LADIES DRAWING CLÜB ISSUE#6

Page 1



FIND MORE ISSUES ladiesdrawingclub.com ALL INQUIRIES hello@ladiesdrawingclub.com


VALERIE SAVCHITS valeriesavchits.com

Clüb: Tell us your story. What inspired you to become the artist? Valerie: My mother was drawing with me a lot when I was a kid. She never had a formal education though, but she loved doing calligraphy and drawing with pen random objects which surrounded her. She eventually sent me to a local drawing club which I attended with my best mate for several years. In my teenage years I used to leave tags and graffiti-like doodles on the buildings with my gang. I think last year, when I visited my family, I saw a couple of tags which I left between 2006-2007. It shocked me. In a good way. Also, growing up in a working-class family in post-Soviet Latvia, I witnessed a country that was unwilling to embrace progress, which made thinking outside the box and rejecting traditional views an important step in my artistic journey. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? How do you present it in works? V: I invite to immerse in a world where humanity has failed to fight its own apathy and indifference, a world where fiction becomes reality and a cult of ignorance consolidates its position. Taking inspiration from dystopian sci-fi, star atlases and illustrations from science, history and nature books, my work is also accompanied by text in the form of diary entries and excerpts from Russian literature. Clüb: What mediums do you work with? Why? V: Acrylic, spray paint, markers and oil pastel are my everything, they dry fast and I just love it (I’m Aries and so impatient). All my childhood, and teenage-hood, I spent in a never-ending repairing process which echoed in my current practice, so, occasionally, I work with synthetic and natural materials like concrete, tiles, metal and raw crystals. Besides, this makes my father’s heart melt. Clüb: What already happened in your art career/life? Residencies, exhibitions, collaborations, publications? What is really important to you? V: I have had the opportunity to take part in many

great group shows and exhibit alongside many talented artists. One of my proudest moments, whilst still being a final year student, was a group show at Tate Modern in 2016 which provided me with invaluable experiences. In 2017, I was also involved in the project ‘No Boundaries’, which was organised by National Rail in collaboration with the Royal Association for Deaf people, Scope, the Stroke Association and The National Autistic Society. This exhibition toured some of Britain’s most iconic train stations to encourage travel without boundaries and to educate people about different disabilities and the support that is available. In 2019, my work was exhibited in a group show alongside artists and art collectives such as Mark Wallinger (Turner Art Prize Winner) and Guerrilla Girls. I am grateful to every gallery and curator I have ever worked with, especially Delphian Gallery and Guts Gallery, who are creating space for young underrepresented folks. Also in 2019 two of my large-scale paintings were acquired by the founder of The Zuzeum – the Latvian art centre – and have been added to his permanent art collection. And these days I’m getting ready for my MFA at Brighton University which will commence in September. Honestly, can’t wait to get back in the workshop and start working on some sculptural work. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? V: I’m truly enjoying the process of sketching because it’s a bit complex (I just love challenges) but you get a very satisfying result in the end. I’m starting with a drawing, then I’m taking picture of the sketch and transfer it onto my laptop, then adding the image to Photoshop, creating multiple layers which are then filled with colour. This way it’s easier to work out which colour palette works and which don’t by changing Hues. Another favourite ritual of mine - watching movies or lengthy youtube vids on the background whilst painting. Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. V: Complex relationships, ignorance and ugly truth are my favourite topics. Especially these days. All the work I’m sending through for your consideration was made during COVID-19 pandemic.


LADIES DRAWING CLÜB

Dalmatians Acrylic on A3 paper 2020


VALERIE SAVCHITS www.valeriesavchits.com

“Columba” 30x20x12cm. Acrylic and clay 2020

“Corona Borealis” 22x10cm. Acrylic, clay, quartz crystals 2020


ISSUE 6

“When your past doesn’t throw shadows” 30x25cm, Acrylic on canvas board, 2020

Poison

me once again “We don’t trust you any152x122cm more :( “. 60x60cm, Acrylic on canvas 2020 Acrylic and oil pastel on canvas, 2020


