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CIP Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2016-2019


Vermilion Campus 5707 College Drive Vermilion, Alberta T9X 1K5 Lloydminster Campus 2602 59 Avenue Lloydminster, Alberta T9V 3N7


Table of Contents Executive Summary....................................................................................

3

Accountability Statement........................................................................

4

Institutional Context..................................................................................

5

Affordability, Accessibility, and Quality Goals, Priority Initiatives, and Expected Outcomes...................................................

7

Appendix A: Financial and Budget Information.............................................. 12 Appendix B: Enrolment Plan and Proposed Programming Changes............... 16 Appendix C: Research, Applied Research, and Scholarly Activities.................. 20 Appendix D: Community Outreach and Underrepresented Learners.............. 22 Appendix E: Internationalization.................................................................... 24 Appendix F: Capital Plan................................................................................. 25 Appendix G: Information Technology............................................................. 26 Appendix H: Environmental Scan................................................................... 29 Comprehensive Institutional Plan

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Lakeland College 2016-2019


Executive Summary As Alberta post-secondary institutions continue to face fiscal challenges, Lakeland College is solidly building on its strengths, addressing its weaknesses, opening up to new opportunities, and meeting external challenges. This 2016-19 Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) captures many of the exciting developments at the College as it strives to inspire learner success, foster relevant programming and research, and enhance connectivity and sustainability. Innovating in teaching and learning, practicing financially sustainable measures, and aligning with stakeholders establish the foundation for the College to deal with both internal and external challenges. There is a need to identify areas for continuous improvement at the College as well as a desire to address staff engagement issues. External opportunities for growth and engagement can be found in research and marketing/branding. Lakeland is also proactively facing the

challenges of critical deferred maintenance as well as an urgent need for new capital investment. The College’s strategic plan centres around four central outcomes:

Learner Success • Expand student-managed learning opportunities • Develop and enhance student life opportunities • Optimize usage of classroom technology

Relevant Programming and Research • Optimize enrolment and programming • Build research capacity

Connectivity

Sustainability • Modernize the learning environment • Optimize usage of College resources • Empower staff to excel Lakeland College is presenting a balanced budget for 2016/17. Other than specific resource requests for information technology and capital expenditures, all current goals will be met by utilizing current College resources or through cost-recovery initiatives. Lakeland College strives to ensure it can adapt to the current economic environment in a way that still enables achievement of Lakeland’s key strategies and outcomes as well as alignment to the Government of Alberta and the Ministry of Advanced Education’s key priorities.

• Create and enhance strategic partnerships • Raise the profile of the College

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Accountability Statement This Comprehensive Institutional Plan was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with legislation and associated ministerial guidelines, and in consideration of all policy decisions and material, economic, or fiscal implications of which the Board is aware.

Darrel Howell Chair, Board of Governors Lakeland College

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Lakeland College 2016-2019


Institutional Context Mandate Statement Established under the Post-secondary Learning Act (PSLA), the Board manages and operates the post-secondary institution within its approved mandate [PSLA Section 60(1)(a)]. Lakeland College is a public, boardgoverned college operating as a Comprehensive Community Institution under the authority of the PSLA. Established in 1913, Lakeland College has campuses in Vermilion and Lloydminster. Lakeland College awards certificates, diplomas, and applied degrees. The College also offers baccalaureate degree programs in collaboration with degree-granting institutions. Complementing the economic strengths of Alberta, Lakeland College’s programming seeks to meet the needs of learners, communities, business, and industry in its service region. Programming includes agricultural and environmental sciences, apprenticeship and industry training, energy, fire and emergency services training, wellness and human services, business, and university transfer. The College also designs and delivers programs to meet specific learner, community, and industry needs through continuing education and corporate training. Lakeland College promotes innovation by conducting applied research activities that are relevant to its program areas, complement teaching and learning, and advance innovation-based rural community economic development. The focus of applied research is primarily in agricultural

sciences and energy and environmental sciences. Initiatives are geared towards supporting Alberta’s future economy by helping industry partners capitalize on new opportunities and find solutions to current challenges. Lakeland College’s commitment to the collaborative principles of Campus Alberta is demonstrated through partnerships and transfer agreements within the post-secondary system that strengthen its programming and service capacity while improving efficiencies. Lakeland College works with school jurisdictions to host career and technology studies courses and support learner pathways into postsecondary such as providing dual credit programming so students can earn high school and college credits at the same time. Using different instructional delivery methods including face-to-face, blended, and distance learning, Lakeland College is able to maximize learner access to highquality and affordable lifelong learning opportunities. To inspire learner success, Lakeland College provides a learning and teaching commons that creates personalized learning pathways and supports instructional excellence. Students develop competencies in different learning methods and technologies, so they are prepared for lifelong learning. International projects, practicum experiences, and study abroad opportunities, combined with increased international student enrolment at the College’s campuses, help prepare students for participation in an interconnected world.

To enhance students’ college experience, Lakeland College offers a full range of services including academic advising, athletics, cafeterias, clubs, financial aid, health, learning strategies and support, recreation, residence, student centres, student employment, and wellness services. The College has numerous specialized facilities such as multiple music studios, two community theatres, two recreation centres, a swimming pool, and an indoor riding arena that are often the site of community events and activities and help support the recreational, cultural, fitness, and conferencing needs of the region it serves. Approved by the Board of Governors March 25, 2015 Approved by the Minister, Innovation and Advanced Education June 24, 2015

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Affordability, Accessibility, and Quality Goals, Priority Initiatives, and Expected Outcomes Ever to Excel in a Global Society A Focus on Collaboration, Quality, and Accountability

GOALS

Strategic Goals 1. Learner Success • Expand student-managed learning opportunities • Develop and enhance student life opportunities • Optimize usage of classroom technology

2. Relevant Programming and Research • Optimize enrolment and programming • Build research capacity

3. Connectivity • Create and enhance strategic partnerships • Raise the profile of the College

4. Sustainability • Modernize the learning environment • Optimize usage of College resources • Empower staff to excel

EVER TO EXCEL IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY 6

Lakeland College 2016-2019


Strategic Goal 1 – Learner Success

GOA Priorities

Objectives

Goals for 2016/17

Goals for 2017/18

Goals for 2018/19

Accessibility Quality

Expand studentmanaged learning opportunities

• Ensure each school has at least one studentmanaged or studentled initiative

• Assess needed resources to accommodate increasing enrolment in programs that offer significant studentmanaged learning opportunities

• E valuate studentmanaged learning initiatives

Quality

Develop and enhance student life opportunities

• Conduct root cause analysis of student withdrawals

• Implement identified actions to address student withdrawals

• C onduct further root cause analysis if necessary

• Create a Student Life Advisory Council to improve the student life experience

• Assess the effectiveness of the Student Life Advisory Council

• Develop strategy to support online learners

• Implement plan for improved online learner support

• Assess need for further online learner support improvements

• Expand Desire to Learn (D2L) learning management system usage

• Continue to expand D2L usage

• C ontinue to expand D2L usage

• Support faculty in classroom technology usage

• Continue to support faculty teaching and learning needs

• C ontinue to support faculty teaching and learning needs

Quality

Optimize usage of classroom technology

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Strategic Goal 2 – Relevant Programming and Research

GOA Priorities Accessibility Quality

Quality

8

Objectives Optimize enrolment and programming

Build research capacity

Lakeland College 2016-2019

Goals for 2016/17

Goals for 2017/18

Goals for 2018/19

• Identify areas for targeted enrolment expansion in core programming areas

• Implement actions to support targeted enrolment expansion

• E valuate impact of actions flowing from planning process

• Explore and pilot flexible and creative learning opportunities within programs (e.g. progressive educational approaches, blended learning, online learning)

