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HITECH EDITION

INTRODUCTION BY THADDEUS ARROYO, MEMBER OF THE HITEC BOARD OF DIRECTORS HITEC 100 LIST ›››››››››

MARTA DECRATEL FROM MORGAN STANLEY DISCUSSES NEW VISIONS

www.latinoleaders.com

A SUMMARY OF HACR’S STEM INITIATIVE REPORT

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JESSE CORTEZ HPE FOUNDATION LEADERS

HEALTHCARE SPECIAL TOP HOSPITALS LATINOS IN HEALTH 14

THADDEUS ARROYO 34

USHCC NEW LEADERSHIP

RAMIRO CAVAZOS A MAN WITH A MISSION: RESTORE THE IMAGE AND KEEP GROWING THE LARGEST BUSINESS ORGANIZATION FOR HISPANICS

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March / April 2019 Vol. 20 No. 2

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MARIA EUGENIA (MARU) FLORES

TOP LATINOS IN THE AUTO INDUSTRY


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CONTENTS

MARCH / APRIL 2019

FOLLOW US LatinoLeadersMagazine

8 COMERICA CORNER- ALPFA’s new President, Damian Rivera, chats about his new position as leader of one of the most important national organizations for Latinos. 14 HEALTH- An extensive coverage on stories of successful Latinos in health care. Includes the Top Hospitals for Latino list, stories on Hoy Health’s Mario Anglada, Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Patricio Gargollo, MyTelemedicine’s Rey Colon, and pain doctor Dr. Arnulfo Carrasco from San Antonio, Texas.

Dr. Patricio Gargollo

34 TECH- Technology is one industry where we continue to see Latinos thrive in. In this special, we debut the HITEC 100, HITEC’s list of the most important Latinos in tech companies. We also meet Marta Decatrel from Morgan Stanley who is one of HITEC’s 100. HPE Foundation allowed us a conversation with Jesse Cortez and Alessandra Ginante about their goals for the foundation. 44 AUTO- First time industry feature in Latino Leaders: a list of the Top Latinos in the Auto industry and a piece on Toyota’s efforts to provide information about vehicle safety. 48 RAMIRO CAVAZOS- One of our cover leaders. Ramiro Cavazos is the newly-appointed CEO and President of the USHCC. In our interview a few months ago, he shared a bit of his upbringing in the Texas Rio Grande Valley, his journey through school and his career experience.

Alessandra Ginante

54 SPOTLIGHT- Colombian author Ingrid Rojas Contreras left her country at age 14 with big dreams. She dreamed of becoming a journalist. As nomads, Rojas Contreras and her family were always on the move until she arrived to the U.S. with student visa. She began working on creating her dreams into reality. Through time, she discovered her gift for creative writing. Author of the popular novel “Fruit of the Drunken Tree”. IN EVERY EDITION: 4 Publisher’s Letter 6 Editor’s Letter 12 De la Vega on Leadership 13 Shafer’s Vault 56 Cellar

Shafer ONE POINT FIVE 2016

Ingrid Rojas Contreras

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PUBLISHERS

Publisher Jorge Ferraez

President and CEO Raul Ferraez

Director of Journalism Mariana Gutierrez Briones mariana@latinoleaders.com Administrative Director Lawrence Teodoro Editor Sarai Vega svega@latinoleaders.com Business Development Manager Cristina Gonzalez cristina@latinoleaders.com Art Director Fernando Izquierdo

TECHNOLOGY is driving the world and inventing the future. They say we tend to overestimate the immediate advances but severely underestimate the long-term ones. That also applies to the projection of Latino participation in many areas. Fortunately, enough there are several initiatives in many parts of the country where Latinos are leading and getting organized in areas like Technology, Telecommunications, Software Development, Avionics, and some others. The Hispanic IT Executive Council (HITEC), created not so long ago and grown for the last seven years by Andre Arbelaez is now entering a new chapter, under the leadership of both Guillermo Diaz, from Cisco Systems and Omar Duque, with distinguished members in their Board like Thaddeus Arroyo from AT&T Business, Ralph de la Vega and Jesse Cortez from HPE just to name a few. We have the privilege to be a strategic partner for HITEC and cover many of their important milestones. In this edition, we’re featuring some of those stories and a foreword from Thaddeus Arroyo, one of its pivotal supporters. We’re also publishing our sixth Latinos in Health edition, with an impressive collection of stories and profiles from those leaders doing very influential work. On it, you will find a list of Top Hospitals, some profiles of leading companies and new interesting ventures, like Mario Anglada from Hoy Health, an impressive new concept that is revolutionizing the PharmaceuticalHospital system. Also, one of the most important Hispanic organizations in the country; the USHCC has restarted its big journey to keep advancing the Latino businesses under a new Board and CEO; longtime business leader, and former CEO of the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce Ramiro Cavazos. We met with him and had a conversation on his new role and how is it being reestablished with new priorities and leadership style. For us, they chose a great leader, Ramiro seems to know very well what needs to be done and how to do it! We hope you enjoy this edition that has more than ten interviews with leaders, inspiring the future of our Community and our times!

Editorial Art & Design Carlos Cuevas Luis Enrique González Moisés Cervantes Human Resources Manager Susana Sanchez Administration and Bookkeeping Claudia García Bejarano Executive Assistant to the Publishers Liliana Morales Digital Media & Design Manager Mia Carrera mcarrera@latinoleaders.com Executive Assistant Kelly Argueta kelly@latinoleaders.com For advertising inquiries, please call 214-206-9587

Latino Leaders: The National Magazine of the Successful American Latino (ISSN 1529-3998) is published seven times annually by Ferraez Publications of America Corp., 11300 N. Central Expressway, Suite 300, Dallas, TX, 75243, March/April 2019. Subscription rates: In U.S. and possessions, one year $15.00. Checks payable to Ferraez Publications of America, 15443 Knoll Trail, Suite 210, 75248 Dallas, TX, USA. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Latino Leaders, 15443 Knoll Trail, Suite 210, 75248 Dallas, TX, USA.© 2001 by Ferraez Publications of America Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without the consent of Latino Leaders: The National Magazine of the Successful American Latino. The periodical’s name and logo, and the various titles and headings therein, are trademarks of Ferraez Publications of America Corp.

J&R Ferraez Member of The National Association of Hispanic Publications

Audited by Member of

Jorge Ferraez

Jorge Ferraez

Reg. # 283/01

MEMBER OF SRDS

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Latino Leaders The National Magazine of the Successful American Latino 11300 N. Central Expressway, Suite 300, Dallas, TX, 75243 Phone: 214-206-9587 / Fax: (214) 206-4970


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EDITORS

Another edition hot off the press! This second edition consists of stories, lists and research pieces on Health and Tech. Latinos from top hospitals like UT Southwestern, Cedars Sinai, and Medical City Plano/ Frisco and Latinos that develop breakthrough products to help the community. We’ve also incorporated the Tech section that includes pieces like Marta Decatrel story from Morgan Stanley, a research summary from the study developed by HACR on STEM, and a piece on HPE Foundation and the Latino leader on the board. COMING UP… Currently, our team is working on putting one of the most exciting editions. The Latina edition is next and we are working full-steam ahead and in collaboration with so many POWER Latinas. Latinas like Aleida Rios from BP, Alicia Abella from AT&T, Claudia Romo Edelman from We Are All Human, Monika Mantilla from USHCC Foundation and organizations like Technolochicas, Latinas Poderosas, and more! We also have another SPECIAL focused on Public Infrastructure. We will be talking to city leaders about plans, policies, and how technology is changing the spectrum. Be on the lookout. To finalize this note, I’d like to take the time to remind you that if you know of any leader -no matter the industry- willing to share their story with us, send us an email. We’d love to get know them! Take care, Sarai

SARAI VEGA TITLE: EDITOR AGE: 31 LIVES IN: DALLAS, TX

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COMERICA CORNER

ALPFA

DAMIAN RIVERA CEO

A day in New York City generally begins with a stroll to the subway with a hot cup of coffee in your hand and a newspaper under your arm. Not today. It is 9:31 a.m. on a peaceful Wednesday in mid-March, 2014, and suddenly everything is upside down and your perspective on life goes sideways. It’s a gas explosion and a bad one. Two large buildings in Spanish Harlem have been obliterated and the debris, the bodies, the smoke, the pain are etched into your psyche. Eight people are dead, several missing. And one person, in all this chaos, begins to challenge himself. 8 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

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HAT PERSON, who was not at the scene at the time, was Association for Latino Professionals for America Chief Executive Officer Damian Rivera. He lost a relative in the explosion and counts another as a near miss. One destroyed building housed the church he attended as a child. His life, to be honest, had been rolling along. A biochemistry engineering graduate from Rutgers University, Rivera had married his high school sweetheart, had a son and a daughter and was advancing in his career at Accenture (formerly Andersen Consulting), a place he felt was his second home. He had been there 21 years and didn’t mind the possibility that he would retire from there. He also served on the boards of several non-profit companies, waving off the idea that he would do that full time. Maybe later, he would say. The explosion changed all that. He took time off from Accenture and double-checked his priorities. That (with some nudges from his wife) pushed him into a Masters of Business Administration program at Columbia University. Before he knew it, ALPFA was wooing him to take over as CEO. He signed on in August 2018, taking the helm of the country’s largest Hispanic professional organization, dedicated to the advancement, retention and promotion of Latin leaders in corporate America. Life is about connections, learning, partnerships, giving back, says Rivera. The agency reaches out to corporations, like Comerica, and the corporations reach out to them. The agency takes the pulse of student needs and students, in turn, are the future of the agency. The company is focused on conventions – eight student symposiums a year, adding the Most Powerful Latinas Convention three years ago – a big hit – and hosting the annual convention every year. But now it is reaching for more. Rivera sees the conventions as launching pads. Pushing a six-pillar platform dedicated to a holistic embodiment of leadership survival skills, Rivera sees the agency as finding a purpose in between conventions. One handshake a year isn’t enough, he says. There is a legacy to uphold. Rivera speaks with resolve and focus. “It’s an immense responsibility to make sure I am helping the organization evolve to the next level,” he says, “so that it will continue long after I die.” “Because it’s too important for the organization to be successful. Because of what it means for our chapter leaders and our corporate sponsors, who are looking for the best talent across the spectrum.” “I take that extremely seriously,” he said. “I am very humbled by the fact that I was given this privilege.” Jessie Hilbert

Courtesy

Moisés Cervantes

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OVERVIEW OF THE LATINO BUSINESS SPEAKERS BUREAU

THE FOUNDERS launched the Latino Business Speakers Bureau (“The Bureau”) to fill the Latino speakers’ gap in business and to amplify the speakers’ voice throughout corporate America and beyond. The Bureau brings together business-oriented speakers and helps to elevate their voices and their currency. Our mission at the Bureau is to deliver proven, high-quality speakers to our clients, while we take these speakers on a journey of growth for our collective community. We are committed to shining the spotlight on them, growing their reach and impact, and making it easier for organizations to engage them for speaking opportunities aimed at motivating, inspiring and engaging leaders, employees and communities in the U.S. and around the world. The Bureau is the first of its kind, focusing on men and women business speakers who happen to be Hispanic and who have extensive experience leadingd at the highest levels in business or in corporate America. The speakers have expertise on business topics, and are exceptional at engaging audiences across the U.S., and beyond. The Bureau is a values-centered organization that is guided by the following core values: 1. Amplify the Latino leaders’ voice. 2. Unquestionable integrity and high ethics. 3. Service before self. 4. Collaborate, communicate, connect. 5. Commitment to excellence.

The Bureau was established to bring together Latino business speakers from all industries and generations who represent both our reality and our potential to speakto inspire and impactto audiences of all backgrounds and all sizes. One of our goals is to have 50% of Fortune 1000 companies invite our speakers to speak at their annual leadership sessions. And our speakers can address an array of topics: Do you need a speaker for your organization who can address Innovation or Artificial Intelligence? We have it. How about Culture, Leadership and Values? We have those too. We also have experts addressing generational diversity, multicultural diversity, and gender diversity, along with dozens of other trending topics. Send us an email or give us a call. We’re standing by to support your needs. info@latinobusinesspeakers.com (+52) 55 5658 1111

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DE LA VEGA ON LEADERSHIP

VISIONARY LEADERSHIP IN HEALTHCARE One of the most important traits of great leadership is vision: the ability to imagine a better future and find a way for one’s organization to get there.

A

few weeks ago, while attending a dinner during Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, I met one such visionary leader, this one from the medical field. He is Dr. Antonio de Lacy, a Spanish surgeon and professor whose c.v. lists advancements in laparoscopic surgery, among others. For the past five years Dr. de Lacy has been looking for a way to perform telemedicine in the true sense of the word. That is, in real time, without transmission delays. He finally found it in 5G wireless technology. As the latest evolution of wireless broadband, 5G provides faster download speeds and, most appealing to Dr. de Lacy, it reduces latency (or buffering time) to the single-digit millisecond range, which is virtual real time. The fact that 5G is not commercially available yet has not stopped Dr. de Lacy from exploring and then proving its potential value to the healthcare field (how’s that for having vision?). The proof was in the surgery He did that just a couple of days after our dinner. Sitting in a remote location and using a 5G video connection, Dr. de Lacy was able to assist a doctor performing surgery at a distant operating room. I must emphasize that while telemedicine is not new, the use of 5G for assisted surgery is. That’s because with 5G you have virtually no delay between the moment the operating surgeon makes an incision, the time when the remote specialized surgeon (Dr. de Lacy in this case) sees the incision on a video screen, and when the operating surgeon receives the specialist’s advice. We’re talking distance medicine at real time. Add to that the higher video resolution provided by 5G and you’ll begin to realize the potential that Dr. de Lacy envisioned, not just to provide expert guidance to surgeons

operating in remote locations but even to paramedics who can deliver treatment on the way to the hospital. Healthcare has made tremendous strides on its own over the years, especially when partnering with technology. The 5G example I’ve described is just one of the many applications that may be developed when visionary leaders from different fields put their heads together. At the cusp of change We are at the cusp a new wave of technological change. I’m reminded of a similar time not so long ago when 4G wireless technology first became available. Along with smartphones and great applications, 4G made it possible for a new crop of entrepreneurs to develop innovative business plans that resulted in innovative services (like ridesharing and vacation rentals) that by now have been widely accepted. With the upcoming launch of 5G, we are at similar point in time. Dr. de Lacy has shown us just one of the amazing ways this new technology is going to bring change. There will be others we can’t even foresee yet in healthcare and other fields. I’m incredibly excited about the change that will emerge once visionary leaders begin to think of ways to apply this technology to the way we live, work, play, and, of course, the way we get medical care. Ralph

To learn more about Dr. de Lacy’s telemedicine pilot using 5G please visit: https://healthmanagement.org/c/icu/issuearticle/5g-opens-thefuture-of-telesurgery

Ralph de la Vega is the former vice-chairman of AT&T Inc. He is the author of the best-selling book “Obstacles Welcome: Turn Adversity to Advantage in Business and Life.” He is also a LinkedIn Influencer, posting regularly on leadership and innovation. 12 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

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SHAFER'S VAULT

MEET ELIAS FERNANDEZ Elias Fernandez has been making wine at Shafer Vineyards in Napa Valley since 1984 and is a partner with Doug Shafer in Eighty Four Wines. He has been honored as winemaker of the year by Food & Wine magazine and honored as a Hispanic role model at the White House. For more details, visit ShaferVineyards.com and EightyFourWines.com.

