Chatelaine - January/February 2022

Page 1

Happy hour, hold the booze: Five celebratory picks

The science-approved method to make healthy habits stick

Found: The coziest Canadian pyjamas

How to transform your space—via Zoom!


Every kid grows up thinking they can change the world. We’re counting on it.


All young Canadians should have the chance to reach their highest potential. That’s why we’re helping remove financial barriers and investing in their future, Canada’s future. Over the last five years, we’ve offered nearly 1,800 scholarships to youth attending post-secondary education. And since 2017, we’ve awarded 300 grants to organizations making a difference in the lives of thousands of youth.

Through the Ted Rogers Scholarships and Community Grants, we’re supporting youth as they continue their education and develop the skills to succeed, lead, and make their dreams possible. Learn more at Rogers.com/GenerationPossible.


Contents Volume 95, Issue #01

chatelaine.com

“Were you drinking that?” P 90

Jan/Feb

Five riveting reasons not to leave the house this month. P 10

60

Home

48 Notes

25 Notes

The food, books and gear we’re excited about this year.

Kick off 2022 with a fresh coat of paint.

50 Crunch month

26 How to work with a virtual interior designer

Our January gift to you: 30 delicious, meal-in-a-bowl salad recipes.

What you need to know about redoing a room over Zoom.

In every issue

Health

5 You tell us

31 Notes

6 Editor’s letter

A scientifically proven way to make healthy habits stick.

90 Humour Things my cat has said to me.

32 How to become your own best advocate

Notebook

With our health care system pushed to the brink, it’s never been more crucial to speak up.

Life

7 Agenda 9 things to do this month, indoors and out. Every one of our recipes is tested multiple times to make sure it’s delicious and foolproof.

Style 14 Notes A cult foundation arrives in Canada and more style news.

CHECK THIS OUT We’ve added icons to indicate products from brands that are Canadian and/or owned by Black people, Indigenous people or people of colour (BIPOC). CANADIAN

4

BIPOC-OWNED

36 The long-term care toll Canada’s LTC system needs a radical overhaul. But what about the families that rely on it now? Inside the battle for basic care.

42 My mother’s secret

Fight the winter blues with one of these chic and comfy picks.

Joanna was a beautiful, difficult woman. Then I learned something about her past that changed everything.

18 Turn the page

Food

As we ever so slowly expand our horizons—and explore our wardrobes—again, let Vivek Shraya lead the way.

Happy hour, hold the booze: five tasty zero-proof options.

15 Pyjama party

CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

Step into the comfort zone. P 15

47 Spirited away

ON THE COVER Photography by Erik Putz; creative direction by Sun Ngo; food styling by Ashley Denton; prop styling by Madeleine Johari.


you tell us

LETTERS

MAUREEN HALUSHAK EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

SUN NGO CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Deputy Editor GILLIAN GRACE Senior Editor CHANTAL BRAGANZA Senior Editor, Style and Beauty ANDRÉANNE DION Associate Editor RADIYAH CHOWDHURY CHATELAINE KITCHEN Food Content Director IRENE NGO ART Art Director STEPHANIE HAN KIM Deputy Art Director AIMEE NISHITOBA PRODUCTION In-House Photographers ERIK PUTZ, CHRISTIE VUONG Digital Colour Specialist NICOLE DUPLANTIS Production Manager JOYCELYN TRAN

HANUKKAH PHOTO: RECIPES BY AMY ROSEN, PRODUCED BY AIMEE NISHITOBA, PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIK PUTZ, FOOD STYLING BY MICHELLE RABIN, PROP STYLING BY RAYNA MARLEE SCHWARTZ, FLORAL ARRANGEMENT BY BECKY DE OLIVEIRA, OWNER OF BLUSH & BLOOM.

CONTRIBUTORS TINA ANSON MINE, MIKA BAREKET, IRIS BENAROIA, TAYO BERO, NADIA BROPHY, VÉRONIQUE BUIST, BIANCA BUJAN, ALANNA CHELMICK, LEEANDRA CIANCI, JEN CUTTS, ZAINAB DAMJI, FLANNERY DEAN, RAINA DELISLE, ASHLEY DENTON, ISABELLE DOCTO, EMILY FULKERSON, CHRISTINE HANLON, ZOLA JEFFERS, MADELEINE JOHARI, PATRICIA KAROUNOS, CAITLIN KENNY, MARIYAM KHAJA, KRYSTYNA LAGOWSKI, SYDNEY LONEY, NORA LORETO, CRYSTAL LUXMORE, EMILY MACCULLOCH, NATALIE MICHIE, COREY MINTZ, TARA O’BRADY, JENNIFER PALLIAN, CAROL EUGENE PARK, ZEAHAA REHMAN, LEAH RUMACK, COURTNEY SHEA, VIVEK SHRAYA, CHRISTINE SISMONDO, SÉBASTIEN THIBAULT, RONNIE TREMBLAY, VIDAL WU

[ LETTER OF THE MONTH ]

Happy to see it I was very pleased that you took action in response to the feedback that I sent in my letter to the editor last year [regarding the lack of Hanukkah content in your November/December 2020 issue]. It was very nice to see the “Light it up” essay and Hanukkah recipes (which look yummy) in this year’s holiday issue. Thank you for listening! — DP, Toronto

CONTACT US

ADVERTISING Managing Director, Sales TRACY MILLER tracy.miller@stjoseph.com

Toronto 416-248-4868 Montreal 514-847-2951 Vancouver 604-872-6167 Advertising Inquiries 519-875-2876 Email terry.smith@stjoseph.com

ST. JOSEPH COMMUNICATIONS INC. Chairman & CEO TONY GAGLIANO Vice-Chairman JOHN GAGLIANO President & Publisher KEN HUNT Vice-President, Content & Creative MARYAM SANATI Managing Director, Consumer Revenue ALLAN YUE Managing Director, Research & Consumer Insights CLARENCE POIRIER Managing Director, Marketing NADINE SILVERTHORNE Director, Customer Success TERRY SMITH Director, Production MARIA MENDES Managing Director, Branded Content SASHA EMMONS Head of Business Development JASON MAGHANOY Director, Marketing Sponsorships JESSIKA FINK SUBSCRIBER SERVICES Telephone 1-877-672-0877, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (ET) Website chatelaine.com/ service Email service@chatelaine.com Mail Chatelaine Subscriber Services, Box 460, Station Main, Alliston, Ontario L9R 1V7

VISIT US AT CHATELAINE.COM Subscribe or renew your subscription · Give a gift subscription · Pay your bill · Change your mailing address · Order fragrance-free issues · Check your account status and expiry date · Report delivery problems or duplicate issues › chatelaine.com/service CHATELAINE IS PUBLISHED BY ST. JOSEPH COMMUNICATIONS, 15 BENTON ROAD, TORONTO M6M 7G2. MONTREAL OFFICE: 249, RUE SAINT-JACQUES, BUREAU 201, MONTRÉAL H2Y 1M6. VANCOUVER ADVERTISING OFFICE: 180 WEST 2ND AVENUE, VANCOUVER V5Y 7T9. WEBSITE: WWW.CHATELAINE.COM. CONTENTS COPYRIGHT 2022 BY ST. JOSEPH COMMUNICATIONS; MAY NOT BE REPRINTED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION. ARTICLE PROPOSALS AND MANUSCRIPTS MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPES AND SUFFICIENT POSTAGE; OTHERWISE THEY WILL NOT BE RETURNED OR ACKNOWLEDGED. WHILE THE PUBLISHERS WILL TAKE ALL REASONABLE CARE, THEY WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE LOSS OF ANY MANUSCRIPT, DRAWING OR PHOTOGRAPH. ISSN 0009-1995. SINGLE COPY PRICE: $4.99 + TAX. FULL SUBSCRIPTION PRICES: CANADA, 1 YEAR (8 ISSUES), $20 + TAX. IN U.S., 1 YEAR, $60; FOREIGN COUNTRIES, $100. INDEXED IN THE CANADIAN PERIODICAL INDEX. PRINTED IN CANADA BY ST. JOSEPH COMMUNICATIONS, PRINT. WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA. CHATELAINE RECEIVES UNSOLICITED MATERIALS (INCLUDING LETTERS TO THE EDITOR, PRESS RELEASES, PROMOTIONAL ITEMS AND IMAGES) FROM TIME TO TIME. CHATELAINE, ITS AFFILIATES AND ASSIGNEES MAY USE, REPRODUCE, PUBLISH, REPUBLISH, DISTRIBUTE, STORE AND ARCHIVE SUCH UNSOLICITED SUBMISSIONS IN WHOLE OR IN PART IN ANY FORM OR MEDIUM WHATSOEVER, WITHOUT COMPENSATION OF ANY SORT. THIS STATEMENT DOES NOT APPLY TO MATERIALS AND/OR PITCHES SUBMITTED BY FREELANCE WRITERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS OR ILLUSTRATORS IN ACCORDANCE WITH KNOWN INDUSTRY PRACTICES.

Mail preference: From time to time, other organizations ask Chatelaine magazine if they may send information about a product or service to some Chatelaine subscribers, by mail or email. If you do not wish to receive these messages, contact us in any of the ways listed here.

ST. JOSEPH COMMUNICATIONS CAN BE REACHED AT 15 BENTON ROAD, TORONTO M6M 3G2

A Chatelaine legend lives on

So cool that @Chatelaine renamed their annual Women of the Year awards [December 2021] after the feminist former editor Doris Anderson. She was huge in informing Canadian women about their rights. @JulietONeill Many thanks

Chi’Miigwetch! Thanks so much for including my linen napkins in your holiday gift guide @chatelainemag and @andreannewrites @indigo_arrows Thank you so much for including us in your holiday gift guide! We are so pumped! @lakesandleashes

Thank you so much for including my ceramic paint palette! Such an incredible Canadian gift guide! @sarahbeepottery

Mnopgwad Preserves, which we featured in our made-in-Canada gift guide [December 2021], is owned by Germaine Catchpole.

Thanks so much for including us! @lovelybodyproducts

Kooky Biscuiterie, which we featured in “The ultimate cross-country cookie swap” [December 2021] is owned by Mathieu Benoit.

We need to clarify a few things ... The portrait of SJ Sindu that appeared in our December 2021 issue was taken by sarah bodri and should have been credited to her. Phyllis Webstad, one of our wonderful Doris Anderson Award honourees [December 2021], is the author of three books, not two.

Lastly, thank you to the reader who correctly pointed out that the Classic Apple Pie recipe we featured in “Meatless feast” [October/November 2021] included lard as an ingredient, which is indeed a meat product. Chatelaine sincerely regrets these errors.

We love hearing your feedback on the magazine—please keep it coming. Send your thoughts to letters@chatelaine.com.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

5


letter from the editor

Also in this issue

A gentler start The long-term care toll LTC in Canada needs a radical overhaul. But what about the families who rely on the system right now? (page 36)

30 days of salads I hate meal planning, but thanks to our food director, Irene Ngo, I now know what I’m eating for the next month. (page 50)

Can CBT make healthy habits stick? Whether you want to sleep better, exercise more or finally stop smoking, it could be the ticket. (page 31)

Maureen Halushak @maureenhalushak letters@chatelaine.com How to update a room via Zoom Want to redo your space but don’t know where to start? Consider a virtual design service. (page 26)

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

HAIR, KIRSTEN KLONTZ FOR HOT TOOLS PROFESSIONAL CANADA.

I TYPICALLY DON’T MAKE RESOLUTIONS, although who can deny the promise of a shiny new year? While I’m not planning a complete renovation of my character in 2022—as much as I might need one—there are a few things I’ve been thinking about as we’ve been putting this issue together. Both are inspired by an album I’ve been listening to a lot lately, Brandi Carlile’s In These Silent Days. I’m a writer and editor, so it’s no surprise that what I’m drawn to most from the musicians I love—from Waxahatchee to William Prince to Taylor Swift (unapologetic fan here)—are the lyrics. I’ve been listening to In These Silent Days on my lunchtime dog walks through the woods near my house, and some of Carlile’s words have stopped me in my tracks, from the line “Make me kind again” in “Mama Werewolf” to the entirety of “Stay Gentle” (one standout verse: “Don’t let the world make you callous / Be ready to laugh / No one’s forgotten about us / There is light on your path”). So if there’s anything I’m resolving to do in 2022, it’s to keep these words in mind. Life is busy and overwhelming and scary for all of us, and it’s easy to let kindness and wonder fall by the wayside. I know I’ve been guilty of that in the past, and I’d like to be a little less so as I move forward. (As a side note, if you like female folk-rock with a country lilt, you’ll love Brandi Carlile.) As we venture into 2022 together, I’d also like to thank you for reading Chatelaine. We are beyond grateful to our subscribers, whether you’re reading us in print, on Apple News+ or via our slate of newsletters. We’re an incredibly small team who love what we do, and your support makes that possible. Our resolution for 2022 is to keep telling the stories that matter to Canadian women, in addition to delivering no-BS, science-based health advice, highlighting our favourite homegrown brands and makers, and—of course— bringing you loads of recipes for weeknights and special occasions that are both delicious and doable. What would you like to see more of from Chatelaine this year? Send us a note—I read every single one.


9 THINGS TO DO RIGHT NOW

PHOTO, LEAD ME TO PLACES I COULD NEVER FIND ON MY OWN I BY MERYL MCMASTER, PART OF “ARCTIC HIGHWAYS.”

This self-portrait, by Ottawa-based photographer Meryl McMaster, appears in “Arctic Highways”—part of the Nordic Bridges cultural initiative.

1 [ BORDER CROSSINGS ]

Enrol in a cultural exchange

BRIDGES CONNECT PEOPLE AND PLACES, allowing exchange between the two. That’s the concept behind Nordic Bridges, a year-long cultural initiative that connects Canada with Nordic countries through the arts. With nationwide programming throughout the year featuring both Nordic and Canadian talent, this iteration of Nordic Bridges is the largest yet. “Its approach is very different from previous editions, and I’m sure that was why Canada was selected from over 23 countries,” says Marah Braye, CEO of Harbourfront Centre in Toronto, which applied to have Canada host. Most of the programming is free, including Harbourfront’s “Nordic Lights,” an outdoor series of lit-up contemporary artwork, and “Arctic Highways,” an immersive outdoor exhibition in Whitehorse, Yukon, that explores northern Indigenous cultures and lands. “Nordic Lights” debuts alongside an opening event on January 20 at Harbourfront Centre. nordicbridges.ca. — Natalie Michie

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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agenda 2 [ WORLD VIEW ]

Take a trip around the globe ...via these five must-watch shows set in Madrid, North Korea and more

Borgen

Cable Girls Imagine the sophistication of a prestige workplace series like Mad Men combined with the breakneck pace and irresistible drama of a telenovela. Cable Girls is that show. The Spanish period drama is about four women in 1920s Madrid whose lives change when they get jobs at a telecommunications company. As the seasons unfold, the series reaches shocking depths you may not be prepared for.

Queen Sono Few genres provide the pure entertainment of a spy thriller. But the mainstream stuff can start to feel same-y. Not so with this South African drama, which follows an undercover agent (the titular Queen) whose mission is to protect the lives of people across the continent. The show enters edge-of-your-seat territory when Queen uncovers info about her own mother’s death that will have you bingeing the series in one sitting.

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

MAP ILLUSTRATION, ISTOCK PHOTO. BORGEN PHOTO, COURTESY OF MIKE KOLLOFFEL/NETFLIX. CABLE GIRLS PHOTO, COURTESY OF MANUEL FERNÁNDEZ-VALDÉS/NETFLIX. QUEEN SONO PHOTO, COURTESY OF JWB FOTO-JACO/NETFLIX.

What does life look like for the first-ever woman to lead a country’s government? That’s exactly what this Danish drama explores—think The West Wing, but without the starry-eyed optimism. The series was so acclaimed that Netflix has commissioned a new season almost a decade after the last one originally aired, so you’ll want to catch up before the show really blows up.


agenda 3 [ LO C AT I O N S C O U T ]

Thanks to French thriller Lupin, the Spanish crime series Money Heist and, of course, the world-dominating success of the Korean drama Squid Game, international shows took over pop culture in 2021. But these titles just skim the surface of what the world has to offer. Here are five other international series to check out on Netflix now

FOLLOW IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF YOUR FAVOURITE NETFLIX CHARACTERS Ever wish you could knock back a whisky at Jack’s Bar? You’re in luck: The Netflix in Your Neighbourhood site maps out where some of the streaming service’s most popular titles were filmed across Canada

Written by PATRICIA KAROUNOS

ALICE IN BORDERLAND PHOTO, COURTESY OF © HARO ASO, SHOGAKUKAN/ROBOT/NETFLIX. CRASH LANDING ON YOU PHOTO, COURTESY OF NETFLIX.

Crash Landing on You This sweeping Korean drama takes a concept that—on paper, at least—should raise eyebrows and executes it almost flawlessly. It follows a South Korean heiress and entrepreneur who crashes over the North Korean border in a paragliding accident. There, she meets a stony-faced army captain, and the pair overcome their differences to fall hopelessly in love. It’s surprisingly full of heart and features some of the best onscreen chemistry since ’90s-era Julia Roberts romcoms.

VIRGIN RIVER AND LOCKE & KEY PHOTO, COURTESY OF NETFLIX. THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT PHOTO, COURTESY OF KEN WORONER/NETFLIX © 2020. ANNE WITH AN E AND M’ENTENDS-TU? PHOTO, COURTESY OF IMDB.

Alice in Borderland If you got caught up in the do-or-die stakes of Squid Game, then Alice in Borderland is for you. The Japanese thriller has a similar premise, only instead of children’s games, people are sent to an alternate, abandoned version of Tokyo to compete in a series of competitions of varying difficulty to avoid death by laser. Adapted from a manga series of the same name, the show is about as tense, dark and relentless as you’ll find in the survival genre.

Written by ISABELLE DOCTO

Virgin River The Watershed Grill in Brackendale, B.C., plays Jack’s Bar While this popular romance series is set in a fictional northern California town, it’s filmed in British Columbia. The mountainous backdrop and exterior of Jack’s Bar was shot at Brackendale’s Watershed Grill—and inside, it’s just as warm and inviting as its onscreen counterpart.

The Queen’s Gambit A Winners location in Toronto plays the Ben Snyder Department Store Historic old Toronto is the perfect stand-in for 1950s Kentucky. The store selling the chess set Beth eyes in episode two and later buys with her tournament winnings is a Winners on Front St. E. Other picturesque landmarks nearby include the Gooderham (Flatiron) Building and the dog fountain in Berczy Park.