• Continue to expand flexible and creative learning opportunities

• C ontinue to expand flexible and creative learning opportunities

• Identify expanded learning opportunities and supports for Indigenous learners

• Continue to expand learning opportunities and supports for Indigenous learners

• C ontinue to expand learning opportunities and supports for Indigenous learners

• Implement the College’s strategic research plan

• Review the effectiveness of the College’s strategic research plan

•U  pdate the College’s strategic research plan

• Evaluate the impact of the teaching and learning innovation fund

• Evaluate the impact of the teaching and learning innovation fund

• E valuate the impact of the teaching and learning innovation fund


Strategic Goal 3 – Connectivity

GOA Priorities

Objectives

Goals for 2016/17

Goals for 2017/18

Goals for 2018/19

Quality

Create and enhance strategic partnerships

•Engage with internal and external stakeholders as ambassadors and champions for the College

• C ontinue engagement with key stakeholders

• Increase staff input into the CIP planning process

Quality

Raise the profile of the College

•Roll out a new College branding strategy

• Continue to roll out new brand

• E valuate effectiveness of branding strategy with a public awareness survey

• Continue to update and improve College website

• Continue to update and improve College website

• C ontinue to update and improve College website

• L aunch fundraising campaign to support farm revitalization

• Measure financial impact of fundraising campaign

•M  easure financial impact of fundraising campaign

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Strategic Goal 4 – Sustainability

GOA Priorities Quality

Quality Affordability

10

Objectives

Goals for 2016/17

Modernize the learning environment

• Continue progress on the Dairy Learning Facility, Animal Health Learning Clinic, and trades’ roof projects

• Complete Dairy Learning Facility and Animal Health Learning Clinic

• Renovate up to 3 Vermilion classrooms/ labs as resources permit

• Renovate up to 3 Vermilion classrooms/ labs as resources permit

• R enovate up to 3 Vermilion classrooms/ labs as resources permit

•Consult with staff and students on the development of the Vermilion revitalization plan for classrooms/ labs

• Implement Vermilion revitalization plan as resources permit

• Implement Vermilion revitalization plan as resources permit

• Develop a plan for renovation and expansion of residence service

• Implement the residence plan as resources permit

• I mplement the residence plan as resources permit

• Develop business continuity and risk plans

• I mplement business continuity and risk plans

• Continue to implement business continuity and risk plans

• Review one core service department

• R eview one core service department

• Review one core service department

• Upgrade IT network and infrastructure

• C ontinue to implement IT roadmap

• Continue to implement IT roadmap

• Ensure statement of operations is balanced or in surplus at fiscal year-end (to support reinvestment in College infrastructure)

• E nsure statement of operations is balanced or in surplus at fiscal year-end (to support reinvestment in College infrastructure)

• Ensure statement of operations is balanced or in surplus at fiscal year-end (to support reinvestment in College infrastructure)

Optimize usage of College resources

Lakeland College 2016-2019

Goals for 2017/18

Goals for 2018/19


GOA Priorities Quality

Objectives Empower staff to excel

Goals for 2016/17

Goals for 2017/18

Goals for 2018/19

• Implement targeted engagement practices in response to 2015 survey; resurvey staff engagement

• Implement targeted engagement practices in response to 2017 survey

• C onduct staff engagement survey in early 2019

• Continue to develop the succession and leadership development frameworks

• Continue to develop succession and leadership development frameworks

• C ontinue to develop succession and leadership development frameworks

• Implement improved recognition practices

• Support effective recognition practices

• S upport effective recognition practices

• Increase staff input into the CIP planning process

•Increase staff input into the CIP planning process

• I ncrease staff input into the CIP planning process

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Appendix A: Financial and Budget Information Overview Lakeland College is committed to using its resources to support the achievement of its strategic goals in alignment with the mandate of the Government of Alberta. In particular, achieving excellence in service delivery, promoting accessibility, and ensuring sustainability in the postsecondary educational sector are at the core of Lakeland’s financial and strategic planning processes. Lakeland College has a strong record of fiscal prudence and will continue to maintain this reputation. The College has received a 2% increase in its Campus Alberta grant for 2016/17 and is projecting no further increases for 2017/18 and 2018/19. Maintaining programming and advancing College goals, while at the same time dealing with uncertainty in future funding, is a significant challenge. Zero budget growth may reduce the College’s ability to invest in needed technology, renovations, and renewal. Lakeland is currently predicting a balanced budget during this period through a combination of expense reduction and modest revenue generation. Lakeland’s leadership team has been closely involved in identifying sustainable expense reductions. Building a collaborative approach to strong financial management is core to the College’s ability to deliver a balanced budget. Schools and departments have built and reviewed their budgets with the support of the financial services department. Variance reports and analysis of actual expenditures over the last three years have been used to inform evidence-based decision making in identifying expense reductions. In addition, a cautious but realistic approach, based on past performance, has been used in projections of enrolment and revenue increases.

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Lakeland College 2016-2019

Lakeland College is actively engaged with other post-secondary institutions in forums such as the Alberta Association in Higher Education for Information Technology (AAHEIT) and is seeking opportunities to share best practices and resources to realize efficiencies in the post-secondary sector. Lakeland’s primary sources of revenue, at 80% of all College revenues, continue to be government grants, apprenticeship tuition, and fees.

Budget Assumptions All financial projections are based upon funding conditions known at the time of writing. This plan, as well as the following two years of forecasting ending in 2019, is based on the following assumptions:

Revenues: • The Campus Alberta Grant will increase by 2% in 2016/17 and remain static for 2017/18 and 2018/19. • Apprenticeship seats will be reduced in 2016/17 by 132 seats. • Tuition will remain frozen at 2014/15 levels for each year of this plan. The 2016 review of the Post-Secondary Learning Act may provide clarity on the issue of tuition increases. • The College will continue to receive the grant to offset the freeze in tuition fees. • The full-load equivalent increase is attributed to growth in a number of programs (e.g. Agriculture, Heavy Oil, and other new programs or delivery methods being offered). • Investment income will remain stable. Growth was expected; however, with the uncertainty of the impact of the declining oil revenues in Canada, it is unclear what the long-term impact of this will be on the Canadian economy and on the College’s investment.

• Residence rates in Lloydminster increased considerably in 2014/15 and 2015/16 bringing College rates closer to local market rates; in future years, the increase has been forecast at 3% per annum. • Lakeland will continue to seek revenuegenerating opportunities that flow from College programming to support a stable operating environment.

Expenses: • Salaries and benefits represent the most significant expense to the College and also serve as one of the largest uncertainties in preparing budget projections. The collective agreement with the Lakeland College Faculty Association expires on June 30, 2016; the cost of any settlement remains uncertain. The AUPE collective agreement is settled for the 2016/17 year and provides for a 2.5% increase. The government is requesting that agencies subject to the Alberta Public Agencies Governance Act implement a freeze on compensation increases and grid movement, for all non-bargaining staff, effective April 1, 2016, and extend that freeze to March 31, 2018. • Lakeland’s focus on continued expense reduction, process improvement, and modernization will continue to ensure that the College develops and maintains its financial sustainability.


