.9 776 3.1 26296 1014 3.9 774 2.9 25043 914 3.6 758 3.0 20831 990 4.8 735 3.5 24492 916 3.7 728 3.0 3X 23034 906 3.9 708 3.1 23506 852 3.6 704 3.0 22315 855 3.8 700 3.1 21395 797 3.7 695 3.2 22886 864 3.8 688 3.0 22409 833 3.7 684 3.1 22462 798 3.6 665 3.0 22045 826 3.7 661 3.0 21242 807 3.8 648 3.1 18348 708 3.9 584 3.2 18525 648 3.5 557 3.0

HARDIE FARMS INC. DHI-AP H 1064.3 COOK FARMS DHIR-AP H 271.8 TEACHING & REASEARCH CTR DHI-APCS H 539.9 CARPENTER, EVAN & BREN DHI-AP H 65.7 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP H 689.4 VANDEBOGART, ALAN & RAY DHIR-AP H 88.2 VISION QUEST DAIRY DHI-AP H 392.5 SWEYOLAKAN FARMS DHI-AP H 197.7 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP H 10.4 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP H 12.9 STUTTLE, LEWIS DHIR-AP H 296.7 MILLBROOK FARM DHIR-AP X 73.7 FOUTS FARM DHI-AP H 320.6 SMITH, NIAL S. & SONS DHI-AP X 155.7 CUMMINGS, WILLIAM DHI-AP H 46.7 RANKIN FARM DHIR-AP H 55.6 PINE RIDGE FARM INC. DHI-AP H 316.4 HOUSTON, MARLIN J. DHI-AP H 126.0

29620 986 3.3 918 3.1 3X 27884 945 3.4 858 3.1 3X 26888 790 2.9 820 3.0 27118 940 3.5 820 3.0 27040 929 3.4 817 3.0 3X 25924 1006 3.9 789 3.0 25914 947 3.7 777 3.0 3X 25239 893 3.5 775 3.1 3X 25784 931 3.6 773 3.0 3X 25637 831 3.2 754 2.9 3X 23914 853 3.6 741 3.1 22717 856 3.8 740 3.3 3X 22352 855 3.8 708 3.2 20786 826 4.0 641 3.1 21063 750 3.6 636 3.0 19267 791 4.1 606 3.1 19165 707 3.7 601 3.1 18619 732 3.9 563 3.0

DOMINO FARM F&C BROOKS AND SONS

20812 17294

ULSTER

WASHINGTON

H H H H H H J H H H H H H H H H H H H

RHA MILK

88.7 59.4 70.6 236.4 40.2 90.7 78.1 258.5 155.5 117.5 58.7 52.8 196.6 142.6 76.4 38.3 87.9 48.0 255.6

TOMPKINS

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

DHIRAPCS J 162.0 DHI-AP H 57.4

980 4.7 771 3.7 645 3.7 520 3.0

LINCOLN HILL FARM KENYON HILL FARM RUIGVIEW FARM MAIN DRAG FARM MARNS, ALBERT & DONNA WALKER FARMS CHRISTOPHER MITCHELL STEWART FARM TOOLITE FARM LLC REAFIELD FARM HIBROW FARM THE KUSTER FARM DEER FLATS FARM CORNEREST FARM LLC HOYT, JAY & LORI TWIN BROOKS FARM LLC ABBOTT III, ROBERT TUDOR, JOHN SEACORD, RICHARD & BRIAN WEEPING BIRCH FARM SANDERS BROS. FARM ANDREW, HOWARD & JAY PARKER'S DAIRY #1 TRINKLE FARM SWEZEY VIEW FARM LIDDLE, ADAM PARKER'S DAIRY #2 ROUSE, EDWARD J. CAMPBELL, REA D. PARKER'S DAIRY #3 WEEPING BIRCH FARM FOOTHILL FARM, LLC REID, KYLE & SHANNA TOOLITE FARM LLC SWEZEY VIEW FARM TRINKLE FARM

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H J H H H H H H H H H H H X H H G X A

193.1 350.5 80.1 102.8 135.1 984.2 42.3 132.3 113.4 206.2 234.5 111.1 232.1 190.6 52.7 179.8 63.8 111.7 81.6 99.3 67.2 115.5 87.6 348.4 74.6 70.5 107.3 68.0 87.0 65.0 30.6 80.8 81.5 37.2 42.0 26.5

27881 964 3.5 842 3.0 3X 26607 1033 3.9 827 3.1 3X 25196 1009 4.0 797 3.2 26152 932 3.6 784 3.0 24252 857 3.5 766 3.2 25429 898 3.5 761 3.0 3X 24891 855 3.4 754 3.0 23153 933 4.0 745 3.2 24333 921 3.8 743 3.1 23210 898 3.9 735 3.2 24149 887 3.7 732 3.0 22658 902 4.0 719 3.2 22743 846 3.7 715 3.1 23319 905 3.9 714 3.1 21079 932 4.4 701 3.3 22460 791 3.5 691 3.1 21570 739 3.4 673 3.1 20954 744 3.6 672 3.2 17646 875 5.0 661 3.7 20253 806 4.0 642 3.2 20326 763 3.8 634 3.1 20690 732 3.5 630 3.0 21538 748 3.5 628 2.9 19674 757 3.8 623 3.2 19424 709 3.7 610 3.1 20216 761 3.8 610 3.0 20692 725 3.5 609 2.9 20045 702 3.5 600 3.0 19023 707 3.7 587 3.1 19715 675 3.4 587 3.0 16720 715 4.3 554 3.3 17829 666 3.7 550 3.1 18315 685 3.7 550 3.0 15889 727 4.6 535 3.4 15574 632 4.1 518 3.3 15507 620 4.0 517 3.3

HORIZON DAIRY SCHULTZ, WAYNE H. WELCUMIN FARMS SCHOEACRES BOISE, STEPHEN & JEANNE LONELY LANE FARM DRUMLIN VIEW FARM KOEBERLE, E.W. & SONS SHIRRON FARMS HOAD, BRANDON

DHI-AP DHI DHI DHI DHI-AP DHI DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H

112.7 95.1 143.1 165.1 54.7 61.5 89.4 506.7 76.0 36.0

30833 1071 3.5 911 3.0 3X 23162 882 3.8 699 3.0 22037 852 3.9 676 3.1 22204 795 3.6 672 3.0 21605 831 3.8 658 3.0 22474 774 3.4 648 2.9 20229 761 3.8 635 3.1 21114 748 3.5 631 3.0 19120 716 3.7 582 3.0 16575 603 3.6 506 3.1

WAYNE

WYOMING

BAKER BROOK FARMS DHI-AP H1417.3 RUSSELL GEORGE DHIR-AP H 274.8 WISCOY FARMS DHI-AP H 172.6 SOUTHVIEW FARMS 1 DHI-AP H 1438.5 DOUGLAS GOOD DHI-AP H 146.3 EMERLINGALFRED STATE DHIRAPCS H 97.2 DUEPPENGIESSER, A. DHIR-AP H 1159.0 VANSLYKES DAIRY FARM LLC DHI-AP H 1258.1 SCHREIBERDALE HOLSTEINS DHIRAPCS H 725.0 FARYNA, WALTER DHIRAPCS H 401.6 HIBSCH DHI-AP H 140.5 ARMSON FARMS DHIR-AP H 410.7

28458 27710 26360 27009 26128 26907 27025 28012 26413 25575 25118 25814

1090 1017 942 1038 984 922 1023 962 941 941 1044 953

3.8 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.4 3.8 3.4 3.6 3.7 4.2 3.7

859 835 823 822 817 810 807 795 788 786 783 782

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.8 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0

3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X 3X


executive director of the center. “The Pacesetter Award gives us the opportunity to recognize these role models.” Originally initiated by the Pennsylvania Dairy Stakeholders, which merged with the center in January 2011, the Pacesetter Award is designed to promote and encourage a progressive dairy industry in Pennsylvania. Since its creation in 2000, 24 recipients have been honored with the award. Individuals, companies or organizations are recognized as Pacesetter Award winners because they have distinguished themselves through accomplishments and/or programs that: • Bring positive recognition or advancement to Pennsylvania’s dairy in-

Center to Recognize Outstanding Leaders, Innovators in PA Dairy Industry HARRISBURG, PA — The Center for Dairy Excellence is seeking nominations for the 2011 Pacesetter Award, which annually honors individuals or organizations working to build a positive image of Pennsylvania’s dairy industry and create a prosperous, marketable future for dairy. Nominations are due to the center by Nov. 20 and can be mailed to the center at 2301 North Cameron Street, Harrisburg, PA 17110. “We are fortunate to have outstanding leaders and innovators in Pennsylvania’s dairy industry,” said John Frey,

dustry; • Create positive attitudes about the industry among producers and their families; • Invest in a long-term commitment to Pennsylvania’s dairy foods industry; and • Create a growing recognition by consumers that a healthy, growing dairy industry is positive for everyone who lives and works in Pennsylvania. Anyone can submit nominations to the center for the award. The center’s board of directors will evaluate Pacesetter Award nominees based on how their work provides vision, innovation and progress in a unique package, while demonstrating these accom-

plishments’ performance. Up to three nominees are presented the Pacesetter Award each year, with recipients receiving a commemorative gift and formal recognition at the Pennsylvania Dairy Summit, held Feb. 8-9, 2012 at the Lancaster Host Resort, Lancaster, Lancaster County. The award may also be presented at other industry events to provide additional exposure. For more information about the Pacesetter Award or to obtain a copy of the nomination form, call the center at 717-346-0849 or visit www.center fordairyexcellence.org. Click on “Producer,” then on “Honor Leaders in the Industry.”

Proposals sought for Jersey research The AJCC Research Foundation has issued a request for research proposals to be funded in 2012 addressing significant issues for the Jer-

sey breed and Jersey milk producers. Current priorities for research funding are: • Nutrition of high-producing Jerseys, particu-

TOP HERDS FOR AUGUST NAME

Brd Cows

Milk

NEW YORK

FAT %

PRO %

953 884 924 801 712

770 755 673 653 589

M. CHARLES EVANS SEVEN VIEW FARM SLATEHILL FARM MIKE SWART GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT GEORGE & KATHY CRAFT IDEAL DAIRY FARMS TAYLOR & ALAN HENDERSON WILLIAM LUNDY HOLLISTER BROTHERS GARY & DEBRA MOORE DON DURKEE GARY & DEBRA MOORE GARY & DEBRA MOORE SKIFF FARMS INC. SKIFF FARMS INC. WAYNE FOOTE

71 32 13 84 64

24357 23170 17178 21770 18334

H

59

24857 933 3.8

764 3.1

H 114 H 130 H 70 X 24 G 34

20350 20987 20067 16033 13577

796 821 739 627 585

3.9 3.9 3.7 3.9 4.3

675 660 608 510 437

3.3 3.1 3 3.2 3.2

H H H H H H B J H B G

29106 23963 23294 23341 21800 20438 16989 16398 17823 14328 11756

1121 950 879 947 926 887 838 775 674 606 483

3.9 4 3.8 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.9 4.7 3.8 4.2 4.1

894 743 720 711 688 613 571 569 535 491 369

3.1 * 3.1 3.1 3 3.2 3 3.4 3.5 3 3.4 3.1

SCHOHARIE

WASHINGTON 922 134 154 106 20 79 10 14 83 15 23

ORGANIC

3.9 3.8 5.4 3.7 3.9

3.2 3.3 3.9 3 3.2

MONTGOMERY JOHN G. KELLETT JR.

H

64

Top 40 Herds For August For Records Processed through AgSource, Verona, WI

H H J H H

OTSEGO

• Factors affecting economic impact of Jerseys: efficiencies, net income, longevity, and lifetime profit; • Optimizing the genetic basis for improving animal health and/or enhancing product quality; • Enhancing environ-

* Denotes Herds Milked 3X

MONTGOMERY

SKIFF-S DAIRY FARM LLC HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD HOBART & CYNTHIA PICKARD PETERSHEIM SAMUEL & SADIE JOHN G. KELLETT JR.

larly practical feeding methods to maximize production of valuable milk components; • Factors affecting management of Jersey calves; • Factors affecting yield and/or quality of products manufactured from Jersey milk;

18334 712 3.9

589 3.2

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E YEARS E D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

NEW YORK

CORTLAND

WHEY STREET DAIRY

DHI-APCS H 506.3

26395

935 3.5 801

DHI-AP H1100.4 DHI-AP H 1622 DHI-AP H 521.7

27730 24512 17721

977 3.5 840 3 3X 876 3.5 733 2.9 3X 663 3.7 508 2.8 3X

H 327.2 H 937.2 H 998.9 H1687.6

27139 26472 25887 24058

952 983 953 939

TODD GALTON

DHI-AP H 664.2

24849

888 3.5 735 2.9 3X

WILLOW BEND FARM WILLOW BEND FARMS NEDROW

DHI-AP H 2485 DHI-AP H 91.6

27200 26808

956 3.5 810 2.9 3X 950 3.5 791 2.9 3X

MAPLE VIEW FARMS

DHI-APCS H1869.4

26599

968 3.6 791 2.9 3X

WOODY HILL FARM

DHI-APCS H1086.8

24636

970 3.9 771 3.1 3X

COVINGTON DAIRY

DHI-AP H2039.2

24175

879 3.6 736

ERIE

MAMMOSER FARMS EDEN MAMMOSER GERALD MAMMOSER FARMS ORGANIC

JEFFERSON

GILLIGAN JAMES &DEANNE HILL MICHAEL EASTMAN FARMS PORTERDALE FARMS INC

LIVINGSTON ONTARIO

ST LAWRENCE WASHINGTON WYOMING

DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHI-AP

3.5 3.7 3.6 3.9

3 3X

829 3 805 3 795 3 719 2.9

3X 3X 3X 3X

3 3X

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER TRUE FARMS INC SIMMONS, WM & MARCIA EMERLING FARMS ALAN WEST BILLJILL DAIRY FRIENDLY ACRES FARM SICKLES, RICHARD & SANDRA DAVIS, JAMES F. STONEY CREEK HYMAN, JOHN PINGREY, DONALD VICTORY ACRES LLC WOODVALE FARMS SILVER HAVEN FARMS SILVER MEADOW FARM CHAMBERLAIN, DAVE & GREG ALLEN MASON DANIEL PINGREY VICTORY ACRES LLC BRANT'S HILLTOP DAIRY EAGLEVIEW DAIRY LLC. WING, KERRY & ALAN METZ,DAVID & CYNTHIA HD 1 NICKERSON BROTHERS LEFORT, KEITH

TYPE TEST

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-APCS DHI-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

H 1100.1 H 598.9 H 1092.9 H 147.0 H 56.7 H 556.9 H 119.7 H 255.7 H 86.6 H 64.6 H 277.9 H 71.1 H 570.2 H 183.5 H 176.9 J 666.3 H 75.4 H 251.0 B 130.3 H 147.9 H 349.4 H 81.0 H 73.2 H 171.9 H 66.8

25032 25333 24505 24367 23389 24620 22047 23746 22890 22651 22046 22502 23203 22269 21488 18929 21908 21122 19241 22229 19957 20440 18456 19121 17157

920 866 866 817 846 876 877 864 807 853 815 835 879 888 872 943 838 772 775 706 718 777 737 722 678

3.7 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.6 4.0 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.8 4.0 4.1 5.0 3.8 3.7 4.0 3.2 3.6 3.8 4.0 3.8 4.0

772 744 744 738 730 725 703 702 700 699 697 692 691 690 683 682 680 667 645 642 621 616 578 567 544

3.1 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.1 3.2 3.4 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3.2

3X 3X 3X

3X

3X

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

YATES

TIMBERMAN ROBERT ROLLEN N'S DAIRY JENSEN, RODNEY HERD #1 OSWALD, SAM VINE VALLEY FARM CHRISTI FARM JENSEN, RODNEY HERD #2 CHRISTI FARM

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

B R COW E E YEARS D

H W H H B H A X

67.7 101.0 19.7 307.8 231.6 95.1 27.3 41.2

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

27253 23510 22871 23054 19690 21206 18449 17938

907 865 840 862 778 795 704 673

3.3 3.7 3.7 3.7 4.0 3.7 3.8 3.8

846 702 699 688 653 628 575 525

3.1 3.0 3.1 3.0 3X 3.3 3.0 3.1 2.9

CENTRAL JERSEY AREA/HUNTERDON COUNTY DHI DHI DHIR DHI DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHIR-AP

practical knowledge, creative approach to the problem); (b) competence (i.e., high probability of successful completion within the proposed time frame); and (c) relevance (e.g., problem derived from one of the areas of research priority). Since 1988, the Foundation has awarded nearly $880,000 in seed money for selected projects. Detailed information about the Competitive Grants Program can be found on the web site (www.usjersey.com/pr ograms/r esear chpr ogram.html) or requested from Cari W. Wolfe, Director of Research and Genetic Programs Development, at 614322-4453.

NO BULL TOO BIG OR NASTY Semen Freezing Since 1983 Semen Fertility Evaluations A Value Adding Company

ZIMMERMAN’S CUSTOM FREEZING www.semenfreezing.com

131 Red Well Road New Holland PA

Cell 717-940-1430 717-355-2048

Top 40 Herds For August

NEW JERSEY FULPER FARMS LLC MOUNTAINVIEW CORR FACILIT CEDAR LANE FARM, LLC JONES FARM 1,2,3 DEPT.COR MIDDLEBUSH FARMS, INC. HOWARD SUTTON AND SON CEDAR LANE FARM, LLC HOLLAND VALLEY FARM CEDAR LANE FARM, LLC WENGRYN, JANET BSB HOLSTEIN FARM

mental impact associated with Jerseys; • New technologies for safe and sustainable food production from Jersey cattle; and • Feasibility of adding value and increasing consumer acceptance of Jersey-derived products through enhanced product quality and branding. Application deadline is Thursday, Dec. 1. The Research Advisory Committee of the American Jersey Cattle Association will evaluate the proposals, then forward its recommendations to the AJCA Board of Directors, which will award funds at its meeting in March 2012. Submissions are evaluated for (a) merit (e.g., potential to advance

H H H H H H B H J H H

122.7 77.2 38.2 117.5 45.7 44.8 14.4 41.1 18.2 20.7 39.3

23345 21820 22435 20126 20168 20375 17633 18315 14822 17471 17032

957 801 937 815 752 683 791 678 825 662 681

4.1 3.7 4.2 4.0 3.7 3.4 4.5 3.7 5.6 3.8 4.0

715 693 684 633 611 594 594 551 541 530 528

3.1 3.2 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9 3.4 3.0 3.6 3.0 3.1

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

MYERWOOD FARMS DHI-APCS H 375.4 DOLBOW, WILLIAM M. DHI-AP H 94.9 STRING ALVIN W & MARIE DHI-AP H 110.4 SEBOWISHA FARMS DHI-AP H 69.0 BAYSIDE STATE PRISON FARM DHI H 139.6 ROBERT M LAMANO DHI-AP H 93.2

23737 21531 21177 20789 19391 17964

836 782 726 733 738 653

3.5 3.6 3.4 3.5 3.8 3.6

697 666 636 628 600 555

2.9 3X 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1

VANDERGROEFF FREEBORN LARRY LOCKBURNER,MARK F ALLAVALLEY FARM WINDY FLATS DAIRY MOONEY, C. RAYMOND HOUGH FARM SPRING HOUSE DAIRY SCHOELIER CASEY ERVEY KEVIN CLIFFORD VANETTEN BYACRE HOLSTEINS LLC SPRING HOUSE DAIRY

108.6 101.4 77.6 19.5 98.3 104.6 53.3 41.1 65.0 83.4 40.3 139.3 41.9

26587 26667 26175 22579 22159 21197 21534 21571 20306 19975 20648 19670 14170

984 949 981 911 776 849 944 829 764 870 721 950 776

3.7 3.6 3.7 4.0 3.5 4.0 4.4 3.8 3.8 4.4 3.5 4.8 5.5

818 812 793 725 684 678 645 642 617 607 600 587 519

3.1 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.7

DHI H 154.0 DHIR H 79.3 DHI H 70.7

23470 23194 21353

893 3.8 734 3.1 895 3.9 712 3.1 817 3.8 657 3.1

HERD OWNER

TYPE TEST

SOUTH JERSEY AREA

SUSSEX

WARREN

GREEN VALLEY FARM GIBBS TOWERS DRAKES ACRES

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H X H H H H H H H H J

Page 27 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Center for Dairy Excellence seeking pacesetter nominations


Section A - Page 28 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

BRADFORD

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

PENNSYLVANIA

ALLFORD, JOHN & HOLLY SCOTT AND KAREN NOLT KLINE RON, GLENN & GARY D&L HESS FARMS CLARK BROTHERS ROGER + CATHY BROWN WM CAR WMS FARMS SCOTT AND KAREN NOLT MERLE & LESLIE WANCK SNOWCREST FARMS PETER SOLOWIEJ DAVI LERAY DAIRY DOUG STEWART KEVIN VANDERPOEL RUSSELL MAPLE FARMS SHUMHURST FARM JEFFERY AMMERMAN FEUSNER, JOHN & DENISE WILLIAM & GRETCHEN STEELE PECK HILL FARMS RANDELL SHORES YOUNG, BENNETT ROBBIN&RYAN KINGSLEY HOCRAWF DAIRY PISGAHVIEW FARM KEENEY FARM JONATHAN LAUDERMILCH

BUTLER

EDWARD THIELE MIKE & ANETTE SCHIEVER UNDER GRACE DAIRY HARTZELL FARM RICK + LINDA STUCHAL MARBURGER FARM DAIRY NORMAN H GRAHAM PAUL CRITCHLOW JR. RITA KENNEDY ALBERT HOGG & SONS DROVERS INN JOHN H RENO CHESTNUT RUN FARM BRADLEY & CALEB COOPER CROFT BROS J L & H F KENNEDY WAYNE E HIXON

CENTRE

VALLEYSEND FARM PENNDELL FARMS PINE HOLLOW FARM STRINGERS SAND RIDGE BROOK WAY HOLSTEINS TODD AND LISA WOOMER MURMAC FARMS PENN STATE UNIVERSITY DAVID HOUSER KENNETH C GEPHART VALLEY WIDE FARM GLEN AND LOIS MILLER RAS HOLSTEINS CARL& DIANE HOMAN CARL R GATES PAUL HARTLE TI GLO FARM ROD AND TIM BRUSS JONATHAN GLICK HAAGEN FARM DOUGLAS P VONADA REESES DAIRYHILL BARBARA ROSSMAN CLAUDE HOMAN STEPHEN L MUNDRICK TOM AND LORI HARTLE SCOTT E SWARTZ BREEZY FARMS BREEZY FARMS FISHER FARMS MELLOTTS FARM ORE BANK ACRES ORE BANK ACRES FETTEROLF FARM NITTANY SPRINGS FARM MELLOTTS FARM LORI D. BROWN HAROLD.E.HARPSTER TONY &SAPRINA HARTER CLAUDE NYMAN

CLARION

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H J H H H H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H H

54.9 79.1 497.1 60.0 188.7 192.1 70.5 10.7 82.3 129.2 75.7 74.2 25.1 90.3 45.6 39.8 106.0 69.0 76.1 214.0 57.2 63.6 54.7 31.6 35.7 37.1 16.8

27113 27319 26225 23985 25304 23859 23065 19338 22163 22379 22033 22054 21453 22535 21152 21251 20396 19781 19847 19838 19776 17894 16984 17241 17146 16438 17631

959 914 977 872 894 911 812 930 795 851 827 847 816 837 747 863 786 742 776 690 689 698 672 656 651 661 628

3.5 3.3 3.7 3.6 3.5 3.8 3.5 4.8 3.6 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 3.5 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.5 3.5 3.9 4.0 3.8 3.8 4.0 3.6

833 809 808 749 734 731 720 696 686 685 673 670 662 660 656 646 644 642 630 614 608 575 552 542 522 517 516

3.1 3.0 3.1 3X 3.1 2.9 3X 3.1 3X 3.1 3.6 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.0 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.0 3.1 2.9

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H X X H H H H H H B H

43.2 116.6 52.7 179.5 72.1 134.5 37.8 37.3 29.4 53.6 82.0 34.5 41.3 51.7 39.9 32.3 55.3

25476 24434 24309 23440 22895 22095 23075 18964 19499 20220 19972 19592 19118 18094 17983 16101 18307

943 925 915 822 801 845 825 874 745 779 739 781 757 691 711 639 667

3.7 3.8 3.8 3.5 3.5 3.8 3.6 4.6 3.8 3.9 3.7 4.0 4.0 3.8 4.0 4.0 3.6

784 751 716 694 692 688 679 676 667 621 620 619 600 579 573 571 565

3.1 3.1 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 2.9 3.6 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.2 3.5 3.1

DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP

H 64.4 H 80.5 H 66.1 H 93.0 H 171.9 H 48.6 H 1161.1 H 236.8 H 55.4 H 65.7 H 50.2 H 79.3 H 55.4 H 74.8 H 46.9 H 59.1 H 155.3 H 46.4 H 67.7 H 42.1 H 74.7 H 97.7 H 78.1 H 40.3 H 47.5 H 171.0 H 47.5 H 143.7 H 56.2 H 104.7 H 31.8 H 77.1 X 37.0 H 78.4 H 142.3 H 25.7 H 21.4 J 63.4 X 48.8 H 22.2

27884 1221 4.4 906 3.2 28048 1157 4.1 850 3.0 27310 941 3.4 835 3.1 26105 1046 4.0 802 3.1 26185 956 3.7 771 2.9 25377 989 3.9 765 3.0 25838 861 3.3 757 2.9 3X 24636 893 3.6 756 3.1 24671 886 3.6 749 3.0 25447 901 3.5 744 2.9 24427 962 3.9 743 3.0 24258 855 3.5 742 3.1 23565 830 3.5 720 3.1 23713 848 3.6 719 3.0 22341 852 3.8 703 3.1 23378 862 3.7 696 3.0 23125 856 3.7 696 3.0 21344 819 3.8 683 3.2 23465 831 3.5 681 2.9 22186 917 4.1 680 3.1 21154 821 3.9 673 3.2 22033 826 3.7 667 3.0 21783 761 3.5 663 3.0 21382 808 3.8 662 3.1 20207 814 4.0 653 3.2 21799 923 4.2 648 3.0 21012 814 3.9 645 3.1 21224 767 3.6 637 3.0 21122 774 3.7 637 3.0 20346 785 3.9 634 3.1 19808 736 3.7 628 3.2 19902 677 3.4 623 3.1 19282 667 3.5 622 3.2 19613 777 4.0 615 3.1 19955 944 4.7 609 3.1 19242 684 3.6 607 3.2 19220 717 3.7 585 3.0 15420 772 5.0 571 3.7 17123 695 4.1 551 3.2 17746 693 3.9 542 3.1

H H H H H H

32367 1206 3.7 962 3.0 24855 885 3.6 762 3.1 24049 867 3.6 738 3.1 22391 856 3.8 699 3.1 21449 764 3.6 664 3.1 20403 804 3.9 646 3.2

JOHN HENRY # FROSTBURG FARMS NEXGEN DAIRY INC JOHN HENRY # MABE HOLSTEINS KEB DAIRY

DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP

HICKS DAIRY FARM

DHI-AP H 89.8

CLEARFIELD

57.7 130.1 105.2 63.0 88.7 64.3

25604

915 3.6 807 3.2

Top 40 Herds For August B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

77.9 91.8 76.6 41.5

25393 25183 24813 23020

937 922 920 853

3.7 3.7 3.7 3.7

SCHRACK FARMS SHAWN & WANDA MOORE

DHI-APCS H 873.0 DHI-AP H 89.1

24190 23162

875 3.6 734 3.0 3X 885 3.8 716 3.1

JAN JURBALA HEMSARTH BRUCE&BRENDA LYONS DEN DAIRY

DHIR-AP H 58.2 DHI-APCS H 216.0 DHI-AP H 84.2

29454 1246 4.2 940 3.2 26816 1015 3.8 815 3.0 3X 25179 977 3.9 781 3.1

HERD OWNER ORNER FARMS INC CARL G BRINK + SONS HAAG'S GREEN VALLEY SANKEYCREST FARMS

CLINTON

COLUMBIA

CRAWFORD

TRCP FARM LLC. FOSTERS FAMILY FARM TRCP FARM LLC. LOST ACRES FARM DOLLYRUN FARM FRED WENZEL

TYPE TEST

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

942 945 882 910 677 704

DHI-AP H 74.6 DHI-AP H 57.3 DHI-AP H 73.4

25373 23624 19694

976 3.8 786 3.1 915 3.9 741 3.1 755 3.8 624 3.2

LIND FARM DHI-AP H 68.1 CURTIS HAVEN FARMS DHI-AP H 73.0 MARK VOGEL DHI-AP H 44.5 WILLIAM + BRYAN LOPER DHI-AP H 61.3 WOODS DAIRY DHI-AP H 114.7 KIDSTREAT DHI-AP H 88.5 CRAIG SHINKO DHI-AP H 76.1 TELVIEW FARMS DHI-AP H 77.0 HIGH POINT FARMS DHI-AP H 104.6 DEAN + SUZANNE CURTIS DHI-AP H 152.2 BRAD ROBINSON DHI-AP H 230.6 RAUSCH FARMS DHI-AP H 58.4 PALNEL FARM DHI-AP H 120.0 KRUSE FARM DHI-AP H 90.6 MARSHY MEADOW FARM DHIR-AP H 60.8 CONCORD VALLEY FARMS INC DHI-APCS H 156.3 GEORGE C HEINTZ DHI-AP H 17.1 MARSHY MEADOW FARM DHIR-AP B 16.4 WALTER + LISA ROYEK DHI-AP H 57.4 MIDNIGHT FIRE DAIRY DHI-AP X 38.0

24132 22738 23578 23611 23638 21418 21692 20349 21369 18847 20047 19950 19655 18171 18599 19500 18587 16060 17229 16203

905 872 813 818 793 775 827 851 826 758 804 778 732 686 705 743 690 656 638 660

ROCK GAP DAIRY DHI-APCS JEMI CATTLE COMPANY DHIR-AP PAUL H. ZIMMERMAN JR. DHI-AP EVAN J BURKHOLDER DHI-AP GLENN EBY DHI-AP JAMES & NINA BURDETTE DHIR-AP DENNIS W BRICKER DHI-AP STEVEN E RUBY DHIR-AP ROMARCOHOLSTEINS DHI-AP CURTIS KNEPPER DHI-AP DALE E NISWANDER DHI-APCS GLEN WINGERT DHI-AP OAKLEIGH FARM DHIR-AP MEYERS BROS DAIRY DHIR-AP DUFFIELD DAIRY DHI-AP ANTHONY R LEHMAN DHI-AP MIDDOUR FARMS LLC DHI-AP MILTON ROTZ DHI-AP HONEYSUCKLE ACRES DHIR-AP DENNIS & JOEL SOLLENBERGER DHI-AP PECKMAN HOMESTEAD DHIR-AP GUILSIDE FARM DHI-AP EDGAR S REICHARD DHIR-AP ANTRIM WAY FARM DHI-AP PAUL H.ZIMMERMAN JR. DHI-AP LAMELLO FARM DHIR-AP JEREMY D. MARTIN DHI-AP JEMI JERSEYS DHIR-AP WITTERDALE FARM DHI-AP BEIDEL BROTHERS DHI-APCS LAMELLO FARM DHIR-AP LAMELLO FARM DHIR-AP POVERTY LANE FARMS LP DHI-AP DONALD PIPER # DHI-AP RYAN D MEYERS DHI-AP THOMAS E SHATZER DHI-AP CAMPBELL + RUN JERSEYS DHIR-AP NELSON R MEYERS DHI-AP VERNON W. ZIMMERMAN DHI-AP TIMOTHY I OCKER DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H X H H H H H H H H H H H X H H H J H H J H H X B H H H H J H H H

160.1 19.7 43.1 178.2 113.8 118.7 65.3 196.8 39.6 68.4 44.6 87.3 128.7 190.7 255.8 104.5 160.5 326.7 116.0 96.4 126.6 188.4 56.1 106.5 21.8 69.2 93.0 31.9 195.3 177.0 19.3 126.5 148.0 132.9 35.3 67.3 21.3 58.7 66.1 68.4

27738 1064 3.8 853 3.1 25712 1108 4.3 797 3.1 25146 935 3.7 783 3.1 25143 969 3.9 772 3.1 25776 960 3.7 770 3.0 24374 925 3.8 754 3.1 24508 878 3.6 744 3.0 24258 898 3.7 732 3.0 22583 940 4.2 727 3.2 22985 877 3.8 726 3.2 23608 853 3.6 725 3.1 22537 841 3.7 717 3.2 22552 870 3.9 707 3.1 21950 851 3.9 704 3.2 23019 857 3.7 702 3.0 3X 22977 828 3.6 699 3.0 21581 867 4.0 695 3.2 21553 811 3.8 687 3.2 22166 781 3.5 680 3.1 23286 832 3.6 673 2.9 21131 880 4.2 669 3.2 22350 809 3.6 665 3.0 20968 840 4.0 660 3.1 21258 857 4.0 660 3.1 17807 838 4.7 654 3.7 21186 786 3.7 649 3.1 20696 781 3.8 647 3.1 16647 962 5.8 625 3.8 19328 740 3.8 624 3.2 19320 781 4.0 608 3.1 18266 799 4.4 603 3.3 17776 739 4.2 597 3.4 18527 712 3.8 581 3.1 18943 672 3.5 570 3.0 17336 702 4.0 567 3.3 18242 713 3.9 567 3.1 15387 749 4.9 567 3.7 18696 705 3.8 553 3.0 17117 681 4.0 521 3.0 17355 670 3.9 519 3.0

HIGHLAND H FARMS MOWREYS SPRUCELAWN LONDONDALE FARM MITCHELLS DAIRY FARM HIGHLAND H FARMS DAN RAYBUCK DAN KELLER WINGARD DAIRY FARM D & L FARM SMITH OAK FARM PINE VALLEY FARM KNAPP BROTHERS FARM WINDFALL RUN FARM

H H H H J H H H H H H H H

49.7 121.6 61.3 86.2 15.4 13.1 19.1 38.5 47.5 133.1 43.9 120.7 44.3

29675 1034 3.5 920 3.1 26174 931 3.6 820 3.1 25382 964 3.8 781 3.1 24824 913 3.7 775 3.1 20979 996 4.7 757 3.6 23378 872 3.7 745 3.2 24486 995 4.1 742 3.0 21616 761 3.5 696 3.2 21461 779 3.6 673 3.1 20523 726 3.5 646 3.1 20270 754 3.7 646 3.2 20545 811 3.9 645 3.1 18896 758 4.0 607 3.2

ERIE

FRANKLIN

JEFFERSON

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR DHI-APCS DHIR-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS DHI-AP

4.0 3.7 3.6 3.8 3.7 3.9

3.8 3.8 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.6 3.8 4.2 3.9 4.0 4.0 3.9 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 4.1 3.7 4.1

807 801 758 746 621 564

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1

23817 25846 24667 23814 18436 18005

PAUL SWANSON V BELL FARMS PIERRE PONTZER

B H H H X H

782 778 756 722

36.9 114.9 53.5 99.7 53.7 37.3

ELK

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H

744 726 726 708 704 679 678 670 663 638 625 621 603 597 584 577 549 549 544 520

3.4 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.4 3.1

3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.4 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 3.0 3.0 3.4 3.2 3.2

HERD OWNER LAUREL VALLEY DAIRY HARVESTORE HILL FARM PARADISE ACRES

LACKAWANNA GEORGE YEDINAK PAUL MANNING

LAWRENCE

ROBIN & JOHN THOMPSON LEFTMAC FARM PAUL LAWRENCE CAMPRUN HOLSTEIN HILLMAR FARM TROTACRE FARM HENRY FARMS MARTINHOLM FARMS TROTACRE FARM

LUZERNE

SCOTT RINEHIMER C K TROXELL FARMS

LYCOMING

BENJAMIN MCCARTY ED+CHRISKITZMILLER MICHAEL & LARRY FRY BRYNN BOWER FANTASYFOUND HOLSTEINS LOST BROOK FARM INC.

MCKEAN

DETRICKS FARM SYN TANN THREE MILES DAIRY JAMES & JUDITH LARSON NEAL D GORDON JAMES & JUDITH LARSON

MERCER

CINDA L GANDER CANON DAIRY PAUL J CRITCHLOW DALE L KEPNER CLAN CAMPBELL J. D. PHILSON HILLVIEW ACRES DEWAYNE & BILL COULTER IRISHTOWN ACRES J. D. PHILSON DANE YEAGER WILLOW BROOK FARM SALLY + GARY OAKES LENGEL BROTHERS HILLVIEW ACRES GUERN

MONTOUR

SAMUEL + ADA BYLER MELVIN & LOVINA HOSTETLER

NORTHAMPTON VALKIES REG HOLSTEINS KLEIN FARMS JUNIPERDALE FARM RALPH HAHN EXCELSIOR FARMFLECK BREWER FARMS REDMAPL SPRING FARM THALER FARMS BREWERS JERSEYS JOHN BOCKO JOAN A WILLIAMS MACK FARMS KLEINTOP FARMS

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

DHI-AP H 28.1 DHI-AP J 67.9 DHIR-AP G 45.8

18175 15596 16880

697 3.8 566 3.1 767 4.9 564 3.6 737 4.4 541 3.2

DHIR H 55.7 DHI-AP H 79.6

21981 18006

945 4.3 663 3.0 682 3.8 538 3.0

50.2 61.3 63.7 124.4 64.8 109.8 42.5 221.4 57.8

24154 24943 24267 22537 22995 21282 19455 19827 16032

923 904 851 793 833 734 735 714 689

DHI-AP H 76.8 DHI-AP H 188.5

23278 23180

909 3.9 723 3.1 832 3.6 694 3.0

DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP

H H H H H H X H G

3.8 3.6 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.4 3.8 3.6 4.3

766 765 743 707 687 658 594 580 528

3.2 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3X 3.1 2.9 3.3 3X

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-APCS

H H H H H H

44.3 67.2 81.1 41.4 133.4 147.7

23864 19745 19629 19207 18687 18867

878 793 875 826 712 733

3.7 4.0 4.5 4.3 3.8 3.9

712 622 610 608 585 568

3.0 3.2 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.0

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H W H H H X

47.5 55.1 54.6 88.1 39.9 46.4

23411 23069 20780 21499 20057 16537

890 804 785 771 752 698

3.8 3.5 3.8 3.6 3.7 4.2

731 707 659 656 627 575

3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.5

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIRAPCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHIR-AP DHI DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H J J X X H H G

51.3 124.3 124.9 121.6 68.0 37.7 101.4 146.7 494.1 25.3 20.3 68.9 32.3 97.0 10.3

26181 25425 25197 24745 22740 21132 20358 18950 15763 16700 17054 16876 16859 15503 14317

845 973 896 926 889 780 740 747 791 760 700 670 628 596 655

3.2 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.9 5.0 4.6 4.1 4.0 3.7 3.8 4.6

786 773 752 742 722 654 631 610 595 580 550 534 517 508 506

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.8 3.5 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.3 3.5

DHI-AP H 53.6 DHI-AP H 62.1

22827 16440

870 3.8 692 3.0 661 4.0 505 3.1

DHIR-AP DHIR DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H J H H H H

97.7 60.3 61.9 81.3 98.0 100.4 100.8 165.9 17.0 52.2 112.5 26.5 120.9

28748 1130 3.9 847 2.9 26273 992 3.8 825 3.1 23054 1173 5.1 716 3.1 22362 861 3.9 704 3.1 22916 814 3.6 699 3.1 23314 881 3.8 697 3.0 21697 859 4.0 677 3.1 21993 836 3.8 671 3.1 18541 907 4.9 671 3.6 19246 750 3.9 582 3.0 18377 712 3.9 563 3.1 18240 622 3.4 546 3.0 17190 679 3.9 529 3.1

ROGER+RHODA LENT DHI-APCS BRUBAKERS DAIRY FARM DHI-AP JOHNCAROL FOWLER # DHI-AP RISSER, DAVID & NELSA DHI-AP CADY FARMS DHI-AP THOMPSON, DONALD & CATHY DHIR-AP RON+CANDY COONEY DHIRAPCS J J FARMS # DHI-APCS ROWN FARMS DHI-AP LEON AND CATHY TICE DHI-AP KURT KOSA DHIR-AP

H H H H H H H H H H J

61.0 116.4 61.6 109.7 89.3 60.9 52.6 60.2 68.3 61.3 78.6

24221 23956 23079 21784 22057 20960 21039 21236 17590 17745 15510

LLOYD & DENISE PEASE RANSOMED RANSOMDAIRY WALKER FARMS KEITH BRANT COTTRELL BROTHERS HARVATINE FARMS EMPET FARMS KENNETH S. GESFORD REUBEN EVERITT JOHN CASTROGIOVANNI R M SHIPSKY & SONS JOE VALENTINE DONALD POTTER EMPET FARMS JO AM SAN DAIRY ROBERT JOHNSON HAROLD & NANCY SHAY DONALD C ROBBINS JON ANN FARMS

H H H H H H H H H H H H H J H H X H H

62.8 101.2 66.6 86.4 61.9 107.6 94.0 49.6 34.0 121.6 56.9 34.1 54.0 14.8 55.2 60.4 64.0 48.8 38.8

28022 1080 3.9 913 3.3 24484 930 3.8 790 3.2 26318 965 3.7 786 3.0 25154 967 3.8 781 3.1 24956 954 3.8 771 3.1 24316 785 3.2 749 3.1 23932 891 3.7 744 3.1 23499 908 3.9 731 3.1 22760 863 3.8 723 3.2 23959 840 3.5 722 3.0 22152 799 3.6 692 3.1 23140 832 3.6 675 2.9 21368 827 3.9 658 3.1 18262 878 4.8 639 3.5 20589 728 3.5 609 3.0 19451 769 4.0 600 3.1 17749 733 4.1 572 3.2 18281 688 3.8 570 3.1 17689 672 3.8 549 3.1

POTTER

SUSQUEHANNA

DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

874 807 784 837 827 833 766 789 708 679 718

3.6 3.4 3.4 3.8 3.7 4.0 3.6 3.7 4.0 3.8 4.6

734 716 712 678 671 656 651 648 558 548 536

3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.1 3.5

3X 3X

3X

3X


Margin Insurance for Dairy (LGMDairy), and Federal Milk Marketing Orders (FMMOs). Members of the Subcommittee heard testimony about how these programs are working, current conditions and productivity in the dairy industry, and possible public policy challenges moving forward. “The events of 2009 exposed what many have long-held to be an inadequacy of some of our current dairy programs. While some observers may argue that additional funding may improve the overall effectiveness of our dairy safety net, our current budgetary outlook makes this option a nonstarter. Innovative and effective ideas are needed in order to ensure that our programs support our producers, facil-

WASHINGTON, D.C. — On Sept. 8, Representative Thomas Rooney, Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry held an audit hearing to examine U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) dairy programs. This is the tenth hearing in the series on farm policy that is designed to provide oversight of current spending to ensure programs are delivered effectively. It also provides Members of the Committee with a comprehensive view of farm programs. Current dairy programs include the Dairy Product Price Support Program (DPPSP), Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) Program, Dairy Export Incentive Program (DEIP), Livestock Gross

itate product and market development, and continue to ensure the availability of safe, abundant, and affordable products for our consumers. Today’s hearing provided our Subcommittee with an important perspective about the strengths and weaknesses of our existing programs,” said Chairman Thomas Rooney (R-FL). “The dairy industry has always faced a rocky road, but the past few years have been particularly hard for California producers. It is extremely important that future dairy policy builds a strong base so dairies can continue to produce milk and consumers can continue to enjoy domestically produced products here at home,” said Ranking Member Dennis Cardoza (D-CA).

For Records Processed Through DRMS Raleigh 800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com HERD OWNER CRAIG ROBERTSON

TIOGA

BISHCROFT FARM KEN MARTIN MARK HALTEMAN SHERMAN HENRY&KELLY CARL K ZIMMERMAN

UNION

FLOYD MARTIN BUFF RUN ALLEN & LINDA WEHR GARY B. HOFFMASTER COW COMFORT INN DAIRY LOCUSTRIDGE FARM AMOS M STOLTZFUS GEORGE & JOHN HAUCK SPRUCE RUN FARM DALE L.METZLER

CHAMPLAIN DAIRY SERVICE INC. Swanton, VT 802-868-3144 DON'S DAIRY SUPPLY, INC. South Kortright, NY 607-538-9464

TYPE TEST

B R COW E E YEARS D

DHI-AP H 46.9 DHI-APCS DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

849.0 70.0 51.9 122.4 51.9 62.6 53.9 68.2 101.9 80.2 64.1 69.3 120.5 51.7 94.4

DYKEMAN FARMS Fultonville, NY 518-922-5496 FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Lowville, NY 315-376-2991

RHA MILK

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

16325

648 4.0 524 3.2

25418 23517 23407 22148 19185

886 844 781 782 696

3.5 3.6 3.3 3.5 3.6

758 693 689 668 591

3.0 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.1

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER

B R COW E E YEARS D

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

3.6 3.7 3.9 4.7 4.5

DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

53.4 37.4 62.8 176.0 47.0

21904 21471 21540 18485 18675

778 792 848 869 843

DICKMAR FARMS

DHI-AP H 158.3

24407

802 3.3 759 3.1

MITCHHILL DAIRYFARM

DHI-AP H 61.3

20813

826 4.0 656 3.2

KURTIS MESSENGER

DHI-AP X 24.4

23954

887 3.7 768 3.2 3X

JARED LINDELL

DHI-AP H 132.3

24536

890 3.6 755 3.1 3X

PINE TON FARMS

DHI-AP H 284.7

22571

861 3.8 703 3.1

MARTHA BEARDSLEY

DHI-AP H 46.5

21715

804 3.7 687 3.2

RANDELL FARM

DHI-AP H 110.8

21946

792 3.6 680 3.1

LINDELL FARMS LLC

DHI-AP H 328.9

21636

819 3.8 659 3.0 3X

KEVIN LONG

DHI-AP H 58.6

19708

757 3.8 607 3.1

CONNEATTEE WEST

DHI-AP H 95.9

16404

629 3.8 536 3.3

WARREN

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Seneca Falls, NY 315-568-0955

FISHER FARMS Canastota, NY 315-697-7039

SOUTHERN TIER DAIRY SERVICE Conewango Valley, NY 716-358-9152

FINGER LAKES DAIRY SERVICE Warsaw, NY 585-786-0177

R&M FARM & PRO HARDWARE Marathon, NY 607-849-3291

SOUTHERN TIER DAIRY SERVICE Java Center, NY 585-457-4350

H H H X J

RHA MILK

IVAN NOLT VERNON MARTIN HILL CRAFT FARM COW COMFORT INN DAIRY COW COMFORT INN DAIRY

VENANGO

30712 1176 3.8 938 3.1 3X 28486 1106 3.9 878 3.1 26604 932 3.5 796 3.0 25138 927 3.7 794 3.2 25614 975 3.8 781 3.0 3X 23910 945 4.0 733 3.1 23581 850 3.6 697 3.0 22645 814 3.6 689 3.0 22843 903 4.0 688 3.0 21552 808 3.7 687 3.2

Top 40 Herds For August 678 665 651 632 630

3.1 3.1 3.0 3.4 3X 3.4 3X

CENTER STATE AG. SVC. INC. Rt. 20 Morrisville, NY 13408 315-684-7807

TYPE TEST

HERD OWNER FOGGY MEADOWS FARM JAMES LEOFSKY

WAYNE

ROWE BROS HIGHLAND FARMS JACK AND ELLA CHYLE KEV & GERARDA BURLEIGH N GARY KRAVETSKY CHYLE LAND DAIRY ROCK RIDGE FARM DAVID & SHEILA BANICKY DON STILES TRI NON FARMS D ELLIS DIX CARL A ROBINSON # JOHN A PAWLOSKI

WYOMING

B R COW E E YEARS D

DHI-AP H 97.8 DHI-AP H 43.6 DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP DHIR-AP DHI-AP DHI-AP

HIRKEY BROTHERS SHADOW PRACTICE2 DAIRY

USA BODY INC. 994 Middle Lake Road DeRuyter, NY 13052 315-852-6123

H H H H H J H H H H H H H

79.8 95.6 41.3 48.4 54.9 90.1 80.8 58.6 43.7 74.5 49.7 56.1 38.8

DHI-AP H 42.3 DHI-AP H 136.0

RHA MILK

17292 16654

FAT

% 3 % FAT PRO PRO X

636 3.7 533 3.1 637 3.8 507 3.0

29737 1288 4.3 875 2.9 24815 1135 4.6 790 3.2 24342 901 3.7 750 3.1 24330 926 3.8 736 3.0 22459 818 3.6 693 3.1 18068 829 4.6 632 3.5 20622 816 4.0 632 3.1 20454 816 4.0 627 3.1 18800 733 3.9 609 3.2 20323 787 3.9 605 3.0 19044 729 3.8 575 3.0 17563 709 4.0 545 3.1 16849 639 3.8 507 3.0 18373 21913

679 3.7 595 3.2 835 3.8 675 3.1

HISTANDS FARM & HOME Rd. 1, Box 231, Church St. Rome, PA 18837 570-744-2371

Page 29 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Subcommittee holds audit hearing on dairy programs


Section A - Page 30 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Where Information Creates Opportunity

800.496.3344 • www.dairyone.com

Think Yield The old adage "if you can't measure it, you can't manage it" has never been more true. Today, we have more tools than ever before to manage our crops with the yield information, and you may want to be able to take advantage of those tools sooner than you might think. The ideal is to have multiple-year geospacial yield information to use as a resource. Even if you don't have a yield monitor on your chopper, you can still begin measuring your yields. A great reason to begin running Fields & Crops Manager is to have a place to store your yield information. We were very surprised by the number of farms that record their forage harvest-they just never had a place to put it. Harvest Worksheet from the Fields and Crops Manager Software Program

The Dairy One Improver Agricultural Management Resources Group Welcomes New Staff Member Specializing in Feedwatch Support The Agricultural Management Resources (AMR) group at Dairy One is pleased to announce the addition of Kevin Streeter to the staff as an Applications Support Specialist. Kevin grew up on a custom heifer-raising operation in central New York and graduated from Cornell University in 2005 with a B.S. in Animal Science. While in school, Kevin worked as a herdsman and an AI technician. Since graduation, Kevin worked as a nutritionist for a feed company in Vermont and for a veterinary school in the Caribbean. For the past two and a half years, Kevin worked as a nutritionist, and he is also part-owner of his family farm with 60 cows that are milked with a Lely Robotic Milker. He also raises heifers on his farm, with 200 head on feed. As Applications Support Specialist for the AMR group, Kevin will be supporting Feedwatch, with a focus on feeding and feed management. He is currently traveling and meeting current Feedwatch customers. If you have any questions, please contact Kevin by phone at 800.496.3344, ext. 2188 or by e-mail at kevin.streeter@dairyone.com.