RITA KELLER

instagram.com/margaritkeller

Clüb: Tell us your story. What inspired you to become the artist? Rita: Since I was raised in a small industrial Ukrainian town with no proper environment around and with common censure or stereotyping the artists as someone far beyond and non- stable, I’ve always had a very conscious craving for living a different life. I wasn’t’ t inspired by anything particular, but just the fact that life could be more than that one. Later such an emerging mix of controversial feelings and tricky background transformed into my own identity complexion and now, after years of searching, I just do whatever I feel important for me to do. By virtue of these rotten established notions and boundaries, my story appears as a long pass from rejecting myself as a creative and trying to focus on “normal job” to acceptance and realising the true self. I started from BA in Asian researches and teaching Chinese language and now I’ve settled my individual practice somewhere between art, documentary, social experimental, and fashion photography. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? How do you present it in works? R: My main art and research works are about everything that first could make me feel and then think. I contemplate on our fragile affinity towards nature along with interconnectedness of all life forms and mortality. I am interested in a human as a separate complex individual and as being a part of various social groups. I also reflect on post-soviet repercussions and its impact from the outside perspective. I strive to capture the diversity of lifestyles and cultures. I tend to shift the perspective from photography as an object to photo as a social project, mixing staged things with real life and its vivid absurd narrative. By involving strangers into projects not as models but as artists without any artistic perspective, I try to explore different roles vernacular photography plays today and how it influences people’s behaviour. I’m fascinated by mind and body transformations relating to human initiations like growing up and ageing. And probably the most important thing for me is to challenge myself and people to be more

observant about our reality. Clüb: What mediums do you work with? Why? R: I’m truly enjoying the process of sketching because it’s a bit complex (I just love challenges) but you get a very satisfying result in the end. I’m starting with a drawing, then I’m taking picture of the sketch and transfer it onto my laptop, then adding the image to Photoshop, creating multiple layers which are then filled with colour. This way it’s easier to work out which colour palette works and which don’t by changing Hues. Another favourite ritual of mine - watching movies or lengthy youtube vids on the background whilst painting. Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. R: Most of the photos in my series “People are grass” were made in St. Petersburg before I left Russia in 2018. That time I was inspired by the book “Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs”, 2015 by Sally Mann. One chapter entitled “The Sublime End” contains her thoughts about life through death: just as the leaves that fall from a tree turn into compost, the human body can decompose into atoms and become fertiliser for plants, which is a kind of reincarnation. In the series I explore my emotional affinity towards nature and our mutual influences, question an uncommon notion of home which is everywhere. I aim to stimulate an emotional response in the viewer by combining a contradiction between initial aesthetic attraction along with the subsequent message of environmental awareness and importance to belong. The club is a link between my experience of emigration and the remaining memories of my homeland in St. Petersburg. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? R: During 2-3 weeks I’m watching good movies, reading books, enjoying nature by going to the lakes and forests; then ideas naturally just come into my mind and I’m constantly getting hungry to create. Then I start the research and concept making. It’s quite important for me to have this kind of personal time without any thoughts of mine or other


LADIES DRAWING CLÜB

“People are grass” 2018


RITA KELLER

instagram.com/margaritkeller

“People are grass” 2018


ISSUE 6

artist’s works. Such a cyclic experience helps me to be aware of what I’m standing for in life, why, and how I can translate it through photography. Clüb: What already happened in your art career/life? R: My first photo exhibition ‘Ping Pong” (6-20 November 2019, by Female photographers Gallery Vienna) happened to be in November 2019 in Vienna. Together with my partner artist Agnes Prammer we started a visual dialogue playing ping pong game with our own photos back and forth. The outcome was a photo book, the one-month long exhibition, and launching the artist talks with workshops on analog photography. Currently I’m working on my next group exhibition on 17-30 September in Vienna- QM&A project (with support of Flüchtlinge Willkommen Österreich and Improper Walls cultural platform). We distributed compact analog cameras to random people in order they could film their life during the self-isolation. The idea is to explore the issue of collective creativity in terms of forced overarching circumstances and how cameras can influence people’s behavior. We also have been working on the fragmentary perception of identity and the body, mixing various disciplines like ceramics and photography. We’re trying to generate new meanings by interacting and involving in research vernacular photography and documenting the important period from a non-artistic perspective. The outcome will be the self-published photo zine as a physical visual document. In May 2019 I’ve embarked on my personal project “Youth” where I reflect on my own experience of emigration from Russia-Ukraine to Austria through documenting Austrian teens, visualizing their self-perception, exposed beauty and mental boundaries. The series is also an attempt to swiftly emerge into a new environment, to explore cultural diversities and growing up experience among youth in post-soviet countries in comparison to Western Europe. Publications: Bad to the bone Mag (Paris), UNCERTAINMAG, PERJUSMAG (New York), MAUERMAG, Lesnouveauxriches Mag (Austria), C-Heads Magazine (Austria), YUGEN MAG (London), KALTBLUT Magazine (Berlin).