Statements of Expected Revenues and Expenses: Lakeland College Operating Budget

2016-17

2017-18 2018-19

Revenue Government of Alberta grants Federal and other government grants Student tuition and fees Sales of services and products Donations and other grants Investment income

40,846,462 2,740,792 13,868,300 10,956,161 408,950 1,000,000

41,492,182 2,740,792 14,064,245 11,088,789 408,950 1,000,000

42,150,816 2,740,792 14,263,130 11,225,397 408,950 1,000,000

Total Revenue 69,820,665 70,794,958 71,789,085

Expenses (by Object) Salary and benefits Amortization Materials, supplies and services Facility costs Utilities Scholarship expense

42,278,318 7,396,387 12,846,394 4,410,968 2,193,950 694,648

42,958,959 7,396,387 12,846,394 4,704,620 2,193,950 694,648

43,790,131 7,396,387 12,846,395 4,867,574 2,193,950 694,648

Total Expenses 69,820,665 70,794,958 71,789,085

Expenses (by Function) Instruction and training Academic and student support Facility operations and maintenance Institutional support Ancillary operations Sponsored research Total Expenses

30,111,082 12,224,034 10,190,313 11,011,460 5,121,272 1,162,504

30,508,835 12,346,207 10,541,195 11,078,721 5,148,604 1,171,396

30,946,143 12,497,102 10,757,268 11,211,105 5,191,332 1,186,135

69,820,665

70,794,958

71,789,085

Annual Surplus (Deficit)

-

-

-

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Revenues 3.93%

19.86%

58.50% 58.50%

15.69%

0.59%

n n n n n n

Government of Alberta grants 58.50% Student tuition and fees 19.86% Sales of services and products 15.69% Federal and other government grants 3.93% Investment income 1.43% Donations and other grants 0.59%

1.43%

Expenses by Function

Expenses by Object

17.51%

14.59% 60.55%

43.13% 15.77%

10.59%

7.33%

6.32% 0.99%

1.66%

n n n n n n 14

Instruction and training Academic and student support Institutional support Facility operations and maintenance Ancillary operations Sponsored research

Lakeland College 2016-2019

18.40%

43.13% 17.51% 15.77% 14.59% 7.33% 1.66%

n n n n n n

3.14%

Salary and benefits 60.55% Materials, supplies and services 18.40% Amortization 10.59% Facility costs 6.32% Utilities 3.14% Scholarship expense 0.99%


Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended June 30, 2016

2015-16

Operating Transactions Annual surplus $ - Add (deduct) non-cash items: Amortization of tangible capital assets 6,701,048 Expended capital recognized as revenue (3,643,917) Total non-cash items

3,057,131

Cash Provided by Operating Transactions

3,057,131

Capital Transactions Acquisition of tangible capital assets

(2,601,524)

Cash Applied to Capital Transactions (2,601,524)

Investing Transactions Purchases of investments Proceeds on sale of portfolio investments

1,000,000 (1,000,000)

Cash Provided by (Applied to) Investing Transactions -

Financing Transactions Debt - repayment

(120,000)

Cash Provided by (Applied to) Financing Transactions (120,000) Increase (decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents $ 335,607

Tuition and Mandatory Fees Lakeland College’s fees are managed within the provincial tuition fee policy. For the 2015-16 academic year, the average tuition cost at Lakeland was $4,500 and comprehensive fees averaged $209. Tuition and mandatory non-instructional fees are frozen until at least the 2017-18 academic year as the government reviews the overall funding model for Campus Alberta. For budgetary purposes Lakeland has assumed

a zero per cent increase in these fees for the 2018-19 and 2019-20 academic years. International tuition fees are not subject to the tuition freeze. For the 2016-17 fiscal year, Lakeland’s Board of Governors approved the following international tuition fees: • F or programs with domestic tuition fees up to $6,500, the international tuition fee is $13,800.

• F or programs where tuition exceeds $6,500, the international tuition fee is the domestic tuition fee plus $7,500 up to a maximum of $22,500. The exception is the 12-week Firefighter program. The domestic tuition fee is $8,725 and the international tuition fee is $13,800.

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Appendix B: Enrolment Plan and Proposed Programming Changes Lakeland College continues to offer programming in key areas such as Agriculture, Energy and Heavy Oil, Environmental Sciences, Human Services, Emergency Services Training, Business, University Transfer, Health and Wellness, and Apprenticeship. Lakeland is laying the groundwork for two Centres of Excellence: Commercial Agricultural Production and Agri-Business and Energy and Environmental Sciences.

Commercial Agricultural Production and Agri-Business Lakeland College has been specializing in agricultural training for over 100 years, and the School of Agriculture continues to be a thriving, innovative, and core part of the institution. Lakeland’s focus is on commercial agriculture production and agri-business and features a studentmanaged farming operation powered by New Holland. Students, with faculty guidance, make all business and operational decisions relating to the various business units that are part of the farm including crop production units on over 2000 acres of land, beef and purebred cattle herds, a dairy unit, and a sheep production unit. New to the farm in 2016/17 is a dedicated commercial beef research herd and the establishment of a student-led livestock research team. Plans are well underway for a comprehensive farm revitalization project that will include the construction of

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Lakeland College 2016-2019

new and expanded educational labs, a fully operational Dairy Learning Facility and Animal Health Learning Clinic, and upgrades to the Equine Learning Centre. Lakeland is just completing a significant overhaul to the Livestock Research and Handling Centre. All of these facilities provide significant hands-on learning opportunities for students and will play a central role in the College’s agricultural programming for many years to come. Enrolment in Agriculture has grown considerably at Lakeland College with an increase of about 50% over the last five years. Lakeland will almost certainly exceed 400 FLEs in the School of Agriculture during the 2016/17 academic year positioning the College as a leader in Alberta for training in commercial agriculture at the diploma and certificate level.

Energy and Environmental Sciences Lakeland College is located in the heart of Alberta’s heavy oil industry and has been providing heavy oil and power engineering training for over 35 years. With the construction of the new Energy Centre, which officially opened in the summer of 2015, Lakeland College now has the most up-to-date heavy oil and power engineering training facility in Alberta. Lakeland’s flagship programs in this area are the Heavy Oil Operations Technician (HOOT) and Heavy Oil Power Engineering (HOPE), but the College also provides programming

in such areas as 3rd and 4th Class Power Engineering, Gas Process Operator, Petroleum Management, and Introduction to Heavy Oil and Gas. Thanks to critical targeted enrolment funding, enrolment in Lakeland’s School of Energy has more than doubled over the last five years. While Lakeland’s Energy department provides training in the energy production sector, the College’s Environmental Science department trains students in the fields of land reclamation and restoration, fish and wildlife conservation, and environmental monitoring. This newly combined school is providing some of Alberta’s largest energy sector employers with the trained labour force they need to cover the full spectrum of energy production and environmental operations. Lakeland’s Applied Degree in Environmental Management continues to be of a flagship program well supported by industry with strong student demand and consistent waitlists. Environmental Sciences has also been able to capitalize on Lakeland College’s large land holdings and has developed oil and gas industrial infrastructure on campus that students are using to study environmental impacts and reclamation/restoration methodologies.