This worksheet is printed from Fields and Crops Manager and is meant to be kept in the chopper to make it easy for the operator to record the number of loads from each field. From this sheet, it is easy to key the number of loads with an average weight for each field. Using your scales and frequently sampling for percent dry matter would be best, but absent the scales, you can use the table below to estimate the forage dry matter you are taking off each field. Average Silage Dry Matter Density on Wagons Weighed at the University of Wisconsin Marshfield Ag Research Station

Students Visit Farm to Learn About Agriculture On June 1, 2011, a group of 6th graders from Odessa Montour school district visited Bergen Farms in Odessa, New York. Representatives from Dairy One, DMS, CIDEC, Cornell, and the farm were on hand to describe their jobs, educational experience, and the relation of their jobs to agriculture. Students toured the farm and learned about the milking parlor and milk storage, nutrition, herd reproduction, veterinary services, manure handling and storage, soil sampling, machinery, and other components of running a large-scale dairy operation.

Use this harvest information, along with previous years' information, with your crop consultant to begin working on next year's strategy. Begin with what you have, and then work towards acquiring a yield monitor. Strongly consider a yield monitor for your next chopper. This information is much more valuable than just reinforcing where your fields need tile. Your geospacial harvest information, overlaid on field information, such as electroconductivity maps, is valuable for creating and evaluating subfield management sections, as well as adjusting your variable seed planting and fertilizer rates. Increasingly, your crop consultants will be asking you for this information to help you enter your next phase of increasing yields.

PREPAY NOW…SAVE LATER! This is a great year to consider participating in Dairy One’s prepay program. You can realize tax advantages, save money on your testing bill, and eliminate the inconvenience of paying on test day. Each year, Dairy One members of all herd sizes take advantage of this popular program. Look for information coming soon, or call 800-344-2697, ext 2159.


Page 31 - Section A • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011


Section A - Page 32 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

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East

CHEESE DEMAND/ MILK SUPPLY

Issued Sept. 9, 2011 The latest employment

data showing no job creation in August and declining consumer confidence doesn't bow well for the dairy industry, according to the University of Wisconsin's Dr. Brian Gould. Speaking in Tuesday's DairyLine, Gould said consumers are not willing to pur-

Section B chase food away from home (restaurants). He cited the August consumer confidence index which declined from 59.2 to 44.5. That's about a 20 percent drop, he said. When asked about cheese prices, Gould pointed to existing

stocks relative to production and said "They're pretty high." Case in point is the ratio of American cheese stocks to American cheese production in July which was the highest since 1987, "so we have a lot of stocks out there relative to production," and he warned that he's not optimistic there'll be a rebound in prices in the near future. Futures prices on cheese are pretty stable, according to Gould, right around $1.70, plus or minutes five cents, "so right now the indicators are not looking for substantial changes on the up side or even on the downside." By the way; the July Consumer Price Index (CPI) for all food was 228.3, up 4.2 percent from July 2010, according to USDA. The dairy products index was 214.8, up 7.9 percent. Fresh whole milk was up 10.2 percent, cheese was up 8.1 percent, and butter was up 21percent from a year ago. Prices were mixed in Tuesday's Global Dairy Trade (Fonterra) auction, according to the CME's Daily Dairy Report (DDR). The weighted average price for skim milk powder was $1.56 per pound, up 0.3 percent from the August 16 trading. The whole milk powder price, at $1.50 per pound, was down 1.6 percent. The anhydrous milkfat price was $1.97, up 2 percent, and the Cheddar cheese for industrial use price received an average winning bid of $1.84 per pound, down 4.7 percent from the prior auction. The tradeweighted average for all products was down 1.4 percent from the prior event, and down 25.8 percent from the peak levels established in early March, according to the DDR. Traders and handlers have mixed opinions on what direction price will trend, says USDA. Some feel that weakness will continue, while others indicate the recent weakening trend will cease and prices will possibly firm. Matter of interest;

eDairy economist Bill Brooks notes that European butter prices are near $2.59 per pound while Oceania prices are just below $1.95. U.S. butter has plunged to the lowest level since May, closing the second Friday of September at $1.9125 per pound, down 9 1/4cents on the Labor Day holiday-shortened week, down 18 cents in two weeks, and 31 cents below a year ago. No butter was sold on the week. The lagging NASS-surveyed butter price averaged $2.0596 across the U.S., up 0.9 cent from the previous week. Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.49, down 2 cents, while Extra Grade held all week at $1.61. NASS powder averaged $1.5424, down 2.4 cents. Block cheese closed Friday at $1.7850, down a half-cent on the week, but a nickel above a year ago. Barrel closed at $1.72, down 4 cents on the week, and a penny and a half above a year ago. Six carloads of block traded hands on the week and 13 of barrel. The NASS U.S. average block price fell 10.9 cents, to $1.9843, while the barrels averaged $1.8964, down 18.1 cents. Checking the milk supply side; the full impact and damage assessment of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee is still being assessed. Empire State News.net reports that farmers who were forced to dump milk may be eligible for USDA payments to compensate them. Meanwhile; the Agriculture Department reports that milk production in the Southeast and Florida were mostly steady at reduced levels. Milk intakes in the Midwest were fairly steady. California and New Mexico milk production is steady to lower with Arizona trending lower. Production in the Pacific Northwest is at expected volumes, while Utah and Idaho milk supplies are above year ago levels. Class I orders are fair to good to fill needs for schools resuming class-

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Page 1 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Country y Folks


Section B - Page 2 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Mielke from B1 es. Cream markets are unsettled to weak. Demand ahead of the Labor Day holiday weekend slowed and buying interest was light. Cream volume moving to churns was expected to increase over the holiday period. Weather throughout most of Europe has been quite mild for much of the current milk production season. Outside of dry conditions earlier this summer, producers and handlers indicate that the season has been quite favorable for milk output. Stocks of European manufactured dairy products are generally available for both domestic and international buyer interest. Sales activity has remained quite good from both. Traders and handlers were quite surprised at the level of sales activity in recent weeks and traders are indicating that skim milk powder is moving both domestically and internationally, but whole milk powder sales are more limited, probably due to price. Traders feel that now that the summer vacations season is coming to a close and Ramadan is over, more buyers will be returning to the marketplace for upcoming fall and winter needs. Early spring weather patterns are being reported in the Oceania region. The snow storm in New Zealand a few weeks ago is history and weather patterns are showing more signs of spring versus late winter. Most producers and handlers indicate the snowfall did little to negatively impact the dairy industry. Milk production trends remain in line with recent projections, with New Zealand 2-4 percent higher and Australia in the 12 percent increase range. A favorable end to the most recent production sea-

son in Oceania is causing producers in both countries to consider expansions, according to USDA. Australian milk producers are indicating that milk production growth during the upcoming year will be restrained by herd growth but anticipate that production will potentially be more noticeable in the 2012-2013 year. Having experienced a number of years of negative or minimal growth, it will take a number of years to turn this trend around, especially for Australian producers. Back on the home front, looking "back to the futures" combined with the announced Class III prices for July and August, the Federal order Class III contract's average for the last half of 2011 was $19.75 on August 5, $19.42 on August 12, $19.18 on August 19, $19.36 on August 26, $19.63 on September 2, and was running $19.35 at the close of spot trading on September 9. In other milk price news and looking "back to the futures" combined with the announced Class III prices for July and August, the Federal order Class III contract's average for the last half of 2011 was $19.75 on August 5, $19.42 on August 12, $19.18 on August 19, $19.36 on August 26, $19.63 on September 2, and was running $19.35 at the close of spot trading on September 9. In dairy politics; the International Dairy Foods Association's Peggy Armstrong addressed falling fluid milk sales in Wednesday's DairyLine, blasting efforts that would result in higher milk prices to consumers. She reiterated how milk provides nine essential nutrients Americans need, including

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Mielke from B2 calcium, vitamin D and potassium and that, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, "these nutrients are especially important for growing children." She warned that milk is "losing ground" in "a competitive beverage environment," reporting that per capita milk consumption has continued a slow and steady decline at a rate of about 1percent a year for the past 35 years, according to USDA data, but a recent statistic suggests the decline might be escalating. U.S. fluid milk product sales declined 1.4 percent in 2010, the largest annual decline in more than a decade, she said, and "This trend has continued into 2011, with U.S. fluid milk product sales down 1.6 percent through June." She said "It's important to note that according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the retail price of milk has been higher during most of this period than the same month a year earlier so it appears that in a tight economy and a competitive marketplace, consumers are increasingly looking to beverages other than milk." "That's is why the last thing the U.S. dairy industry needs is a change to the Federal Milk Market Order system that would result in higher Class I prices," she warned, and pointed to the plan proposed by Representative Collin Peterson of Minnesota which is based National Milk's "Foundation for the Future." "NMPF's own analysis estimates that the minimum fluid milk price would have averaged 51 cents higher in recent years under the proposed federal order changes in the draft legislation," Armstrong charged. "Everyone in the U.S. dairy industry should pay close

attention to dairy policy reforms that could hurt demand. That especially applies to proposed legislation that will increase the cost of fluid milk products. We cannot afford to lose any more ground and Americans cannot afford to lose the health benefits of drinking milk," she said. Congress has plenty on its plate to deal with, primarily the economy and budget issues, according to National Milk's Chris Galen in his Thursday DairyLine talk. He said the nation awaited President Obama's plan to help the economy and deal with high unemployment. Coincidentally Thursday was also the first meeting of the so-called Congressional Super Committee whose mandate is to identify an additional $1.5 trillion in budget savings over the next decade. "A lot of what's going to drive the process here this fall in Washington is to reconcile those two issues," Galen said, "How to stimulate the economy formally or informally and help put people back to work and at the same time, identify ways to cut government spending." The committee is supposed to complete its work around Thanksgiving, he said, and present recommendations for Congress to vote on. Many expect farm programs to be targeted for cuts, he concluded, so the groundwork may be in the works for the next Farm Bill. The House Agriculture Livestock, Poultry and Dairy Subcommittee also held a dairy policy hearing Thursday. Witnesses included USDA officials from the Farm Service Agency and Agriculture Marketing Service.

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Home,, Family,, Friendss & You Know how to spot fly-by-night scam artists and phony charities Hurricane Irene has left a path of devastation for many in Upstate New York with hundreds of homes destroyed, towns and farms flooded. The storm has hit close to home and if you’re not directly affected, you may want to help others that have been. After a big storm hits and clean up efforts commence, the Better Business Bureau’s past experience unfortunately points to fly-by-night “storm chasers” looking to take advantage of homeowners and their wallets — as well as fraudulent charities promising to provide relief. The BBB is warning consumers to be wary of solicitations that could take your money for all the wrong reasons. Storm chasers and other door-to-door salespeople often peddle dubious deals that may cost homeowners thousands of dollars and create more heartache. BBB recommends doing your research to avoid getting taken advantage of by untrustworthy home contractors and the like. For those who seek to aid in

relief, BBB Wise Giving Alliance urges donors to check trustworthy charities before making any donations. “Not only do area consumers need to be concerned about avoiding fraud, they need to know that charity relief efforts are legitimate and honorable,” said David Polino, Better Business Bureau. “If you need a home contractor, it’s imperative to find one that you can trust.” Donors looking to help should make sure their money goes to competent relief organizations that are equipped and experienced to handle the unique challenges of providing assistance. BBB recommends that homeowners and donors do the following: Start Your Search with BBB. In addition to offering Business Reviews on tens of thousands of contractors — good and bad — across the US, you can also rely on BBB’s Accredited Business Locator to find trustworthy contractors in your area. BBB accreditation standards require that accredited businesses make a

Morning fuel for school — “break the fast” (NAPSA) — There are many good reasons breakfast is often called the most important meal of the day. Most significantly, breakfast gives you energy. When you wake up in the morning, your body has been fasting, or going without food, during the hours you were asleep. Eating breakfast means you “break the fast” and give your body (and brain) the energy needed to function — very important for school-aged children. Studies have shown that children’s learning is stimulated and they perform better academically when they are “fueled for school.” Eating breakfast also helps to develop better eating patterns-you and your family will feel more satisfied and be less likely to overeat or eat too much junk food later in the day. Breakfast provides a great opportunity to get all the daily vitamins and minerals needed by eating nutritious foods such as whole grains, fruits and dairy products. You can have these delicious breakfasts ready in

minutes: • Fill toasted whole grain waffles with peanut butter and jam for a unique breakfast sandwich; serve with orange juice. • Mix yogurt, frozen strawberries, skim milk and bananas in a blender for a tasty smoothie. • Heat frozen pancakes and top with fruits and with syrup or honey. • Make breakfast sandwiches with bagels, cheese, egg substitute and precooked sausage. For a special morning treat, create this delicious yogurt parfait to make everyone in your family smile.

Breakfast Yogurt Parfait

1 1/2 cups vanilla low-fat yogurt 1/2 cup low-fat granola 1 cup berries (strawberries, blueberries, blackberries), frozen or fresh Layer in parfait glasses or bowls: granola, yogurt and fruit. Repeat layers. Serves two. For more tasty recipes and information on frozen and refrigerated foods, visit www.EasyHomeMeals.com, and on Facebook, “like” www.facebook.com/ EasyHomeMeals.

good faith effort to resolve disputes. Find trustworthy charities when aiding to relief. BBB Wise Giving Alliance urges donors to make sure their donations will go to legitimate and reputable charities and relief efforts that have the capability to help those in need. Be cautious when relying on thirdparty recommendations such as bloggers or other Web sites, as they might not have fully researched the listed relief organizations. Interested donors should visit www.bbb.org/charity to research charities and relief organizations to verify that they are accredited by the BBB and meet the 20 Standards for Charity Accountability. Recognize the red flags. Beware of any contractor who uses high pressure sales tactics or requires full payment upfront. Also avoid contractors who require you to get the necessary permits. When looking to make a donation, be cautious about online giving, especially in response to spam messages and emails that claim to link to a relief organization. In response to the previous natural disasters, there were concerns raised about many Web sites and new organizations that were created overnight allegedly to help victims. Vet the contractor carefully. Verify the business meets all state and local requirements including being licensed, insured and bonded. Also ask the business for references from recent jobs. Confirm whether or not the contractor will be subcontracting the job or relying on their own employees. Beware of storm chasers. In the wake of a storm, fly-by-night repair businesses will solicit work, often door-to-door, in unmarked trucks. They might require advance payment and make big promises on which they won’t be able to deliver. Seek at least three bids. Beware of low-ball estimates that may potentially balloon over time or foreshadow shoddy work to come. Make sure everything is in writing. Make sure that the full scope of the work is explained in the contract including cleanup and disposal of waste. All verbal agreements need to be included in the written agreement. Pay close attention to the payment terms, estimated price of materials and labor and any warranties or guarantees. For more advice on hiring home professionals and for finding a charity you can trust, visit us online at www.bbb.org/us/consumer-tips-home and BBB Wise Give Alliance at www.bbb.org/charity.

Summertime was fair time Hello, this is Jasmine Wratten, the Oneida County Dairy Princess. July and August have been very busy months. July was Ice Cream month and the ambassadors and I scooped plenty of it at fairs and other events. Court members and I attended the Cooperstown Junior Livestock Show July 11, 12, and 13. While there we scooped ice cream and served up free sundaes to the exhibitors and their families. Did you know that ice cream is enjoyed by more than 90 percent of the American population? Their favorite flavors are vanilla and chocolate, beating out funky flavors such as cotton candy and heavenly hash. During the last week of July, the Oneida County Fair was held in Booneville, NY. Court members and I worked hard in the dairy booth bagging cheese, selling milk, and making ice cream sundaes on Kid’s day. We also handed out ribbons for the dairy cattle and goat shows. Congratulations to all the winners! August took us to the Empire Farm Days, where we sold t-shirts and other items. It was very interesting to see all the different aspects of the dairy industry represented at one show. We served up more ice cream on Aug. 17 at the Richard Feeds Appreciation Barbecue, where we also sold t-shirts and small items. It was a very busy and tasty day with a yummy chicken barbecue at the end. Thank you to all the farmers for producing nature’s most nearly perfect food and working hard every single day to make that product available to everyone.


In this time of ever increasing input costs at the farm level, from feed to fuel to maintenance costs of the cow herd or sheep flock, we are all looking for ways to offset those costs as best we can. From a herd management standpoint one way to minimize costs is to get the herd as efficient as possible on feed and to minimize the labor inputs. For many of us this means moving to an all forage, all the time production paradigm. Others have chosen not to go that route because it doesn’t make sense for their particular farm goals.

One thing that can work to the benefit of all livestock or dairy producers is how we choose the stock that gets to stay on the farm and continues to produce for us. Whether we raise sheep, goats, chickens, or cattle makes little difference, the animals that give us the best bang for the buck are the ones that help make our operation profitable. And if the operation isn’t profitable it isn’t sustainable. It is a common practice for stock producers to seek the best off-farm genetics to enhance the productivity of their farming operation. While this

is especially true of the dairy industry and its link to the A.I. studs, it is also true of most commercial stock operations regardless of the species being raised. Something that is perhaps being missed is the fact that our individual farms are not produced by cookie cutters. Every farm and farmer is different in terms of micro climate, management practices, soils, etc. Thus, the stock that thrive in one operation may not do so in another. This seems reasonable, doesn’t it? Yet, when the glossy A.I. stud cata-

logue comes out we all want to see what is the newest, hottest, bestest, fastest, etc. stud animals out there. Maybe we ought to take a step back and look at the stock on our own farms that work the best for us. One eminent breeder of beef cattle in Wyoming often says, “The best cow in the herd is the one that goes unnoticed the longest.” In other words, that cow that brings in an average to above average calf every year for years on end is likely a better cow for the operation

lution for the future or a problem from the past?" Wisconsin dairy producer, John Pagel, who has established a "Risk Management Not Supply Management" website, said he doesn't believe supply management is the answer for the Midwest or for the U.S. dairy industry. He argued that there are so many foreign countries that need dairy products and the Midwest is "sitting in the driver's seat in being able to supply those products." Pagel does agree that the dairy industry needs a safety net but not supply management. The free market allows farmers to produce as much as

they like, he argued, "The better job that you can do on your farm and the more efficient you can be, creates profit on the bottom line and it's up to the rest of the industry to help us export products and do the best job that we can to make sure our dairy industry stays strong." He admits there'll be ups and downs like any other business but doesn't believe it's in farmer's best interest to "slow down production and reduce possible opportunities for feeding the rest of the world," as he put it. He praised National Milk's efforts to

put together a program that would help the dairy industry but supply management is one part he and others do not agree with. He admitted there are regional differences that present challenges in putting a plan together but, with the Midwest having a large amount of processing capacity, "we don't want someone telling us how much milk we can produce" and therefore favors risk management as opposed to supply management. More details and a petition are available to sign at www.stopsupplymanagement.com.

Minimizing B6

Mielke from B3 After attending the hearing, NMPF President &CEO Jerry Kozak stated in a press release that the general tone of the questions at the hearing from the committee members indicated "a concern that current dairy programs are not up to the task of providing a meaningful farm-level safety net." He added that "NMPF shares that concern, and that's what has driven the creation of Foundation for the Future. We believe we have the best answer to the bottom line question of what should come next for dairy policy." But, Friday's DairyLine asked the question, "Is supply management a so-

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2005 H&S ST420 Rotary Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,900 2002 H&S XL-00 Forage Box on 10 Ton H&S Gear . . . . . . . . . . . $5,600 Brillion 24’ Drag Harrow w/Transport Cart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 WIC Cart Mounted Bedding Chopper with Honda Engine . . . . $1,450 2008 Cole 1 Row 3pt. Planter with multiple Seed Plates . . . . . . . $1,195 1981 NH 320 Baler w/70 Thrower Hyd. Bale Tension . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 2001 Keenan FP80 Mixer Wagon, needs new liner . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 Gehl Forage Box, on Dion D1200 Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,895 JD 336 Baler w/Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,200 2010 NH H7230 10’4” Discbine, Roll Conditioner, Like New, Demo. . $24,900 1987 NH 326 Baler w/70 Thrower, Hydra Formatic Tension, Hyd.Pickup . $7,700 2010 E-Z Trail CF890 Rd Bale Carrier/Feeder . . . . . 4 Available $4,995 1989 NH 570 Baler w/72 Thrower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,300 Majaco M580LD, Bale Wrapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,500 2010 LP RCR 1884 7’ Rotary Cutter, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,495 CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT 2008 NH W50BTC Mini Wheel Loader, Cab w/ Heat/Air, Bucket/Forks, 290 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 2009 NH E135B SR Excavator w/ Cab, Dozer Blade, 36" Bucket, 1,211 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $128,500 2009 NH E50B Cab w/ Heat & Air, Blade, Rubber Track, Hyd. Thumb, 348 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,500 2004 Cat 313B CR Cab, Heat & Air, Removable Rubber Pads on Steel Tracks, 32” Bucket - 5884 Hrs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 2007/08 (2) NH C185 Track Skid Steer, Cab, Heat/AC, Pilot, 84" Bucket Around 700 Hrs. Each. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your Choice $46,250 2010 NH L170 Skidsteer, OROPS, 72” Bucket. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,500 2000 NH LS180 Skidsteer, OROPS, Bucket, 3105 Hrs.. . . . . . . $15,025 Mustang MS60P 60” SSL Pickup Broom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 2004 NH LS150 Skid Steer, Hand Controls, 60” Bucket, 3908 Hrs. . $9,750 2002 NH LS170 Skid Steer, OROPS, 72” Bucket, 4685 Hrs . . . . $9,875 1999 NH LX865 Skidsteer OROPS, Bucket, Hi Flow Hyd., 1202 Hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,625 ATTACHMENTS 1999 Mensch M1100 6’Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Good Cond. . $3,150 2002 Mensch M1100 6’ Sawdust Shooter, SSL Mount, Like New . . $3,640 2008 Scoop Dogg 8’ Skid Steer Mount Snow Pusher, Powder Coated, Like New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,100 1999 Coneqtec APX400 Adjustable Cold Planer. . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995 2008 NH 96” Hyd. Angle Dozer Blade-Demo. . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,875 2010 N.H./Bradco 6" x 4' Trencher, Skid Steer Mount, Like New $3,995 2009 Virnig HD Hyd. Drive SSL Post Hole Digger w/ 9” Auger . .$2,195

Page 5 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Minimizing costs and building profits with on-farm genetics


Section B - Page 6 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Minimizing from B5 than the “super cow” that produced those two “great” calves before she had to get shipped for not breeding back. Very few of us can afford to keep our herds or flocks as pets. These animals must work for a living, for our living. They need to breed back reliably every year and do so for years on end to help us be profitable. How many breedings to conception does it take to get that milk cow in calf? I’m guessing the fewer the better. What does that cow that needs regular foot trimming cost vs. another cow that needs little or no foot trimming? By identifying those most reliable, but maybe not the most outstanding, cattle or ewes or does on the farm and then selecting ONLY those females for breeding to off-farm bulls, rams, etc. we can maybe move our home raised herds or flocks ahead better by using home raised offspring out of those “best” females. Yes, I’m advocating keeping some male progeny around out of your cows/ewes/does and using them to infuse the best of the off-farm genetics along with the best of the onfarm genetics across your entire herd or flock. In this way you or I can achieve something that has been forgotten about; uniformity and consistency within our own farm management paradigm and the microclimate in which it runs. A bull raised in a hothouse environment in Wisconsin may produce daughters that read well on test, but will they necessarily do that well in a different environment in Florida? What about range cattle from the Coastal Plain of Mississippi in Upstate New York? Undoubtedly some good has been identified in those herds from those sires, but how can we most efficiently get those traits infused in our

own herds or flocks? To answer that question Bill Hodge will be conducting two pasture walks in Upstate New York during the third week in September. Bill is a co-founder and president of Sustainable Genetics, LLC and has over 40 years experience in the livestock industry. After completing undergraduate work at Virginia Tech he had the unique experience of serving as herd manager for Wye Plantation, Queenstown, MD under the tutelage of the late Jim Lingle, a master breeder of both dairy and beef cattle. Bill completed graduate studies at the University of Georgia and has worked for University of Georgia Cooperative Extension for the last 26 years. He is a past Chairman of the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce, serves as chairman of Carroll County’s Agricultural Preservation Advisory Board and the Georgia Agricultural Land Trust. Bill has made over 100 presentations throughout the U.S. and Canada speaking on behalf of sustainable agriculture and meat animal/forage systems. Bill and his wife Di maintain a minimal input Angus herd (Hodge Ranch, LLC) that utilizes year round grazing with no supplemental feed. They also direct market grass finished beef, pastured pork, and free range eggs in the metro Atlanta area. The first pasture walk to be led by Bill will be at the Crosby Farm owned by Tim Lippert in Berne, NY, Albany County on Sept. 21 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The second pasture walk will be at Rita Partee’s Fleur-de-Lis Farm in Seneca Falls, NY, Seneca County, on Sept. 24, from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Lunch for the Sept. 21 event in Berne is a potluck dish to pass affair with burgers and drinks supplied by the Hudson Mohawk RCD Council.

Lunch will be provided at the Sept. 24 event by the New York Angus Association. Additional support for these two events comes from NE SARE, Albany County Cooperative Extension, the Albany County SWCD, Seneca County Extension, the Seneca County SWCD, the Finger Lakes RCD Council, the Hudson Mohawk RCD Council, NY GLCI, the Finger Lakes Graziers Group and the NY Angus Association. All of these groups have come together in support of these two pasture walk/talks to make them free of charge

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While the Northeast struggles through flooding from tropical storms and the leaves are at their earliest stages of color change, still almost entirely green, we are looking ahead to January of 2012. That’s right, the 4th Annual Winter Green-up Grazing Conference is fast approaching. As a recap we will recall that last year’s event welcomed Joel Salatin and Ray Archuleta to the stage as our two primary speakers. The drawing power of these two names and the great reputation this informative conference has built in a very short period of time brought attendees from as far away as Texas and Idaho. When these attendees were

asked why they made such a long trip the answers were quite similar. It seems these attendees could make the trip to Albany, NY, and participate in the conference for less money than going to other conferences closer to home with the same speakers. That was just what Tom Gallagher and Morgan Hartman, organizers of the event, needed to hear. Gallagher, a long time Cornell Cooperative Extension of Albany County ag agent, and Hartman have focused on making the Winter Green-up an excellent value for the money. They take seriously the mission of Cornell Cooperative Extension to conduct research, education, and outreach on behalf of New York’s

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farmers. And really, this is the mission of the entire Extension Service in all 50 states. In that vein, Hartman and Gallagher have put together another incredible lineup of speakers who bring real world experience and academic expertise together to present possibilities for graziers here in the Northeast. Over two days, Jan. 27 and 28, 2012, the Winter Green-up committee will have five great speakers: • Greg Judy will be here to talk about his mob-grazing operation in Missouri and how that practice has been building topsoil, finishing beeves, and bringing in native species of grasses and forbs simply through altering the animal management on his farms. • Kathy Voth, animal behaviorist and long time Bureau of Land Management employee will discuss her process of training different species of

livestock to eat what many of us call weeds. If the animals eat the plants and thrive on them, are they really weeds? • Ulf Kintzel from right here in New York State will discuss his 100 percent grass-fed sheep and lamb production as well as an overview of his farm practices including the training and marketing of his sheep herding dogs as well as the top notch hair sheep breeding stock and market lambs. • Eddie Draper, Program Director of the Wye Angus Farm for the University of Maryland is coming to the conference this year not as an attendee, but as a speaker. Eddie has supported the conference the last three years as an attendee and also through contributions from the Wye Angus program toward the fund raising raffle at the conference. Eddie’s presentation will entail a history

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of the Wye Angus herd and it’s transition from a private entity to one wholly owned by the University of Maryland Foundation. This tremendous genetic resource of registered Aberdeen Angus cattle has not been outcrossed since 1957 which offers the researchers at the University of Maryland an uncommonly uniform gene pool with which to work for a myriad of studies. • And finally, Jim Ochterski from Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ontario County, NY will be presenting a tremendous look at building a “brand” for your farm. Jim has worked extensively with farmers across the Finger Lakes region of New York State on this very process so important to making farming operations profitable. You won’t want to miss this presentation. This information and process is incredibly useful for anyone selling from their farm, not just

those of us who are direct marketing our farm products. Even if you are selling weaned calves to feedout operations, creating the brand, the name recognition of your higher quality and consistency cattle/sheep/carrots/wha tever you sell, is important to capturing any premiums that might be available for your product. Mark your calendars for Friday and Saturday, Jan. 27 and 28, 2012, to attend the 4th Annual Winter Green-up Grazing Conference in Latham, NY at the Century House. Please contact Tom Gallagher at tjg3@cornell.edu, Lisa Cox at lkc29@ cornell.edu, or Morgan Hartman at blackqueenangus@yahoo.com for more information and to get on the mailing list for registrations. You can also call Lisa Cox at 518765-3512 at the Albany County CCE office in Voorheesville, NY.

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Page 7 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Speakers set for 4th Annual Winter Green-up Grazing Conference


Section B - Page 8 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Fellowship of Christian Farmers Editor’s Comments

Storm Warnings I’m writing this column on Monday, Aug. 29, the day after Hurricane Irene traveled up the East Coast raising havoc with everything in it’s path. As all the media focused on the storm and possible dangers associated with it, the images in our minds of the approaching storm were of fear and uncertainty. Would the storm strike us? How much rain would fall? How about flooding? Power outages? The list goes on. Well, we know the answers to the above concerns. We, in Central New York, escaped with some flooding in low

lying areas, but didn’t experience a great deal of loss. Other areas, especially in the Schoharie County region did not fare as well. I just got off the phone with Pastor Jim Woolford, pastor of Gallupville Gospel Church in Schoharie, a good friend and one who has helped FCFI many times at farm shows. His report was not good. Farmers barely escaped as flood waters came into their barns while the farmers were milking. One farmer lost 80 cows. Many have lost all their crops in fields. They’ll have no feed for their animals this winter. FCFI will be organizing work mis-

FCFI at Empire Farm Days

sion trips ASAP to help where needed. If you’d like to help, please contact me at 315-736-5864. I was working in Maine and Connecticut the previous week and got home safely early Saturday morning, just before we felt the storm. Please keep the folks in the devastated areas in your prayers and consider how you may help. This storm and its aftermath will disappear, although it might take years for some to recover, but there is another one on the horizon. It’s the moral decay that is destroying our great country. When working shows, especially fairs, for FCFI, it is becoming more and more evident that the moral fabric is being destroyed right before our very eyes. From the way young ladies dress, yes, even some mature ones, to the language people use and the disrespect for any-

thing good and moral, it’s no wonder our country is in the shape we find ourselves. But there is hope and that’s where we, as Christians and members of FCFI come in. We need to continue sharing the good news of Jesus Christ. Most are willing to listen. The storm clouds are rising; let’s continue to sound the warning. Jesus Christ and a relationship with him will calm the storms both in our own lives and in our country. Philosopher Edmund Burke once said, “All that is necessary for evil to triumph is that good men do nothing.” It’s no time to sit idly by and do nothing. The folks in Schoharie County need us. Our country needs to stand up and be counted. Remember to give Him thanks in all things, Bill Brown

The FCFI tent at Empire Farm Days remained busy all three days of the show with over 2,000 stopping by to hear the message. FCFI workers are (L-R) Josiah Gant, with an armful of sticksto refill display cans; Charlie Jones, from Gallupville Gospel Church in Schoharie County sharing with a group and Brittany Gant, part-time secretary for the northeast office of FCFI in Marcy, NY, explaining the wonderful message of forgiveness to a show attendee.

Bill Brown continued to spread the message at Empire Farm Days.

Mission trip to Albania 2012

It takes lots of work to prepare walking sticks for all the shows where FCFI exhibits. Shown working hard at Empire Farm Days are (L-R) Caleb Blair, Uriah Portner, Josiah Daniels and Josh Gant from Friendship Baptist Church in Rome, NY.

The Fellowship of Christian Farmers International will once again sponsor a mission trip to Albania in the winter of 2012. FCFI continues to make mission trips available, both domestic and to foreign countries, for those who feel they would like to expand their service. George and Julie Holmes from Trumansburg, NY, will host their 18th FCFI trip to Albania. Two mission groups are available for those interested in joining the Holmes. Each group is scheduled for two weeks in duration, with one in January and the other in February. Anyone going to Albania will be involved with assisting at two children’s meetings, helping with Bible studies, packing seeds, visiting orphaned babies in the hospital, helping at an English school, visiting full-time missionaries to encourage them, and sharing your faith with the Albanian people. You will also be involved in handing out reading glasses and seed packets to individual homes and schools. At the end of the trip, you will have time to visit historical sights and a couple of farming villages before heading home. If this sounds challenging, please contact us at 607-387-6538. We’d love to have you join us.


Farm show report The purpose of the Fellowship of Christian Farmers International is “To build, maintain and strengthen faith for the farmer, farm family and rural community by presenting Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.” We, in the Northeast, have carried that message this summer from Clinton, ME, to Buffalo, NY, from Brooklyn, CT to Batavia, NY, from Dannsville, NY, to Owego, from Lockport to Seneca Falls, NY, and from Hebron, CT, to Mohawk and Vernon Center, NY, all the while keeping our goal of sharing Christ’s love with as many as possible. And we’re not done yet! The fall schedule will find us in Ontario, Canada, Lowville, NY, and then we head to Moultrie, GA, for the largest outdoor farm show in the south. We also have several mission trips scheduled from the storm ravaged Schoharie County in New York to a possible work trip to Vermont and then to two trips to Florida. I include the mission trips

because they, as well, give us opportunity to show Christ’s love in a very practical way. James 2:17&18 “Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone. Yea a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works.” We have had around 7,000 people stop by our tents this summer, with the largest shows still on the schedule. The International Plowing Match in Ontario, Canada and the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Georgia will see over 20,000 visit our tents. Around 350 have already made Christ their savior and hundreds of others have been challenged to consider where they will spend eternity. God only knows how many will reconsider this powerful question. “If you died today, are you sure Heaven will be your home?” It’s a question we all need to answer. On right, Josh Gant explains the bead story at the 25th Annual Antique Truck Show held Aug. 6 and 7 in Batavia, NY.

FCFI traveled to the Maine State Farm Show in Clinton, Maine in August. Chuck Anken is shown with three young people. Twenty-five people made the all important decision to accept Christ as their savior at the show.

Mission trip opportunities The Fellowship of Christian Farmers International is sponsoring two mission trips to Florida in late October and early November. The mission trip to Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization (ECHO) in Fort Myers, FL, is scheduled for Oct. 29 to Nov. 5 and the mission trip to Reality Ranch Ministries, Zolfo Springs, FL, will take place from Nov. 6-12. ECHO work projects include machine repair; fence building; plumbing, electrical and outside repairs; cleanup, chain saw, clearing farm land; irrigation repairs, ditch digging; landscaping, mulching, trimming; planting and harvesting; general maintenance, power washing and cleaning; seed bank, packaging seeds; and making jellies and jams. The cost for the trip is $320 per person from Fort Myers, FL, which includes food and lodging at the Lehigh Resort Club in Lehigh Acres, FL. For more information on this mission trip, contact Bill and Kathy Brown at 315-736-5964 or 315-749-6823. For more information about ECHO, visit www.echonet.org. Work projects planned for the Reality Ranch Ministries trip include work on Pastor Randy Johnson’s home, building a new pole building and many smaller

maintenance jobs including painting, pressure washing, and fence building. The cost for the trip is $320 per person from Orlando, FL, and includes food, lodging and some cost of materials for construction projects. Reality Ministries Inc. is a non-profit corporation, founded on June 12, 1980. The ministry’s founder and president, Randy Johnson, easily relates to the cowboy life, having spent years doing ranch work and being involved in Rodeo. Injured in a diving accident that rendered him quadriplegic, Randy committed his life to Christ, Aug, 28, 1975. He then became dedicated to sharing the Gospel. He is an ordained minister. He provides “Cowboy Church” before the rodeo begins for the contestants, workers, rodeo fans and anyone else who wants to attend. You don’t have to be a Cowboy to come! Some of you might remember Pastor Randy, he was keynote speaker at the 1996 FCFI Conference in New York. For more information on this mission trip, contact Ron and Deb Herrold at 219-916-3535 or 219-916-3994, or Bill and Kathy Brown, 315-736-5964 or 315-749-6823. For more information on Reality Ranch Ministries, visit www.realityranchministries.org.

Chris Dearborn from Olcott Bible Church in Olcott, NY, shares the bead story at Niagara County Fair in Lockport, NY. The church has partnered with FCFI and has successfully exhibited at the fair for the last six years with great results. This year 106 people committed their lives to Christ at the Fair.

New York FCFI members win top environmental award

New York’s highest environmental honor, the Agricultural Environmental Management Award, was presented to Porterdale Farms of Adams Center, NY, on Wednesday, Aug. 10. The three generation dairying family and sponsoring Jefferson County Soil and Water Conservation District received the award from New York State Agricultural Commissioner Darrel J. Aubertine during the Agricultural Leadership Luncheon at Empire Farm Days near Seneca Falls, NY. What began in 1938 as Glenn and Ruth Porter started farming 35 dairy cows, leaped to 150 cows by 1958 after son, David, and wife, Judy, took over the farm. Porterdale Farms leaped again as the next generation — Ron and wife, Mary, and Greg and wife, Lisa, — took charge. Today, the farm milks 1,750 cows and manages 5,000 acres with 36 employees. This 18th annual AEM award bolsters public awareness of exceptional farmer efforts in preserving the environment. It’s jointly sponsored by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, Empire State Potato Growers and American Agriculturist. “As one of the first thousand-cow dairies in the state, Porterdale Farms has had a lifelong commitment to being good stewards of the land — a practice and belief that dates back long before state requirements for large livestock farms came about,” Aubertine said. The Porters are actively involved with the Fellowship of Christian Farmers International, with Dave serving on the international board of directors. John Vogel, editor of American Agriculturist, added the following, “Their faith, belief in family, plus a good team of employees and advisors has been the foundation of their success.” Source: American Agriculturist

Page 9 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Fellowship of Christian Farmers


Section B - Page 10 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Jobs, jobs, jobs -- farms, farms, farms by Lynne Finnerty This year, Labor Day must have seemed a bittersweet celebration to many, with more than 15 million Americans on the unemployment rolls. Farmers and ranchers typically don’t belong to labor unions. They can’t go on strike, because that would mean hungry livestock and potential crop losses. But, here’s one good reason to think of farmers around Labor Day: because agriculture is creating jobs at a time when our nation needs them — badly. According to a joint USDA-Purdue University report, agriculture will generate an estimated 54,400 job openings each year for the next five years for college graduates with degrees in food, renewable energy and environmental specialties. USDA on Aug. 31 predicted that our agricultural exports would set a new record this year at $137 billion. That translates into more than 1 million American jobs, thanks to farmers’ and ranchers’ productivity and high demand for

their products around the world. Next year’s ag exports are expected to be equally strong. If Congress approved the free trade agreements with Colombia, Panama and South Korea, we could add nearly $2.5 billion more to the annual export tally, along with 22,500 more jobs. Every $1 billion in agricultural exports supports 9,000 U.S. jobs, according to USDA, including transportation workers, food processors, packers and others. Another report, released in August by the Battelle Institute, an independent research group, looked at agriculture’s impact on the economy of the productive North-Central U.S. The report values the 12state region’s agriculture, forestry and value-added products system at $125 billion, supporting 2.4 million jobs. The industry is poised to expand with new markets such as health, specialty crops, biofuels and other biobased products. That opportunity, however, depends on whether the U.S. makes adequate investments go-

ing forward in research and development. Clearly, one way to create jobs is to have a strong agriculture. To make that happen, government should not hamstring farmers and ranchers with unnecessary regulations. One of our strengths, obviously, is trade. To take advantage of this, we must continue to open foreign markets by negotiating and ratifying

FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE

trade agreements that eliminate tariffs and other trade barriers. And, believe it or not, allowing some non-citizens to work on U.S. farms plays a role in creating jobs for Americans. It’s simply a fact that most Americans don’t choose to make a career out of picking produce for two to three months out of every year. If farmers can’t get the workers they need to harvest

American Farm Bureau Federation crops when they’re ready, we will lose up to $9 billion worth of agricultural production per year. That’s thousands of American jobs at stake. Comprehensive immigration reform should be part of our nation’s jobcreation plan. The president, Congress and even political candidates will float lots of job-creation ideas over

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the next few months. They should take a look at what’s working in America’s heartland. Maybe the “jobs, jobs, jobs” mantra should become “farms, farms, farms.” Lynne Finnerty is the editor of FBNews, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s official newspaper

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and distributing information at events throughout the area. Don’t Move Firewood is an annual outreach effort and multimedia campaign that educates the public about non-native forest insects and diseases that are wreaking havoc on trees in all 50 states. In New York, the newest and most prominent threats to trees are the Asian longhorned beetle and the

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tree-killing invasive species to spread into new territory. This year’s interns are Sean Mahoney, a Forestry major at the University of Vermont and Natalie Garcia, an Environmental Studies major at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. By attending 15 different major events in New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts, Mahoney, Garcia and the

Don’t Move Firewood team dramatically raised public awareness about this pressing issue. “Moving firewood spreads invasive pests that can quickly destroy our forests. If you’ve ever enjoyed the shade of a nearby tree, remember to buy it where you burn it,” said Mahoney. During their outreach at Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival in Oak Hill, The Big Up in Ghent, and

Warrior Dash in Windham, Mahoney and Garcia spoke with visitors, dressed up in an emerald ash borer costume, and handed out stickers, Frisbees, water bottles, and other items emblazoned with the Don’t Move Firewood campaign’s tagline: That’s What Tree Said. “I’ve been amazed at how well the Don’t Move Firewood message is received by people of all ages. The emerald ash borer costume is a huge hit everywhere we go,” added Garcia. The emerald ash borer has been found in 15 states, including Greene, Ulster, and Orange Counties in New York. Millions of trees have been killed in the Midwestern states by the emerald ash borer, and there is no treatment or spray that works to control this invasive insect once it reaches the forest. In the greater New York metropolitan area, eradication efforts for the Asian longhorned beetle are still underway after its discovery there in 1996.

Page 11 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

College students spend their summer protecting trees in New York State


Section B - Page 12 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Trucks USDA highlights assistance to residents affected by Hurricane Irene WASHINGTON, D.C. — On Aug. 31, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said USDA is ready to deploy personnel and resources to assist the efforts by federal, state and local authorities in response to Hurricane Irene. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to all who have suffered losses caused by this massive storm,” said Vilsack. “USDA is ready to provide food, emergency assistance and other resources to the affected areas. We continue to closely coordinate with many partners to meet the immediate and plan for the long-term needs of those affected by Hurricane Irene.” USDA encourages farmers, ranchers, producers, landowners and rural communities to contact their local USDA Farm Service Agency Service Center to report damages to crops or livestock loss; their local Rural Development office for housing, business or community assistance

information and/or their local Natural Resources Conservation Service office for help with debris removal. USDA is offering the following assistance in response to the hurricane: Housing Assistance — USDA’S Rural Development is encouraging residents affected by the disaster to immediately apply for funding assistance under Rural single family housing loan and grant programs. Funds are available for housing repair, rehabilitation and home purchases. For home financing, USDA will assist with expediting lender approval and approval for access to the Guaranteed Underwriting Services; and offer streamlined loan processing. Individuals needing payment assistance on their existing USDA Rural Development Single and Multifamily loans are encouraged to contact the Centralized Servicing Center at 800-414-1226. Community Assistance — Rural communi-

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ties in Presidentially declared disaster areas may be eligible for funding through Rural Community Facilities programs. Facilities eligible for funding include schools, libraries, childcare centers, hospitals, medical clinics, assisted living facilities, fire and rescue stations, police stations, community centers, public buildings and transportation. These communities can contact USDA Rural Development offices to determine which program is applicable to assist them. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service state operations are prepared to work with local communities to determine Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) requests in the disaster areas. EWP helps protect lives and property threatened by

natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and wildfires. The program provides technical and financial assistance to preserve life and property threatened by excessive erosion and flooding. Owners, managers, and users of public, private or tribal lands are eligible for EWP assistance if their watershed area has been damaged by a natural disaster. NRCS can fund immediate actions necessary to address threats to life or property (exigencies). Exigency funds are provided and approved quickly to lessen the threat to lives and property that exists as a result of storms or flooding. For example, exigency funding can be used to remove stream blockages and debris. Debris can include twisted trees and other woody

vegetation as well as home construction materials. The removal of stream debris is important because obstructions increase the risk of flooding thus the further risk to life and property. Other conditions where EWP exigency funds can be used include embankment stabilization and erosion control around culverts or bridges of open roads. If these areas are not protected and stabilized after a storm or flooding there is increased threat to life and property. Business Assistance — Rural businesses in Presidentially declared disaster may be eligible

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have crop and or physical damage, to contact their local Farm Service Agency Service Center as soon as possible. The affected State and County Emergency Boards, chaired by the USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA), are assisting with the response efforts and quickly assessing agricultural needs and determining the storms impact on crops. Emergency loans are available to agricultural producers through the Farm Service Agency Emergency (EM) Loan Program which provides low-interest EM loans for crop and livestock production and physical losses. The loans are available in counties de-

clared under a Presidential (FEMA) declaration or Secretarial disaster designation. Assistance also might be available through the Farm Service Agency Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) funds, subject to the availability of funds. ECP signup will be held where authorized by FSA State Committees. ECP applications will be processed subject to available funding. And farmers and ranchers may qualify for assistance for any crop or livestock losses if they meet certain eligibility requirements. Assistance is available through the following FSA assistance programs: • Supplemental Revenue Assistance

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Additionally, USDA staff is coordinating closely with agricultural industry representatives to address specific needs as they arise. In advance of the storm, the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) helped consumers prepare for Hurricane Irene by providing critical food safety information. Food safety public service announcements were sent to media outlets along the entire Eastern seaboard to give direction about how to prevent food borne illness once families return to their homes. Additionally, FSIS issued consumer alerts in English and Spanish to media outlets and on the Web to provide consumers with food safety steps to take before and after a power outage as well as flooding. Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 888MPHotline (888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service provided livestock and pet safety tips. Additional information about these assistance programs, safety tips and updates about USDA’s hurricane relief efforts are posted on the Web at www.usda.gov/disaster. Click on the hurricane relief link. Rural Development state office contact information is available at www.rurdev.usda.gov/Home.html. And information about the U.S. Government’s hurricane response efforts is available at www.ready.gov.

Page 13 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

USDA from B14


Section B - Page 14 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

A View from Hickory Heights by Ann Swanson Thank God for birthdays There will never be anything about a birthday that is ordinary after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Each and every birthday will be a milestone documenting the years that God gives me. Although I have never taken good health for granted, it is now more important to me than ever. I pray that I use the gift of days or years as they are given wisely. May I honor God in every phase of my life. My journey through this dark valley has been filled with many reminders that I am not alone, ever. From the first I was not afraid. God gave me peace. Many thanks go to the team in the mammography unit for their skillful diagnosis of a tumor

when it was very small. I would not have felt it for years in the spot that it was growing. I went from there to my personal physician who sent me back for a recheck. At the point that I was making this appointment I experienced something that I had never experienced before. I heard a voice behind me say, “You are going to be alright.” I took that as my sign that although I would have to go through many procedures there was hope on the other end. If you have to have some form of cancer, I guess breast cancer is as good as any since there has been so much research done. They have a pretty good success rate as long as it is detected early. The whole experience has been nothing short of amazing. Since the doctor

assured me that time away would not hurt my condition, I traveled in peace. Everything has fallen in place. Usually I go to Chautauqua the last week, but not this year. My week there was before treatment started this summer. When my 50th high school reunion rolled around I was able to go because my treatment had not yet begun. Trips from the fair for treatment were at times that did not interfere with events that I wanted to see. I finished radiation just before my birthday. I have never felt so completely under the

care of the Lord. I have not attempted to hide what was happening to me; I just needed more information before I said anything. When you get into the health care system you go from test to test and doctor visit to doctor visit waiting for information. In my case, I went from surgery to surgery waiting for a sign that all would be well. Finally, that sign arrived in a clean diagnosis following lymph node surgery. The young student, a daughter of a former colleague, who was shadowing the surgeon, thanked me for providing

the opportunity to see two unique procedures. She followed me through needle location of the tumor and the lymph node surgery. Once I had all of the particulars I shared my news with my relatives, friends, and my church family. Now as I mark another birthday I do so prayerfully thanking my maker for giving me more days to do his work. I share my story with you, my readers, in the hopes that it will help at least one person. Routine mammograms are extremely important. My tiny tumor was not visible last year,

but it was this year. That is enough reason for me to advocate annual mammograms. Throughout my treatment — I only needed radiation and a pill for the next five years — friends and family have been not only attentive, but supportive. This time I have been on the receiving end of cards and phone calls. All of those things are very important. They let me know that I was in someone’s thoughts and prayers. That meant a lot to me. The Bible does not

Hickory B15

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LIMITED BOOTH SPACE AVAILABLE CALL TODAY!! 800-218-5586 2012 SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE: • Flower Production • Flower Marketing • Labor • Potatoes • Tree Fruit • Tomatoes & Peppers • Cultural Controls More than a house, a wonderful way of life. 3.5 acres, Kitchen with built in Dishwasher, Stove, Refrigerator/Freezer, Ample Cupboards and Work Island. Dining Area - Living Room adjacent to Den, 3 Bedrooms with 3 Baths. Large, Glassed Sunroom, Outside Deck, Insulated Barn with concrete floor. Oil Hot Water Baseboard Heat. You owe it to yourself to come and take a look. Owner will carry mortgage for qualified buyer with down payment. Otsego Lake Privilege.

