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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF LAKE LAND COLLEGE

NEW HOPE AFTER JOB LOSS SHORT-TERM PROGRAMS THAT LEAD TO SUCCESSFUL CAREERS NEWLY RENOVATED VO-TECH BUILDING STUDENTS MAKING A DIFFERENCE ON CAMPUS AND IN THEIR COMMUNITIES MEETING THE NEEDS OF AREA BUSINESSES

FALL 2016


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

As we transition from fall to winter I am reminded that January 2017 will be here before we know it. If you’re like me, you begin thinking about your new year’s resolutions on January 1. Your list may include eating healthier, joining a gym or volunteering in your community. If you anticipate returning to school, completing your college degree or mastering a skill will be one of your 2017 resolutions, I encourage you to take the first step today. Just think, if you get started today, you’ll already be making progress toward your 2017 resolutions. And, you’ll have enough time to complete the financial aid process, meet with an academic counselor and choose the classes that best fit into your busy schedule. The first step in enrolling is to complete the free Intent to Enroll. You can easily find this by going to lakelandcollege.edu and clicking on the Enroll Now button. You can also make an appointment in Counseling Services by calling 217-234-5232. Soon you will be on your way to reaching your goals, just like the many students and graduates who are featured within this issue of the magazine. I encourage you to read the stories of Pam Slone and Bryan Cox, former dislocated workers who have experienced success through Lake Land College. We welcome the opportunity to help you get started, engage your mind and change your life through the power of learning. We would like to get to know you and hope you’ll consider becoming part of Laker Nation!

Dr. Josh Bullock, President

GET SOCIAL WITH LAKE LAND COLLEGE! VISIT US AT LAKELANDCOLLEGE.EDU. LAKE LAND COLLEGE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Gary Cadwell, Chair, Mode Dave Storm, Vice Chair, Effingham Doris Reynolds, Secretary, Mattoon Ann Deters, Trustee, Effingham Robert Luther, Trustee, Mattoon Bruce Owen, Trustee, Dieterich Mike Sullivan, Trustee, Mattoon Jensyn Morrison, Student Trustee, Cowden

LAKE LAND COLLEGE CABINET

Josh Bullock, President Jon Althaus, Vice President for Academic Services Bryan Gleckler, Vice President for Business Services Jean Anne Grunloh, Senior Executive to the President Jim Hull, Vice President for Workforce Solutions and Community Education Tina Stovall, Vice President for Student Services

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STAFF

Director: Kelly Allee Graphic Designer: Paula Rosine

On the cover: Pam Slone will graduate this December with an associate degree in accounting.


CONTENTS 2

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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CABINET REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY

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NEW HOPE AFTER JOB LOSS

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LAKER HOMECOMING

2016 w VOLUME 2 w ISSUE 4

10 LAKER ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME 12 NEWLY RENOVATED VO TECH BUILDING 14 SHORT-TERM PROGRAMS THAT LEAD TO SUCCESSFUL CAREERS

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16 PAYING FOR COLLEGE 18 STUDENTS MAKING A DIFFERENCE ON CAMPUS AND IN THEIR COMMUNITIES 20 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 22 CHOOSE YOUR MAJOR

LAKE LAND COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT Lake Land College creates and continuously improves an affordable, accessible and effective learning environment for the lifelong educational needs of the diverse communities we serve. We fulfill this mission through: • University transfer education • Technical & career education • Workforce development • Community and continuing education • Intellectual and cultural programs

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THE LAKE LAND COLLEGE MAGAZINE is published three times a year for the residents of Lake Land College District #517 by Marketing & Public Relations at Lake Land College, 5001 Lake Land Blvd., Mattoon, IL 61938. This magazine will introduce you to Lake Land College and provide you with resources to get started or continue your education with us. For inquiries, contact Marketing & Public Relations at 217-234-5215. Views and opinions expressed by individuals in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of Lake Land College.

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SPRING CLASSES BEGIN JANUARY 9! Register by January 6.

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COMMITTED

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Lake Land College works closely with area companies to develop new curriculum and create training programs that help meet the demand for a trained workforce. “We are committed to partnering with businesses and community leaders to assist in the economic growth of East Central Illinois,” Lake Land College President Josh Bullock said. During the past year, the college created a new organizational unit to focus on this important initiative. Under the leadership of Vice President Jim Hull, the new Workforce Solutions and Community Education unit encompasses the Center for Business & Industry, Adult Education, Correctional Education, Community and Professional Development, IDOT QC/QA, the East Central Illinois Development Corporation staff and the Local Workforce Innovation Area 23 (LWIA). Hull and his staff are already working on new strategic partnerships. By assessing an organization’s needs, the college can customize existing curriculum or develop new short-term training programs that meet specific needs for a skilled and educated employee base.

the Marshall area. The classes are held in the evenings at the Eastern Region Center and all students complete an internship at Yargus as part of the program. Upon successful completion of the program, students are anticipated to be hired at the company. “This is an excellent example of the college’s ability to respond to the needs of our communities and businesses,” Hull said. “We want to work with organizations to help them develop the resources they need to achieve their goals.” As the college plans for the future, partnerships with industry and private and governmental agencies are essential to the college’s success. “We are already leaders in expanding the delivery of education beyond the traditional classroom,” Hull said. “We are one of the largest providers of correctional education in the country, delivering programs to 19 sites throughout Illinois. Perhaps this is a model we can replicate beyond our state borders.”