New Program Proposals Other Programming Highlights • Niche programming in Fire Fighting and Emergency Services Technology, Sign Language Interpretation and American Sign Language and Deaf Studies, Real Estate Appraisal and Assessment, Interior Design, Street Rod Technologies, and Human Services training in French (offered online throughout Alberta) •E nrolment growth in Agriculture, University Transfer, Business, and Human Services • Additional intakes for the Renewable Energy and Conservation program planned for 2016 and beyond in response to a recent surge in student demand • P iloting of two competency-based programs in 2016/17 • P rioritizing of student accessibility to post-secondary education through Academic Prep programming and increased online delivery

New Programming Opportunities New academic program development at Lakeland College is strategic and coordinated in order to meet the needs of students and the labour market. All new program proposals must be supported by significant, documented evidence of student and industry demand, linkages to governmental priorities, and longterm financial viability. Pending resource availability, Lakeland is exploring the following new programming opportunities:

Program Proposal Apprenticeship

Business

Overviews • Plans to develop 4th period of Instrument Technician • Identified regional training needs in Plumbing, Millwright, and Sheet Metal • Plans to offer Apprenticeship Hairstyling beginning in 2017/18 • Administrative Professional certificate program featuring unbundled curriculum delivered in an on-demand, blended format to full- and part-time learners • Exploring potential for a credential in Leadership

Human Services

• Currently offering Community Mental Health program as continuing education; plans to offer it as a parttime, online, credit certificate in 2016/17 • Exploring potential for programming in Animal Assisted Therapy

Energy

• Reinstatement of Heavy Oil Operations Technician (HOOT) certificate program for 2016/17 • Development of 2nd-Class Power Engineering • Development of Well Site Supervisor • Development of Service Rig Drilling

Environmental Science

• Potential expansion in Renewable Energy; investigating on-campus delivery and interdisciplinary training with Trades and Technology • Investigating potential for an Adventure Tourism program

Emergency Services

• Reinstatement of the Bachelor of Applied Business Emergency Services for 2016/17

Degree Completion

• Investigating opportunities in Agriculture, Environment, and Energy

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Enrolment Plan - FLE Projections Lakeland College Enrolment Plan - FLE projections 2014/15 to 2018/19

Program

Apprenticeship Certificates Accounting Technician American Sign Language & Deaf Culture Studies Business Administration Community Mental Health Early Learning and Child Care Educational Assistant Emergency Medical Responder Esthetician Fire Fighter Certificate of Achievement General Agriculture Health Care Aide Heavy Oil Operations Technician International Development Office Administration Power Engineering Pre-Employment Renewable Energy and Conservation Street Rod Technologies Veterinary Medical Assistant Western Ranch and Cow Horse Diplomas Agribusiness Animal Health Technology Animal Science Technology Business Administration Child and Youth Care Crop Technology Early Learning and Child Care Emergency Services Technology Environmental Sciences Heavy Oil Power Engineering Interior Design Technology Practical Nurse Renewable Energy and Conservation Sign Language Intrepretation Applied Degrees Bachelor of Applied Business: Emergency Services Bachelor of Applied Science: Environmental Management University Studies Other Non Credential Employment Skills Enhancement Open Studies Tourism - Ready to Work

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Lakeland College 2016-2019

2014/15 Actuals Dom 390.165 7.100 10.000 8.600 0.000 49.675 33.422 0.000 11.500 24.408 7.500 10.101 29.875 6.400 0.273 57.925 34.730 8.500 10.500 21.182 22.000 75.364 76.700 73.061 95.084 25.025 60.835 29.175 63.800 137.334 113.357 35.275 12.604 1.638 11.000 13.003 42.830 173.700 17.533 59.175 5.673 1,920.022

2015/16 Actuals (to date)

Int

4

1 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 2 1 35 2 0 0 0 0 4

Dom

Int

390.000 3.500 9.800 5.500 2 0.000 68.775 0 41.163 1.350 8.100 0 35.654 17.800 5 16.467 0 0.000 0 0.000 0.000 56.859 53.260 25.500 0 13.000 26.500 0 21.900 70.967 0 77.333 1 89.812 0 120.900 29 51.533 4 72.100 0 48.567 0 61.695 144.600 0 185.694 2 40.778 0.000 1.000 8.000 6.600 40.118 161.400 6 23.679 8.700 0.000 2,057.604

2016/17 Projected Dom

Int

354 10 1 10 10 2 2 70 0 43 1.6 10 0 36 15 0 12 3 25 8 0 0 50 45 25 0 15 26 2 22 65 1 78 1 75 1 155 37 54 4 60 2 47 3 58 137 5 188 2 41 0 1 7 9 30 175 2 16 10 6 2,068


Enrolment Trends Dom = Domestic Int = International 2017/18 Projected Dom

Int

2018/19 Projected Dom

Int

Growth/Decline Dom

Int

370 390 0 0 10 2 10 2 7 2 9 9 -1 0 10 4 10 6 5 4 4 4 4 4 70 2 70 2 1 2 45 45 4 0 1.6 1.6 0 0 10 1 10 1 2 1 36 36 0 0 15 1 15 2 -3 -3 14 4 14 5 -2 5 27 9 29 9 29 9 0 0 0 0 3 5 5 0 52 54 -3 0 47 49 -4 0 27 1 29 1 4 1 17 19 6 0 26 3 26 4 -1 4 22 22 0 0 65 2 65 2 -6 2 78 2 78 2 1 1 75 2 75 2 -15 2 157 57 160 75 39 46 56 5 56 6 4 2 60 4 60 5 -12 5 48 5 48 6 -1 6 58 58 -4 0 140 6 145 8 0 8 188 2 188 2 2 0 41 41 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 6 6 -2 0 27 36 29 0 35 40 0 0 180 4 185 5 24 -1 16 16 -8 0 10 10 1 0 0 6 6 0 2,058 2,124 115 100

There are several forces driving enrolment increases and decreases at Lakeland College: • University Studies enrolment should increase as families look for more economical university pathway options closer to home. • Targeted expansion funding for the expansion of the Heavy Oil and Power Engineering program and reinstatement of the Heavy Oil Operations Technician program will fuel further Energy enrolment growth. • As international enrolment increases, there should be a steady increase in Business enrolment. • Online programming is driving growth in Human Services enrolment. • The economic downturn and subsequent reduced demand for Apprenticeship students, particularly in welding, will lead to enrolment decreases in Apprenticeship training.

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Appendix C: Research, Applied Research, and Scholarly Activities Lakeland College supports and encourages applied research to achieve excellent student outcomes and to support the social, environmental, and economic life in its communities, Alberta, Canada, and the world. A society supported by a healthy, diversified economy is a receptor for welleducated, motivated graduates. Through applied research, students take the lead in learning and gain hard and soft skills that will benefit both them and their employers. In addition to providing a wider perspective on applied research as well as possible sources of funding, industry and community partners contribute real-world problems for students and faculty mentors to solve. Applied research priorities support the College’s strategic goals of Learner Success and Relevant Programming and Research by providing flexible and creative learning opportunities that expand student-managed learning, optimize enrolment and programming, and build research capacity. Research also provides additional means to attain the College’s goals of Connectivity and Sustainability by creating and enhancing strategic partnerships, raising the College profile, supporting the modernization of the learning environment, and optimizing usage of College resources. As noted in the College’s mandate, “Lakeland College promotes innovation by conducting applied

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Lakeland College 2016-2019

research activities that are relevant to its program areas, complement teaching and learning, and advance innovation-based rural community economic development. Initiatives are geared towards supporting Alberta’s future economy by helping industry partners capitalize on new opportunities and find solutions to current challenges.” The Board of Governors has identified four priority areas for applied research growth: Agriculture, Environment, Energy, and Emergency Services. Lakeland will focus on these areas but also take advantage of opportunities that support the College’s strategic goals as they align with the Alberta Research and Innovation Framework (ARIF). For example, Lakeland, in collaboration with the Regional Business Accelerator, and the Alberta Innovates Technology Futures Technology Development Advisor (TDA) in Lloydminster, will explore options for engaging business students with the local business community. The priority areas were selected for their relevance to the Lakeland region and to complement institutional strengths. Agriculture is the largest school at Lakeland College and an important industry in the region. Research will play a strong role in the emerging Commercial Agricultural Production and Agri-Business Centre of Excellence. Some agricultural applied research is integrated with Lakeland’s