OLGA TEREKHOVA

instagram.com/karakurt_v_karakurtochke

“My love bolds me”графика 118 x 84 cmмм, 2020


LADIES DRAWING CLÜB

“No name” 118 x 84 cm мм, 2020


AMANDA DORAN www.amandadoranart.com

“Self Portrait Primitive Pretty”, mixed painting and collage, 20 x 20 cm, 2017


ISSUE 6

Hair in All The Right Places, 50 x 70 cm, 2018

La Grotta Della Perdita Della Purezza, 25 x 20 cm, 2018


AMANDA DORAN amandadoranart.com

Amanda: All my life I have lived in my imagination, its much more fun there! I’ve always looked at the world through a bright coloured filter, reinventing peoples characters and exaggerating quirks of the general public. My uncle is an artist so I’ve grown up around creativity and have always been encouraged to make art. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? How do you present it in works? A: I like to examine people. I am especially fascinated by sub cultures, minorities, eccentrics and general “out there” sort of people. I love to explore how people express themselves and how these expressions can be so outlandish, or quite subtle or even introverted. Diversity I suppose is a huge drive for me to make work. I am always hungry to learn about alternative outlooks on life, humans are truly fascinating and beautiful creatures to me. I explore these interests in my work with an approach of naivety and childlike wonder. I like to think I have an innocent fascination for the subject matter and I wish to express these fascinations with bright bold colours and glitter and loud garish characters and scenes in my work. Aesthetically I love kitsch, awkward and naive art. For me it holds such excitement, sincerity and purity. Clüb: What mediums do you work with? A: I work primarily in paint but I also love to draw a lot and collage and incorporate fabric into my work. I love being very tactile when I make work so I love thick messy paint, using my hands or adding odd bits and pieces into the paintings. I enjoy using fabrics because it so readily comes in such wonderful bold and colourful patterns. I might not always use my drawings and collages in my bodies of work that I present but they are vital to me for making my work. It’s a fantastic way to explore texture. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? A: I like to listen to music or podcasts while I work, it keeps me company! When I’m starting a new body of work I al-

-ways start off drawing, then I will move to collage, maybe working on fabric then progress to paintings (maybe small acrylic works first then oil paintings.) This process isn’t planned its a subconscious process I realised I have maybe about a year ago. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? How do you present it in works? R: My main art and research works are about everything that first could make me feel and then think. I contemplate on our fragile affinity towards nature along with interconnectedness of all life forms and mortality. I am interested in a human as a separate complex individual and as being a part of various social groups. I also reflect on post-soviet repercussions and its impact from the outside perspective. I strive to capture the diversity of lifestyles and cultures. I tend to shift the perspective from photography as an object to photo as a social project, mixing staged things with real life and its vivid absurd narrative. By involving strangers into projects not as models but as artists without any artistic perspective, I try to explore different roles vernacular photography plays today and how it influences people’s behaviour. I’m fascinated by mind and body transformations relating to human initiations like growing up and ageing. And probably the most important thing for me is to challenge myself and people to be more observant about our reality. Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. A: I have attached a collection of my work that I have made over the past 3 years. I decided to put these particular ones together as I feel they make a great self-portrait. They especially capture my sense of humour, my love for including humour in my art and the kitsch/ naive aesthetic that I love. These works are also a perfect representation of womanhood, celebrating the physical body of a woman, I suppose in particular celebrating my body! Championing feminine energy and the power of expressing it.