BECOMING RELENTLESS IT WAS LIKE nothing I’d seen or experienced before. Being in our nation’s Capitol, meeting President George W. Bush, and being honored alongside people I admired, was deeply moving. As I soaked it all in, I took a moment to silently thank the people who got me there – my mentors. Growing up in Napa Valley in the 1970s, my first mentors were my parents. They were farmworkers, who worked in orchards and vineyards and acted as role models for a work ethic that keeps going no matter what. My mom pushed me to take that work ethic out of the vineyards and apply it to school. My high school track coach, Toby Wolf, also pushed me to do my best. Every time I was about to hit the bar he’d set for me, he raised it higher, expecting more. Eventually he named me captain of the track team because, as he told our team, “Some of you are more gifted runners but no one gives it the kind of effort Elias does.” In my senior year I got a memorable push from my math teacher, Gordon Anderson. In that last year of high school I was feeling the symptoms of “senior-itis,” a laziness that

overtakes those about to graduate. In my last quarter I planned to avoid a lot of things including an advanced mathematics course. My math teacher had other plans. He met me in the hallway one day and said, “I signed you up for that advanced math class; you need it.” Initially I was annoyed but later was grateful. That class laid the foundation for success in college, where my winemaking classes involved a lot of advanced math. Again, a mentor had taken the time to give me a push, to help me see that I could accomplish more. Just out of college I got my first job at Shafer Vineyards in Napa Valley. It was tough work as John Shafer, who founded the winery, his son Doug, who was the winemaker, and I, were learning how to grow grapes, make wine, run a cellar, and get the wine out into the marketplace. Those first ten years were the most challenging of my life. But I remember distinctly how, for example, I would arrive at the winery during bottling at 4:30 a.m. to work in the cellar and John Shafer was already in his office making sales calls to the East Coast, per-

forming the meticulous, nonstop work of lifting a wine brand off the ground. John was my boss but he was also a mentor. He expected a lot. But when you failed he didn’t make you feel like a loser, he expected you to use it as an opportunity to learn and improve. He was also good at celebrating your successes. He made you feel like part of a team that was growing, improving, getting it right. In the early 2000s when Shafer Vineyards was preparing to unveil a new wine, a Syrah, John and Doug Shafer secretly decided they were going to name the wine to honor me. They called it Relentless as they saw my approach as being relentless in the pursuit of wine quality. I appreciate every honor, like this, that I’ve ever received. But I don’t ever forget how I got here and who helped me along the way. When I was honored at the White House I was able to bring two guests. One was, naturally, my wife Stacey. The other was my mom, who from the very beginning pushed me to always be relentless.

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HEALTH CARE AND LATINOS In the following pages, we’ve dedicated a space to follow some of the top leaders and breakthrough talents in healthcare. These doers are actively working to provide Hispanics the proper leadership in healthcare and a voice for community. We continue to discover not only their stories, but what moves them. Carlos Cuevas

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HEALTH

TOP HOSPITALS FOR LATINOS

TOP HOSPITALS FOR LATINOS

A fundamental right for all should be the access to proper healthcare. For Hispanics, and other minority groups, language and cultural barriers influence the health of our group, more importantly the health of our own families. We have compiled a list of the top hospitals in seven categories. These seven categories reflect the areas where 1) Latino doctors are needed in and 2) where Hispanic-serving hospitals are also needed. Oncology: branch of medicine that specializes in the diagno- including the movement of material through the stomach and sis and treatment of cancer. It includes medical oncology, radia- intestine, the digestion and absorption of nutrients into the body, tion oncology, and surgical oncology.1 removal of waste from the system, and the function of the liver as a digestive organ.5 Womens: branch of medicine that focuses on the treatment Cardiology: branch of medicine that specializes in diagnosing and diagnosis of diseases and conditions that affect woman’s physical and emotional well-being. It includes gynecology, breast and treating diseases of the heart, blood vessels, and circulatocancer, mammography, menopause and hormone therapy, preg- ry system. These diseases include coronary artery disease, heart nancy and childbirth, and preventative care.2 rhythm problems, and heart failure.6 Childrens: Children’s health, or pediatrics, focuses on the Endocrinology: study of medicine that relates to the endowell-being of children from conception through adolescence. It crine system, which is the system that controls hormones. Endoincludes growth and development, injuries, behavioral and emo- crinologists treat people who suffer from hormonal imbalances, tional health, mental health, and illnesses.3 typically from glands in the endocrine system. It can include adrenal disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, pituitary disorders, thyroid Neurology: branch of medicine that deals with the anatomy, disorders, weight and metabolism, among others.7 functions, and organic disorders of the nerves and the nervous system. It includes cerebrovascular diseases, headache disorders, www.cancer.gov infections of the brain and peripheral nervous system, seizure dis- 1. 2. medlineplus.gov orders, neurodegenerative disorders, and speech and language 3. www.medicinenet.com 4. www.urmc.rochester.edu disorders.4 5. gi.org 6. www.cancer.gov

Gastroenterology: study of the normal function and diseas- 7. www.hormone.org es of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon and rectum, pancreas, gallbladder, bile ducts, and liver. It involves a detail understanding of the normal action of the gastrointestinal organs 16 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019


Oncology MD Anderson Cancer Center (University of Texas)

Houston, TX

Aside from serving one of the most diverse populations in the country’s fourth largest city, MD Anderson currently boasts a 654-bed cancer facility with over 27,700 admissions and has performed 8,656 annual inpatient and 10,281 outpatient surgeries. Its emergency room had 22,423 visits; a staggering number considering it is also a teaching hospital. Diversity is at the core of the mission as they serve a city with an estimated 90 languages spoken in Texas’ largest city. With pertinent information available in Spanish as well as four other languages, it has already acclimated to the changing face of the Houston.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

New York, NY

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center — the world’s oldest and largest private cancer center — has devoted more than 130 years to exceptional patient care, innovative research, and outstanding educational programs. Today, they are one of 50 National Cancer Institute–designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, with state-of-the-art science flourishing side by side with clinical studies and treatment. According to US News & World Report, Memorial Sloan Kettering has ranked as one of the top two hospitals for cancer care in the country for more than 25 years and among the nation’s top pediatric hospitals for cancer care.

Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN

Among the most notable on the list, the Mayo Clinic has locations across the country and sees more than 1 million patients a year including 8,000 international patients from 150 countries. The renowned hospital network has developed websites that provide comprehensive information for patients whose first language is Spanish and established an International Patients Office to help ensure that distance and language are not obstacles to receiving world-class care. It also offers minority health and wellness programs on: cancer prevention, healthy brain aging, community outreach, community-engaged research and others. Oncology at Mayo Clinic is one of the largest, most comprehensive cancer diagnosis and treatment programs in the world.

Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center

Boston, MA

Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center has a singular focus on conquering cancer and improving the way that cancer care is delivered throughout the world. Through the 12 specialized disease treatment centers, experts from one of the world's leading cancer institutes and one of the world's leading hospitals work together as one team to offer the most advanced treatments with the compassion and care that makes all the difference. Brigham and Women’s Hospital was formed in 1980 by the merger of three Boston hospitals – Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Robert Breck Brigham Hospital and Boston Hospital for Women.

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, OH

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. At Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center, part of the NCCN and NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, more than 450 highly skilled doctors, researchers, nurses and technicians care for thousands of patients each year. Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center unites clinicians and researchers in Taussig Cancer Institute and in Cleveland Clinic’s 26 other clinical and surgical institutes, as well as cancer specialists at our regional hospitals, health centers and at Cleveland Clinic Florida.

Seattle Cancer Alliance / University of Washington Medical Center

Seattle, WA

Set in Seattle, Washington, the decorated hospital is nationally ranked in 11 specialties. As part of the medical student curriculum, there are optional educational pathways concerned with underserved communities, including Hispanic, Indian, Global, and LGBTQ health. The medical students also engage in numerous service learning opportunities and student-run clinics as well as working with many of the undergraduate diversity programs on the UW campus. Organizations include the Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA), a medical school student group devoted to Latino students and serving the Latino population to name just one.

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Tampa, FL

As one of the leading cancer research and treatment facilities in the nation, the Tampa, Florida-based hospital is also serving one of the most diverse populations. Moffitt treats more than 300,000 patients with cancer from common to complex. Moffitt also belongs to a group of elite cancer centers. It is one of only 47 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the country and the only one based in Florida.Among the tools used to invest in diversity includes enhancing Moffitt’s image among underserved communities as an organization delivering cultural and linguistically competent care through prevention education and mutually beneficial partnerships and serving as a resource, as well as, to identify opportunities to increase Moffitt’s preparedness when serving diverse communities.

UCSF Medical Center

San Francisco, CA

City of Hope

Duarte, CA

UCSF is part of the 10-campus University of California, the world’s premier public research university system, and the only of its campuses dedicated to graduate and professional education. UCSF is recognized as one of the world’s greatest research universities, with a collaborative culture focused on understanding, preventing and treating disease. The UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center was the first center in the Bay Area to receive the prestigious designation of "comprehensive" from the National Cancer Institute. The center ranks first in California and sixth nationwide in National Cancer Institute research grants, and is home to pioneers in research into genetic, cellular and immune system causes and responses to cancer. City of Hope is an independent biomedical research and treatment center for cancer, diabetes and other lifethreatening diseases. Founded in 1913, City of Hope is a leader in bone marrow transplantation and immunotherapy such as CAR T cell therapy. City of Hope’s translational research and personalized treatment protocols advance care throughout the world. Human synthetic insulin and numerous breakthrough cancer drugs are based on technology developed at the institution. A National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center and a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, City of Hope is ranked one of America's "Best Hospitals" in cancer by U.S. News & World Report. Its main campus is located near Los Angeles, with additional locations throughout Southern California.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Phoenix, AZ

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) is a national, comprehensive cancer care network, with five hospitals around the country and a growing footprint of Outpatient Care Centers and other locations. Founded in 1988 on a personalized, patient-centered approach to cancer care, CTCA® is dedicated to tailoring a combination of cancer treatments to the needs of each individual patient. From advanced genomic testing to state-of-the-art technologies and evidence-informed supportive therapies that target cancer-related side effects, comprehensive services are delivered by a team of cancer experts, all under one roof. MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 17


HEALTH

TOP HOSPITALS FOR LATINOS

Gynecology

Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN

University of Michigan Hospital

Ann Arbor, MI

Johns Hopkins Hospital

Baltimore, MD

Arguably the most famous hospital in the nation, it has been the seminal example of medical achievement. It totals 1,194 licensed beds and 2,000 full-time physicians and has been ranked the best hospital in the country for 22 years. The Diversity Postdoctoral Alliance Committee (DPAC) was launched in February 2015 to create a clear, consistent voice for and to support the development of postdoctoral fellows and trainees who are African-American, Latino, Native American and Pacific Islanders. In patient care, many Latinos are beginning to tap the hospital’s health seminars and social services—three Spanish-speaking therapists are available at Johns Hopkins Bayview’s pediatric clinics.

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, OH

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Today, with nearly 1,400 beds on Cleveland Clinic main campus and 5,895 beds system-wide, Cleveland Clinic is one of the largest and most respected hospitals in the country. Cleveland Clinic sponsors one of the nation’s largest physician-graduate training programs. Doctors from around the world visit Cleveland Clinic for residency training in one of many specialty areas and for advanced fellowship work in more specialized disciplines.

UCSF Medical Center

San Francisco, CA

UCSF is part of the 10-campus University of California, the world’s premier public research university system, and the only of its campuses dedicated to graduate and professional education. UCSF is recognized as one of the world’s greatest research universities, with a collaborative culture focused on understanding, preventing and treating disease. UCSF Medical Center is recognized as one of the top hospitals in the nation for gynecological care. They treat the full spectrum of conditions including menopausal symptoms, pelvic pain, fibroids, incontinence, abnormal uterine bleeding, uterine myomata, abnormal pap smears, vulvar abnormalities, pediatric and adolescent gynecology disorders and menstrual complaints.

Stanford Hospital

Stanford, CA

Stanford University Medical Center is a medical complex which includes Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children's Health. It is consistently ranked as one of the best hospitals in the United States and serves as a teaching hospital for the Stanford University School of Medicine. Level-1 verification by the American College of Surgeons confirms that a hospital can provide comprehensive, round-the-clock care for patients with the most serious trauma injuries, from admission through rehabilitation and follow-up care. Stanford Hospital is the only hospital between San Francisco and San Jose verified as level-1 trauma center.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Nashville, TN

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) is one of the largest academic medical centers in the Southeast, and is the primary resource for specialty and primary care in hundreds of adult and pediatric specialties for patients throughout Tennessee and the Mid-South. The School of Medicine’s biomedical research program is among the nation’s top 10 in terms of National Institutes of Health peer review funding, receiving more than $500 million in public and private awards during 2016. The Medical Center is the region’s locus of postgraduate medical education, with over 1,000 residents and fellows training in more than 100 specialty areas.

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MA

Massachusetts General Hospital has been ranked among the top five hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report ever since the rankings began. Mass General is recognized as #4 out of nearly 5,000 hospitals considered in the ranking. Mass General is the only hospital ranked in all 16 specialties considered by U.S. News & World Report, a testament to the breadth and depth of our expertise. Mass General has the largest hospital-based research program in the United States. The brightest minds in medicine collaborate on behalf of the patients to bridge innovative science with state-of-the-art clinical medicine.