Student Managed Farm (SMF). In 2016/17, the SMF will have both Crops and Animal Research Teams. These teams take the lead in integrating agricultural applied research projects at the College, allocating resources, and working closely with industry partners and advisory groups to align projects with industry needs. Lakeland’s applied research in agriculture will concentrate on supporting large-scale commodity agriculture, such as crops and livestock, that is typical in the region. The College is expanding its crops applied research to incorporate both field scale and small plot work. Lakeland’s knowledge, coupled with its land base and the recent hire of an experienced crop researcher with expertise in small plot research, will lead to an expansion of this activity. The College has most of the infrastructure and equipment necessary; although, as the applied research expands, gaps will certainly emerge. Lakeland’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System (UAS) with multispectral camera and software packages further enhances the College’s capacity to support agricultural applied research. With the recent acquisition of a dedicated research herd of 50 heifers and GrowSafe equipment, Lakeland is well placed to conduct long-term research related to feed efficiency. This is enhanced by a close collaboration with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. Lakeland, Olds College, and the


University of Alberta have complementary expertise and infrastructure and have worked collaboratively on such projects in the past and will continue to do so in the future. This cluster of expertise is an opportunity for Alberta to demonstrate international excellence. Lakeland has invested in the development of this priority through the expansion of the Livestock Research Centre on the Vermilion campus. While the College continues to engage in projects in renewable energy and energy conservation, there will be an increased emphasis on land use and the intersection of conventional energy production and environmental management. Lakeland’s Renewable Energy Learning Centre and Bio-Energy Centre at the Centre for Sustainable Innovation (CSI) provide significant infrastructure developed for research purposes and are very useful for public education and engagement, through informal extension work, as well as for teaching in the Renewable Energy and Conservation program. The future direction of research on renewable energy and energy conservation will focus on the agricultural sector, rural issues and applications, and the bioeconomy. The UAS will also enhance College capabilities in land-use applied research. Lakeland has been working with industry to establish a test site to examine the impacts of gas migration from abandoned

wellheads. This applied research program is a high priority for the College as it involves energy and environment and has the potential to significantly contribute to evidence-based policy making as well as provide support to the oil and gas industry. The former Alberta Fire School has been the Emergency Training Centre at Lakeland College for some years. Applied research on the use of UAS for emergency services will be another area of future applied research growth. Business integrates with all of the other disciplines; engagement of business students in real business issues, and specifically the issues of technologybased businesses, will help reinforce entrepreneurship and practical business problem solving in student learning activities. The new TDA will be co-located with the Regional Business Accelerator (RBA) at Lakeland’s Lloydminster campus. Lakeland has taken on a leadership role, in partnership with the RBA, to coordinate participation in the Alberta Regional Innovation Networks (RINs) programs and will continue to collaborate with other institutions to develop best practices in engaging in applied research and identifying opportunities for partnership. Outcomes expected from Lakeland’s applied research programs include enhancing the student learning experience, fostering entrepreneurship,

advancing environmental stewardship and resource management, and supporting an engaged community in achieving economic diversification. The Alberta Research and Innovation Plan (ARIF) identifies four provincial-level outcomes: “Economic Diversification and Job Creation, Environmental Stewardship, Effective Resource Management, and Engaged Individuals and Communities for a Healthy Alberta.” Lakeland College is working hard to support and align with these provincial outcomes through internal applied research activities.

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Appendix D: Community Outreach and Underrepresented Learners Supporting High School to Post-Secondary Pathways: Dual Credit Lakeland College continues to develop dual credit pathways for students throughout Alberta. Through a flexible and innovative online delivery system, the College is able to partner with any school division in Academic Year

Alberta thus creating student cohorts with participants province wide. Since Lakeland’s first dual credit offering in 2011, dual credit has grown through an increase in the number of courses offered, students enrolled, and participating school divisions. Although formal funding for dual credit is currently at risk, the College

Number of School Divisions

Number of Courses Offered

Number of Students Enrolled

2010/11

1

1

3

2011/12

1

5

21

2012/13

3

7

90

2013/14

6

10

155

2014/15

13

14

304

2015/16

17

22

359

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Lakeland College 2016-2019

will continue to build on its success with this initiative and will continue to promote the transition from high school to postsecondary education.


Academic Prep: Increasing Access to Post-Secondary Programs Academic Prep provides students with an opportunity to prepare for entrance screening by completing preparation modules in math, biology, chemistry, English, ESL, general science, or physics. These free, online, self-paced modules, with free tutorial support from Lakeland’s academic prep advisor, allow students to gain necessary skills to meet entrance requirements in their program of choice. In 2015/16, 46 students completed academic prep modules, and 25 of those students were accepted at Lakeland College for the 2016/17 academic year. This program constitutes a new and significant pathway for learners to access post-secondary education.

Academic Upgrading Returns to Lakeland College Lakeland College, an active partner with eCampusAlberta, provides tutorial services and resources to students completing Academic Upgrading through another institution. Feedback from students and community groups indicate a desire for Lakeland to offer Academic Upgrading courses again. The Teaching and Learning Department is collaborating with the Continuing Education Department to pilot Academic Upgrading course offerings in math and biology for 2016/17. Courses will be offered as blended delivery with both online and face-to-face options.

Regional Stewardship Lakeland College values its role and responsibilities with regional stewardship partners and enjoys an active and growing relationship with the Community Adult Learning Centres (CALCs). Lakeland is transitioning to a centralized model of regional stewardship led by a director and supported by all of the College’s deans. Lakeland meets regularly with its CALC representatives to discuss mutual priorities around adult basic education, literacy, and continuing education. The recent focus for this collaboration has been on the Academic Prep program and eCampusAlberta offerings. CALC coordinators have full access to the College’s entire Academic Prep curriculum and are able to use those resources to support regional learners hoping to transition into post-secondary education. eCampusAlberta is an increasingly important access point for learners in a rural setting where face-to-face programming isn’t viable. CALCs also enjoy free access to College teaching spaces and are regularly offering programming on campus.

Indigenous Learners Lakeland College continues to prioritize opportunities and supports for Indigenous learners. With the City of Lloydminster, Lakeland co-hosted an Indigenous Economic Summit in Fall 2015 that featured Indigenous leaders and youth as well as business and industry leaders from across the region and beyond. On-campus supports continue to grow, and in 2016/17, the College will be establishing a full-time Indigenous Advisor position as well as two new courses in University Transfer —

An Introduction to Indigenous Studies and Cree Language. Lakeland continues to offer programming that is either designed particularly for Indigenous learners or that seems to attract high proportions of Indigenous learners: Introduction to Heavy Oil and Gas (offered at Onion Lake Cree Nation), Tourism: Ready to Work, Employment Skills Enhancement, and Esthetician. Several campus events are held annually to bring increased awareness to and recognition of Indigenous culture: annual Teepee raising ceremony; music, dance, and traditional cooking demonstrations; and an Indigenous art display. In February 2016, the College brought Her 4 Directions, a cooperative of four businesses run by young Indigenous artists, on campus for a presentation and cultural panel discussion on Indigenous Women in Business. Lakeland College will continue to build on current efforts to create effective opportunities and supports for Indigenous learners to address this ongoing need.

Community Programming Lakeland continues to support programming to meet specific community needs. For example, Fine Arts programming in guitar, piano, percussion, brass, voice, string (violin and cello), saxophone, flute, and theatre are open to members of the public of all ages. Demand is strong, and programs run at full capacity. Lakeland is an important member of both the Vermilion and Lloydminster communities, and the College recognizes and values its role in providing community supports.