Earlier this year, Yargus Manufacturing and Lake Land College’s Adult Education department formed a partnership that is providing training in welding to students from

THE CENTER FOR BUSINESS & INDUSTRY The Center for Business & Industry plays a leading role in providing customized employee training and development services to regional employers. Services range from leadership development to electrical and manufacturing training. The Center for Business & Industry served 25 area business and provided customized training to more than 225 employees during the past year. The Manufacturing Skills Lab is a unique training facility that provides hands-on training in electrical maintenance skills, manufacturing skills certificate, safety quality, ISO standards and lean manufacturing. Training is offered on site or at the Workforce Development Center in Mattoon.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU Workforce Solutions and Community Education wants to hear from you! What training

needs to do you have? What services can we provide to help your organization expand or reach its goals? Please contact Myra Taylor, workforce solutions project coordinator, at 217-234-5228 or mtaylor@lakelandcollege.edu.

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“WHEN I GOT TO CAMPUS I WAS SURPRISED TO SEE THERE WERE SO MANY PEOPLE IN MY AGE GROUP HERE.” – PAM SLONE

ACCOUNTING MAJOR

MAKING A DREAM COME TRUE

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A positive outlook, determination and an open mind are all ingredients in Pam Slone’s recipe for success as a student returning to Lake Land College. “My time at Lake Land has been wonderful. The staff, faculty and my fellow students are all extremely helpful,” Slone said. After 30 years of employment, she found herself facing decisions as a dislocated worker. One of her options was to train for a new career at Lake Land College. “Accounting has always interested me, and I noticed that a lot of the job opportunities are in the accounting field so I decided to enroll at Lake Land College,” Slone said. At first she was a little nervous.

The staff in TRiO Student Support Services were very helpful along the way, Slone added. TRiO provides individualized guidance to assist students in reaching their academic goals. “TRiO is a fantastic program. The counselors have an open door policy and are always ready to lend an ear or give advice. It’s nice knowing they are available if I need them.”

”IT IS NEVER TOO LATE TO CHASE YOUR DREAM AND LAKE LAND COLLEGE HAS A STAFF THAT GOES ABOVE AND BEYOND TO HELP YOU MAKE YOUR DREAM COME TRUE.”

“I knew seven people from the Effingham area who took the college option. So I knew they were going to be here,” she recalled. “When I got to campus I was surprised to see there were so many people in my age group here.”

She quickly realized her age wasn’t an issue at all and felt welcomed by students of all ages. “Lake Land College is not just for people straight out of high school. Many of us are older. It is never too late to chase your dream and Lake Land College has a staff that goes above and beyond to help you make your dream come true.”

Slone, who lives in Mason, said from the beginning she approached college as a job. “I treated it like a job. I came to class and went home to study,” she said. “You have to prioritize your time. That is the key to being successful.”

And, successful she has been. Slone has been on the Honor’s List and will graduate this December with an associate degree in accounting. She took advantage of an invitation to interview for an internship at a local accounting firm and was hired. She was also fortunate to receive two scholarships from the Lake Land College Foundation–the J&J Venture Scholarship and the Frank & Anne Kabbes Scholarship. “I’ve had a lot of blessings throughout this journey,” Slone said. “Graduating will be a bittersweet time for me. I’m looking forward to starting a new chapter, but also saddened to see this one come to an end.”

NEW PROGRAMS Lake Land College develops new majors and courses to meet the demands of an ever-changing workforce. Faculty recently introduced the following new offerings this year: ŠŠ ŠŠ ŠŠ ŠŠ

Public Safety Telecommunicator – a short-term certificate training students for a career as an emergency dispatcher. Basic Welding – a short-term certificate training students in welding skills. Building Construction – a short-term certificate focusing on hands-on building skills. Welding Series – a three-part series of welding courses offered at Effingham High School.

GETTING STARTED Lake Land College has many options and resources to help you return to school. You can create a flexible schedule that allows you to continue meeting work and family obligations. Courses are offered during the day, evening, weekend and online. Options range from GED courses to Workforce Ready certificates and degrees that prepare you for the workplace to Transfer Ready degrees that prepare you to transfer and earn a bachelor’s degree. To learn more contact: Chris Strohl, director for community outreach, at 217-234-5429 or cstrohl@lakelandcollege.edu.

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The Distinguished Alumni Society Class of 2016 are, left to right, Matthew Cekander, Kerry Fearn, Craig Greeson, Renee Fonner and Kristopher Van Sickle.

BREAKING OUT THE RED & BLACK AT THE INAUGURAL LAKER HOMECOMING

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RENEE FONNER

KRISTOPHER VAN SICKLE

Fonner, Hindsboro, is the on air talent/ promotions director for the Cromwell Group of Mattoon. She has an associate degree in radio/ TV broadcasting from Lake Land College. She serves on the advisory board for Country Cares for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, is the co-coordinator for the Mattoon to Peoria St. Jude Run and a co-coordinator for One Stop Community Christmas.

Van Sickle, Woodstock, Ga., is an administrative officer with the United States Secret Service, Carter Protective Division. After high school, Van Sickle took a few classes at Lake Land College and then enlisted in the Coast Guard. He returned to school, completing bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Strayer University while stationed in Washington, D.C. Following his graduation from the Coast Guard he spent a short time working for the U.S. Postal System. In 2010, he succeeded in securing a position with the U.S. Secret Service and eventually was assigned to protect former President Jimmy Carter.