UW Health

Madison, WI

UW Health is the integrated health system of the University of Wisconsin-Madison serving more than 600,000 patients each year in the Upper Midwest and beyond with approximately 1,500 physicians and 16,500 staff at six hospitals and more than 80 outpatient sites. UW Health is governed by the UW Hospitals and Clinics Authority and partners with UW School of Medicine and Public Health to fulfill their patient care, research, education and community service missions. University Hospital, a 505-bed regional referral center that is home to a Level One adult and pediatric trauma center.

Scripps Memorial Hospital-La Jolla

La Jolla, CA

Scripps Health is a $2.9 billion private, nonprofit, integrated health system in San Diego, California that is ranked among the top 15 health systems in the nation. Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla shares a campus with many physician offices and medical buildings, including the Barbey Family Emergency and Trauma Center, the renowned Prebys Cardiovascular Institute and Scripps Clinic’s John R. Anderson V Medical Pavilion. They are also home to notable specialty programs, including cancer care, heart surgery, orthopedic surgery, labor and delivery services (including a Level III neonatal intensive care unit) and a nationally designated Comprehensive Stroke Center.

18 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

Among the most notable on the list, the Mayo Clinic has locations across the country and sees more than 1 million patients a year including 8,000 international patients from 150 countries. The renowned hospital network has developed websites that provide comprehensive information for patients whose first language is Spanish and established an International Patients Office to help ensure that distance and language are not obstacles to receiving world-class care. Women's health services at Mayo Clinic consist of comprehensive consultations and advanced diagnostic and treatment options. Women's health doctors coordinate their efforts with related specialists and provide referrals as needed. They also coordinate your care with your local doctor. Michigan Medicine is home to one of the largest health care complexes in the world. It has been the site of many groundbreaking medical and technological advancements since the Medical School first opened in 1850. According to U.S. News and World Report, Michigan Medicine is among the best in the nation in a broad range of adult and pediatric specialties. Michigan Medicine is one of the largest hospitals in Michigan and a premier academic medical center made up of U-M Health System, University of Michigan Medical School and its University of Michigan Medical Group practice, one of the nation's largest biomedical research communities, and Michigan Health Corp.


Childrens AdventHealth for Children

Orlando, FL

AdventHealth for Children, formerly Florida Hospital for Children, provides patients and families with an extraordinary neonatal care network through a world-class team of physicians, surgeons, nurses and support staff in extraordinary facilities throughout Central Florida. The Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) combine state-of-the art technology, soothing baby-friendly environments and a comprehensive range of specialty services to provide the highest level of care to the tiniest patients. AdventHealth for Children is the first hospital system in the nation to use the Draeger Babyleo TN500 IncuWarmer.

Advocate Children's Hospital

Oak Lawn, IL

Advocate Children’s Hospital has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the Nation’s Best Children's Hospitals for pediatric cardiology and heart surgery, and many physicians on staff here have been recognized among the Top Doctors regionally and nationally in their field. They are also the first children's hospital in the country to receive congenital heart disease accreditation from ACE (Accreditation for Cardiovascular Excellence) for setting the highest standards of quality care for children. The Center for Fetal Care at Advocate Children's Hospital combines world-class experts with the most advanced detection and treatment available.

Akron Children's Hospital

Akron, OH

Akron Children's Hospital is ranked among the best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. And to ensure families have convenient access to the pediatric care, Akron has 2 hospitals in northeast Ohio and more than 60 urgent, primary and specialty care locations. We also partner with other health systems to bring our neonatal and pediatric expertise to patients in their community hospitals.

American Family Children's Hospital

Madison, WI

The American Family Children’s Hospital is a beautiful, world-class children’s medical and surgical center with a pediatric intensive care unit, a widely recognized transplant surgery program, a children’s cancer centerand a family-friendly atmosphere. In 2014, American Family Children’s Hospital became the first in the world to use cutting-edge technology that reduces – by up to 50 percent – exposure to radiation for children who require catheterization, electrophysiology studies or other invasive heart procedures.

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Chicago, IL

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago (formerly Children's Memorial Hospital) is a nationally ranked pediatric specialty hospital based in Chicago, Illinois. The Heart Center at Lurie Children’s, the region's largest children's heart center, brings the spectrum of cardiac specialists together to care for patients with the most complex and serious heart conditions throughout their lifespans — from before birth, through childhood and into adulthood.

Arkansas Children's

Little Rock, AK

Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH) is a pediatric hospital with a Level I Trauma Center, that’s located in Little Rock, Arkansas. It is among the largest pediatric hospitals in the United States and serves children from birth to age 21. ACH is affiliated with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and is a teaching hospital with the UAMS College of Medicine's Department of Pediatrics. The nationally recognized Level 1 Trauma Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock, Arkansas, is the only Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in the state of Arkansas.

Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children

Orlando, FL

At Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children you’ll enjoy the most advanced technology, Central Florida’s only pediatric Level One Trauma Center and ED. You can be assured of the high quality of care in a hospital that meets the gold standard in nursing: The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®. Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and Orlando Health Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies has joined the ranks of fewer than 400 out of a potential 6,000 U.S. healthcare organizations to be recognized with this honor.

Boston Children's Hospital

Boston, MD

Boston Children's Hospital is a 404-bed comprehensive center for pediatric health care. As one of the largest pediatric medical centers in the United States, Boston Children's offers a complete range of health care services for children from birth through 21 years of age. As the world’s largest, oldest and most experienced neurology and neurosurgery departments, their team treats more nervous system conditions than any other pediatric program in the world. "

Brenner Children's Hospital

Winston Salem, NC

Brenner Children's Hospital provides care to patients from birth to age 18 and is staffed by more than 120 full-time pediatric faculty members representing more than 30 areas of expertise, as well as all pediatric surgical specialties. Brenner Children's Hospital has its own Emergency Department, including the first Level I Pediatric Trauma Care unit in North Carolina. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Brenner Children’s Hospital is one of the largest and most comprehensive intensive care nurseries in North Carolina. Brenner's neonatologists work with a team of more than 120 multidisciplinary pediatric specialists.

Children's Hospital

Dallas, TX

Children's Health in Dallas is the leading pediatric health care system in North Texas, the eighth largest pediatric health care provider in the nation, and the second busiest in terms of admissions and pediatric Emergency Department visits. For more than 100 years, Children’s Health has been making life better for children across North Texas. With two full-service hospitals and one specialty hospital, 18 specialty centers and a primary care practice, we provide an expanded breadth and depth of care and meet patients where they live, learn and play within their communities. We are the only academic health care facility in North Texas dedicated exclusively to the comprehensive care of children. Children’s Health is the primary pediatric teaching facility for The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern performs transformative biomedical research with a dedicated team of world-class researchers. Children’s Medical Center Dallas, the system’s flagship hospital, has once again been recognized among the nation’s best pediatric hospitals by U.S. News & World Report for 2018-2019. Children’s Medical Center is the only hospital in North Texas ranked in all 10 pediatric specialties in the annual Best Children’s Hospital report, which is based on patient treatment outcomes. MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 19


HEALTH

TOP HOSPITALS FOR LATINOS

Neurology

Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN

The Mayo Clinic Department of Neurology is one of the largest and most comprehensive neurological practices in the world. It includes more than 200 subspecialized experts trained in epilepsy, movement disorders, dementias and other cognitive conditions, stroke and cerebrovascular diseases, neurooncology, multiple sclerosis and demyelinating disorders, autoimmune neurology, pediatric neurology, neurophysiology, headache, neuromuscular diseases, peripheral nerve, sleep neurology, and speech pathology.

Johns Hopkins Hospital

Baltimore, MD

Arguably the most famous hospital in the nation, it has been the seminal example of medical achievement. It totals 1,194 licensed beds and 2,000 full-time physicians and has been ranked the best hospital in the country for 22 years. The Diversity Postdoctoral Alliance Committee (DPAC) was launched in February 2015 to create a clear, consistent voice for and to support the development of postdoctoral fellows and trainees who are African-American, Latino, Native American and Pacific Islanders. In patient care, many Latinos are beginning to tap the hospital’s health seminars and social services—three Spanish-speaking therapists are available at Johns Hopkins Bayview’s pediatric clinics.

UCSF Medical Center

San Francisco, CA

UCSF is part of the 10-campus University of California, the world’s premier public research university system, and the only of its campuses dedicated to graduate and professional education. UCSF stands as one of the principal economic engines in San Francisco and the nine-county Bay Area, generating 43K jobs, $8.9B impact, and 24,140 employees. Specialists in the Neurology Clinic are leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of disorders, from cerebrovascular disease to headaches to nerve injuries. Patients may undergo a comprehensive evaluation in the Neurology Clinic before being referred to a neurological expert who specializes in a specific condition.

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, OH

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Today, with nearly 1,400 beds on Cleveland Clinic main campus and 5,895 beds system-wide, Cleveland Clinic is one of the largest and most respected hospitals in the country. Doctors from around the world visit Cleveland Clinic for residency training in one of many specialty areas and for advanced fellowship work in more specialized disciplines. Cleveland Clinic's Neurological Institute includes more than 300 medical, surgical and research specialists dedicated to the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders.

New York Presbyterian Hospital - Columbia

New York, NY

NewYork-Presbyterian is one of the nation’s most comprehensive, integrated academic health care delivery systems, dedicated to providing the highest quality, most compassionate care and service to patients in the New York metropolitan area, nationally, and throughout the globe. In collaboration with two renowned medical schools, Weill Cornell Medicine and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, NewYork-Presbyterian is consistently recognized as a leader in medical education, groundbreaking research, and innovative, patientcentered clinical care. NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia is internationally renowned for its cardiac programs – offering the latest interventional therapies and pioneering cardiac surgery expertise, including heart transplant.

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MD

Massachusetts General Hospital has been ranked among the top five hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report ever since the rankings began. Mass General is recognized as #4 out of nearly 5,000 hospitals considered in the ranking. Mass General is the only hospital ranked in all 16 specialties considered by U.S. News & World Report, a testament to the breadth and depth of our expertise. Mass General has the largest hospital-based research program in the United States. The brightest minds in medicine collaborate on behalf of the patients to bridge innovative science with state-of-the-art clinical medicine.

Barnes-Jewish Hospital

St. Louis, MO

Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University Medical Center is the largest hospital in Missouri and the largest private employer in the St. Louis region. An affiliated teaching hospital of Washington University School of Medicine, Barnes-Jewish Hospital has a 1,800 member medical staff with many who are recognized as "Best Doctors in America." They are supported by residents, interns and fellows, in addition to nurses, technicians and other health-care professionals. Barnes-Jewish was ranked nationally in all 12 data-driven specialties and received the highest rating in 8 common care procedures.

Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Chicago, IL

Northwestern Memorial Hospital is an academic medical center in the heart of downtown Chicago with physicians, surgeons and caregivers representing nearly every medical specialty. Northwestern Memorial has also earned Magnet® recognition*, the gold-standard for nursing excellence from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. It is the flagship campus for Northwestern Medicine and the primary teaching hospital for Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. Nearly every medical specialty is represented by over 1,900 physicians on the medical staff at Northwestern Memorial who also carry faculty appointments with Feinberg School of Medicine.

University of Michigan Hospital

Arbor Ann, MI

Michigan Medicine is home to one of the largest health care complexes in the world. It has been the site of many groundbreaking medical and technological advancements since the Medical School first opened in 1850.They've earned national recognition from other hospital-quality organizations, too. Michigan Medicine is one of the largest hospitals in Michigan and a premier academic medical center made up of U-M Health System, University of Michigan Medical School and its University of Michigan Medical Group practice, one of the nation's largest biomedical research communities, and Michigan Health Corp.

UCLA Medical Center

Los Angeles, CA

With California being home a number of top ranked hospitals, the need to reach the increasingly Hispanic population is more pressing than ever. It is even nationally ranked in 15 adult specialties and 10 children’s specialties. Among institution-wide goals of the UCLA Heath System is promote recruitment, retention, professional excellence, and overall well-being among underrepresented residents, fellows, and faculty and enhance departmental cultural awareness and sensitivity to enrich the services we provide to the diverse communities represented by patients.

20 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019


Gastroenterology Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN

Among the most notable on the list, the Mayo Clinic has locations across the country and sees more than 1 million patients a year including 8,000 international patients from 150 countries. The renowned hospital network has developed websites that provide comprehensive information for patients whose first language is Spanish and established an International Patients Office to help ensure that distance and language are not obstacles to receiving world-class care. With 13 specialty groups and more than 140 digestive disease specialists on staff, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo Clinic is one of the largest and most deeply experienced in the world.

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, OH

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Today, with nearly 1,400 beds on Cleveland Clinic main campus and 5,895 beds systemwide, Cleveland Clinic is one of the largest and most respected hospitals in the country. Doctors from around the world visit Cleveland Clinic for residency training in one of many specialty areas and for advanced fellowship work in more specialized disciplines. Cleveland Clinic’s Digestive Disease & Surgery Institute (DDSI) provides patients with the most advanced level of medical and surgical care, primarily focused on the safe and proven treatment of disorders related to the gastrointestinal tract. Of the top digestive disease centers in the United States, DDSI is the first of its kind to unite all specialists in one unique, fully integrated model of care – aimed at optimizing the patient experience.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Los Angeles, CA

Johns Hopkins Hospital

Baltimore, MD

Cedars-Sinai is a nonprofit academic healthcare organization serving the diverse Los Angeles community and beyond. Cedars-Sinai serves more than 1 million people each year in over 40 locations, with more than 4,500 physicians and nurses and 1,500 research projects in motion.Ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the No. 1 gastroenterology program in California and No. 3 in the nation, Cedars-Sinai can provide every known procedure available for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and GI tract surgery. The dedicated care team of specialists works to advance the field and improve the quality of care for patients dealing with these unique challenges. Arguably the most famous hospital in the nation, it has been the seminal example of medical achievement. It totals 1,194 licensed beds and 2,000 full-time physicians and has been ranked the best hospital in the country for 22 years. The Diversity Postdoctoral Alliance Committee (DPAC) was launched in February 2015 to create a clear, consistent voice for and to support the development of postdoctoral fellows and trainees who are African-American, Latino, Native American and Pacific Islanders. In patient care, many Latinos are beginning to tap the hospital’s health seminars and social services—three Spanish-speaking therapists are available at Johns Hopkins Bayview’s pediatric clinics.

University of Michigan Hospital

Arbor Ann, MI

UCLA Medical Center

Los Angeles, CA

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MA

Massachusetts General Hospital has been ranked among the top five hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report ever since the rankings began. Mass General is recognized as #4 out of nearly 5,000 hospitals considered in the ranking. Mass General is the only hospital ranked in all 16 specialties considered by U.S. News & World Report, a testament to the breadth and depth of our expertise. Mass General has the largest hospital-based research program in the United States. The brightest minds in medicine collaborate on behalf of the patients to bridge innovative science with state-of-the-art clinical medicine.