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Appendix E: Internationalization Internationalization at Lakeland College consists of a three-fold focus: recruitment of international students, participation in international development projects, and provision of opportunities for international mobility of College faculty and students. Lakeland experiences multiple benefits of internationalization. International students serve to enrich the classroom and other aspects of campus life; they broaden perspectives of the entire College community by creating a mix of cultures that more closely resembles the outside world. This is invaluable both for learners who are preparing to enter a global workforce as well as for faculty and staff who support graduates to be successful in an increasingly global economy. There is great potential for further growth in international enrolment at Lakeland. Although CCIs have only a small percentage of Alberta’s visa student population in the system, some rural institutions have started to actively capture this student market through strategic recruiting practices. Although modest in comparison to larger Alberta post-secondary institutions, Lakeland College has grown its international student enrolment from a headcount of 6, in 2010/11, to 49 students from 20 different countries as of 2015/16. Significant growth is expected for future semesters. Lakeland has actively partnered with overseas recruiting agents in key markets in Asia, Africa, Europe, and South America. Additionally, Lakeland College was recently

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Lakeland College 2016-2019

granted Student Partnership Status (SPP) in India; this simplifies and speeds up the study permit application process for Indian nationals. India currently accounts for approximately 40% of the international student body at Lakeland and, as a result of SPP and the Indian demographic, will likely remain the College’s top recruiting market. With potential inroads into new recruiting markets in East Asia and South America, Lakeland will continue to explore the viability of English as an Additional Language (EAL) programming to meet an anticipated demand. Lakeland continues to provide a great experience for international students. The College’s 2015 International Student Satisfaction Survey showed that 80% of international student respondents would definitely recommend Lakeland College to a friend or family member; 82% assessed contact and communication with the International Development as convenient. Lakeland will continue to improve upon logistical, academic, and social supports for its international students. The College continues to build on past experiences with international development projects and remains actively involved with development work. Lakeland completed the current CARICOM Education for Employment project in Belize as of March 2016 and has launched a new three-year Improved Skills Training for Employment Program (ISTEP) in Tanzania as the lead institution in partnership with NorQuest College. The successful

Belize project has supported economic development in the Belize region with a focus on agricultural training development at the University of Belize Central Farm. The three-year Tanzania ISTEP project began in March 2016 and is focused on remedial access programming and supports for disadvantaged learners. At the College level, the impact of international development work is very positive; when instructors who perform work internationally return to Lakeland, they bring back with them renewed energy and expertise that benefit all students. Lakeland students are also directly involved in College international projects; a group of Agriculture students took part in project activities in Belize in June 2015. Lakeland will continue to pursue additional international development projects that complement key College programming areas. Agriculture, Business, University Transfer, Environment, and Human Services students participated in study abroad experiences in 2015/16. Lakeland will continue to support such opportunities through such initiatives as the Campus Alberta Grant for International Learning.


Appendix F: Capital Plan In the competitive post-secondary environment, it is vital for Lakeland College to maintain and develop facilities that meet the expectations of students for modern, technologically advanced learning environments. Lakeland’s focus for capital renewal is the Vermilion Campus where aging infrastructure no longer meets the needs of some College programs. Much of the classroom space is outdated, and classrooms are too small for current class sizes. In addition, the College’s student-managed farm requires major refurbishment and reinvestment to expand the student experience and reflect the

range of farming and agricultural activities available to the 21st-century farm. As well, the leaking Trades building roof continues to be a significant concern and safety issue. Complete failure of the roof would result in significant risk to the College’s Trades programming. The replacement of Lakeland’s Dairy Learning Facility and Animal Health Learning Clinic are equally high priorities for the College. Replacement of both facilities will allow the College to meet required animal care standards and continue to offer regionally and provincially valuable programming.

Creating partnerships on the use of space and the development of programming is essential to Lakeland’s ongoing success as an institution. The College is currently partnering with the University of Alberta to leverage the larger institution’s expertise as Lakeland develops its future capital plans and projects. In its partnership with the Town of Vermilion, the College is also reviewing its future role in community recreation and developing a land utilization plan for College land to support both College and community needs.

New & Expansion Capital Priority

Project Name

Description

Location

1

Animal Health Learning Clinic

The current building no longer meets either the program’s space requirements or animal care standards. The plan is to create a learning environment that mirrors real-world clinics that students will be working in. In addition, 3 new laboratory spaces attached to the clinic will support the Animal Health and Animal Science programs and provide continuing education opportunities. The cost of this project will be in the $7.1 million range. Planning is well advanced, and it is expected that building will commence in 2017.

Vermilion

1

Dairy Learning Facility

A new Dairy Learning Facility, providing both parlour and robotic milking, will ensure a state-of-the-art training centre for the Alberta dairy industry as well as increased applied research opportunities. The cost of the new learning facility will be in the range of $9.5 million. Planning is well advanced, and it is expected that building will commence in 2016.

Vermilion

3

Residence Expansion

Current residences do not meet College needs, and Lakeland loses students who are unable to secure a place in residence. At the same time, some of the family housing units are past the point of economic repair and need to be demolished. The plan is to build 6 new townhouses for 24 students, create a small year round RV park for 25 RVs, renovate the remaining family-style housing, and complete the renovation of the Lloydminster residences. The cost of these initiatives will be in the range of $15 to $20 million.

Vermilion & Lloydminster

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

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Main Header Preservation Capital Priority

26

Project Name

Description

Location

1

Trades Building Exterior and Roofing Repair

A pilot will be completed in 2015/16 to better assess the cost of the desperately needed repairs to the metal cladding, glazing, and roofing. This potential cost is in the region of $4.1 million.

Vermilion

2

Replacement of Laboratory Space

There is urgent need to relocate and create four new laboratory spaces to support the Environmental and Agricultural programs. The current labs are too small and outdated. The cost of creating new lab spaces will be in the region of $3.5 million.

Vermilion

3

Vermilion Renovation & Classroom Renewal

The Mead & Bentley Buildings house the majority of Vermilion classroom and lab space and require extensive renovation and modernization in order to sustain appropriate learning environments. A plan is currently being developed to identify and prioritize annual renovations and to address asbestos abatement issues. In addition, as part of Lakeland’s farm revitalization project, the aim is to create a more consistent and attractive façade for the farm buildings. A budget of $30 million will be required for these initiatives. Lakeland is currently developing plans to assess options for creating larger classrooms within the College’s existing footprint and for phasing the renovation process to avoid disruption to academic programming.

Vermilion

4

Equine Learning Centre

Widely used by both the College and community, the current Equine Arena needs updating and renovating to create more flexible usage options and to better support the high regional demand for arena space. Renovations would include upgrading of siding and roofing, new seating, a new kitchen, new washrooms, and a new warm-up area. The cost of the renovations will be approximately $4.5 million.

Vermilion

5

Co-generation, Utilities and Lighting Retrofit Project

With the completion of the new Energy Centre and the existing opportunities on each site, the College will develop a co-generation strategy that will help to sustain building energy needs in the longer term. In addition, the current lighting systems on both campuses are outdated; light bulbs are no longer available. There will be considerable energy savings from the retrofit. This work is over 30% complete. The total cost of these projects is in the region of $8.1 million.

Lloydminster & Vermilion

Lakeland College 2016-2019


Priority

Project Name

Description

Location

6

Paving

The majority of roadways and some parking lots at the College are in desperate need of repaving. There are significant potholes in many areas; this is one of the most frequent complaints heard from Lakeland students. The cost to address the paving issues on both campuses is estimated to be $7 million.

Lloydminster & Vermilion

7

Learning Commons renovation

Creating a 24/7 modern learning space, including the addition of a second floor in the current learning commons, is the goal. It is estimated that this project will cost $6 million.