LAKER NATION CLASS OF 1990

One Laker Nation shined brightly during the college’s inaugural Laker Homecoming. Alumni and their families returned to campus to enjoy a weekend full of fun and activities. Sponsored by the Lake Land College Alumni Association and Laker Athletics, the weekend included athletic competitions, a golf outing and an Alumni Recognition Banquet, as well as fun appearances by Laker Louie. “Our first ever Laker Homecoming was a huge success. We are so pleased our alumni returned to their alma mater to reunite with their friends and classmates,” Dave Cox, director of alumni relations and annual giving, said. The Alumni Association inducted five new members into the Distinguished Alumni Society.

MATTHEW CEKANDER

LAKER NATION CLASS OF 1999 Cekander, Effingham, is a CPA and firm partner with Doehring, Winders & Co. LLP. He has an associate degree in business administration from Lake Land College and a bachelor’s degree from Illinois State University. He is a certified public accountant. In 2015 he was named as one of the Top 20 Community Leaders Under 40 from the Effingham Chamber of Commerce. He serves on the board of the Effingham Chamber of Commerce and actively supports the Family Life Center in Effingham.

KERRY (LAWSON) FEARN

LAKER NATION CLASS OF 1989 Fearn, Charleston, is the president and CEO for the Area Educational Credit Union. She has an associate degree in mathematics education from Lake Land College, a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Eastern Illinois University and a master’s degree in educational psychology from Eastern Illinois University. She has held many leadership positions in her field and served the Boyle chapter of the Illinois Credit Union League as the secretary for two years and as the chairperson for three years. She serves as the chairwoman of the legislative committee for the Illinois Credit Union League.

LAKER MEMBER OF 2007

We’re busy planning for next year’s event! Watch for more information about the 2017 Laker Homecoming.

CRAIG GREESON

LAKER NATION CLASS OF 1988 Greeson, Hanover Park, is a product manager– industrial business unit for Littelfuse, Inc. He has an associate degree in pre-engineering from Lake Land College and a bachelor’s degree in engineering from the University of Illinois. Greeson started his career as a product foreman at Littelfuse, Inc. in Arcola and has advanced as the company has grown throughout the years. He has held positions of quality manager and logistics manager for Littelfuse’s Electrical Fuse Division, regional quality manager for North American and European Littelfuse operations. In 2012 he moved into his current position. LAKE LAND COLLEGE w 217-234-5253

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LAKER HALL OF FAME MEMBERS

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Laker Athletics welcomed two new members to the Athletics Hall of Fame during the inaugural Laker Homecoming weekend. The newest members of the Lake Land College Athletics Hall of Fame are Jessica Daugherty, Casey and Jenna Bradley Hilligoss, Mattoon. The Athletics Hall of Fame recognizes athletes, coaches and friends who have excelled in their careers or brought recognition and support to the program.

JESSICA HILLS DAUGHERTY

JENNA BRADLEY HILLIGOSS

Daugherty played for the Lake Land College Volleyball team for one year. With the Lakers, she was part of the All-Region and All-Tournament teams. After Lake Land, Daugherty finished her playing career at Southeast Missouri State University. At SEMO, she was awarded AllConference and All-Tournament teams both junior and senior years.

Hilligoss was an All-Great Rivers and All-Region Tournament team softball member in both her ‘08 & ‘09 season. She was also an All-Region 24 member and All-Midwest second team pick. Hilligoss helped the Lakers to a 46-9 as a sophomore and a 36-9 season as a freshman. She recorded a .441 batting average her final campaign and a .406 batting average as a freshman. Jenna batted in 52 runs on 14 doubles, seven triples, and two home runs as a rookie. She also went 7-for-7 on stolen base attempts. Her sophomore year she batted in 52 runs making her the Lake Land Softball career leader in runs batted in with 104 until the record was broken in the 2015 season. In 2009 Jenna finished her season with seven homeruns, four triples and 15 doubles. Those 15 doubles her sophomore year made her the Lake Land Softball career leader in doubles with 29 until that was beaten in 2014.

LAKER NATION CLASS OF 2001 VOLLEYBALL COACH & PLAYER

Daugherty was the assistant coach under Lori Bennett for two years at Lake Land, during the 2003 and 2004 seasons. In 2005, she was hired as the head coach. During her tenure, the Lakers were in the top 25 in the nation four of the five years and three years were in the top 10. Daugherty coached a two-time All-American and five other AllAmericans. She was voted Great Rivers Athletic Conference Coach of the Year in 2009 and Region XXIV Coach of the Year in 2005, 2007 and 2008. “Jess’s impact on the Lake Land College Volleyball program has spanned from player to assistant to head coach. Under her leadership, Lake Land College Volleyball was put on the national map. It was a privilege to play for her and is an honor to follow in her footsteps,” said Ashli Robison current Lake Land Volleyball head coach, who also played for Daugherty at Lake Land College from 2007-2009. Daugherty is originally from Martinsville. She now lives in Casey with her husband Aaron, son Jackson, and daughter Lillian. She works from home and volunteers as a volleyball coach.