Mount Sinai Hospital

New York, NY

Encompassing the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and eight hospital campuses in the New York metropolitan area, as well as a large, regional ambulatory footprint, Mount Sinai is internationally acclaimed for its excellence in research, patient care, and education across a range of specialties. Mount Sinai has more digestive disease specialists represented on New York magazine’s Best Doctors list than any other institution in New York City. In addition, a listing by Time magazine of the top 50 most influential gastroenterologists of the twentieth century includes six doctors from Mount Sinai—more than from any other medical center in the country.

UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside

Pittsburgh, PA

Over the last 20 years, UPMC has ushered in a new era of health care excellence in Pittsburgh, western Pennsylvania, and locations around the world. UPMC has evolved from a single psychiatric hospital into a $19 billion integrated global health enterprise closely affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh. As Pennsylvania’s largest nongovernmental employer, with more than 87,000 employees, UPMC is comprised of more than 30 hospitals, more than 700 doctors' offices and outpatient sites, an international division, and an enterprises division. UPMC operates 40 academic, community, and specialty hospitals, 700 doctors' offices and outpatient sites, employs 4,900 physicians, and offers an array of rehabilitation, retirement, and long-term care facilities.

Michigan Medicine is home to one of the largest health care complexes in the world. It has been the site of many groundbreaking medical and technological advancements since the Medical School first opened in 1850. They've earned national recognition from other hospital-quality organizations, too. Michigan Medicine is one of the largest hospitals in Michigan and a premier academic medical center made up of U-M Health System, University of Michigan Medical School and its University of Michigan Medical Group practice, one of the nation's largest biomedical research communities, and Michigan Health Corp. Michigan Medicine is home to one of the largest digestive health and liver disease programs in the country, providing prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract and liver. With California being home a number of top ranked hospitals, the need to reach the increasingly Hispanic population is more pressing than ever. It is even nationally ranked in 15 adult specialties and 10 children’s specialties. Among institution-wide goals of the UCLA Heath System is promote recruitment, retention, professional excellence, and overall well-being among underrepresented residents, fellows, and faculty and enhance departmental cultural awareness and sensitivity to enrich the services we provide to the diverse communities represented by patients.

MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 21


HEALTH

TOP HOSPITALS FOR LATINOS

Cardiology

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, OH

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Today, with nearly 1,400 beds on Cleveland Clinic main campus and 5,895 beds system-wide, Cleveland Clinic is one of the largest and most respected hospitals in the country. Doctors from around the world visit Cleveland Clinic for residency training in one of many specialty areas and for advanced fellowship work in more specialized disciplines. For the 24th consecutive year, Cleveland Clinic’s heart program has ranked as the best in the nation, earning the No. 1 ranking in U.S. News & World Report’s “2018-19 Best Hospitals.” Since 1995, no hospital in the country has ranked higher than Cleveland Clinic in cardiac care.

Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN

Smidt Heart Institute Cedars - Sinai

Los Angeles, CA

Among the most notable on the list, the Mayo Clinic has locations across the country and sees more than 1 million patients a year including 8,000 international patients from 150 countries. The renowned hospital network has developed websites that provide comprehensive information for patients whose first language is Spanish and established an International Patients Office to help ensure that distance and language are not obstacles to receiving world-class care. The Mayo Clinic Department of Cardiovascular Medicine is one of the largest and most comprehensive heart practices in the world. It includes more than 240 subspecialized experts trained in congenital heart disease in adults and children, coronary artery disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, heart rhythm disorders, and heart valve diseases. The Smidt Heart Institute is home to a distinguished team of experts who are setting the bar for cardiovascular care in the United States. The Institute unites 16 centers and programs to diagnose and treat the full spectrum of heart and vascular conditions for all patients, from infants to those with advanced disease. Led by Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, our faculty and attending physicians provide deep expertise across all specialties, including transplantation, stem cell therapy, congenital heart disease, women’s heart health, valve disorders, arrhythmia and hypertension.

New York Presbyterian Hospital- Columbia

New York, NY

NewYork-Presbyterian is one of the nation’s most comprehensive, integrated academic health care delivery systems, dedicated to providing the highest quality, most compassionate care and service to patients in the New York metropolitan area, nationally, and throughout the globe. In collaboration with two renowned medical schools, Weill Cornell Medicine and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, NewYork-Presbyterian is consistently recognized as a leader in medical education, groundbreaking research, and innovative, patientcentered clinical care. NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia is internationally renowned for its cardiac programs – offering the latest interventional therapies and pioneering cardiac surgery expertise, including heart transplant.

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MD

Massachusetts General Hospital has been ranked among the top five hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report ever since the rankings began. Mass General is recognized as #4 out of nearly 5,000 hospitals considered in the ranking. Mass General is the only hospital ranked in all 16 specialties considered by U.S. News & World Report, a testament to the breadth and depth of our expertise. Mass General has the largest hospital-based research program in the United States. The brightest minds in medicine collaborate on behalf of the patients to bridge innovative science with state-of-the-art clinical medicine.

Penn Presbyterian Medical Center

Philadelphia, PA

The Penn Presbyterian Medical Center has an outstanding track record of medical accomplishments — such as creating one of the first coronary care units in the country — and it continues to provide leading-edge care as part of Penn Medicine. Penn Presbyterian includes the Pavilion for Advanced Care (PAC), a 178,000 squarefoot, acute care building, and Penn Medicine's Level 1 Trauma Center. Penn Medicine University City (PMUC), also part of the Penn Presbyterian campus, is located at 3737 Market Street. PMUC provides seamless, integrated care to patients by offering advanced treatment options and bringing a multitude of specialties together, all under one roof for outpatient care.

Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Chicago, IL

Northwestern Memorial Hospital is an academic medical center in the heart of downtown Chicago with physicians, surgeons and caregivers representing nearly every medical specialty. Northwestern Memorial has also earned Magnet® recognition*, the gold-standard for nursing excellence from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. It is the flagship campus for Northwestern Medicine and the primary teaching hospital for Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University. Nearly every medical specialty is represented by over 1,900 physicians on the medical staff at Northwestern Memorial who also carry faculty appointments with Feinberg School of Medicine.

University of Michigan Hospital

Arbor Ann, MI

Michigan Medicine is home to one of the largest health care complexes in the world. It has been the site of many groundbreaking medical and technological advancements since the Medical School first opened in 1850. According to U.S. News and World Report, Michigan Medicine is among the best in the nation in a broad range of adult and pediatric specialties. Michigan Medicine is one of the largest hospitals in Michigan and a premier academic medical center made up of U-M Health System, University of Michigan Medical School and its University of Michigan Medical Group practice, one of the nation's largest biomedical research communities, and Michigan Health Corp.

Mount Sinai Hospital

New York, NY

Encompassing the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and eight hospital campuses in the New York metropolitan area, as well as a large, regional ambulatory footprint, Mount Sinai is internationally acclaimed for its excellence in research, patient care, and education across a range of specialties. The Health System includes more than 7,000 primary and specialty care physicians and 12 minority-owned free-standing ambulatory surgery centers. Mount Sinai Heart at The Mount Sinai Hospital, is celebrated internationally as a world leader in all facets of cardiology care, cardiac surgery, and advanced research.

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Dallas, TX

UT Southwestern, one of the premier academic medical centers in the nation, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty includes many distinguished members, including six who have been awarded Nobel Prizes since 1985. UT Southwestern physicians provide medical care in about 70 specialties to more than 105,000 hospitalized patients, nearly 370,000 emergency room cases, and oversee approximately 3 million outpatient visits a year. UT Southwestern Medical Center earned High Performing recognition for cardiology and heart surgery by U.S. News & World Report for 2018–19, placing the hospital among the country’s leading hospitals for heart care.

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Endocrinology Among the most notable on the list, the Mayo Clinic has locations across the country and sees more than 1 million patients a year including 8,000 international patients from 150 countries. The renowned hospital network has developed websites that provide comprehensive information for patients whose first language is Spanish and established an International Patients Office to help ensure that distance and language are not obstacles to receiving world-class care. It also offers minority health and wellness programs on: cancer prevention, healthy brain aging, community outreach, community-engaged research and others. Mayo Clinic's Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism, & Nutrition is one of the largest in the world, with locations in Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and several communities throughout the Mayo Clinic Health System (MCHS).

Mayo Clinic

Rochester, MN

Johns Hopkins Hospital

Baltimore, MD

Massachusetts General Hospital

Boston, MA

Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland, OH

Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Today, with nearly 1,400 beds on Cleveland Clinic main campus and 5,895 beds systemwide, Cleveland Clinic is one of the largest and most respected hospitals in the country. Doctors from around the world visit Cleveland Clinic for residency training in one of many specialty areas and for advanced fellowship work in more specialized disciplines. The multidisciplinary institute is made up of more than 38 staff physicians, 5 surgeons, 20 advanced practice providers, nurses, medical assistants, diabetes educators, secretaries, patient service representatives, coders, administrators and managers, working together to provide the finest care in the country.

Penn Presbyterian Medical Center

Philadelphia, PA

The Penn Presbyterian Medical Center has an outstanding track record of medical accomplishments — such as creating one of the first coronary care units in the country — and it continues to provide leading-edge care as part of Penn Medicine. Penn Presbyterian includes the Pavilion for Advanced Care (PAC), a 178,000 square-foot, acute care building, and Penn Medicine's Level 1 Trauma Center. Penn Medicine University City (PMUC), also part of the Penn Presbyterian campus, is located at 3737 Market Street. PMUC provides seamless, integrated care to patients by offering advanced treatment options and bringing a multitude of specialties together, all under one roof for outpatient care.

UCSF Medical Center

San Francisco, CA

UCSF is part of the 10-campus University of California, the world’s premier public research university system, and the only of its campuses dedicated to graduate and professional education. Driven by their public mission, USCF is a collection of dedicated scientists, clinicians, students and staff who strive to make the world a better place through our singular focus on health. Compassion is as critical as discovery in fulfilling the mission to make a difference for individual patients and whole populations. UCSF is recognized as one of the world’s greatest research universities, with a collaborative culture focused on understanding, preventing and treating disease. UCSF stands as one of the principal economic engines in San Francisco and the nine-county Bay Area, generating 43K jobs, $8.9B impact, and 24,140 employees.

UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital

Denver, CO

Top medical professionals, superior medicine and progressive change make UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital in metro Denver (UCH) one of the leading hospitals in the nation.The providers at University of Colorado Hospital are also faculty members at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, one of the premier academic research institutions in the country.At UCHealth Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic – Anschutz, expert providers from a range of related specialties come together to offer you effective, integrated treatments. University of Colorado Hospital’s endocrinology practices provide diagnosis, education and treatment of endocrine-related conditions such as diabetes, menopause, osteoporosis, ovarian cancer, pancreatitis, pituitary tumors, testicular cancer and thyroid conditions.

New York Presbyterian Hospital -Columbia

New York, NY

UCLA Medical Center

Los Angeles, CA

NewYork-Presbyterian is one of the nation’s most comprehensive, integrated academic health care delivery systems, dedicated to providing the highest quality, most compassionate care and service to patients in the New York metropolitan area, nationally, and throughout the globe. In collaboration with two renowned medical schools, Weill Cornell Medicine and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, NewYork-Presbyterian is consistently recognized as a leader in medical education, groundbreaking research, and innovative, patient-centered clinical care. NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia is internationally renowned for its cardiac programs – offering the latest interventional therapies and pioneering cardiac surgery expertise, including heart transplant. With California being home a number of top ranked hospitals, the need to reach the increasingly Hispanic population is more pressing than ever. It is even nationally ranked in 15 adult specialties and 10 children’s specialties. Among institution-wide goals of the UCLA Heath System is promote recruitment, retention, professional excellence, and overall well-being among underrepresented residents, fellows, and faculty and enhance departmental cultural awareness and sensitivity to enrich the services we provide to the diverse communities represented by patients.

Barnes - Jewish Hospital

St. Louis, MO

Arguably the most famous hospital in the nation, it has been the seminal example of medical achievement. It totals 1,194 licensed beds and 2,000 full-time physicians and has been ranked the best hospital in the country for 22 years. The Diversity Postdoctoral Alliance Committee (DPAC) was launched in February 2015 to create a clear, consistent voice for and to support the development of postdoctoral fellows and trainees who are African-American, Latino, Native American and Pacific Islanders. In patient care, many Latinos are beginning to tap the hospital’s health seminars and social services—three Spanish-speaking therapists are available at Johns Hopkins Bayview’s pediatric clinics. Massachusetts General Hospital has been ranked among the top five hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report ever since the rankings began. Mass General is recognized as #4 out of nearly 5,000 hospitals considered in the ranking. Mass General is the only hospital ranked in all 16 specialties considered by U.S. News & World Report, a testament to the breadth and depth of our expertise. Mass General has the largest hospital-based research program in the United States. The brightest minds in medicine collaborate on behalf of the patients to bridge innovative science with state-of-the-art clinical medicine.

Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University Medical Center is the largest hospital in Missouri and the largest private employer in the St. Louis region. An affiliated teaching hospital of Washington University School of Medicine, Barnes-Jewish Hospital has a 1,800 member medical staff with many who are recognized as "Best Doctors in America." They are supported by residents, interns and fellows, in addition to nurses, technicians and other health-care professionals. Barnes-Jewish was ranked nationally in all 12 data-driven specialties and received the highest rating in 8 common care procedures. MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 23


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HEALTH

HOY HEALTH

HEALTHCARE FOR ALL How Mario Anglada is Pushing the Boundaries of Healthcare Jake Rivard

THE HISPANIC COMMUNITY makes up 17% of the United States’ population and is projected to reach 30% by the end of 2030. They have larger families, suffer from higher rates of chronic health conditions, and live longer with their conditions. Why aren’t health care companies reaching out to these communities? That’s the question Mario Anglada, founder of Hoy Health asked himself before embarking on his journey. A seasoned veteran in the healthcare industry, Anglada spent over 23 years working with healthcare juggernauts like P&G, Johnson & Johnson, Cardinal Health, and even Univision Communications. In that time, he noticed that attention to Hispanic communities was sorely lacking. With a heart full of ambition and a mind full of ideas, Anglada set out to found Hoy Health, a Hispanic-focused healthcare platform that prioritizes access, affordability, and engagement for communities around North and South America. He wants to disrupt how primary care is delivered to underserved populations. And he is getting noticed; Hoy Health was named as one of 15 most innovative companies in 2019 by a reputable health related newsletter. “Our goal is to be the company that addresses the needs of our community,” Anglada exclaims. Hoy Health’s focus on access, affordability, and engagement allow them to provide essential care for patients with and without health insurance. “Any group, no matter their income, can access Hoy Health’s basic services.” Patients have access to over 3,700 different medications, each prioritizing affordability above all else. In fact, their highest price point for generic medication tops off at only $40. Accessibility is a value Anglada has emphasized since Hoy Health’s first day. Hoy Health’s status as an omnichannel platform allows patients to access its services wherever and however patients need -- whether it’s by the phone, on the Internet, or even at a supermarket. All of their material is available in Spanish and English to help both bilingual and monolingual patients receive the care and support they need. “We’ve made it our goal to work hand-in-hand with patient and provider to ensure that treatment is accessible, affordable, and engaging for both parties.” 26 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

MARIO ANGLADA • Founder & CEO, Hoy Health • Born & raised in Puerto Rico • Worked alongside P&G, Johnson & Johnson, Cardinal Health, Nestle Healthcare, and Univision Communications • 23+ years experience in healthcare

“WE WORK HAND-IN-HAND WITH PATIENT AND PROVIDER TO ENSURE THAT TREATMENT IS ACCESSIBLE, AFFORDABLE, AND ENGAGING FOR BOTH PARTIES.”