Anne with an E Cape Tryon, P.E.I., plays itself Like Anne, you too can run to the edge of P.E.I.’s red sandstone cliffs and bask in the beauty of the Atlantic Coast. There, you’ll find a magnificent 40-foot lighthouse, while the Anne of Green Gables Museum is just 10 minutes away by car.

Locke & Key Lunenburg, N.S., plays Matheson, Massachusetts Travel to this quaint seaside town and take a stroll down Montague St. Be sure to stop at Sweet Treasures Confectionery—which you know as Matheson Creamery on the show—for some ice cream.

M’entends-tu? Montreal’s Bar R.V. plays itself Located in the Ville-Émard neighbourhood of Montreal, this bar is the go-to hangout for this dramedy’s main characters: Ada, Fabiola and Carolanne. Grab a drink and then go for a stroll at nearby Angrignon Park, one of Montreal’s largest green spaces.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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agenda 4 [ H I B E R N AT I O N S TAT I O N ]

Don’t leave the house this month 5 riveting, newly released excuses to stay in Written by CAROL EUGENE PARK

Toufah by Toufah Jallow with Kim Pittaway

The Maid by Nita Prose This debut mystery—written by a veteran book editor—centres around 25-year-old Molly Gray, who has always struggled with social interactions. But her love for cleaning and decorum makes her work as a hotel maid a perfect fit. Her life takes a turn when she finds a wealthy man dead in his suite, and Molly becomes a suspect in his murder. With the help of friends, she searches for clues to clear her name and find the true murderer. January 4.

5 [ SCREAM QUEEN ]

Watch Neve Campbell kill it on the big screen, again “It’s like returning to summer camp,” says Neve Campbell about reprising her iconic role as Sidney Prescott in the fifth Scream. The California town of Woodsboro experiences déjà vu when a group of teenagers is the latest target in a string of killings by Ghostface. She’s in great company: Dewey Riley (David Arquette) and Gale Weathers (Courteney Cox) are back, too. — ZAINAB DAMJI In theatres January 14.

6

The Last Grand Duchess by Bryn Turnbull Olga Romanov, the eldest daughter of Russia’s last czar, has only known life inside Alexander Palace. But due to a period of political tension that eventually leads to war, Olga and her sisters are no longer sheltered by privilege and must step into the fray as nurses. As controversies about her family spread—among them the disappearance of the czar’s mystical advisor, Rasputin—calls for revolution threaten to end the Romanov dynasty. February 8.

Meet Me in the Margins by Melissa Ferguson When Savannah Cade isn’t editing poetry anthologies at her day job, she’s writing a romance novel in a secret room in the publishing house. One day, she accidentally leaves her manuscript behind and returns to find someone has left notes in the margins. The notes become more romantic, and Savannah sets out to uncover the identity of her mystery editor. February 15.

Tides by Sara Freeman After a devastating loss, Mara runs away to a small but wealthy seaside town, where she finds comfort in spending her nights near the ocean. When she runs out of money, she takes a job at the local wine store, where she meets the lonely owner, Simon. As their friendship blossoms, she’s confronted by her attraction to Simon—and the past she ran away from. This debut novel has drawn comparisons to the works of Rachel Cusk and Jenny Offill. January 18.

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

[ YO U ’ V E G OT M A I L ]

Subscribe to an even smarter you in 2022 Written by ZEAHAA REHMAN

This year, instead of scrolling through the headlines—and the attendant outrage—on social media, give yourself the gift of being better informed by subscribing to these five smart and engaging Canadian newsletters. If you . . . want to keep up with pop culture, catch up with Stacy Lee Kong as she unpacks the politics behind the week’s biggest stories in Friday Things. If you . . . want bite-sized versions of big topics in Canadian business and tech that span from the upcoming Metaverse to mining Bitcoin, peruse The Peak. If you . . . want to alleviate some of the apprehension that comes with consuming news, subscribe to Hannah Sung’s weekly newsletter, At the End of the Day, where she provides an in-depth recap of the pressing

issues of the day in a compassionate and reassuring—rather than rage-inducing—way. If you . . . have trouble keeping track of Canadian politics— both federal and provincial—and want a detailed yet digestible way to stay on top of your local representatives’ actions and help hold them accountable, sign up for The Maple. If you . . . want help confronting your eco-anxiety, try Sarah Lazarovic’s Minimum Viable Planet (the term for a planet that’s sustainable and hospitable enough for humanity to endure). Each week she recommends actions both big, like refusing to think of climate change as someone else’s problem, and small, like practising “mendfulness,” that we can adopt to ensure, well, a minimum viable planet.

CAMPBELL PHOTO, NEVE CAMPBELL (“SIDNEY PRESCOTT”), LEFT, AND COURTENEY COX (“GALE WEATHERS”) STAR IN PARAMOUNT PICTURES AND SPYGLASS MEDIA GROUP’S “SCREAM.” PHOTO BY BROWNIE HARRIS.

When Toufah Jallow wins a contest in Gambia, she catches the eye of dictator Yahya Jammeh. But after she refuses his proposal, Jammeh drugs and sexually assaults her. The attack prompts Toufah to flee Gambia and find refuge in Canada. After Jammeh’s deposition, Toufah testifies about her rape, sparking Africa’s own #MeToo movement. She wrote her memoir alongside Kim Pittaway, who was once editor-in-chief of Chatelaine. February 1.


agenda 7 [ LET’S CHILL ]

Leave the house this month 5 winter festivals that are worth bundling up for

LEAVE THE HOUSE THIS MONTH PHOTO, ISTOCK PHOTO. DEEP FREEZE PHOTO, EPIC PHOTOGRAPHY. FESTIVAL DU VOYAGEUR PHOTO, MARIE BERCKVENS. SOLARIS PHOTO, BRONWEN SHARP. WOMEN’S HOCKEY PHOTO, THE CANADIAN PRESS/JEFF MCINTOSH.

Written by BIANCA BUJAN

EDMONTON

WINNIPEG

OTTAWA

QUEBEC CITY

FREDERICTON

Deep Freeze: A Byzantine Winter Fête January 14–23 An action-packed winter celebration where you can try your hand at the Deep Freezer Race (literally deep freezers mounted on skis) or cheer on contestants at the log-cutting competition (very Virgin River). Then warm up with poutine or a BeaverTail— or both. deepfreezefest.ca.

Festival du Voyageur February 18–27 This 10-day celebration is Western Canada’s largest winter festival. Acknowledging the adventurous spirit of voyageurs and the history of the Canadian fur trade, it includes live fiddling and jigging competitions, powwow performances and period food, like pea soup. heho.ca.

Winterlude February 4–21 Ottawa’s legendary annual winter festival features a massive snow playground, ice sculptures galore and a horse race held on the frozen Rideau Canal. Warming stations and indulgent food stalls featuring cream-covered Cronuts and deep-fried Oreos will keep you cozy and carb-ed. ottawatourism.ca.

Quebec Winter Carnival February 4–13 Say bonjour to Bonhomme Carnaval, the iconic, red-toquewearing snowman who is said to represent the joie de vivre of Quebecers, at the world’s largest winter festival, where you’ll find everything from ice-canoe races and dog sledding to a life-sized ice palace. carnaval.qc.ca.

FROSTival January 20– February 6 Culture and cuisine are the highlights of FROSTival, which includes a music fest, live theatre and three-course meal deals at local restaurants. Be sure to check out the Ice Sculpture Showcase that pays homage to the craft as an Indigenous art form. frostival.ca/en.

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[ A N OT H E R D I M E N S I O N ]

BUY AN AFFORDABLE TICKET TO SPACE Canadian Stage makes an intergalactic return to indoor performances with the North American premiere of Solaris. The 2019 Scottish play based on the 1961 Polish novel that inspired the 2002 George Clooney movie (whew!) is a set-in-space story about our relationship to the unknown—a timely theme, and a huge get for Canadian theatre. — COURTNEY SHEA Jan. 25– Feb. 5, 2022; canadianstage.com.

9 [ O LY M P I C S P I R I T ]

Lose yourself in Beijing 2022 Yes, there’s a significant time difference, but grab a coffee, because these are the women you’ll want to cheer for live

Fingers crossed The Canadian women’s ice hockey team will try to regain their champ status after breaking their fourmedal gold streak with a silver in 2018. Keep your eyes peeled for these breakout stars Figure skater Piper Gilles, monobob/ bobsleigh athlete Cynthia Appiah and freestyle skiing champ Marielle Thompson.

— TAYO BERO

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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Add resistance to your fave workout with stylish wrist weights. Bala 1-lb bangles, $65, indigo.ca.

ONE DAY (AND FOUR OUTFITS) IN THE LIFE OF VIVEK SHRAYA

page 18

Adjustable straps allow for a

TEXT, ANDRÉANNE DION. PHOTO, CHRISTIE VUONG. MAKEUP AND HAIR, RONNIE TREMBLAY FOR P1M.CA. PRODUCED BY ANDRÉANNE DION AND SUN NGO. YOGA MAT, NIYAMAYOGAWELL.CA. BINK WATER BOTTLE AND TOWELS, NORDSTROM.CA. BLANKET AND BLOCKS, BYOGANOW.COM. SNEAKERS, CALLITSPRING.COM.

customized fit.

[ B O DY M OV I N ’ ]

One-piece wonder Once the stuff of ’80s Jazzercise videos, the workout bodysuit is making a comeback with a modern twist. Think muted colours (neon hues are best left to Olivia Newton-John and Jane Fonda) and comfortable, sweat-wicking fabrics. We asked Connie Cornelius, owner of personal training studio Area Fitness in Toronto, to put the one-and-done style to the test. “It’s great for yoga, Pilates or anything with inversions,” she tells us. “I just think about my movements, not my clothes. I know that I’m covered up and everything is secure—it frees me up mentally to focus on the class.” Sign us up! Lolë jumpsuit, $149, lolelife.com. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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style

NOTES

COLD CALLING For its third Project Atigi collaboration, Canada Goose teamed up with Winnipeg-based Inuk designer Victoria Kakuktinniq, founder of outerwear label Victoria’s Arctic Fashion, to create a three-jacket capsule. “The tattoo trim on each style is very special to me,” says Kakuktinniq. “It represents key milestones in my life and my strength as a single mother, and it’s also a tribute to my parents.” Proceeds from the sale of the collection go to Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, a non-profit organization that provides health-and-wellness support to Inuit communities. Kakuktinniq Parka, $1,495, Kakuktinniq

Beauty talk READERS SHARE THEIR FEEDBACK ON OUR FAVOURITE NEW(-ISH) PRODUCTS

Down Jacket, $1,095, Kakuktinniq Jacket, $1,095, available January 24 at canadagoose.com and select Canada Goose stores. Sizes XS–2XL.

Youth to the People Superberry Dream Cleansing Balm, $45, sephora.com. “This cleansing balm melts makeup off in seconds. As you massage it into the skin, the balm turns into an oil but doesn’t leave a greasy film behind. I love that it contains hydrating hyaluronic acid; it’s perfect for winter.” — Shammi, 38, Edmonton

Three Ships Dream Bio-Retinol + Shorea Butter Night Cream, $39, threeshipsbeauty.ca.

ALL BASES COVERED The cult multi-purpose foundation-slash-serum from Vancouver-founded Ilia is finally available in Canada after breaking sales records in the United States. Beloved for its dewy finish and skinlike coverage, the lightweight tint—which comes in 30 shades—is loaded with mineral sun protection and skincare ingredients, like squalane, hyaluronic acid and niacinamide. Ilia Super Serum Skin Tint SPF 40, $62, sephora.com.

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Fenty Beauty Hydra’Reset Intensive Recovery Glycerin Hand Mask, $29, sephora.com. “Cold temperatures and frequent handwashing have wreaked havoc on my skin. This soothing hand mask has been a lifesaver. The smell is delightful without being overpowering and the consistency is thick, so I feel protected from further irritation.” — Josie, 60, Ottawa

Want to join our roster of beauty testers? Email us at style@chatelaine.com.

TEXT, ANDRÉANNE DION. PROJECT ATIGI PHOTO, COURTESY OF CANADA GOOSE.

“I love the packaging—thanks to the pump, I don’t have to put my fingers in the jar. Despite containing a plantbased retinol, the cream is gentle on my sensitive skin and leaves it noticeably softer.” — Simran, 42, Stoney Creek, Ont.


style

SHOP CANADA

Pyjama party Getting cozy is our favourite way to fight the winter blues. Snuggle up in one of these chic and comfy picks

Checks, please

Comfort zone

Relaxed longsleeved set, $165, thisisj.com.

Flannel nightshirt, $65, littlebluehouse.com.

Lambswool slides, $160, cougarshoes.com.

Perfect match

Sleep set

Bold type

Crewneck, $54, joggers, $60, petitlem.com.

Eye pillow and mask, $34 each, scrunchie, $12, shopdreamsjumper.com.

Printed tunic, $125, kateaustindesigns.ca.

Short story

Fine print

Puff piece Lined with cozy fleece to keep your toes toasty all

PRODUCED BY EMILY MACCULLOCH.

winter long.

Top, $35, bottoms, $45, wonderbra.ca.

Brushed jersey boxer shorts, $50, kotn.com.

Printed lounge set, $139, tamgadesigns.com.

Puff slippers, $50, shop.kombicanada.com.

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CHATELAINE SHOPS TSC From healthier, heartier meals to a cleaner, cozier home, get through a long Canadian winter with these hygge-inspired items hand-picked by our Chatelaine editors. All available at tsc.ca.

ALL-STAR CAST-IRON Increasing your iron levels can be easy and delicious with this pretty, blue-hued cast-iron cookware. Henckels Enameled Cast-Iron Casserole Item# 703-823, $144.99

Henckels Enameled Cast-Iron Frying Pan Set Item# 703-822, $179.99


(Counter clockwise from top) CLUB BED No more “revenge bedtime procrastination.” This inviting, cozy bedding will help encourage you to get your requisite recharge time. Eddie Bauer Mountain Plaid Reversible Duvet Cover Set Item# 701-402, $109.99 COUNTER APPEAL These retro-look small appliances from SMEG are so gorgeous you’ll never want to put them away. Shop the entire SMEG line at tsc.ca MAKE THINGS STEAMY Get creative with your recipe repertoire (may we suggest some ideas from Chatelaine?) while upping your healthy cooking game, thanks to this all-in-one glass steamer. Cuisinart CookFresh Digital Glass Steamer Item# 489-198, $249.99

PET PROJECT Give Fido a comfy resting spot while you use this super-efficient vacuum to remove his hair from everywhere else. The Casper Dog Bed Item# 666-894, $235.00 Dyson Omni-Glide Item# 213-608, $499.99

Shop tsc.ca


style

WORK IN PROGRESS

Produced by ANDRÉANNE DION and AIMEE NISHITOBA Photography by CHRISTIE VUONG Makeup and hair by ALANNA CHELMICK Styling by ZOLA JEFFERS Photo assistant EMILY FULKERSON Shot on location at 1 HOTEL TORONTO


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style

WORK IN PROGRESS

Style guide Vivek Shraya shares her top 5 tips for making getting dressed up fun again

1. Don’t wear anything you don’t feel like a 10/10 in. If it’s not love at first try-on, it never will be. You deserve to feel your best in what you wear.

THE BREAKFAST CLUB Vivek nails off-duty, brunch-ready style with

’ve always relished the act of transformation. As a teenager, I looked forward to tearing off my house pyjamas and putting on going-tothe-mall attire. The process of changing stoked fantasies for the outing at hand—the conversations to be had, the snacks to be consumed, the movies to be watched. But no party or hangout ever lived up to my hopes, or to my outfit. Because of these disappointments, I soon reframed dressing up as the main event. Did my love of transformation come from watching, on repeat, the sensual scene in Batman Returns when Michelle Pfeiffer as Selina Kyle unravels her apartment and stitches herself a slick black catsuit? Or from my affinity for makeover scenes in teen comedies? A case could be made that I identified with the homely protagonist who—by merely whipping off her glasses—reveals herself to be a starlet. Or maybe it was the way these characters discovered that their true selves had been lying dormant, waiting to be unleashed.

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As much as I love getting dressed up, I also can’t wait to return home and slip back into my pyjamas, turning off the social switch and the corresponding pressure to impress. It’s the before, the after, and the subsequent that has drawn me to transformation, the opportunity to express multiplicity—that someone can be more than one person, can oscillate between shy secretary and ferocious cat woman, and that no one person is more true, but rather the truth (and thrill) lies in the sum of my parts and in the seeming contradictions among them.

My fashionista origins can be traced to eighth grade, when I’d spend hours on my bedroom floor after school poring over photo spreads in magazines like GQ and Details. These were transformation bibles that illustrated how different times and settings demanded different appearances. Eventually, I started scrapbooking my inspirations in lined journals and

4. Reclaim colour. Don’t buy into the idea that you can’t wear certain colours. You just might not have found the right shade for you yet. 3. Accessorize. This is the most important step in putting together a look. A belt or a felt hat or a necklace can transform your outfit from casual to head-turning. 4. When in doubt, add a jacket. I often make a statement jacket the main event. It’s easy—once it’s on, you’re ready to go! 5. Break your rules—and mine.



style

WORK IN PROGRESS

planning my seasonal look months in advance. My more adventurous ideas needed to be tested out live on the runway (the school hallway), including sporting an onion bag on my head as a hat, weaving a crocheted winter scarf through my belt loops, and wearing unplugged headphones around my neck as a choker (and to add movement when I sashayed). Through these external experiments, I was developing something internal: my sense of individuality. But also, judging from these particular choices, my personal style emerged in some part from resistance to the mundane. Changing my style was a form of artistic expression.

As an adult, I revel in changing my style not only as a means to highlight different physical and emotional angles but also to explore personas. I studiously reference my favourite actors and musicians—not as pure mimicry or idolatry. Instead, like a style Frankenstein, I’m eager to observe how transposing someone else’s aesthetic onto mine creates someone new. This is why Halloween makes me uncomfortable: the intention behind dressing up is to scare (or for jest). Why must transformation be monstrous and frightening, or something to be laughed at, instead of an opening for self-discovery? Queer people learn to hide ourselves at a young age through mastering performance. We know firsthand and through keen observation that the exterior is always a show. Learn from us: You don’t have to cloak your fantasies with guises. All clothes are costumes. Come out! Give yourselves more than one day of the year.