LAKER NATION CLASS OF 2009 SOFTBALL PLAYER

Following her graduation from Lake Land College, Hilligoss continued her education and softball career at Murray State University. She gives much credit for her success at Murray State to her experiences at Lake Land College and her coach, Denny Throneburg. Through the tough love he showed and knowledge of the game he shared, Jenna was awarded the Ohio Valley Conference Player of the Year in 2011. Jenna is a program coordinator for Body Electric at Sarah Bush Lincoln. She lives in Mattoon with her husband Mitch. They are expecting their first child in January. “Besides being a great athlete and student, Jenna was a strong team leader who has returned and is now giving back to her home community of Mattoon,” Laker Softball Coach Nic Nelson said.

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A TIGHT-KNIT CREW Sometimes things come up unexpectedly in your life and you have to take advantage of them, Chasidy Galloway of Hume said. When Galloway transferred to Lake Land from New Orleans she was not expecting to go into the automotive program. “I was an accounting major first, but then I met some of my classmates who were in the auto program and it seemed like a really good fit for me” she said. “I was just going to do the one year certificate and be done. But, after being here for a short time, I realized I really enjoyed the atmospherethe instructors, the students. So, I decided to stay and complete the degree program.”

Auto Club President Shane Trevino, Mattoon, agreed with Galloway. “This place has changed my life,” Trevino said turning to classmate Amine Jarrad. “AJ here – he’s like a brother to me. We are a family here.” In the auto lab, students enjoy working together on assignments. “Everyone is willing to share what they know with each other, which helps us all learn,” Galloway added. Trevino said he had worked on cars for years and thought he knew a lot. “Boy was I wrong,” he said. “I have learned so much in here from Kevin, Brian, Scott and my classmates. It is great.” Galloway agreed that the instructors are wonderful and always helpful. As for the class make up, she said, “there have been a few women come and go. I’m really proud of myself for sticking it out.”

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In the same breath, she said she never feels she is treated differently by her instructors or her classmates. “I have a really great support system in our program. My instructors allow me to work on projects like suspension and steering myself because they want me to learn and know I haven’t done it before. They never hold my hand or make me feel like I can’t do it because I am a woman. They have always included me and made me feel accepted.” Galloway said she would encourage anyone who is interested in this field to enroll. “You don’t already have to have knowledge of cars to be successful here at Lake Land.” Galloway came to the program knowing how to change the oil and a tire, things she learned from her dad years ago. Today, she is repairing a customer car by herself. “Lake Land College is able to help people reach their goals and takes them to places they never expected. It is a great school.”


LAKE LAND INVESTS IN VO TECH RENOVATION Lake Land College students in automotive and welding majors returned this fall to a renovated Vo Tech Classroom Building. During the summer months, the college invested in a $2.4 million renovation project to upgrade the automotive exhaust ventilation system, install brighter energy efficient LED lighting, improve safety and ADA accessibility, secure reliable mechanical systems and attach the building to the geothermal loop. “It now feels like a place you would like to bring your car to be repaired,” sophomore Chasidy Galloway said. All agree the building is now more inviting to the students and has created a new energy in the program. The welding lab is also much more open, as a large archaic pod was removed from the center of the lab.

“I can now see what all of my students are working on in the welding stations. The lab is much more open and bright,” John Gentry, power plant mechanic instructor/coordinator, said. One of the most dramatic changes happened in the once-crammed lobby of the building. Today, students walk into a spacious lobby area with a study table, computers, vending machine, resources and welcoming office spaces for faculty and staff. Kevin Miller, automotive technology instructor/coordinator, said the faculty really wanted the students to have a place to gather and network. “Once they graduate from this program, they are going to be in contact with each other. Networking with other technicians is a valuable tool you can use when diagnosing the newer vehicle systems that might not be familiar,” he added.

MEET THE FACULTY KEVIN MILLER Automotive Technology Instructor/Coordinator

BRIAN MADLEM Automotive Technology Instructor

JOHN GENTRY Power Plant Mechanic Instructor/ Coordinator

Miller will soon celebrate 20 years of teaching at Lake Land College.

Madlem has been teaching at Lake Land College for 15 years.

Gentry started as an adjunct instructor teaching welding and CAD 16 years ago and moved into his current position.

“I really enjoy working with the students and seeing them develop their skills while they are here. A lot of our graduates come back and it’s great to hear how successful they are.”

“In the lab situation you get to know your students really well. I enjoy watching them diagnose a vehicle and work together to repair it.”

“I enjoy seeing students successfully move out into the workforce and apply the skills they have learned in my classes.”

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Bryan Cox’s first day at Lake Land College was a little nervewrecking. “Honestly, it was scary. I had been out of school for more than 20 years and I had two kids in school who made straight As. I had to show them dad could do it too,” Cox recalled. When Cox learned he was going to lose his job at Ampad he decided to take advantage of the opportunity to return to school to benefit himself and his family. He researched his options and landed on Mechanical Electrical Technology, better known as MET, because of the versatility it offered.