One of Hoy Health’s most innovative systems is their Chronic Condition Management. Through this program, Hoy Health partners with healthcare systems to manage chronic patients. This allows Hoy Health to provide affordable remote treatment and monitoring options to patients that may not otherwise have access to them. They work directly with healthcare providers to help them manage their patients using remote monitoring technologies that can evaluate a patient daily from their comfort of their home. This program improves health outcomes and reduces readmissions and costs for hospitals. Additionally, their CCM system offers 30-day management kits for patients that live with diabetes, asthma, and other chronic illnesses at an affordable rate. Plus, CCM doesn’t require health insurance; their kits are all valued at under $100, nearly a quarter of the cost of individual purchases. These services are available to both national and international families alike, allowing members to purchase affordable healthcare options for members in other countries. The sky’s the limit for Mario Anglada and Hoy Health. In the future, Anglada hopes to one day provide affordable, accessible, and engaging healthcare to loved ones throughout the world. “More than anything, we want to serve as a support system to patients and providers alike.” He’s made it his goal to become the number one provider to patients without medical insurance. With the astonishing growth Hoy Health has had over the last few years, it seems more like a question of “when” than a question of “if”. For more information on Mario Anglada and Hoy Health’s mission, visit www.hoyhealth.com


SÍ SE PUEDE Mayo Clinic Patricio Gargollo’s Legacy in Medicine Jake Rivard

PATRICIO GARGALLO knew he wanted to save lives the moment he set foot in a hospital. “I’d always been interested in science,” he began, “but my passions quickly ignited as soon as I met Dr. Easter.” While working as an equipment sterilizer in the University of California San Diego, Gargallo met Dr. Easter, the resident chief surgeon of UCSD. The two quickly bonded as Easter offered to let Gargallo observe surgeries after his shift ended. After graduating as his high school’s valedictorian, he made his way through his undergrad, medical school, residency, and his fellowship, earning accolades and honors all along the way. Since 2016, Patricio Gargollo has worked in the pediatric urology department at the Mayo Clinic, one of the most prestigious hospitals in the entire world.

Latino communities, assisting the Diversity & Inclusion department of the Mayo Clinic with advocacy in schools and colleges. Leaving a legacy is the most important thing Patricio Gargollo wants to accomplish. “I want to leave the world in a better place than when I arrived. I hope that I’m remembered as a good person who dedicated his career to fighting a horrible disease that’s taken too many lives. One day, I hope that minority students will look at me and what I’ve done and think, hey, maybe I can do this too. That’s why sí se puede is my favorite saying; because, if you work at it, you can do it, too.”

The reason he chose pediatrics? Altruism.

“By far the most amazing part of my job is working with children and helping them solve problems,” he remarks, a warm smile on his face. “All I want is to see their lives change for the better.” His primary focus is to assist children with rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare, often lethal form of cancer. His ultimate goal in his field is to find a cure. His determination, work ethic, and focus encourage him each and every day to work tirelessly towards this goal. “The Mayo Clinic has provided me with the best job I’ve ever had in my life. We’re all here for one purpose: to help the patient. Nothing more, nothing less.” Despite his long list of accolades, Gargollo remains remarkably humble about his achievements. “I don’t approach my work with an award in mind. My focus is on the patient, and my philosophy is simple: how would I want my child’s doctor to behave?” He references his upbringing as the source of his humility frequently. “We Latinos are a hardworking people, but we remain remarkably humble throughout it all. No matter the roadblock, we strive for success every day.” Gargollo cites his background as the driving force behind his career. As an immigrant from Mexico, he spent years adapting to American culture while bringing his best attitude and work ethic day in and day out. “The hardest thing about being an immigrant is that there’s no net to catch you if you fall. You have to work harder, smarter, and strive for success every single day.” He frequently advocates for mentoring within the

“ONE DAY, I HOPE THAT MINORITY STUDENTS WILL LOOK AT MY ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND THINK, HEY, I CAN DO THIS TOO” PATRICIO GARGOLLO • Pediatric Urologist, Mayo Clinic • Born in Mexico City in 1974 • Moved to Southern California in 1982 • Earned Undergraduate Degree at Baylor University -- 1996 • Graduated from Harvard Medical School • Finished Fellowship at #1 Urology

“MY PHILOSOPHY IS SIMPLE: HOW WOULD I WANT MY CHILD’S DOCTOR TO BEHAVE?”

• Earned Over 10 Awards for Practices, Presentations, and Innovation in Pediatric Urology • Joined the Mayo Clinic in 2016

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HEALTH

CEDARS-SINAI

ANDY ORTIZ is a talent and change management expert dedicated to building organizational strength by fostering a high-performing, talent-driven culture. He is responsible for the strategy and implementation of systemwide human resources policies and programs at Cedars-Sinai. As a trusted adviser to colleagues on the executive team, Ortiz is relied on to ensure that policies and programs align with Cedars-Sinai’s mission, vision and goals. Ortiz has held leadership roles in a variety of fields, including healthcare, entertainment and financial services. Before joining Cedars-Sinai in 2016, he served as Health Net’s senior vice president and chief people officer, responsible for strategy, policy development and administration of all aspects of human resources — including compensation, benefits, performance evaluation and rewards, staffing, equal employment and diversity, leadership and talent development, organization effectiveness and change management. Prior to that, he was senior vice president of Organization Effectiveness at Warner Bros. Entertainment Group. His community activities include serving on the board of directors of The Point Foundation and on the Southern California Advisory Board of The Hispanic Scholarship Fund. Ortiz earned a bachelor’s degree in speech communication from California State University, Fullerton, and a master’s degree in organizational leadership from Woodbury University. He is a certified executive coach from the Hudson Institute of Coaching and a member of the International Coaching Federation. 28 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT AND CHIEF ADVANCEMENT OFFICER

ARTHUR J. OCHOA, JD

ANDY ORTIZ

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

CEDARS-SINAI

ARTHUR J. OCHOA is a lawyer, healthcare executive and community leader who has dedicated his life to serving others. Ochoa graduated from the University of Southern California (cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa) and Yale Law School. In between, he served as an advocate and policy analyst at Youth Service America in Washington during the formative years of the national and community service movement. Ochoa, who joined Cedars-Sinai in 2001, leads the organization’s external relations, including development, community engagement and marketing/communications. Cedars-Sinai has raised more than $1 billion in philanthropic support since 2004, when Ochoa was appointed chief development officer. Prior to joining Cedars-Sinai, Ochoa practiced corporate and tax law at the Los Angeles offices of O'Melveny & Myers LLP and Irell & Manella LLP. He is a past chairman of the Los Angeles County Bar Association Tax Exempt Organization Committee. Ochoa’s civic leadership has focused principally on the fields of education and healthcare. Ochoa now serves as board chair of Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and also is a board member of the Pacific Council on International Policy, a member of the Yale Law School Association’s Executive Board and an honorary trustee of the Mexican American Bar Foundation. He is vice president of the board of Marlborough School in Los Angeles. He has been board chair of Planned Parenthood Los Angeles and is a past president of the board of the Center for Early Education. Additionally, he is a former adjunct faculty member at American Jewish University and lectures frequently on legal, fundraising management and governance issues.


DIRECTOR OF THE CARDIOGENETICS PROGRAM AT THE SMIDT HEART INSTITUTE

EUGENIO CINGOLANI, MD, was born and raised in Argentina, where he also completed medical school and served as a medical resident. His passion for science and medicine started early on during his childhood as both of his parents were scientists and professors at the School of Medicine in Argentina. Cingolani’s father, Horacio, regularly traveled to America during sabbaticals to work with Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD in Marbán’s laboratory at Johns Hopkins. Years later, in 2002, Horacio’s son, Eugenio, went to work for Marbán as a cardiology research fellow at Johns Hopkins University. Eugenio Cingolani then went on to complete his clinical training in Cardiology and Cardiac electrophysiology at Cedars Sinai. Following his training, he accepted a faculty position at the Smidt Heart Institute. During his time in Argentina and through his medical training both in Argentina and in the U.S., Cingolani became acutely aware of the disproportionate medical care offered to residents of third world countries. His mission in all he does is to serve not only his immediate, surrounding community, but also to improve outcomes and fill the gaps for those without healthcare and readily available medical advances. Cingolani currently serves as director of the Cardiogenetics Program at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai, where he focuses on heart rhythm disorders and electrophysiology. His current project involves creating a “biological pacemaker” – specialized cells engineered to keep the heart beating in perfect rhythm.

EUGENIO CINGOLANI, MD

DIRECTOR OF THE SMIDT HEART INSTITUTE

EDUARDO MARBÁN, MD, PHD

BORN IN CUBA, Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, was just six years old when his family fled the country in 1961 as political refugees. The Marbán family initially landed in Miami but followed the path of opportunity up the east coast, eventually settling in Pennsylvania. Although Marbán’s parents held important teaching positions in Cuba, once the family immigrated to the U.S., they had to start over again. In the beginning, Marbán’s mother worked as a hotel maid and his father delivered newspapers. Her mother went on to complete her PhD at the University of Virginia, later becoming a tenured professor at Wilkes College in Pennsylvania. To save money, Marbán attended Wilkes College (for free) to study mathematics, graduating at the age of just 19. He received both his MD and PhD from Yale Medical School and, in 1981, started residency training at Johns Hopkins University. He eventually worked his way up to directing the Johns Hopkins cardiology programs before coming to Cedars-Sinai in 2007. Marbán is perhaps best known for his work in developing cell-based treatments for regenerating heart muscle after it is damaged by a heart attack. Today, Marbán oversees Cedars-Sinai’s Smidt Heart Institute, ranked third among heart programs on the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals list. “Adversity, my parents’ uncompromising commitment to education, and curiosity led me to where I am today,” said Marbán. “I couldn’t be prouder of my upbringing and the numerous experiences I encountered to get here.”

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HEALTH

CANCER CARE

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CANCER RESEARCH GOES FROM GENERIC TO PRECISE

Arturo Loaiza-Bonilla MD, MSEd, FACP

The Marvel comic book character Deadpool is not the type of superhero you want your daughter to bring home for dinner. He’s crude, irreverent and sarcastic. But he has a truly remarkable gift: he has an immune system that can put him back together in 30 seconds or less, no matter how severe his injuries. Timothy Baler

W

hat if we could all do that? Well, believe it or not, we’re heading in that direction. Researchers are now targeting cancer cells and the cellular mechanisms from the inside, such as their genetic makeup. The practice is precision medicine and the targets are some of the most intractable illnesses known to humankind, including genetic mutational disorders and the “Big C,” cancer. According to Arturo Loaiza-Bonilla, MD, MSEd, FACP, Vice Chair, Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) Department of Medical Oncology, cancer treatment is going in the direction of developing drugs that react to specific biomarkers, including genes and proteins inside a cancer cell, then choosing a response based on that individual’s cancer source. In the “old” days, the focus of stomach cancer treatment, for example, was in the tissue of the stomach. Treatment models are now shifting gears. Two people with stomach cancer could have very different precision treatments customized for their own illness because, just like two people with different DNA sequencing, they may have different manifestations of the disease. Not only is the cancer the focus, but the mechanisms of the cancer cells are the new target. Furthermore, specific cases will get individual treatment based on their own cancer cells’ DNA profiles. One example of this new tailored approach to cancer is immunotherapy. Not unlike a superhero with an immune system you can’t beat, non-specific immunotherapies simply boost a patient’s immune system, allowing the body to respond effectively to fast-growing cancers. One approach, adoptive cell therapy, uses genetically modified immune cells to kill cancer cells by “training them to target the cancer cells,” according to Dr. Bonilla. How do you conduct gene splicing or cell manipulation with a walking, talking patient whose 37.2 trillion cells are doing their own thing? One technique is to place the genes next to multiplying cells. Another is to supply

drugs made with molecules so small they can penetrate a cell membrane. If that doesn’t work, try coercing a virus. Onolytic virus therapy, as it’s called, uses genetically engineered viruses to kill cancer cells by prompting the immune system to go after the cancer. While traditional chemotherapy, radiation and surgery are still very viable options in oncology, “the shift we are experiencing is that in some cases, we can add precision oncology approaches, particularly when the cancer has certain biomarkers that predict responses to these targeted agents,” says Dr. Bonilla. In effect, oncology is shifting from approaching cancer as a generic illness to sabotaging cancer from the inside out. The green light for gene editing to possibly impact precision cancer treatment, in fact, came from a different field. In December 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of LuxturnaTM for a rare genetic disorder that results in tunnel vision and, eventually, blindness. The treatment was the first-ever gene therapy approved in the U.S. to combat a gene mutation. It works by delivering a healthy gene directly to the cells of the retina. This allows the cells to begin producing the correct protein that converts light into electrical signals. The electrical signals zip along the nervous system to the brain and restore vision. In effect, it “turns the lights back on.” With FDA approval for Luxturna, precision cancer treatment options were now reaching the patient. “This is a pivotal time for cancer patients as we are driving real momentum in cancer research and treatment, changing the paradigm of how we approach the disease,” says Dr. Bonilla. And he looks forward with unmitigated excitement to the future. “I encourage everyone to learn more about precision oncology and to promote enrollment and access to clinical trials so that we can continue to find better options and, hopefully, cures,” says Dr. Bonilla. “We are changing the face of cancer care. What was unimaginable not that long ago is quickly coming to fruition.”