Vermilion

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

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Appendix G: Information Technology The College is planning key strategic investments and building blocks in information technology to order to better meet business needs and user expectations. The focus will be on improving the student and staff experience, enhancing access to services, and ensuring safeguards for sensitive information. The expectation is that this approach will improve operational performance and enduser satisfaction. In order to implement foundational technology solutions, realize savings, and continue to deliver services in a more efficient manner, Information Technology will be focusing on four key areas: • R eplacement of end-of-life devices to provide continual service •M  odernization of infrastructure and deployment of technology to reduce the risk of a security breach • R eview and optimization of information technology business processes •D  evelopment of strategic initiatives focused on improving operational Priority

28

Item

performance, reducing the complexity of the informational technology environment, and supporting the day-today direction of the College. Bandwidth is a necessity to accommodate high network traffic and future growth. In March 2016, Lakeland completed its bandwidth upgrades with benefits of substantial savings and increased services. Lakeland’s network infrastructure provides the foundational building blocks needed for the College to effectively deploy and support new business requirements. Information Technology will be upgrading or replacing its present infrastructure for the next two years. Information Technology continues to invest in new strategic technologies and processes with the goal of an improved user experience, operational performance, and savings. Lakeland is moving in the direction of cloud-based identity and access management. Single sign-on and password management are the initial building blocks.

Details

Lakeland’s participation in collaborative opportunities with other post-secondary institutions will aid in achieving financial efficiencies and a platform to share knowledge and resources. As committee members of the Shared Services Framework, the College will benefit through improved quality of services to clients, increased scope of services, and cost savings. Technology capital and operating requirements are funded largely from Lakeland’s internal budget. Therefore, opportunities for budget savings are a significant benefit to the College. Lakeland will be identifying and assessing emerging technologies such as “Cloud Computing,” “Internet of Things (IoT),” and social media as means to reduce costs and be more responsive to the College’s needs. Lakeland’s Information Technology department is moving to a more efficient and effective operational future state. The following table lists Information Technology initiatives. Most items are not single-year costs; rather, they will be spread out over several years as indicated. Funding Source

Cost

1

Network Refresh Infrastructure Project

To replace and upgrade network and telecommunication infrastructure

Capital Budget

$2,737,000 (over 2 years)

2

Identity Management (single sign-on password management)

To provide cloud-based identity and access management solutions

Capital Budget

$150,000 (over 2 years)

3

Lifecycle Asset Management

To replace such assets as computers/notebooks, printers, and classroom audio-visual equipment

Capital Budget

$182,000 (over 1 year)

Lakeland College 2016-2019


Appendix H: Environmental Scan Strengths Leading in Learning Lakeland College is leading with strategies and opportunities for its students through student-managed experiences, market responsiveness, and teaching and learning innovations. Lakeland students don’t just gain handson experience; they are also given opportunities to lead their own practical learning: • E mergency training programs allocate dedicated apparatus bays to students who then maintain the bay in a manner similar to a fire hall; the class is broken up into several “platoons” with the leadership going to each student in rotation. • E sthetician and Pre-Employment Hairstyling students provide public clinics; they take bookings from clients and provide services, at a reduced rate from industry, under instructor supervision. • The School of Agricultural Science’s Student Managed Farm (SMF), Powered by New Holland, incorporates business training in a practical, engaging, and industry-relevant manner; in various teams, students manage each farming unit by establishing strategic direction, setting goals, managing finances, and overseeing marketing, research, and stewardship. • S tudents take on the role of shift supervisor for the Energy Centre. Today’s learner wants to be actively engaged in the learning process, and the student-managed concept provides Lakeland students with experiences and skill building that are aligned with today’s workplace.

The College is also incredibly responsive to market needs for flexible learning opportunities: • Municipal fire personnel can access programming through modular delivery, both in house and at a distance, through client-hosted, correspondence methodologies. • Online Human Services courses are offered in both English and French. • Dual credit opportunities are now available in the Buffalo Trail School Division in carpentry and welding. • Online Renewable Energy and Conservation students can access 8-week courses that can be taken in any sequence with exit points for both certificate and diploma programs. • Part-time Welding courses are offered in two streams: entry-level students can practice cutting and welding whereas journeyman students can access advanced course in ABSA B Pressure initial testing. • Electrical contractors can access the Alberta Master Electrician course through evening and weekend programming. Lakeland is also moving forward in its implementation of innovative teaching and learning strategies: • Online Early Learning and Child Care students can now attend a virtual practicum, so they don’t need to leave full-time employment for a 4-week, onsite practicum. • Lakeland is now flipping classrooms through a technological transformation of space to increase active learning and engagement without a traditional “front of the class” feel; instructors and students equally share one learning community.

 igher mathematics courses, in the •H University Transfer program, now extensively use classroom sets of iPad tablets for students to explore various content-related apps and learning activities. • The Desire to Learn (D2L) Learning Management System (LMS) is extensively used in Business and University Transfer programs.

Financial Health All publicly funded institutions strive for a balance between ensuring the efficient use of public funds while still providing the best service possible to stakeholders. Lakeland College has a strong history of financial strength. Prudent budgeting and resource allocation practices have allowed the College to balance the need for growth with the need for sustainability. Lakeland has strong, collaborative processes for determining what new initiatives will be approved and for aligning resource allocation with the priorities identified within the Comprehensive Institutional Plan. As well, budget managers work actively to make the best use of the funds they’re accountable for in order to optimize outcomes for students, staff, community members, and other stakeholders. Lakeland remains committed to maximizing available resources while keeping operating costs contained. Maintaining financial sustainability and fiscal prudence will allow Lakeland to continue meeting the needs of both the Government of Alberta and future generations of students. Lakeland’s fiscal management has allowed for reinvestment into capital projects, such as the Energy Centre in Lloydminster, as well as investments in program development in such areas as agriculture, emergency services, and energy.

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Alignment Lakeland College prides itself on its strong alignment with government, industry, and its region. Proactively working for the betterment of all Albertans, the College seeks to support its government in creating accessible, affordable, relevant, and sustainable programming. In addressing the need for inclusion and diversity, Lakeland will continue to seek opportunities to meet the needs of the underrepresented learner. In the midst of migration and global access, the College strives to ensure students understand global citizenry by providing real world educational and business opportunities. Lakeland continues to work with partners in Campus Alberta to ensure the mobility of students. The College also continues to support the government to move forward initiatives, such as dual credit, thereby creating easy transitions for young learners to move through the post-secondary system. Lakeland’s dual credit opportunities have been the catalyst for many young students who may not otherwise attend the post-secondary system. In addition, through its support of Skills Canada, the College ensures its apprentices are provided with opportunities to be competitive in the world market. Lakeland College collaborates with industry to ensure its students have access to reallife experiences. Bringing industry to the classroom provides students with a greater understanding of their future workplace. Industry is at the table with all College advisory committees to ensure Lakeland’s curriculum and practical experiences provide up-to-date material based on industry standards and expectations: • F irefighter program graduates can be put on the job very quickly after their 12 weeks of training in large part due to the work of practicing fire personnel, on the

30

Lakeland College 2016-2019

program’s advisory committee, who give feedback on the practical learning that firefighting students receive at Lakeland • Because of a strong advisory council, Environmental Conservation and Reclamation (ECR) students have access to a wide variety of industrial partners: Canada Land Reclamation Association, Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Alberta Energy Regulator, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, Husky Energy, TransCanada Pipelines, Enbridge, and the Northern Forest Research Centre. Local industry take part in the College’s agricultural, environmental, trades, energy, emergency training, business, health, and human service programming events to provide knowledge, skills and equipment to ensure Lakeland students receive experiences which match the work world: • The College’s partnership with Alberta Milk has created additional educational quota to expand the dairy herd to create an industrial model for student learning and experiences. Dairy producers are also able to upgrade their knowledge on the latest practices. • Thanks to the support of New Holland, Lakeland’s Agricultural students have access to new agricultural equipment with state-of-the-art technology. • Lakeland has applied research opportunities because of its close alignment with industry expectations and student activities. • The College is working with industry on renewable energy systems. • Agricultural producers and related companies are cooperating on a variety of agricultural research projects. • Lakeland is encouraging student entrepreneurship through the Regional Business Accelerator (RBA).