Every portrait of myself (and the responses others have to it) teaches me what expressions, poses, angles, clothing, and lighting I like, giving me invaluable intel about how I want to present myself, both in front of a lens and not. What if we stopped trying to project authenticity and instead admitted that our image and presentations actually reflect an ongoing process of figuring ourselves out? And that this process of learning (and relearning) how we want to see ourselves and how we want to be seen involves stumbling and posturing. Because whether we steer the process or not, our exteriors are always changing, never flat or one-dimensional. Why deny our growing pains and transformations instead of owning them?

Excerpted from People Change by Vivek Shraya. Copyright © 2022 Vivek Shraya. Published by Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

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WHAT IT’S LIKE TO REDO A ROOM OVER ZOOM

page 26

October Mist (CC-550) by Benjamin Moore

[ C O LO U R O F T H E Y E A R ]

Natural selection Itching for a room reset? Reach for a lush shade of green. All of the major paint brands have included verdant hues—from mint to sage to olive—in their 2022 trending palettes. “It’s versatile and works in any space,” says Jo Smeeth, founder of Kawartha Lakes, Ont.-based design firm INDA Interiors. “It’s a nice complement to black, white and natural textures like rattan and jute.”

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TEXT, IRIS BENAROIA. PHOTO, COURTESY OF BENJAMIN MOORE. WALL COLOUR, OCTOBER MIST (CC-550). CEILING, TRIM AND MANTEL COLOUR, STEAM (AF-15).

is serenity in a can.


home

NOTES

1

2

4

5

PHOTOS: 1. COURTESY OF BEHR PAINT COMPANY; 2. COURTESY OF FARROW & BALL; 3. COURTESY OF BEAUTITONE; 4. COURTESY OF HGTV HOME BY SHERWIN-WILLIAMS; 5. COURTESY OF VALSPAR.

3

1. Perfect Penny (S180-6), Behr “Terracotta is hot right now,” says interior designer Jo Smeeth of INDA Interiors. The sun-baked hue is ideal for adding warmth to existing neutral palettes and surprisingly easy to incorporate. She suggests testing the waters with an accent feature, like a ceiling or a single wall in a room decorated with patterned wallpaper in complementary colours, like hunter green or mustard yellow. Perfect Penny is a cozy hue that’s also a great choice for cocooning spaces, such as dens and bedrooms. Want to nail the evertrendy boho look? Just add plants, leather poufs, bleached linen and desertscape artwork. 2. Babouche (223), Farrow & Ball Named for the flat, open-heeled leather shoe worn in Morocco, Babouche is an energetic yellow worth dipping into. “It can be overwhelming, so use it as

New year, new hues Kick off 2022 with a fresh coat of paint in one of the year’s top shades Written by IRIS BENAROIA

an accent and add affordable accessories, like art and textiles, to tie it all together,” says Smeeth. For a hit of sunshine, try a coat in an enclosed space, like a foyer, hallway or door. Or paint geometric accents in rooms that could use a little pick-me-up, such as a home office. Get creative! Yellow pairs well with an array of colours, from saturated jewel tones to pastel hues.

3. Mirror Brown (FD055-0), BeautiTone Beige gets a bad rap, but it doesn’t have to be boring. With its grey undertones, Mirror Brown is an incredibly versatile

colour that allows statement pieces to shine. “The key is to introduce contrast,” says Calgarybased interior designer Amanda Hamilton, who recommends pairing it with wood furniture, woven rugs and nubby fabrics like bouclé. “It’s a great pick to use throughout the home for a chic European vibe,” she adds. It’s also a solid option in a modern farmhouse kitchen, where it lets shaker cabinets, cushy banquettes and tin lighting do the talking.

4. Aleutian (SW 6241), Sherwin-Williams Livable and soothing, blue is a perennial favourite that never

really goes out of style. In all its iterations, it’s a favourite of interior designers because it strikes a delicate balance between cool and timeless. Sherwin-Williams’ watery Aleutian is as breezy as can be, especially when paired with sandy hues and knotty driftwood for an effortless coastal vibe. For a luxurious touch, try it against deep wood furnishings, cream linen and gold accents.

5. Grey Suit (4004-2A), Valspar Grey is the perfect choice for those who can’t commit to a bold colour. “Don’t let the name Grey Suit fool you; this shade has a green undertone that makes it anything but stuffy,” says Hamilton of the warm neutral. It works well in cozy spaces, like dens and family rooms, but it’s also beautiful in a media room, nursery or kid’s bedroom. It’s a grounding shade with plenty of grown-up potential, which means it will evolve with your little ones.

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home

VIRTUAL DESIGN

Cover a large wall for less with a cluster of affordable prints.

Break up an open concept space with greenery at varying heights.

Warm tones and soft textures make for an inviting lounging spot.

Ficus lyrata potted plant, $27.99, ikea.ca. Glattis tray, $19.99, ikea.ca. Coffee table, Article Lenia Oval, $509, article.com. Oui beige cushion cover, $34.50, indigo.ca. Hjorthede rug, $499, ikea.ca. Basket, tall faux plant, framed art, floor lamp, sofa cushions, throw, gold drum table and coffee table decor, homesense.ca.

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home

VIRTUAL DESIGN

HOW TO WORK WITH A

VIRTUAL INTERIOR DESIGNER After 18 months of Zoom wine nights and FaceTime birthdays, it’s been a joy to entertain at home once more. But if you’ve suddenly realized that your space could use a little help in the decor department, you might just want to head back to the computer again Written by CAITLIN KENNY Produced by STEPHANIE HAN KIM Photography by ERIK PUTZ Prop styling by CHRISTINE HANLON

3-D RENDERING, WHITE DAHLIA DESIGN.

THE BEFORE TIMES Bare walls and mismatched pieces demonstrate the decor indecision we’d been living with.

THE 3-D PLAN White Dahlia Design created a 3-D rendering of the vision for our space, including new furniture, a painted wall and tons of accessories.

THEY SAY LOVE IS what makes a house a home, but some well-chosen art, a few throw cushions and, oh maybe, furniture that actually fits your space must play a role, too. Because despite all the happy vibes happening in my own little Toronto semi, there’s nothing about the still-blank walls and media unit bulging past the living room doorway that screams “happy and functional humans live here.” It’s not for lack of trying. Since moving in last January, my husband, Colin, and I have repainted, replaced the kitchen cabinets, added a second bathroom sink, opened up walls, ordered new windows and more. But the seemingly simpler task of furnishing the place? After my third attempt at buying an area rug for our living room, I was ready to admit that I didn’t have the time, eye or decisiveness to decorate this house on my own. Enter a virtual interior design service, which can help with everything from finishing touches to a full remodel using video conferencing and other online tools. “Even as someone who loves design, I still took two years to furnish my home,” says Gloria Song-Foster, founder of White Dahlia Design, a virtual design service based in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont. She and her team now help clients get their rooms in Pinterest-worthy shape in less than a month, all without setting foot in their houses. Packages start from $200 for choosing paint colours and sourcing small accessories and go up to $749 or more for a 3-D renovation plan. I opted for their mid-level package for my open concept living and dining areas. Starting at $649 per room, it includes a 3-D floor plan, furniture and accessory shopping lists, and pre- and post-design calls, plus placing and tracking your orders (and returns) for you. “Most people know their style; they just don’t know how to pull it off,” says Song-Foster. But with a few calls and clicks—and a bit of legwork—it’s easy to outsource a decor update. Here’s how to max out your virtual makeover.

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home

VIRTUAL DESIGN

Hanging planters, ca.umbra.com. Floor lamp, gold drum table, bar cart accessories, large faux plant and baskets, homesense.ca.

Bold but worth it: A dramatic coat of Sherwin-Williams’ Greenblack (SW 6994) transforms the dining area.

Rens sheepskin, $39.99, ikea.ca. Floor lamp, gold drum table, wall art and chair throw, homesense.ca. Lounge chair, Sundays Endless Summer in Black Ash, $950, sundayscompany.ca.

A mirror, a console table and a dish for keys make this space pretty and practical.

Sunset tones and a mix of glass and ceramics serve up a well-styled bar cart.

1. Consider your space. The process for most services is similar: They all require some upfront work and a little soul-searching. “The number one thing to consider is how you experience your current space,” says Song-Foster. “What kind of functionality are you missing?” Maybe you’re low on storage; maybe you can’t see the kids playing when you’re cooking dinner. The other big question: How do you want to feel in the space? In our case, we wanted an inviting area to host friends but lacked seating. Then I took pictures of my space, filmed a video walk-through, made a list (with dimensions!) of every piece of decor and furniture that I wanted to keep and drew a detailed floor plan. I uploaded all of this to an online portal and added comments where needed, explaining, say, the vision behind our DIY slat wall and media unit.

2. Think about what you like. Before your first call with your designer, you’ll also need to figure out what aesthetic you’re going for. “It’s less important to have it captured in a specific style name,” says Song-Foster. “Instead, curate the photos you love.”

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Large faux plant, plant basket, golden bird candle holders, watering can, wall art, white plant pot, dishes and decorative vases, homesense. ca. Stockholm mirror, $59.99, ikea.ca.

On the call, we chatted about some of the common elements among my inspiration photos: a pared-back paint palette, subtle colours through accessories, and natural textures and clean lines in furniture. Song-Foster also took me through further questions about fabrics, finishes and colours. We ultimately decided the space should feel contemporary and clean, with warmth added through natural elements. “Like walking into a boutique hotel lobby,” she threw out. That felt exactly right.


home

A dark, DIY slat wall helps electronics blend into the background.

VIRTUAL DESIGN

were larger differences to consider. In the first option, our existing furniture layout remained intact, along with our DIY media unit and couch, but the shelf had been replaced by a narrow console table, a functional upgrade as it’s near our front door. In the second, our living room layout was flipped, with the couch on a different wall, a new media unit and room for two lounge chairs. Most notably, the white dining room wall was painted in the same green-tinged black as our slat wall behind the TV—the perfect solution to divide the long common wall that runs along the living and dining areas. Song-Foster says one of the biggest mistakes her clients make is scheduling the post-design call before they’ve properly reviewed the plans. With this in mind, Colin and I carefully scrutinized each option before booking the call. We ultimately decided to cherry-pick from both: keep our couch configuration, upgrade our media unit, swap the shelf for a console table, add one lounge chair and, yes, paint that wall black.

5. Take it all the way.

Media unit, Article Envelo Short, $799, article.com. TV wall speaker, Sonos Beam (Gen 2) in Black, $559, sonos.com. Tote and decorative vases, homesense.ca.

3. Set your budget. After tallying the large items we needed (dining set, lounge chair and, potentially, a media unit) and rounding up for accessories, we landed at $5,000—a sum that probably wasn’t going to go as far as we thought. Song-Foster says it can cost from $7,000 to $9,000 to furnish a room on a budget: “People underestimate the cost of accessories, but it’s the little things that make a room look finished.” I was open to investing in key pieces, so we chose a highlow mix. We also talked about the brands I love: EQ3, Article and Sundays for furniture; HomeSense, Indigo and Ikea for accessories. With that, the team took it away.

4. Review the plans thoroughly. “Our house can look like that!?” Colin asked when I showed him our two 3-D design options a week later. I shared his sense of awe. It was clear that layers of accessories would make a huge impact: tall plants, tons of cushions, a throw blanket styled just so, mirrors, wall art, and every surface neatly styled with vases and objets. But there

New stuff—exciting! Ringing it through on your credit card—daunting! Being about $3,000 over budget made it even more nerve-wracking. All those pillows and vases can add up, making them tempting to put off. But that’d be a mistake, says SongFoster: “If you wait to add accessories, the room doesn’t quite feel finished.” And because my goal was exactly that—a home that looks like an actual living space— I realized that it’s those details that would separate my blank-slate box from its boutique-hotel potential. Of course, I made some compromises. Because I knew I’d like to eventually splurge on original artwork, we stuck with prints for the moment. Otherwise, I checked off all my product selections in the portal, and White Dahlia handled ordering and tracking. One by one, boxes started showing up. After a few messages to the design team about what height to install the plant hangers and how to artfully arrange our new throw pillows (they offer 30-day support for these types of questions), the transformation was complete. With our new furniture, a rug I actually like and every perfectly styled surface, maybe it is love that makes a house a home—love for how it looks from floor to ceiling, with every well-designed detail in between.

Go online Spruce up your space with Canada’s top virtual design services If you want to skip the shopping hassle . . . White Dahlia Design This firm handles not just design and item sourcing, but also ordering, tracking and returning, too. If you want to use your own items . . . The Room Editor Toronto-based decorator Elias Blunden-Stone’s DecorBlitz service focuses on repurposing and restyling items you already have. If you don’t want to wait . . . Room Edit by Stacey Cohen Design The Instant Package serves up design direction in minutes: Pick a style (from “modern moody” to “sophisticated nomad”) and room type, and then receive a floor plan, an inspo board, a 3-D rendering and a shopping list.

If you’re planning a major reno . . . Spec Select a design scheme from this Vancouver-based company and they will mail you a hefty binder of material samples and product specs from various suppliers. If you need advice stat . . . Articulated Design Studio Among other services, this firm offers 60-minute video sessions to pick a designer’s brain on anything from paint colours to building codes. If you want a detailed game plan . . . Good Space Plans Online Founded by a mother-daughter duo, this company develops customized plans for all your decor needs, including furniture arrangement, lighting plans, fabric recommendations and more.

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This super-grippy scrunchie is the brainchild of a Western University athlete turned entrepreneur. $20, hairstrong.ca.

CAN CBT MAKE HEALTHY HABITS STICK?

page 31

The new group workout It’s old news that you’re more likely to stick with a fitness routine if you work out with a friend. But now you can do it virtually. Apple SharePlay allows two or more users to do Fitness+ classes together, seeing and talking to one another via FaceTime. Team Chatelaine tried and loved this function for dance and HIIT workouts. Two caveats: It works best in small groups, and you’ll need to do a pre-workout dry run to make sure everyone’s tech is connected properly.

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MAIN PHOTO, STOCKSY.

[ C L A S S AC T I O N ]


health

NOTES

Can CBT make healthy habits stick? Whether you want to sleep better or get more exercise, the solution may be all in your head Written by SYDNEY LONEY Illustration by VÉRONIQUE BUIST

s the pandemic tested our mental health, it also pre- and sleep are what Amaria calls “the trifecta of self-care,” and vented us from visiting the very professionals who CBT can help you establish better habits around all three. might have mitigated that strain. Small wonder that A first step toward better habit building is to set goals, says tech has stepped in: In 2021, it was estimated Dr. Randy Paterson, a psychologist in Vancouver that there were somewhere between 10,000 and author of How to Be Miserable: 40 Strategies and 20,000 mental-health-related apps on You Already Use. He recommends setting ultiTHREE APPS TO the market. Many of those apps use cognitive mate goals (exercising three times a week for BUILD BETTER behavioural therapy to tackle everything from one hour) and immediate goals (what’s actuHABITS anxiety to insomnia—but CBT, in app form or ally going to happen this week—like walking Streaks otherwise, can likely do even more. once around the block). “You think, ‘Of course A to-do list that helps The underlying principle of CBT is that thoughts, I can do that,’ and then you gradually ramp it you track up to 24 goals feelings and behaviour are all connected, and up,” says Paterson. Hitting these manageable and tasks each day, when you change one, you can change the othincrements essentially tricks your brain into whether it’s not smoking ers. “If you look at your running shoes and think, reaching your ultimate goal. or eating more veggies. ‘Well, these were a waste of money,’ it makes you Another way to use what he calls “self-directed feel bad about yourself and skip the gym,” says CBT” is to monitor what you’re doing in the area Calm This award-winning app Dr. Khush Amaria, a psychologist and senior clinwhere you want to build healthier habits. For incan help you develop ical director at MindBeacon in Toronto. “Instead, stance, rate the quality of your sleep from zero to healthy sleep habits, when you look at your shoes, think, ‘The last time 10 for a week to get a sense of what’s going on. reduce stress or learn I felt like this but still made it to the gym, I felt bet“Habit change is a journey from an origin to a desto meditate. ter afterward.’” A little positive reinforcement can tination, which means you have to know what the make a big difference. origin is,” says Paterson. Next, pick the healthy Ate Food Diary Psychologists have used CBT to treat mental habit you’re going to adopt, whether it’s sticking to Build healthier health issues for 50 years, and much of that treata standard bedtime, looking at a book instead of food habits through ment is based on developing healthier habits. “Its your phone or investing in a white noise machine. mindfulness (without use as a stand-alone treatment for things like exerIn the end, it’s not about getting rid of bad habits, counting calories or restricting foods). cise is more recent,” says Amaria, “but the connecadds Amaria, but building new, better ones. And, tion has always been there.” Exercise, nutrition as luck would have it, there’s an app for that.

A

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health

SPEAK UP

How to become your own best advocate

Written by RAINA DELISLE

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I

n her 26 years as a critical-care nurse, Paige Lennox saw a lot of patients fall through the cracks—not getting the diagnoses, treatments or referrals they needed—often because they weren’t able to advocate for themselves, or didn’t have someone to do it for them. Self-advocating involves speaking up about your feelings, asking for what you need and making sure your rights are respected, all of which can help health care providers treat you more efficiently and effectively. “Just by advocating for yourself, you’ll get better care, and your health will improve,” says Lennox, who is based in Nelson, B.C., and is the founder and CEO of Canadian Health Advocates Inc., which connects patients with medical professionals who are experts at navigating the Canadian health care system. The pandemic has pushed our long-stressed system to the brink, making self-advocacy more important than ever. Across the country, procedures are being postponed or cancelled outright, while health care workers are leaving the field in droves. In the first quarter of 2021, there were nearly 100,000 job vacancies in the health care and social assistance sector, a 39 percent jump from 2020—and the largest increase in any sector—according to Statistics Canada. “With a depleted workforce and procedural backlogs

PHOTO, GETTY IMAGES.

