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Again and again we are looking for contemporary and young artists who create art as a new breath, as they try and explore, as they feel and study. We know how it始s essential to present self and art what is growing from you. How it始s hard to step out of self art practices. We are so proud of every one who applied and found the power to step into Ladies Art Club. We put all our energy and minds to present you arts and stories. Call for Art 6 and selecting time was very impressive for club始s creators. We saw how artists observe our aesthetic and following us with knowledge. We detect so beautiful paintings, installations, drawings and textiles. Some works are translating the COVID meltdown, some works are telling strong female stories and some are the really full-value ideas about society and personalization. Our ISSUES are so bright as a child books and we do it specially. The youthful exuberance is a very inspiring source what we find so familiar to the young art. These vibes improve club始s style what distinguish us from another societies. Bright book with big symbols as a fantasy room or just the art work from the inside look. Please, enjoy our ISSUE 7.


Sofia Alexandra Magdits Espinoza www.so�iamagdits.com

I am from Lima, Peru. I live and work in DĂźsseldorf, Germany. Since I was little I had a near approach to the arts. I started playing music, then doing dance classes, acting classes, and then painting classes. When I ended school it all came natural, I knew I didnĘźt wanted to do anything else but paint. I applied to study in an art academy in Lima, Peru and got accepted. Then I moved to Germany to continue my studies. Music still accompanies me, I have my solo music project, and I like to have an exchange with dance, theatre and other arts (literature for example). In the visual arts I developed from painting and now I'm doing a lot of weaving as well. Im always open and curios of trying new materials and mediums. It all started with painting, I did a lot of abstract painting and the main exploration there was colors and shapes, how to build a composition that is dynamic and interesting for the viewer. I liked the thought that although thei are abstract you could recognize some forms or complete some others. And that thinking I translated into weaving. I liked the fact that I could "paint" without any brushes or paint. And like any material comes with a feeling, for me the wool gave another level of meaning to my work and process, the though and approach to nature in a way. My first small weavings were inspired on the feeling of the sea and the beach. "Oh holly palitos" is also an abstract mixture of underwater landscape and a forest. And with "Las sirenas de paracas" I tryed to explicitly show some characters that would live in this abstract beach universe. As I am very curios I try to experiment a lot and keep exploring new possibilities. At the moment I am doing with a lot of textile, weaving. I like the softness of the wool, and the slow process of weaving. From time to time i take the brush paint again and paint on canvas or on a wall, I have discovered wallpainting recently and i like it very much. I also do sculptures, kind of abstract creatures made out of wire grid and nylon, I did an installation last year with one of these creatures. I have also worked a bit with ceramic, done also some etchings and well also music editing and production. Working with video is next on the agenda.


Sofia Alexandra Magdits Espinoza www.so�iamagdits.com

«Sirenas en Paracas». 80 x 110 cm, weaving, 2019

Do you have any rituals while creating art? Sofia: Not really, I like to put music on, but I dont know if that is a ritual. Tell us about your works you attached. When did you create them? Sofia: "Oh holly palitos", "Wandering soul" and "la choza de maria" are some of my latest works, they are an exploration of nature and tribal feeling. I also sent "1am" and "2am" have another feeling, is more this theatrical, the sculpture becomes alive and coexists with the world surrounding us.


Marguerite Nolan www.margueritenolan.nl

«Aesthetics Of Power». Collage, 2020.

«Aesthetics Of Power». Collage N3, 2020.

I think the visual world has been the most dominant my entire life. As a child I didnʼt speak until relatively late. My parents said they thought it was because I was looking at things "too much" and not listening and talking. Drawing was my happy place as soon as I could, and still is. During my psychology studies I realized I had to extend my "visual urges" on a more thorough level and I applied for art school. A lot happened in my work since then. I only finished my BFA this month and I am excited to continue working on my own, outside the context of school and teachers.