REBECCA RAU rebeccalrau.com

The Fishermans wife, 4ft x 6ft, oil on canvas, 2020


REBECCA RAU rebeccalrau.com

Clüb: Tell us your story. What inspired you to become the artist? R: I didn’t grow up with the idea that art was something that people were allowed to do, so I didn’t think about it much. After high school I joined a sort of non religious cult maybe some would call it a commune. I was introduced to filmmaking and painting. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? How do you present it in works? R: I really like the male body. I cant help it. A lot of people see my work and assume I am a gay man... some men get upset about my work. I find that really funny. What does that say about how our culture feels about women’s desires? Clüb: What mediums do you work with? R: Paint and pastel. I work in video too- which is also what I do for my job. Clüb: What already happened in your art career? R: I curated a big show last year with other Brooklyn artists (www.lostretainerbk. com). I really loved all the work I showed and was really proud. I had a residency in Ireland last year as well, but abandoned it to have a love affair instead. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? R: I either have to be really happy and in love or extremely depressed to make work that I like. If I’m feeling OK the work is not good. Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. R: The first few weeks of the quarantine were pretty magical- I was falling in love, I had all the time in the world to paint, I still had some money saved..it was great. My dreams were rich, I felt juicy, something gestating inside me. This painting with the horse was my first painting after we were told to isolate. It took many shapes before the horse appeared. The painting with the pig is a collaboration between my new boyfriend and I. His mind is very different than mine, all conceptual very heady, critical. Painting is like shitting for me..I have to do it but it’s embarrassing. But sometimes you want to show your friends...Somehow he can describe painting in a way that sounds noble. The painting is called ‘selling pork to a pig’. This (the blue painting) painting ended up being about the colour blue more than anything else. I was thinking about how you can never really get close to anyone - it’s actually physically impossible to TRULY touch someone on a subatomic level- because of electron repulsion atoms never actually make contact. There is always a space between. That space is incredible small relative to us...but maybe it is big enough that we feel it on some unconscious level? Now I am working a series of American basketball stars as religious icons. I’m painting them life size..it’s hard to really imagine how BIG these guys are, but painting them at scale gives me a sense.


LADIES DRAWING CLÜB

“Getting close to you”, acrylic and oil pastel on canvas, 6ft x 4ft , 2020


VICTORIA PREDYBAILO instagram.com/nelepitsa_ceramics

“My soft folds on body”. Ceramics, 10 смcm, 2020


ISSUE 6

“My soft folds on body”. Ceramics, 10 смcm, 2020 Clüb: Tell us your story. What inspired you to become the artist? Victoriya: It was a dream to become an artist and now I feel it, and really happy to be an artist. It was a long way. I played in the theatre, worked in the office, studied, painted and finally chose ceramics. My life experience helped me to establish stream as ceramics intuition - fast creation in clay with feeling of materials, feeling own wishes. Art in ceramics help me to feel lines, own body. Fantastic! Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? V: Life experience helped me to establish stream as ceramics intuition - fast creation in clay with feeling of materials, feeling own wishes. Art in ceramics helps to feel lines, own body. Fantastics! My approach is to create object and forget about usage, to mix different materials, such as clay and cloth, clay and paper, clay and glass, clay and wire. Also I work with children and “special” children. Clay is a natural material and contact with clay develop children mentally. Clüb: What mediums do you work with? V: Ceramics. It’s a combination of 4 creates: earth, water, fire and air. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? V: Firing ceramics I bless! Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. V: Ceramics is a part of our life. We eat from plates, leave in homes from bricks but we don’t know about nature of clay. The same we do with our bodies, we use body, but forget about nature. For women’s it is very important to love every fold in a body, with no clichés and taboo.