With our health care system pushed to the brink, it’s never been more crucial to speak up for yourself


health

SPEAK UP

Herstory in 2019 after several frustrating years of feeling judged, belittled and dismissed by doctors. “When you’re being told that your pain isn’t serious, or that what you’re feeling is normal, or that maybe you’re being dramatic or emotional, it’s easy to believe it and just go home and live with that pain,” says Ford, who is based in Montreal. “But when you can find your voice, that can make all the difference in your medical journey.” Here’s how to start.

at all-time highs, patients risk experiencing a subpar health system,” warned Dr. Katharine Smart, president of the Canadian Medical Association, in a statement last October. That can be especially true for women and gender-diverse people, particularly those from racialized communities, says Tori Ford, founder and executive director of Medical Herstory, an international non-profit organization that advocates for gender health equity and runs workshops on how to self-advocate. Research shows that doctors are less likely to believe women and gender-diverse people when they say they’re in pain compared with men (a phenomenon known as the trust gap). On top of that, conditions that only or disproportionately affect women, such as endometriosis, are often underfunded and understudied, making them more difficult for doctors to diagnose and treat (this is called the research gap). But as Lennox and Ford know, it’s not necessarily easy to advocate for yourself or someone else. When Lennox was advocating for her mom, who was in the final stages of cancer, she found it daunting despite her professional expertise, which inspired her to create Canadian Health Advocates in 2018. Ford, who suffers from chronic yeast infections, launched Medical

WALK INTO YOUR APPOINTMENT WITH AN AGENDA Just as you’d show up to a job interview primed to discuss your resumé and career objectives, you should arrive at medical appointments armed with your health history and goals. Dr. Jennifer Zelmer, who holds a PhD in economics and is president and CEO of Healthcare Excellence Canada, a non-profit charity focused on improving Canadian health care, also suggests jotting down any questions in advance. And while health care providers often urge patients to avoid Dr. Google, consulting the websites of reputable organizations (like, say, the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Mayo Clinic) can help you prepare for your appointment and, according to a 2021 survey, may even improve your chances of arriving at an accurate diagnosis. Zelmer recommends keeping track of your health information in a journal or in the Notes app on your phone. (There are also several stand-alone apps that can help, like Flaredown and Symple.) What are your symptoms? When did they start? How long did they last? What may have brought them on? How severe are they? How are you managing them? What has worked and what hasn’t? If your vital signs or lifestyle factors (like how much you’re exercising, sleeping or drinking) are relevant, track those, too. Finally, make note of key health information, such as your current medications, allergies, and personal and family medical histories. Ford suggests setting a goal for your appointment, whether that’s getting a referral, asking about a new treatment or changing your medication. “This helps you focus on what you want to get out of the appointment and prevents you from leaving feeling overwhelmed, hopeless or frustrated,” she says.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS AND EXERCISE THEM Did you know that you have the right to a second opinion? Or the right to refuse treatment? Every province and territory has laws around patient rights, which you can find on your government’s website. There’s a lot of overlap between jurisdictions, and laws typically include the rights to health care without discrimination, access to your medical records, information on proposed treatments and adequate pain and symptom management. If, for example, your doctor dismisses your pain, you can remind them that you have a right to relief—whether it’s a prescription, a note for time off from work or a referral to a specialist. It’s important to exercise these rights to ensure your comfort, as well as your physical and mental JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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safety. On one occasion, Ford declined a pelvic examination because she didn’t feel it was necessary and wasn’t in the right mental space. She stresses that it’s critical to remember that consent extends to the doctor’s office. “It’s your body, and you have the right to say no,” she says.

KEEP CALM AND ASK QUESTIONS Medical appointments can bring on some big feelings but staying calm will help you self-advocate more effectively. “If you’re getting frustrated or tearful,” says Lennox, “it’s okay to say, ‘I’m not feeling heard’ or ‘I’m feeling really overwhelmed.’ If you need to leave the room for a minute, it’s okay to do that.” This is also where your notes come in handy. If you become too upset to speak, hand them over to your doctor. Virtual care can also be helpful in challenging situations: You can set up in a comfortable space, and, as Ford points out, “if you get emotional or upset, there’s some distance between you and the physician.” Doctors may make assumptions about what you know, use medical jargon or glaze over critical information, so ask questions if you’re unsure about something or want more details. “Don’t think that your questions are irrelevant or be afraid of sounding silly,” says Ford. “It’s up to us to make sure that we leave the appointment feeling like we have all the information we need.” Research shows that about half of patients don’t take their medication as prescribed, often because they don’t know why they’re on it—so be sure you do, and that you understand why any specific tests or screenings are being conducted, too. Speaking of physical examinations: Ford encourages patients to ask about any alternatives that may make you feel more comfortable, such as selfinserting a speculum for gynecological exams or self-swabbing for sexually transmitted infections. “I’ve found that physicians are more than willing to accommodate those requests,” she says. At the end of the appointment, ask what’s happening next: when your next appointment will be, when you’ll get your test results or when your treatment

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will start. If you’ve had a procedure, Zelmer says you should be clear on the signs of complications and what you should do if they arise, whether it’s simply calling the clinician or racing back to the hospital. CONNECT WITH OTHERS—AND YOURSELF A large body of research shows that connecting with people who are going through similar health experiences can help you manage chronic conditions, cope with stress and even prevent some diseases. It can also give you insight into how to advocate for yourself. “Every time a patient advocates for themselves and then shares that knowledge, they make it easier for other people to do so,” says Ford, noting that Medical Herstory provides a platform for people to share their stories. You can find formal support groups by searching online or asking your health care team; there are groups organized by many clinics and associations, such as the Canadian Cancer Society. There are also lots of informal groups on social media, but Zelmer says it’s essential to vet them, especially with the rise of medical misinformation. “There’s nothing like [speaking with] somebody who’s walked a mile in your shoes, but it’s always wise to make sure that it’s a healthy conversation for you to be in,” she says. And after practising self-advocacy, Ford encourages you to practise self-care. She suggests planning a reward for after an appointment, whether it’s watching your favourite TV show or going on a date with your best friend. “Advocating takes a lot of resilience and a lot of hard work,” she says. “I get ice cream after every appointment.”

PHOTO, GETTY IMAGES.

BRING SOMEONE WITH YOU When you’re sick, scared, frustrated or overwhelmed, it isn’t easy to advocate for yourself, absorb medical information and keep an eye on what’s going on. Several studies have found that patients forget about half of what their MDs tell them and are more likely to blank if their doctors do most of the talking during the appointment and overload them with information. That’s why it’s valuable to bring a support person to your appointments; someone who can prompt you about things you wanted to discuss, take notes and help you remember what your doctor said. This is particularly important if English isn’t your first language or if your condition affects your cognitive ability. (If COVID rules prevent you from having someone in the room with you, you can call or Zoom them into the appointment or speak to them immediately afterward to debrief.) Zelmer points out that there’s a growing body of evidence showing that patients are safer and have better experiences and outcomes when they have someone supporting them in their health care journey. For instance, studies have found that they’re more likely to take their medication as prescribed and less likely to be readmitted, have falls or experience anxiety. If you don’t have a friend or family member who can provide this support, consider reaching out to a professional or volunteer advocate. The health care experts at Canadian Health Advocates (who are mostly nurses) do research, explain medical information, participate in appointments, follow up on referrals and requisitions, help with advanced-care planning, assist with paperwork and act as a link between various health care providers. It’s an emerging industry in Canada, but Lennox says their services, which cost between $115 and $125 per hour, are already covered by two insurance companies, as well as a First Nations band.


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The pandemic revealed to the wider world what many within Canada’s long-term care system already knew: LTC in this country needs a radical overhaul— if not a complete reimagining. But what about the families who rely on the system right now? Nora Loreto explores the constant battle for basic care Illustrations by SÉBASTIEN THIBAULT

NIZI CALLS HER mother’s long-term care facility every night. During each call, she asks someone on staff if Maria, 83, has showered and what she’s eaten. In January 2021, for three nights in a row, Nizi was told her mother had only eaten breakfast. She immediately knew something was wrong. At the time, the facility was in the midst of a COVID-19 outbreak. Maria’s nurse practitioner said it was likely that Maria had COVID but had not been tested; first she had refused, and then Nizi says the doctor told her she didn’t want to administer the test, as it might “ruin her rapport” with Maria. On February 5, Maria fell and was hospitalized. In the hospital, she tested positive for COVID-19 and also got her first sponge bath in six weeks. Maria, who has schizophrenia, has lived in this Toronto-area public facility since 2018. She is independent and spirited, and still a fashionista. She walks down the hallway of her residence as if it’s a catwalk whenever Nizi brings her a new outfit. Before COVID—which caused the deaths of more than 20 residents in her facility— Maria would participate in bingo, birthday parties, exercise classes and creative activities. Nizi would take Maria shopping and to get her hair done. These routines helped strengthen their bond as they navigated Maria’s new reality in long-term care. When the home went into lockdown in March 2020—as provincial governments across Canada closed LTC facilities to essential caregivers as an infection-control measure—Nizi’s visits were reduced to standing on the other side of Maria’s firstfloor window. “The lockdown put a big wedge in our relationship, because Mum thought I had abandoned her. But I didn’t. I just couldn’t get in,” says Nizi. Without the activities and regular visits from Nizi, Maria became depressed and— like an increasing number of Ontario longterm care residents during lockdown—was

prescribed antidepressants. Twenty months after the initial lockdown, Maria says their relationship has recovered, but it’s not the same. Nizi desperately misses the friendship that she and her mother used to have; the one where she could talk to Maria about everything. She wants to tell Maria about the health problems that she’s having related to constantly needing to advocate for Maria’s care. But Nizi doesn’t want to stress her mother out: Living in a long-term care facility in Canada is stressful enough as it is. Nizi is Maria’s primary caregiver, and the role is grinding her into the ground. When I first talked with Nizi, she had recently been hospitalized for five days due to the stress of being an essential caregiver. Before she entered long-term care, Maria lived briefly with Nizi’s family, but her schizophrenia was deteriorating, making caring for her more challenging. On four separate occasions, Maria left Nizi’s home in search of her deceased husband, hoping to find him at the intersection where they used to live. Three times, Nizi says that they needed help from police to locate her. The fourth time, Nizi found Maria with a packed bag. Every time Maria left, Nizi’s young son would start shivering with shock over the stress of her disappearances. “I needed that 24-hour help . . . . It was a very, very hard choice to place Mum in a long-term care home,” says Nizi. She got the call that a spot had opened up at the facility on her son’s seventh birthday. Maria moved in three days later, first into a semi-private room and then into a private room so that she could have her own bathroom. In the beginning, the facility’s care wasn’t so bad, says Nizi. But in March 2020, triggered by the chaos and loneliness of the pandemic, Maria started refusing care from personal support workers (PSWs). As the level of care Maria was receiving deteriorated, Nizi found that

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making complaints to Ontario’s Ministry of Long-Term Care was her only recourse to ensure that her mom not only had regular baths but received other care, too. In total, the ministry has found 22 instances of non-compliance that Nizi says were related to Maria’s care—including issues related to her diet and medication. “I’m just fighting for basic care . . . and shouldn’t be,” says Nizi, exasperated. “These are things that the home should be providing.” anada’s 2,076 LTC facilities have been understaffed and underfunded for years, but the pandemic kicked the dysfunction into overdrive. The average amount of reported daily direct care that LTC residents receive— one-on-one time that staff spend with residents to provide for their daily needs, whether that’s help eating, bathing, dressing or toileting—varies by province: In British Columbia, it’s 3.14 hours per day; in Ontario, it’s around two hours and 45 minutes. In 2021, Alberta’s Parkland Institute, in collaboration with CUPE Alberta, a provincial union that represents LTC staff, conducted a survey that showed how understaffing and underfunding have had profound impacts on resident care. Fortyone percent of the Alberta-based workers surveyed felt that current staffing levels were “seldom or never adequate to meet care needs,” and more than 40 percent said that understaffing led to injuries and delayed assistance with meals. These are concerns echoed by Emily, a PSW at a not-for-profit long-term care facility in southwestern Ontario. On a day when her facility is fully staffed, it has four PSWs for every 30 residents. Each morning, she quickly assesses each of her eight to nine residents to see if anyone needs immediate help. After that, she deftly moves from room to room to get each resident dressed, bathed and into the dining room for breakfast. She only has six minutes with every resident. If one needs more time to do something, she has to make that time up somewhere else. If she needs to use a lift to help a resident out of bed, she runs down the hall to find another PSW to help with the two-person job. At the best of times, it’s a massive challenge to care for everyone. But if one PSW calls in sick, it means that the remaining three have to do everything for even more people—in less time. “[Even] when we’re fully staffed, we’re running JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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they know their loved ones better than we do.” But in March 2020, that all changed. Overnight, the thousands of unpaid caregivers who help the long-term care system operate were shut out—with no indication of when they could return. There was no question, says Arya, that this decision would have dire consequences.

crazy,” says Emily. She has to calculate her actions down to the bowel movements, back washes and daily demeanour of each resident. Every single shift, says Emily—who makes about $21 an hour—you have to mentally prepare yourself to “just go.” Palliative care physician Dr. Amit Arya has worked in various Ontario LTC facilities and sees this rush regularly. When medications are added to the mix, it can get even harder: If a resident is prescribed something that requires they be monitored every 30 minutes, that leaves very little time for a nurse—who may be caring for 30 other residents, if not more—to do other things, including calling a doctor if they need to discuss the resident’s reaction to the medication. “This is not a system that was ever even designed to look after people that live there, to accommodate their wishes, to provide them good care and to support their families,” he says. Instead, long-term care homes rely on essential caregivers like Nizi: unpaid family helpers who regularly come into the facility to feed, bathe and provide companionship to their loved ones. This regular contact also allows them to see when protocols are not being followed, which places them in the spot of also being whistleblowers. “Caregivers are a giant part of why LTC is successful,” says Emily, “because

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ob is an optimistic guy. Sitting inside a car in a Tim Hortons parking lot beside his daughter Jo-Anne, he tells me over the phone that his current residence is comfortable. In longterm care, “you don’t have the agony of fighting with a construction company anymore,” he says, referencing life as a homeowner. When I ask the 94-year-old how hard it has been to live within the facility during the pandemic, he says, “Each day is a new day, and there’s nothing to fear about it if you know the platform on which you can build a happy environment wherever you are.” Bob’s cheery demeanour doesn’t betray how difficult his past two years have been. In January 2019, he was hospitalized after several falls. By March, Jo-Anne says she felt pressured to take Bob home from the hospital early so that she wouldn’t lose home support from government-funded PSWs. She quickly assembled a team— PSWs, family members, a few friends— to help accommodate Bob’s return to the condo that he shared with Barbara, his wife of 68 years. Then, in May 2019, Barbara had a stroke and was hospitalized for months. In September 2019, Bob moved into a long-term care facility west of Toronto as it became financially impossible for Jo-Anne to keep him at home with roundthe-clock care. Barbara joined him at the facility that November. When Barbara moved in, she was given a room kitty-corner to Bob’s, so they could see each other. But she couldn’t get out of bed. When the pandemic started and residents were confined to their rooms, Jo-Anne estimates that Barbara was alone for 22 hours a day, going in and

out of delirium and experiencing terrible, progressive arthritic pain. Jo-Anne says she followed up constantly about her parents’ care: issues like insisting that staff use a lift for Barbara in a way that didn’t hurt her and constantly reminding them to bring Bob to see his wife. During a window visit during this time, Jo-Anne heard her mother scream in pain, but there was nothing she could do. Jo-Anne says she was constantly advocating for the home to implement measures to ease Barbara’s pain—including changing the way her medication was administered—and keep her hydrated. Jo-Anne says that when she would ask staff about the latter, they would say that there was always a glass of water beside her bed (by then, Barbara was quadriplegic). During lockdown, Jo-Anne would call the home twice a day to check in on her mom. If she wanted to talk to Barbara, she needed staff to hold a phone to Barbara’s ear. But they were often too overwhelmed to assist with the calls. Barbara eventually asked if Jo-Anne was mad at her, as she wasn’t calling as often. On the Friday before Thanksgiving in 2020, Barbara died. For weeks, Jo-Anne tells me through tears, she had tried to get an exemption from lockdown rules to be with Barbara. In September 2020, the Ontario government announced that each LTC resident could designate two essential caregivers for unlimited visits. (Prior to this announcement, there wasn’t a consistent caregiver policy in place across all Ontario homes.) But Jo-Anne says she never received any communication about this. (A spokesperson for the Canadian chain that operates the facility in question told Chatelaine that such news is communicated to family members via email or voicemail updates “as soon as possible after such changes happen.”) Jo-Anne was eventually able to see her mom again before she passed, but she can never make up for the time she lost not knowing the facility was open to visitors. This facility operates on a for-profit basis, and is located in Ontario’s Halton Region. It ha s on ly sing le o c cupancy rooms and did not have a single death related to COVID-19 per official figures. Jo-Anne asked me not to name it for


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fear that it could have repercussions for Bob’s care. Of the dozens of people with family in LTC that I spoke to for this story, this was an overwhelming concern. All of the advocacy for Bob’s care falls on Jo-Anne’s shoulders. She says she has made complaints to the Ministry of LongTerm Care regarding both of her parents’ care, but she’s too overwhelmed to recall the outcomes. She says that the time she spends advocating for Bob has ruined her financially (she’s selfemployed) and emotionally. “I’m just so done with it all,” she tells me. “I know most of the people I deal with are kind people, but the system is so broken and the disconnect between admin and front-line [workers] is so acute . . . . I’ve never been so exhausted in my life.” here are two ways in which provincial governments oversee the quality of care that is delivered within long-term care facilities, regardless of whether they are public, private not-for-profit or private for-profit. The first is through routine, unannounced inspections. These allow inspectors to see what the day-to-day operations of an institution are like and make recommendations to improve them. They might look at how medicine is stored, if there are any fire hazards or safety lapses and if the facility is fulfilling its responsibility under various pieces of legislation or regulations. The second form of oversight is triggered either by a complaint from a family member or other concerned party, or a critical incident. Complaints can be a frustrating, difficult and drawn-out process. In Alberta, for example, anyone with concerns about food, cleanliness or general upkeep of their loved one’s LTC are encouraged to first bring their concerns to their home’s resident-and-family council, which is run by family caregivers and attempts to resolve issues that arise between families and the home. If bringing a complaint to this group doesn’t result in a resolution, a person can lodge a formal complaint with Alberta Health’s Accommodation Standards. But by the time this process plays out, weeks or even months might pass. If a concern was pressing, like unclean living conditions or a problem with a resident’s meals, the resident and their family either must live with the problem