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HEALTH

MYTELEMEDICINE Timothy Baler

REY COLON A SIMPLE IDEA PERFECTLY TIMED WHEN ALASKAN-BORN, Puerto Rican Army vet Rey Colon caught the entrepreneurial bug, he caught it bad. With sales and customer service behind him – and with four years of his own military service to provide some discipline – Colon’s first business, started in 2000, was New Step Solutions, which leveraged technology to provide personal financing services – a deft way of saying it was an online blunder. “Of course, like most entrepreneurs, you start off and everything went well,” he said. “Then you make a few bad decisions and the market changes. New regulations come up …” and you know how it goes. Before you can say “Bob’s your uncle,” it’s good-bye start up. Colon, however, has a fresh perspective on blunders. You take them as lessons, analyze them and move forward. In a onehour interview, he mentioned making bad decisions at a young age and in business. He makes them sound like old friends. Of course, there’s a lot to be said for great timing, too. Born in 1972, Colon was in his mid twenties when the Internet began to look like fertile ground. His second start up was an online marketing venture timed to perfection. Businesses around the globe were wondering how to rank high in Google searches and Colon was there to show them the way. He mastered SEO marketing, which gave him a wide view of the Internet landscape, where opportunities are only a bright idea away. That bright idea was hatched at a Starbucks – and there’s nothing like a handshake over a cup of coffee in a bistro in the middle of some weekday to give an entrepreneur honest to goodness street creds. With just that kind of notes-written-ona-napkin ambiance, Colon formed a partnership that launched MyTelemedicine’s predecessor, a company called AmeriDoc, which was acquired in 2013. The telemedicine concept, in fact, is brilliant. While everyone is thinking up ways to keep healthcare costs in check, MyTelemedicine simply offers secure online medical consultations with board-certified doctors: Digital house calls. But they keep the agenda very simple. Think sore throats, pink eye, fever, ear infections. Toss in allergies and stomachaches. Needless to say, if you break your arm or have a seizure, call a doctor you can see in person. But if you have a mild rash and you’re thinking of heading to the emergency room, where the average wait time to see a physician across the country is seven hours, why not try a video conference through the MyTelemedicine mobile app Access a Doctor, where the average wait for a call back is under 21 minutes and where a full Spanish

language service is available? Physicians are able to provide advice, recommendations, and diagnose for common conditions, which may result in a prescription called into the pharmacy of your choice, anywhere in the United States. Then there’s the money. Understanding the average bill in an emergency room is over $2,000, insurance companies are overjoyed with non-emergency needs taken care of with a high-tech solution paid for by employers. Costs go down because routine conditions are treated with the least expensive option instead of the most expensive. And, what’s next? Well, Latin America and then the world, says Colon. MyTelemedicine is a rising star in an industry that is expected to reach $48 billion a year by 2023.

REY COLON

PRESIDENT & CEO OF MYTELEMEDICINE

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HEALTH

MEDICAL CITY

JORGE PEREZ

JAMES MENDEZ was named Chief Development Officer for Medical City Plano and Medical City Frisco in January 2019. Mendez joined the leadership team in 2018 and was responsible for leading physician recruitment efforts, along with planning, organizing, coordinating and directing all hospital functions related to growth and business development initiatives. As Chief Development Officer, Mendez directs strategic development and physician recruitment for both hospitals. Prior to joining Medical City Plano and Medical City Frisco, Mendez worked his way up from a registered respiratory therapist at Bayfront Medical Center in St. Petersburg, Florida, to Market Chief Executive Officer for Kindred Hospital in Dallas and Kindred Hospital Dallas Central. Mendez holds a Bachelor of Science in Applied Science with a concentration in Behavioral Health from the University of South Florida and Master of Business Administration from Saint Leo University.

CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER MEDICAL CITY PLANO/MEDICAL CITY FRISCO

MEDICAL CITY


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INTRO

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››››››››› DIVERSITY IN TECHNOLOGY

Innovation. Passion. Purpose. These values are the common denominator for Latinos in the technology field. In another set of narrative pieces highlighting the Latino talent, we discover the enormous and continuous effort there is to advance and grow talent of high-caliber.

Note from Thaddeus Arroyo: “The next-generation is comprised of a much more diverse and connected population. As the youngest and fastest-growing demographic in our country, Latinos have a huge part to play in shaping positive change. Latino changemakers will be crucial to our ability to innovate and ignite the next engines that drive our new mainstream economy forward.” “As a global Latino community we are being called to define a new future and tap into the power of technology for the good of society. Our world will look, feel and act very differently 10, even 5, years from now than it does today. Next-generation technologies are serving as a catalyst, spurring the transformation of business, cities and countries. These tech advancements are disrupting the status quo and propelling us deeper into the heart of a fourth industrial revolution. They are shaping a future with entirely new economies, requiring new jobs with different skills. This is a technologydriven future that we must take a leadership role in shaping.” “I encourage everyone to actively take ownership of transforming themselves, as well as those that follow in their footsteps, through continuous learning, mentoring and participation in organizations like HITEC. I am where I am today in large part because others invested time and effort in my development. It matters tremendously that today’s Latino leaders take the time to share what they’ve learned along the way. We must teach. We must encourage. We must bring others with us.”

Thaddeus Arroyo

CEO of AT&T Business

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MORGAN STANLEY

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Morgan Stanley’s Marta Decatrel Celebrates HITEC 100 List Honor

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or many women, the technology industry is an intimidating career to jump into, but for Marta Decatrel, it empowers her. From the very beginning, she knew this was something she wanted to do, and became the first woman in her family to pursue a position in STEM. Decatrel has been advocating women in technology since she could remember. In an industry where the ratio from men to women still isn’t where she wants it to be, her willingness and passion for developing interest of technology in not only Latinas, but all women, has brought her many opportunities and success for over 25 years. Today, she celebrates making the HITEC 100 list, and being one of the top 100 Latinos in the country in the technology industry. She tells us that she attended HITEC's Silicon Valley Leadership Summit this past fall, and one of the things that really struck her was the number of women that were in attendance. “It was such an honor to be surrounded by so many successful Latinas--women who exemplify the tremendous impact we're making in Technology” she says. Decatrel says she

DECATREL’S CAREER AT A GLANCE • College: Skidmore College; The George Washington University • Senior Technical Writer Citibank • Consultant - BSG • Senior Technical Writer - Bear Sterns • Senior Technical Writer - Morgan Stanley • Product Manager Morgan Stanley • Executive Director Morgan Stanley

owes much of her own success to Morgan Stanley, the leading global investment firm she has been with for 21 years. Decatrel serves as Executive Director of Technology at Morgan Stanley, an American multinational investment bank and financial services company headquartered in New York, New York. When asked how Morgan Stanley has helped her excel in her career, she said, “At Morgan Stanley, diversity is part of our core fabric. We understand that to be a global leader and organization that continually strives for excellence our corporate culture must be open and inclusive. This not only helps us serve our clients better, but it helps our employees, such as myself, achieve their professional objectives. Morgan Stanley has created, and continues to build a culture of inclusion evidenced through our constant focus on recruiting,

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“WE HAVE IN THIS COUNTRY, CLOSE TO 58 MILLION LATINOS, AND YET LATINAS ONLY REPRESENT ABOUT 2% OF THOSE HOLDING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING JOBS. WE NEED TO DO A BETTER JOB ENGAGING AND ATTRACTING THIS TALENT. IT’S UP TO US WHO ARE ON THE INSIDE TO DEMONSTRATE THE POSSIBLE AND INSPIRE THE NEXT GENERATION. ” - MARTA DECATREL TRAINING THE NEXT GENERATION OF WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY

developing and advancing individuals based on their skills and talent.” The firm has helped Decatrel reinvent her career. In her current role as Executive Director, Decatrel embraces a diverse leadership style. She has been part of Morgan Stanley’s WIT (Women in Technology) organization for several years. The program has been crucial to helping women in tech at Morgan Stanley find role models, mentors and overall a support network to develop a personal development and career progression. It is also an organization that plays a big role in helping young girls and women that are interested in a tech career. Decatrel is part of a WIT working group focused on outreach and general recruiting. “We’ve made a difference in attracting more female technology talent to the Firm. This year half of our incoming class for our tech associate programs are women, and a significant percentage of them are racially diverse,” she tells us. Mentorship and networking are two things that are really supported across the firm. They hold large sessions where they have leadership conferences that target their female technologists across the globe, all around inspiring

Girls Who Code is a national nonprofit organization that aims to support and increase the number of women in computer science by 2027. The program was founded by Reshma Saujani in 2012 who came up with the idea of creating the organization during her run for the United States Congress when she noticed that schools along her campaign route lacked girls in computer science classrooms. Morgan Stanley is a sponsor of the nonprofit, and hosted their first Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program last summer. Marta Decatrel leads the technology and classroom track for the program at Morgan Stanley. The Girls Who Code Summer Immersion Program is a seven week program covering a broad range of topics, from programming fundamentals to cyber security. Students are paired with Morgan Stanley mentors to serve as examples and create a connection with students. Morgan Stanley's WIT has also partnered with Anita Borg on the Grace Hopper Celebration to ensure they have a diverse pipeline of students. This has helped increase the female-to-male ratio of incoming class graduates.

that connection, offering training, helping facilitate the network, and celebrating the accomplishments of women in technology. More specifically around the Latinas. “When it comes to Latinas it becomes critical. Relatable role models are so few. Attracting that talent requires those of us who have broken through to share our experiences and inspire those to follow,” Decatrel says. When asked how she defines success Decatrel said it’s the feeling of making a difference. Whether it was when she was a tech writer where she helped take the complicated to make it more digestible, to today where she is looking more at the user experience and trying to ensure that the products they deliver help people be more productive, she gets satisfaction knowing she made a difference. “That is something that has been critical to my success. Is my ability to deliver something that added value.” MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 37

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TECH

HEWLETT PACKARD ENTERPRISE

HOW HPE’S VISION IS PUSHING TECH COMPANIES FORWARD With over 113 offices, 60,000 employees, and over 50 years of inclusion-focused culture, Hewlett Packard Enterprise has long been a pioneer of diversity in the workplace. Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Talent Officer Alessandra Ginante and Head of Global Inclusion Jesse Cortez weigh in on the strides HPE has taken, the Office of Inclusion and Diversity’s recent rebrand, and the steps the company will take to further their inclusion efforts.

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n the surface, changing the Office of Diversity and Inclusion’s name to the Office of Inclusion and Diversity may seem semantic. Chief Talent Officer Alessandra Ginante doesn’t see it that way. “The rebrand was absolutely intentional,” she begins, a proud look flashing across her face. “When we prioritize inclusion, we help to build a culture where one can be their authentic self. Inclusion isn’t a product of diversity; diversity is a product of inclusion.” Ginante’s focus on inclusion shares philosophical similarities to company founders Dave Packard and Bill Hewlett. As early pioneers of inclusion in the workforce, Hewlett and Packard created Employee Resource Groups to bring people with similar experiences together. HPE’s inclusive-minded services have met with great success; in fact, one in two employees actively participates or invests their time in the company’s many Employee Resource Groups. These employees often taking time out of their weekends to support their communities with their knowledge and skills. “Our community within our workforce should reflect our community beyond these walls,” Ginante states. HPE directly partners with Catalyst, a nonprofit for women in the workplace, AnitaB, the IT Senior Management Forum for Black IT workers, and a wide variety of other nonprofits to foster inclusion across the corporate world. One of HPE’s biggest assets, Ginante remarks, is its inclusive culture. “At the heart of any good company is its’ people,” Cortez chimes in. “Our top priority is building a community where everyone can bring their whole selves to work. That’s what inclusion is.” As a board member of the HITEC Foundation Board, Cortez keeps his eyes on the future, investing in scholarships for the next generation of Hispanic tech leaders. His ultimate goal is to see a ripple effect of inclusion in the tech and corporate community. Currently, he serves multiple roles within his team ensuring that hiring, talent sourcing, and onboarding efforts keep HPE’s culture of inclusion embedded within its process.

ALESSANDRA GINANTE

SENIOR EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF TALENT OFFICER

“YOU CAN’T BE INCLUSIVE IF YOU’RE SURROUNDED BY PEOPLE THAT ARE JUST LIKE YOU.”

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“CHANGE COMES FROM EVERY ANGLE. FROM OUR PROCESSES TO OUR CULTURE, WE NEED TO ENSURE EVERY PART OF OUR BUSINESS IS DRIVEN BY INCLUSION.” ALESSANDRA GINANTE

HPE’s focus on inclusion expands beyond the walls of their office, as well. The business’s Employee Resource Groups make their mark on their communities by volunteering at countless offices around the globe to better live the company’s value of citizenship. Urging their employees to give back, HPE lays out its philosophy on the company’s website. Their mantra, better known as The HPE Way, urges employees “...to meet the obligations of good citizenship by making contributions to the community and to the institutions in our society which generate the environment in which we operate.” It urges their employees to give back to their community with their time, knowledge, and skills to enrich the lives of those around them.

JESSE CORTEZ

HEAD OF GLOBAL INCLUSION

Last year, the company held its first-ever Global Day of Service, investing countless hours into their local communities. Children from low-income communities were invited to the HPE offices to learn integral STEM skills, while offices in Houston ran a food drive, donating tens of thousands of food bags to their local towns. Their efforts with inclusion have been met with accolades from LGBT inclusion groups, disability inclusion organizations, and minority-minded organizations alike. “At HPE, inclusion is our priority.” Ginante remarks. “The most important thing I’ve learned in my position is that you can’t be inclusive if you’re surrounded by people just like you.” Ginante and Cortez’s biggest motivators? Gratitude. “Nothing feels better than knowing that you’re making the workforce a better place for someone else.” People like Cortez and Ginante don’t just say what they mean; they live what they say. The duo frequently participates in their Employee Resource Groups, creating programs, volunteer efforts, and more to better actualize their dreams of diversity. “It isn’t just a manner of altruism,” Ginante cleverly remarks. “It helps us to better tell our stories and to show what people can do when they come together.” The most fulfilling part of the inclusion-minded mentality, Cortez says, is more than the fact that it’s the right thing to do. “It provides a competitive advantage. The value of having such an open and welcoming community helps to attract talent, giving them a space where they can wholly feel themselves. It helps communities to share their diverse stories and brings people with similar and differing experiences together.” Creating an inclusive environment for everyone, regardless of background, is a key priority for Ginante. At HPE, men and women both receive a minimum of six months of paid parental leave when they bring a child into the world or adopt. “Inclusion means acceptance for everyone -- not just one or two groups. We want to support our employees’ families by giving them time to spend with their loved ones.” The company encourages women and members of lower-income communities to participate in hack-a-thons and other events to increase their knowledge of coding. They provide a wide variety of grants to these communities to help enrich their neighborhoods, paving the way for the future of programming across the country. The most important thing to note about inclusion, Ginante states, is that it’s not just one person’s job. Diversity and inclusion require everyone’s participation. No matter your role in your company, your commitment to inclusion is a pivotal part of making everyone feel welcome. “Diversity and inclusion aren’t a one-step solution. It can be approached in a variety of different ways, but everyone’s participation is key. Everyone, from CEO to intern, has a role to play in order to ensure their work environment is a welcoming space.”