PAULINA JOLĹ DA amandadoranart.com

Theresa, blue da be dee da 2020 oil on canvas 120 x 100 cm,

Ecstasy of Theresa oil on canvas 100 x 130 cm, 2020


LADIES DRAWING CLÜB

Mess, 2020, 40 x 60 cm, oil on canvas, 2020


CHARLOTTE DALIA instagram.com/charlottedalia

Clüb: Tell us your story. What inspired you to become the artist? Charlotte: When I was a kid I wanted to be an author. Now I think that being an artist is not that different, I just write with plasticity, lights and images. I decided to dedicate my life to art while watching movies. I was moved by the cinematic experience and blown away by the interaction of movies into real life. Pop culture was and still is a main part of my work, as I consider pop culture as a kind of diffuse map of fiction that occurs in reality and shapes it in an intertwined way. I did Beaux Arts in Toulouse, south of France, and a year in Los Angeles, where I worked for a performer artist named Emily Mast, that I truly admire. Going to Los Angeles was an important process for my work and a turning point : for me it was like entering the screen, in a very Alice in Wonderland way. Crossing the other side and experiencing Los Angeles imagery was a really disturbing experience, as I went there by my own, had no money, had to take the bus and walk a lot (and LA is a huge city), couldn’t pay for 3 meals a day... It was really different from a regular “Los Angeles experiment”. I did manage to take everything I could from it and to this day I continue to be inspired by this journey. It was life changing and I regret nothing. I did do a short movie there, called Sweet Dreams Are Made Of This. I also met the desert. And I met Emily and had the chance to work with her and it was amazing. It comforted me on this path, on the importance of engaging with the world playfully by making a scene, a stage of it. Addressing reality on its terms. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? How do you present it in works?

C: What I explore through my work is an ambiguity of the world « reality ». I use lights and build scenes, I work my sculptures and installation like they are part of a movie yet to be made. Those scenery are made to be little heterotopian scenes. Always depicting reality as an hallucination, and movies as a way to experience the world. As Jean-Luc Nancy said, we experience reality with movies. We can’t unseen what we saw. It’s forever in us, our brains, our eyes. We lived through it. Movies are important, they reveal the realms of reality on itself. My favourite thing in the world is the set of a movie because nothing bends reality as well as somebody holding a camera. Therefore, I use every aspect of cinema in my work. I use the backstage, the tools, the icons... Every bits of the movie’s grammar are part of my plastic vocabulary, along with myths and pop culture references. I tend to create spaces for the spectator to experience a decor, a suspended time between fiction and reality. Clüb: What mediums do you work with? C: I work mostly with lights, installations, short movies, sculptures. I have a sculptural approach of the video medium. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? C: I don’t have particular rituals. But dreams are important in my process. Most of my works originates from dreams, or where thoughts right before falling asleep. That’s why i have a notebook next to my bed, to write it off and not forget it. And I think a lot abut my works before sleeping, so that I dream about it and it helps the process during daytime.


ISSUE 6

Mess, 2020, 40 x 60 cm, oil on canvas, 2020

Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. C: The works I sent you where made during the course of the last 3 years. They all are pictured as sceneries, but could also could be seen as a whole. I like the fact that those pictures of installations work also as images itself. They seem like screenshots of a movie. I wanted to send them to CLÜB because, although they are different from the work selected in the precedent issues -as they are very dark, as opposed to the bright white cube- they seem to work together. Telling a story. A story of ending worlds, a story of films meeting its own credits. That’s how I picture it. I have a very apocalyptic approach, as a myth and as a main theme of what cinema is, and my works are a depiction of ending times. Hymn (2017) is an inflated pool filled with water and with coins at its bottom. A light on the ceiling is linked to a detection movement and enlightens the water every time someone enters the room. It very much reminds you of a magic fountain, as you are invited to make a wish and toss a coin. Especially because the pool is deflating and the coins could be used to buy tape for the pool’s holes. Red Apocalypse (2018) is an image of the end of the worlds, but a very calm and peaceful one, where you can almost meditate while watching the flaming star that is the sun, slowly rotating. Ghostworld (2018) is a video projection of a loop : a floating mattress, framed by a led garland. It seems like somebody just left the mattress, as it slowly moves at the surface, and all we see is a deserted scene, that is like a dream, but is that really as happy as it seems ? Evergreen (2019) and Double Feature (2018) can be seen as related, in that they depicts a body, a female body, disenchanted. Stars, wannabes, contemporary sacrifices. I did Burial at Venice Beach (2018) after my trip to Los Angeles. It was a gesture addressing the world as a stage, by burying a prop book in Venice Beach sands. I simulated the sand with corn in the installation, as I am fascinated by corn : it seems to me it’s a part of the gold mythology and the movie idioms. In Disney’s Pocahontas, when she was asked if Indians had gold, she said yes and then showed corn to the conquistador. Nowadays, corn price is still very low, but once popped into pop corn, it’s sold for 5th times its price. To be then consumed in front of movies, as a mechanic reaction from hand-to-mouth while being subjugated by a work of fiction and the experience of it through cinematic.