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Growers expecting high quality fruit and plenty of cider this Fall FISHERS, NY — The harvest of New York State’s most popular apple varieties began the week of Sept. 12. Growers are emphasizing to the public that the recent Hurricane Irene damage did NOT affect the apple crop. A complete directory of the state’s orchards, as well as variety info, recipes and health facts can be found online at www.nyapplecountry.com. “We’ve got a beauty of a crop,” said Jim Allen, president of the New York

Apple Association. “While our hearts go out to our brothers and sisters in other areas of agriculture who sustained huge damage from Irene, our crop of apples weathered the storm quite well,” Allen said. The quality of the fruit this season is outstanding, with a sunshiny, arid summer putting high sugar levels into fruit, according to grower reports. “Consumers should expect super sweet apples from our growers this fall,” Allen said.

McIntosh apples are being picked right now across the state. Other varieties due the week of Sept. 19 in most orchards include Gala and Honeycrisp. Consumers should also look for the Zestar, a new variety showing up in select orchards and retailers. The New York Apple Association is again partnering with retailers this fall to help alert consumers to the local aspect of the crop. Consumers looking for help in the shopping aisles for picking out good apples can download the “ThemApples” app from the Apple App Store.

“There’s an app for that,” Allen said. “Buy local” signage and “New Crop Apple” displays will be in place in most supermarket produce departments. Apples grown locally taste better, are more crunchy and fresh and leave a smaller “carbon footprint” since they travel shorter distances to market, helping the environment. Growers are predicting a 30 million bushel crop, with outstanding growing conditions throughout much of the summer, despite the heavy rains of the past month.

Hickory from B14 promise that if you believe in the saving grace of Jesus that you will have a life without trouble. What it does say is that when you walk through the valley you will never be alone. I took Jesus with me to every procedure and every treatment. I recalled favorite songs and Bible verses. I remembered Bible stories where the power of the Lord was the focus. I prayed for others as I endured the trials before me. Now, I move forward. Life will never be the same. Each day is a gift that I treasure and hope to make the most of. Jesus said, “In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” John 16:33 (NIV) Ann Swanson writes from her home in Russell, PA. Contact at hickoryheights1@verizon.net

Page 15 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Apple harvest underway in New York


Section B - Page 16 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

FSA reminds producers of disaster assistance deadlines The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Administrator Bruce Nelson reminded producers about upcoming deadlines for disaster assistance. Nelson emphasized that losses must be the result of a weather event occurring on or before Sept. 30, 2011. The 2008 Farm Bill authorized coverage of disaster losses through five programs: Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program (SURE); Livestock Indemnity Program; Emergency Assis-

tance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish; Livestock Forage Disaster Program; and the Tree Assistance Program. SURE applications for 2010 crop losses will begin this fall. SURE applications for 2011 crop losses will be accepted in the fall of 2012. Fact sheets for these programs can be found at www.fsa.usda.gov by clicking on Newsroom, then Fact Sheets. Source: American Sheep Industry Weekly Sept. 2

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by Phoebe Hall

Perfect late summer day As I made my way downstairs, the orange hue of the sun was streaming in our east kitchen window. I looked out across the hay field at the low lying fog at a perfect late summer day. I smiled in

spite of myself. Next, I looked out the window across the room to the west into the courtyard. A beautiful huge sunflower plant filled its space and was looking back at me. It had grown so tall and had so many blossoms on it that it started to fall

late summer day and the next I was thinking of all the flooding that our children have had to endure in Pennsylvania. We talked to our son in eastern Pennsylvania who sounded a little dismayed, as they were receiving their third heavy rainfall in the last two weeks. He said that it was the wettest August on record, with 18 inches and three floods. Last night, our weatherman said to look for Northern Lights. It is early for them and they

claim that it means a weather change is approaching. I can’t remember what kind of change, but I do hope it’s for the good. Personally, I don’t think it could get much worse. We’ll just have to wait and see what comes because we can’t change it; we just have to learn to roll with the punches. It is bad enough we have to let nature take its toll, but this year we also have to live with the 9/11 threats. Many times we are reminded of

those out to harm us for whatever reason. Dear Lord save us from what we are all doing to ourselves. All these woes remind us of the adversities we have had to endure all these years. Because of everything we’ve gone through, our hearts and prayers go out to all those in harm’s way. It is only by a miracle from our Creator that we have made it through all these years of farming. The last few days, we’ve started to notice geese. Our one son is surprised that they are this late, but we’re not, everything else is a little later than usual. When the geese fly, my husband is reminded that it’s time to get serious about cutting wood. I know that at our age we’re not supposed to be working this hard, but I think that one of the reasons he doesn’t mind it so much is because he likes to go down in the woods for the solace. It’s like a different world when you are under the canopy of those big old trees. The magic and beauty are really a venue that creates an atmosphere to meditate without interruptions, with only the sounds of the birds and animals scurrying about. As you exit the woods, you’re greeted by the bright sunlight, the alfalfa and cornfields and you’re brought back to reality and all that comes with it. Some folks prefer not to have many trees, but we not only enjoy our woods, we also try to plant trees every year. They heat our home and domestic water and also serve as wind breaks and shade. The woods, which are at the back of our farm and on the highest ground, have the tendency to hold water and then release it slowly during a long hot summer drought. We are so thankful for our trees! God, the creator of the farthest parts of the earth, never grows faint or weary. He gives power to the tired and worn out, and strength to the weak. But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength. They shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint. I am holding you by your right hand — I, the Lord your God — and I say to you, Don’t be afraid; I am here to help you. (Isaiah 40:28, 29, & 31, 41:13) TLB

Page 17 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

A Few Words

over, requiring some support. I counted over 30 yellow blossoms spreading their beautiful colors, telling me that everything was still alive. Then taking a closer look, I noticed a little orange sunflower standing as straight and tall as it could, in the shadow of the larger one. I think it was trying to tell me that there is room for everyone, no matter how small they seem to others. One minute I was dreaming of a perfect


Section B - Page 18 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

“SAFETY SAVVY” Affiliated with Bassett Healthcare One Atwell Road Cooperstown, N Y 13326 607-547-6023 800-343-7527 jcarrabba@nycamh.com

NYCAMH delivers farm safety training to 4,516 people in 45 New York counties last year! by James J. Carrabba, The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health-NYCAMH NYCAMH offers educational farm safety services to the farming community throughout the state of New York. These services include on-site farm safety training, onfarm safety surveys, and farm safety presentations for rural communities, agricultural education programs, 4-H groups, and agribusiness meetings. This service is made possible by a grant from the New York State Department of Labor Hazard Abatement Board. All of these services are offered at no cost to the New York farming community through this grant funding. During the last complete year of the grant, NYCAMH was able to provide direct contact farm safety training to 4,516 people in 45 different New York counties. Last year, nearly every county in New York had some type of NYCAMH farm safety training educational event or onfarm safety survey! Here is a breakdown of the numbers of people that received direct contact farm safety training last year: • Number of individuals trained on farms: 2,522 • Number of individuals trained in other farm safety presentations: 1,994 Here is a breakdown of the farm safety educational events that were delivered: • On-farm safety surveys: 44 • On-farm safety training sessions: 257 • Total of all other farm safety educational presentations: 117 Here is a sample of some of the comments from farm owners about the NYCAMH farm safety training sessions conducted at their farms: “Refreshed safety habits and raised safety awareness” “Saves on insurance/ accidents/loss of work” “Bilingual services are

great” “Helps them comply with audits” “NYCAMH was able to provide a visit on short notice” “Personal awareness of safety issues” “No accidents” “Shows employers

care” “Employees know that their safety is important to the owner” We are very pleased to announce that once again NYCAMH has been awarded another year of the New York State Department of Labor Hazard Abatement Board funding to provide farm safety educational services anywhere in New York. The new grant year started on Aug. 1. We extend a sincere thank you our friends in the New York Agriculture com-

munity that have supported this program so much over the years. To schedule a farm safety survey, on-farm safety training session or farm safety presentation, contact Jim Carrabba, Agricultural Safety Specialist at 800-343-7527, ext. 239. NYCAMH, a program of Bassett Healthcare Network is enhancing agricultural and rural health by preventing and treating occupational injury and illness.

NYCAMH Farm Safety Educator Anna Meyerhoff delivering safety training to orchard workers. Photos courtesy of The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health-NYCAMH


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com CODE 35 40 45 55 75 80 85 90 95 105 115 120 130 140 155 160 165 175 190 210 215 235 325 335 340 370 410 415 440 445 455 460 465 470 495 500 510 560 580 585 590 595 610 620 630 640 645 650 655 670 675 680 700 705 730 735 740 760 780 790 805 810 815 860 885 900 910 915 950 955 960 1035 1040 1050 1060 1075 1080 1085 1100 1115 1120 1130 1135 1140 1160 1170 1180 1190 1195 1200 1205 1210 1220 1225

CLASSIFICATION Announcements Antique Tractors Antiques Appraisal Services ATV Auctions Backhoe/Loaders Bale Covers Barn Equipment Bedding Beef Cattle Bees-Beekeeping Bird Control Books Building Materials/Supplies Buildings For Sale Business Opportunities Cars, Trucks, Trailers Chain Saws Christmas Trees Collectibles Computers Custom Butchering Dairy Cattle Dairy Equipment Dogs Electrical Employment Wanted Farm Machinery For Sale Farm Machinery Wanted Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn Fencing Fertilizer & Fert. Spreading Financial Services For Rent or Lease For Sale Fresh Produce, Nursery Grain Handling Eq., Bins & Dryers Groundcover Guns Hay - Straw For Sale Hay - Straw Wanted Help Wanted Herd Health Hogs Hoof Trimming Horse Equipment Horses Housing For Stock Industrial Equipment Insurance Irrigation Lawn & Garden Legal Notices Livestock For Sale Livestock Wanted Llamas Lumber & Wood Products Maintenance & Repair Maple Syrup Supplies Miscellaneous Mobile Homes Motorcycles Organic Parts & Repair Pest Control Plants Poultry & Rabbits Real Estate For Sale Real Estate Wanted Recreational Vehicles & Motor Homes Seeds & Nursery Services Offered Sheep Silos, Repairs, Silo Equip. Snowblowers Snowmobiles Snowplows Stud Service Tires & Tire Repair Service Tools Tractors Tractors, Parts & Repair Trailers Tree Trimming & Removal Truck Parts & Equipment Trucks Vegetable Vegetable Supplies Veterinary Wanted Water Conditioning Waterwell Drilling Wood For Sale

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Dumpster Rentals www.ridovit.com Barn Equipment

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9’ & 10’ Ag Bag Machines w/Truck Table Reasonable Rates ~ Responsible Service Brett (cell) 585-689-1857 William (cell) 585-689-1816 (Home) 585-495-6571

2 BLACK SIMMENTALS, one 3 years old, one 5 years old. Both due September 29th to Simmental bulls. AI sired & bred AI. $2,200 both. 845482-4330

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CHECK YOUR AD - ADVERTISERS should check their ads on the first week of insertion. Lee Publications, Inc. shall not be liable for typographical, or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the first weeks insertion of the ad, and shall also not be liable for damages due to failure to publish an ad. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. Report any errors to 800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

Reduce your bedding costs!

50 ANGUS, CHAROLAIS, Chocolate feeder steers & heifers, 350-500 lbs. 315-6332944

ADVERTISERS Get the best response from your advertisements by including the condition, age, price and best calling hours. Also we always recommend insertion for at least 2 times for maximum benefits. Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or 518-673-0111

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NEED BUSINESS CARDS? Full color glossy, heavy stock. 250 ($45.00); 500 ($65.00); 1,000 ($75.00). Call Lee Publications 518-673-0101 Beth bsnyder@leepub.com

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Also Available at: Dealers wanted in select areas Genesee Valley Nutrition, Piffard, NY, ph 585-243-9597 Himrod Farm Supply, Penn Yan, NY, ph 315-531-9497 Homestead Nutrition, New Holland, PA, ph 888-336-7878 Levi Fisher, Honey Grove, PA (Juniata County), ph 717-734-3145 Martin’s Ag, Shippensburg, PA, ph 717-532-7845 Elam Miller, Fort Plain, NY, ph 518-993-3892 New Bedford Elevator, Baltic, OH, ph 330-897-6492 Norm’s Farm Store, Watsontown, PA, ph 570-649-6765 Robert Rohrer, Millmont, PA, ph 570-898-1967 Steve B. Stoltzfus, Lykens, PA, ph 717-365-3804 Walnut Hill Feeds, Shelby, OH, ph 419-342-2942

PEANUT HULL BEDDING New York Prices Quoted • Call for Prices Elsewhere

Country Folks

Load Size

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$125.00 $115.00/Ton

Call Peg at 1-800-836-2888 or email classified@leepub.com Bale Covers

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MAX TECH BALE WRAP 20”x6000’ or 30”x5000’ Also Net Wrap 48”x9840’ & 51”x9840’ Now Carrying - Stretch-O-Matic Fully Automatic Tubular Wrappers - All At Competitive Prices (1) Available in Stock Also Selling - Bale Thrower Racks 8-1/2’x20’, Creek Bank Bale Wagons & Barn Feeder NEW - CREEK BANK 25’ BALE WAGON w/12 Ton Tandem Running Gear & Tires 9000’ Brazilian Green • 20,000’ Poly Twine 9,600’ Poly Twine (same as 7200’Twine) • Others Available

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BECKET FALL FOLIAGE SALE: 50 head miniature hereford. Auction October 1st, Pike, NH. 603-712-5064. becketfarmsminiaturehereford.word press.com BREEDERS CLASSIC - Registered Hereford Sale: Cows, calves, bulls, embryos. Saturday, October 1st, Noon; Gettysburg, PA 717-642-9199 www.stoneridgemanor.com CORNELL BEEF Replacement Auction. October 29, 2011 in Dryden, NY. Registered and commercial heifers, bred heifers and cows. Angus, Simmental, Hereford. Mike B a ke r, 6 0 7 - 2 5 5 - 5 9 2 3 , mjb28@cornell.edu DEXTER CATTLE: bred heifers, $800; calves, $500. Strictly grass raised. Ber ne,NY 518-339-6030 tlippert@hughes.net FOR SALE: Six 100% grassfed rotationally yearling Herefords, ready to finish. 518-9432046, 518-821-1249

New York Angus Association

OPEN HOUSE and PASTURE WALK with Bill Hodge Sustainable Genetics

Saturday 24th September, 11am Lunch Provided

At Fleur de lis Farms, 2497 Canoga Rd, Seneca Falls, NY 13148 Contact Robert Groom 315-573-2569 or robert@angus.us

Sponsors: Seneca Co. Extension, Seneca Co. SWCD, Graze NY, Fingerlakes RCD & New York Angus Association

Page 19 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 20 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Beef Cattle

Beef Cattle

REG. ANGUS BULLS Embryo Yearlings out of Final Answer, $2,000; show heifer and market steer prospects. 802-3766729, 518-436-1050

WANTED: Quality grain finished beef cattle. Now booking for October. 518-231-0239

TWO REGISTERED Simmental heifers sired by RC Club King. Five commercial Angus heifers sired by Traveler 004 Gar Predestined and AAF Final Frontier. Parkhurst Farms 315-343-3420, 315343-9296

Buildings For Sale FA R M R A I S E D H O M E BUILDER, featuring Bill Lake Homes. Your plans or ours. www.kdhomesny.com Call Dave KD HOMES 315-841-8700 kdhomes@frontiernet.net

Buildings For Sale FOR SALE: Repossessed single-wide and double-wide homes, discount prices, covering New York State and surrounding states, delivery and setup available. 315-771-6217

Building Materials/Supplies

Midlakes Metal Sales • Metal Roofing and Siding in Many Colors

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1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

(14) OPEN Organic Heifers, Call 607-847-9388

50 WELL GROWN Freestall Heifers due within 60 days. Joe Distelburger 845-3447170.

20 COWS FOR SALE, AI sired, 6 dry, 9 due Feb-April, 5 Bred not confirmed; 34 heifers for sale, AI sired, 3 calves, 13 open, 9 bred not confirmed, 9 preg due Feb-March. 315571-8700 39 COWS FOR SALE: (2) bred heifers, (20) 1st and 2nd calf milkers, rest various stages, low SCC, over 10 years super milk awards, $1,250 per head, take all or $1,400, pick and choose. 315232-3188 5 LARGE HOLSTEIN HEIFERS. Due October, A.I. Bred, vaccinated, de-horned. 315-298-2009 50 TIESTALL HOLSTEINS, 20,000 lb. DHIA herd average. Charlie Reed, Carlisle, NY 518-234-4559

95 WELL-GROWN freestall trained Holstein heifers due October & November. Had all shots. 315-269-6600 BOSS LIVESTOCK: WANTED Holstein Jersey or Mixed Dairy Herds, immediate payment and removal. Also Dairy Cows For Sale: One or 100your choice, quality replacements. Call Chris Boss 315219-0590(cell), 315-8581651(home). CERTIFIED ORGANIC Dairy Herd for sale, Holstein, Holstein crosses, 25 in milking herd, 14 heifers and calves, herd avg. 14,884 lbs., butterfat 4.0, protein 3.0, SCC 76,000. 802-5844077 kurganbc@kingcon.com FOR SALE: 25 good big Holstein heifers, springing, some close. 315-695-5671

Dairy Cattle

Dairy Cattle

ALWAYS AVAILABLE: Whether you’re looking for a few heifers or a large herd, we have a quality selection of healthy, freestall trained cattle. Herds ranging in size from 30-200+ tie or freestall.

Strong demand for youngstock, heifers and herds.

Visit Our New Troy, NY Location! DISTELBURGER LIVESTOCK SALES, INC. Middletown, NY (845) 344-7170 buycows@warwick.net

Dairy Cattle

Herd Expansions

WANTED All Size Heifers

Also Complete Herds Prompt Pay & Removal

315-269-6600 JERSEY HEIFERS For Sale. Overstocked. Bred heifers to calves. Buyer can pick. 315767-3884 JUST FRESH milking well first and second calf Registered Ayrshire cows. 518-895-8886 8am-2pm ORGANIC COWS, Jersey’s and Crosses. Intensive grazing/parlor herd. 25 cows, 14 bred heifers (mostly fall bred) Young stock also available. Little Falls,NY. 315-868-4905

All Semen Processed at Our Lab Under Strict Regulations Electronic Seal of Straws (no powder plug)

40 Years Experience

Dependa-Bull Services

315-829-2250

USED COWS WANTED

1-800-777-2088 AMERICAN RENDERING CO. BINGHAMTON, NY

 WANTED 

Operating 6 Days~Monday thru Saturday

300 Lbs. to Springing Free Stall Herds & Tie Stall Herds

Route 37, Brier Hill, NY

315-375-8459

WANTED: Holstein Heifers Bred 1-5 Months. Prompt Pickup & Payment Northeast Kingdom Sales, Inc. P.O. Box 550 Barton, VT 05822

Jim Young

Ray LeBlanc

(802) 525-4774 Cell: 274-0179

(802) 525-6913 Cell: 249-2155

FAX: (802) 525-3997 Email: neksales@together.net http://www.together.net/~neksales

SEVERAL USED Double 6 and 8 parlors w/ATO’s and 3” low lines complete. Several 2”: pipelines, used vacuum pumps, receiver groups, claws, ATO’s, washer boxes, etc. 585-732-1953

Call 607-722-5728 Anytime

ATTENTION FARMERS

PINE TREE RENDERING

Bulk Milk Coolers, Stainless Steel Storage Tanks, Pipeline Milkers, Milking Parlors, Vacuum Pumps, Used Milking Machine Plus Agitator Motors, Stainless Steel Shells, Weigh Jars, Etc.

NEW YORK STATE approved 150 gallon pasteurizer with recorder, $12,000 OBO; 400 Gal. Girton Milk Tank w/ compressor, $1,800 OBO; Heat exchanger, $1,600 OBO; 4’x5’ cooler w/ new compressor, $3,500 OBO; 3 Door reach in cooler, $1,400 OBO; High Temperature washer for bottle washing, $3,500 OBO; Milk pump, $950 OBO; New Milk Bottles for sale. 518-2793362

For Rendering - Courteous Service

Down, Disabled & Fresh Dead Cows for Rendering

USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT

At Your Farm or At Our Stud in Verona, NY

DEAD - DOWN - DISABLED CATTLE

WANTED

585-732-1953

CJM Farm Equipment 802-895-4159

Down - Disabled & Fresh Dead Cows

315-793-0043

6000 Mueller 900 Mueller 4500 Mueller 850 Sunset 4000 Mueller 800 Universal 3500 Mueller 800 Sunset 3000 Girton 800 Mueller 3000 Mueller 800 Surge 2-3000 S.S. 735 Sunset Sugar Tanks 700 Mueller 2500 Mueller 625 Sunset 2-2000 Mueller 600 Mueller 1500 Mueller 545 Sunset 1500 Surge 500 Mueller 1350 Mueller 400 Mueller 1000 Zero 310 Sunset 3-1000 Mueller 300 Mueller 1000 Surge 250 Mueller New Sunset Tanks New & Used Compressors 200-4000 Gal. StorageTanks Used Freheaters

SEMEN COLLECTED ON YOUR BULL

ATTENTION FARMERS

WA N T E D

Dairy Equipment

HEIFERS (ALL SIZES)

Dogs

BASKIN LIVESTOCK 585-344-4452 508-965-3370

TEN WEEK OLD Australian Shepherd puppies, (2) black tie females, have had first shot, $600. 814-673-6948

- WANTED -

Drainage & Tiling

Electrical

Farm Equipment

Let our 35 years of electrical experience go to work for you.

BUILDING & REBUILDING OF

Providing Complete Grain/Dairy Facility Installations, Facility Power Distribution & Lighting, Motor Control Centers, Automation & Troubleshooting, and New Services & Upgrades. Call Jeffrey at Agri-Fab & Repair, Inc. dba AFR Electrical Service

@ 585-584-9210

518-791-2876

www.cattlesourcellc.com

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

You can’t afford downtime! Use Dual-Cut Rolls For Peak Performance

Y QUALIT EED T N A R GUA

Questions? Call us. PH#

THINK SUMMER

IH & WHITE PLOWS & PARTS JD 4650 MFD, new PS . . . . . .$28,500 Case IH 9170 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$29,500 CIH 5140 new eng. C/A . . . . .$21,500 CIH 4366 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,900 IH 3588 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9,500 IH 966 Fender . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8,250 IH 1066 Black Stripe, new engine, exc. cond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$14,500 IH 1066 4WD . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,500 IH 1066 w/LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call IH 1066 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10,900 IH 806 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,900 IH 656 weak hydro . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 IH 424 w/LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 IH 656 diesel, RBT eng . . . . . .$6,500 FD 4100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6,500

JD Combines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call JD 9510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$69,900 JD 9500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,900 JD 843 corn head . . . . . . . . . .$7,900 JD 643 corn head . . . . . . . . . .$6,750 Gehl CB1200 chopper w/heads.. ..$2,000 JD 4-8R corn head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call JD 8300 drill w/seeder . . . . . . .$3,750 Case 8430 Round baler . . . . . .$5,000 Elwood 4WD unit . . . . . . . . . . .$5,500 Loaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call IH & White plows 3x-10x . . . . . . .Call IH 100# Front End wgts.. . . . . .$105 1st Choice GS520-4 tedder . .$4,500 Chisels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call

Alternative Parts Source Inc. Chittenango, NY •

Drainage & Tiling

O’Connell Farm Drainage Plows, Inc. Potosi, WI

For Estimates Call

518-673-8536 518-461-8933

APPROX. 100 APPLE BINS for sale, excellent condition, $50.00 each. 518-929-9172

Jack Gordon (518) 279-3101

jeffking@kingsransomfarm.com

HAY WAGONS Also SILAGE CONVEYORS

Farm Equipment

Heifers & Herds

We have clients in need of herds, fresh cows, bred, and open heifers. Call Us with your information or email

Self-Unloading FLAT BED and

Joe O’Connell

563-920-6304

315-687-0074

Page 21 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 22 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

PACK YOUR SILAGE TIGHT

Charles McCarthy Farm Machinery

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

FOR SALE: JD 915 flex head, very good condition, $6,500; NH #25 blower, very good, $300. 315-209-7183

GEHL 865 chopper, 1,000 RPM, electric controls, TR3038 2 row narrow corn head, 6’ grass head, field ready, $6,000. 860-567-9537

TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY • UTILITY TRAILERS

Now with Changeable Hookups

MARTIN’S MACHINING & WELDING 717-892-2717 Concrete Weights setup for quick hitch & 3pt CAT. 2, 3, 3N, 4’ & 4N, 3500 lb, 5000 lb, 6000 lb, 7000 lb & 8000 lb.

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

1155 MASSEY FERGUSON, good shape, $6,000; 24’ SI Feeders feeder wagon, $1,800. 802-434-2151, 802434-3565

825 Belarus Tractor

1996 JD 750 GRAIN DRILL, sale priced at $16,900. Good value, nice drill. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322

2010 EDGE high-flow snowblower, used one season, 36”H 86”W, chute hydraulically controlled, $8,900. 518872-1386 (7) JD 693 poly corn heads, some with hyd. deck plates. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322 (8) CASE IH 1063 corn heads, 6RN. Large selection 863-963. Zeisloft Eq. 800-9193322

Farm Machinery For Sale

MESHOPPEN, PA 18630 Farm Machinery For Sale

FORD 7600 w/cab, 85hp PTO, newer tires, $10,500; Ford 5000 open station, $6,000. Both run great & ready to work. 518-642-3454

Farm Machinery For Sale

BEST BUYS IN USED EQUIPMENT

ANTIQUE Mower, Plow, Massey Harris equipment, John Deere Equipment. Call 315-363-1599 ANTIQUE TRACTORS: 660 Super D6, IH 300, 400 & Super D9; many more. IH 782 & 882 lawn tractors. 716-9126109

700451 NH

790 BASE UNIT $12,500

Farm Machinery For Sale

TRANSPORT HAY ELEVATORS

JD 5830 self propelled chopper w/kernal processor, 4 row corn, 4 row snapper, winrow pickup, $45,000; Rotopress 8’ bagger, $10,000; Richardson model 1200 dump wagon, $2,500. 607-656-8244

JOHN DEERE 6400 MFWD, PTO 540/1000, dual hyd., $14,500; Brillion 27’ X-fold packer, good cond., $9,200. 315-536-3807

701913 NH 701500 NH 701715 NH U45050 NH

FP240 BASE UNIT W/KP $29,500

FP230 BASE UNIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$22,500

824 CORN HEAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 360N3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,900

LOOK UP AND ORDER YOUR PARTS ONLINE THRU OUR WEB SITE: www.whitesfarmsupply.com 4154 State Rt. 31, Canastota (315) 697-2214 (800) 633-4443

1 1/2” square tubing, 14 gauge 24’ - 48’

962 State Rt. 12, Waterville (315) 841-4181 (800) 859-4483

Includes Motor & Wheels

8207 State Rt. 26, Lowville (315) 376-0300

Other sizes available Call for prices.

www.whitesfarmsupply.com

We Custom Build Wagon Gears - 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 Ton

MILO MFG. • PENN YAN, NY

315-536-8578

JD 4960 MFWD, recent overhaul, used on our farm. Reduced to $58,500. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322

JOHN DEERE 3 row corn head-green, good shape, $5,000 OBO. 607-965-8734

BROCK Grain-Spreader model GS-31 w/inlet cone. excellent condition, $350.00. Red Creek,NY 315-573-3037

FORD TW-35, 171hp, FWD, w/cab, new paint, new short block, $10,000. 518-483-7718

INTERNATIONAL 800 10 bottom/700 8 bottom trailer/White 588 7 bottom on-land; 2 M&W 400 bushel w/heavy hi-floatation gear, grain boxes. 315536-3807

JD 620, WFE, runs good, $4,000.00. 315-363-0262

BRILLION 16’ wing fold harrow w/C shank tines. $600. Red Creek, NY 315-573-3037

FEED/GRAIN BIN: Holds 8 tons, new plastic boot, 12’ auger, $1,800 OBO. Little Falls,NY, 315-868-4905

HUTCHINSON 8”x61’ portable grain auger, PTO drive, $1,500. Red Creek,NY 315-573-3037

JD 4960 MFWD, recent OH/JD 4760 MFWD. $46,500. Both real good. Zeisloft Eq. 800-919-3322

BADGER PTO ROLLERMILL, auger in, auger out. 315-8226883

COMBINES ARE ROLLING in and out, lots of recent arrivals. Call! 1 year warranty on motors & trans. Low 3.8% financing. Zeisloft Eq. 800919-3322

HD5 AC LOADER, runs good, make offer. 540-774-0384, 540-314-1499

JD 3955 forage harvester, excellent condition, 2-row corn head plus grass head, $19,900. 978-544-6105

Before 7:00 PM

ANOTHER JD 9550 sidehill arrived & thousands less than others. Lots of new parts. 3.8% fin. Zeisloft Eq. 800-9193322

2004 NH TL-100A, 52LC selfleveling loader, 850hrs., 4WD, full cab, very clean, $39,500. 518-872-1386

Farm Machinery For Sale

570-833-5214

315-963-3586 8x58’ GSI transport auger, top drive, oil bath, $3,600. 315986-2487

2001 JD 3710, 8 bottom plows, auto reset, hydraulic variable width, many new parts, field ready, $18,500. ALLIS CHALMERS D17, recent motor overhaul, 3 bottom plows included, very good condition, $4,000. 315-3237699

PH: 570-869-1551 Cell: 607-759-4646 4698 ST. RT. 3004

4WD, Only 600 Hours Like New - Best Offer

1680 CIH COMBINE, 4x4; 1063 corn head; 1994 IH 22’ grain dump. Koskinen Farms, Trumansburg, NY 14886, 607387-9208

2 STALKSTOMPERS w/teflon pads for Case IH 1000 Series corn head. Exc. cond. Both for $200.00. Red Creek,NY 315573-3037 B21B22B23B21

BUY ~ SELL ~ TRADE

H&S hydraulic fold tedder, new summer 2010, used total of 8 times, $4,000; MF 596 4WD, cab, loader, air, w/350 hrs. 607-746-3108

©2007 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLC. www.caseih.com

JOHN DEERE 6620 hydrostatic combine, 6 row, 4WD w/grain & corn head. 518-2793751 JOHN DEERE BALER PARTS, new & used. New wrappers, tedders, crimpers, grabbers, rakes. Nelson Horning 585526-6705

JOHN DEERE TRACTOR PARTS

Many New Parts in Stock RECENT MODELS IN FOR SALVAGE:

•4430 qd, cab 6420 burnt •JD L3020 dsl PS •E4020 •3010 •2630 •2950 4WD •L4020 PS •2640 •2010 •JD 5400 4WD burnt We Rebuild Your Hydraulic Pumps, SCV Valves, Steering Valves, etc. All units are Bench Tested Many Used Tractor Parts Already Dismantled CALL FOR YOUR NEEDS

NELSON PARTS 800-730-4020 315-536-3737


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

2010 JD 8320 R c/a MFD, 50” duals, Q-hitch, G. Star ready, low hours. Same As New! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $205,000 JD 8420 c/a MFD. duals, wts., ONLY 2,680 hrs., V. nice . . . . . . . $126,000 2-2010 JD 7930 c/a MFD’s., P.Q. w/LH Rev., 46” duals, same as with 65 hrs. & 250 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $138,500 1-2010 JD 7930 c/a MFD, 46” duals, IVT, 200 hrs. Coming in 2 weeks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call! JD 6115-D c/a MFD, Hyd. reverser, 3 remotes, 2 doors . . . . . . . . $38,500 JD 2555 & 2550 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call! JD 720 wide ft., P. steering, 3 ph. remotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,200 If you need other JD’s, call me, I will find them for you! 2010 Case IH 335, 305, 275 Magnums, 3 PTO’s, duals all around, luxury cabs, 5-remotes, wts., H.D. draw bar, Q-hitch, twin flow Hyd., AFS ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $155,000, $165,000, $175,000 Case IH MX 120 c/a MFD, 2,500 orig. one owner hrs . . . . . . . . $45,750 New Holland TD 5050 c/a 4x4 w/loader, 400 hrs, fancy outfit. $37,500 Ford NH 8160 c/a 2 wheel, V. Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 Ford 7740 2 wheel, canopy, 8 speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 Ford 3910 & Ford 3000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 Choice Knight 5127 TMR mixer, 205 model, working scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,750 (New gear box) NH FP 230 Harvester, 3 row & hay, No KP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 Knight 8132 Slinger Spreader, rebuilt & using here . . . . . . . . . . $17,500

See this & more at www.Andrewsfarms.com ANDREWS FARM EQ. INC. Conneautville, PA 814-587-2450 or 814-573-3344

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

Combine Salvage

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

KEMPER Corn Head for John Deere 5830 chopper; John Deere 5830 chopper, 4WD for parts or repair; International 815 diesel combine; New Holland 166 winrow converter. 315-532-5581

NEW HOLLAND 717 corn chopper with grass head, $1,000. Allis Chalmers silage blower with pipe and chute, $300; Both stored inside, ready to work. 518-630-6936

K & J Surplus

Kennedy Tractor (315) 964-1161 Williamstown, NY “We Deliver”

60 Dublin Rd. Lansing, NY 14882 (607) 533-4850 • (607) 279-6232

Front Mt. Snowpushers: 7’ for Ldr or skid steer & 8’, 12’, 14’ & 15’ for loaders, new/used; 3Pt Snowblowers 4’ thru 7 1/2’, new/used, nice selection; PTO Generators: Dayton 50/25 on trailer $2,750 & Winpower 70/35 on pallet $2,450; Farmi Winches: new/used; JD 100 Silage Blower $575; NH 824 (2) Row Corn Head; 300 Gal.Water Totes; 4x4 (Hydro) Kubota L3410 Heated Cab 30-35HP Dsl, “Ag” tires w/3pt snowblower (package) $9,850; 4x4 Zetor 5245 w/Allied Ldr 50HP Dsl, low (1) owner hrs, dual outlets $9,750; 4x4 NH TC45D w/NH Ldr, 40HP Dsl, Hydro, outlets w/rabbit/turtle control on joystick $14,500; 4x4 Ford 2120 w/Ford Ldr 40HP Dsl, 1300 hrs $8,950; Landpride RCR 2510 10’ Rotary Mower trailer type w/chain guards & (3) gearboxes $5,500 (Demo); Vermeer V3550A Trencher w/Front Angle Blade low hrs, Dsl $3,500; 4x4 Kubota B1750 w/Ldr & Mwr 20HP Dsl $7,950; Ford NH 4630 Heated Cab very nice inside & out, 55-60HP Dsl, 1800 hrs $11,500; 3pt 4’ Rototiller new w/slip clutch $1,599; Oliver 550 all orig. w/live PTO $4,100; 4x4 Ford 545D w/Factory Heated Cab & Ldr 65+HP Dsl, 1000 hrs, wheel wts, PS 3pt live PTO $12,900; Sander/Spreader for pickup w/all controls $675; Lots More

FOR SALE: JOHN DEERE 4240 Excellent Condition, Quad Range Trans., 5600 Hrs.

$17,000

518-768-8173

MABIE BROS., INC.

KICKER BALE WAGONS $2,350; 8 & 10 Ton Running Gears, $1,325-$1,500; 20’ Bale Carriers, $2,750. Horst’s Welding, 585-526-5954

See the Krone Difference for Size, Strength and Unmatched Durability

LARGE SELECTION OF FARM TRACTORS available. Call for great pricing. BUYING good tractors too! Located just below LJ HANDS Farm Center, 518-922-6301

MAINE TO NORTH CAROLINA We broker and manage Multi Farm Partnerships.

MACK ENTERPRISES Randolph, NY

(716) 358-3006 • (716) 358-3768 Ship UPS Daily www.w2r.com/mackenterprises/

New & Used Tractor & Logging Equipment Parts

SW 42T 13’ 9” Rake

0% for 36 Mos. OR 2% for 60 Mos.

$140/Mo. w/ 15% Down

On Rakes, Tedders, Mowers

MabieBros.Com

315-687-7891 315-510-2400 Do you have a digital subscription?

www.countryfolks.com

MASSEY FERGUSON 1155, 2869 hrs., 150hp, 2WD w/cab, nice shape, $12,000 OBO. 607-776-4511, 607-329-9489

Wet fields? Make land tile application a part of your crop rotation @ PleasantCreekHay.com Welsarth@msn.com Become a Partner Dealer 91 Front PTO Tractors, 25 Mph+, Air Brakes, 151-331HP 2006 Claas 3300 (x2) 330HP, 31Mph . . . . . .From $155,241 US 06-07 JCB 8250 (x2) 260HP, 44Mph . . . . . .From $106,270 US 2009 NH 7050 (x2) 241HP, 31Mph . . . . . . . . . . . . .$125,054 US 04-06 NH TVT190 (x5) 190HP, 31Mph . . . . . .From $68,737 US 95-03 JCB 3185 (x10), 188HP, 42Mph . . . . . .From $30,731 US 05-06 JD 6920 S (x4) 160HP, 31Mph . . . . . . .From $81,248 US 94-02 JCB 155 (x7) 155-174HP, 38-50 Mph . . . . . .$29-64K US 99-03 Case IH MX 150 (x4) 150HP, 31 Mph . . . . . .$57-62K US 10 w/Loaders, 160-250HP, 42Mph . . . . . . . . From $28K 21 R/over Kverneland Plows 4-12 bottoms . . . $16-103K US 29 Triple mowers, 10 w/collectors

NEW HOLLAND 790 forage harvester, electric controls, 1000 rpm w/2 heads, 824 corn head, 790W hay head, $6,500. 845-361-5239, 845361-5209 NEW HOLLAND 980 chopper, 2 row corn head, hay head, works very good; Kelly Ryan 8’ big bagger, good condition. 315-564-6446, 315-440-5413 NEW IDEA Model #12A ground driven wooden manure spreader, good condition, always shedded, $550. Red Creek,NY 315-573-3037 NEW IDEA one row picker, $900; horse drawn 10A manure spreader, $500; New Idea husker shredder, $300; all field ready. Team harness, nylon, complete; several collars, different sizes. 845-2462360

New Skid Loader Attachments, Buckets, Pallet Forks, Manure Forks, Round Bale Grabbers, Bale Spears, Feed Pushers, Adapter Plates, Skid Steer Hitch

MARTIN’S WELDING

315-536-8854

NH LX 665 Turbo Skid Loader $7,000 OBO. 607-965-8734 NH TB 110 TRACTOR, 90HP, FWD, Loader w/Quick Attach, 4 remotes, new clutch in 2010, good shape, very reliable. Little Falls,NY 315-8684905 PEOPLE WILL PAY TO HUNT on your land. Earn top $$$ for hunting rights. Call for a FREE quote and info packet toll free 1-866-309-1507 or request at www.BaseCampLeasing.com

NEW HOLLAND 790 chopper w/both heads; 2 Knight tandem axle wagons w/roofs. All good condition. 315-750-9164

READY FOR FALL PLANTING: IH 5100 Soybean Special drill 18x7, double disc, press wheels, excellent, $3,600; IH 620 press drill & seeder, double disc, press wheels 21x7, markers, $2,200; JD 8300 drill 21x7, double disc, excellent, $2,200; JD 215, 218 & 220 flex heads, $3,200 each; Unverferth grain cart, 400 bushel, $4,800. Mike Franklin 607-749-3424

Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

McCONNELL 12’ silage dump wagon, very good condition. 315-896-6144 NEW HOLLAND 27 whirl-afeed blower, $1,000. 607-9658151

88 Int. • Auto, 4200 Gal.

Call us today for your Subscription to

Country Folks

Your Weekly Connection to Agriculture

888-596-5329

As our readers say... “Monday just isn’t Monday without your Country Folks!”

9,800 - 518-643-9468 or 518-570-9468

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Page 23 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 24 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery Wanted

Roto Grind Tub Grinder model 1090 . . . .$16,500 1960 Farmall Cub tractor with cultivators & plow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,900 6’ Bush Hog Mower $875 5’ Rotary Mower . .$675 6’ Howse Finish Mower, 3pt. hitch . . . . . . . . .$875

413-834-4689

3RN Corn Head for a Hesston or Field Queen chopper. Also, looking for Hesston or Field Queen choppers. 845-2645726

WANTED

John Deere 5460, 5820, or 5830 Choppers

814-793-4293

WANTED: GEAR BOX drive shaft for a New Holland 256 or 258 rake. 607-829-6817

SKIDDER TYPE Tire chains 13.6”x28” purchased new January 2009, $300. Sell for $200 cash. 518-893-2643

Smiley’s Farm & Ind Equipment Excavator, $12,500; Case 450 Dozer, $8,500; JD 350C Dozer, $11,500; White 4x4 Loaderhoe, $9,500; Case Loaderhoe, $6,000; MF 4x4 Hoe, $10,000; IH diesel Dump Truck, $4,000; GMC pickup, $1,500; JD Lawnmower, $600; 4x4 Ford, $4,500; Hesston 4x4 & cab, $8,500; JD 4230 Tractor, $12,500; 1020 JD, $4,500; David Brown, $3,500; New Dump Trailer, $5,000; 9 Ton Trailer, $1,500; Baler, $2,000; Round Baler $1,500; Corn Picker, $1,500; Corn & Flail Choppers, $1,200 up; Brush Hogs, Discs, Harrows, Plows & More.

Farm Supplies

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn BUYING Mold & Heat Damaged Grains. Also high moisture corn. Auburn,NY. Call Ralph 315-729-0918

Custom Roasting and Cooling Your Soybeans,Corn, etc. At Your Farm or Mill Serving All of NY State

WEILER’S GRAIN ROASTING

(315) 549-7081

CHICKEN WIRE - Long Lasting Black PVC Coated 1” Hex 20G. 1st & 2nd’s, 24W, 36W, 48W, 60W or 72W x 150’L. Welded cage wire also available. KB Wire 518-993-4837

EAR CORN for sale, near Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, NY, 845-266-4412

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

YOUR SOURCE FOR:

• Livestock Feeds • Ration Balancing • SeedWay Seeds • Crystalyx Products

Fencing

Fencing

LOCUST POSTS, POLES, Split Rails, 6x6’s, 4x4’s. Other hardwood & softwood boards and planks, custom cut. Also lots, land cleared, woodlots wanted. 518-883-8284

POST DRIVER, shaver HD10 manual tilt w/3pt hitch bracket. Bought new in 2008, not used since installing new springs last fall. $2,750. Call or email Ben 207-892-6820 sebagolakeranch@gmail.com

Fencing

Fencing

Buying Corn, Feed Wheat & Oats

(315)) 549-82266 Romulus, NY 14541

SILAGE FOR SALE. 1000 ton available. $50/ton. Van Slyke’s Dairy Farm, LLC 585-7393761 WANTED: Oats, up to 50 tons. 607-244-2195

E & A FENCE

771 State Highway 163, Fort Plain, NY

Bringing Security For Them Peace of Mind For You ~ Sales & Installation of All Types of Fence ~ Visit Our Retail Location by Appointment

518-993-5177

Serving All Of New York

Quality First - Always

E FARM FENCE & SUPPLY EMPIR

Fencing

“Miles of Quality Start Here”

ELECTRIC FENCE CONTROLLER REPAIRS. Factory authorized warranty center for Zereba, ParMak, many others. No charge for estimates. Quick turn-around time. Send or bring to our shop, any make, any model. 518-284-2180

• High Tensile • Split Rail • Misc. Types of Fence • Energizers • Fencing Supplies

4097 Rt. 34B, Union Springs, NY 13160 RUSTIN WILSON

(315) 364-5240

Fencing

Buying Machines Dead or Alive

518-634-2310 THE LARGEST SELECTION of Quality JD & Case IH combines in East. 1 year warranty on motor & transmission. 3.8% fin. zeisloftequip.com 800919-3322, Bloomsburg, PA

WANTED

Massey Ferguson 165, 175, 265, 275, 285 Any Condition

814-793-4293 Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

188 Genesee St. - Suite 209 Auburn, NY 13021

2033 Brothertown Rd., Deansboro, NY 13328 Phone: (315) 841-4910 Fax: (315) 841-4649 Summer Hrs.: Mon.-Fri. 8am-4pm; Sat. 8am-Noon www.williamsfarmfence.com

WE SELL:

1-800-599-7150 315-258-4394

• Treated Posts • Horse Stalls • Bale Feeders • Horse Mats • Gates • Energizers • Waterers • Electrobraid • Cattle Handling Equip. • And Much More!

Grieg Dougherty • Richard Damaske Carter Riley • Greg Creeden Jeff Kuney • Dan Campbell (Distiller Sales)

GRAIN AND INGREDIENT MERCHANDISERS Supplier of Organic Feed and Fertilizer

ORIGINATING CORN & MARKETING DISTILLERS FOR SUNOCO ETHANOL PLANT , F ULTON , NY

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

Feed, Seed, Grain & Corn

“BUYERS OF GRAIN” “Call for Market Information and Bids” 518-272-7212 or 800-833-3636 Clayton Charles - Ext. 131 - Corn • John Maloy - Ext. 102 - Soybeans Matt White - Ext. 115 - Oats


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

AG LIME HI-MAG

3 0 To n M i n i mu m Spreader & Spreading Available Large Quantity Discount ALSO BEDDING SAND & CHICKEN MANURE

Call T J Allen 315-845-6777 315-868-2438

HI-MAG LIME

Delivered by the Truckload Also BEDDING

SAND

for Horse Arenas or Cattle FOB McConnellsville, NY Delivery Available

888-339-2900 ext. 10 SCHAFER LIQUID FISH FERTILIZER, 100% Organic OMRI listed. For pricing call WIGFIELD FARMS, Clyde, NY 14433, 315-727-3910

Spr ing Lak e Far ms Quality Services You Can Count On Custom Farming “Since 1995”

Financial Services

Farm Financing Available To buy, build, expand, improve or refinance your farm business to increase cashflow & profitability. Loans, Mortgages, Leases and Lines of Credit for Real Estate, Cattle & Equipment from conventional lenders, insurance companies and wealthy private investors. Even bankruptcies, bad credit and difficult loan situations can be helped. CONFIDENTIALITY REFERENCES Call

Electronic Rate Controlling GPS Guidance Clinton Zimmerman

Pumpkins, Gourds, Winter Squash, etc. Pie, Jack-O-Lantern, White & Munchkin Pumpkins Acorn, Butternut, Spaghetti, Buttercup, Ambercup, Sweet Potato, Sweet Dumpling Squash

ANY SIZE LOTS AVAILABLE From Bushels to Tractor Trailer Loads

Hoeffner Farms Hornell,NY

607-769-3404 607-324-0749 eves

607-215-0899 For Rent or Lease FARM FOR LEASE: 114 acres, Worcester, NY. Nice 4 bedroom home, 2 bath, 3 car garage, pasture, hay fields, ponds, 2 barns. $1,500/ month plus utilities. First & last month security. 10 minutes to I-88. 607-397-8883, 401-4867925

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

Fertilizer & Fertilizer Spreading

BULK LIME Hi-Mag Hi-Cal 5 or 8 Ton Spreader Supplied GYPSUM CHICKEN LITTER BEDDING SAND Mercy Hill Farm LLC 315-858-2941 • 315-868-5201 Cell

Hay - Straw For Sale

STANTON BROTHERS

TOO MUCH HAY?