MET

MECHANICAL ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY

A VERSATILE DEGREE, A SECURE FUTURE

According to the national Department of Labor Statistics, jobs in this area are projected to grow by 16 percent by 2024. – Source: bls.gov

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“I wanted something that would train me in a range of skills so that I wouldn’t be tied down to a specific place such as a factory. I wanted to have options no matter what happened in the future,” he explained. The MET program trains students in mechanical and electrical skills. Courses cover motors and generators, industrial wiring skills, welding, hydraulics, pneumatics, CAD, CNC, HVAC, AC/DC circuits, ladder logic, motors and PLCs. “Our program covers a broad range of skill sets. A lot of our students specialize in an area such as mechanical systems, electrical systems or even computer aided drafting and design,” MET Industrial Technology Instructor Dion Buzzard said. The hands-on training in this major aided Cox in securing a job even before he graduated in May 2014 with an associate degree in MET. “I went to the Technology Division

Job Fair sponsored by Career Services and was hired by Quad Graphics. I worked there on the weekends while I was still in school and a few months after graduation. When my current job opened at Anamet in Mattoon I took it because it was closer to home.” A Mattoon resident, Cox works as an industrial maintenance technician at Anamet, an international company that makes several types of electrical conduit and accessories. The MET major at Lake Land prepared him well for his profession, Cox said. “I do it all. I wire machine cabinets, fix anything that goes wrong. If a machine breaks I have to troubleshoot it and repair it. Most of my day involves electrical jobs, but I sometimes do mechanical projects,” Cox said. Cox’s duties are similar to many of the MET graduates. “Manufacturing facilities depend on the technicians to fix everything and restore production as quickly as possible. If a machine breaks down, our graduates know how to troubleshoot it and fix it, no matter what the problem is. We even cover fabrication so when a part breaks down they can make a new one and get the machine up and running,” Buzzard said. Buzzard said ideal candidates for this career are those who have a mechanical aptitude, are willing to learn and who are self driven. “The company depends on you to fix what’s broken. Essentially, you are responsible for minimizing the


loss of production time,” Buzzard said. “Many large manufacturing companies offer room for advancement to positions such as head of maintenance.” Outside of a production facility, MET graduates work as repair technicians fixing critical machines and appliances the public takes for granted. “Imagine if the fryer is down at a fast food place. You can’t make french fries. You need a technician to fix the machine. Or, what if the freezers stopped working at a grocery store? Management can’t wait. They need to have a technician there fixing it as soon as possible,” Buzzard explained.

Buzzard said he often receives calls from regional businesses seeking good students. In fact, Cox is one of those graduates who worked with Buzzard to hire two new technicians at Anamet. “The courses at Lake Land helped a great deal. I’m really glad I went to college and prepared for this career,” Cox explained. “At the time it was a change and it was a change I wasn’t expecting, but I decided I needed to just do it. It’s a good thing. I now have more knowledge and skills as well as schooling that will help me in the future.”

MEET THE FACULTY DION BUZZARD Industrial Technology Instructor Buzzard has been teaching at Lake Land more than 20 years. “I really enjoy helping students reach their goals. Lake Land College provides a nice environment for our students to learn and to be successful. I enjoy helping my students understand and grow in their knowledge and abilities.”

KRIS KERSEY Industrial Maintenance Instructor/Coordinator Kersey has worked at Lake Land for 19 years. He started in the telecommunications field and moved into his current position. “I really enjoy working with the students and getting to know them. There are times that they are frustrated and I enjoy being here to help them through.”

INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE SHORT-TERM PROGRAM, LONG-TERM CAREER

The Lake Land College Industrial Maintenance program has adapted over the years to fit the needs of area employers. Three groups of GE students have gone through the program, coming to campus once they completed their shifts to take classes. Bob Meek, one of those students, said the program was a great help to him in his career. He was already working in the field, but learned a lot in class. “Going through Lake Land College was invaluable. A lot of things I had worked on through my years of experience, but actually learning the schematics and diagnostics has been really helpful.” Although Meek graduated from Lake Land College with an associate degree in marketing years ago, he said he was still a little nervous coming back to campus. His fears quickly faded thanks in large part to his instructor Kris Kersey. “He was very welcoming and encouraging. He always told us, ‘You’ve got this. You can do this,’” Meek, of Neoga, said. “He really stuck with us.” Meek left GE for an opportunity to return to his previous employer, RR Donnelly as a maintenance mechanic. At the time, he was still enrolled at Lake Land, something that impressed his supervisors. The Industrial Maintenance program is a short-term certificate. Students gain a basic knowledge in a variety of areas such as electronics, hydraulics, pneumatics, motors and machining. “There is a high demand in the industry for people with these skills. I am aware of more job opportunities than we have graduates,” Kersey added. “Kris was invaluable. He was a great help. He broke down a lot of information for us in a short time. He would be showing us math and would simplify it in a way we could understand. Dion (Buzzard) was the same with hydraulics. He was excellent at explaining information to us,” Meek said. “Even though I had been welding for years, John Gentry made the information a lot more user friendly.” Lake Land College’s Industrial Maintenance certificate courses feed right into the requirements for the associate degree in Mechanical Electrical Technology.

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DID YOU KNOW that tuition and fees for an entire academic year at Lake Land College for a full-time student is only $3,800? This is about ¼ of the total cost of four-year universities in Illinois.