BOGDANA SKORIK instagram.com/bog.danaaa

‘’I Usually Keep Silence”, 52x72 cm, 2020


LADIES DRAWING CLÜB

“My Husband is Ashamed of Me”, 52x72 cm, 2020


BOGDANA SKORIK instagram.com/bog.danaaa

“I am Russian”, paper and acrylic paint, 2020 Since childhood, I have a rather unusual way of looking at the world around me: I see details, shapes, angles and they begin to transform and interact in my head. It is the same with people: I see all the details and forms on every face. This is what inspires me the most. I can’t get past the detail. I’m for not seeing the world through rose-coloured glasses. My favourite part of the portrait is bruises and under-eye bags, I deliberately make them bigger and more visible. It is the same with everything. It is not darkness. It is a reality. For LADIES DRAWING CLÜB I have made a series of posters about the girls who are abused by their partners using the image of a sex doll. “I usually keep silence” is about the women who are scared to talk about it. “My husband is ashamed of me” is about the girls who are used not disclosing to anyone about the relationship with them, most commonly because of shame for the connection with the girl in front of his friends. The inscriptions on the posters are written in a heavy-handed manner. Can’t dolls write properly? I don’t think so. The work “I am Russian” is a collective image of a gloomy Russian man in sportswear which we see in the yard every day. There are a church and a can of beer behind bars in the background. Those objects have an equal value to some people.


CAMILA CURIEL curielis.com

Clüb: Tell us your story. What inspired you to become the artist? Camila: Since I can remember I’ve felt the necessity to express myself. It is an impulse I can’t stop. I come from a very complex reality, Venezuela, the country of contradictions and precariousness. Contradiction, because is the country with the biggest oil reserves in the world, but also the country with the biggest inflation peak. Having the opportunity to experience all the chaos that meant to live in Venezuela really gave me an input to create, and to become. Creating was just a way of facing the panorama, to say very in between the lines, what I really thought, and not going to jail for it, cause that’s the beauty of art. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? C: Basically I’ve experimented my whole life, with different mediums, techniques, trying to hopefully found a voice, that I discovered under all the post-trauma that Venezuela left me: Degeneracy. I study the effect of time, life, nature and the decadence of human condition, always hoping find an answer to paucity with a bright side. Passionate for the unknown and for what is to be discovered. I work with organic matter, basically organic waste, trying to find a second life to everything that surrounds me, as we all did back home. I debate myself between photography and drawing, techniques I’ve being slowly merging. For me, technique is not as important as communicating my conceptual compass to the audience. Clüb: What mediums do you work with? C: I mostly work with photography and drawing. I made by bachelor in Illustration and Animation, but in parallel I studied photography, later I made a master in Visual Design.

G11, Caracas 2015 Incubadora Visual-Contemporary Art I think both mediums are very connected with the world of words, and for me words are essential. I am trying to say something to you, is not just about feelings, I have a message to deliver. Clüb: What already happened in your art career/life? C: For me is very important to tell my story, my country’s story through my work, so people realise what’s going on, and maybe be more sensitive about it, more conscious, or at least, never make the same mistakes we did as a nation. We are a great lesson (to never be repeated again). 2019 Catalogo Iberoamericano de Ilustración - FIL, Guadalajara 2019 NoThemeMiArt -Fabbrica del vapore, Milano 2016 MeridaFoto IV Photography Salon-Modern Art Museum of Merida 2016 Incubadora Visual-Galpones de los Chorros G11, Caracas 2015 Incubadora Visual-Contemporary Art Museum of Zulia, Maracaibo. 2015 Alicia en el país-Espacio Avaro Sotillo, Caracas. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? C: I don’t let my boyfriend through things away, if something is dying on the fridge, I cultivate bacteria out of it, till is the right moment. Also try to find some aesthetically use to all the single-use practice that comes into the house. For example, I made a mask out of the small plastic threads that close the bread bags. Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. C: This project is called GUASTE. They are my response to the crisis: make sense to everything I have, nothing is useless. The beauty of death.