Marguerite Nolan www.margueritenolan.nl

Religiosity and truth have been the most dominant themes throughout my visual work as well as academic work. My visual work responds to contemporary forms of belief, obedience and (individual) truths that steer human perception and behavior. Subsequently I explore the possibilities (and limitations) of applying my researched findings, methodically or aesthetically, on an analogical situation or self-imposed problem, challenge or hypothesis that presents itself or interests me. The eventual work is a combination of research processes, playful confrontations, and always alternating materializations. I work with always alternating materials. Sometimes I draw, sometimes I sculpt or design or make a video. My materials depend on what I think the subject of the matter "needs", or what my findings need. LDCLĂœB: Do you have any rituals while creating art? Marguerite: Coffee and music. Music depends on topic I am working on, and what energy I think the artwork needs. LDCLĂœB: Tell us about your works you attached. Marguerite: The works attached are my graduation work called "Stardump" and collages that led up to that graduation work. The collages stem from a time last year when I was fascinated by mass individual movements, that form a pattern. It fascinates me because when one person in the alignment moves, the pattern breaks. A vast amount of individuals creates an inanimate view, in which you forget the individuals and a new image exists. In Stardump, I was fascinated by the amount of "stuff" that individuals accumulate with which they identify. It is a new form of religiousness. Objects range from being very useful tools (such as knives and forks and coffee), to items that we think we need (like a facebrush and dry-shampoo spray). While making this work I was increasingly fascinated by the cross-section between buying stuff, and believing things. I think religious belief is moving more towards consumerism and belief in brands. LDCLĂœB: Do you explore contemporary art? Marguerite: I think all the time. Though I have barely made any visits this year to art locations due to Corona. Some names: Guido van der Werve, Frederique Jonker, Sylvie Fleuri, Femke Herregraven, Arturo Kameya, Michael Raedecker... These are some that I was looking in to recently.


Brubey Hu brubeyhu.com

I originally came from Xiamen, China. Currently I live and work in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. I create work to acknowledge that there is distance between people, between my artwork and viewers. By creating images that has more room for interpretations, I seek to reconcile disagreements and conflicts between different cultures. «Wash». 18 x 40 inches, acrylic and fabric on wood panel, 2020

My work explores architectural space, colour theory, memory, and translation through the lens of duality both visually and conceptually. A duality that exists within a body does not necessarily exist as a pair of oppositions. The pair can also be complementary to each other, or live at the same time as coexistence. Employing geometric shapes painted over two panels using masking tape, the visual duality is constructed within diptychs that juxtapose opaque acrylic colors and breathable reflec«Wash». 18” x 14 inches, acrylic tions. Through subtractive simplification, the and paper on wood panel, 2020. paintings are my attempt to discuss the notions of consensus and reconciliation. They transcend flat images or physical space and objects, and document introspective moments. Translation is a process that I frequently engage with—being bilingual and living-in-between. The first action is to tear a piece of paper into irregular shapes with torn edges; I then carefully transcribe the shapes onto the painting ground using acrylic paint, the shapes are articulated with variations of white to mimic the colour of the paper. In this process of translation, subtle textures are created where the background shows through as organic traces of my hand. Metaphorically, it is unavoidable to see the organic traces in the process of literal translation as well—there is always something missing or distorted, whether it is the original verb


Brubey Hu brubeyhu.com

and adjective that do not have equivalents in the other language, or the imagery embedded within an idiom that loses its ability to convey the same message once translated. In addition, the used tapes are collected to serve as the memory of how the paintings are made. The same kind of paint left on the tapes and contact sheets but it appears with a totally different look in comparison with the defined and rigorous shapes on the paintings. They become two opposite stand-ins as the duality of me being both controlling and free simultaneously on different surfaces. They coexist with each other, with distinct results from the same process.

«A Piece of 7" by 7" Paper Torn Apart No. 12». 12 x 9 inches. Acrylic on wood panel, 2020  «Absence No. 4». 8.5 x 11 inches. Acrylic on tapes on paper, 2020 

Mostly I work with acrylic paint. There are many medium I can use to change the quality of the acrylic paint. Because the paint I apply to the painting surface is usually pretty thick, oil paint dries too slowly for this process. I do drawings/collages on paper as well, incorporating painted tapes and paper. Do you have any rituals while creating art? Brubey: I do. I collect leftover masking tapes from the painting process. I do a lot of mathematics and calculating before I start working on a new piece.