10 Ton Minimum Limited Availability

Generators

PTO Units in Stock 25 & 40 KW. Portable & Standby •Shipping Available•

GREENVILLE SAW SERVICE, INC. 518-966-4346 FAX 518-966-4647 Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

2009 HAY FOR SALE: Trailer accessible, $1.00/bale. 70 miles north of Syracuse,NY. 315-783-0595 HAY FOR SALE: 4x4 round bales, $25.00 each. 518-4295663

H AY Farmer to Farmer Wet and Dry Round & Square Bales Also Square Bales of

STRAW CALL STEVE

519-482-5365 HAYLAGE BALES & dry round bales. 700 bales baleage, 400 bales dry hay. Mulch/bedding round bales available. Albany,NY area. James Frueh, 518-436-1050 LOT’S OF GOOD HAY: 1st & 2nd cutting. 518-284-2180

ONTARIO DAIRY HAY & STRAW

Quality Alfalfa Grass Mix 30’ 12,000 BUSHEL Grain Bin, torn down, $5,000. 570966-9893

Try Selling It In The

CLASSIFIEDS Call Peg At

1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut Hay

GENERAC SERVICE CENTER

Save Money ~ Call Us

315-729-1066

Fresh Produce, Nursery

GENERATORS

Horseheads, NY

Hay - Straw For Sale

518-768-2344

Tom McAbee

FARM FOR RENT: Cooperstown School District NY. 4 bedroom farm house, plus 2 large fenced pastures, with water, $1,100/month. Call 203-948-4926

Savannah, NY

FOR RENT: Susquehanna County,PA, turn-key dairy farm, TMR mixer, large stalls with mattresses, barn, with or without housing. Silos full, ready for cows. 570-756-2370

Farm Finance Consulting

50 Mile Radius

HI-CAL Lime & Lime Spreading Big Square Baling Liquid Manure Spreading & Pumping

For Rent or Lease

Lg. Sq. - 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cut

ALSO CERTIFIED ORGANIC Low Potassium for Dry Cows

800-836-2888

ALWAYS WANTED TIMOTHY MIXED HAY ALFALFA MIXED HAY 1st, 2nd & 3rd Cuttings Also Small Square Mulch

Call 4M FARMS 315-684-7570 • 315-559-3378 Giorgi Mushroom Company, located in Berks County now buying the following materials:

HAY CORN STOVER STRAW All bale sizes and types, including ROUND BALES, accepted. Spot Buys or Long Term Contracts Small or Large Quantities Quick Payment Contacts: Kevin Eickhoff 610-926-8811 ext. 5216 keickhoff@giorgimush.com

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

• Hopper Feed Bins • Transport Augers • Crane Service • Dryer Service

ASSISTANT HERDSMAN for 950 cow farm in Western Saratoga County,NY. Wage plus benefits. David Wood, 518-882-6684 or drwfarm@aol.com ASSISTANT HERDSPERSON for 400 cow Finger Lakes dairy. High production, excellent facilities, competitive compensation. Responsibilities to include fresh & sick cow care, breeding protocols, DC 305 records, calf health. 607-592-6759.

WANTED

Grain Handling Equip. Bins & Dryers

• Sukup Grain Bins • Dryers • Grain Legs • Custom Mill Righting

Help Wanted

Michele Fisher 610-926-8811 ext. 5189 mfisher@giorgimush.com

We Pick Up & Pay Cell 717-222-2304 Buyers & Sellers

WE SPECIALIZE IN

CENTRAL BOILER E-Classic OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES. Cleaner and Greener. 97% Efficient. EPA Qualified. Call today Halloran Farm 845-482-5208.

Allen Hollenbach 610-926-5753 ahollenbach@giorgimush.com

Hay & Straw - All Types

Clyde, NY

CENTRAL BOILER EClassic OUTDOOR FURNACES. Cleaner and Greener. 97% Efficient. EPA Qualified. Call North Creek Heat 315-8663698

Hay - Straw Wanted

NEEB AGRI-PRODUCTS

315-923-9118

Heating

classified@leepub.com

Call for Competitive Prices

A N MARTIN GRAIN SYSTEMS

WANTED: 1st & 2nd cut big & small squares. 315-363-9105

or email

NEW AND USED Grain Dryers: GT, MC, GSI. Call anytime toll free 1-877-422-0927

519-529-1141

Hay - Straw Wanted

WANTED

HAY & STRAW

Trailer Load Lots Janowski Bros. 315-829-3794 315-829-3771

DRIVER: CDLA, frameless dump, 3 years experience, mail resume and references to: ANJ Morris Corp, 725 Shells Bush Rd., Herkimer, NY 13350

Heating

Heating

ROY’S

SPREADING SERVICE LLC Want to get the Spreader By Float

New Lime Hi - Cal

lowest fuel prices around?

cell#

607-434-1024

Roy Van Warner

607-432-7476

CALL

A & L Home Fuel 607-638-9561

Page 25 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 26 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Help Wanted

Horse Equipment

Irrigation

85 Bushel Lancaster Manure Spreader

IRRIGATION PIPE, over 14,000’, aluminum 3” to 6”, fittings, risers, valves, $12,500. Steve 716-649-6594

Ground Drive, Brand New $ 3,200 Delivery Available

315-963-3586 BEFORE 7:00 PM

English Saddle Set (Complete) Wintec 500 Close Contact CAIR 16 ½” Seat Color: Caramel, 50” Professional Choice English Girth, Stirrup Straps and Irons, Leather Bridle, Reins, and Breast Collar to match, 2 Pads, Complete Gullet System, $650.00. 518673-2858

Horses 3yr. old Spotted Draft/ Percheron cross, solid color, currently under saddle, all shots and coggins current. $2,500. If interested in meeting this handsome horse call 518-872-2005

Lumber & Wood Products BAILLIE LUMBER CO. buys all species of hardwood veneer logs, sawlogs and standing timber year round. IMMEDIATE LOCAL PAYMENT AND TRUCKING AVAILABLE. Please call for an updated price and spec sheet today! Smyrna Sawmill 607-627-6547. Mark Mowrey 315-796-6644; Phil Day 315436-2766; Jonathan DeSantis 315-882-8174; Sean Karn 315-436-3588. Boonville Sawmill 315-942-5284. Dave Prezyna 315-436-5329; Paul Snider 315-827-4062 (home) or 315-436-0949 (cell); Tom King 315-436-0936; Lukas Myers 315-263-6909.

10 BRED sows, ready to farrow. $350/ea. 518-756-3364

WORK HORSES for sale, ready for work, $900.00 to $2,200. Daniel Zook, 315823-1618

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

KICKER RACKS 8’x16’ Up To 9’x18’ 16’ & 20’ FEEDER BOXES FLAT RACKS

We Rebuild Forage Boxes For Sale - Rebuilt - Dion Forage Box

Ph. (315) 336-8268

If Busy - Cell #525-1814 Just off Rt. 365 between Rome & Verona 1/2 mile past Warner Sales & Service

Attention

GOODRICH TRACTOR PARTS

Rt. 38 & 38B, Newark Valley, NY

• Models Available In Stationary & Portable • Limited Warranty

The Ultimate in Tilt Tables SHEP’S WELDING, INC. PO Box 296, Chiefland, FL 32644 • www.shepswelding.net

1-800-370-8454

Parts & Repair

IH TRACTOR SALVAGE PARTS BATES CORPORATION 12351 Elm Rd BOURBON, IN 46504

1-800-248-2955 Help Wanted

Alltech | Pennsylvania 1860 Charter Lane, Suite 203 Lancaster, PA 17601 Fax: 717-393-9774 • mgast@allltech.com

• Increased Production With Less Effort

607-642-3293

Our Web Address: www.batescorp.com

The ideal candidate should have:

• Heavy Duty Professional Quality

Case-JD-IHC Crawlers Case-JD-Ford-IHC TLB’s Case-JD-Wheel Loaders Skid Loader Parts SPECIAL: MultiKey Construction Sets $45

Call the IH Parts Specialists:

Key responsibilities include:

Affordable Hydraulic Hoof Trimming Tables

PARTS FOR CONSTRUCTION & AGRICULTURE

New, Used & Rebuilt We Ship Anywhere CHECK OUT OUR MONTHLY WEB SPECIALS!

Regularly visit our industry partners (feed companies, consulting nutritionists, veterinarians, producers, government agencies, etc) across the territory to manage existing relationships while cultivating new relationships Drive sales by identifying customer needs and finding solutions Attend industry events and tradeshows to showcase Alltech in a positive, professional manner

Hoof Trimming

Lowville Sport & Farm Equipment

NEW, USED & RECONDITIONED

Witchley MFG.

Don’t tear down Your failing structures. We can repair them.

Alltech is currently looking for a Territory Sales Representative with a strong dairy background for Pennsylvania. Alltech sales people are highly motivated professionals who provide a natural link between marketing, research and the customer. Alltech ranks among the top 10 animal health companies in the world. The company has experienced consistent growth since it was founded in 1980. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has a presence in over 110 countries with distributors around the world. Today it employs 2,600 people and growth continues at a rate of 20 percent.

Hoof Trimming

Badger Farm Parts, Wic, Miller, Miraco, Ideal & Honda Parts.

Greenway-New Loudon Road • RD #1 • Verona, NY 13478

ON HOPE ISLAND, CASCO BAY, ME.

A strong technical background: BSc, MSc or higher Strong verbal and written communication skills Interest and experience in the animal health or nutrition industries Self-motivated and proactive A valid driver’s license E-mail resumé and cover letter to: mgast@alltech.com

Parts

Call 315-376-3329

Do you yearn for peace & quiet? Do you love animals? Do you want the country life? Then this is for you! Apartment

mrs.c@gmbny.com

C A M PA I G N P O S T E R S : Very reasonable prices. Call Beth at Lee Publications 518-673-0101 or email bsnyder@leepub.com

Pickup & Delivery Available

WORKER FOR HORSE, SHEEP & BIRD FARM

provided with salary plus gas and electric. You’ll love it! We have other help. Send resume in detail including previous employment, telephone number, and address.

Miscellaneous

Maintenance & Repair

Building Owners

REGISTERED Belgian Draft Horse for stud services. Call for details 518-568-5817

Hogs

Maintenance & Repair

Before

After

Performing structural renovations and general construction since 1965. With having been involved in over 30,000 projects we feel confident we can solve your problems

STARTERS, ALTERNATORS, and GENERATORS for all domestic and import engines. Also HIGH TORQUE DIESEL STARTERS. Prompt Service 315-826-7892 Gary Sneath

Woodford Bros., Inc. Box 108, Apulia Station, NY 13020 1-800-OLD-BARN WWW.1-800-OLD-BARN.COM

Maintenance & Repair

Dannible’s Engine & Machine Discount Howards Parts by Request

We specialize in Diesel Cylinder Head Rebuilding & Complete Engine Rebuilding for:  John Deere, all series  Case/IH also 5.9 & 8.3 Cummins  Ford NH Power Star/Pre-Power Star  Allis Chalmers 152 - 426 CI  Continental  Massey Ferguson A&I,  White /Oliver/Perkins FP Diesel  Caterpillar & Clevite  Farmall Engine Kits  Cast Iron Welding

Alcohol Pulling Tractor Head after Machining on our T&S 2000 XL

Resurfaced JD Head prior to setting valve heights

60 East Main St., St. Johnsville, NY 13452

Diesel Connecting Rod being bored to correct Cntr to Cntr

518-568-7794


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Parts & Repair

Parts & Repair

Dave Gabel Agricultural Belt Services

“BELT T BUSTERS” $ave on Flat Belts for Your Farm Machinery

Real Estate For Sale 100 ACRE FARM, 60 cow barn, 30 heifers barn, house, trailer. Burke,NY. 518-4833370

21 Years of Customer Satisfaction QUALITY BELTS AT FARMER PRICES Now Available: Extensive Line of Trailers & Trailer Parts ~ Call for Information & Prices

Agricultural Belt Service Route 75, Eden, NY 14057 Call 716-337-BELT Now accepting MasterCard, Visa & Discover

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate For Sale

Van Billings Real Estate, LLC Van Billings, Broker/Owner

46 ACRES Hunting Land for sale, in Montgomery Co., NY. Owner will finance with $20,000 down. 518-461-3089 or ccarpenter999@yahoo .com

Real Estate For Sale

FARMS

Newport - 22 Acres - $59,900 Beautiful Vintage home in need of total restoration. Being sold in "As Is" condition. Create a mini farm on this 22 level acres of hay and cornfield within the village. City water available. Victorian carriage garage with great detailing overlooks West Canada Creek.

Manheim - 42 Acres - $160,000 Barn on about 42 acres with apartment built into barn. Includes the business of Zook’s storage shed, lawn furniture and food goods, but does not include the inventory. Excellent main roadbusiness site.

Norway - 69 Acres - $199,900 Wonderful small farm with pasture, barn, hayfields and updated farmhouse in perfect setting on quiet road. Ideal for beef or gentleman's farm. Second floor of house is apartment but could be converted back to single family. Excellent setting for wildlife, hunting, 4 wheeling, and snowmobiling. New septic installed.

Manheim - 83 Acres - $440,000 Vintage brick farmhouse fully restored with beautiful floors and trim, keeping the original look, yet with a modern kitchen and baths. The main house has 3200 sq ft including 3 bedrooms and 3.5 baths. There is a 1 bedroom, 1800 sq ft apartment with a huge great room, amazing fireplace and wonderful views. Could be used as a 2 family or in law apartment. Set on 83 magnificent acres of useable farmland this property is ideal for horses or a small sustainable farming operation. There is an old barn and two modern steel barns. The Morton pole barn, 40X80 has water and electricity. Part of a larger parcel, taxes to be determined.

Oppenheim - 96.5 Acres - $149,900 Old 4 Bedroom farmhouse set on 96.5 wonderful acres of land. House is being sold “As Is”

Champion - 190 Acres - $365,000 Nice small dairy farm on a quiet country road with plenty of land. Could be organic, 100 acres tillable, 50 acres wood and 30 acres pasture. 32 tie stall barn in excellent condition, new roof and all milking equipment stays. Older solid 6 bedroom house with updates. First time offered for sale in over 100 years, don’t miss out!

Johnstown - 80 Acres - $265,000 Nicely remodeled old farmhouse on beautiful land, including hayfields, pasture and woods. Ideal horse farm with fenced areas, barn with three stalls and hay storage. Additional building has fenced dog run. Access to snowmobile trails. Located on dead end road, this is the perfect retreat!

www.countryfolks.com

250 Acre Farm in Central New York

Northern New York 310 Ac., 150 tillable, 114 tie stall, hiproof barn, heifer & calf facilities, 3 upright silos, 4 bedroom farmhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$295,000 310 Ac., 1 story 10 yr. old 80 cow tie stall barn, pipeline, 1000 gal. tank, hay storage, v.g. 4 bedroom home, great views . . . .$295,000 Cattle & Machinery available. 29 Ac. hobby farm, 3 bedroom ranch w/ finished basement, 40x120’ tie stall barn, needs milking equipment, 36x72’ machine shed & shop, small horse barn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Only $134,900 101 Ac., 80 tillable, good soils, 64 cow barn w/ heifer barn, 3 silos, machine shed, 100% remodeled house w/ 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, new interior & exterior, in “like new” condition . . . . . . .$250,000 We have others! Also, looking for listings.

With 70 Holstein milkers, 40 young stock, including 1 month old up to 2 years old. Beautiful land with lots of opportunity. Buildings include renovated barn with spacious cow stalls, tiestalls w/mats, addition on barn houses heifers & dry cows. Big spacious 5 stall garage. Big 5 bedroom, 1½ bath farmhouse. Must see property. Tons of equipment in excellent shape and wellmaintained.

$650,000.00

315-489-0742

Little Falls, NY 13365 Phone (315) 823-0288

315-429-0300

Want To Sell Your Farm or Land? Call Van!

Real Estate For Sale

DEMEREE REALTY

14 S. Main St., Dolgeville, NY 13329 www.vanbillingsrealestate.com

Real Estate For Sale

www.demereerealty.com • demeree@ntcnet.com

North Country Realty Malone, NY

www.northcountryrealty.com

518-483-0800

Real Estate For Sale WE HAVE OVER 20 FARMS FOR SALE THROUGHOUT PA. JOHN MATTILIO, BROKER

FARM AND LAND REALTY, INC. 717-464-8930

www.farmandlandrealtyinc.com

Real Estate Wanted

WANTED - FARM TO BUY OR RENT Within Hour Commute of New York Capital/ Saratoga Area

518-469-4270 WANTED: Farm, 100 acres or more, good barn and water supply. Call 518-993-5591

Real Estate For Sale

#501 - Outstanding “Dairy of Distinction” farm w/500 acres, COULD BE A GREAT GRAIN, 360 tillable, 70 pasture & 68 woods - like new 2 story barn w/130 tie stalls & gravity flow to manure pit - 3 yr. old free stall heifer barn w/113 stalls - also 14 stall dry cow barn - 2000 gal. B.T. & 2” pipeline - new 30x40 ft. heated work shop - 22x20 ft. grain dryer - 2 26x20 ft. metal grain bins - 2 25x70 & 2 12x90 ft. bunk silos, 20x70 & 20x60 ft. Harvestore silos - extra nice 2 story home with 9 rms. - also 2nd home w/6 rms. & a small tenant house - 2 wells & 6 ponds - farm borders Rte. I-88 South of Albany - priced to sell @ . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,100,000. COWS & MACHINERY AVAIL. #69 - Farm w/150 A. - 130 tillable, 20 woods, nice apple orchard, outstanding looking property w/very good 2 story home w/beautiful lawns and nice in-ground swimming pool - also outside wood furnace, 2 story barn with lg. heated shop at one end - nice creek borders property - located across the road from #70. Priced @ . . . .$435,000 #15-A - Great commercial buy on Rte. 5S just outside of Herkimer & Mohawk, NY on 50 acres of mostly flat & tillable land w/1730 ft. of rd. frontage - has lg. 2 story house with kitchen, dining area, living rm. & one bedroom downstairs & 2.5 bedrooms upstairs all on one side of house with room for lg. kitchen, living rm., 2 lg. bedrooms upstairs on other side of house - this property would be a nice location for a new shopping mall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $950,000 #36 - Nice hunting & recreation property on very quiet road - 141 acres near Adirondack Park on south side - 5 rm. A-Frame home w/attached 10x18 ft. breezeway & 20x24 ft. work shop - lots of water - 125 ft. well - 3 ponds, 2 stocked w/bass & 3 creeks - INCLUDES TRACTOR AND LAWNMOWER - PRICED @ . . . .$268,000 #35 - JUST LIKE THE PONDEROSA W/NO NEIGHBORS IN SIGHT! Lots of good hunting & panoramic views - 490 acres in secluded country setting - 206 acres of managed wood lots - 200 acres tillable land - Nice 7 rm. three yr. old modular home w/garage underneath - eat-in kitchen w/oak cabinets, full basement, buried electric & phone lines - also 2 story barn w/horse stalls & new 45x30 ft. single story addition 3 well, 1 EX. spring & 2 lg. ponds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $980,000 C-68 - 107.6 A. Farm, 81.6 A. prime, river bottom farmland with 27 A. woods; spacious 2400 sq. ft. well-maintained 150 yr. old farmhouse, 10 rm., 5BR, 1 1/2 baths, new windows and furnace, full cellar, enclosed porch, furnishings included; two-story dairy barn, 48 stanchions, heifer/calf tie-stalls, Patz barn cleaner in covered manure room; 14x70 concrete stave silo, three-bay garage with overhead doors, additional bldgs. for storage, all in excellent condition, one pond and year round creek runs through poperty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Asking $395,000

POSSON REALTY LLC 787 Bates-Wilson Road Norwich, NY 13851

(607) 334-9727 Cell 607-316-3758 www.possonrealty.com possonrealty@frontiernet.net David C. Posson, Broker

Richard E. Posson, Associate Broker

2223 - Madison County Show place Free Stall operation. 500 acres, 330 tillable well drained high lime very productive soils w/additional 200 acres rented with more land available. All on a quiet road w/very nice setting. Main free stall modern 4 row with 207 free stalls. Second barn 4 row w/additional 98 free stalls. 2 other barns for 100 head of young stock or dry cows & a pre-fresh barn with additional 12 stalls. Very nice Double 10 rapid exit parlor with crowd gate. 5,000 gallon bulk tank. 36x80 machinery building with heated shop. Large pad for corn silage and haylege. Separate heifer facility for 200 head of heifers available for rent close by. Good remodeled 2 story 3 bdrm home. This is a great area of Central NY to farm in. Everything is close by. Long growing season, good milk markets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Asking $1.35 million

2285 - Great Buy! Western NY Free Stall Operation located on a quiet road. 560 acres of land 315 acres tillable growing corn and hay. Decent growing season. Additional 440 acres available to purchase. 3 good free stall barns with 300 stalls. Manure lagoon, 30x90 machine shop, 5 bunker silos with 7,000 ton capacity, Double 6 herringbone parlor. Good 2 story 4 bdrm 1 bth home in good condition. This farm is an ongoing operation, can be purchased with cattle, machinery and feeds. Owners are retiring. . . . . . . . . . . . . Asking $750,000 bare 2284 - Herkimer County 23 acre Gentleman's Farm. 23 acres 15 acres tillable balance pasture. 35 acres additional land to rent close by. Good 2 story 58 stall barn with 28 new stalls. Side addition for 25 head of heifers. Shop and machinery building. 4 run in sheds. Nice remodeled 2 story 4 bbrm 2 bth home. This farm has a very pretty setting. 20 mins south of Utica and Herkimer. Nice little farm for someone who wants to raise beef, horses or milk a small dairy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reasonably priced at $179,000 2280 - Otsegoo County Dairy Farm. 25 acres total, 10 tillable, balance pasture. Plenty of additional land close by to rent or purchase feed, dealers in the area. Single story conventional barn with 55 ties set up to milk. 20x80 young stock barn. 2 upright silos 20x60 & 18x60. Older 2 story 4 bdrm 2 bth home in good condition. New windows, new septic. All located on a quiet road, mins to Cooperstown. Buy for Dairy or would make a nice farm for horses or beef. . . . . . . . . . Asking $175,000

Page 27 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 28

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Roofing

Roofing

ROOFING & SIDING

St. Lawrence Silo Service

e Metall Roofing g & Siding.. BUY DIRECT – Wee manufacture

• New Stave Silos

ABM M & ABX X Panell - Standingg Seam m - PBR R Panel LOW PRICES - FAST DELIVERY – FREE LITERATURE

A.B. MARTIN ROOFING SUPPLY, LLC Ephrata, PA 1-800-373-3703 N e w v i l l e , PA 1-800-782-2712

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

Specializing in Teardown & Rebuilding New & Used Staves Silos • Shotcrete Relining • Distributors • Fill Pipe • Replacement Doors • Roofs • Chutes • General Repair

Will Buy Good Used Concrete Stave Silos SHOTCRETE SERVICE Repair Retaining Walls Strength Existing Masonry Walls Stanley, NY

585-526-6575

• Fill Systems • Silo Parts

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

• Chute Repairs

NEW JAMESWAY Unloaders In Stock. Sales, Parts and Service on Jamesway, VanDale, J-Star and Big Jim Unloaders. Converting Harvestore silos to top unloading. 717-768-7456 # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ## # # # # # # #

MARTIN’S SILO REPAIR

• Silo Retensioning • Footer Repairs

www.abmartin.net • Email: sales@abmartin.net

WHITE Dorper & Katahdin Rams, 10 months old, all colors, $125.00. 315-945-9006

• Stave Replacement • Shotcrete Relining

Full line Pole Building material. ~ Lumber - Trusses - Plywood.

Sheep

New Stave Silos

Center State Ag. Service Morrisville, New York

315-684-7807

JAMESWAY & VAN DALE

Equipment, Parts & Service Authorized Harvestore & Laidig Dealer Sales, Service-Repair

PATZ DEALER Parts-Sales-Service

VALMETAL DEALER Sales-Service-Parts

DAIRYMASTER DEALER

# # # # # # # # # #Sales-Service-Parts # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #Mixers, # # Stationary # # # & #Trailer # # #

of # # # # # VENTILATION # # # # # # #We # carry # #a full # line # #

# # All # Types # # of#Systems # # # milking # # # # # #for#tie# # equipment # # # # # # # # # # #stalls # #& parlor # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

SILO REPAIRS - Blower Pipe, Vinyl & Steel, Distributors, # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Silo Hoppers, Poly Chute Hoppers, Chute Replacements, # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Chute Liner, Klean Chute Tubing, Wood Doors # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # WOOD CONVEYORS - Single & Double Chain, # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # Taper Board Feeders

# # # #

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

MID-STATE TECH INC.

B&G Trailer Sales Dryden, NY 13053

607-898-9558 COMPLETE LINE OF ADAM LIVESTOCK TRAILERS 12’ TO 24’ ADAM & COTNER HORSE TRAILERS Also

Flatbed Trailers

Trucks

Trucks

Martin’s Farm Trucks, LLC

Trucks for All Your Needs - Specializing in Agri-Business Vehicles

1979 AM General TA 6x6 Tractor, Cum NTC 250hp, 5spd, Hi-Lo Transfer Case, Hyd Brakes, Spring Susp, Max Speed 45 MPH $7,900

1983 AM General M915A1 TA Tractor, Cum NTC 400hp, Jake, Allison HT750, Hend Walking Beam 12/38 Axles, WB 166” 98k mi., Runs out Excellent $7,900

888-497-0310

CALL FOR ESTIMATE

(315) 393-3399 Lisbon, NY 13658 www.slsilo.com Tires & Tire Repair Service

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #

For All Your Automation and Filling Needs Call:

Trailers

Silos, Repairs, Silo Equipment

# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # ## # # # # ## ## # #

September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

AIRPLANE TIRES 14”-50” used & recapped, 34ply, custom rims available. Hill Top Tire, State Hwy. 163, Fort Plain, NY 518-993-2235

Tractor Parts NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS: John Deere 10,20,30,40 series tractors. Allis Chalmers, all models. Large inventory! We ship. Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage, 715-673-4829

Tractors 1939 MASSEY HARRIS tractor, Model #22, tin work is good with only battery box cover missing. Tractor runs, $1,500 OBO. Call 315-3631599

CIRCLE L TRAILER SALES All Aluminum Horse & Livestock Trailers

1979 Ford LTS 9000 350 HP Diesel 8LL Trans., 18,000 Front, 40,000 Rears, 16.5’ Steel Dump Body, Work Ready, Cheap! Priced To Sell Or Trade

1999 Freightliner FL-70 Cummins 6 Speed Trans., Air Brakes, 33,000 GVW, Double Frame, Southern Truck, No Rust, 16’ Steel Dump Body Priced To Sell or Trade

1993 Mack DM690SX 350 Mack, Mack 6 Spd. Low Hole Trans., 18,000 Front, Mack 44,000 Rears, Mack Camel Back, Double Frame, Southern Truck, No Rust Priced To Sell Or Trade

1993 International S-2574 Tri-Axle Dump N-14 350 Cummins, 8LL, 20,000 Front, 20,000 Lift, 46,000 Rears, Hendrickson Walking Beam, Double Frame, 17 1/2’ Steel Body, Cheap! Price To Sell or Trade

NEW Steel Livestock Trailers Bumper Pulls Starting at $3,950 ALSO Aluminum Skin & Steel Horse Trailers In Stock

ALSO

UTILITY • CARGO MACHINERY • HYDRAULIC DUMP LANDSCAPE TRAILERS

Large Selection at All Times

ADVANTAGE TRUCKS (716) 685-6757 www.advantagetrucks.com

WE DELIVER

“Exporters Welcome”

M-F 9-5 • Sat 9-3

3032 State Hwy 30 Gloversville, NY 12078

518-661-5038 FAX 661-6658

1964 JOHN DEERE tractor, model #1010, utility with gas engine, tractor is running, $3,900 OBO. Call 315-3631599

TEITSWORTH TRAILERS: Over 400 in stock now! PJ Goosenecks, Dumps, Tilt Tops, Landscape, Car Haulers, Skid Steer & more. Best prices, largest selection. 585-243-1563

Trucks

Trucks

2000 International 4700, DT466E, Auto, Complete with Hoist, Pump, Everything. Ready for your body. $3,950

2001 Mack RD Long Frame 10 Wheeler w/Pusher Wet Kit, Heavy Spec, Clean Truck

1991 Kenworth W900 with 26’ dump trailer 3406B, 15 speed wet kit, long frame, will separate $11,500 together

Many New and Used Feed and Gravel Bodies

6024 Greene Rd. Munnsville, NY

315-495-6506 315-404-6721 David Stanek

Pre-Owned Tanks & Silos NRCS Approved Slurry Storage Systems

New Conventional Silos FULL LINES VAN DALE NORBCO RISSLER GRAETZ LAIDIG Ventilation Cow Mattresses Stalls & Gates All Silo Repairs Conveyors & Mixers Utility Augers

Hammer Mills

NORTHEAST SILO DEMO: Need a cheap, quick & easy way to get your silo down? Will travel, give us a call. 518568-3560

1990 7500 GALLON HEIL TANKER, New Pump and Swing Boom, With 8 inch Piping Will unload in 3-4 Minutes. Excellent Brakes, Tires and Suspension

REPLACEMENT SILO DOORS & HARDWARE AGRI-DOOR

1997 CH 613 Mack 350 Engine, 44,000 Rears on Springs, 23’ of Frame

Jake Stoltzfus 649 South Ramona Rd. Myerstown, PA 17067

Truck Cabs, Hoods & Doors Call With Your Needs

717-949-2034 Toll-free 1-877-484-4104

SOLLENBERGER SILOS, LLC, 5778 Sunset Pike, Chambersburg, PA 17201. Poured Concrete silos since 1908, Manure Storage and Precast Products. For Information: Ken Mansfield 717-503-8909 www.sollenbergersilos.com “1908-2008” Celebrating 100 Years

1996 Mack RDSX 350 Mack motor, 13 spd Mack transmission, 58k rears, 20k front. Heavy truck!

Many Used Engines & Components AUTOMATIC TRUCKS IN STOCK

9000 GALLON HEIL TANKER, New Pump and Swing Boom, With 8 inch Piping Will unload in 4-5 Minutes! Excellent Brakes, Tires and Suspension 1985 Mack Superliner 350 Mack motor, 10 speed, long frame on springs

5700 GALLON TANKER

Many New Silage Bodies - ALL SIZES - Starting Price at $5,500

Call Us With Your Used Parts Needs - Many Hydraulic Parts in Stock

1991 IH 2074 14/40 L 10 Cummings, 620,000 miles, 9 speed, double frame, 20 feet of frame $8,000

Call Chuck Hainsworth 585-734-3264

DERBY TRUCK PARTS 802-673-8525 Days • 802-895-2961 Eves www.derbytruckparts.com


1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Trucks

Trucks

1987 FORD LN8000 10 wheel dump truck, 17½’ heated gravel body, $12,500. 978-5446105

1999 Int. 4900 DT530 automatic, w/20’ dump, ready to go . . . . . .$23,000 8000 Gallon Liquid Manure Trailer . . . .Call for Pricing

Trucks FOR SALE: 2002 DODGE RAM 1500 with cap, V8, auto tran., 4x4, PS, PB, PW, AC, AM-FM, cassette, road ready truck, $6,000.00. 518-6735474

Trucks

Trucks

1998 MACK RD690 300HP, 5 spd., Auto, 18 Front, 46 Rears, Eng. Brake, PTO

Trucks, Parts & Floatation Tires Also Available Email for Pricing or More Info Lawtonfamily@gmavt.net

Wanted

802-758-2396 802-349-5429 Cell

WANTED TO BUY: Old Grit newspapers (not the Grit magazine). 518-568-5115

Trucks

Trucks

2002 FREIGHTLINER FLD120 445HP, 8LL, 20 Front, 46 Rears, 19’-6” Dump

1993 CASE 621B Trucks

6 Cyl., 2.25 Yd. Bucket, 7300 Hrs., Good Condition

CALEDONIA DIESEL, LLC TRUCK & EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE

1998 VOLVO WG64

“The Diesel People!”

2905 Simpson Rd., Caledonia, NY

585-538-4395 • 1-800-311-2880 Since 1982

Just 1 mile south of Route 20 on 36 south

330 HP, 5 spd. Auto, 12 Front, 40 Rears, Will Separate Body

ILY DA ING V I R AR

1996 IHC F5070 6X6 300 HP, 9LL, 23 Front, 46 Rears, Prentice Loader

(Qty 10) Peterbilt 335 Mixer Trucks, Cummins (Qty 3) 1998/99 Ford LT9513 Day Cabs, ISC 315hp, 8LL, 20 front axle, 46k full locking 2002 Peterbilt 385 Daycab (1) w/Cat, (2) w/Cummins power, 13 speed, 20k front rears, average 68,000 miles. 18-1/2’ of frame Cat C12 425hp, 10 speed, Air ride, Wetline, aluminum axle, 46k full locking rears, 16 feet of double frame wheels, 544k miles, 185” wheelbase. behind the cab. We will separate the mixer behind cab, new rubber. $29,900 each SHARP TRUCKS $23,900 from the chassis. Call for price.

2000 IHC 2674 280 HP, 5 Spd., Auto., 14 Front, 26 Rear, Lift Axle

Southern Tier Truck Sales

1-800-942-9881 • 585-610-0197 (cell) 2005 Terex TCX225 Excavator, Long stick and long U/C. Only 1348 hours, 42” digging bucket, excellent condition $69,750

2001 Nissan 8000# Forklift Cab with heat, sideshift, 7800 hours $9,900

2003 New Holland LW230B Loader, Cab with heat and AC, traction control, 5325 hours, 26.5 rubber, 4.8 CY bucket with coupler and forks $69,500

Please check our Web site @ www.caledoniadiesel.com

2004 KW T800B Daycab Cat C-12 w/EB, 18 speed, air ride, 46k rears, 886k miles, aluminum wheels, 197” wheelbase. Clean truck $31,900

1999 IH 9400 Eagle Cummins 460 hp, 10 speed, 700k miles, Wetline, 14,600# front axle, 46k rears, Aluminum wheels, good rubber, very clean truck $27,900

John Deere 9500 4WD, 30.5x32’s at 90%, Straw Spreader, 3794 Sep. Hours $30,500

1999 Kohler 350KW Generator Self contained, 350kw, 3 phase, 480v, 60hz, 200 gallon fuel tank, 6638 hours $28,900

1999 Cat D5M X Engine just rebuilt, 70% U/C, 6 way blade, OROPS. $45,000

40-43 ft. Aluminum Grain Hopper Trailers in stock and arriving weekly. Prices Starting at $22,500

SEP 5-19

Calendar of Events EAST NOTE: Calendar entries must arrive at the Country Folks office by the Tuesday prior to our publication date for them to be included in the calendar of events. Email: jkarkwren@leepub.com

MAY 7 - DEC 17 Cooperstown Farmers Market 101 Main St., Pioneer Alley, Cooperstown, NY. 9 am - 2 pm. Fresh local produce, meat, cheeses, herbs, baked goods, maple syrup, honey, flowers, crafts and much more. On Internet at www. otsego2000.org/farmers market

Fish Available for Stocking Orders are currently being taken. The deadline for ordering the fish is Mon., Sept. 19. Any Schoharie Co. landowner who has a current farm pond fish license for trout, bass or minnows are allowed to participate. All fish will be picked up on Fri., Sept. 23.For additional information, or to have a fish order form sent to you, call the Soil and Water Conservation District office at 518295-8811, or drop by the office in the USDA Service Center, 108 Holiday Way, Suite 2, Schoharie, NY 12157. The order form is available online at www. schohariesoilandwater.org.

SEP 6 - NOV 5 Fall 2011 Group Classes with Ashley Harr River Run Farm, 68 Folts Rd., Corinth, NY. 8 week session. Save the date and reserve your spot! Beg./Int. Class Tues., 4:30-6 pm. Intermediate Class Thurs., 4-5:30 pm. Int./Adv. Class Saturdays, 9-10:30 am. Competition Team Class Saturdays, 11:30 am-1 pm. No Saturday classes Oct. 15. Tues. & Thurs. classes end Oct. 25 & 27. $30/class, $240/session. Pay for the entire 8 week session up front and get 2 free lessons towards the next group session. Contact Ashley Harr, 518-222-6490 or e-mail ashley@ashleyharr.com. On Internet at www. ashleyharr.com

www.sttrucksales.com

SEP. 12 - DEC. 12 Master Gardener Volunteer Training Program 9 am - 3 pm. Regular attendance at the weekly training sessions is required. Training sites may vary, however, transportation will be provided. The fee for this comprehensive training is $250/person and covers the costs of the training, materials and resources. Contact Donna Peterson, 518-3929576 ext. 103 or e-mail dmp234@cornell.edu. SEP 18-20 2011 New York State Maple Tour The tour will feature visits to a variety of maple operations. Tour stop information will be available soon at www.cornellmaple.com and www.nysmaple.com. SEP 19 Family Security Workshop Legacy Education Center, 555 French Rd., New Hartford, NY. No cost. Registration required. Limited seating. Call 315-793-3622. SEP 21 14th Annual All Dairy Antiques & Collectibles Show Dairy Activity Center, PA Farm Show Complex & Expo Center, Harrisburg, PA. Fri. noon - 5 pm. Sat. thru Wed. 8 am - 5 pm. Free parking, free exhibitor space & free admission. Featuring Holstein breed items, but all dairy related collectors and invited and encouraged to attend. Antique Consignment Auction Tues., Sept. 20. Contact Gary Gojsovich 717-635-5067 or Lolly Lesher 717-787-2905.

21st NYS Dry Bean Field Meeting Rod Stettner’s Farm, east of Bergen, NY & Bob and Dan Duyssen Farm, Stafford, NY. 4:45-8:30 pm. 1.6 DEC plus CCA credits have been requested. Bring your card. Registration: $5 for current Cornell Vegetable Program Enrollees; $10 for all others. Contact Carol MacNeil, 585313-8796 or e-mail crm6@cornell.edu. SEP 22 The Greenhorns at SCCC Seelig Theater on campus, 112 College Rd., Loch Sheldrake, NY. 2:30 pm. Local farmers will vend their products and regional advocacy organizations will share local food resources in the theater lobby. 4:30 pm: Screening of “The Greenhorns” (50 minutes) begins. 5:30 pm: Moderated panel discussion featuring local young farmers Greg Swartz of Willow Wisp Organic Farm (Abrahamsville, PA), Adrianne Picciano (Youngsville) of The Dirt Diva, Sara & Brett Budde of Majestic Farm (Mountaindale) and Patrick Kiley of the Greenhorns project. Moderated by Challey Comer of Pure Catskills. SEP 22-24 3rd International Symposium on Mastitis and Milk Quality St. Louis, MO. Submission of abstracts for presentation at this fall symposium (either as a poster or orally) will be due by March 1. Watch the NMC Web site at nmconline.org for more details. SEP 23 & 28 Four Farms Open Doors to Shine Light on Renewable Energy • Sept. 23 - 10 am-noon.

Highland Hills Farm, 227 Green Rd. North, Charleston, NY • Sept. 28 - 10 am-noon. Cross Island Farms, 44301 Cross Island Rd., Wellesley Island, NY. Contact Violet Stone, 607-255-9227 or vws7@cornell.edu. SEP 23 Solar and Wind Energy Field Day Highland Hills Farm, 227 Green Road North., Charleston, NY. 10 am noon. If you are looking for a do it yourself, affordable approach to renewable energy, come meet Jan and Ron. Contact Violet Stone, 607255-9227 or e-mail vws7@cornell.edu. On Internet at https://sites.google. com/site/highlandhillsfarm SEP 24 15th Annual River Clean-up Streams, Lakes and Ponds in Cortland County. 10 am - 12 noon. Participants form teams and claim a portion of a stream, pond, or lake from which they remove accumulated trash and debris for a few hours. Supplies and materials are provided to teams in advance. Teams will have the option of depositing trash collected at a designated drop off point or the Cortland County Soil and Water Conservation District office. The event is free and open for all to participate. The registration deadline is Sept. 9. Contact Mike Catalano, 607-756-5991. Forest Field Days Caywood Point site, State Hwy. 414, Town of Lodi (immediately west of Shalestone Vineyards). Contact Chris Zimmer, 607-5464470 ext. 311 or e-mail czimmer@fs.fed.us. Hurricane Irene Fundraiser Schaghticoke Fairgrounds. Gates open at noon, music starts at 1 pm. There will be music, food, raffles, vendors, kids activities, a two hour Zumba lesson and an auction. Admission is $10/carload. All proceeds will be used to help farms devastated by Hurricane Irene. Join us on FB @ Goodnight Irene! Eastern NY Farm Aid 2011. Contact Kris, 518-859-3743 or e-mail kbrock1968@ aol.com. SEP 25 22nd Annual Fall Yearling Sale Morrisville College Equine Institute’s Nancy Sears Stowell Arena on Swamp Rd.. 11 am. The preview day for the sale, the largest of its kind in New York state, is Sept. 24. Profits from the sale go toward general maintenance and enrichment of the college’s equine programs. There is no admission charge and the public is welcome to attend. Call 315684-6355. On Internet at www.morrisvillesale.com SEP 27 Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate? Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center, Corning, NY. 6-8 pm. Explores the sensitivity of how to pass on personal possessions. Registration is limited to 25 participants. The 94 page workbook for Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate will be be included in the $15/person or $20/couple fee. Call 607-664-2300. On Internet at www. putknowledgetowork.com SEP 29 Gas Leasing Workshop 1-1:30 pm at Tionesta Church of God, 1582 Route 36, Tionesta, PA and 7-9:30

Page 29 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428


Section B - Page 30 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Sell Your Items Through Reader Ads P.O. Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

1-800-836-2888 classified@leepub.com Farm Machinery For Sale

Farm Machinery For Sale

MABIES OEM PARTS Massey Challenger Allis White Krone Perkins Hesston 315-687-7891 315-510-2400

Calendar of Events pm at Rimersburg Town Hall, 484 Main St., Rimersburg, PA. Workshop is free but please pre-register. Call 814-755-3544. SEP 30 & OCT 2 Fall Hunter Education Course Date Change BMFGC, 531 Synders Lake Rd., Wynantskill, NY. • Sept. 30 - 7-11 pm • Oct 2 - 7:30 am - 4:30 pm Signups will start on Wed.,

Aug. 17, 7-8:30 pm and continue each Wednesday until the courses are full. SEP 30, OCT 14, NOV 4 & 18 Beginning Meat Goat Farmer Workshop Series Various Locations throughout Delaware County. Fridays 10 am - 4 pm. Preregistration and prepayment are required by Sept. 23. Fee is $50/person for entire program or $15/program. Make check out to “Cornell Cooperative Extension” and mail to P.O. Box 184, Hamden, NY 13782. Bring a bag lunch and chair. Water and juice will be provided. Contact

Janet 6531.

Aldrich,

607-865-

OCT 1 25th Annual Open House on the Farm Nop Dairy Farm, LLC, Zylstra Lane, Montgomery, NY. Contributors needed. Contact Audrey, 845-344-1234 or e-mail ald5@cornell.edu. Herkimer County Family Day At The Farm Raycliff Farm, 795 Snells Bush Rd., Little Falls, NY. 10 am - 4 pm. Free event. Enjoy animals, hay rides, antique tractors, parade, live music, kids crafts & games and Agri-Business vender plus more. Call 315-823-4321. Small Scale Woodlot Management Workshop New Berlin (Millbrook Rec Park). 9 am. The workshop will emphasize three areas: safety, silviculture and technique. Registration is limited and receiving the $15/person registration fee will reserve your spot ($5 for NYFOA members). Please send a check to CCE Chenango, 99 N Broad St., Norwich, NY 13815 by Sept. 23. Contact CCE Chenango, 607-334-5841 or chenango@ cornell.edu. On Internet at www2.dnr.cornell.edu/ext/ forestconnect/2011wood lotwkshp.html OCT 2 2011 Brunswick Grange Annual Fall Agricultural Tailgate Sale Schaghticoke Fairgrounds, Rt. 67 & 40, Schaghticoke, NY. 8 am - 12:30 pm. More than 50 vendors with various varieties of chickens, ducks, geese, pigeons, plants, flowers & other relat-

ed agriculture items. Donation of $15/vendor will be charged. Rain or shine. Refreshments available. Call 518-279-9113. OCT 3 Interfering Plant Ecology and Management Neuhauser Tree Farm, 434 West Groton Road; Groton, NY. 5:30-7:30 pm. New York’s woodlands are increasingly threatened by a multitude of noxious plant species that impose many costs on landowners and the surrounding community. Join us for an informative evening as foresters from NYS DEC & CCE will discuss and demonstrate a variety of practical, effective, do it yourself strategies to control undesirable vegetation in the forest and farm landscape. Contact Brett Chedzoy, 607535-7161 or e-mail bjc226@ cornell.edu. ANCA Annual Meeting 2011 Lake Placid Conference Center, Lake Placid, NY. To include a discussion about “The State of the Adirondack North Country: A focus on economic and demographic changes since 2000.” On Internet at www. meetingslakeplacid.com or www.adirondack.org OCT 4 Blessing of the Animals 250 New Skete Lane, Cambridge, NY. 4 pm. All and the animals they love are welcome! New Skete Monasteries’ Annual Blessing of the Animals in celebration of the Feast of Saint Francis of Assisi. Light refreshments of the season to follow. All ani-

mals must be on a leash or in a secure pen at all times for the safety of participants and other animals. Call 518677-3928 ext. 303. On Internet at www.newskete. org OCT 13 Grazing Conference Pennsdale Civic Center, Pennsdale, PA. 8 am - 3:45 pm. Registration is required. The price is $25/person if registered by Aug. 15 and $30 after Aug. 15. Contact Rod Morehart at 570-3291619 or Chad Bower at 570329-1621. OCT 15 2nd Annual 4-H Fall Festival Ulster County Fair Grounds located at 249 Libertyville Road in New Paltz, NY. The festival is free and will begin at 10 am and festivities will proceed until 2 pm. Lots of exciting hands-on activities, contests & educational demos for the entire family. Call 845-340-3990. On Internet at www.cceulster. org OCT 21 Goin’ Underground (Root Cellars) Sullivan County CCE, 64 Ferndale Loomis Rd., Liberty NY. Root cellars are nature’s way of storing food. A hundred years ago, root cellars were one of the few ways to keep things cool. Preserved meats, dairy products, fruits and vegetables were all kept underground. Dave Forshay, will review the history of root cellars. He will also review how to construct your own root cellar and what to store under ground. Cost: Mem-

bers $7, non-members $10. Contact Marianna Quartararo, 846-292-6180 ext. 112 or e-mail mdq2@ cornell.edu. OCT 22 Ties to the Land Petersburgh Veterans Memorial Community Center, 71 Main St., Petersburgh, NY. 9 am - 12:30 pm. $40/person, $10/each additional family member. The fee includes refreshments and one copy per family of the workbook: Ties to the Land: Your Family Forest Heritage (additional copies will be available at the workshop or online at the Web site). Participants must attend both of the sessions. Contact Maureen Mullen, 607-254-6556 or e-mail mlm394@cornell.edu. On Internet at http:// successionplanning.ning.com OCT 28-29 2011 Cornell Sheep & Goat Symposium • Oct. 28 - Cornell Sheep Farm, Hartford, NY • Oct, 29 - Morrison Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. • Oct. 28 - 11 am - 5 pm • Oct. 29 - 7:45 am - 6 pm Simultaneous programs for commercial and small farm dairy and meat producers. Special sessions for FAMANCA certification, on farm necropsie and many others. To obtain complete program and registration information for the Symposium go to www.sheep.cornell.edu and click on the calendar. Online registration for credit cards is available. Contact Victoria Badalamenti, 607-255-7712 or e-mail vb65@cornell.edu.

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East

New England

Name: (Print)________________________________________________________________

Country Folks Classifieds, PO Box 121, Palatine Bridge, NY 13428

Farm/Company Name: ________________________________________________________ Street: _________________________________________ County: ____________________ City: __________________________________________ State: ________ Zip: __________

E-MAIL

Phone #_____________________Fax #________________Cell #_____________________

E-mail your ad to classified@leepub.com

e-mail address: _____________________________________________________________ Payment Method:  Check/Money Order  American Express  Discover  Visa  MasterCard

5. ON-LINE -

Go to www.countryfolks.com and follow the Place a Classified Ad button to place your ad 24/7!