TEXTBOOK RENTAL SAVINGS

FOR A BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR Estimated cost of books without textbook rental Semester 1 BUS-151 BUS-200 ECO-231 BUS-120 BIO-100

Financial Accounting Legal Environ. Business Principles of Econ I (Macro) Business Career Dev. Bio Science

TOTAL

$210.55 $274.00 $196.05 $78.75 $164.10

$923.45

Semester 2 BUS-152 BUS-281 ECO-232 PHI-290 BIO-130

Managerial Accounting Business Statistics Principles of Econ II (Micro) Intro to Logic Environmental Science

TOTAL

$245.00 $225.00 $196.05 $151.85 $196.00

$1,013.90

If you had to buy your books it would cost about $1,937.35. WITH LAKE LAND COLLEGE’S TEXTBOOK RENTAL, YOU’LL SAVE ALMOST

FINANCIAL AID PROCESS ALL students requesting financial aid must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at fafsa.gov as early as possible to determine financial aid eligibility. Lake Land College’s school code is 007644. The following financial aid options do not require payback or reimbursement: 1. Federal or state financial aid grants such as the Pell Grant 2. Lake Land College Foundation Scholarships 3. Third-party scholarships Those who do not qualify for state, federal or local assistance can explore: 1. Paying the bill in-full by the due date. 2. Signing up for the Nelnet tuition payment plan. Lake Land offers the Nelnet payment plan that allows students to spread their tuition payments out over the semester as opposed to paying their bill in full at one time.

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$1,600

PER YEAR, IN THIS MAJOR


CHANGES TO THE FINANCIAL AID PROCESS

YOU CAN APPLY TODAY FOR FALL 2017! Applying for financial aid just got easier. From now on, the online FAFSA will be available on Oct. 1 for the following school year. “Most schools award financial aid on a first-come, first-served basis. Completing the FAFSA early will ensure you are in the applicant pool for any awards for which you qualify,” Paula Carpenter, director of financial aid and veteran services said. The FAFSA is the first step in the financial aid process to receive a grant or a loan. Many scholarships also require a student to complete the FAFSA. “We know that fall 2017 seems far away, but we want our Lake Land College students to be first in line to receive any Illinois MAP grant funding that could become available,” Carpenter added. In addition to making the form available earlier, it will be easier to complete the FAFSA, the free financial aid form, as families can use 2015 tax information which should be readily available. The form is available at fafsa.gov. Lake Land College’s school code is 007644.

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EASY WAYS TO GET STARTED

at Lake Land College 1. CALL

217-234-5232

2. LOOK

for the “Enroll Now” button at lakelandcollege.edu

3. VISIT

the Student Services wing of the Robert K. Luther Student Center.

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FLYING WITH AN IDEA While working in the library, Sarah Mummel started hearing thuds around sunset. Soon, she realized it was the sound of birds flying into the large windows. Most of these instances were fatal – either a bird broke its neck or injured a wing and became prey for raptors or other carnivores. “It was heartbreaking to witness. I would feel very distraught when I heard the sound because I knew what it meant,” Mummel said. About the same time, she received an environmental magazine in the mail and was surprised to see the cover story was about the controversy of birds flying into windows, especially in the city.

“It motivated me to work faster. I talked to my coworkers and Director Scott Drone-Silvers about how we could solve the problem,” Mummel explained. “I discussed my concern at the very first meeting of the Environmental Club.” Club members agreed it was an issue that they wanted to tackle and the mission began. Mummel talked with club advisor Jeff White and several staff on campus, navigated the administrative process and determined the best option. “I did a lot of research and discovered birds fly into the windows because they see a reflection of the nature around them and view it as a continuum of their surroundings or view their reflection as a mating competitor or a predator,” she said.

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Mummel suggested the club install a perforated window cling that would provide a matte barrier to the birds, while maintaining visibility within the Library. Club members and the administration agreed. The next step was to secure funding for the project. “We had less than half of the funds when I started this project, but the club members approached it wholeheartedly. We had two Krispy Kreme Doughnut fundraisers and the club members made phenomenal sales. Some were even selling 30 and 40 dozen donuts,” Mummel said. She said navigating the processes on campus took a little longer than anticipated, but she hung on to the idea and was inspired by her


BUILDING LEADERS

of credit on your college transcript. The credit is not transferable, but is a valuable credential for your future. “I like the idea of being able to have leadership credit on my transcript as a transfer student. The experience will help me when I transfer to a bigger school and take on a leadership role in a student club or classroom project,” Macklin said. Macklin, who is from Effingham, is a Presidential Scholar majoring in engineering. She plans to transfer to the University of Illinois in general engineering.

After completing Lake Land College’s Leadership Training Program, Cheryl “Jessie” Macklin knew she was ready to take on a new role on campus. With a year under her belt as a member of the Student Activity Board (SAB), Macklin decided she was ready to run for president of the board. SAB plans free weekly events for students. “The leadership workshops definitely helped me in both my roles on SAB,” said Macklin, who was elected president. Through the leadership series sponsored by Student Life, free workshops are offered throughout the year. If you attend four of the events, you receive a half hour

dream and the individuals who helped make it a reality. So far, Mummel has not heard the thuds but time will tell if the stickers were the best investment for the birds. Nevertheless, the campus beautification is enjoyed by all. “This was truly a group effort. I just came up with an idea. I’m truly grateful to everyone who helped me along the way,” Mummel said. “I feel fortunate that everyone was motivated by the cause and was willing to help the birds.” Mummel, pictured farthest right, who is from Windsor, graduated this past May with an associate degree in environmental science. She is now pursuing a certificate in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to widen her career options.

The leadership workshops touch on a variety of topics. For instance this year, seminars include the importance of community involvement, time management, goal setting and leadership and diversity. “It’s been fun being involved on campus and helping other students be involved. I work with a lot of student leaders on campus and I’ve learned a lot. We all try to work together and plan events that students will want to attend,” she said. “I would be sure to attend Welcome Day. That’s where I went at the beginning of the year to learn about all the clubs and activities Lake Land has to offer. I knew I wanted to be involved. It’s a great way to make friends and feel a part of the college community. There are a lot of clubs to join and I think there’s something for everyone.”