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“I know most of the people I deal with are kind people, but the system is so broken. I’ve never been more exhausted in my life.” in the meantime or find other ways to raise the issue. This process is similar in provinces across Canada. Any time a patient is injured, harmed or killed by the unintentional actions of staff—and if the impact has nothing to do with an underlying health issue—it must be reported. That also triggers an inspection (albeit one that management is anticipating). Unannounced, thorough inspections are the backbone of effective compliance, and the reduction of such inspections means family members are often left to pick up the slack. Take, for instance, what has happened in Ontario: Prior to 2018, each long-term care facility in the province had an annual, unannounced inspection. CBC News found that those inspections were nearly eliminated in fall 2018—a few months after Doug Ford’s C on s e r v a t ive s took office. (While most of Ontario’s 626 LTC homes received unannounced inspections in 2015, 2016 and 2017, CBC reports that only nine did in 2019.) This meant that inspections triggered by complaints and critical incidents became even more important. Not only does this leave a large part of enforcing compliance on the shoulders of family members, it also resulted in less-thorough inspections: An Ontario ministry report from 2015 found that these thorough,

unannounced annual inspections were the only kind that were able to consistently identify lapses in infection control. Once Doug Ford became premier, the number of violations of non-compliance found within Ontario’s system dropped by 30 percent. Did this mean that facilities were safer, or only that conducting fewer inspections yields fewer instances of non-compliance? In 2020, there were zero proactive investigations, called resident quality investigations, conducted. Ontario’s Ministry of Long-Term Care told Chatelaine that it’s working on creating “an improved proactive inspections program” but that the pandemic “sidelined this work until early 2021.” As a PSW, Emily says that staff rely on family complaints just as much as families do. When staff complain to management, she says, their reports are easy to brush off or delay. But when management hears from a family member, issues are taken more seriously. Complaints can be about anything, from minor issues that could be easily addressed by asking a PSW to do something specific to major ones that try to identify how a resident was harmed by a particular practice. But larger issues are often systemic, and a complaint can only highlight the acute expression of a generalized problem. So while a complaint might result in a resident receiving a bath more often, it certainly cannot change protocols within a facility to ensure that all residents have more frequent baths, because bathing is a victim JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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of chronic short staffing rather than a momentary lapse in a staffer’s daily work. In November 2020, Ontario’s Ministry of Long-Term Care conducted a complaints-driven inspection at Maria’s home, including issues raised by Nizi, and found numerous infractions. Some residents’ care plans, which outline the specific care a resident should receive, were not being followed. Facility management failed to ensure that staff were using safe transferring and positioning techniques, resulting in a resident’s fall, as well as other care-related issues. The inspection also found that facility management didn’t follow their own complaints protocol. As a result, the inspector gave the home’s management a written notification indicating that the facility was found to be in noncompliance with provincial regulations. The notice was posted publicly—and that’s it. A 2020 CBC Marketplace investigation found that, out of 10,000 inspection reports completed in Ontario between 2015 and 2019, there were 30,000 written notifications given. None resulted in more serious action. Revoking an operator’s licence is exceedingly rare. Since the pandemic began, in Ontario, just seven retirement residences—all owned by the same family—had their licences revoked. During the hearings held by Ontario’s Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission in late 2020, commissioners heard that in the 20 years prior to the pandemic, just two LTC facilities had had their licences revoked. In May 2021, another inspection triggered by complaints at Maria’s LTC home found that bed rails weren’t being used properly, after a resident fell out of bed, among other infractions. Two days earlier, there had been a criticalincident inspection after a resident attacked and injured two other residents. The result of the critical-incident inspection was a voluntary plan of correction, the next level of infraction after a written notice: The facility was compelled to develop a plan to manage and avoid violence. There is no public reporting about whether or not the facility actually developed or implemented this plan.

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At Bob’s residence, there were criticalincident and complaints-triggered inspections in December 2020, and another critical-incident inspection in May 2021. During the December 2020 criticalincident inspection, the inspector found that a resident was improperly transferred, resulting in a fall, and that several residents’ needs were not met by their care plans. It was also determined that medication was given to the wrong individual. Two of these infractions also resulted in a voluntary plan of correction. Once again, there is no mechanism in place to ensure that this plan was made. It’s unfair and unreasonable that regulation and compliance should fall on the shoulders of family members, but that is exactly what has happened. Arya sees families in desperate situations, like those of Nizi and Jo-Anne, all the time. “I have seen the most burnout and the most stress in caregivers when their loved ones are in long-term care—more than any other setting; more than hospice, hospital or home care,” he says. “The time that people have to give to their loved ones is a set-up for burnout.” He thinks the complaints process is essentially futile: “Perhaps it gives people an outlet, but I can’t see it accomplishing anything,” he says. That’s because the problems within the system are far deeper than one nurse or PSW—or one manager or one facility. izi and Jo-Anne met last year through a support network that formed during the pandemic and that is anchored by someone they all call Dr. V: Vivian Stamatopoulos, a sociology professor at Ontario Tech University, who has, for the past 20 months and counting, been an outspoken advocate for LTC residents and their families. With Dr. V’s help, a community of essential caregivers shares advice on how to advocate for their loved ones and bring concerns they have directly to politicians. She is stunned by what she has witnessed during the pandemic: “I’ve never seen this level of trauma, pain and injustice,” Stamatopoulos says. She says


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A prominent LTC advocate says the family caregivers she works with have all developed “trademarks” of depression and trauma. that the essential caregivers in her network have all developed “trademarks” of depression and trauma. And when families’ only hope for adequate care for their loved ones rests in the complaints process, they often find themselves even more burnt-out, trying to follow a drawn-out, bureaucratic process that seems specifically designed to not address underlying systemic problems. t’s clear that long-term care in Canada is not working; not for staff, not for residents’ family members and certainly not for residents. While much of the attention focused on LTC has been related to system reforms, there are many voices that are questioning its existence outright. Seniors for Social Action Ontario (SSAO), a group that advocates for better care and supports for disabled and elderly Ontarians, is calling for institutional long-term care as we know it to be abolished. It wants LTC replaced with alternative approaches, including home care and community care, such as group homes. It references Denmark’s community-care model as one possibility; the country experienced fewer than half the COVID deaths in LTC that Canada did. (It’s worth noting that Denmark spends nearly equal amounts on home care and institutional care, and banned the development of new LTC homes in the 1980s. Canada, on the other hand, spends most of its long-term care funds on institutional and hospital care.) Formed in spring 2020, SSAO comprises a group of seniors that includes policy experts, activists and retired professors. It is resolute in its position that the institutional model of long-term care reduces the quality of the care that residents receive. In a presentation to Ontario’s Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission in December 2020, SSAO argued that “all

human conditions get worse in institutions” and that “external environment and trauma create aggressive behaviour.” SSAO has lots of ideas on what could replace the current institutionalized system of long-term care. Member Kay Wigle, who has since passed away, told the commission about one project that she was involved in 25 years ago. Residents of a group home in London, Ont., who had Down’s syndrome were developing early onset Alzheimer’s as they aged. Rather than looking toward long-term care as the solution, this community agency decided to change how they delivered care within the group home setting. As a result, the facility never had to transfer any of its residents to long-term care: “They’ve used community nursing when needed, but they were also able to do a lot of care that typically a longterm care [facility] may or may not be able to do,” Wigle described. In its testimony, SSAO noted that implementing some of these changes would require breaking down silos that exist between the ministries of health, social services and long-term care. But there are also changes that could be imposed on the sector as it is that would make a big difference immediately. SSAO argues that LTC facility managers need to be legitimately fearful that they may have their licences revoked. Instead, some of the deadliest operators during the pandemic have recently been granted the right to expand their facilities. Take, for example, Southbridge Care Homes, which has 784 new beds and 1,200 redeveloped beds either under contract with Ontario’s Ministry of Long-Term Care or at various levels of approval within the ministry process. This is in spite of the fact that half of Southbridge’s 26 facilities had a total of 214 COVID-19 related deaths. This figure includes 70 deaths at Orchard Villa in Pickering, Ont.—which experienced

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one of the province’s deadliest LTC outbreaks and was also the subject of a military report on alarming conditions inside certain LTC facilities. [Editor’s note: Chatelaine’s editor-in-chief’s mother is a resident in a Southbridge home.] There’s no question that Canada needs more capacity to care for the elderly, but governments seem more interested in expanding the status quo rather than exploring alternatives that could be immediately implemented.

ltimately, the sweeping changes that are required to fix the long-term care system require money, creativity, courage and, most importantly, political will. And any changes will likely come far too late for Bob and Maria. For his part, Bob told me the change he would like to see most in the LTC system is more support for peer-to-peer interaction within his facility. He thinks that incoming residents should be connected with veteran residents to foster relationships that would ease the loneliness he says is common. Facilitating this type of socialization, however, would require more staffing—and as it stands, there aren’t enough staff members at most homes to meet residents’ basic needs, never mind to provide social support. Since I spoke with Bob, things are going better for him—Jo-Anne describes his health as stable—though life is just as difficult for Jo-Anne. She still meets with either the director of care or the executive director of the facility each week to monitor Bob’s care and address any new concerns that arise. She tells me via email that she’s still exhausted. Nizi also continues to regularly advocate for her mother’s care and has encouraged other family members at Maria’s residence to file complaints, too. She tells them that she honestly believes her complaints have had a positive impact on the care Maria is receiving, though she wishes it didn’t have to be that way. The LTC system, as it stands, continues to rely on the unpaid labour of essential caregivers to ensure the delivery of basic care, and to raise the alarm, again and again, when it’s compromised. The trauma that this system perpetuates—for staff, for family members and, most notably, for residents—is a national crisis. And the only solution is a radical upheaval of the status quo. What will it take for our governments to enact one? JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

41


life

MEMOIR

The author holding a photo of her mother from 1948.

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022


life

MEMOIR

My mother’s secret She was a difficult woman, and I feared that looking like her would make me one, too. Then I learned something about her past that changed everything Written by KRYSTYNA LAGOWSKI Photography by CHRISTIE VUONG

MAKEUP AND HAIR, RONNIE TREMBLAY FOR P1M.CA. OLIVE LEAF ILLUSTRATIONS, ISTOCK PHOTO.

Makeup and hair by RONNIE TREMBLAY

VER SINCE I CAN REMEMBER, everyone—family, friends, complete strangers—commented on how much I looked like my mother. And it’s true. We both had the same self-conscious smile, wavy dark hair, large hazel-brown eyes and slim build. My mother, Joanna, was shapely, with killer legs and a patrician profile. But she was also a tightly wound woman, easily angered and riddled with neuroses. She’d married my father after they both immigrated to Canada from Poland following World War II. It was a tempestuous marriage, with heated screaming matches that often ended with my mother in tears and my father retreating to his basement workshop. The day after, she would wander the house wrapped in a mantle of gloom, or bang pots and pans in the kitchen. My father and I walked on eggshells. Although Joanna had trained to be a concert pianist, the war had destroyed her family and ruptured her dreams. As a child, I knew only small bits and pieces of her life, and I was discouraged from prying. In Canada, she was a suburban housewife, dependent

E

on her husband, cooking our meals and cleaning our home. My father, Andrew, was a hard-working, amiable man who had a way with small appliances and animals. He, too, had endured the war and earned a European law degree, which was useless in Canada, so he worked his way up from an assembly line to become an electrical engineer. When my parents fought, he growled menacingly at Joanna’s accusations—which were often of anti-Semitism—but invariably backed down. I dismissed these accusations as baseless, another reason not to be like her. As their daughter, it was my job to keep misery at bay, so I worked hard to get good marks in school, practise piano, say my prayers to Jesus in Polish and go to church. My misdemeanours were limited to sneaking the odd cigarette and trying on drugstore makeup. When my parents fought, I hid in my room, weeping into my blanket. I swore I would never marry and would never be like my mother. It was an uphill battle. I was a spindly wisp of a child, with skinny legs and protruding ribs. How I wished for plump shoulders and rounded calves. “I was the exact same when I was young,” Joanna would crow. “You’re just like me.” JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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MEMOIR

She was right, as hard as I fought it. Most of what I later, one wrong word from my father would spark hosknew about beauty and fashion, I had learned from tilities, and I would fear for my future. my mother. She had me moisturizing before I wore I had to get out. I had to find my own identity. At a bra. Sometimes we’d drive into Toronto from our age 25, I hennaed my hair burgundy and drove my home in Oakville, Ont., and have open-face sand- 1972 Dodge Dart to an apartment in downtown wiches at the Café de la Paix at the Colonnade or the Toronto. At last! The Eaton Centre was only 10 minCoffee Mill. We’d stroll through Holt Renfrew, ad- utes away, packed with fashion crimes waiting to miring tie-necked crepe de Chine blouses in tiny be committed. prints, smart A-line skirts and sleek V-neck georOnce I was gone, my parents stayed together gette sheaths. At home, my mother would whip up for nine more years. In 1990, my mother left my exact replicas on our ancient New Williams treadle father. One day while I was visiting my dad, he asked sewing machine. me to explain an affidavit for financial support Soon, I mastered the New Williams and could churn that had been delivered to him via courier. It itemout gaudy and gauzy peasant blouses, swirling paisley ized various charges my mother had made against maxi-skirts, wrap him. Item numblouses and halter ber 14 jumped out tops. My specialty at me: My mother was denim vests, stated that she had which I embroibeen born into the dered lavishly with Jewish faith, and whimsical folk art. even though she I crocheted cloche had converted to hats with enorCatholicism, my mous flowers, and father had conf unk y ponchos stantly denigrated with long tassels. her Jewish origins. In other words, the My hands shook as sartorial antithI read and reread esis to my mom’s t he document. quiet elegance. How had I not Bell-bottoms were known? My mother au courant, and I was a Jew and a made mine tight Holocaust survivor. to the knee, where For 40 years, she’d they f lared and kept that fact botdragged fashiontled up inside. Dorota/Joanna strikes a glamorous pose in a new ably behind my Suddenly, my dress—a rare splurge—in the late 1950s. purple platform stomach sagged shoes. “You’re not and my mouth went dry. The pieces fell wearing that to into place. What school, are you?” horrors had she Joanna would berate me, clad in her favourite ecru satiny blouse and been through? No wonder she’d been simmering with beige, knee-length pencil skirt. rage all this time. And how I’d coldly dismissed her The next line of defence was my hair. It was coloured, moods as hysterics. I had resented her instability, feathered, chopped, scrunched, layered, teased and feared it, without trying to understand what caused tortured to ensure it wouldn’t resemble my mother’s it. What an ingrate I was. wavy dark bob. Then came the makeup. Peacock blue I quickly realized that if my mother was Jewish, paint-by-number eyeshadow and fuchsia lip gloss, of according to millennia-old Jewish law, so was I. From which my mother heartily disapproved. “Look natu- their separate perches in Oakville, my parents veheral,” she scolded me. I waved at her with long red talmently denied it. I’d had every Catholic sacrament ons. “I’ll look natural when I’m dead!” I said. of initiation decreed by the Vatican. I’d even met Even though our household could shake with Pope John Paul II, who was Polish. I couldn’t possiJoanna’s tantrums and rages, there were good times. bly be Jewish. It was the first thing they’d agreed on We laughed often, usually at ourselves—her inabilin years. ity to pronounce “th” or my stumbling over a Polish But I was Jewish, and so was my mother. Slowly, tongue twister. My oversalted babka that even the her story came out. Her name wasn’t even Joanna. squirrels rejected. We’d blast an impassioned tango She’d been born Dorota Milstein, the only child of two on the stereo and stalk around the living room. But assimilated Jews, Maurycy Milstein and Bronislawa

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

DOROTA/JOANNA PHOTO, COURTESY OF KRYSTYNA LAGOWSKI.

life


life

MEMOIR

OLIVE LEAF ILLUSTRATION, ISTOCK PHOTO.

“Racked with guilt, I wanted to crawl back in time to undo all of my mother’s suffering. She had outlived the war but couldn’t un-live the anguish.”

Dawidowicz, in Częstochowa, Poland. In 1939, she was 20 years old, and war hovered in the air. Dorota caught the last civilian train from Warsaw to be with her parents in Lwów, Poland (now Lviv). When the Nazis invaded in 1941, the family was forced to move to the Jewish ghetto. Every day saw a new brutality, another atrocity. Both Maurycy and Bronislawa were murdered by the Nazis. Left on her own, Dorota worked as an enslaved labourer in the ghetto hospital and then the Janowska concentration camp, surviving typhus and bloody Nazi aktions (the German phrase for the rounding up of Jews). On June 1, 1943, she secured false papers and became Joanna Litniowska, a good Polish Catholic girl, and escaped the ghetto. She wound up in Berchtesgaden, Germany, just four kilometres from Hitler’s summer headquarters, until the French army liberated her in May 1945. I knew the rest. Dorota/Joanna (as I came to think of her) and I would talk, wrapped in each other’s arms. We would both break down in tears, sobbing for all she had lost, her cruel past. Sometimes we just sat in silence, rocking back and forth, emotionally drained. I gently wiped her wet cheeks and told her how proud I was of her. What brilliant madness had possessed her to live among Nazis? “They would never suspect a Jew would dare wander into their midst,” Dorota/Joanna said of her time in Berchtesgaden. “It was in the mouth of the wolf.” And yet, she carried on like normal, making friends, going dancing, doing her hair, cracking jokes. “In war, you act natural,” she shrugged. “Otherwise, you are suspicious.” Nearly five decades after the war, my mother’s conversion to Catholicism still wasn’t good enough for my father. I tried to reason with him about this after they split. “Jews are all communists. We wanted them to assimilate, but they were too good for us,” he spat at me. I was shocked; I had never heard him speak this way before. Still legally married to my mother, he had acquired a young Polish girlfriend, an immigrant

whom he had helped find a job and a place to live. She took an instant dislike to me. I was a Jew, and that was reason enough. So if my mother had been a closet Jew, my father had been a closet anti-Semite. I became estranged from him and grew closer to my mother. Over time, she accepted that I was Jewish and even admired me for embracing my Judaism. I celebrated the Jewish holidays and read every book I could about Jewish tradition, history and, in particular, the Holocaust. What I learned was horrific. Racked with guilt, I wanted to crawl back in time to undo all of my mother’s suffering. She had outlived the war but couldn’t un-live the anguish, burying it under layers of grit and resolve. Her pain had never stifled her love for me. I ached for the damaged woman whose life had been warped by tragedy, yet who nurtured me with every shred of her being. My mother became my hero, my champion, my North Star. As it turned out, Dorota/Joanna was a total badass who had practically mooned Hitler during the last few years of the war. There was a Jew, just four kilometres away from his summer headquarters, and he had no clue. I couldn’t be prouder to look like her. My mother passed away on May 27, 2009. Now, 12 years later, I’ve adopted a minimalist approach to beauty that I think she would be pleased with. The red nails are long gone, as is the fuchsia lip gloss. My hair is still red, but it’s long and left to its natural wave. I moisturize every day. New cafés and restaurants have sprung up where the Café de la Paix and the Coffee Mill stood. Holt’s is still there, along with other more affordable outlets. I love to rummage through the high-end schmattes, then go down the street to pick up something that fits me and my wallet. Every now and then, I buy a blouse and realize that it’s just like something my mother would wear. I feared looking like my mother, thinking I would somehow turn into her. But now I know I could do a lot worse. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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Bentgo’s sectioned, leak-proof containers are a dream for packed power salads. $32, amazon.ca.