Card # __________________________________________Exp. Date __________________ (MM/YY)

Name On Credit Card:(Print)____________________________________________________ Signature: ________________________________________ Todays Date: ______________ (for

credit

card

payment

only)

15 1 Week $9.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.55 per zone per week

17 1 Week $10.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.15 per zone per week

18 1 Week $10.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.45 per zone per week

19 1 Week $10.75 per zone / 2+ Weeks $9.75 per zone per week

16 1 Week $9.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $8.85 per zone per week

20 1 Week $11.05 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.05 per zone per week

21

22

23

24

1 Week $11.35 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.35 per zone per week

1 Week $11.65 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.65 per zone per week

1 Week $11.95 per zone / 2+ Weeks $10.95 per zone per week

1 Week $12.25 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.25 per zone per week

25

26

27

28

1 Week $12.55 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.55 per zone per week

1 Week $12.85 per zone / 2+ Weeks $11.85 per zone per week

1 Week $13.15 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.15 per zone per week

1 Week $13.45 per zone / 2+ Weeks $12.45 per zone per week


Page 31 - Section B • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011


September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Section B - Page 32


Section C

AUCTION SECTION and MARKET REPORTS

MACFADDEN'S FALL AUCTION

SAT., SEPTEMBER 24TH - 8 AM

TRACTORS - FARM, CONST. & TURF EQUIP. - ANTIQUE TRACTORS - HIT & MISS ENGINES - PARTS & MORE! AT OUR YARD ON US 20, 4MI EAST OF SHARON SPRINGS, NY Live online bidding available through PROXIBID TRACTORS Our usual run of 50 to 100 farm and compact tractors; Some early highlights include a Rare JD 5020 w/ Elwood Mechanical 4wd - one owner!; JD 6030 w/619 eng - 350hp !!; JD 6030 w/531 eng; JD 3020 side console dsl with single front & 42” tires one owner orig; JD 1010 Row Crop w/wide front, PS & remote, 2110 orig hrs - near perfect!; ‘67 JD 4020 w/3700 hrs-sharp orig; JD 2640; 4020; 2750 4wd w/cab; IH 1066 Black Stripe w/1800 orig hours!!; Case IH 7110 Magnum; IH 1066 Hydro; IH 1566; Case IH 895-700 orig hours!; CIH 885 4wd w/ldr; IH 856 4100 hrs sharp!; CIH 4230; NH 8160 4wd; NH TN70DA 4wd w/cab & ldr-1300 hrs; Ford 8210 Series II 4wd; White 2-105; White 2-85 w/cab; JD 2510; MF 1085 w/cab-low hours; Nice MF 398 w/cab; IH 674; Oliver 1800; JD 2010 LP gas; Rare MF 50 LP gas; IH Cub. H, M; Ford 8N, 9N, Jubilee; Case L pulling tractor-700 cu. in.; Compact Tractors; NH 1910; 1320; 1720; CIH DX25; DA 5220 all 4wd w/loaders; MF 1010 w/ldr; JD 750 4wd; Kubota B6000-like new; As-Is Row: Ford TW25 4wd; JD 2440; NH TS110; NH TB100; JD 6215-burnt; NH 3930 4wd w/ldr-bad trans; several skid steers; also 2 complete farm estates plus lots more! INDUSTRIAL MF 60H 4wd ldr backhoe; Hydra-Mac 2650 SSL; Vermeer V4550A & V450 dsl trenchers - both like new; Skylift mini-derrick w/post hole digger & bucket; JD 1010 & 2010 Dozers; Wood Miizer LT30 bandsaw mill; Excavators; NH LS140 w/cab; Bobcat 553 w/cab-400 hrs!; skid steers; backhoes, stone rakes; ‘02 Johnson 4000 sweeper w/5.9 Cummins; (2) Razorback diesel power trowels; Bobcat 4x4 dsl Utility vehicle w/cab; ZM 7ft snowpusher (4) new 23.5-25 tires & more!!! TURF EQUIPT. Toro Multipro 5500 sprayer; Toro 2300 topdresser; Salsco greens roller; JD 3215A Fairway mower; 5 JD 180B greens mowers; Near new JD 1000 Aerocore aerator; JD 1545 mower w/cab & snowblower; Ferris IS300; CC Zforce; 5 walk behind commercial mowers; 10 lawn tractors; plus more coming in! FARM EQUIPT. NH 1895 SP forage harvester 4wd w/Cat 3306 eng low hrs; Kelly-Ryan Ag Bagger; JD 556 round baler; Krone KR160 round baler; Welger Mastercut round baler; Super sharp NH 311 baler; Sharp NH 1465 haybine; JD 630 discbine-like new; Nice Case IH 8309 discbine; JD 820 MoCo; NI 5209; Kuhn 3pt disc mwr; 2 NH bale wagons; Kuhn GT300 rotary rake; NH 256 & 56 rakes; IH 35 rake; rakes; Bushwacker 15ft batwing; Case IH round bale processor; Brillion 25ft cultimulcher; Excellent Great Plains No-Till drill; JD 8250 21x7 drill; 20 new radial tractor tires including 28-30-34-38-42 inch sizes; All kinds of farm equipment as usual including tillage; hay equipment; mowers; rakes; balers; loaders; snowblowers; Woods ditchbank mower; JD 12’ Heavy disc; JD 213 grain head; Oliver 2x rollover plow; lots of 3pt eq; 2 complete farm estate sales; we will be full! Plus more coming daily!!! ANTIQUE TRACTORS: Approx 1pm; Great antique lineup featuring a gorgeous local Oliver and MH collection. Completely original set of Oliver Super 66 gas; Super 66 diesel; Super 77 gas and Super 77 diesel - all 4 tractors completely original with perfect sheet metal - a once in a lifetime opportunity!; Plus an Oliver Super 55 w/ an absolutely perfect restoration; From same collection; MH Pony; MH Pacer w/ original MH tires; MH Colt and Mustang - both all original w/ WF & 3pt; MH 44 Special WF & 3pt all original; Hudson Valley collection including Fordson tractor with original plow, original canvas cover and all manuals plus 2 nice Ford 9Ns, JD rollover plow; NOS Wards plow; JD hiller; Hoover potato digger and Hoover potato planter-both never rained on! 1927 Ford Model T touring car; all from same Hudson Valley farm; Ford 8N w/ flathead V8 - beautiful! Rare MM BG offset; MM V w/ cultivators; MM Twin City KTA on steel - all original; Sharp original 1947 Cat D2 dozer - 1800 orig hrs!; Rare 1940 Caterpillar R5 (less than 50 made! S/N3R28SP); 1939 Cat D2 tailseat orchard S/N5J338SP; Cat R2 gas; Rare Lombardini Castoro diesel vineyard crawler w/ blade-very low hours; Rare Schmiedag diesel crawler with original German paperwork; Sharp all original JD Lindeman crawler very early flatback S/N 330887; (2) other good original JD BO Lindeman crawlers; Rare early JD MC w/Lindeman undercarriage-one of 10 built; JD 620LP; JD 730 diesel; 1939 JD BNH-totally original; 1939 JD H w/ original paint and tires-NICE !! JD GP on steel; JD 50 LP gas; JD LI original w/mower; JD H; JD MT w/ cultivators-very low hours; Oliver 80 industrial; Jacobsen G10; 1973 Chevy C10 pickup with factory 454/automatic-40,000 mi from Kansas - completely original from Jims collection - WOW!! Rare Military IH I-9; Rare Pampa Lanz I cyl hot bulb tractor from Argentina - totally original; Rare IH Farmall Super FCC w/ 3pt Made in France - Sharp original; Farmall 450 diesel; Rare Mercury “The Trackless Train” 3 wheel warehouse tractor; Rare Cockshutt 35 Wheatland; MH Pacemaker; MH 101; 1980 GMC John Deere service truck; AC B & C both restored; 1960’s Harley Davidson golf cart; 10 antique lawn mowers; Plus many more tractors coming in!! HIT & MISS ENGINES; Approx 1pm; Great hit and miss engine collection featuring a rare 1 3/4 hp Stickney; an IH 1hp Mogul; IH 2 1/2hp Mogul; 2hp Fairbanks upright; Original 1 hp Brownwall; 1hp Emerson-Brantingham; Gilson “Goes Like Sixty” 1hp; Aermotor; Restored Airway 4hp; Associated ChoreBoy 1 3/4 hp-Restored; Cushman upright; Majestic 1 1/2 hp; Rare 7hp Ruston Hornsby; 1930 Lister diesel; 4hp Lister Ball Top; Petter 1hp Apple Top w/ pump; Ruston Hornsby upright diesel; New Idea; DeLaval 3 1/2 hp; Hercules 1 1/2 hp & 3hp; Economy 1 1/2 hp; Meco 4hp-restored; HVID 8hp diesel; 1 1/3 hp Sandow; Caile Perfection 1hp upright; IH LB w/ radiator-original; JD LUC-NOS never run!; Rare Harley-Davidson stationary engine; over 50 engines total! Many ANTIQUES, SIGNS ETC incl. antique implements plows; discs; corn shellers; grinders; Porcelain & other farm signs including Esso; Kendall; Surge; Large “IH Farmall Tractors” plus several more; 1917 Dowagiac one horse drill; Coffee grinders; Cider press; 1920’s Westinghouse Range NOS!; 100yr old telephone switchboard; MH disc plow; 1890 Oliver plow-orig; NI & Oliver Literature racks; toys; + more! TERMS; Cash or good check. Full payment day of auction. List is subject to change. All items sold “as is.” Selling w/ 2 Auctioneers bring a friend. Consignments taken ‘til 5pm Friday, Sept. 23rd. Major items onsite by Friday Sept 16 will be on internet auction. Five percent buyer’s premium for internet buyers only.

MACFADDEN N & SONS,, INC. 1457 Hwy. Rt. 20, Sharon Springs, NY 13459 (518) 284-2090 or www.macfaddens.com

Page 1 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Country y Folks


Section C - Page 2 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

State lawmakers bring DFS Superintendent Lawsky to focus on critical insurance issues in the wake of Irene Assemblyman Pete Lopez (R,C,I-Schoharie) and Senator James L. Seward (R,C,I-Oneonta), working with the governor’s office, recently brought Benjamin M. Lawsky, Superintendent of the state Department of Financial Services, to tour the damage of Tropical Storm Irene throughout the Schoharie Valley and Catskills and meet with local officials to help ensure residents have the best assistance from the new state agency, which will assume the duties of the state Department of Insurance. “Families and businesses in communities devastated by recent storms are determined to rebuild,” said Senator Seward. “There are a great number of stakeholders pulling together to revive our communities and I am confident the insurance industry along with government will play significant roles moving forward.” “The importance of the insurance issue cannot

Right — Pictured above from left: Hubies Pizzeria owner, Chris Hubbard, discusses storm damage following Tropical Storm Irene with Senator Seward, Assemblyman Lopez and Superintendent Lawsky. The state officials along with other insurance department representatives toured several hard-hit Schoharie County businesses and homes and met with local municipal officials to discuss ongoing recovery needs. Photo courtesy of Senator Seward

be overstated,” said Assemblyman Lopez. “The devastation of Irene and, most recently, Hurricane Lee have pushed homeowners, farmers and employers to the brink. They are making decisions now whether to stay and rebuild their lives and futures in the region or simply walk away.” Senator Seward and Assemblyman Lopez have been working together with local, state and federal officials to ensure a quick and thorough response throughout the region, which includes the hardest hit counties of the 21 New York State counties that have since been declared disaster sites due to storm and flooding damage. A particular concern is the ability of homeowners and employers to ensure damage is cov-

ered by their insurance companies, especially since many residents did not have flood insurance. To help better ensure New Yorkers affected by

Lawmakers C3

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570-772-2352 (C)

S&L Builders LLC is proud to announce we are offering all types of masonry and concrete services... foundations, retaining walls, brick, stone, pavers, etc.

ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES

ANNUAL FALL DAIRY/FEEDER CONSIGNMENT SALE!! WED., OCTOBER 5TH 12 NOON

We build all types of Pole Barn construction... freestall barns, indoor riding arenas, machinery storage, garages, etc.

WHERE: ACCS BARNS RT. 125, EAST MIDDLEBURY, VT

ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS NOW!! CASH ON YOUR OVERSTOCK

150 HEAD EXPECTED/TOP HOLSTEIN ARTIFICIALLY SIRED - FRESH & SPRINGING - SHORTBRED - READY TO BREED - OPEN HEIFERS & CALVES CALL FOR MORE INFO 802-388-2661 ACCS T.G. WISNOWSKI 802-989-1507 VT TOLL FREE 800-339-COWS SALE MANAGER - T.G. WISNOWSKI AUCTIONEER: JOHN NOP ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES WWW.ACCSCATTLE.COM

We have a 90 foot Clear Span truss available and we are offering the Agriculture Bird Free Truss. We would like to thank our customers for their business! Heritage Hill Farms - Fort Ann, NY 54x242x12

Jess Monk - Lisle, NY 24x40x11.6

M&M Dixon Farms - Greenwich, NY 40x105x14

Scott Bennett - Waverly, NY 36x60x12

Kerry Metiver - Fort Edward, NY 36x84x10

Rick Powell - Owego, NY 30x36x10

Adirondack Tree Surgeons - Gavenport, NY 80x100x16

Beagle Club - Towanda, PA 24x24x11.6

Joe Lawrance - Perryopolis, PA 40x60x16

Charles Petrie - Little Falls, NY 50x96x15

Jay Andreas - West Franklin, PA 66x80x14, 24x32x14

Whittaker Farms - Whitney Point, NY 45x152x14

Tom Andzulis - Clifford, PA 30x32x13.6

Cooperstown Holsteins - Cooperstown, NY 85x40x14, 40x40x14

Mike Galcik - Schuylerville, NY 32x48x11.6

Lavra Fay - Castleton, PA 80x48x16

Christene Huston - Chester Springs, PA 36x48x12 Hope Enterprise - Williamsport, PA 20x24x8

Brian Lebarron - Whitehall, NY 50x100x16

WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD!

FOR ALL YOUR BUILDING AND MASONRY NEEDS, GIVE US A CALL


the storms and floods have assistance when dealing with their insurance companies, the Senator and Assemblyman brought Superintendent Lawsky to view the widespread damage in the Schoharie Valley and Catskills firsthand. As a result, the pair are pleased to announce that the Superintendent is setting up Mobile Command Centers in Greene and Schoharie counties to help residents and employers with insurance-related concerns. While Senator Seward and Assemblyman Lopez continue to urge residents or employers in need to contact any of their offices for any assistance, they also recommend that those with insurance-related questions contact

the state Department of Insurance’s special Irene Insurance Help Hotline by calling 800-339-1759. The hotline will be staffed with insurance professionals Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. until further notice and can help residents and employers not only with property damage but health insurance-related concerns as well as auto insurance. Additional information also can be found on the department’s web site at www.ins.state.ny.us. As residents and employers are returning to their homes and businesses, Senator Seward and Assemblyman Lopez encourage constituents to take photos of the damage and document

all conversations with your insurance representatives, as well as to use every precaution to keep themselves safe, including wearing gloves and masks, proper waterproof footwear and being wary of fallen materials such as tree limbs, power lines, and building debris. For more cleanup tips and assistance, please visit the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Web site at www.disasterassistance.gov or www.fema.gov or by calling 800-621-3362. Assemblyman Lopez said, “If sufficient funds are not made available and government is unable to fill the gap, we face dramatic changes in the fabric of our communities. We must

do everything possible to preserve our communities.”

Page 3 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Lawmakers from C2


Section C - Page 4 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

AUC TION CALENDAR To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 Monday, September 19 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. Call with consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-847-8800 or 607-6993637 www.hoskingsales.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-2589752. • 12:00 Noon: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 12:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Calves. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 12:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Sheep, Goats, Pigs, Horses & Hay. 1:30 pm Calves & Beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Chatham Market, 2249 Rte. 203, Chatham, NY. Regular Sale. Harold Renwick, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-392-3321. • 6:00 PM: Madison Central School. School Buses - ‘03 Ford E450 school bus & ‘99 Chevy G30 school bus w/(2) wheelchair stations. Both with keys & clean titles. • 6:10 PM - Town of Yorktown Water Dist. Vehicles - Komatsu D38E bulldozer, ‘01 Kobelco 330LC excavator, ‘78 Bomag roller, ‘08 Ford F350 pickup, Crown Vics & more. • 7:43 PM - Village of Whitehall Police Crown Vics - ‘98, ‘99, & ‘05 Ford Crown Vic 4 door Police Interceptor w/4.6L V8 EFI gas engines. Sold with keys & clean titles. Auctions International, 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com

Tuesday, September 20 • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Tuesday. Groceries, hay, straw, grain & firewood. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 • 1:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Dairy, sheep, goats, pigs and horses; 3:30 PM feeders followed by beef and calves. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Wednesday, September 21 • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop Off Only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 9:30 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Heifer Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104. • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 1:30 PM: Dryden Market, 49 E. Main St., Dryden, NY. Phil Laug, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-844-9104 • 1:30 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Calves followed by beef. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 1:30 PM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Market, 716-296-5041, 585-7382104 Thursday, September 22 • Cadiz, OH.Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com • San Bernardino, CA. Government Surplus, Vehicles, Construction Equip.,

B RO U G HT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES Rte. 125, E. Middlebury, VT 05740 Sale every Monday & Thursday Specializing in Complete Farm Dispersals “A Leading Auction Service” In Vt. 800-339-2697 or 800-339-COWS 802-388-2661 • 802-388-2639 ALEX LYON & SON Sales Managers & Auctioneers, Inc. Jack Lyon Bridgeport, NY 315-633-2944 • 315-633-9544 315-633-2872 • Evenings 315-637-8912 AUCTIONEER PHIL JACQUIER INC. 18 Klaus Anderson Rd., Southwick, MA 01077 413-569-6421 • Fax 413-569-6599 www.jacquierauctions.com Auctions of Any Type, A Complete, Efficient Service philcorn@jacquierauctions.com AUCTIONS INTERNATIONAL 808 Borden Rd. Buffalo, NY 14227 800-536-1401 www.auctionsinternational.com BENUEL FISHER AUCTIONS Fort Plain, NY 518-568-2257 Licensed & Bonded in PA #AU005568

TO

BRZOSTEK’S AUCTION SERVICE INC. Household Auctions Every Wed. at 6:30 PM 2052 Lamson Rd., Phoenix, NY 13135 Brzostek.com 315-678-2542 or 800-562-0660 Fax 315-678-2579 THE CATTLE EXCHANGE 4236 Co. Hwy. 18, Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2226 • Fax 607-746-2911 www.cattlexchange.com E-mail: daveramasr@cattlexchange.com A Top-Quality Auction Service David Rama - Licensed Real Estate Broker C.W. GRAY & SONS, INC. Complete Auction Services Rte. 5, East Thetford, VT 802-785-2161 DANN AUCTIONEERS DELOS DANN 3339 Spangle St., Canandaigua, NY 14424 585-396-1676 www.cnyauctions.com dannauctioneers.htm DELARM & TREADWAY Sale Managers & Auctioneers William Delarm & Son • Malone, NY 518-483-4106 E.J. Treadway • Antwerp, NY 13608 315-659-2407

Commercial Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 8:00 AM: Half Acre Market, Ridge Rd., Auburn, NY. Drop off only. John Kelley, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-258-9752 • 12:30 PM: Pavilion Market, 357 Lake St., Pavilion, NY. Regular sale. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 585-584-3033, 585-738-2104. • 1:15 PM: Burton Livestock, Vernon, NY. Dairy Cattle followed by Beef & Calves. Dale Chambers, Manager, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-829-3105 • 2:00 PM: Gouverneur Market, 952 US Hwy. 11, Gouverneur, NY. Calves, Pigs, Goats, Dairy and Beef. Jack Bero, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 315-322-3500, sale barn 315-287-0220 • 4:00 PM: Holley, NY. Danny Moore Farms Machinery & Tool Auction - Selling a full line of farm machinery including Ford & IH tractors, nearly new NH baler, plus other NH hay equipment, tillage equipment, Snap-On tools and more. William Kent, Inc., Sale Managers and Auctioneers, 585343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com • 5:00 PM: Central Bridge Livestock, Rte. 30A, Central Bridge, NY. Calves, followed by Beef. Tim Miller, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 518-868-2006, 800-321-3211. Friday, September 23 • South Bend, IN. 2 Auctions in One Day! Complete Liquidation of Late Model Construction, Support Equip. & Large Job Completion of Late Model Construction, Support Equipment & Large Job Completion of Late Model Earthmoving Equip., Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 9:30 AM: Newark Valley, NY. Large Public

YO U

BY

Auction. Farm & Collector Tractors, Construction Equip., Farm Machinery. Goodrich Auction Service Inc., 607-6423293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com • 10:00 AM: 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY. Auction every Friday. Full line of produce, bedding plants & flowers. Mohawk Valley Produce Auction, 518-568-3579 Saturday, September 24 • Betty & Nelson LeDuc, Champlain, NY. Dairy Dispersal. 180 head. Northern New York Dairy Sales, 518-481-6666, Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503, Harry Nererett 518651-1818 www.nnyds.com • Woodward, PA. Houserdale Holsteins Dispersal. Featuring 100 registered Holsteins. David Houser & family, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 9:00 AM: Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY. Lamb & Webster Used Equipment Auction of Farm Tractors & Machinery. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-2431563. www.teitsworth.com • 9:30 AM: 4501 Leipzig Ave., Mays Landing, NJ (Atlantic City Race Track). Rental Return Auction of Construction, Aerials, Attachments, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944, Site phone 609272-9702 www.lyonauction.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi.

THESE

EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKETING LLC 5001 Brittonfield Parkway P.O. Box 4844, East Syracuse, NY 315-433-9129 • 800-462-8802 Bath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-776-2000 Burton Livestock . . . . . . . . . . .315-829-3105 Central Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-868-2006 Chatham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .518-392-3321 Cherry Creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . .716-296-5041 Dryden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-844-9104 Farm Sale Division . . . . . . . . . .315-436-2215 Gouverneur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-287-0220 Half Acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315-258-9752 Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .585-584-3033 FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK 3 miles east of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20. Livestock Sale every Wednesday at 1 PM Feeder Cattle Sales monthly Horse Sales as scheduled 585-394-1515 • Fax 585-394-9151 www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com FRANKLIN USED EQUIPMENT SALES, INC. AUCTION SERVICE Franklin, NY 607-829-5172 Over 30 Years Experience in Farm Equipment Auctions Frank Walker, Auctioneer P.O. Box 25, Franklin, NY 13775 fwalker2@stny.rr.com

FRALEY AUCTION CO. Auctioneers & Sales Managers, Licensed & Bonded 1515 Kepner Hill Rd., Muncy, PA 570-546-6907 Fax 570-546-9344 www.fraleyauction.com GENE WOODS AUCTION SERVICE 5608 Short St., Cincinnatus, NY 13040 607-863-3821 www.genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com GOODRICH AUCTION SERVICE INC. 7166 St. Rt. 38, Newark Valley, NY 13811 607-642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com H&L AUCTIONS Malone, NY Scott Hamilton 518-483-8787 or 483-8576 Ed Legacy 518-483-7386 or 483-0800 518-832-0616 cell Auctioneer: Willis Shattuck • 315-347-3003 HARRIS WILCOX, INC. Bergen, NY 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com Sales Managers, Auctioneers, & Real Estate Brokers


To Have Your Auction Listed, See Your Sales Representative or Contact David Dornburgh at 518-673-0109 • Fax 518-673-2381 E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:30 AM: Woodhull, NY (Steuben Co) Space Farm Dairy Herd & Farm Machinery Auction. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-7282520 www.pirrunginc.com Monday, September 26 • Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Schoharie County 50 head Dairy. All stages of lactation. Selling due to loss of feed. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607847-8800 or 607-699-3637 www.hoskingsales.com • 6:00 PM: Military Memorabilia Private Collection. WWII Studebaker M29C Weasel, ‘55 Dodge M43 ambulance, ‘42 Dodge 1.5 ton truck, ‘67 Kaiser M52A2 semi tractor & more. Auctions International, 800-5361401 www.auctionsinternational.com Tuesday, September 27 • Ben K. Stolzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. PA Dairy Classic Sale featuring herd reductions for Liddleholme (NY) and Schug’s Holsteins (OH). 100 head will sell. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 9:00 AM: Spencer’s Inc. of Mt. Airy, 525 Quarry Rd. (Spencer’s yard), Mt. Airy, NC. One Owner Complete Liquidation Going out of Business Absolute Auction. Construction Equip., Trucks & Trailers. Online bidding is provided by RealtimeBid. Visit their Web site at www.realtimebid.com for more information and to bid online. Note: There is an additional 2% buyer’s premium for online bidders. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990

info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com Wednesday, September 28 • 10:00 AM: 7045 Blue Ridge Ave., Harrisburg, PA. Secured Creditors Auction of Construction Equip., Support Equip. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944, Site phone 863-6028365 www.lyonauction.com • 11:00 AM: Hardwick, VT. Complete Dispersal of registered Jersey herd, 110 head and all barn equip. for Maple View Farm. Sales Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, Auctioneer Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 neks@together.net • 11:00 AM: Cherry Creek Market, 6732 Pickup Hill Rd., Cherry Creek, NY. Monthly Feeder Sale. Followed by our regular Wednesday sale at 1:30 pm. Don Yahn, Mgr. & Auctioneer, Empire Livestock Marketing, 716-296-5041, 585-738-2104. • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: Barton, VT. Selling 75 head Beef Cattle, Equipment, Machinery & Hay for D&R Farms. Wrights Auction Service, 802-334-6115, www.wrightsauctions.com. Thursday, September 29 • 1250 Roosevelt Hwy., (Rt. 18), Hamlin, NY. Robert Caswell Construction Retirement Auction. Selling lifetime accumulation plus additions. Harris Wilcox, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-494-1880 www.harriswilcox.com • 10:00 AM: Bath, NY (Steuben Co,). Steuben Co. Surplus Vehicles, Heavy Equipment & Accessories. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Friday, September 30 • 9:00 AM: Showaker IH Sales & Service, 44 Hair Rd., Newville, PA. Public Auction of

rare & unique memorabilia. Two day event Sept. 30 - Oct. 1. Quality collection of Farmall, McCormick & IH. Leaman Auctions Ltd., 717-464-1128, AuctionZip Auctioneer ID #3721 ed@leamanauctions.com www.leamanauctions.com • 10:00 AM: Barker, NY. Atwater Farms Fall Consignment Auction- Featuring very sharp John Deere 9500 combine with 3 head, JStar 7200 tanker, JD skid steer and much more! Now accepting consignments. William Kent, Inc., Sale Managers and Auctioneers, 585-343-5449 www.williamkentinc.com Saturday, October 1 • 9:00 AM: 145 Paul Rd., Exit 17, Rt. 390, Rochester, NY. Monroe County Municipal Equipment Auction. Heavy Construction Equipment, Cars & Trucks. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 10:00 AM: 100 Donnertown Rd., Altoona, PA. Retirement Complete Liquidation Auction for Krieger Contracting. Crawler Tractors, Loaders, Excavators, Backhoes, Scrapers, Rollers, Haul Trucks, Equip. Trailers, Welders, Attachments and much more. Online bidding available at www.lyonauctionlive.com. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com Monday, October 3 • 1:00 PM: 1518 Hicks Field Rd., East Fort Worth, TX. Rental Fleet Auction of late model Rental Fleet Construction Equip., Attachments, Support, Aerials, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944, Site phone 817-847-2071

www.lyonauction.com Wednesday, October 5 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 12:00 PM: East Middlebury, VT. Annual Fall Dairy/Feeder Consignment Sale. Addison County Commission Sales, 800-339COWS or 802-388-2661. Thursday, October 6 • 1490 Crispin Dr., Elgin, IL. Remediation, Demolition, Asbestos Removal Contracting Equip., Tools & Accessories. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315633-2944, Site phone 262-903-6269 www.lyonauction.com Friday, October 7 • Tuscaloosa, AL. Late model Construction, Logging Equip., Attachments, Support, Pickups, Truck Tractors & Dump Trucks. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com Saturday, October 8 • Martinelli Construction, 234 Thomaston Rd., Morris, CT. 2008 IH 4400 Truck w/rolloff, Komatsu CK30 Track Skidsteer, Kubota Track Excavator; Utility & Equipment Trailers; IR 642 Lull Lift & Manlift; tools. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413-5696421 • 9:00 AM: Hamburg Fairgrounds, Hamburg, NY. Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com Wednesday, October 12 • Lexington, KY. Late model Cat & Komatsu Construction Equip. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-6332944 www.lyonauction.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock

PA RT I C I PAT I N G A U C T I O N E E R S HOSKING SALES Sales Managers & Auctioneer 6810 W. River Rd., Nichols, NY 13812 Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 005392 607-699-3637 • Fax 607-699-3661 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny.rr.com HOSKING SALES-FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK MARKET Tom & Brenda Hosking • AU 008392 P.O. Box 311, New Berlin, NY 13411 607-847-8800 • 607-699-3637 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771 www.hoskingsales.com hoskingsales@stny,rr.com LEAMAN AUCTIONS LTD 329 Brenneman Rd., Willow St., PA 17584 717-464-1128 • cell 610-662-8149 auctionzip.com 3721 leamanauctions.com KELLEHER’S AUCTION SERVICE R.D. 1, Little Falls, NY 315-823-0089 We Buy or Sell Your Cattle or Equipment on Commission or Outright In Business Since 1948!

MEL MANASSE & SON, AUCTIONEERS Sales Managers, Auctioneers & Real Estate Brokers Whitney Point, NY Toll free 800-MANASSE or 607-692-4540 Fax 607-692-4327 www.manasseauctions.com

NORTHAMPTON COOP. AUCTION Whately, MA • Farmer Owned Since 1949 Livestock Commission Auction Sales at noon every Tues. Consignments at 9 AM 413-665-8774

ROBERTS AUCTION SERVICE MARCEL J. ROBERTS Specializing in farm liquidations. 802-334-2638 802-777-1065 cell robertsauction@together.net

MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION 488 Cherry Hill Rd., Middlefield, CT 06455 Sale Every Monday Lisa Scirpo 860-883-5828 Sales Barn 860-349-3204 Res. 860-346-8550

NORTHERN NEW YORK DAIRY SALES North Bangor, NY 518-481-6666 Sales Mgrs.: Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818 Auctioneer John (Barney) McCracken 802-524-2991 www.nnyds.com

ROY TEITSWORTH, INC. AUCTIONEERS Specialist in large auctions for farmers, dealers, contractors and municipalities. Groveland, Geneseo, NY 14454 585-243-1563 www.teitsworth.com

MOHAWK VALLEY PRODUCE AUCTION 840 Fordsbush Rd., Fort Plain, NY 13339 518-568-3579 NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLE Norman Kolb & David Kolb, Sales Mgrs. Auctions Every Mon., Wed., & Thurs. 717-354-4341 Sales Mon., Wed. • Thurs. Special Sales NORTHEAST KINGDOM SALES INC. Jim Young & Ray LeBlanc Sales Mgrs. • Barton, VT Jim - 802-525-4774 Ray - 802-525-6913 neks@together.net

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. P.O. Box 607, Wayland, NY 14572 585-728-2520 Fax 585-728-3378 www.pirrunginc.com James P. Pirrung R.G. MASON AUCTIONS Richard G. Mason We do all types of auctions Complete auction service & equipment Phone/Fax 585-567-8844

TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Rt. 32 N., Schuylerville, NY 518-695-6663 Owner: Henry J. Moak WILLIAM KENT, INC. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Farm Real Estate Brokers • Stafford, NY 585-343-5449 • www.williamkentinc.com WRIGHT’S AUCTION SERVICE 48 Community Dr., Derby, VT 14541 802-334-6115 • www.wrightsauctions.com

Page 5 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

AUC TION CALENDAR


Section C - Page 6 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Auction Calendar, Continued (cont. from prev. page)

Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Friday, October 14 • Detroit, MI. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • Intercourse, PA. Plankenhorn Farms Complete Dispersal. Co-managed with Stonehurst Farms. Dr. Sam & Gail Simon, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 10:30 AM: Catskill Tractor Co., 384 Center St., Franklin, NY. Fall Inventory Reduction and Machinery Auction. Consignments accepted. Frank Walker Auctioneers, 607-829-2600 • 5:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Saturday, October 15 • Sweet Water Farm Auction, 26 Barker St., Three Rivers, MA. IH 5088 & 1086, JD 2020, Dozer, IH Silage Trucks, Equipment, Owner George Foskit. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413-569-6421 • 11298 State Route 149, Fort Ann, NY. Late model Construction Equip., Forestry Attachments, Support Equip., Tagalong & Equipment Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: Richfield Springs, NY. 63rd OHM Holstein Club Sale. 100 head of quality registered Holsteins sell. Hosted by Roedale Farm, the Pullis Family. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-847-8800 or 607-6993637, Brad Ainslie Sale Chairman 315822-6087 www.hoskingsales.com Wednesday, October 19 • Manassas, VA. Cat Construction Equip., Support, Attachments, Forklifts, Dump Trucks, Pickups & Equipment Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • Allentown, PA. State Auction. Complete Liquidation of Automotive Dismantling Operation. MAC Car Crusher, Rubber Tired Loaders, Rollback & Dump Trucks, Vans. Over 100 Cars (40-50 running), UNBELIEVABLE Accumulation of Motors, Transmissions, Shocks, Glass & Much More.Online bidding available. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315633-2944 www.lyonauction.com • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, October 20 • Darlington, PA. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com • 140 Manda Ct., Troy, MO. Complete Liquidation of Concrete Precast Plant plus Real

Estate. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers, 315-633-2944, Site phone 262-903-6269 www.lyonauction.com • Gordonville, PA. Jo-Lan Farm Complete Dispersal. John & Rachel Lantz, owners. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Friday, October 21 • Ben K. Stolzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. Vision-Gen & Partners Elite Offering. Hosted by Vision Genetics. Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Saturday, October 22 • 9:00 AM: Syracuse, NY (NYS Fairgrounds). Onondaga County Area Municipal Equipment Auction of Municipal & Contractor Equipment. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:30 AM: Woodhull, NY (Steuben Co.) Levi Farmwald Retirement Auction. Horses, Dairy Herd & Farm Machinery. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com • 11:00 AM: Dutchess County Fairgrounds, Rhinebeck, NY. The Eastern New York Fall Heifer Sale. kmooney498@aol.com, or call 845-7023643 Tuesday, October 25 • 10:00 AM: 12601 State Rd. 545, North Winter Garden, FL. Rental Returns of Late Model Construction, Support Equip., Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Wednesday, October 26 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, October 27 • Moira, NY. Carl & Annabelle Bilow. 85 head of Quality Dairy Cattle. “Super Milk” every year since 1986. Delarm & Treadway, Sale Managers & Auctioneers, 518-4834106 • Cleveland, OH. Complete Liquidation Cat Construction Equip. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Friday, October 28 • Bloomfield, NY. Bennett Farms Milking Herd & Bred Heifer Dispersal. Bennett Farms, Inc. owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Detroit, MI. Large Construction, Agricultural Equip., Attachments, Support Equip. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Saturday, October 29 • Syracuse, NY. Construction, Support, Attachments, Aerials, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Tuesday, November 1 • Pell City, AL. Truck Tractor & Specialized Trailer Auction. Large quantity of specialized trailers of different configurations: 19 axles, Trail Kings, Liddell, Hobb & others. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Wednesday, November 2 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Saturday, November 5 • Canaan Tire, Gandolfo Dr, Canaan, CT. 5 Oliver Tractors, 1989 Ford Service Truck, Tire and Service Equipment, Office Equipment. Auctioneer Phil Jacquier, 413-5696421 • Delaware, OH. Late Model Rental Return Construction Equip., Aerial Lifts, Attachments, Support Equip. & Camping Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com • Ithaca, NY. New York Holstein Fall Harvest Sale. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Ithaca, NY. NY Fall Harvest Sale. Hosted by Cornell University Dairy Science Club. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • 8:30 AM: Gray’s Field, Rt. 5, Fairlee, VT. Public Consignment Auction of Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Autos, Trucks, Trailers and small tools. Consignments accepted on Friday from 8 am till noon. C.W. Gray & Sons, Inc., Complete Auction Services, 802-785-2161 • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 9 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, November 10 • Ben K. Stolzfus Farm, Intercourse, PA. Reserved for a major New York Herd Dispersal w/ a BAA of 110%! Co-Managed by The Cattle Exchange & Stonehurst Farms. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com Friday, November 11 • 11:30 AM: Hosking Sales, 6096 NYS Rt. 8, New Berlin, NY (30 miles S. of Utica & 6 miles N. of New Berlin). Fall Premier All Breeds Sale. 100 head of quality all breeds sell. Call to participate in this sale. Tom & Brenda Hosking 607-847-8800 or 607-6993637 www.hoskingsales.com Saturday, November 12 • Madison, NY. Fern Hill Farm II Milking Herd Dispersal. 100 outstanding registered Holsteins sell. Jack Russin & Family, owners. The Cattle Exchange, Dave Rama, 607-746-2226 daveramasr@cattlexchange.com www.cattlexchange.com • Racine, WI. Late Model Earthmoving Equip., Truck Tractors, Dump Trailers, Equip. Trailers, Campers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Tuesday, November 15 • Houston, TX. Late Model Construction Equip., Aerials, Forklifts, Support, Trucks & Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Wednesday, November 16 • The Pines Farm, Barton, VT. 150th Top of Vermont Invitational Dairy Sale. Free turkey for every buyer. Sales Managers, Northeast Kingdom Sales, 802-525-4774, Auctioneer

Reg Lussier 802-626-8892 neks@together.net • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, November 17 • Bow, NH. Yoder & Frey Auctioneers, Inc., 419-865-3990 info@yoderandfrey.com www.yoderandfrey.com • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Saturday, November 19 • Ledyard, CT (Foxwood Casino). Earthmoving Construction Equip., Aerial Lifts, Forklifts, Support, Dump Trucks, Truck Tractors, Equip. & Dump Trailers. Alex Lyon & Son, Sales Managers & Auctioneers www.lyonauction.com Wednesday, November 23 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, November 30 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 3 • 9:00 AM: Teitsworth Auction Yard, Groveland, NY. Special Winter Consignment Auction of Farm & Construction Equipment, Heavy & Light Trucks, Liquidations & Consignments. Roy Teitsworth, Inc., Auctioneers, 585-243-1563. www.teitsworth.com • 10:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Feeder Cattle sale. Please vaccinate your cattle & bring documentation. Cattle accepted Thurs. & Fri. between 7:30 am - 6 pm. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 7 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Saturday, December 10 • 9:00 AM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Horse Sale. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com • 11:00 AM: Ulysses, PA (Potter Co.) Fox Hill Farms (The Hoopes Family) Complete line of upscale vegetable farm equipment. Real estate sells at 10:15 am. Pirrung Auctioneers, Inc. 585-728-2520 www.pirrunginc.com Wednesday, December 14 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Thursday, December 15 • 4:30 PM: Bath Market, Bath, NY. Special Feeder Calf and Beef Replacement Sales. Phil Laug, Mgr., Empire Livestock Marketing, 607-776-2000 or 315-427-7845. Wednesday, December 21 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com Wednesday, December 28 • 1:00 PM: Finger Lakes Livestock, 3 mi. E. of Canandaigua, NY. Regular livestock sale every Wednesday. Finger Lakes Livestock Exchange, 585-394-1515. www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com


MIDDLESEX LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middlefield, CT September 12, 2011 On the Hoof, Dollars/Cwt Calves:45-60# .25-.30; 6175# .35-.40; 76-90# .42.56; 91-105# .48-.5250; 106# & up .5750-.65. Farm Calves: .70-.85 Started Calves: .22-.28 Veal Calves: .85-1.35 Heifers: Open 75-132.50; Beef 79-85. Feeder Steers: .66-1.20; Beef .64-.83 Stock Bull: .59-1.35 Beef Bull: 73.50-85 Boars: one at 16 Sows: 32-50 Butcher Hogs: one at 65 Feeder Pigs: 60-75 Sheep, ea: 77-90 Lambs, ea: 60-190 Goats, ea: 85-190; Kids ea 42.50-140. Canners: up to 65 Cutters: 66-69 Utility: 70-73 Rabbits: 6-33 Chickens: 5-20 Ducks: 4-22 COSTA & SONS LIVESTOCK & SALES Fairhaven, MA September 14, 2011 Cows: Canners 30-57; Cutters 58-66; Util 66.5075.50. Bulls: 79.50-104 Steers: Ch 111-115.50; Sel 107-110.50; Hols. 72.50-102. Heifers: Ch 101-111.50; Sel 85-104; Hols. 78-90. Calves: 35-200/ea. Feeders: 58-151 Sheep: 87-106 Lambs: 145-181 Goats: 68-154/ea; Kids 35-111/ea. Sows: 45 Boars: 27 Feeder Pigs: 45-75/ea. Chickens: 3-15.50 Rabbits: 4.50-31 Ducks: 4.50-23 * Sale every Wed. @ 7 pm. FLAME LIVESTOCK Littleton, MA September 13, 2011 Beef Cattle: Canners 4055; Cutters 55-68; Util 6771; Bulls 70-90; Steers 90106; Heifers 60-78. Calves: Growers No. 1 .751.25; No. 2 .50-1; Veal .701.20; Heifers 1-2; Other .50-.75. Hogs: Feeders 3040/ea;Sows .40-.50; Roasters 65-80/ea; Boars .25; Market 50-70/ea. Sheep: 75-92; Lambs 1.70-2. Goats: Billies 150-210/ea; Kids 30-70/ea. NORTHAMPTON COOPERATIVE AUCTION, INC Whately, MA September 13, 2011 Calves: (/cwt) 0-60# 5-25; 61-75# 10-62; 76-95# 1562; 96-105# 59-61; 106# &

up 56-64. Farm Calves: 70-180/cwt Start Calves: 36/cwt. Feeders: 85-125/cwt Heifers: 82.50-90/cwt. Steers: 60/cwt. Bulls: 85/cwt. Canners: 20-60/cwt Cutters: 62-68/cwt Utility: 70-77.50/cwt Sows: 45.50/cwt Boars: 20-29/cwt Shoats: 73-80/ea. Pigs: 46/ea. Lambs: 140-200/cwt Sheep: 40-94/cwt Goats: 5-180/ea. Rabbits: 1-7/ea. Poultry: .50-12/ea. Hay (22 lots): .505.10/bale. northamptonlivestockauction.homestead.com HACKETTSTOWN AUCTION Hackettstown, NJ No report CAMBRIDGE VALLEY LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Cambridge, NY No report EMPIRE LIVESTOCK MARKET BURTON LIVESTOCK Vernon, NY September 8, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. .75-2.30; Grower Buull Calves over 92# .80-1.30; 80-92# .801.25. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .65-.77; Lean .52-.65; Hvy. Beef Bulls .74-.85. Dairy Replacements (/hd): Fresh Cows 9001500; Springing Cows 8501400; Springing Hfrs. 10001700; Bred Hfrs. 900-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 900-1600; Open Hfrs. 500-1000; Started Hfrs. 150-400. Beef (/#): Feeders .701.20. Lamb & Sheep (/#): Feeder .80-1.50; Market .75-1; Slaughter Sheep .35-.65. Goats (/hd): Billies 100190; Nannies 75-125; Kids 30-80. CENTRAL BRIDGE LIVESTOCK Central Bridge, NY September 8, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. .75-2.30; Grower Bull over 92# .801.30; 80-92# .80-1.25. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .65-.77; Lean .52-.65; Hvy. Beef Bulls .74-.85. Dairy Replacements (/hd): Fresh Cows 9001500; Springing Cows 8501400; Springing Hfrs. 10001700;Bred Hfrs. 900-1200; Fresh Hfrs. 900-1600; Open Hfrs. 500-1000; Started Hfrs. 150-400. Beef (/#): Feeders .70-1.20 Lamb & Sheep (/#): Feeder .80-1.50; Market .75-1; Slaughter Sheep .35-.65. Goats (/hd): Billies 100-

190; Nannies 75125; Kids 30-80. CHATHAM MARKET Chatham, NY September 12, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. 1.001.50; Grower over 92# .65.85; 80-92# .55-.70; Bob Veal .44-.50. Cull Cows (/hd): Gd .72.76; Lean .58-.66; Hvy. Beef Bulls .79-.8150. Beef (/hd): Feeders 106118; Veal 44-74; Hfrs. 75.50-87.50. Lamb/Sheep (/#): Feeder 1.40-1.70; Market 1.85-2; Slaughter .60-.70. Goats (/hd): Billes 150185; Nannies 120-130; Kids 35-70. Swine (/#): Hog .62-.69; Sow .40-.45; Feeder Pig .40-.70. *Buyers always looking for pigs. CHERRY CREEK Cherry Creek, NY September 7, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. 2; Grower Bull over 92# 1-1.25; 80922# .50-1.15; Bob Veal .05-.50. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .60-.75; Lean .45-.62; Hvy. Beef Bulls .83. Beef (/#): Ch 1-1.13; Sel .88-.95; Hols. Ch .94; Sel .80-.85. DRYDEN MARKET Dryden, NY No report GOUVERNEUR LIVESTOCK Governeur, NY September 1, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. 1.352.85; Grower Bulls over 92# .85-1.45; 80-92# .60.80; Bob Veal .20-.74. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .65-.82; Lean .50-.78; Hvy Beef Bulls .72-.85. PAVILION MARKET Pavilion, NY September 8, 2011 Calves (/#): Grower Calves 2.50; over 92# 1-1.25; 8092# .70-1.15; Bob Veal .05.75. Cull Cows (/#): Gd .60-.75; Lean .40-.62; Hvy. Beef Bulls .75. Beef (/#): Feeders 1.06. BATH MARKET Bath, NY September 8, 2011 Calves (/#): Hfrs. 1.622.10; Grower Bulls over 92# .90-1.30; 80-92# .801.10; Bob Veal .20-.50. Cull Calves (/#): Gd .62.74; Lean .58-.68; Hvy. Beef Bulls .70-.82. Goats (/hd): Billies 70-90; Nannies 40-70; Kids 20-25. Swine (/#): Sow .48-.54; Feeder Pig (/hd) 35-45. FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK AUCTION Canandaigua, NY

Gouverneur

Canandaigua Pavilion Penn Yan Dryden Cherry Creek

Vernon New Berlin

Cambridge

Central Bridge

Bath

Chatham

September 14, 2011 Dairy Cows for Slaughter: Bone Util 59-76; Canners/Cutters 39-71; HY Util 68.50-83. Slaughter Calves: Bobs 95-110# 30-60; 80-95# 2557.50; 60-80# 20-55. Dairy Calves Ret. to Feed: Bull over 95# 60120; 80-95# 55-115; 7080# 50-85; Hrs. 100-200; Beef Bull over 95# 60117.50. Beef Steers: Ch 100-117; Sel 85-95; Hols. Ch grain fed 88-100; Sel 75-84. Hogs: Slaughter US 1-3 60; Sows US 1-3 40-56; Boars US 1-3 21. Feeder Lambs: Ch 50-80# 130-197.50. Market Lambs: Ch 80100# 117.50-140. Slaughter Sheep: M 39. Rams: Ch over 130# 75. Goats (/hd): Billies L 110# & up 97.50-175. Nannies: L 60-80. FINGER LAKES PRODUCE AUCTION Penn Yan, NY September 7, 2011 Acorns: .50-.70 Apples (1/2 bu): 4.2512.50 Beans (1/2 bu): 1-14.50 Beets (bunch): .50-1.75 Broccoli (hd): .45-1.75 Butternuts: .50-1 Cantaloupe: .10-2.05 Cauliflower (hd): 1.852.35 Cucumbers (1/2 bu): 1-10 Eggplants (1/2 bu): 2-8 Eggs (dz): 1.05-1.75 Grapes (12 bu): 9-26 Hot Peppers (1/2 bu): 3.50-10.50 JBL’s (1/2 bu): 4-7.50 Lima Beans (1/2 bu): 5-10 Mums: 3-10 Nectarines (8 qt.): 5.50-10 Onions (bu): .05-.25 Peaches (1/2 bu): 6.50-16 Pears (1/2 bu): 6-17.50 Peppers (1/2 bu): 2-11.50 Pickles (1/2 bu): 2.50-18 Pie Pumpkins: .25-.55 Plums (peck): 5-12 Potatoes (1/2 bu): 8-10.50 Pumpkins: .30-.55

Radishes: .30-.55 Raspberries (pt): 1.452.85 Salad Tomatoes (pt): .451 Salt Potatoes (1/2 bu): 8.50-12.50. Sweet Corn (dz): 7-12 Summer Squash (1/2 bu): 2.50-9 Tomatoes (25#): 7-25 Watermelons: 1.25-2.60 Zucchini (1/2 bu): .75-9 Produce Mon @ 10 am, Wed-Fri @ 9 am sharp. HOSKING SALES New Berlin, NY No report BELKNAP LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belknap, PA No report BELLEVILLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Belleville, PA September 7, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 71.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 67.25-68.50, lo dress 66; Boners 80-85% lean 6065.25, hi dress 67.75; Lean 85-90% lean 54.25-60.75, lo dress 46.50-54. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1610-1790# 76.25-77.75. Feeder Cattle: Steers L 3 Hols. 210-425# 74-75; 575785# 69-75. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 95-110# 115-145; No. 2 95-110# 80-115; 80-90# 82-100; No. 3 70-105# 5077; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 85105# 210-350/hd; No. 2 80100# 85-130/hd. Vealers: 65-85# 20-49. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 260275# 140-165/hd. Sows: US 1-3 300# 140/hd. Boars: 370# 125/hd. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 2045# 24-45. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 40-65# 100-160; 70-100# 110-160; 110130# 145-160; Yearlings 90-120# 105; Ewes Gd 2-3

135# 80; Rams 100# 105. Slaughter Goats: Sel 2 under 20# 10-40; 20-50# 30-50; Nannies Sel 1 130140# 95-110; Sel 2 80130# 70-95; Billies Sel 1 140# 120. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA September 13, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Sel & Ch 1090-1390# 110113.50; cpl Hols. 10651190# 95.50-97.25. Slaughter Cows: Boners 65-73; Lean 68.50-74.50; Big Middle/lo dress/lights 57.50-68; Shelly 56 & dn. Bulls: 1150-1380# 81.5088.50. Feeder Cattle: Bulls Beef 825# 84. Calves Ret. to Farm: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-115# 135140; No. 2 80-125# 100135; No. 3 75-155# 55-98; Util 50 & dn; Hols. Hfr. 1 100# 210. Swine: Hogs 205-240# 5659.50; 250-265# 57.5059.50; 275-290# 58-60.25; thin 275-290# 53-55; Sows 480# 61. Feeder Pigs: As Is/Roasters 90-105# 35-70 Boar: 150-575# 33.50-40. Goats: L Billies 155; Fleshy Kids 102-112; Small/thin 24-69. Lamb: Gd & Ch 60-90# 158-160; one 145# 122. Sheep: all wts. 65-97. Sale every Tuesday * 5 pm for Rabbits, Poultry & Eggs * 6 pm for Livestock starting with Calves * Special Fed & Feeder Cattle Sale Tues., Sept. 20. CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC Carlisle, PA Small Animal Sale September 13, 2011 Rabbits & Bunnies: 1-8 Pigeons: 1.50-5 Turkeys: 14 Ducks/Ducklings: 1-9.50 Goose: 3 Parakeet: 8

Page 7 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT


Section C - Page 8 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT Rabbit Families: 9-10 Chicks/Chickens: .50-9 Turkin: 1 Guineas: 5-7.25 Guinea Pigs: .50-2.50 All animals sold by the piece. Sale starts at 5 pm CARLISLE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC State Graded Feeder Pig Sale Carlisle, PA No report *Next State Graded Sales Fri., Sept. 16. Receiving 7:30 am till 10 am. Sale time 1 pm.