Working with and through industry, Lakeland students can access an educational experience that might not always be available to other post-secondary students: • Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation graduates receive more industry-ready skills, certifications (wilderness first aid, ATV, snowmobile, electro-fishing, bear awareness, wilderness survival, pleasure craft operator) and experience (chainsaw, field camp, trailer back-up, truck outfitting) than any of Lakeland’s competitors. • E sthetician Certificate and PreEmployment Hairstyling Certificate students both benefit from strong industry support in Lloydminster as they provide services to the public in their student clinics. As a key northeast player in the Campus Alberta vision, Lakeland will continue to provide world-class learning experiences. Lakeland prides itself on working strategically to meet regional labor market needs by providing unique training opportunities in such industries as power engineering, truck driving, heavy oil programming, gas process operator, trades, and emergency training. Continuing to build a vibrant learning community, Lakeland seeks opportunities to support local needs such as unbundling current programs to create access for learners who need to continue working while upgrading or seeking further education. Providing stewardship for the northeast region means listening and proactively finding ways to link learners in a viable and transferable manner.


Weaknesses Continuous Improvement Systems Lakeland has identified areas for continuous improvement College wide: •N  eed to address loss of students during applicant process (e.g. for oversubscribed programs; withdrawals of qualified applicants after acceptance) •N  eed to ensure consistent customer service for College students •N  eed for faculty to stay current with demands of industry despite workload restrictions •N  eed for stronger alignment between Information Technology department and fluid classroom technological requirements •N  eed to find ways to encourage and reward innovative and proactive staff initiatives

Staff Engagement In April 2015, Lakeland conducted the Gallup Q12 Engagement Survey with College staff. With a 52% completion rate, the survey results highlighted a number of issues that the College needs to address with managers and staff: • S taff want to know what is expected of them and that they have the necessary materials and equipment to do their work. • The College needs to foster a stronger internal culture of recognition and appreciation. • S taff need to know how and where their contribution fits into the goals, mission, vision, and values of the College.

Since the survey results have been shared, College deans and directors have been meeting with their staff to develop an action plan for their schools and departments. College managers have been supported through training as they take this critical work forward and develop a strengths-based approach to team development. The plan is to resurvey staff in January/February of 2017.

Opportunities Research Lakeland wishes to build upon its successful applied research record by expanding where opportunities exist with an emphasis on the College’s four key themes: agriculture; sustainable environments (with a focus on renewable energy and buildings); conventional energy; and emergency response with particular emphasis on fire There are several applied research opportunities for Lakeland College: • Maximizing the potential of the College’s large land base (~2200 acres) and utilizing a long-term grant (to Feb 2018) for agricultural research from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council for both independent and collaborative projects • Investigating energy use and integration of energy systems in agricultural buildings (including the proposed Dairy Learning Facility) • Continuing and further developing research on crop management and inputs including the expansion of small plot research and demonstration plots

• Increasing opportunities for livestock feeding research trials as a result of the addition of a research cattle herd • Building on the changing political landscape with its increased emphasis on decreasing greenhouse gas emissions and increased reliance on renewable energy • Exploring research on abandoned petroleum wells with industry partners • Investigating practical uses of unmanned aerial vehicle systems in agriculture, environmental monitoring and research, and firefighting and protection • Supporting innovative and entrepreneurial companies and exposing students to entrepreneurship through the Regional Business Accelerator • Developing the East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network

Marketing and Branding In previous environmental scans, branding was recognized as a weakness. This has set in motion an in-depth process to strategically determine what Lakeland does differently from other post-secondary institutions so that a creative platform can be built to help the College share its story. Lakeland’s marketing and communications team worked with a brand strategist to uncover the fundamental elements of the College’s identity. After reviewing research and enrolment data and conducting numerous focus groups, a new brand strategy was developed and shared with the campus community in 2015. The unique selling point of the brand is that Lakeland is a leader in student-managed learning experiences. Whether it’s running the student farm, managing the on-

Comprehensive Institutional Plan

31


campus salons, hosting a community play program, or coordinating a fashion show and webcasting it to the world, Lakeland students have the opportunity to take the lead today. Berlin Communications was hired in December 2015 to develop brand elements. They developed a logo and visual platform that reinforces Lakeland’s brand and helps the College share its story with prospective and current students, staff, parents, alumni, government, donors and industry. While the visual identify redesign work was underway, a new responsive website was also being developed to provide a more engaging user experience. More than 40% of Lakeland’s web traffic is from mobile devices, and the strategically web-optimized pages weren’t providing a seamless experience for visitors. With responsive design, no matter the device, users will see the same look providing a consistent Lakeland College brand and experience. A marketing strategy is being finalized for the brand campaign rollout in September 2016. With the right messages, visual platform, and marketing and communications strategy and tools now in place, there’s an opportunity for Lakeland to recruit more students to low enrolment programs, raise more money, and improve relationships with the College’s many stakeholders.

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Lakeland College 2016-2019

Challenges Critical Deferred Maintenance A prioritized deferred maintenance plan has been developed and is updated annually. This plan informs the priorities for action for the College’s deferred maintenance projects. There are several challenges resulting from the backlog of deferred maintenance: • The majority of deferred maintenance needs are at Lakeland’s Vermilion campus; many buildings are in need of significant repair or complete renovation. • The allocation of resources for maintenance is barely sufficient to address emergency repairs required by the College’s aging infrastructure. • Many academic spaces do not provide an appropriate learning environment, and the small size of some classrooms limits a program’s ability to accept students. • There is a need to develop an updated space utilization plan for the redevelopment of the Vermilion campus. • There are significant challenges, such as a leaking roof in the Trades Centre, for which there is no immediate prospect of resources to repair.

Urgent Need for Capital Investment Significant capital resources are required to redevelop the Vermilion campus: • The Animal Health Learning Clinic and the Dairy Learning Facility no longer meet the required standards for animal care; these facilities must be replaced before the end of 2017 if the College is to maintain the Animal Health Technology program and a Dairy Learning Facility program as part of the School of Agriculture. Business cases seeking partnership funding for both projects have been submitted to the Government of Alberta. • In addition to the Animal Health Learning Clinic and Dairy Learning Facility, Lakeland is developing a broader farm revitalization plan to reflect the growing needs of the College’s very successful agricultural programming. • The shortage of student residence places in Vermilion results in a loss of students; in order to maintain and then grow some programs, additional residence spaces will be required. • A plan for the complete refurbishment of the main academic buildings is being developed. This will replace the plan for a new build, should be more cost efficient, and will result in a revitalized and modernized learning spaces for Lakeland’s students.


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Lakeland College 2016-2019

1 800 661 6490 www.lakelandcollege.ca

Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2016-19  

The comprehensive institutional plan (CIP) is a guideline for the next five years. The CIP sets the direction for the college to meet its go...

Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan 2016-19  

The comprehensive institutional plan (CIP) is a guideline for the next five years. The CIP sets the direction for the college to meet its go...