CAMILA CURIEL

“Guaste Lifes Scheme” Photography, 2020


ISSUE 6

“Guaste is there life out there” Photography, 2020


IRINA BRANA instagram.com/brana_art

“Deconstruction” Photography, installation, 10x10 cm, 2020


NANA SCHLEZ nanasch.com

“Las Cascadas” Oil, pencil and also digital medium, 160 x 100 cm 2020 Clüb: Tell us your story. What inspired you to become the artist? Nana: I think it’s more a necessity than an other thing, my body, my soul, my mind needs a place to download all the information that we constantly receive. The only way that I could find to do that process was the art. I thing the art for me is a medium, it is the possibility to see what happens to me, whats is going on. Clüb: What concepts and ideas do you explore? N: Nowadays I’m exploring the time and space, more specify the transitions and the coexistence between the nature and the urban, those little and sometimes unnoticeable changes that happens all around us. In which moment the tree seized the electricity wire o voiceovers. In which moment those changes happened , when do we notice them ? can we stop those mutations ? I wonder if this process is a fight between nature and city or just a way to find a balance between both of them. In my art there is always a dialogue between the harsh and the soft, the pencil and the oil, the organic and the not so organic, it’s balance, a constant between. Sometimes one is more noticeable that the other. I like to play between a playful stroke and harsh line, almost a graphic/ digital one. Clüb: What mediums do you work with? N: I work with oil, pencil and also digital medium. I like the contrast between all of them. I like the softness of the pencil but also the precision. I like all the possibilities of the oil, were it can very dense but also fragile if you don’t use it well. And the digital it almost appears as consequence of my work, and my daily life and trying to in corporate those worlds. Clüb: Do you have any rituals while creating art? N: It is not a ritual, but i realise that i need to have some specific energy before I enter to work. I need to be relax, without a lot of energy or problems in my mind, I try to do exercise before i paint in order to release al that extra energy that sometimes make me really anxious and doesn’t help me . if I can i light some palo santo to clean the room or some herb that can give some “good down” sense and the idea of being present. Clüb: Tell us about your works you attached. N: I have been creating them since 2018 and continue to do it. Due to I’m still working with them it’s the work that I feel more relatable with, the one that goes with my present concerns.


NANA SCHLEZ nanasch.com

“Herdia y Av del Campo” Oil, pencil and also digital medium, 100 x140 cm 2020


LADIES DRAWING CLÜB

“Nursey trolley” Oil, pencil and also digital medium, 30 x 30 cm 2020


ELIZAVETA SEMENOVA instagram.com/novaveta

I work with ceramics, and it is mostly porcelain and slip casting. Such a technique makes it possible to create ‘pure’ things – not made by hand, pseudo-natural and pseudo-found. I like the process itself: multistage and long-term. It involves creating models and removing the shape. When working on a model, I need to achieve the perfect sculptural surface. The very concept of a sculptural surface was revealed to me about three years ago and is still very exciting. After removing the mould from the model, I deal with a liquid porcelain mass. I pour it into the mould, then I pour it out, and inside there, the porcelain sculpture seems to have been made not by me, not by a human at all. Then I need to put it into firing, in a muffle furnace where the sculpture transformation takes place within eight hours. It is the transformation of a very fragile object into an irreversibly strong one, but it also can be broken. The ceramic process brings a lot of emotions. It is a small life. I also really love the black and white line art. A line drawing, in my opinion, is the maximum pure. I love the fluidity of watercolour, its unpredictability. I make a video as an accompaniment to a project or as a way to capture important memories. This desire to remove all the husks might be a natural result of long academic training. Perhaps my ritual of work is to search. I always search for something. Every my work is one step up to me. Is it possible then to define something like a ritual? Perhaps it is a ritual of sweet torments creativity. on, and maybe be more sensitive about it, more conscious, or at least, never make the same mistakes we did as a nation. We are a great lesson (to never be repeated again). 2019 Catalogo Iberoamericano de Ilustración - FIL, Guadalajara 2019 NoThemeMiArt -Fabbrica del vapore, Milano 2016 MeridaFoto IV Photography Salon-Modern Art Museum of Merida 2016 Incubadora Visual-Galpones de los Chorros G11, Caracas 2015 Incubadora Visual-Contemporary Art Museum of Zulia, Maracaibo. 2015 Alicia en el país-Espacio Avaro Sotillo, Caracas.ways start off drawing, then I will move to collage, maybe working on fabric then progress to paintings (maybe small acrylic works first then oil paintings.) This process isn’t planned its a subconscious process I realised I have maybe about a year ago.


ISSUE 6

“Cloud in pants” Porcelain, wood, 60Xх40хX20 cm, 2018


NOTES



ISSUE 6 was presented at 10 of July, 2020 LADIES DRAWING CLĂœB was founded in St-Petersburg, Russia in 2019