For more information on HPE’s focus on inclusion and diversity, visit https://www.hpe.com/us/en/about/diversity.html MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 39

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TECH HACR

WILL HISPANICS BE READY FOR THE STEM FUTURE?

Timothy Baler

Latinos looking to succeed in America’s high-tech society have an uphill climb to make, according to an extensive survey from the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR). But at least one expert says significant gains have been made to bridge the racially delineated gaps in the so-called STEM sector of the economy, which clumps together those coveted jobs in healthcare, engineering and computing.

C

ollaborative partnerships between high schools, colleges and corporations are already making a striking difference in achievement levels among Hispanic students, says Antonio R. Flores, president and chief executive officer at the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Links between Hispanic-serving institutions, especially ones close to Hispanic communities, can create “very, very successful partnerships in achieving high level attainment and entrance to college,” said Flores, who also points to “increased family engagement” among Hispanic families as a contributing factor. Indeed, recent figures show extraordinary shifts at the high school level. The graduation rate among Latinos climbed sharply in one four-year span, jumping from 61.4 percent in 2006 to 71.4 percent in 2010. The trend has held up in recent years. From 2000 to 2016, dropout rates among Hispanic students plummeted from an embarrassing 27.8 percent to a near-respectable 8.6 percent, according to the National Center for Educational Statistics. Figures also show that Latinos are now entering college at approximately the same rate as whites, although graduation

rates from college show the gaps between races widening again. This may be an ominous sign, according to the HARC report. STEM jobs, which pay 26 percent more than the rest of the employment options, are substantially outpacing job growth elsewhere, the report says. Clearly, staying in college is crucial for future high-tech success. STEM jobs – which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – have grown 11.4 percent since the Great Recession of 2008, while all other jobs have grown 4.5 percent. The problems, says Flores, are familiar: A lack of resources, a lack of mentors and too much soft discrimination. Predominantly, Hispanic school districts at the high school level “don’t have the money to attract and maintain the best math and science teachers,” he said. This not only diminishes the odds of having STEM-oriented role models in Hispanic schools, but greatly reduces advanced curricula options that wealthier districts offer kids who are trying to impress top-level college admission offices.

“VERY, VERY SUCCESSFUL PARTNERSHIPS IN ACHIEVING HIGH LEVEL ATTAINMENT AND ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE.”

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The points are illustrated in a recent New York Times article concerning this year’s crop of brainiacs at Stuyvesant High School (How the Few Black and Hispanic Students at Stuyvesant High School Feel, March 22, 2019). In New York City, Stuyvesant is where the smart kids go. The highly selective school of 3,300 students had more than 30,000 applicants from the five boroughs last year, making entrance to the school more pressure-cooked than trying to get into Harvard University. However, of the school’s 3,300 students, only 29 this year are black. Only 3 percent are Hispanic. Asian students make up 73 percent, while whites make up 20 percent. The Ivy League bastion Harvard, in fact, is more racially balanced – 43.5 percent white; 17.1 percent Asian; 10.8 percent Hispanic/Latino and 7.1 percent Black. Meanwhile, U.S. News & World Report ranks Stuyvesant 21st in the nation among so-called STEM high schools. In so many words, if you call Stuyvesant High School New York City’s Nerd Central, not many people will argue with you. So how do minority students feel at Nerd Central? Some suffer from imposter syndrome, which is defined as that haunting feeling that maybe they don’t deserve their own success. “I’ve been told the only reason I got into Stuyvesant is because I’m black,” said one student quoted in the Times. “Not only is that discouraging and alienating, but it makes you feel like maybe you don’t deserve your spot,” she said. The corporate world is also loaded with invisible perils that go under the modern buzzword of “soft skills.” As opposed to chemistry or physics, soft skills are defined as all those unforeseen cultural nuances that the HARC report calls “intangibles.” These are rarely written down, but dozens of online advice columns tell it like it is. These

columns advise charge-ahead employees to laugh at the right jokes, make the boss look good, cheer for the right team, develop compatible outside interests and “fit the suit,” as one website put it. These intangible items can change spontaneously to match the current environment. That means a joke that works in the cafeteria might not work in the parking lot or the boardroom. Don’t ask why. A roomful of social scientists would likely come up with a roomful of likely-sounding answers. But the gap is real. According to a recent Pew report, cited by HARC, Hispanics make up 16 percent of the current workforce, but only 7 percent of the employees working in high-paying STEM jobs, where growth is expected to outpace other sectors through 2024. Today, there are 8.6 million STEM jobs, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The big question: Will Hispanics, who are projected to make up 27.5 percent of the U.S. population by 2060, be able to catch up? The answer, of course, is how can they not? As HACU CEO Flores points out, the collaborative initiative started by linking Hispanic community high school to nearby colleges, who then become bona fide “Hispanic-serving institutions.” There are over 500 colleges on board and the effort to develop Hispanic-serving corporations is now underway. But Flores admits the intangible barriers are quite real. STEM jobs, he says, maybe prone to a certain closed-loop dynamic in which recruiters from Google, Apple or Microsoft happen to be graduates of top-ranked schools. Those recruiters then reach out to their alma maters when it comes time to bringing on more staff. “A lot of these companies already have a cluster of preferring institutions they recruit from … because they have the money to hire them,” Flores said. Furthermore, don’t bank on that fabled resurgence of the manufacturing sector to bail anyone out. Even if manufacturing bounces back as the result of a concerted effort from the White House, there will be less of a payoff than you might expect. It now takes only 177 factory workers to accomplish what took 1,000 employees to do in the 1950s, a column in Industry Week proclaims. (Hope Is Not a Plan: The Myth of American Manufacturing.) That makes STEM jobs the place to go. And, as they say, the future isn’t here, but it’s rumored to be very close. MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 41

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TECH

HITEC

Michelle Boston

Marcelo De Santis

Bank of America

1871

Eduardo Cabrera

George DeCesare

Senior Vice President Business Solutions Technology Executive

HITEC 1OO

››››››

HiTEC (Hispanic IT Executive Council) has announced their HITEC 100-Class of 2019. These 100 leaders are the most distinguished and influential leaders in technology. Let's join in celebrating these leaders and their achievements!

Chief Cyber Security Officer Trend Micro

David Cagigal

Chief Information Officer State of Wisconsin

Hector Calva

Gartner, Inc.

Rosio Alvarez

Chief Information Officer

Rodolfo Dominguez

Chief Executive Officer Woven

Julio Caraballo

Director - Global Head of Application and Host Security Citi

ALPFA

Carlos Carpizo President

LinkAmerica

Henry Cason Fannie Mae

Chief Applications Officer and Company Vice President Johnson & Johnson

Brian Arellanes

Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Founder

•“Testing and learning, empowering employees, leaders who are mentors and coaches, and unstructured collaboration. Fannie Mae’s commitment to these concepts and, more broadly, to the digitization of the mortgage process, are what make it so exciting to work here.”

Alvaro Celis

Vice President Worldwide Device Sales Microsoft

ITSourceTEK, Inc.

Santiago A. Chamorro

Thaddeus Arroyo

General Motors

Chief Executive Officer, AT&T Business AT&T

Vice President, Global Connected Customer Experience

Nick Chang

Julio Avalos

Vice President, Global Services and Customer Success

GitHub, Inc.

Adriana Cisneros

Chief Strategy Officer

Mariely Bandas-Franzetti

Information Technology Support, Vice President Dell Technologies

Daniel Barriuso

Global Chief Information Security Officer Santander Bank

Ricardo Bartra

Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Constellation Brands

Ivonne Beauboeuf Managing Director BNY Mellon

Ernesto Boada

Vice President Digital Engineering Western Union

Morgan Stanley

Timothy Campos

Georgette Antelo

Jose Guillermo Ardon

Executive Director

Cisco Systems, Inc.

Senior Vice President and Head of Digital Products, SingleFamily Business

SAP America

Marta A. Decatrel

Procter & Gamble

Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Global Vice President, Global Strategic Pricing and Commercialization

Kaiser Permanente

Guillermo Diaz, Jr.

Chief Information Officer Managing Vice President - CRM, CX and Digital Commerce Technologies

Senior Vice President, Chief Technology Risk Officer

Vice President of Information Technology, Chief Development Officer

Julio Carbonell Gene Alvarez

Startup Mentor and Corporate Innovation Advisor

BlueData Software

Chief Executive Officer

Cisneros and Cisneros Foundation, Co-CEO of Endeavor Miami

Tony Colon

Senior Vice President, Success Cloud Product and Innovation Salesforce

Ana Corrales

Vice President of Global Operations and Google Store Google

Eddy Cue

Senior Vice President, Internet Software and Services Apple

Frank DeArmas Chief Information Officer

SVP, Customer Transformation.

Vice President Business Transformation and Chief Digital Officer Mercedes-Benz Financial Services USA, LLC

Kristina Draper Tech Division Executive Wells Fargo

Marina Escobar

Vice President, Advanced Technology ESPN

Nancy Faginas-Cody

Senior Vice President, Information Technology Enterprise Business Systems The Walt Disney Company

Francisco Fraga Chief Information Officer

Campbell Soup Company

Jorge Frausto

Senior Vice President Digital Enterprise and Chief Information Officer GE Power

Carlos Fuentes

Vice President of Strategy, Architecture and Security Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Isaura Gaeta

Vice President, Security Research Intel

Miguel A. Gamiño, Jr.

Executive Vice President, Global Cities | Enterprise Partnerships Mastercard

Gregory L. Garcia

Deputy Chief Information Officer/G6 Department of United States Army

Michael Garcia

Vice President Command Center Capital One

Yvonne Garcia

Senior Vice President, Global Head of Client Solutions and Program Management Operations, Investment Manager Services State Street

Noni Gonzalez

Vice President, Commercial Applications InterContinental Hotels Group

ZeroChaos

42 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

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Karl Gouverneur

Vice President - Digital Workplace, Corporate Solutions and Head of Digital Innovation Northwestern Mutual

Carlos Granda

Claudia Mirza

Founder, Chief Executive Officer Akorbi

Dr. Pablo Molina

Senior Vice President, Global Customer Success

Associate Vice President and Chief Information Security Officer

SAP America Inc.

Drexel University

Charles Grau

Luisa Monge

Chief Information Officer United Data Technologies

Robert N. Grillo

Vice President and Chief Information Officer Florida International University

Yamila Haim Harris

VP, Service Delivery - Infrastructure & Data Management Atos

Julio Hernandez Principal KPMG

Miriam Hernandez-Kakol

Global Service Line Leader for Customer and Operations Advisory, KPMG Executive Sponsor for Google Alliance, Global Lead Partner Verizon KPMG, LLP

Darrell Higueros Chief Executive Officer

Next Generation Inc.

Crystal Johnson

Vice President, AT&T Integrated Account Team IBM Corporation

Javier Llinas

Vice President Information Technology Infrastructure Colgate Palmolive

Sandra Lopez

Vice President and General Manager Intel

Carlos Lopez-Abadia

Global Vice President and General Manager Consulting DXC Technology

Ricardo Madan

Vice President, Technology Services

Senior Director AI and Intelligent Cloud Business Development Microsoft Corporation

Jesus Montano

Chief Information Security Officer and Head of Enterprise Information Risk Management MassMutual

Frank Mostek

Head of Data Architecture, Modeling and Analysis - WIM Technology Wells Fargo

Enrique Muñoz Torres Co-Founder

Lumi Labs, Inc.

Carmen Nava Senior Vice President AT&T

Antonio Neri

Chief Executive Officer Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Aldo Noseda

Chief Information Officer Eastman Chemical

David Olivencia

Managing Director, Journey to Cloud Accenture

Juan Perez

Chief Information and Engineering Officer UPS

Alexis Polanco

Senior Vice President, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) Products Team Moody's

TEKsystems Global Services

Martha Poulter

Pilar Manchón

Royal Caribbean Cruises

Vice President of AI

Chief Information Officer

Roku, Inc.

Jeanette Prenger

Jesus Mantas

ECCO Select

Global Head of Strategy and Offerings for IBM Global Business Services, and Managing Partner for GBS Ventures and Cognitive Assets

Chief Executive Officer - President

Miguel Quiroga Chief Executive Officer

IBM Corporation

Visible

Maria Martinez

Raymond Quiroga

Cisco

KPMG

Monica McManus

Rosa Ramos-Kwok

Executive Vice President, Chief Customer Experience Officer

Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Rotory and Mission Systems Lockheed-Martin

Roberto Medrano Chief Executive Officer Venture Network

Digital Chief Financial Officer

Managing Director and Senior Executive Bank of America

Sergio Retamal Chief Executive Officer Global4PL

Yesenia Reyes Managing Director Accenture

Andres Ruzo

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer LinkAmerica

Cipriano A. Santos Director of Technical Content Gurobi Optimization

Lidia Santos

Information Technology Director UPS

Sue Siegel

Chief Innovation Officer and Chief Executive Officer of Business Innovation General Electric

Nuria Simo

Chief Information Officer Inter-American Development Bank

Lúcia Soares Managing Director Health2047, Inc.

Myrna Soto Partner

ForgePoint Capital

Jorge Titinger

Founder and Chief Executive Officer Titinger Consulting

Adriana P. Torres

Senior Vice President, Global Head of Hospitality and Food & Beverage Support Oracle

Emma L. Trejo-Farhadi

Managing Director Derivatives and FX, Regulatory Reporting and LATAM Operations Technology Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Lisa Tuccio King

Senior Vice President, Enterprise Production and Technology Services Wells Fargo

Nina Vaca

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Pinnacle Technical Resources

Ivonne Valdes

Vice President, Global Strategic Accounts, Schneider Electric

Adam Vazquez

Vice President, Technology Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Marisa Viveros

Vice President Strategy and Offerings, Telecommunications and Media IBM Corporation

Enna Zarate

Chief Information Officer DHL Express

MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 43

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AUTO

TOP LATINOS IN AUTO

AUTO MOTIVE Carlos Cuevas

Latinos not only heavily influence the economic power of the auto industry, but they also dominate the workforce behind. A focus on the continuous development of this industry as more sustainable and innovative systems emerge. The top leaders in the industry and the push from Toyota to advance vehicle safety.