Pennsylvania Markets Mercer

Jersey Shore

New Wilmington

Dewart Leesport Belleville Homer City

New Holland Carlisle Lancaster Paradise

Eighty-Four DEWART LIVESTOCK AUCTION MARKET, INC Dewart, PA September 12, 2011 Bulls: 1516-1664# 7981.50. Cows: Breakers 65.50-68; Boners 60.50-65; Lean 5559.50. Calves: 167. Bulls No. 1 94# & up 140-172.50; 8090# 105-145; No. 2 94# & up 105-135; 80-90# 75100; Hfrs. 94-106# 340370; 88-92# 285-360. Feeder Pigs: (/hd) 42-70. Goats (/hd): Billies up tp 150. Hay: 8 lds, 90-300/ton. EarCorn: 6 lds, 185215/ton. Straw: 4 lds, 145-180/ton. EIGHTY FOUR LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Holland, PA September 12, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1225-1305# 115.50-116; Hols. Ch 2-3 1305# 93.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1255# 117.50; Ch 2-3 1120-1185# 112-115. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 75.5078; Breakers 75-80% lean 71.50-74.50, hi dress 75, lo dress 69-71; Boners 8085% lean 67-71.50, hi dress 72-74, lo dress 6566.50; Lean 85-90% lean 60-65.50, hi dress 69, lo dress 57-59. Slaugter Bulls: YG 1 1310-2155# 79-83; YG 2 1220-2100# 73-77. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-500 126.50-137.50; 500-700# 119-124; 700900# 107-116; M&L 2 300500# 117-125; 500-700# 107-115. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 117.50-125; 500700# 110-118; M&L 2 300500# 106-115; 500-700# 103-109. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 118-125, few fancy 131-134; 500-700# 111118; M&L 2 300-500# 100112.50; 500-700# 96-107. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 90-120# 110-140; No. 2 90-130# 90-107.50; No. 3 85-120# 45-87.50; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 90-100# 215235; Beef 95-200# 127.50140.

Vealers: 65-120# 15-45. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 45-50% lean 260280# 63-66. Sows: US 1-3 300-500# 55-56. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 1-3 50-80# 187.50-199; 80100# 180-191; 100-130# 165-175. Slaughter Yearlings: 123150# 87.50-92.50. Ewes: Util 1-2 215# 70. Slaughter Goats: Sel 1 48# 72.50; 60-70# 92.50117.50; 90-95# 130-135; Sel 2 45# 70; 75# 62.50; Nannies Sel 2 70-85# 5557.50; 110# 57.50/cwt; Billies Sel 1 195# 85/cwt; Sel 2 145# 85/cwt. GREENCASTLE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Greencastle, PA September 12, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1294-1564# 116118.50; Ch 2-3 1228-1596# 111-116.50; Sel 1-3 11761336# 107-111. Slaughter Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1520# 98.50; 1646# 97; Ch 2-3 1306-1506# 93-95; Sel 1-3 1084-1592# 87-92.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1410# 113.50; Ch 2-3 1056-1580# 107.50109.50; full/YG 4-5 13021580# 103-106; Sel 1-3 1050-1380# 100-105. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 73.5076.25; Breakers 75-80% lean 68.25-73; Boners 8085% lean 64.25-69, hi dress 69-72.25, lo dress 57.50-63.25; Lean 88-90% lean 57-64, hi dress 65-70, lo dress 50-57. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1372-2146# 73-83; YG 2 1136-1486# 72-74.50; Bullocks 1146-1408# 86.5095. Feeder Steers: L 1 888# 111; M&L 2 402-412# 100107.50; L 3 Hols. 448# 91; 612-912# 86-92. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 208-264# 112.50-122.50; 290-422# 117.50-120; L 2 446# 102.50. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 316475# 115-132.50; 538724# 92-125; L 2 248#

117.50. Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 96-112# 130-157.50; 90-92# 125.50-135; No. 2 94-125# 100-135; 86-92# 90-120; No. 3 94-115# 65100; 74-92# 52.50-80; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 82-94# 200-245. Vealers: Util 58-118# 17.50-59. Slaughter Hogs: Sows US 1-3 368-488# 48-54; 630# 55; Jr. Boars 189-221# 4549. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 Roasters 176-202# 5970/cwt. Slaughter Lambs: Ch 2-3 52-65# 175-190.50; 86102# 157.50-195; 110136# 170-190; Ewes Gd 23 96-142# 75-80; Rams 162# 85. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-55# 85-110; 60-70# 100-115; Sel 2 20-35# 37.50-72.50; 40-60# 57.50100; Nannies Sel 1 90130# 90-102.50; Sel 2 80120# 60-85; Billies Sel 1 140-170# 130-155; Sel 2 120-140# 112.50-125. INDIANA FARMERS LIVESTOCK AUCTION Homer City, PA No report KUTZTOWN HAY & GRAIN AUCTION Kutztown, PA September 10, 2011 Alfalfa: 3 lds, 135-185 Mixed Hay: 7 lds, 125-230 Timothy: 2 lds, 195-300 Grass: 3 lds, 150-280 Straw: 6 lds, 150-200 Rye Seed: 1 ld 13.50/bu. Firewood: 1 ld, 55 LANCASTER WEEKLY CATTLE SUMMARY New Holland, PA September 9, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1250-1645# 115120; Ch 2-3 1165-1535# 110.75-116.50; Sel 2-3 1070-1490# 108-113; Hols. Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1430-1575# 97-100; Ch 2-3 12851650# 91.50-96; Sel 2-3 1290-1530# 90-92.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1200-1300# 110.50-113; Ch 2-3 1100-

1335# 107.25-109.75; Sel 2-3 1030-1225# 104.25107. Slaughter Cows: Prem Whites 65-75% lean 7076.50, lo dress 68.50-70; Breakers 75-80% lean 6872, hi dress 72-76, lo dress 62-68; Boners 80-85% lean 64-68.50, hi dress 68.5073, lo dress 59.50-64; Lean 85-90% lean 58-62, hi dress 63-66.50, lo dress 51-56.50. Slaughter Bulls: Mon. YG 1 1555-1970# 83.50-86; Bullocks 890-1385# 84.5088.50, hi dress 810-1370# 90-95; lo dress 750-1680# 80.50-84; Thurs. YG 1 1035-2050# 79-83, hi dress 1325-1890# 87-91, lo dress 1015-1315# 7679. Graded Holstein Bull Calves: Mon. No. 1 95130# 145-160; 80-90# 105117; No. 2 95-120# 132147; 75-90# 80-100; No. 3 100-115# 100-120; 80-95# 40-75; Util 70-120# 30-50; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 95-105# 300-340; No. 2 75-115# 140-260; Tues. No. 1 112121# 110-113; 95-103# 121-123; 85-90# 90-108; No. 2 114# 107-110; 95103# 120-128; 75-90# 87102; No. 3 82-109# 70-87; pkg 70# 50; Util 74-107# 30-45; Graded Hols. Hfrs No. 1 pkg. 115# 335; pkg 101# 360; pkg 95# 325; pkg 85# 260; No. 2 91-108# 260; 73-83# 50-100; nontubing 64-83# 12-45. Graded Bull Calves: Thurs. No. 1 86-118# 112127; No. 2 112-128# 108112; 88-112# 119-126; pkg 80-86# 95; No. 3 80-130# 85-102; pkg 72-78# 50; Util 80-110# 30-45; pkg 60-78# 15; Hols. hfr. calves No. 1 95-105# 230-290; No. 2 75100# 200-185. LEBANON VALLEY LIVESTOCK AUCTION Fredericksburg, PA September 6, 2011 Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 68-73.50; Boners 80-85% lean 62.5067.50, lo dress 55-58; Lean 88-90% lean 55-60.50, lo dress 45-51.

Feeder Calves: No. 1 Hols. Bulls 95-120# 115-148; 8090# 70-115; No. 2 95-120# 80-120; No. 3 90-120# 3060. Vealers: 60-100# 10-45. LEESPORT LIVESTOCK AUCTION Leesport, PA September 7, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Ch 2-3 1150-1415# 107.50110.50; Hols. Ch 2-3 13751490# 97.25-98.25. Slaughter Heifers: Sel 2-3 1100-1230# 80-88. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 67-70.50; Boners 80-85% lean 6267.50;Lean 85-90% lean 57-62.50, hi dress 62.5067.50, lo dress 48-53.50. Vealers: Util 70-105# 1040. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-120# 122.50137.50; 80-90# 80-105; No. 2 95-125# 105-125; No. 3 90-115# 90-105; 70-90# 40-90; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 110-115# 240-260. Lambs: Ch 1-3 40-70# 195-215. Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 85-87.50; Nannies Sel 1 80-130# 94-130; Sel 2 80130# 71-90. MIDDLEBURG LIVESTOCK AUCTION Middleburg, PA September 6, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1220-1475# 116116.50; Ch 2-3 1130-1500# 111-115; full/YG 4-5 13351385# 109.50-111; Sel 1-3 1090-1285# 107.50-111. Slaughter Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1315-1500# 99.50-103; Ch 2-3 1235-1570# 95-99.50; 1710# 87-90; Sel 1-3 11901570# 89-94.50. Slaughter Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 1195-1295# 112.50-113; Ch 2-3 10551435# 106.50-112. Slaughter Cows: Prem. Whites 65-75% lean 7375.50, hi dress 80.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 6772, lo dress 64; Boners 8085% lean 63-68, lo dress 55-56; Lean 85-90% lean 58-64, lo dress 48-54.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1470-1855# 84.50-92; Bullock 1235# 99. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 655# 105; Herefords 345445# 92-100; M&L 2 325487# 100-111; 677-990# 91-99; L 3 Hols. 3050-370# 77-82; 500-915# 74-82. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 290-425# 90-104; 530770# 82-92; Herefords 255385# 92-107; M&L 2 480# 88; 610# 89. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 365490# 90-113; 517-785# 91105; Herefords 390# 87; L 3 Hols. 810# 82. Feeder Calves: Hols. Bulls No. 1 95-125# 140-169; 8590# 122-1440; No. 2 95-

115# 100-137; 80-90# 87120; No. 3 70-115# 40-85; Hols. Hfrs. No. 1 85-125# 190-245; No. 2 Hols. Hfrs 70-95# 140-185. Vealers: Util 60-95# 10-55. Slaughter Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 49-54% lean 230275# 64-66, single 73.50; 280-283# 64-66.75; 4550% lean 235-277# 6364.50; 285-310# 62-65. Sows: US 1-3 365-478# 51-59.25; 635-680# 65.7566. Boars: 530-765# 33.5033.75; Jr. 305-335# 54-56. Feeder Pigs: US 1-3 3555# 44-54; 65-80# 45-59. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch 2-3 35-62# 137-150; 102# 160-162; Yearlings 80-95# 97-112; Ewes Gd 2-3 112-158# 70-97; Rams 175-215# 117. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 45# 82; Sel 2 under 20# 20-22; 25-40# 32-50. Slaughter Nannies: Sel 1 120# 90-107; Sel 2 90120# 70; Sel 3 70-110# 4062. Billies: Sel 1 120# 130. Wethers: Sel 2 100# 112120. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK AUCTION Martinsburg, PA September 12, 2011 Cattle: 118 Steers: Ch 105-112; Gd 100-105. Heifers: Ch 104-110; Gd 98-103. Cows: Util & Comm. 65-75; Canner/lo Cutter 65 & dn. Bullocks: Gd & Ch 72-82 Bulls: YG 1 65-75 Feeder Cattle: Steers 80105; Bulls 70-95; Hfrs. 6590. Calves: 90. Ch 100112.50; Gd 80-95; Std 1550; Hols. Bulls 90-130# 50120; Hols. Hfrs. 90-130# 100-200. Hogs: 66. US 1-2 68-72; US 1-3 63-65; Sows US 13 50-60; Boars 25-60. Feeder Pigs: 13. US 1-3 20-50# 30-48 Sheep: 49. Lambs Ch 160180; Gd 150-160; SI Ewes 60-80. Goats: 20-140 MORRISON’S COVE HAY REPORT Martinsburg, PA September 12, 2011 Alfalfa/Grass: 225-255 Mixed: 95-145 Rd. Bale: 85-120 Lg. Rd, Bales: 165 Straw: 150-175 Hay Auction held every Monday at 12:30 pm. MORRISON’S COVE LIVESTOCK, POULTRY & RABBIT REPORT Martinsburg, PA September 12, 2011 Roosters: 4.50-7 Hens: .25-3 Banties: .10-1.75 Pigeons: .50-4.75


Ducks: 3-9 Bunnies: 1-5.50 Rabbits: 6-10 Auction held every Monday at 7 pm. NEW HOLLAND SALES STABLES New Holland, PA September 8, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1250-1615# 116.50120; Ch 2-3 1175-1435# 113.50-116.50; Sel 2-3 1070-1425# 109-113. Holstein Steers: Ch 2-3 1295-1650# 91.50-96; Sel 2-3 1290-1530# 90-92.50. Slaughter Cows: Prem. White 65-75% lean 74.5076.50, lo dress 68.5072.50; Breakers 75-80% lean 69-72, hi dress 72.5076, lo dress 62-66; Boners 80-85% lean 64.50-68.50, hi dress 69-73, lo dress 59.50-63; Lean 88-90% lean 58-62, hi dress 63.5066.50, lo dress 53.5056.50. Slaughter Bulls: YG 1 1035-2050# 79-83, hi dress 1325-1890# 87-91; lo dress 1015-1315# 76-79. Graded Bull Calves: Hols. No. 1 86-118# 112-127; No. 2 112-128# 108-112; 88-112# 119-126; pkg 8086# 95; No. 3 80-130# 85102; pkg 72-78# 50; Util 80110# 30-45; 60-78# 15. Holstein Heifer Calves: No. 1 95-105# 230-290; No. 2 75-100# 200-185. NEW HOLLAND PIG AUCTION New Holland, PA September 7, 2011 US 1-2: 18 hd, 20-30# 110135; 46 hd, 30-40# 100120; 9 hd, 40-45# 70-80; 56 hd, 70. US 2: 20 hd, 20-25# 180220; 50 hd, 30-35# 100105; 42 hd, 40-55# 70-80 *Next Feeder Pig sale is Wed., Sept. 21.

NEW HOLLAND SHEEP & GOATS AUCTION New Holland, PA September 12, 2011 Slaughter Lambs: Nontraditional markets: Wooled & Shorn Ch & Pr 2-3 5060# 206-221; 60-80# 196211; 80-90# 192-207; 90110# 196-211; 110-130# 180-194; Wooled & Shorn Ch 2-3 40-60# 174-202; 60-80# 184-201; 80-90# 182-196; 90-110# 179-194. Slaughter Ewes: Gd 2-3 M flesh 120-160# 104-119; 160-200# 102-117; Util 1-2 thin flesh 120-160# 72-87. Slaughter Kids: Sel 1 4060# 92-132; 60-80# 118143; 80-90# 130-145; Sel 2 30-40# 60-70; 40-60# 66100; 60-80# 94-118; 8090# 118-126; 90-100# 120134; Sel 3 30-40# 43-57; 40-60# 49-80; 60-80# 7491. Slaughter Nannies/Does: Sel 1 80-130# 106-120; 130-180# 111-126; Sel 2 80-130# 86-100; 130-180# 89-114; Sel 3 50-80# 5065; 80-130# 66-81. Slaughter Bucks/Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 128-142; 150-250# 168-122; 150250# 128-140. NEW WILMINGTON LIVESTOCK AUCTION New Wilmington, PA No report NEW WILMINGTON PRODUCE AUCTION, INC. New Wilmington, PA No report PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Market Summary Compared to last week corn sold .20 to .30 lower, wheat sold .30-.40 lower, barley sold .10 higher, oats sold steady to .05 higher & Soybeans sold steady to

.05 higher. EarCorn sold 510 lower. All prices /bu. except ear corn is /ton. Southeastern PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.52-8.48, Avg 7.99, Contracts 6.387.46; Wheat No. 2 Range 6.81-7.79, Avg 7.33, Contracts 6.09-7.05; Barley No. 3 Range 4.70-5.10, Avg 4.90; Oats No. 2 Range 5.20; Soybeans No 2 Range 13.54-14.06, Avg 13.79, Contracts 13.6613.23; EarCorn Range 235-235. Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.70-8.65, Avg 8.31; Barley No. 3 Range 4.754.95, Avg 4.81; Oats No. 2 Range 3.80-4.30, Avg 4; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.65-13.95, Avg 13.70; EarCorn Range 195-250, Avg 222.50. South Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.86-8.10, Avg 7.98; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.41-7.25, Avg 6.31; Barley No. 3 Range 4.255.30, Avg 4.87; Oats No. 2 Range 3.25-5, Avg 3.87; Soybeans No. 2 Range 14.15-14.20, Avg 14.17; EarCorn Range 165. Lehigh Valley Area: Corn No. 2 Range 8.05-8.22, Avg 8.11; Wheat No. 2 Range 7.40; Barley No. 3 Range 5.05; Oats No. 2 Range 4.50; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.50-14.49, Avg 13.86; Gr. Sorghum Range 7.90. Eastern & Central PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.528.65, Avg 8.16, Mo. Ago 8.01, Yr Ago 3.42; Wheat No. 2 Range 5.41-7.79, Avg 6.88, Mo Ago 6.35, Yr Ago 3.16; Barley No. 3 Range 4.25-5.30, Avg 4.88, Mo Ago 4.82, Yr Ago 2.23; Oats No. 2 Range 3.255.20, Avg 4.13, Mo Ago 4.32, Yr Ago 2.40; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.5014.49, Avg 13.88, Mo Ago 13.75, Yr Ago 10.52;

EarCorn Range 165-250; Avg 211.25, Mo Ago 212.50, Yr Ago 107.15. Western PA: Corn No. 2 Range 7.25-8.50, Avg 7.74;Wheat No. 2 Range 6.55; Oats No. 2 Range 3.50-4, Avg 3.72; Soybeans No. 2 Range 13.72. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Weekly Livestock Summary September 9, 2011 Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 115.50-120; Ch 1-3 110115; Sel 1-2 108-111. Holstein Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 97-100; Ch 2-3 91.75-96; Sel 1-2 89-92.50. Heifers: Hi Ch & Pr 2-3 110.50-113.50; Ch 1-3 106.50-110.50; Sel 1-2 101-106. Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 68-74; Boners 80-85% lean 63.50-70; Lean 8590% lean 57-62. Bulls: YG 1 83-91; YG 2 76-84. Feeder Steers: M&L 1 300-500# 117-143; 500700# 114-137; M&L 2 300500# 107-134; 500-700# 93-127. Feeder Heifers: M&L 1 300-500# 107-136; 500700# 101-127.50; M&L 2 300-500# 115-120; 500700# 80-111. Feeder Bulls: M&L 1 300500# 92.50-135; 500-700# 93-125; M&L 2 300-500# 102.50-127; 500-700# 93107. Vealers: Util 60-120# 1040. Farm Calves: No. 1 Hols. bulls 95-125# 115-160; No 2 95-125# 85-140; No. 3 80-120# 30-85; No. 1 Hols. Hfrs. 84-105# 240-340; No. 2 80-105# 140-260. Hogs: Barrows & Gilts 4954% lean 220-270# 62-68; 45-50% lean 220-270# 60.50-63. Sows: US 1-3 300-500#

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56-60; 500-700# 61-64.50. Feeder Pigs: US 1-2 2030# 110-135; 30-40# 100120; 40-60# 70-80; 50-60# 70; US 2 20-30# 180-220; 30-40# 100-105; 40-50# 70-80. Slaughter Sheep: Lambs Ch & Pr 2-3 40-60# 212226; 60-80# 200-215; 80110# 190-212; Ch 1-3 4060# 178-194; 60-80# 186192; 80-110# 180-188. Ewes: Gd 2-3 120-160# 114-129; 160-200# 116131; Util 1-2 120-160# 88103; 160-200# 82-84. Slaughter Goats: Kids Sel 1 40-60# 70-118; 60-80# 112-127; 80-100# 126-141; Sel 2 40-60# 56-72; 60-80# 82-102; Sel 3 40-60# 5068; 60-80# 60-80. Nannies: Sel 1 80-130# 105-119; 130-180# 108123; Sel 2 80-130# 92-107; Sel 3 50-80# 48-63; 80130# 68-81. Billies: Sel 1 100-150# 127-142; 150-250# 165180; Sel 2 100-150# 116131. PA DEPT OF AGRICULTURE Hay Market Summary September 12, 2011 Hay & Straw Market For Eastern PA: All hay prices paid by dealers at the farm and /ton. Compared to last week hay & straw sold steady. All hay and straw reported sold /ton. Alfalfa 130-200; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 130-210; Timothy 120-180; Straw 100-150 clean; Mulch 60-75. Summary of Lancaster Co. Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 122 lds Hay, 20 Straw. Alfalfa 218-315; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 115400; Timothy 175-365; Grass Hay 135-260; Straw 90-220 clean. Diffenbach Auct, N. Holland: August 22, 42 lds Hay, 8 lds Straw. Alfalfa 130-315; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 130-400; Timothy 175-365; Grass 160 clean. Green Dragon, Ephrata: August 26, 36 lds Hay, 3 Straw. Alfalfa 160-300; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 135315; Timothy 152-290; Grass Hay 145-205; Straw 147-187 clean. Weaverland Auct, New Holland: September 8, 2 lds Hay, 0 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 165175. Wolgemuth Auction: Leola, PA: September 7, 5 lds Hay, 0 lds Straw. Alfalfa 255; Alfalfa/Grass Mix 235280; Straw 185-200 clean. Summary of Central PA Hay Auctions: Prices/ton, 59 Loads Hay, 7 Straw. Alfalfa 100-230; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 95267.50; Timothy 125-225; Grass 80-200; Straw 150200 clean. Belleville Auct, Belleville:

September 7, 21 lds Hay, 0 lds Straw. Alfalfa 110-220; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 145267.50; Timothy 155-162; Grass Hay 80-192.50. Dewart Auction, Dewart: August 24, 3 Lds Hay, 1 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 170; Grass Hay 150; Straw 195 clean. Greencastle Livestock: August 22 & 25, 9 lds Hay, 0 ld Straw. Alfalfa/Grass 70100. Kutztown Auction, Kutztown: August 27, 18 lds Hay, 4 Straw. Alfalfa 100230; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 95-208; Timothy 225; Grass Hay 110-200; Straw 155200 clean. Middleburg Auct, Middleburg: August23, 8 lds Hay, 2 Straw. Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 115-250; Timothy 125; Straw 150 clean. Leinbach’s Mkt, Shippensburg: August 13 & 16, 25 lds Hay, 6 Straw. Alfalfa 170-300; Alfalfa/Grass Mixed 75-250; Timothy 145-165; Grass Hay 227; Straw 90-145 clean. New Wilmington Livestock, New Wilmington: August 19, 3 lds Hay, 1 lds Straw. Alfalfa 200; Timothy 150; Grass Hay 200; Straw 145 clean. VINTAGE SALES STABLES Paradise, PA September 12, 2011 Slaughter Steers: Hi Ch & Pr 3-4 1215-1630# 118122, mostly 118.50-121; Ch 2-3 1180-1605# 115118; Sel 2-3 1090-1380# 111-114.50; Hols. Ch 2-3 1225-1360# 95.50-97.75. Slaughter Heifers: Ch 2-3 1095-1270# 111.50-113; full 1060-1155# 108-110. Slaughter Cows: Breakers 75-80% lean 64.5067.50; Boners 80-85% lean 62-64; Lean 85-90% lean 58-62.50, lo dress 52-57. Holstein Bull Calves: No. 1 95-120# 97-112; 85-90# 65-75; No. 2 100-120# 7597; 85-95# 50-65; No. 3 95125# 50-60; 70-90# 40-50; Util 65-115# 12-35. * Next Feeder Cattle Sale Oct. 7. WEAVERLAND AUCTION New Holland, PA September 8, 2011 Loads: 2 Mixed Hay: 2 lds, 165-175 WOLGEMUTH AUCTION * Leola, PA September 14, 2011 Loads: 59 Alfalfa: 6 lds, 189-310 Mixed Hay: 28 lds, 188280 Timothy: 4 lds, 176-230 Grass: 7 lds, 205-265 Straw: 7 lds, 191-230 Baleage: 1 ld, 42 Rye: 3 lds, 14-14.75

Page 9 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

WEEKLY MARKET REPORT


Section C - Page 10 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Reforms of federal order dairy pricing system, featured in Foundation for the Future package, to simplify milk pricing Past attempts to reform — and simplify — federal regulations affecting dairy pricing have achieved mixed results at best, but the changes included in the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF)’s Foundation for the Future (FFTF) program represent a once-in-a-generation opportunity to make major improvements, NMPF said. Reforming the current complex milk pricing system is one of the key elements of FFTF, along with providing a better margin-focused, farmlevel safety net, and a means of temporarily adjusting milk production when conditions warrant. But revamping the Federal Milk Marketing Order system “is perhaps the most daunting, because the current structure is difficult to alter unless comprehensive and specific adjustments are written into legislation,” said Dave Fuhrmann, President of Foremost Farms USA, a dairy cooperative based in Baraboo, WI. Fuhrmann chaired a NMPF committee that developed the Federal Order improvements featured in the FFTF package. Under the proposal that NMPF has helped to design, and which has been drafted into legislative form by Representative Collin Peterson (DMN), the U.S. Department of Agriculture will no longer specify a

monthly minimum price for four classes of milk, derived from a weekly price survey of dairy commodities. Instead, the system will feature just two classes: one for fluid milk, and another for manufactured products. This will “allow the discovery of a true, competitive market price for milk, rather than a price derived from an unwieldy and divisive formula-based approach,” Fuhrmann said, noting that the current endproduct pricing formulas, featuring make allowances for manufacturers, will be eliminated. This change, along with the elimination of the Dairy Product Price Support System, “will significantly enhance the ability of the U.S. to grow export markets over the long term.” Reducing the system to two classes not only simplifies things, it will also reduce price volatility, because more milk is moving in response to the same prices and adjusts supply and demand more quickly and more consistently, according to Fuhrmann. The FFTF proposal maintains a minimum price for fluid milk, using the “higher of” feature in the current system, to help maximize the return to dairy producers for bottled milk sales. Current Class I differentials in the ten Federal Order areas are also

STATE SURPLUS PROPERTY AUCTION

Wed., September 21, 9:30 AM Finger Lakes DDSO: 703 East Maple Ave. Newark, NY 14513 Preliminary listing includes: 00’ Ford Contour; ‘99 Dodge Ram 2500 pickup 4x4; ‘01 Chev. Cavalier; ‘98 Dodge Ram 3500 van; ‘99 Jeep Cherokee; (2) ’96 Dodge Ram 3500 vans; ‘96 Chev. G3500 van; (2) ’96 Chev. G30 vans; (2) ’97 Dodge Ram 3500 vans; ‘98 Ford Taurus; ‘98 Chev. G2500 van; ‘98 Chev. G3500 Express van w/wheel chair conversion; (2) ’98 Dodge Ram 3500 vans; ‘99 Ford E350 van; (3) ‘99 Ford Taurus wagons; ‘99 Dodge Ram 2500 pickup; (6) ’00 Chev. G3500 Express vans w/wheelchair conversion; ‘00 Chev. G3500 Express van; ‘00 Ford Taurus wagon; ‘00 Dodge Ram 3500 van w/wheelchair conversion; ‘00 Chev. Astro van; ‘00 Dodge Ram 3500 van; ‘00 Dodge Ram 3500 van; ‘00 Dodge Ram 1500 van; ‘00 Dodge Ram 3500 van; ‘00 Ford E350 van ‘00 Eldorado Chev. Bus; (3) ’01 Ford Taurus wagons; (3) ’01 Chev. G3500 Express vans w/wheelchair conversion; ‘01 Dodge Ram 3500 van w/wheelchair conversion; ‘01 Chev. G1500 Express van; (2) ’02 Dodge 3500 vans; (2) ’02 Chev. G3500 bus; ‘03 Chev. Astro van; ‘04 Chev G3500 Express van; (2) ’04 Chev. Astro vans; ‘05 Chev. Astro van; ‘07 Chev. Uplander van. Check our website daily for continuous updates: www.scottperryco.com Preview 8AM day of auction. No Buyers Premium. Payment accepted: Cash or credit card only.

Scott Perry & Co. Auctioneers 2019 River Rd., Niagara Falls, NY 14304

716-283-SOLD (7653) www.scottperryco.com

maintained as they are, as is the overall geographic structure of the Federal Order regions. Farmers in states like California, which are governed by a state pricing system, would not be impacted by the changes to the federal system. Some farmers have expressed concern that the proposed change to a competitive pricing system will not mandate component pricing, featuring a regulated mini-

mum value for the protein in their milk. However, “producers and cooperatives will still be able to negotiate for components values in their milk, since the proposal doesn’t preclude the use of component pricing, particularly when the plant buying the milk places an importance on protein for their products,” Fuhrmann said. Fuhrmann noted that those who are calling for

32 FALL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION ND

Sat., October 15, 2011, @ 9:00 a.m.

Located: At Alparon Park (Troy Fair Grounds) Troy, PA. Gate-3, (Intersection of Rtes. 6&14)

Selling: Agricultural Equipment - Municipal & Contracting Equipment - Dozers, Backhoes, Skid Steers, Forklifts, Equipment Trailers, Livestock Trailers, Trucks, Automobiles, Recreational Vehicles, Landscaping Equipment, Antique Equipment, Horse Equipment, and Lawn & Garden Equipment. Titles must accompany Vehicles when consigned. Accepting Consignments up to Friday noon Oct. 14. Terms: Full Payment Auction Day by CASH, CHECK, VISA, and M/C. Paying with check or cash saves 3% processing fee.

SHAYLOR AUCTIONEERS

496 Elmira St., Troy, PA 16947 • LIC. #833L, Bonded, NAA, PAA Phone 570-297-3278 • 570-297-3873 • 570-297-2991 www.shaylorauctioneers.com • email robert@shaylorauctioneers.com Note: Submit your listings & Photo's early so we can post them on Auction Zip. If you do not have a computer & would like to consign items, call or send description to the above address.

the complete elimination of any type of milk marketing orders “have to realize that dairy farmers support Federal orders. We’re taking great strides in reforming it, but we’re not looking to end the system entirely,” he said. There is still wide-

spread support for the beneficial aspects of Federal Milk Marketing Orders, including the fact that they help enhance the bargaining power of producers, and help balance supplies of milk to ensure adequate fluid milk for bottling.

FEEDER CATTLE SALE

Sat., Sept., 24, 2011 • 10 AM PLEASE BRING CATTLE IN ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 23RD

For info call: 585-394-1515

FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK EX. 3 Miles East Of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20 Cash or good check day of sale, nothing to be removed until settled for, Announcements day of sale take precedence over advertising Visit Our Web Site www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Next Feeder Cattle Sale Sat., Oct. 1, 2011 @ 10 AM

D&R FARMS COMPLETE DISPERSAL DATE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2011; TIME: 10AM LOCATION: 1791 HOLLOW RD, BARTON, VT DIRECTIONS: Off exit 26 take Route 58 East toward Willoughby go past Desmarais Equipment take next right onto Hollow road to auction site. Watch for auction signs.

D&R Farms have commissioned us to sell the contents of the farm to include; beef cattle, equipment & machinery, farming accessories & feed.

74 HEAD BEEF CATTLE

This herd consist of (36) mature pure blood Black Angus (some with papers), (2) mature Dutch Bell beef (1 registered), (22) ready to wean calves, (11) fancy Black Angus bred heifers & (2) pure bred bulls. D& R Farms has had 25+ years of high quality Black Angus beef with many showings in the US & Canada.

EQUIPMENT & MACHINERY M9000 Kubota Tractor w/roll bar roof (1688 hrs) & LA1251 Kubota bucket, 80-66 Hesston 4WD Tractor (4545 hrs), 915 JD Moco 9' disc mower w/fingers, 3610 Gehl Skid Steer, 4150 New Idea Rake w/front wheel, Vicon Andex 423T Rake (1 yr old), Grimm tedder, KR-130 Krone baler w/netting & string, Salsco self contained bale wrapper, 3722 New Idea spreader w/hydraulic tailgate (like new), 24' Eby 5th wheel aluminum cattle trailer w/deck, 16' 5th hitch equipment trailer w/wood floor, 520 Pequea 24-cow feeder w/front hitch, Wifo bale clamp, bale spear, 8' 3pth scrapper blade, Kools blower, 500 Polaris Sportsman 4 wheeler w/winch (as is), 500 Artic Cat snow machine, Puma Artic Cat snow machine, & more

ACCESSORIES (8) complete pens w/catch chutes (to be dissembled by buyer), 20+ gates in various sizes, complete show stalls & equipment to include; halters, rings & fitting chutes, Sullivan aluminum show box w/halters & blow dryers, Rubbermaid water tubs, platform cattle weighing scale, round bale feeders, (2) aluminum pick-up boxes, Val Metal grain cart, Gallagher fencers, snow machine dolly, storage caddys, 250 gal fuel tank w/hand pump, mineral tank, various small farming tools, etc... & more FEED - 450+- first cut & 250+ second cut round bales.

SPECIAL Omega EM-32 Semen tank w/ Embryos & Black Angus semen straws to be sold w/reserve. TERMS: Cash or good check w/ID. ***Purchases will not be released until paid in full. For buyers unknown to management, they must provide letter of credit issued to Wright's Auction Service. *** Lunch catered by Wright's Catering Service. Sale managed by Wright's Auction Service, Newport, VT & CC Miller Jr., Morrisville, VT

Email: info@wrightsauctions.com Website: www.wrightsauctions.com AUCTIONEER: Ron Wright - TEL: (O) 802-334-6115 (C) 802-673-9840 CC Miller Jr. - TEL: (O) 802-888-3670 (C) 802-793-1583 Ring man: Roland Ayers - TEL: 802-343-3750 Gate man: Jimmy Dean - Ontario


Assembly Minority Leader Brian Kolb asks Governor Cuomo to redirect $50 million in state economic development funding to help commu-

nities devastated by Hurricane Irene repair, rebuild and recover. Leader Kolb calls for $50 million in state economic development funds to be

DAIRY CATTLE & HEIFER SALE BEEFERS & MISC.

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 23, 2011 11:00 A.M. Directions: Sale to be held at Jack Wood's Sale Barn, located on Taylor Valley Road, Cincinnatus, N.Y.2 miles north of Cincinnatus. Just off Route 26. Watch for auction signs.

(42) Head Freestall dairy. This is a good young herd, with good udders, and show milk. (35) Holsteins, with several Crosses. (15) Recently fresh, with cattle milking up to 90 lbs. (6) Due for October & November. Good cattle milking well, and bred back in various stages. Cattle are easy to work with. Over (30) Head consigned, with top 1st calf heifers in this group. Some are strictly fresh, with heifer calves on their side, and others springing close. Good group of shortbred heifers, with size and condition. (4) Jersey's, and Black Crosses. (3) Guernsey's, short bred 3-4 mos. Nice. (28) Head from one consignor. (6) Bred cows. (22) Heifers from 300 lbs. to short bred. Holsteins, Jersey's, & Black Crosses in this group. (7) Bulls, from 200 lbs. to breeding age. Jerseys, Holsteins, and Guernsey Cross. (6) Beefers, (2) Black Angus Crosses, (1) Red Angus Cross, and (3) Herefords. (2 Steers) From 500 lbs. to breeding age. Good condition. Used to fencing, easy to work with, and have been handled. (5) Steers, (4) young ones, and one 16 mos. old. Misc.. Items: Universal vacuum pump, 3 hp. Works. DeLaval pale milker. Bale spear for bucket. Feeder trough. 300 gallon oil tank. Lamco forage wagon. Wooden feeder wagon. Manager'ss note: Good cattle at this sale, with more being consigned daily. Dairy shows milk, with some good 1st calf heifers. Starting with misc. items, equipment, then dairy cattle and beefers. Sale Managed By:

Gene Wood’s Auction Service, Inc. Cincinnatus, NY 13040

(607) 863-3821

Visit us on the Web @ genewoodsauctionserviceinc.com October 8, 2011: John Laskowski, Clayville, NY, full line of machinery, produce, horse tack, and recreational vehicles. JD 2940 4WD, w/260 loader. MF 2640 w/cab. CASE IH SBX 530 baler. (like new). JD 446 round baler. ELHO 410 bale wrapper. NI 5212 discbine. Kuhn GF 5001 TH 4 star tedder. NH 258 rake. 400 bales of 1st & 2nd cutting baleage. 600 square bales of 1st & 2nd cutting. Horse saddles.

fast tracked to aid localities, businesses and farms hardest hit by the storm As New Yorkers continue to assess the personal and financial toll wrought by Hurricane Irene, Assembly Minority Leader Brian M. Kolb (R,I,CCanandaigua) on Sept. 7 called on Governor Cuomo to redirect $50 million of the $200 million in state economic development funding toward helping local governments, businesses and farms that bore the brunt of the storm repair, rebuild and recover. “Millions of New Yorkers weathered Hurricane Irene’s wrath with the storm’s economic impact to our state estimated at $1 billion. The storm impaired local governments, devastated businesses and damaged regional roadways, bridges and other critical infrastructure that are the lifeline for citizens, commerce and communities across New York,” Leader Kolb said. “To help affected communities repair, rebuild and recover, we need to get funding out of the state���s administrative pipeline and flowing directly into impacted regions as quickly as possible. This is exactly what I asked Governor Cuomo to do by redirecting $50 million of the $200 million in state economic development funding currently targeted for the administration’s Regional Council Initiative. If ever there was a time to redirect a portion of state economic development funding to assist distressed communities, businesses and farms in getting back on their feet, now is that time,” Leader Kolb stated. Leader Kolb’s letter to the Governor stated, “Ideally, the $50 million – currently targeted for the Regional Council Initiative – would be fast-tracked to aid affected localities, businesses and

farms hardest hit by the storm. Utilizing $50 million from the $200 million already set aside for economic development aid would have minimal impact on the administration’s Regional Council Initiative, especially since so many areas of our state were adversely impacted by Hurricane Irene and will undoubtedly qualify for economic recovery funds. Frankly, given the storm’s size, severity and scope, such a reordering of priorities is necessary,” Leader Kolb wrote. “A total of 21 counties throughout New York State have already been declared eligible for Public Assistance by FEMA. Hurricane Irene impacted a significant portion of our state, including the Capital Region, North Country, Hudson Valley, Long Island and New York City. All of these areas had local businesses, farms and infrastructure severely damaged or, in some cases, completely destroyed by the storm,” Leader Kolb stated. “Providing targeted and timely financial assistance to localities, businesses and farms that were among the hardest hit by Hurricane Irene will accelerate recovery efforts by strengthening the economy and supporting private sector job creation, both of which happen to be priorities of the Governor’s Regional Economic Development Council initiative. My proposal is to bypass any bureaucracy and fast track this funding in light of the economic devastation Hurricane Irene caused to the Empire State. Doing so will assist storm-impacted communities, local businesses and farms already working to move forward after the storm,” Leader Kolb concluded.

Dairy & Barn Equipment Dispersal Saturday, September 24, 2011 @ 11:00 am Nelson & Betty Leduc 818 Perry Mills Rd - Champlain, NY 12919 518-298-8068 DIRECTIONS: 3 miles West of I-87 in Champlain to Perry Mills Rd . Approx. 5 Miles East of Mooers, turn North at V.F.W onto Perry Mills Rd. First farm on left "WATCH FOR SIGNS"

170 HEAD ALL CATTLE HAVE BEEN VACCINATED AND VET CHECKED 79 Cows: 15 fresh last 2 months- 5 Due Oct., 2- Nov, 7- Dec, 8- Jan, 4- Feb. -- 50% are 1st & 2nd calf lactation Raised in free stall milked in tie stall -- 3.7 Fat - 3.1 Protein - 275,000 cc -65 lbs average in the tank 88 Freestall Heifers: (84 Holsteins- 4 Blue) 12- springing, 17- bred 1 to 5 months, 6 - RWB, 11- Ready to breed, 10 - 600 to 700 lbs, 13- 500 to 600 lbs, 12- 400-500 lbs, 7- calves 3 Bulls- 1 Blue (2yrs old), 2 Holstein (1yr old) Sample of Herd Sires: Tarmark- Alabama- Kenston- Matrix

ALSO SELLING

Milking Equipment: 800gal Boumatic bulk tank w/ compressor & Alfa Laval tank washer, Complete 80 cow 2" universal pipeline appox. 390' w/ sinks, jar & 6- Germania units 60/40, 5hps Mast port vacuum pump Feeding Equipment: (2) Wic #52 feed carts 9hps -1 is excellent cond. 1yr old, Wic Grain cart, Wic bedding chopper, (2) Grain carts Barn Equipment: Houle barn cleaner 5hps w/ 370' chain (clockwise), (54)-Trojan water bowls, (50)- Electric cow trainers, (4)- 20" barn fans, (3) 36" Exhaust fans, Tunnel fan, Zareba fence controller, Electric fogger, Electric Dehorner, Vet supplies Managers Notes: The Leduc family has sold their farm. This good, young, honest herd has not been pushed. This is a sale you don't want to miss!! We are also selling their full line of machinery in April 2012 Nelson has a super line of machinery. It's a line-up that you don't see sold every day. Lots of new models & low hour equipment

To see pictures check out our Web site: www.nnyds.com Terms: ABSOLUTELY NO CREDIT!! CASH OR GOOD CHECK - ALL ITEMS SOLD AS IS

Northern New York Dairy Sales

1838 STATE RT. 11~NORTH BANGOR, NY 12966 • 518-481-6666

Sales Managers Joey St. Mary 518-569-0503 Harry Neverett 518-651-1818

Auctioneer John “Barney” McCracken 802-524-2991

Page 11 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Assembly Minority Leader asks Governor to redirect $50 million to help communities devastated by Hurricane Irene


Section C - Page 12 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Scientists point to precarious state of U.S. Pesticide Safety Education Program Scientists with the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA), the American Phytopathological Society (APS) and the Entomological Society of America (ESA) expressed concern about the precarious state of the U.S. Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP). Funding for the program has plummeted in recent years and is now in danger of evaporating completely. As the nation’s primary pesticide applicator training and education program, PSEP is responsible for ensuring the safety of applicators, other workers and the public, for protecting the environment and for providing guidance in the proper use and security of pesticides. “In addition to certifying applicators and delivering education on the safe use of pesticides, the program today is tasked to provide guidance on a wide range of pesticiderelated topics — from avoiding spray drift and minimizing development of pest resistance to protecting endangered species,” said Lee Van

Wychen, science policy director for WSSA. Collectively, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are responsible for ensuring that the nation’s pesticide training needs are met. Since 1965, federal funds to support PSEP and its coordinators have been provided annually by EPA through USDA’s Cooperative Extension System. In fiscal year 2000, for example, EPA provided $1.9 million for PSEP, but in fiscal year 2011, EPA funding has been eliminated. The only remaining source of federal funding for PSEP is $500,000 mandated by the Pesticide Registration Improvement Renewal Act (PRIA II), which translates to only $10,000 per state. However, this funding will end in fiscal year 2012 when the statutory authority of PRIA II expires. To compound the problem, most states have significantly reduced their funding for the personnel and basic services needed to support pesticide education

STATE SURPLUS PROPERTY AUCTION

Thurs., September 22, 9:30 AM NYS DOT & NYS POLICE - Oneida

5450 South Bay Rd., North Syracuse, NY 13201 Preliminary listing includes: (6) ‘09 Ford Crown Victorias; ‘08 Ford Crown Victoria; (3) ‘07 Chev. Tahoe; (2) ‘07 Ford Crown Victorias; (6) ‘06 Chev. Tahoes; (5) Chev. Tahoes; ‘07 Chev. Tahoe; ‘00 Ford Taurus wagon; (2) ‘00 Chev. G3500 van w/wheelchair conversion; ‘01 Toyota Prius; ‘02 GMC G3500 van; ‘02 Chev. Astro van; ‘03 Chev. Astro van; ‘04 Ford Crown Victoria; ‘93 Ford F250 pickup; (2) Ford Think elec. vehicles; (2) ‘02 Chrysler Gem elec. Vehicles; ‘06 Chev. Impala; ‘05 Ford Taurus; (2) ‘05 Chev. Impalas; ‘05 Chrysler Town & Country minivan; (2) ‘04 Buick Century; ‘96 Dodge Ram 2500 pickup; ‘98 Chev. S10 pickup; ‘08 Chev. Venture minivan, ‘02 Dodge Durango; ‘01 Jeep Cherokee; ‘05 Ford Taurus; ‘06 Ford Expedition; ‘99 Chev. Astro van; ‘00 Chev. G3500 Express van; (2) ‘02 Chrysler Voyager minivan; ‘05 Toyota Prius; ‘04 Ford Taurus; ‘96 Chev. C3500 Dump; ‘98 Plymouth Voyager minivan; ‘01 Chev. C1500 pickup; ‘05 Buick Lasabre; ‘00 International S2574 Dump; (2) ‘98 International S2574 Dump; (3) ‘01 Ford F150 pickups; (2) ‘00 Chev. C3500 pickups; ‘01 Dodge Ram 2500 pickup; ‘00 Dodge Ram 3500 van; ‘00 Ford F150 pickup; ‘00 Chev. C1500 pickup; ‘98 Dodge Ram 3500 van; ‘97 International S2474 Dump; ‘95 Chev. G30 van; ‘95 Chev. C2500 pickup; ‘93 International S2574 Dump; ‘85 Chev. K20 pickup 4x4; ‘84 Ford 555 Backhoe (2644 hrs.); ‘88 Champion 710A Grader (6575 hrs.); ‘88 Champion 710A Grader (2865 hrs.); ‘88 Champion 710A Grader (1044 hrs.); ‘93 Case 621B Loader (8385 hrs.); ‘93 Case 621B Loader (1497 hrs.); Kleanline steam cleaner; (2) Sem700 paper shredders; Onan Generator; Detroit 4-53 Short block; (2) Wisconsin VG4D1 engine; (2) Cox oil Furnaces; Xtend coolant flusher; 3 unit locker; (4) oil hose reels; generator fuel tank; ‘99 Shindalwa floor sweeper; ‘91 JD 544E Loader (5762 hrs.); ‘84 Ford 2910 Tractor (9182 hrs.); ‘84 Ford 2910 Tractor (7586 hrs.); ‘84 Ford 555 Loader/tractor (2211 hrs.); ‘96 Ravens Trailer; ‘01 Bobcat skidsteer loader (1187 hrs.); ‘87 Ford 1320 Tractor (5225 hrs.); ‘87 Ingersoll Rand trailer mounted air compressor; ‘89 JD riding mower; (4) ‘94 Toro Groundsmaster riding mowers; ‘95 Jacobsen Greensking IV riding greens mower; ‘01 Jacobsen riding greens mower; ‘95 Cub Cadet log splitter; Mobile vacuum unit; (3) Onan gen set generators; misc. truck/van seats; Bear alternator tester; Karcher pressure washer; Lee pallet truck; Tar kettle pump; Liftmore truck cane; Briggs & Stratton 5HP motor; Honda 9HP motor; Lincoln bumper jack; Saturn 2 ton shop crane; Yale 2 ton chain fall; (2) ABC oil furnaces; 4 drawer file cabinet; 2 drawer file cabinet; Gradall bucket; misc. hydraulic hose; Target saw; asst’d trimmers; Snapper push mower; (3) Airflo spreaders; (3) Monroe spreaders; Henderson spreader; welder; shop lights. Check our website daily for continuous updates: www.scottperryco.com Preview 8AM day of auction. No Buyers Premium. Payment accepted: Cash or credit card only.

Scott Perry & Co. Auctioneers 2019 River Rd., Niagara Falls, NY 14304

716-283-SOLD (7653) www.scottperryco.com

through the Cooperative Extension System. Statistics show close to 900,000 private and commercial applicators holding PSEP certification in 2010, including more than 100,000 new certifications and more than 225,000 applicators pursuing recertification. In addition, the program has educated more than a million other pesticide users. “With nearly a 75 percent reduction in federal support for PSEP over the past decade, there is no question that states will not be able to deliver the same quality of PSEP training or to certify the same number of individuals,” said Carol Ishimaru, APS president. Recently, WSSA released a technical paper on PSEP that addresses its history, goals and funding. The paper also discusses proposed ideas for ensuring more stable financial resources for PSEP in the future.Examples include:

• Allocating additional dollars from federal and state pesticide product registration fees to cover education on the proper use of pesticides. • Pursuing grants from pesticide companies, commodity groups, conservation groups and others with an interest in pesticide safety education. • Changing policies, regulations and statutes to better support funding.

For example, most states direct fines for improper use of pesticides into their general funds. These dollars would be an especially appropriate source of support for pesticide safety education. “There is no one solution to the increasingly precarious state of the Pesticide Safety Education Program,” Van Wychen said. “A grass-

roots effort is needed by stakeholders at the state and national level to overcome policy and regulatory impediments and to ensure the program’s sustainability and focus.” The WSSA technical paper on pesticide safety education is available on the WSSA Web site: www.wssa.net.