Petra Schott

www.petra-schott.de

I am an artists on the borderline of figurative and abstract art. This gives me the freedom to invent and put together recognizable and unrecognizable forms and shapes. My main subject have been humans and landscapes turning into humans or vice versa. My view is a fragmented view, I take up aspects of a human being and place it into an environment which can be its inner world our outside ghosts or real outside. In my work I try to react to my inspiration, let it flow into my work without being censored by my ratio. I go on until the flow stop sand then let my work rest. It is often only afterwards that with my intellect I can understand what I did. Sometimes I work on a specific subject like myths or I have a more formal goal that is letting lines speak or letting white colors speak. LDCLĂœB: What inspired you to become the artist? Petra: The beauty of paintings and the emotional reaction it can cause and caused in me inspired me to become an artist. It inspires me to male an unseen world visible, to bring magic and unseen secrets into our world. It inspires to make people question their view of the world and to give a voice to visual articulation that has not been existent until now. LDCLĂœB: What mediums do you work with? Why? Petra: Lately I work with egg tempera and pigments and I also use ink, oil pastels, graphite and other pencils in my work. Egg tempera which I create myself for me is a very natural and direct way to connect to my colours and also gives me the freedom to choose the exact composition of the colours I want. It is mostly a natural pigment I use. Egg tempera painting also allows a wonderful mat, transparent surface. I use egg tempera to put layers on layers and let them shine through. I also like to draw into my paintings with another medium like graphite or oil pastels to create another layer of ideas and objects. Sometimes my drawing becomes writing and the writing moves back into drawing showing my love for transitions. LDCLĂœB: Do you have any rituals while creating art? Petra: Yes, I do have some rituals. First of all I go to my studio via bike.


Petra Schott

www.petra-schott.de

«What are you afraid of?». 100 x 80 x 2 cm; oil and oil sticks on canvas, 2020.


Petra Schott

www.petra-schott.de

LDCLÜB: Tell us about your works you attached. Petra: Three of my works I attached are from the cycle "Into the open". It shows my way of working in an in-between way. I let ideas and shapes come up to the surface without following them through until the end, thus not giving them a definitive form. It also shows how I work with lines and layers of thin egg tempera color. I called the cycle

«Flying» (from the series:Rhythms of love). 130x100 cm; pigments, acrylic, graphite, pencils on canvas, 2020.

«Reach for the stars» (from the series Rhythms of love). 100 x 100 cm, oil and oil sticks, pigments, acrylic colours on canvas. 2020

"Into the open" because it represents openness and awareness for all that comes to my mind. It is the freedom not to decide what is right and wrong and worth to be taken up or not. It is the freedom to let things in the in-between. I further attach one work which is more figurative but also in a very open way. It is called "Dancing". The woman dancing through the canvas is described only very lightly, it is more an idea than reality. I thus create an atmosphere of lightness, flying and weightlessness. The following two works are from the cycle about myths. They stem from the myths of Medea, the woman who murdered her sons because of the deceit by her lover and father of the children. The works a re called "Medea praying" and "Medea mourning". Again I work with intimations and hints without too much completed description of reality. The last work stems from a cycle of works on paper which is called "life films". The work I chose is called "dance", this time with two persons and a big gesture which nearly seems too big for the paper. It thus opens the space and points beyond the limits of the work.


Alysia Davis

instagram.com/paintingwhatiknow

I obtained my MFA at San Francisco Art Institute, then after school I moved back home to Colorado where I have a studio. My affinity for the figure takes over my canvases. My source material comes all the way from life models to internet pornography. Lately I've been using spray paint on larger canvas. I love how the freehand approach looks whimsical and wild. I live in Colorado where recreational marijuana is legal. My daily routine includes smoking a joint and drinking coffee while I look at my works of art from the previous day. I spend a lot of time observing.

«Hugs and kisses». Spray paint on canvas, 76cm x 76cm, 2020

Tell us about your works you attached. When did you create them? Why this works? How do you connect them with clüb? Alysia: I created these painting during the pandemic. Although I didn't have as much access to my studio, I carved out a space in my storage trailer to paint. For this body of work I'm focused on scale, color, and texture.


Dutch Pink dutch.pink

«Floating». 9 x 14 x 2 cm. Acrylic & oil on reclaimed wood, 2020.

«Infinity». 10,5 x 9,5 x 1 cm. Acrylic & oil on reclaimed wood, 2020.


Dutch Pink dutch.pink

Raised by wolves in a desert of coal, DUTCH PINK conjures an oasis of calm through bas-relief sculpture made from reclaimed wood and found objects. LDCLÜB: What concepts and ideas do you explore? How do you present it in works? Dutch Pink: I explore the concepts of water and escapism through architecture. LDCLÜB: What mediums do you work with? Why? Dutch Pink: I use reclaimed wood to make my sculptures and I work with the finishes of the wood that I found, combined with acrylic and oil paint. LDCLÜB: Do you have any rituals while creating art? Dutch Pink: I make many of my sculptures simultaneously as small pieces, then I put the small pieces together like a puzzle to create something bigger than the sum of the parts to create a new structure. LDCLÜB: Tell us about your works you attached. Dutch Pink: They are about the movement of water and escaping to a calming space. LDCLÜB: What already happened in your art career/life? Dutch Pink: I am just starting to put my art out there! LDCLÜB: Do you explore contemporary art? Can you tell us the names of artists you love? Dutch Pink: I am inspired by Louise Nevelson and David Hockney