HOW TO EAT SALAD FOR 30 DAYS AND NOT GET BORED

[ M O R N I N G G LO RY ]

A sweet start Growing up, I’d wake up to the smell of chocolate instead of bacon and start my day with a bowl of champorado, a Filipino rice porridge. It felt illegal to eat something so decadent for breakfast: soft glutinous rice swimming in chocolate soup, made by dissolving tablea (tablets of ground roasted cocoa beans) in boiling water, and topped with evaporated milk. Our recipe—find it on page 89—is inspired by the original, using oatmeal instead of rice. — Isabelle Docto

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

RECIPE, IRENE NGO. PRODUCED BY STEPHANIE HAN KIM. PHOTO, ERIK PUTZ. FOOD STYLING, ASHLEY DENTON. PROP STYLING, MADELEINE JOHARI.

page 50


food

LET’S HAVE A DRINK

SPIRITED AWAY Not drinking this month? Cocktail hour can live on with this delicious, zero-proof sparkler Recipe by CHRISTINE SISMONDO

The Rose Garden

THE ROSE GARDEN PRODUCED BY STEPHANIE HAN KIM. PHOTO, ERIK PUTZ. FOOD STYLING, ASHLEY DENTON. PROP STYLING, MADELEINE JOHARI.

This fresh and vibrant lowball is a great antidote to the mid-winter blues. It combines the floral notes of Ceder’s Pink Rose faux gin with honey and bright pink grapefruit, which, like all citrus, is at its peak this month. 1

small slice lemon peel

2

sprigs thyme

1

oz honey syrup✤

2

oz Ceder’s Pink Rose Distilled Non-Alcoholic Spirit✤✤

1

oz freshly squeezed pink grapefruit juice

2

oz soda water Dehydrated orange wheel, for garnish✤✤✤

1. In a rocks glass, gently muddle together lemon peel, 1 sprig thyme and honey syrup to coax out the citrus oils. Add Ceder’s and grapefruit juice and stir together, ensuring all honey syrup is incorporated in mixture. Add 1 oversized “king” ice cube

(or several regular-sized cubes) and top with soda water. Stir again briefly. Garnish with remaining sprig of thyme and dehydrated orange wheel. ✤ Heat one part honey with one part water in a saucepan set over low. When honey is fully incorporated into water, remove from heat. Let cool, and then refrigerate for up to 2 weeks. ✤✤ Don’t have Ceder’s on hand? Almost any non-alcoholic spirit will work. ✤✤✤ Preheat oven to 250F. Slice an orange and arrange slices on baking sheet. Bake, flipping once, for 2 to 3 hours.

WHAT A PAIR We asked wine pro Vidal Wu and beer sommelier Crystal Luxmore to play matchmaker for some of the recipes in this issue. Here are their tasty, zero-proof picks.

Le BockAle Berliner Sonne + Colourburst Citrus Chicken Salad, p 58 Crafted in Drummondville, Que., this wheat beer drinks like champagne, with a bready centre, lemony zing and tons of bubbles. It’ll accentuate the salad’s citrusy core and tease out its peppery accents. lebockale.com.

Libra Pilsner + Roasted Squash Salad with Marinated Bean Dressing, p 72 Made in Prince Edward Island by Upstreet Craft Brewing, Libra beers are full of flavour and surprisingly low in calories. This pilsner’s bright, herbal flavours will balance out the rich, roasted vegetables in the salad. drinklibra.ca.

Teetotaler Wines Sparkling Rosé + Smoked Trout Salad, p 88 A fresh, easygoing, Ontario-made sparkling rosé. Its rhubarb shrub, cranberry cocktail and earthy green pepper notes cut through the richness of smoked trout with a crash of salty sea spray. teetotalerwines.com.

Acid League Nightshade + Steak and Arugula Salad, p 79 Acid League’s Proxies evoke wine-like sensations in a food-friendly, zero-proof package. This rustic red has savoury notes of hibiscus, black olives and Rockets (the candy!) with plump tannins that pair perfectly with grilled steak. acidleague.com.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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Mika Bareket from Good Egg, a Toronto cookbook store and independent cookbook publisher, on the books she’s cooking from this year

A Cook’s Book by Nigel Slater (HarperCollins)

Filipinx by Angela Dimayuga and Ligaya Mishan (Abrams) I’m privileged to have experienced many food cultures in Toronto, but I’ve long felt that Filipino cuisine is underrepresented in the restaurant and cookbook worlds. It’s great to see several new books exploring this rich food culture. Filipinx focuses on the diaspora, a POV near and dear to my immigrant heart. Cooking is, after all, about adapting.

All Day Baking: Savoury, Not Sweet by Michael and Pippa James (Hardie Grant) I’m a retailer, so the post-holiday season is my time to bake. And while I have a sweet tooth, my craving for savoury is stronger. This book is going to be in heavy rotation this winter: Its Indian Vegetable Curry Pie and Root Vegetable Wellington recipes are beckoning me to the rolling pin.

want to see purple reign 2 Iover store shelves Ube is a purple yam from the Philippines that has a nutty, vanilla-like flavour when cooked. Ube ice cream was one of my favourite desserts growing up in Asia, but the flavour didn’t take off here until Filipino food businesses started featuring it. Now big brands like Trader Joe’s are trying to get in on its deliciousness. — Irene Ngo, Chatelaine food content director

3 The way I’m changing dining out

I want to let go of the impulse to always try somethe uncomfortable questions) to find restaurants and support the hell out of them. It helps that a

FOOD ILLUSTRATIONS, ISTOCK PHOTO. BAREKET PHOTO, COURTESY OF MIKA BAREKET. UBE COOKIE PHOTO, JEANNIE KIM/@JEANNIEATS.

I’ve been obsessed with Slater’s writing for years. He has a way of making every recipe, simple or complex, sound compelling. This new book feels extra-special: It’s chunky, offers loads of witty narrative and has lovely design details. Produced by CHANTAL BRAGANZA and STEPHANIE HAN KIM

Forget trend reports or resolutions: We’re excited about the future in food we make for ourselves. We asked six tastemakers about the books, tools, treats and habits that will change how they eat in 2022

OUR NEW YEAR IN FOOD

1 The cookbooks I’m cracking open


food Jennifer Pallian, blogger at foodess.com and food waste champion at Love Food Hate Waste Canada

4

PALLIAN PHOTO, COURTESY OF JENNIFER PALLIAN. O’BRADY PHOTO, STEPHANIE NORITZ. BRAGANZA PHOTO, COURTESY OF CHANTAL BRAGANZA. MINTZ PHOTO, JAIME HOGGE.

I’M GOING TO CUT DOWN ON KITCHEN WASTE— BY CUTTING DOWN ON MEAL PLANNING I plan three dinners a week. Any more and I inevitably have an evening when I don’t want to cook, plans change or I lose steam. Plus, what are you going to do with all the half-stalks of celery and leftover rice from seven planned meals? I freestyle the rest of the week’s dinners with those leftover bits and a list of simple go-tos: pasta, coconut Thai curry, frittata, veggie dal, quesadillas and bean soups. I can make them from pantry staples, and they accommodate straggling ingredients well. Or I just start over and build whatever’s left strategically into my next three-day meal plan. It totally minimizes waste.

The average Canadian wastes

79 kg of food a year—more than the U.S. or U.K.

KITCHEN NOTES

Haechandle hot pepper paste, $32, amazon.ca.

5. The kitchen project I want to master I’ve long wanted to make cheese buldak, a Korean dish of spicy barbecued chicken blanketed with cheese whose name literally translates to “fire chicken.” A local place used to make theirs with a crispy layer of rice. I sorely miss it. The cold nights of the new year are the ideal time to bring it back.

61% of food waste in Canada happens in household kitchens

6

Tara O’Brady, cookbook author and recipe developer

Cathrineholm casserole, $170, kookn.ca.

MY NEXT KITCHEN SPLURGE

A secondhand pan I was going to treat myself to a cast iron braiser but fell down the rabbit hole of vintage cookware instead. Many mid-century pots and pans still cook well if you take care of them. Also, they’re gorgeous—and you can find them for a steal if you’re willing to scour estate sales or thrift shops.

—Chantal Braganza, Chatelaine senior editor

thing new. Instead, I want to put in the effort (and ask with ethical labour practices as well as delicious food, good restaurant is always better than a new one.

Corey Mintz, journalist and author of The Next Supper: The End of Restaurants as We Knew Them, and What Comes After (PublicAffairs)

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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food

SALAD DAYS

We’re calling it: ’Tis winter salad season. Our January gift to you? Thirty recipes for plant-based, seafood and grilled-meat salads to fill up these weeks with colour, texture and flavour. Forget New Year’s–resolution food; this is a month’s worth of vibrant, filling, cold-weather crunch you’ll want to return to year-round Recipes by IRENE NGO Produced by STEPHANIE HAN KIM, SUN NGO and AIMEE NISHITOBA Photography by ERIK PUTZ and CHRISTIE VUONG Food styling by ASHLEY DENTON Prop styling by MADELEINE JOHARI

CHICKEN P 51–58

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2622

VEGETARIAN P 59–63

VEGAN P 68–32

STEAK + PORK P 33–80

SEAFOOD P 81–89


CHICKEN The key to making this go-to entrée-salad protein sing: dressing it up with grains, fruit and roasted veg

Chicken Salad with Peanut Butter and Curry Dressing P 57

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food

SALAD DAYS

Warm Chicken and Farro Caprese Salad P 57

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food

SALAD DAYS

Rotisserie Chicken Winter Cobb Salad with Crispy Chicken Skin P 57

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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food

SALAD DAYS

Winter Waldorf Salad P 57

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SALAD DAYS

Colourburst Citrus Chicken Salad P 58

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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food

SALAD DAYS

Chicken, Pear and Roasted Parsnip Salad P 58

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food Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 35 min 1

large sweet potato, peeled and cut in 1-in. cubes

1

tbsp olive oil

1/2 1

Chicken Salad with Peanut Butter and Curry Dressing

900-g rotisserie chicken cup mayonnaise

Warm Chicken and Farro Caprese Salad

1/4

cup 2% plain Greek yogurt

1

tbsp lemon juice

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 35 min

2

tbsp finely chopped chives

8

cups chopped romaine lettuce

225

g farro

4

soft-boiled eggs, halved

1/2

cup white vinegar

¼

cup balsamic vinegar

1

¼

cup granulated sugar

¼

cup extra-virgin olive oil

pint cherry tomatoes, halved

1

tsp salt

2

shallots, thinly sliced

4

tsp honey

1

head iceberg lettuce, cut in four 1-in.-thick slices

1

tbsp Italian seasoning blend, such as Club House

4

4 2 2

small cooked chicken breasts, cut in bite-sized cubes mini cucumbers, thinly sliced

mangoes, peeled and thinly sliced tbsp smooth natural peanut butter

2

tbsp yellow curry paste

2

tbsp canola oil

2

tsp sesame oil

1½ 1

cups cilantro leaves red chili pepper, sliced (optional)

1. Combine vinegar, sugar and salt in a small saucepan set over high. Boil until sugar dissolves. Add shallots. Boil for 1 min. Set aside for 15 min. 2 . Meanwhile, lay iceberg slices on serving dishes. Top with chicken, cucumbers and mango slices. 3. Using a fork, remove shallots from vinegar mixture and arrange over salad. 4. Whisk peanut butter, curry paste and oils into vinegar mixture until combined. Drizzle over salad. Sprinkle with cilantro and chili pepper. Kitchen tip In this recipe, you pickle the shallots in the vinegar mixture, and then use the pickling liquid to make your salad dressing.

1/2

tsp salt

1

shallot, thinly sliced

2

pints multicoloured cherry tomatoes, halved

2

250-g balls fresh mozzarella, roughly torn

4 1

small cooked chicken breasts, sliced cup basil leaves

1. Cook farro following package instructions. 2 . Whisk vinegar with oil, honey, seasoning blend and salt in a bowl until combined. Stir in shallot. Set aside. 3. Drain farro, and then add to dressing along with tomatoes. Season with pepper. Stir to combine. 4. Divide warm farro mixture among plates. Top with mozzarella and chicken. Season with pepper. Sprinkle with basil.

Rotisserie Chicken Winter Cobb Salad with Crispy Chicken Skin

1/4

To cook bacon: Lay strips flat on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake at 400F until crispy, 15 to 20 min.

tsp salt, divided

1/4

Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 25 min

SALAD DAYS

Winter Waldorf Salad

cup crumbled feta cheese

1. Position racks in lower third and centre of oven and preheat to 450F. 2. Toss sweet potato with oil and 1/4 tsp salt on a large baking sheet. Roast in the centre of oven until potato is forktender and golden-brown, 12 to 14 min. 3. Meanwhile, remove chicken skin from rotisserie chicken. Trim and discard excess fat from skin, and then lay skin flat on a baking sheet. Bake in lower third of oven until crisp, 5 to 6 min. Set aside. 4. Meanwhile, debone chicken legs and shred leg meat. Slice breast meat. 5. Stir mayonnaise with yogurt, 2 tbsp water, lemon juice, chives and remaining 1/4 tsp salt in a large bowl. Season with pepper. Add chopped romaine lettuce and toss until coated. 6. Divide lettuce among 4 plates. Top with eggs, sweet potato, tomatoes, chicken and feta. Break chicken skin into smaller pieces and sprinkle overtop. Kitchen tip You can also cook your own chicken for this salad recipe. We rely on a seasoned rotisserie chicken to make the crispy skin extra-flavourful, but you can substitute the skin with crispy bacon if you’re not using rotisserie chicken.

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 30 min 4

celery stalks, cut in 2-in.- long pieces

3

cups seedless red grapes

1

large gala apple, cut in 1-in. wedges

1

tbsp olive oil

1/3 2 1 1/2

cup mayonnaise tbsp apple cider vinegar tsp Dijon mustard

1/4

cup finely chopped chives

1/4

cup finely chopped tarragon (optional)

1

142-g pkg baby kale

4

small cooked chicken breasts, cubed

1/2

cup walnuts or pecan halves, toasted

½

cup celery leaves (optional)

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat broiler. Toss celery, grapes and apple on a large baking sheet with oil. Season with pepper. Spread across sheet in a single layer. Roast until apple is just starting to brown, 8 to 10 min. Set aside and let mixture cool for 5 min. 2 . Meanwhile, whisk mayonnaise with vinegar and Dijon in a small bowl. Whisk in chives and tarragon. Season with pepper. 3. Arrange kale, celery, grapes and apple on a serving platter. Top with chicken. Drizzle with dressing. Sprinkle with walnuts and celery leaves.

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food

SALAD DAYS

1 1/2

Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 20 min Dressing 1/3

cup olive oil

3

tbsp lemon juice

2

tbsp Dijon mustard

1/3

tsp granulated sugar

Salad 1

142-g pkg baby arugula

4

small cooked chicken breasts, sliced

2

oranges, peeled and sliced in thin rounds

2

radishes, thinly sliced

2

shallots, thinly sliced

1

raw beet, thinly sliced

cup pepitas, toasted

1. Dressing: Whisk oil with lemon juice, Dijon and sugar in a medium bowl. Season with pepper. 2 . Salad: Arrange arugula on a platter. Scatter chicken, oranges, radishes, shallots, beet and avocado over arugula. Drizzle with dressing and sprinkle with pepitas. Kitchen tip If you have a mandoline, use it to safely and quickly slice your beet, radishes and shallots. (If you want to use multicoloured beets, use 2 small ones.) Otherwise, carefully slice them as thinly as you can with a sharp knife. Kitchen tip Use different varieties of in-season oranges, such as navel, cara cara or blood oranges, to make an even more colourful salad.

Colourburst Citrus Chicken Salad

Dressing

large ripe avocado, pitted and sliced

4 ways to cook

1/3

cup sherry vinegar

¼

cup olive oil

3

tbsp honey

2

tbsp thyme leaves

2

tsp Dijon mustard

¼

Chicken, Pear and Roasted Parsnip Salad Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 35 min Salad 4

parsnips (about 500 g), cut diagonally in 1/2-in.thick slices

1

tbsp olive oil

1

small head radicchio, roughly torn

4

cups spring mix

4

small cooked chicken breasts, shredded

1

large pear, thinly sliced

1

cup walnut halves, toasted

1/2

cup crumbled gorgonzola cheese

tsp salt

1. Salad: Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 400F. Toss parsnips with 1 tbsp oil on a baking sheet. Roast until tender-crisp, 20 to 25 min. 2 . Arrange radicchio and spring mix on a platter. Top with shredded chicken. Scatter parsnips, pear, walnuts and gorgonzola overtop. 3. Dressing: Whisk vinegar with ¼ cup oil, honey, thyme, Dijon and salt in a small bowl. Drizzle over salad just before serving. Kitchen tip We used a redskinned pear in this recipe, but feel free to substitute any variety you like.

chicken breasts

For each method, use 4 small skinless, boneless chicken breasts (about 200 g each). A chicken breast is cooked through when a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reaches 165F. For an easy, no-cook method, substitute store-bought rotisserie chicken have an ovenproof pan, transfer chicken to a baking sheet.)

Pan-frying

Roasting

Season chicken with salt and pepper. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high. Add 1 tbsp oil and then chicken breasts. Cook until bottom of chicken is golden-brown, about 3 min. Reduce heat to medium-low. Flip chicken. Cook, covered with a lid,

Season chicken with salt and pepper. Heat a large ovenproof frying pan over medium-high. Add 1 tbsp oil and then chicken breasts. Cook until just golden-brown, about 2 min per side. Transfer pan to a 450F oven. Roast until chicken is cooked through, 10 to 12 min. (If you don’t

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Poaching Boil 4 cups salted water or chicken broth in a large saucepan. Reduce heat to medium. Add chicken breasts. Gently poach, flipping halfway, until cooked through, 8 to 10 min.

CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

Grilling Preheat barbecue to medium. Brush chicken with 1 tbsp oil and season with salt and pepper. Oil grill. Barbecue chicken until grill-marked and cooked through, 5 to 6 min per side.