Danny Moore Farm Machinery & Tool Auction September 22, 2011 • 4:00 PM 4577 County Line Road, Holley, New York SELLING: TRACTORS: Ford 8000 tractor, diesel, new clutch and rebuilt engine; International 56 rake; double hitch; dump rake; New Holland 717 chopper with 1 row corn head and hay head; New Holland 36 flail chopper; Papec self unloading wagon; Grimm self unloading wagon; 30' hay & grain elevator; International 715 combine, for parts; TILLAGE: International 455 planter, 4 row; International 700 4 bottom plow, auto reset; John Deere 210 disc, 16' with new bearings; Brillion 16' cultimulcher; International 16' cultimulcher; Massey Ferguson 43 drill; 8' cultipacker; 8' roller; 250 gallon sprayer; 4 row cultivator; BARN & MISC: New Holland 230 spreader, plastic floor; Livestock trailer; 60" finishing mower, 3pt; 3 pt bale spear; bale spear; 38" duals; 34" duals; (2) 300 gallon fuel tanks, with pumps; (2) fiberglass feeders; 3pt york rake; 3 pt log splitter; buzz saw with 2 blades; 21' boom; rough cut lumber; TOOLS: Millermatic 252 welder; MAC plasma cutter; Miller Thunderbolt XL welder; Aluminum welder; Miller welder/generator; Craftsman & Snap-On tool chests; Craftsman drill press; floor jacks; (2) 100lb propane tanks; salamander heater; grinder; acetylene torches; Powerlift parts washer; (2) battery chargers; quantity of raw steel, chain, and parts plus more! CONSIGNED: Farmall Super A; Massey 35; Watch our website, www.williamkentinc.com, for details and photos! TERMS: Cash, Check, MasterCard or Visa. 13% buyer's premium up to $2,000, 3% discount for cash or check. Nothing to be removed until settled for. All items sold "AS IS".

ATWATERR FARMSS FALLL CONSIGNMENTT AUCTION Friday, September 30, 2011 at 10:00 AM Corner of Lower Lake Road & Snellgrove Road, Barker, NY NOW ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS! Selling for Atwater Farms: John Deere 9500 combine, 4 wd, approximately 4,000 engine hours & 3,000 separator hours; John Deere 920 rigid head; John Deere 216 rigid head; John Deere 643 corn head; Horst 25' header cart; J Star Waste Handlers 7200 manure tanker, new baffles; John Deere 575 skid loader; John Deere 338 baler with JD 40 kicker; 1979 IH Loadstar 1700 with 18' deck; H&S HayMachine II; Automatic ATGB1800 rollermill; Dion F1460 blower; (3) New Holland blowers; Schuler SF16 dump table; UFT 450 bu grain buggy; Stoltzfus 30' feeder wagon; (3) wood basket wagons; Brady 1680 flail mower, new flails in 2010; Artex 1008H sand thrower, 3pt or skid loader mount; (2) JStar Alley Cat scrapers w/ corner wheels, 1 single phase & 1 three phase; silo unloaders, feeders, (2) AgriSpeed quick hitches; Quantity of calf panels & dividers; bale spear and more! CONSIGNMENTS: Demco sprayer, tandem gear, 40' booms, 600 gallon; 3pt 12 row anhydrous knifer; 1,000 steel nurse tank; Ford 8N; (2) gravity wagons; John Deere 918 flex head; 1000 gal Anhydrous ammonia tank w/running gear; John Deere 8300 grain drill 23 disc; Gehl hammermill; Glencoe 11 shank chisel plow; 1986 Mack dump truck 17' box; TERMS: Cash, Check, MasterCard or Visa. Nothing to be removed until settled for. All items sold "AS IS".

Please visit our website, www.williamkentinc.com, for more information and photos!


BEDFORD, PA — Burger enthusiasts flocked to Hamburg, Berks County, on Saturday, Sept. 3, for the eighth annual Taste of Hamburg-er Festival. What began as a celebration of the hamburger’s 100th anniversary has grown into an event attract-

ing upwards of 20,000 people to the town each Labor Day weekend. The Taste of Hamburg-er boasts a variety of entertainment including three stages with live music, petting zoos, beef themed contests and all the burgers you can eat at the infamous

COBY CLASSIC XIV SHOW CALF SALE October 14th, 15th & 16th SPONSORED BY SUNY COBLESKILL AMERICAN ANIMAL PRODUCERS CLUB This is a show calf sale of both steers and heifers from the ages weaning to yearling. All sale animals will be halter broke. There will be a variety of breeds with 30 head of cattle available from some of the Northeast's best breeders of fine cattle. Consigning farms: Simme Valley, Equity Angus, Double S Farm, JCW Farm, R.I.J. Farm, Trowbridge Angus, Premier Farm, JKW Polled Herefords, Minerdale Farm, Wanna-B-Rich Farm, Stannard Hill Simmentals, Kelley's Stock Farm, Card's Maple Hill Farm, Ledge Knoll Farm, Tulleyfergus Angus, SUNY-Cobleskill College Farm, Hay Acres

Schedule of Events * Friday - Cattle are brought in. * Saturday is the Sale @ 3 PM. Come early to preview our fine selection of show quality heifers and steers. * Sunday is the New York State Junior Beef Producers Show. Cattle purchased in the sale on Saturday can be shown on Sunday with no entry fee if you are a junior. This is the last show of the season. * For SHOW information contact Charlie Davis at (315) 662-7691 or at hawknestfarm@hotmail.com * There will be youth activities such as a beef judging, meat ID, and a stockman's quiz. For SALE information or a catalog please contact the following; Donna Cappadona - Advisor (518) 255-5262 or cappaddm@cobleskill.edu Dr. Jason Evans - Advisor (304) 692-3950 or evansjr@cobleskill.edu Justin Harmon - Sale Chair (585) 307-6523 or harmonj374@cobleskill.edu Ashley Simmons - Co-Chair (585) 689-9412 or simmona733@cobleskill.edu

All Proceeds from the sale go to SUNY-Cobleskill Animal Science Scholarships

Beef Council mascot Patty Melt greets visitors at the 8th annual Taste of Hamburger Festival, Sept. 3. Burger Stand. Arika Snyder, 2011 PA Beef Ambassador, addressed the crowd and visited with consumers about the importance of including beef as part of a healthy diet. She also distributed easy, delicious recipes and educational materials focused on beef and its benefits. The Berks County 4-H Beef Club also entertained crowds with Patty Melt, the Beef Council’s burger mascot. Patty strolled the streets of Hamburg, waving to visitors and even posing for pictures. Other highlights of the festival included the restaurant cook off, chili cook off, hamburger eating contest, mooing contest and wooden cow decorating contest. Prizes were even awarded to visitors who traveled the farthest.

This consumer promotion was funded by Pennsylvania’s beef, dairy and veal producers through the $1 perhead national Beef Checkoff. For more information on this program or the Beef Checkoff, contact the PA Beef Council office at 1-888-4BEEFPA.

Page 13 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Beef Council joins celebration at Taste of Hamburg-er


Section C - Page 14 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

SEE ONE OF THESE AUTHORIZED KUBOTA DEALERS NEAR YOU! NEW YORK

NEW YORK (cont.)

NEW YORK (cont.)

PENNSYLVANIA

CLAVERACK, NY 12513

NORTH JAVA, NY 14113

SPRINGVILLE, NY

ABBOTTSTOWN, PA 17301

COLUMBIA TRACTOR, INC.

LAMB & WEBSTER, INC.

LAMB & WEBSTER, INC.

MESSICK FARM EQUIPMENT, INC.

841 Rt. 9H • 518-828-1781 www.columbiatractor.com

4120 Route 98 585-535-7671 • 800-724-0139

Crs Rt. 219 & 39 716-392-4923 • 800-888-3403

7481 Lincoln Way 717-367-1319 • 800-222-3372 www.messicks.com

FULTONVILLE, NY 12072

PALMYRA, NY 14522

TROY, NY 12180

RANDALL IMP. CO. INC.

JOHN S. BLAZEY, INC.

2991 St. Hwy. 5S • 518-853-4500 www.randallimpls.com

111 Holmes Street 315-597-5121

SHARON SPRINGS FARM & HOME CENTER

Greenville, NY 10586

SALEM, NY 12865

GREENVILLE SAW SERVICE, INC.

SALEM FARM SUPPLY

5040 State Route 81 West • 518-966-4346

5109 St. Rte. 22 518-854-7424 • 800-999-3276 www.salemfarmsupply.com

MOOERS, NY 12958

DRAGOON’S FARM EQUIP., INC. 2507 Route 11 • 518-236-7110 www.dragoonsfarmequipment.com

SHARON SPRINGS, NY 13459

SHARON SPRINGS FARM & HOME CENTER 1375 Rt. 20 518-284-2346 • 800-887-1872

1175 Hoosick St. • 518-279-9709 WATERTOWN, NY 13601

WALLDROFF FARM EQUIPMENT, INC. 22537 Murrock Circle • 315-788-1115

WHITE’S FARM SUPPLY, INC. CANASTOTA, NY • 315-697-2214 WATERVILLE • 315-841-4181 LOWVILLE • 315-376-0300 www.whitesfarmsupply.com

ELIZABETHTOWN, PA 17022

MESSICK FARM EQUIPMENT, INC. 187 Merts Dr. 717-367-1319 • 800-222-3373 www.messicks.com HONESDALE, PA 18431

MARSHALL MACHINERY INC. Rt. 652, 348 Bethel School Rd. • 570-729-7117 www.marshall-machinery.com


Page 15 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011


Section C - Page 16 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Farm feed and supply donations being sought In an effort to assist local farms devastated by the effects of Tropical Storms Irene and Lee, area agencies and residents are working together to coordinate the donation of farm supplies and services to farmers in need. Although emergency operation centers have been

working to provide clean water, food, shelter and assistance to local communities affected by flooding, needs unique to farming such as livestock feed and bedding, farming equipment and animal housing are in great demand. To address this issue, New York Farm Bureau

Field Advisor, Bambi Baehrel, has been working with members of the Otsego County Farm Bureau, the Schoharie County Cooperative Extension and the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) to match up donated farm services and materials

with identified needs on affected farms. “Although many livestock were saved from flood waters, much of the food and supplies needed to sustain them, were not,” said Baehrel. “Due to structural damage and crop loss, these farms are financially strapped

and concerned about how they will feed and provide for their animals in the coming weeks.” Area farmers, agricultural service providers and suppliers interested in donating materials, services or contributions to affected farms should con-

tact Ms. Baehrel at 518-634-7852. An update on donation activities will be provided at the upcoming annual Otsego County Farm Bureau meeting being held at the Worcester Inn on Oct. 4.

New legislation aims to prevent EPA regs on farm dust WASHINGTON, D.C. — New legislation introduced by Senator Mike Johanns (R-NE) that would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating naturally occurring farm dust is welcome news for the nation’s farmers and ranchers, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. “Regulation of farm dust by EPA could severely hamper the ability of farmers and ranchers to meet the world’s food needs,” said AFBF President Bob Stallman. EPA is reviewing existing regulations for particulate matter, which includes soot and dust. Soot is generated by car emissions and factories; dust occurs naturally. According to Stallman, planting and harvesting crops, livestock moving from place to place and people driving down dirt roads are just a few of the ways dust occurs naturally on farms and in rural areas. “The current rules pertaining to dust are adequate,” said Stallman. “Increased regulation of farm dust could result in decreased productivity and higher food prices, coupled with lost jobs in the rural economy. Moreover, the scientific basis for establishing such regulation has been called into question and it has not been demonstrated that the benefits of EPA regulation would outweigh the costs.” The new legislation introduced by Johanns prevents EPA from making dust regulations even more stringent, while taking health concerns into consideration. “State and local governments would have the authority to regulate dust in localized areas if necessary,” Stallman explained. “But a national standard would not be imposed.”

Richfield Springs, NY 55 Main St. 315-858-0720

St. Johnsville, NY 7403 St. Hwy. 5 518-568-2016

Oneonta, NY

56 Oneida St. 607-432-0171

Kubota L4330 used, w/loader, 876 hrs . 1997 JD 5400 w/loader, grapple bucket, 2010 Kubota Bx2360V w/loader, 44 hrs 2009 NH BR7060 Silage Special round . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$21,500 2596 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$19,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,500 baler w/netwrap . . . . . . . .SALE $22,900

NH 648 Silage Special round baler w/net JD 457 Silage Special round baler w/net Kubota BX2200 diesel tractor w/60” wrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SALE $12,900 wrap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SALE $13,900 mower deck, 1200 hrs . . . .SALE $5,995 NH 1431 discbine . . . . . .SALE $14,900

NH TC33D diesel, 4x4 tractor w/loader, New Holland TD80D 4WD, cab, loader, Massey Ferguson 2605 tractor w/loader NH 492 haybine . . . . . . . . .SALE $6,500 60” deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SALE $13,900 1088 hrs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,900

New Holland 1411 Discbine . . .$11,900 New Holland 630 round baler . . $6,995 Bobcat E32 mini-ex . . . . . . . . . .$36,900 NH TC24D 4x4 diesel . . . . . . . . .$14,900

IH 460 tractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,500 JD 530 Discbine Center Pivot . .$17,500

2010 Kubota M9540 4WD tractor, ROPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$32,500 Kubota tractor loader, cabCall For Price

2000 Cub Cadet M60 0-turn mower . . . . 2006 Kubota B7610 HSD tractor loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$13,500 Bobcat T180 tracked loader . . . .$25,900 Polaris Ranger w/Plow . . . . . . .$10,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,500


Accidents will happen, even to responsible hunters with over 10 years of experience. Accident frequency and severity can be reduced in a number of ways. Find out what you can do as a hunter or property owner to protect yourself. Mike had been thinking about this day for weeks…the first Saturday of hunting season. Mike wanted to make sure everything was perfect since he was taking his twelve year old son hunting for the first time, the same age he was when his father first took him and he shot his first

quail. He has been hooked on hunting ever since. Earlier in the week he took his son to an outfitter store and got him everything he needed. Mike spent the previous evening laying everything out. He verified that he had packed his shotgun sling, leg gaiters, shells, hunting vest, and favorite shotgun. Thank goodness he remembered to pack the First Aid Kit. Twenty pounds of gear was packed and loaded in the vehicle. The coffee pot was scheduled to brew at 4:30 a.m. Mike met up with his

hunting partner John and his son at their usual meeting place and time. The group of four had been hunting for hours, but with no success. Finally, they flushed a large covey out of some plum thickets. John went off to search for a downed bird. The three other hunters walked over to another covey about 200 feet away. A quail flew up behind Mike and he turned around and unknowingly shot in John's direction. John screamed out in pain. The rest of the afternoon was spent dressing John's wounds in the field, running to the Emergency

Room, and answering questions from the conservation officer interview. Obviously, the day did not end as expected. Mike did not expect John to name him in a lawsuit, after all they had been friends for 25 years, but he could have. Fortunately, Mike had purchased liability insurance to cover the hunt club members and the owner of the property where they hunted regularly. No one expects to go hunting and get injured, but like most any outdoor activity, injury is a risk. Since firearms are typically involved, the injury

CATSKILL TRACTOR, INC., 384 CENTER STREET • FRANKLIN, NEW YORK (607) 829-2600 TRACTORS Ford 5000 row crop cab IH 2404 gas IH 1086 cab JD 4020 w/loader Kubota L3430 cab & loader MF 285 MF 65 diesel Mahindra 7010 4WD, cab Satoh S5506 w/blade INDUSTRIAL Ford 575D TLB 20 ft tri-axle gooseneck trailer w/winch (1993) Komatsu D32E dozer Bobcat QT backhoe TILLAGE Bush Hog 12 ft cutaway disc IH 12 ft disc IH 21 ft wing disc Leinbach 3pt disc AC 6 ft transport disc Bush Hog 10 shank chisel plow Kewanee 10 shank chisel plow Brillion 10 ft cultipacker IH 510 3 btm semi-mount plow White 508 4 btm plow MF 3pt 3 btm plow IH 310 3pt 1 btm plow (2) Dearborn 3pt 2 btm plows Kverneland 5 btm plow CATSKILL TRACTOR, INC.

$8,995 $4,395 $12,995 $9,995 $21,900 $9,495 $4,995 $19,750 $3,495 $14,750 $2,275 $18,975 $2,950 $3,495 $1,495 $8,795 $1,050 $999 $1,895 $775 $895 $1,695 $1,750 $475 $699 $485 ea. $3,595

Kverneland 4 btm plow (salvage) IH 420 3 btm plow SKID STEERS Gehl 3825 Bobcat 843 HAY & FORAGE NH BR740 silage special round baler NH 310 baler w/thrower Gehl 1310 round baler, salvage Claus 250 rotocut round baler Case IH 8530 inline baler MF 12 baler w/thrower NH 316 baler w/thrower NH 268 baler w/thrower JD 1207 haybine Gehl 860 chopper w/2 row corn & hay heads Gehl 970 self-unloading wagon Dion self-unloading wagon NH 25 blower Gehl 99 blower NH 28 blower JD 525 moco MF 39 2 row corn planter Kuhn 5001T tedder New Idea 17 ft hyd-fold tedder Pequea HR10 rotary rake NI wheel rake Kuhn tedder NH 478 haybine (2) Wooden hay wagons

(607) 829-2600

$350 $1,375 $8,575 $12,995 $16,800 $3,285 $2,750 $16,995 $9,475 $2,395 $10,500 $2,195 $2,850 $6,775 $5,995 $1,350 $695 $695 $1,295 $13,750 $2,575 $2,795 $2,895 $7,975 $475 $1,595 $3,150 $999 ea.

NH 451 3pt sickle bar mower NH 256 rake w/dolley JD trailer mower Case IH 1300 3pt sickle bar mower MISCELLANEOUS NH 352 grinder mixer Gehl 55 mix-all MF grain drill w/seed box John Bean orchard sprayer Nelson wood chipper (diesel) Kuhn TB181 ditch bank flail mower Landall 3 pt power seeder Gehl 315 manure spreader NH 135 manure spreader Gehl 1312 manure spreader IH Cub ground-drive spreader Katolight PTO generator Worksaver post hole digger Shaver post pounder Mayrath 24 ft hay & grain elevator Kidd round bale chopper (2) Gravity wagons Valmetal bedding chopper 8 ft box blade QT grapple bucket 5 ft 3pt rotary mower

$1,875 $1,995 $950 $1,650 $2,975 $3,295 $695 $995 $5,375 $6,995 $2,590 $4,655 $4,795 $4,995 $975 $1,650 $400 $1,875 $1,625 $3,895 $1,495 ea. $1,295 $735 $1,795 $475

ANNUAL FALL INVENTORY REDUCTION AUCTION Friday, Oct. 14, 10:30AM Consignments Welcome

Visit www.catskilltractor.com to View Pictures of Our Used Equipment

may be more serious. Every year the International Hunter Education Association (IHEA) compiles a hunting accident incident report. The most prevalent “major factors” cited for these accidents include the following: “Failure to identify target, Victim out of site of the shooter, Firearm fell from insecure rest, Failure to use safety belt, Victim moved into line of fire, Shooter swinging on game, Failure to check beyond target, Careless handling of firearm.” IHEA recommends hunters and shooters follow four basic rules of firearms safety, known as the TABK acronym. T - Treat every firearm as it if were loaded A - Always point the firearm in a safe direction. B - Be sure of your target and what is beyond your target.

K - Keep your finger out of the trigger guard and off the trigger until ready to shoot. How Can Hunters Reduce Risks? Hunting accidents of all types happen every year. Most hunting accident victims are responsible hunters who have over 10 years' experience. Although hunting accidents have trended downward as a result of increased hunter education requirements, there are still approximately 1,000 hunting accidents annually. Ten percent are fatal. What can you do to increase safety while hunting? 1. Get proper education. Read, take a hunter safety education course, watch hunter education videos, take an on-line course. A variety of re-

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PUBLIC C AUCTION Sat., Oct. 1st at 10:00 am Lucille Hand-Monson Estate Ponderosa Drive, Mountainville, NY I-84 to exit 7B, South on Rte. 300, approx. 5.3 miles to Rte 32, 3.1 miles to auction on Rte. 32. Mr. Hand was an avid collector of farm machinery and a collector of a little bit of everything.

To see listings and photos go to AuctionZip.com #8563 Terms: cash, check with bank letter of referral. 10% buyer’s premium. New York Sales tax will be charged. If you are tax exempt please bring a copy of your tax exemption license.

Expect a long auction. Two auctioneers, two auctions at same time. Rain or Shine. Bring chairs.

Gordon n W.. Kinzinger AU002085

570-470-4755

FALL JERSEY SALE Friday, October 7th, 2011@ 1 PM

D.R. CHAMBERS & SONS, INC. 76 Maple Ave. - Unadilla, NY 13849

607-369-8231 • Fax 607-369-2190 Please have your consignments in early for advertising All Cattle will have nasel shots and will be vet checked if needed Call Scott and Kimberly Chambers 607-369-7316 Cattle Sales Every Wednesday. Starting at Noon with small animals, Dairy sells @ 3pm, followed by Feeder Cattle. Beef and Feeder Cattle are Selling very Well. D. R. Chambers and Sons, Inc. is expanding our Dairy Cattle Division. If you are planning on selling your Dairy of cows or having a complete dispersal give

Scott Chambers or Home 607-369-7316 Cell 607-353-2728

Frank Walker a call. Home 607-829-5172 Cell 607-434-0042

Celebrating 74 years in business Check out our Website for market report, sale dates and more. www.drchambersauction.com Join us on Facebook at Chambers Livestock-Auction

Page 17 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Are you protected?


Section C - Page 18 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Protected from C17 sources exist. Taking a class can be interesting and rewarding, regardless of how long you have been hunting. 2. Practice the skills needed. It's one thing to be book smart and another to put it into play. Some students take a course, but then don't touch a firearm until opening day. Shooting arrows and firearms can be done in a number of safe, supportive places. 3. Follow state guidelines for wearing hunter orange. This universal hunter safety color will dramatically reduce your chance of being mistaken for

game. Each state has its own guidelines, which can be viewed on www. IHEA.com under “Hunter Education”. 4. Don't take deer stand safety requirements for granted. Follow the instructions on deer stand equipment and check for faulty equipment. In the state of Alabama alone, 2010 had a record number of deer stand accidents. Fourteen accidents were reported and four of these were fatal. 5. Establish a method for locating and communicating with other members of your hunting party. Have a

ONLINE ONLY AUCTION CLASSIC CAR & WELL MAINTAINED FARM EQUIPMENT ENDING FRIDAY SEPT 30,2011 @4:00 P.M. EASTER TIME LOCATION: 6989 Daugherty's Run Road, Cogan Station PA. 17728 We invite you to inspect these items Sept: 26,27,28,29 for information call Garry 570-323-0987 1951 1 PACKARD D AUTOMOBILE 300 Ultimatic, 4 dr, auto trans., new tires, 33,418 original miles. SR 2472; 1979 9 CHEVROLET T PICKUP P TRK. 20 Series Custom Deluxe, Class 2, 5.7 eng. V8, standard shift, 4X4, 6 FARMALL (new fenders & panels) NEW INSPECTION, 67,602 orig. miles, vin CKL249116835; 1206 DIESEL, turbo, WF, 8/4-16.8 gears, double hyd.,3-pt.hitch,Traction&Road Firestone 18.4-38 tires, new RPILLER R TYPE E G,, 499-5000 0 lb.. mast, 144 540&1000 main pump, 7,300hrs, SR15710; V50BCATER height cylinder, shift & tilt, gas engine, power steering, hydro/static drive, 50LZDEAL tires; SR8961; NH H 1048 8 BALE E WAGON.,366 Ford gas eng., 5-spd.trans.,2-sp.axle, SR1869; Model YB32 YORK T SWEEPER, mechanically driven, 3-pt. hitch, mounted 6' brush & fiberglass broom; G-110-124 STREET CASE E OFFSET T DISC, front disc 22 ?" front, 23" rear; SR1625138; WR420 0 GEHL L WHEEL L RAKE, H 144 4 HAY Y INVERTER, SR845854; 330 0 JD D BALER, new compressor rack, silage kit, SR16003; NH 0 GEHL L HARVESTER R SR9389 w/2-R narrow corn head heavy duty lacers, SRE00330X720907; 860 D #39 9 7'' SICKLE-BAR R 3-PT.. MOWER, fits sq. tube; JD D TRACTORS /w 10 series SR14516 w/hay head; JD L 1-R R TREE E TRANSPLANTER, 3-pt., never used: & 40series, type M 5 PO, SR03045; MECHANICAL Terms: 10% buyers fee will be added to all purchases. 3.5% convenience fee unless using cash or a certified check. Credit cards are accepted.

SHAYLOR AUCTIONEERS 496 Elmira St., Troy PA 16947, Bob 570-297-3278 Check in Auction Zip for pictures & shaylorauctioneers.com to bid

map that outlines where each member will be hunting. Have an emergency plan in place. 6. Don't forget the rules of safety in your ambition to get an animal. Don't cut corners at the end of the day in order to get a trophy so that you can call it a successful day. 7. Avoid consumption of drugs and alcohol. How Can Landowners Reduce Risks? Landowners can assist hunters by making sure property lines are well marked and posting “No Trespassing” signs. Hazards such as wells, cliffs, and cable gates should be well identified to help prevent accidents and injury. A safe area for campfires should be designated. Lastly, establishing open lines of communication with the hunt club can go a long way towards maintaining an accident free environment. Is Hunting Lease Liability Coverage Needed? Liability lawsuits can ensue as a result of the emotional and financial stress resulting from injury. If you are leasing hunting land from a private landowner, hunting lease insurance can protect you and your loved ones from financial catastrophe. With a general liability insurance policy, coverage is provided if a club member is found legally responsible for the accident. The beauty of hunting lease liability insurance is the fact that the insurance company is obligated to defend you whether it is a frivolous case or not. What Coverage is Needed? Most policy holders look for the following benefits to be included: Member-toMember Coverage, Guest Liability Coverage, Fire Damage Liability, and Liability from tree-stands and ATV's. The coverage most recommended has $1 million per occurrence general liability coverage and $2 million general aggregate.

Who Should be Covered? All landowners who charge a fee to hunt. Most state statutes offer a lower level of liability protection when there is compensation involved. The American Hunting Lease Association (AHLA) program is designed to protect both the landowner and the hunters and can be purchased by either party. How Much Will It Cost Prices vary from underwriter to underwriter and are sometimes based upon a number of variables. Some insurers will charge based upon number of people in the hunt club, game harvested, location of the property, size of the property, and cost of lease. Prices can range from $175 and up per policy. At American Hunting Lease Association the price is based upon one variable: acreage. AHLA is one of the top sellers of hunting lease insurance in the country and gets low pricing due to the high volume of policies sold. Through AHLA, a policy that insures both landowner and hunting club costs only $175 for less than 500 acres. Does the Landowner need to be Named as an Additional Insured? More and more landowners are requiring the hunting club to purchase insurance naming the landowner as an additional insured. If the landowners are named in a suit caused by an occurrence of the hunting club on their land, they will be covered. What Protection is Provided to the Club in the Event of Legal Action? If the hunting club becomes legally obligated to pay damages for bodily injury or property damage arising from claims against the club, the hunting lease liability insurance policy will pay all sums due up to policy limits.

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GEHL SL3825 SKID STEER BOBCAT 553 UNILOADER MUSTANG 2070 UNILOADER GEHL CTL85 TRACK LOADER RENTAL CAB/AIR HI-FLOW 145 HRS NH L170 SKID STEER W/ CAB ENCLOSURE 517 HOURS KUBOTA KX 1613R4A EXCAVATOR -CAB - ANGLE BLADE KUBOTA KX 413VR1 EXCAVATOR ROPS HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT CASE-IH 8312 DISC MOWER CONDITIONER EXCELLENT CASE -IH 8575 BIG SQUARE BALE W/ APPLICATOR NEW HOLLAND 570 SQ BALER W/ THROWER KUHN FC353GC DISC MOWER CONDITIONER EXCELLENT KUHN GA6002 DOUBLE RAKE - RECONDITIONED KUHN GA7301 CENTER DELIVERY DOUBLE RAKE CLAAS 255 UNI WRAP ROUND BALER - NEW DEMO NEW MILLER (OXBO) 918 MERGER - GREAT PRICE $22000 NEW MILLER 5300 18' RECEIVER BOX ON TANDEM TRAILER TEAGLE 808SCD BALE PROCESSOR - ROUND OR BIG SQUARE DEERE 7200 6/30 VACUUM PLANTER - LIQUID CLEAN CASE-IH 900 6/30 PLANTER - LIQUID MISCELLANEOUS JD 3800 TELEHANDLER PATU DC65 PTO CHIPPER HYD FEED

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The Cornell Cooperative Extension Vegetable Program will be hosting the 2011 New York State Dry Bean Field Meeting on Sept. 21, 4:45–8:30 p.m., at Rod Stettner’s Farm E of Bergen and the Bob and Dan Duyssen Farm in Stafford. 1.25 DEC plus CCA credits will be available. Growers and agribusiness professionals will learn about zone till beans and the importance of crucifer cover crops for break-

ing up compaction and for suppressing weeds and root diseases at Stettner’s farm. At the Duyssen farm, Cornell’s Eric Sandsted and Don Halseth will share the results of their dry bean variety and breeding line trial, including information on disease resistance. NYS IPM Field Crops Specialist, Keith Waldron, will discuss the Western bean cutworm trap network, populations in Western New York and the

risk they pose to dry beans. Dry bean disease developments will be reviewed by Carol MacNeil, CCE Cornell Vegetable Program. Thomas Björkman, Cornell, will provide more details on cover crops for improving soil health, reducing erosion, reducing weed pressure, and for root disease suppression. A light dinner will be provided with pre-registration to Carol MacNeil, Veg-

etable Specialist, at 585-313-8796 or crm6@cornell.edu. Pay at the field: $5 for current Cornell Vegetable Program enrollees; $10 for all others. Sponsored by King Cole Bean and New York Bean, LLC. The complete agenda and directions are available at http://blogs.cce.cornell.edu/cvp/files /2011/09/2011-NYS-Dry-Bean-FieldMtg-Agenda_LH.pdf.

Protected from C18 less than 500 acres. Does the Landowner need to be Named as an Additional Insured? More and more landowners are requiring

the hunting club to purchase insurance naming the landowner as an additional insured. If the landowners are named in a suit caused by an oc-

currence of the hunting club on their land, they will be covered. What Protection is Provided to the Club in the Event of Legal Action?

If the hunting club becomes legally obligated to pay damages for bodily injury or property damage arising from claims against the club, the hunting lease

2 DAYS - 1000'S OF LOTS - 2 DAYS MAJOR PUBLIC EQUIPMENT AUCTION with equipment from A&A TEST BORING, LLC & COMPANY WRENCH & TILCON CT & JENSEN INDUSTRIAL PAINTING & CASACELI TRUCKING, INC. & AREA CONTRACTORS & EQUIPMENT DEALERS 275 ROUTE 32, NORTH FRANKLIN, CT 06254 DAY 1 - FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 9:00 AM

CONSTRUCTION, EARTHMOVING & PAVING EQUIPMENT, TRUCKS & TRAILERS

PARTIAL LISTING: EXCAVATORS: CRAWLER TRACTORS & LOADERS: RUBBER TIRED LOADERS: TRACTOR LOADER BACKHOES: SKID STEERS & COMPACT TRACK LOADERS: SKID STEER ATTACHMENTS: PAVING EQUIPMENT: CRUSHING & SCREENING PLANTS & COMPONENTS: LARGE GENSETS: ROAD MILLERS & PROFILERS: ROLLERS & COMPACTORS: TELESCOPIC BOOM LIFTS: ROUGH TERRAIN, TELESCOPIC & PNEUMATIC TIRED FORKLIFTS: MOTOR GRADERS & SCRAPERS: FORESTRY EQUIPMENT: TRENCHERS: TEST CORE DRILL: ARTICULATED & RIDGID FRAME END DUMPS: CRANES: BUCKETS & ATTACHMENTS: ROLLOFF TRUCKS & CONTAINERS: ROLLBACK TRUCKS: MIXER TRUCKS: REFUSE TRUCKS: SEPTIC PUMP TRUCKS: TRUCK TRACTORS: TRI, T/A & S/A DUMPS: GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EQUIPMENT & TRUCKS: WRECKERS & RECOVERY EQUIPMENT: DIGGER DERRICK TRUCKS: CRANE TRUCK: BUCKET & BOOM TRUCKS: VAC & SWEEPER TRUCKS: CAR HAULER: REEFER TRAILERS: DETACHABLE & LOWBED TRAILERS: DUMP TRAILERS: VAN, FLATBED & SGL DROP TRAILERS: TAG-ALONG & OTHER H.D. EQUIPMENT TRAILERS: LIVE BOTTOM TRAILERS: SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT & TRUCKS: UTILITY, FLATBED & VAN BODY TRUCKS: SERVICE, WATER, FUEL & LUBE TRUCKS: TANK TRUCKS & TRAILERS: FLEET VEHICLES: SNOW HANDLING EQUIPMENT: PARTS VEHICLES: TRENCH & SHORING BOXES & ROAD PLATES: SEA & STORAGE CONTAINERS (Some Both Days): EQUIPMENT & TRUCK PARTS & COMPONENTS: AND MORE!

DAY 2 - SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 9:00 AM

CONTRACTOR SUPPORT, AG, LANDSCAPE & MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT

SWEEPERS, SCRUBBERS & VAC UNITS: (2) Advance Whirlamatic 2700 Elec Floor Scrubbers; GENSETS, COMPRESSORS, PUMPS, WELDERS & LIGHT TOWERS: Sullair 185DPOJD S/A Portable Air Compressor, John Deere Dsl, Hrs Read: 1359, s/n 004132405; Ingersoll Rand 185 Air Compressor; 1989 Ingersoll Rand XHP750 Air Compressor, Hrs Read: 16,863, s/n 174107; Miller Thunder Bolt Welder, AC, Power Cable Leads; Miller Thunder Bolt Welder w/Bench; Miller Trailblazer Welder; Lincoln 400 Amp Welder, Perkins Dsl; MESSAGE & ARROW BOARDS: MAN LIFTS & SCISSOR LIFTS: Snorkel SL20 Scissor Lift, Non Marking Tires; CUSHION TIRE & WAREHOUSE FORKLIFTS: BOATS & RECREATIONAL VEHICLES: 1994 Wellcraft Excell I/O 23'Boat, Gas, 185 Hp, w/Trailer, Vin #XLBAJK901394; 1995 Summit 40FL Camper Trailer, Vin #1CASU40T9SG001220; UTILITY TRACTORS & ATTACHMENTS: John Deere 2350 Tractor, 2WD; John Deere 2150 Tractor; 2004 Kioti DK45 Tractor w/Loader, 4x4, Hrs Read: 563; Ford 3910, Tractor, 2 WD, Hrs Read: 2700; Ford 5000; Ford 4000 w/Loader, Gas; AG IMPLEMENTS: 3 Bottom Plow; UTILITY VEHICLES: John Deere Gator, 4x2; John Deere Gator, 4x4; Yamaha 500C ATV w/Spare Parts; Cushman Scooter; WOOD CHIPPERS, STUMP GRINDERS & MULCHERS: Olathe 986 Tag-Along Chipper, 2.3L Ind Ford; Bobcat B8 8" Chipper; Woods 8100 9" Chipper, Hyd Feed; Work Shaver SG50 3 Pt Stump Grinder; COMMERCIAL LANDSCAPE & GROUNDS CARE EQUIPMENT: Turf Master Easy Lawn TM60 Hydro Seeder, 22HP, Robin Gas, 600 Gal Tank, Sgl Tube Jet Agitation, 220 Lb Mulch Cap, s/n 23366; 2005 Toro 328D Groundsmaster, 4x4, 6' Cutting Deck, Dsl, Hrs Read: 2000+; Cub Cadet 127 Lawn Tractor, 38" Deck, Hydrostatic, Kohler Gas; Toro 230D; Jacobsen F15, Gang Rotary Mower; (2) Toro Reel Master 3100, 3 Wheel Turf Mowers, 16 HP Vanguard; Toro Grounds Master 3000D, 4 Wheel w/Contour 82 Front Mount, Dsl; John Deere HD45 Walk Behind Mower; UTILITY & LANDSCAPE TRAILERS: 2005 Pequea Utility Trailer, Vin #111264; 2003 Big Tex 60SP T/A Utility Trailer, Elec Brakes, Vin #99788; 1998 HM T/A Utility Trailer w/Ramps; 1993 Class S/A Enclosed Trailer, 3000 Lb, Vin #10WPAEE17PW018091; 1979 Coleman S/A Utility Trailer, Vin #CLN13FF5921002; THREE PT HITCH ATTACHMENTS: Bushog 285 Mower; Counterweights; OUTBUILDINGS: 20'x11'6" Shed w/Man Door & Roll Up Door; 16'x10' Shed w/Dbl Door; Dbl Door Storage Sheds; Chicken Coops; Sheds; INDUSTRIAL PAINTING EQUIPMENT: MAJOR INVENTORY OF CONSTRUCTION, GENERAL, MECHANICAL & UTILITY CONTRACTOR SUPPORT EQUIPMENT: 100's Of Lots! AND MORE!

TERMS: Complete payment or a minimum requirement of 20% deposit day of sale in Cash, Certified Check or Guaranteed Funds. Balance due within 4 days.

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275 Route 32, North Franklin, CT 06254, (860) 642-4200, Fax: (860) 642-7900 www.petrowskyauctioneers.com

liability insurance policy will pay all sums due up to policy limits. What separates American Hunting Lease Association's Policy from other Underwriters? 1. Annual insurance rates as low as $175. 2. No membership dues or any other hidden fees. 3. No Deductible. 4. AHLA offers a hunting lease agreement template FREE to policy holders. Use AHLA's program and put your trust in a time tested proven contract. A sample lease agreement can be viewed at

www.aHuntingLease.org. 5. The Insurance Carrier is Praetorian Insurance company, rated “A (excellent)” by A.M. Best. We can control a lot of outcomes in the woods, but when tragedy strikes it is better to be safe than sorry. Is it worth the risk to put your financial security at stake due to an unforeseen catastrophe? For more information on American Hunting Lease Association, visit www.aHuntingLease.org or call 866-782-6330.

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FREE Sample Excell 7000 The Alternative For Today

SYNERGY ANIMAL PRODUCTS 1681 Schubert Rd. • Bethel, PA 19507

1-800-507-9361 WEEKLY SALES EVERY MONDAY HOSKING SALES - FORMER WELCH LIVESTOCK Weekly Sales Every Monday 12:30 Fresh Produce from Casey Farm Market, Misc. & small animals; 1:00 Dairy; **We will now sell lambs, goats, pigs, feeders immediately following Dairy. Calves and cull beef approx. 5:00-5:30PM. Help us increase our volume - thus making a better market for everyone. **We are Independent Marketers - working 24/7 to increase your bottom line. Competitive marketing is the way to go. Monday, Sept. 12th sale – Cull cows ave. .55 top cow .7550 wt. 1726 $1303.13 (cows up to $1406.30) Bulls up to .80 wt. 1118 $894.40, bull calves top $1.2750, heifer calves $1.6750 Monday, Sept. 19th – Monthly Sheep, Lamb, Goat & Pig Sale. A group of 4 ewe lambs, 2 ewe rams; another group of 5 sheep & 1 Ram. The sheep, lamb & goat market is at all time high. Also consigned 4 Scottish Highlanders. Monday, Sept. 26th – Due to loss of feed - Schoharie County Milking Herd - 50 Head Dairy all stages of lactation. 4 Fresh in the last 30 days, 12 fresh in the last 60 days, balance all stages. Ave. 50#/cow in tank. Many Registered cows in this group info at ringside. Also consigned a group of Jersey X Heifers; a group of Holstein bred heifers. Saturday, Oct. 15th – Richfield Springs, NY. 63rd OHM Club Sale - 11 AM. Chairman – Brad Ainslie 315-822-6087. Watch for future ads. Brad says this will be the best group ever! Friday, Nov. 11th – Fall Premier All Breeds Sale – held at the sale facility in New Berlin. Selections are underway - Call if you want to participate We Don’t want to miss anyone. LOOKING TO HAVE A FARM SALE OR JUST SELL A FEW - GIVE US A CALL. **Trucking Assistance - Call the Sale Barn or check out our trucker list on our Web-Site. Call to advertise in any of these sales it makes a difference. Directions: Former Welch Livestock 6096 NYS Rt. 8, 30 miles South of Utica & 6 miles North of New Berlin, NY. www.hoskingsales.com Call today with your consignments. Tom & Brenda Hosking 6096 NYS Rt. 8 New Berlin, NY 13411

607-699-3637 or 607-847-8800 cell: 607-972-1770 or 1771

Page 19 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

2011 New York State Dry Bean Field meeting to be held on Sept. 21


Section C - Page 20 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Food safety advice to commercial growers regarding flooded crops Floods occur when water or runoff from surface waters such as rivers, lakes or steams overflows and runs into fields. Water from heavy rainfall that pools on the surface of saturated soils is NOT considered flooding. Flood waters are likely to contain contaminants. These may come from upstream farms and rural septic systems, urban lawns and roadways, industrial sites or overflow from municipal sewage systems. Contaminants may include: raw manure or feces, agricultural chemicals, heavy metals or other chemical contaminants. Microbial pathogens that could be in flood waters include bacteria, viruses, and parasites. For these reasons, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers crops where the edible portion has come in contact with flood waters to be adulterated and not to be sold for human consumption. See: • www.fda.gov/Food/FoodDefense/ Emergencies/FloodsHurricanesPowerOutages/ucm112723.htm • www.fda.gov/RegulatoryInformation/Legislation/FederalFoodDrugandCosmeticActFDCAct/FDCActChapterIVFood/ucm107527.htm As painful as it may be to do, all crops with edible portions that have come in contact with flood waters should be destroyed or discarded.

Advice for growers with flooded crops: Per FDA, discard all crops that have edible portions that have come in contact with flood water. Before cleaning up or destroying crops in flooded fields, check with your crop insurance and/or local Farm Services Agency (FSA) representatives regarding exact documentation to certify losses, procedures for initiating claims, possible financial assistance. Although root crops are usually cooked and often peeled before consumption, if under flood waters, they may be considered to be grown in unsanitary conditions. We are waiting to learn more details from the FDA about their regulations, but common sense suggests that intact, undamaged crops that are to be peeled and cooked, such as winter squash, can be sold after they were flooded BUT ONLY IF flooding was for a short period of time (several hours at most) and the crop was promptly harvested and is thoroughly washed and then treated with a high rate of sanitizer such as chlorine or Sanidate before sale. We have contacted the FDA about this — if we learn differently from the FDA we will inform you as soon as we have a response. Place markers at the high water line so you can identify the area where crops were in contact with flood waters.

Leave a 30 foot buffer between flooded areas of fields and adjacent areas to be harvested for human consumption; this is to accommodate a generous turn-around distance for equipment to prevent contact with flooded soil and avoid cross-contamination of nonflooded ground. Workers should wear protective clothing such as rubber boots and rubber gloves when working in fields that were flooded where plants that may be contaminated. Protective clothing should be discarded or thoroughly cleaned after working in flooded areas. Avoid feeding crops that came in contact with flood waters to livestock as plants could have pesticides, pathogens, mycotoxins, or other contaminants that could be harmful to livestock health. If your well head was submerged, retest your well water to make sure that

only safe, potable water comes into direct contact with produce. The Vermont Department of Health “NU” test kit costs $15 for a measure of coliform and E.coli. Call 800-660-9997 to order with credit card or request an order form. Regarding crops near flooded areas, or with no edible parts developed or exposed to flood water: Crops near flooded areas or those that were flooded without the edible part of the plant coming in contact with flood water (such as sweet corn or staked tomatoes) need to be evaluated on a case by case basis. These, and crops in which the edible portion develops after flood waters recede are not automatically deemed adulterated. It is your decision whether to sell them after considering the following:

Food C21

SHORT NOTICE AUCTION!!!

SPACE FARM DISPERSAL

SAT., SEPTEMBER 24 @ 10:30 A.M. SHARP!! 4807 STATE ROUTE 417 (Jasper-Woodhull Road) WOODHULL (Steuben Co.) NY (Just above the NY-PA Line)

Sale at the farm located along Rte. 417 about midway between Jasper and Woodhull.

ADVANCE NOTICE 6th Annual Broome County Fall Absolute Consignment Auction AND 17th Annual Sur plus School Bus, Vehicle & Equipment Auction Broome County Fairgrounds - Whitney Point, NY

Saturday

October 1, 2011

9:00AM

Auction To Be Held @ Broome County Fairgrounds, 2924 US Rt. 11, Whitney Point, NY 13862. Take I-81: To Exit 8, To Rt. 11. Whitney Point Is 15 Mi. North Of Binghamton, 20 Miles South Of Cortland. Large Auction Consisting Of Tractors, Farm Equipment, Construction Equipment Commercial & Residential Lawn & Garden Equipment; Plus: School Buses & Vehicles Early Hi-Lites Including: Tractors- JD 2550; JD 2950; JD 4020; MF 255 w/ MF Loader; Kubota L3650; Ford 3000; Ford 8N & 9N; IH 656; IH 1066; Muir Hill 4wd, 100+Hp; Many Others; Construction Equipment: JLG 45’ Art. Aerial Lift, Dual Fuel, Nice; Dresser TD-7 Dozer; JD 240 Skid Steer; Case 1840 Skid Steer; Eager Beaver 20 & 10-Ton Tagalong Trailers; Special Equipment Trailer: ‘06 Ledwell 48’ Drop Tail, Drop Deck Equip. Trailer w/ Winch, Super Nice!!!; Utility Vehicles & ATV’s: JD HPX Gator; Polaris Ranger 6x6; Honda 4-Wheeler; Club Car Precedent Golf Cart; (6) Club Car Gas Golf Carts; Farm Equipment: JD 456 Round Baler; CaseIH Round Baler; NH 467 Haybine; IH 14’ Disc; Mill Creek Small PTO Spreader-New; Several 3pth Items; (75) Lawn & Garden: JD ‘s: 1545- 72’, 4wd, Front Mt., Sharp; X475; 445; GX345; (2) 345; 325; GT245; LX277; 318; 316; L130; LT133; 320; LT180; LX176; F525; Many Others, Many w/ Blowers; EXMarks: (3) 2972’s, 72” Decks w/ Bagger, Late Model, Very Expensive; (2) 2560’s; Dixie Chopper 50,” 150 Hrs.; Toro Z-Turn 60”; Cub Cadet’s: 982 w/ Cab & Blower; (10) Other Cub Cadet Trade-Ins; New Trailers: (8) New Cross Country Equipment Trailers, From 5-Ton Down To Landscape; Dump Truck: ‘88 GMC Brigadier S/A Dump, Dsl., Nice Cond.!!; Special NYS Sales Tax Seized Vans: ‘04 Chevy 1500 Cargo / Tool Van; ‘02 Chevy 2500 Cargo / Tool Van; School Buses & Vehicles: (15) Full Sized Buses, Flat Nose Styles; Some Asst. Vans, Watch Next Weeks Paper For Full List. Also, Many Quality Tools And Small Items, PLUS: Group Of Nursery stock; Live Interactive Online Bidding Available For This Auction Through www.equipmentfacts.com Many Other Items Coming, Items Being Added Daily, Still Time To Consign For Great Ad Coverage!! Consignments Welcomed If Pledged To Absolute Sale!! For Questions & Consignment Consultation Call Us!! Advertising Deadline: Monday Sept. 19th. Receiving Consignments: Tues 9/27 Thru Thurs. 9/29, 9-5PM, Fri. 9/30, 9-12 Noon. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Licensed Real Estate Brokers In NY, NJ & PA Whitney Point, N.Y. 13862 607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE www.manasseauctions.com

Due to serious illness selling as quickly as possible, the following: (the Space family has worked this farm for 100 years!) Interstate Ready 95 Head Dairy Herd (Sells First @ 10:30 SHARP!) (blood tested, inoculated, pregnancy examined!) 72 Milking age with about 65 head in milk and the balance dry. This is a tie stall herd, gentle, pastured, large in size and heavy in flesh, with over all good udders. A quality premium comes in the milk check! Cattle are bred for year around freshening and are currently with a red and white bull. All the flavors are represented with black and white and red and white Holsteins, Jerseys, Black Jerseys; Guernseys; Ayrshires and 1 black belted cow. Balance of herd are heifer calves to short yearlings. MACHINERY FEATURING: 1 yr. old NH F.P. 230 chopper with kernel processor, tandem axle, Metalert III System and only about 110 total acres of use! (corn only); Selling separately will be the 1 yr. old NH 824 2-row corn head!; Miller Pro 1 yr. old 5300 forage box, (18 ft.) with roof and on heavy tandem gear, p.t.o. rear unload; Meyer 18 ft. hyd. rear unload forage box (18 ft.) with roof and tandem axle gear; NH 818 (18 ft.) forage box with roof and tandem gear; TRACTORS-SKID STEERS-ATTACHMENTS: NH LX 585 diesel skid steer with big bucket; NH LX 485 diesel skid steer with small bucket; Bell Tec hyd. post hole digger with skid steer; Bale spear and pallet forks for skid steers; JD 7200 4WD tractor with cab, 2 remotes, 18.4x38 and 13.6x28 tires, 6000 hrs., outfitted with JD 740 loader; White 6085 4WD tractor, cab, 16.9x34 and 14.9x24 tires, 2 remotes, outfitted with White 676 quick attach loader; White 135 4WD tractor, cab, freshly rebuilt engine, 2 remotes, 20.8x38 tires; White 135 2WD cab tractor, 2 remotes, 20.8x38 tires; White 2-110 2WD cab tractor, 2 remotes, 20.8x38 tires; White 285 with cab, cracked motor; GENERAL PURPOSE EQUIPMENT: Locke 18 ft. hyd. dump box on tandem axle gear; JD 7000 6-row corn planter; JD 8300 grain only 23 hole grain drill with single disc openers and grass seed box; NH 351 grinder mixer; Winpower 25/15 p.t.o. generator on cart; NH 165 single axle spreader with slippery floor and end gate; NH 185 tandem axle spreader, slippery floor, good frame and tires, needs repairs; JD 3970 chopper with both heads, needs repairs; NH 489 haybine; JD 1460 diskbine with rolls and turtles; Baltic 3 pt. broadcast spreader; Friend 500 gal. trailer type sprayer with 60 ft. booms; Unverferth gravity box wagon; Little Giant gravity box, only; 24 ft. steel frame big bale carrier wagon; 3 pt. bale spear; Tuffline heavy duty 3 pt. 8 ft. scraper blade; White 508 4-b. and 5-b. (16 inch) semi-mt. plows, spring reset, both with power slide hitches (5-b. has buster bar); Oliver 546 5-b. semi-mt. plow; JD and other 14 ft. cultimulchers; AC 2300 heavy 12 ft. transport disk; Brillion 24 ft. transport drag; NOTE SALE ORDER: Cattle First @ 10:30 followed by the machinery! Lunch and comfort facility on site. Sale only due to George’s health! See you at the Space farm on the 24th! TERMS: Cash! Honorable checks from known persons in good standing! Unknown persons need favorable and current bank letter or leave purchases until check is cleared. Cattle need to be removed sale day! Owned by Mr. and Mrs. George Space 607-458-5597

Auction Conducted by James P. Pirrung and Associates

PIRRUNG AUCTIONEERS, INC. Wayland, New York Office 585-728-2520 Fax 585-728-3378 Web page: www.pirrunginc.com


FEEDER CATTLE SALE

Sat., Oct., 1, 2011 • 10 AM PLEASE BRING CATTLE IN ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 30TH

For info call: 585-394-1515

FINGER LAKES LIVESTOCK EX. 3 Miles East Of Canandaigua, NY on Rt. 5 & 20 Cash or good check day of sale, nothing to be removed until settled for, Announcements day of sale take precedence over advertising Visit Our Web Site www.fingerlakeslivestockex.com

Next Feeder Cattle Sale Sat., Oct. 15, 2011 @ 10 AM

NORWICH, NY — The Central New York Resource Conservation and Development Project, Inc. (CNYRC&D) recently completed the second year of a three year program to assist beginning women farmers, defined as those having less than 10 years farming experience. “Empowering Beginning Women Farmers in the Northeast through Whole Farm Planning” is funded by Holistic Management International through a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture. Across the Northeast, over 150 women have graduated from the training giving them new tools, information and perspectives on how to

* * AUCTION RESCHEDULED * * 29th Annual Broome & Tioga Counties Surplus Vehicle & Equipment Auction

New Date: Saturday, November 5, 2011 Binghamton, NY 13901

Watch Our Website For More Detailed Listing, Terms & Pics @ www.manasseauctions.com. Sales Managers & Auctioneers Licensed Real Estate Brokers In NY, NJ & PA Whitney Point, N.Y. 13862 607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE www.manasseauctions.com

succeed in farming. This innovative program instructs participants on using a holistic approach to decision making on their farms. Thirty participants (15 per year) from all across New York State met for 10 sessions on topics such as goal setting, financial, business, and marketing plans, land and infrastructure planning, soil fertility, and planned grazing. The final four sessions were located on farms to allow for hands-on learning. According to participant Linda Haley Ross of Madison County, “The NE Beginning Women Farmer program allowed me to learn hands-on, in-classroom, and through peer discussion the real challenges I would be facing as a

farmer today, while providing me the tools to address them. In addition, I leave with a lifelong support system and perpetually growing network of resources to guarantee my success.” Participants are provided with a mentor and are connected with a network of other beginning women farmers throughout the Northeast for additional support. Participants from previous classes continue to meet after

graduation to stay connected, enjoy the camaraderie created by the training and expand their learning. Applications for the third year of this program are due on Sept. 30, and are available at www.cnyrcd.org or by contacting Lauren Lines, New York State Coordinator at rcdstaff@cnyrcd.org. The sessions will begin in November and will be located in Central New York for the upcoming year.

some pathogens and/or chemicals. • If feeding to livestock, was the crop exposed to prolonged periods of moisture and stress that could promote fungal growth or molds that could produce mycotoxins? Other considerations: Allow at least 60 days to elapse between flooding and planting of the next human food crop. In absence of known or suspected biological or chemical contaminants in flood waters (such as sewage discharge or run-off from industrial sites) you can replant after 60 days. Organic growers: flood waters might contain residues of prohibited substances. Contact your certifier to discuss your situation. Soils should be al-

lowed to dry sufficiently and then tilled to at least six inches deep before planting crops. Adding compost or other organic matter when tilling will be beneficial to many soils. The soil should be retested for nutrient levels after flood waters recede, as the pH and nutrient levels of the soil may have changed. To protect the soil from erosion, it is advisable to plant a cover crop on fields that cannot be replanted soon with an edible crop. Cover crops can also help suppress weeds, and improve overall soil health. At this time of year (early fall) small grains such as oats or winter rye are good choices, with or without hairy vetch for adding fixed nitrogen.