44 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019


TOP 10 LATINOS IN THE IN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY Ranked by alphabetical order 1. Luis Alcantara Group VP of Vehicle Production Engineering Toyota

3. Fred Diaz President and CEO Mitsubishi Motors North America

5, Maria Eugenia (Maru) Flores Global Manufacturing and MP&L Development Services Manager Ford Motor Company

2. Santiago Chamorro VP of Global Connected Customer Experience GM

6. Claudia Marquez 4. Rodolfo Dominguez VP of Business Transformation and Chief VP of Sales and Vehicle Operations Nissan North America Digital Officer MBFS (Mercedes Benz Financial Services)

MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 45


AUTO

TOP LATINOS IN AUTO

7. Brandon Ramirez Senior Group Manager of Product Communications Hyundai Motor America

9. José Luis Valls Senior VP, Nissan Motor Company Ltd., and Vice Chairman Nissan North America.

8. Laura Hernandez-Romine 10. George Villasana Director of Global Media and Multicultural Senior VP and General Counsel Marketing Asbury Automotive Group General Motors Corporation

WRITE AND SHARE #ConnectLL

46 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019


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COVER USHCC

A NEW AND REFRESHING TOUCH

Jessie Hilbert

Courtesy

Moisés Cervantes

When Ramiro Cavazos received a call from the executive search firm last year, he was asked - “If you were nominated to be the new CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, would you ever consider it?” AFTER MUCH thought, he applied for the job, even though he knew the pool of candidates that were nominated were going to be tough to beat. “I was confident that this just wasn’t my time to be CEO of such a large organization, I was happy where I was at in my career, however, when the opportunity presented itself, my family and I prayed long and hard for it,” said Cavazos humbly.

His prayers were soon answered.

On October 1, 2018 Ramiro Cavazos was appointed CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the largest Hispanic business organization representing over 4.3 million Hispanic-owned businesses. Here, we were able to talk to Ramiro about his background and journey leading him to his successful role today. Cavazos is more than prepared to take on this new role. In fact, his experience and knowledge began early at a young age where he was fortunate enough to focus on academics and any opportunities that came his way thanks to his upbringing. He was raised in West Loco, Texas on a farm as a seventh generation Texan. His father was a County Commissioner and his mother was a bookkeeper. He grew up speaking english and spanish, with a Latino and Hispanic upbringing living in America, but crossing the border quite often to go to Mexico for dinners, Quinceaneras, and other special celebrations. He attended the University of Texas at Austin, where he completed his bachelor’s degree in government studies. Shortly after his finishing his undergrad,

RAMIRO CAVAZOS

CEO OF THE USHCC

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“WE NEED TO SEE MORE OF A DIVERSITY ON THIS LIST TO REPRESENT THE COMMUNITY THEY ARE REACHING OUT TO”. he completed his graduate degree in public administration from St. Mary’s University in San Antonio. Prior to becoming CEO of USHCC, Cavazos first 25 years of his career was impressive. He was the President and CEO of the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Director of Research and Economic Development for the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and was also Director of Economic Development for the City of San Antonio. Additionally, he was Global Public Affairs Manager for the Levi Strauss Foundation in Texas, Mexico, and Latin America. “Throughout my career, my wife, Christa, would always ask me, ’What do you think you are going to do next?’. I would always say ‘if something comes along it would need to be the right thing at the right time.’ My new role is the next right thing, I loved my job as President and

CEO as the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, but now I get to work with all 250 of the Latino chambers, and it is a proud honor to do so,” he says. As the new CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Cavazos was able to transition into the role right away. Now, spending his weekdays in Washington D.C., and his weekends in San Antonio with his wife, and two sons, his life has changed quite a bit. Cavazos has spent the last four and half 4 months meeting as many supporters, senators, Congress representatives and traveling to the different Latino chambers. “Ramiro brings a new personal touch, and it is very refreshing for the chamber community here. We have received lots of feedback in the past from the hispanic community saying we could do a better job at representing the businesses. However, in the MARCH / APRIL 2019 LATINO LEADERS 49

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COVER USHCC

past couple of months we have already seen Ramiro bring his special flavor and personal touch to working towards that communication,” Richard Garcia, Chief of Staff tell us. If you ask Cavazos what he has planned for the next five to ten years, his list will leave you writing for days. He plans to build an organization that takes advantage of the opportunities and resources it has. He wants to be active and responsive to members of the hispanic community by doing good work and delivering on commitments. “We want to have a 20 million dollar organization that has the resources to be actively leveraging, growing and contracting for our members,” says Cavazos. He explains how they would access over a trillion dollars of new GDP to the economy by helping the hispanic owned businesses get the capital they need. “We need to make them bankable,” he says. Lastly, he plans to grow the number of women and Latinos that are on the Corporate 500 list which is barely at 2% today. “We need to see more of a diversity on this list to represent the community they are reaching out to”.

When asked Cavazos what his role means to him, his answer was genuine. “I’m very proud and grateful. It’s a privilege to be in a role of such high responsibility. For me, this is perfect timing to take all of the skills I have and put them all to work in D.C. I want to change the tone of the city and make sure that we are seen as a leader for where we need to go as a Latino community.” He also wants to encourage the same determination to other Latino leaders across the country that they are leaders too. “They need to own it and realize that they are powerful no matter what role they are in,” he says. Cavazos says he can’t do this alone, and that he needs everyone to be moving in the same direction. He can be the servant leader to set the example and tone for everyone, but he needs help. “It’s all about the 58 million of us in this community. This makes us the tenth largest economy in the world. When you look at what we can produce, that is the opportunity that we have,” he says.

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BUSINESS

FRANCISCO CAPETILLO PARTNER AT IBERBRAND FRANCISCO CAPETILLO comes from a family of lawyers. His paternal grandfather, his uncle and his father were all lawyers graduated from the best law school in Mexico. However, his interest in law did not come until his last year of high school. He took a class called “Introduction to the Study of Law”. In 1993, he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in law from Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City. After graduating, Francisco found an opportunity and worked for Olivares & Cia, one of the best law firm specializing in Intellectual Property in Mexico. Francisco learned so much within the three years he was part of the team. He then became a junior partner for Arochi & Lindner, one of the largest and newest firms in Mexico also specializing in Intellectual Property. He then worked as Partner for ten years in a boutique firm specializing in Corporate and Intellectual Property. In this firm, he had the opportunity to work with big clients in the automotive industry. On November 1, 2016, he partnered with IBERBRAND, a young, innovative Mexican firm with a lot of drive. Here he found

some of the best lawyers and partners, as well as the tools, resources, infrastructure, and organization needed to serve his clients better. His portfolio is basically made of clients that have origin in United States, Europe and Brazil, and have the need to protect their trademarks and patents in Mexico or Latin America. Francisco is recognized for his trademark and litigation work. With one source describing his as a tough and fast experienced advisor. He is recommended in the field of IP by LEGAL 500 as “valued member of the IP team who looks after big-name clients”. Francisco represents important companies in the automotive and insurance companies. For more than 25 years, Francisco has guided clients not only through the core areas of trademark and litigation counseling and portfolio management, but also through the more complex areas of the practice, including infringement actions, domain name disputes, clearance searches, trademark license agreements, assignments, changes of name, merges, security interest and audits.


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SPOTLIGHT

INGRID ROJAS CONTRERAS

R JOURNEY TO THE FIRST NOVEL Jessie Hilbert

Courtesy

Carlos Cuevas

When Ingrid Rojas Contreras was in school, she was doubted by many that she could ever do something in journalism. “Well, maybe you should study something else,” her teachers would say to her. That statement never stopped her.

54 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

ojas Contreras was born in Bogota, Colombia. Both her father and mother came from lower-income families and were the first people in each of their families to travel to the city. Her childhood consisted of hot weather, hard work, but a lot of love with big family gatherings, holidays and story sharing. When she was 14, she left Colombia with her parents and went to Venezuela, and from there she moved around, a number of times. However, one thing she knew for sure, was that she always wanted to be a journalist. Although she grew up in a family where no one really knew anyone who wrote, and there wasn’t necessarily a writing mentor to look up to, her parents pressured her into finding a way to study journalism. So she did. She set out to do what she wanted to do and made her way to the States to attend journalism school in Chicago under a student visa. Rojas Contreras had five different student visas during her time in journalism school and eventually got her green card. Just this last year, she became a citizen. During her time in Chicago, she struggled but eventually found the niche she was looking for. “I loved the aspect of writing a story, doing the research, doing the interviews, and then coming back with all of that material to start writing,” she tells us. However, reporting stories wasn’t letting her express what she felt like she needed to express. “Once I got into fiction, it really satisfied that hunger for that expression I was looking for,” Rojas Contreras tells us. After turning to fiction, Rojas Contreras never turned back from it. Recently, she published her first novel Fruit of the Drunken Tree, that made an impressive debut to the public. “I had seen so much throughout my time in Bogota,” she tells us. “I was going through different visas at the time when the story first came to me. I was feeling homesick and couldn’t travel back, so I started to describe the country. Since I couldn’t be there, I decided to put it down on paper, and it kind of made it a reality on the page.” Since publishing her first novel, life has been exciting, yet and different. “When you’re writing your first book, you're in your own little world at your own desk,” she says. “Once you publish a book, showing up


to your desk is a little different.” I feel like people are watching or listening in on me because now they are wanting and expecting a second book!” She finds herself having to focus a little bit harder to try and get that out of her mind. However, she tells us that the first draft has always been something that she has struggled with for many reasons. She says you don’t know what you are creating, it’ll come slowly or in spurts and she has found that creating something new is very difficult to do. “One day it goes well, the next day I might just not be able to write one good sentence,” she says. The next day, she’ll be ready to go again. She often starts her days by opening the dictionary to search for random words. “I’ll write something based on whatever word I pick,” she says. “Believe it or not, I have a whole backlog of these words that I find. If I’m looking for something new to write, I’ll look through those first.” When asked to give a piece of advice to young Latina women, the first thing she said was to give yourself time. “If you’re aspiring to be a writer, find work that allows you to set your own schedule, figure out what time of day is better for you to write.

RELIEF FROM WRITER'S BLOCK When it comes to experiencing writer’s block, Rojas Contreras has a system for herself: if she’s drafting at her computer, she will switch to her typewriter. If that doesn’t work, she will print what she is working on and do it longhand. Then, if that doesn’t work, she will either do more editing instead of trying to write something new. If she becomes frustrated, she won’t write for the rest of the day and starts crafting, a new hobby she has recently taken on!

The main thing is to allow yourself to fall deeply into the story you want to tell,” she says. Rojas Contreras wants every young writer to never hold back, to never be insecure and to know it’s ok to not know what you are doing right away. Currently, she is working on a family memoir about her grandfather, whom people said had the power to move clouds. While only 30 pages in, she hopes to have this published within the next two years, “that’s my goal,” she says, “maybe even sooner.”

www.ingridrojascontreras.com

ingrid_rojas_c i__rojascontreras

MARCH / APRIL 2018 LATINO LEADERS 55


LATINO LEADERS CELLAR

FOLLOW US LatinoLeadersMagazine

Jorge Ferráez

@ JFerraez_Latino

Luis E. González

ELEMENTS OF WINE PRODUCTION

F

OR MORE than 25 years, I’ve been collecting wine and it still makes me feel very excited about learning and knowing how it is produced. I have accepted the fact that a substantial portion of the quality of the wine is the fruit. So, the vineyard and soil qualities, weather and terroir can give you the potential to make a great wine. But the rest is a cocktail of many other elements that go anywhere from attention to detail in how to harvest, to temperatures at fermenting, passing through cleanliness of must and visiting the realms of the techniques of toasting the barrels for cellaring. The former is usually the hand of the Wine-Grower and the latter the one of the Wine-Maker. A duo that when fortunate, produce the best out of any vineyard. Growers like Bulmaro Montes, Rolando Herrera, Gustavo Aviña, Manuel Frias, Hugo Maldonado and Winemakers like Elias Fernandez and Michael Trujillo are great examples of Latinos with the highest level of quality and professionalism in this industry. Below, I’m fortunate to review some of their wines:

01 KLINKER BRICK WINERY OLD VINE

ZINFANDEL 2015

• Region: Lodi, California • Varietal: Zinfandel • Price: $45 • Aromas: Vanilla, Ripe Plum • Flavors: Spice, Red Currant, Cherry • Impression: Nice and round • Structure: Full Body, Rich • Drink with: Short Ribs, BBQ Pork Ribs • Why I loved this wine? Easy to understand and enjoy • My Rating: 90 pts.

01 SHAFER ONE POINT FIVE 2016

• Region: Napa Valley, Stags Leap District • Varietal: Cabernet Sauvignon • Price: $95 • Aromas: Lots of ripe red and black fruit • Flavors: Toasted coffee, vanilla, truffle, black cherries • Impression: Elegant • Structure: Full body, impressive • Drink with: Juicy Steaks, Pork Tenderloin, Ribs • Why I loved this wine? Consistent quality and satisfaction • My Rating: 93 pts.

01 HL HERB LAMB VINEYARD 2015

Bulmaro Montes

Rolando Herrera

Hugo Maldonado

Gustavo Aviña

Elias Fernandez

Manuel Frias

• Region: Napa Valley • Varietal: Cabernet Sauvignon • Price: $150 • Aromas: Chocolate, red currant, cherries • Flavors: Vanilla, pepper, raspberry compote, mint • Impression: Succulent, impressive! • Structure: Melodic, complex and elegant. • Drink with: Big pan-seared Rib Eye, Filet Mignon in green pepper sauce • Why I loved this wine? You can really taste those hilly vineyard ripe fruits. • My Rating: 94 pts.

Michael Trujillo

01 Klinker Brick Winery Old Vine Zinfandel 2015

02 Shafer ONE POINT FIVE 2016

05 HL Herb Lamb Vineyard 2015

56 LATINO LEADERS MARCH / APRIL 2019

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Profile for Latino Leaders

Latino Leaders Magazine- Mar/Apr 2019  

Latino Leaders Magazine- Mar/Apr 2019  

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