ICONS, ISTOCK PHOTO.

until bottom of chicken is golden-brown and cooked through, about 7 min.


food

SALAD DAYS

Meat makes way for mushrooms, jammy eggs and grilled cheese

Mushroom Salad with Fennel and Goat Cheese P 66

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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food

SALAD DAYS

Fresh Mozzarella and Clementine Panzanella P 66

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022


food

SALAD DAYS

Seared Halloumi and Fig Tabbouleh P 66

TIP Soaking the halloumi in water will reduce the saltiness of the cheese. Omit this step, if desired.

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food

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Creamy Bean and Sweet Potato Salad with Soft-Boiled Egg P 66

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food

SALAD DAYS

Greek Potato Salad with Roasted Red Peppers P 67

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food

SALAD DAYS

TIP You can also purchase pre-roasted beets instead of roasting your own.

Roasted Beet and Egg Salad with Rye Croutons P 67

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food

SALAD DAYS

Red Cabbage Steaks with Bulgur Salad P 67

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food

SALAD DAYS

plant-based fresh-mozzarellastyle cheese for the mozzarella.

Mushroom Salad with Fennel and Goat Cheese

Fresh Mozzarella and Clementine Panzanella

Serves 4 Prep 10 min; total 25 min

Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 25 min

3

tbsp butter, divided

1

demi-baguette, cubed (3 cups)

¼

cup white wine vinegar

¼

cup extra-virgin olive oil

227-g pkgs sliced cremini mushrooms

¼

cup clementine juice

3 1

garlic clove, minced

1

tbsp finely chopped sage

1/4

tsp salt, divided

3

tbsp canola oil

2

tsp lemon zest

Dressing

2 1/2

tsp honey tsp salt

Salad 4

Seared Halloumi and Fig Tabbouleh Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 45 min 1

250-g pkg halloumi cheese

½

shallot, very thinly sliced

1/3

cup lemon juice

1/2

cup coarse bulgur wheat

celery stalks, cut in 2-in. pieces

2

tbsp + 2 tsp olive oil, divided

tbsp lemon juice

2

tbsp olive oil, divided

1

tbsp honey

1/2

tsp Dijon mustard

1

tsp lemon zest

fennel bulb, cored and thinly sliced, fronds reserved

demi-baguette, roughly torn

2

1/2

2

tsp sumac

cups chopped watercress (about 2 bunches)

1

tsp smoked paprika

4

cups packed parsley leaves (about 1 large bunch)

2

1 1/2 1/3

8

142-g pkg arugula 113-g pkg goat cheese, crumbled

4

cup finely chopped walnuts

2 ¾

1. Melt 1 tbsp butter in a large frying pan over medium-high. Add bread cubes. Toast, stirring often, for 3 to 4 min. Transfer to a plate. 2 . Return pan to heat. Add mushrooms. Cook, stirring often, until mushrooms are golden-brown, 10 to 12 min. Add remaining 2 tbsp butter, garlic, sage and 1/8 tsp salt. Stir to combine. 3. Whisk oil with lemon zest, juice, Dijon and remaining 1/8 tsp salt in a large bowl. Add fennel, arugula and croutons. Toss to coat. 4. Divide salad among 4 plates. Top with mushrooms, goat cheese and walnuts. Kitchen tip Make this recipe vegan by substituting canola oil for butter and a crumbly and sharp plant-based cheese for the goat cheese.

66

clementines, peeled and sliced into rounds 250-g balls fresh mozzarella, roughly torn

CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

2

cups coarsely chopped mint

1

pint cherry tomatoes, halved

6

black figs, quartered

cup pomegranate seeds

1. Position racks in centre and top third of oven and preheat broiler. 2 . Dressing: Whisk vinegar with oil, clementine juice, honey and salt in a medium bowl. Season with pepper. 3. Salad: Toss celery with 1 tbsp oil on a baking sheet. Broil in top third of oven for 5 min. Remove from oven; flip celery and push to 1 side of pan. Add torn baguette to other side of pan. Drizzle remaining 1 tbsp oil overtop. Broil in centre of oven until bread is toasted, 3 to 5 min. 4. Assemble watercress, clementines, mozzarella and pomegranate seeds on a platter. Top with celery and croutons. Drizzle dressing overtop. Kitchen tip Make this recipe vegan by substituting a

5. Divide tabbouleh among plates. Top with halloumi and figs. Sprinkle with pistachios and pomegranate seeds.

1/2

cup chopped pistachios

1/2

cup pomegranate seeds

1. Cut halloumi in half lengthwise, then cut into ½-in-thick slices. Soak halloumi in a medium bowl filled with cold water. Combine shallot with lemon juice in a large bowl. Set both aside for 20 min. 2 . Meanwhile, cook bulgur following package directions. Drain and rinse bulgur. 3. Whisk 2 tbsp oil with honey, lemon zest, sumac and paprika into shallot mixture. Add parsley, mint, tomatoes and bulgur. Toss to coat. 4. Pat halloumi slices very dry with towels. Heat a large nonstick frying pan over mediumhigh. Add remaining 2 tsp oil and then halloumi. Cook until golden, 2 to 3 min per side.

Creamy Bean and Sweet Potato Salad with Soft-Boiled Egg Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 25 min 1

large sweet potato, peeled and cut in 1-in. cubes

4

shallots, quartered

¼

cup + 1 tbsp olive oil, divided

1/2

tsp salt, divided

500

g green beans, trimmed

2

tbsp lemon juice

1

tbsp lemon zest

2

garlic cloves, minced

1/2

cup jarred roasted red peppers, drained and diced

1

113-g log plain goat cheese, crumbled

8

cups mixed baby greens

4

soft-boiled eggs

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 450F. 2 . Toss sweet potatoes and shallots with 1 tbsp oil and ¼ tsp salt on a baking sheet. Season with pepper. Roast, stirring halfway through cooking, until golden-brown, 12 to 14 min. 3. Meanwhile, bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Add beans. Boil until tendercrisp, 4 to 6 min. Drain and rinse immediately with cold water. Pat dry. 4. Whisk lemon juice with zest, garlic and remaining ¼ tsp salt in a large bowl. Whisk in remaining ¼ cup oil. Stir in red pepper and goat


food cheese. Add beans and toss to evenly coat. 5. Divide greens among plates. Top with green-bean mixture and roasted vegetables. Peel eggs. Place an egg over each portion and slice open with a knife. Season with pepper.

vegan by omitting feta or substituting a plant-based feta-style cheese.

Roasted Beet and Egg Salad with Rye Croutons

beets, and then cut each into quarters. Arrange beets, eggs, croutons and pickled shallots over greens. 6. Stir sour cream with dill, chives, horseradish and remaining ¼ cup vinegar. Season with pepper. Drizzle dressing over salads. Sprinkle with more dill and chopped chives, if desired. Kitchen tip If you don’t have enough beet greens to make 6 cups, substitute or top up with spring mix.

Serves 4 Prep 25 min; total 55 min

Greek Potato Salad with Roasted Red Peppers Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 35 min 680

tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

3

tbsp lemon juice

1

garlic clove, minced

1

tsp dried Greek oregano

3/2

tsp salt

½

cup jarred roasted red peppers, drained and thinly sliced

3/4

cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained and thinly sliced

3/3 1 3/3

HOURGLASS ILLUSTRATION, ISTOCK PHOTO.

g mini yellow potatoes

3

cup pitted kalamata olives, halved 142-g pkg spring mix cup crumbled feta cheese

1. Add potatoes to a large pot of cold salted water. Bring to a boil and cook until tender, 15 min. Drain and run under cold water for 30 sec, until cool enough to handle but still warm. Halve or quarter larger potatoes and set aside. 2 . Whisk oil, lemon juice, garlic, oregano and salt in a large bowl. Stir in peppers, tomatoes and olives. 3. Add potatoes to dressing and toss to coat. Arrange spring mix on a platter. Top with warm potato mixture. Sprinkle with feta. Kitchen tip Make this recipe

1

kg small red or yellow beets with greens, washed

1

shallot, thinly sliced

½

cup seasoned rice vinegar, divided

4

cups roughly torn rye loaf or bread

1

tbsp olive oil

6

hard-boiled eggs, quartered

3/2

cup sour cream

Red Cabbage Steaks with Bulgur Salad

tbsp chopped dill

2

tbsp chopped chives

1

small red cabbage

1

tbsp prepared horseradish

4

tbsp olive oil, divided

1

tsp salt, divided

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 400F. 2 . Remove leaves from beets and set aside. Trim beets, then arrange in a single layer on a large piece of foil. Wrap to seal completely. Place foil packet on a baking sheet. Roast until fork-tender, 30 to 35 min. Carefully open foil packets and let stand until cool enough to handle. 3. Meanwhile, stir shallot with ¼ cup vinegar in a medium bowl. Set aside for 10 min. Toss bread with oil on same baking sheet. Spread in a single layer. Bake until toasted, 5 to 6 min. 4. Roughly tear beet leaves into bite-sized pieces and add to bowl with shallot. (You will ideally have about 6 cups.) Toss to coat. Divide greens among 4 plates. 5. Remove peels from cooled

3/2 5

tsp pepper tbsp apple cider vinegar, divided

3/2

cup dried green lentils

3/2

cup medium bulgur wheat

3/4

cup crumbled goat cheese

3/4

cup dried cherries

1 3/3

3. Roast for 20 min. Remove foil and flip cabbage steaks. Continue roasting, uncovered, until tender, 15 to 20 min more. 4. Meanwhile, combine 1 ½ cups water and lentils in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, for 10 min. Add bulgur. Return to a boil over high. Reduce heat to low and simmer until tender, 12 to 15 min more. Let stand, covered, for 5 min, and then fluff with a fork. Set aside to cool. 5. Stir goat cheese, cherries, thyme, remaining 2 tbsp vinegar, 2 tbsp oil and ½ tsp salt into bulgur mixture. Serve cabbage steaks with bulgur salad and top with pistachios. Kitchen tip Make this recipe vegan by omitting goat cheese or using a vegan alternative.

How to boil eggs

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 45 min

2

SALAD DAYS

tbsp chopped thyme cup chopped pistachios

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 400F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment. 2 . Cut cabbage from top to bottom through the core, making 4 slices, each about ¾ in. thick. (Reserve end pieces for another use.) Place cabbage steaks on prepared sheet. Brush both sides with 2 tbsp oil, then sprinkle with ½ tsp salt and pepper. Drizzle with 3 tbsp vinegar. Cover sheet tightly with foil.

The perfect boiled egg has never been simpler. What’s involved? An easy three-step process: boil, drain and rinse To start, carefully lower eggs into a pot of boiling water and set your timer. After the desired time, drain, and then rinse eggs in cold water (they’ll continue to cook otherwise, resulting in an overcooked yolk).

Soft-boiled eggs: 6 min Hard-boiled eggs: 12 min Egg-peeling tip: Fresh eggs are more difficult to peel. As eggs age, the shell starts to detach from the membrane, resulting in boiled eggs that are easier to slip from their shells.

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food

SALAD DAYS

Pulses, tofu and spicy cold noodles give these plant-based mains the perfect balance of crisp, cooked and carb-y

Roasted Chickpea Salad with Hot Harissa Dressing P 72

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section food

TKTKTK SALAD DAYS

TIP If you have some extra time, let the beans marinate longer for a more developed flavour.

Roasted Squash Salad with Marinated Bean Dressing P 72

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food section

SALAD TKDAYS

Sesame-Ginger Tofu Soba Noodle Salad P 72

TIP Frozen-thenthawed tofu takes on a light, chewy texture that soaks up soups and dressings well.

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food section

TKTKTK SALAD DAYS

Wheat Berry, Kale and Cranberry Salad P 72

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food section

SALAD TKDAYS

½ tsp salt in a large bowl. Add tomatoes, cucumbers, shallot, parsley and pomegranate seeds. Toss to coat. 5. Break pita into bite-sized pieces. Add pita, mint and warm roasted chickpeas to salad just before serving.

Roasted Chickpea Salad with Hot Harissa Dressing Serves 4 Prep 25 min; total 45 min 2

large pitas

3

tbsp olive oil, divided

1

540-mL can no-salt-added chickpeas, rinsed and drained well

1 1/2 1

tsp sumac, divided tsp smoked paprika

3/4

tsp salt, divided

1/4

cup extra-virgin olive oil

2

tbsp lemon juice

1

tsp harissa paste

1

garlic clove, minced

1 4

4

cups parsley leaves (about 1 large bunch)

1

cup pomegranate seeds

2

cups coarsely chopped mint

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 425F. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil. 2 . Slice each pita along the seams into 2 rounds. You will have 4 rounds total. Brush both sides of pitas with 1 tbsp olive oil and arrange on prepared sheet. Bake until golden and crisp, 5 to 8 min. Set pitas aside on a plate. 3. Toss chickpeas with remaining 2 tbsp olive oil, ½ tsp sumac, paprika and ¼ tsp salt on same sheet. Season with pepper. Roast, stirring chickpeas halfway, until crisp and golden-brown, 25 to 30 min. 4. Meanwhile, whisk extravirgin olive oil with lemon juice, harissa paste, garlic and remaining 1 tsp sumac and

2 . Cook noodles in a large pot of boiling water, following package directions but omitting salt, until tender, 4 min. Drain, then rinse under cold water to remove excess starch. 3. Stir maple syrup with vinegar, ginger, sesame seeds and sesame oil in a large bowl. Add tofu. Set aside. 4. Heat a large frying pan over medium. Add canola oil, and then garlic. Cook for 1 min. Add spinach, in batches if necessary, and cook until wilted, about 1 min. Stir in soy sauce. 5. Divide soba among 4 bowls. Top with spinach, cucumbers, carrots and tofu. Drizzle remaining dressing overtop. Sprinkle with green onions.

Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 35 min Marinated Beans 1/4

mini cucumbers, coarsely chopped small shallot, thinly sliced

72

Roasted Squash Salad with Marinated Bean Dressing

pint multicoloured cherry tomatoes, halved

1

3. Salad: Meanwhile, trim ends off squashes, and then cut in half lengthwise. Using a spoon, scoop out and discard seeds. Cut squash halves into ¾-in.-thick slices. Toss squash and onion with 2 tbsp oil, 1 tbsp maple syrup and ½ tsp salt on a large baking sheet until coated. Arrange in a single layer. 4. Roast until squash is goldenbrown, about 10 min per side. 5. Divide arugula among plates. Top with warm squash and onion. Drizzle with beans and dressing. Sprinkle with pepitas and pomegranate seeds.

cup sherry vinegar

3

tbsp olive oil

2

tbsp maple syrup

1

tsp Dijon mustard

1

tbsp thyme leaves

1

small shallot, finely chopped

1

garlic clove, minced

¼ 1

tsp salt 398-mL can navy beans, drained, rinsed and patted dry

Salad 2

delicata squashes, about 500 g each

Serves 4 Prep 25 min; total 30 min 1 180

454-g pkg medium tofu, drained g soba noodles (about two 1-in.-diameter bundles)

Wheat Berry, Kale and Cranberry Salad Serves 4 Prep 10 min; total 40 min 1

cup maple syrup

1/2

cup dried cranberries

¼

cup seasoned rice vinegar

1/3

cup extra-virgin olive oil

tbsp grated ginger

3

red onion, cut in 1-in. wedges

2

tbsp sesame seeds, toasted

1/2

2

tbsp olive oil

4

tsp sesame oil

1

tbsp maple syrup

2

tsp canola oil

tsp salt

4

garlic cloves, minced

1/2

142-g pkg baby arugula

1

142-g pkg baby spinach

1/4

cup unsalted raw pepitas

4

½

cup pomegranate seeds

tsp sodium-reduced soy sauce

3

mini cucumbers, cut in matchsticks

1

cup carrot matchsticks

2

green onions, thinly sliced

1

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 425F. 2 . Beans: Whisk vinegar with 3 tbsp oil, 2 tbsp maple syrup, Dijon, thyme, shallot, garlic and ¼ tsp salt in a medium bowl. Season with pepper. Stir in beans. Set aside for 20 min.

cup dried wheat berries

¼ 2

1

CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

Sesame-Ginger Tofu and Soba Noodle Salad

1. Cut tofu in half horizontally and then cut each piece into 1-in.-thick rectangles. Lay on a paper-towel-lined plate and set aside to drain.

tbsp balsamic vinegar tsp salt

5

cups chopped kale

1/2

cup diced red onion

1

yellow bell pepper, diced

1. Rinse wheat berries. Combine with 8 cups water in a pot. Bring to a boil over high. Reduce heat to medium-high and cook, covered, until tender, 30 to 35 min. Stir in cranberries in last 2 min of cooking. Drain and rinse with cold water. 2 . Whisk oil with vinegar and salt in a large bowl. Season with pepper. Stir in wheat berry mixture, kale, onion and bell pepper.


food

SALAD DAYS

Warm dressings and hearty ingredients steer these fully-loaded salads into comfort-food territory

Steak and Potato Salad with Horseradish Dressing P 79

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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food

SALAD DAYS

Steak and Arugula Salad with Warm Tomato Dressing P 79

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food

SALAD DAYS

Roasted Cabbage with Pork Larb Salad P 79

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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food

SALAD DAYS

Black Kale, Bacon and Roasted Tomato Panzanella P 79

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food

SALAD DAYS

TIP Tearing large mushrooms instead of chopping them ensures a crispy, craggy texture.

Winter Steak and Mushroom Salad P 80

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022 • CHATELAINE

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food

SALAD DAYS

Fig Salad with Warm Bacon Dressing P 80

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food

SALAD DAYS

Steak and Potato Salad with Horseradish Dressing

Steak and Arugula Salad with Warm Tomato Dressing

Roasted Cabbage with Pork Larb Salad

Black Kale, Bacon and Roasted Tomato Panzanella

Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 40 min

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 45 min

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 40 min

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 40 min

400

g baby potatoes, halved

400

g finger or mini sweet potatoes, cut in 3/4-in. rounds

1 3

red onion, cut in 1-in. wedges tbsp canola oil, divided

1

1-in. thick beef flank steak (about 500 g), at room temperature

6

tbsp olive oil, divided

1

tsp salt, divided

1/2 1

tsp pepper, divided medium sweet onion, thinly sliced

3/4

tsp salt, divided

1/2

cup sour cream

3

garlic cloves, minced

1/4

cup seasoned rice vinegar

3

tbsp sherry vinegar

2 2

tbsp prepared horseradish tbsp chopped dill

2

tbsp chopped parsley

2

1-in.-thick beef strip loin steaks (300 g each), at room temperature

1

1

142-g pkg baby spinach

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 450F. 2 . Toss potatoes, sweet potatoes and onion with 2 tbsp oil and ¼ tsp salt on a baking sheet. Spread in a single layer. 3. Bake, flipping vegetables halfway, until golden and tender, 20 to 25 min. 4. Meanwhile, stir sour cream with vinegar, horseradish, dill and parsley in a medium bowl. Season with pepper. 5. Sprinkle remaining ½ tsp salt over steaks. Season with pepper. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over high. Add remaining 1 tbsp oil, then steaks. Reduce heat to medium. Cook 3 to 4 min per side for mediumrare. Transfer steaks to plates and let rest, covered, for 5 min. 6. Arrange spinach on a platter. Top with potatoes, sweet potatoes and onion. Thinly slice steak and arrange on salad. Drizzle with dressing.