Jennifer Smith jennifersmith.nl

Hello, I am Jennifer Smith. I am from rural Ireland. I now live and work in a windmill in The Netherlands. I work with oil, acrylic, ink and charcoal. I love mixing up textures and fluidity. I also love drawing and try not to lose that through painting. My first real interest in art was sparked when I saw the work of Jack B Yeats. It was a particular painting called He Sings to the night. There was something, a feeling, a story I imagined that stopped me in my tracks. I still cant explain that painting but I knew I wanted to paint and make work that was expressionist. After getting my Degree in Fine Art I spent years just traveling and moving around the world and didnʼt really paint much along that journey. When I relocated to The Netherlands, I didnʼt know anyone and I couldnʼt speak the language. It droves me to pick up a paintbrush. I havenʼt stopped since and in 2012 took the leap to commit to painting. I had been doing internships in two galleries in Rotterdam at the time but realized very quickly I was on the wrong side and wanted to be the artist. Right now my work is focused on the female gaze and for the first time I am experimenting with using symbolism in my work. I am currently inspired by Greek mythology and how views on the female body are still issues and relatable in contemporary culture. Through this body of work, I am also interested in the power of a female artist painting the female nude. When looking at the female nude in art we often reflect on the age-old male gaze and look at the female nude as a sexualized and fetishized object, from the perception of the male artist and viewer. However, how does a female artist change our interpretation? How regularly do we question the artist? Is a female nude created by a male artist and a female artist inherently different? Are we able to differentiate the female nudes seen through a male artistʼs eye in comparison to a femaleʼs. What kind of power does this reclaiming of the figure give to a female artist and what kind of freedom of expression does it allow for. The paintings I am attaching are my most recent work painted over the last few weeks. These paintings are forming the basis of a new series of work I am exploring. I decided to go with these new works as they are the most exciting to me. My focus remains on investigating the female gaze and the role of the artist when making work. I have always been curious about the "consumption"of the female nude. The women I paint arenʼt polished, theyʼre real.


Jennifer Smith jennifersmith.nl

«Athena and Peitho relax in a garden». Oil, acrylic and ink on canvas, 60 x 80 cm, 2020

«Aphrodite at night». Oil, acrylic and ink on canvas, 60 x 55 cm, 2020


Andrea Guzzetta andreaguzzetta.com

When I was a kid, my house was tumultuous. There were a lot of scary things happening. My parents were getting a divorce because my Dad was an alcoholic and addict. He drove drunk with me in the car we got in a crash. I split my forehead on the dashboard. I was 5 years old. While other kids were going to the zoo or whatever normal kids do, we were driving to a rehab facility to visit my Dad singing 'Under the Bridge' by the Red Hot Chili Peppers on repeat. I didn't know that song was about addiction, but I knew it was about loneliness and that's how I felt. At the time, I had a lot of feelings about what was happening but I hadn't developed the language to express it. I was reading at a high level, but how many 5 year olds have the capacity to express 'Nowhere feels safe and I cannot trust the adults in my life?' My Mom took me to a therapist named Penny and she had these special paint markers. She would ask me questions and I would paint. I think that because of this, the process of unraveling my thoughts and feelings was forever linked with the process of making. All of my work can be boiled down to death and love. At its core, my work is about how the fragility of our existence gives life meaning and makes it beautiful. We all live trapped in the universe of our own minds, obsessed with our own lives and it is a lonely existence. I think that expressing our deepest hopes, fears, and desires through art is a way of connecting to others and mitigating that loneliness. The more we connect with others, the more we realize our own life is exactly the same as everyone around us, that we aren't alone, just struggling to find our place in the Universe. I generally work with oil paint because I like hot pink, but I honestly like making things. I'll make with whatever medium I think fits the concept best. When I went to art school, I got a sculpture degree because I idolized DaVinci. I thought that artists should know every form of making, so I picked a major where I felt I had the most to learn. In addition to oil painting, I have worked in clay, glass and embroidery. LDCLĂœB: Tell us about your works you attached. These pieces were all created during the early months of quarantine when we didn't know what was happening. They embody our collective feelings at that time: fear, a forced but fragile hope, and the preciousness of every square of Charmin.


Andrea Guzzetta andreaguzzetta.com

“Virtual Hugs” 4" x 4" ink and embroidery on toilet paper 2020

“#quarantinelife” 4" x 4" ink and embroidery on toilet paper 2020


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LADIES DRAWING CLÜB ISSUE 7  

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