Food from C20 • Is the edible part of the plant developing and if so, how far above the flood water was it? • Is there any evidence that floodwater splashed up onto edible portion of the crop? Floodwater almost certainly contains

ABSOLUTE CONSIGNMENT

AUCTION

Located at Gray's Field, 1315 US RT 5 in Fairlee, VT 05045. Take exit 15 off I-91 go North on RT 5 and field is on the left.

SATURDAY - SEPTEMBER 24TH, 2011 STARTING @ 8:30 AM

SELLING CONSTRUCTION & FARM EQUIPMENT, AUTO'S, TRUCKS, TRAILERS & MORE

2008 Kubota B7800 4WD tractor loader backhoe 620 hrs; 2008 Mahindra 2525 4WD tractor w/loader; 2006 Cat 247B turbo rubber track skidsteer w/power tach 1300 hrs; JD 790 4WD tractor loader backhoe 492 hrs; JD 1070 4WD w/loader, bucket & forks; Cat D3C dozer w/6 way blade; 2006 Kubota GR2100-54 diesel lawn tractor 163 hrs; Kubota BX1800 4WD tractor w/blower 241 hrs; Kubota B2100 w/mower, loader & blower; MF 35 tractor; Ford 8N tractor w/side mower; 2002 Challenger MT295 4WD w/loader 594 hrs; 2004 Benford Terex 5003 4WD articulated front dump 1062 hrs; JD 90 skidsteer w/3 buckets; Case 590 turbo 4WD xtenda-hoe tractor loader backhoe; Kubota GF1800 diesel front mount mower; 2005 Case 580 Super M 4WD tractor loader backhoe w/thumb 2380 hrs; 1998 Hyundai HL-740-3 wheel loader 3 yd. bucket; Ford 445C 4WD w/loader; Ford 455 4WD Industrial w/loader; Ford 1720 4WD tractor; 2011 Kaufman 20' 7000GVW tilt trailer; 40' Stainless steel storage trailer; 2008 Wallenstein GX700 3pth backhoe attachment; Ford/NH 918L 3pth flail mower, 2000 Econoline 7T tilt equipment trailer; Honda Foreman 300 4 wheeler; Bush Hog 72" finish mower; Kuhn GA3200GT rake; Kuhn GF44 tedder; York 6' 3pth power rake; Alamo SH96 flail mower; Rossi BF210H 3pth mower; Landpride 54" box blade; Landpride 48" finish mower; Woods LR72 rock rake; Ferri 155 3pth flail mower, Landpride FDR2560 finish mower; Bush Hog 285 rotary mower; Miller 200 amp gas powered welder; 2006 JD 145 lawn tractor; 2003 JD 130 lawn tractor, 2001 Sterling Acterra cab & chassis Cat diesel w/6 speed auto, air brakes, quantity of Timber Tech composite decking.

D SALES STABLES , INC HOLLAN W . NE

Dairy Cow & Heifer Sale Wed., Sept 21ST • 10:30 AM Consignments of Cows - Bulls - Heifers welcome Weaned Calves to Mature Cows

Many more consignments expected. All vehicles must have proper title papers or previous registrations. Consignments Accepted on Friday - Sept 23rd from 8:00 to 12:00. Small items will be accepted until 10:00. TERMS CASH OR GOOD CHECK, VISA & MASTER CARD ACCEPTED W/A 3% CHARGE

LUNCH BY WRIGHT'S AUCTIONEERS: C W GRAY & SON'S, INC. EAST THETFORD, VT 802-785-2161 FIELD # 802-333-4014 VT LIC #128 NH LIC Tim Gray # 2890 www.cwgray.com email: cwgray@valley.net www.auctionzip.com

Consigners please provide birthdates, milk wts, fresh dates, Sire & Dam info, Current SCC, Pedigrees on Registerd animals especially bulls.

Good uddered recently fresh & close Heifers are in Demand. Thank You

SALE MANAGED BY: New Holland Sales Stables, Inc. David Kolb 61-L

717-354-4341 (Barn) 717-355-0706 (FAX)

Page 21 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Beginning women farmers — whole farm planning training program accepts applications for upcoming sessions


Section C - Page 22 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

$10 million federal fund to help New York repair farmland destroyed by Hurricane Irene

LARGE PUBLIC AUCTION FRIDAY, SEPT. 23RD @ 9:30 AM

Statement from Dean Norton, President of New York Farm Bureau on the announcement on Sept. 7 of a bill that would create a $10 million federal fund to help New York repair farmland destroyed by Hurricane Irene: “Our farm families are grateful for the response from our Congressional delegation to help our farmers who were devastated by this storm. “The Post-Irene Emergency Farm Aid Act, if passed, will go a long way to restoring the precious soils that were washed away at the hands of this unprecedented weather event. “This is a valuable part of our long-term recovery prospects and will help ensure that our farms remain a vital part of the rural economy, providing jobs. “We thank Senators Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, together with Congressmen Chris Gibson, Maurice Hinchey, Paul Tonko and Bill Owens for stepping up for our farmers.”

R. Tom Jones, Auctioneer FOUR GENERATIONS OF COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICE

PO Box 536, Stone Road West Winfield, New York 13491

(315) 822-5243

Hoke Lumber Supply Auction

9:00 AM Saturday, Sept. 24 Downtown, Jordanville, NY

5mi N of Rt. 167; 11 mi. S of Rt. 5S on 167; 3 mi. E of Rt. 28, take Jordanville Rd. Arrows

Lumber - Nails - Forklifts - Doors - Windows 12” DeWalt comp. mitre saw w/10’ slide, 5’, 6’ swing patio doors; 32”, 36” storm doors; lots of new windows; countertop; sm tools; huge bolt, nail assortment, joist hangers; drywall screws; Arrow staples, Pas. framing nails; coil nails; propane mosquito vac; old store scales; 1/2”-6” PVC fittings and pipe; Ferco couplings; Tec screws; 6” stove pipe’ lots of wiring supplies; int.. ext., closet doors; rolled insulation; moldings of all kinds; 2x6, 2x8, 6x6x20, 6x6x12, stacks of rough sawn white oak, poplar, hemlock, pine, wormy butternut, 5/4 maple, 5/4 cherry, Adirondack birch; 2x2 treated spindles; roof cement; roof coating; cellar hatchways; 8’ jackposts; Bobcat ramps; 12’ Timbertec decking; vinyl soffit; metal siding of var. lengths, colors; 1x8 channel pine siding; 7x16 green fiberglass overhead door; gutter; downspout; ridge vent; shingles; builders felt; rolled roofing; Gasboy gas pump; plastic flared end culvert; 24” coupling; 4” solid coil plastic pipe; joint compound; plastic mouldings; masonry paint; Selling at 1:30 PM - 9000 lb. Huyster diesel fork lift - low reserve on each. Note: This is only a partial listing. I know we’ll find many surprises. This business has been in the family for 2 generations. Come early and plan on a long day. Have your measurements on hand and bring a truck! Lumber sells approx. 1:00 PM.

Auction to be held in our yard at the corner of Rts 38 & 38B in Newark Valley, NY (19 miles West of Binghamton, 8 miles North of Owego exit 64 off I-86.) Tractors: NH TN60A 2wd w/loader 700 hours!; Ford 8210 MFWD w/ROPS 2200 hrs, Ford 550 loader & forks; JD 4430 MFWD, 4020 ROPS w/Frey loader (sells seperate), JD 3010 D wfe nice; IHC 3588 2+2, 1086, 444 w/new tires; MF 1080, 180; Kubota L3700 SUDT w/ldr low hour demo!; B8200 w/ldr, B1550 w/belly mower; Ford 1220 333 hours nice!; Case 930, David Brown 1410; Ford 8700 need clutch; JD 317 mower; Antique Tractor: ‘55 Case 400 Gas completely rebuilt nice!; Case CC & RC on steel, RC, 800; Farmall F20, (2) H; Ford 8N, 801, 841 w/MFWD; MH Pony; JD 420W w/loader; Oliver 1850 MFWD; Fairbanks 2 hp & IHC 3-5 hp hit-n-miss; Inventory Reduction for Goodrich Tractor Parts. 60+ Parts tractors, 20 engines from GRTO to Longblocks, Wagons and pallets of parts, weights, wide front ends & more! Parts Tractors: AC CA, WD45, D17, 180, 185, HD4 6 way; Case VC, VA, VAC, DC, 800, 1494, 1594 MFWD, 580 forklift, W7 loader, 420 TLB; Farmall F12, SCH, M wfe, W9, 300U, 400D, 340, 404, 574, 656, 656 Hi-Crop, 1086, 3588 2+2; Ford (2) 3000, 3400, 550, A64 loader, TW30; JD A, 40, 420 CRL, 420 Ldr, 440 Dzr, 544A, (2) 4020, 5020, 2440, 2840, 4240; MF 1150, 2675, 2500 forklift; MH Pony, 22, 30; DB 780, 1200; Oliver 55, 77, 88, 1250; Long 460; Some tractors are running/fixable, some strictly parts machines. Lots of scrap iron will be sold in this sale.

Industrial: ‘01 Earthmaster 2SSX 4wd backhoe; Dresser TD7C dozer; Cat 225 excavator; Bobcat 743 & 743B, NH L775 skid steers; Dresser 714 roller; Cat forklift (fire); Yale forklift; New quality 18’ 10k lb trailer; tag-a-long trailers; cement mixer; New SSL bale spear, forks, weld on plates. Machinery: (3) Woods batwing mowers; Ford, NH, MF, Case sickle bar mowers; 4’-7’ rotary mowers; (15) good gravity wagons; long wheel rake; (2) NH 56 rakes, Case IH 8440 round baler; JD 16A, NH 35 flail choppers; Caroni 6’ tiller; Niemeyer 4 star tedder; NH 455 sickle bar; MF 2R planter, potato digger; Case 460 pull-type combine very nice!; JD grain wagon, JD 1470 discbine, 820 MoCo haybine, much more! Terms: Cash or Good check day of sale, nothing removed until paid in full. All items subject to change due to daily business, call for particular items. Everything sells as-is where-is. Lots of Absolute Items. There will be more than listed, ad made 3 weeks in advance, check website for updates. **Large auction, may be necessary to sell with 2 trucks** *No Buyers Premium * Free Loading * Lunch Onsite * Loading Dock * Consignments Welcome!* AUCTION BY:

Goodrich Auction Service, Inc. Newark Valley, NY • (607) 642-3293 www.goodrichauctionservice.com

Hoke Supply - Owners Inspect 1 hr. prior. - Lunch - Tent - Porta John - Positive ID for buyer's number. Bring a chair - Terms: Cash or good NYS check. NO buyer's penalty

TOM JONES AUCTIONS • 315-822-5243 • jonesauctions.com

TRADE SHOW OPPORTUNITIES • KEYSTONE FARM SHOW •

January 3, 4, 5, 2012 • Tues. 9-4, Wed. 9-4 & Thurs. 9-3 York Fairgrounds • York, PA

• VIRGINIA FARM SHOW • Jan. 19, 20 & 21, 2012 • Thurs. 9-4, Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-3 Augusta Expoland • Fishersville, VA

• BIG IRON EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • February 8 & 9, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 Eastern States Exposition • West Springfield, MA

• EMPIRE STATE FRUIT & VEG EXPO • Jan. 24, 25 & 26 2012 Oncenter Convention Center • Syracuse, NY

• HARD HAT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY

• MATERIAL HANDLING & INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT EXPO • March 7 & 8, 2012 • Wed. 10-7 & Thurs. 9-4 New York State Fairgrounds • Syracuse, NY FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO EXHIBIT AT OR ATTEND ANY OF THESE SHOWS

CALL 800-218-5586 www.leetradeshows.com • mwhite@leepub.com

TWO DAY SALE The 35th Annual Sale of the New York State Draft Horse Club will be held...

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2011 Tack & Equipment 9:00 AM Tack & Equipment Consignments taken until 11:00 AM on Thurs., Oct. 6 NO Saddles Will Be Accepted Outside Machinery will be sold at 10:00 AM

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2011 Horses 9:00 AM Horse consignments taken until 11:00 AM on Friday, October 7 THE SALE WILL BE HELD AT THE

CORTLAND COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS CORTLAND, NEW YORK Directions: Exit 12 from I-81 South then south one mile or from New York Route 13 go north on US 11 to village line. Signs will be posted. NEW AND USED EQUIPMENT BEING SOLD! SALE WILL BE HELD UNDER COVER.

ABSOLUTELY NO PETS ALLOWED

Yearling Raffle $1.00 per ticket or book of six for $5.00 DO NOT HAVE TO BE PRESENT TO WIN. Drawing at the Sale. Yearling or $500.00

Auctioneers: LeRoy Yoder, Shipshewana, Indiana Dave Myers, Decatur, Indiana

To make consignments or for information contact: Chuck Minturn David Johnson Lisa Furman 7639 Freeman Rd. 1590 Erieville Rd. 1121 Ridge Road Auburn NY 13021 Erieville NY 13061 Lansing NY 14882


UNIVERSITY PARK, PA — A unique set of circumstances could lead to a heightened threat of deadly gas being created in silos across the Northeast, according to a farm-safety expert in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. The dangerous phenomenon may have started with the scorching heat wave the region experienced in July — which has some areas on the edge of drought conditions, according to Davis Hill Sr., extension associate in agricultural and biological engineering. The gas could develop if the region receives normal amounts of rainfall through the rest of the summer. “There is now a lot of drought-stressed corn, particularly on manured fields,” he said. “If this crop receives sufficient rainfall later in the season, there will be a potential for higher-than-average nitrates to build up in the corn plants just prior to harvest. This condition can lead to high gas levels in silos.” During the fermentation process of silage, a number of gases are given off, Hill explained. Of particular concern is a family of gases called oxides of nitrogen — often referred to as “silo gas.” “The formation of these gases peaks in one to two days after filling and can last for 10 days to two weeks after the fresh, green forage is chopped and blown into the silo,” he said. “This is a naturally occurring process and is necessary to ferment the forage so it is usable feed for livestock and for long term storage. “Sometimes, gas production is so great that it is mistaken for a silo fire,” Hill said. Farmers and fire personnel need to realize that it would be nearly impossible for a silo fire to start soon after filling, Hill noted. “This is why we always talk of attempting to locate the actual fire location within the silo before any attempts at extinguishment proceed.” Silo gas sometimes has a bleach-like odor and under certain conditions can be visible as a fog from a distance — and thus be mistaken for smoke. If the gas is concentrated enough, this fog will appear to be yellow to reddish brown, and the silage surface, silo wall, base of the chute and other structures of the silo may be stained yellow, orange or reddish from the gas. This gas is heavier than air, which means it will settle at the surface of the silage instead of rising to the top of the silo, exiting through the fill door. This is an important factor, Hill pointed out. “The highest concentration of gas will be at the surface of the silage, which is where a person will be going if he or she needs to enter the silo for any reason,” he said. “Also, if a silo door is open near the surface of the silage, the highly concentrated gas could exit the silo through this door, flow down the

chute and settle at the base of the silo in the feed room or into the barn area. “If there is little ventilation in the barn area, a dangerous buildup of silo gas can occur, which can affect livestock or people who enter the area.” The presence and concentration of silo gas is dependent on the storage structure and the quality of the forage material that is chopped. Those crops that have received nitrogen fertilizer (corn) and those crops that have suffered prolonged drought — or, in particular, prolonged drought conditions followed by rain just prior to harvest — often are prone to high gas production. That could happen this summer, Hill worries. “It appears that this year, with the long droughty period that much of the state endured — which stunted the corn crop — there will be more corn harvested for silage, and that will be done fairly early,” he said. “The high levels of nitrates in this crop will lead to higher-than-normal concentrations of silo gas produced during the ensiling process. Operators need to be aware of this and take precautions.” These precautions include ensuring that all spaces at the base of the silos are well ventilated and that silo doors are closed well above the level of the silage surface. People should stay out of the silo for three weeks after it is filled and always should ventilate the silo with the silo blower for at least 20 minutes prior to entry (however, this is effective only if the silo is more than half full). Hill also advises producers to consider leaving the lower 10-12 inches of stalk in the field (chop higher

than normal), as this part of the plant may have the highest level of nitrates accumulated. Individual reactions to silo gas depend on the concentration of gas that is inhaled and the length of exposure, Hill explained. Very high concentrations of gas will cause immediate distress, which will result in a person collapsing and dying within minutes. “When gas levels are this high, normally the individual will not be able to withstand the symptoms felt and will vacate the area quickly,” he said. Lower concentrations could cause upper respiratory congestion, watering eyes, cough, breathing difficulty, fatigue and nausea. “If symptoms are mild, an unsuspecting individual may stay in the area to finish the job at hand,” Hill said. “This can make the effects of silo gas worse, as these effects can last for many hours in the body, causing symptoms to become progressively worse over the course of the next day or two.” People experiencing any of these symptoms when inside or near a freshly filled silo should immediately exit to fresh air and leave the task for another day. They also should immediately go to their doctor or a hospital emergency room and report having a serious “silo gas poisoning” exposure, Hill advises. “One after-effect of silo gas poisoning is fluid in the lungs leading to chemical pneumonia, and perhaps death, if not treated promptly,” he said. “The effect of fluid filling the lungs may not present itself until several hours after the exposure — and then it may be too late.”

Pennsylvania Shepherd's Symposium set for Oct. 22 and 23. Whether you currently own sheep or goats, or are considering starting a small ruminant flock or herd, you should plan to attend the Pennsylvania Shepherd's Symposium and Beginning Shepherd's Workshop on Saturday, Oct. 22, and Sunday, Oct. 23. The symposium will be held at the Samuel E. Hayes Jr. PA Livestock Evaluation Center, Pennsylvania Furnace, PA on Saturday, Oct. 22 and will focus on reproduction. Making sound reproduction management decisions can really make a significant impact to your flock, both economically and genetically. Join us as we explore the reproduction systems of the ram and ewe and learn how technology has come to play a vital role in the process. Topics covered will include everything from ram collection to embryo transfers. Our featured speaker is Glen Erickson of New Frontier Genetics in Wellsville, Utah. Erickson is actively working with deer, goats, sheep, and some exotic species on semen collection and evaluation, artificial insemination, and embryo transfer. After spending over 20 years as the Shepherd at Utah State, Glen now travels the country performing reproductive procedures for some of the most elite flocks and herds. The day will also include the opportunity to meet with our industry's youth. We will offer a youth program that will have a breakout session in the morn-

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ing to discuss basic reproduction and then join the hands-on portion of the symposium in the afternoon. The youth portion will run simultaneously with the symposium program. There will be a lamb luncheon, showcasing the contestants for the 2012 Pennsylvania Lamb & Wool Queen contest. Throughout the day, there will be a silent auction going on to benefit the PA Sheep & Wool Growers Association. The evening will feature a reception and door prizes, concluding with the PA Sheep & Wool Growers Annual Meeting. The Beginning Shepherd's Workshop will be held on Sunday morning, Oct. 23 at the Penn State Sheep Barns, University Park, PA. The goal of the workshop is to provide hands-on management information for both first-time and experienced shepherds. This year's focus will be all things wool Topics covered will include: basic wool handling, preparation, storage, evaluating your clip, marketing and sales, and how to improve your wool quality. Plan to attend this motivating and educational symposium and workshop with fellow sheep enthusiasts. For more information and to pre-register, contact Joanne Evans at 717-485-0532 or by e-mail at genetic@innernet.net

Page 23 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

Beware of silo gas — it could be common this summer


Section C - Page 24 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

Islip, NY, declared free of the asian longhorned beetle Eradication efforts demonstrate success, additional areas targeted ISLIP, NY — The trees in Islip, NY, have been declared free of the destructive Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). The announcement was made Aug. 23 at a special event hosted by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. It was welcome news in the fight against this beetle, which has the potential to wipe out most of the nation’s hardwood trees. The ALB was first detected in Islip in September 1999. Its eradication was possible because of an 11-year cooperative effort between APHIS, the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets and various partners at the state and local levels, as well as the concern and involvement of the public. “Efforts of this magnitude can only succeed when we all work together and are vigilant in helping to report and stop the ALB’s spread,” said Darrel J. Aubertine, Commissioner, New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. “The biggest thanks go to the citizens of Islip, whose support was critical. Some allowed us to cut down several of their trees in the process to eradicate the beetle, and they can take pride in knowing that without their help, we would still be battling it today.” “The successful eradication of ALB from Islip would not have been possible without the solid partnership between federal, state and local governments,” added Christine Markham, APHIS National Director of the Asian longhorned beetle cooperative eradication program. “Eliminating the ALB required the continued communication between government agencies and the public, and a united commitment to eliminate the pest.” To celebrate the accomplishment, government officials at the event, held in East Islip, presented a certificate of appreciation to the Town of Islip. They also planted a commemorative tree in Brookwood Hall Park, which was donated by the New York City Parks and Recreation. In all, 181 infested and high-risk host trees were removed in Islip between

2000 and 2002. In addition, just over 23,000 surrounding non-infested host trees received treatment applications from 2001 through 2004. Now that Islip is ALB-free, APHIS will issue a federal order and the Department of Agriculture and Markets will revise its regulations, to rescind the seven-square-mile quarantine. This will reduce the regulated area in New York from 142 to 135 square miles. “We have been happy to work with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to eradicate this dangerous threat to Long Island’s ecosystem,” said Islip Town Supervisor Phil Nolan. “I am proud to join in declaring the

Town of Islip officially cleared of the Asian longhorned beetle, and I thank everyone for their hard work in this lengthy undertaking.” “This beetle is a serious threat to our maple trees and we are excited to hear about the progress being made in eradicating it from New York,” said Helen Thomas, Executive Director, NYS Maple Producers Association. “New York is the second largest maple producing state in America and the Asian longhorned beetle is one of the leading threats to our future. This is a very important announcement.” “The Asian longhorned beetle poses a major threat to our trees, particularly

our sugar maples — the trees largely responsible for our beautiful fall foliage and home grown maple syrup,” added Troy Weldy, Director of Ecological Management for The Nature Conservancy of New York. “This eradication effort exemplifies what our federal and state agencies can accomplish when the necessary resources are provided. These agencies need our full support as we look towards fully eradicating this destructive beetle from New York.” “New York’s forest products industry contributes $4 billion to the State’s gross economic output annually,” said Eric Carlson, President and CEO of the Empire State Forest Products Association.

“The livelihood of some 60,000 people is jeopardized by this beetle and we are very encouraged by the progress in the fight to eradicate it from New York and the U.S.” “More areas are starting to win the fight against this pest,” said Rhonda Santos of the ALB Cooperative Eradication Program at APHIS. “We’re hopeful that when people hear of the successful eradication in Islip, they’ll be on the lookout for the ALB and report it when they see it. That way, efforts can be made to quickly contain and isolate an area from future destruction. We also want people to remember to not move firewood, which is the num-

ber one cause of the spread of this beetle.” The ALB was successfully eradicated from Chicago, IL, and Hudson County, NJ, in 2008. Islip marks the third successful eradication in the U.S. Currently, portions of Manhattan and Staten Island, NY, and Middlesex and Union Counties, NJ, are undergoing a survey process that, if successful, will eventually declare them ALB-free in 2012 (Manhattan) and 2014 (Staten Island and New Jersey). “An area is declared free of the ALB after all the infested trees are eliminated and surveys are negative for active signs of beetle activity or the presence of the ALB,” explained Santos.

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HARRISBURG, PA — The Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority (PENNVEST), working in conjunction with the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), will host auctions this fall for the sale and purchase of nutrient credits in the Susquehanna and Potomac watersheds. There will be two “spot” auctions of verified credits, applicable to the 2011 compliance year. Both auctions will afford wastewater treatment plants in these two watersheds to purchase credits as a means of meeting their nitrogen and phosphorous discharge limits for the compliance year. PENNVEST is conducting these auctions as a component of Pennsylvania’s nutrient credit trading program to encourage the trading of nutrient credits in the Susquehanna and Potomac watersheds. The Nutrient Credit Trading program provides a cost-effective means for facilities subject to meet limits for ni-

TRACTORS Case IH 9110. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . Fultonville CAT D4H LGP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen Ford 8N w/Blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 4240 Quad Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7210 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,000 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5510 w/540. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500 . . . . . . Fultonville (2) JD 244 J Loaders. . . . . . . . . . . . $37,900 . . . . . . Fultonville AC CA 2btm/cult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . Fultonville Ford 4610 Narrow, MFWD, cab . Coming In . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota MX5000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,400 . . . . . . Fultonville NH TL90 cab 2WD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,900 . . . . . . . Chatham AC 200 w/ cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . Schaghticoke JD 5425 w/542 ldr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/Cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5325 2WD/Cab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,000 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 5065M w/553 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen COMPACT TRACTORS MF 1220 w/mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,595 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 2305 w/ldr & deck . . . . . . . . . . . $11,900. . . . Schaghticoke JD 110 TLB, w/cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,800. . . . Schaghticoke JD 755 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500 . . . . . Clifton Park JD 855 w/cab, & loader . . . . . . . . . . . $9,800. . . . Schaghticoke JD 970 w/430 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 2520 w/loader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,900 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 3720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 . . . . . Clifton Park Kioti DK455 TLB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000 . . . . . . . . Goshen Kubota L39 TLB, canopy. . . . . . . . . $28,400 . . . . . Clifton Park Kubota L5450 loader/backhoe . . . . $21,000 . . . . . . . Chatham NH TC45D cab/loader . . . . . . . . . . . $27,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen NH TZ25DA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,900 . . . . . . . . Goshen SKID STEER / CONSTRUCTION 317 Skid steer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Cat 236 cab, heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 . . . . . . Fultonville MOWER CONDITIONERS NH 477. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,900 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 1209 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 925 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 946 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen Kuhn FC 302 Moco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500 . . . . . . . Chatham TILLAGE Brillion Seeder 10’. . . . . . . . . . . Coming In. . . . Schaghticoke IH 710 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In. . . . Schaghticoke IH II Shank Chisel . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In. . . . Schaghticoke JD 1450 4 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2000 6 bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2500 4 bottom plow . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000 . . . . . . Fultonville HAY AND FORAGE Claas 870 SPF H w/Heads . . . . . $169,500. . . . Schaghticoke DBL Rake Hitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $950 . . . . . . Fultonville Gehl 860 w/2R 6’ po . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,950 . . . . . . Fultonville

trogen, phosphorus and sediment to meet those limits by working with other facilities, with nonpoint sources, or both. PENNVEST has chosen Markit to provide the platform for enrollment and eligibility, auctions and registry services. The schedule for the auctions is as follows: • Oct. 5 — application information from potential auction participants due to PENNVEST; • Oct. 12 — application information finalized by PENNVEST and potential auction participants; • Oct. 26 — PENNVEST informs potential auction participants on their eligibility to participate in the auction; • Nov. 2 — PENNVEST conducts first spot auction; • Nov. 4 — PENNVEST announces first spot auction results; • Nov. 9 — PENNVEST conducts second spot auc-

Gehl 1470 RB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . Chatham NH 258. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . Fultonville NH Flail Chopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . Fultonville NH 169 Tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,900 . . . . . . Fultonville Miller Pro Rake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,750 . . . . . . Fultonville Miller 1416 merger . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,500. . . . Schaghticoke Miller 1416. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,500. . . . Schaghticoke JD 714 Forage Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,750 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 6750 SP w/640 . . . . . . . . . . . Coming In . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7300 SP w/686 & 640 . . . . . . . $139,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3960 forage harv., base unit. . . . . $3,800 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 3970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,000 . . . . . . Fultonville NH 166 inverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,850 . . . . . . Fultonville Fahr KH500 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . Fultonville Vicon 4 Star Tedder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,200 . . . . . . . . Goshen Kuhn FC 4000 Disc Mower . . . . . . . . $6,800 . . . . . . . Chatham Kuhn 500 Disc Mower . . . . . . . . . . . $7,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Krone 550 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,650 . . . . . . Fultonville Rossi 7’ sickle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Sitrex 302 Tedder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville PLANTING / TILLAGE Brillion 18’ Harrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,900. . . . Schaghticoke JD 220 disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville Taylorway 16’ disc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,500. . . . Schaghticoke JD 2500 4 btm hyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 4RH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,550 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 12’ BWA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . Fultonville BALERS NH 326 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900. . . . Schaghticoke NH 316 baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . Goshen JD 335 Round Baler . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,850 . . . . . . Fultonville Pequea Fluffer 81⁄2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,500 . . . . . . Fultonville Hesston 560 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . Chatham Hesston Rounder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . Fultonville MISCELLANEOUS HARDI 210 3pt Sprayer . . . . . . . . . . . $2,850 . . . . . . Fultonville POLARIS RAZOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,950 . . . . . . Fultonville ARCTIC CAT 650 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,850 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 135 mixer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 245 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,500. . . . Schaghticoke JD 840 loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,950 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 6600 combine w/215 . . . . . . . . . . $7,800 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 7000 Series 3 pt./PTO, front hitch $4,950 . . . . . . Fultonville JD HPX Gator 4x4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,750 . . . . . Clifton Park H&S 125 spreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 . . . . . . Fultonville Great Bend loader for JD 7000’s . . . $5,500 . . . . . . Fultonville Bush Hog 4 ft. mower . . . . . . . . . . . . . $850 . . . . . . . Chatham JD 9600 w/643, combine. . . . . . . . . $41,500 . . . . . . Fultonville JD 2 BTM Plow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $450 . . . . . . . . Goshen 3 pt. Disc 4’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $750 . . . . . . . . Goshen 7’Loader blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $875 . . . . . . Fultonville MC 7’ Rotary Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,200 . . . . . . Fultonville

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tion; • Nov. 11 — PENNVEST announces second spot auction results. To acquaint users with the electronic auction platform, an information meeting will be held Sept. 14 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. This meeting will be a WebEx event. To access it via the Internet, go to the following link and register prior to the event: https://copa.webex.com/copa/onstage/g.php?d=64 2046680&t=a To access by phone at the time of the meeting, use the following call-in numbers for the U.S. and Canada: 877-669-3239, toll free, and, locally, 408-6003600. In both cases, the event number is 642 046 680. Those interested in participating in either of these auctions should consult the “PENNVEST Nutrient Credit Clearinghouse Rulebook – 9-24-10.pdf” through PENNVEST’s Web site, online at the following location: www.portal.state.pa.us/ portal/server.pt/community/nutrient_credit_trading/19518/Hide%20Nutrient%20Credit%20Trading%20Rulebook/763393 PENNVEST anticipates charging buyers and sellers a nominal fee of 2.5 cents per credit as a means of offsetting the administrative costs it incurs in conducting these auctions. For more information, contact Paul Marchetti at PENNVEST, 717-783-4496 and pmarchetti@pa.gov, or Ann Roda at DEP, 717-787-4726 or aroda@pa.gov

15th ANNUAL FALL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

SATURDAY, OCT. 8TH, AT 9:00 AM Sharp! Farm Machinery, Construction Equipment, Lawn & Garden Equipment, Recreation Vehicles, Trucks, Tools & More! TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE 457 Rt. 32 - 3 Miles North of Schuylerville, NY NOTICE: LARGE CONSIGNMENTS received ANYTIME AFTER SEPT. 20TH. SMALL ITEM CONSIGNMENTS received Sunday, Oct. 2nd, 10am to 4pm, Oct. 3rd - Oct. 6th, 9 AM TIL 6 PM, & Friday, Oct. 7th until NOON! TOWN & COUNTRY AUCTION SERVICE Henry J. Moak • 518-695-6663 Check Our Web Site For Details: towncountryauctions.com Auctioneers: Henry J. Moak, Kyle McPhail, Nathan Sweet & Pat McLenithan We Reserve the Right to Refuse any Item. Please Call Ahead on Big Items for Advertising Purposes. No TIRES Accepted! Terms: Cash, Check, All Major Cards - NO BUYER’S PREMIUM! BREAKFAST & LUNCH AVAILABLE

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LEID’S NURSERY

FARM MACHINERY CONSIGNMENT AND NURSERY STOCK AUCTION

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 at 9:00 AM 1633 RTE. 14A, PENN YAN, NY 14527 Directions: approximately 1 mile north of Penn Yan Village on vacant lot kitty-corner from Stape Road & 14A intersection - watch for signs. TRACTORS: JD6200 4WD (power quad) 8000 hours, Ford 5000 ROPS good rubber (Dual power) Ford 5900 72 hp (good cond.) MF 180 75 hp. Sellick Maxi Reach MR 737 Telehandler: 7000 lb. lift 37 ft. reach. Skid Loaders: Case 1845 C, JD 250 dirt bucket 3900 hrs, JD 240 foot control dirt bucket 5000 hrs. FARM MACHINERY: Kewanee 20’ Rock flex wing disc, 2-4’ cultipacker pups WHITE 508 4 W spring reset plow, OLIVER 3x trailer plow, NH 848 Rd. Baler w/monitor, NH 849 Rd baler (good cond.) automatic twine tie, Hydraulic bale grabber (universal attach) JD 213 13’ flex head w/stainless bottom (black reel) JD 443 4RN cornhead (low tin) 4-16’ headlock sections. LAWN TRACTORS: JD 318 w/54” deck 1200 hrs. (good cond.), JD 318 w/snow blower, WHITE 25 hp 50” cut, SIMPLICITY 18 hp 38” cut, FERRIS 12.5 hp 32” cut walk behind. LAWN EQUIPMENT: TROYBILT TOMAHAWK 2 in 1 chipper-shredder 8 hp towable. Nice selection of furniture, swing sets, picnic tables, ect. Note: More expected by sale date Sale Order: Nursery stock at 9:00AM, Lawn & Garden approx. 11:00, Farm Equipment approx. 11:30-12:00. THERE WILL BE A NICE SELECTION OF NURSERY STOCK INCLUDING (BUT NOT LIMITED TO) SHADE AND FRUIT TRE EES, PERENNIALS, ORNAMENTS, SHRUBS & HEDGE MATERIAL. FALL IS AN EXCELLENT TIME TO PLANT. ASK US WHY!! PLEASE CALL LAURENCE AT 315-536-6406 OR R FAX 315-536-6460 NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR NO SHOWS. REFRESHME ENTS SERVED!! ALL ITEMS MUST BE REMOVED FROM AUCTION SITE BY SEPT 30, 2011. RECEIVING DATES ARE FRI., SEPT. 23rrd ALL DAY OR BY APPOINTMENT

AUCTIONEER: L.W. HORST 315-536-0954

Page 25 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

PENNVEST, DEP announce Nutrient Credit Trading auctions


Section C - Page 26 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

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Case IH 520 - Front Mounted Loader, Hose Kit, No Joystick, Fits Case 5100/5200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,275 Country Folks Special . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,775

1997 New Holland 790 - Hydraulic Tongue Swing, Field Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Base Unit Only $11,575 2002 New Holland FP240 - Metalert, Processor, Serviced 2004 New Holland FP240 - Metalert, Processor, Field NH 824 2 Row Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,275 and Field Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . .Base Unit Only $27,975 Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Base Unit Only $39,900

Uebler 810 Feedcarts - 30 Bushel Capacity, Serviced and Wic 45 Feedcart - 45 Bushel Capacity, Front Steer, Ready For Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,875 - $3,995 Discharge Either Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,375

New Valmetal Bale Chopper - 13hp Motor, Single Bale. Several In Stock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3,675

Richardton Side Dump Wagon - 12’, Field Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4,575

New EZ-Trail Gravity Box 510 Grain Carts In Stock, 490 Bushel Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,975

Rental Unit Lancaster 40 Hammer Blower Mill . . . . . . Rental Discount Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,650

Page 27 - Section C • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS • September 19, 2011

2010 New Holland T8030 - 225 PTO HP, 5 Rear Remotes, 2009 New Holland T6030 - 95 PTO HP, 4WD, Cab, Loader Full Duals, Intellisteer Ready. . . . . . . . . . . .Call For Price Ready, Semi-Power Shift, 500 hours . . . . . . . . . .$59,975


Section C - Page 28 September 19, 2011 • Let Them Know You Read COUNTRY FOLKS •

PH (585) 243-1563 FAX (585) 243-3311 6502 Barber Hill Road, Geneseo, New York 14454 WWW.TEITSWORTH.COM

ROY TEITSWORTH INC. SUCCESSFUL AUCTIONS FOR 41 YEARS

Lakeland Equipment Auction Lawn Tractors, Skid Steer Loaders, Landscape Equipment

Thursday, September 22, 2011 • 5:00 P.M. This is a preliminary list only; we expect additions and possibly some deletions. Visit www.teitsworth.com for complete listing and pictures. (15) Tractors, Backhoes & Forklifts: 1999 JD 5210, MFWD, 2800 hrs, cab; JD 401C, 4001 hrs, cab; JD 4010; JD 2630 65HP; Clark 450 forklift; 2003 JD 5420, 65HP, MFWD; JD 302 2WD 50HP, cab; IH 1086; JD 310D; Case IH 580, cab, ldr, backhoe. (10) Compact Tractors: '03 JD 4110, hydro, MFWD, 967 hrs; '00 JD 4200, MFWD 217 hrs; '09 JD 4320, 48HP, MFWD, 154 hrs, cab; Kubota L2350, 755 hrs; '00 JD 4200, 965 hrs, hydro; '07 JD 3120, MFWD, 325 hrs; '09 JD 3320, MFWD, 160 hrs, cab; '03 JD 4310 31hp, MFWD, 1407 hrs, cab; JD 2305, hydro; Ford 2000. Skid Steer Loaders: '04 NH 160LS, BKT 2800 hrs; '06 JD 317 BKT, 5200 hrs; '09 NH L170, 2814 hrs; '06 NH LT185B, BKT 4320 hrs; '04 Bobcat S250, 5800 hrs, forks; '04 NH LS160, BKT 3070 hrs; '04 Cat 257B. Equipment: JD 261 5' finish mower; Bush Hog ATH720 finish mower; JD 655 55" rotary mower; FR GM1060 3PT, finish mower; JD 46 BACKHOE; JD 261

60" 3pt. Finish Mower; CB 49" BALE SPEAR (new); 2005 Pequea 1016SST T/A utility trailer w/mesh ramp; CB 42" PALLET FORKS (new); 2007 FR MS1105G 50 BU. Manure Spreader (new). Toys, Gator's & UTV: 2006 JD 650 644CC, 25 hrs; 2010 JD 6X4 24HP, diesel; 2005 Polaris RANGER 4WD MAN DUMP 381 hrs. (75) Lawn Tractors, Zero Turn mowers, Push mowers: '07 JD Z425, ZTRAK, 54", 644 hrs; '08 JD Z245, ZTRAK, 48"; '05 Cub Cadet RZT42 KOHLER, z-turn, 42"; '99 White Z200, 48", z-turn; '08 JD 997 z-turn 72" cut 607 hrs; '06 JD 797 72"; '08 JD 717A ,z-turn, 48", 500 hrs; '08 JD Z820A, 54" cut 482 hrs; '10 JD Z910, z-turn, hydro, 48 cut, 50 hrs; '08 Scag z-turn, 61" cut 482 hrs; '10 JD Z930A, z-turn, 60", 216 hrs; '09 JD Z850A, z-turn, 72", 73 hrs; '10 JD Z920, z-turn, 54", 356 hrs; '08 JD Z820 z-turn 54" cut 47 hrs; '10 Kubota ZG327 27HP z-turn w/60" deck; JD SST16, hydro, 42 cut; JD F525 front mount, w/48" deck; JD F525 48" Front Mount 1039 hrs; JD 425 w/60" deck; JD 345 hydro 54" cut 730 hrs; JD 325 lawn tractor 48"; JD X485, 54" deck; JD X475, 54" cut 1745 hrs; Husqvarna LGT2554, 54"; JD 317, 980 hrs; JD GT235, 54" cut; JD X729, 62" cut 613 hrs; JD 425, 60" cut 1207 hrs; JD 445, 60" cut; JD 190C, 54"; JD X300, 42"; JD X320, 54" and many more!

LAMB & WEBSTER USED EQUIPMENT AUCTION FARM TRACTORS & MACHINERY

Saturday September 24, 2011 @ 9:00 A.M. Routes 39 & 219, Springville, NY NOTICE - After a strong summer season, L&W has a great selection of high quality, used equipment it needs to sell. This annual auction is open to the public and a great opportunity to buy. PRELIMINARY LISTING ONLY! There will be items added to this list daily as they continue to review their inventory and take in trades. (40) Tractors: Case 9230; Case CX80; Case C50; Case 885; Case 685; Case 485; Case 310B; Case 2470; NH TD 5050; NH TS100; NH TV140; NH TC40D; NH TZ24DA; JD 8760; JD 7800: JD 4710; JD 2755 MFWD, JD 4430; JD 2940; (2) Ford 1220; Ford 3600; (2) Ford 3910; Ford 445; Ford 540B; Ford 800; Ford 8240; Ford 850; Ford 9N; Holder A-50; (2) IH 1086; (2) IH 350; IH 3688; IH 460; IH 544; IH 674; IH 706; IH 986; Kubota B7500; Kubota B7400; Kubota L3300; Kubota L 2900GST; Kubota L2850; Kubota L4330 HSTC; Kubota L4630; Kubota 9580; MF 4253; MF 255: MF 165; (2) MF 35; MF 65; MF 50; Minn Mol. G350; Farmall 300; Farmall C; Oliver 1850; Steiger PT350. (10) Skid Steer Loaders: Case 430; Case 420; Case 1835C;

Case 1840; Cat 257B tracks; (2) NH L565; NH LX665; NH L 455; NH L555; NH L775; NH LS170; Manitou MLT 730 telehandler. Choppers: Class 900, Self propelled with heads; NH FX58 with heads; Gehl 860; (2) NH 782; NH 790; NH 900; JD 893 head; IH 810 w/heads; Dion 1224. Round and Square Balers: Case IH 8435; JD 430; NH BR780; NH 644; NH 650; NH 855; Case LBX431; Class 1150; IH 445; NH 315. Plow & Tillage: Case 720; IH 700; JD 145; JD 2500; Unverferth 6 shank zone builder; Brillion 30' drag; Knowles 20' drag. Mower Conditioners: NH 2450, self propelled; NH 489; Vicon DMP 4000; (2) Kuhn FC 302; Kuhn FC 352; (2) Kuhn FC4000; NH 1442; JD 1600; (2) NH 1465; Frontier 1107. Hay Equipment: Claas 1550; H&S ST420; JD 670; (3) Kuhn GA7822; (2) NH 258; Pequea HR1140; Vicon 423T; Vicon 653; Deutz KH500; JD 752; Miller Pro 7914 and more. Spreaders & mixers: Gehl 1312; New Idea 3618 box spreader; Knight 8024; Knight 8030; Knight 8114; Knight 8124; (2) NH

165; NH 185; JD 135; Knight 3036; Knight 3300; (2) Knight 3450. Planters: JD 7000, 4R/dry; JD 7000; Deutz-Allis 6R. Rotary mowers: Bush Hog FTH720; Bush Hog RTH72; Bush Hog 3210 and many more. (75) Lawn tractors & ATV's: Kubota RTV 900 Utility vehicle; Honda TRX500 4 wheeler; Honda TRX 650 4 wheeler; Cub Cadet 4x4 utility vehicle; Cub Cadet LT 1024: Cub Cadet I1050; Cub Cadet GT1554; Cub Cadet RZT50 Zero turn; Ferris C320 Misc.: Lesco Aerator; Westfield 10"x61' auger; Bush Hog 762 backhoe; (2) Sweepster broom; HLA 6' defacer; Little Giant 40 elevator; Calhoun Fert. Spreader; Hesston BP20 shredder; JD 520 shredder; Mensch M1100 side shooter; Mensch M2100 side shooter; Demco GM500 sprayer; OWNER - Lamb & Webster Financing available to qualified buyers with prior approval, call 716-592-4923 for details. Check our website at www.teitsworth.com for terms, updates and pictures of items.

MONROE COUNTY Municipal & Contractor Equipment Auction

October 1, 9:00 A.M. Monroe County Fleet Center 145 Paul Rd Rochester, NY

Consignments still welcome! Call our office to take advantage of our extensive marketing program Selling: Heavy Equipment, Tandem & Single Axle Trucks, Trailers, 1- Tons, Pickups, Vans, Cars & Landscape equipment. Visit teitsworth.com for up-to-date listings and photos.

“WE SPECIALIZE IN LARGE AUCTIONS FOR DEALERS, FARMERS, MUNICIPALITIES AND CONTRACTORS”


CE 9.19.11