SERVING YOUR COMMUNITY Cassandra Hall learned the value of volunteering at an early age. “When I was 14, I won the Miss Teen Pageant in Neoga. In that role I volunteered at the Food Pantry and the Neoga Community Clothesline Project. It just kind of stuck with me,” Hall said. When she learned about the Serve Your Community volunteer program offered by Student Life, she thought it aligned with her beliefs. For every 7.5 hours of community service you complete, you receive a half hour of credit on your college transcript. The credit is not transferable, but is a valuable credential for your future.

“There are people out there who need help. If everyone said, ‘no’ where would we all be? If I can help at least one person in my life, it makes me feel better. I want to be a pediatrician and helping people is what I want to do in my life,” Hall said. “I believe in giving back,” Hall said. “It’s nice to be recognized for my service.” Hall is a member of the Student Government Association and Phi Theta Kappa. She is a Presidential Scholar and serves as a tutor to other students on campus. She is majoring in biology and plans to transfer into a pre-med program. Last year, Hall helped at Camp New Hope Clean Up Day and babysitting. This year she is helping out with SOFF and at the concessions and gate for the Cumberland Junior Football League. She plans to help her uncle with a dance he is hosting for adults with disabilities and continues to help out at the Clothesline.

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ON THE ROAD TO SUCCESS

COMMERCIAL DRIVER TRAINING OPTIONS As the regional leader in commercial driver training since 1991, Lake Land College has helped hundreds of men and women find employment in the trucking industry. The CDL department offers three options: CLASS A CDL PROGRAM Our program focuses on the safe and proper handling of commercial vehicles in restricted areas and on public streets and highways. Emphasis is placed on skills required to pass the Illinois Secretary of State commercial license written and road tests. Special emphasis is placed on skills required to operate equipment safely and respond to changing roadway conditions, hazards, and emergencies in preparation for the Illinois and Indiana secretary of state CDL written and road tests.

You will train in various traffic environments, gaining experience in common driving challenges under real-world driving conditions. Classes begin every three weeks and you can choose from a four-week full time or eight-week part time program. Benefits include: ŠŠ On-site recruiting with nearly 100% job placement rate. ŠŠ Graduates are awarded a Lake Land College certificate accredited by the Illinois Community College Board. ŠŠ The program is not financial aid eligible, but financial assistance may be available through a monthly payment plan, employer reimbursement, Illinois Veteran Grant or WIOA or dislocated worker grant. Greg Williams, who recently graduated from the program, said, “This was a great staff of people

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to learn from. I would strongly recommend this school to receive your training from.” CLASS B CDL PROGRAM Our Class B program is a 40-hour course that allows you to drive a straight truck that has two or more axles and gross vehicle weight of more than 26,000 pounds or towing a vehicle weighing 10,000 pounds or less. REFRESHER COURSE Our refresher course allows you to tailor a course to fit your needs. Maybe you have been off the road for a while and just need to brush up on skills, or you need to switch an out-of-state license to an Illinois CDL. Maybe you just want to learn and practice a new skill. For more information contact: Justin Onigkeit, transportation training coordinator at 217-238-8239 or jonigkeit@lakelandcollege.edu.


REACH YOUR

POTENTIAL

LEADERSHIP SERIES

In this series, current leaders can enhance skill sets while new or emerging leaders can create a solid foundation of leadership skills. All participants will develop individual, practical skills to become extraordinary leaders and lead your business to the next level. Courses are offered one half-day per month. This series is offered throughout the year at the Workforce Development Center in Mattoon or can be offered on site.

FRANKLIN COVEY’S 7 HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLE Participants will learn the key principles of effectiveness that underline successful, productive living with the principles of Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits. Classes are facilitated by Jami Brown, training and development specialist from Effingham. Training can be scheduled at your convenience. Choose from two eight-hour sessions or four four-hour sessions.

EXCEL FAST TRACK COURSES These four-hour courses are designed to help you brush up on your skills or advance in your knowledge.

MAKE YOURSELF AN INDISPENSABLE EMPLOYEE In this two-hour workshop you learn how to position yourself as a valuable asset to your current or future employer. Human Resource Consultant David Cox, SPHR, developed The Indispensable Employee to empower individuals to achieve their potential in the workplace. The program is ideal for individuals who want to brush up on their skills or advance in their careers, people who recently lost their job and students who will soon be entering the workforce. Organizations are also welcome to schedule private seminars. The seminar will be held at the Workforce Development Center in Mattoon or can be scheduled at off-site locations.

ONLINE COURSES THROUGH ED2GO.COM Online Courses through ed2go.com ŠŠ Personal Finance ŠŠ Explore a Career in Medical Coding ŠŠ Introduction to Interior Design ŠŠ Creating Classroom Centers ŠŠ Leadership INTERESTED IN MORE ONLINE COURSES? Visit ed2go.com/lakelandcollege to view all available courses and dates. Take these online courses from anywhere at the times convenient for you. Read lessons, participate in exercises and hold discussions with fellow students and the instructor. All courses are offered through the Center for Business & Industry. Call 217-238-8260 to register or learn more about these programs!