2 1/2 1

2

tbsp + 1 tsp canola oil, divided

1

head green cabbage (1 to 1.25 kg), cut in 8 wedges keeping core intact

1/4 2 1

Dressing 1/3

cup olive oil

¼

cup lemon juice

1

large garlic clove, minced

tsp salt

1

tsp Dijon mustard

454-g pkgs ground pork

1

tsp maple syrup

small red onion, finely chopped

1

tsp anchovy paste

¼

cup fish sauce

Salad

283-g pkg multicoloured cherry tomatoes

3

tbsp lime juice

8

strips thick-cut bacon

1

tbsp chili-garlic sauce

2

tsp grainy Dijon mustard

4

tsp packed brown sugar

255-g pkgs cherry tomatoes on the vine

tsp dried oregano

3

cups coarsely chopped cilantro leaves and stems

1

demi-baguette, roughly torn

1

cup coarsely chopped mint

8

4

mini cucumbers, cut into thin rounds

cups roughly torn black kale leaves

4

1

red chili pepper, thinly sliced (optional)

soft-boiled eggs, quartered

1

avocado, cut in wedges

142-g pkg baby arugula

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 250F. Rub each side of steak with 1 tbsp oil, and then ½ tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper, and place on a rack on a baking sheet. 2 . Roast until rare or until internal temperature reaches 110F, about 20 min. Remove from oven. 3. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a large frying pan over high. Sear steak until dark-brown, 1 to 2 min per side. Transfer to a plate. 4. Reduce heat to medium. Add 1 tbsp oil and onion to pan. Cook until onion is softened, about 3 min. Stir in garlic, vinegar and tomatoes. Cook until tomatoes burst, 2 to 3 min. 5. Whisk remaining 2 tbsp oil, remaining juices from steak plate, Dijon and oregano in a large bowl. Toss in tomato mixture and arugula to coat. Divide salad among plates and top with thinly sliced steak.

Lime wedges (optional)

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 425F. 2 . Rub 2 tbsp oil and salt all over cabbage wedges on a baking sheet. Arrange cut-side down. Season with pepper. Roast until tender and edges are golden, 20 to 25 min. 3. Meanwhile, heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high. Add remaining 1 tsp oil, and then pork and onion. Cook, stirring often, until no pink remains and mixture is dry, 7 to 10 min. Stir in fish sauce, lime juice, chili-garlic sauce and sugar. Cook for 1 min. 4. Divide hot cabbage wedges among 4 plates. Top with pork larb and sprinkle with cilantro, mint, cucumbers and chili pepper. Serve with lime wedges to squeeze over salad.

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 400F. Line a baking sheet with foil. 2 . Dressing: Whisk oil with lemon juice, garlic, Dijon, maple syrup and anchovy paste in a medium bowl. Set aside. 3. Salad: Arrange bacon in a single layer on 1 side of baking sheet; add tomatoes to other side. Bake for 10 min, flip, and continue baking until bacon starts to crisp and tomatoes are wrinkled, 5 to 8 more min. Transfer bacon and tomatoes to a paper-towel-lined plate. 4. Add bread to bacon fat in pan. Stir until fat absorbs. Bake, stirring halfway, until bread is toasted, 8 to 10 min. 5. Arrange kale on a platter. Roughly tear bacon. Top with bacon, croutons, eggs, tomatoes and avocado. Drizzle dressing overtop.

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SALAD DAYS

Winter Steak and Mushroom Salad Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 30 min 300

g oyster mushrooms

8

tbsp olive oil, divided

2

tbsp Italian-style bread crumbs

2

1 3/4

tbsp finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese tsp garlic powder tsp salt, divided

2

1-in.-thick beef strip loin steaks (300 g each), at room temperature

2

tbsp balsamic vinegar

1

tsp honey

½ 1

tsp Dijon mustard 142-g pkg baby arugula Shaved ParmigianoReggiano cheese (optional)

1. Position oven rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 425F. 2 . Tear mushrooms in half and toss with 3 tbsp oil on a baking sheet. Spread in a single layer. Sprinkle with bread crumbs and grated cheese. 3. Bake until mushrooms are golden, 10 to 12 min. 4. Meanwhile, sprinkle garlic powder and ½ tsp salt over steaks. Season with pepper. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over high. Add 1 tbsp oil, and then steaks. Reduce heat to medium. Cook for 3 to 4 min per side for mediumrare. Transfer steaks to plates and let rest, covered, for 5 min. 5. Whisk vinegar with honey, Dijon and remaining 4 tbsp oil and ¼ tsp salt in a small bowl. Season with pepper. 6. Thinly slice steak. Divide arugula among 4 dinner plates. Top with mushrooms and steak. Drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette. Garnish with shaved cheese.

Fig Salad with Warm Bacon Dressing Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 30 min 8

slices thick-cut bacon

1

shallot, thinly sliced

¼

cup red wine vinegar

4

tsp honey

1

tsp Dijon mustard

1

small radicchio, leaves roughly torn (about 4 cups)

4

cups mixed greens

6

green or black figs, quartered

2

170-g pkg blackberries

½

cup chopped walnuts, toasted

½

cup crumbled blue cheese

1. Arrange bacon in a single layer in a large non-stick

frying pan. Set over medium. Cook bacon until it is just starting to crisp, 6 to 7 min per side. Transfer bacon to a paper-towel-lined plate and set aside to cool. While still liquid, pour leftover bacon fat into a small measuring cup. Discard all but ¼ cup of the fat or reserve for another use (add enough canola oil to make ¼ cup if you don’t have enough). Return fat to pan. 2 . Reduce heat to low. Add shallot to reserved bacon fat in pan. Cook, stirring occasionally, until shallot is softened but not translucent, about 2 min. Stir in vinegar, honey and Dijon until combined. Season with pepper. 3. Roughly tear cooled cooked bacon. Arrange torn radicchio, mixed greens, torn bacon and quartered figs on a large serving platter. Drizzle dressing overtop while still warm, and then sprinkle blackberries, walnuts and cheese overtop.

Liquid gold Vinegar brightens any salad—but not all vinegars work the same way. A guide to three faves

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CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

is ideal if you want a dressing that’s lighter in colour, but substituting one for the other is generally fine.

Sherry vinegar Authentic sherry vinegar, made in southwestern Spain, also carries a protected designation: It’s made by naturally fermenting sherry wine, which is then aged in oak barrels for at least six months to give it a slight oaky flavour. Grocery store versions exist, though they’re not as readily available as balsamic. It won’t replicate the flavour, but red or white wine vinegar can be substituted in a pinch. Wine vinegar White and red wine vinegars are both made from wine. And just like drinking wines, red wine vinegar is often more robust, with a bolder flavour than its white counterpart. White wine vinegar has a slightly brighter, more delicate flavour. Wine vinegars are interchangeable in a pinch, as they have similar acidity levels.

ICON, ISTOCK PHOTO.

Balsamic vinegar Authentic balsamic vinegar has a protected designation of origin seal on its label, a guarantee that the vinegar is made in the traditional way in the Italian regions of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Specific grape varietals are crushed, cooked down until caramelized and aged in a series of barrels for a minimum of 12 years— sometimes up to 50. Over time, each barrel imparts its own flavour to the vinegar, which continues to thicken until it has a sweet, mellow flavour and a syrupy consistency. Some of the oldest vintages can even be poured on ice cream. Authentic balsamic vinegars can be pricey, but the grocery store stuff is fine for your daily salad needs—it’s made by boiling down a combination of wine vinegar and grape must (pressed juice from grapes and stems). White balsamic is milder and less sweet than classic balsamic. It’s mostly made the same way, but is cooked at a lower temperature to maintain its golden hue. White balsamic


food

SALAD DAYS

Pair the fruits of the sea with actual fruit— and herbs and lentils and mountains of parm

Seared Salmon with Lentil Salad P 88

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food

SALAD DAYS

Hot-Smoked Salmon Niçoise Salad P 88

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SALAD DAYS

Shrimp and Green Bean Salad P 88

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SALAD DAYS

Smoked Trout Salad with Horseradish P 88

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SALAD DAYS

Shrimp and Orange Salad with Roasted Broccolini P 88

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SALAD DAYS

Modern Tuna Cobb Salad P 89

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food

SALAD DAYS

Kale Caesar Salad with Tofu Croutons P 89

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SALAD DAYS

8

Seared Salmon with Lentil Salad

Hot-Smoked Salmon Niçoise Salad

Shrimp and Green Bean Salad

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 25 min

Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 55 min

Serves 4 Prep 25 min; total 35 min

4 3/4 2

skinless salmon fillets, about 700 g total tsp salt, divided tbsp + 2 tsp olive oil, divided

2

tbsp lemon juice

2

garlic cloves, minced

1

tsp sumac

300 g baby red potatoes, halved 4 1/2

Dressing

tbsp olive oil, divided

3

tbsp olive oil

tsp salt, divided

2

tbsp red wine vinegar

1

tbsp chopped oregano

1

garlic clove, minced

400 g green beans, trimmed 2

tsp lemon zest

1

tbsp lemon juice

1

tbsp Dijon mustard

2

tsp honey

2

cups trimmed green beans

Salad

½

tsp Dijon mustard

1

540-mL can lentils, drained and rinsed

1

shallot, finely chopped

1

2

340-g pkg frozen peeled raw shrimp, thawed

1

pint multicoloured cherry tomatoes, halved

tbsp coarsely chopped tarragon (optional)

4

6

radishes, quartered

cups thinly sliced romaine lettuce

4

cups loosely packed stemmed arugula

2

hot-smoked salmon fillets, each about 125 g

1

small red onion, thinly sliced

1

pint cherry tomatoes, halved

1

cup crumbled feta cheese

1/2

cup chopped mint

1/2

cup chopped parsley

1. Sprinkle salmon with 1/2 tsp salt. Season with pepper. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high. Add 2 tsp olive oil, and then salmon. Cook until underside of fillet is light-golden, 3 to 4 min. Turn fish over and continue cooking until a knife tip inserted in centre and held for 10 sec comes out warm, about 3 min more. Set aside. 2. Whisk lemon juice with garlic, sumac, Dijon and remaining 2 tbsp oil and ¼ tsp salt in a large bowl. Stir in lentils, cherry tomatoes, arugula, mint and parsley. Season with pepper. Toss to coat. 3. Arrange lentil mixture on a platter. Top with salmon.

88

1/3

cup niçoise or kalamata olives, pitted and halved

4

soft- or hard-boiled eggs, halved

1

pint cherry tomatoes, halved

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 425F. 2 . Toss potatoes with 1 tbsp olive oil and ¼ tsp salt on a baking sheet. Arrange cut-side down and roast for 15 min. 3. Push potatoes to side of sheet. Add green beans. Continue roasting until golden-brown, about 15 min more. 4. Whisk lemon zest and juice with Dijon, honey, shallot and 3 tbsp oil and ¼ tsp salt in a bowl. Whisk in tarragon. 5. Toss green beans in a bowl with half of dressing. Arrange on a platter. Add potatoes to same bowl and toss with 2 tbsp dressing. Arrange beside beans. Toss radishes with 1 tbsp dressing and add to platter. Arrange salmon, olives, eggs and tomatoes on platter. Season with pepper.

CHATELAINE • JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

1. Dressing: Whisk oil with vinegar, oregano and garlic in a large bowl until combined. Season with pepper. 2 . Boil a pot of water. Add green beans and shrimp. Cook until shrimp turns pink, about 3 min. Drain and rinse under cold water. Pat dry. 3. Add beans and shrimp to dressing, along with romaine and onion. Toss until coated. Top with tomatoes and feta.

mini potatoes

1/4

cup sour cream

3

tbsp lemon juice

2

tbsp mayonnaise

1 1/2

tbsp prepared horseradish

1

tsp poppy seeds (optional)

1/2

tsp salt

1/4

tsp pepper

6

cups coarsely torn watercress

1/2

fennel bulb, thinly sliced

1/4

cup parsley leaves

1/4

cup dill fronds

1/4

cup chopped chives, cut into 1-in. pieces

300 g hot-smoked trout 3

radishes, thinly sliced

1/2

cup pickled red onions

1. Cover potatoes with water in a small pot set over medium-high. Boil until just fork-tender, 8 to 10 min. Drain and let stand until cool enough to handle. Cut in half. 2 . Whisk sour cream with lemon juice, mayo, horseradish, poppy seeds, salt and pepper in a small bowl. 3. Combine watercress, fennel, parsley, dill, chives and potatoes in a large bowl. Drizzle with half of the dressing, tossing well to coat. Arrange salad mixture on a large platter. Top with large pieces of trout, radishes and pickled onions. Drizzle with remaining dressing. Season with pepper.

Shrimp and Orange Salad with Roasted Broccolini Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 20 min

Smoked Trout Salad with Horseradish Serves 4 Prep 20 min; total 30 min

Dressing 1/3

cup olive oil

1/3

cup white balsamic vinegar


food 4

tsp honey

1

tbsp Dijon mustard

1

tsp orange zest (optional)

1/2

tsp salt

oranges

250 g broccolini, thicker stems halved lengthwise 1

tbsp olive oil

1

large head radicchio, roughly torn, about 8 cups

1

1

cup crumbled gorgonzola or stilton cheese

2

tbsp finely chopped chives

1

tbsp lemon juice

¼

Salad 2

1/4

454-g pkg large frozen cooked shrimp, thawed and peeled pint cherry tomatoes, halved

1. Position rack in top third of oven and preheat broiler. 2. Dressing: Whisk 1/3 cup oil with vinegar, honey, Dijon, orange zest and salt in a medium bowl. Season with pepper. Set aside. 3. Salad: Slice a small piece off top and bottom of each orange. Slice off and discard remaining peel, including white pith. Slice oranges into rounds. 4. Toss broccolini with 1 tbsp oil on a large baking sheet. Broil until broccolini starts to brown, 3 to 4 min. 5. Meanwhile, arrange radicchio, oranges, shrimp and tomatoes on a large platter. Top with roasted broccolini. Drizzle dressing overtop. Season with pepper.

tsp pepper

Salad 8

cups baby spinach or arugula

1/2

350-g pkg silken tofu, drained

1/3

cup grated ParmigianoReggiano cheese

4

anchovy fillets, chopped

2

garlic cloves, chopped

2

tbsp lemon juice

2

tbsp olive oil

1

tsp Dijon mustard

85-g cans solid white tuna in oil, such as Rio Mare

1/2

tsp Worcestershire sauce

4

slices prosciutto, each sliced into 4 strips

1/8

tsp salt

1

pint multicoloured cherry tomatoes, halved

1

avocado, peeled and cut into thin wedges

Kale Caesar Salad with Tofu Croutons Serves 4 Prep 25 min; total 45 min

Modern Tuna Cobb Salad Serves 4 Prep 15 min; total 15 min

Dressing

4

1. Dressing: Stir mayo with sour cream, gorgonzola, chives, lemon juice, pepper and 2 tbsp water in a bowl. 2. Add spinach to dressing and toss until coated. Divide among 4 plates (or arrange on a platter). Top with tuna, prosciutto, tomatoes and avocado. Season with pepper. Kitchen tip Canned tuna packed in oil is more flavourful than tuna packed in water. And don’t waste that oil! Drizzle any leftovers onto the salad, or use it as a dip for crusty bread and serve alongside the salad.

Tofu Croutons 1

350-g pkg extra-firm tofu, cut into 1/2-in. cubes

Dressing

1

tbsp olive oil

1/4

cup mayonnaise

1/8

tsp salt

1/4

cup sour cream

1/2

cup panko bread crumbs

SALAD DAYS

Salad 1

large bunch green or purple kale

1/2

cup dried cherries or cranberries

1. Position rack in centre of oven and preheat to 400F. Line a baking sheet with foil. 2 . Tofu croutons: Toss extrafirm tofu with 1 tbsp oil and 1/8 tsp salt in a bowl. Season with pepper. Pour panko into a medium bowl. Toss tofu, in batches, in panko until completely coated, then arrange in a single layer on prepared sheet. 3. Bake until tofu cubes are crispy and golden-brown, 15 to 20 min. 4. Dressing: Meanwhile, combine silken tofu with cheese, anchovies, garlic, lemon juice, 2 tbsp oil, Dijon, Worcestershire and 1/8 tsp salt in a food processor or blender. Whirl until very smooth. Season with pepper. 5. Wash kale and pat dry with paper towels. Remove and discard stems and ribs. Tear kale leaves into small pieces, and then transfer to a large bowl. Using your hands, firmly massage and scrunch leaves to tenderize. Drain off any excess water. 6. Arrange kale on a platter. Drizzle dressing overtop and toss to coat. Sprinkle with cherries and tofu croutons. Season with pepper. Garnish with shaved ParmigianoReggiano, if desired.

Frome pag 46

Champorado (Filipino Chocolate Oatmeal) Serves 2 Prep 5 min; total 10 min 1

cup water or skim milk

1/3

cup quick oats

4

tsp granulated sugar

1

tbsp cocoa powder

¼

cup 18% cream or coconut milk

1. Combine water, oats, sugar and cocoa powder in a medium saucepan set over medium-high. Cook, stirring often, until thickened, 3 to 5 min. Scrape into a bowl. 2 . Drizzle with cream.

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one last thing

HUMOUR

Things my cat has actually said to me Because we can’t all have golden retrievers, okay? Written by LEAH RUMACK Illustration by LEEANDRA CIANCI

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MBLE SE

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D

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“Made you look. And yes, I’m wearing Always Discreet.”

CANA

Always Discreet Boutique Underwear. Fits close. Keeps you dry, too.


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