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LAKE LAND COLLEGE MAJORS

WORKFORCE READY AGRICULTURE

Agriculture Power Technology Agriculture Business & Supply Agriculture Business Agriculture Production & Management Alternative Ag Production Crop Production Horticulture Horticultural Production & Landscape John Deere Tech* Livestock Production

ALLIED HEALTH

Associate Degree in Nursing* Basic Nurse Assisting Dental Hygiene* Emergency Medical Services Fire Science Technology Massage Therapy* Paramedical Services Physical Therapist Assistant* Practical Nursing* Public Safety Telecommunicator

BUSINESS

Accounting Computer Applications Specialist Cosmetology* Cosmetology Teacher Desktop Publishing/Graphic Design E-Commerce Marketing Entrepreneurship Esthetics Information Technology IT-Computer Applications IT-Computer Game Development IT-Digital Media Specialist IT-Network Administration IT-Programming IT-Web Technology Management Marketing Medical Coding & Health Information

Medical Coding Specialist Medical Transcriptionist Office Assistant Executive w Legal w Medical Office Receptionist Office Manager Office Support Specialist General w Medical w MOS Professional Sales

Computer-Aided Design Computer-Aided Drafting Computer Technician Computer Troubleshooting Electronic Control Technician Electronic Control Technology Electronic System Specialist Electronics Engineering Technology Heating, Venting, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Technology Industrial Maintenance Instrumentation & Control Technology Manufacturing Skills Mechanical Electrical Technology Mechatronics Programmable Logic Controllers Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Management Renewable Energy Technician Residential Wiring Sustainable Energy Welding

CENTER FOR BUSINESS & INDUSTRY Commercial Truck Driver Training

HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATIONS Radio/TV Broadcasting Broadcast Announcing Radio Broadcasting TV Field/Studio Production

MATH & SCIENCE

* Special Admission Program

Geospatial Technology

SOCIAL SCIENCE & EDUCATION

Child & Family Services Criminal Justice Leadership Early Childhood Care & Education Human Services Business w Criminal Justice w Dietetics w Education Health w Psychology w Sociology Law Enforcement Law Enforcement Operations Paraprofessional Education-Teacher Aide Nanny Child Care Provider

TECHNOLOGY

Advanced Automation & Control Technology Automotive Mechanic Basic Welding Automotive Technology Building Construction Technology Civil Engineering Technology Civil Engineering Technology Co-op CNC Operator CNC Programmer Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technology

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TRANSFER READY AGRICULTURE

Agriculture Pre-Veterinary Medicine

BUSINESS

Business Administration Accounting w Finance w Management w Marketing Business Education

HUMANITIES & COMMUNICATIONS Art English Liberal Arts Speech Communication


MATH & SCIENCE

Biological Science (Non-Teaching) Chemistry Clinical Laboratory Science Conservation—Pre-Forestry Conservation—Pre-Wildlife Earth Science Environmental Science Mathematics Physics Pre-Chiropractic Pre-Dentistry Pre-Engineering Pre-Medicine Pre-Nursing Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Physical Therapy Secondary Education Biology w Chemistry w Physics

ASSOCIATE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE DEGREE

SOCIAL SCIENCE & EDUCATION Criminal Justice Early Childhood Education Economics Elementary Education Health Education History Mathematics Education Physical Education Political Science Psychology Recreation Science Education Social Science Sociology/Social Work Special Education

TECHNOLOGY

Building Construction Technology CET/Advanced Technical Studies Electronics Engineering Technology

Engineering

GET STARTED ONLINE @ LAKELANDCOLLEGE.EDU/SCHEDULES LAKE LAND COLLEGE IS NEAR YOU! Take a class in one of our regional extension centers!

EASTERN REGION CENTER 224 South Sixth St. Marshall, Illinois 62441 217-826-8490

THE KLUTHE CENTER FOR HIGHER EDUCATION & TECHNOLOGY 1204 Network Center Blvd. Effingham, Illinois 62401 217-540-3555

WESTERN REGION CENTER 600 East First St. Pana, Illinois 62557 217-562-5000

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT CENTER 305 Richmond Ave. East Mattoon, Illinois 61938 217-235-2222

LAKE LAND COLLEGE DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE on the basis of race, color, sex, age, religion, national origin, ancestry, disability, marital

status, veteran status, sexual orientation or any basis of discrimination precluded by applicable federal and state statutes in admission or access to or in treatment of employment in college programs and/or activities. Limited English language skills will not be a barrier to enrollment, nor will race be a barrier to the receipt of financial aid. The Director of Human Resources, Lake Land College, 217-234-5210, has been designated to coordinate compliance with nondiscrimination requirements contained in the implementing regulations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Age Discrimination Act of 1975. The Counselor/Coordinator of Disability Services, Lake Land College, 217-2345259 is designated as the Section 504 Coordinator of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

SPRING CLASSES BEGIN JANUARY 9 REGISTER BY JANUARY 6!

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NON-PROFIT ORG. ECRWSS U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 280 MATTOON, IL 61938

5001 Lake Land Blvd. Mattoon, IL 61938

Postal Customer

PLAN TO JOIN US FOR A

LAKER VISIT DAY!

December 2, 2016 February 10, 2017 March 31, 2017 June 22, 2017

9 a.m. – Noon Register at lakelandcollege.edu/visit

Lake Land College Magazine Fall 2016  
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